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Full text of "Passionist : bulletin of Holy Cross Province."

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assionist 

BULLETIN OF HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 












THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished bimonthly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 TSewburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each January, 
March, May, July, Septem- 
ber, and November. Financed 
by free-will offerings of its 
readers. There is no copy- 
right. The paper is a private 
publication. 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach anil are 
sought. 

Vincent Mary, C.P, 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. 8, No. 1 



Jan.-Feb. 1955 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Dear Reader 



Dear Editor 



Marian Year Missions 



Passion Feasts 



N$w Prefect Apostolic, C.P. 



Jubilarians 



News of the Congregation 



Works of the Ministry 



^beai 'deaden*, 



I would no longer be human if 1 
were not to take this occasion to pub- 
lically thank every one of the Breth- 
ren who were so lavish in their praise 
of the Marian issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST both by mail and word of 
mouth. In all justice, however, I must 
give credit where credit is due. The 
Marian issue of THE PASSIONIST 
would never have turned out to be 
what it is, had not our own Very 
Reverend Father Provincial taken the 
personal interest he did by choosing 
the topics of the articles and also ap- 
pointing the writers of same. About 
all that was done at this end of the 
line was taking the material as it 
came and placing it into the printers' 
pot and hoping and praying that all 
would turn out well. As a matter of 
fact THE PASSIONIST in general 
owes its existence to the generous 
support of the respective Father Pro- 
vincial's under whom it came into ex- 
istence and thrived: Father Herman 
Joseph, Father James Patrick and our 
present Father Provincial; our end 
of the work, i.e. the results, is a 
standing miracle. Lack of Faith, or 
something, ever brings a sort of 
"jittery" feeling when the coming is- 
sue is in press, wondering how it 
will turn out. In a way all this makes 
us feel "Dominus est." 

As we mentioned in our note in 
the Marian Issue, that respective is- 
use was to be a "different" one, and 
that especially from two angles. In 
the first place it was to be especially 
good and all other features were 
dropped in favor of Mary in Her 
Year. For obvious reasons it seems 




to us that this high standard cannot 
be reached in every issue and in a 
way should not. Secondly the purpose 
of THE PASSIONIST from the begin- 
ning was to be a "family" paper with 
news past and present of the Congre- 
gation, thus trying to preserve the 
heritage of the past and also to adapt 
our spirit to the present and thus 
making the link of brotherhood 
amongst us as close as possible. This 
necessarily brings the "classical" tone 
of our periodical a little lower, but 
perhaps helps lift an ideal for us 
that no other paper does. 

We are also happy to be able to 
say that our notice regarding the 
Letters of St. Paul of the Cross that 
we are putting into English brought 



1 



a very gratifying reaction. We are 
now no longer advertising the Let- 
ters" but working on the principle 
"first comes, first served." 

And now again, a grand "God re- 
ward your charity" for all the kind 
words etc. They all help over rough 
spots in the work when, now and 



then, the supernatural motives seems 
to be behind a cloud. 

Our final prayer is that The Ma- 
rian Issue may for a long time reap 
fruits in our own souls and in all 
those with whom we come in contact. 
In other words that the fine work the 
writers in said issue did will keep on 
bearing fruit. 



l/si>H<j&*tf 



% 



*y 



(p.p 



Dear Editor, 

"The Marian Edition was to my 
mind, the very best. Truly outstand- 
ing in every way: a magnificent trib- 
ute of love, a strong spur to our 
personal devotion, and a source for 
future thoughts." 

"Your Bulletin has done a miracle 
for Passionist esprit de corps. We 
look forward to the reception of THE 
PASSIONIST with great anticipa- 
tion." 



"I'm sure the general opinion is 
that the Marian issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST was one of the greatest con- 
tributions to not only our Provincial 
Marian Year, but to the whole Con- 
gregation's Marian Year. We are all 
impressed by the articles." 

"THE PASSIONIST just received 
yesterday, and what a token to our 
Immaculate Mother. Congratulations! 
We are proud of our "Brothers." 

"The Marian edition is without 



doubt, the best THE PASSIONIST 
has given us. I offer my toast! It is 
indeed, a fitting tribute to our Lady, 
conceived and authored almost ex- 
clusively by brethren of our province. 
Each paper is outstanding and be- 
speaks a devoted and well qualified 
author or authors. Surely our Blessed 
Mother will bless you and your asso- 
ciates for the efforts put into this 
classic in Passionist Marian litera- 
ture. You have given us something 
from our very own in which we can 
take pride and not a little inspira- 
tion. I join you in the fond hope and 
prayer that the matter put forth will 
deepen and perfect a genuine devo- 
tion to our Immaculate Queen of Our 
Congregation." 



"Before some days ago I was given 
some second-hand clothes by the Pon- 
tifical Mission and between them I 
found a number of the Passionist 
Bulletin. I was happy to read it — 
from cover to cover. I found it very 
interesting. I wish to read it monthly 
to feed my soul and mind, but I 
cannot pay the subscription, because 
I am a poor Catholic Arab refugee." 



vox 



MAIORUM 



NOSTRORUM 




Fr. John Baptist of St. Vincent 

Ferrer, Second General of the 

Congregation. 



Very Reverend and most honorable 
Father in Christ. 

The time is approaching when for 
the first time we are to solemnly 
celebrate the Feast of the Passion 
with Office and Mass; this has been 
graciously granted us for every year 
from now on by His Holiness, Pope 
Pius VI, now gloriously reigning. It 
is my happy duty to second the sacred 
intentions of Holy Church, of His 
Holiness and of our most loving 
Father and Founder, of happy mem- 
ory, that this solemnity be cele- 
brated with all the piety and devotion 
that such a fundamental duty and so 



fruitful an exercise as the devotion 
to the Passion and Death of our Re- 
deemer merits. As sons of the Most 
Holy Cross and Passion of Jesus 
Christ we are herein to distinguish 
ourselves above devout seculars in 
fervor and enthusiam. A further rea- 
son for this particular fervor in cele- 
brating this feast is the fact that it 
takes place this year, and will take 
place every year, during the very 
days during which the world more 
than ever is immersed in entertain- 
ment and thinks little of the most 
bitter pains and sorrows and ignomi- 
nies of Jesus Christ; nay even not a 



3 



few Catholics in thousands of ways 
by their sins renew His Passion and 
Death. In view of this I am urged to 
ask you to celebrate this solemnity 
with interior spirit and devotion and 
true piety; also exteriorly that there 
be solemn First and Second Vespers 
chanted beyond the Solemn Mass and 
that during these three functions 
there be exposition of the relic of 
the Holy Cross. 

I hope that the Lord will be pleased 
with these devout tribtues of our de- 
votion and that He permit us to par- 
ticipate in His graces as pledges of 



His eternal mercies; of these latter 
I pray He will render us worthy if we 
remain true sons of the Congregation 
of the Most Holy Cross and Passion 
of Jesus Christ: from my heart I pray 
His Infinite Goodness that this may 
be granted to each and every one. 
Amen. 

Your devoted and affectionate 
servant 
John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer 

To the Very Reverend Father 
Bartholomew of Jesus and Mary 
Rector at Viterbo- Soriano 
Retreat of St. Eustace, Martyr. 



A copy of this letter is found in the archives of the Retreat of St. Eustace; it carries no date 
but without doubt was written not long after the publishing of the rescript approving the Office and 
Mass of the Passion. This rescript is dated January 10th, 1776. Although the copy extent of this letter 
is addressed to the Father Rector of St. Eustace it was probably sent to all the Rectors. 




ON THE CRUCIFIX 



The course of my long life hath 
reached at last 

In fragile bark o'er a temptuous 
sea, 

The common harbor where must 
rendered be 

Account of all the actions of the past. 

The impassioned phantasy, that, 
vague and vast, 
Made art an idol and a king to me, 
Was an illusion, and but vanity 

Were the desires that lured me and 
harrassed. 



The dream of love, that were so 
sweet of yore, 

What are they now, when two 
deaths may be mine, 

One sure, and one forecasting 
its alarms? 

Painting and sculpture satisfy no 
more 

The soul now turning to the Love 
Divine, 
That oped, to embrace us, on the 
Cross its arms. 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 



Marian Year Missions 



It was with the intention of offer- 
ing a special tribute to Mary Im- 
maculate, during the Marian Year 
proclaimed in her honor by His Holi- 
ness Pope Pius XII, that the Provin- 
cial Curia of Holy Cross Province, in 
the Spring of 1954, decided upon the 
giving of Charity Missions as a prac- 
tical way in which the Province might 
make a very acceptable offering to 
the Mother of God. Despite the great 
increase in requests for our work — 
the first half year of 1954 showed an 
increase of at least 25% over recent 
banner years — it was thought that 
the Province should set aside a num- 
ber of men for such work. 

Once again, as in the Holy Year 
of 1950, it was decided that the Dio- 
cese of Little Rock, Arkansas, might 
very profitably be given first con- 
sideration. The great deal of good 
accomplished there in 1950 together 
with the wonderful cooperation re- 
ceived from His Excellency Bishop 
Fletcher and his clergy gave assur- 
ance to the hope that limited efforts 
might produce the greatest results in 
that Diocese. 

Therefore on June 17th, Very Rev. 
Fr. Provincial wrote to His Excel- 
lency, Bishop Albert L. Fletcher, of 
Little Rock, acquainting him with the 
desire of the Curia, and offering the 
services of our Missionaries for 
charity missions in the poorer parish- 
es of his Diocese. His Paternity re- 
marked: "We will consider it a priv- 
ilege to be able to send several of 
our missionaries to conduct free mis- 
sions in parishes that would other- 



wise be unable to pay a stipened for 
such work. Although the Marian Year 
has brought more than the usual 
number of requests for Missions and 
Retreats, we feel that we ought to as- 
sign some Missionaries for this work, 
which will be especially acceptable 
to Our Blessed Mother . . . ." 

Bishop Fletcher's gracious letter of 
acceptance was dated on June 28th 
and, in part, stated: "I have been out 
on the road a good deal recently, 
which accounts for this delay in ac- 
knowledging and thanking you for 
that wonderful letter of June 17th. 
Let me assure you how happy I and 
the missionaries will be to accept 
your generous and kind offer. I have 
already spoken to a few missionaries 
whom I have chanced to meet since 
receiving your letter and they are 
certainly most enthusiastic ... In 
accordance with the kind suggestion 
contained in your letter, I am here- 
with enclosing a list of little parishes 
and misisons which I feel pretty sure 
have never had a mission. . . If you 
have an opportunity, I would certain- 
ly appreciate your kindness in re- 
membering me to the Missionaries 
(Fathers Bertrand Abell, Leo P. 
Brady, Wilfrid Flannery, Flannon 
Gannon, Brendan McConnell, Daniel 
Maher and Henry Vetter) who gave 
so many Holy Year Missions in poor 
little places. I have continued to re- 
member them in my Mass ... I hope 
you will let me know if I can be of 
any help in working out this sche- 
dule of Marian Year Missions in our 
poor places. Let me simply assure 



you now that these missions will be 
wonderful spiritual gifts to Mary's 
children in these little mission places. 
Not only they but she will appreciate 
the gifts. It was mighty good of you 
to think of us and I want to assure 
you of my gratitude and apprecia- 
tion ..." 

His Excellency enclosed with the 
above letter a list of nineteen~smain 
parishes and missions, as follows: 
Levy, Sylvan Hills, Geyer Springs, 
Bald Knob, Batesville, Benton, Adona, 
DeQueen, Foreman, Gillett, Hartford, 
Wynne, McCrory, Malvern, Marked 
Tree, Waldron, Mountain Home, New- 
port and Crossett. 

After studying the geography of 
the towns listed and noting the ap- 
proachability of each from the various 
railway lines that cross the State, a 
tentative schedule of Missions and 
dates was drawn up. In his letter of 
July 9th, to Bishop Fletcher, enclos- 
ing the schedule of proposed missions 
and suggested dates, Fr. Provincial 
noted that the next step was to 
"write all the Pastors and acquaint 
them with our offer of a mission. If 
the tentative dates suggested are not 
satisfactory, I am sure that we will 
be able to arrange others that will 
be." 

Four days later, His Excellency 
wrote to say: "The proposed arrange- 
ments are wonderful as far as I am 
concerned and I am sure also as far 
as the pastors of these little places 
are concerned. There may be some 
question, as you mention in your let- 
ter, regarding a certain proposed 
date, but I am sure that this can 
be arranged satisfactorily. I am sur- 
prised and gratified that you could 



spare these fine missionaries for so 
many missions. I sort of feel that I 
am imposing on your generosity. 
These missions in little places will 
do a wonderful amount of good. They 
will be happy and appreciative at 
knowing that they have been remem- 
bered. The missionaries will get al- 
most a hundred percent attendance 
in these little places. While receiving 
the blessing of the missionaries' 
work in the Diocese, I am sure that 
the Missionaries themselves and all 
the members of your Province can 
expect a special expression of thanks 
from Our Blessed Lady. You may be 
sure that this will be my prayer." 

Next came the job of contacting 
all the Pastors, to make the necessary 
arrangements. Due to the fact that 
several were away on a well-earned 
rest, this proved to be more time- 
consuming than anticipated. Never- 
theless, the reaction of the Pastors 
was immediate and very enthusiastic. 

Fr. Burke, Pastor of Geyer Springs, 
wrote: "I do believe, Father, that a 
Mission would be a wonderful be- 
ginning for these people. I am sure 
that some of the people in the out- 
lying district have never made a 
mission." Fr. Busby, Pastor of Cros- 
sett, wrote in the same vein: "Yes, 
indeed yes! We would like to have 
a mission very much, but didn't 
dream it possible for years to come. 
It is a very small parish, only ten 
families, but the non-Catholics are 
very receptive and an open-to-all Mis- 
sion would do untold good." And Fr. 
Milan of Hartford wrote: "There 
never has been a mission at St. Leo's 
Church, and there is ho doubt it 
needs a good spiritual revival. There 



are many fallen-aways in the terri- 
tory ..." 

As expected, local conditions caus- 
ed a change of dates in a number of 
instances for reasons ranging from 
lack of heating facilities in some 
churches to the late rice, cotton and 
soybean harvest, to the relocating of 
a parish church. Some two months 
were consumed in arranging the fin- 
al list of 18 charity missions. On 
September 16th, Fr. Provincial was 
able to write Bishop Fletcher: "... 
we have completed the list of the 
Marian Year missions. The first mis- 
sions will open . . . September 19th. 
We received the most gratifying co- 
operation from all the Pastors with 
regard to dates, etc. In a very few 
cases (Gillett, Benton and Mountain 
Home) circumstances prevented the 
holding a mission this Fall. On the 
other hand, we were happy to add 
two others to the list (Weiner and 
Mena) . . 

Fr. Dunstan Brannigan, C.P. was 
appointed to conduct the missions at 
Mena, Waldron, Hartford, Foreman, 
DeQueen and Crossett. Fr. Dominic 
Merriman, C.P. was assigned to con- 
duct those at Sylvan Hills and Mal- 
vern. The missions at Wynne and Mc- 
Crory were conducted by Fr. Arnold 
Vetter, C.P., those at Levy and Geyer 
Springs by Fr. Robert Borger, C.P., 
and that at Adona by Fr. Cormac 
Lynch, C.P. Fr. Cornelius McGraw, 
C.P. was appointed to conduct those 
at Newport, Batesville, Bald Knob, 
Weiner and Marked Tree, Ark. 

As expected, the Missions proved 
to be very beneficial and blessed 
with many graces. Typical of the let- 
ters received are those written by 



Fr. Cheney, of Mena, and Fr. Milan, 
of Hartford. The latter wrote to Fr. 
Provincial: "Just a note of thanks for 
your great kindness in supplying one 
of your Fathers to conduct a mission 
in Hartford. This was the first mis- 
sion that was ever held in the little 
church. It was a grand success. We 
had just about a hundred percent at- 
tendance at the mission every night. 
One of our parishoners who had not 
been to the sacraments in thirty-three 
years went ... as a result of it." The 
former wrote: "In the name of the 
parishoners of St. Agnes Church, 
Mena, and St. Albert Church, Wal- 
dron, and myself, I wish to express 
sincere thanks for the excellent mis- 
sions ... We all feel that much 
spiritual good was accomplished. The 
people will surely remember your 
Congregation in their prayers." 

On December 20th, Bishop Fletcher 
sent a gracious final note of thanks: 
"I cannot allow Christmas to pass 
without sending you a little note of 
gratitude for all that you and your 
wonderful Missionaries did during 
the Marian Year for the little mis- 
sions and parishes of the Diocese of 
Little Rock. 

"Priests and people in these little 
parishes and missions will remember 
you and the Passionist Fathers who 
gave them such a memorable exam- 
ple of the care which Our Lord and 
His Blessed Mother have for the 
scattered sheep in missionary areas. 

"Christmas is the poor man's feast 
— a time when he must have a special 
access to the Sacred Heart of the 
King and His Queen. I know that the 
members of our little missions and 
parishes (both priests and people) 



will not forget the Passionist Fathers 
when they visit the King and His 
Mother on Christmas morning. As a 
missionary Bishop, I would like to 
assure you and your zealous confreres 
that I will join them in my Masses 
and prayers on Christmas morn- 
ing .. . " 



"Expressing my grateful apprecia- 
tion for all you have done and know- 
ing that Our Lord and His Blessed 
Mother will have a special way of 
thanking you for us, I am, 

Gratefully yours in Christ, 

f ALBERT L. FLETCHER 

Bishop of Little Rock 




un, Pn&feen, 'Pawioit ?e€Wfo 



General Introduction 

Besides the feasts of the Passion 
that are celebrated by the Universal 
Church, we Passionists have a num- 
ber of Passion feasts that are proper 
to us. Most of these Passion feasts 
are celebrated by us during Lent 
and immediately before and after it. 
Beginning with the Feast of the 
Prayer of our Lord in the Garden 
on the Tuesday after Septuagesima 
and ending with that of the Title 
of the Holy Cross on the Friday after 
the second Sunday after Easter, we 
celebrate eight proper feasts of the 
Passion. Added to this, on Oct. 23 
we have the feast of the Most Holy 
Redeemer as a proper feast. Though 
nearly all of these feasts have a his- 
tory behind them in one locality or 
another, we were the first to celebrate 
them as a group. It is understand- 
able that our Holy Founder would 
have been interested in celebrating 
these feasts, centering as they do 



the principal devotion of our con- 
gregation. 

The greater number of these feasts 
were granted to us in 1773 by Pope 
Clement XIV at the request of St. 
Paul of the Cross. Others were in- 
troduced later. Of those introduced 
during the life of our Holy Founder, 
it seems that nearly all the Offices 
were either composed or revised by 
Bishop Thomas Struzzieri, C.P., who 
in our Congregation was known as 
Father Thomas of the Side of Jesus. 

After these proper feasts had been 
granted to us, various religious Con- 
gregations and Dioceses asked the 
Holy See for permission to celebrate 
the same feasts. It is a matter of in- 
terest that the proper Passion feasts 
were granted to the Dioceses of the 
United States Dec. 12, 1840 at the re- 
quest of the Fourth Provincial Coun- 
cil of Baltimore. These feasts at that 
time had the rank of double major 
and were not transferable without 



8 



special indult. The United States ob- 
tained this indult, but they were not 
transferable beyond Lent. The feasts 
celebrated in the United States were 
approximately the same as those we 
now celebrate. One notable differ- 
ence is this: the feast of the Precious 
Blood was then among the proper 
Passion feasts. It was only in 1849 
that a feast of the Precious Blood 
was granted to the Universal Church. 
These proper Passion feasts were 
celebrated in the United States from 
1840 until 1911. They were dropped 
when Pius X reformed the Breviary 
in 1911. 

Among us, the feasts of the Pas- 
sion were celebrated with the rite 
of double major from the time of 
their grant until 1900. By decrees of 
Dec. 14, 1900 and March 4, 1901 all 
of the feasts were raised to the rank 
of double of the second class. When 
Pius X published his 'Divino Afflatu' 
in 1911, reforming the Roman Brev- 
iary, they were all reduced once 
more to the rank of double major. 
An exception to this was the feast 
of the Solemn Commemoration of the 
Passion. It has had the rank of dou- 
ble of the first class from the be- 
ginning. 

After the reform of the Breviary, 
the allocation of some of the feasts 
was changed. Further changes in the 
dates was made by a decree of March 
27, 1923. Suffice it to say that at 
present we celebrate the Passion 
feasts on the following days: 

Tuesday after Septuagesima — 
Prayer of our Lord in the Garden 

Tuesday after Sexagesima — Solemn 
Commemoration of the Passion 

Friday after Ash Wednesday— Pil- 



lar of the Scourging 

Friday after First Sunday of Lent — 
Crown of Thorns 

Friday after Second Sunday of 
Lent — The Lance and Nails 

Friday after third Sunday of Lent 
—The Holy Shroud 

Friday after Fourth Sunday of Lent 
—The Five Wounds 

Friday after Fifth Sunday of Lent 
— Seven Dolors (Universal Church) 

Friday after Low Sunday — The 
Holy Sepulchre 

Friday after Second Sunday after 
Easter— Title of the Holy Cross 

October 23— Feast of the Holy 
Redeemer. 

In future issues of the PASSION- 
IST each of the above Passion feasts 
will be treated individually. In the 
treatment of the various feasts we 
shall speak first of the history of 
the feast, insofar as we have been 
able to determine it. In the case of 
some of the feasts there is a little 
difficulty in determining accurately 
certain aspects of their history. In 
our research on this matter we have 
used all the sources available. In 
most cases the history of the feasts 
is very clear and complete. It is only 
here and there that obscure points 
are encountered. 

After the historical aspect of each 
feast we shall give a brief summary 
of our evaluation of the particular 
spirit of the feast. In doing so we 
depend entirely on the text of the 
Office and the Mass. We hope that 
this effort to further our understand- 
ing of the Passion feasts will be of 
help to all English speaking Passion- 
ists. 

In this issue we begin our treat- 



9 



ment of the individual feasts. We 
intend to follow the chronological 
order and so we begin with the first, 



the feast of the Prayer of Our Lord 
in the Garden. 



FEAST OF THE 
PRAYER OF OUR LORD IN THE GARDEN 



History of the Feast 

This feast is not one of the older 
feasts of the Passion. Apparently no 
such feast existed before 1775. From 
the sources available there is not 
much information about the origin 
of the feast, and what information 
there is is not altogether clear. 

According to the Catholic Ency- 
clopedia, Vol. 12, p. 354, the Office 
of this feast was probably composed 
by Bishop Thomas Struzzieri, Passion- 
ist, at the request of St. Paul of the 
Cross and approved by Pius VI. If 
this information is accurate it would 
date the compilation of the Office 
around 1775. However, the feast was 
not adopted by us until 1828. In the 
Bollettino, Oct. 1922, p. 304, it is 
stated that permission to celebrate 
this feast was obtained by Father 
Anthony of St. James, Superior Gen- 
eral, on Nov. 22, 1828. The same 
source gives no indication that the 
feast was of Passionist origin. If the 
Office was compiled by Bishop Struz- 
zieri around 1775, it remains a mys- 
tery why it was not adopted by us 
until 1828. 

Once Rome had granted us this 
feast it began to have a history all 
its own. It was adopted by the city 
of Rome in 1831. After that, it be- 
came to be listed among the Proper 
Passion feasts and was adopted along 
with them by various dioceses and 
religious congregations. 

Like all the other Passion feasts, 



this one was raised to the rank of 
double of the second class in 1900 or 
1901. It was reduced to a double 
major at the time of the Breviary 
reform in 1911. (Bolletino, Oct. 1922, 
p. 304) It has always been celebrated 
by us on the Tuesday after Septua- 
gesima. 
Spirit of the Feast 

Notice that this is the feast, not of 
the Agony, but of the Prayer of our 
Lord in the Garden. Its object is to 
commemorate the prolonged prayer 
of Christ offered in Gethsemani in 
preparation for the suffering of his 
Passion. The feast is placed at the 
approach of Lent in order to remind 
us that the penitential season is above 
all a time of prayer, and to invite 
us to pray in union with Christ ddur- 
ing the Lenten season. (Cath. Encycl. 
Vol. 12, p. 354) 

The central theme of the text of 
this Office is prayer, with special 
emphasis on Christ's prayer in Geth- 
semani. See, for example, the anti- 
phons and lessons for the first two 
Nocturns of Matins. These are drawn 
from texts of Scripture and the Fa- 
thers that pertain to prayer in gen- 
eral. However, these general texts on 
prayer are brought to bear on the 
prayer of Christ. Thus, the third les- 
son of the first Nocturn and the 
epistle of the Mass are taken from 
Hebrews 5:5-10, which speaks of 
Christ as a Priest according to the 
order of Melchisedech offering pray- 



10 



ers and supplications to God. This 
certainly has direct reference to 
Christ's prayer during his Passion. 

The element of the sufferings of 
Christ is not lacking, however The 
antiphon and lessons of the third 
Nocturn; the hymns, antiphons and 
versilces at Vespers, Lauds and the 
short hours center our attention on 
Christ suffering and shedding Blood 
during His prayer. 

The Office of this feast, then, shows 
us the relationship of prayer to suf- 
fering. It invites us to take up our 
cross with Christ, praying with him 
as we share his Cross with him. The 
same may be said of the text of the 
Mass. 



The Oration of this feast asks that 
we, in imitation of Christ, may per- 
severe in prayer: 

"O Lord Jesus Christ, who in the 
Garden hast, by thy word and ex- 
ample, taught us to pray to overcoms 
the dangers of temptations, gracious- 
ly grant that ever giving ourselves to 
prayer, we may merit to obtain its 
abundant fruits." 

Sources: Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 
11, pp. 526-527; Vol. 12, p. 
354. 

Bollettino, October 1922, p. 
304. 



FEAST OF THE 
SOLEMN COMMEMORATION OF THE PASSION 



Tuesday after Sexagesima 
History of the Feast 

The origin of this feast is traced 
directly to St. Paul of the Cross. The 
only evidence of an earlier feast of 
the Passion is found in the 1517 
Breviary of Meissen (Germany). This 
feast was of simple rite and was cele- 
brated on November 15. It disap- 
peared during the Reformation. 
(Cath. Encycl. Vol. XI, 526). 

From the earliest days of our Con- 
gregation, St. Paul of the Cross 
wished to celebrate a feast of the 
Passion. In a letter dated 1758 he 
asked Father Candidus to begin work- 
ing on an Office of the Passion. (Let- 
ters, III, 166). However, the work was 
ultimately done by Father Thomas of 
the Side of Jesus, later Bishop Struz- 
zieri. He did most of the work at our 
Retreat at Paliano. In 1760 his work 
was interrupted by his being sent to 



Corsica to do special work for the 
Holy See. After ten years there he 
was named Bishop of Amelia. Before 
taking possession of his new see he 
spent some time at Rocca di Papa 
near Rome. While he was there he 
put the finishing touches on the Of- 
fice of the Passion. (Bollettino, Oct. 
1922, p. 297-298) N. B. The book, 
First Companions of St. Paul of the 
Cross, p. 246 states that Bishop Struz- 
zieri finished the Office at the Re- 
treat of Monte Cavo. Though this is 
very near Rocca di Papa, they are 
two distinct places. We do not know 
which version is correct. 

An interesting story is told in 
manuscript life of Bishop Struzzieri 
by Father John Mary of St. Ignatius. 
While Father Thomas was compiling 
the Office of the Passion at Paliano, 
one morning someone entered his 
room and asked him what texts he 



11 



was using for the Responses at Ma- 
tins. Father Thomas replied that he 
was taking them from the Offices of 
Holy Week. The visitor said: "No, 
you should take them from the Re- 
proaches that are said after the un- 
veiling of the Cross on Good Friday." 
Father Thomas thought it over and 
liked the idea, so he changed his plan 
accordingly. As he was greatly ab- 
sorbed in his work at the time he 
did not notice who his visitor had 
been. Wishing to know who had of- 
fered this valuable suggestion, he la- 
ter asked every member of the com- 
munity who had made the suggestion. 
He discovered that no one had been 
to his room that morning. (Bollettino, 
Oct. 1922, p. 297). 

When the Office was finished it was 
submitted to the Holy See for ap- 
proval. Pope Clement XIV was Pope 
at the time. He received it gracious- 
ly and promised to approve it. But 
there was a long delay and no ap- 
proval was forthcoming. He was re- 
minded of the matter several times 
but the Pope replied: "Give me time 
and fear not. I have not forgotten it; 
I remember it very well." It was re- 
ported and with good reason, that 
Clement XIV was considering approv- 
ing the Office for the Universal 
Church. If such was his plan, he was 
not able to carry it out for he died 
shortly afterwards. (Ibid. p. 298). 

When Pius VI became Pope in 1775 
he expressed his willingness to ap- 
prove the new Office. But before do- 
ing so he had it re-examined by the 
Sacred Congregation of Rites because, 
he said: "This Office will not remain 
with the Congregation of the Passion 
but will be asked for by the Bishops 



of various Dioceses." (Ibid., 293). 

Finally, and January 10, 1776, the 
Sacred Congregation of Rites ap- 
proved the Office and granted us 
permission to celebrate the feast as 
a double of the first class with an 
octave. The date assigned for the 
feast was the Tuesday after Sexages- 
ima Sunday. This was the date that 
our Holy Founder wanted. He wished 
our celebration of this octave before 
Lent to counteract the excesses of 
Carnival time. However, our Holy 
Founder did not live to celebrate the 
feast. It was approved just three 
months after he died. (Ibid. 298). 

Father John Baptist of St. Vincent 
Ferrer, second Superior General, 
wrote a letter to the Congregation on 
the occasion of the first celebration 
of the feast. This letter may be found 
in the Bollettino, Sept. 1929, p. 263. 

Bishop Struzzieri was one of the 
first Bishops to request the feast for 
his Diocese. His request was granted 
Dec. 11, 1776. (Acta Congregationis, 
July, 1935, p. 468). He wrote a letter 
to his diocese on this occasion. This 
letter may be found in the Bollettino, 
June 1923, p. 170. 

Having at last obtained the feast of 
the Passion, our Superiors asked for 
a further privilege, that of saying the 
same Office as a Votive Office. The 
permission to say the votive Office 
of the Passion on all Fridays that 
were not impeded (except during 
Lent and Advent) was granted by the 
same Pius VI 'vivae vocis oraculo' on 
May 5, 1781. 

On May 8, 1884, Pope Leo XIII 
further extended this privilege of the 
Votive Office to include the times of 
Lent and Advent with the exception 



12 



of certain days. (Bollettino, Oct. 1922, 
p. 303). At the same time, May 8, 
1884, the feast was granted a priv- 
ileged octave, admitting only feasts 
of the first and second class. (Cath. 
Encycl. vol. XI, 527). 

After the reform of the Breviary 
in 1911, we retained the feast as a 
double of the first class, but the 
octave was reduced from a priviliged 
to a common octave. So it remains 
today. (Bollettino, Oct. 1922, p. 2043. 
Spirit of the Feast 

The object of this feast is to de- 
voutly recall and honor the sufferings 
that Christ endured for the redemp- 
tion of the human race. (Cath. 
Encycl. vol. XI, 527). Its spirit is one 
of mingled sorrow and joy: sorrow at 
contemplating the sufferings and de- 
reliction endured by our Savior; joy 
at contemplating the fruits of his suf- 
ferings. This combination of sorrow 
and joy is best expressed in the ora- 
tion of the feast: 

"0 almighty and eternal God, 
who, to give mankind and ex- 
ample of humility to follow, 
willed our Savior to assume our 
flesh and be shown to us on the 
Cross, graciously grant that as 
we celebrate the solemn com- 
memoration of the Passion we 
may thus merit to practice pa- 
tience and to have part in his 
Resurrection." 
The note of sorrow is most promi- 
nent in the hymns, antiphons and ver- 
sicles of the Office. The lessons, on 
the other hand, while not neglect- 
ing the sorrowful aspect, insistently 
point out to us the fruits of the Pas- 
sion. See especially the lessons of the 
first Nocturn of the feast, taken 



from Romans ch. 5 and 6, and the 
first lessons of the octave day, taken 
from the first Epistle of St. Peter. 
The lessons of the second and third 
Nocturns throughout the octave are 
worthy of special note. They are 
drawn from fourteen different Fa- 
thers and Doctors of the Church, not 
one of them being represented twice. 
These lessons are a gold mine of 
Christian writings on the Passion. 
The Catholic Encyclopedia is not 
wrong in stating: "The Office com- 
posed by Struzzieri is very rich and 
full of pious sentiment." (Vol. XI, 
p. 527). 

In conclusion, we quote the oration 
for the octave day of the feast. It 
expresses so well our particular spirit 
and impresses upon us the reason 
for celebrating the feast: 

"Pour forth upon us we beseech 
thee almighty God, the spirit of grace 
and prayer; that we may always be 
able to recall with holy affection the 
Passion of thine only begotten Son, 
and imprint it in the hearts of thy 
people by word and example." 
(to be continued) 
Fr. Columban, C.P. 
St. Gabriel Retreat 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Sources: Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. 

XI, pp. 526-527. 
Bollettino, October 1922, 
pp. 296-304; June 1923, p. 
170; Sept. 1929, p. 263. 
Acta Congregationis, Vol. 

XII, July 1935, p. 468. 
Memoirs of the First Com- 
panions of St. Paul of the 
Cross, p. 246. 
Passionist Proprium. 



13 




olu Cyatner 



y 

June 14th, 1954 His Holiness, Pope 
Pius XII erected a new Prefecture 
Apostolic in Borneo and confided 
same to our Congregation. Since 
July 1946 our Fathers of the Pro- 
vince of our Lady of Holy Hope (Hol- 
and) worked in Ketapang, Borneo 
and took St. Gemma as their Patron 
of the Mission. On Aug. 25th, 1954 
Father Gabriel of the Most Blessed 
Sacrament, Religious Superior of 
the Mission, (William Sillekens) 
was appointed Prefect Apostolic of 
the Ketapang Prefecture. 

As soon as Msgr. G. Sillekens was 
nominated Apostolic Prefect of the 
new Prefecture of Ketapang, His 
Excellency Msgr. G. de Jonghe d'- 
Ardoye, the papal Internuntio of 
Indonesia, expressed the desire to 
install the new Prefect Apostolic 
himjself, notwithstanding the long 
and difficult journey and the lack of 
sufficient housing accomodations — 
for, as he wrote, he himself had 



onors 



v_yOiiqre 



g re gallon 

been a missionary and to assist at 
the birth of the new Prefecture will 
give me great pleasure, even and 
especially if the baptism will take 
place in poverty." 

Together with His Excellency 
came Msgr. T. V. Valenberg, Apos- 
tolic Vicar of Pontinak and Msgr. 
Van Kessel, Apostolic Prefect of 
Sintang. The head of the district 
kindly placed his own ship at the 
disposal of the three guests to bring 
them from Pontinak to Ketepang. 

Saturday morning, November 13, 
at 8:30 a.m. they arrived at the 
mouth of the river. The local au- 
thorities sent a government boat 
to welcome them and guide them 
into the harbor. All the officials 
were present to welcome the dis- 
tinguished guests. Upon arrival at 
the presbytery a Daya and a Chinese 
spoke some words of welcome on 
behalf of the Catholics. Our new 
Prefect thanked His Excellency for 



14 



his kindness in visiting our poor 
mission. His Excellency was deeply 
impressed by the cordial welcome 
shown by the people and responded 
in Dutch and Chinese, thanking 
especially the local authorities for 
their kindness and cooperation. It 




Msgr. G. Sillikens, C. P. 
Prefect Apostolic of Ketapong, 



was for him, he said, a proof of 
the good understanding between the 
authorities and the Church, and he 
hoped that this would continue and 
that the government would cooper- 
ate closely with the Catholics who 
have fought for the freedom of In- 
donesia. 

The next day, Sunday, November 
14, His Excellency installed the new 
Prefect Apostolic. Afterwards he 
delivered a sermon in the Indone- 
sian language, expressing his great 
joy that the mission of Ketapang 
had become an Apostolic Prefec- 
ture. He asked the Catholics to 
obey the new Prefect, to help him 
in his difficult task. He also warn- 
ed them against communism and de- 
clared emphatically that there can- 
not be any cooperation between 
Catholics and communism. He 
strongly recommended the "Legion 
of Mary" as a mighty weapon to 
defend and spread the Faith. 

After the sermon the new Prefect 
thanked him and urged the Catho- 
lics to strive eagerly to become 
loyal subjects of the Church, to as- 
sist him in building up the Church 
in this part of the country. Then 
Msgr. G. Sillekens celebrated a Pon- 
tifical Mass, at the end of which the 
Apostolic Internuncio gave the pa- 
pal benediction. 

At the reception in the afternoon 
all the civil, military and police 
authorities were present, as well as 
many Catholics and non-Catholics, 
to congratulate the new Prefect. 
The head of the local authorities 
spoke with deep appreciation of the 
work of the missionaries, who went 
inland to found schools and hospit- 



15 



als, to look after the sick and the 
poor. Considering that nearly all 
the people here are Mohammedans, 
this appreciation of the Church and 
the work of the missionaries was a 
great comfort and encouragement 
for the new Prefect. 

May God grant him the strength 
to fulfil his difficult task! 
STATISTICS OF THE APOSTOLIC 
PREFECTURE OF KETAPANG: 

Area: 41,000 Km2 — Inhabitants: 



182,000 divided as follows: Melayan 
(Mohammedans): 98,150; Daya's: 
74,650; Chinese: 9,200. — Catholics: 
2137 — Catechumens: 1979. 

Missionaries: 16 priests, 1 laybro- 
ther, 8 sisters, 1 pyhsician, 20 cate- 
chists, 25 schoolmasters, 13 schools 
with 980 pupils, 10 boarding-houses 
with 155 people; 6 missionary sta- 
tions, 22 auxiliary stations, 9 
churches or chapels. 



Our Jubilarian 



December 22, 1954, was a day of 
rejoicing throughout the Province 
of Holy Cross and even throughout 
the entire Congregation. It was the 
Silver Jubilee Day of the class of 
1929 of Holy Cross Province — the 
Jubilee of our Most Reverend Fa- 
ther General. 

By means of the following letter 
even His Holiness, Pope Pius XII 
desired "to share with His own good 
wishes": 

Secretariate of State 
of His Holiness 
N. 339121 

The Vatican, December 14, 1954 
Most Reverend Father 

In the forthcoming celebration of 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
priestly ordination of Your Most 
Reverend Paternity, the Supreme 
Pontiff, to whom the family of 
Saint Paul of the Cross is particu- 
larly dear, desires to share with His 



own good wishes. 

It is known to all that the worth 
of this Religious Congregation, 
which is governed today by Your 
Paternity in the spirit of its saintly 
Founder, continues to serve the 
Church by zeal of word and by the 
example which strengthens it. 

The Holy Father is pleased with 
the spiritual expansion whereby 
this same Congregation spreads 
throughout the world its so bene- 
ficial apostolate under the guidance 
of Your Paternity; and He is grate- 
ful to the Lord, who has reserved 
such weighty and noble mansions to 
the priesthood of Your Paternity, 
and happy that to this, your mission, 
you consecrate with praiseworthy 
devotion the talents and the graces 
of the priest and the religious. You 
have good reason to rejoice;and in 
offering to the Lord your grateful 
homage for the favors He has gen- 



16 



erously bestowed on you, you may 
be confident of continuing to gather 
abundant fruit. 

In these sentiments, His Holiness 
invokes on Your Paternity and on 
the beloved family of the Passion- 
ists the abundance of Divine Favors; 
and to you He sends from His Heart, 
as a pledge of His Fatherly bene- 
volence, the Apostolic Blessing. 

Permit me to add here the horn- 
age of my own sincere good wishes 
and to profess myself with senti- 
ments of religious deference, 
Most devotedly yours in the Lord 
(Signed) 

Angello Dell'Acqua 
(Substitute) 
The Most Reverend 
FATHER MALCOLM OF MARY 
Superior-General of 
the Passionists. 

Twenty-five years ago twelve Pas- 
sionists knelt in the cathedral of Des 
Moines, Iowa, to receive the sacred 
powers of Christ's Priesthood from 
the hands of Bishop Drumm. Last 
December they had finished twenty- 
five years of priestly life in the Pas- 
sionist Apostolate. 

As we recall, one by one, the mem- 
bers of the class of '29 and their 
work for these last twenty-five years, 
we see graphically the extent and 
depth of the Passionist apostolate. 
The silver Jubilarians of Holy Cross 
Province have worked in practically 
every field of our manifold ministry 
— as missionaries and retreat mas- 
ters, on the Colored missions and in 
our parish work, as Superiors, lec- 
tors, and Sign preachers. 

The various responsible offices 



and duties that the members of this 
class have performed for the Pro- 
vince and for the Order manifest 
also their personal abilities and 
sound religious qualities. Among the 
Jubilarians we find priests who have 
been entrusted with the training of 
our younger religious, with the gov- 
erning of our communities, and 
there is one who was called to the 
great responsibility of guiding the 
destinies of the entire Congregation. 
But the record stands for anyone to 
read. 

The entire Province and The Pas- 
sionist rejoice with the Jubilarians 
on this happy occasion. Surely it is a 
time to express our sincere gratitude 
to God who called these religious 
to our Congregation — to the older 
religious who trained and formed 
them in the Passionist spirit — to 
the men themselves for their many 
labors, their good example, their 
generous spirit, during these twenty- 
five years of the Passionist Priest- 
hood. 

Most Reverend Father Malcolm 
of Mary (LaVelle) 

Father Malcolm's first appoint- 
ment was a lector in our Detroit 
Monastery. He was also lector and 
director at both Cincinnati and De- 
troit, until his election as Master of 
Novices in 1938. Three years later 
the Chapter elected him to the rec- 
torship of our Preparatory Seminary 
in Normandy. In 1944 he was chosen 
the First Provincial Consultor. It 
v/as in this office that he took an 
active part in our foundation at 
Houston. In 1946 he attended the 
General Chapter in Rome, and was 
elected First General Consultor. He 



17 




Most Reverend Father General 



fulfilled this new office so satisfac- 
torily that in the following General 
Chapter he was elected to the gen- 
eralate itself on the first ballot. 



Father Malcolm has brought honor 
and distinction to our Province by 
becoming the first American to hold 
this high office and the third non- 



18 



Italian in the long history of the 

Congregation. 

Very Reverend Father Camillus of 

the Sorrowful Virgin (Kronlage) 

After ordination Father Camillus 
was chosen for post-graduate studies 
in Semitic languages and Sacred 
Scriptures. 'He attended the Hebrew 
Theological Seminary in Cincinnati 
preparatory to going to Rome for 
Scripture at the Biblical Institute. 
On his return to the Province, he 
taught Scripture in St. Paul, Kansas, 
Des Moines, and finally for 18 years 
at Louisville. Father Camillus was 
relieved of this arduous post in 1949, 
and assigned to conduct the lay re- 
treats at Holy Cross Monastery, Cin- 





V. Rev. Fr. Camillus, C. P. 



Rev. Fr. Valentine, C. P. 

cinnati. In 1950 the Provincial Chap- 
ter elected him Rector of our mona- 
stery in Chicago, and the following 
Chapter re-elected him to this same 
important post. 

Reverend Father Valentine of the 
Sorrowful Virgin (Leitsch) 

Father Valentine was sent after 
ordination to the Preparatory Semi- 
nary in Normandy. He studied 
Science at St. Louis University and 
taught this same subject until 1939, 
when he was appointed Vicar of our 
Detroit community. Next he was 
sent to Sierra Madre, California, to 
work with our lay-retreatants. His 
success in this work prompted the 



19 




Rev. Fr. Ralph, C. 

Chapter of 1947 to elect him Rector 
of the Cincinnati Community, which 
had just recently been made a Re- 
treat House. After three years as 
Rector, he was transferred to the 
same work at our new house in Clay- 
ton, Missouri. He was appointed Su- 
perior of this house and Retreat Di- 
rector in 1952. He celebrated a 
Solemn Jubilee Mass on December 
22 in Louisville St. Agnes Church. 
Reverend Father Ralph of St. Joseph 
(Brisk) 
Father Ralph received his first as- 
signment to our Preparatory Semi- 
nary, where he taught English, 
French, and Elocution. In 1938 he 
was chosen Vicar of same communi- 



ty. Later he held the same office 
in Birmingham, and was then chosen 
Superior of this new foundation in 
1945. In 1950 Father Ralph was ap- 
pointed to his present office as Vicar 
of St. Paul's Monastery, Detroit. To- 
gether with these duties as Superior 
and Vicar, Father has taken part in 
the usual works of our ministry. 

Father Lambert of the Mother of 
God (Hickson) 

Father Lambert was appointed 
Vicar of the community at St. Paul, 
Kansas, shortly after the conclusion 
of his formal studies. He held this 
post until 1938, and at the same time 
began full time work as a member of 
our Mission Band. He was stationed 
at Cincinnati for a while, and in 1942 




Rev. Fr. Lambert, C. P. 



20 



was chosen Superior of the Birm- 
imgham Foundation. In 1944 the 
Provincial Chapter elected him to 
the rectorship of Detroit, and the 
following Chapter entrusted the 
Sierra Madre Community to his care 
in 1947. During his term in California 
the new retreat house was built and 
the annual fiesta was initiated. Since 
1950 Father Lamber has been a mem- 
ber of the Cincinnati and Birming- 
ham communities, and occupied in 
missions and retreats. 

Father Alan of St. Gabriel 
(Prendergast) 

After his Ordination in 1929 Father 
Alan took his Sacred Eloquence 




Rev. Fr. Alan, C. P. 



course in the Chicago Retreat, after 
which he was "de familia" in Des 
Moines. In February 1932 he was ap- 
pointed Vice Master of Novices in 
Louisville, then the Novitiate House 
of the Province. 1934 found him back 
as a member of the Community in 
Des Moines. From 1935 to 1938 he 
served as Assistant Pastor in St. Ag- 
nes Louisville and in 1938 as Pastor 
of St. Rita Parish in Sierra Madre, 
then under the care of the Passion- 
ists. 1939 brought the appointment 
of Vicarship in Matre Dolorosa Re- 
treat in Sierra Madre, California. The 
Chapter of 1941 elected him Rector 
of the Sierra Madre Community. 
After one term in this capacity he 
became a member of the Community 
in St. Paul, Kansas. 1947 brought him 
to Chicago and with this move also 
became Field representative of the 
"Sign". This strenuous position seem- 
ingly brought on a serious stomach 
ailment that necessitated a major 
operation. In 1953, upon the illness 
of Father Fabian he was sent to 
Kailspell Montana Hospital to re- 
lieve Father Fabian and remained 
there till the latters late death. He 
is celebrating a Solemn Jubilee Mass 
in our Chicago Retreat January 4th. 

Father Daniel of St. Anthony 
of Padua (Maher) 

Father Daniel after ordination was 
assigned to the teaching of Philos- 
ophy in Detroit. He continued in this 
work until released for missionary 
activities in 1938. Since that date he 
has been engaged in conducting mis- 
sions and retreats, and has been a 
member of the Sierra Madre, Cin- 
cinnati, and Detroit communities. 
From 1944-1947 he was appointed as 



21 




Rev. Fr. Daniel, C. P. 



Vicar of the Sacred Heart Retreat 
in Louisville. At present Father 
Daniel is stationed in Detroit. 

Father Eustace of the Assumption 

(Eilers) 
Father Eustace received the ap- 
pointment after ordination to the di- 
rectorship at our Preparatory Semi- 
nary. He continued in this work un- 
til 1935 when he was chosen Provin- 
cial Secretary. In 1937 he was elected 
out of chapter Rector of Detroit to 
fill up the term of Father Edwin, 
who was returning to the Armed 
Services in the Philippines. A year 
later Father Eustace became a mem- 
ber of the Sierra Madre community. 
He remained on the coast as a mis- 
sionary, retreat master and assistant 



pastor until 1947, when he was se- 
lected as Pastor and Superior of the 
Colored Mission at Ensley, Alabama. 
Since 1950 Father Eustace has been 
de familia in Cincinnati, Sierra 
Madre, and Des Moines, fulfilling at 
the same time our usual ministerial 
works. He is now member of the 
Community of Holy Family Parish 
in Ensley where he celebrated an 
evening Jubilee Mass on December 
22nd. 

Father Edgar of the Holy Spirit 
(Ryan) 

After ordination Father Edgar re- 
ceived his first and only provincial 
assignment — the lectorship at our 




Rev. Fr. Eustace, C. P. 



22 



Preparatory Seminary. The fact that 
he has remained there since 1931 
shows his success in teaching Greek 
and Latin to our young candidates. 
He studied the classical languages at 
St. Louis University. As a lector Fa- 
ther Edgar has been selfless — de- 
voting many extra hours each week 
to the "specials" who have come to 
the Prep without a sufficient Latin 
or Greek background. He has also 
combined with his teaching the work 
of chaplain at the nearby religious 
institution, has regularly conducted 
an inquiry class by mail for prospec- 
tive converts, and has served over 





Rev. Fr. Edgar, C. P. 



Rev. Fr. Kenneth, C. P. 

the week ends in the parish at Ed- 
wardsville, Illinois. 
Father Kenneth of the Assumption 

(Ward) 
During the years of his priestly 
life Father Kenneth has had to bear 
ill health and physical inabilities. 
In spite of this cross was Lector of 
Philisophy in Detroit and taught 
Moral Theology to our Students in 
Louisville, and from 1942-1944 was 
the Vicar at Holy Cross Monastery, 
Cincinnati. During the years Father 
Kenneth has taken part in our min- 
isterial work, excelling especially in 
retreat work. At present he is sta- 
tioned in Chicago and celebrates his 
Solemn Jubilee Mass January 20th. 



23 




Rev. Fr. Clarence, C. P. 

Father Clarence of the Passion 

(Vowels) 
Father Clarence was selected to be 
the Vice Master of the class of '29. 
He also taught at the Preparatory 
Seminary, and in 1933 was appointed 
Director of Students in Chicago. In 
1938 the Chapter elected him to the 
office of Rector at the Preparatory 
Seminary, and the following Chapter 
made him First Provincial Consultor. 
The next three years found him a 
member of the Des Moines communi- 
ty, and active in missionary and re- 
treat work. In 1947 the Chapter 
again elected him Rector, this time 
to Detroit. During his term the lay 
retreat movement was begun there. 
Since 1950 Father Clarence has been 



stationed at Houston, and employed 
in mission and retreat work. 

Father Arnold of the Holy Family 
(Vetter) 

After ordination Father Arnold 
was appointed Lector at Cincinnati. 
From there he was chosen to work 
in the new German Province for five 
years. On his return to the Province, 
he was selected in 1938 to found our 
first Colored Mission at Ensley, Ala- 
bama. For three years he worked 
there, laying the solid foundations 
for this important work. During his 
years at Ensley the first Church was 
built and dedicated. In 1941 Father 
Arnold was appointed Vicar of the 
Kansas Community. Since 1944 he 
has been engaged exclusively in mis- 
sion and retreat work, with great 
success. He has been stationed in 
Des Moines, Louisville, and at pres- 
ent is a member of the Kansas com- 
munity. Due to the critical illness 
of his good, aged Mother, Fr. Arnold 
did not formally celebrate his Jubi- 
lee. He requests prayers for his 
Mother. 



LAMENT FOR A POOR POET 

He sits at the foot of Golgotha, 

And out of his singing soul 
He fashions songs to make his Lord 

A shining aureole. 
But all the songs he sings are vain, 

And all his singing dross — 
For he sits at the foot of Golgotha 

While Christ hangs on the cross. 
And yet his Lord may deem his songs 

Were better sung than not, 
For they, at least, remembered Him 

While other songs forgot. 

— By Myles Connolly. 



24 



Father Ignatius Has Golden Jubilee 



"My soul magnifies the Lord . . . 
because He who is mighty has done 
great things for me!" These words 
of jubilant gratitude, first uttered by 
the very Mother of God long cen- 
turies ago, furnished the leitmotiv 
for the Golden Jubilee of Ordination 
celebrated on September 22 by our 
Father Ignatius of the Mother of 
God. From the opening text of the 
sermon during the Solemn Mass, 
through the various speeches of con- 
gratulation at the Jubilee bsnouet, 



right up to the closing hymn of the 
program presented by the students 
in the evening, the theme was con- 
stantly recurring in one form or an- 
other: "He has done great things for 
me, and Holy is His Name!" 

Such was Father's spontaneous re- 
action, as he looked back upon a life- 
time of blessings from on high. Born 
into a fine, Irish Catholic family of 
Grafton, Illinois, Harry Conroy from 
his very early years drsamed of the 
nnesthood. From the time he met 




t r. ignauus, t.r. (Center) alter the Golden Jubilee Mass with 
Bishop Cuthbert, C.P. (left) and Bishop Daly. 



25 



Father Raymond O'Keefe, C.P., dur- 
ing a mission in Grafton, and began 
to work as porter in our St. Louis 
retreat, that dream was completed to 
read Passionist priesthood. A God- 
given dream this, to be realized in 
part on the day of his religious pro- 
fession, January 27, 1897, and in full 
on that glorious December 17, 1904, 
his ordination day. "The splendor of 
that event recurs to me as if it were 
but yesterday, when kneeling at the 
feet of dear Bishop O'Connor of 
Newark, New Jersey, the chasuble 
of the priesthood fell over my shoul- 
ders, and I was clothed with powers 
never given to Angels, was made an 
ambassador of Jesus Christ, and dis- 
penser of the Mysteries of God." 

Then followed forty-five years of 
zealous carrying out the Office of 
the Word. His powerful voice and 
his eloquence were completely dedi- 
cated to the service of Christ Cruci- 
fied. Missions . . . "How many did I 
give? I don't know — 1 trust they 
are recorded in the Book of Life." 
Retreats . . . Father delivered the 
first Laymen's Retreat at our Sierra 
Madre house way back in 1928 — in 
the open air. Confessional work . . . 
All in all Father Ignatius has estab- 
lished a record as one of our out- 
standing missionaries. Yet in his cha- 
racteristic way he passes all the 
credit to others: "If my ministry has 
prospered, it is due, after God's all- 
conquering grace, to the never fail- 
ing cooperation of my brethren. 
What would my work on the plat- 
form or in the confessional have 
amounted to, had it not been for the 
untiring labors, prayers, and sacri- 



fices of by brethren at home? Thanks 
to them!" 

For the past five years Father has 
been living quietly tucked away in 
the monastic solitude of St. Gabriel's 
in Des Moines. His entire Passionist 
and priestly life has, it is true, been 
characterized by a spirit of ready 
helpfulness towards the younger 
members of the communtiy, especial- 
ly the young missionaries. But now, 
his preaching opportunities past be- 
cause of his health, Father spends 
his zeal almost solely in this aposto- 
late of charity and good example to 
his Passionist brethren. Only on the 
occasion of this Jubilee did he step 
once more into the limelight. And it 
was, of course, that honor might b8 
paid "not to me personally, but to 
the priesthood of Jesus Christ. Had 
I rounded out fifty years of the most 
distinguished career as a doctor, a 
lawyer, or a captain of industry, 
there would be no such celebration 
as this. It is because I am a priest, 
and fill an office as much above 
these others as the Heavens are 
above the earth." 

Honor assuredly was paid. Tributes 
poured in from all sides: a blessing 
from His Holiness, Pius XII; a cable- 
gram from Most Reverend Father 
Malcolm LaVelle, C.P.; a letter from 
Archbishop Bergen of Omaha; con- 
gratulations from the Mayor of Chi- 
cago, and from the Irish Fellowship 
Club. Personally present for the cele- 
bration were Bishop Edward C. Daly, 
O.P., of Des Moines; our own Bishop 
Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P.; Very Reverend 
Fathers Ernest Welch, C.P., and Neil 
Parsons, C.P., Provincials of the 
Eastern and Western provinces; Fa- 



23 



ther David Kelley of Newark, a be- 
loved friend of the Jubilarian for 
over fifty years; monsigori and clergy 
from the Des Moines and neighbor- 
ing dioceses; Passionist brethren 
from both American provinces; Fa- 
ther's three living sisters, and scores 
of relatives and friends. 

Highlight of the day's festivities 
was naturally the Solemn Mass Co- 
ram Pontifice, at which Bishop Daly 
presided in cappa magna, with Bishop 
O'Gara in attendance, and the Rev- 
erend Jubilarian assisting in the 
sanctuary. Very Reverend Father 
Neil, C.P., celebrated the votive mass 
of Saint Paul of the Cross, with Rev- 



erend Father Richard Hughes, C.P., 
as deacon, and Very Reverend Father 
Walter Kaelin, C.P., sub-deacon. In 
his inspiring sermon Father Ronan 
Dowd, C.P., underscored the triple 
apostolate of Father Ignatius' career: 
the Mass, the Word of God, Suffer- 
ing — all three of them to be counted 
as "great things" given by Him "who 
is mighty." Music for the Mass, Gre- 
gorian and harmony, was expertly 
rendered by our Student Choir. 

After the Mass a Jubilee banquet 
was held for the many clergy and 
layfolk who had gathered to rejoice 
together with Father. The office of 
toastmaster was most capably handled 




Father Ignatius cutting the Cake during banquet. Clergy (left to right) V. 
Rev. Fr. Neil, Provincial, Most Rev. Bishop Daly, Fr. Ignatius, C. P., Most 
Rev. Bishop Cuthbert, C. P., V. Rev. Ernest, C. P., Provincial of St. Paul of the 

Cross Province. 



27 



by Father Justin Smith, C.P. At the 
conclusion of the meal an unexpect- 
ed and rare honor was conferred 
upon the Jubilarian — a letter from 
the Honorable Governor Lawrence 
B. Weatherby, containing an official 
commission as Kentucky Colonel! In 
the evening the students staged a 
grand Irish Minstrel to top off the 
day. 

It was a big day for Father Igna- 
tius, a renewed proof of the esteem 
and affection in which his fellow 
Passionists hold him, and of the mer- 
ciful kindness of his Divine Master. 
The day is over now, as the first 
fifty years of his priesthood and the 
first fifty-seven of his Passionist life 
are over and past — stored in Eterni- 
ty. They have been, as Father empha- 
tically stated, most happy years. i4 I 
tell you, if Almighty God were to 



say to me on this day of Jubilee 
that He wanted me to start over 
again and go for fifty-seven years 
more, and would give me my choice 
of a religious vocation in life, I 
would reply: For fifty-seven years I 
have loved my Passionist vocation, 
and I love it still! I love the habit 
I've worn through all those years. 
I want to cling to it! What I 
ask of You, my God, is that You give 
me the grace to be faithful to You — 
and then, in Your own good time, 
just call me home." 

Of course we couldn't let our dis- 
tinguished jubilee guest, Bishop 
O'Gara, leave Des Moines without 
giving us an account of his experi- 
ences in Red China. Although he is 
a very busy man indeed, His Excel- 
lency graciously agreed to do so. 
His talk to the community was, to 




St. Gabrile's public Chapel where Fr. Ignatius' Golden 
Jubilee Mass was offered. 



28 



put in in one word, an eye-opener. 
It certainly started many of us to 
thinking — and praying harder than 
ever. 

Father Miles and Brother Edwin 
combined forces to prepare a very 
fitting gift for the Golden Jubilari- 
an. Above Father's special altar in 
the choir sacristy they arranged a 
Passionist mission cross against a 
beautiful crimson back-drop. It must 
certainly have brought tears to Fa- 
ther Ignatius' eyes as he celebrated 
his Mass there the morning of the 
twenty-second, and recalled the many 
times he had preached before a like 
image of his Crucified Master. The 
arrangement was originally intended 
as a more temporary decoration for 
the jubilee days, but it turned out 
to be so impressive that it has been 
made a permanent fixture. 

"Carry me, Christ, on the Cross, 
which is salvation to the wanderers, 
sole rest for the wearied, wherein 
alone is life for those who die." 
—St. Ambrose, In Ps., 118, XXII, 30. 




Altar where Fr. Ignatius offered his 

private Jubilee Mass September 

22nd, 1954. 



ACTA CURIAE GENERALIS 



Letter from the Vatican Secretariate 

of State 

to 

Most Reverend Father General 

(Free and private translation) 

The Vatican, June 15th, 1954 
I have the honorable appointment 
from His Holiness to make known to 
Your Paternity His great pleasure 
at receiving your message on the 
occasion of the Solemn Canonization 



of Saint Pius X in which mention 
was made of the benevolent rela- 
tions the new Saint had with the 
Congregation of the Passionists. 

The memorable words spoken by 
the Grand Pontiff to the Capitular 
Fathers in 1914, which you mention 
in your letter, may well be recorded 
by the Congregation as a spiritual 
testament and norm of perfection 
and His Holiness is desirous to make 



29 



them His own as a new exhortation 
and encouragement. 

I have furthermore the pleasure 
to express the sincere gratitude of 
His Holiness for the offer you have 
made of help from the members of 
your Congregation for the works of 
the ministry in favor of souls, espe- 
cially in the outskirts of Rome where 
a particular need is felt for a mce 
careful religious assistance. Informa- 
tion of this act of devotedness on 
your part to the Bishop of Rome has 
been handed on to His Eminence the 
Cardinal Vicar of Rome, who shares 
with the Holy Father the grave re- 
sponsibilities and pastoral cares of 
this Holy City; this offer has been a 
source of consolation and comfort. 

With these paternal sentiments 
the August Pontiff imparts to Your 
Paternity and to all the Religious 
and to all the works of the Congrega- 
tion, the Apostolic Blessing. 

I gladly take this occasion to ex- 
press my devotedness to Your Pa- 
ternity. 

Sincerely in the Lord, 
G. B. Montini, Prosecretary. 



Letter of Most Reverend Father 

General 

to 

The Holy Father 

(Private and free translation) 

Rome, June 8th, 1954. 
Most Holy Father, 
The Solemn Canonization of Your 
Holiness' august Predecessor Pius X 
has filled with joy the entire Cath- 
olic world, which sees not only the 
meek and mighty Pontiff, now 
crowned with the aureola of Sanc- 
tity, but also the Roman Pontificate, 



instituted by Jesus Christ as the bul- 
wark of faith and the guide of souls 
in the way of salvation, resplendent 
with brilliant light. 

And for this reason, Most Holy 
Father, I, in the name of the entire 
Congregation of the Passionists, pre- 
sent to your Holiness our most sin- 
cere thanks and congratulations. 

Saint Pius X who at the beginning 
of this century with his farseeing 
enactments and especially by empha- 
sizing the Holy Eucharist as the true 
font of salvation and happiness both 
temporal and eternal for clergy and 
laity, will ever be for all a bright 
and wonderful example for imita- 
tion. 

For us Passionists, so loved and 
favored by the Holy Pontiff, the re- 
membrance of the solemn words 
which He addressed to the Capitular 
Fathers during an audience granted 
May 19th, 1914, will ever be most 
dear: Observe the Rule, because in 
the Rule there is order and in order 
there is peace, and in peace there is 
God and in God is every good. 

In these sad and menacing times, 
Holy Father, may the thought of 
having a mighty Intercessor in heaven 
be of great comfort to You. And we 
on our part will beg of Him that He 
may second the desire and the in- 
cessant cares of Your Holiness to 
remove atheistic Communism from 
the world and the danger of new 
and terrible conflicts. 

And knowing quite well the par- 
ticular preoccupation of your Holi- 
ness regarding the advancement of 
communism in the city of Rome and 
particularly in the outskirts of the 
city I feel obliged to put at the dis- 



30 



posal of Your Holiness all the Pas- 
sionist Religious for the works of 
the ministry in favor of souls, as 
Your Holiness will deem opportune 
to institute. 

Imploring the Apostolic Blessing 
upon myself and our entire Congre- 
gation I prostrate myself at Your 
feet and confess myself 

most devotedly and obediently 

Malcolm of Mary 

General C.P. 



Number 93 of our Holy Rule was 
the object of a petition to the Holy 
See by our Most Reverend Father 
General in 1952. The respective num- 
ber of the Rule speaks about the 
land property in connection with our 
Retreats, its uses and the prohibi- 
tion of selling the superfluous pro- 
duce. The Sacred Congregation of 
Religious empowered our Father 
General to dispense certain phases 
of number 93 of the Rule in favor 
of Retreats where there was a neces- 
sity to do so, until the next General 
Chapter. Vide Acta Congregationis, 
July 1954, Number 10, pages 324 
and 325. 



The renewal of the faculties, 
enumerated in the appendix of our 
"Privilege Book" was announced for 
another three years as of June 19, 
1954. The faculties as granted are 
reprinted on pages 326, 327 and 328 
of the Acta Congregationis, July 
1954, Number 10. 



On August 14th, 1954 the Sacred 
Congregation of Religious gave our 
Most Reverend Father General the 
authority to suppress our Retreat of 



Our Lady of Good Counsel in St. 
Louis and with a second letter of the 
same date granted the permission to 
canonically erect a retreat in War- 
renton, Mo. On August 15th, 1954, 
Most Reverend Father General graci- 
ously put the Rescripts into effect, 
("executioni mandavit"). 



The statistical chart of the Acta 
Congregationis (September 1954 p. 
383) gives the following totals for 
January 1st, 1954: Priests: 2,340; Pro- 
fessed Students: 564; Brothers: 623; 
Total membership of Professed mem- 
bers: 3,527; Novices 217; Prep Stu- 
dents: 1,692; Retreats: 184; missions: 
1,739; other public ministries: 3,717; 
closed retreats: 2,785. These figures 
show an increase in the year 1953 
to 1954: Priests: 17; Professed Stu- 
dents 11; Brothers: 2; Professed 
members: 30; Novices: 21; Prep Stu- 
dents: 43; Retreats: 4; Closed Re- 
treats: 467. A decrease in the num- 
ber of Missions was shown (9) and 
in other Public Ministries (969). The 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross 
showed the highest number of priests 
(404) with the Province of the Holy 
Cross next highest (209); Province 
of St. Paul of the Cross also had the 
highest number of Professed Stu- 
dents (93) with Province of Holy 
Cross in the 3rd place (39); Province 
of the Sacred Heart having second 
place with (70); Province of the Sac- 
red Heart also has the highest num- 
ber of Brothers (78) with the Pro- 
vince of St. Paul of the Cross in the 
6th place (38) and the Province of 
Holy Cross in the 8th place (36); Pro- 
vince of St. Paul of the Cross holds 



31 



the highest place in the total of pro- 
fessed members (535) with the Pro- 
vince of the Holy Cross in 3rd place 
(284); Province of the Sacred Heart 
has second place with 306 members. 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross has 
the highest number of Novices (27); 
Province of Holy Cross holds 10th 
place (10) with the Province of Lady 
of Holy Hope (10). Province of St. 
Gabriel holds the highest number of 
Prep Students (170). Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross holds 12th place 
with 82; Province of Holy Cross 
holds 13th place with 70; Fifteen 
is the highest number of Retreats 
any Province has (Immaculate Heart 
and Holy Family). Next comes the 
Province of the Presentation with 
14; next comes the Provinces of St. 
Paul of the Cross and Sorrowful 
Mother with 12 Retreats; Holy Cross 
Province, together with the Provin- 
ces of Pieta, St. Joseph, Heart of 
Jesus and Precious Blood with 11 
Retreats. St. Paul of the Cross Pro- 
vince holds the first place in the 
number of Missions given and Re- 
treats (public and private) conduct- 
ed with the Province of Holy Cross 
in the second place. 



will remember Brother as the 
Brother who so faithfully took care 
of the coffee room for many a year. 



Sts. John and Paul 

On December 29th, 1954, Brother 
Casimir, C.P., celebrated the 50th 
anniversary of his profession as a 
Passionist Brother. He is one of the 
first fruits of the Passionist Foun- 
dation in Poland, by Fr. Bartolomeo, 
C.P. Holy Mass was celebrated in 
the Holy Founder's Chapel with all 
the Community attending. Many Fa- 
thers who spent some time in Rome 



Most Reverend Father General of- 
fered a Solemn Mass early in Janu- 
ary commemorating the 25th anni- 
versary of his ordination to the 
priesthood. The disquieting rumor 
about Father General having been 
in an accident has been verified to 
the extent that, thanks be to God, it 
was only a slight accident. His Pa- 
ternity, as far as can be noticed, is 
showing no effects of the shake-up 
on December 14th. 



Our Fathers in Rome participated 
in two formal visits to St. Mary Ma- 
jors Basilica in Rome as part of the 
Marian Year celebrations in Eternal 
City. The first occasion was April 
36th, 1954 and was visualized as a 
pilgrimage of all the General Curias 
of Religious. At least two of each 
General Curia were expected to be 
present. Our Congregation was repre- 
sented by Very Rev. Fathers Sebas- 
tian, III General Consultor, Paul 
Francis, IV General Consultor, Al- 
fred, Procurator General and Hya- 
cinth, Secretary General. The other 
celebration, November 19th, was a 
joint one of some 150 Passionists 
and about 100 Redemptorist Fathers. 
A Redemptorist Father preached the 
sermon and our Most Reverend Fa- 
ther General had the Solemn Bene- 
diction, closing the Holy Hour in 
the Borghese Chapel, at the altar 
where our Holy Founder made the 
vow to spread devotion to the Pas- 
sion of our Lord and where our pres- 
ent Holy Father offered his first Holy 



32 



Mass. The harmony music for the oc- 
casion was taken care of by the Pas- 



sionist Students under the able di- 
rection of Father Stanislaus, C.P. 



SCALA SANCTA 



A solemn Triduum was held in 
Scala Sancta from September 17th 
to 20th, 1954 commemorating the 
hundredth anniversary of receiving 
the sacred edifice from His Holiness 
Pope Pius IX. Every day of the Tri- 
duum Bishops honored the occasion 
by preaching and offering the Holy 
Sacrifice. History tells us that the 
sacred place had been in a rather 
neglected condition and Pope Pius 
IX wished that it be taken care of 
by a religous body of men devoted 
to the Passion of our Lord. Thus it 
was that it was given to the Passion- 
ists. His Holiness Pius IX directly 



assisted in conditioning the place for 
a Passionist Monastery. It will be re- 
membered that Scala Sancta is espe- 
cially known for the Papal chapel 
most rich in relics, for the most an- 
icent picture of the Saviour, and for 
the Holy Steps upon which, accord- 
ing to tradition, our Lord ascended 
to the court of Pilate. As many as 
30,000 faithful ascended these steps 
on Good Friday, 1923, when an ap- 
proximate count was taken. The 
religious of Scala Sancta published a 
very attractive and informative 
pamphlet commemorating this cen- 
tenary. 



PROVINCE OF HOLY CROSS 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
RETREAT 

(Chicago) 

Our Chicago community was sin- 
gularly privileged and blessed in hav- 
ing three of its members observe 
joyous silver jubilee of ordination on 
December 22nd. The happy Jubilari- 
ans are: Very Rev. Fr. Camillus 
Kronlage, Rector of our Community; 
Rev. Fr. Alan Pendergast; Rev. Fr. 
Kennetn Ward. 

Since so many of the brethren 
would be engaged in Christmas work 
on the anniversary date itself, those 
in charge of the celebration decided 
to anticipate the day honoring our 
good Fr. Rector. The other two Jubi- 



larians, whilst participating to some 
extent in this first celebration, are 
to be given individual days of honor 
at a later and more suitable time. 

On December 20th, Very Rev. Fr. 
Camillus celebrated the Solemn High 
Mass of Jubilee, assisted by his class- 
mates, Frs. Alan and Kenneth as 
Deacon and Sub-deacon respectively. 
Fr. Clarence Vowels, another class- 
mate, was the Master of Ceremonies. 
Fathers Gregory Joseph and John 
Baptist, former students of the Cele- 
brant and present members of his 
community, were acolytes of the 
Mass. Brothers George and Joachim 
were Thurifers. Rev. Fr. Francis Fla- 
herty Vicar of our Community, 



33 



was a miniature Altar, with mensa, 
chalice, paten and host, Missal and 
stand, Cruets and lavabo dish all 
carved beautifully and most meticu- 
lously from pure white Stereo-foam. 
This artistic work, together with the 
stained-glass windows, was the work 
of our gifted Confr. Casimir Gra- 
lewski. 

As though all this were not al- 
ready suficient, our good Students 
had prepared several songs in har- 
mony to add to the pleasure of our 
festive dinner. During the dinner it- 
self, served so well by the Students, 
Father Vicar once again expressed 
the community's congratulations and 
then called upon the good Fr. Rector 
for a few words. In his speech, Father 
Rector expressed his heartfelt grati- 
tude to all who helped him along 
the years in his vocation to the 
priesthood. His parents, his early com- 
panions, his directors, his classmates, 
his brethren — all these were grate- 
fully mentioned as having made this 
joyous day possible. 

After dinner, Father Raphael 
Grasshof, C.P., said a few words 
honoring his fellow priest and relig- 
ious from "the greatest state in the 
Union." For those readers who might 
differ with Fr. Raphael about said 
state, we better mention that it's 
Louisiana. Father Raphael's pleas- 
antries added much to the enjoy- 
ment of the brethren and his serious 
thoughts added much to the signifi- 
cance of this happy silver jubilee of 
a priest. 

The Buffet Supper in the recrea- 
tion room deserves a special mention 
also since it was followed by a choral 
program by the Students. Since our 



ailing Father Aurelius Hanley had 
missed the songs at dinner, these 
were repeated for his enjoyment to- 
gether with several new selections. 
All in all, the students sang, Oh Su- 
sanna; Kentucky Babe; The Whip- 
penpoof Song; You'll never walk 
alone; The Birthday of a King; 'Twas 
the Night before Christmas; and by 
special request of the brethren, Ave 
Maria. 

The Passionist Fathers were well 
represented at the 16th National Con- 
vention of the Catholic Student's 
Mission Crusade held at the Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame, August 26 - 29. 
His Excellency, Bishop Cuthbert, 
C.P., was present and in the "Con- 
vention Personalities" he was men- 
tioned as the second former member 
of the Catholic Students' Mission 
Crusade to have been appointed a 
missionary Bishop. His Excellency 
addressed the students at the Asia 
Area Meeting. Due to limited time, 
he spoke very briefly about the reali- 
ty of Communism. Many students ex- 
pressed their disappointment at not 
being privileged to hear Bishop 
Cuthbert relate his personal experi- 
ences. 

The University Gymnasium held 
the mission exhibits. Fifty-seven 
mission-sending-orders were repre- 
sented. The simplicity and good taste 
of the Passionist booth won praise 
from teachers and students. Holding 
the central place in our booth was 
a display of the Passionist life spring- 
ing from Calvery. Brother Charles, 
C.P. (now "de familia" in Louisville) 
prepared his display. The art work 
was considered exceptional; it con- 
tains four oil paintings. 



36 



The vocational Directors, Frs. Jor- 
dan and Simon have now their head- 
quarters in St. Louis Retreat; they 
left Chicago during the first days 
of last September. 

Our Community of Immaculate 
Conception Retreat helped swell the 
immense crowd on September 8th to 
honor the Blessed Mother in Chica- 
go's Soldier's Field. Both secular and 
religious papers carried the accounts 
of the 260,000 faithful and clergy 
that tried to enter the Field for the 
Pontifical Mass celebrated by His 
Eminence Samuel Cardinal Stritch. 

September 13th was the day of 
departure of Fathers Firmian, Paul 
Mary and Barry for their stay in the 
eternal city. 



Each Sunday during the month of 
October (1954) Very Rev. Father 
Gordian gave a radio talk on Station 
WFJL. The series was called "The 
Kingdom of God," and was based on 
the parables. On the last Sunday of 
the month the topic was in harmony 
with the Feast, Christ the King. 




Also Father Francis, C.P., our Vi- 
car, has been giving a number of 
lectures. His theme was Communism, 
with which he came into personal 
contact; and his audiences were var- 
ious parish K. of C. groups and also 
the Reserve Officer's Squardron in 
Chicago. 



The required examinations in pre- 
paration for Minor Orders were taken 
at Mundelein, December 1st by our 
12 students here. These examinations 
were followed by the regular tri- 
mester exams in the Retreat. On De- 
cember 5 the clerics started the 
three day retreat in preparation for 
the Minor Orders. His Excellency, 
Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., conferred the 
Tonsure on the evening of Decem- 
ber 7th and the four Minor Orders 
on all the clerics December 8th in 
the public Monastery Chapel. The 
same day the Bishop also received 
the final profession from Brother 
Joachim, C.P. That same evening His 
Excellency conferred the Sacrament 
of Confirmation upon 300 children in 
Immaculate Conception Church. 



In the early part of October 
Brother Felix underwent a major op- 
eration in Resurrection Hospital; up 
to date, he recovered nicely. 



Cfr. Sebastion, professed August 26th 
and Brother Robert, professed Aug- 
ust 15th. 



A bit late, but for the sake of the 
record, last May 31st, Fr. Vincent 
Ehinger, C.P., had the honor of being 
celebrant of the solemn High Mass 
in his home parish, Decatur, Indiana, 
on the occasion of the Dedication of 
the new church by Archbishop Noll. 



37 




Fr. Vincent Ehinger, C.P., celebrant at the Solemn Dedication Mass of the 
new parish church at his home, Decatur, Ind. 



Funeral services for Mr. Vaitekai- 
tis, father of Fr. Leopold, were held 
October 6th in our public chapel. 
Father Leopold was celebrant of the 
Mass and the students formed the 
choir. 



The eve of Thanksgiving Day was 
chosen as the day for the Marian 
Symposium, as part celebration of the 
Marian Year. The audience had the 
privilege of hearing four well pre- 
pared papers on the Blessed Mother 
and also some good singing. THE 
PASSIONIST intends, as occasion 
offers, to publish these papers. 



HOLY CROSS RETREAT 

(Cincinnati) 
The two new 50 h.p.r. copper tub- 
ing Bryan boilers, on the way since 
last summer, have at last been in- 
stalled. They replace the old boiler 
in use since the building of the 
house. Because of the delay two of 



the week-end retreats had to be can- 
celled. Heat was promised for Fri- 
day afternoon, November 5th, so the 
usual retreat was held, however the 
boilers were not functioning until 
one o'clock the next afternoon. The 
change in the weather gave the 
bretheren ample opportunity for 
mortification during the last two 
weeks in October and the first week 
of November. 

On October the tenth the annual 
Holy Name parade took place 
through the streets of Cincinnati to 
Crosley Field. An estimated forty to 
fifty thousand men and boys marched 
in the parade accompanied by sev- 
eral dozen bands and fife and drum 
corps. The delegations from Holy 
Cross and the Immaculata parishes 
marched in traditional style from the 
top of Mt. Adams to the heart of 
town where they joined with other 
parish units. 



38 



The hospitality of Holy Cross 
Monastery to itinerent vagabonds 

and local derelicts is famous through- 
out the city. During one retreat this 
fall the group of retreatants while 
standing outside near the refectory 
door were joined by one such visitor. 
Unnoticed he joined the group dur- 
ing the meal and was not detected 
until toward the end of the meal 
when Fr. Wilfrid noticed a new "re- 
treatant" sitting at the rector's table. 
Afterwards the fellow explained 
that he thought all the men waiting 
outside before the bell rang were 
looking for an "hand-out" such as 
he. When it was explained to him 
what a retreat is he was all for stay- 



ing and finishing it with the men, 
but was persuaded to come back an- 
other time. 



On the day before Thanksgiving 
Day we were honored by a visit from 
Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara who was in- 
vited here to address the Holy Cross 
Retreatants league at their annual 
Thanksgiving Mass. This year Arch- 
bishop Alter gave permission for an 
evening Mass which was celebrated 
in St. Mary's Church. Eleven hun- 
dred men joined hearts and voices 
in the Missa recitata celebrated by 
Bishop Issenmann, Auxiliary Bishop 
of Cincinnai. Bishop O'Gara spoke 
earnestly to his attentive audience of 




New Boilers at Holy Cross Monastery, November, 1954. 



39 



the utter impossibility of coexistance 
with Communism. 



The Fifth Synod of the Archdio- 
cese of Cincinnati was held here 
from November 30 to December 14. 
The Preliminary session took place 
at Mt. Saint Mary Seminary, the Sol- 
emn Session at Saint Monica Cathe- 
dral. Very Rev. Fr. Gilbert, Rector 
of Holy Cross and Fathers Cyprian 
and Bernard Mary were among the 
"synodales." Father Cyprian served 
on the committee for Religious in 
preparatory meetings before the 
synod. This Synod, the first in the 
Archdiocese in thirty-four years, 
served the purpose of formulating 
and having adopted by the Arch- 
bishop many spiritual and temporal 
matters for the welfare of the arch- 
diocese. 



On December the eighth for the 
closing of the Marian year Father 
Alphcnsus spoke at the Immaculate 
Church. It was another unique oc- 
casion for our beloved octogenarian. 
Father Alphonsus, a native of the 
parish, spoke in this same Church 
fifty years ago for the Golden Jubi- 
lee of the declartion of the Dogma 
of the Immaculate Conception. 



Very Rev. Father Provincial held 
the annual visitation here during the 
week before Christmas. While here 
Father Provincial discussed the plans 
for the renovation of the monastery 
with Mr. McDonald the architect. 
The plans for the enlargement of the 
retreat facilities will not be ready 
till the middle of January, and the 
bids for the work will not be in till 



the middle of February, so it will 
no doubt be Easter before the work 
is underway and any community 
changes take place. 



The work on the elevator for the 

retreatants use only have already 
begun. It is being installed at the 
rear of the house in the patio behind 
the fish pond and B.V.M. statue, and 
will run from the first to the third 
floors, only. While the frames for 
the concrete are now being set up 
the Otis elevator itself will take 18 




Holy Cross tower under 
repair, 1954. 



40 



weeks to be made and another 12 
weeks to install. 



On December 3 a group of men 
from St. John's, Deer Park, broke the 
attendance record to date, with 51 
men on retreat. 

The Fathers and brothers of Holy 
Cross Monastery joyfully joined with 
Edgar Ryan, C.P., in the silver jubi- 
lee celebration of his priesthood. Fr. 
Edgar celebrated Solemn High Mass 
at St. Francis De Sales Church on 
Wednesday morning, December 29th. 
Fr. Rector and Fr. Vicar assisted as 
Deacon and Sub-deacon, Fr. Edwin 
Ronan, C.P., preached eloquently of 
the priesthood and the fruits of it as 
experienced by Fr. Edgar in the past 
25 years. Ad. multos annos!! 




December 18 was the day of ordi- 
nation for the Fourth year Theology 
class here in Louisville. The Most 
Reverend Archbishop came to St. 
Agnes Church to perform the cere- 
mony. Those ordained were: Frs. 
Myron Gohmann, Denis McGowan, 
Albert Schwer, Eugene Peterman, 
Lawrence Browning, Bruce Henry, 



Berchmans Pettit, and Carl Anthony 
Tenhunfeld. Five Trappists from 
Gethsemani Abbey were ordained 
along with our students; two to the 
Holy Priesthood, and three to the 
subdiaconate. The Rt. Rev. Abbot 
James Fox, O.C.S.O. assisted at the 
ordination Mass. The eight new 
deacons had their first opportunity 
to exercise their order on the feast 
of Christmas, both in St. Agnes 
Church and in several of the nearby 
parishes. 



But the joys of Ordination day 
tempered by reports from Sts. Mary 
and Elizabeth Hospital that Brother 
Luke's condition was becoming very 
serious. During the fall, Brother 
Luke had to make frequent trips 
to the hospital for treatments, and 
toward the middle of November it 
was apparant that the sclerosis of 
the liver had progressed so far that 
it was only a matter of a short time 
till the condition would be fatal. Luke 
was determined to die standing up — 
and you would see shuffling along 
the first-floor corridor to the refec- 
tory, a used-up old man, now, with 
the light of life burning nowhere, 
almost, but in his eyes. For he never 
lost his keen wit, and ready chuckle. 
On Thanksgiving Day he was again 
taken to the hospital. The next few 
weeks showed a steady decline. He 
was anointed, and from then till his 
death some one from the monastery 
stayed with him. On December 21, 
about four in the morning, a call 
came, that Luke was dying. Frs. Rec- 
tor and Vicar hurried to the hospital. 
Brother passed away shortly after 
they arrived. Bro. Luke's funeral was 



41 



held on the 23 of December. Fr. Pro- 
vincial celebrated the solemn mass. 
Fr. Joseph Mary, C.P. preached a 
moving sermon on the hidden great- 
ness of our Brother's vocation — a 
sermon which the retiring and unas- 
suming Bro. Luke would have been 
very pleased to hear. 



a breakfast was held in the parlor for 
the families of the jubilarians. 



On December 22, upon Fr. Rector's 
invitation, Fr. Clarence, C.P. and Fr. 
Valentine, C.P. celebrated a solemn 
Mass of Jubilee for the 25th anniver- 
sary of their ordination. Fr. Joseph 
Mary, C.P. a former lector of the 
jubilarians was preacher for the oc- 
casion, and Fr. Conrad, C.P. also 
once their former lector was sub- 
deacon for the mass. After the mass 



Christmas saw a new-look in St. 
Agnes Church. The Delia Robbias 
around the sanctuary wall have been 
repainted, and in an expert, and 
tasteful way have kept to the genuine 
Delia Robbian style. Also all the 
marble of the altars have been 
cleaned and polishsd and a new light- 
ing arrangement installed in the 
sanctuary, with floodlights illuminat- 
ing the altar, the Delia Robbias and 
the ceiling. 



The new St. Agnes Convent is 

practically finished. An advance 
guard of four sisters has already 




Brother Luke (left) and Brother Louis. 



42 




During and after Ordination. Below, L. to R.: Fr. Slyvanus, Trappist, Frs. 

Alexius, C. P., Myron, Denis. Eugene, Lawrence, Bruce, Berchmans, Carl 

Anthony, Andrew, Vincent Mary. Extreme right. Most Rev. Archb. Floersh, 

ordaining Prelate, Dec. 18, 1954. 




43 




Above: newly ordained C. P. Deacons (Dec. 18, 1954) _ L to R: Frs. Denis, 
Lawrence, Albert, Berchmans, Mayron, Carl Anthony, Bruce, Eugene. 

Below: Most Rev. Abbot Fox with his three newly ordained Trappist Sub- 
deacons. 




44 




St. Agnes Convent in the making, now completed. 




New gym-auditorium rising aside of St. Agnes school. 



45 



•Him 



*I/V ■ 




Left: St. Agnes Convent: Right: Carmel Convent. 



moved in. And guard they are, for 
someone has already attempted to 
break into the new convent. The 
people of the parish have contributed 
rather generously to the furnishing 
of the convent, so that by January 
20 or so, all will be in readiness 
for the whole community. 



The Marian Year was observed in 
Loiusville and by the local commun- 
ty with special triduums for the im- 
portant Marian Feasts. At the clos- 
ing novena Father Quentin preached 
each evening. The closing day was 
observed by Evening Masses through- 
out the Archdiocese — the first time 
evening Mass was permitted in Louis- 
ville. The community took part in 
the Solemn Mass at St .Agnes at 6:30 
p.m. with a large crowd of the faith- 
ful in attendance. 



as ordered by the letter of Most 
Reverend Father General. They chose 
as the subject of their papers "Maria 
Filia Israel", showing Our Lady to 
be the perfect Israelite, and thus 
perfectly prepared to accept the 
promised Messias. The Symposium 
was held in the Professed Recreation 
which was fittingly decorated for the 
occasion and with almost the entire 
community present. The content of 
the four papers, their format and 
delivery indicated that the Students 
had worked hard and long on this 
Marian project. All came away with 
a better and deper appreciation of 
Our Lady's character as mirrored in 
the pages of the Old and New Testa- 
ments 



On Thanksgiving Eve the Students 
held their Marian Year Symposium, 



On January 13 Father Forrest be- 
gins a series of evening courses on 
the subject "For Happier Families" 
at Bellarmine College. 



46 




The Brethren may not have no- 
ticed in the Catholic Press that the 
Chancellor of the Archdiocese of 
Louisville, Father Charles Maloney, 
has been elected Auxilary Bishop of 
Louisville. 

The consecration ceremonies are 
to take place February 2nd in As- 
sumption Cathedral, Louisville. 



Brother Leo wielding four - foot 
wrench on new heating system (Vide 
THE PASSIONIST, Sept. '54, p. 446) 



Father Thomas became a patient 
in St. Joseph's Infirmary early in 
December; about the middle of Jan- 
uary it was judged necessary to have 
him transferred to the Mayo Bro- 




Brother Gabriel inspects new 500-gal. concrete wine vat made lately under 
his supervision. (Vide THE PASSIONIST, Sept. 1954, p. 446.) 



47 



thers Hospital in Rochester. About 
the same time that Fr. Thomas left 
St. Joseph's Fr. Regis had to be 
taken there and was operated on 
January 24th and was doing nicely 
after the operation. Also Father An- 
drew is a patient in St. Mary and 
Elizabthh's Hospital. 

From January 17th to 21st Father 
Provincial was here for the annual 
visitation. The close took place on 
the morning of January 21st after 
the Solemn High Mass in honor of 
St. Agnes. 

OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL 
RETREAT 

(St. Louis) 
On December 21 we observed the 
occasion of Fr. Edgar's Silver Jubi- 
lee of Ordination. This is, perhaps, 
the second time in the Prep's history 
that one of our priests, whose entire 
ministry has been consecrated prin- 
cipally to the work of teaching, was 
celebrated. In 1950 we observed the 
first such event with Fr. Herbert's 
Jubilee celebration. Fr. Edgar said 
the Jubilee Mass at 8:30 that morn- 
ing, at which Fr. Leo Patrick, the Di- 
rector of Students, glowingly de- 
scribed the work of the Passionist 
priest. Along with the special dinner 
on the occasion, there was also a fit- 
ting program presented by the Col- 
lege Students — those students whom 
Fr. Edgar is at present teaching. Fr. 
Rector, on behalf of the professed, 
and the dean of the Prep, on behalf 
of the boys, presented Fr. Edgar 
with material and spiritual gifts. AD 
MULTOS ANNOS! 



Since Rev. Fr. Valentine, the Su- 
perior of our Retreat House in Clay- 
ton, spent a good number of the 
years of his priesthood teaching here 
in the Prep, it was thought well to 
have the observance of his Silver Ju- 
bilee here. So, on December 18, be- 
fore a gathering of friends and the 
communties of both houses, Father 
Valentine celebrated his Jubilee 
Mass. Very Reverend Father Elmer, 
Rector of the Prep, tellingly and 
strikingly developed St. Paul's de- 
scription of the priest. May God 
grant Father many more fruitful 
years of his present ministry! 



On Saturday, January 8, the com- 
munity, together with a number of 
diocesan priests and members of the 
laity, assembled in the Seminary 
Chapel for the Solemn Funeral ser- 
vices of Reverend Father Bertrand, 
formerly stationed here at the Prep, 
and the last Passionist to be pastor 
of neighboring St. Ann's parish. The 
body of Father Bertrand arrived at 
the Seminary on Friday afternoon. 
It was met at the entrance to the 
chapel by the entire community. 
There, before the high altar, the 
body lay in state until the Requiem 
Mass at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. 
People of St. Ann's parish filed 
passed the casket and prayed for the 
repose of his soul. Fr. Provincial was 
the celebrant of the Solemn Funeral 
Mass, at which Very Rev. Fr. Con- 
leth, Rector of the Houston Retreat, 
preached on the missionary career 
of Father Bertrand. The Most Rev- 
erend Leo Byrne, D.D., Auxiliary 
Bishop of St. Louis presided at the 



48 



Mass, and gave the final absolution. 
Father Bertrand's body is in a vault 
at Calvary Cemetery, until our new 
cemetery on the property at Warren- 
ton is established. R.I. P. 

ST. FRANCIS DE HIERONYMO 
RETREAT 

(St. Paul, Kansas) 
Brother Phillip came back to us 
us from Houston last September the 
ninth — but only for a couple of 
days, as Brother was enroute to our 
retreat in Birmingham where he will 
be of great assistance all-around, 
especially to Father Joseph. While 
Brother Phillip was still here, Father 
Jordan stopped in for an overnight 
stay while on his way to Wichita in 
order to line up some schools for his 
vocational work. A week later, Fa- 
ther returned to give talks at Pitts- 
burg, Walnut, and Parsons, Kansas. 



since he had spent a couple of years 
here in this very monastery before 
the formation of separate Provinces. 



Our beloved Father Edward O'Sul- 
livan, who had been almost two 
months in Mt. Carmel Hospital, Pitts- 
burg, Kansas, for treatment and rest, 
returned to the Community on Sep- 
tember the seventeenth. Everyone 
noticed how much better Father was 
looking, and that he brought back all 
his usual good cheer and lively 
spirits. 



The day of Faher Edward's return 
was a day of double rejoicing: for, 
that same evening brought the ar- 
rival of one of our brethren from 
the eastern Province, Father Colum- 
ban Courtman, who came to share 
with us the joy of his golden jubi- 
lee for profession. It was also a bit 
of homecoming for the Jubilarian, 



Father Matthew had considerable 
difficulty weathering our record- 
breaking Summer heatwave. Even so. 
and plus the complication of having 
a cast on his broken wrist, Father 
pulled through — it might seem — 
by sheer will to live. Though, of 
course, a large factor in his recov- 
ery, was the almost constant help 
and attention given him by our Bro- 
ther Christopher. During the early 
part of October, just as Father was 
once again becoming a usual sight 
on Solitary Walk, a broken hip 
caused him to be taken to Mercy Hos- 
pital in Parsons where he had to un- 
dergo an operation. The fact that 
Father Matthew came through that 
operation at all attests to his almost 
proverbial iron constitution. But, now 
that the grand old Priest has baen 
on his back for more than two and 
a half months, he no longer cherishes 
his ambition of reaching 100 years. 
Though always cheerful, and spend- 
ing much of his waking hours in 
prayer, our senior Passionist of the 
Province is becoming weak from loss 
of appetite. Let us all remember him 
in our prayers. 



The eastern Province's Father Al- 
binus, who was stationed at Forbes 
Field, the Army Air Force Base near 
Topeka, came down to St. Paul for 
his usual monthly Day of Recollec- 
tion on October the eleventh. But, 
this time Father brought news that 
he would be able to come back only 
once again in November, as he was 



49 



recently notified of his transfer to 
the Far East. Father's presence was 
an inspiration and a friendliness that 
shall all miss. 



Father Jordan returned to St. Paul 
once again in order to conduct the 
high school retreat for the parish 
here. Reports were just what you 
would expect: Really good! 



The Novice clerics received a wel- 
come addition on November the sixth 
in the person of Michael Hoolahan, 
who had recently studied at Loyola 
University in his hometown of Chi- 
cago and then spent of few months 
at the Prep in St. Louis before join- 
ing the class. Mr. Hoolahan was given 
the name of Confrater Aloysius Mary. 
On December the seventh, Confrater 
received the holy habit. 



However, before December rolled 
around, the Novitiate spent a good 
part of November giving a "new 
look" to our barnyard and recrea- 
tional area. We had a bulldozer work 
for several hours leveling the ground 
around the recently constructed ten- 
nis court, grading the barnyard it- 
self, and smoothing off the pasture 
that has been serving as our ball- 
field. After that, the Novitiate crew 
spent several days discing, harrow- 
ing .. . plus resetting and rewiring 
about 150 fence posts. The change is 
quite noticeable and has brought 
many favorable comments from both 
members of the Community and visi- 
tors alike. 



Novices and Postulants gave a sym- 
posium in honor of the Marian Year. 
The entire program gave evidence 
to the Community of their devotion 
and abilities as well. 



Only one shadow fell across our 
calendar for November. On Novem- 
ber the third, our Father Leopold 
received the news that his father had 
died in Chicago. 



December 8th, besides being the 
closing day of the Marian Year, and 
the feast of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion, was a day of special joy for 
Brother Franics and the Communi- 
ty — It was the day of Brother's 
final profession. A rather large dele- 
gation of his relatives from Kansas 
City were on hand for the occasion; 
and, the Master, Very Rev. Fr. Faus- 
tinus, was celebrant at the Solemn 
Vespers and Profession Ceremony 
immediately following. His sermon 
will surely be long remembered by 
all who were present. 



Now we are having our Forty 
Hours Devotion in the midst of the 
customary Novena in preparation for 
the feast of Christmas. So, everyone 
here is looking forward to that great 
Feast and the bright hopes of the 
coming New Year. 



On the evening of November 21st, 
the feast of the Presentation, the 



ST. GABRIEL RETREAT 

(Des Moines) 
Last summer a local benefactor 
rang the front doorbell to ask an 
unusual favor. He was going to do- 
nate a record-player to Mercy Hos- 
pital here in Des Moines, and won- 
dered if we would record the fifteen 



50 



decades of the Rosary — so that the 
patients there could recite them "to- 
gether with the monks." It seemed 
an ideal way to spread and deepen 
devotion to Our Lady during this 
Marian Year. So we set about gather- 
ing suitable introductory matter, 
meditations, and music. The prayers 
are all recited in English, with ap- 
propriate English hymns sung by 
the student choir before each five 
decades: "Mother of Christ" for the 
Joyful mysteries, "O Come and 
Mourn" for the Sorrowful, "Hail, 
Holy Queen, Enthroned Above" for 
the Glorious; and at the end of each 
set of mysteries the simple Gregorian 
"Salve Regina." We finished record- 
ing on Rosary Sunday, and turned 
the results over to the benefactor. 
May Mary be honored by our efforts. 



Shortly after midnight November 
14 Father Brian's mother, Mrs. Mary 
Mahedy, passed away. The funeral 
was held in St. Theresa's Church, 
Des Moines, with Father Brian cele- 
brating the Solemn Requiem, assist- 
ed by very Reverend Father Gordian 
and Father John Mary. The students 
from the monastery sang for the 
Mass and burial, and a large part 
of the community was present for 
the services. 



A rather new approach in the line 
of vocational work was the panel 
discussion engineered last December 
by Father Thomas Thomas More and 
three of our students for the benefit 
of the Newman Club at Iowa State 
College. Over a hundred young col- 
lege students listened attentively, 
first to Father's talk on the general 



character and need of priestly and 
religious vocations, and then to the 
three students as each outlined 
briefly the story of his own voca- 
tion. When the discussion was op- 
ened to the floor, several intelligent 
and serious-minded questions were 
asked — a good indication that the 
audience had at least been listening 
to the talks. As a matter of fact, 
several young men remarked after- 
wards that they had profitted very 
much from the concrete and per- 
sonal presentation of a subject which 
had, they confessed, promised them 
a dull evening. This was the second 
such panel Father Thomas More has 
handled, the first being given by the 
same speakers last March at the 
Catholic Forum of St. Cecilia's 
Parish, Ames. At that time the au- 
dience was made up of parents, 
about forty-five of them. The results 
of the panels are, of course, quite 
difficult to measure. You can't ex- 
pect anyone to announce during the 
discussion that he is leaving for the 
seminary tomorrow morning. But 
these first two efforts seem to have 
borne fruit at least from an informa- 
tional angle: by making clear to the 
listeners what a vocation to ths 
priesthood or religious life is really 
like, and perhaps starting them 
thinking of its possibility in their 
own or their children's lives. 



In the early part of January 
Father Ignatius, Golden Jubilarian, 
was taken to the hospital for some 
minor ailments, but he recovered 
nicely and is back in the retreat 
again. 



51 



MATER DOLOROSA RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 

One of the most important news 
features of the last few months has 
been the annual Captain's Meeting 
for the Mater Dolorosa Laymen's Re- 
treat League. More than three hun- 
dred men were present on Septem- 
ber 26 for a chatty but instructive 
meeting conducted by that jovial M. 
C. Mr. Moon Mullins. After papers 
and reports were read regarding the 
retreat movement, the men put on 
a humorus but informative skit on 
how not to meet your quota of lay 
retreatants. Mr. Eddie Duckworth, 
the cook for the retreat house, served 
a fine corn-beef-and-cabbage dinner 
that all enjoyed, and the evening 
ended with some musical entertain- 
ment. 

The Mater Dolorosa Retreat House 
had more than 4000 retreatants in 
1954. The average for 45 week-end 
retreats was a shade over 76 men 
per week. Six regular Mid-week Re- 
treats brought 328 men, or nearly 
55 men each time. Mid-week Re- 
treats for high school students were 
attended by 298 boys. 



The Archdiocose of Los Angeles 
has given permission to preach the 
"Sign" so Fr. Brian is here organiz- 
ing things. The Pastors have given 
him a good reception, and Fr. 
Brian's hard work is bringing in 
quite a few requests for "Sign" 
preachers. 



There was a private Mid-night Mass 

in the monastery chapel for friends 
and benefactors of the Passionist 
Fathers. Fr. James Patrick was cele- 



brant; Fr. Gabriel was deacon; Fr. 
Isidore, sub-deacon. Fr. Pius was 
Master of Ceremonies, and Fr. Mau- 
rice preached a fine sermon. The 
choir of St. Francis parish, Los An- 
geles, provided very beautiful sing- 
ing for the occasion. 



On January 2nd, Fr. Eustace cele- 
brated his Silver Jubilee Solemn 
Mass in the monastery chapel. Fr. 
Charles was deacon, and Fr. Paul 
Francis was sub-deacon. Fr. Roland 
gave one one of his usually fine ser- 
mons on the wonderful vocation of 
a priest. 



December 30th brought the sad 
news of the sudden death of Mr. 
John White, Boston, a brother of Fr. 
Rector. R.I.P. 



ST. PAUL RETREAT 

(Detroit) 

Death came quietly and peacefully 
to Mrs. Elizabeth Westhoven, mother 
of our Father William Westhoven, 
C.P., at the age of 84, on December 
10th, at Liberty Center, Ohio. Every- 
one of our Fathers who had been 
priviledged in knowing her have at- 
tested to the saintliness of her life 
and to her valiant and courageous 
spirit. 

The solemn Requiem Mass had 
been celebrated on December 14th 
in the same parish Church were she 
had been baptized and lived her 
faith for eighty-four years. Father 
William, her own son, had been the 
celebrant of the Mass, assisted by 
Father Finnian Connolly, O.F.M., as 
deacon and her own nephew, and by 
Father Charles Ruess, her former 



52 



pastor at St. Patricks, as sub deacon, 
and by Father W. E. Wilson, Direc- 
tor of the Propagation of the Faith 
in the Toledo Diocese, as Master of 
Ceremonies. Mrs. Westhoven's ne- 
phews served the Mass. Bishop Cuth- 
bert O'Gara, C.P., presided in the 
sanctuary, assisted by Fr. Paul Ubin- 
ger, C.P., and Father Linus Lombard, 
C.P., who recently had been released 
from Communist China. The small 
Church had been filled with rela- 
tives, priests from the Toledo Dio- 
cese, former missionary companions 
in China, and many of the Detroit 
Community. Mother Gerald Barry, 
of the Dominican Sisters of Adrian, 
Michigan, with some of the Domini- 
can Sisters were present for the 
Mass. The overflow crowd remained 
in the recreational hall where a loud 
speaker carried the services. Father 
Clarence, C. P., gave an inspiring 
sermon evaluating and emphasizing 
her life as one of Christian and 
womanly Faith. 

After the interment in the ceme- 
tery an excellent luncheon had been 
prepared by the members of the 
Altar Society in the recreational 
hall. Everyone remarked that though 
they had been present in the time 
of bereavement the whole atmos- 
phere seemed to be tinged with a 
happy reunion festivity and a touch 
of gladness, just as she would want 
it in her life. We offer Father Wil- 
liam our condolences and prayers 
in the loss of his saintly mother. 



our Vicar, Father Ralph, C.P., and 
Father Daniel, C.P. Father Ralph, 
C.P. was the celebrant of the Mass, 
assisted by Father Daniel as deacon, 
Fr. Fidelis as sub-deacon, and Fr. 
Flannon as Master of Ceremonies. 
Fathers Roderick and Thadeus were 
the acolytes; and Father Harold was 
the Thurifer-Bearer. The silver 
jubilee banquet had been held in 
the recreation room and an old fash- 
ioned Passionistic recreation follow- 
ed in which everyone participated 
in the community singing and gaiety. 
We pray and ask God that the solid 
achievements of the past twenty-five 
years may be continued into the 
gleaming gold of fifty years in the 
priesthood. 



On the 22nd of December, a solemn 
Mass of gratitude was held in the 
monastery Chapel, on the occasion 
of the silver jubilee celebration of 



ST. JOSEPH REAREAT 

(Birmingham) 

The tiny chapel in St. Joseph's Re- 
treat was the scene of the Solemn 
Silver Jubilee Mass of Father Lam- 
bert, C.P. on December 22nd. The 
brethren from Ensley came up to 
the hill to help enhance the occasion. 
It, is probably one of the few times, 
if not the only time, that a solemn 
high mass was celebrated on "the 
hill", but the ocassion surely called 
for it: Twenty-five hard and fruit- 
ful years in the priesthood of Father 
Lambert called for something unique. 
Brother Philip served a fine break- 
fast after the Mass, which brought 
a nice homey atmosphere. We are 
also happy to say that at this writ- 
ing we are told that Father Joseph's 
physical condition is such that he 
could partake in the celebrations of 
the Jubilee as Rector of the Retreat. 

Soon after celebrating his Jubilee 



53 



Father Lambert started on a mis- 
sion tour that will keep him busy 
up to Easter. Ad multos annos! 



operating table January 4th to have 
an ulcer that has been troubling him 
for the past twenty years. 



HOLY NAME RETREAT 

(Houston) 

The big news from Houston at this 
time is the wonderful year just clos- 
ed for the laymen's retreats. We 
had hoped in spite of many obstacles 
that our attendance during our first 
year would reach the thousand mark. 
We far exceeded our goal. Eleven 
hundred and sixty-seven laymen and 
seventy-three priests made the spiri- 
tual exercises during 1954. Coopera- 
tion of both pastors and the men 
in the parishes was excellent. 

During the year many improve- 
ments on the grounds were made. 
The cottage was remodeled to house 
sixteen men and Father Dominic was 
appointed Assistant Retreat Director 
Practically every Parish in the Dio- 
cese is now organized with a Retreat 
Captain. It will still demand much 
hard work to recruit the weekend 
classes but the foundation has been 
laid for continued development. 



On December 27th, Father Ber- 
trand was taken to the hospital with 
what the brethren thought a case of 
acute indigestion; but Doctor Zeis 
immediately diagnosed it as a heart 
condition. He was put under oxygen, 
but as we know to no avail. He died 
January 5th. Funeral services were 
held in St. Louis and temporary in- 
terment made in a vault. 

Father Dominic, assistant Retreat 
Director, was scheduled to go on the 



IMMACULATE HEART RETREAT 

(Japan) 
All the Fathers, as far as we can 
judge are well and still studying 
"the language." Fathers Paul, Peter 
Claver and Clement at the Francis- 
can Language School in Tokyo, Fr. 
Matthew in Kyoto and Father Carl 
at "headquarters" in Hibarigaoka. 



But English is still useful. During 
August into September Fr. Matthew 
gave five Retreats to the Clergy: The 
Friars of the Atonement, American 
Franciscans (2), Army Chaplains and 
the Columban Fathers. Father Carl, 
during August had a Retreat for the 
Canadian Grey Sisters and the Aus- 
tralian Good Samaritans; in October 
to the Canadian Scaraborough For- 
eign Mission Society. Faher Carl gave 
the annual Community Retreat the 
week before Christmas; immediately 
after that he went to Yokohama to 
give a Retreat to the Irish Sisters 
of St. Maur, whilst Father Matthew 
gave a Retreat to the Sisters of St. 
Joseph (Wichita Kansas Province) 
in Kyoto. Tentative arrangements 
are being made by the Atonement 
Fathers for mission during Lent in 
their English speaking parish. In fact 
the demand for English preaching 
is so big that it could keep one man 
busy continually. 

Last October they had their first 
formal large-scale Retreat for Jap- 
anese Priests in the Immaculate 
Heart Retreat House. About twenty 
priests made the Retreat. Very Rev. 



54 




First group of overnight (5 days) retreatants in Immaculate Heart of Mary 

Retreat, Japan. University students (mostly non-Catholic from Kobe. Fr. 

Van Straelen (next to Fr. Carl) conducted the retreat. 



Fr. Tarte, O.P., a man of 25 years 
experience in Japan and Superior of 
the Canadian Dominicans in Japan 
was treat-master. During the recent 
war he had been with our own Fr. 
Edwin Ronan in Concentration Camp 
in Japan. Many old friends of Father 
Edwin make themselves known to 
our Fathers then many others who 
persued their studies in Rome came 
in contact with our Congregation, 
others again know of us through Re- 
treat Masters in the USA before they 
joined the foreign mission work. So, 



though we are few in Japan, we are 
fairly well known as a Congregation. 



A very high point in October was 
the visit of our Most Reverend Fa- 
ther General on his way to Rome 
from Australia. No one not in the 
foreign field can know what such a 
visit means. It is probably the first 
time that a Passmionist General vis- 
ited our establishments in the Orient. 
His Paternity also had the oppor- 
tunity to have an excellent visit with 
Father Anthony Maloney in China. 



55 



Besides Retreat work in Hibari,gao- 
ka the Fathers have established a 
Sunday School in connection with 
the church; some 50 to 60 children 
attend. 



By next summer the Fathers will 
also have charge of a parish in Ikeda. 
By this time the property will have 
been bought. "In Japan, all future 
parishes have to begin with a kinder- 
garten for which, as I understand it, 
there are many rules and laws re- 
garding locations etc. Gradually this 
Ilkeda property will be turned into 
a full-scale parish and there will be 
a complete "plant" there eventually. 
It will be only a parish; there is no 
intention of ever using it for a 
monastery etc." 



There are about 100,000 souls with- 
in limits of this coming parish 
among whom there are about 100 
Catholics. The Fathers are pleased 
with the property purchased: it is 
near the center of the town, near the 
electric train station. There is a 
house on the property which can be 
converted into a temporary chapel 
with rooms upstairs for the priest. 



OUR CHAPLAINS 

St. Louis Cathedral in La Rochelle 
was the scene of an impressive dedi- 
cation ceremony, when a statue of 
Our Lady of Fatima became a per- 
manent fixture of the historic 18th 
Century church on Place de Verdun. 

The huge Cathedral was filled to 
capacity with French and American 




Shopping section in Ikeda, Japan. 



56 




New C. P. Parish in Ikeda, Japan. 



worshippers who came not only to 
pray, but to wittness the dedication 
of the statue, made possible by the 
contributions of American military 
personnel stationed in the La Ro- 
chelle area. 

Truly bilingual, the ceremony be- 
gan with the humming of "The Star 
Spangled Banner" and "La Marseil- 
laise" by the Les Petits Chanteurs 
au Lys de France (The Little Singers 
to the French Lily.) 

Chaplain (Major) Kenny E. Lynch, 
Assistant Command Chaplain, speak- 
ing first, stated: "The statue was 
materialistic proof of spiritual 
thought and a constant reminder of 
French-American understanding." 

Archpriest Jean Marie Salaun 



thanked the Americans for a "Won- 
derful addition to our Cathedral" 
and summed it up as a "Grand occa- 
sion." 

Following the dedication prayer 
and the ceremouy at the high altar, 
the procession, led by members of 
the Basec Honor Guard carrying the 
flags of the two countries, proceeded 
to the Altar of the Annunciation for 
the blessing of the Statue. 

The ceremonies were brought to a 
close with the Solemn Benediction of 
the Blessed Sacrament. 

At the foot of the altar, an Amer- 
ican soldier stood guard. Resplendent 
in his Honor Guard uniform he sym- 
bolized what all free men have 
fought for through the ages — the 



57 




Father Kenny, C. P. together with Archpriest Jean Marie Salaun places 

statue in St. Louis Cathedral, October 20th, 1954. The statue was bought 

with donations given by American military personnel. 



58 




Blessing of B. Mother Statue in the St. Louis Cathedral, La Rochelle, France, 
under the auspices of Father Kenny, C.P. 



right to worship in their chosen 
faith. 

Father Kenny says the above 
writeup is a very weak description 
of the tremendous demonstration of 
faith that took place in that Cathe- 
dral . 



OUR PARISHES 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 

CHURCH 

(Chicago) 
On December 8, 1954, Confirma- 
tion was administered to the Golden 
Jubilee Class, so called because of 
the Golden Jubilee of the establish- 
ment of the Parish by our Fathers. 



The Sacrament was administered by 
His Excellency, Bishop Cuthbert O'- 
Gara. There were 250 in the Class, 
together with 40 adults, many of 
whom were Converts to the Faith. 
After the services, a dinner was 
served to the visiting Diocesan 
Clergy in the Church Hall. The din- 
ner was served by the Ladies of the 
Altar and Rosary Soc. and the Mo- 
ther's Club. 

The Golden Judilee Mass was a 
Solemn Pontifical Mass offered by 
Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara at 12:15 on 
December 12th. At the 50th Anni- 
versary Mass the Bishop preached, 
having been first introduced to the 



59 



Congregation by Fr. Richard C. P., 
the Pastor. Knights of Columbus 
and Holy Name Soc. formed a Guard 
of Honor for His Excellency. 

The Chalice used at the Mass was 
especially made for the occasion. It 
was made by the Beaugrand Co. of 
Montreal, Canada. The materials 
used for the Chalice were entirely 
of the gold and precious stones do- 
nated by members of the Parish. 
There was enough gold so that the 
Cup of the Chalice and the Paten 
were of solid gold. At the base of 




Chalice made of donations of parish- 
oners of Immaculate Conception Par- 
ish, Norwood Park, 111. used the first 
time during Golden Jubilee Mass of 
Parish. Notice reflections of dia- 
monds at base. 



the chalice there is a beautiful Cross 
made of the diamonds donated by 
the people. 

Very Reverend Father Provincial 
was Arch-priest of the Mass; Frs. 
Benet and Barnabas were Deacon 
and Subdeacon; V. Rev. Fr. Rector 
and Fr. Augustine (one time pastor 
of the parish) were Deacons of 
honor; Fr. Brendan Boyle, C. P. was 
first Master of Ceremonies and Fr. 
Clyde, second. 

His Excellency in his sermon de- 
veloped and enlarged on the history 
of the parish and expressed hope 
that soon a fitting church in honor 
of the Mother of God would be the 
Parish's pride. 



The new convent of the Immacu- 
late Conception is now completed; 
Father Richard offered the first 
Holy Mass in its chapel on Christmas 
day. The cost of the convent is esti- 
mated at some 170,000 dollars. 

IMMACULATA CHURCH 

(Cincinnati) 

The improvements on the shrine 
church are still being carried on. 
Recently the tin work on the roof 
was renewed, and now a fine storm 
fence has been erected to replace 
the old battered wooden fences 
around the side of the church; and 
a protective fence in front of the 
famous crucifix at the side has been 
set up. 

Shortly before Christmas a new 
confessional was installed into the 
church; much study was given to its 
construction along every detail of 
measurement and was constructed 
right on the spot; it is an outstand- 



60 




'^mm.......... 

New six-room addiion to Immaculate Conception School, Norwood Park, 111. 



ing addition to the church. The same 
is to be said of the new pulpit in- 
stalled some time earlier. 

At the closing of the Marian Year 

Fr. Cyprian, the pastor, estimated 
that some 85,000 (not counting those 
attending Holy Mass) had visited 
the shrine during the year. 455 
group pilgrimages were counted, 
distributed as follows: Parish 
groups, 63; Retreat men groups, 48; 
Grade Schools, 190; High Schools, 
123; Sodalities, 31; Groups of Sis- 
ters, 68. 

HOLY CROSS CHURCH 

(Cincinnati) 
The annual Fall Festival was held 
here on November 14th and was a 
fine success considering the scarsity 
of money and jobs at the present 
time. 



On December 5th the youth of 
the parish under the auspices of the 
Young Catholic Adults Club had a 
day of recollection here in the 
church and school. It was a Marian 
Year activity in preparation for the 
feast of the Immaculate Conception. 



The weekly Monday night Novena 

Devotions to St. Gabriel, long famous 
here in the city in previous years 
have been resumed. It is hoped that 
the devotion to St. Gabriel will do 
much for the spiritual formation of 
the people especially the youth. The 
weekly novena services were started 
nine weeks before the feast in Feb- 
ruary. 



With the closing of St. Philo- 
mena's church and the Marionite 
Church for the new highway exten- 
sion on Columbia Parkway the par- 



61 



ish boundaries have been extended 
from Baum Street to Kemper Lane. 

HOLY FAMILY CHURCH 

(Ensley) 
The new office is now in working 
order. But the costs have made it 
impossible to start work on the new 
High school; in the meantime the 
Holy Family Hi is being partly 
housed in the new addition to the 
grammar school. About 200 children 
had to be turned away from en- 
rolling in Holy Family School and 
also quite a few at Fairfield, St. 



Mary's. Requests for enrollment 
started last June. 



With the "new" law in force it was 
possible for several auto loads of 
Holy Name men from Holy Family 
and St. Mary's take part in the state- 
wide Holy Name Convention in Mo- 
bile, Alabama. 



Father Ludger is a very busy man; 
from just the mail angle: On Decem- 
ber 6th he was the recipient of 2300 
pieces of mail. 



Province of St. Paul of The Cross 



BISHOP CUTHBERT'S TWEN- 
TIETH ANNIVERSAARY. On Oc- 
tober 28, 1934, His Excellency, Most 
Reverend Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., 
D.D. was consecrated a bishop in 
the Cathedral of Hankow, China by 
the Most Reverend Mario Zanin, at 
that time Apostolic Delegate to 
China. On the twentieth anniversary 
of his consecration, October 28, 1954, 
Bishop Cuthbert commemorated the 
happy event in the midst of his 
Passionist brethren at St. Michael's 
Monastery, Union City, N. J. This 
was strictly a Passionist family 
event, the public celebration of the 
anniversary taking place on the fol- 
lowing Sunday, October 31, the 
Feast of Christ, the King. 

On the occasion of the community 
celebration, Bishop Cuthbert was 
surrounded not only by the members 
of St. Michael's community, but by 
many of the brethren from Jamaica 



and Riverdale, as well as by several 
former missionaries to China who 
came from the various monasteries 
of the Province to honor their Bish- 
op on the anniversary of his conse- 
cration. 

In the same church in which the 
previous year he had sung a "Te 
Deum" in thanksgiving for his safe 
return to freedom after 22 months 
imprisonment in Red China, Bishop 
Cuthbert celebrated on October 31, 
1954, a Solemn Pontifical Mass in 
commemoration of the twentieth 
anniversary of his episcopal conse- 
cration. On this occasion, Very 
Ernest Welch, Provincial, was the 
Archpriest. The Deacons of Honor 
were Very Rev. Carrol Ring, Con- 
suitor, and Very Rev. Berchmans 
Lanagan, Rector of St. Michael's 
Monastery. Rev. Paul Ubinger, who 
had suffered imprisonment with 
Bishop Cuthbert, was the Deacon 



62 



of the Mass, and Rev. Leo Joseph 
Berard, who had labored for many 
years in China, was the subdeacon. 
The Masters of Ceremonies were 
Rev. Brendan Boyle, Provincial 
Econome, and Rev. Columba Moore, 
Director of Students at St. Michael's. 
The eloquent and touching sermon 
on the occasion was preached by 
Rev. Alfred Duffy, who also read 
the Apostolic Blessing sent to 
Bishop Cuthbert by His Holiness, 
Pope Pius XII. 
Present at the Mass were Bishop 



Cuthbert's two sisters, Miss Mary 
O'Gara of New York City, and Miss 
Kathleen O'Gara of Ottowa, Canada, 
and a brother, Francis O'Gara of 
Detroit, Michigan. 

RETURN OF FOUR MISSION 
ARIES. It was a happy day foi 
four Passionist missionaries to China 
when the SS. Independence docked 
in New York on November 18, 1954. 
These four Passionists, Fathers 
Linus Lombard, John Baptist Maye, 
Lawrence Mullin, and Ernest Hotz, 




M. Rev. Bishop Cuthbert, C. P. greets homecoming Chinese C. P. Missioners, 
November 18, 1954, at St. Michael's Monastery, Union City, N. J. L to R: 
V. Rev. Fr. Ernest, Provincial, V. Rev. Berchmans, Rector, Bishop Cuthbert, 
Frs. John B. Maye (kneeling), Lawrence Mullin, Linus Lombard, Ernest 

Hotz. 



63 



were at last safely home after five 
years of house arrest under the 
Chinese Reds. 

The heroic Passionists were greet- 
ed in New York by a large delega- 
tion of relatives and friends who had 
long prayed for their safe return. 
Among the welcoming Passionists 
were Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara; Fath- 
er Ernest Welch, Provincial; Father 
Canisius Hazlett, Consultor; and 
Father Berchmans Lanagan, Rector 
of St. Michael's Monastery. On hand 
were many reporters and photo- 
graphers, as well as representatives 
of the U. S. State Department. A 
message of liberation, in which the 
missionaries told of their experien- 
ces and of the conditions they wit- 
nessed behind the bamboo curtain 
was later beamed around the world 
on the Voice of America broadcast. 



Immediately after their arrival at 
the monastery in Union City, the 
entire community, led by Bishop 
Cuthbert and Father Provincial es- 
corted the missionaries from the 
church entrance to the high altar 
where all joined in singing the "Te 
Deum" in thanksgiving. 

The four missionaries reported 
that although their years of "house 
arrest" were filled with humiliation 
and abuse at the hands of "The 
People's Republic" police, they felt 
that their lot had been better during 
the past five years than that of the 
average Chinese citizen. 

As Americans and Catholic priests 
the missionaries were a source of 
particular irritation to their captors, 
since they were looked upon as visi- 
ble symbols of the two greatest anti- 




Recently released Chinese C. P. Missioners at St. Mark's Square, Venice, 
Italy. L to R: Lawrence Mullin, John B. Maye, Linus Lombard, Ernest Hotz. 



64 



Communist forces in the world to- 
day. 

During the years of "house ar- 
rest" the priests were not allowed 
to come into contact with the people 
and they were forbidden to carry on 
any priestly work for the Catholics 
of the Yuanling Diocese. No task 
was too menial for, their, captors to 
impose on them. They were forced 
to do their own cooking, washing, 
and mending, apparently in an effort 
to make them lose "face" before the 
Chinese populance. A particular 
source of discomfit were the fre- 
quent unannounced inspections by 
day or by night on the part of the 
armed guards, who delighted in 
riping apart the furniture of the 
house or their personal belongings 
with bayonets in a search for evi- 
dence of alleged "activity against 
the People's Republic." 

The Religious of the Province 
welcome home these good priests 
who have suffered so much in their 
endeavor to spread the Gospel of 
Christ in China. Let it be their con- 
solation to realize that their labors 
and sufferings have not been in 
vain. They, with so many other Pas- 
sionists, both living and dead, have 
planted the good seed in the field 
of China. The faithful Catholics 
who responded to their ministrations 
and who are persevering in the faith 
in spite of all obstacles are their 
present joy and an ernest of brighter 
days to come for the Church in 
China. 

REV. LAWRENCE MULLIN, C.P. 
Jersey City, N. J. 

Father Lawrence Mullin, C. P., 
was born July 19, 1916, in Jersey 



City, N. J., the son of Mrs. Elizabeth 
J. Mullin, 12 Waverly St., Jersey 
City, and the late James Mullin. He 
was educated at St. Joseph's School 
in his native city; St. Michael's High 
School, Union City, N. J., and Holy 
Cross Preparatory Seminary, Dun- 
kirk, N. Y. 

He was professed a Passionist 
August 15, 1938 at Our Lady of 
Sorrows Monastery, West Spring- 
field. Mass., and ordained a priest 
May 5, 1945 by the late Archbishop 
Thomas J Walsh of Newark, at the 
Cathedral of St. Patrick, Newark, 
N. J. 

Father Mullin went to the Pas- 
sionist Diocese of Yuanling, Hunan, 
China, in 1946. He was placed under 
"house arrest" when the Chinese 
Reds occupied Hunan in 1949. Re- 
leased by the Chinese Communists 
following negotiations at Geneva, he 
reached Hong Kong August 27, 1954. 

He has two sisters, Jane and Mar- 
garet Mullin, of Jersey City, and a 
brother, Gerald Mullin of West 
Paterson, N. J. 

REV. JOHN BAPTIST MAYE, C.P. 
Scranton, Penna. 

Father John Baptist Maye, C.P., 
was born April 16, 1910, in Scranton, 
Pa., the son of John J. and Mary 
Durkin Maye, both deceased. He at- 
tended St. Patrick's High School, 
Scranton, Pa., and Holy Cross Pre- 
paratory Seminary, Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Professed a Passionist August 15, 
1932, at Our Lady of Sorrows Monas- 
tery, West Springfield, Mass., he was 
ordained a priest April 28, 1939, at 
St. Mary's Monastery, Dunkirk, N.Y. 
by the late Bishop John J. Duffy of 
Buffalo. 



65 



He was director of students at 
Passionist Monasteries in West 
Springfield, Mass., and Dunkirk, 
N. Y. and served in the Passionist 
"Dixieland" Mission at New Bern, 
N.C. 

Father Maye went to China in 
1946. He was put under "house ar- 
rest" in 1949 when the Communists 
occupied the Passionist Diocese of 
Yuanling, Hunan. Expelled from 
China in 1953, he was taken to the 
Hong Kong-China border, then un- 
explainably brought back to Chang- 
sha, Hunan, where he remained 
nearly a year under "house arrest". 
Freed from Red China by the Gen- 
eva Conference, he arrived in Hong 
Kong on August 21, 1954. 

His sister, Mrs. Frank Roache lives 
at 1429 Luzerne St., Scranton, Pa. 

REV. LINUS LOMBARD, C.P. 

Ipswich, Mass. 

Father Linus Lombard, C.P. was 
born January 3, 1902, in Everett, 
Mass., the son of Richard and Cath- 
erine Cochran Lombard, both de- 
ceased. A resident of Ipswich, he at- 
tended Boston College High School 
and Boston College. 

He was professed a Passionist, 
September 9, 1923, at St. Paul's 
Monastery, Pittsburgh, Pa., and was 
ordained a priest March 15, 1930, at 
St. Michael's Monastery Church, 
Union City, N. J., by the late Pas- 
sionist Bishop Paul Nussbaum of 
Marquette, Mich. 

Father Lombard went to the Pas- 
sionist Diocese of Yuanling, Hunan, 
China, in 1931. During his 22 years 
in China, he served in Hankow and 
Yuanling as Procurator, Pastor and 



Religious Superior of the Passionists 
in China. 

When the Communists occupied 
Hunan in 1949, he was put under 
"house arrest". He was released by 
the Chinese Reds following negotia- 
tions at Geneva. He arrived in Hong 
Kong August 27, 1954. 

His brother, John E. Lombard, 
manager of The Groton House Farm, 
resides in Ipswich, Mass. 

REV. ERNEST HOTZ, C.P. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Father Ernest Hotz, C.P., was born 
September 22, 1916, in Brooklyn, 
N.Y., the son of Carl and Mary Beck- 
er Hotz, both deceased. He was edu- 
cated at St. Matthew's School, Brook- 
lyn, and Immaculate Conception 
Prep. Seminary, Brooklyn, and Im- 
maculate Conception Seminary, 
Huntington, L. I., N. Y. 

Professed a Passionist August 15, 
1938 at Our Lady of Sorrows Monas- 
tery, West Springfield, Mass., he 
was ordained a priest May 5, 1945 
by the late Archbishop Thomas J. 
Walsh of Newark at St. Patrick's 
Cathedral, Newark. 

Father Hotz went to the Passionist 
China Diocese of Yuanling, Hunan, 
in 1946. Placed under "house ar- 
rest" when the Communists occupied 
Hunan in 1949, he was freed from 
Red China by the Geneva Confer- 
ence, and arrived in Hong Kong 
August 27, 1954. 

He is the brother of Mary Hotz, 
6059 70th Ave., Ridgewood, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., and Fred Hotz, 64-16 Ca- 
talpa Ave., Glendale, L. I., N. Y. 

While rejoicing over the safe re- 
turn of the most recently released 
missionaries, let us not forget to 



66 



remember in our prayers Father 
Marcellus White and Father Justin 
Garvey who are still in the hands 
of the Chinese Reds. 

Vestitions and Professions. Some- 
what out of the usual times, there 
have been some vestitions and pro- 
fessions at the novitiate house in 
Pittsburgh. On October 6, 1954, two 
clerics received the holy habit and 
began their canomical novitiate. 
They are Confraters Shamus Mc- 
Hugh and Pius McGinniss. On No- 
vember 21, 1954, three clerics com- 
pleted their novitiate and made pro- 
fession of temporary vows. They are 
Confraters Owen Lally and Roderick 
Mescall who were assigned to the 
class in third year philosophy at 
Jamaica, and Confrater Isaias Pow- 
ers who was assigned to the class 
in first year philosophy at Hartford. 

NEW FOUNDATIONS In accord 
ance with the recommendation made 
in the last Provincial Chapter, the 
Provincial Curia has accepted two 
new mission foundations. One is on 
the Island of Jamaica, British West 
Indies, and the other is a mission 
for the Colored in the city of At- 
lanta, Georgia. 

Most Reverend John J. McEleney, 
S.J., Vicar Apostolic of Jamaica, 
visited Father Provincial some 
months ago and requested that con- 
siderations be given to his need for 
additional priests to labor in his 
vicariate. It is the Vicar Apostolic's 
plan to establish a college for the 
Catholics of Jamaica, but to do this 
he needs to recall some of the 
Jesuits engaged in missionary work 
and have them staff the proposed 
college. In accordance with this 



plan, the Passionists were invited to 
take over the territory of two par- 
ishes, St. Elizabeth and Manchester. 
In Jamaica the term "parish" is used 
to designate districts corresponding 
in general with the counties into 
which most States of our country 
are divided. The parishes of St. 
Elizabeth and Manchester together 
constitute a territory of approxi- 
mately 900 square miles. 

In accordance with the suggestion 
of Bishop McEleney, Father Provin- 
cial sent the First Consultor, Father 
Canisius Hazlett, to Jamaica to sur- 
vey the situation and to report back 
to the Provincial Curia. Father 
Canisius spent some time in Jamaica, 
and his report based on his own ob- 
servations and his consultations with 
the Jesuits working in Jamaica, in- 
dicated that there is a real need for 
more priests in the whole vicariate 
and especially in the parishes of St. 
Elizabeth and Manchester. The as- 
signment in Jamaica needs priests 
who are in good physical condition, 
and able to travel considerable dis- 
tances between Masses on Sunday 
and during the week to give instruc- 
tions and attend to other missionary 
activities. In a word, the work in 
Jamaica will not be easy, but there 
are excellent prospects to expand 
the work of the Church where it is 
already established and to extend 
it to new sections of the two par- 
ishes. 

After mature deliberation, the 
Curia decided to accept the Jamaica 
mission, and volunteers for the new 
mission were asked to offer their 
services. The following priests have 
been selected and in due time will 



67 



depart for Jamaica: Fathers Cormae 
Shanahan, William Whelan, Callis 
tus Connolly, and Anthony Fee 
heery. 

The second missionary venture 
being undertaken by the Province 
is an extension of the work being 
done by both American Provinces 
for the Negroes of our country. In 
many ways, however, the new mis- 
sion in Atlanta will differ from the 
work for the Colored undertaken by 
the Province over 25 years ago in 
the State of North Carolina. The city 
of Atlanta is vastly better off eco- 
nomically than is our mission terri- 
tory in North Carolina, and this is 
reflected in the improved civic and 
economic status of the Colored popu- 
lation of Atlanta. While the number 
of Catholics in Atlanta and in the 
entire State of Georgia is not pro- 
portionally great, the Church has 
had a long history in the State and 
especially in modern times the very 
active and apostolic Catholic Lay- 
men's Association has done much to 
make the Catholic Church and its 
teachings better known and respect- 
ed. 

The Passionist mission will be lo- 
cated within the limits of the city of 
Atlanta, and will be dedicated to St. 
Paul of the Cross. A new corpora- 
tion, The Passionist Fathers of 
Georgia, Inc., has been formed and 
approved, and recently took title to 
60 acres of land situated at Collier 
and Harwell Roads. Eventually about 
20 acres of this land will be sold to 
the Medical Mission Sisters who al- 
ready have purchased a large tract 
adjacent to the Passionist property 
along Harwell Road. The Sisters 



have plans to erect a large hospital 
for the Colored, in connection with 
which there will be a training school 
for nurses and facilities for accomo- 
dating a staff of internes and resi- 
dent physicians. 

A special feature of the mission 
is that it will be located in a section 
of the city which is being developed 
exclusively by and for the Colored. 
This will be the first time in the 
history of Atlanta that the Negroes 
have been able to develop a resi- 
dential section of their own instead 
of moving into areas formerly occu- 
pied by the white population. Al- 
ready in the neighborhood the Color- 
ed have erected many fine and mod- 
ern homes. 

Along with the new territory un- 
der development, the Passionists 
have been given about one half of 
the territory of the already estab- 
lished parish of Our Lady of 
Lourdes. 

Father Emmanuel Trainor, C.P., 
former Mission Procurator on the 
staff of The Sign, has been chosen 
as Pastor of the New parish. Father 
Emmanuel lived at the rectory of 
Monsignor James J Grady during 
his first weeks in Atlanta, but the 
latest report from him is that a 
suitable house has been procured to 
serve as a temporary residence until 
the new monastery is erected. This 
temporary residence is located at 
29 West Lake Avenue, Atlanta, Ga. 

At the request of Father Emman- 
uel, and with the approval of Father 
Provincial, Father Gabriel Gorman 
will later take up residence with 
Father Emmanuel and will have 



general supervision of the building 
program. 

The proposed building schedule 
calls for the erection of a church, 
monastery, school, and convent. The 
architect, Mr. Edwin Wade of the 
firm of Kuhlke and Wade, Augusta, 
Ga., is presently at work on the 
plans for the new buildings and soon 
will have ready some of his pre- 
liminary drawings. 

BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS. At 

St. Joseph's Monastery Parish in 
Baltimore, because of the great in- 
crease in the number of parishon- 
ers in recent years, the Pastor, Fa- 
ther Adrian Poletti, has undertaken 
the construction of a large addition 
to the parish school. The ground- 
breaking ceremonies took place on 
Sunday, October 3, 1954, with Fa- 
ther William Harding, C.P., former 
Pastor, being the guest speaker. 

The addition will be a two story 
brick structure with concrete floors 
and stairways. It will contain 12 
large classrooms,, a superintendent's 
office, and nurse's room. The base- 



m V 



Sketch of 12 classroom addition to 
St. Joseph Monastery School, Balti- 
more, Md. 



ment will contain a janitor's apart- 
ment, a rest room for the teachers, 
and a special meeting room. 

Besides the new school addition^ 
Father Adrian announced that the 
project will embrace the installation 
of an elevator in the present audi- 
torium, the erection of a kitchen 
wing adjoining the present base- 
ment hall, and additional toilet fa- 
cilities for the students. The old 
boiler room will be enlarged and 
equiped to service the new addition. 

Extensive renovations and improve- 
ments were found necessary in old 
St. Mary's Church, Dunkirk, N. Y. A 

communication from the Pastor, Fa- 
ther Eugene Kiernan, gives an idea 
of the work undertaken and now 
practically completed. He states that 
the contract calls for tearing out 
the entire floor of the church from 
the main entrance to the altar rail, 
the replacing of all wooden beams 
with steel beams, the treating of all 
wood supports above ground for dry 
rot, laying a new cradle to support 
the entire church, replacing wood 
floor with flexicore and covering all 
with tile, removing all paint from 
pews and wainscoting and restoring 
them to their natural oak color, re- 
moving the reredos from its present 
position under the baldacchino and 
attaching it to the wall of the apse, 
construction a new passage from the 
monastery to the church, pointing 
and sandblasting all the exterior 
brick work, repairing the steeple 
and the beams in the roof of the 
church, renovating the altar boys 
sacristy, cleaning and touching up 
the interior walls, and rewiring the 



entire church. The estimated cost 
of this extensive job is $70,000.00. 

TWO DEATHS IN THE PROV- 
INCE. Recently death came to two 
priests of the Province of St. Paul of 
the Cross, Father Alexander of the 
Sacred Heart (Croker), and Father 
Bartholomew of St. Joseph (Dean). 

Father Alexander was born in 
Belfast, North Ireland, on December 
17, 1893. While still very young he 
came with his family to Newport 
News, Virginia where he continued 
his education until he entered the 
Passionist Preparatory Seminary at 
St. Mary's, Dunkirk in 1909. Father 
Alexander was professed on March 
24, 1911, and was ordained on June 
14, 1919. 

After completing his sacred elo- 
quence course, Father Alexander 
was assigned to teach at Holy Cross 
Seminary, Dunkirk, and remained in 
that capacity from 1920 until 1924. 
This was followed by an interlude 
of parish work in Union City from 
1924 to 1926. In this latter year he 
was elected Rector of Holy Cross 
Seminary, and in the following Chap- 
ter convened in 1929 he was elected 
Master of Novices, an office he held 
for two terms. From 1935 until 1940 
he was chaplain at St. Agnes Hos- 
pital, Baltimore. 

Father Alexander died in Pitts- 
burgh on the afternoon of Friday, 
November 26, 1954. Funeral services 
were held at St. Joseph's Passionist 
Church in Baltimore, and burial was 
in the Passionist plot in Bonnie 
Brae cemetary. 

Father Bartholomew was a native 



of Dunkirk, N. Y. wher he was born 
on December 30, 1907. After com- 
pleting his high school course at St. 
Mary's Parochial School, he entered 
Holy Cross Seminary in 1925. He 
was professed on August 15, 1927, 
and was ordained on June 15, 1933. 

From 1936 until 1942, Father Bar- 
tholomew was a curate at St. Ann's 
Parish in Scranton. Shortly after 
completing his assignment in Scran- 
ton, Father Bartholomew's active 
life ended, due to his suffering a 
severe paralytic stroke which left 
the use of one arm and leg seriously 
and permanently impaired. In spite 
of his handicap, Father Bartholomew 
did his best to keep himself busy 
around the monastery, and never 
let his affliction overshadow a na- 
turally cheerful and buoyant spirit 
which made him a most pleasant 
community man. 

Death came to Father Bartholo- 
mew suddenly and under rather 
tragic circumstances on December 
23, 1954. He had been granted per- 
mission to spend some of the holiday 
season with his aged mother and 
some other members of his family 
in Philadelphia. He traveled to Phil- 
adelphia by air and as he left the 
plane in that city, he met our Father 
Kevin McCloskey who had been a 
passenger on the same plane. Until 
that moment, however, neither had 
known of the presence of the other. 
As the two priests walked together 
toward the passenger terminal, Fa- 
ther Bartholomew was very cheerful, 
and was on the watch for the rela- 
tives who were to meet him. Finally 
recognizing them in the group of 



70 



people waiting for passengers, Fa- 
ther Bartholomew pointed them out 
to Father Kevin and said, "there is 
the welcoming committee." Those 
were his last spoken words, for no 
sooner were they uttered than he 
fell to the ground and was dead be- 
fore medical assistance arrived on 
the scene. 

The funeral of Father Bartholo- 
mew was held at St. Mary's Church 
in Dunkirk, and interment was in 
the cemetery on the grounds of Holy 
Cross Seminary. 

May the souls of our two departed 
brethren rest in peace. Later the 
usual obituaries of Father Alexan- 
der and Father Bartholomew will 
be published. 



STATE DEPT. ASKED TO QUERY 

PEIPING ON JAILED 

PASSIONISTS 

No Word Received Of Clothing, Food, 

Medicine Sent Through China 

Red Cross 

UNION CITY, N. J., Dec— Con- 
cern over the two remaining Pas- 
sionist missionaries, both of whom 
were jailed three years ago by the 
Chinese Reds, was voiced today by 
Passionist Provincial Ernest Welch 
as he revealed he had appealed to 
the State Department to query the 
Peiping Government whether they 
are living. 

The missionaries, whom a recent 
Peiping radio broadcast said were 
among the American citizens being 
held in jail, are the Rev. Justin Gar- 
vey, C.P., 39, a native of Grantwood, 
N J., who was imprisoned Decem- 
ber 21, 1951, and the Rev. Marcellus 



White, C.P., 46, of Waltham, Mass., 
imprisoned February 24, 1952. 

According to the State Department, 
there are 80 American citizens being 
held by the Red Chinese — 54 un- 
der "house arrest" and 26 in jail. 
The figure does not include the 11 
U.S. airmen and two civilians whose 
release is being sought by Dag Ham- 
marskjold, U.N. Secretary General, 
when he confers shortly after the 
New Year in Peiping with Red 
China's Foreign Minister, Chou En- 
lai. 

The Passionist official said he con- 
tacted the State Department im- 
mediately upon being informed by 
Mrs. Jennie Dearcy White of Walt- 
ham, that she had received a brief 
note purportedly written by her son 
— the first word to come out of Red 
China from either of the priests 
since their imprisonment. A check 
with Father Garvey's mother, Mrs. 
Martin J. Garvey, who makes her 
home with a daughter, Mrs. Clare 
Harrigton in West Covina, Calif., dis- 
closed that she has not heard from 
her son for three years, Father Welch 
said. 

Fathers Garvey and White were 
last seen alive in the Yuanling prison 
courtyard in the Spring of 1952 by 
Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., and 
the Rev. Paul Ubinger, C.P., of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., both of whom spent 22 
months in the same prison before 
their release and expulsion from 
China in 1953. Although they occu- 
pied cells in the same compound, 
they rarely saw each other, and then 
only from a distance, the Provincial 
said, adding that they never were 



71 



permitted to speak or to visit one 
another. Two other Passionists, the 
Rev. William Westhoven, C.P., of 
Liberty Center, Ohio, who was re- 
leased with Bishop O'Gara, and the 
Rev. Harold Travers, C.P., of Revere. 
Mass., who was expelled from China 
after six and one-half months in 
prison, also reported seeing their 
two imprisoned colleagues. Father 
Welch said he had received an un- 
confirmed report that the two priests 
had been seen in June 1953 under 
heavy guard at the bus station in 
Yuanling, apparently being transfer- 
red to another prison. 

Father Welch observed further 
that no acknowledgment has been 
received from either of the two 




Fr. Justin Garvery, C. P. 



priests for gift boxes of clothing, food 
and medicine mailed to them each 
week through the China Red Cross. 

Father Garvey had lived in Jersey 
City, N. J., Mineola, N. Y., and 
Oyster Bay, N. Y., where he attended 
school before entering Holy Cross 
Passionist Preparatory College, Dun- 
kirk, N. Y., in 1933. He was professed 
a Passionist August 15, 1936, at Our 
Mother of Sorrows Monastery, West 
Springfield, Mass., and after studies 
at various Passionist seminaries in 
the East, was ordained a priest on 
February 27, 1943 by Bishop Thomas 
A. Boland, now Archbishop of 
Newark. He went to China in 1946, 
and at the time of his arrest and im- 
prisonment, was superintendent of 
the Catholic Hospital in Yuanling, 
seat of the Passionist Diocese in West 
Hunan. • 

Father White, a product of St. 
Charles elementary and senior high 
schools in his native city, also studied 
at Holy Cross Preparatory College 
in Dunkirk, and was professed a Pas- 
sionist August 15, 1928 in West 
Springfield, Mass. After studies at 
Passionist monasteries in Scranton, 
Boston, Baltimore, Jamaica, N. Y., 
he was ordained a priest April 28, 
1934 at St. Ann's Monastery by the 
late Bishop Thomas O'Reilly of 
Scranton. 

In 1935, he was assigned to the 
Passionist Diocese of Yuanling, and 
subsequently served as a missionary 
in Chihkiang; pastor of the Catholic 
Mission in Yungshun. During World 
War II, he served as a contract chap- 
lain with the United States Forces, 
stationed at the Army and Navy Air 



72 




Fr. Marcellus White, C. P. 

Base at Chihkiang. In 1945, he came 
to the States for a year, returning to 
China in 1947. He is a brother of 
James White, Harwich, Cape Cod, 
Mass.; John White, Holmes, N. Y.; 
Mrs. Mary O'Brien, Waltham, Mass., 
and Mrs. Margaret Enman, Milvale, 
Conn. 

"MODES OF LIFE" 

The weekly television program, 
produced by Father Fidelis Rice, 
C.P., Lector of Sacred Eloquence in 
the Province of Saint Paul of the 
Cross, was resumed early in October. 
The program is called "MODES OF 
LIFE," and is presented each Sun- 
day afternoon, from 3:00 to 3:30 on 
Channel 61-WWLP in Springfield. 



This station has a wide coverage 
throughout a great part of New Eng- 
land. Father Fidelis will be "on 
camera" for forty weeks in the cur- 
rent series. 

Last Good Friday the local televi- 
sion station asked Father Fidelis to 
conduct the "THREE HOURS" ser- 
vice from 12:00 to 3:00 as a studio 
presentation. All of the personnel 
and all of the facilities of the studio 
were placed at Father's disposal, and 
even the Jewish employees did yeo- 
man service in trying to make the 
telecast a success. "The Catholic As- 
sociation of Broadcasters and Tele- 
casters," after investigating, have 
reported that this was the first time 
that the "THREE HOURS" was ever 
telecast from the studio, although 
parts of this devotion have been tele- 
cast from churches. Since Father Fi- 
delis had full charge of the produc- 
tion, he tried to pattern it after the 
program usually presented in our 
churches, as far as that was possible 
within the framework of the visual- 
audio pattern. 

The reports from the THREE 
HOURS were so good that the studio 
management then asked Father Fi- 
delis to take a half-hour each week 
for his own program. He planned a 
program which he called "MODES 
OF LIFE," based on the play-on- 
words in the meaning of "mode" — 
which is the equivalent in Gregorian 
Chant of a "musical key." He opens 
the program by playing a selection 
on the studio organ — some selec- 
tion from the Liturgy — which serves 
as a basis for comment on the mean- 
ing of the words. He then goes on 



73 



to talk on some basic religious ques- 
tion suggested by the words. The 
program ends with an organ selec- 
tion as a "recessional." 

On Sunday, October 24th, Father 
Fidelis varied the pattern of his tele- 
cast somewhat by presenting as his 
guests the Passionist Students of 
Holy Family Monastery in West 
Hartford. They sang several poly- 
phonic motets, "a cappella," and one 
or two Chant selections with organ 
accompaniment. Father Fidelis talked 
then on the meaning of the Passion- 
ist life, and interviewed three of the 
Students to reveal some of the back- 
ground in the story of a vocation. 



Letters received and comments com- 
ing in through other channels indi- 
cate that the program was most 
enthusiastically received by non- 
Catholics as well as Catholics. 

The Most Reverend Cuthbert Mar- 
tin O'Gara, C.P., D.D., has accepted 
an invitation to be Father's guest on 
TV in the near future, and he will 
tell much of the story of his years 
in China. 

Father Fidelis receives a great 
many requests from various schools, 
choirs, glee-clubs, etc., to appear on 
his program, and from time to time 
will present some of these groups. 
Since the half-hour each week has 




Father Fidelis, as he appears each week in "Modes of Life. 



74 




The Guest - presentation of the Students of the West Hartford Monastery on 
"Modes of Life" Program. 



been given to him outright by the 
studio, he can use the time as he 
wishes. 



"THE HOUR OF THE CRUCIFIED" 

"THE HOUR OF THE CRUCI- 
FIED," a weekly radio program 
which was initiated last Lent in the 
Province of Saint Paul of the Cross, 
is growing steadly. It is heard each 
week on a chain of some 50 inde- 
dependent stations which reach now 
from the Province of Alberta, Cana- 
da, to the Panama Canal; and from 
Maine, to California. 



This program was begun last Lent 
by the Sacred Eloquence Class of the 
Eastern Province. In its inception 
there was no thought of a permanent 
program. It was intended only for 
one local station, in Holyoke, Mass., 
(near Springfield, where the Sacred 
Eloquence House is located), and was 
to be only a Lenten Course on the 
radio. However, before Lent was 
half over, it had already extended 
to three or four other stations in 
New England. A great deal of mail 
began to come in, indicating that 
much good was being done for many 



75 




Fr. Fideiis (standing) and Fr. Leo 
Garrity, C.P., making recordings for 
"The Hour of the Crucified." Profes- 
sional equipment for this worthy 
project was all donated by friends, 
to the sum of around $6,000 . 




Front, L. to R.: Srs. Gonzage, There- 
sa and Mary Francis. Back: Srs. de 
Chantal (Superior of new St. Luke 
Convent, West Barrington, R. I., and 
sister of Fr. Timothy O'Regan, C. P., 
Ireland). Very Rev. Mother Provin- 
cial, C.P. (sister of Fr. Fabian Gro- 
gan, C.P., Scotland). Opposite page, 
above: Most Rev. Bishop Russell J. 
McVinney at blessing of new St. Luke 
Convent, August 23, 1954. Below: 
(opposite page) Sideview of St. Luke 
Convent. Three lower windows, and 
steps leading to sacristy. Vide THE 
PASSIONIST September 1954, page 
463 et seq. 

souls, and it was earnestly requested 
that it be made a permanent pro- 
gram. With the approval of Most 
Reverend Father General and the 
Very Reverend Father Provincial, it 
was decided by the Sacred Eloquence 
Lector, Father Fidelis Rice, to make 



76 



the radio work a permanent part of 
the formal training in Sacred Elo- 
quence. 

The program is recorded on sound- 
tape, in the classroom of the Monas- 
tery, and duplicate tapes are then 
made from the original recording, 
and are mailed out to radio stations 
all over the country. Recording and 
duplicating machines worth many 
thousands of dollars have been ac- 
quired through generous donations 
and benefactions, and Father Fidelis 
reports that the Sacred Eloquence 
course is as well equipped as a pro- 
fessional recording studio with elec- 
tronic recording devices. 

Each week the program conforms 
to the same basic pattern. There is 
introductory organ music and the 
opening announcements; the prayer 
to Jesus Crucified; then a selection 
in Gregorian Chant, sung by the 
Sacred Eloquence Class or by one of 
the other Classes of Students in the 
Province; there is a question-and-an- 
swer, chosen from those sent in by 
listeners, tackling some practical 
problem in the light of the Passion; 
a sermon by some ''guest preacher;" 
a polyphonic motet; special prayers 
for the sick, in which some hospital 
or some sick persons in various cities 
in which the program is heard are 
mentioned by name; and then, the 
closing organ selection. The program 
runs for 29 minutes. 

Father Fidelis Rice, who initiated 
the program and who directs it, is 
trying to utilize the outstanding 
talent of so many classes of students 
by presenting the singing of differ- 
ent classes each week. He has been 



able to record the singing of the Stu- 
dents in several Monasteries of the 
Eastern Province. Likewise, he tries 
enlist the services of different 
preachers of the Province as the 
"guest speakers" on the program. 
The Students of the Sacred Elo- 
quence Class act as announcers each 
week, present the question-and-an- 
swer, etc., and later in the year, 
when they have become more profi- 
cient, will also deliver some of the 
sermons. 

Father Fidelis has announced 
that he is anxious to obtain the co- 
operation of the Brethren in placing 
the program on as many radio sta- 
tions as possible. There are many ra- 
dio stations looking for such pro- 
grams and if it is brought to their 
attention they will gladly donate the 
time. An audition-tape will be mailed 
gladly to any of the Brethren who 
are interested in putting the pro- 
gram on the air. A tape will then be 
mailed out each week, gratis, to any I 
station willing to carry the program. 
Letters coming in from station-man- 
agers, who are the severest critics, 
have praised the program highly. 

The Manager of Station WVDA in 
Boston wrote: "In the short time we 
have been carrying 'THE HOUR OF 
THE CRUCIFIED' we have come to 
consider it the best religious program 
we have. We are proud to feature it, 
and look forward to the pleasure of 
broadcasting this program for many 
years to come." The Manager of Sta- 
tion WFMJ in Youngstown, Ohio: 
"This is a superb program, and the 
mail we are getting in considerable 
quantity shows that the people like 



78 



it. What pleases me is that so many 
non-Catholics write in about it." 
Station WIDE, in Biddeford, Maine: 
"Although I am not a Catholic I have 
often heard of the Passionists as 
being fine speakers. Your program 
confirms that report. We are forced 
to carry a lot of non-Catholic pro- 
grams, and by contrast with your 
program they are a drab and unin- 
spiring lot. Keep it up! WIDE is 
proud to be with you!" Station 
KWKW in Pasadena, California: 
"The Passionists can well be proud 
of this program, Father. It's the kind 
of thing that we radio people wel- 
come. It is certainly educational, in- 
spirational, and cultural. The kind of 
music heard on the program, for ex- 




ample, is of a quality that is rarely 
heard." 

It is hoped that the Brethren will 
do what they can to place the pro- 
gram on more stations, and that they 
will help the work with their pray- 



CHINA 

A letter (November 2, 1954) from 
Father Anthony Maloney, C.P., in 
Hong Kong tells us of his joy at 
meeting Father General for a few 
hours on October 16th. Father Smith, 
M.M., Maryknoll Superior, drove Fa- 
ther Anthony to the airport. During 
the short stay Father General had 
an opportunity to see some of the 




Most Rev. Father General (right) and Fr. Smith, M.N. Picture taken by 
Fr. Anthony Maloney in China October 16th, 1954 



79 



Ford Memorial Refugee center work 
done. 



Father also mentions that the 
Hongkong diocesan authorities with- 
drew the offer to allow the Passion- 
ists to operate a refugee center local- 
ly; but Father still has hopes and is 
trying to master local Cantonese 



dialect. There is also no word from 
Hunan and as a result we have seen 
the last issue of the "Hunan News." 



With all this Father has struck out 
into a new field: he is being re- 
quested to conduct English Retreats 
and give conferences and has accept- 
ed the offers. 




Around the World CP. 



ITALY 

From July 5th to the 10th, 1954 
there was a joint meeting of the five 
Provincial Curias in Italy together 
with the General Curia under the 
presidency of Most Reverend Father 
General, at Sts. John and Paul, 
Rome. 

Among the many proposals brought 
up seven found a practical solution 
and were agreed upon. 

I. The establishment of a national 
school of Eloquence at the Retreat 
of St. Paul of the Cros in Florence. 
The General Curia assumed the duty 
of appointing the Director and the 
teaching staff of the school after 



having consulted the Rev. Fathers 
Provincial. The same Curia was also 
to regulate the support of the school. 
This school of Sacred Eloquence was 
opened October 5th, 1954. There are 
ten students, 5 from the Province 
of the Pieta and 5 from the Province 
of the Immaculate Heart. There are 
three lectors and beyond Sacred Elo- 
quence there are lectures in Pastoral 
Theology and Sociology. 

II. The second proposal agreed 
upon was the establishment of a na- 
tional center for taking care of the 
bigger missions. This step was taken 
in consequence of the fact that in 
late years Bishops were asking our 



80 



Fathers to preach missions in the 
larger cities, i.e., have a mission for 
all the parishes in the city and ex- 
clusively Passionist missionaries. 
Often a single Province was not able 
to provide the number or the quality 
of men desired, or both. It was agreed 
that the Provincial Secretary who 
would receive such a request would 
immediately come in contact with 
the other four Provincial Mission 
Secretaries to get the necessary men; 
all this under a national Mission 
Secretary. The second Father Pro- 
vincial Consultor of the Province 
of the Addolorata was named first 
Secretary. 

III. Next question was the fact 
that the Retreat of the Presentation 
on Monte Argentaro was in urgent 
need of extensive repairs. The dis- 
cussion highlighted three points: a) 
Of the actual building on Monte 
Argentaro that our Holy Founder 
put up there was only one or the 
other wall in existence today; hence 
the question was not so much the 
preserving the present building, but 
keeping the place, sanctified by our 
St. Paul of the Cross, b) Whether 
there should be merely a radical re- 
pair job or an entirely new construc- 
tion in the same area, was a question 
for the engineers and architects to 
decide after a thorough investiga- 
tion, c) It was decided that the en- 
tire Congregation should give their 
moral and material support to this 
project, but that the house remain 
part of the Province it now belongs 
to. 

Since something had to be done 
immediately a Committee was ap- 



pointed to study the problem and 
hand its report to the General Curia. 
Later another committee would be 
appointed from different Provinces 
with a representative to interest the 
Provinces where the English language 
was in use. 

IV. Since the missionary activity, 
not only in foreign lands but also 
in the "back districts" of Italy, places 
with same conditions as in foreign 
lands, was growing among Passion- 
ists, it was agreed that the different 
Provinces would lend their subjects 
to each other in these missionary 
projects. This was especially with a 
view to check Communism, also in 
Italy. 

V. It was decided that various 
Italian Provincial Curias would soon 
be sent a questionaire relating the 
definite boundaries of their respec- 
tive Provinces; differences arise in 
regard to Missions and the Quest, 
because of indefinite boundaries. 
The General Curia, after having con- 
sidered the answers to the question- 
aire, would decide definite boundaries 
for each Italian Province. 

VI. The five Provincials were 
asked to write up a suggested Regu- 
lation-Horarium Book for their Pre- 
paratory Schools. Complaints had 
come that Prep Students come to the 
Novitiate without any knowledge of 
the Spiritual Life. This book should 
contain the rules, not only for the 
students but also for the Community. 
The General Curia would then de- 
cide on the regulations. 

VII. The five Provincials under 
the presidency of the Procurator 
General were constituted a commit- 



81 



tee to investigate the economic status 
oi the Italian Provinces and to send 
their findings and suggestions to the 
General Curia. 



"An extensive mission was con- 
cluded at Cremona on the occasion 
of the Marian Year. The Mission, 
which lasted two weeks, was re- 
quested by Bishop Bolgnini and was 
preached by fifty Passionist Fathers 
in the eighteen parishes of the city 
and outlying districts. 

The fifty missionary fathers di- 
vided the work of preaching in the 
parishes, in the hospitals, in the 
schools, in the factories and even in 
the prisons. Everywhere and by 



everyone they were received and 
heard with kindness and respect. At 
the same time special conferences 
were held for business and profes- 
sional men, for lawyers and doctors, 
for men in commerce and industry, 
for employers and employees, and 
for college and university students. 
Not only was the mission attended 
with individual fervor, but there 
were various public manifestations 
of faith and devotion: the solemn re- 
ception of the Missionaries as they 
arrived from the Sanctuary of Ca- 
ravaggio, the suffrages at the Ceme- 
tery, the Stations of Cross through 
the streets of the city and ending 
at the Cathedral Square, and the de- 




Public reception of C.P. Missioners before gigantic mission in 
Cremona, Italy. Bishop carries big Cross. 



82 



dication of the children to the 
Blessed Mother. Not to speak of the 
throngs receiving at the General 
Communions as well as the large 
number of men and youths, partici- 
pating in the night Vigils before the 
Blessed Sacrament. 

The Diocesan Bishop, besides 
thanking the Missionaries, asked All- 
Mighty God to grant the people of 
the Diocese steadfastness in the faith 
and firmness of resolution, so as to 
preserve the fruits of that memor- 
able Passionist Mission." 



resented. Some 20,000 attended the 
public Rosary celebration and the 
concluding midnight Mass was high- 
lighted with some 4,000 men receiv- 
ing Holy Communion. 



A very similiar gigantic mission 
is recorded in the Acta Congrega- 
tionis as having taken place last May 
in Lecce, Italy, some 30 Passionist 
Missionaries conducting the various 
servies. Among the missionaries all 
our five Italian Provinces were rep- 



PROVINCE OF THE IMMACULATE 
HEART 

(Italy) 
Last June in the Provincial House 
of the Province, at Caravate, a meet- 
ing of missionaries, Lectors and Di- 
rector. The purpose of the meeting 
was to further and perfect the meth- 
od of catechetical instructions on the 
Missions. Also the question was treat- 
ed of how the future missionaries 
should receive their spiritual educa- 
tion according to the methods of 
modern pedagogy. President of the 
meeting was Very Reverend Father 
Sebastian, General Consultor; pres- 




Passionist Students taking part in the pilgrimage to our Lady of the 
"Pilar" during the Marian Congress, Saragossa, Spain. 



83 




L. ta R.: Fr. Juan Cruz, secretary of Marian Congresillo of the Confraternity 
of the Passion, Provincial of the Holy Family Province, Very Rev. Fr. Igna- 
tius Gen. Consultor, representative of Father General and finally the 
Provincial of Province of the Precious Blood. Picture was taken during one 
of the ceremonies of the Congress, October 7 to 12 in Saragossa, Spain. 



ent were also the members of the 
Provincial Curia. 



SPAIN 

During the large National Marian 
Congress held at Saragossa, Spain, 
from October 7 to 12, 1954, there 
were many small "Congresillos" of a 
particular nature, 14 in number. The 
Passionists of all three Provinces 
joined to celebrate a Marian Congress 
of the Confraternity of the Passion 
on October 8, 9, 10 in Saragossa. 
Representatives came from 45 Con- 
fraternities, with each Confraternity 
sending 30 to 35 delegates. The stu- 



84 



dy theme of the Congress was the 
Maran Spirit (Marianismo) of the j 
Passionist Congregation and of the 
Confraternity of the Passion. 

The Organizing Committee was 
made up of Frs. John Mary, C.P., 
Ramiro, C.P., and John of the Cross, 
C.P., of the Holy Family Province, 
Fr. Basil, C.P., of the Precious Blood 
Province, and Fr. Bernard, C.P., of 
the Sacred Heart Province. Fr. John 
of the Cross, C.P., was appointed 
General Secretary of the Congress. 
Very Rev. Fr. Ignatius, C.P., General 
Consultor, attended as the represen- 
tative of Fr. General. 



Each morning there was a large 
Communion Mass, with a sermon on 
"the Immaculate Conception as the 
Masterpiece of the Redemption" for 
the first day, "the Spiritual Materni- 
ty of Mary on Calvary" for the sec- 
ond day, and "the Marian Spirituali- 
ty of the Confratenity" on the third. 

The afternoon sessions treated of 
such themes as the Marian Spirit 
of the Passionist Congregation and 
of the Confraternity. Spiritual Union 
among the Confraternities, and the 
Marian Spirit of the particular Con- 
fraternities. 

The high point of the Congress was 
an organized pilgrimage to the shrine 
of Our Lady of the Pillar, where Very 
Rev. Ignatius, C.P., celebrated Mass 



and read the Consecration of the 
members of the Congress to the Im- 
maculate Heart. 

The Congress formed a number of 
resolutions. Perhaps the most note- 
worthy was the request, embodied in 
a telegram to the Holy Father, to 
have Mary's Universal Mediation 
and Co-Redemption declared a dog- 
ma of faith. Other resolutions were 
to promote study and devotion to 
Mary in the Confraternity, especially 
in her Compassion and Co-Redemp- 
tion with Jesus Crucified. The desire 
was expressed for a greater bond of 
union between the different Confra- 
ternities as a means of promoting 
their work and forming a true spirit- 
uality among their members. A re- 




Some of the members of the Confraternity of the Passion that attended 
the Marian Congress in Saragossa. 



85 



quest was made to the three Passion- 
ist Provincials to appoint a perma- 
nent Committee to further this end. 

The Passionistic spirit of the Con- 
gresillo is expressed in the hymn 
written and sung for the occasion, 
where the delegates address Mary: 
"You alone have been preserved from 
sin 

By the Blood and the Death of Jesus. 
In spite of hell, you are Immaculate! 
We, the children of the Cross, salute 
you. 



PROVINCE OF THE HOLY FAMILY 

Solemn rites were held from Octo- 
ber 17th to 25th, 1954 in St. Blase 
Retreat (Valencia, Venezuela) com- 
memorating the 25th anniversary of 
the coming of our Brethren of the 
Holy Family Province to Venezuela. 
The crowds attending the various 
services were so great that often the 
ceremonies had to be carried out in 
the open. Among the features were 
the renewal of the Baptismal vows, 
outside Way of the Cross and the 
first meeting of the members of the 
Confraternity of the Passion in the 
district; about 300 members attend- 
ed. 



SWEDEN 

There is little to boast about with 
our little mission center here, but 
the photos give you "a view of the 
villa we had the luck to get when we 
first came, the big room on the bot- 
tom floor serving as a temporary 
chapel until we can get money, li- 
censes etc. to start building some- 



in the way of a church. But that lies 
in the dim future. For the Marian year 
we built a grotto, which was blessed 
in August by the Auxiliary Bishop 
Nelson. Mostly the work of our Bro- 
ther Gabriel; it is built from boulders 
which were lying around the gar- 
den. This province of Smaland is 
covered with these boulders, relics 
of the ice-period, so they say. Any- 
how we feel we have Our Lady of 
Lourdes to stand by us in our efforts 
for the Protestants here. We have, 
by the way, six or seven Mass-centres 
in distant parts of the district, where 
Mass is said regularly. We hope to 
extend when we get our own motor- 
transport. Our Catholic refugees are 
a disappointing mixture, they have 
to be reconverted and that is some- 
times more difficult than converting 
biggotted Protestants. The latter 
were dear to the heart of our Holy 
Founder and Venerable Dominic, who 
we may be sure are pleading our 
cause before the Lord. We difinitely 
feel the need of lots of sincere pray- 
ersand self-sacrifice to succour our 




C.P. Mission House in Sweden with 
Fr. Oliver, C.P. 



86 



work. The devil has certainly got a 
firm grip on Scandinavia, and he 

won't easily let go. Pray for us. The 
brethren stationed here at the pres- 
ent besides myself are Father Ger- 
ard, Father Oliver, and Brother Gab- 
riel. Further recruits are or will 
soon be preparing themselves in Eng- 
land for Sweden. Three converts in 
three years does not look good, but 
it is the thin edge of the wedge, or 
at least we hope so. God gives the 
increase. 



This Lourdes Grotto was blessed 
and dedicated on Sunday, August 22, 
at Vaxjo, Sweden, by His Excellency, 
Bishop Anscar Nelson. The signifi- 
cance of this ceremony lies in the 



fact that this was the first public act 
of devotion to Our Lady in 400 years! 
It is significant too that St. Vaxjo 
was converted by St. Sigfried of 
England, and now again, Catholic 
missionaries from England are try- 
ing to win back Sweden to Holy 
Mother Church. This Grotto was built 
by the missionaries themselves: Fa- 
thers Dominic, Gerard, Oliver and 
Brother Gabriel, with the stones 
taken from the area where they hope 
to build a chapel. 

The High Mass and dedication ser- 
vice was attended by about 60 peo- 
ple, a considerable group because 
they were mostly non-Catholics and 
had traveled from all over the mis- 
sion area. Some were of high stand- 




Most Rev. Bishop Anscar Nelson who blessed the above Lourdes Shrine 
at C.P. Mission in Vaxjo, Sweden. 



87 



ing in the community. Confirmation 
was conferered at the Grotto on 2 
of the first converts made by the 
Passionists: Countess Margerita Ham- 
ilton and Doctorinna Christina Pripp. 
It was a most historic day and augurs 
well for the future — with God's 
blessing. 



PROVINCE OF THE IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION 

(Argentina) 
During March 1954 (3 to 11) the 
Congress of the States of Perfection 

was held in Argentina. His Eminence 
Cardinal Copello was named presi- 
dent directly by the Holy See; Fr. 
A. Larraona, C.M.F., Secretary of 
the Sacred Congregation of Religious 
was general chairman. The inaugural 
ceremonies took place in a large hall 
(seating 3,000) of the National Uni- 
versity in Buenos Aires. The crowd 
was so great that many had to con- 
tent themselves to listen from ad- 
joining halls and class-rooms. 

There really two congresses in 
one; one for the male religious of 
whom there were about 1200 present; 
the other, for religious women, of 
whom about 5,000 attended. 

One of the days of the Congress 
was set aside for a pilgrimage to the 
national shrine of our Lady of Lujan 
about 40 miles distant from Buenos 
Aires. Special trains were set at 
the disposal of the pilgrims by H. E. 
President Peron. In the evening of 
the same day a most impressive 
gathering was held as an act of 
homage to His Holiness Pope Pius 
XII on the anniversary of his coro- 
nation. He is still very deeply re- 



membered from the time, as Cardi- 
nal Pacelli, he served as Legate of 
Pipe Pius XI at the international 
Eucharistic Congress at Buenos Aires 
in 1934; his name is ever held in 
benediction. This celebration was 
held in Luna Park. Some 10,000 relig- 
ious were present with another 10,- 
000 of the laity. On behalf of the 
government the Sub-secretary of 
Cult, Dr. Leonardo Benitez de Alda- 
ma made a speech of welcome; Dr. 
Thomas D. Casares, member of the 
Supreme Court of Justice gave a 
masterly dissertation on the religi- 
ous life. Bishop J. Borgatti, of Vied- 
ma spoke on behalf of the assembly 
and finally the Apostolic Nuntio, 
Archbishop M. Zanin (the heart and 
soul of the Congress from the be- 
ginning to the end) in the name of 
the Holy Father expressed the grati- 
tude of His Holiness for such a mag- 
nificent manifestation of love and 
adherence to the Holy See. 

During the course of the Congress 
several of the Brethren had various 
themes assigned to them; prominent 
among the C.P. speakers were His 
Excellency Bishop Ubaldus Cibrian, 
C.P., from Bolivia, Father Modestus 
Seoane, C.P. from Chile and Fr. 
Mark Perbrian, C.P., who very ably 
represented the Province of the Im- 
maculate Conception. 

The official chronicler of the Con- 
gress remarked at the close of his 
account: "Beati oculi qui vident quae 
vos videtis," as indeed it was some- 
thing to behold and give thanks to 
God that these South American Re- 
publics could make such a magnifi- 



88 




Above: Interior of St. Joseph's Chapel at the C.P. Preparatory Seminary, 

Argentina on day of dedication, May 25th, 1954. Below exterior of the 

Preparatory Seminary and chapel. 




cent display of union and religious 
fervor. 



On May 25th, 1954 the Province 
saw another of its dreams come true: 
the dedication of St. Joseph's Chapel 

at the Province's Prepartory Semi- 
nary, Vicente Casares. The chapel 
is built in the same style as the 
Seminary buildings (built in 1942) 
"Californian in style, with white 
walls set off by red brick facing out- 
side, with white and cream walls 
within contrasting with the heavy 
beamed ceiling." Bishop Julian Mar- 
tinez performed the dedication cere- 
monies and gave a very inspiring 
sermon on the work of the Congre- 
gation in the missions of Argentina 
and Uruguay. The chapel fills a long 
felt want; it easily seats $300. 



August 25th, 1954 saw the death 
of Father Joseph Campion, C.P. He 
is one of the last members of the 
Province to go to eternity who were 
born in the U.S.A. He was a sickly 
man throughout life, even his ordina 
tion was postponed several years on 
account of his health. "Though never 
enjoying robust health, he was con- 
stantly engaged in visiting the aged 
and infirm. Hardly a day passed 
without his traveling through the 
city or suburbs on errands of mercy 
and priestly zeal. He was a familiar 
figure in almost every hospital (in 
Buenos Aires) and sanatorium where 
his kindly smile and Christian chari- 
ty brought solace to many a despond- 
ent patient." 



tius, Provincial Consultor was pre- 
paring an 8 year old little girl from 
Boston, Mass., for her First Holy 
Communion: her name is Finochiet- 
to-Sancristoforo! 



During the past year the Province 
was happy to have one of the Con- 
fraters ordained to the Subdiaconate 
at the Jesuit Major College, where 
he had persued his Theological Stu- 
dies. Also eight boys from the Pre- 
paratory Seminary entered the No- 
vitiate during the past months. 



The city of Buenos Aires, as part 
of the Marian Year celebrations, 
had a mission in all the 123 parish- 
es; many of these missions were 
conducted by the Passionist Fathers. 



It will be remembered that Very 
Rev. Father Peter Richards intro- 
duced the "Cana Conferences" into 
the Argentine. The work is prosper- 
ing. In 1954 in Buenos Aires alone 
25 were given and as a consequence 
75 Christian Family Circles were es- 
tablished in the City and some 13 
in the surrounding country. This 
again brought requests for retreats 
to married couples and to engaged 
persons. The same work is being car- 
ried on in Uruguay. Most Rev. Fa- 
ther Albert, former General is Su- 
perior in the Retreat House at Mon- 
tevideo, where retreats are held 
especially for married couples. 



In August, Very Rev. Father Igna- 



Father Peter was on the radio 
twice a week during November; 
earlier he had a series of programs 
on T.V. 



90 



Most Reverend Father General is 

expected to arrive in the Immaculate 
Conception Province some time in 
February to preside at the Provin- 
cial Chapter. 

As we go to press we received 
the Marian issue of "Turris Eburnea" 
official organ of the Marian Congre- 
gation "Regina Passionis." It is 
edited by Father Andrew Killian, 
C.P., at the Passionist Preparatory 
Seminary in Vicente Casares. It is a 
quarterly in mimeographed but neat 
form. On the other hand we have 
been informed that "Santa Cruz" for- 
merly edited by our Fathers at Holy 
Cross Church, Buenos Aires, has 
been discontinued. 



Novices and one Brother on August 
23. On the same day six other young 
men were clothed with our Holy 
Habit. In the near future four fur- 
ther Brother-novices will make their 
profession and three Postulants for 
the Brotherhood will receive the 
habit. The newly professed clerics 
soon had to leave the Novitiate to 
persue their philosophical studies in 
Ere, the Retreat founded by Ven. 
Father Dominic and the first Retreat 
opened outside of Italy. 



PROVINCE OF ST. GABRIEL 

(Belgium) 
The Province of St. Gabriel had 
the joy of professing five clerical 



August 3rd was also a day of joy 
for the Province: it celebrated the 
Golden Jubilee of Profession of 
Brother Florintinus, C.P. Before the 
offertory of the Jubilee Mass Brother 
with a firm and vibrant voice re- 
newed his Holy Vows. A fervant Te 
Deum by all closed the beautiful 
ceremony in a very beatifully deco- 




Newly professed and Novices with their V. Rev. Fr. Master and 
Fr. Vice-Master Province of St. Gabriel. 



91 




Profession Day in St. Gabriel Province, Belgium. 



rated church. Most of Brother's life 
was spent on the quest; he went 
from village to village on foot and 
this seemed to be a great asset to his 
health. He also ever showed a deep 
religious spirit, especially when re- 
turning from the quest he was a 
model to all religious in the Retreat, 
attending all the observance, includ- 
ing the night office. 



of Banneux. Speaking of Pilgrim- 
ages, the tomb of Brother Isidore, 
mm C.P., in Kortrijk is visited by 
many daily, especially during the 
Christmas Season; among them were 
noticed some for New York. 



All this joy however was tempered 
by the death of six members of the 
Province within the space of a few 
months: four Fathers and two Bro- 
thers. R.I.P. 



During the month of August the 
Fathers and Brothers of the Novi- 
tiate house in Kruishoutem made 
their annual pilgrimage to Our Lady 



On November 21st a Marian Year 
Monument was solemnly blessed in 
the presence of many of the faith- 
ful on the Monastery grounds of the 
Novitiate house in Kruishoutem. The 
decision to erect the huge stone 
grotto was made in October and I 
within six weeks the work of art 
was completed. It was designed by 
Mr.. A. De Moor, whose life and art 
were discussed in a Detroit daily 
some time ago. The grotto measures 
some 24 ft in heighth and about 60 
feet in length and is constructed out 



92 



of dark colored stone, set off by the 
white statue of Our Lady and St. 
Bernadette. 



The second volume of "Passiolo- 
gia" appeared. As is known it is a 
bibliography of books, articles and 
reviews of the Passion of our Lord 
that appear yearly. Any one inter- 
ested can come in touch with the 
"Passiologicum", Diepenbeck, Bel- 
gium. 



The students also continue to pub- 
lish their "Adimpleo" magazine for 
mutual encouragement and inspira- 
tion. 



PROVINCE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 

(Australia) 

A word or two from the Western 
side of the Pacific. At the end of 
August Most Rev. Fr. General arrived 
in Sydney to commence the Canoni- 
cal Visitation of our Province, and 
to preside at our 11th Provincial 
Chapter. After completing the Visi- 
tation of our five Retreats, Father 
General and the Capitulars met at 
our Juniorate, St. Pius X. Retreat, 
St. Ives, N.S.W. for the Chapter. Our 
new Provincial is V. Rev. Fr. Xavier, 
formerly Rector of St. Gabriel's Re- 
treat, Leopold, Vic, with Frs. Paschal 
and Placid as Consultors. 

During the year three of our Stu- 
dents were ordained Priests, Frs. Ig- 
natius and Theophane in July, and 
Fr. Nicholas in December. The young 
Priests are continuing their studies 
at St. Paul's Retreat, Glen Osmond, 
S.A. 

Early in January nine boys from 
our Juniorate went to the Novitiate 



at Mary's Mount, Goulburn, N.S.W. 
where they will be clothed in the 
holy Habit at the end of the month; 
about the same time, two cclerical 
Novices will make their First Pro- 
fession and then go on to Glen Os- 
mond to commence their studies. 

The additions to our Church at 
Marrickville are almost finished, and 
are to be blessed and opened on 30th 
January. The people of the Parish 
are looking forward eagerly to the 
great day. 

During the last three months every 
available missioner has been engaged 
on mission and retreat work, and 
there is a heavy list of engagements 
to keep us busy during 1955. 

Just recently, the Archbishop of 
Brisbane, Queensland, invited us to 
his Diocese, and a suitable property 
has been purchased in the suburb 
of Oxley about eight miles from the 
city of Brisbane; it is hoped that a 
small community will take up resi- 
dence some time in April, when the 
present owners will give us vacant 
possession. 

Sunday, October 10th, 1954 Pres- 
entation Retreat in Goulburn had 
the honor of having the diocesan 
Marian Year Porcession on its 
grounds with the Archbishop of 
Canberra-Goulburn presiding. The 
newly elected Father Rector, Father 
Gerard, C.P. gave the sermon for 
the occasion. A statue of Our Lady 
was carried around the grounds with 
about 1,000 of the faithful partici- 
pating. 



Among the many worthy projects 
that the Province of the Holy Spirit 
furthers is devotion to St. Mary 



93 



Goretti. A Goretti Guild has been 
established at the Preparatory Semi- 
nary, (in St. Ives) which is doing 
wonderful work; the guild publishes 
literature on St. Mary, including a 
quarterly magazine "St. Maria". The 
magazine addresses children to have 
a devotion to St. Mary, as their Pa- 
troness, to young men and women, 
who will find in her a strong pro- 
tectress, to Religious Brothers and 
Sisters to place St. Mary before the 
minds and hearts of the children 
they teach and to fathers and moth- 
ers who will encourage their child- 
ren with a love for St. Mary. The 
Guild itself was established by His 
Eminence Cardinal Gilroy, Arch- 
bishop of Sydney. Lest anyone think 
the specific work of the Preparay- 
tory Seminary, C.P. at St. Ives suf- 
fers from the work the guild de- 
mands, let it be known that the stu- 
dents taught there must and do pass 
the government examinations. 



PROVINCE OF OUR 
LADY OF HOPE 

(Holland) 
The big news and joy of the Pro- 
vince, of course, is that the Pre- 
fecture of Ketapang, Bornoe, was 
given to the Fathers by the Holy 
See, with Msgr. Gabriel Sillekens, 
C.P. as first Apostolic Prefect. In 
another page of this issue we have 
treated this big event fully. 



Fr. Oswald Lauwerier, C.P., mem- 
ber of the Province has published 
a new study of St. Paul of the Cross: 
"De Mystieke Weg Van de H. Paulus 
Van het Kruis" (the Mystical way 
of St. Paul of the Cross) The work 



is dedicated to "Reverendissimo 
Malcolm a Maria undevigesimo S. 
Pauli a Cruce successori in moder- 
anda Congregatione a SS. Cruce et 
Passione D. N. J. Chr. humiliter et 
grati animo D. D. D. Auctor". The 
book is strictly scientific and is con- 
sidered to be the first of its kind in 
and outside of the Congregation. It 
is a book of 148 pages, 40 of which 
are references to sources. We are 
anxiously looking forward to a pro- 
mised English translation in the 
near future. The original is done in 
the dutch language. In 1938 (Octo- 
ber issue) of the "Etudes Carmeli- 
tains" the same author (upon re- 
quest) published an article on the 
personality of St. Paul of the Cross. 



Another work of love for our Holy 
Founder in the province is a collec- 
tion of more than 3,000 quotations 
from the Letters of St. Paul of the 
Cross that have some reference to 
our Holy Rules. Each quotation is 
preceded by a) date of letter in 
question; b) chapter number and 
date of edition of Holy Rules to 
which the respective quotation has 
reference; c) number of present 
Holy Rules to which quotation is 
referable. After each quotation 
volume and page of "Letters" is 
given. The whole has been arranged 
alphabetically, similar to the analy- 
tical index in our present Holy 
Rules. An extensive analytical index 
of matter is added plus all the ref-i 
erences made to our present edition 
of the Holy Rules. There are only 
three copies of this work (typewrit- 
ten) in existence, two in Mook and 
one in Sts. John and Paul with the 



94 



"Rule Committee". The reporter did 
not mention who the author or au- 
thors of this work could be. 



Mook, where our Monastery of 
Mater Dolorosa is situated, lies with- 
in the diocese of Roermond whose 
zealous Bishop has a great devotion 
to the Blessed Mother. A star is on 
his coat of arms with the inscription 
"Stella Duce". A lone star was also 
part of the escutcheon of ancient, 
pagan Maastricht. The star today has 
reference to the miraculous Statue of 
the "Stella Maris" which is enthron- 
ed in the golden altar of her basilica, 
in Maastricht. The good Bishop 
ordered that the statue be carried 
to all the churches of his diocese. 

The parish of Mook has within its 
boundries two Passionist Monas- 
teries, and two convents of Sisters. 
October 25th was the day scheduled 
for the Star of the Sea to visit 
Mater Dolorosa Retreat. At 7:30 
P.M. two processions were formed: 
one from the Parish Church with the 
statue, the other from the Retreat 
to meet the statue and carry it in 
procession to the Monastery church. 
There were about 500 in the pro- 
cession of which there were about 
150 from the two Passionist Monas- 
teries, including the students of the 
Preparatory Seminary. All had a 
light candle in one hand and the 
rosary in the other. All the way 
there was praying and singing; The 
Mayor of Mook represented the civil 
authorities. The statue was carried 
into the profusely decorated church 
by the students and placed on the 
throne prepared for it. At 9:30 P.M. 
there was a Solemn High Mass and 



after that till 12:30 A.M. there was 
private devotion by many of the 
faithful. At 12:30 there were low 
Masses; after the second the Blessed 
Sacrament was exposed. There were 
scheduled groups for adoration until 
the end of the exposition at 6:00 
A.M. when Masses again were cele- 
brated. At 9:30 A.M. there was 
another Solemn High Mass during 
which Bishop Lememns addressed 
the crowd of faithful. After the 
Mass the statue was carried to the 
convent of the Dominican Nuns in 
a colorful procession; and thus the 
visit of the Star of the Sea came to 
end for the Passionists. 



October 31st, Feast of Christ the 
King was a red letter day for the 
Passionist Missionary Sisters of St. 
Gemma in Mook. (vide THE PAS- 
SIONIST Vol. II number 2). These 
Sisters have as their founder the 
newly appointed Apostolic Prefect 
of Ketapang, Msgr. Sillekens, C.P., 
who at that time was Provincial of 
the Province of Our Lady of Holy 
Hope. On the Feast of Christ the 
King, last year, they took solemn 
possession of their first real con- 
vent; up to that time they had been 
living in a wing of the Preparatory 
School of our Fathers in Mook. The 
celebration started with a solemn 
High Mass in the Parish Church. 
The celebrant was the Very Rev. 
Father Sebastian, C.P., General Con- 
suitor, assisted by the V. Rev. Fr. 
Provincial and the Second Provincial 
Consultor. The Rev. Pastor was 
Archpriest and the Bishop assisted 
pontificaliter in cope at the throne. 
Then came the solemn carrying of the 



95 





96 



Blessed Sacrament in a grand Corpus 
Christi Procession to the new convent; 
the crowd wound its way to the new 
location through the fields amidst 
singing and the playing of the band 
etc. At the convent an outdoor altar 
had been erected where His Excel- 
lency imparted the Benediction and 
then carried the Blessed Sacrament 
into the new convent's Chapel. The 
great ceremony ended by the crowd 
singing a hym to Christ the King 
to band accompaniment. 

Opposite page. Above: Blessed. Sacra- 
ment solemnly carried to new Con- 
vent of the Passionist Missionary Sis- 
ters of St. Gemma. Bl. Sacrament is 
carried by V. Very Gen. Consultor 
Sebatian, deacon. Very Rev. Fr. Pro- 
vincial and subdeacon V. Rev. Fr. 
Second Consultor. Below: Passionist 




Missionary Sisters and the "brass 
band" on their way to the new Con- 
vent. Above: New Convent of the 
Passionist Missionary Sisters of St. 
Gemma. Below Mary "Star" of the 
Sea carried by C.P. Students to 
neighboring chapel. 




97 



The attendance of the faithful, also 
the Mayor of Mook, showed the love 
the people have for this new Sister- 
hood. Although primarily intended 
for the foreign missions it is already 
making itself also useful at home 
by teaching and nursing etc. May 
God grant blessing to the new insti- 
tute! 



THE PASSIONIST for May 1954 
made mention of the trade-school for 
our Brothers in the Province. These 
Brothers were immensely helpful in 
finishing the new Convent spoken 
of above. Although the principal 
idea of this trade-school training is 
for the foreign missions, the Bro- 
thers are also doing fine work at 
home. 



The Students of Theology in Mook 
have issued their 3rd number of 
"Passionisten Leven" (Passionist 
Life). It covers Passionist news over 
the world, especially that of Holland 
and also articles of interest to the 
life of a Passionist. It is in mimeo- 
graph but very neat format. 

VICE-PROVINCE 
OF THE FIVE WOUNDS 

( Germany-Austria ) 
A few changes were made within 
the past months in the Superiors of 



the Vice-Province. Father Victor's 
resignation as Provincial Consultor 
was accepted by the General Curia. 
In his place Fr. Leopold was ap- 
pointed; as a consequence Father 
Leopold is no longer Rector in 
Schwarzenfeld but is still Master of 
Novices, without Novices, however! 
V. Rev. Father Joseph, a Bavarian 
by birth, has been named Rector in 
Schwarzenfeld and Fr. Ignatius 
Vicar. 



V. Rev. Father Walter, C.P., Pro- 
vincial, made his way to Maria 
Schutz, red-zone; in 1954 some 250,- 
000 pilgrims visited our pilgrimage 
church there. The church is also a 
favorite spot for getting married. 
In 1954 our Fathers took care of 
230 weddings there. 



Most Reverend Father General has 
given permission for our Father 
William to continue his work in N. 
Germany, the diaspora, where he 
has been working for some on 
"Blizmissions" by means of an auto- 
chapel. In cell, the headquarters, 
there are about 10,000 Catholics and 
no church; Holy Mass etc. is being 
offered in schools and Protestant 
churches. So far no permission has 
been granted to build a church. Let 
us pray for the project! 




98 




na 



The new edition of the "Passionist 
Directory for Missions and Retreats" 

of Holy Cross Province was put into 
the hands of the Brethren some time 
during December last. It is a neat 
little booklet of some 140 pages. 
The key to the references shows that 
besides the Rules and Regulations 
also former Mission Directories were 
used as well as the suggestions of 
the Missionary Congress of 1945. The 
date of the approval of Father Gen- 
eral is December 31, 1952, of Father 
Provincial's Introduction August 
15th, 1954. It is the fond hope of 
all that the new edition will bring 
added blesing to our Missions and 
Retreats. The committee to whom 
the work of revising the Directory 
consisted of Fathers Stanislaus, Al- 
ban and Emmanuel. 



Father Nicholas' Life of BROTH- 
ER ISIDORE brought the following 
letters of commendation, among 
many others: 

My dear Father Nicholas: 

Your little life of Brother Isidore 
tells in simple language the working 
of God's grace in an humble soul. 
In these days when so much store 
is placed on success, this booklet 
shows youth the secret of genuine 




3^ 



success and greatness. I thank you 
for it. 

Sincerely yours in Christ. 

(Signed) Samuel Cardinal Strich 

Archbishop of Chicago. 



Dear Father Nicholas: 

Thank you for your thoughtfulness 
and kindness in sending me a copy 
of "Brother Isidore" which I shall 
read with interest and I am sure with 
edification. 
With best wishes, I am 

Very Sincerely Yours 

(signed) F. Cardinal Spellman 

Archbishop of New York. 



My dear Father Nicholas: 

I have read with interest the Life 
of Brother Isidore, C.P., as it comes 
from your fluent pen. The reading 
of it has given me great inspiration 
and I hasten to offer my sincerest 
congratulations to its scholarly au- 
thor. 

His Grace, the Archbishop of Cin- 
cinnati, in his introduction had given 
you high praise, and with him I con- 
cur when he says that the book is 
written in a straightforward un- 
adorned style, with the literary 
medium best suited to present to 
your readers the life of a simple lay 
brother. In this life your have met 



99 



the rank and file of our people, and 
I am sure that among our young 
men in the world it will spark a vo- 
cation to the brotherhood. It is an 
uncultivated field in America. 

With every good wish and senti- 
ments of esteem, I am 

Very sincerely yours in Christ, 

(signed) William T. Mulloy 

Bishop of Covington. 



V. Rev. and dear Father: 

At last we have received the Eng- 
lish edition of the life of Brother 
Isidore. It pleases me very much. 
May it make Brother Isidore more 
and more known. Here in Belgium 
devotion to the Servant of God grows 
greater and greater. His grave is 
never alone and people are also 
constantly visiting the house where 
he was born. Thousands upon thous- 
ands have visited his grave this sum- 
mer and thanksgivings are on the 
increase. Congratulations for the 
publication of the book and the 
Novena and my sincerest thanks for 
the interest in the Cause of Brother 
Isidore. 

In Xsto Iesu 

P. Angelus 

Postulator of the Cause 

of the Servant of God, Isidore of 

St. Joseph Wezembeek — Oppem 

Belgium. 



"God's Tailor" is an inspiring little 
biography of a Benedictine Lay Bro- 
ther, Meinrad Eugster, O.S.B. The 
spirit of supernatural simplicity and 
humility, so fundamental in the life 
of any Brother in any Order or Con- 
gregation, shines forth on almost 
every page of the interesting history 



of Brother Meinrad's life. It will 
prove inspirational reading matter 
for any religious Brother. It is a 
Grail Publication (St. Meinrad, Ind.) 
and can be had for 15c a copy. 



October 8th, 1954 Assunta Goretti, 
Mother of St. Mary Goretti, ended 
her earthly career in Corinaldo, An- 
cona, Italy. The solemn funeral took 
place on October 11th with Bishop 
Humbertus Ravetta presiding. Sev- 
eral other bishops were present for 
the sacred rites as well as a repre- 
sentative of the Italian Government, 
three of her children, Father Maurus, 
C.P., Postulator of the cause of St. 
Mary Goretti and also the Saint's 
asassin, Alexander Serenelli. The 
remains were temporarily placed in 
the common cemetery; plans are to 
later place them in the local chapel 
in honor of her Virgin Martyr 
daughter, which is under construc- 
tion. 



St. Mary Goretti has been officially 
named Patroness of Nettuno by the 
Holy See. 



From a note in the "Revue de la 
Passion", periodical edited by our 
Brethren in France, we learn that 
Fr. Maurus, C.P., the Postulator who 
so successfully brought St. Mary 
Goretti to the altars, has now been 
named Postulator for the cause of 
His Holiness Pope Pius IX. THE 
PASSIONIST, wishes him all success 
in this, since, Pope Pius IX was very 
close to our Congregation, gave us 
"Scala Santa", visited personally 
Sts. John and Paul etc. But the work 
for this canonization will be differ- 



100 



ent from that of St. Mary Goretti, 
since the latter could neither read 
nor write. 



1954 was the hundreth anniversary 
of the last time a Pope visited per- 
sonally Sts. John and Paul. On May 

18th, Pope Pius IX spent the day in 
Sts. John and Paul. Acta Congrega- 
tionis (May 1954. p. 308) gives the 
account of the great event that the 
Platea of Sts. John and Paul pre- 
served for us. 



The December issue of "Cross and 
Crown", published an article on our 
St. Gabriel written by Father Colum- 
ban, C.P., Director in Des Moines. 
We must congratulate Father in his 
work and we are all happy that St. 
Gabriel was brought to the atten- 
tion of the English speaking world 
during the Marian Year. 



Also the following Fathers ap- 
peared in various Catholic periodi- 
cals: 

Fr. John M. Render, C.P. American 
Eccesiastical Review, Nov. 1954. 
"Newman at Birmingham," sketch 
of the city in which Newman lived 
and worked. Priest, August, 1954. 
Translation of St. Paul of the 
Cross "Regulation for Confessors." 
Also article in Dec. Crozier. 
Fr. Aidan Baker, C.P. Clergy Review, 
Dec. 1954. "TheValiant Woman," 
on Mary as the valiant woman typi- 
fied by Judith. 
Fr. Fulgentius Ventura, C.P., Homi- 
letic and Pastoral Review, January 
1955. "The Foundation of Humili- 
ty" on the importance of humility 
in the spiritual life. 



Fr. Roger Mercurio, C.P., and Fr. 
Conell Dowd, C.P., regular contri- 
butors to Books on Trial, each has 
had three book review since Octo- 
ber on books of theological or 
scripture nature. 

Fr. Ronald Murray, C.P., "Divine 
Friendship" in "'Cross and Crown" 
June 1954. 



"Prayer", especially mental prayer 
proves to be a stumbling block for 
many religious and, perhaps, the ma- 
jority of the laity never think of 
practising mental prayer. "The Best 
Part" a little booklet of 22 pages 
written by Father Benjamin, C.P., 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross, 
is a fine clear and persuasive treat- 
ment of the subject, useful both for 
a layman and for religious. It has 
now appeared in its fourth edition 
and over 31,000 copies have been 
printed and distributed. We all must 
admit the necessity and advantages 
of mental prayer, also for the laity, 
but also often feel helpless in trying 
to do something about it. Why not 
try distributing Father Benjamin's 
"The Best Part"? Father Benjajmin 
has held responsible positions in the 
Congregation, including that of 
Master of Novices. At present he is 
Pastor of St. Joseph Parish, 1309 
Central Ave., Union City, N.J. Copies 
of the opsuculum can be had from 
the author at 10c per copy. 



Father Victor Donovan, C.P., Pro- 
vince of St. Paul of the Cross had 
the honor of preaching during the 
Church Unity Octave, 1954, in the 
National Shrine of the Immaculate 
Conception, Washington, D.C. It be- 



101 



ing the Marian Year he naturally 
spoke on the Blessed Mother in her 
USA Shrine and being interested 
personally in the ''children of Israel" 
the subject of his sermon was "Our 
Lady and Israel". The Franciscan 
Friars of the Atonement are using 
the sermon for Church Unity pub- 
licity purposes in 1955. 



"Our Lady's Orphanage", a quar- 
terly, published at Nazareth, N.C., in 
a recent number gave two pages, 
with picture, in memory of the late 
Father Patrick Darrah, C.P., Pro- 
vince of St. Paul of the Cross. For 
the past several years he had been 
a benefactor and friend of the or- 
phans. Especially did he take an 



interest in their library. His efforts 
were appreciated by all, whether 
they were priests, sisters, staff or 
children. It seems the entire or- 
phanage sought his advice and his 
spiritual suggestions or direction. 



The readers of THE PASSIONIST 
who have been stationed in Sacred 
Heart Retreat, Louisville, during the 
past years, will be interested to know 
that Brother Capistran, C.F.X., was 
sent to work in the Uganda mission 
of the Xaverian Brothers in East 
Africa. In one of the departure 
ceremonies Father James, C.P., 
(Louisville Community) had the 
honor of serving as Deacon of the 
Solemn High Mass. 



Gemma receives the stigmatas see "Life" by Fr. Germano, p. et; also 
"Passionist" July 1954 p. 343ff "I felt all the powers of my soul in recollec- 
tion. My intellect knew nothing but my sins . . . and all the torments that 
Jesus had endured to save me . . . This recollection ivas quickly followed by 
a rapture out of my senses, and I found myself in the presence of my Mother, 
who had my Angel Guardian on her right. He spoke first, telling me to repeat 
the act of contrition, and when I had done so my Holy Mother said: 'My 
child, in the name of Jesus may all thy sins be forgiven thee.' Then she 
added: 'My Son Jesus loves thee beyond measure, and wishes to give thee a 
grace; wilt thou knoiv how to render thyself worthy of it? My misery did not 
know what to answer. Then she added: 'I will be a Mother to Thee; wilt thou 
be a true child?' She opened her mantle and covered me with it. At that 
moment Jesus appeared with all his wounds open: but from those wounds 
there no longer came forth blood, but flames of fire. In an instant those 
flames came to touch... my hands, my feet, and my heart. I felt as if I were 
dying; I should have fallen to the ground had not my mother held me up, 
while all the time I remained beneath her mantle. I had to remain several 
hours in that position. Finally she kissed my forehead, all vanished, and I 
found myself still kneeling; but I still felt great pain in my hands, feet and 
heart. I rose to go to bed, and because aware that blood ivas flowing from 
those parts where I felt pain. — Gemma bore the marks of Jesus Crucified. 



102 



■!,-„•, ^.L-JJ 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 



Works of the ministry, from September 1954 to January, 1955 inclusive, that have come to our 

notice). 

"*" Denotes Marian Year Charity missions in Diocese of Little Rock. 



COMMUNITY RETREATS 

1955 



Chicago 


January 


25 — February 1 


Cincinnati 


January 


25 — February 1 


Detroit 


February 8 — 15 


Des Moines 


February 3 — 15 


Louisville 


February 15 — 22 


Normandy 


January 


27 — February 3 


Boys 


January 30 — February 3 


Creve Coeur 


January 4 — 11 


Kansas 


February 15 — 22 


Birmingham 


January 2 — 7 


Ensley 


January 


9—16 


Houston 


January 4 — 11 


Sierra Madre 


January 6 — 13 


Citrus Heights 


January 6 — 13 






MISSIONS 


SEPT. 5-12 


Cestohawa, Texas 


Nativity BMV 


5-19 


Rockford, Iowa 


Holy Name 


12-19 


Roseville, Calif. 


St. Rose 


12-26 


Beaumont, Texas 


St. Anthony 


19-26 


Sigourney, Iowa 


Assumption 




Dentin, Nebr. 


St. Mary 




St. Henry, Ind. 


St. Henry 




Levy, Ark.* 


St. Anne 




Sylvan Hills, Ark.* 


Immac. Conception 




Mena, Ark.* 


St. Agnes 




Wynne, Ark.* 


St Peter 




Newport, Ark.* 


St. Cecilia 




Adona, Ark.* 


St. Elizabeth 




Colfax, Iowa 


Immac. Conception 


19-3 


Cincinnati, O. 


Visitation BMV 




Cleveland, O 


St. Ladislaus 


19-10 


Cleveland, O 


BMV Good Counsel 


23-28 


Goodrich, 111. 


Sacred Heart 


26-3 


Hopkinton, Iowa 


St. Luke 




Faribault, Minn. 


St. Lawrence 




Protivin, Iowa. 


Holy Trinity 




Redwood Falls, Minn 


. St. Catherine 




Humboldt, Kansas 


St. Joseph 




Waldron, Ark.* 


St. Albert 




McCrory, Ark.* 


St. Mary 




Batesville, Ark.* 


Our Lady 




Geyer Springs, Ark.* 


St. Theresa 




Lawler, Iowa 


Mt. Carmel 




Sonora, Calif. 


St. Patrick 


26-17 


Dearborn, Mich. 


St. Alphonsus 


27-31 


Winona, Minn. 


St. Mary College 


OCT. 3-10 


N. Little Rock, Ark. 


St. Ma.ry 




Montrose, Mo. 


Immac. Conception 




Cresco, Iowa 


St. Joseph 




San Antonio, Texas 


St. Michael 




Wichita, Kansas 


McConnell AFB 




Ravenna, Nebr. 


Lady of Lourdes 




Waukegato, 111. 


St. Bartholomew 




Birmingham, Ala. 


St. Mark 




Hartford, Ark.* 


St. Leo 




Malvern, Ark. 


St. John 




Ryan, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


3-17 


Evergreen Park, 111. 


St. Bernadette 


10-17 


Madison, Minn. 


St. Michael 



Fr. David Bulman, C.P. 

(East) 
Fr. Bertrand McDewell 

(East) 
Fr. Bertrand McDewell 

(East) 
Fr. David Bulman 

(East) 
Fr. Howard Ralenkotter 
Fr. Ronan Dowd 
Fr. Gordian Lewis, C.P. 
Fr. Ronan Dowd 
Fr. John Devany 
Fr. Jerome Stowell 
Fr. Jerome Stowell 
Fr. Robert Borger 
Fr. Damian Cragen 
Fr. Charles Guilfoyle 



Hilary 

Alb an 

Edward 

Emmanuel, Caspar 

Philip 

Godfrey 

Fidel is 

Robert 

Dominic 

Dun stan 

Arnold 

Cornelius 

Cormac 

Justin 

Boniface 

Cyril Mary 

Regis, Bartholomew 

Gilbert 

Alb an 

Daniel, Michael 

Finan 

Terence 

Charles 

Dun stan 

Arnold 

Cornelius 

Robert 

Walter 

Edward 

Kyran, Flannon, John 

Gordian 

Emmanuel 

Conell 

Finan 

Bertrand 

Cormac 

Keith 

Justin 

Lambert 

Dunstan 

Dominic 

Alban 

Timothy, James 

Terence 



103 



17-24 



17-31 



24-28 
24-31 



31-14 



NOV. 



7-21 



21-28 



21-5 
28-5 



Seneca, Kansas 
Walnut, Kansas 
Des Pikadnes, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Bald Knob, Ark. * 
Newago, Mich. 
Grass Valley, Calif. 
Hillsboro, Wis. 
Little Kock, Ark. 
Lonsdale, Minn. 
New Buffalo, Mich, 
Clear Lake, Iowa 
Meyer, Iowa 
Foreman, Ark.* 
Rhodes, Iowa 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Independence, O. 
Victoria, Texas 
Norman, Okla. 
Detroit, Mioh. 
Booneville, Mo. 
Sheffield, Ala. 
Delhi, Ala. 
Marathon, Wis. 
W. Des Moines, Iowa 
DeQueen, Ark.* 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Paragould, Ark. 
Yuba City, CaLf. 
Bridge City, Texas 
Louisville, Ky. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Madelia, Minn. 
Irishtown, Mich. 
Ellinwood, Kansas 
Beatrice, Nebr. 
Altura, Minn. 
Jonesboro, Ark. 
Prairieburg, Iowa 
Churchville, Iowa 
Racine, Wis. 
Akron, Ohio 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Cleveland, O. 
Churchpoint, La. 
Springfield, Minn. 
Litchfield, Minn. 
Stewart, Minn. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Highlands, Texas 
Crossett, Ark.* 
Weiner, Ark.* 
Branson, Mo. 
Algiers, La. 
Springfield, Minn. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Church Point, La. 
New Hope, Ky. 
Sun Valley, Calif. 
Dubuque, Iowa 
Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Greenleaf, Minn. 
Kansas City, Kansas 
Bryan, Texas 
Marked Tree, Ark.* 
State Center, Iowa 
Waukee, Iowa 
Lillis, Kansas 
Eldora, Iowa 
Pritchard, Ala. 
Tyler, Minn. 
Crowley, La. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Texas City, Texas 



St. Mary 

St.. -faiii-ck 

St. Mary 

St. Ann 

St. nicnard 

St. ±iarthoiomew 

St. Patrick 

St. Aioysius 

u. L. uoou Counsel 

immac. Conception 

St, Mary of Lake 

St. Patrick 

&acred Heart 

Sacred Heart 

St. Joseph 

/YfcO-nsion 

Sts. Joseph and Paul 

St. Michael 

.Lady of Lourdes 

Naval Air Center 

SL Bartholomew 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St. Joseph 

tvayvihe Miss. 

St. Mary 

Sacred Heart 

St. Barbara 

St.. * raincis de S 

St. Mary 

St. Isidore 

St, Henry 

St. Pnnip Neri 

Holy Souls 

Mater Dolorosa 

Si. Patrick 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St,. Joseph 

St. Anthony 

Bl. Sacrament 

St. Joseph 

Assumption 

St. Rita 

St. Mary 

St. Augustine 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St. Raphael 

St. Philip 

St. Boniface 

St. Stephen 

St. Jude 

Holy Cross 

St. Anthony 

O. L. of the Lake 

All Saints 

St, Raphael 

St. Paul 

Mother of Mercy 

St. Vincent de Paul 

Holy Rosary 

St. Anthony 

St. Joseph 

St. Columbanus 

Sts. Cyril & Method. 

Bryan AFB 

St. Norbert 

St. Joseph 

St. Boniface 

St. Joseph 

St. Mjary 

L. of Fatima 

St. Dionysius 

St. Theresa 

St. Elizabeth 

St. Mary 



Ignatius 

tormac 

tjnaries 

Micnael 

Cornelius 

Koderick 

Edward 

Alban 

Emmanuel 

uodfrey 

Daniel 

a man 

Fideiis 

Dunstan 

Keith 

ivoland, Angelo 

Gordian, Lambert 

Justin, Philip 

Clarence, Robert 

Cormac 

Roderick 

Terence 

i>ertr^ind 

Arnold 

ivia tunas, Fideiis 

Ignatius 

D unstan 

f'lannon, John 

Cornelius 

Edward 

jonn Aelred 

.Bartholomew, Ronan 

Emmanuel 

Godfrey 

Cyril Mary 

Cormac 

Conell, Miles 

Keith 

Cornelius 

Alban 

Michael 

Daniel 

Brian, John 

Edwin, Timothy, Regis 

Hilary 

Arnold 

Fideiis 

Terence 

Howard 

Charles 



Dunstan 

Cornelius 

Stanislaus 

Lambert 

Godfrey, Warren 

Finan, Michael 

A mold 

Flannon 

Edward 

Alban 

Emmanuel 

Terence 

Cyril Mary 

Brian 

Cornelius 

Keith 

Miles 

Conell 

Alban 

Lambert 

Terence 

Robert 

Walter, Timothy 

Emmanuel 



104 



^^ ^ss?rr—^^ 



DEC. 



SEPT. 



OCT. 





Ireland, Ind. 


St. Mary 


Fidelis 




Holy Cross, Ky. 


Holy Cross 


Daniel 




Fortworth, Texas 


St. Andrew 


Godfrey 




Masury, O. 


St. Bernadette 


Cyril Mary 




Creston, Iowa 


St. Malachy 


Ignatius 




Damon, Texas 


Sts. Cyril & Meth. 


Clarence 




South Bend, Ind. 


St. Stanislaus 


Hilary 


28-12 


Akgonac, Mich. 


St. Catherine 


Regis 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Rita 


Bartholomew, Dunstan 




Tupelo, Miss. 


St. James 


Cornelius 




Sheboygan, Wis. 


St. Peter Glaver 


Gordian, Flannon 




Sacramento, Calif. 


L. of Guadalupe 


Edward 


5-8 


Iowa Falls, Iowa 


St. Mark 


Miles 


5-12 


Alton, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Alb an 




Scammon, Kansas 


St. Bridget 


Michael 




Hampton, Minn. 


St. Matthias 


Terence 




Tuscumibia, Ala. 


L. of Sacred Heart 


Lambert 




Carroll, Iowa 


St. Joseph 


Conell 




Fontana, Calif. 


S. Bernardino 


Theophsne 


5-19 


Alton, 111. 


St. Patrick 


Justin, Robert 


12-19 


Barberton, O. 


Sacred Heart 


Emmanuel 




S. Milwaukee, Wis. 


St. James 


Francis 




Detroit, Mich. 


Sts. Peter & Paul 


Hilary 


13-19 


Shafter, Calif. 


St. Theresa 

RETREATS 


Edward 


6-15 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Xiaivier Col. Srs. 


James 




Omaha, Nebr. 


St. Mary Col. Srs. 


Ronan 




Maple Mount, Ky. 


Ursuline Mother House 


Arnold 


16-26 


Glendale, O. 


Glenmary Srs. 


Cyril Mary 


4-6 


Harrison, O. 




Dunstan 


7-16 


Chicago, 111. 


Maria H. S. 


Godfrey 


9-12 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


S. Teresita Sanat. 


Joel 


10-12 


Dayton, O. 


Lay at Dominicans 


Howard 


12-14 


Mt. St. Joseph, O. 


Postulants 


Dunstan 


17-19 


Petoskiey, Mich. 


Laywomen 


Nilus 


21-28 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Clare Convent 


Paulinus 


22-24 


Backersfield, Calif. 


High School 


Joel, Kent 


24-26 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Women ar CP Nuns 


Vincent Mary 


24-10 


Minneapolis. Minn. 


Fist House 


Howard 


24-30 


Seattle, Wash. 


Good Sheph. 


Damian 


27-1 


Greenbay, Wis. 


Vocational 


Godfrey 


27-30 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Florian H. S. 


Hilary 


1-3 


Maria Stein, O. 


Laywomen 


Edwin 


1-3 


Petoskey, Mich. 


Laywomen 


Nilus 




Owensboro, Ky. 


Women at CP Nuns 


Vincent Mary 




Alhambra, Calif. 


Lay 


Kilian 




St. Paul, Kansas 


Laywomen 


Kevin 


8-10 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Lay 


Roland 


3-11 


J a spar, Ind. 


Comp. of Mary Srs. 


Fidelis 


4-6 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Fiat House 


Godfrey 




Bismark, N. Dak. 


St. Mary Hi 


Howard 




Memphis, Tenn. 


Christ. Bros. College 


Ronan, Caspar 


4-7 


Norfolk, Nebr. 


S. Heart Hi 


Luke 


11-14 


Milford, O. 


Cincy Clergy 


Boniface 


12-22 


Evansville, Ind. 


St. Mary Hosp. Nrs. 


Anthony 


13-15 


Sturgis, S. Dak. 


St. Martin Acad. 


Howard 


13-17 


St. Bernard, Ala. 


St. Bernard Sem. 


Bertrand 


14-20 


Evansville, Ind. 


St. Mary Hospital 


Anthony 


15-17 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Women at CP Nuns 


Vincent Mary 


16-26 


Grand Rapids, Mich 


Carmtelite Nuns 


Paulinus 


17-20 


Rapid City, S. Dak. 


St. John Hospital 


Howard 


18-20 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Dowling Hi 


Charles, Luke 




Atchison, Kansas 


Maur Hill Hi 


Arnold 


18-21 


Decatur, 111. 


Clergy 


Thomas 




Milford, O. 


Cincy Clergy 


Boniface 


19-21 


Aurora, 111. 


Marmion Acad. 


Nilus 


19-24 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Little Srs. (O. F.) 


Kevin 


20-22 


Oklahoma City, Okla. Mercy Hospital 


Cornell 


20-23 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Andrew Hi 


Hilary 


21-2S 


Frontenac, Minn. 


Villa Maria Ac?d. 


Howard 


22-24 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Women at CP Nuns 


Vincent Mary 


23-28 


Minnesota 




Howard 



105 



24-31 


Oshkosh, Wis. 


Alexian Bros. 


Alexis 


25-28 


Milford, O. 


Cincy Clergy 


Boniface 


25-29 


University City, Mo. 


Mercy Hi 


Nilus, Fergus. 


29-31 


Lexington, Ky. 


St. Jos. Hospital 


Howard 


1-8 


Tuscon, Ariz. 




Roland 


2-5 


Cincinnati, O. 


Seton Hi 


Howard 


5-7 


St. Paul, Kansas 


St. Francis Hi 


Jordan 




Owensboro, Ky. 


Women at CP Nuns 


Vincent Mary 


5-14 


Iron Mountain, Mich 


Carmelite Nuns 


Matthias 


8-11 


Milford, O. 


Cincy Clergy 


Boniface 


12-20 


Portland, Ore. 


Good Sheph. Conv. 


Damian 


12-21 


Normandy, Mo. 


Immac. Heart Conv. 


Roch 




Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Villa Maria 


Nilus 




Denver, Colo. 


Good Shepherd Ns. 


Alfred 


13-21 


Detroit, Mich. 


Vista Maria 


Roderick 


14-17 


Atchison, Kansas 


St. Benedict College 


Ignatius 


15-21 


Wausau, Wis. 


St. Mary Hospital 


Anthony 


17-21 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Passionist Nuns 


Matthias 




Erlanger, Ky. 


Passionist Nuns 


Arthur 




Kirkwood, Mo. 


Passionist Nuns 


Elmer 




San Antonio, Texas 


L. of the Lake Conv. 


Godfrey 


19-28 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Fiat House 


Howard 


20-24 


Portland, Ore. 


Good Sheph. Conv. 


Damian 


21-25 


New Orleans, La. 


Little Srs. (O.F.) 


Kevin 




New Orleans 


Little Srs. (O.F.) 


John Aelred 


22-24 


Memphis, Tenn. 


Christ. Bros. College 


John 




Chicago, 111. 


St. Thomas Hi. 


Charles 


26-5 


New Orleans, La. 


Little Srs. 


John Aelred 


26-28 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Women at CP. Nuns 


Vincent Mary 




Covington, Ky. 


St. Elizabeth Hosp. 


Edwin 




Minneapolis, Minn. 


Catholic Youth 


Howard 


28-1 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Francis Hosp. 


Paulinus 


29-8 


New Orleans, La. 


Little Srs. 


Kevin 




Loretto, Ky. 


Motherhouse 


Elmer 




Chicago, 111. 


Little Srs. 


Anthony 




Evansville, Ind. 


Little Srs. 


Boniface 




Cincinnati, O. 


Little Srs. 


Roderick 


29-10 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Pius X Hi. etc. 


Howard Jordan 


30-8 


Columbus, O. 


St. Rita Home 


Arthur 


2 1-8 


Tulsa, Okla, 


St. John Hospital 


Charles 




San Antonio, Texas 


L- of Lake Conv. 


Conleth 




Oakland, Calif. 


Little Srs. 


Joyce 


2-4 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Mary Hospital 


Paulinus 


2-5 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Elizabeth Conv. 


Bernard 


2-8 


Kankakee, 111. 


St. Mary Hospital 


Fergus 


4-8 


Youngstown, O. 


St. Mary Home 


Edwin 


5-8 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Villa Maria 


Nilus 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Elizabeth 


Timothy 


5-12 


Lakewood, O. 


SS. Cyril & Method. 


Cyril Mary, Luke 


6-S 


Houston, Texas 


Kirwin Hi 


Clarence 




Bedford, Ind. 


St. Vincent de Paul 


Fidelis 


6-10 


Dallas, Texas 


Good Counsel Acad. 


Godfrey 


12-19 


Long Beach, Calif. 


Carmelite Nuns 


Roland 


13-17 


Dallas, Texas 


St. Edward Acad. 


Godfrey 




Muskegon, Mich. 


Catholic Centr. Hi 


Howard 


19-21 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Lay 


Joel 


21-23 


Omaha, Nebr. 


Lady of Sorrows 


Philip 


28-1 


Chicago, 111. 


Mercy Infirmary 


Columban 




Chicago, 111. 


Resurrection Convent 


Daniel 




Columbus, O. 


Srs. of Mercy 


Paulinus 




Omaha, Nebr. 


St. Catherine Hospital 


Matthias 




Fairgo, N. Dak. 


Sacred Heart Academy 


Alfred 




Pontiac, Mich. 


St. Joseph Mercy Hosp. 


Arthur 




Owensboro, Ky. 


O. L. of Mercy Hosp. 


John 




Laredo, Tex. 


Mercy Hospital 


John Aelred 




Chicago, 111. 


O. L. of Mt. Carmel 


Frederick 




Ann Arbor, Mich. 


St. Joseph Hospital 


Hilary 




Oklahoma City, Okla 


Mercy Hospital 


Kevin 




Iowa City, la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Philip 




Centerville, la. 


St. Joseph Mercy Hosp. 


Leon 




Cedar Rapids. la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Nilus 




Des Moines, la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Fergus 




Homewood, Ala. 


O. L. of Sorrows Conv. 


Robert 




Marshalltown, la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Finan 



106 





Joplin, Mo. 


St. John Hospital 


Anthony 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Catherine Convent 


Regis 




Independence, Kans. 


Mercy Hospital 


Conell 




Omaha, Nebr. 


College of St. Mary 


Cormac 




Hot Springs, Ark. 


St. Joseph Hospital 


Emil 




Detroit, Mich. 


Provincial House 


Bartholomew 




Hutchinson, Kans. 


St. Elizabeth Hospital 


Miles 




Des Moines, la. 


St. Catherine Hall. 


Alban 




Oklahoma City, Okla 


Villa Teresa 


Jerome 




Ft, Scott, Kans. 


Mercy Hospital 


George 




Joplin, Mo. 


St. Peter's Con v. 


Terence 




Nashville, Tenn. 


St. Bernard Convent 


Germain 




Des Moines, la. 


Bp. Drumm Home 


Thaddeus 


30-1 


St. Louis, Mo. 


S. Heart Villa 


Campion 


JAN. 2-6 


Malibu, Calif. 




Angelo 


6-13 


Citrus Heights 


CP Community 


Charles 


17-20 


Sioux City, Iowa 


Heelan Hi 


Ignatius, Charles 


FEB. 2-11 


Belleville, 111. 


White Srs. 
NOVENAS 


Charles 


SEPT. 7-15 


Byssville, O. 


Holy Trinity 


Cyril Mary 


24-2 


La Crosse, Wis. 


St. Wenceslaus 


Miles 


OCT. 1-10 


Shreveport, La. 


Holy Trinity 


Hilary 


24-2 


Red Lake Falls, Minn. St. Joseph 


Charles 


NOV. 21-29 


Keokuk, Iowa 


St. Peter 


Michael 


28-6 


Whittier, Calif. 




Roland 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Immac. Conception 


Angelo 


28-8 


Grayslake, 111. 


St. Gilbert 


James 


29-7 


Irinton, O. 


St. Lawrence 


Gilbert 




Flint, Mich. 


St. Mary 


Francis 


29-8 


Bison, Okla 


St. Joseph 


Caspar 




New Buffalo, Mich. 


St. M of Lake 


M atthias 




Norwood Park, 111. 


Immac. Concept. 


Ronan 




Chicago, 111. 


S. Heart Home 


Anthony 


30-8 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Immac. Concept. 


Stanislaus 




Harlan, Iowa 


St. Michael 


Philip 




Joplin, Mo. 


St. Mary 


Cormac 




Houston, Texas 


Immac. Concept. 


Arnold 




Detroit, Mich. 


St. Mary Redford 


Finan 




Chicago, 111. 


St. William 


Gregory McE. 


DEC. 4-11 


0=irmichael, Calif. 


Assumption 


Canute 


5-14 


Yuma, Ariz. 


Immiac. Conception 


Joel 


16-25 


Dearborn, Mich. 


St. Sebastian 


Nilus 




FORTY HOURS 




SEPT. 5-7 


Waverly, Ky. 


St. Peter 


Bede 




Monterey Park, Calif 


. St. Stephen 


Kent 




Lawndale, Calif. 


St. Catherine Lab. 


Joel 


10-12 


Louisville, Ky. 


Holy Trinity 


James 




Manly, Iowa 


Sacred Heart 


Philip 




Adair, Iowa 


St. John 


Rian 


12-14 


Louisville. Ky. 


St. Augustine 


Conrad 




Melrose, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Luke 




Williams, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Keith 


17-19 


Lost Nation, Iowa 


Sacred Heart 


Paiulinus 




Stuart, Iowa 


All Saints 


Keith 




Audubon, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Charles 


19-21 


Louisville. Ky. 


St. Vincent de Paul 


James 




St. Paul Kv. 


St. Paul 


Bede 




Rhodelia, Ky. 


St. Theresa 


Conrad 




Lebanon Junct., Ky. 


St. Benedict 


Alexis 




Grinell, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Rian 




Cbanute, Kansas 


St. Patrick 


Roch 


24-26 


Peterstown, Iowa 


Sts. Peter & Paul 


Keith 




Marengo, IoWa 


St. Patrick 


Rian 




Cumming, Iowa 


St. John 


Frederick 




Westphalia, Kansas 


St. Teresa 


Joachim 


26-28 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Rita 


James 




New Albany, Ind. 


Holy Trinity 


Bede 




Melcher, Iowa 


Sacred Heart 


Brian 




Weller, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Luke 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Sts. Perp. & Felicitas 


Roland 


OCT. 1-3 


Kewanee. Iowa 


St. Joseph 


Paulinus 




Parniell, Iowa 


St. Joseph 


Philip 



107 





Wiota, Iowa 


St. Joseph 


Alfred 




Milwood, Mo. 


St. Alphonsus 


Leon 




Piqua, Kansas 


St. Martin 


Roch 


3-5 


Philpot, Ky. 


St. Lawrence 


Bede 




Cecelia, Ky. 


St. Ambrose 


Alexis 




Hugo, Minn. 


St. John Bapt. 


John Mary 




Dunlap, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Riian 




Alton, 111. 


St. Patrick 


Emil 


8-10 


Des Moines, Iowa 


St. Augustine 


Philip 




Greenfield, Iowa 


St. John 


Randal 




Anita, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Rian 




Greeley, Kansas 


St. John Bapt. 


Joachim 


10-12 


Knottsville, Ky. 


St. William 


Bede 




Peonia, Ky. 


St. Anthony 


Conrad 




Norfolk, Nebr. 


Sacred Heairt 


Luke 




Maloy, IoWa 


Immac. Concept. 


Malachy 


15-17 


Georgetown, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Alfred 




O 'Fallon, Mo. 


Assumption 


Emmet 


17-19 


Earlington, Ky. 


Immac. Conception 


Bede 




Stanley, Ky. 


St. Peter Alcantara 


Conrad 




Boone, Iowa 


Sacred Heart 


Thomas More 




Seneca, Kansas 


St. Mary 


Ignatius 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Mary 


Joel 




Cleveland, O. 


St. Philip 


Bartholomew 


22-24 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Agnes 


James 




Roseville, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Rian 


24-26 


New Buffalo, Mich. 


St. Miary of Lake 


Daniel 




Curdsville, Ky. 


St. Raphael 


Bede 




Akron, O. 


St. John 


Cyril Mary 




Woodbine, Iowa 


Saicred Heart 


Luke 




Albia, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Thomias More 




Sierra Madre, Calif. 


Assumption 


Joel 




San Bernardino, Cal. 




Kilian 




Warsaw, 111. 


Sacred Heart 


Emmet 


29-31 


Sommerset, Ky. 


St. Mildred 


James 




Brussels, 111. 


St. Mary 


Emil 




Odin, Kansas 


Holy Family 


Caspar 


31-2 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Patrick 


Bede 




New Haven, Iowa 


St. Peter 


Finan 


NOV. 5-7 


Des Moines, Iowa 


All Saints 


Philip 




Logan, Iowa 


St. Ann 


Paulinus 




Winterset, IoWa 


St. Joseph 


Luke 


7-9 


St. Louis, Mich. 


St. Joseph 


Cyril Mary 




Alhambra, Calif. 


All Souls 


Kent 




Long Beach, Calif. 


Carmel Conv. 


Piua 


12-14 


Des Moines, Iowa 


St. Peter 


Philip 




Ottiumiwa, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Luke 




Evansville, Ind. 


Sacred Heart 


Bartholomew 


14-16 


Lovilia, Iowa 


St. Peter 


Michael 




LaHabra, Calif. 


Lady of Gudalupe 


Roland 




Ferguson, Mo. 


Sts. John & James 


Emil 


21-23 


Curdsville. Ky. 


St. Elizabeth 


Bede 




Starlight, Ind. 


St. John 


James 




Owensboro, Ky. 


Im/mlaculate 


Conrad 




Peoria, 111. 


St. Cecilia 


John Mary 


26-28 


Des Moines, Iowa 


St. Cath. Hall 


Alfred 


28-30 


Owensboro, Ky. 


St. Stenhen Cathedr. 


John 




Des Moines. Iowa 


St. Ambrose Cathedr. 


Jerome 




Sigoumiey, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Keith 


3-5 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Christ the King 


•Tohn Mary 




Harper, Iowa 


St. Elizabeth 


Keith 




Atlantic, Iowa 


Sts. Peter & Paul 


Alfred 


5-7 


Louisville, Ky. 


Christ the King 


John 




Knoxville, Iowa 


St. Anthony 


Jerome 




Palmdale, Calif. 




Aiden 


12-14 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Bridget 


Ron/an 




Sterling. HI. 


St. Marv 


Keith 




E^ele Grove, Iowa 


Sacred Heart 


Philip 




Ackley, Iowa 


St. Mairy 
TRIDUA 


Miles 


OCT. 17-20 


Bayard, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Rian. 


NOV. 3-5 


New Haven, Iowa 


St. Peter 


Finan 


15-17 


Mound City. Kansas 


Bl. Phil. Duchesne 


Joachim 


DEC. 5-7 


Covington, Ky. 


La Salette 


Egbert 



108 



5-8 


Eldon, Iowa 


St. Aloysius 


Rian 




Des Moines, Iowa 


All Saints 


Columban 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Barnabas 


Kilian 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Cyprian 


Kent 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Resurrection 


Pius 




Claremont, Calif. 


Assumption 


Ferdinand 


6-8 


Fort Smith, Ark. 




Emmanuel 




THIRTEEN HOURS 




OCT. 17 


Avoca, Iowa 


St. Mary 


John Mary 




Rockwell City, la. 


St. Francis Assis. 


Malachy 


24 


Maple River, la. 


St. Francis Assis. 


Anthony 


NOV. 14 


Panora, Iowa 


St. Cecilia 


John Mary 


DEC. 19 


Casey, Iowa 


St. Joseph 


Thomas More 


28 


Spanish Lake, Mo. 


St. Aloysius 


Campion 




DAYS OF RECOLLECTION 




OCT. 3 


St. Louis, Mo. 


S. Heart Villa, Srs. 


Fergus 


6 


Maria Stein, O. 


Lay 


Edwin 


10 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


. Laywomen at Oarm. Srs. 


Caspar 


14 


St. Louis, Mo. 


St. Gabriel P. Sodal. 


Fergus 


17 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Helpers of H. Souls 


Campion 


19 


Cincinnati, O. 


Laywomen (Reperatrix) 


Cyril Mary 


20 


Kirkwood, Mo. 


Women at CP Nuns 


Fergus 


24 


Xavier, Kansas 


College Alumnae 


Conell 


26 


Cincinnati, O. 


Holy Cross (Clergy) 


Hubert 


31 


Parsons, Kansas 


St. Mary 


Kevin 




Maria Stein, O. 


Ladies 


Louis 


NOV. 3 


Cincinnati, O. 


L. of Repratrix 


Egbert 


5 


Joplin, Mo. 


St. Peter Hi 


Joachim 


6 


Cincinnati, O. 


Lady of Repratrix 


Louis 


13 


St. Paul, Kansas 


Clergy 


Pashal 


21 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Helpers of H. Souls 


Joel 


22 


Covington, Ky. 


La Salette 


Wilfred 




Cincinnati, O. 


Lady of Repratrix 


Bernard 


28 


Westphalia, Kansas 


St. Teresa Hi 


Joachim 


30 


Cincinnati, O. 


Teaching Clergy 


Egbert 


DEC. 5 


Cincinnati, O. 


Youth of H. Cross 


Bernardine 




Wichita, Kansas 


Srs. of St. Joseph 


Roch 


7 


Enid, Okla. 


Hi School 


Caspian: 


12 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Helpers of H. Souls 


Joel 


14 


St. Paul, Kansas 


Clergy 


Kevin 




St., Charles, Mo. 


Clergy 


Campion 


15 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Clergy (at Prep) 


Campion 


28 


Cincinnati, O. 


H. Cross for Clergy 


Hubert 


31 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Ursula Conv. 


Louis 


JAN. 2 


Olathe, Kansas 


St. Paul (Men) 


Joachim 


11 


Godfrey, 111. 


M. Im. Novitiate (Clergy) 


Campion 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 

HOLY CROSS PROVINCE — JANUARY 1955 



ROME 

Gen'l Curia 

Malcolm LaVelle 1 
Rene Champagne 42 

Students 

Firmian Parenza 43 
Paul M. Boyle 43 
Barry Rankin 43 

CHICAGO 

Neil Parsons 2 
Kyran O'Connor 3 
Gordian Lewis 4 
Camillus Kronlage 5 
Francis Flaherty 7 
Cyril Meis 
Aurelius Hanley 



Augustine Scannell 

Vincent X. Ehinger 

Justin Smith 23 

Alban Hickson 

Thomas Carter 

Richard Hughes 9 

Matthias Coen 

Gregory McEttrick 

Joseph M. O'Leary 

Alan Prendergast 

Kenneth Ward 

Donald Ryan 26 

Brian Mahedy 26 

Benet Kieran 10 

Barnabas M. Ahern 27 

Wm. Gail Steil 14 

Gregory Jos. Staniszewski 13 



Godfrey Poage 

John Baptist Pechulis 12, 

Warren Womack 16 

Carroll Stuhlmueller 27 

Clyde Zarski 10 

Melvin Glutz 43 

Ward Biddle 17 

In Minor Orders 

Gerard Steckel 
Peter Berendt 
Michael Jos. Stengel 
Raphael Domzall 
Owen Duffield 
Francis Cusack 
Casimir Gralewski 
Sebastian MacDonald 



109 



Louis Doherty 
Henry Whitechurch 
Philip Schaefer 
Thorn. Anthony Ragalski 

Brothers 

Felix Bauer 
George Stoiber 
Robert Raalman 
Joachim Saunders 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert Kroger 5 
Egbert Nolan 7 
Alphonsus Kruip 
Edwin Ronan 
Raphael Grashoff 
Bernard Brady 
Louis Driscoll 
Nicholas Schneiders 15 
Hubert Bohnie 20 
Cyprian Frank 9 
Emmanuel Sprigler 
Bernard Mary Coffey 9 
Dunstan Branigan 
Howard Ralenkotter 
Cyril Jablonovsky 
Bartholomew Adler 
Wilfrid Flanery 18 
Bernadine Johnston 10 

Brothers 

Columban Gausepohl 
William Lebel 
James Keating' 

LOUISVILLE 

Boniface Fielding 5 
Ronan Dowd 7 
Adalbert Schesky 
Lawrence Bailey 
Anselm Secor 9 
Alexis Quinlan 
Stanislaus Geekie 
Andrew Ahler 
Conrad Amend 
Hilary Katlewski 
Quentin Reneau 10 
Regis Enright 
Vincent M. Oberhauser 
James Busch 
Roger Mercurio 27, 17 
John Devany 
Forrest Macken, 28, 29 
Bede Doyle 

Deacons 

Myron Gohmann 

Denis McGowan 

Albert Schwer 

Eugene Peterman w 

Lawrence Browning 

Bruce Henry 

Berchmans Pettit 

Carl Anthony Tenhundfeld 

Brothers 

Gabriel Redmon 
Gilbert Schoener 
Casimir Skiba 
Leo Arndt 



Charles Archuleta 

ST. LOUIS 

Elmer Sandman 5 
Fergus McGuinness 7 
Celestine Leonard 31 
Aloysius Dowling 
Herbert Tillman 32 
Claude Nevin 32 
Edgar Ryan 32 
Ervan Heinz 32 
Germain Legere 32 
Cyprian Towey 32 
Wm. Joseph Hogan 32 
Leo P. Brady 17 
Emil Womack 32 
Leon Grantz 32 
Campion Clifford 32 
Raymond McDonough 32 
Jordan Grimes 33 
Simon Herbers 33 
Emmet Linden 30, 32 
Jude Monteith 
Brothers 
Conrad Adams 
Regis Ryan 
David Williams 
John Gebaur 
Thomas Brummett 

ST. PAUL 

Roch Adamek 5 
Faustinus Moran 6 
Cormac Lynch 7 
Matthew Miller 
Hyacinth Clarey 
Julian Montgomery 
Edward O'Sullivan 
George Jungles 
Urban O'Rourke 
Brendan McConnell 9 
Kevin Cunningham 
Arnold Vetter 
Leopold Vaitiekaitis 
Conell Dowd 
Paschal Barry 
Loran Aubuchon 14 
Caspar Watts 
Joachim Gemperline 11 

Novices 

Gabriel Duffy 
Augustine Wilhelmy 
James Michael Mahon 
Mel Joseph Spehn 
Andre Auw 
Terrance O 'Toole 
Aloysius Mary Hoolahan 
Bro. Isidore Bates 

Postulants 

Bro. Marion SWanson 
Bro. Raphael Couturier 

Brothers 

Louis Hochendoner 
Francis Hanis 
Pius Martel 
Christopher Zeko 

DES MOINES 

Ignatius Bechtold 5 



Miles Bero 7 
Ignatius Conroy 
Sylvester Cichanskl 
Malachy Farrell 
Philip Gibbons 
Paulinus Hughes 
Peter Kilgallon 
Anthony Maher 
Alfred Shalvey 
Finan Storey 
Charles Guilfoyle 
Thos. More Newbold 25 
Frederick Sucher 25 
Keith Schiltz 
Co'lumban Browning 17 
Randal Joyce 25 
Michael Brosnahan 
John M. Render, 22, 24 
Luke Connolly 
Rian Clancy 

Students 
Edwin Dolenz 
Cletus Cahill 
Kevin Kenney 
Andrew Mary Gardiner 
Stephen Balog 
Vincent Giegeri"h 
Leonard Kosatka 
Gerald Appiarius 
Joseph M. Connolly 
Morris Cahill 
Martin Thommes 
Jerome Brooks 
Alfred Pooler 
Lucian M. Guimond 
Francis Martin Keenan 
Bernard Kinney 
Damian McHale 
Benedict Olson 

Brothers 

Romuald Reuber 
Leonard Paschali 
Matthew Capodice 
Edwin Levesque 

DETROIT 

Walter Kaelin 5 
Ralph Brisk 7 
David Ferland 
Gerald Dooley 
Arthur Stuart 
Cornelius McGraw 
Linus Burke 
Gerard Barry 
Mark Hoskins 
William Westhoven 20 
Timothy Hurley 
Daniel Maher 
Fidelis Benedik 
Patrick Tully 9 
Cyprian Leonard 10 
Colum Haughey 
Mel Schneider 
Nilus Goggin 
Flannon Gannon 
Thaddeus Tamm 
Roderick Misey 
Harold Mary Leach 
Declan Egan 18 



110 



Brothers 

\loysius Schoeppner 
rheodore Lindhorst 
Bernard Schaefer 

SIERRA MADRE 

James Patrick White 5 
Paul Francis Ratterman 7 
Reginald Lummer 
Gabriel Sweeney 19 
Maurice St. Julien 
Nbrbert McGovern 
A.ngelo Hamilton 
Pius Leabel 21 
Ferdinand Madl 
Marion Durbala 
Roland Maher 
Harold Travers 
Theophane Gescavitz 
A.idan McGauran 
Joyce Hallahan 17 
Kilian Dooley 
Ernest Polette 20 
Isidore O'Reilly 18 
Brice Zurmuehlen 
Joel Gromowski 
Kent Pieper 

Sacred Eloquence 

John Francis Kobler 
Victor Salz 
Gail Robinson 
Brothers 
Richard McCall 
Gerald LaPresto 



Joseph Stadfeld 

Justin Garrity 

BIRMINGHAM 

Joseph Gartland 5 
Robert Borger 7 
Lambert Hickson 
Terence Powers 
Bro. Henry Zengerle 

CITRUS HEIGHTS 

Basil Killoran 5 
Canute Horack 7 
Leo Scheibel 
Edward Viti 
Damian Cragen 18 
Henry Vetter 20 
Bro. Patrick Keeney 

HOUSTON 

Conleth Overman 5 
Jerome Stowell 7 
Herman Joseph Stier 
Clarence Vowels 
John Aelred Torisky 
Dominic Merriman 19 
Bro. Daniel Smith 
Bro. Philip Frank 

ENSLEY 

Nathanael Kriscunas 9 
Eustace Eilers 
Ludger Martin 
Canisius Womack 
Alvin Wirth 10 



FAIRFIELD 

Edmund Drake 9 

CREVE COEUR 

Valentine Leitsch 8, 18 
Christopher Link 
Jeremiah Beineris 20 
Bro. Anthony Blankmeyet 
Bro. Denis Sevart 

CHINA 

Anthony Maloney 41 
JAPAN 

Matthew Vetter 

Carl Schmitz 

Paul Placek 

Peter Claver Kumle 

Clement Paynter 

Passionist Fathers 

Cath. Church of Hibarigoaka 

(Kawanishi Post Office 

Division) 
Hyogo-ken 
Japan 

CHAPLAINS 

Leonard Barthelmy 35 
Edward Xavier Praino 36 
Kenny Lynch 39 
Lucian Hogan 37 
Noel Pechulis 40 

ON SICK LEAVE 

Reginald James 
406 N. 17th Ave. 
Phoenix, Arizona 



REFERENCES 



General 

Provincial 

First Consultor 

Second Consultor 

Rector 

Master of Novices 

Vicar 

Superior 

Pastor 

Assistant Pastor 

Vice Master 

Church History 

Lector of Dogmatic Theology 

Chaplain at Dunning 

Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

Provincial Secretary 

Director of Students 

Retreat Director 

Assistant Retreat Director 

Retreat Master 

Lector of Sacred Eloquence 

Lector of History 

Mission Secretary 



24. Lector of English 

25. Lector of Philosophy 

26. Sign Fieldman 

27. Lector of Scripture 

28. Lector of Canon Law 

29. Lector of Moral Theology 

30. Vice Director 

31. Chaplain, St. Vincent's 

32. Lector 

33. Vocational Director 
34. 

35. Veterans Administration, Marion, Ind. 

36. U.S. Veterans' Administration Hospital. 
Northport, Long Island, New York 

37. US Naval Station Green Cove Springs, 
Florida. 

39. 7964 Hq Gp BASEC COM Z Apo 21, New 
York, N.Y. 

40. US Naval Station Navy No. 103 FPO New 
York, N.Y. 

41. Maryknoll House Stanley, Hongkong, 
China. 

42. Secretary to Fr. General 

43. Higher Studies 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 



ROME 

Paul F. Nager 1 
Neil McBrearty 45 
Ignatius Formica 47 
Caspar Caulfield 46 



Luigi Malorzo 
Cronan Regan 48 
Norman Demeck 48 
Harold Reusch 48 
A.quinas McGirk 48 



Michael Brennan 48 

UNION CITY 

M. Rev. C. O'Gara, 
Provincial Staff 



DD 



111 



Ernest Welch 2 
Ganisius Hazlett 3 
Carrol Ring 4 
Frederick Harrer 9 
Brendan Boyle 10 
Paul Jos. Dignan 
Ferdinand Braun 11 
Robert O'Hara 12 

The Sign 

Raloh Gorman 25 
Damian Reid 26 
Jeremiah Kennedy 26 
Donald Nealis 28 
Harold Poletrti 29 
Pius Trevoy 30 
Hugh Carroll 31 
Austin Busby 31 

St. Michael's Monastery 

Bercnmans Lanagan 5 
Hubrjrt Arliss 8 
Herbert McDevitt 
Xavier Gonter 
Michael Rausch 18 
Hyacinth Sullivan 
Cyril Feeley 
Alfred Duffy 
Adelbert Poletti 
Ernest Cunningham 35 
Ronald Norris 23 
Bernard Gilleran 
Kenneth Naudin 
Raymond J. Foerster 
Stephen P. Kenny 17 
Michael A. Campbell 
Justinian McLaughlin 
Matthias O'Byrne 
Bonaventure Griffith 24 
Andrew Ansbro 22 
Michael Sullivan 
Agatho Dukin 
Lawrence Steinhoff 
Wendelin Moore 18 
Hyacinth Malkowiach 
Bennet Kelly 
Cuthbert Sullivan 
Athanasius Drohan 
Richard Kugelman 15 
Bertrand Weaver 
Claude Ennis 
Patrick J. McDwyer 18 
John B. Pesce 18 
Charles A. Oakes 18 
Leo Byrnes 
Nicholas Gill 
Columba Moore 13 
Cyril Schweinberg 
Augustine P. Hennessey 15 
Fintan Lombard 15 
Francis Kuba 

Students - 3rd Theology 

William Davin 
Raymond Pulvino 
Francis Hanlon 
Martin Grey 
Kilian M. McNamara 
John M. Kelly 
Edward M. Leger 
Kevin Casey 
Patrick McDonough 



Norbert M. Dorsey 
Nicholas Zitz 
Eugene Leso 
Richard Grady 
Brian Rogan 
Alexis Hewitt 
John Fidelis McMillan 
Albert Pellicane 
Damian Towey 
Anselm Cimonetti 
Timothy Fitzgerald 
Luke Mulligan 
Aloysius Fahy 
Alan Cavanaugh 

(Brothers) 

Jerome Cowan 
Bernard M. Pughe 
Conrad Federspiel 

St. Joseph's 

Benjamin Wirtz 17 
Julius Reiner 18 
Vincent M. Frahlick 18 

PITTSBURGH 

Cuthbert McGreevey 5 
Gregory Flynn 6 
Leo F. Vanston 8 
Urban Manley 
Fulgentius Ventura 
Adrian Lynch 
Theophane Maguire 
Charles Fred. Lang 
Celestine McGonigal 
Gabriel Jaskal 
Cyril McGuire 
Camillus Barth 
Cajetan Sullivan 19 
Bertin Donahue 21 
Kieran Baker 
Daniel Hunt 
Paulinus Gepp 
Angelo Jacavone 
Anselm Lacomara 
Hilarion Walters 
Malcolm McGuinn 
Paschal Smith 
Sebastian Kolinovsky 
Cajetan Bendemagel 14 
Raymond Houlahan 
Cornelius Davin 

Brothers 

Damian Carroll 
Xavier Vitacollona 
William Drotar 
Pashal Di Boll 
Virgil Pasi 

St. Michael's 

Adolph Schmitt 17 
Wendelin Meis 18 
Edward Hennessey 18 
Timothy Stockmeyer 18 

DUNKIRK 
St. Mary's 

Rupert Langensteln 5 
Eugene Fitzpatrick 8 
Isidore Smith 
Antoine de Groeve 
Mark Seybold 



Paul M. Carroll 
Eugene Kiernan 17 
Flavian O'DonnE'l 
Myles Whelan 
Herman Kollig 18 
Alban Lynch 
Crispin Lynch 
Sylvester Cannon 
Ernan Johnston 18 
Basil Stockmeyer 18 
Alban Carroll 
Gerard Orlando 
Dunstan Guzinski 
Clement Pavlik 
Michael Connor 
Bonaventure Moccia 

Brothers 

Stanislaus Tansey 
Thomas Aul 

Holy Cross 

Boniface Buckley 5 
Aquinas Sweeney 8 
Linus Monahan 
Maurice Kanzleiter 
Columban Courtman 15 
Luke Hay 
Columban Aston 15 
Silvio DeLucca 
Paschal Drew 15 
Christopher Collins 34 
Leopold Sscundo 15 
Simon P. Wood 15 
John S. Gresser 15 
Aiden Mahoney 15 
Colman Haggerty 15 
Malaehy McGill 15 
Emmanuel Gardon 15 
Declan Maher 32 
Brendan Breen 33 
Brice Ingelsby 15 
Linus Rottloff 15 
Victor A. Mazzeo 15 

Brothers 

Vincent Cunningham 
Ronan Caulson 
Gabriel Chilbert 
Joseph Holzer 

BALTIMORE 

Clement Buckley 5 
Basil Cavanaugh 8 
Hilarion O'Rourke 
Arthur Benson 
Jeremias McNaimara 
Hubert Sweeney 
Vincent Connors 
Columba McCloskey 
Arthur May 
John F. Poole 18 
Flavian O'Donnell 
Cosmas Boyle 
Alexis Scott 
Terence Brodie 
Adrian Polertti 17 
Silvan Brennan 38 
Leander Delli Veneri 
Alan McSweeney 37 
Leonard Amhreim 18 



112 



Linus McSheffrey 18 

Dominic Cohtee 
Albert Catanzaro 18 
Edward Banks 18 
Wilfrid Scanllon 
Benedict J. Mawn 
Kilian McGowan 13 
Flavian Dougherty 
Raphael Duffy 
Alban Carroll 
Victor Donovan 15 
Silvan Rouse 15 
Richard F. Leary 15 
Students - 2nd Theol. 
Benedict Berio 
Clement Kasinskas 
Leo Jos. Gorman 
Vincent M. Boney 
Joseph McCuie 
Kiernan Earley 
Augustine Sheehan 
Colman Connolly 
Gerard Griffiths 
Donald Mclnnis 
Gabriel Shields 
Aelred Lacomara 
Brothers 
Aloysius Blair 
Bernardine Carmassi 

SCRANTON 

Felix Hackett 5 
Owen Lynch 8 
Bernard Hartman 
Hienry Brown 
Edward Goggin 
Stephen Sweeney 
Andrew McGuire 
Winfrid Guenther 
William Cavanaugh 
Roland Hoffman 
Leonard Gownley 
Brian Murphy 
Ambrose Diamond 

Jordan Loiselle 
Alfred Weaver 17 
Edgar Vanston 

Cletus Dawson 51 
Edmund MoMahon 
John M. Aleckna 18 
Raphael Sventy 
Horbert Herman 
George Nolan 13 
Godfrey Kaspar 18 
Christopher Czachor 
Thomas Carroll 
Hilary Sweeney 
Justinian Gilligan 15 
Venard Byrne 15 
Marcellus McFarland 

Students 2nd Phil. 

Keith Blair 
Austin McKenna 
Terence Kelly 
Rex Mansman 
Myles Scheiner 
Andre Giondomenica 
Ralph Tufano 
Vernon Kelly 
Carl Thome 



Conrad Smith 
Kent Rummenie 
Rocco Oliverio 
Warren Deeney 
Bernard O'Brien 
Dominic Papa 
Kenan Peters 
Philip Bebie 

Brothers 

Patrick Fallon 
Edward Blair 

BOSTON 

Dennis Walsh 5 
Walter Wynn 8 
Damian O'Rourke 
Francis Shea 
Quentin Olwell 17 
Lucian Ducie 19 
Timothy McDermot 21 
Jordan Black 
Claude Leahy 
Bede Cameron 18 
Leo J. Berard 
Finbar O'Meara 
Jerome O'Grady 
Cletus Mulloy 
Austin Busby 
Gerard Rooney 20 
Joseph P. O'Neill 
Theodore Foley 13 
Jerome Does 
Fidelis Connolley 18 
Kevin McCloskey 15 
Bertin Farrell 15 
Neil Sharkey 15 
Thomas Sullivan 
Kenneth Walsh 18 
Giles Ahrens 
Louis Maillet 
Ronald Beaton 

(Students - First Theol. 

Jerome McKenna 
James A. Wiley 
Gerard Surette 
Herbert Eberly 
Walter O'Keefe 
Henry Free 
Bartholomew Weeks 
Roger Elliot 
Columban Hewitt 
Alban Harmon 
Gregory Paul 
Leonard Murphy 
Campion Cavanaugh 

(Brothers) 
Benedict Palese 
Christopher Farrell 
Michael Stomber 

SPRINGFIELD 

Luke Misset 5 
Roderick Hunt 8 
Bede Horgan 
Eugene Kozar 
Frederick Corcoran 
Nilus McAllister 
Hilary McGowan 



Rupert Langenbacher 
Myles McCarthy 
Conel Hopkins 
Dominic Grande 
Gilbert Walser 19 
Winfrid McDermott 
Philip Ryan 21 
Fidelis Rice 16 
Casimir Horvat 
Ronald Murray 
David Buhnan 
Lucian Morel 
John Chrys. Ryan 20 
Jude Mead 
Peter Hallisey 13 
Canisiius Lareau 
Stanislaus Waseck 
Quentin Amhrein 

(Sacred Eloquence) 

Cyprian Regan 
Regis Eichmiller 
Stephen Haslach 
John F. McLoughlin 
Justin Brady 
Justinian Manning 
Ronald Hilliard 
Leo Gerrity 
Anthony Neary 
Jude Dowling 

(Brothers) 

Valentine Rausch 
Andrew Winkelman 
Timothy Foley 
Valentine Cashman 
Francis Dalton 

JAMAICA 

Cornelius McArdle 5 
Arthur Derrig 8 
Bartholomew Mulligan 

John Jos. Endier 
Cosmos Shaughnessey 19 
Roger Monson 
Owen Doyle 17 
Bertrand McDewell 
Canice Gardner 
Ignatius Ryan 
Conon O'Brien 
Gordian O'Reilly 
Cronan Flynn 18 
Lambert Missack 

Malachy Hegerty 
Bernardine Gorman 
Benedict McNamara 
Alexander Hoffman 
Kevin Conley 
Urban Curran 
George Sheehy 
Julian Connor 21 
Kieran Richardson 18 
Gordian Murphy 
Brian Burke 18 
Florian Pekar 

Thomas M. Berry 
Camillus Gentakes 
Gerald Hynes 
Columkille Regan 13 
John Jos. Reardon 15 
Fergus MacDonald 15 



113 



Xavier Welsh 15 
Daniel Free 
Bernardine Grande 

Arnold Horner 38 

Peter Quinn 
Edmund Hanlon 

Betfaird Tierney 20 

(Students - 3rd Phil.) 

Nelson McLaughlin 
Adrian Christopher 
Xavier M. Hayes 
Christian Kuchenbrod 
Ambrose O'Hare 
Alexander Mulligan 
Victor Hoagland 
Theodore Walsh 
Paulinus Cusack 
Fidelis Garmer 
Sebastian Collupy 
Mark Clogan 
Cosmas Dimino 
Emmett McGuire 
Matthew Martin 
Dermot Dobbyn 
Barnabas Wenger 
Owen Lally 
Roderick Mescall 
(Brothers) 
John Murphy 
Henry Cavanaugh 

HARTFORD 

Thaddeus PUrdon 5 
Aloysius O'Malley 8 
Vincent Durkin 
Gilbert Smith 
Caspar Conltey 
Alphonsus Grande 
Sylvester Grace 
Kenan Carey 
Paulinus Hughes 
Conran Kane 
Ronan Carroll 
Joseph L. Flynn 19 
Regis Mulligan 
Gerald Matiejune 
Venard Johnson 
Bonaventure Gonnella 
Damian F. Rail 
Martin Tooker 20 
Gregory Durkin 

Cormac Kinkead 20 
Alphonsus Cooley 
Louis Maillot 
Roger Gannon 
David Roberts 13 
Ronan Callahan 15 
Gassian Yuhas 15 
Justin Mulcahy 15 
Frederick Bauer 

Matthew Nestor 21 



(Students - 1st Phil.) 

Maurice Sullivan 
Mario Gallipol 
Edwin Moran 
Joel Polasik 
Donartais Santorsa 
Matthias Manger 
Joseph Fiorina 
Gordan Amidon 
Barry Ward 

Leon Redondo 

Islaias Powers 

(Brothers) 

Simon West 44 
Arthur Bouchard 
Paul Morgan 
Alphonsus Coen 
George Kowalski 
Dominic Critchlow 
Anselm Catalucci 
Philip Maggiulli 

TORONTO 

Connel McKeown 5 
James A. McAghon 8 
Gerard Keeney 
Egbert Gossart 17 
Donald Keenan 
Maurus Sehenck 
James Verity 
Joyce Spencer 
Boniface Hendricks 
Julian Morgan 
Lawrence Bellew 
Neil O'Donnell 
Bro. Brian Foresta.'l 

RIVERDALE 

Benedict Huck 7 
William Harding 
Albinus Kane 
Aloysius McDonough 27 
Constantine Phillips 
Bro. Francis Boylan 

NORTH CAROLINA 

(Washington) 

Daniel McDevitt 17 
Joachim Oc<rrigan 18 
(New Bern) 
Julian Endler 17 
Howard Chirdon 18 
Gerald Ryan 18 
(Greenville) 
Maurice Tew 17 
Berchmans McHugh 18 
ATLANTA, GA. 
Emmanuel Trainor 17 
Gabriel Gorman 52 
JAMAICA, B. W. I. 
Cormac Shanahan 



William Whelan 
Callistus Connolly 
Anthony Feeherry 
FRAMINGHAM 
Reginald Arliss 50 
MEXICO CITY 
Anthony J. Nealon 17 
Dunstan Stout 18 

ARGENTINE 

Justinian Tobin 

GERMANY 

Walter Mickel 2 
Leopold Snyder 4, 6 
Germain Heilmann 
Roland Flaherty 

AUSTRIA 

Fabian Flynn 43 

CATHOLIC U. 

Edgar Crowe 
Joques McQuillan 
Robert Ehrne 
Paul Jos. Fullam 
CHINA 

Marcellus White 49 
Justin Garvey 49 
(Furlough) 
Paul J. Ubinger 
Basil Bauer 
Linus Lombard 
Lawrence Mullin 
John B. Maye 
Ernest Hotz 

CHAPLAINS 

Norman Kelly 39 
Sidney Turner 39 
Christopher Berlo 39 
Timothy McGrath 40 
Romuald Walsh 40 
Godfrey Riley 41 
James F. Follard 40 
Nilus McAndrew 39 
Albinus Lesch 42 
Hugh McKeown 39 
Julius Durkan 39 
Conran Free 39 
Gabriel Bendernagel 42 
Conor Smith 39 
Eustace McDonald 42 
Robert Mulgrew 29 
Conan Conaboy 39 
Nilus Hubble 40 
Ambrose M?guire 39 
SICK LEAVE 
Martin Ford 
Raphael Vance 
Leander Steinmeyer 
Terence Connelly 
Cyprian Walsh 
Quentin Cerullo 



REFERENCES 



1. 4th Gen'l Consultor 

2. Provincial 

3. 1st Consultor 

4. 2nd Consultor 

5. Rector 

6. Master of Novices 



7. Superior 

8. Vicar 

9. Prov. Secy. 

10. Prov. Econome 

11. Mission Secy. 

12 Prov. Dir. Studies 



13. Director 

14. Vice Master 

15. Lector 

16. Lect. Sac. Eloq. 

17. Pastor 

18. Curate 



114 



Latest Flashes 

1) "The Hour of the Crucified" (See page 75 of this issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST) is now not only nation wide but WORLD-WIDE. One day within 
the past few weeks, Father Fidelis, the originator and director of the "Hour", 
received a phone call from the Pentagon in Washington, D. C, requesting 
the "Hour" for the "ARMED FORCES RADIO". Since this request came 
on the initiative of the Government, it loudly bespeaks commendation for 
the program. Since the phone call the Chief of Chaplains at the Pentagon 
wrote during the first days in February that the "Hour" goes out over a 
network of 72 stations — all in Grade A class — to all military personnel over- 
seas, in the world, their families etc. While no exact figures are available, 
the Chief of Chaplains said that the audience definitely numbers several 
millions. The Army has a board to audit all programs and to pick out those 
they think best. On their own, without any knowledge of the directors of 
"The Hour", they audited "The Hour" and picked it as THE Catholic pro- 
gram for the mid-week "Catholic Hour" for the Armed Services. THE PAS- 
SIONIST wishes to congratulate Father Fidelis and all who are connected 
with the production of "The Hour" and we all are happy to know that so 
many will be hearing about the Passion and Passionists each week. Beyond 
this extension iof "The Hour", the Jesuit Fathers in China have requested 
the program for two stations on the the Island of Formosa. 



2) Father Kenny Lynch, C.P., -has a new address: 
Chaplain (Major) Kenny Lynch 
7911 AU 

AP0 58, New Y«> ",N.Y. 



3) On May 28, 29, 30 A National Congress of the Confraternity of the 
Passion will be held at West Hartford, Connecticut. The Congress will open 
with a Solemn Pontifical Mass at the Cathedral of Hartford, with the Arch- 
bishop pontificating. The other sessions will be held at the Monastery. Each 
day will close with Pontifical Benediction out of doors, weather permitting. 
Further details on this important Congress will be given in the next issue of 
THE PASSIONIST. 



DISPENSATION 

from 

IRREGULARITIES 

The readers will be grateful to Father Forrest, C.P., J. CD., lector of 
Moral Theology and Canon Law at Sacred Heart Retreat, Louisville, for 
the following compact, practical and clear presentation of the powers of 
dispensing from IRREGULARITIES a Passionist Father may possess. "CFI" 
is a reference to the "Collectio Faculatatum et Indulgentiarum" vulgo 
"Faculty Book". 

I. ANY confessor (acting in the internal NON sacramental forum), 
IF the Ordinary cannot be approached, and 

IF the case is occult, and 

IF it has not been brought before a court for formal trial, and 
IF it is so urgent that danger of grave harm or infamy threatens, and 
IF irregularity is NOT for voluntary homicide, nor for either procuring 
or cooperating in abortion, 

may dispense from other irregularities ex delicto, to exercise (NOT 
receive) orders. Canon 990, 2. 

II. Any PASSIONIST confessor (acting in the internal NON sacramental 

forum), 

IF the irregularity is occult, 

IF it has not been brought before a court for formal trial, and 

IF it is NOT for voluntary homicide, nor 

for procuring (although it MAY be for cooperating in) abortion, 

may dispense from all other irregularities, both to receive and 

exercise orders. CFI, No. 63. 

III. A Passionist CONDUCTING A MISSION or (even private) RETREAT 

(in SACRAMENTAL forum), 
IF the irregularity is occult 

may dispense from ALL irregularities, both to receive and exercise 
orders. CFI, No. 86. 

IV. A Passionist granted the SPECIAL faculty by Fr. General (in SACRA- 

MENTAL forum), 
IF penitent agrees — to present under fictitious names within a month to 
the S. C. Penitentiary the number & circumstances of 
the delict, and 
— to obey its mandate under penalty of ipso facto sus- 
pension a divinis 
may dispense irregularities arising from voluntary homicide, or 

from either procuring or cooperating in abortion, 

but only to exercise (not receive) orders if that can be done without 

scandal, infamy. CFI, p. 219. 

V. A Passionist granted the SPECIAL faculty by Fr. General (in SACRA- 

MENTAL forum), 
IF the irregularity is occult, and 
IF it DID arise from violation of censure.. 

may dispense it for exercising (not receiving) an order 

CFI, n. 218. 

116 



I ii m^«.i1 



THE PICTURE ON THE FRONT COVER IS TAKEN FROM THE STATUE 

OF OUR BLESSED MOTHER IN THE PUBLIC CHAPEL OF ST. GABRIEL'S 

RETREAT, DES MOINES, IOWA. 



tfOP 



onunvite 



LOOK at Me 



^lEN : Follow Me 




as a Pnssionist 



for information write 

Vocationai Director 

7101 NATURAL BRIDGf ROAD 
St. U)UIS JO, MO. 



i 



ABOVE 1$ A MINIATURE OF ONE OF THE LATEST (OCTOBER 1954) 
POSTERS T^AT OUR REV. VOCATIONAL DIRECTORS USE. THE ORIG- 
INAL IS IN COLOR (RED, AMBER, GREEN LIGHTS) AND ABOUT 12 x 
15 INCHES. THE POSTER WAS CONCEIVED AND DESIGNED BY C.P. 
TALENTS IN DES MOINES, IOWA. 





















J 


BULLETIN OF HOLY CROSS PRO 


V1N 







! 



... ■■:■ ..'",:■; ■• ' \ , 







It ,, li 





THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished bimonthly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each January, 
March, May, July, Septem- 
ber, and November. Financed 
by free-will offerings of its 
readers. There is no copy- 
right. The paper is a private 
publication. 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. 

Vincent Mary, C.P. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. 8, No. 2 March- April 1955 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Dear Reader 

Vox Maiorum 

Passionist Spirituality? 

Conquest of World for Christ 

Passion Feasts 

Jubilee Sermon 

Passionist News 

Varia 

Works of Ministry 

Whos Who and Where 



^beat tleadei, 



I am not a missionary, and it may 
be presumptious for me to write 
what I am about to write. During 
the past I have, off and on, spoken 
to missionaries about number 191 
of our Holy Rule, which number 
opens with: "Let them not only ex- 
hort but also instruct the people 
how to meditate piously on the Mys- 
teries of the Life, Passion and Death 
of our Lord Jesus Christ, etc. The 
chapter under which these words are 
written is headed: On the Manner 
of Preaching the Word of God and 
the Chief Duties of the Missionaries." 
The words 'not only exhort', quoted 
above, seem to take for granted that 
we do try to persuade the faithful 
to take up the practice of meditating 
on the Passion. 

The reaction to my conversation 
with missionaries along the lines 
mentioned, especially in reference to 
the idea of trying to persuade their 
audience to make a practice of daily 
setting aside some time for exclusive 
meditation on the Passion, and teach- 
ing them clearly and explicitly how 
to do this, brought different reac- 
tions. 

It was but natural that when I re- 
ceived a copy of Father Fidelis' "We 
Preach Christ Crucified", I looked 
to see what this Lector of Sacred 
Eloquence had to say on this ques- 
tion. 

I was quite happy to find state- 
ments like the following: "We are 
obliged to teach the Faithful to medi- 
tate on the Passion. We are bound, 
by our Rule, to be teachers of the 
art of prayer . . . Many of our older 




fathers used to have regular groups 
of laypeople who spent a half-hour 
and more, daily, in meditation on 
the Passion. There is a trend today 
to dismiss such practices with the 
observation: 'Never mind teaching 
them to meditate; teach them to 
keep the Ten Commandments.' The 
whole point of the matter is that the 
most effective way of keeping the 
Commandments is by meditation on 
the Passion . . We must teach them 
how to meditate (on the Passion) be- 
cause one of the PRIMARY OB- 
JECTS OF OUR CONGREGATION 
IS TO TEACH PEOPLE HOW TO 
PRAY . . . (Rule #3) ... The Lesson 
in the 'Motive' is exactly what is 
suggested by the name — a simple 



117 



lesson in how to meditate on the 
Passion . . . Were we merely to give 
them a Passion Meditation, we might 
impress them deeply then, but we 
would not be leaving them with a 
knowledge of how to go about doing 
this themselves, and that is the im- 
portant part of the LESSON . . . The 
EXHORTATION is the third and 
final element in a Passion Motive. 
Its purpose is to urge the Faithful 
to be constant in the exercise of 
meditations on the Passion ... In all 
truth, the practice of meditating on 
the Passion of our Lord might make 
the difference between Heaven and 
Hell for some of these people ..." 

These quotes are taken, in a way, 
at random and out of their contexts, 
but the point I think is clear. It is 



certain that if a person is persuaded 
\$y Ihe missionary to take up the 
practice of daily meditating on the 
Passion of Jesus, the mission will 
hot be a merely passing phenomena 
in his life. 

My concluding thought is that 
teaching the Faithful how and per- 
suading them to meditate daily on 
our Lord's Passion need not be limit- 
ed to the time of the mission: Forty 
Hours (The Bl. Sacrament is the 
Memorial of the Passion), our Sun- 
day Sermons, our work in the Con- 
fessional, or in directing souls are 
also occasions for doing the same 
wonderful work. The Graces of our 
Lord's Passion are not limited to the 
time of a Mission. 



^W^y % a** , <?:p 




Gemma obtained forgiveness of sinners through Mary. "I found the child 
in ecstasy. The subject of the ecstasy was the conversion of a sinner and 
the form was a wrestling between the Blessed maiden and the Divine Justice 
to obtain this conversion . . . In spite of . . . (many) efforts, Our Lord re- 
mained inflexible, and Gemma again relapsed into anguish and discourage- 
ment . . . Then, of a sudden, another motive flashed to her mind that seemed 
invincible against all resistance. She became all animated, and spoke thuss 
' . . . look, I present Thee another advocate for my sinner; it is thine own Mo- 
ther! Surely thou canst not say no to her. And now answer me, Jesus say 
that thou hast saved my sinner.' The victory was gained, . . . and Gemma . . . 
exclaims 'He is saved, he is saved!' " 

Fr. Germano 



118 



vox 



MAIORUM 



NOSTRORUM 




Fr. John Baptist of St. Vincent 

Ferrer, Second General of the 

Congregation. 



John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer 
General of the Congregation of the Most Holy Cross and Passion 

of 

Jesus Christ 

Greetings and Peace in the Lord to all the Religious of our Congregation. 



The filial and devoted affection 
and the great and special gratitude 
that we owe towards His Holiness, 
Our Lord Pope Pius VI, now glor- 
iously reigning, obliges us beyond 
measure to be untiring in diligent 
prayers, day and night, according to 
His holy intentions, especially for 
His prosperous continuance in office, 
this, up to the moment, in conformity 



with the wish left us by our Father, 
of blessed memory, I have recom- 
mended conscientiously. Now, how- 
ever, more than ever, we must pray 
to implore the Divine Mercy, through 
the intercession of the Mother of 
Graces, invoked as the Health of the 
Sick, to obtain the convalescence of 
the said Holy Father who is now 
prostrate with rheumatism; also we 



119 



must pray according to His special 
intentions and he present needs. 
Now, beyond the prayers and other 
particular devotions for these inten- 
tions, which I recommend with every 
expression of sincerity; also that 
each and every Religious of our Con- 
gregation, especially the priests 
make a fervent momento in Holy 
Mass; beyond all this, with this pres- 
ent letter, I ordain that in all the 
churches of our Retreats, immediate- 
ly upon receipt of this circular there 
be begun a seven day devotion in 
honor of the Sorrowful Mother; this 
devotion is to be made by the entire 
respective community gathered to- 
gether, in the following manner. 

Every day immediately after Com- 
pline, according to the prescribed 
rite and with a becoming number of 
candles light, not less than twelve, 
a priest, vested with surplice and 
stole, shall open the tabernacle and 
place the sacred ciborium.. which 
contains the Blessed Eucharist, in 
view, without taking it out of the 
tabernacle; after the customary in- 
censation there shall be devoutly re- 
cited seven Paters and Aves in mem- 
ory of the Passion and Death of 
Jesus Christ and of the Dolors of 
His Divine Mother; after that the 
Litany of the Saints will be recited 
followed by the singing of the Tan- 
tum ergo, etc. with the respective 
incensation etc. Then shall be added 
the following versicles and orations: 
V. Panem de coelo etc.; V. Ora pro 
nobis Sancta Dei Genitrix; R. Ut 
digni, etc.; V. Oremus pro Pontifice 
nostro Pio; R. Dominus conservet, 
etc. V. Domine exaudi orationem 
meam; R. Et clamor, etc. 



Oremus: Deus, qui nobis sub Sac- 
ramento etc.; Concede nos famulos 
tuos etc.; Omnipotens sempiterne 
Deus, miserere famulo tuo Pontifici 
etc.; Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, 
salus aeterna credentium etc.; Deus, 
refugium etc.; After that the taber- 
nacle is closed without giving bene- 
diction. 

Beyond this, during the seven day 
devotion the customary third part 
of the Rosary shall be offered for 
the same intentions; every night at 
the beginning of the prayer time 
after Matins the Litany of the Saints 
shall be recited with the same ver- 
sicles and orations as above, exclud- 
ing the versicle Panem de coelo, etc., 
and the oration Deus qui nobis, etc. 
In their stead the versicle: V. Bene- 
dicamus Patrem et Filium cum 
Sancto Spiritu; R. Laudemus, etc. 
and the oration of the Most Blessed 
Trinity: Deus, qui dedisti famulis 
tuis, etc. shall be recited. When the 
discipline is taken the oration a pro 
infirmis" shall be added. 

I am persuaded that the mere 
knowledge about the condition of 
His Holiness and the good will tow- 
ards a Pontiff so benevolent to us, 
will serve as a most efficacious stim- 
ulant for every one of our Religious 
to follow our most sincere recom- 
mendations to the best of his abili- 
ties and at the same time asking 
everyone to commend the matter to 
God in prayer and silence. I wish 
to all the abundance of divine bless- 
ings. 

Given at the Retreat of Sts. John 
and Paul, Rome on this 13th day of 
March, 1779. 

John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer. 



120 



The biographer of John Baptist of St. Vincent 
Ferrer emphacizes the fact that the Servant of 
God was quite devoted to the Vicar of Christ 
and mentions the abov'e letter as a proof of 
this fact. It seems .hat there are cnly two 
copies of this letter extant; one with an auto- 



graph signature, the text of which was followed 
in the above translation; it is found in the 
provincial archives at Scala Santa, Rome. The 
other copy is in the archives of the Presenta- 
tion Retreat, Monte Argentaro. 




St. Gabriel 

1. Fr. Nobert said of him: "The special feature of his spiritual life was 
his extraordinary devotion to the Blessed Xirgin; for he was appassionato 
pazzo (passionately mad) . . . He was always talking of her; he died pressing 
burning kisses on her picture; he was her slave, her champion, her knight." 

Life by Fr. Camillus, p. 258-9 

"Thou, O Immaculate Virgin, Queen of Martyrs, by those dolors which 
thou didst feel in the Passion of thy most beloved Son, give to us all thy 
maternal benediction, for I place them all and leave them under the mantle 
of thy protection." (Words spoken during his last illness on Aug. 30th). 

"He who wishes most to please Our Blessed Lady must humble and 
annihilate himself the most; for, because Mary was the most humble of all 
creatures, she pleased God more than all by her humility." 

"The holy Church has not declared herself on this point, but I would 
give my blood and sacrifice my life in torments in defense of it, and if in 
this matter I did not become a martyr, I should at least give great glory to 
this great Lady, and I know happy I should be could I do so." 

"The sorrow of Mary is like the Sea, for it is written: Magna est velut 
mare contritio tua; from this sea one passes to the other limitless one of the 
Passion of Jesus, in the Person of Whom David says: Veni in altitudinem 
maris; and here the soul enriches itself fishes out the most precious pearls 
of the virtue of Mary and Jesus." 

"Hunter of Souls" by Fr. Edmund, C.P. 

St. Paul of the Cross 

"All my hopes are placed in the Passion of the Son and the sorrows of 
the Mother." 

"Where the Son is, there is the Mother. Who goes to the Crucified, goes 
also to Mary, who stands at His feet in a sea of sorrows. From the sea of 
sorrows of Mary, one passes to the sea of Jesus, and there souls are enriched 
by fishing out the most precious pearls of the virtue of Jesus and Mary." 



121 



Passionist Spiritualit)>? ! 

It is with a distinct feeling of satisfaction that THE PASSIONIST offers the following to its 
readers. "Adapt or die out" is a law of nature and consequently applies also to the life of our 
Congregation. Father Ward shows us the principles for a religious Congregation to use in making a 
healthy adaptation; naturally he is making only suggestions as to how those principles should be 
applied to our own beloved Congregation. But his suggestion for study and work and prayer along 
these lines is a must in these fast changing times. Our "spirituality", in the sense defined in the 
article, forms the essence, the form, the soul of our Congregation, and if that is touched or changed, 
our Congregation is no longer what St. Paul of the Cross wanted it to be. Both the author of the 
article and THE PASSIONIST invite comment, pro and con, on the thoughts her presented. Father 
Ward tells us that the article grew over a period of several months during his stay near the tomb of 
our Holy Founder, "stimulated and often inspired in its revisions by the criticism and advice of our 
best men from many different Provinces . . . what really drove me on to spend many, many hours 
in its writing and rewriting was the realization that we were doomed to futile effort in any spirituality 
effort, till we could agree that we at least had one. I cherish the hope that the article may help us 
settle the question, and progress further from that point." 



Is there such a thing? And if there 
is, precisely what is it? 

The acts of our last General Chap- 
ter contain a Recommendation di- 
rected to Provincial Superiors. It 
urges them to send candidates to 
Rome to pursue the courses in spirit- 
uality at the universities there. Then, 
addressing itself to the General 
Curia, the Recommendation seeks to 
provide for these university students 
special lectures on the subject of 
our proper spirituality. 1 This would 
envision some sort of a Faculty of 
Passionist Spirituality. 2 

The term "Passionist Spirituality" 
— to the best of our knowledge — is a 
new one in the official documents 
of our Congregation.' From that as- 
pect alone it would merit an explana- 
tion. However, besides this, there is 
the much discussed question as to 
whether or not there do really exist 
distinct schools of spirituality. Are 
they perhaps much ado about incon- 
sequential variations? And are we, 
then, justified in referring to a prop- 
er spirituality for Passionists? Until 
we have a satisfactory answer to this 
question, we can hardly hope for any 




Did St. Paul of the Cross give us a 
distinct spirituality? 



122 



lasting success through a Faculty 
that would be charged to teach such 
a spirituality. 

In the course of this article we will 
cite the opinions — which are unani- 
mous — of the best spiritual theolo- 
gians in the various recognized 
schools of theology. The weight of 
their arguments and the deductions 
we make from them will lead us to 
conclude : 

1) that the schools of spirituality 
are truly distinct from one an- 
other. 

2) that our Congregation has a 
distinct spirituality of its own. 

3) that there is great need for 
working out this spirituality in 



theological form, into a theology 
of our Passionist vocation. 
We will divide this article into 
three parts, corresponding to these 
points. Two short appendices have 
been placed at the end of the second 
part, which are intimately connected 
with the subject matter treated there, 
but separated so as not to interrupt 
the progression of thought. And it 
will be well to state here that our 
purpose in this article is not to stress 
the diversity between the spirituali- 
ties. That would lead to confusing 
souls rather than to helping them. 
The end in view is to recognize our 
proper spirituality for what it is, so 
as to attain the end that God had in 
inspiring it. 



I Spiritualities Truly Distinct 



We should begin by defining a 
few of our terms. Spirit and Spirit- 
uality are not synonymous. Spirit, as 
used in this context, would signify 
an habitual outlook on the spiritual 
life and the way in which a soul 
responds to that outlook. This in- 
terior spirit of an individual be- 
comes a spirituality when under 
God's light and inspiration it reach- 
es out toward the traditional means 
of perfection, and gathors them to 
itself in a new pattern of life. This 
spirit brings together those tradi- 
tional elements of perfection in a 
manner that is expressive cf itself, 
and characteristic to itself. Its direc- 
tive influence upon them results in 
an intrinsic ordination toward attain- 
ing some specific purpose. Most often 
it is a founder or foundress whose 
personal spirit becomes thus incar- 



nate in a new spirituality. 4 

We see, therefore, that spirituality 
presupposes spirit. The latter is but 
a form, a soul; whereas spirituality 
is defined as "a way of living the 
spiritual life."' It is body and soul 
together." Sometimes years after a 
spirituality is born in the Church 
and has prospered, it becomes a 
"school". This only takes place if 
the spirituality is analyzed theologi- 
cally and worked out in a manner 
that permits it to be studied and 
taught. This is the task of a Faculty, 
such as the last General Chapter 
proposed to establish for our Con- 
gregation. This would not mean 
that a school of spirituality can be 
fabricated at will. The study and 
teaching of a school is only possible 
when God has Himself first inspired 
and matured the spirituality. 



123 



Now then, we must de- 

ntenor t ermine whether the exis- 

Diversity t[ng spiritualities in the 

Church have really any more than 
superficial differences between them. 
Most often we find them arising in 
connection with religious institutes. 
The members of these religious or- 
ders all wear different habits. They 
have varying customs and horariums. 
It there anything more than such 
external appearances to distinguish 
them? 

In a widly acclaimed article in the 
Gregorianum, back in 1938, Fr. De 
Guibert, S.J., undertook to investi- 
gate In What the Diverse Catholic 
Schools of Spirituality Really .Dif- 
fer. 1 He noted that "superficial dif- 
ferences are the manifestation of 
more profound characteristics". And 
these more profound differences lay 
precisely "in the use of the essen- 
tial means of perfection". 8 They are 
the diverse ways of arranging and 
employing the means under the 
guiding influence of divine inspira- 
tion. One Congregation may accent- 
uate "some mystery of faith by which 
it is nourished more habitually, to 
which it is more devoted." 9 It is by 
emphasis upon some doctrine or de- 
votion, or upon some one of the 
means to perfection that the various 
schools of spirituality are character- 
ised. 

This emphasis upon one means of 
perfection cannot be exclusive, De 
Guibert remarks, because all the 
means are common to the entire 
Church, and all necessary. "There is 
no sanctity without participation in 
the cross of Christ. But in this par- 
ticipation, interior and exterior mor- 



tification are necessarily united; and 
each of them can take on a variety 
of forms." 10 Perhaps it is "differen- 
ces in the proportion by which the 
means are associated. There is no 
sanctity without a filial devotion to 
Mary. Yet there is not just the "True 
Devotion" of de Montfort. We have 
also the devotion taught by St. Ber- 
nard to his Cistercians . . . But their 
devotion does not permeate their 
spiritual life in the same way as does 
that of de Montfort's sons." 11 These 
differences are not essential, but 
they are characteristic, and they 
manifest an interior diversity. 

Fr. De Guibert remained of this 
opinion, as the latest edition of his 
Spiritual Theology attests. 12 And he 
is surely the best spokesman for the 
Jesuit school of spiritual theology 
today. 

Agreeing with him in this real 
distinction between the spiritualities 
is the Dean of the Spirituality Fac- 
ulty of the Angelicum University in 
Rome, Fr. Paul Philippe, O.P. In the 
Introduction to his course on the 
history of spirituality he says: "A 
priori we can assert that never is it 
a question of substantial difference. 
For all spiritualities have in common 
the end and all the necessary means 
of Christian perfection; but variously 
organized and composed." 13 And an- 
other professor of the same Faculty, 
Fr. Huerga, O.P., expressed a like 
opinion in a recent article in The 
Cross and Crown. 1 * 

We quote one further Dominican 
authority in this field, Fr. Colossio, 
who wrote some years ago "Concern- 
ing the Problem of the Multiplicity 
of Spiritualities." 15 While granting 



124 



that we ought not to exaggerate in 
admitting an indefinite number of 
schools, he held out strongly for 
their distinction and great utility. 
He distinguished first a generic spir- 
ituality, contained in the ordinary 
magisterium of the Church. This 
points out to us the end, Christian 
perfection, and the common means 
for attaining it. Next there is a spe- 
cific spirituality, which consists in 
an organic way of coordinating these 
means. Such is the spirituality of a 
religious order, as the Dominicans. 
And finally there is an individual 
spirituality, which is the concrete 
manner in which each soul makes 
use of some determinate spiritual- 
ity. lfi 

The Carmelite theologian, Fr. Ga- 
briel of St. Mary Magdalen, wrote 
the following, apropos of this ques- 
tion: "The spiritual life, substantial- 
ly one by nature, can be organized 
in different ways, by selecting the 
motives to which one is inspired by 
preference, and by determining 
the proportion amongst the means 
that are necessary to attain the 
end." 17 At times the result is so 
harmonious that it constitutes a 
"true formula of life," as with the 
particular spiritualities of various 
religious families. In this case "an 
inspirational and fundamental idea 
gives unity to this organic complex- 
ity." 18 

This citation is from a paper de- 
livered by Fr. Gabriel at a Spiritual- 
ity Week held at Rome in April, 
1943. Outstanding representatives 
from other religious institutes de- 
fined and described their various 
spiritualities. Of exceptional notice 



is the treatment of Franciscan Spiri- 
tuality by Fr. Agostino Gemelli, O. 
F,M., the Rector of Milan's Catholic 
University. In his paper as well as 
in his preface to the publication of 
the proceedings of the convention, 
Fr. Gemelli makes completely his 
own the teaching of Fr. De Guibert, 
S.J. He summarizes the theological 
thought on the varying schools of 
spirituality, and concludes unhesi- 
tatingly in favor of real distinctions 
between them. 

Thus we find in the spiritualities 
a different proportion in arranging 
the elements of the religious life. 
Some give more time to the contem- 
plative aspect. Others have a min- 
imum of common (observance. Or 
we may find characteristic emphasis 
on the Sacred Liturgy. And this vary- 
ing emphasis is a solid basis for dis- 
tinguishing these spiritualities. St. 
Thomas never treats 



End Specifies 



our question of spiri- 



Spirituality tu , alities But he used 

the very same argument to disting- 
uish the religious orders. 19 However, 
it is most important to note that for 
St. Thomas this was not the most 
fundamental reason for distinction. 
He calls it secondary. For "princi- 
pally," he wrote, "the difference is 
considered from the end." 20 And 
that is how it must always be: means 
specified by the end. So, following 
the same line tof reasoning, we ought 
to be able to distinguish spiritualities 
more basically from the end of each 
religious institute. What is its work 
in the Church for which it was 
founded? What is its function in the 
Mystical Body of Christ? 
This is exactly how St. Francis de 



125 



Sales approached the question. Treat- 
ing of the rules and spirit of his 
Visitation Nuns, he wrote: "All re- 
ligious institutes have a spirit which 
is common to all, and each has one 
that is proper to itself ... It is most 
necessary to understand what this 
proper spirit of an institute is. In 
order to know it well we must con- 
sider the end for which it was found- 
ed and the different means for at- 
taining the end."" 1 Sisters of Charity 
will have a spirituality that corres- 
ponds to their active work. It will 
differ from the spirituality of the 
Little Sisters of the Poor, just as 
Franciscan Spirituality differs from 
Dominican. This is not surprising. 
For if religious are to be sanctified 
through their work, then it ought to 



Reflecting 
Christ 



have a great influence on their spirit- 
uality. 22 

Fr. Ricardo Lombardi, S.J., sum- 
med up the whole doctrine in an ad- 
dress he gave to the General Con- 
gress of Religious held in Rome dur- 
ing the Hioly Year. 

"That we may the bet- 
ter understand," he said, 
"what in any institute 
is its own proper and genuine spirit, 
to be always and everywhere pre- 
served, we must keep our gaze fixed 
upon Jesus, the sublime exemplar of 
Christian perfection, and upon His 
virtues . . . For according to the 
urgent need of the Church in some 
particular circumstances, each holy 
founder tried to sketch some similar- 
ity or resemblance (to Him). By his 




The Church of St. Charles in Castellazzo where St. Paul wrote his first Rule 

and Diary. 



123 



rules each one depicted especially 
those traits of the Divine Master 
which were most suitable to the 
peculiar needs of the times. And it 
was by these rules that the active 
work was promoted which was called 
for at that period. Whence there re- 
sulted a certain unity of features, 
a familiar appearance to be passed 
on to those who would follow, ex- 
pressed in the peculiar purpose and 
proper spirit of the Institute." 

Then he illustrated his meaning: 
"Thus some shine forth with humil- 
ity, simplicity and Franciscan charity 
toward the lowly; others by preach- 
ing teach men the theological virtues, 
expressing them too in their deep, 
continual meditation and contempla- 
tion, from which abundance of their 
hearts their teaching flows. Still 
others, imitating in a profound im- 
molation Him Who became obedient 
even unto the death of the Cross, 
offer themselves ad nutum as instru- 
ments of His Vicar for any necessity, 
to the greater glory of God. There 
are those who, touched by the same 
tender pity for the unfortunate that 
moved Jesus, expend upon the sick 
a sweet and sollicitous care ... or 
undertake with the vigilance of 
guardian angels the education of 
children. Which is more beauti- 
ful?" 23 

It is the many-colored rainbow re- 
fracting the pure white light of 
Christ's holiness. But we would not 
deny that the colors are different 



just because at their source they are 
one. The various spiritualities are 
all Christian, but reflect upon earth 
the multiple facets of His sanctity. 

This unanimous opinion of the 
specialists in all the theological 
schools is nothing new. Our own 
venerated Fr. Bernard Mary of Jesus 
wrote of this subject fifty years ago 
in practically the same words, in the 
opening paragraph of his book on 
the first Passionists. 24 For centuries 
the Church has respected these dif- 
ferent approaches to the kingdom 
of heaven. Our age has chosen to 
call them "spiritualities", and reput- 
able theologians have approved the 
term. They have explicitly studied 
the matter and agreed upon a solid 
basis for distinction between them. 
That should settle the question. 

In conclusion to this section of the 
article, and as an introduction to the 
next, we cite from Fr. Philippe what 
might be termed a guidepost for all 
religious institutes in this pursuit: 

"Let us beware." he counsels, "of 
defining the spirituality of any 
school by one word. For that ele- 
ment, although perhaps very treas- 
ured, will not easily or sufficiently 
signify the whole spirit. Yet, there 
is also the modern error prevalent 
among some of denying any other 
spirituality for their own Order ex- 
cept that of its being 'Catholic'. In 
reality it is a question of true dif- 
ferences." 25 



II. A Distinct Passionist SpiririrJic 



V 



In this second part we wish to 
show that our Passionist way of life 
is a distinct spirituality. We will 



proceed by setting forth the qual- 
ities that are considered necessary 
for a spirituality to be specially dis- 



127 



tinct. Then we will examine the 
sources that manifest how perfectly 
these requisite qualities are verified 
in our case. Since these are the con- 
ditions agreed upon by the theolo- 
gians, they alone can serve as the 
norm by which to judge. 

In seeking to define a spirituality 
proper to our Congregation, we 
might justifiably reason thus: A 
Passionist Spirituality would of nec- 
essity have to revolve about the Pas- 
sion. But the Passion is so funda- 
mental a truth of Christianity, that 
it is futile to expect that we might 
have any distinctive spirituality. And 
de facto this is the reason why many 
Passionists refuse to consider the 
possibility of it. 

But isn't this because 

1 ° of a misconception of the 

Monoply term? The defimtion of a 

spirituality implies no exclusiveness 
whatever. The characteristic of any 
spiritual school is found to be an 
emphasis iof one element that must 
necessarily belong to all the other 
schools. Carmelite Spirituality, for 
example, is defined as that of divine 
intimacy." 6 A misunderstanding of 
the term would prompt us to scoff 
at this. But Carmelites don't claim 
to monopolize the divine intimacy. 
They base their claim on the fact 
that the whole of their religious life 
is unified by this ideal; all the tra- 
ditional means of perfection are 
viewed in this light and arranged 
accordingly. This is not true of any 
institute of the so-called "merely ac- 
tive life". Nor is it the specifying 
factor for any other institute of the 
mixed life. Even the purely con- 
templative Trappists and Carthusians 



are not distinguished in their spiri- 
tualities by this specific viewpoint, 
though obviously the means to divine 
intimacy must figure large in their 
form of religious life. 

The qualities consider- 
Quahties ed necessary to verify a 
Required distinct spirituality have 
been given by Fr. De Guibert: 

"The firmly established spirituali- 
ties," he wrote, "present in their 
various use of means the character 
of an organic whole. It is a formula 
of life, whose efficacy has been prov- 
en as a way to arrive at the goal of 
sanctification. Toward this organic 
whole two factors work together: 
the experience of the interior life 
of the founder, and the experience 
of the spiritual formation of his first 
disciples. 

"A new spirituality is not born 
just because one bright day an in- 
ventive mind put into the melting 
pot of his personal life a number of 
diverse elements. It is born rather, 
because God in His supernatural and 
providential government of the 
Church, selects a soul, confers on it 
special grace, and then impels it 
supernaturally to live a life whose 
characteristics he traces out for it. 
In it are marvellously fused the tra- 
ditional modes of activity and pray- 
er, together with a new form. This 
experience of the life in the founder 
constitutes the first orientation of 
the new school. Then, through the 
first disciples, that type of life, vig- 
orously marked out by God in the 
founder, becomes susceptible of be- 
ing reproduced in many other souls. 
This double supernatural action con- 



128 



fers originality upon each spiritual- 
ity." 27 

In giving us the requisites for 
a distinct spirituality this illustrious 
Jesuit theologian has made a keen 
analysis of the origin of a spiritual- 
ity. He directs our attention to the 
founder of a religious institute, there- 
by implying that, ordinarily at least, 
every school of spirituality takes its 
rise from the institution of a new 
religious family. The qualities which 
he indicates we must look for in the 
early history of an institute can be 
reduced to three: 1) God's super- 
natural inspiration; 2) a new, Char- 
acteristic form that proves effica- 
cious; and 3) an organic unity de- 
riving from a new form. These same 




Paul felt inspired by God to institute 
a new form of life. 



points are stressed by the other theo- 
logians. 28 

So let us turn to the 

St. Paul of life Qf g t paul of the 
the Cross CrQSS and gee whether 

these three requirements are verified 
in the foundation of his Congrega- 
tion. Fortunately we possess docu- 
ments that give us first hand evi- 
dence <of what we seek — letters writ- 
ten by our Holy Founder himself at 
this period of his life. 

One is a letter written by the 
young man to his Bishop, during his 
forty-day retreat in Castellazzo. It 
forms the preface to the early Rule 
which he wrote at that time. 29 We 
find in this letter a splendid account 
of how his vocation developed. It 
explains in detail the series of lights 
and inspirations that he received 
from God regarding the founding of 
the Congregation. Almost like a psy- 
chological analysis it takes one ele- 
ment after another of our Passionist 
life, describing how and when each 
appeared on the horizon of his con- 
sciousness, tracing the motivation 
and influence of each upon his state 
of soul. 

The first quality to 
be identified is pre- 
cisely what stands out most predom- 
inantly in this document: the clear 
evidence of God's supernatural in- 
tervention. The letter abounds in 
explicit references to divine insipra- 
tion: "vehement inspirations to re- 
tire into solitude," and ever-in- 
creasing impulse," the "holy inspira- 
tion" to leave the world, "a high in- 
spiration to gather companions," 
lights concerning the habit and 
words revealing its meaning. But by 



GotVs Hand 



129 



far the reference most to the point 
here is one that comes near the end: 
"After these visions of the holy tunic 
with the most holy sign, God gave 
me greater desire and impulse to 
assemble companions, and with the 
permission of Holy Mother Church 
to found a Congregation." 30 These 
affirmations of the young Founder 
were confirmed by him countless 
times later on in life. There can be 
no doubt whatever that St. Paul of 
the Cross founded his Institute be- 
cause he was convinced from per- 
sonal experience that God was im- 
pelling him to do so. 31 

The second quality — 
New Mode fl new ohiaracteriatic 

°f Ll f e mode of life— finds its 

basic verfication in this same letter 
to the Bishop. It shows that Paul 
did not just copy a manner of living 
from one or other existing religious 
order. Rather, as he testifies, it was 
the action of God that impelled him 
first to solitude, then "to live in the 
greatest poverty ... so necessary to 
maintain the fervor of holy pray- 
er." 32 It was not a matter of pick 
and choose at random. Nor was the 
result just a conglomeration of di- 
verse elements of the religious life. 
It was an orderly arrangement, man- 
ifesting divine direction. It was a 
new, characteristic mode of life. 

It would be foolish, we believe, to 
deny that there was in this new way 
of life a definite dependence upon 
what the young Founder had seen 
and heard, for instance, of Capu- 
chin poverty or of eremitic solitude 
and penance. It is safe to presume 
that his mind had been deeply im- 
pressed with the penitential life of 



Same as 



Capuchins? a p peQrs to be even an 
over-all similarity of Passionist life 
with that of the Capuchins or Fran- 
ciscans. Aside from the fact that sol- 
itude is not essential for them as it 
is for us, if we examine those ways 
of religious life more closely, we will 
discover a different directive prin- 
ciple. St. Francis wanted his sons to 
be totally imbued with a spirit of 
humility and simplicity, so much so 
that this would be characteristic of 
them. 36 He wanted them ito show 
forth the simplicity of a total, joy- 
ous imitation of Christ. 37 Everything 
else was ordained to this in his spiri- 
tuality. One of the best illustrations 
of it was the Saint's exhortation to 
his followers to manifest such joy and 



the desert Fathers. It had been vi- 
vidly described in the books his mo- 
ther had read to him as a boy. 33 It 
was from the Capuchin monastery 
close by his home that he chose his 
spiritual director. And there were 
besides communities of Augustinians 
and Servites in the little town of 
Castellazzo. 34 The knowledge he 
gained from such associations was 
bound to have its effect when the 
young Paul felt moved by God to 
lead a life apart from the world. 
God's inspiration does not necessarily 
dispense with naturally acquired 
knowledge when this will serve His 
purpose. But the mode of life that 
God "infused in my soul," as Paul 
put it, was an organic union of these 
elements of experience. 35 It was 
something new and characteristic, 
like the habit and sign that he was 
shown to wear. 

However, many have 
been struck by what 



130 



exaltation in their life, that they 
would appear as "God's jesters". 38 

Now St. Paul of the Cross wanted 
his sons to be cheerful too, and glad 
of heart. 39 But a greater concern 
for him was that they should have 
the grief for the Passion that their 
habit manifested. 40 Yes, there are 
many external similarities between 
the life of Capuchins or Franciscans 
and our own, many borrowed cus- 
toms perhaps. But inwardly there 
is a different inspiration, a different 
motivating principle. This will be 
treated in the next point more fully. 
But in confirmation of this present 
point, the tremendous difficulty that 
our Holy Founder encountered in 
securing approbation for his mode 
of life is a good sign that it was dif- 
ferent from Franciscans or any 
others. Its austerity was a continual 
bone of contention. Moreover, had 
St. Paul's Rule not been so new and 
characteristic of the Passionists, a 
wise and cautious Pope like Benedict 
XIV would never have consented to 
approve it. The Passionists could 
have pursued their own apostolate 
while living one of the older well- 
tested Rules. Repeated papal appro- 
bation, as well as the canonization of 
our three saints, prove the efficacy 
of this new way of life. 

This brings us to the 
Organic third and ^ condition 



Unity 



required for a truly dis- 



tinct spirituality, that of organic un- 
ity deriving from a new form. Where 
is there evidence of it in the found- 
ing of our Congregation? It stands 
out most clearly, we believe, in the 
Diary of St. Paul of the Cross. 41 
This was composed, as we know, 



during the forty-days retreat, i.e., 
during the same period in which the 
early Rule was written. From the 
Diary we learn again of Paul's in- 
spiration to found the Congregation. 
Typical of God's action in souls, He 
had given Paul a deep appreciation 
of the need for such a religious in- 
stitute in the Church. The super- 
natural inspiration worked through 
a profound realization of the purpose 
of the Passion. And when confronted 
with the apparent frustration of 
Christ's sufferings for so many souls, 
the young man was moved to do 
something about it. 

In the entry for the 4th of De- 
cember we read: "Then there came 




"I say to Him: Oh, my God when 

You were scourged, what were the 

sentiments of Your Sacred Heart?" 

—Diary, Nov. 26, 



131 



to me sorrow at seeing Him offended 
and I told Him that I desired to be 
torn to shreds for one soul. Alas! I 
seemed to faint away at seeing the 
ruin of so many souls who do not 
experience the fruit <of the Passion 
of my Jesus." And on the 6th he 
writes: "I had particular fervor in 
praying God to hasten the founda- 
tion of this Congregation in Holy 
Church, and in praying for sinners." 
Again the following day: "I had also 
a particular tenderness in beseeching 
God, by His mercy, to establish quick- 
ly the Holy Congregation, and to 
send forth a band for His greater 
glory and the profit of their neigh- 
bor." 

Paul's devotion to the Crucified 
Christ impelled him to want to make 
His Passion fruitful in the souls of 
sinners. But he could not do it alone. 
The field was too vast. He must con- 
script others for the work, others 
who would be inspired with the 
same ideal. It was precisely during 
these days that he composed his Rule 
of life for them, And what was it 
but a duplicate of the plan upon 
which his own interior life had been 
formed? — solitude, poverty, pen- 
ance, and prayer centering in the 
Passion, overflowing in a zeal to 
make that Passion known and ap- 
preciated by others. We see here evi- 
dence of an organic unity in the 
choice and arrangements of the ele- 
ments of religious life. 

This unity points to a 
"new form" inspiring it. 
But even more, there was something 
here that demanded a new form. It 
was the particular end toward which 
Paul's Congregation was directed — 



ISew Form 



toward a specifically Passionist apos- 
tolate. This apostolate by its very 
nature called for a new form. And 
it specified that form, the form of a 
Passion-contemplation, as the soul 
of its spirituality. 

This is proven from the type of 
religious life that our Holy Rule 
marks out for us. Our Congregation 
undeniably is an institute of the mix- 
ed or apostolic life, as outlined by 
St. Thomas in the Summa Theologica 
and commented upon extensively by 
Passerini. 4 - Our predominant spirit 
of prayer and solitude, as well as the 
nature of our work identify our mode 
of life with that which aims "to de- 
liver to others what has been con- 
templated." 43 

This is most important in an in- 
vestigation of our proper spirituality. 
If our Congregation were not one of 
the mixed or apostolic life; if instead 
it had as its specific function in the 
Church a "work of the active life 
that consists totally in exterior occu- 
pation," 44 then there would not be 
this intrinsic dependence upon the 
prayer and contemplation of the 
members. But it is clearly the apos- 
tolic type of religious life that is set 
forth in the Holy Rule and as such 
approved by God's Vicar. Passionists 
are indeed approved as missionaries 
to promote devotion to the Passion. 
This is their specific work for souls. 
But this apostolate must be exercis- 
ed within the given framework as- 
signed for it. To be true to itself, 
it must flow from contemplation: 
"contemplata aliis tradere." 

The object of this 
contemplation, there- 
fore, has to be, in 



Delivering 
the Passion 



132 



great part, the Passion. Reading" and 
study are all part of contemplation, 
as St. Thomas analyzes it. 45 They 
are the initial process. But they can- 
not be all-sufficient. The most im- 
portant part follows, when a man 
dwells long and lovingly upon the 
material gathered, to acquire that 
personal and experimental know- 
ledge that will bear abundant fruit 
in his own soul, and allow of its 
being shared with others. Mere spec- 
ulative study sufficient to preach a 
sermon on the Passion, or even a 
meditation, might in an individual 
case produce true supernatural fruit. 
But it cannot be the ordinary manner 
of preparation for a whole institute. 
If that were the general rule, then 
the Passionist Congregation would 
be betraying its trust. For in order 
to fulfill the specific work confided 
to it by the Church, its members 
must deliver the Passion to others 
as the fruit of their own prayer and 
meditation upon it. 

This is the formal element of their 
spirituality demanded by their apos- 
tolate of the Passion. As Fr. Philippe 
notes in his book on contemplation, 
"the spiritual life differs among spi- 
ritual families (the religious insti- 
tutes) not only in its moral part, in- 
sofar namely as they diversely ordain 
the means, but also in its contem- 
plative part, insofar as they tend 
toward God according to the special 
end of their mission in the Church."* 6 
It is most important to grasp the 
significance of this truth. For it is 
the key to the spirituality of any 
institute — at least of an institute of 
the mixed life or the contemplative 
life. This mode of prayer and con- 



templation is the form of its spiri- 
tuality, inspiring and directing all 
the icther elements to converge in 
producing that type of religious need- 
ed for its mission in the Church. 

In our case it amounts to this: de- 
votion to the Passion was not some- 
thing imposed on the life from with- 
out. The Apostolate of the Passion 
was not just assigned to our Congre- 
gation after its spirituality was form- 
ed, like some juridic office that must 
be fulfilled. The very fact that it is 
the matter of the vows, which in re- 
ligious life are admittedly the es- 
sence, indicates how profoundly our 
apostolic work determines our spiri- 
tuality. 

. We can see this 

Passion Passion form of con- 

Contemplation templation guiding 

and motivating our Holy Founder in 
his writing of the early Rule. 47 The 
only two paragraphs that remain of 
that primitive Rule prove how much 
the remembrance of Christ's suffer- 
ings was influencing the Founder's 
arrangement of the life. 48 In the 
first of these paragraphs he makes 
an impassioned appeal for mortifica- 
tion on Friday, reminding his sons 
that to recall that day of sorrow 
should be a thing to cause the death 
of a true lover of an Incarnate God. 
The second paragraph of that early 
Rule illustrates beautifully how the 
memory of the Passion should be the 
true formal element of Passionist 
Spirituality. It was to inspire first 
of all the interior life of the men 
themselves, and then their apostolic 
work for souls. "Dearly beloved, 
know that the principal end of gcing 
clad in black (according to the part- 



133 



icular inspiration that God has given 
me) is to be clothed in mourning for 
the Passion and Death of Jesus, and 
that we should never forget to keep 
with us a continual and sorrowful 
remembrance of it. And therefore 




"The principal end of going clothed 

in black is in mourning of the 

Passion." — 1st Rule. 



each one of the Poor of Jesus shall 
endeavor to instill in whomsoever 
he can the pious meditation of the 
sufferings of our most sweet 
Jesus." 49 

Our present redaction of the Holy 
Rule contains this same directing 
motive for our poverty and solitude 
and prayer, 50 as well as for the apos- 
tolate. It is this characteristic form 
of Passion-prayer that gives organic 
unity to our whole way of life. In 
this respect of inspiring a complete 
formula of life directed toward a 
Passion Apostolate, it is indeed new 
in the Church. It makes Passionist 
Spirituality specifically distinct from 
others. 

Yes, our Spirituality does possess 
all the required conditions. It veri- 
fies the qualities necessary for a dis- 
tinct spirituality: 1) God's super- 
natural intervention inspiring our 
Holy Founder; 2) a new mode of 
life characteristic of the Passionist 
Apostolate and efficacious; and 3) 
an organic unity deriving from a new 
form that is specified by its mission 
in the Church. We can rightly claim 
and glory in our own Spirituality. 



Appendix I - Apostles of the Passion 



Contemplation of the Passion 
could never be anything new within 
the Church. But a Spirituality of 
the Passion, a complete program of 
life directed to stamping men's 
minds and hearts with the memory 
of the Passion — this was something 
new. And the Holy See recognized 
it as new. Never before had a found- 
er been inspired by God to organize 
the traditional means of perfection 



into a formula of life that would 
converge toward that particular end. 
These will be men who are steeped 
in the Mystery of the Cross, whose 
whole lives are orientated toward 
Christ Crucified in such a way that 
their contemplation of Him will be 
the cause of turning others toward 
Him too. Passionist Spirituality, em- 
bracing both interior and exterior 
formation, is a training school for 



134 



the Church's ex professo Apostles of 

the Passion. 

If men are to vow 
A Guarantee their j.^ %Q accamp . 

lish this Apostolate, they themselves, 
as well as the Church, need a guar- 
antee that this vow will achieve its 
purpose. Only a spirituaility that is 
aimed at this, and informed by this 
Passion-mode of prayer, can give 
this assurance. 

Pope Benedict XIV expressed sur- 
prise on examining iour Rule that a 
Congregation with a purpose so fun- 
damental as ours should have been 
founded so late. He ventured the 
opinion that it should have been 
the first. 51 And in like manner we 
may wonder that as far along as the 
18th Century so basic a work as ours 
could give rise to any specifically 
different spirituality in the Church. 
But, as the liturgy notes for the 
feast of St. Francis' Stigmata, when 
the world was growing cold, God, in 
order to inflame hearts with the fire 
of His love, renewed in human flesh 
the sacred marks of His Passion. 52 
And so it seems, the effect of Fran- 
cis' stigmata was not enough for the 
whole new-found and far-flung world 
of six centuries later. God judged 
that it required an abiding, world- 
wide institution to keep constantly 
before men's eyes the remembrance 
of Christ's Wounds. It was not to be 
through marks in the flesh, but 
through words and works of a new 
Congregation whose members would 
keep His sufferings within their 
hearts and on their breast, and would 
vow to impress them upon the hearts 
of others. 

Certainly the Passion had been 



preached for nineteen centuries be- 
fore Paul Danei was even born. But 
God raised him up and through him 
a new Congregation, to do that very 
thing ex officio. For this did God 
"select him, confer on him special 
graces, impel him supernaturally to 
live a life whose characteristics He 
traced out and in which are marve- 
lously fused the traditional forms of 
activity and prayer, together with a 
new form." 5 ' 

How will any of the Founders fit 
better into that picture sketched by 
Fr. De Guibert? No wonder that a 
few days before he began to write 
his Rule, Paul of the Cross had a 
vision of all the Founders united in 




. to keep aglow in the world the 
light and love of the Passion." 



135 



prayer for him. 54 The manner in generating in a long line of men a 

which he was inspired to form his zeal to keep aglow in the world the 

Passioriist Spirituality made of it a light and love of His Son's Passion! 55 
new powerhouse in the Church for 

Appendix II - The Overflow of 
our Contemplation 



In the foregoing study of our 
Spirituality we referred to a mode 
of Passion-prayer or contemplation 
as its form, demanded by the Pas- 
sion-apostolate. This should not be 
misunderstood. We did not mean to 
imply that our interior life is direct- 
ed primarily to the apostolate. That 
would be an inversion of right order. 
In every religious institute the prin- 
cipal end is the sanctification of the 
individual members. 55a And it is to 
this that their life of prayer is di- 
rected. 

What we meant rather was that 
the secondary end can modify this 
principal one, specify it. Taking it 
for granted that there will be present 
in a spirituality the element of men- 
tal prayer, there is nothing to pre- 
vent its particular form being deter- 
mined by the apostolate. 56 Religious 
can sanctify their souls without such 
a pronounced emphasis on the Pas- 
sion in prayer as we have. Our pra- 
yer takes its intense Passion coloring 
in view of our work. God and our 
Holy Founder both planned it that 
way. Our Spirituality envisions men 
who will first sanctify themselves 
through intimate union with Christ 
Crucified, and who will then be pre- 
pared to place others in contact with 
Him too. 57 This apostolate is the 
spontaneous overflow of it. 



This is the teaching of St. Thomas 
on the apostolic life. 58 Preaching of 
the mysteries of faith presupposes 
an abundance of contemplation that 
will overflow upon those listening. 
St. Paul of the Cross urged the first 
Passionists to beseech the Holy 
Spirit to admit them to "the font of 
the living waters of His graces, to 
drink in abundance"™ And he told 
them in the very first chapter of 
the Rule that the font was Jesus 
Christ and meditation on His Pas- 
sion. 60 A font, and a fire as well: 
"Fons vivus, ignis, caritas." "Let us 
all en-flamed with love," he wrote, 
"on fire with charity, enkindle this 
divine fire in the hearts of our poor 
neighbors by the holy preaching of 
the most Sacred Sufferings of our 
Crucified Love." 61 

Let us consider the interrelation 
of this prayer and apostolate of the 
Passion, first from God's point of 
view; then from the angle of its de- 
velopment in the mind of our Holy 
Founder. That will give us a few 
clues as to the respective roles they 
should play in our life. 

In God's plan the 
contemplation of the 
Passion in relation 
to our apostolate should be as cause 
to effect. It should be spiritual light 
and love in our own souls first and 



"Lead others to 
do the same" 



136 



foremost; then as a cause it will en- 
lighten and enflame the souls of 
others. God intends that Passionists 
attain so close a union and identifi- 
cation with His Crucified Son, that 
when they mount a mission platform 
it will be Christ in them that draws 
suuls to Himself. 63 Their contempla- 
tion of the Crucified will be com- 
municated to their hearers and im- 
pressed on their hearts as a mold 
produces a likeness to itself. 64 

The first chapter of the Holy Rule 
sets forth this perspective clearly: 
"Since one of the chief objects of 
our Congregation is not only to de- 
vote ourselves to prayer . . . but also 
to lead others to do the same . . . the 
members should teach the people 
how to meditate on the Mysteries, 




'Lead others to do the same' 
Holy Rule, n. 3. 



Sufferings and Death of our Lord 
Jesus Christ." 65 And the third chap- 
ter, on the purpose of our solitude, 
teaches the same doctrine. 

Fr. Garrigou -Lagrange explains 
the relation of contemplation to ac- 
tion by an analogy with the Incarna- 
tion and Redemption. 66 God sent His 
Son into the world with a view to our 
redemption — "propter nostram Salu- 
tem," as the Creed proclaims. But 
the Incarnation is a mystery so great 
that it could not have been ordained 
as a means to the redemption of 
men. That would be the subordina- 
tion of the greater to the lesser. In- 
stead, God decreed the Incarnation 
of His Son as an eminent cause from 
which man's redemption would flow. 

So too with the personal contem- 
plation of an apostle and the preach- 
ing that flows from it. It is an emi- 
nent cause from which his apostolate 
proceeds. The contemplation should 
never be subordinated to the aposta>- 
late; it should Inspire it. Nor should 
apostolic work ever harm a man's 
contemplative life. Letting our light 
shine before men ought not to lessen 
it. In fact, preaching should benefit 
the apostles themselves. It should be 
"to the great advantage of their own 
souls and of those of others." 67 

These two ends of an apostolic re- 
ligious institute are intimately con- 
nected: the preaching flowing from 
contemplation, and then in turn 
helping and preparing the preacher's 
soul for further and deeper prayer. 68 
They are causae ad invicem causae. 

This is what occurred in the soul 
of our Holy Founder, judging from 
his writings and teaching. Apparent- 
ly young Paul Danei was not aware 



137 



at first that his own prayer on the 
Passion would ever overflow in 
preaching to others. But even when 
he did become aware of God's will 
in this regard, he never subordinated 
contemplation to action. 

The Diary manifests clearly how 
his contemplation was steeped in the 
Passion. And we know how it super- 
abounded upon souls in his early 
teaching and preaching apostolate. 69 
His devotion to the Passion was an 
eminent cause producing an effect 
in others like to itself. 

These results of contemplation are 
proposed to us by our Holy Rule. 70 
And we know from the letters of our 
Holy Founder that he had nothing 
more at heart than to give to the 
Church really capable and zealous 
apostolic workers. What he meant 
by "apostolic" was men well purified 
and enlightened by the aridities of 
mental prayer, men so deeply in 
contact with God in the depths of 
their souls that they could remain 



so while working for others. 71 This 
is the goal of Passionist Spirituality. 

This gives us a norm for our own 
prayer and preaching of the Passion. 
We don't spend the time of medita- 
tion in sounding the depths of 
Christ's sufferings, in order to pre- 
pare sermons and to teach this 
knowledge to others. Our purpose is 
the sanctification of our souls, for 
God's glory and out of compassion 
for Christ Who foresaw our devotion 
and was consoled by it. But these 
primary concerns do not prevent us 
from realizing and praying that we 
may be able later to give others the 
fruit of our contemplation. 

In fact, this zealous prayer for 
others has always been a great spur 
to contemplative souls, even though 
they personally were not destined to 
apostolic work. The prayer of such 
cloistered souls as the two Sts. Te- 
resa overflowed not in preaching 
but rather in winning grace for the 
preachers and their hearers. 



Pare III The Great Need For 
Elaboration Of Our Spirituality 



It should not be out of place to 
note that in the last General Chapter 
the very first measure decided upon 
"to insure, safeguard, and strengthen 
perfect discipline and observance in 
every place", was that of institutiing 
a Faculty of Passionist Spirituality. 70 
(This was in answer to a letter from 
the Sacred Congregation of Reli- 
gious.) 71 

That really goes right to the heart 
of the question. Too drastic a change 
in the world's attitudes and ways of 
living has occurred in the past fifty 



years for the Church herself not to 
be affected by it. And one of the 
results has been an endangering of 
discipline and observance in Reli- 
gious Institutes, because of the lack 
of adjustment to the changing times. 
That is why in recent years the Pope 
has stressed time and time again in 
his addresses to General Chapters of 
many Institutes that there is urgent 
need for them to adapt their way of 
life to modern conditions. 72 

No doubt one of the basic reasons 
for the failure to progressively adapt 



138 



is the lack of well-formulated prin- 
ciples upon which to do so. Adapta- 
tion cannot be safe and sane, nor 
endure for long, unless it is known 
exactly what is essential and un- 
adaptable in a particular form of 
life ,and what there is in it that can 
and should change with the times. 73 
And this knowledge of what is es- 
sential and what is not in a Religious 
Institute can only come from a study 
of its particular spirituality. 

We can see, therefore, how vitally 
necessary it is for us to have very 
clear and well-defined notions about 
our Passionist way of life. If in the 
past a scientific, theological investi- 
gation of our Spirituality might have 
been considered a hobby, 
Adapt or we ^now j t j s s heer neces- 
die out gity today The advance of 
time demands that we advance with 
it. 74 Progress and development call 
for a similar activity in ourselves, if 
we are not to be cast aside as out- 
moded. We see that even in the 
teaching magisterium of God's eter- 
nal Church there is a development of 
doctrine, new modes of exposition, 
even an explicit affirmation of im- 
plicit truth. And religious congre- 
gations, as the Churches' 'brightest 
ornament and firmest support', must 
keep abreast of these developments 
by elaborating the theology of their 
particular vocations. 

This theological analysis of our 
life and spirituality is not a neces- 
sary evil that must be feared, as apt 
to complicate matters or introduce 
dangerous innovations. It will be a 
protection, a bulwark against the 
slashing waves of modernism, secu- 
larism, and materialism which are 



breaking in upon religious institutes 
in our age. Fr. Gemelli writes that 
usually after the formation period 
of a new congregation "there come 
the theologians, and they offer the 
support of their speculation and the 
fruit of their research in order to 
give doctrinal justification to the 
characteristic aspects of the school." 75 

It is true, Passionists for two hun- 
dred years have been living accord- 
ing to the Spirituality of St. Paul of 
the Cross, without most of them per- 
haps ever knowing in theological 
terminology what constitutes it. But 
that won't do today, as the Holy See 
has been advising religious. Unless 
we know our proper Spirituality in 
a truly scientific manner, we cannot 
hope to preserve it intact before the 
onslaught of modern erroneous ten- 
dencies. The Letters of our Most 
Rev. Generals have described and 
even at times detailed it to some 
extent. 76 These will serve as guiding 
norms in the further research that 
is required today, if our progressive 
adaptation is to be wholesome. Then, 
too, we must test that which has been 
made in some places. 77 We must ask: 
Does it follow along the lines traced 
by our Holy Founder? 

By way of illustration we would 
like to propose a few matters that 
seem to us to call for urgent clari- 
fication in our Spirituality. They are 
really at the basis of any attempt at 
adaptation. They concern: 1) our 
apostolate; 2) a call to reparation; 
and 3) the night office. 

1. In our Congregation we have 
what are called by the last General 
Chapter "primary ministries" in the 
exercise of our apostolate, as dis- 



139 



tinguished from "secondary" ones. 
The primary ones are said to be "es- 
sential means for ob- 
An essential taining the end of our 
Institute." 78 But it is 
worthwhile observing that in an ad- 
dress to the General Congress of 
Religious, Fr. Lombardi would ques- 
tion whether any given means of an 
apoistolate could be essential to ful- 
filling its end. 79 And he was treating 
specifically of institutes "that have 
received the mission of sacred 
preaching." The end of the aposto- 
late is all important, he insists, and 
the means have value only as long 
as they are useful in attaining the 
end. 

; Now, we do not call attention to 
this matter in any spirit of criticism. 
It is only that we feel this is an out- 
standing illustration of how much 
profound research and study is re- 
quired before safe principles and 
norms of adaptation can be given. 
More or less vague "traditions" can- 
not stand alone as norms. Actually 
there seems to be no reason for 
thinking that missions and retreats 
should ever go out of date. The Holy 
Father has repeatedly through the 
years insisted on the timeliness of 
preaching the eternal truths — or bet- 
ter, the timelessness of it. 80 And cer- 
tainly St. Paul of the Cross consider- 
ed such work our proper ministry. 81 
Even way back in the early days 
when he composed his Diary we find 
him thinking of promoting devotion 
to the Passion in terms of preaching 
the eternal truths: 82 There is probab- 
ly no need to doubt that missions and 
retreats will always be primary works 
of the ministry for us. 



But what this distinction high- 
lights (between primary and essen- 
tial) is the paramount 
End of our imp3rtance of determi- 
Apostolate ning ^^ what . g ^ 

specific end of our apostolate, as dis- 
tinct from any of the specific means 
it uses. What is our purpose, our 
function, as a particular organism 
in the Mystical Body of Christ? 

Perhaps we could state the end 
of our ministry in the terminology 
of a function in the Church. Passion- 
ists, we would say, are to specialize 
in placing souls in direct and living 
contact with Christ Crucified, pre- 




The solitude of Monte Argentaro 

which Mary chose for the first 

Passionists. 



140 



cisely by presenting to them the Pas- 
sion itself as a mystery of faith. 

If this is the end of our Aposto- 
late, we can then use any means to 
accomplish it? And here again we 
see the urgent need of knowing our 
Spirituality well. So many ways of 
exercising the apostolate are open 
to us today, that we must have a 
clear and exact answer to this ques- 
tion. The answer can only come from 
a correct understanding of our par- 
ticular Passionist way of life. Are 
there in our Spirituality factors that 
directly condition our Apostolate? 
Are there some essential elements 
that by their very nature exclude 
certain means from the Passionist 
ministry? 

We believe that anyone who goes 
deeply and thoroughly into the ques- 
tion of what St. Paul of the Cross 
really meant by Passionist solitude 
as an essential of our life, will con- 
clude that not any means will do in 
spreading devotion to the Passion, 
even though prompted by an ingeni- 
ous love. 83 

2. Reparation and its relation to 
Passionist life is another point that 
should be clarified. For many years 
now Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange has been 
praising our Holy Founder in his 
various bsoks. He has consistently 
put him forward as "a most perfect 
example of the reparative life". 84 
That is a beautiful tribute. But it is 
not uncommon for the illustrious 
Dominican to go further and add 
that St. Paul of the Cross founded a 
Congregation "vowed to repara- 
tion". 85 

Undoubtedly Fr. Garrigou does 
not mean this literally. He well 



knows that Passionists do not pro- 
nounce a public vow of reparation. 
He is alluding to a special call to 
reparation, to a call implicit in the 
very nature of a Passionist vocation. 
Of course all Christians are called 
to make reparation. This is implied 

in their union with a 
Called to it Crucified Head> Who 
a fortiori wag ^ Repairer par 

excellence. 88 In their encyclicals the 
Popes have made this call an expli- 
cit duty. 87 On this basis it would not 
take much to make out a strong case 
for Passionists being called to repar- 
ation a fortiori. If, as Pope Pius XI 
wrote, "every soul which burns with 
true love of God . . . and contemplates 
Jesus suffering for mankind . . . will 
organize his life so that in all things 
it will be inspired by the spirit of 
reparation", 88 what shall we say of 
Passionists, whose continual medi- 
tation is on the sufferings of Christ? 

We see in the life of St. Paul of 
the Cross how the contemplation of 
the Passion inspired him to organize 
his life in the spirit of reparation. 
"Sorrow came upon me to see Him 
offended," we read in his Diary, "and 
I said to Him that I would wish to 
be flayed alive for one soul." "I 
know that through the mercy of our 
dear God I desire to know nothing, 
nor to taste any consolation, except 
that alone of being crucified with 
Jesus." "Praying for the conversion 
of sinners ... I said to my God that 
I can no longer endure to see Him 
offended." 89 

Paul may not have used the word 
'reparation', but this is certainly 
what it was. And he looked to his 
sons to repair the harm done by 



141 



sin. s ° a "I had particular fervor," he 
recorded in the Diary, "in begging 
God to found this Congregation of 
Holy Church quickly, and for sin- 
ners." 90 At home the penance and 
austerity of their life would merit 
grace for the souls in sin to whom 
they were to preach. This expiatory 
value of penance is at the very basis 
of reparation And the penitential se- 
verity of Passionist life is bound to 
provide such expiative benefit for the 
Mystical Body. Our solidarity with 
the Church ensures that none of our 
sacrifice or suffering will be with- 
out its reparative effect in other 
cells and members of Christ's Mys- 
tical Body. 

There are even explicit references 
to reparation in our Ritual for Ves- 
tition and Profession. One prayer 
begs God: "Show us... how much 
we should do and suffer for Thy 
Name." (p. 16) Another asks that the 
novice "ever bearing in himself the 
mortification of the Cross might live 
constantly nailed with Christ to the 
Cross." (p. 19) These are strong 
words, the language of generous 
souls determined to enter upon a life 
of continual self-denial in union with 
Christ the Repairer of His Father's 
outraged love and mercy. 

Most often today the notion of 
reparation is closely linked to the 
devotion toward the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus and the Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment. This dates from the time of 
the apparitions to St. Margaret Mary 
at Paray-le-Monial about 1675. We 
never find reference in the letters of 
our Holy Founder to his having 
heard of these apparitions, but there 
is reference to the very same con- 



cept of reparation. 91 He writes of 
the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus to 
"suffer in sorrow for the irreveren- 
ces that He receives from bad Chris- 
tians and from worse eccelesiastics 
and religious men and women who 
correspond to such love with ingrati- 
tude and sacrilege. To make repara- 
tion," he continues, "for so many 
outrages the loving soul ought to 
offer itself as a victim consumed in 
the fire of love; ought to love and 
praise and visit It often for those 
who maltreat It, especially to visit 
It at those hours when there is no 
one attending It ... Oh! how much 
I could say on this matter, but time 
does not allow me . . . " 92 

St. Paul wrote that letter relative- 
ly early in his career, long before the 
later revisions of his Rule were 
made. Even though not addressed to 
one of his religious, revealing as it 
does his inmost sentiments, it pro- 
vides excellent background for pas- 
sages in our Rule such as n. 172. 
Another letter written by him just 
a year after the one quoted above 
manifests how he looked for this 
reparative spirit in his own sons too. 
Addressing himself to one of his 
Cardinal protectors on the occasion 
of his being permitted to reserve 
the Blessed Sacrament in the Church 
on Monte Argentaro he wrote: "I 
rejoice over it greatly because I hope 
that by their adoration (that of his 
religious) there may be repaired in 
some part the countless irreverences 
that unfortunately are committed 
every day in Its presence." 93 

From what we gather 
of our Holy Founder's 

frontline reparative spiri t from 



In the 



142 



such passages as these, how, we 
might ask, would he have reacted to 
an encyiical on reparation such as 
Pius XI issued in our times? With 
his devotedness to the Popes we can 
easily imagine him composing a cir- 
cular letter to his sons throughout 
the world, quoting the words of the 
Vicar of Christ and calling upon 
them to take up their spiritual wea- 
pons and advance to the very front 
line in the troops of reparative souls. 
The description that this Pope gave 
of "families of religious born from 
this spirit of reparation", leading "a 
life that in all things is inspired by 




' . . . tuum da filiis spiritum' 

A group representing 8 Provinces 

from the "international" Community 

at Sts. John and Paul, on a visit to 

Monte Argentaro. 



the spirit of reparation", 94 would fit 
Paul's Congregation too well for him 
to have mistaken it. The whole tenor 
of Passionist life is one of effective 
reparation for the forgotten Christ 
on His Cross. This was the burden of 
the Sorrowful Mother's message 
when she appeared to outline the 
program of life for the Institute of 
the Passion. 

In response to such an encyclical 
on reparation we can be sure that 
St. Paul would not have designated 
anything additional for Passionists 
to do. To live out to the full the 
letter and spirit of their Rule would 
be the best possible response. Such 
passages as n. 146 and 171 provide 
ample matter for a reparative life. 
Besides, our Congregation has as- 
similated the best in the reparative 
devotion to the Sacred Heart that has 
arisen in the last century. Over sev- 
enty-five years ago the whole Insti- 
tute was consecrated to the Sacred 
Heart in a solemn act which is re- 
newed each first Friday of the month. 
Here in the United States, as a sign 
of wholesome adaptation, we have 
the practice of a Eucharistic Holy 
Hour every Thursday during prayer. 

This brief treatment of the sub- 
ject has only attempted to point out 
how deeply rooted in our life this 
spirit of reparation is. The close 
bonds that join a Passionist to the 
suffering Redeemer may indicate a 
special call to share intimately in 
the reparative work of Calvary. This 
is what Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange has 
in mind. He is thinking in terms of 
Passionists imitating St. Paul of the 
Cross in his reparative spirit, since 
religious are supposed to follow 



143 



closely in the footsteps of their 
Founder. Pius XI wrote: "We exhort 
religious to look to their Founder 
for an example, if they wish assured- 
ly and abundantly to participate in 
the graces that flow from their vo- 
cation . . . For the characteristics 
which (the Founders) wanted to im- 
press upon their Institutes, they first 
manifested in themselves. 95 Repara- 
tion appears certainly to have been 
a most marked characteristic in our 
Holy Founder. 96 So it is not surpris- 
ing to find spiritual theologians like 
this Dominican and the Jesuit, Fr. 
Lebreton 97 , singling it out as a sa- 
lient feature and trait that they ex- 
pect to be inherited by his sons. Still, 
the place of reparation in the Pas- 
sionist vocation evidently needs 
much more thorough investigation. 
Only a deep study of our Spirituality 
will give us the clear knowledge we 
ought to have as to the part that 
God expects it should play in the in- 
dividual life of each son of St. Paul 
of the Cross. 

3. The night office is the third 
example we have chosen to demon- 
strate the need we have for working 
out a theology of our life. This con- 
stitutes a very complex question in 
some countries today. We will not 
involve ourselves in its intricate de- 
tails, but will only try to show how 
closely knit with our Passionist 
Spirituality and Apostolate this 
penitential observance is. 

There is little doubt that in the 
United States one of the best known 
known elements of our life is that 
of rising for Matins. Next to our 
Apostolate of preaching the Passion, 



no part of our Spirituality is so fa- 
miliar to people. And that 



Passionist 
example 



is of tremendous signifi- 
cance as a psychological 
preparation for our ministry. It is a 
form of credentials with souls, which 
gains for us a ready hearing, and 
even more, a willing response. Pas- 
sionists— it is presumed — are living 
testimony to the urgency of their 
words. Sin must be the greatest evil 
in the world. These men are witness 
to it by their lives. The Passion is 
the biggest fact of life to be faced 
and coped with. These Passionists 
testify to it by their example as well 
as by their words. 

It has often been said that we must 
preach the Passion both by word and 
by example. Our Holy Rule states 
that we can put over our message 
even better by our deeds. 98 And our 
Holy Founder definitely had in mind 
that people should be moved to re- 
pentance and greater love for Christ 
by the conduct of his sons as much 
as by their sermons." 

But the point we wish to make is 
this: the large part that the night 
observance plays in this witnessing 
to the Passion. It is predominant in 
any notion that outsiders have of our 
life, whether they be 

Witnessing to dergy Qr Mty And for 

the Passion ourselveS) besides the 
sanctifying power that it exercises on 
our lives, it has great psychological 
effect in impressing upon us that we 
have a very definite spirit of pen- 
ance, that we are called to testify to 
the meaning of the Passion, by our 
lives as well as by our ministry. 100 

Only thus can we explain the rigor 
of our life. The hard beds and bare 



144 



furnishings, the fast and abstinence, 
and most characteristically of all — 
the habitual interruption of sleep. 
All this is eloquent testimony to the 
meaning of the Sign upon our hearts. 
It is all aimed at forming apostolic 
preachers of the Passion. As we have 
shown above, our total Spirituality 
comprehends not just the interior 
spirit of a Passion form of prayer, 
but also the body of material ele- 
ments. This severity of our life helps 
to make us a living lesson of the 
Passion in deed, and then so much 
the more powerfully in word. 101 

Cardinal Suhard's ideas on being 
a living testimony to Christ, like the 
Martyrs of the early Church, can be 
well adapted to ourselves. For we 
are called to witness to Christ Cru- 
cified. This is a concept rooted in 
Sacred Scripture and Christian tra- 
dition. 102 "To be a witness," wrote 
the Cardinal of Paris, "does not con- 
sist in engaging in propaganda, nor 
even in stirring people up, but in 
being a living mystery. It means to 
live in such a way that one's life 
would not make sense if God did not 



exist" 103 — or for Passionists, to live 
in such a way that would not make 
sense if Christ Jesus had not suffer- 
ed for the souls of men. 

This is integrally bound up with 
our vocation in so many respects, 
deeply interwoven in our Passionist 
Spirituality. We will have to be cau- 
tious, therefore, in mitigating the 
external penance that testifies so 
manifestly to the Passion. Even 
though it be in the pursuit of greater 
efficiency for our work, we cannot 
afford to adapt so drastically as to 
alter the penitential appearance that 
we present to the Church. If Pas- 
sionists are meant by God to witness 
to the Sufferings of Christ by the 
very austerity of their life, then this 
service to the Mystical Body will 
compensate for what we might other- 
wise give it in greater efficiency. 

The particular applications and 
decisions must be left to those who 
have a full view of the problems and 
complications involved. But this 
much is clear: we need deep study of 
our Spirituality before any secure 
decisions can be made. 



Conclusion: The Goal In View 



The task that lies ahead of us 
should surely be a labor of love. For 
the men assigned to research in our 
Spirituality at Rome it will mean 
much painstaking work in archives 
and apostolic processes that contain 
details of our Holy Founder's life. 
It is to the example of St. Paul of 
the Cross that we must go to see the 
principles of Passionist life in action. 
We need to see how he applied these 
principles in the concrete decisions 
of every day life, in the very sizeable 



amount of adaptation that he him- 
self made in establishing the Con- 
gregation. 104 This is how we will ob- 
tain our practical norms for adapta- 
tion today. 

But even more important, it is 
necessary to study the sources from 
which St. Paul of the Cross derived 
his principles for Passionist life. 
Thousands of others before and after 
him read the works of Tauler, St. 
Teresa, St. Francis de Sales and St. 
John of the Cross. But none had ever 



145 



been inspired by God to apply their 
teaching toward the attainment of 
our Passionist ideals. Our Holy 
Founder read those works of the 
spiritual Masters under the guidance 
of a special divine light. It taught 
him to fuse the teaching and prac- 
tice of the Saints into a new formula 
of religious life and apostolate. 

That divine light shone in Paul's 
soul through his contemplation of 
the Crucified. It unified and directed 
all things to the goal, the Passionist 
goal that he saw could be realized by 
his sons in an intimate union with 
Christ on His Cross. Only then would 
they be the hunters of souls that he 
knew God meant them to be. 
Christo confixus sum cruci. This 
Introit of our Founder's Mass repre- 
sents not only his achievement, but 
our aim. It is the concrete expres- 
sion of the Passionist ideal. From 
that ideal shines forth the light to 
illumine our way — the formal light 
that enables us to judge all things 
in relation to our goal, our heavenly 
calling in Christ Crucified. 

Can any task of an Institute of 
Passionist Spirituality be more ur- 
gent than this one: to focus the light 
of the Passion on the best that spiri- 
tual theology today has to offer, to 
show us how to view it, how to 
choose from it and assimilate what 
will aid us in the pursuit of our goal? 

It is precisely here that the writ- 
ings of St. Paul of the Cross can 
teach us so much. We learn from 
them how to point all ascetical and 
mystical theology toward the end of 
our vocation. They teach us how our 
Founder studied the whole of the 
spiritual life and the apostolate for 



souls in the formal light of the Pas- 
sion. In his Letters we find the fun- 
damental spiritual norms that under- 
lie the directives of our Rules and 
Regulations. 

Today there is need to demonstrate 
clearly how our Holy Rule and the 
best traditions of our Congregation 
are based upon what is most solid 
and rich in Christian spirituality. In 
doing this we will see how thorough- 
ly St. Paul of the Cross had absorb- 
ed the doctrine of the spiritual Mas- 
ters and incorporated it into his In- 
stitute, both by written word and 
his living example. But we will also 
see the basic reasons for our way of 
life. It will give us a deeper insight 
into the mind and heart of our Holy 
Founder, that we may share his con- 
viction of the crying need for our 
Passionist life and work in the world. 
That will spur us on to carry it out 
with great love and zeal. 

If in years past life was so simple 
and regular that a Passionist could 
live holily with no more than his 
Rule, the complexity and unpredicta- 
bility of modern life make it impera- 
tive that we know the principles 
dictating the prescriptions of the 
Holy Rule. We must see the goal at 
which they aim. Then, and only 
then, will a genuine Passionist spirit 
be able to adapt safely to the chang- 
ing conditions in which it is placed. 

This is the spirit of St. Paul of the 
Cross which we pray for each even- 
ing: tuum da jiliis spiritum, da per- 
severantiam. It is an enlightened 
spirit, steeped in the Passion, but 
also well rooted in the deepest spiri- 
tual tradition of the Church. It is in 
such a spirit that the Rule exhorts 



146 



the Master of Novices to 

Tradition educate his charges with 
the utmost diligence. 105 It is this 
which is the essence of what we call 
our Passionist tradition, the spirit 
that gives life to the letter of the 
Law. 

For, a genuine tradition must be a 
living entity. It must be a formative 
power, not just a conserving factor. 
It can indeed be expressed in set 
forms and ways of acting which are 
"handed down", but this must be 
done in such a way that the tradition 
is not bound down or confined to the 
concepts or customs of one period. 

Pope Pius XII has set us a splen- 
did example of how we should in- 
terpret the Church's "nihil innove- 
tur". We must proceed with caution, 




"The spirit that our Father and 

Founder drew from the side of the 

Crucified" — Altar-tomb of St. Paul 

of the Cross in Rome. 



not arbitrarily decide what is or is 
not outmoded. Just because we see 
no good reason for a custom to be 
carried on does not mean that a good 
reason does not exist. Yet, we must 
not fear or falter when God makes 
clear His will that some ancient ways 
of doing things are not suited to the 
sanctification of souls in the present 
age. Especially when the Vicar of 
Christ points the way, we must 
launch forward courageously, confi- 
dent in the guidance of the Holy 
Ghost through the spirit and tradi- 
tion that animates our Congregation. 

Analogous to the Divine Tradition 
in the Church, ours must be living, 
pulsing with the very life of the 
Mystical Body of Christ. In his for- 
ward to our Book of Customs the 
Most Rev. Fr. General sets before 
us >our aim in this matter: "May the 
spirit that our Holy Father and Foun- 
der drew from the sacred side of 
our Crucified Redeemer and trans- 
mitted to us his children be always 
maintained as a living and active 
principle in our hearts as long as 
the Congregation will endure." 

It is such a Passionist spirit and 
tradition that we can deepen in our 
souls by a renewal of contact with 
St. Paul of the Cross, through read- 
ing and study of his Letters. Those 
particularly which he addressed to 
all his sons hold a wealth of spiritual 
doctrine that will enrich every in- 
dividual Passionist life. 

For many years now during Satur- 
day afternoon classes at the Angel- 
icum University in Rome, Fr. Garri- 
gou-Lagrange has been chiding the 
Passionists who have been present. 
"You should be ashamed," he says, 



147 



"not to be making the doctrine and 

example of your Founder better 

known." The Dominican theologian 

is not alone in this es- 
"Make known ^ m f Qr gt paul Qf 

St. Paul of the Cross Fr Arinte . 

the Cross!" YQ Qp before h|m 

had marveled at the Diary, when he 
discovered it, and at once published 
a translation of it in the Spanish 
theological review that he edited. 108 
Theologians who are at odds on so 
many matters in theology are agreed 
in this. The Jesuit, Fr. De Guibert, 
expressed the greatest admiration 
for the Diary of St. Paul. He hailed 
it as "a document of the first order", 
which deserved a place "among the 
classics of Catholic mysticism". He 
wrote of "the riches of spiritual doc- 
trine contained in the correspon- 
dence" of our Holy Founder. 107 Other 
famous Jesuits have engaged in 
specialized studies on him. 108 The 
spiritual historian, Msgr. De Luca, 
and the Franciscan, Fr. Antonelli, on 
the Sacred Congregation of Rites 
have publicly voiced their regret that 
we do not know more about St. Paul 
of the Cross and his Passionist 
Spirituality. 109 

Besides the research of Fr. Caje- 
tan of the Name of Mary, 110 there 
has been other good work done along 
this line in recent years. 111 The new- 
ly published thesis of the Italian 
Passionist, Fr. Constante, 112 and a 
new book by Fr. Oswald, a Dutch 
Passionist, are good examples of 
what can be done. 113 

We have attempted to show the 
need of a well-defined Passionist 
Spirituality, the really urgent need 
in view of the adaptation required 



in some countries. We hope that the 
existence of a distinct Spirituality of 
our own has been proven both from 
authority and reason. The life of our 
Holy Founder gives evidence of this. 
It is confirmed in St. Thomas' doc- 
trine on the specification of re- 
ligious institutes by their particular 
work in the Church. This manifests 
how our special Apostolate demands 
a proper Spirituality. 

But we believe that the most solid 
argument for this thesis lies in the 
very nature of the apostolic form of 
life, as St. Thomas defines it. The 
apostolic preacher must, to be true 
to his vocation, speak "ex plenitu- 
dine contemplationis" . 113 a And since 
our message is the Passion, we must 
preach from the fulness of our own 
contemplation of the Passion. This 
is insured only by a spirituality that 
forms men steeped in the sufferings 
of Christ, through interior as well 
as exterior means of religious life, 
and sharing their abundance of 
spiritual knowledge with the faith- 
ful. Only this Passionist Spirituality 
gives the Church the necessary guar- 
antee that our Congregation will 
produce zealous Apostles of the Pas- 
sion. Only thus do Passionists them- 
selves have the guarantee they are 
entitled to that they will be able to 
fulfill their fourth vow in a manner 
that will be truly "to the great ad- 
vancement of their own souls and 
those of others". 114 

We have singled out a few of the 
many problems arising today which 
are intimately bound up with our 
Spirituality. Clarification is called 
for on the precise nature of our 
ministry as regards the means of the 



148 



apostolate compatible with our spirit. 
The place of reparation in the Pas- 
sionist vocation has not as yet been 
delineated for us. And the night of- 
fice presents difficulties that can be 
solved safely only through a study 
of the specific function that God has 
destined us to perform in the Mys- 
tical Body of His Son. 

Since we do possess untapped re- 
sources of our Spirituality, since we 
do have a Founder who is univer- 
sally acknowledged as a master of 
spiritual doctrine, we should be eag- 
er to set to work. Our Spirituality is 
centered right in the Heart of Christ 
upon the Cross. Investigating it 




. . . since we have a Founder 
so great ..." 



means working toward a deeper and 
clearer understanding of what our 
profession contract with Him really 
implies. With joyful and ready 
hearts we have vowed our lives to 
the task of making His Passion bet- 
ter known and appreciated in the 
world. Let this be the incentive that 
spurs us on to learn better ourselves 
how to live and appreciate that goal 
toward which we are directing oth- 
ers. Our preaching of the Passion 
must be a first-hand account of what 
we have come to know by experience, 
from personal, intimate acquaintance 
with the God of Calvary. 

Ward of Our Sorrowful Mother, C.P. 

Immaculate Conception Retreat 

Chicago. 

1) Acta Congregations, XVII (July 1952) p. 
243; for the English translation of The 
Passionist, (Dec. 1952) n. 4; cf. also p. 
p. 240 of Acta. 

2) cf. Acta Congregationis, XVIII (Jan. 1954) 

p. 224, where the Gen Curia states the 
necessity of temporarily postponing the 
execution of this recommendation. 

3) The same term is found in the Letter of 

Most Rev. Fr. General Leo of the Sacred 
Heart on the Study of the Passion, as it 
appears in Selected Letters of Recent Pas- 
sionist Generals, p. 93, n. 38, is a free 
translation, cf. Acta Congre. XI (1930) p. 
39. 

4) A so-called spirituality like that of St. 
Therese of Lisieux or of Sister Elizabeth 
of the Trinity would seem to come under 
the classification of individual spirituali- 
ties. For they developed within the frame- 
work of a specific Carmelite Sprirituality, 
as individual interpretations of it. They 
are excellent examples of the freedom 
that exists within a given spirituality of 
a religious institute. St. Therese approached 
the Carmelite way of life with a charac- 
teristic childlike attitude that is strikingly 
different from the rarified atmosphere in 
which her sister Carmelite at Dijon soared 
straight upward to the Holy Trinity. These 
individual approaches might be better 
termed "spiritual doctrines," which can 
be assimilated into any of the complete 
spiritualities of religious institutes. 

5) Paul Philippe, O.P., Historia Spiritualitatis, 

introductio. 

6) There are varying degrees in which the 
pattern cf daily living will be permeated 
by this "spirit." In the spiritualities inaugu- 



14$ 



rated by religious institutes the highest 
degree is that set forth in the Roles & 
Constitutions, where the body of daily 
life is informed intrinsically by the spirit 
of the institute. There everything is aimed 
at realizing the ideal of the spirituality, 
and it receives infallible approval as such. 
For example, the Passion "spirit" in our 
Passionist Spirituality dictates not only 
the subject of prayer, but even determines 
the food and dress of its followers. Note 
how the Holy Rule exhorts our brothers to 
"often reflect on the end of the Institute 
which they have embraced, and to that 
end direct their desires and actions." (n. 
169) Religious of an active institute or 
laity who receive spiritual direction from 
Passionists would participate in our spirit- 
uality. St. Gemma, directed by the Pas- 
sionist Fr. Germano, is a good example, 
although the degree of intensity with 
which her life was orientated toward the 
Passion undoubtedly surpassed that of most 
members of the Congregation. Again, 
members of the Confraternity of the Pas- 
sion share our Spirituality in another de- 
gree, which could be very profound if 
they follow a rule of life such as that re- 
cently composed and published by Fr. 
Roger Mercurio, C.P. (Rule of life for Mem- 
bers of the Confraternity of the Passion, 
Chicago 1953). 

7) En quoi different reellement les diverses 

ecoles catholiques de Spiritualite, XIX, 2, 
264. 

8) 'Differences de surface . . . sont la mani- 
festation de traits particuliers plus pro- 
founds dans I'usage des moyens interieurs 
essentielle de perfection," o.c, p. 272. Or- 
dinarily we will not reproduce the whole 
of our numerous and long citations in the 
original language, but only some important 
and significant passages from them. 

9) idem, p. 273 

10) idem 

11) idem 

12) Theol. Spir. Ascetica et Mystica, Romae 
1952, n. 24-27; cf. also G. Augustine El- 
lard, Schools of Spirituality in Review for 
Religious X (1951) 1. p. 3. 

13) "aliter ordinata et composita" (italics ours) 

14) V,n. 3 (Sept. 1953) p. 344, The Schools 
of Spirituality, cf Dominican Spirituality, 
A. Townsend, Bruce, Milwaukee, 1934. 

15) "Intorno al problema della molteplicita 
delle scuole spirituali," Vita Cristiana XV 
(1943) 2. p. 175. 

16) idem, p. 186. 

17) "La vita spirituale sostan^ialmente unica 
per la sua natura . . . puo organizzarsi nei 
modi piu differenti." Le Scuole Cattoliche 
di Spiritualita, p. 169, Vita e Pensiero, 
Milano, 1949. 

18) idem, p. 170. 

19) Summa Theologiae, 11-11, q. 188, a. 6, 
corp.; cf. a. I., corp. 

20) "differenia unius religionis ad aliam 
principaliter ex parte finis" (italics ours). 

21) Entretiens Spirituels XIII. Whether St. 
Francis would mean only the spirit, or 
likewise the material elements of the whole 



spirituality, is immaterial. Both part and 
whole are distinguished from the end. 

22) In this regard one of the conclusions of 
a recent Religious Congress is interesting, 
counseling a minimum of obligatory pray- 
ers, which "should be adapted to the rule 
of the particular institute in the Church." 
Second National Congress of Active Wo- 
men Religious in the Lowlands, May 1953. 
cf. Cross and Crown, March 1954, p. 113. 

23) Acta et Documenta Congressus Gen. de 
Statibus Perfectionis, Vol. I, p. 118 

24) Memorie dei Primi Compagni de S. Paolo 
Croce, introduction. 

25) "realiter agitur de veris differentiis." 
op. cit., introductio 

26) Fr. Gabriel, O.C.D., op. cit., p. 169; "II 
P. Gabriele di S.M.M., profilo biografico" 
by P. Beniamino della S. Trinita, Rome 
1953, p. llff; cf. Review for Religious 
X (1951) 6. p. 283 "Spirituality of Teresian 
Carmel" by Fr. Thomas, O.C.D. 

27 This is a summary of De Guibert's teach- 
ing by Fr. Gemelli, O.F.M., in his preface 
to the published addresses at the Spiri- 
tuality Week of 1943 in Rome: Le Scuole 
Cattoliche di Spiritualita. We have used 
it here instead of the Jesuit's article in 
the Gregorianum because of its compact 
precision and clarity. Other authors such 
as Colossio, O.P., op. cit., Cavallero, S.J., 
"Ecoles de Spiritualite" RAM, p. 313; 
Mariani, O.E.S.A., Le Scuole Cattoliche, 
p. 23; Card. Schuster, O.S.B., idem, p. 
32-44; Fr. Gabriel, O.C.D., idem, p. 169; 
Cordovani, O.P., idem, p. 49, will be 
found in accord with these qualities, 
though all do not precise them so well. 

28) cf note 27 

29) Lettere di S. Paolo della Croce, Vol. IV, 
p. 217 

30) idem. In the Diary that St. Paul com- 
posed for the Bishop at this same time 
we see a similar insistence on super- 
natural intervention. "I know that I 
had a particular urge to go to Rome in 
behalf of this great wonder of God." 
(Nov. 27th) "I was praying especially 
to the Soverign Good for the happy out- 
come of this holy inspiration which by 
His infinite goodness He has given me 
and is giving me continually." (Nov. 28th) 

31) Two months after his retreat Paul wrote 
to this same Prelate: "God gave me the 
inspirations and a very certain mark that 
God wills it. What should I fear? I be- 
lieve I would sin by infidelity were I to 
doubt." (Lettere, I, p. 22; Letter n. 3 to 
Msgr. Gattinara, Bishop of Alexandria, 
March 11, 1721. (italics ours) 

32) Lettere IV, p. 217 

33) cf. Processes of Rome: 2148; 477; 816; 
2266; 2326. Processes of Vetralla; 106; 
691 

34) S. Paolo della Croce by P. Luigi-Teresa, 
p. 31; Fr. Edmund, C.P., Hunter of Souls, 
p. 11 

35) "infusa nello spirito" Lettere IV, p. 220 

36) Philippe, O.P., Historia Spiritualitatis, 
chap, on Franciscan Spir. 

37) Gemelli, O.F.M., "La Spiritualita Francis- 



150 



cana" in Le Scuole Cattoliche di Spiritu- 
alita, p. 84 ff 

38) "Joculatores Domini", Speculum Perfec- 
tionis, p. 100, ed. by Quaracchi; Firenze. 

39) Rule ■& Constitutions, n. 226; Regulations, 
n 81; Gaetan, C.P., Esprit et Vertus de 
S Paul la Croix, ch. xxiv, p. 334, Tirle- 
mont, 1950. Lettere IV, p. 260 & 224; I, 
427 & 776. 

40) Primitive Rule, cf Lettere IV, p. 220 

41) Lettere I, p. 1; Eng. trans, by Fr -Co urn- 
ban, C.P., in Cross and Crown VI (June 
1954) 2. p. 127ff 

42) I Ml, q. 179, sq, especially a.2; Passenni, 
De Hominum Statibus et Officns. 

43) ll-ll, q. 188, a.6 corp 

44) idem 

45) ll-ll, q. 180, a.3 

46) "circa finem specialem missioms suae in 
Ecclesia." cf. the series of articles on the 
various spiritualities of religious insti- 
tutes in Review for Religious Vol. X 
(1951); particularly for this point of form- 
al specification, cf "Redemptonst Spiri- 
tuality" by Jos. AA. Colleran, C.SS.R., n. 
4 (July) p. 175. . 

47) Distinct from this spirit of the Passion 
animating St. Paul in composing the Rule, 
we would call attention to what he 
termed "the form of the Holy Rule in- 
fused in my soul (infusa nel spiritc. la 
forma della Regola)". We are inclined to 
view this form as a blue print of Pas- 
sionist life, a plan of the framework upon 
which the life was to be built up. Though 
God infused in Paul's soul this rough out- 
line of the Rule, His Providence would 
not necessarily dispense with the Foun- 
der's personal activity. Rather he would 
bring into play tfce knowledge he had 
gained from lights and inspirations in the 
past. Under the direction of the Holy 
Spirit all would be used to sketch this 
blue-print. We have an analogy in God's 
use of the personal talents and experience 
of a sacred writer in the composition of 
the Scriptures. Paul of the Cross could 
hardly have been unmindful when he 
sat down to write his Rule of the words 
he had heard from the Sorrowful Mother 
on the purpose of the Congregation (cf. 
P. Bernardo M. di Gesu, Raccolta di noti- 
zie spettanti alia cronaca della Congrega- 
tione della Passione di N.S.G.C, n. 29). 
That heart bearing the name and nails 
of Jesus and His Passion, with the Cross 
above — the memory of it as he had 
seen it worn upon the Heart if Mary 
must have been impressed deeply in his 
mind. Such recollections would have had 
their part to play in precising that form 
of the Holy Rule in Paul's soul. 

48) Lettere IV, p. 220 

49) idem. In an article in Tabor Jan. -Feb 
1954, Fr. Costante of St. Gabriel adds 
that the Founder understood this mourn- 
ing to be also for the death of Christ 
in souls who revolt against Him, a 
mourning because "the greater part of 
men live in complete forgetfulness of 
how much Jesus has done and suffered 



for the love of them, a thing worthy of 
inconsolable tears and cause of the many 
evils that abound in the world." cf Lettre, 
IV, p. 228 (Appendice n. 22). The article 
is entitled: "S Paolo della Croce e la sua 
Spiritualita 'Passionista' ". 

50) e.g., n. 120, n. 170, n. 221. 

51) Life of St. Paul by P. Luigi-Teresa, cap. 
XIX, p. 177; summary of the ordinary 
Processes 1, 93, n. 49; 2, 95, n. 6. 

52) Collect for the Feast, Sept. 17th, Roman 
Missal 

53 op. cit., in note 

54) Diary, cf. Lettere I, p. 4 (Nov. 28th); 
Cross and Crown IV (June 1954) 2. p. 131 
for English trans, by Columban Brown- 
ing C.P. 

55) cf Lettere II, p. 101 (n. 543) where St. 
Paul writes to Fr. Fulgentius of the 
Congregation as "a huge furnace atop a 
very high mountain with a fire so im- 
mense that it illumined and inflamed the 
whole world;" cf also idem II, p. 122 
n. 552) and p. 126 (n. 553) 

55a) cf. Rule & Constitutions, n. 2; Lettere 
II, p. 272, n. 630. 

56) cf. the fine article of Marcel Viller, S.J., 
"Mystique de la Passion chez St. Paul 
de la Croix" in Recherches de science 
religieuse XL (1952) pp 426-445; Eng. 
trans, by Fr. Jerome Crowe in Passionist 
VII (May 1954 3. pp 213-226. The 1741 
Rule, ch. 19, prescribed one-half hour 
meditation on the Passion, instead of five 
Paters and Aves, for those not engaged 
in apostolic work, to fulfill the fourth 
vow. Lettere II, 274, n. DCXXX; cf Fid- 
elis Rice, C.P., "Passionist Spiritually" in 
Review for Religious X (1951) 5. p. 242. 

57) cf optional oration for the hours of the 
Little Office of the Passion. 

58) ll-ll, q. 179, a. 2; q. 180, a. 3, corp. ; III, 
q. 40, a. I, ad 3. 

59) Lettere IV, p. 228 n. 3 to his religious; 
cf. the Postcommunio of St. Paul's Mass: 
"ut aquam de fontibus tuis hauriamus in 
vitam aeternam salientem, et tuam sacratis- 
simam Passionem in cordibus nostris im- 
pressam moribus et vita teneamus." April 
28th, Roman Missal 

60) It is interesting to observe a variation of 
the English text from the Italian version. 
In place of "teach the people to meditate 
... on the Mysteries, Sufferings and Death," 
the Italian has "d'insegnare a viva voce 
ai popoli la devota memoria della Pas- 
sione e Morte." 

61) Lettere IV, p. 228, n. 3 to his religious; 
also II, p. 213, n. 2 to Abbot Garagni. 

63) cf John 12:32. Viller, S.J., in the article 
cited above on St. Paul of the Cross, 
states: "It does not seem that this aposto- 
late (of the Passion) by itself suffices to 
give a special orientation to Paul's con- 
templation. We should rather say that there 
is a reality of a higher order that domi- 
nates at one and the same time both his 
apostolic and his contemplative life." p. 
430. Taking into account the Jesuit's philo- 
sophical and theological background, we 
believe he is expressing here an opinion 
like to that of Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange on 



151 



the aposlolale being the effect of the 
higher cause, contemplation. 

64) cf. Passerini, op. cit., q. 188, a. 6, n. 4: 
"Cause and effect are alike, and they are 
one, because a cause produces its own 
likeness." 

65) In a very significant letter to the Mother 
Foundress of the Passionist Nuns, St. Paul 
wrote how God had given him to under- 
stand that the Institute of the Passion must 
be extended also to women. Thus among 
both sexes "there might be some who, 
dedicated in a special way to contem- 
plating the Passion . . . would mourn His 
sorrowful death with sentiments of love 
and sorrow, and awaken in others the same 
remembrance by words and example." (Life 
of Mother M. Crucified by Fr. Luca of St. 
Joseph, C.P., Spanish translation, p. 100. 

66) The Three Ages of the Interior Life, Vol. 
II, Part IV, ch. XLVIII, p. 489ff. 

67) Rules and Constitutions, n. 132. 

68) "per modum additionis," Summa Theo- 
logica 11-11, q. 182, a. 1, ad 3; q. 181, a. 
1, ad 3; "vita activa adjuvat ad contem- 
plationem," 11-11, q. 182, a. 3, corp.; cf. 
q. 182, a. 2 corp.; a. 4. 

69) Life by P. Luigi-Teresa, pp. 28 & 60. 

70) nn. 3, 10, 196 & 197. 

71) Lettere, II, p. 85, n. 537; p. 115, n. 549; 
p. 148, n. 563; p. 150, n. 564; p. 752, n. 
952; cf Fr. Brice, C.P., In Spirit and in 
Truth, ch. xvii, p. 325. 

70) Acta Congregationis, XVII (July, 1952), 
p. 240, IV, a. Translation taken from that 
of the U.S. Eastern Province, p. 10, A. 
cf. The Passionist, V (Dec. 1952), n. 3 for 
another translation. 

71) Idem, p. 234. 

72) Acta & Documenta Congressus Gen. de 
Statibus Perf., Vol. I, p. 3-38 Review for 
Religious, Jan. 15, 1955, p. 3. 

73) cf. the Letter of Most Rev. Fr. Malcolm, 
Acta Congregationis, XVI II, July-Sept., Eng- 
lish translation in The Passionist, (July, 
1953), p. 240. 

74) e.g., "The Mystical Body of Christ . . . 
does not live nor move in the abstract, out- 
side the incessantly changing conditions of 
time and place; it is not able to be seg- 
regated from the world that surrounds it; ti 
is always of the age, advances with it from 
day to day, from hour to hour, continually 
adapting its ways and bearing to that of 
the society in whose midst it must work 
. . ." Allocution of Pope Pius XII, Acta & 
Documenta Congressus Gen. de Statibus 
Perf., Vol. 1, p. 33. 

75) Le Scuole Cattoliche di Spiritualita, p. xii. 

76) cf. Selected Letters of Recent Passionist 
Generals. 

77) As long as e have touched on the prob- 
lem of adaptation, we would like to call 
attention to a distinction that is often for- 
gotten. Temporary conditions of some coun- 
tries may call for a local and temporary 
adaptation, or even for exceptions to be 
made. But a universal and abiding adap- 
tation for the whole Congregation should 
not therefore be thought necessary. A good 
deal of adjustment was made in many 
countries as the need arose for it. cf. Acta 
& Documenta Congressus Gen., I, p. 21. 



78) "Ministeria PRIMARIA, quae-scilicet media 
essentialia sunt ad finem." Acta Congre- 
gationis, XVII (July, 1952), p. 242. 

79) Acta et Documenta Congressus Gen., I, 

p. 118. 

80) Allocutions to the Lenten Preachers of 
Rome 1942, 1948, & 1949: A.A.S., XXXIV, 
p. 128-129; XL, p. 116; XLI, p. 185: 
"more than ever necessary and urgent in 
our times." cf. a paper treating this topic 
in regard to Passionist missions, written 
by Jerome Crowe, C.P., at ths Angelicum 
University: "Utrum Praedicatio Missionis 
Popularius Accomodetur Necessitates Tem- 
poris Nostri." 

81) cf. Lettere, I, p. 9?. .1. 2, to his mother; 
II, p. 269, n. 629; p. 271, n. 630; IV, p. 
250, n. 10 to his religious. Letter n. 1573 
(III, p. 721) states "the primary end (of 
the Passionist Apostolate) is the exercise of 
holy missions." But this must be interpreted 
in the' light of the Founder's other state- 
ments. 

82) Entries for December 4th, 7th, 20th, and 
26th. 

83) cf. Lettere, III, p. 417, n. 1343 and Bollet- 
tino, VIII (1927), p. 229. 

84) The Three Ages of the Interior Life, Part 
IV, ch. XLIX, Vol. II, p. 502; Union of the 
Priest with Christ, Part I, ch. vii, p. 64, 
107 & 186. 

85) idem, 1. c, p. 505. 

86) cf. Mystici Corporis (Paulist Press trans.), 
n. 2, n. 122-125, where the Pope speaks of 
the Church "whose members glory in a 
thorn-crowned Head", "who are flesh of 
the Crucified One", according to St. Leo. 

87) Miserentissimus Redemptor of Pius XI and 
Mystici Corporis of Pius XII, n. 46. 

88) Miser. Redemp. n. 19. 

89) entry for Dec. 3rd, Nov. 23rd and Dec. 
6th. 89a) cf. Lettere, II, p. 213, n. 594. 

90) Dec. 6th. 

91) Lettere, I, p. 473, n. 278; cf. idem, p. 54, 
n. 21; p. 94, n. 47; p. 214, n. 112; p. 216, 
n. 113; II, p. 735, n. 938; III, p. 593, n. 
1470. 

92) Lettere, I, p. 473, n. 278. 

93) quoted in the Life by St. Vincent M. 
Strambi, It. version, p. 80. 

94) Miserentissimus Redemptor, n. 21 & n. 19. 

95) Unigenitus Dei Filius, A.A.S., XVI, p. 135. 

96) cf. Life by P. Luigi-Teresa, p. 270; Sum- 
mary of the Ord. Processes, 1, 264, n. 64. 

97) Tu Solus Sanctus, Beauchesne, Paris, 1948, 
p. 233-34; cf. Gaetan, C.P., Doctrine de 
S. Paul de la Croix sur I'Oraison et la 
Mystique, Louvain (1932) p. 149; Summary 
of Processes, p. 321, n. 84. 

98) n. 132. 

99) Lettere, IV, p. 285 & p. 294, nos. 46 & 50 
to his religious; cf. Summa of St. Thos. Ill, 
q. 7, a. 7 corp. 

100) Even though men be dispensed from ris- 
ing for Matins, the very fact that they 
know others are rising should be an in- 
centive to perform our other penetential 
practices with all the more generosity. Nor 
ought we too easily to accede to the argu- 
ment that the observance is for the men, 
and not the men for the observance, and 
therefore transfer the time of Matins to an 
hour at which more of the religious could 



152 



assist and benefit. If witnessing to the Pas- 
sion by deed as well as by word is part 
of our function in the Mystical Body of 
Christ, we must fulfill it, even though some 
members of the Institute are not directly 
concerned or benefited 

101) We have a few very interesting records 
of references to Passionist life by Fr. Gar- 
rigou-Lagrange in his classes. They are food 
for thought. "Gratia inclinans ad amorem 
Crucis; hoc est were Christianismus . . . 
Ita Passionistae acceperunt gratiam special- 
em ad imitandam Passionem Christi per 
intercessionem S. Pauli a Cruce." Dec. 13, 
1947. "Opera satisfactoria debent perman- 
ere in Ecclesia. Si Ordo ea derelinquit, 
alius Ordo suscitatur a Deo, qui ea iterum 
perficiat. Ita in historia Ecclesiae videmus 
quod si aliquis Ordo dereliquit Matutinum 
in media nocte, Deus alium Ordinem sus- 
citavit maiori fervore praeditum, qui sur- 
gere potuit eadem hora ad Matutinum. Et 
est mirabile quod in Ecclesia singula hora 
noctis aliquis Ordo surgit ad laudes Dei 
concinendas. VIDETE ERGO VOS, PAS- 
SIONISTAE, FIDELITER SERVARE LOCUM 
VESTRUM!" March 5, 1949. 

102) e.g. Lk. 24:49; 21:13; John,; 5:27; Acts, 
1:8; 1:22; 22:15; 22:20; I Cor. 2:2; I Tim. 
6:12; II Tim. 1:8; Acts, 23:11; & Letter of 
St. Ignatius of Antioch to the Romans.,, 

103) Priests Among Men, Part II, p. 50 & cf. 
p. 32-38 (Integrity Press edition). 

104) cf the record of a General Congress of 
our Congregation held at the express wish 
of St. Paul of the Cross to examine the 
Rules "ad eas aptandas", convoked in 1775, 
Apostolic Processes of Rome, V, fol. 2116, 
quoted by Most Rev. Fr. Malcolm in his 
letter concerning adaptation, May, 1953, 
Acta Congregationis, XVIII (July-Sept., 
1953), English trans, in The Passionist, VI, 
3 (July, 1953), p. 240. 

105) cf. n. 47 of our Rules and Constitutions. 
It is said that often the genuine spirit of 
an Institute can best be found in the chap- 
ters of its Rule concerning the examination 
and formation of candidates. 

105a) We can be grateful that for some years 
now our Superiors and Directors have been 
putting at our disposal translations of our 
Holy Founder's Diary and Letters. And 
now a complete, though modest, mimeo- 
graphed edition of the Letters in English 
is being put out by The Passionist through 
the labors of our Passionist Nuns in Owens- 
horo. 



106) La Vida Sobrenatural; cf. Diario di S. 
Paolo della Croce (Marietti, 1926), edited 
with a commentary by Fr. Stanislao dell' 
Addolorata, p. 3. 

107) cf. Revue d'Ascetique et mystique, t. VI 
(1925), p. 25, the introduction to De Gui- 
bert's translation of the Diary into French. 

108) Jules Lebreton, Tu Solus Sanctus (Paris, 
1948), Livre III, ch. ii, p. 215-236; Marcel 
Viller, article in the Dictionaire de Spirit- 
ualite, under Contemplation, Vol. II, col. 
2039-2042; Revue d'ascetique et mystique, 
t. XXVII (1951), p. 132. 

109) cf. De Luca's review of the life of Ven. 
Dominic Barberi by Fr. Federico, C.P., in 
L'Osservatore Romano (1948), Aug. 12; An- 
tonelli's address at the 1946 Spirituality 
Week in Rome, published in La Preghiera, 
ed. Vita e Pensiero (Milano), p. 86. 

110) Oraison et Ascension mystique de S.Paul 
de la Croix; Doctrine de S.Paul de la Croix 
sur I'Oraison mystiquex, both published 
by Museum Lessianum, Louvain, 1930. St. 
Paul, Aporte et Missionaire and Recrute- 
ment, Gouvernnment de Religieus, Soeurs 
Passionistes Missionaires, Tirlemont, Bel- 
gium, 1934; Esprixt et Vertus de St. Paul 
de la Croix, Soeurs Passionistes Miss., Tir- 
lemont, 1950. 

111) Roger Mercurio, C.P., Homiletic and Pas- 
torial Review, Vol. XLV (1945) July, p. 
727; Aug. p. 826. for articles about the 
teaching of St. Paul of the Cross on prayer; 
II Gigante della Croce, ed. Paoline (No- 
vara, 1951) by Fr. Cristoforo, C.P. 

112) L'lntroduzione alia Spiritualita di San 
Paolo della Croce: Morte Mistica e Nati- 
vita Divina by Fr. Costante di San Gab- 
riele. 

113) The Spirituality of St. Paul of the Cross 
is the title, but it has not yet been trans- 
lated into English. We also want to call 
attention to the mimeographed pages en- 
titled Paulacruciana by Fr. Gerard Rooney 
of the Eastern Province. They afford pen- 
etrating insights for research on the life 
and spirit of St. Paul of the Cross. Another 
mimeographed work is the two-volume set 
of cross references between the various 
versions of our Rule and the Letters of St. 
Paul of the Cross, painstakingly collected 
by Brother Lambert of the Dutch Province. 

113a) Summa Theologica, 11-11, q. 188, a. 6, 
corp. 

114) n. 132 of our Rules and Constitutions. 



m 



153 



THE MISSIONARY CONQUEST 
OF THE WORLD FOR CHRIST 

SERMON 

Preached by 

His Excellency, Most Reverend Cuthbert M. O'Gara, C.P., D.D., 

Bishop of Yuanling 

in 

St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York, 

Closing 

THE CHURCH UNITY OCTAVE 

January 18, 1955 

THE MISSIONARY CONQUEST OF THE WORLD FOR CHRIST 



NOW GO FORTH 

AND BUILD UP MY 
HOUSE 
FOR IT IS NEARLY 

FALLING DOWN! 
(Words of Our Divine Lord once 
spoken to St. Francis of Assisi) 

Coming 1900 years after Christ's 
command to His disciples to "go 
and teach all nations," and 1900 
years after His divine pronounce- 
ment "there shall be but one fold 
and one shepherd," the subject of 
this evening's discourse gives all of 
us food for most serious reflection. 

In the United States — from latest 
authentic records — there are at this 
time, 4 Cardinals, 29 Archbishops, 
166 Bishops, 36 Abbots, 45,451 
priests; a total Catholic population 
of 31,648,424, — a gain in the past 
decade of 8,228,723; during the past 
year, 116,696 converts were received 
into the Church. These figures in- 



deed allow some reason for satisfac- 
tion that the Church Militant has 
been advancing on the home front; 
they furnish some ground for grati- 
fication that American Catholics — 
clergy and laity — in the words of 
St. Paul, are presently "laboring as 
good soldiers of Christ Jesus." 

But let not these flattering statis- 
tics beguile us into a treacherous 
self-complacency. Rather let us be 
humble enough, and realistic enough, 
to count our losses on the world 
front. 

Consider for a moment the religi- 
ous situation in Russia, in Latvia, in 
Estonia, in Lithuania, in Poland, in 
East Germany, in Hungary, in Bul- 
garia, in Roumania, in Czechoslova- 
kia and in Yugoslavia. Apostacy en 
masse and in speed of accomplish- 
ment, without historic parallel! Yes, 
and what of the empty churches in 
Rome and in Paris and in other capi- 



154 



tals of erstwhile Catholic countries? 
Count, too, the evergrowing number 
of registered Communists, freely 
operating within the confines of the 
supposedly Christian West. 

Who will tell the authentic story 
of China-proper, of North Korea, of 
Northern Indo-China — the cream of 
the Christian flock in the Orient! 
Add all this together, and know, that 
in the last 35 years, almost 150 mil- 
lion souls have been lost to the Cath- 
olic Church and to Christian civiliza- 
tion. 

A staggering, a dismaying, a tragic 
fact, when balanced against the MIS- 
SIONARY CONQUEST OF THE 
WORLD FOR CHRIST. Weighed on 
this level, the grim truth is, that we 
are not only being challenged by our 
enemies but we are being outma- 
neuvered and outnumbered — that 
the perimeter of the Catholic world 
in the 20th Century is contracting 

and not expanding. 

* * * 

Against whom are we fighting this 
losing campaign? Is it against Mos- 
cow? Is it against Peking? Are we 
pitted against Karl Marx, Engels, 
Lenin, Stalin, Malenkov or Mao Tze 
Tung? Shallow, materialistic think- 
ers might so judge, but not the in- 
spired Apostle, St. Paul. When in- 
structing the embattled Church of 
his day, vehemently does he write: — 
"For we are not contending against 
flesh and blood but against the prin- 
cipalities, against the powers, against 
the world-rulers of this present dark- 
ness, against the spiritual hosts of 
wickedness in the heavenly places." 

Make no mistake! The struggle of 
Christ's Church today, as always it 



has been, is against the Spirit of 
Evil, against the Prince of Darkness, 
against the foul Arch-fiend, SATAN. 

Our enemy is so powerful, so intel- 
ligent, so resourceful, that all men 
and angels taken together, save only 
Mary Immaculate, cannot withstand 
him. Satan is impervious to dollars 
and immune to atom bombs. If the 
United Nations were composed of 
10,000 times 10,000 units each as pow- 
erful as the U.S.A. is today, and all 
these units, through the instrumen- 
tality of natural powers and human 
ingenuity, were aligned in common 
league against him, still Satan would 
prevail. 

Do I exaggerate? My dear friends, 
ponder the words of Satan himself, 
spoken to Christ on the mountain- 
top when he showed the Divine Mas- 
ter all the kingdoms of the world in 
a moment of time: — "To you I will 
give all this authority and their 
glory, for it has been delivered to 
me and I give it to whom I will." 

* * * 

The most practical man who ever 
walked this earth was Our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ. He once laid 
down this truth: — "By their fruits 
you shall know them: a bad tree 
cannot bring forth good fruit, neither 
can a good tree bring forth evil 

fruit." 

* * * 

Let us take a view of the world, 
my Brethren, as it were, in a moment 
of time, from Satan's mountain-top. 
Look at the fruits this civilization 
has borne during the last one hun- 
dred years. Since 1848 we have had 
Karl Marx and the Communist Mani- 
festo which cited, it is true, some 



155 



just grievances and furnished a thou- 
sand diabolical remedies. Came then 
the age of Industrial Exploitation and 
Colonial Expansion, which movements 
effected the enslavement of the 
working-man and the subjugation of 
the tribesman. The Twentieth Cen- 
tury was ushered in by the Boer 
War and the Spanish-American war 
— jingo adventures in Empire Build- 
ing. After this came the First World 
War — the clash between World Em- 
pires for world supremacy — a war 
fought supposedly to make the world 
safe for Democracy, but resulting 
only in the further crushing impover- 
ishment of the masses and the dark- 
some ominous birth of the USSR. 
Then followed the Second World 
War, waged, we were told, to make 
the world safe for small nations, yet, 
which accomplished the liquidation 
of small nations, and brought about 
the rise of Red China and made pos- 
sible the erection of an Iron Curtain 
around almost two thirds of the 
world's population. And if I am to 
give credence to those who impris- 
oned me, and who attempted to 
"wash my mind," the Third World 
War will achieve the conquest of the 
entire world for atheistic Commun- 
ism. 

Did I mention above that a tree 
is known by its fruits? Our civiliza- 
tion must have been rotten indeed 
to have begotten such bitter, noxious, 
lethal fruit! 

Let us take a close-up view of 
world conditions today. In Russia 
and the satellite countries are to be 
found, the total regimentation of the 
populace, the ruthless concentration 
camp, the brutal slave-labor gangs, 



the open, declared, insensate war 
against God, the diabolical supres- 
sion of all religion. In Red China, of 
which I bear personal witness, 400 
million defenseless human beings 
are cowed at gun point, herded as 
sheep and heartlessly driven by their 
Communist overlords; subjected to 
having lying, hellish, hate-propagan- 
da stuffed down their throats; re- 
duced to dire poverty and starving 
on the meagre government rations 
which in the sweat of their brow and 
with uncounted groans, they them- 
selves have toiled to produce and 
which they must now humbly accept 
as a life-saving dole; and under 
frightening threats, prohibited any 
outward manifestation of belief in a 
Supreme Being. And all this hard, 
studied, cynical program under the 
shoddy sham of Agrarian Reform 
and the brazen lie of Freedom of 
Religion! Need we wonder at all 
this? Satan was, is and always shall 
be, the Father of Lies! 

Communism now has the effrontery 
to suggest, even to insist, that Amer- 
ica and her distinguished allies enter 
with her into a period of peaceful 
'co-existence.' More incredible still, 
this latest scheme launched on the 
international scene is listened to, and 
debated, by so-called Christian gov- 
ernments, yes, even by educated 
Catholics here in the United States. 
To such deluded American Catholics 
I would cry out, as St. Paul the 
Apostle once uttered his agonizing 
appeal: — "Oh, senseless Galatians 
who hath bewitched you?" 

AMERICAN CATHOLIC, I say to 
you in deadly earnest, shake off this 



156 



paralysing torpor which threatens 
your very life! What more evidence 
do you need, what more evidence do 
you demand? You have your eye- 
witnesses — your Bishops, your 
priests, your religious brothers, your 
Sisters, the very members of your 
own families who served in the 
armed forces — all who have known 
the inside of Communist prisons, ex- 
perienced the brutalities there en- 
acted, who have been "brain washed" 
and indoctrinated, and who by a 
seeming miracle have returned to 
you with their personal tragic stories 
and yet the talk of 'co-existence' with 
this spawn of Satan still goes on! Is 
Our Divine Lord speaking to this 
generation as He spoke to His own? 
"Hearing you shall hear, but shall 
not understand; seeing you shall see, 
and shall not perceive." Truly, oh so, 
truly is it said: — "No one is so blind 
as he who will not see!" 

Without collaboration there can be 
no co-existence. Eighteen years ago 
Pope Pius XI wrote to the Catholic 
Bishops of the world: — "See to it 
that the faithful do not allow them- 
selves to be deceived. Communism 
is intrinsically evil. And no one who 
would save Christian civilization 
may collaborate with it in any un- 
dertaking whatsoever. Those who 
permit themselves to be deceived 
into lending their aid towards the 
triumph of Communism in their own 
country will be the first to fall vic- 
tims to their own error. And the 
greater the antiquity and grandeur 
of the Christian civilization in the 
regions where Communism success- 
fully penetrates, so much more dev- 
astating will be the hatred display- 



ed by the godless". 

"Communism is intrinsically evil" 

and we can no more have truck with 
it, or co-operate with it, unharmed, 
that we could unvaccinated and with 
bare hands, dress the open suppur- 
ating pustules of virulent small-pox 
and still escape the deadly infection 
of the disease. 

"Communism is intrinsically evil" 
and hence is the spawn of the Devil. 
It is the modern weapon used by 
Satan in his ceaseless effort to des- 
troy Christ's Church. Fight Commu- 
nism we must; but if we seek to do 
this only with natural means we 
shall be like the discomforted dis- 
ciples in the Gospel who had un- 
successfully attempted to cure the 
young man possessed of a devil. 
When these defeated followers of 
Christ asked the Master why their 
efforts had been in vain, He told 
them, "Because you had no faith . . . 
there is no way of casting out such 
spirits as this except by prayer and 
fasting". In like manner the Red 
scourage which today torments the 
nations can be conquered only by a 
world-wide holy crusade of prayer 
and penance. Herein lies the MIS- 
SIONARY CONQUEST OF THE 
WORLD FOR CHRIST! 

The Powers of Evil have won a 
bridgehead in this very land; the 
battle today must be waged by 
American Catholics on our home 
front. If this decisive battle is lost, 
all is lost. We must be thoroughly 
aroused to the peril that confronts 
us. Too long have we kept sheathed 
the Sword of the Spirit which is the 
Word of God. We have kept this 
Sword hidden in a scabbard of crimi- 



157 



nal prudence and cringing coward- 
ice which we have chosen to call 
diplomacy. Alas! In this struggle 
to the death with Satan there can 
be no diplomacy, there can be no 
neutrality. "For you are either with 
Me or against Me" said that most 
practical of all persons, Jesus Christ. 
"You are either with Me or again- 
st Me!" To every one who stands 
with Him, Christ speaks, as He spoke 
to His disciples on the night where- 
in He suffered: — "Take courage, I 
have overcome the world". In the 
legions of Christ there is no place 
for the shirker, the coward, the de- 
serter! 

* * * 

The gentle St. John, the Beloved 
Apostle, he who braved the boiling 
oil and endured the anguish of exile, 
it is he who gives us our inspired 
plan for the present campaign. He 
writes: — "This is the victory that 
overcomes the world, our FAITH". 

A FAITH that, in season and out 
of season, compels to an unflinching 
practice of one's religious beliefs; 

A FAITH that fears no calumny, 
no misunderstanding, no ridicule, no 
insidious 'smear', 

A FAITH that encourages priests 
and nuns and religious-brothers to 
exile themselves to the fartherest 
corners of the world for the Gospel 
of Christ; 

A FAITH that bouys up the laity 
at home in a whole-hearted support 
of their missionaries in foreign 
fields; 

A FAITH that renders the Chris- 
tian immune to every wile of flesh 
and blood; 

A FAITH that inspires the mem- 



bers of Christ's Mystical Body on 
earth to bear up with the Saviour 
against every onslaught of the ene- 
my! 

A FAITH that imparts to the sol- 
dier of Christ the strength to be 
racked and cut with whips as was 
his Divine Lord, to be scorned and 
to be spat upon, to be thrown into 
prison and to be cast into the slave 
camp, to be tortured with every 
diabolical device the ingenuity of 
man can devise, to be taunted the 
while with the sneering blasphem- 
ous jeer, "Where now is your God? 
Why does He not now deliver you 
from the torment of this pain?" 

Twelve humble fishermen, armed 

with a FAITH such as this, willingly 

shed their blood in defence of their 

belief and by their steadfastness laid 

the solid foundation of the Catholic 

Church and changed the course of 

all subsequent history. 
* * * 

During the early weeks of the 
First World War, Paris was threat- 
ened by the crushing might of con- 
verging German armies. The city 
was all but doomed. General Joffre, 
Commander-in-Chief, in that critical 
hour, sent out his soul-stirring, nev- 
er-to-be-forgotten battle-order: "My 
right wing is being turned, my left 
wing is giving way and my center 
is being driven in. I say to you — 
'ADVANCE' ". 

My dear Catholic people, our mis- 
sion fields are being lost to us, our 
missionaries are being expelled, im- 
prisoned, liquidated; iron curtains 
and bamboo curtains now stand in 
our way. The decadent Christian 
world ST' ~~ A us ceaselessly makes 



158 



ever greater and greater compro- 
mises with age-old sacred principles 
and daily yields more and more 
ground before the onward confident 
march of the godless legions. Lead- 
ers in the arena of world affairs, 
prominent and experienced, trust- 
worthy and honorable, solemnly 
warn us that we are fast approach- 
ing the hour of 'no-return'. Tonight, 
I say to you American Catholics — 
ADVANCE! 

If 31 million Catholics in these 
United States lived up to their Cath- 
olic profession in all its fullness and 
all its dynamic power, as this Cath- 
olic radio-active faith is set forth in 
the Gospels, the enemies of religion 
would be put to rout and Commu- 
nism would be overthrown. Where- 
fore, in the words of St. Paul I en- 
treat you, "TAKE UP THE WHOLE 
ARMOR OF GOD, THAT YOU MAY 
BE ABLE TO WITHSTAND IN THE 
EVIL DAY, AND HAVING DONE 



ALL, STILL TO STAND. STAND 
THEREFORE, HAVING GIRDED 
YOUR LOINS WITH TRUTH, AND 
HAVING PUT ON THE BREAST- 
PLATE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS, AND 
HAVING SHOD YOUR FEET WITH 
THE EQUIPMENT OF THE GOS- 
PEL OF PEACE; ABOVE ALL, 
TAKING THE SHIELD OF FAITH, 
WITH WHICH YOU CAN QUENCH 
ALL THE FLAMING DARTS OF 
THE EVIL ONE. AND TAKE THE 
HELMET OF SALVATION, AND 
THE SWORD OF THE SPIRIT, 
WHICH IS THE WORD OF GOD. 
PRAY AT ALL TIMES IN THE 
SPIRIT, WITH ALL PRAYER AND 
SUPPLICATION". 

A final word Christ speaks to each 
one of you: — 

NOW GO FORTH 
AND BUILD UP MY 
HOUSE 

FOR IT IS NEARLY 
FALLING DOWN! 



Oun 'Pn&fi&i Patecoa ?e&4t& 

(Continued) 

FEAST OF THE PILLAR OF THE SCOURGING 

First Friday of Lent 



History of the Feast 

This feast is first mentioned after 
the arrival of the Pillar of the Scour- 
ging at Rome in 1223, where it was 
brought by Cardinal Colonna to the 
Church of St. Praxedes. Like the 
other feasts of the Implements of 
the Passion therefore, it is of medie- 
val origin. We might add that the 



general and picturesque medieval 
designation of these Offices was the 
"arma Christi". (Homiletic and Pas- 
toral Review, vol. XLIV, Jan. 1944, 
art. by Jude Mead, C.P.) 

Although this feast is an ancient 
one, it was one of the latest to be 
adopted by us. While most of our 
other feasts of the Implements of the 



159 



Passion date from 1773, this one was 
not adopted until 1898. On Sept. 13, 
1898, Father Bernard Mary of Jesus, 
Superior General, asked and obtain- 
ed from the Holy See permission for 
us to celebrate this feast on the 
second Sunday of July. The Office 
that we then adopted was but recent- 
ly approved. (Rollettino, Oct. 1922, p. 
304) 

In 1900 or 1901 the feast was ele- 
vated to the rank of a double of the 
second class. When the Breviary was 
reformed in 1911 it was reduced to 
a double major. (Bollettino, Oct. 
1922, p. 304) At the same time it 
was affixed to the fifth Friday of 
Lent. On March 27, 1923 it was mov- 
ed to the first Friday of Lent. (Bol- 
lettino, May 1923, p. 134) 
Spirit of the Feast 

This feast commemorates and 
honors primarily, not the Scourging 
of our Lord, but the Pillar or Col- 
umn to which He was tied during 
the Scourging. However, as is to be 
expected, the Office does not center 
so much on the material instrument 
used in^ the Scourging as on the Son 
of GOd who is tied to the Pillar. The 
pervading spirit of the Office is the 
unjust persecution of Christ. To ex- 
press this, some of the antiphons 
etc. pertain to the actual Scourging; 
other to the dereliction of Christ 
during the Scourging; and still oth- 
ers are general texts whose central 



idea is the persecution of Christ 
without special reference to the 
Scourging. 

The lessons of the first nocturn 
and the Capitula throughout the Of- 
fice are very aptly chosen from the 
fifty third chapter of the prophecy 
of Isaias. In this section of his prop- 
hecy Isaias is foretelling the Suffer- 
ings of the Messias and his words 
apply perfectly to Christ during the 
Scourging. For example: "There is 
no beauty in him, nor comeliness: and 
we have seen him and there was no 
sightliness, that we should be de- 
sirous of him. Surely he hath borne 
our infirmities and carried our sor- 
rows: and we have thought him as it 
were a leper and as one struck by 
God and afflicted. But he was 
wounded for our iniquities: he was 
bruised for our sins. The chastise- 
ment of our peace was upon him: 
and by his bruises we are healed." 
(Isaias 53: 2-5) 

The end for which we celebrate 
this feast is well expressed in the 
oration: "O God, who in the weak- 
ness of the flesh which Thou hast 
taken for our salvation, didst wish to 
be bound to the Column and to be 
beaten with scourges; grant that we 
who celebrate the solemnity of this 
same Column may merit to receive 
the fruits of Thy Precious Blood." 
Sources: Bollettino, Oct. 1922; Homi- 
letic and Pastoral Review, Jan. 1944. 



FEAST OF THE CROWN OF THORNS 

■ > . Second Friday of Lent 

History of the Feast Thorns was brought there from 

The feast of the Crown of Thorns Constantinople. From Paris, the 

first appeared at Paris under Louis feast spread into all of France and 

IX in 1241 when the Crown of into Germany. (Catholic Encyclo- 



160 



pedia, Vol XI, p. 527). The feast was 
later celebrated in Spain and Scan- 
danavia. Today it is celebrated by 
the Dominicans on April 24. (Catho- 
lic Encyclopedia, Vol. XIV, p. 706) 

Among us, this feast dates from 
1773. It is one of the six feasts of 
the Passion that our Holy Founder 
obtained from Pope Clement XIV 
on Jan. 10, 1773. (Bollettino, Oct. 
1922, p. 304) 

In 1795 (Jan. 14) the date set for 
this feast was the Friday after Ash 
Wednesday. It was celebrated on 
this day until 1923, when it was 
changed to the following Friday, the 
second Friday of Lent. (Bollettino, 
Oct. 1922, p. 304 & May, 1924, p. 134) 

In 1900 or 1901 this feast was rais- 
ed with all the other Passion feasts 
to the rank of a double of the second 
class. After the reform of the Bre- 
viary in 1911 it was reduced once 
more to a double major. (Bollettino, 
Oct. 1922, p. 304). 
Spirit of the Feast 

This is another of the feasts of 
the Instruments of the Passion. It 
therefore commemorates and honors 
the Crown of Thorns placed on our 
Lord's head during His Passion. 
While the Crown of Thorns was 
placed on our Lord as a mark of 
derision, the Office of the feast fre- 
quently passes from the notion of 
mockery to that of Glorification. As 
an example of this, see the Vesper 
antiphons, the lessons at Matins and 
the Capitula for the hours. 

The element of derision and its 
consequent suffering is not lacking 



however. For example, the first 
lessons are taken from the Passion 
prophecy of Isaias, ch. 53. The 
hymns of Vespers and Lauds focus 
attention on the ignominious aspect 
of the Crowning, but pass from that 
to the note of glory. 

To sum up, the Office of this feast 
looks on Christ crowned with thorns. 
It sees Him suffering from being 
thus ignominiously treated but does 
not stop there. It points out to us 
that Christ is indeed worthy of a 
crown, "corona sapientiae et exulta- 
tionis". (2nd ant. of Vespers) It 
shows us further that the Crown of 
Christ's shame was but a step tow- 
ard His Crown of Eternal Glory. And 
it does not neglect the consequent 
fruit of Christ's crowning in us, our 
own crowning with Him in heaven. 
This notion is beautifully expressed 
in the oration of the feast: 

"Grant, we beseech Thee, almighty 
God, that we who on earth venerate 
the Crown of Thorns of our Lord 
Jesus Christ in memory of His Pas- 
sion, may merit to be crowned by 
Him with glory and honor in heav- 
en." 

This Office sums up, therefore, 
the whole of the Christian life. 
Christ is God; He was crowned with 
shame; through His shame He merit- 
ed His glory and ours; we reach our 
share in His glory by sharing in His 
Crown of Thorns. 

Sources: Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 
XI, p. 527; XIV, p. 706; Bollettino, 
October, 1922. 



161 



FEAST OF THE LANCE AND NAILS 

Third Friday of Lent 



History of the Feast 

This is another of the feasts of 
the Instruments of the Passion, the 
"arma Christi". Its date of origin 
as a feast is Feb. 13, 1353. On that 
date Pope Innocent VI approved the 
feast for Bohemia and Germany at 
the request of Emperor Charles IV. 
Pope Innocent preached a moving 
sermon on the occasion of instituting 
the feast. (Cf. Catholic Encyclopedia, 
vol. XI, p. 527, vol. VIII, p. 19. Also 
the lessons of the second nocturn of 
the feast.) 

This was one of the six Passion 
feasts obtained by St. Paul of the 
Cross from Pope Clement XIV on 
January 10, 1773. (Bollettino, Oct. 
1922, p. 304) Apparently the Office 
then adopted was drawn from an 
older source. 

On September 9, 1792 we adopted 
a new Office which had been but 
recently approved. (Bollettino, p. 
304) Most likely, this new Office 
was compiled by a Passionist, prob- 
ably Bishop Struzzieri, but we have 
no authority for this. 

On January 14, 1795 the date of 
this feast was set for the second 
Friday of Lent. It passed to the 
third Friday of Lent in 1923. (Bol- 
lettino, May, 1923, p. 134) 

In 1900 or 1901 the feast was rais- 
ed to a double of the second class; 
it was reduced to a double major af- 
ter the Divino Afflatu of Pius X in 
1911. (Bollettino, p. 304). 
Spirit of the Feast 

This feast honors the nails and 
the lance used in the Passion. But 



as in the case of the other feasts of 
the Instruments, the main emphasis 
is on the wounds caused by these 
instruments. The antiphons versic- 
les and lessons focus our attention 
on the gaping wounds of Christ. But 
we are not left contemplating mere- 
ly His material wounds; we are led 
further to the consideration of the 
fruits of these same wounds. For 
example: 

1) The Church was born from the 
open Side of Christ on the Cross, 
just as Eve was taken from the side 
of Adam. (Vesper Hymn, lessons of 
the second and third nocturn) 

2) The Sacraments of the Church 
flow likewise from the open Side of 
Christ. (Homily of St. Augustine in 
the lessons of the third nocturn). 

3) The Wounds of Christ strength- 
ens our faith in Him. (Cf. the third, 
fourth, and fifth antiphons of Ves- 
pers: also second, third, eighth and 
ninth antiphons of Matins) 

4) By the opening of Christ's 
Side, the gate of eternal life is open- 
ed to us (Cf. fifth lesson of Matins) 

This last mentioned effect of 
Christ's Wounds may be said to sum 
up all the others. This effect is the 
precise one asked for in the oration 
of the feast: 

"O God, who for the salvation of 
the world didst will to be pierced 
by the nails and lance in the weak- 
ness of the flesh which Thou didst 
take, graciously grant that we who 
on earth solemnly venerate these 
nails and this lance, may enjoy in 
heaven the glorious triumph of 



162 



Thy victory." 

Sources: Catholic Enclyclopedia, 



vol. XI, p. 527; vol. VIII, p. 19, Bol- 
lettino, October 1922, p. 304 



FEAST OF THE HOLY SHROUD 

Fourth Friday of Lent 



History of the Feast 

A study of the history of the relics 
of cloth used in our Lord's burial 
reveals that they had a rather check- 
ered career. Various places have 
professed to have a relic of the 
cloth. This explains why there were 
at least three distinct feats of the 
"winding sheet" during the Middle 
Ages. The only one that we shall 
concern ourselves with here is the 
one granted by Pope Julius II to 
Chambery in Savoy in 1506. This 
feast was granted to commemorate 
the relic that is now known as the 
Holy Shroud of Turin. It later be- 
came the patronal feast of the royal 
House of Savoy. (Catholic Enclyclo- 
pedia, vol. XI, p. 527; vol. XV, p. 
652) In his decree of April 25, 1506 
granting this feast, Pope Julius re- 
ferred to: "that most famous Shroud 
in which our Savior was wrapped 
when He lay in the tomb and is now 
honorably and devoutly preserved in 
a silver casket." (Ibib. Vol. XIII, p. 
762) 

The feast of the Holy Shroud was 
granted to us by Clement XIV on 
January 10, 1773, along with five 
other feasts. (Bollettino, Oct. 1922, 
p. 304) The Office then adopted by 
us was taken from that or Turin. 
This seems providential since the 
Holy Shroud of Turin is now rather 
generally accepted as the true 
Shroud. 

Like all the other Passion feasts, 
this one was raised to a double of 



the second class by decrees of Dec. 
14, 1900 and March 4, 1901. With 
them also, it was reduced to a double 
major in 1911. (Bollettino, p. 304). 
Until 1923 this feast was celebrated 
on the third Friday of Lent. From 
that time until the present it has 
been assigned to the fourth Friday 
of Lent. (Bollettino, May, 1923, p. 
134) 
Spirit of the Feast 

This feast commemorates primari- 
ly the material cloth used in the 
burial of our Lord. But unlike all 
the other feasts of the Instruments, 
this one fixes our attention almost 
constantly on the Shroud itself. This 
is not surprising, as the Shroud 
shows Christ to us so clearly. The 
antiphons of Vespers and Lauds give 
us a continuous narrative of the 
burial of Jesus. The hymns of Ves- 
pers and Matins center almost en- 
tirely on the Shroud itself and the 
markings on it. These latter, of 
course, lead us indirectly to contem- 
plate the wounded Christ. 

The lessons of the first nocturn 
are fittingly chosen from Isaias, ch. 
53. In Isaias's Passion prophecy he 
speaks in clear terms of the defile- 
ment of Christ's sacred features and 
the wounds of His sacred body. The 
Shroud shows these phenomena very 
clearly. 

The hymn at Lauds is a beautiful 
salutation to the wounded person of 
Christ. It appears as if the compos- 
er of this hymn stood before the 



163 



Shroud and while contemplating 
Christ as represented there, poured 
fourth to Him the sentiments of his 
soul. This hymn is too filled with 
mystical meaning to be grasped by 
mere reading; it must be contem- 
plated. It is a clear proof that in 
celebrating this feast we are intend- 
ed to pass through the material relic 
to contemplate the wounded Christ. 
The same fact is borne out by the 
Capitula which so repeatedly stress 
the Precious Blood of Christ. 

The oration points out the fruit 



to be gained from the feast: 

"O God, who didst leave the traces 
of Thy sacred Passion upon the holy 
Shroud in which Thy sacred Body 
was enfolded by Joseph after he had 
taken it down from the Cross: gra- 
ciously grant that by Thy death and 
burial we may be brought to 
glory of Thy Resurrection." 
Sources: Catholic Enclyclopedia 
XI, p. 527; vol. XIII, p. 762; vol 
p. 652; Bollettino, October, 1922; 
Self-Portrait of Christ, by Gevnschel, 
C.S.S.R. 



the 

vol. 
XV 






FEAST OF THE FIVE WOUNDS 

Fifth Friday of Lent 



History of the Feast 

The earliest evidence of this feast 
comes from the Monastery of Fritz- 
ler in Thuringia where it was cele- 
brated in the 14th century. By the 
15th century it had spread to other 
parts of Germany, France, England, 
Spain, and the Carmelites, Francis- 
cans and Dominicans. (Catholic En- 
clyclopdia, vol. XV, p. 715) 

A feast of the Five Wounds cele- 
brated in all the Portugese speaking 
countries is of interest. It commem- 
orates the founding of the Portugese 
kingdom in 1139. Before a battle on 
the plains of Ourique, Christ appear- 
ed to Alfonso Henriquez, promising 
victory over the Moors and com- 
manding him to insert into the coat 
of arms of the new kingdom the em- 
blem of the Five Wounds. (Catholic 
Encyclopedia, vol. XV, p. 715) 

This was one of the six Passion 
feasts granted to our Holy Founder 
by Clement XIV on January 10, 1773. 
Jude Mead, C.P. (cf. Homiletic & 
Pastoral Review, Jan. 1944, p. 285) 



says the Office we use was compos- 
ed by Bishop Struzzieri. However, 
no other source indicates this. The 
Catholic Encyclopedia states: "The 
Office is one of those bequeathed to 
us by the Middle Ages." (Vol. XV, 
P- 715) 

In 1900 of 1901, the feast was 
raised to a double of the second 
class and was reduced to a double 
major in 1911. (Bollettino, Oct. 1922, 
p. 304). 
Spirit of the Feast 

In the Office, our attention is fo- 
cused on the five painful Wounds 
of Christ. The Invitatory verse sets 
the tone for the feast: "Christum in 
Cruce confixum, quinque plagis vul- 
neratum, venite adoremus." 

The predominant note of the Of- 
fice is one of sorrow, though joy 
over the fruits of His Wounds is not 
lacking. In the antiphons and Capi- 
tula texts are drawn from Sacred 
Scripture to help us express our sor- 
row on beholding the wounded figure 
of Christ. The familiar first lessons, 



164 



drawn from the Passion prophecy of 
Isaias, likewise serve this purpose. 
We are not allowed to forget the 
cause of His Wounds: "Ipse autem 
vulneratus et propter iniquitates nos- 
tras; attritus est propter scelera nos- 
tra." (1st lesson) "Quid sunt plagae 
istae in medio manuum tuarum? His 
plagatus sum in domo eorum qui 
diligebant me." (7th & 8th antiphons 
of Matins) 

The hymns are taken from the 
beautiful "Pange lingua gloriosi" of 
the Office of Good Friday. The first 
five verses are used at Vespers and 
Matins and the last five at Lauds. 
The same hymns are used on Pas- 
sion Sunday. 

Especially beautiful is the Mag- 
nificat antiphon for second Vespers. 
In it the wounded Christ speaks to 
us. He begins: "Ego sum vestra Re- 
demptio"; then follows an enumera- 



tion for His Wounds; He ends "resur- 
rexi: vobiscum sum, et vivo in aeter- 
num." 

In the Oration of the feast we ask 
for eternal life through the merits of 
Christ's Wounds and His Precious 
Blood: 

"O God, who by the Passion of Thy 
only begotten Son and by the shed- 
ding of His Blood through the Five 
Wounds, hast redeemed human na- 
ture that was lost by sin; grant we 
beseech Thee, that venerating here 
on earth the Wounds received by 
Him, we may merit to receive in 
heaven the fruit of His Precious 
Blood." 

Sources: Catholic Encyclopedia, vol. 
XV, p. 715; Bollettino, Oct. 1922 
(To be continued) 

Fr. Columban, C. P. 
St. Gabriel Retreat 
Des Moines, Iowa 



"... You know. Father, what my heart said in those moments? These 
words: 'Mother, how much I enjoy calling you Mother-' My heart, you see, 
leaps as it does when I think of Jesus.' And she said: 'You enjoy calling me 
Mother, and I enjoy calling you daughter.' She repeated these words to me 
at least three times in the course of the day .... Yes, I have found so many 
times that the feast of my Mother is for me a day of great peace, greater 
love, and of sanctification." And another time: "If you could see how beau- 
tiful the crown of glory is that the Eternal Father places upon the forehead 
of my Mother . . . She is the dispenser of the treasures of Paradise ..." 

"O how sweet! O, how beautifuly it is to discourse on the excellence of 
the Blessed Virgin." 

"How beautiful the Blessed Virgin is! If I began speaking (about this 
beauty) . . . and continued to speak of her beauty until the end of the world, 
I would not be able to express, even in part, how great and superhuman it is. 
.... Oftentimes finding myself alone, I think of this beauty and say, O what 
splendor! what beauty! O what sweetness." 



165 



Sermon 

by Fr. Alfred Duffy, C.P., honoring 

Most Reverend Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., 

on the Twentieth Anniversary of Consecration 



"For unto you it is given for 
Christ not only to believe in 
Him, but also to suffer for Him." 
(Phillippians 1:29) 
Let us in spirit this morning take 
our place on the summit of a high 
mountain in Palestine. Let us bridge 
the intervening centuries by our im- 
magination and observe with deep 
reverence the scene taking place be- 
fore our eyes. There is the Lord. 
At first sight He seems little dif- 
ferent from the three men who ac- 
company Him as they climb the 
steep ascent. Two are older than 
He. One younger. Suddenly there 
is a change. There is a dazzling 
transformation. There is the blind- 
ing brightness of the sun. There is 
the pure whiteness of driven snow. 
It is His face! It is His clothing! It 
is His divinity! It has burst through 
the bonds of His humanity that had 
hidden its splendor. It is Jesus, the 
King of Kings, in all the magnifi- 
cence of His regal glory. Is it any 
wonder that St. Peter with rampant 
joys surging within his heart cried 
out: "Lord it is good for us to be 
here!" 

Again in spirit let us this morning 
go back just twenty years ago to a 
glorious celebration of today's feast. 
We travel to distant China, to the 
stately cathedral church of St. Jos- 
eph in the city of Hankow. Let us 
watch the ceremony being enacted 



before our mind's eye. Once more 
there are four figures. There is the 
Apostolic Delegate from Rome to the 
church of China, Archbishop Mario 
Zanin, D.D. There are the two Fran- 
ciscan bishops, Massi and Palazzi. 
There is the Passionist, Monsignor 
O'Gara, the bishop-elect. The man- 
date authorizing the consecration 
had been received from the Bishop 
of Rome, Pope Pius XI, the lineal 
descendant of St. Peter, of Christ. 
There comes a sacred moment of 
change. The consecrating prelate 
and his assisting consecrators place 
their hands on the head of the bis- 
hop-elect saying: "Receive the Holy 
Ghost!" There is a luminous trans- 
formation of soul as the fullness of 
the eternal priesthood of Jesus 
Christ becomes the cherished pos- 
session of another man. From the 
heart of the great assemblage of 
bishops, prefects apostolic, priests, 
seminarians, brothers, sisters, dip- 
lomats, naval, air, and army officers, 
distinguished laymen, and an over- 
flow congregation of Chinese laity, 
perhaps the most notable gathering 
in the history of the Church in 
China, comes a re-echoing of the 
cry of St. Peter: "Lord it is good for 
us to be here!" 

But this morning, my brethren, it 
is our turn for actual participation 
in a holy ceremony, the Solemn Mass 
of Bishop O'Gara as he ascends the 



166 



altar of sacrifice in thanksgiving 
with a heart full of joy for the 
graces of his episcopate. And like- 
wise, by the power of that strange 
ability of grace, with a heart full of 
sorrow that cruel necessity places 
this anniversary celebration here 
rather than in his own cathedral 
church in Yuanling, China. Is it any 
wonder that the same paeon of joy 
rises in our hearts today, wings its 
way in gratitude to God: "Lord it is 
good for us to be here!" For we are 
not merely celebrating an anniver- 
sary, we are participants, sharers 
by association in the life of a bishop, 
who had been destined from all eter- 
nity by God to blazon before the 
world the possession of divinne pri- 
vilege granted only to a few chosen 
souls. "For unto 'him' was given for 
Christ not only to believe in Him, 
but also to suffer for Him." This 
chacteristic is his inherent greatness 
and is the reason for our rejoicing 
this morning. 

Let us study, then, some of the 
highlights and shadows in the epis- 
copate of Bishop O'Gara. We will 
see his career was stamped indelibly 
with the divine insignia of greatness, 
the cross. We will be awed by the 
difficulties of his apostolate and as 
highly edified by the strong faith 
and superb courage that supported 
his labors. And while gratitude will 
fill our hearts for the grace of hero- 
ism that was his. we can at the same 
time gather inspiration to walk in 
his footsteps — albeit afar off — as we 
direct our own personal life in the 
love and service of God. 
(I) CHRIST'S CHALLENGE 

We must never forget, my breth- 



ren, that our Lord Jesus Christ has 
pointed out most definitely a way 
of life for those who profess alleg- 
iance to Him. He has given to man- 
kind a spiritual philosophy to serve 
as the only safe guide for true fel- 
lowship with Himself. He has set 
up a code of conduct which embodies 
a sign of fealty in His divine ser- 
vice. He has established a mark 
of real discipleship. For in one terse 
sentence the Saviour has issued a 
directive to His followers, a direc- 
tive which at the same time consti- 
tutes a challenge: "If any man will 
come after Me. let him deny himself, 
take up his cross daily and follow 
Me." And He adds: "For he that will 
save his life, shall lose it; and he 
that shall lose his life for My sake, 
shall find it." 

It is readily understood that such 
a course of living is beset with hard- 
ships. It must be admitted, indeed, 
that only honor students in the 
school of the Crucified reach that 
degree of heroism out of which mar- 
tyrs are made. Yet isn't it a sublime 
thought that generous souls do exist 
in this world, which we are wont to 
think of as soft and pleasure-seek- 
ing, so that in this our day we can 
say in truth of many in the words 
of St. Paul: "For unto you is given 
for Christ, not only to believe in 
Him but also to suffer for Him." 
These are the stalwarts who cry out 
with the apostle: "God forbid that I 
should glory save in the cross of our 
Lord Jesus Christ; by whom the 
world is crucified to me, and I to the 
world." 

Generous souls really understand 
the Passion of Christ. Humanly 



16' 



speaking there does seem to be some- 
thing infinitely pathetic about the 
sufferings of Jesus despite their in- 
finite worth. There seems to be 
something almost unbecoming the 
dignity of God about them. Some- 
thing, as it were, out of divine 
character as though during them He 
ceased to be omnipotent and acted 
in an improper role. His public life 
had been one, clear, emphatic argu- 
ment in deeds of extraordinary pow- 
er proclaiming His divinity. Yet. it 
was He, God who willed to suffer 
and to die. His Passion must be 
infinite wisdom, because He is in- 
finitely wise. It is not human defeat, 
as though the Lord were vanquished 
by His enemies, but divine power by 
which He conquered them. It was 
the mighty effort of love that sal- 
vaged the wreckage sin had caused 
in God's plan of creation. It was a 
magnet by which He would draw to 
Himself innumerable souls in the 
ages of the world to come. For had 
not Jesus Himself said: "And I, if 
I be lifted up will draw all things 
to Myself." 

(II) DIVINE DRAWING TO MEET 
A DIVINE CHALLENGE 

How Christ Crucified did draw our 
bishop to His Sacred Heart and held 
him there to agonize the while in 
union with himself, is the story 
known to all of you. Here was one of 
the elect. Here was one who could 
face a challenge. Here was one who 
not only could believe, but could 
suffer! 

And what bitter, soul-searing suf- 
fering it was! June 30, 1951 began 
the real Passion of Bishop O'Gara. 
In a communist jail, in solitary con- 



finement. His little flock, the fruit 
of hard years of labor, his labors and 
that of his priests, now without a 
shepherd. Their churches closed. 
Their priests, his priests, under 
house arrest or driven out of the 
land as unwanted criminals or in 
jail with himself. His good sisters, 
who had been as his right arm in 
their noble efforts for the spiritual, 
intellectual, and bodily health of his 
people driven away from their 
heart's love and forced to go home 
as exiles from their cherished work. 

The loneliness of those twenty- 
two months! When a heart was cru- 
cified, when a mind was tortured, 
reduced to mere skin and bones. But 
with rare courage the bishop bore 
it. 

(Ill) THE CHOSEN SOUL, A 
PASSIONIST 

One day a certain woman stood in 
a crowd listening to Jesus preach. 
She had witnessed His cure of the 
dumb man and had observed with 
what effortless ease He had out- 
witted His enemies in argument and 
reduced them to silence. She deeply 
admired His calm dignity, His sure 
poise, and the note of authority in 
His voice. She began to think — and 
what a delightful train of thought 
it was — what a wonderful mother 
this young Prophet must have had! 
Such a noble son! His mother must 
have been brave and sweet and holy 
and charming and lovely! So she 
cried out in a loud voice: "Blessed 
is the womb that bore Thee, and the 
breasts that nursed Thee!" 

Today, in a broader sense we think 
likewise of Bishop O'Gara. What a 
splendid father and devoted mother 



168 



he must have had! How truly Chris- 
tian must have been the home which 
God blessed with three vocations to 
the holy priesthood! Yet, there were 
other motherings, too, in the bishop's 
life. There were the good sisters in 
school who taught a small boy in the 
early formative years of youth! 
There were the Oblate Fathers who 
trained his soul and they gave his 
mind knowledge in his college days 
at Ottawa University. There were 
the Sulpician Fathers in Montreal, 
surely they whose spirit is so evident 
in the Grand Seminary that it seems 
to be almost tangible, had a lasting 
influence on the young seminarian 
preparing himself for the real voca- 
tion God had in store for him. 

A chance visit of a Passionist mis- 
sionary to the seminary! An invita- 
tion of the superior to address the 
seminarians! It was that simple for 
God to lead a soul to the religious 
life and his true vocation. 

We Passionists have a custom in 
our community following the exam- 
ple of our holy Founder of adding to 
our given religious name, a title. I 
wonder what prompted the novice, 
Martin O'Gara back in 1913, to 
choose his —"Of the Cross?" Cuth- 
bert of the Cross! He did not wait 
long to get it. After his ordination in 
1915 he wanted to be a missionary. 
His superiors wanted him to teach. 
He taught eight years. Then came a 
call to China in 1924. His was to be 
an official position at the Apostolic 
Legation. But Almighty God didn't 
want Father Cuthbert at the lega- 
tion. He wanted him in the Province 
of Hunan. He had great things in 
store for him there. It was a simple 



matter for God to see to it that the 
position at the legation was filled 
by another. It was. 

Three years later Divine Provi- 
dence gave Fr. Cuthbert a more 
generous sharing in crossbearing. 
His mission was destroyed by the 
first invasion of the communist army 
in China. He barely escaped with 
his life, yet returned to rebuild the 
mission. 

In 1930 the Lord added another 
ingredient to the chalice of suffer- 
ing He was offering to a chosen soul. 
Father Cuthbert was appointed Pre- 
fect Apostolic of the Passionist mis- 
sion field. Gone forever were the 
comparatively simple problems of an 
individual mission. The entire pro- 
ject was now his responsibility. The 
Lord saw to it that there would be 
emergencies. There were floods and 
famine and bandits and deaths. 
These words cannote a great deal 
to us simply hearing them, but to 
the missionaries and their leader 
they meant the pain of heartache, 
the weariness of continual struggle, 
the impossibility of making known 
to others thousands of miles away 
the precarious situations that arose. 
Judgements had to be made, policies 
formulated with the common good 
in mind, yet individual needs satis- 
fied, not with a ready telephone on 
hand to give immediate counsel, nor 
with automobile roads waiting for 
a speeding car, nor with convenient 
trains to be taken at leisure. For 
this was interior China, not a coastal 
province. There were many days of 
Gethsemane. 

In 1934 Rome decided that the 
Passionist Prefect should be conse- 



169 



crated a bishop. It was an honor, 
indeed, to have the fullness of the 
priesthood of Jesus Christ as ones 
own. But it made the crossbearing 
a permanent task. What the answer 
was we know: "My God let this chal- 
ice pass from me, but if it be Thy 
holy will that I drink it, Thy will be 
done." With the threat of a commu- 
nist invasion imminent Monsignor 
O'Gara went to Hankow and was 
consecrated a bishop. Naturally 
there would be a hearty welcome on 
his return and a celebration both 
civic and religious. But he returned 
only to hear the guns of the reds at 
the gates of his episcopal city. 

Then the Lord added still another 
ingredient to the chalice, the Sino- 
Japanese war. Millions of the Chin- 
ese people were made homeless, 
those of the coastal provinces seek- 
ing comparative safety in the in- 
terior of their vast country. By air 
the war was carried into Hunan and 
a new title was added to those the 
bishop already possessed. He was 
called, "The Stretcher-bearer Bis- 
hop," because he was seen so often 
after air-raids carrying the wounded 
on a stretcher to our hospital for 
medical aid. Another title could have 
been given him, "The Bishop of 
Charity," for he established thirteen 
refugee camps in his diocese and 
fed literally tens of thousands of 
starving people. 

By the relatively simple though 
somewhat painful expedient of a 
badly infected tooth Divine Provi- 
dence arranged to have the bishop 
go to Hong Kong for proper dental 
care. If God makes crosses to fit 
shoulders, and He does, He certainly 



gives us now a clear picture of the 
spiritual massiveness and develop- 
ment possessed by the bishop. The 
Japanese captured the city of Hong 
Kong. It was just by a few minutes, 
— minutes — that the bishop escaped 
execution. The surrender of Fort 
Stanley prevented it just in time. 
With two brother Passionist priests 
and Maryknoll priests and brothers, 
thirty-one all told, as prisoners in a 
small garage the bishop that Christ- 
mas night preached one of his more 
memorable sermons. Its theme he 
had well known and practiced: "The 
servant is not above the master. 
Christ suffered. He was crucified. 
He has given us an example, that we 
might follow Him." 

After six months in an internment 
camp the bishop was released 
through the intercession of the Vati- 
can. Did he return home for needed 
rest and medical care? No! He went 
back to his diocese. He barely made 
it, collapsing as he neared his be- 
loved people. The end of the war 
brought on the climax. The commu- 
nists captured the Province of Hu- 
nan and immediately put the bishop 
under house arrest. 
(IV) THE CRUCIFIXION 

In a letter to the brethren in the 
United States Bishop O'Gara painted 
a striking picture of the condition 
of his diocese under the commu- 
nists: "The battle still rages in 
Yuanling. Here the Chinese com- 
munists are fiercely persecuting my 
Christians, priests, and sisters. My 
loyal Christians are openly threat- 
ened with beatings, jail, and death, 
if they do not join the communist- 
sponsored national church. My 



170 



courageous priests and sisters are 
subjected to public trials and out- 
rageous indignities. The reds have 
given me an ultimatum: 'Hand over 
your authority and your cash!' Now 
I must drop the gauntlet. I will not 
surrender. They can throw me in 
jail. Pray for me." 

A letter from one of the brethren 
tells us what happened next. "The 
chief of police and forty yelling 
soldiers arrested the bishop and 
Father Paul. Then at bayonet point, 
they herded the priests, sisters, and 
gathered Christians into the church. 
The police tore down the two docu 
ments of excommunication directed 
against those interfering with eccles- 
iastical authority and those who join- 
ed the so-called national church . . . 
Then the bishop was dragged to the 
altar where they tore his pectoral 
cross from him, stripped him of 
his underclothes. The bishop ten- 
derly took off a small cross he had 
about his neck, kissed it, and gave 
it to his captors. Through it all the 
bishop maintained a noble dignity. 
The soldiers mocked him. The or- 
deal in the church lasted three 
hours. When the bishop had put on 
his clothes again, he solemnly bles- 
sed himself with the Sign of the 
Cross, as if he were beginning a 
pontifical mass. Then he was march- 
ed with Father Paul through the 
streets to jail with an entire com- 
pany of soldiers as guards, the 
bishop saying his rosary." 

My brethren, are these scenes not 
a reminder of the Passion of Jesus? 
The bishop's ordeal lasted twenty- 
two months. Then came release. His 
captors did not want him to die on 



their hands in jail. Father William 
Westhoven, C.P., a fellow prisoner 
with the bishop gives a strikingly 
beautiful facet of the heart of a 
true shepherd of souls when he 
wrote: "When I reminded the bishop 
that in another halfhour we would 
be across the border and safe in 
Hong Kong he answered: 'Yes, 
thank God! But I would come back 
to these people hobbling on crutches 
if they would only permit me.' " 

my brethren, truly can we say: 
"For unto 'him' it is given for 
Christ, not only to believe in Him 
but also to suffer for Him." How 
well, indeed, did Bishop O'Gara ac- 
cept God's own insignia of great- 
ness! 

What can be said in conclusion? 
Human language is so inadequate at 
the moment. How proud the dear 
ones of the bishop must be! Justly 
proud, for he is, in truth, a noble- 
man of God's own fashioning. He 
well knows that of himself he could 
not even pronounce the name of 
the Lord Jesus. He realizes that 
without God he could do nothing, 
that his sufficiency is not from him- 
self. But he knows well, also, that 
God's grace was never an assault on 
the fortress of an unwilling heart. 
God's graces were tremendous, but 
so was his human co-operation. 

How privileged are those who 
blessed with the friendship of Bish- 
op O'Gara! How more fortunate are 
we Passionists to be able to call 
him our brother-in-Christ, a valiant 
son of our holy Mother the Congre- 
gation, very dear to the heart of 
our common Father, St. Paul of 
the Cross. We are proud of him 



171 



as he himself is proud of his priests 
and sisters who worked with him 
and suffered with him that Christ 
might reign in his diocese of Yuan- 
ling. 

How pleased Our Lady must be 
with him! Another Christ son, who 
prayed her rosary as he was led to 
jail and in whose Immaculate Heart 
he found solace and strength! What 
a delight it must have been for her 
to channel graces into his courag- 
eous soul that he might suffer the 
more for the cause of her divine 
Son, Jesus! 

But these are human words, hu- 
man thoughts, full of sincerity and 
truth, it is true, but still faltering 
and woefully insufficient. What 
would our Lord say this morning if 
He were to step out of His tabernacle 



4 



home and ascend this pulpit. Surely 
He would recall His own words 
spoken to us in His Sermon on the 
Mount: 

"Blessed are they that suffer per- 
secution for justice' sake: for theirs 
is the kingdom of heaven." 

Blessed are you, Bishop Cuthbert! 

"Blessed are ye when they shall 
revile you." 

You were reviled, Bishop! 

"And persecute you," 

You were persecuted, Bishop! 

"And speak all that is evil against 
you, untruly, for My sake," 

This was done to you, Bishop! 

"Be glad and rejoice, for your re- 
ward is very great in heaven." 

Be glad, Bishop, rejoice! Your 
name is written in the book of life. 




CONSIDER WELL 

By St. Sir Thomas More (1478-1535) 

that both by night thy soul with loss 

Think on His Passion and the bitter 

pain, 
Think on the mortal anguish of the 

Cross, 
Think on Christ's blood let out at 

every vein, 
Think on His precious heart all rent 

in twain; 
For thy redemption think all this 

was wrought, 
Nor be that lost which He so dearly 

bought. 



Consider well 
and day 

While we busily provide and care 

For our disport, our revel and our 
play, 

For pleasant melody and dainty fare, 
Death stealeth on full slily; unaware 
He lieth at hand and shall us all 

surprise, 
We wot not when nor where nor in 

what wise. 

When fierce temptations threat 



172 




FATHER JULIUS, C.P. 

Father Julius of the Heart of Mary 
(Busse) died on the evening of July 
13, 1954, in the 47th year of his life. 
The hour was 10:45 when the long- 
desired privilege of death was grant- 
ed to this priest of God. He had pray- 
ed earnestly for the coming of this 
hour so that God might call him 
the sooner. He had waited in patient 
resignation as this request was denied 
him through the long months of cher- 
ished sufferings. This Tuesday after- 
noon had seen his lapsing into the 
unconsciousness that was the prelude 
to his passage into eternity. 

Sister Pancratia, who had devoted 
all her care to his welfare, had noted 
the change in Father's condition at 
noon that day in July. Sister Ruth, 
the Superior of St. Joseph Mercy 
Hospital, Parsons, Kansas, had noti- 
fied Father Rector of the critical 
development and had summoned 
members of the Busse family to the 



sick room. So it was that Father Jul- 
ius, fortified with the rites of Holy 
Mother Church and assisted by the 
prayers of his religious brethren, the 
Sisters of Saint Joseph, and his fam- 
ily answered God's call to eternal 
happiness and passed from life to 
Life without struggle. 

The Solemn Mass of Funeral was 
celebrated by His Excellency, the 
Most Reverend Mark Carroll, Bishop 
of Wichita, on Friday, July 16th. In- 
terment was made in the newly-es- 
tablished Monastery Cemetery close 
to the church of his childhood. His 
aged mother spoke the sentiments of 
Father Julius' heart out of her own 
lips: "if it be God's will, it is best," 
she said of the moment when her son 
and God's priest was laid to rest after 
a life that was short and unfinished 
in the counting of mortal years but 
complete in the annals of the Al- 
mighty. 

Father Julius was born in Seneca, 



173 



Kansas, in the year of 1907. The day 
was the 21st of March, the feast of 
Saint Benedict. His parents, Charles 
Busse and Fredericka Nolte, were 
blessed with five other sons and four 
daughters. The Busse family moved 
to south-eastern Kansas shortly after- 
wards and established their home on 
a farm north-east of St. Paul on the 
bank of the Flatrock Creek. It was 




Father Julius, C. P. 



here that Sebastian Busse grew out 
of childhood into the youthfulness of 
his manhood with strong promise of 
a vocation to the Passionist Priest- 
hood. With his brothers and sisters 
he attended the parish school. Two 
of Father's sisters entered the con- 
vent upon the completion of their 
parochial schooling. They are now 
known in the Community of the Sis- 
ters of Saint Joseph as Sister Ilde- 
fonsus and Sister DeSales. 

The year 1921 found Sebastian 
completing the seventh grade of St. 
Francis School. The determination to 
be a priest and a Passionist was 
strong in him. As three other young 
men from the school were to go to 
the Preparatory Seminary that Aug- 
ust, it was arranged for Sebastian to 
accompany them. He arrived in St. 
Louis in August, 1921. Father An- 
selm was then Rector of the Prepara- 
tory Seminary. The beginning had 
been made. 

The four years spent in St. Louis 
passed quickly. There was never any 
question in any mind as to his voca- 
tion. The eager simplicity that was 
so profoundly to mark his later years 
was an established characteristic at 
that early date. He would turn his 
hand to any task and his determined 
spirit and varied ability would serve 
his duty to good stead. A solid work- 
manship was his sterling quality. He 
was not one to catch the eye with 
show of brilliance or to command 
attention with startling performance 
but all learned to put reliance in his 
steadfastness and reliability. Upon 
completion of the four years in the 
Preparatory Seminary, he alone re- 
mained of those who had come with 



174 



him from the parish in St. Paul. 

In July, 1925, the class of which 
Sebastian Busse was a member enter- 
ed the Novitiate at the Sacred Heart 
Retreat, Louisville, Kentucky. There 
he was given the religious name of 
"Julius" and made choice of "the 
Heart of Mary" as his title. He re- 
ceived the holy Habit of the Passion 
on the second day of August of that 
year. Father Jerome was the master 
of Novices. The class was to be the 
last one he would introduce into the 
Passionist way of living. Upon the 
successful completion of that canon- 
ical year, Julius of the Heart of Mary 
pronounced his vows on the third 
day of August, 1926. 

The six years that followed his pro- 
fession as a Passionist Religious were 
devoted to the usual preparation for 
the living of this life as a follower 
of the Crucified and as a minister 
of the Cross. Under the tutelage of 
able professors and under the direc- 
tion of capable directors, Julius es- 
tablished himself as a worthy can- 
didate for the reception of the Sac- 
rament of Holy Orders. He was or- 
dained in Chicago, Illinois, on the 
20th day of December in the year 
1931. That year of 1931 saw the com- 
pletion of the course of formal stud- 
ies for Father Julius. Yet another 
year remained that he might receive 
training in the special work of the 
missionary career. The class of which 
| he was a member was disbanded in 
July, 1933, and assignments made to 
the various duties of the professed 
priests in Holy Cross Province. 

Ten years later, Father Julius was 
to recall those years and estimate 
their value. "Every hour of study as 



as a student is richly rewarded in 
after years," he would write, "just 
as every hour of study lost is deeply 
regreted and seriously missed as 
years go on." The importance of the 
"student days" to the priestly years 
was brought home to Father Julius 
most clearly in his contacts with the 
spiritual needs as felt in the soldier's 
life. From an over-sea camp he would 
write: "I feel deep regret that I did 
not worry more about them during 
the hours of study and apply myself 
more closely." 

During the first ten years of his 
priestly life, Father Julius was var- 
iously employed about the Province. 
He served as Assistant-Pastor in the 
parish of St. Ann in Normandy, Mis- 
souri. He was associated in the work 
of the Colored Missions in our parish 
of the Holy Family in Ensley, Ala- 
bama. He was a member of the Mis- 
sion Band while stationed at Saint 
Gabriel's Monastery in Des Moines, 
Iowa. It was while Father Julius was 
a member of this Community that he 
requested permission of Father Pro- 
vincial to offer his services to the 
United States Army as a Chaplain. 

In the year 1941 Father Julius was 
permitted to make application for a 
commission in the Chaplain Corps. 
A strong man, with good health, he 
met with considerable difficulty at 
the hands of the medical examiners. 
A worrisome callus on the sole of 
his foot offered a serious threat to 
his acceptance by the Army. After 
some months delay and medical treat- 
ment, this difficulty was over come 
and Father received his commission 
as a First Lieutenant on the 8th of 
April, 1942. He remained in the Ser- 



175 



vice, gaining the permanent rank of 
Major, until his discharge in April, 
1946. 

During the interval that lapsed be- 
tween his making application for his 
commission and the Army's accep- 
tance of his services, Father Julius 
served as assistant Chaplain in the 
Hines Memorial Hospital for the Vet- 
erans in Maywood, Illinois. Within 
a short period — six months time was 
all that was given him in this ap- 
pointment — Father established a long 
memory of his kindness and zeal. 
Much could be said of these days but 
the great loyalty shown him by the 
patients to whom he ministered is 
the perfected narrative of those 
months. 

The "War Years" for Father Julius 
were those of April 8, 1942, to April 
11, 1946. These were years of rich 
experience for Father and ones that 
filled his memory. The story contain- 
ed in them is a most interesting one. 
By sheer merit of priestly sincerity 
and devotion, Father rose from the 
rank of First Lieutenant to that of 
Major and to the position of Division- 
al Chaplain. Father Julius' concept 
of the Chaplain's responsibility is best 
expressed in words that he wrote on 
May 16, 1944. "It is a big job," he 
wrote, "that a Chaplain has but it 
can be made a soft job if a man wants 
to work that way. I would hate to 
come back to the States and the Mon- 
astery with the memory that I had 
wasted so many opportunities to bring 
men nearer to God." If we would look 
for a reason for Father's outstanding 
success in this work of his choice, 
we need but consider these words 
that he added to his appraisal of the 



Chaplain's task: "It can happen very 
easily and I check myself regularly 
to see if I am neglecting opportuni- 
ties." Nor did Father depend merely 
upon himself for the strength of 
fidelity. In a letter written to his 
sister, Father observed: "Now you 
can get your little tots in school to 
pray for me and those for whom I 
am responsible. I do not ask that 
they pray that none of them are kil- 
led for we must expect some to die. 
But what I ask is that they pray 
that not one of them who has need of 
me die without me. I have a lot of 
men to care for and I can not be 
everywhere that there are men dying 
but I hope that I am where I am 
needed most at the proper time." 

The strength of Father's influence 
over the men under his spiritual 
charge was evidenced in their heart- 
felt concern for him in the days of 
his protracted illness. They came 
from every part of the country to 
visit him and the daily mail brought 
its regular tribute of affection out of 
the store of their remembrance of 
him. It is not strange that they did 
not forget him for he had remember- 
ed them in the day of their need. 
In a letter written after the campaign 
on Attu, he had said: "A Chaplain's 
work in battle is endless. Each man 
has his own fox-hole and you have 
to expose yourself to get there. It's 
worth it though. The men are tickled 
to see you and many a black sheep 
is brought back." And he added as 
an after-thought the thing that all 
the soldiers knew: "I could hang 
back but I wouldn't be doing the 
job." Many of the letters he received 
in the hospital were a thank you for 



176 



the help given in those past days. 
Such a spirit is not a thing easily for- 
gotten nor is it one to lose its hold. 

Father Julius was assigned to the 
17th Infantry of the 7th Infantry 
Division of the United States army. 
This Division saw service in the Pa- 
cific area. Prior to the transfer to 
the theater of action, the Division 
was located at Fort Ord, California. 
The combat training program was 
carried out on the hot sands of the 
Mohave Desert. The first battle as- 
signment of the Division was that 
of the Aleutian Islands Campaign. 
There in the cold and the mud that 
characterized the Island of Attu, Fa- 
ther proved his Chaplain fitness. He 
gained much publicity for his dis- 
covery of the body of the Battalion 
Commander, Colonel Edward Earle, 
who had fallen in an area under 
enemy fire. He also earned the 
notable decoration of the Silver Star 
for his zealous fulfillment of his 
spiritual duty in that campaign. 
Colonel Edward Smith in making 
the recommendation stated that "his 
close attention to the wounded and 
dying while under enemy mortar, 
rifle and machine gun fire was of the 
highest morale value to this bat- 
talion and the men to whom Chap- 
lain Busse administered." Major 
General Charles H. Cartlett award- 
ed Father Julius "this decoration for 
gallantry at Attu." The exposure to 
the bitter cold and to the icy mud 
and water resulted in a short period 
of hospitalization at this time. 

The 7th Division was transferred 
from Attu to the Island of Hawaii 
in 1943. From this base they took 
part in the battles for the Marshall 



Islands. Of this campaign, Father 
wrote briefly saying "this last job 
was a whole lot easier on me and 
everyone else than the job at Attu." 
He also noted, as in passing, that he 
had been transferred from the 17th 
Infantry post to the Headquarters 
of the 7th Infantry Division. 

Upon the successful completion of 
the campaign for the Marshall Is- 
lands, the 7th Division moved into 
the area of the Philippine Islands. 
The southern portion of the Islands 
was the new center of activity. Dur- 
ing the 110 day campaign, Father 
Julius suffered a bullet wound in 
the wrist. Father explained it all 
in a most unromantic way: "I dove 
for a ditch," he wrote, "but didn't 
quite make it." The untold incidents 
of these days are revealed by the 
fact that this engagement brought 
him not only the decoration of the 
Purple Heart but also the Bronze 
Star. This took place on the Island 
of Leyte. 

Father was hospitalized as a re- 
sult of his wound. His stay in the 
medical center, however, was of 
short duration. Within twenty-four 
hours the Chaplain was back at his 
post. The Doctor was unimpressed 
by Father Julius' request for instant 
dismissal until Father explained 
that while "you can promote a lieu- 
tenant to a Captain or a Major to a 
Colonel, no one can be promoted to 
the priesthood on the field of battle. 
There is no one," Father added, "to 
take the place of a missing Chaplain. 
After a moment's thought," he con- 
tinued, "he let me go." The fact 
that the Medical Officer made a con- 
cession to the Chaplain is illustrated 



177 



by the letter Father Julius wrote ex- 
plaining how he had "said Mass for 
two weeks with one hand, the other 
in a sling." 

Father Julius served with this 
same 7th Infantry Division during 
the time it was headquartered in 
Seoul, Korea, and during that period 
that it occupied Okinawa. 

With the coming of peace, Father 
Julius made preparation to return 
to the Monastery. He had written 
from the Philippines in January, 
1945, saying: "It will be a great day 
when I get back to all those bless- 
ings. Now I would like to hear as 
much about them as possible to keep 
them as a goal to look forward to." 
It was the wish of the Military that 
Father Julius continue with the 
Chaplain Corps. However he had 
made his choice of the monastic life 
— that was his vocation. "I feel," he 
wrote, "that it is about time to get 
back to the life as a Passionist." 
Separation from the Armed Forces 
was accomplished on April 11, 1946. 

The Military Record of Major 
Julius Busse, Chaplain, as recorded 
on the separation card simply states 
that he saw service in the Aleutians, 
Western Pacific, Ryukus, and South- 
ern Philippine Campaigns. This 
record also names the citations Fa- 
ther received as those of the Asiatic 
Pacific Campaign Medal with four 
bronze stars and one bronze arrow- 
head, the Philippine Liberation Rib- 
bon with two bronze stars, the Pur- 
ple Heart Medal, and the Silver Star 
Medal. The fact remains, nonethe- 
less, that the greatest honor shown 
him by the Military Services was the 
deep affection and the sincere re- 



spect of the men, non-Catholic and 
Catholic, who served with him. 

Upon his return to Holy Cross 
Province, Father Julius was station- 
ed at St. Joseph Retreat in Birming- 
ham, Alabama. While there he aid- 
ed in the construction of the addi- 
tion that was made to the residence 
and engaged in mission work. The 
year following his release from the 
Army saw the Provincial Chapter 
(1947) select Father Julius as Rec- 
tor of Sacred Heart Retreat in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. The following Pro- 
vincial Chapter sent Father to De- 
troit, Michigan, as Rector of St. Paul 
of the Cross Monastery. Father serv- 
ed in this capacity until September, 
1952, when he tendered his resigna- 
tion in order to carry out the wishes 
of the Provincial Superior in regard 
to the newly accepted foundation at 
Osaka, Japan. Father Julius was ap- 
pointed Superior of the band select- 
ed for this mission and was enroute 
to the port of embarkation (San 
Francisco) when the disease that 
finally claimed his life manifested 
itself. 

Father had undergone a physical 
examination in Detroit and had in- 
dicated recurrent pains in the ab- 
domen. These, however, were not 
of a serious nature, and no malig- 
nancy was indicated in the tests 
when made. A few weeks later, 
while visiting his mother in St. Paul, 
Kansas, a very severe intestinal 
seizure compelled him to enter Mer- 
cy Hospital in Parsons, Kansas. An 
exploratory operation was perform- 
ed by Doctor Charles Miller and the 
malignant cancer was detected. The 
cancerous growth was immediately 



178 



removed, but no promise of recovery 
could be offered with finality. In 
view of this development, Father 
Julius was relieved of the appoint- 
ment to the Mission in Japan. The 
final labors of his life were being 
made evident in the Providence of 
God. From this date forward, resig- 
nation of God's will was to be the 
predominant note of his living. He 
daily grew in the certainty that this 
was the final task that was to be 
asked of him before the rewards of 
the Passionist life would be given 
him. Therefore he saw it, this lin- 
gering death of suffering, not as a 
thing to be feared but as a cross to 
be carried to its desired ending. He 
summoned up, as it were, his best 
efforts and spent them in impatience 
to work God's fulfillment. He had 
written: "Some tell me that at 46 
I am in the prime of life and it is 
a dreadful thing that I must die. 
How untrue. That is like saying it 
is not good to finish a job quickly." 
It is not strange that he would look 
upon this death as an honor. "In 
heaven," he would say, "there will 
be peace and love and everlasting 
life. As I lie waiting for a cancer 
to finish my stay on earth, my 
thoughts are joyous and I harbor a 
strong feeling of anticipation." Nor 
were these thoughts born of the 
immediateness of death. Prior to 
sailing for Attu, Father Julius had 
written to his sister of the dangers 
of a Chaplain's life. He wrote: "I 
am not a bit afraid. As a priest I 
have a definite bit of work to do, 
and when it is done, there is no use 
hanging around. But until it is done, 
I don't feel that God is going to take 



me so long as I try to do my job as 
well as I can. So why worry? If I 
am taken, my work will have been 
finished and I want to go as soon as 
it is." Out of such convictions was 
made the resignation to God's will 
that was so remarkable in him. 

The natural will to life was also 
strong in him. Twice was a false 
hope pressed upon him. His re- 
covery from the first operations 
seemed complete. Within a few 
months, he had regained the lost 
weight and strength. His health im- 
provement presaged a resumption of 
mission work. Father had been able 
to return to the Monastery in time 
for the Community Retreat and to 
follow its exercises. Later in that 
year, he conducted a six week course 
in Mental Hygene to the Community 
of Carmelite Sisters, Villa Teresa, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Thus en- 
couraged, he spoke to Father Pro- 
vincial about a work that he felt he 
could do, namely the preaching of 
the lay-retreats. This effort, how- 
ever, proved to be short lived. Fa- 
ther Julius was able to give but two 
retreats at the Clayton (now, Creve 
Coeur) Missouri, Retreat House. 
Shortly afterwards he was compelled 
by his indisposition to enter St. 
John's Hospital in St. Louis, Miss- 
ouri. In October an operation was 
performed by Doctor Sauer. That 
same evening the nurse brought Fa- 
ther a complete dinner. He thought 
an error had been made and insisted 
that the nurse call Dr. Sauer. She 
returned with word that he could 
eat everything. Father understood 
the meaning of those words and ac- 
cepted them with resignation. 



179 



With the approval of Father Pro- 
vincial, the patient was moved by 
plane to the hospital of the Sisters 
of Saint Joseph, Parsons, Kansas, so 
that he might be nearer his mother 
and family. He was not to leave the 
hospital alive. 

From October until mid-April, 
Father was fed only intravenously. 
He was able to sip a bit of water and 
to go to Holy Communion. With the 
permission of the Bishop, Holy Mass 
was said twice weekly and on the 
principal feasts in his room. Each 
day saw his condition deteriorate. 
A strong desire to die possessed him. 
Many times the hour seemed near 
only to draw away. Each time Fa- 
ther would say: "I guess I am not 
ready yet" and add, "God will take 
me when He wants me." In late 
April an unexpected improvement 
was shown. Father was able to take 
solid food again and even managed 
a few steps about his room. How- 
ever, the many prayers said for his 
recovery were not to be answered. 
A relapse shortly set in and the 
time of waiting for the inevitable 
end began anew. The end came on 
that evening of July 13th when God 
gave ear to Father's own prayer and 
called him out of this life. 

Father Julius was beset with two 
constant fears during those days of 
his illness. He had no fear for him- 
self as the bearer of pain for his 
eternity. An ardest desire to share 
more fully in the Passion of Christ 
and an unearthy trust in God's mercy 
were his staunch supports. He did, 
however, dread the impact that his 
medical report would have upon his 
ailing mother. But when he told her 



what was before him, she simply 
said: "if that is what God wants, it 
is what we should want," and began 
to talk about other things. And so 
this worry was taken from him. 

The other worry that always was 
with him was that he would scandal- 
ize others by not bearing his pain as 
a Passionist ought to endure. No 
one heard a word of complaint come 
from his lips but a moan or gasp 
would at times escape his vigilance 
and he judged that not even these 
involuntary expressions of suffering 
had place in his vocation. Father 
had to be encouraged to speak freely 
to the Doctor and nurses so that 
they might have the needed knowl- 
edge of his condition and to be re- 
minded that he needs must permit 
them to treat him according to their 
judgment. He desired to bear all 
unrelieved in silence. 

While on the Island of Okinawa in 
1945, Father Julius had written, say- 
ing: "Perhaps you have already no- 
ticed that if you are to be a good 
Passionist, Christ will expect you to 
suffer with him. It may be continual 
disappointments, it may be sickness, 
it may be frustrations; it is certainly 
going to be something to cause pain. 
You may as well expect it: you are 
not going to be a good Passionist 
until you are tested by it and when 
the test is over it is the sweetest 
consolation to know that you have 
been accepted by Christ as a fellow 
Passionist." This conviction was his 
preparation, and the sincerity of his 
ideal is evidenced in the resignation 
he practiced and in the joy he ex- 
perienced under the weight of his 
own burden. He expected it to be 



180 



hard and he was glad it was heavy 
for it made his last days more to the 
likeness of the final hours of his 
Crucified Master. You could see it, 
the light of joy in his eyes as the 
pain struck. And he would explain 
it all saying, "I am just trying to be 
a good Passionist." 

In 1943, Father Julius had written: 
"A priest has a wonderful opportu- 
nity ... As long as a priest acts nor- 
mally and behaves himself, the im- 
pression is far greater than might 
be imagined." We can not measure 
the influence exerted by Father 
Julius upon others in these last 
months of his life. The publicity 
given him made his example a far 
flung one that would awaken dor- 
mant faith and be the corrective of 
erring ways. A stranger wrote to 
him saying that he had read of him 
in the daily paper. "I want to tell 
you," he added, "that I have just 
gone to confession, my first in twen- 
ty years." Friends of army days and 
strangers alike came to visit him and 
judged it a privilege to be with him. 
The impression they took away was 
one blended of respect for the faith 
he held and for the life he had 
fashioned to its demands. Father 
Julius., on his part., distrusted the 
publicity and feared its effect on 



his soul. Neither did he understand 
it all. He would often say, "I do not 
understand. But God's ways are not 
our ways. He must see some use in 
me." 

Through all his days in Mercy 
Hospital, Father benefited by the 
untiring care of the Sisters of Saint 
Joseph. Sister Pancratia was ever at 
his side. Mother Baptista was a fre- 
quent caller. Doctor Miller was un- 
flaging in his attention. The Fathers 
from the monastery spent long hours 
with him. And when death did come, 
all felt a sense of personal loss tem- 
pered with the realization that this 
was Father's gain. "Death," he had 
kept repeating, "is but a journey 
from earth to heaven and who will 
say that the change is not for the 
better." 

The mortal remains of Father 
Julius now rest in the Monastery 
Garden but his memory lives on in 
many hearts, and his soul, we trust, 
is with God. Let us ever keep him 
in our prayers, this our Brother in 
religion, Father Julius of the Heart 
of Mary, whom God has taken from 
our midst. May his faults be things 
forgotten. May his virtues be long 
remembered. May God be good to 
his soul and give eternal peace to 
his Priest, Father Julius, Passionist. 



X 



181 




The Jubilee Mass of Most Reverend Father General at the tomb of Our 
Holy Founder January 4th, 1955. 

182 




Most Reverend Father General 
celebrated the Silver Jubilee of his 
Priesthood in Rome at the Retreat 
of Sts. John and Paul on January 
4, 1955. He offered a low Mass of 
thanksgiving in the chapel of St. 
Paul of the Cross, assisted by two of 
his Consultors, V. Reverend Father 
Sebastian, 3rd General Consultor, 
and V. Rev. Father Paul Francis, 4th 
General Consultor. The Jubilee ser- 
mon was delivered by V. Reverend 
Father Germano, 1st General Con- 
sultor. The Spanish University stu- 
dents sang appropriate motets dur- 
ing the Mass. Besides the large Com- 
munity of Sts. John and Paul and 
other Passionists stationed in and 
near Rome, there were in attendance 



many dignitaries, clerical, religious 
and lay. In the evening a dinner 
was served to the many guests in the 
retreatants' cafeteria. 

Among the many guests, not of 
the Congregation, the Acta Congre- 
gations tells us of the presence of 
the Secretary of the S. Congrega- 
tion of the Council, the Secretary of 
the Sacred Penitentiary, two Audi- 
tors of the Roman Rota, two repre- 
sentatives from the Papal Secretar- 
iate of State, the Generals of the 
Redemptorists, Assumptionists, Pre- 
cious Blood Fathers, and the Xaver- 
ian Brothers; also present were the 
Rectors of the Irish, Scottish and 
English Colleges in Rome and the 
Vice Rector of the American College. 



ACTA CURIAE GENERALIS 



PASSIONIST PARISHES 

On account of the present and 
truly pressing necessities of the 
Church in certain localities or coun- 
tries and in order to more fittingly 



follow the mind and will of the Holy 
See, presently quite insistent, our 
General Curia, after having maturely 
weighed the reasons in individual 
cases, by way of exception has per- 



183 



mitted our members to administer 
parishes. This, however, should by 
no means be considred a change of 
policy in the government of the 
Congregation, nor, much less, a 
change in our Holy Rule. 

Ecclesiastical Authorities, who 
highly esteem and admire our Con- 
gregation, often attribute the happy 
results of our ministries to our faith- 
ful adherence to our genuine and 
specific vocation. 

This vocation, founded in solitude 
and in a certain freedom and mo- 
bility necessary for the preaching 
of missions and retreats, would be 
seriously endangered and even ren- 
dered impotent to fulfil its purpose, 
if our religious would readily under- 
take the care of parishes. 

We wish therefore hereby to ex- 
pressly and emphatically affirm that 
the office of pastor is not compatible 
with our vocation and it is therefore 
only by way of exception and with 
a reluctant mind that we permit the 
acceptation of parishes. 

We also wish to take this occasion 
to remind the Fathers Provincial of 
their strict obligation according to 
our Regulations (num. 191) to an- 
nually together with their Consul- 
tors consider whether the grave ne- 
cessity still persists to continue car- 
ing for the parishes they have under 
their charge. 

Rome, January 14, 1955. 

Malcolm of Mary 
General 

The Sacred Congregation of Re- 
ligious in a Rescript, dated Decem- 
ber 11, 1954, granted our Most Rev- 
erend Father General the faculty to 



erect a canonical retreat in the city 
of Nutterden, Diocese of Muenster 
(N. W. Germany). This retreat will 
be opened by the Fathers of the Pro- 
vince of Our Lady of Holy Hope, 
Holland. 

GENERAL POSTULATION 

In the January number of the Ac- 
ta Congregationis our Postulator 
General, Father Frederick of the 
Sorrowful Virgin, gives us a list of 
those members of our Congregation 
whose cause for Beatification was 
furthered officially during the year 
1954. They are: 1) Fr. Bernard Mary 
of Jesus; 2) Fr. Charles of St. An- 
drew; 3) Cfr. Galilaeo Nicolini; 4) 
Brother Isidore of St. Joseph; 5) Fr. 
John of the Holy Spirit; 6) Fr. Jos- 
eph of Jesus and Mary; 7) Fr. Law- 
rence M. of St. Francis Xavier; 8) 
Mother Maria Crucifixa of Jesus; 9) 
Fr. Nazarenus of Mary Immaculate; 

10) Fr. Nicephorus of Jesus and 
Mary and his 25 associate Martyrs; 

11) Fr. Pius of St. Aloysius. 

On the occasion of the closing of 
the Mairan Year, a Stamp Exibition 
was held in the Basilica of St. Mary 
of the Angels. On the 16th of De- 
cember it was opened and blessed 
by Msgr. Cosimo Bonaldi. 

Among the exhibitors was Brother 
Hermann Tatangelo, Passionist from 
the Province of our Lady of Sorrows. 
He had two very interesting pieces 
of work, pictures made in the form 
of mosaic from tiny pieces of post- 
age stamps. They were entitled "The 
Good Shepherd" and "The Triump- 
hal Entry into Jerusalem". 

Brother Hermann was awarded a 



184 




Brother Herman, C.P., and his philatelical creation 

prize by the Belgian Ambassador to the pictures that he had so patiently 
the Holy See. In the photo we see made during his long stay in India. 
Brother Hermann standing beside 

PROVINCE OF HOLY CROSS 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
RETREAT 

(Chicago) 
On the Friday during the Octave 
of the Solemn Commemoration of 
the Passion, February 18th at about 
10:30 A.M. another of our Brethren 
was called to eternity, Father Cyril 
of the Sorowful Mother (Meis). Fa- 
ther Cyril was born in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., October 26, 1874, professed, 
April 8, 1891 and ordained June 4, 
1898. Father Cyril was one of our 



sturdy, good religious. He was ac- 
tive in his own way till very near the 
end of his life, ever trying to make 
himself useful to the Community in 
which he lived. On February 3, of 
this year, it was found necessary to 
take him to Resurrection Hospital. 
February 10th a prostate operation 
was performed. On February 14 a 
report said he was just about hold- 
ing his own. Father has two living 
brothers, one of whom, Father Wen- 
delin, C.P., is a member of the Pro- 



185 



vince of St. Paul of the Cross. Both 
of them were in Chicago for the 
funeral, but did not arrive in time 
to see their brother alive. Father 
Wendelin is stationed in St. Mich- 
ael's Church, Pittsburgh. Father 
Cyril was buried in our Chicago 
cemetary; V. Rev. Father Provincial 
was celebrant for the funeral Mass. 
Frs. Adrian Lynch and Adolph 
Schmitt represented the Pittsburgh 
Community. May the soul of good 
Father Cyril rest in peace! 



Besides Very Reverend Father 
Rector, two other Fathers celebrated 
the Silver Jubilee of their priest- 
hood lately. On January 4th Father 
Alan had his Solemn Mass of thanks- 
giving with Frs. Kenneth, a class- 
mate, and Matthias respectively as 
deacon and subdeacon. Father Jos- 





Brother Joachim, C.P., Perpetual 

Profession December 8, 1954, 

Chicago, 111. 

eph Mary was the speaker for the 
solemnity. Father Kenneth the other 
Jubilarian offered his jubilee Mass 
solemn Mass on January 20th with 
Frs. Camillus and Benet as deacon 
and subdeacon respectively. Again 
Father Joseph Mary was the preach- 
er for the occasion. Father spoke 
quite inspiringly of the close parel- 
lelism of Christ's priesthood with 
that of the Catholic priest. Guests, 
including diocesan clergy and doc- 
tors were present both at the Holy 
Mass and the banquet following. 



Fr. Cyril, C.P. 



Brother Joachim, infirmarian, has 



186 



has several members of the Commu- 
nity, some regularly, some off and 
on, on the sick list. Around the 
middle of January Father Aurelius 
had to be taken to the hospital, but 
at the present writing is again at the 
monastery, doing fairly well. Also 
Fr. Donald had to have a checkup on 
his heart condition around January 
24. A few days later Fr. Kenneth 
was ordered to the hospital again; 
several days seemed to have been 
sufficient to enable him to take up 
his place again in the retreat. After 
his operation for ulcer, in Rochester, 
Father Thomas is recuperating in 
Immaculate Conception Retreat, and, 
according to reports, is doing pretty 
well. 



The Community Retreat, January 
25 to February 1, by common con- 
sent was an outstanding one. The 
zero weather did not in the least cool 
the enthusiasm and fervor of the 
Community under the direction of 
the Retreat Master, Father David 
Bulman, C.P., of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross. Congratulations 
after the retreat were most sincerely 
given by young and old. Soon after 
the Retreat, February 4, the Pro- 
vincial visitation opened. 



In Park Ridge Parish St. Paul of 
the Cross finally came to his own 
again as Patron of the parish when 
lately his statue was erected on the 
very spot where the original frame 
church stood, where our Fr. Augus- 
tine, years past, served so well. 



ing in this retreat under the chair- 
manship of Very Rev. Father Kyran, 
Moderator of Studies; the purpose of 
the meeting was to plan the work 
for a general meeting of all the Lec- 
tors of the Province to be held in 
the near future. 

HOLY CROSS MONASTERY 

(Cincinnati) 
On January 16th Father Daniel 
Maher, C.P., celebrated his solemn 
Mass of thanksgiving for his twenty- 
fifth sacerdotal jubilee here at his 
home parish. Father Daniel was as- 
sisted at his Mass by his cousins 
Father Roland Maher, C.P. and Fa- 
ther Anthony Maher, C.P. As one 
parishoner remarked five of the 
priests in the sanctuary were voca- 
tions from the parish, the three 
Mahers, Father Gilbert, Rector of 
Holy Cross and Father Francis, 
Vicar of our Retreat in Chicago. In 
his congratulatory sermon Fr. Roland 
with his accustomed eloquence spoke 
of the truly priestly virtues and work 
exemplified in the life of the jubi- 
larian. An outstanding visitor for 
this jubilee celebration was the Most 
Reverend Charles Leo Nelligan, a 
personal friend of Father Daniel. 
Bishop Nelligan journeyed from 
Windsor Canada where he is at pres- 
ent professor of history at Assump- 
tion College. 



On February 24 a committee of 
Lectors of the Province had a meet- 



On January 25 to February 1st 
Father Bernard McDewell, C.P. from 
our Eastern Province conducted the 
annual retreat for the fathers and 
brothers of this monastery. All are 
very grateful to Father Bertrand for 
a solid and practical Passionist re- 



187 



treat. 



off. A "kick-off" rally for this major 
project will be held on March 15. 



Toward the middle of February 
the work of remodeling the monas- 
tery for the use of the retreatants 
began. The priests recreation was 
moved to the library. Five rooms for 
retreatants are being made out of 
the former recreation room. Addi- 
tional toilet facilities and washrooms 
are being made out of the small 
rooms adjoining the sunporches on 
the second and third floors. Three 
rooms are being made out of the 
end sections of corridors, and the 
infirmary rooms are being changed 
into a retreat office and three rooms. 
At the same time the work on the 
elevator is in progress. The lower 
part of the brick shaft is up and the 
windows on the upper stories are 
now being removed. 

In spite of the working conditions 
the retreats continue on the week 
ends. We are told that all the re- 
pairs should be finished by May. 

To beautify the outside appearance 
of the monastery grounds a group of 
outdoor Stations of the Cross are be- 
ing planned. The old concrete hand- 
ball courts are being torn down to 
make room for the stations on the 
south side of the house. 

When the Archbishop was ap- 
proached for approval of the ways 
and means to raise money for the 
financing of the retreat repairs he 
wisely replied, "Let the men of the 
retreat movement take care of it." 
As a consequence the fifty-seven 
captains unanimously adopted the 
plan whereby a ten thousand dollars 
cash prize or one-hundred dollars a 
month for ten years will be raffled 




Our beloved Bishop Cuthbert 
O'Gara chose to make his annual re- 
treat with our Community in Louis- 
ville. All felt it a happy privilege 
to be on retreat with one who has so 
manifestly shared in the Sacred Pas- 
sion of Our Lord. During his stay 
in Louisville, Bishop Cuthbert spoke 
before the entire student foody of 
Bellarmine College and before the 
Xaverian Brothers of St. Xavier 
High. 



The annual retreat from February 
15-22 was conducted by Fr. Howard. 
Fr. Cyril, Fr. Leo Patrick, and Bro- 
ther Thomas were also present for 
the retreat. 

The annual community retreat was 
also the ordination retreat for our 
Students, as word came officially on 
February 17 that they would be or- 
dained to the priesthood with the 
Diocesan Seminarians on March 26. 

Those to be ordained are: Father 
Myron Gohmann of Louisville, Denis 
McGowan of St. Louis, Albert Sch- 



183 



wer of St. Louis, Eugene Peterman 
of Pinelawn, Mo., Lawrence Brown- 
ing of Calvary, Kentucky, Berch- 
mans Pettit of Grand Rapids ,and 
Carl Anthony Tenhundfeld of Cin- 
cinnati. Fathers Myron, Denis, Al- 
bert and Eugene are "originals" from 
the Prep, having taken the entire 
six years there. Fathers Lawrence, 
Bruce, and Berchmans are former 
"G.I.'s, who entered the Prep after 
the War. Fr. Lawrence is the broth- 
er of our Fr. Columban. Fr. Carl 
Anthony was professed a year after 
the rest, but joined the class in Des 
Moines. He and Fr. Jude are the 
sole members of the 1949 Profession 
Class. 

The newly ordained will offer 
their first Masses on Passion Sunday 
in Louisville, and then return to 
their home parishes to sing their 
first Solemn Masses on Low Sunday, 
April 17. The following priests will 
preach at the First Masses: Father 
Herbert for Fr. Myron; Fr. Elmer 
for Fr. Denis; Fr. Faustinus for Fa- 
ther Albert; Fr. Thomas More for 
Fr. Eugene; Fr. Roger for Fr. Law- 
rence; Fr. Leo Patrick for Fr. Bruce; 
Fr. John Stephen, Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross, for Fr. Berchmans; 
Fr. Cyril Mary for Fr. Carl Anthony. 



repainted, and the Delia Robbias in 
the sanctuary were renewed. 



Shortly after the Community Mass 
on the Feast of the Solemn Com- 
memoration of the Passion, the paint- 
ers took over St. Agnes Church and 
are now busily repainting the entire 
interior. The work is proceeding 
rapidly and Father Anselm is assur- 
ed that the renovating work will be 
finished before Holy Week. Previous 
to this work the station altars were 



There has been a marked improve- 
ment in the attendance at the month- 
ly services of the Confraternity of 
the Passion. For over a year now a 
notice has been appearing each 
month in the Record through the 
generosity of Mr. Bill Smith. 



As the last issue of the Passionist 
noted, Father Thomas went to Mayo 
Clinic. He was successfully operated 
on at St. Mary Hospital, and is now 
recuperating at our Chicago Monas- 
tery, where he is stationed. Fr. 
Regis underwent surgery at St. Jos- 
eph Infirmary. He returned to the 
Monastery for the retreat. He is now 
at his mission assignments for Lent. 
Fr. Andrew has returned to the hos- 
pital for further medical care. Fa- 
ther has a fractured vertebrae, and 
must wear a brace. On March 10 he 
was well enough to be brought back 
to the Monastery, but is still very 
weak. After preliminary examina- 
tions it was decided that Brother Leo 
must undergo surgery during Lent. 
His gall bladder was removed March 
8. While he is away, Brother Charles 
is taking care of the boilers, and 
Brother Casimir is doing the cook- 
ing. And then quite unexpectedly 
on Sunday, March 6th, Father Bruce 
was found with a bleeding ulcer; he 
had to be rushed to St. Joseph's In- 
firmary. He is improving nicely and 
will be able to be ordained with his 
class and offer his first Solemn Mass 
on the scheduled date. 

The Community was happy to have 
Very Rev. Fr. Joseph with us for a 



189 



few days. He was accompanied by 
Fr. Alan and Brother Philip. Fr. Jo- 
seph's prolonged sickness has not 
taken the cheer out of his voice, nor 
the smile from his lips. 



On March 5th our Community re- 
ceived a most welcome addition in 
the person of Brother Francis, C.P. 
Brother spent several years at our 
Preparatory Seminary in St. Louis, 
as a student. After careful con- 
sideration he saw his calling among 
our Brothers and had the happiness 
of making his final profession last 
December 8th in the Novitiate, St. 
Paul, Kansas. He is now our Tailor 
and Porter and we hope he will be as 
happy with us in his first appoint- 
ment away from the Novitiate as we 
are in having him with us. 

On March 9, the Feast of St. Fran- 
cis of Rome, Rt. Rev. Msgr. B. J. 
Boland, pastor of the St. Francis of 
Rome parish, Louisville, was burried. 
Msgr. Boland was one of the promi- 
nent men of the Louisville clergy 
and many of the Brethren of our 
Province will remember since; off 
and on we had Lenten courses, mis- 
sions etc. in his parish. 



ST. FRANCIS DE HIERONYMO 
RETREAT 

(St. Paul, Kansas) 
There is not much of the unusual 
to report from this Retreat as of 
now. The old Neosho just keeps 
rolling along. 



By the time all of the Fathers had 
returned from giving their "Year 
End" retreats for the Mercy Sisters, 
Father Provincial arrived for the 



annual visitation which he conduct- 
ed from January 3rd to 7th. So, that 
afforded us another of his enjoyable 
and salutary visits. 



During the visitation, we opened 
the doors to another postulant to 
our brotherhood. He came to us as 
George Juenemann, from Temple 
City, California — now goes by the 
name of Brother Luke of the Bles- 
sed Sacrament. Another product of 
our retreat movement in Sierra 
Madre. 



Around the first of February, Fa- 
ther Hyacinth bade farewell to 
Hutchinson, Kansas, and returned 
to St. Paul with all his pep and en- 
thusiasm. Within less than a week 
Father mustered together some con- 
ferences and preached the monthly 
Day of Recollection for the local 
Clergy. 



At present, Father Leopold is a 
patient in the hospital at Parsons. 
He is there for treatment of a little 
foot ailment which started to bother 
him reecntly. However, we expect 
him to return to the monastery any 
day now. Fr. Matthew is also con- 
fined in the hospital; is doing as well 
as can be expected. 



We have just finished our annual 
Community retreat, given by Father 
John Devany. We all seem to share 
the feeling that any praise of Fa- 
ther's work would be an understate- 
ment. 



190 



GENERAL SURVEY 

OF THE 

MISSIONS OF THE PASSIONIST CONGREGATION 

IN 

1954 





NAME 


SITE 


ENTRUSTED TO 


ORDINARY 


RELIG. SUP. 


1. 


'NICOPILIS 
Diocese 
(1781) 


Bulgaria 


Holy Hope 
Province 


M. R. Eugene 

Bossilkoff, C. P. 

Bishop 




2. 


SAN GABRIELE 

Vicariate 

(1912) 


Peru, 
Maranon 


Sacred Heart 
Province 


M. R. Athanasius 
Jaregui y Goiri 
C.P., Viv. Apost. 


V. R. Fr. John of 

the Sorrowful 

Virgin C.P. 


3. 


YUANLING 
Diocese 
(1922) 


China 


St. Paul of 
Cross Ptov. 


M. R. Cuthbert 

M. O'Gara, C. P. 

Bishop 


V. R. Fr. Linus 

of the Heart of 

Jesus, C.P. 


4. 


TSHUMBE 

Vicariate 

(1930) 


Belgian 
Congo 


St. Gabriel 
Province 


M. R. Joseph A. 

Hagendorens, C.P. 

Vicar Apostolic 


V. R. Fr. Lambert 
Mary of St. 
Theresa C.P. 


5. 


DODOMA 
Diocese 
(1934) 


Tanganyika 
Br. E. Africa 


Immaculate 
Heart Prov. 


M. R. Jeremiah 

Pesce, C.P. 

Bishop 


V. R. Fr. Candid 

of St. Joseph 

C.P. 


7. 


KETAPANG 

Prefecture 

(1946) 


Indonesia 
Borneo 


Holy Hope 
Province 


V. R. Gabriel 
Sillekens, C. P. 
Prefect Apost. 




6. 


MOYOBAMBA 

Prelature 

Null. (1948) 


Peru 


Sacred Heart 
Province 


M. R. Martin Elorza 

Lejaristi, C. P. 

Tit. Bishop 


V. R. Fr. Athanasius 

of the Presentation 

C.P. 


8. 


COROCORO 

Prelature 
Null. (1949) 


Bolivia 


Precious 
Blood Prov. 


M. R. Ubaldo E. 

Cibrian, C.P. 

Bishop 


V. R. Eligius of 

St. Paul of the 

Cross C.P. 


9. 


VAXJO 

Parish 
(1951) 


Sweden 


St. Joseph 
Province 


M. R. John Erik 
Muller D.D. 
Vic. Apost. 


V. R. Fr. Dominic 
of the Holy 
Spirit C.P. 


10. 


KHALE 

4 Missions 

(1952) 


Bechuanaland 
Br. Protect. 


St. Patrick 
Province 


M. R. John 

Boekenfoehr, O.M.I. 

Archbishop 


V. R. Fr. Placid 

of the Blessed 

Virgin Mary C.P. 


11. 


HYOGO-KEN 

Founda'/ion 
(1952) 


Japan 


Holy Cross 
Province 


M. R. Paul Y. 

Taguchi D.D. 

Bishop 


V. R. Matthew of 

the Holy Family 

C.P. 


12. 


NORTH CAROLINA 

3 Missions 

(1928) 


United 
States 


St. Paul of 
Cross Prov. 


M. R. Vincent S. 

Waters, D.D. 

Bishop 


V. R. Fr. Ernest 

of the Cross C.P. 

Provincial 



13. 



ALABAMA 

2 Missions 

(1940) 



United 
States 



Holy Cross 
Province 



M. R. Thomas J. 
Toolen, D.D. 
Archbishop 



V. R. Fr. Nathaniel 
of the Mother 
of Sorrows C.P. 



191 



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Schools 

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Population 



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192 



ST. GABRIEL RETREAT 

(Des Moines) 

Sunday afternoon, February 13, 
the community was summoned to 
Father Ignatius' room, and assisted 
there as Father Rector administered 
Viaticum and Extreme Unction to 
our beloved Golden Jubilarian be- 
fore he was taken to Mercy Hospital. 
Father Ignatius had begun our Com- 
munity retreat the previous Tuesday 
evening, apparently in fine condition. 
But on Wednesday morning while 
vesting for Mass, he fell in the choir 
sacristy and had to be assisted to 
his cell. His strength seemed to im- 
prove, and he did his best to attend 
as many of the retreat exercises as 
possible the next few days. After 
night prayers Saturday evening, how- 
ever, he fell again in his cell. That 
night and the next day the brethren 
took turns watching with him, until 
finally the doctor notified Father 
Rector that the patient was in ser- 
ious condition and should be an- 
nointed and hospitalized immediate- 
ly. 

That night he was placed under 
oxygen, but his blood pressure con- 
tinued to drop so dangerously that 
death was expected at any moment. 
Only Monday evening was the crisis 
arrested, and Father began to rest 
easier. During the next few weeks 
of crisis Brother Edwin stayed with 
him most of the time, relieved off 
and on by some other of the breth- 
ren. On March 11 Doctor Losh per- 
formed an operation on the prostate 
gland. From all appearances it was 
a success, and Father felt much bet- 
ter afterwards. So much so, in fact, 
that at this writing — March 14 — we 



are hopefully looking forward to his 
return to the monastery. 



Provincial visitation and commu- 
nity retreat came to Des Moines in 
rapid succession in late January and 
early February. The fine talks of 
both Very Reverend Father Neil and 
of our Retreat Master, Father 
David Bulman, province of St. Paul 
of the Cross, could not help but in- 
spire us to a higher esteem of our 
Passionist vocation and its place in 
the modern world, together with a 
determination to live it to the full. 
We were happy to have Fathers Con- 
leth, Warren, Clyde, and Loran here 
from other houses to make their re- 
treat with us. 



Mr. John Connolly, father of one 
of our students, spoke on the subject 
of labor unions to an interested au- 
dience of lectors and students on the 
afternoon of February 4. He drew 
on his long experience as a labor 
lawyer to give us a very enlighten- 
ing insight into the problems and 
attitudes of the worker, and also 
commented on the present status of 
the papal encyclicals in the U.S. 
labor union movement. The infor- 
mation, and, we may add, the spark 
of enthusiasm which he imparted to 
us, will be invaluable for our priest- 
ly work. 



That generous smile recently add- 
ed to the professed recreation is 
none other than Father Mel's trade- 
mark. He was transferred here from 
Detroit on February 20, and we are 
all glad to have him among us. 



193 



MATER DOLOROSA RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 

In the last issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST (Jan-Feb p. 52) the infor- 
mation given re preaching "The 
Sign" in the Archdiocese of Los An- 
geles was mis-stated: so far permis- 
sion has not been received. 

Since the last issue of the Passion- 
ist our community has been grieved 
by the sickness of both Fr. Eustace 
and Fr. Dunstan. Fr. Eustace suffer- 
ed several heart attacks while here 
on his Silver Jubilee visit, and had 
to be rushed to St. Luke's hospital. 
Few of the brethren were allowed 
to visit him because it was feared it 
would put an added strain on his al- 
ready weakened constitution. How- 
ever, we learned recently that Fr. 
Eustace will soon be living with us 
in the monastery, and there is every 
hope for his complete recovery. 



Fr. Dunstan also suffered a heart 
attack while at Immaculate Concep- 
tion parish, Sacramento. Since that 
time Fr. Dunstan has been in the 
hospital in Sacramento recovering 
his strength. Within the next few 
weeks he too should be home with 
us in Sierra Madre and on the road 
to recovery. 



The rose garden which is being 
put in at the back of the house near 
the chapel is taking shape gradually. 
It has already been laid out and 
many of the bushes have already 
been planted. Soon there will be 
scenic asphalt paths winding through 
the garden. Besides the planting in- 
volved here, there will also be plant- 
ed some trees along the newly con- 



structed fence separating our pro- 
perty from the Bailey Basin dam pro- 
ject. These trees will be donated 
by the forestry department of Cali- 
fornia. Since the fire last year, the 
road along the dam project suffered 
quite a bit from the rains and the 
work on the dam. This road will be 
completely resurfaced by asphalt, 
and that will make the roadway 
much neater-looking coming up to 
the monastery. 



Fr. Pius gave a television talk on 
Jan. 16, at 9 A.M., for the "Hour of 
Faith." The title of his talk was 
"Happiness in Holiness," and was 
very well received by those who 
heard it. 

ST. JOSEPH RETREAT 

(Birmingham) 

Very Reverend Father Joseph, Rec- 
tor, of the Retreat had an opportun- 
ity to show his well-known grand 
hospitality by being host to several 
distinguished guests. Among these 
was Very Reverend Father Provin- 
cial Ernest of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross. St. Joseph's Re- 
treat is now almost next door neigh- 
bor to the new foundation of the 
Eastern Province in Atlanta, Georgia. 
Honoring Father Provincial on that 
occasion with their presence were 
also Frs. Emmanuel, Wilfried and 
the Fathers from Holy Family, Ens- 
ley. 

Other visitors during the course 
of the past two months were Mon- 
signor Morgan Flaherty, Pastor of 
St. Peter Canisius parish, Chicago, 
and Rev. Father Thomas O'Brien of 
St. Raymond parish in Prospect, 111. 



194 



Father Alan has been made a mem- 
ber of the Community and we are 
happy to state that his health per- 
mits him to temporarily take care 
of parishes etc. 

Monsignor Durick, pastor of St. 
Margaret Parish, Birmingham, has 
been named Auxiliary Bishop of the 
Mobile-Birmingham Diocese and will 
be consecrated March 24th. 

The Brethren at St. Joseph's were 
quite happy to have Father Jerome, 
Vicar of Christ the King Retreat, 
give the annual retreat. His addres- 
ses were quite instructive and in- 
spirational. 

THE PASSIONIST was most hap- 
py to meet Frs. Joseph, Alan and 
Brother Philip in Louisville during 
the week of February 20th. Especial- 
ly was it gratifying to know that 
Very Reverend Father Joseph was 
well enough to stand a trip to and 
from Birmingham in a car. We pray 
that his health will continue to hold 
up. 



CHRIST THE KING RETREAT 

(Citrus Heights) 

While detailed at Holy Spirit 
Church, Sacramento for "Sign" work, 
Father Dusntan, C.P., was stricken 
with an attack of angina pectoris, 
February 5th and had to be taken 
to the hospital. Towards the end of 
February a report told that he was 
doing as well as could be expected 
at the time, but the prospects are 
that a long period of rest will be 
necessary. 

Other Fathers of the Province as- 
signed to "Sign" work on the West 
coast during the season before Lent 
were besides Father Brian, Frs. Fi- 



delis, Flannon, and Keith; these Fa- 
thers made their headquarters at 
Christ the King Retreat, "between 
times". 

Father Arnold, C.P., is also still in 
California. He had the privilege of 
celebrating his Silver Jubilee Mass 
in presence of his invalid mother at 
her home in Milbrae, Calif. The last 
report about his mother was that she 
was doing a bit better. Father also 
is helping with "Sign" work. 

* * * 

The Laymen's Retreat continue to 
be oversubscribed and almost each 
week end sees an overflow crowd. 
Once 47 men announced themselves 
which necessitated placing some of 
them in a nearby motel. The retreat- 
ants are working hard to promote 
another successful Festival this 
spring with the hope of soon starting 
to build another wing to the Christ 

the King Retreat House. 

* * * 

Work is being done at leveling the 
terrain around the entrance to the 
Retreat House from Auburn Blvd.; 
the plan is to beautify also that en- 
trance by the errection of cement 
posts, connected by a chain, along 
the drive. Mr. Jerry Olrich and Bro- 
ther Patrick are about to plant a 
row of cedar trees and blooming vi- 
burnum bushes along the road from 
the front entrance to the house. A 
grateful retreatant has donated some 
fruit trees, which have been planted 
with the other fruit and nut trees 

about the premises. 

* '<• * 

Brother Anthony has been gladly 
received into the Community and we 
are very happy to know that he is 



195 



recovering from his recent illness, 
so much so that he is again able to 
do some light work. 

IMMACULATE HEART RETREAT 

(Japan) 

As of February 10th Father Cle- 
ment writes: The new school term 
started January 10th with nothing 
new or startling. Christmas was ush- 



ered in with a fine Community Re- 
treat conducted by Father Carl. The 
day after Christmas the Sunday 
School personnel of Hibraigaoka pre- 
sented the Christmas Story, in slides, 
and the Catholic version of St. Nich- 
olas. The pictures were interspersed 
with Christmas carols. Quite a few 
of the non-Catholic parents were pre- 
sent and showed interest in what 




Upper left and lower right are scenes taken during the Christ the King 
Celebration, 1954. About 7,000 people turned out for the procession; benedic- 
tion was given in atheletic field of the Sphia University, a Jesuit institution. 
Upper right, Father Peter Claver showing the crib of the Monastery chapel 
to a little pagan girl. 

Lower left "Santa Claus" (a catechumen) and some of the Sunday-school 
children. "Santa Claus" expects to be baptized around Easter time. 



19; 



was primarily presented for their 
children. 

A few days after Christmas a 
"sick-call" came to the monastery. 
The reporter said there was a sick 
woman in a nearby hospital who 
wanted to be baptized, but did not 
say how sick the woman was nor 
how much she knew about the Faith. 
Father Matthew sent Father Clement 
to see her. A Catholic Japanese wo- 
man and another person who also 
spoke English accompanied Father 
Clement to the hospital. One glance 
told Father Clement that the woman 
was dying; but she was still con- 
scious. The Japanese woman inform- 
ed the patient what Father was about 
to do; she expressed her desire, Fa- 
ther baptized her and within 15 min- 
utes the privileged lady was dead. 

Father Matthew writes that his 
impression of Japan right now is 
that the devil has a pretty good hold 
on it. Japan is very progressive in 
practically every way and apes the 
West in almost everything, yet she 
remains almost completely pagan. 
The older people stick to their old 
superstitions while the younger ones 
seem to be content without any re- 
ligion at all. 

From different sources we were 
most happy to hear that Father Carl 
now preaches in Japanese and also 
has faculties to hear confessions in 
Japanese. 

We owe the pictures from Japan 
here give to the kindness of Father 
Paul. 

OUR CHAPLAINS 

Father Kenny's address, given in 
the "Latest flashes" of the last issue 



of THE PASSIONIST, did not give 
us the least idea of where he was 
stationed. Since then he wrote us 
that he is now at the headquarters of 
the USAREUR Communications Zone 
in Orleans, France. It is the head 
office of all France and consequent- 
ly "I am at my desk most of the day: 
more like a Vicar, Rector or Direc- 
tor of Students than my former as- 
signments. However, we have a chap- 
el near by and a room set apart for 
the reservation of the Blessed Sac- 
rament." 



In a letter dated February 24th 
Father Lucian tells us he is looking 
forward to a transfer to Japan. His 
address will be: FPO 955, San Fran- 
cisco. He is to be stationed at the 
Naval Air Station in Iwakuni, Japan. 




Midnight Mass, Christmas 1954, 
Cove Springs. Father Lucian, 
officiating. 



197 



The Station is about 5 hours by train 
from our Immaculate Heart Retreat 
in Hibarigaoka. He says "It seems 
strange, but I'll be closer to the 
brethren when I am in Japan than 
I have been in the States". Father 
also mentions that of late attendance 
at Holy Mass has been much better 
in Green Cove Springs; so he will 
leave this post with a feeling that 
after all his work was not in vain. 

In a letter of March 2 Father 
Xavier writes from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital, Northport, 
N. Y. where he has been stationed 
for the past six months as chaplain. 
The hospital is located about fifty 
miles from New Yark City going 
East, out on Long Island; it is on 
the North shore of the Island, about 
six miles East of Huntington, within 
the limits of St. Philip Neri Parish 
in Northport and about forty miles 
from our Monastery in Jamaica. 

There are about twenty-five hun- 
dred patients in the hospital. Some 
of them are veterans of the First 
World War. About fifteen hundred 
are Catholic and about five hundred 
of these are able to assist at Holy 
Mass but not all of them are in a 
mental condition to enable them to 
receive the Sacraments. 

During the eleven years that Fa- 
ther served in the Navy he was sta- 
tioned in four different hospitals. 
Before this present assignment he 
dealt with healthy minds and sick 
bodies; in his present charge the 
majority have healthy bodies but 
sick minds. Often it is only when a 
patient is on the seriously ill list that 
the Sacraments can be administered 



and then at times only conditionally. 

There is another priest, Father 
Ciani, of the Albany Diocese, sta- 
tioned with Father Xavier in the 
hospital. Father Ciani has been work- 
ing there for some nine years and 
thus is aquainted with the work and 
also the workings of the V. A. This 
is quite a help for Father Xavier. 

Although a mental hospital, Father 
thinks much good can be done with 
those "exceptional" children of God 
(Archbishop Cushing). There are 
"men here who are living saints . . . 
hearing their confession often re- 
minds me of first communicants". 
But they must remain there because 
some little thing might "set them off 
on their idiosyncracy, even to the 
point of violence". 

Father ends his letter with an ex- 
pression of deep appreciation of the 
hospitality of the Brethren in Ja- 
maica. When he visits them "I am 
as one of the Community". Father 
appreciates also very sincerely every 
letter from the Brethren, especially 
his classmates, "they give me a tre- 
mendous uplift". 



OUR PARISHES 
IMMACULATA CHURCH 

(Cincinnati) 

We are sorry that in the Jan.-Feb. 
issue of the PASSIONIST we relayed 
wrong reports. On page 60 we spoke 
of the "tin work on the roof renew- 
ed". As a matter of fact the interior 
roof structure of the Immaculata 
had been repaired, all the tin on the 
top of the roof was removed and 
hauled away and in its place the 
roof was covered with fire-proof 
shingles. The City Safety Commission 



198 



insisted on this. Now the roof of the 
church looks much more beautiful 
than formerly. The work recently 
done had "nothing to do with tin" 
nor primary anything to do with the 
roof. It was an entirely new job and 
a job in copper to the cost of $2,000. 
The front and rear walls of this 
church extend up beyond the roof, 
in fact the famous statue is standing 
on the top of the front wall of the 
church. These two walls are covered 
with coping stones through which 
water has been seeping ever since 
the church was built in 1859. It is 
these coping stones on top of the 
walls in the front and rear of the 
church which were recently covered 
with 16 oz. copper sheeting to keep 
the walls dry. Up to the time that 
this work was done the front and 
rear interior walls needed yearly 
plastering and painting as far back 
as the people can remember. Some 
forty years ago a pastor covered these 
symptoms for 6 feet from the floor 
with marble slabs. The problem has 
now been finally settled with the 
recent "copper" job. Beyond this by 
order of His Grace, the Archbishop, 
a gas-oil heating system is to be in- 
stalled into the church this coming 
spring. 

Zealous Father Cyprian, however, 
is not wholly tied up with "material" 
improvements. His Parish Bulletin 
shows that he is having a special eye 
on the youth of the parish. He also 
has over 40 persons above the age 
of 70 who need and get his ministra- 
tions in their home. 



HOLY CROSS CHURCH 

The Solemn Novena to St. Gabriel 



was preached this year by Father 
Finan Storey, C.P. from our Des 
Moines monastery. The novena 
though far from being attended as 
in former days of the parish was in- 
strumental in instructing the people 
again in the power of their chosen 
patron in heaven, and in bestiring 
the embers of devotion to St. Gabriel 
particularly among the children and 
youth of the parish. 

Discussion is under way to revive 
the former St. Gabriel Council of 
the Knights of Columbus here in the 
Mt. Adams area. 



ST. GEMMA CHURCH 

(Detroit) 

The good news comes from Father 
Patrick, Pastor of St. Gemma's that 
the new building is complete but for 
minor touches. Men of the parish are 
building altar, confessionals, com- 
munion rail, vestment case etc. Fa- 
ther hopes to have the first Holy 
Mass in the new church on the first 
Sunday in May. School is also in 
danger of soon being overcrowded. 
There are 540 pre-school age chil- 
dren in the parish and it is easily 
possible that next September two 
rooms will be needed for the first 
grade. 



PASSIONIST NUNS 

The Nuns in St. Joseph Monastery, 
Owensboro write quite enthusiastic- 
ally of their annual retreat (Febru- 
ary 11-18) conducted by Fr. Arthur, 
C.P. Showing love for our Crucified 
Savior by fidelity in small things was 
one of the themes of the retreat 
which they appreciated very much: 
Let your love be expressed in action. 

199 



Since the Nuns in Owensboro live 
rather distant from any Monastery 
of the Passionist Fathers, retreat 
time is about the only time they have 
any conferences or sermons from 
one of our Fathers and they are very 
grateful for having had such fervent 
and saintly retreat masters so far. 
Soon after the retreat the Nuns 



were destined to have quite a dis- 
appointment: Bishop Cuthbert, C.P. 
had announced his coming to visit! 
them, but had to cancel his appoint- 
ment on account of being suddenly 
called to Pittsburgh, Pa. in view of I 
the death of Sister Christina, S.S.J., 
who had been Superior of the Sis- 
ters of St. Joseph in Hunan China. 




Some views of Hongkong harbor and surroundings. Upper right corner 
shows (on top of hill) the Mary knoll House, Stanley, Fr. Anthony Maloney'sj 
address. Bottom left corner is the chapel of the refugee camp in Hongkong.! 



200 



Province of St. Paul of The Cross 



V. Rev. Fr. Provincial, C.P. 

Passionist Monastery 

Union City, N. J. 

February 22, 1955 
Dear Father Rector: 

No doubt, all the Brethren know 
that the Province of St. Paul of the 
Cross is now producing a weekly 
radio program called — "The Hour of 
the Crucified". Although not yet one 
year old, this program is being car- 
ried by 131 stations each week, and 
it reaches many millions of listeners. 
Consequently, it opens to us the 
largest audience we have ever had, 
and provides us with an extraordin- 
ary opportunity to extend our great 
work of preaching the Passion of 
Christ. Recently, this program re- 
ceived the unusual commendation of 
being selected by the Armed Forces 
Radio for transmission to the men 
and women of the Armed Services 
throughout the world. We have been 
informed by the Pentagon that it is 
carried by a net-work of 72 A-l sta- 
tions each week, and that through 
this Government net-work, it has an 
audience of 'several millions'. 

Because we are keenly conscious 
of the unique opportunity this af- 
fords us to preach the Word of God 
and the Passion of Our Lord, we wish 
to make known to the Brethren that 
this is an official undertaking of the 
Province, and merits the cooperation 
of all. The unusual success of the 
Jesuit "Sacred Heart Hour" must be 
attributed, in no small measure, to 
the cooperation of the Jesuits every- 
where in getting this program on the 
air. So, too, we Passionists should 



cooperate by helping, directly or in- 
directly, to interest more radio sta- 
tions in carrying OUR program; by 
recommending "The Hour of the Cru- 
cified" to our relatives and friends; 
and by referring to it whenever feas- 
ible in the various works of the min- 
istry, particularly in our own parish- 
es and retreat houses. The Provin- 
cial and the Brethren of our Western 
Province have been most cooperative 
in this new venture, and we feel con- 
fident the members of our own Pro- 
vince will give it their wholehearted 
support also. 

Sincerely in J.X.P., 
Ernest of the Cross, Provincial 
P.S. We are enclosing some of the 
comments typical of those we re- 
ceive daily, and also a list of some 
of the stations broadcasting "The 
Hour of the Crucified". 
After this letter is read in the re- 
fectory, please post it on the bul- 
letin board until all have had an 
opportunity to read it. 
The Armed Forces Board of Selec- 
tion wrote from the Pentagon: "We 
find 'The Hour of The Crucified' an 
excellent program in every way, and 
the kind of well-balanced program 
we like to beam to our Armed Forces. 
It is not controversial, but solidly 
helpful and inspiring. The quality of 
the music is of unusual caliber." 

Mr. John Mounteer — Manager of 
Radio Station WVDA— Boston, Mass.: 
"We regard your program as the best 
religious program we carry, because 
of its fine balance. It is certainly the 
one which brings us the most favor- 
able comment. We are honored and 



201 



proud to have been permitted to 
carry it, and we look forward to 
broadcasting this program for years 
to come." 

Mr. John Vondell — Radio Station 
WREB — Holyoke, Mass.— "The listen- 
ers' response to 'The Hour of The 
Crucified' has brought us an all-time 
high at this station. We find it in- 
credible that in two weeks 3,347 re- 
quests should have reached us for 
your picture of Christ on the Cross. 
Your program is firmly enshrined 
on our calendar. We want to hold 
on to it always." 

Mr. William Beaton — Manager- 
Station KWKW— Pasadena, Californ- 
ia. "Your program is the 'different' 
kind of religious broadcast for which 
we have been looking. It is not 'Pious' 
in the obnoxious sense of the word, 
but it is solidly religious. What in- 
terests us is that we get as many 
comments from people who inform 
us that they are non-Catholics as we 
do from co-religionists. The mail 
which comes to us from this one pro- 
gram is very considerable. We thank 
you for giving us this program." 

Mr. Arthur Deters — Manager— Ra- 
dio Station WIDE— Biddeford, Maine: 
"We have been greaatly surprised by 
the enthusiastic response to your pro- 
gram, 'The Hour of The Crucified'. 
When we took it on, we thought it 
would be (no offense intended) — just 
another 'religious show'. It is a wel- 
come surprise for us to find out that 
it has aroused considerable interest. 
Since you asked us for the reactions 
of our audience, I can tell you that 
most of our comments indicate a 
keen interest in the 'Question-and- 
Answer', and the fine quality of the 



music. 
Mr. F. Colyer Snyder — Kingston, 

N.Y.: "We are a Methodist-Lutheran 
household, yet we all agree that we 
have never heard a finer broadcast 
than the new year program on 'The 
Hour of The Crucified'. The writer 
has more than thirty years of exper- 
ience in coast-to-coast platform lec- 
turing, yet he candidly admits that 
the talk given on this broadcast by 
Father Rice, the director of the pro- 
gram, was the finest talk ever heard 
anywhere." 
We List Here Some of The Stations 
Now Carrying the "Hour of 
The Crucified" 

The Armed-Forces Network of 
Seventy Stations 

Station WBEC, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Station WIDE, Biddleford, Maine 

Station WFMJ, Youngstown, Ohio 

Station HOLA, Christobal, Panama 

Station KWKW, Pasadena, Calif. 

Station WVDA, Boston, Mass. 

Station WMMN, Fairmont, W. Vo. 

Station WKBW, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Station WSAR, Fall River, Mass. 

Station CJEM, Edmundson, N. B., 
Canada 

Station (Call letters not known) 
Houlton ,Me. 

Station WREB, Holyoke, Mass. 

Station WTOR, Torrington, Conn. 

Station WPTS, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Station WSCR, Scranton, Pa. 

Station HOL (Short Wave) Chris- 
tobal 

Station WPTX, Leonardtown, Md. 

Station WSOU-FM, So. Orange, 
N.J. 

Station WGKV, Charleston, W. Vaj 

Station WJMJ, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Station WGRM, Greenwood, Miss. 



202 



Station WKRG, Mobile, Alabama 
Stations (2) on Formosa (Nat'l. 
China) 



PASSIONISTS LEAVE FOR NEW 
MISSIONS IN JAMAICA, B.W.I. 

UNION CITY, N. J., March 7— Five 
American Passionists will leave New 
York aboard the S.S. Platano on Fri- 
day, March 18, for Jamaica, B.W.I., 
where they will establish a new Pas- 
sionist Foundation, it was announced 
today by the Very Rev. Ernest Welch, 
C.P., Provincial. 

The missionaries are the Very Rev. 
Canisius Hazlett, C.P., 1st Provincial 
Consultor, and the Rev. Cormac Shan- 
ahan, C.P., both of St. Michael's Mon- 
astery here; the Rev. William Whal- 
en, C.P., Vicar, Our Lady of Sorrows 
Monastery, West Springfield, Mass.; 
the Rev. Callistus Connolly, C.P., cu- 
rate, St. Gabrield's Monastery, Bos- 
ton, Mass., and the Rev. Anthony 
Feeherry, C.P., St. Gabriel's Monas- 
tery, Toronto, Canada. Father Haz- 
lett will lead the mission band to 
Jamaica, and remain there for an 
undetermined stay. 

At the invitation of the Most Rev. 
John J. McEleney, S.J., Victar Apos- 
tolic of Jamaica, the Passionist Fa- 
thers of the Eastern U. S. Province 
of St. Paul of the Cross, will estab- 
lish their first West Indies founda- 
tion in Jamaica. They will take over 
from the Jesuit Fathers the church- 
es and mission stations in the two 
counties of Manchester and St. Eliz- 
abeth, a combined area of 814 square 
miles in the southwest part of the 
island, with a population of 219,828, 
and two parishes in the Capital City 
of Kingston. Headquarters for the 



interior missions will be located at 
St. Luke's Central Mission in Man- 
derville, and at St. Elizabeth's Rec- 
tory in Kingston. 

The Caribbean foundation is the 
fourth foreign mission established by 
the American Passionist — Mexico, 
China, Japan and Jamaica. They also 
have colored missions in North 
Carolina, Alabama and Georgia. 

The departing priests bring to 
their new mission a wealth of ex- 
perience acquired during years of 
peace and war. Fathers Shanahan 
and Whalen are veteran China Mis- 
sioners; the former interviewed Mao 
Tse Tung in the caves of Yenan in 
1944, and the latter was a prisoner 
of the Japanese in China. Fathers 
Connolly and Feeherry are decorated 
World War II chaplains who went 
through the bitterest campaigns in 
Europe and the Pacific. 

As a China missionary, Father 
Cormac Shanahan was one of 15 
correspondents who, after year-long 
waiting, penetrated the Communist 
stronghold in northwest China to in- 
terview Mao Tse Tung and Chou 
En-lai in the caves of Yenan during 
World War II. A fearless missionary, 
he worked among the aboriginal 
Miao tribe of West Hunan in the 
Passionist Mission of Yuanling, and 
is one of the few foreigners who can 
speak the little-known dialect of the 
Miao tribesmen. 

Father Cormac's priestly career 
has spanned three decades and three 
continents. He spent a total of 14 
years in China (1926-1934 and 1939- 
45) where, during World War II, he 
served in the war-time capital of 
Chungking, as a contract chaplain 



203 



with the U.S. Army Air Force and 
as editor of "China Correspondent", 
a Catholic review popular among 
American soldiers there. 

In 1950, he was assigned to Rome 
by Passionist Provincial Ernest 
Welch and placed in charge of the 
guest house at Sts. John and Paul 
Monastery, headquarters of the 
World Passionists. Two years later 
he was transferred to Paris as curate 
at St. Joseph's Passionist Church. He 
returned to the States in 1953 and 
has since been stationed in St. 
Michael's monastery, Union City, N. 
J., and at Immaculate Conception 
Monastery, Jamaica, Long Island, 
where from 1948 to 1950 he was as- 
sistant director of the Bishop Mal- 
loy Retreat House. His China ser- 
vice was interrupted in the late '30's 
when he was recalled to fill the po- 
sition of Procurator of the Mission 
Department of "The Sign", national 
Catholic monthly. 

Born June 14, 1899, in Brockton, 
Mass., he is the son of the late John 
J. and Ellen Burke Shanahan, both 
of County Cork, Ireland. He was 
professed a Passionist in 1919 at St. 
'Paul's monastery, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
and after studies at Passionist Mon- 
asteries in Dunkirk, N.Y., Scranton, 
Pa., and Union City, N.J., was or- 
dained a priest December 19, 1925 in 
Seton Hall College Chapel, East 
Orange, N.J., by the late John Jos- 
eph O'Connor, of Newark. 

He is a brother of William J. 
Shanahan, South Braintree, Mass., 
and Mrs. Florence McColgan and 
Mrs. W. J. Davey, both of Dorchester, 
Mass. 

When Father Whelen left for 



China on Christmas Day 1940, little* 
did he suspect that less than a year 
later, his missionary activities would 
be curtailed by four long harrowing 
years. 

He was in Peking that fateful De- 
cember 7, 1941 when the Japs attack- 
ed Pearl Harbor, and the following 
four years were spent as a prisoner 
of war instead of a missionary. After 
V-J Day, he went to Chungking, 
China's war-time Capital, where hei 
served as a contract chaplain with 
the U.S. Army Air Force. Later in' 
1945, he joined his colleagues in 
West Hunan, and for the next three 
years served as secretary to the 
Most Rev. Cuthbert M. O'Gara, C.P., 
Bishop of the Passionist Diocese of 
Yuanling. He returned to the States 
in September 1948 and spent the 
succeeding nine months at Imma- 
culate Conception Monastery, Jama-' 
ica, N.Y., as a member of the mission; 
band. In 1949, he was assigned to! 
the Passionist Mission in Mexico 
City, remaining there until 1952 ; 
when appointed Vicar of Our Lady; 
of Sorrows Monastery, West Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Father Whelan comes from a fam- 
ily of 10 children, three of whom 
entered religious life. He was born 
February 22, 1912, in Jersey City, 
N.J., the son of Joseph and Char- 
lotte Vogel Whalen for whom hef 
celebrated a Mass of Thanksgiving, 
on January 6, this year on the oc-; 
casion of their 55th wedding anni-, 
versary. His parents live at 133 Za- 
briskie St., Jersey City. 

A graduate of St. John's school in 
Jersey City., he began his priestly 
studies in 1925 at Holy Cross Pas- 



204 



ionist Monastery, Dunkirk, N.Y. He 
was professed a Passionist August 
L5, 1931, at Our Lady of Sorrows 
Monastery. After studies at Passion- 
ist monasteries in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Baltimore, Md., and Boston, Mass., 
tie was ordained a priest May 30, 
L938 at St. Gabriel's Passionist Mon- 
astery Church, Brighton, Mass., by 
Francis Cardinal Spellman, then 
auxiliary bishop of Boston. 

He is a brother of Michael, George, 
lames and Thomas Whelan, Mrs. 
Gertrude Heaney and Sister Rose 
Marie, O.P., a teacher at St. John's, 
ill of Jersey City; Sister Michaeleen, 
3.P., a teacher at Caldwell College, 
Daldwell, N.J.; Mrs. Frederick Staub, 
^ew Brunswick, N.J., and Mrs. Wil- 
iam Heaney, Rutherford, N.J. 

Father Callistus Connolly, C.P., 



had been in Adelaide, Australia, for 
almost three years as a member of 
St. Paul's Passionist Monastery when 
the Japs attacked Pearl Harbor. Then 
came the news that Corregidor had 
fallen, and Father Connolly left the 
sanctuary of his monastic home to 
join General MacArthur's Army as 
a Chaplain. By V-J Day, Father 
Connolly had participated in some 
of the bitterest campaigns of the 
Pacific, including New Guinea and 
the Philippines. After the Armistice, 
he served with the occupation forces 
in Japan. One of the most highly 
decorated chaplains of the Pacific, 
he was awarded the Purple Heart, 
the Bronze Star, the Silver Star, and 
four campaign medals. He was dis- 
charged with the rank of Major in 
1946. Since his return to the States, 




Fr. Anthony, C.P. 



Fr. William, C.P. 



Fr. Cormac, C.P. 



205 



he has been stationed at St. Joseph's 
Monastery, Baltimore, McL, and Our 
Lady of Sorrows Monastery, West 
Springfield, Mass., 1946-47, and as 
a curate at St. Gabriel's Monastery 
Church, Boston, 1947 to present. 

A native of Taylor, Pa., Father 
Connolly was born January 18, 1911, 
the son of Edward and Bridget Nee 
Connolly, both deceased. He began 
his priestly studies in 1925 at Holy 
Cross Preparatory Seminary, Dun- 
kirk, N.Y., and was professed a Pas- 
sionist August 15, 1930 at Our Lady 
of Sororws Monastery. After studies 
at Passionist monasteries in Boston, 
Jamaica, N.Y., and Scranton, Pa., he 
was ordained a priest April 20, 1939, 
at St. Mary's Monastery Church, 
Dunkirk, by the late Bishop John A. 
Duffy at Buffalo. Following his or- 
dination, he was assigned to the 
Passionist Monastery in Adelaide, 
Austrailia. 

He is a brother of Francis and 
Gerald Connolly, both of Buffalo; 
Joseph and Mary Connolly, both of 
Bridgeport, Conn., John Connolly, 
Syracuse, N.Y.; James Connolly, De- 
troit, Mich., and Mrs. James Ruddy, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Father Feeherry was born May 3, 
1911 in Worchester, Mass., the son 
of the late Patrick and Elizabeth 
McManns Feeherry. A graduate of 
St. Peter's high school in his native 
city, he began his priestly studies in 
1928 at Holy Cross Passionist Semi- 
nary, Dunkirk, N.Y. He was pro- 
fessed a Passionist September 25th, 
1931 at Our Lady of Sorrows Mon- 
astery, West Springfield, Mass., and 
ordained a priest May 30, 1938, at 
St. Gabriel's Monastery Church, 



Brighton, Mass., by Francis Cardinal i 
Spellman of New York, then auxili- 
ary bishop of Boston. 

With the exception of three years 
as an Army chaplain during World 
War II, Father Feeherry has spent: 
most of his priestly career as a mem- 
ber of the Passionist Mission Band 
preaching retreats and missions in 4 
chur .ies throughout Eastern United 
States. He has been stationed ati 
Passionist monasteries in Boston, 
Mass., Scranton, Pa., Jamaica, N.Y., 
Baltimore, Md., and Union City, N.J.: 
Last year, he was assigned to thei 
new St. Gabriel's Passionist Monas- 
tery in Toronto, to preach missions 




Fr. Callistus, C.P. 



206 



and retreats throughout Canada. 

During World War II, Father Fee- 
herry served with General Patton's 
Third Army in France and Belgium, 
participating in many of the major 
campaigns, including the Battle of 
the Bulge. He holds several decora- 
tions for exceptionally meritorious 
service. 

He is a brother of Mrs. John F. 
Daniels, David and Edward Fee- 
herry, all of Worchester, Mass.; Mrs. 
Bernard Horgan, Fitchburg, Mass., 
and Thomas Feeherry, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Father Hazlett is widely known as 
a missionary. He has preached many 




V. Rev. Fr. Canisius, C.P. 



parish missions and retreats to re- 
ligious throughout Eastern United 
States. Since his election in 1950 as 
1st Provincial Consultor, he has 
traveled extensively in Europe, the 
Near East, Central America and the 
Caribbean. In 1952, he attended the 
General Chapter of the world-wide 
Passionist Congregation in Rome. 
Last year, he went to Jamaica, B.W.I, 
to negotiate the establishment of a 
Passionist Foundation there, which 
has now become a reality. 

Born April 21, 1910, in Walpole, 
Mass., the son of the late James Haz- 
lett and Mrs. Joanna Mahoney Haz- 
lett, of Walpole, he attended Wal- 
pole high school, and Holy Cross Pas- 
sionist Seminary, Dunkirk, N.Y. He 
was professed a Passionist August 
16, 1929, at Our Lady of Sororws 
Monastery, West Springfield, Mass., 
and ordained a priest on May 30, 
1936, at St. Michael's Monastery 
Church, Union City, N.J. by the Most 
Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., Bishop 
of Yuanling, China. 

In 10 years, Father Hazlett rose 
from Director of Students to 1st Pro- 
vincial Consultor, having served in 
the interim as Director of Students 
at St. Ann's Monastery, Scranton, 
Pa.; Vice Master of Novices at St. 
Paul's Monastery, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
and as Rector of the Scranton and 
West Springfield monasteries. 

Father Hazlett was first elected 
Provincial Consultor in 1950 at the 
Provincial Chapter held at St. Gab- 
riel's Monastery, Boston, Mass. He 
was reelected in 1953. 

He is a brother of James and 
Thomas Hazlett, both of Walpole, 
and Miss Mary Hazlett and Mrs. Carl 



207 



Smith, also of Walpole, and Mrs. 
David Conley of Boston, Mass. 

GOLDEN JUBILEES 

Two members of the Province 
celebrated their Golden Jubilee of 
Profession on March 7. 

FATHER WILLIAM HARDING, 

C. P., of the Riverdale community, 
was born in Dunkirk, N. Y., in 1888. 
He entered the Preparatory College 
then located at St. Mary's Monastery, 
Dunkirk, in 1903. On March 7, 1905, 
he was Professed and ordained by 
Bishop Colton in the Buffalo Ca- 
thedral in 1912. 

Father William's first assignment 
was to the Preparatory College which 
had been moved to Baltimore in 1912 
and as Vice Director and Director 
he remained attached to the Prep 
until Holy Cross College was opened 
in 1920 when he was appointed Vicar 
of the new house. There followed 
a Lectorship in Union City and a 
curate's assignment in Baltimore 
and Union City. In 1924 the Jubila- 
rian became the first Retreat Direc- 
tor at the new Immaculate Concep- 
tion Monastery, Jamaica, Long Is- 
land. There, Father William pio- 
neered the lay retreat movement 
which has become one of the spirit- 
ual mainstays of the Diocese of 
Brooklyn. From the seed implanted 
in 1924, there has flowered the 
monumental Bishop Malloy Passion- 
ist Retreat House. 

During Father William's tenure 
as pastor at Baltimore, 1927-1942, a 
new and magnificant parish church 
was erected. Over the years, the 
Jubilarian won the admiration and 
enjoyed the friendship of the late 



Archbishop Michael J. Curley. For 
three years, beginning in 1943, Fa- 
ther William journeyed the United 
States and Canada as Field Repre- 
sentative for the national magazine 
published by the Passionist Fathers, 
The Sign. Since then he has been 
engaged in preaching missions and 
retreats. 

On March 1, Father William was 
the guest of honor at a small Jubilee 
Dinner at St. Vincent's Monastery, 




Fr. William Harding, C.P. 



208 



Riverdale. The gracious and genial 
superior, Father Benedict Huck, C. 
P., welcomed Father Provincial and 
the Rector of Union City, Father 
Berchmans Lanagan, C.P., and sev- 
eral other members of the Province 
who have been closely associated 
with the Jubilarian through the 
years. 

Father William sang a Solemn 
Mass of Thanksgiving on March 6 in 
St. Joseph's Monastery Church, Bal- 
timore, where he had been pastor 
for fifteen years. V. Reverend Clem- 
ent Buckley, C.P., Rector of the 
Baltimore Monastery preached the 
sermon. A reception was held in the 
parish hall in the afternoon. 

FATHER MARTIN FORD, C.P., 
the other Golden Jubilarian, was 
honored by the Province on March 
7 but without the direct participation 
of the Jubilarian himself. Father 
Martin has lain in a hospital bed for 




Fr. Martin Ford, C.P. 



the past sixteen years, the victim of 
a stroke, and for the past year or 
more had lost complete lucidity of 
mind. 

Father Martin was born in Hobo- 
ken, N.J., in 1885 and Professed on 
March 7, 1905. He was ordained by 
Bishop O'Connor of Newark in St. 
Michael's Monastery, on December 
21, 1912. 

The Jubilarian spent the earlier 
years of his priesthood assisting 
Bishop Paul Nussbaum in Corpus 
Christi Diocese, Texas. Later he 
served as curate in St. Michael's, 
Union City. While he was mission- 
ary at times, he was better known 
as an excellent house man, always 
ready for any assignment that came 
his way. His genial disposition and 
extraordinary sense of humor made 
him a favorite in any house wherein 
he was stationed. A fine musician 
and organist, Father Martin until 
stricken, usually played and sang 
the High Masses during the week. 

After his seizure he carried on an 
apostolate in the hospital, often be- 
ing wheeled into the rooms of dif- 
ferent patients to console and con- 
vert them. Gradually his illness 
progressed to a sad point when he 
lost both his legs. So he comes to 
his Golden Jubilee in the apostolate 
of suffering. 

SILVER JUBILEES 

Eleven members of the Province 
celebrated the Silver Jubilee of Or- 
dination on March 15. The Jubilar- 
ians are: Fathers Stephen Paul Ken- 
ny, pastor of St. Michael's Parish, 
Union City; Frederick Joseph Har- 
rer, Provincial Secretary; Bernardine 



209 



Gorman, Immaculate Conception 
Monastery, Jamaica; Leo Joseph 
Berard, China missionary and Chap- 
lain of the Kennedy Home, Brighton; 
Linus Lombard, recently released 
from house arrest in China and ex- 
pelled by the Communists; Celestine 
McGonigal of Pittsburgh; Gabriel 
Jaskal of Pittsburgh; Paul Mary Car- 
roll of St. Mary's, Dunkirk; Mark 
Seybold of St. Mary's Dunkirk; Ar- 
thur May of Baltimore and Justinian 
McLaughlin of St. Michael's, Union 
City. (The next issue will carry de- 
tails of the Jubilee celebrations.) 

BISHOP CUTHBERT 

His excellency Bishop Cuthbert 
preached in St. Patrick's Cathedral, 
New York, at the closing of the 
Church Unity Octave on January 18. 
A tremendous congregation filled 
the huge edifice as the Bishop spoke 
on "The Missionary Conquest Of The 
World For Christ". His Eminence, 
Thomas Cardinal Tien, exiled Arch- 
bishop of Peiping, presided. Several 
mission Bishops attended and almost 
the entire community of St. Mich- 
ael's, Union City, were seated in the 
sanctuary. Before the services, His 
Excellency Bishop Cuthbert and Fa- 
ther Provincial were guests of Card- 
inal Spellman for dinner at His Emi- 
nence's residence, New York. 

TRANSFERS 

Father Provincial has transferred 
the Office of Provincial Chronicler 
from Riverdale to St. Michael's 
Monastery, Union City. To replace 
Father Bonaventure Griffiths, Chron- 
icler, as a member of the Riverdale 
community, the Editor of the "Sign 



Post", Father Aloysius McDonough, 
S.T.D., was transferred from Jama- 
ica. Father Emmanuel Gardon, a 
graduate of the Catholic University 
School of Library Science, has been 
appointed Librarian of St. Michael's 
Monastery, Union City. Father Cyril 
Feeley, former Mission Secretary, 
has moved to Hartford. 



Father Aloysius McDonough, C.P., 
Secretary of the American Catholic 
Theological Society announces the 
publication of the "Proceedings of 
the Ninth Annual Meeting of the 
Catholic Theological Society of 
America." Copies are $3.00 each and 
may be obtained from Father Aloy- 
sius, 5801 Palisade Avenue, New 
York 71. N. Y. 



An elevator has been installed in 
St. Michael's Monastery, Union City. 
This has been found to be a great 
convenience, especially to the older 
members of the community. With 
ready access to all floors it was pos- 
sible this year to accomodate visitors 
for the annual retreat even on the 
fourth floor. The engineers who in- 
stalled the elevator maintain that 
the four floors of St. Michael's are 
equivalent to a modern nine story 
apartment building. 



A heavy Lenten schedule is in full 
swing. At least three hundred and 
fifty Provincial appointments for 
missions, retreats and novenas have 
gone out of the Provincial Office. 



On January 9th Father Wilcox, 
S.J., of Fordham, celebrated a By- 
zantine Mass in St. Michael's Monas- 



210 



tery Church. The Students assisted 
in the elaborate rite and sang beau- 
tifully the responses, many of which 
were in English. The faithful at- 
tending this Mass were privileged 
to receive Holy Communion under 
both Species. 



Recently on five different Sun- 
days, a Day of Recollection was held 
for the Catholic Servicemen from 
Fort Monmouth, N. J.; three Voca- 
tional Groups and the male cast of 
"Veronica's Veil" at St. Michael's 
Monastery, Union City. 



The Province of St. Paul of the 
Cross seems to have scored another 
record in the Congregation. It is 
quite possible that this record is 
unique in the history of any religious 
order. There are in the Province at 
the present time four sets of three 
blood brothers, eighteen sets of two 
blood brothers and four religious 
whose own brothers in the Province 
have died. Among the deceased of 
the Province there are two sets of 
three blood brothers and six sets of 
two brothers. 

Deceased are the famous Baudi- 
nelli brothers, John Luke, John 
Philip and John Baptist; the Kelly 
brothers, Lay-brothers Gabriel and 
Edmund and Father Fabian who was 
professed in the Province but or- 
dained in the Western Province; the 
twins Frederick and Charles Lang, 
the later becoming the first Provin- 
cial of Holy Cross Province; Lay- 
brothers Stephen and Raymond 
Rohe; Fathers Lawrence and Mark 



Moeslein; Walter and Edmund 
Campbell (the latter was the first 
Passionist to die in China); John 
Baptist and Joseph Kerr; Mark and 
Augustine Cotter. 

Living brothers with a departed 
brother are Bernard Hartman whose 
brother Caspar is deceased; Wende- 
lin Meis whose Brother Cyril died 
recently; Mark Seybold whose bro- 
ther Clement was killed by bandits 
in China and Dunstan Stout whose 
brother Theadore is dead. 

Brothers alive in the Province are 
the Grand brothers, Dominic, Al- 
phonsus and Bernardine; the Carroll 
brothers, Alban, Hugh and Ronan; 
the Free brothers, Conran, Daniel 
and Henry; the Regan brothers, Co- 
lumkille, Cronan and Cyprian. 

There is one set of twins, Julian 
and John Joseph Endler; the seven- 
teen other pairs are Damian and 
Hilarion O'Rourke; Isidore and Gil- 
bert Smith; Gabriel and Ralph Gor- 
man; Jeremias and Benedict McNa- 
mara; Cronan and Joseph Leo Flynn; 
Roland and Alexander Hoffman; 
Thomas Aquinas and Cajetan Sulli- 
van; Alfred and Bertrand Weaver; 
Adrian and Harold Poletti; Reginald 
and Hubert Arliss; Edgar and Leo 
Francis Vanston; Basil and Timothy 
Stockmeyer; Gabriel and Cajetan 
Bendernagel; Anselm and Aelred 
Lacomara; Cornelius and William 
Davin; Edmund and Francis Hanlon; 
Alexis and Columban Hewitt. 

Other blood relations, past and 
present, among the members of the 
Province, such as uncles, nephews 
and cousins are also quite numerous. 



211 



LETTER FROM FATHER JUSTIN 
GARVEY, C.P., FROM PRISON 
CELL SOMEWHERE IN CHINA 

January 9, 1955 
Very Rev. Ernest Welch, C.P., 
St. Michael's Monastery, 
Union City, N. J. 
Dear Father Provincial: 

Through the auspices of the Peo- 
ple's Red Cross Society of China, 
your package reached me yesterday 
afternoon. It is a true gift in every 
sense of the word, and I am grateful. 
Many, many thanks! 

You will be pleased to know each 
item as listed on the custom's declar- 
ation arrived safely and in good con- 
dition. What is more, I am now per- 
mitted to keep the package here in 
my cell, free to dip into it at will. 
You cannot know adequately all that 
this means, except for me to tell 
you that it is truly wonderful. Every- 
thing you sent I am able to use, all 
of which comes as a good diet sup- 
plement. Already I have worked out 
a little rationing plan to spread the 
package out over the days when it 
can fill the gap of a lunchless noon 
hour. Yesterday, however, was an 
exception, as I had a private gaude- 
amus almost as soon as I received 
your gift. What a treat to put a 
generous helping of boneless chicken 
over my evening rice. That bowl 
was truly a-la-king! And the coffee! 
Although the water in my bowl may 
not have been steaming, still the 
powdered coffee put into it worked 
like a charm, providing my first 
drink of something other than na- 
ture's own. It was tops! Even the 
candies have a value besides their 
good taste. In this winter weather 



they come in handy for giving a 
quick spurt to dampened bodily heat 
and energy. And so it will go for 
those tins I have yet to sample, each 
a treat in its own way. All I can say, 
Father Provincial, is thank you and 
may God bless you! 

Best gift of all, however, is the 
realization your package comes as 
the material expression of your 
spiritual solicitude and care. Of this 
I have no doubt, counting much on 
the spiritual works of Your Pater- 
nity and all the Brethren, in my re- 
gard. This thought of your continu- 
ed Masses and prayers is for me a 
source of great peace, and something 
of which I have great need. At times, 
in the past, I have failed spiritually 
on more than one score, lacking the 
fortitude and resignation I should 
have had. And now, I make no final 
claim to these virtues, realizing full 
well I can only sustain them in their 
ultimate measure through complete 
reliance on daily prayers. That is 
why I say, I lean heavily upon your 
support in this regard, — again, even 
though least worthy, as long as I 
remain over here, I am still a China 
Missioner. As such, though, I try 
to place myself completely in the 
hands of Providence, now having no 
futher hope, desire or design. Thus, 
if my vocation is in the apostolate 
of reparation, I accept it all as part 
of the Divine Will. If this is what 
God wants of me, then, in this I take 
confidence. All I ask is prayers to 
know God's Will, prayers to follow 
it, and prayers to be able worthily 
to fill up in myself those things that 
are wanting in the Passion of Our 
Lord. Meanwhile, I try to do my 



212 



part, giving you and all the brethren 
a full share in the daily offerings, 
prayers and mediations that go to 
fill out the long hours. May it all, 
somehow, serve God's Glory and His 
designs for each of us. 

Physically, I am not too badly off. 
My health of late has been going in 
ups and downs, but for the most 
part, I am managing well enough, 
with no complaints. Last Fall a 
recurrence of my chronic ear condi- 
tion gave me considerable trouble. 
However, a very competent inmate 
physician was permitted to make 
regular visits to my cell, and after 
some days, along with penicillin, the 
pressure and pain was reduced to a 
minimum, where it has remained. 
Outside of these occasional physical 
setbacks which all receive care in 
due time, I have no other material 
needs. I write this that you may 
know clearly how I am, hoping 
thereby to allay any fears you may 
have on these points. I likewise 
hope that I shall not in my way be a 
cause of worry or concern to you, 
now or at any time. 

I trust, Father Provincial, that 

these few lines will find you well. 

I thank you for your gift, and all it 

cannotes. Again, I am ever grateful 

to Your Paternity and the Brethren 

for your spiritual interest in me. 

Every best wish to yourself, to your 

Fathers Consultors, and the entire 

Province. May God be your reward, 

and that of the Brethren, too, until 

the day we all meet again in Him! 

Asking you blessing, I am 

Sincerely in Christo, 

(signed) Justin, C.P. 

I wish to thank here, the People's 



Government of China, the People's 
Red Cross Society of China, and the 
International Red Cross Society, 
through whose joint co-operation the 
above mentioned food-parcel was re- 
ceived by me, and through whom 
this correspondence is made possible, 
(signed) Rev. Justin Garvey, C.P. 
(Letter airmailed from Peking, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1955 via Canton, February 
11, 1955; received Union City, N.J., 
February 15, 1955.) 
Envelope marking: 
"Attention: 

People's Red Cross Society 
Peking, 
China." 

UNION CITY, N. J., Feb. 21— 
The Rev. Justin Garvey, C.P., one of 
two remaining Passionist mission- 
aries jailed three years ago by the 
Chinese Reds, is alive in a "prison 
cell somewhere in China", according 
to word received by Passionist Pro- 
vincial Ernest Welch. 

News that the Grantwood, N. J. 
priest is alive came in the form of a 
letter believed to be in his own hand- 
writing — the only word to be re- 
ceived by his superiors since he 
dropped from sight after his arrest 
December 21, 1951. Dated January 
9th this year and airmailed from 
Peiping February 8th, the letter con- 
tained a communication that he ask- 
ed be forwarded to his mother, Mrs. 
Martin J. Garvey of West Covina, 
Calif. 

Passionist officials credit efforts 
of the State Department which last 
month, at the request of Father 
Welch, queried the Peiping Govern- 
men whether Father Garvey and his 



213 



colleague, the Rev. Marcellus White, 
C.P., of Waltham, Mass., imprisoned 
February 21, 1952, were alive. 

The State Department was asked 
to query Peiping, Father Welch said, 
when no acknowledgement was re- 
ceived from either of the two priests 
for gift boxes of clothing, food and 
medicine mailed to them through 
the Chinese Red Cross. He said he 
appealed to the State Department 
after being informed by Mrs. Jennie 
Deacy White of Waltham, Mass., 
that she had received a brief note 
purportedly written by her son. The 
letter was received by Mrs. White 
shortly before Christmas and she 
has since received other letters from 
her son, Father Welch said. He 
pointed out however, that in none 
of the letters was there mention of 
having received the gift boxes sent 
him and Father Garvey. 

State Department officials further 
disclosed that while confirmation 
had been received from the Peiping 
Government that Father White is 
alive, repeated requests to visit Fa- 
ther Garvey and talk to him have 
been denied. 

A firm belief that he will never 
leave China alive was strongly in- 
dicated by Father Garvey who wrote 
"... if my vocation is in the aposto- 
late of reparation, I accept it all as 
part of the Divine Will." 

"As long as I remain over here, I 
am still a China Missioner. As such, 
I try to place myself completely in 
the hands of Providence, now having 
no further hope, desire or design. 
All I ask is prayers to know God's 
Will, prayers to follow It, and pra- 
yers to be able worthily to fill up in 



myself, those things that are wanting 
in the Passion of Our Lord." 

The 39 year-old priest said that he 
had received but one package. He 
wrote: 

"Through the auspices of the Peo- 
ple's Red Cross Society of China, 
your package reached me yesterday 
afternoon. It is a true gift in every 
sense of the word, and I am grate- 
ful. Many, many thanks!! 

"You will be pleased to know each 
item as listed on the custom's dec- 
laration arrived safely and in good 
condition. What is more, I am now 
permitted to keep the package here 
in my cell, free to dip into it at will. 
You cannot know adequately all that 
this means, except for me to tell you 
that it is truly wonderful. 

He concludes his letter with a post- 
script which Passionist officials be- 
lieve was dictated by his Red cap- 
tors: 

"I wish to thank here, the People's 
Government of China, the People's 
Red Cross Society of China, and the 
International Red Cross Society 
through whose joint cooperation the 
above-mentioned food parcel was re- 
ceived by me, and through whom 
this correspondence is made possi- 
ble." 

"The Tidings", of Los Angeles, 
carried the following extracts from 
the letter of Father Justin to his 
mother inn West Covina, Calif.: "My 
health is sufficiently good, and, all 
things considered, I am managing 
well enough under the present cir- 
cumstances . . . There are few occa- 
sions happier than that of a pleasant 
surprise, and this is one of them; a 



214 



pleasant surprise for me to be able 
to write to you and an equal sur- 
prise, I am sure., for you to receive 
this . . . Take care of yourself. Keep 
as well as you can. Try not to worry 
about me. Let this incident of my 
package settle any doubts you may 
have. As each day I place you in 
God's loving care, so do you also 
place me, while each of us sees in 
our separation the manifest Will of 
God . . . Remember, God cannot be 
outdone in generosity, and you have 
given only living son to Him, of 
which He is never unmindful . . . My 
quarters, while small, provide ample 
space for some daily exercises . . . Up- 
on my sleeping plaryform I use a 
cotton mat which provides a bed 
equally as good as our monastic 



horses and boards. I have the use of 
my sleeping bag, which is warm even 
in the coldest weather . . . Keeping 
close to God, keeps us close to each 
other. Thus whether we are all home 
together or whether we are separat- 
ed by half a world; whether we cor- 
respond or not, it should make little 
difference fundamentally . . . Thus in 
our separation, and even periods of 
silence, no matter how long or final 
these may be, you'll always know my 
love for you is equally long and 
made stronger by time . . . Have faith 
and courage, have no fears for me. 
God be with you, God bless you al- 
ways. God grant you his love and 
grace until that day we meet again 
in Him! ... I give you my blessing, 
and now ask yours." 




Around the World CP. 



PALESTINE 

Good Father Pius, C. P., Superior 
of our retreat in Bethany writes an 
interesting letter to THE PASSION- 
IST, dated January 25th. He tells 
us that in Bethany they are in a 
mission territory, living amongst a 
population mostly mohammedan, who 



are quite prejudiced and by no 
means disposed to enter the Church 
of Jesus Christ. This is a cause of 
great sorrow that in the very land 
where Jesus lived and worked out 
the Redemption and established the 
Church, the missionaries find their 
hands tied by the prejudice of the 



215 



Musselman and the hatred of the 
Schismatic. 

It is true that the Latin Patriarch 
of Jerusalem has started many par- 
ishes in all Palestine and Trans jor- 
dania, but in spite of this catholics 
remain by far a scattered minority. 
The few converts are almost exclus- 
ively from Orthodoxy. The Mussel- 
man remains so far most refractory 
to Catholocism. 

Nevertheless the heroic Mission- 
aries., both priests and Sisters who 
live and work among the Mohame- 
dans have their consolations. Even if 
they have few, if any, conversions 
from the numbers of the adult, they 
do have opportunities to baptize 
many a child in the moment of death 
and send them to heaven to be in- 
tercessors for their own native land. 
This is the case for instance in the 
nearby Dispensary of the Sisters of 
Charity. 

Last November 13th in our own 
little chapel of St. Martha we had 
the great joy of baptizing a little 
Mohamedan boy, a quite exceptional 
thing. A little group of the faithful 
attended the unusual ceremony of 
an adult baptism. Now the little lad 
is preparing to receive his first Holy 
Communion during the month of 
Mary. 

At times one can almost feel the 
presence of grace when at the most 
unusual hours musselman mothers 
come from a very great distance to 
the Dispensary to get some help for 
their little child, which is in a dying 
condition. Help is given in much 
greater measure and meaning than 
the mother requests. They receive 
the grace of baptism. 



PRESENTATION PROVINCE 

(Italy) 

In the early hours of January 4th 
of this year Monte Argentaro be- 
came alive with pilgrims climbing 
the mountain up to St. Joseph's Re- 
treat to attend the Solemn Mass and 
to receive the Sacraments. It was 
the 25th anniversary of the death 
of Father Nazarenus of Mary Imma- 
culate (Santolini), C.P., who had been 
Master of Novices some 30 years on 
Monte Argentaro and died in the 
Retreat of St. Joseph January 4, 
1930 on the same Monte Argentaro. 

At 10:00 A.M. Solemn Requiem 
High Mass was celebrated in the 
presence of Bishop Galeazzi; Very 
Reverend Father Hyacinth, Secre- 
tary General, who made his Novitiate 
under Fr. Nazarenus, had the sermon 
in which he expressed the hope to 
see the Servant of God raised to the 
honors of the altar. After the "Lib- 
era" all went to the sepulchral crypt, 
midway between the Retreat of St. 
Joseph and that of the Presentation 
on the Mount, to pay respects to the 
remains of the Servant of God. After 
that the Bishop gave a sermon ex- 
tolling the virtues of Father Naza- 
renus and mentioning the blessings 
he had brought to the vicinity. The 
crowd of both laity and clergy that 
were present for the occasion show- 
ed that Fr. Nazarenus' memory is 
still alive. 



On September 24th, 1954 Very 
Reverend Father Generoso of the 
Crucified, C.P., celebrated the Gol- 
den Jubilee of his ordination. For 
many years Father Generoso had 
been spiritual director of the Servant 



216 



of God, Lucia Mangano, and also for 
thirty years confessor at the dioce- 
san Seminary of Catania, Sicily. Lu- 
cia Mangano had fortold that a Pas- 
sionist Retreat would be built in 
Mascalucia, Sicily; two wings of the 
Retreat have already been built on 
the spot fortold by the Servant of 
God and the occasion of the Golden 
Jubilee of her Spiritual Father was 
taken to lay the corner stone for the 
Mater Dolorosa Church in connection 
with the Retreat. The Jubilee cele- 
bration and the ceremony of the 
laying of the cornerstone of the 
church was honored with the pres- 
ence of five Bishops besides many 
other dignitaries and faithful. 

PROVIDENCE OF THE PIETA 

(Italy) 
From September 27 to 30, 1954 
the Province of the Pieta sponsored 
its second (the first was in 1953) 
Congress of Passionist Studies. Pa- 
pers were read by members of the 
different Italian Provinces; also sev- 
eral of the Provinces were repre- 
sented in the audience. The theme 
of this Congress was Mary in the 
Passionist Spirituality. The titles of 
some of the papers were: Mary in 
the Spirituality of a Passionist; Mary 
in the Spirituality of St. Paul of 
the Cross; Marian Spirituality in the 
Province of the Pieta; Mary in the 
life of St. Gabriel; Mary in the Pas- 
sionist Apostolate, etc. 



Novices, tells us that at the close 
of the Marian Year they looked upon 
the past twelve months as months 
full of graces and blessings from the 
Blessed Mother. In the first place 
during the Marian Year the new 
building at the Province's Prepara- 
tory Seminary was solemnly dedi- 
cated, an account and picture of 
which was given in the July 1954 
PASSIONIST. October last brought 
the number of Preparatory Seminar- 
ians to 38, a quota never before 
reached in the Province. Then on 
September 28th the first vestition 
ceremony for quite some time was 
held in the Province. On September 
14th four Preparatory Seminarians 
entered the Novitiate and are now 
known as: John Michael of our Lady 
of Holy Hope, Herve of our Lady of 
Confidence, Marcellus of our Lady 
of the Snows and Frank of our Lady 
of the Way. (Our Lady of the Way is 
the Patroness of the Boy Scouts of 
France). 



PROVINCE OF ST MICHAEL 

(France) 
Our corespondent from the Prov- 
ince of St. Michael, the Very Rever- 
end Father Henri, C.P., Master of 



On January 13th, a departure 
ceremony was held at our Prepara- 
tory Seminary in honor of Father 
Julius Durkan, of the Province of 
St. Paul of the Cross. Father Julius 
has endeared himself to us very 
much by his great interest in our 
Province. Through his kindness we 
feel indebted not only to him but to 
all his brother Passionists in the 
United States. On said January 13, 
Father came to our Preparatory 
Seminary in Longeron accompanied 
by several of his soldiers and also 
Fathers Louis and Germain, Fathers 
of our Province who helped Father 
in his chaplaincy work. Father Jul- 



217 



ius offered a Solemn High Mass as- 
sisted by Fr. Henry, Master of Nov- 
ices as deacon and Fr. Etienne, Vice- 
Master as subdeacon. The singing 
was done under the able direction 
of our Father Joseph, by the Pre- 
paratory Students and the Novices 
who had come to the Seminary for 
the day. Present at the services 
were also our Very Reverend Father 
Provincial, Pol-Joseph, Fr. Econome, 
Benoit, Fr. Vicar, Pierre, Fr. Flor- 
entin, a Doctor of Louvain and not 
least Fr. Gabriel who was a sort of 
master of ceremonies for the day. 
After the Holy Mass there was a 
little banquet for all with the usual 
toasts, skits by the students. The 
whole celebration served to streng- 
then the bonds of charity between 
the Brethren in France and the 
United States. 

PROVINCE OF THE SACRED 
HEART 

(Spain) 
The number of vocations in the 
Province of the Sacred Heart moved 
the Superiors to undertake the erec- 
tion of a new Preparatory Seminary 
in Amorebieta-Euba, Vizcaya, Spain. 
On October 24th 1954 Holy Mass was 
celebrated by the Local Ordinary on 
the spot where the new building is 
to arise and after the Holy Mass His 
Excellency laid the corned stone. 



PROVINCE OF ST. GABRIEL 

(Belgium) 
The Province of St. Gabriel within 
the last few years has been privi- 
leged over many other Provinces in 
the fact that thew are receiving quite 
a few young men for our Lay-broth- 



erhood. On February 14th, the Vigil 
of the Feast of the Solemn Comme- 
moration of the Sacred Passion of 
our Lord, they had the joy and bles- 
sing of professing four Lay Brothers: 
Brother Remy of the Immaculate 
Conception, Brother Paulinus of St. 
Rita, Brother Baldwin of the Sorrow- 
ful and Immaculate Heart of Mary, 
and Brother Isidore of the Holy 
Family. Brother Baldwin is from 
the French-speaking district of Bel- 
gium wheras the other three Broth- 
ers are from the Dutch section. (If 
you have read the life of Saintly 
Brother Isidore of St. Joseph, you 
will remember that one his difficul- 
ties was learning French after he 
had been transferred to a retreat in 
French section of the Province.) 
The solemn ceremony of profession 
opened at 10:00 A.M. with Very Rev- 
erend Father Bernardine Mary, Pro- 
vincial as celebrant, Very Rev. Fr. 
Achiel, Rector of the Novitiate Re- 
treat, deacon and also representa- 
tive of the Dutch-speaking part of 
the Province and Very Rev. Fr. Lu- 
cian, Rector of Ere and representa- 
tive of the French-speaking section 
of the Province; Rev. Fr. Walter, 
Vice-Master was master of ceremon- 
ies and Brothers Marin, Anthony and 
Albert acted as servers. Very Rev. 
Fr. Lucian gave an eloquent and 
fitting sermon for the occasion, 
speaking fifteen minutes in Dutch 
and fifteen minutes in French. Rev. 
Fr. Hypolite, during the toling of 
the bell read the Passion according 
to our Ritual. The whole beautiful 
rite ended with a hym (Dutch and 
French) in honor of the Blessed 
Mother beautifully sung by the stu- 



218 



dents and novices under the able 
direction of Father Walter. It was 
the first time in the history of the 
Province (started in 1924 when it 
was separated from Holland) that 
on one single occasion four Brothers 
made their profession. February 14, 
the day eventful day, was also by 
happy coincidence the Feast of St. 
Valentine, the Feast day for more 
than 25 years of the late Father 
Valentine, Provincial, founder of the 
Monastery and Novitiate. At present 
the Novitiate of St. Gabriel at Kruis- 
houtem has seven professed Lay 
Brothers, two Postulants and one 
Novice, Brother Marin, vested De- 
cember 1st. 

PROVINCE OF THE IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION 

(Argentina) 
In the recent Provincial Chapter 
(closing February 28) Most Rever- 
end Father Albert Deane, C.P., for- 
mer Father General, was elected 
Provincial of the Province; Very 
Reverend Father Ignatius Fagan was 
reelected first Consultor and Very 
Reverend Father Gerard Pez, C.P., 
second Consultor. Very Reverend 
Father Stephen Quaine, C.P. was re- 
elected Rector of Holy Cross (Bue- 
nos Aires), V. Rev. Fr. Louis Dolan, 
C.P., elected Rector of St. Paul (No- 
vitiate) and V. Rev. Fr. Norbert 
Canedo, C.P., Rector of Holy Rosary 
(house of Studies). THE PASSION- 
IST offers its sincerest congratula- 
tions to the newly elected, especially 
to Most Reverend Father Albert, who 
during his Generalship was most en- 
couraging towards the work of THE 
PASSIONIST (vide PASSIONIST 



1948 page 429) and to Very Rever- 
end Father Ignatius, who often sup- 
plied us with interesting items of 
news from the Province of the Im- 
maculate Conception. 

Father Peter Richards, C.P., for- 
mer Second Consultor, is now free 
to devote his entire time to work on 
Cana Conference work and the Chris- 
tian Family Movement. This work 
in the past has given him many op- 
portunities to give Retreats. Voca- 
tions are badly needed in Argentina 
which has a population of some 150 
million Catholics and only 25 thous- 
and priests. The work Father is do- 
ing for the spiritalizing of the home 
life will help the vocational problem. 



From the daily papers all our read- 
ers are aware of the persecution go- 
ing on in Argentina, bloodless it is 
true, but nevertheless quite effica- 
cious. Laws have been passed to 
legalize prostitution, divorce, elimi- 
nation of religion in the schools, 
equal rights for illegitimate child- 
ren, prohibition of religious meet- 
ings and a systematic campaign to 
make catholic life (whether in the 
educational, cultural or apostolic 
field) almost impossible. Let us not 
forget to include our Brethren down 
there in our prayers. 

PROVINCE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 

(Australia) 
On the Feast of the Conversion of 
St. Paul, Jan. 25th, nine clerical 
novices were clothed in the Holy 
Habit at our Novitiate House, Goul- 
burn, N. S. W. This is the largest 
group received for some years. A 
fortnight later, Feast of the Purifi- 



219 



cation of Our Blessed Lady, Confs. 
Fidelis and Luke made their First 
Profession, and are now at Glen Os- 
mond, S.A. ploughing through their 
first year Philosophy. 

During the past couple of months 
we have acquired two new founda- 
tions: one in the Archdiocese of 
Brisbane, Queensland, and the other 
in the Archdiocese of Melbourne, 
Victoria. The first is ideally situat- 
ed in the surburb of Oxley, about 
eight miles from the city of Bris- 
bane and will be known as Regina 
Coeli Retreat; the second, which is 
to be called Mater Dolorosa Retreat, 
is in the Melbourne suburb of East 
St. Kilda. Vacant possession of each 
house will be granted in April when 
a small community will take up resi- 
dence. 

In the near future it is expected 
that four members of our Province 
will leave for New Guinea to work 
with the Divine Word Fathers in the 
Vicariate of Madang, of which Bish- 
op Noser, S. V. D., is the Vicar- 
Apostolic. If the work is blessed by 
God, as we confidently expect, and 
our numbers increase, we hope to 
send more men from our Province 
to join our pioneer foreign mission- 
aries in New Guinea, and eventually 
to be strong enough to take over a 
section of this huge Vicariate. The 
prayers of our Brethren in other 
Provinces are earnestly sought that 
Our Divine Lord and His Holy 
Mother will bless this work and those 
who are about to enter into it. 



PR. BLOOD PROVINCE 

(Spain) 
During the International Marian 



Congress in Rome last October, Fa- 
ther Basil of St. Paul of the Cross, 
C.P... Province of the Precious Blood, 
and Secretary of the Spanish Na- 
tional Marian Society, had the honor 
of reading a paper on the question 
of the Death of the Blessed Mother. 

PROVINCE OF OUR LADY 
OF HOLY HOPE 

(Holland) 

Our Fathers in Mook, Holland 
rendered a gigantic ovation to the 
Blessed Mother for the close of the 
Marian Year, December 8th. In the 
early afternoon of said date the two 
Passionist Communities of Mook as- 
sembled in the Chapel of their Pre- 
paratory Seminary for Solemn Ves- 
pers. After Vespers all went to the 
'aula' for the Marian Year Sympo- 
sium. Both the papers and the 
singing was done by the students of 
Theology and the Students of the 
Minor Seminary. The program end- 
ed with a mystery play composed by 
Fr. Amadeus, C.P., member of the 
Province. The music was supervised 
by Father Luke, C.P., graduate of the 
Cecelia Academy in Rome. 

At 8:00 P.M. public services were 
held in the Monastery church. Very 
Rev. Father Ambrose, C.P., Rector 
had taken great pains to train the 
children for this occasion and his 
efforts were crowned with success. 
A group of little girls dressed in 
white and blue with lighted torches 
prayed and sang in front of the 
"throne" of the Blessed Mother; af- 
ter their procession through the 
aisles of the church in the name of 
all they renewed their baptismal 
vows and the consecration to Mary 



220 



our Mother. Then the congregation 
sang their favorite Marian hym to 
Mary Star of the Sea. The whole 
ceremony closed with a solemn High 
Mass at which many of the faithful 
received Holy Communion. 



For Lent twenty-four Fathers of 
the Province have been detailed for 
Lenten sermons in 55 different 
churches, one of which is the Cathe- 
dral Church in Roermund. 



Father Hubert Litjens, C.P., form- 
er pastor at Semmering in the Ger- 
many Five-Wound Province returned 
to Holland February 22nd and found 
to have cancer of the lung. 



The happy beginning of the new 
convent of the Missionary Sisters of 
St. Gemma (vide PASSIONIST, Jan- 
Feb. 1955, page 95) was saddened 
February 24th by the sudden and 
unexpected death of Sister Mary 
Paula of the Cross (Cornelia Eliza- 
beth Mestrom). A few days before 
her death she had complained of a 
severe headache and the doctor ord- 
ered some medicine for relief; her 
death seems to have been caused by 
a hemorrhage of the brain. She was 
only 28 years of age and in the third 
year of her religious life. Solemn 
Funeral services were held in the 
convent chapel February 28th; the 
Passionist Theological Students of 




Closing of the Marian Year in C.P. Church, Mook, Holland. 



221 



Mook formed the choir. She has a 
brother - priest, Father Maurice Mes- 
trom, working in the Borneo C.P. 
mission. 



We ARE VERY HAPPY TO AN- 
NOUNCE THAT THE 3,000 QUO- 
TATIONS FROM THE LETTERS OF 
ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS AR- 
RANGED ALPHABETICALLY 
WILL IN ALL PROBABILITY BE 
SOON OBTAINABLE IN PRINTED 
FORM. COPIES (UNBOUND) WILL 
COST APPROXIMATELY 5 OR 6 
DOLLARS. ORDERS CAN BE MADE 
DIRECTLY TO: BROTHER LAM- 
BERT, C.P., (THE COMPILER), 
PATERS PASSIONISTEN, MOOK, 
HOLLAND. 

CALVARY PROVINCE 

(Brazil) 
February 21, 1954 Very Reverend 
Father Bonaventure of Mary, Pro- 
vincial of the Calvary Province offer- 
ed Holy Mass on the spot where the 
new St. Paul of the Cross Prepara- 
tory Seminary for the Province is 
to be erected. After the Holy Mass 
the Vicar General of the Diocese 
blessed and laid the corner stone of 
the new building. 

VICE-PROVINCE OF THE 
FIVE WOUNDS 

( Germany-Austria ) 
Some time ago we received a quite 
informative letter about some of the 
grand activities of the struggling 
Province in Germany and Austria. 
Father John 'a Maria Regina' (pro- 
fessed 1930) is doing gigantic mis- 
sion work, almost single handed in 
the Province. During one 8 day 



Mission beyond the regular mission 
sermons note was taken of the fact 
that he was in the confessional 84 
hours! The records show that he con- 
ducted 23 convent Retreats and dis- 
persed in between days of recollec- 
tion etc. A spectacular event it must 
have been when some 30,000 pilgrims 
on their way to the famous pilgrim- 
age church 'Maria Eich' passed by 
our church in Munich-Pasing; group 
by group of these pilgrims stopped 
in front of the church to hear a ser- 
mon by Father John. The loudspeak- 
er system was out of order, so there 
in the open, under the chestnut trees 
our missionary satisfied all by 
preaching to all on their way to 
Maria Eich. A personal specialty of 
Father John is what he calls "Buss- 
wochen", Pennance-weeks. We are 
trying to get more information on 
what these are. 

In Maria Schutz the number of pil- 
grims visiting our church are in- 
creasing so fast that parking space 
is becoming a real problem. To those 
who have ever been at Maria Schutz 
it will be of interest to know that 
the Passionists no longer have charge 
of the parish at Semmering. Maria 
Schutz is the red zone of Austria; 
two Russian Guard posts are station- 
ed within walking distance of our 
monastery. But there are no longer 
annoiances along that line. Voting 
is now actually free in Austria, the 
papers do (to the surprise of every- 
one) give the truth etc. The red 
flag is seen only here or there on 
private property. Of course the sit- 
uation is quite different in Hungary, 
East Germany etc. 

A new venture, which it will be 



222 



interesting to watch, was started in 
Schwarzenfeld, Holy Trinity Retreat, 
a postulate for lay-brothers was 
opened. The boys who express their 
intentions of becoming brothers are 
sent daily to different "masters" to 
learn a trade in the village. They 
are not to enter the Novitiate till 
they have learned a trade, e.g. car- 
penter, gardener etc. Father An- 
drew, C.P., member of the Vice- 
Province is in charge of the boys 



and so far the experiment seems to 
be working very well. 

VICE PROVINCE OF THE 
ASSUMPTION 

(Poland) 
On October 31, 1954 six members 
of the Vice-Province were raised to 
the Holy Priesthood in the episco- 
pal chapel by His Excellency Thad- 
deus Paul Zakrzewski, Bishop of 
Plock. 




na 



NOTICE: As of March 12th the 
telephone number for St. Joseph's 
Retreat, Birmingham, Alabama, is: 
Tremont 1-3266. 

One of the magazines printed in 
Italy under Passionist auspices tells 
that on November 21st, 1954, Solemn 
Matins were held in the Basilica of 
Sts. John and Paul, Rome, in pres- 
ence of the Blessed Sacrament 
solemnly exposed. 

In the small village of Verezzo di 
Sanremo, Italy, the Passionist Sis- 
ters inaugurated a movement to pro- 
cure a statue of "Regina dei Passion- 
isti" for the local church. The statue 
was solemnly blessed last Septem- 
ber 19 with a large gathering of 
clergy and faithful. A solemn tri- 




duum was held in preparation for 
the occasion and many received the 
Sacraments. A procession with the 
statue carried through the streets 
ended the ceremony. A picture of 
the "Regina dei Passionisti" was 
carired in the November issue of 
THE PASSIONIST, page 570, also on 
the front cover of the May issue. 

The "Revue de la Passion", Pas- 
sionist periodical of the Province of 
St. Michael, tells us that in the near 
future a chapel in honor of St. Paul 
of the Cross will be dedicated in the 
cathedral of Christ the King, Liver- 
pool, England; it is to serve as cen- 
ter of prayer for the conversion of 
England and the return of Angeli- 
cans to the unity of the Roman Cath- 
olic Church. 



223 



The Brethren will be quite pleased 
to know that Father Raphael's life 
of St. Pius X, "A Good Shepherd He 
Was" is now released in its second 
printing. The cover was made over 
and is very attractive; naturally it 
now is subtitled "The Life of Saint 
Pius X, since the first edition had 
Blessed Pius X. There is also an 
additional and final chapter added: 
A Providential Saint, which brings the 
work up to date with the Canoniza- 
tion. The booklet can be obtained 
from the Abbey Press, St. Meinrad, 
Ind. for 35c. 

Father Columban, C.P... Director in 
St. Gabriel's, Des Moines, has told 
us that "Cross and Crown" has ac- 
cepted the Autobiography of St. 
Gemma (translated by Father Co- 
lumban) for publication. Vide PAS- 
SIONIST, July 1954. 

Father Fidelis Rice, C.P., Lector 
of Sacred Eloquence in Our Lady of 
Sorrows Retreat, West Springfield, 
Mass and also Director of the 'Hour 
of the Crucified' is writing down and 
giving others, besides his students, 
the benfit of his teaching. The first 
volume of his "We preach Christ 
Crucified" is completed in mimeo- 
graphed form. The mimeograph 
work is done most neatly and most 
easy on the eye. This first volume 
deals with the basic object of all 
preaching; the different kinds of 
sermons we are called upon to 
preach; the structure of Sunday ser- 
mons, Passion motives and Passion 
meditations, with a brief resume of 
some of the theological and scrip- 
tural details of the Passion. The 



second volume, he tells us, will tell 
us about the "big" sermons; Forty 
Hour sermons; High School Retreats 
and Festive sermons, such as for 
Christmas, Easter, Jubilees, etc. 
From this brief description it is clear 
that Father gathers together ideas on 
sermons for occasions that perhaps 
are no where else treated, or if so, 
in various places hard to lay ones 
hands on. Father also covers all oc- 
casions where WE are called upon 
to preach. And he is up to date, tak- 
ing into consideration even the, of 
necessity, "short" Sunday sermon. 
The typography and arrangement of 
matter is excellent and the style and 
manner of presentation of matter is 
exceptionally clear. For this review- 
er the book read as interestingly as a 
novel and he thinks that will be the 
case for any preacher and emphati- 
cally so for any Passionist preacher. 

Father Paolo Luigi, C.P., respon- 
sible editor of our ACTA CONGRE- 
GATIONIS sent THE PASSIONIST 
an interesting little Marian Year 
Booklet of some 64 pages and ob- 
tainable at Sts. John and Paul, Rome. 
It contains a collection (in Latin) of 
aspirations taken from the works of 
St. John Damascene on the Blessed 
Mother. The work is divided into 
31 chapters, one for each day in the 
month. The work was first published 
in 1863 by Father Peter Mary of 
Jesus (Foglietta,) C.P. Its present 
'imprimatur' restricts it to the use 
of members of our Congregation. 
The very flowry and highly poetical 
invocations to the Blessed Mother 
might prove very helpful to certain 
types of souls. 



224 



The February issue (1955) of The 
Clergy Review contains an article by 
Father Aidan Baker, C.P. of the 
English Province on "Saint Gabriel 
of Our Lady of Sorrows". 

Fr. John Mary, C.P., Lector in Des 
Moines has continued his publication 
of things Passionistic with a trans- 
lation of "A Saint's Last Letter" from 
the pen of St. Gabriel. This letter 
appeared in January, 1955 issue of 
the Review for Religious. 

Fr. Barnabas Mary contributed a 
discussion "On Teaching Osee" in 
the January issue of the Catholic 
Biblical Quarterly. His paper was 
part of a panel discussion on the 
methods of teaching Scripture held 
at the Catholic Biblical Association 
Convention in Perryville, Missouri, 
last August. 

In the same issue of the Biblical 
Quarterly Fr. Richard Kugelman, 
C.P., of the East presented a book 
review of Ernst Schmitt's Leben in 
den Weisheitsbuechern Job, Sprue- 
che, und Jesus Sirach. We might 
mention here that Fr. Richard's 
study on I Cor 7:36-38, which appear- 
ed in the Catholic Biblical Quarterly 
in 1948, is referred to in a learned 
article in latest fascicule of the Sup- 
plement to the Dictionnaire de la 
Bible. The reference occurs in the 
article on "Marriage" by H. Cazelles. 

The Acta Congregationis (Jan. 
1955) mentions nine Passionists 
whose contributions to the inter- 
national Congress on the States of 
Perfection have been printed. This 
Congress was held in Rome from 
November 26 to December 8th, 1950. 



About two months ago Fr. Kane 
came out with the third book of a 
series entitled" Why I became a Bro- 
ther". It is a sequel to "Why I be- 
came a Priest" and "Why I entered 
the Convent". Brother Simon, C.P. 
(Province of St. Paul of the Cross) 
sent THE PASSIONIST a copy. Bro- 
ther tells us that in less than four 
weeks between the pamphlet stand 
in the Public Chapel (West Hart- 
ford) and the Retreat House there, 
more than 90 Copies of the book 
(paper cover $1.00) were sold. THE 
RETREAT HOUSES IN WEST 
HARTFORD, BOSTON AND PITTS- 
BURGH HAVE A COPY IN EACH 
RETREATANT'S ROOM. Brother is 
convinced that the Retreat House is 
a fruitful field for the book and for 
vocations to the Brotherhood. Bro- 
ther himself owes his vocation to a 
Retreat made in a Monastery. We 
need Brothers and putting this book 
also in the rooms of the Retreatants 
in the Retreat Houses at least en- 
lightens many on the nature of that 
vocation, which is the first step. The 
book reads most interestingly. 



In the September 1954 PASSION- 
IST we called our readers' attention 
to the "Our Lady Color Books". 
There is now such a color book on 
The Way of the Cross available at 
the Abbey Press, St. Meinrad, Ind. 
If you are in any way responsible 
for children these Color Books will 
be a help to you, e.g. in suggesting 
to teachers or parents to keep their 
children occupied with them rather 
than "packing them off to movies or 
tossing comic books at them". Read 
the inclosed folder. 



225 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 



Works cf the ministry from January to March 1955 that have come to our notice 

MISSIONS 



JAN. 



FEB. 



MAR. 



DEC. 
JAN. 



9-23 


Morgan City, La. 


Sacred Heart 


Lambert, Terence 


16-23 


Indepencia, Calif. 








George AFB, Calif. 


Chapel 


Kilian 


16-30 


Pontiac, Mich 


St. Benedict 


Bartholomew, James 


23-30 


Bayou Boeuf, La. 


Chapel 


Lambert 




Del Rio, Texas 


Laughlin AFB 


John Aelred 




Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Paul 


Charles 




Westminster, Calif. 


Bl. Sacrament 






Bladwin Park, Calif. 


St. John Bapt. 


Angelo 


30- 6 


Natchitoches, La. 


Immaculate Concept. 


Hilary 


30-13 


White Castle, La. 


O.L. of Prompt Succor 


Lambert, Terence 


6-13 


Laredo, Texas 


Bl. Sacrament 


Emmanuel 




San Bernadino, Calif. 


St. Anthony 




13-20 


Tallulah, La. 


St. Edward 


Hilary 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Raphael 


Roland, Angelo 




Claremont, Calif. 


Assumption 


Aiden 


20-27 


Birmingham, Ala. 


St. Bernard 


Lambert 




Fort Worth, Texas 


St. Patrick 


Cormac 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Brigid 






Catalina, Calif. 


St. Catharine 


Joel 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Brigid 


Kent 




Santa Barbara, Calif. 




Angelo 




Praesidio, Calif. 




Kilian 


20- 6 


Hinton, Okla. 


S. Heart & Mission 


Cornelius 


27- 6 


Sparta, Wis. 


St. Patrick 


Alban 




Chicago, III. 


Addolorata 


Terence 




St. Paul, Minn. 


Assumption 


James 




St. Paul, Minn. 


Maternity BMV 


Philip 




Fort Worth, Texas 


St. Rita 


Robert 




Waxahachie, Texas 


St. Joseph 


John Aelred 




New Orleans, La. 


St. Teresa 


Hilary 




Fort Carson, Colo. 


Chapel 


Ronan, Fidelis 




Eglin, Fla. 


AFB 


Conell 




Ft. Sam Houston, Tex. 


Brooke Med. Center 


Conleth 




Vancouver, Canada 


Cathedral 


Aiden, Theophane 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Patrick 


Norbert 




San Francisco, Calif. 




Kilian 




Reno, Nevada 


Lady of Snows 


Arnold 


27-13 


Des Plaines, III. 


St. Mary 


Walter, Regis 




Baytown, Texas 


St. Joseph 


Emmanuel 




Detroit, Mich. 


Ss. Cyril & Methodius 


Cyril Mary 




Cleveland, O. 


St. Francis de Sales 


Gordian, Flannon 




Houston, Texas 


Assumption 


Jerome, Casper 




Hurley, Wis. 


St. Mary 


Daniel, Miles 




New Orleans, La. 


St. Matthias 


Camillus, Clarence 




St. Clair Shores, Mich. 


St. Gertrude 


Timothy, Michael 




Chicago, III. 


St. Francis Xavier 


Edwin, Roderick 




Oak Park. III. 


Ascension 


Bartholomew, Charles 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Transfiguration 


Roland, Angelo 


27-20 


Norwood, O. 


Ss. Peter & Paul 


Stanislaus. Nilus 


6-13 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Holy Rosary 


Leo Patrick 




Orville, O. 


St. Agnes 


Gilbert 




New Orleans, La. 


St. Paul 


Conell 




Lebanon, Mo. 


St. Francis de Sales 


Finan 


6-20 


Chicago, III. 


St. Kevin 


Kyran, Fidelis 




Thibodaux, La. 


St. Joseph 


Lambert, Cormac 




Tulsa, Okla. 


Christ the King 


Ronan, Luke 




Newton, Iowa 


Sacred Heart 
RETREATS 


Keith 


28- 1 


Long Beach, Calif. 


O.L. of Refuge 


Pius 




Orange, Calif. 


Motherhouse 


Harold Mary 


30- T 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Retreat House 


Kent 


2- 5 


Detroit, Mich. 


Nariannhill Frs. 


Vincent Mary 


2- 6 


Malibu, Calif. 


Retreat House 


Angelo 


3-10 


Erlanger, Ky. 


CP Nuns 


Bernard 



MAR. 



5- 7 
5-14 

6- 9 
6-13 

7- 9 
10-12 
15-21 
15-26 
16-23 



17-20 
20-26 
23-26 
23-29 
24-26 



24-29 
24- 1 
25-26 
25-27 
25-28 

26-28 



26-29 

27-28 
30- 2 

30- 6 

31- 2 
31- 5 

1- 3 

1- 4 

2- 5 
2- 8 
2-11 

4- 6 
9-11 



11-20 

13-20 

14-18 

14-23 

15-18 

15-25 

16-20 

17-20 

17-21 

24-26 

26- 4 

27- 

27- 

28- 

3- 

3- 



1 

5 
3 
4 
9 
3-10 
4- 6 
8-12 



Saginaw, Mich. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Chicago, III. 
Citrus Heights, Calif. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Bismark, N.D. 
Rolling Prarie, Ind. 
Wichita, Kansas 
Oakland, Calif. 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Sioux City, la. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Xavier, Kansas 
Sioux City, la. 
Fort Madison, la. 
Dubuque, la. 
Clarksville, Ind. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Marion, Iowa 
Peru, III. 
Lemont, III. 
O'Neil, Nebr. 
Cincinnati, O. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Des Moines, la. 
Hutchinson, Kansas 
Louisville, Ky. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Fort Scott, Kansas 
Louisville, Ky. 
Sterling, III. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Chicago, III. 
Des Moines, la. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Orange, Calif. 
Bellville, III. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Chesaning, Mich. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Urbana, Ohio 
Monence, III. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Dunkirk, N.Y. 
Sioux City, la. 
Chicago, III. 
Crookston, Minn. 
Montecito, Calif. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Davenport, la. 
Beaumont, Texas 
Cullman, Ala. 
Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Champaign, III. 
Chicago, III. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Donaldson, Ind. 
Dearborn, Mich. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Rock Island, III. 



St. Mary H.S. 

Srs. of St. Mary 

St. Mary Hospital 

CP Community 

Mary Reparatrix 

St. Mary H.S. 

St. Alex Hosp. 

St. Jos. Novitiate 

Mt. St. Mary 

Franciscan Fathers 

Retreat House 

Heelan H. S. 

St. Jos. Hospital 

St. Mary College 

St. Jos. Mercy Hosp. 

St. Mary H. S. 

Immac. Concept Academy 

Providence H. S. 

Holy Family H. S. 

O. L. Mercy H. S. 

Mercy Novitiate 

St. Bede College 

Mt. Assisi Academy 

St. Mary Academy 

St. Mary H. S. 

Rosary H. S. 

Marygrove College 

Cathedral H. S. 

Newman H. S. 

Mercy Hosp. 

St. Elizabeth Hosp. 

Holy Trinity Gr. School 

St. Joshn Seminary 

CP Community 

Mercy Hospital 

Lady of Mercy H. S. 

Newman H. S. 

Holy Family H. S. 

St. Anthony 

Mercy Hospital 

Prescious Blood Srs. 

Novitaite 

White Srs. 

Women at CP Nuns 

lady of Perp. Help H. S. 

St. Rose H. S. 

St. Mary H. S. 

High School 

Passionist Nuns 

CP Community 

St. Vincent Hosp. 

St. Mary of Providence 

St. Benedict Acad. 

Novitiate 

Good Shepherd Home 

Mercy Hospital 

Hotel Dieu Hosp. 

S. Heart Academy 

Srs of St. Agnes 

Newman Foundation 

St. Elizabeth Hosp. 

Serra H. S. 

Mission H. S. 

Conv. Ancilla Dni 

St. Alphonsus 

Ladies at CP Nuns 

St. Anthony Hosp. 

FORTY HOURS 



Howard 

Paulinus 

Anthony 

Godfrey 

Thaddeus 

Howard 

Howard 

Ronan 

Cormac 

Angelo 

Kent 

Ignatius, Charles 

Anthony 

Michael 

Finan 

Rian 

Columban 

Hilary 

Jerome 

Howard 

Paulinus 

John Mary 

Luke 

Warren 

Cyril Mary 

Godfrey 

Walter, Nilus 

Joel 

Keith 

Caspar 

Roch 

Quentin 

Emmanuel 

Conell 

Caspar 

Howard 

Keith 

Bartholomew 

Francis 

Philip 

Edwin 

Godfrey 

Charles 

Vincent Mary 

Mark 

Howard 

Cyril Mary 

Francis 

Arthur 

Conell 

Cormac 

Matthias 

Charles 

Godfrey 

Anthony 

Michael 

Clarence 

Fergus 

Matthias 

Quentin 

Keith 

Kilian 

Jcel 

Alexis 

Edwin 

v/ "n^nt Mary 

Godfrey 



JAN. 



2- 4 
7- 9 
9-11 



Los Angeles, Calif. 
Schiller Park, III. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Ft. Scott, Kansas 



Holy Name 
St. Beatrice 
St. Philip 
Lady of Angels 



Joel 
Alban 
Roland 
Kevin 



227 



FEB. 



MAR. 



FEB. 



JAN. 



FEB. 





Lebanon, Ky. 


St. Augustine 


James 




Indianapolis, Ind. 


St. Francis de Sales 


Stanislaus 


16-18 


Claremont, Calif. 


Assumption 


Aiden 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Paul 


Stanislaus 


23-25 


Sierra AAadre, Calif. 


St. Rita 


Kent 


27-30 


Buechel, Ky. 


St. Bartholomew 


Stanislaus 


30- 1 


San Diego, Calif. 


Lady of Angels 


Kent 


6- 8 


Park Ridge, III. 


St. Paul of the Cross 


Alban 


13-15 


San Gabriel, Calif. 


St. Anthony 


Kilian 




Arcadia, Calif. 




Kent 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Leo 


Ronan 


20-22 


Santa Ana, Calif. 


St. Joseph 


Theophane 


27- 1 


Coffeeville, Kansas 


Holy Name 


Kevin 


4- 6 


Louisville, Ky. 


Ss. Simon & Jude 


Bede 


6- 8 


Owensboro, Ky. 


St. Paul 
NOVENAS 


John 


3-11 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Elizabeth 


Roland 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Lady of Lourdes 
RECOLLECTION DAYS 


Kilian 


2 


Olathe, Kansas 


St. Paul (Men) 


Joachim 


9 


St. Paul, Kansas 


Clergy 


George 




Chicago, III. 


St. Peter Canisius 


Barnabas Mary 




Chicago, III. 


St. Anthony 


Francis 


11 


Melrose Park, III. 




Matthias 


16 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Helper of H. Souls 


Joel 




Santa Barbara, Calif. 


OFM Fathers 


Pius 


22 


Reading, Ohio 




Barnabas Mary 


23 


Louisville, Ky. 


Aux. K. of C. 


Quentin 


3 


Waukesha, Wis. 




Alban 


6 


Paris, III. 


St. Mary Parish 


Stanislaus 


7 


Wichita, Kansas 


Mt. St. Mary (Srs.) 


Joachim 


9 


St. Paul, Kansas 


Clergy 


Hyacinth 




Grand Rapids, Mich. 




Matthias 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 

HOLY CROSS PROVINCE — MARCH 1955 



ROME 
Gen'l Curia 

Malcolm LaVelle 1 
Rene Champagne 42 
Students 

Firmian Parenza 43 
Paul M. Boyle 43 
Barry Rankin 43 
CHICAGO 
Neil Parsons 2 
Kyran O'Connor 3 
Gordian Lewis 4 
Camillus Kronlage 5 
Francis Flaherty 7 
Aurelius Hanley 
Augustine Scannell 
Vincent X. Ehinger 
Justin Smith 23 
Alban Hickson 
Thomas Carter 
Richard Hughes 9 
Matthias Coen 
Gregory McEttrick 
Joseph M. O'Leary 
Kenneth Ward 
Donald Ryan 26 
Brian Mahedy 26 
Benet Kieran 10 
Barnabas M. Ahern 27 



Wm. Gail Steil 14 

Gregory Jos. Staniszewski 13 

Godfrey Poage 

John Baptist Pechulis 12, 13 

Warren Womack 16 

Carroll Stuhlmueller 27 

Clyde Zarski 10 

Melvin Glutz 43 

Ward Biddle 17 

Students 

Gerard Steckel 

Peter Berendt 

Michael Jos. Stengel 

Ralph Domzall 

Owen Duffield 

Francis Cusack 

Casimir Gralewski 

Sebastian MacDonald 

Louis Doherty 

Henry Whitechurch 

Philip Schaefer 

Thorn. Anthony Bagalski 

Brothers 

Felix Bauer 

George Stoiber 

Robert Baaiman 

Joachim Saunders 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert Kroger 5 



Egbert Nolan 7 
Alphonsus Kruip 
Edwin Ronan 
Raphael Grashoff 
Bernard Brady 
Louis Driscoll 
Nicholas Schneiders 15 
Hubert Bohne 20 
Cyprian Frank 9 
Emmanuel Sprigler 
Bernard Mary Coffey 9 
Dunstan Branigan 
Howard Ralenkotter 
Cyril Mary Jablonovsky 
Bartholomew Adler 
Wilfrid Flanery 18 
Bernadine Johnston 10 
Brothers 

Columban Gausepohl 
William Lebel 
James Keating 
LOUISVILLE 
Boniface Fielding 5 
Ronan Dowd 7 
Adalbert Schesky 
Lawrence Bailey 
Anselm Secor 9 
Alexis Quinlan 
Stanislaus Geekie 



228 



Andrew Ahler 

Conrad Amend 

Hilary Katlewski 

Quentin Reneau 10 

Regis Enright 

Vincent AA. Oberhauser 

James Busch 

Roger Mercurio 27, 17 

John Devany 

Forrest Macken, 28, 29 

Bede Doyle 

Student-Priests 

Myron Gohmann 

Denis McGowan 

Albert Schwer 

Eugene Peterman 

Lawrence Browning 

Bruce Henry 

Berchmans Petit 

Carl Anthony Tenhundfeld 

Brothers 

Gabriel Redmon 

Gilbert Schoener 

Casimir Skiba 

Leo Arndt 

Charles Archuleta 

Francis Hanis 

ST. LOUIS 

Elmer Sandman 5 

Fergus McGuinness 7 

Celestine Leonard 31 

Aloysius Dowling 

Herbert Tillman 32 

Claude Nevin 32 

Edgar Ryan 32 

Ervan Heinz 32 

Germain Legere 32 

Cyprian Towey 32 

Wm. Joseph Hogan 32 

Leo P. Brady 17 

Emil Womack 32 

Leon Grantz 32 

Campion Clifford 32 

Raymond AAcDonough 32 

Jordan Grimes 33 

Simon Herbers 33 

Emmet Linden 30, 32 

Jude AAonteith 

Brothers 

Conrad Adams 

Regis Ryan 

David Williams 

John Gebaur 

Thomas Brummett 

ST. PAUL 

Roch Adamek 5 

Faustinus AAoran 6 

Cormac Lynch 7 

Matthew Miller 

Hyacinth Clarey 

Julian Montgomery 

Edward O'Sullivan 

George Jungles 

Urban O'Rourke 

Brendan McConnell 9 

Kevin Cunningham 

Arnold Vetter 

Leopold Vaitiekaitis 

Conell Dowd 

Paschal Barry 

Loran Aubuchon 14 

Caspar Watts 

Joachim Gemperline 11 

Novices 



Gabriel Duffy 
Augustine Wilhelmy 
Mel Joseph Spehn 
Andre Auw 
Terrance O'Toole 
Aloysius Mary Hoolahan 
Bro. Isidore Bates 
Postulants 

Bro. Marion Swanson 
Bro. Raphael Couturier 
Bro. Luke Juenemann 
Brothers 

Louis Hochendoner 
Pius Martel 
Christopher Zeko 
DES MOINES 
Ignatius Bechttold 5 
Miles Bero 7 
Ignatius Conroy 
Sylvester Cichanski 
Malachy Farrell 
Philip Gibbons 
Paulinus Hughes 
Peter Kilgallon 
Anthony Maher 
Alfred Shalvey 
Mel Schneider 
Finan Storey 
Charles Guilfoyle 
Thos. More Newbold 25 
Frederick Sucher 25 
Keith Schiltz 
Columban Browning 17 
Randal Joyce 25 
Michael Brosnahan 
John M. Render, 22, 24 
Luke Connolly 
Rian Clancy 
Students 
Edwin Dolenz 
Kevin Kenney 
Andrew Mary Gardiner 
Stephen Balog 
Vincent Giegerich 
Leonard Kosatka 
Gerald Appiarius 
Joseph M. Connolly 
Morris Cahill 
Martin Thommes 
Jerome Brooks 
Alfred Pooler 
Lucian M. Guimond 
Francis Martin Keenan 
Bernard Kinney 
Damian McHale 
Benedict Olson 
Brothers 

Romuald Reuber 
Leonard Paschali 
Matthew Capodice 
Edwin Levesque 
DETROIT 
Walter Kaelin 5 
Ralph Brisk 7 
David Ferland 
Gerald Dooley 
Arthur Stuart 
Cornelius McGraw 
Linus Burke 
Gerard Barry 
Mark Hoskins 
William Westhoven 20 
Timothy Hurley 
Daniel Maher 



Fidelis Benedik 

Patrick Tully 9 

Cyprian Leonard 10 

Colum Haughey 

Nilus Goggin 

Flannon Gannon 

Thaddeus Tamm 

Roderick Misey 

Harold Mary Leach 

Declan Egan 18 

Brothers 

Aloysius Schoeppner 

Theodore Lindhorst 

Bernard Schaefer 

SIERRA MADRE 

James Patrick White 5 

Paul Francis Ratterman 7 

Reginald Lummer 

Gabriel Sweeney 19 

Maurice St. Julien 

Norbert McGovern 

Angelo Hamilton 

Pius Leabel 21 

Ferdinand Madl 

Marion Durbala 

Roland Maher 

Harold Travers 

Theophane Gescavitz 

Aidan McGauran 

Joyce Hallahan 17 

Kilian Dooley 

Ernest Polette 20 

Isidore O'Reilly 18 

Brice Zurmuehlen 

Joel Gromowski 

Kent Pieper 

Sacred Eloquence 

John Francis Kobler 

Victor Salz 

Gail Robinson 

Brothers 

Richard McCall 

Gerald LaPresto 

Joseph Stadfeld 

Justin Gerrity 

BIRMINGHAM 

Joseph Gartland 5 

Robert Borger 7 

Lambert Hickson 

Alan Prendergast 

Terence Powers 

Bro. Philip Frank 

CITRUS HEIGHTS 

Basil Killoran 5 

Canute Horack 7 

Leo Scheibel 

Edward Viti 

Damian Cragen 18 

Henry Vetter 20 

Bro. Anthony Blankemeyer 

Bro. Patrick Keeney 

HOUSTON 

Conleth Overman 5 

Jerome Stowell 7 

Herman Joseph Stier 20 

Clarence Vowels 

John Aelred Torisky 

Dominic Merriman 19 

Bro. Daniel Smith 

Bro. Henry Zengerle 

ENSLEY 

Nathanael Kriscunas 9 

Eustace Eilers 

Ludger Martin 



229 



Canisius Womack 

Alvin Wirth 10 

FAIRFIELD 

Edmund Drake 9 

CREVE COEUR 

Valentine Leitsch 8, 18 

Christopher Link 

Jeremiah Beineris 20 

Bro. Denis Sevart 

CHINA 

Anthony Maloney 41 



JAPAN 

Matthew Vetter 8 

Carl Schmitz 

Paul Placek 

Peter Claver Kumle 

Clement Paynter 

Passionist Fathers 

Cath. Church of Hibarigoaka 

(Kwanishi Post Office Division) 

Hycgo-ken Japan 



CHAPLAINS 

Leonard Barthelmy 35 
Edward Xavier Praino 36 
Kenny Lynch 39 
Lucian Hogan 37 
Noel Pechulis 40 
ON SICK LEAVE 
Reginald James 
406 N. 17th Ave. 
Phoenix, Arizona 



1. General 

2. Provincial 

3. First Consultor 

4. Second Consultor 

5. Rector 

6. Master of Novices 

7. Vicar 

8. Superior 

9. Pastor 

10. Assistant Pastor 

11. Vice Master 

12. Church History 

13. Lector of Dogmatic Thology 

14. Chaplain at Dunning 

15. Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

16. Provincial Secretary 

17. Director of Students 

18. Retreat Director 

19. Assistant Retreat Director 

20. Retreat Master 

21. Lector of Sacred Eloquence 

22. Lector of History 

23. Mission Secretary 



REFERENCES 

24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 



Lector of English 
Lector of Philosophy 
Sign Fieldman 
Lector of Scripture 
Lector of Canon Law 
Lector of Moral Theology 
Vice Director 
Chaplain, St. Vincent's 
Lector 
Vocational Director 



Mar 



Ind. 



Veterans Administration, 
U.S. Veterans' Administration Hospital, 
Northport, Long Island, New York 
37. Naval Air Station, FPO 955, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

39. 7911 Au, APO 58, New York, N.Y. 

40. U.S. Naval Station, Navy No. 103, FPO 
New York, N.Y. 

A^. Maryknoll House Stanley, Hongkong, China. 

42. Secretary to Fr. General 

43. Higher Studies 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 



ROME 

Paul F. Nager 1 

Neil MoBrearty 45 

Ignatius Formica 47 

Caspar Caulfield 46 

Luigi Malorzo 

Cronan Regan 48 

Norman Demeck 48 

Michael Brennan 48 

Aquinas McGurk 48 

Harold Reusch 48 

UNION CITY 

M. Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, DO 

Provincial Staff 

Ernest Welch 2 

Canisius Hazlett 3 

Carrol Ring 4 

Frederick J. Harrer 9 

Brendan Boyle 10 

Ferdinand Braun 11 

Paul J. Dignan 11 

Robert O'Hara 12 

The Sign 

Ralph Gorman 25 

Damian Reid 26 

Jeremiah Kennedy 26 

Donald Nealis 28 

Harold Poletti 29 

Pius Trevoy 30 

Hugh Carroll 31 

Austin Busby 31 

St. Michael's Monastery 

Berchmans Lanagan 5 



Hubert Arliss 8 
Herbert McDevitt 
Xavier Gonter 
Michael Rausch 18 
Hyacinth Sullivan 
Alfred Duffy 
Adelbert Poletti 
Ernest Cunningham 35 
Ronald Norris 23 
Bernard Gilleran 
Kenneth Naudin 
Raymond J. Foerster 
Stephen P. Kenny 17 
Michael A. Campbell 
Justinian McLaughlin 
Matthias O'Byrne 
Bonaventure Griffiths 24 
Andrew Ansbro 22 
Hyacinth Malkowiak 
Michael Sullivan 
Lawrence Steinhoff 
Agatho Dukin 
Athanasius Drohan 
Richard Kugelman 15 
Bertrand Weaver 
Wendelin Moore 18 
Claude Ennis 
Leo Byrnes 

Patrick J. McDwyer 18 
Charles A. Oakes 18 
Nicholas Gill 
Francis Kuba 
Augustine P. Henne3sey 15 



Columba Moore 13 
Fintan Lombard 15 
Bennet Kelly 
Cyril Schweinberg 
Emmanuel Gardon 53 
Cuthbert Sullivan 
John B. Pesce 18 
Students— 3rd Theol. 
William Davin 
Raymond Pulvino 
Francis Hanlon 
Martin Grey 
Kilian M. McNamara 
John M. Kelly 
Edward M. Leger 
Kevin Casey 
Patrick McDonough 
Norbert M. Dorsey 
Micholas Zitz 
Eugene Leso 
Richard Grady 
Brian Rogan 
Alexis Hewitt 
John F. McMillan 
Albert Pellicane 
Damian Towey 
Anselm Cimonetti 
Timothy Fitzgerald 
Luke Mulligan 
Aloysius Fahy 
Alan Cavanaugh 
Brothers 
Jerome Cowan 



230 



Bernard M. Pughe 
Conrad Federspiel 
St. Joseph 
Benjamin Wirtz 17 
Julius Reiner 18 
Vincent M. Frahlick 18 

PITTSBURGH 

Cuthbert McGreevey 5 
Gregory Flynn 6 
Leo F. Vanston 8 
Urban AAanley 
Fulgentius Ventura 
Adrian Lynch 
Bertin Donahue 21 
Theophane Maguire 
Charles F. Lang 
Celestine McConigal 
Gabriel M. Jaskal 
Cyril McGuire 
Theophane Kapcar 
Camillus Barth 
Cajetan Sullivan 19 
Daniel Hunt 
Raymond M. Houlahen 
Paulinus Gepp 
Anselm Lacomara 
Angelo lacavone 
Hilarion Walters 
Malcolm McGuinn 
Kieran Baker 
Paschal Smith 20 
Sebastian Kolonovsky 
Cajetan Bendernagel 14 
Cornelius Davin 
Brothers 
Damian Carroll 
Xavier Vitacollona 
William Drotar 
Paschal Di Boli 
St. Michael's 
Adolph Schmitt 17 
Wendelin Meis 18 
Edward Hennessey 18 
Timothy Stockmeyer 18 
DUNKIRK 
St. Mary's 

Rupert Langenstein 5 
Eugene Fitzpatrick 8 
Isidore Smith 
Antoine de Groeve 
Paul M. Carroll 
Mark Seybold 
Alban Carroll 
Eugene Kiernan 17 
Myles Whelan 
Herman Kollig 18 
Sylvester Cannon 
Alban Lynch 
Ernan Johnston 18 
Clement Pavlick 
Basil Stockmeyer 18 
Michael Connor 
Gerard A. Orlando 
Crispin Lynch 
Dunstan Guzinski 
Bonaventure Moccia 
Brothers 

Stanislaus Tansey 
Thomas Aul 
Holy Cross 
Boniface Buckley 5 
Aquinas Sweeney 8 
Linus Monahan 
Maurice Kansleiter 
Columban Courtman 15 



Luke Hay 

Columban Aston 15 
Silvio De Luca 
Paschal Drew 15 
Cristopher Collins 34 
Leopold Secundo 15 
Simon P. Wood 15 
John S. Gresser 15 
Aidaan Mahoney 15 
Colman Haggerty 22 
Malachy McGill 15 
Declan Maher 32 
Brendan Breen 33 
Brice Inglesby 15 
Linus Rottlof 15 
Victor A. Mazzeo 15 
Brothers 

Vincent Cunningham 
Ronan Caulson 
Gabriel Chilbert 
Joseph Holzer 
BALTIMORE 
Clement Buckley 5 
Basil Cavanaugh 8 
Hilarion O'Rourke 
Arthur Benson 
Jeremias McNamara 
Hubert Sweeney 
Vincent Connors 
Columba McCloskey 
Raphael Duffy 
Arthur May 
John F. Poole 18 
Flavian O'Donnell 
Cosmas Boyle 
Alexis Scott 
Terence Brodie 
Adrian Poletti 17 
Silvan Brennan 38 
Leander Delli Veneri 
Edward J. Banks 18 
Alan McSweeney 37 
Leonard M. Amhrein II 
Victor Donovan 15 
Linus McSheffrey 18 
Dominic M. Cohee 
Albert Catanzaro 18 
Wilfrid Scanlon 
Benedict J. Mawn 
Richard F. Leary 15 
Kilian McGowan 13 
Silvan Rouse 15 
Flavian Dougherty 
Students-2nd Theol. 
Benedict Berlo 
Clement Kasinskas 
Leo J. Gorman 
Vincent M. Boney 
Joseph McCue 
Kiernan Earley 
Augustine Sheehan 
Colman Connolly 
Gerard Griffiths 
Donald Mclnnis 
Gabriel Shields 
Aelred Lacomara 
Brothers 

Bernardine Carmassi 
Aloysius Blair 

SCRANTON 

Felix Hackett 5 
Owen Lynch 8 
Bernard Hartman 
Henry Brown 
Edward Goggin 



Stephen Sweeney 
Andrew McGuire 
Winfrid Guenther 
William Cavanaugh 
Roland Hoffman 
Leonard Gownley 
Brian Murphy 
Ambrose Diamond 
Alfred Weaver 17 
Jordan Loiselle 
Edgar Vanston 
Edmund McMahon 
John M. Aleckna 18 
Raphael Sventy 
Norbert Herman 
Hilary Sweeney 
Cletus Dawson 51 
Marcellus McFarland 
Justinian Gilligan 15 
George Nolan 13 
Venard Byrne 15 
Godfrey Kasper 18 
Christopher Czachor 
Thomas Carroll 
Students-2nd Phil 
Keith Blair 
Austin McKenna 
Terence Kelly 
Rex Mansman 
Myles Scheiner 
Andre Giondomenica 
Ralph Tufano 
Vernon Kelly 
Carl Thome 
Conrad Smith 
Kent Rummenie 
Rocco Oliverio 
Warren Deeney 
Bernard O'Brien 
Dominic Papa 
Kenan Peters 
Philip Bebie 
Brothers 
Patrick Fallon 
Edward Blair 
BOSTON 
Dennis Walsh 5 
Walter Wynn 8 
Damian O'Rourke 
Claude Leahy 
Francis Shea 
Quentin Olwell 17 
Lucian Ducie 19 
Timothy McDermott 21 
Jordan Black 
Thomas A. Sullivan 
Leo J. Berard 
Finbar O'Meara 
Jerome O'Grady 
Cletus Mulloy 
Bede Cameron 18 
Gerard Rooney 20 
Joseph P. O'Neil 
Louis Maillet 
Theodore Foley 13 
Ronald A. Beaton 
Jerome Does 
Bertin Farrell 15 
Neil Sharkey 15 
Kevin McCloskey 15 
Kenneth Walsh 18 
Fidelis Connolly 18 
Giles Ahrens 
Students-lst Theol. 
Jerome McKenna 
James A. Wiley 



231 



Gerard Surette 
Herbert Eberly 
Walter O'Keefe 
Henry Free 
Bartholomew Weeks 
Roger Elliot 
Columban Hewitt 
Alban Harmon 
Gregory Paul 
Leonard Murphy 
Campion Cavanaugh 
Brothers 
Benedict Palese 
Christopher Farrell 
Michael Stomber 
SPRINGFIELD 
Luke Misset 5 
Roderick Hunt 8 
Bede Horgan 
Eugene Kozar 
Frederick Corcoran 
Nilus McAllister 
Hilary McGowan 
Rupert Langenbacher 
Miles McCarthy 
Connel Hopkins 
Dominic Grande 
Philip Ryan 21 
Gilbert Walser 19 
Winfrid McDermott 
Fidelis Rice 16 
Casimir Horvat 
Ronald Murray 
David Bulman 
Jude Mead 
Lucien Morel 
J. Chrysostom Ryan 20 
Peter Hallisey 13 
Canisius Lareau 
Stanislaus Waseck 
Quentin Amhrein 
Sacred Eloquence 
Cyprian Regan 
Regis Eichmiller 
Stephen Haslach 
John F. McLouglin 
Justin Brady 
Justinian Manning 
Ronald Hilliard 
Leo Gerrity 
Anthony Neary 
Jude Dowling 
Brothers 

Valentine Rausch 
Andrew Winkleman 
Timothy Foley 
Valentine Cashman 
Francis Dalton 
JAMAICA 

Cornelius McArdle 5 
Arthur Derrig 8 
Bartholomew Mulligan 
John J. Endler 
Cosmos Shaughnessey 19 
Roger Monson 
Owen Doyle 17 
Canice Gardner 
Ignatius Ryan 
Conon O'Brien 
Bertrand McDewell 
Gordian O'Reilly 
Cronan Flynn 18 
Lambert Missack 
Malachy Hegarty 



Kevin Conley 
Bernardine Gorman 
Benedict McNamara 
Alexander Hoffman 
Xavier Welch 15 
Urban Curran 
Peter Quinn 
George Sheehy 
Arnold Horner 36 
Julian Connor 21 
Kieran Richardson 18 
Gordian Murphy 
John J. Reardon 15 
Brian Burke 18 
Florian Pekar 
Thomas M. Berry 
Fergus McDonald 15 
Bernardine Grande 
Berard Tierney 20 
Columkille Regan 13 
Camillus Gentakes 
Gerald Hynes 
Daniel Free 
Edmund Hanlon 
Students-3rd Phil 
Nelson McLaughlin 
Adrian Christopher 
Xavier M. Hayes 
Christian Kunchenbrod 
Ambrose O'Hare 
Alexander Mulligan 
Victor Hoagland 
Theodore Walsh 
Paulinus Cusack 
Fidelis Garmer 
Sebastian Collupy 
Mark Clogan 
Cosmas Dimino 
Emmet McGuire 
Matthew Martin 
Dermot Dobbyn 
Barnabas Wenger 
Owen Lally 
Roderick Mescall 
Brothers 
John Murphy 
Henry Cavanaugh 
George Kowalski 
HARTFORD 
Thaddeus Purdon 5 
Aloysius O'Malley 8 
Gilbert Smith 
Cyril , Feeley 
Sylvester Grace 
Justin Mulcahy 15 
Kenan Carey 
Alphonsus Cooley 
Caspar Conley 
Paulinus Hughes 
Conran Kane 
Ronan Carroll 
Joseph L. Flynn 19 
Vincent Durkin 
Matthew Nestor 21 
Regis Mulligan 
Gerald Matejune 
Venard Johnson 
Bonaventure Gonella 
Maurice Sullivan 
Damian F. Rail 
Alphonsus Grande 
Martin J. Tooker 20 
Roger Gannon 
Gregory Durkin 



David Roberts 13 
Cassian Yuhas 15 
Ronan Callahan 15 
Cormac Kinkead 20 
Students-lst Phil. 
Frederick Bauer 
Mario Gallipoli 
Edwin Moran 
Joel Polasik 
Donatus Santora 
Matthias Manger 
Joseph Fiorina 
Gordon Amidon 
Barry Ward 
Leon Redondo 
Isias Powers 
Brothers 
Simon West 44 
Arthur Bouchard 
Paul Morgan 
Alphonsus Coen 
Dominic Critchlow 
Anselm Catalucct 
Philip Maggiulli 
Virgil Pasi 
TORONTO 
Connel McKeown 5 
James A. McAghon 8 
Gerard Keeney 
Egbert Gossart 17 
Donald Keenan 
Boniface Hendricks 
James Verity 
Maurus Schenck 
Joyce Spencer 
Julian Morgan 
Lawrence Bel lew 
Neil O'Donnell 
Bro. Brian Forrestall 
RIVERDALE 
Benedict Huck 7 
William Harding 
Albinus Kane 
Aloysius McDonough 27 
Constantine Phillips 
Bro. Francis Boylan 
NORTH CAROLINA 
Washington 
Daniel McDevitt 17 
Joachim Carrigan 18 
New Bern 
Julian Endler 17 
Gerald Ryan 18 
Howard Chirdon 18 
Greenville 
Maurice Tew 17 
Berchmans McHugh 18 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 
Emmanuel Trainor 17 
Gabriel Gorman 52 
JAMAICA, B. W. I. 
William Whelan 
Cormac Shanahan 
Calistus Connolly 
Anthony Feeherry 
FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 
Reginald Arliss 50 
MEXICO CITY 
Anthony J. Nealson 17 
Dunstan Stout 18 
ARGENTINE 
Justinian Tobin 
GERMANY 
Walter Mickel 2 



232 



Leopold Snyder 4, 6 
Germain Heilmann 
Roland Flaherty 
AUSTRIA 
Fabian Flynn 43 
CATHOLIC U. 
Joques McQuillan 
Edgar Crowe 
Paul J. Fullam 
Robert Ehrne 
CHINA 

Marcellus White 49 
Justin Garvey 49 
Furlough 
Linus Lombard 
John B. Maye 
Lawrence Mullin 
Ernest Hotz 
CHAPLAINS 
Norman Kelly 39 
Sidney Turner 39 
Christopher Berlo 39 
Timothy McGrath 40 
Romuald Walsh 40 
Godfrey Riley 41 
James Follard 40 
Nilus McAndrew 39 
Albinus Lesch 42 
Hugh McKeown 39 
Julius Durkan 39 
Conran Free 39 
Gabriel Bendernagel 
Conor Smith 39 



42 



Eustace McDonald 42 


21. 


Robert Mulgrew 39 


22. 


Conan Conaboy 39 


23. 


Nilus Houbble 40 


24. 


Ambrose Maguire 39 


25. 


Sick Leave 


26. 


Martin Ford 


27. 


Raphael Vance 


28. 


Leander Steinmeyer 


29. 


Terence Connelly 


30. 


Cyprian Walsh 


31. 


Quentin Cerullo 


32. 


REFERENCES 


33. 


1. 4th Gen'l Consulor 


34. 


2. Provincial 


35. 


3. 1st Consulor 


36. 


4. 2nd Consulor 


37. 


5. Rector 


38. 


6. Master of Novices 


39. 


7. Superior 


40. 


8. Vicar 


41. 


9. Prov. Secy. 


42. 


10. Prov. Econome 


43. 


11. Mission Secy. 


44. 


12. Prov. Dir Studies 


45. 


13. Director 


46. 


14. Vice Master 


47. 


15. Lector 


48. 


16. Lect. Sac. Eloq. 


49. 


17. Pastor 


50. 


18. Curate 


51. 


19. Retreat Dir. 


52. 


20. Asist. Ret. Dir. 


53. 



Retreat Master 

Vocational Director 

Public Rel. Dir. 

Chronicler 

Sign: Editor 

Sign: Asso. Ed. 

Sign Post 

Sign: Business Mgr. 

Sign: Mission Proc. 

Sign: Field Director 

Sign: Fieldman 

Dir. Prep. Sem. 

Assist. Dir. Prep. 

Dean of Studies Prep. 

Chaplain; Laurel Hill 

Chaplain; Creedmor 

Chaplain; St. Agnes Hosp. 

Chaplain: Bon Secours Hosp. 

Chaplain: Army 

Chaplain: Navy 

Chaplain: Marine 

Chaplain: Air Force 

War Relief Services 

Supervisor Jun. Bros. 

General Econome 

Secy. Gen'l. For. Miss. 

Rules Commission 

Higher Studies 

Communist Prisoner 

Novice Master, Sons of M. 

Chaplain: Pass Nuns 

Building Superintendent 

Librarian 



* 




THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished bimonthly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each January, 
March, May, July, Septem- 
ber, and November. Financed 
by free-will offerings of its 
readers. There is no copy- 
right. The paper is a private 
publication. 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. 

Vincent Mary, C.P. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. 8, No. 3 



May-June 1955 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Dear Reader 

Dear Editor 

Will of God and St Paul 



Impressions of Bishop Raymond, India 

70-57; 

Obituaries 



f5 



News of the Congregation 
Works of the Ministry 



jbeai (leaden,, 



The article in the last (March- 
April) issue of THE PASSIONIST 
on Passionist Spirituality was evi- 
dently read with great interest by 
many judging by casual remarks and 
many letters. Most of the letters re- 
stricted themselves to general re- 
marks of "congratulations to Father 
Ward on the splendid study" or "it 
was an inspiring article" or "we even 
read it in the refectory" and other 
similar remarks. It may be that some 
readers are still waiting for time to 
send a full appreciation or rather 
their own evaluation of the article 
and the principles it contains. 

We are happy that at least one 
reader did write such an apprecia- 
tion and we are offering it to our 
readers in this issue. 

We once more wish to state that 
the question of our Spirituality or 
which is the same thing, our essence, 
is a vital one. A physical body keeps 
its essence in face of time and 
change by the natural law. A moral 
body, whose members are intellec- 
tual beings, keeps its essence only 
by the knowledge of its essence 
(spirituality) and a striving to live 
up to it. We seem to be in the stage 
of clarifying that knowledge. This is 
nothing to the discredit of our Con- 
gregation, because every religious 
congregation first lives on the in- 
spiration of its founder and after his 
death as time goes on must find its 
proper path as the clear remem- 
brance of the founder gradually van- 




ishes. Since we are all members of 
this body (our Congregation) all 
must work to get this knowledge and 
live it. once found. 

In this issue we are fortunate to 
be able to offer our readers another 
very telling article on St. Paul of the 
Cross, one that can illuminate us very 
much on the spirituality of St. Paul 
of the Cross, our spirituality. Al- 
though the article is somewhat dis- 
jointed and rambling in spots, any- 
one who takes the time and trouble 
to wade through it will reau immense 
profit. It reestablishes, certainly, the 
depths of St. Paul's supernatural 
sense of values, and his keen aware- 
ness of the indwelling of God in the 
center of the soul. Again it does 



233 



seem that trust and dependence upon true poverty, so maybe that is one 
Providence goes hand in hand with reason why St. Paul so loved poverty. 



^W^«y,^ 




jbean, £dUai 



I want to commend both the Pas- 
sionist and Fr. Ward on the very 
fine article, "Passionist Spirituality", 
of the last issue. This is the type of 
article that brings to light some of 
the dynamic, spiritual principles 
latent in the spiritual teachings of 
St. Paul of the Cross. The article 
will surely stimulate renewed inter- 
est and devotion to our Holy Foun- 
der. 

For about a year and a half I 
sporadically worked on just such an 
article as Fr. Ward's. Though de- 
veloped from a slightly different 
angle, the conclusion was much the 
same as his. I abandoned the pro- 
ject because, as Fr. Ward mentions, 
there is a great deal of positive re- 
search necessary to ascertain our 
Holy Founder's mind on the subject. 
Neither the time nor the sources 
were available to me for such an 
undertaking — let alone the ability. 

However, I would like to touch on 
a few points that struck me after 
writing my own article and talking 



it over with a few of the brethren. 
Let me say, though, that I agree in 
theory with most of Fr. Ward's con- 
clusions; the problems here mention- 
ed are those that confronted me in 
trying to apply those conclusions in 
the concrete. 

Fr. Ward mentions that we must 
distill our spirituality into theologi- 
cal terminology if we are both to 
understand it properly and make 
adaptations safely. This is a very 
difficult undertaking! I do not be- 
lieve our Holy Founder conceived 
his purposes or religious ideals in 
anything like a strict theological 
terminology. His was a very practi- 
cal mind and he seemed to speak 
very much on the experiential level. 
Furthermore, he seemed to view his 
"spirit" or "spirituality" very much 
in the concrete and only in terms of 
the congregation he was founding in 
pre-industrialized, Catholic Italy. 
Hence very much of a positive, con- 
structive re-formation of his ideas 
is necessary to get the theological 
content of his religious . ideal. This 
is further complicated by the fact 



23* 



that our Holy Founder describes his 
ideal of prayer in mystical, intuitive 
terms: something very difficult to 
define precisely. I believe Fr. Ward 
had this difficulty in mind in dis- 
cussing "Passionist Spirituality," be- 
cause it is noteworthy that he never 
once quoted our Holy Founder on 
the meaning of spirit, even though 
St. Paul often expressly states what 
is the "spirit" of his Institute, (cf. 
"Selected Letters of Recent Passion- 
ist Generals," pg. 184 sq.) I empha- 
size this point simply to show that 
historical research alone will not 
open our Holy Founder's mind to us. 
Some theological "higher criticism" 
is necessary to reveal the abstract 
truth from our Holy Founder's "adap- 
tation" of that truth to his times. Fr. 
Ward's article is a good step in the 
right direction. 

But we may ask ourselves., would 
the formulation of our spirit or 
spirituality only in theological terms 
be adequate? It we analize St. Paul's 
motivation and outlook only in the 
abstract and in its relation to theo- 
logical principles, would the end- 
product be an adequate guide in our 
adaptation? I think not. One of the 
things that struck me in my own 
study of this subject is that every 
religious institute is a theologico- 
juridic complex: both theological 
principles and law enter into its 
make-up. Hence, many features en- 
ter into a religious institute that are 
there simply by positive law. Some 
of these features are there due to a 
certain intrinsic moral necessity, it 
is true, due to the great utility of 
such things. But when we are con- 
sidering some end to be achieved, 



certain features may be found in a 
religious institute which are not 
there by any intrinsic necessity, but 
rather by an extrinsic, physical ne- 
cessity — if we may use such a term 
correctly. Though extrinsically ne- 
cessary to attain the end, they are 
strict and essential means. For ex- 
ample, in theology we speak of God 
freely instituting Baptism as a strict 
means for salvation: this is a case of 
extrinsic, physical necessity from the 
viewpoint of final cause. Now St. 
Paul could have freely instituted 
certain things as strict means to at- 
tain the end of our congregation, 
even though other means might have 
also attained that end if we view 
them intrinsically. I believe our min- 
istry of missions and retreats is one 
such item. We could easily function 
as a mixed congregation in another 
juridic framework without too much 
stretch of the imagination. However, 
St. Paul under the lights given him 
by God decided otherwise. This point 
seems to be confirmed by the fact 
that not only motivation, but also 
proportion amongst the means ne- 
cessary to attain the end is an essen- 
tial element in any "spirit." Propor- 
tion is a very relative term, and only 
the de facto decision of St. Paul can 
give us a clue to what that propor- 
tion is for us. I do not think mere 
theological reasoning will give us St. 
Paul's mind in the matter. We have 
to have a delicate sense of what he 
actually established, otherwise we 
could find "theological reasons" for 
almost any adaptation that appears 
to promote devotion to the Passion. 
Fr. Ward does give us a tentative 
norm whereby we can guage what 



235 



adaptations are fitting regarding the 
apostolate. "We believe that anyone 
who goes deeply and thoroughly into 
the question of what St. Paul of the 
Cross really meant by Passionist 
solitude as an essential of our life, 
will conclude that not any means 
will do in spreading devotion to the 
Passion ..." As an illustrative ex- 
ample of St. Paul's mind, allow me 
to quote the following given regard- 
ing the controversy about the Re- 
treat of San Sozio: "that it may be 
better known at the present and for 
future time what my mind and in- 
tention is, I testify, declare., and by 
present letters affirm, that this is 
my most firm, and to the highest 
degree inviolate will, that our Re- 
treats must be founded and main- 
tained in the greatest possible soli- 
tude, so removed from all habita- 
tion, that no house, even a rural one, 
may be present to distract the Re- 
ligious." (boldface ours; cf. "Select- 
ed Letters," pg. 21) Another case of 
duties incompatible with solitude is 
cited by Fr. Titus of St. Paul of the 
Cross in his Letter on "The Spirit of 
Solitude." (op. cit... pg. 230) Now the 
problem that seems to arise for me 
is how our foreign missionary work, 
as at present conducted by taking 
parishes, and engaging in various 
external works incompatible with 
our spirit in Catholic countries, is in 
accord with our spirit. True, our 
Holy Founder allows us to take for- 
eign missions, but is it any kind of 
foreign missions: By the wording of 
the Acts of the Thirty-sixth General 
Chapter one infers that foreign mis- 
sion work is co-equal with our work 
in Catholic regions of giving mis- 



sions and retreats. Yet, this type of 
foreign mission work is far more 
active than certain types of care of 
souls, chaplaincy duties in hospitals, 
or the ordinary direction of monas- 
teries or houses of religious women, 
which are forbidden us. On the sur- 
face, at least, there seems a slight 
anachronism to train a man in a 
rigidly monastic regime, and then 
put him in an environment which 
appears directly contrary to his mo- 
nastic "spirit." I am not saying that 
our present method of conducting 
missions is wrong, but I do think it 
is a facet of our vocation which has 
not been fully elucidated in connec- 
tion with our Holy Founder's state- 
ments regarding our spirit. I bring 
up the problem because one Order 
at least allowed a misinterpretation 
to develop within its midst. That was 
the case of the Marianhill Fathers in 
Africa which are an off-shoot of the 
Trappists. Here was a case of a mo- 
nastic foundation conducting foreign 
mission work in a way incompatible 
with the spirit of the Order. Our 
spirit seems closer to the contem- 
plative life of the Trappists; yet we 
conduct our foreign missions more 
on the style of the Maryknollers, 
Jesuits, or any of the other more 
active Orders. How is our foreign 
missionary work then integrated 
with the monastic ideals of St. Paul 
of the Cross? This is an important 
angle of our spirit that should be 
developed and explained due to the 
prominence our foreign mission work 
plays in the Congregation. 

In investigating the theological 
content of St. Paul's ideal we must 
also take into consideration the pres- 



238 



ent status of the Congregation. Fr. 
Albert Deane quotes this important 
passage from Cardinal Ehrle: "Most 
often the God of all majesty gives to 
saintly founders of Congregations 
only the broadest outlines. He leaves 
the rest to the judgment and ingen- 
uity of men, who learn from experi- 
ence as they go along ..." (Selected 
Letters," pg. 293) Now while this ap- 
plies more to the concrete organiza- 
tion of the Institute, might this not 
also apply to St. Paul of the Cross's 
religious ideals? Is there room, we 
may ask, for a real theological de- 
velopment (or development of doc- 
trine) regarding our particular 
spirituality? Personally, I think so. 
There seems to be no reason why 
one or other founder of religious 
institutes should have exhaustively 
known all the applications of his re- 
ligious principles. We do not attrib- 
ute this to the apostles themselves in 
their grasp of Catholic dogma. Under 
the guidance of the Holy Spirit the 
Church down successive centuries 
attains a more comprehensive grasp 
of the deposit of Faith. Hence there 
may possibly be the same type of 
development in the spirituality of an 
Order. Interesting, for example, 
would be: has St. Gabriel or St. Gem- 
ma contributed anything to the un- 
derstanding of St. Paul's spirituality? 
Here too we see the need for a posi- 
tive re-formulation of St. Paul's 
spiritual doctrine that would not be 
warrented solely by use of a purely 
historical methodology. 

Granting, hypothetically, that we 
would distill St. Paul's authentic 
spirituality, how should we make our 
adaptations to modern life? Here I 



think we should adopt what might 
be called the "principle of purpose- 
ful substitution." If we are going to 
abandon any of our traditional prac- 
tices, we should first ascertain what 
was their original purpose. Then we 
should try to substitute some other 
practice, if possible, which would fill 
an analogous function today. The 
substitution need not necessarily be 
in precisely the same field. For ex- 
ample, we have given up wooden 
eating utensils. Their original pur- 
pose seems to have been an expres- 
sion of poverty; what thing could we 
substitute today that would make us 
more truly poor according to today's 
standards? In this way we would 
safeguard our spirit, and avoid being 
merely negative in our approach to 
adaptation. 

Again, let me say I whole-hearted- 
ly agree in theory with Fr. Ward's' 
conclusions. However, the problem 
of adaptation and a more intesified 
living of Passionist ideals seems to 
be somewhat larger than simply 
learning the true meaning of our 
spirituality. Such a solution seems 
only a segment of the true answer. 
Perhaps the American situation is 
too close at hand for me to make an 
adequate judgement of the needs of 
the Congregation as a whole. But for 
our country it seems our biggest 
difficulty is coping with the spirit 
of secularism. Our Rule, as it stands, 
needs little, if any, changes. One dan- 
ger I see with over-emphasizing the 
importance of this problem of spirit- 
ualities is that we will miss or mini- 
mize a problem that is closer at 
hand. Certainly a precise delineation 
of St. Paul's spirituality would act 



237 



as a trenchant guage to judge the 
way we are living our lives, but 
should not the common ascetical 
ideals of the Church also offer such 
a norm? If such more universal 
ideals do not stir us to react against 
the more immediate problem of se- 
cularism, then it is possible that a 
precise spirituality will accomplish 
little. In this problem, an ounce of 
discipline is worth a pound of spirit. 



This is a rather short-sighted, prag- 
matic view, I admit but it empha- 
sizes the role of our wills in accept- 
ing any ideal placed before us. 

May I once more congratulate Fr. 
Ward and the Passionist on a needed 
job well done? The genius of our 
Holy Founder is behind such high 
caliber work and will bring it to 
fulfilment. 

Sodalis Americanus 




238 



vox 



MAIORUM 



NOSTRORUM 




INSTRUCTIONS 

To be observed in our Retreats, 

Relative to the Archives for the 

custody of documents. 

In virtue of the obligation imposed 
by the Apostolic Constitution Max- 
ima vigilantia of Benedict XII, of 
blessed memory, it is necessary that 
all the Retreats of our Congregation 
follow with diligence and uniform- 
ity the instructions of said Constitu- 
tion regarding the erection and keep- 
ing of archives and of the faithful 
and safe preserving of documents 
pertaining to churches, religious 
houses and pious places of any kind. 
In view of the intsructions of the 



Fr. John Baptist of St. Vincent 

Ferrer, Second General of the 

Congregation. 

Holy See, expressed in precise and 
rigorous terms and joined with the 
threat of severe censures, we order 
that each of the following points, 
taken from the aforementioned Bull, 
be given prompt and preserving exe- 
cution. 

1. — Although up to the present 
there has been an archive for the 
custody of documents in every one 
of our Retreats, nonetheless in order 
to insure a more precise and uniform 
system (as has already been done for 
the General Archives of the entire 
Congregation and for the particular 
archive of the Retreat of the Holy 
Martyrs Saints John and Paul) there 



239 



must be assigned and determined a 
particular room, safe and becom- 
ming, not subject to moisture or any 
other danger, in which there is to 
be built a suitable safe or vault, di- 
vided into different sections into 
which the abovementioned papers 
can be placed orderly and distinctly 
according to their nature. 

2. — In the Retreat designated as 
the regular residence of the Father 
Provincial there shall be another 
safe, in the same manner as de- 
scribed above, which shall serve as 
the common archive of the respec- 
tive Province. Clearly in view, that 
is on the front part of each Archive, 
there shall be the corresponding in- 
scription; of the last mentioned: 
Common Archives of the Province of 
N . . . ; and on the others of particu- 
lar Retreats: Archives of this Re- 
treat of N... 

3. — Each of the mentioned Arch- 
ives or safes shall be closed with 
two different locks and the keys 
thereto to be kept as follows: The 
one key of the Common Provincial 
Archives shall be in the hands of 
the respective Father Provincial, the 
other to be held by one of his con- 
suitors or by him whom the Pro- 
vincial appoints as Archivist; as to 
the keys for the Archives of particu- 
lar retreats: one key is to be kept 
by the respective Father Rector the 
other by the Archivist of the Re- 
treat: for the present till a new ap- 
pointment takes place the respec- 
tive Vicar of the house shall hold 
the second key. Concerning the var- 
ious Archivists mentioned it is here- 
by ordered that (even as done here 
with the General Archives) every 



year they shall be appointed by the 
Father Provincial, both for the Pro- 
vincial as well as for the local 
Archives; the Father Provincial thus 
shall yearly appoint or reappoint 
as Archivst whom he thinks fit. 

4. — Having thus provided an arch- 
ive and an archivist, the respective 
documents shall be placed therein; 
special shelves or compartments shall 
be marked for the various kinds of 
documents and each document itself 
shall be marked so to indicate its 
contents. 

5. — And that it be known which 

documents are to be preserved in 

the abovedescribed Archives, the 

following instructions, taken from 

the abovementioned Bull, shall serve. 

I 

Documents to be preserved 

the Provincial Archives 

Account of all Visitations and their 
Decrees. 

All Publications, that is Circular 
Letters, which should also be regis- 
tered in a separate book. 

All Dimisorial and Testimonial 
Letters furnished for those to be 
ordained. 

A book containing the oaths of 
perseverance to be made by all be- 
fore receiving Subdeaconship; this 
oath must be made in presence of 
two witnesses and must be signed 
by the persons to be ordained; the 
form of this oath is the same as that 
prescribed for Novices before their 
profession. If this oath be taken in 
a Retreat not the Retreat where the 
Provincial resides, the Rector of the 
house, or he who has been delegated 
to accept the oath, must send in the 
document that it can be inserted in 



240 



the porper place of this book. 

A register of the approved Confes- 
sors, the special faculties granted to 
our Congregation and the petitions 
issued to receive the approval of the 
Ordinary for confessions. 

All the certificates of ordinations, 
especially those of the Priesthood. 

All the certificates of Baptism and 
Confirmation and all other attesta- 
tions or documents pertaining to the 
religious of the Province; these 
therefore must be sent from the 
Novitiate after profession. 

All Briefs or Apostolic Rescripts, 
whether from the Sacred Congrega- 
tions or Bulls, that have reference to 
the Province. 

All the Acts of Chapters. 

A registers of deaths indicating 
the place or retreat together with 
note of day month and year. 

A register in which the names of 
those dismissed from the Congrega- 
tion are given. 

The Father Provincial is also to 
see to it that an authentic copy of 
the documents concerning the foun- 
dation of the respective Retreats as 
well as of other important documents 
pertaining to the various retreats be 
kept in these archives. 
II 
Documents to be kept 
in every Retreat 

The instruments and other docu- 
ments concerning the erection and 
foundation of the retreat and of the 
church. 

The privilges or concessions and 
permissions given via Indult of the 
Supreme Pontiff or of the Sacred 
Congregations or of secular princes 
or of others, either in the original 



or in authentic copy. 

There is to be kept a book entitled 
'Platea' in which a distinct descrip- 
tion be made of the real estate 
around the retreat and of all the 
rights and deeds etc. pertaining to 
retreat or church. 

Similarily another book in which 
are recorded all the notices concern- 
ing foundations, concessions, privi- 
leges and prerogatives of church or 
retreat. 

The authentics and note of all in- 
dulgences granted and of all the 
relics that are kept there. 

A copy of the sentences, judicial 
acts and decisions of the Sacred 
Congregations; notice of the cases, 
contraversies, litigations which took 
place in either ecclesiastical of se- 
cular tribunals in things pertaining 
to the Retreat or church. 

A book containing distinct notice 
of the death of the religious or any 
one else who died in the retreat in- 
dicating the burial and the day, hour, 
month and year. 

An inventory of the moveable pro- 
perty, utensils, cloth, laundry and 
the other articles, both sacred and 
profane, including also the books, 
belonging to the church or the re- 
treat. This inventory is to be brought 
up to date every three years, before 
the Provincial Chapter by noting 
whatever has been removed or con- 
sumed or acquired. This is to be 
noted on the current inventory. 
Ill 
Documents to be kept in 
the Novitiate Archives 

Beyond the papers mentioned 
above pertaining to the retreat there 
must be here a book in which is 



241 



registered the day, hour, month and 
year of the entrance of Novices, their 
vestition and of their leaving, in 
case they do not persevere to their 
profession. 

Another book in which the renun- 
ciation of use of property is noted, 
which is made by novices before 
their profession; this renunciation, 
according to the Council of Trent is 
to be made within the last two 
months before profession, and not 
to have any effect until the profes- 
sion has been made. 

A further book in which is noted, 
with the same indication of time as 
noted above, their profession; this 
must be signed by each one of them. 

A book in which the oath of perse- 
severence made by the Novices be- 
fore profession; this oath is taken in 
presence of two witnesses and the 
Superior of the Retreat. 

After the abovementioned docu- 
ments shall have been orderly placed 
into their respective compartments, 
as was explained above, there is to 
be compiled a double catalogue or 
inventory in which all the documents 
are registered in the same order as 
they are found in the archives to- 
gether with a brief summary or 
epitome notation after the mention 
of each document. Then to avoid 
confusion in the future and to in- 
sure that each document remains in 
its proper place, each document is 
to be numbered in the same order as 
they are placed in the same archives 
and the same number is to be used 
for the document in the inventory or 
catalogue; the catalogue shall be di- 
vided into paragraphs corresponding 
to the different compartments in the 



archives according to the different 
kinds of documents; the first docu- 
ment in each compartment of the 
archives (and also the first docu- 
ment mentioned in each paragraph 
of the inventory) shall be numbered 
one; a few blank sheets of paper shall 
be added after each paragraph of the 
inventory so that future documents 
to be placed into the archives can be 
catalogued in their proper place. 
When compiling the catalogue of the 
documents care shall be taken to in- 
sure that all the documents are ac- 
tually in the archives and if it be 
found that some are missing all care 
shall be taken to find them and to 
place them where they belong. This 
shall be a particular duty of the 
Father Provincial and the Father 
Rector. Every January the new docu- 
ments of the past year and those 
that have been overlooked, shall be 
placed into the archives. 

7. — The two mentioned inventories 
of documents shall be made identical, 
numbered on every page by the one 
appointed archivist in presence of 
the dean priest in each respective 
retreat and by the respective Father 
Provincial or Father Rector, who 
will also sign his name at the bottom 
of each page. One of the two men- 
tioned inventories will be kept in 
the archives themselves and the 
other by the respective Father Pro- 
vincial and Father Rector; at the 
termination of their office they shall 
consign it to their respective succes- 
sor. For this reason they shall bring 
them to the Provincial Chapter and 
during the Chapter give an account 
regarding the Inventory and if the 
Archives have been established and 



242 



kept up to date as prescribed. 

8. — It is the precise obligation of 
the Father General or Provincial or 
of any other person delegated to 
make the visitation also to make an 
exact inspection of the Archives to 
see if all the prescriptions regarding 
same have been carried out and to 
remedy defects, if necessary with 
the punishments contained in the 
mentioned Bull. Therefore the visi- 
tator, appointed as mentioned above, 
in his account of the visitation must 
also mention to the Father General 
or the Father Provincial (depending 
upon by whom he was delegated) 
the condition in which he finds the 
archives and give evidence that he 
has diligently inspected them to in- 
sure an accurate following of this 
letter, which is based on the Papal 
Bull and, if necessary, suggest that 
their authority be used to insure 
proper corrections etc. 

9. — It is never permitted to take 
any document from the archives 
without the express permission of 
the respective Superior without 
whose permission it is not even al- 
lowed to make a copy of one; if for 
some just reason such a permission 
is granted such a document must be 
returned within three days; to in- 
sure this a special book is to be kept 
in which the one taking the docu- 
ment obliges himself with his sig- 
nature to return the paper within 
three days, and this book is to be 
kept in the archives themselves. 

10. — Finally in order that every- 
thing here ordered be carried out 



with all exactness and diligence and 
care( although mere reflecting on 
the damage possible for non-observ- 
ance should suffice) and that all 
may be conscious of the obligation 
imposed by this letter according to 
the Bull mentioned, we here quote 
the very words of the Papal instruc- 
tion as to the obligation imposed: 
"We enjoin under the precept of 
holy obedience the execution of each 
and all points mentioned upon all 
ecclesiastics in sacred orders under 
pain of suspension 'a divinis'; all 
regulars of either sex, suspension 
from office and privation of active 
and passive voice; all seculars major 
excommunications. The absolving 
and relaxation of these censures and 
punishments is reserved to the Rom- 
an Pontiff. 

11. — And in order that the Super- 
iors may not grow amiss in their 
duty in this and that they may be 
vigilant and diligent in procuring 
and maintaining the constant ob- 
servance of what has been here pre- 
scribed, we quote the following: "Let 
all mentioned Prelates and Regular 
Superiors strive with all diligence to 
have observed all contained in this 
Our Constitution and to advert to 
the great harm that could threaten 
churches by hiding rights which they 
are bound to guard and preserve 
with all their power by the very fact 
of the obligations they assumed when 
taking their office and dignity; there- 
fore they shall remind those who dis- 
obey that they can be forced by the 
methods of law and punishments. 

Given in the Retreat of Sts John 



243 



and Paul in Rome on the 31 of March, 
1779. 



John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer 

General. 



Note: As will be noticed the matters treated in this letter are taken care of in present day Canon Law 
by somewhat differnt means and regulations. The letter does, however, show us how concerned our 
early Fathers were about keeping a.i up to date archive, general, Provincial and local. 



THE WILL OF QOD 

In the Letters 
of 

St. Paul of the Cross 

by Marcel Villers, S.J. 

(Revue D'Ascetique et Mystique, April-June 1951) 

Translated by Fr. Simon, Wood, C.P., 

Holy Cross Seminary, Dunkirk, N. Y. 



When Joseph Strambi of Civitavec- 
chia sought to reclaim his son who 
had joined the Passionists against 
his father's wishes, St. Paul of the 
Cross wrote to him to point out that 
neither he nor any of his religious 
had influenced the young priest to 
become a Passionist, but rather had 
dissuaded him on the score of his 
delicate health; however, they had 
had to bow before a vocation coming 
so clearly from God: 

"Ought I to set myself against the 
will of God", he wrote, "and assume 
the grave obligation of having to give 
an account to the tribunal of God for 
the soul of Don Vincent? I do not 
have the heart to commit so grevious 
a sin, nor do I feel willing at present 



to command Don Vincent to return 
home. Souls belong to God, and I do 
not want to oppose His holy Will. I 
never sought out y:ur son. If of his 
own accord, he wants to go, I will 
not hold him, but in conscience I 
cannot command him to go. If God 
is not calling him, he will himself 
decide to return, but if God is calling 
him, who are we to stand in the 
way?" Then, without discussing whe- 
ther Vincent would do more good 
in the world than in religious life, 
he added: "I tell you only that God 
has no need of man, and that the 
greatest good He demands of each 
is the accomplishment of His holy 
Will. That is what Don Vincent is 
seeking, and I cannot prevent him." 2 



244 



It is because this letter manifests 
so well the exceptional esteem that 
St. Paul of the Cross had for the 
Divine Will that I have quoted the 
principal portions of it at the begin- 
ning of these pages in which I intend 
to show the place the Will of God 
held in his spirituality. This is the 
year of the cannonization of Saint 
Vincent Strambi, so it will also re- 
flect honor both on the writer of the 
letter and on the saint about whom 
it is written. 

If I choose this subject, it is sure- 
ly because the doctrine of the Will 
of God shows up as so salient a part 
of St. Paul's thought, and as the 
central idea that explains and dom- 
inates the whole. 

As characteristic as it is of his 
teaching, however, I do not maintain 
that it distinguishes and sets St. Paul 
apart from the spiritual writers of 
his day. I would say, instead, that 
it is precisely through this doctrine 
that he comes the closest to his con- 
temporaries and immediate prede- 
cessors and becomes part of the 
strong — but not sufficiently studied — 
spiritual current of abandonment to 
God; through it, he is preeminently 
a man of his times. 

There is a second reason, also, as 
cogent as the first, and this is to 
attempt to understand the importance 
of this teaching of his, and to see 
its wonderful harmony with what 
is truly the original source of his 
spiritual life: participation in the 
Passion of Our Lord, and union with 
the suffering Christ. 

This doctrine the saint presents to 
us, not neatly arranged in a formal 
treatise in which the parts are ex- 



plained with all their implications, 
but in letters that are written has- 
tily, in personal terms, in great num- 
bers and addressed to different sorts 
of correspondents. The edition pub- 
lished by Fr. Amadeus of the Mother 
iclf the Good Shepherd at Rome in 
1924 includes 1882 letters, and others 
have been discovered since. It is true 
that there are purely official letters 
among them pertaining to the Con- 
gregation of the Passionists or to 
some particular retreat, but the great- 
er number are spiritual letters. 

The writer of these letters does 
not concern himself with pure theory. 
In giving directions he makes very 
few explanations, but proceeds large- 
ly fyy allusions and an appeal to prin- 
ciples — with a completely practical 
aim, therefore, like a physician giving 
a prescription. The man, however, has 
an experience that is so profound 
and well-rounded (he is obviously 
the greatest mystic and the greatest 
spiritual leader of 18th Century It- 
aly), his sanctity is so evident, he 
has so much benevolence and kind- 
ness that, without in the least min- 
imizing the demands of the perfection 
to which so firmly he directs all his 
correspondents, he is still the most 
encouraging of guides and the most 
enheartening of masters. 

If we look only at the way he lived, 
we would expect to find rugged and 
steep the way which he travelled 
himself and sought to lead others to. 
But when we read his letters this 
impression disappears almost entire- 
ly, so well does he know how to say 
just the right word of comfort to re- 
assure and console, and the right 
heroic word to stimulate and support. 



245 



He belongs truly to the line of great 
directors: he possesses so much skill, 
prudence, balance and good sense 
that he is never at a loss for words, 
no matter how often he protests his 
his incompetence or manifests em- 
barrassment in handling a more in- 
volved case. Besides, he uses a lang- 
uage that is so simple and direct — 
the language of the people in pro- 
verbs — that, despite its elevation, his 
thought is very rarely obscure and 
its main points can easily be under- 
stood. 

The most striking thing about him 
is what I would like to call his sense 
for the essential, a trait that I have 
not found in the same degree in any 
other spiritual director. This man 
who is always in poor health, always 
under pressure, who is compelled to 
act quickly because he has no time 
to waste, puts his finger immediately 
upon what is fundamental. We might 
think that he is incessantly on the 
search for short cuts and telling 
methods. 1 Without fear of repeating 
himself, he has a talent for insisting 
upon what is important. We have 
here, it seems to me, a trait of charac- 
ter worth singling out; but lest my 
observation be 'only a vague and sub- 
jective impression I Will rely on the 
texts. 

The emphasis that he places on the 
Will of God is truly remarkable. We 
can say of him what has been said 
of St. Ignatius Loyola, that he was 



",a man of the Will of God." The foun- 
der of the Jesuits, "and obsession 
with the Will of God." Often, at the 
end of his letters, St. Ignatius would 
beg his correspondents to obtain for 
him the grace of knowing the will of 
God better that he might fulfill it 
more perfectly. The great saint of 
Lombardy habitually asked prayers, 
instead, that the Will of God would 
be accomplished in him and (outside 
him. While the former, following 
the example of the Apostle, often 
used the ejaculatory prayer: "Lord, 
What will you have me do?", the 
latter repeats more readily the words 
of the Savior: "Fiat voluntas tua." 
In other words, the spirituality of St. 
Paul iof the Cross is orientated more 
to the Will of Good-pleasure than to 
the signified Will of God. 

Like his contemporary St. Alphon- 
sus de Ligouri, St. Paul makes fre- 
quent use of the terms: unijormita 
and unijormarsi, but these two words 
which, in St. Alphonsus' language, 
designate active conformity iof one's 
will to the Will of God, in St. Paul's, 
usually refer to a passive conformity. 
The reason, perhaps, is that St. Paul 
for the most part directed contem- 
plative souls like his own, and his 
personal attraction as well as his 
experience with the souls of others 
led him, hot indeed to neglect the 
necessary active conformity, but to 
focus more of his attention upon the 
passive aspect of conformity. 



246 



PERFECTION AND 

There are itwo facts (that strike us. 
First, while, to be brief, we can 
reduce the definitions and occasional 
descriptions which St. Paul gives of 
perfection to two kinds: one, iden- 
tified with complete conformity to 
the Will of God, the other, consisting 
in the acquisition of the virtues, 
still it is certainly the first kind 
that is the most ordinary and the 
only important one, the one which 
we must consider definitive and the 
most representative io<f the Saint's 
thought. The other is secondary and 
accessory and appears only as an 
explanation and development of the 
first. Two reasons lead me to this 
conclusion: (a) among the virtues 
which he incorporates into the spiri- 
tual edifice of perfectibn and which 
are, as it were, its foundation-stones, 
he always mentions union with the 
Will of God under some form: (b) 
whatever he calls it, this union with, 
or conformity to the Will of God is 
for him the supreme essential virtue, 
the one that most pleases God and 
occupies the most important part of 
the spiritual life. 

Seconly, while the various defin- 
itions and references in which St. 
Paul clearly identifies complete con- 
formity to God's Will — and that 
alone — with perfection, undoubtedly 
give proper attention to active con- 
formity, still it is passive conformity 
and its fundamental attitudes that he 
insists upon the most often; he relies 
upon it so fully, indeed, that it is 
true to say that the one expression 
that most appropriately and exactly 
characterizes his manner of going to 



THE WILL OF GOD 

God and of directing others to Him 
is the way of abandonment. There 
is a letter to Thomas Fossi after he 
became a Passionist, written on the 
8th of October, 1772, in which St. 
Paul of the Cross says without any 
qualification: "Perfection consists in 
acquiring true virtues." 5 But the 
words that follow indicate clearly the 
essential role that he gives to the 
Will of God: "And prayer does not 
consist in having consolations, tears 
. . . one does not give strong men 
the nourishment of infants; after the 
fall comes the hard winter, and it 
is very true that the best thing is 
to take whatever Gbd sends, and to 
allow oneself to be governed entirely 
by His infinite Goodness (always do- 
ing our part and fulfilling His divine 
Will in all things.)" 

Thirty-three year earlier, on June 
11th, 1739, he had written to Vit- 
toria Fossi, the wife of the same 
Thomas: "He who is the most hum- 
ble and patient and obedient and 
charitable, and the most abandaned 
to the divine Will, he is the most 
perfect." 

St. Paul, indeed, never fails to put 
conformity to God's Will among the 
foundation-stones of perfection. 7 To 
Laura Gianotti he addressed the fol- 
lowing lines on March 19, 1234: "Prac- 
tice the holy virtues; humility, obe- 
dience, mortificati'jnt-interior and ex- 
terior — are the foundation-stones. 
Love self-contempt. Above all, form 
for yourself the important habit of 
abandonment to the Will of God." 8 
There we can see, the essential role of 
abandonment. 



247 



Again and again, self-contempt en- 
ters into his definition, together with 
accomplishment of the Will of God: 
"True perfection consists in this: the 
accomplishment of the Will of God, 
and self-cpntempt." 9 Whenever he 
would define What was for him the 
most important thing in the spiritual 
life, he would say, similarly: "The 
principal pbint of the devout life is 
contempt of ourselves and perfect 
union with the Divine Will. May His 
Majesty grant it to all." 10 In a letter 
to Agnes Grazi, he tells her to ask 
St. Frances de Paula for herself and 
and for him a profound annihilation 
before God," with true contempt of 
oureslves, and a total union with, and 
transit rmati on in the divine Good- 
pleasure.. 11 

Whatever the value he attached to 
self-contempt, I fully believe (that the 
two elements of this definition do 
not have the same importance in his 
thought. Does he not tell us which 
one is essential for him when he says 
— to mention only one instance: "Our 
sanctification and perfection consists 
in doing perfectly the holy Will of 
God."? 12 

In a letter to Sr. M. Cherubim 
Bresciani, a Poor Clare of Piombino, 
St. Paul describes three fundamental 
degrees of passive conformity: "True 
love of God is exercised on the Cross 
of (the well-beloved, Jesus Christ. And 
the true manner of being enriched 
with graces in the midst of interior 
and exterior sufferings is to nourish 
oneself with the divine Will. This is 
important; it is great perfection to 
resign oneself in everything to the 
divine Will; it is greater perfection 
tio live abandoned with deep indif- 



ference to the divine Good-pleasure; 
the greatest and highest perfection is 
to nourish oneself, in a pure spirit 
of faith and love, on the divine 
Will." 13 

The reader may be led to believe, 
solely on the strength of these lines, 
that our saint consistently considered 
abandonment more elevated than re- 
signation, and that the union with 
the divine Will of one who nourishes 
himself on it brings him to abandon- 
ment. It is true that certain texts 
keep such a distinction clear, those 
for example in which he affirms that 
holiness consists in being totally uni- 
ted to the Will of God, 14 that perfect, 
total union with the Will of God is 
the highest degree of perfection, and 
"he who is the most united and trans- 
formed into the divine Good-pleasure 
is . . . the holiest," 15 and also those 
texts in which he declares that aban- 
donment implies perfect resignation. 
But he speaks more usually as if 
there were no precise distinction be- 
tween these three notions: resigna- 
tion, abandonment and union with 
the Divine Will. He is forever mixing 
them up, confusing them and shifting 
from one to the other. These three 
words, if they are not perfect syno- 
nyms, at least seem equivalents and 
indicate simply nuances that are 
barely distinguishable, or better three 
aspects or three directions of one 
and the same virtue. Since he takes 
each in its widest sense, or, if I may 
call it that, in their complete perfec- 
tion: resignation in all things aban- 
donment in all things, union with 
God's Will in all things, he very often 
uses one for the other. 

Resignation he conceived of only 



248 



as animated by perfect charity, and 
this is an absolute sense: true resig- 
nation includes in itself perfect char- 
ity. 16 So there is no need to be sur- 
prised when he calls resignation "the 
treasure of (treasures," 17 and we know 
that he said the same thing of chari- 
ty: " I rejoice in Jesus Christ to 
learn that you live always more de- 
sirous of loving the dear Jesus; your 
desire will be accomplished, because 
the Lord will grant you the great gift 
of holy love, which is the treasure of 
treasures." 18 

With the logic of the saints, at the 
very start he sets his course toward 
perfection, and never strays from it; 
it is toward the most perfect that he 
makes sure to direct, as swiftly as 
he can, the chosen souls who are 
under his direction. He would believe 
he had done them an injustice if he 
spoke to them of a resignation which 
stopped half-way, accepting God's 
Will only grudgingly or for any mo- 
tive that was not the most perfect, 
as if there were no other way of 
acting. 

Obviously he is not thinking of any 
division of the three degrees of per- 
fection when he tells us that "resig- 
nation is the virtue which pleases 
God the most," 19 and that "he who 
is the most resigned is the most 
holy." 20 There is no appreciable dif- 
ference between resignation and 
abandonment and union, or between 
resigning oneself and abandoning 
oneself and uniting oneself. In fact, 
St. Paul says as well: "Ybu will be 
as pleasing to God as you live the 
more abandoned." 209 

He is also evidently equating aban- 
donment and union when he repeats 



that "the best way is to live aban- 
doned to the divine Will." 21 This 
recommendation seems to say that 
abandonment is the best way, at least 
for the difficulties raised by Thomas 
Ftossi in the letter to which the saint 
was replying. But it is absolutely the 
best way in itself that he is discussing 
in his words to D. Dominic Oiarelli, 
of September 3, 1748: "Your Most 
Reverend Lordship does very well 
to abandon yourself in all things to 
the Most holy Will of God, which is 
the most perfect thing that one can 
do." 22 

St. Paul's insistence <on passive con- 
formity is so evident that I need 
only to mention it; I have not dwelt 
on it at any length. The remainder 
of this article will simply put it in 
clearer light. For the present, I am 
content to make a few remarks. 

As impressive as the number of 
allusions to passive conformity al- 
ready is in all the texts which treat 
directly or indirectly lof perfection, 
more significant still is the manner 
in which our saint develops the three 
principal attitudes of passive con- 
formity as degrees of perfection. St. 
Paul of the Cross evidently makes 
perfection consist in the accomplish- 
ment of the divine Will and very 
often he expresses his own desire 
to do the Will cf God. But to do the 
Will of God is an ambiguous expres- 
sion: it can mean passive conformity 
as well as active conformity. One ex- 
ample will be sufficient to prove 
how easily this assertion applies. We 
read in a letter to a religious, August 
9, 1757: "It is many years ago that 
I asked the Lord in my peer cold 
prayers that He would make me do 



249 



His divine Will perfectly, for I wished 
to nourish myself on His Will in all 
happenings," 24 Now, to do the Will 
of God in all happenings and to be 
nourished on it is first of all to ac- 
cept it and to be abandoned to it. 
The words of Our Lord: "My nourish- 
ment is to do the Will of My Father," 
has always been interpreted in the 
sense of passive conformity. 25 

Abandonment is at one and the 
same time "perfection, " "the means 
of perfection," and "the short cut to 
perfeetibn." "Embrace the Will of 
God lovingly in every sort of anguish : 
this is the great formula for arriving 
quickly iat perfection." 26 

Sometimes, he puts emphasis on 
the acceptance of trials: "the mis^ 
fortunes of the world, when they are 
accepted as from the loving hands 
of God with resignation (rassegna- 
zione) to His Holy Will, serve to 
make us run farther in the way of 
the divine precepts." 28 Again, aban- 
donment is joined to the virtues and 
to the attitudes that necessarily go 
with it: "When you conduct your- 
self as a completely guileless child 
reposing on the loving breast of Jesus 
Christ, mystically leaving all your 
cares and desires and even good in- 
tentions tto disappear, keeping your- 
self in a true interior solitude with 
true humility of heart and perfect 
abandonment to the divine Good- 
pleasure, then you will most quickly 
become holy." 29 

He wants to help Agnes Grazi ad- 
vance 'in holy love"; so he recom- 
mends to her "to abandon herself 
more and more," just as if the pro- 
gress of abandonment would measure 
the progress of love. 30 This recom- 



mendation to abandon self more and 
more is a frequent one. 31 

Thomas Fossi also received this 
instruction: "The more you nourish 
yourself on the divine Will, accepting 
every trial without looking at the 
creature but considering it only as 
a gift from the Creator, the more 
easily will you accomplish something 
worthwhile, and fly to perfection by 
the shortest path." 32 

Once St. Paul reminded Agnes 
Grazi: "In keeping with the present 
condition of your spiritual develop- 
ment, you ought to lose sight more 
and more of all ceratures and images 
of being and to become more impres- 
sed with the knowledge iaf your own 
real and fearful nothingness; when 
this grand despoiling has been ac- 
complished, you must wish to die 
ever more to self and to every created 
thing, to put your nothingness in 
that All which God is, and to lose 
yourself there, so absorbed that you 
forget self and every creature." Then 
he concludes: "the short cut to ar- 
rive at true union with God is what 
I have already told you and repeated 
(so many times, both in letters and by 
word of mouth: he who Studies the 
science of his nbthingness is prepared 
to know the true All which is God." 33 
We might think that here we are far 
from the Will of God. By no means. 
In (this same letter, the saint tells 
us immediately after the passage we 
just quoted: "This nothingness pro- 
duces a continual abandonment and 
complete resignation to the divine 
Good-pleasure that leaves to God the 
care even of one's own perfection, 
and lives despoiled of attachment to 
every consolation." 3 * 



250 



This study of the ideas of St. Paul 
lof the Cross on perfection gives such 
emphasis 'to passive conformity that 
we are convinced his spirituality is 



a way of abandonment. A more de- 
tailed examination will confirm such 
a conclusion. 



WAY OF ABANDONMENT 



In his Letters, we find — 'and it 
strikes the eye alt first glance — the 
essential characteristics of the way 
of abandonment, just as Pere Piny 
has described them in the second 
chapiter of his work Le Plus Par fait, 
published in 1698. The habitual for- 
mula Pere Piny uses tto sum up those 
characteristics, "to allow God to act 
by accepting whatever He does," well 
describes its two fundamental aspects. 

a) Complete acceptance of the Will 
of God is, for St. Paul of the Cross, 
a first necessity. He practised it him- 
self, and manifested it to an extra- 
ordinary degree: "Even if I should 
find myself thrown like a criminal 
from lone prison failed with serpents 
into another full of dragons and 
basilisks, I ought to remain silent and 
approve God's disposal of me as ex- 
cellent." 35 

Nor does he seek to justify at any 
length this Will of God imposed on 
him as the best thing. 36 All that God 
has done is well done. In the face of 
events, there is no point in wanting 
them to be different than they are. 
It is all too clear that every complaint 
goes contrary to the Will of God. 
Therefore, he recommends accepting 
all things, especially trials, as coming 
directly from God and not frbun crea- 
tures, seeing all things by the light 
of faith in God or in the Good-plea- 
sure of God. To accept all from the 
loving hands of God, to see all things 



in the Good^pleasure of God, this is 
the way to find consolation in every- 
thing, "because in God, there is no 
pain, but only comfort, joy and light- 
heartedness." 40 

A submissive acceptance: "we must 
bow our heads before the Will of 
God; this is the rule for our perfec- 
tion," 41 and adore the dispensations 
of God. 42 A tranquil and peaceful 
acceptance. 43 A loving acceptance, 
that kisses the hand that strikes 
us. 44 A complete acceptance. 45 

b) Allowing God to do what He 
wants to do: This is the other aspect 
of abandonment. St. Paul of the Cross 
reminds us that we must trust our- 
selves completely to God, 46 put our- 
selves entirely in His hands and, in 
the saint's most habitual expression: 
"leave Him the care of everything," 47 
we should repose in Him in every- 
thing, 48 surrender all our worries to 
Him, even aibout cur perfection; 49 and 
"putting all our worries in God's 
hands." 50 retain only that of pleasing 
Him and of doing His Good-plea- 
sure. 51 We are to be content if all 
our plans, even good plans, are up- 
set, 52 provided only that the Will of 
God is accomplished. We are to let 
ourselves be guided by Him, by Prov- 
idence, 53 as though we were children; 
in order that He may do with us as 
He desires, "we must Willingly allow 
ourselves to be fashioned by Him." 5 * 

To certain restless souls too much 



251 



inclined to agitation, to seHnanalysis 
and introversion (like the good 
Thomas Fbssi, a wealthy landowner 
on the isle of Elba and father of a 
family, but later on a Passionist)-, he- 
recommends not thinking of them- 
selves in too great detail: 55 "advance 
toward the good," with the simplicity 
of children." 56 

There are certain expressions he 
uses that indicate clearly the peace 
and tranquility of a soul that has so 
placed all its cares in God: "to repose 
on the loving breast of the heavenly 
Father," to repose in the divine will. 57 

Of itself, the expression: "to allow 
God to act," underlines the passivity 
of abandonment. This passivity can be 
more or less pronounced. When he 
addresses contemplative souls, as is 
€iften the case, the mystic flavor of 
abandonment is more evident. His 
words to Fr. John Mary of St. Igna- 
tius: "Allow yourself to be led by 
God in a passive way," 58 show us how 
far it can go. We are very well in- 
formed of the role that he gives to 
abandonment in contemplative 
prayer. Undoubtedly, no one has 
shown more clearly than he at what 
point the spiritual current of aban- 
donment has aided souls to arrive at 
contemplation. 

c) Abandonment in prayer: 59 60 St. 
Paul of the Cross directed more than 
one soul called to contemplation, for 
example, Agnes Grazi. We have his 
letter to her in which, learning that 
she could no longer meditate or make 
the composition of place, he gives her 
a very clear direction far her prayer 
that actually consisted in abandon- 
ment to the guidance of God. 61 Aban- 
donment is here set forth as the best 



preparation for contemplation, the 
essential disposition [for gaining it. 
He also had under his direction souls 
that had already arrived at contem- 
plation, among others Sister Columba 
Gertrude Gandolfi. The counsels he 
gave her for her prayer are no dif- 
ferent from those he repeated many 
times to Agnes Grazi. 62 In prayer, 
abandonment is the normal disposi- 
tion for a contemplative soul. Since 
the contemplative soul is passive un- 
der the action of God and since con- 
templation is the action of God alone, 
the soul 63 has nothing else to do but 
to permit God to perform His divine 
work in it. 

"To allow God to act," in prayer. 64 
Now, this special direction for con- 
templatives is so much in accord 
with St. Paul's general teaching on 
the Will of God that it seems only 
a counsel of abandonment to, and 
perfect union with the Will of God. 
"We must arouse ourselves only when 
and as God wishes. In our nothing- 
ness, we must respond to the touches 
of God's love, and When the soul 
feels itself drawn, it ought to run 
after the divine sweetness, and as 
sown as it can return, to become ab- 
sorbed in its own real nothingness, 
with true nudity of spirit. You al- 
ready understand what I am saying; 
to explain it further, you must, with 
God's grace, detach your spirit from 
all created objects, keeping your will 
dead in the loving arms of God, so 
that the Most Holy Will of the Su- 
preme Good may live alone in us." 65 

In short, that is the only direction 
that St. Paul of the Cross would give 
to these two classes of sbuls, those 
on the way to contemplation, and 



252 



those who had already arrived there. 
But there is a wide variation in its 
formulation, so it is perhaps best to 
give the principal ones. 

One idea dominates them all, this 
is that the contemplative soul must 
"allow herself to be guided by the 
Holy Spirit," 66 and as St. Paul repeats 
so often to Agnes Grazi: "to make 
prayer not in one's own way, but in 
the Holy Spirit's way." 

Therefore, it is necessary to "yield 
to the attractions" of the Holy Spirit, 
to accept His attractions," "to obey 
His attractions," 68 "the divine attrac- 
tions," 69 to follow oneself to be moved 
by that "loving breath of the Holy 
Spirit," as soon as one feels it. 70 

It is God Who is the Master. With- 
out resisting His action, without any 
curiosity of spirit, we must "allow 
Him to accomplish His work in us," 
"to allow Him to perform His loving 
deeds. 71 

And as it is God who is "the place 
of prayer," 72 we are to allow the 
soul "to immerse itself entirely in 
the Supreme Good," "to lose itself 
in God" to be lost in, and over- 
whelmed by the Immensity of God, 74 
"to let our nothingness disapepar in 
the infinite All lof God. 75 This last 
expression is the most frequent, but 
it also has its variations: "to let one's 
fearful nothingness disappear in the 
joy of Our Savior." 76 

All these expressions— and I have 
not even tried to b3 comprehensive — 
highlight very well the role of God 
in contemplative prayer 77 and there- 
fore the indispensible docility of the 
soul to the divine action. But to give 
these expressions their exact sense 
and to prevent misunderstandings, it 



is necessary to read them in context, 
alongside of the other counsels that 
go with them and enable us to see, 
'alt a glance, their real meaning. 

St. Paul of the Cross knows well 
that if God does His part, man must 
also do his. In the very letter in 
which he tells Sister Columba Ger- 
trude Gandolfi that her prayer is pas- 
sive, he reminds her to do her part. 78 
And man's role is to eliminate the 
obstacles which can interfere with 
the divine action, that is, by prac- 
tising all the virtues, faith and es- 
pecially charity. It will be detach- 
ment from all created things, that 
fundamental humility which consists 
in keeping oneself in one's nothing- 
ness, and in holding nothing back 
from God. Does not St. Paul make 
the perfection of prayer consist in 
this fundamental disposition: "keep- 
ing oneself in one's nothingness . . . 
in order to hold nothing back from 
God?" 79 

This is how he described the role 
of man to a master of novices in 
speaking to him about infused prayer 
and the manner of preparing souls 
for it: "Since it is a free gift of 
God, no one should think he can 
lead another to it by sheer force of 
arms, as the saying is. But all the 
care of the master ought to be to 
train them in a firm habit of virtue 
and true humility of heart, knowledge 
of their own nothingness and con- 
tempt of self, true blind obedience, 
and to see that they develop a great 
love for this virtue and above all 
for true and perfect abnegation of 
their own self-will in everything, per- 
sonal mortification of their inclina- 
tions, their own opinions, sympathies 



253 



and antipathies. These are the fun- 
damental virtues for the spiritual ed- 
ifice and for obtaining the gift of 
holy prayer and union with God: 
otherwise one builds on sand." 80 

The point on which he insists the 
most is humility and the necessity of 
keeping oneself in one's nothing- 
ness 81 We can say that every time 
he gives a soul the counsel of aban- 
doning itself in prayer, he gives it 
at the same time, by way of counter- 
part, that of annihilating itself pro- 
foundly. Sometimes, he even adds — 
and this is a characteristic point in 
his mystical doctrine — that the soul 
should not come to prayer unless 
clothed with the sufferings of Christ, 
and to enter prayer, so to say, 
through the door of the Passion. 

It is sufficient to read, in order, 
all the successive letters he sent to 
Sister Coilumba Gertrude Gondolfi to 
be impressed by the frequency with 
which these three counsels recur. We 
ought to cite at least one example: 
"Continue your prayer in the manner 
in which God is leading you, and be 
very obedient to the loving attrac- 
tions of the Hloly Spirit; do not lose 
sight of your fearful nothingness that 
you may hold nothing back from the 
Blessed God- Go to your prayer im- 
mersed in your own nothingness but 
clothed with His sufferings, in pure 
faith and nudity of spirit, despoiled 
iof images and let your spirit make 
a grand flight of love that will lead 
you to the heavenly Spouse." 82 

St. Paul of the Cross, who wishes 
that man do his part in the way of 
contemplation and sets up as it were 
a constant counterweight to whatever 
excess passivity could bring, took 



great care to apply the same pre- 
cautions in the general practice of 
abandonment. He manifests, in this 
as in everything, his perfect balance 
of judgment. No one who has ever 
read him attentively could entertain 
any least suspicion that he overem- 
phasizes passivity. 

Pere Piny remarks that the way 
of abandonment "is not so passive 
with regard to God, accepting what- 
ever He does, that it is not also very 
active on its own part. It asks of each 
of us that we perform, whether ex- 
ternally or internally, all there is of 
duties, obligations and employments. 
The Will of God, in effect, enjoys 
the role of primary cause so far as 
we are concerned, but it does not ex- 
clude — what am I saying — it demands 
our cooperation as secondary causes, 
therefore the application of each one 
to all that duty dictates. But this 
activity ought to be accomplished 
without eagerness, without anxiety 
of spirit, without solicitude or wor- 

jvy "83 

St. Paul, at once an enemy of all 
excess and so judicious, never omit- 
ted to recommend to those he direc- 
ted everything demanded by active 
conformity with the Will of God. 
When we read his correspondence 
with Thomas Fossi, we may be sur- 
prised at the frequency with which 
he recalls him to the duties of his 
state; for certain periods, this advice 
is found in almost every letter he 
writes him. Nlo one highlights as he 
does the necessity of spiritual combat 
and the exercise of solid virtues. 

d) Union: the end obviously sought 
by all those who preach the way of 
abandonment is to be united with 



254 



God as perfectly, intimately, and in- 
separably as possible. Conformity, or 
uniformity with the Will of God, ac- 
cording to Pere Piny will go so far 
as '"being transformed, as the mys- 
tics say, to the Will of God, and pos- 
sessing no other will than that of 
God." Now, .this is what St. Paul of 
the Cr^ss wrote to Thomas Fossi: 
"AH your prayers, all your exercises 
ought to be directed toward uniting 
you closely to the Divine Will." And 
then, after having advised him to 
see ail his sufferings in the Will of 
God and to take everything imme- 
diately from His hands, he adds: 
"Embrace His most holy Will with 
holy affections, espouse it with the 
ring of faith and charity . . . This 
is the noblest, most fruitful, holiest 
exercise a soul can perform." 86 

But union ought to go further still, 
even to "a total transformation in the 
divine Good-pleasure." 87 To Sister 
Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, whtom he 
was reassuring in her interior trials, 
he wrote: "I rejoice in God . . . that 
the sovereign and infinite Goodness 
has led you to the state in which you 
now >are, that is to say, in naked 
suffering, a happiness devoid of 
every pleasure, ia love without joy, 
so that your soul, free from attach- 
ment to every satisfaction may place 
its happiness in being united to the 
Good^pleasure of the great heavenly 
Father who is the consolation of con- 
solations." And he concludes: "Keep 
yourself, then, hidden in Jesus Cru- 
cified without desiring anything but 
to be completely transformed by love 
in His divine Good-pleasure in every- 
thing . . . " 88 

St. Paul has nowhere indicated his 



deepest thought on union with the 
Will of God more clearly than in 
these words: "I do not want t> resist 
the most holy Will of the Most High, 
and I can tell you that I have no 
other thirst, that I can desire nothing 
else, ask for no ether grace for my- 
self but that of doing, of being to- 
tally united, and transformed by love 
in the ever adorable Will of the 
heavenly Father, and I desire most 
intensely that my nourishment be to 
do His most holy Will in the midst 
of any and every suffering, any and 
every trial." 89 

e) Not to think about the future: 
Abandonment implies the absence of 
solicitude about the future. St. Paul 
of the Cross repeats it as do all the 
partisans of the way of abandonment. 
"Do not think of the future, that is 
to say, about misfortunes, events that 
the imagination places before us, but 
make them disappear in the Will of 
God . . . without anxiously thinking 
of tomorrow." 90 He told Father Ful- 
gentius of Jesus, June 23, 1746: "Do 
not think of the future, but serve 
God without reserve." 91 

So also, he did not want anyone to 
try to predict the future: "To claim 
that one knows the future is to put 
oneself in danger of being deceived." 
But he desired that a person use the 
present moment to the fullest. One of 
his favorite thoughts was that one 
must look on each day and each in- 
stant as if it were the last, "so that 
such a thought might arouse us to 
press on to hloly perfection," 93 to each 
action as if it were the last, to cele- 
brate Mass as it were the last. 95 We 
must live at the present moment, love 
God at the present moment, as if it 



255 



were the last of our life. 96 We must 
do the Will of God at the present mo- 
ment. 97 "Happy is the soul that rests 
in the bosom of Gbd without thinking 
of the future, but sets itself to live 



at the present moment without any 
oare but that of doing His most holy 
Will in every happening, and in ac- 
complishing it faithfully in all the 
duties of its state." 98 



FRUITS OF ABANDONMENT 



If anyone had asked St. Paul of 
the Cross why he had such a pre- 
dilection for abandonment, I think 
he would have replied with his cus- 
tomary brevity that abandonment fa- 
cilitated for the better his own spiri- 
tual life because it is, as we already 
know, the most perfect, quickest and 
best way. If someone pressed him to 
give a more precise answer, he would 
have doubtless added that abandon- 
ment is the best means of putting 
and maintaining ourselves in peace, 
which is, of all the ways that lead 
to God, the simplest and surest. This 
is iat least the answer that he gives 
us in his Letters. To develop his 
thought on these three points will 
permit us to delve more profoundly 
into his teaching and to account bet- 
ter for the place that abandonment 
holds in it. 

a) Peace: In a letter to Thomas 
Fossi of 18 June, 1766, St. Paul made 
of abandonment "the shortest path" 
to perfection. But he will reach it 
only by a detour: "I am privileged 
to tell you and to repeat that the 
short cut to the acquiring of that 
true peace which is the offshoot of 
love of God, from which all the vir- 
tues flow as from an eternal source, 
is to take every trial, temporal or 
spiritual pain, sickness or infirmity 
of whatever sort they may be . . . 
from the loving hands of God, re- 



garding and receiving every unfavor- 
able event as a gift and treasure 
which is offered to us by the Heaven- 
ly Father and to repeat the Holy 
words of Christ Jesus: "Ita, Pater, 
quoniam sic fuit placitum ante te," 
and in this way to be always joyful 
and to take pleasure in the fact that 
His most holy and eternal Will is 
being accomplished in us; in short, 
I have just told you the shortest 
path to holy perfection." 100 

A short cut to perfection, abandon- 
ment is also at the same time, a 
short cut to peace. Peace is for St. 
Paul of the Cross, indeed, a matter 
of great importance which he pro- 
tects at all cost 1 ' 1 by allowing noth- 
ing to trouble him. 102 Of all the 
goods of the soul, it is the most 
precious, that which the devil seeks 
first of all to steal from us, because 
"he fishes only in troubled waters." 
103 In fact, we should not admit any 
fear save that which maintains us in 
peace. 104 It is absolutely necessary 
to keep one's heart tranquil, 105 and 
even if the world goes to pieces, we 
should not lose our peace. 106 For it 
is indispensable "for acting well in 
everything and for maintaining one- 
self in sinu Dei,' n07 because "it gives 
the soul more opportunity to exer- 
cise the holy virtues" 108 ; because it 
is "the most efficacious means of 
keeping oneself in the interior king- 



258 



dom": because, by assuring recollec- 
tion, it is "the great joy which makes 
us sons of God." 109 Now, peace is the 
fruit of abandonment. 110 The whole 
problem of interior recollection is 
spotlighted by these last lines. In 
attributing to peace the power of 
making us more and more sons of 
God, our saint simply makes us re- 
call what a privilege he considered 
recollection to be. 

The reason is that in fact, if peace 
and recollection are not identical, 
they are at least gifts well nigh in- 
separable. If there is recollection, 
there is peace. And peace, if it is 
to endure, must of necessity associ- 
ate itself with recollection; it is not 
only an indispensable condition, it 
is the necessary introduction. See 
the beginning of a letter to Teresa 
Palozzi, of March 29, 1759: "I rejoice 
in the Lord that you continue always 
recollected and in interior peace." 111 
"Recollection," he says in another 
place, is tranquil, peaceful, without 
commotion, without effort." "Con- 
tinue to keep yourself recollected in 
God, with tranquillity of spirit, with- 
out ever letting yourself become 
troubled about anything." He does 
not seem to make any distinction be- 
tween "keeping one's heart in tran- 
quillity," and "keeping one's heart 
recollected." 114 

Recollection — he wants us to make 
a good deal of it. The term by which 
he frequently designates it enables 
us to understand it very well. He 
calls it adoration in spirit and in 
truth. 115 It is, in effect, "the sacred 
desert," "the interior solitude in 
which God speaks to the soul words 
of eternal life and conserves the 



soul in perfect tranquillity." 116 It is 
prayer, in all its degrees, into which 
one enters only through the door of 
the Passion. It is the perpetual cause 
of progress, because it unceasingly 
renews the soul and makes it to be 
reborn to a new life: "Every time 
that the soul recollects itself united 
to God in the interior temple of its 
spirit, it is reborn to a new life of 
love in the Divine Word, Christ 
Jesus." 117 

This new birth, this continual 
deepening of the interior life, is 
spoken of in many passages. 118 At 
each repetition, his thought becomes 
more explicit: "The more often you 
center yourself upon God, in the 
most profound depths of interior 
solitude, the more often you will 
celebrate the divine mystical birth 
in your interior temple and you will 
be reborn at every moment to a di- 
vine life, godlike and holy, and fiet 
in te Divina Nativitas." 119 This is in- 
deed the way he taught perfect par- 
ticipation in the mystery of Christ- 
mas. 120 

It seems that St. Paul attributes 
to abandonment even the most re- 
markable of the effects of interior 
recollection: "How we ought to bless 
and glorify the divine mercy which 
does not permit us to feel any con- 
solation land so mixes bitterness with 
every nourishment that could satisfy 
us and bring us joy. This is one of 
the greatest graces that His divine 
Majesty accords to those who are the 
most dear to Him. Let us nourish 
our selves, then, on this divine Will 
and immerce ourselves often in this 
bath all of fire, the divine love. As 
often as we resign ourselves to the 



257 



divine Good-pleasure, we are bap- 
tised in the Holy Spirit, and made 
sons of God." 121 To abandon oneself 
fully and from the depths of the 
heart, one ought to have a heart that 
is recollected and turned toward 
God. "To rest on the breast 
of the heavenly Father," 122 "to 
rest in sinu Dei/' to rest in the 
arms of Jesus and all such similar 
expressions apply as well to interior 
recollection as to prayer, peace and 
abandonment. These four things, so 
intimately united to each other, we 
must not only bring to life in our- 
selves, but conserve, develop and 
make habitual. 

We are masters of our peace. We 
are ourselves the cause of our dis- 
quietudes. If we no not have peace, 
it is obviously our own fault. "It is 
because we do not receive with tran- 
quil submission all that happens as 
coming from the loving Providence 
of the Supreme Good." 124 

It is truly "the short path to keep 
our hearts in peace," 125 and "there 
is no other"; one must willingly "put 
one's spirit in tranquillity" and "pre- 
serve it in a holy indifference toward 
any happening whatever," "rejoice 
in God with the higher part of the 
soul that things go as they do." 126 

St. Paul iof the Cross seems to in- 
dicate yet another short cut to peace : 
complete detachment: "For the love 
of Jesus Christ, make yourself dumb, 
deaf and blind, and you will have a 
deep peace." 127 

To a religious who was letting 
herself get involved in details he 
wrote: "If you want to gain imper- 
turbable peace, the short cut to keep 
yourself in it is to imitate that holy 



monk who had received a large bun- 
dle of letters from his home and 
country. Without opening them, he 
threw them into the fire, saying: Go 
into the fire, thoughts of home and 
distractions. Do the same. Make a 
packet of your reflections, fears, pet- 
tinesses and minutiae and throw 
them into the fire of the divine 
love." 128 There is no doubt that com- 
plete detachment is necessary for one 
who wishes to abandon himself per- 
fectly. 129 

It is in the Will of God, and in 
abandonment that we must take ref- 
uge if we wish to preserve peace. 
"Your Reverence ought, in all hap- 
penings, hide yourself in the impreg- 
nable fortress of the divine Will : it 
is certain that then neither winds 
nor tempests can any longer inter- 
fere with the peace and tranquility 
of spirit that (are so necessary to do 
all things well." 130 

Often he used another comparison: 
"I intend to act as the vine-dresser 
or gardener when he sees a storm 
threatening, rain and hail begining 
to fall, and lightening and thunder; 
he takes refuge in his cottage and 
remains seated there in peace until 
the storm has passed. So I wish to 
act, and mean to do with the grace 
of God, and to keep myself in repose 
and tranquility under the protection 
of the divine Will." 131 

It is not only peace, but also joy, 
the full flowering of peace, that St. 
Paul of the Cross demanded of an 
abandoned soul: "Never make room 
in your heart for afflictions and 
much less for melancholy which is 
the ruin of peace." 132 We should 
walk in the service of God without 



258 



faint-heartedness or excessive fear, 
"with a great gaity." 133 The joy of 
abandonment, completely disinter- 
ested," is due to the knowledge that 
the Will of God is being accomplish- 
ed in all things," 134 The soul does 
not seek its own satisfaction, but it 
acts in such a way that all its de- 
light is "the delight of the Most 
High." 135 When one looks for no 
other consolation that that of "pleas- 
ing God," and of doing His Will, 136 
when "one wishes nothing but what 
God wishes," 138 one always has a 
real motive for being contented in 
God. 139 

b. Simplicity: Abandonment is the 
simplest way. Because it is the reme- 
dy for every evil, because there is no 
difficulty that it cannot resolve, 
abandonment helps the spiritual way 
to become greatly simplified. 

It is the remedy for every evil. 
There is no suffering, interior or 
exterior, that is not sweetened by 
"the balm of the divine Will." 139 So 
Saint Paul counselled abandonment 
in the sufferings both of body and 
of soul. To Father Francis of Jesus 
and Mary who was recovering from 
a sickness, he sends this wish: "I 
hope that the beneficial air of your 
home will help you, but abandon- 
ment (rassegnazione) will be even 
more profitable." 140 The principle is 
so general and its realization so prac- 
tical that he repeats it on every oc- 
casion: "The best remedy in diffi- 
culties is to adore and to love the 
Will of God in events." 141 

The "sure path" in trials whatever 
they may be, "is to keep oneself sub- 
missive to the divine Will and to 
allow oneself to be scourged by that 



loving hand". 142 "The short cut to 
be healed is a true peaceful resigna- 
tion (rassengazione) to the divine 
Will, living completely in repose in 
the arms of the Savior." 143 

To answer the difficulties of 
Thomas, a Man always uneasy and 
always being tried, St. Paul of the 
Cross wrote him: "I can tell you 
nothing else but that resignation 
(rassengazione) to the divine Will 
is a very efficacious means in all 
evils, trials, unpleasant happenings. 
When one receives and considers 
them in the divine Good-pleasure, 
they take on a different appearance 
of peace and consolation. Diligenti- 
bus Deum omnia cooperantur in 
bonum." Lii 

He assures Don Erasmus Tucci- 
nardi that news "always seems good 
to him, provided that the most holy 
and adorable Will of God be 
done." 145 

There is nothing astonishing, then, 
that patience, which he identified 
with loving resignation and abandon- 
ment, is so important: "It accomp- 
lishes a perfect work." 146 "It ought 
to supress all complaints, to be silent 
and peaceful. "These two words: to 
suffer and to be silent, are the short 
cut and the rule to become holy and 
perfect quickly." 147 

Abandonment is recommended to 
so many people and under so many 
conditions that we can almost look 
on it as a unique and, so to speak, 
universal point of direction. 

One day, when Thomas Fossi had 
asked him question after question, 
our saint contented himself with re- 
plying, after acknowledging his gifts : 
"As for the other points in your let- 



259 



ter, so numerous and varied, I want 
to say that one single thought will 
answer all. This is to put everything 
in the divine Good-pleasure and to 
regard all happenings as coming 
from the hand of God . . . ; lose sight 
of everything save the duties of your 
state. And with the ejaculatory 
prayer: Fiat voluntas tua, keep your- 
self at peace." 148 

Another letter of the same Thomas 
Fossi contained only difficulties that 
Saint Paul had already answered. 
Why give a new counsel? "Not to 
leave your questions unanswered, I 
tell you to apply yourself to live in 
everything and despite everything 
abandoned (rassegnato) in every 
event and infirmity." 149 

To a woman who recommended to 
his prayers the affairs of her home, 
he gave this simple principle: "The 
best remedy is to adore and love the 
Will of God in events which come 
one after the other. In this way the 
heart will keep itself in peace and 
the soul will be enriched with merits 
and virtues." 150 

The Will of God is, for St. Paul of 
the cross., the means for resolving all 
interior difficulties. Making use of 
an expression which he had borrow- 
ed from St. Francis de Sales, 151 he 
wishes us to put to death in the Will 
of God all that is opposed directly 
or indirectly to that Will, all that is 
an obstacle to progress, all that 
hinders the spiritual life: desires, 
fears, sufferings, anxieties, dis- 
quietudes, afflictions of every kind, 
movements of nature . . . Let us cite 
one or two examples: "Make all your 
sufferings disappear in the divine 
Good-pleasure," 152 "Make all your 



agonies, and worries disappear in the 
divine Good-pleasure." 153 

It is important to take note that 
St. Paul makes all these obstacles of 
the interior life disappear, either in 
the divine Will or in the fire of di- 
vine love: the two expressions are 
for him, entirely equivalent. "You 
should make these fears disappear 
in the fire of divine Love." 154 "Do 
not forget to make your sufferings 
and agonies, whatever they be, dis- 
appear in the fire of holy love." 155 
He even came to use the two formu- 
lae at the same time: "As for the 
desire that concerns your own per- 
son for the work you mention, make 
it disappear in the holy love and in 
the divine Good-pleasure." 156 

He also made use of other analo- 
gous formulae: for example, "make 
all your worries disappear on the 
loving breast of Jesus." 157 

We should not be surprised to 
find St. Paul so often recommending 
that we make our desires disappear. 
He who so often manifested his in- 
tention of doing the Will of God or 
of wanting to see it done, is convin- 
ced that we ought to reduce to this 
one single desire all* our other de- 
sires, even good ones, as well as use- 
less or worrisome desires. 

"To go surely, the best way is 
always to make our desires disappear 
in God." 158 His correspondence with 
Thomas Fossi is full of recommenda- 
tions of this sort: "Cultivate your 
desires by reducing them to the one 
and only desire of doing in all things 
the most holy Will of God. As for 
the rest, cast them into the fire of 
holy love." 159 His thought is express- 
ed somewhat differently according to 



260 



the needs of his correspondent: "You 
are full of holy desires and pious 
resolutions. Very good. But the 
point is that you ought to make them 
disappear in the divine Goodness, 
ready, however, to accomplish them 
whenever the Savior should wish, 
leaving them in a corner of your 
heart so that these desires and reso- 
lutions may not interfere with what 
is necessary for your present state. 
If God wishes something else for 
you and your children, He will make 
you know it with strong and clear 
lights, and even with prodigies if 
that is necessary to make you know 
His most holy Will clearly." 160 

When Thomas Fossi became a re- 
ligious, the Will of God was indi- 
cated by obedience: "As for working, 
or having desires for it, one who 
lives under obedience can live tran- 
quilly and in repose, ready to work 
or to rest to go or to be silent . . . 
as God will dispose directly by means 
of his superiors. St. Ignatius replied 
to one of his own, a great servant of 
God and apostolic worker, who had 
told him he had a great desire to 
work, to aid souls and go to India: 
'As for me, I do not have any incli- 
nation, and if I were as you, I would 
incline myself to have no inclination. 
This is the reason: we are totally in 
the hands of the Pope, and it is his 
right to decide to use us in the man- 
ner which pleases him the most. We 
have only to obey!' I say the same 
thing to your reverence." 181 

But indeed he praises the submis- 
sion of all one's desires to the Will 
of God when writing to all his cor- 
respondents: "These desires of love 
that you experience in reading the 



lives of the saints are excellent signs: 
cultivate them, but with complete 
abandonment to the divine Will." 162 

This counsel holds true also for 
faults, imperfections, failings. One 
must cast them into the fire of di- 
vine love," 163 "let them be consumed 
there," 161 and "make them dissapear 
there." 16 " 1 Be sorry for them, humble 
yourself for them, but without dis- 
quietude, and take up the combat 
"with more fervor than before." 166 
For example, this is the recommen- 
dation given to Mother Mary Inno- 
cence of the Sorrowful Mother: "If 
you fall into any faults not seven 
times, but a hundred and ten times, 
do not for that lose peace and con- 
fidence in God, but humble yourself 
gently with a loving sorrow and a 
sorrowful love, with only one word 
or two — God will teach them to you.- 
There you have the short cut to de- 
stroy imperfection." 167 

c) Abandonment is a sure way: If 
St. Paul of the Cross was preoccu- 
pied with advancing quickly, he was 
even more so with advancing well 
and advancing surely. He was an 
advocate of short cuts only if they 
were at the same time safe. No one 
sought to avoid., for himself and for 
others, "deceptive paths" as much 
as he. The clear lucidity of his judg- 
ment and his prodigious humility 
protected him from illusions. No one 
opposed tenseness and excessive ef- 
forts of head and heart as much as 
he. But if he was unconvinced that 
it was either necessary or possible to 
acquire perfection by "sheer force 
of arms" 168 he still demanded an 
energetic cooperation from everyone. 
He reminded contemplative souls 



261 



that "this divine work" — of contem- 
plation, "to be sure, must pass 
through the door which is Jesus 
Christ our Lord, and His most Sac- 
red Passion." 169 He wrote to Agnes 
Grazi who was too readily impressed 
toy imaginative visions and interior 
locutions that "to remain in prayer 
in pure faith, absorbed in God, with- 
out figures and without visions, is 
the surest way." 170 He does not hesi- 
tate to ask her to retrench certain 
visions that she might advance more 
surely and give more glory to 
God. 171 He gives Thomas Fossi the 
following counsel: "Do not think 
about yourself too much, but go for- 
ward to the good, follow in the foot- 
prints of Jesus Christ. Continue your 
prayer, always make it on the divine 
mysteries of the most holy Life and 
Passion of Jesus, our life. That is 
the sure way . . . " 172 

Now, this shrewd man, so prudent 
and so well-informed, does not hesi- 
tate to declare that the way of aban- 
donment has a sure outcome. To a 
lady who was afflicted, he wrote: 
"Support everything with courage, 
patiently and perseveringly, as long 
as it shall please God, without seek- 
ing to live or die, but resign your- 
self entirely and in everything to 
His holy and divine desires because 
this is the sure path to succeed in 
obtaining the glory of heaven with- 
out illusions." 173 

This is not the only statement to 
such effect. He wrote to Agnes 



Grazi: "The cedars of Libanon fell 
because they did not have enough 
fear of themselves and were obsti- 
nate in their own opinions. He who 
lives abandoned to God will not 
perish." 174 "he who reposes in God 
with confidence and true humility 
will not be deceived." 175 "He who 
puts himself in the arms of Jesus 
will not fail." 176 And to Don Erasmus 
Tuccinardi: "God who is the guide 
of souls in abandonment will lead 
them to the harbor." 177 

Abandonment is happiness already 
here upon earth. A way that leads 
so surely to peace and so surely to 
heaven, which heals all evils and en- 
ables us to endure all trials easily, 
is manifestly & way of happiness. 
"Nourish yourself with that divine 
Will because in doing so you will in 
time experience an anticipation of 
Paradise." 178 

St. Paul extolled the happiness of 
abandoned souls. 179 Abandonment is 
for him truly: "a very efficacious 
remedy to remain contented in God 
before all the happenings which oc- 
cur within us or outside us." 180 

But it is time to end this chapter 
that is already overlong because each 
paragraph seems to repeat what the 
preceding one said, with only a 
slightly different formulation. St. 
Paul of the Cross never perfectly 
distinguished, one from the other, 
the reasons which so strongly up- 
hold the wav of abandonment. 



WILL OF GOD, PASSION OF CHRIST AND SUFFERING 

Why did St. Paul of the Cross What did he contribute to give so 
make abandonment so far-reaching? much depth and extent to the doc- 



262 



trine of the Will of God? For reply, 
we need look only to his teachings 
on the Passion of Christ and the suf- 
fering of the Christian as a partici- 
pation in it. These teachings may be 
summarized: a) they furnish aban- 
donment with a favorable climate in 
which to develop freely; b)the reas- 
ons for which our sufferings assimi- 
late us to Christ in His Passion con- 
tinually reinforce abandonment. 

a) We touch here upon the very 
summit of his thought. The clarity 
and vigor with which he writes, in 
his own brief way, about the efficacy 
of the Passion on souls necessarily 
attract attention. 

"It is a very good and holy thing 
to think upon the holy Passion of 
the Lord, to make prayer about it, 
and this is the means of arriving at 
union with God.' 181 The Passion is 
"the most efficacious means to ex- 
terminate vices and to plant true 
piety," 182 "the most efficacious 
means to convert even the most ob- 
stinate souls," 183 "to destroy iniquity 
and to cause the soul to rise to a 
great holiness." 184 Preaching the Pas- 
sion is a very efficacious means for 
the conversion of sinners and the 
strengthening of the just. 185 The 
most hardened souls do not resist 
its action. 186 

There is a greater intensity when 
it is a question of the relationship 
between the Passion and perfection: 
"It is all in the Passion. It is there 
that one learns the science of the 
saints." 187 It is a fact of experience 
that suffering is intimately bound up 
with perfection. The great saints 
have arirved at their great perfec- 
tion by remembering the Sufferings 



of Jesus. 188 The greatest tribulations 
are for the greatest servants of 
God. 189 The trials that Thomas Fossi 
endured were a manifest sign that 
God wished to make him a saint. 190 
When God wishes to lead a soul to 
sancitity, he sends him suffering. St. 
Paul never tires of repeating this to 
us. Suffering is at once the sign that 
one is the friend of God 191 and that 
one is advancing in God's way. 192 It 
is at one and the same time the 
means and the mark of sanctity. 

To his brothers and sisters to 
whom he was giving the formula of 
abandonment, he said: "Be of good 
heart in tribulations and understand 
that they are the most certain signs 
that one is the friend of God." 193 
Without ever a variation, he wrote 
forty-six years later: "Do not be af- 
flicted by the trials that you suffer, 
because they are the clearest signs 
that you are much loved by God." 194 

The Cross is the way that leads to 
holiness, 195 a preparation for perfec- 
tion and for union with God. Saint 
Paul seems to hold an equation be- 
tween suffering and holiness, just as 
he held an equation between the 
Will iof God and perfection. 196 

But for this equation to be real, he 
always pre-supposes, although he 
says so only occasionally, that one 
welcomes suffering as perfectly as 
possible, that is to say, with aban- 
donment, or in other words, as the 
Will of God: "The way of the saints 
is to submissively endure trial for 
God." 197 

Even if he did not understand how 
anyone could reasonable misuse suf- 
fering, he did recognize that it was 
necessary to learn how to suffer. 



263 



But to learn how to suffer is to learn 
how to abandon oneself to the Will 
of God. And according to what has 
been said, this is manifestly to ad- 
vance in perfection. The good use of 
sufferings, then, is identified with 
the practice of abandonment. "He 
who knows how to suffer in silence 
and in peace is not far from being 
perfect." 198 

One must make use of the Will iotf 
God to use suffering well. The 
strongest motive that we have for 
accepting the sufferings that God 
sends us is to see in them the Will of 
God. 199 We must consider all our 
sufferings in God's Will, 200 and make 
all our pains disappear in the divine 
Good-pleasure. 201 The real manner 
of supporting the hardest sacrifices 
or the mast severe interior pains is 
to be persuaded that God has willed 
them from all eternity. 202 Again, we 
must undoubtedly prefer the suffer- 
ings that God wishes to all those 
that we would like. 203 

By a very remarkable coincidence, 
he said that "the balm to heal all 
suffering is the most holy Passion of 
Jesus Christ and union with, and 
total abandonment to His most holy 
Will." 204 The Passion has the same 
healing power that he recognized in 
?the Will of God, in abandonment and 
in union with that Will. 

It is principally in suffering that 
we should resign ourselves, abandon 
ourselves and unite ourselves to the 
Will of God. Resignation presupposes 
suffering because it is simply an 
acceptance of it and is exercised 
truly only on the Cross. 205 It is in 
difficult things above all that we 
should abandon ourselves, in trials 



that we should unite ourselves more 
intimately with the divine Will and 
be nourished on it. 206 

So many souls have reached aban- 
donment by the way 'of sufferings 
that we can truly say that abandon- 
ment is a normal development in a 
life of suffering, and that a life of 
suffering very easily becomes a life 
of abandonment. 

Among the advantages of the way 
of abandonment, does not Pere Piny 
find that it is "a sort of true interior 
martyrdom," that it is the way that 
is "the most crucifying, that in which 
we carry the Cross with the holiest 
results"? 207 

b) The imitation of Christ, which 
gives its value to suffering, adds to 
abandonment a new force which 
constantly increases its grandeur. 

If it is from the ocean of the Pas- 
sion of Christ that we ought to draw 
all the virtues, the sufferings of 
Jesus are the most efficacious means 
to establish souls in the love and in 
the fear of God. 208 The Passion, 
which is the work of love, supreme- 
ly so, is the most powerful motive 
for love. St. Paul of the Cross re- 
quires suffering, if one is to arrive 
at the perfection of love. 209 

Love is the most powerful force 
of the spiritual love, and we must 
grow unceasingly in love. 210 Now if 
true love comes from the cross, it is 
also on the Cross that it must be 
exercised. 211 And to give God positive 
proof of our love, we must pass 
through the ordeal of pure suffer- 
ing. 212 The short path to arrive at 
love of our Lord is to let oneself be 
lost in the ocean of His suffer- 
ings. 213 



264 



Therefore, "love has the power of 
uniting." It compels us to imitate the 
suffering Christ. It is love which de- 
termined St. Paul of the Cross to 
make the suffering of Jesus his 
own, 214 and to desire up to the day 
it was granted, to feel in his soul 
and body the actual sufferings of 
the Passion iof Jesus. 215 When one 
loves, one necessarily imitates. 

He considered it an incontestable 
truth that the whole life of Christ 
was one only of sufferings. The 
words of the Imitation: "Tota vita 
Christi crux fuit et martyrium," 216 
impressed him deeply and he repeat- 
ed them more than once. 217 The con- 
clusion that he drew was very sim- 
ple: our lives, as Christians, ought 
to be, like the life of Christ, lives of 
sufferings. And that was for him 
the Will of God. 

"Since the dear Jesus has willed 
that His most holy life here below . . . 
be always amid . . .pains, trials, fa- 
tigues, difficulties, agonies, contempt, 
calumnies, sorrows, whips, blows, 
thorns and a most bitter death on 
the Cross, so I am made to see that, 
in attaching myself to Him, I should 
lead the same sort of life in the 
midst of every suffering. With what 
/rejoicing my poor soul embraces 
every sort of suffering." 218 

It is a principle for him, there- 
fore, that suffering makes us re- 
semble Christ. And in his usual man- 
ner, he repeats this thought in all 
kinds of ways. He wrote to a sick 
woman: "His Divine Majesty wishes 
to make you a portrait of Jesus Cru- 
cified." 219 He said to another sick 
person that she lived "a life entirely 
conformed to the heavenly Spouse, 



Jesus Christ." 220 He exclaimed quite 
simply: "Substantially, the rewards 
that God gives to His servants here 
below are crosses, anguishes, trials 
of every sort to make them thus re- 
semble His Son, Jesus Christ." 221 

The more we suffer, the more we 
are made like Jesus. Likewise, the 
more we suffer with patience and 
abandonment, the more our suffer- 
ing approaches that of Jesus, and 
consequently the more it makes us 
resemble Him. 222 

The more our suffering resembles 
that of Christ, the more it is pure 
and naked, the more it is without 
comfort — and these expressions seem 
quite synonymous — so much the 
more we will be made like Christ 
Suffering, and the more iour suffer- 
ing will be perfect. 223 This suffering 
without any comfort, "God grants 
only to souls that are dear to 
Him." 224 It is truly the mystical 
death which leaves souls so agree- 
able to God, 225 or rather the "short 
cut" that leads there. It helps us to 
make great progress in perfection. 

St. Paul of the Cross repeats the 
words of St. Ignatius of Antioch, that 
suffering turns us into disciples of 
Christ. 226 That is a saying that he 
meditated on profoundly, and from 
which he sought to draw all its im- 
plications. 

The example of Christ, which is 
the true motive for accepting suf- 
fering, is also the most elevated mo- 
tive for practicing abandonment. It 
is because Christ abandoned Him- 
self, because He made His nourish- 
ment the Will of His Father, that we 
ought also to make of it our nourish- 
ment. It is because Jesus has suffer- 



265 



ed and kept silent, that we also ought 
to suffer and keep silent. 227 

"He who wishes to be holy, loves 
to follow the footsteps of Jesus 
Christ faithfully, to become the re- 
proach of men, the abjection of the 
people, because he recognizes him- 
self as guilty of treason against God 
since he has sinned. He who wishes 
to be holy loves to be hidden from 
the eyes of the world. He takes the 
sweet for the bitter, and the bitter 
for the sweet. 'My nourishment is to 
do the most holy Will of the Father 
in all things.' And because this is 
done better in suffering than in re- 
joicing, since in rejoicing self-will 
always seeks itself, the true servant 
of God loves naked suffering, accept- 
ing it without any intermeriary pure- 
ly from the Will of the Lord." 228 

The imitation of Christ enraptured 
the soul of St. Paul of the Cross. But 
it also produced this wonderful ef- 
fect: it left his soul completely dis- 
interested and turned to God. What- 
ever his suffering might be, he never 
withdrew into himself, but accepted 
the full strength of his sorrows. His 
soul kept its peace and, if possible, 
its joy. 

His teaching on this point, as on 
the others, corresponds completely 
to his own practice: "I would like 
you, even in your grief, to annihilate 
yourself, to make nothing of it, not 
to fix your thought upon it or look 
it, as they say, in the face; above all, 
I would like you not to show it ex- 
ternally, or at least to do so as little 
as possible, and with as serene and 
joyful a countenance as you can, like 
those who truly love the Holy Cross 
seek to do. I tell you not to look 



your sorrows in the face, nor to fast- 
en your thought upon them; I mean, 
with the higher part of the soul; for 
you know already that the lower part 
can not help feeling them, otherwise 
they would not be sorrows. I say this 
that you may not lose sight of the 
Sovereign Good, but may remain up- 
on the Cross as a victim of love, com- 
pletely united to the gentle Jesus, 
and entirely enflamed and consumed 
by the fire of His infinite charity." 

L'29 

As for St. Paul of the Cross' aban- 
donment, at once so elevated and so 
simple as he practiced it heroically 
in his own life, 230 in all things attach- 
ing himself only to the Will of God, 
and in his direction of souls making 
it one of the essential notes — we 
would like to know its origins, and to 
be able to say under what influences 
it was conceived. One fact is certain. 
No matter how far back we read in 
the writings of the saint, we find his 
doctrine on abandonment complete 
as well as on the Passion of Christ, 
and it is difficult to notice any ap- 
preciable variation in the rest of his 
life. From the first day of his re- 
treat in 1720, during which he wrote 
the Passionist rule, he manifests his 
ardent desire to unite his sufferings 
to th:se of Christ: "I know that, by 
the mercy of our dear God, I desire 
to know no other thing, to taste no 
consolation save only the desire of 
being crucified with Jesus." 231 He 
went so far as to desire to actually 
suffer the pains of Christ, 232 to de- 
sire to suffer always more, 233 to be 
always in suffering. 234 

Suffering was so dear to him that 
he did not seek any relief 235 except 



288 



in the lower part of his nature. 236 In 
fact, lie asked Our Lord not to de- 
liver him from his sufferings, 237 ex- 
cept the temptations that go con- 
trary to God; he was afraid that he 
would be freed from them. His love 
for the Passion made him pray to 
die ifor Christ 240 and to become a 
martyr. 241 The crosses of Jesus were 
the joys of his heart; 242 the joy of 
suffering was such that it made him 
forget hunger and cold. 243 

He felt a real "contentment that 
the Will of God was done." 244 His 
soul willingly embraced sufferings 
because it knew that they were the 
Will of God. Without the explicit 
mention of the word abandonment, 
we have there, already, all the ele- 
ments: perfect acceptance of suffer- 
ing and complete union with the Will 
of God. The soul that is perfectly 
indifferent "dreams no longer of 
either suffering or of rejoicing. It 
remains fastened only upon the Will 



of its beloved Spouse Jesus. 



pre- 



ferring to be crucified with Him that 
it might be conformed to Him, whose 
whole life was one only of suffering. 
One sentence expresses his whole 
thought: "May the Will of our dear 
God be done in all things." 246 
, It is, then, the mystery of the years 
of his formation pereeding 1720 that 
we must try to penetrate, if it is at 
all possible. We know that the in- 
fluence of St. Francis de Sales, 247 
who is the starting-point for the 
spirituality of abandonment, upon 
St. Paul of the Cross was quite ex- 
tensive during this period of his life. 
As evident as it may be, and as con- 
siderable as it may seem, I do not 
think it alone is sufficient to explain 



the astonishing developments that 
the founder of the Passionists, gave 
to the doctrine of abandonment. I 
remain persuaded that we must look 
nearer the saint's own time and that 
it would be valuable to take the 
trouble to study the spiritual current 
of abandonment in Italy at the end 
of the 17th and the beginning of the 
18th century, that spiritual current 
of which the Letters of St. Paul of 
the Cross are one of the most prec- 
ious monuments. 

M. Viller, S. J. 
Enghien, Belgium, December, 1950. 



1) References to the letters are indicated by giv- 
ing the volume and page of Lettere , di S. 
Paolo della Croce, 4 vols., in 80, Roma, 
Scuola tipografica Pio X. It is unfortunate 
that the alphabetical table of contents, val- 
uable as it is, is limited to only a few key- 
words. Throughout, I have made use of the 
excellent works of Fr. Cajetan of . the Holy 
Name of Mary, particularly the one entitled 
Docrine de Saint Paul de la Croix sur I'orai- 
son et la mystique, Louvain, coll. Museum 
Lessianum, 1932. In this work the author 
makes an excellent point of the direct in- 
fluence upon St. Paul of four great mystics: 
Tauler, St. Teresa, St. John of the Cross and 
St. Francis de Sales. But it seems to me that, 
in his attention to the resemblances, he has 
not given enough consideration to the diver- 
gences or to what is characteristic and per- 
sonal in St. Paul of the Cross' own experien- 
ces, and has not, therefore, thrown suffi- 
cient light upon the saint himself. It is un- 
derestimating a man as original as the found- 
er of the Passionists to try to make him too 
dependent upon his predecessors. The role 
of the Passion in his mysticism is also much 
greater than Fr. Cajetan states. He ought to 
have studied St. Paul of the Cross in him- 
self and for himself, to describe, for example 
that loving and sorrowing contemplation of 
of which the saint had already spoken in 
his retreat diary of 1720: "God gave me to 
understand that the soul that He wishes to 
attract to a high union with Himself by 
means of prayer ought to pass through this 
way of suffering in prayer." (1, 9) (Cf. M. 
V illers, S. J., "Mysticism of the Passion in 
St. Paul of the Cross," in The Passionist, 
VII, 3, May, 1954. pp. 213-226. Translator's 
note.) It would have been well. also to treat 
the spirituality of the saint as a whole. 

2) To Joseph Strambi, September 30, 1768 (LV, 

75). 

3) He knew by experience that contemplative 

souls are not easy to understand, and, for 
that reason, to direct. "The most elevated 
souls are not able to express what they un- 



267 



derstand, although they do understand it. If 
it were: easy to understand it would not be 
the work of God." (To Sister Coluba Ger- 
trude Gandolfi. August 3, 1756 [IL, 497].) 

4) There were many expressions he used to in- 

troduce what was inmportant; "what must 
never be permitted," — "never lost sight of" 
— "we should consider it important," or 
"take very much into account . . ." 

The seventeenth century, much before St. 
Paul of the Cross, made conformity with the 
Will of God a short way to attain perfec- 
tion. Rev. P. J. de Guibert, in his Lecons de 
theologie spirituelle, Toulouse, 1943, t. I, 6e 
lecon: "Perfection et conformite a la vol- 
onte de Dieu," p. 208, remarked that in the 
17th century, a whole series of works on 
conformity with the Will of God were pub- 
lished as short paths to arrive at perfection. 
He cites Benedict of Canfeld, Regie de per- 
fection contenant un abrege de toute la vie 
spirituelle reduite au seul point de la vol- 
onte de Dieu, Paris, 1609; Paul de Lagny, 
Le chemin abrege de la perfection contenu 
dans I'exercice de la volonte de Dieu, Paris, 
1662; Eusebus Nieremberg, Vida divina y 
camino real para la perfection, Madrid, 1633 
(a French translation by Pere d'Oultreman 
appeared under the title Chemin royal pour 
arriver bientot a la perfection, Douai, 1642); 
Gaspard Druzbicki, Tractatus de brevissima 
ad perfectionem via, hoc est de praesenti 
divinae voluntatis intentione, executione, ap- 
prehensione, Kalish, 1662; Alexander Piny, 
Etat du pur amour on conduite pour bientot 
arriver a la perfection par le seul fiat, Lyon, 
1676. 

5) I, 805. 

6) II, 62. 

7) The "foundation-stones" most commonly men- 

tioned are found in the following passage: 
"If Your Reverence applies yourself to a 
total denial of self, to a thorough interior 
and exterior mortification, to a complete 
abandonment to the Divine Good-pleasure, 
and a real detachment from everything cre- 
ated, with these foundation-stones, you can 
build a palace of perfection." (To Marianna 
Eleonora del Pozzo, December 12, 1735 [II, 
51). Other accounts III, 598; 663; IV, 261; 
292. Sometimes there is only one "foundation- 
stone": "love of our own self-contempt and 
knowledge of our own nothingness are the 
foundation-stones of the other holy virtues" 
(to his religious, November 30, 1760. IV, 
268). "Knowledge of yourself and of your 
own miseries and of your own nothingness, 
of your in-ability to do or know anything 
is the foundation upon which you should 
erect the edifice of your perfection" (to 
Thomas Fossi, October 8, 1772, I, 804). 
"Always love more and more the funda- 
mental virtue you spoke about to me, which 
is humility of heart: N.,N..N." (To Rev. John 
Mary of St. Ignatius, August 25, 1757. 
[Ill, 164]. The three N's stand for the three 
"nothings" of the preceding text.) 

8) L, 528. He sent Sister Mary Crucified a list 

of the virtues which those preparing to re- 
ceive the Passionist habit ought to practise. 
He was careful to mention in a special way 
"total abandonment to the divine Good- 
pleasure." (May, 1774 [II, 321]). 



9) To Laura Giannotti, March 19, 1734 (I, 528). 

10) To Don Erasmus Tuccinardi, November 29, 
1730 (I, 86). 

11) I, 307. 

12) To Sister Colomba Gertrude Gandolfi (II, 
521). 

13) December 18, 1743 (I, 491). 

14) To Agnes Grazi, June 21, 1742 (L, 286). 

15) To the same, December 8, 1742 (I. 292) 

16) To D. Dominic Panizza, April 2, 1750 (Hi, 
18); also to Thomas Fossi, Feb. 20, 1749 
(I, 574). This motive of charity ... will 
often be the Passion of Our Savior which 
inspires charity. "By abandoning yourself 
peacefully to the will of God and by being 
willing to live a sorrowful and dying life 
for love of the Passion and death of the 
Savior, who for love of us made Himself 
so poor and then died on the Cross, you 
would be more dear to God than if you 
would lead a penitential life in the desert 
of the Thebaid, and you would die very 
holily." (To his brother, Joseph Daneo, 
Nov. 2, 1756 [II, 553]) 

17) To Sister M. Louise of the Passion, Feb. 7. 
1761 (III, 625) 

18) To Teresa Palozzi, Aug. 22, 1756 (III, 356). 
St. Alphonsus de Liguori seemed to admit 
that resignation included perfect charity. 
The celebrated fourteenth chapter of The 
Holy Monk, "Concerning resignation to the 
will of God," commences with these words: 
"St. John Chrysostom says that the per- 
fection of the love of God consists in 
recognition to His Divine Will." St. Fran- 
cis de Sales is less clear (A Treatise on the 
Love of God, book IX, chapter 4: "The 
union of our will with the Good-pleasure 
of God through indifference.") 

The precise equivalent of this resignation 
of St. Paul of the Cross is the resignatio 
sui of the Middle Ages, such as one finds, 
for example, in St. Gertrude, Insinuationes 
Divinae Pietatis, III, 54, or in the Imitation 
of Christ, III, 37. The word "resignation" 
in the narrow modern sense is a poor 
translation. It is much better translated as 
abandonment. Fr. Cajetan of the Holy 
Name of Mary has taken into account that 
resignation and abandonment mean the 
same thing. In the alphabetical table of 
contents of Doctrine de Saint Paul de la 
Croix sur I'oraison et la mystique, the 
word "abandonment" and the word "resig- 
nation" have the same references. The same 
author in his work, Oraison et Ascension 
mystique de St. Paul de la Croix, Louvain, 
1930, coll. Museum Lessainum, chapter 3, 
pp. 150-160, has a long paragraph in which 
he attempts to describe the attitude of St. 
Paul of the Cross toward the Will of 
God . . . : "during his forty years of deso- 
lation," and which he entitles "Patience 
and Resignation to the Divine Will." Is 
this saying enough? It would be much 
better, certainly, to say: "Perfect Abandon- 
ment and Complete Union with the Divine 
Will." 

19) To Agnes Grazi, March 18, 1738 (I, 207)- 
Elsewhere it is humility which is the virtue 
that pleases God most. Here is what he 
writes Agnes Grazi: "If one wants to be 
pleasing to Mary most Holy, he must 
humble himself more because Mary was 



263 



the most humble of all creatures and that 
is why she pleased God more by her 
humility." (I, 349) He wrote to her, August 
30, 1736: "There is nothing which pleases 
God more than to annihilate oneself and 
abase oneself in one's nothingness. And 
this frightens the devil and puts him to 
flight." (I, 150) Must one hold a certain 
fluctuation in the preferences of St. Paul 
of the Cross and say that sometimes it is 
abandonment and sometimes humility 
which most pleases God? It is possible; 
I believe, however, that he attaches more 
importance to abandonment than to humility. 
Witness the following lines; where he de- 
clares to a religious that if God has sent 
her sufferings, "it is that she may be exer- 
cised in those virtues which most please 
the divine Spouse and which are exer- 
cised in suffering more than on other 
occasions. These are principally humility 
of heart and love of one's own abjection, 
patience and constancy in suffering in a 
holy silence of faith and love. Patience 
contains in itself a perfect work and a 
true resignation (rassegnazione) to the 
treasure of treasures." (To Sister Mary 
Louise of the Passion, Feb. 7, 1761 til, 
625]). 

20) To Dominic Panizza, April 2, 1750 (III, 18). 
20a) To Sister Maria Cherubina Bresciani, Oct. 

2, 1750 (I, 506). 

21) To Thomas Fossi, June 26, 1756, (I, 674). 

22) II, 642. 

23) I limit myself to these references: To 
Agnes Grazi (I, 157; 178; 217; 223; 315; 
326); to Thomas Fossi (I, 611; 647); to the 
prioress of the Carmel te Vetralla, Feb. 9, 
1756 (III, 94); etc. 

24) III, 484. 

25) To Maria Calcagnini, December, 1770 (III, 
833). 

26) Is it necessary to mention that at the same 
time, Pere de Caussade was professing 
exactly the same doctrine? "You do well 
to attach yourself strongly and almost solely 
to the excellent practice of entire aban- 
donment to the Will of God. It is there 
that perfection lies for you." (Abandonment 
to Divine Providence, Book I, Letter 1.) 

"You want me to point out to you the 
swiftest and the surest way to arrive at 
perfection . . . Complete abandonment, blind, 
absolute, there it is for souls like you, the 
crown and the summary of perfection; 
perfection consists in pure love and, for 
you, the exercise of pure love consists in 
abandonment ..." (ibidem, Letter 2). 

"With regard to some souls who have 
acquired the habit of avoiding every de- 
liberate fault and of accomplishing faith- 
fully the duties of their state, one can 
reduce all perfection practically to this one 
maxim; exercise a continual resignation to 
all God wills, a complete abandonment to 
all the dispositions of His Providence . . 
Yes, Heavenly Father, accept everything; Yes 
and ever yes. This he says and says again 
by the habitual disposition of his heart, 
without needing to pronounce it even in- 
teriorly. There, in a few words, is the 
great and swift way to the highest per- 
fection ... " (ibidem, Book 2, Letter 1). 

27) To a religious of a monastery at Vetralla 



(IV, 321). 

28) To John Bemardine Forlani, June 17, 1748 
(II, 703). 

29) To Sister Maria Cherubina Brescini, Oct. 2, 

1750 (I, 506). 

30) June 13, 1738 (I, 209). 

31) To Agnes Grazi (I, 180; 265; 324:) to 
Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, Feb. 5, 
1765 (II, 303). 

32) February 20, 1749 (I, 574). 

33) To Agnes Grazi, August 4, 1740 (I, 256- 
257). 

34) I, 257. 

35) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, Sep- 
tember 14, 1755 (II, 482). 

36) To Girolama Ercolani, February 22, 1750 
(II, 584). If St. Paul of the Cross refers only 
in passing to the motives for abandonment, 
a line sufficed to summarise it for Agnes 
Grazi: "God is your guide, your father, 
your master, and your spouse." (June 13, 
1738 [I, 209].) But he often comes back 
to the fact that God wishes only the best, 
that He does all to lead us to the best 
(to Thomas Fossi, June 13, 1760 [I, 717].), 
that He disposes events for our best 
spiritual advantage (to Agnes Grazi, [I, 
330]), and for the greatest good of our 
souls (to Girolama Ercolani, February 20, 

1751 [II, 589]; to Hippolytus Piccarili Pet- 
tirossi, August 4, 1752 [III, 115]). Every- 
thing that happens is good (to Agnes Grazi, 
December 8, 1742 [I, 292]). Everything 
that God sends us is excellent because He 
wishes it. As to our sufferings, God has 
been pleased with them from all eternity. 
(To Thomas Fossi, June 16, 1756 [I, 671]; 
to a religious of Vetralla, [IV, 321]). In 
the face of any events, whatever they may 
be, one has only to keep silence and 
approve because "the works of God are 
all perfect" (To Sister Columba Gertrude 
Gandolfi, Sept. 18, 1743, [II, 442]). One 
need only say the words of Our Lord: 
"My Father, may it be done according to 
Thy Will." 

37) To Thomas Fossi, June 16, 1756, July 11, 
1765, June 18, 1766 (I, 672, 760, 768-769). 

33) To Girolama Ercolani, Feb. 29, 1750, (II, 
584). To a religious of Vetralla, (IV, 321). 

39) To Agnes Grazi, (I, 330). To Thomas Fossi, 
June 16, 1756, (I, 671). 

40) To Teresa Palozzi, Jan. 1, 1767, (III, 407). 

41) To Thomas Fossi, Aug. 26, 1736, (I, 536); 
to Agnes Grazi, I, 316; to Marianna Girelli, 
Dec. 28, 1768, (ill, 756). 

42) To D. James Mary Massa, March 1, 1775, 
(IV, 165). 

43) To his brothers and sisters, Feb. 21, 1722, 
(I, 54); to Maria Giovanna Venturi Grazi, 
Jan. 17, 1765, (II, 39); to Mother Mary 
Crucified Costantini, Jan. 14, 1769; (II, 318); 
to Dominic Anthony Ercolani, Dec. 27, 1749, 
(II, 746); to a religious of Corpus Domini 
Aug. 13, 1769, (IV, 54 and IV, 67). 

44) To Thomas Fossi, Feb. 14, 1752, (I, 611). 

45) To the same, Aug. 21, 1764, (I, 752); to 
Agnes Sagneri, March 29, 1768, (IV, 10). 

46) To Agnes Grazi, March 7, 1737, (I, 177 
and 326). 

47) To Agnes Grazi, (I, 110, 159, 326, 333): to 
Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, May 24, 
1768, (II, 315); to Girolama Ercolani, Feb. 
22, 1750, (II, 584). 

48) To Agnes Grazi, April 17, 1734, (I, 110). 



269 



49) To Agnes Grazi, Aug. 4, 1740, (I, 257). 

50) To Thomas Fossi, Nov. 27, 1764, (I, 756). 

51) To Teresa Palozzi, Oct. 26, 1764, (III, 396). 

52) To Agnes Grazi, Nov. 29, 1736, (I, 159). 

53) To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, June 
3, 1766, (II, 309). 

54) To Sister Maria Cherubina Bresciani, Oct. _ 
19, 1740, (I, 476). 

55) To Frances Lucci, Feb. 8, 1736, (I, 383); to 
Francis Anthony Appiani, July 16, 1738, 
(I, 417); to Thomas Fossi, May 30, 1752 and 
March p, 1758, (I, 615 and 639). 

56) To Thomas Fossi, Aug. 26, 1737, December 
12, 1738, Jan. 10, 1749, (I, 542, 547, 573). 

57) To Paul Polycarp Cerruti, August 2, 1741, 
(II, 274). 

58) October 10, 1759, (III, 176). 

59-60) I am not referring here to abandonment 
in contemplative prayer. But we should at 
least indicate the general connection be- 
tween abandonment and prayer, in all its 
degrees. 

First of all, St. Paul of the Cross agrees 
with St. Francis de Sales when, in his 
18th Discourse, on the Sacraments, he says 
about prayer: "Do not go to prayer pre- 
occupied with and desires to be consoled 
or satisfied, because that would be to fail 
to keep your will united and adjusted to 
that of Our Lord." 

So St. Paul makes clear that abandon- 
ment is a fruit of prayer. "You must pray 
because you are subjected to many hap- 
penings, and that you may receive them 
all with abandonment." (To Marianna de 
11a Scala del Pozzo, Nov. 11, 1728, [I, 41]). 
He says of himself: "I do not desire any- 
thing else but to do the Will of God, and 
it is to that end that all my prayers tend." 
(To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, 
July 13, 1756, [II, 490].) Prayer is thus 
an exercise of abandonment, an exercise 
of the Will of God. Coldness, dryness, 
desolation have this advantage, that they 
oblige us to practice abandonment con- 
tinually. The Will of God "is accomplished 
in desolation better than it is in consola- 
tion." (To Mother Mary Crucified Costan- 
tini, December 8, 1762, [II, 295].) Thus 
he advises us often to make acts of aban- 
donment when there is coldness in prayer. 
(To Teresa Palozzi, July 26, 1757, [III, 
3631; August 31, 1758, [III, 367].) 

61) December 16, 1733, (I, 203-104). 

62) This is an example: "Walk always with 
real poverty of spirit, with the sole guide 
of holy faith and without any other help 
than simple and complete abandonment to 
the divine Will." (To Sister Columba Ger- 
trude Gandolfi, October 14, 1755, [II, 484].) 

63) To Sister Columba Gertrude, August 3, 
1756, (II, 496). 

64) To the same, January 25, 1755, II, 469); to 
Sister Mary Crucified of Jesus, Julv 31, 
1770, (IV, 100). 

65) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, 
March 29, 1747, (II, 446). 

66) To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, Aug. 
10, 1741, (II, 289). 

67) August 4, 1734; April 19, and October 3, 
1736, (I, 113; 135; 155). 

68) To Sister Columba Gertrude aGndolfi, Aug. 
3, 1756, March 26, 1763. (II, 496; 511). 

69) To the same, December 21, 1754. (II, 467). 



70) To Teresa Palozzi, April 28, 1763. (Ill, 383); 
cf. (II, 289). 

71) To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, Sept. 
3, 1754, (II, 291-292). 

72) To Thomas Fossi, October 23, 1764. (I, 753). 

73) To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, II, 
322); to Lucy Burlini, August 17, 1751, 
(II, 724); to Fr. John of St. Raphael, Aug. 
16, 1753. (Ill, 191). 

74) To Agnes Grazi, October 13, 1741. (I, 275). 

75) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, Jan. 

25, 1755. (II, 469). 

76) To the same, June 26, 1762. (II, 510). 

77) We know that the habitual contemplation 
of St. Jane de Chantal, the prayer of 
simple regard, or "recollection in God," 
was entirely in keeping with her aban- 
donment to the Will of God. There was, 
as she herself says, "a simple looking at 
God and her own nothingness with entire 
abandonment to His holy Will; it is neces- 
sary to remain contented and tranquil in 
the effects of this gaze, without making 
any act of the will." (Questions addressed 
to St. Francis de Sales ... in Oeuvres com- 
pletes de Sainte Jeanne de Chantal, Paris, 
1875, t. II, p. 41). It is likely that the 
repose in God "in the silence of faith and 
love," we meet so often in the correspon- 
dence of St. Paul of the Cross was very 
close to the prayer of St. Jane de Chantal. 
It is already passive prayer. It is also 
probable ,on the other hand, that the 
prayer to which he directed Teresa Palozzi, 
when she was unable to meditate (July 
13, 1757 [III, 362]), was an act of the 
prayer of simple regard where the presence 
of God is felt: "keep yourself interiorly 
in pure faith without images, with a sweet 
and passive attention to God whom you 
have within you, because you belong more 
to God than to yourself." We notice the 
extremely strong statements about the 
presence of God which the Saint more than 
once makes to Teresa Palozzi: "It is by 
faith that God dwells within us." (June 
19, 1757 [III, 359]). "Do you know that 
it is a truth of faith that God is as near 
to us as we are to ourselves, nearer to 
us than our covering of flesh." (Aug. 31, 
1758, [III, 367]). 

78) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, June 

26, 1762, (II, 509). 

79) To Thomas Fossi, June 27, 1770, (I, 796). 

80) To Fr. Peter of St. John, Oct. 24, 1764, 
(III, 439). 

81) We remark that as man's role in contem- 
plation is to remember his nothingness, 
even in the simple advance to perfection, 
self-annihilitation and humility hold a large 
role. He says in a letter to Agnes Grazi, 
March 8, 1736: "God calls you to a very 
high profession, and to arrive there, your 
cooperation is necessary. This is done by 
annihilating yourself before God and your 
neighbor in a spirit of true and very 
simple humility, with a profound detach- 
ment from all creatures, a complete trans- 
formation in the Devine Pleasure, and a 
total abandonment in the abyss of His 
infinite bounty." (I, 132). We have there 
a very good resume of his general direction 
to a contemplative. The dispositions out- 
side of prayer will not differ from those 



270 



which must accompany prayer. Similar in- 
dications are found again and again in 
his correspondence. He says, for example, 
to Agnes Grazi: "If God does not teach it 
(infused contemplation), we cannot put our- 
selves in it." To Thomas Fossi: "After long 
trials the Divine Majesty will grant lofty 
prayer to souls well purified— not indeed 
all— but to a small number according as it 
pleases His Divine Providence." (June 2, 
1753, [I, 625]). To a religious: "Since you 
tell me that you do not understand what 
this contemplation is to which God brings 
great and generous souls, who are very 
dear to Him, I tell you that, if you are 
faithful in supporting with patience, meek- 
ness and great resignation, the spiritual 
and bodily suffering which God permits 
in your regard, and if you accept them im- 
mediately from His Divine Hands, then 
certainly the Divine Majesty will .grant 
you the grace of knowing how to con- 
template and meditate on the holy Suffer- 
ings of Christ, and to imitate His divine 
virtues. That in itself is a rich contem- 
plation. The other, God grants freely to 
whom He pleases. It is a way not open to 
all, but to privileged souls who are dear 
to Him-very dear." (Feb. 15, 1766 [II, 
267]). 

82) Aug. 3, 1756, (II, 496); July 13 and Aug. 
21, 1756, Aug. 13, 1757, March 26, 1763, 
(II, 489; 499; 503; 511; 522). It would 
take twice the number of references if 
I mentioned all the texts where only the 
two principal counsels were indicated. 

83) A. Piny, O. P., Le Plus Parfait, edition 
Noel, Paris 1919, ch. 2, pp. 15-16. 

84) To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, June 
21, 1768, (II, 316). 

85) Le Plus Parfait, edition Noel, Paris 1919, 
p. 18. 

86) July 11, 1765, (I, 760), "To espouse the 
divine Will' is an expression that will be 
found elsewhere: to the same Thomas 
Fossi, August 4, 1751 (I, 607), and May 16, 
1750, (I, 591). 

87) To Agnes Grazi, December 8, 1742, (I, 292); 
to Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, July 
16, 1754, (II, 457); to Sister Maria Angela 
Cencella, December 19, 1762, (III, 612) 

88) September 18, 1743, (II, 442). 

89) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, July 
16, 1754, (II, 457). 

90) To Girolama Ercolani, Feb. 22, 1750, (II, 
457). 

91) (II, 87); cf. to Sister Marv Innocent of the 
Sorrowful Mother, June 21, 1757, (III, 480). 

92) To Agnes Grazi, Sept. 19, 1740, (I. 262). 

93) To Mary John Venturi Gra?:i, July 29, 1751, 
(II, 23); To Marv Angela Cencelli, SeDt. 22, 
1760 and Dec. 18, 1761, (III, 600, and 604). 

94) To Teresa Palozzi, Oct. 26, 1762, (IV, 337). 

95) To Father Anthony of Saint Teresa, Jan. 12, 
1765, (III, 717) to a new priest of his 
congregaiton, Dec. 12, 1765, (III, 743). 

96) To Marianne Alvavez, Jan. 15, 1735, (I, 
530). 

97) To Thomas Fossi, May 14, 1749, (I, 578). 

98) To the same, Aug. 31, 1754, (I, 645-646.- 
The very comparisions which he uses to 
mark the profundity of abandonment are 
very instructive. If they highlight its 
passivity, they also show the love and 



confidence which ought to animate it. 
The most ordinary one is that of the tiny 
infant who rests on his mother's breast 
(I, 209, 220, 756) ... It is from St. Francis 
de Sales (Treatise on the Love of God, 
Book IX, Chapter 14; "as a tiny infant in 
his mother's arms" and Discourse II: 
"... this soul which has abandoned itself 
... in the arms of Our Lord as an infant 
in the bosom of his mother.") There is the 
one of the lamb which allows itself to be 
shorn without resistance. (I, 476). There is 
another, more expressive: "You will do 
well to throw yours if as if dead in the 
arms of divine mercy." (To Sister Mary 
Crucified of Jesus. July 31, 1770, [IV, 100]). 
He said the same to Sister Mary Crucified 
Costantini, Jan. 9, 1768, "I desire that 
your will should be as if dead in the 
always adorable Will of God ... Be as if 
dead and buried in the divine Good Pleas- 
ure , without complaining of anything." 
(II, 312). Without doubt the strongest is 
the following, "The ship is on the sea 
without sails and without oars, yet it is 
guided by the great Pilot, who wihout 
anythng else will bring it safely to port. 
It is beaten about by tempests and by 
winds because thus the power and the 
wisdom of the great Pilot who guides it." 
(To Don Arasmus Tuccinardi, Nov. 29, 1730, 
[I, 86]). This comparison is found in a 
letter to Agnes Grazi, "Put yourself in the 
hands of God, entirely abandon to Him 
as a ship without sails and without oars." 
(July 29, 1739, [I, 236]) 
99) I had thought at first of entitling this 
chapter "Advantages of Abandonment," 
after the example of P. Piny, who Le 
plus parfait shows us 18 reasons why, 
according to him, the way of abandon- 
ment is superior to other interior wavs. 
But I confess that this title would hardly 
have been in the spirit of St. Paul of the 
Cross and that without doubt, when refer- 
ing to a way that is so disinterested, 
identified with the way of pure love, hav- 
ing no other end than pleasing God, it 
would be better not even to speak of 
advantages. It is, to tell the truth, only 
a question of words. But it seems to me 
that instead of multiplying rasons that up- 
hold the way of abandonment, we should 
look less for numbers than for depth and 
following the mind of St. Paul, keep to 
what is essential. 

I have not insisted, for example, on the 
fact that St. Paul of the Cross often saw 
in abandonment an efficacious means of 
obtaining all sorts of graces. (To Nicolina 
Pecorini Martinez, February 16, 1726, [I, 
62]; to Sister Mary Cherubina Bresciani, 
December 18, 1743, [I, 491]; to Don John 
Bernadine Forlani, June 7, 1748, [II, 703].) 
He tells us indeed— and it is characteristic 
that God's Will brings His grace with it; 
when God gives us a task to do, a mission 
to accomplish, He gives us the means to 
do it. The venerable Father Balthazer Al- 
varez, when he was named confessor for 
St. Teresa, asked God for the gift of prayer 
to direct his new penitant, and it was 
granted. (To Sister Columba Gertrude. Gan- 
dolfi, August 3, 1756, [II, 497].) 



271 



100) June 18, 1766, (I, 768-769.) 

101) To Thomas Fossi, July 25, 1754, (I, 644.) 

102) To Mary Grazi, (II, 48.) 

103) To Teresa Palozzi, March 6, 1765, (III, 
399.) 

104) To Thomas Fossi, July 15, 1758, (I, 695), 
to Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, July 
16, 1754, (II, 458.) 

105) To Fr. Vincent of St. Augustine, March 9, 
1765 (III, 302, 303). 

106) To Agnes Grazi, August 10, 1733, (I, 101). 

107) To Father Joseph Andrew of the Concep- 
tion, Nov. 6, 1764, (III, 260). 

108) To Teresa Palozzi, Dec. 15, 1765, (III, 403). 

109) To Father Fulgentius of Jesus, Dec. 9, 
1747, (II, 126). 

110 To Teresa Palozzi, June 8, 1758, (III, 365). 

111) March 29, 1759, (III, 368). 

112) To Thomas Fossi on February 3, 1756, 
(I, 663). 

113) To the same on September 23, 1756, 
(I, 697). 

114) To the same on February 3, 1756, (I, 663- 
664). 

115) To the same on September 23, 1747, and 
May 16, 1750, (I, 558, and 589); To Canon 
Paul Sard! on Aug. 28, 1760, (III, 122); To 
Teresa Palozzi on Dec. 17, 1761, (III, 381); 
To Sister Rose Mary Teresa of the Cruci- 
fied Redeemer on April 8, 1758, (III, 515). 

116) To a Passionist about to be professed, 
written on June 30, 1763, (III, 664). 

117) To Sister Mary Cherubina Bresciani on 
Dec. 15, 1761, (I. 526). 

118) To Thomas Fossi, Dec. 29, 1768, (I, 787- 
788); To Lucia Burlini, Aug. 17, 1751, (II, 
724-725); To Anna Maria Calcognini, Dec. 
31, 1768, (III, 820); To Sister Mary Cherubina 
Bresciani, Dec. 15, 1761, (I, 526); cf. Caje- 
tan of the Holy Name of Mary, Doctrine*** 
. . . , p. 56. 

119) To Fr. Bartholomew of St. John, December 
24, 1767 (III, 348). 

120) To Teresa Palozzi, December 17, 1761 (III, 
382); and December 24, 1763 (III, 386). 

121) To John Francis Sancez, April 2, 1762 
(II, 404). 

122) To Sister Mary Cherubina Bresciani, June 
18, 1749 (I, 504); to Anna Marie Calcog- 
nini, May 23, 1769 (III, 824). 

123) To Fr. Joseph Mary of St. Lawrence, No- 
vember 17, 1764, (III, 701; to a religious, 
March 20, 1759 (III, 546). 

124) To a Superior on April 15, 1766, (III, 780). 

125) To Thomas Fossi on June 13, 1760, (I, 717). 

126) To Marianna Girelli on Sept. 24, 1768, 
(III, 755). 

127) To Fr. Lawrence of the Side of Jesus on 
Nov. 22, 1768, IV, 86,-the combination 
of these same three adjectives to describe 
complete detachment is also used in let- 
ters to Don John Anthony Lucattini on 
Aug. 28, 1751, (II, 816); and to Thomas 
Fossi on March 20, 1749, (I, 576). 

128) To a Religious on March 24, 1767, (III, 
835). 

129) This importance given to total detachment 
is one of the common characteristics of the 
spirituality of abandonment. Pere de 
Caussade has written: "Do you want me 
to show you the shortest and surest way 
of arriving at perfection . . . Detach your- 
self from all your own opinions, from all 
pretentions, from all scrutiny, from all 



introspection, from all that you can call 
yours, and you will be delivered over 
without reserve and without return to the 
direction and to the Good pleasure of 
God." (Abandonment to Divine Providence, 
Book I, Letter 2). Who could count the 
numberless passages in which St. Paul of 
the Cross asks his correspondents to "de- 
tach themselves from every creature," "from 
all that is not God"? Concerning detach- 
ment from oneself, I will cite only this 
test to Agnes Grazi: "Happy is the soul 
that is detached from its own joy, its own 
feelings, its own judgement." (March 17, 
1734 [I, 1071). This counsel concerning 
modesty, given to Teresa Palozzi, is also 
quite significant: "A true servant of God 
ought not to care for anything on earth 
that will one day be buried." (July 13, 
1757 [III, 361]). 

130) To Fr. Joseph Andrew of the Conception 
on Nov. 6, 1764 (III, 260). He says almost 
the same thing again: "In case of such 
happenings, one should take refuge in the 
strong fortress of confidence in God and 
be resigned to the all holy Will of God, 
without looking to see what is coming . . . 
(To Dominic Anthony Ercolani on June7, 
1749, [II, 742].) Elsewhere, this impreg- 
nable fortress is the Sacred Heart of Jesus 
(in two letters to Agnes Grazi, [I, 238; 
283]). 

131) To Don John Francis Sancez on Dec. 31, 
1765, (II, 412-413). The tempest mentioned 
here was the persecution the saint was 
subjected to. The same comparison was 
used in a letter to Marianna Girelli on 
May 24, 1768, (III, 753). 

132) To Teresa Palozzi on July 4, 1761, (III, 
380). 

133) To Sr. Mary Cherubina Bresciani on Aug. 
29, 1744 (I, 495). He also adds, as if to 
indicate the source of this joy: "with a 
great confidence in God, wholly abandoned, 
and resting on His paternal bosom." 

134) To Teresa Palozzi on Oct. 26, 1764, (III, 
396). 

135) To Sr. Coulmba Gertrude Gandolfi on March 
18, 1755, (II, 473). 

136) Jo Mother Mary Crucified Costantini on 

Dec. 2, 1762, (II, 295). 

137) To Thomas Fossi on June 13, 1760, (I, 
718). 

138) In the correspondence with Teresa Palozzi, 
who had a fiery temperament (111, 410) 
restless, agitated, officious, there are many 
counsels about peace: "These disturbances 
are always born of an evil root and that is 
whv one should immediately humble oneself 
and become abandoned to the divine Will 
in every untoward event. Take all trouble- 
some things as coming from the loving 
hand of God and let all anxiety perish in 
the fire of divine charity." (March 13, 
1764, [II, 387]). He urged her to recollect 
herself before every action: "Put your 
heart at peace before you begin doing 
anything." (Oct. 17, 1764, [III, 395]). "Do 
everything with great peace, without 
anxiety or haste because they are the 
ruination of devotion, as St. Francis de 
Sales says. "Rest then, in peace by thinking 
about God, work, cook, wait on everyone, 
live in peace . . . What a short path to 
sanctity." (Sept. 8, 1759, [III, 372]). Teresa 



272 



Palozzi accused herself of coldness in the 
service of God, and St. Paul replied by 
asking her to check and see if she had 
not been "dissipated in her exterior senses." 
(June 20, 1759, [III, 3701). On the rela- 
tion between peace and abandonment ac- 
cording to Pere De Canssade, see Abandon- 
ment to Divine Providence, Book I, Letters 
1 and 10. 

139) To Girolama Ercolani, Sept. 30, 1758, 
(II, 615). 

140) January 14, 1749, (II, 767). 

141) To Lucretia Bastiani Paladine, July 28, 1766, 
(III, 59). 

142) To Sister Columba Gertrude Fandolfi, June 
24, 1760, (II, 506). 

143) To a religious, Oct. 7, 1760, (II, 264). 

144) February 19, 1760, (I, 713). 

145) November 29, 1730, (I, 86). 

146) To Maria Giovanna Venturi Grazi, June 20, 
1760, (II, 30) to Sister AA. Louise of the 
Passion, Feb. 7, 1761, (III, 625). 

147) To Teresa Palozzi, Dec. 7, 1755, (III, 355). 

148) July 21, 1764, (I, 751). 

149) August 21, 1764, (I, 752). 

150) To Lucretia Bastiani Paladine, July 28, 1766, 
(III, 591). 

151) As soon as a soul that has abandoned itself 
to God's good pleasure notices in itself 
any movement of the will whatever, it 
immediately makes it disappear in the 
will of God. (St. Francis de Sales, Discourse 
II, on Confidence). This expression recurs 
at least two other times in this Discourse 
II. It is also found in the Treatise on the 
Love of God. Book IX, ch. 12. 

152) To Thomas Fossi, Aug. 13, 1757, (I, 686). 

153) To Marianna Girelli, Sept. 24, 1768, (III, 
755). 

154) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, Dec. 
13, 1764, (II, 515). 

155) To a religious in the monastery of Corpus 
Christi, Auq. 1, 1769, (IV, 53). 

156) To Sister M. Clara of St. Philip, Mar, 21, 
1757, (III, 465-466). 

157) To Sister M. Cherubina Bresciani, Oct 2, 
1750, (I, 506). 

158) To Agnes Grazi, Aug. 17, 1739, (I, 238). 

159) Feb. 14, 1752, (I, 611). 

160) Dec. 15, 1754, (I, 647). 

161) Jan. 1, 1773, (I. 807). 

162) To Anna Cecilia Anguillare, Aug. 27, 1754, 
(III, 215). 

163) To a religious, Nov. 29, 1769, (IV, 58). 

164) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, Jan. 
31, 1756. (II, 487). 

165) To a religious, June 17, 1769, (IV, 51). 

166) To Sister Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, Jan. 
31, 1756 (II, 487). 

167) November 5, 1757 (III, 482). 

168) To Don Francis Anthony Appiani, July 16, 
1738 (I, 418). He also said: "It is neces- 
sary to gain our perfection not in our own 
way, but as it pleases the Lord." (To 
Thomas Fossi, April 6, 1758 [I, 6911). This 
was perhaps a reminiscence of St. Francis 
of Sales: "If we are holy according to our 
own will, we shall never be truly holy; it 
is necessary to be holy according to the 
Will of God." (Letter to President Brulart, 
September, 1606, ed. d'Annecy, t. 3, p. 
214). 

169) To Sister Columba Gertrude, July 13, 1756 
(II, 489); to Don John Anthony Lucattini, 



170) 

171) 
172) 
173) 
174) 
175) 
175) 

177) 
178) 

179) 

180) 

181) 

182) 

183) 
184) 
185) 
186) 

187) 
188) 

189) 
190) 
191) 

192) 
193) 



194) 



195) 
196) 



197) 
198) 

199) 

200) 
201) 
202) 

203) 

204) 



205) 
206) 



May 25, 1751 (II, 808). 
July 11, 1738 (I, 211-212). 
To the same, June 21, 1742 (I, 286). 
May 30, 1752 (I, 615). 

To Agnes Sagneri, March 29, 1768 (IV, 10). 
January 30, 1740 (I, 251). 
To Agnes Grazi, March 7, 1737 (I, 177). 
To Don Francis Anthony Appiani, Novem- 
ber 26, 1736 (I, 403). 
November 29, 1730 (I, 86). 
To Sister Marianna of Jesus, December 28, 
1765 (II, 737). 

To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, Sep- 
tember 3, 1754 (II, 291). 
To Mother Prioress of the Corpus Christi 
Convent, August 13, 1769 (IV, 54). 
To Marianna della Scala del Pozzo, January 
3, 1729 (I, 43). 

To the Abbot Conte Garagni, January 10, 
1741 (II, 213). 

To the same, December 10, 1742 (II, 234). 
To a Bishop, July 6, 1741 (II, 270). 
To Pope Clement XIV (IV, 203-204). 
To Don Cesare Macali, October 2, 1750 
(III, 72). 

To Thomas Fossi, Sept. 23, 1747, (I, 558). 
To his brothers and sisters, Feb. 21, 1722, 
(I, 54). 

To Teresa Palozzi, June 19, 1757, (III, 359). 
To Thomas Fossi, July 15, 1758, (I, 695). 
To Faustina Giannotti, May 23, 1768, 
(III, 65). 

To Thomas Fossi, Sept. 5, 1743, (I, 552). 
Feb. 21, 1772, (I, 54-55),-Often St. Paul 
of the Cross proposed to his correspondents 
ejaculatory prayers, and particularly acts 
of abandonment, v. g., to Laura Giannotti, 
March 19, 1734, I, I, 528; to Thomas 
Fossi, June 13, 1760 (I, 717-718), he coun- 
sels the "Fiat voluntas tua sicut in coela 
et in terra." He suggests to Fr. Vincent of 
St. Augustine some aspirations to the 
divine Will, March 9, 1763, (III, 302); the 
same to Teresa Palozzi, June 19, 1757, 
(III, 358). 

To Faustina Ciannotti, May 23, 1768, (III, 
65). 

To Thomas Fossi, May 26, 1759, (I, 704). 
He wrote to Fr. rulgentius of Jesus: "You 
know that true holiness is not separate 
from pains and tribulations" (Dec. 15, 
1746, [II, 1151). Note also this line to 
Agnes Grazi: "The more one advances in 
the service of God, the more suffering in- 
creases." (April 17, 1734, [I, 117]). 
To Maria Girelli, Dec. 28, 1768, (III, 756). 
To Sister Marianna of Jesus, Dec. 28, 1765, 
(II, 736). 

To Fr. Vincent of St. Augustine, Mar. 9, 
1765, (III, 302). 

To Thomas Fossi, Julv 11, 1765, (I, 760). 
To the same, Aug. 13, 1757, (I, 686). 
To Anna Maria Calcognini, Dec, 1770, 
(III, 833). 

To Anna Maria Cecilia Anguillara, May 
10, 1768, (III, 218). 

To Thomas Fossi, Aug. 31, 1751 (I, 645); 
cf. to Girolania Ercolane, Feb. 22, 1750 
(II, 837); to the Provost of Paliano, Aug. 
9, 1763, (III, 662). 

To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, Jan. 
14, 1769, (II, 318). 

To St. M. Cherubina Bresciani, Dec. 18, 
1743, (I, 491). 



273 



207) Le Plus Parfait, Ch. 16 and 17. 

208) To Don Cahetan Gionnine, Jan. 25, 1748, 
(II, 644). 

209) To St. M. Cherubina Bresciani, Jna. 18, 1753, 

(I, 512). To be crucified with Christ "is 230) 
the most efficacious way to arrive at the 
perfection of holiness, to a pure and shin- 
ing love," (To AAarianna Civelli, Apr. 1769, 
(III, 758). 

210) To Agnes Grazi, (I, 329). 

211) To St. M. Cherubina Bresciani, Dec. 18, 
1743, (I, 491). 

212) To Anna Maria Calcagnini, Dec. 12, 1769, 
(III, 827). 

213) To St. M. Clara of St. Philip, Jan. 18, 1757, 
(III, 459). 

214) To St. Columba Gertrude Gandolfi, July 
10, 1743, (II, 440) to Sr. Mary Crucified 
of Jesus, July 2, 1770, (IV, 99). 

215) To Agnes Grazi, March 15, 1736, (I, 134); 
to St. M. Cherubina Bresciani, Nov. 17, 
1739, (I, 465); cf. to Signora Dorotea, Feb. 
9, 1756, (III, 415). 

216) The Imitation of Christ, (II, 12, 7). 

217) To Agnes Grazi, Aug. 29, 1737, (I, 194); 
to Thomas Fossi, Feb. 20, 1749, (I, 574). 

218) To Agnes Grazi, Aug. 29, 1737, (I, 194)- 
We should note the circumstances of this 
statement, for they give us— St. Paul of the 
Cross is so sparing in confidences— one of 
his personal experiences: "... You recall 
that yesterday, in our devout conference, 
I confided to you that sometimes I undergo 
a great storm; I first found myself before 
my Love, before the Blessed Cacrament 
(mio Amore Sacramentato); my soul flew 
away in spirit to attach itself to this infi- 
nite charity, exposed on the altar for the 
adoration of the people, and I heard the 
Savior address to me this sweet word, "He 
who attaches himself to me, attaches him- 
self to thorns." 

219) To Maria Angela Cencelli, Dec. 9, 1760, 

(III, 602). 231) 

220) To Sister M. Louisa of the Passion, Jan. 5, 232) 
1762, (III, 627). 233) 

221) To the same, Oct. 5, 1762, (III, 629). 234) 

222) To Girolama Ercolani, July 31, 1751, (II, 235) 
592). 236) 

223) To Agnes Grazi, June 29, 1743, (I, 298)- 237) 
He speaks also, and here we touch upon 238) 
his mysticism of the Passion, of a "prayer 239) 
without consolation." (To the same, Oct. 3, 240) 
1736, [I, 155]). To Sister Marianna of 241) 
Jesus (Mar. 19, 1768, [II, 7381), where one 242) 
must "imitate Jesus' agonizing in the 243) 
Garden." 244) 

224) To Mother Mary Crucified Costantini, Jan. 245) 
1, 1765, (II, 300). 246) 

225) To the same, June 15, 1765, (II, 306). 247) 

226) To Agnes Grazi, Oct 3, 1736, (I, 153; to 
Anthony Coccia, Jan. 10, 1768, (IV, 25). 

227) To Agnes Grazi, Oct. 12 ... (I, 330); to 
Teresa Palozzi, Aug. 21, 1763, (III, 384). 

228) To Thomas Fossi, July 6, 1752, (I, 616-617). 

229) To Agnes Grazi, Aug. 4, 1738, (I, 216)- 
He tells her likewise "that one must not 
look at consolation but rather at the God 
of consolation". (Sept. 26, 1740, [I, 264]). 
In short one must look at God alone to be 
indifferent to suffering or joy, as St. 
Paul so readily repeats, because indiffer- 



ence is synonymous with abandonment, 
abandonment to God in joy as in suffering, 
having only God in view and being de- 
tached from all creatures. 
The words which he wrote in 1736 are 
applicable to the entire life of St. Paul of 
the Cross. "My place and my rest is the 
Will of God." (To Agnes Grazzi, Oct. 11, 
1736, [I, 157]). The Saint always looked 
for the Will of God and "for nothing else.' - 
(I, 318). In 1741, in view of the scarcity 
of vocations, he resigned himself to the 
dispersion of his congregation, if it was 
the Will of God: "I see the work begun, 
but I see also great evidence that it could 
die at birth; because I do not see the 
means by which the esrvants of God will 
come who are to be the foundation stones 
to build this spiritual edifice: it could be, 
however, that once I, who am an obstacle, 
have been taken away, His Divine Majesty 
will provide them." And he added: "I am 
prepared for everything and I do nothing 
but to resign myself and abandon myself 
readily to see the beginning and the end 
of this work if God so wills." (To Mother 
Mary Crucified Costantini, Aug. 10, 1741. 
[II, 290]). Nevertheless, one feels the emo- 
tion in these words. Twenty years later 
it is a more tranquil soul that writes, "I 
am indifferent and find myself equally 
content with events favorable or unfavorable 
because God gives me the grace to desire 
nothing except His divine Pleasure." (To 
Canon Paul Cardi, Aug. 28, 1760, [III, 
122]). During his last years, in the midst 
of a sickness which kept him in bed and 
forbade all exterior action, he had only 
one word, and this indeed the result of the 
efforts of his whole life: "I rejoice that 
in me and through me the Will of God 
be done." (To D. James Mary Massa, March 
1, 1775. [IV, 165]). 
Nov. 23, 1720, (I, 2). 
Dec. 6, (I, 7). 
Dec. 10, 11, 12, 13, (I, 9). 
Dec. 21, (I, 11). 
Nov. 25, (I, 3). 
Dec. 10, 11, 12, 13, (I, 9). 
Dec. 15, 16, 17, 18, (I, 10). 
Dec. 23, (I, 14). 
Dec. 21, (I, 12). 
Nov. 26, (I, 3). 
Dec. 26 and 29, (I, 14 and 16). 
Nov. 26, (I, 3). 
Nov. 27, (I, 4). 
Nov. 25, (I, 3). 
Dec. 21, (I, 13). 
Dec. 21, (I, 16). 

St. Francis de Sales is in fact the author 
St. Paul of the Cross quotes most frequent- 
ly. A letter of 1726 shows us that on that 
date the Treatice on the Love of God was 
shown by him to Nicolina Peccorini Mar- 
tinez, May 26, 1726, (I, 164). We know 
by the witnesses of the process of beatifi- 
cation (Cajetan of the Holy Name of Mary, 
Doctrinne . . . P. 11), that, while still in 
his father's house, he read St. Francis de 
Sales assiduously and knew his doctrine 
thoroughly. 



274 




On May 11, at about 4:40 P.M. Fa- 
ther Kenneth of the Assumption 
(Ward) was called to eternity. Dur- 
the years of his priestly life he often 
had to bear the cross of ill health, 
especially during the past few years. 
His death took place in Resurrection 
Hospital, Chicago. During the last 
days he was quite delirious, but 
about 3 hours before the end he be- 
came quite conscious and prayed al- 
most constantly till he breathed his 
last, to the edification of all present. 
He was burried in our Monastery 
cemetery, Norwood Park. 



Your prayers are also requested 
for the deceased Mrs. Maud Burke 
(March 20), a sister to our deceased 
Father Michael O'Brien. 



On the Feast of our Holy Founder 
(April 28) Mrs. H. Kurrus, a sister 
of our Father Ralph died. Your 
prayers are requested. 



Notice was also received of the 
death of Mr. John Jablonovsky, fa- 
ther of our Father Cyril Mary. He 
died in Campbell, 0., May 9. R. LP. 



Also on May 9, after a long pro- 
tracted illness, Sister Mary Albert, 
Sister of Charity of Nazareth, was 
called to her eternal reward. Sister 
Mary Albert was active for several 
years in our Holy Family Mission in 
Ensley, Alabama. 

FATHER FABIAN 
OF THE ASSUMPTION 

The familiar notice posted by the 
Superior that one of our Brethren 
has been called to his eternal reward, 
and the religious of the community 
thereby asked to offer the suffrages 
so bountifully provided for in our 
Holy Rule, gives rise to reflections in 
varying kind. These may be stimu- 
lated by a lively faith, a supernatural 
charity, a personal interest, and even 
a mild curiosity. Who was this re- 



275 



ligious? What were his virtues and 
abilities? What of worth did he ac- 
complish in the obedience assigned 
him by superiors? The crowning 
grace was his; he persevered unto 
the end. For the rest, one sets him- 
self to conjecture and perhaps, to 
interpret within the purview of his 
competence. 

St. Paul once queried the Romans: 
"Who has known the mind of the 
Lord?" And with equal assurance he 
might have added: "Who can fathom 
the soul of man?" Indeed, we at- 
tempt appraisals and draw inferen- 
ces which seem logical, based as they 
are on words and actions observed 
in him whose soul we would un- 
cover. Who, after all, are we to 
essay the role of appraiser? Our 
qualification could easily fault sound 
judgment. Preconceived notions, or 
motives of sympathy and personal 
friendship, and possibly a jealous 
strain could well mar unbiased con- 
clusions. However, the quality of 
another's soul cannot remain entire- 
ly hidden. As we observe mental and 
emotional attitudes, physical and 
moral courage or weakness, the signs 
point to what makes of a creature, 
a man. Underlying ideals, motives, 
virtue or its lack must rise to the 
surface in the donduct of life. In 
retrospect we come upon the pattern 
of life so often missed in daily con- 
tact. The cumulative picture shows 
in fair degree the soul of any man. 

The measure of accuracy will no 
doubt fall far short of the divine 
scrutiny. None-the-less, our obser- 
vations are not to be wholly dis- 
counted. Because a religious does 
not live alone he needs to cultivate 



the virtues of self-sacrifice, patience, 
meekness, generosity and kindness. 
All these reflect the love for God 
and man in him who is vowed to 
seek His Holy Will. 

We are emboldened in this brief 
obituary of Fr. Fabian Kelly to un- 
dertake to show from the edifica- 
tion of his life that pledge to God of 
this sincere dutiful priest-religious. 
We measure his excellence by what 
we have learned of his love for God 
and service to fellow man through 
the long years of his sojourn 
amongst us as a brother religious. 

To Father Fabian, born June 17, 
1883, and christened James William, 
there came early in life the grace 
of vocation to the Passionist priest- 
hood. Nurtured within the shadow 
of our first American foundation, 
the Monastery of St. Paul of the 
Cross, in Pittsburgh, Pa., he was 
hardly twelve years old when two 
of his brothers, Joseph F. and John 
R. were professed as Brothers and 
known in the Congregation as Bro. 
Gabriel and Bro. Edmund respec- 
tively, each bearing the same title 
of the Sorrowful Virgin. After ser- 
ving for some months as door boy 
at the monastery, he was admitted 
to our Preparatory School of St. 
Mary, at Dunkirk, N.Y., in Septem- 
ber, 1898. Then, on the feast of Our 
Lady's Assumption, August 15, 1902, 
the erstwhile little door boy, Willie 
Kelly, was privileged to pronounce 
his perpetual vows before the same 
altar in St. Paul's monastery church, 
where his elder brothers had preced- 
ed him. Likewise, they have gone 
before him to their Father's house. 
The mortal remains of these three 



276 



brothers in the flesh and in religion 
are interred side by isde in the 
monastery cemetery in Pittsburgh. 

At the time of the division of the 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross in 
1906, Father Fabian was following 
his studies at Holy Cross Monastery, 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. It was then and 
there he cast his lot with the newly 
established Province of Holy Cross. 
Never did he find cause to regret his 
choice, and in turn, our Province 
has been grateful to him for the 
decision. 

On the feast of Our Holy Founder, 
April 28, 1909, he was ordained and 
shortly thereafter entered upon his 
long service of priestly ministry, 
lasting more than forty-five years. 
The final appointment of the Master 
came to him on October 16, 1954, at 
the Sisters of Mercy Hospital in the 
little town of Kalispell in Montana, 
where at the time he was serving as 
chaplain. The Fathers Provincial 
graciously accended to the request 
of the relatives that the remains be 
brought to Pittsburgh for burial, 
where Father Neil sang the Solemn 
Requiem Mass and gave the final 
absolution on Friday, October 22. 

Respectful treatment of the life 
of one departed, aptly phrased De 
mortuis nil nisi bonum, would pre- 
clude enlargement upon weaknesses 
to which nature is heir, and by the 
same token should restrain the ex- 
uberance of unwarranted praise. 
Exaggeration of whatever kind is 
an excess offensive to truth and 
hurtful to him whom one would in- 
cautiously criticize or unduly exalt. 
How easily it comes to eulogize the 
accomplishments of those so spec- 



tacularly different, whom circum- 
stance forced to deeds of heroism; 
to do the unusual and the unexpect- 
ed. How perfectly normal it is to 
pass over in silence, even minimize 
the virtue of him who carries on 
faithfully in uneventful daily ser- 
vice. We call it the usual and ex- 
pected, so we remain unimpressed. 
Virtue seems to be taken for grant- 
ed. But, let us note, this test of en- 
durance shows a quality of virtue 
not always found in him who on 
occasion rises to the heroic. 

The most honorable tribute we can 
pay to the memory of Father Fabian 
is to recognize in him a genuine 
soldier, a private 1st class. As 
General MacArthur remarked: "an 
old soldier never dies, he just 
fades away." Never physically ro- 
bust, the spirit and zeal of a real 
soldier of Christ so animated him 
that finally, the worn out body could 
no longer contain its energy. As 
one who was with him in his last 
moments asid: "He's going down 
fighting." 

Our Father in heaven by His mer- 
ciful Providence often thwarts the 
calculations of men, however sincere 
and honest they may be. It is of 
record that the superiors at the pre- 
paratory school deemed him too 
limited in mental qualification to 
pursue the necessary studies leading 
to the priesthood. He was rejected 
and sent home. Thus the germinat- 
ing grace of vocation became serious- 
ly endangered, but, thank God, not 
destroyed. Through persistent effort 
on his part another try was granted 
and after several months he was al- 
lowed to return to Dunkirk. The 



277 



sequel tells the story of success and 
a long and useful life in the Priest- 
hood. Might we not note in passing, 
the evidence here presented. Intel- 
lectual stature alone is not all that 
God asks of his priests. They also 
serve who willingly labor and pray. 
Fr. Fabian did both and well. 

This incident of persistent effort 
to accomplish his vocation is the 
first inkling of a characteristic cour- 
age so repeatedly observed in him. 
His was not the stubborn, hardhead- 
ed determination refusing advice or 
rejecting compromise. Rather was 
he amenable to judgements of su- 
periors ,who in turn, were not left 
disturbed by his reactions to their 
decisions. The virtue of obedience 
dominated his energetic spirit. He 
was indeed blessed with a disposition 
that could throw off the momentary 
shock of disappointment. There was 
no harboring of grudge as he quickly 
regained the poise of one sensitive 
to the divine will manifested to him 
through human instruments. Frus- 
tration and discouragement were de- 
fects from which he was singularly 
free. And at no time was he victim- 
ized by self-pity, which leads to the 
wasteful diversion of feeling sorry 
for oneself. 

The qualities of mind and heart 
God gave him, and they were many 
and varied, were dutifully nurtured 
and turned to benefit the legions of 
souls coming under his care through- 
out his long career. 

Father Fabian was never elected 
to canonical office in the Congrega- 
tion. He was not a missionary as we 
understood the word. It was in the 
field of pastoral activity that his 



zeal found outlet. That superiors 
reposed confident trust in his ability 
and good judgement is easily estab- 
lished by the many posts of respon- 
sibility to which he was appointed. 
His ingenuity and resourcefulness 
came quickly into play whereever 
obedience placed him. No change, 
however important or ordinary, to 
which duty called made any differ- 
ence in the amount of interest and 
devotion expended. In any and all 
circumstances, the same attention 
absorbed his energy. He was ap- 
pointed pastor successively in three 
parishes under our charge; in St. 
Louis, Chicago and iSt. Paul, Kansas. 

As a member of the community, 
between special provincial assign- 
ments, he could be counted on by the 
Father Rector to undertake what- 
ever type of work desired of him, 
such as Sunday work, 40 Hours de- 
votions, Lenten courses, administer- 
ing little neglected country parishes, 
no matter, the same earnest effort 
went into it. 

Perhaps the most noteworthy of 
his various duties was that which 
consumed twenty years of uninter- 
rupted service for God"s afflicted 
ones, and the unfortunates who fell 
afoul of the law. Three difficult 
chaplaincies near the City of Detroit 
were held simultaneously by him. 
A hospital for tuberculars, number- 
ing 800 patients; a school for re- 
tarded children with 200 inmates; 
and two houses of correction, usually 
called prisons, one for men and the 
other for women. Only a genius with 
supernatural outlook could handle 
such multiple tasks. Father did, and 
how efficiently, the record is there 



278 



to prove. 

Few indeed have surpassed his 
Christlike approach and understand- 
ing of those under stress of pain and 
affliction. He learned, like the Mas- 
ter, in the school of suffering. He 
was no stranger to death, having 
gone to its brink on more than one 
occasion. Pneumonia seemed to have 
been his nemesis. Thus could he 
understand those who labored 
against sickness. To the resentful 
and rebellious in prison he was the 
kind and helpful friend. An advice 
given by him to a veteran social 
worker at the women's prison tells 
of his own heart: "Be kind, be kind. 



You can't do much else, but you can 
be kind." And her comment after 
his death: "how true. He was truly 
a kind and patient priest." 

Having completed the alloted 
years of service, he was retired by 
the City of Detroit with pension. 
Though broken in health, superiors 
sent him to act as chaplain for the 
Sisters of Mercy and their hospital 
at Kalispell, Montana. It was a 
thoughtful act on the part of the 
Father Provincial, who cherished 
the hope that lighter work and an 
invigorating climate might bring 
back his depleted strength and add 
a few more years to the more than 




Fr. Fabian and his "Marian Collection' 



279 



forty he had already given to the 
Lord. It did prolong his life for 
approximately three years. 

What of service and edification he 
accomplished during these years in 
the Northwest is best summarized in 
the short but meaningful letter of 
the Mother General of the Sisters 
of Mercy who was on visitation at 
the hospital when death called him. 
Writing to Father Provincial she 
says: "... the example that his life 
in Kalispell gave was evidenced by 
the large attendance at his funeral 
Mass by both clergy and laity. The 
regularity of his life and his devo- 
tion to Mary were always an in- 
spiration to those of us who were 
privileged to live in the hospital 
during the years he served as chap- 
lain." 

The pastor of the parish in Kalis- 
pell was even more outright in ex- 
pressing himself. In a letter hurried 
to Father Provincial on the day of 
Father's death his tribute was un- 
restrained: "Truly do I feel that he 
departed this life in the odor of 
sanctity. His life during his stay 
in Kalispell was most exemplary at 
all times. He was ever most faithful 
to the ideals of the priesthood and 
the Congregation to which he was 
evermost loyal and devoted. His loss 
is a great one for the City of Kalis- 
pell and for all those who were 
blessed with his friendship." 

The tribute paid his memory by 
the clergy who attended the funeral 
Mass at Kalispell should warm the 
heart of every member of our Pro- 
vince. There came the Vicar Gen- 
eral and the Chancellor of the dio- 
cese, the pastor of the Cathedral, 



the editor of the diocesan paper, 
with pastors and chaplains, all to 
the number of twenty. Helena num- 
erically is a small diocese with 
widely scattered parishes. Three of 
the priests chartered a plane to fly 
from Helena. Fr. John F. Cronin, 
pastor of Whitefish, pronounced the 
eulogy, and in the words of one 
present: "it was a grand sermon." 
Indeed, it was a generous expres- 
sion of admiration by the priests of 
the Helena diocese for an unpreten- 
tious Passionist priest who served 
with them. 

No effort was made to solicit trib- 
utes to his memory, but they con- 
tinue to come nevertheless, mostly 
from the humble needy ones who 
learned from him the hopeful les- 
son of the Master, that life is well 
worth living and suffering carries 
a recompense. 

For almost twent-five years his 
assignments kept him away from the 
monastic observance the greater part 
of the time. This caused no aliena- 
tion of religious spirit, nor desire to 
become detached from his commu- 
nity. His popularity with the breth- 
ren may be guaged by the repartee 
and banter indulged in and the jokes 
interchanged, with never a resentful 
retort indicating feelings that were 
hurt. How readily he could forget 
because he had nothing to forgive. 
This was not due to indifference nor 
a happy-go-lucky disposition devoid 
of sense of the serious. Rather was 
it the outgrowth of schooling in re- 
ligious charity. No one, we believe, 
was ever made sad or uncomfortable 
when dealing with him. Generous to 
a fault., and ever keeping in charac- 



280 



ter, the mark of the humble man, 
Father Fabian was known as a self- 
sacrificing, patient and kindly soul. 
He thought of others more than of 
himself. Indeed, he has taught us 
much. R. I. P. 

FR. BERTRAND, C.P. 

The angel death came quickly for 
Father Bertrand of the Passion on 
January 5, 1955. It was, however, the 
sort of death that any priestly heart 
would desire; sufficient clear warn- 
ing, some days of preparation, all 
rites of Holy Mother the Church. 




Up until Father was taken ill he 
had apparently been in good health. 
He had worked extremely hard all 
through the Fall; there had been a 
number of Missions, Days of Recol- 
lection and occasional sermons. 
While at home he kept busy with his 
voluminous correspondence and his 



duties as sacristan. After his death 
it was learned that he had experi- 
enced some chest pain and that he 
had been overfatigued. But these in- 
dispositions did not cause him to 
lessen his activities. He was in his 
place in the choir for every act of 
the Observance that was required of 
him. 

On Christmas he sang Midnight 
Mass at St. Jude Thaddeus Church 
in Highlands and returned home at 
2:30 A.M. After a few hours he arose 
again to say his other two Masses. 
He was in very fine spirits all during 
Christmas Day and the day follow- 
ing. On the 27th after dinner he suf- 
fered the heart attack that carried 
him off. He went to the hospital that 
night and almost immediately was 
put in an oxygen tent. He was anoint- 
ed on the 28th and received Viati- 
cum and the Last Blessing the fol- 
lowing day. He did not seem to ex- 
perience any exceptional pain dur- 
ing his illness although he was ex- 
tremely restless. The restlessness 
was in all probability due to an in- 
sufficiency of oxygen. He lapsed into 
a coma about 5:00 o'clock on Janu- 
ary 4th and died the following day 
at 4:45 P.M. His death agony was 
very brief, lasting not more than five 
minutes. 

The remains were brought to the 
Chapel of Holy Name Retreat House 
the following day and remained un- 
til 2:00 o'clock. His body was then 
taken to St. Louis and laid out in 
the Chapel of the Preparatory Semi- 
nary. The Funeral Mass was sung 
at 10:00 o'clock, January 8th by Very 
Rev. Father Provincial. The Very 



281 



Rev. Father Conleth, Rector of Holy 
Name Retreat, preached the Sermon 
and His Excellency Bishop Leo Byrne 
gave the Obsequies. The body was 
then brought to Calvary Cemetery 
and placed in a vault awaiting its 
final resting place at the new Pas- 
sionist Cemetery at Warrenton, Mis- 
souri. 

There is an old saying to the effect 
that we die as we live. Any sudden 
change from a lifetime of habit is 
an exception for the moment of 
death. Father Bertrand had lived an 
edifying priestly life and he died 
a holy death. His thoughts were in- 
creasingly fixed on the ordeal before 
him and on existence after death. 
His illness laid upon him much dis- 
comfort and an intolerable restless- 
ness but he was patient and accomo- 
dating all the time. 

Father Bertrand was born June 
14, 1889 at Lakenan. Missouri and 
was christened Ernest. His parents 
had emigrated from Kentucky and 
had settled on a farm in mid-Mis- 
souri not long before. His mother, 
Martha Adams, was a convert to 
Catholicism. There were five child- 
ren in all in the Abell family. One 
boy, Harry, and one girl died very 
early in childhood. The mother died 
while the children were all still 
small. Emma, who was three years 
older than Charles and seven years 
older than Ernest, took over the 
chores of the household and helped 
to raise her younger brothers. 

The surviving brother, Charles, 
tells us that Father Bertrand was a 
normal farm boy at home. He worked 
on the farm helping his father and 
took a hearty interest in all the ac- 



tivities of the boys of the neighbor- 
hood. After preparatory school he 
went to Quincy College, Quincy, Illi- 
nois, and spent two or three years 
there. His vocation to the Congrega- 
tion of the Passion seems to have 
come from a chance encounter with 
Father Benedict Henley, C.P. He 
entered the Passionist Novitiate in 
Pittsburg where his training as a 
young religious was in the hands of 
Father Wilfred Avery, C.P. He was 
professed on August 15, 1910 and or- 
dained five years later, June 13, 
1915. The ordination was in the 
Monastery Church at St. Paul, Kan- 
sas, and was performed by Bishop 
Hennessy. All the relatives from 
Lakenan and Shelbina, Missouri, 
were down for the ordination. 

Father Bertrand's first assignment 
as a young Passionist Priest was 
to be director of students and lector 
at Immaculate Conception Retreat, 
Chicago. It was under his regime 
that the attic of the monastery was 
transformed into a place suitable for 
the presentation of elocutionary spec- 
tacles. Eleven years after ordination, 
in the Chapter of 1926, Father Ber- 
trand was elected the 18th Rector 
of Holy Cross Monastery, Cincinnati. 
This position he held for six years. 

Father Bertrand made a good Rec- 
tor. He was a man of great regularity 
and loved routine. He also was pa- 
ternal in his relationship to his sub- 
jects. He was generous in the hand- 
ling of his community although he 
could speak out quite forcefully when 
things went awry. After the 1932 
Chapter Father was Vicar for a num- 
ber of years in St. Paul, in Detroit, 
and in Sierra Madre. His time, too, 



282 



was increasingly taken up with re- 
treat and mission activities. About 
the year 1945 he was appointed Pas- 
tor of St. Ann's Parish, Normandy. 
He discharged his duties as pastor 
with commendable diligence. His ca- 
pacity for regularity and for detail 
was an asset in parish work. He 
renovated the Convent, initiated the 
plans that ultimately were used for 
the new Church. Father selected Joe 
Murphy as the Architect for the new 
St. Ann's. When the parish was given 
back to the diocese in 1948, Father 
Bertrand was transferred to the new 
foundation at Houston, Texas. He 
began to get more and more mission 
and retreat appointments, many of 
them personal requests. At the time 
he died he was solidly booked all 
through Spring until Easter. 

As the preacher at the Funeral 
Mass pointed out, Father Bertrand 
was a priest who was always sincere- 
ly interested in people. This was pos- 
sibly one of his outstanding priestly 
characteristics. He made friends 
easily and was extremely loyal in his 
attachments. This entailed a great 
deal of work inasmuch as many both 
among the laity and among religious 
came to Father for guidance and 
counsel. A Sister who wrote after his 
death sums up what was the experi- 
ence of many: 

"I was shocked and grieved to 
learn of the death of Father Ber- 
trand. For years he has been a friend 
of mine. When I desperately needed 
help spiritually, he was kind and 
understanding and through the years 
has proved to be a wise counsellor 
and a trusted friend." 

A lay person had this to say when 



notice of Father's death was received: 
"It was a great shock to the whole 
parish and we all grieved over it be- 
cause everyone loved him so much. 
I don't believe I could have felt any 
worse if I'd heard that my husband's 
own father were dead. He was like a 
relative, friend and counsellor all 
rolled into one. He was so good 
about writing and I went to him with 
all of my problems, big and small." 
The extent of Father's influence 
for good will not be known until 
Judgment Day but from the letters 
that were received after his death 
from all parts of the country, his 
ministry as a spiritual father and 
guide was very widespread. 

Father Bertrand was a very fine 
community man. He loved the Pas- 
sionist life and he loved his fellow- 
Passionists. The routine of prayer 
and work and recreation within the 
walls of the monastery seemed to 
offer him all that his mind and heart 
needed. Since he was human, he had 
his faults and idiosyncracies. How- 
ever, he never allowed them to be- 
come major obstacles to fraternal 
charity. He had a spirit of thought- 
fulness and was quick to offer his 
services. When any member of the 
community wanted some little sup- 
ply, scotch tape or the use of a screw- 
driver, or the latest timetable or bus 
information, he could find what he 
wanted by knocking on Father Ber- 
trand's door. His spirit of coopera- 
tion with the local superior was most 
edifying. No matter how tired he 
might be, he still would cheerfully 
undertake some trivial preaching 
chore that would have to go begging 
because nobody else was available. 



283 



Father Bertrand's death, to quote 
again the preacher of the Funeral 
Mass, is a cause of both sorrow and 
joy, His quick passing is sad because 
a good priest is no more; his death 
at the same time is a source of joy. 
God gave him a clear call ten days 
before his death. God gave him the 
grace of all the sacraments of the 
Church. Father Bertrand was an in- 
spiration to many in life. He will be 
an inspiration to many in death. 



HEART OF MARY 

Fr. Edmund Hill, C.P. 

Heart of Mary, be my home 
Through the toilsome years to come. 
Few or many let them be, 
So I live them all in thee. 

Be my chapel when I prays 
Be my altar day by days 
Be my recollection sweet, 
My perpetual retreat. 




284 




PROVINCE OF HOLY CROSS 



April 12, 1955 
TO ALL THE BRETHREN OF 
HOLY CROSS PROVINCE: 

For a good many years, we have 
been conscious of the inadequacy of 
the facilities at our Preparatory Sem- 
inary. At the close of World War II, 
the remedying of this condition was 
placed on the agenda of building pro- 
jects needed in the Providence. 

During the past fourteen months, 
we have been planning a new Pre- 
paratory Seminary and a Laymen's 
Retreat House, to be built near War- 
renton, Mo., in the diocese of St. 
Louis. Plans are now completed and 
construction is scheduled to begin 
about May 16. 

This new Preparatory Seminary is 
the most extensive and the most ex- 
pensive project yet undertaken by 
our Province. I wish, at this time, 
to recommend this project to the ear- 
nest prayers of all the members of 
the Province. 



I am happy to be able to say that 
we are currently receiving more en- 
quiries about Passionist life from 
prospective candidates than ever be- 
fore. We have good reason to think 
that many of these enquirers will 
eventually become actual candidates. 
Thus, we trust that the enlarged fa- 
cilities at the Preparatory Seminary 
will be fully justified in the not 
distant future. 

Very little experience with pros- 
pective candidates for Religious Life 
and the Priesthood suffices to im- 
press one deeply with a realization 
of the special need of actual grace 
to enable such candidates to make 
the practical decision to turn their 
back on the world and give them- 
selves wholly to God. Therefore, I 
deem it timely to request each priest, 
brother and student in the Province 
to pray and to offer good works and 
sacrifices that God will inspire many 
and good recruits to our life. 



285 



Especially during the forthcoming 
Novena in preparation for the feast 
of our Holy Founder should this in- 
tention be kept in mind. I wish that 
in each Community of the Province, 
a Novena of Masses be offered in 
honor of our Holy Founder for this 
intention. If possible, let this be the 
Community Mass. In addition, each 
day during the Novena, the enclosed 
prayer of our Holy Father, Pope Pius 
XII, for vocations will be said by the 
entire Community after Compline. To 



that prayer will be added the follow- 
ing indulgenced ejaculations: 

"0 Lord, grant unto Thy Church 
saintly priests and fervent religious." 

"Send forth, Lord, laborers into 
Thy harvest." 

Recommending all the needs of the 
Brethren and the Providence to your 
prayers and to the special interces- 
sion of our Holy Founder, I am, 
Fraternally in Christ, 
NEIL OF THE MOTHER OF GOD 



LECTORS' CONFERENCE 



As a result of the meeting of the 
Planning Committee for the forth- 
coming Lectors' Conference (the 
Committee met in Norwood Park, 
on February 22), the program for 
the Lectors' Conference has been is- 
sued. 

The program is arranged for three 
full days of morning and afternoon 
papers and evening discussions. The 
tentative date of the Conference is 
Christmas week of 1955. 

The papers to be written for the 
Conference are the following: 

1. "General and Special Law on 
Passionist Seminary Curriculum". 

2. "History of Educational Program 
in Holy Cross Province". 



3. "Goals of Passionist Student For- 
mation as the Aim of Professors". 

4. "Standards and Ideals for Lec- 
tors". 

5. "Methodology in Academic For- 
mation in Minor Seminary". 

7. "Role and Standards of Modera- 
tor of Studies". 

The discussions are listed as fol- 
lows: 

1. "General Problems of Integra- 
tion" — Fathers Herbert, Frederick, 
and Leon. 

2. "Language Studies" — Fathers 
Edgar, Emil, and Roger. 

3. "Public Speaking" — Fathers 
Pius, Germain, Melvin. 



286 




Vocational Day, Sacred Heart Church, Evansville, Ind., February 13, 1955 



4. "Gregorian Chant" — Fathers 
Claude, Gregory Joseph, Ward. 

5. "Single House of Studies (from 



point or view of Student intellectual 
formation)" — Fathers Roger, John 
Baptist, Columban 



HOLY CROSS RETREAT 

(Cincinnati) 

Holy Week was observed in the 
traditional way up here on Mt. 
Adams. At midnight of Holy Thurs- 
day the first group of people were 
waiting to "pray the steps" after the 
blessing at Immaculata. The line of 
pilgrims from there to Holy Cross 
Monastery and parish church span- 
ned the entire day. Contrary to the 



usual Good Friday drenching the 
crowds enjoyed one of the most 
beautiful and warmest of spring days 
on record. The priests of the monas- 
tery who were not engaged in preach- 
ing work and those who were, on 
their return, were busy giving bless- 
ings with the relic of the True Cross 
from early morning till midnight. 
The good brothers supplied the peo- 
ple with thousands of votive lights 



237 



and cheerfully met the endless re- 
quests for Lourdes water and the 
oil of St. Gabriel. It is difficult to 
estimate the number of pilgrims who 
yearly visit our churches here on 
Good Firday, but somewhere between 
twenty and twenty-five thousands 
would be a fair guess. 



On April the 17th the community 
was happy to take part in the cele- 
brations of the First Solemn Mass 
and reception of Father Carl An- 
thony Tenhundfeld, C. P. Fr. Cyril 
Mary, C. P., preached a fine con- 
gratulatory sermon for the grand 
occasion. Fr. Bernardine, C. P., was 
sub-deacon for the Mass. On the fol- 
lowing morning Fr. Carl Anthony 
sang High Mass here at Holy Cross 
and very graciously obliged in giving 
his priestly blessing to each of the 
grade school children assembled for 
the Mass. 



On April 20th took place the long 
expected departure of the missionary 
band from this community. Fr. Ed- 
win, C.P., has been transferred to 
Des Moines; Fr. Howard, C.P., and 
Fr. Cyril. C.P., to Detroit; Fr. Bar- 
tholomew, C.P., to Chicago and Fr. 
Emmanuel, C.P., to Louisville. Re- 
treatants were on hand to supply the 
vacant rooms the following Friday. 
The retreats are all well attended in 
spite of the difficulties which the 
building repairs entail. It is seem- 
ingly impossible to keep the house 
clean and in order while the re- 
modelling is going on. The elevator 
has been an obstacle course in the 
corridors for months; the new pipe 
lines throughout the house are a 



plumbers nightmare. The fire doors 
which partition off the corridors and 
stairs are nearly all completed ,and 
at last the plaster work in the new 
rooms is almost finished. The work- 
men are busy now with the marble 
slabs for the washrooms. 



The prospects for the success of 
the drawing on the $10,000 are look- 
ing pretty good. Nearly $28,000 has 
been taken in with the raffle but a 
month away. The raffle has received 
good publicity, and the demand for 
the tickets is gratifying. 



On the Feast of Our Holy Founder 
the Captains of the St. Paul of the 
Cross Retreat Guild attended Solemn 
Benediction and received the bless- 
ing with the relic of St. Paul at 
Holy Cross Church. The well at- 
tended services were followed with a 
meeting and gaudeamus for the men. 



Here is an interesting item for all 
interested in the Sacred Passion in 
art. A city-wide campaign is in prog- 
ress to raise funds to purchase the 
famed Cellini Crucifix. This Cruci- 
fix formed in bronze and covered 
with gold is one of two religious 
pieces from the hands of the famous 
16th century sculptor and jewel- 
smith, Benvenuto Cellini. The story 
is that Cellini, imprisoned in Castle 
Sant'Angelo in Rome, one day saw 
the sun streaming through the prison 
windows and to his mind it seemed 
to form into the figure of Christ 
Crucified. This was the inspiration 
for his masterpiece. The Crucifix is 
valued at twenty-five to thirty thous- 
and dollars. It was brought to Cin- 



288 






cations were to appendix trouble; 
Brother insisted that he had already 
gone through an appendectomy. But 
his condition was so bad that within 
a few hours after his arrival in the 
hospital an exploratory operation 
was decided upon. He was found to 
have a ruptured, gangrenous appen- 
dix. Brother was in a very serious 
condition for a few days, but now to 
the happiness and surprise of all he 
is up and around doing very well. 

Since the last issue of the PAS- 
SIONIST also the bodies of our de- 
ceased Brethren resting in the Paro- 
chial Cemetery have been transfer- 
red to the monastery cemetery in 
the Novices' Garden aside the re- 
mains of the late Father Julius. The 
Brethren reinterred are: Father 
Aloysius of St. Michael (O'Connor), 
died March 6, 1899; at the time of 
his death he was in Texas on account 
of a tubercular condition. Confrater 
Andrew of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion (Tansey) died September 17, 
1908; he was in St. Francis Monas- 
tery on account of his health. Fr. 
Athanasius Schwingler was taking 
care of him and on that September 
17 had taken Confrator to the banks 
of the Neosho River for a walk 
when an electric storm arose and 
Confrator was struck by lightening. 
Father gave absolution and rush- 
ed two miles to the Monastery to 
announce the accident. The third to 
be brought to the monastery ceme- 
tery was our well-known Father 
Agatho of the Cross (Donnelly) who 
died suddenly while on parish work, 
September 23, 1949. Vide PASSION- 
IST, 1949. p. 504 et seqq. 

Changes in the "de familia" always 



cause a ripple in the stream of con- 
versation. Father Arnold's change to 
the community at Sacramento was 
not too surprising, since his mother 
has long been seriously ill at her 
home in San Francisco. Father Cor- 
nelius is expected to arrive here soon 
to fill up our list of missionaries. 

The Novices and Postulants recent- 
ly drubbed the Professed in a game 
of softball by a score of 16 to 7. No 
human respect there! 

Workmen have just completed work 
on our refectory floor. The entire 
center part has been filled in with 
a smooth cement base. This is in- 
tended as a preparation for tiling 
later on. The procedure seems to be 
wiorking out so well that plans are 
now being made for similar improve- 
ments in other parts of the monas- 
tery ... to the relief and hearty ap- 
proval of all the brethren! 

ST. GABRIEL RETREAT 
(Des Moines) 

The pamphlet rack in our public 
chapel was filled with an attractive 
display of vocational literature during 
the month of March. The selection 
included general material on the 
priesthood, brbtherhood, and sister- 
hood, and also some on particular 
religious orders. Naturally, our own 
life was given prominence, especially 
in the posters used. A word of credit 
is due Confrater Kevin, not only for 
this special display, but for his pa- 
tient pamphleteering these last two 
years. He reports that during this 
period over 2,008 pamphlets have 
been taken by visitors to the chapel. 
While no price is asked, a small do- 
nation box has kept business out of 



293 



the red. Confrater Leonard has also 
been active in the pamphlet aposto- 
late. He designed and constructed 
two streamlined racks, one for the 
Des Moines bus station and the other 
for the municipal airport. The sisters 
and students of St. Joseph's Academy 




Cfr. Kevin at phamplet rock in St. 
Gabriel's public Chapel, Des Moines 

keep these racks supplied, but their 
success has been due in great part 
to Confrater's creative intuition and 
carpentry. 



March 15 is the traditional moving 
day for Iowa farmers. And, this year 
at least, the Iowa monks follbwed 
suit. For since that date four trans- 
fers have been made to and from Des 
Moines. Father Malachy moved to 
Chicago, and Father Keith to Hous- 
ton, while incoming trains brought 
us Father Edwin from Cincinnati and 
Father Jude from St. Louis. 



Fathers Finan and Michael hit the 
Oregon trail immediately after Eas- 
ter to take part in operating Port- 
land, preaching the Sign in the pa- 
rishes there. We hope their far wes- 
tern expedition will result in a new 
subscription high. 



The symposium usually presented 
by the third year philosophy class 
for the feast of St. Thomas was this 
year postponed until early May, so 
that more of the community would 
be able to attend. The general theme 
chosen was that of "Labor: the Popes' 
concern . . . our concern." The four 
papers, developed from material 
treated in Father Randal's social phi- 
losophy course, were as follows: La- 
bor Unions, their development and 
benefits (Confrater Leonard); the 
General Obligation to join a Union 
(Confrater Edwin); the Duties of Un- 
ion Men and Officials (Confrater 
Joseph Mary); the Association of 
Catholic Trade Unionists (Confrater 
Stephen). 



A brief course touching on the 
principles and problems of medical 
ethics was presented to the students 
of Still College of Osteopathy and 
Surgery, Des Moines, by Father Fred- 
erick and Father Thomas More. Al- 
though the two Fathers were invited 
by the Newman Club, the audience 
for the series of three evening dis- 
cussions was composed mainly of non- 
Catholics. They showed a definite in- 
terest in the material given. And, as 
might be expected, the talks were 
marked by rather lively debate. 



Our students' choir was requested 



294 



to sing for the dedication of the new 
St. Joseph's Church here on April 27. 
Report has it that Bishop Daly told 
the pastor, "If the Passionists will 
sing the Mass, I will dedicate it my- 
self." Be that as it may, the Passion- 
ists did sing. It was felt that the re- 
quest had been made because of a 
desire to hear the chant rendered 
well, so Gregorian was the order of 
the day. 

Father Ignatius Convoy is still a 
patient in Mercy Hospital. His con- 
dition, while somewhat improved, is 
as yet far from complete recovery. 
He has undergone several slight heart 
attacks since his operation in early 
March, and is often noticeably weak 
and tired. But he keeps making the 
effort to sit up awhile each day, and 
even to move about some with the 
aid iof an orthopedic walker. He is 
deeply grateful to all Who have pray- 
ed for his recovery, and will surely 
appreciate a continued remembranec. 



MATER DOLOROSA RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 

The biggest news from Mater Dolo- 
rosa is the happy event of Fr. Provin- 
cial's annual visitation. Very Reve- 
rend Fr. Neil arrived on Easter Tues- 
day to be present for the "kick-off" 
dinner for the Retreatants' fiesta. 
Over six hundred men attended. Judg- 
ing from the enthusiasm the men 
showed, this year's fiesta will be the 
mbst successful yet. 

On April 13th Fr. Provincial began 
his visitation. His talks to the reli- 
gious in choir were very inspiring 
and will be remembered for a long 
time to come. At present Fr. Provin- 
cial is in Sacramento. 



We are happy to say that the num- 
ber of missions given in California 
during the past Lent was greater 
than ever before. The Sign work was 
resumed after Easter. Some is being 
conducted in Califbrnia, but most of 
it is centered in Oregon. 



The work on the monastery grounds 
still continues in preparation for the 
fiesta. Recently about 2,500 vine 
plants were planted under Fr. Pius' 
able direction, and Brother Joseph 
is supervising the installation of a 
more extensive sprinkling system be- 
hind the house. 



The brethren were very glad to 
welcome to the community our be- 
loved Fr. Dunstan. In spite of his 
recent illness he is still very cheer- 
ful and quickly getting back his 
health. Fr. Dunstan's illness dates 
back to the first Saturday of Febru- 
ary while he was on a Sign call in a 
Sacramento parish. He noticed a se- 
vere pain in his chest, which he 
thought was duetto a bone being out 
of place. Although he could find no 
relief, he answered the pastor's call 
to lunch. Just as he sat down to the 
table, Fr. Dunstan felt his arms go 
dead from the elbows down. He im- 
mediately retired to his room, but 
the pain grew worse. The Pastor sum- 
moned the doctor who insisted on 
sending Father Dunstan to the hos- 
pital in an ambulance. Fr. Dunstan 
remained in Mercy Hospital in Sacra- 
ment d until March 18th, when he re- 
turned to Citrus Heights. It was on 
Easter Tuesday that we were happy 
to welcome him back to our own com- 
munity in Sierra Madre. Father Dun- 



295 



Stan's case is described as a "coro- 
nary occlusion", and he must take 
things easy for several weeks. We 
can judge how serious the attack 
was from the fact that Father lost 
over thirty pounds since it occured. 
During his stay in the hospital, Fr. 
Dunstan received many notes from 
the brethren promising prayers for 
his speedy recovery. He is grateful 
for these remembrances and wants 
it known that these notes were a 
source of edification to the various 



visitors who called on him. 

On Passion Sunday Fr. Pius gave 
another talk on T.V. The subject 
was the History and Meaning of the 
Cross. From the number of letters 
received the program was very well 
received. 



The community was happy to meet 
Fr. Lucian when he passed through 
Sierra Madre recently. Father is on 
his way to Japan as chaplain for our 
Navy boys. 



mi 

frff 






% # r 



1 •Sp 



"m 



Mater Dolorosa Community 1954 - 1955 
L to R & top to bottom: I Frs. Victor, Kilian, Joel, Roland, Ernest. Bros. 
Justin, Gerald, Fr. Kent. II. Frs. Gail, John Francis, Pius, Brice, Ferdinand, 
Brian. Bro. Joseph, Fr. Aiden, Bro. Richard. III. Frs. Eustace, Angelo, Marion, 
Theophane, Harold, Joyce, Isidore. IV. (sitting) Frs. Maurice, Reginald, 
James Patrick, Rector, Paul Francis, Vicar, Norbert, Gabriel. 



296 



ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 
RETREAT 

(Detroit) 

The news item of the most impor- 
tance in this branch lof the Providence 
is the official release that a new Lay- 
Mens Retreat House is planned for 
the near future. The Local Chapter, 
held before the Lenten Mission Sea- 
son, discussed and approved the erec- 
tion of the new retreat house. From 
the present plans actual construction 
will begin sometime in the early part 
of next spring. The new retreat house* 
a three story building, will be located 
near the west side 'of the Chapel, on 
the site of the present orchard. A 
new retreat house had been consi- 
dered a needed necessity as the pre- 
sent accommodations are very limit- 
ed. Publicity could not be given 
through preaching and the diocesan 
paper because of the limited numbers 
that could be accepted. 



The Community Counselling Ser- 
vice of New York will conduct a cam- 
paign to raise the approximate sum 
of Two Hundred Thousand ($200,000) 
Dollars for capital building fund pur- 
poses. The term of this campaign 
will be from the early part of Sep- 
tember until the middle of December 
of this year of 1955. 



In the recent changes of De Fa- 
milia, Fr. Cornelius, C.P., had been 
transferred to our community in St. 
Paul, Kansas. Father Howard, C.P., 
and Fr. Cyril Mary, C.P., have been 
welcomed as the new members of 
this community, having been chang- 
ed from Holy Cross Community. 



On April 14th, the annual banquet 
and reunion of our Doctor friends, 
benefactors and friends from various 
professions, had been a highlight of 
the Easter Season. Under the sponsor- 
ship of our long standing and devoted 
friend, Doctor Louis J. Gariepy, it 
has always been a very pleasant and 
enjoyable reunion. 

CHRIST THE KING RETREAT 
(Citrus Heights) 

From the Easter Issue of "The Re- 
treatant" we learn that May 22 has 
been set for this year's Spring Fes- 
tival. The announcement tells us 
that last year "Brother Pat" fed 
some 2600 persons a famous ham 
dinner and hopes to do the same and 
more this year. All the trimmings 
that go with a festival will be there 
such as booths and prizes and tours 
through the Retreat House etc. Spec- 
ial emphasis is made this year on 
the Festival because "This year we 
will begin the construction of the 
new wing" to the Retreat House. 



Brother Anthony is reported as 
doing quite well since his heart at- 
tack in early April. 



HOLY NAME RETREAT 

(Houston) 

After seeing Fathers Cormac, Em- 
manuel, Regis, Rian, Casper, and Jor- 
dan in and out of here on missionary 
assignments, we finally got the long 
awaited replacement of Father Ber- 
tram! in the person of Father Keith. 
Of course we haven't yet seen Father 
Keith, but we know he is assigned 
here permanently because his trunk 
has been shipped down here. At pre- 
sent Fr. Keith is doing missionary 



297 



work in east Texas. 



March; but after Easter the number 
dropped off to 15. 



Father Rian played the part of old 
time circuit rider in going from one 
parish to another in the diocese 
preaching days of recollection to the 
Laywomen's Retreat League. The la- 
dies have been high in their praise 
tof Father Rian, and have expressed 
their wish to have him back to give 
their longer retreats to be held in 
Galveston this Summer. 



Apparently pleased with the ar- 
rangements made for them last year, 
the Serra Club turned out 70 strong 
for a lunch here at the retreat house 
Good Friday. This was followed by 
the Mass of the Pre-Sanctified, Ser- 
mon and Stations. The Serrans left 
after the blessing with the relic of 
the True Cross was imparted at three 
o'clock. Of course, to serve 70 men 
in our present accommodations taxed 
the ingenuity of our Brothers Daniel 
and Henry; but they made room for 
the extra men by setting up tables in 
the assembly hall. 



At the first Captains' meeting of 
the Holy Name Retreat League, about 
30 captains appeared and showed by 
their questions and discussion a lively 
interest in the apostolate of the re- 
treat movement. Following up a sug- 
gestion made by one of the captains, 
Father Rector had a digest made of 
the talk given and the accompanying 
discussion and sent it out to each 
captain. 



Following the precedent set last 
year a group of Seniors from St. 
Thomas High School made their an- 
nual retreat here during the first 
three days of Holy Week. All the 
brethren here were very much edi- 
fied by the fervor of these young 
men on retreat. A group from Kirwin 
High School have scheduled a retreat 
for the week-end of Mother's Day. 
And a group of altar boys and "vo- 
cational prospects" will make a day 
of recollection here Ascension Thurs- 
day. This last group is one of the 
^by-products", as it were, of a num- 
ber iof talks that Father Jordan gave 
in different grade schools while he 
was down ihere on Missionary work 
during our rush Lenten season. 

Father Rector has been called to 
fill in for Fr. Dan Lord on a series 
of Cana Conferences in Portland, 
Oregon. In his absence, Fr. Dominic 
has had the opportunity to show his 
grasp of the problems of Retreat Di- 
rector by the way he has handled 
the April retreats. 



The monthly days of recollection 
for the Clergy continue to be fairly 
well attended. We had 25 priests in 



IMMACULATE HEART RETREAT 

(Japan) 

On the feast of St. Gabriel the first 
full-fledged Passionist Mission was 
opened in Japan. It was conducted 
by Fr. Carl at the Sacred Heart Ca- 
thedral in Yokohama for the English- 
speaking members of that parish. 
About a hundred attended the ser- 
vices. Platform, crucifix etc. were 
used in accordance with our mission 
traditions. After the mission the pas- 
tor, Fr. Albert, S.A. (An Atonement 



298 



■■■iSS 



t 11- 







■■HRM 



HHKwH 

: ' I. 

1HHHH| 



First Passionist Mission in Japan, 
given by Fr. Carl, C.P., (in English), 
in Sacred Heart Cathedral Yoko- 
hama, Feb. 27 to March 6, 1955. 

Friar) wrote to Fr. Matthew that the 
"mission was a huge success. It was 
quite well attended, and everyone 
who came was deeply impressed with 
Fr. Carl's sincerity". Later this same 
pastor asked for a priest during Holy 
Week, and Fr. Paul preached there 
on Holy Thursday and Good Friday 
nights — again in English. 



During Passion week Fr. Matthew 
had a retreat for the School Sisters 
of Notre Dame in Kyoto. Fr. Carl 




Most Rev. Fr. General and some of 
Japanese parishoners. Oct. 1954 




Sunday School picnic at C. P. new 

Property in Mefujinja, Japan. Oct., 

1954 

conducted a Holy Week mission at 
the Sacred Heart Church in Kobe 
(another big port town about one 
hour from Hibarigaoka). The Fathers 
have also been preaching from time 
to time for our military chaplains in 
Japan. 



But what is even better news is 
that our missionaries in Japan are 
now preaching in Japanese also. Both 
Fr. Peter and Fr. Clement preached 
in Japanese on Easter. Fr. Carl con- 
ducted a day of recollection for the 
Ladies' Sodality at the close of his 



299 



Yokohama mission in Japanese. Of 
course, the sermons are most read, 
from the manuscripts, but the be- 
ginning has been made. As Fr. Carl 
writes: "Though Japanese is still 
very difficult, at least we are a few 
steps out of the woods — after two 
years! . . . Japanese confessions are 
becoming a bit easier, and I can take 
my nose out of my Japanese manu- 
script once in a while when preach- 
ing". 



Only Fathers Miatthew, Peter Cla- 
ver, and Clement were at the Monas- 
tery for Holy Week, but they man- 
aged to have the Solemn Services, 
excluding Tenebrae and the Manda- 
tum. The girls from the Madam's col- 
lege did the (Singing. The parishoners 
and house-boy did the serving. The 
lad Father Matthew baptized last year 
was Master of Ceremonies — and they 
all did a wonderful job, practicing 
each night with the help of their 
Japanese Missals and a copy of O'Con- 
nel. The nearby Catholics signed up 
for adoration on Hloly Thursday. Eas- 
ter was celebrated with two Masses 
at the Monastery. On Easter Monday 
the Australian Marist Fathers started 
their retreat at the Monastery. By 
the end of the week the misisonaries 
were back at their books — to learn 
more Japanese. 




Next year's procedure is still in 
the consultation stage. Father Mat- 
thew is considering farming the priests 
out to individual Japanese parishes 



L to R: Fr. Carl, Most Rev. Fr. Gen- 
eral and Fr. Matthew, Japan, Oct., 
1954 

for a year's experience, and maybe 
rotating with one of them on a six 
month's basis here at the Monastery. 
Such practical language experience 
is most essential. 

Our Father Lucian is due to arrive 
in Japan after Easter as a navy chap- 
lain. The missionaries will be glad 
to have him close at hand, as are two 
of our Eastern Fathers, Father Sid- 
ney Turner and Fr. Albinus Lesch. 



300 



OUR CHAPLAINS 

In a letter dated March 17 Fr. Leo- 
nard writes that he was a patient in 
a hospital for over a month and tests 
etc. showed that he has an ulcer in 
the stomach about the size of a nickle. 
At the time of his writing he was 
back on the job again in his Marion 
Administration Hospital, full of zeal 
as ever in spite of the strict diet im- 
posed and the prohibition of smokes 
and drinks. He was hbping that no 
operation would be necessary. Father 
is happy at the attendance at Holy 
Mass by his "flock", has two Holy 
Masses on Sundays and Feast Days 
and many of those mentally fit, re- 
ceive Holy Communion. He has few 
seriously ill patients and few funerals 
just at present. 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CHURCH 

(Chicago) 

At the beginning of Lent our Arch- 
bishop, Samuel, Cardinal Stritch, cal- 
led on everyone to pray earnestly and 
receive Holy Communion for the 
return of the Prodigals tand the Con- 
version of non^Catholics during the 
coming year. The answer during Lent 
was most inspiring — crowds came to 
early Masses and over 15,000 Holy 
Communions were distributed to the 
faithful of Immaculate Conception 
Parish during March alone. 



On Holy Thursday, as was custo- 
mary, the Holy Name Men formed 
a Guard of Honor to the Blessed 
Sacrament all night. There were 
crowds all night, not only of men, 
but in many cases of whole families. 



Forty Hours Devotion will be ob- 
served Sunday April 24 to April 26. 
Father Justin Smith, C.P. will preach 
the sermon and we anticipate a pack- 
ed congregation. 

IMMACULATA CHURCH 

(Cincinnati) 

Father Cyprian, pastor at the Im- 
maculata, writes quite enthusiastical- 
ly about the weather during Holy 
Week, which enables some 18,000 pil- 
grims to make "The Holy Steps". A 
new feature seems to have started 
this year in the fact that quite a num- 
ber, perhaps some 500, made the 
"steps" on Holy Thursday. 



As on other spots of the country 
the weather was not so good shortly 
before Holy Week, when a 90 mile 
wind did some $450 damage, now all 
repaired. The change from coal to 
oil for the steam-heating of the build- 
ing is now (middle of April) being 
done. 

Holy Cross Church 

On March 20th Bishop Clarence G. 
Issenmann, auxiliary bishop of Cin- 
cinnati, conferred the Sacrament of 
Confirmation to 102 parishoners 
from our school and parish. After- 
wards the bishop graciously visited 
with the Fathers of the monastery in 
recreation. 



HOLY FAMILY CHURCH 

(Ensley) 

Once more Holy Family High 
School had a red letter day when 
on April 21, 1955 they were the win- 



301 




County group, the only Catholic High 
School to do so. The Immaculata H.S. 
(colored) and also John Carroll H.S. 
(white) were knocked out in the first 
round. Sisters Mary Bathildes and 
Catherine Ambrose were coaches for 
this event and can justly be happy 
over the event. This contest was mo- 
deled after that of Tom Henry's 
column in the "THIS WEEK MAG- 
AZINE" supplement. Cal Douglas was 
Master of Ceremonies and very 
friendly, in fact the whole staff of 
station WAPI was most gracious. 



Holy Family Pupils winning in the 

FINALS on the "Quizz 'Em on The 

Air Program", April 21, 1955 

ners of the "Quizz 'Em on the Air" 
Radio Program. They topped all the 
colored High Schools in the Jefferson 



The "BIRMINGHAM NEWS" gave 
quite a bit of publicity to Holy Fam- 
ily's 400 pupils who wholeheartedly 
entered the campaign to clean up the 
news stand of obscene literature. 
About a ton of the thrash was gather- 
ed by Holy Family students and a 
public bonfire was the high point of 




His Excellency Archbishop Toolen conducting Diocesan Holy Name Meeting 
in Holy Family new Assembly Room, February 1955. 



302 




Public burning of trashy literature by Holy Family School Pupils, Ensley, 

January 1955 



their efforts. It was probably the 
only bonfire so made in Birmingham 
and took the public's eye. 



is to personalize the mail as much 
as possible. 



It is a pleasure for us also to pre- 
sent a picture of the new addition to 
Holy Family School. In April work 
was being done to install a 70 ft. deep 
freeze in the kitchen and a 6x6 ft. 
walk-in cooler and refrigerator in the 
kitchen. This was necessary to take 
care of the perishable foods supplied 
in large quantities by the govern- 
ment, for the lunch program. Other- 
wise the new kitchen and cafeteria 
are not completed with the necessary 
installations; this must wait till the 
time when the new high school will 
be built and the present cafeteria 
and kitchen will be moved out of this 
new hall. 



The best news is that Holy Family 
High School has given its first voca- 
tion to the religious life in the person 
of Marvin Threatt, known in religion 
as Brother Martin de Porres, O.S.B. 
He entered the Benedictine Commun- 
ity of St. Bernard's Abbey shortly 
after Christmas — as a result of a 
vocational display in Birmingham 
some months previous. He is very 
happy with the Benedictines. Pray 
for his perseverence. 



The new office building (see pic- 
ture) has recently installed three au- 
to-typists for answering the mail. This 



Soon after Easter Father John con- 
ducted a Mission at Holy Family to 
help strengthen the faith of the good 
people down there and encourage 
the rest in the right direction. 



303 




Brother Martin de Porris, 0. S. B., 
(Marvin Threatt), St. Bernard's Ab- 
bey, Cullman, Alabama. First relig- 
ious vocation from Holy Family Par- 
ish, Ensley, Alabama. 



REFUGE OF SINNERS 

Fr. Edmund Hill, C.P. 

How readest thou, my Queen, that 
wondrous Book 

Thou bendest o'er, the while with 
precious nard 

Thou closest rift and gash? Dost 
thou regard 

Our sins that scored the page? Or 
rather look 

At love's argument — His love who 
took 

Their penance on Himself, nor 
deemed it hard? 

Let me not wrong thee. Nothing can 
retard 

Thy pardon pity. There is not a nook 
In all thy bosom where a moment 
lurks 

Of aught but love for sinners. Thou 
didst share 

His Passion for their sokes, and didst 
become 

Their Mother by thy throes. e Tis this 
that works 

Within Thee — the new Mother's 
tender care 

That each child-soul shall find thy 
heart a home. 



304 




Holy Family Hospital, Ensley, August 1954 




New addition to Holy Family School, Ensley, August 1954 




New Office Appeal Building, August 1954 



Province of Sf. Paul of The Holy Cross 

CIRCULAR LETTER COMMEMORATING THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE 

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE FIRST CONFRATERNITY OF THE SACRED 

PASSION AND ANNOUNCING THE FIRST NATIONAL CONGRESS OF 

THE CONFRATERNITY 

VERY REVEREND AND REVEREND FATHERS 

AND DEAR BRETHREN: 

One of the principal duties of the Higher Superior both during the time 
of Sacred Visitation and throughout his term of office is to exercise vigilance 
that the true spirit of the Congregation be preserved. It is clear to all from 
the teachings of our Holy Father and Founder, St. Paul of the Cross, that 
the true spirit of our Congregation is the spirit of prayer, penance, solitude, 
poverty, and zeal in the promotion of devotion to the Passion of Our Blessed 
Lord. 

This last mentioned component of the Passionist Spirit is evident not 
only from the life and works of St. Paul but in the very words of the formula 
of the Passionist Vow, in which all premise according to their strength to 
promote in the minds and hearts of the faithful a lively devotion toward, and 
a grateful remembrance of, the Passion of Our Lord, according to the Rules 
and Constitution of our Congregation. 

The special vocation given to our Holy Founder, a vocation which singles 
him out from every other saint in the whole catalogue of the elect in heaven, 
was to preadh the Passion of Christ. The first recruits of the Congregation 
were so deeply imbued with his spirit that they inspired the faithful to form 
groups or sodalities in order to help them cultivate this devotion. 

The sacred traditions of our Congregation as found in the General Arch- 
ives at SS. John and Paul's in Rome relate f^r us in detail the foundation, 
purpose and spirit of the first Confraternity of the Passion. The sons of St. 
Paul of the Cross labored so earnestly in the city of Verula giving missions 
and inflamed the people with such an ardent love for Christ Crucified that, 
by commion consent of the faithful, it was decided to establish a pious sodality 
under the title of "The Passion." The Passionist Missionaries suggested to 
them rules and regulations to assist them in this zealous effort. Father 
Thomas of the Side of Jesus, later Bishop Struzzieri, the author of the 
majority of our Passion Masses and Offices, presented these statutes to 
St. Paul of the Cross for his revision and approval. These things having 
been done, the final canonical approval and erection was made by the local 
Ordinary on April 6, 1755. At this time, a rather indefinite aggregation to 
the Congregation and communication in spiritual benefits was alsb granted 
to the first Confraternity of the Passion by our Founder himself. The present 
faculty of canonically aggregating pious sodalities of the faithful devoted 
to the Passion of Our Lord and of granting to them a communication of our 

306 



indulgences was not given until 1804, when Pope Pius VII authorized this 
in Rescript of February 17. 

The purpose of the original Confraternity was to promote devotion to 
the Passion in the daily lives of the faithful, especially by the observance of 
feast days and special functions in particular oratories. 

The spirit of that first Confraternity, composed as it was of the simple 
folk, farmers, and artisans, is identical with the spirit of the hundreds of 
Confraternities since erected throughout the world. Daily living with Christ 
Crucified by frequent attendance at Mass, constant thinking on His suffer- 
ings, frequent ejaculatory prayers, the Way of the Cross, pious exercises of 
devotion in honor of the Passion, and the special sanctification of Friday by 
acts of mortification in honor of Jesus Crucified are some of the more out- 
standing rules proposed to these ardent lovers of the Sacred Passion. 

In 1730, our Holy Founder had written a rule of daily life for Agnes 
Grazi, a lay woman under his direction. Likewise, throughout the volumes of 
his letters we find a very clear presentation of a rule for the spiritual life 
of those living in the secular state. All of these maxims are derived from 
the spirit of our own Passionist vocation. Collectively, they reveal a prudent 
austerity that can be adapted to suit every condition of life, and they are as 
timely today as when St. Paul wrote them two centuries ago. Their Founder's 
method in teaching the laity was a natural for the sons of St. Paul of the 
Cross as they developed the original Confraternities. 

With the spread of the Passionist Congregation throughout Italy and later 
to the entire world, the Confraternity of the Passion was erected in the 
churches attached to our retreats as well as in many diocesan churches. The 
approval by Pope Pius IX of blessed memory, whose cause of beatification 
has happily been committed to our Congregation quite recently, gave a new 
inpetus to the spread of the Confraternity. This took place notably in France, 
England, Ireland, Spain, and South America. Thus, the humble seed of de- 
votion to the Passion, planted by St. Paul of the Cross in Verula, has grown 
into a mighty tree whose branches have spread into every continent and to 
almost every nation on earth. 

As a further mark of his approval of the work of the Passionist Fathers 
in spreading devotion to the Passion and of the pious exercises of the Con- 
fraternities, the same Pius IX committed the custody of the Pontifical Sanc- 
tuary of the Scala Santa in Rome to our Fathers and designated this Holy 
Place as the center of all the Confraternities of the Passion. This sanctuary 
of the Passion, containing the stairs upon which Jesus stood before Pilate and 
which were purpled with His Precious Blood, as well as many other notable 
relics, rejoiced the heart of every true Passionist and should be the proud 
boast of every member of the Confraternity. 

Within the memory of many of the Religious of this Province, as our 
Congregation observed the golden jubilee of the canonization of our Blessed 
Father and Lawgiver, St. Paul of the Cross, Pope Benedict XV, on the 16th 

307 




Holy Family Retreat, scene of the first National Congress of the Confraternity 
of the Passion in America, 1955. 

of February, 1918, raised the Confraternity at Scala Santa to the dignity of 
an Archconfraternity "causa honoris," according to Canon 725 of the new 
Code of Canon Law. Likewise, moved by his great devotion to St. Paul of the 
Cross and his work, the Holy Pontiff approved a new summary of indulgences 
for the members of the Sodalities annexed to our religious families. 

Encouraged by these new marks of Pontifical approbation, the Fathers 
of the Province of St. Paul of the Cross canonically erected the first Con- 
fraternity o fthe Passion in the United States in the Church of St. Michael 
the Archangel, Union City, New Jersey, on Passion Sunday, April 6, 1918. 
The remarkable response of the thousands who joined the Confraternity in 
the early days in Union City encouraged the superiors to establish this work 
of St. Paul of the Cross in our other retreats, until at this writing there is 
a canonically erected Confraternity of the Passion in every Retreat of this 
Province, including our most reecnt foundation at Toronto, Canada. 

As we look over these historical facts and the interest of our Superiors 
in the past, as well as the zeal of various Directors of the Confraternity and 
the interest of the members of the Confraternity of the Passion, there is 
great encouragement for its future development. It would be ungrateful and 
negligent not to mention the untiring efforts of the late Father Raymund 



308 



Kohl and the tremendous work he did through the leaflets of the Confrater- 
nity of the Passion and his little Passionist Crucifix. The same is also true 
of many other religious of the Province who gave unstintingly of their talents, 
time, and efforts to imitate those first Passionists who initiated the Confra- 
ternity apostolate according to the spirit of St. Paul of the Cross. 

As we prepare for the Bicentennial Observance of the foundation of this 
Sodality of the laity, which is so much a reflection of our own life and voca- 
tion, there are some very serious problems to be considered. The idealism 
of the Confraternity as a most powerful means to promote devotion to the 
Passion among the faithful and the wonderful accomplishments in our be- 
half of this association in the past, — a burse presented to Holy Cross Semi- 
nary for the education of Passionist priests in April, 1921; The Sign, estab- 
lished in August, 1921, as the "official organ of the Confraternity of the 
Passion" and its first public appeal for subscriptions made at a meeting of 
the Confraternity of the Passion antecedently on June 26, 1921; the first 
donations for the Passion Chapel in Union City made by the members of the 
Confraternity; the number of vocations which have come out of the Confra- 
ternity in our various houses; and in recent times, the magnificent main 
altar in the newly redecorated public chapel in Pittsburgh, and the outdoor 
shrines of the Crucifix and St. Paul of the Cross in Springfield, as well as 
the outdoor Stations and Crucifixion Shrine in Hartford — all must fall be- 
fore the realism that today the interest in the Confraternity has waned. We 
must admit that the Confraternity has been sadly neglected as an aposolate 
of vocations, where young people come to the knowledge and love of Jesus 
Crucified and St. Paul of the Cross, where parents are trained to love and 
respect our Passionist life and ideals, and where the principal work of our 
Congregation, preaching the Passion, is emphasized. As a source of spiritual 
and material assistance to our houses, it has for the most part been over- 
looked. 

That there should be a deep interest in the Confraternity of the Passion 
is clear from our Regulations: "It is earnestly recommended not only that 
all superiors have the Confraternity of the Passion established in our church- 
es, but also that our priests do the same when conveniently possible, in the 
places where they fulfill the sacred ministry." (No. 207). 

So that we may not seem negligent in the duties incumbent upon our 
office and that the observance of the Bicentennial of the foundation of the 
Confraternity of the Passion may bear the desired fruit, it is hereby announ- 
ced that a National Congress of the superiors, local directors, members of the 
Confraternity of the Passion, and those interested in becoming members of 
this sodality will be held on May 28, 29, and 30, 1955, at our Retreat of the 
Holy Family in West Hartford. At this time, there will be a meeting of all 
the Capitular Fathers and local directors of the Confraternity of the Passion, 
to discuss the problems concerning the organization, expansion, stability, uni- 
fication, and a more universal interest in the Confraternity amongst our 

309 



various activities, such as our retreat houses, our parishes, our novena devo- 
tions, our missions, our retreats, our periodicals, our vocation work, our 
radio programs, our chaplaincies, and our Southern and foreign missions. 

Besides this special session for our own religious, immediately connected 
with the Confraternity, Fathers from every one of our various fields of en- 
deavor have been assigned to address the visiting laity and religious of other 
Institutes who may attend the sessions. The National Congress will open 
with a Pontifical Mass at the Hartford Cathedral and the remaining sessions 
will be held at the Monastery. The Very Reverend Provincials of both Prov- 
inces will attend and take an active part in the sessions and ceremonies. 
Several Fathers from the Western Province will be among the selected 
speakers and lecturers. 

At this point it will be interesting to note that as far back as May, 1938, 
an abortive attempt was made to organize a National Convention of the Con- 
fraternity of the Passion. According to the official records of that time, this 
effort failed because of the lack of interest and co-operation. While we have 
no fear as to the success of the present endeavor, because of the efficient 
planning and organization, the highest approval of the Most Reverend Father 
General and the Provincials of both Provinces, and the zeal and response of 
all those approached to take part, we recommend this National Congress to 
the prayers of all the brethren and earnestly ask them to interest their 
relatives and friends in this solemn convocation to honor Christ's Passion. 
Local Directors of the Confraternity are encouraged to form pilgrimages to 
the Congress. Pastors of our various parishes are urged to send groups from 
their parish societies. Retreat directors are exhorted to have a representation 
from their various retreat leagues. The local vocational directors who have 
vocational clubs should encourage their members to be present. 

In developing the theme of the National Congress, "We preach Christ 
Crucified," all of the sessions and religious functions will have as their pur- 
pose an explanation of the knowledge and love of the Passion and Death of 
our Lord. The laity will be presented with a comprehensive treatment of 
this sacred theme which motivates our very life. Looking upon the Congress 
as a special opportunity to bring the faithful to the Cross of Christ, we may 
profitably recall the words of our Holy Founder, which were written for the 
encouragement of his sons: "If you are successful through your exhortations 
or labors in leading to the Feet of Our Crucified Saviour, and finally to 
Heaven, one single soul, you will have performed a task that will fill with 
rejoicing the whole court of Heaven." 

Therefore, we call upon all the brethren, in conformity with our fourth 
vow, for a united effort in the apostolate of the Confraternity. May our 
labors produce the desired results of holiness for ourselves and the faithful 
to whom we minister, especially on our missions, in our retreat houses, and in 
our parishes. 

With the help of God and the prayers and the co-operation of all the 

310 



members of the Province, we have good reason to believe that the Confrater- 
nity of the Passion will rise again to take its rightful place as a powerful 
means for promoting devotion to the Passion according to the spirit of St. 
Paul of the Cross. 

Given at this Retreat of St. Michael the Archangel, 
on Good Friday, April 8, 1955. 

ERNEST OF THE CROSS 
PROVINCIAL 
OFFICERS OF THE NATIONAL CONGRESS 
HONORARY 

President Most Rev. Henry J. O'Brien, D.D. 

Chairman Most Reverend Malcolm LaVelle, C.P. 

Co-Chairmen Very Rev. Ernest Welch, C.P. 

Very Rev. Neil Parsons, C.P. 
ACTIVE 

Chairman « Very Rev. Thaddeus Purdon, C.P. 

Co-Chairmen Rev. Joseph Leo Flynn, C.P. 

Rev. Martin Joseph Tooker, C. P. 
Rev. Cormac Kinkead, C.P. 

Treasurer Rev. Aloysisus O'Malley, C.P. 

Secretary Rev. Jude Mead, C.P. 

BICENTENNIAL NATIONAL CONGRESS 

Holy Family Monastery 

May 28, 29, 30, 1955 

Theme: "WE PREACH CHRIST CRUCIFIED" 

Saturday, May 28, 1955 

10:00 AM Opening of Congress — St. Joseph's Cathedral 

Pontifical Mass — Archbishop Henry J. O'Brien, D.D. 
Keynote Address — Very Rev. Cuthbert McGreevy, C.P. 

Rector, St. Paul's Monastery, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
2:00 PM Panel I: "The Sacred Passion in the Old Testament" 
Presiding: Rev. Fidelis Rice, C.P., S.T.L. 
Lector of Sacred Eloquence 
Director of "Hour of the Crucified" 
Lecturer: Rev. Barnabas M. Ahern, C.P., S.T.L., S.S.L. 
Lector of Sacred Scripture, Louisville, Ky. 
Lector of Sacred Scripture, Chicago, 111. 
Panel II: 'The Sacred Passion in the New Testament" 
Presiding: Rev. Ronan Callahan, C.P., Ph.D. 

Lector of Philosophy, West Hartford 
Lecturer: Rev. Richard Kugelman, C.P., S.T.L., S.S.L. 
Lector of Sacred Scripture, Union City. 
4:00 PM Panel I: "Passionist Retreats and Devotion to the Sacred 

Passion" 
Presiding: Mr. Harold McCall 

311 



State President, Holy Family Retreat 
League 
Speakers: Rev. Gilbert Walser, C.P., 

Retreat Director, West Springfield, Mass. 
Mother Clotilde, C.P. 

Retreat Directress, Peace Dale, R. I. 
Mr. & Mrs. Albert Rochon 
Passionist Retreatants 
Panel II: "Meditation and the Sacred Passion" 
Presiding: Mr. Joseph W. Cunningham 

Trustee, Serra International 
Lecturer: Rev. Donald Nealis, C.P. 

Business Manager, 'The Sign' 
Panel III: "The Holy Shroud" — Illustrated lecture 
Presiding: Atty. John Greco 

Director, Catholic Campaigner for 
Christ, Waterbury, Conn. 
Lecturer: Rev. Adam J. Otterbein, C. SS. R. 

Director, Holy Shroud Guild, Esopus, N.Y. 
7:30 PM Outdoor General Session 

Presiding: Most Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., D.D. 
Speaker: Very Rev. Berchmans Lanagan, C.P. 
Rector, Union City, N. J. 
"A Knowledge of the Sacred Passion 
through Prayer" 
Sunday, May 29, 1955 — Feast of Pentecost 
8:30 AM Solemn Mass 

Celebrant Very Rev. Neil Parsons, C.P. 

Provincial, Holy Cross Province 

Deacon Rev. Paschal Drew, C.P. 

Lector, Holy Cross College 
Sub-Deacon ___ Rev. Jude Mead, C.P. 

Secretary, National Congress 

Master Rev. David Roberts, C.P. 

Director of Students, Holy Family 
Retreat 

Homily Very Rev. Gregory Flynn, C.P. 

Master of Novices, Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross 
9:30 AM Communion Breakfast — The Hedges, New Britain, Conn. 
Toastmaster: Mr. Joseph Mulready 
Address: Most Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P. 

Bishop, Yuanling, Hunan, China 
2:00 PM Panel I: "The Five Wounds of Christ" 

312 



:'! Presiding: Mrs. Mabel Furlong 

Hartford Council of Catholic Women 
Lecturer: Very Rev. Rubert Langenstein, C.P. 

Rector, St. Mary's Retreat, Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Panel II: "The Stations of the Cross" 

Presiding: Hon. Thomas J. Molloy 

Circuit Judge, State of Conn. 
Lecturer: Rt. Rev. Msgr. John S. Kennedy 

Editor, The Catholic Transcript 
4:00 PM Panel I: "Victims with Christ" 

Presiding: Mrs. Francis Regan 
Providence, R. I. 
Lecturer: Very Rev. Boniface Buckley, C.P. 

Rector, Holy Cross Passionist Prep, 
Panel II: "Mary's Compassion" 

Presiding: Rt. Rev. Msgr. Francis Oechsler 
Lecturer: Rev. Stephen Paul Kenny, C.P. 

Pastor, St. Michael's Monastery Church, 
Union City, N. J. 
7:30 PM Outdoor General Session 

Presiding: Most Rev. Bernard J. Flanagan, D.D., J.C.D. 

Bishop of Norwich 
Speaker: Very Rev. Dennis Walsh, C.P. 

Rector, St. Gabriel's Retreat, Brighton, 
Mass. 
"The Sacred Passion & Penance" 
Monday, May 30, 1955 — Family Day of Recollection 
10:30 AM Solemn Mass 

Celebrant Very Rev. Ernest Welch, C.P. 

Provincial, St. Paul of the Cross Province 

Deacon Rev. Joseph Leo, C.P. 

Retreat Director, Holy Family 
Sub-Deacon ... Rev. Cormac Kinkead, C.P. 

Ass't. Retreat Director, Holy Family 

Master Rev. Paschal Drew, C.P. 

Lector, Holy Cross College 

Homily Very Rev. Luke Misset, C.P. 

12:00 N Picnic Lunch 

2:00 PM Panel I: "Cana Explains the Graces of Matrimony" 
Presiding: Mr. William Martens 
Lecturer: Rev. John C. Knott, M.A. 

Archdiocesan Director of Cana 
Panel II: "The Confraternity and Vocations" — Illustrated 
Presiding: Mr. James Critchley 



313 



4:00 PM Panel I 



7:00 PM 



Lecturer: Rev. Colman Haggerty, C.P. 
Vocational Director 
Panel III: "The Need for Lay Spirituality" 

Presiding: Dr. James S. Misset, M.D. 
Lecturer: Rev: Robert O'Hara, C.P. 

Dean of Studies, Province of St. Paul 
of the Cross 
"The Passionist Saints" 
Presiding: Rev. Justin Mucahy, C.P. 
Lector of Sacred Music, 
Holy Family Retreat 
Speakers: Rev. Ward Biddle, C.P. 
St. Paul of the Cross 
Rev. Paschal Drew, C.P. 

St. Vincent Strambi 
Rev. Paul Joseph Dignam, C.P. 

St. Gabriel 
Rev. Cassian Yuhas, C.P. 
St. Gemma Galgani 
Panel II: "The Perennial Cross" 

Presiding: Mr. Thomas J. Ward 

Secretary, Holy Family Retreat League 
Lecturer: Rev. Kenan Carey, C.P. 
Author, Missionary 
Panel III: "The Passionist Religious Family" 

Presiding: Dr. Edward P. White, M.D. 
Speakers: Rev. Roger Mercurio, C.P. 

Director of Students, Louisville 
Confrater Joel, C.P. 

Passionist Student, Holy Family 
Brother Philip, C.P. 

Passionist Brother, Holy Family 
Sr. Mary St. John, C.P. 

Passionist Sister, Providence, R. I. 
Miss Mary J. Mclnnis 

Confraternity, Springfield, Mass. 
Solemn Closing 

Presiding: Most Rev. John F. Hackett, D.D. 
Speaker: Very Rev. Clement Buckley, C.P. 

Rector, St. Joseph's Retreat, Baltimore, 
Md. 

"The Sacred Passion and Good Works" 
Acknowledgement: 

Very Rev. Fr. Ernest Welch, C.P. 



314 



St. Mary's Monastery 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 
April 18, 1955 
Rev. and Dear Father Vincent Mary, 

On Sunday, January 30, of this 
year, the Confraternity of the Pas- 
sion was reorganized here in the 
monastery Church of St. Mary. It 
had been inactive for may years. 
Most of the original members were 
already dead and the few others that 
were members were too old to do 
very much. We preached at all the 
masses and passed cards around to 
the people after the manner of a 
Sign call and were extremely sur- 
prised by the generous response. We 
warned the people not to sign the 
cards unless they intended to be 
good and faithful members. At that 
time close to seven hundred mem- 
bers were enrolled. 

The first meeting took place on 
February 6th with a wonderful crowd 
of four hundred people in attend- 
ance. The weather was so bad that 
Sunday that it was practically impos- 
sible to walk and the roads too dan- 
gerous for driving. At that meeting 
we distributed to each member a 
copy of the Rule of Life, by Fr. 
Roger. This little booklet was gra- 
ciously received by the members and 
since become somewhat of a holy 
rule for them. So many people mani- 
fested their praise and appreciation 
for this little booklet that we had to 
stoclc up on them for future mem- 
berships. 

We operate a rather heavy adver- 
tising campaign to keep members 
interested and find that now the 
members themselves have become so 
interested that they tell one another 



about it. Hardly a day goes by that 
we do not have new members and in 
fact people call the monastery on 
their own requesting membership. I 
have also enrolled about two hund- 
red sisters of the Diocese in the Con- 
fraternity and also most of the par- 
ish priests with whom I come in con- 
tact. Many of them have heard about 
the Confraternity from their brother 
priests and requested membership. 
It is so gratifying to see them wear- 
ing the Passionist sign-medal on the 
lapel of their coats! 

At our regular meeting which 
takes place monthly, we offer special 
prayers for our sick members and 
also offer the Holy Sacrifice of the 
Mass for our dead members when 
notified. It is surprising how this 
has served to stimulate the people in 
the corporal works of mercy as 
many have begun to visit the sick 
and offer their donations for the 
poor to the St. Vincent de Paul So- 
ciety. But the most encouraging ef- 
fect of the Confraternity is to see 
the real manifestations of devotion 
to Jesus Crucified. People are be- 
coming determined to live a better 
life. We also have some good results 
in the endeavor to promote vocations. 
We usually have the members of the 
Confraternity serve the priest at the 
devotions and now have two boys 
entering the Passionist seminary in 
September, one boy the S.V.D. bro- 
therhood and one girl the Grey Nuns. 
Four others have manifested their 
desire to definitely enter in the next 
two years. So it is gratifying what a 
diversity of good comes from this 
society established for the laity by 
our Holy Founder. 



315 



I am enclosing a few newspaper 
reports on the Confraternity that 
may prove of interest. At least they 
may help to encourage the brethren 
on their work of fostering member- 
ship in the Confraternity. Even if 
we do not get large numbers to at- 
tend the regular monthly meeting 
we can certainly have pauci sed boni. 
I think at times we all make that 
mistake of considering something a 
failure because the numbers in at- 
tendance are few and then lose heart 
and become discouraged. But if we 
do our planting with courage and 
determination, God will certainly 
give the increase. 

May I take this opportunity to 
thank you personally for the wonder- 
ful work you are doing through the 
Passionist Bulletin. These articles 
make good spiritual reading and 
serve to keep before our eyes at all 
times the wonderful Passionist ideal. 
We should be most grateful to God 
for the wonderful life which is our 
vocation. 

In conduction with the Confrater- 
nity of the Passion we have begun a 
Solemn Novena in honor of St. Paul 
of the Cross and will conclude this 
novena with our regular monthly 
meeting with an evening Solemn 
Mass on His feast. 

Asking God to bless you for your 
labor in the good of the Congrega- 
tion, I am.. 

Respectfully yours in XPI, 

Fr. Dunstan Guzinski, C.P. 



ed death of Father Andrew. While 
preaching Wednesday, evening of the 
week before Palm Sunday, March 30, 
he suffered a heart attack. At the 
time he was on a Lenten mission at 
St. Patrick's Church in Montreal, 
Canada. After receiving the last 
sacraments in the sacristy of the 
church he was taken to St. Mary's 
Hospital. There he rallied and after 
a few days his condition readily im- 
proved. However, a week later, on 
Wednesday of Holy Week, April 6, 
he suffered a relapse and died. 




FR. ANDREW McGUIRE 

The Province of St. Paul of the 
Cross lost one of its finest and most 
popular missionaries in the unexpect- 



Funeral of Fr. Andrew McGuire, C.P. 

Father Andrew, a native of Ho- 
boken, N. J., was professed on May 
26, 1912 and ordained in St. Michael's 
Monastery Church, Union City, on 
December 18, 1920. After ordination 
he filled the office of Lector until 
appointed Retreat Director in Pitts- 
burgh in 1925. From 1926 to 1929 
he occupied the same position at 
Brighton, Mass. During the years 
from 1930 to 1932 he served as Vicar 



316 




Funeral of Fr. Andrew McGuire, C.P. 

of St. Michael's Monastery, Union 
City. From then until his death he 
was almost constantly preaching mis- 
sions and retreats. 

His funeral took place on Easter 
Monday from St. Michael's Monastery 
Church, Union City. The Provincial, 
V. Reverend Ernest Welch, C.P., 
celebrated the Solemn Mass, assisted 
as Deacon and Sub-deacon by two 
classmates of the deceased religious, 
Fathers Bartholomew Mulligan, C.P., 
and Adrian Lynch. The Rector of 
the monastery, V. Reverend Father 
Berchmans, C.P. was the Master of 



Funeral of Fr. Andrew McGuire, C.P. 

Ceremonies. Father Cosmos Shaugh- 
nessey, C.P., Director of the Bishop 
Malloy Retreat House, Jamaica, 
preached the eulogy. His Excellency, 
Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., assisted at the 
mass and gave the absolution at the 
obsequies and also at the graveside. 
Chaplains to His Excellency were the 
V. Reverend Connel McKeown, Rec- 
tor of St. Gabriel's Monastery, Tor- 
onto, and V. Reverend Felix Hackett, 
C.P., Rector of St. Ann's Monastery, 
Scranton, where Father Andrew had 
been stationed at the time of his 
death. 



FATHER MARTIN FORD, C.P. 



Just a few weeks after celebrating 
his Golden Jubilee of Profession, 
Father Martin Ford, C.P., was called 
to his eternal reward. Thus ended 
the Passion of this good religious 
who for almost sixteen years had 
been confined to a hospital bed. 
Throughout the long years of pro- 
gressive incapacitation, Father Mar- 



tin edified and inspired all who 
came in touch with him. His resig- 
nation to the will of God bouyed him 
up at all times and his unfailing 
sense of humor shed a special joy 
on his fellow patients. Before the 
amputation of his legs he carried on 
his own apostolate from a wheel- 
chair. Of late months his mental 



317 




Funeral of Fr. Martin Ford, C.P.: 
V. Rev. Cornelius McArdle, C.P., Fr. 
Benjamin Wirtz, C.P., V. Rev. Fr. 
Master Gregory Flynn, C.P. and V. 
Rev. Fr. Benedict Huck, C.P. 

keeness became dimmed and often 
he was incapable of recognizing his 
visitors. Late in the evening of April 
18 Father Berchmans, the Rector of 
St. Michael's, Union City, received a 
call from St. Mary"s Hospital, Ho- 
boken, where Father Martin had 
been confined since 1940, with the 
news that the sick religious had 
taken a bad turn. Father Rector, to- 
gether with Father Provincial, Fath- 
er Brendan of the Provincial Staff 
and Father Columba, Director of 
Students, immediately went to the 
hospital. Father Provincial recited 
the prayers for the dying. At 5:10 
the next morning, Father Martin 
quietly breathed his last. 

A native of Hoboken, N. J., Father 
Martin Ford, C.P., was professed a 
Passionist on March 7, 1905 and or- 
dained in St. Michael's Monastery 



Funeral of Fr. Martin Ford. Fr. 

Berchmans, M. of C, Very Rev. Fr. 

Ernest, Provincial, Rev. Joseph 

O'Neil, S.J. 

Church, Union City, on December 21, 
1912. Father Martin's first assign- 
ment was curate in St. Michael's 
Monastery Parish, Union City. After- 
wards he spent several years on the 




J ill! i ■-.-*/ 




Funeral of Fr. Martin Ford, C.P. 



318 



Texas missions under Most Reverend 
Paul J. Nussbaum, C.P., Bishop of 
Corpus Christi. From 1926 to 1928 
he served with the Argentine Pas- 
sionists in Buenos Aires. Since his 
return from South America, Father 
Martin was stationed in our various 
eastern houses where his musical ac- 
complishments were in demand at 
the different liturgical functions of 
the Congregation. In 1940 he suffer- 
ed the stroke which hospitalized him. 
Father Martin was buried on April 
21 from St. Michael's Monastery 
Church. V. Reverend Father Provin- 
cial, C.P., was the celebrant of the 
Funeral Mass. A nephew of Father 
Martin, Reverend Joseph O'Neil, S.J., 
was the Deacon and a class mate, 
Father Columban Courtman, C.P., 
the Subdeacon. Another classmate, 
Father William Harding, C.P., of the 
Riverdale Community, preached the 
eulogy. Father Martin's brother, 
Father Joseph Ford, S.J., had pre- 
deceased him by some years. Among 
those who attended the funeral were 



Father Keough, S.J., the Rector of 
Fordham and Father Mulqueen, S.J. 
Burial was in the community ceme- 
tery of St. Michael"s Monastery. 

Another death which affected the 
Province was that of Monsignor 
James J. Grady, of Atlanta, Georgia. 
Monsignor Grady had been of great 
assistance to the Province in the 
establishment of the Atlanta Foun- 
dation. His interest and love of the 
Congregation had always been mani- 
fested ever since the days he spent 
as a Passionist Novice. It was a 
great joy to him that he could assist 
us when our entrance into Atlanta 
was under discussion. He was the 
pastor of Immaculate Conception 
Parish and host to Father Emman- 
uel Trainor, C.P., until our own resi- 
dence was obtained. His sudden 
death at the early age of 44 was a 
real shock. Father Provincial and 
his secretary, Father Frederick Har- 
rer, C.P., attended the funeral in 
Atlanta on April 29. 



MISSIONARIES LEAVE FOR JAMAICA, B. W. I. 

The five Passionist Missionaries 
chosen to work in Jamaica, B.W.I., 
left St. Michael's Monastery, Union 
City, on March 23. The first leg of 
their journey was by train to Miami 
and then by ship to Kingston. Our 
Blessed Lady of Sorrows will surely 
bless their missionary endeavors 
since they arrived in Jamaica on the 
Feast of the Seven Dolors. On March 
17 a fare well dinner was tendered 
in the coffee room of St. Michael's 
Monastery. 




The Missionaries about to leave St. 

Michael's, Union City, for Jamaica, 

B. W. I. 



319 



HIS EXCELLENCY BISHOP McELENEY, S.J., VICAR APOSTOLIC OF 
JAMAICA, B.W.I., WELCOMES THE PASSIONIST FATHERS OF THE 
PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS TO HIS VICARIATE WITH A 
PUBLIC LETTER. 



Dearly Beloved in Christ, P.C., 

In his Encyclical Letter on the 
Missions (Evangelii Praecones), Our 
Holy Father, Pope Pius XII, now 
gloriously reigning, pointed out with 
some emphasis that as a mission 
grows to maturity it will be found 
that the religious institute to which 
it has been committed will come up- 
on the day when by itself, it cannot 
supply the number of missionaries 
necessary if the growth of the mis- 
sion is to be continued and assured. 
He implied that the arrival of that 
day would prove that the institute 
had been doing well, and that its 
harvest had outgrown the number of 
reapers. He urges Bishops, when 
that day comes, unhesitatingly to 
call upon the resources of other in- 
stitutes for assistance — as the Apos- 
tles in their fishing boats had to call 
upon their fellows to lend a hand. 
Here are his words: 

"In those territories which the 
Apostolic See has entrusted to 
your zeal to be won to Christ 
our Lord, it sometimes happens, 
since they are often extensive, 
that the number of missionaries 
each of you has from his own 
religious institute is far less than 
what is needed. Insimilar cir- 
cumstances, even in fully consti- 
tuted dioceses, additional Priests, 
Brothers and Sisters from dif- 
ferent religious families come in 
and help the Bishop. So, too, in 
the missions, do not hesitate to 



summon to your aid as your co- 
workers, missionaries who are 
not of your own religious family 
. . . They can be called in to help 
in spreading the Faith, to edu- 
cate the native youth and to en- 
gage in other missionary activi- 
ties." 

That day, my dearly beloved breth- 
ren, has arrived for Jamaica. The 
work to be done is simply too great 
to be coped with under present cir- 
cumstances. The bulk of our native 
clergy is still in formation and God 
is prospering it; the New England 
Province of the Society of Jesus, be- 
cause of its multiple apostolic ac- 
tivities at home, (another mission in 
the East), finds that it cannot send 
men in sufficient numbers to Ja- 
maica. Many works here, for exam- 
ple, the opening of new parishes in 
hitherto undeveloped areas, the 
strengthening of parishes already 
established, the opening of new sec- 
ondary schools for boys, the planned 
major seminary — all, demand an in- 
crease in sacerdotal manpower. 
Therefore, I have, with the blessing 
of the Holy Father, called upon the 
Passionist Fathers to come to our 
assistance. They have graciously and 
generously responded. Their own 
mission field in China has been over- 
run by the enemy and they have 
been exiled from it as a reward for 
their long years of self-sacrificing 
labours. 

Today, therefore, it is officially 



320 



made public that the Fathers of the 
Congregation of the Most Holy Cross 
and Passion replace the Fathers of 
the Society of Jesus at Mandeville 
with its attached stations and at St. 
Elizabeth's Church in Kingston; they 
also come to the relief and assistance 
of Monsignor Adolphus Cidal at St. 
Peter Claver's Church, and thus al- 
low him to devote all his boundless 
energies to the new parish of the 
Holy Name., Greenwich Town, so dear 
to his heart. 

In making this announcement, I 
also take occasion to express my 
deep and lasting appreciation to the 
Jesuit Fathers and the Monsignor 
Vidal who have so long tended these 
churches and made them prosper as 
centres of Catholic life. 

St. Peter Claver's parish, begun as 
a mission from St. Anne's Church, 
has been served lovingly by Mon- 
signor Vidal from its early begin- 
nings, and has grown so vigorously 
that it, in its turn, has mothered a 
mission of its own, Holy Name in 
Greenwich Town. 

St. Elizabeth's parish, begun as a 
mission from Holy Cross under Fath- 
er Kilcoyne, has seen the grand work 
of its first pastor continued and 
completed by Fr. Glavin. 

The missions in Manchester, with 
their centre at Mandeville, were be- 
gun by Father Ford of revered mem- 
ory, and have seen over the years, 
the devoted service of many of the 
Jesuit Fathers, and most recently 
that of Fathers Eberle and Cruchley, 
and of Fathers Reilly and Higgins. 

To all of these Fathers, and to 
their predecessors, we are much in- 
debted, and we are grateful beyond 



words, — as they know. May God 
prosper their efforts in the new 
work they have taken up or will soon 
undertake. 

The very need we have of the as- 
sistance of the Passionists is a source 
of deep consolation and satisfaction 
to me, strange as that may sound at 
first hearing. The reason is this: it 
means that we are growing to ma- 
turity. Any fully-developed diocese 
in the Church can boast visibly of 
variety in oneness, of diversity in 
unity. The fullness of Catholic life 
is manifest, in part at least, by the 
variety of its religious orders and 
congregations. We have a long way 
to go for full maturity, for there are 
lacking here, among other things, 
convents of the contemplative orders; 
our works of charity must be dou- 
bled, trebled, and spread over the 
whole island; our Church here must 
become self-sustaining and self-pro- 
pagating if we would reach true ec- 
clesiastical adulthood. But we are 
advancing towards the goal — the 
coming of the Passionist Fathers is 
witness of that — and for that we 
thank God. 

This letter therefore, is a word 
of hearty and fraternal welcome to 
the sons of Saint Paul of the Cross. 
These selfless men, uprooted from 
the work to which they had devoted 
their lives, have come joyfully and 
generously to this new corner of the 
Lord's Vineyard, ready to begin all 
over again. The growing Church 
here welcomes them with open arms. 
We rejoice in the readily-proffered 
assistance of this outstanding Re- 
ligious Congregation, founded in 
1720 and already extended to 33 



321 




322 



countries of the world, including 
many of the mission fields of the 
Church. We greet with brotherly 
affection its sons who come to us to 
preach "Christ and Him Crucified." 
Our people will find in them de- 
voted and wonderful priests ,and will, 
we know, give them a warm welcome 
and the same whole-hearted co-opera- 
tion they have always manifested 
towards the priests, Jesuit and dio- 
cesan, who have preceded them in 
the care and administration of these 
churches. May their labours among 
us bear abundant fruit. 

Faithfully yours in Christ, 
Sgd: * (Most Rev.) 

John J. McEleney, S.J. 
Vicar Apostolic of Jamaica 

Bishop's Office, 

2a North Street, 
Kingston. 
April 1, 1955. 

PROFESSION OF BROTHERS 

Brothers Conrad Federspiel, C.P., 
and George Kowalski, C.P., made 
their Final Vows as Passionists at 
Hartford on Palm Sunday, April 3. 
V. Reverend Thaddeus Purdon, C.P., 
received the vows of the Brothers 
and preached an appropriate sermon 
at the ceremony. Father Ronan Cal- 
lahan, C.P., Lector of Philosophy in 
Hartford, recited the Sacred Passion. 
Brother Conrad is stationed at St. 
Michael's Monastery in Union City 
and Brother George at Immaculate 
Conception Monastery in Jamaica, 
L. I. 




Brothers Conrad Federspiel, C. P. 

and George Kowalski, C.P., Final 

Profession, Palm Sunday 1955, West 

Hartford. 

BREAK GROUND FOR NEW 
RETREAT HOUSE 

On the Feast of St. Paul of the 
Cross, April 28, ground was broken in 
West Springfield for the addition to 
the Retreat House. His Excellency, 
Most Reverend Christopher Weldon, 
D.D., turned the first spadeful fol- 
lowed by the Rector, V. Reverend 
Luke Misset, C.P., Father Gilbert 
Walser, C.P., Director of the Retreat 
House, Messrs. Roy, Contractor, Lee 
Costigan, George Angers and Frank 
L'Annunciata, leaders of the Retreat 
League Drive for the new Retreat 
House. The new addition will con- 
tain 70 rooms and is expected to be 



323 



ready for occupancy in a little over 
a year. 

VOCATIONAL EXHIBITION 

From April 28 to May 3 a Relig- 
ious and Vocational Exhibition, spon- 
sored by the Most Reverend Joseph 
Ryan, C.P., Bishop of Hamilton, On- 
tario, was held in the Cathedral High 
School, Hamilton. Father Andrew 
Ansbro, C.P., and Father Colman 
Haggerty, Asociate Provincial Direc- 
tors of Vocations, attended the Ex- 
hibition and presided at the Passion- 
ist display booths. 

CHANGES 

Father Linus McSheffrey, C.P., 
curate in St. Joseph's Monastery 
Parish, Baltimore, Md., has been 
transferred to St. Gabriel's Monas- 
tery, Brighton, as a member of that 
community. His place in the Balti- 
more Parish has been filled by Fa- 
ther Daniel Free, C.P., formerly of 
the Jamaica community. 



IMMACULATA 

Fr. Edmund Hill, C.P. 

Immaculate! The very word 

Was made for thee, God's peerless 
love! 

The one low note by angels heard, 

As o'er thee hung the brooding 
Dove, 

In that still moment when thy soul 
Became its generate body's form; 

And from the Cross to grace it stole 
A ruddy gleam Redemption-warm. 




Fr. William Hardung, C.P., Golden 
Jufoilarian, with V. Rev. Fr. Clem- 
ent Buckley, C.P., Rector in Balti- 
more (to his right), and Fr. Hilarion 
O'Rourke, C.P. 

A rather disasterous fire destroy- 
ed the parish hall of St. Joseph's 
Mission, New Bern, N. C, last Feb- 
ruary 19. This is the second major 
fire that came to the Mission during 
Fr. Julian Endler's 27 year pastorate 
there. In 1943 a blaze destroyed the 
church and elementary school that 
Father had built soon after his ar- 
rival in New Bern in 1928. Im- 
mediately he began to rebuild the 
church and school and added a con- 
vent, rectory, an industrial high 
school for boys, a home economics 
school for girls and a parish hall. 
Soon after Easter this year he broke 
ground for a new parish hall to re- 
place the one destroyed by fire. Fa- 
ther Julian expects the new $35,000 
brick structure to be completed by 
June for the graduation exercises. 



324 




Galden Jubilee Mass of Fr. William Harding, C.P. 



tliiill 



• 




Statue of St. Gemma lately erected 

in St. Michael's Monastery Garden, 

Union City; a gift from the family of 

Fr. Stephen Sweeney, C.P. 



CHINA 

In a letter of April 20 we are told 
that no news is forthcoming from 
our two Fathers in Yuanling. April 
19 a Canadian Jesuit Father arrived 
over the "border", the first in April. 
Reporters were told that country 
people behind the "curtain" are eat- 
ing grass. This is a confirmation of 
reports that have trickled through 
describing food conditions as stead- 
ily worsening. It is said that discon- 
tent is now stirring even in the army, 
the power that sustains the Red 
power; the army's rice bowl is not as 
full as formerly. Perhaps Providence 
has set in motion that which will be 
the answer to our prayers! 

The following letter was received 
in Hong Kong, April 25 and was 



325 



"translated" as follows: 

We have long since received your 
letter of last December 28th. Thank 
you very much. 

Sister Vincentina took her vows 
last January, though this had to be 
done privately at Chihkiang. I am 
enclosing herewith the formal, sign- 
ed document concerning this, which 
I wish you would kindly forward to 
Sister Clara. Sister Vincentina, with 
her companion, the postulant Irene, 
was able to visit her father in Kien- 
yang during February, remaining at 
her home for a couple of weeks. 
They are now trying to obtain per- 
mission to move down here to Yuan- 
ling. 

Fr. Bede had not been home to 
visit his parents in more than twenty 
years. Early last February he asked 
and obtained permission to visit his 
native place in the Supu district. He 
remained there for forty days then 
returned to Yuanling without inci- 
dent. While visiting his home he 
saw many of the faithful of that area 
including the mother of Fr. John 
Nien. Though she wept bitterly over 
the imprisonment of her son, she is 



courageous, resigned to the Will of 
God. Fr. Bede says she looks as 
young and healthy as when he last 
saw her twenty years ago. God cer- 
tainly takes care of His Own! Fr. 
Nien is still in prison. 

Just as I finished writing the 
above, a letter came from Sister Vin- 
centina saying they have obtained 
permission to move, that they would 
be leaving Chihkiang for Yuanling 
on April 11th or 12th. I have held 
this letter till they should arrive. I 
saw Sister Vincentina and her com- 
panion, Irene, at Mass on Low Sun- 
day, April 17th. 

Though we are without any help 
or advice, we are happy, full of pep, 
working circumspectly never feeling 
lonely or at a loss. Thanks be to 
God both the flock and the shepherds 
are getting along as well as ever, 
though things might be better. We 
have many evidences of His blessing 
and support. We earnestly request 
your prayers. 

With all best wishes and regards 
to all, 

Raphael. 



PASSIONIST NUNS 



OUR LADY OF SORROWS 
CONVENT 

(Pittsburgh) 

On Sunday, February 13th., this 
Community again had the happiness 
to see the holy Sign of the Passion 
placed upon one of its novices, when 
Consorella Mary Ann of the Sorrow- 
ful Mother pronounced temporary 
vows in the hands of Very Rev. Fa- 



ther Cuthbert McGreevey, Rector of 
St. Paul's Monastery, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Most Rev. Coleman F. Carroll, the 
Auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of 
Pittsburgh intended to preside at 
the ceremony, but as His Excellency 
was called out of the City on business 
at the last moment, he delegated 
Very Rev. Father Rector as his rep- 
resentative to receive the vows. 



326 



Rev. Father Paulinus Depp of St. 
Paul's Monastery preached a very 
beautiful and appropriate Sermon 
on the excellency of the religious 
state. The ceremony was brought to 
a close with solemn Benediction of 
the Blessed Sacrament. 

And on Friday, April 15th., Con- 
sortia Mary Catherine of The Im- 
maculate Heart of Mary made pro- 
fession of perpetual vows. Most Rev. 
Coleman Carroll, D.D., Auxiliary 
Bishop of Pittsburgh, after celebrat- 
ing a low Mass in our public chapel, 
presided at the ceremony of profes- 
sion and received the vows. Very 
Rev. Father Cuthbert McGreevey, 
Rector of St. Paul's Monastery read 
the Passion, according to St. John, 
while the religious about to pro- 
nounce her perpetual vows, lay pros- 
trate under the pall. 

A most beautiful, inspiring and 
touching sermon was preached by 
Rev. Father Anselm Lacomara, C.P., 
of St. Paul's Monastery, taking for 
his text: "Why this waste?" All 
present were deeply impressed with 
Father Anselm's sermon, and the 
chapel was crowded with relatives 
and friends of Cons. Catherine and 
the Community. After the ceremony, 
the Bishop exposed the Blessed Sac- 
rament, which was left exposed un- 
til Benediction at 5 P.M. Friday af- 
ternoon. 

ST. GABRIEL MONASTERY 

(Scranton) 

On the Feast of St. Gabriel, the 
Passionist Nuns of Scranton, Pa., re- 
ceived their first visit from the new 
Bishop of the Scranton Diocese, the 



Most Reverend Jerome D. Hannon, 
D.D. 

His Excellency was formerly Vice- 
Rector at Catholic University, Wash- 




His Excellency Jerome Hannon, D.D., 
Bishop of Scranton 

ington, D. C. He was consecrated 
Bishop at the Shrine of the Imma- 
culate Conception on September 21, 
1954, and officially assumed his po- 
sition in the See of Scranton on the 
30th of the same month. Bishop 
Hannon made his retreat for conse- 
cration at our Immaculate Concep- 
tion Monastery, Jamaica, L. I. The 
Nuns were most anxious to make 
his acquaintance, and personally to 
offer him their fealty and devotion. 
This opportunity was given them on 



327 



the Patronal Feast of their Monas- 
tery when His Excellency assisted at 
the Solemn Office of Compline, and 
gave Benediction of the Blessed Sac- 
rament. 

Under the direction of the convent 
chaplain and retreat master, Father 
Cletus Dawson, C.P., all went smooth- 
ly — until, after the services, under 
stress of excitement, the prize altar- 
boys forgot ail their carefully memo- 
rized instructions, and blandly greet- 
ed His Excellency with a hearty 
hand-shake, and "How-do?" 

With Fr. Cletus as Hebdomadary, 
the Nuns sang Solemn Compline. For 
Pontifical Benediction, Bishop Han- 
non was assisted by Very Rev. Msgr. 
Joseph Madden as Master of Cere- 
monies and Fr. Cletus and Confrater 
Austin McKenna as Deacon and Sub- 
deacon, respectively; Confraters Rex 
Mansmann and Warren Deeney also 
assisted. After a brief talk of ap- 
preciation and encouragement to the 
Community, the Bishop retired to the 
chaplain's quarters while the Nuns 
sang a hymn to St. Gabriel. Later 
His Excellency also met the Com- 
munity informally in the convent 
parlor and cemented their growing 
esteem by his gracious simplicity. 
With the assistance of some students 
from St. Ann's Monastery, dinner 
was served to the Bishop, Msgr. Mad- 
den and Fr. Cletus, and the day's 
festivities were concluded in an at- 
mosphere of friendly cordiality that 
left in the heart of each a warm 
sense of gratitude for the blessing 
of family unity "in Christo Jesu." 



ST. JOSEPH MONASTERY 

(Owensboro) 

The month of April, or more pre- 
cisely Easter, is the date set for the 
change of Retreat-Masters in St. Jos- 
eph's Monastery. It was an encourag- 
ing fact to know that, during the 
retreat-year of 1954-1955, 348 ladies 
made a retreat at the monastery and 
24 made a day of recollection. This 
is a nice number, considering the 
fact that only 18 retreatants can be 
accomodated at one retreat. Father 
James, C.P. has been appointed re- 
treat-master for the coming year in 
place of Father Vincent Mary C.P., 
who had charge during the past year. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
MONASTERY 

(Kirk wood) 

St. Gabriel is still showing his 
brotherly solicitude for our commun- 
ity. It will be remembered that we 
came out here on his feast in 1948 
and the following day (on which his 
feast was kept that year) the first 
Holy Mass was offered in our little 
chapel. Our seventh anniversary was 
doubly joyful for that day negotia- 
tions were completed for the pur- 
chase of property for our new con- 
vent. The new site is about ten 
miles northwest of our present place, 
is on the west side of Woods Mill 
Road about one-half mile north of 
Ladue Road. Being on a knoll the 
property is about as high as one can 
get in this locality and we believe 
we have enough acreage to secure 
and maintain our enclosure. Woods 
Mill Road is about one mile from 
Highway 40 so we will be easily ac- 
cessible minus the noise of that busy 



323 



thoroughfare. It will be still some 
time before we can hope to build but 
prayer can hasten the day. Our need 
for the convent becomes more ur- 
gent each day so we will appreciate 
the prayers of the brethren for this 
intention, also that God will send us 
some good vocations. 



We have just received news of the 
appointment of Reverend Father 
Philip, C.P. for our community re- 
treat which coincides with the Pente- 
cost novena and consequently closes 
on that beautiful feast. 

PASSIONIST SISTERS 

(R.I.) 

Although we Passionist Sisters 
have not appeared "in print" for 
some months, the days, for us, have 
been for from uneventful. 

A joyful Easter brought to a close 
a spiritually active Lenten season. 
The renewal, or rather the continu- 
ation, of the monthly Holy Hour, 
introduced during the Marian Year, 
was a welcome feature of our De- 
votions. 

During Easter week, two sisters 
represented the Congregation at the 



N.C.E.A. in Atlantic City. Many re- 
ligious, already familiar with the 
Passionist Fathers expressed their 
delight at meeting and welcoming 
the Passionist Sisters. 

At a recent ceremony in Mount 
Saint Joseph, Bristol, two postulants 
received the holy habit and two sis- 
ters made first profession. This addi- 
tional help is welcome at Mount 
Saint Joseph where the Days of Re- 
collection, begun last year, continue 
with very great success. 



At Pease Dale, an overcrowded 
schedule tells of the remarkable pro- 
gress of the retreat movement. The 
Retreat House has bookings for re- 
treats without interruption to the 
end of the summer. 



Plans on both large and small 
scales are already afoot for the pro- 
per celebration of Mary's month. May 
she who is our life, our sweetness, 
and our hope continue to obtain for 
us the many graces and blessings 
we need to become daily more like 
her in her — and our — role of true 
Passionist. 




329 




Around the World CP, 



ADDOLORATA PROVINCE 

(Naples) 

Twenty-two missionaries of the 
Province were engaged in a city-wide 
mission at Marcianise (Caserta) from 
January 2-16. They spoke in the 
seven churches of the city and by 
means of loudspeakers to the crowds 
outside the churches in the piazzas. 
The last mission given at Marcianise 
was by the Passionists in 1940. 

PIETA PROVINCE 

(East Italy) 

Father Casimir Lorenzetti, Direc- 
tor of the ECO di S. Gabriele, spoke 
during the Church Unity Oactave 
celebrations in Rome. His discourse 
on Protestantism in Continental Eur- 
ope was caried over the Vatican 
Radio. A large crowd gathered at 
St. Gabriel's Shrine at Isola to hear 
the discourse by radio. 



looking the Adriatic. The abbey is 
dedicated to St. John the Baptist, and 
was built over a pagan shrine to 
Venus. 



The Passionist Fathers of the Pieta 
Province have taken charge of the 
ancient abbey of Fossacesia, over- 



The Eco di S. Gabriele is sponsor- 
ing a series of scholarly studies on 
Passionist life and themes under the 
title of "Studi e Testi Passionisti", 
published by the Edizioni "Eco" at 
Isola. The first of these was by Fa- 
ther Costante on "Introduzione alia 
Spiritualita di S. Paoli della Croce. 
Morte Mistica e Divina Nativita." 
Father Stanislaus Breton of the 
French Province wrote the second: 
"La Passione du Christ et les Philo- 
sophies." 

PROVINCE OF THE 
SACRED HEART 

(Spain) 

February 11, J 955 was the 75th 
anniversary of the founding of the 
Motherhouse of all the Passionist 
Retreats in Spain, The Retreat of the 
Passion of our Lord in Bilbao-Deusto. 



330 



The solemn celebration was trans- 
ferred to the Feast of St. Gabriel. 
All the houses of the Province parti- 
cipated in this event, by religious 
services, programs, academies, talks 
over the radio etc. 



The current year has 13 theologi- 
cal students. Seven of these by 
special indult of the Holy See were 
ordained last November 30., in order 
to receive the sacred order during 
the Marian Year; five received the 
sacred priesthood, March 5. Quite 
interesting is the fact that these five 
newly ordained have twenty blood 
brothers who are religious, of these 
twenty, eleven are Passionists, the 
remainder belong to various relig- 
ious Institutes. There is one more 
ordination to the sacred priesthood 
to be held on the Feast of St. Peter. 



IMMACULATE HEART 
PROVINCE 

(North Italy) 

On January 16 of this year Most 
Rev. Fr. General laid the corner- 
stone for a new Preparatory School 
at Calcinate. Signora Carolina Ber- 
etta who took part in the ceremony 
has given the property for the new 
Prep from her estate. 



Father Saverio is continuing his 
work in the north of Italy on the 
Crusade of Penance. The Crusade 
is intended to enlist as many as pos- 
sible in the work of reparation — to 
win God's grace for our modern 
world. From parish to parish Father 
Xavier goes calling for ''Volunteers 
of the Cross", and his success is 
notable. The movement is sponsored 




Newly ordained Passionist Fathers in Spain 



331 



by the Confraternity of the Passion, 
and has received the endorsement of 
the Hierarchy, of Most Rev. Fr. Gen- 
eral, and others. The noted Jesuit 
preacher, Father Lombardi, has ex- 
plicitly expressed his praise of the 
Crusade. From a note in the Revue 
de la Passion for March of this year 
we learn that the "Volunteers of the 
Cross" will soon be inaugurated in 
France. 

HOLY FAMILY PROVINCE 

(Spain) 

This year marks the golden jubi- 
lee of the Province. The periodical 
El Labaro is publishing a series of 
historical articles on the various 
foundations of the Province during 
the past fifty years, in commemora- 
tion of the jubilee. 

ST. GABRIEL PROVINCE 

(Belgium) 

The Province reports a very heavy 



Lenten schedule, especially along the 
line of Passion Lenten Sermons. Cus- 
tom has it that in, maybe, most of 
the churches this Passion sermon is 
given Sunday afternoon between 
Vespers and Benediction. In some 
localities, however, this sermon is 
given on a weekday evening and so 
it happened that some of our Fa- 
thers carried two or three of such 
courses during Lent. 

On March 25 the V. Rev. Fr. Ber- 
nadine Mary, Provincial, had the 
happiness to cloth two Lay Brothers 
with the Holy Habit, Brothers An- 
gelus and Anthony. Fr. Julian, an 
expelled Bulgarian Missionary, 
preached an eloquent sermon for the 
occasion; both in Dutch and in Ger- 
man since one of the newly vested 
is of German birth, but will be a 
member of the Belgian St. Gabriel 
Province. 




New Prep. Seminary, Province of Holy Family, Zuera, Spain 



332 



PROVINCE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 

(Australia) 

During Lent every available mis- 
sioner was fully occupied, and from 
every Parish in which our Fathers 
were engaged, came glowing reports 
of the good work that was done and 
the whole-hearted way the people 
responded. 

There is a heavy demand for our 
services till the end of May, v/ith 
missions and retreats to Religious 
Communities. In fact many requests 
have had to be declined, especially 
for the May retreats, as the men 
were not available. 



On April 1st. Fr. Placid (2nd Con- 
sulor) Fr. John and Brother Anthony 
took possession of our new property 
at Oxley, a suburb of Brisbane, 
Queensland. On the way up they 
were flood bound for a week, but, 
thanks be to God eventuallv g:t 



through the badly devastated flood 
area of northern N.S.W. without any 
loss or damage. The new house is 
to be known as Regina Coeli Retreat, 
and we have high hopes that in the 
not too distant future there will be 
a commodious new house built there, 
and filled with fervent religious. 



Frs. Raymund and Wilfred are 
waiting to obtain vacant possession 
of the new foundation at East St. 
Kilda, Melbourne — that will be either 
this month or early in May. It will 
be called Mater Dolorosa Retreat. 



Our four missionaries destined for 
the New Guinea mission field, have 
left on the first stage of their jour- 
ney to the Vicariate of Madang, 
where they will work under the di- 
rection of Bishop Adolph Noser, S. 
V.D. to gain experience, until we 
are numerically strong enough to 





£ ' ^ 




Fr. Gregory, C.P. 



Father Hilary, C.P. 



Fr. Anselm, C.P. 



333 




Matthew Beovich, D.D., Ph.D. 



fit 



Fr. Ignatius, C.P. 

take over a section of the Vicariate 
ourselves. 

The privileged four chosen for this 
arduous pioneering work are Frs. 
Anselm Turner, Gregory Kirby, Hil- 
ary O'Donnell and Ignatius Willy. 
They will be most grateful for God's 
blessing on their work. At present 
they are in Brisbane doing a course 
of hospital training the better to fit 
themselves for their work as mis- 
sionaries in a primitive land. The 
Liturgical farewell took place before 
a crowded congregation at St. Bri- 
gid's Church, Marrickville on March 
27th. Father Provincial officiated 
while Father Paschal preached the 
occasional sermon. 



On Saturday April 16th, three of 
our Students at St. Paul's Retreat, 
Glen Osmond, Sth. Aust., received 
Minor Orders from His Grace the 
Archbishop of Adelaide, Most Rev. 



i The annual pilgrimage to the Pre- 
sentation Retreat at Mary's Mount, 
Goulburn took place on Good Friday, 
when some thousands came from the 
three Parishes in the city of Goul- 
burn for the outdoor Stations of the 
Cross. Prior to the ceremony, His 
Grace Most Rev. E. M. O'Brien, D.D., 
Ph.D., M.A. — Archbishop of Canberra 
& Goulburn— blessed the Fifth Sta- 
tion which was donated in memory 
of Rev. Fr. Edwin Dowd, of the Ca- 
thedral Staff who died on Easter 
Sunday last year. Seven of the mar- 
ble statuary group of Stations are 
now in position; others are on their 
way from Italy, and it is hoped that 
all fourteen will have been erected 
by Good Friday 1956. 

PROVINCE OF THE 
PRECIOUS BLOOD 

(Spain) 

In the May issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST, page 296, we were happy 
to present to our readers the photo 
of Father Mario, C.P., the first Pas- 
sionist Father who was born in Chili. 
Father Mario of St. Gabriel is now 




Fr. Basilio, C.P. with Students 



334 




Four C.P. Students from Chile with their Direc- First vocation from Portu- 
tor (2nd from L) Fr. Mario, C. P. gal, Cfr. Claudino, C.P. 



11 : 




C.P. Philosophy Students of Provi- 
dence of the Precious Blood. 

director of twenty-two Passionist 
Students of Philosophy in Mieres. 
The large number of students is con- 
sidered a grace of the Blessed Mo- 
ther to the Province during her 
Marian Year. Among the. students 
are now also four further clerics 
from Chili and one from Portugal, 
the first from that country, Cfr. 
Claudino, C.P. Conf rater Claudino, 



when a small child was taken by his 
parents to Angola, Africa (Portugese 
Colony) and two years ago returned 
to Europe to join the Congregation. 
THE PASSIONIST has had occasion 
several times to mention Father Ba- 
silio of St. Paul, a nationally cele- 
brated theologian in Spain. He is a 
prolific writer, is Secretary Mariolo- 
prolific writer, is Secretary of the 
Mariological Society and in 1954, dur- 
ing the International Marian Con- 
gress in Rome he was named associ- 
ate member of the International Aca- 
demy of Mariology. December 24, 
1954 he celebrated the golden jubi- 
lee of his profession as a passionist. 
Ad multos Annos. We present his 
picture with a group of students. 

OUR LADY OF HOLY HOPE 
PROVINCE 

(Holland) 

On April 23 the burial of Father 
Hubert took place in the cemetery 
of Mater Dolorosa Retreat, Mook. 



335 



Father Hubert was born in 1887, pro- 
fessed in 1905 and ordained in 1911. 
From 10-15 years of his priestly life 
were spent in Bulgaria. He was ex- 
pelled from that country by the Com- 
munists and since 1947 had been at- 
tached to the Vice-Province of the 
Five Wounds in Germany and Aus- 
tria. (In the report of his death a 
note was added to the effect that up 
to date no definite information was 
at hand to tell whether Bishop Eu- 
gene, C.P., Bulgaria, was alive or 
dead) Father Hubert was elected 
Rector of Maria Schutz in 1952. In 
January 1955 he was taken to a hos- 
pital in Austria and his condition 
was diagnosed as cancer of the lung. 
Upon his own request, he was per- 
mitted to return to his home-land, 
Holland and there again examined 
by several specialists and all agreed 
that his condition was hopeless. Ten 
days before his death he asked to 
return to his monastery in Mook, to 
die with his Brethren. His death 
was most edifying as had been his 
life. His funeral was attended by 
Father Walter, C. P., Provincial of 
the German Vice-Province, by repre- 
sentatives of all the Retreats in Hol- 
land and by many relatives. May his 
soul rest in peace. 

VICE PROVINCE OF THE 
FIVE WOUNDS 

(Germany-Austria) 

A step forward in the work of our 
German Fathers in the "Diaspora" 
(Displaced persons territory in Ger- 
many )was made by the esitablisning 
a Mission-house in Celle, East of Ber- 
lin. Father William, C.P., is Superior 
and working with him is Father 



Hadrian from the Province of our 
Lady of Holy Hope. This Mission- 
house will serve as a center from 
Which "Blitz-missions" will be given 
with the Auto-chapel. 



April 20 Father Hubert, former 
Rector of Maria Schutz, Austria, suc- 
cumbed to cancer of the lungs; he 
died among his Brethren in Holland. 
Father Ignatius, C.P., former Vicar 
in Schwarzenfeld, has been appoint- 
ed Rector in Maria Schutz. 

DIOCESE OF DODOMA 

Our readers will find the following 
excerpt from a letter dated Decem- 
ber 28, 1954 quite interesting. It was 
written by a Passionist working in 
the Dodoma Mission. "... Until 
three years ago, we went forward 
tranquilly enough, because both we 
and our separated Brethren proceded 
according to our possibilities and we 
had the advantage of being superior 
to them by three times the number 
of Christians. A commission from 
UNO came here and strangely recom- 
mended the British Government to 
set up Central Schools wherever a 
sufficient number of children would 
be found. To fulfill this program it 
depends almost entirely on the Mis- 
sion, Catholic and Protestant. Who- 
ever accepts these schools has the 
right of putting therin its own teach- 
ers. Where we are, the Protestants 
in practice can no longer come in; 
where they are, every way of pene- 
trating remains closed to us. For this 
reason, these years are for us truly 
decisive. The Protestants were ex- 
tremely satisfied with this situation. 
They used to say: The Catholics are 



336 



Italian; they have no money. They 
succeeded in building so many cate- 
chetical schools, because to build 
such schools it is sufficient to have 
poles and mud. But they will fail 
in building schools according to the 
rules of the UNO. We, on our part, 
held a meeting and this was our de- 
cision: We have little money, but 
strong hands. We will make lime, 
bricks, desks and what else is need- 
ed for the schools. We will live 
from the produce of our fields and 
with the subsidy we receive from 



the Propaganda and the Mass sti- 
pends we will buy cement. We suc- 
ceeded in putting up a building 
every third day! It sounds incredi- 
ble, but it is so! There are about 
fifty missionaries working here and 
we have nine lorries. We hope to 
continue in this race for souls. From 
time to time God sends some Guar- 
dian Angel to the USA, the refugim 
desperantium, and then cement 
comes more abundantly from Dar es 
Salaam! 




Father Celstine Nerone, C.P., has 
published a life of Assunta Goretti, 
the saintly Mother of St. Mary Go- 
retti. The work is obtainable from 
the Scala Santa in Rome. 



The Revue de la Passion, for April, 
1955, contained a long article on our 
Father Julius Busse, C.P., and his 
message of hope to those afflicted. 



Father Aidan Baker, C.P. wrote 
an article on "Saint Gabriel of our 
Lady of Sorrows" for the February 
issue of the Clergy Review. 



Father Roger's book review of 
Catherine Emmerich's "Life of the 
Blessed Virgin" (in Books on Trial, 



ria 




January, 1955) has aroused the ire 
of several readers. In the May issue 
the publisher takes issue with the 
review. However, before publishing 
the first criticism, by Mr. Larson, 
the editor of Books on Trials gra- 
ciously wrote to Fr. Roger, request- 
ing a rebuttal to the criticism. 



Father Angelus, C.P., Vice-Postula- 
tor for the cause of Brother Isidore, 
C.P., Belgium, has assembled and ed- 
ited the letters of the Servant of God. 
The letters were translated into 
French from the original by Father 
Luke, C.P. of the same Province of 
St. Gabriel. It looks a bit ironical 
to edit the letters in French, since in 
life, one of Brother Isidore's diffi- 



337 



culties was mastering the French 
language. However, it is true that 
the letters in French garb are more 
likely to reach a larger reading au- 
dience. All the letters contained in 
the collection were written from a 
Passionist Monastery; whether Bro- 
ther Isidore wrote any before his 
entrance into religion or not, is not 
indicated. The first letter is dated 
April 21., 1907 and the last June 7, 
1914, a bit more than two years be- 
fore his death; first World War cut 
down correspondence for Brother in 
Belgium. The letters are not num- 
bered but do cover about 120 printed 
pages. We do feel confident that any 
one who has a reading knowledge of 
French will benefit greatly by read- 
ing these letters. Judging from the 
"favors received" noted in the Pas- 
sionist periodicals of Holland and 
Belgium, Brother Isidore is quite 
well known and loved in and around 
his earthly home. 



The Louisville Times (April 7) 
gave considerable space to "Pitts- 
burg's Own Passion Play", known 
among us as Veronica's Veil. Full 
credit was given to Father Bernar- 
dine Dusch, C.P., the writer of the 
play and to its present Director, Fa- 
ther Wendelin Meis, C.P., brother of 
our lately deceased Father Cyril. The 
play was first produced in 1913 and 
this year was its 36th production. A 
few years of interruption were 
caused bv the two World Wars. ' 



The General Decree of the Sacred 
Congregation of Rites simplifying 
the Rubrics of Missal and Breviary 
has been carried in the several Cath- 



olic papers. Our readers may be in- 
terested to see a few applications of 
the decree to our own Proprium etc. 

In Title I, General Norms, the De- 
cree states explicitely that it covers 
also "particular calendars", therefore 
our particular feasts. 

In the section on Octaves, all Oc- 
taves except those of Christmas, Eas- 
ter and Pentecost are abolished; 
therefore we will no longer have an 
Octave attached to the Feast of St. 
Paul of the Cross, to the Solemn 
Commemoration of the Passion, to 
the Feast of the Holy Cross (Septem- 
ber 14) nor to the Patrons of parti- 
cular Churches, nor to the Dedicatio 
of consecrated churches. Also the 
Octave of Sts. Peter and Paul is 
abolished; July 6, the former Octave 
Day of Sts. Peter and Paul, is the 
day of the Martyrdom of St. Mary 
Goretti; it is possible that her Office 
will now be had on July 6 instead 
of the 9th. 

In Lent, as heretofore, the option 
on certain days of either the Mass of 
the Feast or that of the Ferial still 
holds, but the same option is given 
for the Office "in recitatione priva- 
ta". Whether our recitation of the 
Office in choir is to be considered 
a "private" recitation or not, needs 
clarification. 

All Paters and Aves and respec- 
tive Credos are dropped before and 
after the Office. Thus Matins starts 
with "Domine labia mea aperies", 
Lauds the small hours and Vespers 
with "Deus in adiutorium," Compline 
as heretofore. This does not of itself 
rule out our "In nomine Iesu", since 
that can without difficulty be con- 
sidered a "Community Prayer" to 



338 



be said before we begin an hour. 

The Marian Antiphon (Regina 
Caeli, Salve Regina, etc.) is said 
ONLY after Compline ( with the ad- 
ded V. "Divinum auxilium") and to 
it are attached the privileges and In- 
dulgences of the "Sacrosanctae". 

Second class Feasts and other (A) 
offices, not First Class, from now on 
have the ferial Antiphons and Psalms 
for Prime, Tierce, Sext and None: 
thus on the Feasts of St. Gabriel, St. 
Vincent Mary, our Feasts of the Pas- 
sion during Lent etc. 

These lines are not intended as a 
resume of the Decree (it is much 
more far reaching) but only some 
high points that strike our present 



choir practice and our proper Feasts. 
The Ordo maker will try to incor- 
porate the entire Decree into the 
body of the 1956 Ordo for the United 
States, Deo volente. 

In the March-April issue of THE 
PASSIONIST, page 211 the names 
of the living blood brothers who are 
members of the Province of St. Paul 
of the Cross were enumerated, minus 
two. The two youngest blood brothers 
of the Province, namely Confrater 
Keith and Brother Edward Blair, 
both at present stationed in Scran- 
ton. We offer our apologies with the 
assurance that the omission was an 
unintentional one. 



6 




339 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

Works of the ministry from March to May 1955 that have come to our notice. 

MISSIONS 

Edward 

Edward 

Edward 

Edward, Kent 

Kilian, Canute 

Leo 

Arnold 

Edward 

Damian 

Fidelis 

Edward 

Conell 

Kilian 

Joel 

Edward, Kent 

Basil, Canute 

Cormac 

Fidelis 

Terence 

Hilary 

Robert 

Angelo 

Norbert 

Edward, Kent 

Gilbert, John 

Theophane, Aiden 

James 

Ferdinand 

John Aelred 

Charles, Michael 

Gregory McE. 

Harold Mary 

Finan 

Edwin 

Daniel 

Cornelius 

Leo Patrick 

Alban 

Cyril Mary 

Joel 

Canute 

Arnold 

Godfrey, Thaddeus 

Emmanuel, Jordan 

Timothy, Flannon 

Matthias, Fergus 

Walter, Bartholomew 

Jerome, Casper 

Philip, Roderick 

Ignatius 

Camillus, Clarence 

Warren 

Roland 

Kilian, Edward 

Caspar 

Cormac 

Philip, Roderick 

Alban 

Stanislaus 

Nilus 

Finan 

Cormac, Regis 

Robert 

Kyran, Justin 

Luke 

Ronan 

Hilary 



JAN. 


16-23 


Westminster, Calif. 


Bl. Sacrament 




23-30 


Independence, Calif. 




FEB. 


6-13 


San Bernardino, Calif. 


St. Anthony 




20-27 


Los Agneles, Calif. 


St. Agnes 






San Francisco, Calif. 


Presidio 






Davis, Calif. 


St. James, 






Sacramento, Calif. 


Immac. Conception 






Oakland, Calif. 


St. Anthony 






Sacramento, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 




27- 2 


Colorado Springs, Colo 


Ft. Carson Camp 


MAR. 


1- 6 


Etiwanda, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 




6-13 


New Orleans, La. 
Yuma, Ariz. 


St. Paul 






Firebaugh, Calif. 


St. Joseph 






San Gabriel, Calif. 


St. Gabriel 




6-20 


Carmichael, Calif. 
Thibadaux, La. 


St. Philomena 






Chicago, III. 


St. Kevin 




13-20 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


O. L. of Pompey 






Many, La. 


St. John 






Elgin, Fla. 


Elgin AFB 






Costa Mesa, Calif. 








Coalinga, Calif. 


St. Paul 






Long Beach, Calif. 


St. Cyprian 




13-27 


Middletwon, O. 
Victoria, Bro. Columb. 


St. John 




16-20 


Summit, III. 


St. Joseph 




20-25 


Victorville, Calif. 


St. Joan Arc 




20-27 


La Porte, Tex. 


St. Mary 






N. Mankota, Minn. 


Holy Rosary 






Cicero, III. 


St. Anthony 






Chicago, III. 


St. Francis Cabrini 






Duncan, Iowa 


St. Wenceslaus 






Assumption, O. 


St. Mary 






Melrose Park, III. 


'-At. Carmel 






Kansas City, Mo. 


St. John Bapt. 






Joplin, Mo. 


St. Peter 






Vining, Iowa 


St. Mary 






Bannister, Mich. 


St. Cyril 






Los Angeles, Calif. 


O. L. Lourdes 






Eureka, Calif. 


St. Joseph 






Paradise, Calif. 


St. Thomas More 




20- 3 


Crown Point, Ind. 


St. Mary 






Port Arthur, Texas 


St. James 






Dearborn, Mich. 


St. Sebastian 






Concordia, Kansas 


O. L. Perp. Help 






Evansville, Ind. 


Sacred Heart 






Fredericksburg, Tex. 


St. Mary 






Maywood, III. 


St. Eulalia 






Hampton, Iowa 


St. Patrick 






New Orleans, La. 


St. Francis Assisi 






Neosho, Mo. 


St. Canera & Mission 






Orange, Calif. 


Holv Family 






San Diego, Calif. 


St. Patrick 






Fredericksburg, Tex. 


St. Mary 






Orange, Tex. 








Chicago. III. 


St. Eulalia 




27- 3 


Tama, Iowa 


St. Patrick 






Chicago, III. 


St. Lucia 






Chicago, III. 


St. George 






Garner, Iowa 


St. Boniface 






Orange, Texas 


St. Mary 






Camden, Ark. 


St. Louis 






Weyburn, Sask. 


St. Vincent de Paul 






Ogden, Iowa 


St. John 






Cincinnati, O. 


St. Mary 






Monroe, La. 


St. Matthew 



340 



APR. 





Culver City, Calif. 


St. Augustine 


Angelo, Joel 




Bakersfield, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 


Norbert 




Oakland, Calif. 


St. Anthony 


Basil, Edward 


27-10 


Pensacola, Fla. 


Sacred Heart 


Lambert 




Ft. Walton, Fla. 


St. Mary 


Terence 


29- 1 


Braymer, Mo. 


St. Mary 


Cornelius 


3-10 


Newhall, Iowa 


St. Paul 


Alban 




Edna, Texas 


St. Agnes 


Regis 




Somerville, Texas 


St. Ann 


John Aelred 




Cleveland, O. 


St. Martin 


Cyril Mary 




Ames, Iowa 


St. Thomas More 


Charles 




Omaha, Nebr. 


Holy Cross 


James 


4- 9 


Biggs AFB, Tex. 


Chapel 


Hilary 


6-10 


Williams, Calif. 




Henry 


17-24 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


St. Wenceslaus 


Hilary 




Mansura, La. 


Lady of Pr Succor 


Lambert 




McKinnville, Oregon 


St. James 


Arnold 




Ensley, Alabama 


Holy Family 


John 


17- 1 


Fort Bragg, Calif. 


Lady of G. Counsel 


Kilian 


24- 1 


Moreauville, La. 


Lady of Sorrows 


Lambert 




Alma, Kansas 


Holy Family 


Cyril Mary 


1- 8 


Eskridge, Kansas 


St. John Vianney 


Cyril Mary 


15-22 


Moquah, Wis. 


Sts. Peter & Paul 
NOVENAS 


Cyril Mary 


10-18 


Evergreen Park, III. 


St. Bernadette 


Thaddeus 


30- 7 


Fowlerville, Mich. 


St. Agnes 
RETREATS 


Harold Mary 


3- 9 


Donaldson, Ind. 


Poor Handmaids 


Alexis 


10-19 


Witchita, Kans. 


Mt. St. Mary 


Fergus 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Mary Motherhouse 


Joyce 


11-13 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Ladies at CP Nuns 


Vincent Mary 


12-19 


Cincinnati, O. 


Mt. Alverno 


Paulinus 


14-16 


Davenport, Iowa 


Im. Cone. Academy 


Godfrey 


15-16 


Holy Cross, Iowa 


Holy Cross H. S. 


Columbian 


16-25 


Louisville, Ky. 


Srs. St. Jos. Infirm. 


Roch 


18-20 


Detroit, Mich. 


Mary Reparatrix 


Thaddeus 


19-26 


Norwood, O. 


Mt. St. Mary Sem. 


Boniface 


20-26 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Villa Gesu (SND) 


Vincent Mary 


21-23 


Cincinnati, O. 


McNicholas H. S. 


Conell 


21-24 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Xavier H. S. 


Ronan, James 


22-25 


Evergreen Park, III. 


Little Co. of Mary 


Alexis 


23-25 


Victor, Iowa 


St. John H. S. 


John Mary 




Little Rock, Ark. 


Catholic High 


Robert 


23- 1 


Brownsville, Tex. 


Mercy Hospital 


Kevin 




Hanford, Calif. 




Joyce 


24-27 


St. Louis, Mo. 


St. John Hosp. 


Anthony 


25-27 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Ladies at CP. Nuns 


Conell 


25- 3 


Davenport, Iowa 


Mercy Hospital 


Alfred 


28-31 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Xavier H. S. 


James, Bernardi 




San Pierre, Ind. 


Little Comp. Mary 


Alexis 


28- 1 


Crookston, Minn. 


St. Jos. Academy 


Michael 


31- 4 


Okauchee, Wis. 


Cistercian Frs. 


Daniel 


1- 3 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


S. Heart Retreat H. 


Kent 




Owensboro, Ky. 


Ladies at CP. Nuns 


Vincent Mary 


1-10 


Mt. St. Joseph, O. 


Srs. of Charity 


Conell 




Omaha, Nebr. 


St. Catherine Hosp. 


Paulinus 




Colorado Springs, Colo 


. El Pomar 


Arthur 


3- 7 


Cleveland, O. 


St. Martin 


Cyril Mary 


3- 8 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


Mt. Mercy 


Anthony 


3-10 


Fremont, O. 


St. Ann Parish 


John 




Chicago, III. 


Holy Cross Bros. 


Alexis 


4- 6 


Evansville, Ind. 


Mater Dei H. S. 


Fidelis 




Louisville, Ky. 


Bellarmine College 


Forrest 


5- 6 


Dallas, Tex. 


Ursuline Academy 


Rian 


12-21 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Mercy Hospital 


Charles 


13-20 


Cincinnati, O. 


Srs. of Poor of St. Francis 


Vincent Mary 


14-17 


Des Plaines, Iowa 


Nurses 


Anthony 


15-24 


Erlanger, Ky. 


Passionist Nuns 


Matthias 


17-24 


Witchita, Kans. 


St. Francis Hosp. 


Miles 



341 



MAY 



JUNE 



MAR. 



APR. 
MAY 





Selma, Alabama 


Frs. of St. Edmund 


22-24 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Ladies at C.P. Nuns 


26-28 


Harper, Iowa 


St. Elizabeth H. S. 


27-29 


Fort Dodge, Iowa 


Corpus Christi H. S. 


3-12 


Chicago, III. 


St. Bernard Hospital 


9-13 


Michigan City, Ind. 


Immac. H. S. 


9-18 


Cleveland, O. 


Franciscan Nuns 


10-19 


Aurora, III. 


Mercyville Sanit. 




Louisville, Ky. 


Lady of Peace Hosp. 


15-22 


Concordia, Kans. 


Nazareth Motherhouse 


3-10 


Carthagena, O. 


Seminarians C.P.P.S. 


5-11 


Columbus, O. 


Good Shepherd Srs. 


6-10 


St. Mary, Ky. 


Resurrectionist Frs. 


10-19 


Nazareth, Ky. 


Srs. of Charity 




Chicago, III. 


St. Ann Conv. R.S.M. 


11-18 


Cleveland, O. 


Srs. of St. Joseph 


12-19 


Cleveland, O. 


Beaumont Scholl, OSU 


12-21 


LaGrange Park, III. 


Srs. of St. Joseph 




Chicago, III. 


Mercy Convent 


13-16 


Comstock, Mich. 


Clergy (Lansing) 


19-26 


Cleveland, O. 


Srs. of St. Joseph 


20-23 


Comstock, Mich. 


Clergy (Lansing) 
FORTY HOURS 


6- 8 


Hoistington, Kans. 


St. John Evan. 




Ashton, Iowa 


Lady of P. Help 


11-13 


Des Moines, Iowa 


St. John 


18-20 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


St. Patrick 




Holy Cross, Ky. 


Holy Cross 


25-27 


Des Moines, Iowa 


St. Anthony 




Earling, Iowa 


St. Joseph 


27-29 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Annunciation 




Sleepy Eye, Minn. 


M. Help of Christians 




Halletsville, Tex. 


Sacred Heart 




Marathon, Wis. 


St. Mary 


30- 1 


Humbolt, Kans. 


St. Joseph 


1- 3 


Emery, S. Dak. 


St. Martin 


24-26 


Catalina. Calif. 






St. Joseph, Ky. 


St. Alphonsus 


1- 3 


Flaherty, Ky. 


St. Martin 


8-10 


Michigan City, Ind. 


Immac. Concept. 




South Bend, Ind. 


St. Stanislaus 



Mary 



Stanislaus 

James 

Rian 

Philip 

Vincent 

John 

Alexis 

Boniface 

Lambert 

Stanislaus 

Boniface 

Forrest 

Hilary 

Ronan 

Alexis 

Hilary 

John 

Vincent Mary 

Stanislaus 

Boniface 

Hilary 

Boniface 



Joachim 

Alfred 

Anthony 

Frederick 

Bede 

Miles 

Thomas More 

James Patrick 

Keith 

Rian 

Fidelis 

Joachim 

Keith 

Kent 

Vincent Mary 

Bede 

John 

Hilary 



DAYS OF RECOLLECTION 



FEB. 
MAR. 



APR. 
MAY 



20 
27 
5 
6 
9 
13 

14 
15 
16 
17 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
27 
3 
12 
15 



Beaumont, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Galveston, Tex. 
Blessing, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Westphalia, Kans. 
Texas City, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Beaumont, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Houston, Tex. 
Westphalia, Kans. 
Galveston, Tex. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Evansville, Ind. 



St. Joseph 

St. Peter 

Clergy (at CP House) 

St. Teresa (Women) 

Annunciation 

St. Vincent de Paul 

Immac. Concept. 

Holy Name 

St. Ann 

St. Christopher 

NCCW-Sacred Heart 

St. Rose 

St. Peter 

St. Teresa (Men) 

K of C 

St. Stephen 

Christ the King 

TRES ORE 



Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Joachim 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Rian 

Joachim 

Rian 

Cyril Mary 

Forrest 



Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Fremont, O. 



St. Agnes 
St. Elizabeth 
St. Francis 
Holy Spirit 
St. Ann 



Ronan 

Stanislaus 

Basil 

Canute 

John 



342 



Waco, Texas 


Assumption 




Caspar 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Cathedral 




Alfred 


Des Moines, Iowa 


St. Augustin 




Keith 


Dunlap, Iowa 


St. Patrick 




Frederick 


Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 


Cathedral 




Philip 


Beaumont, Texas 


St. Anthony 




Rian 


Canton, 0. 


St. Clara Adorat. 


Monastery 


Daniel 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Raphael 




Forrest 


Louisville, Ky. 


Holy Trinity 




Beds 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 

HOLY CROSS PROVINCE -MAY 1955 



ROME 
Gen'l Curia 

Malcolm LaVelle 1 ' 

Rene Champagne 42 

Students 

Firmian Parenza 43 

Paul M. Boyle 43 

Barry Rankin 43 

CHICAGO 

Neil Parsons 2 

Kyran O'Connor 3 

Gordian Lewis 4 

Camillus Kronlage 5 

Francis Flaherty 7 

Aurelius Hanley 

Augustine Scannell 

Vincent X. Ehinger 

Justin Smith 23 

Alban Hickson 

Thomas Carter 

Richard Hughes 9 

Matthias Ccen 

Gregory McEttrick 

Joseph M. O'Leary 

Malachy Farrell 

Donald Ryan 26 

Brian Mahedy 26 

Benet Kieran 10 

Bartholomew Adler 

Barnabas M. Ahem 27 

Wm. Gail Steil 14 

Gregory Jos. Staniszewski 13 

Godfrey Poage 

John Baptist Pechulis 12, 13 

Warren Womack 16 

Carroll Stuhlmueller 27 

Clyde Zarski 10 

Melvin Glutz 43 

Ward Biddle 17 

Students 

Gerard Steckel 

Peter Berendt 

Michael Jos. Stengel 

Raphael Domzall 

Owen Duffield 

Francis Cusack 

Casimir Gralewski 

Sebastian MacDonald 

Louis Doherty 

Henry Whitechurch 

Philip Schaefer 

Thorn. Anthony Ragalski 

Brothers 

Felix Bauer 

Theodore Lindhcrst 

Thomas Brummett 



Robert Baalman 

Joachim Saunders 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert Kroger 5 

Egbert Nolan 7 

Alphonsus Kruip 

Raphael Grashoff 

Bernard Brady 

Louis Driscoll 

Nicholas Schneiders 15 

Hubert Bohne 20 

Cyprian Frank 9 

Bernard Mary Coffey 9 

Dunstan Branigan 

Wilfrid Flanery 18 

Bernadine Johnston 10 

Brothers 

Columban Gausepohl 

William Lebel 

James Keating 

LOUISVILLE 

Boniface Fielding 5 

Ronan Dowd 7 

Adalbert Schesky 

Lawrence Bailey 

Anselm Secor 9 

Alexis Quinlan 

Stanislaus Geekie 

Andrew Ahler 

Conrad Amend 

Hilary Katlewski 

Emmanuel Sprigler 

Quentin Reneau 10 

Regis Enright 

Vincent M. Oberhauser 

James Busch 

Rcger Mercurio 27, 17 

John Devany 

Forrest Macken, 28, 29 

Bede Doyle 

Student-Priests 

Myron Gohmann 

Denis McGowan 

Albert Schwer 

Eugene Peterman 

Lawrence Browning 

Bruce Henry 

Berchmans Petit 

Carl Anthony Tenhundfeld 

Brothers 

Gabriel Redmon 

Gilbert Schoener 

Casimir Skiba 

Leo Arndt 

Charles Archuleta 

Francis Hanis 



ST. LOUIS 

Elmer Sandman 5 
Fergus McGuinness 7 
Celestine Leonard 31 
Aloysius Dowling 
Herbert Tillman 32 
Claude Nevin 32 
Edgar Ryan 32 
Ervan Heinz 32 
Germain Legere 32 
Cyprian Towey 32 
Wm. Joseph Hogan 32 
Leo P. Brady 17 
Emil Womack 32 
Leon Grantz 32 
Campion Clifford 32 
Raymond McDonough 32 
Jordan Grimes 33 
Simon Herbers 33 
Emmet Linden 30, 32 
John Francis Kobler 
Brothers 
Conrad Adams 
Regis Ryan 
David Williams 
John Gebaur 
George Stoiber 
ST. PAUL 
Roch Adamek 5 
Faustinus Moran 6 
Cormac Lynch 7 
Matthew Miller 
Hyacinth Clarey 
Julian Montgomery 
Edward O'Sullivan 
George Jungles 
Cornelius McGraw 
Urban O'Rourke 
Brendan McConnell 9 
Kevin Cunningham 
Leopold Vaitiekaitis 
Cone 1 1 Dowd 
Paschal Barry 
Loran Aubuchon 14 
Caspar Watts 
Joachim Gemperline 
Victor Salz 11 
Gail Robinson 
Novices 
Gabriel Duffy 
Augustine Wilhelmy 
Mel Joseph Spehn 
Andre Auw 
Terrance O'Toole 
Aloysius Mary Hoolahan 
Bro. Raphael Couturier 



343 



Postulants 

Bro. Luke Juenemann 
Bro. Vincent Haag 
Brothers 

Louis Hochendoner 
Christopher Zeko 
Isidore Bates 
DES MOINES 
Ignatius Bechttold 5 
Miles Bero 7 
Ignatius Conroy 
Edwin Ronan 
Sylvester Cichanski 
Philip Gibbons 
Paulinus Hughes 
Peter Kilgallon 
Anthony Maher 
Alfred Shalvey 
Mel Schneider 
Finan Storey 
Charles Guilfoyle 
Thos. More Newbold 25 
Frederick Sucher 25 
Columban Browning 17 
Randal Joyce 25 
Michael Brosnahan 
John M. Render, 22, 24 
Luke Connolly 
Rian Clancy 
Jude Monteith 
Students 
Edwin Dolenz 
Kevin Kenney 
Andrew Mary Gardiner 
Stephen Balog 
Vincent Giegerich 
Leonard Kosatka 
Gerald Appiarius 
Joseph M. Connolly 
Morris Cahill 
Martin Thommes 
Jerome Brooks 
Alfred Pooler 
Lucian M. Guimond 
Francis Martin Keenan 
Bernard Kinney 
Damian McHale 
Benedict Olson 
Brothers 

Romuald Reuber 
Leonard Paschali 
Matthew Capodice 
Edwin Levesque 
Pius Martel 
DETROIT 
Walter Kaelin 5 
Ralph Brisk 7 
David Ferland 



Gerald Dooley 

Arthur Stuart 

Linus Burke 

Gerard Barry 

Mark Hoskins 

William Westhoven 20 

Timothy Hurley 

Daniel Maher 

Fidelis Benedik 

Patrick Tully 9 

Cyprian Leonard 10 

Colum Haughey 

Howard Ralenkotter 

Cyril Mary Jablonovsky 

Nilus Goggin 

Flannon Gannon 

Thaddeus Tamm 

Roderick Misey 

Harold Mary Leach 

Declan Egan 18 

Brothers 

Aloysius Schoeppner 

Bernard Schaefer 

SIERRA MADRE 

James Patrick White 5 

Paul Francis Ratterman 7 

Reginald Lummer 

Gabriel Sweeney 19 

Maurice St. Julien 

Norbert McGovern 

Angelo Hamilton 

Pius Leabel 21 

Ferdinand Madl 

Marion Durbala 

Roland Maher 

Harold Travers 

Theophane Gescavitz 

Aidan McGauran 

Joyce Hallahan 17 

Kilian Dooley 

Ernest Polette 20 

Isidore O'Reilly 18 

Brice Zurmuehlen 

Joel Gromowski 

Kent Pieper 

Sacred Eloquence 

Brothers 

Richard McCall 

Gerald LaPresto 

Joseph Stadfeld 

Justin Gerrity 

BIRMINGHAM 

Joseph Gartland 5 

Robert Borger 7 

Lambert Hickson 

Alan Prendergast 

Terence Powers 



Bro. Philip Frank 
CITRUS HEIGHTS 

Basil Killoran 5 

Canute Horack 7 

Leo Scheibel 

Arnold Vetter 

Edward Viti 

Damian Cragen 18 

Henry Vetter 20 

Bro. Anthony Blankemeyer 

Bro. Patrick Keeney 

HOUSTON 

Conleth Overman 5 

Jerome Stowell 7 

Herman Joseph Stier 20 

Clarence Vowels 

John Aelred Torisky 

Keith Schiltz 

Dominic Merriman 19 

Bro. Daniel Smith 

Bro. Henry Zengerle 

ENSLEY 

Nathanael Kriscunas 9 

Eustace Ei'ers 

Ludger Martin 

Canisius Womack 

Alvin Wirth 10 

FAIRFIELD 

Edmund Drake 9 

CREVE COEUR 

Valentine Leitsch 8, 18 

Christopher Link 

Jeremiah Beineris 20 

Bro. Denis Sevart 

CHINA 

Anthony Maloney 41 

JAPAN 

Matthew Vetter 8 

Carl Schmitz 

Paul Placek 

Peter Claver Kumle 

Clement Paynter 

Passionist Fathers 

Cath. Church of Hibarigoaka 

(Kwanishi Post Office Division) 

Hyogo-ken Japan 

CHAPLAINS 

Leonard Barthelmy 35 

Edward Xavier Praino 36 

Kenny Lynch 39 

Lucian Hogan 37 

Noel Pechulis AQ 

ON SICK LEAVE 

Reginald James 

406 N. 17th Ave. 

Phoenix, Arizona 



1. 


General 


2. 


Provincial 


3. 


First Consultor 


4. 


Second Consultor 


5. 


Rector 


6. 


Master of Novices 


7. 


Vicar 


8. 


Superior 


9. 


Pastor 


10. 


Assistant Pastor 


11. 


Vice Master 


12. 


Church History 



REFERENCES 




24. 


Lector of English 


25. 


Lector of Philosophy 


26. 


Sign Fieldman 


27. 


Lector of Scripture 


28. 


Lector of Canon Law 


29. 


Lector of Moral Theolcgy 


30. 


Vice Director 


31. 


Chaplain, St. Vincent's 


32. 


Lector 


33. 


Vocational Director 


34. 





35. Veterans Administration, Marion, Ind. 



344 



13. Lector of Dogmatic Theology 

14. Chaplain at Dunning 

15. Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

16. Provincial Secretary 

17. Director of Students 

18. Retreat Director 

19. Assistant Retreat Director 

20. Retreat Master 

21. Lector of Sacred Eloquence 

22. Lector of History 

23. Mission Secretary 



36. 
37. 

39. 

40. 

41. 

42. 
43. 



U.S. Veterans' Administration Hospital, 

Northport, Long Island, New York 

Naval Air Station, FPO 955, San Francisco, 

Calif. 

7911 Au, APO 58, New York, N.Y. 

U.S. Naval Station, Navy No. 103, FPO 

New York, N.Y. 

Maryknoll House Stanley, Hongkong, China. 

Secretary to Fr. General 

Higher Studies 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 



ROME 

Paul F. Nager 1 

Neil McBrearty 45 

Ignatius Formica 47 

Caspar Caulfield 46 

Luigi Malorzo 

Cronan Regan 48 

Norman Demeck 48 

Michael Brennan 48 

Aquinas McGurk 48 

Harold Reusch 48 

UNION CITY 

M. Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, DO 

Provincial Staff 

Ernest Welch 2 

Canisius Hazlett 3 

Carrol Ring 4 

Frederick J. Harrer 9 

Brendan Boyle 10 

Ferdinand Braun 1 1 

Paul J. Dignan 11 

Robert O'Hara 12 

The Sign 

Ralph Gorman 25 

Damian Reid 26 

Jeremiah Kennedy 26 

Donald Nealis 28 

Harold Poletti 29 

Pius Trevoy 30 

Hugh Carroll 31 

Austin Busby 31 

St. Michael's Monastery 

Berchmans Lanagan 5 

Hubert Arliss 8 

Herbert McDevitt 

Xavier Gonter 

Michael Rausch 18 

Hyacinth Sullivan 

Alfred Duffy 

Adelbert Poletti 

Ernest Cunningham 35 

Ronald Norris 23 

Bernard Gilleran 

Kenneth Naudin 

Raymond J. Foerster 

Stephen P. Kenny 17 

Michael A. Campbell 

Justinian McLaughlin 

Matthias O'Byme 

Bonaventure Griffiths 24 

Andrew Ansbro 22 

Hyacinth Malkowiak 

Michael Sullivan 

Lawrence Steinhoff 

Agatho Dukin 

Athanasius Drohan 

Richard Kugelman 15 

Bertrand Weaver 

Wendelin Moore 18 



Claude Ennis 

Leo Byrnes 

Patrick J. McDwyer 18 

Charles A. Oakes 18 

Nicholas Gill 

Francis Kuba 

Augustine P. Hennessey 15 

Columba Moore 13 

Fintan Lombard 15 

Bennet Kelly 

Cyril Schweinberg 

Emmanuel Gardon 53 

Cuthbert Sullivan 

John B. Pesce 18 

Students— 3rd Theol. 

William Davin 

Raymond Pulvino 

Francis Hanlon 

Martin Grey 

Kilian M. McNamara 

John M. Kelly 

Edward M. Leger 

Kevin Casey 

Patrick McDonough 

Norbert M. Dorsey 

Micholas Zitz 

Eugene Leso 

Richard Grady 

Brian Rogan 

Alexis Hewitt 

John F. McMillan 

Albert Pellicane 

Damian Toway 

Anselm Cimonetti 

Timothy Fitzgerald 

Luke Mulligan 

Aloysius Fahy 

Alan Cavanaugh 

Brothers 

Jerome Cowan 

Bernard M. Pughe 

Conrad Federspiel 

St. Joseph 

Benjamin Wirtz 17 

Julius Reiner 18 

Vincent M. Frahlick 18 

PITTSBURGH 

Cuthbert McGreevey 5 
Gregory Flynn 6 
Leo F. Vanston 8 
Urban Manley 
Fulgentius Ventura 
Adrian Lynch 
Bertin Donahue 21 
Theophane Maguire 
Charles F. Lang 
Celestine McConigal 
Gabriel M. Jaskal 



Cyril McGuire 
Theophane Kapcar 
Camillus Barth 
Cajetan Sullivan 19 
Daniel Hunt 
Raymond M. Houlahen 
Paulinus Gepp 
Anselm Lacomara 
Angelo lacavone 
Hilarion Walters 
Malcolm McGuinn 
Kieran Baker 
Paschal Smith 20 
Sebastian Kolonovsky 
Cajetan Bendernagel 14 
Cornelius Davin 
Brothers 
Damian Carroll 
Xavier Vitacollona 
William Drotar 
Paschal Di Boli 
St. Michael's 
Adolph Schmitt 17 
Wendelin Meis 18 
Edward Hennessey 18 
Timothy Stockmeyer 18 
DUNKIRK 
St. Mary's 

Rupert Langenstein 5 
Eugene Fitzpatrick 8 
Isidore Smith 
Antoine de Groeve 
Paul M. Carroll 
Mark Seybold 
Alban Carroll 
Eugene Kiernan 17 
Myles Whelan 
Herman Kollig 18 
Sylvester Cannon 
Alban Lynch 
Ernan Johnston 18 
Clement Pavlick 
Basil Stockmeyer 18 
Michael Connor 
Gerard A. Orlando 
Crispin Lynch 
Dunstan Guzinski 
Bonaventure Moccia 
Brothers 

Stanislaus Tansey 
Thomas Aul 
Holy Cross 
Boniface Buckley 5 
Aquinas Sweeney 8 
Linus Monahan 
Maurice Kansleiter 
Columban Courtman 15 
Luke Hay 
Columban Aston 15 



345 



Silvio De Luca 
Paschal Drew 15 
Christopher Collins 34 
Leopold Secundo 15 
Simon P. Wood 15 
John S. Gresser 15 
Aiden Mahoney 15 
Colman Haggerty 22 
Malachy AAcGill 15 
Declan Maher 32 
Brendan Breen 33 
Brice Inglesby 15 
Linus Rottlof 15 
Victor A. Mazzeo 15 
Brothers 

Vincent Cunningham 
Ronan Caulson 
Gabriel Chilbert 
Joseph Holzer 

BALTIMORE 

Clement Buckley 5 
Basil Cavanaugh 8 
Hilarion O'Rourke 
Arthur Benson 
Jeremias McNamara 
Hubert Sweeney 
Vincent Connors 
Columba AAcCloskey 
Raphael Duffy 
Arthur May 
John F. Poole 18 
Flavian O'Donnell 
Cosmas Boyle 
Alexis Scott 
Terence Brodie 
Adrian Poletti 17 
Silvan Brennan 38 
Leander Del i i Veneri 
Edward J. Banks 18 
Alan McSweeney 37 
Leonard M. Amhrein 18 
Victor Donovan 15 
Dominic M. Cohee 
Albert Catanzaro 18 
Wilfrid Scanlon 
Benedict J. Mawn 
Richard F. Leary 15 
Kilian McGowan 13 
Silvan Rouse 15 
Flavian Dougherty 
Daniel Free 18 
Students— 2nd Theol. 
Benedict Berlo 
Clement Kasinskas 
Leo J. Gorman 
Vincent M. Boney 
Louis J. McCue 
Kiernan Earjey 
Augustine Sheehan 
Colman Connolly 
Gerard Griffiths 
Donald Mclnnis 
Gabriel Shields 
Aelred Lacomara 
Brothers 

Bernardine Carmassi 
Aloysius Blair 

SCRANTON 

Felix Hackett 5 
Owen Lynch 8 
Bernard Hartman 
Henry Brown 
Edward Goggin 



Stephen Sweeney 
Winfrid Guenther 
William Cavanaugh 
Roland Hoffman 
Leonard Gownley 
Brian Murphy 
Ambrose Diamond 
Alfred Weaver 17 
Jordan Loiselle 
Edgar Vanston 
Edmund McMahon 
John M. Aleckna 18 
Raphael Sventy 
Norbert Herman 
Hilary Sweeney 
Cletus Dawson 51 
Marcellus McFarland 
Justinian Gilligan 15 
George Nolan 13 
Venard Byrne 15 
Godfrey Kasper 18 
Christopher Czachor 
Thomas Carroll 

Students-2nd Phil 

Keith Blair 
Austin McKenna 
Terence Kelly 
Rex Mansman 
Myles Scheiner 
Andre Giondomenica 
Ralph Tufano 
Vernon Kelly 
Carl Thorne 
Conrad Smith 
Kent Rummenie 
Rocco Oliverio 
Warren Deeney 
Bernard O'Brien 
Dominic Papa 
Kenan Peters 
Philip Bebie 
Brothers 
Patrick Fallon 
Edward Blair 

BOSTON 

Dennis Walsh 5 
Walter Wynn 8 
Damian O'Rourke 
Claude Leahy 
Francis Shea 
Quentin Olwell 17 
Lucian Ducie 19 
Timothy McDermott 21 
Jordan Black 
Thomas A. Sullivan 
Leo J. Berard 
Finbar O'Meara 
Jerome O'Grady 
Cletus Mulloy 
Bede Cameron 18 
Gerard Rooney 20 
Joseph P. O'Neil 
Linus McSheffrey 
Louis Maillet 
Theodore Foley 13 
Ronald A. Beaton 
Jerome Does 
Bertin Farrell 15 
Neil Sharkey 15 
Kevin McCloskey 15 
Kenneth Walsh 18 
Fidelis Connolly 18 
Giles Ahrens 



Students— 1st Theol. 

Jerome McKenna 
James A. Wiley 
Gerard Surette 
Herbert Eberly 
Walter O'Keefe 
Henry Free 
Bartholomew Weeks 
Roger Elliot 
Boniface Cousins 
Columban Hewitt 
Alban Harmon 
Gregory Paul 
Leonard Murphy 
Campion Cavanaugh 
Brothers 
Benedict Palese 
Christopher Farrell 
Michael Stomber 
SPRINGFIELD 
Luke Misset 5 
Roderick Hunt >8 
Bede Horgan 
Eugene Kozar 
Frederick Corcoran 
Nilus McAllister 
Hilary McGowan 
Rupert Langenbacher 
Miles McCarthy 
Connel Hopkins 
Dominic Grande 
Philip Ryan 21 
Gilbert Walser 19 
Winfrid McDermott 
Fidelis Rice 16 
Casimir Horvat 
Ronald Murray 
David Bulman 
Jude Mead 
Lucien Morel 
J. Chrysostom Ryan 20 
Peter Hallisey 13 
Canisius Lareau 
Stanislaus Waseck 
Quentin Amhrein 
Sacred Eloquence 
Cyprian Regan 
Regis Eichmiller 
Stephen Haslach 
John F. McLouglin 
Justin Brady 
Justinian Manning 
Ronald Hilliard 
Leo Gerrity 
Anthony Neary 
Jude Dowling 
Brothers 

Valentine Rausch 
Andrew Winkleman 
Timothy Foley 
Valentine Cashman 
Francis Dalton 
JAMAICA 

Cornelius McArdle 5 
Arthur Derrig 8 
Bartholomew Mulligan 
John J. Endler 
Cosmos Shaughnessey 19 
Roger Monson 
Owen Doyle 17 
Canice Gardner 
Ignatius Ryan 
Conon O'Brien 
Bertrand McDewell 



346 



Gordian O'Reilly 
Cronan Flynn 18 
Lambert Missack 
AAalachy Hegarty 
Kevin Conley 
Bernardine Gorman 
Bsnedict McNamara 
Alexander Hoffman 
Xavier Welch 15 
Urban Curran 
Peter Quinn 
George Sheehy 
Arnold Horner 36 
Julian Connor 21 
Kieran Richardson 18 
Gcrdian Murphy 
John J. Reardon 15 
Brian Burke 18 
Florian Pekar 
Thomas M. Berry 
Fergus McDonald 15 
Bernardine Grande 
Berard Tierney 20 
Columkille Regan 13 
Camillus Gentakes 
Gerald Hynes 
Edmund Hanlon 
Students-3rd Phil 
Nelson McLaughlin 
Adrian Christopher 
Xavier M. Hayes 
Christian Kunchenbrod 
Ambrose O'Hare 
Alexander Mulligan 
Victor Hoagland 
Theodore Walsh 
Paulinus Cusack 
Fidelis Garmer 
Sebastian Collupy 
Mark Clogan 
Cosmas Dimino 
Emmet McGuire 
Matthew Martin 
Dermot Dobbyn 
Barnabas Wenger 
Owen Lally 
Roderick Mescall 
Brothers 
John Murphy 
Henry Cavanaugh 
George Kowalski 
HARTFORD 
Thaddeus Purdon 5 
Aloysius O'MaKey 8 
Gilbert Smith 
Cyril Feeley 
Sylvester Grace 
Justin Mulcahy 15 
Kenan Carey 
Alphonsus Cooley 
Caspar Conley 
Paulinus Hughes 
Conran Kane 
Ronan Carroll 
Joseph L. Flynn 19 
Vincent Durkin 
Matthew Nestor 21 
Regis Mulligan 
Gerald Matejune 
Venard Johnson 
Bonaventure Gonella 
Maurice Sullivan 
Damian F. Rail 
Alphonsus Grande 
Martin J. Tooker 20 



Roger Gannon 
Gregory Durkin 
David Roberts 13 
Cassian Yuhas 15 
Ronan Callahan 15 
Cormac Kinkead 20 
Students— 1st Phil. 
Frederick Bauer 
Mario Gallipoli 
Edwin Moran 
Joel Polasik 
Donatus Santora 
Matthias Manger 
Joseph Fiorina 
Gordon Amidon 
Barry Ward 
Leon Redondo 
Isias Powers 
Brothers 
Simon West 44 
Arthur Bouchard 
Paul Morgan 
Alphonsus Ccen 
Dominic Critchlow 
Anselm Catalucci 
Philip Maggiulli 
Virgil Pasi 
TORONTO 
Connel McKeown 5 
James A. McAghon 8 
Gerard Keeney 
Egbert Gossart 17 
Donald Keenan 
Boniface Hendricks 
James Verity 
Maurus Schenck 
Joyce Spencer 
Julian Morgan 
Lawrence Bellew 
Neil O'Donnell 
Bro. Brian Fcrrestall 
RIVERDALE 
Benedict Huck 7 
William Harding 
Albinus Kane 
Aloysius McDonough 27 
Constantine Phillips 
Bro. Francis Bcy!an 
NORTH CAROLINA 
Washington 
Daniel McDevitt 17 
Joachim Carrigan 18 
New Bern 
Julian Endler 17 
Gerald Ryan 18 
Howard Chirdon 18 
Greenville 
Maurice Tew 17 
Berchmans McHugh 18 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 
Emmanuel Trainor 17 
Gabriel Gorman 52 
JAMAICA, B. W. I. 
William Whelan 
Cormac Shanahan 
Calistus Connolly 
Anthony Feeherry 
FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 
Reginald Arliss 50 
MEXICO CITY 
Anthony J. Nealson 17 
Dunstan Stout 18 
ARGENTINE 
Justinian Tobin 



GERMANY 

Walter Mickel 2 
Leopold Snyder 4, 6 
Germain Heilmann 
Roland Flaherty 
AUSTRIA 
Fabian Flynn 43 
CATHOLIC U. 
Joques McQuillan 
Edgar Crowe 
Paul J. Fullam 
Robert Ehrne 
CHINA 

Marcellus White 49 
Justin Garvey 49 
Furlough 
Linus Lombard 
John B. Maye 
Lawrence Mullin 
Ernest Hotz 
CHAPLAINS 
Norman Kelly 39 
Sidney Turner 39 
Christopher Berlo 39 
Timothy McGrath 40 
Romuald Walsh 40 
Godfrey Riley 41 
James Follard 40 
Nilus McAndrew 39 
Albinus Lesch 42 
Hugh McKeown 39 
Julius Durkan 39 
Conran Free 39 
Gabriel Bendernagel 42 
Conor Smith 39 
Eustace McDonald 42 
Robert Mulgrew 39 
Conan Conaboy 39 
Nilus Houbble 40 
Ambrose Maguire 39 
Sick Leave 
Raphael Vance 
Leander Steinmeyer 
Terence Connelly 
Cyprian Walsh 
Quentin Cerullo 

REFERENCES 

1. 4th Gen'l Consulor 

2. Provincial 

3. 1st Consulor 

4. 2nd Consulor 

5. Rector 

6. Master of Novices 

7. Superior 

8. Vicar 

9. Prov. Secy. 

10. Prov. Econome 

11. Mission Secy. 

12. Prov. Dir Studies 

13. Director 

14. Vice Master 

15. Lector 

16. Lect. Sac. Eloq. 

17. Pastor 

18. Curate 

19. Retreat Dir. 

20. Asist. Ret. Dir. 

21. Retreat Master 

22. Vocational Director 

23. Public Rel. Dir. 

24. Chronicler 

25. Sign: Editor 

26. Sign: Asso. Ed. 

27. Sign Post 

28. Sign: Business Mgr. 



347 



29. Sign: Mission Proc. 

30. Sign: Field Director 

31. Sign: Fieldman 

32. Dir. Prep. Sem. 

33. Assist. Dir. Prep. 

34. Dean of Studies Prep. 

35. Chaplain; Laurel Hill 

36. Chaplain; Creedmor 

37. Chaplain; St. Agnes Hosp. 



38. Chaplain: Bon Secours Hosp. 

39. Chaplain: Army 

40. Chaplain: Navy 

41. Chaplain: Marine 

42. Chaplain: Air Force 

43. War Relief Services 

44. Supervisor Jun. Bros. 

45. General Econome 



46. Secy. Gen'l. For. Miss. 

47. Rules Commission 

48. Higher Studies 

49. Communist Prisoner 

50. Novice Master, Sons of M. 

51. Chaplain: Pass Nuns 

52. Building Superintendent 

53. Librarian 




348 



I 


raK 


isi 


Wm 




BULLETIN 


OF HOLY 


CROSS PROVINCE 





THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished bimonthly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each January, 
March, May, July, Septem- 
ber, and November. Financed 
by free-will offerings of its 
readers. There is no copy- 
right. The paper is a private 
publication. 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. 

Vincent Mary, C.P. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. VIII, No. 4 



July-Aug. 1955 



IN THIS ISSUE 

National Congress of the Passion 

Address of Bishop Cuthbert, C.P. 

Our Passion Feasts 

Particular Examen 

The Trial of Jesus 

Obituaries 

News of the Congregation 

Varia 

Whos Who and Where 

Works of the Ministry 



2>eat (leaden,, 



The recent First National Congress 
of the Confraternity of the Passion 
in the United States, the month of 
July, dedicated to the Most Precious 
Blood of Jesus, the rather widely dis- 
cussed article on "Passionist Spiritu- 
ality" may seem and may be uncore- 
lated facts or thoughts; just now, 
however, are in the minds of many 
readers. 

Whatever may have been the reso- 
lutions or fruits of the National Con- 
gress of the Confraternity of the Pas- 
sion, or what our 'distinct' Spiritu- 
ality may be, or what conclusions 
we may see in the mystery of the 
Most Precious Blood, all must some- 
how dovetail themselves into the 
Law or Charity. "By this shall all 
men know that your are my disciples, 
if you have love for one another. 
Love one another as I have loved 
you." 

On his death-bed, Our Holy Foun- 
der, before he spoke of the oft men- 
tioned spirit of prayer, solitude and 
poverty, said: "Above all, I recom- 
mend most urgently the observance 
of that most holy admonition that 
Jesus Christ gave his disciples: In 
this shall all know that you are my 
disciples, if you have love for one 
another. Behold, my dearest Breth- 
ren, what I desire with all the inten- 
sity of my poor heart, I give to you; 
to you who are present here and to 
all the rest who are now wearing 
this garb of pennance, of sorrow in 
memory of the Passion and Death 
of our most amiable Divine Redeem- 
er, as well as to all those who, by the 




mercy of God, in times to come, shall 
be called to this little flock of Jesus 
Christ." 

Charity means to give, to give all 
and to give all gladly. Our Lord in 
his sacred Passion gave his life, the 
last drop of His Most Precious Blood. 
St. Paul wanted to be all to all men, 
sin excepted, Love can be kept only 
by being given away. 

The real lover is ready to gladly 
sacrifice all for the beloved: thoughts, 
desires, things, time, comfort, so- 
called rights etc. We are never losers 
if we give in true love. The severity 
of our lives gives more than mere 
reason can see as right. The Cross, 
the Precious Blood, the Passion is 
still a stumbling block to many. 



349 



True love gives what is really good 
for the recipient. Therefore not mere- 
ly to please, to be pleased, to expect 
a return. Love one another as I have 
loved you. He did please when he 
cured the sick, the lame, the blind, 
the lepers etc.; but His refrain was: 
Sin no more. 

The greatest good we can give to, 
or perfect in, the recipient of our 
love is the Love of God. As members 
of the Mystical Body our sacrifices 



asked by Rule or duty do partake of 
the merits of the Precious Blood and 
the Passion of our Lord for an in- 
crease of Love of God in the world; 
our own personal favors and sacri- 
fices help straighten out the path of 
our neighbor to the Love of God. 

Of course all this entirety of giving 
in Love would make no sense if our 
Lord had not in his Passion and 
Death shed the last drop of His 
Precious Blood. 



Vsw&y % *y , <?<P 




Dear Father Vincent, 

I feel there should be some im- 
mediate clarification on a point treat- 
ed in your last issue. 

The letter that you published com- 
menting on my recent article about 
our Spirituality questions whether 
the present form of our foreign mis- 
sionary work is compatible with our 
spirit. I don't see how it could be 
incompatible, since paragraph No. 209 
of the Holy Rule explicitly provides 
for it. And the final revision of the 
Rule was made after the present 
form of missionary organization was 
an accepted practice with the Propa- 
ganda. It seems to me that this fact 
should remove all suspicion about 
the foreign missions being reconcil- 
able with our spirit. 



I would like to make a few further 
observations in this respect. St. Paul 
of the Cross had a tremendous love 
for the foreign missions and a great 
interest in them. It is very notice- 
able in the Diary of his forty-day re- 
treat, where he mentions several 
times his grief at the manner in 
which the Bl. Sacrament is treated 
in non-Catholic lands, and his ardent 
desire to go to such places and to 
die there as a martyr of the Real 
Pressence. This was no mere velleity, 
for he maintained this interest 
through life, especially in regard to 
England, which was considered mis- 
sion country at that time. Nor was it 
only a personal interest, for St. Paul 
longed to see his sons in England, 
and apparently received divine assur- 



350 



ance and prevision that they would 
be there someday. 

Moreover, our Holy Founder 
worked and prayed hard to obtain 
a foreign mission for his nascent 
Congregation from the then recently 
established Propaganda Fidei. In his 
correspondence about it there seems 
to be no evidence whatever that St. 
Paul feared for the spiritual life of 
the men who would be chosen for 
this mission work, though he did 
strive to select for it his finest sub- 
jects. 

However, there are two important 
considerations here that merit atten- 
tion: first, what were the conditions 
and circumstances at that time under 
which the missioners could be pre- 
sumed to work Second, what were 
the underlying reasons why our Holy 
Founder so earnestly desired us to 
have a mission field? 

In brief answer to the first ques- 
tion, certainly the foreign missioners 
of two centuries ago did not work on 
the well-organized parish basis that 
is the accepted and prescribed form 
today. Presumably at that period the 
approach was similar to that of St. 
Francis Xavier: rather free-lance ac- 
tivity, wide-spread, with little of a 
consistent policy of concentrating on 
one section of a country at a time. 
Perhaps had the project gone through 
in his lifetime our Holy Founder 
would have made some sort of pro- 
vision that the missionaries keep to 
a very modified rule of life based on 
the essentials of our spirit. But there 
is no trace of such provision that I 
ever heard of. 

As regards the second question, the 
only reason that appears on the sur- 



face for St. Paul's desire for a mis- 
sion field is that the Congregation 
might perhaps have martyrs to adorn 
it. But he was deeply concerned at 
the time about complete approval of 
his Institute. And a closer study cor- 
roborates the suggestion that the wise 
Founder knew well how a mission 
field would stabilize his Institute in 
the eyes of the Holy See, and per- 
haps even help toward obtaining the 
coveted privilege of solemn vows. 

These are only sketch answers to 
these two important questions. But I 
believe they are reliable. While stu- 
dying in Rome I had frequent talks 
with a few experienced foreign mis- 
sioners attending the Propaganda 
University, as well as with some stu- 
dents of Paulacrucian documents. If 
there are problems for reconciliation 
that should not be surprising. But it 
should not give rise to doubt regard- 
ing the missions being compatible 
with a Passionist vocation. 

This matter may manifest our need 
for clear and precise Passionist norms 
of adaption even better than the ex- 
amples I chose to treat in my article. 
That would be the benefit of theo- 
logically defining Passionist Spiritu- 
ality. Nor by that did I mean just 
theorizing. We must be practical, cer- 
tainly. And I would like to correct 
the mistaken notion that I was advo- 
cating study of our Spirituality as 
the only solution, or that what I was 
proposing was merely to "distill" the 
essence of our Spirituality. 

I am firmly convinced that much 
more than an essence or a substance 
has to be retained in any adaptation. 
It has been noted that the bark of 
a tree is not of the essence, but the 



351 



tree will not thrive long without it. 
This example was used by Fr. Gar- 
rigou-LaGrange when writing of re- 
ligious orders adapting to the times. 
They must keep some accidents at 
least. 

I was impelled to write this letter 
to you, Father, lest some of our 
younger men might gather that they 
could not be full, true-blooded Pas- 
sionists and still long to be sent to 
a foreign mission field. 1 don't be- 
lieve that suspicion holds up under 
examination. Rather, let those who 
feel the desire for foreign mission 



work be encouraged to go to our 
Holy Founder to ask his blessing. 
Let them beg him to deepen their 
Passionist spirit, so that it will be 
able to prove itself in such admir- 
able apostolic work, and to thrive in 
it. We are really sons of the Church 
before we are sons of the Congrega- 
tion. There is no opposition here, 
however. We are the most loyal sons 
of the Church precisely in being the 
finest truest Passionist sons of St. 
Paul of the Cross. 

Sincerely in J.X.P., 
Ward, C.P. 



Our Front Cover 

. . . pictures Most Reverend Henry J. O'Brien, D.D., Archbishop of 
Hartford, opening the National Congress of the Confraternity of the 
Passion in St. Joseph's Cathedral by celebrating a Pontifical Low 
Mass, Saturday, May 28, 1955. Most Reverend Bishop Cuthbert 
O'Gara, C.P., D.D., Very Reverends Ernest Walsh, C.P. and Neil 
Parsons, C.P., the two American Provincials, many visiting Passionists, 
many Sisters and other pilgrims attended the opening Mass. 



352 



vox 



MAIORUM 



NOSTRORUM 




Fr. John Baptist of St. Vincent 

Ferrer, Second General of the 

Congregation. 



John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer 

General Superior 
of the 

Congregation of the Discalced Clerics 

of the 

Most Holy Cross and Passion 

To all our most beloved Religious, eternal benediction in the Lord! 



On the morning of the 27th of last 
February His Holiness, Our Lord 
Pope Pius VI, left this Holy City of 
Rome for Germany to attend to af- 
fairs of the Holy See. Since the re- 
action of such a departure for the en- 
tire Roman population was one of 
tender emotion expressed with lively 
demonstrations joined even with 



tears, I do not doubt that this knowl- 
edge will effect a most tender con- 
cern in the hearts of all our Relig- 
ious, since we have a special obliga- 
tion to implore, day and night, the 
Most High God, through the inter- 
cession of the Divine Mother, Mary 
Most Holy, and all the Saints, especi- 
ally the most glorious princes of 



353 



Holy Church, the Holy Apostles Pet- 
er and Paul, for the welfare of the 
Holy Father and for the happy issue 
of this arduous journey and his holy 
intentions. In order to increase still 
more this zealous concern in the 
hearts of all, especially in view of the 
fact that last Saturday I personally 
expressed this when with his accus- 
tomed kindness His Holiness admit- 
ted me to his sacred presence to wish 
him a happy journey and to implore 
the Apostolic and his paternal bless- 
ing on the Congregation, I exhort 
each and every one of our most be- 
loved religious, from the innermost 
of my poor heart, to actually be more 
than ever zealous in prayer for this 
intention and to add to the accus- 
tomed prayers extraordinary ones, 
not only personally by each indivi- 
dual, but also in common by the 
community of every retreat, praying 
fervently, day and night, for a pros- 
perous journey and a most happy 
return and for the other intentions 
of His Holiness. 

Therefore, beyond the daily reci- 
tation of the Litany of the Saints, it 
is hereby ordered with special insis- 
tence that for the afore mentioned 
intention, that every night after the 
regular Matins there be recited five 
Our Fathers and Hail Mary's in mem- 
ory of the Sacred Passion of our 
Lord Jesus Christ and the Sorrows 
of Mary most Holy with the addition 
of the V. Oremus pro Pontifice nos- 
tro Pio — R. Dominus conservet Eum 
etc. and the oration: Omnipotens 
sempiterne Deus, miserere Famulo 
tuo Pontifici nostro Pio etc., with the 
oration of the Mass "Pro Peregrinan- 



tibus vel iter agentibus" and change 
the words Famulorum tuorum, into 
Famuli tui Pontificis nostri Pii; and 
every time the discipline is taken ac- 
cording to the Holy Rules, after the 
oration: Deus, qui pro redemptione 
mundi, there shall be added from the 
Litany: Ut Ecclesian tuam sanctam 
regere etc., ut Domum Apostolicum 
etc. 

Then, every morning after the Con- 
ventual Mass, the celebrant kneeling 
in front of the altar in presence of 
the entire religious Community, shall 
recite the prayers of 'The Itinerary' 
as given in the Roman Breviary and 
in the Roman Pontificial for pre- 
lates, adapting it as follows: 

In viam pads etc.; this Antiphon 
to be recited entirely. 

Benedictus Dominus Deus Israel, 
quia etc. 

In Viam pads etc., repeated as 
above. 

Kirie eleison etc. 

V. Salvum fac servum tuum Ponti- 
ficem nostrum Pium. 

R. Deus meus, sperantem in Te. 

Oremum. Deus, qui filios Israel 
etc. . . Tribue quaesumus Pontifici 
nostro Pio etc . . .ad eum, quo pergit 
locum etc . . pervenire valeat. 

Deus, qui Abraham etc . . . quae- 
sumus, ut Famulum tuum Prontifi- 
cem nostrum etc. Esto ei Domine 
etc . . . quo tendit etc ... prospere 
perveniat, et demum incolumis ad 
propria redeat. 

Adesto quaesumus etc . . . viam dic- 
ti Famuli tui etc . . . protegatur auxi- 
lio. 

Praesta, quaesumus omnipotens 
Deus, ut famulus tuus Pontifex nos- 



354 



ter Pius per viam salutis incedat, et 
beati Joannis Praecursoris hortamen- 
ta sectando, ad eum, quern praedixit 
securus perveniat, Dominum nostrum 
Jesum Christum Filium tuum. 

Apostolicis, nos, Domine quaesu- 
mus, beatorum Petri et Pauli attolle 
praesidiis, ut quanto fragiliores sum- 
us, tanto earum intercessione vali- 
dioribus auxiliis joveamur, ut jugi- 
ter apostolica defensione muniti, nee 
succumbamus vitiis, nee opprimamur 
adversis. Per Christum. R. Amen 

Finally, during the customary reci- 
tation of the Rosary, which will also 
be offered up for this same intention, 
after the regular oration of the Bles- 
sed Virgin, there shall be added the 
abovementioned oration Omnipotens 
sempiterne Deus, misserere Pontifici 
nostro Pio etc. 

Note, however, that the prayers 
ordered to be recited after the Con- 
ventual Mass are to be said only up 
to the date of the arrival of His Holi- 
ness in Germany ( * ) ; then they shall 
be taken up again upon notice of his 
departure up to his arrival in Rome; 
this notice will be given by me at the 
signified time. 



During the interval, however, in 
place of the Intinerary Prayers, there 
shall be recited after Tierce, in the 
choir, the hym Veni Creator Spiritus 
etc., with the orations: Deus, qui 
cor da fidelium etc., Concede nos 
jamulos tuos, etc., Omnipotens sem- 
piterne Deus, miserere famulo tuo 
etc., Deus, refugium nostrum et vir- 
tus etc., ut intercedente beata Vir- 
gine Dei Genitrice Maria, et Sanctis 
Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, quod 
fideliter petimus etc. Per Dominum 
etc. 

I also recommend to the prayers of 
all the Religious all those who are 
in the company with the Holy Father 
on his journey and especially the 
Most Illustrious and Most Reverend 
Monsignori Marucci and Contessini. 
In the meantime, with the most cor- 
dial affection, I beg for all of you 
the Divine Blessing. 

Given at this Retreat of Sts. John 
and Paul, 

March 1, 1782. 

John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer 
Superior General. 



{*) Here between the lines is written: That is up to the 20th of the current Month of March. 

The 'Bolletino' C.P., Dec, 1929, page 359, in a note prefacing the above letter of Father John 

Baptist tells us that about 1781 there was another lost circular letter which asked for volunteers 

to the Chinese Mission that had been offered to the Congregation in consequence of the great good 

being done by our Fathers in Bulgaria. However, the original of this letter has not been found 

up to date. 

There are two original copies of the above letter still in existence, the ones addressed to Corneto 

S. Sosio. It is another instance of the great devotion to the Holy See by our first Religious. 




355 



Bicentenary of The Confraternity 
of The Sacred Passion 

1775-1955 

National Congress, Holy Family 
Monastery, Hartford, Conn. 

MAY 28, 29, 30, 1955 

WE PREACH CHRIST CRUCIFIED! Pilgrims and delegates to the 
First National Congress of the Confraternity of the Passion, heard this 
theme expounded and saw it exemplified during the three days of the 
Bicentenary Conference., held at Holy Family Monastery during the last 
week-end of May. Passion preachers spoke at the Masses and the outdoor 
evening functions. Passion scholars and exegetes lectured at the numerous 
panels. Distinguished laymen discussed the Passion from scientific, legal 
and medical standpoints. The Sacred Passion was viewed and studied in its 
full relationship with life, religious, social and personal. The Congress was 
truly a School of Jesus Crucified, a Seminar of Passionist thought and 
teaching and a Passion Retreat. 

It is estimated that almost four thousand pilgrims and delegates journey- 
ed to Hartford for the Congress. They came by train and bus and car from 
Louisville, Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Scranton, 
Hazeltown, Union City, New York, Jamaiac, Dunkirk, Boston, Providence, 
Worchester, Springfield and other places. The Congress also brought to- 
gether the largest gathering of Passionists in the history of the Order in 
America. One hundred and seventy-eight Sons of St. Paul of the Cross. 
These included a Passionist Bishop, exiled from his diocese in China, the 
two North American Provincials, the Superiors of the Province of St. Paul 
of the Cross, Directors of the Confraternity from both American Provinces, 
and a massed choir composed of Passionist clerics from St. Michael's Mon- 
astery, Union City, Immaculate Conception Monastery, Jamaica, L. I., St. 
Gabriel's Monastery, Brighton, Mass., Mother of Sorrows Monastery, West 
Springfield, Mass., and Holy Family Monastery, Hartford, Conn. 

Those in charge of the Congress worked long and arduously for many 
weeks on the complicated arrangements. Fortunately, the grounds of Holy 
Family Monastery were spacious enough to accommodate several thousand 
at one time and the commodious retreat house large enough to house the 
visiting religious. The host of the Congress, V. Rev. Thaddeus Purdon, C.P., 
Rector of Holy Family Monastery, had a corps of very competent assistants 
who planned the details. Father Martin J. Tooker, C.P., Confraternity Direc- 

356 



tor in Hartford, took on the most trying assignment and it was due to his 
able management that the Congress proved to be so great a success. 

His Excellency, Most Rev. Henry J. O'Brien, D.D., Archbishop of Hart- 
ford, opened the Congress in St. Joseph's Cathedral, by celebrating Ponti- 
ficial Low Mass, Saturday, May 28. Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., V. Revs. 
Ernest Welch, C.P., and Neil Parsons, C.P., the two American Provincials, 
the Superiors of St. Paul of the Cross Province, visiting Passionists and the 
Community of Holy Family Monastery, attended the Mass, together with a 
large number of Sisters, out of town pilgrims and local members of the 
Confraternity. V. Rev. Cuthbert McGreevey, C.P., Rector of St. Paul's Mon- 
astery, Pittsburgh, Pa. — the first Passionist monastery founded in the United 
States — preached the sermon which key-noted the Coongress. His address 
was one of the most stirring of the entire convention. 

The first day of the Congress was given over in great measure to the 
Sisters, a Day of Recollection they will all long remember. Various com- 
munities were represented, including a large delegation of Passionist Sisters. 
After luncheon in the retreat house cafeteria, the nuns assembled in St. 
Gemma's Hall, to hear Father Augustine Paul Hennessey, C.P., speak on 
"Pedagogy and the Sacred Passion". This lecture was supplemented by 
demonstrations conducted by the Sisters themselves, to show how the Passion 
can be brought into the teaching of catechism and Christian Doctrine classes. 

A Holy Hour followed in the public chapel, presided over by His Ex- 
cellency, Bishop Cuthbert, C.P. V. Rev. Monsignor Vincent J. Hines, Vicar 
for Religious, read the prayers and was the Celebrant for Solemn Benediction. 
V. Rev. Felix Hackett, C.P., Rector of St. Ann's Monastery, Scranton, Pa., 
preached the Meditations. The Day of Recollection closed with the Sisters 
walking in procession for the Stations of the Cross around the beautiful 
outdoor Way of the Cross. The splendid choir of the Religious Teachers 
Fillipini enhanced the Holy Hour and Benediction with their distinguished 
singing. These Sisters were special favorites of St. Paul of the Cross during 
his lifetime. 

His Excellency, Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., also presided over the first 
evening out door function. A large congregation filled the mall before the 
great stone altar. While the celebrant with his assistants passed from station 
to station, the Bishop, priests and people prayed the Stations of the Cross 
from their places before the altar. The meditation for the first evening, 
"The Sacred Passion and Prayer", was delivered by V. Rev. Berchmans 
Lanagan, C.P., Rector of St. Michael's Monastery, Union City, N. J. Ponti- 
fical Benediction closed the day's session. 

The second day of the Congress, Pentecost Sunday, opened with Solemn 
Mass in the public chapel. Because of the limited capacity, attendance was 
restricted to out of town delegates. The V. Rev. Father Provincial of Holy 
Cross Province, Neil Parsons, C.P., was the celebrant. Confraternity Direc- 

357 




Most Reverend Bishop Cuthbert and Very Reverend Father Neil, Provincial 
of the Province of Holy Cross (in center) and Rev. Father Martin, C.P., 
(extreme left) Director of the Confraternity of the Passion in Hartford, 
together with some of the Sisters who made a Day of Recollection on the 
first day of the Congress. 

tors Father Killian McGowan, C.P., of Baltimore and Father Cornelius Davin, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., were the Deacon and Subdeacon. The Homily was de- 
livered by V. Rev. Gregory Flynn, C.P.* the Master of Novices. 

The Congress Communion Breakfast was then held at 'The Hedges' in 
nearby New Britain. His Excellency, Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., addressed the 
large gathering that filled every inch of the capacious ballroom. It seems 
that the Bishop's inspiring words which held everyone spellbound, summed 
up the entire purpose and end of the Congress. Not only to know the Passion 
but to live it. His Excellency gave examples from his own experiences under 
persecution and how Chinese Catholics are today compelled to live the 
Passion. In his own day he had preached the Passion but real knowledge 
came only when he had to live it under oppression and tyranny. 

In mid-afternoon all gathered before the Shrine of the Crucifixion for 
the Rosary Procession. Panel lectures filled out the time and then in the 
evening the second outdoor function. His Excellency, Most Rev. Bernard 
J. Flanagan, D.D., Bishop of Norwich, Conn, presided. The second in the 
trilogy of Passion meditations, "The Passion and Penance", was given by 
V. Rev. Denis Walsh, C.P., Rector of St. Gabriel"s Monastery, Brighton, Mass. 
Pontifical Benediction closed the second day's session. 

The closing day of the Congress will never be forgotten by those who 
were privileged to attend. Solelmn Mass was celebrated at the great stone 



358 



altar at the Shrine of the Crucifixion. Black robed Sons of the Passion 
walked in solemn procession in a seeming never ending line. A Guard of 
Honor of the Knight of Columbus in full dress flanked the Bishop and the 
Ministers of the Mass. The combined monastic choirs sang in its fullness 
the liturgy of the Mass. The V. Reverend Provincial of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross, Ernest Welch, C.P., was the celebrant, assisted by the 
Second Consultor, V. Rev. Carrol Ring, C.P., Deacon and V. Rev. Cornelius 
McArdle, C.P., Rector of Immaculate Conception Monastery, Jamaica, L. I., 
Subdeacon. The Homily was preached by V. Rev. Luke Misset, C.P., Rector 
of Our Mother of Sorrows Monastery, West Springfield, Mass. 

In the afternoon, the long procession of people, religious and the Bishop, 
wended its way from the monastery entrance to the community cemetery 
for the solemn Memorial Service. Rev. Paschal Drew, C.P., of the Faculty 
of Holy Cross Seminary, Dunkirk, N. Y., delivered the address, standing 
before the large stone cross in the center of the cemetery. Bishop Cuthbert 
O'Gara, C.P., presided at the exequies while the combined choirs sang the 
Libera. It was a most impressive ceremony. 

His Excellency, Most Rev. John F. Hackett, D.D., Auxiliary Bishop of 
Hartford, presided at the closing session of the Congress held that evening. 
He was attended by V. Rev. Carrol Ring, C.P., and V. Rev. Cornelius McArdle, 
C.P., who were also the ministers for Pontifical Benediction. His Excellency, 
Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., sat on the epistle side with the two Provincials as his 
chaplains. The third Passion meditation, "The Passion and Good Works", 
was eloquently presented by V. Rev. Clement Buckley, C.P., Rector of St. 
Joseph's Monastery, Baltimore, Md. His Excellency, Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., 
then gave the Papal Blessing. V. Rev. Father Ernest, C.P., Provincial, spoke 
a word of appreciation to all who had attended the Congress and all who 
heard him knew that the success of the Congress had been very close to his 
heart from the moment of its inception. Pontifical Benediction by Bishop 
Hackett closed the First National Congress of the Confraternity of the 
Passion. 

It has been impossible in the short outline above to touch on more than 
the highlights of the Congress. The weather remained favorable throughout. 
A shower or two fell while in the indoor panel lectures were in progress or 
during the night. Informative and vocational literature was on hand in 
abundance and exhibits of Passionist life drew many admirers. Posters and 
signs as well as the cover for the program were the work of Brother Paul 
Morgan, C.P. Music was under the direction of Father Fidelis Rice, C.P., 
director of the radio and TV program "The Hour of the Crucified", and 
Father Justin Mulcahy, C.P., Sac. Mus. L. The Director of Students, Father 
David Roberts, C.P., was in charge of the liturgical ceremonies. A feature 
of the Congress was the special care given to the children who attended. 
Revs. Dunstan Guzinski, C.P., and Cassian Yuhas, C.P., conducted the panels 

359 




One of the out-door services during the Congress. 



for the little ones. Besides Father Neil Parsons, C.P., Provincial of Holy 
Cross Province and his secretary, Father Warren Womack, C.P., Passionists 
attending from the Western Province, were V. Rev. Walter Kaelin, C.P., 
Rector of St. Paul's Monastery, Detroit, Mich., Rev. Declan Egan of Detroit, 
Rev. Fergus McGuinness, C.P., of St. Louis, Rev. Roger Mercurio, C.P., of 
Sacred Heart Retreat, Louisville, Ky., and Rev. Xavier Praino, C.P., Naval 
Hospital., Northport, L. I. 




Rev. Father Adam Otterbein, C.S.S.R., lecturing on the "Holy Shroud' 

during the Congress. 

360 




Solemn High Mass on 

CONFRATERNITY DIRECTORS OF 

Rev. Cuthbert Sullivan, C.P. 
Rev. Cornelius Davin. C.P. 
Rev. Dunstan Guzinski, C.P. 
Rev. Kilian McGowan. C.P. 
Rev. Edmund McMahon, C.P. 
V. Rev. Dennis Walsh. C.P. 
Rev. Rupert Langenbacher, C.P. 

Rev. Peter Quinn, C.P. 
Rev. Martin Tooker, C.P. 
V. Rev. Connel McKeown.. C.P. 
Rev. Declan Maher, C.P. 
Rev. Ward Biddle, C.P. 
V. Rev. Gilbert Kroger.. C.P. 
Rev. Roger Mercurio, C.P. 
V. Rev. Roch Adamek. C.P. 
V. Rev. James P. White, C.P. 
V. Rev. Ignatius Bechtold, C.P. 
V. Rev. Walter Kaelin. C.P. 
V. Rev. Basil Halloran. C.P. 
V. Rev. Elmer Sandman. C.P. 



last Day of Congress. 

THE TWO AMERICAN PROVINCES 

St. Michael's, Union City, N. J. 

St. Paul's, Pittsburgh, Pa. JP 

St. Mary's, Dunkirk, N. Y. # ' 

St. Joseph's, Baltimore, Md. 

St. Ann's, Scranton, Pa. 

St. Gabriel's, Brighton, Mass. 

Our Mother of Sorrows, 

West Springfield, Mass. 
Immaculate Conception, Jamaica, L.I. 
Holy Family, West Hartford, Conn. 
St. Gabriel's, Toronto, Ont. 
Holy Cross, Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Immaculate Conception, Chicago, 111. 
Holy Cross, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Sacred Heart, Louisville, Ky. 
St. Francis Jerome, St. Paul, Kan. 
Mater Dolorosa, Sierra Madre, Cal. 
St. Gabriel's Des Moines. la. 
St. Paul's. Detroit. Mich. 
Christ the King, Sacramento, CaL 
Mother of Good Counsel, 

St. Louis, Mo. 



NOTE: The Proceedings of the National Congress of the Confraternity of The Passion are being 
published and may be had from the Secretary of the Congress, Rev. Fr. Jude Mead, C.P., Passionist 
Fathers, West Springfield, Mass. THE PASSIONIST hopes, also to offer its readers the variousaddresses 
and sermons and lectures etc. that were given during the Congress. 



361 



ADDRESS 

Given By 

MOST REVEREND 

CUTHBERT M. O'GARA, C.P., D.D. 

On the evening of June 19, a Testimonial Concert to the "MARTYRS WHO HAVE SUFFERED UNDER 
OR FOUGHT AGAINST COMMUNIST TYRANNY THROUGHOUT THE WORLD". The Assembly of 
Captive European Nations sponsored the concert under the chairmanship of Doctor Charles A. McLain, 
Conductor and Composer. His Excellency, Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., gave the following address 
of the evening. His stirring words thrilled the large audience. The concert was held in Carnegie 
Hall, New York. 

I ask you to join with me tonight in a common tribute to the MARTYRS 
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD WHO HAVE SUFFERED UNDER, AND 
FOUGHT AGAINST, COMMUNIST TYRANNY. 

A MARTYR IS ONE WHO HAS VOLUNTARILY LAID DOWN HIS 
LIFE FOR SACRED PRINCIPLE AND FOR HIS GOD! 'MARTYR' is the 
most honored title to which any mortal can aspire. The MARTYR, in Chris- 
tian tradition and practice, holds first place in the esteem and in the 
reverent awe of the faithful. 

I hold in my hand the Church's "BOOK OF MARTYRS" — 'The Martyro- 
logy' — the annals, day by day, from Stephen the first martyr, to our own 
times; the official record of those sons and daughters of the Church, who, 
in fact or in effect, suffered and died under tyranny, in glorious witness to 
the faith that they professed. 

THIS IS NOT A CLOSED BOOK! THE AGE OF MARTYRS, UNFOR- 
TUNATELY, HAS NOT PASSED! Incredible as it may seem, in this day of 
vaunted progress and of boasted enlightenment, the army of Christian 
martyrs far exceeds the total number of martyrs for all preceding ages. 

These present day heroes have passed through their flaming test of 
faith, loyalty and courage. THEY ARE DEAD! AND, IN A BETTER 
WORLD, THEY NOW BEAR THEIR TRIUMPHANT PALMS! OH SAINTED 
DEAD! 

We leave your praises unexpressed, 

We leave your greatness to be guessed, 

And silence then shall guard your fame, 

But somewhere out of human view 

Whate'er your hands are set to do 

Is wrought with tumult of acclaim! 

THE TITLE OF MARTYR, SO HONORED IN THE CHRISTIAN WORLD, 
IS OFFICIALLY HELD IN CONTEMPT, AND CONTINUALLY, BE- 
SMIRCHED, BY EVERY REGIME BEHIND THE IRON AND BAMBOO 
CURTAINS! THERE, the term "MARTYR" is used with cutting cynicism 

362 



and in mocking scorn. The victims of Communist tyranny are told by their 
tormentors that THERE CAN BE NO MARTYRS. I MYSLF, while in a 
Communist prison, many times had it sneeringly thrown in my face, that 
I was not going to be a SO-CALLED MARTYR. 

But whether the Communists accept the term or reject it, the DAS- 
TARDLY RED RECORD STANDS! The shocking facts cannot be contested 
and there are, in this hall tonight, living witnesses to the authenticity of 
the figures I shall cite. 

FIRST, let us take the citadel of Communism, SOVIET RUSSIA — 
COMMUNISM'S PROMISED LAND. At least TWENTY MILLION HUMAN 
BEINGS are confined in prisons and in slave camps, or committed to linger- 
ing death in the foul, odious and torturous mines of Siberia. In the same 
pitable plight with these hapless Russians, are thousands of wretched 
deportees from the enslaved satellite nations. 

Listen to but a few statistics taken from official sources: 

HUNGARY 

Population 9,750,000 

In prison and slave camps 70 — 80,000 

(including one Cardinal) 

In Russia as war prisoners 60,000 

In Russia as civilian deportees 40,000 

ALBANIA 

Population 1,2 15,950 

In prison and slave labor camps 10,000 

BULGARIA 

Population : 7,280,000 

In prison and slave labor camps 40 — 50,000 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

Population 13,000,000 

In prison and slave labor camps 300,000 

ESTONIA 

Population 1,250,000 

In prison and slave labor camps 25,000 

In Siberia 100,000 

LITHUANIA 

Population 3,135,000 

In prison and slave labor camps 
in Lithuania and Russia 300—500,000 

363 



POLAND 

Population 27,000,000 

In prison and slave labor camps 100 — 150,000 

(including one Cardinal) 

ROUMANIA 

Population 17,000,000 

Known prison camps 55 

LATVIA 

Population 17,000,000 

In prison and slave labor camps in Siberia 150 — 200,000 

YUGOSLAVIA 

The well known and tragic story of Cardinal 
Stepinac is evidence enough. 

THESE ARE NOT ALL BUT WILL SUFFICE FOR THE PURPOSE. 
OTHER TOTALS ARE EQQUALLY PAINFUL. 

WHAT OF THE ORIENT! CHINA with its 500 millions; North Korea, 
devastated and impoverished and then abjectly ceded to the Communist 
world at the Panmungjon debacle; Indo-China, the latest of the peoples of 
the world to be handed over — lock, stock and barrel — first to be torn to 
shreds and then to be devoured by the RED DRAGON. In Europe we count 
Communist victims by the hundreds of thousands. But in Asia, our hun- 
dreds of thousands swell into multiple millions of those, whose sole future 
is the prison cell, the slave labor camp, the torture chamber, the firing squad. 

Out of these dark dungeons of Europe and Asia, the cries of the doomed 
— the voices of the LIVING MARTYRS of Communist oppression — rever- 
berate in the world of the FREE NATIONS. An excruciating wail of men, 
women and children in an extreme of physical anguish. 

Physical anguish? Far and above all bodily pain is the horrifying ex- 
perience of a technique never before conceived by human intelligence, 
howsoever depraved. In this Communist hell — 

"Things are done that Son of God 

nor Son of Man 

ever should look upon." 

THE ASSAULT UPON THE HUMAN MIND, IN THIS DAY, HAS 
BEEN REDUCED TO A SCIENTIFIC FORMULA! An assault that effects 
the utter debasement of the human personality. Man's pre-eminence and 
nobility reside in his immortal soul — a soul made 'to the image and likeness 
of God'. The very presence of this pre-eminence and nobility, Communism 
would destroy, and into the spiritless, grovelling slave thus begat, Commun- 
ism would breathe its own 'image and likeness' — THE IMAGE AND LIKE- 

364 



NESS OF SATAN! The victim of this scientific and diabolic method comes 
to feel, and openly avows himself to be, what in the depth of his being he 
knows he could not be, but what his COMMUNIST TORMENTORS FAIN 
WOULD MAKE HIM. 

Yet, howsoever crushed and forlorn the vast army of Communist pris- 
oners may be, in the breast of each and every one of them there flickers 
a tiny flame — a flame nourished by the unextinguishable hope that the 
GIANT REPUBLIC OF THE WEST WILL YET COME TO BREAK THEIR 
CHAINS! YEA, and this same tenuous flame of hope burns in the hearts 
of untold millions who, whilst free from actual Communist prisons, feel 
themselves, and judge themselves doomed to live under oppression behind 
the Iron and the Bamboo curtains. 

Vast as the sea is the sorrow we contemplate tonight! Oh you 
Estonians and Latvians, you Lithuanians and Poles, you Hun- 
garians and Albanians, you Czechoslovakians and Yugoslavians, 
you Roumanians and Bulgarians, you Nortern Koreans and Indo- 
Chinese, and you — a multitude no man can number — of my own 
beloved adopted Chinese, I see you as you stand tonight in the 
arena of your sufferings, your eyes trained on the peoples of 
the free West, and I hear you, as you lift up your suppliant 
hands and in solemn chorus hail us: 
"We who are about to die, salute you!" 



WE STAND TODAY AT THE CROSSROADS! 

In 1932 a tragic blunder was made. The United States recognized the 
USSR. The reasons given at the time, were supposedly reasons calculated 
to benefit America. The then threatening commercial supremacy of Germany 
would be off-set and the control of sea-commerce would be wrested from the 
already tottering British Commonwealth of Nations. As an added incentive 
and bait, a veritable flood of GOLD was promised — a flood which was to 
pour into America, creating hitherto undreamed of richness of living and 
economic security beyond belief. 

This FLOOD OF GOLD never materialized. On the contrary, it seems 
that ever since that tragic year, OUR PRECIOUS AMERICAN GOLD HAS 
BEEN CONSTANTLY SIPHONED OFF FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALMOST 
EVERY NATION UNDER THE SUN. 

BUT A FLOOD DID COME UPON US! A 'flood' of locusts, a 'flood' of 
termites, a 'flood' of spies, of saboteurs and of fellow-travellers, each a 
carrier of vicious, deadly Communist propaganda. Like the 'plagues' of 
Egypt, these 'locusts' and 'termites' overran the land, burrowed into the 
understructure of our country, and penetrated every crack and cranny of 
the noble edifice that has been designed, constructed and dedicated by our 

365 



Founding Fathers; they infiltrated — these 'termites' — into the uppermost 
levels of the Armed Forces and of the country's Government, and — as docu- 
ments and statements attest — they even wormed their way into power at 
the very 'summit' of our NATIONAL ADMINISTRATION. 

NOW ARE WE TO STAND AS HELPLESS OBSERVERS AND AS 
MUTE WITNESSES TO A CALAMITY THRICE COMPOUNDED? ARE THE 
POWERS AND THE FORCES — make no mistake, they are powerful and 
carry immense weight — ARE THEY TO SUCCEED IN COMPELLING 
US TO BETRAY OUR HONORED ALLY ON FORMOSA AND RECOGNIZE 
THE PERFIDIOUS AND BLOOD-SODDEN REGIME THAT MASQUERADES 
AS THE PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT OF CHINA? 

AGAIN I SAY, WE STAND TODAY AT THE CROSSROADS! 

As was done in 1932, specious and beguiling reasons are now being 
advanced, to persuade an unwary public, that it is to the NATIONAL AD- 
VANTAGE to enter into a 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' WITH THE RED 
MONSTER OF MOSCOW AND THE RED DRAGON OF PEPING! 

'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE'. WHAT A MOCKERY TO THE FREE 
PEOPLES OF THE WORLD! WHAT A BETRAYAL OF THOSE WHO 
HAVE FALLEN MARTYRED SLAVES TO COMMUNISM! 

The honored dead to whom we pay tribute tonight, would rise from 
their graves and denounce those besotted leaders who would propose 
'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' as the solution of World Tension. The 
martyred living, who, with leaden hearts and pain-wracked frames, lie in 
dungeons foul and dark, would, like a mighty army of vengeance, expose 
their broken bodies, and open to us the wounds of their souls, and in one 
tremendous outburst cry, "THESE ARE THE FESTERING SORES OF 
'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE'". And those ten thousand times ten thou- 
sand, who as serried ranks of cowed slaves, doomed forever to trod under 
the lashes of the Red oppressor, THEY WITH EYES THAT SPEAK AN 
ETERNAL DISMAY, would ask us: 

"WOULD YOU ALSO BECOME LIKE UNTO US?" 

Do the high-placed proponents of 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' mean 
that we are to forget, even to applaud, the deaths of millions of our martyrs 
in Russia and Asia? Do our Kremlin-minded diplomats want us to welcome 
with open arms the purveyors of atheism into our homes? Into our schools? 
Into our churches? Are we spinelessly to greet the advocates of 'collectiv- 
ism' and bow them into our great industries and into our financial corpor- 
ations? Are we to admit into our unmatched and fertile farmlands, the 
Bolshevik butchers who cold-bloodedly engineered the horrendous manmade 
famines of the Ukraine? Has our national memory become so atrophied and 
grown so craven? 

366 



If 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' means merely breathing the same air, 
eating the same food, patronizing the same doctors and lawyers, worshiping 
God according to the dictates of one's own conscience — WELL AND GOOD! 

BUT WHEN 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' MEANS SHAKING HANDS 
WITH THE DEVIL, AND ACCEPTING IN SILENCE AND WITHOUT 
PROTEST HIS NEFARIOUS PHILOSOPHY, I CHOOSE TO STAND WITH 
STEPHEN DECATUR, WHO PREFERRED DEATH TO THE BETRAYAL 
OF HIS COUNTRY AND ITS SACRED INSTITUTIONS. WE MAY NOT 
PURCHASE SECURITY, OR EVEN FREEDOM, AT SO HIGH OR SO 
LETHAL A PRICE! 

I lived four years under the oppression of a Communist regime, under 
the so-called PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT OF CHINA. Two of those four 
years were spent in solitary confinement in a Communist prison. From a 
prison cell I was ignominiously expelled from the country, accused as a 
SPY FOR THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT, AN ARCH-IMPERIALIST, 
AND AS AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE OF CHINA! 

During those years I was well schooled in Communist doctrine and in 
Communist objectives. To me, my jailers emphasized, that between ATHE- 
ISTIC COMMUNISM — of which they boasted — and the CHRISTIAN 
WORLD, a knock-down struggle was NATURAL AND INEVITABLE. Time 
and again these zealots repeated that their MAIN OBJECTIVE and PRIMARY 
GOAL, was the 'LIBERATION' of the United States. Moreover, in their 
arrogance, they assured me that they had many friends and sympathizers 
in America and that from these sources — so they impressed on me — they 
could always draw for whatever information they wanted. 

'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' may exist in the minds, or be found in 
the dictionaries, of some Western diplomats — but this I know, and well 
it were that all men should know the same — the term 'PEACEFUL CO- 
EXISTENCE' IS NOT TO BE FOUND IN THE LEXICON OF COMMUNISM! 

I SHALL ADMIT THE PRACTICALITY, YES, EVEN THE POSSI- 
BILITY OF 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' ONLY WHEN: 

Mr. Mao, the President of THE PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT OF 
CHINA, orders his deputy, who daily lectured and berated me — and 
whose name I still do not knoiv — orders this deputy to withdraw 
and stamz> as false, the statements made concerning the IRRECON- 
CILABILITY OF ATHEISTIC COMMUNISM AND CHRISTIAN PRIN- 
CIPLES, AND REPUDIATES THE COMMUNIST OBJECTIVE TO 
LIBERATE' THE UNITED STATES. 

I SHALL ACCEPT 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE', ONLY WHEN: 
Mr. Mao orders the retraction of the SLANDEROUS ATTACKS, 
published in the Chinese daily press, against myself, my missionary 
priests and Religious Sisters. 

367- 



I SHALL CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITY OF 'PEACEFUL CO-EX- 
ISTENCE', ONLY WHEN: 

The churches and schools and hospitals and orphanages, which were 
high-handedly seized and defaced by the agents of the PEOPLE'S 
GOVERNMENT, have been returned to the mission authorities and 
RESTORED TO THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH THEY WERE BUILT! 
(And I might add, built through the generous help of God-fearing 
and freedom-loving Americans.) 

I SHALL ACCEPT 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' ONLY WHEN: 
Myself and other expelled missionaries and Religious Sisters, are 
invited by the PEOPLE'S GOVERNMENT to return to China and to 
re-engage again in the work of religion and culture, AS FRIENDS 
OF THE PEOPLE OF CHINA, AND NOT AS SLANDEROUSLY 
AND FRAUDULOUSLY ACCUSED ENEMIES! 

I SHALL ACCEPT 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' ONLY WHEN: 
All Americans are freed from prison; WHEN our flyers are released 
from bondage; WHEN the hundreds of our American servicemen are 
identified and given their freedom from Communist captivity; 

AND THAT, with apologies from the Red Government for the insults 
contained in the unwarranted detention of these defenders of freedom, 
AND WHEN indemnity for the ill-effects suffered by American pris- 
oners and the grief inflicted on their families, HAS BEEN DULY 
PAID. 

I SHALL ACCEPT 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' ONLY WHEN: 
The prison gates of Europe open wide, and into the free air of God's 
creation walk again the living martyrs of ComwMnism, THOSE TO 
WHOM WE PAY RESPECTFUL, ADMIRING AND AFFECTIONATE 
TRIBUTE TONIGHT! 

'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' is but a plot to mislead the unwary and 
the gullible, and thus eventually — so help me, God — TO INCREASE THE 
ARMY OF LIVING MARTYRS UNDER COMMUNISM! 



Grave and menacing as is the question of 'PEACEFUL CO-EXISTENCE' 
at this fateful hour, it is still not the FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEM. Our 
greatest concern today, and the gravest responsibility pressing on all Chris- 
tian statesmen, MUST BE THE PLIGHT OF THE MILLIONS YET UNBORN, 
AND WHOM WE ARE NOW PROPOSING TO ABANDON WITH EVERY 
COUNTRY THAT IS DELIVERED INTO COMMUNIST DOMINATION. 
We of the Christian World dare not at our peril, temporal and eternal, 
refuse seriously TO REFLECT ON, AND ANXIOUSLY TO WEIGH, THE 
CONSEQUENCES TO OURSELVES OF ABANDONING THE UNBORN! 

368 



FRIENDS — Stand with me, I ask you, in a narrow street of the Holy- 
City. Behoold there, the FIRST, THE DIVINE MARTYR, with His crown of 
thorns, His blood-streaked face, His torn body, His crushing cross — a sad 
spectacle of stark tragedy. Above the wails of the pious women, give ear 
to the serene and compassionate voice of Christ: 

"WEEP NOT FOR ME BUT FOR YOURSELVES AND YOUR CHILDREN" 

FOR THE CHILDREN YET UNBORN! To Christ in His supreme 
agony, it was not His physical and mental torment that was of prime im- 
portance. No, it was the FUTURE WELL-BEING OF UNBORN GENERA- 
TIONS. And so, today, despite the confusion, the distress, the turmoil that 
weighs upon our distraught world, the MAIN CONCERN MUST BE THE 
UNBORN CHILDREN OF AGES STILL TO COME. 

Would the spokesmen of the august body of Christian Nations presume 
to reverse Christ's teaching and to annul His example? Have we come to 
a point, when for some temporary good or political advantage, we dare 
repudiate, and make a travesty of, Christ's solemn warning? 

WEEP NOT FOR ME BUT FOR YOURSELVES AND FOR YOUR 
CHILDREN. 

CHRIST SPEAKS TO YOU, MR. PRESIDENT, THE HONORED 

HEAD OF THIS CHRISTIAN NATION: 
CHRIST SPEAKS TO YOU, THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF 

CONGRESS — SENATE AND HOUSE: 
CHRIST SPEAKS TO YOU, THE HONORABLE GOVERNORS OF 

THE STATES OF THE UNION: 
CHRIST SPEAKS TO EACH AND EVERY ONE IN THE FREE 

WORLD WHO ENJOYS THE SACRED FRANCHISE OF THE 

BALLOT. 

The status of the unborn — a responsibility that no one in our world 
dare shirk — is a COMMON. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. 

THESE UNBORN MILLIONS SHALL BE WITH US OR AGAINST US! 
ABANDON THEM NOW TO THE RED BLOC, AND FOREDOOM THEM 
TO GROW UP ACTIVE COMMUNISTS AND DEADLY ENEMIES OF THE 
CHRISTIAN WORLD — DO THIS FOUL THING — AND THESE UNBORN 
WHOM WE HAVE BETRAYED.. SHALL RISE UP IN JUDGEMENT 
AGAINST THIS GENERATION AND THEY SHALL POSSESS OUR LAND! 

IT IS CHRIST OR CHAOS! 

WE RISE NOW TO OUR FEET IN HUMBLE, GRATEFUL, INSPIRED 
SALUTE, TO THE MARTYRS OF THE WORLD, DEAD OR LIVING — 
THE NOBLE SUFFERERS UNDER COMMUNIST OPPRESSTION AND 
TYRANNY. 

369 



of 

HIS LORDSHIP LEONARD RAYMOND 

Bishop of Allahabad, India. 

(Excerpt from "Cathlicus" Aug. 1954) 



It was also in the latter part of 
December that I made my first con- 
tact with the Passionist fathers at 
Jamaica who were to be my hosts 
for the greater part of my stay in the 
U.S.A. I was looking for a place to 
stay in New York, which appeared 
to be most central from my point 
of view. Bishop Fulton Sheen was 
himself interested in my finding a 
suitable home. An Irish lady whom 
I met at the house of a mutual friend 
suggested the Passionist monastery 
at Jamaica. I had no idea where 
Jamaica was, since I naturally as- 
sociated it with the West Indies; 
and worse still, I did not know the 
Passionists, except as a very austere 
order of men who rise in the middle 
of the night to recite the Divine 
Office and who had the reputation 
of scourging themselves to blood be- 
fore they start preaching. I had no 
objection to asceticism and austerity 
but I wondered how such a regime 
would harmonize with the task be- 
fore me. I knew the Passionists in 
Rome: they did real apostolic work 
among the poor but I visited their 
residence once in my student days 
and their home at SS. Giovanni e 
Paolo looked so much like a prison 
that I had no inclination to repeat 
that visit. The only Passionist in 
India had been the Internuncio, 



Archbishop Kierkels and one saw 
little of the Passionist in a high dig- 
nitary of the Church. When the Ja- 
maica monastery was mentioned to 
me as a possible place of residence, 
visions of the awful dungeon at SS. 
Giovanni e Paolo came to mind and 
I hesitated. But then the Irish lady 
came forward with a piece of in- 
formation which bowled me over: 
she had spoken to the Father Rector, 
and without even seeing me, the 
Father Rector had offered me the 
Bishop's suite in the monastery for 
as long as I chose to stay. I was over- 
whelmed: at least I must go to Ja- 
maica and thank the Rector for his 
very kind offer. 

My first few minutes at the Monas- 
tery convinnced me that God was 
with me on my trip — a lovely home 
had been offered me when and 
where I least expected it. The mon- 
astery is delightfully situated, on a 
hill outside New York, sufficiently 
close to the city, and sufficiently far 
from its noise, its bustle and its dirt. 
Tastefully built, with its cells, its 
corridors and its library and chapel 
and refectory, the Monastery wore 
the aspect of a suburban villa and 
Reckoned you to hearth and home. 
I soon learned the multifarious ac- 
tivities it was engaged in: attached 
to it was a parish of over 4000 souls, 



370 



and of course the usual parish school 
with its hundreds of children; there 
was a retreat house for men which 
was filled every week end; there 
were students in the house prepar- 
ing for the priesthood; and the mem- 
bers of the community were always 
on the move, preaching retreats and 
missions, acting as chaplains, re- 
sponding to the calls that came to 
them. And the number of calls that 
came every day was legion, not only 
for the parish but for the most 
outlandish purposes. A particular 
pleasure was it for me to see the 
priests that trooped in regularly for 
confession. When good service is 
given, Catholics respond wholeheart- 
edly, and the only satisfaction a 
worthy priest has, comes when he 
sees he is in demand. So it was in 
Jamaica. In that Passionist Monas- 
tery I spent the better part of 7 
months and I count them among the 
happiest days I have lived. Austere 
the lives of those monks certainly 
are: their cells are small and bare, 
with bed and table and chair; their 
refectory is a place of perpetual 
silence and their restrictions on food 
are rigid; every night they are up to 
sing the praises of the Lord. How 
often, lying comfortable in a warm 
bed, have I heard the Venite Exul- 
temus Domino! But for their guests, 
there is none of this austerity; my 



quarters were luxurious with com- 
fortable furniture; the food was ex- 
cellent, special meals being cooked 
for me when the others were fasting; 
a car was always at my disposal 
whenever I needed conveyance either 
to Grand Central or to one of the 
aerodromes. Above all the monastery 
was home where I could move about 
with ease, confident that I was ac- 
cepted as one of the family. As I 
look back on those months, I cannot 
help wondering at the charity which 
prompted Rector and community to 
take me to their hearts as they did: 
the relations between the Passion- 
ists and myself had been tenuous: I 
came from a different world entirely, 
the world of the Orient, and outside 
our common faith there ought to 
have been little in common between 
us. And yet for 7 months I was one 
with them, sharing their joys and 
their sorrows, interested in their 
projects, fired by their ambitions, 
partaking of their simple pleasures — 
and all the while inspired and ele- 
vated and edified by the supernatur- 
al spirit and the zealous endeavour 
which could abide in men so human 
and so understanding. It was a phase 
of American Catholic life which 
pleased me most. 

Courtesy of Fr. Columkille, C. P., 
Jamaica, N. Y. 




371 



THE PARTICULAR EXAMEN AND THE PASSION 



Spiritual writers all agree on the 
importance of the particular examen 
for progress in the attainment of 
perfection. For Passionists, however, 
this importance is further emphasized 
both by our Rules and Regulations. 
For example, all our religious are 
to make the particular examen each 
day before private spiritual reading 
(Rule, No. 50, 175; Reg. No. 59). This 
examen is to be made with "diligence 
and deliberation" since our spiritual 
advancement in a great measure de- 
pends on it. (Reg., No. 60). 

The purpose of this article is to 
suggest a simple but effective meth- 
od of making the particular examen 
in a way that emphasizes the Passion 
of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

St. Ignatius is generally acknowl- 
edged as the one who perfected the 
method of making the particular ex- 
amen. In his "Spiritual Exercises" he 
distinguishes between the general and 
particular examination of conscience. 
The general examen bears on all the 
actions of our day, while the particu- 
lar examen focuses on one special 
point, e.g., a fault to be corrected or 
a vitrue to be acquired. The particu- 
lar examen, however, is the more im- 
portant of the two, and St. Ignatius 
considered it even more important 
than meditation, (cf. Tanquerey, A., 
S.S., "The Spiritual Life," pg. 228). 

For the sake of brevity we presup- 
pose that our readers are familiar 
with Tanquerey's admirable treat- 
ment of the particular examen in his 
book "The Spiritual Life." (cf. pp. 
227-232). His summary is a good gen- 



eral background for using the particu- 
lar examen properly. 

The Examen and the Cross: 

Nothing is closer or dearer to a 
Passionist than the cross. One is be- 
fore him on his deck throughout the 
day; a cross is at his side on his 
rosary. The one lesson he strives to 
implant firmly in his mind is that all 
good comes to man from the pierced 
side of our Saviour. This thought is 
the inspiration of his zeal and gen- 
erosity. It should therefore prove 
profitable for our spiritual training 
if we can bring the cross into our 
particular examen. 

One method suggested by spiritual 
writers to bring the cross into our 
examen is the following. After a 
brief prayer to the Holy Spirit for 
light and guidance, a person may 
take his crucifix to fix his attention 
on the supreme manifestation of 
God's Love for man. One begins by 
kissing the wound of the RIGHT 
HAND and makes an act of thanks- 
giving to God for all His spiritual 
benefits. Then one kisses the wound 
of the LEFT HAND and begs God 
for the light necessary to know the 
faults to be overcome. After kissing 
the wound of the RIGHT FOOT, one 
makes his particular examen. (Here 
we might remark that our Regula- 
tions emphasize the importance of 
knowing the causes and roots of our 
faults, rather than the mere faults 
themselves, cf. No. 60). When the 
examen is finished, the wound of the 
LEFT FOOT is kissed, and God's 
pardon is petitioned for our faults. 



372 



Lastly, one kisses the wound of the 
PIERCED SIDE for the graces of 
making the proper resolutions and 
carrying them out. (Our Regulations 
here also solicit us to direct our re- 
solutions to the practice of those vir- 
tues which are necessary to apply a 
proper remedy to our faults, cf. No. 
60). 

It is of course apparent that the 
above method is best used when one 
is in the privacy of his cell. Our 
Regulations recommend, however, 
that the Brothers can make their ex- 
amen in the choir after finishing 
their vocal prayers (cf. No. 64). 
Since it might be inadvisable to mani- 
fest the above external devotion of 
kissing the wounds of the cross, still 
one would contemplate the crucifix 
over the altar and mentally go 
through the same process. 

In order to render the above gen- 
eral method more effective and to 
extend its Passionistic influence 
throughout the day, we would like to 
say a few words about the aspiration 
method of making the particular ex- 
amen. 
Aspirations and the Passion: 

The aspiration method is used by 
those practicing the particular ex- 
amen to make it effective in a prac- 
tical way. After determining on the 
virtue to be acquired, a person se- 
lects one or two ejaculations that 
appropriately express or center on 
that virtue. Then during the day 
these aspirations, or ejaculations, are 
repeated as often as feasible in order 
to get into the habit of making acts 
of the virtue to be acquired. This 
methods works positively by substi- 
tuting a virtue in the place of the 



fault we want to remove. The ejacu- 
lations also serve as thought-centers 
promoting recollection. If the ejacula- 
tions have a theme rooted in the 
Passion, they help to center our 
thoughts and our spiritual strivings 
on the supreme motive of our lives 
as Passionists. For example, if we 
want to practice the virtue of obedi- 
ence as our Suffering Lord did, we 
might select the phrase "Not my will 
but thine be done." (cf. Mt. 26:42). 
Here we would have the whole at- 
mosphere of the Agony in the Gar- 
den with us during the day to inspire 
us to emulate the generosity of Christ 
in carrying out the will of his Father. 
Lastly, these ejaculations have both 
the power of prayer and a virtue- 
value. This is especially true of those 
ejaculations indulgenced by the 
Church. 

One spiritual writer, Fr. Charles 
A. Imbs, S.J., has given these ejacu- 
lations names. One is called the 
builder. The builder is the main 
ejaculation we make use of to elicit 
an act of the virtue we want to ac- 
quire. For example, if we want to 
acquire meekness, we might say: 
"Jesus, meek and humble of heart, 
make my heart like unto thine." 
(300 days indulgence). Or we might 
say: "Christ emptied himself, taking 
the nature of a slave." (cf. Phil. 2:7). 
A second, optional ejaculation is 
called a helper. This is a supplemen- 
tary ejaculation we may add that 
either expresses a different aspect or 
application of the virtue to be ac- 
quired or appeals to some saint for 
help in our struggle. For example, if 
we are striving to acquire the above 
virtue of meekness we might use: 



373 



"Jesus autem tacebat" (cf. Mt. 27:12) 
or "Immaculate Queen of Peace, pray 
for us." (300 days). 

These ejaculations are said fre- 
quently throughout the day in set 
patterns (e.g., repitition of the "build- 
er" five times is suggested). This is 
called a "victory." For those follow- 
ing the counsel of St. Ignatius to 
keep a written record of their par- 
ticular examen, these "victories" can 
be kept track of each day. Record- 
ing the "victories" is a more positive 
and inspiring method than keeping 
track of our failures. If there is basic 
sincerity, we will not accumulate a 
collection of paper "victories" while 
our faults continue to pile up. 
Summary of method: 

Begin making the particular ex- 
amen with the help of your crucifix, 
as outlined in the early part of this 
article. During your examen select 
the virtue you wish to acquire most, 
e.g., meekness — a mild yet strong, 
firm and courteous personality. Then 
select the opposing fault to be over- 
come, e.g., anger — a quarrelsome, 
fussy, angry, and insulting disposi- 
tion. Now you want to choose an ap- 
propriate "builder" and "helper" 
ejaculation, such as those suggested 
above for the virtue of meekness. 
Close your particular examen with the 
usual acts of sorrow and resolution, 
always drawing your source of 
strength and hope from the crucifix. 

Most authors suggest that we try 
to recall the subject of our particu- 
lar examen as soon as we get up in 



the morning. That is a wonderful op- 
portunity to achieve a "victory": re- 
peat the "builder" or "helper" ejacu- 
lation the set number of times you 
have determined on (e.g., five times). 
This will help you to get recollected 
on the way to morning prayer, in ad- 
dition to alerting you to a big spirit- 
ual task for the day. These "victories" 
should be repeated at intervals during 
the day as occasion offers. St. Igna- 
tius strongly recommends we keep 
a record of our achievement, and 
compare our efforts from week to 
week. 

If at all possible we should reduce 
our aspirations into act. Thus if an 
occasion for putting the virtue of 
meekness into practice presents itself, 
we should of course try to take ad- 
vantage of it. The aspirations keep 
us mentally alert to spot such occa- 
sions; the prayer-value of the aspira- 
tions are disposing our wills to bene- 
fit from such incidents; but we must 
cooperate with God's grace. If ejacu- 
lations have been selected which cen- 
ter around Our Lord's Passion, there 
will be an added incentive for a Pas- 
sionist to seize the opportunity to 
practice the virtue and thus fill up 
what is wanting to the sufferings of 
Christ, (cf. Col. 1:24). 
Conclusion: 

The above method of making the 
particular examen has two big ad- 
vantages. (1) It couples a time-hon- 
ored and important ascetical practice 
with the Passion of Christ, and (2) it 
keeps the Passion before our minds 
in an effective way all day long. If 
the method is sincerely and zealously 



374 



put into practice, it will prove very 
helpful for Passionists to attain a 
true Christ-likeness: "I live now, not 
I, but Christ lives in me." 

Fr. John Francis, C.P., 
Mater Dolorosa Retreat, 

Sierra Madre, Calif. 

* * * * 

Bibliography: 

Tanquerey, A., S.S., "The Spiritual 
Life," pp. 227-232: very good gen- 
eral summary of the particular ex- 
amen and its use. 

McElhone, J. F., C.S.C., "Particular 
Examen," Ave Maria Pres, Notre 
Dame, Ind., revised edit., cl952: a 
complete book on the particular 
examen and its use. Complete with 



examples for the individual virtues 
and appropriate prayers. 

Imbs, Chas., S.J., "The Daily Examen: 
The Aspiration Method," Queens 
Work, St. Louis, Mo., cl945. A 
pamphlet promoting the aspiration 
method for clergy, religious and 
laity. Contains a very practical 
explanation of the use of the ex- 
amen, along with a fourteen-months 
program of character building. 

Tissot, Joseph, "The Interior Life," 
Newman Press, Westminster, Md., 
cl952. Cf. Pg. 227 sq. for some pru- 
dent and helpful principles regard- 
ing examination of conscience in 
general; pp. 236-237 for the particu- 
lar examen. 



"The Trial of Christ as Reported to Tiberias" 



Meldrin Thomas Jr. 
Law Notes", Jan. 38, v. XLI, No. 3. 



The following oral report of a 
Roman spy might have been made to 
the Emperor Tiberias about 31 A.D. 
and reported by the industrious 
scribe; it could have been made; but 
no one today knows for a fact that 
it was made. During the imperial 
reign of Tiberias Claudius Nero, (14 
A.D.-37 A.D.) the Roman Empire 
fulfilled its destiny by pushing its 
boundaries out to the four winds of 
the world. The imperial eagles 
swooped over the chalk cliffs of 
Dover, soared across the pillars of 



Hercules, circled about the Mace- 
donian Mountains, and came to rest 
on the northern fringe of the great 
Budda's fabled land. So vast was the 
ramifications of the empire, that 
Tiberias, like his predecessor Augus- 
tus, was compelled to install his 
agents in the palaces of conquered 
kings; and, lest his legates, procur- 
ators, and governors should prove 
faithless, he was forced to develop 
an extensive spy system. His spys 
could be found throughout the em- 
pire. They frequently made trips to 



375 



Rome, at the command of their Em- 
peror, to render reports on the con- 
duct of the officials to whom they 
had been assigned for observation. 

This report is given by the spy 
Caius who for ten years had toiled 
faithfully for his master. It is pri- 
marily concerned with the malad- 
ministration of Pontius Pilate, Rom- 
an Procurator before whom Jesus of 
Nazareth was tried; and it was de- 
livered, probably, in the Emperor's 
reception room before a select group 
of imperial confidants. 

"0 Mighty Citizen of Rome, Pro- 
tector of republican privileges, Em- 
peror of vast domains, your messen- 
ger has come with great haste from 
a distant land with news vital to the 
imperial welfare. Your command to 
make report to you was my spur. It 
drove me relentlessly across land 
and sea with all speed, and now I am 
here to tell of strange doings in far 
away Jerusalem. In all the things 
whereof I am about to speak my 
eyes and ears have been the couriers 
of my intelligence, and sad news it 
is they have conveyed to me. 

Great Emperor, I pray you that if 
in the true account I am to render 
now, you find cause for anger, su- 
press it till I have done and you 
witness how deeply the matter 
grieves me who am but a citizen of 
Rome. Of a truth, your son-in-law, 
Pontius Pilate, has greatly erred in 
administrating the affairs of the He- 
brews in Palestine. His acts of in- 
fidelity have been numerous and the 
instances of his disobedience of im- 
perial edicts have been unnumbered, 
but not one so emphatically discloses 



his inability to administer the laws of 
Rome as, the farcical trial he con- 
ducted of a Jew from the wild coun- 
try of Galilee, whom the Jews call 
Jesus of Nazareth. Listen, O Emper- 
or, to my account of the trial. 

Palestine has enjoyed the privi- 
lege of home rule since the days of 
its conquest by Pompey. Augustus, 
your father-in-law, allowed the He- 
brew laws to govern in all things 
wherein they did not contravene the 
laws and policies of the empire, and 
you, in following the program formu- 
lated of old, graciously confirmed 
the local liberties of the Hebrews, 
allowing them freedom in most 
things, even to the worship of their 
mystical God. In conformity with 
established custom you did deny to 
them the right to execute a criminal 
found guilty by their High Court. 
The imperial power of life or death 
you delegated to your procurator 
cum potestate, and in him you vested 
the right to affirm or negate the de- 
cision of the High Court in Jeru- 
salem. These matters, Honored Cae- 
sar, I trace in review that you may 
the better comprehend the events 
surrounding the trial of Jesus. 

It was last spring that Jesus was 
tried and crucified. It was on the 
fourteenth day of Nisan, as the Jews 
reckon time. Jerusalem was thronged 
with Jews who had come from all 
parts of Palestine for the ceremonial 
holiday in their Holy City. Thousands 
of these people were common folk, 
herders of flocks and tillers of soil. 
They had heard this man Jesus 
preaching and teaching and had be- 
come his friends. He spoke and 



376 



taught of love, gentleness and life 
after death. 

His friends were numbered among 
the masses, but it was his enemies 
who administered the Hebrew laws. 
The Pharisees and Sadducees sat in 
the seats of the mighty; it was they 
who put him to death. They hated 
him for his simple doctrines which 
militated against their venal inter- 
ests or aspirations and they feared 
him for his power over the common 
folk. And, so, hating and fearing 
him, they secretly conspired for his 
death. 

Late at night, Jesus and eleven of 
his disciples retired to a little garden 
on the outskirts of the city, which 
is called by the Jews, Gethsemane. 
There in solitude they worshipped 
their God. 

About midnight Roman soldiers 
and temple guards, led by a false 
follower, found Jesus in the garden. 
He was arrested and carried away to 
the home of the former High Priest, 
Annas. And these things were done 
in disregard of the Hebrew law. For 
by their law no criminal prosecution 
can be commenced at night, yet it 
was in the dead of night that the 
arrest was made. No accomplice can 
be employed to promote the ends of 
justice, and yet this false follower, 
named Judas, was clearly an accom- 
plice if Jesus was guilty. 

The simple man, Jesus, without 
fuss or furor, followed his captors to 
the home of Annas. I did not enter 
the politician's home for my interest 
was attracted to a disturbance on a 
road close by, but I assume that 
Jesus was privately interrogated by 



Annas. If this be true, then again 
the Hebrew law was bound in fetters, 
that the illegal end of those entrus- 
ted with its administration might be 
achieved. It is unlawful under He- 
brew law for a criminal to be priv- 
ately examined for a capital offense. 
To the Sanhedrin alone is given the 
power to try one charged with such 
an offense. 

From Annas Jesus was taken to 
Caiaphas, High Priest by authority 
of Pilate and there was conducted 
the Hebrew phase of the illegal trial 
of Jesus. Before recounting the de- 
tails of this trial, Caesar, allow me 
just a word about Hebrew law re- 
garding criminal trials. 

The Jews have three groups of 
courts: 390 inferior courts, composed 
of three judges each; two minor San- 
hedrin with 23 judges each; and the 
Great Sanhedrin made up of 71 
judges. To the Sanhedrin is given 
the right under Hebrew law to find 
one guilty of an offense warranting 
the death penalty. Its official resi- 
dence is the Hall of the Hewn Stone, 
and meetings which are not conduct- 
ed there are illegal. Its membership 
is theoretically made up of the flow- 
er of Hebrew manhood, but for a 
generation now the theory has been 
a skeleton, devoid of flesh and bone. 
Where once sat great rabbinical 
scholars of unimpeachable character 
now lounge men wise in technicali- 
ties but poor in moral fiber. 

The judges sit cross-legged on pil- 
lows in three semicircular tiers, the 
oldest and wisest on the outer tier. 
At each end of the semicircles of 
judges sits a scribe, and one is also 



377 



seated by the side of the High Priest 
in the center of the outer circle. To 
them is given the task of recording 
the proceedings of the court, the 
ballots of the judges, and the rea- 
sons why the judges voted as they 
did. 

In a criminal proceeding sentence 
can not be pronounced on the same 
day a conviction is found. And be- 
fore the balloting for sentence is 
taken on the second day, the scribes 
must remind the judges how they 
had previously voted and their rea- 
son for doing so; for if a judge 
should overnight change his reason 
for voting as he did his vote is no 
longer counted. 

Here I might say, Great Tiberius, 
that the Hebrew laws are harsh and 
their punishment severe, never have 
I seen a race of people so zealous in 
their protection of the innocent. All 
kinds of safeguards are thrown 
around the accused. The Jews have 
a saying that 'Tis slaughter for a 
court to kill more than one person 
within the space of seventy years. 
They look upon themselves as having 
been created in the image of their 
God; and consequently, it is a very 
serious matter with them to take a 
life. 

I might best illustrate their vigil- 
ance in this respect by describing 
how they employ the time during 
the interim while the prisoner is be- 
ing taken from the court to the place 
of execution. A herald goes before 
the prisoner proclaiming to the peo- 
ple that line the highway the pris- 
oner's name and the crime of which 
he is charged. If as the prisoner 



passes thru the throng one of the 
bystanders should announce that he 
possesses knowledge which would 
lead to the acquittal, the procession 
returns to the court for a further 
hearing. Behind the prisoner's pro- 
cession follows a man on horseback 
who must keep in view a man who 
stands in the doorway of the court, 
signal flag in hand. If the judges 
within, who remain in deliberation 
until the prisoner is executed, should 
think of some new argument favor- 
ing acquittal, the flagman is told of 
their decision. He signals to the man 
on horseback who spurs ahead to 
inform the executioners that they 
must return the prisoner to the 
court. Or if the prisoner himself 
while walking to the spot of execu- 
tion thinks of a reason why he should 
not die, he can tell his captors and 
they will escort him back to the pres- 
ence of the judges. Five times the 
prisoner is permitted to exercise this 
privelege. Thus, it can be readily 
seen that the Hebrew law requires 
utmost caution in criminal proceed- 
ings. 

The Hebrew prisoner can be ac- 
cused by only two witnesses whose 
stories must coincide substantially. 
Never has it been within the power 
of a judge of the Sanhedrin to ac- 
cuse. Nor is it possible to convict a 
prisoner on his uncorroborated tes- 
timony. The judicial debate preced- 
ing the decision of the judges must 
be opened with a speech by one of 
the judges setting forth reasons for 
releasing the prisoner. The verdict 
must be determined by sundown on 
the day the proceedings were insti- 
tuted. 



378 



A verdict for conviction requires 
a vote of two in excess of a minority 
present, providing that these present 
constitute a quorum. But no verdict 
is legal which has been obtained by 
a unamimous vote. In casting their 
ballots, the judges must give them 
in order of seniority, beginning with 
the youngest. 

After the verdict is given the 
judges go forth into the streets to 
gather in small groups and discuss 
the correctness of their decision. 
They later retire to their respective 
homes where they spend the night 
in meditation and prayer. You see, 
Emperor, these people are anxious 
to conform their every act to the 
will and pleasure of their God. 

Now as I have said, Emperor, 
Jesus was taken to the home of the 
High Priest, Caiaphas. This was at 
two in the morning. There were 
gathered the judges of the Great 
Sanhedrin who had determined 
among themselves the fate of Jesus 
before he had been captured. Two 
witnesses to accuse him could not be 
found, so false witnesses were pro- 
duced. Their stories were as diver- 
gent as the ends of the empire. Then 
Caiaphas, despairing lest they should 
not find any ground for trial, asked 
Jesus if he were the Christ, the Son 
of the Blessed One, to which the 
prisoner answered that he was. Now 
it was on this, his uncorroberated 
testimony that he was Son of the 
Blessed One, that he was convicted 
of blasphemy and condemned to die. 
The conviction was the result of an 
unanimous vote, and sentence was 
passed immediately after the ballot. 



You will note, in view of what I have 
said about Hebrew criminal law, that 
every move made by the High Priest 
and his conspirators was grossly il- 
legal. In an effort to maintain the 
appearance of legality the court re- 
convened in the early morning hour, 
before the morning sacrifice had 
been made, and'passed sentence upon 
Jesus a second time. 

Roman soldiers witnessed these 
high handed proceedings; conse- 
quently when the priest took Jesus 
before Pilate he knew or had the 
means of knowing how great had 
been the miscarriage of Hebrew 
justice. 

The sun had just risen above the 
Judean hills when the priests with 
their captive and a hired band of 
ruffians stood before Herod's place 
demanding an audience with Pontius 
Pilate. Your son-in-law heard their 
entreaty for the execution of Jesus. 
When he asked upon what grounds 
they accused him, the priests, in 
order to insure his execution, chang- 
ed their charge to that of treason 
against you, Great Emperor. 

Upon learning that their prisoner 
was charged with treason, Pilate im- 
mediately removed him to the prae- 
torium to ascertain whether he was 
guilty. He asked Jesus if he were the 
King of the Jews. He was informed 
that the Nazarene's kingdom was not 
of this earth but was one after death. 
Obviously, this Jew from the hill 
country violated no law by claiming 
kingship over a mysterious kingdom 
beyond the realm of knowledge. Pil- 
ate acquitted Jesus. 

The priests and their mob were 



379 



thirsty for blood. They insisted that 
Jesus be crucified. So your son-in- 
law ordered that he be taken before 
Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Galilee, 
under whose jurisdiction the case 
fell. However, no trial was conducted 
by Herod, for he is a weak, vain rul- 
er whose sole care is for his own 
pleasure. Herod quesVoned Jesus un- 
til his curiosity was satisfied and 
then returned him to Pilate sending 
word with the prisoner that he did 
not find him guilty of any crime. 

Thereupon, Pilate again told the 
priests that he had not found Jesus 
guilty either under Roman or He- 
brew law. But the priests cried out 
that they had a law against blas- 
phemy which Jesus had violated, and 
that in accordance with the penalty 
to be exacted he should forfeit his 
life. Next Pilate offered to scourge 
the prisoner and then to release him, 
but the priests and mob would not 
hear of it. They were bent upon kill- 
ing him for they hated and feared 
him. 

As a final resort your son-in-law 
proposed to free Jesus in conformity 
with a custom by which the procur- 
ator released one prisoner at the time 
of the Feast of the Passover; how- 
ever, the goaded crowd demanded 
that Barabbas be freed instead of 
Jesus. Where he should have de- 
ported himself with the dignity and 
firmness befitting a Roman procur- 
ator, Pilate pursued a weak, concilia- 
tory course in an attempt to placate 
the mob. 

Thus, Tiberius, for the third time 
since his appointment to Palestine, 
Pilate gave in to the Hebrew mob, 



showing himself lacking the stern 
quality so essential to the makeup 
of a Roman leader. You will recall 
from my last report that Pilate per- 
mitted himself to be deterred by the 
Jews when he acceded to their de- 
mand that he remove the eagle stan- 
dards from Jerusalem which he had 
caused his soldiers to raise in the 
Holy City following their removal 
from Caesarea. Upon the second oc- 
casion he sought to divert temple 
moneys for the construction of an 
aqueduct but was again met with 
violent protests, and ultimately gave 
way to the wishes of the Jews. And 
now Pilate gave to them a man il- 
legally convicted under their own 
laws and whom three times he had 
found guiltless merely because they 
insisted upon having his blood. 

Pilate ordered Jesus to be cruci- 
fied because the Jews insisted that 
he was guilty of blasphemy. Cruci- 
fixion, as you well know, Tiberius, 
is a Roman punishment. To the He- 
brew law, it is unknown. Their law 
provides for four kinds of execution: 
beheading, strangling, burning, and 
stoning. 

Beheading is resorted to as a 
means of punishment for the most 
heinous crimes. It is accomplished 
by strapping the culprit securely to 
an upright post and severing his 
head with one stroke of a sword. To 
execute a prisoner by strangling, the 
Jews bury the doomed man in soft 
mud to his armpits tie a rope wrap- 
ped in soi* cloth about his neck and 
pull it tight uptil all his wind is cut 
off and death follows. In the strict 
sense of the word the Jews never 



380 



burn their condemned prisoners. By 
burning they really mean strangling. 
In this instance the criminal is bur- 
ied in the earth with only his head 
and chest protruding, a rope is plac- 
ed around his neck and the two ends 
pulled violently by two husky men. 
As a result of the quick and violent 
pressure on his neck the lower jaw 
of the helpless victim drops open. 
A lighted wick is then inserted in 
the mouth. In place of the wick, 
molten lead is sometimes poured in- 
to it. To kill a man by stoning, the 
Jews first throw him from some high 
prominance. If the fall does not re- 
sult in instant death, two men roll 
a large stone over the cliff onto the 
victim. Should he still show signs of 
life the mob that is gathered to wit- 
ness the execution is then permitted 



to pelt him with stones. Stoning is 
the punishment inflicted for those 
who are found guilty of blasphemy. 

This man Jesus was illegally con- 
victed of blasphemy, a Hebrew crime, 
and executed by crucifixion, a Rom- 
an punishment. And all of these 
things received the sanction and ap- 
proval of your brother-in-law, Pon- 
tius Pilate. 

I have laid stress upon the trial 
of this unknown Jesus, Emperor, 
because it so graphically demon- 
strates the inability of your procur- 
ator to administer the local laws of 
the Hebrews and at the same time 
instill respect for Roman authority. 
Details of other misdeeds are not 
wanting. You have but to call upon 
me for them." 

Courtesy of Fr. Brian, C.P. 



Christ in Agony 

a painting by Luigi Morgari. 



a 



After passing through St. Steph- 
en's gate, on the north-eastern corner 
of the old city of Jerusalem, the road 
hurries down into the Kedron Valley. 
The Kedron brook is a dry river-bed 
(a wadi) except for the rainy season 
of November to February. It cuts its 
way between the Mount of Olives on 
the east and the mountain-top city 
of Jerusalem on its west. As you 
stand on the modern bridge that 
spans the Kedron brook and look 
back at the city of Jerusalem, the 
holy city has the appearance of 'a 



city so compact, so complete." (Ps. 
121:3) Turning away from the city, 
you cross the Kedron valley and come 
at once to the base of the Mount of 
Olives. 

Here there are some of the most 
sacred shrines of Christendom: the 
spot where St. Stephen was stoned, 
the tomb of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
the grotto where Our Lord frequent- 
ly prayed, and a stone's throw to the 
south of the grotto, the Garden of 
Gethsemani. This grotto was long 
venerated as the actual place where 



381 




"Christ in Agony" by Luigi Morgari. 



Our Lord prayed and sweat blood on 
the first Holy Thursday night. How- 
ever, in 1920 the mosiac pavement of 
a fourth century basilica was found 
in the nearby Garden of Olives, and 
the site of the agony identified with 
a large natural stone which the com- 
munion rail of the ancient basilica 
had encircled. 

But let us go back to the grotto. 
Tradition tells us that Our Lord fre- 
quently came here to pray, when he 
was near Jerusalem. One altar in the 
grotto is dedicated to the Mother of 
God. This altar is built against the 
wall that separates the grotto from 
the adjoining tomb of the Virgin 
Mary. (Mary's tomb by right belongs 
to the Franciscan Fathers; they have 
the papers to prove this. But in 1757 
the Greek Orthodox monks forcibly 
evicted the Franciscans.) At this 



altar a priest can celebrate a votive 
mass in honor of the Assumption all 
the year around. 

Above the principal altar in the 
grotto is a painting by a famous 
Venetian, Luigi Morgari. For a long 
time he hesitated from even begin- 
ning to work on this picture. He had 
the same difficulty which St. Thomas 
faced: how was it possible to recon- 
cile the all-powerful God pulled to 
his knees in a struggle with death, 
the obedient Christ wrestling with 
fear. Morgari wanted to combine in 
his picture the strength of God with 
a man's fear of death, the generous 
whole-souled FIAT with a sorrow 
strong enough to kill. The power 
which guided the painter's brush 
came through prayer; Luigi Morgari 
would kneel for long hours in prayer 
before going back to work on his 



382 



picture. He did succeed. And as we 
look at the picture, we seem to be 
led deep into that mysterious sanc- 
tuary which is the Sacred Heart of 
Christ, where strength and weakness, 
obedience and fear, sorrow and joy, 
all merge into the one overpowering 
mystery which is the Love of God in 
Christ Jesus. (Rom. 11:33). 

The painting was presented to the 
Franciscan Fathers in 1858 by a cer- 
tain Spanish nobleman named Don 
Carlos. 

An old Franciscan lay-brother 
cares for the grotto. He spends the 



entire day from six in the morning 
to six at night, in the semi-darkness 
of the cave-like grotto. Silently he 
sits or kneels, praying all the time. 
Whenever a visitor enters, he ex- 
plains the history of the grotto, 
points out the stars painted on the 
roof by the Crusaders, and then di- 
rects their attention to the beautiful 
picture of the Agonizing Christ. If 
the writer remembers correctly, he 
has been here for over 22 years. 
"What a privilege I have," he once 
remarked, "to spend the last years of 
my life here where Jesus prayed." 




Om 'Piofi&i ^ete&iatt ^eaAfo 

(Continued from March, 1955 Passionist) 

FEAST OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE 

Friday after Low Sunday 



History of the Feast 

This feast is one of the more re- 
cent Passion feasts adopted by us. 
Permission to celebrate it was ob- 
tained by Father Bernard Mary of 
Jesus on September 13, 1898. At the 
same time we obtained the feasts of 
the Pillar of the Scourging and the 
Title of the Holy Cross. (Bollettino, 
Oct. 1922, p. 304) 

We were unable to determine 
whether this feast had a more an- 
cient history behind it, though it 
probably did. Neither is it evident 
what date was given the feast at the 



time of its adoption by us. We know 
that at least since 1923 it has been 
celebrated on the Friday after Low 
Sunday, or the second Friday after 
Easter. It seems probable that it has 
been celebrated on this day from the 
beginning. (Bollettino, May 1923, p. 
134). 

Like all other Passion feasts, this 
one was raised to the rank of double 
of the second class by decrees of 1900 
and 1901. It was reduced to the rank 
of double major after the reform of 
the Breviary by Pius X in 1911. (Bol- 
lettino, Oct. 1922, p. 304) 



383 



Spirit of the Feast 

The predominant note of the pro- 
per Passion feasts that fall during 
Lent is one of sorrow at contem- 
plating the sufferings of our Savior. 
In the liturgy of the present Paschal- 
tide feast a change of spirit is im- 
mediately noticeable. The texts do 
not let us forget that the Christ who 
had died was laid in the Sepulchre 
that we are commemorating. But 
they insist more on the fact that 
Christ has risen from the Sepulchre. 
Thus the Invitatory verse reminds 
us: "Surrexit Dominus de Sepulchro, 
alleluja". The dominant note of this 
feast is therefore one of glory and 
exultation. 

It would almost seem as though the 
compiler of this Office was guided 
by the opening words of the Second 
Lessons which are taken from St. 
Bernard's De Sepulcro. He says: 
"Among all holy and desirable 
places, the Sepulchre of Christ in a 
certain sense holds first place. And 
I am hard pressed to decide which 
inspires the greater devotion, the 
place where the dead Christ rested 
or the place where the living Christ 
stood; and which serves the better to 
inspire piety, the remembrance of 
His death or His return to life. It 



seems to me that the former is a 
more austere consideration, the lat- 
ter more sweet." 

The Office begins with a note of 
exultation in the first antiphon for 
Vespers: "Exaltate Dominum Deum 
nostrum, et adorate scabellum pe- 
dum ejus, quoniam sanctum est, all- 
eluja." It continues on this note to 
the very end, finishing with: "Introe- 
untes in monumentum, viderunt juv- 
enem sedentem in dextris, cooper- 
turn stola Candida, et obstupuerunt, 
alleluja." (Magnif. Ant. for Second 
Vespers). When the sufferings of 
Christ are alluded to it is more from 
the aspect of the glory that He has 
acquired through them. See, for ex- 
ample, the Hymns for Vespers and 
Lauds. 

The spirit of the feast and the 
fruit to be gained from it are best 
expressed in the Oration: 

"0 Lord Jesus Christ who didst 
will to suffer death for our sakes, to 
be placed in a Sepulchre and to rise 
on the third day: mercifully grant 
to Thy servants that we who recall 
the memory of Thy Sepulchre may 
merit to be made sharers in the glory 
of Thy Resurrection." 
Sources: Bollettino, October 1922; 
May 1923 



FEAST OF THE TITLE OF THE HOLY CROSS 

Friday after Second Sunday after Easter 



History of the Feast 

This feast was obtained for us by 
Father Bernard Mary of Jesus on 
Sept. 13, 1898. (Bollettino Oct. 1922, 
p. 304) It was therefore among the 



last Passion feasts granted to us. We 
do not know the origin of the feast 
but it was adapted to the Roman 
rite from the Cistercian Breviary. 
(Boll. Oct. 1922, p. 304) This would 



584 



seem to indicate that its origin as a 
feast was quite early. 

This feast, along with the other 
Passion feasts, was raised to the rank 
of double of the second class in 1900 
or 1901. At the time of the reform 
of the Breviary in 1911 it was sup- 
pressed from our Calendar. (Boll. 
Oct. 1922, p. 304) Just why it alone 
of all the Passion feasts suffered this 
fate does not appear. 

The feast was granted to us anew 
by a decree of March 27, 1923. It 
was then adopted with the rank of 
double major. (Boll. May 1923, p. 
134) 

The date of this feast has varied. 
When it was first granted to us in 
1898 it was given the third Sunday 
of July. (Boll. Oct. 1922, p. 304) 
Sometime between then and the re- 
form of the Breviary it was changed 
to the fourth Sunday after Easter. 
(Bollettino, May 1923, p. 134) At the 
time of its re-adoption by us it was 
affixed to its present date, the Fri- 
day after the second Sunday after 
Easter. (Ibid.) 
Spirit of the Feast 

Like the feast of the Holy Sepul- 
chre of the preceding week, this 
feast partakes of the joy of Paschal 
time. Once more the predominant 
note of the Office is one of joy and 
exultation. This time, the joy arises 
from the contemplation of Christ as 
King of souls through His Cross. The 
words written on the Title are held 



up for our consideration: "Jesus Naz- 
arenus Rex Judaeorum." (Magnif. 
Ant. for First Vespers) The same 
notion is extended to embrace all of 
us in the Invitatory verse: "Jesum 
Nazarenum, Regem nostrum Cruci- 
fixum, venite adoremus, alleluja." 

This feast could almost be called 
another feast of the Holy Cross. 
Many of the texts are drawn bodily 
from the feasts of the Holy Cross. 
See for example the Antiphons at 
Vespers and Lauds (with the excep- 
tion of the fourth antiphon which 
expresses the present particular mys- 
tery); the Vesper hymn (Vexilla 
Regis and the Capitula for Sext and 
None. The Mass is also taken largely 
from the Mass of the Holy Cross. 
The Lessons of the Second Nocturn, 
from St. Ambrose, recount the find- 
ing of the Cross and its Title by St. 
Helena. 

Despite the fact that this feast 
centers on the glory of Christ, it is 
still truly a Passion feast. The Ora- 
tion expresses this very well: 

O Lord Jesus Christ, our King, 
Who didst will to decorate Thy 
Church with the Title of Thy most 
Holy Cross; mercifully grant to us 
Thy servants that as we celebrate by 
this Title the memory of Thy Pas- 
sion, we may happily gain the effects 
of that same Passion." 

Sources: Bollettino, October 1922; 
May and June, 1923 



FEAST OF THE MOST HOLY REDEEMER 

October 23 
History of the Feast Venice in the 16th century. In 1576 

This feast was first celebrated in a plague broke out in Venice and 



385 



carried off thousands of victims. The 
city promised that if the plague were 
removed, a magnificent temple 
would be built in honor of the Re- 
deemer of the human race, and that 
every year solemn honor would be 
paid to the Redeemer on the third 
Sunday of July. The plague came to 
an end and immediately the people 
began to fulfil their promise. (Catho- 
lic Encyclopedia, Vol. XII, p. 677) 

On March 8, 1749, Pope Benedict 
XIV granted this feast to the Re- 
demptorists as a double of the first 
class for the third Sunday of July. 
The Redemptorists also celebrate the 
feast two other times in the year, 
Feb. 25, and Oct. 23. (Cath. Encycl., 
Vol. XII, p. 677) On Jan. 10, 1773 
Pope Clement XIV extended the 
feast to the Passionists as a double 
of the second class with an octave. 
It was reduced to a double major in 
1911. (Bollettino, Oct. 1922, p. 303- 
304) 

We celebrate the feast on Oct. 23. 
It is uncertain when we celebrated 
it in the beginning, probably on the 
third Sunday of July. The date Oct. 
23 was given to the feast when it 
was adopted by the City of Rome, 
March 8, 1830. (Cath. Encycl., Vol. 
XII, p. 677) The Office we use was 
taken from some earlier source, prob- 
ably from the Redemptorists. 
Spirit of the Feast 

The pervading spirit of this feast 
is one of joy and gratitude for the 
ineffable fruits of the Redemption. 
It commemorates the Passion under 
the aspect of the redemption that it 
won for us. The note of sorrow is 
entirely lacking. As we celebrate 



this feast, the prophecy of Isaias, 
used in the lessons of the first noc- 
turn, is fulfilled: "And now they are 
redeemed by the Lord shall return 
and shall come into Sion singing 
praises; and joy everlasting shall be 
upon their heads. They shall obtain 
joy and gladness; sorrow and mourn- 
ing shall flee away." (Isa. 51:ll-3rd. 
lesson) 

The same note of joy is sustained 
throughout the Office. The anti- 
phons, hymns and Capitula have 
about them a tone of sustained exul- 
tation, as if the soul could not tire of 
praising God for His goodness in re- 
deeming us. Notice especially the 
antiphons for Lauds. The Mass for 
the feast also contains this note of 
joy, the introit beginning with: "Gau- 
dens gaudebo in Domino, et exul- 
tabit anima in Deo meo; quia induit 
me vestimentis salutis, etc." 

Especially noticeable throughout 
the Office is the word 'misericordia'. 
We rejoice in the fruits of Our 
Lord's redemption and as we do so 
we are not allowed to forget that 
this redemption is all a work of 
mercy. 

But we do not content ourselves 
with rejoicing that we are redeemed 
by the Precious Blood of Christ. In 
the Oration of the feast we ask 
pointedly that the fruits of this 
plentiful redemption may be applied 
to our souls, not merely in heaven 
but also here on earth by a deepen- 
ing of charity: 

"O God, who didst constitute Thy 
only begotten Son the Redeemer of 
the World, and through Him didst 
mercifully restore us to life by the 



386 



conquest of death; grant that, cele- 
brating the memory of these bene- 
fits we may be united to Thee with 
never failing love and attain the 
fruits of Thy reedmption." 
Sources: Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 



XII, p. 677 Bollettino, Oct. 1922, p. 
303 

Fr. Columban, P. P. 

St. Gabriel Retreat 

Des Moines, la. 



Our Father Hilary ran across the 
following incident during a mission 
in Vivian, Louisiana: 

In the last days of February, 1954, 
a letter arrived at the Catholic rec- 
tory of Vivian, La. informing the 
Pastor that Mrs. J. C. Cassidy, a new 
parishioner, was at home in a dying 
condition. Shortly afterward, the 
Pastor was at her bedside. 

She made her Confession in a weak 
and low voice; for she could talk 
only with great difficulty. Her Doc- 
tor attested that she was suffering 
from a persistent and far advanced 
malignancy affecting her throat, 
skull, vertebrae and ribs. As a result, 
she was given only two or three 
months to live. 

When the Priest asked her if she 
thought she could swallow the 
"Host", she looked at him and said: 
"Oh! Father, if only I Could receive 
Communion, I believe Jesus would 
clear my throat!" 

That same nite her wishes were 
granted. She received Holy Com- 
munion with great Faith and rever- 
ence. What happened during the 
next few moments only God knows. 

Mrs. J. C. Cassidy fell asleep. And 
behold, for the first time in a long 
time she rested all night thru. All 
were tremendously surprised the 
next morning to see that her throat 
had considerably cleared up, and 



that she could swallow with much 
less difficulty. Rapidly she kept im- 
proving. Later, the St. Clement's 
Congregation was quite surprised to 
see her, accompanied by her 
daughter, walk right in the front 
door of the Church, assist at Mass 
and receive Holy Communion; After 
Mass she was congratulated by the 
Pastor and the Congregation. All 
were astonished at seeing her re- 
covery. 

There is no doubt in the minds of 
all who have seen Mrs. J. C. Cassidy 
before and after her marvelous cure, 
that the power of Christ in Holy 
Eucharist was visibly manifested in 
her case. The belief in the super- 
natural power in this case was ex- 
pressed by her non-Catholic Doctor 
in his statement. "I am certain" he 
wrote, "that a power above and be- 
yond that of mortal man has caused 
her improvement." 

Her tremendous Faith that Christ 
in the Holy Eucharist would clear 
her throat did it. Christ marvels to- 
day at such a great Faith as He did 
in His days, when the centurion 
came to see Him about a sick ser- 
vant. Jesus still says today as He 
did to the centurian: "As thou hast 
believed so be it done to thee. And 
the servant was healed at that same 
hour." (Matt. 8:13) 

So as Mrs J. C. Cassidy believed 
she was healed from that same hour. 



387 



rf-oUxuueld. 




.PXSSIII/ 

\*7 



Your prayers are requested for Mrs. Ann Hayes, a sister of our Fr. Wil- 
liam Gail, who died May 19; for Mrs. Agnes Nevin, Mother of our Father 
Claude, who died May 30 (see St. Louis news of this issue); for Dr. Michael 
J. Henry and Dr. Lyn Smith, who died June 3 (see Louisville news of this 
issue); for Mr. Gordon J. Clancy, Father of Fr. Rian, who died June 26 (see 
Des Moines news of this issue); Fr. Michael Sullivan, C. P., member of the 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross, who died June 22 (vide St. Paul of the 
Cross Province news of this issue); Fr. Andrew of the Cross (Ahler) C.P., 
who died July 2 (see Louisville news of this issue); Mr. Lawrence Ryan, who 
died June 12 (see Chicago news of this issue). 



FATHER AUSTIN, C.P. 

Success and fame on the theatrical 
stage demand the ability not only to 
enter into, but really to live each 
role. Whether or not Father Austin 
— known to the world as Richard 
Luckenbill, and to the Broadway 
stage as Richard Stoneleigh — might 
or might not have achieved such 
fame, only God can tell. For, in the 
mysterious Providence of God, this 
young man, so full of promise in 
the theatrical world was called not 
only to the true Faith, but given the 
singular Passionist vocation of in- 



timately following in the interior 
sufferings of Jesus Crucified. 

If acting on the stage had been 
Father Austin's role prior to June, 
1912, from the day on which he was 
clothed in the coarse, black habit 
of the Passionists, every trace of 
make-believe vanished from his life. 
To be one with Christ — a living 
replica of His Crucified Master — this 
alone was the ambition of Austin of 
the Immaculate Heart of Mary. His 
motto henceforth would be the words 
of Saint Paul: "God forbid that I 
should glory save the cross of our 



388 



Lord Jesus Christ by whom the 
world is crucified to me and I to the 
world." 

As the cross was placed upon his 
shoulders, and the thorn-crown upon 
his head that June day in 1913, one 
wonders if this neophyte of but four 
short years to the Catholic Faith 
fully realized how completely Al- 
mighty God was to mould him into 
the image of Jesus Crucified. Know- 
ing Father Austin as intimately as 
some of us have, one cannot but feel 
that if — on that day of his Profes- 




# s ¥>J<w*~.- -** 




Fr. Austin, C.P. 



sion, June 22, 1913,— Almighty God 
revealed to Austin the interior agony 
awaiting him, this heroic soul would 
willingly have risen to the challenge, 
and, like his Divine Master in Geth- 
semani, exclaim: "Not my will but 
thine be done." 

To give within this brief obituary 
even a scant, thumb-nail sketch of 
one who lived amongst us for forty- 
one years as a professed Passionist, 
is an almost impossible task. What- 
ever drama Father Austin may have 
experienced on the stage was but 
a feeble experience in comparison 
to what God's Divine Will had in 
store for him. 

Father Austin Luckenbill was 
born in Mahoney City, Pennsylvania, 
October 24, 1884. His saintly moth- 
er, though a non-Catholic at that 
time, and later converted to the 
true Faith, fostered in her son the 
stern principles of the Presbyterian 
religion, high ideals, and a love for 
the good and the pure. 

The full story of his conversion to 
the Catholic Faith is told in an arti- 
cle written by Father Austin entitled 
"Between the Acts." (Sign Maga- 
zine, April, 1927) This dynamic in- 
fluence of an exemplary Catholic 
actor, Charlie Doherty, his stage 
manager; the special graces extend- 
ed to him by our heavenly Queen 
who led him into the living presence 
of her Divine Son — there in her 
own NOTRE DAME in Montreal— 
finally dispelled the fog of ignorance 
and prejudice. In the summer of 
1909 he was received into the Church 
at the Paulists' in New York City. 
Father Austin sums up his feelings 



389 



on that occasion: "Whereas I was 
blind, now I see." and, in the words 
of Fenelon he expresses his grati- 
tude, peace, contentment and hap- 
piness: "Oh Holy Church of Rome, 
if I forget Thee — may I forget my 
very self!" 

The same Charlie Doherty who 
had brought him to the threshold of 
the true Church also introduced him 
to the Passionists at Saint Michael's 
in Union City. A native of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, Mr. Doherty had long 
been a close friend of our Fathers in 
that city. 

So it was that on June 22, 1913, 
Austin of the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary pronounced his vows as a Pas- 
sionist. Five years later, on May 16, 
1918, he was ordained to the holy 
priesthood. 

After finishing Sacred Eloquence 
under a great master, Father Alexis 
Cunneen, C.P., Father Austin began 
his brilliant career as a Passionist 
Missionary. Gifted with a strong 
physique, a striking personality, a 
deep, resonant, powerful voice, — 
fired with a consuming zeal for 
souls, and aflame with an ardent 
love for Jesus Crucified, — Father 
Austin took his place on the mis- 
sionary platform as one of our most 
distinguished and effective mission- 
aries. Many years of fruitful labor 
in the mission field seemed to await 
his harvesting. 

For a few years he was appointed 
to the position of Lector of Sacred 
Eloquence. In this position he par- 
ticularly inspired his students to 
bring the sufferingns of the Master 
before the people with burning 



words of sympathy and love. 

How eloquently did he impress 
upon his students that they must 
not only preach the Passion by word, 
but live it out in their daily conduct 
on the missions in a spirit of un- 
worldliness, humility and detach- 
ment. 

In the Provincial Chapter of 1932, 
Father Austin was elected to the 
Rectorship of Saint Gabriel's Mona- 
stery in Brighton, Massachusetts. 
Never ambitious for power or au- 
thority, Father Austin accepted his 
election with great reluctance. One 
would have to grasp his deep sense 
of responsibility, — at times almost 
exaggerated — to see in this appoint- 
ment as Rector the human explana- 
tion which precipitated the great 
crisis of his life. 

In office but one year, the dark- 
ness of a fearful mental depression 
settled over the mind and soul of 
Father Austin. It was a terrifying 
thing to witness. Rational enough to 
know he must desperately cling to 
Jesus Crucified in His abandonment 
in Gethsemani and in His dereliction 
on Calvary, nevertheless the black 
waves of an almost devilish despair 
pounded over the soul of this great 
Passionist. 

With David of old he could ex- 
claim: "Save me, Lord, for the 
waters have come in even unto my 
soul!" Hour by hour, day and night, 
month by month this agony lasted. 
How truly could he cry out with the 
Psalmist: "My soul goes down to 
the deepest hell and my life is like 
the life of one damned!" In his 
dereliction, his Crucified Master 



390 



caused him to repeat — "If it be pos- 
sible, let this chalice pass from me. 
Yet not my will but thine be done." 

Though his superiors afforded him 
the very best doctors and hospital 
treatment in the country, all these 
learned men seemed unwittingly to 
plunge his suffering soul deeper and 
deeper into the abyss. It was one 
of his own Passionist brethren, full 
of years, learned and mature in the 
school of Jesus Crucified, who, by 
his kind yet firm guidance, gently 
led Father Austin out of this horri- 
fying gloom back to the sheltering 
wounds of the Crucified. 

For some mysterious reason, at 
least at this time, psychiatrists were 
helpless in this case. Only one who 
himself understood the science of 
the Cross was finally able to restore 
some peace to the afflicted soul of 
Father Austin. 

Subsequently, during the past 
twenty years, though able at times 
to engage in his priestly apostolate 
which he loved, nevertheless the 
awesome clouds of fear, doubt, and 
an agonizing sense of guilt constant- 
ly hovered over Father Austin. He 
had loved his holy Faith and his 
Passionist Vocation above all things 
in life. To spread that holy Faith, 
and to fulfill his Passionist Vocation 
to the 'nth' degree had been his one 
consuming ambition. And for the 
purification of that Faith and the 
spreading of it to other souls, God 
tried Father Austin as He has tried 
very few amongst us. 

He idolized the Passionist life with 
its full Choir Observance and all its 
sacred traditions. His charity to the 



brethren, especially to the sick, was 
unbounded. He loved prayer and 
holy poverty. Except when under 
the heavy hand of God he delighted 
in recreating with his brethren. 

But all these virtues, outstanding 
as they were, are but dim facets in 
the great soul of one whom God 
selected to suffer, almost to a heroic 
degree, some of the most poignant 
agonies of Jesus Crucified. 

In his first great and last physical 
illness, an intestinal malignancy, he 
who had endured so much suffering 
of mind, of heart and of soul, wrote 
to one of the brethren: "You say, 
dear Father, to keep you in my 
sufferings! I have no sufferings 
worse than the needle for the in- 
travenous!" 

To one who had lived so close to 
the interior agony of Gethsemani 
and Calvary, the physical pain of the 
throbbing nerve and the ravages of 
cancer seemed but very little to offer 
His Crucified Saviour! 

On the morning of August 9, 1954, 
Father Austin, with full abandon- 
ment and complete resignation, sur- 
rendered his soul into the loving 
hands of his Divine Exemplar. The 
quiet peace and rest that once had 
settled over Calvary's Victim came 
at last to dear Father Austin. With 
his Crucified Master, how well could 
he exclaim in that moment of death: 
"It is finished. Into thy hands I 
commend my spirit." 

May eternal rest be the portion of 
this great and true Knight of the 
Cross. And may our continued 
prayers succor him in eternity. So 
that his human frailties may be 



391 



blotted out in the Precious Blood of 
the Master Whom he served so pa- 
tiently, so generously and so heroic- 
ally. 



FR. CYRIL, C.P. 

On February 18, 1955, the Friday 
within the octave of the Solemn 
Commemoration of the Passion, Fr. 
Cyril of the Sorrowful Mother passed 
to his eternal reward. 

There was something beautiful and 
consoling and inspiring in the last 
sufferings of this old and faithful 






mm:***- m % :*«? 




Fr. Cyril, C.P. 



priest. For the past several years, 
the earthly habitation, which had 
been the instrument of the divine 
service, was visibly failing, but we 
were all aware of a profound peace 
and silent serenity, that were to us 
the outward signs that God was pre- 
paring for his servant" a house not 
made by human hands, eternal in the 
heavens." 1 

Jesus Christ the High Priest has 
already entered "once for all through 
the greater and more perfect taber- 
nacle . . . into the holies," 2 and "has 
taken his seat at the right of the 
throne of Majesty in the heavens." 3 
There He "continues forever," exer- 
cising His "everlasting priesthood;" 4 
making intercession for them who 
come to God through Him. 

We would expect, therefore, in the 
eternal High Priest, a special care 
over those whom He has chosen to 
share His everlasting priesthood — 
most especially over those who have 
gone forth and produced abundant 
fruit in long years of faithful, apos- 
tolic ministry. 

Jesus Himself, indeed, has lifted 
somewhat the veil of His tender 
solicitude for His chosen ones. In 
His glorious appearance at the Lake 
of Tiberias, Jesus asked for Simon 
Peter's triple confession of love. 
Then He said to Peter: "Amen, amen, 
I say to thee, when thou wast young 
thou didst gird thyself and walk 
where thou wouldst. But when thou 
art old thou wilt stretch forth thy 
hands, and another will gird thee, 
and lead thee where thou wouldst 
not . . Fololw me." 3 Peter did. It was 
enough for him to know that the 



392 



tender love of the Master enfolds 
His own to the end. When Peter 
entered into his own agony, crucified 
like his Master, Jesus would remem- 
ber the disciple's words: "Lord, thou 
knowest all things, thou knowest 
that I love Thee;" and Peter then 
would know the strength of the 
"everlasting arms" 6 that supported 
him. 

Then too, on that occasion, Jesus 
had in mind the long years of waiting 
that lay ahead for the Beloved Dis- 
ciple. "If I wish him to remain un- 
til I come, what is it to thee?" 7 Jesus 
could never forget the disciple who 
leaned upon His bosom at the Last 
Supper, and to whom He had com- 
mitted His mother at the foot of the 
Cross. John would always be the Be- 
loved, even in the boiling cauldron 
of oil, even to advanced age, when 
his whole soul would be reaching 
out to the final welcome: "Come, 
Lord Jesus." 8 

St. Paul experienced the assurance 
of knowing that he was in the care 
of the divine Master, who had made 
him a fit minister of the new cove- 
nant. 9 Conscious that his outer man 
was decaying, the great apostle 
found his comfort in the abundant 
power of God that was daily renew- 
ing his inner man. Therefore, he 
counted as light all affliction that 
was preparing for him "an eternal 
weight of glory;" 10 he looked forward 
"not at the things that are seen, but 
at the things that are not seen." He 
knew full well "that if the earthly 
house in which we dwell be destroy- 
ed, we have a building from God, 
a house not made by human hands, 



eternal in the heavens ... He who 
made us for this very thing is God, 
who has given us the Spirit as its 
pledge." 11 And at the very end, Saint 
Paul writes to Timothy: "As for me, 
I am already being poured out in 
sacrifice, and the time of my deliver- 
ance is at hand. I have fought the 
good fight, I have finished the 
course, I have kept the faith. For the 
rest, there is laid up for me a crown 
of justice, which the Lord, the just 
Judge, will give to me in that day." 12 

Yes, Jesus Christ is always with 
His chosen ones. We are not at all 
presumptuous in thinking of our dear 
old departed priest in the company 
of the great apostles, Peter and John 
and Paul. Holy Mother Church, at 
the most solemn moment of priest- 
ly ordination, praises God for His 
providence in joining to the Apostles 
of His Son teachers of the faith; and 
so asks for her candidates that they 
be invested with the dignity of the 
priesthood. 13 

On the head of Cyril Meis had 
been imposed "the hands of the 
priesthood." 14 To him had been given 
the power to offer Holy Mass, to 
forgive sins, to preach the Gospel of 
Christ. In all essentials, he did not 
come short of the first apostles of 
Jesus Christ. And at the end, the 
tender mercy and solicitude of his 
divine Master showed forth in a 
very striking way. Fr. Cyril"s last 
illness was of very short duration, 
a matter of only two weeks. Stricken 
suddenly with critical internal ob- 
struction and severe pain, he was 
taken to Resurrection Hospital. Af- 
ter careful tests and preparations, 
surgery was decided upon. A few 



393 



hours after the operation, Fr. Cyril 
suffered from shock and for a time 
was in a critical condition. From 
this, however, he rallied splendidly, 
and for several days his recovery 
seemed assured. Then came the fatal 
change. One long night of suffering 
ushered in the day that was to be 
his entrance into eternity. Comforted 
and assisted by Very Reverend Fa- 
ther Camillus and Father Justin, by 
his physicians, Doctors Lally and 
Petersen, and his devoted nurse, Sr. 
Bernarda, C. R., Father passed away 
peacefully at 10:30 A. M. 

The solemn funeral Mass was in 
our monastery chapel on Feb. 21, 
with burial in our community ceme- 
tery. Very Reverend Father Neil, 
Provincial Superior, was the cele- 
brant of the Mass; Very Reverend 
Father Camillis, Rector, was deacon, 
with Father Adolph Schmitt of the 
Eastern Province as subdeacon. Fa- 
ther Ward was Master of Ceremonies, 
and the sermon was given by Father 
Joseph Mary. Reverend Father Wen- 
delin, brother of Fr. Cyril, was pres- 
ent, accompanied by Father Adrian 
Lynch, and Mr. William Meis, anoth- 
er brother. Three Eastern guests had 
arrived very shortly after Fr. Cyril's 
death. 

Joseph Meis, son of William Meis 
and Teresa Immekus, was born on 
the South Side of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, October 26, 1874. His pre- 
liminary education was in our St. 
Michael's parochial school. At the 
early age of twelve, he left school, 
a common practice at that time. His 
first work was with his father in his 
blacksmith shop and hardware store. 

Joseph's thoughts turned early to 



the priesthood; and the Passionists 
were his choice, as his uncle, Fr. 
Ferdinand Immekus, was a member 
of the Congregation. He entered the 
Preparatory School at Dunkirk, New 
York, in 1889, shortly after the open- 
ing of this first American Prepara- 
tory School. After a few months, he 
was sent to the novitiate at Pitts- 
burgh, where his master of novices 
was the saintly Fr. Frederick Lang. 
He made his religious profession on 
April 8, 1891. 

In the autumn of that year, Con- 
frater Cyril and his companions be- 
came the first class of students in 
our newly dedicated Retreat of Our 
Lady of Good Counsel at Normandy, 
Missouri, under Fr. Peter Hanley as 
Rector. 

Later the class was transferred to 
the East, and ordination came on 
June 4, 1898, in St. Patrick Cathedral 
at Newark, New Jersey. The minister 
of ordination was Bishop W. M. Wig- 
ger. This ordination class was dis- 
tinguished as an outstanding mis- 
sionary class: Fathers John Francis 
Vanston, Cyprian McGarvey, Alexis 
Cunneen, Alexander Kilgour, Cyril 
Meis, Bertrand Barry and Hubert 
Cunningham. 

After a year of sacred eloquence 
study, Fr. Cyril was appointed as- 
sistant pastor at his home parish, to 
which he gave his first year of 
priestly ministration. 

Then, through the voice of his 
superiors, a new call came to him: 
"Go forth out of thy country, and 
from thy kindred, and out of thy 
Father's house, and come into the 
land which I shall show thee." 15 In 
coming to St. Paul, Kansas, as pastor, 



394 



Fr. Cyril began his long years of 
priestly service in what was soon to 
be the new Province of the Holy 
Cross. He was one of the last, of 
that glorious band of Eastern Pas- 
sionists, who have done so much for 
the establishment and development 
of this Province. 

Fr. Cyril spent between eight and 
ten years as pastor of our church of 
St. Francis Hieronymo at St. Paul. 
In this first decade of his priestly 
life, Fr. Cyril's devotion to duty 
meant self-sacrifice and self-discip- 
line. Parish duties were fulfilled 
amidst primitive and pioneering con- 
ditions. Sick calls meant horseback 
journeys over rough and muddy 
roads. But dear Fr. Cyril chose to 
stay with us, when the division of 
the province was made in 1906. 

A short period of parish work at 
Holy Cross., Cincinnati., was ended 
when Fr. Cyril entered upon his mis- 
sionary career. According to his own 
careful records, Fr. Cyril's regular 
mission appointments extended from 
October 1914 to September 1946, a 
period of thirty-two years. However, 
there had been an occasional mission 
between 1911 and 1914; with one earl- 
ier mission in 1902 at Nokomis, Illi- 
nois, in company with Fr. James 
Ryan. Then, too, there may possibly 
have been a mission or so later than 
1946. 

Besides the mission appointments, 
numbering over 200, there is a rec- 
ord of many retreats given to re- 
ligious or to the laity; also a few 
non-Catholic missions, with some no- 
venas and occasional preaching as- 
signments. 

In the record of his missionary 



activities, Fr. Cyril had little of a 
personal note. One notation, "very 
successful," stands alone as an indi- 
cation of success. From others, how- 
ever, we learn of his well-prepared, 
methodic and common-sense mater- 
ial. God had graced him with a fine 
appearance and an exceptionally 
fine voice. Even to his last days, Fr. 
Cyril's reading of the New Testa- 
ment in the refectory was a thing of 
beauty and inspiration. 

Now and then in conversation, Fr. 
Cyril would relate some happening 
of his missionary labors that would 
be a simple revelation of his zeal 
and sincerity. Alone on a certain 
mission, he found the confessions so 
heavy that he was obliged to shorten 
his Saturday night sermon. He spoke 
briefly, about ten minutes, on God's 
love and mercy. After the sermon, 
a young man of about 35 years came 
into the sacristy to speak with Fr. 
Cyril. "Father, do you believe all 
you said tonight?" "Why certainly," 
answered Fr. Cyril, "why do you 
ask this question?" "Well, my broth- 
er and I have not been to confession 
for many years; but we are going 
now, if you meant all you said. We 
have made the mission, but no ser- 
mon budged us until tonight. 

After his death, a great amount of 
manuscript material was found in 
Father's room. An examination of 
this material showed well-prepared 
sermons and conferences, that had 
been subjected to constant revision 
and improvement. 

A very large part of Fr. Cyril's 
missionary labors was performed 
"with a ready and willing mind" in 
"poor, incommodious, troublesome 



395 



places ,and subject to inclemencies 
of the weather." No regrets were 
registered about work "for the sal- 
vation of souls in places more neg- 
lected and of no consideration." 16 
The zeal of the missionary developed 
in him a universal interest in things 
and people. Even in his advanced 
years, he read constantly and well — 
he always loved to "take a look" at 
the most recent serious literature in 
the sacred sciences. On his desk lay 
his last spiritual gook: The Book of 
the Poor in Spirit, by a Friend of 
God. 

Fr. Cyril's last priestly assignment 
was his chaplaincy at the Mother of 
Mercy Novitiate in Des Plaines. For 
the last several years, he fulfilled 
this trust with great regularity and 
devotedness. Only one day interven- 
ed between his last trip to this post 
of duty and his retirement to the 
hospital in his last illness. 

Fr. Cyril was a man sturdily built, 
one of strong constitution. This was 
a sign of his inner life. He was sing- 
ularly reticent about the secrets of 
his spiritual life, his intimacy of 
union with God in love and prayer. 
The inner depths could be sounded, 
however, by certain outer manifesta- 
tions. First of all, we remember his 
daily fidelity in the exercises of our 
monastic observance. Behind and 
beneath his quiet, unassuming priest- 
liness, there was the simple faith of 
a child and the great love of a sin- 
cere and devoted Passionist religious. 

Though away from the monastery 
a great deal during the years of his 
missionary labors, Fr. Cyril kept his 
love for his brethren and the com- 
mon life. At hours of recreation, he 



was cheerful and alert, an exception- 
ally good compainion for one so ad- 
vanced in age. 

All of us will miss the old familiar 
figure of the gardener, going regu- 
larly to his beloved vineyard. Gone 
forever from our midst is the patient 
workman, whose happy smile would 
annnounce the season's first fruits 
ready for the monastic table. The 
fruit, I think, of his late vineyard 
was the symbol of his work in the 
Master's vineyard. We loved Fr. 
Cyril and we would love to have him 
back. 

Putting all together, we are not 
surprised that the Divine Master 
waited for the Friday within the oc- 
tave of the Solemn Commemoration 
of His Passion to call His Passionist 
home. Supported in the strong arms 
of the sacraments, nourished with 
the Body of Christ, the absolving 
words said over him; his senses seal- 
ed with the holy oils; in the company 
of the Mother of Sorrows and his 
glorious patrons, Saints Joseph and 
Cyril and Paul of the Cross, he found 
peace at the last. To him to live was 
Christ, to die was gain. 

But there is sorrow in the hearts 
of his religious brethren; and deep- 
er sorrow in the hearts of those who 
loved him most, his own brothers 
and sisters. To them, in the name of 
Very Reverend Father Provincial, of 
Very Reverend Father Rector, of 
every Passionist of Holy Cross Prov- 
ince, we express our sincere and 
deep sympathy and our profound 
and lasting gratitude for what Cyril 
of the Mother of Sorrows has done 
for our Province. 



396 



May eternal joy be his lot with the 
saints of God. 

FOOTNOTES 

1. 2 Cor. V, 1 

2. Hebr. IX, 11-12 

3. Hebr. VIII, 1 

4. Hebr. VII, 25 

5. J. XXI, 18 

6. Deut. XXXIII, 27 

7. J. XXI, 22 

8. Apoc. XXII, 21 

9. 2 Cor. Ill, 4-6 

10. 2 Cor. IV, 18 

11. 2 Cor. V, 1-5 

12. 2 Tim. IV, 6-8 

13. Rite of Ordination; Preface with the Form. 

14. I Tim. IV, 14 

15. Gen. XII, 1 

16. Holy Rule, n. 211 

BROTHER LUKE, C.P. 

The life of Brother Luke Kirby, 
C.P., came to its finale with the 
greatest of God's blessings, a holy 
and well provided death. For on the 
morning of December 21, 1954 Bro- 
ther Luke passed to his eternal re- 
ward. 

His death was not unexpected, 
least of all to himself. Months pre- 
viously he knew that his years of 
service to the Divine Master were 
drawing to a close. With the serenity 
and peace so characteristic of his en- 
tire religious life he looked forward 
to the final hour of life. The great 
desire of his heart was to die within 
the hallowed walls of. the monastery. 
While confined to the hospital in 
November his awarness of the prox- 
imity of death prompted him to re- 
quest that he be allowed to return 
to Sacred Heart Retreat. In a matter 
of weeks though he realized his con- 
dition made hospital care imperative 
and in holy resignation he accepted 
the way of Divine Providence and 
spent the last three weeks of his life 
in Saints Mary and Elizabeth hos- 
pital. A few days before the joyous 



feast of Christmas, without struggle 
or pain his soul laid aside his frail 
and now aged body and entered into 
the joy of the Lord. 

He was not without the consolation 
of being assisted in his final hours 
by Very Rev. Fr. Rector and Fr. Vi- 
car. Early in the morning of Dec. 
21st while Fr. Rector was celebrating 
mass in the hospital chapel Brother 
Luke died. 

Born on June 25, 1881 Brother 
Luke was the youngest of six child- 
ren. He was baptized Edward in the 
parish church of St. Patrick's, Pitts- 
burg, where he later received his 
first Holy Communion. There too he 
assisted as an altar boy at the first 
of many thousands of masses he 
served during his long life. To the 
very end he manifested a deep love 
for the Holy Sacrifice and a great 
reverence for the priesthood. It was 
his daily joy to serve mass. 

As a young man of 17 years he 
applied for admission to the Passion- 
ist novitiate as a brother. His seem- 
ing fraility caused some misgivings 
about his ability to live the severe 
life of a Passionist lay brother. His 
spirit, determination and fervor 
quickly dispelled any such doubts 
and more than compensated for any 
lack of physical robustness. He was 
professed May 16, 1899. 

The completeness and fervor of 
his dedication to the service of 
Christ is amply witnessed by the 
manner in which he fulfilled the 
various assignments that were given 
him during almost fifty-five years. 
From his first appointment as assis- 
tant cook in Hoboken shortly after 
his profession to the final year and 



397 




Brother Luke, C.P. 



even weeks of his life when he serv- 
ed as porter at Sacred Heart Retreat 
in Louisville his quiet, gentle, yet 
efficient ways made him respected 
and loved by all. 

He proved himself unbelievably 
vigorous; no task was too strenuous 
for him. He was among the hardy 
group that pioneered the foundations 
of the Western Province. Cheerfully 
and graciously he bore the burdens 
and hardships of the early years in 



the foundations at St. Louis, Kansas, 
Louisville and Des Moines. It was in 
the "horse and buggy" days at Norm- 
andy that he suffered the accident 
that impaired his walk and left him 
with a limp. While driving the mona- 
stery cart he was hit by the street 
car that ran in back of the monastery 
property. 

As cook, as boiler man, as outside 
man, as porter, Brother Luke took 
a religious interest in any work as- 



398 



signed to him. His great liking was 
for outside work tending the chick- 
ens, caring for the farm. He con- 
tinued his interest and concern in 
these matters even when ill health 
during his last years reduced his 
activity to the less strenuous office 
of porter. Whatever his work, Su- 
periors always found his thoroughly 
competent and reliable. 

Always mild-mannered and self- 
effacing he possessed a keen sense of 
humor, remarkably alert powers of 
obesrvation, and an admirable bal- 
ance of judgement. His wit and hum- 
or seemed to be ingrained; not shal- 
low, never offensive. Rather it was 
spontaneous, part of his very per- 
sonality; really an overflow of that 
joyousness of spirit that belongs only 
to guiless lovers of God. His opinions 
and views were an expression of not 
so much any philosophy of life as 
simply a wholesome spiritual out- 
look on all things. To him all life 
was but the unfolding of Divine 
Providence and therefore was never 
cause to be worried or upset. 

His consideration for others espec- 
ially endeared Brother Luke to all 
his religious brethren. Even in his 
last sickness this thoughtfulness of 
others made him hesitate about mak- 
ing any requests; he wanted to in- 
convenience no one. His love for his 
neighbor was based upon his strong 
love for God. In the life of prayer, 



work and solitude fashioned by the 
rule of St. Paul of the Cross Brother 
Luke found the fulfillment of his 
aspirations to serve God and sanc- 
tify his soul. 

Only a sincere and deep interior 
life can explain the gracious and 
virtuous character of Brother. He 
loved and faithfully observed to the 
very end the rule he professed more 
than fifty years ago. No wonder that 
in his last days his spirit of complete 
obedience and resignation was so 
much in evidence. 

The solemn funeral mass and ex- 
sequies with Very Rev. Fr. Rector as 
celebrant, and with the sermon 
preached by Fr. Joseph Mary, C.P. 
were held for Brother Luke of the 
Immaculate Conception in St. Agnes 
Church on the morning of Dec. 23rd. 
Interment was in the monastery 
cemetery alongside the Church. 

What more can we, or need we 
say of Brother Luke than that by the 
grace of God he lived the Passionist 
lif for over fifty years and by the 
goodness of God died a holy death. 
And so indeed can we trust in that 
same promise made to him in the 
name of God when he vowed his life's 
service: "keep these and you will 
come to eternal life." God, faithful 
to His word has now brought Bro- 
ther Luke in the steps of Christ, 
through the Passion to the Glory of 
God forever. 



4 




399 




STS. JOHN AND PAUL 
(Rome) 

June 20 was exam day for Frs. 
Firmian and Barry. As one put it 
"and we did well enough — consider- 
ing that we're Americans". We hope 
all of all will find rest, mental and 
physical, during the summer months. 



the laureate on his thesis: "The 
Meritorious and Satisfactory Contri- 
bution of Religious to the Mystical 
Body". 



Father Cronan Regan, C.P., Prov- 
ince of St. Paul of the Cross, received 



In the early part of June, His Ex- 
cellency, Bishop Fulton Sheen, offer- 
ed a Holy Mass in the Basilica of 
Sts. John and Paul on the third an- 
niversary of his consecration there. 



PROVINCE OF HOLY CROSS 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
RETREAT 

(Chicago) 

The congratulations of the Prov- 
ince go to Father Melvin Glutz, C.P., 
who gained the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy, at the Studium Generale 
of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Domini- 
can House of Studies, River Forest, 
111., with a summa cum laude. Fath- 
er Melvin defended his thesis on 
Thursday, June 2, in the presence of 
a number of the Fathers and the 



Students of this retreat, before five 
examiners from the Pontifical Philo- 
sophical Faculty of St. Thomas 
Aquinas. On the previous day, Fath- 
er Melvin delivered his Lectio Solem- 
nis, on the Formal Subject of Meta- 
physics, for which he was awarded a 
magna cum laude. He completed his 
studies with a comprehensive mark 
of 97, summa cum laude. 

Father Melvin is a native of Im- 
maculata Parish, from Mt. Adams, in 
Cincinnati. He spent six years in the 



400 



Preparatory Seminary at Normandy, 
before his entrance into the Novi- 
tiate, where he made his first vows in 
July, 1944. He was ordained in Louis- 
ville, in 1&51, after Sacred Eloquence 
was appointed Lector of Modern and 
Contemporary European History in 
Des Moines. He began studies at the 
Pontifical Faculty of St. Thomas 
Aquinas, River Forest, 111., in Sep- 
tember, 1953, and received the Lic- 
entiate in Philosophy the following 
year. 

Fr. Melvin's doctoral dissertation 
is entitled The Manner of Demon- 
strating in Natural Philosophy. Fa- 
ther's thesis maintains that, inas- 
much as the Aristotelian - Thomistic 
demonstrative method is our human 
instrument for the attainment of 
scientific knowledge, the science of 
Natural Philosophy can and should 
use the demonstrative method, and 
consequently should be organized ac- 
cording to the requirements of this 
method. "Our concept of Natural 
Philosophy," Father writes, "is that 
of Aristotle and St. Thomas. It is the 
science of material and mobile being 
from the most general aspects down 




Dominican House of Studies 
River Forest, 111. 



to the level of ultimate species. It 
is only by taking this integral View 
of Natural Philosophy that we can 
fully comprehend the methodology 
of the science, as St. Thomas accept- 
ed it from Aristotle." 

"Stress is placed upon the need 
for a definition of the subject before 
the scientific process can begin. For 
such a definition is the middle term 
of the demonstrative syllogism, and 
in the light of it the causes and pro- 
perties are demonstrated. The man- 
ner of finding a definition broad 
enough to include all of material 
reality and of sufficient scientific 
value to serve as a medium of dem- 
onstration is investigated at length. 
It is shown that sensory motion is 
the key that opens up nature to us. 
From this general beginning the 
science can be unfolded, according 
to the human mode of proceeding 
from the general to the particular, 
from the confused to the distinct. 
The science of nature attains its 
perfection only when it arrives at 
demonstrative knowledge on the 
level of ultimate species. 

"Natural philosophy," Father con- 
tinues, "is essentially an experien- 
tial and inductive science. It seeks, 
not to deduce facts, but to explain 
facts in the light of their proper 
causes and of the first principles of 
the subject. The natural philosopher 
must ask the question WHY in terms 
of all four proper and proximate 
causes of every natural thing. Thus, 
demonstration in natural philosophy 
is seen to be a method of explana- 
tion and understanding, not a pro- 
cess of discovery." 



401 






\ ,-> >:;« 



I 

: : :v!s5:- : 



-H2 



rf®**Y 



®>. 









THE FIRST U.S.A. NATIONAL CONGRESS 

; May 2 
Brought together the largest gathering of Pas 



402 




THE CONFRATERNITY OF THE PASSION 

30, 1955 

| in the history of the Congregation in America. 



403 



The Province rejoices With Fr. 
Melvin upon such a successful climax 
to his years of study, and wishes him 
many successful years of teaching 
on the philosophical faculty at St. 
Gabriel's Monastery, Des Moines. 



Father Kenneth Ward died a holy 
death in Resurrection Hospital on 
May 11th. It can hardly be said that 
his death came unexpectedly, if it 
was a profound loss to the Com- 
munity. Father's health had been 
very poor for almost a year, and at 
the time of his Silver Jubilee of 
Ordination, in December, he was 




barely able to go through a token 
celebration. He remained much the 
same until his death. He was anoint- 
ed on Saturday, April 30 and after- 
ward taken to Resurrection Hospital, 
where he was soon put into an oxy- 
gen tent because of his Weak heart, 
which was described graphically by 
the physician as "so worn out, it 
was just like a rag." His relatives 
were notified, and for several days 
his two sisters, both registered nur- 
ses, were on hand to provide ex- 
perienced care. Father passed away 
at 4:35 P.M., May 11th, in the pres- 
ence of his sisters and Fathers Ca- 
millus, Joseph Mary and the hospital 
chaplain, Fr. Lynch, conscious to the 
last, after spending his last four 
hours on earth reciting and answer- 
ing prayers for the dying. 

The funeral was held May 13 in 
the Monastery Chapel. Very Rev. Fr. 
Neil, Provincial, was celebrant of the 
Mass, assisted by Very Rev. Fr. Ca- 
millus, Rector, and Rev. Fr. Benet, 
as deacon and subdeacon. Fr. Joseph 
Mary preached a beautiful sermon 
to the many Clergy, Sisters and laity 
who crowded into the Chapel. Burial 
took place in the Community ceme- 
tery, next to the freshly dug grave of 
Father Cyril Meis, C.P. 



Father Kenneth, C.P. 



Through the combined efforts of 
Fathers Warren and Ward, Radio 
Station WFJL-FM is now carrying 
the fine program produced in the 
Eastern Province under the direction 
of Fr. Fidelis Rice, C.P., The Hour 
of the Crucified. This station has 
very graciously placed its facilities 
at our disposal on three or four dif- 



404 



ferent occasions, in order that the 
Students at Immaculate Conception 
Retreat might record a number of 
polyphonic selections for use on The 
Hour of the Crucified. 



Rev. F. X. Smith, Pastor of St. 
Paul of the Cross Church, Park 
Ridge, 111., upon the completion of 
his new church, decided upon the 
erection of two statues of St. Paul 
of the Cross, one outdoors and the 
other in the vestibule of the beauti- 
ful new edifice. The ceremony of 
blessing was set for Sunday, April 
24, and was performed by Father 
John Baptist Pechulis, C.P., who af- 
terward preached to those present. 
The Students were also invited, and 
sang for Benediction after the cere- 
mony. The statues are of white car- 
rara marble. 



On a Thursday afternoon, in mid- 
April, the Students and some of the 
Fathers listened to a lecture by Mr. 
George Solar and a Mr. Smithers, 
both members of Alcoholics Anony- 
mous. The vivid description, in very 
personal terms, by the two gentle- 
men, of their long trek back from 
the shadows of alcoholism, was an 
unforgettable and rewarding exper- 
ience for those present. Neither Mr. 
Solar nor Mr. Smithers is a Catholic, 
though obviously groping for the 
truth, and both were greatly impress- 
ed by the glimpse of monastic life 
and Catholicism that the occasion af- 
forded them. 



win O'Hara, Archbishop-Bishop of 
Kansas City, Missouri, the episcopal 
chairman of the Committee for the 
new translation of the New Testa- 
ment, has been appointed to the 
active chairmanship of the transla- 
tion committee, succeeding Rev. Fr. 
McConnell, M.M., whom illness had 
forced to resign. This new transla- 
tion of the New Testament, in accord- 
ance with the desires of the Holy 
See, is being made from the original 
Greek, and will replace the present 
Confraternity Edition, which was 
translated from the Vulgate. In order 
to be able to handle the many duties 
imposed upon him, and especially in 
order to be available for frequent 
consultation with the other Scripture 
scholars engaged in the translation 
work, Father Barnabas Mary will 
spend the next six months at St. 
Michael Monastery, Union City, N.J. 



Fr. Barnabas Mary Ahern, C.P., at 

the special request of Most Rev. Ed- 



The Viatorian Fathers are estab- 
lishing their Major Seminary Depart- 
ment in Chicago, near Evanston. 
Toward this end they have been 
preparing a Theological Faculty. 
Since their Scripture men have not 
yet completed their studies in Rome, 
the Very Rev. John F. Brown, C.S.V., 
Provincial, has appealed to the Pas- 
sionists to supply a Scripture Profes- 
sor. During the past year, Fr. Joseph 
Mary O'Leary, C.P. conducted Scrip- 
ture classes two days a week for the 
Viatorian Students at Arlintgon 
Heights, 111. Arrangements are being 
made for Father Joseph Mary and 
Father Carrol Stuhlmuehler, C.P. to 
conduct similar classes at Evanston 
during the coming school year. 



405 



Mr. Lawrence J. Ryan, one of the 

outstanding benefactors of Holy Cross 
Province, died of a heart attack in 
Florence, Italy, on June 12. The body 
was flown back to this country, and 
the funeral was held in St. Paul of 
the Cross Church, Park Ridge, 111., on 
Tuesday, June 21. On Monday, June 
20, Very Rev. Fr. Boniface Fielding, 
C.P. offered a special Mass in St. 
Paul of the Cross Church. The Pro- 
vince owes Mr. Lawrence Ryan a 
great debt of gratitude, for his vast 
generosity, in a financial way, over 
the past twenty years. R.I. P. 

HOLY CROSS MONASTERY 

(Cincinnati) 

Holy Cross Retreat House conclud- 



ed a very successful drive to raise 
funds for the remodeling of the Mon- 
astery and Retreat House. The grand 
prize, in the drawing held June 1st, 
went to Mr. Joseph Koch, a retreat- 
ant from St. Mark's Church, Cincin- 
nati. Mr. Koch, our information goes, 
was at home saying his prayers be- 
fore retiring, when the telephone 
rang to inform him his name had 
been drawn. He refused to believe 
the good news at first, till soon rela- 
tives, neighbors and friends began to 
descend upon him and his wife, to 
offer congratulations! 

A vote of sincere thanks is due to 
the men of the Cincinnati area, to 
Fr. Wilfrid, C.P., and to Mr. William 




Mr. Joseph Koch, winner of the grand prize in the Benefit Drawing for Holy 
Cross Retreat House, being presented with a check by Mr. Charles Epping- 
hoff, President of the National Retreat Conference. Behind Mr. Koch stand 
his wife and daughter. To his left are Mr. William Miller, Chairman of the 
Drive, and Fr. Wilfrid Flannery, C.P., Retreat Director. 



406 




Present at the "drawing" of the grand prize were (I. to r.) V. Rev. Father 
Gilbert, Rector of Holy Cross Retreat House, V. Rev. Father Neil, C.P., Pro- 
vincial of Holy Cross Province, Hon. Carl Rich, Mayor of Cincinnati, Mr. 
William Miller, Chairman of the drive and Fr. Wilfrid, C.P., Retreat Director 
of Holy Cross Retreat House 



Miller, General Chairman of the 
drive for funds, for making the raf- 
fle one of the most successful ever 
staged for our retreat work. The pro- 
ceeds has already gone out for bills 
or is ear-marked for future ones. 
The repair work and remodelling is 
still going on, and no immediate end 
is in sight. The elevator should be 
in operation within a couple of 
weeks. The work was held up all 
winter long by the inexcusable in- 
action of the Ben Shaffer Co. con- 



tracted to build the shaft. Their in- 
efficiency caused not only delay but 
much inconvenience and damage dur- 
ing the extreme cold weather. 



At the height of the change from 
monastic quarters to retreat accomo- 
dations a group of deacons of the 
Glenmary Missioners were here to 
enjoy the "quiet" of a retreat in 
preparation for ordination. The re- 
treat was conducted by Father Ber- 
nard Brady, C.P. 



407 



During the first week of July Fr. 
Nicholas, C.P. relinquished his post 
as chaplain to the Passionist Nuns 
in Covington. It is the plan of the 
bishop to use the convent chapel as 
a temporary parish church while the 
new parish is being built up in the 
vicinity. Fr. Nicholas was one of the 
few religious priests still at work in 
the Covington diocese. 



On the Fifth of July the com- 
munity of Holy Cross was happy to 
welcome back Fr. Dunstan, C.P. who 
due to a heart condition had an en- 
forced stay in California following 
a Sign preaching assignment. 



SACRED HEART RETREAT 

(Louisville) 

At about 9:45 P.M., on the Feast of 
the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin, 
July 2, Father Andrew of the Cross 
(Ahler) was called to eternity. For 
the past several years Father had 
been more or less inactive and during 
the last months it had been neces- 



f JK 

Jet <** : w 












Fr. Andrew, C.P. 





sary for him to be taken care of in 
St. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital, 
where also his death took place in 
the presence of Very Rev. Fr. Boni- 
face, Rector, Frs. Emmanuel, Regis 
and our Infirmarian, Brother Francis, 
besides several of the good and de- 
voted Sisters of Charity of Nazareth. 

During his active life Father had 
made many friends for himself by 
his kindness and readiness to be of 
assistance and many a soul thought 
very highly of him in consequence 
of spiritual advice rendered. 

Father Andrew was born July 29, 
1890 in Frankfort, Ky., professed 
August 30, 1911 and ordained June 
27, 1917. Very Rev. Father Neil, 
Provincial was celebrant of the fun- 
eral Mass in St. Agnes Church, Louis- 
ville, with Frs. Regis and James as 
Deacon and Subdeacon. The funeral 
sermon was given by Fr. Stanislaus. 
Most Reverend Charles G. Maloney, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Louisville, was 
celebrant for the obsequies after the 
Mass. Very Reverend Father Provin- 
cial gave the final blessing at the 
grave in the monastic cemetary aside 
of St. Agnes Church. R.I.P. 



The Community of Sacred Heart 
had the honor and pleasure of again 
having His Excellency Bishop Cuth- 
bert, C.P., as their guest for a few 
days in June. On the Feast of St. 
John the Baptist His Excellency was 
kind enough to celebrate a Pontifical 
Low Mass for us at eight o'clock in 
St. Agnes Church. 



On June 19, Father Roger, Director 
of the Confraternity of the Passion 



408 



in Louisville, held a panel meeting 
with "eye witness' accounts of the 
Convention held in Hartford during 
the last days of May. He brought 
home with him the enthusiasm that 
evidently ran high in Hartford and 
by means of photographs, souvenirs 
and discussions tried to enkindle it 
here to further the spirit of the 
Confraternity. 



to make his residence at Sacred Heart 
Retreat. 



Following the examinations, June 
13 and 14 the newly ordained Fathers 
of this Community received faculties 
to hear Confessions and to preach 
and had ample opportunity to use 
said faculties in the neighboring par- 
ishes, especially on Sundays. The 
last two weeks of the scholastic year 
were taken up with Fr. Thomas More's 
course in Pastoral Psychiatry. This 
year the course had the added fea- 
ture of panels on "Recovery Inc." and 
"Alcoholics Anonymous", sponsored 
by Mrs. and Mr. Dieruf, respectively, 
who are prominent along these lines 
in Louisville. 



On June 17, Fr. Eugene, a member 
of the class of newly ordained priests 
here, received notice to leave Louis- 
ville early in July to take the summer 
course in Spiritual Theology at River 
Forest, 111., and then, in September, 
to repair to Rome to persue further 
studies in Theology. The rest of the 
class are scheduled to leave Louis- 
ville July 11 to start their journey 
to Sierra Madre, California, for the 
Sacred Eloquence Course. 



After July 4 the Louisville Com- 
munity will miss the very valuable 
and faithful Mr. Cyril Lancaster. He 
has now been working for the Mon- 
astery about 11 years, but for various 
reasons judged it imperative to move 
with his family back to Kansas. 



Towards the end of June the Com- 
munity was happy to welcome Father 
Emmanuel, who had been appointed 



On June 3, the First Friday of the 
month, Dr. Michael J. Henry died 
suddenly in St. Agnes Church whilst 
attending Holy Mass there. Fr. Roger 
was called to annoint him on the 
spot where he was stricken; first aid 
was given by Dr. George Roth and 
Sisters and nurses were in attendance 
from Our Lady of Peace Hospital. 
But all to no avail. The Doctor was 
dead before he arrived at the hos- 
pital. Dr. Henry is not only well 
known to many of our Fathers but 
also took care of quite a few of them 
in their illnesses. On the same day, 
in St. Joseph's Hospital Dr. Lyne 
Smith died; also Dr. Smith had care 
of several members of our Province 
during their sickness. 

MOTHER OF GOOD COUNSEL 
RETREAT 

(St. Louis) 
Of interest to the whole Province 
is the work under progress at War- 
renton, Missouri. Bids were taken 
June 16 on the construction of the 
new Preparatory Seminary, and con- 
struction began shortly after. The 
construction schedule calls for the 
completion of the Seminary by Sep- 
tember, 1956. Work will be done on 
the new retreat house simultaneously, 



409 




X^r* 



The new Preparatory Seminary and Monastery at Warrenton, Mo. 



and it is hoped that both buildings 
will be completed by the above date. 
The property on which the new 
Preparatory Seminary and Retreat 
House are to be situated is a beau- 
tiful tract of land about one mile 



east of Truesdale-Warrenton, Missou- 
ri. It is 55 miles from the Union 
Station, St. Louis, off Highway 40, 
the main highway between St. Louis 
and Kansas City. The tract comprises 
approximately 450 acres and, as des- 




The new Laymen's Retreat House at Warrenton, Mo. 



410 



Approximate locations of the 
various rooms and offices of 
the new Preparatory Seminary: 
A— Chapel; B— College Dormi- 
tory; C— High School Dormi- 
tory; D-High School Class 
Rooms; E— High School Recre- 
ation Rooms; F— Gymnasium 
and Auditorium; G— Parlors; 
H— Library; I— Refectory J— 
Boiler Room; K— Kitchen; L— 
Infirmary Rooms; M— Monas- 
tery; N— Altars; O— Choir. 




Floor Plan of our New Preparatory Seminary 
Building at Warrenton, Mo. 



cribed by an appraiser, is "an excel- 
lent tract of slightly rolling to rolling 
land, well located; about 30 acres in 
timber, about 80 acres in timber pas- 
ture, the balance in grass, suitable 
for the plow and in fine condition." 

The new preparatory seminary and 
retreat house will be easily accesible 
from St. Louis. Bus services to War- 
renton are very frequent, and the 
Wabash Rail Road, whose main line 
to Kansas City touches the edge of 
the seminary property, has indicated 
that it will be willing to stop all its 
trains, save one, at the Truesdale 
Station, which is a mile from the 
entrance to the property. 

General Contractors for the new 
buildings is the J. A. McNeil Com- 
pany, of Alhambra, California, the 
same company that constructed the 
new retreat houses in Sierra Madre 
and Sacramento. Mr. Alec J. Arany 
is the Architect. The new buildings 
will utilize a new construction tech- 
nique, for the first time in the St. 
Louis area, that of pre-cast concrete, 
"tilt-up" construction, in which the 



walls will be cast in forms on the 
property, and lifted into place. 

Plans call for separation of the 
High School and Junior College units, 
both of which, in turn, are separated 
from the Monastery unit. The high 
school is designed for a capacity of 
100 boys, while the junior college 
will provide private rooms for a max- 
imum of 42. The Monastery will have 
38 rooms for priests and brothers, 
in addition to rooms for visitors. 

A preliminary survey has been un- 
dertaken for development of the ath- 
letic grounds, and for the provision 
of an artificial lake. 



Mrs. Agnes Nevin, Father Claude's 
mother, died after a comparatively 
short illness, in St. John's Hospital, 
on May 30. On May 31, the whole 
Community gathered in the Chapel 
for the Solemn Funeral Mass, sung 
by Father Claude, assisted by Fathers 
Herbert and Leon, as deacon and 
subdeacon respectively. The sermon 
was preached by Father Aloysius. 
Father Claude then accompanied the 



411 



body to Cincinnati, where it was 
buried in the family lot. R.I.P. 



The farewell for the novices-elect 

was held on the evening of June 12. 
Eight seminarians left for the Novi- 
tiate: Robert Zerr, Walter Sobczak, 
Anthony Deshaw, Robert Hollcraft, 
Donald Pates, Robert Albert, Donald 
Devaney and Gregory Timlin. 



Graduation ceremonies for the High 
School Department were held on Sun- 
day afternoon, June 26. Very Rev. 
Fr. Elmer, the Rector, officiated at 
the special services, at which Fr. 
Leon gave the graduation address, 
explaining to the graduates the mean- 
ing of the ceremony in the light of 
their vocation. On the following day, 
all the boys departed for the sum- 
mer vacation. 



The 1955 PREPANNUAL, the Sem- 
inary magazine-yearbook, made its 
debut on June 12, and received fine 
praise from the Community. Under 
the capable direction of Fr. William 
Joseph, the PREPANNUAL launched 
some new features this year. It is 
dedicated to Most Rev. Fr. General 
and to his class of 1929, which this 
year celebrates its Silver Jubilee of 
Ordination. 

ST. FRANCIS DE HIERONYMO 
(St. Paul, Kansas) 

If the previous issue of the Bulle- 
tin had gone to print