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Full text of "Past and present of Adams County, Nebraska"

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PAST AND PRESENT 



OF 



ADAMS COUNTY 

NEBRASKA 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1916 



1585318 




WILLIAM R. BCRTOX 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



WILLIAM R. BURTON. 

jMacaulaj^ has said that "the history of a country is best told in the 
lives of its people," and if we would preserve the history of any 
section, the facts must be preserved while those wlio have been par- 
ticipants in important events still remain to tell the tale of their 
activities. There is no one better qualified to speak of Adams county 
and its annals than Hon. William R. Burton, so closely has he been 
associated with events that figure prominently in its records. He is 
a product of the frontier of Southwestern JNIissouri, where he was 
born June 30, 1843, the eldest of five children born to the marriage 
of Garrett Burton and Catherine Ware. He was a student in the 
Northwestern Christian University at Indianapolis, Indiana, at the 
time of the outbreak of the Civil war and, laying aside his textbooks, 
he enlisted Juh% 1861, in response to the country's call for aid, be- 
coming a member of Company E, Twenty-third Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, M'ith which he served until wounded in one of the engage- 
ments of the Vicksburg campaign. After recovering from his in- 
juries he served in the quartermaster's department of the Army of 
the Cumberland under General Thomas until honorably discharged 
at the close of the war in 1865, 

For a time Mr. Burton engaged in the practice of law in Union 
county, Indiana, but temporarily abandoned that profession to become 
a member of the editorial staff of the Indianapolis Journal. In 1883 
he removed to Adams county, Nebraska, and for a time engaged in 
teaching school, but the recognition of his ability as a lawyer, his 
public spirit and his trustworthiness as a citizen led to his election to 
the office of judge of the city court of Hastings in 1887, every ballot 
except one being cast in his favor. In 1889 he was elected county 
judge and served upon the bench in that capacity until January, 1894, 
his decisions being strictly fair and impartial, so that he "won golden 
opinions from all sorts of people." Since then he has devoted his 
attention to the jiractice of law. 

5 



6 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Judge Burton was married in 1873 to JMiss Anna J. Langtree, of 
Madison, Indiana, and they have one son. For almost the third of a 
century the family have resided in this state and throughout the entire 
period JNIr. Burton has not only been an interested witness of the 
events which have occurred in shaping the history of his county, but 
has been a most active jiarticipant in many and on more than one 
occasion has been the leader and molder of public thought and action. 



JAMES P. A. BLACK. 

James P. A. Black, of Hastings, is a typical western man, plain 
and unassuming in manner, strong and upright in purpose, readily 
adapting himself to changing conditions or the needs of any situation 
and at all times alert, enterprising, progressive and honorable. He is 
largely a self-educated as well as a self-made man and is one of the 
stalwart characters that the west jjroduces, his powers having grown 
through the exercise of effort. The feeling entertained for him 
throughout the community in Avhich he lives is indicated in the fact 
that he is known as "Jim" to all of his friends and yet high Honors 
have come to him at the hands of his fellow toAvnsmen and success in 
large measure has rewarded his efforts. He is today president of the 
German National Bank of Hastings and at the same time he is widely 
known as a successful lawyer and real estate dealer. 

JNIr. Black was born in Prospect, Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
October 10, 18.54, a son of Isaac and Jane Black, natives of Ohio and 
of Pennsylvania respectivel}'. The father was a teacher during much 
of his life and in 1860 went to the Omaha Indian INIission, being sent 
there as a teacher by the Presbyterian Board of IMissions. He con- 
tinued in that work until 1867, when he established his home upon a 
farm in Nemaha county, Nebraska. About 1871, however, he re- 
turned to the Omaha Reservation, where he remained as a teacher in 
the employ of the government until the sj^ring of 1879, when he 
removed to Bloomington, Franklin county, Nebraska, and there lived 
retired. In 1905 he came to Hastings, where he passed away at the 
advanced age of eighty-four years. In early life he had been superin- 
tendent of schools in Butler county, Pennsylvania. His entire career 
was characterized by useful service for the benefit of others and his 
influence was of no restricted order. His wife was a native of Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, where she was reared and educated, and she 
too has passed away. They were long consistent members of the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 7 

Presbyterian church and their Christian lives constituted a potent 
influence and example for good wherever they were known. They 
had three children: W. SteAvart, who died in 1873; James P. A.; and 
one Avho died in infancy while the family were making the trip to the 
west. 

Mr. Black was about five and a half years of age when the family 
left Pennsylvania and started for the west. His youth being largely 
jDassed amid the Indian tribe of the Omaha Reservation, he picked up 
the language of the red men with a readiness with which a child always 
masters a foreign tongue, and he used the Indian language so largely 
that for some time after leaving the reservation he did not speak real 
plain, pure English. He went to school with the Indians until thir- 
teen years of age, at which time the family removed to Nemaha 
county, after which the father instructed JNIr. Black and his brother 
on the farm. In the spring of 1870 he removed to Peru, Nebraska, 
Avhere Mr. Black entered the State Normal School, there remaining 
until his graduation with the class of 1876. His course, however, was 
not continuous, for during that period he taught in the district schools 
for three years and with the money thus earned paid his own way 
through normal. Determining upon the practice of law as a life 
work, he began studying with the Arm of Cobb, ]\Iarquette & INIoore, 
of Lincoln, Nebraska, and in the spring of 1877 was admitted to the 
bar, after which he went to Bloomington, where he entered upon active 
practice, there remaining until the fall of 1904. He also extended his 
efforts into other fields, for in 1882 he established the Franklin County 
Bank at Bloomington, a private banldng institution, which he con- 
ducted in connection with a partner. About 1889 this was converted 
into a state bank with ]Mr. Black as president and thus he continued 
until 1904, when he sold his interest and removed to Hastings. Here 
he purchased stock in the German National Bank, was at once elected 
its president and has since continued in that capacity. He has also 
been attorney for the bank throughout the entire period but otherwise 
does no active professional work at the present time. 

In 1883 Mr. Black was married to ]Miss Kittie Ross, a native of 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, where she was reared and educated. 
They became the parents of a daughter, Edna, who is now the widow 
of M. O. Bishop. JNIrs. Black passed away in 188.5 in the faith of the 
Presbyterian church, of which she was a consistent member. In De- 
cember, 1891, ]\Ir. Black wedded ]Mrs. Candace W. Tussey, a native 
of Ohio, but an old resident of Adams county. 

In his political views INIr. Black is a stalwart republican and under 
appointment served as county treasurer of Franklin county, Nebraska, 



8 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

while for two years he was county attorney. His opinions have long 
carried weight in party councils and he has contributed in substantial 
measure to republican successes. He studies thoroughly the questions 
and issues of the day so that he is always readj^ to support his position 
by intelligent argument. Mr. Black was made a JNIason in Joppa 
Lodge, No. 76, A. F. & A. M., of Bloomington, and belongs to Hast- 
ings Chapter, R. A. M. He has been ver}^ prominent in the order, 
having served as grand orator, grand marshal, grand deacon, grand 
senior warden and in 1893 as grand master of the Grand Lodge of 
Nebraska. He has also taken all of the degrees of the Scottish Rite 
and has been a veiy j)rominent worker and representative of the craft. 
His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church and they occupy a 
very enviable social position. Aside from his other interests jNIr. 
Black has dealt largely in real estate and is now the owner of much 
valuable property, including both town and farm lands. ^Vhen Judge 
Guslin, one of the early noted jurists of Nebraska, passed away it 
was his request that Jim Black take charge of the services of the 
funeral, which he did. This is but one evidence of his standing among 
his fellow citizens. He is always approachable, courteous and kindly 
and his cordiality is unfeigned, for iie has a deep interest in his fellow- 
men and is thoroughly alive to all conditions of the present and its 
opportunities. He stands today strong in his honor and his good 
name, strong in his ability to plan and to perform. 



THOMAS KENNEDY, 



Adams county OAves the greater part of its prosperity to the labors 
of its energetic and progressive agriculturists, among whom Thomas 
Kennedy was numbered. He acquired title to valuable farm land on 
sections 4 and 5, Highland township, and for many years devoted liis 
time and energies to its cultivation and improvement and in the course 
of time acquired financial independence. His demise, which occurred 
on the 10th of October, 1914, was sincerely mourned and his memory 
is still honored by those who knew him. His birtli occurred in County 
Sligo, Ireland, on the 27th of August, 1843, and his j^arents were 
James and Bridget (GilHgan) Kennedy. The family was originally 
Scotch but later settled in the north and west of Ireland. The father, 
who was a weaver by trade, preceded his family to this country and 
prepared a home for them, after Avhich they joined him. For some 
time they lived in Waterloo, New York, whence they removed to 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 9 

Chicago, where thej- spent ten years. The next removal was to a 
farm in the vicinity of Fall River, Wisconsin, and there the father 
and mother passed away. To them were born nine children, Bridget, 
Thomas, James, IMichael, William, John, Catherine, Mary and INIar- 
garet, the three eldest of whom were natives of Ireland, while the 
others were born in America. All of the daughters are now married 
and ^Michael owns the homestead. 

Thomas Kennedy Avas ten years of age when he came to this coun- 
try and continued his education in the public schools here. About 
1877 or 1878 he came to Nebraska with Thomas Kernan and while 
on the way to Hastings met JNIr. Fisher, who was also intending to 
locate in this locality. Mr. Fisher established a bakery at Hastings 
and met with gratifying success in his undertaking and JNIr. Kennedy 
settled on three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 5, High- 
land township. Subsequentl)' he bought eighty acres on section 4, 
which made the total of his holdings four hundred acres, and his well 
directed labors enabled him to secure a handsome financial return 
from his land. He raised hogs and cattle and also grew considerable 
grain. At first he raised corn and oats but later substituted wheat 
for oats. After his first home was burned he erected the present resi- 
dence, which is a comfortable and well designed structure, and he also 
built good barns and outbuildings. 

On the 19th of February, 1889, Mr. Kennedy was united in mar- 
riage to jNIiss jMargaret Conroy, a daughter of Stephen and Catherine 
(Wright) Conroy, both natives of Ireland. IMrs. Kennedy was born 
in County Galway on the 19th of August, 1864, and was one of a 
family of seven children to emigrate to this country, the others being 
John, jNIark, James, INIary, Annie and Katherine. To Mv. and INIrs. 
Kennedy were born six children, one of whom died in infancy. The 
others are JNIary, James, Thomas, Katherine and William, all of whom 
are residing on the homestead. 

JNIr. Kennedy was one of the founders of St. Patrick's Catliolic 
church in Highland township and helped to defray the expense of 
erecting the house of worship. His wife is also a communicant of that 
church and takes a commendable interest in the advancement of 
its work. He gave his political allegiance to the democratic party 
and could be depended upon to fulfill his duties as a citizen although 
he never took a prominent part in politics. His time was taken up 
with the work of developing his farm and the care and labor which he 
bestowed upon it were well rewarded. His land was kept in a high 
state of cultivation and he seldom failed to harvest good crops, while 
his stock raising interests also proved profitable. When he removed 



10 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

to his place it was still wild prairie and he broke the sod with oxen — 
a tedious and arduous task. The success which he gained Avas well 
deserved, for it was the direct reward of his enterprise, industry and 
good judgment, and he was justly accounted one of the leading resi- 
dents of his township. 



W. T. CARSON, M.D. 



Dr. W. T. Carson, who follows the most improved scientific 
methods in the practice of medicine and surgerj^ is one of the more 
recent arrivals in Hastings, having taken up his abode here in October, 
1915, but he is not unknown in the county, for he had j^reviously 
practiced with success at Holstein. He was born in Moline, Illinois, 
July 24, 1867, a son of Peter N. and Ida (Gurius) Carson, both of 
whom were natives of Germany but in early life came to the United 
States. They were married in JMoline, Illinois, and removed to La 
Crosse, Wisconsin, where W. T. Carson attended the public schools 
until twelve years of age. The family then went to Denver, Colo- 
rado, where they lived for one year. They removed to Hastings, 
Nebraska, in 1881, and the first set of abstract books for Adams 
county was made by INIr. Carson. For some time he was deputy 
county clerk and was very able in the discharge of his duties. W. T. 
Carson remained in Denver until 1885, when he came to Hastings 
and spent one year as a student in Hastings College. He afterward 
attended the State University of Iowa, there pursuing his medical 
course, which he completed by graduation with the class of 1889. 
He then located for practice in Holstein, where he remained for 
twenty-six years, or until October, 1915, when he returned to Hast- 
ings and opened an office. He is wideh^ recognized as an able 
physician and his ability has brought to him a liberal and growing 
practice. 

In early manhood Dr. Carson was imited in marriage to JNIiss 
Jennie E. Larsen, a daughter of C. P. Larsen. They have two 
children, Leona and William, both of whom are attending school. 
Fraternally Dr. Carson is connected with the INIodern Woodmen of 
America and filled nearly all of the offices in the camp at Holstein, 
of which he was a charter member. He is identified with the Eagles 
at Hastings and the Sons of Herman. He belongs to the Lutheran 
church and in his political views is a republican, being recognized 
as one of the active leaders in the local ranks of the party. He served 



■s^.m^v 



""f i) 






DR. \V. T. CARSdX 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 13 

as chairman of the town board when in Holstein and as mayor of the 
city and was a member of the school board there and also treasurer 
of the school district. His attention, however, has chiefly been con- 
centrated along the line of his profession. He is not only a graduate 
physician but also a registered pharmacist and likewise a graduate 
of the Jacksonian Optical College. These add to his efficiency in 
the treatment of patients and at all times he keejis in touch with the 
trend of modern thought and progress. He belongs to the Adams 
County, Nebraska State, and American ]\Iedical Associations, is also 
a member of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science and has taken several post-graduate courses and also attended 
clinics in Germany, specializing in the diseases of women and chil- 
dren. He reads broadly, thinks deeply and the result of his investi- 
gations is manifest in his growing ability in his practice. 



TRUMAN S. PHILLIPS. 

Truman S. Phillips was an efficient and up-to-date farmer and 
his well directed labors yielded him a gratifying financial return. He 
was also recognized as a public-spirited citizen and in his earlj^ man- 
hood gave indisputable proof of his patriotism by enlisting for service 
in the Union army in the Civil war. A native of the state of New 
York, his birth occurred on the 3d of June, 1838, and his parents were 
Asa and Sarah Ann Phillips. They removed to the vicinity of St. 
Catharines, Canada, when our subject was but a child and there the 
mother passed awaj' in 1843. The father continued to reside there 
until 1858, when he returned to the United States. His last days 
were spent in California, where his demise occurred in 1894. 

Truman S. Phillips received a public school education and during 
his boyhood and youth also became familiar with the best methods nf 
agricultural work. In 1858 he removed to Grundy county, Illinois, 
and engaged in farming rented land there until September, 1862. 
when he joined Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illi- 
nois ^^olunteer Infantry. He remained at the front with his com- 
mand until 1865, and took part in over one liundred battles and 
marched over three thousand miles. His regiment was one of four 
mentioned in general orders for marching and good discipline. The 
greater part of ]Mr. Phillips' service was in the sotith and he i^ar- 
tici])ated in the Tallahatchie campaign and the Vicksburg Expedition 
under General Sherman, in the battle of Chickasaw Bayou and the 



14 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

battle of Ai'kansas Post, in which his regmient was the first to break 
through the enemy's lines and plant their colors, in the Grand Gulf 
camjiaign, the battle of Champion's Hill, in a number of engagements 
around Vicksburg, in the battles of Jackson and Chattanooga, in the 
Atlanta and the Savannah campaigns and the battles of Fa3'etteville 
and Bentonville. On the 3d of August, 1864, JNIr. Phillips was 
wounded in the leg bj^ a minie ball and his widow still has the bullet 
in her possession. She also has a sword which he captmed from a 
rebel and many other relics of his military exijerience. After par- 
ticipating in the Grand Review and receiving his honorable discharge 
from the army Mr. Phillips Avent to Gardner, Illinois, where he en- 
gaged in farming and blacksmithing until 1897. In that year he came 
to Kenesaw townshij), Adams county, and purchased two hundred and 
forty acres, on which he made his home until his demise on the 9th 
of July, 1903. He was a man of great energy and spared no pains in 
bringing his farm to a high state of development and in keeping 
everything about the place in the best possible condition. He did 
general farming and received a gratifying income from his land. 

On the 13th of October, 1868, occurred the marriage of jNIr. Phil- 
lips and JNIiss Jane E. Harpham, of Gardner, Illinois, who was born 
in Spaulding, England, on the 13th of December, 1850. Her parents, 
Samuel and Sarah Harpham, were both natives of England and her 
father served for seven years in the English army. In 18.50 he re- 
moved with his family to the United States and located in IMichigan, 
where he resided for nineteen years, after which he took up his resi- 
dence in the vicinity of Gardner, Illinois. In 1861 he went to the 
defense of his adojited country, enlisting in Company B, Fifty-third 
Illinois Infantry. He took part in the engagements at Savannah, 
Shiloh, Corinth, Jackson and Vicksburg and in the Yoena Exi^edition. 
Following the expiration of their first term of enlistment his entire 
regiment reenlisted and fought in the Atlanta campaign and in the 
Carolina campaign in the pursuit of General Hood. They took part 
in tlie Grand RevieAv at Washington and were mustered out on the 
22d of July, 1865, at Chicago. ]Mr. Harpham made a record of 
which he had every right to be proud, never faltering in the perform- 
ance of any duty no matter how arduous or dangerous. He not only 
took part in many engagements but also made an unusual number of 
long marches, covering in all seven thousand twenty-three miles. 
After the period of hostilities he returned to the pursuits of civil life 
and for some time farmed in the vicinity of Gardner, Illinois, where 
he later conducted a butcher shop. He passed away in 1901 and his 
wife died in 1895. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 15 

INIr. and Mrs. Phillips became the parents of eight children: 
Edward L., a resident of Forest City, Iowa; Anna, the wife of S. 
Allison, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Asa, who is living in Kenesaw; Nor- 
man, deceased; Betsy, the wife of C. Erickson, who resides near 
Prosser; Cornelia, deceased; Ella, who married M. Rogers, of Los 
Angeles, California; and Daniel, at home. 

JMr. Phillips was a stalwart adherent of the republican party 
which vij)held the Union in the darkest days of its history. His re- 
ligious faith was that of the Presbyterian church and he held mem- 
l)ership in the Grand Army of the Republic while living in Illinois. 
His life was a busy and useful one and in carrying on his agricultural 
operations he contributed to the development of his locality as well as 
gained financial independence for liimself. His personality was such 
that he gained the warm regard of those A\'ith whom he was brought 
in close contact and his friends still honor his memory. 



E. WEEKS. 



E. Weeks is one of the prominent agriculturists of Adams county. 
He lives in the vicinity of Juniata, where he owns an entire section 
of land, ujjon which he has four sets of buildings and other substantial 
improvements. He likewise has other farm property in the county 
and elsewhere in the state and his jiossessions are the visible evidence 
of an active and well spent life, his course ever being marked by inde- 
fatigable energj^ intelligently directed. He was born in Stafford- 
shire, England, February 8, 1854, a son of Thomas and Rebecca 
Weeks, who in the year 1861 came to the United States, settling at 
Kewanee, Illinois. There the mother passed away, after which the 
father removed to Fountain Green, Utah, wliere his death occurred in 
the year 1905. His entire life was devoted to coal mining. To his 
first marriage there were born seven children : Hannah and Thomas, 
both deceased; E., of this review; JNIrs. Rachel "Whitehouse, of Hall 
county, Nebraska; H. W., living in Kewanee, Ilhnois; Israel, de- 
ceased; and jNIartha, whose home is in Chicago, Illinois. After losing 
his first wife the father married Betty Bates, a native of England, 
and their children are ]Mrs. Tillie CoUard, a resident of Fountain 
Green, Utah; and INIrs. INIary A. Ostler. 

E. Weeks was a little lad of but seven years when brought by his 
parents to the new world. He is a self-made man in the truest and 
best sense of the term. He attended the common schools but his edu- 



16 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

cational privileges were extremely limited, for when but nine years 
of age he began working in the mines and was thus employed at dig- 
ging coal until he reached the age of twenty-six years. He then 
removed to Union county, Iowa, and for eight years engaged in farm- 
ing a mile north of Creston, after which he came to Nebraska, settling 
in Verona toAvnship near the Bigelow schoolhouse. He took up his 
abode there in 1888 and continued to engage in farming upon that 
tract of land until 1891, Avhen he removed to his present place near 
Juniata. To his farm he has added all modern improvements, making 
it one of the valuable proj)erties of the county. It is equijiped Avith 
all the accessories and conveniences of the model farm of the twentieth 
century and is a most attractive and well kept place. On this tract 
are four sets of buildings, and he also has eighty acres on section 18 
in Denver township. He holds title to six hundred and forty acres in 
Adams county, a half section in Perkins comity, Nebraska, and land 
at Lakeview, Oregon. 

In 1880, at Kewanee, Illinois, jNIr. AVeeks was united in marriage 
to ]Miss Hannah Coats, by whom he has four children, namely: Ina, 
the wife of Charles Cooper, who lives near the home of his father-in- 
law ; Elbert, a resident of Verona township, this county ; Vada, who is 
the wife of ^Miller Kindig and resides near Juniata; and John L., 
living on the home place. 

]Mr. Weeks formerly gave his political allegiance to the republican 
party but is now supjjorting President Wilson. He holds to progres- 
sive ideas on political questions and stands for all that is best in 
citizenship. He attends the ]Methodist Episcopal church and is a 
member of the ]Modern Woodmen camp at Juniata, in which he has 
held all of the offices. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers 
Elevator Company of Juniata and is a most progressive citizen, wide- 
awake, alert and enterj^rising, carefully directing his business efforts 
and winning success through persistent energy, determination and 
honorable dealing. 



JOHN M. TEELING. 



John ]M. Teeling is proprietor of the Clarke Hotel, which is not 
only the leading hostelry of Hastings, but also one of the finest in 
the state, and ranks as one of the finest hotels between Chicago and 
Denver. It is conducted according to the most modern ideas of hotel 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 17 

management, being under the control of a most progressive, enter- 
prising business man. 

Mr. Teeling was born at Waukon, Iowa, August 15, 1877. His 
father, James Teeling, was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and 
there married Anna JNIartin, after which they came to the United 
States, in 1872, establishing their home upon a farm near Lansing, 
Iowa, where their remaining days were passed. The father died in 
1878 and the mother passed away later in the same year, leaving 
John M. Teeling an orphan during his early infancy. 

The boy was reared by Mr. and Mrs. James Sweeney, of Alla- 
makee county, Iowa, who had been neighbors of his parents, and he 
there attended the country schools until he reached the age of four- 
teen years. In 1898 he went to Milwaukee, where he entered upon 
his career as a hotel man, becoming night clerk in the Schlitz Hotel, 
then the leading hostelry of that city. He was connected therewith 
for a year and a half, after which he went to Merrill, Wisconsin, 
where he became night clerk in the new Lincoln Hotel. Three 
months later he was made day clerk and seven months afterward 
became manager of the hotel, which he conducted until June, 1911. 
At that date he went to Rapid City as manager of the Harney Hotel, 
there remaining for six months, when he was transferred by the ]\Iid- 
West Hotel Comj^any to the Widman Hotel at ]Mitchell, South 
Dakota, where he remained for six months. On the expiration of 
that period he leased the new Lincoln Hotel at Watertown, South 
Dakota, furnished it and conducted it for a year, after which he dis- 
posed of his lease. He then came to Hastings, Nebraska, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1914, rented the Clarke Hotel, which is one of the finest hotels 
of the middle west, being scarcely equalled between Chicago and 
Denver. It contains one hundred and twenty rooms, sixty with bath, 
and has every modern convenience and equipment. The interior fin- 
ishing is artistic and attractive and the most careful attention has been 
paid to sanitation, ventilation, lighting, heating and, in fact, every- 
thing that will contribute to the comfort of the guest. The cuisine 
is unexcelled and the most courteous attention is demanded of all 
employes. 

On the 17th of February, 1901, at IMerrill, Wisconsin, Mr. Teeling 
was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Mollie Phielman. ]\Irs. Teeling died 
April 20, 1910, and Mr. Teeling was married August 1.5, 1911, to 
Mrs. Amanda Kyes, of Merrill, Wisconsin. He is a Catholic in 
religious faith and she is a Lutheran. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political indorsement is 
given to the democratic party, and while living at IMerrill, Wisconsin, 



18 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

he served for two years as city alderman. He is now serving on the 
staff of Governor INIorehead with the rank of colonel. His activities 
in the hotel field have made him widely known. He has an extensive 
acquaintance throughout the country and is a poj^ular host, geniality 
and affability winning him friends, while his s^Dlendid business quali- 
fications command for him the respect and confidence of those with 
whom he is brought in contact. 



R. L. WOODS. 



R. L. Woods is identified with the business interests of Prosser 
as the owner and manager of an up-to-date and well patronized hard- 
ware store and has gained recognition as a man of enterprise and 
sound judgment. His birth occurred in Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 27th of November, 1864, and his parents were Albert D. and 
JNIary Etta ( Coon) Woods. They were born and reared in New York 
state, where their marriage occurred, but subsequently removed to 
Pennsylvania, whence they came to Nebraska in 1871. They located 
in Otoe county, and there the father passed away in that year. Sub- 
sequently the mother returned to Pennsj-^lvania with her family, but 
still later removed to Portland, Oregon, where she died in 1914. The 
father followed the occupation of farming and stock dealing, and as 
he was industrious and understood the business thoroughly he met 
with a gratifying measure of success. There were five children in the 
family, namely: O. S., who is living at Pauline, this state; R. L.; 
Leland, deceased; Clarence A., who resides southwest of Blue Hill, 
in Webster county, Nebraska; and Susie B., the Avife of Joseph Bay- 
liss, of Lincoln. 

R. L. Woods received a good common school education and 
remained with his mother until he reached the age of thirteen years, 
when he returned to Otoe county, Nebraska. After he attained his 
majority he engaged in farming in that county for some time, but in 
1890 went to Milford, Seward county, where he worked for the 
Adams Express Company for three years. At the end of that time 
he located near Pauline, Adams county, and for nine years concen- 
trated his energies upon agricultural pursuits. At the end of that 
time he decided that he would prefer to devote his life to other busi- 
ness pursuits, and accordingly purchased a hardware store at Pauline 
from Glasier & Son. After conducting that business for some time 
he came to Prosser in 1912 and purchased a hardware business here. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 19 

which he has since owned and managed. He carries a large stock of 
shelf hardware, paints and oils, and the high quality of his goods, 
combined with his reasonable prices and fair dealing, has commended 
him to the support of the public. 

Mr. Woods was married in Sej)tember, 1907, to Miss Reka Rode- 
macher, by whom he has two sons: Dexter D., who is six years of 
age; and Chester H., who is three years old. 

IVIr. Woods supports the republican party, as he believes in its 
principles, and he is now serving in the office of township clerk. He 
belongs to the JNIasonic blue lodge at Blue Hill, the consistory at 
Hastings and the Shrine at Lincoln, and exemplifies in his life the 
beneficent teachings of that order. He attends the jNIethodist Epis- 
copal church and contributes to its support. The representative and 
lucrative patronage which he has gained is due entirely to his business 
ability and integrity, and he is recognized as one of the men who are 
contributing to the commercial growth of Prosser. 



E. P. HUBBARD. 



E. P. Hubbard, manager for the Juniata Grain & Live Stock 
Association and actively and prominently connected with other busi- 
ness enterprises which are factors in the material development and 
progress of his village and county, was born at IMarseilles, in La Salle 
county, Illinois, December 27, 1862, his parents being Porter and 
Emily (Godfrey) Hubbard, Avho were natives of Wisconsin. The 
mother died when her son, E. P., was but six years of age and he was 
left an orphan by his father's death when a little lad of nine years. 
He was the second in a family of three children, his elder brother 
being Levi, now a resident of El Paso, Texas, while his younger 
brother is C. S. Hubbard, of Grafton, Nebraska. 

At the time of his father's death E. P. Hubbard went to live with 
S. B. Spicer, remaining upon his farm until he had attained his major- 
ity, when the opportunities of the developing west attracted him and 
he made his way to Nebraska. Here he entered the employ of J. H. 
Spicer, who was living five miles south of Juniata and with whom he 
remained for one year. He afterward turned his attention to farm- 
ing, which he followed for a year, and still later he removed to Colo- 
rado, where he secured a preemption claim, complying with the law 
that ultimately brought him the title to the property. He then 
returned to Adams county, where he engaged in general farming until 



20 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

1897, when he became connected with the Juniata Grain & Live Stock 
Association, of which he has since been the manager. This company 
ojjerates two elevators at Juniata and is conducting a growing and 
profitable business. The ofiicers of the company are : T. C. Signor, 
president; J. F. Gangwish, vice president; W. S. Lamereux, secre- 
tary; and E. P. Hubbard, treasurer and manager. These gentlemen 
constitute the board of directors, together with T. A. Trausch, T. G. 
Whiting, E. D. Pratt and G. W. Long. The business was organized 
in 1897, at which time the company purchased an elevator, and in the 
intervening period they have built two others. Under the manage- 
ment and control of Mr. Hubbard the business is steadily growing 
and developing and has become ah important industry of the county. 

In 1891 ]\lr. Hubbard was married to IMiss Hattie L. Harris and 
they have become the j)arents of three children: Elizabeth, the wife 
of C. J. Willtrout, of Juniata ; Agnes, who is teaching the comfner- 
cial course in the Franklin Academy at Franklin, Nebraska; and 
EdAvin, deceased. They now have an adopted son, Paul. 

In politics Mr. Hubbard is an earnest democrat and is recognized 
as one of the active partj' workers in Adams county. He served as 
a member of the legislature in the year 1913, has been mayor of 
Juniata and is now serving as school director. He belongs to the 
Odd Fellows lodge at Juniata, in which he has passed through all the 
chairs, and he likewise holds membership in the JNIodern Woodmen 
camj) there. His sterling worth is recognized by all, for he is loyal 
to dut}', faithful to every trust reposed in him, and thoroughly reliable 
and straightforward in his business connections. 



JOHN C. STEVENS. 



John C. Stevens, deceased, was one of the prominent members of 
the Adams county bar, displaying marked skill and ability especially 
in the field of criminal law. He was born in New Jersey on the 8th 
of September, 1863, a son of Thomas and Mary (Devereaux) 
Stevens, who in the year 1883 came to Nebraska and settled upon a 
farm south of Hastings. Thej^ afterward removed to the city but 
both have now passed away. 

John C. Stevens was one of a family of eight children and after 
attending the public schools he supplemented his course of study by 
private reading. Entering upon preparation for the bar, he was 
admitted to jiractice in Hastings in 1889 and was with the firm of 




JOIW C. STEVENS 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 23 

McCreary, Cajsps & Stevens in active practice for a long period. No 
dreary novitiate awaited him. He came to the front ahnost imme- 
diately as a member of the bar, being strong and forceful in argvmient, 
clear in his reasoning and logical in his deductions. He was partic- 
ularly successful as a jury lawyer and many a man accused of crime 
has felt that his destinies were safe in the hands of Mr. Stevens, who 
had the rejiutation of securing more acquittals than perhaps any other 
practitioner at the Adams county bar. He always prepared his cases 
with thoroughness and care and was felicitous and clear in argument. 
On the 4th of February, 1890, Mr. Stevens was joined in wedlock 
to JNliss Marj^ Ann Rooney, a daughter of James and Bridget Rooney, 
who were born in Ireland but came to America in 1884. To Mr. and 
IMrs. Stevens were born two children : Anna JNIarie, who died at the 
age of nineteen years; and Philomena, at home. The religious faith 
of the familj' is that of the Catholic church, to which ]Mr. Stevens 
belonged, and he was also a member of the local organization of the 
Knights of Columbus. In politics he Avas a democrat, and while he 
never sought nor desired public office, he was frequentlj" heard on the 
rostrum in defense of the principles in which he believed and his elo- 
quence and strong arguments seldom failed to carry conviction. He 
was very prominent in both state and national politics and was hon- 
ored by being made chairman of the national committee of the dem- 
ocratic party. Aside from his practice he had business interests as a 
stockholder in the Clarke Hotel and by reason of his carefully con- 
ducted financial affairs he was able to leave his family in comfortable 
circumstances when on the 23d of January, 1914, he passed away. 
He left behind him many friends, for he was cordial and genial in 
manner and his sterling traits of character won him high esteem. 



SYDNEY HARRIS. 



Sydney Harris, who owns three hundred and twenty acres of good 
land in Verona township, is living retired in a beautiful home at 
No. 620 West Eleventh street, Hastings, Nebraska. He came to 
this county when it was still but sparsely settled and is entitled to 
credit as one of the pioneers who aided in its development from a 
frontier district to the prosperous agricultural section that it is today. 
A native of England, he was born in Trowbridge on the 22d of Feb- 
ruarj^ 1840, of the marriage of James and Eliza (Webb) Harris. 



24 • PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

The father engaged in the practice of law at Trowbridge and also 
held the office of register of births and deaths. 

Sj'dney Harris received his education in his native town and 
resided there until 1873, when with his family he emigrated to the 
United States, locating in Juniata, Adams county, Nebraska, in ]\Iay. 
Not long after his arrival in this county he took up a homestead in 
Verona township, on which he resided for a number of years, although 
he subsequently removed to another farm which he purchased and 
on which he lived until he retired from active life and came to Hast- 
ings. He still owns the southeast quarter of section 10, range 8, 
township 11, and the southwest quarter of section 11. His land is in 
a high state of development and yields him a good financial return. 
When he passed through Hastings in 1873 there was only the railway 
station, the jjostoffice and two or three little one story shacks, and as 
the years have passed he has watched with interest the growth of the 
little village into a prosperous and up-to-date city. Sixteen years 
ago ]\Ir. Harris lost the sight of an eye through the bursting of a gun 
and ten years later his daughter Florence, who is a graduate nurse, 
removed from the eyebrow a steel sliver similar to a needle point 
M'hich had penetrated the skull. A number of years after the first 
accident ]Mr. Harris was struck by a barn door on the other side of 
his face and this resulted in his losing the sight of the left eye for nine 
months. He was totally blind during that period and because of 
other injuries sustained had to be propped up in bed and fed with a 
spoon. He has since recovered and has regained the sight of the 
left eye, although that of the right is irretrievably lost. 

]Mr. Harris was married in Trowbridge, England, to Alice ]Maud 
Williams Frawley, a daughter of John Guy and ]Mary (Williams) 
Frawley, the former a contractor and builder. ISlrs. Harris Avas born 
in Trowbridge on the 31st of December, 1846, and passed away in 
Hastings, Nebraska, on the 23d of December, 1915. To Mr. and 
JNIrs. Harris were born ten children, as follows: Wilfred Henry 
Sydney Frawley, whose birth occurred on the 24th of October, 1867, 
is residing in Hastings. Maud Evelyn JNlary, born on the 17th of 
January, 1869, is the wife of William Carries, a minister stationed at 
Fall City, Nebraska. Frank Reginald Guj^ born on the 3d of April, 
1871, is farming the homestead in Verona township. INIay Alice, 
whose birth occurred on the 24th of February, 1873, is residing at home 
and is a practical nurse by occupation. Arthur Dudley, whose birth 
occurred on the loth of O'ctober, 1875, is an expert accountant of 
Lincoln, Nebraska. He married INIiss Bertha Shoals. Herbert 
Stanley, born on the 18th of INIay, 1878, is now principal of schools 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 25 

at Adams, this state. Florence Emeline, who was born on the 18th 
of December, 1880, is a graduate nurse and is residing at home. Edith 
Elsie, who was born on the 5th of ]March, 1883, is the wife of Ray- 
mond Bailey, of Concordia, Kansas. An infant unnamed died in 
1885 when six weeks old. Eva JMaria, whose birth occurred on the 
6th of July, 1887, is keeping house for her brother Frank on the home 
farm. 

JNIr. Harris is independent in politics and has never been an office 
seeker. He is not identified with any fraternal order, preferring to 
spend his leisure time with his family. Although he does not hold 
membership in any church, he is a consistent Christian and his faith 
is attested by the uprightness of his daily life and his consideration 
for the rights of others. He has a wide acquaintance not only in 
Hastings but throughout the county, and his personal friends are 
many. 



DANIEL N. BITNER. 



Daniel N. Bitner, who is successfully engaged in farming in 
West Blue township, was born in Center count}% Pennsylvania, on 
the 13th of November, 1860, a son of Jacob and Catherine Bitner, 
who was born in that county and there engaged in farming until his 
demise in 1880. Our subject was educated in the common schools. 
On attaining his majority he left home and was employed in a store 
in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, for one year. He then removed 
to Stephenson county, Illinois, where he remained for two years, but 
in 1884 he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and for a few months 
A\orked as a farm hand in the southern part of the county. He then 
rented a farm in Ayr township for six years, after which he went to 
Avestern Kansas and proved up on two claims of a quarter section 
each. He remained there for five years and then returned to this 
county and for six j^ears operated a rented farm in Silver Lake towai- 
ship. For two j^ears he rented land in Zero township, but since 1903 
has operated the William Brock farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres on section 36, West Blue township. The farm is seven miles 
northeast of Hastings, is not only in an excellent location but is also 
one of the well improved and productive places of the township. 
Mr. Bitner is an up-to-date and energetic farmer and as the years 
have passed his resources have increased so that he is now financially 
independent. 



26 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Mr. Bitner was married on the 24th of December, 1885, to Miss 
Catherine Snyder, a daughter of Christian Snyder, who passed away 
in Ilhnois. His widow removed to Roseland township, this coimty, 
in 1884. Mr. and ]\Irs. Bitner are the jDarents of six children. 
Matilda Blanch, who was born in 1886, married William Banta, a 
merchant of Trumbull. Chris U., born in 1888, is now superintend- 
ent of schools at Elm Creek. He married Anita Joynt, a daughter 
of W. E. Joynt, formerly of Roseland township and later of St. Paul, 
Nebraska. Jacob R., who was born in 1890, is now attending Hast- 
ings College. Nevin, born in 1892, is also a student at Hastings 
College. William, whose birth occurred in 1895, is at home, and Maiy 
Catherine, born in 1900, is attending the Trumbull schools. 

]Mr. Bitner is an adlierent of the republican party and for the 
past three terms has been a member of the county board of super- 
visors. In former years he served on the school board as township 
clerk and as road overseer, and in all of his official capacities he has 
proved capable and public-sjnrited, making an excellent record. He 
holds membership in the JNIethodist Episcopal church at Trumbull 
and takes a praiseworthy interest in the work of that organization. 
His life has been one of well directed activity and the prosperity which 
he now enjo3's is well deserved. 



GEORGE H. PRATT. 



George H. Pratt is a retired merchant, banker and capitalist of 
Hastings whose identification with the development and upbuilding 
of the city dates from earliest days. In fact, he and his partner, 
Charles K. Lawson, erected the second store building in Hastings 
and were the owners of one-eighth of the town site. Their business 
block Avas erected before the city was platted and from that period 
to the jH-esent INIr. Pratt has borne an active and helpful part in all 
that has pertained to the city's development and converted it from a 
tiny hamlet into a metropolis of twelve thousand population. 

He was born in Lewis county, New York, December 7, 1849, and 
in 1859 accompanied his parents on their removal to Oneida, Knox 
county, Illinois, where he was educated in the public schools. At the 
age of thirteen years he began clerking in his father's drug store, in 
which he spent three or four years, and when he A\'as about seventeen 
years of age a friend opened a dry goods and clothing store in Mr. 
Pratt's name and he took charge as manager, continuing active in that 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 27 

business until, in connection with C. K. Lawson, he purchased the 
store, for which they agreed to pay six thousand dollars, although their 
combined capital at that time amounted to but three hundred dollars. 
Thej'- were both ambitious, energetic young men, however, and they 
recognized the fact that success is won through earnest, persistent 
effort, close application and honorable dealing. They continued the 
business at that point until 1872, but early in that year INIr. Lawson 
came to Nebraska to look for a favorable location and decided upon 
Hastings. ]Mr. Pratt then disposed of their store in Illinois and 
joined ]Mr. Lawson at this point. They had only one predecessor in 
a business way and he was conducting his trade in a little pioneer shack. 
The partners, however, erected a two-story business block, occupj^ing 
the lower floor with a stock of groceries, hardware, stoves, implements 
and other commodities needed by the pioneer, while the upper story 
was used as their home and was shared by their clerk as well. The 
partners bent their energies to the development of their trade, which 
grew with the growth of the countj^ their patronage coming to them 
from a very broad territory. In fact, it was not long before they 
were conducting a very extensive business and their large patronage 
made their enterprise a profitable one. TJie relation between them 
was maintained until 1876, when the partnership was dissolved. 

]\Ir. Pratt afterward became connected in business with Mr. 
Hamot for a few months, at the end of which time he sold out. In 
1877, in connection with A. L. Clarke, he jjurchased the Adams County 
Bank from J. S. INIcIntyre. This is now the First National Bank. 
JNIr. Pratt entered that institution as cashier and so continued for a 
quarter of a century, or until January, 1902, when he sold a part of his 
stock and retired from active connection with the bank, although he 
is still one of its directors. He has since devoted his time to the super- 
vision of his land and other investments. He is the owner of large 
tracts of land in Nebraska, Colorado and Idaho, having jjlaced his 
money in the safest of all investments — real estate. On the 2d of 
January, 1879, INIr. Pratt was married to INIiss Harriet E. Wikoff, a 
native of Knox county, Illinois, where she was reared and educated. 
They have become the parents of four children: Homer and Ger- 
trude, both of whom died when twelve years of age ; Katherine, who 
died when but ten months old ; and Howard G., now attending Hast- 
ings College. 

In his political views Mr. Pratt is a liberal republican and has never 
sought public office, preferring that his public duties be done as a pri- 
vate citizen. He belongs to Hastings Lodge, No. 50, A. F. & A. M., 
also to the chapter and commandery, and has been treasurer of the 



28 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

JMasonic Temple Craft for the past twenty-eight years. He and his 
wife are niemhers of the Presbyterian church, to the teachings of which 
they loyally adhere, and their influence has been a potent element in 
the moral progress of the community. No history of Adams county 
would be complete without extended reference to George H. Pratt, 
so closely and actively has he been identified with business interests and 
with the general develojiment and progress of the community. In 
working for the public good he has looked beyond the exigencies of the 
moment to the opportunities of the future and in the conduct of his 
private business interests he has closely adhered to those principles 
and lines of activity which lead to honorable success. His worth is 
widely acknowledged, his courage and industry have never failed and 
his course has demonstrated the truth of the saying that success is not 
the result of genius but is the outcome of clear judgment and experi- 
ence. 



WALTER EDWARD NOWERS, M. D. 

Dr. Walter Edward Nowers, one of the progressive and capable 
young physicians of Adams county, has practiced in Kenesaw since 
completing his hospital work and has gained a large and rei^resenta- 
tive patronage. He was born in Howell, Nebraska, on the 20th of 
June, 1881, a son of George and ISlary (Allen) Nowers. The father 
was born in England in 1843 and died in Howell, Nebraska, in 1883. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of INIary Allen, was born in Illi- 
nois in 1850 and is now living in Kenesaw. 

Walter E. Nowers attended the comitry schools and subsequently 
became a student in the Leigh high school, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1898. During five winters he taught school in Colfax county 
and devoted his summers to attending the Wayne and Fremont Nor- 
mal Schools. He was also employed on the Northwestern Railroad 
for one year, but in 1904 entered the Creighton JNIedical College in 
Omaha, having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life 
work. He was graduated with the degree of INI. D. in 1908 and 
afterward served as interne in the Inglewood Hospital for a year and 
a half. He then came to Kenesaw and began the independent prac- 
tice of his profession. It was not long before his ability and con- 
scientiousness gained recognition and as the years have passed his 
practice has grown steadily. 

Dr. Nowers was married on the 10th of January, 1910, to Miss 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 29 

Susie Petit, of Otisville, JMichigan, by whom he has a daughter, 
Grace. He is connected with a number of fraternal organizations, 
belonging to Kenesaw Lodge, No. 144, A. F. & A. ]\I., in which he is 
senior deacon; Kenesaw Lodge, No. 231, I. O. O. F., of which he is 
vice grand ; Enterprise Lodge, No. 29, K. P., of which he is chancellor 
commander; Kenesaw Lodge, No. 188, A. O. U. W., of which he is 
treasurer; and Leigh Court, Tribe of Ben Hur, of Leigh, Nebraska. 
His religious beliefs accord with the teachings of the Methodist church, 
of which he is a member, and his political allegiance is given to the 
republican party. He largely concentrates his energies upon his 
professional work and has won the confidence of both the general 
public and his colleagues. He is also popular personally and is con- 
sidered as one of the leading citizens of Kenesaw. 



GEORGE W. LOVEL. 



George W. Lovel, a well known and highlj^ respected resident of 
Blaine township, was born in Hendricks countj% Indiana, on the 22d 
of JMarch, 1844. His parents, George and Lydia (JNIontgomery) 
Lovel, were both born in Virginia and both died during the childhood 
of their son George W., the mother passing away in 1852 and the 
father in 1856. To them were born two children, but William Lovel, 
the brother of our subject, passed away in 1865. 

George W. Lovel received a good education, attending school 
until he enlisted in September, 1861, at the age of seventeen years, 
in Company H, Seventh Indiana Infantry, for service in defense of 
the Union. He was at the front for three years and was under the 
command of Generals Grant, Burnside, Hooker and Warren. At the 
battle of Welden Railroad he was captured and for six months was 
held in prison at Belle island and Salisbury, North Carolina. After 
the close of the war he returned home and worked at odd jobs in 
Indiana until 1878, in which year he removed to Kingman county, 
Kansas. He devoted about thii'teen years to farming there, but in 
1890 went to the vicinity of Enid, Garfield covmty, Oklahoma, whence 
he later removed to Woods county, that state. He cultivated rented 
land there until 1905, which year witnessed his arrival in Denver 
township, Adams county. He is now renting the William Dean 
farm, in Blaine township, two miles south of Hastings, and his well 
directed labors are rewarded by excellent crops. 

In 1865 JNIr. Lovel was united in marriage to Miss Nan INIiles, a 



30 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

daughter of James Miles, of Indiana. She passed away in 1877 in 
Indiana and was laid to rest in that state. She left three children, 
as follows: James H., who was born on the 19th of October, 1866, 
in Indiana, came to Adams county, Nebraska, in 1891, and is farming 
in Blaine township in partnership with his father. In 1893 he was 
married to JNIiss Caroline Foster, a daughter of William and Jennie 
Foster, who were early settlers of Blaine township. Both of her 
parents are deceased, the father dying in 1888 and the mother in 
1913. To Mr. and JMrs. James H. Lovel three children have been 
born, namely: Vei'a, whose birth occurred on the 25th of August, 
1899; and Ona and Alma, both deceased. Joseph E., who was born 
November 8, 1868, married JNIiss Lizzie Patterson, of Kingman 
county, Kansas, and they are now living in California. Emma was 
born on the lith of March, 1874. JNIr. Lovel was again married in 
1881, Lydia Leech, a resident of Indiana, becoming his wife. She 
passed away in Garfield county, Oklahoma, and is buried in Enid. 
Since the demise of his A\if e jNIr. Lovel has made his home with his son, 
James H. 

JNIr. Lovel is a stalwart republican, as he believes firmh^ in the prin- 
ciples of that partj' and works loyally for its success at the polls. His 
religious allegiance is given to the JNIethodist Episcopal church. The 
gratifying measure of success which he has gained is due not to any 
particular good fortune, but to his continued industry and his good 
management and he is conceded to be one of the highly efficient 
farmers of his township. 



LELAND RAY tEARSON. 

Leland Ray Pearson, who is engaged in cultivating a good farm 
of two hundred acres on section 29, Highland township, is a native 
son of the county and a representative of one of its well known fami- 
lies. He Mas born upon the farm on which he still lives on the 30th 
of October, 1885, of the marriage of Fletcher Herbert and Amiie 
(Iveson) Pearson. The father was born in Lenawee county, INIichi- 
gan, and his parents were David and Jane (Pickering) Pearson, who 
emigrated to this country from England in 1837. To their union 
were born nine children, of whom seven are still living. Fletcher Her- 
bert Pearson greAv to manhood upon the home farm in INIichigan and 
there learned practical methods of agriculture. In 1879 he removed 
to Adams county, Nebraska, where he had previously purchased a 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 31 

quarter section of railroad land on section 29, Highland township, and 
for thirty years he maintained his residence upon that place, which he 
brought to a high state of cultivation. He still owns the farm, but 
for six years has lived retired at No. 227 East Seventh street, Hast- 
ings. He was married on the 30th of September, 1879, just before 
his removal to Adams county, to ]Miss Annie Iveson, of Lenawee 
county, JNIichigan, a daughter of Thomas and Rudy (Kinney) Iveson, 
farming peoi^le. Three children were born to JNIr. and Mrs. Pearson. 
Laura, whose birth occurred on the 15th of July, 1880, is the wife of 
H. R. Burnham, a farmer in West Blue township, this county, and 
they have six children, Anna, Nelson, Florence, Raj^mond, Harold 
and JMargery. ]\Iilo Eber, who was born December 29, 1883, is a 
Congregational minister living in Hyannis, JNIassachusetts. He was 
married in New Haven, Connecticut, to JNliss Nellie Crane. Leland 
Ray, of this review, is the youngest of the family. Fletcher H. Pear- 
son gives his religious allegiance to the JMethodist Episcopal church, 
fraternally is connected with the INlystic Legion Lodge at Juniata, 
and is a republican in politics. He takes a commendable interest in 
public affairs, but has never sought office, although he has served 
acceptably as a member of the school board. 

Leland R. Pearson devoted the greater part of his time during his 
boyhood and youth to the acquirement of an education and to helping 
his father with the work of the homestead. He has continued to 
reside on the farm and since his father retired to Hastings has had 
entire charge of the operation of the one hundred and sixty acres in 
the home place and of forty acres additional, which he himself pur- 
chased about 1906. The two hundred acres which he farms yields 
him an excellent return and he ranks among the progressive young- 
agriculturists of the county. He grows wheat, corn, oats and hay 
for the market and also raises stock for his own use. His work is 
well planned and his industry and energy are enabling him to gain 
success. 

On the 22d of December, 1909, ]Mr. Pearson was united in mar- 
riage to INIiss Dora Nida, a daughter of George and Isabella Nida, 
of Highland township. The family came to this county from Vir- 
ginia in 1893 and the father is a representative farmer of his locality. 
There are three children in the family, those besides jMrs. Pearson 
being: JMrs. A. R. Robinson, of Hall county, Nebraska; and Rilda, 
now INIrs. L. E. Perkins, of Juniata township, this county. JSIr. and 
jNIrs. Pearson have two daughters: INIildred JMarguerite, born on the 
6th of INIay, 1911 ; and Virginia Irene, born January 8, 1913. 

Mr. Pearson casts his ballot in support of the men and measures 



32 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of the republican party, but has never sought official preferment. Both 
he and his wife hold membership in the JNIethodist Episcopal church 
at Hastings. They are well known throughout the county and their 
many excellent qualities of character have gained them the respect 
of all who have been brought into contact with them. JSIr. Pearson 
is progressive in his work and takes justifiable pride in his farm, 
whicli is in a high state of cultivation and is well improved with build- 
ings, all of which he has erected, including the neat and comfortable 
residence. He owns an automobile and finds it of value to him in his 
farm work as well as a source of much pleasure. 



HON. CLARENCE J. MILES. 

The consensus of public opinion establishes the Hon. Clarence J. 
INIiles as one of the prominent business men of Hastings, Nebraska, 
where he is activelj^ engaged in the grain trade. JNIoreover, it is uni- 
formly said that no man in Hastings has more friends than he. A 
native of Illinois, INIr. JNIiles was born in Jersep^ille, Jersey county, 
on the 25th of INIay, 1866, and is a son of George S. and JNIartha 
(DeWolf) Miles. The father, a native of Westminster, JNIassa- 
chusetts, was there reared and educated, pursuing an academic course. 
He took up the profession of dentistry and for a time engaged in 
active practice in Alton, Illinois, while later he removed to Jersey- 
ville, and in the year 1889 became a resident of Beatrice, Nebraska, 
where he continued to follow his j)rofession until his death, which 
occurred in 1893 when he Avas sixty-two years of age. In politics he 
was an active repviblican and Avas for many years chairman of the 
county central committee in Illinois. Fraternally he was connected 
Avith the jNIasons and Avith the Odd FelloAvs. All through his life he 
manifested those sterling traits AA'hich Avon for him leadership and 
Avhich gained for him the high and enduring regard of those Avith 
AA horn he Avas associated. His Avife Avas born in Alton, Illinois, and 
Avas reared and educated in JerseA-A'ille, also studying for a time in 
Chicago. She survived her husband and died in 1909 at the age of 
scA-enty-one years, passing aAvay in tlie faith of the Presbyterian 
church, of Avhich she Avas a consistent member. 

Clarence J. INIiles, the third in order of birth of six children, spent 
his boyhood days in his natiA'e city, Avhere he attended the public and 
high schools. When nineteen years of age he became assistant cashier 
of the Farmers Bank in Solomon City. Kansas, having previously 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 33 

had experience in banking in the capacity of bookkeeper in a bank at 
Jerseyville. After leaving Kansas he went to Pasadena, Cahfornia, 
accepting a position in the First National Bank of that city, but after 
a short time he resigned and returned to Kansas, where he became 
cashier of the Citizens Bank in the town of Liberal. At the end of 
the j'ear he was transferred by the owners of that bank to Chicago to 
take charge of their office in that city. They were extensively engaged 
in construction work there and ]Mr. JMiles remained with them for 
about a year. He was afterward with Kilpatrick Brothers & Collins, 
large railway contractors at Beatrice, Nebraska, for ten years, and 
in 1899 established business in Hastings as a grain and coal dealer. 
At one time he owned five elevators in the state and he has conducted 
an extensive grain business, his enterjjrise proving an important one 
in the various communities where he has operated, as it has furnished 
a market to grain raisers. He was also for several years president of 
the jNIcCanaughey Grain Com^Janj^ ojjerating ten elevators in Ne- 
braska, and at the same time he was operating his own chain of five 
elevators. At the f)resent time he is the owner of three elevators, one 
at Giltner, another at Bruning and a third at Eustis, Nebraska. He 
is also owner of the electric light plant at the last named place, is 
president of the Grand Island Gas Company at Grand Island, Ne- 
braska, and is a director of the First National Bank of Hastings. 
He is likewise a heavj' stockholder in the Beatrice Creamery and in 
numerous commercial and industrial enterprises of Hastings. He is 
thus connected with various corporations and along legitimate lines 
of business has won substantial success, steadily working his way 
upward. He possesses tireless energy, keen perception and a genius 
for devising the right thing at the right time, joined to everyday com- 
mon sense. His plans have been well formulated and carefully exe- 
cuted and his perseverance and determination have carried him 
steadily forward. 

In 1884 ]Mr. ]\Iiles was married to INIiss Flori D. Cory, who was 
born in Jerseyville, Illinois, where they Avere reared and educated. 
They were schoolmates in youth and the friendship of childhood 
ripened into love which found its consummation in marriage. Theirs 
was a beautiful home life, which was terminated, however, by death 
on the 18th of October, 1915, when JNIrs. INIiles passed to the home 
beyond. Her many splendid traits of character, her kindliness of 
spirit, her symjiathj' and her goodwill to all won her the high esteem 
and love of those with whom she came in contact and her death was 
the occasion of deep regret wherever she was known. 

Mr. Miles is well known in Masonic circles, belonging to Hastings 



U PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; to Mount Herman Commandery, and to 
Sesostris Temple of the JNIystic Shrine at Lincoln. He also has 
membership with the United Workmen and the Elks at Hastings 
and with the United Commercial Travelers, in which organization he 
has filled all the local, state and national offices. In 1905 he was 
elected suj)reme councillor of the Commercial Travelers of the United 
States at the convention in Columbus and so served until 1906. He is 
a recognized leader in the ranks of the republican party, his opinions 
carrying weight in its councils. In 1906 he ran second for the nomina- 
tion for governor in the state convention and many of his friends are 
urging him to again become a candidate for the position. Five times 
he has been elected mayor of Hastings, twice without opposition, 
serving in all for eleven years. Nearly all of the asphalt paving in 
the citj' was put down between the years 1902 and 1913 during his 
administration. His direction of municipal affairs was businesslike 
and progressive. He opposed the useless retrenchment that hampers 
progress and was equallj^ strong in his opposition to unwise expendi- 
ture, and his efforts constituted a potent force toward the upbuilding 
of the city and the establishment of those interests which are a matter 
of civic virtue and civic pride. He is a man of fine personal appear- 
ance and the physical is but the indication of the spirit within. He 
is entirety free from ostentation, nor is there about him the least 
shadow of mock modesty. He is a man who correctly judges life's 
contacts and experiences and in everj^ relation works along the lines 
of progress and improvement for the individual and for the com- 
munity. 



AREND R. JUNKER. 



Arend R. Junker, who owns and operates an excellent farm on 
section 17, Highland township, ranks among the most efficient and 
jjrogressive farmers of his township and has gained a gratifying 
measure of financial success. He was born in Hanover, Germanj^ 
on the 18th of November, 1841, a son of Roelf and Hilke (von 
iSIarck) Junker, who about 1866 came to the United States and set- 
tled in Adams county, Illinois. Subsequently they lived in Peters- 
burg, JMenard countj% that state, and in Livingston county, and at 
length removed to Adams county, Nebraska, where the father passed 
away about 1892. The mother had previously died in Illinois. Our 
subject has two brothers living: Harm, a resident of Illinois; and 



1585318 

PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 35 

Roelf, who is living in Dawson county, Nebraska; and has also a 
sister, Lina, who is now Mrs. Cornelius Johnston and resides in 
Menard county, Illinois. 

Arend R. Junker came to the United States in 1866, preceding 
his parents in his emigration to this country, and settled in Adams 
county, Illinois, where he worked out by the month for about four- 
teen years. He subsequently farmed in that state on his own account, 
but in 1894 he came to Nebraska and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of his present farm from Jake Evens. He has since 
added to his holdings until his farm comprises four hundred and 
eighty acres, and the excellent condition in which things are kept 
testifies to his thrift and good management. He grows wheat, 
corn and some oats and also raises stock for his own use, and his well 
directed labors yield him a handsome income. He has enlarged the 
residence, which is now modern in its aj)pointments, and has added 
needed buildings to the farm equipment so that the improvements 
upon his place compare favorably with those on other farms in the 
locality. He is up-to-date and progressive in his work and is con- 
tributing to the agricultural advancement of his township. 

In 1874, in Petersburg, Illinois, Mr. Junker was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Albertina Dallmann, a daughter of Chris and Maria 
(Tesloch) Dallmann. Mrs. Junker was born in Germany, but was 
brought to this country by her parents when but two and a half years 
old. After living in Wisconsin for a time the family removed to 
Illinois, and there both of her parents passed away. She has three 
brothers living: Herman, who resides in Franklin county, Nebraska; 
and Fred and Ernest, both residents of Petersburg, Illinois. There 
are also two sisters: JNIatilda, the wife of Will Carroll, of Peters- 
burg; and Amelia, who married Harm Weremeson. 

]Mr. and Mrs. Junker have had eight children. Christopher 
Friedrich, who was born on the 5th of November, 1874, died when 
almost four years of age, on the 2d of November, 1878; Rudolph 
Arend, who was born January 29, 1877, owns an eighty acre farm in 
Highland township, to the cultivation of which he devotes his time. 
He married INIiss Lulu JNIorgan, by whom he has a daughter, Irene, 
who was born February 18, 1909. Hilke INIaria Friederike, who was 
born on the 16th of ]May, 1879, married Albert INIorgan, a farmer 
of Logan township, this county, by whom she has four children, Lily, 
John, Tena and Albert. Herman, born December 22, 1881, is living 
at home, as is his twin brother, Christian Friedrich. Each owns an 
eighty acre farm in Highland township and both are progressive and 
successful j'oung farmers. Tena, who was born on the 14th of Feb- 



36 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ruaiy, 1884, died at birth. Albertina Matilda, who was born on the 
7th of June, 1886, married John Warrings and resides in Clara Citj% 
^Minnesota. Carl Wilhelni, who was born on the 9th of January, 
1889, John, born on the 14th of July, 1891, and Albert, born April 3, 
1894, are all at home. 

Mr. Junker and his family attend the German Lutheran church 
in Verona township and give their support to its work. He casts his 
ballot in sujJiJort of the republican party, but has never been an office 
seeker. Neither does he belong to any lodges or societies, preferring 
to spend his leisure time at home. Sound judgment and well directed 
industry have enabled him to gain more than a competence, and his 
sterling integrity and genuine worth of character have won him the 
respect of those who have been brought in contact with him. 



ARTHUR J. MILLS. 



Arthur J. INIills is successfully engaged in the operation of a 
splendid farm of seven hundred and twenty acres in Denver township, 
and in addition to raising an immense amount of grain gives much 
attention to breeding registered Percheron horses. He was born in 
Grinnell, Poweshiek county, Iowa, in 1869, a son of George H. and 
Hope (English) JNIills. The father was born in IMichigan, of Scotch 
and German ancestry, and now makes his home with his son, Arthur J. 
The mother has passed away. Two brothers and a sister of our sub- 
ject reside in Adams county, namely: Leonard P., who is mentioned 
elsewhere in this work; B. B.; and Mrs. W. H. Harris, whose husband 
is an engineer at the State Hosj^ital, near Hastings. 

Arthur J. ]\Iills was reared under the parental roof and received 
his education in the common schools. For a considerable period he 
assisted his father in the operation of the home farm in Hamilton 
county, Nebraska, but about two decades ago came to Adams county 
and rented the farm which he is now operating. The place comprises 
seven hundred and twenty acres of as fine land as there is in Denver 
township and is a part of the Kerr estate. Mr. Mills has erected all 
of tlie buildings upon the place except the residence and keeps every- 
thing in the best possible condition. He facilitates the work of culti- 
vating the fields by using up-to-date machinery and methods and 
seldom fails to harvest large crops. He has grown as much as twenty 
thousand bushels of grain in a j^ear and has paid for shucking ten 
thousand bushels of corn in a j^ear. During 1915 he only raised 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 37 

seven thousand bushels of wheat on account of the rainy season, but 
the hay crop totalled one hundred and sixty tons. He also is engaged 
quite extensively in stock raising and makes a specialty of Percheron 
horses. He has thirty-six head, and at the head of the stud is Col- 
lector 60152, a fine imported stallion. He also has a few grade 
Holstein cattle and is beginning to raise Hampshire hogs. He rents 
the farm on which he resides, but owns one hundred and sixty acres of 
land on section 15, Denver township, which he purchased from the 
IMeyers estate, and likewise holds title to land outside the county and 
to city lots. He has succeeded in all that he has undertaken and his 
activities have been a factor in the promotion of the agricultural and 
stock raising interests of his county. 

In 1894 j\Ir. JNIills was united in marriage, in Doniphan, Hall 
county, Nebraska, to ]\Iiss Clara Orcutt, a daughter of Lorenzo S. 
and Hannah E. (Barton) Orcutt. Two children have been born to 
this union, namely: Winona Hojje, who was born April 20, 1908; and 
Gerald Harmon, who died when three days old. 

Mr. JNIills supiJorts the prohibition party at the polls, but has been 
too deeply engrossed in the management of his personal affairs to 
take a very active part in politics. However, he is not remiss in any 
of the duties of citizenshii^ and can be counted upon to support move- 
ments seeking the advancement of his community along any worthy 
line of endeavor. Fraternally he is connected with the Royal High- 
landers lodge at Aurora, Nebraska. Both he and his wife belong to 
the Christian church and they have done much to further its work. 
At the time of the erection of the ncAV house of worship four years 
ago they contributed twelve hundred and fifty dollars to the building 
fund and they have always been very generous in their support of 
the church. 



REV. FATHER BERNARD. 

Rev. Father Bernard, pastor of St. Patrick's Catholic church in 
Highland township, Adams county, Nebraska, holds in full measure 
the esteem of his parishioners and is highly respected by all who know 
him. His birth occurred in Nebraska City in 1864, and he is a son of 
Peter Ulbrick and IVIary Kalus, both natives of Austria. 

Rev. Father Bernard received his education at the Benedictine 
College at Atchison, Kansas, and there took the commercial, classical 
and theological courses; and when twenty-four years of age, was or- 



38 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

dained to the priesthood. For some time he taught in that institution, 
and subsequently spent two or three years in charge of small missions 
in that locality. Later, as a priest in the Lincoln diocese, he held 
many different charges dm-ing a period of some twenty years, the 
last being that of St. Patrick's church, in Highland township, Adams 
county, and during the five years that he has held this pastorate his 
influence has been felt as a factor for good in the life of his community. 
St. Patrick's church was organized about twenty-five years ago, and 
now nimibers about thirty-four families, or one hundred and fifty- 
one souls. Before the establishment of the church, the parishionei-s 
drove to Hastings, a distance of twelve miles, to attend service. The 
aflPairs of St. Patrick's are in a satisfactory condition and it is doing 
well its work as a spiritual and moral agency. Father Bernard is a 
cultured gentleman of kind and genial disposition and these qualities, 
together with his devotion to his work, have gained him a high place in 
the warm regard and the sincere goodwill of all who have come into 
contact with him irrespective of their religious beliefs. 



BERNHARD SCHMIDT. 

One of the exicellent citizens and efficient farmers of Highland 
township is Bernhard Schmidt, who owns one hundred and sixty 
acres of productive land on section 32. He was born in Prussia, 
Germany, on the 20th of August, 1855, of the marriage of Johan 
and Eva (Thimgan) Sclmiidt, who passed their entire lives in their 
native land, where the father engaged in farming. To them Avere 
born seven children, of whom five came to America : Adelia, who is 
now Mrs. C. Miller and lives in Cass county, Nebraska; Herman, 
also a resident of Cass county; Augusta, who lives in Pierce, Ne- 
braska; and Theresa, who resides in Colorado. 

Bernhard Schmidt received his education in Germany and re- 
mained in that country until he was twenty-one years of age, when 
he accompanied his brothers and sisters to this country. After living 
in Cass countj% Nebraska, for two years he went to Seward county, 
whence he came to Adams county in the spring of 1885. For about 
four years he was engaged in carpenter work in Hastings but in the 
meantime, in 1886, he purchased his present farm in Highland tOAAU- 
ship, to which he removed in 1888. He has since lived there and the 
excellent condition of the place testifies to his enterprise and good 
management. He grows grain, wheat, oats and alfalfa and als.j 





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PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 41 

raises horses and a few hogs. His progressive spirit is indicated by 
the fact that he introduced the culture of alfalfa to this county, 
shipping four hundi'ed pounds of seed here from Colorado and 
sowing one hundred pounds himself, while the remaining three hun- 
dred was distributed equally among three other men. These four 
experimental fields proved successful and at the present time alfalfa 
is generally grown throughout the county. He has always sought 
to keep in touch with the developments in scientific agriculture and 
has at all times been ready to profit by the discoveries of investigators 
although he has not been unduly hasty in discarding time-tried 
methods. This combination of progressiveness with conservatism leads 
to success in agriculture as in other fields and he has gained financial 
independence. 

At Seward, Nebraska, in 1883, Mr. Schmidt was married to Miss 
Emma Thimgnen, a daughter of JNIichael and Adelia (Cirot) Thimg- 
nen. The maternal grandfather of JNIrs. Schmidt was a school teacher 
in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt have become the parents of ten 
children. Antonia, who was born in Seward county, Nebraska, in 
1885, is now the wife of John Thompson, and lives in Hastings. 
Otto, born in Hastings in 1886, married Miss Mary Kennedy and is 
now living in Highland township. Ernest, born in Hastings in 1887, 
is farming in the emjjloy of others in this county. Harry, born upon 
the home farm in 1890, married IMiss Annie Wisdom. Lena, whose 
birth occurred on the 26th of January, 1892, died at the age of two 
}'ears and tlu-ee months. Albert, born in 1894, JNIartha, in 1897, Jose- 
phine, in 1898, Etta, in 1901, and Fred, in 1904, are all at home. 

JMr. and ]Mrs. Schmidt belong to the German Evangelical church 
and guide their lives by its teachings. He votes the republican ticket 
but has never had time to take a very active part in politics, his farm- 
ing interests demanding his undivided attention. His ability, in- 
tegrity and genial sj)irit have made him popular among those who 
have been associated with him and he is highly respected wherever 
known. 



W. H. DE SANNO. 



W. H. De Sanno, as a member of the firm of W. H. De Sanno & 
Son, is conducting an important business enterprise vmder the name 
of the Juniata JSIilling Company, Incorporated. He was born in 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, April 23, 1845, and is a son of 



42 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

John F. and Charlotte (Gamble) De Sanno, the latter of English 
descent, while the former came of Pennsylvania German ancestry. 
He was born and married in the Keystone state and there the mother 
passed away when their son, W. H. De Sanno, was but six years of 
age. The father afterward removed to the middle west in 1853, set- 
tling in Peoria, Illinois, Avhere he remained mitil 1864. In that j^ear 
he became a resident of Livingston county, Illinois, where his remain- 
ing days were passed, his death occurring in 1869. He was a tailor 
by trade and thus provided for the support of his family, which num- 
bered five children: Elizabeth, now living in ]Macomb, Illinois; 
Elnora, whose home is in Pemisjdvania ; JNIarj-, a resident of Gordon, 
Nebraska ; W. H., of this review ; and Amelia, deceased. 

W. H. De Sanno pursued his education in the common schools of 
Pennsylvania and of Illinois, and in his youthful days began farm 
work, being thus employed vuitil about twenty-two years of age. He 
then turned his attention to the milling business in Peoria, Illinois, 
serving a full term of apprenticeship. He was connected with the 
trade in that city for five j'ears, after which he went to Fairburj;^, Illi- 
nois, as second miller. He spent about three years there, on the expira- 
tion of Avhich period he went to Chenoa, Illinois, where he remained 
for a year. He next located at Davenport, Iowa, where he engaged 
in the milling business for two and one-half years, after which he spent 
a year in Cleveland, Illinois, and later went to Tazewell county, engag- 
ing in the milling business at Lilly. There he remained for eleven 
years and during four years of that time served as postmaster of the 
town. 

In 1891 'Mr. De Sanno arrived at Beemer, Nebraska, where he con- 
tinued in the milling business for five years. He afterward went to 
Tekamah, Nebraska, where he resided for three years, and on the 
expiration of that jjeriod removed to Silver Creek and leased a half 
interest in a mill, spending eight months at that place. He was subse- 
quently at Beemer, Nebraska, for fifteen months, after Avhich he came 
to Juniata and purchased the mill here. He remodeled the mill and 
installed new machinery and had everj'thing in excellent shape when 
in 1907 the plant was entirely destroyed by fire in the month of August. 
Immediately he began the work of rebuilding and by ISIarch of the 
following year his mill was again in operation. The business is con- 
ducted by the firm of W. H. De Sanno & Son, under the name of the 
Juniata JNIilling Company, Incorporated. They maintain a high 
standard of excellence in the manufacture of their product, for 
which they find a ready sale on the market, and the business is today 
recognized as one of the leading productive industries of the county. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADA3IS COUNTY 43 

In 1873 Mr. De Sanno was married to Miss Mary Rice and to 
them were born five children, namely : Nora, who is the wife of August 
Linneman, of Forest Green, INIissouri; Harry C, who is associated 
with his father in the milling business ; and Hattie, Walter and Clif- 
ford, all of whom are deceased. The wife and mother passed away 
in 1886, and in 1891 Mr. De Sanno was again married, his second 
union being with Ella Koonce, b}^ whom he has two children : INIabel, 
who is attending school in Hastings ; and Bernice, a school student at 
Juniata. 

In his political views ]Mr. De Sanno is a democrat and has served 
as a member of the town board. He belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge 
of Juniata, in which he has passed all the chairs, and he gives his 
active support to various projects for the upbuilding of the com- 
munity and the promotion of the public welfare. His has been an 
active and well spent life and the industry and integrity which have 
characterized his business career have been the crowning features of 
his success. 



FREDERICK A. BO\D. 

Frederick A. Boyd, who is successfully engaged in farming in 
Roseland township, is a native son of that township and his birth 
occurred on the 13th of JNIarch, 1877. His father, Robert A. Boyd, 
was born in Seneca county, Ohio, of Irish ancestry and the mother, 
who bore the maiden name of Ellen Addis, was a native of New 
Jersey. Robert A. Boyd accompanied his jiarents to Stark county, 
Illinois, and remained there until about 1872, when he came westward 
to Nebraska and took up a homestead and a tree claim on section 10, 
Roseland townshij), Adams county. He at once began to cultivate 
his land and as the years passed brought it to a high state of develop- 
ment. He was very successful as a farmer and acquired title to almost 
a whole section of land. He was prominent in his community and 
served as countj^ supervisor, proving very efficient in that office. He 
belonged to the Workmen and to the Grand Army of the Republic, 
having served in the Civil war as a member of the Sixty-ninth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. He passed away in 1899, but his wife is still 
living and has the distinction of being the only woman in the township 
who is residing upon the original family homestead. To them were 
born five children, namely: Frances V.; Frederick A.; John and 
Clara, both deceased; and Warren E., who is farming the home place. 



U PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Frederick A. Boj'd entered the public schools at the usual time 
and after completing the work of the grades became a student in the 
Roseland high school and still later spent two years in Hastings Col- 
lege at Hastings. He continued to reside at home until he was 
twenty- four or twenty-five years of age, when he removed to his pres- 
ent place which comprises one hundred and sixty acres of fine land 
on section 23, Roseland township. He is well known as a breeder of 
Hereford cattle. He manages his business afi^airs well and is at once 
jiractical and progressive in his work as an agriculturist. His place 
is kept in excellent condition and he ranks among the able and efficient 
farmers and stock raisers of the county. 

IMr. Boyd was married in 1901 to Miss Clara Joynt, by whom he 
has five children, JNIargaret, Alice, Geraldine, Jeannette and Sadie. 
He casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of the repub- 
lican party and has served as central committeeman, doing much to 
promote the success of that partj^ in this comity. Both he and his 
wife are active members of the JMethodist Episcojial church and he is 
now superintendent of the Sunday school. His daily life bears witness 
to the sincerity of his belief and no movement for the moral advance- 
ment of his community lacks his support. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Juniata. 



LEWIS CURRIER. 



Lewis Currier is living retired in Kenesaw and is enjoying a period 
of leisure made possible by his former well directed labors as an agri- 
culturist. He is also a veteran of the Civil war and just as in the 
days when the Union was threatened he willingly fought in its defense, 
so he is now giving largely of his time and energy in carrying on a 
campaign against the use of tobacco and intoxicating drinks. He 
was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, on the 7th of January, 
1838, a son of John and Anna (Robinson) Currier, the former born 
in New Hampshire in 1810 and the latter in Pennsjdvania in 1811. 
In 18.50 the family removed from Pennsylvania to Livingston county, 
Illinois, and there the father passed away in 1862. 

Lewis Currier received a fair education in the country schools of 
Pennsylvania and Illinois and after putting aside his textbooks de- 
voted his attention to farm work until he enlisted in the Union army, 
joining Company B, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Illinois Volun- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 45 

teer Infantrj^ on the 15th of August, 1862. He took part in the 
battle of Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, fought in > number of skir- 
mishes, was a member of the expedition which went in pursuit of Gen- 
eral JNIorgan, the famous cavalry leader, and was also on guard and 
garrison duty for some time. Later he was in the Blue Star division 
of Sherman's armj^ went on the memorable march to the sea and took 
part in the siege of Atlanta which led to the fall of that city. He was 
discharged in 1865, after the close of hostilities, and marched in the 
Grand Review. He then returned to Illinois and for fourteen j^ears 
engaged in farming there. In 1882 he came to Verona township, 
Adams county, and homesteaded one hundred and forty-one acres of 
land, to the cultivation and improvement of which he devoted the 
following thirteen j^ears. At the end of that time, feeling that he 
had saved sufficient capital to provide for his wants throughout the 
remainder of his life, he retired and took up his residence in Kenesaw, 
where he is still living. 

Mr. Currier was married January 22, 1867, to JNIiss Lydia L. 
Pratt, who was born in JNIichigan, IMarch 9, 1842, and died in Kene- 
saw on the 27th of October, 1906. To them were born four children, 
of whom two are living: Frank E., a farmer of Adams county; and 
Ned C, who is residing in Kenesaw. 

Mr. Currier has supported the republican party since its organiza- 
tion and believes firmlj' in its principles. He is a member of the 
Church of God and takes an active interest in the work of that organ- 
ization. For twenty years he has done all in his power to create 
sentiment against the tobacco and liquor habits and although he is now 
seventy-eight j^ears of age he still travels in the interests of that work. 
He recognizes the value of literature in such a campaign and has had 
published a small collection of poems dealing with the evils of the use 
of tobacco and liquor and uses this booklet in carrj'ing on his agita- 
tion against these habits. The motive power in all of his efforts to 
better humanity is his sincere Christian faith, which finds expression in 
the following poem from his pen. The theme of the poem is based 
on Hebrews 3:1-3 and 10 :28-29 : 



THE GOSPEL OF CHRIST. 



The law was once 
By JNIoses given. 

But the sayings of Jesus 
Guide us to Heaven. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Jesus is the life. 

The truth, the way; 
But none need be lost 

If they learn to obey. 

In trying to find 

What David said; 
We leave behind 

What Jesus did. 

By looking backward. 

On sayings of old, 
We miss the streets 

Paved with gold. 

Oh, then let us 

While time on earth is given. 
Accept the gospel of Christ 

And secure a home in Heaven. 



HENRY AUGUSTIN, Sr. 

Henry Augustin, Sr., is one of the representative agriculturists 
of Verona township and his farm on section 21 is in a high state of 
development. He was born in Hanover, Germany, on the 14th of 
September, 1849, a son of Claus and Engel (Tobaben) Augustin, 
who were natives of that country and Avere there reared and married. 
The mother passed away in Germany and the father came to the 
U'nited States in 1870 and located near Red Wing, JNIinnesota, where 
he resided until his demise. He followed the occupation of farming 
and met with gratifying success therein. To him and his wife were 
born three children: Hans, who died in INIinnesota in 1914; Henry; 
and IMary, the wife of Ernst Rehder, of Red Wing. 

Henry Augustin, Sr., received a good education in Germany and 
prepared for the school teacher's profession, attending a normal 
school. After teaching for two years he came to the United States 
with his father in 1870 and secured a position in a parochial school 
near Red Wing. He taught there for ten years but in the winter of 
1880-1881 came to Nebraska and located on section 21, Verona town- 
shij), Adams county. He has lived there ever since and has made 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 47 

excellent improvements upon the place, which now comprises two 
hundred and forty acres. He also owns another farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres and a half section near Kenesaw. He engages 
in general farming, finding that the raising of both grain and stock 
is more profitable than specializing in either. He assisted in organiz- 
ing the companj^ which conducts elevators at Prosser and Kenesaw 
and is now serving as one of its directors. 

In 1871 ^Ir. Augustin was united in marriage to Miss Mari 
Ruhter, who passed away in December, 1915. They were the par- 
ents of thirteen children, namely : Rudolph, a resident of Doniphan, 
Nebraska; Henr)^ Jr., who lives near Kenesaw; Peter, also residing 
near Kenesaw; JNIeta, the wife of John Sauerman, who lives three 
miles south of Kenesaw ; Jacob, who resides near Hayland, Nebraska ; 
George, who lives in the vicinity of Kenesaw ; Walter, of Doniphan ; 
Adolph and Fred, both of whom are farming in this county; Emma, 
at home; Anna, the wife of John Uden, who lives near Prosser; and 
Lena and Herbert, both at home. 

]\Ir. Augustin votes the democratic ticket at the polls and takes 
the interest of a good citizen in everything relating to the public wel- 
fare although not an aspirant for official preferment. He was 
reared in the faith of the German Lutheran church, in which he still 
holds membership, and his wife was also identified with that organi- 
zation. When he began his business career he was without capital 
but he i^ossessed good judgment and energy, and as the years have 
passed his resources have increased until he is now numbered among 
the substantial men of Adams county. 



REV. WILLIAM McDONALD. 

Rev. William ISIcDonald, pastor of St. Cecilia's Catholic church 
at Hastings, was born in Ireland, ]\Iay 19, 1860, a son of Lawrence 
and Elizabeth (Lewis) IMcDonald. The father was a farmer by 
occupation and both he and his wife are now deceased. After pur- 
suing his preliminary education in the national schools of Ireland, 
William JNIcDonald pursued a classical course in the Oniversitj' 
School at Waterford, Ireland, and studied philosophy and theology 
in St. John's College at Waterford, having determined to jirepare 
for the priesthood. He was then ordained in the cathedral at Water- 
ford, June 21, 1884, by the coadjutor bishop of Dublin. He was 
then assigned to the Omaha diocese, which included Nebraska and 



48 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Wj^oming, although since that time a division has occurred in the 
diocese. He was given charge of his first mission as assistant pastor 
at Falls City, where he remained for a year, when he was appointed 
to take charge of the Catholic church at Dawson, Richardson county, 
where he remained for nine years. In 1894 he was appointed to Has- 
tings as pastor of St. Cecilia's Catholic church and his labors have 
here since continued, covering a period of twenty-two years. The 
congregation numbers two hundred families. During his connection 
with this parish the present fine house of worship has been erected at 
fi cost of seventy-five thousand dollars. There is a parochial school 
maintained under the charge of the Sisters of St. Dominic in connec- 
tion with the academy. The organized bodies of the church include 
an Altar Society, the League of the Sacred Heart and the Children 
of Mary. The Immaculate Conception Academy was built in 1880 
by the Sisters of the Visitation, but there was a period of drought in 
Nebraska and the academy found itself in financial difficulties. The 
building reverted to the mortgagee. After this building had stood 
idle for twelve years Father JNIcDonald succeeded in raising the 
money to buy it back, securing a gift of five thousand dollars from 
the Commercial Club of Hastings. Six j^ears ago the Dominican 
Sisters came and took charge of the academy and the work of the 
school has since been in a flourishing condition. 

The labors of Father INIcDonald found fruition in the erection of 
the splendid house of worship which is now the property of the Catho- 
lics of Hastings and is known as St. Cecilia's church. It was dedicated 
on the 22d of December, 1912, on which occasion the building, 
one of the finest church edifices in Nebraska, held at the dedi- 
catorj'- services about one thousand people. This congregation had 
its beginning as far back as 1871, when the Rev. Father Leichleitner 
of Crete visited the new settlement. He continued to hold occasional 
services until jNIarch 2.5, 1878, when the Rev. George Glauber was 
appointed jjriest in charge. Under his leadership the fii-st church 
building of St. Cecilia's ^^arish was erected on Second street. A lit- 
tle later the congregation purchased a half block of ground and the 
old building was afterward removed to that site and enlarged until 
it had a seating capacity of five hundred. In September, 1881, 
Father Glauber was succeeded by Father Simeon, who remained until 
July, 1888, when the Rev. J. E. English was appointed pastor of St. 
Cecilia's church. During his pastorate the church acquired a half 
block of land facing on Seventh street between Kansas and Colorado 
avenues. When Father English was transferred to an Omaha par- 
ish in September, 1894, he was succeeded by Father INIcDonald, who 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 49 

is much loved by his people. He put forth every eiFort to upbuild 
the church in all of its departments of work and about ten years ago 
entered upon the activities which resulted in the erection of St. 
Cecilia's fine house of worsliip. The church was built of a brick such 
as is used in the erection of old European cathedrals. The decora- 
tions of the church are most handsome and fitting and in the con- 
struction the modern method of reinforced concrete and steel beam 
construction was used, there being no pillars to obstruct the view in 
the interior of the church. Father JNIcDonald is continuing his laboi's, 
being unfaltering in his efforts to promote the cause to which he has 
dedicated his life, and his purposes and activities are being crowned 
with splendid results. 



PHILIP W. YAGER. 



Philip W. Yager is activelj^ identified with business interests in 
Hastings as proprietor of Yager's bakery, which is today one of the 
leading productive industries of the city, conducting an extensive busi- 
ness and accorded a liberal patronage. He Avas born in Germany, 
August 26, 1870, and is a son of Adam and Elizabeth Yager, the 
latter now living. The father has passed away and was a forester in 
the government service. 

Philip W. Yager was educated in the schools of Germany and 
after coming to the United States attended business college in Hast- 
ings. He sought employment here in connection with the bakerj^ busi- 
ness and for seventeen j-ears was employed in the establishment of 
which he is now the proprietor. Gradually in that connection he 
mastered every phase of the business and Avorked his way upward 
until in 1902 he purchased the plant and has since carried on the 
business under his own name. His trade has constantly grown and 
developed and has noAv assumed extensive and gratifying propor- 
tions. He keeps a Avagon for the delivery of his goods and employs 
nine people. The most cleanly and sanitary conditions are maintained 
in the bakery and he never deviates from the highest standards in the 
excellence of the product. 

On the 11th of January, 1891, INIr. Yager Avas united in marriage 
to INIiss Christina E. Wagner, a daughter of John Wagner, of Adams 
county, Ohio, and to them have been born three children, Clarence P., 
Lloyd A. and Effie M. The family hold membership in the Bai)tist 
church and jNIr. Yager belongs also to the JMasonic fraternity, in Avhich 



50 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

he has attained the Knights Templar degree of the York Rite and the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is also connected with 
the Knights of Pythias and with the Odd Fellows. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and he keej)s well informed 
on the questions and issues of the day but never seeks nor desires 
office. He is a progressive and public-sj)irited man, interested in 
Hastings and in the upbuilding of the state as well. He deserves 
much credit for what he has accomplished in a business way, for his 
advancement is due to close application, indefatigable energy and 
perseverance. His course has ^\on for him not only deserved success 
but also the high respect of those with whom he has been brought in 
contact. 



GEORGE BLANKENBILLER. 

For a third of a century George Blankenbiller has been a resi- 
dent of Adams county. At the time of his arrival he settled upon a 
tract of raw prairie land on section 3, Silver Lake township, and 
began the development of a farm. In the careful management of his 
business he won success and is now the owner of a half section of rich 
and valuable land from which he derives a gratifying annual income. 
He leaves the active operation of the place to others, however, at the 
l^resent time, while he is living retired in Juniata, enjoying a rest 
which he has truly earned and richly deserves. Pennsylvania claims 
him as a native son. He was born near Reading, in Berks county. 
May 9, 1838, a son of George and Elizabeth (Siward) Blanken- 
biller, who were likewise natives of that state, where they always 
remained. The father, who was of German lineage, devoted his life 
to carpentering and thus provided for the support of his family, con- 
sisting of wife and three children, all of whom are now deceased with 
the exception of George Blankenbiller. 

Spending his youthful days under the jjarental roof, George 
Blankenbiller attended the common schools and at the time of the 
Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting on 
the 1.5th of August, 1862, for three years' service in the One Hun- 
dred and Sixteenth Regiment of Pennsylvania Voltmteer Infantry. 
He was assigned to Company C but during the war was transferred 
at Harper's Feriy to Battery A of the Fourth Artillery. He par- 
ticipated in the battle of Fredericksburg and afterward went into 
camp for the winter on the north side of the Rappahannock river, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 51 

where the troops remained until May, 1863. They then started down 
the river to Chancellorsville and participated in the engagement of 
that place. They were afterward at Gettysburg and Mr. Blanken- 
biller took part in the three days' engagement there. Later he par- 
ticipated in the battle of the Wilderness, but becoming ill, was sent 
on sick leave to Washington and was there honorably discharged on 
accomit of disability. He sustained two slight womids in the battle 
of Gettysburg. Ever faithful to duty, he made an excellent record 
by his loyalty and bravery. 

After his retm'n home Mr. Blankenbiller worked as he could until 
he had recovered his health. He then went to Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1868, when he removed to Ash- 
land countj^ Ohio, where he made his home for six years. On the 
expiration of that period he came to this state and took up his abode 
on section 3, Silver Lake township, Adams countj\ His place was 
a tract of raw prairie on which not a fuiTOw had been turned nor an 
improvement made, but wdth characteristic energy he began to break 
the sod and develop the jilace, building a small house and setting out 
a good orchard. He continued the work of development and improve- 
ment year after year and is today the owner of a valuable property 
comprising a half section of land which returns to him a gratifying 
annual income. He was also at one time the owner of seventy acres on 
section 9 of the same township but sold this to one of his sons. In 
1905 he removed to Juniata, where he has two acres surrounding an 
attractive, commodious and comfortable residence. His lawn is 
tastefully adorned with shrubs and trees and the home provides him 
with all of the comforts of life. 

]Mr. Blankenbiller has been married twice. On the 12th of Octo- 
ber, 1869, he wedded Miss Harriett Palmer, who passed away in 
October, 1883. To them were born the following children: John, 
who resides on the home jilace; David, a high school professor in St. 
Paul, Minnesota; George and Henry, both of whom are deceased; 
Daniel, a druggist of Rushville, Nebraska; Samuel, living in Has- 
tings, Nebraska; ]\Iilton, who makes liis home near Roseland, this 
state : and Mary, the wife of Floyd Woods, living near Juniata. In 
December, 1885, Mr. Blankenbiller was again married, his second 
union being with JNIiss Anna Brubaker, a native of Snj^der county, 
Pennsylvania, by whom he had two children, namely: Anna, who 
became the wife of C. C. Laap and died in 1914; and Harriet, 
a trained nurse in the Frances E. Willard Hospital of Chicago. 

iNIr. Blankenbiller and his wife are very active and devout mem- 
bers of the Brethren church and assisted in building the house of wor- 



52 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ship near Roseland. He is serving as one of the deacons of the church 
and both take an active and helpful interest in its work. In politics 
he has been a lifelong republican, joining the party when age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise and giving to it stalwart 
allegiance through all the intervening years. JSIr. Blankenbiller is a 
self-made man, for from early j^outh he has depended upon his own 
resources, basing his success upon industry, honesty, perseverance 
and determination. .As the years have gone on he has prospered 
through the utilization of those qualities and the most envious cannot 
grudge him his success, so honorably has it been won and so worthily 
used. 



ISAIAH D. EVANS. 



Isaiah D. Evans, of KenesaAv, who was formerly connected with 
journalism and banking, has since 1896 given his attention to agricul- 
tural interests and has proved very successful as a farmer. He has 
given a great deal of time and thought to public affairs and has been 
called to a number of offices, which he has filled with distinction. He 
was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, December 25, 1844, of the 
marriage of Evan and JNIargaret (Williams) Evans, who emigrated 
from Wales to America in 1843. They resided in Penns3dvania 
until their son, Isaiah D., was four years of age, when removal was 
made to Wisconsin. The father was one of the representative citi- 
zens of his community and his demise, which occurred in 1863, was 
deeply regretted. 

Isaiah D. Evans was reared at home and at the usual age entered 
the public schools, where he secured his early education. Subse- 
quently he was a student in an academy at Sjjring Green, Wisconsin, 
and he took a commercial course in Eastman's Business College. At 
the time of the Civil Avar he enlisted in Company E, Forty-ninth 
Wisconsin Infantry, of which he became first sergeant, and remained 
with that command until after the close of hostilities, being mustered 
out at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Missouri, in November, 1865, 
when not quite twenty-one years of age. He decided to tiy his for- 
tune in the far west and in 1866 drove four mules across the plains 
from Nebraska City to Salt Lake City and thence to Virginia City, 
Montana. He remained in that territory for about four j^ears, dur- 
ing which time he engaged in prospecting to a considerable extent, 
and for two winters taught school. In 1871 he returned to Nebraska 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 53 

and located at Lowell, where he published the Lowell Register. Sub- 
sequently he established the Sutton Register and still later he was 
made cashier of the internal reX^enue office at Omaha. After his term 
of service expired he founded the town of Stockham in Hamilton 
county, Nebraska, in accordance with the terms of a contract with 
the Northwestern Railroad for establishing a station at that point. 
He saw to the platting of the town site and gave his j)ersonal atten- 
tion to the sale of the town lots. During this time he also organized 
the Bank of Stockham, of which he was cashier for seven years. In 
1896 he removed to Kenesaw and has since engaged in farming in 
this locality. He is a frequent contributor to the agricultural press 
of the state and active in promoting better farming along modern 
lines. Mr. Evans was married on the 25th of April, 1878, at Kene- 
saw, to Miss Emma Williams, a daughter of Professor A. D. Wil- 
liams, a minister of the Baptist church, an educator of note and an 
able writer. Before her marriage JNIrs. Evans was a very successful 
teacher and for about three years, while Mr. Evans was in the govern- 
ment service at Omaha, she conducted the Sutton Register, having 
charge of all the work of publishing the pa^Jer with the exception 
that JNIr. Evans furnished some of the editorial copy. To this union 
have been born three children, as follows: Grace Alice, whose birth 
occurred in 1881, is a graduate of the State University of Nebraska 
and is now the wife of F. J. Schaufelberger, of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. Fred W. lives near the Evans homestead and is farming in 
partnership with his father. He married JNIiss Hazel Armitage and 
they have a son, Cedric, two years of age. Esther Evilian is living at 
home and has largely relieved her mother of the cares of the house and 
is proving herself an expert housekeeper. 

JMr. Evans is a man of influence in political circles of the state and 
has been a frequent contributor to tlie press on public questions. He 
is a progressive republican, being a strong believer in the rule of the 
people and in the strict regulation of big business. He recognizes that 
adjustment must be made in the political field as well as in others to 
the changed conditions of modern life and sui^ports all movements cal- 
culated to bring about a more exact social justice. Among other pro- 
gressive measures he favors the abolition of the liquor traffic as he is 
convinced that it is responsible for manj' of the evils with which society 
has to contend. He has served in a number of offices and has always 
proved capable and conscientious in the discharge of his duties. He 
was for some time clerk in the internal revenue office at Omaha and 
was later promoted to cashier of that office. In 1899 and again in 1911 
he was elected representative from Adams county to the state legisla- 



54 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ture and during both sessions he stood firmly for all measures whose 
adoption he believed would make for the public good. In 1911 he was 
the republican candidate for speaker and was recognized as one of the 
leaders of the house. He was very influential in legislative affairs, was 
the author of the presidential primary law, of the law creating a board 
of pardons, and was active in support of the initiative and referendum 
amendment to the constitution. In 1912 he was a candidate for the 
republican nomination for state auditor. He is at the present time a 
candidate for the state senate for the district comprising Adams and 
Clay counties. He is widely known throughout the state because of 
his activity in political lines and all who come in contact Avith him 
acknowledge his ability and his public spirit. His interest in the larger 
affairs of government has not prevented him from being active in local 
matters and for fifteen years he was a member of the Kenesaw school 
board. He is connected with the INIasonic order and the Odd Fellows 
and is also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, thus keep- 
ing in touch with his comrades in blue. The record of his varied activi- 
ties is in itself proof that he is a prominent citizen of Kenesaw and of 
Adams county. " .~ '^.^^eO 59i,*-vAaa H 

DEATHS ANEmThOALr' 

-— jn-i 

McKELVY, James— Died 12:20 

a. m., today, Juuiata. age 86; fu._ 

T A "\nr C "\T/-.T4"17T ArV neral at Methodist Church, con-' 

probably Fi-iday. 

James IMcKelvy is an honored veteran of the Civil war, being 
among the leaders of the old guard who defended the Union during 
the darkest hour in our country's history. He now resides at Juniata 
and all through the days of peace he has been as loyal to the flag as 
when he followed the stars and stripes on southern battlefields. He 
was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, April 25, 1838, the day on 
which Queen Victoria was crowned. His parents were Hugh and 
^Margaret (Caldwell) JNIcKelvy, and his grandparents were born in 
Scotland and came of an old family of that country. The father and 
mother, however, were natives of the Emerald isle and they came to 
the United States in 1842, when their son James was but four years 
of age, making the voyage in a sailing vessel which reached New York 
six weeks after leaving Liverpool. Thev hf^o^-<^^^ ^'£<\'^'''\'^':, "f "^^^ 

ox. Notlc« of Hearm0. 

Lawrence county. New York, where the f ath. ^^%Vr^'^ty coJ^'ldaSrcol';?: 
tion of farming and where both he and his wife'^^ a^r'pe'i'ons mtereaud m .aid Ee- 
family M-ere nine children : John, deceased ; J xa'ue Notice, That a petition has 

^^ , -\ n • • ,^ y-^- •■! 1 ^ been filed for the probate of a cer. 

enlisted tor service in the Civil war under Geitam .vTitten mgtnimnt now on fiio in 

1 -n 1 . -n 11 T 1 •■ . ^ , „ said Court, and purporting to be the 

killed at Folly Island m South Carolina; Alex liX,^;'^" a*e"cl..lr*and"sai^/ ^i^nl's■ 

feM bean «et for hearing March 1. 
1924, at 2 o'clock P. M.. at tlie Ooun- 
Jy Court Room, In Hastlngrs, Nebras- 

i>fttea February 7, \ltH. 
(SEAL) JoMph M. TuAyflll. 

.Tudfe of the County Court. 
A true copy. t-g-lS-22. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 55 

the front under General Gillmore and lost a leg at the battle of 
Chapin's Farm, his death resulting two years later from the effects of 
his injmy; Elizabeth Gray, Ellen Armstrong, Jane Glass and JNIar- 
garet Johnson, all now deceased; and INIrs. Sibella Armstrong, living 
in St. Lawrence county. New York. 

James McKelvy pursued his education in the common schools of 
New York and remained at home until he reached the age of seven- 
teen years. He afterward worked out for a time but on the death of 
his father in 1859 returned home and there remained until the 29th of 
April, 1861, when in response to the country's call for troops he 
enlisted as a member of Company G, Sixteenth New York Infantry, 
to serve for two years. He was honorably discharged May 15, 1863, 
following the exi^iration of his term of enlistment. He then returned 
home, where he remained until the news reached him concerning the 
battle of Gettysburg, when he again joined the armj% becoming a 
member of the Fourteenth 'New York Heavy Ai'tillery for a three 
years' term. He was discharged September 14, 1864, at which time 
he was first sergeant of his company, and he received a commission as 
second lieutenant in recognition of his general efficiency. He then 
served as an officer until the Grand Review in Washington, when he 
resigned and returned home. He had been wounded in the explosion 
of the mine in front of Petersburg and was in the hospital for about 
two months, after which he was granted a sick leave of two months, 
which he sjient at home. Twice during his connection with the army he 
was taken prisoner, once at the first battle of Bull Run and again in 
front of Petersburg, but he managed to make his escajje both times. 
He was with the Army of the Potomac in all of its principal engage- 
ments except at Gettysburg and he made a splendid record as a brave 
and loyal soldier. Years afterward he served as a delegate to the reun- 
ion of the old soldiers held at Rochester, New York. 

After the war jNIr. JMcKelvy remained in the Empire state for a 
year and then removed to Van Buren county, JNIichigan, where he 
engaged in farming and carjientering for four years. In the spring of 
1872 he arrived in Nebraska, settling four miles west of Juniata, 
where he secured a homestead claim on section 8, Juniata precinct. 
He there built a board shanty twelve by sixteen feet and sodded it up 
the first winter. He remained upon that farm until 1905 and then 
came to Juniata, where he still resides, purchasing a fine residence in 
the town after selling his farm. He now has a house and barn and 
four lots in the town and his is one of the most attractive and pleasant 
residences of Juniata. When he first came to Nebraska he worked at 
his trade, but the greater part of his attention has been given to gen- 



56 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

eral agricultural pursuits and through his careful methods in tilling 
the soil and his well directed energy he won the success which is now 
his, enabling him to live retired in the enjojanent of well earned rest. 

]\Ir. jNIcKelvy has been married twice. In 1865 he wedded Miss 
Sarah J. JMcFadden, by whom he had five children, as follows: Lewell, 
who is deceased; Glenn, a resident of Biglake, Washington; Vasco J., 
who makes his home in California ; Lysle, who has passed away ; and 
one who died in infancy. The wife and mother passed away in 1882 
and the following year Mr. INIcKelvy was again married, his second 
union being with INIrs. Emma Lochmar, who bore the maiden name of 
Emma Burwell. By her first husband she had a son, Frank Lochmar, 
who is a resident of Sioux City, Iowa. 

JNIr. JMcKelvy has been a lifelong republican and cast his first presi- 
dential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He once served for a term as 
township supervisor but has never been a politician in the sense of 
office seeking, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business 
affairs and leave office holding to others. His religious faith is evi- 
denced in his membership in the jMethodist church, to the teachings of 
which he has ever loyally adhered. He is a member of the INIasonie 
lodge at Juniata, in which he has filled almost all of the chairs," and 
both he and his wife are connected with the Order of the Eastern Star. 
He is likewise a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and has 
filled all of the offices in Geary Post, No. 81, of which he is now com- 
mander. In this way he maintains jileasant relations with his old army 
comrades and delights in recounting scenes and incidents of the days 
when they followed the nation's starry banner upon the battlefields of 
the south. It was a time that tried men's souls, but from the war there 
were formed many pleasant associations, and kindred experiences 
drew men together in strong ties of friendship. 



DAVID JOHN LEWIS. 

David John Lewis is a well-known newspaper writer of Hastings 
who has done excellent and highly acceptable work for the Omaha Bee 
and the Hastings Daily Tribune. His birth occurred on a farm in 
Clay county, Nebraska, his parents being Herbert and Mary Lewis, 
who Avere married in Wales and following their emigration to the 
United States spent four years in Pennsylvania and Ohio. In 1875 
they settled on a farm in Clay county, Nebraska, where the father 
was actively and successfully identified with general agricultural pur- 




DAVID J. LKWI 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 59 

suits until 1905, when they took up their abode in Hastings, where 
the mother passed away on the tenth of Maj^ 1910. Herbert Lewis 
still survives and is now enjoying the fruits of his former toil in 
well-earned ease. 

David J. Lewis supplemented his early education by a course of 
study in Hastings College of Hastings, Nebraska, which institution 
conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1900. Since 
his graduation he has been engaged in newspaper work as a writer for 
the Omaha Bee and the Hastings Daily Tribune, and has won enviable 
recognition by his pleasing, forceful style, his articles proving an 
attractive feature of the journals to which he contributes. In his 
political views JNIr. Lewis is independent, while fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His life measures 
up to the highest standards in every relation and he has won an exten- 
sive circle of warm friends in the city of his residence. 



LEANDER JOHNSTON. 

Leander Johnston owns a good farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 8, Denver township, but has retired from active life 
and is living in Hastings. He was born in Ohio just across the river 
from Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1853, and is a son of John and 
Eleanor (Gibson) Johnston, the former a native of Ireland and the 
latter of Scotland. Both parents, however, accompanied their respec- 
tive parents to Ohio in childhood and there grew to manhood and 
womanhood. A number of years after their marriage they removed to 
Illinois, but subsequently returned east, taking up their residence in 
Cortland, New York, where both passed away. 

Leander Johnston was but a child when the familj^ removed to Illi- 
nois and there he received his education. After completing the work 
offered in the public schools he entered the State Normal School near 
Bloomington and took a course in that institution. He assisted his 
father with the operation of the home farm during his boyhood and 
youth and continued to follow agricultural pursuits in Illinois until 
about 1890, when he came west to Nebraska, purchasing land in Den- 
ver township, Adams county. He devoted his time and energy to the 
operation of that place for many years and his industry was rewarded 
by a good financial return. About five years ago, feeling that he had 
accumulated a competence, he removed to Hastings and hired a man 
to take charge of his farm. He owns a comfortable residence at 



60 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

No. 1124 West Sixth street and has made a place for himself as a val- 
ued resident of the city. While engaged in farming he raised both 
grain and stock and found both branches of his business profitable. 

Mr. Johnston was married in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1887, to JNIiss 
Lena Everly, a daughter of Nicholas and Julia Everly. ]\Ir. and 
]\Irs. Johnston have become the parents of a son, Raj^mond L., who 
was born in 1892 and is now the owner of a shoe store on Lincoln ave- 
nue in Hastings. 

JMr. Johnston gives his political support to the republican party but 
has never sought office. He holds membership in the ^Masonic order 
and in the Elks lodge and has sought to exemplify the spirit of frater- 
nity in his life. He had no capital when he began his career, but he 
understood farming thoroughly and this knowledge, combined Avith 
his industry and good business judgment, enabled him to gain financial 
independence. 



JOHN REES. 



John Rees, a prominent representative of musical interests of Has- 
tings, was born in Wales, September 7, 185o, a son of Richard and 
Elizabeth (Edwards) Rees, the former a marine engineer and machin- . 
ist. The family crossed the Atlantic in 1870 and became residents of 
Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Both parents are now deceased. 

John Rees was one of a family of five sons and jjursued his early 
education in the schools of Wales, while later he attended high school 
at Oshkosh. He was afterward apprenticed to the tinner's trade and 
in October, 1878, came to Hastings, where for two years he worked at 
his trade. In the meantime he had been studying music and merely 
utilized his trade in order to secure the means that would enable him to 
pursue his musical education. In 1880 he began teaching music and 
has since devoted his time and attention to that profession, teaching 
the violin, piano and pipe organ. He has also been active as a director 
of church choirs and is now serving as choir leader in the Congrega- 
tional church. All of his time is given to his duties, for he has a large 
class and is regarded as one of the most capable and eminent musical 
directors in this part of the state. Nature imbued him Avith a love of 
music and from early manhood he has cultivated his taste and talent in 
this direction and has done much to further the enjoyment of the art 
in the city and county in which he lives. He had charge of the Presby- 
terian choir in Hastings for over thirty j^ears and of the orchestra of 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 61 

the Kerr Opera House for about twenty years and organized the Con- 
servatory of JMusic at Hastings College. In the fall of 1912 he with- 
drew from the Hastings College Conservatory and established the 
Rees Music School. 

In INIay, 1878, Professor Rees was married to JNIiss Laura Emery 
and to them have been born two daughters, JNIay E. and Gertrude, 
both of whom are teachers in the Rees JNIusic School. Gertrude dis- 
plays marked talent as a pianist, Avhile the elder daughter is regarded 
as one of the finest violinists in this section of the country and devotes 
part of her time to concert and recital work. She is now giving con- 
certs in New York state. Both excel in their chosen branches of 
music and have studied under those who are acknowledged masters of 
the art. 

In his political views Professor Rees is a republican but while he 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the daj' has never 
been an office seeker. Fraternally he is connected with the INIasons as 
a Knight Templar and as a Scottish Rite ]Mason of the thirty-second 
degree. He is also a representative of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. He is very fond of golf, in Avhich sport he displays 
considerable skill, and for the past three years he has been president of 
the Country Club. His artistic powers and his moral nature render 
him popular in all circles and he is most widely and prominently 
known in his part of the state. 



LEONARD P. MILLS. 

Leonard P. INIills, who for the past nine years has operated his 
fine farm of four hundred and eighty acres on section 21, Denver 
township, was born in Hamilton county, Nebraska, on the 7th of INIay, 
1877, a son of G. H. and Hope (English) INIills. The mother is 
deceased but the father is residing with his son, A. J. IMills, of Denver 
toAvnship, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 

Leonard P. jNIills was reared in his native county and received his 
education in the Trumbull schools. As a boy he became familiar with 
agricultural work and remained on the homestead for some time after 
reaching mature years. At length he Avent to Omaha but after staying 
there for a year came to Adams county, where he has since remained. 
He rents four hundred and eighty acres on section 21, Denver town- 
ship, from George H. Pratt, a well known business man of Hastings, 
and has been very successful in the operation of this farm. He raises 



62 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

wheat, corn and alfalfa and also sheep, cattle, hogs and horses. He 
understands thoroughly the cultivation of the land and the care of 
stock and both phases of his business return him a good profit. Since 
he removed to this place it has been improved by the erection of a cattle 
bam, a sheep barn and a silo. He owns eighty acres near North Platte 
and residence property in Hastings. 

In July, 1906, Mr. Mills was married, in Hastings, to Miss Flor- 
ence Hull, by whom he has two children : Evart, born April 30, 1909 ; 
and Esther, whose birth occurred on the 6th of June, 1911. Mr. Mills 
casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of the prohibition 
party but has never sought office. He belongs to no societies nor 
lodges, preferring to spend his leisure hours at home. He has gained 
recognition as a progressive and capable agriculturist and as a man 
has won the respect and regard of those who have been associated 
with him. 



THE HANSEN STATE BANK. 

The Hansen State Bank is regarded as one of the strong and sub- 
stantial financial institutions of Adams county because of the men 
who occui^y its offices and direct its policy. This bank was founded in 
1912 by H. A. Redman, who was elected president, C. ]M. Redman, 
vice president, L. J. Berg, second vice j^resident, and J. J. Mohlman, 
cashier. The bank was cajiitalized for ten thousand dollars and they 
erected a bank building at a cost of forty-two hundred dollars. It is 
the first bank of the town of Hansen and it draws its jjatronage from 
the surrounding farmer community. It has adopted as its motto, 
service, silence and safety. The bank statement issued December 9, 
1915, indicates a business of sixty-six thousand six hundred and 
twenty-six dollars, its deposits amounting to fifty-three thousand five 
hundred and seven dollars, its capital stock and surplus to ten thou- 
sand five hundred dollars and its profits to two thousand two hundred 
and fifty-six dollars. This statement shows that the bank is in excel- 
lent standing and indicates the excellent growth made by the institu- 
tion during the short period of its existence. 

H. A. Redman, the president of the bank, was born in Germany 
and in his youthful days came to America, settling first in Wisconsin, 
while afterward he accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Adams county in 1882, at which time the family home was established 
on a farm near Juniata. He afterward turned his attention to the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 63 

implement business in Juniata and later conducted a similar under- 
taking in Kenesaw. Becoming actively interested in banking, he aided 
in organizing the First State Bank of Kenesaw and later served for 
a few j^ears as cashier of the German National Bank of Hastings. 
In the fall of 1911 he organized the Commercial Exchange Bank of 
Donij)han, Nebraska. Thus he brought broad experience to the pres- 
ent undertaking and his ability in the field of banking is an assurance 
to the patrons of the Hansen State Bank of its wise and successful 
conduct. Mr. Redman was married to IMiss Anna Bade, of Adams 
county, who died while they were residing in Doniphan, leaving three 
children, of whom the son, C. M. Redman, is serving as the cashier 
and the daughter. Bertha, is assistant cashier of the Bank of Doni- 
phan. The family hold membership in the German Lutheran church 
and are prominent in the business and social life of the community. 

C. M. Redman, vice president of the Bank of Hansen, was born 
on a farm near Juniata in 188.5 and attended the common schools 
there, after which he continued his education in the Creighton Phar- 
macy College of Omaha and then joined his father, H. A. Redman, 
in business and assisted him in organizing the First State Bank of 
Kenesaw and later the Commercial Exchange Bank of Doniphan, 
serving at j^resent as cashier of the latter as well as vice president of 
the Hansen State Bank. He married Clara Polensky, a daughter of 
Emil Polensky, of Hastings. They, too, are members of the German 
Lutheran church. 

L. J. Berg, who was the second vice president of the Hansen State 
Bank although he has retired from active management, was born in 
Illinois in 1878, a son of Gottlieb Berg, now deceased. In the early 
'80s he accompanied his parents to Nebraska, the family home being 
established on a farm near Kenesaw, where he still resides. He is one 
of the extensive landowners and prosperous citizens of the county, 
owning now five hundred and sixty acres. He helped to organize both 
the Hansen and Donij^han banks but sold his interest in both in 1913 
and is now living retired at Kenesaw. He married a daughter of 
Ed Rief, of Hall county, and they have one child. 

John J. JMohlman, cashier of the Hansen State Bank, to whom 
we are indebted for the material concerning the institution and the 
history of its officers, was born in Germany in 1883 and in the year 
1889 was brought to Nebraska by his parents, John and Antje JMohl- 
man, who settled in Clay county, near Glenville, where the father 
purchased a section of land, where he and his wife still make their 
home. They had a family of seven children, of whom two have passed 
away, while those yet surviving are Fred, John, George, Anton and 



64 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Grace, all living in Hall county with the exception of the second 
named. 

John J. JMohlman was reared to manhood upon the old homestead 
and acquired a common school education, supplemented by study in 
Hastings College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1908. 
He took up the profession of teaching and served for three years as 
principal of schools, spending two years at Valentine and one year at 
Nelson. He then turned his attention to the banking business and 
aided in organizing the Hansen and Doniphan banks and is now vice 
president of the Commercial Exchange Bank of Doniphan and cashier 
of the Hansen State Bank, being active in the management and con- 
trol of the latter, while his official position also gives him voice in the 
direction of the former. He is a wide-awake, enterprising and pro- 
gressive young business man who realizes the fact that the bank which 
most carefully safeguards its depositors is the one most worthy of 
support. 

In 1913 Mr. Mohlman was married to Miss Elsie Nielson, a 
daughter of Hans Nielson, Avho was formerly a resident of Valentine, 
Nebraska, but is now living in Copenhagen, Denmark. They have 
one son, Laverne, who was born in 1914. The parents are members 
of the Presbyterian church at Hansen, in the work of which they are 
actively interested, Mr. INIohlman serving as one of the trustees, and 
fraternally he is also connected with the Odd Fellows lodge at Hast- 
ings. He is a wide-awake and enterprising young business man, alert 
to the oi^ijortunities for the attainment of success and, like the other 
officers of the Doniphan and Hastings banks, occui^ies a very enviable 
position in financial circles in this county. 



THOMAS G. WHITING. 

Thomas G. Whiting is engaged in general farming in Juniata 
township and is today the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of 
land which pays tribute to the care and cultivation which he bestows 
upon it. Though he started out in life empty handed, he has worked 
his way upward and perseverance and industry- have been the salient 
features in his growing success. He was born in Rutlandshire, Eng- 
land, on the 9th of INIay, 1849, a son of Noel and Margaret (Bissell) 
Whiting, both of whom were natives of England, where they spent 
their entire lives. The father served for some time as a county official 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 65 

there. In the family were six children, but the five daughters never 
came to the new world. 

Thomas G. Whiting attended school in his native country but his 
educational opi)ortunities were limited, for at the age of eleven years 
he^ began work and has since provided for his own support. He 
served for a time as footman in the family of a wealthy man and was 
variously employed in England until 1870, when he came to the 
United States, settling near JMadison, Wisconsin. He spent two years 
there and in 1872 arrived in Adams county, Nebraska, after which he 
homesteaded on section 18, Juniata township, securing eighty acres of 
land to which he has added from time to time as his financial resources 
have increased until he is now the owner of three hundred and twentj^ 
acres, constituting a very valuable farm to which he has added all mod- 
ern accessories and equipment. He is also the owner of some city 
property in Oklahoma. His life in this county has been devoted to 
general farming and his labors have been attended with substantial 
success. He was also one of the organizers of the Farmers Grain 
Company of Juniata and has been a member of its board for a number 
of years. 

In 1872 JNIr. Whiting was united in marriage to INIiss Elizabeth 
Hardy, a native of England, by whom he had three children, as fol- 
lows : George Noel, who cultivates land belonging to his father ; Elva, 
who is the wife of E. J. Bolton and resides near Juniata; and Harry 
B., at home. 

Politically ]Mr. Whiting is a stanch republican, having supported 
the party since becoming a naturalized American citizen. His fellow 
townsmen, ajipreciative of his ability, have several times called him to 
public office. For four years he served as county connnissioner, was 
justice of the peace for two years and has been road supervisor and 
school director. Both Mr. and Mrs. Whiting were members of the 
Episcopal church, but about five years ago he was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his wife, whose death was deeply regretted throughout the 
community as well as bj^ her immediate family. She had indeed been 
a faithful companion to him, and to her he attributes half that he jjos- 
sesses. She shared with him in the hardships and trials of pioneer life 
in the days when they came to the county and their home was a little 
dugout. Afterward they had a sod house before they were able to 
build the more commodious, modern residence which INIr. Whiting 
later erected upon the farm. He put out one of the early orchards of 
the county and added all the improvements to his place and through all 
was encouraged by his wife, who ably managed the household aiFairs 
and indeed proved a helpmate to her husband. Mr. Whiting is con- 



66 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

nected with the United Workmen lodge of Juniata and with the Bank- 
ing Life of Lincohi, Nebraska. He has always been interested in 
community affairs, cooperating in movements and measures for the 
public good, and wherever he is known he is held in high regard be- 
cause of a well spent life. 



W. L. SUCHA, M. D. 



Dr. W. L. Sucha, of Hastings, a well known surgeon of Nebraska, 
utilizes all of the latest discoveries and scientific developments of 
surgical science in the practice of his profession and has won a notable 
and enviable position as one whose skill places him in the foremost 
ranks. He was born on the 31st of INIarch, 1884, in Schuyler, 
Nebraska, a son of Frank and Mary Sucha, who were farming peo- 
ple. The family came to this state in 1879 from Shelby ville, Illinois, 
and after devoting about a quarter of a century to general agricultural 
pursuits the father retired from active business in 1903. He and his 
wife celebrated their golden wedding in October, 1915, having trav- 
eled life's journey together for a half century, during which their love 
and confidence has increased as the years have gone by. They became 
the i^arents of eleven children, six sons and five daughters. 

Dr. Sucha, after attending the district schools, continued his 
studies in the Schuyler high school and afterward attended the Fre- 
mont Normal College, from which he was graduated with the Bach- 
elor of Science degree. He thus secured a broad foundation for 
professional learning and entered upon the study of medicine at 
Creighton University at Omaha, from which he was graduated on the 
2d of ]May, 1908. He afterward served as interne in the Omaha Gen- 
eral Hospital for a year and subsequently practiced medicine at 
Orleans, Nebraska, for four years. He then went to Chicago, where 
he took post-graduate work, devoting his time to surgical clinics under 
the direction of J. B. JMurphy, one of the greatest surgeons of the 
United States. He also added to his experience by professional 
service in ]\Iercy Hospital. In February, 1914, he came to Hastings, 
Avhere he now confines his attention to surgical work, performing both 
major and minor operations. His ability has brought him to the front 
and his laudable ambition along professional lines keeps him in touch 
Avith the latest discoveries of the science. 

On the 1st of June, 1909, Dr. Sucha was united in marriage to 
Miss Irene Muldoon, a daughter of James K. Muldoon, of Omaha. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 67 

Both are devout communicants of the Cathohc church. Dr. Sucha 
also belongs to Hastings Council of the Knights of Columbus and he 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is interested 
in all that pertains to the progress of his community, supporting every 
political and public measure for the general good. Along professional 
lines he is connected with the Republican Valley Medical Association, 
of which he has been president, the Nebraska State Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. He enjoys motoring and 
hunting as a means of recreation and when leisure permits employs 
his time in that way, but his first duty is always his profession and each 
year he takes post-graduate work in order to keep abreast with the 
trend of the times. 



WILLIAM H. BURKE. 

William H. Burke, who is a successful farmer of Highland town- 
ship, where he owns one hundred and sixty acres of good land, was 
born in Galesbm-g, Illinois, on the 28th of December, 1869, and is a 
son of Patrick and Catherine (Gleasure) Burke. The father was 
born in Ireland and was there left an orphan, both of his parents dying 
during his boyhood. He came to America in 1849, when twelve years 
of age, being brought to this country by friends, and grew to man- 
hood in Michigan. He engaged in farming there but following his 
marriage, which occurred in the ^Volverine state, he went to Gales- 
burg, Illinois, where he worked on a railroad until 1881, when he 
removed to Adams county with his family, which numbered four chil- 
dren. His wife was born in Denmark and was a daughter of Henry 
Gleasure, a representative of the same family of Gleasures that estab- 
lished the first JMethodist Episcopal church in the United States. JNIrs. 
Burke's father farmed in Michigan for a number of years and was 
successful in his chosen occuj^ation. JNIr. Burke died upon his farm 
in this county Avhen sixty-five years of age but his wife is still living 
and makes her home in Hastings. All of their children are still living, 
namely: Rosa, who is teaching school in Chicago; William H.; 
Thomas G., who is retired and lives in Nevada ; and Hattie, the wife 
of Len Patterson, a resident of Idaho. 

William H. Burke attended the city schools of Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, and following the removal of the family to Adams county, 
Nebraska, attended the country schools near his home. As his age 
and strength increased he aided more and more in the work of the 



68 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

farm and after reaching mature years took charge of the oi^eration of 
the place. Subsequently he bought a quarter section across the road 
from his present farm but in 1904 disposed of that property and pur- 
chased the farm on section 16, Highland township, which he still owns. 
It comprises one hundred and sixty acres and as the land is naturally 
fertile and in a high state of cultivation he seldom fails to harvest 
good crops. He raises wheat, corn, oats and alfalfa and also keeps 
on hand some stock, averaging from eight to ten head of cattle and 
from twentj' to thirty hogs. He has erected all of the buildings upon 
the farm with the exception of the residence and has otherwise im- 
IJroved the place. 

]\Ir. Burke was married on the 29th of November, 1894, to Miss 
Mabel Houser, a daughter of George and Emily Houser, of High- 
land township. Her parents were formerly residents of Iowa but are 
now living in Linden, this county. ]Mr. and JNIrs. Burke have become 
the parents of three children: Rollin, who was born December 23, 
1895; JNIaurice, born December 11, 1900; and Kenneth, whose birth 
occurred on the 8th of September, 1906. Mr. Burke is a stanch 
rejiublican and works loyally to secure the success of that party at the 
polls. He is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
at Hastings. 



HENRY B. DAILY. 



Henry B. Daity was one of the leading carpenters of Kenesaw 
and won an enviable reputation for skilled work and business integ- 
rity. He was born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, on the 22d of 
May, 1838, of the marriage of John and Catherine (Becker) Daily. 
His parents, who were natives of Pennsylvania, went to Putnam 
county, Illinois, with their family in 1853 and three j-ears later 
removed to Des INIoines county, Iowa, Avhere both passed awa3\ The 
father devoted his life to farming and met with a good measure of 
success in that occupation. 

Henry B. Daily attended the common schools and also assisted 
his father with the farm work. He remained at home until the 21st 
of October, 1861, when he enlisted in Company E, Fifteenth Iowa 
Volunteer Infantry. He participated in the battle of Shiloh and on 
a forced march between Pittsburgh Landing and Corinth was rup- 
tured and was forced to remain for six months in camp. He was 
then discharged on the 10th of June, 1862, on account of disability 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 69 

and returned home. He worked as a hired hand until 1872, when he 
came to Adams county, Nebraska, and located in Kenesaw. He 
turned his attention to carpentering, which he folloAved successfully 
until his death in JNIay, 1897. He took a great deal of pride in his 
work, which was always well done, and the demands upon his services 
were heavy. 

On the 2d of February, 1865, occurred the marriage of Mr. Daily 
and JMrs. Anna (Landis) Daily, a widow of his brother. She was 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, on the 7th of February, 
1838, and is a daughter of Christian and Anna (Funk) Landis, who 
were also natives of that county. In 1850 the family removed to Des 
Moines countj^ Iowa, and there both parents passed away. Mrs. 
Daily's first husband was also a soldier of the Civil war and while 
serving as a teamster during the siege of Vicksburg his saddle mule 
fell Avith him. He was very badly injured and also contracted swamp 
fever, from which he died in the Cumberland Hospital at Nashville, 
Tennessee. To Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Daily were born four chil- 
dren, namely: Alice, the wife of O. I. Roberts, Avho resides near 
Prosser; John W., a resident of Jones county, Iowa; Emma, at home; 
and Joseph L., who lives in Wheeler county, Nebraska. 

]\Ir. Daily was an adherent of the republican party and served 
acceptably as assessor. He belonged to the ]Methodist Episcopal 
church and was also identified with the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He always discharged to the full all obligations resting upon him and 
took a public-spirited interest in the general welfare. He was a man 
of sterling worth and the circle of his friends was almost coextensive 
with the circle of his acquaintance. 



HENRY J. C. MEYER. 



Henry J. C. Meyer, who owns two hundred and forty acres of 
the north half of section 20, Blaine township, was born in Harrison 
county, Indiana, on the 22d of November, 1852. His father, C. 
Meyer, was born in Germany but emigrated to the United States in 
young manhood and in 1833 settled in Indiana, where he was married 
to Elizabeth Reinhart, also a native of Germany. In his earlj^ days 
the father was a turner and later became identified with agricultural 
pursuits. 

Henry J; C. Meyer attended the common schools until he was six- 
teen years of age, when he j)ut aside his textbooks and devoted his 



70 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

entire time to assisting his father with the work of the farm. Two 
years later he went to Louisville, Kentucky, and there found employ- 
ment in a furniture factory, so continuing until he was twenty years 
old. He then went to Troy, Indiana, and was engaged in making 
furniture there for six months, after which he was for a short time a 
resident of New Orleans. On returning north he went to INIarshall 
county, Illinois, where he rented land until 1888, which year wit- 
nessed his arrival in Adams county. For a time he rented a farm but 
as soon as his resources would permit purchased his present place in 
Blaine township. He has always worked hard and his industry and 
careful management of his affairs have enabled him to acquire a com- 
petence. 

Mr. Meyer was married on the 6th of October, 1888, to Miss 
Anka Valentine, a daughter of Harm and Trintze (Betten) Valen- 
tine, early settlers of this county. Four children have been born to 
JNIr. and ]\Irs. JSIeyer, namely: William R., who was born on the 
20th of August, 1892, and who is assisting his father; Christian L., 
who was born January 21, 1894, and is at home; Lorena, who was 
born July 2, 1898, and is now attending high school at Hastings; and 
Louisa, who was born November 24, 1903, and is a pupil in the South 
ward school at Hastings. 

Mr. JNIeyer supports the republican party at the polls and keeps 
well informed as to the questions and issues of the day. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the German Evangelical Luth- 
eran church at Hastings. His sterling personal worth has gained him 
the respect of all who have been brought into contact with him and 
his efficiency as a farmer is generally recognized. 



JUDSON BURWELL. 



Judson Burwell, who arrived in Adams county in INIay, 1871, took 
up his homestead in Juniata township and has since, or for a period of 
forty-five years, continued to reside upon that place, which he has 
brought to a high state of development. A native of Ohio, his birth 
occurred on the 18t]i of October, 1843, in Elmira, Fulton county. His 
father, Friend Burwell, was born in Addison, Vermont, on the 22d of 
September, 1814, and died in 1901. His parents were Henry and 
Annice Burwell. Friend Burwell was married in Williams county, 
Ohio, to Harriet S. N. Reynolds, who was horn in Vermont in 1822 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 71 

and died on the 13th of March, 1850. She was a daughter of Stephen 
and Samantha Reynolds. 

Judson Burwell was reared under the parental roof and received 
his education in the public schools of his native county. On the 21st 
of April, 1861, he enlisted at Waterville, Lucas county, Ohio, in Com- 
pany I, Fourteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which went into camp 
at Cleveland. A short time later the command went to Columbus, 
where the men were armed, and some time in May they proceeded to 
Parkersburg, West Virginia. On the 3d of June, 1861, they took 
part in the battle of Philippi and they were also in the engagements at 
Laurel Hill and at Carricks Ford, Cheat river. His term having 
expired, ]Mr. Burwell was discharged on the 13th of August, 1861, at 
Toledo, Ohio, but on the 18th of the following October he reenlisted 
at ^Vauseon, Fulton county, becoming a member of Company E, 
Sixty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. This command went into 
camp at Napoleon, Henry county, Ohio, where they remained until 
January, 1862, when they proceeded to Columbus to secure their arms 
and then left for the front. On or about the 1st of February they took 
boat at Cincinnati and landed in the vicinity of Fort Donelson on the 
13th of February, 1862. The regiment was assigned to Colonel J. M. 
Thayer's Brigade, which was a part of General Lew Wallace's di- 
vision, and the command remained in that division until Corinth, Mis- 
sissii^jji, was evacuated. Subsequently they went into camp at Bolivar, 
Tennessee, but on the oth of October, 1862, they participated in the 
battle at Hatcher's Run. In November they became a part of the 
Second Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Army Corps, Army of 
the Tennessee, and from that time until October, 1864, INIr. Burwell 
took part in all of the campaigns of the Army of the Tennessee, the 
most notable being those around Vicksburg, Mississippi, and Atlanta, 
Georgia. His term of service expired on the 28th of October, 1864, 
when he was honorably discharged and returned to civil life. Two of 
his brothers gave their lives in defense of the Union. Henry S. was a 
member of the Third Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and was killed near 
luka, ]Mississippi, and James, who belonged to the Fourteenth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, was fatally wounded at Chickamauga. 

After leaving the army Mr. Burwell made his way to Kosciusko 
county, Indiana, where he engaged in farming for a year. He then 
removed to JNIichigan and after working on a farm there for a year 
he returned to Indiana, where he remained until the 4th of May, 1871. 
He then started for Nebraska and arrived where Juniata now stands 
on the 8th of that month. He went to Lincoln and filed on the south- 
east quarter of section 2, township 7 north, range 11 west, on the 1.5th 



72 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of INIay and had the distinction of being the first man to take up a 
lioniestead in that township. He still owns the farm and is still super- 
vising its operation. He has proved very successful as an agricultui*- 
ist, being at once j)ractical and progressive in his methods, and his 
well directed labors have j'ielded him a gratifying income. 

Mr. Burwell was married on the 29th of December, 1867, in Kos- 
ciusko count}^, Indiana, to ]Miss jNIary A. Robinson, a native of that 
county and a daughter of James and Rachel (Anderson) Robinson, 
who were born respectively in Kentucky and Ohio. To this union has 
been born a daughter, who is the wife of J. E. Wiltrout. They have 
two living sons, Chester J. and Ora B., both of whom are married. 
Chester married Elizabeth Hubbard, by whom he has a daughter, 
Jean, born in JNIay, 1913, and a son, Edward Elroj^ whose birth 
occurred in June, 1915. Ora B. married JNIary Clouder. 

Mr. Burwell is a stanch republican in politics and has alwaj's taken 
a keen interest in public affairs. When the county was organized on 
the 12th of December, 1871, he was appointed by the governor as one 
of the judges of election, and he has also served as township assessor, 
as village trustee and as school trustee. Both in his official capacities 
and as a private citizen he has placed the public welfare above all per- 
sonal considerations and his jiublic sjiirit is generally recognized. In 
early manhood he became a member of the Christian church but of late 
years he has attended and contributed to the support of the Baptist 
church, of which he and his wife are now members. He holds mem- 
bership in Geary Post, No. 81, Department of Nebraska, G. A. R., 
with which he has been identified since October, 1881, and he has held 
most of the offices. He is at present serving as commander, Avhich 
position he has held a number of times, and the high esteem in which 
he is held by his comrades is further indicated by the fact that he was 
made a delegate from the Department of Nebraska to the National 
Encampment at Louisville, Kentucky; at Denver, Colorado; at To- 
ledo, Ohio ; at Detroit, Michigan ; and at Los Angeles, California. 

During the period of ]\Ir. Burwell's residence in this county it has 
developed from a frontier region to a prosperous farming district and 
its people instead of having to endure the many hardships of pioneer 
life are provided with all the conveniences found in the older east. 
For a year after his arrival here he had to go to Grand Island, thirty- 
two miles distant, to get his mail and to buy groceries and other needed 
supplies, and it was a number of years before railroads were built 
through the county. He recognized, however, that the east was be- 
coming overcrowded and that in time the west would be developed 
and believed in the future of this district. His faith in Adams cnuntv 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 73 

has been justified, and the land which he homesteaded in 1871 is now 
very valuable. His life has been filled with useful activity and he is 
justl}' held in high esteem by all who know him. 



JMULFORD M. HAYNES. 

Mulford JNI. Haynes is a member of the firm of Haynes Brothers, 
conducting business at Hastings as decorators. They stand in a con- 
spicuous and enviable jDosition in their chosen field of labor, the 
excellence and beauty of their work winning for them a liberal 
patronage and insuring to them a continuance of the trade. Industiy, 
promptness and reliability are also factors in their growing success. 

Mulford M. Haynes was born in Henry county, Illinois, Novem- 
ber 16, 1867, a son of E. P. and Joanna (Barrows) Haynes. The 
family came to Nebraska in 1877 from Illinois and settled on a farm 
where the cemetery is now located. There the father carried on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits for a number of years but afterward lived 
retired. Both he and his wife have now passed aAvay. 

JMulford jM. Haynes pursued a public school education and after- 
ward turned his attention to the building business, working at the 
carpenter's trade. For seven j^ears he was in the employ of W. L. 
Y^'etter, a decorator, and in 1900 he and his brother purchased the 
business of Mr. Y'etter and have since continued active along that 
line. They have done work all over this section of the state and now 
employ fifteen men. They have decorated the princij^al buildings in 
Hastings and also many fine structiu'es elsewhere and their work 
presents many beautiful and artistic features as well as all that is new 
and novel in their line. Their patronage is extensive owing to the 
excellence of their work and their business integrity', their reputation 
in business affairs being unassailable. 

On the 31st of ]March, 1897, INIr. Haynes Mas united in marriage 
to JNIiss Ida Gilbreth, a daughter of John Gilbreth, of Hastings. To 
them have been born four children, namely: Gilbert M., Dorothy L., 
Katherine J. and John W. 

In his i^olitical views ]Mr. Haynes is independent, while his 
religious faith is that of the Christian church. Fraternally he is iden- 
tified with the JMasons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
]Mr. Haynes belongs to the Commercial Club and is interested in all 
the plans and projects for the upbuilding and development of his cit^^ 
He served for four years as a member of the city council and exer- 



74 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

cised liis official i^rerogatives in support of many plans and measures 
for the general good. He was one of the first to take up the fight 
against saloons and has always been a stalwart supporter of the cause 
of temperance. In a word, he stands for anytliing that is for the bet- 
terment of the individual or the community and his influence is always 
on the side of right, reform and progress. 



LEANDER E. MAXIM. 

Leander E. Maxim engaged in carpentering in Kenesaw for a 
number of years and his excellent workmanship and good business 
ability enabled him to gain a gratifying measure of success. For 
twenty years before his removal to Kenesaw he followed farming in 
Kearney county and his well directed labors as a farmer also yielded 
him good financial returns. He was born in Somerset county, Maine, 
on the 3d of February, 1837, of the marriage of Jesse and Louisa 
(Pease) Maxim. The father, who was born in Plymouth county, 
Massachusetts, in 1807, was a direct descendant of Mayflower an- 
cestry. In 1811, when but four years of age, he was taken by his 
j)arents to Maine and there resided until his death. 

Leander E. Maxim received M^hat was considered a fair education 
in those days, but as he was the eldest child and the family were in 
only moderate circumstances he had to begin work while still a boy. 
He aided in the cultivation of the home farm and also worked as a 
hired hand, being so employed until the 5th of November, 1861, Avhen 
he enlisted in the Union arm}% becoming a member of Company D, 
Thirteenth Regiment, Maine Volunteer Infantry. During much of 
his service he was employed in guarding trains and commissary stores 
but he took part in considerable fighting, including the Red River 
campaign. He was mustered out in January, 1865, and returned to 
Maine, where he followed the carpenter's trade until 1866. In that 
year he removed to Lewiston and for two years worked in the cotton 
mills there. He then again turned his attention to the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed in the east until 1876. That year witnessed 
his removal to Wisconsin and in 1878 he went to Kearney county, 
Nebraska. He homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land there 
and for twenty years folloM^ed agricultural pursuits, but at length sold 
his farm and removed to Kenesaw, where he worked at the carpen- 
ter's trade until he retired from active life. 

Mr. Maxim was married on the 14th of September, 1868, to Miss 





HERVEY r. JIAXnt MRS. HERVEY U. JIAXlil 




CLARENCE H. ilAXIJI 





LKAXDER E. JIAXIM MRS. I.KAN DKR K. MAXIM 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 77 

Cornelia A. Jones, who died in 1874. To them were born two chil- 
dren, Alma and Her^'ey U., both of whom are deceased. JNIr. JMaxim 
is indej)endent in politics and takes a commendable interest in public 
affairs. His religious faith is that of the Free Baptist church and 
he is identified with the Grand Ai'my of the Republic. He is eligible 
to the Sons of the American Revolution and has proved worthy of 
his JNIayflower ancestry, standing firmlj' at all times for what he 
believes to be the right and manifesting a spirit of enterprise and 
self-reliance. 



GEORGE W. LONG. 



George W. Long, a progressive and efficient farmer residing on 
section 6, Denver township, was born in Livingston county, JNIissouri, 
on the 10th of October, 1879. His parents, James M. and Martha 
Josej)hihe (Wilson) Long, were natives of Pennsyhania but resided 
for many years in JNIissouri, where the mother passed away. In Sep- 
tember, 1904, the father came to Adams county, Nebraska, whence 
he subsequentlj' removed to the state of Washington. After living 
there for a year he returned to this county and is now living on an 
eighty acre farm on section 5, Denver township, which is owned by 
our subject. There were three children in the familj', of whom one 
died in infancy, the others being: George W. ; and JMarguerite, who 
gave her hand in marriage to J. L. FuUerton, the owner of a flour and 
feed store in Hastings. 

George W. Long remained in JNIissouri until he was twentj^ years 
of age and is indebted for his education to the public schools of the 
state. Through assisting his father with the work of the home farm 
he gained valuable knowledge concerning practical methods of agri- 
culture and after his removal to Adams country, Nebraska, in 190-4, he 
purchased an eighty acre tract three miles north of his present farm. 
Subsequently he bought a quarter section in West Blue township 
wliich Bentley Brown now owns. After selling that place JNIr. Long 
went to Kansas, where he purchased two farms, Avhich he later dis- 
posed of. He next bought land in Hamilton county, Nebraska, but 
after holding it for some time sold out and returned to Adams county, 
])urchasing land in Denver township. However, he resides on a rented 
farm, which is owned b_v Edwin A. Carl and which comprises one hun- 
dred and sixty acres on section 6, Denver township. He has operated 
this place for five years and his well directed labors are rewarded by 



78 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

good financial returns. He does general farming, raising grain and 
stock, paying esjjecial attention to the raising of thoroughbred Poland 
China hogs. 

In 1901 occurred the marriage of JNIr. Long and JNIiss Nannie 
Bruce, who was born in Sheridan county, INIissouri, of the marriage 
of Daniel and Sarah Bruce. Two children have been born to this 
union, namely: Gladys, born on the 23d of February, 1906; and 
Alice, seven years old. 

Mr. Long supports the democratic party at the polls as he believes 
fii-mly in the wisdom of its policies. He is well known in local fra- 
ternal circles, belonging to the INIodern Woodmen, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, all of Juniata. 
He is very active in the work of the INIethodist Episcopal church at 
Juniata, to which he belongs, and for three years has served as super- 
intendent of the Sunday school. His life has been guided by the 
highest principles of morality and all who have come in contact with 
him testify to his integrity and regard for the rights of others. In his 
farm work he is at once practical and progressive and the gratifying 
measure of success which he has gained is due entirely to his own 
efforts. 



KARL KAUF. 



Karl Kauf is the senior partner of the firm of Kauf & Rinder- 
spacher & Company of Hastings, controlling one of the important 
commercial and industrial enterprises of the city. Well defined plans, 
carefullj' executed, have led him forward to the goal of success and at 
the same time his business interests have been of a character which have 
contributed to the general welfare as well as to individual prosperity. 
He was born in Baden, German}% on the 16th of jMarch, 1862, a son 
of Jacob and Selma Kauf. The father, who Avas a farmer by occupa- 
tion, has now jiassed away, but the mother is living at the age of eighty- 
four years, having for forty-one years survived her husband, Avho died 
in 1874. 

Karl Kauf was educated in Germany and was a young man of 
eighteen years when on the 25th of September, 1880, he sailed for the 
Uliited States. He located first in Newark, New Jersey, and after- 
ward went to INIassachusetts, where he remained for six months. Still 
later he became a resident of Nebraska City, where he spent three 
years working for one man. He afterward became a resident of Cab- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 79 

fornia, where he remained for two years, and m 1887 he located at 
Hastings, where he formed a partnership with JNIr. Rinderspacher, 
since which time they have been associated in business. They started 
with very little capital and a two by four meat rack was sufficient for 
their stock of meat. They made it a rule that they would never incur 
indebtedness and to this day have strictly adhered. Their trade stead- 
ily grew by reason of their honorable methods and unfaltering enter- 
j)rise and after six years they were enabled to j)urchase their present 
place of business — a two story brick building now entirely devoted to 
their trade. They conduct both a wholesale and retail business in 
meats, shipping to various i^arts of the state, and they have the best 
equii^ped independent meat establishment in Nebraska, conducting 
their own slaughter house to which a private switch has been extended, 
having also their own ice house and employing twenty men. In addi- 
tion to his other interests JNIr. Kauf is a stockholder and director of the 
b]'ewerj% also of the canning factory at Hastings and is a stockholder 
in the foundry. 

On the 9th of July, 188.5, in California, Mr. Kauf was united in 
marriage to Miss Selma Rinderspacher, a daughter of Jacob Rinder- 
sjjacher. To them have been born four children, namely : INIina, Marie, 
Selma and Karl. 

Politicallj^ ]Mr. Kauf is independent, supporting men and meas- 
ures rather than party. His religious faith is indicated by his mem- 
bership in the German Lutheran church, in which he is serving as 
treasurer. He is a valued member of the Commercial Club and also 
belongs to the Sons of Herman, of which he was the first president 
and is now acting as treasurer. He is a most ^progressive man, recog- 
nized as a leader in the German-American circles of the city, and not- 
withstanding the fact that he had but twenty-seven dollars when he 
arrived in the new world, he has worked his way steadily upward and 
is today one of the jDrosperous citizens and substantial business men of 
Hastings. 



GEORGE W. GOSSARD. 

George W. Gossard, who is engaged in general farming in West 
Blue township, was born in Washington county, JMaryland, on the 
18th of September, 1865, and in his youth attended the common 
schools until he reached the age of sixteen years, after which he worked 



80 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

for three years upon the home farm of his parents, David and JNIary 
(Elliott) Gossard, in whose family were fourteen children. 

^Vhen nineteen years of age George W. Gossard removed to Mc- 
Donough county, Illinois, where he remained for two and a half years, 
Avorking at farm labor for his brother, after which he engaged in the 
cultivation of a rented farm on his own account for a year. In 1887 
he removed to Hamilton county, Nebraska, and following his mar- 
riage in the same j^ear he homesteaded in Hayes county, Nebraska, 
where he resided for seven years. In 189ri he went to Hall county, 
just north of the Adams county line, Avhere he cultivated a rented 
farm for two years. In 1896 he rented land in Adams county and has 
since resided in this county with the exception of four and a half 
months, which he and his family spent in southern California. In 
1906 he purchased his i^resent farm. 

It was on the 20th of September, 1887, that ]Mr. Gossard married 
JNIiss Ida Radenbaugh, a daughter of Henry Radenbaugh, one of the 
pioneer settlers of Adams county, who died in the year 1913, while his 
widow survives and is living in Hastings. Mr. and Mrs. Gossard have 
become the parents of four children. Guy C, who was born October 
30, 1888, married JMarie Crabb, of Los Angeles, California, and is now 
engaged in the practice of dentistry at La INIanda Park, California. 
Ralph, born October 7, 1891, is engaged in farming near Victorville, 
California. Roy, born June 22, 1894, is at home. Dorothy, born 
July 2, 1901, is attending school in Trumbull. 

]\Ir. and INIrs. Gossard are well known in their part of the county 
and are valued members of the ISIethodist church of Trumbull. jNIr. 
Gossard is also prominent in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the INIodern Woodmen camp and in the former has twice passed 
through all of the chairs and is now again noble grand. He has served 
as road overseer for five years but does not seek to figure prominently 
in political circles and in exercising the right of franchise casts an in- 
dependent local ballot but at national elections supports the repub- 
lican party. 



CHARLES IMORITZ. 



Charles JMoritz has made a creditable place for himself in busi- 
ness circles of Prosser and under his able management the Farmers 
Elevator & Lumber Company has enjoyed a steady growth. He was 
one of the organizers of the concern, which conducts five elevators 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 81 

and which in addition to dealing in grain handles lumber, live stock 
and coal. A native of Saxony, Germany, his birth occurred on the 
3d of Februarj% 18.55, and he is a son of Carl and JNIary (Stahlhut) 
iNIoritz, who emigrated with their family to the United States in 1880. 
They located in Adams county, Nebraska, where they lived until 
1914, when both passed away. They were the parents of six children, 
namely: Charles; Bertha, the wife of P. L. Boyd, a resident of the 
state of Washington ; William, who is living in San Francisco ; Mar- 
tha, the wife of Rudolph Siebert, of Grand Island, this state; Robert, 
a resident of Seattle, Washington ; and Richard, a high school in- 
spector of Nebraska at Lincoln. 

Charles INIoritz was reared in his native land and received a thor- 
ough general education in azi excellent g3'mnasiuni in that country. 
When sixteen years of age he went to sea but after a short time came 
to the United States in 1871. He at once made his way to the middle 
Avest and remained in Stark county, Illinois, until 1878, which year 
witnessed his arrival in Adams county, Nebraska. He located in 
IMartin townshii). Hall county, and for fourteen j^ears was promi- 
nently identified with agricultural interests there. In 1896 he 
embarked in the grain business at Prosser, organizing a farmers eleva- 
tor company, which he managed with gratifying success until 1904. 
In that year he withdrew from that concern and in 1908 it became 
insolvent. He still remained active in the grain trade and at length 
organized a new company, known as the Farmers Elevator & Lumber 
Company, which now conducts five elevators, carrying on business in 
Prosser, Kenesaw, New IMarsh, Hayland and the switch. The com- 
l^any handles a large amount of grain annually in its elevators and 
also does a large business in knnber, live stock and coal. The presi- 
dent of the concern is Henry Augustin, Jr., the vice president is 
Daniel jNIcGowan and, as before stated, INIr. INIoritz is the manager. 
His thorough knowledge of the business, combined with his sound 
judgment and foresight, has enabled him to develop the company into 
one of the leading concerns in this field of activity in this part of the 
state. He is also financially interested in the Hayland Bank, owns a 
half section of land in Hall county and one hundred ^nd ten acres of 
irrigated land in Texas near the Rio Grande river. 

JNIr. INIoritz was married in 188.5 to ^liss Helen Jost, by whom he 
has three children : Otto, who is associated with him in business ; INIax, 
cashier of the Bank of Hayland; and 3Iartha, the wife of J. C. 
Suavely, of Hastings, Nebraska. 

INIr. INIoritz supported the republican party in his young manhood, 
was later a populist and now votes independently, supporting the best 



82 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

candidate irrespective of his party affiliation. While living in Hall 
county he served as supervisor and has always taken the interest of a 
good citizen in public affairs. He holds membership in the ^Methodist 
Episcopal church and the principles which govern his life are still fur- 
ther indicated by the fact that he is a prominent ]Mason. He belongs 
to the blue lodge at Juniata, to the chajjter and consistory at Hastings 
and to the Shrine at Lincoln, and his wife and daughter are both affil- 
iated with the Order of the Eastern Star. He is a man of ability and 
unquestioned integrity and his personal friends are many. 



LEONARD E. ISAAC. 



Leonard E. Isaac, who is a representative farmer of Blaine town- 
ship, was born in Bureau county, Illinois, on the 1st of January, 1869. 
His father, J. W. Isaac, was also born in Bureau county, where his 
jjarents, Elias and ]Mary (Black) Isaac, had settled in 1832 and 
where they both passed away. He was reared upon the home farm 
there and followed agricultural pursuits in that county until 1884, 
when he removed to section 23, Zero township, Adams coimty, Ne- 
braska. He took up land and was actively and successfully engaged 
in its cultivation until 1892, when he retired to Hastings, where he 
served on the police force from 1893 to 1898. He passed away on the 
8th of April, 1898. His wife bore the maiden name of Emeline Hil- 
debrand and was a daughter of John T. Hildebrand, who settled in 
Zero townshij), Adams county, in 1882. He passed away ten years 
later and was survived by his wife for six years. ]Mrs. Isaac made her 
home with our subject from the time of her husband's demise tmtil 
she too was called to her final rest, and she is buried in Parkview ceme- 
tery. 

Leonard E. Isaac attended the common schools of Bureau county, 
Illinois, and assisted his father until he was twenty-one years of age. 
when his marriage occurred. In the meantime the family home had 
been established in Adams county. Nebraska, and on beginning his 
independent career our subject began farming on his own account in 
this county. He has been very successful as an agriculturist and 
derives a good income from the cidtivation of two hundred and forty 
acres of land on section 32, Blaine township. He raises corn, hay and 
wheat and also stock and is a practical and progressive agriculturist. 

On the 2d of November, 1890, ]Mr. Isaac was united in marriage 
to INIiss JNIyrtle Susan Carter, a daughter of W. H. and ]Malvina 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUXTY 83 

Carter, of Livingston, Illinois. Her father is deceased but her mother 
is living and now resides at Des JNloines, Iowa. JNIr. and Mrs. Isaac 
have two children, a son and daughter. Verna JNIalvina, who was 
born on the 17th of JNIarch, 1893, married Joseph Daugherty, a son of 
James and ISIary Daugherty, of Denver township, and an efficient 
young farmer of that township. To this union has been born a daugh- 
ter, Neva, whose birth occurred on the 9th of January, 1913. Ernest, 
who was born on the 1st of January, 1898, is still at home. 

JNIr. Isaac supports the progressive party where national issues 
are at stake but at local elections votes independently. He belongs 
to the United Brethren church at Bethel, Denver township, and is 
identified with the ]\Iaccabees. He discharges to the full all obliga- 
tions resting upon him and his many admirable qualities have gained 
him the personal friendship of those who have been most closely asso- 
ciated with him. 



FRED BLAKE, JR. 



Fred Blake, Jr., who is manager of the Pioneer market and as 
such is well known in the business circles of Hastings, belongs to that 
class of enterprising, progressive men whose close application and 
energy are the salient features of their growing success. He was born 
in Oxford, England, on the 18th of April, 1870, and is a son of Fred 
and Emily (Jones) Blake. The family came direct from England 
in 1874, settling at Hastings, where the father established a meat 
market, which is today the oldest market in years of continuous exist- 
ence in the state. The company conducts both a wholesale and retail 
business and operates its own slaughterhouse and ice plant. They 
have utilized the most modern machinery to carry on the work and 
jDrepare and care for their meats and their shipping facilities are 
augmented by a private railroad switch which extends to their plant. 
The father is today numbered among the oldest business men of 
Nebraska and throughout all the years he has borne an enviable repu- 
tation for enterprise and diligence in his chosen line. 

Fred Blake, Jr., spent his youthful days under the parental roof 
and acquired a public school education in Hastings, where practically 
his entire life has been passed. He was trained to the business in 
which he is now engaged and' which has claimed his attention through- 
out the entire period of his connection with commercial interests. As 
his ability and experience developed he was intrusted more and more 



Si PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

largely with the control of the plant and is now manager, thus having 
direct supervision over the labors of ten employes. The business is 
one of the important enterprises of its kind in the city and the life 
record of ]Mr. Blake has been one of continuous activity, in which has 
been accorded due recognition of labor, so that he is today numbered 
among the substantial citizens of Adams county. 

On the 12th of September, 1905, occurred the marriage of JNlr. 
Blake and JSIiss Elizabeth Colby, a daughter of George W. and Addie 
Colbj\ They have two children, JNIary Jane and Adeline. The re- 
ligious faith of the family is that of the JMetliodist church, to which 
they generously contribute and to the teachings of which they loyally 
adhere. JNIr. Blake is a socialist in his political views and fraternally 
is connected with the Knights of Pythias and the Eagles. His has 
been an active and useful life crowned with a substantial measure of 
success and he is now not onlj^ one of the owners of the Pioneer meat 
market but is also the owner of farm lands in the state and is greatly 
interested in the development of city and state, never faltering in his 
allegiance to those interests which have constituted directly resultant 
factors in public progress and improvement. 



FRANCIS NAULTEUS, M. D. 

Dr. Francis Naulteus, a well known representative of the medi- 
cal profession in central Nebraska, practicing in Hastings, was born 
in Prussia on the 8th of October, 183.5. Although he has now 
passed the eightieth milestone on life's journey, he still remains active 
in his chosen life Avork and is specializing in the treatment of dis- 
eases of the eye, ear, nose and throat and has one of the best equipped 
offices for the practice of his specialty in Nebraska. His parents, 
Frederick Francis and Theresa (Wahnschaft) Naulteus, Avere also 
natives of Prussia, but the father died at the age of fifty-six years, 
while the mother passed away at the age of sixty. He served in the 
army and he studied for the position of head forester. He spent his 
entire life in the forests, acting as inspector for many years, having 
an excellent position in the government employ. He had a fine home 
and Avas most comfortably situated. 

After acquiring his elementary education Dr. Francis Naulteus 
continued his studies in the gymnasium at jNIecklenburg, Saxony, 
and in the University of Halle. He studied medicine at Heidelberg 
and at Wurzburg and won his professional degree at Leyden, Hoi- 




])R. FRANCIS NAULTEUS 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY S7 

land. He afterward took post-graduate work in 1886 and 1887 at 
Berlin, specializing in the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose 
and throat. He entered upon his military career in 1857 and after 
a year's service with the volunteers became a lieutenant of the 
Twenty-seventh Regiment of JNIecklenburg Infantry in 1859. In 
1864. he served with the Prussian troops against Denmark and in 
1866 with the Prussians against Austria. In the former war he was 
wounded in the leg and in the war with Austria was wounded in the 
knee. He did not lay off from duty, however, but, his wounds having 
been bandaged, kept on with the army. On the 2d of July, 1866, in 
recognition of his bravery, he was advanced to the rank of captain. 
Some years before this, or in 1857, he had served for six months in the 
hospital service and from 1866 until 1870 he was military physician 
with the rank of captain. 

In the latter year Dr. Naulteus came to the United States, land- 
ing at New York. In 1873 he settled in New Orleans and later 
removed to Council Bluffs, where he engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine and surgery until 1878, during which period he served as examin- 
ing surgeon for the pension board and for the Berkshire Life 
Insurance Company. While in Toledo, Ohio, in 1872 he was natural- 
ized and has ever been a most loyal American citizen. 

On the 30th of April, 1878, Dr. Naulteus came to Hastings to 
recuperate from a four weeks' siege of diphtheria which had oc- 
curred in Council Bluffs. He had slept only two hours in four weeks 
and his health was badly broken under the strain. Pleased with 
Hastings, he decided to locate here and has since remained save for 
the years 1886 and 1887, which he spent in post-graduate work in 
Berlin. When he removed to Hastings it contained a population of 
about three hundred people. There were no sidewalks and no improve- 
ments of any noticeable nature. About one-third of the population 
were thieves or robbers and everyone carried a gun for self-protection. 
He here entered upon the practice of his profession and has main- 
tained a foremost place in the ranks of the medical fraternity of cen- 
tral Nebraska. He does not believe in operations except in extreme 
cases, and in two hundred and fourteen appendicitis cases which he 
has treated since 1904 he has never felt it necessary to operate in a 
single instance. He has always been a thorough student and has 
done a great amount of research work. He is the avithor of a INIedi- 
cal Compendium and has written considerable for tlie medical press. 

In 1859 Dr. Naulteus was united in marriage to INIiss Fredericka 
Hesse, a native of Prussia Avhose father was a whiskey manufacturer 
of Germany. She passed away in 1903, at the age of sixty-seven 



88 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

years, leaving a son, Alfred Francis, who is a graduate of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, resides at Dead- 
wood, South Dakota, is married and has two children. On the 6th 
of Aug-ust, 1904., Dr. Naulteus was again married, his second union 
being with INIiss Emma Weitstein, who died the same year. For his 
third wife he chose JNIiss Julia Budnek, by whom he has a son, Francis 
William Armin. Her father served as a soldier in the German anny 
and after emigrating to the United States became an agriculturist of 
Crete, Nebraska. 

Dr. Naulteus has had no political aspirations and has filled no 
public offices. His religious belief is that of the Catholic church. 
He belongs to the Sons of Herman, which he aided in organizing, 
and he is Avell known in IMasonic circles, having taken the degrees of 
the blue lodge, the Royal Arch chapter, the Royal and Select INIas- 
ters, the Knights Templar and the Consistory. He holds member- 
ship also with the German Veterans and tlie German Landwehr 
Verein, which he aided in organizing and of which he was captain for 
four years. His is indeed a notable career. Few men of his j^ears 
are as active, but he has ever kept alert and in touch with the prog- 
ress of the times and is yet giving out of the rich stores of his wisdom 
and experience for the benefit of others. 



EDWARD J. BOULTON. 

Edward J. Boulton is the owner of one of the fine farm properties 
of Juniata township. His place is a beautiful one, with all modern 
equipment and giving every evidence of the careful and continued 
supervision of an owner who is both j^ractical and progressive. He 
ranks with the representative agriculturists of this district and has 
been a valued citizen here for twelve years. He was born in Han- 
cock, IMichigan, on the 9th of August, 1873, a son of John and INIary 
Anne (Adams) Boulton, both of whom were natives of England, 
where thej^ remained until after their marriage. They then came to 
the United States and after living in ISIichigan for a number of years 
removed to Nebraska in 1879, the father ixn-chasing railroad land 
near Juniata. His attention was there given to general agricultural 
pursuits until about sixteen years ago, when he retired from active 
business life and took up his abode in Juniata, where he passed away 
eight years ago, having for tAvo years survived his wife. In their 
family were eight children, as follows: John, who is a resident of 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 89 

Kenesaw, Nebraska ; Alice, who is the wife of T. W. McDonald and 
lives in Michigan; George and Mary, both of whom are deceased; 
Kitty, the wife of S. O. VandrefF, of Arapahoe, Nebraska; Harriet, 
who has jDassed away; Sarah, who gave her hand in marriage to 
W. J. Pedersen, of Juniata township; and Edward J., of this review. 

The last named acquired a common school education and remained 
with his father until twenty-five years of age. Twelve years ago he 
took up his abode ujoon the farm which is now his home. It is situated 
on section 11, Juniata townshijj, and is one of the most beautiful and 
attractive places of the district. He has erected a large and com- 
modious residence built in modern style of architecture, has also built 
a big barn, a silo and a hog and chicken house. In fact there is every 
modern equipment upon his place, including the latest improved 
machinery, and he has one hundred and twenty-two acres of rich and 
IJroductive land which he devotes to general farming, his labors annu- 
ally producing good crops. In addition to his home interests he is a 
member of the Farmers Elevator Company of Juniata. 

In 1901 JNIr. Boulton Avas united in marriage to JNIiss Elva Whit- 
ing, a daughter of Thomas G. Whiting. They have one son, Harry, 
who is attending school. ]Mr. Boulton exercises his right of franchise 
in support of the men and measures of the republican party and he 
and his Avife are consistent members of the INIethodist Episcopal 
church, guiding their lives by its teachings. During the period of his 
residence in the state he has gained a wide acquaintance and the sub- 
stantial qualities which he has displayed have established him firmly 
in the warm regard and goodwill of all who know him. 



CHARLES M. HARE. 



Among the up-to-date and energetic young business men of Kene- 
saw who are doing nnich to promote the commercial growth and 
expansion of the town is C. M. Hare, the proprietor of the Kenesaw 
Smoke House. He deals in liigh grade tobacco, cigars and candy and 
also has three good pool tables, and the high standard whicli he main- 
tains is indicated by the fact that his patrons are among the best people 
of tlie town. He was born upon a farm in Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania, on tlie 18th of August, 1887, and is a son of Daniel and 
Malinda (McLaughlin) Hare, also natives of the Keystone state. 
The father died there in 1908 but the mother is still living and now 
makes her home in Prosser, Nebraska. In their family were four 



90 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

sons and four daughters of whom one son and one daughter are 
deceased. 

Charles M. Hare grew to manhood in Adams county, Nebraska, 
and received his education in the country schools near Prosser. For 
a time he engaged in farming west of Prosser, after which he ran a 
dray line in Ivenesaw, but on the 15th of July, 1915, purchased the 
Ivenesaw Smoke House, which he has since successfully conducted. 
He carries a fine line of tobacco, cigars and candy, and his place is 
equijjped with three good pool tables. He is accorded a large and 
representative patronage and is recognized as one of the leading busi- 
ness men of the town. 

JMr. Hare was married in jNIay, 1910, to Miss Louisa Garska, and 
they have a son, Elmer, whose birth occurred on the 14th of October, 
1912. jNIr. Hare is a supporter of the democratic party and takes the 
interest of a good citizen in public affairs although not an aspirant 
for office. Fraternally he is identified with the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, and his religious faith is indicated in the fact that 
he is a member of the JNIethodist Episcopal church. He is always 
willing to cooperate in jDrojects calculated to advance the interests of 
his community along moral, commercial and civic lines, and he holds 
the sincere resjDect and the high esteem of all who have been associated 
with him. Although he is a young man and he has only been engaged 
in his present business for less than a year, he has proved his ability 
and business acumen and his continued success is assiu"ed. 



COXRAD GROTHEN. 

Conrad Grothen, who owns eight hundred acres of excellent land, 
ranks as one of the most successful farmers of Adams county, and 
his home farm of four hundred acres on section 30, Denver township, 
is one of the best improved places in its locality. A native of Ger- 
many, he was born in 1866 of the marriage of Diedrich and INIargaret 
(Ehlers) Grothen. The father died when our subject was four years 
old and the mother subsequently married John Hofer, who also passed 
away in the fatherland. Mr. Grothen of this review and others of 
the family came to the United States about 1879 and in 1881 the 
mother and the three youngest children also emigTated to the United 
States. By her two marriages she had eleven children and she now 
resides with a daughter in Aurora, Illinois. 

Conrad Grothen attended the public schools in his nati^•e land 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 91 

until he was about fourteen years of age, when he came to the United 
States to seek his fortune. He first located in Bureau county, Illinois, 
and for a number of years worked as a farm hand but in 1892 he 
decided to remove farther west and came to Adams county, Nebraska. 
^Vhile working for others he carefully saved his monej^ and accumu- 
lated sufficient capital to jjurchase a quarter section of land in Denver 
townsliip, which constitutes a part of his present home farm. His 
thorough knowledge of all phases of farm Avork, his energy and good 
judgment enabled him to prosper from the beginning and he has 
increased his holdings from time to time until he now owns four hun- 
di-ed acres on section 30, Denver township, and an additional four 
hundred acres in other jjarts of the county. His land is in a high 
state of cultivation and yields large crojjs annually. He operates his 
home farm and part of his other holdings and rents the remainder of 
his land. His principal crop is wheat but he also grows corn, oats and 
alfalfa and gives some attention to raising graded cattle, hogs and 
horses. With the exception of two small buildings he has made all of 
the improvements upon his farm and he keeps everything about the 
place in excellent condition. His residence is commodious and at- 
tractive and the barns and other outbuildings are large and well 
adapted to their purposes. 

Mr. Grothen was married in 1892 to JNIiss Amelia A. Gross, a 
native of Bureau county, Illinois, and a daughter of Nicholas and 
Elizabeth (Stamberger) Gross, who engaged in farming in that 
county but who are now deceased. INIr. and ]Mrs. Grothen are the 
parents of seven children, namely: Elmer, who was born IMarch 10, 
1893, and is assisting with the Avork of the home farm; Arthur, born 
December 14, 1896, who is also assisting his father; George, who was 
born JMay 10, 1899; Walter, INIay 24, 1902; Flora, INIarch 15, 1904; 
Henry, October 23, 1907; and INIartha, JMay 21, 1909. 

JSIr. Grothen is independent in politics, voting for the man rather 
than the party. He has always taken the keenest interest in every- 
thing relating to the general public welfare and his abilitj^ and public- 
spirit have been recognized by his fellow citizens, who have elected him 
to the office of justice of the j^eace. He was one of tlie leaders in the 
organization of the Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran churcli in Den- 
ver township, in the work of which lie and his wife take an active part. 
He is not only one of the men of wealth in his county but he is also 
one of its most public-spirited citizens and personally he is held in 
warm regard. His genial nature and his consideration for the rights 
of others have gained him the friendship of those with ^hom he has 
been associated and his integrity has always been above question. He 



92 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

came to this county as a poor boy but although he had no capital, no 
influential friends and did not understand the customs of the country, 
he was determined to gain success and aj^plied himself energetically 
to the work which he found to do. His industry and perseverance 
liave been richly rewarded and liis career indicates what industry and 
sound judgment may accomplish. 



HENRY C. HOBROCK. 

Henrj^ C. Hobrock is successfully engaged in farming on section 
35, Highland township, and has made good improvements upon his 
place, Avhich is in a high state of development. He was born in JNIere- 
dosia, Illinois, on the 1st of February, 1867, a son of Herman and 
Eliza (Krems) Hobrock. The father was born in Hanover, Ger- 
many, but removed to America with his parents, who settled at Beards- 
town, Illinois, when he was fourteen j^ears of age. There he grew to 
manhood and in 1866 was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Krems, a 
native of that town and a daughter of Henrj^ Krems. JNIr. Hobrock 
engaged in farming and accumulated a competence, which enables 
him to live retired in Hastings. His wife also survives. They be- 
came the parents of six children who grew to maturity, those besides 
our subject being: F. W., a resident of Hastings; W. C, who is 
living in Lincoln; Carrie, the wife of F. H. Kilver, of Denver, Colo- 
rado; Emma, who married Charles Rolfe, of Alma, JNIissouri; and 
Anna, now Mrs. Henry Kilver, of Bluffs, Illinois. 

Henrj^ C. Hobrock was reared in his native town but when twenty 
3'ears of age accompanied his parents to Bluffs, Illinois. He remained 
at home until he was twentj^-four years old, giving his father the benefit 
of his labor. On beginning his independent career he determined to 
follow the occupation of farming, witli which he was thoroughly 
familiar, and rented his father's farm, which he operated on his own 
account for some time. He then purchased a farm in that locahty 
and concentrated his energies uj^on its cultivation and development 
until the spring of 1907, when he sold and removed to Adams county, 
Nebraska. He had purcliased his present farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres on section 35, Highland township, two years previously 
and on removing to this county at once took up his residence upon 
that place. He does general farming, growing wheat, corn, oats and 
alfalfa and raising stock for his own use. Although all of the build- 
ings upon the farm were there when it came into his possession he has 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 93 

improved it in other ways and keeps everything in excellent condition. 
He is at once jjraetical and progressive and his industry and good 
management enable him to gain a gratifying financial return from 
his land. 

Mr. Hobrock was married in 1891, when twenty-four years of 
age, to Miss Lizzie Finigsmier, a daughter of Henry and Mary 
Finigsmier, of JNIeredosia, Illinois. She passed away within a year 
of her marriage and on the 12th of JNIarch, 1896, JNIr. Hobrock wedded 
IMiss Louisa JNIarsh, a daughter of Henry and Clara (Sheuter) 
Marsh, also residents of JNIeredosia. Following the marriage of their 
daughter to JNIr. Hobrock, however, they removed to Bluffs, Illinois. 
JNIr. and JNIrs. Hobrock have four children, namely: jNIabel E., who 
was born JNIarch 2, 1897, and is at home; Harvey H., who was born on 
the 20th of February, 1899; Elmer H., born April 14, 1901; and 
Helen JNI., whose birth occurred on the 16th of February, 1911. 

JNIr. Hobrock is a stalwart republican and takes a commendable 
interest in everything affecting the public welfare. He attends the 
Lutheran church at Hastings, to the support of which he contributes. 
He possesses marked jjublic si^irit and no movement for the advance- 
ment of his community lacks his hearty cooperation. He is respected 
for his ability and genuine worth and his personal friends are many. 



JOSEPH PITTZ. 



Joseph Pittz, who owns a fine farm in Roseland township, has 
made many excellent improvements thereon and is especially proud 
of his grove, which is one of the best in the county. He was born in 
the grand duchy of Luxemburg on the 30th of April, 184-5, of the 
marriage of Nicholas and Margaret (Schlemes) Pittz, who passed 
their entire lives in that country. They were the parents of seven 
children, namely: John, who when last heard from was residing in 
Germany; John, deceased; INIathias, a resident of Germany; Joseph; 
Anna, deceased; Elizabeth; and Bernard, who is living in Gernianj'. 

Joseph Pittz received his education in the public schools of Lux- 
emburg and remained in that country until 1882, when he emigrated 
to the United States. He at once made his way to Nebraska and pur- 
chased land on section 6, Roseland township, Adams comity, which 
he has since operated, although while a resident of Luxemburg he 
followed the carpenter's trade. He has carried on general farming, 
finding that the raising of both grain and stock is more profitable 



94 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

than specializing in either. The buildings on his farm are substantial 
and well designed and everj-thing is kept in good condition and he has 
a fine equipment of up-to-date machinerj-. He has given much atten- 
tion to the development of his grove, which consists of over five thou- 
sand box elder and ash trees. He has now retired from the active 
work of the fields and his farm, which comprises one hundred and 
sixty acres of good land, is operated by his son. 

JNIr. Pittz was married in 1873 to ^liss Anna Snyder and they 
became the parents of seven children, namely: Mary, the wife of 
Phillip Knapp, of INIadison county, Nebraska; JNIathias, who is farm- 
ing in Juniata township ; Peter, who resides near Bladen, Nebraska ; 
Catherine, the wife of Herman Fischer, of Roseland township ; John, 
who is operating the home place; JNIaggie, the wife of Nick Arens- 
dorf, who resides in Silver Lake township; and Anna, who married 
J. P. jNIangers, of Roseland toAvnship. The wife and mother passed 
awa}^ in 1915 and is buried in Assumption. 

Mr. Pittz was formerly a deniocra>t in politics but is now independ- 
ent, casting his ballot for the man rather than the party. He is a 
member of the Assumption Catholic church, to which his wife also 
belonged, and contributes to its support. He has concentrated his 
energies upon agricultural pursuits and has won a measure of pros- 
perity that now enables him to live retired and enjoy a period of 
leisure. He has many friends throughout the county and all who know 
him respect him highly. 



FRANCIS INIARION DENMAN. 

Francis Marion Denman, a well known citizen of Kenesaw, 
Nebraska, eminently deserves classification among those self-made 
men who have distinguished themselves for their ability to master 
the opposing forces of life and to wrest from fate a large measure of 
success and an honorable name. His early environment was such 
as has ever fostered the spirit of personal independence and self-reli- 
ance, which have played so large a part in the upbuilding of the 
nation. His birth occurred on a farm in JNIiami county, Ohio, on the 
12th of February, 1839, and his parents were Abraham and Marga- 
ret (Stickles) Denman, who were born in Hamilton county, Ohio, 
where they were reared and married. Both died in their native state 
and their passing was deeply regi*etted by their many warm friends. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 97 

They were devout Christians and exemplified the sincerity of their 
faith in their daily lives. 

Francis M. Denman was reared under the parental roof and much 
of his time was devoted to farm work although he received a limited 
country school education. When twenty-two years of age he left home 
and went to Illinois, where on the 5th of October, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company I, Fifty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as a private. 
His command was assigned to the Army of the Tennessee and he 
took part in the following engagements : Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, 
Chickasaw Bayou, Russell House, Arkansas Post, Hains Bluffs, 
Champion's Hill, the siege of Vicksburg, the relief of Knoxville, the 
siege of Jackson, Kenesaw jNIountain, INIissionary Ridge, Fort 
]\IcAllister, Savannah, Clinton, the siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, 
Columbia and Bentonville. He was also with Sherman on his 
famous march to the sea and northward through the Carolinas. Ke 
was made fourth sergeant on the 1st of November, 1864, and served 
as such with much credit to himself until the regiment was mustered 
out at Little Rock, Arkansas, on the 14th of August, 1865. During 
the siege of Atlanta he was wounded in the left leg on the 22d of 
July, 1864, but escajjed further injury. His regiment made an 
unusual record, traveling eleven thousand miles and marching over 
three thousand miles. He marched in the Grand Review at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and while there visited the tombs of George and INIartha 
Wasliington. He is an ardent admirer of Generals Sherman and 
Grant, under whom he served, and he was for some time under the 
command of General Halleck. He has a number of army relics but 
jirizes most a cake of genuine army hardtack, which he has had 
framed. 

Following his honorable discharge from the army at the close of 
hostilities ]\Ir. Denman returned to his old home in Ohio, where he 
farmed until the spring of 1866, when he again went to Illinois. He 
was married there and followed agricultural pursuits in that state 
for fourteen years, but on the 20th of February, 1880, became a 
resident of Fillmore countj^ Nebraska, where he engaged in farming 
for twentj'-two years. He devoted much time and thought as well 
as monej' to the development of his fine farm of two hundred and 
forty acres, which he made one of the best farms in Fillmore county. 
In 1902 he retired from active life and removed to Bruning, where 
he interested himself in various movements for the advancement of 
the communit}'. In 1909 he came to Kenesaw, where he has since 
lived, enjoying the fruits of his former labor. He owns the northeast 
quarter of section 13, township 2, range 3, Jefferson county, 



98 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Nebraska, and the southeast quarter of section 36, township 9, range 
13, west, Buffalo county, on which the town of Denman is laid out. 
He derives a gratifying income from his holdings and now ranks 
among the men of affluence residing in Adams county. 

JNlr. Denman was married in Illinois, in 1867, to INliss Julia A. 
]\IcKnight, who was born in Ohio, near Piqua, on the 2d of November, 
1846, a daughter of John and JNIartha (Giffin) JNIcKnight. Her par- 
ents were born in Ohio, where they were reared and married, and the 
father passed away in JNIason county, Illinois, at the age of sixty-five 
years. The mother is also deceased. JNIr. and Mrs. Denman have 
iiad four children : Albert J. ; Ella, the wife of E. Cook, of Hastings ; 
jNIartha B., the wife of Samuel Wells, of Hall county, Nebraska; 
and John F., deceased. 

Mr. Denman cast his first ballot for Stephen A. Douglas for 
president in 1860 and has always taken a keen interest in public affairs. 
His fitness for office has been recognized and while living in Bruning 
he served on the town board and on the school board and while a resi- 
dent of Fillmore county was for three years county supervisor. He 
votes independently, preferring to follow his own judgment rather 
than the dictates of a party leader. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church,, in which he holds the office of elder, and fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The 
success which he has gained in spite of the fact that he began his 
career empty-handed is indisputable proof of his energj' and his sound 
judgment, and he has been so straightforward and upright in all of 
his business transactions that there has never been the slightest ques- 
tion as to his integrity. He is highly respected for his ability and 
sterling qualities of character and his pleasing personality has gained 
him the Avarm regard of those who have been closely associated with 
him. 



FRANK A. BLOOM. 



Frank A. Bloom, conducting a poolroom in Hastings and also 
dealing in cigars and tobacco, was born in New York city on the 15th 
of September, 1870, a son of Charles and Fanny Bloom. The father 
was a speculator and both he and his wife are now deceased. 

Frank A. Bloom obtained his education in the public schools of 
Ottumwa, Iowa, to which city his parents removed during his boy- 
hood days. When he had mastered the branches of learning therein 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 99 

taught he took up the business of cigar manufacturing and in the fall 
of 1888 came to Hastings. For a year and a half he worked at his 
trade in a factory and then became foreman, in which position he con- 
tinued until 1900. Desirous of engaging in business on his own 
account, he had carefully saved his earnings until his industry and 
economical exi^enditures had enabled him to become the possessor of 
some capital. He then joined John W. Zink and they established the 
Evans Bloom Cigar Company. After a time Mr. Zink sold his interest 
to Mr. Evans, while JNIr. Bloom continued his active interest in the 
business until 1910. In that year he purcliased his present establish- 
ment, although he still remains a stockholder in the cigar factory. 
The principal brands of cigars made by the firm are the High Alti- 
tude in four sizes of ten cent cigars, the Very Best and the Good 
Cheer. His poolroom is a well appointed establishment liberally 
I^atronized. Everything is conducted according to high standards and 
the success which has come to him is well merited. 

In 1900 Mr. Bloom was united in marriage to JNIiss JNIoUie E. 
Butler, and, while they have no children of their own, they are rearing 
an adopted daughter, Nellie Butler. In religious faith Mr. Bloom 
and his wife hold to the Lutheran church and he also belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and to the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In politics 
he is a democrat, believing in the efficiency of the party principles as 
factors in good government, but he does not seek nor desire office and 
concentrates his efforts upon the development of his business, know- 
ing that close application and unfaltering energy are among the 
strongest elements of success. 



JOHN F. FABER. 



John F. Faber, who is now residing at Hastings, has engaged in 
farming for many years and has gained a place among the most effi- 
cient agriculturists of the county. He was born in New York, and is 
a son of Jacob Faber, a native of Germany, who was married in 1866 
to Johanna Faber, a cousin, and in 18G7 emigrated with his wife to 
the United States, settling in New York. 

John F. Faber attended the district schools in his native state and 
also devoted much of his time during liis boyhood and youth to assist- 
ing his father with the farm work. On beginning his independent 
career he determined to follow the occupation to which he had been 
reared and has never had occasion to regret his choice of a life work. 



100 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

He came to Adams countj^ and became the owner of a good farm on 
section 7, township 5, range 12. He at once tm*ned his attention to 
its development and ojjeration and it is now one of the best improved 
i^laces in its locaHt)^ He raises both grain and stock and receives a 
good income from his land. 

In 1896 INIr. Faber was married at Carlton, Nebraska, to Miss 
Anna M. Koinzan, a daughter of Frederick Koinzan, of that place. 
Nine children, all of whom are at home, have been born to this union, 
namely : Emil, Adolph, Emma, Elsa, Ella, John, Goldie, Victor and 
Rudolph. 

Mr. Faber belongs to the Lutheran church and can be depended 
upon to further movements seeking the moral advancement of his 
community. Since taking up his residence here he has gained many 
friends and his genuine worth is indicated bj' the fact that those Avho 
have been most closelj' associated with him hold him in the highest 
esteem. 



G. N. COON. 



G. N. Coon is at the head of the Coon Lumber Company and as 
such controls an extensive trade in lumber and fviel, operating at 
Juniata and various other points. In all he undertakes he displays 
sound judgment and the spirit of enterprise that characterizes the 
west. He was born in Hamilton county, near Avirora, Nebraska, 
April 3, 1874, and is a son of Christopher C. and JNIary (Kutch) 
Coon. The father's birth occurred near Columbus, Ohio, while the 
mother is a native either of Indiana or of Iowa. They were married, 
however, in Hamilton county, Nebraska, whither they removed with 
their parents, the Avedding being celebrated June 24, 1873. IMr. Coon 
secured a homestead and followed farming for several years, after 
which he turned his attention to carpentering. Both he and his wife 
are still residents of Aurora and the former is of Scotch descent, 
Avhile the latter is of German lineage. In the family Avere five children, 
as folloAvs: G. N., of this review; A. B., Avho is a resident of Aurora, 
Nebraska; C. J., Avho lives at New Plymouth, Idaho; INIyrl, a resident 
of Aurora, Nebraska ; and OliA^e A., the Avif e of ]M. J. McDougall, of 
Aurora, this state. 

G. N. Coon pursued his early education in the district schools of 
his native county, afterAvard attended the high school of Aurora and 
spent one year as a student in the State Normal School at Shenandoah, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY lOi 

Iowa. Starting in the business world, he became connected with the 
lumber trade at Aurora, being employed at various points until nine 
years ago, when he engaged in business for himself at Ehnwood, 
Nebraska, Avhere he remained for two years. On the expiration of 
that i^eriod he removed to Juniata, where he purchased a lumber and 
fuel yard, handling all kinds of lumber and building materials, cement 
and coal. In addition to the business at Juniata he has yards at 
Kenesaw, Roseland and Ayr, Nebraska, all of these being operated 
under the name of the Coon Lvmiber Company. The steps in his 
orderly progression are easily discernible and he has constantly 
broadened the scope of his activities as opportunity has offered, mak- 
ing wise investment of his capital in increase of his business. 

In 1898 Mr. Coon was united in marriage to INIiss Sophia S. Hurst, 
wlio Avas born near Coifeyville, Kansas, and by whom he has a daugh- 
ter, Thelma ]\Iaurine. Both INIr. and ]Mrs. Coon are members of the 
]Methodist Episcopal church and he also has membership in the Odd 
Fellows lodge at Juniata, the Knights of Pythias lodge at Osceola, 
the Workmen's lodge at Kenesaw and also with the Highlanders of 
Osceola, exemplifying in his life the beneficent and fraternal spirit 
which underlies these organizations. He is a public-spirited citizen, 
interested in everything pertaining to the welfare and progress of the 
community in which he makes his home, and he has cooperated in 
many plans and measures for the general good. Early in liis career 
he also learned the lesson that there is no success in life without effort. 
The purpose of life is to afford opportunities, and in America these 
are presented in turn to everyone who is willing to embrace them. 
Humble birth and poverty are no handicap to the American youth, 
but opportunities slip away from the sluggard and tauntingly play 
before the dreamer, but surrender to the individual with high purpose, 
undaunted courage and indefatigable determination. These qualities 
Mr. Coon has displayed and therefore occupies his present enviable 
position in business circles of Adams county. 



HORATIO R. S:\nTH. 

Horatio R. Smith, who is successfully operating a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Blaine township, was born in Fayette 
county, Oliio, on the 27th of January, 1861. His parents, Peter W. 
and Ella (Painter) Smith, w^ere both also natives of Ohio, where they 
were reared and married. At length they removed to Jasper county. 



102 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Iowa, where the father purchased land which he operated for a number 
of years. In 1881, however, he came to Adams county, Nebraska. 
To him and his wife were born five sons and five daughters, of whom 
two daughters and all the sons became residents of Adams county. 
Malvern became the wife of Elwood Hickman, but both are now 
deceased. Anna, the only living daughter, for a time made her home 
in Adams county but is now living in Fayette county, Ohio. Edward 
and Charles E. are living in Hastings. Louis is now living in Fayette 
county, Ohio, but was formerly a resident of Adams county. Wil- 
liam E. is living in Holbrook, Nebraska. 

Horatio R. Smith attended the common schools during his boy- 
hood and also devoted much time to assisting his father with the farm 
work, thus gaining valuable knowledge concerning practical agri- 
cultural methods. In 1879 he came to Adams county and for a year 
worked for his brother Charles E., who was farming in Blaine town- 
ship. In 1880 he began his independent career and has since operated 
rented land. He has farmed at different times in Blaine, Zero and 
Denver townships and for the past two years has rented one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 32, Blaine township. He is successful in 
the cultivation of the soil and the care of stock and receives a good 
annual income from his labors. He takes pride in keeping every- 
thing about the place in good condition and is recognized as an efficient 
agriculturist. 

In 1887 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to JNIiss Lizzie Roberts, 
a daughter of William Roberts, who removed to this county from 
Ohio in 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have become the j^arents of six 
children, as follows: Earl, who was born on the 22d of INIarch, 1888, 
married INIiss Frances Ferguson, a daughter of Frederick Ferguson, 
formerljr of Denver township but now farming in Blaine township. 
Two children have been born of this union. Charles, Avhose birth 
occurred on the 5th of December, 1894, is living in Blue Hill, Ne- 
braska. Florence, who was born on the 6th of October, 1897, is at 
home. The three youngest children, Carl, born December 6, 1899, 
Floyd, born October 2, 1904, and Paul, born February 7, 1907, are all 
attending the district school. 

j\Ir. Smitli believes that the policies of the republican party are 
based upon sound principles of government and supports its candi- 
dates at the polls. He served for several years as road overseer and 
justice of the peace and made an excellent record in those offices. His 
religious allegiance is given to the Methodist church and fraternally 
he belongs to the Loyal ISIystic Legion of Hastings, of which he is a 
charter member. He began his career empty handed but as the years 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 103 

have passed has worked hard and practiced thrift and is now in com- 
fortable circumstances. Moreover, he has so ordered his life that he 
has Avon the esteem and respect of all who have come into contact with 
him and has gained the warm regard of many. 



DOEDE SMITH. 



Doede Smith is now living retired in Hastings but in former years 
was prominently identified with commercial and industrial pursuits, 
his business affairs being of a nature that contributed to public prog- 
ress as well as to individual benefit. A native of Germany, he was 
born on the 7th of January, 1848, and is a son of Engelke and Tomke 
( Jansen) Smith, the former a blacksmith by trade. 

Doede Smith spent his youthful days in his native country and, 
while he did not have unusual opportunities, he attended the public 
schools and received thorough training in work that brought to him a 
knowledge of the value of industry, perseverance and economy as 
factors in the attainment of success. At length he determined to try 
his fortune in America and when a young man of nineteen years sailed 
for the new world, attracted by the opportunities offered on this side 
the Atlantic. It was in 1867 that he came to the United States, 
making his waj^ to Pekin, Illinois, where he remained for three years. 
In 1870 he went to Lincoln, Nebraska, and soon afterward secured a 
homestead claim in Lancaster county. Not a furrow had been turned 
nor an imj^rovement made upon that place, but with characteristic 
energ}' he began its development. Later he removed to Nebraska 
City, where he remained for a year and a half, and on the expiration 
of that period took up his abode at Crete, Nebraska, where he took 
up the business of plow manufacturing. He also engaged in the 
implement business and in merchandising and remained a very prom- 
inent and active factor in the industrial and commercial circles of that 
city for an extended period. Gradually he worked his way upward, 
his success resulting from unfaltering industry and capability. In 
1904 he disposed of his business and came to Hastings, where he 
erected a beautiful residence, in which he is now living retired, enjoy- 
ing a rest that he has truly earned and richly deserves. After coming 
to Hastings, however, he purchased an interest in the Polinske Schel- 
lak & Company brickyard, but takes no active part in the management 
of the business, his investment, however, bringing to him a good finan- 
cial return. 



104 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

On the 28th of August, 1871, Mr. Smith was united in marriage 
to Miss Franke Wilts, a daughter of Frederick and Tetta Wilts, and 
their children are: Engelke, now living in Omaha; Tetta, the wife 
of William S. Schellak; and Fred D., who is a traveling salesman and 
resides in Norfolk, Nebraska. There are also eight grandchildren. 
Having lost his first wife, 3Ir. Smith was married again, his second 
union being with Sojihie Onken, of Peoria, Illinois. JNIrs. Smith has 
been very prominent as a leader among the ladies of Hastings. She 
belongs to a family that has been rejjresented here for thirty-four 
years and has been closel}^ associated with pubhc interests of the city. 
In his political views Mr. Smith is a republican thoroughly informed 
concerning the questions and issues of the day. He belongs to the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and both he and his wife are 
connected with the Congregational church. He is likewise identified 
with the German Congregational Seminary at Crete, of which he was 
a trustee for a quarter of a century, while for seven years he has been 
president of its board. His interest centers in all those things which 
work for the development and upbuilding of the community along 
material, intellectual, social and moral lines. He is a representative 
of our best type of American manhood and chivalry. Hy persevei*- 
ance, determination and honorable effort he has overthrown the 
obstacles which barred his path to success and reached the goal of 
jjrosperity, while his genuine worth, broad mind and public spirit 
have made him a director of public thought and action. 



WILLIAM URE NICHOL. 

William Ure Nichol, funeral director, conducting business at 
Kenesaw, was born at JNIinden, Nebraska, on the 12th of November, 
1888, his parents being W. E. and Ida (Ure) Nichol. The father 
settled in INIinden in the early '80s and engaged in the hardware and 
furniture business until about 1909. Since then he has given his 
attention exclusively to the undertaking and to the wall paper busi- 
ness. For a long period he has been regarded as one of the most 
prominent and active business men of INIinden and is well known 
throughout Kearney county. 

Reared under the parental roof, William Ure Nichol attended 
the INIinden high school and later became a student in JMonmouth 
College at INIonmouth, Illinois, whei-e he pursued a four years' clas- 
sical course, winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts. From early 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 105 

childhood he has been associated with his father in the undertaking 
business and was connected with a large undertaking establishment 
at Omaha before coming to Kenesaw. He arrived here, however, in 
1914 and opened undertaking parlors, since which time he has con- 
ducted business as a funeral director and licensed embalmer. 

On the 17th of July, 1914, at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Mr. 
Nichol was married to JNliss ]\Iarguerite Wallace, a daughter of the 
Rev. William Wallace, of JMitchell, South Dakota. They are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church at Kenesaw and occupy an enviable 
position in social circles, being accepted wherever true worth and 
intelligence are received as passports into good societj'. 



GEORGE B. McCOLLAM. 

George B. JNIcCollam was successfully engaged in farming for 
many years and at the time of his death owned a good farm eiglit 
miles northeast of Hastings. He was born in New Philadelphia, Ohio, 
on the 18th of January, 1855, and in his early youth accompanied his 
parents to the vicinity of Bloomington, Illinois, where they resided 
until called by death. The father followed the carpenter's trade and 
Avas very successful in that connection. 

George B. JNIcCollam received a common school education and 
learned the carpenter's trade under his father, whom he assisted until 
he was twenty-three years old. He then left home and after residing 
for a year in Iowa came to Adams county, Nebraska, in 1879. For a 
short time he worked by the month and then rented a farm. Subse- 
quently he was joined by his married brother James and they oper- 
ated in partnership a rented farm located about eight miles northeast 
of Hastings. Following his marriage in 1892 Mv. JNIcCollam of this 
]Tview purchased that farm and continued to reside there until called 
by death on the 3d of June, 1912. He took great pride in keeping 
up his place and added a number of improvements to the farm after 
it came into his possession. He followed approved methods in his 
work and used up-to-date machinery, thus increasing his efficiency, 
and seldom failed to harvest large crops. As he managed his affairs 
well he secured a good income from his land and became one of the 
prosperous residents of his township. 

In 1892 JNIr. JNIcCollam was united in marriage to JNIrs. Emma 
(JNIaj-^s) Cook, the widow of Fletcher Cook, of Indiana. By her first 
marriage she had a son, Fred Edward, who was born on the 25th of 



106 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

November, 1884, and died on the 21st of July, 1905, at the home 
of his uncle, David JMays, of this comity. Following the demise of 
Mr. Cook his widow removed to Adams county in 1889 and made her 
home with her brother David until she became the wife of JNIr. JMc- 
Collam. To this union was born a son, George Alvin, whose natal 
day was the 8th of February, 1896, and who assists in the operation 
of the homestead. JNIrs. JMcCollam's sister Ella, who is the widow of 
George Dallas JNIullin, and her daughter Dora are also living on the 
home j)lace. JNIrs. JNIcCoUam and her son have kept the farm in a 
high state of development and are operating it successfully. 

]Mr. JNlcCollam gave his jjolitical allegiance to the democratic party 
but was never very active in public affairs. He gained many friends 
during the long period of his residence in this county and his memory 
is still held in honor. 



C. J. VANHOUTEN. 



For many years C. J. Vanhouten has been connected with agri- 
cultural and banking interests in Adams county. He entered the field 
of banking about eighteen years ago and since that time he has con- 
ducted the institution now known as the Bank of Juniata. IMr. Van- 
houten is a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred near Crown 
Point, November 18, 1873, his parents being Jolm R. and Josephine 
(Chapman) Vanhouten. The paternal grandfather was a native of 
the state of New York and was of Holland extraction. On leaving 
the east he resided at different periods in jNIichigan and in Ohio, fol- 
lowing the occupation of farming as a life work. John R. Vanhouten 
left Indiana M'hen his son C. J. was but nine months old and removed 
with his familj' to Nebraska, where he homesteaded four miles west 
and four miles south of Juniata. He also secured a tree claim and, 
meeting the requirements of the law concerning the acquisition of 
jjroperty, secured in time his title to the land. He built thereon a sod 
house with a board floor and roof and after proving vip on his claim 
he removed to Juniata, where he remained for thirty years, engaging 
in the livery business during twenty years of that time. He served 
in the Civil Avar as a member of Company E, One Hundred and 
Fifty-first Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry under Captain 
Aaron W. Lytle. He was a self-made man whose business ability 
brought to him all that he enjoyed or won of this world's goods and 
his many sterling qualities occasioned his death to be deeply regretted 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 107 

when, in 1909, he passed away. His widow survives and made her 
home in Juniata until two or three j'ears ago. In the family were five 
children : H. J., now living in ^Montana ; C. J., of this review ; F, M., 
a resident of Forest City, Arkansas; R. J., M'ho is in Los Angeles, 
California ; and R. L., living in Redlands, California. 

C. J. Vanhouten obtained his education in the schools of Juniata, 
supplemented by a commercial course. His early youth was spent 
upon the home farm and he has always been more or less largely con- 
nected with agricultural pursuits. In early manhood he turned his 
attention to tilling the soil, purchasing eighty acres of land on section 
15, Juniata township, after which he converted the tract into pro- 
ductive fields. Eighteen years ago he took up banking in the employ 
of the firm of C. R. Jones & Company. They conducted their busi- 
ness as a private bank for twentj^ years but afterward reorganized it 
as the Bank of Juniata, vmder which name it has since been conducted. 
At the time of the reorganization Mr. Vanhouten became a member 
of the firm. In 1910 he erected a building for bank purposes and the 
institution was installed in its new home. The capital has been doubled 
since the organization and the business has ever been conducted upon 
a safe, substantial basis that thoroughly protects the interests of de- 
positors. ]Mr. Vanhouten also conducts an insurance and real estate 
business and the various phases of his activities are constituting fea- 
tures in his growing success. 

In 1909 JNIr. Vanhouten was married to JNIiss Laura E. Boyd, who 
is a member of the IMethodist church, while jNIr. Vanhouten belongs 
to the Baptist church, his parents having been instrumental in estab- 
lishing the first Baptist church in Juniata. In politics he is independ- 
ent, nor has he ever sought political preferment. His chief interest 
has been his business and the careful direction of his affairs has 
brought to him growing and substantial success. 



CHARLES C. LARSEN. 

Adams county has been signally favored in the class of men who 
have occupied lier public offices, for on the whole they have been men 
of public spirit, devoted to the welfare and upbuilding of the district 
and faithful, businesslike, prompt and reliable in the discharge of 
official duties. Such has been the course of Charles C. Larsen, now 
filling the office of county recorder of deeds. He was born in Hol- 
stein, Adams county, February 24, 1883, and is a son of Paul C. and 



108 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Caroline Larsen, who were farming people. The father came to 
Nebraska in the year 1878 and purchased railroad land, after which 
he bent his energies to the development of a farm, converting the 
wild land into productive fields. , He continued to engage actively in 
the work of the farm until 1904, when he put aside business cares. 
His wife died in 1903, but he and his daughter still reside upon the 
farm, although he has retired from business. 

Charles C. Larsen entered the public schools at the usual age and 
after mastering the lessons therein taught spent two terms at the 
Fremont Normal College. He afterward engaged in teaching, which 
l^rofession he followed for nine years in Adams county, proving a 
capable educator with ability to impart clearly and readily to others 
the knowledge that he had acquired. He was called to official position 
in 1912, when he became deputy in the office of the district clerk, thus 
serving until the 7th of January, 1914, when he entered upon the 
jjosition of countj^ recorder of deeds, to which he had previously been 
elected. His jiolitical allegiance has always been given to the demo- 
cratic party and he does everything in his power to legitimately further 
its success. 

On the 30th of August, 1911, Mr. Larsen was united in marriage 
to JNIiss Ellen JM. Rothwell, a daughter of James H. Rothwell. In 
religious faith the family are Protestants. Fraternally INIr. Larsen 
is connected with the Modern Woodmen, with the Royal Highlanders 
and with the Odd Fellows. He turns for recreation to fishing and 
outdoor life, which he greatly enjoys. He is never remiss in the 
duties of citizenship and his devotion to the welfare of his community 
is marked. At all times he manifests a progressive spirit in relation 
to the public good and his substantial personal traits also endear him 
to those with whom he is brought in contact. 



JOHN L. KENT. 



John L. Kent, of Verona townshii?, has gained a place among the 
efficient and well-to-do farmers and stock raisers of the county and is 
also entitled to recognition as a veteran of the Civil war. His birth 
occurred in Kendall county, Illinois, on the 26th of November, 1842, 
and he is a son of James M. and Mary (Ferguson) Kent. His 
paternal grandfather, James Pierce Kent, was born in Virginia in 
178.5, and his wife was also a native of that state. James JNI. Kent 
was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, but in young manhood 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY m> 

removed to Ohio, where he was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Ferguson, a native of that state. In October, 1842, they removed to 
Kendall county, Illinois, and ten years later went to Cedar county, 
Iowa. They squatted on land which they subsequently purchased for 
a dollar and a quarter per acre and resided upon their farm until called 
by death. In early manhood the father followed the tailor's trade 
but Avhen thirty years of age turned his attention to farming, to which 
he devoted the remainder of his life. He was very active in public 
affairs and served for three terms as a member of the Iowa state 
senate. His death occurred on the 20th of August, 1896, and that of 
his wife on the 28th of February, 1888. To them were born nine 
children, as follows: Keziah F., the wife of C. G. Brink, of Craw- 
ford count}^ Iowa; Laura, deceased; John L.; James INI., of Kene- 
saw, Nebraska; W. O., who is living in Oakwood, Oklahoma; T. B., 
of Oxford Junction, Iowa; N. H., of Clarence, Cedar county, Iowa; 
Mary E., who is the wife of Edwin Elijah, of Clarence; and Charles 
H., who is living in JNIarion, Linn county, Iowa. 

John L. Kent received a good common school education in Illinois 
and also gained much valuable training in agriculture during his boy- 
hood and youth. On the 5th of August, 1862, he answered his 
country's call for volunteers, enlisting in Company B, Twenty-fourth 
Iowa \^olunteer Infantry, for three years, or during the war, but was 
discharged on the 31st of July, 1864, on account of wounds received 
in the service. At the battle of Port Gibson he A\as Avounded in the 
ankle and at the battle of INIansfield his arm was shattered above the 
elbow. It was two years before he was able to use it at all and as a 
result of the wound it is four inches shorter than the other. He par- 
ticipated in the battles of Port Gibson, Raymond and Champion's 
Hill, was in the siege of Vicksburg and in the battle at Jackson, 
Mississippi. He then returned to Vicksburg and from that point 
went down the IMississij)]:)! to New Orleans and up the Red river, 
taking part in the engagement at Carrion Crow bayou. He then 
returned to New Orleans but subsequently again went up the Red 
river and fought in the battle of JNIansfield, where he was wounded. 
He lield the rank of a non-commissioned officer, and his coolness and 
gallantry gained him the commendation of his superiors. 

After receiving his discharge from the army on account of dis- 
abilitj' ISIr. Kent returned to Cedar county, Iowa, and remained there 
until June, 1873, when he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and 
homesteaded land on section 30, Verona toAvnship. He brought bis 
place to a high state of cultivation and made many excellent improve- 
ments thereon but in 1890 sold out and purchased his present farm 



no PAST AND PRESEXT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

on section 28, Verona township. The farm comprises a quarter section 
of productive land and its value has been enhanced by the erection of 
commodious and substantial buildings. JNIr. Kent breeds jjure blooded 
Poland China hogs and shorthorn cattle and also engages in raising 
full blooded Phaiiouth Rock chickens. His labors have been re- 
warded by a substantial income and he is now in very comfortable 
circumstances. 

In 1867 occurred the marriage of JNIr. Kent and Miss INIaggie E. 
KemjJ, who j)assed away in 1879. To them were born seven children, 
namel}': John G., a resident of Nampa, Idaho; Alice, the wife of 
L. M. Hayes, of Nampa; Laura C, who married D. W. JMiles, of 
Cherry county, Nebraska; Edward L., who is farming near the home 
place; J. D., of Lake Mills, Iowa; O. C, who is farming near our 
subject; and Keziah JNI., the wife of T. W. Mays, of Kenesaw. In 
1881 Mr. Kent was again married, Miss Sara A. Trueman becoming 
his wife. Their four children are: Amelia L., the wife of G. H. 
Teeple, of Floyd county, Iowa ; Ella L., who married Harry Graham, 
of Hastings, Nebraska ; George Arthur, of Grant county, Nebraska ; 
and Minnie K., the wife of William Geddes, of Prosser, Nebraska. 

Mr. Kent has sujiported the republican part^^ since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise and does all in his power to secure its 
victory at the polls. For forty years he has acceptably filled the 
office of school director and for seven years he was assessor. He was 
reared in the Methodist Eiiiscojial church, which he still attends and 
supports. He is identified with the Grand Army post at Juniata and 
thus keej^s in touch with his comrades in blue. In all the relations of 
life he has measured up to high standards and enjoys the confidence 
and warm regard of his fellow citizens. 



WILLIAM S. SCHELLAK. 

Death seldom carries with it such a sense of personal bereavement 
to so many as it did when William S. Schellak was called from this 
life on the 11th of November, 1915. He had been a popular business 
man of Hastings for more than two decades and was the possessor of 
qualities which rendered him popular in the various circles in which 
he moved. A native of Dayton, Ohio, he was born in 1870 and was a 
son of INIartin Schellak, a prominent early settler of Adams county. 
He arrived in this county in 1882, removing from Dayton, Ohio, and 
for years William S. Schellak bore his part in the work of business 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY lU 

development in Hastings. His rise in business circles was rapid. He 
seemed to knoAv just when and where and how to put forth effort to 
produce the greatest possible results and seemed to have realized at 
any one point of his career the possibility for successful accomplish- 
ment at that point. He became a leading figure in manufacturing 
circles, becoming connected with the Polenske & Schellak Brick Com- 
pany and also with the Polenske Brothers Brick Company. He was 
a most progressive business man, realizing and utilizing opportunities, 
and whatever he undertook proved of benefit and value to the com- 
munity as well as a source of individual success. In the late '90s he 
was for some time manager of the Kerr opera house. 

In 1901 ]Mr. Schellak was united in marriage to ]Miss Tetta Smith, 
a daughter of Doede Smith, and they became the parents of two 
children, Evelyn and Wilhelmina, aged respectively twelve and nine 
years. JMr. Schellak belonged to the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Sons of Herman. He 
was a man of vmfailing good nature which made him lovable in his 
home, in business and in club circles. He was alwaj^s ready to respond 
with a cheery word or warm smile and he was one of those who shed 
around him much of life's sunshine. Death came upon him without 
a moment's warning and j^roved a shock to the entire communitj% for 
he was very popular and his sudden taking oiF was a matter of the 
deepest regret to all who knew him and especially to those of his own 
household, where he was known as a devoted husband and father. 



R. L. SARIN. 



R. L. Sabin, president and manager of the Queen City Laundry 
of Hastings, has conducted liis present business since 1903 and intel- 
ligentlj' directed effort is bringing to him growing success. He is one 
of Nebraska's native sons, his birth having occurred in Beatrice on 
the 17th of November, 1878, a son of R. W. and Emma L. Sabin. 
The father is an attorney and in 1870 came with the family to 
Nebraska, where he won distinction as a member of the bar. He 
served as city attorney, as county attorney and for some years filled 
the office of district attorney. Both he and his wife are still living 
and he yet reinains active in professional circles. 

R. L. Sabin completed his public school education by graduation 
from the high school of Beatrice, Nebraska, after which he entered 
the State University and pursued the electrical engineering course. 



112 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

He was thus well qualified by liberal education for life's practical and 
responsible duties. He then became connected with F. J. Kimball 
&L Co. in the laundry business and began operating this plant, of 
which he had charge for four years. On the 27th of JNIarch, 1903, he 
purchased the business, which he reoi'ganized. He was also at one 
time the owner of a half interest in Shipley's Laundry at Sioux Falls, 
South Dakota, and operated that plant. He is likewise proprietor 
of the laundry business at Grand Island conducted under the name of 
the ]Model Laundry Company. At his Hastings plant he employs 
thirty jaeople and utilizes two automobiles in the collection and deliv- 
ery of laundry. He employs the latest improved processes, uses the 
best machinery and maintains the highest standard of excellence in 
the work. These points, added to his thoroughly reliable business 
methods, have brought him a constantly increasing patronage and 
made the enterprise one of the profitable industrial concerns of the 
city. 

On the 15th of December, 1906, ]Mr. Sabin was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna H. Speich, a daughter of Emanuel Speich, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. They have one child, Hilbert Speich. Mr. Sabin 
holds the Protestant faith and in politics is a republican. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he 
also belongs to the Commercial Club and to the State Laundrj^ Asso- 
ciation. He is fond of outdoor life and in that way takes his recrea- 
tion, thus finding relief from onerous business cares which are con- 
stantly growing with the increase of his patronage. He is at all times 
alert, wide-awake and enterprising, ready for an}' emergencj^ and a 
dependable man under any circumstances and in every relation. 



JOHN P. DUNCAN 



John P. Duncan has resided in Roseland since 1887 and has had 
a part in the business develojiment of tlie town. For a number of 
years he -was engaged in the grain, coal and live-stock business but 
is now living retired. His birth occurred in Elgin, Illinois, on the 
14th of September, 1845, and his parents M-ere Patrick William and 
Bridget (Kingsley) Duncan, the former born in County IMonaghan, 
Ireland, and the latter in County Wexford. They Avere married, 
however, in the vicinity of Hartford, Connecticut, about 1843 and 
in the following j^ear removed to Chicago, whence they Avent to Elgin, 
Illinois. The father, Avho was a stonemason, worked on the con- 




JOHN P. DUNCAX 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 115 

struction of the Illinois Central Railroad and after leaving the employ 
of that corporation continued to follow his trade for some time. He 
also farmed near Elgin for a few years hut later went to Savanna, 
Illinois, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits and also worked 
as a stonemason. In 1870 he decided to try his fortune still farther 
west and came to Adams county, Nebraska, homesteading on section 
14, Silver Lake township. That place remained his home until 1879, 
when he took up his residence in Roseland, where he died about 1900 
and where he is buried. He was a man of marked public spirit and 
held the esteem of his fellow citizens in full measure. He lost his 
fu-st wife when their only child, our subject, was but six months old 
and subsequently he married Ellen JNIcGrath, by whom he had the 
following children: William F., a resident of Roseland; James, of 
Thorp, Washington ; Eugene, Julia, Mary and Kate, all of whom are 
deceased; Anna, the wife of Lee Arnold, of Roseland township; and 
Ella Bovard, who lives at Ayr, Nebraska. 

John P. Duncan was educated in the common schools of Illinois 
and through assisting his father gained much valuable knowledge of 
farming. In 1870, when about twenty-five years of age, he came to 
this county and took up a homestead on section 10, Silver Lake 
township. His first residence here was a shantj' built of palings, and 
his farm equipment was very primitive. But he was determined to 
succeed and by dint of much hard work and careful planning he 
gained a start and from that time on his resources increased steadily. 
He engaged in farming until 1887 and during that time brought his 
place to a high state of development. In October of that year he 
built a residence in Roseland, the second house to be erected there, 
and he has since resided in the town. About 1888 he and his brother 
William built an elevator in Roseland and for a number of years he 
was one of the leading grain, coal and live-stock dealers of the locality. 
The enterprise and sound judgment which enabled him to succeed 
as a farmer were again demonstrated in the conduct of his business 
interests in Roseland and he gained a gratifying measure of pros- 
perity. He is now living retired and is enjoying a leisure which his 
former labor has made possible. 

INIr. Duncan Avas married when twenty-eight years of age to INIiss 
Anne Dempsey, who passed away leaving a daughter, Bridget Frances. 
In 1881 ]Mr. Duncan was again married, ]\Iiss Bridget Loughran 
becoming his wife. To them Avere born seven children, namely: 
Stephen P., a druggist of Blue Hill, Nebraska; IMary Ellen, the wife 
of Frank J. Roth, of Roseland; Annie F., Avho is a stenographer in 
the employ of the Peters Trust Company of Omaha; John W., a 



116 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

practicing physician of Omaha; Sarah, at home; James, attending 
the State University; and Kathleen, deceased. 

Mr. Duncan is a democrat in politics and served as supervisor for 
a number of years. He and his family are members of the Assump- 
tion Catholic church and observe its teachings in their lives. Fra- 
ternally he is associated with the Workmen lodge at Roseland. He 
is acquainted with practically the entire history of the county as it 
was but sparseh^ settled when he arrived here in 1870, and in the fall 
of 1871 he planted what was probably the first fall wheat sown in 
the county. While so occupied the Indians stole a horse and it was 
not until the following April that he recovered it. This incident is 
of interest as it indicates the annoyances to which the earlj^ settlers 
were subjected by the red men and there were also many other un- 
pleasant features of pioneer life, but JMr. Duncan had faith in the 
future of the county and lived to see that faith amply justified. 



JOHN R. COREY. 



John R. Corey is proprietor of the Hastings Bus & Transfer Line, 
in which connection he is conducting a substantial business, his suc- 
cess being based upon close application, unfaltering energy and 
reliability. He was born in Titusville, Pennsylvania, October 24, 
1867, and is a son of M. V. and Sarah (Burgher) Corey. The father 
was engaged in the implement and oil business when in the east and 
in the year 1876 he came with his family to Nebraska, settling in 
Saline county, where he condvicted an implement store, remaining in 
active business there until his death. His wife has also passed away. 
In their family were seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

The j^oungest son, John R. Corey, whose name introduces this 
review, obtained a public school education and afterward continued 
with his father for some time, assisting him in the conduct of the 
implement business. He then went upon the road as a traveling 
salesman, representing a dry goods house for a number of years. He 
started out independently as partner in the Evans Bloom Cigar Com- 
pany at Hastings, in which he owned a third interest for six years. 
He then purchased the bus and transfer business on the 11th of July, 
1914, and has since been at the head of an undertaking conducted 
under the name of Hastings Bus & Transfer Line, in which connec- 
tion he ojjerates five taxis and also has eighteen head of horses and 
various vehicles. He has all the equipment for the conduct of 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 117 

funerals, including three hearses. He operates hotel busses and does 
baggage transfer work and furnishes employment at all times to 
from twelve to fourteen men. His business has now grown to large 
IJroportions and is caj^ably, systematicallj^ and carefully condvicted. 
Mr. Corey at all times endeavors to please his jiatrons and thus secures 
a gratifying patronage. 

On the 2J<th of November, 1887, JMr. Corey was united in mar- 
riage to JNIiss Eda J. Goebring, her father being Jacob Goebring, who 
settled in Clay county, Nebraska, in 1873 and became the proprietor 
of the first hotel in Harvard. Both he and his wife have passed away. 
Mr. and Mrs. Corey have one son, John Raymond, who is nine years 
of age. 

In religious faith Mr. Corey is an Episcopalian. His political 
allegiance is given to the democratic party and he takes an active part 
in furthering its work and promoting its success. While he has never 
been a j^olitician in the sense of office seeking, he served by appoint- 
ment on the staff of the governor with the rank of colonel. Frater- 
nally he is identified with the Elks, the Woodmen and the United 
Commercial Travelers and he belongs to the Commercial Club. In 
manner he is social and genial and has the qualities which render him 
popular M'herever he is known, for he is always approachable and con- 
siderate of others. His business integrity and enterprise have also 
won him high respect and he is justly accounted one of the representa- 
tive residents of Hastings. 



C. C. ROBINSON, 



While actively engaged in farming C. C. Robinson managed his 
affairs so well that he accumulated a competence, which now enables 
him to live retired in Prosser and to enjoy a period of well earned 
leisure. His birth occurred in Highgate, Vermont, on the 29th of 
AugTist, 1842, and he is a son of Warren and Polly (ISIiers) Robinson, 
lifelong residents of Vermont. The father was very prominent in 
public affairs, served as overseer of the poor for forty years, was 
county judge for about ten years and for four terms represented his 
district in the state legislature. He reached a very advanced age, 
dying in 1896, when ninety-two years old. The family originally 
came from the north of Scotland and the ancestry has been traced 
back three hundred years. The mother of our subject passed away 
in 1879 and both she and her husband are buried at Highgate, Ver- 



118 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

mont. To them were bora eight children, namely: Felicia, who is 
deceased; Byron, a resident of Blaine, IMaine; Orville, who is living 
in St. Paul, JMinnesota, and has the distinction of being the oldest 
violin maker in the United States, having followed that trade for 
sixty years; Emily, deceased; C. C; Roswell, who was killed in the 
battle of the Wilderness during the Civil war; Anna, the Avife of 
C. G. Austin, of Highgate, Vermont, and one who died in infancy. 

C. C. Robinson attended the common schools of Vermont in the 
acquirement of an education and remained at home until nineteen 
j-ears of age. On the 7th of February, 1862, he answered the call of 
the government for troops, enlisting in Company F, Eighth Vermont 
Volunteer Infantry. He remained with that command until honor- 
ably discharged on the 22d of July, 1864, and took part in many hard 
fought engagements. He went to New Orleans with General Butler 
and after engaging in the campaign around that city for six months 
was with the forces of General Banks and participated in the siege 
of Port Hudson. Later he fought in the battle of Bisland, Louisiana, 
and after that went on the Red river expedition under General Banks. 
Subsequently he Avas detailed to jjicket duty in the swamps and 
bayous of that region for some time and also took part in the expedi- 
tion against the rebel gunboat King Cotton. He volunteered as one 
of the sharpshooters avIio were to kill the gunners assigned to the rebel 
gunboats, Hannah Jane, John C. Calhoun and The Little Devil, 
before they reached the boats. These Federal sharpshooters were also 
on a boat and when their vessel was compelled to stop because of 
running against a large chain stretched across the river the rebel 
soldiers entrenched along the bank began shooting at them. The 
officer in command, Commodore Buchanan, was shot in the wheel- 
house, and the sharjishooters in the rigging were subsequently ordered 
to land and charge the rifle pits. This was done and the trenches and 
sixty sharpshooters were captured. The Federal forces followed the 
King Cotton up the bay as far as the channel was navigable and then 
the rebels, seeing that capture was inevitable, burned the boat. 

jNIr. Robinson returned home after his discharge from the army 
and for three years resided in Hubbardstown, JNIassachusetts, after 
which, in 1879, he migrated westward and took up a homestead in 
Hall county, Nebraska. He proved up on that place and for twenty- 
two years concentrated his energies upon its further imiDrovement 
and development. His labors were practical and progressive and Avere 
rewarded by a substantial financial return. He is now living retired 
in Prosser but still owns two hundred acres in Hall county and also 
holds title to twentv acres within the limits of Prosser. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 119 

In 1867 Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to JNIiss Phoebe E. 
Sheppard, bj' whom he has had six children, namelj^ : Artemus, who 
is operating his father's farm in Hall countj^; Emma, the widow of 
David Elliott; Pearl J., who is engaged in the automobile business in 
Prosser; Lillie D., who is the widow of Elmer Stalkup and resides 
in Alberta, Canada ; Lee Warren, of Butte, Montana ; and Ray, at 
home. 

Mr. Robinson is a republican in politics and has taken considerable 
interest in public affairs. He has served acceptably as road super- 
visor, as marshal and as street commissioner and keeps well informed 
as to iJolitical conditions. He attends the Methodist Episcojjal church 
and is always willing to aid in its work in every way possible. His 
Christian faith has guided him in all of the relations of life and no 
movement for the moral advancement of his community has lacked 
his heartiest cooperation. For fifty years he has been affiliated with 
the JNIasonic order and he is one of the leading members of the local 
blue lodge. He belonged to the Grand Army post in Prosser as long 
as it was maintained but since its discontinuance has not become iden- 
tified M'ith any other post. His sterling worth has gained him the 
sincere respect of all who have come in contact with him and there 
are many who hold him in warm personal regard. 



CHARLES G. LANE. 



The Exchange National Bank of Hastings, now one of the strong 
and leading financial concerns of Adams county, is largely the out- 
growth of the business enterprise, ability and close application of its 
president, Charles G. Lane, whose thoroughness in all that he under- 
takes is one of the salient features of his growing success. He is one 
of New England's native sons, his birth having occurred in Hamp- 
ton, New Hamjjshire, November 2.3, 1862. There he was reared and 
he supplemented a public school education by study in the Phillips 
Academy at Exeter, New Hampshire. After completing his school 
life he went to Boston and accepted a position as city salesman with 
the Batchelder & Lincoln Company, wholesale dealers in shoes, with 
whom he remained for about three years. His identification with the 
west dates from 1884, in which year he made his way to Red Oak, 
Iowa, where he entered the First National Bank, in which he spent 
four and a half years. In 1888 he arrived in Hastings and accepted 
the position of assistant cashier in tlie bank of which he is now the 



120 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

president. Three years later he was advanced to the position of 
cashier and continued in that connection for several years, or until he 
was made president. Tlu'oughout the period of his residence in Hast- 
ings he has devoted his entire time to the bank and his efforts have 
been one of the potent elements in its substantial growth. He infused 
life into the institution, introduced modern methods and at all times 
has kept in touch with the trend of modern progress in banking 
circles. His close application, his thoroughness, the wise system which 
he installed and his careful safeguarding of the interests of depositors 
have been the elements in the continued growth of the institution, 
which is today one of the leading banks of this part of the state. 

On the 30th of July, 1902, INIr. Lane was married to Miss Mary 
jMcElhaney, a native of Brookfield, Pennsylvania, but reared and 
educated in Greenville. They have one son, Charles Willson, ten 
years of age. The family occupj' a fine residence in Hastings, in 
addition to which INIr. Lane owns considerable property in jNIinnesota 
and Nebraska. In his political views he is a republican Avhere national 
issues are involved, but casts an independent local ballot and has never 
accepted political office. He has served, however, as president of the 
school board of Hastings for a few years and he is never remiss in the 
duties of citizenship, cooperating in various plans and measures for 
the public good, notwithstanding the fact that he leaves office holding 
to others. Fraternally he is connected with Hastings Lodge, No. 50, 
A. F. & A. M., with Nebo Commandery, No. 11, K. T., of which he 
is the present eminent commander, and with Hastings Consistorj^ in 
which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. 
He also belongs to Sesostris Temple of the INIystic Shrine at Lincoln. 
He is a courteous, genial gentleman of unfeigned cordiality and he 
has many friends in this i^art of the state, for his marked characteris- 
tics are those which in every land and clime awaken confidence and 
regard. 



W. J. PEDERSEN. 



W. J. Pedersen, who carries on general farming on section 26, 
Juniata township, purchased his j^lace about fourteen years ago. It 
comprises one hundred and sixty acres of excellent land two and a 
half miles south of tlie town of Juniata and he operates the entire 
half section. His farm is equipped with all modern improvements and 
accessories and constitutes one of the attractive features of the land- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 121 

scape. The spirit of enterprise has actuated Mr. Pedersen in all that 
he has done and laudable ambition has been one of the strong features 
of his growing success. He was born in Denmark, April 24, 1863, a 
son of Hans and Hannah Pedersen, who were likewise natives of that 
country. They came to the Ujnited States in 1867, settling in Hart- 
land, Wisconsin. Soon afterward the father died and the mother 
later married again, becoming the wife of Ole Halverson. By her 
first marriage she had five children, namely: Charles, who is deceased; 
Rosa, who is the wife of Rasmus Christensen, of Wisconsin; W. J., 
of this review ; Anna, who is the wife of Carson Stover and lives near 
Hastings, Nebraska; and one who died in infancy. There were no 
children born of the second marriage, and JNIrs. Halverson passed 
away about ten j^ears ago. 

^V. J. Pedersen was only four years of age when brought by his 
parents to the new world. He acquired a common school education 
but was early thrown upon his own resources and worked as a farm 
hand for his board and clothing until he reached the age of sixteen 
years, when he began working by the month, receiving five dollars per 
month in the summer, while in the winter season he ^vorked for his 
board. He was emi^loyed in that capacity until 1881, spending some 
time as a farm hand near Casselton, North Dakota. In 1885 he 
removed to Adams county, Nebraska, settling in Juniata township, 
where he purchased eighty acres of land. About fourteen years ago 
he purchased his present property, which is situated on section 26 of 
the same townshijj. He owns three hundred and twenty acres, all in 
Juniata township, and success is attending his well directed labor as 
a farmer. There were no improvements upon the place at the time 
of his purchase but he erected a good house which was afterward 
destroyed by fire. In the summer of 1915 he completed his present 
commodious and attractive residence, which is one of the fine farm 
houses of the township. He has added all the barns and sheds neces- 
sary for the shelter of grain and stock and has secured the latest im- 
proved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. His life is a 
busy and useful one and excellent results follow his labors. 

At the age of twenty-seven j-ears jNIr. Pedersen was united in 
marriage to ]\Iiss Sarah E. Boulton, a sister of Edward J. Boulton, 
of whom a sketch ajjpears on another page of this work. To them have 
been born four children, namely: Charles, Orta. ^Nlarcella and Walde- 
mar, all at home. 

In his political views JNIr. Pedersen is a democrat yet does not feel 
himself bound by party ties and casts an independent l)allot if his 
judgment so dictates. Fraternally he is connected with the JNIodern 



122 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Woodmen of America at Juniata and he and his wife are members 
of the Lutheran church. They have many warm friends in the com- 
munity where they reside, for their fidelity to duty and their sociability 
have gained for them the warm regard of those whom they have met. 



HENRY AUGUST DAMKROEGER. 

Henry August Damkroeger has devoted his life to farming and 
is recognized as one of the capable and successful agriculturists of 
Highland toAvnship. He owns two hundred and forty acres of good 
land on section 26 and keeps everything about the place in excellent 
condition. He was born in Westphalia, Germany, on the 29th of 
July, 1876, and is a son of Henry and Charlotte (Grenemeyer) 
Damkroeger, who in 1888 removed with their family to the United 
States and settled in Jefferson county, Nebraska. After farming 
there for seventeen years they went to Clay county, Nebraska, where 
the father engaged in agricultural pursuits for fifteen years. At the 
end of that time he retired and he and his wife are now living at Hast- 
ings. They are the parents of the following living children, namely : 
Louisa, who is residing in Adams county; Katie, now jNIrs. H. H. 
INIahling, of Highland townshijj; Henrj^ August; INIary, the wife of 
Frank Seiko, of Clay county; Charlotte, who married Henry ^Nleyer, 
of Jefferson coimty, Nebraska ; Emma, the wife of Fred Seiko, of 
Clay county; and Ida, the wife of Ferdinand Dieck, of Clay county. 

Henry A. Damkroeger accompanied his i^arents to the United 
States in childhood and received his education in Jefferson county, 
Nebraska. He early began to assist his father with the farm work 
and remained on the home place until he was thirty years of age, 
during part of which time he was engaged in the operation of the 
farm on his own account. At length he purchased one hundred and 
twenty acres of land in Clay county but after operating that place for 
five years sold and came to Adams county. He i^urchased his present 
farm, which comprises two hundred and forty acres on section 26, 
Highland township, and in the intervening years has made a number 
of improvements thereon. He raises wheat, corn, alfalfa and oats 
and also some stock. He has a number of good dairy cows and derives 
a gratifying profit from the sale of his cream. He understands thor- 
oughly all phases of farming and his labors are efficient and are 
rewarded by a good income. 

On the 15th of Februarv, 1901, IMr. Damkroeger was united in 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 123 

marriage to Miss Dora Papenhaden, a daughter of Fred and Augusta 
(Schmidt) Papenhaden, of Hamburg, Germany. INIr. Damkroeger 
was born in that country but when sixteen years of age emigrated to 
the United States. By her marriage she has become the mother of 
eight children, namely: JNIartha, who was born on the 10th of Jan- 
uarj^ 1902; Ernest, born August 31, 1903; Henry, November 22, 
1905; Tabitha, September 28, 1907; Helmuth, July 24, 1909; 
Amanda, February 13, 1911; Alfred, December 30, 1912; and Fred- 
erick C, September 26, 1914. 

jNIr. Damkroeger votes the rei^ublican ticket as he believes in its 
policies and he takes the interest of a good citizen in public affairs. 
He and his family attend the German Lutheran church, to the sup- 
port of which he contributes, and the uprightness of his life has gained 
him the sincere respect of all who have come into contact with him. 
The gratifying measure of success which he has gained is due entirely 
to his own industry and good management and he is one of the valued 
citizens of his township. 



ORVILLE BUTLER. 



Orville Butler, connected with the Farmers Cooperative Grain & 
Live Stock Company at Juniata, is also actively identified with agri- 
cultural interests in this county and has farm property elsewhere. He 
has ever depended entirely upon his own resources and labors for 
advancement in the business world and his progress has been the 
merited reward of his effort. He was born in Lee county, Illinois, 
November 14, 1852, a son of Albert and Olive (Rodgers) Butler. 
The father was born in the state of New York but was married in 
Illinois and in the year 1854 removed to Marshall county, Iowa, 
where he and his wife spent their remaining days. The father fol- 
loAved the occupation of farming but died there prior to the Civil war. 
In the family were five children: Franklin, now living in JNIarshall 
county, Iowa; INIartha J., whose home is in Holt county, Nebraska; 
Rachel, who was a twin sister of JNIartha and is now deceased; and 
]Mrs. Estella Scott, of Ida Grove, Iowa. 

The other member of the family is Orville Butler, who was but 
two years of age at the time his parents removed to Iowa, where he 
pursued a common school education. He was reared to farm life and 
remained at home until about nineteen years of age, when he began 
farming on his own account in Iowa. In 1882 he came to Nebraska, 



124 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

where he carried on general agricultural pursuits for a few years. He 
later began work at the grain trade, with which he has since been con- 
nected save for a period of three and one-half years when he held the 
position of head engineer at the State Hospital. He was the fii-st 
man hired by the month when that institution was opened. He is now 
comiected with the Farmers Cooperative Grain & Live Stock Com- 
pany, in which connection he is conducting an important and growing- 
business. He thoroughly understands every phase of the trade and 
is therefore well qualified to carry on the interests under his direction. 
He now owns a pleasant home in Juniata, together with sixteen acres 
of land adjoining the town, and he is likewise the owner of one hmi- 
dred and sixt}^ acres in Wichita county, Kansas, together with ten 
acres and a town lot at Sheridan, Colorado county, Texas. All that 
he possesses has been acquired entirelj^ through his own efforts and his 
energy and laudable ambition have been the basis of his growing 
success. 

In 1874 Mr. Butler was joined in wedlock to ]\Iiss INIary Livering- 
house, by whom he has eight children, as follows: Faye F., who is a 
resident of Eldorado, Nebraska; Frank, at home, who spent about a 
year in Cuba as a member of the Third Nebraska; Cora, who is the 
wife of Paul Walker, of INIinden, Nebraska ; Fred, living in Abilene, 
Kansas ; Ross, a resident of Germantown, Nebraska ; Ralph, at home ; 
Vida, who is the wife of A. L. Dominy, of Hastings ; and Nettie, the 
wife of A. Stull, residing on her father's farm near Juniata. 

In politics jMr. Butler is a republican and has filled the office of 
road overseer. His wife is a member of the Dunkard church and he 
holds membership in the INIodern Woodmen camp at Juniata, in which 
he has filled all of the chairs, serving at the present time as banker. 
His has been an active and well spent life and devotion to duty is the 
keynote of his character. He has based his success upon persistency 
of purpose, indefatigable energy and unfaltering business integrity 
and has steadily progressed toward the goal of prosperitJ^ 



CHARLES H. HUDSON. 

Charles H. Hudson, recognized as one of the leaders of the repub- 
lican party in Adams county, is now filling the position of county 
clerk and makes his home in Hastings, where he has a wide and favor- 
able acquaintance. His record is one which makes Adams county 
proud to number him among her native sons. His birth occurred on 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 125 

the 19th of February, 1879, his parents being Orlando and ]\Iinerva 
J. (Gihiiore) Hudson. The family came to Nebraska in 1878 from 
Vandalia, Illinois, and settled a mile north of Hastings, where they 
took up their abode upon a farm. There they resided for eight years 
or more, when the farm was sold and the family removed to western 
Nebraska, where the father continued business as a general mechanic. 
It was a period of drought, however, when crop faihu-es brought on 
hard times, and ]Mr. Hudson accordingly sold his interests in that part 
of the state and went to Utah. Still later he became a resident of 
Idaho and is now living in Palma, that state. 

Charles H. Hudson is the eldest surviving member of a family of 
five children. He was educated in the country schools and the public 
schools, in which he pursued his stvidies to the ninth grade. His j'outh- 
ful training was that of the home farm and he early became familiar 
with all of the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. 
When but a young lad he took his place in the fields and continued to 
assist in the work of plowing, planting and harvesting until he attained 
his majority, when he secured a clerkship in a general store at Prosser. 
He afterward became a partner in a drug store and continued in that 
business until he entered the campaign for county clerk in 1911. He 
made an excellent run for the office, was elected and entered ujjon the 
discharge of his duties. During his first term he was only absent from 
his office one day and on that occasion — a day in 1912 — he went with 
other officials to Lincoln and there was instrumental with them in pre-' 
venting the state board of equalization from making the threatened 
ten per cent increase in the assessment of real estate in Adams county. 
He discharged the duties of his position promptly and faithfully and 
as economically as conditions Avould warrant. He was most painstak- 
ing in all that he undertook and the excellent record of his first term 
led to his reelection, so that he is now serving for a second term. 

In religious faith INIr. Hudson is a Methodist and fraternally is 
connected with the Odd Fellows, Elks, the Woodmen and the Eagles. 
He also belongs to the Commercial Club and cooperates in every plan 
and movement of that organization for the benefit and upbuilding of 
the city along lines leading to permanent good. He is fond of camp 
life, of hunting and in fact all phases of outdoor life and is interested 
in baseball and tennis. In a word, his is a well rounded development. 
He can Avork well and play well and knows that the even balance of 
these things develops the strongest men and the best characters. He 
has social manlj' qualities Avhich render him popular and which have 
gained for him the esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. 
Moreover, he is a self-made man, for from the age of twelve years he 



126 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

has been deiiendent ui^on his own resources. His father was the first 
blacksmith of Hastings and when his parents left this district Charles 
H. Hudson largelj^ earned his living by farm work, which he followed 
through the summer months, attending school as opportunity offered 
in the Avinter seasons. Thus gradually he worked his way upward 
and in the course of years reached the position Avhich he now occupies 
as a rejjresentative citizen of his native county. 



JESSE LEW TEMPLETON. 

Jesse Lew Templeton, a well known real estate and insurance 
dealer of Kenesaw, was born on the 12th of JNIay, 1870, in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. His father, Thomas Templeton, who was 
born also in that state October 6, 1839, received the education common 
at the time of his boyhood and on beginning his business career devoted 
some time to clerking and later worked in the oil fields. At the time 
of the Civil war he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Thirty- 
ninth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and participated 
in a number of engagements, including the battles of Bull Run, Antie- 
tam, Fredericksburg, INIary's Heights, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg 
and JNIine Run. After the close of hostilities he went to Illinois, where 
he clerked for a time and then returned to Pennsylvania, where lie 
served as county clerk of Butler county. Subsequently he engaged in 
merchandising there but in 1881 he removed to Topeka, Kansas, and 
after clerking there for two years came to Kenesaw, Nebraska. He 
purchased a quarter section of fine land three miles north of the town 
and devoted eleven months to its cultivation, after which he sold the 
place. He then went again to Topeka but a year later returned to 
Kenesaw and again purchased land in this county. For four years he 
served as postmaster of KenesaAV but at length he removed westward, 
settling at Hood River, Oregon, where for two years he operated a 
fruit ranch. Subsequently he engaged in the real estate business at 
Long Beach, California, and there he passed away on the 18th of 
August, 1915. His friends were many and there was sincere grief 
at his demise. He was a republican in politics, was connected Avith 
Kenesaw Lodge, No. 144, A. F. & A. jNI., and with the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, and his religious faith was that of the Presby- 
terian church. He never ceased to enjoy meeting his comrades of the 
war and was a loyal member of the Grand Army of the ReiDublic. He 
Avas married October 6, 1868, to JNIiss INIaria Ann Hutchison, also a 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 127 

native of Pennsjdvania, and they became the parents of four children, 
of whom our subject is the only one surviving. 

Jesse L. Templeton received a good education and was graduated 
from the Topeka, Kansas, high school in 1888, after which he engaged 
in farming in this count}^ for a considerable period. For a nmnber of 
years, however, he has resided in Kenesaw and has won a place among 
the leading business men of the town, being very active in the real 
estate and insurance field. He studies the various phases of those lines 
of business carefully, keeps in close touch with local business condi- 
tions and has gained a large clientage. 

JNIr. Templeton was married in 1891 to INIiss Lettie Latta, by 
whom he has three children, namely : Robert Bruce, Faye and Fern. 
Mr. Templeton casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of 
the republican party and is well known fraternally, belonging to Ken- 
esaw Lodge, No. 29, K. P., Kenesaw Lodge, No. 231, I. O. O. F., 
and the Royal Highlanders. He has not only gained a gratifying 
measure of prosperity but he also holds in full degree the resj)ect of 
those who have been associated with him. 



C. D. HOFF. 



C. D. HofF, who is engaged in the cleaning and dyeing business at 
Hastings, building up a good trade by reason of excellence of work 
and straightforward dealing, Avas born in Russia on the 18th of 
August, 1879, of German parentage, being a son of Conrad and INIade- 
line Hoff. His father followed the occupation of farming in Russia 
until the year 1903, when he brought his family to the United States. 
He made his way at once into the interior of the country, settling at 
Hastings, where both he and his wife now reside. In the family were 
eight children, five sons and three daughters. 

C. D. Hoff, the fourth in order of birth, was educated in the 
schools of his native land and after coming to the new world learned 
the cleaning and dyeing business. He embarked in business on his 
own account at the age of twentj-^-one years, starting in a very modest 
way and gradually increasing his trade and his facilities until he now 
has the largest establishment of the kind in the county, employing 
five people and utilizing an automobile for the collection and delivery 
of goods. He has the patronage of Hastings' leading people and the 
establishment is a valuable asset to the business interests of the city. 
He occupies both the lower and upper floors of the building at 806 



128 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

West Second street, with a cleaning department in the rear supphed 
with all modern improvements. He has made excellence of work the 
basis of his growing trade and is meeting with gratifying success. 

On the 21st of April, 1900, jMr. Hoff was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine Burngard, a daughter of Henry Burngard. They 
have two children, Robert and Neoma. JMr. HofF belongs to the 
German Congregational church and fraternally is a chapter JNIason, 
exemj)lifying in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft. In politics 
he regards the capability of the man rather than his party affiliation. 
He turns to fishing and hunting for recreation, but the major part of 
his time is given to his business affairs and his concentration and 
energy constitute the salient factors in his growing trade. He has 
worked hard, his labors have been intelligently directed and his efforts 
are now bringing to him gratifying success. 



JAMES D. McFERREN. 

Among the retired farmers of Juniata is James D. McFerren, 
who was born at JNIount Alton, Pennsylvania, JNIarch 24, 1845, a son 
of James and Lena (Kuhn) JNIcFerren, both of whom were natives 
of the Keystone state, where they were reared and married. The 
father was a teacher in the public schools and remained a resident of 
Pennsylvania until his death, which occurred in 1849. In the family 
Avere but two children, James and Clara, the latter now deceased. 

In the schools of Pennsylvania, James D. INIcFerren pursued his 
education and when quite young began to earn his own livelihood. 
He is a self-made man in the truest and best sense of the term, having 
depended entirely upon his own resources for material advancement 
from his early youth. He was but seventeen j'ears of age when on the 
8th of Aug-ust, 1862, he responded to the country's call for troojjs and 
M'ent to the front for nine months' service. At the end of that time 
he was honorably discharged July 14, 1863. Later he again joined 
the army, becoming a member of Company D, Twenty-first Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry, M'ith which he remained for six months, being dis- 
charged July 8, 186.5. He was captured at Farmville but was released 
three days later on account of the close of the war. He was on duty 
with the Army of the Potomac, serving as corporal a part of the 
time, and he participated in the battles of Fredericksburg and Antie- 
tam, together with others of lesser importance. 

When his military service was ended Mr. JNIcFerren returned to 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 129 

Pennsj'lvania, where he remained for about two years, when he re- 
moved to Goshen, Indiana, there spending three years. In 1870 he 
became a resident of JMarshalltown, Iowa, and in that locahty was 
engaged in farming until 1883. Later he came to Nebraska, settling 
on section 11, Juniata township, Adams county, where he continued 
to engage in farming until he took up his abode in the town about 
twenty-one years ago. Here he owns a fine residence and he is also 
the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Perkins 
county. His business affairs have ever been carefully managed and 
while upon the farm he Avas regarded as a very progressive agricul- 
turist, wide-awake, alert and enterprising. He brought his fields to a 
high state of cultivation and carefully and j^ersistently carried on his 
work, his labors bringing to him a gratifying measure of success. 

In 1867 Mr. JMcFerren was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
Liveringhouse, by whom he has seven children, as follows : William, 
who is a resident of Kenesaw, Nebraska; Louie, living in Juniata, 
this state ; Frank, who Avas killed by lightning ; Charles, a resident of 
Grand Island, Nebraska; JNIay, who is the wife of R. L. Workman, 
of Holdredge, Nebraska; Belle, living in Denver, Colorado; and 
Winnie, at home. 

The i^arents are members of the Brethren or Dunkard church and 
were among the organizers of the congregation. Thej' are people of 
the highest respectability and they enjoy the goodwill and confidence 
of all who know them. For a third of a century they have been resi- 
dents of this countj' and have therefore been witnesses of much of its 
growth and improvement. 



WILLIAM I. MAYS. 



William I. JNIays, a well known and efficient farmer, is now assist- 
ing his brother David with the operation of his farm a half mile south- 
west of Trimabull. Our subject was born in Kosciusko county, In- 
diana, on the 4.th of JNIarch, 1866, a so^ of G. W. and Julia M. 
(Kearns) Mays, further mention of whom appears in the sketch of 
David IVIays. He received good educational advantages, graduating 
from the high school at Warsaw, Indiana, and during his youth he also 
learned much concerning the various phases of farm work. He 
remained on the home place until he was nineteen years of age and 
then hired out to others, continuing as a farm hand for three years. 
In JNIarch, 1890, in company with his mother, brother and sister, lie 



130 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

came to Adams county and all made their home with Da^'id INtays, 
who had taken up his residence in this county two years previously. 
Mr. Mays of this review worked by the month for three years, after 
wliich he was married and began farming for himself, renting land 
nine miles northeast of Hastings. After operating that place for 
two years he removed to his brother's farm a half mile south of Trum- 
bull and remained there for five years. Following the demise of his 
wife in 1901 he went east, where he worked for a year, but in 1902 he 
returned to Adams county and for six years followed the barber's 
trade. At the end of that time he again turned his attention to agri- 
cidtural pursuits and is now aiding his brother in farming his place 
near Trumbull. 

JNIr. JNIays was married on the 7th of JNIarch, 1894, to Grace F. 
Randall, a daughter of F. R. Randall, who resided near Trumbull. 
ISIrs. JNIays passed away on the 20th of March, 1901. She was the 
mother of four children, as follows: Claude E., who was born on the 
11th of September, 1896, and is now attending high school at Trum- 
bull; Leo C, who was born October 25, 1897, and is also a high-school 
student; Leslie Ward, who was born in February, 1899, and died in 
infancy; and David William, whose birth occurred on the 5th of 
February, 1901, and who, following the death of his mother when he 
was six weeks old, was adopted by AVilliam Randall, a real-estate 
agent of Trenton, Nebraska. 

INIr. jNIays gives his j^olitical allegiance to the democratic jDarty 
where national issues are at stake, but at local elections votes inde- 
pendently. He holds membership in the Christian church. He is well 
known throughout the countj' and is recognized as an able farmer, a 
good citizen and a man of high moral principles. 



JOSEPH W. PLUI^IMER. 

There are many successful farmers in Adams county, among 
whom is numbered Josejjh W. Pkmimer, of West Blue township. 
He was born near Sterling, in Whiteside county, Illinois, on the 10th 
of February, 1855, but when two years of age was taken by his 
parents to INIarshall county, Iowa, where he attended the common 
schools. Subsequently he was a student in Friend's Academy at 
IVIarshalltown and he remained ujDon the home farm with his parents 
until he was twenty-seven years of age. In 1880 the family removed 
to Burt county, Nebraska, and there his parents passed away. After 





MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH W. PLUMMT3R 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 133 

farming for nine years in that county INIr. Plummer of this review 
removed to Dawes county and resided on a ranch there until 1901. 
In that year he came to Adams county and purchased the John Owens 
homestead about three miles northeast of Hastings, where he now 
lives. He is a practical and up-to-date farmer, and his industry has 
enabled him to accmnulate more than a competence. In 1910 he 
rented his farm and removed to Hastings, but in the spring of 1915 
he returned to the farm. 

Mr. Plummer was married in Iowa in 1880 to Miss Rhoda Mote, 
of INIarshall county, Iowa, whose parents subsequently removed to 
Dawes county, Nebraska. Five children have been born to this union 
as follows: IMae C, Avho was born in 1882, is now the wife of Charles 
A. Smith, an insurance agent of Sioux City, Iowa, and has two chil- 
dren. Harry M., born in 1883, is a plumber of Chadron, Nebraska, 
and he married INIae Hart, of Edgar, Nebraska. Ada L., whose 
birth occurred in 1886, married George M. Drollinger, a son of 
M. H. Drollinger, a pioneer settler of Adams county. George ISl. 
Drollinger is a collection agent in Spokane, Washington, and on the 
2d of July, 1915, was called upon to mourn the death of his wife. 
They were the parents of four children. Norman C, born in 1888, 
is engaged in farming at Hinton, Iowa. Roy, born in 1890, is farm- 
ing at JMeckling, South Dakota. He married Grace Kohlman, of 
Hastings, Nebraska, a daughter of L. H. Kohlman, a pioneer of this 
county, and thej' have two children. 

INIr. Plummer supports the democratic party at the polls, as he 
believes in its principles, and his religious faith is that of the Methodist 
church. In 1911 he took an extensive trip through Europe, the Holy 
Land and Egj^pt and derived much pleasure and profit from his 
travels. He is a man of keen intelligence and keeps well informed on 
all questions and issues of the day. He has won financial success and 
has also gained a high place in the regard of his fellow citizens and 
ranks as a substantial resident of his township. 



L. PHILLIPS. 



L. Phillips, proprietor of the Bostwick Hotel at Hastings, con- 
ducted on the European plan, has in the course of his business career 
made steady advancement and the steps in his orderly progression are 
easily discernible. The faithful performance of each day's duties has 



134 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

brought him strength and power for the labors of the succeeding day 
and his abihty has grown through the exercise of effort. Thus it is 
that he has come to a place among the substantial business men of his 
adopted city. JNIr. Phillips is a native of Nebraska, his birth having 
occurred in Furnas county on the 14th of December, 1879, his parents 
being Caliph and Sarah Phillips, who in the year 1866 came to this 
state and for a year resided in Plattsmouth before removing to Fur- 
nas county, where the father homesteaded land, securing both a pre- 
emption and a timber claim. Year after year he carefully tilled the 
soil until the once wild prairie was converted into a valuable farm, on 
which he continued to make his home until about seven years ago, 
when he retired from active business life. When he settled upon the 
old homestead he was surrounded bj^ Indians, for the red men were 
then more nvmierous in that section of the country than the white 
settlers. There were many hardships and privations to be borne and 
dangers to be faced, but with resolute sj^irit the family faced the 
conditions of frontier life and lived to see a remarkable change and 
profit by the improved conditions. In the family were four sons and 
two daughters, of whom L. Phillips is the fourth in order of birth. 
The youngest son is now operating the old homestead. At the time 
of the Civil war the father joined the armj^ serving for four years 
and twenty daj^s in the West Virginia Cavalrj'. 

L. Phillips, whose name introduces this review, was reared amid 
the wild scenes and conditions of frontier life. His education Avas 
acquired in one of the primitive schoolhouses of Furnas county, it 
being partly a dugout and partly a sod structure. School was held 
only through the winter seasons, for during the remainder of the year 
the labors of the children were usualh' required in farm work. Mr. 
Phillips remained at home until he reached the age of sixteen years, 
but, thinking to find other pursuits more congenial than the work of 
the fields, he then began learning the barber's trade, Avhich he followed 
for three years in the employ of others and afterward for several 
years on his own account. In 1903 he removed to Adams county, 
settling first at Juniata, where he engaged in business, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1911, he removed to Hastings and took charge of the Bostwick 
Hotel, of which he has since been the proprietor. This hotel is con- 
ducted on the European plan and he furnishes employment to twenty 
people. He has made it a popular hostelry, liberally patronized, and 
his capable management is resulting in the attainment of success. He 
is also the owner of farm lands and of real estate in Hastings, having 
made judicious investments in property, which return to him a gratify- 
ing annual income. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 135 

In religious faith Mr. PhilliiDs is a Catholic. He belongs to the 
Travelers' Protective Association, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and 
to the Commercial Club. He enjoys hunting big game and makes 
long trips for this purpose. He has one of the finest collections of 
mounted big game to be seen in the west, having been offered thirty- 
thousand dollars for this collection, which, however, he refused. In 
j)olitics he is independent, holding to men and measures rather than 
to party, and, while he does not seek nor desire office, he is never remiss 
in the duties of citizenship, preferring to concentrate his energies 
upon his business affairs, which are wisely and systematically directed. 
He has attractive social qualities which have won for him popularity 
and those who know him entertain for him high esteem. 



CHARLES HENRY DIETRICH. 

Distinguished among Nebraska's eminent sons is Charles Henry 
Dietrich, whose record reflects credit and honor upon the state which 
has honored him. In business circles he figured prominently for 
many years as a leading banker and in other connections he has left 
the impress of his individuality upon the history of the common- 
wealth, for he has been Nebraska's chief executive and has also been a 
member of the United States senate. His course in office, as in private 
life, has been creditable to himself and satisfactory to his constituents 
and his work has at all times been fraught with good for the com- 
munity at large. A native of Illinois, JNIr. Dietrich was born in 
Aurora on the 26th of November, 1853, his parents being Leonard 
and Wilhelmina (Stein) Dietrich, both of whom were natives of 
Germany. The father, who was born in Darmstadt, died at the 
advanced age of eighty-six years, and the mother, whose birth occurred 
at Frankfort, passed aAvay at the age of eighty years. He was a shoe 
manufacturer and followed that business in Germany until the time 
of the revolution of 1848. He belonged to the socialist party, joined 
the revolutionists and was driven from Germany. He then went to 
Canada, from which point he proceeded by slow stages down through 
the United States to St. Louis, where he met his wife and family, 
who had come by sailing vessel to the new world, arriving after a 
voyage of three months or in the year 1849. JNIr. Dietrich then took 
his family to Aurora, Illinois, where he became connected with the 
shoe business. He was a well educated man and a most interesting- 
conversationalist and he taught both German and French in the schools 



336 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of Aurora, where he continued to reside throughout his remaining 
days, taking an active interest in the affairs of the city and enjoying 
the fruits of hberty as offered in the new world. 

Charles Henry Dietrich attended school in Aurora to the age of 
ten years, when he ran away from home, possessing the venturesome 
spirit that many a boy manifests. The following year he returned 
home and then went to school until he reached the age of twelve. 
Again leaving Aurora, he made his way to St. Joseph, jNIissouri, and 
for three years occupied a position as clerk in the hardware store of 
W. M. Wyeth. In 1868 he went to Chicago, where he engaged with 
the Hayden Kay Saddlery & Hardware Company until their business 
was destroyed by the great fire of 1871. He then entered the service 
of the Chicago City Railroad Company as inspector but after having 
trouble with a conductor went to St. Louis, where he worked as a 
conductor on the street railroad for a short time. Later he was at 
JMemphis, Tennessee, where he drove a horse car until quarantined 
with yellow fever. After his release he made his way to Laconia 
Circle, Arkansas, with the intention of going into business there on 
his own account, but he was robbed of his money. Returning to 
Aurora, he worked at the blacksmith's trade mitil 1875, when he made 
his way to the Black Hills. At that time the city of Deadwood was 
not laid out and the district was still an Indian reservation. He cut 
logs used in the building of the first store there and, working for a 
pioneer firm, he delivered goods on pack mules all over the Black 
Hills. One of the party located in Spearfish, South Dakota, and 
traded his interest in the town site for a gold watch. JNIr. Dietrich 
located the Aurora mine in Hidden Treasure Gulch and worked the 
mine for a short time, after which he sold out to a syndicate composed 
of United States Senators George E. Sj^encer, Thomas Piatt and 
Roscoe Conkling. He then returned to Aurora and in 1878 made 
his way to Texas, where he had a big herd of sheep near San Antonio. 

In the fall of 1878 jNIr. Dietrich came to Hastings, where he en- 
gaged in general merchandising with John Wood, the first mayor of 
the city. In 1880 he tvn-ned his attention to the hardware business, 
forming a partnership Avith J. B. Dallas, with whom he remained for 
a year. In 1881 he opened a loan and insurance office as senior partner 
in the firm of Dietrich & Slaker, their relation being maintained for 
about six j'ears or until 1887, when JNIr. Dietrich organized the Ger- 
man National Bank, remaining as its president for eighteen years or 
until July, 190.5. He placed that institution upon a safe, substantial 
basis, inaugurated a progressive policy that worked for the upbuilding 
of the bank and at the same time carefully safeguarded the interests 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 137 

of depositors. Throughout the long years of his residence in Hast- 
ings Mr. Dietrich has taken a most active and helpful part in promot- 
ing the upbuilding of the city and advancing its interests in many 
ways. For several j'ears he was the president of the Board of Trade 
and he took an active part in inducing the Northwestern and JNIissouri 
Pacific Railroads to build their lines through Hastings. He has ever 
been a leader in movements for the benefit of the city and surrounding 
country. He it was who jjlanted the first timothy and clover field in 
the county and also the first alfalfa field, and at one time he was the 
owner of large farm holdings in Adams county. He recognized the 
ojiportunity for judicious investment and so placed his capital that 
excellent results accrued. 

Mr. Dietrich has been twice married. On the 4th of May, 1878, 
he wedded JNIiss Elizabeth Slaker, of Aurora, who j)assed awaj^ in 
February, 1887. Their daughter, Gertrude E., is the wife of Herbert 
Knox Smith, a well known supj^orter of Theodore Roosevelt who 
served as commissioner of corporations at Washington from 1907 to 
1912, has been a member of the Connecticut house of representatives, 
was a candidate for United States senator and has also been candidate 
for governor on the progressive ticket. In 1909 INIr. Dietrich was 
again married, his second union being with Miss Margretta S. Stewart, 
of Philadelphia, a daughter of William Shaw and Delia (Allman) 
Stewart. The Stewarts were of an old Scotch family established in 
the United States in 1749. Her father was a leading physician of 
Philadelphia who was graduated from the Jeiferson Medical College 
there. In 1861 he enlisted in the army and served throughout the 
Civil war. Following the close of hostilities he returned to Philadel- 
phia and began practice, being recognized as a prominent and honored 
representative of the profession in that city. He was one of the most 
prominent members of the Philadelphia Medical Society and he was 
the one who introduced the four years' course in the Philadeljihia 
College of JNIedicine. He was dean of its medical department and in 
that connection maintained the highest standard of professional ethics. 
Three times he was sent as a delegate to the International JNIedical 
Society. IMrs. Dietrich is very active in all civic and social affairs of 
Hastings. She is president of "Sunnyside," an institution for the 
care of the old, the destitute and the needy, was one of the organizers 
and the president of the Adams County Woman's Suffrage Associa- 
tion and is a member of the state board of the Suffrage Association. 

In his fraternal relations INIr. Dietrich is a prominent INIason, 
having taken the consistory degrees of the Scottish Rite. He also 
belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In politics he 



138 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

has ever been an earnest republican and has come more and more into 
prominence with the passing years as his opinions have carried weight 
in party councils and his efforts have proven effective in promoting 
political successes. He was elected governor of Nebraska in 1900 
after the state had been under democratic and populistic rule for 
eight years. He was chosen on the 28th of March, 1901, to fill out 
the unexpired term of Senator Hayward and therefore resigned his 
position as governor on the 1st of May following, after which he con- 
tinued to represent the state in the United States senate from Decem- 
ber 21, 1901, until INIarch 4, 1905. In the latter year he retired from 
all activity, business, political and otherwise, but the state is still 
enjoying the benefits of his public service and of his business activity, 
for he set in motion the wheels of progress and the results have not 
yet reached their full fruition. His record is an indication of what 
may be accomplished through the employment of opportunities when 
laudable ambition and determination point out the way, and his life 
history should have its inspirational effect upon the lives of others, 
encouraging them to continued effort toward the attainment of high 
ideals. 



FREDERICK J. HALLER. 

During the later years of his life Frederick J. Haller was a resi- 
dent of Kenesaw and enjoyed the respect, confidence and goodwill of 
all who knew him there, as he had in various other localities in which 
he had made his home. He was of foreign birth but America had no 
more loyal nor devoted citizen among her native sons. It sometimes 
seems that men born under monarchial rule have an even higher appre- 
ciation of the opportunities and jjrivileges afforded under a republican 
form of government than those m'\\o have always enjoyed them, as 
they judge their condition in contrast to what they have formerly 
known, and Mr. Haller was anaong those who proved his patriotic 
devotion to America by valiant service in the Civil war. 

He was born in Bavaria, Germany, December 11, 1832, a son of 
John and Eva Catherine (Frone) Haller. The father, a man of 
great intelligence, devoted his life to the profession of teaching, 
Frederick J. Haller was reared in his native country to the age of 
seventeen years and was liberally educated, displaying particular 
skill in mathematics. Crossing the Atlantic in 1849, he landed at New 
York, where he made his home for two years, after which he removed 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 139 

westward to AVisconsin and later to INIichigan, where he engaged in 
farming and lumbering. Subsequentlj^ he removed to Huron county, 
Ohio, ^v'here he was living at the outbreak of the Civil war. In re- 
sponse to the country's call for troops he offered his services to the 
government, enlisting as a private of Company A, One Hundred and 
First Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He left a wife and small children 
to go to the front, feeling that he owed a duty to his adopted country 
in aiding in her jDreservation. He took part in a number of hotly 
contested engagements and with his command entered the field at 
Chickamauga, where he was shot on the 19th of September, 1863. 
On the 13th of November the fu'st lieutenant of his company, Ben- 
jamin F. Brj^ant, then commanding the regiment, wrote Mrs. Haller: 
"Our regiment went into action on Saturday, September 19th, at 
about 11 o'clock A. M. At fii-st we laj^ down in front of the battery, 
placed on an eminence behind us, which shelled the woods in our imme- 
diate front where the enemy were. Then we rose up and advanced to 
the edge of the woods Avhere we became engaged. It A^'as almost noon, 
and while we were engaged near the edge of the woods your husband 
was shot through the body by a musket ball and fell dead. We were 
driven from the first position and never regained it. At sundown the 
fighting had ceased. Our skirmishers were full fortj' rods from the 
place of which I speak and we could not get beyond there as the rebels 
were in the woods and shooting at every one who approached. On 
Sunday the fighting was near Chattanooga and as we left the field 
Sunday night and fell back to Rossville, and JNIonday night went to 
Chattanooga, we know nothing of those who fell in the fight. Every- 
thing your husband had was about his person and of course lost. I 
most sincerely sympathize with you in j'our irreparable loss. I bear 
testimony to the good conduct of your husband as a soldier under all 
circumstances. I am, Yours very truly, Benjamin F. Bryant, 1st 
Lieut. Comdg. Comj^any A, 101st O. V. I." 

Such was the account which reached INIrs. Haller but fate had not 
been thus unkind to the family, for many years more of active and 
useful life remained to Mr. Haller. As his commander had stated, 
he was struck by a musket ball which entered just below the left eye, 
passed through it and came out the back of the neck but though left 
for dead, life Mas not extinct. He lay all night on the battlefield, was 
captured and kej^t in the open. He was afterward for fifteen months 
in jjrisons at Richmond, Danville, Andersonville and Florence and 
was paroled in December, 1864. He then rejoined his regiment and 
was mustered out with his command. 

When his military service was over ]Mr. Haller returned to Huron 



140 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

county, Ohio, and in 1865 went to JNIichigan, where he engaged in 
farming until 1888. He then went to Clarke county, Iowa, where he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1905, when he became 
a resident of IvenesaAv, Nebraska, there spending his remaining days. 

It was on the 17th of JMarch, 1856, that JNIr. Haller was married 
to JNIiss Frances L. Stevens, of Berrien county, Michigan. She was 
born in Huron countj^, Ohio, September 4, 1837, a daughter of JNIr. 
and JNIrs. John JNI. Stevens. She traces her ancestry back to the 
Revolutionary war period, her great-grandfather having served as a 
captain in the conflict to establish American independence. On the 
paternal side the family was represented in the War of 1812. To 
Mr. and INIrs. Haller were born seven children: Mary H., the wife 
of J. M. Russell, of Kenesaw; Emma F., who is deceased; JNIartha 
B., who has also passed away; Almeria G., who died at the age of 
nineteen months ; John F., who is in the general offices of the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company at Omaha; Ernest L., deceased; and 
Romaine W., who is engaged in farming at Elk Head, Colorado. 

The familj^ are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church, to 
which Mr. Haller belonged, and he guided his life by its teachings. 
His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he held 
membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. He died August 
9, 1915, and in passing on left a memory honored and revered by all 
who knew him. Once more from B. F. Bryant came a word of sym- 
pathy and condolence, such as he had written when, more than a half 
century before, he believed he was sending to the widow the news of 
her husband's death upon a southern battlefield. ]Mrs. Haller was 
sent a Resolution of Respect, reading: 

"When sounds the last assembly 

And the guard has gone the round, 
]May we pitch our tents together on 
Some happier camjiing ground. 

"It becomes our duty as members of the One Hundred and First 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to record the death of Comrade Frederick 
J. Haller, a member of Company A, who entered the service of his 
country August 4, 1862. He was wounded in the battle of Chicka- 
mauga, Georgia, September 19, 1863, was captured and spent fifteen 
months in Confederate prisons, paroled and rejoined his command, 
December, 1864, served to the close of the Avar, and was mustered out 
with his company, June 12, 1865. 

"Resolved, That in the death of Comrade Haller we have lost out 



PAST A^D PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 141 

of our ranks a noble hero, loyal, brave and true ; his countr j^ a peace- 
able, law-abiding citizen and a good man; his family, to whom we 
tender the love and synipath}' of all our comrades, a devoted husband 
and father. 

"Resolved, That a copy of these Resolutions be forwarded to his 
family at Kenesaw, Nebraska; also, a copy filed with the Association 
records. 

"A. C. Knapp t 

"B. F. Bryant \ Committee." 

"Miles E. Cartwright j 

For ten years Mr. Haller had been a resident of Kenesaw and 
during that period had gained a firm hold upon the affectionate regard 
and goodwill of his fellow townsmen who appreciated his sterling 
worth and his fidelity to principle. He held friendship inviolable and 
was a devoted husband and father, counting it his greatest happiness 
to provide for his wife and children and in every way promote their 
interests. 



LEOPOLD HEMBERGER. 

Leoj3old Hemberger, who has gained success as a farmer and now 
owns two hundred and forty acres of good land in Juniata township, 
was born in Baden, Germany, on the 5th of December, 1863. His 
parents, Constantin and Agnes (Hemberger) Hemberger, were also 
born in that country, where they passed their entire lives. The father 
died when our subject was but three years of age and the mother 
when he Avas a young man of twenty-five years. They were the par- 
ents of eleven children : Sigmond, who is living in Sangamon county, 
Illinois ; Gallus, a resident of Adams county, Nebraska ; Emil, a resi- 
dent of White Lake, South Dakota; Edward and August, both of 
whom are deceased ; Katie and Bertha, both of whom are residing in 
Germany; Charlotte, Amelia and INlary, all of whom are deceased; 
and Leopold, the youngest of the family. 

Leopold Hemberger attended school in Germany for eight years 
and received a most thorough training. As is customary there he 
went to school on Saturday as well as on the other week days and had 
only six weeks' vacation in the entire year. As a youth he learned the 
shoemaker's trade and subsequently when seventeen years of age emi- 
grated to the LTnited States, making his way at once to Springfield, 
Illinois. He there found work as a farm hand and was so employed 



U2 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

for three and a half years, after which he came to Adams county, 
Nebraska. He had saved his money carefully and was able to pur- 
chase a farm in Cottonwood township, which he operated successfully 
until 1904. In that year he removed to his present place on section 7, 
Juniata township, and in the intervening twelve years has made many 
improvements upon the farm, which comprises two hundred and forty 
acres of excellent land. He understands thoroughly the various 
phases of agriculture and derives a good financial return from his 
labors. 

When twenty-three years of age Mr. Hemberger was united in 
marriage in Hastings, Nebraska, to Miss Elizabeth Fabry, by whom 
he has ten children, namely: John, who is farming in Cottonwood 
township, this county ; Henry, an agriculturist of Roseland township ; 
Anna, the wife of Charles Kaiser, of Roseland township; Leo, at 
home; Teresa, who is keeping house for her brother Henry; and 
Ehardt, Francis, Frank, Joseph and Albert, all of whom are at home. 

jNIr. Hemberger supj^orts the democratic party at the polls but has 
never taken a verj^ active part in jjolitical affairs. He and his family 
are members of the Roman Catholic church, to the support of which 
they contribute. He began his career without capital other than his 
energy, good judgment and determination to succeed and these quali- 
ties have enabled him to gain a competence and ha^e also won him the 
respect and esteem of those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



STEPHEN FABER. 



Stephen Faber has made many improvements upon his farm on 
section 28, Juniata township, and is recognized as a substantial citizen 
of his community. He was born in the grand duchy of Luxemburg 
on the 13th of JNIay, 1865, of the marriage of Peter and Elizabeth 
(Kertz) Faber, who passed their entire lives in that country. They 
M'ere the jjarents of six children, namely: John Peter, a resident of 
Luxemburg; Peter, deceased; Harry and Elizabeth, both of Avhom 
are living in Luxemburg; Stejshen; and Susan, a resident of Paris, 
France. 

Stephen Faber received a good education in the schools of his 
native land and remained at home until he was seventeen years of age. 
He then began working for others and so continued in Luxemburg 
for six years. At the end of that time he emigrated to the LTnited 
States as he desired to take advantage of the opportunities offered 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 143 

by a comparatively new country. He located at Maryville, Missouri, 
where he worked for a few months, after which he removed to 
Holdredge, Nebraska. Not long afterward he arrived in Hastings 
and for three years worked as a farm hand in that vicinitj\ During 
the ten years following he operated rented land and carefully saved 
his money with the view of purchasing a farm. At length his ambi- 
tion was realized and he bought a good tract of land in Ayr townshij), 
on which he lived for nine years and during that time brought the 
place to a high state of development. He next purchased his present 
farm of one hundred and forty acres on section 28, Juniata township, 
and is devoting his energies to its operation. He seldom fails to 
harvest good crops and also gives some attention to raising high gi'ade 
stock and finds both branches of his business profitable. 

In 1890 JNIr. Faber was united in marriage to Miss Susanna David 
and they have become the parents of nine children, namely: John, 
Anna C, INIary M., Pauline S., Peter N., William N., Albert P., 
Gertrude A. and Irena A., all at home. 

The democratic party has a stalwart supporter and advocate in 
Mr. Faber but he has been too busj^ with his business interests to take 
an active part in politics. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights 
of Columbus at Hastings and he and his wife are communicants of 
the Roman Catholic church. Mr. Faber deserves much credit for 
what he has accomplished as when he came to this country a young 
man of twenty-three years he was practically emj)ty-handed and, 
moreover, did not understand the customs of the jJeople. He has 
always worked hard and has managed his affairs well and is now the 
owner of a good farm and also a stockholder in the Roseland Elevator. 
He has not only won financial success but he has also gained the 
sincere respect of those with whom he has had dealings and there are 
manv who are his warm friends. 



EZRA E. SCHULTZ. 



Ezra E. Schultz is one of the active business men of Hastings, 
prominent, enterprising and progressive. He is the manager of an 
extensive commercial enterprise conducted under the name of Stephen 
Schultz, liis partners in the undertaking being Stephen and Harry E. 
Schultz of Hastings and Walter C. Schultz, of Kenesaw. They are 
dealers in agricultural implements, vehicles, harness and automobiles 
and maintain a chain of houses in this part of the state so that their 



144 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

trade covers a wide territory. Ezra E. Schultz is a most progressive 
young man, wide-awake, alert and determined in what he midertakes, 
and the record of his success should serve to inspire and encourage 
others. He was born in Toledo, Ohio, on the 23d of July, 1881, and 
is a son of Stej)hen and Johanna (Martin) Schultz. The family 
came to Nebraska in 1887, settling first at Kenesaw, where the father 
engaged in the blacksmith business, his activities along that line con- 
tinuing for several years, after which he extended the scope of his 
labors, becoming a dealer in agricultural implements in 1892. He 
remained in business at Kenesaw until 1907, when he removed to 
Hastings, opening an establishment at Second and Burlington streets. 
In 1910 he erected a fine business block containing twelve hundred 
square feet of floor space and two stories in height. In 1913 the garage 
was built, sixt}' by one hundred and twenty-five feet — a fireproof 
structure. They conduct a retail business, handling the Paige, Grant 
and Velie cars. 

Ezra E. Schultz was educated in the Kenesaw high school, the 
parents giving liberal educational advantages to their children, who 
were ten in number. Ezra E. Schultz is the eldest of the six who are 
yet living. He sjjent his youthful days under the jiarental roof and 
has always been associated with his father in business and under his 
direction received his business training. Three of the sons are now 
partners in this undertaking and aside from the main establishment 
at Hastings they have seven branch houses in Nebraska, situated at 
Juniata, Kenesaw, Heartwell, Holstein, Prosser, Giltner and Rose- 
mont. They carry the goods of the John Deere Plow Company and 
handle all kinds of agricultural implements, harness and vehicles, be- 
ing able to supply to the trade all that the best markets afford. 

Ezra E. Schultz was united in marriage to INIiss Ona Blythe, a 
daughter of A. B. Blythe, on the 12th of September, 1906, and they 
have one son, Dale. In religious faith the parents are JMethodists 
and are liberal and generous supporters of the church. INIr. Schultz 
also belongs to the ]\Iasonic fraternitj^ having attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is likewise a member of the 
Commercial Club and is interested in all that has to do with the up- 
building and progress of his city. In politics he is a republican and 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has 
never sought nor held public office. He enjoys motoring and hunting 
and is fond of outdoor life, turning thereto for needed recreation from 
the cares of an onerous and growing business. It is true that he 
entered upon a business already established, but in controlling and 
enlarging this many a man of less resolute spirit would have failed* 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY li5 

and his course demonstrates that success is not a matter of genius as 
held bj- some but is rather the outcome of sound judgment and ex- 
perience, supplemented bj' unfaltering industry. 



DIRK H. STROMER. 



Dirk H. Stromer was one of the pioneer settlers of Hanover 
township, Adams county, and, although he had many obstacles to 
overcome, he persevered and succeeded in gaining financial indepen- 
dence. His demise, which occurred in Hastings, October 24, 1914, 
Avas deeply regretted by his many friends. A native of Germany, he 
Mas born in 1846 and remained in that covmtry until 1866, when he 
accompanied his parents, Richard and Elizabeth Stromer, on their 
emigration to the new world. They located in Woodford county, 
Illinois, where the father rented land, and Dirk H. Stromer worked 
as a farm hand for three years, after which he was married and began 
farming on his own account, renting land for six years. In 1875 he 
came to Adams county, Nebraska, and the following year his parents 
also removed here and from that time until their deaths made their 
home Avith him. He purchas.ed railroad land in Hanover township 
and at once began its cultivation and improvement. There were the 
usual hardshijis of pioneer life to be encountered, conveniences were 
few and there was much hard work to be done, but as the years passed 
he had the satisfaction of seeing his farm brought to a higher state of 
development and of knowing that its value was constantly increasing. 
From time to time he purchased other land, owning in all one thousand 
five hundred acres. He followed general farming, raising both grain 
and stock, until January, 1906, when he retired from active life and 
took up his residence in Hastings, where his demise occurred on the 
24th of October, 1914. 

jNlr. Stromer was married JNIay 3, 1868, in Illinois to IMiss Johanna 
Williams, a daughter of John and INIattie Williams, natives of Ger- 
many, where the father passed away. The mother subsequently re- 
moved to the United States and died in Woodford county, Illinois, 
where she is buried. INIr. and jMrs. Stromer became the parents of 
eight children. Alma, who was born on the 23d of November, 1870, 
in Illinois, gave her hand in marriage to Wyatt Meester, a son of John 
and Jennie IMeester, of Hanover township, and they have five chil- 
dren. Eliza, who was born on the 12th of February, 1873, in Illinois, 
is the wife of Sam Yeatman, who is farming in Hanover township, 



146 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Adams county, and they have three children. Johann, who was born 
in Adams comity on the 15th of February, 1876, and is now living in 
Home City, Kansas, married JNIatilda Arnast and has two children. 
George was born on the 7th of October, 1878, and is now engaged in 
farming in Hanover township. He married Anna Kohl, by whom he 
has three children. Andrew, whose birth occurred on the 31st of ]May, 
1881, and who is living in Hanover township, married Kate INIeester 
and has tlu-ee children. Henry, who was born on the 17th of Sep- 
tember, 1883, and is now a resident of Hastings, married Lulu Kohl. 
William was born on the 26th of December, 1885, and is engaged in 
farming in Hanover township. He married Sarah Hardenstein and 
they have five children. Edward, who was born on the 14th of Novem- 
ber, 1888, married Elsie Sabbal and resides in Hanover township. 

Mr. Stromer supported the democratic party at the polls and 
served acceptably in a number of township offices. His religious faith 
was that of the Evangelical Lutheran church and he helped to build 
the house of worship. His success was due to his determination, his 
untiring industry and his good management and all who knew him 
recognized in him a citizen of sterling worth. His widow, who is well 
and favorably known in Hastings, resides at No. 310 West Fourth 
street. 



DAVID 3IAYS. 



David Mays has resided upon his farm in AVest Blue township 
for many years and has gained recognition as an efficient and energetic 
agriculturist. He was born in Wood county, Ohio, on the 26th of 
November, 1852, but when he was four j'ears old was taken by his 
parents to JNIercer county, Illinois, the journey being made by wagon. 
The father rented a farm there and devoted his time and attention to 
its operation for eight years. Subsequent to his demise his widow 
removed with her children to Kosciusko county, Indiana. 

David ]Mays received but a limited education as it was necessary 
for him to go to work when he was quite young. He was employed 
as a farm hand until he was twenty-three years of age, when he began 
renting land, so continuing until 1887. In the spring of 1888 he 
came to Adams county, Nebraska, and settled upon his present farm 
in West Blue township, which he had purchased from the railroad 
several j'ears previouslj'. Two years later, in the spring of 1890, his 
mother, sister and two brothers also came to this county and made 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 147 

their home with him for a time. The mother passed away in 1899 
and the other members of the f amilj^ married and estabh'shed homes 
of their own. JNIr. JNIays has brought his farm to a high state of de- 
velopment and the excellent condition in Avhich everything is kept 
testifies to his energy and good management. He concentrates his 
energies upon the cultivation of his land and derives a substantial 
income from his labors. 

]Mr. JNIays supports the democratic party at the polls but has 
never taken a very active part in i^ublic affairs. His religious faith 
is that of the Christian church. He has worked hard since boyhood 
and has not only gained a competence for himself but also provided 
for his brothers and sister until they were able to take care of them- 
selves. His many sterling qualities have commended him to the warm 
regard and the respect of those who have come into contact with him 
and he is one of the valued residents of his township. 



WILLIAM R. DUER. 



Death often removes from our midst those whom we can ill afford 
to lose and such Avas the feeling in Adams county when William R. 
Duer i^assed to the home beyond. He was born at Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana, on the 12th of INIay, 1836, and in the maternal line came 
from Scotch ancestry. He left Louisiana when his mother died and 
made his Avay to the home of an uncle in Cincinnati, Ohio, after Avhich 
he pursued his education in the schools of that city. He later re- 
moved to Illinois and turned his attention to farming, following gen- 
eral agricultural jnu-suits in that state for some years. In 1893 he 
arrived in Hastings, Nebraska, after Avhich he lived retired, enjoying 
a well earned rest. He had previously invested in farm lands in 
Illinois and he continued the owner of property in that state up to 
the time of his demise. In business affairs his judgment Avas sound 
and his indefatigable industrj^ won him the success which ultimately 
crowned his efforts and made him one of the well-to-do residents of 
Hastings. 

On ]May 9, 1861, ]\Ir. Duer was united in marriage to INIiss JMary 
C. Brown, a daughter of Bedford and Caroline Brown, of Kentucky. 
Their wedding was celebrated in Illinois and to them were born several 
children: Robert H., who Avas employed as engineer in the state 
Capitol of Illinois; Caroline A.; William S., who is engaged in fruit 
raising in Oregon; John S., Avho is connected Avith the Stitt garage 



148 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of Hastings; Charles B., living in New York city; and Bessie L., who 
became the wife of John B. Klein and died on the 24th of May, 1911. 
There are also five grandchildren. 

The death of the husband and father occurred Februarj' 28, 1911, 
and his remains were laid to rest in the cemetery at Hastings. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church and his political indorse- 
ment was given to the republican party but he never sought nor 
desired office of any kind, preferring to concentrate his energies ui:)on 
his business affairs and jjerform his public duties as a private citizen. 
He left to his family not only a comfortable competence but also the 
priceless heritage of an untarnished name, which, according to the 
wise man of old "is better to be chosen than great riches." JNIrs. Duer 
still survives her husband and is now in her seventy-fifth year. She 
is Avell known in Hastings, where she makes her home and where she 
has a large circle of warm friends. 



REV. HERIMAN F. RAMELOW. 

Rev. Herman F. Ramelow, pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran 
church of the JNIissouri synod at Kenesaw, is doing effective work for 
the moral advancement of his community and the upbuilding of his 
church and is held in high esteem. He was born on the 28th of 
February, 1887, in Cook county, Illinois, a son of Herman and ]Mag- 
dalena (Stiegemeyer) Ramelow, who are now residents of Thayer 
county, Nebraska. 

Rev. Herman F. Ramelow attended a parochial school in St. Louis 
and also the parochial and public schools near Brazilton, Kansas. He 
prepared for the ministry in Concordia College, at Springfield, Illinois, 
graduating from the theological course in 1911. His first charge was 
at Columbia^ Illinois, where he remained for two years, but in 1913 
he came to Kenesaw, where he has since remained. He is not only 
zealous in promoting the spiritual growth of the church but is also 
capable in furthering its material interests, and he has the hearty 
cooperation of his parishioners in carrying on the various phases of 
church work. His influence has also been strongly felt in the com- 
munity at large and he is always ready to support anj^ movement 
which seeks to advance the cause of right and justice. 

Rev. Ramelow was married on the 28th of December, 1911, to 
]Miss Cornelia jMiessler, of Carlinville, Illinois, and they have a 
daughter, Ruth. He takes a keen interest in public affairs and is a 




REV. IIKRJIAX Y. KAMEIJIW 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 151 

careful student of the political questions and issues of the day. He 
votes independently, as he believes that by so doing he can best serve 
the public welfare. 



WILLIAM MADGETT. 

William Madgett, mayor of Hastings and recognized as one of 
the prominent representatives of the republican party in Nebraska, 
has been well known in the business circles of his city for a number 
of years as a prominent real estate dealer, handling important prop- 
erty interests. He is a native son of New York, his birth having 
occurred in Broome county on the 9th of Jul}', 1878, his parents being 
James and JMary JNIadgett, of whom mention is made elsewhere in 
this work. During his youthful days he was brought to the west and 
he supplemented his district school training by further study in the 
schools of Hastings. He began earning his living by selling papers 
on the streets and, like many another self-made man, has risen to 
prominence, becoming a leader of public thought and action. When 
his school days were over he became identified with banking interests 
and for' nine years occupied the position of accountant. He then went 
to Holstein, Nebraska, where he organized the Holstein Bank, which 
he conducted for a brief jjeriod. He then returned to Hastings and 
opened a real estate office in connection with his brother. Since that 
time he has continuously ojierated in the real estate field here, has 
become the owner of valuable property, including one of the finest 
buildings in the city, and has negotiated many important realty trans- 
fers. His i)lans are well formulated, his enterprise is unfaltering and 
his enthusiasm is contagious. 

Mr. JNIadgett was married in 1899 to JNIiss Pauline E. Nance and 
they have a little daughter who bears the mother's name. Their re- 
ligious faith is that of the Episcopal chiu-ch, while in fraternal rela- 
tions JNIr. JNIadgett is well known as a Consistory JNIason, a Mystic 
Shriner and a member of the Knights of Pytliias. He has given his 
political allegiance to the reiiublican party since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise and has taken a more and more active part 
in politics as he has been aroused to the needs and demands of the 
hour. In 1915 he was elected mayor of Hastings and is giving to the 
city a businesslike, progressive administration based upon his tliorough 
knowledge of municipal conditions and problems — problems for which 
he finds a ready and correct solution. On account of friends urging 



152 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

him to do so he has become a candidate for the repubHcan nomination 
for governor. His position is never an equivocal one. He stands 
loyally for a cause in which he believes and he advocates woman suf- 
frage; conservation of the state's natural resources, such as rivers, 
streams and lakes for water power and irrigation purposes; loan of 
state school money on Nebraska farm mortgages; a more thorough 
and uniform system of public accounting, so the different offices will 
have a check on each other; a commission to pass upon the constitu- 
tionality and validity of proposed bills befoi'e they are enacted into 
law by the legislature; and a good roads law requiring more and 
better work done upon our public highways and providing that con- 
vict labor and the proceeds shall be appropriated b}^ the state for such 
purposes. Mr. ]\Iadgett regards a public office as a public trust and 
his loyaltj^ and progressiveness in the office of mayor indicate the 
course which he would follow should he become the state's chief 
executive. 



RAY SIPPLE. 



Among the wide-awake and enterprising 3^oung business men of 
Hastings is Raj^ Sipple, member of the Sipple Brothers Motor Com- 
pany. Adams county numbers him among her native sons, his birth 
having occurred in Holstein on the 4th of January, 1891. His par- 
ents are C. A. and Ella Sipple, who came to Nebraska in pioneer times 
and are still residents of this state. The father was engaged in the 
grain and livestock business at Norman, Holstein and Kenesaw. 

After acquiring his education by attendance at the public schools 
through the period of his boyhood and early j'outh, Ray Sipple began 
work upon his father's cattle ranch in Boone county and while thus 
employed learned the value of industry, perseverance and determina- 
tion. In ]\larch, 1914, he arrived in Hastings and in partnership with 
his brother Earl established the Sipple Brothers JNIotor Company. 
They handle the Ford cars for Adams county and also the Oldsmobile 
in five counties. They also conduct a rejiair business and deal in auto 
accessories. Both are active in the conduct and management of the 
business and in addition thej^ employ five men. Thej^ occujjy a room 
one hundred and twenty-five by forty-four feet in a two story brick 
building and have built up a business of large and gratifying pro- 
portions. 

On the 8th of February, 1911, IVIr. Sipple was united in marriage 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 153 

to Miss Cora Rice, a daughter of W. A, Rice. They attend the 
Methodist church and in the social circles of the city occupy an enviable 
position, having many warm friends in Hastings. JNIr. Sipple belongs 
to the Conmiercial Club and his political allegiance is given to the 
republican party. He is interested in all that pertains to the welfare 
of the community and cooperates in many plans for the public good. 
He represents one of the old and honored pioneer families of the 
county and the work which was begun by his father in early days in 
behalf of the county's development is being carried on by the son. 



JAMES F. CROWLEY. 

In no profession does advancement depend more entirely upon 
individual merit and ability than in the law and that James F. 
Crowley has gained recognition as a leading attorney is the result of 
his close application, thorough studj^ and fidelity to the interests of 
his clients. He was born in Ottumwa, Iowa, April 9, 1879, and is 
a son of Jerome and Agnes (Carney) Crowley, who in the fall of 
1884 left Iowa and came with their family to Hastings. Here the 
father engaged in business as a wholesale grocer, continuing active in 
that line until his death, which occurred in 190.5. His widow survives. 

After attending the public schools James F. Crowley continued 
his education in St. JNIary's College at St. JNIary's, Kansas, and after 
reviewing the business situation with its varied possibilities along 
industrial, agricultural, commercial and professional lines he de- 
termined u^jon the practice of law as a life work. Accord- 
ingly he began studying in the office of IMcCreary & Button at 
Hastings and was admitted to the bar on the 13th of June, 1901. He 
then entered upon the active practice of his profession, in which he 
has made steady advance and is now accorded a liberal clientage that 
has connected him with much imjiortant litigation heard in the courts 
of his district. He is felicitous and clear in his statement, strong in 
argument and logical in his reasoning, and the court records indicate 
that he has won many verdicts favorable to his clients. 

On the 10th of June, 1915, INIr. Crowley was married to Miss 
Blanche Cantwell, a daughter of Thomas J. Cantwell. They are 
Catholics in religious faith and Mr. Crowley belongs to Council No. 
1123 of the Knights of Columbus. He has served as grand knight 
and also as district deputy. He has membership with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and he gives his political allegiance to the 



154 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

republican party, taking an active interest in both county and state 
politics. He has served as a member of the central committee and 
for three terms filled the office of justice of the peace. He is fond 
of outdoor life and, indulging his taste in that direction, secures 
needed rest and recreation from the onerous duties of a professional 
career. He is a member of the Bar Association and he enjoys the 
confidence and high regard of his colleagues and contemporaries in 
practice. 



MORDECAI W. HENSLEY. 

JNIordecai W. Henslej^ is well known in Kenesaw, where he is liv- 
ing retired, and throughout the county is held in high respect and 
esteem. Although at the time of the Civil war he was living in Ken- 
tucky, where the sympathy with the Southern cause was very strong, 
he served in the Union army as he believed that the north was 
right. His birth occurred in Carter county, Kentucky, on the 
10th of November, 1842, and his parents, Madison M. and Elizabeth 
(Williams) Hensley, both passed away in that countJ^ He attended 
a subscription school for a few months a year but much of his time 
as a boy was given to helping with the work of the home farm. On 
the 11th of June, 1861, when not yet nineteen years of age, he enlisted 
in Company F, Fourteenth KentucW Volunteer Infantry, which 
engaged in several skirmishes Avith bushwhackers in Carter covmty 
before it was mustered into the United States service in November 
of that year. ]Mr. Hensley particijiated in fighting around INIiddle 
Creek, Kentucky, and Kingston, Georgia, and subsequently took 
part in the Atlanta campaign and witnessed the fall of that city. He 
was often in the thickest of the fight and saw General JNIcPherson 
killed. After the fall of Atlanta he fought in the battle of Nashville 
and in the engagements on the Tennessee river. On the 31st of Janu- 
ary, 186.5, he was discharged at Louisa, Kentucky, and returned 
home. For a long period after the close of hostilities feeling ran high 
in that locality against all who had served in the Union armj^ but 
IVIr. Hensley remained there five years in spite of the illwill which 
most of his neighbors bore him. At length, however, fiftj^ men 
banded together and attempted to capture him and it was with diffi- 
culty that he escaped into the timber, reaching the Ohio river, which 
he crossed. He decided never to return to Carter county and went 
to Andi-ew county, Missouri, where he purchased land, which he 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 155 

operated for ten j'ears. His next removal was to Claj^ county, Kan- 
sas, where he farmed for five years, and at the end of that time he 
located in Kearney county, Nebraska. After carrying on agricul- 
tural pursuits there for a similar period he took up his residence in 
Kenesaw, where he still lives. While actively engaged in farming 
he gained recognition as an efficient and successful agTiculturist 
and the competence Avhich he accunmlated now enables him to enjoy 
a period of leisure. 

INIr. Hensley was married on the 15th of October, 1865, to Miss 
Selah Ann JNIcGinnis, of Boyd county, Kentucky, who was born on 
the 6th of August, 1843, and died in Kenesaw on the 16th of Janu- 
ary, 1892. To their union were born four children, of whom three 
are still living, namely: jNIadison M., who is operating the lighting 
plant at Kenesaw; Joseph D., at home; and Mordecai W., a resident 
of Grafton, Nebraska. 

JNIr. Henslej^ has always supported the republican party, believ- 
ing firmly in its jDrinciples. He is identified with the local Grand 
Army post and greatly enjoys meeting with other Union veterans. 
In March, 1865, he was given the entered apprentice degree in Can- 
nonsburg Lodge, No. 383, A. F. & A. M., in June of that year 
became a Fellowcraft JNIason and on the 31st of August was made 
a JNIaster JNIason. At that time there was much feeling against the 
Masons in his locality and the meetings had to be held in secret. He 
now holds membership in Kenesaw Lodge, No. 144, of which he is a 
charter member. He exemjilifies in his life the teachings of Masonry 
and, moreover, has always been characterized by a strong public spirit 
which has led him to promote the general welfare in every way possi- 
ble. 



JOHN P. MADGETT. 



John P. INIadgett is a partner in the real estate firm of ]\Iadgett 
Brothers and as such occupies an enviable position in the business 
circles of Hastings. In this connection, moreover, he is a partner in 
the ownership of the INIadgett building, one of the fine structures of 
the city. He was born at Binghamton, New York, on the 3d of 
March, 1879, and is a son of James and INIary (Hayes) Madgett, 
who were natives of Ireland. The father was born in County Kerry 
in 1823 and died in Hastings at the very advanced age of ninety-one 
years. The mother was born in County Cork in May, 1845, and is 



156 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

still living in Hastings. James Madgett followed farming on the 
Emerald isle and afterward engaged in shipbuilding in England. In 
1866 he came to the United States, settling first in New York, where 
he engaged in railroad work, but after thirteen years or in 1879 
he ai-rived in Adams county, Nebraska, where he purchased 
land, casting his lot with the pioneer settlers of this section of the 
country. His first home was a half sod house and half dugout and 
there was a lean-to barn upon the place. He engaged in farming 
with an ox team, his place being on 32 ISIile Creek in Denver town- 
ship. Upon that farm he reared his family of six children, of whom 
John P. was the youngest. For many years the father carried on 
general farming and stock raising but in 1886 retired from active 
business life, although he continued to reside on his farm for some 
time. Later he removed to Hastings, where his death occurred. His 
religious faith was that of the Catholic church. 

John P. JNIadgett pursued his education in the district schools, in 
the city schools of Hastings and in Hastings College. He started out 
in life by selling papers on the streets of Hastings when a mere boy 
and at fifteen years of age he began work in the First National Bank. 
It was subsequent to that time that he attended college, for he had 
come to realize the value and worth of education as a preparation 
for life's jjractical and responsible duties. In early manhood he fol- 
lowed general office work and bookkeeping, remaining with the First 
National Bank for sixteen years, during which time he advanced 
through intermediate positions to that of assistant cashier, and his 
long connection with the bank plainly indicated his fidelity as well as 
his capabilit}\ In 1911 he joined his brother, ^Nlayor William JNIad- 
gett, in the real estate, insurance, loan and abstract business and they 
have since been active and successful along that line. They had laid 
out additions to the city of Hastings, have also handled lands in 
Oklahoma, Texas and Canada, and in addition to his operations in 
the real estate and loan field JNIr. JNIadgett is a stockholder in the 
First National Bank. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life JNIr. JNIadgett 
chose JNIiss JNIay Belle Parks, her j^arents being J. J. and Anna B. 
(Barton) Parks, who are natives of New Jersey and Georgia, 
respectively, and make their home in Hastings. The father, who came 
to Adams county in 1890, here devoted his attention to general agri- 
cultural pursuits for a decade but during the past sixteen years has 
lived retired. Our subject and his wife have a son, John Patrick, Jr., 
who was born on the 2d of October, 1910. 

In his political views JNIr, JNIadgett is an earnest republican, well 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 157 

informed on the questions and issues of the day, but has never been 
an office seeker. He is well known in fraternal circles, holding mem- 
bership in the IMasonic lodge, the Royal Arch chapter, the council and 
the Knights Templar commandery, in the last named sei-ving as cap- 
tain general. He is also an active member of the consistory and he 
belongs to Sesostris Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Lincoln. He is 
also identified with the Knights of Pythias, of which he is a past 
grand chancellor, having been unanimously chosen for the position 
of grand chancellor for the years 1913 and 1914. He has also been 
grand prelate and grand vice chancellor. His is an excellent record 
in the various relations of life, for fidelity to duty has been one of his 
watchword and progress has characterized him at every point in his 
career. 



CLARENCE EUGENE KIDDER, M. D. 

Dr. Clarence Eugene Kidder, a practicing physician and surgeon 
of Holstein, Nebraska, Avas born in Winnebago county, Illinois, 
October 3, 1881, his parents being B. F. and M. A. (Hewitt) Kidder. 
The father served for three years as a soldier in the Seventy-fourth 
Illinois Infantry during the Civil war and after the close of hostili- 
ties settled in Winnebago county, Illinois, Avhere he remained until 
1885, when he removed with his family to eastern Colorado, there 
taking up his abode upon a farm. He afterward became a resident 
of Greeley and it was during the period of residence of the family in 
that place that Dr. Kidder attended the graded schools, the high 
school and the normal school. He determined upon the practice of 
medicine as a life work and in 1910 entered upon preparation for the 
profession at Cotner University in Lincoln, Nebraska, from Avhich 
institution he was graduated in June, 1914. On the 1.5th of July of 
the same year he took up his abode at Holstein and in the intervening- 
period, covering about two years, has built up a large, extensive and 
gratifying practice. During the period in which he was pursuing his 
studies in Lincoln he was for eighteen months associated with the city 
physician there and thus gained broad and valuable practical experi- 
ence. He worked his way through college and thereby displayed the 
elemental streng-th of his character, his determination to secure an 
education being indicative of the success that will undoubtedly come 
to him as the years go by. 

On the 29th of July, 1914, Dr. Kidder was married to Mrs. 



158 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

]Martha Herrick, of Lincoln, and thej- have one cliild, Jeannette 
Helen. They hold membership in the Evangelical church and they 
IJi-ominently known socially, having gained many warm friends during 
the period of their connection with Holstein. In his political views 
Dr. Kidder is a republican, Avhile fraternally he is connected with the 
JNIasonic lodge at Lincoln and with the Knights of Pythias lodge at 
Osceola, Nebraska. He has many strong and admirable character- 
istics and by his well defined activity and laudable ambition is work- 
ing his way steadily upward. 



C. G. INGRAHAM. 



C. G. Ingraham, manager of the manufacturing department of 
J. H. Haney & Company and thus active in the business cn-cles of 
Hastings, is also a prominent figure in connection with political activ- 
ity and has served his city as mayor. He was born in Jackson county, 
jNIissouri, on the 2d of December, 1868, and is a son of Jacob and 
Phoebe (Gallahue) Ingraham. The father was a farmer bj' occupa- 
tion and at the time of the Civil war put aside all business and per- 
sonal considerations to serve as a volunteer in an Ohio regiment of the 
LTnion army, rendering valiant aid to his covmtry during the darkest 
hour in its history. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 

C. G. Ingraham, who was one of a family of seven daughters and 
two sons, pursued his education in the public schools of Kansas, the 
family having removed from JNIissouri to that state during his early 
childhood. He supplemented his public-school course by study in 
the normal college at Fort Scott, Kansas, and afterward learned the 
saddlery business, working at his trade in Fort Scott, Kansas. The 
year 1891 witnessed bis arrival in Hastings, where he continued to 
represent the same firm. He remained for five years or until financial 
conditions, caused bj^ the continued and excessive droughts in the 
state, compelled the closing of the shop. He then returned to Kansas 
and engaged in farming on the old homestead for five years. In 1900 
he again entered the employ of J. H. Hane^^ & Company and has 
since represented the firm, being one of its most trusted and its oldest 
employes in years of continuous service. He is thoroughly acquainted 
with every phase of the business and has ^\orked his way steadily 
upward until he occuijies the responsible position of manager of the 
manufacturing department. 

On the 15th of August, 1900, Mr. Ingraham was united in mar- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 159 

riage to INliss Effie M. Worthy, a daughter of William C. Worthy. 
They have one child, JNIary Corrine. The religious faith of the fam- 
ily is that of the ]Methodist church. In his political views Mr. 
Ingraham is a democrat and is a recognized leader of his party in 
Hastings and this section of the state. He is now acting as chair- 
man of the democratic county central committee and also as president 
of the Wilson & ^Marshall Club. He served for two terms as a mem- 
ber of the city council and was then elected mayor of Hastings, dur- 
ing which time he made an excellent record for efRciencj^ and for 
businesslike methods in conducting municipal affairs. During his 
administration there was passed an ordinance requiring railroads to 
install and maintain at their own expense lights at the crossings. An 
excellent traffic ordinance was also j^assed, and over one hundred 
electroliers were installed, ninetj^ intersection lights and one hundred 
and fourteen bracket lights, nine miles of new line and three hundred 
and fifty new services, while a reduction of almost fifty per cent was 
made in the electric rates. jNIr. Ingraham also succeeded in reducing 
the indebtedness of the city, which at the time he took office on the 
8th of April, 1913, amounted to twenty-two thousand five hundred 
and seventy-four dollars. jNIoreover, he so managed financial inter- 
ests that the close of his term saw an excellent balance in the treasury. 
Many other evidences of his tangible public spirit might be cited, 
but these are sufficient to indicate that his administration was one 
which wrought for great good to the public. ]Mr. Ingraham is also 
a believer in woman suffrage. Fraternally he is a Royal Arch ISIason 
and a Modern Woodman. He has a wide acquaintance and all who 
know him sjjeak of him in terms of high regard. Even those who oppose 
him f)olitically acknowledge his honesty and recognize his devotion to 
the public welfare. He is straightforward, reliable and thoroughly 
honest in all that he undertakes and he never hesitates to express his 
convictions clearly and unequivocally. 



J. W. LINGER. 



J. W. Unger is a prominent farmer and live stock dealer of 
Adams county, having handled much blooded stock, and in this con- 
nection he has done much to improve the grade of stock raised in this 
part of the state. He now makes his home in Juniata and still gives 
personal supervision to the management of his business interests, 
although he is now in the seventy-eighth year of his age. He was 



160 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 15, 1838, a son of 
John and Elizabeth (Faust) Ujiger, both of whom were natives of 
Pennsylvania and representatives of old Pennsylvania Dutch fami- 
lies. The mother died during the early boyhood of her son, J. W., 
and the home was broken up. In his seventeenth j'ear he came west, 
locating at Pawpaw, Lee county, Illinois, where he remained until, 
aroused by a spirit of patriotism, he enlisted in 1862 in defense of the 
old flag, joining Company K of the Seventy-fifth Illinois Regiment 
to serve for three years or during the war. He remained with his 
command until discharged at the close of hostilities. He had been 
wounded in the battle of Stone River, a ball striking a finger on his 
right hand. He never left his company, however. He took part in 
the battle of Perryville, where after an hour and a half's hard fight- 
ing there were only two hundred and fifty men left out of the thou- 
sand who entered the engagement. He participated also in the bat- 
tles of Nashville, Chickamauga, Pine IMountain, Lookout INIountain 
and Ringgold and with his command proceeded into Alabama and 
took part in a number of engagements in that state. He was also in 
the battle of Love joy Station, of Franklin, Tennessee, Libert)^ Gap 
and ^Vhiteside and Avhen the war was over he returned to his home 
with a most creditable military record, having proven his fidelity and 
his bravery on many a hotly contested battlefield. 

For some time after the war ISh: Unger remained a resident of 
Illinois and then removed to Chariton county, JNIissouri, where he 
spent twelve years. On the expiration of that period he established 
his home in JeflPerson count}^ Nebraska, where he remained for ten 
years, and in 1892 he went to Oxford, Nebraska, but in 1893 removed 
to Prosser, continuing his residence at that place for nine or ten 
years, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits. He 
then came to Juniata, where he has since resided save for a period of 
five years spent in the city of Hastings and two and one-half years in 
Colorado. He has always followed farming and is one of the most 
enterprising and progressive agriculturists of this part of the state. 
Ever a lover of good horses, he has kept some fine blooded stock and 
was one of the first in this part of the state to invest in blooded im- 
ported stable horses. He has likewise engaged in raising fine hogs and 
both BraHches of his business' have proven profitable. He is today 
th^ owner of one hundred and sixty acres of valuable farm land near 
INIaywood in Lincoln county. His business affairs have ever been 
carefully conducted and well directed energy has brought him success. 

In 1862 JNIr. Unger was united in marriage to ]Miss Rebecca Brit- 
ton and they became the parents of four children; John Sherman, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 161 

living in Colorado; Susie, the wife of Ed Carroll, of Juniata; Ada, 
who gave her hand in marriage to George Pratte, of Juniata; and 
Louie, who is the wife of Lester Fairbanks of this county. The wife 
and mother passed away in August, 1895, and her death was deeply 
regretted not only by her immediate family but also by many 
friends. 

In politics Mr. Unger has been a lifelong republican, always 
indorsing the party since age conferred upon him the right of fran- 
chise. He belongs to Hastings Post, G. A. R., thus maintaining 
pleasant relations with his old army comrades, and he likewise belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while his religious faith 
is that of the JNIethodist Episcopal church. Those who know him 
esteem him highly, for his has been an upright career characterized 
by public-spirited citizenship, by enterprise and industry in business, 
by reliability in all trade transactions and by strict honor in liis rela- 
tions with his fellowmen. 



WILLIAM M. DUTTON. 

William M. Dutton, manager of the wholesale saddlery house of 
J. H. Haney & Company and thus active in one of the foremost busi- 
ness enterprises of Hastings, was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, on the 1st 
of JNIarch, 1859, and is a son of Basil T. and Mary A. (JNIendell) 
Dutton. The father was a native of IMarietta, Ohio, and the mothei-'s 
birth occurred in Wellsburg, West Virginia. ]Mr. Dutton was a con- 
tractor and in early life removed westward to Iowa, making his home 
for a considerable period in Oskaloosa, where he was not only active 
in business as a contractor but was also a leading member of the Bap- 
tist church. 

AVilliam M. Dutton completed his education in the Oskaloosa 
high school and there received his business training, making his initial 
step in business in Oskaloosa in connection with merchandising. In 
1886 he removed to Nebraska and with J. H. Haney and W. A. 
McKay organized the J. H. Haney & Company and has since been in 
active control of the business. It is one of the most extensive and 
important manufacturing and industrial enterprises of this part of 
the state. He thoroughly understands the trade in every department 
and is thus able to direct the labors of the employes so that they pro- 
duce maximum results with minimum efforts. He is also interested 



162 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

in the firm of J. H. Haney & Company at Omaha, wholesale manu- 
facturers of saddlery and harness. 

In 1887 ]Mr. Button was united in marriage to Miss Kitty INI. J. 
Loughridge, a daughter of James P. and Emilj^ (Bean) Loughridge. 
To them have been born four children, as follows: Florence JNIay, 
who is a graduate of the high school, ]\Iilwaukee-Downer College and 
the University of Nebraska and who is now the wife of Barton 
Greene, an attorney of Lincoln, by whom she has one child ; George 
Reynolds, who is engaged in business with his father at Hastings; 
Armilda, a senior in the high school; and William, Jr., a soi^homore 
high school student. 

In politics Mr. Dutton is independent and feels himself in no way- 
bound by party ties. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of 
Pythias. His attention has been given in undivided manner to his 
business affairs and since 1886 he has figured continuously and pronii- 
neatly in harness manufacturing circles of central Nebraska. 



SAMUEL ALEXANDER. 

Among the pioneers of Adams county was Samuel Alexander, 
who engaged in homesteading for some time. He became the first 
postmaster of Hastings and in the discharge of his duties Avas eflicient 
and courteous, thus gaining the commendation of his fellow citizens. 
He was born January 16, 1842, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was a 
son of William and Agnes (Black) Alexander and was of Irish 
extraction. His education was received in the common schools of 
Clarinda, Iowa, and in early manhood he joined the Union army, 
serving at the front until he was honorably discharged in 1864. Later 
in that year he came to Adams county and took up a claim Avhere 
Hastings now stands and he was also one of the early settlers of Lin- 
coln. He engaged in farming and proved very successful in that con- 
nection and after the town of Hastings was established took a very 
active jiart in public afi^airs. He was the first postmaster of the town, 
was a member of the city coimcil and was elected maj^or on the temper- 
ance ticket, serving in that office for four years. He also held other 
minor jjositions of trust and at all times proved a capable and consci- 
entious official. He was not only interested in politics and municipal 
government but also in the moral and educational advancement of 
his communit}' and was one of the leaders in the establishment of 
Hastings College. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 163 

In 1870 JNIr. Alexander was united in marriage to jNIiss Harriet 
R. Phillips, a daughter of Russell and Rachel (Bristol) Phillips. 
She is the only survivor of a f amilj^ of eight children. Although born 
in Erie, Pennsylvania, she attended school in Nebraska and Iowa, 
her family being pioneers of those states. By her marriage she became 
the mother of five children : Agnes, who is the wife of William Duer, 
of Sutherlin, Oregon, and has three children; Rachel, who is now 
JNIrs. Joe Webster, of Lincoln, and has a daughter; Esther H., who 
gave her hand in marriage to Herbert Young, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
and has two living children and one deceased; Frances, who married 
George Van Antwerp and has a son; and Samuel R., a resident of 
Montana. 

JNIr. Alexander indorsed the principles of the republican party 
but felt at liberty to vote independently if he considered the candi- 
date of the opposing party better fitted for the office in question. 
He gave his religious allegiance to the United Presbyterian church 
and was always one of the first to champion a movement along the 
line of moral jirogress. He was an honored member of the Pioneers 
of Nebraska and for many years was a witness of the development 
of this part of the state, residing here from 1864 until his death in 
April, 1908. He is buried at Hastings. Although he has passed 
away, the influence of his life and his work is still felt and his many 
friends cherish his memory. 



JOHN A. LAWLER. 



John A. Lawler, devoting his energies to law jiractice at Has- 
tings, is one of the younger members of the bar who has already 
attained a j)osition that manj' another representative of the profes- 
sion might well envy. ■ He was born in Gladstone, INIichigan, on the 
18th of January, 1889, a son of Thomas C. and ]Matilda J. Lawler, 
the former special agent and insurance adjuster. The family located 
in Hastings in 1900 and the parents still remain residents of this 
city. 

John A. Lawyer was a lad of eleven years when the family 
removed to Hastings and in the public schools he continued his edu- 
cation, while later he became a student in the Kearney IMilitary Acad- 
emy, from which he was graduated with the class of 1910. He then 
entered upon the study of law in the L^niversity of Nebraska, com- 
pleting his course by graduation in 1913. He then opened his office 



164 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

in Hastings and has been very successful in following his profession. 
Along with those qualities indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, rapid, 
logical mind, plus the business sense and a ready capacity for hard 
work, he brought to the starting point of his career certain rare gifts 
— eloquence of language and a strong personality. An excellent 
presence, an earnest, dignified manner, marked strength of character, 
a thorough grasp of the law and the ability to accurately aj)ply its 
principles are factors in his elFectiveness as an advocate. 

In his political views Mr. Lawler is a democrat and was one of 
the organizers and served as first president of the Young JNIen's 
Democratic Club of Adams county during the last campaign. In 
November, 1914, he was elected justice of the peace on the democratic 
ticket and is now filling that position. In religious faith he is an 
Episcopalian and is serving as vestryman and treasurer of St. ]\Iark's 
Episcopal church. In Masonry he has attained the third degree in 
the blue lodge and in his life he exemplifies the beneficent spirit of 
the craft. He also belongs to the Hastings Bar Association, of 
which he is the secretary. He is regarded by contemporaries and col- 
leagues, as well as by the general public, as one of the rising young 
lawyers of his part of the state and already his position is a most 
creditable and enviable one. He was a candidate for nomination at 
the April, 1916, primaries of the democratic party for county attor- 
ney. 



EDWIN SMITH. 



Edwin Smith, a retired farmer residing in Hastings, is widely 
known throughout the county and his sterling worth is indicated in 
the fact that those who have been most closely associated with him 
are his stanchest friends. He was born in New York in 1842 and is 
a son of John and Keziah (Hallock) Smith, both also natives of 
that state. He attended the common schools until fifteen years of 
age and in 1863, when twenty-one years old, enlisted in Company G, 
One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, having 
removed to Marshall county, Illinois, earlier in that year. He 
remained with his command until honorably discharged from the 
military service on the 28th of October, 1864, when he returned to 
Illinois. He continued to farm there until 1876, in which year he 
came to Adams county, Nebraska, and bought eighty acres of land in 
Ayr township. He devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits and 
lived upon his farm until 1905, when he removed to Hastings, where 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 165 

he has since lived. He was very industrious and as the years passed 
his well directed labors yielded him such large returns that he was 
able to accumulate a competence that now enables him to enjoy a 
period of leisure. 

Mr. Smith was married in 1882 to ]Mrs. Isabelle (Herlinger) 
Campbell. By her former marriage she had a son, Ira, who was 
born on the 2d of June, 1876, in Pennsjdvania but was brought by 
his parents to Adams county in 1878. He attended the country 
schools until he entered the high school at Hastings and after com- 
pleting the course there continued his studies in the University of 
Nebraska at Lincoln, graduating from the Liberal Arts College of 
that institution in 1901. He devoted his life to the profession of 
teaching and was for some time superintendent of schools at Nelson, 
Nebraska, and also taught summer schools at Geneva, Nebraska. 
His untimely death occurred on the 25th of August, 1906. He was 
married in 1902 to JNIiss Anna Stein, a daughter of John Stein, an 
early settler of Adams county, and to them was born a daughter, 
Dolores, whose birth occurred in 1903. She and her mother are now 
living in Hastings. ]\Irs. Smith died in Hastings in 1906. In 1908 
Mr. Smith was again married, jNIrs. Sarah (Glazier) Garries becom- 
ing his wife. She Avas born in Ireland in 1848 but in 1852 accom- 
panied her parents to America, the family home being established 
first in Canada. Subsequently a removal was made to JNIichigan and 
in that state she was married to Charles Garries, a farmer who about 
1888 removed with his family to Adams county, Nebraska. He 
became the owner of a good farm six miles north of Hastings and 
resided there until 1905, when he retired and moved to Hastings, 
where he died not long afterward. To him and his wife were born 
six children, four sons and two daughters. William Henry, who was 
born in 1864, is an evangelist and is living in Falls City, Nebraska. 
He has two children. George EdAvard, whose birth occurred in 1867, 
is an implement dealer of Bentley, Alberta, Canada, and is married 
and has seven children. John Hollis was born in 1869 and is farming 
four miles northwest of Hastings. He is married and has a daughter. 
Rosa Anne, born in 1872, became the wife of Robert Eenfield, of 
Hastings, and died in 1904, leaving two children. jNIary Elizabeth, 
who was born in 1874, is the wife of Elmer Stedman, of Denver and 
has one child. Arthur Hugh, born in 1881, is farming near Caster, 
Alberta, Canada, and is married and has four children. 

JMr. Smith is a democrat in his political belief and served for a 
number of years as school treasurer and township assessor and treas- 
urer. He is a member of Silas A. Strickland Post, No. 13, Civil ^Var 



166 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Veterans, and has held all of the offices, including that of commander, 
in which he is now serving. The JNIethodist Episcopal church profits 
by his support and all measures seeking the moral advancement of 
his commmiity receive his cooperation. The success which he has 
gained is the direct result of his enterprise and careful management 
and his many friends are glad that he is now able to enjoy a period 
of leisure. 



J. F. GANGWISH. 



J. F. Gangwish, who carries on general farming in Juniata town- 
ship, was born in Baden, Germany, on the 31st of May, 1855, his 
parents being J. F. and ]Mary (Earth) Gangwish, who were also 
natives of the fatherland, where they spent their entire lives, ]Mr. 
Gangwish devoting his attention to general farming. In the family 
were five children, namely: J. F., of this review; Victor E., a resi- 
dent of Adams county, Nebraska; Karl, who is deceased; Bernhardt, 
living in New York city ; and IMary, who is still in Germany. 

J. F. Gangwish obtained his education in the common schools of 
Germany, where he also attended high school. He came to the United 
States in 1871, settling in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and in that sec- 
tion of the country worked in the coal mines and also engaged in 
railroad work. There he remained until 1879, when he came to 
Nebraska, casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Adams county. 
He took up his abode on section 27, township 7, range 11, and under- 
took the task of converting the wild land into prodvictive fields. As 
the 5'ears went on his labors were attended with good results and his 
farm became a valuable property. He added many fine modern im- 
provements, erected an attractive residence, a substantial barn, and 
also a silo and has built a fine elevator thirty by forty feet with twenty- 
one-foot studding. He now owns three hundred and twenty acres of 
rich and productive land and his farm is one of the most thoroughly 
modern in its equipment and accessories. He has given much atten- 
tion to the raising of high grade stock, which has constituted an im- 
portant feature of his business. He is also a director of the Farmers 
Elevator Comi^any of Juniata, with which he has been oflScially con- 
nected for twelve years. 

In 1885 ]\Ir. Gangwish was united in marriage to INIiss Rosalia 
IVIecham and to them have been born thirteen children, as follows: 
Elmer, who lives a mile north of his father's farm; Harrison, who 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 169 

lives two miles south of the home place; Carl and Earl, twins, the 
latter living a mile southwest of Juniata ; Bertha, who gave her hand 
in marriage to C. W. Leopold; Albert, Rebecca and Raljjh, who are 
still under the parental roof; Letha and Retha, twins, also at home; 
Meton, at home ; Af ton, who is deceased ; and Fern. 

In his political views Mr. Gangwish is now a democrat but for- 
merly gave his allegiance to the republican party. He has served as 
justice of the peace and as road boss and is always interested in plans 
and measures for the public good. He was reared in the faith of the 
Catholic church and fraternally he is connected with the JNIodern 
Woodmen and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has 
never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new 
world, for in this country he found the opportunities which he sought 
and in their improvement has advanced steadily, becoming one of the 
substantial and prosperous farmers of the district in which he lives. 
Wherever known he is held in high esteem and most of all where he 
is best known. 



COLONEL H. HANSELL. 

IMercantile interests find a worthy reiiresentative in Colonel H. 
Hansell of the Vastine Hansell Clothing Companj', conducting busi- 
ness on West Second street in Hastings. He is wide-awake, alert 
and enteri^rising and his well defined plans have carried him steadily 
forward to success. He was born in one of the oldtime log cabins 
of Franklin county, Iowa, on the 26th of December, 1871, his par- 
ents being George W. and Laura B. (Smith) Hansell. The father 
was born in Pennsjdvania in the year 1830 and passed away in 1887, 
while the mother, who Avas born in Rhode Island in 1836, is still liv- 
ing at Hamilton, Iowa, and has almost reached the eightieth mile- 
stone on life's journey. The father was a farmer by occupation and 
on making his way westward to lo^a settled in Franklin county. He 
had made the journey on horseback and after reaching his destina- 
tion traded his horse for oxen, with which he did his farm work, hitch- 
ing the team to a breaking plow with which he turned the first fur- 
rows in the fields. He lived in a log liouse and continued to spend 
his remaining days in that district. He took an active part in all the 
affairs of the community, filled the position of county supervisor, 
gave his political allegiance to the republican party and was a con- 
sistent and helpful member of the IMethodist church, aiding in organ- 



170 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

izing the church near his home. His business aif airs were carefully 
and conscientiously conducted and success attended his labors. He 
became the owner of considerable land and won a place among the 
extensive stockmen of the district, raising shorthorn cattle and Ches- 
ter White hogs. His efforts did not a little to improve the grade of 
stock raised in his part of the state. 

Colonel H. Hansell was the youngest in a family of four children. 
He attended the district schools of Fi'anklin county and also the 
Highland Park Business College at Des jNIoines, Iowa. He spent 
his boyhood days upon the home farm and after becoming familiar 
with all the duties incident to the work of the fields engaged in mer- 
chandising at Hansell, Iowa, a town founded by his father. In that 
field of activity he continued active until he removed Avestward to 
York county, Nebraska, in ISdi, at which time he became the cash- 
ier and a stockholder and director of the First State Bank of Lush- 
ton, Nebraska. In 1897 he removed to Bradshaw, where he accepted 
a similar position in the Bank of Bradshaw, and in April, 1898, he 
arrived in Hastings, where he became connected with the cold storage 
business as a member of the Hastings Produce Company. That 
business was eventually merged into the Beatrice Creamery Com- 
panj% of which JNIr. Hansell became a stockholder and the local mana- 
ger, continuing his activity in that field through eighteen years. He 
became connected with the Vastine Hansell Clothing Company when 
he withdrew from the creamer}^ business and he is also president of 
the Hastings Brewing Comj^any, of which he was one of the original 
stockholders. The clothing business is now growing steadily and 
their patronage is well deserved, for their methods measure up to the 
highest commercial standards. 

In 1893 JNIr. Hansell was united in marriage to JMiss Ora JM. Gib- 
son, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Alexander J. and 
Hannah Gibson, both natives of Pennsylvania. jNIr. Gibson partici- 
pated in the Civil war as a gunner in an artillery regiment from 1861 
until 1865 and after the close of hostilities removed from Illinois to 
Iowa. In the latter state he successfully carried on general agricul- 
tural pursuits until 1891, when he embarked in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Hansell, Iowa. He is a man of retiring disposition but recog- 
nized worth and is noAv living with his wife at Hampton, Iowa. ]Mr. 
and JNIrs. Hansell have a son, Paul G., who was born on the 27th 
of July, 1906. 

]\Ir. Hansell belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
but otherwise has no membership connections with lodge, church or 
club and he is without political aspiration, preferring to concentrate 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 171 

his vmdivided attention upon his business interests, which are wisely 
directed and which have resulted in the attainment of a gratifying- 
measure of prosperity. 



WILLIAM C. HINES, D. V. M. 

Dr. William C. Hines, of Kenesaw, has gained a large and 
profitable practice as a veterinarian and has won high standing pro- 
fessionally. He was born on the 10th of ]May, 1880, in Science Hill, 
Pulaski county, Kentucky, a son of Shelton and Nancy (De Board) 
Hines. The mother, who was born near Bethel, Casey county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1847, died in 1882 and the father subsequently married jNIiss 
Siotha Carson, a daughter of George and Polly (Girdler) Carson, 
who spent their entire lives in Kentucky. Mrs. Hines is still living 
and makes her home with the Doctor. 

Shelton Hines, the Doctor's father, was born in Pulaski county, 
Kentucky, December 22, 1845, and at the time of the Civil war en- 
listed on the 4th of August, 1863, as a private of Company D, 
Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry, which fought on the Union side, serv- 
ing two years and two months. At the battle of King Saltville, Vir- 
ginia, he was wounded in the hand and thigh by the same bullet and 
later in the battle was captured by the Confederates. He was con- 
fined in Libby prison for seven months and seventeen days and during 
that time was almost starved. The privations which he endured there 
so weakened him that he was almost helpless for two years after his 
release as for twenty-one months after he was wounded he was unable 
to walk. He was honorably discharged October 23, 1865, on the sur- 
geon's certificate of disability. At length he regained his strength 
and about 1870 purchased a farm, which he operated until 1903. In 
that j^ear he retired and removed to Kenesaw, Nebraska, where he 
resided until his demise on the 10th of November, 1908. His political 
allegiance was given to the republican party and his religious belief 
was that of the JNIethodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Hines received a common school education in Kentucky and 
after leaving school worked on the home farm for a time and also 
partially learned the carpenter's trade. In June, 1898, he removed 
to Kenesaw, Nebraska, and for two years thereafter was employed 
as a farm hand. The next two years were spent as a fireman on the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, during which time he made 
his home in jNIcCook, Nebraska. Later he went to ]Marshall, Texas, 



172 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

and for six weeks worked for the Texas & Pacific Railroad. Dur- 
ing the following ten years he was in the employ of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad as fireman, engineer and brakeman. Hav- 
ing determined to enter the veterinary profession, he next spent three 
3'ears at the JMcKillip Veterinary College in Chicago and was gradu- 
ated from that institution in A^jril, 1912, with the degree of D. V. ]M. 
He at once located at Kenesaw, Nebraska, where he has since engaged 
in the active practice of his jirofession. He has demonstrated his 
ability and although he has only been in practice for about four years 
he has secured a j)atronage that would be a credit to a man of much 
longer experience. 

Dr. Hines supj)orts the republican party at the polls and is now 
serving acceptably as a member of the toAvn board. He holds mem- 
bership in the ^Methodist Episcopal church and casts his influence on 
the side of righteousness and justice. He is well known in fraternal 
circles, belonging to the JMasonic order, in which he has taken thirty- 
two degrees, to the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Alpha 
Sigma, a college fraternity. He is also a member of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Firemen and Engineers. He has made many 
warm fi'iends in Kenesaw since his arrival here and is one of the most 
higlily esteemed and respected residents of the town. 



ALFRED METCALFE CLARK. 

Alfred ]Metcalfe Clark is now the oldest druggist in Hastings in 
3^ears of continuous connection with the trade. His name is insepa- 
rably associated with the commercial activity of the city, as enterprise 
and industry have brought him to a foremost position in the ranks of 
the leading business men of Adams county. He was born in Cass 
county, Illinois, March 16, 1862, his parents being Alfred M. and 
Nancy M. (Troutman) Clark. The father, who was a native of 
Wales, was bound out at the age of seven years and learned the tailor's 
trade. In the early '50s he became a resident of Illinois, removing 
from Kentucky to Jacksonville. He became the owner of farm 
lands in the latter state and at different periods he lived in Cass, 
Coles and Piatt counties, always following the occupation of farming 
and always taking an active and helpful interest in public affairs. 
He died in JMarch, 1880, at the age of sixty-five years and Avas long 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 173 

survived by his widow, who passed away in February, 1912, at the 
age of eighty-six years. 

Alfred JM. Clark pursued his education in the district schools 
of Cass county, in a private school at Charleston, Illinois, and in the 
high school of that jjlace. He received his professional training in 
the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, in which he completed a 
course in January, 1880. He sawed wood at night and performed 
other humble labor that would enable him to earn money wherewith 
he met the expenses of his pharmaceutical course. In 1880 he clerked 
in a drug store at Charleston, Illinois, and in 1882 removed to Areola, 
that state, where he had charge of a drug business until 1885, when 
he removed to Hastings. Here he continued in the drug business 
and in 1892 formed a partnership with A. H. Farrens, that connect- 
tion being maintained until June, 1893, since ^\hich time INIr. Clark 
has been alone in business. He has been associated with the trade 
longer than any other druggist of the city and he has a well appointed 
store on Second street, where he is accorded a liberal patronage. He 
has seen wonderful changes in the city, witnessing its growth along 
all lines of substantial imju'ovement and development whereby it has 
become the attractive modern city of today. He is likewise interested 
in several other business enterprises of Hastings aside from his drug 
store and his activities have at all times been wisely and carefully 
directed. 

In 1893 Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Florence Trout, 
of Areola, Illinois, a daughter of D. S. Trout, a wagonmaker of that 
place and an active business man and public-spirited citizen of the 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have become parents of two children: 
Alfreda, who is attending Downer College at JNIilwaukee, Wisconsin ; 
and Alfred JNIetcalfe, who is also in school. 

Mr. Clark belongs to various fraternal organizations. He is an 
active member of the Knights of Pythias lodge of Hastings and 
became a charter member of the Dramatic Order of the Knights of 
Khorassan. He is well known in ^Masonic circles, having attained tlie 
Knights Templar degree of the York Rite, and in the commandery 
he is an active worker, serving now as senior warden. He has also 
taken the Scottish Rite degrees and has held office in that branch of 
JNIasonry. He belongs also to the ^Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Mystic Legion of the Orient, in the organization of Avliich he was 
a prime mover and in which he has been an active worker. He votes 
with the republican party but has never held political office. He has 
served as a member of the school board, however, and is interested in 
plans and movements for the public good, cooperating heartily and 



174 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

earnestly along lines leading to public benefit. The history of 
Hastings is largely familiar to him, for his mind bears the impress of 
its early historic annals, while with the passing years he has taken an 
active part in shaping the material development and progress of this 
portion of the state. 



KARL D. BEGHTOL. 



Karl D. Beghtol attorney at law at Hastings now serving as 
police judge, was born in Shenandoah, Iowa, on the 22d of March, 
1876, a son of James V. and Edith (McCoy) Beghtol. The father 
is a physician and in the year 1882 removed with his family to Lin- 
coln, Nebraska. He afterward came to Hastings, where he is still 
engaged in the active practice of medicine and surgery, occupjang 
a prominent and enviable position in that connection. 

Karl D. Beghtol was educated in the public schools and in the 
high school of Friends, Nebraska, where he was graduated. He 
afterward took up the profession of teaching and became assistant 
principal of the Nebraska Institute for the Blind at Nebraska City, 
i-emaining there for a year. During his school work he specialized in 
the teaching of Latin and history. He afterward took the classical 
course at the University of Nebraska, specializing in languages for 
four years, and again he taught school, spending three years in that 
connection at Ogden, LTtah. Later he devoted a j^ear to teaching in 
the schools of Anaconda, JNIontana, and on the expiration of that 
period retired from the profession and became credit man for tlie 
Copper City Commercial Company of Anaconda. 

In 1905 ]Mr. Beghtol reentered the LTniversity of Nebraska for 
the study of law and on the completion of his professional course 
was graduated with the class of 1908. He then returned to Hastings, 
opened liis office and is enjoying a good practice. He holds a teach- 
er's life certificate in Nebraska but expects henceforth to concen- 
trate his energies upon his laAv practice, which is becoming continu- 
ally more extensive and of a more imj^ortant character. His legal 
learning, his analytical mind, the readiness with which he grasps the 
points in an argument all combine to make him a strong and capable 
lawyer, rendering him a formidable adversary in legal combat. 

On the 12th of October, 1910, INIr. Beghtol was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ena Brach, a daughter of William Brach, of Hastings. 
They have one child, Karl D., Jr. Mr. Beghtol gives his political 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 175 

allegiance to the republican party and was a candidate for the office 
of count J' attorney in 1912, but was defeated by a small vote, the 
Wilson ticket carrying everything with it. His religious faith is 
that of the Presbyterian church. Fraternally he is connected 
M-ith Acacia Lodge, No. 233, A. F. & A. M., also with the Royal 
Arch chapter of Anaconda, Montana, and with Anaconda Lodge, 
No. 239, B. P. O. E. He likewise belongs to a university fraternity, 
the Betha Theta Pi, and to the Pan Hellenic, T. N. E., the Phi Delta 
Phi and the the Theta Kappa Nu. Upon examination he won an 
honorary membership in an honorary legal fraternity. In the line of 
his profession he has membership with the Bar Association and in 
November, 1914, was elected police judge. He turns for recreation 
to fishing, hunting and various phases of outdoor life, which he greatly 
enjoys. Laudable ambition prompts his activity in his professional 
career and leads to his thorough preparation of cases. At no time 
has his reading ever been confined to the limitations of the questions 
at issue. It has gone beyond and compassed every contingency and 
provided not alone for the expected but for the unexpected, which 
happens quite as freqviently in the courts as out of them. 



WILLIAM M. LOWMAN. 

"William INI. Lowman, a prominent real estate dealer and capital- 
ist of Hastings, is now giving his attention to his private business 
afi^airs, although for a considerable period he figured prominently in 
financial circles as the i^resident of the Bank of Commerce. A native 
of Illinois, he was born in Toulon in 18.56, and was there reared and 
educated. In 1878 he arrived in Hastings and with his father, Davis 
Lowman, engaged in the real estate business under the firm style of 
D. Lowman & Son, opening their office on the 1st of January, 1879. 
The relation between them was maintained until January 1, 1886, 
when William M. Lowman succeeded to the business of the firm and 
has since been widely known as one of the most prominent real estate 
dealers of this part of Nebraska. He has negotiated many impor- 
tant realty transfers, is thoroughly conversant with property values 
and has utilized his opportunity for judicious investment, adding to 
his holdings from time to time until he now has important and exten- 
sive interests of that character. He also extended his activities into 
other fields, becoming a well known figure in banking circles as the 
president of the Bank of Commerce. He remained at the head of 



176 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

the institution for an extended period, wisely and capably directing 
its activities and shaping its policy and making it one of the foremost 
financial concerns of this part of the state. He continued as presi- 
dent until 1915, when he resigned, and has since concentrated his 
efforts upon his individual interests. 

In 1881 JNIr. Lowman was married to Miss Florence M. Garrett, 
of Sterling, Illinois, and to them have been born two children : Mrs. 
Vera G. INIcCleery and William JNI. Thirty-eight years have come 
and gone since JNIr. Lowman arrived in Hastings, which was then a 
small town giving little promise of future greatness. With its 
development he has been closely associated and as the years have 
passed on his work has been directly beneficial to the community. He 
can tell the story of the changes in Adams county, not as a matter of 
hearsay but as a matter of actual experience, and he has a wide 
acquaintance which includes all of the pioneer settlers as well as the 
majority of the more prominent later arrivals. 



BALTHAUSER GRUENER. 

Balthauser Gruener, deceased, was one of the well known far- 
mers of Juniata township and in his death the community lost a 
worthy and substantial citizen. He was a native of Germany, born 
July 23, 1849, and in the fatherland spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth. He was one of a family of six children and he received 
the usual advantages of boys of the middle class. He came to the 
United States in 1871, taking up his abode at INIendota, Illinois, where 
he resided for a few years, devoting his attention to farm work there. 
He afterward removed to Arkansas, purchasing eighty acres of land 
near Little Rock, and upon that place he continued for a number of 
years. He afterward became a resident of Iowa and purchased 
eighty acres of land near INIuscatine, devoting his time and ener- 
gies to the further cultivation and improvement of that tract until 
1888, when he came to Nebraska and bought a farm on section 
2.5, Juniata township. With characteristic energy he began the 
further development of this place and added to it many substan- 
tial modern imjjrovements He owned one hundred and sixty acres 
of land at the time of his death and was regarded as one of the enter- 
prising and progressive agriculturists of his community, devoting 
his attention to the work of the fields until his life's labors were 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 177 

ended on the 10th of July, 1899, when he had reached the age of forty- 
nine years. 

Mr. Gruener left a family to mourn his loss. He had wedded 
Miss Louisa Shaber, who was born in OberfuUbach in Coburg- 
Gotha, Germany. They were married in INIendota, Illinois, and to 
them were born seven children, as follows : Freda, wlio is the wife of 
Albert Shultz, of Denver township, Adams county, Nebraska; 
Edward, who is a resident of Roseland township, Adams county, 
Nebraska; May, who is the wife of Glen Christwell and lives near 
Hansen, this county ; Emma, who gave her hand in marriage to Wil- 
liam Wright, of Denver townshij), this county; and Frederick, Wil- 
liam and Ludwig, all at home. 

Since the death of her husband JMrs. Gruener has remained upon 
the home farm and has extended its boundaries by the purchase of an 
additional tract of forty acres. She is cultivating the farm with the 
aid of her younger sons and has made many substantial improve- 
ments upon the place. It is a fine tract of land devoted to general 
agricultural pursuits and she is a successful business woman. Mr. 
Gruener was a supporter of the republican party and his sons have 
followed in his political footsteps. He belonged to the German 
Lutheran church, in which his wife and children also hold member- 
ship, and the family is one of prominence and worth in the community. 
Mr. Gruener was a very substantial and progressive business man, 
thoroughly reliable in his dealings and having many good qualities 
which endeared him to his fellow citizens. 



LOUIS HADDEN. 



Louis Hadden, who owns a valuable farm in Blaine township, 
was born in Kendall county, Illinois, on the 28th of October, 18.54, 
and attended the common schools there until he was sixteen years of 
age. Subsequently he was a student in the Jennings Seminary at 
Aurora, Illinois, and after completing his education worked for his 
father until 1880. In that year he came westward, settling in Seward 
county, Nebraska, where he purchased a farm which he operated for 
two years. At the end of that time he sold that place and removed to 
Illinois, devoting two years to farming his father's land. In 188.5 
he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and for two years rented a farm 
three miles southwest of Hastings. He saved his money with the 
intention of buying land and in 1887 purchased his present farm in 



178 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Blaine toAvnshiiJ, three miles northeast of Hastings. He has since 
resided there and as the j^ears have passed has brought the farm to a 
high state of development. He seldom fails to gather good crops and 
has never had occasion to regret his choice of an occupation. - 

Mr. Hadden was married in Aurora, Kane county, Illinois, in 
1882 to JNIiss Hattie Tiifany, of Chicago, and they have three chil- 
dren. Lula, who was born in 1883 in Kane county, Ilhnois, married 
Guy Eastman, a banker of JNIitchell, Nebraska, by whom she has 
three children. Glen JNI., who was born in Kendall county, Illinois, 
in 1885, is living with his parents. Bessie, who was born in 1889 in 
Adams count)^ Nebraska, married Ai'thur Eastwood, a hardware 
merchant of JNIorrill, by whom she has a son and daughter. 

Mr. Hadden votes the republican ticket and for two terms served 
as township school director. Fraternally he is connected with the 
JNIodern Woodmen of America. He has based his success upon hard 
work and careful management and his career indicates what may be 
accomplished by persistent and well planned industry. 



JACOB F. HEILER. 



Jacob F. Heiler is chairman of the county board of supervisors, 
in which connection he is proving a capable official, discharging his 
duties with the promptness and fidelity that arises from a public- 
sjjirited devotion to the general good. He was born in Buffalo, New 
York, on the 6th of February, 1846, his parents being Jacob jNI. and 
IMargaret Heiler, both of Avhom are now deceased. The father de- 
voted his attention to the butchering business and thus provided for 
the support of his familJ^ He pursued his education in the schools 
of Buffalo and during the Civil war, M'hen still a youth in his teens, 
joined the army, becoming connected with the "boys in blue" of Com- 
pany B, Twenty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with which he 
served for eighteen months. He rendered valiant aid to his country 
and left the service at the close of the war in 1865. He then made his 
Avay to Iowa in 1866 and in 1867 came to Nebraska. Four years 
later, in 1871, he secured a homestead claim in Hamilton county and 
devoted the succeeding three years to general agricultural pursuits. 

In 1874. JNIr. Heiler removed to Hastings and for six years was 
in the employ of Staple & Dasher. On the exiDiration of that period 
he became connected with the INIarsh-Hunter Company, with which 
he continued for four years, and for one year he was with the Emer- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 179 

son establishment. Later he sj)ent one year as traveling salesman 
upon the road, representing the Minnesota Chief people, and at the 
end of that time turned his attention to the hardware trade. In 1890 
he embarked in business on his own account as a dealer in coal and 
remained active in that line vmtil 1907, when he sold out and practi- 
cally retired from business. In the meantime he had built up a trade 
of large and gratifying i^roportions that had brought to him substan- 
tial success and with the competence which came to him as the reward 
of his labor and close application he put aside business cares and is 
now practically living retired. However, he has served for five years 
as a member of the board of county supervisors and his present term 
will continue him in office for three years longer. 

On the 3d of July, 1879, Mr. Heiler was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine JNI. Fisher and thej' have one son, H. H., who is now 
a mail carrier. He is also connected Avith the Grand Amy of the 
Republic, with the Odd Fellows and with all the bodies of jNIasonry. 
In his political views he is a stalwart republican, believing firmly in 
the principles of the party, and for two terms he has served as a mem- 
ber of the city council. He cooperates in many plans and measures 
for the benefit and upbuilding of the community in which he makes 
his home and at all times manifests a public-spirited citizenship. He 
derives his income largely from property in Hastings, for he has 
made judicious investments in real estate. His social qualities and his 
personal worth have won him popularity wherever he is known and 
he is held in the warmest regard where best known. 



DAVID B. MARTI. 



David B. INIarti, a well known real estate dealer of Hastings, his 
activities covering a broad scope, was born in Pijier City, Illinois, 
December 17, 1877, his parents being Godfrey and Rosa (Conrad) 
jNIarti. The father was born in Bern, Switzerland, and is now living 
at the age of seventy years, his home being at Long Beach, Califor- 
nia. The mother, a native of Hanover, Germany, is now sixty-five 
years of age. Godfrey INIarti came to the United States when a youth 
of fourteen and lived at different towns in Indiana and Illinois and 
in Hannibal, INIissouri. In 1878 he removed to Butler county, Ne- 
braska, where he carried on farming, and still owns six hundred and 
forty acres of rich land, being numbered among the active farmers of 
the state for a considerable period, during which time he filled the 



180 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

office of county supervisor. In 1893 he came to Adams county, set- 
tling in Little Blue township, where he owns one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, known as Rattlesnake Farm, it having derived its name 
from the fact that there were many rattlesnakes upon the place in the 
early days. He lived on the Little Blue property for about fifteen 
years and was accounted one of the most prominent and progressive 
stockmen of the neighborhood. He was widely and favorably known 
and was identified Avith the Farmers Alliance and Avith the populist 
movement. He helped organize and Avas president in 1912 of the 
Farmers Grain & Supply Company of Hastings and Avas very active 
in affairs of public concern. In his political vicAvs he is noAv a Bryan 
democrat. He continued to engage actively in agricultural pursuits 
until 1908, Avhen he retired to Hastings, and in 1912 he removed Avith 
his Avife to Long Beach, California, Avhere they noAV make their home. 

David B. jNIarti, the eldest of their children, attended district 
school No. 33 in Little Blue toAvnship, folloAved by study in the Hast- 
ings high school and in Hastings College. He remained on the home 
farm until the age of tAventy years, at AA'hich time he began teaching 
in district school No. 33. In 1899 he became principal of the Hol- 
stein schools and in 1900 Avas made assistant instructor of science and 
mathematics in Hastings College. In 1901, hoAvcA'cr, he turned 
from the educational field to commercial life, and joined D. W. Ball 
in organizing the firm of Ball & Marti for the conduct of a book and 
stationery business, Avhich they carried on until 1905. During the 
succeeding tAvo years Mr. IMarti Avas engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in Hastings and in 1907 he became office manager of a AA'hole- 
sale and mail order house at Omaha. In 1911, hoAvever, he returned 
to Hastings, Avhere he has since been engaged in the real estate 
business, a part of the time Avith the firm of Higgenbotham & Pick- 
ens and a part of the time in connection Avith his brother, R. E. JNIarti, 
under the firm style of Marti Brothers. They have conducted a 
general real estate, loan and insurance business, handling insurance 
of all kinds, and their operations extend all over Avestern Nebraska. 
The firm is accorded a liberal clientage and is conducting an exten- 
sive business. They haAX erected a number of nice bungaloAvs and 
cottages and are doing considerable speculative building, erecting 
buildings on the east side for sale, Avhich they place upon the market 
at a reasonable price, selling at terms helpful to the purchaser. 
Their efforts have been an element in the material upbuilding of the 
city and Hastings has benefited bj^ their operations in the real estate 
and loan field. 

In 1899 David B. JNIarti Avas married to INIiss Hettie J. BroAvn, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY ISI 

who was born in Richardson county, Nebraska, a daughter of Charles 
W. and Ida Brown, natives of Pennsylvania and of Ohio respec- 
tively. Her father homesteaded land in Richardson county at an 
early day and became a very active business man and extensive stock 
dealer of that county, widely known because of the importance of 
his business affairs and his active support of measures for the gen- 
eral good. In 1905 he removed to Hastings, where he now lives 
retired, but is still the owner of four hundred acres of valuable land 
in Adams county, from which he derives a gratifying annual income. 
He is also an active member of the Presbyterian church. In the 
family of Mr. and Mrs. JNIarti are two sons, Lloyd and Paul. 

In his political views ]Mr. JNIarti is an earnest democrat and is 
now serving as a member of the Hastings city council from the 
fourth ward. During his teaching days he was identified with the 
Adams Countj^ Democrat and the Hastings Tribune in connection 
with reportorial and advertising work. His activities have reached 
out along many lines and always to the benefit and betterment of the 
community in which he has lived. He is now president of the Church 
Federation, a teacher in the Sunday school and an active member of 
the Presbyterian church, in which he is serving as an officer. He hiis 
done imjjortant and effective work in viplift campaigns, has been 
active in brotherhood work and, in fact, does everj-thing in his power 
to promote the moral progress of the community, that the individual 
may have a better, broader scope for the exercise of his activities 
along lines of constructive effort. 



CHARLES K. LAW SON. 

No history of Hastings would be complete without extended ref- 
erence to Charles K. Lawson, who is today the oldest retail merchant 
in the city in years of continuous connection with the business. He 
is familiar with every phase of the city's development and progress 
along commercial lines and his efforts have been of immense value 
in promoting the public welfare. He was born in Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania, August 4, 1846, and was only two years of age when his 
father died, after which he made his home with his grandparents in 
Erie. He was but eleven j^ears of age at the time of the death of 
his grandfather and was then thrown upon his own resources, since 
which time he has made his way in the world unaided, his success and 
advancement being attributable entirely to his own efforts. He 



182 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

worked in a factory at making oars for two svimmers and in the 
Avinter months worked for his board and the privilege of attending 
school. He afterward engaged in driving teams which were used 
in hauling oil from Titusville. Ambitious to secure an education, he 
utilized every opportunity that would enable him to advance in that 
direction, and after mastering the work of the public and high 
schools continued his course in an academy at Waterford, Pennsyl- 
vania. In 1863 he went to Greene county, Illinois, where he was 
emploj^ed at farm work through the succeeding winter. He pos- 
sessed considerable natural mechanical ingenuity and, removing to 
Oneida, Knox county, Illinois, there worked in a lumberyard for a 
year. He afterward clerked in a dry goods store for about a year, 
when, in connection with G. H. Pratt, he purchased the business. 
Energy, determination and industry stood them instead of capital 
and, concentrating their efforts upon their undertaking, thej' devel- 
oped the trade and conducted the enterprise successfully. 

In 1872 JNIr. Lawson started out to find a new location and on 
the 13th of July, of that year, decided on Hastings. JMuch of the 
land in this part of the state was still in the possession of the gov- 
ernment and the town had not yet been laid out. There had been a 
few homesteaders in the district in 1872 and ]\Ir. Lawson believed 
that the country would develop rapidly and that there would be 
opportunit)^ for the conduct of commercial interests at this point. 
Accordingly, ]Mr. Pratt shipped a carload of lumber from Rock 
Island and they built the first store on the town site. Samuel Alex- 
ander had alreadj' opened a store in a small shack, but ISIr. Lawson's 
was the first regular store building within the limits of what is now 
the city of Hastings. His place of business was at the corner of 
First street and Hastings avenue. JNIr. Pratt disposed of their store 
in Illinois and joined ISlr. Lawson in Hastings in December, 1872. 
The two i^artners, Avith their clerk, A. H. Cramer, kept bachelors' 
liall over the store. Their building Avas a tAvo story structure tAventy- 
two by eighty feet, and they carried a stock of groceries, hardAvare, 
imi^lements, stoves and other commodities needed in a jjioneer com- 
munity. The business Avas conducted under a partnership relation 
until 1877, Avhen they divided their interests, ]Mr. LaAVSon taking 
over the lands owned by the firm, Avhile ^Ir. Pratt had an equal 
amount in money. FolloAving the division of their interests INIr. 
Lawson, in 1878, formed a partnership Avith C. J. Hamot and 
erected a good brick store building near Hastings aA^enue on Second 
street. There he opened a stock of hardAvare and continued the busi- 
ness as a partnership until 1881, Avhen he purchased his partner's 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 183 

interest and continued to cany on the store alone. In the meantime 
he had become interested in the cattle business, owning a big ranch 
on the Loup river in connection with JNIr. Pratt. They were asso- 
ciated in that undertaking until 1890, when INIr. Lawson sold his 
interest in the cattle. In 1889 he established a branch store in Fair- 
bury, Nebraska, and removed to that place in order to personally 
superintend the business and place it upon a substantial basis. After 
two years he sold out there and in 1891 returned to Hastings. He 
continued to engage in the hardAvare trade here for several years and 
then, on account of his health, disposed of his store. Two years later, 
however, he reentered mercantile circles, becoming proprietor of his 
present store, which he has since successfully conducted. There is 
not another retail merchant in Hastings who was in business here at the 
time of his arrival, leaving him the pioneer in his field in this county. 
His activities have covered a broad scope and have been rewarded 
with a large measure of success. 

jNIr. Lawson and his partner INIr. Pratt became connected with 
the Hastings Townsite Company, in which they owned an eighth 
interest, and from that time forward they have been identified with 
the development and growth of the city. They shipped the first car- 
load of lumber to Hastings over the Chicago, Burlington & Quincj' 
Railroad, and during the earh^ days thej^ conducted a very extensive 
business, their trade coming to them from a wide territory. Mr. 
Lawson still looks after his commercial interests and has followed 
most progressive methods throughout the years of his residence here. 

On the 16th of SejJtember, 1874, jNIr. Lawson was united in mar- 
riage to INIiss Amy Ellis, a native of Greene county, Illinois, where 
she was reared and educated. They became the parents of four 
sons: Truman J., who is engaged in the hardware business at Rock- 
land, Idaho; Ellis Gale and Arthur A., who are associated with their 
father in the conduct of the store at Hastings; and ]Marion C, wlio 
is engaged in the abstract and loan business at JMalad City, Idaho. 

The parents are members of the Presbyterian church. JNIr. Law- 
son is connected with the lodge, chapter and commandery of the 
JNIasonic fraternity at Hastings and with Sesostris Temple of the 
jNIystic Shrine at Lincoln. In his political views he is a republican, 
stalwart in his advocacy of party principles, yet never an office seeker. 
He is a splendidly preserved man, giving personal attention to his 
business, playing golf for recreation and taking an active part in 
everything that pertains to the Melfare and jirogress of his district 
and conmiunity. He has witnessed the entire growth and develop- 
ment of the town and county and has contributed in large measure to 



184 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

the development of Hastings, his hf e work being a substantial asset 
in its commercial progress. He has a very wide acquaintance 
throughout this part of the state and wherever known is held in the 
highest esteem. 



WILLIAM JOHN FALK. 

On the list of Hastings' honored dead appears the name of Wil- 
liam John Falk and the deepest regret was felt throughout the com- 
munity when he passed away. He was born in Iowa City, Iowa, on 
the 25th of December, 1859, his parents being John and Wilhelmina 
(Werner) Falk. The father was a shoe merchant and manufacturer 
who died when his son, William John, was but twelve years of age. 
The mother, however, long survived, passing away in 1913. 

William J. Falk was educated in the jjublic schools of his native 
city and made his initial step in the business world when a youth of 
sixteen j'ears by securing employment in a clothing store there. From 
that time forward he was dependent ujjon his own resources and 
whatever success he achieved was attributable entirely to his earnest 
persistent labors. When twenty-five years of age he came to Ne- 
braska, arriving in Hastings in 1885, at which time he engaged in the 
clothing business with Ed Bloom. There he continued until his 
death and remained one of the foremost merchants of the city, pro- 
gressive, wide-awake, alert and enterprising. After four years his 
partner died, after which he j)urchased the interest in the business, 
which he conducted independently from that time mitil his own de- 
mise. He also conducted a store at Grand Island, Nebraska, for eight 
years, and his well defined plans and business methods wrought for 
success. He was one of the pioneer clothing merchants of his part of 
the state and througliout his entire career his business methods were 
such as would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 

Mr. Falk was united in marriage to ]Miss Nellie D. Dowd, a 
daughter of Thomas James and INIary Jane DoAvd, the former a 
native of Ireland and the latter of INIassachusetts. In 1855 they re- 
moved to INIilwaukee, Wisconsin, where they resided until 1873, when 
they came to Nebraska, becoming pioneer residents of this part of the 
state. The father was a watchmaker and jeweler but his business 
activities were interrupted at the time of the Civil war, when he re- 
sponded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a member of 
Company E, Third Wisconsin Infantry, with which he served for 




WILLIAM J. FAL 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 187 

four years, the regiment being attached to the Army of the Potomac. 
He rendered vahant aid to the comitry and then at the close of the 
war resumed business as a jeweler. He possessed marked genius in 
that line and successfully conducted his business until his death, which 
occurred on the 20th of June, 1901. His widow survives at the age of 
seventy years. To Mr. and Mrs. Falk were born four- children: 
George Edward, who is attending the Notre Dame University of 
Indiana; Margaret Mary, a student in Mount St. Mary's school at 
Omaha; and William John and Mary Jane, also attending school. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and 
in his fraternal relations Mr. Falk was an Elk, belonging to the lodge 
at Hastings. In politics he was a democrat but did not seek nor desire 
office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. 
He passed away on February 23, 1913, since which time his widow 
has disposed of both of the stores. He was a very successful man and 
ranked with the representative merchants of Hastings. He had 
many substantial and admirable qualities and his life and character 
were as clear as the sunlight. He constantly labored for the right and 
those who came in contact with him speedily appreciated him at his 
true worth. 



C. L. MOSIER. 



Among the well known general farmers of Juniata township is 
C. L. JNIosier, who is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of 
land on which he has lived for fifteen years, and the creditable 
appearance of the place is due to his industry and careful manage- 
ment. He was born September 25, 1874!, in Adamsville, Cass county, 
Michigan, a son of Isaac and Susan (Conley) Mosier, who were 
natives of Pennsylvania and of Ohio resiDectively. They were mar- 
ried, however, in Michigan and in that state the father passed away. 
The paternal grandfather came from Lorraine, France, while the 
mother's people were of German lineage. Isaac INIosier devoted his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits and his death occurred 
about six j^ears ago. In the family were five sons, as follows : Theo, 
who is a resident of Adamsville, Michigan; Charles A., living in 
INIiami, Florida; C. L., of this review; Leland, who makes his home 
in Berkeley, California ; and Willard, of Adamsville, IMichigan. 

During his youthful days C. L. Mosier, residing upon the home 
farm, divided his time between the work of the fields and the 



188 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

acquirement of a common school education. When fifteen years of 
age he made his way to Nebraska and was employed for some time 
as a farm hand, but he was ambitious and energetic, practiced close 
economy as well as industry and in the course of time had earned 
enough to enable him to purchase jDroperty. He became owner of 
his present place fifteen j^ears ago and now has one hundred and 
sixty acres of good land which he devotes to general farming. His 
methods are practical and progressive and his desire to make a good 
home for his family is manifest in the improvements which he has 
put upon his place. He is also connected with the Farmers Grain 
Company of Juniata. 

In 1900 Mr. Mosier vt'as united in marriage to INIiss Ethel M. 
Savery, who is the eldest daughter of Henry R. and Eliza (Van 
Houten) Savery. Her father is of English lineage and is a descend- 
ant of Elder William Brewster and Richard Warren, who came over 
in the Mayflower, and also of Zachariah Whiteman, of Revolution- 
ary fame. The mother is of Dutch lineage and the Van Houten 
family was established in Dutchess county. New York, in the early 
days of this countr5^ IMr. and INIrs. Savery are still living in the 
old home at Juniata. ]Mr. and JNIrs. INIosier have two sons and two 
daughters: Ethel M. and Rex T., of Juniata; and George C. and 
Donna B., of Los Angeles, California. 

In his political views Mr. INIosier is independent, voting according 
to the dictates of his judgment. He belongs to the JModern Wood- 
men lodge at Juniata and his influence is always cast on the side of 
improvement and advancement. He is ever wUling to aid in move- 
ments for the general good and at the same time he has led a busy 
and useful life in the conduct of his farming interests. 



WILLIS P. McCREARY. 

Willis P. JNIcCreary, distinguished as an able criminal lawyer, 
well known as a sportsman and esteemed in all circles by reason of 
his genuine worth, his public spirit and his activity in behalf of the 
general welfare, was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember 8, 1854 , his parents being Pearson and Nancy (Dean) 
McCreary. The father, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1832, was 
a drover and stock buyer by occupation. He died in 1856 and the 
mother was again married in 1859. In 1865 the family removed to 
Lee county, Iowa, where the stepfather of our subject engaged in 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 189 

general farming. The mother, who was born in 1833, met death in 
the memorable railroad wreck at Chatsworth, Illinois, in 1887. 

Willis P. JNIcCreary was a lad of eleven years at the time of the 
removal of the famil}^ to Lee county, Iowa, where he attended the 
district schools. Later he became a student in the academy at Den- 
mark, Iowa, and prepared for a professional career as a law student 
in the State University, from which he was graduated on the 28th of 
June, 1876. He had left the farm when seventeen years of age and 
had engaged in school teaching, also employing other methods in 
order to earn the money that woiild enable him to pursue his law 
course. On the 14th of July, 1876, he opened a law office in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, where he remained until 1884, when he came to Hast- 
ings and has here since followed his profession. In 1887 he formed 
a partnership under the firm style of Capps, JNIcCreary & Stevens, 
but his partners have both passed aAvay, and Mr. JNIcCreary remained 
alone in practice until 1912, when he admitted E. E. Danly to a part- 
nership under the firm style of JNIcCreary & Danly, an association 
that is still in existence. For three terms JNIr. JNIcCreary filled the 
office of prosecuting attorney for Adams county and he has always 
been accorded a large and distinctively representative clientage, for 
he disjDlays marked ability in presenting his cause before the courts. 
He jDossesses superior oratorical powers and is regarded as the most 
eloquent lawyer practicing at the Hastings bar. His jjractice ex- 
tends all over southwestern Nebraska and he has been connected 
with some of the most important cases tried in the courts of 
the state. 

On the 1st of January, 1878, JNIr. JNIcCreary was united in mar- 
riage at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to JNIiss JNIary B. Greene, who was born 
in that city and is a daughter of William and Louisa (Higley) 
Greene, who were natives of England and of Connecticut respec- 
tively. JNIr. Greene and his brother George, who was afterward 
judge of the supreme court of Iowa, went to Cedar Rapids in an 
early day from Buffalo, New York, and opened the first store in the 
former citj\ They afterward made their way to Colorado and 
opened up mines at Silverton, hauling the machinery for a smelter 
on pack mules over the range from Durango, Colorado. Subse- 
quently they returned to Cedar Rapids and William Greene was 
active in financial circles there. He became a prime mover in the 
building of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railroad and 
was associated with the freight department of that road at a time 
when one of his fellow employes was A. L. JNIohler, now the presi- 
dent of the Union Pacific Railroad Company. 



190 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

To JNIr. and Mrs. McCrearj^ have been born four children, Willis 
M., who is engaged in general merchandising at Scotts Bluff, Ne- 
braska, is married and has one child. Mary and Dorothy are at home. 
James R. is a graduate of the State Manual Training Normal School 
at Pittsburg, Kansas, and is now engaged in teaching manual train- 
ing in the schools of Hastings and is also operating a farm. He is 
married. 

Mr. McCreary was reared in the Quaker faith. He is active in 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a recognized leader 
in the ranks of the republican party. He served as president of the 
Republican Club of Nebraska in 1896 and was very active in that 
compaign. He also did much work all over the state under the direc- 
tion of the state central committee in the campaign of 1900 and his 
words of eloquence and learning never fail to carry weight and in 
manj' cases bring conviction. He is a lover of good horses, always 
enjoys good clean sport and, in a word, his is a well rounded char- 
acter, in which business and pleasure maintain an even balance. In 
the jjractice of law he has made steady progress and, while nature 
endowed him with the gift of oratory, he has never depended upon 
it to sway juries but has always carefully prepared his cases and bases 
his arguments upon the law applicable to the jjoint at issue. 



HARRY CLAY HAVERLY. 

Harry Clay Haverly, well known as a politician, has been very 
active in public affairs in Adams count}' for many years and has 
filled various offices, the duties of which he has discharged with 
promptness and fidelity. He is also well known in business circles as 
one of the organizers of the Hastings Building & Loan Association, 
of which he is now the president. In his entire career he has made 
it his purpose never to neglect the duty at hand for some other task 
and his loyalty and fidelitj' have been ever recognized as salient 
featvu'es in his career. Mr. Haverly is a native of Pennsylvania, 
having been borne at Belief onte on the 25th of December, 1858, his 
parents being Francis S. and Hannah (Poorman) Haverly, who 
were also natives of the Keystone state. The father is still a resident 
of Belief onte and has attained an advanced age, having been born in 
1833. The mother, who was born in 1836, died in 1876. For many 
years Francis S. Haverly was general foreman of an axe factory at 
Belief onte and became the owner of considerable land and real estate 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 191 

in that locality. He also took a helpful interest in public affairs, 
served as a member of the town board, and has been quite active as a 
member of the JNIethodist church. He is now enjoying a rest that he 
has truly earned and richly deserves. 

Harry Clay Haverly is the eldest child in his father's family and 
in the public schools of Belief onte pursued his education. After leav- 
ing home he was employed in a factory, store and office. In 1879 he 
came to Nebraska, at which time Hastings contained a population of 
about two thousand. Here he acted as clerk in the store of F. J. 
Benedict for six or eight months and in 1880 went to Culbertson, 
Nebraska, as manager for a store owned by the firm of Benedict & 
Mowrey, the location being sixty miles from the railroad on the 
Texas trail in the cow country. He saw buffaloes killed in that dis- 
trict and watched big stampedes. In the fall of 1880 he returned to 
the store in Hastings and in 1884 became a partner in the grocery 
firm which then operated under the name of the Benedict Company. 
He was called to public office in 1888, when he was elected city clerk, 
which position he filled for four years. In 1892 he was appointed 
deputy county treasurer and in 1899 became a candidate for thq 
office of county treasurer, but was defeated by fifteen votes. In 1900 
he accepted the position of bookkeeper with the firm of McKinley & 
Lanning and in 1901 was appointed steward at the Hastings Asylum 
by Governor Dietrich, and was reai^pointed in 1903 by Governor 
Michey, who again named him for that position in 1905, while in 
1907 he was appointed to the same office by Governor Sheldon. He 
thus served until December 1, 1907, when he resigned and became 
connected Avith the Bostwick Hotel, but in June, 1913, sold his in- 
terest in that business and was appointed deputy clerk. In the mean- 
time he had assisted in organizing the Hastings Building & Loan 
Association in 1896 and is now its jn-esident. This is one of the strong 
financial concerns of the county and has constituted an important 
element in furthering public progress. 

In 188G, at Hastings, "Sir. Haverly was married to Miss Carrie 
Calvert, a native of Wisconsin, who died in the year 1913. Her par- 
ents were Alfred and Elizabeth Calvert, who on coming to Nebraska 
settled in Highland township, Adams county, where the father 
secured a homestead claim and entered upon the active work of the 
farm. Afterward he removed to Hastings and became agent for the 
St. Paul mills, which he thus represented for many years. He was a 
Civil war veteran, going to the front with a Wisconsin regiment, and 
he afterward became a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
JNIrs. Haverly was very prominent in the social circles of the city and 



3 92 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

was also deejjly interested in civic affairs. She possessed many 
attractive qualities which won her personal popularity so that her 
death was deepl}^ regretted. To JNIr. and JNIrs. Haverly were born 
two sons: Cecil F., who is city salesman with a wholesale dental sup- 
ply house in ]\Iinneapolis ; and Ernest S., attending high school. 

In his political views Mr. Haverly has ever been a stalwart repub- 
lican since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and is a 
recognized leader in the local ranks of the party. He served as chair- 
man of the county central committee from 1911 until 1915 and has 
been active in everj^ campaign during the past thirty years. Fratern- 
ally he is identified with the JSIasons, holding membership in the lodge, 
the chapter and the council, while in the consistory he has attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He also belongs to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, becoming a charter member of 
Lodge No. 159, and he has also been a member of the Grand Lodge 
of Elks. He is a charter member of Hastings Lodge, No. 28, K. P., 
and of Delhi Temple, No. 109, D. O. K. K. He likewise has mem- 
bership with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Royal Highlanders 
and the Loyal JNIystic Legion of America. His religious belief is 
that of the EiJiscopal church, in which he is serving as vestryman, 
and he takes an active interest in furthering its cause and extendin*^ 
its influence. His activities have touched various interests of society 
and his influence has ever been on the side of progress, reform and 
improvement. 



GRIFFITH EVANS. 



Griffith Evans is now living retired in Hastings. His has been an 
active life and his present rest is well deserved. He was born at 
Beddgelert, in North Wales, on the 14th of January, 1849, and is a 
son of Owen and Catherine Evans, the former a farmer by occupa- 
tion. Both, however, are noAV deceased. After attending the public 
schools of his native land Griffith Evans continued his education in 
the normal college at Bangor, in North Wales, and then took up the 
]>rofession of teaching, which he followed in England for ten years. 
He was a j'oung man of about thirty-four years when he crossed the 
Atlantic to Nebraska, arriving in 1883. Here he resumed teaching, 
becoming connected with the schools of Adams county. He was thus 
engaged until 1908, when he was called to public office, having been 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 193 

elected county assessor. In 1896 he paid a visit to his old country, 
thus renewing the friendships of his youth. 

On the 9th of February, 1910, JNIr. Evans was united in marriage 
to IMrs. Sarah E. Kelley, the widow of Absalom H. Kelley and the 
daughter of Abner Coates. He gives his political allegiance to the 
democracy, while his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. 
As the years passed by Mr. Evans made investment in farm lands 
and his property now returns to him a gratifying annual income, 
enabling him to live retired. His was an active life in former years and 
he contributed much to the educational development of the districts 
in which he labored. He has never had occasion to regret his deter- 
mination to come to the new world to try his fortune, for here he 
found favorable opportunities and in their improvement has gradually 
worked his way upward, gaining therebj' the competence which enables 
him to rest from further business cares and yet enjoy all of the com- 
forts and some of the luxuries of life. 



FRED STULKEN, 



Fred Stulken, a resident of Hastings, is a self-made man and 
as such is entitled to the honor which is always given to the man pos- 
sessing enterprise, self-reliance and sound judg-ment. He has 
devoted his life to farming and now owns five hundred and sixty 
acres of fine land in Adams county, the operation of which, however, 
he leaves to others as he has retired and is enjoying a period of 
leisure. He was born in Germany on the 2.3th of October, 1844, and 
attended tlie common schools until he was fourteen years of age. For 
eight years thereafter he worked as a farm hand in Germany but in 
1870 removed to Freeport, Illinois. He was in the employ of others 
in that vicinity for seven years, after which he came to Adams county, 
Nebraska. For four years he operated a rented farm three miles 
east of Hastings and at the end of that time had accumulated suffi- 
cient capital to enable him to purchase land four miles northeast of 
Hastings, which his youngest son, August, is now farming. I'or 
many years, however, he devoted his time and energj^ to the opera- 
tion of his farm and j'ear by year his well directed labors yielded him 
a good financial return. In 1903 he removed to Hastings, where !<e 
has since lived in honorable retirement. He holds title to five hun- 
dred and sixty acres of as fine land as there is in the county and is a 
man of independent means. 



194 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Mr. Stulken was married in 1875 to Miss Helene Lammers, who 
nad emigrated to this country from Germany only a short time pre- 
viously. They have become the parents of eight children. Helene, 
who was born February 21, 1876, is now the wife of Luke Buskirk, 
of Hastings, an employe of the Union Pacific Railroad. Four chil- 
dren have been born to this union. Mr. Buskirk also has two children 
by a former marriage. Henry, who was born September 29, 1877, 
is farming three miles east of Doniphan. He married Nattie 
Olthoff, of Hall county, by whom he has three children. Anna, whose 
birth occurred on the 28th of April, 1879, is the wife of William 
Bloomenkamp, a farmer of Key county, and they have six children. 
August, who was born June 16, 1881, is farming the homestead. He 
married Miss Lorena Finningsmier, a daughter of Henry Fin- 
ningsmier, who is living retired in Hastings, and two children 
have been born to this union. Mary, born September 21, 1883, mar- 
ried George Filges, who was formerly of St. Louis but is now 
farming six miles northeast of Hastings. They have one child. 
Hermine, who was born on the 8th of March, 1886, married William 
Molle, an emploj^e at the waterworks in Hastings, and one child has 
been born to their union. Eliza, born February 10, 1888, married 
L. Ellsworth, an employe of the Manhattan Oil Company, and their 
children are two in number. Fredericka, born Januarj'- 14, 1894, is 
at home. 

Mr. Stulken is a member of St. Paul's German Lutheran church 
and has guided his life by high moral standards. He is independent 
in politics, refusing to bind himself by party ties. Both he and his 
wife are still vigorous and in good health and are enjoying leisure 
made possible by their labor in former years. They are well and 
favorably known not only in Hastings but throughout the county 
and the part which they have played in the development of their part 
of the county is generally recognized. 



JACOB RUHTER. 



Jacob Ruhter, who resides in Verona township, has been very 
successful as a farmer and now holds title to eight hvmdred acres of 
excellent land. He was born in Hanover, Germany, on the 25th of 
June, 1852, of the marriage of Henry and ]\Iary (Banidt) Ruhter, 
both natives of that country. In 1867 they emigrated to the United 
States with their family, locating at Red Wing, ]\Iinnesota, where 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 195 

the father passed away. The mother's demise, however, occurred hi 
Kansas. They were the parents of the following children: John, 
who resides in the vicinity of Roseland, this county ; Peter, who lives 
in Long Beach, California; Jacob; JNIary, the deceased Avife of 
Henry Augustin, Sr., of this county; ]\Ieta, the wife of Fred C. 
Alms, of York county, Nebraska; Henry, of Hastings, Nebraska, 
who owns a well improved farm in this county ; George, who lives in 
Sidney, Chej^enne county, this state; Anna, the wife of Jolin Stahr, 
who is living in Burke, South Dakota; William, of Norfolk, Ne- 
braska; Fred, of Clay Center, Kansas; and Emma, also a resident of 
that place. 

Jacob Ruhter attended the public schools of Hanover until he 
was fourteen and a half years old, or until 1867, when he was brought 
by his parents to the United States. He resided with them in Red 
Wing, Minnesota, until 1878 and during part of that time was en- 
gaged in blacksmithing. In the year mentioned he came to Nebraska 
and located on section 29, Verona township, Adams county. For 
five jrears he ojjerated that place and then removed across the road to 
his present farm on section 20. He has made excellent improve- 
ments upon the place, which is one of the most valuable farms of the 
localit}', and keeps everything in the best of condition. He has pur- 
chased additional land from time to time and his holdings now 
comi^rise eight hundred acres. He engages in general farming, 
raising both grain and stock, and derives a handsome income from his 
land. For many years he has also operated a threshing outfit and 
this has likewise proved a profitable venture. He is also interested 
financially in the Farmers JNIutual Elevator Company at Prosser. 

JNIr. Ruhter was married on the 16th of February, 1883, to IMiss 
Kate INIeyer and they have become the parents of seven children, 
namely: William Henry, who died in infancy; George F., of Verona 
township; Herman O. and Albert R., also residing in that township; 
Lilia, the wife of Frank Bockstadter, of Verona township; and Emil 
Peter and Erwin Henry, both at home. 

]Mr. Ruhter is independent in politics, refusing to follow the dic- 
tates of party leaders but voting for the candidates whom he deems 
best fitted for ofl^ce. For twenty-seven consecutive years he has 
served as a member of the school board and he has always used his 
influence to secure the educational advancement of his district. He 
and his family belong to the German Lutheran church in Verona 
township and for nine years he was a member of the official board. 
The principles which have governed his conduct in all relations of 
life are found in the teachings of the church and no movement mak- 



196 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ing for righteousness has lacked his support. He had no unusual 
advantages in his youth and began his career without capital but he 
has been quick to recognize and utilize opportunities and has gained 
financial independence. 



WILLIAM H. DILLON. 

William H. Dillon is proprietor of the lunch room at the Bur- 
lington depot in Hastings, in which connection he is maintaining a 
well appointed establishment, catering to the needs of the traveling 
public, recognizing the fact that promptness, efficiency, cleanliness 
and good foods are salient elements in the attainment of success along 
the line of his chosen business. He was born in Delaware county, 
Iowa, on the 16th of December, 1840, a son of Gilbert D. and Mary 
(Schoonover) Dillon, who were natives of New York. It was in the 
year 1836 that the father removed westward to Iowa, then a part of 
the territory of Wisconsin, and established the first bank at Dubuque. 
He was prominently identified with the pioneer development of the 
state and was a leading factor in financial circles in the early days. 
He died in 1874, while his wife survived only until 1875. In their 
family were eight children, of whom William H. is the third in order 
of birth. 

During his youthful days William H. Dillon assisted in the farm 
work and attended the district schools. He afterward continued his 
education in a college at Epworth and in 1864 began clerking in a 
dry goods store in Dubuque, where he was employed for three years. 
He afterward returned to the farm, on ^vhich he spent the succeeding 
period of two years, when he resumed active connection with the dry 
goods trade at Worthington, Iowa, conducting business at that point 
for two years. He then sold out and devoted nine years to the in- 
surance business, being special agent and collector for the Water- 
town Fire Insurance Companj'. In 1879 he engaged in the grocery 
business at HojDkinton, Iowa, where he remained until 1883, when 
he came to Nebraska. Here he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on the Indian Reservation and afterward sold that 
propertj', removing to Hastings in August, 1885. Here he resumed 
active connection with the insurance business, in which he engaged 
until February, 1886, when he became interested in hotel life, con- 
ducting the New England House for one year. He likewise con- 
ducted the Commercial Hotel for two years and in February, 1889, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 197 

took charge of the Bostwick, which he managed for twenty-two 
3^ears. He now conducts the hinch counter at the Burlington de])ot 
to keep in active touch with business, for indolence and idleness are 
utterly foreign to his nature and he would not be content without 
some active interest in the city. He is also the owner of farm lands 
and from his proj^erty derives a substantial annual income. He has 
always led a very busy life and his unfaltering industrj', intelligentlj'. 
directed, has brought to him the substantial measure of success which 
has crowned his efforts. 

In 1871 INIr. Dillon M^as united in marriage in Iowa to Miss Nellie 
Hayward, a daughter of the Rev. W. H. and Lydia Hayward, and 
unto them has been born a daughter, INIrs. Grace G. Stitt, who now 
has one son, Harold. JMrs. Dillon is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church and is quite active in both club and church circles in 
this city, formerly serving as president of the Women's Club of 
Hastings. In his political views JNIr. Dillon is a republican but is. 
not an office seeker, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
individual interests, whereby he has won a substantial measure of 
success. His i^lans have always been carefully formulated and 
promjjtly executed and he has allowed no obstacle nor difficulty to bar 
his jjath if it could be overcome by persistent, earnest and honorable 
effort. 



ROBERT R. MORLEDGE. 

Robert R. Morledge, Avho is living retired in Hastings, is well 
known and highly esteemed there and for about ten years served as 
justice of the j^eace. His birth occurred in Jennings county, Indiana, 
on the 16th of July, 1840, and he is a son of John R. and JNIaria 
Louise (Branham) JNIorledge, the former a native of England. He 
was reared at home and received his education in the public schools of 
Indiana, which he attended until he was sixteen or seventeen years 
old. He removed westward to Iowa when eighteen years of age and 
located at Clarinda, where he remained until the 11th of July, 1861. 
On that date he enlisted in the Fourth Iowa A^olunteer Infantrj^ and 
went to the front with that command. He took part in the battle of 
Pea Ridge and in 1863 was honorably discharged for disability. He 
desired to be of some service to his country, however, and went into 
the commissary department, in which he remained until the close of 
the war. He then returned to Clarinda, Iowa, and remained there 



198 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

until 1871, during which time he engaged in the grocery business. In 
1873 he came to Hastings, Adams county, Nebraska, and became 
identified with business circles as the owner of the leading store in the 
town. He built the JNIorledge block, which he occupied for a time, 
after whicli he sold out, and then engaged in the furniture business 
for about eight months. On disposing of his interests in that connec- 
tion he turned his attention to the real estate and insurance field, in 
which he was active until 1898. He was then elected justice of the 
peace and with the exception of three years, which he spent in Cali- 
fornia, he held that office continuouslj'^ until 1910, his repeated 
reelection indicating the high esteem in which he is held. Since 1911 
he has lived retired from the cares of business and oflScial life, enjoying 
a period of leisure which is well deserved. He was farsighted and 
progressive as a merchant, was impartial as justice of the peace and 
as a citizen has always sought to advance the public interests. 

On the 13th of October, 1863, Mr. INIorledge was united in mar- 
riage to JNIiss Phoebe J. McMullen, a daughter of Stephen and Phoebe 
(Loy) McJNIullen, both natives of Ohio. Three sons and three daugh- 
ters have been born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Morledge, namely: EfFa and 
Fred, both deceased ; Burt, who is living at home ; Edgar Robert and 
Lula, both deceased; and Ina Evelyn, who is the wife of Bruce Brown, 
of North Platte, and has two children, Robert J. and Dorothy Jane. 

JNIr. INIorledge supports the republican party at the polls and in 
addition to holding the office of justice of the peace was for two 
terms a member of the town board and for one term a member of the 
school board. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. 
Through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic he keeps 
in touch with others who went to the defense of the Union and he 
has at all times been characterized by patriotism. He began his career 
empty handed but his industry and good management have been 
rewarded and he is now in excellent financial circumstances. 



RAYMOND CROSSON. 

On the list of city officials in Hastings appears the name of Ray- 
mond Crosson, now the efficient chief of police, holding to high stand- 
ards of service and looking ever to the advancement of the municipal 
welfare. A native of Illinois, he was born at Arrowsmith, on 
Christmas Day, 1887, his parents being Martin J. and Ida (Ed- 
wards) Crosson. The family came to Nebraska about 1888 and the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 199 

parents are now residents of Hastings. In his youthful days Ray- 
mond Crosson devoted his attention to the acquirement of an educa- 
tion in the public and high schools of Trumbull, Nebraska, and later 
he became connected with a threshing outfit. Following his mar- 
riage he was appointed to the position of manager of the Farmers 
Grain Elevator at Farmers, in which connfection he continued for five 
years. He afterward purchased the collection business conducted 
under the name of the Nebraska State Mercantile Agency and 
remained active in that field until appointed chief of police of Hast- 
ings, the duties of which position he assumed on the 13th of April, 
1915, the appointment coming to him from Mayor Madgett. He is 
making an excellent record in the office, the duties of which he is dis- 
charging promptly and fearlessly. 

On the 28th of October, 1908, Mr. Crosson was united in marriage 
to JNIiss Bertha Moore, of Hall county, a daughter of Joel N. Moore, 
and their children are INIildred and Raymond. The family are Prot- 
estants in religious faith and in his political views Mr. Crosson is an 
earnest republican, putting forth eff'ective and earnest efi^ort to ad- 
vance the interests and growth of his party. He belongs to the blue 
lodge of JNIasons, to the Woodmen of the World and the Modern 
Woodmen of America and is well known in connection with military 
interests of the state, having long been identified with the National 
Guard. He enlisted in the Hastings Rifles on the 2d of July, 1906, 
when the companj^ was formed, and was promoted to the rank of 
corporal on the 2d of August, of that year. He became sergeant in 
May, 1907, first sergeant in February, 1908, and on the 1st of August 
of that year the Rifles were mustered into Company D, of the second 
regiment of the Nebraska National Guard. In February, 1909, Mr. 
Ci'osson was made second lieutenant and on the resignation of Captain 
Boggs and First Lieutenant H. R. Brown he was placed in command 
of Comjjany D and so continued until February, 1910, when Captain 
Riff'e was appointed to the command of the company and jNIr. Crosson 
was made first lieutenant. On the 2d of April, 1912, Mr. Crosson 
was promoted to captain and took command, and in February, 1915, 
he was advanced to the rank of major. He has attended all camp 
maneuvers, officers' schools and rifle competitions and he had command 
of a district in Omaha at the time of the tornado in 1913, when for a 
great period the city was under martial law to protect the interests 
of those who were rendered homeless. In recognition of his services 
to the state at that time he was presented with a medal. He has a 
very wide acquaintance in military circles throughout the state and is 
prominent in that connection. He is a man of fine military bearing. 



200 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

straight and erect, ready to command and yet never over hasty in 
issuing orders but recognizing at all times the exigencies of a situa- 
tion. The same qualities render him a most commendable official in 
his present position as chief of police in Hastings. 



C. C. CHRISTOPHER. 



Prominent among the energetic, farsighted and successful busi- 
ness men of Hastings is C. C. Christopher, the manager of the 
Hastings Equity Grain Bm Company. He is strong and pm-pose- 
ful, ready to meet any condition or emergency that arises and along 
the well defined lines of trade and commerce is gaining substantial 
success. He was born in Greene comity, Pennsylvania, on the 17th 
of 31arch, 18.57, and is a son of William C. and Mary (Reeves) 
Christopher. The father was a farmer by occupation and thus pro- 
vided for the support of his family, which mmibered four sons and 
two daughters, but both he and his wife are now deceased. 

C. C. Christopher was educated in the j^ublic schools and when 
his textbooks were put aside continued to remain with and assist his 
father until he reached the age of twenty-seven years. He was then 
married and removed to Iowa, where he remamed for two years, on 
the expiration of which period he became a resident of Hall county, 
Nebraska. There he purchased land and engaged in farming until 
1908, when he came to Hastings, where he pm-chased land and built 
a home. In 1910 he became connected with the Hastings Equity 
Grain Bin Company as manager. In fact he was one of the organ- 
izers of the company, which does job work in sheet metal and also 
shop work all over the state and also into southeastern Elinois, 
Wyoming, Kansas, Colorado and South Dakota. This is one of the 
important productive industries of Hastings, employing twenty-five 
men. They manufacture tanks for evert- need, including garages, 
grain bins, undergroimd gasoline systems, for water, milk, oU, grain, 
also dipping, wagon, scalding, thi-esher. cistern, tower and supply 
tanks. They have a large and well apj^ointed plant at Hastings, 
comprising the manufacturing building and the warehouse. Their 
tanks are manufactured from the best grade of material obtainable 
and are rust proof. The tanks which they manufacture show many 
points of excellence over others and by reason of this their business 
is constantly and steadily growing, having already reached gratifying 
proportions. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 201 

On the 31st of January, 1883, Mr. Christopher was united in 
marriage to Miss ^Maggie E. Price, a daughter of W. H. Price, of 
New Jersey. They have four children, namely: Edward; Edith, 
who is the wife of W. B. Brown; ^Nlay, who assists her father in his 
plant; and Vern. The religious faith of the family is that of the 
Evangelical church. 

In his fraternal relations lSh\ Christopher is an Odd FelloAv and 
is also connected with the Knights of Luther. He belongs to the 
Commercial Club and gives his political allegiance to the reiJublican 
partj\ For twenty-one years he served as township treasurer, was 
also a member of the school board for some time and has been town- 
ship clerk. He is now concentrating his efforts, however, upon his 
business affairs, which are capably directed and are bringing to him 
gratifying returns. He Avorks hard, closely ajiplies himself to tlie 
interests of the business, studies out new methods and improvements 
and is continually advancing the standard of excellence maintained 
by the house. 



JOHN RUHTER. 



John Ruhter, who has gained financial independence through 
wisely directing his farming activities, now holds title to five hundred 
acres of excellent land in Roseland township. He was born in Han- 
over, Germany, near the city of Hamburg, on the 24th of February, 
1850, of the marriage of Henry and ^lary (Banidt) Ruhter, Avho 
were born and reared in that locality. They continued to reside there 
until 1866, when with their family they came to the United States, 
locating in ^Minnesota, fifty miles east of St. Paul, where the father 
died. Subsequently the mother removed to Kansas and there she 
passed away. They were the jiarents of eleven children, as follows: 
John; Peter, who is living in Long Beach, California; Jacob, a resi- 
dent of Verona township; Mary, the deceased wife of Henry 
Augustin, Sr., who is living near Prosser; flattie, who married Fred 
Alms, of York county, Nebraska : Henry, of Hastings : George, who 
is living in Cheyemie county, Nebraska; Anna, the wife of John 
Stehr, of Gregory county. South Dakota ; William, of Norfolk, Ne- 
braska; Fred, of Clay county, Kansas: and Emma, who is residing 
with her brother Fred. 

John Ruhter was educated in the public schools of Germany and 
of JNIinnesota and remained at home until 1874. In the meantime he 



202 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

had been thoroughly trained in agricultural work and on begimiing 
his independent career he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and pur- 
chased his present home farm on section 5, Roseland township, which 
was raw prairie when it came into his possession. He at once set about 
its development and has brought the land to a high state of cultivation 
and has made many fine improvements. There are two sets of build- 
ings upon the place, which now comprises five hundred and eighty 
acres, and his work is facilitated by the use of the most up-to-date 
implements. He has manifested the qualities of determination, fore- 
sight, thoroughness and thrift and the signal success which he has 
gained as an agriculturist is the direct result of his own industry and 
good management. 

In 1879 Mr. Ruhter married Miss Katie SchifFerns, a daughter 
of Peter and Susie (Pauly) SchifFerns, who came to this state from 
Illinois in 1873. Mr. and Mrs. Ruhter have had ten children: Susie, 
who died when two years old; P. H., a resident of Hall county, 
Nebraska; Emma, the wife of Charles Oldfeldt, who is farming in 
Cottonwood township; Ada, who married Fred Tauty, of Verona 
township; Fred, at home; Amelia, the wife of William Struss, who 
is living near Kenesaw; Caroline, the deceased wife of Richard Struss; 
and Charles, August and Anna, all at home. 

]\Ir. Ruhter casts his ballot in favor of the man whom he deems 
best suited for the office regardless of his political allegiance. He has 
served as school director for the past thirty-eight years and during 
that time has been instrumental in bringing about great advancement 
in school affairs in his district. Both he and his wife hold member- 
ship in the German Lutheran church and their lives are guided by its 
teachings. For forty-two years he has been a resident of this county 
and he is not only widely but is also favorably known, his genuine 
worth being attested by all who have come in contact with him. 



SIMEON JOHNSTON. 

Simeon Johnston makes his home in Juniata, where he assisted in 
building the first house of the town, arriving here with the first load 
of lumber which was brought from Grand Island. His original place 
of residence was a little sod house, while his present home is one of 
the finest in the town. For a considerable period he engaged in gen- 
eral farming and at the present is living retired, enjoying the fruits 
of his former toil. He was born near ]Mount Jackson in Lawrence 




Jffi. AND MKS. 8IMEON .loHNSTON 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 205 

count j% Pennsylvania, January 4, 1844, a son of David and Margaret 
(IMcGeithen) Johnston, who spent their entire lives in the Keystone 
state, both jiassing away about the time of the Civil war. Tlie father 
followed the occupation of farming and thus provided for his family 
of four children, of whom the three eldest, Eliza Ann, Margaret and 
John, are all now deceased. 

Simeon Johnston, the only survivor of the family, pursued his 
education in the common schools of Pennsylvania and was reared to 
farm life, having the usual experiences that come to the farm lad as 
he divides his time between the work of the schoolroom and the work 
of the fields. At the outbreak of the Civil war he attempted to enlist 
but was not accepted. Finally, however, on the 5th of September, 
1862, he was permitted to join the army and enlisted for three years, 
serving until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner at Mill- 
wood, Virginia, December 17, 1864, and was not exchanged until the 
following JMarch. On one occasion his horse was shot from under 
him and fell upon him, from which he suffers a rupture to the present 
time. He was a member of Company B, Fourteenth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry, and with that command participated in the battles of Rocky 
Gap, Cedar Creek and a large number of skirmishes with the troops 
of General Sheridan. After being caj^tured he was in the prison at 
Richmond, Virginia, for three months and his health was greatly 
underminded by the hardships of southern prison life, necessitating a 
period of rest in which to recuperate after the close of the war. 

Mr. Johnston continued to live in Pennsjdvania until 1868, when 
he removed to Clinton county, IMichigan, where he engaged in farm- 
ing until the spring of 1871, when he removed to Nebraska and home- 
steaded the southwest quarter of section 18, Denver township, Adams 
county. With the development and progress of the county he has 
since been closely identified. From Grand Island he hauled the firsb 
load of lumber into Jimiata and assisted in erecting the first building 
here. On his own claim he built a sod house, planted trees and put 
out an orchard, but during the grasshopper j)lague the insects took 
the orchard and killed the trees. In 1874, however, he planted an- 
other orchard and he continued the work of further developing and 
imj^roving liis jjroperty until he had converted it into a very valuable 
and productive farm. He broke his land with ox teams and for four 
years continued to do his farm work with oxen before he was able to 
purchase a team of horses. He started out practically emi^ty handed 
but he was industrious and ambitious and made good use of his oppor- 
tunities, while his persistent labors j^ear by year enabled him to 
progress steadily toward* the goal of success. He is still the owner 



206 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of one hundred and sixty acres of land — the old homestead place in 
Denver township — and he continued to carry on general farming 
until nine years ago, when he took up his abode in the town of Juniata, 
where he now owns a fine residence which he occupies and also the 
adjoining house. 

]Mr. Johnston has been twice married. In December, 1867, he 
wedded JNliss Margaret P. ]McCollum, by whom he had five children, 
as follows : Joseph, who is deceased ; Alfred, a resident of Fullerton, 
California; Harry C, living in Vancouver, Washington; Jessie, who 
died in the '80s; and Earl, who is a resident of Juniata. The wife 
and mother passed away Februarj^ 1, 1905, and in the following year 
JNIr. Johnston was again married, his second union being with ]Mrs. 
D. R. Ball, the widow of D. R. Ball, who was born in Henry county, 
Indiana. He served for three j^ears and ten months as a soldier in 
the Union army during the Civil war and he continued his residence 
in his native state until 1880, when he came to Juniata. To IMr. and 
Mrs. Ball were born five children, namely: Cora, who is the wife of 
George Bivins and lives a mile south of Juniata: JNIary E., w^ho gave 
her hand in marriage to G. N. INIunger, of Hastings, Nebraska; 
Cloyd S., a resident of Spirit Lake, Idaho; and Wilbur and Olive, 
both of whom are deceased. 

jNIr. and INIrs. Johnston are members of the Baptist church and 
he holds membership in the Grand Army post at Juniata. Their in- 
fluence is always on the side of progress and improvement, of truth 
and of right and their well spent lives have gained for them the warm 
and enduring regard of many friends. As pioneer settlers of the 
count}^ they have witnessed practically its entire development, ]Mr. 
Johnston having made his home within the borders of Adams county 
for about forty-five years, during which he has seen notable changes 
as the wild land has been converted into productive farms, as towns 
and villages have sprung up and as all the advantages of the older 
east have been introduced. 



ALEXANDER H. CRAMER. 

Alexander H. Cramer is a pioneer resident of Hastings and one 
of the leading real estate and loan agents of the city, handling l)oth 
farm and town property. He possesses untiring energy, is quick of 
perception and forms his plans readily, while his close application to 
business and his excellent judgment have brought to him the high 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 207 

degree of jjrosperit}^ which is today his. A native of New York, he 
was born in the city of Utica, January 31, 1852, and was four years 
of age when the familj^ removed to Wisconsin, setthng on a farm in 
Waushara countJ^ There he attended the public schools until he 
reached the age of seventeen years, when he removed to Oneida, Knox 
county, Illinois, where he had two brothers living. There he spent 
nine months a year as a high school pupil for about four years and 
during vacation periods worked upon farms or engaged in clerking. 
During a part of the last year he was employed in the store of Pratt 
& Lawson, the owners of the business being George H. Pratt and 
Charles K. Lawson, who on selling out came to what is now the city 
of Hastings. Wishing to retain the services of JNIr. Cramer, they 
induced him also to come to the west and he arrived in this city on the 
1st of October, 1872, assisting his employers in the erection of their 
store building and afterward continuing with them as a clerk. All 
three were young men and they kept "bachelors' hall" over the store 
during that winter, JNIr. Cramer doing the cooking while the others 
furnished the food. This arrangement jiroved veiy satisfactory to 
the three and there were pleasant hours spent in that way. 

In the spring of 1873 Mr. Cramer began working in a lumber yard 
as it was his desire to have outdoor employment, which he hoped would 
prove beneficial to his health. On the 13th of April, 1873, a terrific 
snow storm occurred accompanied bj^ high and violent winds. The 
storm raged for three days and three nights and ]Mr. Cramer says no 
other such storm has occurred during all of the forty-four years of 
his residence in Nebraska. The country was then sparsely settled, so 
that the homes were few and far between and several people were 
lost in the blizzard. JNIr. Cramer continued to Avork in the lumber 
yard until December of that year and in the month of October was 
elected county clerk of Adams county, assuming the duties of the 
position in the following January. Under the law of that time the 
countjr clerk was also ex-ofiicio register of deeds and district clerk. 
He was reelected in 187.5 and again in 1877, serving in all for six 
years, making a most creditable record by the prompt and capable 
manner in which he discharged his duties. In 1874 he secured a con- 
tract with the Union Pacific Railroad Company to sell their lands and 
the clerk of the court was authorized to make out applications and 
final proofs of homesteads, jireemptions and tree claims and transmit 
them to the government land ofl^ce, which was a great convenience to 
the homesteaders, obviating the necessity of their making a trip to the 
land office. JNIr. Cramer sold large tracts of Union Pacific Railway 
lands, ranging in price from three to eight dollars per acre. In 1871) 



208 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

the clerk of the district court was made an independent office separate 
from the city and INIr. Cramer was elected to the position and ser^^ed 
for four j'ears, at the same time continuing his real estate business. 
He continued in business altogether for ten years and his experience 
during that period well qualified him to engage in the real estate, loan 
and abstract business, to which he tm'ned his attention in January, 
1885. However, he had begun making farm loans in 1875 and has 
since continued active along that line. His first loans were made at 
twelve per cent interest and twenty per cent commission. In January, 
1912, he sold his interest in the abstract and real estate business, main- 
taining his interest in the loan business, which he still conducts. He 
places loans on farm and city property and he is thoroughly conversant 
with real estate values and with the financial standing of the majority 
of Adams county's citizens, so that his business is most carefully con- 
ducted, insuring him against loss. 

On the 13th of October, 1874, Mr. Cramer was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ella E. Cox, a native of Indiana, who came to this 
county in August, 1873, with her parents, having acquired her educa- 
tion in the schools of her native state. INIr. and Mrs. Cramer have 
become the parents of two children: Edna, now Mrs. Henry F. 
Jacobson, of Hastings ; and jNIabel, at home. 

In his political views Mr. Cramer is a republican and served as a 
member of the first board of education in Hastings in 1881, at which 
time there were but three members on the board, which now numbers 
nine. He acted in that capacitj' for nine years, and during four years 
of that time served as secretary. He was also supervisor during the 
years 1888 and 1889 and for eleven years was city treasurer. Over 
the record of his official career there falls no shadow of wrong nor 
suspicion of evil, for he has ever been most loyal to the interests 
reposed in him and has discharged his duties in a prompt and business- 
like manner. Fraternally he is connected Avith Hastings Lodge, No. 
50, A. F. & A. IM., and has attained the thirty-second degree in the 
Scottish Rite. He was also a charter member of the Knights of 
Pythias lodge and his wife and daughters are members of the Presby- 
terian church. ]Mr. Cramer's career is a notable and commendable 
one. He had a cash capital of but fourteen dollars and a half when 
he arrived in Hastings and, moreover, was suffering from ill health. 
He came to a frontier district in which the work of development and 
progress seemed scarcely begun. He has since taken an active part in 
the work of the upbuilding and improvement of city and county, 
cooperating in all plans and measures which look to the welfare and 
betterment of the community. As time has gone on he has become 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 209 

the owner of considerable city property and has laid out the east side 
addition. He is truly a self-made man and one who deserves great 
credit for what he has accomplished in a business way. His social 
qualities have gained him personal popularity, winning for him the 
friendship and kindly regard of all with whom he has been associated, 
and as one of the honored pioneer residents he well deserves mention 
in a history of Adams county. 



GEORGE H. POULSON. 

George H. Poulson is now living retired from active business 
life but for a considerable period was identified with general agri- 
cultural pursuits and in the capable management of his business 
affairs won a substantial measure of success. He remained upon his 
farm until September, 1915, when, putting aside all business activi- 
ties, he took up his abode in Hastings. He was born in INIcLean 
county, Illinois, on the 1st of March, 1867. His father, Peter Poul- 
son, was born and reared in Pickaway county, Ohio, his natal day 
being December 24, 1833. He was married in 1857 to INIatilda 
Messie, of Pickaway county, where he engaged in farming until 1864, 
when he removed to Illinois, where he carried on general agricultural 
pursuits until 1892. That year witnessed his arrival in Adams 
county, Nebraska, after which he engaged in farming about ten miles 
northeast of Hastings. His wife died in 1907 and subsequently he 
lived with his children until the time of his death, which occurred 
SeiJtember 26, 1914. He had sons and daughters to the number of 
ten. John, who was born August 17, 1859, married Bertha Reed, of 
Iroquois county, Illinois, and they have seven children. Andrew E., 
born January 2, 1861, married JMollie Carter, of Iroquois county, 
Illinois, by whom he has two children, and now makes his home near 
Overton, Nebraska, where he is engaged in farming. David, who 
was born February 5, 1863, is also engaged in farming near Overton. 
He married Emma INIcCoy, of JMcLean county, Illinois, and they 
Jiave six children. JNIary, born JNIarch 19, 1865, is the wife of Alfred 
Cunningham. George H. is the next of the family. Ida, born JNIarch 
21, 1869, is the wife of Mont Salyards, of Iroquois county, Illinois, 
who is now engaged in farming near Brady, Nebraska, and they have 
three children. ISIyrtle, born March 22, 1871, is the wife of Ernest 
Crawford, of Denver, Colorado, by whom she has three children. 



210 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Lula, born November 5, 1873, became the wife of Cassius Crane, of 
Iroquois county, Illinois, and died in Virginia, leaving five children. 
Emma, born February 13, 1878, is living at Lodgepole, Nebraska. 
Will, born Ajjril 15, 1880, married SoiJhie Hoffman, by whom he has 
two children, and resides at Overton, Nebraska. 

George H. Poulson, spending his youthful days in his native 
comity, there attended the public schools until he reached the age of 
eleven years, when his i^arents removed with their family to Say- 
brook, Illinois, where he resided for six years, attending the town 
schools of that place until he reached the age of seventeen. In 1884 
the family took up their abode upon a farm in Iroquois comity, Illi- 
nois, and George H. Poulson continued to assist his father in the 
cultivation and improvement of that place until 1891. On the 28tli 
of January of the latter year he arrived in Adams county, Nebraska, 
where he engaged in farming in connection with his brother, Andrew 
L. Poulson, on a tract of land ten miles northeast of Hastings. He 
planted trees and cared for them in order to prove up the land as a 
timber claim, doing this for the owner, Edgar Lewis, to which work 
he devoted a year. In the sjiring of 1892 his parents came to Adams 
county and George H. Poulson purchased a farm eleven miles north- 
east of Hastings and for a year carried on general farming there 
with his father. He then sold the property and returned to his first 
farm after his marriage. He remained thereon continuously until 
1915 with the exception of the years 1909 and 1910, during which 
time he resided in Colorado, being engaged in fruit raising near 
Canon City. He then returned to this county and again occupied 
the old homestead farm until September, 1915, when he retired from 
active business life and removed to Hastings, where he is now enjoy- 
ing a period of well earned rest with leisure to indulge in those activ- 
ities which are a matter of interest or recreation to him. 

On the 21st of December, 1892, JNIr. Poulson was married to jMiss 
Belle Cunningham, a daughter of James Cunningham, who had been 
a neighboring farmer of the Poulson family in Illinois. He was born 
in County Wicklow, Ireland, ^lay 18, 1833, and when about ten 
years of age had accompanied his parents on the voyage across the 
Atlantic, the family home being established in Guelph, Canada. 
After the death of his father James Cunningham, then about sixteen 
years of age, started out in life on his own account and finally went 
to Ohio, where he remained until about 1864., when he removed to 
INIcLean county, Illinois, and subsequently to Iroquois county, that 
state. In the spring of 1891 he arrived in Adams county, Nebraska, 
and purchased a farm comprising the southeast quarter of section 12, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 211 

township 8, range 9, known as the Holdemian timber claim, upon 
which he resided for some time, but for a few years prior to 1910 he 
spent a part of his time in Trumbull, Nebraska, with his son. In the 
year mentioned he sold his farm and purchased a home in Trumbull, 
where he remained until his death, which occurred on the 4th of 
December, 1915. It was in 1858 that he wedded Caroline StumpfF, 
a daughter of William StumpfF, of Harrisburg, Ohio, and they had 
two sons and four daughters who came to Adams county. Their 
eldest son, Alfred, born in JNIcLean county, Illinois, in 1864, arrived 
in Adams county in 1888, driving a team across the country from 
Iroquois county, Illinois, after which he rented a farm four miles 
southwest of Giltner, Nebraska, remaining thereon for seventeen 
years. In 1911 he removed to Garden county, Nebraska, where he 
again purchased a farm. He was married in Illinois to JNIiss ]\Iary 
Poulson, a sister of George Poulson, and they had eight sons. Alfred 
Cunningham was a prominent and influential citizen of Adams 
county and twice represented his district in the state legislature. 
Death terminated his career on the 30th of December, 1913. Belle 
Cunningham, the second of the family, was born in JNIcLean count}', 
Illinois, July 6, 1866, and prior to her marriage engaged in teaching 
in a country school which her children have since attended. Jennie, 
born in 1867, was for twenty years a most able teacher in the country 
schools of Adams, Clay and Hamilton counties of Nebraska and in 
1912 she became the wife of J. Helm Haggard, of Clay county, who 
is now living retired in Trumbull. Edith, born in 1872, died in 1910. 
Anna, born in 1874, is the Avife of A. R. Rich, a grain buyer of Trum- 
bull. Alvin, born in 1880, wedded JNIary Harter, a daughter of Lou 
Harter, who follows farming near Giltner, Nebraska. The^' have 
three children. 

James Cunningham, the father of these children, died on the 4th 
of December, 1915, and in his passing the community lost a valued 
and representative citizen. He' had been a lifelong member of the 
Christian church, serving as a deacon in the church for fifty years, a 
part of that time at Trumbull. Success had come to him through 
earnest and indefatigable effort and his life was ever upright and 
honorable. There have been several marriages between relatives of 
the Poulson and Cunningham families that are interesting because of 
their oddity. The grandfatlier of JNIrs. Poulson was William 
Stumpff, who married Ella jNIessie, the grandmother of JNIr. Poul- 
son. Again, Peter IMeyers, an uncle of JNIr. Poulson, wedded INIary 
StumpfF, an aunt of JNIrs. Poulson, while the Poulson and Cunning- 
ham families were more closely connected through the marriage of 



212 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Alfred Cunningham to Mary Poulson and of George Poulson to 
Belle Cunningham. 

To JNIr. and JMrs. Poulson have been born three children: Earl 
L., who was born February 10, 1894, and was a student in a business 
college at Canon City while residing in Colorado; Clifford E., who 
was born November 1, 1895, and is now a senior in high school; and 
Laura Belle, who was born September 1, 1897, and is also a senior 
in high school in Hastings. 

The family holds membership in the Christian church and for a 
number of years Mr. Poulson was an elder in the church at Trum- 
bull and also suiierintendent of the Sunday school. He takes a most 
active and helpful interest in all departments of church work and in 
fact does everything in his power to promote the progress of the com- 
munity and advance its material, intellectual and moral interests. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party but the hon- 
ors and emoluments of office have never had any attraction for him 
as he has always preferred to concentrate his energies upon his busi- 
ness affairs, which, wisely, carefully and honorably directed, have 
brought to him a most gratifying success. 



JOSEPH MILLIGAN. 

For many j'ears Joseph Milligan was connected with railroading 
but he subsequently turned his attention to agricultvu'al pursuits and 
is now living upon his farm in Juniata township. He was born in 
Creton, Scotland, on the 4th of September, 1831, in a house which 
his grandfather erected and in which, fifteen years later, the birth of 
his father, John Milligan, occurred. The latter passed his entire life 
in Scotland and followed the stonecutter's trade. He married jMiss 
Jane Dowell, also a lifelong resident of that country, and they became 
the parents of ten children, of whom our subject is the eldest and all 
of whom are living in the United States with the exception of the 
youngest brother. He returned to Scotland after residing in this 
country for a year and now lives in the old home. 

Joseph Milligan received his education in the common schools and 
after putting aside his textbooks worked in a garden and nursery and 
subsequently in a stone quarry. In 1852, when twenty-one years of 
age, he emigrated to the United States, crossing the Atlantic on a 
sailing vessel which was twenty-one days en route. He landed at 
New York city, where he remained for a few months but at the end 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 213 

of that time removed to Chicago. A short time later he went to 
Joliet, lUinois, and for fifteen years was a resident of Will county. 
Wliile there he engaged chieflj^ in railroad work but after removing 
to Kankakee county turned his attention to farming. In 1878 he 
removed to Nebraska and took up his residence in Juniata township, 
Adams count}\ He devoted three years to farming and during that 
time lived in a sod house, which fact is indicative of the pioneer con- 
ditions that prevailed. At the end of that time he again turned liis 
attention to railroading and removed to the section house and in 1883 
was made section foreman, a position which he filled satisfactorily for 
thirteen years. At the end of that time he resumed farming and is 
still living upon his place on section 5, Juniata township. He owns 
eighty acres of good land, which is well improved, and derives a grati- 
fying financial return from the farm. Since his sons have started out 
in life for themselves he has rented his farm as he has reached the 
advanced age of eighty-four years and is living in honorable retire- 
ment. 

Mr. INIilligan was married, in Joliet, Illinois, in 1864, to Miss 
JNIartha Ellen Parson, who was born in Indiana, and they have become 
the jjarents of seven children, namely : JNIartha, the wife of Clinton 
]Meecham, of Grand Island; Rose, deceased; Libby, who married 
Grant Ruby, who is farming near our subject; Clara, the wife of 
Theodore Signer, who resides a half-mile south of Juniata; William 
Otto, a railroad engineer residing at Alberton, Montana; Edward, 
Avho is living in North Dakota ; and John, who was a ticket agent at 
ISIarion, Iowa, and was accidentally killed there. 

JNIr. ]\Iilligan has sujiported the republican party for years but 
when he deems that the interests of the community can be best served 
by voting independently he does not hesitate to do so. Both he and 
his wife are consistent members of the INIethodist Episcopal church, 
which he aided in organizing and the work of which they have always 
furthered to the extent of their ability. His life has conformed to 
high standards and has been filled with efl^cient and useful labor. 



ALBERT E. LIVINGSTON. 

Albert E. Livingston is well known in Hastings, where much of 
his life has been passed, and as a business man and citizen is held in 
the highest regard. He was born in Jersey county, Illinois, April 15, 
1874, and is a son of Albert Livingston, Sr., who still remains at the 



214 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUXTY 

head of the undertaking business which he established many years ago 
and who is represented elsewhere in this volmne. The son pm-sued his 
education in the public schools, supplemented by a busmess course. 
He had special training for his chosen calling in study in the Champion 
College of Embalming at Chicago, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1890. He then taught embalming to students who were 
office i^upils, among whom were: Volland, of Hastings; Ed Town- 
send, of Tecumseh; F. Gotchelda, of Utica and others, conducting 
business in various parts of the state. He graduates pupils and gives 
diplomas and in his instruction follows the latest and most improved 
methods. 

In religious faith ]Mr. Livingston is a ]Methodist and in jjolitics is 
independent, supjiorting men and measures rather than party. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Knights of P}i:hias, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the ^Mystic Legion and the ^Maccabees. He 
has a wide acquaintance in Hastings and different parts of the state 
and displays many sterling qualities which win for him high regard 
among all with whom he comes in contact. 



ALBERT WELLS BORDEX. 

Prominent among the enterprising, progressive and determined 
business men of Hastings is Albert Wells Borden, manager of the 
gas company and also the vice president and one of the stockholders 
in the busmess. He was born in Kings county, Xova Scotia, Decem- 
ber 18, 1880, a son of A. W. and Louisa (Woodbury) Borden. The 
father was also a native of Kings comity and engaged in the shipping 
business, handling maritime supplies. He was active in public aif airs 
to the time of his death, which occurred when he was but forty-four 
years of age. His wife, who was born in Annapolis, jSIaryland, is 
still living at the age of seventy-one years. 

Their son, Albert W. Borden, attended a private school in his 
native county and afterward continued his education in Acacia Col- 
lege at Hortonville, X'ova Scotia. At seventeen years of age he be- 
came connected with a gas light company at ]\Iount 'N'ernon, X"ew 
York, and since that time has been identified with similar business 
enterprises, winning success in his chosen field of labor. He went to 
Galesburg, Illinois, as assistant to the superintendent of the gas com- 
pany at that place and in 1903 he came to Hastings as manager for 
the Hastings Gas Company, which is a corporation. Becoming 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 215 

financially interested in the undertaking, lie is now vice president. 
He rebuilt the j)lant, which represents a large investment, and the 
latest processes are used in the manufacture of gas and in supplj'ing 
the commodity to the customers. He is likewise interested in the gas 
companj' at Grand Island and is regarded as one of the representative 
business men of his city. 

In early manhood JNIr. Borden was united in marriage to Miss 
Julia Ferris, a native of Woodhull, Illinois, and a daughter of Robert 
O. and Estelle (Richards) Ferris, both of whom were born in Gales- 
burg, Illinois, and now reside at Hastings, Nebraska. The father 
successfully followed farming in Illinois and remained an active and 
public-sj^irited citizen of Galesburg until 1908, when he removed to 
Hastings, where he has since been known as a well-to-do retired resi- 
dent. ]Mr. and JNIrs. Borden have two children: Ferris W., born 
September 16, 1908; and Robert Wells, whose natal day was jNIarch 
18, 1913. 

Fraternally JNIr. Borden is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, in which he has held office, and Avith the Travel- 
ers Protective Association. He is a member and one of the directors 
of the Chamber of Commerce and takes an active and helpful interest 
in all of its affairs relating to the general development and imjirove- 
ment. His religious faith is that of the ]Methodist church and he 
exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican part}', of which he is a stahvart advocate, doing all 
in his power to promote its growth and extend its influence. In his 
chosen field of business he has steadily advanced, working his way 
upward step by step, his exjjanding powers winning for him a 
creditable position in the business circles of Hastings. 



J. E. ADDIE. 



J. E. Addie is the junior partner in the law firm of Ragan & 
Addie of Hastings, prominent representatives of the profession in 
Adams county. He is actively identified Avith a calling which has 
imjjortant bearing ujion the progress and stability of everv com- 
munity by conserving the rights and jjrivileges of the individual, and 
it is well knoAvn that in the conduct of his cases he is thorough and 
painstaking and that his devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial. 
INIr. Addie is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred at Cresco on 
the 15th of January, 1875, his parents being John and Christina 



216 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Addie, both of whom are now living. The family is of Scotch lineage 
and the parents resided for some time in Wisconsin before removing 
to Iowa, where the father followed the occupation of farming in 
order to provide for the support of his wife and children. 

At the usual age J. E. Addie became a public school pupil and 
passed through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high 
school. Later he pursued a classical course of study at Milton Col- 
lege, at Milton, Wisconsin, and at Valparaiso University, and then 
entered upon the study of law in the Indianapolis College of Law, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1904. He made 
thorough i^reparation for his profession and since entering upon active 
practice has constantly advanced. He located first at Friend, Ne- 
braska, where he remained from 1905 until 1913, when he removed to 
Hastings and here entered upon his present j)artnership as a member 
of the firm of Ragan & Addie. He displays ability in putting forth 
the strong jjoints in his case and in detecting the weak points in his 
adversary's cause and as the years have gone by his powers in argu- 
ment have increased, while his pleas are characterized by a clear and 
decisive logic. The firm are now attorneys for the Chicago & North 
Western Railroad, for the Hastings & Northwestern Railroad and 
the Union Pacific Railroad. 

On the 17th of October, 1907, Mr. Addie was united in marriage 
to Miss Ethel Riggle, a daughter of B. F. Riggle, of Callaway, 
Nebraska. They have one child, Dwight B. The religious faith of 
the family is that of the Congregational church and Mr. Addie also 
holds membership with the Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United 
^Vorkmen and the Modern Woodmen. In his political views Mr. 
Addie is an earnest republican and he was appointed United States 
commissioner for this district by Judge Thomas Munger. He is fond 
of outdoor life and indulges his taste in that direction whenever the 
demands of his practice give him opportunity. 



ALBERT LIVINGSTON. 

A record of the leading business men of Hastings would be incom- 
plete were there failure to make reference to Albert Livingston, who 
is one of "The Livingstons," undertakers, in which connection they are 
conducting a large business. He was born in Delaware, February 
18. 1834, and is a son of James and Sarah (Kirkpatrick) Livingston, 
farming people, who have long since passed away. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 217 

The son was educated in the public schools and his early training 
and environment were that of the home farm. He continued to assist 
in the work of the fields until he attained his majority, after which he 
began learning the carpenter's trade, following that pursuit for many 
years. In 1858 he became a resident of Illinois, where he continued 
to work at the carpenter's trade and also engaged in farming for about 
sixteen years. In 1884 he arrived in Nebraska and the family home 
was established upon a farm near Harvard. He was thereafter iden- 
tified with general agricultural pursuits in this part of the state for 
nineteen years, or until 1903, when he removed to Hastings. He had 
engaged in the undertaking business in Harvard and after coming to 
Hastings opened undertaking parlors, which are still carried on. 

In 1861 JNIr. Livingston was united in marriage to J\Iiss Viola 
Gatewood and to them have been born four children: Anna B.; 
Francis ; and Albert E. and Walter, who are connected with the under- 
taking business. 

JMr. Livingston is connected with the United Brethren church and 
has guided his life by its teachings. He has taken an advanced stand 
on the temperance question, voting with the prohibition party, and he 
favors every jslan and measure that will benefit the comniunity and 
better the conditions among which the people live. His has been an 
active and useful life and wherever known he is held in high esteem. 
He was the founder of the business, which is now carried on under the 
name of "The Livingstons," undertakers. This firm teaches under- 
taking and gives diplomas to its students. They have one of the most 
complete establishments of the kind in the state and the father and 
sons were among the first to take the state examination for funeral 
directors, their licenses bearing the numbers 12 and 13. They passed 
the examination with the highest rank and the two sons, Albert E. and 
Walter, are members of the State Funeral Directors Association. 
They embalmed the body of John O'Connor, a recluse, who died 
August 17, 1913. They used fiuids of their own manufacture and 
the body is still in a perfect state of preservation, being viewed daily 
by many people. It has been seen by thousands and is regarded as 
the finest specimen of embalming. This man died without a will or 
known relatives, leaving an estate valued at one hundred thousand 
dollars. One hundred and fifty people have put in claims for the 
O'Connor estate, claiming to be relatives of the man, but the question 
has not yet been settled, hence the body continues to lie in the Liv- 
ingston vault. The firm carries the finest display of caskets in the 
state, representing investments of many thousands of dollars. They 
operate two auto hearses, two horse hearses, a limousine and a travel- 



218 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ing car. Thej^ have their own chapel, in which funeral services may 
be held, and they are prejDared to take care of the business in the best 
possible way. The father still remains an active factor in the busi- 
ness although he has now passed the eighty-second milestone on life's 
journey. JNIuch of the more arduous work, however, is left to the 
two sons, Albert E. and Walter, who for a long period have been asso- 
ciated with their father in the establishment. 



CHARLES MAN AH AN. 

Charles JNIanahan represents that percentage of Hastings' citizens 
who have retired from active business, success in former years en- 
abling them to rest from further labor. A native of Sandusk}" county, 
Ohio, he Avas born on the 24th of October, 1869, and is a son of Ira 
and Nancy (Weatherwax) Manahan. The former was a farmer by 
occupation, following that pursuit throughout his entire life. He has 
now passed awaj', but his widow survives. 

Charles JNIanahan pursued his early education in the district schools 
and also has learned many lessons in the school of experience. His 
early training was that of the farm lad, for in his youthful days he 
began work in the fields and soon became familiar with all the duties 
incident to the develojiment of the fields. He left home at the age of 
seventeen years and began farming on his own account in Indiana. 
On the 8th of February, 1891, he came to Nebraska, where he was 
again engaged in general agricultural pursuits, carrying on farming 
on his own account in Kenesaw township, Adams county. His atten- 
tion was devoted to general farming until 1908, when he came to 
Hastings, Avhere he has since resided. Here he erected a residence 
at No. 1001 North St. Joe street and is now most jjleasantly situated 
in life. As a farmer he was progressive and enterprising and brought 
his land to a high state of cultivation, converting the prairie into rich 
and productive fields which annually brought forth golden harvests 
as a reward for the care and labor which he bestowed upon them. He 
followed the most progressive methods in his farm work and year by 
year his competence increased. He is still interested in farm lands in 
Adams county and other parts of the state and his property brings 
to him a gratifying income. 

On the 22d of November, 1894, IMr. jNIanahan was united in mar- 
riage to ]\Iiss IMinnie Matlick, a daughter of Isaac INIatlick. They 
have one son, Vern, In religious faith Mr. Manahan and his family 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 219 

are Presbj^terians and in political belief he is a republican. He keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the daj^ and is therefore 
able to support his position by intelligent argument. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Elks and his wife is a member of the Eastern 
Star. He is highly respected and is popular wherever he is known 
because of a social, genial nature which appreciates the good qualities 
of others. He holds to high standards of manhood and citizenship, is 
free from ostentation and disjjlay and has many sterling traits of 
character. 



JOSEPH R. SIMS. 



Josejih R. Sims engaged in contracting and was one of the leaders 
in that line of work in Hastings. He passed awaj^ on the 18th of 
March, 1901, and his demise was the occasion of much sincere grief. 
He was born in England on the 21st of June, 1848, and was a son of 
William and Louisa Sims, who emigrated to the United States when 
he was but six j^ears of age. His early education was acquired in the 
public schools of Scranton, Pennsylvania, although he continued to 
study and read widely throughout his life. When twenty-four years 
of age he went to Chicago and there took a course in building. Subse- 
quently he returned to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1877, 
when he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and located in Hastings. 
He engaged in contracting and erected many of the fine residences of 
the city and its vicinity, his reliability and the thoroughness with which 
he did his work recommending him to the public. Although he had 
to Avork his way up from the bottom, having no capital and no_ influ- 
ential friends when he began his career, he never wavered in his deter- 
mination to gain success and his untiring industry, his exact technical 
knowledge and his business ability enabled him to gain prosperity. 

Mr. Sims was married on the 7th of April, 1875, in Pennsylvania, 
to INIiss JNIarion E. Hart, a daughter of Theodorus and Eliza 
(Ruland) Hart. INIrs. Sims has two brothers and one sister living. 
She is a descendant of Philip Hart and also of Jeremiah Hart, who 
fought in the American Revolution. To JNIr. and IMrs. Sims were 
born three children. Theodore, who was born in INIeshoppen, Penn- 
sylvania, married INIiss Grace D. Brown, of Wyalusing, Pennsyl- 
vania, and is now engaged in the jewelry business in Hastings. 
Maude L. is deceased and is buried in Hastings. Joseph Forrest is 
living at home and is operating a ranch south of Hastings. 



220 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Mr. Sims gave his political indorsement to the republican party 
and served acceptablj' for one term as a member of the city council. 
In religious faith he was a Baptist and fraternally he was connected 
with the Odd Fellows lodge at Pittston, Pennsylvania, and with the 
York Rite JNIasonic bodies and the ]\Iystic Shrine. He was highly 
esteemed in those organizations and served as recorder of the blue 
lodge. Although he passed away in 1901 his friends still honor his 
memory and all who knew him testify as to his uprightness and his 
l^ublic spirit. 



CHARLES W. WINKLER. 

Charles W. Winkler, who was for a considerable period success- 
fullj^ engaged in the florist's business in Hastings, was born in 
Wisconsin on the 7th of June, 1867. He became a resident of 
Nebraska while still a boy and attended the common schools here 
until he was fourteen or fifteen years of age, when he went to work 
as a farm hand. Subsequently he engaged in stone cutting and still 
later entered the employ of the John Davis men's furnishing store in 
Hastings, where he remained for twenty-one years, his long connec- 
tion with that business proving beyond a doubt his ability and trust- 
worthiness. About 1900 he resigned his position there and engaged 
in the florist's business at 1129 West Fourth street, Hastings, and 
continued active in that line until his death on the 2d of August, 1914. 
He managed his business aff'airs efficiently and built up a large and 
representative patronage, winning an enviable reputation for fair 
dealing and for supjilying plants and flowers Mhich retained their 
freshness and vitality as long as could be expected. In the meantime 
he iiurchased land and at the time of his death he owned two hundred 
and forty acres in Denver township. 

On tiae 28th of November, 1892, ISIr. Winkler was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ella E. Lulin, a daughter of Godfred and Anna (Bit- 
ters) Luhn. Both of her parents were born in Germany but became 
residents of Adams county, Nebraska, in its early days and subse- 
quently homesteaded in Webster countj'. To INIr. and INIrs. Winkler 
were born two children: Clarence, whose birth occurred in Adams 
county on the 18th of January, 1895, is now engaged in business as 
a florist, specializing in carnations; Charles, born October 15, 1908, 
is attending the public schools. 




CHARLES \V. WIXKLKR 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 223 

Mr, Winkler Avas an adherent of the republican party, but he 
considered the qualifications of a candidate of greater importance than 
his political allegiance and at times voted independently. His re- 
ligious faith was that of the Christian church. At no time in his 
career did he receive assistance from the outside but depended entirely 
uj)on his own i-esources, and the success which he gained was the direct 
result of his industry and careful planning. 



GEORGE A. VOLLAND. 

George A. Volland, who is engaged in the undertaking business 
at Hastings, was born at Haigler, Nebraska, on the 30th of July, 1888, 
his parents being Fred P. and JNIary (Kearney) Volland, the father a 
native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and the mother of Illinois. They are 
now residents of Omaha, Nebraska, and upon removing to this state 
in 188-i settled in Adams county, where the father followed the carpen- 
ter's trade. He afterward removed west to Haigler, Nebraska, still 
later became a resident of Platteville, Colorado, and subsequently es- 
tablished his home in Omaha, where he is still conducting business as a 
contractor and builder. George A. Volland became a pupil in the 
high school at Platteville, Colorado, and afterward qualified for the 
onerous duties of a business career by a course of study in the Has- 
tings Business College. He then entered upon active life as a book- 
keeper and still later learned the undertaking business, remaining in 
the employ of others until 1912, when he established business in Has- 
tings as senior jjartner in the firm of Volland & Coon. He is still 
carrying on this business and his house is accorded a liberal patronage. 
He carries a large and well selected line of caskets and funeral sup- 
plies and is most tactful and considerate in the conduct of his busi- 
ness affairs. 

In 1909 Mr. Volland was united in marriage to INIiss Paquita 
Studebaker, a native of Kent, Illinois, and a daughter of Frank 
Studebaker. The latter, who came to Nebraska in 1890, was success- 
fully engaged in the dray and cement business at Red Cloud, this 
state, and also took an active part in the work of the Brethren church. 
He is now living on a fruit ranch at Elberta, Utah. ISIr. and INIrs. 
Volland have two children, namely: Vernon G., who was born 
December 11, 1910; and Norman Hugo, whose natal day was Octo- 
ber 8, 1914. 

Mr. Volland holds membership in the Congregational cliurch and 



224 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

also with the Masonic fraternity, the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the 
World and the Loyal Mystic Legion of America. His political 
indorsement is given to the republican party and he was elected county 
coroner by the largest majority given to any candidate for any office 
in the history of the county — a fact which indicates his personal popu- 
larity and the confidence and regard reposed in him. He is social and 
genial, appreciative of good in others, looking at all times upon the 
bright side, and his friendliness and worth have gained him the high 
position which he occupies in the esteem of his fellow townsmen. 



CHARLES E. SMITH. 



Charles E. Smith gained financial independence through his 
activities as a farmer and is now living in honorable retirement in 
Hastings. He was born on the 15th of December, 1850, in Fayette 
county, Ohio, of the marriage of Peter W. and Ella (Painter) 
Smith, further mention of whom is made in the sketch of Horatio 
R. Smith. Our subject attended the public schools when opportunity 
offered until he was seventeen years of age and during that time also 
assisted his father on the farm. In 1870 the family removed to Jas- 
per county, loAva, and he aided in the development of the homestead 
there for two years. He then went to Henry county, Iowa, and for 
a year worked for his uncle, William Young, but at the end of that 
time returned to Jasej^r county and rented land which he operated 
for four years. In 1877 he arrived in Adams county, Nebraska, and 
purchased the northwest quarter of section 33, Blaine township, on 
which he resided until 1901, when he retired to Hastings. He was 
both practical and progressive in his methods and his industry and 
good management were rewarded by a gratifying financial return. 
As the years passed his resources increased and he is now enjoying a 
period of well deserved leisure. He owns a good residence at No. 
201 West Third street, and is one of the valued citizens of Hastings. 
He still holds title to his farm on section 33, Blaine township, and 
also owns the southwest quarter of section 28, and the north one-half 
of the southeast quarter of section 29, Blaine township, and valuable 
residence property in Hastings. 

Mr. Smith was married in Henry county, Iowa, in 1874, to JNIary 
C. Foster, a daughter of William and Betsy Foster, farming people 
of Henry county, both of whom have passed away. JNIr. and INIrs. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 225 

Smith have five living children and lost two in infancy. William W. 
was born on the 28th of October, 1875, and is now living in Lincoln, 
Nebraska. He married Miss Belle Tatroe, a daughter of D. B. 
Tatroe, of Omaha. Harlan, whose birth occurred on the 2d of 
December, 1877, is engaged in farming in Blaine township. He mar- 
ried Miss Ollie Hickman, a daughter of Elwood and JNlalvern Hick- 
man, of Hastings, and they have seven children. JNIyrtle, who was 
born on the 12th of December, 1884, is the wife of George Cisney, a 
carpenter of Hastings. Addie, who was born on the 14th of July, 
1887, is the wife of Charles Harris, a son of Frank and JNIattie Harris, 
of Hastings, and they have two children. JMr. Harris is a well known 
baker of Hastings. Clara, who was born on the 28th of June, 1893, 
married Bert Edwards, a baker of Hastings who was formerly a resi- 
dent of New York, 

j\Ir. Smith has supported the republican party since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise, but has never aspired to offi- 
cial preferment. However, he served for several years as a member 
of the school board in Blaine township and has always taken much 
interest in the welfare of the public schools. He holds membership 
in the United Brethren church and has conformed his life to high 
moral standards. None begrudges him the leisure which he now 
enjoys, for it is the direct result of his untiring industry. He had no 
unusual advantages in his youth and began his career without capital, 
but he believed that it was possible to gain success through hard work 
and the exercise of sound judgment and accordingly applied himself 
diligently to his farming oi^erations. 



A. L. CLARKE. 



A. L. Clarke, president of the First National Bank of Hastings, 
was born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, April 14, 1842, and 
sjient his boyhood days at home on the farm. He pursued a public 
school education, supplemented by study in an academy at Poland, 
Ohio, and in 1863 he went west to Douglas county, Illinois, where he 
engaged in tlie drug business at Areola for several years. He then 
turned his attention to financial interests, organizing the First Na- 
tional Bank of Areola, of which he became the first cashier. Later 
he was made its president and so continued until 1877, when he dis- 
posed of his interest in that institution and removed to Hastings. 
Here, in partnership with G. H. Pratt, one of the pioneer merchants 



226 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of the city, he i^urchased the Adams County Bank from J. S. Mcln- 
tyi-e and assumed the management of the institution as its president. 
This was converted into the First National Bank on the jth of July. 
1881, with JNIr. Clarke as its first president and in that connection he 
has since remained. 

In his political views Mr. Clarke is a republican and for one term 
served as mayor of Hastings but on the expiration of that period 
refused to again become a candidate for the office. In 1907 he was 
elected a member of the state senate and served for one term. He is 
an honorary member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
Throughout Nebraska he is considered one of the leading bankers of 
the state and when a company of Hastings' leading business men 
erected a new hotel they insisted against his wishes on naming it The 
Clarke in his honor. He has sought for progress and improvement 
in municipal affairs and has supported all worthy public enterprises 



AUBREY LAWLER TWIDALE. 

The upbuilding of a community does not depend so much upon its 
machinery of government or even upon the men A'sho hold its public 
offices as it does upon the enterprise and public spirit of its business 
men — they who promote its commercial prosperity and contribute to 
its substantial advancement. In this connection Aubrey L. Twidale 
is well known, being engaged in business at Hastings as a shoe mer- 
chant. He was born in Pontiac, INIichigan, on the 1st of January. 
1869, his parents being William and Elizabeth (Lawler) Twidale, 
the former a native of England and the latter of New York. In the 
late '50s the father came to the United States and established his 
home in Michigan, where he remained until the outbreak of the Civil 
Avar, when his patriotic spirit was aroused by the attempt to over- 
throw the Union and he joined Company F of the Ninth ^Michigan 
Cavalry, with which he served from 1861 until 1865. He was held for 
a time as a jirisoner of Avar at Salisbury. After the Avar he returned 
to JMichigan, Avhere he engaged in farming until 1870, Avhen he 
removed to Adams county. He secured a homestead claim in High- 
land toAvnship Avith a patent Avhich he had previously secured and 
which bore the personal signature of U. S. Grant. For a considera- 
ble period he carried on general agricultural pursuits but at length 
retired from the farm and engaged in merchandising in Juniata, 
Nebraska. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 227 

Aubrey L. Twidale was the eldest in a family of three children. 
In early life he was brought by his parents to this state and in the 
acquirement of his education passed through consecutive grades in 
the public schools of Juniata until graduated from the high school. 
In 1895 he removed to Hastings and established his shoe store, in 
which he carries many attractive lines of fine and medium grade shoes. 
He has a well appointed store, is ever courteous and obliging in his 
treatment of his patrons and as the years have passed his business has 
steadily grown until it has now reached large and gratifying propor- 
tions. 

Mr. Twidale was joined in wedlock to JNIiss JMargaret Wantz, a 
native of Friend, Nebraska, and a daughter of JNIichael and INIinnie 
(Schultz) Wantz, the former born in Aurora, Illinois, and the latter 
in ^Milwaukee, Wisconsin. IMr. Wantz, an agriculturist by occupa- 
tion, came to Nebraska in the early days and took up a homestead 
claim near Friend. 

Mr. Twidale belongs to the Masonic fraternity and has advanced 
through the Scottish Rite to the Consistory, in which he has attained 
the thirty-second degree. He is a rejjublican and feels deep concern 
for the political situation, doing all in his power to further the growth 
and promote the success of his party. His religious belief is that of 
the Episcopal church and his cooperation is heartily given to its well 
defined plans to promote moral progress. In a word, his life 
measures up to high standards and the integrity and reliability which 
he manifests in business affairs also features in his other relations of 
life. 



THE HASTINGS FOUNDRY AND IRON AVORKS. 

The Hastings Foundry and Iron Works is one of the extensive 
and important productive industries of Adams county. It is a busi- 
ness of large proportions and is constantly growing vmder the capa- 
ble supervision and direction of J. W. Worrick, who is now general 
manager and who took charge of the plant on the 1st of June, 1913. 
The company succeeded to the business of Emerick Brothers in 1907. 
The stockholders are all residents of Hastings and are most substan- 
tial and enterprising business men. The output includes agricultural 
machinery, wind mills, grain elevator machinery, also structural steel 
and general contract work, bridges, aqueducts, etc. The company 
manufactures for the Western Electric Company. The plant covers 



228 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

two entire blocks and is composed, of many buildings. There is a 
large building used for office and shipping rooms, a forge shop, 
a machine shop, a woodworking shop, a foundry, a steel shop and a 
storage building. These are well ventilated and well lighted and 
moreover they are equipped with the latest improved machinery to 
facilitate the work. They employ fifty men and their output is sold 
over many states. The business of the company increased thirty per 
cent in the year 1915 and the plant is utilized to its fullest caj)acity. 
The comi^anj' never deviates from its high standard in the matter of 
the excellence of the output, never using inferior material in manu- 
facture, and in all business dealings is thoroughly reliable as well as 
progressive. Their different products meet the demand for which 
they are made, reaching the highest point of efficiency, while some of 
their work, such as the electroliers, shows marked artistic beautj^ and 
finish as well. 



WALTER LIVINGSTON. 

Walter Livingston is a partner in the undertaking business con- 
ducted under the name of The Livingstons at Hastings. He was 
born in Jersey county, Illinois, on the 31st day of March, 1876, and 
is a son of Albert Livingston, who was the founder and is the senior 
partner in the business which is still carried on by the father and his 
two sons. Walter Livingston acquired a public school education and 
is a graduate of the high school of Harvard. He afterward took ujj 
the profession of teaching, which he followed for three years at 
Edgar, Clay county. Later he pursued a course in embalming and 
joined his father and brother in the conduct of the business in which 
he has since been active. They have the best appointed undertak- 
ing establishment in the state, carrying a large line of caskets and 
funeral goods, having also four auto hearses and two horse hearses. 
In connection thej' maintain a well ajipointed chajJcl in which services 
may be held, and no one is better able to handle funerals than this 
firm. 

In 1900 INIr. Livingston was united in marriage to Miss Christina 
Firestein, a daughter of Henrj^ Firestein, of Grand Island. In his 
political views Walter Livingston is a republican and is now serving 
for the second term as a member of the city council, in which he is on 
several important committees. He does good work for the public 
welfare along the lines of substantial jirogress and improvement and 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 229 

his cooperation can always be counted upon to further any plan or 
measure for the benefit and upbuilding of Hastings. Fraternally he 
is connected with the IMasons, the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and the Modern Woodmen and his religious belief is indicated in 
his membershij) in the Christian church. The Livingston family is 
one well known in Hastings and throughout this jjart of the state, 
and warm regard is entertained for them not only because of activity' 
and success in business but also because of sterling worth manifested 
in other relations of life. 



JOHN C. SWARTZ. 



John C. Swartz, agent at Hastings for the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quiney Railroad Company, has practically devoted his entire life to 
railroad service and in this connection has made steady progress by 
reason of his ability and fidelity. He was born in Greenville, Ohio, 
on the 19th of December, 1854, and is a son of Jacob and Barbara 
(Kahle) Swartz, both of whom are now deceased. In the family 
were seven children, five sons and two daughters, of whom John C. 
was the first in order of birth. Having pursued his education in the 
public schools, he then entered the railroad service as an operator, 
working along that line for two j^ears, after which he left Ohio and 
came to the west, settling in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, on the 11th of 
October, 1878. A month later, however, he was transferred to Hast- 
ings, where he remained for six months. He was then promoted to 
the j)osition of frontier agent, in which connection he continued for 
several years, after which he returned to Hastings, where he spent the 
■winter of 1881-2. In May of the latter year he was sent to Denver, 
Colorado, to become the first agent of the Burlington Railroad at 
that place and remained in that city until 1891, when he left the 
employ of the company to enter into business relations Avith the Colo- 
rado Fuel Company. Drought brouglit on hard times and he severed 
his connection with the Colorado Fuel Company, after which he 
returned to the Burlington Railroad as local agent at Denver, con- 
tinuing there for eight j'ears. He was afterward made general agent 
and occupied that position until the 17th of November, 1901, .when he 
returned to Hastings, Avhere he has since been located. He has proven 
a most capable representative of the road, is always courteous and 
obliging to its patrons and at the same time carefullj^ safegiiards the 



230 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

interests of the corporation which he represents. During this period 
he has witnessed the development and upbuilding of the city, which 
at the time of his arrival contained no brick residences. There were 
only board walks and the water supply was furnished with windmills. 
He was the night oj)erator who got into communication with the gov- 
ernment, leading to the sending of the militia here. As the years have 
gone he has witnessed marked changes and rejoices in what has been 
accomplished, converting Hastings from a western frontier town into 
a city of attractive proportions and opportunities. 

On the 30th of September, 1890, JNlr. Swartz was joined in wed- 
lock to JNIiss Mary E. Leight. He is a Protestant in religious faith 
and his wife belongs to the Christian Science church. In his political 
views IMr. Swartz is a republican and fraternally is connected with 
the Elks and the Commercial Club. He is one of the town's noted 
pedestrians, fond of walking for exercise. In his busy life, however, 
there have been few idle hours, his entire time and attention being 
concentrated upon his duties, which have been capably and efficiently 
discharged, making him one of the most trusted representatives of the 
corporation with which he is connected, while among his fellow towns- 
men he is regarded as a most popular citizen. 



BOWNE S. KOEHLER. 

Bowne S. Koehler is an active business man, devoting his entire 
attention to his duties as secretary and treasvirer of the Koehler Twi- 
dale Elevator Company of Hastings. He finds in the faithful per- 
formance of each day's duties courage and inspiration for the labors 
of the succeeding day and along the steps of an orderly progression 
he is working his way upward. He was born at Blue Hill, Nebraska, 
INIay 19, 1887, a son of Christian and Helen (Sweetland) Koehler. 
The father was born in Geneva, Illinois, and is now living at Hastings 
at the age of fifty-nine years. He has devoted his life to the grain 
trade and to farming and he dates his residence in Nebraska from 
1878, at which time he took up his abode at Ayr, Adams covuity. He 
found here pioneer conditions and with the work of general improve- 
ment and development has since been associated. He carried on 
farming for a time but for many years has been actively engaged in 
the grain business and is now the vice president of the Koehler Twi- 
dale Elevator Company, oiJerating a line of fifteen elevators, one of 
which is situated at Roseland in this county. His growing business 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 231 

aiFairs have made him a prosperous man and his activities have been 
of a nature that have contributed to public progress and prosperity 
as well as to individual success. In the earlj' '80s he removed to Blue 
Hill, Nebraska, and took an active part in public as well as business 
affairs there. In 1900 he came to Hastings, where he now has a fine 
residence. He sjiends much of his time in looking after his JNIontana 
holdings, for he has made extensive investments in that state. 

After completing a course of study in the high school at Blue Hill, 
Bowne S. Koehler continued his education in the Nebraska State Uni- 
versity and later made his initial step in the business world in connec- 
tion with banking, securing the position of cashier in the First 
National Bank at Elwood, Nebraska, where he served as a director 
and stockholder. In 1909 he came to Hastings and entered into active 
relations with the Koehler Twidale Elevator Company as secretary 
and treasiu'er. His undivided attention is now devoted to this business 
and his enterprise and jirogressive spirit constitute a potent element 
in the growth of the undertaking. In this connection he occupies a 
leading position as a representative of the grain trade in the state and 
he has thoroughly familiarized himself with every branch of the busi- 
ness and is thus able to successfully direct the activities of the com- 
pany which he represents. 

]Mr. Koehler was joined in wedlock to ]Miss jNIary Pierce, a native 
of Friend, Nebraska, and a daughter of George Pierce, who became 
an early settler of Friend, where he embarked in merchandising and 
has since been prominent and active in the affairs of the town. Our 
subject and his wife have one child, JNIary Helen. 

JNIr. Koehler is a worthy exemplar of the IVIasonic fraternity and 
an active member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He 
is a young man of marked enterprise and laudable ambition. He 
never fears to venture where favoring opportunity leads the way and 
he is fortunate in joossessing character and ability that inspire confi- 
dence in others. 



THOiAIAS R. VARAH. 



Thomas R. Varah, who is successfully engaged in the real estate 
business in Hastings, is still a large landowner and for a quarter of a 
century farmed a thousand acres, his ability to manage his extensive 
interests being j^roof of his energy, his foresight and his power to 
think in large terms. He was born in Oswego county. New York, in 



232 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

1857, of the marriage of James and Alice S. Varah, the former a 
native of Staffordshire, England, and the latter of London. They 
came to America in 18,56 and settled in New York, where the father 
engaged in truck farming for fifty years, or until 1906, when he 
retired. He passed away in 1914 at an advanced age. He is sur- 
vived by his widow, who lives in Central Square, ^e\v York. 

Thomas R. Varah divided his time between working for his father 
and attending school until he was eleven years of age and then became 
a newsboy on the New York Central lines, working in that capacity 
for five years. He was subsequently brakeman for a year, fii'eman 
for two years and conductor for two years but at the end of that time 
removed to La Salle county, Illinois, and rented a farm, feeling that 
agriculture offered greater opportunity for success than railroading. 
For five j-ears during the winters, when there was little farm work to 
be done, he attended school at Ottawa, thus supplementing the educa- 
tion which he had previously acquired. On the 22d of February, 1881, 
he removed to Adams county, Nebraska, and rented land in High- 
land township which he operated until 1884, when he purchased land 
in Hall county. For twenty-four years he devoted his time to agri- 
cultural pursuits there and during that period farmed a thousand 
acres of land. Although he is not now giving his personal attention 
to farming interests he still owns a large tract of land in Hall and 
Adams counties. 

Mr. Varah was married in Illinois, in December, 1879, to Miss 
Erissa A. Wisner, who is a daughter of James R. and Sophronia 
Wisner, old settlers of West Blue township, this county. They ai-e 
now living with their daughter, jNIrs. Varah, and are enjoying good 
health although they have reached the advanced age of ninety j^ears. 
To ]Mr. and INIrs. Varah have been born seven children, as follows. 
Alice S. married Josej^h Herrod, who is a son of William and Dora 
Herrod, old settlers of Hall county, and who is farming in Hanover 
township. To this miion have been born six children. Kittie B. gave 
her hand in marriage to Ross Foster, Avho is a son of Ora and Eliza- 
beth Foster, residents of Hall county, and is farming in Custer county, 
Nebraska. Three children have been born to this marriage. James R., 
who is farming in Hall county, married jSIiss INIary Rothwell, a 
daughter of James Rothwell, of Trumbull. Ray Thomas, who is fol- 
lowing agricultural pursuits in Doniphan township, Hall county, mar- 
ried ]\Iiss Edith Keller, a daughter of William and Anna Keller, of 
Hall county, and they have three children. Orange W. died in Hall 
county in 1905, at the age of fourteen years, and is buried in Green- 
wood cemetery in this county. William, who is a graduate of the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 233 

Hastings high school, is hving with his sister Alice and aiding his 
brother-in-law in the farm work. Arthur, who completes the family, 
is attending the Hastings high school. JNIr. and JNIrs. Varah have six- 
teen grandchildren. 

]Mr. Varah is independent in politics, refusing to obey the dictates 
of a party leader, and he has always taken much interest in public 
affairs. While living in Hall county he served for one term as a mem- 
ber of the board of supervisors and in 1881 he was elected secretary 
and treasurer of the A. S. of E., a farmers' selling organization of the 
middle west. In religious faith he is a Nazarene. Fraternally he is 
connected with the ]\Iodern Woodmen of America. Although he has 
gained financial independence he has received no aid from outside 
sources but has at all times depended upon his own energy and good 
judgment and attributes his success to his willingness to work hard 
and his readiness to take advantage of every opportunity as it offered. 
At times he had to endure hardship and success seemed far distant but 
he persevered and has gained his reward. 



CUHTIS LEONIDUS ALEXANDER. 

Curtis Leonidus Alexander, now living retired in Hastings, was 
born at Leesville, Lawrence county, Indiana, August 23, 1848, a son 
of Eli H. and Sallie (Flynn) Alexander. The father Avas a black- 
smith by trade and enlisted in the Second Indiana Infantry for service 
in the JNIexican war, in which he Mas engaged in active duty, par- 
ticipating in the battle of Buena Vista and also in the military move- 
ments in the mountains of Saltillo. In 18.5.5 he made an overland trip 
with ox teams to Decatur countj% Iowa, and purchased raw prairie land 
in that district. No improvements had been made thereon and his first 
home was a log house. He participated in the pioneer development 
of the district and was a recognized leader in the community. In 
1862 he organized Company A of the Thirty-fourth Infantry, of 
which he was captain. The company rendezvoused at Burlington, 
proceeded down the INIississippi and went to Vicksburg. Later Mr. 
Alexander resigned and returned home, resuming agricultural pur- 
suits. He became an extensive stock raiser and owned four hundred 
acres of land, upon which he made all of the improvements. In poli- 
tics he was ever an active republican. In the later years of his life he 
retired from active business and removed to Leon. He became a char- 



234 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ter member of Claj- Lodge, G. A. R., at Louisburg, of which he was 
the &-st master. 

Cm-tis L. Alexander is the eldest in a family of nine children, of 
whom six are yet living. He pursued his education in one of the old- 
time log schoolhouses Avith its puncheon floor and split log seats. 
He afterward attended the Garden Grove school and the high school 
at Leon, Iowa. Before the building of the railroad he drove a stage 
from Ottumwa, Iowa, to Nebraska, at which time there was a stage 
station at his father's home. At thirteen he began to earn his own 
living, working in a brickyard, and from that time forward has been 
dependent upon his own resources. In 1864 he enrolled at Leon, 
Iowa, as a member of Company C, Forty-eighth Iowa Infantry, for 
service in the Civil war and went down the river, being engaged in 
skirmish and guard duty. After a service of eight months and 
twenty days he was honorably discharged and returned to Decatur 
county, Iowa, where he learned the trade of blacksmithing. 

In the spring of 186.) Mr. Alexander came to Nebraska, settling- 
near Nebraska City, where he lived for a short time, after which he 
returned to Iowa. On the 4th of June, 1874, he arrived in Hastings 
and two years later was joined by his family, at which time Hastings 
was a little village. He engaged in buying and selling horses and 
has always been in that business. In 1875 he established the Hast- 
ings Bus Company and conducted a successful business until June 
11, 1913, when he retired. 

Mr. Alexander has long been active in politics as a supporter of 
the republican party and he served upon the county board of super- 
visors for ten years. He was elected state senator from the 
twenty-ninth district and thus became active in shajsing the laAvs of 
the commonwealth. For eight years he filled the position of city 
councilman and is still active in politics, doing everything in his 
power to promote the growth and insure the success of his party, for 
he believes its principles are the strongest elements in good govern- 
ment. 

jNIr. Alexander married INIiss Harriett Caldwell, of Wayne 
county, Iowa, a daughter of Nicholas and Abigail Caldwell, natives 
of Ohio, whence they removed to INIichigan and afterward made the 
trip across the country to Iowa, casting in their lot with the ])ioneer 
settlers of Wajaie county in 1854. The father became an extensive 
landowner and converted a tract of raw prairie into a valuable and 
productive farm, w^hich he continued to develop until his death. To 
ISIr. and Mrs. Alexander have been born three children. Harl 
Morris, who is married and has two children, is a traveling salesman 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 235 

for a music company and makes his hom'fe in Hastings. JNlargaret is 
the wife of J. T. Welch, attorney for the ]\Ioneyweight Scales Com- 
pany of Chicago, and they have one child, Gail. Abigail, the young- 
est of the family, is at home. 

]\Ir. Alexander was made a Mason in Hastings and has taken the 
degrees of the chapter, the commandery and the consistory, becom- 
ing a Scottish Rite Mason in Omaha in 1883. He was chosen chief 
of the staff of the Grand Knights Templar at the conclave in Den- 
ver, Colorado, in 1913. He became a charter member of the Elks 
Lodge, No. 149, at Hastings and he has many friends in these organ- 
izations. There is no phase of pioneer life in the west with which 
Mr. Alexander is not familiar and the events which to most people 
are matters of hearsay or history are matters of personal experience 
to him. For seven years he was associated with Buffalo Bill as 
Indian scout and cowpuncher, and has a j^icture of him bearing the 
autograph "To My Prairie Pard. W. F. Cody." JNIany people 
think that Mr. Alexander greatly resembles Buffalo Bill. He has 
all kinds of interesting Indian Aveapons given to him bj^ the red men 
whom he knew when he was doing scout duty. If one wishes to know 
anything concerning early experiences in the west or the history of 
pioneer development in Adams county they have but to ask Mr. 
Alexander to gain reliable information. 



CHARLES B. BIGELOW. 

Charles B. Bigelow is now living retired at Hastings but derives 
a gratifying annual income from his farming interests. He long- 
figured prominently in public affairs and made an excellent record 
as an official but is now leaving office holding to others, Avhile he is 
enjoying the rest that is the legitimate reward of earnest and intel- 
ligently directed effort. He was born in Erie coimty. New York, 
on the 7th of May, 1852, and is a son of Reynolds and Harriet 
(Darling) Bigelow, both of whom were natives of Erie county. The 
father, who was born in 1822, and the mother, who was born in 1825, 
both passed away at the age of seventy-two years. JNIr. Bigelow was 
a sailor on the Great Lakes in early manhood and in 1864 established 
his home in Illinois, where lie engaged in farming, carrying on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits there until 1872, when he traveled overland 
to Nebraska and secured a homestead claim in Verona township, 
Adams county. At that time there was not a house in sight of liis 



236 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

claim and the work of progress and development in the county 
seemed scarcelj^ begun. His first home was a combination dugout 
and sod house. He dug down to a depth of three feet and the sod 
superstructiu-e rose to a height of four feet. He lived in a wagon 
till this j)rimitive home was completed and then he bent his energies 
to the development and imj)rovement of his farm, which he converted 
into rich fields, annually gathering therefrom substantial harvests. 
He was also active in public affairs and was a leading representative 
of the democratic party. He served as justice of the peace in Verona 
township. 

Charles B. Bigelow is the younger of two children. He com- 
pleted his education in the high school at Beloit, Wisconsin, and on 
attaining his majority secured a homestead claim in Verona town- 
ship, where he lived in a sod house during pioneer times. For many 
years he continued his residence in Verona township, his labors being- 
devoted to the development and improvement of a farm. He Avas 
also active in public affairs and was a recognized leader in the ranks 
of the rejjublican part}'. He served as township clerk and in 1892 
was elected county clerk, which position he acceptably filled for two 
terms. He removed to Hastings in 1892 and remained in oflSce until 
1896, since which time he has lived retired. He has, however, two 
hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land from which he 
derives a gratifying annual income. A part of his farm constitiites 
an old homestead claim which was entered from the government by 
its former owner, who, however, lived in Nebraska for only a few 
years and then returned to the east, Mr. Bigelow purchasing the 
property for six hundred dollars. It was once owned by James S. 
Carson, who was born in Ontario county. New York, and in 1873 
arrived in Verona township, where he homesteaded the northwest 
quarter of section 22, township 8, range 11. He remained thereon 
for a few years and then sold his farm for six hundred dollars, return- 
ing to his native place. 

In 1874 Mr. Bigelow was united in marriage to JNIiss Eliza Pease, 
a native of Erie county, New York, and a daughter of Orson and 
]Maria Pease, who were also born in the Empire state. The father 
followed blacksmithing in New York and after removing westward 
to Illinois continued work as a blacksmith in the latter state. In 
1873 he took up a homestead claim in Verona township, Adams 
county, Nebraska, on which there has never been a mortgage and 
which is still in possession of ]Mrs. Bigelow. In this county Orson 
Pease carried on agricultural pursuits and also conducted a black- 
smith shop on his farm. He was a man of quiet and retiring disposi- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 237 

tion but recognized nevertheless as a citizen of enterprise and sterling 
worth. Mrs. Bigelow is the j-ounger of his two children. Her 
sister, JNIrs. Eleanor INI. Ohlheiser, was born in Erie county, New 
York, in 1846, came to Nebraska in 1873 and for many years engaged 
in teaching school, after which she became the wife of Joseph Ohl- 
heiser, now deceased. She took up a homestead which comprised the 
north half of the northeast quarter of section 10, township 8, range 
11, and still owns that property, although she now resides at No. 912 
North Lincoln avenue in Hastings. 

Mr. and JNIrs. Bigelow have become the parents of two children. 
Grace B. is the wife of A. B. Hopper, a practicing dentist of Hast- 
ings, by whom she has a daughter, Harriet. Harriet gave her hand 
in marriage to T. P. Shively, cashier of the Citizens Bank of Fair- 
field, Nebraska, by whom she has three children, Francis, Charles 
and Thornton. Such in brief is the life history of Charles B. Bige- 
low, now living retired in Hastings. His residence in the county 
covers a period of forty-three years and therefore he has been a wit- 
ness of the changes Avhich have occurred since pioneer times. 



CHARLES F. MOREY. 

Charles F. IMorey, who is one of the leading attorneys of Hast- 
ings, has engaged in practice in this city since 1886 and is a member 
of the well known firm of Tibbets, JNIorey, Fuller & Tibbets. His 
birth occurred in Wyoming, New York, on the 17th of November, 
18.54, and he is a son of Reuben and Abby C. (Bogman) JNIorey, 
natives respectively of New York and Rhode Island. The paternal 
grandfather, Samuel JNIorey, was also born in the Empire state and 
the family is of English extraction. Reuben JNIorey was born in 
1805, became a minister of the Baptist church and in 1865 removed 
with his family to Illinois, whence six years later he went to Wiscon- 
sin. He passed away in that state in 1880 but his wife died there 
in 1871. 

Charles F. JNIorey attended the public schools in Illinois and after 
the removal of the family to Wisconsin continued his education in 
Beaver Dam, that state. Still later he became a student in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1879 with the 
degree of A. B., and he then began his preparation for the bar, read- 
ing law in Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in that city in 1884 
and engaged in jiractice there until 1886, when he came to Hastings, 



238 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Nebraska, and formed a partnership with George W. Tibbets, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. This connection has, 
since been maintained. Other partners have been admitted to the 
firm, which is now Tibbets, Morey, Fuller & Tibbets, and it figures 
in practically all of the important litigation tried in the courts of this 
district. Mr. Morey has long been recognized as an attorney pos- 
sessing a comi^rehensive knowledge of the law and a keen and analyt- 
ical mind which enables him to determine at once which are the 
essential and which the nonessential factors in a case. 

Mr. JMorey was married on the 27th of June, 1883, to JNIiss Anna 
]M. Riordan, by whom he has a son, Clive, an electrical engineer. 
Mrs. Morey is descended from an old American family and belongs 
to the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

INIr. JMorey believes that the policies of the republican party are 
based upon sound principles of government and supports its candi- 
dates and measures at the polls but has never sought office. He 
affiliates with the Protestant Episcopal church and supports move- 
ments seeking the moral advancement of his community. He is held 
in the highest esteem not onlj' as an attorney but also as a citizen and 
as a man, his dominant qualities being such as have always com- 
manded respect and regard. 



CHRISTIAN NISSEN, Sr. 

Christian Nissen, Sr., who is living in honorable retirement from 
active life in Roseland, was for many years engaged in farming and 
still owns the south half of section 19, Roseland township. He was 
born in Denmark on the 16th of October, 1839, a son of Nicholas and 
JNIattie (Christensen) Nissen, who passed their entire lives in that 
country, where the father engaged in farming. They were the parents 
of three children, those besides our subject being Mary and Martha, 
both of whom died in their native land. 

Christian Nissen, Sr., received good educational advantages, at- 
tending the common and high schools of Denmark, and subsequently 
he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in that country 
untU he was twenty-one years of age. He then came to the United 
States, crossing on a vessel which sailed from Hamburg to New York. 
He made his way westward to JNIilwaukee, but soon after\\'ard went 
to Madison, Wisconsin, and there he followed his trade until Septem- 
ber, 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, Fifteenth Wisconsin 



*i«?^ 



'^Wlfcf 






PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 2il 

Volunteer Infantry, for three years, or during the war. He took part 
m the battles of Stone River, Island No. 10, Shiloh and Nashville, 
and was discharged at Atlanta at the end of his term of enlistment. 
He returned to JNIadison, Wisconsin, and farmed in that locality until 
1872, when he took up his residence on section 22, Hanover township, 
Adams county, Nebraska. For twenty-two years he cultivated 
that place but at the end of that time purchased land on section 19, 
Roseland township, where he resided until 1913. In that year he 
removed to Roseland, where he had erected a fine home, and here he 
has since lived, enjoying well earned leisure. He made many im- 
provements u^jon his farm and took justifiable pride in keeping every- 
thing in excellent condition. He owns a half section in Roseland 
townshiiJ and receives a good financial return from his land. 

In 1861 jNIr. Nissen was united in marriage to JMiss INIarie Teresa 
Holzer, b}^ whom he has had the following children: August, a resi- 
dent of Rawlins county, Kansas; jNIattie, deceased; Joseph, who is 
living in Silver Lake township, this county ; Nicholas, deceased ; Louise, 
the wife of David Rhodes, of Franklin county, Nebraska; ]\Iary, 
who married Clark Capra, also of that county; Christian, Jr., who is 
on the home place; Jennie, the wife of John Stromer, of White 
River, South Dakota; ]Martha, deceased; John, who is living on sec- 
tion 19, Roseland township; and JMinnie, the wife of Lloyd Tracy, of 
Rawlins county, Kansas. 

]Mr. Nissen has supported the republican party since becoming a 
naturalized citizen of the United States and has taken considerable 
interest in jjublic affairs. He served as school director and moderator 
for years and did much in that time to advance the interests of the 
county. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Danish Luth- 
eran cluirch and support its various activities. He is also identified 
with the Grand Army of the Republic. Since beginning his inde- 
pendent career he has depended entirely upon his own resources and 
the large measure of success which he has gained testifies to his 
industry and his good management. 



P. L. JOHNSON. 



P. L. Johnson, who is interested in farming and engineering 
work makes his home in Hastings, although his practice has covered 
a wide territory. He was born in Cincinnati, Appanoose county, 
Iowa, on the 12th of October, 1860, and is the voungest of the three 



242 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

sons in a family of five children, whose parents were Walter Samuel 
and Sarah B. (Gibson) Johnson. The father was an attorney of 
Centerville and served as clerk of the district court. He also gave 
part of his time to merchandising. In 1895 he removed to Lincoln, 
Nebraska, where his remaining days were spent. His widoAv, how- 
ever, yet svu-vives. 

P. L. Johnson was educated in the public schools and was grad- 
uated from the University of Iowa with the class of 1883, on the 
completion of a classicial course. He afterward entered upon a pro- 
fessional career as a teacher in the high school of Council Bluffs, and 
in 1886 his alma mater conferred upon him the INIaster's degree. In 
August, 1885, he located in Hastings and turned his attention to the 
banking and investment business, becoming manager of a branch 
office for Burnham Tulleys & ComiDany, and later was with the First 
National Bank of Hastings. He severed his connection with that 
business in order to enter upon the position of secretary and treas- 
urer of Hastings College and raise an endowment fund for the 
institution. He succeeded in securing fiftj^ thousand dollars for the 
buildings in addition to the endowment fund and he still remains as 
secretary and treasurer. He served, for the most part, without a 
salary and his labors resulted in the erection of four buildings and 
the acquirement of one hundred thousand dollars, which was added 
to the invested funds. Since then another one hundred thousand 
dollars has been added. The grounds cover thirty acres and there is 
a row of substantial buildings across the front of the campus. This 
institution certainly owes a debt of gratitude to jNIr. Johnson for his 
untiring efforts, which have placed the school upon a splendid basis, 
equipj)ed with the most substantial property and provirled with an 
excellent income from the endoAvment fund. 

On the 21st of December, 1887, Mr. Johnson was united in mar- 
riage to JMiss JNIarie Louise Brown, a daughter of Robert Brown, 
who settled in Nebraska in 1885 and became a very prominent 
banker and landowner, occujjying the position of vice president and 
one of the directors of the Exchange National Bank of Hastings. 
His activity did not a little to shape the business history of the city 
and county and the high regard in which he was ever held Avas widely 
expressed Avhen death called him on the 20th of INIarch, 1905. His 
widow survives and now makes her home with JNIr. and INIrs. John- 
son, who are the parents of a son, Walter Bedford, who is now jH-in- 
cipal of the high school at Gothenburg, Nebraska. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Presbyterian 
church and JNIr. Johnson is serving as one of the elders in the church 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 243 

at Hastings. In politics he is a republican prohibitionist and his first 
ballot was cast in support of the prohibition amendment in Iowa. He 
has ever been deej)ly interested in the cause of temperance and does 
everj^thing in his power to prevent the sale and use of intoxicants. 
He takes a great interest in amateur athletics and during his college 
days was a member of the varsity' teams. He is also much interested 
in the athletics of Hastings College and the Johnson Gymnasium 
was established through his efforts and the work of the students. 
Hastings has no more public-spirited citizen. He has long been 
particularly active in educational and religious circles, putting forth 
time, money and effort to further advancement along those lines. 
He always holds to high ideals, looking to the advancement and ben- 
efit of the community in which he resides, and his labors have been 
far-reaching, effective and resultant. 



ADAM BREEDE. 



Adam Breede, editor of the Tribune published at Hastings, was 
born in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, a son of ]Mr. and IMrs. William 
Breede, who were among Nebraska's early pioneers and were prom- 
inently identified with the development of the state, residing at 
different times at Plattsmouth, Lincoln, Sutton and Hastings. 
Adam Breede pursued his early education in the Hastings public 
schools and afterward attended Hastings College. Turning his 
attention to the field of journalism, he acquainted himself with every 
phase of the business and has become editor and proprietor of the 
Hastings Daily Tribune, one of the leading papers of the state. He 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has done 
not a little through the columns of his paper to mold public thought 
and action. 



W. G. SADDLER. 



W. G. Saddler is now living retired in Hastings, but for a long 
period was numbered among the active business men of the county, 
especially well known because of his important farming and stock 
raising interests. He was born in Pulaski county, Kentucky, on the 
15th of August, 1844, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth Saddler, 
both of whom have now passed awa}\ They were farming people 



244 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

and enjoyed the good will and respect of all with whom they came in 
contact. 

W. G. Saddler was educated in the public schools and when his 
textbooks were put aside turned his attention to the occupation of 
farming. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted for active military 
service, becoming a member of Company G, Thirty-second Kentucky 
Infantry. He was afterward honorably discharged and reenlisted 
as a member of Companj^ D, Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry, with 
which he remained until the 10th of January, 1865, when he was 
again honorably discharged. He then took up the occui^ation of 
farming in the employ of others and on the 3d of JNIay, 1866, he was 
united in marriage to JNIiss Susan C. Hail. He afterward continued 
in active connection with farm work and also taught in the common 
schools until 187-5, when he removed to Indiana, where he resided 
until 1883. In that year he came to Adams county, Nebraska, where 
lie carried on general agricultural pursuits until 190.5. In that year 
he retired to make his home in Hastings, where he has since remained. 
He is still the owner of farm lands and he was formerly known as a 
very prominent breeder of shorthorn cattle and was president and 
secretary of the State Association of Shorthorn Breeders. He has 
sold some of the highest priced shorthorn cattle ever sold in this 
county. These were bred by him and his efforts did much to improve 
the grade of stock raised in this section of the state. On leaving the 
farm he closed out his livestock interests in order to enjoy a rest which 
he has trulj' earned and richly deserves. He was the first to sow 
winter wheat in this jjart of the state and his experience proved that 
it was the wheat to raise in this section. He ranked with the most 
prominent and progressive farmers and stock raisers and his labors 
set the standard which many others followed. 

To Mr. and ]Mrs. Saddler were born seven sons and a daughter: 
John, Thomas, James, Farmer, Clay, Leonard, Harrison, and 
Mary, the wife of G. JNIorr. Several of the sons are married and 
there are eleven grandchildren. The religious faith of the family 
is that of the INIethodist church, to Avhich the parents loyally adhere, 
being devoted members of that organization. In his political belief 
Mr. Saddler is an earnest republican, keeping well informed on the 
questions and issues of the day and supporting his position by intel- 
ligent argument. In 1903 he was elected to represent his district in 
the state legislature, and made so creditable a record in that connec- 
tion that he was reelected for a second term. Fraternally he is 
identified with the JNIasons and has attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite, while with the Nobles of the ]Mvstic Shrine he 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 245 

has crossed the sands of the desert. He Hkewise maintains pleasant 
relationship with his old army comrades through his membership in 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and he finds it a pleasure to recall 
with them events which occurred upon the tented fields. His life 
has been an active and useful one well spent. He has given liberally 
to church work and has taken a prominent part in religious activities, 
doing everything in his power to further the moral development of 
the community in which he makes his home. His own life has ever 
been an honorable and upright one, conforming to high standards 
of manhood and citizenship, and constitutes an example which others 
might profitably emulate. 



ASHLEY T. SHATTUCK. 

Well directed activity along business lines in former years has 
brought Ashley T. Shattuck to a position where he can now live 
retired, spending his time in those ways Avhich afford him interest 
and pleasure and relieve him of necessity for fiu-ther labor. He was 
born in Jefferson county. New York, August 19, 1848, his parents 
being Abel and Sally (Hastings) Shattuck, both of whom were 
natives of Massachusetts. The father was a clothier who made cloth 
in the mills of New England and was also a colorer, dyeing the wool 
used in cloth manufacture. Removing to New York, he settled upon 
a farm of one hundred acres in Jefferson county, where he lived a 
quiet, unassuming life, devoting his attention to general farming. 
He was very thorough, systematic and methodical in all that he did 
and by a vote of the county fair commissioners his farm was pro- 
claimed the cleanest and best kept of any in Jefferson county. His 
sterling worth was widely recognized. Everybody liked him and he 
was known as Uncle Abel throughout the entire community — a term 
which is only applied when friendliness and geniality constitute 
salient characteristics of the individual. He died October 12, 1876, 
at the age of eighty-three years, two months and twenty-one days, 
and his widow survived him until 1881, when she, too, passed away. 
He was twice married and A. T. Shattuck is the youngest of the three 
children who were born of the second marriage. His political alle- 
giance was given to the democratic party but he never sought nor 
desired public office. 

Ashley T. Shattuck acquired his education in the district schools 
of Jefferson county, New York, but his opportunities went little 



246 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

beyond the three R's. In the spring of 1873 he arrived in Adams 
county, Nebraska, Avhieh was then a frontier district in which the 
work of development and improvement seemed scarcely begun. He 
had to face all of the conditions of frontier life with its hardships 
and privations. He located on section 10, townshij) 8, range 11, now 
loiown as Verona township, and resided there for over thirty years. 
He performed the arduous task of breaking the sod and preparing 
the fields for cultivation, and when he took up his abode upon the 
place the only building in sight was the schoolhouse. He built a 
frame dwelling and made all of the imi^rovements upon the farm. 
At first he used oxen to till the fields but with the passing of years 
he was able to introduce more modern methods. He had a fine resi- 
dence, substantial barns and outbuildings and four hundred acres of 
land when he retired and his place had been converted into a valuable 
projjerty from which he annually gathered rich harvests that brought 
him substantial financial return. He still owns one hundred and 
sixty acres of land and from that tract derives a good income. In the 
later 3'ears of his residence upon the farm he engaged in raising 
Poland China hogs, which he shipped all over the country. He had 
a very large number of fine bred hogs of that kind and won prizes 
upon his stock at the county fair, securing the major prizes in the 
only j'car that he exhibited. He continued to occupy the farm until 
1903, when he retired and removed to Hastings, where he has since 
made his home. 

In 1869 JNIr. Shattuck was united in marriage to JNIiss Thankful 
Sanders, a native of Jefferson county. New York, and a former 
schoolmate. Her parents, Aaron and Julia (French) Sanders, were 
both born in the Empire state but there was ten years' difference in 
their ages. The father owned and successfully operated a large dairy 
farm in Jefferson county, New York. He gave his political alle- 
giance to the democracy but never sought nor desired office, being a 
quiet, unassuming citizen. His wife passed away on the 29th of 
]\Iarch, 1870, when fifty years of age. JNIr. and ]\Irs. Shattuck have 
two living children. Thomas A., who is married and has three chil- 
dren, is i^roprietor of the Queen City Stock Farm, the finest farm 
in Adams county, and makes a specialty of raising Poland China 
hogs. Perley is married and resides in California. 

INIr. Shattuck greatly enjoys fishing and, having now retired 
from business cares, has ample opportunity to indulge his love of the 
sport. In politics he is a stalwart republican and has been active in 
politics, doing all in his power to promote the growth and insure the 
success of the party. He was the first supervisor from Verona town- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 247 

ship and occupied that position for three terms. He is an earnest 
Christian man but does not bind himself to creed or by denomiiia- 
tional lines. For several years he served as suj)erintendent of the 
Sunday school before the church became a denominational organ- 
ization, and at all times he has endeavored to make his life an exem- 
plification of the golden rule, doing unto others as he would have 
them do unto him. His wife has been a most true and loyal help- 
mate to him and that her good qualities are appreciated is indicated 
in the fact that she has won many friends throughout the county. 
The career of Mr. Shattuck has been fraught with good deeds and 
his sterling qualities have won for him the highest regard of those 
among whom he has lived. 



L. J. SIEKMANN. 



L. J. Siekmann, who is managing the Siekmann estate, was born 
in Wisconsin. He is the son of Henry and Katherine Siekmann and 
came to Adams count j' with his parents in the fall of 1878. 

The father, who is a minister, was the founder of the First Ger- 
man Lutheran Evangelical church at Hastings, and is still active in 
the work of the Lutheran church throughout this part of the state. 
He also organized churches near Glenville, South Hastings and 
Grand Island. His work was productive of much good. He has 
thoroughly identified his interests with those of his adopted state and 
has invested from time to time in fertile land of the countj' and is 
now a large owner of same, and also is connected with many other 
enterprises in the county. His wife passed awaj' in August, 1902. 

L. J. Siekmann entered the Plastings high school after complet- 
ing the work of the grammar school and still later graduated from 
Gem City Business College of Quincy, Illinois. On beginning his in- 
dependent career he engaged in the flour and feed business but later 
accepted a position with the German National Bank. He remained 
with that institution for twenty-two years or until lie left to take 
charge of the Siekmann estate. He is one of the directors and is serv- 
ing as second vice president of that institution at present. He is 
connected Avith a number of local business enterprises, being inter- 
ested in the Hastings Canning Company and having held the office 
of treasurer of the Farm Central INIutual Fire Insurance Company 
since the organization of that company. 

On the 26th of September, 1894, occurred the marriage of INIr. 



248 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Siekmann and Miss Emilie Orth, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad 
Orth, of Peru, Illinois. 

Mr. Siekmann is a firm advocate of republican principles and 
stanchly supports that party at the jjolls. His religious faith is that 
of the Lutheran church and fraternallj^ he is connected with the 
Roj'al Highlanders, which he aided in founding and on whose board 
he is now serving. He is a member of the Country Club and is very 
fond of outdoor life. He has resided in Adams countj^ since boy- 
hood, understands conditions here thoroughly and believes that the 
opportunities afforded energetic and prudent men are the equal of 
those found in any other section of the country. 



HENRY SHICK. 



Henry Shick, a well-to-do retired farmer residing in Kenesaw, 
was born on a farm in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, on the 9th 
of JNIarch, 1840, a son of John and Charlotte (Gruver) Shick, who 
were also natives of that county. The father served in the Union 
army for nine months and three of his sons also fought in defense 
of the Union. He passed away in Pennsylvania, and his widow 
subsequently removed to Topeka, Kansas, where her demise occurred. 

Henry Shick received but a limited education, as it was necessary 
for him to provide for his own support when but a boy. For some 
time he worked by the month but in October, 1862, he enlisted in the 
Union army, becoming a member of Companj^ D, One Hundred and 
Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He took part 
in the siege of Suffolk, Virginia, and in the battle of Deep Creek, 
Virginia, and after that engagement his command was called to Gettys- 
burg, but on account of a railroad wreck did not get there in time to 
take part in the battle. He was discharged in July, 1863, but in 
February of the following year reenlisted, joining Company D, One 
Hundred and Fifty-second Pennsjdvania Volunteer Infantry. His 
command was in garrison at Fortress IMonroe for some time and at 
the close of the war was honorably discharged. 

jNIr. Shick returned home and for three years aided in the opera- 
tion of the home farm, but at the end of that time secured a jiosition 
on a star mail route, which he held for four years. In 1879 he removed 
to Hall county, Nebraska, and for fourteen years farmed the eighty- 
acre tract which he entered from the government. He met with 
gratifying success as an agriculturist and as he managed his affairs 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 251 

well his capital increased from year to 3^ear, and after leaving tlie 
farm he removed to Kenesaw, where he is now living in honorable 
retirement. 

On the 27th of February, 1868, Mr. Shick was united in marriage 
to Miss JNIartha Hall, by whom he has five children: Mary E., the 
wife of B. K. Foulk, of Ericson, Nebraska; Alice, at home; Charlotte 
M., who has taught for twenty-one years and for thirteen years has 
been a teacher in the Grand Island schools ; Etta L., the wife of H. 
Wilcox, of Council Bluffs; and Sidney J., who is assistant superin- 
tendent at the Crow Creek Indian agency in Montana. 

Mr. Shick supports the republican part}^ at the polls but has never 
desired office as a reward for his fealty. However, he has seiTed as 
school director and while living in Hall comity held the office of con- 
stable. He is a member of the Grand Ai-ni}^ of the Republic and 
greatly enjoys associating with his comrades in blue. His religious 
faith is that of the Baptist church. He has always discharged all 
obligations resting upon him, and his sterling worth has gained him 
a high place in the esteem of his f ellowmen. 



GEORGE B. TYLER. 



George B. Tyler is well known in business circles of Hastings 
and Adams county. A native of Ohio, he was born in JNIedina county 
and his parents were Solomon and Eliza (Tuller) Tyler. He 
attended the public schools until fifteen years of age, when his ardent 
patriotism prompted him to enlist in the Union army and he became 
a member of Company B, Sixth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He re- 
mained with that command until mustered out in 1865 at Sioux City 
and his military record was highly creditable to his gallantr}' and 
loyalty. In 1866 he went to Colorado, crossing the plains to Pike's 
Peak, which was then the goal of many fortune seekers. He con- 
tinued his way westward to Idaho and prospected in that state and in 
INIontana and Nevada until 1875, when he returned as far east as 
Iowa. After remaining in that state for some time he went to Colo- 
rado and lived there until 1884, when he took up his residence in 
Hastings. He has varied business interests here and it was largely 
through his initiative that the Clarke Hotel was erected. 

INIr. Tyler was married in l879 to JNIiss INIargaret Pattie, a 
daughter of Mary Pattie, of Chicago, but in 1904 was called upon 
to mourn the loss of his wife, who was buried in Hastings. He is an 



252 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

adherent of the republican party where national issues are at stake 
but at local elections votes for the best man. Fraternally he belongs 
to Hastings Lodge, No. 1.59, B. P. O. E., which he was mstrumental 
in organizing. During his early manhood he resided in various parts 
of the Avest and gained a wide experience and a spirit of tolerance 
which make him an miusually agreeable companion. He has made 
and retained the friendship of many and is also recognized as one of 
the most successful men of this section of the state. 



HANS HANSEN. 



Business enterprise in Hastings finds a worthy representative in 
Hans Hansen, owner of a lumberyard in that city. His activities 
have ever been carefully directed and his course has measured up to 
high standards of business enterprise and integrity. He was born 
in Denmark on the 11th of September, 1863, and is a son of Chris 
and Sina Hansen. The family came to the United States in 1881 
and settlement was made upon a farm near Hampton in Hamilton 
county, Nebraska, where the father, with characteristic energy, began 
to develop and cultivate the fields. He continued the work of further 
improving his farm up to the time of his death, which occurred in 
IMarch, 1913. For thirteen years he had survived his wife, who died 
in INIay, 1900. They were worthy pioneer people of the district in 
which they lived and their efforts constituted an element in public 
progress and improvement there. 

Hans Hansen was educated in Denmark, attending school, how- 
ever, to onlj^ a limited extent and learning many of life's lessons in 
the school of experience. When still quite young he went to work 
as a farm hand and was thus employed for two years. He after- 
ward engaged in hauling coal and lumber for six years. He was a 
youth of eighteen when the family crossed the Atlantic and for a 
year he resided upon a homestead claim in Colorado, living in a dug- 
out. Later he embarked in business on his own account at JNIinden, 
Nebraska, where he opened a lumberyard Avhich he successfully con- 
ducted for eleven years. On the expiration of that period he removed 
to St. Paul, Nebraska, where he remained for nine months, and in 
1900 he came to Hastings, where he established a lumber business. 
Here he still carries on the lumber trade but his operations here by 
no means cover the extent of his activities in that field. He has 
formed a partnership with several men and they are numbered 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 253 

among the prominent lumbermen of this part of the state, having 
about fourteen lumberyards in this section of the country, together 
M'ith five in Canada. Their operations are therefore extensive, the 
business having assumed profitable proportions. ]Mr. Hansen is also 
engaged in selling farm lands and is recognized as a business man of 
keen sagacity, promptly and wisely utilizing the opportunities that 
have been presented. His ramifying business interests now cover a 
wide territory and the extent of his activities has made him one of 
the foremost factors in the lumber trade of the west. The lumber- 
yards owned by the firm at various points are operated under differ- 
ent names and JNIr. Hansen spends much of his time in traveling 
from one yard to another, overseeing the business and directing its 
policJ^ He bends his efforts to administrative direction and execu- 
tive control and splendid results accrue. 

In November, 1887, Mr. Hansen was united in marriage to Miss 
Tillie Johnson, a daughter of John Johnson, and to them have been 
born four children, Mabel, Perley, Dorothy and Duff. The religious 
faith of the familj^ is that of the Congregational church, to which 
the parents belong. Mr. Hansen, however, is connected with no 
secret societies. In politics he is a prohibitionist and takes an active 
part in the temjierance movement. He is fond of travel and has 
spent considerable time in Europe and has also visited from coast to 
coast in America. His efforts to uplift man have been far-reaching 
and beneficial, for he cooperates in many movements which have 
direct bearing upon the lives of the individual and on the community. 
His course, too, proves that success and an honored name may be 
won simultaneously, for in the legitimate lines of trade he has won 
advancement, his course ever conforming to the highest standards of 
connnercial ethics. 



H. M. CARPENTER. 



H. jM. Carpenter is associated with the firm of J. H. Haney & 
Comj^any, in which connection he is well known in the business cir- 
cles of Hastings. Although he has now passed the seventy- 
sixth milestone on life's journey, he yet remains active in business. 
His birth occurred in Worcester county, ^lassachusetts, on the 8th 
of December, 1839, his parents being Jason and INIercy (INIerett) 
Carpenter. The father was a cotton manufacturer Avho after follow- 
ing that line of business in the east for a number of years removed 



25i PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

westward with his family to Iowa and there passed away. His wife 
is also deceased. 

H. M. Carpenter was the youngest in a family of six children 
and in the jjublic schools of his native state pursued his education, 
passing through consecutive grades to the high school. He afterward 
learned the saddler's trade and has continued in that line of busi- 
ness through sixt)' years, starting out at the age of sixteen. All' busi- 
ness and personal considerations, however, were put aside at the time 
of the Civil war, when in response to the country's call for troops he 
offered his services to the government, enlisting on the 4th of August, 
1861, as a member of Company B, Fifteenth JNIassachusetts Infan- 
trj^ with which he was connected for three j^ears. He j)articipated 
in the princij^al engagements of the Army of the Potomac and was 
wounded at Ball's Bluff and also at Gettysburg. After six months 
spent in the hospital he was transferred to the invalid corps as a mem- 
ber of Company C, Twenty-second Regiment, and was mustered out 
at Washington, D. C, on the 4th of August, 1864, after three years' 
continuous connection with the army. He had come to know everj"^ 
feature of military life — the long hard marches, the strenuous cam- 
paigns, the hotly contested battles and the weary waiting in Avinter 
quarters, but he never faltered in the performance of his duties and 
with a most creditable military record returned to his home. 

]Mr. Carpenter afterward worked at his trade in Massachusetts 
until 1880, when he came to the west, making his way to INIarengo, 
Iowa, where he lived for three years. On the expiration of that 
period he came to Hastings and entered the employ of JNIarks Broth- 
ers, dealers in saddlery, with whom he continued until the Haney 
establishment was opened, since Avhich time he has been associated 
with J. H. Haney & Company. He is an expert workman, having 
kept in close touch with the advance made in the trade and its meth- 
ods through all the years in which he has been active as a harness and 
saddlery manufacturer. 

In Sejitember, 1864, INIr.. Carpenter was united in marriage to 
JNIiss Sophronia A. Fuller, who was a daughter of Charles and jNIerril 
Fuller, of JNIassachusetts, and who died in January, 1906. To this 
union Avere born four children, namely: Nina E., who has been prin- 
cipal of the first ward school at Hastings for twenty-seven years; 
William H., living on a ranch at Aberdeen, Idaho; Janett L., who is 
a graduate of Hastings College and a professor in that institution; 
and Allen F., professor in the University of Washington at Seattle. 
There are also two grandchildren. 

Mr. Carpenter holds membership in the Presbyterian church, to 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 255 

which Mrs. Carjjenter also belonged and in whose work she was quite 
active. In j)olitics ]Mr. Carpenter is a republican and fraternally he 
is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the INIystic 
Legion and the Grand Army of the Republic. He belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce and is interested in all that pertains to the 
welfare and progress of his city. There are few men of his years 
who remain so active in business and few who maintain such close 
connection with the trend of the times, but in spirit and interests he 
seems yet in his prime. Old age does not necessarily suggest idleness 
nor want of occupation. There is an old age which grows richer and 
stronger mentally and morally as the }'ears go on and gives out of the 
rich stores of its wisdom and experience for the benefit of others, and 
such has been the record of Mr. Carpenter. 



GEORGE W. TIBBETS. 

George W. Tibbets, of Hastings, has gained a high standing in 
the legal jirofession, in which advancement depends solely ui)on 
ability and personal force. He was born in Belfast, New York, on 
the 2.5th of July, 1848, and his parents were James A. and Lucj' A. 
(Raymond) Tibbets, both of whom Avere born in New York, tlie 
former on a farm in Seneca county. The grandfather of our subject, 
Lyman Tibbets, was born in Connecticut and served in the War of 
1812. 

George W. Tibbets received good educational opportunities in 
his youth, as after leaving the public schools he attended the Genesee 
Valley Seminary of Belfast, New York, in which he prepared for 
college. He subsequent!}^ matriculated in the Iowa State Uni\er- 
sity at Iowa City, where he remained for tlu'ee years, taking an 
academic course. Later he taught school in Illinois during the fall 
and winter of 1873, after which he returned to New York and became 
principal of the schools of Angelica. He remained there a year, sub- 
sequently returned to Belfast and taught in a j^rivate school for a 
similar period and then went again to Angelica, accepting the posi- 
tion of superintendent of schools. He also resumed the reading of 
law, which he had begun when first connected with the Angelica 
schools. While serving as superintendent he was elected school com- 
missioner, which important office he held for three years. In 1879 he 
was admitted to the bar at Rochester, New York, and engaged in 
practice at Belfast until he came west to Hastings, Nebraska, in 1886, 



256 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

since which time he has been a member of the local bar. In that year 
he formed a partnership with Charles F. Morey, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work, and thej' are still associated in the 
practice of law. They have admitted others to the fu'm, which is now 
known as Tibbets, Morey, Fuller & Tibbets and which holds a high 
position at the bar. ]\Ir. Tibbets has always given every case the most 
thorough study and has never neglected the consideration of any 
point which might have a bearing upon the outcome of the trial. He 
is convincing in the presentation of his arguments and has won 
a large percentage of the cases in which he has appeared as counsel. 

On the 2d of August, 1882, in Belfast, New York, occurred the 
marriage of ]Mr. Tibbets and JSIiss ]\Iary A. Caj^ron. They have a 
son, Raymond 'M., who was born in 1883, was graduated from the 
Nebraska State University in 1908 and Avas admitted to the bar in 
that year. He is now a member of the firm of Tibbets, JNIorey, Fuller 
& Tibbets. ]Mrs. Tibbets belongs to the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, having ancestors who fought for independence from 
England. 

Mr. Tibbets supports the democratic party at the polls and in 
1908 and again 1910 was elected to the state senate from this district. 
In his first term he was honored by being elected president pro tem 
of that bodj' and in his second term he was made chairman of one of 
the important committees — that on judiciarj'. He made an excellent 
record as a senator and it was recognized that in all that he did he was 
actuated by a desire to promote the jiublic welfare. He is well known 
in local JNIasonic circles, belonging to tlie blue lodge, the York and 
Scottish Rite bodies and the ]Mystic Shrine, and he is also identified 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He has a wide 
acquaintance and his genuine worth is indicated bj' the fact that those 
who have been longest associated with him are his stanchest friends. 



JAMES A. ROSE. 



James A. Rose, president and manager of the James A. Rose 
^Manufacturing Company, is one of the most influential factors in 
the commercial development of Hastings and has built up a business 
of large jjroportions. In addition to his manufacturing interests he 
has given considerable attention to the plumbing and heating business 
and has had the contract for work along those lines in a number of 
important buildings of Hastings. A native of Ohio, he was born on 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 257 

the 24th of December, 1854, of the marriage of Peter and Lizzie 
(Watts) Hose. The father followed agricultm-al pursuits and in 
1873 removed with his family to Nebraska and located on a home- 
stead nine miles southwest of Hastings. He continued to operate 
that place until a few years before his death, when he removed to 
Roseland, Nebraska, where he lived retired. His wife is also 
deceased. He was a man of strong patriotism and at the time of the 
Civil war enlisted in an Oliio regiment, with which he served for three 
years, 

James A. Rose received his education in the public schools and 
after putting aside his textbooks concentrated his energies upon 
farming until he was twenty-five years of age, when he removed to 
Hastings. He was first connected with the windmill and plumbing- 
business and later began taking contracts for installing heating plants 
in connection with his other lines and proved very successful in that 
field. He installed the heating and plumbing in the Carnegie library, 
the high school, the Exchange National Bank building, a number of 
business blocks and many of the best residences of the town. Since 
1911 he has given much of his thought and energy to the development 
of the J. A. Rose JNIanufacturing Companj% whose trade has shown 
a steady and rapid growth since its organization. The company man- 
ufactures the Rose frictionless tire pump, which is said to be the only 
tire pump on the market that will stand up under constant use, and 
it also makes the Rose automobile grease gun for individual automo- 
bile use, which is self-loading and is the same in principle of construc- 
tion as the Rose shop grease gun. The latter is of larger capacity 
and is especially adapted to the use of garages. Another specialty of 
the J. A. Rose jNIanufacturing Company is the Rose washer and 
gasket cutter, which is complete in itself, dispensing with the use of 
a brace, is very easily adjusted to size and cuts the washer without 
damaging the material. It has many other good points as it can be 
used to cut almost any kind of material, including asbestos and glass, 
has an automatic feed and is supplied with an attachment that makes 
the cutting of oval gaskets as simple as round washers. It is supplied 
in a number of sizes and is giving complete satisfaction, doing all that 
is claimed for it. The J. A. Rose jNIanufacturing Company now 
employs about ten men and expects soon to enlarge its plant, Avhich 
is thoroughly modern in its equipment. ]Mr. Rose retained the own- 
ership of the home farm for a number of years but has now disposed 
of that place and is concentrating his energies upon the management 
of his other business interests. 

Mr. Rose was married in 1879 to INIiss I.,izzie INIartin, a dau»liter 



258 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of Solomon Martin, who came with his family to Adams county in 
1876. He is still living at the advanced age of ninety-four. Mr. and 
JNIrs. Rose are the parents of eight children, namely: Ettie, Frank, 
Lura, Ralph, Guy, Ira, JNIyrtle and Earl. 

In politics Mr. Rose is independent, voting for the man rather 
than the party. He served as a member of the city council for two 
years and was on the school board for six years, doing much in those 
capacities to promote the general welfare. He is a member of the 
INIethodist Episcoj)al church, whose work he furthers in every way 
possible, and fraternally he is connected wath the JNIodern Woodmen 
of America. He is quick to recognize opportunity^ and prompt in 
carrying out his plans for the development of his business interests. 
His energy and sound judgment have been rewarded and he has 
gained financial independence and also aided in promoting the busi- 
ness growth of his town. He is much interested in everything that 
pertains to the progress of his community and is recognized as a 
public-spirited citizen. 



BENEVILLE F. SCHLEGEL. 

Beneville F. Schlegel, a well known resident of Kenesaw, was 
formerly engaged in farming in this county and later conducted a 
hardware and implement store in Kenesaw for nine years. His birth 
occurred on a farm in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, on the 
3d of February, 1840, and his parents were Peter and Susanna 
(Bohne) Schlegel, who spent their entire lives in that county. He 
attended a subscription school for some time, but his educational ad- 
vantages were limited, as he was the oldest son and was obliged to 
devote much of his time to helping with the farm work. He remained 
at home until 1859 and for two years thereafter Avas emploj^ed as a 
hired hand. 

On the 14th of April, 1861, INIr. Schlegel put aside all personal 
considerations and joined the Union army, enlisting in Company E, 
Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which regiment was the first at 
Camp Denison. After serving for three months he was honorably 
discharged but, recognizing the fact that the war was likely to last 
for a much longer period, he went to Pennsylvania and enlisted in 
Company H, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, for three 
years. At the end of that time he reenlisted in the same company 
and regiment and was at the front until the close of hostilities. His 




MRS. BEXEVILLE F. SCHLEGEL 




BENEVILLE F. SCHXEGEL 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 263 

command marched through Raleigh, North CaroHna, to Washington 
and participated in the grand review in the capital city. On the 16th 
of Jul}', 1865, he was honorablj' discharged at Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. He saw a great deal of hard fighting and participated in many 
engagements, including the following: Winchester, under General 
Banks ; Cedar ]\Iountain, the second battle of Bull Run and Antietam, 
under General Pope; Chancellorsville and Gettysburg and Lookout 
Mountain, Rocky Face Ridge and Peachtree Creek. He also took 
part in the Atlanta camj^aign. After he was transferred to the west- 
ern front he served under General Hooker. He was twice wounded 
and endured the many hardships incident to military senice. 

After his return from the army Mr. Schlegel remained upon the 
home farm for a month and then went to Sandusky, Ohio. Subse- 
quently he was on a farm in Erie county, Ohio, for a year, but in 
1867 he migrated westward, settling in Dakota county, Nebraska, 
■where he farmed for four years. At the end of that time he returned 
east and spent five years in Ohio and Pennsylvania, but in 1877 he 
again came to the west. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in Kenesaw precinct, Adams county, Nebraska, and later 
bought three hundred and twenty acres in Kearney county. He car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits in Adams county for some time and 
operated his farm in Kearney county for a j'ear, after which he sold 
that i^lace. In 1895 he removed to Kenesaw and for nine years con- 
ducted a hardware and implement store, gaining recognition as one 
of the progressive and successful business men of the town. He is 
now living retired, enjoying the fruits of his former labor. 

In 1866 jNIr. Schlegel was married to ]\Iiss Eliza A. Combs, who 
passed away two years later. In 1872 he was united in marriage to 
Miss Rosa A. Reid, by whom he has had four children, namely: 
Almeda M., now JNIrs. John Gerhard, of Kenesaw; Charles G., also 
a resident of Kenesaw; Susanna J., a resident of Loup City; and 
Sarah C, now INIrs. W. Hays, of Naponee, Nebraska. 

INIr. Schlegel is a stalwart republican and has taken quite an active 
part in jjolitical affairs. For thirt_y-three years he served as a mem- 
ber of the school board, for four terms he was a member of the board 
of supervisors and for many years he held the office of township 
treasurer. He was again elected supervisor in 1915 to serve four 
j^ears. He has discharged his official duties with a conscientious regard 
for the public welfare and has made a highly creditable record. 
Fraternally he belongs to Kenesaw Lodge, No. 144, A. F. & A. M., 
of which he was treasurer for sixteen years; and to Enterprise Lodge, 
No. 29, K. P. All who have come in contact with him, whether in 



264 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

business, fraternal or social relations, hold liini in high esteem and 
respect him for his many admirable qualities. He has gained a grati- 
fying measure of financial success as a result of his energy and sound 
judgment and has also found opportunity to work for the advance- 
ment of the interests of his community. 



DAVID HART. 



Among the residents of Hastings who are now living retired is 
David Hart, who for a considerable period Mas actively connected 
with farming and stock raising interests in West Blue township and 
bj' his well directed efforts won the competence which now enables 
him to rest from further labors. He was born in Peoria county, Illi- 
nois, February 18, 1845, a son of ]Mr. and ]Mrs. Amaziah Hart. His 
parents had removed from Fleming county, Kentucky, to Illinois a 
few years previous to his birth and at the earlj- age of three years he 
was left an orphan. He then went to live with a brother-in-law, 
James Jones, who died when David Hart was a lad of about ten sum- 
mers. He afterward resided with a brother, John ]M. Hart, to the 
age of sixteen j^ears, when he began working as a farm hand. Since 
that time he has been dependent entirely upon his own resources, so 
that whatever success he has achieved is the merited return and reward 
of his labor. 

]Mr. Hart is the j-oungest in a family of nine children, having 
four brothers and four sisters, as follows: Lucinda, JNIargaret A., 
John jNI., Abraham, James, JMalinda, Fielding and JNIary. Two of 
liis brothers, John JNI. and James, lost their lives in defense of their 
country during the dark days of the Civil war. Our subject had 
accomijanied his brother to JNIenard county, Illinois, and after the 
latter's enlistment he had to make his own way unaided. He went 
from there to JNIcLean county, Illinois, in 1867 and there owned and 
operated land for some years. It was in February, 1891, that he 
arrived in Adams county, Nebraska, and settled in West Blue town- 
ship, where he became the owner of a farm of four hundred and forty 
acres of rich and productive land, which he brought to a high state 
of cultivation. To his place he added various improvements and as 
the years went by he carefully directed his business affairs so that 
success in substantial measure came to him. In addition to tilling 
the fields in the cultivation of the crops best adapted to soil and 
climate he engaged in the raising of Norman horses. At length. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 265 

wishing to retire from active business, he removed to Hastings on the 
1st of March, 1902, and he has since made his home here. 

On the 21st of January, 1869, JNIr. Hart was united in marriage 
to Miss JNIary I. Campbell, a native of Indiana and a daughter of 
JNIark Campbell, a carpenter, who always lived in that state. Mrs. 
Hart passed away January 15, 1904, at the age of fifty-six years. 
To this union were born five children but Charles died in infancy. 
The others are: Edith A., who is acting as her father's housekeeper; 
John F., who is married and has three children and makes his home 
at Elba, Nebraska, where he is engaged in the practice of medicine; 
Henry E., who lived upon a farm in West Blue township and died 
at the age of thirtj'-four years; and Dora E., the wife of W. A. 
Hazle, a farmer of Hall county, Nebraska, by whom she has two 
children. 

In his fraternal relations JNIr. Hart is connected with the Loyal 
Mystic Legion. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party, which he has earnestly supported since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. In 1904 he was elected to represent his 
district in the state senate but his health failed and he did not qualify 
for the office. However, he keeps well informed on all the questions 
and issues of the day and is able to support his position by intelligent 
argument. He is an active member of the Presbyterian church and 
has guided his life according to its teachings so that his manj' admira- 
ble traits and honorable principles have gained for him the respect 
and confidence of all who know him. 



A. W. BINDERUP. 



Nature seems to have intended tliat man should enjoy a period 
of rest in the evening of life. This is evidenced by the fact that he 
possesses enthusiasm and energy in youth, which qualities in mature 
manhood are guided by sound judgment. If he exercises his powers 
to good advantage he will become the possessor of a competence that 
will supply him with all the necessities of life during his later years. 
That A. W. Binderup has carefully directed his labors is shown in 
his present financial condition, which enables him to enjoy all of life's 
comforts and some of its luxuries. He makes his home at No. 1134 
West Second street in Hastings, where he is most pleasantly situated. 
He was born in Vile, Denmark, on the 1st of JNIarch, 1842, a son of 
Nels J. and Augusta H. Binderup. The father was an inspector of 



266 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

the Roj-al Hospital at Copenhagen and spent his entire life in the 
emiiloy of the government, making his liome at Vile. He owned land 
in that locality and was a valued and representative citizen of his 
community. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church. 

In the family were t^\'elve children, of whom A. ^V. Binderup was 
the ninth in order of birth. He attended school in his native town 
and afterward served in the Danish army for three j-ears, during 
whicli he won promotion to the rank of second lieutenant and then to 
first lieutenant. He took part in the Danish war of 1864 and then, 
thinking to try his fortune in America, made arrangements to come 
to the United States, arriving at New York on the 26th of December, 
of that year. For eight years he was a surveyor and draftsman in the 
east and on the 30th of Ajiril, 1873, he arrived in Hastings, which 
was then a small western frontier town giving little promise of its 
future development and progress. He had purchased lands in Blaine 
township and there he erected a frame residence of a story and a lialf , 
it being one of the first frame houses in the township. He purchased 
forty acres of railroad land at first and afterward added to this until 
he had one hundred and sixty acres, Avhich he cultivated and upon 
which he resided for six years. In 1879 he removed to Hastings, 
where he purchased two and a half acres for one hundred and fifty 
dollars. All of this is now divided into city lots lying along First and 
Second streets, which streets he laid out in 1879. For a time he was 
in the employ of the Burlington & Missouri Railroad Company and 
on the 16th of August, 1879, he established business as a dealer in 
coffees, teas and spices, conducting the business until July 16, 1881, 
when it was destroyed by fire. He immediatel}' resumed business, 
however, his store occupying the site where the postoftice now stands. 
He gradually developed his trade into a grocery business which he 
conducted until 1887, when he retired from active commercial pur- 
suits. In the meantime he had developed a business of extensive pro- 
portions and his trade brought to him a gratif j'ing annual income 
which enabled him to put by a goodly sum so that in the course of 
time he became one of the substantial citizens of Hastings. 

In 1872 ]\Ir. Binderup was married to JMiss Emma INIatilda Char- 
lotte Hansen, who was born ill Copenhagen, Denmark, October 19, 
1843, a daughter of Hans and Jesina ( Aanesen) Hansen, the former 
an architect, sculptor and artist. The mother came to the United 
States in 1872 and lived with Mr. and Mrs. Binderup until 1893. 
Mrs. Binderup conducted the farm while Mr. Binderup was in the 
emploj" of the railroad company and in the mercantile business. INIany 
Indians would call at their home, for the red men were numerous in 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 267 

this section of tlie state, and there were all kinds of wild game, even 
buffalo being killed near their home in the earlj' days, together with 
antelopes and smaller game. The conditions of pioneer life every- 
where existed. When Mr. and JNIrs. Binderup arrived in Hastings 
they were dropped off in the mud, as the Burlington was not making 
a regular stop here at the time. School and church services were all 
held in the same building. Corn cobs and chips were the fuel used 
and all of the hardshijis and privations of frontier life were to be met. 
Their experiences were varied and ofttimes were of a most arduous 
nature. They have lived to witness notable changes as the years have 
brought all of the improvements and advantages of civilization, trans- 
forming' this district into a j^opulous and prosperous county. 

In politics JMr. Binderup is a republican but with independent 
tendencies, and has no jDolitical as^iirations. He is also liberal in 
religious thought and in fact in all the relations of life has largely 
followed an independent course, nor has he interfered with the right 
of others to do the same. His has been a straightforward, upright 
course, marked by devotion to duty, by reliability in business and by 
enterj^rise and progressiveness in all life's relations, and thus it is that 
he has won his place among the substantial and highly respected 
citizens of the county. 



J. H. LOSEE. 



J. H. Losee gained a competence through his well directed labors 
as an agriculturist and is now living in honorable retirement in Hast- 
ings. A native of Greene county, New York, he was born on the 12th 
of September, 1840, of the marriage of Ranson and Sarah Ann 
(Palmer) Losee, who passed their entire lives in the Empire state, 
Avhere the father engaged in farming. 

J. H. Losee attended the public schools in his boyhood and j'outh 
and also gave much of his time to assisting his father with the farm 
work. When twenty-one years of age he began following agricultural 
pursuits on his own account and in 1868 came Avest, locating on a farm 
in Illinois. He remained in that state for fifteen years, at the end of 
which time he removed to Adams county, Nebraska, and took up his 
residence on a farm in Highland township. For twenty-seven years 
he operated that j^lace and as the years passed brought his land to a 
high state of development and made many excellent improvements 
upon his farm. He was both practical and progressive in his methods 



268 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

and as year after year he harvested good crops he was able to add to 
his holdings and at length accumulated sufficient capital to provide 
for his comfort throughout the remainder of his life. In 1911 he 
gave over the active work of the farm to others and removed to Hast- 
ings, where he is now living. However, he still owns the farm. 

On the 5th of June, 1876, Mr. Losee was united in marriage, in 
^ Marshall county, Illinois, to Miss Josephine Roll, a daughter of 
Charles Roll, a resident of Illinois. To this union have been born the 
following children : Mina, who is now Mrs. George Garriss ; Charles 
S., who is farming; Fred, who died at the age of twenty-eight; Lo- 
renzo, who is engaged in farming; Edna, who married M. Applin; 
Edward, who is farming; and Eva, now ]Mrs. M. Shaffer. There are 
also fourteen grandchildren. 

Mr. Losee is independent in politics, refusing to follow the dictates 
of party leaders but rather casting his ballot in accordance with his 
best judgment as to the qualifications of the candidates. He has held 
a number of local school offices and has served as justice of the peace 
and has always manifested a keen interest in the public welfare. In 
religious faith he is a Protestant. He belongs to the Society of 
Pioneers and takes justifiable pride in the fact that he aided in the 
early development of the comity. He has always had faith in the 
resources and possibilities of this section and his confidence in its 
future has been justified and he is now one of the substantial men of 
Hastings. In addition to his home farm he owns other land in the 
state and is a stockholder in the Bank of Commerce. 



E. D. HAYSMER, M. D. 

The Nebraska Sanitarium at Hastings is conducted according to 
the most scientific principles and the highest standards of service to 
patients are maintained. JNIuch of the success of the institution in the 
treatment of disease is due to the thorough training and the ability of 
Dr. E. D. Haysmer, the surgeon and medical superintendent of the 
institution. He was born in Battle Creek, JNIichigan, on the 19th of 
January, 1891, a son of Albert J. and Dora V. (Van Deusen) Hays- 
mei-, both of Avhom are still living. The father is a minister of the 
Seventh Day Adventist church and is now president of the West 
Indian union conference of that denomination. 

E. D. Haysmer, who is one of two children born to his parents, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 269 

attended the public schools and also received private educational train- 
ing during the time that he lived in the West Indies. He prepared 
for college in the Southern Training School at Graysville, Tennessee, 
which is conducted by the Seventh Day Adventist church. He subse- 
quently matriculated in the University of Tennessee, where he com- 
pleted the junior year, after which he entered Vanderbilt University 
at Nashville, where he took a medical course, graduating in 1912. For 
a year thereafter he had charge of the Nashville Sanitarium and 
subsequently he became superintendent of the Oakwood Sanitarium 
at Huntsville, Alabama. Still later he was connected for three months 
with the Washington Citj^ Dispensary at Washington, D. C, and at 
the end of that time he became house physician of the Washington 
Sanitarium, a position which he filled for a year. Wishing to still 
further prepare himself for his chosen life work, he then took post 
graduate work at Johns Hopkins University of Baltimore and on the 
1st of August, 1914, was made surgeon and medical superintendent 
of the Nebraska Sanitarium at Hastings. This institution is under 
the control of the Seventh Daj^ Adventist church and is thoroughly 
up-to-date in all of its equipment. It is prepared to utilize all the 
means, methods and appliances recognized in the modern ideas of 
Iwgiene, sanitation, rational medicine and hygienic dietetics. JNIuch 
emphasis is placed upon the value of hydrotherapy, electrotherapy 
and massage and the most careful attention is given to the prepara- 
tion of hygienic foods but no "fads" are urged upon the guests. The 
patient is trained to cooperate with the healing forces of nature and 
his recovery is hastened by the atmosphere of helpful service that 
pervades the place. The institution has been unusually successful in 
the treatment of chronic diseases and specializes to a considerable ex- 
tent in such cases, refusing to admit those suffering from contagious 
diseases. A thoroughly equipped surgical department is also main- 
tained and all anaesthetics are administered by a physician especially 
trained in that work. Dr. Haysmer, who is the surgeon and medical 
superintendent, is splendidly equipped for his responsible position 
and has made an excellent record. He keeps in close touch with every- 
thing that is being done in his departments, insists on the highest stand- 
ards being maintained, and in his work as a surgeon manifests great 
skill. He is registered in Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Maryland and Nebraska and he is connected with 
the American ISIedical Association, the Adams County, the Nebraska 
State, the District of Columbia, the INIontgomery County ( INId. ) and 
the ^Maryland State IMedical Societies and keeps abreast Avith the 
advancement that is being made in medical and surgical knowledge. 



270 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

His high standing in his profession is indicated by the fact that he is 
IJi-esident of the Adams County Medical Society. 

Dr. Haysmei- was married on tlie 6th of November, 1913, to ]\Iiss 
JNlary Ella Sigrest, a daughter of Walter M. Sigrest. The Doctor 
supports the democratic party at the polls and his religious faith is 
that of the Seventh Day Adventist church. He is very fond of out- 
door life, finding therein needed recreation and much enjoyment. 
Although a young man he is one of the foremost representatives of 
his profession in this part of the state and his friends believe that the 
future holds in store for him still greater achievement. He has not 
only gained a high standing in his profession but he lias also won the 
personal friendship of those who have been associated with him and 
he is recognized as a public-spirited citizen. He has thoroughly iden- 
tified his interests with those of Hastings and does all in his power to 
further the advancement of his community along various lines. 



JAMES ROONEY 



On the list of honored dead in Adams county appears the name 
of James Rooney, who for many years was a well known hotel pro- 
prietor of Nebraska, in which connection he gained a wide acquaint- 
ance, while his affability, geniality and com-tesy won him many 
friends. A native of Ireland, his birth occurred in Dublin in 1848, 
and he was educated at Trinity College in Dublin, thus enjoying 
advanced educational j^rivileges. When twenty years of age he de- 
termined to seek a home in America and in 1868 bade adieu to friends 
and native land. He landed in New York and after residing for a 
time in the Empire state removed westward to Iowa, where he con- 
tinued until coming to Nebraska in 1884. He did carpenter contract 
work and was thus identified with building operations for a time but 
later entered the hotel business, Avhich he followed in various parts of 
the country. He became proprietor of the Lindell Hotel, afterwards 
the JNIetropolitan, of Hastings and was thus engaged in business up 
to the time of his death. 

While in New York, when twenty-one years of age. ]Mr. Rooney 
was united in marriage to jNIiss Bridget JNIoran and they became the 
parents of eight children, of whom six are yet living, while two have 
passed away. The death of the father occurred on the 23d of June, 
1910, while the mother survived until the 18th of August, 1915, when 
she, too, was called to her final rest. The religious faith of the family 




AMES ROOXEY 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 273 

is that of the Catholic church and ISlr. Rooney was very prominent 
in church circles and in Catholic societies. He Avas also an active 
jiolitical leader of his community, giving stalwart allegiance to the 
democratic party, feeling that its platform expressed the best princi- 
ples of good government. He had the facultj'' of making friends 
wherever he went and in everj^ commimity in which he lived he left 
behind him a large circle of warm friends who had high appreciation 
for his sociability and many excellent qualities. 



FRED PLU^NIER OLMSTEAD. 

Prominent among the representatives of the Adams county bar 
is Fred Plumer Olmstead, whose abilitj^ has gained him distinction in 
the ranks of the legal fraternity and who as well is Avidely and prom- 
inently known as a lawmaker. Many tangible evidences of his jiublic 
spirit and devotion to the general good may be cited and his life has 
at all times been actuated by high ideals of prompt and effective serv- 
ice for the benefit of his fellowmen. He was born in Wliiteside 
county, Illinois, October 29, 1850, a son of Daniel C. and Octavia 
(Kendall) Olmstead. The father's birth occurred at Old Scipio, New 
York, and he was a representative of a Quaker family. In the year 
1834 he removed westAvard to Illinois and took contracts to build barns 
and houses in the section of the state in which he located. He would 
go into the timber, hew the trees and manufacture the lumber used in 
construction. He Avas also foreman of the building of the government 
locks at Camden, Illinois, being appointed to that position under 
William INIatheAvs, the contractor. All of the locks, gates and steps 
Avere of lumber. During the process of construction General Scott 
and his army Avere there to protect the builders from attack by Black 
HaAvk and his Avarriors. ]Mr. Olmstead purchased laud on the Rock 
river from the government and engaged in farming Avith ox teams, 
there residing until 1863, Avhen he removed to Geneseo, Illinois, in 
order to give his children education. In 1875 he removed to Nebraska, 
settling in Little Blue toAAiiship, Avhere he jjurchased eiglity acres of 
land and homesteaded eighty. He set out trees and developed a fine 
home and maintained Avhat Avas knoAvn as Olmstead Grove — a popular 
picnic ground. He Avas also largely interested in horticultural pur- 
suits and in the early days had the only orchard in the county, in Avhich 
he had many kinds of apples, demonstrating the possibility of suc- 
cessful cultivation of fruit in this part of the state. He Avas also an 



274 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

extensive stock raiser and was one of the most progressive and leading 
men of his community, setting the standard for activity along the 
lines of general farming, stock raising and fruit growing. He and 
his son Fred became the owners of eight hundred acres of land. He 
was a naturalist who loved the woods and the beauty of the trees and 
flowers, and he was a well informed botanist. In fact, he was thor- 
oughly familiar with many sciences, including astronomy. His educa- 
tion was liberal, not only as a result of attendance at school but also 
because of his extensive reading, deep thinking and thorough research 
work. He believed in the process of evolution and saw much in nature 
to confirm his theory. He was a very temperate man, i^ossessed no 
bad habits, and the sterling worth of his character was recognized by 
all with whom he came in contact. He lived to the vei-y venerable age 
of ninet3'-one j^ears, j)assing away at his home in Hastings in 1909.' 
His wife, who was born in Augusta, JMaine, died at the age of sixty- 
eight years. 

Fred P. Olmstead is the youngest in a family of three children. 
He began teaching school in Henry county, Illinois, when eighteen 
years of age and afterward engaged in teaching in Cleveland, be- 
coming principal of the schools of that citj". In 1876 he came to 
Nebraska to hold teachers' institutes and introduce normal methods 
to the teachers of this state. In 1878 he opened the Western Normal 
School at Harvard, Nebraska, and the following year he removed to 
Grand Island, where he remained for three years as principal of the 
schools of that city. In 1882 he took up his abode upon a farm 
adjoining the town of Pauline and in 1883 he was admitted to the 
bar, whereupon he entered upon the practice of law in Hastings as a 
member of the firm of Hughitt & Olmstead, with which he remained 
for some time. He has been jjrominently connected with litigated 
interests in this county throughout the entire period of his connection 
with the bar and his recognized ability finds exiDression in his careful 
preparation of his cases and in his clear, concise and cogent reasoning 
before the courts. 

Mr. Olmstead was united in marriage to Miss Adelaide Boyer, 
who was born in Illinois and is a daughter of Jacob Boyer, who in 
1861 enlisted at Princeton, Illinois, and served for five years with the 
Union army. In 1885 he removed to Nebraska and established his 
home in Hastings, becoming a member of the Grand Army post in 
this city. He was particularly skilled as a penman. His wife, who 
was born in Pennsylvania, died in 1910 at the age of sixty-eight years. 
To Mr. and INIrs. Olmstead has been born a son, Clyde, now of Mon- 
tana, who is married and has two children. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 275 

Mr. Olmstead has always been intensely and deeply interested in 
the public welfare and has cooiierated in many plans and measures for 
the general good, attacking everything with a contagious enthusiasm. 
He was largely instrumental in inducing the INIissouri Pacific and 
Kansas City & Omaha Railroads to follow the Little Blue to Pauline. 
In 1883, in 1885 and again 1886 he introduced into the legislature 
the bill wherebj^ the insane asylum was established at Hastings. Up 
to 1913 he drew up every bill that Avas introduced into the legislature 
for appropriations for the insane asylum. In 1889 and 1890 he was 
a member of the state legislature, being elected on the republican 
ticket. He is a most active and stalwart supporter of the republican 
party and has ever been an earnest worker in its ranks, making cam- 
paign speeches throughout the state. He introduced the bill for the 
first Australian ballot law in Nebraska in 1889 and for four years he 
was chairman of the republican county central committee. In 1897 
he was chosen county attorney and filled that office for four years. 
He prosecuted the celebrated murder case of Barney Pierson, the last 
murder case in the county, and did splendid work while in the office 
of county attorney. In 1903 he was chosen president of the Humane 
Society and has continued in that position since, during which 
time he has made a fight to protect the interests of the children 
and of horses and dogs in the community. His entire life has been 
characterized bj^ a spirit of broad humanitarianism that has not only 
manifested itself in protecting the helpless from abuse but has found 
expression in much constructive work, his efforts being put forth in 
the belief that prevention is better than cure. He is a broad-minded 
man capable of looking at questions from every standpoint, and his 
opinions are never narrow nor jirejudiced. His work has been of 
widespread benefit and value to the community and Hastings numbers 
him among her prominent and honored citizens. 



CHARLES EDWARD BRUCKMAN. 

Charles Edward Bruckman, member of the Hastings bar and now 
serving as city attorney, was born on the 28th of ]March, 1877, in 
Lowell, Indiana. His father, George H. Bruckman, was a native of 
Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and when only three years of age started 
with his parents for the LTnited States but his mother died on the 
voyage and his father passed away soon afterward. George H. 
Bruckman was reared to farm life and continued his residence in 



276 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Indiana until 1880, when he came to Nebraska, settling in Juniata 
township, Adams county, where he had two hundred and forty acres 
of good land. He engaged extensively and successfully in general 
farming and stock raising and was accounted one of the active and 
leading agriculturists of the community until 1901, when he returned 
to Indiana. He is now living retired at Tolleston, that state, at the 
age of sixty-two years. He was married in Indiana to Miss Esther 
Nichols, who was born in Ohio but was reared in Indiana and is now 
sixty years of age. His jsolitical allegiance is given to the democratic 
pai-ty and his family attend the JMethodist church. 

Charles Edward Bruckman obtained his early education in the 
district schools of Juniata township, for he was but three years of age 
at the time of the removal of the family to this state. He afterward 
attended the high school of Juniata and the Business & Normal Col- 
lege at Grand Island, after which he entered the law department of 
the State Universitj^ therein completing his course with the class of 
1903. He left home at the age of twenty years and made his own way 
through school, providing the necessary funds by teaching in the 
schools of Juniata and Wanda townships for three years and also by 
farming. Determining upon the practice of law as a life work, he 
prepared for his profession and entered at once upon active practice 
in Hastings. He filled the office of clerk of the district court in Adams 
county from 1904 until 1912. Two years later he entered into part- 
nership with John Snider for the practice of law and in 1915 was 
appointed city attorney, which position he now fills. He practices in 
all the courts and is regarded as one of the capable representatives of 
the Hastings bar, displaying ability in the preparation of his cases 
and in the presentation of his cause before the courts. 

]Mr. Bruckman was married on the 27th of December, 1903, to 
]\Iiss Blanche A. Favinger, who was born in this county and is the 
j'oungest daughter of Solomon and Louisa (Betrier) Favinger, Avho 
in the late '70s came to Adams county, settling near Roseland. The 
fatlier engaged extensively in farming and also became a general mer- 
chant of Roseland, where he continued business until 1907, when lie 
removed to Hastings, where he now lives retired. He is a member of 
the IMethodist church and his entire life has been passed in harmony 
with his professions. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Bruckman have become the jiarents of a son, Oren 
Russell, born October 5, 1904. Fraternally JNIr. Bruckman is con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He 
has served as vice president of the school board of Hastings but re- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 277 

signed that position to become city attorney. He is a democrat in 
politics and is a recognized leader in the "dry" branch of his party. 
He stands loyally for all those interests which are a matter of civic 
virtue and civic pride and has put forth earnest and effective effort 
for advancing the i)ublic welfare. He has a wide acquaintance and 
wherever known is held in high regard because of his sterling personal 
traits and the value of his service in public connections. 



L. B. HOAGLAND. 



L. B. Hoagland, the owner and manager of the Hoagland New 
Process Laundry, located at No. 515 West Third street, Hastings, 
has gained a place among the aggressive and successful business men 
of the cit)^ and has built up a trade of gratif jnng proportions. He 
was born in Pennsjdvania on the 22d of August, 1875, and is a son of 
Jonathan J. and E. M. (Goss) Hoagland, who came to Nebraska 
with their familj^ in 1877. They located on a rented farm three miles 
south of Hastings and remained there for eight years, after which 
removal was made to Custer county. The father there met his death 
in a fire and in 1886 the family removed to Hastings, where the 
mother is still living. In early life the father was a contractor and 
general merchant but after coming to Nebraska followed agricultural 
pursuits. 

L. B. Hoagland attended the public schools but did not consider 
his education completed when his textbooks were put aside. He has 
been a careful observer and has learned much from his contact with 
the world. In 1896 he became connected with his present line of busi- 
ness, buying out with a partner the Queen City Laundry, which he 
conducted for eighteen months, after which tlie plant was sold and 
Mr. Hoagland became deputy water commissioner of Hastings, an 
office which he filled capably for a year. In 1904. he establislied the 
Hoagland New Process Laundry, which he has since conducted and 
wliich has gained a large patronage from the best people of Hastings. 
The laundry is equipped with the most modern machinery and the 
highest standards are insisted upon in all de])artments. Employment 
is furnished to about nineteen people and one wagon is used in col- 
lecting and delivering laundry. The plant occupies an entire floor 
and its patronage has shown a steady increase as the high quality of 
the work done has become more widely known. Our subject is asso- 



278 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

ciated in the ownership of the business with his brother, W. L. 
Hoagland. 

Mr. Hoagland of this review was married on the 10th of December, 
1910, to JNIiss Gertrude ]\Iore and they have two daughters, Ruth and 
Bernice. He advocates the principles of the republican party and 
loyally sujjports its candidates at the polls but has never desired office 
as a reward for his fealty. Fraternally he belongs to the Eagles and 
both he and his wife are Protestants in their religious faith. He finds 
much pleasure and needed recreation in hunting and in other forms 
of outdoor life and thus maintains that physical vigor which is so im- 
portant in the attainment of success along any line of activity'. He 
is very much interested in the material, civic and moral advancement 
of his community and can always be depended upon to further pro- 
gressive movements. He is highly respected personally and all who 
have come into contact with him recognize his business ability and his 
sterling integritJ^ He is very progressive and is always willing to 
adopt any new method of conducting his business that promises to 
increase its efficiency or to better the service given his patrons. He 
keeps in close touch with what is being done by other men in his line 
through his membership in the state and national laundry associations. 



FREDERICK H. BLAKE. 

Frederick H. Blake, engaged in the meat business at Hastings, 
Nebraska, has been a resident of this place since December, 1873, and 
may therefore well be termed one of its pioneer settlers. Throughout 
the intervening years he has been connected with its business interests 
and the spirit of enterprise has actuated him in all that he does, 
bringing him substantial success. He was born in Oxford, England, 
July 17, 1847, and there pursued his education, after which he was 
apprenticed to the meat business in his native country and has since 
followed it. He remained in England through the period of his boy- 
hood and youth and was a youth of twenty-six years when he arrived 
in Hastings, Nebraska, where he has now made his home for about 
forty-three years. He has continuously engaged in the meat business 
for many years, being proj^rietor of one of the leading markets of the 
city, and he also conducted a cattle ranch in eastern Colorado from 
the year 189.5 to 1900. 

INIr. Blake was united in marriage to Emily F. Jones, and their 
children are: Frederick C, George, Ada, Thomas, Arthur, Annie, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 279 

JNIorris, Alice and James. In his political views Mr. Blake has been 
an earnest democrat since becoming a naturalized American citizen 
and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. About 
1878 he joined the ^Masonic lodge and has since exemplified in his life 
the beneficent spirit of the craft, to the teachings of which he has ever 
been most loyal. 



ADAM WARREN POWELL. 

Adam Warren Powell devoted his life to farming and ranked 
among the most prosperous and efficient agriculturists of Kenesaw 
township. He was born upon a farm in Orange county, New York, 
on the 12th of January, 1830, of the marriage of Thomas and Hannah 
(Howell) Powell. He received the usual schooling of the period and 
like other farm boys worked upon the homestead until he became of 
age. He then left home and w ent to live wdth an aunt in Lackawanna 
county, Pennsylvania. He rented a farm, which he operated until he 
enlisted as a private in Company L, Fifteenth Regiment, New York 
Volunteer Engineers. He served with that command until the close 
of the war, making a thoroughly creditable record as a soldier, and in 
June, 1865, was honorably discharged from the military service. He 
returned to Lackawanna county, Pennsylvania, and farmed there until 
1873, when he came to Adams county, Nebraska. He homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Kenesaw township and some 
idea may be gained of the pioneer conditions which prevailed then 
from the fact that he broke the sod with oxen and lived in a sod house. 
At length, however, he had all of his land under cultivation and as his 
resources increased he made many improvements upon the farm, erect- 
ing a substantial residence and other necessary buildings. He added 
eighty acres to his original homestead and at the time of his death on 
the 29th of June, 1897, was in very comfortable circumstances. 

INIr. Powell was married on the 12th of January, 1854, to ]Miss 
Rachel M. Edwards, who was born on the 11th of JNIay, 1830, in 
Lackawanna county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Richard and 
Asenath Edwards. Her father was a veteran of the War of 1812. 
Mr. and JNIrs. Powell became the parents of eight chiklren, seven of 
whom are living, namely: Clarence, a resident of Smithfield, Ne- 
braska; Nora, the wife of R. Besecker, of Smithfield; Angle, who 
married E. Oster, of Boulder, Colorado; Ella, the wife of L. Ketcham, 
of INIadison, Wisconsin; Roenna, who married F. Cook, of Buda, 



280 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Nebraska; Jerusha, the wife of H. Ai-mitage, of Kenesaw; and Loren, 
who is farming the homestead. 

Mr. Powell supported the republican party at the polls but was 
not an office seeker. Through his membership in the Grand Army 
of the Republic he kept in touch with other Union veterans and found 
much pleasure in this association. His religious allegiance was given 
to the JMethodist Episcopal church. His success was the direct result 
of his industry, foresight and good management and none begmdged 
him his prosperity. His wife still owns the homestead of two hun- 
dred and forty acres and also holds title to property in Kenesaw, She 
is widely known throughout the county, in which she has lived for 
many years, and is highly respected and esteemed. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON WOLCOTT. 

George Washington Wolcott, deceased, was one of the successful 
and progressive farmers of Wanda township and was also connected 
with business interests as president of the Independent Telephone 
Company, which he aided in organizing. His birth occurred in Oneida 
county. New York, on the 3d of December, 1843, and he was a son of 
Josiah and Hannah (Russell) Wolcott. At that early day there 
were no public schools but the residents of a locality organized a 
subscription school, each family paying so much for each child wlio 
attended. In such a school George W. Wolcott received his education 
and during his boyhood aided in the operation of a sawmill. On the 
29th of August, 1862, he put aside all personal considerations and 
enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Fortj-'-sixth New York 
Volunteer Infantry. He participated in much hard fighting, includ- 
ing the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and 
Little Round Top. On the 2d of June, 1864, he was taken prisoner 
near Richmond, Virginia, and Avas confined in the following Con- 
federate prisons — Pemberton, Danville, Libby, Florence and Ander- 
sonville, in which he Mas held for six months. In December, 1864, he 
was paroled and in July of the following year he was honorably 
discharged from the United States military service. 

Mv. Wolcott worked in a shingle mill until 1873, in Avhich year he 
homesteaded a quarter section of land in Wanda township, Adams 
county, Nebraska. As the years passed he made many improvements 
upon his place, which he kept in a high state of cultivation, and he 
seldom failed to harvest good crops. He accmnulated more than a 




iffi. AND iffiS. (iEoKCK W. WOLC'OTT 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 283 

competence and was instrumental in organizing the Independent 
Telephone Company, of which he served as president and which he 
made a substantial and prosperous concern. He was progressive and 
up-to-date in all that he did and this characteristic was manifested 
when he built the first brick block and the first brick residence in 
Kenesaw, to which he removed in 1899. 

Mr. Wolcott was married on the 4th of March, 1866, to Miss 
Celestia E. Burr, who was born in Lewis county. New York, and is a 
daughter of John and Abby (Tuttle) Bm-r. To JNIr. and ]\Irs. Wol- 
cott were born seven children, namely : Ervin E., who died in infancy ; 
Arthur, who married INIartha E. Finley and is living Avith his mother; 
Clinton A., deceased; Myrtle H., who was the second white child born 
in Wanda township and is now the wife of Samuel Colter and resides 
in Hastings; Harry E., a Baj^tist minister now stationed at Sumner, 
Nebraska; Guy E., a mining engineer in California; and Abby, who 
died when two years of age. 

Mr. Wolcott was a stanch sujiporter of the republican party and 
took a verj^ active i^art in local politics. He was called to a number 
of offices, serving as assessor, as justice of the jjeace and as a member 
of the school board and in all of his official positions made a highly 
creditable record. He belonged to the Baptist church, in which he 
served as deacon, and could always be counted upon to further all 
movements seeking the moral advancement of his community. Fra- 
ternally he was a member of KenesaAV Lodge, No. 144, A. F. & A. INI., 
and he was also identified with the Grand Army of the Republic. 
The foregoing record of his life indicates that he was a man of 
influence in his community and was active along many lines. His 
demise, which occurred on tlie 17th of September, 1911, was sincerely 
regretted, and all recognized that Kenesaw had lost a jirominent 
citizen. 



ERICK JOHNSON. 



Erick Johnson, who is living retired in Hastings, was for many 
years actively engaged in agricultural pursuits and Avas recognized as 
one of the most progressive and efficient farmers of the county. His 
place, wliich is known as the Rosedale farm, received the prize offered 
by the Lincoln Star for the best kept farm and in all of his Avork he 
used the most up-to-date machinery and folloAved scientific methods. 
A native of Sweden, he Avas born on the 13th of November, 1854, a 



284 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

son of John Peter aod Anna M. Johnson. The father engaged in 
farming and fishing and passed his entire life in Sweden, as did his 
wife. 

Erick Johnson attended the common schools in the acquirement 
of his education and also assisted his father with the farm work, being 
so employed until eighteen years of age, when he emigrated to the 
United States. He lived at Lincoln, Illinois, for a time and while 
there worked at laying gas pipe at two dollars a day. In 1876 he 
came to Adams county, Nebraska, and purchased one hundred and 
sixtj' acres of land near Roseland but did not settle here at that time, 
returning to Illinois, where he was emploj^ed on the farm. Two years 
later, in December, 1878, he purchased a span of mules and with his 
brother, John, and two others started to drive to this state, but they 
were overtaken by a storm and when they reached JNIacomb, Illinois, 
they placed the mules in a car and shipped them to Adams county. 
]Mr. Johnson was in straitened circumstances and in order to pay 
the freight had to borrow money at the rate of three per cent interest 
a month. He brought his land under cultivation as soon as possible 
and also rented an additional tract near Juniata, and as he was at that 
time unmarried he boarded while engaged in the development of his 
farm. Subsequently he took up his residence upon his place and as 
the years passed continued to improve his property, making it a 
thoroughly modern and very attractive farm home. It became kn.o^vn 
as one of the show places of the neighborhood and was awarded the 
prize offered by the Lincoln Star for the best kept farm. JNIr. John- 
son invested in additional land from time to time and acquired title 
to several farms in the county. On the 22d of August, 1914, he re- 
moved to Hastings, having purchased a beautiful residence at the 
corner of Tenth street and North Denver avenue. He has since 
resided here and is enjoying a period of comparative leisure made 
possible by his energy and good management in former years. He 
has not only been an important factor in the agricultural development 
of the county but has also been connected with its business interests, 
being a director of the Farm IMutual Central Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of Hastings, president of the Roseland Grain & Supply Com- 
pany, Avhich position he has held since the organization of the concern, 
and vice president and a director of the Roseland State Bank. While 
actively engaged in farming he paid much attention to the raising of 
stock, finding that branch of his business esi^ecially profitable. 

jNIr. Johnson was married on the 15th of October, 1882, to ]Miss 
Alma Johnson, a daughter of John Johnson, who came to Adams 
county in 1879 and located near Hastings. Both he and his wife are 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 285 

deceased. JNIr. and ]\Irs. Erick Johnson have become the parents of 
the following children: John Elmer, who died when twenty-seven 
years of age ; Mabel, the wife of A. W. Johnson, who is farming our 
subject's home jjlace; and Carl Eric, who is eleven years of age and is 
attending school. 

JMr. Johnson is a leader in local republican circles and has taken 
a i^rominent part in public affairs. During the sessions of 1905 and 
1909 he represented his district in the state legislature and in his two 
terms of service aided in the passage of a number of bills that have 
since proved of great value to the commonwealth. He has also held 
local office, having been township supervisor of Roseland township 
for two terms and having served as school moderator for nine years. 
In religious faith he and his family are Lutherans and the principles 
which govern their lives are foimd in the teachings of that chin-ch. 
He is an enthusiastic motorist, uses his car in the management of his 
numerous farms, and is fond of all phases of outdoor life. He has 
alwaj's recognized the obligations resting upon a good citizen to fvu-- 
ther in everj' Avaj^ possible the community welfare and has great faith 
in the future of this part of the state. His signal success indicates 
what may be accomiilished when a man is energetic and progressive 
and is quick to recognize and utilize opportunity, for although he was 
^practically penniless when he came to this county he is now financially 
independent. 



WILLIAM THOI^IAS BLACKMAN. 

William Thomas Blackman, engaged in the wholesale grocery 
business, has thus been identified with the commercial interests of 
Hastings since July, 1887. Honored and resjiected by all, there is no 
man who occupies a more enviable position in commercial and financial 
circles in his part of the state, not alone by reason of the success he has 
achieved but also owing to the straightforward business policy which 
he has ever followed. He was born in Beverly, Randolph county, 
Virginia, now West Virginia, September 2, 1853, a son of Judson 
and Philadelphia Burns (Rees) Blackman. His paternal grand- 
father, David Blackman, was the owner of large tracts of land in 
Randolph and Jackson counties of West Virginia. He was born in 
Connecticut but removed to West Virginia in the j^ear 1822. The 
progenitor of the familj^ in America was a native of Staffordshire, 
England, born in 1598, and was the Rev. Adam Blackman. In 1639 



286 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

he crossed the Atlantic to New England and in 1640 settled in Strat- 
ford, Connecticut. 

William Thomas Blackman supplemented a public school educa- 
tion by study in the State Normal School at Fairmont, West Virginia. 
There was a period, however, before his normal course that he spent 
in his father's general mercantile store at Beverly, West Virginia, 
being there employed until 1872. In 1873 he accepted the manage- 
ment of a general store at INIoscow, JNIaryland, and in 1875 returned 
to his native town, where he was manager of a general store until the 
fall of 1876. At that time he removed to Peoria, Illinois, and was 
employed in a wholesale notion house until the spring of 1877, when 
he removed to Red Oak, Iowa, where he was manager of a general 
store until 1880. For five years afterward he acted as traveling sales- 
man for a wholesale dry goods house of St. Joseph, IMissouri, and for 
one year represented a Chicago house upon the road. In 1886 he 
j)urchased an interest in a wholesale grocery business at Red Oak, 
Iowa, and in July, 1887, removed to Hastings, Nebraska, where, with 
his business associates, he immediately afterward established the whole- 
sale grocery business, with which he is still connected as senior partner. 
His trade has steadily groAvn in volume and imi^ortance and the busi- 
ness is now one of extensive and gratifying proj)ortions. 

i\Ir. Blackman married ]Miss Blanche Alpin Chenoweth, a daugh- 
ter of INIr. and JNIrs. Lemuel Chenoweth, of Beverly, Randolph county, 
West Virginia, the mother having in her maidenhood been JNIiss Nancy 
A. Hart, a descendant of John Hart, one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. Mr. and JNIrs. Blackman have a son 
and daughter; Dr. Julian Raymond Blackman, who married Louie 
Ferris and resides in Hastings; and JMarjorie Hart. In his political 
views i\Ir. Blackman has always been a democrat but has never been 
an aspirant for office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
business affairs. Close application and intelligently directed industry 
have brought him to the notable place which he occupies as a leader in 
the commercial circles of Hastings. 



E. A. BRANDES. 



E. A. Brandes is engaged in the automobile business in Hastings, 
in which connection he has secured a liberal patronage and operates a 
large plant. He possesses the sjiirit of enterprise which has ever 
characterized the upbuilding of the west. His birth occurred in Min- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 287 

neapolis, JMinnesota, on the 28th of JMarch, 1874, his parents being 
D. A. and Catherine Brandes. The family came to Nebraska in 1880, 
setthng in Filhnore county upon a farm. They were pioneer residents 
of that district and became actively identified with the early agricul- 
tural development of that section of the state. The father Avas of 
German birth and served in the Prussian army during the war from 
1863 until 1860. It was subsequent to that time that he came to the 
new world, establishing his home in JNIinnesota, where he remained 
until his arrival in Nebraska. 

E. A. Brandes was a little lad of but six years when the family 
removed to this state and in the public schools he pursued his educa- 
tion. After his textbooks were put aside he devoted six years to gen- 
eral farming and then came to Hastings, where he entered the employ 
of Adams & Company, dealers in agricultural implements, with whom 
he remained, however, for but a short time. He then went upon the 
road as a commercial traveler, spending four years in that manner, 
at the end of which time he returned to Hastings and purchased one- 
half interest in the implement and automobile business of C. L. Jones 
& Company. This was run as the Jones & Brandes Company for a 
number of years and then the business was divided between E. A. 
Brandes and A. H. Jones. The former afterward bought the Odd 
Fellows building, a three story brick structure sixty-six by one hun- 
dred and twenty feet, and in the lower floor of this building conducts 
a large automobile business, the upper floors being used for lodge 
purposes. His service and repair departments are maintained in a 
large brick building at the corner of Third street and Denver avenue. 
Employment is furnished to twenty men and two stenographers, and 
in addition to his extensive business at Hastings INIr. Brandes main- 
tains a large plant of similar character at Grand Island. He has the 
state agency for the Overland automobile and the agency for the 
Packard in a number of counties. He has placed many Packard cars 
upon the road and has also had a large sale for cars of lower price. 
As he has prospered in his vmdertakings he has made judicious invest- 
ments in property and is now the owner of considerable farm land. 
He is regarded as one of the most successful automobile dealers in 
the state, his sales increasing annually imtil they have now reached a 
most gratifying figure. 

On the 6th of November, 1897, Mr. Brandes was united in mar- 
riage to JNIiss Augusta Puis, a daughter of John Puis. To them have 
been born three children, Esther, Helen and Ra%Tnond. In his 
political views INIr. Brandes is independent, while his religious faith 
is that of the German Lutheran church. Fraternally he is a jNIason, 



288 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, while 
with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the 
desert. He is also identified with the Sons of Herman, the United 
Commercial Travelers, the Travelers Protective Association and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member of the 
Commercial Club and cooperates in all of its plans and projects for 
the upbuilding of the city and the promotion of its material interests. 
He stands for all things which are a matter of civic virtue and civic 
pride. He is fond of outdoor life and finds in it his recreation and 
rest from the arduous cares of business life, to which he applies him- 
self closely, as is indicated by the fact that he stands today among the 
most prominent automobile dealers of the state. 



HON. AVILLIAM E. ANDREWS. 

Hon. William E. Andrews, who has filled various positions of 
public trust in connection with Nebraska and with the federal govern- 
ment, now makes his home in Hastings. He was born December 17, 
1854, near Oskaloosa, ]\Iahaska county, Iowa, a son of George R. 
and Sarah Andrews, the former a farmer by occupation. He supple- 
mented his public school training by study in Simpson College at 
Indianola, Iowa, and in Parsons College at Fairfield, Iowa, from 
Avhich institution he was graduated June 10, 1885, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, while three years later Parsons College conferred 
upon him the JNIaster of Arts degree. He worked as a farm hand for 
several 3'ears, however, before entering college and at different periods 
engaged in teaching in public schools, also in the Garden Grove (Iowa) 
Normal School and in different business colleges. In January, 1880, 
he was chosen superintendent of the schools of Ringgold county, Iowa. 
While in his senior year at Parsons College, in January, 1885, he was 
elected a member of the faculty of Hastings College and so con- 
tinued for eight years or until 1893. He then became private secretary 
to Hon. Lorenzo Crounse, governor of Nebraska, and after two years 
sjjent in that position was elected to congress from the fifth Nebraska 
district, serving from INIarch 4, 1895, until INIarch 4, 1897. On the 
9th of June of the latter year he became auditor for the United States 
treasury department. His varied service enabled him to learn tlie 
general conditions and needs of the state and federal governments 
from the executive and legislative points of view. While he was 
auditor in the treasury department the volume of business that passed 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 289 

over his desk exceeded one hundred billion dollars and involved a 
careful study of the Wilson, Dingley, Payne and Underwood tariffs. 
The excellence of his record is indicated in the fact that not one dollar 
of that vast amount was ever charged back to the discredit of the office. 

On the 1st of September, 1885, at Fairfield, Iowa, Mr. Andrews 
was married to JNIiss JMira McCoy, a daughter of Laben L. and Alice 
S. JMcCoy. Mrs. Andrews is a musician and held the chair of voice 
culture in Hastings College for several years. She was a member of 
the board of ladj^ managers of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at 
St. Louis, was president of the Federation of Women's Clubs of the 
District of Columbia and is now a member of the board of directors 
of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, which includes not 
only clubs in the United States but also in Canada and other countries, 
the organization being international. 

IMr. Andrews has always been a stalwart republican and adheres 
to the teachings of Washington, Hamilton, Lincoln and JNIcKinley. 
He belongs to various fraternal organizations and has passed up 
through both rites of INIasonry, taking the various degrees save the 
thirty-third of the Scottish Rite. He is also an Odd Fellow, Knight 
of Pythias, LTnited Workman and INIodern Woodman of America. 
He holds membership in the Presbyterian church, in the work of 
which he is actively interested. His influence has been a potent factor 
in advancing the welfare and progress of the state along educational, 
political and moral lines. He has never been content to choose the 
second best, nor has he ever deviated from the high ideals which are 
factors in bringing about a more advanced civilization. 



W. F. J. COJMLY 



W. F. J. Comly, of Hastings, who has been connected with the 
railway mail service for thirty-tAvo years, was born in Pennsylvania on 
the 27th of October, 184.8, of the marriage of Joseph T. and Eliza- 
beth (Thompson) Comly. The family removed to the vicinity of 
Brooklyn, Iowa, in 1871, and the father engaged in farming. Both 
he and his wife have passed away. To them were born three children, 
two sons and a daughter, of whom W. F. J. is the youngest. 

He was educated in the public schools and after putting aside his 
textbooks devoted his entire attention to assisting his father on the 
farm until he began his independent career. For two terms lie taught 
school in Pennsylvania and was similarly emploj^ed in Iowa for two 



290 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

terms. Then, at the age of twenty-three j^ears, he came to Nebraska 
and took up an eighty acre homestead near Hastings. After a short 
time, however, he sold a rehnquishment to that farm and began Avork- 
ing in the office of the Journal, which was then i^ublished by ^Vigton 
& Lewis. On leaving that place he went into the postoffice and after 
serving as clerk there for four years was given a run in the railway 
mail service, with which he has been connected for thirty-two years. 
He is quick, accurate and thoroughly reliable in his work and has made 
a record of which he has every reason to be proud. 

Mr. Comly was married in 1876 to JNIiss Virginia Spooner, who 
passed away in 1890, leaving two children: Eleanor JNIay, who is now 
Mrs. LeRoy Van Fleet ; and Virginia, the wife of J. A. Lett. There 
are also two grandchildren. In 1894 Mr. Comly was again married, 
JNIiss Anna Rogers becoming his wife. She is a daughter of Thomas 
Rogers, who removed to Hastings with his family in 1885. 

iNlr. Comly is a rejjublican but has never taken an active part in 
j)olitical affairs. He is prominent in the work of the local Presby- 
terian church, of which he has served as deacon, and he has also been 
chorister of the Sunday school. His wife is very active in missionary 
and Sunday school work and both are recognized as sincere Christian 
people. JNIrs. Comlj' is also identified with the Woman's Club, to 
Avhich she has belonged for fifteen years. JNIr. Comly belongs to the 
Ancient Order of LTnited Workmen and the Loyal JNIystic Legion 
and is jjopular within and without those organizations. He has always 
manifested the interest of a good citizen in everj'thing pertaining to 
the general welfare and is highly respected by all who have come into 
contact with him. His home is at No. 720 North St. Joseph street. 



GEORG UDEN. 



Among the successful farmers of Verona township who have 
earned the title of self-made man is Georg Uden, who owns valuable 
land on sections 14 and 21. He is a native of East Friesland, Ger- 
many, and his natal day was the 1st of October, 1850. His parents, 
John B. and Anna (INIangela) Uden, were lifelong residents of the 
fatherland. To them were born six children, namely: Henry, de- 
ceased; Georg; John, also deceased; Onno, a resident of Adams 
county; Fred, of Hall county; and Kathrina. 

Georg Uden is indebted for his education to the common schools 
of his native land and he remained at home until 1871, when, having 



4il 


f% 




fc A^#™! 


* 





jm. AND MRS. GEORG UDEN AND SON 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 293 

attained his majority, he started out in life for himself. He had 
heard much concerning the superior advantages offered by the United 
States and, desiring to take advantage of them, emigrated to this 
country. He made his way at once to Secor, Woodford county, Illi- 
nois, and after working by the month for some time rented a farm. 
In 1880 he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and purchased the land 
on which the town of Prosser now stands but which he sold after the 
railroad was built through that section. Subsequently he purchased 
his present home place, which comprises one hundred and sixty acres 
on section 21, Verona toAvnship, and he has since acquired title to an 
eighty-acre tract on section 14. He has erected excellent buildings 
and otherwise improved his farm, which is in a high state of develop- 
ment and which returns him a good income. He engages in general 
farming, raising both grain and stock, and is at once practical and 
progressive in his methods. 

When thirty j^ears of age Mr. Uden was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Augusta Summerf eldt, and they have become the parents of 
seven children, namely : Adoljih, who is farming near the home place ; 
John B. and Fred A., both of whom are following agricultural pur- 
suits in Verona township ; and Walter, William, Emma and August, 
all of whom are yet at home. 

JMr. Uden takes a keen interest in the questions and issues of the 
day and is independent in the exercise of his right of franchise. Both 
he and his wife hold membership in the German Lutheran church near 
their farm, which they aided in organizing. They also contributed 
generously to the building fund and have always taken an active part 
in the work of the church. Although JNIr. Uden had no capital Avhen 
he came to this country, he possessed energy and sound judgment and 
as the years have passed his industry and good management have 
enabled him to gain a competence. He has discharged to the full all 
the obligations resting upon him, and his genuine worth is recognized 
by those who have been associated with him. 



GEORGE COLLING. 



George Colling, a well known retired farmer residing at No. 628 
South Denver street, Hastings, is also entitled to mention as a veteran 
of the Civil war. He was born in Prussia, Germany, in 1847, the 
fourth in a family of six children whose parents were Theodore and 
Elizabeth (Schadeck) Colling. The father, who was born in France 



294 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

in 1803, was a contractor and builder by trade and in 1861 removed 
with his family from Germany to the United States, settling in Du 
Page county, Ilhnois, where he worked as a mason for several years. 
He passed away in Illinois on the 21st of June, 1880, in the faith of 
the Roman Catholic church. He was married in Germany in 1831 to 
Elizabeth Schadeck, a daughter of Peter Schadeck, a native of the 
Rhine Province, Prussia. Her demise occurred in Illinois on the 5th 
of February, 1879. She was also a Roman Catholic. To them were 
born the following children, all natives of Germany: Henry; Nicho- 
las; William; George; Charles, a resident of Indianola, Nebraska; 
and jNIary, John and Peter, all of whom are deceased and are buried 
in Indianola. 

George Colling spent his childhood in his native country as he was 
thirteen years of age when he was brought by his parents to the United 
States. He continued his education in the public schools of Illinois 
and after putting aside his textbooks devoted his energies to farming 
pursuits. He remained in the Prairie state until September, 1872, 
when he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and took up one hundred 
and sixty acres of government land in Hanover township. At that 
time the place was a tract of unbroken prairie but he soon brought it 
under cultivation and as the years passed his resources increased. 
However, he did not escape the hardships incident to all pioneer life 
and he also had to contend with the grasshopper scourge and some of 
the winters were extremely severe, especially that of 1873, when the 
memorable blizzard occurred. He carefully conserved the fertility of 
the soil and added to the value of his farm by making many excellent 
improvements and in carrying on his work used up-to-date methods. 
He raised both grain and stock, finding this more profitable than 
confining his attention to one phase of agriculture, and his Avell directed 
efforts were rewarded by a substantial income. In 1904 he retired 
from active life and took up his residence in Hastings on the 1st of 
November. He has since resided here and is one of the valued citizens 
of the town. 

JNIr. Colling was married on the 9th of INIarch, 1869, in Illinois, to 
Miss Mary E. Kinnear, a daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth (Cline) 
Kinnear, both natives of New Brunswick, the former born in 1816 
and the latter in 1821. In 1847 they took up their residence in Kane 
county, Illinois, where the father died twenty years later. The mother 
is still living at St. Charles, that state, and although she has reached 
the venerable age of ninety-three years is still enjoying excellent 
health. To Mr. and ISIrs. Colling were born five children, as follows: 
Elizabeth Mary, whose birth occurred on the 25th of January, 1870, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 295 

is the wife of John Smith, who is fanning two hundred and forty 
acres in Webster county and is the son of John Smith, Sr., an old 
settler of this county. To this union have been born three children. 
Bertha Jane, whose birth occurred in Adams county on the 31st of 
December, 1874, gave her hand in marriage to Henry Herren, a 
farmer of Blaine township, and they have four children. Anna L., 
who was born on the 12th of July, 1878, became the wife of John 
JNIcKinney, a farmer of Clay county. She passed away leaving one 
child. Edward George, whose birth occurred on the 30th of Decem- 
ber, 1881, is farming in Lincoln county, Nebraska. He married 
Emma JMadson, by whom he has two children. Etta Natalie, who 
was born January 15, 1885, died on the 3d of February, 1887. The 
wife and mother passed away on the 18th of June, 1914, and is buried 
in a cemetery in Hanover township. She was a representative of the 
finest tj'pe of womanhood and was held in the highest respect by all 
who knew her and her demise was the occasion of much sincere grief. 
JNlr. Colling has always supported the republican party and for 
eighteen years served as justice of the jjeace and for many years as a 
member of the school board, proving very efficient in the discharge of 
his duties. He has manifested his patriotism by placing the public 
welfare above personal interests and in 1864, together with his brother, 
William Colling, he enlisted in Company A, Fifty-second Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to Sherman's army. He 
fought in the battles of Resaca and Atlanta and took part in a num- 
ber of skirmishes, remaining at the front until he was honorably 
discharged on the 12th of July, 1865. He holds membership in the 
Grand Army of the Republic, thus keeping in touch with his com- 
rades in blue, and he is also identified with the Sons of Herman. The 
success which he gained, which now enables him to enjoy a life of 
leisure, was the direct result of his hard work and thrift and none 
begrudges him the i^rosperity which is his. 



LUTHER EGELPIOFF. 

Luther EgelhofF is proprietor of a barber shop at Hastings and 
is well known not only through his business connections but also by 
reason of his activity in political circles. He was born in La Fayette. 
Indiana, September 29, 1865, his parents being William and INIary 
(Baker) EgelhofF, both of whom were natives of Germany, born in 
Mainz. The father was twenty-two years of age when he crossed the 



296 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Atlantic to the United States, settling in Indiana, where he took up 
the occupation of farming. He became the owner of lands there and 
lived a quiet, retiring life but his sterling worth won him place among 
the substantial and honored residents of the comnmnity. In politics 
he was an active republican, giving strong indorsement to the party. 
He died in 1885, at the age of fifty-three years, while his wife passed 
away in 1893, when sixtj'-three years of age. 

Luther Egelhoff pursued his education in the district schools of 
his native county and spent his boyhood days upon the home farm to 
the age of seventeen years, working as a farm hand. He then began 
learning the barber's trade, which he followed in Indiana until 1889, 
when he removed westward to Seward, Nebraska. He afterward 
followed his trade at various places in this state and in August, 1895, 
came to Hastings, where he opened a shop in the Bostwick Hotel 
which he has since conducted. In connection therewith he conducts 
a pool hall and both branches of his business are liberally' patronized. 

While residing at Seward, Nebraska, on the 1st of January, 1891!, 
Mr. EgelhoiF was united in marriage to INIiss Rose Wood, a native of 
New York and a daughter of Mr. and JMrs. S. K. Wood, both of 
whom were born near Syracuse, that state. The father, who in early 
life was a sailor and later embarked in business as a jeweler, enlisted 
for service in the Civil war from Syracuse, New York, and remained 
with the army from 1861 until 1865, being promoted to the rank of 
captain. In 1873 he came west to Nebraska and took up his abode 
among the pioneer settlers of Seward county, remaining on his 
original homestead until he passed away in 1914 at the age of seventy- 
seven years. During the early period of his residence in the state he 
lived in a sod house and used an ox team in the work of the fields. His 
well directed labor as an agriculturist were eventually rewarded 
with a substantial and gratifying measure of success and as the years 
passed he acquired considerable property. He assisted in the organi- 
zation of the Congregational church near his home and though a man 
of unassuming disposition was widely recognized as a citizen of value 
and worth. Mrs. EgelhofF also takes an active and helpful part in 
the Avork of the Congregational church and by her marriage she has 
become the mother of two children, namely: JNIarion, who is a high 
school graduate; and Stanley, a high school student. 

JNIr. EgelhofF holds membership with the Knights of Pythias 
lodge, in which he is serving as prelate. In politics he maintains an 
indei^endent course, not wishing to be bound by party ties, his vote 
being cast according to the dictates of his judgment. He served as 
a member of the county board of supervisors in 1907 and was reelected 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 297 

to that office in 1909. For three years he has been a member of the 
hbrary board. He possesses a studious nature and is extremely well 
read. Although he had limited educational advantages in his youth, 
he has become a man of broad general information, is the possessor 
of a fine library and is regarded as one of the best posted men in the 
county. In religious belief he is a Unitarian and he holds to the doc- 
trine of the brotherhood of man. In all affairs he is progressive, rec- 
ognizing the duties and obligations of the individual to his fellowmen 
and at all times meeting and utilizing his opportunities for his own 
advancement and for the betterment of the community. His ideals 
of life are high and to these he strictly adheres. 



THE NEBRASKA SANITARIUM. 

The Nebraska Sanitarium at Hastings has the distinction of being 
one of the two institutions in the state prepared to utilize all the meth- 
ods and appliances recognized in the modern sciences of hygiene, sani- 
tation, rational medicine and hygienic dietetics and it draws its pat- 
ronage from a large territory. It is situated in the east side of Has- 
tings, removed from the noise and dust of tlie city, and is surrounded 
by Hartwell park Avith its beautiful lake, spacious golf links, fine 
trees and shaded lawns and yet it is close enough to the city to profit 
from the advantages which it offers. The building is heated by steam, 
lighted by electricity, provided with electric elevator service and every 
room has hot and cold water. The greatest care has been taken to 
l^rovide everything that could in any way add to the comfort or hasten 
the recovery of the patients ; and the spirit of the institution, which is 
one of helpfulness and service, is in itself an important agency in the 
restoration of health. Tlie sanitarium is very different in its atmos- 
phere from a hospital and is rather a home Avhere those who are sick 
or tired may find cheerful surrounding's and skilled attention. The 
institution pays esjiecial attention to the treatment of chronic diseases 
and has every facility for the use of modern therapeutics. Great 
emphasis is laid upon hj'gienic food but no extreme dietetic ideas are 
exploited and it is recognized tliat tlie flavor and the dainty service 
of food are important as well as the amount of nourishment that it 
contains. INIassage is used in the treatment of many cases and the 
sanitarium is completely equipped for treatment with both electro- 
therapy and hydrotherapy. Patients are trained to cooperate with 
the healing forces of nature and thus hasten their recovery. The sani- 



298 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

tarium also maintains a maternity department. Although much of 
the work of the institution is of a medical rather than surgical natiu-e 
there is a modern surgical department which is equipped with aseptic 
operating rooms and a surgical ward. All anaesthetics are given hy 
a physician especially trained in anaesthesia and everything pertaining 
to surgical work is under the personal supervision of Dr. F. D. Hays- 
mer, the superintendent of the sanitarium, who is a surgeon of estab- 
lished reputation. An additional point in favor of the institution as 
a place for the treatment of chronic and surgical conditions is that 
those suffering from tuberculosis and other contagious diseases are 
not admitted. 



HENRY DRUECKER. 



Among the most highly respected residents of Ayr township is 
Henry Druecker, who came to this country from Germany as a young 
man without capital but who possessed the greater assets of determina- 
tion, enterprise and sound judgment and through the exercise of these 
qualities has gained financial independence. In all relations of life 
his conduct has measured up to high standards and his community has 
jorofited by his public spirit and his willingness to aid in movements 
furthering the general M-elfare. 

jNIr. Druecker was born in Westphalia, Germany, on the 19th of 
October, 1858, of the marriage of Christoph Plass and Sophia 
(SchafFer-Frans) Druecker. His father dying when he was but six 
weeks old and his mother when he was six months old, he became a 
ward of the state, which gave him a good education. He studied care- 
fully the opi^ortunities for advancement in German}^ and believing 
that at that time there was little chance for a poor man to gain success 
there, he began to investigate conditions in America. Becoming satis- 
fied that they were favorable, he emigrated to this country when 
twenty-two years of age, arriving at Baltimore on the 16th of April, 
1881. He at once continued his journey westward as he had decided 
to locate in the middle west and three days later he reached Platts- 
mouth, Cass county, Nebraska. As it was necessary for him to secure 
work immediately he accepted a position paying ten cents a day but 
after a short time was given sixteen dollars a month and during the 
second year that he worked as a hired hand received twenty dollars a 
month and the third j^ear thirty dollars a month, an indication of the 
satisfactoriness of his services. He carefully saved his money, prac- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 299 

ticing strict economy, and at length was able to begin farming on his 
own account on rented land. He was also married about that time. 

After operating land belonging to others for four years INIr. 
Druecker came to Adams county and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres one mile south of his jiresent farm. For ten years he 
remained upon that place and his well directed industry and his tln-ift 
enabled him to add to his capital from time to time. At the end of a 
decade he purchased an adjoining quarter section, subsequently bought 
another adjoining one hundred and sixtj^ acre tract and two years 
later purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty-six acres on section 
3-1, Ayr township, on which he still resides and for which he paid ten 
thousand dollars. Three years later he added to his holdings by the 
purchase of four quarter sections in Zero township, three of which are 
in a body, and for this property he paid sixteen thousand dollars. He 
also owns stock in the Ayr Bank and in the Ayr Grain & Supply 
Comjjanj^ which owns an elevator in Ayr. In addition to operating 
his home farm he, together with two of his sons, cultivates the three 
quarter sections in Zero township and the remaining quarter section 
in that township is operated by another son. All of his farms are 
well improved and he keeps everything in excellent condition, realizing 
tliat carelessness in that regard is one phase of inefficiency in farming. 
He has so wisely managed his farm work that he has secured a large 
return from his land and has also conserved the fertility of the soil 
and he has been quick to adopt improved methods of machinery, recog- 
nizing that advancement should be made in agriculture as well as in 
other forms of industrj\ During the '80s when times were exceedingly 
hard in Nebraska and many failed and left the state he remained here 
in spite of everything and by rigid economy kept his credit good and 
managed to gain a start. One of the factors in his success has been his 
unquestioned integrity and the certainty that he would meet all obli- 
gations that he might incur. His determination, his industry and his 
foresight have gained their reward and he is today one of the wealthy 
men of his township. 

jMr. Druecker was married on the 3d of ]March, 1884, to INIiss 
Louisa Albert, who was also born in Westphalia and is a daughter of 
William Albert. To this union eleven children have been born, five 
sons and six daughters, as follows. Ernest, who is operating one of 
his father's farms in Zero townsliip, married JNliss Amanda Brown, 
by whom he has a son, Clinton. William resides with his brother 
Ernest and is also operating land belonging to his father. INIinnie 
gave her hand in marriage to Frank Robertson, by whom she has two 
daughters, Lucille and JNIabel. Edward, who is residing on his 



300 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

father's west farm, married ]Miss Birdie Vovard and they have a son, 
Darwin. Ella is the wife of William Ribold, who is operating the 
Mary Cole fanii, six miles northeast of Ayr, and they have three 
children, Letta, Marguerite and Ervin. Lena gave her hand in 
marriage to Frank Basard, a farmer of Ayr township, and they had 
one child, who, however, died in infancy. Henry and Fred are both 
at home, as are Louisa, Tilla and Fern, all three of whom are attend- 
ing school. 

Mr. Druecker supports the democratic party in politics, being 
convinced of the soundness of its governmental policies. He is con- 
nected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and both he and 
his Avife hold membership in the Presbyterian church of Blue Hill. 
On the 8th of ISlay, 1906, they sailed for Germany and remained for 
a month in the town where INIr. Druecker was born and also visited 
his wife's old home. Before returning they went to various places 
of interest in Europe and the trip was very enjoyable in all respects 



MATT HEUERTZ. 



Matt Heuertz, one of the financially independent and represent- 
ative farmers of Juniata township, was born in Jackson county, Iowa, 
on the 23d of April, 1877. His parents, Peter and Johanna (Siren) 
Heuertz, were both natives of the grand duchy of Luxemburg but 
emigrated to the United States in young manhood and womanhood. 
Both settled in Iowa, where they were married and continued to live 
until the spring of 1886, when they removed to Adams county, Ne- 
braska. The father owned a good farm on section 9, Roseland town- 
shiji, which he brought to a high state of development, and was pro- 
gressive as a farmer and as a citizen, contributing to the development 
of his community along various lines of activity. He passed away in 
1899, but his M'ife survives and is still living in Roseland township. To 
their union Mere born seventeen children, of whom Nicholas, Joseph, 
James, John Peter, Susie and John are all deceased, and one died un- 
named. Those living are: John, who owns and operates a good farm 
in Roseland township; August, also a farmer of that township; Lena 
Katie, the widow of JNIartin Scheifelbein and a resident of Juniata 
townshij) ; Lizzie, who is now Sister Sabastian in a convent at IVIilwau- 
kee ; jNIary, who is now Sister Fastina in a convent in Chicago ; Anna, 
who is Sister Felix and is also in Chicago; ]\Iatt; JNIaggie, who is Sister 
Carista and is in Milwaukee ; Nicholas, a farmer of Roseland town- 



I lil lig I' f 




TUE SUMMIT i'AKM UAIJ.X A.XD ,SILO 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 303 

shij) ; and Susie, the wife of Alexander Parr, of Roseland township. 
Of the four daughters who are nuns tlu-ee are teachers and all are 
highly educated. 

JNIstt Heuertz attended school in Iowa for two years and completed 
his education in the common schools of this county, to which he was 
brought when nine years of age. He began to assist with the farm 
work as soon as he was large, enough and by the time that he reached 
maturity he was thoroughly familiar with all phases of agTiculture. 
He remained at home until his marriage, which occurred when he was 
twenty-three years of age, and then began farming on his own account, 
operating land on section 9, Roseland townsliip, for six years. At the 
expiration of that period he rented his present farm, which comprises 
the whole of section 16, Juniata township. He owns a half section in 
Holt count}'; Nebraska, a quarter section in Keith county and forty 
acres in Juniata township, this county. The large measure of success 
which he has gained is indicative of his ability and energj', and there is 
no more efficient farmer in the county than he. He not only under- 
stands thoroughly the cultivation of the soil and the care of stock, but 
he is also a business man of acumen and sound judgment. 

JMr. Heuertz married INIiss Susie Kolen and they are the parents 
of seven sons, Josef, Anton, Benedict, George, Edward, Adolph and 
Peter. JNIr. Heuertz indorses the jjrinciples of the democratic party 
but does not consider himself bound by partj^ ties, often voting inde- 
pendently. Fraternally he belongs to Hastings Council, No. 1123, 
K. C, at Hastings and, as this affiliation indicates, is a communicant 
of the Roman Catholic church. He has the greatest faith in the future 
development of his county and of the state as a whole and has given 
practical evidence of his belief by investing heavily in land, and the 
wisdom of his course has been justified as his property has increased 
in value and has also returned him a good income. 



MRS. GEORGE H. NORTON. 

INIrs. George H. Norton was long identified with the west. Sne 
became a resident of Nebraska in 1872 and became an active factor in 
the agricultural development of Adams county. She was born in 
Springfield, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1831, a daughter of Phineas 
Cromwell and JNIary ]Marilla (Loomis) Williams, and a sister of Pro- 
fessor Alvin Dighton Williams. She was educated at North Scituate, 
IMassachusetts, and in early womanhood took up the trade of coat 



304 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

making in a tailor shop in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, becoming more 
than ordinarily proficient in that work. She continued throughout 
her life in active connection with business interests. For a time she 
was engaged in the millinery business, and later became interested in 
farming. 

On Thanksgiving Day, the 30th of November, 1854, in Paw- 
tucket, ]\Iassachusetts, now Rhode Island, she became the wife of 
George Henry Norton, a son of Joseph and Elvira (Davis) Norton, 
the latter a sister of ex-Governor John Davis of Rhode Island, and 
a cousin of Edwin Davis French, the New York artist. Mr. Norton 
was born May 7, 1833. Following their marriage, the young couple 
resided in Pawtucket and afterward at North Attleboro, JNIassachu- 
setts. On the 8th of September, 1862, Mr. Norton enlisted for nine 
months service as a member of Company C, Forty-seventh IMassachu- 
setts Regiment, being in the command of Captain E. S. Horton. He 
was sent to New Orleans and on the 7th of JNIarch, 1864, he reenlisted 
as a member of Company C, of the Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, which was attached to the army of the Potomac under Gen- 
eral Burnside and in the retreat from Fredericksburg, Mr. Norton 
was taken prisoner. He was sent to Belle Isle and soon afterward to 
Andersonville, where he died September 9, 1864. 

Mrs. Norton thus left a widow and in straightened financial cir- 
cumstances, went with her children to INIinnesota to join her brother 
at Fairmont, ]\Iinnesota, where she resided until 1872. In that year 
she came to Nebraska and settled on a homestead claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, directly north of her brother's home place in 
Adams county. This she cultivated and improved with the assistance 
of her eldest son and the younger children. She surrounded the quar- 
ter section with a honey locust hedge and planted shade and fruit trees, 
having at one time a fine orchard of apple, pear, plum and other fruit 
trees. She also planted a fine grove of cottonwoods which flourished 
for a number of years. She raised grain and wheat and made a liv- 
ing for herself and children with the help of the pension granted by 
the government. After living for a number of years in a sod house, 
she finally built a substantial six room frame house, which is still 
standing on the place occupied by her daughters. She also filled the 
office of deputy postmaster at Kenesaw in 1872-3. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norton had two sons and two daughters: Delmur 
Dighton, a lumber merchant of Kenesaw, who married JNIiss ISIarga- 
ret Jones; INIarilla Elvira; Melina Adelina; and George Henry, a 
farmer of Kenesaw, who married IMiss IMabel Powers. 

Mrs. Norton was a believer in the principles of the republican 



( 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 305 

party and she held membership in the Freewill Baptist church, in the 
work of which she was actively interested, becoming a teacher in the 
Sunday school. She died at her home in Kenesaw, July 9, 1894, in 
her sixty-third year, leaving a memory that is cherished by all who 
knew her because of her many excellent qualities and kindly deeds. 
She was a most devoted mother, making many sacrifices for her fam- 
ily and to her friends she was ever loyal. 



EDWARD J. GIBSON. 

Edward J. Gibson, a prosperous and up-to-date farmer of West 
Blue township, was born in Cass county, JNIichigan, on the 7th of 
July, 1867. His father, James M. Gibson, was a native of Sandusky 
county, Ohio, and was born on the 12th of June, 183.5. He attended 
school in his native state when opportunity afforded and continued to 
live there until about 186.5, when he removed to Cass county, ]N[ich- 
igan. In 1886 he came to Adams countj% Nebraska, and rented a 
farm two miles north of Hastings, to the operation of which he de- 
voted his time for a number of years. He has now passed the eightieth 
milestone and is still in good health and takes an active interest in the 
affairs of the day. For some time he has resided with our subject. 
He was married in 1857 to Miss Katherine Bowers, of Summit 
county, Ohio, and she passed away on the 18th of March, 1897. To 
them were born three children, of whom our subject is the only son. 
Ella, born on the 6th of March, 1862, was a native of Ohio and be- 
came the wife of Edward JNIead, who is a drayman of Hastings and 
who served as chief of the fire deiJartment for several years. She died 
on the 1st of June, 1903, leaving her husband and two children to 
mourn her loss. ]Mary, whose birth occurred in Cass county, ^Michigan, 
on the 27th of April, 1872, married Albert E. Troyer, of Boise, Idaho, 
and has one child. 

Edward J. Gibson, the youngest in the family, attended the com- 
mon schools of ]Michigan until he was eighteen years of age, and the 
following year accompanied the family to this county. For five years 
he worked for his father on the home farm, but in 1891 he rented land 
four miles northwest of Hastings on his own account and remained 
there until 1902. During the succeeding seven years he engaged in 
the dray business in Hastings, but in INIarch, 1909, resumed farming, 
renting a place four miles northwest of Hastings. In 1914 he rented 
the Godfrey JNIarti farm five and a half miles northeast of Hastings, 



306 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

and there he still lives. He is energetic and progressive and his labors 
are yielding him a good financial return. 

On Christmas Day, 1901, Mr. Gibson was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma Crissman, a daughter of Joseph W. Crissman, an old 
settler of Adams county, now residing in Hastings. Two children 
have been born to this union, namely : Marian, whose birth occurred 
on the 19th of January, 1903, and who is attending school in district 
No. 33; and Edward D., who was born July 15, 1905, and is also 
attending school. 

JNIr. Gibson gives his political allegiance to the democratic party 
and fraternally is a member of the Fraternal Union, an organization 
with headquarters at Denver. His religious faith is that of the Baptist 
church. He has so ordered his life that he has not only gained a 
gratifying measure of financial success but has also won and held the 
friendship and respect of those who have been brought into close 
contact with him. 



ED TANNER. 



Ed Tanner, a general contractor conducting business at Hast- 
ings, was born in New York on the 15th of September, 1863, a son 
of Job and Mary Tanner. It was in the year 1871 that the family 
made their way across the country to Nebraska, settling seven miles 
northwest of Juniata, where the father secured a homestead claim and 
engaged in farming for fifteen years. There were eight children in 
the family, three sons and five daughters, of whom Ed was the fifth 
in order of birth. Both the parents are now deceased. 

Ed Tanner was a little lad of but eight summers when the family 
left the Emi^ire state and came to the middle west, so that he was 
largely reared here amid pioneer conditions. He pvu-sued his educa- 
tion in the schools of Adams county, conning his lessons in a little log- 
school building such as was common in pioneer times. When his text- 
books were put aside he concentrated his efforts upon farming and 
in fact his early training made him familiar with all the work of the 
fields from the time of early spring planting until after crops were 
harvested in the late autumn. When twenty-five years of age he 
concentrated his energies upon house building, into which business he 
had gradually worked, and since that time he has become well known 
as a contractor. He has been accorded many large jobs, including the 
making of the grade cut-off for the Hastings & Northwestern Rail- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 307 

road, a distance of five miles. He has taken contracts for paving and 
sewer building at Nebraska City, Aurora and Nelson and he put in 
the Y for the Burlington & JNIissouri Railroad. He has also taken 
large contracts for work at Grand Island and for paving and sewer 
building in various parts of the state and is now working on a big 
drainage ditch between Kearney and JNIinden. He employs about 
forty men and teams in the execution of his contracts, having sixty- 
five head of horses and all the equipment necessary for undertaking 
big jobs of the character herein indicated. He understands the 
scientific phases as well as the practical features of the work and is 
thus able to direct the efforts of those whom he employs. 

In September, I880, Mr. Tanner was united in marriage to INIiss 
Helen JMonroe, a daughter of Stephen jMonroe, of Illinois. They 
had two children, Vernon and Roy, who are associated with the father 
in business, and there is also one grandchild. The family home is 
maintained at Crane and High streets, but the wife and mother 
passed away on the 2d of April, 1915, her loss being deeply regretted 
not only by her immediate relatives but also by many friends. 

JNIr. Tanner votes with the reiJublican party but has never been 
an office seeker, jjreferring to concentrate his time and energies upon 
his business affairs. In religious faith he is a JNIethodist, holding 
membership in the church in Hastings. In his business affairs he 
has closely ajiplied himself to the duties at hand and at all times his 
course has been characterized by a progressive spirit. Industry has 
been his salient characteristic and diligence the directing force of his 
life. Advancement has not been accorded him but has been won at 
the price of earnest, self-denying effort, his imdivided attention being 
given to business affairs. 



ALVIN DIGHTON WILLIAMS. 

Alvin Dighton Williams was born October 3, 182.5, at Smithfield 
Center, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, the son of Phineas Cromwell 
Williams, who in turn was an only son. The latter left Connecticut 
about 1820. He was orphaned at the age of ten years and had but 
little educational opportunity. He came of Welsh and English ances- 
try and tradition says that his ancestors were of the same branch as 
Oliver Cromwell's. The Williams family in Connecticut were gener- 
ally well educated and tradition says that Tiiomas AVilliams was 
offered the presidency of Yale College but declined because of his con- 



308 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

nection with Oliver Ci'omwell and his fear of prominence. Phineas 
Cromwell AVilliams became a carriage maker and farmer and devoted 
his life to those pm-suits. In politics he was a whig and an ardent ad- 
mirer of Henry Clay. He wedded JNIarilla Loomis of Troy, Pennsyl- 
vania, having spent his bojdiood and youth upon a farm near that place. 
The Loomis family were English people from Connecticut and her 
mother's mother, a Godard, was Scotch-Irish. Both JNIr. and INIrs. 
Phineas CromAvell Williams were members of the Freewill Baptist 
church. Their son, Alvin Dighton Williams, attended Whitestown 
Seminar}' and Hamilton College of Ncav York and upon graduation 
in 1849 received his degree. INIany years later the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity was conferred upon him by Quincy College, now Chad- 
dock College of Quincy, Illinois, this honor being received in 1871. 
He worked his own way through the seminary and college, teaching 
and preaching and doing any work he could secure. At the time of 
his graduation he was ill with typhoid fever. He became a member 
of the Freewill Baptist church, having been baptised and received into 
the church of that denomination at Troy, Pennsylvania, Jvme 2, 1839. 
Two years later he was licensed by the church to jireach and given a 
quarter!}' meeting license by the Bradford and Tioga meeting in 18i2. 
He was ordained at Carolina ]Mills, Rhode Island, in 1848 and became 
pastor of the church there for a time, later resuming the work after 
his graduation. During his college days he read a great deal of Eng- 
lish literature and developed a taste for the best which he continued 
to cultivate and which he transmitted to his children. He bought 
books as he could afford them and acquired many by writing for pub- 
lishers. When he came to Nebraska he brought Avith him a library 
of between fifteen and twenty hundred volumes. 

It was in 1851 that Rev. Williams accepted a call from the church 
in Pawtucket, iNIassachusetts, now Rhode Island, remaining there for 
four and a half years, during which time he increased the church mem- 
bership to more than twice its original number. In 1855 he assumed 
the pastorate of the church at Lawrence, INIassachusetts, and imder- 
took the work of raising money for a new house of worship which was 
finished in 1857. An all winter revival trebled the membership. In 
1857 he suffered a nervous breakdown and a throat trouble developed 
into bronchitis which never afterward entirely left him. Physicians 
said he must leave the New England climate and recommended JNIin- 
nesota. In the fall the family removed to INIinneapolis where he took 
the pastorate of a Freewill Baptist church, but the throat trouble 
eventually obliged him to give up preaching and he devoted his time 
to teaching, writing and publishing papers. He established the Free- 



PAST AND, PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 309 

will Baptist Quarterly, managing it for three years and finally becom- 
ing editor. He was principal of the Minnesota Seminar)' at Wasioja, 
JNlinnesota, until the war called forth the young men in attendance. 
He then went to Cheshire, Ohio, where for a year he was principal of 
an academy. He started the West Virginia College at Flemington, 
West Virginia, and served for several years as president. In 1871 he 
came to Nebraska and served for one year as president of the State 
Normal School at Peru. In August, 1872, he arrived in Adams 
county, Nebraska, and settled on a quarter section, cornering on the 
townsite of Kenesaw on the northeast, being the first permanent set- 
tler within six miles. He built the first permanent house and put 
down the first well. He bought railroad land and at one time had 
nearljr eight hundred acres. He won a prize of forty acres near Firth 
for the best article on sheep raising in Nebraska, the prize being 
offered by the Nebraska State Journal. He also started the Kene- 
saw Times, later published by his son, and for one year he published 
the Register at Lowell. Subsequently he established and published 
the Hastings Nebraskan, of which he had charge for several years. 
He served for a number of years as a trustee of the Nebraska Hos- 
pital for the Insane at Lincoln and as a member of the state board of 
agriculture. At the same time he was conducting his private business 
interests, both wisely and well. He developed a number of farms near 
Kenesaw and proved up on a timber claim northwest of the town. 
During the '70s he acquired eight hundred acres of land in Nebraska, 
mostly in Adams county, and at his death he left an estate valued at 
about fifteen thousand dollars, his land bringing ten thousand dol- 
lars. His library of from twelve to fifteen hundred volumes was 
given to the Oakland City College of Indiana, of which he was presi- 
dent at the time of his demise. 

While in Kenesaw JMr. Williams assisted in building a Freewill 
Baptist church and organized the church membership. He also aided 
in organizing the Hastings, Aurora and Nemaha River quarterly 
meeting, as chairman of the executive committee of the Nebraska 
yearly meeting. He organized churches at ]Marsliall. Pleasant Plain, 
Long Branch, and Lincoln, Nebraska. About 1890 he went south 
and worked among the General Baptists. He became president of 
the Oakland City College of Indiana and was thus identified with 
educational interests at the time of his death. He had been state 
superintendent of schools in West Virginia in 1869 and 1870, and 
Avas principal of the State Normal School at Peru, Nebraska, in 
1871-2. He held other positions of public trust, being chaplain of 
the ^Minnesota house of representatives between 1857 and 1800. 



310 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

Alwaj'S a stalwart champion of the cause of temperance, he was 
worthy chief of the Good Templars in INIinneapolis and in 1860 was 
a delegate to the national convention which met in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. He was made a member of the Association of General Bap- 
tists in 1891, so continuing until 189-i and was its moderator in 
1891-2. In politics he was a republican from the organization of the 
party until his death. He supported the party as editor of weekly 
newspapers — the Kenesaw Times, Lowell Register and Hastings 
Nebraskan — and by correspondence to different papers including the 
Nebraska State Journal. While in INIinneapolis about 18.58 he joined 
the JNIasons and the Good Templars and was a delegate from the lat- 
ter to the convention in Chicago at which was organized the prohibi- 
tion party, though he opposed the organization, believing that the 
temperance movement had better remain non-political. During the 
senior year of his college days he was elected retiring president of the 
Phoenix society and also of the Delta Upsilon fraternity and was 
editor of college papers. 

On the 25th of April, 1850, at West Falls, Maryland, Mr. Wil- 
liams wedded Sarah Anne Harn, daughter of John and Charlotte 
(Hay) Harn, the former of English and the latter of English and 
German descent. They settled in Frederick county, ]\Iaryland, on a 
farm near JMount Airy. IVIrs. Williams was the eldest in a family of 
nine. She educated herself and assisted her two sisters in securing a 
course at Cedar Hills Seminary for Young Ladies at JNIount Joy, 
Pennsylvania, of which Rev. N. Dodge was principal and in which 
]Mrs. Williams was an assistant teacher at the time of her marriage. 
She and her sister, Ellen D. Harn, were the first teachers of Fred- 
erick county, INIaryland. Her oldest brother, Rev. George U. Harn, 
was a minister of the Church of God. He became identified with the 
abolition movement, joined the republican party on its organization 
and was killed while serving in the Civil war. Her brother Jesse died 
in the hospital during his service and another brother, Thomas, died 
from the effects of wounds. The children of Rev. and INIrs. Wil- 
liams were Cromwell Harn, deceased; Emma Loomis, the wife of I. 
D. Evans; INIary; JNIinnie, Avho has passed away; Katie, the wife of 
Joseph R. Thrall; and George Thomas, who married ]Miss Grace 
Barton of Kenesaw and is now residing in Denver, Colorado. 

It would be almost tautological in this connection to enter into a 
series of statements as shoAving Rev. Williams to be a man of broad 
scholarh^ attainment, for this has been shadowed forth between the 
lines of this review. Further evidence, however, of his position as a 
man of marked mentality is the fact that he was the author and pub- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 311 

lisher of various volumes including the Rhode Island Freewill Baptist 
Pulpit; Memories of Free Communion Baptists; Four Years of 
Cooperation in Nebraska; Life of Benoni Stinson; The Christian 
Church and its Institutions ; and the Beginning of an Autobiography. 
After making a trip to Florida for his health he died at his home in 
Kenesaw, December 31, 1894. 



C. W. WAY 



Hastings points with pride to the labors of C. W. Way, who is 
one of the leading architects of this part of the state. He was well 
trained for his profession and has made steady progress along that 
line since starting out in business on his own account. A native of 
Michigan, he was born in January, 1870, a son of George A. and 
Lydia J. Way. The father is a carpenter and electrical contractor 
and is now engaged in business at Champaign, Illinois. 

Following the removal of the family to that state C. W. Way 
piu'sued his education in the public schools there and afterward entered 
the State University. He then entered upon practical work in order 
to complete his i^rofessional training, for in his university course he 
had specialized in those lines whicli fitted him for the work of an archi- 
tect. In 1904 he came to Hastings and entered upon active practice. 
Here he has since remained and in the intervening period of twelve 
years has won for himself a most enviable position, while his ability 
has gained for him a liberal patronage. He has drawn the plans for 
the Clarke Hotel, St. Cecilia's church, the First Congregational 
church, the ]Madgett block, the Fraternity building, St. Paul's Ger- 
man Lutheran chiu'ch, the Second Congregational cliurch, the Zion 
German Lutheran church, the modern jjublic school buildings, the 
Carnegie library and many of the fine residences of the city. All of 
these stand as monuments to his skill and are the highest expression 
of architectural art. 

On the 2d of September, 1893, ^Nlr. Way was united in marriage 
to ]\Iiss Helen Arnold, a daughter of Ernest Arnold, and their chil- 
dren are Elsie D., Hedwig, George and Norine. The family reside at 
No. 116 West Third street and in social circles of the city they occupy 
an enviable position. Mr. and ]\Irs. Way hold membership in the 
Episcopal church and lie belongs also to the Knights of Pytliias fra- 
ternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Conuuercial 
Club. In his political views he is a republican and keeps well informed 



312 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

on the questions and issues of the day but has never been a politician 
in the sense of office seeking. He enjoys hunting and motoring as a 
means of diversion and recreation from onerous business cares but his 
attention is chiefly concentrated upon his work as an architect and 
he stands in the very forefront of the profession in his part of the 
state. To broad scientific knowledge he adds an appreciation of archi- 
tectural beauty and his buildings always constitute an expression of 
beauty as well as of stabilitj^ and comfort. 



DAVID H. R. GODFREY. 

David H. R. Godfrey gained financial independence through the 
wise management of his farming interests and is now living in honor- 
able retirement in Kenesaw. He is a veteran of the Civil war and in 
times of peace has manifested the same public spirit which prompted 
him to go to the defense of the Union. He A\'as born on a farm in 
Noble county, Indiana, on the 25th of April, 1842, a son of Jacob C. 
and Rebecca (Douglass) Godfrey. The father, who was born in 
New York in 1815, died in Noble county, Indiana, in 1855, and the 
mother, whose birth occurred in 1822 in Ohio, passed away in Shelton, 
Nebraska, in 1909. 

David H. R. Godfrey received the usual education obtainable dur- 
ing his boyhood and assisted in the operation of the home farm until 
he was nineteen years of age. On the 17th of JNIarch, 1862, he enlisted 
in Company I, Thirtieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served in 
the Shenandoah valley campaign under Sherman and fought in the 
battle of Shiloh under Grant. Not long after that engagement he 
was discharged for disability, but subsequently reenlisted in Company 
B, Seventeenth Indiana Veteran Volunteer INIounted Infantry, with 
which he served during the remainder of the war. He was in a num- 
ber of important engagements besides those already mentioned, in- 
cluding the battles of Lookout IMountain, Cumberland Gap and 
Cliattanooga and was with General Buell when he chased General 
Bragg out of Kentucky. 

On returning to civil life Mr. Godfrey engaged in farming in 
Noble county, Indiana, for two years, after which he went to Stark 
county, Illinois, where he worked on a farm for six months. His next 
removal was to Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he Avas employed in a saw- 
mill for two years, after which he went to Jewell county, Kansas. 
There he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land and for 




MR. AND MRS. DAVID H. R. GODFREY AND GRANDSON 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 315 

seven j'ears he concentrated his energies ui)on the cultivation and 
improvement of his farm. He met with the usual pioneer experiences, 
as that district was then on the western frontier. On leaving Kansas 
he came to Adams county, Nebraska, and became the owner of land 
in Ivenesaw township. He engaged successfully in farming and as 
he managed his business affairs well he accumulated a competence 
which enabled him to retire from active life in the fall of 1915. He 
has since lived in Kenesaw and is enjoying a well deserved period of 
leisure. 

On the 19th of September, 1863, Mr. Godfrey was united in 
marriage to JNIiss Angeline Gilbert, then a resident of La Grange 
county, Indiana. Her birth occurred in Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
and her natal day was the 24th of February, 1842. On the 19th of 
September, 1913, they celebrated their golden wedding and received 
the felicitations of their relatives and friends on their half century 
of happy married life. They have become the parents of eleven 
children, of whom five survive, namely: Joseph J., who is farming 
in Kearney county, Nebraska ; James F. and Norman, both residents 
of Sumner, Nebraska; Ella V., the wife of F. Bowman, of Shelton, 
Nebraska; and INIinnie R., who married C. Calkins, of Shelton. 

jNlr. Godfrey casts his ballot in support of the men and measures 
of the reiJublican party but has not been otherwise active in political 
affairs. He is a member of the Christian church, is identified with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen and belongs to the Grand 
Army of the Republic, finding much pleasia-e in associating with 
others who Ment to the defense of the Union in its time of need. 



A. J. VAN EVERY. 



A. J. Van Everj% conducting a house moving and general con- 
tracting business, makes his home in Hastings, but his business extends 
over a radius of one hundred miles. He is regarded as an expert in 
this line and thus a liberal patronage is accorded him from a wide ter- 
ritory. Mr. Every was born in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on the 
3d of April, 1869, and is a son of James and Ruth Van Every, the 
former a pattern maker by trade, which business he followed to pro- 
vide for his family. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 

A. J. Van Every largely acquired his education in the school of 
experience and therein has learned many valuable lessons. He came 
to Hastings in 1889 Avhen a young man of twenty years and was 



316 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

emi)loyed in various waj's in order to earn an honest living and gain 
a start in life until 1905, when he turned his attention to his present 
business. He handles heavy buildings and general contracts and his 
expert workmanship in this line causes his services to be sought over 
a territory covering one hundred miles in all directions from Hastings. 
He has taken the contracts for moving the Clu'istian church, the Hig- 
ginbotham house, the Burlington depot at Holdrege, the Loop City 
mill, which is the largest in the state, and the St. Paul courthouse. He 
understands both the practical and scientific phases of his business, 
knows to a certainty the kind of adjustment needed to insure safety 
from all danger in moving and directs the efforts of employes in a 
manner that produces the best results. 

Mr. Van Every was united in marriage to jNIiss Ada Earner, a 
daughter of George Earner, of Ohio, who for five years was a soldier, 
serving throughout the entire jjeriod of the Civil war. The wedding 
of JNIr. and ]Mrs. Van Every was celebrated on the 6th of May, 1894, 
and has been blessed with the following named children: INIildred, 
now a student in Hastings College; Marian, who is teaching in this 
state; Irene, attending high school; Lucile; Robert; Ruth; Kenneth; 
jNIary; and Alice E. 

The parents are members of the Christian church and are well 
known socially in Hastings, where thev have an extensive circle of 
warm friends. In his political views INIr. Van Everj^ is a democrat and 
has taken a very active interest in local politics, doing all in liis power to 
promote the growth and insure the success of his party. He is now 
serving for the second term as alderman of the fourth ward and he 
exercises his official prerogatives in support of every plan and meas- 
ure for the general good. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd 
Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the ^Modern 
Woodmen of America. In all matters of citizenship he maintains a 
progressive spirit and seeks the material, intellectual, social and moral 
progress of his citj- and state, giving earnest sujiport to all movements 
looking to the general welfare. 



WILLIAM J. SHRIVER. 

William J. Shriver, who has gained a place among the successful 
and progressive farmers of Denver township, was born in Noble 
county, Ohio, and is a son of Michael T. and IMary Ann (Hughes) 
Shriver. After engaging in farming in that county for a number of 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 317 

years the father removed with his family to Iowa county, Iowa, about 
1866 and there remained until his death, which occurred in July, 1913. 
His wife is still living upon the home place in Iowa county. Six 
children were born to their union, namely: W. J.; Jolin S., who lives 
near Spencer, Clay county, Iowa; Elwood, a farmer residing in the 
vicinity of Jefferson, Greene county, Iowa ; Emma, who is now Mrs. 
Joseph JNIisel and resides in Marengo, Iowa ; Amos, who lives in Iowa 
county, Iowa; and Lucy, the wife of Atkin Pladen, a retired mer- 
chant living in Coleridge, Nebraska. 

William J. Shriver was reared in Noble county, Ohio, and attended 
the district schools in the acquirement of his education. When eight- 
een or nineteen years of age he accompanied his parents to Iowa and 
assisted his father in operating the home farm until he reached his 
majority. He then rented that jjlace and engaged in farming on his 
own account for a decade. At the end of that time he decided to trj^ 
his fortune in Nebraska and located in Denver township, Adams 
county, purchasing one hundred and sixty acres on section 23. After 
farming that j)lace for a number of years he sold in 1903 and took up 
his residence on his present farm, also on section 23. Although he 
supervises the ojieration of the farm he leaves the greater part of the 
actual work to his son, Emory A. Shriver. He has acquired title to 
other land in Denver township, owning two hundred and forty acres 
on section 35 and two hundred and forty acres on section 36. 

Mr. Shriver was united in marriage in Keokuk county, Iowa, in 
1873 to Miss Harriet J. JNIisel, a daughter of David and Martha 
(Tremble) Misel. Six children have been born to this union, of 
whom three are living. IVIartha died when eight months old and 
'William passed away at the age of ten years. David Russell is a 
farmer living in Denver township. He married INIiss JNIattie Van 
Meter, by whom he has the following children, Ruth ISIabel, 'William 
J. and Donald. Amos Emanuel died when a young man of twenty 
years. John Weslej% who is farming in Denver township, married 
Roxy Van Meter and they have two sons, Lester and James. Emory 
Andrew, who is operating the home farm, raises wheat, corn, oats and 
alfalfa and also a few hogs and cattle and his well directed labors 
are rewarded by good financial returns. He married INIiss Bessie 
Brocken, of Kansas, and they have a son, Emory Lloyd, who is now 
two years of age. 

William J. Shriver supports the democratic party in politics but 
has never been an office seeker. Both he and his wife belong to the 
United Brethren church and take a commendable interest in its work. 
He has so directed his labors and managed his affairs that he now 



yi8 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

has more than a competence and all who have been brought mto con- 
tact with him acknowledge his abilitj\ JNIoreover, his personality is 
such that he has gained and held the warm friendship of those who 
have been closely associated with him. 



JOHN HEMPEL. 



John Hempel, a contractor and builder, is a prominent repre- 
sentative of industrial activity in Hastings, where there are to be 
seen manj' evidences of his handiwork in a number of the finest struc- 
tures of the city. He was born in Russia on the 8th of July, 1862, 
and is a son of Jacob and INIargaret (Gorman) Hempel. In the j-ear 
1876 the family came to the United States, making their way to Clay 
county, N^ebraska, where the father homesteaded land and engaged 
in farming. He converted a tract of wild prairie into richly produc- 
tive fields, from which he annually gathered good harvests, and his 
labors too were an element in advancing progress in pioneer times. 
During the later years of his life he put aside the active farm work 
and removed to Hastings, where he lived retired until called to the 
home be5^ond. His wife has also passed awa}\ 

John Hempel pursued his education in the schools of Russia, 
remaining in that country until fom-teen jxars of age, when he came 
Avith his jiarents to the new world. Here he assisted in the arduous 
task of develojjing a new farm and gave his father the benefit of his 
services until he reached the age of twenty-two years, when he started 
out in business life independently. He had previously learned the 
stonecutting trade and had acted as foreman in the employ of Thomas 
Farrell, a contractor. When a young man he located in Hastings and 
has since been actively identified with building operations in this city. 
He secured the contract for the erection of the Clarke Hotel, the 
Young INIen's Christian Association, Hastings College, St. Cecilia's 
Catholic church and the brewery. He has three times erected what is 
known as the Stein block, previous buildings having been destroyed 
by fire. He was also the builder of the Brandes garage, the Stitt 
garage and some of the principal business blocks and fine buildings 
of the city. His work is of an excellent character, his contracts are 
promptly executed and there is no sacrifice of labor or material in 
order to further his financial ends. He is straightforward and relia- 
ble in business and what he undertakes is done well. He built the 
laundry at the State Asylum, has remodeled many of the public build- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 319 

ings of Hastings and at all times is kept busy with the demands made 
upon him in the line of his chosen vocation. 

Mr. Hempel has been twice married. He first married INIiss ]Mar- 
garet Hemple and following her demise married INIiss Christina Hane, 
a daughter of Phillip Hane. The children of his first marriage are 
jNIary, Carl and William. He is a member of the Evangelical church 
and is a Avell known figure in fraternal circles, belonging to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khoras- 
san, the JModern Woodmen of America, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In these organi- 
zations he has many friends, who esteem him highly because of his 
possession of that fraternal spirit ujion which the difi^erent organiza- 
tions are based. 



RAYMOND CHRISTIAN NELSON. 

Raymond Christian Nelson, conducting a photographic studio in 
Hastings, was born September 26, 1877, a son of L. P. and Nicholin 
(Larson) Nelson, who were natives of Copenhagen, Denmark. The 
father was born in the year 1838 and the mother in 1842, and he is 
noAv living in Los Angeles at the age of seventy-seven years. It was 
in the year 1868 that ]Mr. Nelson came to the LTnited States, settling 
in Pennsylvania, where he conducted business as a mason and con- 
tractor. He afterward removed westward to Racine, Wisconsin, and 
for a time was a resident of INIilwaukee. In 1897 he established his 
home in Hastings, Avhere he continued in the contracting business 
until 1899, during which period he erected several business blocks and 
dwellings in Hastings. He then removed to Los Angeles, where he 
is still active in business, although he has now reached the age of 
seventy-seven years. 

Raymond C. Nelson was the second in order of birth in a family 
of nine children. He pursued his education in the schools of Racine 
and INIiiwaukee, Wisconsin, and at sixteen years of age began to learn 
the art of oil painting at Racine under the direction of Professor 
Hendrickson, who was head of the Art Institute at Copenhagen for 
six or seven years. He then took up the study of photography under 
H. S. Klein of ^Milwaukee, with whom he remained for three years. 
He afterward traveled all over the United States, making home 
portraits, and at length came to Hastings, where he maintained a 
portable gallery. When engaged in that branch of the art he at times 
had eight men in his employ. He became familiar with all branches 



320 PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 

of photography and f ollowmg his arrhal iii Hastmgs he took up his 
permanent abode here, having continued his residence in the city for 
sixteen years. He ranks today among the foremost photographic 
artists of the state and has taken many prizes at exhibits. His busi- 
ness is now extensive and in the conduct of his gallery he employs the 
most modern scientific methods and utilizes the latest appliances to 
insure the high qualitj^ of his work. 

The excellence of his work is shown in the large nimiber of prizes 
which he has won in photographic contests. He won two gold medals 
given by the Photographic Association of Nebraska at Omaha in 
1903; the silver loving cup given by the same association at the same 
time; two gold medals given by the Photographers Association of 
Nebraska at Lincoln in 1904-; a large valuable bronze vase given by 
the Iowa Association of Photographers at the meeting held in Des 
Moines in 1904; two gold medals and a loving cup given bj^ the 
Photographers Association of Nebraska at Lincoln in 1905; a valu- 
able gold medal given for entry in the grand portrait class o^Jen to the 
world at Topeka, Kansas, in 1905; the two gold medals of the Ne- 
braska Photographers Association at Lincoln in 1906; silver cup at 
Lincoln in 1907; the grand prize of the Southern States Association 
in 1907; the first grand prize at the Jamestown Exposition in Nor- 
folk, Virginia, in 1907, in a contest open to the world; the highest 
salon honors in an open to the world contest at Dresden, Germany, 
in 1908, when he received a magnificent gold certificate; the highest 
salon honors in an open to the world contest at London, England, 
where he received a gold seal certificate in 1909; the first prize, an 
Angelo trophy, in an open to the world contest, held by the National 
Photographers Association in 1910; a valuable cup in the grand 
portrait class oj^en to the world contest of the Iowa Photographers 
Association in 1910; a silver cup in 1910, given as first prize by the 
Nebraska Association at Omaha, for work entered in the grand 
portrait class in a contest open to the world; a large silver cup in 1910 
given in the grand portrait class by the Inter ]\Iountain States Photog- 
raphers Association in a contest open to the Avorld; the first prize, a 
valuable gold medal given by the Kansas Photographers Association, 
to tlie grand portrait class open to the world ; the grand sweepstakes 
trophy of the Nebraska Association in 1911 ; first prize of the grand 
portrait class open to the world at the Inter INIountain Photographers 
Association held at Denver. Colorado, in 1911, the prize being a valu- 
able cup ; first prize of the grand postrait class of the JNIissouri Photog- 
raphers Association held at Kansas City in 1912; first grand portrait 
prize of the Iowa Photographers Association in an open to the world 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ADAMS COUNTY 321 

contest at Sioux City, in 1912; first grand portrait prize at the Inter- 
national Photographers Exposition at Winona, Indiana, wh.ere he 
was awarded a valuable diamond medal in 1912; first prize in the 
grand portrait class of the Illinois Association — a gold medal — in 
1912; first grand portrait prize, a silver cup, given by the Pacific 
Coast States Association in 1913; a loving cup given as first grand 
portrait prize by the Oklahoma Photographers Association in 1914; 
the first grand portrait prize in an open to the world contest held by the 
Texas Photographers Association in 1914; a gold and bronze vase in 
the first grand portrait class in the contest held by the Northwestern 
Association at jNIilwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1914; the fii'st grand portrait 
prize, a large silver loving cuj), given by the Iowa Association at Des 
Moines in 1914; the first grand prize, a cup, given by the Northern 
States Association in 191i5; the four hundred dollar cash prize in the 
American beautiful women contest held by the Ansco Company at 
Binghamton, New York; and the first grand prize, a valuable gold 
plaque, given at the International Exposition in New York city. 

In early manhood Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to ISIiss 
Eliza Muench, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who was born in Calmar, 
Iowa, her father being Rudolph IVIuench, a native of INIiinchen, Ger- 
many. Emigrating to the United States, Mr. ]\Iuench settled first in 
Calmar, Iowa, but several years later removed to Watertown, Wis- 
consin, where he died of typhoid fever. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have 
three children, Raymond, Ruth and Doris. Mr. Nelson has become 
widely known during the jieriod of his residence in Hastings and in 
his business connections has gained prominence. He appreciates all 
the finer points of photography and his artistic taste and perception 
find expression in his work. 



INDEX 



Addie, J. E 

Alexander, C. L 

Alexander, Samuel . . 

Andrews, W. E 

Augustin, Henry, Sr. 



46 



Beghtol, K. D 174 

Bernard. Rev. Father 37 

Bigelow, C. B 235 

Binderup, A. W 265 

Bitner, D. N 25 

Black, J. P. A 6 

Blackman, W. T 285 

Blake, Fred, Jr 83 

Blake, F. H 278 

Blankenbiller, George 50 

Bloom. F. A 98 

Borden, A. W 214 

Boulton, E. J 88 

Boyd, F. A 43 

Brandes, E. A 286 

Breede, Adam 243 

Bruckman, C. E 275 

Burke, W. H 67 

Burton, W. R 5 

Burwell, Judson 70 

Butler, Orville 123 

Carpenter, H. M 253 

Carson, W. T 10 

Christopher, C. C 200 

Clark, A. M 172 

Clarke, A. L 225 

Colling, George 293 

Comly, W. F. J 289 

Coon, G. N 100 

Corey, J. R 116 

Cramer, A. H 206 

Crosson, Raymond 198 

Crowley, J. F 153 

Currier, Lewis 44 

Daily, H. B 68 

Damkroeger, H. A 122 

Denman, F. M 94 

De Sanno, W. H 41 

Dietrich, C. H 135 

Dillon, W. H 196 

Druecker, Henry 298 

Duer, W. R 147 

Duncan, J. P 113 

Dutton, W. M 161 

Egelhoff, Luther 295 

Evans, Griffith 192 

Evans, I. D 52 

Faber, J. F 99 

Faber, Stephen 142 

Falk. W. J 184 



Gangwish. J. F ige 

Gibson, E. J ' ! ! 305 

Godfrey, D. H. E 312 

Gossard, 6. W 79 

Grothen, Conrad 90 

Gruener. Balthauser 176 

Hadden, Louis 177 

Haller, F. J 138 

Hansen, C. H igg 

Hansen, Hans , _ 350 

Hansen State Bank 62 

Hare. C. M §9 

Harris, Sydney 23 

Hart, David 264 

Hastings Foundry & Iron Works 227 

Haverly, H. C 190 

Haynes, M. M 73 

Haysmer. E. D 268 

Heiler, J. F . . .. 178 

Hemberger, Leopold 141 

Hempel, John 318 

Hensley, M. W 154 

Heuertz. Matt 300 

Hines. W. C [ m 

Hoagland, L. B 377 

Hobroek, H. C ' 92 

Hoff, C. D .'.■..■;■' 127 

Hubbard, E. P 19 

Hudson, C. H 124 

Ingraham, C. G 153 

Isaac, L. E §2 



Johnson, Eriek 283 

Johnson, P. L 241 

Johnston, Leander 59 

Johnston, Simeon 202 

Junker, A. R 34 

Kauf, Karl 73 

Kennedy, Thomas 8 

Kent, J. L 108 

Kidder, C. E ]'. . 157 

Koeliler, B. S 230 

Lane, C. G uy 

Larsen, C. C io7 

Lawler, J. A les 

Lawson, C. K isi 

Lewis, D. J 56 

Livingston, Albert 216 

Livingston, A. E 213 

Livingston, Walter 228 

Long, G. W '. 77 

Losee, J. H 207 

Lovel, G. W 29 

Lowman, W. M 175 



323 



INDEX 



McCoUam, G. B 105 

McCreary, W. P 188 

McDonald, ^yilUam 47 

McFerren, J. D 128 

McKelvy, James 54 

Madgett, J. P 155 

Madgett, William 151 

Manahan, Charles 218 

Marti, D. B 179 

Maxim, L. E 74 

Mays, David 146 

Mays, W. 1 129 

Meyer, H. J. C 69 

Miles, C. J 32 

Milligan, Joseph 212 

Mills, A. J 36 

Mills, L. P 61 

Moray, C. F 237 

Moritz, Charles 80 

Morledge, R. R 197 

Hosier, C. L 187 



Naulteus, Francis 


84 


Nebraska Sanitarium 


397 


Nelson, R. C 


319 


Nichol, W. U 


104 


Nissen. Christian, Sr 


238 


Norton, Mrs. G. H 


303 


Nowers, W. E 




Olmstead, F. P 


273 



Pearson, L. R 30 

Pedersen. W. J 120 

Phillips, L 133 

Phillips, T. S 13 

Pittz, Joseph 93 

Plummer, J. W 130 

Poulson, G. H 209 

Powell, A. W 279 

Pratt, G. H 26 

Ramelow, H. F 148 

Rees, John 60 

Robinson, C. C 117 

Rooney, James 270 

Rose, " J. A 256 



Ruhter, Jacob 1 94 

Ruhter, John 201 

Sabin, R. L Ill 

Saddler, W. G 243 

Schellak, W. S 110 

Schlegel, B. F 258 

Schmidt, Bernhard 38 

Sehultz, E. E .• 143 

Sliattuck, A. T 245 

Shick. Henry 248 

Shriver, W. J 316 

Siekmann, L. J 247 

Sims, J. R 219 

Sipple, Ray 152 

Smith, C. E 224 

Smith. Doede 103 

Smith, Edwin 164 

Smith, H. R 101 

Stevens, J. C 20 

Stromer, D. H 145 

Stulken, Fred 193 

Sucha, W. L 66 

Swartz, J. C ". . 229 

Tanner, Ed 306 

Teeling, J. M 16 

Templeton, J. L 126 

Tibbets, G. W 255 

Twidale. A. L 226 

Tyler, G. B 251 

Uden, Georg 290 

Unger, J. W 159 

Van Every, A. J 315 

Vanhouten. C. J 106 

Varah, T. R 231 

Volland, G. A 323 

Way, C. W 311 

Weeks, E 15 

Whiting, T. G • 64 

Williams, A. D 307 

Winkler, C. W 220 

Wolcott, G. W 280 

Woods, R. L 18 

Yager, P. W 49