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Full text of "Past and present of Alameda County, California"

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PAST AND PRESENT 



OF 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 

CALIFORNIA 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



CHICACiO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1914 



1131898 




FKAXK K. MOTT 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



FRANK K. MOTT. 

Among the prominent and representative men of Alameda county 
none stands higher nor possesses a wider circle of friends than Frank 
K. Mott, the mayor of Oakland. A self-made man who, by his 
natural leadership, initiative and unswerving principles of honor, 
has risen from humble station through the several positions of mes- 
senger boy, clerk, merchant, real-estate dealer, member of city coun- 
cil and several times mayor of Oakland. In every capacity he has 
measured up to the highest standards of efficiency and more than 
satisfied the expectations of his friends and party. 

Frank K. Mott was born in San Francisco, January 21, 1866. His 
parents, Peter D. and Fannie K. Mott were from New York state 
and settled in San Francisco at an early day. Leaving school at the 
age of twelve years and working as a messenger boy for the Western 
Union and American District Telegraph Company, his education was 
of necessity very limited. However in a year's time he had advanced 
to the position of clerk and collector for the company, and he 
remained there for four years, at the end of which time he entered 
the employ of George S. Brown, a hardware merchant of Oakland. 

When he was twenty- two years of age Mr. Mott entered into 
partnership with A. E. Howard and together they succeeded to a 
part of the business. This firm continued for eleven years when 
Mott bought his partner out and became sole proprietor. In Janu- 
ary, 1907, he sold his mercantile business and founded the well known 
firm of Frank K. Mott Company, real-estate brokers, whose extensive 
dealings and manifold improvements have helped so materiallv 
toward a greater Oakland. 

In the meantime, in 1897, he was appointed to the city council and 
chairman of the committee on finance by Mayor Pardee, afterward 
governor of California. In this capacity he served for two years, 
the last year of which time he was president of the council. In 1899 
he was elected on the republican ticket to the council again. Another 
honor was bestowed upon him in 1905 when he was elected mayor of 



6 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

Oakland on the republican ticket, having also received endorsement 
of the democratic party and the Municipal League. He was elected 
again in 1907 to succeed himself, being a candidate of all parties. 
Since then two elections have been held, in 1909 and 191 1, and he 
has been reelected both times. 

Mr. Mott is a member of the Nile and Athenian Clubs, and 
is active in Masonic, Elk, Knights of Pythias, Moose and Native 
Sons orders. He has also served on the republican state central com- 
mittee. He is organizer, president and stockholder of the Frank 
K. Mott Company and several allied corporations. He is director 
in the Security Bank & Trust Company and was president of the 
League of California Municipalities. 

Mr. Mott was married in 191 1 to Mrs. Gertrude Bennett. 



HON. CHARLES FREDERICK HORNER. 

On the roster of county officials of Alameda county appears the 
name of Hon. Charles Frederick Horner, who, following a period 
of efficient and capable service as a member of the board of super- 
visors, was in 191 1 elected county assessor. He is a native son, born 
in Irvington, Alameda county, November, 1858, his father, the late 
W. Y. Horner having been one of the well known figures in the 
pioneer days of California. He came to the Pacific coast around the 
Horn in 1849 and became prominently identified with the develop- 
ment of San Francisco in early times, laying out the first addition to 
the city, which was known as Horner's Addition, and controlling 
about two hundred and thirteen thousand acres of land in tlie state. 

Charles F. Horner acquired his early education in the public 
schools and later attended Washington college. Early in his career 
he became interested in the business of refining sugar and lias made 
a comprehensive study of every branch and department of this 
industry. He was for many years manager of one of the largest 
sugar plantations in the Hawaiian islands located at Lahaina, Mani. 
Starting in with a very modest position at this plantation, he exhibited 
such business acumen and earned such a reputation for integrity and 
responsibility that he soon won the confidence of the capitalists who 
had invested in the enterprise and was steadily promoted, being 
finally given full supervision of the property. He took an active part 
in public affairs while a resident of the Hawaiian islands and in 1887 



HISTORY OF ALA:\IEDA COUNTY 7 

and 1888 served as a member of the legislature under the reform 
movement. 

Mr. Horner was elected a member of the board of supervisors 
of Alameda county in 1900 and served in this capacity for eleven 
years, his continued reelection to office being the best proof of his 
acceptability to the people. His tireless efforts and conscientious 
work in behalf of progress and general improvement, particularly in 
regard to the betterment of the roads and public highways, soon 
gained for him an enviable reputation for well directed activitv in 
office. 

Improvements along these lines had his particular attention as a 
member of the board, and it is largely owing to his influence that 
Alameda county enjoys its excellent system of roads. In addition to 
this Mr. Horner was a strong advocate for better bridges and suc- 
ceeded, among other things, in obtaining for the county the modern 
steel bridge in Niles canyon. As presiding member of the board he 
always showed a constant courtesy and impartiality to petitioners, to 
his fellow board members and to the public at large. In August, 
iQii, after the conviction of Henry P. Dalton, county assessor, the 
board of supervisors appointed Mr. Horner to fill the vacancy, and 
he has since served in this office, discharging his duties in his usual 
prompt and systematic manner. 

Mr. Horner is well known in fraternal circles, being a Knight 
Templar Mason, a member of the Order of Elks, the Odd Fellows, 
the Woodmen of the World, the Knights of Pythias, the Native Sons 
of the Golden West and the Druids. He holds membership also in 
the Nile Club of Oakland. He is a progressive and public-spirited 
citizen, a business man of unusual insight and ability and a conscien- 
tious and capable official, and he holds the confidence and good-will 
of all who are in any way associated with him. 



PERRY A. HAVILAND. 

One of the most valued and representative citizens of Oakland 
is Perry A. Haviland, well known in official circles in Alameda 
county from his many years of continuous service in the department 
of engineering with which he is still connected as county survevor. 
He was born in Fort Dodge, Iowa, September 8, 186^, and there 
ac(]uired a public-school education, later entering the Iowa State 
University where he took a thorougli engineering course. After 



8 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTV 

finishing his studies at the university he was tendered a position with 
the Union Pacific Railway Company in the engineering department 
and after several years' satisfactory service with them came to Cali- 
fornia. He established a private engineering office in San Luis 
Obispo and for two years did work of various kinds in line with his 
profession, serving as consulting engineer, draftsman, and in similar 
capacities. Following this he came to Oakland, where he took up his 
residence. At about this time he accepted a position in the citv 
engineer's office, where he remained for several years. 

Mr. Haviland has been connected with the department of 
engineering in various capacities in Alameda county for the past 
eighteen years. As county surveyor he has conducted the work of 
his office in a businesslike and systematic manner, and the public is 
to be congratulated in securing the services of a man of his broad 
experience, integrity and unquestioned ability in the engineering 
department of the county. He is uniformly courteous and prompt 
in his business transactions and in his dealing with his associates and 
office staff. The best proof of his popularity is the fact that he has, 
for two elections, received the indorsement of both the republican and 
democratic parties and at the last election was nominated by the 
republican, democratic and union labor parties. Mr. Haviland has 
recently had supervision of some very important public work. The 
county boulevard, which was planned by him, is widely known as one 
of the finest works of its kind in the state. 

Mr. Haviland's marriage to Miss Anna Knight of San Francisco, 
who comes from a prominent English family, took place in that 
city in 1891;. There are two children in the family, Marian, a 
daughter of eighteen and a son Carlton, aged fourteen. 

Mr. Haviland has had to make his own way in the world and 
is what is generally called a self-made man. During his long resi- 
dence in Oakland he has become well liked in both his social and 
business intercourse and has many firm friends throughout the county. 



ALAMEDA COl NTY ABSTRACT COMPANY. 

The Alameda County Abstract Company, one of tiie leading busi- 
ness concerns of its kind in this part of California, was established 
in 1878. Wright anci Lvnch being the founders and owners. After 
a few years the concern was purchased by William drier, who con- 
ducted it until icioi.whcn lohn McCarthy became tlic owner. Since 



HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 9 

that time he has been associated with W. H. Waste in the conduct of 
this enterprise, Mr. McCarthy being its president and Mr. Waste 
vice president. Under its present management the business has had 
a remarkable growth and is now the leading abstract company in 
Alameda county. When Mr. McCarthy assumed control in 1901 
about fifty orders a month were received by the house. The monthly 
average today is five hundred and fifty orders and the entire business 
has expanded proportionately. The Alameda County Abstract Com- 
pany purchased the plant of the Oakland Title & Abstract Company 
two years ago and is the only company in the county that has a com- 
plete title plant which enables it to do thorough and reliable work. 
The concern is well managed along progressive and modern lines and 
is a valuable contribution to the business resources of the city and 
county. 

John McCarthy, president of the Alameda County Abstract Com- 
pany, came to Berkeley in 1873, later removing to Oakland, where he 
now resides, honored and respected by all who know him. He has 
been in the abstract business for eighteen years and understands it in 
principle and detail, his experience and knowledge being salient ele- 
ments in his success. He has always taken an active interest in com- 
munitv afifairs, being in heartv sympathy with all movements to 
advance the permanent interests of the city. He has won a wide 
circle of friends, who hold him in the highest estimation for the many 
sterling traits of character which he has evidenced in many ways, 
throughout his long career as a citizen of Alameda county. 



JAMES B. BARBER. 



The worth and fidelity of James B. Barber in positions of public 
trust is evidenced by the fact that since 1888 he has been continuously 
in public office and since 1894 has served by reelection as tax collector 
of Alameda county. He was born in Marysville, this state, Novem- 
ber 9, 1850, and is a son of Arthur S. and Elmira (Burton) Barber, 
who came to Alameda, Alameda county, in 1853. In that city James 
B. Barber was reared and educated, attending public school until he 
was fifteen years of age at which time he laid aside his books and 
began his business career, working as a clerk in his fathers grocery 
store and continuing there until he was twenty years of age. Being 
ambitious for a broader field of activity he learned telegraphy and 
was afterward for three years and a half in the employ of the Southern 



10 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Pacific Railroad as operator, proving conscientious, prompt and able 
in the discharge of his duties. He resigned this position in order to 
go into business for himself, turning his attention to dealing in wood 
and coal in Alameda and building up a large and profitable enter- 
prise along this line, a liberal patronage being accorded him in recog- 
nition of his upright and honorable business methods and his earnest 
desire to please his patrons. 

Mr. Barber sold out his business interests at the end of three years 
and came to Oakland, accepting the appointment of deputy county 
tax collector, a position which he filled so ably and efficiently that in 
1888 he was elected tax collector of Alameda county. He served 
two years and at the end of his term was elected city treasurer of 
Alameda, an office which he held until 1894. I" th^ latter year he 
was again elected county tax collector, and he has served continuously 
since that time, his excellent record proving his business ability, fore- 
sight and discrimination. 

In Alameda on the 25th of December, 1878, Mr. Barber married 
Miss Anna M. Cook, and both are well known in the city where they 
make their home as people of genuine personal worth and many fine 
qualities of mind and character. Mr. Barber is prominent in fra- 
ternal circles, being past master of Oak Grove Lodge, No. 215, F. and 
A. M., past president of Halcyon Parlor, Native Sons of Alameda 
and past chancellor of Alameda Lodge, No. 49, K. P. He belongs 
.also to the Order of the Eastern Star and is a member of the Unitarian 
club. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, and 
he has always been stanch in his support of its principles and policies, 
upholding them both as a private citizen and as a public official. In 
the city where he has resided since the beginning of his public career, 
he is well known and deservedly popular, commanding the respect, 
esteem and confidence of all with whom he is in any way associated. 



HON. JOSEPH R. KNOWLAND. 

Hon. Joseph R. Knowland is the present representative of his 
district to the sixty-third United States congress, having been elected 
to that office by virtue of his previous excellent work in various fields 
of public service. He is, moreover, numbered among the distin- 
guished citizens of California because of the prominence he has 
attained in promoting the permanent interests of the state along all 
lines and by reason of the extent and importance of his business con- 




KXdWl.AXI 



HISTORY OF AI,AMKDA COUNTY 13 

nections. He is identified with industrial, commercial and financial 
enterprises, the successful conduct of which indicates his keen sagacity 
and unfaltering enterprise. 

Mr. Knowland was born in Alameda, August 5, 1873, and is a 
representative of a well known pioneer family of this state. His 
father, Joseph Knowland, settled in California in the early days and 
was one of the most prominent and successful business men of Ala- 
meda county, being one of the leading lumbermen of the Pacific 
coast. 

Following the completion of a public-school education Joseph R. 
Knowland attended Hopkins Academy and the University of the 
Pacific, after which he became associated with his father in the 
lumber industry and in the latter's various shipping interests. He 
began at the bottom and rose steadily, learning the business in prin- 
ciple and detail and becoming soon a valuable assistant to his father. 

Later, however, he turned his attention to public affairs and here 
found his chosen field of work, for he early manifested ability as a 
politician and an intelligent interest in matters of community develop- 
ment. He was only twenty-five years of age when he was elected to 
the assembly from the forty-seventh district by a majority of fifteen 
hundred votes and he served with credit and ability both at the 
regular session of 1899 and the extra session of 1900, during which he 
was chairman of the committee on commerce and navigation. So 
acceptable was his work to the people of his district that in 1900 he 
was reelected by a majority of two thousand and during his term of 
service was appointed chairman of a special committee to investigate 
the police department of San Francisco. As a result of disclosures 
made in the course of this investigation Mr. Knowland introduced 
legislation, now on the statute books, prohibiting Chinese slave girl 
traffic in San Francisco. 

In 1902 Mr. Knowland was elected to the state senate from the 
fourteenth district by a majority of twenty-eight hundred votes and 
he served in an eflicient and capable manner as chairman of the com- 
mittee on banking. During his entire legislative career he was identi- 
fied with all movements calculated to improve public morals and 
elevate the standard of citizenship and his courage and integrity as 
well as his ability led to his nomination in 1904 to fill out the unex- 
pired term in the fifty-eighth congress of Hon. Victor H. Metcalf, 
who had been appointed secretary of commerce and labor. His elec- 
tion to the fifty-ninth congress followed by a plurality of seventeen 
thousand, three hundred and eighty-four votes and he was later 
reelected to the sixtieth congress and again to the sixtv-third, being 



14 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

now a member of the house. His continued return to office speaks 
eloquently of his services for the state and is a tribute to his integrity, 
intelligence and public spirit. As a member of the committee on 
interstate and foreign commerce Mr. Knowland has taken an active 
interest in legislation connected with the Panama canal and he led 
the fight on the floor of the house for free tolls for American ships 
on the coastwise trade. He has at all times favored movements which 
would allow the United States to get the fullest possible benefit from 
the canal, voting in favor of a provision in the Panama canal bill pre- 
venting railroads owning or controlling steamships from operating 
through the canal, where they compete with railroad lines in traffic. 
Never being content without exact and comprehensive knowledge of 
the subject on which he is working, Mr. Knowland made four trips 
to the canal during its construction, has studied methods and condi- 
tions there and can speak with authority on everything connected 
with its building and use. Among other important legislation with 
which he has been connected was the bill to suppress the white slave 
traffic and it was he who recently introduced bills to enlarge the pro- 
vision of the present act relating to this. In the natural course of 
advancement he is now a candidate for the senate. He is of the con- 
scientious type of public men, ever holding to his ideals and principles 
without swerving. He is not only a patriotic x\merican but an ultra 
loval Californian, with an intimate knowledge of the state's needs. 
Mr. Knowland has had extensive and important business affilia- 
tions, being president and a director of the Gardiner Mill Company; 
a director in the Kennedy Mine & Milling Company; a member of 
the Gas Consumers Association of the United States; and a director 
in the Alameda National Bank and the Union Savings Bank of Oak- 
land. He is thoroughly alive to the interests of the city and com- 
iiuinity and can always be counted upon to further any plan for their 
material development. 

Mr. Knowland married Miss Ella Fife and of the children born 
to them two are still living. Mrs. Knowland passed away in July, 
iqo<S, and her death was sincerely mourned by a wide circle of friends 
in Oakland, to whom her culture and refinement as well as her many 
excellent qualities of character had greatly endeared her. 

Mr. Knowland is well known in various fraternal organizations, 
being a life member of the Masonic body; past master of Oak Grove 
Lodge, No. 215. F. & A. M.; Alameda chapter, Oakland com- 
mandery, Oakland consistory and Islam Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 
He also belongs to the Klks and the Woodmen and for eight years 
served as grand officer of the Native Sons of the Golden West, of 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 15 

which he is now past grand president. Early in his career Mr. 
Knowland became interested in the preservation of the landmarks, 
relics and other mementos of the early history of California and 
ardently participated in movements for the restoration of the old 
missions and other structures of the pioneer period. He delivered 
illustrated lectures in over twenty states on this subject and con- 
tributed greatly toward raising public sentiment to the necessity of 
preserving the landmarks of the first European occupation on these 
shores. He is now president of the California Landmarks League. 
His interests are varied and all along lines of progress and improve- 
ment. He is a broad-minded man who places a correct valuation 
upon life, its opportunities and its privileges, and in the course of a 
useful and honorable career has wrought along lines of the greatest 
good to the greatest number, his activities in various fields proving 
of great benefit to the community at large. He stands today among 
the most honored and eminent residents of Alameda countv. 



JUDGE E. M. GIBSON. 

The life of Judge E. J\L Gibson of Oakland has been so varied 
in its activities, so high in its purposes and so far-reaching in its 
effects, that it is difficult to state which of its phases has been most 
directly beneficial, for at different periods he has proved himself a 
patriot, jurist, statesman, philosopher and philanthropist, and at all 
times an honorable and worthy man and a loyal citizen. During 
a period of connection with the legal profession in Oakland dating 
from 1874, he has risen to a place of honor and distinction in this 
field, but it does not by any means limit the scope of his interests 
which extend to every phase of municipal development or public 
growth. 

Judge Gibson is a native of Indiana, and was born on a farm in 
Hamilton county on the 13th of June, 1842. He is a representative 
of one of the oldest southern families, the members of which have 
been prominent in North Carolina for many generations. He is 
descended from Quaker lineage. From North Carolina his paternal 
granii father, Thomas Gibson, was a volunteer soldier in the con- 
tinental army of the Revolutionary war, rendering distinguished 
service as a cavalryman. After receiving an honorable discharge he 
made his home in that state until his death. He wedded a Miss 
Crothers and their son, George (iibson, father of the subject of this 



16 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

review, was born in North Carolina and went to Indiana as one 
of the early pioneers of the latter state. George Gibson married 
Mary Winslow, daughter of Eleazer Winslow, a descendant of an 
old Massachusetts family of Winslows, one of whom was at one time 
governor of that state. The Winslows were Quakers for generations 
and left their native Massachusetts to become residents of the south. 
Judge Gibson's great-grandfather Winslow, was a sea captain of 
Nantucket, Massachusetts, sailing the high seas in his own ship for 
many years. When he retired because of approaching old age he' 
purchased a large tract of land in North Carolina where he estab- 
lished his home, and the family became prominent among the wealthy 
and aristocratic people of that locality. The Winslow family were 
intimately related with the Stantons, also Quakers of North Caro- 
lina, Elizabeth Stanton being the maternal grandmother of our sub- 
ject and Edwin M. Stanton, who was secretary of war under Lincoln, 
was a member of the same family. 

Judge Gibson acquired his early education in the crude log school- 
house, so representative of that early day, in his native county, which 
was supplemented by a course at a Quaker seminary. Upon the out- 
break of the Civil war, being a patriotic lad, he enlisted in Company 

A, Nineteenth Indiana (Volunteer) Infantry, under Colonel Sol 
Meredith, and went with his company into camp in Indianapolis. 
From there it was sent to Washington, D. C, and later to Arlington 
Heights, Virginia, where Judge Gibson served under General George 

B. McClellan. He saw a great deal of active service, participating 
in many of the most important engagements of the war, including the 
battles of Gainesville, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He 
was with General Pope's army on its retreat from the Rapidan to 
Washington when it was under fire much of the time for twenty-one 
consecutive days. During that retreat Pope's army fought the battles 
of Gainesville, Second Bull Run and Chantilly. 

After the battle of Antietam General Burnside was placed in com- 
mand of the army of the Potomac and fought the battle of Fredericks- 
burg. For excellent conduct in that battle young (iibson was pro- 
moted from the ranks to the position of sergeant. His service at 
Gettysburg was as a member of the famous Iron Brigade, the Hrst 
infantry on the field of that great battle. Late in the afternoon in a 
desperate charge made by the enemy he was badly wounded, taken 
prisoner and was left four days and nights on the field before being 
taken to a hospital. \Mien he had recovered sufficiently to be moved 
he was taken to Phil uielphia, whence in December he was sent to 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 17 

Indianapolis and was honorably discharged from the service, June 
25, 1864. 

With this creditable military record Judge Gibson returned home 
and took up the study of law, a profession which had always attracted 
him. For a time he read in the offices of Hamlin and Wickersham 
in Indianapolis and in the autumn of 1865 entered the law depart- 
ment of Columbian University, now George Washington University, 
\\'ashington, D. C, from which he was graduated in 1868. He was 
appointed a clerk in the department of the interior and was later 
transferred to the third auditor's office in the United States treasury 
department. 

He was in Washington when President Lincoln was assasinated 
and Andrew Johnson became president, heard his impeachment trial, 
and knew personally General Benjamin Butler who had much to do 
in bringing the impeachment proceedings; was in Washington during 
the trial of Mrs. Suratt, who was tried and executed for conspiracy 
resulting in the shooting of President Lincoln and he was also present 
at Ford's Theatre the night of the assasination and saw the martyred 
president carried from the building. Among his friends were many 
of the illustrious men of that time, and his personal acquaintance 
embraced such men as James A. Garfield, Senator Oliver P. Morton, 
Thaddeus Stevens, Charles Sumner, Schuyler Colfax, General Wil- 
liam T. Sherman, General John A. Logan and many other noted men 
of that period. 

In 1870 he came west to California and in this state made his 
first location at San Jose and after a short stay removed to San 
Francisco. Remaining for a time in that city he came, in 1874, to 
Oakland where he made his home. Here he took up the active prac- 
tice of law and soon became widely and prominently known as a 
resourceful, strong and able practitioner, whose knowledge of legal 
principles was comprehensive and exact, and whose application of 
points of law was generally correct and logical. Turning his atten- 
tion to politics he soon won a position high in the councils of the 
republican party, to which he gave the aid of a powerful, convincing 
and eloquent speaker and a versatile and able politician. As a plat- 
form speaker he travelled to various parts of the state in political 
campaigns and did a great deal to insure the election of his party's 
candidates. In recognition of his legal and political ability he was 
in 1S7S appointed district attorney to Hll the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Henry Vrooman, and one year later was elected 
and later reelected to the office which he filled with credit and dis- 
tinction for four years. After being defeated for the office of railroad 



18 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

commissioner and for that of mayor of Oakland, he was elected judge 
of the superior court of Alameda county and served for six years, 
accomplishing much effective work. Upon the expiration of his term 
he again took up the practice of law in Oakland, where he is today 
recognized as one of the leading members of the legal fraternity. He 
is well versed in every branch of his profession and has won distinc- 
tion in all, although he does his best and most effective work in the 
court, especially in jury cases, where his commanding eloquence, his 
striking presence and attractive personality hold the attention of his 
listeners. He has been connected with a great deal of important 
litigation and has won many hotly contested cases, his powers con- 
tinually expanding and developing with the added calls made upon 
them. Not wholly has his time been devoted to his professional and 
political labors for the financial interests have for some years held 
claim to his valued services. He is president of the Bank of Com- 
merce. 

In Washington, D. C, in 1869, Judge Gibson married Miss Irene 
E. Brashears, a native of that city, of French and German ancestry. 
They have three children: Augusta; Clara, the wife of Ben F. 
Woolner, city attorney and junior partner of Judge Gibson; and 
Grace. For a number of years the family occupied a beautiful 
country home beyond Piedmont but they now reside in the city. 

Mrs. Gibson for many years has been an active factor in the social 
life of this vicinity being a member of the Ebell Society, one of the 
oldest and most influential woman's organizations of Alameda county. 
She is also a member of the Oakland Club ; the Women's Relief Corps 
of California and Nevada, being past president of this department; 
and the Daughters of the American Revolution, having served as 
regent of the Oakland chapter, besides being a member of several 
other societies. She has evinced a marked interest in all matters 
tending to social uplift and improvement and possesses a wide circle 
of friends. 

Judge Gibson holds membership in the Sons of the American 
Revolution, and, being public-spirited, patriotic and loyal himself, is 
justly proud of his ancestors who fought for the cause of freedom. 
He is a most ardent admirer of Abraham Lincoln, classing him above 
all other men of any age and has developed in himself much of Lin- 
coln's broad sympathy and wide understanding. He is so familiar 
with the history of the great emancipator that he has made his life 
and character the subject of many interesting lectures. An inde- 
fatigable worker, a hard student, a deep thinker. Judge Gibson has 
throughout his life systematically developeii his powers, talents and 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 19 

abilities and in so doing has won success — a success important in its 
material and tangible manifestations and important also by reason 
of the standards, ideals and principles upon which it is based. His 
charities have been most liberal yet unostentatious and with it all his 
honesty of purpose and absence of misleading pretense have been 
characteristic virtues. 



WILLIAM J. BACCUS. 

William J. Baccus, serving in a creditable and able manner as 
commissioner of streets of Oakland, has demonstrated his ability 
during a period of nearly ten years in the public service, rising rapidly 
to his present place in official circles. He was born in San Fran- 
cisco, November 17, 1869, and is a son of Benjamin Baccus, one of 
the pioneers in California, who came overland by team to the coast in 
1 85 1. The father worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad and was 
afterward engaged in the plumbing business in San Francisco. 

William J. Baccus came to Oakland when he was ten years of 
age and acquired his education in the public schools of this city. 
Following the completion of his studies he engaged in the teaming 
business with W. H. Parrish and later learned the bricklaying trade, 
which he followed for several years. Recognizing, however, the 
greater opportunities which were to be found in the contracting busi- 
ness, he turned his attention to this line of work and soon met with 
excellent success in it, for he had a thorough knowledge of general 
construction work, acquired through practical experience, and the 
insight, integrity and ability necessary for success in any field. Bv 
virtue of these qualifications and his thoroughness and promptness in 
filling his many large contracts he has now become one of the fore- 
most men engaged in this line of work in Oakland, many of the most 
important structures in the city being built by him. His most recent 
contract was for the reconstruction of the Syndicate building and he 
was also identified with the reconstruction of the Kahn Brothers 
building. 

Mr. Baccus began his public career in 1903, wlien he accepted 
the nomination on the republican ticket for member of the city coun- 
cil, receiving the indorsement of the union labor forces, with whom 
he is closely affiliated. He was elected by a large majoritv and after- 
ward served four terms by reelection, during four years of which he 
was chairman of the street committee. He has alwavs been a hard 



20 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

and consistent worker for better streets in Oakland and has accom- 
plished a great deal of valuable work along this line, as it has been 
largely through his efforts and influence that the number of paved 
streets has been so greatly increased. So acceptable was Mr. Baccus' 
record on the city council that when the primary law went into effect 
he was nominated by direct primary vote for the office of commis- 
sioner of streets under the new charter and was elected by a large 
majority. He has continued his intelligent and constructive work 
in this office and is regarded today as one of the most able men in the 
service of the municipal government. 

In San Jose, California, in 1896, Mr. Baccus was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Catherine Muir, daughter of an early pioneer in this 
state. They have become the parents of three children: Volma, 
William J.. Jr., and Robert. Mr. Baccus is a member of the Native 
Sons of the Golden West; Council No. 7, I. O. R. M.; the Loyal Or- 
der of Moose, and other fraternal orders and clubs. In all essential 
respects he is a self-made man, the foundation of his success being 
plain, honest hard work. Most of his opportunities he has himself 
created, and he has utilized them in an intelligent and capable way, 
being ranked today among the men of worth and substance in the citv 
where he makes his home. 



JUDGE JOHN ELLSWORTH. 

Judge John Ellsworth, who in January, 1913, declined to be a 
candidate for reelection to the position of judge of the superior court 
of Alameda county, which he had filled with credit and distinction 
for twenty-four years, has had a long and varied career in public 
service, his worth and fidelity in positions of trust and responsibilitv 
being indicated by the wide-spread confidence and esteem in which 
he is held today. For forty-six years he has resided in Alameda 
county and may be termed the dean of the legal fraternity of the 
countv. He is now engaged in the general practice of law in 
Oakland. 

Mr. Ellsworth was born at East Windsor, Connecticut, on the 
7th of January, 1842, a descendant of one of the old and prominent 
families of New England, who settled in Connecticut in 1646. He 
is a son of Abner Moseley and Lucy W. Ellsworth. His early labor 
was that of the farm boy and the public schools of his native com- 
munitv afforded him his first educational opportunities. He was 




rrnr;!-: .khix kllsworti 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 23 

afterward a student in Phillips Academy, but he responded to his 
country's call for troops in the great Civil war, enlisting in the 
Twenty-fifth Connecticut Regiment, and proceeded to the south. He 
served nine months under General Banks in Louisiana and was 
present at the surrender of Fort Hudson, which had been besieged for 
six weeks. After his honorable discharge from the army he returned 
to Phillips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts, and there pursued 
such studies as would prove advantageous to his subsequent study of 
law, as he had decided to devote himself to that profession. He was 
graduated in 1864, but although he had fitted himself for Yale 
University financial conditions prevented his going there, so after 
spending one year in Williams College at Williamstown, Massa- 
chusetts, where ne took senior work, he began to study law, enter- 
ing the law office of Hubbard & McFarland in Hartford, Connecti- 
cut. He read there for tw'o years, winning his admission to the bar 
in October, 1 867. In the same year he came west to California, estab- 
lishing his residence in Alameda county, his home being at Alameda 
and his office in San Francisco, where he engaged in a general legal 
practice until 1876, when he moved his office to Alameda. The same 
year he became city attorney of that community. This position he 
resigned in 1886, after ten years of able and effective service, in order 
to accept a seat in the state assembly, to which he had been elected. 
After two years of progressive work in that capacity he was elected 
in 1888 and in January, 1889, took his seat as judge of the superior 
court of Alameda county and by reelection he served four terms, 
holding the office in all twenty-four years and accomplishing during 
that period a great deal of constructive, beneficial and far-reaching 
work and leaving the impress of his personality and ability upon the 
judicial history of this section of California. His last term expired 
on the 5th of January, 1913, and he declined to be a candidate for 
reelection, turning his attention to the general practice of law in Oak- 
land. He is known in this city as a strong and able practitioner, well 
versed in underlying legal principles, able in his appeals before the 
court and concise in his presentation of a case. 

On the 17th of April, 1892, Judge Ellsworth was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ada L. Hobler, of Alameda, and both were well known 
in social circles of this city until April 15, 1906, when the wife died. 
Fraternally Judge Ellsworth is identified with the Odd Fellows, the 
Masonic order and the Grand Army of the Republic, and he is a 
member of the Athenian Club. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party, which he has served capably and well through- 
out his entire connection with public life, upholding always its prin- 



24 ]]1S•|■()R^• Oi- AI.AMI'IDA COfXTV 

ciplcs and policies, in which he lirnily believes. Throughout a period 
of residence in Alameda dating from 1867 he has securely entrenched 
himself in the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens, his public 
career having been varied in service and faultless in honor, and his 
professional and personal life beyond reproach. It has been said of 
him that "He has established a record that few public men can 
equal, not only for continued public service, but for the able and faith- 
ful manner in which he has performed the duties entrusted to him." 



GEORGE E. GROSS. 



Oakland numbers among its most progressive and successful native 
sons George E. Gross, who since 1901 has been connected with the 
treasury department of the city government and is now serving in 
a capable manner as auditor and assessor. He was born in this city, 
March 14, 1872, and acquired his education in the public schools. 
Following the completion of his studies he went into business with 
his father, who was engaged in the marble and granite industry in 
Oakland. 

On the ist of May, igoi, Mr. Gross entered public life as dejuity 
in the city treasurer's ofHce and during his three years of service in 
that capacity exhibited an unusual aptitude for the work and mas- 
tered the details of the management of the office. His ability led to 
his appointment in 1904 as chief deputy treasurer and it was while 
he still held that office that he accepted the republican nomination 
for city auditor and assessor, receiving the indorsement of the demo- 
crats and the Municipal League. He was elected by an overwhelm- 
ing majority and assumed his duties at the time of the charter elec- 
tion. About two years ago the office was raised from being one in 
which the county auditor's figures were accepted as the basis of the 
city assessment rolls to a department in which the entire work of the 
city was handled carefully and justly. The change was made by 
charter amendment but the work of bringing the office up to the 
new standard has been undertaken carefully and slowlv, new men 
being employed from time to time as necessitv required. These are 
now employed on a permanent basis instead of being appointed by a 
blanket ordinance from time to time for successive periods. The 
handling of the auditing and assessing by the city instead of accepting 
the county figures raised the assessed valuation for the city as a whole 
over ten million dollars above what it would have been under the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 25 

county figures and resulted in a more equal distribution of the burden 
of taxation in the city. An ordinance was introduced and passed to 
print under suspension of the rules of the last council, placing the 
auditor's office on a permanent basis. The ordinance provides for 
the following: The fixing of the salaries of the first and second 
deputy auditors at one hundred and fifty dollars; the appointment by 
the auditor of one additional deputy at a salary of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars; the fixing of the salary of the deputy assessor in 
charge of personal property at one hundred and seventy-fi^ve dollars, 
and the appointment of three additional deputy assessors. Mr. Gross 
proved his popularity in the direct primary election of 191 1, when he 
was nominated by the people direct and elected by an overwhelming 
majority with practically no opposition. He is assisted by Deputy 
Auditors A. V. B. Davus and H. C. Hencken. W. H. Dwyer is also 
afYected by the new ordinance, having been appointed permanently 
with the title of deputy assessor in charge of personal property. 

Mr. Gross married Miss Ethel Gage, of Oakland, and his home 
and social life has been particularly pleasant, for during a life's resi- 
dence in Oakland he has made a wide circle of friends. He is con- 
nected fraternally with the Woodmen of the World and belongs to the 
Native Sons of the Golden West. In all the relations of life he has 
held stcadilv to high standards and his sterling worth makes him 
well known in his native city both as a public official and a private 
citizen. 



p:dwin meese. 



No more able and conscientious public official can be found in 
Alameda county than Edw^n Meese, city treasurer of Oakland, who 
in the course of twelve years' connection with the municipal govern- 
ment has fully demonstrated his intelligence, executive ability and 
initiative spirit. He was born in San Francisco, March 28, iSs". and 
is a son of Hermann Meese, one of the pioneers in California, who 
came to the coast in 1850. In the early days the father engaged in 
carpentering and later went into business as a contractor and builder. 
He also enjoyed the distinction of having been one of the first men to 
engage in the sugar business in the west, having been one of the pro- 
moters of the Bay Sugar Refinery and was prominentlv identified 
with business interests of Oakland for thirty years. 

Edwin Meese acquired Iiis early education in the public schools 
of San Francisco and later attended the GoUcge of Fort Wavne, 



2(j HISTORY OF ALA.MKDA COUNTY 

Indiana, and Heald's Business College, of which institution he is a 
graduate. Following the completion of his studies he accepted a 
position as assistant secretary of the Bay Sugar Refinery and when he 
resigned went into the mercantile business in Sacramento, building 
up a large and profitable enterprise. In 1879 Mr. Meese came to 
Oakland and almost immediately began to take an active interest in 
civic afifairs. In 1898 he accepted the nomination on the republican 
ticket for the ofiicc of city councilman and served in this position by 
reelection for a number of years. He stood always for progress and 
improvement along municipal lines and has always been a strong 
advocate of the consolidation of the city and county governments. 
During his membership on the city council he was identified with 
the street committee and in this capacity accomplished a great deal 
of constructive work looking toward the improvement of the public 
streets and highways. While Mr. Meese was still a member of the 
council a vacancy was created by the resignation of the city treasurer, 
and he was appointed to fill the position. His appointment was not 
one of political preferment but came to him because of his unques- 
tioned integrity and proven ability. He has held the office since that 
time and his record has been one of conscientious, intelligent and able 
service. In the election of 1907 his nomination for the position of 
city treasurer was indorsed by all parties and he had no opponent, 
this being a gratifying tribute to his popularity and efficiency. 

In politics Mr. Meese is a stanch republican and has been a con- 
stant worker for the principles and candidates of that party. He is 
a member of the Nile Club of Oakland and well known in social 
circles of the community which has for the past thirty-five years num- 
bered him among its most public-spirited and progressive citizens. 



ARCHIBALD G. TAFT. 

Archibald G. 'I'aft, occupying a position of distinctive precedence 
in financial circles of Oakland as president of the Harbor Bank and 
in business afifairs as founder, secretary and manager of the Oakland 
Box Factory, was born in Elko, Nevada, March 26, 1877, and is a 
son of George W. and Millicent 'I'aft. In the acquirement of an 
education he attended public school until he was sixteen vears of 
age and then entered the I'niversity of California, from which he was 
graduated in due course of time. Immediately afterward he came 
to Oakland and here engaged in various occupations until 1898, when 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 27 

he moved to Flagstaff, Arizona, establishing there a box factory 
which he disposed of after conducting it for one year and a half. 
Returning to Oakland at the end of that time, he founded a similar 
enterprise in this city, organizing the Oakland Box Factory, of which 
he has since been secretary and manager. His ability and resource- 
fulness have been prominent elements in the growth of this institu- 
tion, and his work in its upbuilding has been rewarded by a success 
which places him in the front ranks of substantial and representative 
business men of the city. 

This prominence has resulted in the extending of his interests into 
other fields for in January, 1910, he became connected with the 
Harbor Bank of Oakland as vice president and in January, 1912, was 
elected president, a position which he now holds. During the four 
years of his association with this institution he has proved himself a 
reliable, forceful and discriminating financier and has conducted the 
affairs of the bank in a conscientious and able way, continuing the 
policies upon which it was founded but inaugurating the necessary 
changes. He is also a past president of the Merchants Exchange of 
Oakland, and his signal ability is widely recognized in financial and 
business circles. 

In Oakland, on July 4, 1905, Mr. Taft was united in marriage to 
Miss Katharine Alexander, and they have become the parents of a 
son, Harold, seven years of age. Mr. Taft is a member of the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
belonging to the shrine. He has been since 1900 treasurer of the 
local lodge of the Woodmen of the World and is a stanch republican 
in his political beliefs. During the period of his residence here he 
has taken an active interest in community affairs, and his labors have 
been an element in the substantial growth and progress of the city, 
while his efforts in business circles have brought him substantial 
returns. 



PHILIP M. WALSH. 



Philip M. Walsh, a prominent and successful attorncv of Oak- 
land, was born in California, May i, 1870, and is a son of .Maurice D. 
ami Mary Walsh, natives of Ireland. The father served in the Civil 
war as a corporal in the Sixty-ninth New York Volunteer Infantry, 
forming a part of the Irish Brigade. One year after the close of 
hostilities he and his wife came to California. In their familv were 



28 



TTTSTORV OF Al.AMEDA COUNTY 



three sons and one daut^HKcr. the subject of this review being the first 
in tlie order of birth. 

Philip M. Walsh acHiuired his education in the Oakland public 
schools and afterward turned his attention to journalism, becoming a 
reporter on the Oakland Times. In 1890 he was made court reporter 
and in this way became interested in the legal profession, which he 
determined to follow. Accordingly he read law during his spare 
time and in 1895 was admitted to the bar of California. After four 
years he was made deputy district attorney of Alameda county and 
in 1900 was appointed chief deputy, serving under John J. Allen. 
He was elected to the state legislature in 1902 and served as a mem- 
ber of that body for two years, his vote and influence being always on 
the side of riglit, reform and progress. Mr. Walsh is now engaged 
in the general practice of law in Oakland, where he is numbered 
among the foremost representatives of the bar, his knowledge and 
ability bringing him a large and growing practice which he is very 
successful in conducting. 

In 1894 ^Ii"- ^^ <ilsh married Miss Annette Lefevre, a daughter of 
Dr. A. Lefevre, a leading dentist of California. Mr. Walsh is con- 
nected fraternally with the Order of Elks and the Native Sons of 
the Golden \\'est. In all official, professional and social relations he 
has adhered steadily to high ideals and has the confidence and regard 
of the entire communitv. 



ASA \^ MENDENHALL. 

Asa V. Mendenhall, who since 1898 has been in the active and 
successful practice of law in Oakland, was born in Danville, Contra 
Costa county, California, August i, 1866, a son of William M. and 
Mary (Allen) Mendenhall, pioneers in this state. He acquired his 
education in the public schools of Santa Clara county and in Liver- 
more College at Livermore. At the age of eighteen he drove stage 
in Amador and Alameda counties and continued at that occupation 
for three years, after which he embarked in the mercantile business 
in San Francisco. He also acted as traveling salesman for A. Shill- 
ing & Company and carried on his legal studies at the same timc 
under the direction of his brother-in-law, G. W. Langan, of Oakland. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1898 and began practice as a member 
of the firm of Goodcell & Mendenhall, which partnership was dis- 
solved in 1903. He was then alone in practice in Oakland until 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 29 

March. 1906, when he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, 
Mr. Langan, under the firm name of Langaii & Mendenhall. They 
have built up a large and lucrative practice, specializing in corpora- 
tion law and in mining and land cases. Mr. Mendenhall has become 
an expert in this branch of his profession and his opinions are con- 
sidered authority on all matters pertaining thereto. The firm has 
had charge of some very important cases and represents fourteen 
large mining companies and eight manufacturing companies, includ- 
ing the Electric Amalgamation Company, the original Amador 
Mines Company, the Omega Gold Mining Company and the Es- 
meralda Land Company of Nevada. Mr. Mendenhall has also large 
interests in mining companies in this part of California and is known 
as a progressive and farsighted business man. 

In June, 1903, he married Miss Florence E. Hatch, a native of 
Oakland, and they have two children: Edwin, aged six; and Sally, 
aged three. Mr. Mendenhall is a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and prominent in its afifairs. He is not active in politics, preferring 
to concentrate his attention upon his profession, of which he is today 
a leading and successful representative. 



STANLEY T- S^^TH. 



The California bar numbers among its representatives no more 
able, prominent and successful lawyer than Stanley J. Smith, now 
practicing in Oakland as a member of the firm of Bell, Bell & Smith. 
He was born in Downieville, Sierra county, California, December 
30, 1879, and is a son of Stanley A. and Anna C. (Neilson) Smith. 
In the acquirement of an education he attended public school in his 
native community until he was fifteen years of age and then came 
to Oakland, where he entered the high school, graduating in 1898. 
He was afterward a student in the University of California and 
received his degree from that institution in 1903. Having determined 
to make the practice of law his life work, he attended Hastings Col- 
lege of the Law in San Francisco, graduating in 1905 and being 
immediately afterward admitted to the bar by the supreme court. 

He began the practice of his profession in San Francisco and 
there remained until lanuar\, 1906, when he moved to Oakland, 
becoming a partner with Harmon Bell in the (irm of Bell, Bell & 
Smith, a connection which he still maintains. His farsighted and 
discriminating work has been an important factor in making this 



30 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

one of the strongest and most reliable firms of its kind in the city, 
connected through a representative and extensive patronage with a 
great deal of important litigation. Mr. Smith himself is a forceful 
and able lawyer possessed of a comprehensive knowledge of under- 
lying professional principles, and, being energetic and able in his 
presentation of his cases, he has developed a large and growing 
clientage and his ability makes him very successful in its conduct. 

In Oakland, in June, 1907, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to 
Miss Genevieve Costa and they have two children: Margaret, aged 
four; and Stanley Campbell, aged two months. Mr. Smith is a 
stanch republican in politics and is an active member of the Athenian 
Club. His career has been marked by continuous advancement in 
a difficult profession, one in which success can come only as a result 
of superior merit and ability. 



MELVIN C. CHAPMAN. 

Among the strong and reliable legal firms in Oakland is num- 
bered that of Chapman & Trefethen, and its senior member, Melvin 
C. Chapman, has long been accounted one of the most progressive 
and able representatives of the California bar. Along with profes- 
sional success he has also won prominence in politics and his inter- 
ests have extended to many other fields touching closely the general 
advancement of the community. 

He was born in Westfield, Illinois, September 5, 1850, and is a 
son of Charles de Grasse and Cynthia (Palmer) Chapman, botii 
representatives of well known American families. One of his pater- 
nal ancestors, Robert Chapman, came from England in 1637 and 
was among the first settlers at Saybrook, Connecticut, the homestead 
upon which he lived being still in possession of the family. Others 
of Mr. Chapman's forebears served under Oliver Cromwell and sev- 
eral were conspicuous in the Revolutionary war, the War of 18 12 and 
in the Civil war. Members of this family have been prominent in 
commercial, professional and political life, winning success as mer- 
chants, ministers and lawyers. 

Melvin C. Chapman acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Chicago, which he attende"d from 1856 until 1S67. He was 
graduated from Onarga Seminary in Illinois in 1870 and three years 
later came to California. He established himself in the real-estate 
business in San I^ancisco, whence he moved his residence to Oakland 




MELVIX C. CHAPMAN 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY :« 

in 1876. Six years later he disposed of all his business interests in 
San Francisco and began the study of law. After he was admitted 
to the bar he formed a partnership with Roscoe Havens under the 
firm name of Chapman & Havens, an association which was dissolved 
after eight months, Mr. Chapman continuing alone. In June, 1910, 
he formed a partnership with E. E. Trefethen and they are still 
associated under the name of Chapman & Trefethen. In the office 
of this firm is transacted some of the most important legal business 
heard in the courts of California, for the partners control a large and 
representative clientage, both being strong, forceful and able prac- 
titioners. Mr. Chapman has won for himself an enviable place at 
the bar of the state and his success is the direct result of his ability 
and energy. He is president of the Oakland Bar Association and is 
held in high respect and honor by the members of the legal fraternity. 

In Oakland, on the 21st of December, 1887, Mr. Chapman was 
united in marriage to Miss Lillian M. Childs, and they became the 
parents of one son, Melvin C, Jr. Mrs. Chapman has passed away. 

Mr. Chapman gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party and takes an active interest in public affairs. In 1887 he served 
for one term as a member of the state legislature and he has been 
mayor of Oakland, giving to the city a constructive and progressive 
administration. He is president of the Tribune Publishing Company 
and belongs to the Athenian Club. He is an enterprising and pro- 
gressive citizen, who takes a commendable interest in public affairs, 
and along professional lines he has met with that success which is the 
natural result of merit and ability. 



OAKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Oakland may well point with pride to its fire department which 
under the able direction of its chief, N. A. Ball, is today one of the 
best managed, most perfectly equipped and most adequate public 
service enterprises in California. In addition to this the fire-fighting 
force is composed of men of more than ordinary ability and intelli- 
gence, and the entire department maintains a standard of efficiency 
not equaled in this part of the state. 

There has been a remarkable growth in the department during 
the last ten vears, for in 1903 there were only si.x engine companies 
and two truck companies, whereas today there are seventeen engine 
and five truck companies and a permanent working force of two 



;{4 HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COL'XTY 

hundred and ninety men headed by Chief Ball, who is aided by two 
assistant chiefs and two battalion chiefs. The fire department has 
also three chemical and hose companies and two chemical companies 
provided with eight pieces of automobile apparatus and fourteen 
steamers. A salt-water, high-pressure fire protection system has 
recently been placed in operation, being designed as an au.xiliary to 
the other fire-fighting facilities in a restricted area in which the 
number of fire streams required is greater than is demanded in the 
surrounding sections of the city. The pumping plant of the system 
supplies these additional streams and the design provides that as the 
restricted area increases the salt-water mains may be extended. Hose 
streams are taken directly from hydrants on the high-pressure mains, 
so that no steamers are required. Dependence for a supply for 
fighting ordinary fires is placed on the existing fresh-water system of 
mains, and the salt water pumping plant stands idle except when 
called on in emergencies. Damage to the contents of a building by 
salt water thus is avoided in all except large fires. The pumping 
plant is in a park on the shore of Lake Merritt, a body of salt water 
connected with San Francisco bay, and is at a distance of about one 
and one-quarter miles from the center of the area in which the mains 
of the salt-water system have been laid. Including the force main 
leading to the edge of that area, twelve tiiousand feet of mains are in 
service, protection thus being provided to sixty blocks of business 
propertv. An additional five thousand three hundred and forty feet 
of mains, including fire-boat connection on the water front, has been 
installed and the scheme for the system contemplates that mains 
eventually will cover an area of one and one-half square miles. 

The mechanical ei]uipment of the pumping plant embraces two 
two hundred and fifty horsepower gas engines, each connected to a 
four-stage turbine pump. The two units are capable of delivering 
ten fire streams of two Inimlred gallons per minute each, against 
pressure of two hundred pounds per square inch. The specifications 
require that within two minutes of the time an alarm is given, five of 
the streams should be delivered and the additional five within two 
minutes of the call on tiie station. These requirements have been 
reduced by actual service so tliat one pump is placed in operation in 
thirty seconds and the second within two minutes. Recent tests 
siinwL-d that two piniips dclivereil twenty-four hundred gallons per 
minute througii two hundred and fifty feet of hose in the center of 
the business area with eighty pounds nozzle pressure. The pressure 
on the mains at the pumps is two hundred pounds per stjuare inch. 
The plans contemplate an additional engine and pump, which will be 



1131898 

HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 35 

used as a spare unit, or to increase the capacity of the phmt fifty per 
cent during a conflagration. In the design of the pumping plant and 
the arrangement of the distribution mains, the suggestions of the 
engineers of the Board of Underwriters of the Pacific were followed. 
The pumping station, which is also a park building, is a one- 
story reinforced concrete structure, sixty-four by eighty feet in plan 
and seventeen feet high to the eaves line, which is treated architectur- 
ally to harmonize with its surroundings. The exterior walls were 
given a plaster finish. The roof is of the low, Spanish type, with a 
covering of red tile on steel trusses. The ground around the build- 
ing was graded to bring the latter naturally into the landscape, the 
eft'ect secured being particularly satisfactory. The interior of the 
building also is finished in keeping with the exterior treatment. The 
building is divided into five rooms, one, forty-six by forty-six and 
five-tenths feet in plan, that contains the mechanical equipment, an 
engineer's room, a storeroom, and two public toilet rooms, with a 
sixteen foot porch on both sides. The pump of each main unit draws 
water from a separate screen chamber in a section well under the 
floor of the room. This well is built to provide for the installation 
of a third unit and is connected with the adjacent lake by means of a 
four by four foot concrete conduit extending twenty feet ofT shore into 
ten feet of water. The suction pipe of each pump is provided with a 
double flap foot valve designed to hold a pressure of two hundred 
and fifty pounds to the square inch. The discharge of both pumps 
has an eight-inch connection to a fourteen-inch force main laid on the 
floor at the end of the room and over the suction well. Each of these 
connections is provided with a check valve, which prevents the return 
of water to the pump in case the latter goes out of commission su«i- 
denlv- Beyond this check valve is a gate valve provided to permit 
the pump to be cut off when desired, without interfering with the 
operation of the other unit. The valves by means of which the mains 
are divided into sections arc in brick manholes having cast-iron tops 
and covers. They are of extra weight and are designed for the high- 
pressure salt water service, under a working head of two hundred 
and twenty-five pounds to the square inch. They have cast iron 
bodies, w'ith bell connections, except for special lengths. Their 
dcjuble gates are independently adjustable and are arranged so the 
central pressure is removed entirely and the disks freed from their 
seats before being raised. All working parts of the valves, including 
the entire gate disk and all contact surfaces, are of bronze of a special 
composition selected to resist wear and corrosion by salt or brackish 
water, the wedging surface on the spreader being of harder bronze 



Sfi HISTORY OF ALA^FEDA COUNTY 

than those on the disks. The upper end of the spreader nuts and the 
inner surface of the top of the valve case are finished to a close tit 
when the valve is fully open, so that only slight leakage occurs when 
the stuffing box is repacked without shutting down the valves. 

A flush hydrant is placed at every street intersection in the area 
protected by the high-pressure mains. The hydrants are each in a 
concrete manhole built at one side of the main and below the surface 
of the street, a location being selected in each case as near the center 
of the street intersection as possible. This type of hydrant was 
chosen because any possibility of damage to a hydrant by a wagon or 
other vehicle striking it was eliminated. These hydrants also avoid 
the difficulty occasionally experienced with the usual type of post 
hydrant, placed behind the curb at the corners of a street intersec- 
tion, being rendered unsafe for use during a fire in an adjoining 
building. The hydrant manholes each have a cast iron cover, so 
that any part of the hydrant may be repaired or replaced without 
disturbing the surface of the street. The cover also is of such design 
that two men can lift it with ease. The fact that no frost occurs in 
Oakland, of course, should be borne in mind, since this condition per- 
mitted the employment of a hydrant of this type. Each hydrant has 
a manifold of eight-inch pipe which is connected inside of the man- 
hole to tile main. A valve on this connection is provided with a 
hand wheel in the manhole, placed where it can be reached and 
operated readily. The quarter-turn on which the manifold is 
mounted is carried by a cast iron chair anchored to the bottom of 
the manhole. The blank flanges on the ends of the manifold also are 
both fastened to brackets embedded in the sides of the manhole. Five 
three-inch hose connections are attached to the manifold by means 
of flanges. Each connection is provided with a gate valve so it may 
be operated independently. The manifold not only permits a quite 
satisfactory arrangement of these connections, but also reduces the 
loss of friction in the hydrants to a minimum. On each hydrant is 
a four-inch connection, by means of which standpipes for buildings 
can be supplied through a pipe laid underground and provided at 
the hydrants with gate valves. These standpipes have hose connec- 
tions at the sidewalk which are left open for use with fire engines 
and Ircsh water. The connection with the high-pressure system is 
made at the base of the standpipe, so the one above it can be left open 
witiiout interference. Since tiie hydrants are ordinarily only two 
hundred and eighty feet apart on the mains, it was considered better 
to make the standpipe connections at them, where they are readily 
found, rather than along the main between the hvdrant. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 37 

The total cost of the high-pressure fire protection system, embrac- 
ing the pumping plant and the twelve thousand feet of mains that 
were laid under the first contract, was ninety-five thousand dollars. 
This amount included approximately four thousand five hundred 
dollars for the replacement of pavements in the streets in which the 
main had to be laid. The cost of the pumping station building also 
was somewhat higher than would ordinarily be incurred under most 
conditions, amounting to a total of twenty-three thousand dollars. 
The contract for the entire mechanical equipment amounted to 
twenty-eight thousand dollars and included all of the apparatus in 
the station. 

The Oakland Fire Department is under the supervision of Chief 
N. A. Ball, one of the most able firemen in Alameda county, who, 
with the exception of four years, has in the thirty-three years since 
1880 been continuously a member of the department. He is a native 
of San Francisco and in 1862, when he was three years of age, moved 
with his family to Oakland, where he was reared and educated. Fol- 
lowing the completion of his studies he engaged in the grocery 
business for a number of years and while still retaining this connec- 
tion joined the Oakland Fire Department in 1880 as call man. 
Advancement came rapidly. In 1889 he was made assistant chief 
and on the 29th of March, 1898, was appointed chief. He still holds 
this responsible and important position, and his success is unques- 
tioned, being evidenced in the excellent condition of the fire depart- 
ment and in its growth and improvement along all lines. 



JOSEPH W. BINGAMAN. 

One of the most prominent and enterprising young attorneys of 
Oakland is Joseph W. Bingaman, practicing as a member of the 
firm of Reed, Black, Nusbaumer & Bingaman. He was born in 
Salinas, California, on the ist of March, 1881, and is a son of W. H. 
and Isabella Bingaman. His early education was acquired in the 
public schools of his native community and in 1898 he went to 
Berkeley, where he entered the high school, graduating in 1900. 
He afterward became a student in the University of California, re- 
ceiving his bachelor's degree from that institution in 1904, after 
which he took up the study of law, graduating from the legal depart- 
ment of the State University in 1908 with the degree of Doctor of 
Law (J. D.). In the same year he began the practice of his pro- 



38 mSTOin- ol" Al.AAIKDA COUXTY 

fcssioii as a clerk with the hrni of Reed, Bhick & Reed, but he proved 
such a strong and able practitioner that in 1912 he was admitted to 
tile firm, the name being then Reed, Black, Reed & Bingaman. since 
which time Clarence Reed has retired and Emil Nusbaumer become 
a member, the rtrm name now being Reed, Black, Nusbaumer & 
Bingaman. This is one of the most important law firms in Oakland, 
connected through its extensive practice with a great deal of notable 
litigation, and its junior member has proven himself fully up to the 
high standards which have always distinguished its other repre- 
sentatives. Mr. Bingaman specializes in probate and real-estate law 
and trial work and for the past five years has also been acting as 
attornev for George Gray, public administrator. 

Mr. Bingaman together with his copartners is also associated with 
Charles F. Lee of Fruitvale and Walter A. Clark of San Francisco 
in the ownership and subdivision of a tract of land containing about 
eight thousand acres in Fresno county. The land is adapted espe- 
cially to the growth of alfalfa and is one of the largest irrigati(Ki 
projects in Fresno county. 

In Oakland on the 8th of September, 1909, Mr. Bingaman was 
united in marriage to Miss Genevieve Kimball, and they have be- 
come the parents of two children: Jean, aged three and one-iialf 
years; and Geraldine, one vear and six months. Fraternallv Mr. 
Bingaman is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks, the Masonic order and the Phi Delta Phi, and gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party. He belongs to the Methodist 
church and has done active and helpful work as a member of the 
Oakland Commercial Club. He is still a young man, but his ability 
has carried him forward into important professional relations and 
his many friends do not hesitate to predict for him continued and 
rapid progress in his chosen field. 



GEORGE E. SLEEPER. 

George E. Sleeper, a representative of a well known pioneer 
family of California, prominently connected with business interests 
of Oakland as manager of the Oakland Clearing House Association, 
was born in this state in 1874. His father, Charles Sleeper, a native 
of Maine, came to California in 1861 and for a time mined at Co- 
lumbia, Tuolumne county. He is now manager of the San Francisco 
Clearing House. George E. Sleeper's grandfather, \\\ O. Sleeper. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY :» 

was one of the earliest settlers in this state, having arrived here in 
1 85 1. He was one of the first bankers in California, conducting a 
bank at Columbia. 

George E. Sleeper acquired his education in the public schools 
of San Francisco and later engaged in the electrical business in Oak- 
land. During the last eighteen years he has been connected with the 
clearing house business in San Francisco and Oakland and a great 
deal of his present success is due to his wide experience and detailed 
knowledge. When the Oakland Clearing House Association was 
organized in 1906 Mr. Sleeper was chosen its manager, and this 
position he has filled with credit and ability since that time. He 
occupies an enviable position in business circles of the city as a man 
whose sagacity is far-reaching and whose integrity is beyond question. 



GEORGE J. McDONOUGH. 

Actively connected with a profession which has important bear- 
ing upon the progress and stable prosperity of any section or com- 
munity and one which has long been considered as conserving the 
public welfare by furthering the ends of justice and maintaining 
individual rights, George J. McDonough has won success as a law- 
yer, practicing before the bar of Oakland. 

He is one of California's native sons, his birth having occurred 
in Eureka on the 8th of February, 1879, his parents being John and 
Margaret McDonough. In the public schools he pursued his edu- 
cation until sixteen years of age, after which he matriculated at St. 
Mary's College in Oakland, graduating therefrom in 1902. His 
legal training was acquired at Hastings College of Law, which he 
attended for a year and eight months, and then, with wide general 
information and careful preparation, he was admited to the bar of 
the supreme court. He did not at once, however, embark upon his 
professional career as a lawyer but accepted a position as instructor 
at the Sacred Heart College of San Francisco, which he capablv and 
efficiently filled until April, 19116, when he resigned. Since that 
year he has been engaged in active practice in Oakland, making a 
specialty of criminal law, and his success in a professional wav 
affords the best evidence of his capabilities in this line. He is a 
strong advocate with the jury and concise in his appeals before the 
court and he has won for himself most favorable criticism for the 



40 HISTORY OF ALAAIKDA COUNTY 

careful and systematic methods which he follows in the conduct of 
his cases. 

Mr. McDonough was married in San Francisco on the 14th of 
June, 1908, to Miss Syd Frances Reidy. and they are well known 
and popular in the social circles of Oakland. Mr. McDonough 
belongs to the Catholic church and his political views are in accord 
with the principles of the republican party. He is yet numbered 
among the younger generation of practitioners in this city but, pos- 
sessing the qualities of an able lawyer, he has already established a 
good practice in the line of his specialty, his increasing reputation 
bringing him more and more into connection with litigation of an 
important and distinctively representative character. 



HON. FREDERICK S. STRATTON. 

Hon. Frederick S. Stratton, member of the Oakland bar, has de- 
voted much of his life to public service and over his record there 
falls no shadow of wrong nor suspicion of evil. He stands as a high 
tvpe of American manhood, citizenship and chivalry and he has been 
termed "one of the most eminent and popular attorneys in Califor- 
nia." The state is proud to number him among her native sons. His 
entire life having been passed on the Pacific coast, he is thoroughly 
familiar and in sympathy with every phase of life that means prog- 
ress, development and upbuilding in this section. He was born in 
Oakland in 1859, when this city, now of large and attractive propor- 
tions, was of comparatively little importance. He has been an inter- 
ested witness of its development and along various lines has contrib- 
uted to its progress. After attending the old Swett grammar school 
and the Oakland high school he entered the University of California 
and was graduated therefrom in the class of i88r, winning high hon- 
ors. He may well be saitl to be a self-educated as well as self-made 
man, as it was his own effort that made it possible for him to secure 
the university course. While pursuing his studies he set type in a 
newspaper office, earning from eighteen to twenty-hve dollars per 
month, and thus met his expenses. 

It was in early manhood that Mr. Stratton decided upon the prac- 
tice of law as a life work and, entering upon preparation for the prtv 
fession, he soon acquired a knowledge that enabled him to pass an 
examination that admitted him to the bar. He entered upon active 
practice in partnership with W. W. Morrow, later judge of the 




X. 1'i;i;i)i;kiik •<. stkai'iox 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COL-XTY 43 

United States circuit court of appeals in San Francisco. Some time, 
afterward Mr. Stratton became senior partner in the firm of Strat- 
ton, Kauffman & Torchiana. Since that time his progress has been 
continuous, and he has long since reached an enviable position as a 
leader of the California bar. His knowledge of law is compre- 
hensive and exact. He is familiar with principle and precedent, 
and the analytical trend of his mind enables him to readilv apply his 
knowledge to points in litigation. 

It is not alone in the field of his chosen profession, however, that 
Frederick S. Stratton is known and honored. Immediately follow- 
ing the earthquake and the fire of 1906 Mr. Stratton was appointed 
a member of the Red Cross committee of San Francisco and of the 
Oakland relief committee and in that capacity assisted largely in 
the distribution of fourteen million dollars sent for the relief of the 
sufferers. It was at a period when sound judgment had to direct 
sympathy and when business management was necessary to meet the 
exigencies of the case, and in none of these qualities was he found 
lacking. 

At various times public honors have been conferred upon him. 
In 1897 Alameda county elected him to the state senate and during 
his connection therewith he carefully studied every situation that 
bore upon the welfare of the commonwealth, introducing many 
miportant measures and advocating others which found their way to 
the statute books and have had to do with shaping the later existence 
and policy of the state. From the time of his election to the senate 
until the present Frederick S. Stratton has been a recognized leader 
in public affairs in California and the Oakland Enquirer said in this 
connection : "His record is one of distinguished public service, based 
upon progressive ideas and marked by unflinching integrity and 
unswerving fidelity to duty and to the public interests." One of the 
measures which he put through while a member of the general assem- 
bly w as that which increased the State University tax from one cent 
to two, thus providing a substantially increased revenue with which 
to help build up the university to its present gigantic proportions. 
He also wrote and put through the bill which exempted Leland Stan- 
ford, Jr., University from taxation and wrote and fathered the bill 
whicli established primary elections in the state. He afterward 
drafted every amendment to this law passed by the legislature up 
to 1909 and also all the constitutional amendments necessary to meet 
the new order in the election laws through their evolution to the 
direct primary measure. He is the author of the first primary law 
ever introduced into the California assembly and which, after many 



44 HTSTORV OF AI.AMEDA COUNTY 

amciulnicnts, Hnally developed into the present law as it is found 
upon the statute books of the state today. In 19(10 he was called to 
the position of collector of the port of San Francisco and his duties 
in that connection were mostly of a judicial character, for upon him 
devolved the task of making decision upon practically all questions 
officially submitted to him according to the law of the land. 

.Mr. Stratton might have had many other political honors, had he 
desired. l\vice would President Roosevelt have made him assist- 
ant secretary of the United States treasury had he not declined to 
serve, owing to the fact that he did not wish to leave his home and 
establish his residence in Washington. Many of his friends and 
admirers urged him to become a candidate for the United States 
senate, but, as that would have meant removal to Washington had he 
been elected, he again declined. He prefers California as a place of 
residence and does not care to accept office that will take him from 
his native state. 

Mr. Stratton has ever been a stalwart republican, with progressive 
views. He has studied the vital questions with thoroughness, and 
his position is based upon the keenest interest in the welfare and 
progress of the country and the adoption of those principles which he 
deems of vital force in advancing the national goixl. One other 
feature of his public service worthy of mention is the fact that he 
was the author and twice introduced the legislative measure for the 
exemption of church property from taxation, a measure that was 
finally passed. His knowledge of law has been of the utmost value 
to him in his public career and as lawyer and legislator his record 
is one which reflects honor and credit upon the state that has honored 
him. Since his retirement from the office of collector of the port of 
San Francisco, in which he served under the administrations of 
Presidents McKinley, Roosevelt and Taft, he has continued in pri- 
vate practice, with a clientage which in extent and importance indi- 
cates his standing among the foremost members of the California bar 



A. G. DEARDORFF. M. D. 

The ability with which Dr. A. G. DeardorfT has handled intricate 
and important cases at once indicates his marked ability and his high 
standing in the profession. He practices at Berkeley, and through- 
out his connection with the profession his progress has been con- 
tinuous. He was born near Oakland, Oregon, in i8i;4. and is n 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 45 

representative of a pioneer family of the northwest, his parents being 
W. H. B. and Georgiana (Harl) Deardorfif. In 1849 the father 
came to California from the vicinity of Burlington, Iowa, and in 
the fall of 1 85 1 went to Portland, Oregon. The following winter 
he returned to Iowa, where he remained for about a year, and in the 
spring of 1853 h^ married and organized a company of relatives and 
friends, numbering more than one hundred people, whom he piloted 
across the plains to the Pacific coast, being particularly well qualified 
to act as their leader because he had been over the ground before. 
Mr. Deardorff and most of the party located in Oregon, but a few 
continued on their way to California. In the Beaver state he engaged 
in ranching and after years of earnest and well directed labor he 
retired and established his home in the town of Oakland, Oregon, 
where he remained until his death, which occurred November 25, 
1902. His widow survived him for about nine years and passed 
away in Portland, Oregon, in May, 191 1. 

Dr. Deardorfif pursued his education in the schools of Wilbur, 
Oregon, with an academic course in Willamette University. He 
then taught school in Oregon for several years and also engaged in 
farming for a time. He lived most economically, saving his earn- 
ings until he had a sum sufficient to enable him to pursue a course in 
medicine. He then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Keokuk, Iowa, in the fall of 1878, and was graduated with the 
class of 1882. At once he returned to Oregon and engaged in the 
practice of medicine in the town of Jefiferson. There he continued 
until the fall of 1885, when he established his home temporarily in 
Salem, but in 1886 removed to Fresno. In that city he enjoyed a 
liberal and extensive practice, remaining there for nearly ten years. 
In 1895 he opened an office in San Francisco, where he practiced 
for eleven years, or until the fire of 1906. In August of that year he 
came to Berkeley, where he was soon well established as a successful 
physician. He has since resided here and has always been very active 
with the exception of the year 1913, when, owing to ill health, he 
was not able to practice. In 1909, in connection with G. C. Bohannon, 
he organized the Bohannon Cancer Institute, a sanitarium for the 
scientific treatment of cancer. The institution was thoroughlv 
e(]uipped along the most scientific lines and the work accomplished 
has been of most splendid and commendable character. While in 
Fresno Dr. Deardorfif was for some time United States examiner for 
pensions. He is never a man to rest content with his success of past 
years, nor is he content to continue the practice of his profession 
according to the old methods. On the contrary, he is at all times 



4(i IIISI'OR^' ol- .\I.A.\ll-;i)A C< iL'XTY 

busy in experimental work, and study and in his research work has 
been remarkably successful. His progress is of a character that will 
be of decided help to humanity through the prevention of disease. 
He is successfully administering vaccines and serum treatments for 
the cure of chronic and acute rheumatism, pneumonia, bronchitis, 
typhoid, diphtheria and numerous other prevalent and dreaded 
diseases. 

He and his wife are members of the Congregational church at 
Berkeley, in which Dr. Deardorff is serving as a trustee. Mrs. Dear- 
dorfif is also active in the church and in the social circles of the Bay 
cities. Dr. Deardorff belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which 
he has attained the Knight Templar degree. He assisted in organiz- 
ing and firmly establishing the republican party in Fresno county 
and while there was closely associated with the late Joseph Baker 
in political affairs. On all political, economic and sociological as 
well as professional questions he keeps abreast with the best thinking 
men of tiie age and is well fitted for leadership upon many essential 
questions. 



GEORGE F. WITTER. 

George F. Witter, prominently identified with professional in- 
terests of Oakland as an able and successful lawyer, was born in 
Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, on the 8th of November, 1863, a son of 
George F. and Frances Witter. He attended the public and high 
schools in his native city until 1880, when he entered the North- 
western Business College, remaining a pupil in that institution for 
one year thereafter. In 1881 he entered the University of \\'isconsin 
and after two years laid aside his books, turning his attention to 
teaching and becoming principal of the high school at Humbird, 
Wisconsin. He did earnest, straightforward and efficient work in 
that capacity until 1885, when he again became a student in the State 
University, remaining until he received his degree in 1887. He 
afterward resumed his teaching, going to Merrill, Wisconsin, where 
as principal of the city schools he reorganized the entire public- 
school system of the city, placing it upon a more thorough ami busi- 
nesslike basis. His able and forceful work won him reelection to 
the position of principal hut this he resigned in the fall of 1887 in 
order to accept the ofiicc (.1 principal of the high school at Marsh- 
field, Wisconsin, where he remained until the fall of 1888. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 47 

In that year he determined to study law and accordingly entered 
the law department of the University of Wisconsin, graduating in 
1889 and winning admission to the bar in the same year. He opened 
his first office in Wallace, Idaho, where he built up a lucrative 
patronage which he continued to conduct until 1892, going in that 
year to California and locating at Paso Robles, where he engaged 
in general practice until 1900. From Paso Robles he moved to San 
Francisco, becoming prominent and well known in legal circles of 
that city, where he remained until 1906, when he moved to Oakland, 
and he has since been in practice here, making steady progress in 
his profession and controlling today a representative and extensive 
clientage. 

In Humbird, Wisconsin, on January 22, 1891, Mr. Witter was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Carter and they have become 
the parents of five children: Jean C, who is twenty-one years of 
age; Esta, who is attending the high school; Edwin, aged fourteen; 
Phelps, aged ten; and Wendell, who is two years of age. 

Mr. Witter is a member of the Congregational church and fra- 
ternallv is affiliated with the Woodmen of the World. He is a 
republican in his political beliefs, and although he is not active as 
an office seeker he takes an intelligent interest in the growth of the 
community and does everything in his power to promote and ad- 
vance it. His salient qualities of character commend him to the 
confidence and good-will of his fellow citizens, and his circle of 
friends is constantly increasing. 



J. A. HILL, .M. D. C, V. S. 

Among the veterinary surgeons of Oakland, California, there is 
none wlio enjoys a higher reputation for efficiency than Dr. J. A. 
Hill, a native of Yolo county, this state. When a young man he 
followed the sea, spending many years on the trans-Pacific liners and 
traveling extensively, touching on his journevs all of the important 
Pacific ports. In 1903 he took a course at the Chicago Veterinary 
College, graduating in 1906. Shortly afterward he opened an office 
in Alameda, beginning the practice of his profession. In the fall 
of 191 1 he moved to East Oakland, where he built a most completely 
equipped veterinary hospital for the care of sick and maimed animals. 
The building is forty by one hundred and twenty-five feet, modern 
in every respect and sanitary to the minutest detail. Good ventila- 



48 HISTORY OF AI.A.MEDA COUXTY 

tion is provided and pure water is always at hand. An idea as to 
the up-to-date improvements prevailing is given in the fact that even 
a roof garden is provided for the dogs. There are spacious box 
stalls for sick and convalescent animals and, last but not least, there 
is the expert knowledge, wide experience and care of Dr. Hill. He 
is fortunate in having the services of a humane and kindly attendant 
whose object it is to furnish the animals the greatest possible comfort. 
The Doctor has an interesting military record to his credit, having 
served in the Spanish-American war with Company A, of the United 
States Regular Engineers' Corps, on the Philippine islands, his 
services extending over thirteen months. He was detailed on many 
surveying parties, often assigned to special duty, and assisted in 
raising small sunken vessels. He also was engaged in clearing the 
rivers and streams as far south as Jolo. He keeps in touch with his 
comrades of that memorable conflict through his membership in the 
United Spanish War Veterans and is also a member of several fra- 
ternal organizations. He is veterinarian for the First Battalion 
Field Artillery, National Guard of California, which includes Bat- 
tery B of Oakland. A of Los Angeles and C of Stockton. During 
the summer of 1912 he was the veterinarian in charge of the horses 
in the war maneuvers which were held in Monterey county. As is 
but natural Dr. Hill is a great lover of animals and is especially 
fond of fine horses, of which he owns four, some of them broken to 
driving and some saddle horses. He is enthusiastic over the advan- 
tages of Oakland, its climate and its living conditions and is ever 
ready to extol the beauties of his home city. He says that in all his 
travels he has never found a place which pleases him as well as his 
California home, and his enthusiastic spirit finds vent in the support 
of many worthy enterprises undertaken in the interests of the public 
along materia! or intellectual lines. 



REV. LAWRENCE SERDA. 

One of the greatest individual forces in the spread of Catholic 
doctrines in Oakland and in the promotion of Catholic educational 
interests in this part of Alameda county is Rev. Lawrence Serda, 
pastor of the Sacred Heart church, founder and upbuilder of the 
school in connection with it. a scholar, educator and a worthy and 
upright Christian gentleman. He was born in Spain and in that 
country ac(]uired his general education, afterward spending three 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 49 

>cars in the study of theology. At the end of that time he went to 
Ireland, where he continued his studies and where he was ordained 
to the Catholic priesthood. 

In August, 1870, Father Serda crossed the Atlantic to America 
and, making his way to California, went directly to St. Francis 
church, in San Francisco, owing to the fact that Father Andrew 
Garriga, the assistant at that church, had been a classmate of his in 
the theological college in Spain. After a brief stay he was appointed 
assistant to Father King at St. Mary's church in Oakland, where he 
remained for about two years, at the end of which time he was re- 
quested to go to San Jose as assistant to Father Gallagher, pastor 
of St. Patrick's church. Father Serda was chosen for tills charge 
for tlie reason that the mining camp Alamaden was attended from 
St. Patrick's church and it ree]uired a man who spoke both Spanish 
and English. He continued at San Jose for two and a half years 
and during that period attended the noted California bandit Basques 
at the time of the latter's execution, staying with him during his last 
days and administering to him the last sacraments. At the close of 
his work there Father Serda was returned to St. Mary's church in 
Oakland to again become assistant to Father King, wnth whom he 
remained for one year. He established his present parish (Sacred 
Heart) in Oakland, December 17, 1876. This church is one of the 
oldest in the county and has been served by Father Serda continu- 
ously since its foundation. Before the erection of the church build- 
ing services were held in the home of A. M. Montgomery, and the 
first church was soon afterward erected, a small wooden building 
seventy by fifty feet in dimensions, fronting on Fortieth street. 

Father Serda, always interested in the cause of education and a 
most earnest believer in its value and efficacy, established in 1880 a 
small school in connection with his church and brought three sisters 
from the convent to teach his classes. No funds being available to 
pay them, Father Serda built a small room and installed a piano 
in it, where the sisters gave lessons in music in order to defray the 
expenses of the school. This was the only remuneration they re- 
ceived for their services. Later another school was erected for the 
boys of the parish and this was taught by the Christian Brothers 
until 1899, when the church and all the surrounding buildings were 
destroyed by fire. Following the fire the people of his parish, and 
several other Catholics in Oakland as well, were as liberal as they 
possibly could be and readily furnished funds to start the new build- 
ings. They were gradually rebuilt and in 1902 a large school and 
home was erected. The sisters at this time received permission to 



50 HISTORY OF .\I..\M!-:DA COUNTY 

teach the boys, and the school has been uninterruptedly prosperous 
since that time. In 1910 a fine grammar and commercial grade 
school was erected and the institution has now primary, grammar 
and commercial departments. Eight teachers are employed and the 
attendance averages from three hundred and fifty to three hundred 
and seventy-five pupils. This is a fine modern and well equipped 
institution of learning and has been built up against almost over- 
whelming obstacles by Father Serda, who has labored unsparingly 
to make it what it is today. Adjoining it is the pastor's home and a 
fine modern stone church, which was dedicated December 15, iqoi. 
Great credit is due Father Serda for the important work he has 
accomplished along religious and educational lines — work the value 
of which it is impossible to estimate and which he has done unosten- 
tatiously and with no desire for personal aggrandizement. He has, 
indeed, been an apostle among the Catholic people of Oakland, and 
he has their love in large measure, as he has the confidence, esteem 
and respect of people of all denominations. 



S. H. BUTEAU, M. D. 



Dr. S. H. Buteau, a leading surgeon of the Bay cities and promi- 
nently known by reason of his important achievements in medical 
circles of the state, was born in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, January 
4, 1864. At the age of seven he was brought to California by his 
parents and acquired his education in the public and high schools 
of Oakland. His first work was teaching, and in this he spent eight 
years. Deciding to enter the field of medicine he matriculated at the 
Cooper Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1889. He 
soon took up the practice of his profession, but not being content with 
the field of study which he had covered he has since spent much 
time abroad in post-graduate work, visiting Vienna, Edinburgh and 
the many centers noted for expert physicians and surgeons. 

Dr. Buteau has always kept in close touch with the most advanced 
medical thought and his prominence and distinction as an able sur- 
geon is reflected in his extensive practice and important professional 
connections. He is a trustee of the Merritt estate and w-as one of the 
builders of the Samuel Merritt Hospital, which has an endowment 
of one million dollars and is one of the leading hospitals in the west. 
Dr. Buteau specializes in surgery and has attained an enviable repu- 
tation in this field, not only because he has performed a number of 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 5:^ 

difficult operations most successfully but also by virtue of the fact that 
through his own investigation and research he has been able to give 
to the surgical world a most important operation. He is a member 
of the state board of medical examiners and is in close touch with 
the work of the various medical associations. In 1904 he served the 
Oakland board of health. His memberships include the American 
Association of Surgeons and the American Association of Gynecolo- 
gists and Obstetricians. He was a popular lecturer in the Cooper 
Medical College, in which he was once a student, and has contributed 
many valuable articles to the foremost medical journals. 

Dr. Buteau wedded Miss Alice Buswell, a native of Oakland, and 
they have two daughters, Alice and Helen. The Doctor is well 
known in the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in the lodge, 
chapter and commandery. His personal characteristics have gained 
for him the warm regard and friendship of many, while in profes- 
sional circles he has gained that eminence which comes only in recog- 
nition of merit and ability. 



ANDREW E. JOHNSTONE. 

There is no more efficient, able and farsighted man in public 
service in Oakland than Andrew E. Johnstone, chief deputy county 
clerk of Alameda county. He was b(jrn in New Brunswick. Canada, 
on the 8th of September, 1876, and is a son of Robert and Martha 
Johnstone, who came to Oakland in 1883. In this city their son 
attended puJDlic school, graduating from the high school in 1894 and 
afterward entering the University of California, from which he 
received a degree in pharmacy after two years. He began his busi- 
ness career as pharmacist with Leber & Jackson Brothers, druggists, 
in Oakland, and he continued to hold this position until 1903. when 
he resigned in order to become manager of the Oakland Crematory. 
After one year he became deputy in the registration department of 
the county clerk's office, where three years of able and practical 
work brought him advancement to the position of chief deputv. He 
is still serving and has proved capable and farsighted in the discharge 
of his duties, being today one of the most popular men on the roster 
of county officials. 

Fraternally Mr. Johnstone is identified with the Masonic order, 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the \\^)rld 
and the Loyal Order of Moose, and he is past president of Live Oak 



54 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

Chapter, National Union. He has been a resident of Oakland since 
his childhood and has become well known to his fellow citizens, 
who hold him in high esteem for his many sterling qualities of mind 
and character and his genuine personal worth. 



UNITED HOME BUILDERS. 

One of the busiest places in Oakland today is the offices of the 
United Home Builders which, established in 1913, has already be- 
come one of the important factors in the development of the city. 
This stable corporation is practically the pioneer of the home build- 
ing investment idea in the city, and its method of operation furnishes 
a thorough demonstration of the value of a publicly-financed com- 
pany under the direction of practical men and backed by assets 
greater than its market value for its shares. The United Home 
Builders have introduced into Oakland a system of doing business 
which has proved immensely successful and profitable in Los An- 
geles. Home-building companies are fixed necessities in the develop- 
ment of the west and are here to stay. They are founded upon 
scientific principles and although originally experimental, are today 
as established in principle as banks, insurance companies or any 
other form of investment in whicii the public's money may par- 
ticipate. 

The United Home Builders combine the best features of the 
most successful companies. The concern was organized after years 
of close study of the home building investment idea and gives to the 
people of Oakland all that is good in the companies that have prcn-en 
successful elsewhere, as well as added features which make this the 
best investment of its kind ever ofifered. The profits of the United 
Home Builders will be derived from the following sources: First, 
bv purchasing tracts of home building property, by subdividing this 
propcrtv, improving it, building homes on it and taking a profit 
three ways in the process. Second, by building homes on the prop- 
crtv owned by others. Third, by buying properties at wholesale and 
selling them at retail. Fourth, by operating in country lands along 
the same principles. l''itth, by the conduct of a general real-estate 
and insurance business, including every branch, which they can do 
on a larger and more profitable scale than a company with less capital 
and prestige. These sources of profit are not problematical either 
in thcorv or practice. The United Home Builders are actuallv 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNT Y 55 

conducting a successful business along these lines, as is evidenced 
from the fact that their list of shareholders includes people from 
various cities and states, including Burlingame, San Jose, Point Rich- 
mond, Mendocino, San Mateo, Cedarville, Campo Seco, Berkeley, 
San Leandro, Stockton, Fruitvale, Broderick, Riverdale, Angels' 
Camp, Oakland, San Francisco, Richmond, Piedmont, Sacramento, 
Del Monte, Visalia, Amedee, Areata, Spreckels, Oilfields and Santa 
Cruz, California; Verdi, Tonopah, Lovelock and Reno, Nevada; 
Topeka, Kansas; Portland, Oregon; Osceola and Council Blufifs, 
Iowa; Chicago, Freeport, Brownstown, Beecher City, Dietrich, 
Greenville, Morrisonville, Mount Olive, Staunton and Effingham, 
Illinois; Crawford, New Jersey; Crown King and Phoenix, Ari- 
zona; and Honolulu. 

The founders of United Home Builders include men of years of 
experience in building and real estate in the Bay cities. They spent 
much time studying the most successful companies of other cities 
before they applied the plan here. The president of the concern is 
Frederick G. Becker, member of the Real Estate Association of Oak- 
land, actively engaged in real-estate and building operations in this 
city for several years past. He was formerly connected with the firm 
of Becker & Eliel, vice president of the Northern Dredging Com- 
pany in Canada and connected also with Becker, Mayer & Company, 
manufacturers, in Chicago. A. F. Eliel, vice president of United 
Home Builders, has had thirty years' experience in the general con- 
tracting business in several countries. While in South Africa he was 
consulting construction engineer of one of the largest mines in the 
world, and for seven years he has been engaged in the building busi- 
ness in Oakland. He was formerly connected with the firm of 
Becker & Eliel. The other officers in this concern are: T. A. 
Mitchell, second vice president, formerly branch manager for the 
Ford Automobile Company in Iowa; B. G. Ensign, treasurer, for- 
merly president of the State Bank of Neola, Iowa, and of the Bank 
of Persia, that state; W. A. Powell, secretary, a member of the well 
known law firm of Schwartz & Powell, of Oakland; G. H. Hunger- 
ford, assistant secretary; and R. Kittrelle, director. With such men 
of wide experience and recognized ability United Home Builders 
cannot fail to reap the fullest advantage of the tremendous oppor- 
tunities now being oflfered in this city. 

Interviewed regarding this enterprise, its purpose and its success, 
President Frederick G. Becker said : "A proposition of this kind 
financed by the general public is the best for the county at large. 
Any time a clean proposition is put to the public and the people 



5(5 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

interested, it is a boost to the community. It helps all and is a new- 
factor in progress. With a large number of stockholders, every one 
is a silent salesman and a booster. It can be handled on an extensive 
scale, so why not divide the profits with the general public instead 
of borrowing money from the banks. Oakland and Alameda county 
is an ideal location for a project of this kind. The people have been 
setting the stage for years and the curtain is now ready to rise on the 
first act of progress. Oakland is strictly a home town and Alameda 
county the hub of all the surrounding counties of the state. The 
United Home Builders are almost pioneers in the field. This section 
has a million people to draw from. The success of this enterprise 
is assured with the fine management. Many eastern people have been 
interested and are now locating here; also many from the southern 
part of the state are realizing the fine climate of Oakland. The 
people are demanding a better class of homes and more artistic, also 
calling for larger lots, where they can cultivate flowers, etc. The 
company is improving and beautifying its tract. The demand for 
plastered exterior houses tends to beautify the hills around the bay 
and the color of the homes against the green hills makes it similar 
to the Italian villas in Italy. Oakland has the making of the finest 
residential citv in the Union." 



LESTER G. BURPEE. 



More than a quarter of a century ago Lester G. Burpee entered 
the First National Bank of Oakland in the capacity of bookkeeper 
and has remained with the institution to the present time, winning 
successive promotions until elected vice president in iqo6. which 
position he now holds. His birth occurred in Jacksonville, Oregon, 
on the 4th of September, i860, his parents being Joseph S. and Irene 
J. Burpee. In 1873 the father came to Oakland, California, and 
embarked in business as a building contractor, being thus success- 
fully engaged until the time of his retirement in 1906. In former 
years he was an active member of the Municipal League. 

Lester G. Burpee attended the graded and high schools of Oak- 
land until 1879 and tlien became private secretarv to E. C. Sessions, 
wlio was at that time president of the Oakland Bank of Savings. 
In 1 88 1 he left that position and went to Solano countv, wliere he 
purchased a fruit ranch, operating the same until he disposed of it in 
1883. In that \ear he returned to Oakland and here secured a posi- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 57 

tion as clerk in the office of tlie deputv citv marshal, while at the 
end of a year he became deputy in the office of the city treasurer, 
discharging the duties of the latter position for six months. Subse- 
quently he was employed as bookkeeper in several mercantile houses 
until 1886. in which year he entered the First National Bank as 
bookkeeper, afterward serving as exchange clerk, receiving teller 
and cashier in that institution. In 1906 he was elected vice president 
and in that position has since remained an important factor in the 
control and management of the bank, being also a director. He 
likewise acts as vice president and director of the First Trust & 
Savings Bank, which is affiliated with the First National Bank. His 
rise in financial circles is further attested by the fact that he is now 
serving as vice president of the Oakland Clearing House, while 
formerly he was a director of the People's Water Company and the 
New Oakland Hotel. 

In January, 1882, at Oakland, Mr. Burpee was joined in wed- 
lock to Miss Mary Isabelle Adams, by whom he has four children, 
as follows: Earl Lester, who is employed as a salesman by R. A. 
Leet Company of Oakland; Joseph S., Jr., the cashier of the West 
Oakland Bank; Donald, who is a public-school student; and Mrs. 
Roy B. Baker, of Oakland. 

Mr. Burpee gives his political allegiance to the republican party 
and in religious faith is a Methodist. He acts as treasurer of the 
Young Men's Christian Association and Young Women's Christian 
Association and is a w^orthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, be- 
longing to Oakland Lodge and Chapter and having attained the 
fourteenth degree of the Scottish Rite. He likewise belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the World, 
the Nile Club, the Commercial Club, the Home Club of Oakland, 
the San Francisco Fly Casting Club and the Oakland Scottish 
Bowling Club. Mr. Burpee looks at life from a broad standpoint, 
recognizes its obligations and its opportunities and in the enjoyment 
of the latter never neglects the former. 



EDWARD J. TYRRELL. 

Edward J. Tyrrell, state senator, is a native of Oakland. He was 
born May 19, 1880, and in the public schools of his native city 
ac(]uircd an education. On the ist ni .April, 191^^, he was appointed 
secretary to Mayor Frank K. Mott and served in that capacity until 



58 1 11 STORY (.)l- ALAMEDA COUXTV 

January i, 191 1, when he resigned to attend the session of the legis- 
lature, having been elected state senator in November, 19 10. 

Mr. Tyrrell is a lawyer by profession, having been admitted to 
the bar on the i i;th of October, 1909, since which time he has engaged 
in active practice. On the ist of August, 1913, he was appointed 
attorney for tlie California State Commission in Lunacy. 

Mr. Tyrrell is a married man and is identified with several fra- 
ternal and social organizations. He has membership with the Elks, 
the Moose, the Knights of Columbus and also in the Commercial 
Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 



E. R. ANTHONY. 



Among the well known residents of Alameda, California, is E. R. 
Anthony, who holds the important position of assistant superin- 
tendent of the Southern Pacific Railway Company. Mr. Anthony 
was born in Sacramento, California, in i860, and has been a resident 
of Alameda, Alameda county, ever since 1875. After completing 
his education, he entered as a youth the services of the Southern 
Pacific Railwav Companv and graduallv rose to importance. For 
seventeen years Mr. Anthony was a paymaster of the company and 
for ten years has been assistant superintendent. He is successful 
largely on account of his rare executive ability, and he also has the 
knack of handling a great amount of detail work without overlook- 
ing the more important phases of work under his direction. Mr. 
Anthony stands in the most cordial relations with the men who work 
under him, who esteem him as a man of character and one who is 
just in all of his dealings. He corrects by censure where such a 
course is needed but he is just as ready to commend anv of his em- 
ployes for their enterprise and faithfulness, and stands high in the 
estimation of his superior officers. 

Mr. Anthony was married on the 20th of June, 1883, to Miss 
Helen V. Hitchcock, a native of Illinois and to them have been born 
three children. Gerald is a resident of Alameda; E. R., Jr., is with 
the American Radiator Company at San Francisco; and the daugh- 
ter, Helen, is at home. 

Mr. Anthony is socially popular in Alameda, where he has manv 
friends. He is well known in commercial circles and has done much 
toward popularizing his company among business men of the place 
and section. Fraternally he is a Mason, exemplifving in his life the 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 59 

beneficent principles of that order, and politically he is a republican, 
having been active in the interest of his party for many years. For 
twenty years he has been the president of the Alameda Republican 
Club. Mr. Anthony is a business man of probity, energy and good 
judgment, and the high position which he has attained in railroad 
circles has come to him in response to hard work, and close applica- 
tion. He interests himself in all public measures that will make for 
the improvement of local conditions and is in every way a public- 
spirited man and valuable citizen. 



REV. PATRICK J. QUINN. 

Rev. Patrick J. Quinn, pastor of St. Andrew's church in Oak- 
land, was born in Templemore, Ireland, on the 17th of November, 
1868, and is a son of Richard and Helen (Bannon) Quinn. In the 
acquirement of an education he attended the schools of his native 
country until he was fifteen years of age and then entered St. Patrick's 
College at Thurles, from which institution he was graduated in 1894. 
In the same year he crossed the Atlantic to America and went to 
Washington, D. C, where he entered the Catholic University, study- 
ing for the priesthood and graduating in 1895. 

After his ordination he came to California as assistant pastor of 
St. Patrick's church at San Jose, whence after one year he was trans- 
ferred to San Francisco as assistant pastor of St. Patrick's church of 
that city. He held that responsible position for two years, after 
which he was made assistant pastor of St. Brenden's church in San 
Francisco, where he remained for four years, receiving at the end 
of that time his appointment as pastor of St. Alphonsus' church at 
Suisun, California. There he did capable and farsighted work in 
the cause of the Catholic religion until 1907, when he became pastor 
of St. Andrew's church in Oakland, a position which he still holds 
and in which he has done excellent work during the eight vears of 
his connection with the church. The church building, which was 
dedicated September 19, 1909, by Archbishop Riordan, of San Fran- 
cisco, is constructed after a peculiarly attractive style, being the onlv 
real reproduction of old California mission architecture in the citv. 
It is a cement structure built at a cost of sixty thousand dollars, and 
it serves one of the largest and most important parishes in Oakland. 

Father Quinn belongs to Pioneer Council, No. i, Y. M. I., and 
is chaplain of Oakland Council, No. 787, K. C. He is undoubtedlv 



60 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

doing a great work in this city among the Catholic people, and he 
has their love in large measure, while he enjoys the respect and 
confidence of people of all denominations. He is a man of scholarly 
attainments, most earnest and consecrated in his work, and is ever 
watchful over the interests of his people, his activities being an im- 
portant element in the spread of Catholic doctrines in this part of 
California. 



WILLIAM REED. 



Xo one can carry investigation far into the pioneer history of 
California without learning of the honorable and useful career of 
William Reed, whose identification with this state dates back to 
the days of the early mining boom, and who from that time until his 
death remained one of the greatest single forces in the development 
of the Bay country. 

Mr. Reed came of a well known family, the American progenitor 
having been Andrew Reed, a retired colonel of the English armv, 
who was born in County Antrim, Ireland, in 1693, and there mar- 
ried Jean Murray, of Scotch-Irish descent. With his wife and eight 
sons and one daughter Colonel Andrew Reed came to America, set- 
tling in Boothbay, Maine, in 1743. With others he founded the first 
church in that town and a nephew of Mrs. Reed, Rev. John Murray, 
was its first pastor. Colonel Reed died July 22, 1762, and his wife 
February 8, 1780. Two sons passed away before the Revolutionary 
war and of the six remaining five took an active part in that struggle, 
as did also several of Colonel Reed's grandsons. The eldest son, 
Andrew (from whom the Reed family of Oakland is descended), 
was a lieutenant colonel and his son Robert, a boy of nineteen, was 
a fifer. Paul, the sixth son, was commander of a privateer which 
captured several valuable prizes. David was a captain, Joseph, first 
lieutenant and William a private. A grandson, Andrew, Jr., was 
second lieutenant and Robert, before mentioned, was afterward cap- 
tain of a re\enue cutter in connection with the custom house at Wis- 
casset, Maine. liis son William followed the sea for many years 
and was in command of a vessel captured by the British in the war 
of 1 81 2. He was afterward paroled and allowed to continue his 
voyage. One dark night a vessel under his command ran afoul of 
the man-of-war Constitution in Boston harbor, breaking a spar of 
Old Ironsides. Captain ^^'illiam Reed established his home in 



HISTORY OF ALA:\IEDA COUNTY 65 

Vassalboro, Maine, in 1831;, and in the meantime had married Han- 
nah P. Hutchings. Among the children born to this union was a 
son, William, of this review, whose birth occurred October 11, 181 1, 
on Cape Newagen Island, now known as Westport, Lincoln county, 
Maine. The Reed family is well represented in Oakland and the 
vicinity by the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of 
the pioneer, William Reed, who with their wives and children now 
number forty living descendants, among whom may be mentioned 
Charles G. Reed, formerly national bank examiner, and George W. 
and Clarence M. Reed, senior and junior members of the former law 
firm of Reed, Black & Reed. 

Early in his life William Reed became familiar with the sea, 
accompanying his father on his voyages, and when he grew to 
maturity he turned his attention to a seafaring life, becoming com- 
mander of a vessel at the age of twenty years. He conveyed the first 
cargo of cotton ever sent direct from a southern port to Europe, 
making the trip from Galveston, Texas, to Havre de Grace in 1846. 
This marked an epoch in the development of shipping relations 
between the United States and Europe, for previous to this time all 
cotton had been sent to New York or Boston and reshipped. On the 
return voyage Captain Reed brought back a cargo of wines procured 
at Bordeaux. During the thirty years or more of his seafaring life 
he entered every port of any importance from Maine to Florida, 
as well as Mobile and New Orleans, besides making several voyages 
to Europe and various ports of the West Indies. In 1850, on his 
ship Rob Roy, he made the trip around Cape Horn, arriving in 
San Francisco on August 9th of that year, bringing with him as part 
of the cargo the stern-wheel steamer Kennebec, which was put to- 
gether at North Beach and later, with William Reed as captain, 
plied between Sacramento and Marysville. In 1851 Captain Reed 
returned to Maine and there engaged in farming until 1854, ^vhen 
he came again to California, mining at Angels' Camp for two years 
thereafter! At the end of that time he sent for his family and on 
November 4, 1856, they settled in Oakland, the captain having pur- 
chased a tract of thirteen acres on Market street and turned his 
attention to raising fruit From the later sale of this property, all 
of which is now a part of the city, he realized a comfortable fortune 
and upon this was able to spend his declining years in retirement 
from business cares, his horn being at the corner of Sixteenth and 
Market streets. 

On the 30th of December, 1839, Captain Reed was united in 
marriage to Miss Hannah Carletm Hall, who was born at Vassal- 



66 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

boro, Maine, August i6, 1818, a daughter of John Goffe and Mercy 
(Taylor) Hall. Six children were born to the marriage of Captain 
and Mrs. Reed: Elizabeth M., who was born in 1840 and who is 
now the widow of D. P. Barstow; Emily P., who was born in 1842 
and who has passed away; Charles Gofife, born in 1844; George W., 
born in 1852; Nellie Carleton, who was born in 1854 and who is 
now the wife of Thomas C. Mayon, and Annie Lincoln, who was 
born in 1857 and who has passed away. Captain Reed and his wife 
are both deceased, the former passing away April 19, 1905, when 
in his ninety-fourth year, and the latter December 31, 1906. 

Captain Reed was intensely interested in public afifairs and was a 
member of the Union League, organized during the Civil war. He 
was at one time a member of the board of education in Oakland, and 
the public-school system found in him a loyal and able supporter. 
In public as well as in private life his honor never was questioned, 
and his word was always as good as his bond. His sterling character 
and upright dealings with his fellowmen won for him the love and 
friendship of all who knew him, and his death was deeply and sin 
cerely mourned in the city where he had made his home for so 
many years. 



D. G. DONAHUE. 



D. G. Donahue, secretary, treasurer and attorney of the Pulcher 
Concrete Block & Paving Company, has been a resident of California 
since March, 191 1, and of Oakland since December of that vear. .A 
lawyer by profession, he has now turned his attention to commercial 
pursuits in his active connection with the Fulchcr Companv. He 
was born in Hancock, Michigan, February 6, 1879, a son of |. C. 
and Minnie (Jennings) Donahue. He attended the public schools 
until he reached the age of eighteen years, after which he became 
baggage man for the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Railroad, con- 
tinuing in that position for three years. He afterward attended the 
Michigan College of Mines, studying mining engineering for two 
years, and later he entered the University of Michigan, from which 
he was graduated in 1906 with the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Laws. Having thus prepared for a professional career, 
he opened offices in Hancock, Michigan, and South Range, Michi- 
gan, practicing in both places. He was city attorney in the latter 
place until 1910, when he removed to Chicago, where he followed 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 67 

his profession until March, 191 1. At that date he became a resident 
of Del Norte county, California, practicing in Crescent City until 
the following October. In December of the same year he came to 
Oakland, where he opened a law office and was in active practice 
until April 24, 1913, when he became secretary, treasurer and attor- 
ney of the Fulcher Concrete Block & Paving Company, which 
positions he now holds. As legal advisor and practical business man 
he is contributing to the success of this growing enterprise. 

Mr. Donahue was married in Hudson, Wisconsin, to Mrs. Dolly 
(Lynch) O'Dell on the 15th of June, 1909. They have gained many 
friends during their residence in this state. Mr. Donahue gives his 
political allegiance to the progressive party, and his fraternal con- 
nections are with the Elks and with the Masons. He has attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also a member of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is most loval to the craft and exemplifies in his 
life its beneficent teachings. 



WALTER D. COLE. 



Walter D. Cole, a representative of the legal profession in Oak- 
land, has here practiced as a member of the firm of Peck, Bunker 
& Cole since March, 191 1. His birth occurred in San Bernardino 
county, California, on the 15th of April, 1880, his parents being 
James A. and Mary E. Cole. The father came to California in 
1850, settling in San Bernardino county, where he engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising and became a large landowner. His demise 
occurred in the year 1885. 

Walter D. Cole completed the high-school course in 1900 and 
subsequently entered the law department of the University of Michi- 
gan, from which institution he was graduated in 1905. Locating for 
practice in Tonopah, Nevada, he there followed his profession until 
1909 or until appointed by the supreme court as a member of the 
code commission for the revising of the state laws. His duties in that 
connection demanded his attention until March, 191 1, when he came 
to Oakland and joined the law firm of Peck & Bunker, which has 
since been known as Peck, Bunker & Cole. This firm are the per- 
sona! attorneys and are handling the corporation interests of F. M. 
Smith in the bay region and throughout California. Mr. Cole has 
always realized that success depends largely upon a thorough prep- 
aration of his cases and has never feared that laborious work of the 



68 HISTORY OF yXLAMEDA COUNTY 

office which must precede the presentation of his case in the court- 
room. His reasoning is strong, his deductions logical and his points 
follow in a natural sequence that cannot fail to impress court and 
jury with the correctness of his opinion. He never fails to command 
the attention of those in the courtroom and seldom fails to win the 
verdict desired. 

In Oakland, on the jth of October, 1907, Mr. Cole was united 
in marriage to Miss Winifred Burdge, by whom he has two children, 
John A. and Walter D., Jr., who were born in 1909 and 191 1, re- 
spectively.- In politics Mr. Cole is a democrat, believing firmly in 
the principles of that party. He has many genial and admirable 
qualities which have gained him a host of friends and it is charac- 
teristic of him that he holds friendship inviolable. 



JOSEPH KNOWLAND. 

Prominently connected with various business and corporate in- 
terests of San Francisco and Alameda, Joseph Knowland became 
known as one of the real builders and promoters of the Bay country of 
California and through the extent and importance of his commercial 
and financial relations influenced in an important way general ad- 
vancement and progress. From pioneer times until his death. 
November 13, 1913, he remained prominent in business circles and 
in Alameda, where he had resided since 1872, was also a leader in 
the advancement of those interests looking toward civic development 
and community growth. He was born in New York, Octcibcr 8, 
1833, and was reared in Southampton, Long Island, a representative 
of a family long established on American soil. 

Joseph Knowland acquired his education in the public schools 
of Southampton, and when a young man moved to California, at- 
tracted by the reports of the gold discoveries in this state. He secured 
passage on the George Law to Aspinwall, arriving in San Francisco 
on the 14th of February, 1857. Shortly afterward he went to the 
mines and worked in the neighborhood of Yankee Jim's, in Placer 
county, until illness compelled him to return to San Francisco. Fol- 
lowing his recovery he secured an engagement with the shipping 
house of Moore & Folger, then agents for a line of clipper ships 
running between San Francisco and New York city. Mr. Knowland 
retained this connection for some years and also had other engage- 
ments of a like character. In the vear 1862 he first became connected 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 69 

with the lumber business, in which he became a prominent figure 
in the course of time. He first secured a position with Benjamin 
Dore and afterward was connected with the house of Blythe & 
Wetherbee. In 1867 he formed a partnership with Jason Springer, 
and they established an independent business under the name of 
Springer & Knowland, this enterprise existing for about three years. 
During this period Mr. Knowland was ill for some time and out of 
business for about a year. Afterward he associated himself with 
Charles F. Doe under the title of Knowland & Doe, and this firm 
controlled a large and important lumber business for a number of 
years. After the company was dissolved Mr. Knowland made a trip 
east and upon his return in 1882 assisted in the organization of the 
Gardiner Mill Company, with which he was connected until his 
death, being for many years previous president and managing owner. 
The Gardiner Mill Company controls a very important enterprise. 
The mill, which is located at Gardiner City, Oregon, was burned in 
October, 1888, but this impeded operations for only a time. The 
company today owns extensive lumber lands and has interests in a 
coasting fleet besides being heavily interested in the KerckhofT-Cuz- 
ner Mill & Lumber Company of Los Angeles. In its operations a 
large amount of money is used, and it makes for the development of 
this section as only such an extensive enterprise can. 

As president of the Gardiner Mill Company Mr. Knowland 
occupied a prominent place in industrial circles, but his interests 
were not by any means confined to this one connection, as his business 
ability soon carried him forward into important relations with a 
number of other equally important enterprises. He was the principal 
owner of the well known whaler, the Amethyst, which was wrecked 
some time ago, the crew being rescued by a government relief vessel. 
He was at one time interested with the Hoopers and Talbots in the 
San Pedro Lumber Company and acted as director of that concern 
and also had large interests in the Southern Lumber Company of 
San Diego, having acted as president and a member of the board of 
directors. With Governor Lowe, Egbert Judson and other prom- 
inent men he was at one time extensively interested in mines in Tomb- 
stone, Arizona. In Alameda he was one of the largest stockholders 
and a member of the board of directors of the Alameda Bank and a 
trustee of the Gas Consumers Association, with which he was 
identified for seventeen years. He was also vice president of the 
Kennedy Mining & Milling Company of Jackson, Amador county, 
one of the largest mining industries on the coast, employing about 
three hundred men at the plant. 



70 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

On the 13th of May, 1863, Mr. Knowland was united in marriage 
to Miss Hannah B. Russell, a native of Bingham, Maine, and they 
became the parents of the following children: Joseph R. ; Mollis 
P., deceased; Sadie E., who married Professor George E. Coe and 
who died August 24, 1905; and Lucy B. 

Mr. Knowland was well known in fraternal circles, having been 
made a Mason in Golden Gate Lodge in San Francisco in 1864, 
although he later transferred his membership to Oak. Grove Lodge, 
No. 215, F. & A. M. He was a member of Alameda Chapter, 
No. 70, R. A. M.; Oakland Commandery, No. 11, K. T. ; Oakland 
Consistory; and Islam Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. A short time 
before his death he was raised to the first section of the thirty-third 
degree. For a long time he was associated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to San Francisco Lodge, No. 3. 
In citizenship he was progressive and public-spirited and took a 
most helpful interest in matters looking toward municipal advance- 
ment. He was a constant contributor to the Old People's Home, of 
which he was one of the trustees, and made various gifts of a similar 
character, always following the Bible maxim of not allowing his 
left hand to know what his right hand did. A man of broad and 
unostentatious charity, of progressive views and stanch honesty of 
purpose, he rose to a high place among the representative citizens of 
California, and his name adds to the list of those whose labors have 
been so far-reaching and beneficial in effect that they have influenced 
many phases of community development. 



CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK. 

Among the solid, conservative and most thoroughly reliable 
moneyed institutions in Alameda county is numbered the Central 
National Bank of Oakland, which with its savings affiliation, the Cen- 
tral Savings Bank, has long been a prominent factor in the financial 
development of this section of the state. The Central Savings Bank 
is the older institution, having been organized in 1892 as the Home 
Savings Bank. This title was subsequently changed to the Central 
Bank and under this name it continued as both a savings and com- 
mercial bank until August 12, 1909. On that date the commercial 
business of the Central Bank was turned over to a new institution 
known as the Central National Bank of Oakland, \\ ith a paid up capi- 
tal and surplus of one million, one hundred and twenty-five thousand 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUiXTY 71 

dollars, which has since been increased to one million five hundred 
thousand dollars. The Central Bank afterward continued as a strictly 
savings institution and in April, 19 1 1 , its title was changed to the Cen- 
tral Savings Bank of Oakland, its capital having previously been 
increased from three hundred thousand dollars to five hundred thou- 
sand dollars, with a surplus and undivided profits of three hundred 
and twenty-two thousand five hundred dollars. The combined re- 
sources of the two banks are approximately sixteen million two hun- 
dred and sixty-eight thousand dollars. The Central National Bank 
has assets in the neighborhood of nine million dollars, and the Cen- 
tral Savings Bank takes rank with the largest institutions of its kind 
in the city, its assets being approximately seven million two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars. The two banks are housed in a five-story 
brick and stone building at the northeast corner of Fourteenth street 
and Broadway, a property which the Central Savings Bank pur- 
chased in 1892 and which it has occupied continuously since that 
time. The building has a floor area of about one hundred by one hun- 
dred feet and this affords ample room for the conduct of the banking 
business as well as for a spacious lobby. The directors have recently 
installed new coin and book vaults of the latest design, the former 
being practically impregnable. The safe deposit vaults are located 
on the Fourteenth street side of the building and entrance to them 
may be had both from Fourteenth street and from the lobby of the 
bank. These are the property of the Central Savings Bank and have 
the largest and finest safe deposit equipment to be found in Oakland. 
The officers of the Central National Bank are as follows: J. F. 
Carlston, president; H. N. Morris, R. M. Fitzgerald and H. A. 
Mosher, vice presidents; and A. J. Mount, cashier. Both banks are 
under the control of the same board of directors, which is composed 
of the following members: J. F. Carlston, president; H. N. Morris, 
vice president; R. M. Fitzgerald, vice president and attorney at law 
in Oakland; John P. Maxwell of the Maxwell Hardware Company; 
J. W. Phillips, president of the Grayson-Owen Company, wholesale 
butchers; T. A. Crellin, of the Morgan Oyster Company and the 
Ruby Hill V'ineyard Company; W. G. Manuel, capitalist; (jeorge 
L>. Kraft, capitalist; J. K. Mofiitt, vice president and cashier of the 
First National Bank of San Francisco; A. S. Blake, president of 
Blake Brothers, Incorporated, and W. T. Veitch, contractor and capi- 
talist. All of these men have proved their capabilities in representa- 
tive lines of endeavor and are recognized as farsighted, keen and 
discriminating business men. lliey have made the policy of the Cen- 
tral National Bank and of the Central Savings Bank of Oakland 



72 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 

one of progressiveness tempered by a safe conservatism and under 
their efficient management the banks have had a steady and rapid 
growth, both being known today as being among the leading financial 
institutions in Alameda county. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES NELSON. 

The death of Captain Charles Nelson occurred June 5, 1909, and 
he was buried June 8th, from his beautiful home in Oakland, inter- 
ment being made in Mountain View cemetery. The many flowers 
sent as tributes of love and respect by individuals and societies served 
as a slight indication of the place he held in the estimation of the 
people of the Bay country. His demise brought to a close a long, 
honorable, useful and successful life the influence of which was 
felt as a factor in the pioneer development of the state, as an 
element in the industrial, social, economic and civic upbuilding of 
San Francisco and as an influence upon the standards and ideals upon 
which rest the permanent growth and greatness of the Bay cities. 
He was numbered among the representative citizens of California 
and among the men who played an important part in the history of 
the state. His name was well known in financial circles as president 
of the Merchants National Bank of San Francisco and in industrial 
circles as president of the Charles Nelson Company, controlling 
large lumber and shipping interests and conducting one of the most 
stable enterprises of its kind on the Pacific coast. 

Mr. Nelson was born in Denmark. September 15, 1830, and was 
a descendant of an old Danish family, whose members for many 
generations had lived and died in that country. When he was only 
thirteen years of age he left his family and went to sea, securing 
a humble position on a vessel and receiving for a month's laborious 
work seventy-five cents. From this position he rose to that of 
mate on the ship, for it was found that he had mastered practically 
every detail connected with the operation of the vessel and could 
even take the place of cook when necessity arose. On one of his 
voyages he went to New York in 1847 and two years later sailed from 
that city for his old home in Denmark, having promised his mother 
when he left that country that he would return in five years. This 
was the last time he saw his parents, for his father died in 1850 
and his mother in 1863. In the former year Captain Nelson came to 
California, arriving in tiic harbor of San Francisco in July, 18^0. 




CAPTAIX CHARLES NKLSdX 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 75 

He had been attracted by the news of gold discoveries in the state 
and accordingly turned his attention to mining. However, meeting 
with only fair success, he determined to engage in work to which he 
was better adapted and with which he was more familiar and accord- 
ingly secured an interest in a whaling boat at Sacramento. With 
the assistance of a comrade he rowed this from Sacramento to Marys- 
ville, a distance of ninety miles, carrying freight and passengers, and 
he made the trip frequently, often buying vegetables and garden 
produce, which were sold in the city. At this time also Captain 
Nelson took up a government claim, paying two dollars and fifty 
cents per acre for two hundred and fifty acres of land. During the 
winter months, when his shipping operations ceased, he engaged men 
to chop wood and this he sold to the steamers which were engaged in 
the river trade. In this way he accumulated a small sum of monev, 
and he placed it in the Adams & Company Bank, intending to use it 
to defray the expense of rebuilding his vessel. However, before he 
did this the bank, together with other financial institutions in San 
Francisco, closed its doors and he never received one cent of his 
hard earned money. He did not, however, allow this to discourage 
him, but continued his shipping operations, becoming interested in 
1862, in connection with a partner, John Kantfield, in a barkentine, 
this being the first vessel of its kind built on the Pacific coast. Cap- 
tain Nelson still later became interested in a larger vessel in San 
Francisco and his holdings along this line increased rapidiv and 
became very extensive with the passing years. 

Mr. Nelson's identification with the lumber business in San 
Francisco dates from 1867, when he purchased an interest in the 
Kimphill Lumber Company, which controlled large sections of tim- 
ber land in Humboldt county, California. Mr. Nelson had a great 
deal to do with the rapid extension of the scope of this business, for 
he aided in improving the facilities for the manufacture of lumber 
and was instrumental in securing the purchase of a line of tow- 
boats, on which were shipped large quantities of lumber from the 
mills t(j all points along the coast, as far south as San Pedro and 
north to Portland and Seattle. As his financial resources increased 
Mr. Nelson invested in vessels of his own and developed a large 
lumber shipping business on the coast which he owned himself and 
which he organized and incorporated in 1901 as the Charles Nelson 
Company, of which he remained president and active manager until 
his death. This company controls a fleet of steamers, among which 
is a new one of steel built by Moran Brothers of Seattle. During the 
period of Mr. Nelson's connection with this concern the officers were 



76 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

as follows: Charles Nelson, president; James Tyson, vice president 
and treasurer; and P. Thompson, secretary. The company enjoys 
an excellent business reputation and controls a large share of the 
business in their line in San Francisco and the surrounding country. 
Their trade has grown so that their territory includes China, South 
America, Australia and intermediate points. Mr. Nelson remained 
active in the conduct of his immense shipping interests until a short 
time before his death, which occurred in 1909, when he was seventy- 
nine years of age. His unremitting work, his ability, industry and 
untiring ability constituted some of the greatest and most signal 
forces in the upbuilding and growth of the business controlled by 
the Charles Nelson Company. He was endowed by nature with 
retentive, keen and incisive qualities of mind and in whatever com- 
plex situation he found himself he possessed the faculty of grasp- 
ing its details and the no less important ability of executing w'hat 
he had planned. Under his hands his business grew along con- 
structive and modern lines, becoming a great, well managed and 
important institution, a worthy monument to his energy and acumen 
and a factor in the industrial expansion of a great state. 

Captain Nelson was twice married. He wedded in San Fran- 
cisco on the 13th of October, 1856, Miss Metha Clausen, a native of 
Denmark, and six children were born to their union, all of whom 
died in infancy with the exception of one daughter, Margaret, who 
is the widow of Eugene Bresse of San Francisco. Mrs. Nelson 
passed awav in 1896. She was well known in charitable work in San 
Francisco and was especially prominent in the alYairs of the Old 
Peoples Home, with which she had been identified for a number of 
years. At first this was restricted to those of Danish origin, but it 
finally opened its doors to old people of all nationalities. It is now 
in charge of Mrs. Bresse, who was appointed president upon the 
death of her mother. Captain Nelson's second marriage occurred 
at San Francisco, in 1901, when he wedded Miss Helen Stind, also 
a native of Denmark. They took a trip around the world, seeing 
much of interest in the many lands visited. They lived on Seminary 
avenue in Oakland in one of the fine residence properties of the city, 
the ten acres of well kept grounds beautified by flowers and trees 
affording an appropriate setting for the pleasing architecture of the 
house, and there Captain Nelson spent the later years of liis life, 
going daily to his office in San Francisco. 

He was a stanch republican and was identified with the Masonic 
fraternity. He was also a member of the Dania, a Danish society of 
Oakland. For four years he served in a creditable and able manner 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 77 

as president of the Chamber of Commerce and was throughout his 
life interested in the growth, development and expansion of San 
• Francisco. The cause of education found in him a loyal and earnest 
supporter, and for a number of years he was a trustee of Mills Col- 
lege, the widely known girls' school located near his home. He was 
a personal friend of Mrs. Mills, the founder. He was himself a 
scholar and a wide reader, familiar with the best literature, well 
informed upon questions and issues of the day, a fluent and easy 
speaker. Those who were fortunate enough to come within the 
close circle of his friendship found him a large-hearted, broad- 
minded and liberal man, whose devotion to duty was unswerving 
and whose honesty of purpose unquestioned through over fifty years 
of prominent activity in California. His name swells the list of 
San Francisco's pioneer business men who have built for all time and 
in whose footsteps their successors must follow closely or else be left 
behind in a race the honors of which are success, prominence and 
widespread esteem. 



ARTHUR HASTINGS BREED. 

Among the men whose initiative, enterprise and ability have been 
active facto'rs in promoting the remarkable growth and prosperity 
of the city of Oakland is numbered Arthur Hastings Breed, of the 
firm of Breed & Bancroft, well known real-estate operators of the 
city. Mr. Breed has other important business afl^liations, and his 
interests have extended also to politics, in which field his prominence 
is attested by his position in the state senate, representing the fifteenth 
senatorial district. He was born in San Francisco, California, No- 
vember 27, 1865, and is a son of Daniel C. Breed, who came to 
California by way of the isthmus of Panama in the '50s and was 
afterward for many years a well known wholesale grocery dealer in 
San Francisco. 

Arthur Hastings Breed acquired his education in the public 
schools of his native city and after his graduation was for five years 
connected with the wholesale book and stationery firm of Samuel 
Carson & Company. He afterward turned his attention to the real- 
estate business and with this has been connected continuously since 
that time. He is president of the real-estate firm of Breed & Ban- 
croft, a corporation, one of the leading companies of its kind in the 
state, and through his work as its head has proven himself a man of 



78 HISTORY OF ALA^fEDA COUNTY 

administrative ability and executive power of a high order. In 
addition to this Mr. Breed is president of the Magnesite Dock & 
Land Company, president of the Pardee Park Company, president 
of the Roseville Heights Land Company, a director in several other 
land corporations and also in the Oakland Bank of Savings and the 
Bankers Trust Company — connections which prove the extent, 
variety and character of his business interests. 

Politically Mr. Breed is a stanch republican and is without doubt 
one of the leading representatives of this party in Alameda county. 
From 1899 until 1907 he served as auditor and assessor of the city 
of Oakland and in 191 2 was elected to the state senate for a term 
expiring in 1916. Mr. Breed represents the fifteenth senatorial dis- 
trict of California, embracing East Berkeley, the town of Piedmont 
and a considerable portion of Oakland. He has already made a 
creditable record as a member of the state legislature and it is a 
certainty that a great deal of important legislation will bear the 
stamp of his interest and activity. 

On the 9th of May, 1893, in Oakland, Mr. Breed was united in 
marriage to Miss Caroline Hall, and they have become the parents 
of four children, three sons and one daughter. Two are students in 
the high school and the other two are in the grammar scho.ols of 
Oakland. 

Mr. Breed is connected fraternally with the ALisons, the Elks 
and the Native Sons of the Golden West, holds membership in the 
Bohemian Club of San Francisco and the Nile and Athenian Clubs 
of Oakland and is a devout adherent of the First Congregational 
church. Broad-minded and liberal in his views, he has wrought 
along the lines of the greatest good to the greatest number and his 
city and state have profited by his efforts in various fields of endeavor. 
His unbending integrity of character, his fearlessness in the discharge 
of dutv and his appreciation of the responsibilities which rest upon 
him make him a citizen wliose worth is widely acknowledged. 



1RAL\ L MOON, D. O. 



Among the women who have entered the medical profession and 
proven that their ability is equal to that of brother practitioners is 
Dr. Irma L Moon of Oakland, who has her offices in the Union Sav- 
ings Bank building and who, by the consensus of public opinion, is 
accounted one of the most skilled and learned representatives of the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 79 

medical fraternity. Dr. Moon is a native of Colusa county, Cali- 
fornia, and in her girlhood days went to San Jose, where she attended 
high school. Having decided to take up the practice of medicine as 
her life work, she entered the Pacific College of Osteopathy in Los 
Angeles. The faculty of this college includes many regular medical 
practitioners, as well as osteopathic practitioners. Its students, there- 
fore, have an unusual opportunity to gain an unprejudiced knowl- 
edge of the differet systems of treating diseases. The school ranks 
today among the foremost in America, and it was from this institu- 
tion that Dr. Moon was graduated. Immediately afterward she 
established an office in Oakland, and since 1905 she has continuously 
enjoyed a growing practice in the city — a practice that is now very 
extensive. 

Dr. Moon belongs to the American, Bay and State Medical Asso- 
ciations, which were organized to further the interests of osteopathy 
through uniting the members of that branch of practice more closely. 
Tliey have also thus been enabled to keep their practice upon a high 
ethical standard. Since taking up professional duties, Dr. Moon has 
been an active member of those organizations. She is also well 
known in social circles of Oakland and is a member of the Home 
Club and of the Eastern Star. 



WILLIAM H. L. HYNES. 

William H. L. Hynes, as district attorney of Alameda county, 
has discharged his duties with a sense of conscientious obligation, 
combined with ability that has made his record a notable one. He is 
an able and learned lawyer, whose progress has been continuous and 
gratifying, since his admission to the bar. He was born in San 
Francisco, June 12, 1874, and is a son of Patrick and Alicia M. 
Hynes, who in 1877 removed to Oakland, so that the son became a 
pupil in the public schools. He passed through consecutive grades 
until he graduated from the high school, with the class of 1893, 
after which he attended the LTniversity of California and was grad- 
uated in 1897. He next became a student in the Hastings College 
of the Law, in which he completed his course with the class of 1898, 
and in January, 1S99, he entered the office of the district attorney in 
Oakland, in tlie capacity of deputy. He was gradually advanced in 
that connection, until i9(V' when he became first assistant, and on 
the 2nd of December, 191 2, he was elected district attorney, which 



80 HISTORY OF ALA:\rEDA COUNTY 

position he is now capably filling. He has prosecuted all the im- 
portant civic cases during the past six years and has made a splendid 
record, standing stanch and firm in support of the legal interests of 
the district. His cases are prepared with thoroughness and care and 
the strength which he manifests in their prosecution is evidenced 
in the favorable verdicts which he has won. Aside from his active 
duties as prosecuting attorney, he is now professor of medical juris- 
prudence in the Oakland College of Medicine. 

Mr. Hynes was married in Alameda, California, to Miss Pauline 
Merle on the 5th of February, 1902, and they have one child, Adrien 
M., who is eight years of age. In religious faith, Mr. Hynes is a 
Catholic, and his political belief is that of the republican party. 
He is prominently identified with various fraternal and social organ- 
izations, being a member of Piedmont Parlor of the Native Sons 
of the Golden West and member of the grand parlor; a past exalted 
ruler of the Elks lodge; a member of the Moose; of the University 
of California Club; the Unitarian Club of Alameda; and the Alumni 
Council of the Newman Club of the University of California. 

His social t]ualities and personal worth have won him wide 
popularity, while his professional ability ranks him with the repre- 
sentative citizens of Oakland. 



GEORGE WATKINS HOLLISTER. 

One of the most prominent, able and successful members of the 
Alameda county bar is George Watkins Hollister, who since 1895 
has been in the general practice of his profession in San Francisco. 
He was born near Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, October 15, 1866. and 
is a son of Levi J. and Lydia (Dodge) Hollister, the former a native 
of Ithaca, New York, born in 1820, and the latter of Wisconsin. 
The father w'ent to the latter state in 1840 and twenty years later 
moved to Kansas, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits. From 
Kansas he wxnt in 1880 to Oregon, turning his attention to farming 
and merchandising and continuing in both lines of occupation until 
his death, which occurred in 1904. 

George W. Hollister began his education in Wisconsin, later 
moving to Kansas, where he continued his studies, graduating from 
the high school in Ellsworth in 1881. After laying aside his books 
he turned his attention to farming and followed this occupation for 
about eight years, abandoning it eventuallv in order to take up the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 81 

study of law, a profession which had always attracted him and which 
he had determined to make his life work. In 1889 he began reading 
with the firm of Bonham & Holmes of Salem, Oregon, and in 1894 
was admitted to the bar, coming in the following year to California 
and settling in San Francisco, where he has since engaged in the 
practice of his profession. Well merited success has attended his 
labors during the years, and he has built up a large and representa- 
tive patronage, connecting him with much important litigation. He 
is known as a strong and able practitioner, possessed of a compre- 
hensive and exact knowledge of the underlying principles of his 
profession and logical in his application of them, and his success 
places him todav among the leading members of the legal fraternity 
in this section of the state. 

On the 25th of December, 1887, Mr. Hollister was united in 
marriage t(j Miss Maude Doty, a daughter of George and Hattie 
Doty, of Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Hollister have three children: 
Edward, twenty-three years of age; Roland, twenty; and Gladys, 
sixteen. 

In the life history of Mr. Hollister there is a creditable military 
chapter. On the 27th of April, 1898, he enlisted in the First Cali- 
fornia Volunteer Regiment and until September 21, 1899, served 
as regimental band master, receiving his honorable discharge when 
his regiment was mustered out of the United States service. He 
served with distinction in the Philippines, participating in several 
important engagements of the Spanish-American war, and since its 
close has been a member of the California National Guard. He is 
an accomplished musician and an enthusiastic hunter, giving a great 
deal of Iiis leisure time to the latter recreation. In military and social 
circles of Alameda county he is well known and popular and along 
professional lines has gained that distinction which results only 
from superior merit and ability. 



HENRY F. STEEN. 



As Pacific coast manager for the National Biscuit Companv, the 
position of Henry F. Steen in commercial circles is one of import- 
ance, for in this connection he controls extensive commercial inter- 
ests. He was born in Ireland, March 28, 1874, a son of John and 
Jane Stccn. After attending public schools of Chicago to the age of 
fifteen years, he then entered the Lewis Institute of that city, from 



82 HISTORY OF AI..\Mi:i)A COUNTY 

which he was graduated at the age of eighteen. He made his initial 
step in the business world in connection with the National Biscuit 
Company of Chicago, in the capacity of clerk, and his faithfulness 
and industry won him recognition that brought about promotion. 
He was made cashier and afterward salesman and in December, 
1905, was appointed to the position of manager of one of the Chicago 
branches of the corporation, there remaining until February, 191 1, 
when he was transferred to Los Angeles as superintendent of south- 
ern California agencies. After six months spent in that city he came 
to Oakland and organized the Pacific coast department, having charge 
of fifteen branch houses on the coast with Oakland as headquarters. 
They have erected a fine three-story brick building at Fortieth street 
and San Pablo avenue for their purpose and are constructing similar 
buildings all over the coast, where they have branch houses. Mr. 
Steen is the controlling spirit in the development of the business on 
the coast and has instituted plans and methods which are proving 
directly beneficial as factors in the growth and prosperity of the 
business. 

On the 7th of May, 1896, in Chicago, Mr. Steen was married to 
Miss Eugenie V. Brain, and they have two children: Myrtle, seven- 
teen years of age, who is attending high school, and Alfred, eleven 
years of age, a pupil in the Emerson public school. The parents hold 
membership in the Baptist church, and Mr. Steen belongs to the 
order of the Royal Arcanum. His political indorsement is given to 
the republican party, but the honors and emoluments of office have 
no attraction for him, although he keeps well informed on the ques- 
tions of the day and is a public-spirited citizen. His time, however, 
is fully occupied with the responsibilities and interests of a growing 
business, in control of which he has become recognized as one of the 
representative men of his city. 



E. N. TAPSCOTT. 



E. N. Tapscott, engaged in the real-estate business in Oakland, 
is known as the biggest individual owner of subdivided propertv in 
Alameda and Contra Costa counties. He is a native of Howards- 
ville, Virginia, and a son of ^^^ L. and Sallie E. Tapscott. In the 
acquirement of an education he attended successively the public 
schools, the Miller Manual School of Albemarle at Miller School, 
Albemarle count\, \Miginia, and Gans Academv at Red Bluff, 




E. N. TAPSCOTT 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 85 

Tehama county, California. Subsequently he removed to Prince- 
ton, Colusa county, this state, and there conducted a mercantile estab- 
lishment for two years. On the expiration of that period he sold 
out and returned to Red Bluff, where he was successfully engaged 
in the same business for fifteen years. 

Mr. Tapscott then came to Oakland and embarked in the real- 
estate business with E. J. Henderson under the firm style of Hender- 
son & Tapscott. The partnership was dissolved in January, 191 2, and 
since that time Mr. Tapscott has conducted his interests independ- 
ently. In 1906 the firm of Henderson & Tapscott put on the market 
the Kinsella tract No. i, in Elmhurst, then a rolling country. Next 
they subdivided Kinsella tract No. 2. The rolling fields turned into 
homes and stores, property values went up and many a person who 
had paid a few hundred for a lot realized to the extent of thousands 
on the deal. The two tracts, comprising one hundred and fifteen 
acres, are now all utilized as city lots. They then purchased one 
hundred and six acres on the county line and put the property on the 
market as the Henderson & Tapscott tract No. i. Homes sprang up 
like mushrooms in the night. The Toler Heights tract, embracing 
two hundred acres and located on the beautiful scenic boulevard over- 
looking a magnificent pancjrama of city and suburb, lake and bay, 
in the annexed district, is another of the many subdivisions which 
has proven its great popularity by increasing sales and demand from 
the first day it was placed on the market. The lots in this tract are 
all fifty feet front with a generous depth. The property contains all 
improvements, including water mains, sewers and street work. The 
following is an excerpt from a local publication: "Tapscott usually 
gets what he wants. He wanted a railroad for the benefit of his 
clients in the Toler Heights. He built one extending from the tract 
to the East Fourteenth street line of the Oakland Traction Company. 
He paid twenty thousand dollars for that railroad and presented it 
to the railroad company. Recently the contract was let for forty 
thousand dollars worth of sewer work in the tract." 

Mr. Tapscott has on the market for himself Boulevard Gardens 
tract No. i and Reserve Boulevard tract, comprising one hundred 
and sixty acres in citv lots. He purchased the land from a man who 
had made a failure of it and turned it into a successful proposition. 
Then came North Berkeley Terrace, which rests on a continuation 
of the lower range of foothills that shelter Claremont and Piedmont. 
The lots in this one hundred and sixty acre tract have proved and 
are proving most attractive to home buyers. Mr. Tapscott lias 
recently organized tiie East Bay Land Company, of which lie is 



8(i HISTORY Ol' ALA.MI-:i)A COfXTV 

president and in which he owns one hundred and seventy acres. As 
above stated, he owns and controls more subdivided property than 
any other individual in either Alameda or Contra Costa counties. 
In Contra Costa county alone he owns rive thousand lots in the imme- 
diate vicinity of Richmond and the Pullman car shops, all of them 
having a frontage on San Pablo avenue. In fact all the western 
frontage of San Pablo avenue extending for a distance of three miles 
from Berkeley county line to Stege Junction, and extending back to 
the foothills, is owned by him. This propertv is superbly beautiful 
and is so situated that realty experts declare it cannot but increase 
in value to a remarkable extent. His latest acquisition is called 
Richmond Junction. He has two hundred acres of fine land with 
control of five iiundred more acres. The propertv lies along San 
Pablo avenue, beginning at the junction of Cutting boulevard and 
extending past Macdonald avenue. The propertv occupies a most 
favorable position. It overlooks Richmond, Stege and the Golden 
Gate and is considered one of the most valuable pieces of realty in the 
vicinity of Richmond. Contract has been let for the grading, macad- 
amizing and street work, and on April ist two thousand five hundred 
lots were placed on the market, over one million dollars worth of 
property being sold in the first few months. Following the sale of 
these two thousand five hundred lots, the rest of the acreage will be 
subdivided and placed on the market. The Key Route goes through 
Richmond Junction and the Santa Fe has a station there. It is the 
converging point of three main arteries of travel. The Pullman 
shops are located just in front of the property, and it is one of the 
most picturesque spots in this section of the state and yet has the 
advantage of a commercial center. 

.A-n issue of the Home Industry Edition contains the following: 
"In all his dealings Mr. Tapscott has earned the highest praise and 
commendation for his fair methods of dealing with the working 
classes, and the prices and terms arranged for at time of sale have 
always been so fair and reasonable that even the most modest wage 
earner could meet them without any embarrassment whatever. In 
addition to the fair-dealing methods of Mr. Tapscott he also enjoys 
the reputation of being one of the best posted men on realty values 
in the state, a fact borne out by the volume of business done. 'i"he 
headquarters of the Tapscott interests are at 215 to 220 First National 
Bank building and suitable branch offices are maintained on ilic 
difTerent properties in charge of able and courteous salesmen." 

In San Francisco, Mr. Tapscott wedded Miss Lena A. Mcndle- 
son. He is independent in politics and is a popular member of the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 87 

Athenian Club. Fraternally he is identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed through all the chairs. 
In matters of citizenship he manifests a progressive and public- 
spirited interest, yet he devotes the greater part of his attention to 
his business, which is constantly growing in volume and importance. 



ABE P. LEACH. 



Abe P. Leach, who since September 13, 1909, has creditably filled 
the position of attorney for the public administrator in Oakland, 
was born in Vallejo, California, July 27, 1873, a son of Frank A. 
and Mary L. (Powell) Leach. He acquired his early education in 
the Oakland grammar and high schools and afterward studied law 
in the University of California, receiving the degree of LL. B. in 
May, 1895. H^£ was admitted to practice before the supreme court 
of the state May 21st of that year and began the practice of his pro- 
fession in Oakland, where he has since continued. In 1898 he was 
appointed prosecuting attorney of the city, serving with credit and 
ability until 1907. Two years later he was appointed attorney for 
the public administrator, and he has held this responsible position 
from 1909 until the present time. He possesses an exact and compre- 
hensive knowledge of the law and a personality which makes his 
efforts doubly effective before the court. 

On the 6th of February, 1901, Mr. Leach was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Freda Curdts and they have become the parents of a 
son, Abe P., Jr., aged ten. Mr. Leach gives his political allegiance 
to the republican party, is a member of the Masonic fraternity and 
belongs to the Nile Club. He is well known in professional, official 
and social circles and holds the esteem and confidence of all who are 
connected with him. 



CHARLES F. MAU. 



Charles F. Mau, a veteran of the Franco-Prussian war and since 
1873 one of the leading architects of Oakland, where his superior 
ability has gained him wide prominence in his profession, was born 
in Germany in 1848. He learned his profession in the schools and 
colleges of his native country and after completing his education 



88 HISTORY Ol' AT.AAIKDA COL'XTV 

entered the German army in r868. He served in the Franco-Prus- 
sian war, taking part in the battle of Sedan and the siege of Paris. 

In 1 87 1 he emigrated to America and settled first in Nevada, 
where he engaged in mining and where he still owns valuable min- 
ing interests. Mr. Mau afterward engaged in architectural work in 
Chicago, Illinois, and in 1873 came to Oakland, opening an office 
at the corner of Eighth street and Broadway. He designed and 
erected many office buildings in the early days and a number of 
these are still standing and in use. In 1875 he built Germania Hall 
and followed this by the Old People's Home in Fruitvale. He was 
the architect of the Abrahamson, Clifif and Reliance buildings, built 
the Acme Athletic Club and the Masonic Temple in Alameda, as 
well as many of the historic old residences of the early days. His 
later structures include the Pabst Cafe building, the Ghirardelli 
home and many other modern residences. He is a member of the 
American Institute of Architects and in the course of forty years' 
connection with the architectural interests in Oakland has risen 
steadily in his profession until he is today one of its leading repre- 
sentatives in this part of the state. 

ISIr. Mau married Miss Louisa Schumer, and they became the 
parents of four children, t\\(i of whom, Alfred and Gladvs, have 
passed away, and two of whom, Louis and Carl, survive. Mr. Mau 
is a member of the Royal Arch Masons and prominent in the alTairs 
of that organization. He has lived in Oakland since 1873 and has 
borne an active part in the work of city development since that time, 
many of its most important business and residence structures being 
the product of his professional skill. He has earned for himself 
an enviable reputation as a careful man of business, being known for 
his prompt and honorable methods, which have won him the de- 
served confidence of his fellow citizens. 



WILLIAM DP:LAC0UR. 

William Dclacour is well known in Oakland, where he has been 
successfully engaged in business since .April. n)o6, manufacturing 
a general line of art glass. His birth occurred in "^'oughal, in the 
south of Ireland, on the i4tii of November, 1S83, his parents being 
Timothy and Katharine Delacour. He atteiuicil the public schools 
until fourteen years of age, when he began service as an apprentice 
with a stained-glass firm, with whom he remaineil until he had 



HISTORY OF ALA:\IEDA COUNTY 89 

attained his majority. When twenty-one years of age he made his 
way to San Francisco, California, and was there engaged as stained- 
glass designer with the Sierra Glass Company until April, 1906. 
At that time he came to Oakland and embarked in business on his 
own account in association with Mr. Trobock, the firm of Trobock 
& Delacour continuing until 1909, when our subject purchased his 
partner's interest and has since conducted the enterprise alone. He 
manufactures a general line of art glass and has built up a business 
of extensive and profitable proportions. 

In Oakland Mr. Delacour was united in marriage to Miss Marie 
C. Perkins, by whom he has one child, Norbert. He is a member 
of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Attracted by the opportunities 
of the new -world and especially those of the "golden west," he here 
started upon his business career and has already won an enviable 
reputation as one of the prosperous, enterprising and respected citi- 
zens of Oakland. 



JAMES W. McMANNIS. 

James W. McMannis. treasurer of the Sibbett Manufacturing 
Company, one of the important progressive industries of Oakland, 
was born in Washington county, Kentucky, November 30, 1857, and 
is a son of James and Angeline McMannis. He attended public 
school to the age of sixteen years and then turned his attention to 
farming, which he followed until 1878, when he engaged w'ith the 
Queen & Crescent Railway Company, having charge of the main- 
tenance of way department, until 1892. He next became connected 
with the Southern Pacific Railway Company in the same capacity 
and was stationed at Sacramento, Lodi and later at Oakland. He 
continued in that position until 1904, when he resigned and organized 
the Sibbett Manufacturing Company, for the purpose of manufac- 
turing a general line of working garments. He was elected treas- 
urer of the company and his since guided its financial destiny. They 
employ forty people, and the enterprise has been very successful since 
its inception, the business steadily growing until the annual sales 
now reach a large figure. 

On the 17th of May, 1883, Mr. McMannis was married in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, to Miss Ella N. Williams, and thcv have become the 
parents of four children; James W., twenty-eight years of age, who 
is n(nv a locomotive engineer on the Southern Pacific Railroad; Ray- 



W HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

mond, twenty-six years of age, a marine engineer on the steamship 
Paraso; Monica, a nurse at the receiving hospital; and Verano, nine- 
teen years of age, a graduate of the high school and now a student 
of Heald's Business College. The religious faith of the family is 
that of the Catholic church, and the political belief of Mr. McMan- 
nis is that of the democratic party. Since starting out in life on his 
own account he has worked his way steadily upward by persistent 
effort, close application and unfaltering energy, and whatever suc- 
cess he has achieved is the direct reward of his labors. 



E. N. WALTER. 



Among the vounger men prominent in the financial life of Oak- 
land is E. N. Walter, vice president of the First National Bank. 
Born in Virginia City, Nevada, January 24, 1870, he is a man of the 
west and typical of the western spirit that, never daunted, success- 
fully overcomes all obstacles or adverse conditions. His father was 
William A. Walter, a California pioneer, who came to this state in 
1852, locating in Oakland in the early '70s. He took an active part 
in public affairs, serving for two terms on the city council and for 
one term as president thereof. For many years and up to the time 
of his death he was connected with tiie Wells-Fargo Express Com- 
pany in Oakland in an important position. 

E. N. Walter, after attending public scliool in Oakland, entered 
the employ of the Wells-Fargo Express Company, but in 1887 
changed positions, beginning his banking career with the First 
National Bank of Oakland. He has ever since been connected with 
this important institution, having watched its phenomenal growth 
and grown with its progress. He worked his way through various 
departments and, his ability being recognized, was called upon to 
fill more and more responsible positions until on Januarv i, 191 2, he 
was elected vice president of the institution. He has ever since given 
his whole energv toward the building up of the bank and to him 
must be attributed a large measure of the enormous business which 
is now passing through its hands. Thoroughly well informed upon 
the financial situation, he manages the affairs under his direction ablv 
and has become recognized as an authority on banking, his reputa- 
tion far exceeding the confines of his city. 

in 1912 Mr. Walter was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Lewis. 
Mr. N\'altcr has always been an ardent lo\er of sports and lias taken 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 91 

an active part in athletics, finding therein an even bahince to his 
strenuous and confining duties. He was one of the founders and 
commodore of t"he California Yacht Club and in 1904, when the 
Oakland Baseball Club was put on a business basis, he was made 
secretary and was president thereof from 1906 until 19 13. He was 
the first secretary and the second president of the organization. It 
was through his efforts that the club, which won the championship 
of the Pacific Coast League in 191 2, was placed on a secure financial 
basis. The Oakland Club of 1913 was practically the same as the 
igi2 team. Mr. Walter is also well known in fraternal circles, being 
a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and a promi- 
nent Mason, having been treasurer of the local lodge for fifteen 
years and having attained the Royal Arch degree. He is deeply 
interested in all that pertains to the welfare of the city, and his sup- 
port can ever be enlisted in any worthy cause. 



HENRY D. CUSHING. 



Henry D. Cushing, a well known and prosperous merchant of 
Oakland, has since 1909 served as president of the firm of H. D. 
Cushing & Company, conducting a general retail grocery establish- 
ment. His birth occurred in Shasta county, California, on the i8th 
of September, 1865, his parents being John and Annette Cushing. 
In the acquirement of an education he attended the public schools 
of Oakland until eighteen years of age and then became a clerk in 
his father's grocery store, subsequently securing an interest in the 
business, which was conducted under the name of John Cushing & 
Son. In 1897 he took full control of the business, changing the style 
of the concern to H. D. Cushing. He has been at the head of this 
retail grocery establishment throughout the intervening sixteen years 
and has enjoyed an extensive trade, carrying a large and well selected 
line of staple and fancv groceries and doing everything possible to 
please his patrons. He was one of the organizers of the Alameda 
County Retail Merchants' Association and acts as treasurer thereof. 
Mr. Cushing was likewise one of the organizers of the Merchants' 
Exchange and for thirteen vears served as a director and also in the 
capacity of treasurer. 

In Oakland, on the nth of July, 1900, Mr. Cushing was united 
in marriage to Miss Edna A. Cook, by whom he has three children. 



92 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Phillip H., Charles and Barbara, who are eleven, eight and five years 
of age, respectively. 

Mr. Gushing gives his political allegiance to the' republican party 
and is a Unitarian in religious faith, while fraternally he is identified 
with the Native Sons, belonging to Oakland Parlor, No. 50. He is 
likewise a member of the Nile and Commercial Clubs and was one 
of the organizers and a director of the Chamber of Commerce. His 
fellow townsmen recognize his merit and ability and his business 
colleagues and contemporaries entertain the warmest admiration for 
his many good qualities. 



ABRAHAM JONAS. 



This history presents the record of no other citizen more thor- 
oughly imbued with the spirit of public progress than Abraham 
Jonas. He has ever been a man of fair judgment, broadminded and 
sagacious, and in working for the public welfare he has looked 
beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities and opportu- 
nities of the future. Oakland numbers him among its representative, 
useful and worthy citizens, to whose initiative spirit the city owes the 
establishment of one of its best known men's clothing and furnishing 
stores, the development of which has resulted directly from his reso- 
lute energv and unremitting industry, whereby the establishment 
has advanced from an humble beginning to its present large propor- 
tions. For almost thirty-five years he remained active in its man- 
agement and only recently retired from its presidency and from 
active mercantile life, having won rest and leisure, which he now 
enjoys and which enables him to direct his energies into fields of pub- 
lic activity relative to the further growth and development of Oak- 
land. He finds broad scope for his labors in his present position as 
president of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Jonas was born in Germany in 1855 and supplemented his 
public-school education by a commercial course, after which he 
sailed for America in T<S7q, with Oakland as his destination. He 
accepted a minor position in a clothing house, but his energy and 
ambition — his dominant qualities — brought him to the front and 
after two years' residence here he founded what is now the Hub 
Clothing Company, beginning business in a little store on Broadway, 
between Sixth and Seventh streets. The enterprise was established 
in a modest way. but during the thirty-six years of its existence its 




ABRAHAit .TOXAS 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 95 

growth has been of a steady and healthful character. The business 
was in due time incorporated and at different periods when he felt 
that his trade would warrant Mr. Jonas removed to larger quarters, 
ultimately occupying one of the finest and most modern business 
structures of the city at 1103 Broadway. As his sons Milton and 
Irving reached an age whereby they were qualified to take up onerous 
business duties and responsibilities they were admitted to partnership 
and the business was incorporated with Mr. Jonas as president, his 
elder son, Irving, as secretary and manager, and the younger son as 
vice president and assistant manager. These positions they still hold, 
although they have entire charge of the business, their father having 
recently retired from active participation therein. The store was 
established on sound, conservative business principles, to which close 
adherence has been maintained throughout the intervening years, 
and the result of this policy is seen today in the company's prosperity. 

Mr. Jonas is one of the leading figures in the affairs of the Oak- 
land Chamber of Commerce, in which he has served for several 
years as a member of the board of directors and as chairman of its 
finance committee. In the latter position he gave demonstration of 
his ability by placing the affairs of the chamber on a firm financial 
and business basis. His fellow members, recognizing his valuable 
services, elected him president, which position he now occupies. At 
the time of his induction into office a local paper spoke of him as 
follows: 

"To the work which President Jonas takes up he brings special 
qualifications. He has served successfully as president of the Mer- 
chants' Exchange, has held high station upon all occasions of cere- 
mony and big commercial endeavor in the city's latter years. He 
has been a student of the city's conditions and her needs. He is pos- 
sessed of masterful executive ability, is self-reliant, courageous and 
alert. The plans which he speaks of for the Oakland forward move- 
ment will be carried out by him to the letter. 

"Moreover, the Chamber of Commerce is an institution of estab- 
lished reputation. It is nation-wide in its acquaintanceship and 
influence. It has priority of claim to favor by reason of accomplish- 
ment already wrought. It stands today in the forefront of all matters 
related to Oakland's vital interests; has in hand vast schemes for local 
advancement and deep-laid plans for yet further achievement. 

"The Oakland Chamber of Commerce is non-political and 
entirely free from danger of being made use of to further the low 
ambition of individual exploiters. It is free and untrammeled in its 
commercial and industrial policv and beyond the reach of selfish 



06 TIISTCIRV OF ALAMRDA COL'XTY 

combinations. It stands for the city's dignity, and wealth, and indus- 
try, and power. 

"President Jonas takes the hehn of the Chamber oi Commerce 
at a moment fraught with portentous consequence to tlie welfare of 
Oakland. The immediate opening of the Panama canal, the con- 
struction of the Oakland harbor upon the Rces plans, the extension 
of the transportation facilities and centralization of terminals, the 
conquest of trade at home and abroad — the establishment of Oakland 
as the port of the Pacific — all these are possibilities and coming events 
of the highest importance. Upon the proper placing of this citv in 
the rapidly approaching new situatiiMi depends its destiny for all 
time. If it is placed forward where it belongs it will outrun all 
other cities of the coast within ten years from the passage of the first 
commercial ship through the isthmus."" 

Mr. Jonas was for many years a director of the Merchants" Ex- 
change and in 190:; was elected its president, about which time the 
tunnel road was built. He took an active part in that movement, 
which connected Contra Costa and Alameda counties and which is 
tlie largest wagon road tunnel in the world. Mr. Jonas makes these 
connections with the different organizations mentioned the avenues 
by which he accomplishes important work of civic service, for he is 
at all times interested in the growth and welfare of Oakland and is 
untiring in his efforts to promote the city's advancement. For a 
number of years he has been a str(jng advocate of the consolidation 
of the city and county governments, has been chairman of the com- 
mission and iias done everything in his power to bring this about as 
a means toward securing a "Greater Oakland." He iias made a 
careful study of European and American conditions in city building 
and business development and believes in the concentration of power. 
So earnestlv and steadfastly has he worked for such a consummation 
that he is often called "The Father of Consolidation."" He hopes to 
live to see the consummation of tlie plan, which from the recent 
changes in the law may soon be realized. 

Anian of wide cliaritv, Mr. Jonas has of late years devoted much 
time to piiilanthropic work and during the San I'rancisco Hre of i(;ii^ 
he was vice president of the executive committee whicii had charge 
of tlie relief work and ga\e much of time ami monev to tlie cause. He 
is keenly alert to all measures for the relief of the worthy poor and 
in charities takes an active part. For years he has been a director in 
the Non-Sectarian Associated Charities. He is treasurer and a direc- 
tor of the Associated Cliarities and was appointed bv Mayor Mott 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 1)7 

one of the five commissioners of the municipal wood vard, the pur- 
pose of which is the relief of the unemployed. 

Mr. Jonas has extensive and important fraternal relations, being 
a member of the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Knights of Pythias. He is past grand president of the Indepen- 
dent Order of B'Nai B'rith, for the last fifteen years has been a 
supreme representative of the order and is the president of the syna- 
gogue of the First Hebrew congregation. For the last thirty-two 
years he has been a member of the board of directors and also treas- 
urer for years of Oakland. He was the incumbent at the time when 
the old synagogue was built in 1886, and he is now promoting the 
construction of a new synagogue of which the city of Oakland may 
well be proud and which will soon be dedicated. 

Another important work in which Mr. Jonas has been engaged 
has been to some degree the assistance rendered Rabbi Friedlander in 
revising the Jewish prayer book, which as revised was afterward 
approved by the conference of American rabbis. This revised prayer 
book is now in use in the congregation and fills a long felt want in 
the interpreting of the modern spirit of religion. 

In 1881, in Oakland, he was united in marriage with Miss Katie 
Hartman of this city, and they are the parents of four children: 
Gertrude, wife of Otto Hirschman of New York; Corinne, wife of 
Morris Goldtree of San Francisco; and Irving and Milton, pre- 
viously mentioned. 

His business career has been actuated by laudable ambition and 
characterized by unfaltering industry, combined with a close adher- 
ence to a high standard of business ethics. It would be difficult to 
point out any one characteristic as his most pronounced trait, for his 
is a most evenly balanced character, in which business capacity and 
power are matched by the recognition of life's purposes and the 
obligation of man to his fellowmen. The importance of the work he 
has accomplished along commercial, civic and moral lines in Oak- 
land cannot be overestimated. 



JOSEPH EUGENE BAKER. 

Joseph Eugene Baker was widclv known on the Pacific coast as 
editorial writer for the Oakland Tribune, remaining in that connec- 
tion for sixteen years. He was horn near Conycrs, not far from 
Atlanta, Georgia, January 10, 1H47, and in Iiis boyhood accompanied 



98 HISTORY OF ALA:\IEDA COUNTY 

his parents to Texas. He supplemented study in private schools by 
a course in a local academy, which he attended to the age of sixteen 
years. Soon afterward he joined the Confederate service as a soldier 
in the Army of the Tennessee, in which his uncle. Brigadier General 
Alpheus Baker, commanded a brigade. He followed the fortunes 
of war with his command and during the progress of hostilities it 
was said that although a boy in his teens he took an active part in 
compelling the proper and humane treatment of Union prisoners. 

After the close of the war he visited Mexico, then in the throes 
of the republican revolution against the misguided and unfortunate 
Emperor Maximilian. Being equipped with letters from both im- 
perial and revolutionary authorities granting him free transit, he 
traversed the country at will and witnessed the fluctuations of the 
tide of war which ended in the tragic death of Maximilian at Quera- 
taro and the birth of the republic of Mexico under the presidency of 
Juarez. Subsequently he visited Brazil and ascended the Amazon 
river to the highest point which had then been reached by a white 
man, his purpose being to study the agricultural possibilities oi that 
region. With the same purpose in view he went to Rio de Janeiro 
and explored the interior of southern Brazil. In 1868 he entered 
the employ of a St. Louis tobacco house, which he represented as 
traveling salesman in the central part of Texas until 1870. He after- 
ward drove a herd of cattle from Texas to the Laramie plains of 
Wyoming and while enroutc camped upon the present site of Okla- 
homa City. From the Laramie plains he drove a herd of cattle to 
Salt Lake City, where he remained until .^L^rch, 1873. Subsequently 
he went to Pioche, Nevada, where he engaged in mining and after- 
ward turned his attention to newspaper work. In 1877 he removed 
to Tybo, Nevada, where he became a smelter in a mining camp, 
while afterward he was connected with a weekly newspaper until 
the spring of 1879. 

While with the Meadow Lake Mining Company he had with 
him a crowd of fellow workers who afterward became verv distin- 
guished, including Judge Beatty, George Story Curtis, grandson of 
Justice Story of the United States supreme court, and Henrv T. 
Creswell, one of tiie best known members of the San Francisco bar. 
His association with tiiese ilistinguished men greativ influenced iiis 
future life and turned his thoughts into a literary ciiannel, bringing 
him at last to a position as one of the best and most versatile and 
accomplished writers of California. From Pioche Mr. Baker went 
to Belmont and thence to Tybo, Nevada, and after working in a 
smelter there became interested in a small newspaper. During that 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 99 

period he read thoughtfully the works of Addison, Carlyle, Ma- 
caulay and other standard essayists and also spent many hours with 
Hume's History of England. In fact, his reading was broad and of 
a most excellent character. Possessing a wonderfully retentive mem- 
ory, he gathered a store of material from which he could draw at 
will in future years, finding on almost every occasion something that 
applied to the subject matter in hand. In writing of this period of 
his career the Oakland Tribune said, following his death: "When 
the mining company operating the smelter at Tybo closed down Mr. 
Baker moved to Bodie, Mono county, which at that time was one 
of the richest quartz mining camps in this state, and he lived there 
and thereabouts for some time. During a winter spent in a mountain 
cabin near the shore of the lake Mr. Baker witnessed the slide of 
an avalanche of snow down the flank of the Sierran peak and with 
a deafening roar tearing a great gap through the forest of gigantic 
pines fringing the shores of the lake, grinding them into kindling 
wood on its way and moving with such tremendous velocity that 
when it struck the frozen surface of the lake the floe swept swiftly 
over the ice and ascended far up the flank of the mountain at whose 
base his own cabin was located, ripping out in its course the big 
pines by the roots and incorporating them in the wreckage it created. 
The scene was so extraordinary and impressive that Mr. Baker wrote 
an account of it for the newspaper, which revealed his great descrip- 
tive powers. It has been described as the most graphic description 
of an avalanche ever published, not in any sense equaled in vividity 
by any of the numerous productions of distinguished writers who 
have described in their works the great snow avalanches which have 
periodically swept down the flanks of the European Alps, carrying 
death and disaster into the valleys at their feet." 

At a later date Mr. Baker was employed for a time as a writer 
on one of the Reno, Nevada, newspapers. He afterward removed to 
Bodie. California, and for a short time was connected with the Bodie 
Daily News and afterward had charge of the Bodie Standard until 
1 88 1. In that year he removed to Lundy, California, where he began 
the publication of a weekly paper. While thus engaged he was 
offered and accepted a position in a surveying party, which work 
took him across the mountains to the town of Sonora and it was dur- 
ing his residence there that he met the lady who afterward became 
his wife and the mother of his three children, a son and two daugh- 
ters. He was editor of the Sonora Union Democrat until 1885, in 
which year he spent a few months on the local stafT of the Chronicle 
and later on the local staff of the Examiner, where he remained until 



100 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

1887, when he became city editor of the Alta California, which posi- 
tion he held until 1891. He then became managing editor of the 
Oakland Times, with whicii he was connected until the summer of 
1892, when he took editorial charge of the Fresno Expositor. After 
a year spent in Fresno, California, he returned to San Francisco and 
engaged on the special stalif of the Chronicle until 1893. He then 
became managing editor of the Oakland Times, but resigned in 1895 
to become general overseer of the state prison at Folsom. He retained 
that office until June, 1900, when he tendered his resignation. He 
was for sixteen years editorial writer on the Oakland Tribune, which 
position he held at the time of his demise. 

In every place where Mr. Baker resided he made many friends 
and his friendships comprised invariably the brightest men in eacii 
community, by whom he was held in the highest respect for his 
native abilitv, sterling integrity, great mentality and strength of 
character. He always took an active interest in politics and as a 
stanch democrat ranked among the leaders of the party in this state 
and in Nevada. "But," said one of his closest friends and greatest 
admirers in speaking of Air. Baker's career, "he was not a hide- 
bound democrat. He was a democrat with sound discrimination, 
which was exemplified by the support he gave Judge Beatty during 
his two candidacies for a position on the bench in Nevada and when 
he \\as a candidate for the chief justiceship of the supreme court of 
this state, to which he was elected and which position he has since 
held with abilitv, honor and distinction. But while he was an ardent 
democrat, Mr. Baker was not an office seeker. When Governor 
Budd was elected he appointed Mr. Baker to a position at the Fol- 
som state prison, which he accepted and held during Governor Budd's 
term. It was the only public office he ever held and that came to 
him unsolicited and unsought." 

Following the death of Mr. Baker, which occurred at his home 
in Oakland on the 19th of March, 1914. P^H^^'''* "^ th'S and adjoining 
states commented upon his career and from these the following 
excerpts have been made: "Baker was ever loyal to the craft. He 
believed the newspaper was the greatest power on earth and the 
paper he attached himself to was dominant authority in the locality 
where it was published and if it was not he generally aided in making 
it such. Baker was brusque but kind. His friendship rang true. 
He ranks with Frank M. Pixley, Arthur McKewen and John P. 
Irisli as a leader among editorial writers of this generation. He was 
direct, powerful and caustic in his style and he was a general in 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 101 

command of the English language." Another said: "In the death 
of Joseph Baker of the Oakland Tribune California newspaperdom 
loses one of its strongest and most trenchant writers. Baker was no 
ordinary man. His erudition covered a wide field. His memory 
was a veritable storehouse of facts, on which he was able to draw 
for any subject at any time." The Woodland Democrat writes: 
"He was one of the ablest editorial writers in the state and was such 
a careful student of public questions that his ambitions were regarded 
with the greatest respect by his contemporaries. Although editor of 
a republican paper he was a democrat of the old school and through- 
out his whole life he was an ardent supporter of democratic prin- 
ciples, having a record tor loyalty, devotion and integrity that is 
stainless and unblemished. His journalistic career was brilliant, 
full of years and honest achievements, and his private virtues were 
worthy of emulation." The personal note is touched in the words of 
a writer in the Contra Costan, published at Richmond, California: 
"In the death of Editor Joe Baker this writer feels that he has lost 
a good friend, but there are thousands of others who feel the same 
way, for he had friends everywhere by the countless hundreds. We 
seldom ever went to Oakland that we did not drop into the Tribune 
office and chat a few moments with Colonel Joe, and they were 
always bright moments, for he was a good man and a man of noble 
instincts and fine traits of character. It was a pleasure and a privi- 
lege to know him and to be counted among his friends. He was a 
broad and liberal-minded man, \\ith a big brain, a big heart and lots 
of soul." Still another said: "Baker was as big of heart and mind 
as the great west which developed him. That he worked in the mines 
in commonplace positions even into his young manhood might seem 
strange in one so extraordinarly gifted intellectually, but while thus 
employed he was burning the candle into the morning hours, putting 
away for future use a treasure store of information that finally 
brought him distinction and honor in the profession he so splendidly 
ad(jrned. His paragraphs were as fresh and clean as the fine man- 
hood he typified, while his more profound observations were as logi- 
cally powerful as they were entertaining and instructive." 

A well merited tribute to his memory was paid by the Oakland 
Observer in the following: "An American man of the old school is 
dead. The customary phrase is 'a gentleman of the old school' — and 
few ever held in ampler measure the finer qualities of the gentleman 
than Joseph E. Baker — but, as the tribute to Iiis memory from all 
his associates is not perfunctory, I tiiink it is beter to speak of him 
in the more enviable and descriptive words, 'an American man of the 



102 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUXTY 

old' school.' Baker was an American of the period when men were 
needed. He was embrued in the Civil war. He was a pioneer and 
adventurer into far places. He had the Ulyssean spirit that has made 
this nation. He sought the sources of the Amazon. He was in 
Mexico during the days of Maximilian. He trekked to the west in 
the times that we know now only through the record of Remington. 
He lived the life of the frontier American. In journalism he was 
vigorous, sometimes intemperate, but always true to his convictions, 
right or wrong though they might have been. But his adversaries 
always respected his manly qualities, as he always respected the 
manly qualities of his adversaries. In his enmities he was severe and 
uncompromising; in his friendships sincere and unreserved. He 
belonged to the type that made his country — the basic type of initia- 
tive, courage and vigor. He is a type that cannot be replaced; it 
remains only as an inspiration to the coming generation. We mourn 
to see another gap in the ranks of the Old Guard of real Americans, 
but our sorrow is subordinated to the pride we possess in what these 
men have done. Baker would not have us sentimentalize over him. 
He deserves the plain, untearful tribute of respect that the soldier 
accords to the comrade who falls in the van of the charge." 



EMIL LEHNHARDT. 



A man whose force of character, business insight and genius for 
organization made him one of the leaders in the business develop- 
ment of Oakland was Emil Lehnhardt, well and prominently known 
as the founder and upbuilder of one of the largest candy, confection- 
erv and ice cream manufacturing establishments in the bay cities. 
During practically the entire period of his active life he gave his 
energy and attention to this enterprise, with the result that it devel- 
oped from small beginnings to its present large proportions. 

Mr. Lehnhardt was born in New York city and is of German 
ancestry, his father having been a native of Mainz on the Rhine and 
his mother of Westphalia, Germany. In that country his grand- 
father started the first lithograph establishment and for a number 
of years served as lithographer to the crown, some of the official 
maps of his making having been in the possession of the subject of 
this review. His son, the father of our subject, came to America in 
the early \(;os and was one of the founders of the German Turners 
Societv in New York citv. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 105 

Emil Lehnhardt came to California in 1868 and after complet- 
ing a course in the public schools of San Francisco learned the 
trade of watchmaking. He afterward became connected with a large 
wholesale jewelry house, acting as traveling representative of that 
concern for five years, during which he journeyed along the coast as 
far south as Mexico and as far east as the Rocky mountains. When 
he severed his connection therewith he turned his attention to the 
candy and confectionery manufacturing business, opening a small 
plant on Fourteenth street, near the city hall in Oakland. Being a 
conscientious, energetic and capable worker, he met with immediate 
success in the conduct of his business and the enterprise grew so rapidly 
that in 1895 he was obliged to seek larger quarters. He established 
his second plant at 1309-13 Broadway and year by year enlarged this 
as the business expanded. The concern now gives employment to one 
hundred and forty people, this working force having gradually 
developed from the time when Mr. Lehnhardt employed only four 
men and did himself as much work as five. The factory and parlors 
are as complete as those of the leading confectionery firms in the east 
and the equipment is modern in every detail. Mr. Lehnhardt con- 
tinued in active business until his death, which occurred January 26, 
iQi I, after which his wife assumed charge. LInder her able manage- 
ment the concern has continued its phenomenal growth, for she has 
proven a woman of executive ability and keen business insight and 
has held the concern to its enviable position among the leading enter- 
prises of its kind on the coast. She and her husband had planned a 
new factory and after his death she carried out the plans, completing 
the fine modern factory at Twenty-fourth and Grove streets. 

On the 5th of July, 1883, Mr. Lehnhardt was united in marriage 
to Miss Hattie Marcus, a native of New York city, who came to 
California with her parents when she was still an infant. Her father 
engaged in general merchandising in San Francisco in the early '70s 
and continued there until his death, building up a large and important 
enterprise. Mr. and Mrs. Lehnhardt became the parents of two 
children: Edna Anita, who married E. J. Cowing, of Oakland, by 
whom she has two children ; and Emil, attending school. 

Mr. Lehnhardt was a member of the Athenian and Nile Clubs 
of Oakland and was very active in the Masonic fraternity, holding 
membership in the lodge, chapter, commandery and shrine. He 
gave his political allegiance to the republican party but, although he 
was interested in public afifairs as a progressive and public-spirited 
citizen, he was not active as an office seeker, constantly refusing all 
political honors and emoluments. For a number of years he was a 



106 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

director in the Unitarian church of Oakhmd and was known as a man 
of broad but unostentatious charity, giving largely of his time and 
means to the help of the needy and afflicted but adhering closely to the 
Bible maxim of "never letting his right hand know what his left hand 
did." He was a man whose merit and ability carried him forward 
into important relations with many phases of community life' and 
during the course of a long and active career his integrity remained 
unquestioned and his popularity unbounded. His death was sincerely 
mourned bv a wide circle of friends. 



WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER WOOD. 

William Christopher Wood, who since January i, 1914, has been 
state commissioner of secondary schools, was connected with 
educational interests of Alameda as city superintendent of schools 
for a period of five years. He is a native son of California, born in 
Elmira, Solano county, December 10. 1880. His father, Emerson 
Wood, was born in East Smithfield, Pennsylvania, in 1844, and after 
graduating from Abingdon College, Illinois, turned his attention to 
teaching, following this occupation in Illinois and Kansas. He was 
a soldier in the Civil war, marching with General Sherman from 
Atlanta, Georgia, to Raleigh, North Carolina, and upon the organi- 
zation of the Grand Army of the Republic identified himself with 
the afifairs of the association, becoming commander of J. W. Geary 
Post. He came to California in 1875 and in Solano county engaged 
in farming until his death, which occurred in May, 1898. The 
paternal branch of this family is one of the oldest in America, being 
descended from Sir William Wood, who visited the northern Atlan- 
tic coast in 1632, wrote an account of his observations and called it 
"The New England Prospect." The great-grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this review was born at Westminster, Massachusetts, in 1761. 
At the age of sixteen he enlisted in the Continental army and served 
in the defense of Boston in 1780. He died in 1825, at East Smith- 
field, Pennsylvania. His son, Joel \\'ood, the grandfather of the 
subject of this review, was born in Massachusetts in 18 10 and when 
he was two years of age was brought to East Smithfield, where he 
grew to manhood. He became a minister and a farmer, following 
both occupations in Pennsylvania, Illinois and Kansas and dying 
in Thurman, in the latter state, in 1907. Emerson Wood married 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 107 

iMiss Martha Turner, a daughter of Jackson and Mary Turner, of 
Missouri. 

In the acquirement of an education William C. Wood attended 
public school in Solano county and was afterward a student in the 
Leland Stanford University and the University of California. He 
immediately identified himself with educational interests, becoming 
principal of the Fairfield schools and in 1906 principal of the Lin- 
coln school of Alameda. Having proved himself an able educator, 
he was called upon on the ist of January, 1909, to fill out an unex- 
pired term as superintendent of schools of this city and in recogni- 
tion of his efifective and far-reaching work was elected to the posi- 
tion in May, 191 1, for a term of four years. In January, 1914, he 
resigned his position to assume his duties as state commissioner of 
secondary schools. He has proved efficient, conscientious and capa- 
ble in the discharge of his duties and has already left the impress 
of his work and personality upon the educational history of the state. 

In 1905 Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Kerr, a 
daughter of Andrew and Eudora Kerr of Fairfield, California. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wood have one child, Willsie, who is seven years of age. 
Mr. Wood is an enthusiastic fisherman and, in fact, is devoted to 
all kinds of outdoor sports, being particularly interested in moun- 
tain climbing, to which he gives a great deal of his leisure time. He 
has tramped for pleasure over the Sierra Nevadas and the Canadian 
Rockies and can relate many interesting incidents of his travels. 
Fraternally he is past exalted ruler of Alameda Lodge, No. 101 q, 
B. P. O. E., and he is identified with Oak Grove Lodge, F. & A. M., 
and the National Union of Alameda. He is in addition vice presi- 
dent of the Unitarian Club of this city. In his official capacity he 
did much to promote the cause of public education in this commu- 
nity, managing the school's of the citv in a systematic and businesslike 
way and reaping the reward of his well directed labors in the 
increased efficiency of the pupils and teachers alike. 



GEORGE KIRCHNER. 



George Kirchner, a partner in the firm of Kirchncr & Mante, 
representatives in Oakland of the Seattle Brewing & Malting Com- 
pany of Seattle, Washington, was born at Vertheim, Germanv, Jan- 
uary 22, 1868, a son of Fritz Kirchner. He was a public school 
pupil to the age of fourteen years and then came to the United States 



108 HISTORY Ol- ALA.MKDA COL'XTY 

in 1882, settling in San Francisco, where he served an apprenticeship 
with Lang Brothers, bcjttlers, with whom he remained for two years. 
He was afterward employed in various bottling establishments until 
1888, when he entered the employ of the Bufifalo Bottling Company 
at Oakland, with which he continued as bottler for five years. He 
then entered the bottling business on his own account, and soon after- 
ward entered into a partnership with F. Mante under the firm style 
of Kirchner & Mante. They represent the Seattle Brewing & Malt- 
ing Company of Seattle, the largest brewery on the Pacific coast, 
in a business which has been constantly growing and which has won 
them a substantial measure of success. 

In Oakland in 1893 ^^^- Kirchner was married to Miss Dora 
Lueddeke, and they have four children, Helen, Minna Dora, Fritz 
and George. Mr. Kirchner belongs to the Merchants' Exchange 
and the Chamber of Commerce, and also holds membership in the 
Eintracht, the Sons of Herman, the Eagles, the Oakland Turnverein 
and the Loyal Order of Moose. He has never had occasion to regret 
his determination to come to the new world, for here he found the 
business opportunities A\hich he sought and in their improvement 
has made steadv advancement. 



NORALA.N FISK PEART. 

Since 1906 Norman Fisk Peart has been successfully engaged in 
business at Oakland as president of the firm of Peart, Incorporated, 
who handle automobile tires and also conduct a repair shop. As 
their business has grown they have established branches in San Fran- 
cisco and Berkeley. His birth occurred in San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, on the 19th of September, 1878, his parents being Benjamin and 
Sophia Peart, who in iSSS established their home at ^^'oodland, Yolo 
county, this state. 

Norman F. Peart obtained his education in the graded and high 
schools of Woodland and following his graduation, in 1897, spent 
one year as a student in the University of California. Subsequentlv 
he returned to San Francisco, where for four years lie was emploved 
as clerk with the Overland Freight & Transportation Company. He 
next acted as salesroom foreman for the Mobile Carriage Company i 
until 1906, when he resigned his position and came to Oakland, here 
opening an automobile tire and repairing establishment. Mr. Peart 
manifests excellent executive ability and sound judgment in his 



HISTORY OF ALA^iIEDA COUXTY 109 

capacity as president of the firm of Peart, Incorporated, wliich has 
enjoyed continuous growth and prosperity, so that branches have 
been opened in San Francisco and Berkeley. 

In San Francisco, on the 15th of March, 1906, Mr. Peart was 
united in marriage to Miss Kate Ralston, by whom he has two 
children, Madeline and Ruth. He is a republican in politics and 
belongs to the Nile and Rotary Clubs. 



DAN ANDKER. 



Dan Andker has been engaged in business as an undertaker of 
Oakland since 1909, in which year he organized the firm of Andker 
& Company, of which he is the president. His birth occurred in 
Odense, Denmark, on the 19th of April, 1865, his parents being 
Anders and Mortensen Andker. He attended the public schools 
until a youth of fourteen and afterward worked with his father, a 
gardener, until twenty years of age. Subsequently he spent three 
and a half years as a soldier in the army and on the expiration of that 
period emigrated to the United States, settling in San Francisco, 
California, where he worked in a tailor shop for three years. At the 
end of that time he came to Oakland and here was employed as a 
tailor by Joseph Poeheim for six years. Subsequently he spent two 
years in the service of Lancaster & Rehor, tailors, and was then 
engaged as a tailor with John J. Andersen until 1909. In that year 
he embarked in the undertaking business, organizing the firm of 
Andker & Company, of which he has since served as president. Suc- 
cess has come to him in this connection, for his is a well appointed 
and up-to-date establishment and the service rendered is of the 
very best. 

Mr. Andker has been married twice. On the 21st day of Decem- 
ber, 1889, in San Francisco, he wedded Miss Clara Andker, whose 
demise occurred in August, 1906. On the 28th of December. 1909, 
in Sacramento, California, he was again married, his second union 
being with Mrs. Ella Biggi. His children are three in number, 
namely: Exe, twenty-one years of age; Carla, who is fourteen years 
old and a public-school student; and Norman Dan, who is two years 
of age. The last named was born of his second marriage. 

In his political views Mr. Andker is a republican, while his 
religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. He is a member of 
all the Danish societies and likewise belongs to the Masonic order. 



110 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

the Fraternal Brotherhood, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and the Improved 
Order of Red Men. Coming to the new world in early manhood, 
he here found tlie opportunities which he sought and in their wise 
utilization has won a place among the substantial and representative 
citizens of his communitv. 



FRANK R. CRAWFORD. 

Frank R. Crawford is the superintendent of the Oakland Crema- 
tion Association, which was incorporated on the 28th of June, 1901. 
His birth occurred in Sonoma county, California, on the 4th of Jan- 
uary, i860, his parents being T. B. and Sarah Crawford. The father, 
who was born in Scotland on the 21st of May, 1830, acquired his edu- 
cation in that country and in 1849 emigrated to the United States, 
settling in Tuolumne county, California, where he was engaged in 
mining until 1863. In that year he removed to Calaveras county 
and was there identified with copper mining as superintendent of a 
mine until 1869, when he went to Stockton, San Joaquin county, 
and embarked in the steamboat business, his craft plying between 
Stockton and San Francisco. In 1900 he put aside active business 
cares and the remainder of his life was spent in honorable retire- 
ment. In 1884 he had taken up his abode in Oakland, here continu- 
ing to reside until called to his final rest in 1912. The period of his 
residence in Oakland covered twenty-eight years and he was widely 
recognized as one of its prosperous, representative and respected 
citizens. 

Frank R. Crawford attended the public schools of Sonoma, Cali- 
fornia, and then accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Stockton, this state, where he continued his education in the public 
schools until 1884. In that year he came to Oakland and after- 
ward worked as a machinist in the service of the San Francisco Tool 
Company of San Francisco until 1888, while subsequently he was 
engaged as engineer for the Pacific Mail Steamship Company until 
1902. He then returned to Oakland and took charge of the construc- 
tion of the Oakland Crematorium, continuing as superintendent of 
the same. The officers for 19 12- 13 are as follows: George W. Reed, 
president; Dr. F. R. Jordan, vice president; Horace E. Smith, secre- 
tary; First National Bank, treasurer; George W. Reed, Dr. F. R. 
Jordan, the late M. T. Emmert, F. F. Mood, the late A. E. H. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 111 

Cramer, George R. Crane and Dr. E. T. Hosford, directors. The 
crematorium is fully equipped with the best and latest improved 
appliances for incineration, which work is performed by competent 
men of long experience. The columbarium is one of the finest in 
the world for the reception of ashes. The magnificent fireproof 
building is modern in every respect and contains thousands of niches 
for the benefit of those who desire permanent resting places for the 
ashes of their dead. The oflice of the Oakland Cremation Asso- 
ciation is in the Crematorium building at Howe and Mather streets. 
The Pacific contains a well written article setting forth the wisdom 
of cremating the dead and states that "in 1890 there were three hun- 
dred and seventy-two cremations in the United States. In 1900 the 
number was two thousand three hundred and eighty-nine. In 1908 
it was three thousand four hundred and sixty-two. Nearly one-third 
of the number for 1908 was in San Francisco, the figures being one 
thousand one hundred and four. The number in New York that 
year was seven hundred and twenty-three. The number of crema- 
tories in operation in the United States at that time was twenty-five. 
The crematory in Oakland, operated by the Oakland Cremation 
Association, first used in June, 1902, had three hundred and twelve 
incinerations in 1903, nine hundred and thirtv-one in 191 1 and over 
one thousand in 1912." 

On the i6th of February, 1901, Mr. Crawford was joined in 
wedlock to Miss May Kennedy, the ceremony taking place in Oak- 
land. He is a republican in politics, and his religious views accord 
with those of the Christian Science church. He belongs to the Ma- 
rine Engineers and is identified fraternally with the Royal Arch 
Masons. His genuine worth and his devotion to all that is right, just 
and elevating, make him a man whom to know is to respect and 
honor. 



JOHN HEAFEY. 



John Heafey is the junior member of the firm of Chambers & 
Heafey, contractors of Oakland, who are engaged in general cement 
construction, sewer work and water works. He came to Oakland 
in 1901 and has resided here continuously throughout the intervening 
twelve years. His birth occurred in County Waterford, Ireland, on 
the 3rd of June, 1S81, his parents being John and Margaret Heafev. 
Mc attended the public scliools until a vouth of sixteen and subse- 



112 HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 

quentlv worked for his father until he had attained the age of nine- 
teen years. At that time he emigrated to the United States, making 
his way direct to Oakland, California. Here he secured employ- 
ment as a carpenter with his brother William, engaged in the con- 
tracting business, remaining in his service until 1907, when he 
became a partner of his brother. In January, 191 1, he sold out to 
his brother and formed a partnership with Mr. Chambers under 
the name of Chambers & Heafey, which firm has built up an exten- 
sive and profitable business in general cement construction, sewer 
work and water works. The junior partner is a young man who has 
been well trained in his chosen field of labor and merits the success 
which he now enjoys. 

On the 7th of February, 191 1, in Sebastopol, California, Mr. 
Heafey was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary McSorley. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and has fraternal 
relations with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, belonging to 
Berkeley Lodge. In religious faith he is a Catholic. Both he and 
his wife have a large circle of friends and acquaintances and arc held 
in the highest regard by all who know them. 



CHARLES G. REED. 



Charles G. Reed, who from 1907 to 1909 served with credit and 
ability as national bank examiner for the northern district of Cali- 
fornia, is a member of a family which has been well represented in 
Oakland and vicinity; first by the father. Captain William Reed, and 
his wife Hannah; and also by their children, grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren to the number of forty. 

Mr. Reed, of this review, has spent practically his entire life in 
California, for he came to this state with the family when he was 
onlv twelve years of age. He was born in Vassalboro, Maine, De- 
cember 24, 1844. and in November, 1856, was brought to Oakland. 
He attended the old Carpentier school, beginning in the winter of 
1856-7, and circulated a petition for the building of the second 
schoolhouse, the Lafayette primary, at Twelfth and Grove streets. 
He afterward entered the Oakland College school, taking a business 
course. Following the completion of his studies he obtained a posi- 
tion in a wholesale clothing house in San Francisco, with which he 
was connected for four years. At the end of that time he came to 
Oakland and conducted a hardware store at the northwest corner of 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 115 

Twelfth and Broadway. When he disposed of this enterprise he 
entered the office of the county clerk as deputy under J. V. B. Good- 
rich and after four years in this service was elected to the office of 
county clerk in 1875. He won reelection in 1877 and served two 
terms, after which he was made deputy under C. E. Palmer, county 
treasurer. At the end of four years in this office he entered the Union 
National Bank and was soon advanced to the position of paying 
teller. He was later made exchange teller and held this position 
until October, 1907, when he received the appointment as national 
bank examiner for the northern district of California. He held this 
position until 1909 and discharged its important duties in a pains- 
taking, conscientious and efficient manner. 

In Oakland on the 8th of January, 1868, Mr. Reed married Miss 
Flora A. Moore, a daughter of Gorham H. and Mary A. (Jenkins) 
Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Reed became the parents of four children: 
Olive, the wife of S. W. Cushman of Oakland; Elmer, who is 
engaged in the United States marshal's office in Nome, Alaska; 
Aimee, the wife of Harwood D. Swales of the Firemens Fund Insur- 
ance Company; and Eva, who became the wife of H. D. Danforth 
and died June 28, 1904, at the age of twenty-nine years. There are 
seven grandchildren, four boys and three girls. All the children 
and grandchildren have exceptional musical ability and hnd music 
the source of much enjoyment. 

Mr. Reed is connected fraternally with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, in which he is past grand, and he has also filled all 
of the chairs in the Ancient Order of United Workmen, representing 
his lodge in the grand lodge at various sessions and serving also as 
grand trustee. He is at present grand receiver. He is also affiliated 
with the Fraternal Brotherhood and is a member of the First Baptist 
ciiurch, in which he officiated as trustee for a number of years. He 
has always taken a keen interest in movements looking toward the 
benefit of general conditions and has been found ready to lend his 
aid for the promotion of all progressive public projects. He was a 
member of the old Oakland Guard, serving as private in 1862 and 
being later promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. He was also a 
member of the Oakland light cavalry. From 1893 until 1897 he 
served on the board of education of Oakland, acting as chairman of 
the finance committee and the high school committee. Being a 
great lover of liis native state he founded the State of Maine Asso- 
ciation of California and was its first secretary and later its president. 
He can truthfully say that he has never taken a drink of liqui)r, a 
record that few who have lived in California as long as he has can 



116 IIIS'KJRV OF ALAAlliUA C(JUXTY 

equal. He signed a pledge during the great Maine campaign in 
1 8^5 and has never broken it. During the long period of his resi- 
dence in this city he has attained a wide reputation as a broad-minded, 
liberal and public-spirited citizen, and by his strict integrity of char- 
acter, business ability and excellent qualities of mind has won the 
confidence and esteem of all who know him. 



REV. JOSEPH GALLI. 

Rev. Joseph Galli, pastor of St. Joseph's Portuguese church in 
Oakland, has been at the head of this congregation since iqog and 
his labors have been an effective force in the lives of those who 
have come under his teachings. His birth occurred in Varese, Italy, 
on the 1 8th of April, 1877, his parents being John and Antonia Galli. 
He attended the gymnasium until fifteen years of age and then went 
to Braga, Portugal, where he continued his education in the high 
school for three years. He next studied theology for five years and 
subsequently taught in an orphanage in Braga, Portugal, until 
twenty-three years of age, when he went to Lisbon, Portugal, as 
ordain and teacher in a school of trades. At the age of twenty-four 
he came to Oakland, California, as assistant pastor of St. Joseph's 
Portuguese church and in 1909 became pastor thereof. With con- 
secrated zeal he has labored to advance moral interests, and his teach- 
ings have borne fruit in many lives. He is a member of the Y. M. I. 
and the Knights of Columbus, and also belongs to the Salesian Fath- 
ers of Venerable Don Bosco. 



HOWARD A. BIGELOW. 

Howard A. Bigelow, who began the practice of law at Oakland 
in the spring of 1910, has in the intervening period of three years 
built up an extensive and enviable clientage and established his 
reputation as an attorncv of pronounced abilitv. He was born at 
Sailor Springs, lllinnis, on the 14th of April, 1S7:;, and after acquir- 
ing his more specificallv litcrarv education prepared for the practice 
of his chosen profession in the law department of Washington I'ni- 
versity at St. Louis, Missouri, 1 roni which he was graduated in 
1900. Opening an office at Decatur, Illinois, he there practiced law 



HISTORY OF AL.UtEDA COUXTY 117 

for seven years with gratifying and growing success. In the spring 
of 1910 he came to Oakland, California. His offices are at 1020 
Broadway, and in the comparatively short period of time which 
has since elapsed he has built up a large and lucrative practice here. 
He has won a reputation as a criminal lawyer of unusual ability and 
is well versed in that branch of the profession. 

In 1897 Mr. Bigelow was united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Chamberlain, a native of Illinois, by whom he has two children, 
Beulah and Helen. The family home is a handsome residence on 
Fourth avenue, which Mr. Bigelow purchased. He is widely rec- 
ognized as one of Oakland's most enterprising and public-spirited 
citizens and is a public speaker of note, having stumped the state of 
Indiana in the interests of William Howard Taft prior to his elec- 
tion to the presidency. Mr. Bigelow is the attorney for the Progres- 
sive Development Syndicate of Oakland and his aid and cooperation 
are given to every movement and measure instituted to further the 
growth of the city. Fraternally he is identified with the Loyal 
Order of Moose. 



CARL J. FOARD. 



Carl J. Foard, prominently connected with business interests of 
San Francisco as founder and president of the firm of Foard & 
Barstow, ship chandlers, is one of Alameda's native sons, born on the 
26th of November, 1878. His father, Lorens Foard, was born in 
Denmark and in the early '60s came to California, settling in Ala- 
meda county, where he remained active and prominent in local pub- 
lic affairs until his death, which occurred in 1905. His wife was in 
her maidenhood Miss Julia Bertelsen, a daughter of Otto and Julia 
Bertelsen of Germany. 

In the acquirement of an education Carl J. Foard attended public 
school in Alameda, and he began his business career in 1893, ^'^'hen 
he went into business for his father, engaging in ship chandlery, 
building up a large and profitable patronage and proving himself a 
reliable, resourceful and able business man. In 1906 he organized 
the firm of Foard & Barstow and became its president, a position 
which he has filled with credit and efficiency since tliat time. It 
has called for his excellent organizing and executive ability, and tlie 
credit for the rapid expansion and continued growth of the concern 
is in large measure due to him. He has become known as a keen 



118 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

and discriminating man, whose sagacity is far-reaching and whose 
integrity beyond all question, and his success is only the natural result 
of earnest, persistent and well directed labor. 

Mr. Foard married Mrs. Anita Humphrey, a daughter of Gott- 
leib and Juana Zeh, the former a native of Frankfort, Germany, and 
the latter of Mexico. Mr. Foard is identified fraternally with the 
Elks, the Masonic order and the Native Sons of the Golden West. 
He is a member also of the Master Mariners' Association, and is 
well known in social, fraternal and business circles, his name stand- 
ing for enterprise, progress and integrity along all lines. 



WILLIAM N. VAN DE MARK. 

William N. Van De Mark has been a resident of California for 
a period covering four decades and has ably served as deputy county 
assessor of Alameda county for the past twenty years. He makes his 
home in Oakland and here established and still conducts the Dramatic 
Institute and School of Oratory. His birth occurred in Albany 
county, New York, on the 23d of October, 1843, '""'^ parents being 
John E. and Julia A. Van De Mark, nee Vanzandt. The V^an- 
zandts and Stanfords lived on adjoining farms. Hon. Leland 
Stanford was a warm friend of the mother of Mr. Van De Mark. 

In 1S44 the family home was established in Rochester, New 
York, w here our subject attended the graded and high schools until 
the age of fifteen years, while subsequently he spent a vear as a 
student in St. Lawrence University of Canton, New York. In 1S62 
he enlisted in the Union army and served as chaplain during the 
remainder of the period of hostilities between the north and the 
south, being honorably discharged by reason of resignation in 186^. 
During the latter part of his army service he acted as general super- 
intendent of colored education for the Department of the Gulf. His 
service in this position was highly satisfactory. 

Mr. Van De Mark was then elected to the pastorate of the Uni- 
versalist society in Churchville, New York, for one vear and was 
next transferred to Lockport, New York, where he preached for 
three years. On the expiration of that period he went to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, there following his calling until 1873, when he came 
to California and for two years served as minister of the Universalist 
church in San Francisco. He then resigned his pastorate and became 
a teacher of elocution in Oakland and San Francisco, opening the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 119 

Dramatic Institute and School of Oratory, which he has successfully 
conducted to the present time. He has graduated a large number of 
pupils, among whom are some of the most prominent men in San 
Francisco and Oakland. In addition to his work in this connection 
Mr. Van De Mark has also done public service, acting as assistant 
weigher in the United States customs house from 1891 to 1894. 
Since the latter year he has held the position of deputy county assessor 
of Alameda county, proving an able and highly satisfactory incum- 
bent. During the past three years he has had full charge of war 
veterans' exemptions for Alameda county. He has traveled largely, 
having been twice in Europe and completed the round of the States, 
the West Indies and Mexico. 

Mr. Van De Mark has been twice married and by his first wife 
has one son, Clarence R., who is forty-two years of age and is engaged 
in the men's furnishing business in Denver, Colorado. For his second 
wife he chose Miss Mary A. McDonald, whom he wedded in Oak- 
land on the 2d of March, 1884. They have two children: Lester 
W., who is twenty-eight years old and is a manager in the employ of 
the Taylor & Spottswood Company of San Francisco; and Lucy M., 
a soloist in the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The latter has a 
pure contralto voice and is studying for grand opera. 

Politically Mr. Van De Mark has always been a stanch repub- 
lican, supporting the men and measures of that party at the polls. 
He is a member of the Christian Science church and still main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his 
membership in the Grand Army of the Republic and the Military 
Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Mr. Van De Mark 
has recently passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score vears 
and ten but is still an active factor in the world's work and has long 
been numbered among the most highly esteemed and best known 
citizens of Oakland. 



MAURICE M. ROACH. 



Maurice M. Roach, a wortliv native son and successful business 
man of Oakland, is half owner in the undertaking establishment 
formerly conducted under the name of J. H. McCarthy & Company, 
but since changed to Roach & Kenney. He was born on the 12th of 
August, 1869, a son of Michael and Hannah Roach. The father 
came to Oakland in t868 and was here engaged in the tannery busi- 
ness until Ills death in 1869. 



120 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA QJUXTV 

Maurice M. Roach attended the Christian Brothers College 
until sixteen years of age and subsequently secured a position as clerk 
in a retail grocery store, being thus employed until 1894. He then 
became requisition clerk in the United States construction and repair 
department on Mare Island, holding that position until May, 1Q05, 
when he resigned and returned to Oakland. Here he spent two 
years in the government supply business and then became deputy 
county assessor, discharging the duties of that position for a year and 
a half. On the e.xpiration of that period he purchased a half interest 
in the undertaking establishment of J. H. McCarthy & Company, 
now known as Roach & Kenney, and has remained in that business 
to the present time, success attending his venture. In March, 19 14, 
they removed to their present location at 3479 Piedmont avenue, 
where they have one of the finest equipped parlors in the state. 

In March, 1896, in San Francisco, Mr. Roach was united in 
marriage to Miss Alice M. Giggus, by whom he has four children, 
as follows: Maurice, sixteen years of age, who is a student in St. 
Anthony's school; Elizabeth, who is fourteen years old and attends 
Lourdes Academy; Leo, who is nine years of age and attends St. 
Anthony's school; arid Charles, five years old. 

In his political views Mr. Roach is independent, supporting men 
and measures rather than party. His fraternal relations are with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Maccabees and the Foresters of America. 
Well known in the city of his nativity, he has won the uniform trust 
and good will of all by reason of his pleasant and attractive per- 
sonalitv, and all his life he has been straightforward and honorable. 



FRANK A. BRIGGS. 



Frank A, Briggs is an active representative of business interests 
in Alameda county as manager of the Oakland branch of Sherman- 
Clay & Company of San Francisco, who are the leading piano mer- 
chants on the Pacific coast. His birth occurred in Booneville, Mis- 
souri, on the 1 8th of August, 1877, his parents being Dr. C. H. and 
Mrs. Mattie A. Briggs. He became a public-school student in 
Nevada, Missouri, at the age of twelve and a year later entered a 
private school at Fayette, Missouri, there continuing his studies until 
fourteen years of age. During the following four years he attended 
Central College and subsequently engaged in the profession of teacli- 
ing in Kansas City, Missouri, for four years. He next pursued a 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 121 

two years' post-graduate course in Vanderbilt University at Nash- 
ville. Tennessee, and then returned to Kansas City, where he taught 
school until September, 1904. At that time he entered the service 
of the Jenkins Music Company as salesman and later became depart- 
ment manager, holding the latter position until February, 1912, when 
he resigned to become manager of the Oakland branch of Sherman- 
Clay & Company of San Francisco. In that position of responsibility 
he has remained to the present time, ably directing the interests of 
the firm in Oakland, for he is a young man of excellent executive 
ability and sound judgment. 

In May, 1903, at Kansas City, Missouri, Mr. Briggs was united 
in marriage to Miss Bessie Barlow, by whom he has one child, 
Richard, who is nine years of age and a public-school student. He is 
a republican in politics and belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, 
the Oakland Commercial Club and the Nile Club. Fraternally he 
is identified with the Masons, being past commander of Oriental 
Commandery of the Knights Templar in Kansas City. He has by 
his winning personality formed a large acquaintance in Oakland and 
his successful business career as well as his general reputation for 
sterling integrity and ability have made him respected wherever he 
is known. 



JOHN J. Mcdonald. 



John J. McDonald, a practicing attorney of Oakland, has here 
followed his profession successfully for about two decades and has 
likewise been a prominent factor in political circles. He is num- 
bered among the worthy native sons of Alameda county, his birth 
having occurred near Haywards. His father, Thomas McDonald, 
was one of the early settlers of this county, coming here in 18 1^4. 

In the acquirement of an education John J. McDonald attended 
the public schools of Alameda county and also pursued a course of 
study in St. Mary's College, where he was graduated in 1891. In 
preparation for the practice of law he entered Hastings Law School 
and following h.is graduation was admitted to the bar in 1894. Dur- 
ing the nineteen years which have since elapsed he has built up an 
extensive and enviable clientage in Oakland and has maintained a 
reputation as one of the able and successful representatives of the 
profession here, ^^'hatever else may be said of the legal fraternity, 
it cannot be denied that members of the bar haye been more promi- 



122 IIISTURY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

nent actors in public affairs than any other class of the community. 
This is but the natural result of causes which are manifest and require 
no explanation. The ability and training which qualify one to 
practice law also qualify him in many respects for duties which lie 
outside the strict path of his profession and which touch the general 
interests of society. Mr. McDonald has been a very prominent fac- 
tor in public affairs and for the past fifteen years has taken an active 
part in democratic politics in California. He served as chairman 
of the democratic county committee for ten years and was a member 
of the board of freeholders which formed the last city charter of 
Oakland, being the only democrat elected on the board. 

In April, 1904, Mr. McDonald was united in marriage to Miss 
Alice Flvnn, a native of San Francisco, by whom he has two sons, 
John }., jr., and Robert L. He is a member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Knights of Columbus and also belongs 
to the Athenian Club of Oakland. In professional, political and 
social circles of Alameda county he is well and favorably known, 
having spent his entire life within its borders. 



JOHN WATERMAN PHILLIPS. 

As president of the Grayson-Owen Company and in many other 
important connections John Waterman Phillips is prominently iden- 
tified with the business life of Oakland, where for many years he has 
been considered one of its most enterprising citizens and a man who 
in a large way has contributed toward establishing the present pros- 
perous conditions. A descendant of old New England families, Mr. 
Phillips has inherited many laudable traits of character peculiar to 
that race which he has turned to good account. His birth occurred 
in Middletown. Connecticut, in 1832 and he is a son of Elijah and 
Clarissa (Hough) Phillips, both natives of that state. The original 
seat of the Phillips home was in England, whence an ancestor emi- 
grated to American shores during the Colonial period. The mother 
was a daughter of Asa Hough, who distinguished himself in the Revo 
lutionary war, serving with the rank of captain. 

In the public schools of Lewis county. New York, John Waterman 
Phillips acquired his early education and later attended LowvilK 
Academy, his parents having removed from Connecticut to New York 
state in 1837, when he was but five years of age. For two winters 
Mr. Phillips taught school but in 1854 came to California over 




JOHN \V. I'll I M 



HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 125 

the Isthmus route. Arriving in San Francisco, he proceeded to Mari- 
posa county, where for one winter he followed placer mining. In 
the spring he removed yet farther north to Trinity county, locating 
near Weaverville, where he established several meat markets. He 
also engaged extensively in buying cattle, driving them to his place 
of business, where he slaughtered them and prepared them for sale. 
For the greater part of the time he conducted three markets and also 
supplied a number of local butchers in that section. The year 1858 
found him in Oregon purchasing cattle which he drove to the Cali- 
fornia markets. In i860 Mr. Phillips returned to New York for 
his bride and shortly after again set out for California, continuing 
in his former line, conducting meat markets in Trinity county and 
in Red BlufT, Tehama county. He carried on an extensive business of 
this kind for about ten years. 

The year 1870 witnessed his arrival in Oakland, where shortly 
after he established a wholesale packing house from which he sup- 
plied the city butchers as well as the surrounding country. His firm 
was known as Grayson, Owen & Company and so continued until 
1901, when Messrs. Grayson and Owen sold their interests. The 
continually growing business made it advisable to incorporate and 
for that reason the Grayson-Owen Company came into being, its 
capital stock amounting to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 
Mr. Phillips was elected president and has ever since continued in 
that important position. Mr. Phillips has also other interests, being 
director of the Union Gas Engine Company, a director of the Pacific 
Surety Ccmipany and at present president of the Mountain View 
Cemetery Association. He has also been a director of the Central 
Bank ever since its inception. In early days Mr. Phillips invested in 
Fruitvale property, and the first business block ever built in that 
section was due to his initiative. He is an aggressive and progressive 
man, shrewd, able and one who readily understands a situation and 
who, moreover, can make such situation serve his purpose. The 
Gravson-Owen Company own twenty thousand acres of the finest 
land in San Luis Obispo county, where they raise and breed cattle for 
the market, and they iiave a large plant at the stockyards at Emery- 
ville. 

In 1H60, at East Durham, New ^'<)I■k, Mr. Phillips married Miss 
Anna M. Pierce, the only daughter of a well known and highly 
respected merchant of East Durham. She bore her husband two 
daughters, the oldest of whom became the wife of Irving C. Lewis, 
vice president of the Grayson-Owen Company. Mrs. Lewis died 
April I. 1907, leaving one son, Phillips Frisbie Lewis. The otlier 



126 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

daughter married G. N. Easton, and their children are Anna J., 
Russell and Elizabeth. After forty-three years of domestic happi- 
ness Mrs. Phillips passed away in 1903. Two years later Mr. Phillips 
married Mrs. Henry Martin of San Francisco. She has also been 
called to her final rest, and he has since made his home with his 
daughter, Mrs. Easton. 

Mr. Phillips is prominent in the Masonic order, having been one 
of the charter members of Brooklyn Lodge, No. 225, F. & A. M.. of 
East Oakland, in which he has held all of the chairs. He also belongs 
to Alameda Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M., and Oakland Commandery. 
No. II, K. T. He is a life member of the Order of the Eastern Star. 
His club connections are with the Athenian, of which he is a life 
member, the Home and the Claremont Country Clubs. Although 
now past eighty years of age Mr. Phillips is still actively concerned 
in all questions of public importance and gives much time and thought 
to his extensive interests. He has become a loyal son of California 
and is proud of the city which honors in him one of her pioneers. 



GEORGE ROEHM. 



George Roehm is the president of the Independent Brewing Com- 
pany of Oakland, which he organized on the ist of November, 191 1. 
His birth occurred in Wittenburg, Germany, on the i8th of Novem- 
ber, 1872, his parents being David and Margaret Roehm. He 
attended the public schools until fourteen years of age and subse- 
quently served an apprenticeship in a brewery, being employed 
therein until he had attained his majority. At the age of twenty- 
one he emigrated to the United States and located in San Francisco, 
California, where he was employed as a brewer in the South San 
Francisco Brewery until February, 1899. He then came to Oakland 
and was here engaged as brewer with the Anchor Brewery until 
November i, 191 1, when he organized the Independent Brewing 
Company, of which he has since remained the president. Succes;; 
has come to him in large measure and has won him recognition 
among the prosperous and representative business men of the citv. 
He is a valued member of the Brewer Masters Association. 

On the 8th of September, 1900, in Wittenburg, Germany, Mr. 
Roehm was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Neu, by whom he 
has two children, George and Fred, who are twelve and nine years of 
age respectively and arc attending the public schools. He gives his 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 127 

political allegiance to the republican party and belongs to the 
Schwaben Verein, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Foresters. 
Mr. Roehm is a man of many sterling traits of character, reliable in 
business and progressive in citizenship, and has gained the confi- 
dence, good-will and esteem of all who have been in any way asso- 
ciated with him. 



W. B. TOWN SEND. 



W. B. Townsend, who has been a resident of Oakland for the past 
three years, acts as general agent of the Western Pacific, Denver & 
Rio Grande and Missouri Pacific Railways, to which position he was 
appointed on the ist of July, 1910. During his varied career he has 
been identified with journalism, advertising, photography and rail- 
road interests, now having charge of all freight and passenger busi- 
ness for the Western Pacific Railway in Alameda county. He began 
his business career at the age of eighteen as official photographer for 
the Missouri Pacific Railway at St. Louis and spent two years in 
taking photographs of all industries, depots, etc., of the Missouri 
Pacific System. At the end of that time he was appointed traveling 
passenger agent of the Missouri Pacific and St. Louis, Iron Moun- 
tain & Southern Railways at Memphis and was thence transferred to 
Chicago as traveling passenger agent for the Missouri Pacific System. 

Immediately after the peace treaty had been signed with the 
Spaniards after the Cuban war, Mr. Townsend entered into a con- 
tract with the N. D. Thompson Publishing Company and the St. 
Louis Republic to visit Cuba, Isle of Pines, Porto Rico, Sandwich 
Islands and the Philippines and take some three thousand pictures 
showing the island possessions of the United States as they looked 
at the conclusion of the war and also to write upon conditions of 
the country at the time. This work consumed a year and a half and 
resulted in the publication of a thousand page book called "Our 
Island Possessions and Their People," which was sold extensively in 
connection with newspapers throughout all parts of the United States. 
After completing this trip Mr. Townsend was appointed superin- 
tendent of the Southwestern Railway Advertising & Distributing 
Company at St. Louis, that company distributing railway advertising 
matter throughout the states of Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, 
Texas and Louisiana. 



12S HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

On the ist of January, 1902, Mr. Townsend was appointed travel- 
ing passenger agent for the Rock Island Railway at Buffalo, where 
he remained during the Bulifalo Exposition. From that point he was 
transferred as traveling passenger agent of the Rock. Island Railway 
at Salt Lake City, but resigned this position to take that of contract- 
ing freight agent for the Missouri Pacific Railway at San Francisco. 
Subsequently he was appointed traveling freight and passenger agent 
of the Denver & Rio Grande at San Francisco, and later district 
freight and passenger agent of the Denver & Rio Grande, Missouri 
Pacihc and Texas & Pacific Railways at San Jose, while afterward 
he was again transferred to San Francisco. On the ist of July, 1910, 
he was appointed general agent of the Western Pacific, Denver & 
Rio Grande and Missouri Pacific Railways at Oakland and in this 
capacity has remained to the present time, being recognized as a 
valued and highly efficient representative of those roads. 

Mr. Townsend was united in marriage to Miss Leila McKillican, 
her father being Robert McKillican, a prominent contractor of Oak- 
land. He owns a handsome little bungalow at the foot of Paru 
street in Alameda. Mr. Townsend is a popular member of the Encinal 
Yacht Club, the Athenian Club of Oakland, the Oakland Commercial 
Club, the Nile Club, Aahmes Temple of the Mystic Shrine, Apollo 
Lodge of Masons and California Commandery of San Francisco. He 
has lived in various places throughout the United States but likes 
Oakland better than any previous home. 



LESTER WARREN MANTER. 

Lester Warren Manter, a progressive young citizen of Oakland, 
was for four years connected with the Macdonough theatre as its 
treasurer and assistant manager. His birth occurred in Pasadena, 
Los Angeles county, California, on the ist of December, 1887, his 
parents being Edwin Warren and Nellie B. Manter. In 1889 the 
family home was established in Oakland and here our subject attended 
the graded and high schools until the age of nineteen years. Subse- 
quently he spent two years as a clerk in the retail crockery store of 
Nathan Dohrman & Company and afterward w as emploved as book- 
keeper by the Firemen's Fund Insurance Company for one vear, serv- 
ing as an usher in the Chutes theatre at the same time. He next acted 
as an usher in the Orpheum theatre of San Francisco for ten months 
ami later spent a year and a half as clerk with the Whittier & 



HISTORY OI' ALAMEDA COUNTY 129 

Coburn Company. Afterward he was employed as a salesman by 
Butler Brothers of San Francisco until 1909, when he resigned his 
position to become treasurer and assistant manager of the Mac- 
donough theatre in Oakland. Throughout the intervening four years 
he has ably discharged the duties devolving upon him in these con- 
nections and his efforts have been an important factor in the success- 
ful management of the theatre. 

On the 22d of July, 191 1, in Oakland, Mr. Manter was united 
in marriage to Miss Dorothy Henry, by whom he has a son, Warren 
Addis. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
is identified fraternally with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. Mr. Manter likewise belongs to the Theatrical Treasurers 
Club and is a y(5ung man well liked and highly esteemed. 



GEORGE H. NOBLE. 



George H. Noble, a prominent contract(^r and builder of Ala- 
meda, w-as born in Allegan, Michigan, January 15, 1861;. He is a 
son of John and Maria (Burroughs) Noble, the former a native of 
Oswego, New York, and the latter of Rochester. The father was a 
hotel keeper in his native state. He afterward moved to Los Angeles 
and later to Alameda, where he became well known in religious 
circles, doing a great deal of effective church work and holding the 
position of sexton of the Methodist Episcopal church until his death 
in 1 9 1 1 . 

George H. Noble acquired a public-school education, laving aside 
his books in 1879. He learned the carpenter's trade and w^orked at 
it for about two years, giving it up in 1881 in order to mine in Colo- 
rado, a state in which he remained for two years. In September, 
1883, he came to California and for a time worked in the mountain 
lumber camps around Lake Tahoe and Truckee but came eventually 
to Alameda, where he turned his attention to the painting business. 
In :886 he moved to Los Angeles but after three years returned to 
Alameda, again establishing himself in the painting business in this 
city and conducting a profitable enterprise of this character from 
1889 to 1907. In the latter year he went to Lake countv and engaged 
in mining, also taking up a government claim, which was valuable 
on account of the mineral springs upon it. Tills propcrtv, which he 
called Castle Springs, he sold shortly al'icrwarii ami, returning again 
to Alameda, engaged in contracting and building, in which he has 



r.iO HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COUNTY 

continued since that time. Many rtne business buildings and resi- 
dences in the city and in surrounding communities testify to his skill 
and ability, and he has already secured a large and representative 
patronage, which is constantly increasing as he becomes more widely 
known. 

Mr. Noble married Miss Bessie Echenberger, a daughter of Carl 
F. and Frances Echenberger, of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Noble have 
four children: George Leonard, aged nineteen; Ruth Elizabeth, 
aged sixteen; Doris Margaret, thirteen; and Harold Edward, nine. 
Mr. Noble was for ten years a member of the volunteer fire depart- 
ment of Alameda, and fraternally he is connected with the Knights 
of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and the Improved Order of 
Red Men. In the development of his individual success he has con- 
tributed also to the commercial advancement of the city where he 
makes his home and where he is held in high regard by his business 
associates by reason of his enterprise, integrity and sterling personal 
worth. 



M. M. ENOS, M. D. 



Among the prominent and successful surgeons of Alameda county 
stands Dr. M. M. Enos, founder and owner of St. Anthony's Hos- 
pital, Oakland. Dr. Enos is truly a native of this county, his birth 
having occurred at Hayward, July 26, 1875. 

Dr. Enos acquired his early education in the public schools of 
his native town and later attended the California Medical College at 
San Francisco, from which he was graduated in 1896. He after- 
ward took a course in the National University of Chicago and was 
later a student in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Chicago, 
the medical department of the University of Illinois, and later took 
a post-graduate course in the Chicago Polyclinic. For a time Dr. 
Enos taught surgery in the National Medical School of Chicago and 
while there was associated with many of the leading surgeons of the 
middle west. 

He is the founder of St. Anthony's Hospital, established in Oak- 
land in 1904, and he holds a high position in the ranks of the medical 
profession in California. The Doctor specializes in surgery. 

Dr. Enos is a director in the Portuguese- American Bank of San 
Francisco and makes his home at the Hotel Oakland. He is a 
member of the American Medical Association and the California 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 131 

State and Alameda County Medical Societies and always keeps in 
close touch with the most advanced thought and practice of the medi- 
cal profession. He is a conscientious and able physician and is held 
in high regard by the local public and by his fellow practitioners. 



RICHARD T. KESSLER. 

Richard T. Kessler, a successful and representative citizen of Oak- 
land, acts as secretary and manager of the Kessler Cafe at No. 463 
Eleventh street. His birth occurred in Bernburg, Germany, on the 
14th of November, 1861, his parents being Albert and Augusta 
Kessler. The father was a manufacturer of lead and tin pipes, con- 
ducting a foundry and machine shop at Bernburg. 

Richard T. Kessler attended the gymnasium until seventeen years 
of age and afterward was employed as a clerk by an importing and 
banking firm of Stettin, Germany, until 1880. In that year he emi- 
grated to the United States and, landing in New York, there became 
clerk for a large pocket-book manufacturer, for whom he subse- 
quently traveled until 1886. During that year he spent three months 
in Europe. He next made his way to San Francisco and there spent 
a year as a hotel clerk in the Russ House, while later he conducted 
a cafe in the wholesale district until 1895. Selling out, he then spent 
one year in European travel. 

Returning to San Francisco, Mr. Kessler again opened a cafe 
and conducted the same until 1905, when he sold out to become 
manager of the Pabst Cafe in Oakland, on Eighth street, between 
Broadway and Franklin. There he remained until April, 1913, and 
then removed to Eleventh street, between Broadway and Washington, 
which is his present location. The name was changed to the Kessler 
Cafe and our subject now acts as its secretary and manager. It is 
attractively appointed and has become very popular and much 
patronized under the able management and direction of Mr. Kessler. 

In San Francisco, on the 26th of August, 1896, Mr. Kessler was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma Michaelis, by whom he has a 
daughter, Irma, who is a high-school student. He is a republican in 
politics and casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of 
that party. He belongs to the Turn Verein and is likewise identified 
with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Loyal Order of Moose, the 
German General Benevolent Society of San Francisco and the Ger- 
man Altcnhcim, Fruitvale. With trade interests he keeps in touch 



132 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

as a member of the Commercial Club, the Chamber of Commerce and 
the Merchants Exchange. He is widely and favorably known in 
various connections, possessing the social, genial qualities which 
everywhere gain friendship and win confidence. 



JOSEPH NICHOLAS GHIRARDELLI. 

In the death of Joseph Nicholas Ghirardelli, which occurred in 
Oakland, May 1 1, 1906, Alameda county lost one of its most popular, 
prominent and successful business men and public-spirited citizens, 
and California a representative of one of the best known pioneer 
families of the state. Mr. Ghirardelli was born in San Francisco, 
February 7, 1852, and was a son of Domingo Ghirardelli, a pioneer 
in that city, who had founded and conducted a successful chocolate 
manufacturing business for many years. 

Joseph N. Ghirardelli spent his early boyhood in his native city 
but at a comparatively early age he was sent with his brothers to 
Europe, where he pursued his studies. One of the brothers. Caesar, 
died on the continent. Mr. Ghirardelli of this review remained for 
some time in Italy and then returned to California, where he enrolled 
in Santa Clara College, which he attended until within six months 
of his graduation. At the age of twenty years he entered the store 
established by his father in Oakland and there assisted in the man- 
agement of the enterprise, later becoming a partner. The three 
brothers entered earnestly into the business with the father. The 
business at this time was not prospering, but Joseph N. Ghirardelli, 
whose happy disposition enabled him to make friends, brought to 
bear his unusual powers as an organizer, and his influence soon told, 
the business gradually increasing in magnitude until it assumed large 
proportions. Accompanying the development, more and more 
responsibility was assumed by Mr. Ghirardelli, until he was elected 
vice president of the company, a position he held until his death. 
The company became one of the largest manufacturers of chocolate 
in Oakland and San Francisco. 

In Oakland, in 1885, Mr. Ghirardelli married Miss Ellen Frances 
Barstow, a daughter of David Pierce and Elizabeth (Reed) Barstow. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ghirardelli became the parents of two children: 
Joseph N., Jr., who is now engaged in the insurance business in Oak- 
land, and Carmen, still pursuing her studies and residing with her 
mother at Piedmont. Joseph N., Jr., is a member of the Native Sons 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 135 

of the Golden West, the Nile Club and the Elks. On July 2, 1910, 
he was united in marriage with Miss Nina Jones, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Jones. 

The old family home of the Ghirardellis was at the corner of 
Fifth and Brush streets in Oakland, and after Joseph N. Ghirar- 
delli's marriage he built a residence on the corner of Market and 
Nineteenth streets, wherein he made his home until his death. 

Mr. Ghirardelli was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at one time, and at the time of his death was connected with 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, being very active in the 
affairs of the Oakland lodge. He was also a member of the Athenian 
Club and was very active in its affairs, being one of the earnest advo- 
cates of the removal to the present location, at Fourteenth and Frank- 
lin streets. During his early years he voted the Democratic ticket, 
but later inclined to independent views in political matters. 

He passed away at his home in Oakland, May 11, 1906, of heart 
failure, superinduced by the shock received at the time of the earth- 
quake. He was sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends, won 
in the course of a long and honorable connection with the business 
and social life in this community. His funeral was largely attended 
and among the many floral tributes laid upon his casket were some 
from those in humble positions who had found in him a friend in 
need. 

A man of genial personality and keen business acumen, whose 
friends were legion; and although he has ceased from his labors and 
no longer his happy smile and friendly handclasp bring gladness 
to the manv who once called him friend, vet his memory is still green 
and his name is spoken in eulogy throughout Alameda county and the 
state. 



EDWARD V. TIFFANY, M. D. 

Dr. Edward V. Tiffany, a successful and able representative of 
the medical profession, has maintained offices in Oakland since 1906 
and has enjoyed an extensive and lucraj:ive practice. He is a native 
of Independence, Iowa, and a son of V'ester and Louisa Tift'any. In 
the acquirement of an education he attended the graded and high 
schools until the age of twenty and afterward the Upper Iowa Uni- 
versity of Fayette until 1890. Having determined upon the practice 
of medicine as a life work, he entered the medical department of the 



i;{6 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

University of Iowa, where he studied for one year, and then entered 
the medical department of the University of California, which insti- 
tution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 1894. He located 
for practice in Amador county, California, and there remained until 
1Q06, when he came to Oakland, which city has since remained the 
scene of his professional labors, and the success which has attended 
iiim is ample evidence of his skill and ability in the field of his 
chosen life work. He belongs to the Alameda County Medical So- 
ciety and the California State Medical Society, and the proceedings 
of those bodies keep him thoroughly informed concerning the most 
advanced work being done in the country. 

In December, 1895, in Amador county, California, Dr. Tiffany 
was united in marriage to Miss Carrie L. Easton. He is a progres- 
sive in politics and has fraternal relations with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Order of 
Moose, the Woodmen of the World and the Masons, belonging to 
the lodge and chapter of the last named organization. Dr. Tiffany 
is loyal to the teachings of these fraternities, which he exemplifies in 
his life, and in matters of citizenship he manifests a progressive and 
public-spirited interest, yet he devotes the greater part of his atten- 
tion to his professional duties, which are constantly growing in vol- 
ume and importance. 



OSWALD R. WOOD. 



Oswald R. Wood, a prosperous young attorney of Oakland, has 
here practiced his profession with growing success for the past four 
years. His birth occurred in Ovid, Michigan, on the i6th of October, 
1 88 1, his parents being Robert C. and Edna E. (Read) Wood, natives 
of Ontario, Canada. He acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Vancouver, British Columbia, and Everett, Washington, 
and after coming to Oakland, California, in 1895, continued his 
studies here, being graduated from the high school with the class of 
1 90 1. Subsequently he pursued a course of study in the Polytechnic 
Business College at Oakland and then embarked in business in San 
Francisco. Later he made his way to Chico, Butte county, Cali- 
fornia, there entering the law offices of F, C. Lusk. On returning to 
San Francisco he became traveling freight agent for the Rock Island 
Railroad Company. 



HISTORY OF ALA^FEDA COUNTY 137 

In 1908 Mr. Wood took up the study of law with Fred W. Fry, 
of Oakhmd, and was admitted to the bar of California on the i6th 
of October, 1909, for practice in the state and federal courts. He 
has since maintained his office fn Oakland and has been accorded a 
large clientage in recognition of his professional ability. He has 
won for himself very favorable criticism for the careful and system- 
atic methods which he has followed. He has remarkable powers 
of concentration and application and his retentive mind has often 
excited the surprise of his professional colleagues. The utmost care 
and precision characterize his preparation of a case and have made 
him one of the successful attorneys of Oakland. 



EDWARD E. THORNTON. 

Edward E. Thornton is superintendent of the Key division of the 
San Francisco & Oakland Terminal Railway Company and is a rail- 
road man Of experience, who has won this position entirely on his 
own merits. He was born in Leesville, Indiana, March 12, 1874, and 
is a son of Henry P. and Louise Thornton. 

Edward E. Thornton attended the public schools in Oakland until 
1889. in which year he became a pupil in Crawford's Private School, 
there remaining for one year. At the end of that time he accepted 
a position as fireman in the emplov of the Southern Pacific Railroad, 
continuing so until 1894, when he was made motorman of the Oak- 
land, Alameda & Piedmont Electric Railway, which later became 
the Oakland Traction Company. In 1899 Mr. Thornton was pro- 
moted to the position of inspector, and in 1900 he was made superin- 
tendent of the Hayward division, resigning in 1902 in order to accept 
the position of superintendent of the Petaluma & Santa Rosa Rail- 
road. He continued as such until 1904, when he resigned and became 
superintendent of the Key division of the San Francisco & Oakland 
Terminal Railway Company, which office he now holds. He is a 
thoroughly able man, who knows all details of railroading from the 
ground up. His executive force was soon recognized and his man- 
agerial ability was largely the cause of his rapid advancement. He 
is a man who readily grasps any situation and has a large capacity 
for detail, never overlooking small matters in the execution of an 
object. He is determined and energetic, always completing any- 
thing he undertakes. In the estimation of his superior officers he 
stands high and is popular with his associates and with the many 



138 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

men who work under him, all of whom recognize his justness and 
his honorable character. 

Politically Mr. Thornton is a republican, interested but not active 
in the welfare of his party. He cooperates, however, very readily in 
any enterprise undertaken for the welfare of his city and Alameda 
county, and he is ever willing to bear his share in order to further 
the public weal. He is interested in the intellectual and moral 
upbuilding of humanitv. 



CRIS N. ^^LISICH. 



Cris N. INIilisich has for the past twenty-two years been engaged 
in the restaurant business at Oakland in partnership with John 
Crchum, with whom he has conducted the California Cafe at No. 
469 Eleventh street since 1S9S. He was born in Herzegovina, 
Austria, on the 7th of April, 1871, and attended the public schools 
of that country until sixteen years of age. Desiring to take advantage 
of the opportunities offered in the new world, he then emigrated 
to the United States, settling in San Francisco, California, where he 
was employed in a restaurant until 1891. In that year he came to 
Oakland and established a restaurant at the corner of Sixteenth and 
Broadway in partnership with John Crchun.i, remaining at that loca- 
tion until 1898. During the past fifteen years, however, they have 
conducted the California Cafe at No. 469 Eleventh street and have 
been very successful, attracting and holding a desirable patronage. 

On the I St of December. 1897, at Oakland, Mr. Milisich was 
united in marriage to Miss Katie \V. Stratford, by whom he has a 
son, Cris Frank. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and various Servian organizations. 



^V1LL1A^[ B. OriGLEY, Jr. 

William B. Quigley, Jr., is the proprietor of a wholesale and 
retail liquor establishment at the corner of Tenth and Clav streets in 
Oakland and has conducted the same successfully for the past seven 
years. He is a native son of Alameda county, having been born in 
Oakland on the gth of June, 1880, of the marriage of W. B. and Isa- 
belle Quigley. He ac(|uired his education in the graded and high 



HISTORY OF ALAATEDA COUNTY 139 

schools and following his graduation, in 1897, spent two months as 
a student in Heald's Business College. Subsequently he secured a 
position as credit man with Benjamin Curtay & Sons, a piano concern, 
remaining in their service until 1900, when he embarked in the retail 
liquor business in Oakland at the corner of Seventh and Magnolia 
streets. In 1907 he sold that establishment, having in January, 1906, 
opened a wholesale and retail liquor store at the corner of Tenth and 
Clay streets, the conduct of which has claimed his attention to the 
present time. 

On the 17th of March, 1902, in Oakland, Mr. Quigley was united 
in marriage to a Miss Kispert. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party, while fraternally he is identified with the 
Knights of Pythias, the Native Sons, the Druids, the Loyal Order of 
Moose, the Eagles and the Masons, being a member of the local 
chapter of the last named organization. He is a popular and repre- 
sentative young citizen of Oakland and enjoys an extensive acquaint- 
ance in the city in which his entire life has been spent. 



LOUIS J. SILVERS. 



Louis J. Sievers is known in business circles of Oakland as local 
manager of the John Wieland Brewery of San Francisco. His birth 
occurred in Chicago, Illinois, on the i6th of March, 1861, his father 
being Louis Sievers. His mother bore the maiden name of Schafif- 
hausen. He began his education in a German-American school, later 
attended the public schools and subsequently pursued a two years' 
course in a business college. He then entered the University of Notre 
Dame but at the end of a year returned to Chicago and became a 
partner of his father, who was engaged in the wholesale liquor busi- 
ness, under the firm style of Louis Sievers & Son. In 1890 he severed 
this connection and went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he was 
engaged in the wholesale liquor business on his own account until 
1895. In that year he sold out and again returned to his native city, 
remaining with his father until 1896, when he went to St. Paul, 
Minnesota, acting as salesman for the Schlitz Brewing Company 
until 1900. Subsequently he spent three years as manager of the 
Minneapolis branch and on the expiration of that period removed 
to San Francisco as assistant manager of the Wunder Brewery. He 
was afterward employed as traveling salesman by the wholesale 
liquor iirm of Hotaling & Company for six months and at the end 



140 HISTORY Ol' ALAMEDA COUXTY 

of that time came to Oakland, being here engaged in the real-estate 
business until April 30, 191 1. On that date he became local manager 
for the John Wieland Brewery of San Francisco and has since held 
that important position, the business here having doubled under his 
able direction. Mr. Sievers likewise acts as president of the Oak- 
land Beer Bottlers Association and is a member of the Board of 
Trade. 

On the 16th of .March. 18S7, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Mr. 
Sievers was united in marriage to Miss \'on Ende, by whom he has a 
daughter, Agnes, who has decided talent as a vocalist and is studying 
for grand opera. In his political views he is a progressive republican. 
He is a strong man of excellent judgment, fair in his views and 
highlv honorable in all his relations with his fellowmen. 



F. BRICE MAIDEN. 



Numbered among the successful and enterprising young business 
men of Oakland is F. Bruce Maiden, now the general manager of 
the Laymance Real Estate Company. His birth occurred in Platts- 
mouth, Nebraska, on the 6th of May, 1887, his parents being George 
W. and Mary A. Maiden. Accompanying his parents on their 
removal to Fresno, California, he there pursued his education in a 
graded school and after his graduation, at the age of fourteen years, 
came to Oakland. Here he attended high school until graduated at 
the age of seventeen and while a student published a school paper 
called "Tom Cat." Subsequently he spent two years as expert 
accountant in the freight department of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Company and on tiie expiration of that period secured a posi- 
tion as clerk in the rent department of the Laymance Real Estate 
Company at a salary of fifty dollars per month. At the end of a vear 
in that capacity he became manager of the rent department and two 
and a half years later was made general manager of the entire com- 
pany, which position of importance and responsibility he holds at the 
present time. His promotions have come in recognition of unusual 
ability and faithful service. During his first year in the sales depart- 
ment he did business amounting to more than two million dollars 
and brought to a successful culmination the Kahn deal, making it 
possible for the Kahns to erect their present new building at the 
corner of IVelfth and Washington streets, which is considered the 
finest department store on the I'ac'fic coast todav. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 141 

On the qth of July, 191 2, in Oakland, Mr. Maiden was united in 
marriage to Miss Winte Perkins, by whom he has one child, Rowan 
Perkins, born July 22, 1913. He gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party and is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, 
having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and 
also belonging to the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise a member of the 
Commercial Club and the Athenian Club. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Maiden are popular in social circles and have many friends in 
Oakland. 



HARRY A. MOSHER. 



Among the strong financial institutions of Oakland is the Central 
National Bank, and among the bankers of prominence in the city is 
Harry A. Mosher, who as cashier and later as a vice president has 
done much toward securing for his institution the foremost position it 
now occupies. His banking experience extends over twenty years, and 
he has since August i, 1908, been connected with the institution of 
which he is now a vice president. A native of Alameda countv, 
Mr. M(^sher was born in Centerville, July 9, 1871, a son of H. E. 
and Sarah Jane (Warnick) Mosher, who settled in this county 
during its early history, in 1867, and now resides at Niles, California. 

Harry A. Mosher attended in the acquirement of his education 
the grammar schools at Centerville and Niles and the Oakland high 
school. However, ever since he was twelve years of age he has 
earned his own livelihood. He entered banking circles in 1893 ^^ 
clerk in the Farmers & Merchants Savings Bank, later becoming 
assistant cashier as his ability became recognized. For a number of 
years he was private secretary to Edson F. Adams but on August i, 
1908, came to the Central National Bank of Oakland as assistant 
cashier. On January i, 1909, he was elected cashier and in Januarv, 
1914, was elected a vice president and still holds this position. Care- 
ful, painstaking and systematic, Mr. Mosher is yet aggressive and 
progressive, and as he is a student of human nature and conditions, 
seldom, if ever, has made an error in extending credit or making 
investments. The institution of which he is a vice president has 
greatly prospered through his efforts, and he is readily conceded to 
be one of the most able and best informed men in his line of work 
in the city. Mr. Mosher is also president of the Fificld Steamship 
Company of San Francisco. 



U2 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COL'XTY 

Mr. Mosher married Miss Ethel Baechtel, a native of California, 
and they have one daughter, Esther A., and one son, Hugh Martin. 
He is a well known member of the Athenian Club of Oakland. 
While his duties largely confine him to his bank, Mr. Mosher is ever 
ready to join worthy public movements for the extension of trade or 
betterment of conditions. He has never been active along political 
lines, but fulfills the obligations of citizenship faithfully. He enjoys 
the esteem and respect of his colleagues and the general public, and 
by his personalitv has done much toward upholding the prestige 
which his bank cnjovs. 



T. L. CHRISTIAN SON. 

Although yet a young man, T. L. Christianson of Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, is considered one of the best trial lawyers on the Pacific coast 
and has made for himself a reputation along lines of medical juris- 
prudence and toxicology. He is deeply informed along these lines 
and often drawn into important cases for consultation. 

T. L. Christianson is a native son of Oakland, his day of birth 
being February i6, 1880. His parents are Captain H. O. and Karen 
(Thompson) Christianson, and he is of Norwegian descent. He 
spent his boyhood in Washington county, Oregon, and there in his 
early years received a limited education. At the age of seventeen he 
retraced his steps to Oakland, his sole asset, other than his character 
and ability, being an indifferent country-school training. In this city 
he attended for a short time public and night schools, acquiring a 
competent business training. Early in life he studied dentistrv to 
some extent, acted as clerk in a drug store and later was a student 
in the offices of various physicians. His ability was recognized when 
he was appointed an assistant to the surgeon-general under Governor 
Pardee. While he filled this position he also read law. Making 
removal to Indiana. Mr. Christianson attended the University of Val- 
paraiso, there passing his junior year in tlie law department. His 
senior work was done at the American Central Law School of 
Indianapolis, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of 
Laws degree, being one of the foremost in his class. He took the bar 
examination before even obtaining his diploma and was thereupon 
admitted to practice in the courts of Indiana. He has since been 
admitted to practice before the department of the interior united 
patent office. In Indianapolis he first began active work in connec- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 145 

tion with one of the foremost firms of the Hoosier state, Holtzman & 
Coleman, there gaining a wide practical knowledge. 

After about two years he returned to California in April, 1912, 
and was admitted to the courts of this state, opening an office in the 
Pantages building at Oakland. No long novitiate awaited him in 
this city, as he soon demonstrated his ability to successfully handle 
the most intricate cases and he is now accorded a most lucrative prac- 
tice. As Mr. Christianson specializes in medical jurisprudence and 
to.xicology his library along these lines is extensive. He is often 
called into consultation by his colleagues and is considered one of the 
foremost authorities in the state on these subjects. Mr. Christianson 
also acts as California representative for the firm of Bradford & 
Doolittle, patent attorneys, who have offices in Indianapolis and 
Washington, D. C. Mr. Christianson is particularly effective in 
criminal defense and in this field has made himself widely known. 
He has distinct oratorical ability, a convincing manner and a pleas- 
ing personality, and his services are ever in demand by those who 
are unfortunate enough to fall under suspicion. Quiet and 
determined, he cannot be moved by sarcasm or ridicule to precipitate 
action, always preserving his dignity and clear judgment. It is but 
natural, therefore, that he has great influence on court and jury and 
that he succeeds in winning most of his cases. A recent honor which 
has come to Mr. Christianson is his election to membership in the 
Medico-Legal Society of New York. 

Mr. Christianson married Miss Elizabeth L. Spencer on March 
28, 1907, and they have four children: Lawrence Spencer, Blaine 
Ingersoll. and twins, Elizabeth Avis and Lorraine Enid. 



GEORGE MAGGIO. 



George Maggio, an enterprising and prosperous representative 
of business interests in Alameda county, has since 1906 been manager 
of the Oakland branch of the Western California Fish Company. 
His birth occurred in San Francisco, California, in November, 1876, 
his parents being Fortutno and Eleanor Maggio. The father became 
a resident of San Francisco in 1852 and was there engaged in the 
fish supply business until the time of his retirement in 1904. 

George Maggio remained a public-school student until fifteen 
years of age and subsequently spent nine months in Heald's Business 
College. He then embarked in the fish business in San Francisco 



146 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

and conducted an independent enterprise of that character until 
1906, when he consolidated his interests with those of the Western 
California Fish Company, becoming manager of its Oakland branch. 
He has held that important position throughout the intervening seven 
years and has promoted the success of the local establishment in no 
uncertain degree. 

On the 30th of April, 1898, in San Francisco, Mr. Maggio was 
united in marriage to Miss Chlotilde Franchi, by whom he has three 
children: Eleanor, Alma and Maria. The two first named are 
public-school students. In politics Mr. Maggio is a republican, while 
his religious faith is that of the Catholic church. He belongs to 
Piedmont Parlor of the Native Sons and is likewise identified with 
the Loyal Order of Moose and the National Union. In all the rela- 
tions of life he has been honorable and straightforward, and his 
example is well worthy of emulation. 



FRANK A. PARISH. 



Frank A. Parish, general manager of Frank A. Parish & Com- 
pany, has been engaged in the real-estate business in Oakland since 
the fall of 1910. His birth occurred in Corvallis, Oregon, on the 
loth of May, 1873, his parents being James A. and Matilda E. 
Parish. In the acquirement of an education he remained a public- 
school student of The Dalles, Oregon, until 1894 and then went 
to Des Moines, Iowa, where he pursued a course in oratory, elocu- 
tion and dramatic art at Drake University. He afterward lectured 
throughout the state until 1901 and in that year removed to Lawton, 
Oklahoma, where he embarked in the real-estate business, handling 
town sites until 1905, when he disposed of his interests. His next 
place of residence was Long Beach, California, where he dealt in 
real-estate until the fall of 1910, when he came to Oakland. Here 
he has been engaged in the general real-estate business throughout 
the intervening three years, making a specialty of trading countrv 
properties for city realty. 

The following is an excerpt from a local publication : "It is the 
purpose and intent of this issue of our Home Industry Edition to 
call the attention of our friends, members and readers to those busi- 
ness houses who have shown a kindly interest in the principles we 
promulgate, and it is witli this end in view that we are pleased to 
give space to the well known lirm of Frank A. Parish & Company, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 147 

dealers in real-estate and making a specialty of exchanges, located at 
1544 Broadway. This firm enjoys the hearty good-will of the entire 
wage-earning population with which they have done business, and 
the fact that their business has continued to thrive under the vigorous 
business policy proves that the fair and reasonable consideration 
always given to their customers is appreciated. Of equal importance 
is the fact that this firm's standing in the community is such as to 
reflect great credit upon the city at large. They are among the lead- 
ing business men of this section and have never hesitated to give 
liberal support to all worthy projects that have had for their object 
the uplifting and betterment of the city's welfare. We urge our 
readers to do all in their power to further this firm's interest during 
the ensuing year." 

On the 26th of June, 1894, i"^ Heppner, Oregon, Mr. Parish was 
united in marriage to Miss Effie J. 'Warren, by whom he has a 
daughter, Irma, who is eighteen years of age and a high-school 
student. In politics he is independent, while fraternally he is identi- 
fied with the Masons and the Elks. He is also a valued member of 
the Oakland Real Estate Association. 



DAVID MORRIS. 



David Morris, division superintendent of the Peoples Water 
Company in Alameda and one of the well known, popular and repre- 
sentative business men of his community, was born in London, Eng- 
land, on the 26th of May, 1852. He acquired his education in the 
public schools of his native city and there remained until he was nine- 
teen years of age. Leaving England in 1871, he crossed the Atlantic 
to America and, pushing westward to California, located in San Fran- 
cisco, where he remained for a number of years, engaging first in 
various occupations and finally centering his attention upon civil 
engineering, with some branch of which he has been connected since 
that time. He has mastered the profession in principle and detail, 
and this knowledge, combined with the spirit of enterprise which 
actuates him in all that he does, has brought him an enviable degree 
of success and a high phice in business circles of the city where he 
makes his home. 

Mr. Morris came to Alameda in 1880 and here became connected 
with the Artesian Waterworks, rising through successive stages of 
progress and advancement from the position of collector and clerk 



148 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

to that of division superintendent, this final promotion coming in 
April, 1900, when the waterworks plant was taken over by the Contra 
Costa Water Company. Mr. Morris has since served in this respon- 
sible position, and he has proved himself eminently well qualified 
to fill it, being a discriminating, resourceful and enterprising busi- 
ness man and thoroughly well informed on questions relating to the 
work under his charge. 

Mr. Morris married Miss Mary B. Tibbery, a native of San 
Francisco, and they have one son, Jack E. The parents are well 
known in social circles of the city, their genuine personal worth hav- 
ing drawn to them many warm friends. During the thirty-three years 
that he has lived in Alameda Mr. Morris has taken an active and 
intelligent interest in public affairs, cooperating heartily in move- 
ments for the general good and lending the weight of his influence 
to progressive public measures. His business record is above 
reproach, and the long period of his residence here has been fruitful 
and of great good to the community, to the advancement and growth 
of which he has made such substantial contributions. 



PERRY F. BROWN. 



A man well known in Oakland for his public spirit, his broad 
views and his excellent business and professional ability is Perrv F. 
Brown, now acting in a capable and efiicient manner as city engineer 
and superintendent of streets. He was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, 
and acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of tliat 
city, later entering the State University, from which he was grad- 
uated as a civil engineer in 1897. Immediately afterward he engaged 
in professional practice at Janesville and he served as city engineer 
of that city, gaining thus his first experience in his profession as 
applied to municipal questions. Mr. Brown came to Oakland in 
1900. and here he spent one year with the Standard Electric Com- 
pany, in charge of the construction of the Bear River dam, com- 
pleted in 1901. in the following year he entered the employ of the 
city of Oakland in the city engineering department and when the new 
charter went into elfect in July, 191 1, was appointed superintendent 
of streets and city engineer, positions which he has since capablv 
filled. Mr. Brown takes a just pride in the fact that he has been 
identified with tiie inauguration of many movements making for 
public sanitation and beautification and tiiat he lias done much to 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 149 

advance the cause of good roads throughout the county. It has been 
his constant aim to see that all affairs coming before his departments 
are conducted along business lines and upon a fair and honorable 
basis, and in this way he has done a great deal to promote efficiency 
in the offices over which he has control. 

Mr. Brown married Miss Beulah Hodgdon, a native of Wis- 
consin, and they are the parents of a daughter, Marian. Mr. Brown 
has since 1908 been a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers and is widely known in engineering circles, on account 
of his professional ability and the excellent constructive work he has 
done along this line in the public service. 



GILBERT P. HALY 



Gilbert P. Haly embarked in the real-estate and insurance busi- 
ness at Oakland on attaining his majority and during the eight years 
which have since elapsed has won gratifying success in that field of 
endeavor. His birth occurred in London, England, in April, 1884, 
his parents being G. S. and E. M. Haly. In 1896 the family home 
was established in Oakland, California, the father embarking in busi- 
ness as a tea broker of San Francisco, where he is still active. 

In the acquirement of an education Gilbert P. Haly attended the 
graded and high schools until 1905 and when twenty-one vears of age 
became identified with the real-estate and insurance business, in which 
he has won success. He has thoroughly acquainted himself with 
realty values here and is qualified to give expert advice to clients. 

In August, 1907, at Oakland, Mr. Haly was united in marriage 
t(j Miss S. M. Fritsch, by whom he has two children, Ann and Phillip. 
He is a young man of excellent business ability and is popular in 
social circles by reason of his attractive personality. 



CORNELIUS J. TWOMEY. 

Cornelius J. Twomey, merchant tailor of Oakland, has been for 
more than tvyenty-five years a resident of that city and enjoys an 
extensive and gratifying patronage. His birth occurred in County 
Cork, Ireland, on the 21st of March, 1869, his parents being James 



150 HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COUNTY 

and Nora Twomey. He attended the public schools until fourteen 
years of age and then made his way to San Francisco, California, 
where he entered the dry goods establishment of J. J. O'Brien, being 
employed as clerk for two years. On the expiration of that period 
became to Oakland and here continued as buyer for James A. Joyce, 
a dry goods merchant, until igoi. At that time, having gained both 
the necessary capital and experience, he embarked in the men's tailor- 
ing business on his own account and has won an enviable reputation 
for high-class merchant tailoring. 

At Oakland, in 1896, Mr. Twomey was united in marriage to 
Miss Sadie Gallagher, by whom he has three children: Margaret, 
Earl James and Henrietta Marie. His fraternal relations are with 
the Knights of Columbus and other prominent orders. The period 
of his residence in Oakland covers almost three decades and he is 
widely recognized as one of the city's substantial, esteemed and repre- 
sentative residents. 



CHRISTOPHER RUESS. 

Christopher Ruess, of Oakland, was appointed probation officer 
of Alameda county in 1907 and his labors in this connection have 
since been of incalculable benefit in the work of moral uplift here. 
He was born in Sterling, Kansas, on the loth of December, 1878, 
his parents being William E. and Katharine Ruess. He acquired his 
early education in the public schools of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, and at the age of fourteen entered high 
school in Los Angeles, California, graduating when a youth of 
eighteen. Subsequently he matriculated in Harvard College, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, and completed a four years' course in 1900, 
while three years later he was graduated from the Divinity School 
of Harvard University, a non-sectarian institution. He then made 
his way to San Francisco and became head of Boys Work and editor 
of The Kingdom, a social service monthly, at the People's Place 
Social Settlement, 111 the meantime acting as superintendent of the 
Sunday School of the First Unitarian church under Rev. Bradford 
Leavitt until igo4. In that year he became minister of the First 
Unitarian church in Alameda, there remaining until 1906, and after- 
ward acted as a representative of the American Unitarian Associa- 
tion in the earthquake and fire relief work in San Francisco for one 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 151 

vear. At the end of that time he was appointed probation officer of 
Alameda county. 

When Mr. Ruess first undertook the duties of this responsible 
position he occupied half of a desk in the office of District Attorney 
Brown and the Detention Home comprised one small room in the 
Receiving Hospital of Alameda county. Mr. Ruess was the first full 
time probation officer in the county and his salary for the first two 
years was paid by private subscription, as it had been paid since 1903 
to his predecessors, who were Miss Anita Whitney, recently the presi- 
dent of the California Civic League, and Ezra Decoto, now prosecut- 
ing attorney for Oakland, under whom the work was successfully 
carried forward. Great credit is due for ten years of successful 
juvenile court and probation work in Alameda county to the Oakland 
Club and to the Child's Welfare League in particular, under the 
leadership of Miss Bessie J. Wood, Mrs. Elinor Carlisle and Dr. 
Susan J. Fenton, as well as to many other women's organizations in 
this county. Fifty such organizations sent in resolutions to the super- 
visors in 1908, when John Mitchell was president of the board, ask- 
ing for the present juvenile court building to be rented. Recently 
one hundred women's organizations have petitioned the present super- 
visors to appropriate money for land and a building. The super- 
visors have since purchased for twenty thousand dollars the entire 
block between Eighteenth and Nineteenth and between Poplar and 
Union streets, in Oakland. Mr. Ruess' policy has been to enlist the 
cooperation of men and women of ability and caliber by permitting 
and encouraging self-expression and initiative. During his incum- 
bency as probation officer the juvenile court has been under the direc- 
tion of Judges Harry A. Melvin, E. J. Brown, F. B. Ogden and 
William S. Wells, whose successive policies he has endeavored to 
carry out. 

The Detention Home is not under the direction of the probation 
officer but under that of the probation committee, whose members 
are as follows: J. B. Richardson, Herbert D. Clark, Mrs. A. S. 
Lavenson, J. D. McCarthy, R. A. Leet, Dr. Sarah L Shuey and 
Mrs. C. S. Chamberlain, secretary. These are unpaid and are 
appointed for four-year terms by the superior judges. 

Mr. Ruess' hobby may be said to be public service. He has been 
interested in many reforms in the county, especially those bearing 
on the juvenile court, adult probation, child labor, the larger use of 
public-school buildings and the enforcement of educational rights 
of children. He did a great deal of campaigning under the auspices 
of the Women's Christian Temperance Union for the red light injunc- 



152 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

tion and abatement act in towns within one hundred miles of Oak- 
land. Among the local reforms which have enlisted his active sup- 
port are those pertaining to the reduction of the number of saloons, 
the closing of the segregated vice district, the censorship of public 
amusements, the persistent advocacy of more and better playgrounds 
and the establishment of municipal club houses like the Young Men's 
Christian Association in every part of the city. He is a valued mem- 
ber of the Santa Fe Improvement Club, the Central California Social 
Workers Club and the Alameda County Social Workers Club. 

On the 2d of April, 1905, in Los Angeles, Mr. Ruess was united 
in marriage to Miss Stella Knight, her father being William H. 
Knight, a journalist who is connected with several Los Angeles 
papers. They now have two children, Waldo, aged five, and Everett, 
aged one. Mrs. Ruess is a former president of the Mothers Club 
of the Washington school, Oakland, and to her sympathy and interest 
in his work Mr. Ruess attributes his success in great measure. 



ADELBERT WILSON. 



From 1870 until 191 2 Adelbert Wilson was connected with the 
police force of Oakland, with but two years' interruption, and from 
December 20, 1905, he served as chief of police. Under him the 
department developed and increased in efficiency and lawlessness in 
the city of Oakland was kept down at the lowest possible level. 
There is great credit due Mr. Wilson for what he achieved in his 
official position and many were those who voiced regret when he. 
retired on account of ill health on a pension on October i, 191 2, 
although all recognized that this faithful and untiring official was 
entitled to a rest. 

Mr. Wilson was born in Camden, Maine, January 8, 1844, and 
there received a serviceable public-school education, remaining in 
his native town until nineteen years of age. Being possessed of 
ambition and desirous to see the world, he decided to seek his for- 
tune in the west, and in 1863 arrived in San Francisco, California. 
His first position was with Boswell & Geddes, who were located at 
Front and Commercial streets. He was willing to work and turned 
his attention to anything that would yield him a living. After he 
relinquished his first position he turned his attention to the black- 
smith business, and subsequentlv, with his brother Edmund, engaged 
in the express business, and later owned the San Francisco news- 




ADKLI'.IMIT WILSOX 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 155 

paper routes of the News and Transcript of Oakland. On May 30, 
1870, Mr. Wilson was appointed special officer in the police depart- 
ment in Oakland, and served in that position for four years and four 
months, receiving, on October 5, 1874, his appointment to the reg- 
ular force. On October 15, 1877, he was made sergeant, but shortly 
thereafter, during the political excitement known as the "Kearney 
Workingmen's Movement," Sergeant Wilson and eighteen other 
officers were discharged. He was reinstated, only to be again 
dropped from the force and again taken on many times, according 
to what political leaders were in power. For example, on January 
17, 1881, he was reappointed, and removed again on June 6th. He 
was not reappointed after his removal on June 6th until August 20, 
1883, and from this time was continuously connected with the police 
force. On May 7, 1889, he was made captain, and for over sixteen 
years held that important position, being on December 20, 1905, 
appointed chief of police. Although different political administra- 
tions came and went, Mr. Wilson was retained as chief, which title 
was changed to that of superintendent of police, but under the new 
charter was again changed to chief. There is great credit due him 
for what he has achieved, for he rose from the ranks and by the 
faithful and fearless performance of duty and because of his natural 
ability became the head of the department. 

Chief Wilson held office when the great fire in San Francisco 
occurred, and largely to him fell the handling of the immense 
crowds of homeless people who made their way to Oakland, accom- 
panied by the usual lawless element. The magnitude of this task 
can be better appreciated when it is known that over two hundred 
thousand arrived in Oakland within three davs. By promptly insti- 
tuting strict rules Chief Wilson remained master of the situation, 
although he only had his regular force of seventy-one policemen. 
At the recent celebration in honor of the entrance of the Western 
Pacific Railroad into Oakland he again distinguished himself by 
handling an immense throng of one hundred thousand visitors, tak- 
ing precautionary measures in advance of the occasion which made 
the affair pass off without a hitch, and not a single accident was 
reported. This excellent result was largely due to his personal dili- 
gence and inspection. Chief Wilson moved with the police depart- 
ment into Oakland's first city hall on August 9, 1870, one prisoner 
being removed at the time. The city jail was formerly where the 
courthouse now stands and the police court and police office were 
located on the southwest corner of Eighth street and Broadway. 
After forty years of most efficient service Mr. Wilson retired on a 



156 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

pension on October i, 19 12, and the good wishes of thousands accom- 
panied him into a life of leisure, to which he is perhaps more entitled 
than any one man now living in the city. 

On December 19, 1872, Chief Wilson married Miss Mary E. 
Poole, of Whitman (then Abington), Massachusetts, the ceremony 
being performed by Rev. Hamilton and taking place in Oakland. 
Of their three children all are dead. Florence married Wilbur 
Walker, Jr., and passed away October 18, 1913, leaving a daughter, 
Adele. Fraternally Mr. Wilson is a thirty-second degree Mason 
and a Shriner, and since February 12, 1872, has been a member of 
Oakland Lodge, No. 118, I. O. O. F. Both he and his wife belong 
to the Order of the Eastern Star. His home is on Twenty-fifth 
street and was built by him many years ago, as he has resided there 
for twenty-eight years. On May 30, 1907, he was presented with a 
valuable diamond set gold shield by the members of the Oakland 
police force as a token of their esteem and friendship, the mayor of 
the city making a suitable speech at the time. Mr. Wilson has had 
few outside interests except those already mentioned, police effi- 
ciency being always foremost in his mind and his duties being the 
all important thing which continually occupied him. Courteous, 
afifable and approachable, he is ever ready to do a kindness to those 
who need his services, and is esteemed for his unfaltering veracity, 
the purity of his motives and the sincerity of his opinions. As an 
official he has reflected honor upon the citv of Oakland and is a 
credit to the department of which he was so long the head. 



ALBERT C. BARKER. 



Albert C. Barker, present city superintendent of the Oakland 
schools, was born in Canton, Maine. He attended the public schools 
of Turner, Maine, and the Maine Wesleyan Seminary. He served 
as principal of the schools of Mays Landing, New Jersey, for three 
years, and of Austin, Nevada, for the same length of time. 

Mr. Barker then came to California, where he continued his edu- 
cation at Stanford University and the University of California. After 
leaving college he became principal of the high school and superin- 
tendent of schools in Salinas, from which position he resigned to 
accept a similar one in Eureka. Seven years later he came to Oak- 
land and became principal of the Bay and of the Prescott schools. 
He was then elected city superintendent of Santa Rosa, but resigned 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 157 

this position to become assistant superintendent of schools in Oakland. 
In 191 2 he became business manager of the Oakland schools, and on 
the resignation of Superintendent McClymonds became his suc- 
cessor. 

In June, 1900, he was married to Miss Nettie E. Hindry. They 
have two sons, Richard and Horace Albert, who are eleven and six 
years old respectively. Superintendent Barker is a member of the 
Oakland Commercial Club and of several fraternal and local civic 
organizations. 



HENRY B. ORWIG. 



Henry B. Orwig is widely known as the president and general 
manager of the North American Hospital Association at No. 577 
Fourteenth street in Oakland. His birth occurred in Bangor, Michi- 
gan, in August, 1864, his parents being Henry G. and Mary A. 
(Gardiner) Orwig. In the acquirement of an education he attended 
the graded and high schools of Garnett, Kansas, until 1884 and then 
went to Chicago, where for one year he was employed as clerk by 
I. O. Harsh, a member of the Board of Trade. Returning to Gar- 
nett, Kansas, he there worked on his father's stock farm until twenty- 
two years of age and subsequently made his way to Clatskanie, 
Oregon, where he was engaged in the butchering business in associa- 
tion with his brother for two years. On the expiration of that period 
he sold out and again returned to Kansas, working on his father's 
farm for two years. He next went to Girard, Kansas, and there con- 
ducted a mercantile establishment until 1898, when he sold out and 
organized Company D of the Twentieth Kansas United States Volun- 
teers, acting as its captain until his regiment was mustered out in 
July, 1899. In that month he was promoted major of the Thirty- 
seventh United States Volunteers and thus served until the regiment 
was discharged in June, 1901, when he accepted a commission as 
major of native troops around Manila. 

In 1908 Mr. Orwig resigned and came to Oakland, California, 
here acting as a salesman with the M. T. Minney Real Estate Com- 
pany for one year. Subsequently he spent a year as manager of the 
Pacific Coast Hospital Association and then consolidated a number 
of hospital associations under the name of the North American Hos- 
pital Association, of which he was elected president and general 
manager. The purpose of the organization is to afford surgical, 



158 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 



medical and hospital service to men, women and children at a nominal 
cost of one dollar per month. Mr. Orwig is well qualified for his 
important duties as head of this splendid organization— an institu- 
tion of great-value and inestimable benefit to the general public. 

On the 24th of December, 1889, in Garnett, Kansas, Mr. Orwig 
was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Rupp, by whom he has three 
children, namely: Raymond L., who acts as agent for the North 
American Hospital Association; Ethel, at home with her parents; 
and Robert, a resident of Stockton, California. In politics Mr. 
Orwig is a progressive republican and at all times a loyal and public- 
spirited citizen. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and enjoys 
an extensive acquaintance in Oakland and Alameda county. 



BROWN G. ENSIGN. 



Brown G. Ensign assisted in the organization and has since acted 
as treasurer of the United Home Builders, a prosperous con- 
cern of Oakland. His birth occurred in Effingham, Illinois, on the 
6th of June, 1879, his parents being J. H. and Hattie J. Ensign. In 
the acquirement of an education he attended the graded and high 
schools until eighteen years of age and then went to St. Louis, 
Missouri, where he was employed as a stenographer by the 
Mississippi Valley Trust Company until 1903. In that year he 
returned to Effingham, Illinois, and there served as assistant cashier 
for the First National Bank until 1907, when he resigned and 
removed to Neola, Iowa, acting as president of the State Bank of 
Neola for five years or until 19 12. He then made his way to Cali- 
fornia and after spending five months in Sacramento came to Oak- 
land, here assisting in the organization of the United Home Builders, 
of which he has served as treasurer to the present time. In that 
capacity he has contributed in no small degree to the continued 
growth and success of this Oakland concern, which has gained both 
prestige and prosperity. 

At Williamsport, Pennsylvania, on the 7th of June, 190;. Mr. 
Ensign was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Donaldson, by wliom 
he has two children: Donaldson, a public-school student; and 
Brown (i. Ensign, jr. 

Mr. Ensign is a republican in politics and a Protestant in religious 
faith. He belongs to the Athenian Club and the Oakland Commer- 
cial Club and is identified fraternally witii tlie Benevolent Protective 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 159 

Order of Elks. He is a man of exemplary habits, strict integrity and 
strong personality and is well known in Oakland, holding the high 
esteem of all who have business and social relations with him. 



THOMAS M. ROBINSON. 

Thomas M. Robinson, a highly respected and representative citi- 
zen of Oakland, ably discharges the duties devolving upon him in 
the capacity of assistant assessor of Alameda county, having been 
appointed to that position in 1880 and having held the same con- 
tinuously since with the exception of four years. His birth occurred 
near Jacksonville, Jackson county, Oregon, on the 28th of February, 
iBqS, his father being one of the pioneer settlers in both California 
and Oregon coming to the former state in 1849. The latter enjoyed 
a reputation as an able physician and surgeon and was also recog- 
nized as one of the stanch upbuilders of the new and growing western 
commonwealths. 

Thomas M. Robinson acquired his early education in the common 
schools of his native state and when ten years of age accompanied 
his parents on their removal to California, here continuing his studies 
as a high-school student. After putting aside his text-books he 
secured a position in a furniture store and continued to devote his 
attention to that line of business until 1880, when he was appointed 
assistant assessor of Alameda county. A third of a century has since 
passed and, with the exception of four years spent as clerk of superior 
court No. 2, Hon. F. W. Henshaw, judge, he has held the office 
throughout that entire period. Such a record speaks for itself most 
convincingly and requires no eulogistic comment. 

On the 27th of July, 1887, Mr. Robinson was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Mary J. Havens, who was born in Crown Point, Essex 
county. New York, and came to California with her parents in 1868. 
Five children have been born of this marriage. Mr. Robinson is 
identified with numerous fraternal organizations, belonging to 
Sequoia Lodge, F. & A. M., of Oakland; Oakland Consistory, No. 2, 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of F. M.; S. J. R. S. A.; Live Oak 
Lodge, No. 17, K. P.; Oakland Tent, K. O. T. M. ; and Oakland 
Lodge, T. O. F. He is likewise a member of Oakland Camp of 
the Woodmen of the World, in which organization he has passed 
all of the chairs, having been clerk for the past twenty-three years, 
and has also been head manager of the Pacific Jurisdiction of the 



160 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Woodmen of the World for eight years. On account of his father's 
service in the Civil war he is eligible to membership in the Sons of 
Veterans, and his name may be found on the roster of E. D. Baker 
Camp, No. 5, of which he is past commander. He is also past chan- 
cellor of his lodge in the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Robinson is one of 
the well known and highly esteemed citizens of Oakland and his sub- 
stantial qualities of manhood and of character have gained for him 
an enviable position in the regard of all with whom he has come in 
contact. 



JOHN J. HOGARTY, D. V. S. 

Dr. John J. Hogarty, who was admitted to practice as a veterinai \ 
surgeon more than a quarter of a century ago, has spent his entire 
life in Oakland and for the past eleven years has followed his pm 
fession in association with Dr. Archibald, an eminent veterinarian 
and bacteriologist. His birth occurred in Oakland on the 6th ot 
October, 1867, his parents being Dr. J. B. and Josephine Hogarty. 
The father, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, acquired his education in 
the public schools of that city and subsequently removed to Daven 
port, Iowa, where for five years he studied veterinary surgery under 
the preceptorship of Dr. P. J. McDonald, a graduate of the Royal 
College of Veterinary of England. He then located for practice in 
Oakland, California, and here remained an active representative ot 
his profession until 1887, when he retired. His demise occurred in 
1907. 

John J. Hogarty attended the graded and high schools in the 
acquirement of an education and subsequently worked in the butchei 
shop of his uncle for a time. He then studied veterinary surger\ 
under the direction of his father and was examined by the state boanl 
and admitted to practice. In 1897 he entered the San Francisco 
Veterinary College, being graduated from that institution three yeai> 
later. He has always been accorded an extensive practice and during 
the past eleven years has followed the profession in association with 
Dr. Archibald. His prominence in the field of his chosen life work 
is indicated by the fact that he is now serving as president of the 
California State Veterinary Association. 

In March, 1889, at Oakland, Dr. Hogarty was joined in wedlock 
to Miss Mary Senner, by whom he has two children: Ethel B., a 
high-school graduate; and Edward J., who is attending the public 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 161 

schools. Fraternally the Doctor is identified with the Elks and the 
United Workmen. In matters of citizenship his influence and sup- 
port are given on the side of advancement and progress and he holds 
to high standards in man's personal relations with his fellowmen. 



BENJAMIN A. GLOVER. 

Benjamin A. Glover, residing in Oakland, has served as manager 
of the Berkeley branch of the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Com- 
pany since 1910. He was born in Flint, Michigan, on the nth of 
August, 1876, and attended the graded and high schools until grad- 
uated at the age of nineteen years. Subsequently he pursued a two 
years' course of study in a commercial college at Bay City, Michigan, 
and was afterward employed as billing clerk and baggageman by the 
Grand Trunk Railroad for three years. Later he was engaged with 
various railroads in different capacities until the time of his removal 
to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he entered the service of the Inde- 
pendent Telephone Company. Mr. Glover was next identified there 
with the Bell Telephone Company in the contract department until 
1907 and in that vear was transferred to Oakland, the company being 
here known as the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company. He 
held the position of district contract agent until 1910 and was then 
transferred to Berkeley as manager of the branch at that place, in 
which connection he has proven a valued and efficient representative 
of the corporation. 

On the istof September, 1906, in St. Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Glover 
was joined in wedlock to Miss Marie Colby. He belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce and is also connected with the Michigan 
Society and the Masonic fraternity. A cordial, genial manner wins 
his friends wherever he goes, and he well merits the esteem which is 
accorded him. 



EZRA S. FOWLER. 



Ezra S. Fowler is a representative of realty interests in Oakland, 
where he has carried on a business of that character with excellent 
success since 1909. His birth occurred in New Brunswick, Canada, 
on the 22d of January, 1857, 'i'* parents being Weslcv and Mary 



162 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Fowler. He acquired his education in a private school and in 1872 
removed to Rice county, Minnesota, where he acted as manager of 
a large land holding until 1876. In that year he came to California 
and was made manager of the San Francisco plumbing establishment 
of J. J. Vasconcellos, ably serving in that capacity until 1882. He 
then came to Oakland and here was made the first secretary of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, holding the office until 1886, 
when he resigned and went to Lake county, California. There he 
carried on agricultural pursuits for eight years and subsequently 
traveled for a St. Louis hardware concern until 1903. Mr. Fowler 
then returned to Oakland and during the following six years was 
engaged in the metal business in San Francisco. In 1909 he sold out 
and embarked in the real-estate business in Oakland, in which he has 
continued to the present time, enjoying an extensive and gratifying 
clientage. He is thoroughly informed concerning realty values and 
is recognized as one whose judgment is sound in relation to the pos- 
sible rise or diminution in the same. 

On the ist of July, 1884, in San Francisco. Mr. Fowler was united 
in marriage to Miss Jennie E. Mahan, by whom he has two children, 
Eugene S. and Walter M., the former being now a public-school 
student. Mr. Fowler is an enthusiastic supporter of the progressive 
party, believing in the efficacy of the principles and policy expounded 
by Theodore Roosevelt. His fraternal relations are with the Masons, 
of the teachings of which organization he is a worthv exemplar. 



WILLIAM C. DOHRMAXN. 

\^'illiam C. Dohrmann, engaged in the general real-estate busi- 
ness in Oakland, with offices at 706-7 First National Bank building, 
is the general agent of the East Shore Park l^ract at Stege. His 
parents were H. G. F. and Mary E. Dohrmann, and his paternal 
grandfather was one of the pioneers in California, coming to Ala- 
meda county in 1849. He acquired land which is now the business 
center of Oakland and sold for nine hundred dollars what is now the 
corner of Ninth and Broadway. It was at that time covered with 
oak trees, 'i'hc motiicr of the subject of this review died in San 
Francisco wiicn he was but two years of age, but the father, who 
reached the ripe old age of eighty in June, 1914, survives and is 
living retireil. There were five children in their family. Wil- 
liam C. Dohrmann acquired his education by attendance at the 




WII.I.IAM ( . IMUIKMAXX 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 165 

public schools until fourteen years of age, and subsequently entered 
the employ of Lebenbaum Brothers, grocers of San Francisco, driv- 
ing a team for two years. On the expiration of that period he went 
to Pinole, Contra Costa county, California, and there worked for one 
year as a box maker with the California Powder Company. He next 
spent three months in San Francisco taking care of a soda fountain 
for N. M. Benjamin & Company and afterward worked for three 
years in the service of the Underwriters Fire Patrol in the capacity 
of patrolman under Captain J. F. O. Comstock. Returning to Pinole, 
he there remained in the employ of the California Powder Company 
until 1898 and then went back to San Francisco, engaging with the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company as storekeeper on one of their ves- 
sels, while subsequently he acted as assistant purser for eight years. 
At the end of that time he resigned and removed to Richmond, 
Contra Costa county, where he was employed by the Standard Oil 
Company as timekeeper for two months and later as paymaster for 
three months. Afterward he again returned to San Francisco and 
had charge of the vessels of the Barneson-Hibbard Navigation Com- 
pany for two years. 

He then resigned and came to Oakland, here embarking in the 
real-estate business, which he has since carried on with gratifying 
success. He acts as manager of the East Shore Park Tract in Stege, 
which comprises thirty acres and was formerly owned by his grand- 
father, Richard Stege, and was khown as the Stege ranch. Lots sell 
for two hundred and fifty dollars and upwards. Sixty steam trains 
a day, forty on the Southern Pacific and twenty on the Santa Fe, pass 
through Stege, affording splendid service. There are also one hun- 
dred and eighty-five electric cars which reach Pullman through 
Stege's East Shore Park Tract. The depot is but fifty minutes' ride 
from San Francisco, fortv-hvc minutes from Broadway and three 
minutes to Pullman, where the Pullman Company is erecting an 
extensive plant at a cost of two million dollars, and employ one thou- 
sand men. Stege is a well settled community, promising the best 
of social life and community interests. There are factories there, 
fine schools, one of them the grammar school and another the fine 
Union high school, the latter costing eighty-five thousand dollars. 
It is close to the water front, and its pier reaches deep water and 
serves the factories already established. Stege is in Contra Costa 
county, which means "over against the coast,'' and is a pleasant land 
of hill and dale bordering on the western shore of the great northern 
arm of the bay of San Francisco and the southern bank of the great 
Sacramento river. The climate of Stege is exceptional, a minglnig 



166 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

of that belonging to the sea and that of the land. Mr. Dohrmann 
is successfully handling property there and is widely recognized as 
one of the representative and leading real-estate men of Oakland. 

He belongs to the Oakland Real Estate Association and is like- 
wise a member of the Chamber of Commerce. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Masons, being connected with the organization 
as a member of California Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of San Francisco. 
He also belongs to the Sequoia Club in Richmond, and the Oakland 
Commercial Club. 



PETER N. SCH^^DT. 

Peter N. Schmidt has been actively and successfully identified 
with business interests of Alameda as a contractor and builder since 
1907, and he is today one of the leading business men of the city. 
He was born in Scherrebek, Germany, August 26. 1876. a son of 
Carsten Schmidt, also a native of Germany, a jeweler and watch- 
maker by trade, occupations which he followed until his death in 
1900. He was a veteran of the Franco-Prussian war, in which he 
served with honor and distinction, receiving the iron cross as a 
reward for bravery in action. He was a soldier also in the Danish- 
Prussian war of 1864 and after the close of that conflict was deco- 
rated with a bronze medal in recognition of his courage. His wife, 
who was in her maidenhood Miss Anna Hansen, was born in Ton- 
dern, Germany, and died in 1904. 

Peter N. Schmidt acquired his education in the public and Iiigh 
schools of his native city. He was graduated in 1891 and imme- 
diately afterward began serving his apprenticeship at the carpenter's 
trade, completing his term in four years. Afterward he traveled 
through Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria for about two 
years and then extended his journey across the Atlantic to America. 
He settled in California on the ist of May, 1901, and for a time 
worked at his trade in Oakland, going to San Rafael in the latter 
part of the same year. At the end of two years he returned to 
Oakland and there remained until 1906. Tn the following vear he 
moved to Alameda and here established Iiimself as a general con- 
tractor and builder, an occupation to wiiich lie has devoted his 
attention since that time w^ith gratifying results. Manv of tlie most 
attractive buildings in this section of the countv testifv to liis ability 
and skill, and among these may be mentioned tlie Young Men's 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 167 

Christian Association building in Oakland and the First Presbyte- 
rian church in the same city, both structures being artistic in design 
as well as adequate and convenient in arrangement. He has built 
also some of the best residences in Piedmont, Oakland and Alameda, 
and his business is constantly increasing as his ability and excellent 
qualifications become more widely known. 

Mr. Schmidt married Miss Edna B. Waters, a daughter of Helon 
and Sara Waters of Nantucket. Mr. Schmidt is not active in politics, 
but is nevertheless a loyal and public-spirited citizen. His salient 
characteristics are such as have gained for him the friendly regard 
and good-will of all with whom he has been associated through either 
business or social relations, and he is well entitled to a foremost place 
among the representative and respected citizens of Alameda. 



FERDINAND MANTE. 

The German element is an important one in the citizenship of 
Oakland and finds a representative in Ferdinand Mante, who was 
born in Stettin, Germany, December i8, 1857, his parents being 
Ferdinand and Wilhelmina Mante. In accordance with the educa- 
tional laws of the country, he attended the public schools till he 
reached the age of fourteen years and then began working for his 
father, who was engaged in the draying business and also in the sale 
of potatoes. The son spent his time in that way until he reached 
the age of twenty, after which he served for three years in the 
German army. On the expiration of that period he returned home 
and after visiting family and friends in the fatherland sailed for' 
the United States, settling in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 4th 
of May, 1882. He was employed as an apprentice in a furniture and 
hardware store until 1888, when he sought the opportunities fur- 
nished by the great and growing west and made his way to Sacra- 
mento, California. There he entered the employ of the bottling 
firm of Postel & Sneer, by whom he was employed as a bottler for a 
short time. He afterward worked for various other bottling firms 
until 1 891, when he engaged with the Bufifalo Brewing Company, 
being placed in charge of the bottling department. That he was 
capable and reliable is indicated in the fact that he remained in 
that position for six years. He subsequently entered into partner- 
ship with George Kirchner under the firm style of Kirchner & 
Mante, beer bottlers, representing tiie Seattle Brewing & Malting 



168 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

Company. Thev have built up a business of large proportions and 
enjoy substantial success. 

Mr. Mante was married in Milwaukee to Miss Minna Ness on 
the 7th of May, 1882, and they have one daughter, now Mrs. Helen 
Gray, of Los Angeles. Mr. Mante belongs to the Eintracht and 
to the Oakland Turn Verein. He also holds membership with the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles. He has based his success upon persist- 
ent purpose and unfaltering energy, and those qualities have placed 
him in the substantial financial position which he now occupies. 



H. & H.-PATENT DEVELOPING COAH^ANY. 

H. &; H. -Patent Developing Company was incorporated Decem- 
ber \2, 1912, under the laws of the state of California. The busi- 
ness of the company is to develop patents, inventions patented, per- 
fected, bought and sold. Sales office at 30 North LaSalle street, 
Chicago, Illinois, executive offices and factory at 386-388 Tenth 
street. Oakland, California. 



KEYES & MARTIN. 

Among the law firms of Berkeley that of Keyes & Martin takes a 
foremost place. They are located in the Berkeley National Bank 
building and there have for a number of years conducted a suc- 
cessful practice. 

E. E. Keyes, the senior member of the firm, is a native of Kansas 
and when eleven years of age moved with his parents and their 
family to San Diego, California. He was educated in the public 
schools there and in 1897 graduated from the Los Angeles State 
Normal School. He subsequently entered the University of Cali- 
fornia, from which he graduated in 1902. He took post-graduate 
courses in law until 1904, which further prepared him for his pro- 
fession, although he was admitted to the bar in 1903. In 1905 he 
formed a law partnership with Mr. Waite and Mr. Martin under the 
firm name of Waite, Keyes & Martin. Upon the death of Mr. Waite 
in 1907 the firm assumed its present style of Keves & Martin. 

Mr. Keyes was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Gaines, a 
native of California, and they have two children, Kenneth and Enid. 
Mr. Keyes is popular in Berkeley Lodge, No. 1002, B. P. O. E. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 169 

L. E. Martin, the junior member of the firm, was born in Ver- 
mont and when two years of age was brought to California by his 
parents, the family settling in Orange county. In the acquirement 
of his education he attended Berkeley high school and in 1902 grad- 
uated from the University of California, having satisfactorily com- 
pleted his undergraduate work. He then taught in Alameda high 
school and took his bar examination. He then took another course 
of one year in the University of California, beginning practice in 
1904 and in 1905 becoming a partner of Mr. Keyes. He was a class- 
mate in college of his present partner. 

Keyes & Martin are well known in Berkeley as attorneys for the 
Equitable Building & Loan Association of this city. Both are able 
exponents of the law, well grounded in its principles and well 
informed on precedents. They enjoy therefore a large and repre- 
sentative clientage and have gained a place of distinction among the 
practicing lawyers of the city. Both are public-spirited and aggres- 
sive, ever interested in the progress of the city, and readily indorse 
public measures undertaken for the general welfare. 



WILLIAM B. BUNKER. 

William B. Bunker, a leading and successful attorney of Oakland, 
is a member of the law firm of Peck, Bunker & Cole, maintaining 
offices in both San Francisco and Oakland. His birth occurred in 
Rush county, Indiana, in 1863, and there he was reared to manhood. 
He supplemented his early education by a course of studv in Purdue 
University and subsequently took up the study of law at ^^'a^saw, 
Indiana, being admitted to the bar of that state in 1886. The same 
year he made his wav to Las Vegas, New Mexico, and there began 
the practice of law, for a number of years enjoying an extensive 
clientage as a member of the firm of Bunker & Lucas. He was like- 
wise local attorney for the Santa Fe Railroad. In public afifairs he 
became a leading and influential factor, acting as chairman of the 
democratic central committee of New Mexico, being elected state 
senator and also serving as president of the bureau of investigation, 
clerk of the United States court and as a member of the citv council 
of Las Vegas. In these various connections he made a highlv 
creditable record, winning the approbation of his constituents in 
unc]ualified degree. 



170 HISTORY OV .\L.\-MI-:i)A COUNTY 

In igio Mr. Bunker came to California and in March of the 
following year became a member of the law firm of Peck, Bunker & 
Cole, which was organized at that time and has since maintained 
offices in both San Francisco and Oakland. Their practice is exten- 
sive and of an important character. Mr. Bunker is remarkable 
among lawyers for the wide research and provident care with which 
he prepares his cases. At no time has his reading ever been confined 
to the limitation of the questions at issue. It has gone beyond and 
compassed every contingency and provided not alone for the expected 
but for the unexpected, which happens in the courts quite as fre- 
quently as out of them. 

In August, 1890, Mr. Bunker was united in marriage to Miss 
Lydia |. Peck, of Merced. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Masons and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, having been 
exalted ruler of the latter in Las Vegas. What he has accomplished 
represents the fit utilization of the innate talents which are his and the 
directing of his efiforts along lines where mature judgment is leading 
the wav. 



LELAND SPENCER. 



Leland Spencer, a prosperous and respected citizen of Oakland, 
is actively engaged in the real-estate business as a member of the 
firm of George McComb & Company, in which he owns a halt 
interest. His birth occurred in Raleigh, West Virginia, on the 23d 
of March, 1868, his parents being James H. and Polly Spencer. In 
the acquirement of an education he studied in the public schools 
of Fayette county. West Virginia, until sixteen years of age and sub- 
sequently attended a high school and business college in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, graduating when eighteen years of age. He afterward em- 
barked in the real-estate brokerage business and when nineteen years 
of age went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he was also engaged 
in the real-estate business and acted as right-of-way agent for a laro-e 
transcontinental railroad during the next six years. 

At the age of twenty-five Mr. Spencer went to Seattle, Wash- 
ington, and associated himself with one of the leading real-estate 
firms of the city, though still retaining his business in Minneapolis. 
In 1898 he disposed of his interests and thereafter lived retired in 
California, except for the mining interests he retained in Alaska, 
until August, 1913, when he formed tlie real-estate firm of George 



HISTORY OF ALA-MEDA COUNTY 171 

McComb & Company, in which he owns a half interest. They handle 
citv and country properties and also subdivisions and are accorded 
a gratifying clientage. Mr. Spencer lost heavily in the San Fran- 
cisco fire of 1906 and for that reason again embarked in the business 
which had formerly brought him a fortune. He is determined to 
recoup his losses, and in his present undertakings is meeting with a 
measure of success which promises the speedy fulfillment of his 
hopes. 

In July, 1907, in San Francisco, Mr. Spencer was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Osburne, a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Osburne, of 
Los Angeles. They have one child, Leland, who is five years of age. 



JACOB V. SM EATON. 

Jacob V. Smeaton is an active and enterprising representative of 
business interests in Oakland as general manager of the C. A. Smith 
Lumber Company, which important position he has held since 191 1. 
His birth occurred in Montgomery county. New York, on the 20th 
of December, 1868, his parents being James and Elizabeth Smeaton. 
He attended the graded and high schools in the acquirement of an 
education and following his graduation, in 1886, secured a position 
as bookkeeper with the John E. Sutphen Lumber Company, being 
thus employed until 1888. In that year he went to Rochester, New 
York, where he acted as bookkeeper for the Hollister Lumber Com- 
pany until 1890 and was then transferred to their branch in North 
Tonawanda, New York, there serving as bookkeeper until 1893. 
Mr. Smeaton was in that year made manager and held the position 
until 1901, when he resigned and went to Ashland, Wisconsin, there 
establishing the Spider Lake Sawmill & Lumber Company, of which 
he acted as treasurer and manager until disposing of his interests 
in 1909. He then went to Marshfield, Oregon, and there had charge 
of a mill for the C. A. Smith Lumber Company until 1911, when 
he was transferred to Oakland, California, as general manager of 
the concern, and in that connection his efforts have since constituted 
no small factor in its continued growth and success. 

In Passaic, New Jersey, on the 24th of January, 1893, Mr. Smea- 
ton was united in marriage to Miss Jennie F. Birch, by whom he has 
two children: James D., a youth of sixteen, who is attending high 
school; and Samuel Edgar, who is eleven years old and a public- 
school student. 



172 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

In his political views Mr. Smeaton is a republican, exercising 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of that 
party. In Masonry he is identified with both the York and Scottish 
Rites and also with the Mystic Shrine. He is a past commander of 
Ashland Commandery of Ashland, Wisconsin, and a popular mem- 
ber of the Athenian Club and the Commercial Club of San Fran- 
cisco. Mr. Smeaton is widely and favorably known for his straight- 
forward and honorable methods both in business and social relations 
and is numbered among the successful and representative citizens 
of Oakland, being highly esteemed for his sterling worth and as a 
promoter of all that tends to advance the general welfare. 



EDWIN J. BOYES, M. D. 

Dr. Edwin J. Boyes, who since 1893 has been engaged in the 
general practice of medicine in Oakland^ was born in Toronto, Can- 
ada, April 30, 1864. He acquired his early education in the Model 
School in that city and later attended Normal School, after which 
he engaged in teaching in Toronto. Later he took a course in 
natural science at the Association of Civil Engineers and joined the 
engineer corps in the Northwest Territory. He was stationed in 
the wilderness, in the Hudson bay section, and assisted in preparing 
the first map of the northwest country. Having determined to study 
medicine. Dr. Boyes entered Trinitv L'niversity, from which he was 
graduated in 1890. He also holds degrees from the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons in Ontario and Victoria University. He 
came west in 1890 and settled on the old Comstock at Virginia City, 
Nevada, where he remained until 1893. He gained wide reputation 
for skill and had during these years the largest practice of anyone 
in the state, and although locating here over twentv vears ago. some 
of his Nevada patients still come to him for his services. In the 
last named year he moved to Oakland, California, and here has since 
resided, being numbered today among the leading representatives 
of the medical fraternity in the city. He is senior consulting physi- 
cian of the Merritt Hospital and has been since its establishment. 
He also has a large and lucrative private practice, accorded him in 
recognition of his superior skill and ability. He is a member of the 
national, state and county medical societies and in this wav keeps 
in touch with the most advanced medical thought of his profession. 
His personal characteristics have gained him the warm regard and 




nVIX J. BOYKS 



FIISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 175 

friendship of many, while in professional lines he has attained that 
eminence which comes only in recognition of merit and ability. 

In Toronto in 1891 Dr. Boyes was married to Miss Mabel 
Walker, a daughter of Irving Walker, a leading dry-goods merchant 
of Toronto. Of this union two sons have been born: Bedford, a 
graduate of the University of California, and Gordon, a graduate 
of the Oakland high school. 



GEORGE W. HEINTZ. 

George W. Heintz, who embarked in the clothing business at 
Oakland in 1907, now conducts an exclusive establishment of that 
character at Nos. 1217 and 1219 Broadway. He was born in Erie, 
Pennsylvania, on the 24th of June, 1876, a son of Martin Heintz. 
In 1885 he removed with his parents to Pueblo, Colorado, and there 
attended the graded and high schools until seventeen years of age. 
Subsequently he spent five years in travel throughout the United 
States and in 1898 came to California, here acting as a clothing sales- 
man in the service of Brown Brothers of San Francisco until 1907. 
In that year he came to Oakland and embarked in the clothing busi- 
ness on his own account, occupying the second floor of the First 
National Bank building until 1909, when he removed to his present 
location at Nos. 12 17 and 12 19 Broadway. He enjoys a gratifying 
patronage as an exclusive clothier and has the agency for "Benjamin 
Clothes." 

On the I ith of October, 191 1, in Oakland, Mr. Heintz was united 
in marriage to Miss Georgia Wheeler. He is independent in politics 
and is identified fraternally with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 



FRANK M. SMITH. 



Among the many brilliant and able men in public life in Cali- 
fornia is numbered Frank M. Smith, who left the impress of a virile 
and forceful personality and an unusual political ability upon the 
legislative history of the state as a member of the thirty-ninth and 
fortieth general assemblies. In Oakland where he makes his home 
he is found always among the leaders in the promotion of con- 



176 HISTORY OF ALA.MIIDA COUNTY 

striictive and progressive projects for community advancement, and 
he is doing a great deal in the best interests of the city through his 
present service as city clerk. Mr. Smith was born in Albion, Men- 
docino county, California, in 1868 and is a son of George M. Smith, 
who came to this state in 1852. His maternal grandfather was a 
pioneer, arriving in California in 1848. and he afterward formed 
one of the famous vigilante committees which hanged Corey and 
Casey in San Francisco. 

Frank M. Smith came to Centerville, Alameda county, when 
he was five years of age. and after he grew to maturity entered the 
contracting business, following in his father's footsteps. Through- 
out his entire business career he has been interested in this line of 
work and now controls an important patronage in Oakland. He 
is recognized as a farsighted, able and progressive business man 
and his integrity, ability and straightforward dealings have gained 
for him a high place in business circles. 

Mr. Smith is well and favorably known in public life in Cali- 
fornia, and has been for many years a powerful individual force in 
republican politics. In San Francisco he served four years as state 
wharfinger under Governor Pardee, but his most efifective work 
in the public service was accomplished during his term in the state 
legislature. He was a member of the thirty-ninth and fortieth 
general assemblies and during that period was identified with the 
passage of a great deal of important legislation, securing many public 
improvements for Oakland and promoting the interests of the city 
whenever possible. He took a prominent part in the passage of the 
bill which gave the city its present improved waterfront and was 
identified with the East Oakland bill. He was the author of the 
bill providing for free text-books in the grammar schools and dur- 
ing the last term of his service was a member of the committee on 
education, accomplishing a great deal of farsighted, intelligent and 
constructive work in school interests throughout the state. He advo- 
cated the raising of the standard of efficiency in the grammar schools 
and the general adoption of that standard in countv schools and was 
tlic fatlier ol tiie bill permitting local optinn in the matter of kinder- 
gartens. He iniroduccii a bill for the improvement of the streets 
and sewers of Oakland, and, wherever it was consistent with the 
general interests of the state, advanced the claims of his citv in a 
powerful and able wav. He was found alwavs progressive and 
modern in his views, which lie was able to support bv intelligent 
argument, and Ik- liad the adilitional advantage of being a powerful 
and elni]ucnt speaker on the lloor n\ tiie house. He made an enviable 



HISTORY OF ALAMEIX-V COUNTY 177 

record in the state legislature and left behind him a reputation for 
political ability and integrity and constant and untiring work in 
the public service. Mr. Smith is now serving as city clerk of Oak- 
land and in his official and private capacities is a leader in all 
movements for municipal advancement, co-operating heartily in 
projects of civic improvement. As president of the local Improve- 
ment Club he is proving his energy, foresight and business ability, 
and he is well entitled to the place which he holds among the leading 
and representative citizens of Oakland. 

Mr. Smith married Miss Ella R. Trefry, a daughter of J. A. 
Trefry, a pioneer in California, who served as deputy under Sheriff 
Harry Morse. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have four children: Ruth, 
who married George Ellis; Gertrude C, the wife of Herbert Town- 
send; Frank W. M., and Zebbie T. Mr. Smith is prominent in the 
Masonic fraternity and is past presiding officer of the local lodges 
of the Woodmen of the World and the Native Sons of the Golden 
West. His career in the public service has been varied in activity, 
high in its standards and important in its accomplishments and his 
life has brought him public honor, business prominence and that 
true success which lies in the respect, esteem and confidence of many 
friends. 



HENRY Z. JONES. 



Henry Z. Jones, a leading representative of real-estate interests 
in Oakland, here established himself in business twenty-three years 
ago and has enjoyed continued success. He was born in Somerset- 
shire, England, on the 4th of March, 1850, and in the acquirement 
of an education attended the public schools until sixteen years of 
age. Subsequently he was employed as clerk in a dry goods store 
of London, England, until twenty-two years old and then emigrated 
to the United States, settling in Warren, Ohio, where he acted as 
clerk in a general mercantile establishment for two years. 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Jones came to California 
and located in San Francisco, there clerking in a dry goods store 
for a year and a half, while during the next thirteen years he was 
successfully engaged in the retail coal business. He then purchased 
thirtv-five acres of land in Fruitvale (now Oakland) and took up 
his abode here, embarking in the real-estate business. He has sub- 
divided, owned and sold the following tracts: Silver Heiirhts in 



178 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

San Francisco, fifteen acres; Allendale tract, thirty acres; Galindo 
tract, twenty-one acres; Allendale Annex, four acres; Florence- 
Jones tract, fifteen acres; Bona Terrace, four acres; Jones Subdivi- 
sion Quigley tract, six acres; Jones Addition tract in San Francisco, 
ten acres; Westall tract, thirty-five acres; Jessie Jones tract, thirty \ 
acres; Laurel Grove Park, sixty-nine acres; Florence Jones No. 2, 
five acres; Boulevard Villa tract, fifteen acres, and Orange Grove, 
twelve acres. Mr. Jones has sold only his own properties and has 
disposed of them on the easy payment plan. 

In April, 1887, in San Francisco, Mr. Jones was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sarah M. Hillman, by whom he has four children, 
namely: Mrs. Abbie A. Biddall, of Oakland; Jessie A., a higli- 
school student; Florence A., and Henry Z., Jr., who attend public 
school. 

Mr. Jones gives his political allegiance to the republican part\ 
and in religious belief is a Protestant. He enjoys an enviable repu- 
tation as a reliable business man, public-spirited citizen and trust- 
worthv friend. 



A. F. ST. SURE. 



A. F. St. Sure, one of the prominent attornevs of Oakland, is a 
man to whom success has come as a result of unfaltering determina- 
tion, untiring industry, energy and enterprise, for he has worked 
liis own way upward to the success which he now enjoys, never hav 
ing failed to carry forward to completion any project which he 
undertook. His prominence in law and politics has followed closelv 
upon a brilliant career as a journalist, and his success along all linc> 
has been the result of the qualities in his character which make him 
today a leading and representative citizen of Alameda county. He 
was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, March 9, 1869, and is a son of 
Frank A. and Ellen (Donoghue) St. Sure, the former a native n\ 
Sweden and the latter of County Cork, Ireland. 'Hie father emi- 
grated to America when lie was still a child and located in ^^'i^C()nsin 
and afterward in Tennessee, engaging in both states as a druggisi 
and a miner. He was a veteran of the Ci\il war, iiaving served as ,i 
captain in the Confederate army. His father, A. F. St. Sure, alsi 
took part in that conflict, but he served in the Union army, be 
member of the medical staff under General Sherman. 



K'ing a J 



HISTORY OF ALAilEDA COUXTY 179 

Mr. St. Sure of this review was brought to California by his 
parents before he was one year old and when he had reached the 
usual age entered the public schools of Oroville, which he left when 
he was thirteen in order to take a position in the office of the Oroville 
Mercury. He thus began a long period of identification with the 
newspaper business, learning printing in all of its branches and ris- 
ing from a humble position to that of foreman of the printing shop, 
an office to which he was promoted when he was eighteen years of 
age. He was afterward made a reporter and finally manager of 
the Mercury, with which he remained identified until 1891, when 
he came to Alameda. In February of that year he began the pub- 
lication of the Alameda Daily News, associating himself with R. H. 
Magill, Jr., and attempting the difficult task of conducting an 
uncompromising democratic journal in a republican community. 
He was afterward city editor of the Alameda Argus and when he 
resigned that position went to San Francisco, where he was con- 
nected with the Chronicle and the Call, later becoming identified 
with the Sacramento Bee. By a natural evolution he became inter- 
ested in politics and in 1891 began his public career as secretary of 
the Alameda county democratic convention. He was afterward 
appointed city recorder to fill out an unexpired term and was then 
elected to the position, which he held for four terms of two vears 
each. 

After taking office he found it necessary to know law and accord- 
ingly began the study of this profession, winning his admission to 
the bar in 1895. After passing his examination he began the practice 
of his profession and before the earthquake of 1906 was connected 
with the office of the attorney general in the Call building in San 
Francisco. After the fire he established a law practice in Oakland 
and there built up a large and representative patronage, his business 
growing as his ability and legal knowledge became more widely 
known. In 191 1 he was appointed city attorney of Alameda and 
served as such for two and one-half years, his excellent record prov- 
ing conclusively his political ability, his conscientiousness and energy 
in the discharge of his duties. He is one of the well known and 
popular men in the Bay cities at the present time, and his prominence 
has substantial and worthy causes, based as it is upon a public recog- 
nition of the excellent work he lias accomplished along many public 
and private lines. 

Mr. St. Sure married Miss Ida Laura Pettes, a daughter of Wil- 
liam E. and Virginia T. Pettes, the former a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Canada. Mr. and Mrs. St. Sure have two chihircn: 



180 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

William Pettes, aged thirteen; and Joseph Paul, ten. Mr. St. Sure 
is a member of the Alameda County Exposition Commission and is 
active and prominent in all movements and projects for the general 
welfare. He is an enterprising and progressive citizen who takes a 
commendable interest in public afifairs and during the period of his 
residence in Alameda has made a host of warm friends. 



GEORGE SHELDON McCOMB. 

George Sheldon McComb is now at the head of the real-estate 
firm of George McComb & Company, of Oakland, California, where 
it has secured an extensive clientage, although it has been in exist- 
ence for less than a year. Mr. McComb was born in San Francisco 
March 9, 1862. His father, John McComb, was born, in New York 
in 1828 and was a son of John McComb, a native of Scotland. He 
married Elizabeth Milholland, who was born in Columbus, Ohio, 
in 1823, a daughter of John and Mary Milholland. Both John 
McComb and Elizabeth Milholland were pioneer settlers of Cali- 
fornia, the former arriving in 1849 ^^'^ ^^'^^ latter in 1850. Mr. 
McComb made the trip from New York by way of the isthmus of 
Panama and by steamer to the Pacific coast, while the ladv whom 
he afterward married crossed the plains by ox team. For a time 
John McComb engaged in mining, but later returned to San Fran- 
cisco and took up journalism. Subsequently he became managing 
editor of the "Alta California," one of the oldest and most reliable 
commercial newspapers on the coast, and was associated with that 
paper for over thirty years. He next went to Folsom as warden of 
the state prison and was afterward transferred to the San Quentin 
prison as warden of that institution, where he remained in charge 
for eleven years. He afterward became secretary of the Societv for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and after a life of activity 
and usefulness passed away in June, 1896, at the age of sixtv-eight 
years. His widow lived to the advanced age of eighty-six years. 

George S. McComb acquired his education in the public schools 
of San Francisco and of Oakland. He was a primary in the Lincoln 
school at the corner of Fifth and Market streets in San Francisco, 
afterward attended the Washington grammar school of that city 
and the Iiigh school of Oakland, but left school before his gradua- 
tion to accept a position in San Francisco as correspondent for the 
Western Associated Press of Chicago and New York. Having taken 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 181 

up the study of law, he was admitted to practice in San Francisco 
in 1891, but later accepted a position as court stenographer in the 
superior court of the state of California for the years 1891-2. He 
was elected clerk of the justices court of the city and county of 
San Francisco in 1901 and held that office for eleven years, retiring 
on the expiration of that period to enter the real-estate business in 
Oakland. He formed a partnership in August, 1913, with Leland 
Spencer, and they now conduct business under the firm style of 
George McComb & Company, of Oakland. Their business is one 
of growing importance and already they have a clientage which is 
enviable. 

Mr. McComb was married in San Francisco, California, on the 
28th of November, 1889, to Miss Josephine Silva, a daughter of 
Joseph T. and Alice E. Silva, and they have one child, Alice E. 
McComb. 

In his political views Mr. McComb is a republican and has 
ever kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He 
holds membership with the Native Sons of the Golden West, having 
become a charter member and trustee of Stanford Parlor in 1886. 
He is also a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. For years he 
was prominent in connection with swimming and other athletic fea- 
tures of the Olympic Club of San Francisco, but his attention is 
more and more largely concentrated upon his business afifairs which 
are of growing importance and volume, making him today one of 
the well known real-estate dealers of Oakland. 



FRANK C. SULLIVAN. 

Among the successful representatives of real-estate interests in 
Oakland is numbered Frank C. Sullivan, who has been continuously 
engaged in business here for the past seven years. His birth occurred 
in Contra Costa county, California, on the 24th of March, 1880. 
His father, Patrick Sullivan, came to California in 1849, settling 
in Contra Costa county, where he devoted his attention to farming 
and cattle raising until the time of his demise m 1882. 

Frank C. Sullivan acquired his education in the graded and high 
schools of San Pablo, Contra Costa county, and following his gradu- 
ation became identified with agricultural pursuits, being actively 
engaged in farming until 1906. In that year he disposed of his 
interests and came to Oakland, embarking in the real-estate business. 



182 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

in which he has continued to the present time with gratifying suc- 
cess. He has the agency for Brookward Acres and other properties, 
all of which he is handling in a capable and resultant manner. 

In Berkeley, California, on the 14th of May, 1906, Mr. Sullivan 
was united in marriage to Miss Alice Gallagher, by whom he has 
three children : Carmen, Alice and Virginia. He gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and is a devout communicant of 
the Catholic church. 



WILLIAM HENRY FULCHER. 

^^'illiam Henry Fulcher, president of the Fulcher Concrete Block 
& Paving Company, is at the head of one of the younger enterprises 
of Oakland that promises to become one of the most important pro- 
ductive industries of the city. The old saying that necessity is the 
mother of invention has found verification through all the ages. 
There is no individual in the United States who does not recognize 
the fact that forest preservation has become imperative, and that 
other things must take the place of lumber as a building material. 
An understanding of this need has led William Henry Fulcher, in- 
ventor and mechanician, to perfect the Fulcher Concrete Block & 
Paving Machine for the manufacture of concrete monolithic build- 
ing blocks and cement brick, and today the business is one of grow- 
ing importance. Mr. Fulcher was born in San Francisco August 
18, 1856, a son of William and Hannah (Dunphie) Fulcher. The 
father, born in Manchester, England, in 1825, was educated there 
and in 1853 arrived in San Francisco, where he became bookkeeper 
for a large wholesale flour mill. Later he mined in Sacramento 
county until his death, which occurred in 1872. His wife has also 
passed away. 

William H. Fulcher attended the public schools of Sacramento 
county to the age of fourteen years, after which he engaged in herd- 
ing sheep for a year and a iialf. Subsequently he took charge of 
a fruit-drying factory, remaining its manager to the age of twenty- 
one years. At that time he went to Folsom, California, where he 
engaged as blacksmith helper in the Folsom prison. Soon afterward 
he had charge of men in the contract to put up all doors in the prison, 
which work was successfully executed. When about twentv-five 
years of age his interest in all phases of mechanics led him to take up 
mechanical drawing at Sacramento and to continue his work in Oak- 




WIl.I.I.Wl II. ITLC'HKR 



HISTORY OF ALA^fKDA COUNTY 185 

land, where he completed the course. In 1880 he went to Tucson, 
Arizona, where he entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Company as brakeman. He afterward became conductor, but 
resigned his position in 1886 and returned to California, settling at 
Lodi, where he became inspector of locomotives for the San Joaquin 
& Sierra Nevada Railroad Company, which has since been merged 
into the Southern Pacific. He filled that position for seven years, 
or until 1893, when he opened a hotel in Woodbridge, but the fol- 
lowing year sold out and organized a company for the manufacture 
of pottery at Stockton, California, where he continued until 1895. 
He built there the Stockton Terra Cotta Works, thus establishing 
the first plant making glazed pottery on the Pacific coast. Selling 
out, he came to Oakland and engaged as bridge tender for the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad until 1900, when he incorporated the National 
Ditching & Dredging Company, selling stock in an excavating ma- 
chine which he had invented. In 1904 he invented and exhibited 
a pulverizing machine, upon which he received a gold medal at the 
St. Louis World's Fair, and also a personal gold medal for his abil- 
ity. In 1906 he disposed of his interest in the ditching companv and 
invented a mining machine \yhich he sold. 

He then turned his attention to the perfecting of a machine ro 
manufacture concrete blocks and on the 22d of March, 19 13, he 
organized the Fulcher Concrete Block & Paving Company under 
the laws of the state of Arizona. He complied with the law of Cali- 
fornia April 24, 1913, being authorized to do general contracting 
and manufacturing in all of its branches. He is now president and 
mechanical engineer of the company, with Dr. C. F. Allardt as vice 
president and D. G. Donahue as secretary, treasurer and attorney. 
Thoroughly understanding the fact that some other building mate- 
rial must supplant lumber, and also the fact that natural stone is 
too costly for the majority of builders, he set to work to study the 
prices of concrete manufacture and became impressed with the pos- 
sibilities in that line. He determined to find a way to manufacture 
concrete blocks and bricks very cheaply, and invented an automatic 
rotary press in such form that it not only turns out the finished prod- 
uct, but also produces it in such large quantities automatically as to 
render its cost non-competitive. 

The machine which developed from the inventive genius of Mr. 
l-\ilclicr will produce over thirty-six thousand standard sized bricks 
per day of eight hours, and by changing the molds in the machine 
will produce over seventy-two thousand building blocks of mono- 
lithic design, which have also been standardi-zed to meet the univer- 



186 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 

sal requirements of the trade. These blocks can be laid on any curve 
or angle, the whole structure being laced and anchored together, 
forming a compact, air-tight wall, proof against fire, water and 
earthquake. Their system of interlocking the corners of the blocks 
not only insures the solidarity of the walls, but also largely does away 
with the need of reinforcing material and lessens the cost of concrete 
construction. The provision made for anchoring the ceiling and 
floor joists in the walls is another factor in securing rigidity of struc- 
ture. The adamant coat of plaster is applied directly on the blocks 
without the use of lathes and without the preliminary coating of 
rough plaster. This is a point worthy of notice, as it means consider- 
able saving in the building of a residence; moreover, the blocks 
themselves form a beautiful exterior finish which does away with 
the expense of painting. The company also manufacture a splendid 
imitation and substitute for Spanish tiling and tiling for bathrooms, 
kitchens, etc. They have also perfected plans whereby they can 
imitate in colored brick the Persian rugs, with the beautiful color- 
ings of the orient harmoniously blended. All their bricks are per- 
fect and they can be made in any shape and size desired. They are 
likewise able to reproduce all forms of natural stone in colors, glazed 
and otherwise. It is their contention that they are in a position to 
produce at least fifty per cent of the material that goes into the con- 
struction of a building at a saving of at least thirty per cent of the 
gross cost of construction. In addition to the cement blocks being 
used for the most handsome residences and public buildings, they 
can be utilized for paving, for rififraffing for river banks, for rail- 
road bridges, viaducts, dams, tunnels, piers, sewers and many other 
purposes, and can be manufactured at about half the cost of brick 
making. As a paving material the blocks leave little if anything to 
be desired, as they are cheaper than any other paving and last for 
many years. Already the blocks arc coming into popular favor and 
the sale of the machine for manufacturing the same is constantly 
increasing. One fact notable is that the building blocks and brick 
made by the means of Mr. Fulcher's invention remain in perfect 
alignment after being laid for an indefinite period of time and can 
easily be removed for repairs. They also offer unusual resistance to 
the wear and tear of the elements and withstand enormous strain, as 
they are manufactured under great pressure and have a cohesiveness 
almost equal to that of the original rock. 

In addition to his other interests, Mr. Fulcher is president of the 
Teddy Jam Pulverizer Machine Company, in which the rock is 
crushed to a sand. This will produce a material superior to anv 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 187 

other kind, for seaside sand rounded by the waves does not hold, 
while the crushed rock, having a rough edge, does, sustaining fifty 
tons' pressure, and this quality of the sand made from crushed rock 
insures the solidarity of the building materials made therefrom. 
The sand is pure, all vegetable matter being removed. Twenty mil- 
lion dollars is now invested in the manufacture of concrete blocks 
in the United States and no competition exists in this line except in 
the hydraulic press. What Mr. Fulcher has accomplished along 
business lines places him with the foremost representatives of indus- 
trial and commercial activity upon the Pacific coast, and his efforts 
are of untold value, not only as a source of individual success, but as 
a feature in the prosperity of the district. 

Mr. Fulcher was united in marriage, in Lodi, to Mi?s Mary 
McGill, a native of California, and unto them were born four 
children: Ruth, who is now deceased; William H., acting as 
surveyor in Alameda county; Jeannette, who is head stenographer 
with a lumber company, which position she has occupied for four 
years; and Marguerite, who is attending the Fremont high school. 

In politics Mr. Fulcher is a republican of the progressive type. 
His study of political conditions has led him to take this advanced 
step, and he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day, yet does not seek nor desire public office, preferring to concen- 
trate his energies upon his business interests, which are of growing 
importance. 



FRED L. BUTTON. 



The bar of California numbers among its most progressive, able 
and successful representatives Fred L. Button, of Oakland, who is 
not only in control of a large and lucrative private practice but has 
also rendered valuable public service along professional lines. He 
was born in Pontiac, Michigan, in March, 1856, and came to Cali- 
fornia with his parents in 1863. The family settled in Oakland 
and Mr. Button acquired his early education in the public schools 
of this city. He was afterward for a time employed in the office 
of the Daily Transcript, learning the printer's trade, and he also 
attended Brayton College. He later entered the State University, 
from which he was graduated with high honors in 1876, receiving 
the university gold medal for excellence in scholarship and also a 
prize for the most meritorious scientific essay. Having at that time 
served one year as assistant instructor in matliematics under appoint- 



188 HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COUXTY 

ment by the regents, he continued in that positi(jn during the suc- 
ceeding year. 

Mr. Button studied hiw in the office of Vrooman & Davis and 
in 1879 was admitted to the bar of the supreme court of California, 
after which he remained with Vrooman & Davis until 1881 and then 
established an office in Oakland, where his ability has brought him a 
large and representative clientage. Mr. Button stands in the front 
ranks of the legal fraternity in this part of the state and his profes- 
sional opinions are considered authoritative. In 1888 he rendered 
the city valuable service as secretary of the Board of Freeholders, 
who drafted the charter of the city of Oakland, and he later three 
times codified the city ordinances for publication. He is also the 
autlior of the second edition of "Harlow on Sheriffs," a standard 
law text-book. Mr. Button has a comprehensive and exact knowl- 
edge of the law and is a strong and forceful practitioner, possessed 
of the insight, coolness and resourcefulness necessary to success in 
this field. 

On November 5, 1899, he was appointed by the board of educa- 
tion as school director for the second ward, an office to which he 
was afterward elected and filled for one term with credit and ability. 
His attention is given largely to a general office and probate practice, 
and in a field where success is largely the result of individual merit 
and ability, has made rapid and steady advancement, standing today 
in the front ranks of progressive and successful attorneys. He gives 
his political allegiance to the progressive republican partv. 



A. L. WAGNER. 



A. L. Wagner is engaged in business in Oakland as the senior 
member of the real-estate firm of Wagner & Pugh, dealing in citv 
and country property. His birth occurred in Detroit, Michigan, in 
June, 1868, and in the acquirement of an education he attended the 
public schools of Detroit and Saginaw, Michigan, until sixteen years 
of age. He then secured a position as salesman with a hardware 
house and subsequently went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he 
acted as salesman for the Dodson, Fisher & Brockman Hardware 
Company. Mr. Wagner next went to Boston, Massachusetts, and 
was there employed as salesman by the Campbell, Bosworth Ma- 
chinery Company until January, 1906, when he came to San 
Francisco to take charge of their Pacific coast business. In March, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 189 

191 1, he resigned that position to embark in the real-estate specu- 
lating business in Ventura county, California, there remaining until 
January, 1913, when he came to Oakland and here entered a similar 
field of endeavor. In the ist of October, 1913, he formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. Pugh, under the firm style of Wagner & Pugh, and 
is now engaged in dealing in city and country property. Their 
undertakings, though so recently begun, have already been attended 
with results which augur well for the future. 

In Ventura, California, on the i8th of March, 191 1, Mr. \A'ag- 
ner was united in marriage to Miss Elvira Solari. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 



MARTIN KATICH. 



Martin Katich, a resident of Oakland for more than a quarter 
of a century, has for the past eight years been successfullv engaged 
in business as sole proprietor of the Avenue Cafe, a high-class restau- 
rant located at the corner of Sixteenth street and San Pablo avenue. 
A native of Dalmatia, Austria, Martin Katich, however, came with 
an uncle to California when he was but thirteen years of age, in 
1887. Thus his early schooling was obtained in Oakland, where he 
remained with relatives when his uncle, a retired sea captain, 
returned to Austria. After graduating from the grammar grades, 
Martin Katich entered the Oakland high school, then situated on 
Market street. It was destroyed by fire before he had completed 
his course and he did not return to school, preferring to work instead. 
In 1890 he entered into business on his own account with a partner 
in the conduct of a restaurant on Seventh street. That street was 
then a busy location and the business prospered. Mr. Katich was, 
however, possessed with an unusual amount of ambition which 
always induced him to strive for better things, so in 1906 he dis- 
solved partnership and removed to San Pablo avenue, there to 
embark on a business alone. After the disaster of that year he 
removed to his present location and from a somewhat modest begin- 
ning has developed his enterprise to admirable proportions, so that 
now the Avenue Cafe is second to none in the city in excellence of 
appointments and cuisine. 

Meantime Mr. Katich made a journey back to his old home in 
Dalmatia to visit his parents and there, in 1899, 'ic married Miss 



190 HISTORY OF AI.A.MEDA COUNTY 

Annie Urlovich. Two years thereafter the young couple spent in 
their native land, where a daughter, Annie, was born to them. Then 
Mr. Katich brought his wife and their little daughter to California, 
but Mrs. Katich died two years later. Martin, Jr., the only son of 
the couple, was then but three months of age. Later Mr. Katich 
and the sister of his late wife were united in marriage and by this 
union there is a daughter. Lucille, named for her mother. 

Throughout his career Mr. Katich has been successful in his 
business enterprises and has gained an enviable reputation for fair 
dealing and uprightness among all with whom he has come in con- 
tact. Never afraid to venture, he has met with success, and, though 
his career has not been without its vicissitudes, he has now reached a 
position of undoubted security. 

Prominent in commercial and civic affairs, he is a member of 
the Commercial Club, Chamber of Commerce and Merchants 
Exchange of Oakland. In fraternal circles he is also active and is 
a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Loyal Order of Moose, 
Royal Arch and the United Slavonian Society. Politically he is a 
progressive. He owns a handsome home at Twentieth and Webster 
streets and socially both Mr. and Mrs. Katich are popular and noted 
for their hospitality. 



H. A. AL^KINSON, M. D. 

Dr. H. A. Makinson is a prominent and successful representa- 
tive of the medical fraternitv in Oakland and enjoys an enviable 
reputation among his professional brethren here. He was born in 
Ohio in 1873 and acquired his early education in the graded and 
high schools, while subsequently he pursued a course in Latin and 
English at the Salina Normal University of Salina, Kansas, gradu- 
ating from that institution in 1897. -^^ ^^^'^ followed the profession 
of teaching at Smith Center, Kansas, for a period of four years. 
Having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he 
entered the College of Medicine of the LTniversity of Minnesota and 
in 1903 won his degree. He came to California the same year and 
for two years practiced his profession in Sonoma county, while in 
1905 he opened an office in Oakland, Alameda county. For a period 
of five years he taught hygiene and public health in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at San Francisco. He is now engaged in 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 1!)1 

the general practice of his profession at Oakland and is accorded 
an extensive and lucrative patronage in recognition of his skill and 
ability in the line of his chosen vocation. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Dr. Makin- 
son chose Miss Grace M. Cassidy. His fraternal relations are with 
the \A^oodmen of the World, the Knights of Pythias and the Masons, 
and he acts as examining physician for the local lodges of these 
organizations. He is well known throughout the city and has won 
an enviable reputation in both professional and social circles. 



CHARLES W. SHAW 



Charles W. Shaw is secretary of the Alameda County Milk 
Dealers Association, a business organization which has been of im- 
mense value to the county in many ways, improving sanitary condi- 
tions and promptness in the delivery of milk and securing reduction 
in prices. 

Mr. Shaw is a native of New Gloucester, Cumberland county, 
Maine. His youthful days were passed in the Pine Tree state, and 
in the acquirement of his education he passed through various grades 
to the high school, from which he was graduated at the age of seven- 
teen years. He then took a practical course in cotton manufacturing 
and when nineteen years of age was given charge of a department 
with one hundred and fifty men under his supervision. He con- 
tinued in that position of responsibility until he reached the age of 
twenty-five, after which he traveled through the southern states with 
a gang of men, installing machinery in cotton mills for two years. 
He then returned to Lewiston, Maine, where he continued for a 
year, after wiiich he came to Oakland and engaged with the Hook 
Brothers Furniture House as salesman for eight years. Since that 
time he has conducted a dairy business which is one of the extensive 
and important enterprises of the kind in the city. In 1908 he became 
secretary of the Alameda County Milk Dealers Association, which 
was organized about 1Q03 for the purpose of bettering milk condi- 
tions in Alameda, Oakland and Berkeley, some of the objects of 
the association being to prevctit an advance in prices, the improve- 
ment of the quality of milk and tlic methods of its handling. This 
association now handles about ninety-five per cent of the milk sold 
in tlie three cities, and the fact tliat it controls this product is a guar- 
antee tliat the milk is handled in a sanitarv manner. 



192 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Shaw is president of the Business League of Alameda county 
and is regarded as one of the most enterprising citizens of the county, 
looking at all times to the betterment of trade conditions and the 
substantial growth of his part of the state. In politics he is not 
guided by partv rule but votes independently. His religious belief 
is that of the Spiritual Society. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Moose, and he is secretary of the Oakland Stadium Club. The 
width of the continent separates him from his birthplace. Attracted 
by the opportunities of the west, he has here advanced and is now 
numbered among the successful men of Oakland as the result of his 
enterprise, keen discernment and unabating industry. 



L. N. COBBLEDICK. 



Many, indeed, were the warm friends of L. N. Cobbledick. An 
analyzation of his life work shows that the high regard in which he 
was held was the logical sequence of a life of activity, integrity and 
honor. He possessed in large measure a sense of that growing com- 
munity spirit which is manifest throughout the country and which 
is but a keener, stronger recognition of the brotherhood of man and 
the obligations of the individual to his community. 

A native of California, Mr. Cobbledick was born in- Oakland, 
February 15, 1867, his parents being James and Isabelle (Newsom) 
Cobbledick, the father a native of England and the latter of To- 
ronto, Ontario. James Cobbledick came to San Francisco about 
1849 by way of Cape Horn and was one of the pioneer residents of 
East Oakland, settling there at a time when there were but two 
houses within a radius of several miles. He engaged in the whole- 
sale hardwood business and was also a builder of fancv carriages 
and stage coaches. In addition he operated or was interested in 
many of the pioneer stage lines in and around the Bay cities, at a 
period which long antedated the construction of railroads. In pol- 
itics he was a strong republican, and was a factor among the polit- 
ical leaders of the embryo town. Fraternally a Mason, he became 
a charter member of Brooklyn Lodge, and in his life exemplified 
the principles and beneficent spirit of the craft. He was also a 
charter member of the Mountain View Cemetery Association. His 
religious faith was evidenced in his membership in the Seventh 
Avenue Methodist church, in the work of which he took a very 
active and prominent part, as did his wife, who was a recognized 




L. Jv'. COBBLKDiaC 



HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 195 

leader not only in church circles but also in the social life of the 
community. They were the parents of eleven children. The death 
of James Cobbledick occurred in 1904, when he had reached the 
age of seventy-six years, while his wife survived him until August, 
1912. 

L. N. Cobbledick, having attended the Franklin grammar 
school, continued his education in the Oakland high school, and 
with his entrance into business circles became connected with the 
Whittier-Fuller Company, with whom he remained until twenty- 
three years of age as a most trusted employe. On the ist of March, 
1890, after nine years' experience in the paint and glass business, he 
embarked in business on his own account, opening his first store at 
No. 358 Twelfth street, Oakland. In this general business of paints, 
oils, glass, wall paper, etc., he continued until 1906, in which year 
he closed out all departments save the glass. He then enlarged his 
activities in that line and after that confined his attention solely to 
handling glass and mirrors. The business is now conducted under 
the name of the Cobbledick-Kibbe Glass Company and is one of 
the leading concerns of its kind in Oakland, while the mirror silver- 
ing plant is one of the largest on the coast. The company also has 
a department given to the exclusive manufacture of leaded art glass 
and the trade along this line is also extensive and gratifying. Mr. 
Cobbledick was president of the company, which until his death 
was known as the L. N. Cobbledick Glass Company. His keen busi- 
ness discernment and unfaltering energy proved the salient features 
in the attainment of substantial success, and his plans and methods 
constituted the foundation upon which later prosperity has been 
buildcd. 

In his political views Mr. Cobbledick was a republican and 
from early manhood took an active part in politics and in civic 
affairs. He was an officer in the Clinton Improvement Club, which 
organization did much toward improving and modernizing East 
Oakland. The vast amount of efifective work which he did in that 
connection attracted the attention of Mayor Mott and the people of 
his community, and he was induced to become a candidate for the 
city council in ward 7. He won by a large majority and served 
throughout the life of Oakland's last city council. When the new 
form of government was established he was appointed a member of 
the civil service board for a term of two years. At the close of that 
period, in July, 19 13, he was reappointed for a term of six years. 
Throughout the period of his active connection with civic afifairs he 
maintained a remarkably helpful attitude toward movements for 



196 HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 

the public benefit, and the drastic measures which he introduced and 
carried forward will ever be remembered. Very soon after his elec- 
tion to the council and even before this time he labored incessantly 
and untiringly to have the marsh between Eighth street and Lake 
Merritt filled in. He also labored just as earnestly for the abolish- 
ment of the old wooden bridge on Eighth street and the reopening 
of that street as a thoroughfare. Although he was strongly opposed 
in manv measures, his work was ultimately successful and its value 
has been proven by time. He was one of the prime movers in for- 
warding the plan of building the immense auditorium on that newly 
built site to fill the long-felt want of Oakland for such a building. 

This by no means comprised the e.\tent of the activities of Mr. 
Cobbledick in behalf of all that pertained to the welfare, progress, 
upbuilding and improvement of his city and state. He conceived 
the idea and secured the passage of laws doing away with slot 
machines and with closed boxes in saloons and cafes. He was also 
interested in the measure providing .for a board of censorship for 
all films to be shown in the moving picture houses. One of his 
hardest fights was forcing the equipment of proper fenders on street 
cars. He was ever constantly on the alert for ways in which the 
public might be benefited and municipal progress advanced. He 
readily recognized a public need and sought at once to meet the need 
by the adoption of such measures or actions as would accomplish the 
purpose. Never tiring in his efforts to advance the public welfare, 
Mr. Cobbledick again and again gave his services where the inter- 
ests of the community were at stake. He was one of the committee 
selected to investigate the rates of the Peoples Water Company and 
report upon the same. On the expiration of the franchise of the 
Southern Pacific Railwav for their right of way on Seventh street 
he was the leader of the opposition, taking the stand that it should 
not be renewed for fifty years and almost without compensation, but 
that sucli a lease should not be given for more than twenty-five years. 
He \\as successful in this to cjuite a degree, for finally the concession 
was made for tliirtv-fi\e vears, and the companv also pavs the citv 
a handsome rental, as well as keeping the street in good repair and 
the maintenance of the lighting system along that thoroughfare. 
While a member of tiie city council Mr. Cobbledick represented 
iiis ward in most admiraiile and commendable manner, and although 
it w as the largest ward in tlie citv, he overlooked no point that would 
help to improve or beautify it. One phase of his work not to be 
forgotten was iiis successful efifort in securing the building of Hop- 
kins boulevard from Lake Merritt to Foothill boulevard, which 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 197 

lurnishes Oakland with a perfect thonjughfare from the heart of 
the city into the beautiful valleys that lie to the southward of the 
Bay cities. 

Another notable line of Mr. Cobbledick's activity arose from 
his great interest in poultry. For many years he kept a prize flock 
of Barred Plymouth Rocks and other pure bred fowl. He was an 
exhibitor at the Bufifalo and St. Louis expositions and many shows 
of less fame, and on all occasions carried awav the highest prizes 
awarded to poultry. He was also to have been an exhibitor and 
official of the poultry division at the Panama-Pacific exposition, but 
death frustrated this plan. 

On the 20th of February, 1890, Mr. Cobbledick was married to 
Miss Florence White, a daughter of Wilson and Elizabeth (Raw- 
lings) White, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Ho- 
bart, Tasmania. Mr. White went from his native country to Aus- 
tralia as a young man and there, following sheep-raising and mining, 
ac(]uired a large fortune. He owned a large estate and palatial 
home, known as Eurella, at Launceston, Tasmania. Thirty-five 
years ago he went to San Francisco, and not long afterward came 
to Oakland, where he established the California Jute Mill Com- 
pany, which enterprise he successfully conducted for many years, 
becoming known throughout the coast region as the "Bag King." 
He died about 1889 and his wife passed away in 1904. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cobbledick had two sons. Lloyd N. was graduated from the 
Oakland high school with the class of January, 1914. He was pres- 
ident of the student body of the high school and is now a director 
in the Cobbledick-Kibbe Glass Company. The younger son, Wilson 
R., is in the branch office of the glass cornpany which is maintained 
in San Francisco. 

The military record of L. N. Cobbledick was a long one for a 
man of his years and notable in that during his fifteen years of mem- 
bership in the California National Guard he won many medals for 
United States army shooting. He was the organizer and captain of 
the Boys' Brigade of the Eighth Avenue Methodist Episcopal 
church and also established the Cadet Corps of the First Congre- 
gational church, of which he was captain for many years. He was 
a member of the First Congregational church and of its Men's 
League. His death occurred February 18, 1914, after a serious 
operation. He was confined by this for about six weeks and it was 
believed that he would recover, so that the news of his demise came 
as a great shock to his many friends and business associates. The 
luneral was held in the Scottish Rite Cathedral, under the auspices 



198 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

of the Scottish Rite bodies. The pallbearers included Mayor Mott 
and others of his lifelong friends. Mr. Cobbledick belonged to Rose 
Croi.x and Brooklyn Lodges, F. & A. M., to the branches of the Scot- 
tisii Rite and to Aahmes Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He was a 
past president of Oakland Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden 
West and belonged to the Woodmen of the World and the Oakland 
Commercial Club. The nature, breadth and variety of his interests 
showed him to be one of the most forceful and valued citizens of 
Oakland. I'hrough his important business interests he contributed 
to its material development and, prompted by his patriotic spirit, 
he largely promoted the public welfare. His record is that of a 
man faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in repu- 
tation. 



MAY H. SAMPSON, M. D. 

Dr. May H. Sampson, since 1907 in active and successful practice 
of medicine in Berkeley, is a native Californian, born in Mendocino 
county. Her father, Eugene Sampson, was born in Maine and fol- 
lowed a seafaring life for many years, coming in tiic bark Olive Jane 
around the Horn to California in pioneer times. The mother was 
also a native of Maine and a pioneer in California, having crossed 
the Isthmus and come to this state at a very earlv date. 

Dr. Sampson was reared in Mendocino countv and acquired her 
preliminary education in the public schools. She afterwards en- 
gaged in teaching there until 1895 ^^Iien she came to Berkelev, where 
she followed the same occupation in the schools of this citv. Later 
she took up the study of medicine, a profession which had alwavs 
attracted her, entering Cooper Medical College, from which she 
was graduated, M. D. in 19(^-6. In order to supplement her knowl- 
edge by practical experience she served one year as interne in the 
Children's Hospital in San Francisco, and then began the active 
practice ol her profession, coming to Berkeley, where she has since 
resided. In recognition of her knowledge of medicine and her skill 
and ability in the application of it she has been accorded a liberal 
and representative patronage and has gained a high place among 
the leading physicians in the city where she makes her home. She 
keeps in touch with the most advanced professional thought through 
her membership in the state and county medical societies and has 
remained always a close and earnest student of the medical science, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 199 

the results of this study being evident in the excellent work she has 
done along medical lines. Dr. Sampson is a member of the Friends' 
Church and is well known in Berkeley, where her many sterling 
qualities of mind and character have won her an extensive circle 
of friends. 



AUGUSTUS M. CHURCH. 

Alameda county lost one of its public-spirited and progressive 
citizens and successful and prominent business men and California 
one of its pioneer settlers when Augustus M. Church died at his 
home in Oakland, September i, 1889. He was a conspicuous figure 
in the earlv development of the state and was for many years asso- 
ciated with the interests of the bay country, his activities extending 
to many fields and touching closely business, political and social 
progress. 

Mr. Church was born in Allen's Hill, Ontario county, New York, 
June 19, 1816, and was a son of Lovett and Sally (Boyd) Church. 
He spent the first fifteen years of his life in Richmond, New York, 
and then began his business career, finding employment in a hard- 
ware store in Canandaigua. He held this position for about one 
year and then entered the postoffice as clerk. He afterward became 
postmaster in Lockport. Niagara county, New York, and he dis- 
charged the duties of that position until 1834, when he became 
identified with the banking business through his connection with the 
bank conducted by L. A. Spaulding. After two years in this capacity 
he became clerk in the canal collector's office of Judge McKane and 
in the winter of 1837-38 went to Chicago, where he sold out a stock 
of goods for the Bank of Washtenaw, Ann Arbor, Michigan. When 
this work was accomplished he went to Ottawa, Illinois, and there 
became interested in the construction of the Illinois & Michigan 
canal and also in the general mercantile business. In the same year 
he removed to Berrien county, Michigan, and in the following 
autumn to Bcllevue, Iowa, where he embarked in a mercantile enter- 
prise, in which he met with gratifying success, becoming one of the 
most prominent business men of the community. From Bellevue 
Mr. Church removed to Whitmanville, in Cass county, and con- 
ducted a hotel there until 1842, when he moved to St. Joseph, Mich- 
igan, and managed a hotel for a number of years, during which 
time he also engaged in trading. In 1841; he removed to St. Marv's 



I 
I 

200 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 

Rapids, where for eighteen months he conducted a hotel, after which | 
he returned to St. Joseph, Michigan, resuming his former business, i 

In the year 1849, attracted by the reports of the wonderful gold i 
discoveries on the Pacific coast and of the quick fortunes to be made | 
in the mines, Mr. Church joined a number of companions and j 
equipped an outfit for the journey across the plains. On the 13th of I 
August, 1849, the party arrived at Bear river and there called a halt I 
for a brief rest, after which they proceeded to the mines on the Yuba j 
river and Deer creek. In October Mr. Church and his comrades j 
removed to the north fork of the Yuba and mined for a time at Good- | 
year and Michigan bars. During this month three of the party pro- ' 
ceeded to the point where the town of Downieville, Sierra countx . 
now stands. There in an incredibly short time they took out five 
hundred dollars worth of gold and with elated spirits returned u> 
their companions on Goodyear's bar, having decided to locate there ; 
for the winter. Thev were prevented from doing any more work I 
at their mine by the rain and snow which set in and accordingly : 
returned to Sacramento to pass the rainy season. In the spring they ■ 
returned to the location only to find that every vestige of gold was gone | 
and there were no prospects either for the present or the future. Mr. I 
Church then decided to return home and after disposing of all his 1 
effects found himself with eighteen hundred dollars more than when 1 
he first came to California. This, however, was later stolen from 
him, and eventually he returned to Michigan no better off than wlien ; 
he left the state. 

After his return Mr. Church remained at home until the spring 
of 1851, when in company with Socrates Huff of San Leandro, with ' 
whom he had made the first trip, he again came to California. In • 
the following winter with others he hunted in the hills back of j 
Mission San Jose and from this expedition each of the party cleared | 
three hundred dollars. In the following spring Mr. Church located I 
a trading point at New Haven, now Alvarado, in partnership with , 
Henry C. Smith, and while a resident of this locality was elected to 
membership on the board of supervisors, serving in 1852 and 1853, 
when Washington township was a portion of Santa Clara county, j 
It was during Mr. Church's residence in New Haven that Alameda ' 
county was created out of portions of the counties of Contra Costa : 
and Santa Clara, and he was elected the first county clerk and j 
recorder of the new county. He was connected with these otfices 
as chief and as deputy for nine years, and his able service was fol- 1 
lowed in 1867 by his election to the state legislature as representative 
from .Alameda county. He served with tiie late John W. Dwindle 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 201 

and during the period of his activity as a member of the assembly 
gave his influence ahvavs to measures of reform and advancement. 
In 1870 he again turned his attention to business, establishing a 
mercantile enterprise at Healdsburg, which he then believed would 
be the terminus of the San Francisco & North Pacific Railroad. 
However, upon the granting of the franchise for the continuation 
of the line to Cloverdale, the commercial prospects of Healdsburg 
were shattered, and Mr. Church returned to his ranch in Murray 
township, where he succeeded his former partner, Henry C. Smith, 
as justice of the peace, holding that office for four years at Liver- 
more. Mr. Church sold his estate in 1877 and took up his residence 
in the city of Oakland, where in the following year he was elected 
justice of the peace for Oakland township, an office in which he 
served with marked abilitv as he did in all others which he was 
called upon to fill. 

In Berrien county, Michigan, in 1838, Mr. Church was united 
in marriage to Miss Ellen Cronkhite, a native of New York. Mr. 
and Mrs. Church became the parents of the following children: 
Helen White, deceased; Sarah, now Mrs. Gill, of Santa Barbara; 
William H., residing in Oakland; Rod W., of Piedmont, Alameda 
county, and Lincoln S., of Oakland. Mr. Church was well known 
in the Masonic fraternity and belonged also to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Society of California Pioneers. He 
died in Oakland, September i, 1889, and was sincerely mourned 
by a wide circle of friends. His life was characterized by unfalter- 
ing loyalty in all of its important relations, and his honorable stand- 
ards, his stanch honesty and his singleness of purpose, influenced 
the history of California in many of its most important chapters. 



WILLIAM R. GEARY. 

William R. Geary, now filling the ofiice of justice of the peace 
of Brooklyn township, is well known in business connections and 
has his office at No. 607 East Twelfth street, Oakland, where, as 
president, he controls the interests of the Alameda, Venice & Swim- 
ming Baths Company. He was born in Oakland, September 25, 
1876, a son of Maurice and Luella (Yates) Geary. The father 
came to Oakland in 1875 and engaged in the teaming business to 
the time of his death, which occurred fourteen years later, in 1889. 
The son, reared in his native city, attended the public schools until 



202 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

fifteen years of age, after which he pursued a course in a business 
college at night. The day was devoted to work in a drug store until 
1896, when he became collector and bookkeeper for the Hogan 
Lumber Company and so continued until 1902, when he resigned to 
become justice of the peace of Brooklyn township. He is now dis- 
charging the duties of that position in a fair and impartial manner, 
his course winning him high commendation. His business interests 
too are of growing importance. He was one of the organizers of 
the Alameda, Venice & Swimming Baths Company, of which he 
has been the president since the 23d of October, 1913. In business 
affairs he displays an initiative spirit, and his progressiveness is 
winning him growing success. 

In Oakland Mr. Geary was united in marriage to Miss Adelaide 
S. Derby, the wedding being celebrated April 28, 1896. To them 
were born five children: Edwin W. and Henry T., aged respect- 
ively fifteen and thirteen years, now students in a parochial school; 
Mildred E., eleven years of age, attending the College of the Holy 
Names; George T., six years of age, and William R., Jr., a year 
old. The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church, 
and Mr. Geary belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and the Woodmen of the World. He is also con- 
nected with the Commercial Club and is in hearty sympathy with 
its purposes for the business development and substantial upbuild- 
ing of the city. In politics he is now a progressive and stands at all 
times for advancement in every relation of life. 



GEORGE W. REED. 



George W. Reed, one of the successful and prominent attornc}^ 
of Oakland and well known in professional circles as the senior 
member of the firm of Reed, Black, Nusbaumer & Bingaman, wa> 
born in Vassalboro, Maine, June 14, 1852. When he was four year^; 
of age he was brought to the Pacific coast by his parents and up tn 
the age of twelve attended the public schools of Oakland. Later he 
was a student in the Brayton school and afterward enrolled in the 
University of California, being graduated from that institution in 
1872, at the age of twenty. Following this he began the study m 
law and at the end of one year received the appointment of depui\ 
county clerk under iiis brother, Charles G. Reed, a position which 
he iicld for four vears. He resumed his law studies at the end of 




'^(&^^^rtUTr-/&^^.p^^ 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 205 

that time and in December, 1879, was admitted to the bar of 
California. 

In 1880 he entered the office of A. A. Moore as law clerk and 
held this position three years, after which he was admitted to partner- 
ship, the firm name being Moore & Reed. This became one of the 
important law firms of the city, the partners building up an extensive 
and profitable clientage. Their association was dissolved when Mr. 
Reed was elected to the office of district attorney in November, 1888. 
At the close of his first term he was reelected, serving in all four 
years and leaving the office with a record of unusually efficient and 
conscientious service. Subsequently Mr. Reed formed a partnership 
with ]\Ir. Nusbaumer and the firm of Reed & Nusbaumer existed 
eleven years. The present firm is Reed, Black, Nusbaumer & Bing- 
aman, the other members being P. C. Black, E. Nusbaumer and 
J. W. Bingaman. This firm is connected through a large and con- 
stantly increasing patronage with some of the most important cases 
heard in the courts of California, and its strength and prominence are 
growing year by year. Mr. Reed has in the course of a long pro- 
fessional career attained a high place at the bar of California and 
is numbered today among its foremost representatives. 

Mr. Reed became the father of three children: Mabel Linden; 
Clarence Munroe; and Russell Albert, who died at the age of twenty- 
one years. Mr. Reed gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party, and since he attained his majority has always lent his aid to 
the advancement of that party's principles. He takes a strong 
interest in public affairs and has held various important positions 
of trust and responsibility, serving in 1900 as a delegate to the national 
convention at Philadelphia which nominated William McKinley for 
president, and in 1904, in the same capacity, to the national conven- 
tion at Chicago which nominated Theodore Roosevelt. He was 
again a delegate to the national convention in Chicago in 1908 which 
nominated William H. Taft and in 1907 and 1908 served as chair- 
man of the republican county central committee. He was a strong 
supporter of Victor H. Metcalf when Mr. Metcalf ran for congress 
and was a member of his congressional committee. For several years 
he was chairman of the congressional committee of Joseph R. 
Knowland, who was a member of congress from the third district. 

In educational matters Mr. Reed is also active, now serving as 
trustee for the Cogswell Polytechnical College of San Francisco, and 
he was a director of the California School for the Deaf and Blind at 
Berkeley for about ten years. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic 
organization, being a member of Sequoia Lodge, F. & A. M., and is 



206 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

past exalted ruler of Oakland Lodge, No. 107, B. P. O. E. In the 
latter organization he acted as chairman of the building committee, 
which succeeded in the face of many obstacles in building the Elks 
Hall in Oakland. He belongs also to University Lodge, No. 144, 
L O. O. F., and socially is affiliated with the State of Maine Associa- 
tion and the Commercial Club. He is a man of varied interests, all 
of which he has succeeded in making forces in progress, so that he 
stands today among the men of Oakland whose activities have 
influenced political, social and professional advancement. 



H. L. WOOD. 



H. L. Wood is president of the East Bay Home Builders, Incor- 
porated, and as such is contributing much to the substantial develop- 
ment and improvement of Oakland. He was born in Evansville, 
Indiana, January 25, 1877, ^"^^ '* a son of H. B. and C. M. Wood. 
In the acquirement of his education he passed through consecutive 
grades in the public schools until graduated from the high school 
of his native city with the class of 1896. He then went to Chicago, 
where he entered the wholesale dry-goods house of Carson, Pirie, 
Scott & Company, whom he represented as a salesman for three 
years. He then returned to Evansville, where he opened a retail 
grocery store, which he conducted until 1904. He then sold out 
and came to Oakland, where he purchased the business of the Sunset 
Cream & Butter Company in San Francisco. He remained there in 
active business until 1906, when he lost everything that he had in 
the fire. 

Following that disaster Mr. Wood went to Vera Cruz, Mexico, 
where he purchased a ranch and thereon conducted a general mer- 
chandise store. At length oil was discovered upon his land and the 
sale thereof made him immensely wealthy, but when the revolution 
of 1 9 10 broke out he had to leave that country. He was shot eight 
times while trying to get away from Mexico. Disposing of his oil 
interests to the Southern Pacific Railroad, he returned to Oakland, 
where he has since been engaged in the building business, and he 
has erected thirty homes which he has sold on the installment plan. 
On the 6th of December, 191 3, he organized the East Bay Home 
Builders, Incorporated, of which company he is the president. One 
hundred business men of Oakland arc interested in this company, 
wliich iias been cstablisiu-ii upon .1 most substantial basis. Among 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 207 

them are some who represent every commodity in the building busi- 
ness, so that the company is in a position to build better homes for 
less money than any company or firm that ever entered the same 
line. Moreover, the men in control are thoroughly familiar with 
every phase of the business, and they have eliminated all promotion 
schemes or plans. The business has already been firmly established 
and is growing day by day. The officers of the company, which is 
capitalized for five hundred thousand dollars, are: H. L. Wood, 
president; A. G. Rhodes, first vice president; C. U. Henderson, sec- 
ond vice president; A. Alder, secretary; W. P. Stone, treasurer, and 
Benjamin R. Aiken, attorney. On the board of directors are: H. P. 
Briggs, Thomas J. Thompson, A. G. Rhodes, W. P. Stone, A. Alder, 
H. L. Wood and C. U. Henderson. 

In St. Louis, Missouri, Mr. Wood was married to Miss Bertha 
Bridgeman on the 9th of May, 1903, and they have gained many 
friends during the period of their residence here. Mr. Wood be- 
longs to the Oakland Commercial Club, and he gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party. In his connection with the 
former he co-operates in all movements that tend to the upbuilding 
and substantial improvement of his city and manifests at all times a 
public-spirited devotion to the general good. 



OTTO BECHTLE. 



Among the men who by reason of their personal integrity, ability 
and business enterprise have come to be regarded as representative 
citizens and leading business men of Alameda is numbered Otto 
Bechtle, who since 1906 has been engaged in the manufacture of 
gas and electric fixtures in the city. He is a native of Germany, 
born in Wurtemberg, October 3, 1872, a son of Max Bechtle, a 
machinist by trade, who followed his chosen occupation in the 
fatherland until 1907, when he retired from active life. His wife, 
who was in her maidenhood Miss Christiana Geisert, also survives. 

In the public schools of his native country Otto Bechtle acquired 
his education, laying aside his books in 1886 in order to learn the 
silversmith's trade, at which he became very proficient, following 
it in Wurtemberg until 1892. In that year he crossed the Atlantic 
to America and after his arrival in this country pushed westward 
to California, settling in San Francisco in December. In that city 
he engaged in the chandelier manufacturing business as an employe 



208 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 

in the San Francisco Novelty Works, a connection which he main- 
tained for about one year, resigning his position in order to engage 
in the same line of work with the Thomas Day Company. He 
remained with that concern until 1906, when he came to Alameda, 
where he established himself in business as a manufacturer of gas 
and electric fixtures. Success has steadily attended his w-ell directed 
labors since that time, and his business has expanded yearly, the 
entire credit for its rapid growth being directly due to Mr. Bechtle's 
enterprise, initiative and progressive spirit, guided and controlled 
by his excellent business ability. He has now a large and repre- 
sentative patronage, and this has been accorded to him in recognition 
of the fine quality of the goods which he manufactures and his 
straightforward and upright business methods. 

Mr. Bechtle married Miss Elese Kurth, a daughter of John and 
Marianna Kurth, natives of Sw^itzerland. Mr. and Mrs. Bechtle 
have four children: Freda, aged fourteen; Otto, eleven and a half; 
Bertha, nine, and Albert, three. Always interested in the growth 
and welfare of his home city and anxious to do his part in promoting 
its advancement, Mr. Bechtle has identified himself with the North 
Side Improvement Club of Alameda and the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He is a member also of the Electric Association of Oakland 
and fraternally belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Red Men and the Loyal Order of Moose. 
He has made steady progress as the years have gone by and has 
achieved a measure of prosperity which is most creditable, as it has 
been gained by methods that have been ever honorable and upright, 
winning him the respect and good-wall of his associates and friends. 



FRED D. VOORHEES. 

Among the foremost architects and engineers of Oakland is to 
be numbered Fred D. Voorhees, who for about twenty years has 
practiced his profession in this city. Buildings which owe their 
origin to his genius can be found on every hand in the cit\, but of 
late Mr. Voorhees has more closely confined himself to specializing 
in school buildings and also acts as consulting architect. 

A native of Rockford, Illinois, he came with his parents to Cali 
fornia when but six years of age and was educated in the Oakland 
and Vallejo schools. He began his career as an employe of the 
Mare Island navy yard at Vallejo in the civil engineering depart- 



HISTORY OF ALAIMEDA COUNTY 209 

ment. In 1893 he began his private practice in Oakland as civil 
engineer and architect. Among the early buildings for which he 
drew plans are the Reed block on Clay street, the Havens block, 
the Blake block on Eleventh street and the Woodman building on 
Twelfth street, also the Tutt building on Thirteenth street, the M. C. 
Chapman home and the famous home of W. Sharon at Piedmont. 
His later work includes the Pacific building on Sixteenth and Jef- 
ferson and the Powell hotel on Thirteenth and Webster streets. Of 
late years he has made a specialty of school buildings, having drawn 
the plans of the Manzinita school at Oakland and the Grove Street 
school, also of this city. He also made the plans for the addition 
to the Lafayette, Piedmont and Elmhurst schools and the Park and 
Division school and the Fifty-fourth and Market Street school. He 
also acted as architect for the Centerville and Vallejo high schools 
and also for schools in Richmond, California. On account of his 
ability along these lines he is often chosen as consulting architect 
by his fellow workers and also by intending investors and by public 
bodies, and has done work in that connection on the Lodi high school 
of Lodi, California, and the Elks building at Richmond, as well as 
for the supervisors of Alameda county. For a number of years he 
was architect for the Fruitvale school district. 

Mr. Voorhees was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Hunger- 
ford Lewis. He is prominent in the Masons, being a Knight Tem- 
plar, a Shriner and a Scottish Rite Mason. He is also a member 
of the Elks at Oakland and a charter member of Oakland camp of 
the Woodmen of the World. He is a member of the Oakland Com- 
mercial Club and the Chamber of Commerce and his professional 
affiliation is with the American Institute of Architects. A man of 
progressive tendencies and public-spirited in the truest meaning of 
the word, he interests himself as deeply in matters of public import 
as in his own success, and his labors have been of distinct advantage 
to Alameda county and the citv in which he makes his home. 



CHARLES N. WALTER. 

Charles N. Walter, assistant cashier of the First National Bank 
of Oakland, entered the employ of that institution in an humble 
capacity almost a quarter of a century ago and has worked his way 
upward to his present responsible position. He was born in Oakland 
on the 7th of March, 1872, his fatlier being William A M'altcr, a 



210 HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 

native of New York. The latter became a California pioneer, 
crossing the plains to this state in 1852 and being here engaged in 
mining in the early days. Subsequently he became identified with 
the wood and coal business, conducting an enterprise of that char- 
acter at Oakland as the junior member of the firm of Shakespear & 
Walter. Later he was associated with the Wells Fargo Express 
Company at Oakland. As a member of the city council of Oakland 
he did valuable and efficient service, proving himself a public- 
spirited and enterprising citizen who had the best interests of his 
community at heart. His demise occurred in February, 1893. 

Charles N. Walter obtained his education in the public schools 
of his native city and after putting aside his text-books spent two 
years in the office of Wells Fargo & Company. On the ist of August, 
1889, he entered the employ of the First National Bank as messenger 
boy and has since remained in the service of that financial institution, 
being steadily promoted as he has demonstrated his worth and 
ability until he now holds the important position of assistant cashier. 
He is a popular official of the bank and enjoys an enviable reputation 
as one of its able and valued representatives. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Walter 
chose Miss Lucy L. Drake, a native of Colusa, California. Their 
children are four in number, namely: Elizabeth, Charles A., Ar- 
thur G. and Edward M. In Masonic circles Mr. Walter is promi- 
nent. On the rjth of March, 1894, he joined Oakland Lodge, No. 
188, and has held all of the offices therein, serving as master in 1905 
and now acting as secretary, while for two years he s-erved as 
inspector of the district. He is likewise a member of Oakland 
Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M., and Oakland Lodge of Perfection, No. 2. 
For a period of thirteen years Mr. Walter acted as clerk of the 
local library board. He has spent his entire life in Oakland and 
well deserves representation among its substantial and progressive 
citizens. 



HORACE E. SMITH. 

Horace E. Smith is secretary of the Oakland Cremation Asso- 
ciation. He was born in Bristol, Vermont, October 27, 1849, and 
is a son of James Monroe and Martha (Lowell) Smith. At the 
usual age he entered the district schools, which he attended until 
eight years of age, when his parents left the Green Mountain state 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 211 

and with their family removed westward to Sycamore, De Kalb 
county, Illinois. There he continued his education in the public 
and high schools until he reached the age of fifteen years, when, in 
1864, he entered the United States army as a private, becoming a 
member of Company D, One Hundred and Forty-first Illinois 
Infantry, with which he continued for six months. 

At the end of that time, the war having closed, he returned to his 
home in Sycamore, Illionis, where he secured a position on the 
Sycamore True Republican as "printer's devil." He applied himself 
to the mastery of the business and later became a journeyman, so 
continuing until 1877. He next made his way to Salt Lake City, 
where he engaged as clerk in the general merchandising establish- 
ment n{ John W. Lowell until 1879. In that year he came to Oak- 
land and here engaged as traveling salesman for an Eastern text- 
book publishing house, with which he continued for a year. On the 
expiration of that period he returned to Salt Lake City, where he 
again became clerk in the general merchandise store in which he had 
formerly been employed. There he remained until 1884, when he 
came to Oakland and again was connected with the text-book house 
for a year. He afterward made his way to Los Angeles and became 
secretary and assistant manager of the Los Angeles Daily Tribune, 
with which he was associated until 1890. He then went upon the 
editorial stafT of the Los Angeles Herald, with which he continued 
for a year, and was next appointed chief clerk of the United States 
weather bureau at Washington, D. C, acting in that capacity until 
[894, when he was transferred to Oakland as inspector of the same 
department. Here he continued until 1895, when he went to Los 
Angeles and engaged on the editorial stalT of the Los Angeles Herald 
until 1897. In that year he was appointed observer for the United 
States weatlier bureau at Los Angeles, where he continued for a year 
and was then transferred to San Francisco in the same capacity, so 
continuing until 1910, when he resigned and purchased a ranch near 
Martinez. California. A year later he disposed of that property and 
returned to Oakland, at which time he became secretary of the Oak- 
land Cremation Association, in which connection he still continues. 

On the 30th of May, i88r, in Salt Lake City, Mr. Smith was 
united in marriage to Miss Kate Hobson, who passed away seventeen 
years later, on the nth of March, 1898. Mr. Smith was again mar- 
ried on the 28th of November, 1906, in Oakland, at which time Miss 
Emma Nicholson became his wife. He has a son, Edwin Lowell 
Smith, thirty-two years of age, who attended the schools of Washing- 
ton, D. C, Los Angeles and Oakland, being graduated from the 



212 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Oakland high school with the class of igoo. He then spent a year 
in dental college, and at this writing is president of Ye Liberty 
Candy Company of Oakland. Mr. Smith's business and official con- 
nections have made him widely known, as he has traveled from point 
to point, sojourning in various sections of the country. His many 
substantial qualities are widely recognized and have made him popu- 
lar wherever he has gone. 



ROBERT DALZIEL, Sr. 

Robert Dalziel, Sr., a long-time resident of Oakland, whose busi- 
ness enterprise has constituted the foundation of his growing and 
substantial success, is one whose life record may well serve to inspire 
and encourage others, showing what may be accomplished when 
determination and energy lead the way. Starting out in life with no 
capital, he has gradually advanced to his present enviable position. 

Mr. Dalziel was born in Paisley, Scotland, on November 8, 1836, 
and is a son of Andrew and Margaret (Smith) Dalziel. He attended 
the public schools of his native land until fifteen years of age and then 
crossed the Atlantic to the new world, settling first at Brooklyn, New- 
York, where he served his time as an apprentice to a plumber for 
three years. On the expiration of that period he went to San Fran- 
cisco and entered the employ of the San Francisco Water Company 
in the capacity of plumber. After filling that position, for a year 
he went to Sacramento, where he embarked in the plumbing business 
on his own account. After six years spent in the capital city he sold 
out and came to Oakland, opening a plumbing shop on Broadway, 
between Fifth and Sixth streets. After six months he removed to 
Eighth and Broadway, where he conducted business for two years, 
and then located his establishment at Twelfth and Broadway, where 
he continued for three years. He was afterward at Thirteenth and 
Broadway, where he remained for six years, when he sold out. turn- 
ing over his business to his children. In the meantime his patronage 
had steadily increased. Each removal meant that he was seeking 
more commodious quarters and a more advantageous situation for 
the conduct of his trade. He built up a business of gratifying pro- 
portions, his success being attributable in large measure to his enter- 
prise and to the fairness and probity which characterized his deal- 
ings at all times. 




KOBKKT DALZIKL. Si;. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 215 

In his native city of Paisley Mr. Dalziel was united in marriage 
to Miss Agnes Smith, and they have become the parents of seven 
children: Andrew, who is now president of the Dalziel-Muller 
Company, wholesale dealers in plumbing supplies at San Francisco; 
Robert, who is engaged in the plumbing business at Oakland and San 
Francisco; Alexander, now living retired at Oakland; William, who 
is connected with the plumbing business in Oakland; James, a mem- 
ber of the Dalziel-Muller Company of San Francisco; Anstruther 
Smith, living in Oakland, and Mrs. Margaret Smith Williams, of 
Oakland. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian 
church, to which they loyally adhere, and Mr. Dalziel is a member of 
St. Andrew's Society. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party, and his fraternal relations are with the Masons and the 
Odd Fellows. He deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished, and he has never had occasion to regret his determination to 
come to the new world, for here he has found the opportunities which 
he sought and in their improvement has made continuous advance- 
ment. Ambition has pointed out the way, and ability and energy 
have carried him forward to success. 



TIMOTHY C. COUGHLIN. 

Timothy C. Coughlin, newspaper writer and well known Ala- 
medan, took up his residence in that city with his parents in 1892, 
moving from Santa Cruz county. He was born in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, February 17, 1872, his parents being Michael C. and 
Margaret M. (O'Brien) Coughlin. His father, a native of Ireland, 
was brought to the United States as a child and was educated in the 
schools of the old Bay State. In 1868 he came to California by way 
of the Isthmus of Panama and assisted in the building of the first 
transcontinental railroad into Alameda county, via the Altamont 
pass. In 1874 he went to Santa Cruz, becoming one of the pioneer 
lumbermen of that section of the state. He later directed large lum- 
ber industries in Humboldt and Shasta counties. His death occurred 
in Alameda in 1903. His wife, a daughter of the late William and 
Margaret O'Brien, of Springfield, Massachusetts, followed him to 
the grave the same year. 

Timothy C. Coughlin obtained his early education at Notre 
Dame Convent, San Jose, and in the public schools of Santa Cruz 
county. He continued his studies at St. Mary's College, Oakland, 



21(j HISTORY OF AT.AMEDA COUNTY 

from which institution he was graduated with high honors in 1893, 
taking the degree of Bachelor of Science. Following two years' con- 
nection with the San Francisco commission house of Henry Doyle & 
Company, Mr. Coughlin took up news writing, joining the editorial 
stafT of the Examiner. After two years with that paper he went to 
the Morning Call, with which he continued for nearly fourteen years, 
also doing work at various times during that period for the Oakland 
Herald, Tribune and Enquirer. He retired from the Call editorial 
staf¥ April 19, 1913, and two days later was appointed city clerk of 
Alameda, the first political position he ever accepted and one to 
which he did not aspire. As city clerk he won an enviable name for 
himself by reason of his sterling, rugged honesty, fair dealing, all 
around competency and incorruptibility. 

Mr. Coughlin was married in San Francisco, February 17, 1909, 
to Miss Mary C. O'Brien, daughter of the late John and Mary 
O'Brien of Altamont. Two children, a son and daughter, have 
blessed the union. Mr. Coughlin is affiliated with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, being a member of Oakland Lodge, No. 
171. The high principles that have consistently actuated his life 
have been such as to win for him the respect and esteem of all who 
know liim well. 



B. B. MASTEN, M. D. 

Dr. B. B. Masten, who since 1906 has been in active and suc- 
cessful practice of medicine and surgery in Oakland, where he is 
numbered among the foremost representatives of his profession, was 
born in Brazil, Indiana, in 1871, and acquired his early education in 
the public schools of Lafayette, in the same state. He afterward 
took a course in mechanical engineering at Purdue University and 
then entered the L-niversity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he 
spent three years. At the end of that time he enrolled in Bennett 
Medical College of Chicago and in 1895 was graduated from that 
institution with the degree of M. D. 

He came to California in 1896 but remained only a short time, 
returning to Chicago and accepting a position as house physician 
at the Palmer House. He did creditable and able work in that 
capacity for a number of years, after wiiich, in 1905, he returned 
west, locating in San Francisco. After one year's practice there he 
moved his ollicc to Oakland and here he lias since huih up a large 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 217 

and representative patronage, accorded to him in recognition of liis 
unusual proficiency in his chosen field of labor. Dr. Masten belongs 
to the National Medical Association and the state and county med- 
ical societies and keeps in touch with his profession in its most 
advanced phases. Everything pertaining to the medical science, 
every new experiment, every different field of investigation and 
research are of interest to him, and he himself has always remained 
a close and earnest student, his powers developing with the years. 
In Oakland he is regarded as an able, conscientious and reliable 
phvsician and has the respect of his associates in the medical frater- 
nity and the esteem and confidence of the local public. 



FRED L. HANNA. 



Fred L. Hanna, who has been in the service of the Santa Fe 
Railroad for almost a quarter of a centurv, has worked his way 
steadily upward from a clerical position to that of general freight 
and passenger agent in Oakland, winning the last promotion on the 
istof January, 1914. His birth occurred in Steubenville, Ohio, on 
the 1st of May, 1869, his parents being-D. W. and Ella Hanna. He 
attended public school in his native town until fourteen vears of age 
and then came to Los Angeles, California, where he completed the 
high-school course by graduation in 1888. 

Mr. Hanna afterward embarked in the stationery business, but 
sold out at the end of two years and secured a positiiMi as clerk with 
the Santa Fe Railroad Company, in the service of which he has 
remained continuously to the present time, winning gradual promo- 
tion as he has demonstrated his ability and faithfulness in the dis- 
charge of the duties entrusted to his care. Mr. Hanna served as- 
traveling freight agent from 1901 until 1907 and subsequently acted 
as traveling freight and passenger agent until the ist of January, 
1914, when he was made general agent of the freight and passenger 
department in Oakland. In this important position he has already 
ingratiated himself with the officers of the road, as well as shippers 
and the traveling public, by reason of the new ideas which he has 
advanced and the improvements he has promulgated. 

On the 24th of December, 1896, in Los Angeles, Mr. Hanna was 
joined in wedlock to Miss Mary McAleer. He is a valued member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and also belongs to the Commercial 
Club and the Nile Club. In politics he is a republican, while his 



21S HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTV 

religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. In whatever rela- 
tion of life he has been found he has been true and loyal to the trust 
reposed in him and his career has been in conformity with a high 
standard of conduct. 



WILLIAM A. POWELL. 

William A. Powell, a well known young attorney of Oakland, 
was born in this city August 29, 1880. He is a son of Walter and 
Anne B. (Denny) Powell, natives of England, who came to Cali- 
fornia in 1865, the father going by way of the Isthmus of Panama 
and the mother around the Horn in a sailing vessel. 

William A. Powell acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Berkeley and later attended the L'niversity of California, 
from which he was graduated in igo2. He is a prominent athlete, 
having been a member of the varsity track team in 19(^12 and from 
that year until 1907 holding the Pacific Coast championship for 
hurdling. He now engages in the general practice of law in Oak- 
land and controls an important and growing patronage. Mr. Powell 
is a member of the Athenian Club and is a democrat in his political 
views. He holds a high place in his party's councils, as is indicated 
by the fact that from 1910 to 191 2 he was chairman of the democratic 
countv central committee and is now a member of the democratic 
executive state central committee. Although still a young man, he 
has already gained an enviable place in the ranks of the legal frater- 
nity in this part of the state and will undoubtedly be carried forw ard 
into still more important relations with professional life. 



EDWIN H. MAYON. 



Edwin H. Mayon, a representative and esteemed citizen of Oak- 
land, has held the position of chief deputy county auditor for the 
past four years and has made a most creditable record in that connec- 
tion. His birth occurred in Pioche, Nevada, on the ist of Novem- 
ber, 1877, his parents being Thomas C. and Nellie C. (Reed) 
Mavon. The father, who was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, Octo- 
ber 14, 1S43, actjuircd iiis education in the place of his nativity and 
there remained until 1S62, when he came to California and turned 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 219 

his attention to mining, locating first in Marysville and subsequently 
in Amador county, where he continued until 1875. He then went 
to Central America and followed mining there until his removal to 
Alaska, where he served as superintendent of the Apollo until 1900. 
During the past fourteen years, however, he has lived retired in Oak- 
land, being widely recognized as one of its respected and substantial 
residents. It was here that he wedded Miss Nellie C. Reed, by whom 
he has two children: George C. and Edwin H., of this review. 

The latter attended the graded and high schools of Oakland until 
seventeen years of age and subsequently spent eight months as a stu- 
dent in the Aydelotte Business College. He then went to Alaska and 
until 1897 "^^'^^ engaged as assayer in the mine of which his father 
acted as superintendent. Afterward he made his way to Dawson, 
Yukon Territory, and worked a claim until the spring of 1899, when 
he went to Nome, Alaska, being one of the first miners there. In the 
fall of 1899 he returned to Oakland, but in the spring of 1900 again 
made his way to Nome, where he was engaged in mining for six 
months. Subsequently he followed mining in the southeastern part 
of Alaska until 1901 and then sold out, returning to Oakland. Froqi 
1901 to 1904 he was engaged in mining in California, operating in 
Tuolumne, Amador, Butte, Trinity, Siskin, Eldorado and Caliveras. 
He was employed as bookkeeper in the office of the city treasurer 
at Oakland from 1904 until 1908 and in the latter year became chief 
deputy county auditor, in which capacity he has remained continu- 
ously since, discharging his duties in a highly satisfactory and com- 
mendable manner. 

On the 4th of March, 1906, in Oakland, Mr. Mayon was united 
in marriage to Miss Ella McLaughlin, by whom he has one child, 
Elinor, now five years of age. He is a republican in politics and a 
Protestant in religious faith and is identified fraternally with the 
Woodmen of the World. Mr. Mayon is a wide-awake, energetic 
and alert young man, and both he and his wife are highly respected 
in the citv where thev make their home. 



THE BOHANNON CANCER INSTITUTE. 

The Bohannon Cancer Institute, under the management of G. C. 
Bohannon, is an institution established for the scientific treatment and 
cure of cancer and all forms of malignant and benign growths with- 
out the use of the knife, burning plaster or X-ray. It is a large and 



220 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

thoroughly equipped private sanitarium exclusively for the treat- 
ment of cancer and tumor sufferers, and the men in charge of the 
institution have been unusually successful along their special line. 
Their experience in the treatment of malignant growths extends over 
a period of many years, during which several thousand cases have 
come under their observation. With the idea in view that there was 
no reason why they, who have had experience in the treatment of 
cancer and have made a special study of it, should not specialize in 
this disease as others do in other branches of medicine, The Bohannon 
Cancer Institute was established. It is only necessary to consult per- 
sons who have been patients at the sanitarium to be convinced tliat 
the services there are real and efficient and that the institution is 
conducted in a manner which commands respect and approbation 
from all who have come to knovv' about it. 

The directors of The Bohannon Institute claim that cancer is a 
curable disease and base these claims upon the success which they 
have had in the treatment of it. Their scientific method utilizes many 
different medicines in such a manner as to completely revolutionize 
the treatment of all abnormal growths, either malignant or benign. 
There is no one medicine that can be successfully employed in the 
treatment of cancer, and this fact to a certain extent accounts for the 
failures that have been made in the past in this branch of practice. 
The Bohannon method is founded upon three facts, recognized today 
by all regular schools of practice. First: Cancer in its incipiency 
is always a local disease and not a disease of the blood. Second: 
Cancer is a vegetating cell growth and in every instance invades the 
tissues and glands by the process known as infiltration. Third: Can- 
cer, to be permanently cured, requires the removal of the remotest 
cell. Recognizing these facts, The Bohannon Institute employs anti- 
cancer toxin, with a strong affinity for malignant growths, which, 
being diseased and porous, offer it no response but absorb the medi- 
cine instantly, leaving the sound tissue in a perfectly healthy and 
normal condition. The advantages of this treatment are as follows: 
( I ) it is a very rapid method. The patient only need spend a 
short time awav from home; in many cases can be treated and return 
home the same day; the busy man need not neglect his affairs; the 
workman loses but a little time; the housewife is gone from her 
familv but a short time. 

(2) It is a moderate priced treatment. Cost of treatment in 
every case depends entirely upon the extent of the growth and amount 
of tissue involved. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 221 

(3) It is a bloodless treatment. There is no loss of blood and 
consequently no weakening of the system. 

(4) It is a safe treatment. 

(5) It does not produce violent inflammation, as usually accom- 
panies the application of escharotics in general, hence 

(6) Pain is minimized. 

(7) It does not undermine the constitution. 

(8) It does not rack the nerves. 

(9) Patients are not required to remain in bed. 

(10) It does not aflfect the heart. 

(11) The appetite is not impaired. 

(12) It may be used inside the mouth and on other mucous 
surfaces. 

This treatment, or anti-cancer toxin, is introduced into the afifect- 
ed tissues by a hypodermic syringe and in this way the diseased tissue 
is reached immediately and efifectively. The toxin attacks and kills 
only the diseased tissue, having no effect whatever on sound and 
healthy tissues. The Bohannon Institute is located at 1813 Univer- 
sity avenue in Berkeley and is thoroughly equipped and efficiently 
managed, being in the hands of a competent corps of directors, aided 
by a staff of hospital trained nurses, trained also in this particular line 
of nursing. The institution since its foundation in 1909 by G. C. 
Bohannon, its present manager, has had a very prosperous career 
and it treats an increasing number of patients year by year, its best 
advertisement being its satisfied clients. 



LINCOLN S. CHURCH. 

Lincoln S. Church, a member of the firm of Snook & Church, 
general legal practitioners in Oakland, was born in Alvarado, Ala- 
meda county, California, May 12, 1865, a son of Augustus M. and 
Ellen (Cronkhite) Church. He acquired his education in the public 
schools of Oakland, and after he was graduated from the high school 
studied law with J. C. Martin. In 1886 he was admitted to the bar 
and began the practice of his profession. He rose rapidly to a posi- 
tion of prominence and a short time after beginning his independent 
career, or in 1889, was appointed prosecuting attorney for the police 
court, serving for four years under District Attorney George W. 
Reed, and being assistant district attorney for two years, 1895-97, 
under District Attorney Charles K. Snook. He was afterward for 



222 HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 

four years chief deputy in the district attorney's office. In 1899 he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Snook under the name of Snook & 
Church, and this has since become one of the sound and reliable legal 
firms in the city, connected through an extensive clientage with a 
great deal of important litigation. Mr. Church handles all of the 
criminal cases and has made a wide reputation as a criminal lawyer. 
Mr. Church married Miss Rosalia Clark, an accomplished mu- 
sician, a native of California and a daughter of Marion Clark, who 
came to this state in 1851. Mr. and Mrs. Church have a daughter, 
Esther. Mr. Church was for four years prior to January, 1903, 
attorney for the public administrator. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, having taken the fourteenth degree according to 
the Scottish Rite, and he is identified also with the University Lodge 
of Odd Fellows and the Commercial Club. His record since starting 
upon the practice of law has been marked by consecutive progress, 
and his natural qualifications indicate that he will win still higher 
advancement in his chosen field. 



CHARLES LUTHER TRABERT. 

The rapid rise of Charles Luther Trabert in the lumber business 
is a splendid example of the value of specialization in the modern 
commercial world, and it demonstrates also the importance of well- 
directed energy, resolution and ambition as factors in the attainment 
of success. AL-. Trabert has devoted his entire active life to the 
lumber industry and has been associated with the various C. A. 
Smith companies longer than anv of his business associates or em- 
ploves, rising from a humble position to be secretary of all of the 
great lumber corporations controlled by C. A. Smith. Mr. Trabert 
is not only a lumberman, but a forester also, having made a scien- 
tific studv of forestrv and liaving accomplished a great deal of con- 
structive and important work along this line. 

He was born at Ephrata, Pennsylvania, April 30, 1871, and is a 
son of Rev. George H. Trabert, pastor of an English Lutheran con- 
gregation in that city. He is of Pennsylvania-Dutch stock and of a 
familv descended from a line of German burgomasters which can 
be traced back to an ancestor who was a soldier under Gustavus 
Adolphus. The father of the subject of this review is still active 
in the ministry as pastor of the Salem English Lutheran church at 
Minneapolis, Miimesota. He has reached the age of seventy years. 



HISTORY OF ALA:\IEDA COUXTY 225 

For more than forty years he has been a great individual force in 
the advancement of the Lutheran religion in this country and has 
accomplished a great deal of important work during that time. In 
1883 he went to Minnesota as missionary for the Lutheran synod 
and, with the exception of five years spent in Pennsylvania, has made 
Minneapolis his home since that time. He has established English 
Lutheran congregations in Duluth and Red Wing, Minnesota, Fargo, 
North Dakota, La Crosse, Wisconsin, and many other cities, and he 
was for years the only English Lutheran minister in the northwest. 
His wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Mary Elizabeth Min- 
nigh, is of mixed Pennsylvania-Dutch and English stock, an ancestor 
of the family having come from Munich in 1622. 

When Charles L. Trabert was still a child his parents moved to 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania, and in that city he began his education, 
later completing it at Minneapolis, where he attended the grade 
school and later the Central high school for three years. He was a 
member of the first manual training class in the Minneapolis schools 
and was for three years a student in Gustavus Adolphus College at 
St. Peter, Minnesota. Before he received his degree he was obliged 
to lay aside his books in order to earn his livelihood, and the summer 
after his last year at college he entered the employ of C. A. Smith, 
with whom he has remained connected since that time. His first 
position was in the office of C. A. Smith & Company in the Lumber 
Exchange and his work consisted of drawing maps and plans. In 
this way he became interested in the lumber business and gained 
his first knowledge of standing timber, along which line he directed 
his future interests and activities. Later Mr. Trabert was engaged 
by Mr. Smith as tutor for his eldest son, Oscar Smith, afterward 
killed in a street-car accident, and while holding this position he 
traveled with young Smith to Florida and spent the winter there, 
returning the next summer to Minnesota. Thev spent the season in 
the Pine River district, living at the summer farm camp for the 
logging crews, and Mr. Trabert went with the driving crews, thus 
becoming familiar through personal experience with the various 
details of practical lumbering. Mr. Trabert was afterward able to 
arrange his work so that he took his final year in college at New- 
berry College, North Carolina, from which institution he received 
his degree of B. A. in 1894. 

Following this he returned to Minneapolis, where he perma- 
nently entered the employ of C. A. Smith & Company, then a part- 
nership of C. A. Smith and former Governor lohn S. Pillsbury. 
Mr. Trabert at once became connected with the timber end of the 



226 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 

business and rose within a year to be private secretary to Mr. Smith, 
a position which he filled for seventeen years, gradually taking 
charge of the financial side of the business. Mr. Trabert retained 
his position as private secretary to Mr. Smith until January i, 1904, 
when the C. A. Smith Timber Company was formed with a capital 
stock of one million dollars. This company took over all of the 
timber holdings of the former concern and moved its northwestern 
headquarters and Mr. Smith's private offices from the mill in North 
Minneapolis to the Andrus building, whence they moved in May, 
191 2, to their present premises in Oakland, California. Gradually 
the C. A. Smith Timber Company acquired interests in the west, 
and the business grew so rapidly that subsidiary corporations were 
formed to handle various phases of the western business. Of each 
of these companies Mr. Trabert was made secretary, and he now 
holds this position in the C. A. Smith Timber Company of Oregon, 
a corporation with a capital of six million dollars; the Linn & Lane 
Timber Company, with a capital of three million; the C. A. Smith 
Lumber & Manufacturing Company, with a capital of four and 
one-half million; the Smith-Powers Logging Company, with a cap- 
ital of eight hundred thousand; the Inter-Ocean Transportation 
Company, with a capital of five hundred thousand; the C. A. Smith 
Fir Company, and six or seven minor corporations. As the Smith 
timber was cut oft' in Minnesota and the interests on the Pacific coast 
grew, Mr. Smith, looking about for a western location, decided 
upon Oakland, for the reason that the five timber districts controlled 
by the Smith interests — two fir tracts and one spruce in Oregon and 
one redwood and one sugar pine and yellow pine tract in California 
• — all are tributary to tidewater. He therefore moved all of his 
interests to Oakland and established yards, a planing mill and a 
box factory at Bay Point, which he has made the distributing center 
of the concern. The company occupies nearly an entire floor in the 
Syndicate building, on Broadway in Oakland. 

For many years past Mr. Trabert has been interested in forestry. 
or rather in what he terms "conservative lumbering." Mr. Smitli 
placed Mr. Trabert in general charge of the forestry department 
of his companies, and under his able management one of the best 
forestry libraries in the United States has been collected. This has 
been moved from Minneapolis and is now in Oakland. Mr. Trabert 
spent a week with the late J. E. Defebaugh and others studying witli 
Dr. C. A. Schenck at Biltmore, North Carolina, the methods of 
reforestation employed there. He has written considerably on the 
subject and has talked before numerous bodies in the effort to direct 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 227 

public sentiment and to stir up interest in reforestation. He advo- 
cates the abolition of prohibitive taxation of timber lands, his theory 
being that the only way to get justice in this regard is to make the 
public see that it is to its interests to get trees grown rather than 
to have them sacrificed. Mr. Trabert is in direct control of the for- 
esters in the employ of C. A. Smith, and while the company has 
given up reforesting its Minnesota lands, several men trained under 
Mr. Trabert's direction are now in the Minnesota service under 
State Forester W. T. Cox. Mr. Trabert is a member of the National 
Forestry Association, the National Geographical Association, the 
Archaeological Association of America and kindred bodies. He 
also belongs to the Oregon Conservation Association, and consulted 
with the secretary of state of California in regard to the formation 
of the California Conservation Association. He has frequently lec- 
tured before the University of California and the Forestry Club on 
the subject of forestry. 

On the 2t;th of June, i S94, in Newberry, South Carolina, Mr. 
Trabert was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Abney W'ells, a 
daughter of Osborne Wells, a prominent planter of that city. The 
father is a veteran of the Civil war, having served as commissary 
officer in the Confederate army. He is still managing his estate, 
which is on the outskirts of Newberry, partly within the city. Mr. 
and Mrs. Trabert have become the parents of a daughter, Dorothv, 
aged seventeen. 

Mr. Trabert was well known in social circles of Minneapolis, 
where he held membership in the L'niversity Club, the Interlachen 
Club and in various other organizations, such as the Minneapolis 
Choral Club, the Philharmonic Club, of which he was president, 
and the Federation of Men's Church Clubs, of which he was a mem- 
ber of the executive committee. He was a member of the Minneap- 
olis bar, having received a degree in law from the University of 
Minnesota in 1899, and he intends to ask admission also in Califor- 
nia. In Oakland he has also become well known in community life, 
holding membership in the Athenian Club and the Commercial 
Club. In addition to this he is a director in the Chamber of Com- 
merce and in the Young Men's Christian Association and belongs 
also to the University Club of San Francisco. During his entire life 
he has been active in the afifairs of the Lutheran church and during 
his residence in Minneapolis was choirmaster of the vested choir of 
the Salem English Lutheran church. He was one of the prime 
movers in organizing the St. Michael's Lutheran church of Berke- 
ley, which was incorporated September 29, 1913, and is vestryman 



228 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

and choirmaster. He is a director in the Berkeley Ontario Society. 
He belongs to the Sons of the Revolution, and his wife is treasurer 
of John Rutledge Chapter, D. A. R. She is in addition a member 
of Joseph Le Conte Chapter, Daughters of the Confederacy, and 
is popular in the Wednesday Morning Musical Club, connected 
with the Ebell Society of Oakland. 

The ilmerican Lumberman, under date of June 22, 191 2, speak- 
ing of the career of Charles L. Trabert, says: "Faithful allegiance 
to an enterprise and faithful adherence to a principle bring man\ 
rewards. There is the satisfaction of having done good things well. 
There is the success that certainly follows consistent thought and 
action. In the lumber industry especially are many notable exam- 
ples of men who have devoted their lives to the industry, or to some 
particular phase of it, and who have been long connected with houses 
of national standing. In some instances that connection began in 
the early days of the enterprise, when its proportions were smaller 
than they are todav. It is fair, therefore, to give these men credit 
for having contributed a share toward the upbuilding of these par- 
ticular concerns and the development of the industry in general. 
It is the purpose of this article to indicate in a small way the part 
that Charles L. Trabert, secretary of the various C. A. Smith com- 
panies, has plaved in the operations of that great lumberman, and in 
shaping public thought and policy regarding conservative lumber- 
ing. No better example can be found of a man who has grown 
with his company, whose capacity has kept step with his increasing 
responsibilities and increasing opportunities for labor that would 
count. In the rapid development of great industrial enterprises in 
this countrv the pace often becomes too swift for the little men; by 
the potential big man the pace is relished and accelerated. Mr. Tra- 
bert began in a most humble capacity but quickly demonstrated his 
fitness for larger responsibilities. ' In the development of the great 
C. A. Smith operations he has done his share and is accorded proper 
credit by his associates and fellow lumbermen." 



LANCELOT RICHARDSON. 

Lancelot Richardson is well known in railroad circles of ()akl:ind 
as district freight and passenger agent of the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road. He is a trustworthy and faithful official, standing high in the 
estimation of his superior otficers, and is popular with the general 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 229 

public on account of his courtesy and his readiness to oblige them in 
every possible way. He was born in Princeton, California, August 
17, 1863, a son of Lancelot and Catherine (Gardener) Richardson, 
who were married in Maryland. The father was born in Lancashire, 
England, and was there educated, coming to California in 1862 and 
settling in Princeton, where he was engaged in mining until 1868. 
He then went to Utah, where he operated coal mines near Coalville 
until 1873 and thence to Vallejo, California, where he established 
himself in the general merchandise business, continuing thus until 
his retirement in 1877. He died in 1903. He was a popular mem- 
ber of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
To him and his wife was born one child, Lancelot, of this review. 

The latter attended the public and high schools in Vallejo until 
thirteen years of age and then became a messenger for the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company, being after two years promoted to the 
position of operator and ticket agent at South Vallejo and remaining 
there until 1885. He was then transferred to Summit, California, 
as agent, where he was stationed until 1886, then becoming assistant 
agent at Rocklin, in which town he staid until 1887. Until 1888 he 
was telegraph operator in the superintendent's office in Sacramento, 
when he was appointed agent at Suisun City, where he remained until 
1 89 1. In that year he became agent at Carpinteria, remaining there 
until 1893, when he was transferred in the same capacity to Santa 
Barbara, and there he acted as agent until 1905. From 1901; until 
191 1 he was commercial agent of the railroad at Santa Barbara and 
then became district freight and passenger agent at Oakland, which 
position he now holds. His advancement has been steady, and he has 
been constantly promoted to more important positions as his ability 
developed. He stands high in the estimation of the railroad officials 
because of his devotion to his work, his untiring energy and the tact 
which he uses in transacting all business which comes under his 
department. 

In October, 1884, Mr. Richardson married Miss Harriet E. 
Kitto, and they have two children: Elizabeth E., a graduate of the 
Santa Barbara high school, the Berkeley Arts and Crafts School, the 
State Normal and Training School and now a teacher in the Oakland 
public schools; and Lillian B., also at home. Mr. Richardson is a 
member of the Oakland Commercial Club and the Chamber of Com- 
merce and can always be found in the front ranks with those men who 
have at heart the progress of the city. Fraternally he is a Mason and 
practices the principles of that brotherhood in his everyday life. 
He is a member of the Traffic Club of San Francisco and the Atlicn- 



230 HISTORY OF ALA .M EDA COUXTY 

ian and Nile Clubs of Oakland. His political persuasion is that of 
the republican party and in religious faith he is a Unitarian. His 
career should serve as an incentive to the young man of today, for it 
shows that ambition and perseverance lead to the goal of worthv 
success. 



PETER CHRISTENSEN. 

No foreign nation has made better or more valuable contributions 
to the cosmopolitan population of this great republic than the little 
kingdom of Denmark, for the people of that land, coming to this 
country in search of new homes and fortunes, invariably develop into 
substantial, constructive, law-abiding citizens, who in most cases 
make their marks in the world and contribute materially to the pros- 
perity of the communities in which their activities are centered. A 
good example of Denmark's excellent product was found in Peter 
Christensen, a well known and popular contractor of Alameda, who 
died suddenly on February 23, 1912. 

Mr. Christensen was born in the rural district of Fredericia, 
Denmark, June 21, 1845, the son of Peter Christensen, Sr., a well-to- 
do builder in that vicinity. Until he was fourteen years of age the 
son attended the public schools, and then became an apprentice to 
learn the trade of joiner and cabinet-maker. At the end of his two 
years of apprenticeship he went to work at his trade, and followed 
it for fourteen years, or until he was twenty-eight years of age. 

In 1875 Mr. Christensen decided to seek his fortune in the new 
world, so bidding farewell to his home and friends he set sail for 
New York. From that city he went directly to Wisconsin, the mid- 
dle west at that time being the principal destination of the Scandi- 
navian newcomers, but he remained in the Badger state only about 
a year. Hearing of the opportunities for skilled artisans in the Bay 
cities, he came westward and settled in x-^lameda. He immediately 
found ample opportunity to ply his trade of cabinet-maker, and with- 
in a comparatively short time he became a contractor and builder 
on his own account. His business grew rapidly, and as proof of his 
industry and success it may be stated that many of the finest residences 
in Alameda and also business houses and schoolhouses were erected 
under his personal supervision. He employed a large number of 
nuMi in the execution of his contracts, and bv his honesty and integ- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 231 

rity and his straightforward dealing, he won the confidence of the 
people of the city. 

His prominence in business also brought him into the local 
political limelight. He was a pronounced republican and sturdily 
upheld his party's principles in and out of season. He was a valued 
member of the city council and was serving his second term when he 
died. Mr. Christensen also was prominent in fraternal circles, being 
affiliated with the following ocders : Oak. Grove Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
Alameda Chapter, R. A. M., of which he was past high priest; Oak- 
land Commandery, No. ii, K. T. ; Encinal Lodge of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he was a past grand, having 
been identified with that order for more than thirty years; and Ala- 
meda Lodge, Loyal Order of the Moose. 

On October 4, 1878, soon after his arrival in California, Mr. 
Christensen was united in marriage with Miss Marie Nielson. They 
were married in Alameda and there established their home. Mrs. 
Christensen is also a native of Denmark and came to California as 
a young girl. Her father was a prosperous builder in his native 
land. To this union were born two sons: George W., now deputy 
city clerk of Alameda, and William P., a machinist and stationary 
engineer. 

Mrs. Christensen has for many years been a member of the 
Eastern Star and Rebekah lodges. She has held numerous ofiices in 
both orders and has been made the recipient of high honors. In 
October, 1910, she was chosen as the member from her Rebekah 
lodge to receive the Chivalry degree, which was conferred by the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at their convention held at Santa 
Anna that year. 

No higher compliment can be paid the memory of Mr. Christen- 
sen than to quote the resolutions passed by the city council of Ala- 
meda at the time of his demise, which are as follows: 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to take from our midst the 
HoxoR.MU.E Piter Christexsex, 
who has faithfully served the city of Alameda as a member of this 
Council for the past five years, giving ungrudgingly of his time anel 
abilitv in both an official and unofficial capacity. 

Resolved, That in the untimely death of Peter Christensen, the 
citv of Alameda has lost a tried and faithful public official, the 



232 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUXTY 

City Council a wise, true and upright advisor and the community an 
honored and public-spirited citizen. 

Resolved further, As a mark of respect to the memory of 
Peter Christexsex 
that the flags on all public buildings be placed at half-mast until after 
the funeral of the deceased, that the entrance to the City Hall be 
draped for a period of thirty days, that a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family of the deceased and also spread on the minutes 
of this body and as a further token of respect that this council do 
now adjourn. 

Adopted and passed by the Council of the City of Alameda, this 
23rd day of February, 191 2. E. B. BULLOCK, 

Presiding Officer of the Council. 
Attest: F. E. Bruwxixg. City Clerk. 

Presented to and approved by me this 23d day of February, 
191 2. W. H. Nov, Mayor of Alameda. 



OLIVER D. HAMLIN, M. D. 

One of the most prominent members of the medical profession 
in Alameda county and one who has risen to the place of importance 
which he now occupies through his own energy, industry and ability 
is Dr. Oliver D. Hamlin, who for more than twenty years has 
practiced his profession in the city of Oakland. He was born in 
Alameda county, April 21, 1870, and is a son of Oliver Hamlin, both 
his father and mother having been numbered among the pioneers 
of California who came to the coast in 1849 by way of the Isthmus 
of Panama. 

Dr. Hamlin acquired his preliminary education in the public 
schools of Alameda county and later attended Santa Clara College, 
taking a general course and graduating in 1890. In the following 
year he entered the Cooper Medical College of San Francisco and 
received the degree of M. D. from that institution in 1894. January 
I, 1895, almost immediately upon leaving college, he engaged in 
active practice, his first connection being that of resident physician, 
under Dr. Woolsey, at the Southern Pacific Hospital. He showed 
marked ability and a decided liking for his duties and from the very 
beginning preferred surgery to ordinary practice. Now, after his 
years of experience, he finds it possible to devote almost his entire 
time to that branch of professional work and is considered one of 




DR. OLIVER n. HAMUX 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 235 

the foremost surgeons on the Pacific coast. He began as assistant in 
the Receiving Hospital and was later appointed chief division sur- 
geon of the Southern Pacific Company. He is consulting surgeon of 
the Providence and Merritt Hospitals and for a number of years 
acted as surgeon of the Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institution of Berk- 
eley. He was for six years president of the Oakland board of health, 
although his membership in that body covered a period of eight 
years. 

Dr. Hamlin is professor of surgery in the Oakland College of 
Medicine and Surgery and chief surgeon of the Alameda County 
Emergency Hospital. Aside from his professional labors he has 
prepared many papers on surgical subjects which have been pub- 
lished in the leading medical journals and read at numerous meet- 
ings of the local societies. For the years 1912 and 191 3 Dr. Hamlin 
was honored with the office of president of the California State Med- 
ical Society, which demonstrates the high esteem in which he is 
held by his many professional associates. He is past president of the 
Alameda County Medical Society, past president of the Alumni 
Association of Cooper Medical College, and past president of the 
Pacific Coast Association of Railroad Surgeons. 

Dr. Hamlin married Miss Elizabeth McMahon, of San Mateo, 
California, and they have become the parents of a son, Oliver D., Jr., 
who is attending the University of California. The doctor is promi- 
nent in fraternal circles, being a member of the Benevolent Protect- 
ive Order of Elks, the Nile, the Athenians, and the Claremont Coun- 
try Clubs of Oakland, and the Bohemian Club of San Francisco. He 
keeps in close touch with the most advanced medical thought through 
constant reading and research, is thoroughly devoted to the interests 
of his patients and adheres steadfastly to the highest standards of 
professional ethics. Those who know him personally find him a 
genial and courteous gentleman and value his friendship most highly. 



WALTER JOSEPH PETERSEN. 

The present chief of police of Oakland is Walter Joseph Peter- 
sen, who for many years has been connected with that department. 
He is a highly trained, well informed, courteous officer, who is 
eminently fitted for the important position which he holds. He 
comes of Norwegian stock and was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, 
on March 14, 1868, and is a son of Captain Henry U. K. and Amelia 



2;56 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

(Bergner) Petersen. The father was born in Porsgrund, Norway, 
and early in life took up seafaring as his profession. He rose through 
the ranks and later became captain, having charge of several ocean 
liners in the course of his career. He came to Oakland in 1871 and 
from this port operated his own vessels up and down the coast, con- 
ducting excursions between San Diego and Mexico. Both he and 
his wife have passed away. In their family were five children, of 
whom Francis and Laurette are deceased; Fred, another brother 
of our subject, is an expert accountant, employed in the office of the 
auditor of Alameda county. 

Walter J. Petersen came to California in his early youth, attend- 
ing the public schools in this state until he was thirteen years of age, 
when he became a student in the California Military Academy, in 
which institution he remained until sixteen years of age. He then 
went to sea, as was the tradition of his family, entering the employ 
of N. Bichard & Company of San Francisco, his first voyage being 
on the bark Montana, on which he shipped as a cabin bov. The 
voyage was to China and Australia, and he soon worked up to the 
position of third mate. After two years on that line he entered the 
service of the Dispatch line, with which he remained as officer for 
seven months. He subsequently associated himself with his father 
in making excursions between San Diego and Mexico and continued 
so until 1894, when he became a carrier and later superintendent in 
the Oakland postoffice and so remained for about four years. At the 
end of that time he became a patrolman on the Oakland police force 
and on January 12, 1898, was promoted to the rank of sergeant. On 
June 7, 1899, he was made captain of police and in October, 1907, 
became captain of detectives. He showed himself well adapted for 
this work and so ably handled all cases intrusted to him that on June 
I, 191 I, he was promoted captain of inspectors and on September 5, 
1912. became chief of police, the duties of this office beginning on 
October i. In regard to his activities as captain of detectives a for- 
mer writer said : 

"When Captain Petersen assumed his duties he took hold of the 
office with the firm resolution of keeping the detective bureau up to 
a high standard of efficiency. During his administration some of 
the most important and intricate criminal cases in the history 
of the country have come under his supervision. He has been called 
upon to untangle some very knotty problems and there are not many 
instances wherein he has failed to do so. His wide experience among 
all classes of people has given him an exceptional opportunity to 
studv human nature. He is not often wrong in weighing people's 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 237 

motives, their weaknesses or their worth and generally has been able 
to extract the truth from the evidence before him." 

On October 20, 1887, Chief Petersen married Florence B. Fisher, 
and they have three children : Ulric K., who is twenty-four years of 
age and is foreman of the electric shops of the P. P. I. Railroad at 
Beaverton, Oregon; Cedric W., twenty-three years old, who is an 
attorney for the First National Bank and resides at Pleasanton; and 
Roderick Paul, who is six and a half years of age. 

Mr. Petersen is a progressive republican and is interested in pub- 
lic affairs, but is not in any sense a politician. He stands, however, 
for everything that is of value to the city and gives his ready support 
to movements which have for their purpose the advancement of the 
community. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason of the 
Scottish Rite and a Shriner, is grand master of the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen and belongs to the Woodmen of the World. His 
religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, and he belongs to 
the Oakland Commercial Club and the Chamber of Commerce, 
being thoroughly in sympathy with the purposes of these organiza- 
tions. He is a useful and valued citizen, and his appointment to the 
position of chief of police has met with the ready approval of all of 
the residents of Oakland. 



WILLIAM RANDALL ALBERGER. 

William Randall Alberger, a man of action rather than of theory, 
and yet a man whose plans are carefully formulated before being 
promptly executed, is now traffic manager of the Tonopah & Tide- 
water Railroad and vice president of the San Francisco-Oakland 
Terminal Railway. He occupies a central place on the stage of 
activity in connection with western traffic. He is both forceful and 
resourceful; recognizes possibilities and utilizes them; plans out big 
things and accomplishes them. He was born in Bufifalo, New York, 
October 4, i860, and is a son of William Clendenin and Frances 
Augusta Alberger. The father, also a native of Bufifalo, was born 
in 1S36, attended the public schools and during the Civil war served 
with the Forty-ninth New York Infantry, becoming lieutenant 
colonel. He was mustered out in 1865 and turned his attention to 
railroad building and operation, being thus engaged in various places 
until 1885, when he came to Oakland. Here he practiced civil engi- 
neering until IQ04, when he removed to San Francisco, wliere he 



238 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 

continues actively in his chosen profession. He was married in 
Buffalo, New York, on the 12th of January, 1858, to Frances Augusta 
Tyron, and unto them were born five children: William R. ; Ida W. 
Severin, of San Francisco; diaries R. ; Mrs. J. E. Dorry, of Detroit, 
and one who has passed away. 

The stability of the east and the enterprise of the west combine 
in W. R. Alberger and have made him one of the giants in the west- 
ern traflic world. At an early day he heard and heeded the call of 
the business life. He did not even pursue a high-school course, but 
entered at once into the world's activities and has learned his lessons 
in the school of experience, where he has been a most apt pupil. 
However, following his removal westward he was persuaded to enter 
\\'illiam Jewell College at Liberty, Missouri, where he took a spe- 
cial course. 

His identification with railway interests dates from the early 
'70s. and he has been connected with every department, save the 
treasury department. In early life he was employed by the Hannibal 
& St. Joseph Railway Company, in which connection he passed suc- 
cessively through the positions of yard weighmaster, division store- 
keeper and division superintendent's clerk. In 1881 he entered the 
auditing department of the Santa Fc at Lawrence, Kansas, where he 
remained for a longer period than in any other position, for his 
promotions have come with rapidity, inducing many changes. On 
leaving Lawrence he went to Ottawa, Kansas, where he was con- 
nected wdth the mechanical and stores departments. In 1885 he 
arrived in California and served first as freight and afterward as 
passenger agent at San Jose, representing the Santa Fe. He was also 
traveling freight and passenger agent at large and afterward excur- 
sion agent and general agent of the Santa Fe Fruit and Refrigerator 
line. He next became chief clerk to the assistant traflic manager, 
was subsequently foreign freight agent and eventually general agent 
at San Francisco. He was appointed to the last named position just 
three days before the great fire. He passed that period which tried 
men's souls and tested the mettle whereof they were made. The duties 
of that position were not the onlv ones that devolved upon him at 
that momentous period, for only a month before he had been placed 
at the head of the Transportation Club and its quarters, too, were 
destroyed in the widespread conflagration. In July, 1906, Mr. Alber- 
ger became connected with the railway interests controlled by F. M. 
Smith and has so continued to the present time. 

The Time Card, a trade journal, says: *'He has seen railroads 
grow from small, poorly ecjuipped and poorly operated properties 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 239 

to the perfect systems of today. He has seen traffic-getting and rate- 
making in all its phases. He has been through hard times, panics, 
receiverships and paydays delayed four months. He has seen club 
members develop from minor positions to general agents and higher 
places. This experience has molded and made of Alberger the com- 
posite all around railroad and business man that he is, and won the 
higher regard of all those who have ever been associated with him. 
Alberger's word and judgment are law with those who know of his 
ability and achievements." Aside from being traffic manager of the 
Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad in Nevada, Mr. Alberger continues 
as vice president of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railway 
Companv. Again we quote from the Time Card : "Alberger is 
largely responsible for the vast improvements in docks, extensions, 
yards and general facilities planned by the big Key Route System, 
which will involve many millions and serve to focus the eves of the 
world on California. Alberger's has been a busy life. Even in his 
cradle he was planning big deals, and his tireless capacity for work 
is the marvel of his confreres. He tackles each problem with a fresh 
mind and a keen zest, moving in an incisive way, and grappling with 
complex issues as easily as with the simplest, apparently. He is a 
born railroad man and organizer, and his life is so systematized that 
even in his career as president and vice president of the Transporta- 
tion Club, he had in short order perfected it into a working, resultful 
band of hustling committeemen. That is Alberger's way. His ex- 
ample is inspiring." 

There are interests which claim Mr. Alberger's attention aside 
from business, and not the least of these are his home and family. 
He was married in Ottawa, Kansas, December 27, 1884, to Miss Ala- 
meda Frances Stephens, and they have a daughter, now Mrs. Anna 
A. Stanlev, of Portland, Oregon. His social nature finds expression 
in his membership in various clubs. He belongs to the Oakland 
Commercial Club, the Athenian Club, the Jonathan Club, of Los 
Angeles; the Drug and Chemical Club, of New York, and the Ma- 
sonic lodge. He is likewise a member of the Loyal Legion. His 
greatest activity in the field of clubdom has perhaps been in connec- 
tion with the Transportation Club of San Francisco, of which he is 
a most earnest member. He was chosen vice president in 1906 and 
through the two succeeding years served as its president. Another 
biographer has said, in speaking of him in connection with the 
Transportation Club: "Alberger is first in the alphabet — and first 
in the hearts of his fellow club members — and as one of the pillars 
of 'Borax' Smith's gigantic interests he is one of the men wiio control 



240 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

tlie destinies of the Pacific slope. During his term as vice president 
in 1906 and as president in 1907 and 1908 he saw some critical times 
in its history. He is a ready speaker, always has a message of import, 
is witty and humorous, and always loaded with facts and good stories 
to make them more palatable and convincing. 

"Always agreeable and afifable, he takes a pride in watching the 
men who have grown up under his care or purview reach positions 
of prominence. His friends make a line from coast to coast and from 
the gulf to the great lakes. They know Alberger up in Alaska, and 
in the British inner financial and commercial circles they know him 
as one of the potential men of the Pacific coast — the theater of com- 
mercial progress just now." Mr. Alberger is also a member of the 
American Association of Freight and Traffic OiTicers. Like many 
active men of the present age, Mr. Alberger does not scorn politics 
as something unworthy of his notice. He is a republican and there 
is no vital question relating to the party, its policy and its progress 
with which he is not acquainted, nor are his religious duties neg- 
lected, his membership being in the Episcopal church, to which he 
is a generous contributor. The best thing to be said in the history of 
W. R. Alberger is that he is still up and doing and to the activities 
of the past will be added the accomplishments of the future, for in 
his present railway connections there devolves upon him the respon- 
sibility of carrying out the gigantic plans of railway construction 
and development which will mean so much to the future of Cali- 
fornia. His intellect, his energy and his executive ability, com- 
bined with his technical knowledge, are concentrated upon projects 
relative to the improvement of the harbor and transportation plans. 
He can turn with ease to greet a friend and with equal readiness 
take up the big projects which claim his attention. It is this concen- 
tration upon the duty or interest of the moment that constitutes one 
of the salient features of his remarkably successful and resultant 
career. 



JOHN A. COLE, D. C. 

Dr. John A. Cole is now successfully engaged in chiropractic in 
Oakland, California, having embraced this science after many vears 
of careful study and after having reached the conclusion that it is 
the method by which health may be restored in practically all cases 
heretofore treated bv the drug and surgical method. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY -241 

Dr. Cole was born in Barry county, Michigan, November lo, 
i860, and after receiving his education in the district schools re- 
mained on the parental farm until 1882. At the age of twenty-two 
medical men declared that his life could not be prolonged a great 
while, and he therefore decided to devote the years which were left 
to him to the study of and search for health. His travels in this 
quest led him to all parts of western United States and he remained 
in Missouri for a short time before returning to his Michigan home. 
The latter part of the year 1SS2 and the year 1883 Dr. Cole devoted 
to the study of medicine under a brother-in-law, who was located 
in Kent county, Michigan. He later completed a business course in 
Professor Parson's Business College at Kalamazoo, but in 1892 went 
to Valley City, North Dakota, where he was engaged in telephone 
work. In 1901 he was engaged in the same line of work in Lewiston, 
Idaho, but during all these years gave most of his attention to the 
state of his health. He studied the various methods of drugless cures 
for diseases and in the spring of 1902 returned to North Dakota, 
where he remained for two years. In 1904 he went to Reno, Nevada, 
and lived in the mountains for four years, conducting experiments 
with nature cures, and continuing his studies, also cooperating for 
a part of that time with Dr. J. P. Bean and becoming more and more 
convinced of the value of drugless methods for the cure of disease. 
In the fall of 1907 Dr. Cole located in the mountains, returning to 
California, where he built a cabin, studying nature and successfully 
demonstrating to himself a nature cure and studying Professor Bab- 
bit's philosophy of light and color. In February, 19 10, he took an 
eastern trip and remained in that section of the country until June, 
when he went to Davenport. Iowa, and after a thorough investiga- 
tion enrolled in the Palmer Sch(H)l of Chiropractic, chiropratic's 
fountain head. 

To better understand the full meaning of this treatment and its 
import we quote what Dr. Palmer says himself as to chiropractic: 
"Chiropractic is the knowledge (not theory or belief) of philosophy 
of cause of disease, the science of knowing how and the art or ability 
to adjust it. The human brain is the dynamo where life currents are 
concentrated. The spinal cord and nerves are the purveyor of 
this mental force. If brain absorbs, spinal cord conveys, nerves 
transmit, and tissues, organs and viscera receive this life current. 
Health is the product. Body plus life equals health. Body minus 
life equals death. Disease is the abnormal fluctuation between these 
two quantities caused by varying degrees of pressures upon nerves, 
interfering with transmission. A chiropractor knows win. where 



242 HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 

and how to remove the 'pressure' and permit currents to continue 
transmission for the purpose of reconstructing disease to health. 
Health is the restoration of currents — not the stimulation or dinumi- 
tion of how little does exist. Stop taking drugs; they are unneces- 
sary. Avoid the knife; it is useless in ninety-five per cent of cases. 
If sick, no matter what or where your ailment (mild or severe), 
investigate. We can prove that chiropractic is right and applicable 
to your case. Consultation and spinal analysis free." 

In September, 191 1, Dr. Cole completed his studies. He came 
to Oakland about November ist, 191 1, and engaged as a practitioner, 
having ever since continued therein. Many have come to him, and 
he has seldom failed to obtain results by applying his method. Being 
himself an example of nature's cure of disease he can more readily 
understand his patients and has a sympathetic understanding of their 
ailments. He has adjusted many complicated cases where the patients 
themselves had despaired of ever regaining health, but soon those 
v\'ho intrusted themselves to his able hands found to their own aston- 
ishment that a turn for the better had set in and soon they were on the 
high road to recovery. 

Dr. Cole is politically independent, preferring to follow his 
own judgment and supporting those candidates whom he considers of 
greatest value to the public without taking cognizance of their partv 
affiliation. For twenty-eight years he has been a member of Unity 
Lodge, No. 407, I. O. O. F., of Kalamazoo, Michigan. Within but 
a few vears chiropractic has come to the fore in a most remarkable 
way, and it is nKire and more accepted by the general public. 



GEORGE E. DE GOLIA. 

Investigation into the business, political and legal history of 
Alameda county indicates the prominence of George E. De Golia, 
whose position is one of honor and distinction. Energy and perse- 
verance, keen mentality, clear insight, laudable ambition and strong 
purpose have carried him tt) his present position. His is the record 
of a man whom California is proud to claim as a native son, and 
he was born in Hangtown, now Placerville, on the 3d of May, 1857, 
his parents being Darwin and Lavinia (Baldwin) De Golia. His 
father was one of the early gold seekers, coming to California in 
1849. As the \ears passed on he won place among the influential 
citizens of Placerville and for years was proprietor of the Placer- 




(:kok(;k kllis dk golia 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTV 245 

ville Republican., In community affairs he exerted a wide and 
beneficial influence, and his name is inscribed deeply on the pages 
of the history of El Dorado county and Placerville, in which city 
he made his home until 1873, when he moved to Oakland so that his 
children could attend the State University. 

After attending the grammar and high schools of Placerville, 
George E. De Golia became a student in the Universitv of Cali- 
fornia, from which he was graduated in June, 1877, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. His early environment had to do with 
the rugged conditions of pioneer times, when California was the 
home of gold seekers, manv of whom were adventurers — men with- 
out principle, caring for naught save the gold which they might 
secure, honestly or otherwise. Among all these, however, was a 
little percentage of substantial citizens, who laid the foundation for 
the present prosperity and progress of this great commonwealth. In 
preparation for the practice of law George E. De Golia began 
reading in the oflice of Vrooman & Davis, the senior partner being 
recognized as a most brilliant member of the bar and an influential 
republican, occupying a position of leadership in political ranks for 
many years. Through this association he became well acquainted 
with Leland Stanford, John F. Swift, Stephen T. Gage, Governor 
Henry T. Gage, Edson Adams, Henry Carpentier and many other 
well known citizens of Alameda county and the state. On the retire- 
ment of Mr. Vrooman from politics Mr. De Golia became the repub- 
lican leader in Alameda county. 

In the meantime, in his early manhood, after completing his 
preliminarv reading, Mr. De Golia was admitted to practice upon 
e-xamination before the supreme court of California, November 10, 
1879, and was admitted to practice before the United States district 
courts, August 24, 1888, the United States circuit court. May 22, 
1889, and the United States supreme court, October 1 1, 1904. After 
he began his professional career he became associated with Henry 
Vrooman and so continued until the latter's death in 1889, the part- 
nership between them being thus terminated. Since then he has 
practiced alone and has won for himself a foremost position as a 
representative of tlie bar. The consensus of public opinion places 
him in a position of leadership among the distinguished lawyers 
of the state. He is the representative of a number of large cor- 
porations and of many of these is a director. The number includes: 
the Bank of Germany, the Fresno Cactus Nursery Company and the 
Montana Smelting Comp^'iv, of all of which he is a director. The 
Theo Gier Corporation; tiie .Meeker Land Company; and a number 



246 HISTORY OF .\LAMEDA COUNTY 

of mining companies. Mr. De Golia, while. having financial inter- 
ests in many of these important industrial, commercial and financial 
enterprises, displaying sound judgment as a factor in their control, 
regards his law practice as his real life work, and his comprehensive 
study of the science of the profession and his familiarity with 
precedent and principle have gained him the distinguished honors 
tvhich have deservedly come to him. 

On the 23d of June, 1883, Mr. De Golia was united in marriage 
to Miss Carrie B. Rabe, and both are well known in social circles 
of Oakland. Mrs. De Golia is a daughter of William Rabe, an 
early settler of San Francisco, who with other influential citizens 
was sent to Washington to aid in influencing the support of a bill 
to assist the building of the railroads over the mountains to connect 
with California. Mr. and Mrs. De Golia have two children, George 
E. and Mrs. Challen R. Parker, both of Oakland. Throughout his 
entire professional career Mr. De Golia has taken active interest, as 
previouslv indicated, in the political situation and has long been a 
potent force in molding public thought and action in this section 
of the state. He was assistant district attorney of Alameda county 
from 1883 until 1889, his record in this position indicating not only 
his legal abilitv but his marked public spirit. For a number of 
vears, beginning in the latter part of the '80s and extending through 
more than a decade, he controlled republican activity, dictating the 
policies of the party with an understanding that rose from compre- 
hensive study of the situation as well as keen insight into the great 
state and national issues. Toward the close of the century, how- 
ever, he gave up his political activity to devote himself entirely to 
his legal interests, which were of growing extent and importance. 
During his entire career he has accepted no office for himself except 
that of assistant district attorney under Judge Sam T. Hall from 
1883 until 1889. 

Mr. De Golia has been very prominent also in promoting social 
and fraternal interests of county and state. He organized the local 
lodge of Elks, was honored with the position of exalted ruler and 
is now president of the Elks Hall Association. He induced the 
order to purchase its present location at a cost of forty-five thousand 
dollars, a property which is now worth many times that amount. He 
gave two years of his time to the interests of Elkdom in California. 
He worked for the clean and wholesome interests of the organization 
and succeeded in phuing it in California on the high plane which it 
occupies today. He caused the old Elk Lodge of San Francisco to 
lose its charter, and the lodge was reorganized on a basis that every 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 247 

where commands respect. For three years at intervals he was dis- 
trict deputy of the Elks. He was also one of the organizers and 
directors of the Claremont Country Club and aided in selecting the 
site of its present building. He was a charter member and the first 
secretary of the Athenians, and in Masonry he has attained the 
Knight Templar degree and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He 
greatly enjoys outdoor life and all manly athletic sports, finding 
recreation and pleasure in tennis and golf especially. In every rela- 
tion of life and in every activity he is strong and purposeful. His 
interests have been wide and varied and have largely been of a 
character that has contributed to public progress. What he has 
accomplished has worked for the benefit of the community and for 
public welfare, and he stands as a splendid representative of that 
profession wliich the public has rightfully come to regard as the 
conservator of the life and liberties and the rights of the individual 
and the community. 



WILLIAM M. MENDENHALL. 

The last word in one of the most momentous chapters in the his- 
tory of California was written on November 21, 191 1, when William 
M. Mendenhall, only survivor of the original Bear Flag party and 
one of the earliest settlers in Alameda county, passed away. He was 
a conspicuous figure in the early settlement of this part of the state 
and a leader in its later development, a man of such loyal and reso- 
lute faith in his adopted region that after his arrival here on Christ- 
mas Eve, 1845, he never again turned his steps eastward. Through- 
out a life of important accomplishment, closely connected with some 
of the most representative industries in the state, Mr. Mendenhall 
adhered steadily to high and worthy ideals, and his death deprived 
California of one of her honored and valued citizens and one of her 
earliest and greatest pioneers. 

William M. Mendenhall was born in Xenia, Ohio, April 22, 
1823, and spent his youth and early manhood in the east. In July, 
1845, he and nine others met at Independence, Missouri, laid in a 
supply of food and with horses and mules started across the plains to 
California. After an eventful journey, during which they encoun- 
tered many hardships and obstacles, including trouble with the In- 
dians, the party arrived safely at American river, California, reach- 
ing this point on Christmas Eve. Mr. Mendenhall first worked in 



248 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

the lumber mills in the Moroga red woods in Alameda county, con- 
tinuing thus until the troublous conditions throughout the state made 
it necessary for him to take refuge at Sutter's Fort, where a large 
party of Americans had gathered for protection. When the Bear 
Flag was raised in June, 1846, Colonel John C. Fremont, then on his 
way to Oregon, was informed of the conditions in California and 
immediately returned. He was soon afterward joined at Fort So- 
noma by a small company, of which Mr. Mendenhall was a member. 
In the meantime a man-of-war had been sent by the federal -govern- 
ment to San Francisco Bay with the stars and stripes at the masthead. 
The war craft brought an American flag to Sutter's Fort and as the 
Bear Flag was hauled down and the national colors run up the little 
band in the garrison saluted it with cheers and at once began plans to 
place the whole state under the sovereignty of the American common- 
wealth. General Fremont, at the head of one hundred and seventy 
men, started to take the state by march, going through to San Diego 
and wresting control from the Spaniards without the loss of a man. 
Mr. Mendenhall was a member of that historic party and witnessed 
the stirring events which gave California to the United States. Fol- 
lowing the close of hostilities he engaged in business in San Francisco 
and after his marriage, in 1847, lived in Santa Clara county, where 
he raised stock on an extensive scale. In 1853 he disposed of all his 
interests there and went to Contra Costa county, where he operated 
a stock ranch for fifteen years. At the end of that time he purchased 
twelve hundred acres of land on the present site of Livermore, subse- 
quently selling all but four hundred and eighty acres, upon which 
are situated the celebrated springs known as Mendeniiall Springs, 
where there was for years a popular health resort. 

Mr. Mendenhall was the founder of the town of Livermore, 
which stands upon a tract of land which he formerly owned. In 1869 
he laid out the town site on a six hundred acre tract, gave the grounds 
for schools and all public utilities, roads, etc. He erected Livermore 
College on seven acres of land and maintained the institution from 
his private means for several vears, during which time his interests 
extended also to many other fields of public and social development. 
With a faith that never wavered he watched the growth and prog- 
ress of his city, leading in all measures to promote its material and 
moral advancement, cooperating heartily in all progressive public 
projects and making the weight of his influence a potent force in 
growth. He did capable and farsighted work in various positions 
of public trust and responsibility, making an enviable record during 
the eight vears of his service as town trustee of Livermore. Tn the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 249 

city which he founded he built a beautiful nine thousand dollar 
home and there resided until his death, which occurred November 
21, 191 1. 

In Santa Clara county, in 1S47, Mr. Mendenliall was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Allen, who had crossed the plains with 
her parents in the previous year, her father, David Allen, being a 
pioneer settler of California. Mr. and Mrs. Mendenhall were the 
first American couple to be married south of the Sacramento river. 
They became the parents of nine children: James M. ; Elizabeth, 
the wife of Curtis H. Lindley of San Francisco; Emma, who married 
James N. Block of the same city; Ella, now Mrs. G. \V. Langan of 
Oakland; David A.; William W. ; Oswald V.; Etta, who married 
Fred A. Carrick; and Asa V. 

Mr. Mendenhall was a democrat in his political views and 
always a stanch supporter of the principles and policies of that 
party. In the early days he was a member of the Vigilante committee 
of Contra Costa county and belonged to the Society of California 
Pioneers. He was a splendid representative of those brave and hardy 
men who faced the dangers and privations of life on the frontier, 
whose energies and indomitable purpose aided in the building up of 
a great commonwealth and whose dauntless spirit lives today in the 
works thev have left behind. 



VICTOR REITER. 



Victor Reiter, the popular manager of the Hotel Oakland of 
Oakland, has had an interesting career, connecting him with two 
continents. He was born in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, April 
14, 1866. a son of Valentine and Annie L. (Leyers) Reiter. His 
father was born and educated there in the public schools and the 
gvmnasium. Subsequently he devoted himself to general mercantile 
pursuits. He died in his native country. 

\Mctor Reiter attended the grammar schools and the gymnasium 
in Luxeniburg until sixteen years of age. He then went to Versailles, 
France, where lie entered the Eyceiun, from which he graduated at 
the age of nineteen. At the end of that period he went to Pari.-, con- 
necting himself with his cousin, who nwncd the Peter Hotel, in order 
to learn the business. He remained with him until iS8g, when he 
had charge of the Palais de rAlimentation at tiie Paris Exposition of 
that vear. Seeking new fields to coiujuer, Mr. Reiter then came to 



250 HISTORY' OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

New York city, where he managed the outside catering department 
of the Dehnonico until 1891 and then made his way to San Francisco, 
becoming assistant manager of the Palace and Fairmont Hotels. 
He so continued until June, 19 13, when he accepted the position of 
manager of Hotel Oakland. Mr. Reiter is very popular and 
thoroughly conversant with all the details of hotel and restaurant 
business. His connection with some of the foremost institutions of 
that kind in the world well fits him for his present position. Although 
he has been in charge of the Hotel Oakland but a year, marked 
improvements have taken place since he has become the head of the 
establishment. 

On the 14th of November, 1896, Mr. Reiter married, in San 
Francisco, Miss Augusta Pages, and they have one son, Victor Pages, 
ten years of age, who is attending school. Although Mr. Reiter is 
not active politically, he takes part in all public movements under- 
taken in the interest of the city. He displays marked energv and 
determination in his business affairs and has succeeded in life because 
of persistent, energetic and honorable efifort. 



FRANK W. FROST. 

Frank W. Frost holds important offices with a number of trans- 
portation and public utility companies, being particularly known 
in connection with the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railway, 
of which he is assistant secretary and assistant treasurer. He was born 
in San Francisco, California, April 29, 1867, and is a son of Horatio 
and Mary Frost, the former born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
in October, 1821. The father was educated there and later went to 
Boston, Massachusetts, where he was engaged in painting and con- 
tracting until the spring of 1850. Being attracted to San Francisco 
by the stories of great riches which were to be gained in California, 
he made his way to the Golden Gate via the Isthmus of Panama and 
engaged in mining at Placerville until 1852. He then returned to 
San Francisco and again devoted himself to painting and contracting, 
being very successful along that line of business until he retired in 
1887. He was actively interested in the vigilantes movement. He 
died in 1889. He was a charter member and one of the founders of 
the Mechanic's Institute of San Francisco. His political allegiance 
was given to the republican party, and his religious faith was that of 
the Unitarian denomination. He was one of the founders of Star 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 251 

King church and was deeply interested in its work. Mr. Frost, Sr.. 
married in San Francisco Miss Mary L. Wadhams. They had three 
children : Charles H., Frank W. and Horatio T. 

Frank W. Frost attended the public schools until seventeen years 
of age, when he entered upon his active career, becoming an office 
boy with Sullivan & Ravekes, wholesale paint and oil dealers. He 
subsequently was shipping clerk for this firm, remaining with them 
for four years. He then held a similar position with the Overland 
Packing Company for three years. Resigning this position, he was, 
until 1893, teller in the money order department of the San Francisco 
postoffice and then removed to Oakland, accepting a position as 
receiving teller and assistant secretary for the Oakland Consolidated 
Street Railway Company. He remained as such until the latter 
company consolidated with the Alameda, Oakland & Piedmont Elec- 
tric Railway and the Central Avenue Railway under the name of 
Oakland Transit Company on March 21st, 1898. Mr. Frost became 
assistant secretary, remaining in this position until 1910. when he was 
elected secretary, which office he held until March 21, 1912, when 
this firm consolidated with the East Shore & Suburban Railway 
Company and the California Railway, the new company becoming 
the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railway, of which Mr. Frost 
became secretary and treasurer, retaining these offices until January, 
1 9 14, when the property was taken over by other interests, he being 
given the offices of assistant secretary and assistant treasurer. He has 
since held these important positions and is one of the important 
factors in the successful operation of this road. His long and varied 
experience* makes him valuable to his company, and he is recognized 
as one of the most expert men in transportation matters on the coast. 
He is also secretary and treasurer of the Union Water Company, sec- 
retary of the United Properties Company, secretary of the United 
Light & Power Company, secretary of the Oakland Railways and 
secretary of the Oakland Terminal Company. 

On the 26th of February, 1895, ^^^- Frost married Aletta Garret- 
son, and to them were born three children: Harlan G., eighteen 
years of age, who is attending high school; Dudley, fourteen, and 
Phyllis, both attending the public schools. Mr. Frost is a member 
of the Transportation Club of San Francisco and the Oakland Com- 
mercial Club. He is deeply interested in the growth and trade 
progress of his city and county and stands in the front ranks with 
those men who have at heart the expansion and advancement of their 
city. Politically he is a republican, and his religious adherence is 
given to the I7nitarian church. He is connected fraternally with the 



252 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Woodmen of the World and is very popular in social circles of his 
city. As a business man he ranks high and, while he has attained 
individual success, he has also been a factor in the upbuilding of 
Oakland. 



SUSAN J. FENTON, .M. D. 

Among the prominent women physicians of the state of California 
is Dr. Susan J. Fcnton, of Oakland, who for many years has prac- 
ticed in this city with ever increasing success, being accorded an 
extensive practice. She has also always taken a deep interest in 
the public welfare and in charitable work and has done much 
toward promoting the health of children and the sanitary condi- 
tions under which they live, being fully cognizant of the importance 
of giving to the coming generation the best possible chance in life 
She is deeplv interested in civic improvement of anv kind and in 
that line is connected with a number of effective organizations which 
make it their aim to improve the government and remedy antiquated 
measures or bring to a realization new proposals, the wisdom of 
which cannot be so quickly discerned by the general public as it is 
recognized by those who make a particular study of the needs of the 
people. 

Dr. Fenton is a native of Pennsylvania and came to California in 
1874, graduating in medicine from Hahnemann Hospital College 
of San Francisco in 1889. She had, however, previously been in 
Oakland, having served for one year on the staff of Fabiofa Hospital, 
returning to the same institution after her graduation and remaining 
for five years, at the end of that time opening an office on Fourteenth 
street, Oakland, wiiere she remained for two years. Recognizing the 
advantages of studying European methods, she then went, in [896, 
to Berlin, Germany, there pursuing her studies under the most 
famous surgeons of the capital. Ever since she returned she has 
g'wcn herself to her extensive practice. Sympathetic of nature, she 
inspires in her patients that confidence which means half a cure and 
to many families has become more than the mere physician, being 
considered the truest and most unselfish family friend. Dr. Fenton 
is still a member of the staflf of Fabiola Hospital of Oakland. She 
is a surgeon of fine ability and is probably the only woman in the 
county proficient in the many branches of the science of surgery. 
She specializes in gynecology and has operated extensively and most 
successfully along that line. 



HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 255 

Along professional lines the Doctor is a member of the California 
State and Alameda County Medical Societies, taking a prominent 
part in their meetings and keeping in touch with the latest discoveries 
in the world of medical science through meeting her fellow workers. 
She is also a member of the American Institute of Homeopathy. 
She has taken a most helpful part in civic afifairs during her long resi- 
dence here and is a director in the Associated Charities of Oakland. 
She is also a member of the public welfare committee and president 
of the Children's Welfare Club. She has always taken an active 
part in all matters pertaining to the well-being of the children and 
takes her memberships and offices most seriously, advocating meas- 
ures which she deems beneficial and formulating new plans in order 
to attain her ends. As a member of the Public Service Club she is 
interested in and active in good government. The city of Oakland 
has in an immeasurable degree profited by her labor, and Dr. Fenton 
has therefore well earned the esteem and appreciation which is 
accorded her. Essentially a practical woman, she is a physician of 
more than average ability, natural talent and wide experience and 
is also a public-spirited citizen, ever enlisting her powers and abili- 
ties in support of movement that make for the betterment of con- 
ditions. 



BURG BROTHERS. 



The city of Richmond finds progressive and enterprising repre- 
sentatives of its business interests in C. H. and E. J. Burg, compris- 
ing the Burg Brothers Company, Inc., controlling large and import- 
ant real-estate interests in the vicinity. They are the largest real- 
estate operators in Richmond, and their business has grown frt)m a 
humble beginning to its present great proportions. 

Both brothers are natives of Sweden and E. J. came to California 
in 1884, C. H. following in 1889. They have been interested in the 
real-estate business during practically all of their active careers and 
in 1 901 began operations in Richmond. Five years later they formed 
tile Bay City Land Company and in 1910 incorporated the Burg 
Brothers Company. One of their first enterprises was the subdivid- 
ing of the Richmond tract, the first subdivision in Richmond, and 
since that time they have sold si.xtcen different tracts of land in and 
about the city. In two years, ending August i, 1913. they disposed 
of over two and a half million dollars worth of Richmond property, 



256 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

and many of the most important subdivisions of the city have been 
promoted and developed by them. In May, 1910, they put upon the 
market the Central Richmond tract and by January eleven hundred 
and fifty lots had been sold. Some of these were later resold at an 
advance of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars over the original 
price. On the 26th of March, iqi i, the Burg Brothers Company put 
upon the market the Richmond Pulman townsite and up to March 
I, 1913, held contracts for the sale of fourteen hundred and seventy- 
five lots, the largest real-estate record ever made in Richmond. Thev 
are the developers also of Grand View Terrace, a subdivision 111 
which one thousand and seventy-three lots were sold within nine 
mortths, and in November, 191 2, they purchased and put upon the 
market the Nicholl McDonald Civic Center tract, paying five- 
thousand dollars per acre for this propertv. Bv August t, 19 13, thev 
had sold one thousand lots. Both are keen, resourceful and far- 
sighted business men and under their able direction the firm has 
become a powerful factor in the development of Richmond. 

C. H. Burg is a member of the Masonic fraternity, holding mem- 
bership in the lodge, chapter, commandery and shrine, and E. J. 
is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Both 
are members of the Richmond Industrial Commission and at all times 
enthusiastic on the subject of the opportunities which this city ofifers. 
They believe in its splendid future, which their well directed activi- 
ties have aided in making possible. 



DAVID HADDEN, M. D. 

Dr. David Hadden has been successfully engaged in the practice 
of medicine at Oakland for the past seven years and is widely recog- 
nized as one of the able and representative members of the profes- 
sion here. He was born in Ireland in 1875 and when a youth of 
si.xteen came to Oakland, California, spending two years in the Oak- 
land high school with the class of 1893, while subsequently he entered 
the University of California, from which institution he was graduated 
in 1897. Desiring to prepare for the practice of medicine, he then 
matriculated in Cooper Medical College of San Francisco and in 
189Q won the M. D. degree. He makes a specialty of gynecology and 
for four vears acted as first clinical assistant in Cooper Medical 
College, while he was also instructor of gynecology in that institu- 
tion, remaining in tliat capacity for four years. For a period of five 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 257 

years he practiced his profession in San Francisco, being in the marine 
hospital service of that city for a time. In 1906 he opened offices in 
Oakland and this city has since remained the scene of his profes- 
sional labors. The liberal practice accorded him is proof of his skill 
and ability in the field of his chosen vocation, and he is recognized 
as a capable and successful physician and surgeon. He finds inspira- 
tion for further study and research through his membership in the 
Alameda County Medical Society, the California State Medical 
Society, the American Medical Association and the American Asso- 
ciation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians. 

Dr. Hadden married Miss Edith Backus, whose father was a 
California pioneer and the founder of the George H. Tay Company. 
They have two sons, David Rodney and Malcolm Backus. Dr. 
Hadden is a member of the University of California Club and is 
well known and popular in social as well as professional circles. 



CHARLES R. WELCH. 

Charles R. Welch is one of the owners and general manager of 
the James Taylor Company, Incorporated, who are engaged in the 
undertaking business. They conduct one of the foremost establish- 
ments of its kind in Oakland and have been in charge of some of 
the imposing funerals in this city. Mr. Welch gives careful atten- 
tion to all the details of this difficult work and discharges his duties 
in connection with the business in such a quiet and dignified way that 
he has built up a large patronage. He was born in Marion county, 
Iowa, January 29, 1858, and is a son of W. T. and Nancy Ann 
Welch. 

Charles R. Welch attended the public schools until eighteen 
years of age and then followed the profession of teaching for two 
years. At the end of that time he matriculated in the State Agricul- 
tural College at Manhattan, Kansas, remaining there for two terms 
and again teaching for about two years before he removed to Garden 
Plains, Kansas, where he successfully conducted a hardware business. 
He also taught during the winter months, while his father-in-law 
waited upon the customers at the store. Two years later Mr. Welch 
went to Hutchinson, Kansas, where for one year he engaged in car- 
pentering and contracting, and then removed to Salem, Oregon, being 
attracted to the west by the large opportunities which he believed 
existed on the Pacific coast. He continued in contracting there until 



258 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTV 

1899, in which year he turned his attention to the furniture and under- 
taking business, being successful along both lines. He is a man of 
executive ability, thoroughly acquainted with the most modern busi- 
ness methods and therefore successful in his undertakings. At the 
end of six years he gave up the furniture department, giving his entire 
attention to the undertaking business in Salem until December. 191 2, 
when he removed to Oakland to take charge of the James Tavlor 
Company. He became a partner in the business in May. 191 2, and 
has control of its afifairs. 

In July, 1880, Mr. Welch was married in Burton, Kansas, to Miss 
Flora Winches and they have three children: Ernest M., who is 
thirty-three and is engaged in the furniture and hardware business 
in Baker, Oregon; Chester E., twenty-seven years of age, who assists 
his father in the management of the James Tavlor Company; and 
Mildred K., attending high school. 

Politically Mr. Welch is independent, giving his support to all 
measures which he considers of the greatest benefit to the largest 
number of people and supporting candidates according to their quali- 
fications and not because of party affiliation. His religious faith is 
that of a Protestant and he contributes generously to the local 
churches. He is a progressive man who is careful of the interests 
of others and has succeeded in life because he has always closely 
applied himself to the business at liand. He follows the most honor- 
able methods and is esteemed by all with whom he comes in contact 
both in business and social circles, being well worthy of the confi- 
dence and respect which he enjoys. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRICK. 

Abraham Lincoln Prick, who is successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in Oakland, belongs to an old California family, his 
father, George Washington Prick, having settled here many years 
ago. He was a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and a 
son of Abraham Prick, a descendant of early German settlers of 
Pennsylvania. The paternal grandfather died in 1888 and his wife 
some years earlier. In their family were eight children, six sons and 
two daughters. The parents sought the opportunities of the middle 
west, going to Illinois about 1839 and settling on a farm near Moline. 
With them was George \\'asliington Prick, father of our subject. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 259 

There he attended the district schools, supplementing his knowledge 
by private study and subsequently taking a course in the Mount 
Morris Seminary when he was about twenty years old. In Galena, 
Illinois, in 1852, he married Mary Elizabeth Bryant, and before the 
year was out the young couple started for California, being accom- 
panied by Mrs. Prick's parents. Arriving in the Golden state in 
1853, Mr. Frick taught school in Santa Cruz for two terms, at the 
end of which time he removed to Centerville, Alameda countv, there 
following the same profession. He was a republican of strong con- 
victions and from the beginning took an active part in political affairs. 
In 1857 he removed to Sonoma county, purchasing a ranch of one 
hundred and twenty acres, to the cultivation of which he gave some 
time, while during the winter months he taught in Bethel school. 
In i860 he was the nominee for sheriff on his party's ticket but with- 
drew before the election in favor of a union democrat, in order to 
promote the chances of the union party, which was then formed 
between the Douglas democrats and republicans. He was active in 
the Union League movement and was elected president of the Bethel 
Union League. Becoming more and more prominent in his party, 
he was chosen chairman of the Sonoma county delegation to the state 
convention in which George C. Gorham was selected as candidate 
for governor. Twice Mr. Frick served as supervisor, being elected 
in a county in which a democratic majority prevailed. This may be 
taken as a testimonial of his integrity and the confidence which even 
his political opponents had in his ability. For fifteen years he served 
as a school trustee and was an officer in the Methodist Episcopal 
church practically throughout his life. 

In 1 871 he sold his interests near Petaluma and located in Men- 
docino county, where he remained until 1874, when he made his home 
in Santa Barbara county, identifying himself with the Lompoc Tem- 
perance Colony, being one of the pioneers of that movement. He 
kept the first general store in Lompoc and while holding the office 
of school trustee there assisted in making possible the erection of the 
five thousand dollar schoolhouse, which was erected within the first 
year of the settlement. He also took great interest in building the 
church for the Methodist Episcopal denomination. After selling his 
store in Lompoc he bought a dairy ranch of one thousand acres in 
San Miguelito canyon, about 1876, and three years later took up his 
permanent residence thereon. He subsequently rented this propertv 
and removed to Oakland in order to give his children better educa- 
tional advantages. He died while on a visit to Lompoc, fulv 12. 
i88q, at the age of si.\ty-four years, his wife having passed awav 



260 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

May 3, 1884. She was a daughter of William Cowper Bryant, a 
New Englander, who had removed to Illinois early in that state's 
history, becoming a merchant of Galena. He made several trips to 
California by way of Mexico and the Isthmus, and while crossing 
the plains was shot by Indians, although he was not fatally wounded. 
He turned his attention to the draying business in San Francisco and 
while so occupied sustained injuries which crippled him for life. 
His wife, Anna (Stcrret) Bryant, was of German extraction, deeply 
interested in church and charitable work and known throughout the 
state as "Mother Bryant." She lived to be about seventy years old 
and had the respect of all who knew her. Two of her sons, John 
and William, both became ministers. Mrs. Frick was president of 
the Women's Christian Temperance Union of Lompoc at the time 
of her death and always took part in movements for the upbuilding 
and betterment of humanity along moral and intellectual lines. In 
the family of George W. Frick were the following children : George 
\^^, a well known educator of Alameda county; Laura A., who died 
December 3, 1888; Abraham Lincoln, of this review; John Frederick, 
who was born October 23, 1869, and is a lawyer; and Blanche, born 
October 9, 1874. 

Abraham L. Frick was born in Sonoma county, California, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1866, and there attended the public schools until 1875, when 
he went to Santa Barbara, where he completed his course and subse- 
quently entered the high school, which he attended until the age of 
eighteen. He then became a student of the San Jose high school, 
in which institution he remained for six months, subsequently improv- 
ing his knowledge by private study. His professional education was 
acquired in Hastings College of the Law, from which he was grad- 
uated, and in 1888 he was admitted to the bar by the supreme court. 
He immediately established himself in practice in Oakland and has 
remained in this city ever since, being connected with legal matters 
in a private and public capacity. He served as deputy district 
attorney under George Reed for two years and then became chief 
deputy district attorney under Charles Snook, with whom he also 
served for two years. On December 10, 1894, '""c was appointed 
superior judge of Alameda county, filling the unexpired term of 
Judge Henshaw. l^pon the bench he proved himself a man of highly 
trained, judicial mind, rendering decisions which established him 
firmly as a man deeply versed in the law. Mr. Frick now enjoys a 
large and profitable practice, representing a number of important 
interests of Oakland and Alameda county. He is a man of clear, 
logical mind who readily grasps the salient points in any case and 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 261 

presents his arguments convincingly before court and jury. His serv- 
ices are also sought as advisor, and he has a large consulting practice. 
On May 21, 1896, Mr. Frick married Miss Matilda M. Bader, 
and both are very popular in social circles of their city. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party, in the local councils of 
which he is influential. He is entirely in accord with the aims of 
that organization and has done much toward increasing republican 
prestige in Alameda county. He is a Protestant in religious faith 
and is fraternally a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Loyal Order of Moose, being popular in these societies. 
Mr. Frick has at heart the welfare of the people and the growth of 
his city and county and has contributed in various ways to these aims. 
He enjoys in full measure the confidence and respect of his fellow 
members of the profession and stands high in the eyes of the general 
public. 



JAMES P. POTTER. 



James P. Potter holds an important position with the San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland Terminal Railway as the superintendent of trans- 
portation of this system. There is great credit due him for having 
obtained this position, as he succeeded entirelv through his own 
efforts, rising from a comparatively humble position to one of fore- 
most importance. 

Mr. Potter was born in Woolwich, Maine, August 20, 1868, and 
is a son of John B. and Julia S. Potter. After attending the public 
and high schools until fifteen years of age, Mr. Potter of this review 
went to sea and in the latter part of the year 1891 sailed for San 
Francisco around the Horn on the ship Susquehanna. He arrived in 
the harbor of the Golden Gate in 1892 and subsequently removed to 
Oakland, where his first position was that of a bus driver for J. 
Bartlett, who operated a bus line from Twenty-third avenue to the 
narrow gauge railway at Alameda avenue and Park street in Ala- 
meda. He held that position until 1893, when he entered the employ 
of the Alameda, Oakland & Piedmont Electric Railway, with whom 
he continued as motorman until 1898. In that year he was made 
receiver and cashier of the company and later became inspector of the 
Alameda division. His next rise made him division superintendent. 
During this period the company changed hands several times and 
bv consolidation became the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal 



262 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

Railway. Mr. Potter is one of the most efficient officials of his 
company, standing high in the estimation of the officers and directors 
of the road and also with the general public. He has succeeded by 
the sheer force of his ability, his straightforwardness and his close 
application to all matters intrusted to his care. 

In May, 1899, Mr. Potter married, in Alameda, Miss Eleanor N. 
Nebeker, and they have two children: Dorothy, aged thirteen, who, 
after graduating from the public schools, is now attending high 
school; and Donald James, aged ten, attending public school. 
Politically Mr. Potter is a republican, but he has never been active 
in political matters, although he discharges his duties as a citizen 
faithfully. He is deeply interested in the progress of his city and 
ever readv to give valuable help to worthy enterprises of a public 
nature. Fraternally he stands high in the Masons, having reached 
the Royal Arch degree, and is also connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Elks. Mr. Potter enjoys in full the 
confidence of all who know him and socially is popular. In his 
important position he renders valuable service to his company and 
the citv of Oakland. 



IRVING C. LEWIS. 



Irving C. Lewis, vice president of the Grayson-Owens Company, 
is one of the strong and resourceful business men of Oakland, ready 
to meet anv emergency, discriminating easily between the essential 
and the non-essential and making use of all those forces and situations 
which are most conducive to the results desired. Many important 
business enterprises of Oakland have profited by his cooperation and 
sound judgment, and the city numbers him among its representative 
business men. 

Mr. Lewis was born in Medford, Dodge county, Minnesota, Sep- 
tember 22, 1862, a son of Dr. William Frisbie and Albertina 
(Cowhan) Lewis. It is interesting to note that the Lewis family can 
be traced to the very ancestor who emigrated to America. It was a 
Thomas Lewis who at the time of Cromwell's entrance into Ireland, 
i6t;o, came to New Amsterdam from Belfast and thereby established 
the familv in the new land. Thomas Lewis was born in Belfast in 
1628 and landed in New Amsterdam in March, 1650, and in that 
city became engaged in shipping and merchandising. In conjunc- 
tion with Frederick Pliilipse and Thomas Delaval he purchased the 




nixc ( . i.i;\\ IS AXi) SOX 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 265 

territory which became known as the Manor of Philipseburg, now 
the city of Yonkers, stretching sixteen miles along the Hudson 
river. This property remained in the family until after Mr. Lewis' 
death, which occurred in his home on the northeast corner of Han- 
over Square and Williams street, New York city, in 1686, his widow 
a year later selling out these interests. 

His wife was formerly Geesje Barent, a native of Holland, who 
made her home in Beverwyck, now Albany, New York. Of their 
family a son, Leonard, who is the second in direct line of the family 
to reside in this country, was born August 3, 1667, and rose to 
prominence in New York city, serving in various public capacities, 
among them being that of the first treasurer of Dutchess county; first 
representative to the colonial assembly; and the first judge of 
Dutchess county. He was associated with Johannes Hardenburgh in 
the purchase of the great patent of land in Ulster county. New York, 
where he made his home for sometime, the period of his residence 
extending from 1696 to 1700 at least, and perhaps longer. He was a 
man of much ability and of strong, upright character, winning and 
holding the esteem and confidence of all who knew him. 

On December 23, 1772, by order of the New York legislature, he 
was awarded nine ounces and fifteen pennyweights of silver for his 
services at Albany in an expedition against the French in the 
Mohawk country. 

He married Elizabeth Hardenburgh, the daughter of Gerrit J. 
Hardenburgh and his wife, formerly Jalpje Schepmore, both natives 
of Holland. 

A son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, Geradus, who also comes in the 
direct line of descent, was born January 2, 1698, and became allied 
through marriage with one of the oldest and most prominent families 
of the eastern states, his wife being in maidenhood Rachel Kip. Of 
their familv a son, Gradus Lewis, married Angelica Gonsallus, of 
Spanish descent. A son of Gradus Lewis, John by name, married 
Ann Eliza Frisbie, a daughter of Dr. William and Elizabeth 
(Davidson) Frisbie, of Vermont. John Lewis graduated from 
Albanv Medical College with the degree of M. D., after which he 
practiced in Clyde, Wayne county, New York, until his death at the 
earlv age of thirty-eight years. His wife, surviving him, married 
William D. Wylie. Her death occurred in Walworth, New York. 
Bv her first marriage she had two children, a son, William Frisbie 
Lewis, and a daughter who died at an early age. 

Born October 3, 1829, in Clyde, Wayne county. New York. 
William Frisbie Lewis was reared to young manhood in tiiat town 



266 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

and Phelps, receiving his preliminary education through attendance 
at the Phelps Academy, from which he was graduated. Deciding 
to take up the profession of his father, he spent the first two years 
in this study at Rush Medical College, Chicago, his third year being 
passed in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York city. 
From this latter institution he was graduated in 1854 with the degree 
of M. D. and practiced for a time in New York city. Following 
this he visited the hospitals of Europe, where he went to Edinburgh, 
Scotland, and attended a course of lectures. In 1856 he located in 
Mankato, Minnesota, practicing medicine only a short time until he 
became interested in the land and banking business of that city. He 
was one of the first bankers of Mankato, his business being conducted 
for many years under the firm name of Lewis & Shaubut. On 
account of impaired health, he was finally forced to give up his many 
business interests. While a resident of that locality, in 1857, he was 
appointed captain of a company of forty men who went to quell the 
Indians that had taken part in the Spirit Lake Massacre. Their 
principal battle was fought near Mankato. 

He left the impress of his individuality upon public thought and 
action, having aided largely in shaping public afifairs. Seeking 
recuperation, Dr. Lewis came to California in 1887, since which time 
he has virtually retired from the cares of active life. The greater 
part of his time is spent in traveling, having been abroad four times, 
once around the world, and all through India, Asia Minor and 
Egypt, as well as in nearly every state in the Union. Interested in 
the state of his adoption he has purchased two fruit ranches in Tulare 
county. 

In Vienna, Walworth county, Wisconsin, June 15, 1857, Dr. 
Lewis was united in marriage with Miss Albertina Cowhan, a native 
of New York city. To the Doctor and his wife were born the fol- 
lowing children: Irving C, the subject of this review; John Mell- 
gren, a prominent attorney of San Francisco, and Louise Bertina, the 
wife of S. E. Grove of Oakland. Dr. Lewis is a Royal Arch Mason 
and politically adheres to the principles advocated in the platform of 
the republican party. Mrs. Lewis is a member of the Presbvterian 
church. They reside at beautiful Palo Alto and on June 15, 1014, 
they celebrated the fifty-seventh anniversary of their wedding ulicn 
then entertained many of their dearest friends and relatives. 

In the pursuit of his education Irving C. Lewis passed through 
consecutive grades in the public and high schools of Mankato until 
he reached the age of seventeen years, when lie went to Minneapolis 
and entered the employ of N. B. Harwood & Company, wholesale 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 267 

dry-goods merchants, with whom he remained for about a year. He 
then went to Iowa and became a partner in the firm of Abbee & 
Lewis in the conduct of a general mercantile establishment. Soon 
afterward, however, he disposed of his interests there and removed 
to Austin, Texas, where he entered the shoe trade as senior partner 
in the firm of Lewis & Peacock. This relation was maintained 
until 1885, when Mr. Lewis disposed of his interests in the south 
and removed to Denver, Colorado. There he began dealing in real 
estate and afterward re-entered the commercial field, but a little 
later came to California, where in 1887 he aided in incorporating 
the Market Street Bank of San Francisco, of which his father was 
president, while he became cashier. After disposing of his banking 
interests he became a member of the Healdsburg & Sonoma Commis- 
sion Company, engaged in the commission business, but his connec- 
tion therewith was brief, and he joined the Grayson-Owens Company, 
of Oakland, becoming vice president on its incorporation. In this 
connection he has since remained and the success of the undertak- 
ing is attributable in large measure to his efforts. Another business 
enterprise which profits by his cooperation, sound judgment and 
stimulus is the California Ice Company, of Oakland, of which he is 
the president. 7"his company not only engages in the manufacture 
of ice, but conducts a cold storage plant, being the largest of the kind 
in Alameda county. Mr. Lewis has also made extensive investments 
in real estate and in connection with his father and brother has 
large holdings in Oakland and this part of California. To carry 
on their real-estate business the William Frisbie Lewis Company was 
organized, with Irving C. Lewis as vice president and the active 
manager of the business. In association with his brother he erected 
the fine three-story building, seventy-five by one hundred feet, at the 
corner of Ninth and Franklin streets in Oakland, and thus materially 
added to the improvement of that section. Whatever he undertakes 
is carried forward to successful completion and in his vocabularv 
there is no such word as fail. 

In December, 1890, occurred the marriage of Mr. Lewis and 
Miss Clara Eliza Phillips, daughter of J. W. Phillips, president of 
the Grayson-Owens Company, of Oakland. Following their mar- 
riage they entered upon a tour around the world, spending eight 
months in visiting many points of historic, ancient and modern, inter- 
est, Mr. Lewis' father giving them this trip as a wedding present. 
To them was born one son, Phillip Frisbie Lewis, now a successful 
young artist of Oakland. The wife and mother passed away April 
I, 1907. 



268 HISTORY OF-" ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Lewis is well known in club circles, holding membership 
with the Athenian, the Home and the Claremont Country Clubs, 
and also with the Oakland Commercial Club. He is a loyal member 
of Brooklyn Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and of the First Presbyterian 
church. His political views are in accord with the principles of the 
republican party, but he has never sought nor desired office, pre- 
ferring to concentrate his energies upon his business afifairs, which 
are of growing importance, constituting him a leading representative 
of the commercial and financial interests of Oakland. 



ST. MARY'S COLLEGE, OAKLAND. 

Under date of July gth, 1863, the Most Rev. Joseph Sadoc 
Alemany, D. D., O. P. (i 814-1888), Archbishop of Upper Cali- 
fornia, made entry in his diary: "I blessed the chapel of the College 
of St. Mary beyond the Mission Dolores." Simply that and nothing 
more. But it was significant; it marked an epoch in the histt)ry of 
Catholic education in the west. 

San Francisco was growing fast; its El Dorado fascination had 
not vet waned. A sprinkling of the population had the faith and its 
children were maturing with few men to break the word to them. 
To develop a native priesthood, the saintly Bishop had established 
St. Thomas Seminary at the old Mission Dolores, placing it in charge 
of Monsignor J. Prendergast, the present Vicar General of the Arch- 
diocese. To preserve and cultivate the old faith he founded St. 
Mary's College on the Mission Road to San Jose, about three miles 
west of the seminarv. On the scroll that went into the cornerstone 
was written: "* * Joseph Alemany, Archbishop of California, 

laid the cornerstone of this college under the title of St. Mary, for 
the instruction of the youth of California, not in literature only but 
what is, greater, in true Christian knowledge." 

The founding of St. Mary's College was a gigantic undertaking 
in those days and the event is enshrined in names that will forever 
adorn the history of the Catholic church on the Pacific coast. Some 
of these names arc Patrick Manogue (1831-1895), subsequently 
Bishop of Sacramento, who took a handful of clay from the proposed 
site and carried it to town for chemical analysis (it proved fit and 
the brick that went into the beautiful Gothic pile was manufactured 
on the ground) ; James Croke, V. G. (1829-1889), a brother of the 
Archbishop of Cashcl, Ireland, who collecting thirty-three thousand 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 269 

dollars among the miners of California is immortalized in the above 
mentioned scroll with these words : "It has been erected by the offer- 
ings of the miners and the faithful of California, through the exer- 
tions of Rev. James Croke, V. G.;" William Gleason, M. A. (1827- 
1903), author of "Trials of the Church" (1880), and "History of 
the Catholic Church in California" (1872), and Richard Brennan 
( '835-1905), Chancellor of the Archdiocese, both of whom professed 
the ancient classics in the institution; and Patrick J. Gray (1822- 
1907), its first president. 

The site comprised sixty acres of the Salinas Y Viejo Potrero 
Ranch and was purchased for fourteen hundred dollars. The fact 
lends a tinge of romanticism to the establishment. Though exposed 
to the wind and fog of the Pacific ocean the site was long known as 
University Mound and lay on the western slope of Bernal Heights, 
named after the original grantees. The name and a few city lots near 
Mission Dolores is all that is left of that generous Spanish Grant. 
The Bernals have deserved to fare better. They were liberal bene- 
factors to Archbishop Alemany; the boys received their early educa- 
tion at St. Mary's College; but time and "squatters" have dealt hard 
with their descendants. The old college building too has disap- 
peared, having been sold and razed in 1910. 

The beginnings of St. Mary's were quite modest. Five lay pro- 
fessors and two priests composed the faculty. They were assisted 
by pupil-teachers — men who attended class sessions three-fourths of 
the time and taught the other fourth. The curriculum embraced 
the three R's, English, grammar and rhetoric, mathematics to quad- 
ratics, Euclid's geometry, logic and philosophy, modern languages, 
music, physical culture, and a rather extensive course in classics and 
religion. Students flocked to it from all quarters. The first year 
registered four hundred and seventeen, but hard times succeeded the 
season of prosperity. Father Grey was an earnest and stern man of 
the old school. He worked hard and zealously but the proverbial 
Californian writhed under restraint. Though the opportunity was 
offered him to get an education at one hundred and seventy-five 
dollars a year he began to shun St. Mary's and the registration in 1868 
• fell to less than one-fourth the initial number. 

Archbishop Alemany felt keenly the diminution in numbers and 
finances. When one of the professors in 1864 asked about his salary 
for the ensuing year his Grace wrote in reply: "I regret very much 
to have to state — that I must back out from the engagement made 
with you. Poor old St. Mary's has lost too much these last two 
years * * * . If you continue acting as professor — it will have 



270 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

to be at what Father Grey can afiford, which may be a fraction less 
than what he generally gave last year." Father Croke, who was 
absorbed in the success of the college, wrote to the same professor in 
a similar but more hopeful strain, from Mission San Jose, where he 
was confined with a fractured knee: "From what I heard of the last 
examination I think we have reason to be proud of St. Mary's as a 
literary establishment. Its advantages to the public are not duly 
appreciated, but time will efifect a change. Then I hope St. Mary's 
can afiford to be generous toward those who labor with zeal and 
profit in the noble cause of education. Meanwhile they must be satis- 
fied with a moderate supply of United States coin and plenty of 
prayers." 

From the inception of the institution it was the Archbishop's inten- 
tion to have it conducted by Brothers. In December, 1863, he wrote 
to Archbishop Spaulding at Baltimore and to the Bishop of Bruges, 
Belgium, asking if they could provide him Brothers. During the 
same year he visited Montreal, New York and Paris in an effort to 
secure them. In 1867 Cardinal Bornabo wrote to the Superior of the 
Salesians at Bruges, and of the Christian Brothers at Dublin, Ireland, 
inquiring if they could supply subjects to the Archbishop of San 
Francisco to take charge of a boarding college. In 1868 the untiring 
Alemany again visited Montreal, New York and Paris, but in vain. 
As a court of last resource he applied to Rome. The Holy Father, 
Pius IX, immediately ordered Brother Phillipe (1806-1874), 
Superior General of the Brothers of the Christian Schools at Paris, 
to give Archbishop Alemany enough Brothers to open a boarding 
college. On the evening of August 10, 1868, eight Brothers under 
the direction of Brother Justin (1834-1912) landed in San Fran- 
cisco. On the following day they dined with his Grace and in the 
afternoon rode in carriages out the Mission Road to the college, where 
they were installed without ceremony. 

The building was amply large for two hundred students though 
but thirty-four greeted the new tutors. Brother Justin with charac- 
teristic energy immediately sent broadcast the first prospectus of St. 
Mary's, a quarto-sheet, and his Grace sent urgent letters to all the 
priests of the archdiocese asking them to encourage Catholic parents 
to send their children to the college for a Christian education. The 
result was beyond expectations. The register swelled to three 
hundred and twenty-seven names the first year, though the tuition had 
been advanced to two hundred and fifty dollars. In 1872 the institu- 
tion was incorporated. That year was graduated the first Bachelor in 
Arts and Letters, J. Alphcus Graves, and since tiiat year three inindred 



HISTORY OF ALAMf<:DA COUNTY 271 

and twenty-five men have received their degrees from St. Mary's be- 
sides five hundred and seventeen who have been awarded diplomas in 
accounting by the commercial department. A record for collegiate 
work on the Pacific coast. 

Fulfilling admirably the fondest hopes of Archbishop Alemany, 
his Grace felt most kindly towards St. Mary's. He honored it on 
many occasions with his presence and was proud to make it an objec- 
tive point for all his distinguished visitors. Several times was he the 
recipient of words of respect and devotion from the students of the 
college. The bond of union that naturally grew between the clergy 
and the Brothers has been strengthened with time, and his present 
Grace, Most Rev. P. W. Riordan, D. D., has fostered it with untiring 
vigilance. He it was who annually administered the Sacrament of 
Confirmation in St. Mary's since 1884, who dedicated and rededi- 
cated the building in Oakland in 1889 and 1895, and who opened the 
first course of lectures in the new institution with "Books and How 
to Use Them," October, 1889. Other members of his clergy who 
also lectured in the course were the late Most Rev. George Mont- 
gomery, D. D., Rev. Thomas McSweeney, and Rev. Joseph 
Sasia, S. J. 

Brother Justin was succeeded in 1879 by Brother Bettelin, who in 
1889 transferred St. Mary's to Oakland, where a massive building 
had been erected at a cost of three hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars. Owing to the duties devolving on him through the provin- 
cialship of California, Brother Bettelin placed the guidance of the 
college under one of his subordinates, called director. This title 
was maintained until 1900 when the director became president of the 
college and the provincial, president of the board of trustees. 

The Brothers early realized that they were not organized to make 
money and St. Mary's has been no exception. The debt that hung 
over it on August 11, 1889, has never been raised; in fact it has 
grown with age. In 1894 the building was burned and the walls of 
the old college in San Francisco once again resounded with teachers 
and pupils in battle array. Eighteen months passed before the Oak- 
land building was reoccupied. The earthquake of 1906 again 
enhanced the debt when fifty thousand dollars were expended in 
repairs and in the enlargement of accommodations. Then during the 
active prefectship of Brother Joseph, thirty thousand was spent in 
the erection of a completely equipped gymnasium, a swimming tank, 
and the construction of a regulation stadium. Withal the equipment 
of the institution has steadily improved. Assaying, chemical and 
phvsical laboratories were added in h)(xi-i903, a pre-medical course 



272 HISTORY OF .\LA:\IEDA COUNTY 

introduced in 1910, while the first graduates in civil engineering had 
been given their sheepskins in 190^. 

St. Mary's College upholds the old system of non-electives. The 
courses are prescribed and students must fall in line. Some time ago 
it was considered antiquarian, but universities have reverted lately to 
it as the savior of their standards of scholarship. Even in the matter 
of religion all students must follow the religious exercises of H(jly 
Mother Church, and listen to the exposition of Catholic doctrine 
though non-Catholics are dispensed from recitation. Tiie result is 
that St. Mary's has fitted men for this world while it trained them 
for another. The thirst for knowledge acts for and by itself and 
makes its own way; but the art of living must be learned by instruc- 
tion and developed by regular systematic practice. As evidence of 
this idea in education, St. Mary's already numbers amongst its grad- 
uates, twenty-eight priests, thirty-three doctors, fifty-seven lawyers, 
and twelve judges. Further, as orators, its men are called into requi- 
sition on all occasions and never does a St. Patrick's Dav or a Fourth 
of July pass without the alumni of the college upholding the tradi- 
tion emanating from the great Brother Justin. The standard of a 
nation's greatness is set by the number of its great men; may not the 
criterion apply to institutions as well? It is substantiated in the 
Catholic church, and like wheels within a wheel it is lived in the 
institutions which she fosters. 

St. Mary's great work on the Pacific coast will stand. It will also 
grow because its ideal is set down in the scroll that went into the 
head of the corner. On subserviency to this ideal alone does it bank 
its continuity for good. Men must get a moral, physical and intel- 
lectual education, to attain the right standard of true citizenship. 
The influence of such men on the body politic is known to God alone. 
Communicative, it enlarges in an ever increasing circle. 



FREDERICK KAHN. 



In all the Bay cities no firm is more conspicuous for progress and 
fair dealing, nor has done more for the beautification of the city, 
and for the development of the commercial interests of Oakland, 
than has the house of Kahn whose recognized leader and president 
is the subject of this review. 

His father, Israel Kahn, a native of Germany, arrived in New 
York in the year 1849, where he lived until 1S77. In tlic latter year, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 273 

taking with him his wife and nine children, he migrated to Cali- 
fornia. Israel Kahn was not a wealthy man; on the contrary his 
means were extremely limited but he was possessed of those fine quali- 
ties, energy, thrift and conservative progressiveness. He was quick 
to sense a business opportunity and to take advantage of it but in 
connection therewith he always manifested precaution not to overstep 
the needs of the present so far that it would place an element of risk 
in his path. Mr. Kahn's entry into business upon his own resources 
was in small quarters at 908 Market street, San Francisco, the same 
year that he arrived on this coast. He was not there long, however, 
until he became acquainted with conditions and began to look into 
the more distant future. It was then, by most careful study of the 
situation, that he became convinced that the continental side of the 
Bay would soon gain the foothold, growth and prestige to which, 
as the logical terminus for all overland transportation, it was entitled. 

In 1879 he transferred his interests to this side of the Bay and 
first opened to the public of Oakland a store under the name of Kahn 
Sons, a name that is inseparably linked with the annals of Alameda 
county. The many struggles that followed (and many they were for 
Mr. Kahn), were bravely borne, and his arduous labors ultimately 
brought forth fruits of success. This busy little store was situated 
at the corner of Twelfth and Broadway, and, the concensus of 
opinion was an expression of doubt that Mr. Kahn's small estab- 
lishment, with its corps of three salespeople and a floor space of. 
20x40 feet, would even survive the obstacles of a year. 

In a few years the business justified the seeking of more spacious 
accommodations which were found in the vicinity of Tenth and 
Broadway. The evolution of this store, now one of Oakland's most 
substantial, progressive and popular institutions of business, would 
if dealt with step by step fill volumes. In brief, the location has 
been changed five times, the removal each time being necessitated 
bv the enormously increased patronage which has marked every year 
in the history of the business. 

August 2, 1913, marked the opening of the beautiful new store 
facing on Sixteenth street, Telegraph and San Pablo avenues. The 
site occupies an entire acre. The magnificent structure, erected at a 
cost of three quarters of a million dollars, is a masterpiece in the 
art of architectural design ami in the arrangement for the artistic 
display of goods together with the many innovations provided to 
afiford convenience and comfort to its patrons. 

This store justly holds the distinction of being the largest in Ala- 
meda county and the third largest in California. The management 



274 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

remained in the hands of the founder until 1883 when he passed away. 
With all the foresight and wisdom with which the father had builded 
the three sons then continued the business, although Frederick. Kahn 
was not until four years later, 1887, intimately connected with the 
management. The firm was incorporated in 1903, with Henry Kahn 
as president. He capably filled that oflfice until his death in 1907 
when he was succeeded by the late Solomon Kahn who served the 
interests of the concern well for three years. In 1910 Frederick 
Kahn, the only surviving member of the original corporation, 
assumed the presidency. 

Frederick Kahn was born in New York city, September 21, i860. 
He acquired his education in grammar school No. /12 oi the city of 
New York and later attended the evening classes of the Thirteenth 
Street high school. When he began his independent career he was 
made office manager in a San Francisco importing house, holding this 
position from 1880 to 1887. In the latter year he joined his brothers 
in the conduct of the now well established business. 

Mercantile interests however have not held his entire attention 
which is evidenced by his connection with various other capitalistic 
enterprises. He is also president of the Kahn Realty Company and 
University Investment Company. 

On the 19th of February, 1905, Mr. Kahn was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Helen Lavenson, a daughter of Samuel Lavenson, a 
pioneer merchant of Sacramento, and they have become the parents 
of three children: Frederick, Jr., Rose Etta and Helen Sarah. Mr. 
Kahn is a member of the First Hebrew Congregation of Oakland and 
belongs to the Olympic Club, and the Commercial Clubs of both 
Oakland and San Francisco. He is also a thirty-second degree 
Mason, belonging to the San Francisco consistory. 



CLARENCE CROWELL. 

Clarence Crowell, wiio is successfully engaged in the general 
practice of law in Oakland, was born in Waterloo, Iowa, December 
17, 1868, and has been a resident of Oakland since 1888. He acquired 
his legal education in the University of California, from which insti- 
tution he received his degree in 1894, in the same year beginning 
the practice of his profession. In 1896 he was made assistant city 
attorney of Oakland and served one year, after which he was attornev 
for the public administrator for six years. Since 1900 he has been 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 275 

court commissioner of the superior court of Alameda county and has 
held various other positions of trust and responsibility. As a lawyer 
he is recognized as a strong and able practitioner. He is well versed 
in the various departments of the law, is thoroughly devoted to the 
interests of his clients and his careful preparation of his cases and 
their clear presentation in the courts are strong elements in an 
unusually successful legal career. 

Mr. Crowell is connected with the Masonic order, the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and the Nile and Commercial Clubs. He 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party and stands high 
in its councils, having served for ten years as chairman of the repub- 
lican county central committee. He is now at the head of a large and 
constantly increasing practice, and his success is the merited reward 
of his own labor. 



J. STITT WILSON. 



J. Stitt Wilson needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, 
as he is known by reputation if not personally to thousands in this 
country and in Great Britain. He has won distinction as a lecturer 
upon the various phases of socialism, and few men speak with greater 
authority upon the subject, for his studies have embraced every phase 
of life which has to do with socialistic conditions. He was born in 
Huron county, Ontario, Canada, in 1868, a son of William James 
and Sarah Ann (Stitt) Wilson, the former a native of Ireland and 
the latter of Ontario, although both were of Scotch descent. On leav- 
ing Canada the family removed to Huron county, Michigan, where 
the parents spent their remaining days. 

J. Stitt Wilson acquired his classical education in the North- 
western University at Evanston, Illinois, where he won the Bachelor 
of Arts degree in 1897, while in 1901 the Master of Arts degree was 
conferred upon him by his alma mater. While pursuing his studies 
there he was ordained for the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and occupied several pastorates ere his college course was 
finished, the last being in the Erie Street Methodist church of Chi- 
cago, where he remained as minister for four vears. He was also 
a worker in the Northwestern University social settlement and in that 
connection and while serving as pastor of the Erie Street church 
he became a student of social and industrial science and proclaimed 
himself a socialist. He then resigned his pastorate and began tn 



276 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

devote himself entirely to the socialist cause. For years he traveled 
throughout the United States, Canada and Great Britain, preaching 
the doctrine of socialism, which, based upon a recognition of the 
rights of the individual and his obligations to his fellowmen, seeks 
that equitable adjustment in which is found solution for many of 
the vexing national problems. In 1901 he removed to Berkeley, 
where he has since made his home, but at no moment in his life has 
his enthusiasm waned or his cause been neglected. He has made 
four trips to England, studving the social problems of that land, 
lecturing on socialism and on constructive socialistic legislation. In 
TQio he was nominated for governor of California on the socialist 
ticket and was given fifty thousand votes. In 191 1 he was elected 
mayor of Berkeley and in 1913 refused to accept a renomination, feel- 
ing that he could accomplish more for his cause when left free than 
when in public oflice. His work on the public platform in the 
interest of moral and social reform has been of an illustrious char- 
acter attended with splendid results. His efforts in this state alone 
cover thirteen years, during which time he has addressed more people 
than any other public speaker in California. For several years there 
has been maintained in San Francisco a hall, in which cverv Sundav 
he speaks to a large audience. 

Mr. Wilson has been a most thorough student of many of the 
grave, vital and significant questions of the day. His position is 
never an equivocal one. He stands fearlessly for what he believes 
to be right and is an aggressive advocate of woman suffrage, temper- 
ance reform, prison reform and other lines of action leading to the 
progress of the community an(i to the adoption of higher standards. 
He is a strong opponent of capital punishment and is an ardent 
worker for a form of taxation which will embrace the taxing of the 
unearned increment of land values which he declares to be the funda- 
mental principle for the emancipation of the people from industrial 
injustice. In 1912 he was socialist candidate for congress, opposing 
the Hon. J. R. Knowland, and was given a large vote. He has been 
a student of the subject of international peace and often speaks upon 
that question. Beside his numerous contributions to the daily press, 
he has written many pamphlets and several books on social prob- 
lems, which have been widelv read throughout the United States 
and Europe. 

In 1889, in Huron county, Ontario, Mr. Wilson was united in 
marriage to Miss Emma Agnew, also a native of that district, and 
they have three children : William Gladstone, who is now a student 
in the l^niversitv of California; Gladvs Viola, who is the wife of 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 277 

Jack Conway and is known on the stage as Viola Barry; and Violette 
Rose, who is attending high school in Berkeley and who also gives 
indication of marked musical and dramatic talent. Mrs. Wilson is 
especially interested in the socialist movement and often travels with 
her husband. 



BLAKE D. MYERS. 



Blake D. Myers occupies an important position in railroad circles 
in Oakland as terminal agent of the Southern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany. He began work for the Southern Pacific in 1890 as telegraph 
operator and advanced through various positions until he was made 
terminal agent in Oakland in April, 191 2, which position he now 
holds. He has risen steadily and by merit only, and there is great 
credit due him for what he has achieved. He enjoys the full con- 
fidence of his superior officers and stands high in the estimation and 
respect of those who work with and under him. He has many friends 
in Oakland and is particularly esteemed by the general public 
because of his courtesy, his obliging manner and his readiness to 
do a kindness to those who may request his help or assistance. 



WILLIAM BLANCHARD BANCROFT. 

William Blanchard Bancroft is a man of initiative, enterprise and 
discrimination and in the course of a long and successful business 
career has been identified with a number of important corporate 
interests in various parts of the United States and London and was 
for many years one of the greatest individual forces in the upbuild- 
ing and development of the Bancroft Publishing Company of San 
Francisco. For a number of years past he has been identified with 
the real-estate business in Oakland, and he controls today a large 
and representative patronage. He was born in Grand Prairie, Dunk- 
lin county, Missouri, September 27, 1847, and is a son of Curtis and 
Louisa J. (Lamb) Bancroft, the former a native of Grandville, Ohio, 
and the latter of Kentucky. The parents crossed the plains to Cali- 
fornia in 1850 and arrived in Hangtown, now Placerville. The 
father afterward engaged in mining on Rich Bar, Plumas county, 
and later built and operated the Xalional Hotel at Bidwcil's Bar. 



278 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

W. B. Bancroft came by the Nicaraguan route to California in 
August, 1854, being at that time seven years of age. He made the 
journey up the coast to San Francisco on the historic old steamer 
Brother Jonathan and from San Francisco pushed on to Bidwell's 
Bar, where he acquired his preliminary education in private schools 
and subscription schools. He later attended the Oak Grove Institute 
of Alameda, being but twelve years of age, the youngest boarding 
pupil, and he also studied in the public schools of San Francisco. 
In 1861 he entered the employ of H. H. Bancroft & Company, book- 
sellers and stationers of San Francisco, and for twenty-nine years 
thereafter did able work in the service of this corporation. Starting 
in as an errand boy he rose through every department, learning the 
business in principle and detail. He spent some time as a bookkeeper 
and was later, at eighteen years of age, sent to New York, where he 
took complete charge of the company's wholesale department. He 
subsequently returned to California and traveled all over the Pacific 
coast in the interests of the companv, which numbered him among 
its most trusted and able representatives. The period of his con- 
nection with H. H. Bancroft & Company was not continuous, for in 
August, 1869, Mr. Bancroft went to San Diego, purchased three lots 
and built a small store, engaging in the book and stationery business 
for himself. When he returned to San Francisco he again joined 
the Bancroft Company, becoming manager of the printing, book- 
binding and publishing department, a position which offered ade- 
quate scope to his initiative power and executive ability. Under his 
administration the business increased from sixty-five thousand dollars 
a vear to half a million in 1886 when the building was destroyed by 
fire. 

Mr. Bancroft later went to New York, where he became asso- 
ciated with the American Trading Company and was sent by them 
to London as resident agent with the full unrestricted power of 
attorney to reorganize their London office. He accomplished this 
work so successfully that he purchased for them a business worth 
twelve and one-half million dollars. After a number of years of 
unusually able and discriminating service Mr. Bancroft resigned 
from the employ of the American Trading Company and again 
entered the publishing business. He compiled in London a book 
called "Bancroft's Americans in London," which was made a standard 
volume and published every year for six years. At the request of his 
brother, H. P. Bancroft, Mr. Bancroft of this review returned to 
California and became associated in the real-estate business in Oak- 
land with the Breed & Bancroft Company. At the end of six years 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 279 

he returned to London but after one year came again to Oakland, 
resuming his real-estate operations independently. 

Mr. Bancroft is a member of the London- American Society and 
well known in club circles of the world's metropolis, holding mem- 
bership in the Queen's Athletic Club and the Balham Constitutional 
Club of London and also the London branch of the United States 
Navy League, of which he was one of the incorporators. He is 
prominent in the affairs of the Athenian Club of Oakland. He is a 
man of broad culture, progressive views and high ideals and is well 
and favorably known in the social life of the community. In business 
circles he occupies a place of prominence and distinction, being 
widely recognized as a man of tried integrity and worth. 



OLIN D. JACOBY 



Since 1908 Olin D. Jacoby has been cashier of the First Trust 
and Savings Bank of Oakland, occupying a foremost position in the 
financial life of that city. He was born in Towanda, Pennsylvania, 
in December, 1880, and is a son of E. H. and Maria (Trumbull) 
Jacoby. He attended public and preparatory schools until nineteen 
years of age, when he went to New York city and entered the office 
of a marine insurance company as a clerk, remaining with that firm 
for one year. He then was for six months clerk and stenographer in 
the employ of the Western National Bank. At the end of that time 
he crossed the continent to Los Angeles and for three months held a 
position as stenographer with the Santa Fe Railroad Company in that 
city. His next position, covering a period of six months, was as clerk 
of the West Side Lumber Company at Tuolumne, California. Upon 
coming to San Francisco he became a clerk in the American National 
Bank, continuing in that position for three years, when he was made 
assistant cashier of that institution. In 1908 Mr. Jacoby came to Oak- 
land as cashier of the First Trust and Savings Bank, and he has ever 
since held that position. This institution has greatly prospered under 
his able management and has gained in prestige and solidity. 

On July 6, 1903, Mr. Jacoby married, in Los Angeles, Miss 
Elizabeth Jones, and they have three children, Esther Barbara, 
Harold Stanley and Roger De Vere. Mr. Jacoby is a democrat and 
thort^ughly in accord with the principles of his party. He is con- 
versant with the issues of the day and deeply interested in the growth 
of his citv and county, although not an office seeker and not anxious 



280 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

to actively enter into political contests. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist church and is deeply interested in its work, and is also president 
of the Alameda County Epworth League Alliance. Mr. Jacoby is 
an American citizen of the highest type, a man who is considerate 
of the interests of others and who is ever ready to promote the gen- 
eral welfare and the growth and expansion of his C(Mnmunity. 



GRANT D. MILLER. 



Grant D. Miller is a well known undertaker of Oakland, con- 
ducting a handsomely appointed establishment at No. 2372 East 
Fourteenth street. His birth occurred in Amador county, California, 
on the 24th of November, 1863, his parents being David R. and Julia 
(Hinkson) Miller. It was in 1851 that the father came to this state, 
settling in Amador county, where he engaged in business as a black- 
smith and subsequently conducted a carriage factory until 1884, In 
that vcar he removed to Merced, California, and there carried on 
agricultural pursuits until the time of his retirement in 1908, being 
the first fruit grower of the county. His demise occurred in January, 
1909. The mother of our subject, who is still living in Oakland, 
crossed the plains when a girl of nine years with her parents. The 
journev was made with ox teams from Washington county, Missouri, 
and the family settled in Amador county, California, \vhere 
she grew to womanhood and where her parents died. Grant 
D. was the second in order of birth in a family of five children, the 
others being: Edith, the wife of F. B. Layton, of Eureka; Harry, 
a resident of Oakland; Edna, the wife of Donald Foster, of San 
Francisco; and Julia, of Oakland. 

Grant D. Miller attended the public schools until sixteen years 
of age and then came to San Francisco, where he entered the Pacific 
Business College, being graduated from that institution at the end 
of six months. Subsequently he was employed as clerk by Wells 
Fargo & Company for two years and on the expiration of that period 
went to Mariposa, California, serving as secretary of the Compromise 
Mining Company until 1884. In that year he removed to Merced 
and there followed farming in association with his father. In May, 
1900, during the famous Klondike strike, he went to Alaska and from 
June until November of that year was at Nome. He then came to 
Oakland and established the undertaking business which he now con- 
ducts. In this connection he has won a well merited measure of pros- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 283 

perity that has gained him recognition among the substantial and 
representative citizens of Alameda county. 

On the 8th of November, 1894, ''i Fresno, California, Mr. Miller 
was united in marriage to Miss Nella Wood, a daughter of the Rev. 
I. D. Wood. They now have two children: Marjorie, who is a 
high-school graduate; and Jean, who is still attending the high 
school. 

In politics Mr. Miller is a republican and he is now a candidate 
for the office of county coroner. His religious faith is that of the 
Baptist church. He belongs to the San Francisco Press Club and 
the Young Men's Christian Association and is identified fraternally 
with the following organizations: Brooklyn Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; 
the Native Sons, of which he is past president; the Woodmen of 
the World; the subordinate lodge and encampment of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows; and the Knights of Pythias. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Miller are popular in the social circles of their community 
and are highly regarded. 



H. C. CAPWELL. 



The leaders are few. The majority of men are content to remain 
in positions where circumstance or environment has placed them, 
lacking the ambition and the determination which would enable them 
to advance and become active in control of business enterprises or 
important interests. Contrary to the general rule and, therefore, 
standing as a central figure on the stage of activity among his fellows 
is H. C. Capwell, to whom Oakland owes much for the develop- 
ment of her commercial interests, for he stands at the head of the 
H. C. Capwell Company, owners of the largest and most important 
department store in Alameda county. Moreover, he has been deeply 
and actively concerned in municipal affairs, especially along the line 
of improving and beautifving the city, and whether in busmess or 
public connections is actuated at all times by the spirit of modern 
progress. 

Mr. Capwell is a native of Michigan, his birth having occurred 
in Grand Ledge in the year 1858. His father, William Capwell, was 
born in New York, but in early life removed westward to Michigan, 
establishing his home near Grand Ledge, where he engaged in stock- 
raising, being one of the pioneer settlers of that section of the state. 



2S4 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

At the usual age H. C. Capwell became a pupil in the public schools 
near his father's home and afterward had the benefit of instruction 
in Wheelock Academy of Grand Ledge. He has been identified with 
the western coast since 1880, in which year, as representative of 
several eastern mercantile firms, he took charge of a San Francisco 
office, spending two years in that connection. In 1889 he removed to 
Oakland, where he established a small store that formed the nucleus 
of his present gigantic and attractive establishment. His business 
grew steadily from the beginning and something of the extent and 
importance of the enterprise is indicated in the fact that the H. C. 
Capwell Company now employs a sales force of five hundred people. 
Moreover, he has ever held to the highest standards in the character 
of goods carried, in the personnel of the house and in the treatment 
of patrons. Courtesy as well as straightforward dealing is demanded 
from all of his employes, and the attractive trade methods insure 
a continuance of the liberal patronage that has long been accorded the 
house. The company has erected a magnificent business block, which 
adds much to the architectural adornment of Oakland. Mr. Capwell 
remains as president of the company and its chief stockholder, and 
the business is a monument to his enterprise, keen sagacity and initia- 
tive spirit. He is also the president of the Security Bank & Trust 
Company of Oakland, which is likewise one of the visible evidences 
of his ability, industry and integrity. He was very active in the 
founding of the Oakland Chamber of Commerce and has been one 
of its moving spirits. It was when he was president of the old Board 
of Trade that, in 1905, he circulated the petition for the formation 
of the present Chamber of Commerce, of which he became president. 
In 1890 Mr. Capwell was united in marriage to Miss Edwards, a 
daughter of a prominent capitalist and bond broker of San Fran- 
cisco. The family now numbers a son and two daughters. That Mr. 
Capwell is descended from one of the old colonial families is indi- 
cated in the fact that he is entitled to membership with the Sons 
of the American Revolution, for among his ancestors were those who 
fought for independence. Using his prerogative to become identified 
with the patriotic organization of the present day, he has taken active 
part in its work, has held the office of director and has been honored 
with the position of state president. Fraternally he is a Knight 
Templar and also a prominent Elk. He is a past exalted ruler of 
the Elks lodge of Oakland and was its chief official at the time of? 
the erection of the new Elks building. He belongs to a number of | 
the leading clubs and social organizations of the Bay cities, including j| 
the Bohemian Club of San Francisco, the Clarcmont Countrv Club, J' 



HISTORY. OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 285 

the Sequoia Country Club and the Nile and Athenian Clubs of 
Oakland. 

He is perhaps best known, outside of business circles, by reason of 
his connection with those agencies which work for civic betterment. 
He has been identified with many projects which are a matter of 
civic virtue and civic pride and his labors have been an effective force 
in advancing the welfare of his city. A contemporary writer has 
said of him: "A shrewd business man, a logical thinker and a con- 
vincing advocate, combined with his unswerving loyalty, has made 
him a potent factor of conceded leadership in all enterprises initiated 
for the development of Oakland and Alameda county. Generous 
and responsive, he has given with a free hand to many worthy causes 
and may well be regarded as one of Alameda county's foremost 
merchants. Mr. Capwell is a very pleasing and forceful speaker 
and his personality captivates his audiences. His humor is ever- 
ready and infectious." There has been nothing esoteric in his entire 
life history, nor have there been any unusual circumstances or 
advantages. The opportunities which he has recognized and utilized 
are such as are open to all, and it is because he has had the ability 
to persevere in the pursuit of a persistent purpose that he stands today 
where he does, as a leading representative and honored citizen of 
Oakland, prominent in business and equally prominent in civic and 
social affairs. 



HOWELL A. POWELL. 

Howell A. Powell, conducting a law office in San Francisco, 
through which passes a great deal of the most important litigation 
heard in the courts of the state, is a descendant of a Welsh family 
of Breconshire, and his father was among the earliest settlers in 
Sutter county, California. There the subject of this review was 
reared, acquiring his early education in the public schools. He later 
entered the State Normal School at San Francisco and after his 
graduation in 1867 became principal of the Brooklyn grammar 
school of Alameda county. In 1868 he took a special course in law 
in the office of Judge Blatchley in San Francisco and in 1870 was 
admitted to the bar of California. In the same year he established 
an office in San Francisco, where he has since engaged in general 
practice. He has been employed in a number of noted civil cases 
for the state and has successfully completed the settlement of a 



286 HISTORY OF AI.A^rEDA COUXTV 

number of large and complicated estates in probation. He served 
as attorney of the city of Oakland in the water front litigation with 
the Southern Pacific Railroad and by his able handling of this case 
won added prominence as a strong, forceful and able lawyer. In 
1889 Mr. Powell was made a member of the board of freeholders, 
which framed the Oakland city charter, and he was the author of 
that provision which makes it compulsory upon the city council to 
grant franchises within certain territory contiguous to the water 
front to any railroad company that may seek to enter the city. 

In 1876 Mr. Powell married Miss Mary E. King, and they have 
four children, Eva, Helen, Alvin and Stanlev. Mr. Powell gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and has been at all 
times active and prominent in public affairs. He is an ex-member 
of the Oakland board of education and in 1896 served as a McKinley 
elector, representing tlie third congressional district, having received 
for this office the highest vote of his party in thirteen counties. In 
all official, social and professional relations he has held steadily to 
high ideals, and he commands and holds the confidence and regard 
of all who are in anv way associated with him. 



JOHN C. SCOTT. 



John C. Scott, a well known and successful attorney of Oakland, 
has here practiced his profession for more than a decade. His birth 
occurred in Schleswig, Germany, on the 2d of March, 1861, and 
it was as a youth of seventeen that he crossed the Atlantic to the 
United States. Making his way to the Hawkeye state, he attended 
the Iowa State Teachers' College at Cedar Falls and subsequently 
studied law at Waterloo with Hon. Charles Mullen, attorney-gen- 
eral of the state of Iowa. While preparing for the legal profession 
he taught school in Iowa for a period of six years. 

In 1889 Mr. Scott was admitted to the bar and began practice 
at Cedar Falls. Iowa, where he remained an able and successful 
representative of his profession for thirteen years. He was there 
elected citv attornev and held the office for two terms. In 1902 he 
came to Oakland, California, where he has remained to the present 
time, having built up an extensive and lucrative clientage as a prac- 
titioner of law. He is a strong advocate with the jury, and concise 
in his appeals before the court. Much of the success which has 
attended him in his professional career is undoubtedlv due to tlic 



HISTORY OF ALA^klEDA COL'XTY 287 

fact that in no instance will he permit himself to go into court with 
a case unless he has absolute confidence in the justice of his client's 
cause. Basing his efiforts on this principle, from which there are 
far too many lapses in professional ranks, it naturally follows that 
he seldom loses a case in whose support he is enlisted. 

In 1892 Mr. Scott was united in marriage to Miss Minnie E. 
Thompson, a native of Illinois, by whom he has one son, Leo L., 
born in Iowa. Fraternally he is identified with Sequoia Lodge of 
Masons and Oakland Lodge of the Knights of the Maccabees, acting 
as commander of the latter organization in 1904. He is likewise a 
member and trustee of Live Oak Lodge of the National Union at 
Oakland. Attractive social qualities make him popular and he has 
gained many friends during the period of his residence in that city. 



MARSHALL J. RUTHERFORD. 

Marshall J. Rutherford, a practicing attorney of Oakland, has 
won success at the bar and is numbered among the able representa- 
tives of the legal fraternity here. His birth occurred in Vallejo, 
Solano county, California, on the 14th of April, 1880, his parents 
being John and Mary Rutherford. The father came to California 
in 1 861, settling in Vallejo, where he w'as employed as a locomotive 
engineer until 1885. In that year he came to Oakland and here 
resided until 1891, when he removed to Calistoga, Napa county, 
California. He was engaged as a locomotive engineer until 1902, 
but for the past eleven years has devoted his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits. 

Marshall J. Rutherford attended the graded and high schools 
of V^aUcjo and Calistoga until 1899, when he came to Oakland and 
learned the machinist's trade, working at that occupation for four 
and a half years. During that period he continued his studies in 
the evening high school. Subsequently he went to Palo Alto, Santa 
Clara county, California, and there spent one year as a student in 
the Manzanita Hall Preparatory School for Boys, while later he 
attended The Lyceum, a preparatory school in San Francisco, for 
eight months. He next entered the University of the Pacific at 
San Jose and won the degree of B. A. in December, 1909. Having 
decided upon a professional career, he then matriculated in the law 
department of the University of California and in 191 2 received 
the degree of D. J. The University of tlie Pacific likewise conferred 



288 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

upon him the honorary degree of Master of Arts. He was admitted 
to the bar in Oakland and has already built up an extensive and 
lucrative clientage. His is a natural discrimination as to legal ethics, 
and he is so thoroughly well read in the minutiae of the law that he 
is able to base his arguments upon thorough knowledge of and 
familiarity with precedents, and to present a case upon its merits, 
never failing to recognize the main point at issue and never neg- 
lecting to give a thorough preparation. 

While obtaining his education Mr. Rutherford spent his vacation 
periods in travel, working his way to various places. His first trip 
was taken on the steamer Queen, plying between San Francisco and 
Vancouver, British Columbia, on which he spent five months as 
oiler. The ne.xt year he worked as oiler for three months on the 
steamer Korea, which sailed from San Francisco to China, Japan 
and Honolulu, and during the following year spent three months 
as deck engineer on the steamer Transport Buford, which sailed to 
Honolulu and Manila. During the next year he worked as oiler, 
water tender and machinist on the steamer Acapulco, which sailed 
to Mexico and Panama, and in the year following spent three 
months as machinist and junior engineer on the steamer Mongolia, 
which sailed to Honolulu, Japan and the island of Formosa. 

Mr. Rutherford gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party, while his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World. Oak- 
land is fortunate in having as a member of its legal profession a 
young man with the ability possessed by Mr. Rutherford. His pro- 
fessional knowledge is exhaustive and in his presence he is tactful, 
his abilitv winning him a greater degree of success than usuallv 
falls to the lot of an attorney of his age and experience. 



JEREMIAH JOSEPH HANIFIN. 

For many years Jeremiah Joseph Hanitin has been connected with 
business interests of Alameda county, having come to the coast over 
sixtv years ago. He now owns a liquor store at No. 471 Fourteenth 
street, Oakland, and enjoys a profitable trade. He w^as born in 
County Kerry, Ireland, May 15, 1834, and is a son of James and 
Alice Hanifin. In 1838 the parents emigrated to the United States 
and settled in Boston, Massachusetts, where the father for several 
Years was engaged in the mineral water business. His son Jeremiah 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 289 

attended the parochial schools in Boston until thirteen years of age, 
when his parents removed to New York, where he continued in the 
parochial schools until fifteen years of age. 

Laying aside his text-books, he learned the boat builder's trade, 
continuing along that line for about two years, and then came to 
California by way of Cape Horn, being a cabin boy on the Michael 
Angelo, which arrived in San Francisco, August 5, 1852. His first 
position at the Golden Gate was as clerk in a hotel owned by C. L. 
Longley, with whom he remained for ten months. At the end of 
that time, however, he returned to New York city by way of the 
Isthmus of Panama, walking across the isthmus from Panama to 
Gargona in order to save the twenty dollars which was charged for 
the mule ride from one coast to the other. He arrived several hours 
before those who rode, thereby establishing a fair claim as a cham- 
pion pedestrian. After arriving in New York city, his father being 
dead, he assisted his mother in her business afifairs, which largely 
consisted of looking after her investments, collecting rents, and other 
interests, etc. In 1858 Mr. Hanifin returned to San Francisco by 
way of Panama, establishing in that city the. Great Western Hotel, 
which he conducted until 1865, when he sold out and turned his 
attention to the shipping and brokerage business, so continuing for 
three years. Upon disposing of these interests he moved to Oakland, 
where he established the Cosmopolitan Hotel at Seventh street and 
Broadway, but after four years disposed of the hotel in order to give 
his whole attention to his retail liquor stores, which were located at 
Seventh street and Broadway, Seventh street and Washington street 
and 471 Fourteenth street and Broadway. In 1905 he sold the 
Washington and Broadway stores and now gives his undivided 
attention to his establishment on Fourteenth street. He is a man of 
honorable business principles and well liked by his many friends. 
He is courteous, afifable and kindly to those who are in less fortunate 
circumstances and is ever ready to support enterprises as long as 
their value can be proven to him, being always among the foremost 
to do something which may prove of advantage to his city. 

In New York city, on May 16, 1856, Mr. Hanifin married Miss 
Eliza J. Farley, and to them were born the following children: 
Mrs. V. S. McClatchy, of Sacramento; Lyda, a Sister in the Con- 
vent of the Holy Family, who has taken the name of Sister Mary 
Agatha; J. J., Jr., under-sheriff of Alameda county; Herbert L., 
who is a member of the office force of the Pacific Gas Company of 
San Francisco; Mrs. Alice Casey, widow of Dr. P. F. Casey, of 
Oakland; Irene, deceased; Edward Everett, who holds a position 



290 HISTORY OF ALA]\IEDA COUNTY 

in the recorder's office in San Francisco; Ada, a graduate of high 
school, and Frank C, in school. 

Politically Mr. Hanifin is a republican and has ever been inter- 
ested in the progress of his party. He has participated in many 
ways in public afifairs in Alameda county and from 1873 to 1876 
served as fire commissioner of Oakland. From 1881 to 1890 he was 
supervisor and chairman of the board of supervisors, being elected 
from the fourth district, and in that connection did much valuable 
work, promoting many public measures which were of vast benefit 
to the general public. Although he is eighty years of age he is hale 
and hearty, walking eight or ten miles a day, and has the strength 
as well as the appearance of a much younger man. In all the rela- 
tions of life Mr. Hanifin has proven himself a useful, conscientious 
citizen of sound ideas and sound principles and one who considers 
an untarnished name of greater value than the mere acquirement of 
wealth. 



WILLIAM AMBROSE BISSELL. 

William Ambrose Bissell, assistant traffic manager for the Santa 
Fe system at San Francisco, in which connection he manifests notable 
executive power, was born in Lyons, Wayne county. New York, in 
1848, a son of the Rt. Rev. W. H. A. and Martha Colton (Moulton) 
Bissell. The former was an Episcopal bishop of Vermont from 
1868 until his death in 1893. Reared in the atmosphere of a scholarly 
home, his early training left a strong influence on the life of Wil- 
liam A. Bissell who, directing his energies in the broad field of 
business rather than along professional lines, has gained a place 
of responsibility and prominence in connection with railwav man- 
agement. He was educated in the Geneva (New York) Academy 
and throughout his entire career has been interested in railway 
activity. At the age of si.xteen years he entered the employ of the 
Michigan Central Railroad at Detroit, Michigan, where he re- 
mained for about four years or until March, 1868, when he left the 
Mississippi valley and came to California by way of the Isthmus 
route. At that time the Central Pacific Railway Company was 
operating ninety miles of railway in this state, and he became asso- 
ciated with that corporation in a clerical position at Sacramento. 
He was later advanced to the position of freight auditor and con- 
tinued with that corporation until 1883, when he became coast agent 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 291 

for the Texas Pacific Railway with offices in San Francisco. In 
December, 1884, he accepted the office of coast agent for the Atlantic 
& Pacific Railroad, which later became a part of the Atchison Rail- 
road system. In 1894 he was promoted to the position of assistant 
freight traffic manager of the Santa Fe system, which called him to 
Chicago, and he remained there until 1899, when the Atchison, 
Topeka & Santa Fe as reorganized purchased the Santa Fe & San 
Joaquin Valley Railway, when he returned to the Pacific coast as 
assistant trafiic manager of the Santa Fe system. Here he has since 
remained, continuously occupying the position which calls for rare 
executive ability, keen discrimination and thorough understanding 
of every phase of traffic control. He also has large private financial 
interests, having made judicious investment in corporations and busi- 
ness enterprises which have constituted important elements in the 
promotion of public progress and prosperity as well as in the attain- 
ment of individual success. He is president of the Livermore Water 
& Power Company which supplies light and power to the Livermore 
valley; is vice president of the Richmond Light & Power Company; 
vice president of the McNamara Mining Company and a director 
of the Holland Sandstone Company, Lake Tahoe Railway & Trans- 
portation Company, Northwestern Pacific Railway Company, Oak- 
land & East Side Railroad Company, Richmond Land Company, 
Union Savings Bank of Oakland and Santa Fe Terminal Company 
of California. In May, 1913, when the affairs of the United Prop- 
erties Company of California became involved, he was appointed 
one of the trustees of that corporation and as such trustee was elected 
a director of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminals Railways. On 
May 20, 1 91 3, he was elected president of that company and still 
continues in that capacity. 

On the 7th day of January, 1870, Mr. Bissell was married to Miss 
Cora A. Messick and their children are William H. and Daniel R. 
Mr. Bissell makes his home in Alameda and has a beautiful summer 
residence on a delightful location at Lake Tahoe, beside owning 
ranch property near Livermore, California. He is very prominent 
in club circles of San Francisco, being one of the founders and 
members of the Transportation Club and a member of the Pacific 
Union. He also belongs to the Athenian and Claremont Clubs of 
Oakland and the California Club of Los Angeles. He is likewise 
a member of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and is in 
hearty sympathy with its many pj-ojects and movements for the 
upbuilding of the city. In fact he is a very public-spirited man, 
active in matters pertaining to the growth, development and gen- 



292 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

eral welfare of San Francisco and of the state at large. He recog- 
nizes the wonderful possibilities of California and is doing 
everything in his power to promote their utilization, thus aiding in 
the material growth of the state, while at all times he is actively 
and helpfully concerned as well in those things which are a matter 
of civic virtue and civic pride. 



HENRY N. MORRIS. 



Henry N. Morris, of Oakland, California, is vice president of 
the Central National Bank and Central Savings Bank and widely 
known in financial circles of Alameda county as a conservative banker 
who is ever careful of the interests of his depositors and who is yet 
progressive, giving valuable aid to commercial and industrial 
development. He was born in Columbus, Ohio, April 24, i860, and 
is a son of E. D. and Frances Elizabeth Morris. 

Henry N. Morris attended the public and high schools of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, graduating from the latter at the age of seventeen, 
when he entered the Western Reserve College at Cleveland, from 
which he was graduated in 1882. He then entered the Cincinnati 
Law School, receiving his degree in 1885, and subsequently prac- 
ticed law in Cincinnati for two years. At the end of that time he 
became connected with the machinery manufacturing business, con- 
tinuing thus until 1896, when he sold out and went to Munising, 
Michigan, as the representative of eastern capitalists who owned 
large timber tracts there and also as financial agent of the Munising 
Railroad Company. He remained in that city for several years and 
then accepted the position of president of the Shreveport Gas, Elec- 
tric Light & Power Company at Shreveport, Louisiana, also becom- 
ing president of the Texarkana Gas & Street Railway Company at 
Texarkana, Texas. At the end of eight years he retired, however, 
and went to San Antonio, 'I'exas, being appointed receiver of the 
Woods National Bank and discharging the afifairs of that institution 
until Mav, 1909, when he came to Oakland, being appointed receiver 
of the Union National Bank. A little later he was appointed by the 
governmental national bank examiner for the San Francisco dis- 
trict. He administered these offices until August, 1913, since which 
time he has been vice president of the Central National Bank and 
Central Savings Bank of Oakland. His extensive experience well fits 
him for the important position which he now holds at the head of 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 293 

one of the strongest financial institutions of the state. Mr. Morris is 
an influential, man of rare executive ability who thoroughly under- 
stands banking routine and financial conditions. He has a great 
capacity for detail and considers no matter too unimportant to be 
worthy of his attention, realizing that many seemingly trivial affairs 
might make a combination which is of the greatest moment. He has 
all the qualities of which a banker might be proud and is a man of 
unerring accuracy in judgment and of caution in business transac- 
tions. He possesses that intuition as to character and that knowledge 
of humanity so essential in the successful transaction of business, 
and he seldom if ever commits errors as to what and whom to trust. 

In March, 1886, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. Morris married Miss 
Ella M. Blymyer and they have three children: William B., who 
is now connected with oil interests in Geneva, Indiana; Ellis Eliza- 
beth, who is attending Miss Ransome's private school in Oakland, 
and Fearing H., who is attending the Thatcher School at Nordhofif, 
California. 

Politically Mr. Morris is a republican, and his religious faith 
is that of the Congregational church. He is a member of the Athe- 
nian and Home Clubs, and he stands high in the business and finan- 
cial life of Oakland and Alameda county, enjoying in full measure 
the confidence which is his due because of his honorable principles 
and his ability. 



JACOB M. SIPE. 



Jacob M. Sipe began his independent career at the early age of 
seven and his record since that time furnishes many splendid exam- 
ples of the value of energy, perseverance and resolution in the attain- 
ment of success. His prosperity has increased steadily through the 
years and he is today one of the prominent and leading business 
men of Oakland, where he deals in real estate on an extensive scale. 
He was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in July, 1870, and is a son of 
Peter Wells and Hannah (River) Sipe, natives of Pennsylvania, 
both of whom have passed away. Two children were born to them : 
Marv, who is married and lives in Kansas, and Jacob M., of this 
review. 

The father of our subject died when his son was still an infant 
and the mother afterward married again, leaving him dependent 
upon his own resources at the earlv age of seven. He secured a jiosi- 



294 HISTORY OF ALA^^IEDA COUNTY 

tion on a farm at three dollars per month and afterward worked at 
odd jobs for dififerent people and in various places until he was 
twenty years of age. In 1890 he came to California and settled in 
Siskiyou county, where for a time he worked in a mine, after which 
he began developing a mine of his own. He met with a fair measure 
of success in this venture and engaged in mining in Siskiyou county 
and in southern Oregon until 1906, when he came to Alameda county, 
settling in Elmhurst, where he has since resided. He gives his 
attention to the real-estate business, buying and selling property for 
himself and others. He has valuable city and farm holdings in 
Texas and also important interests in Elmhurst. 

On the 2 1 St of May, 1898, Mr. Sipe was united in marriage to 
Miss Elwilda Howe, a daughter of John and Catherine (Mills) 
Howe, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of V^irginia. 
To them were born live children: Henderson, a resident of Kansas; 
Elwilda, wife of our subject; Elmer, of Kansas; Mary, deceased, 
and Roselle, of Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Sipe have become the parents 
of a son, Roy Emerson, aged thirteen years. 

Mr. Sipe is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and gives his political allegiance to the democratic partv. His 
attention is, however, concentrated upon his business affairs, in which 
he is meeting with gratifying and well deserved success. 



CHARLES L. STURM. 

Charles L. Sturm, who since he was fifteen vears of age has 
been engaged in the plumbing business, has now the distinction of 
being the oldest merchant on Twelfth street in point of continuous 
business activity, thirty years of profitable and well-directed labor 
here having brought him prominence, success and a substantial 
fortune. He is one of the oldest residents of Oakland and is a native 
of California, his birth having occurred in Stockton, San Joaquin 
county, July 24, 1859. The name has long been known and honored 
in this state, for the father of the subject of this review, John D. 
Sturm, was a California fortv-niner and a pioneer in the cigar manu- 
facturing business in Oakland, where he took up his residence fifty 
years ago. 

Charles L. Sturm Iias been a resident of Oakland for half a 
century and has been in llic plumbing business on Twelftli street 
for over thirty years, each year bringing him increased prosperity 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 295 

as a reward for his well directed and energetic labor. He has now 
one of the finest plumbing establishments in the city and controls 
an important and representative trade along this line, for he under- 
stands his business thoroughly in principle and detail, having been 
connected wath it since he was fifteen years of age. He furnished 
and did the plumbing for the Hotel Dana, at the corner of Geary 
and Hyde streets, San Francisco; remodeled the plumbing in the 
Kohl building, in the same city, and installed the plumbing fixtures 
in the Key Route Inn and the Eva building, on Thirteenth street, 
in Oakland. He did the plumbing in the Shattuck building and 
in many other structures in Berkeley, and his reputation for lasting, 
reliable and thorough work is increasing with the passing years. 

Mr. Sturm married Miss Mary A. Dufify, a native of San Fran- 
cisco, and they have two daughters : Gertrude, and Genevieve, the 
wife of A. G. Freear. Mr. Sturm gives his political allegiance to 
the republican party and fraternally holds membership in the Elks, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Foresters and the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He is president of the Amador Consoli- 
dated Mines Company and treasurer of the Seventh Street & South 
Side Improvement Club of Oakland. 

He is interested in everything that pertains to the advancement 
and permanent welfare of the community, the more so because he 
has seen practically the entire development of the city and has borne 
an active and honorable part in the work of upbuilding. He has 
a wonderful memory and relates many interesting facts concerning 
early days in Oakland, having still a clear recollection of the time 
when the Delger block was the site of Muller's Gardens and when 
Blote Gardens stood on the lot now occupied by the Oakland post- 
office. In those days the boys stole apples from Merritt's orchard, 
at Twelfth and Jackson streets, and the first horse-car barn was 
situated on the Broadway wharf, the cars running to Fourteenth 
street and Broadway and the fare being ten cents a passenger. On 
the east side of Broadway, at Eighth and Ninth streets, were located 
the old circus grounds, owned and operated by August Seequest, 
while the present site of the Hall of Records was occupied by the 
Democratic Party Park and the courthouse site was the Republican 
Party Park. For fifty cents passengers were taken on the boats, the 
S. M. Whipple and the Chinda Warn, running between Oakland 
and San Francisco, the vessels many times striking on the sand bars 
and being delayed for hours. Mr. Sturm remembers when the 
Ames Hotel was located at First and Broadway and the Washing- 
ton Hotel at Second and Broadwav; when Edson Adams' law office 



2% HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

was on the Broadway wharf and the Oakland Brewery was located 
at Ninth and Broadway. He remembers when East Oakland was 
called San Antonio and when oak trees stood in the center of Broad- 
way, and he can recall the first fire engine, the Phoenix, which was 
housed at Eighth and Washington streets. He knew James Du 
Bois, who ran the first bowling alley, and can remember when 
Hardy's creek ran between Adeline and Market streets. The first 
cemetery was at Nineteenth and Webster streets and tomato orchards 
occupied a great portion of what is now Center street. Joe Dillon, 
the first assessor of Oakland, had his ofiice at the corner of Seventh 
and Fallon streets, and the section lying between Twelfth and Oak 
streets contained the finest residences in the city. Ships were built 
in the yards at First and Franklin streets. 

These and many other reminiscences of the early days are still 
vivid in Mr. Sturm's memory, and he takes great delight in recalling 
things which are matters of history at the present time. The fifty 
years of his residence here have been prosperous and happy ones 
and have brought him a large and important business, a substantial 
fortune and that true success which lies in the respect, esteem and 
confidence of many friends. 



STEPHEN WYTHE, M. D. 

Dr. Stephen W\the is specializing in the treatment of diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat in Oakland, where he is engaged in 
private practice, following a period of connection with the govern- 
ment service as acting assistant surgeon in the United States army 
and with community interests of Oakland as medical inspector of 
the city. He has attained a gratifying reputation in the ranks of 
the medical fraternity in this part of the state, and his ability is 
evident in his large and constantly increasing patronage. 

Dr. Wythe was born in San Francisco, December i6, 1874, and 
is a son of William T. and Laura Belle (Willson) \A'ythe, the former 
a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Oregon. The maternal 
grandfather was one of the pioneers in the last named state and 
owned and laid out the town site of Salem, which still remains as 
originally planned. The paternal grandfather of the subject of this 
review served in the Civil war and following his discharge came 
to California, where he was chief surgeon on the governor's stafif 
in 1864. He became one of the leading physicians and surgeons in 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 297 

the state and was instrumental in building up Cooper Medical Col- 
lege. His son, father of the subject of this review, was also a physi- 
cian and connected with the staff of the Cooper Medical Col- 
lege. In his family were five children: Alice Belle, who makes her 
home with the subject of this review; Willson Joseph, a well known 
architect and assistant professor of mechanical drawing in the Uni- 
versity of California; Grace, who is a teacher in the University of 
Tokio, Japan; Margaret, connected with the Zoological Museum of 
the University of California, and Stephen, of this review. 

Dr. Stephen Wythe was five years of age when his father died 
and he afterward made his home with his grandfather, acquiring 
a preliminary education in the public and high schools. He later 
took a special course in science in the University of California, 
which he attended during the years 1893 and 1894, following which 
he entered Cooper Medical College, from which he was graduated 
in 1895 '^^'ith the degree of M. D. He supplemented his medical 
education by one year's service in the Lane Hospital in San Fran- 
cisco and by a similar period in the United States Marine Hospital 
in the same city. Following this he was surgeon on the United States 
auxiliary cruiser No. 9 of the Pacific squadron, holding this position 
during the Spanish-American war. He was afterward made acting 
assistant surgeon in the United States army, serving from January, 
1899, until December, 1905. During three years of this term he 
was on the transport Sheridan and for one year was stationed on 
the Buford. After the fire in San Francisco Dr. Wythe was placed 
in charge of the emergency hospital in Oakland and when the relief 
work was successfully completed made several trips to Panama as 
surgeon on the Pacific Mail steamship Newport. Following this 
he resigned from the government service and settled in Oakland, 
where from 1907 to 1908 he served as medical inspector, taking an 
active part in the campaign against the bubonic plague. 

Upon the expiration of his term he engaged in private practice 
in Oakland, where he is now one of the leading eye, ear, nose and 
throat specialists. He is connected with the Oakland College of 
Medicine as assistant professor of ophthalmology and laryngologist, 
and he is a member of the Alameda County Society for the Preven- 
tion of Tuberculosis. He belongs to the Pacific Coast Ophthal- 
mological Society and is a member of the American Medical 
Association and the county and state medical societies, thus keeping 
in close touch with the most advanced thought of his profession. 
He is a Scottish Rite Mason and holds membership in Live Oak 
Lodge, F. & A. M. Socially he belongs to the Nile Club. He is 



2<tS HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTV 

hcld in high regard by his fellow practitioners and by the local 
public, for he conforms at all times to the highest standards of pro- 
fessional ethics and is thoroughly devoted to the interests of his 
patients. 



ALEXANDER FRIEDMAN. 

Alexander Friedman is senior partner in the Yosemite Wine 
Company. A native of Oakland, he attended the public and high 
schools, passing through consecutive grades until graduated at the 
age of seventeen years. He then engaged with Fibush Brothers, 
wholesale tobacconists, in the position of salesman and so continued 
for four years, at the end of which time he resigned and embarked 
in the retail cigar business at Thirteenth and Washington streets. 
There he continued until February, 1913, when he and his brother, 
Morris Friedman, bought out the interests of the Yosemite Wine 
Company and are now engaged in the wholesale and retail liquor 
and cigar business. They also have a branch store at No. 488 Sev- 
enth street. They are very successful and conduct a high class 
business, catering to the best people around the bay. Their patron- 
age is now extensive and each month marks an increase in their trade. 

Mr. Friedman was married in Oakland in 1902 to Miss Lydia 
H. Meyers, and they have two children, Verna and Harold. Mr. 
Friedman is well known in Oakland, where he has spent his entire 
life and where he has a circle of friends that includes many that 
have known him from his boyhood to the present. 



ERGO ALEXANDER ALAJORS, M. D. 

Dr. Ergo Alexander Majors, whose suite of offices is in the new 
Dalziel building of Oakland, was born in Santa Cruz, California, 
June 2, 1877. He had a cousin, Joseph Majors, who settled in that 
city in 1843, while his great-grandfather, Benjamin Alajors, came v^ 
the Golden state in i8!;o and was one of three who died on the bank- 
of the San Joaquin with cholera in that year. His grandfather. Alex- 
ander Majors, instituted the famous Pony express, which he ownol 
and ran, in April, 18611. Dr. ^L^jors' father is Greene ALijors, who 
wended his wav to this peerless commonwealtii in 1873 and Iiere mar 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 301 

ried Miss Cora C. Reese in 1875. It is thus seen that Dr. Majors is 
very thoroughly Californian through early family association as well 
as by birth. 

As a boy he showed such a consuming curiosity in studying the an- 
atomy of crabs, birds, gophers and other representatives of animal life 
at every opportunity that his parents were constrained to enter him in 
the medical department of the University of California, from which 
he received his professional degree in 1902. At the close of his col- 
lege course he entered upon country practice, riding over the hills 
and through the valleys for five years and gaining the experience 
that can be obtained in no other wav. In 1907 he drove his stakes 
in Oakland as his permanent home. Since coming to this city Dr. 
Majors has taken his well earned position in the front ranks of 
his profession both as a surgeon and physician, acquiring a prac- 
tice in both that is at once enviable and very lucrative. 

Dr. Majors was married September 7, 1902, to Miss Anna Belle 
Rader, of Siskiyou county, and three lovelv children have blessed 
their union. Dr. Majors spent a number of his boyhood years in 
the lovely city of Alameda, where he attended the public school 
and where his parents have lived for the past twenty-three years. 



HARRY S. ANDERSON. 

Harry S. Anderson, creditably filling the position of commis- 
sioner of public works of Oakland and prominently connected with 
mercantile interests of the city as the proprietor of a large carpet 
business, was born in Oakland, September 3, 1877, and has spent 
his entire life here. Following the completion of a public-school 
education he entered the carpet business with his father, S. 
Anderson, and has been connected with this line of work since that 
time. His present enterprise was established in the old Masonic 
Temple building, whence after three years it was removed to 1114 
Broadway. There it remained for twelve years and at the end of 
that time was moved to its present location at No. 405 Thirteenth 
street. Mr. Anderson gives a great deal of his time and attention 
to the conduct of this concern and, thoroughly understanding the 
business in principle and detail, has met with gratifying and well 
deserved success. In igii he was elected commissioner of public 
works of Oakland, and he has since filled this important position, 
giving to the citv a businesslike administration. He has charge of 



302 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

the construction work on the new two million d(jllar city hall, the 
development work on the water front, the construction of all new 
schoolhouses and full direction of all matters pertaining to wharves, 
docks and shipping, these being some of the most important enter- 
prises within the control of the municipal government. 

On the 23d of April, 1901, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage 
to Miss Edna Frances Camp of Oakland, and both are well and 
favorably known in social circles. Mr. Anderson is a stanch repub- 
lican, and although this is his first elective office, he has been active 
in politics for some years past. He was secretary of tlie county 
republican central committee of Alameda county, secretary of the 
Seventh Ward Republican Club and of the last state republican 
committee's convention under the old regime, before the direct pri- 
marv law went into elTect. He is well known in fraternal circles, 
being a member of the Elks and all the branches of the Masonic 
order, besides holding membership in the Moose, the Owls, the 
Fraternal Brotherhood of America, the Royal Arcanum and other 
representative fraternities. He also enjoys the distinction of holding 
the position of "speaker of the senate" of the National Union, which 
is the third highest gift of the order in the United States. He is one 
of the most active men in the city in furthering the cause of athletics 
and is one of the directors of the Oakland Baseball Association. He 
is a man of energy, resource and capacity and whether in business, 
official or social relations holds the good-will and confidence of all 
who are associated with him. 



JOHN PETER COOK. 



John Peter Cook, now in the third term of his able service as 
county clerk of Alameda county, is one of California's native sons, 
iiis birth having occurred in San Francisco, on the 30th of November, 
i<S69, his parents being Peter and Margaret Cook. The public and 
high schools of his native city afiforded him his educational oppor- 
tunities and after he was graduated in 1886 he spent two years in the 
University of California. He then began his independent career, 
engaging as a clerk for Whittier, Fuller & Company, dealers in 
paints in San Francisco, and he remained active in their interests 
until 1895, when he was appointed deputy county clerk of Alameda 
county under F. C. Jordan, who is now secretary of state. He con- 
tinued as deputy until 1902 and in that year was elected county clerk. 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 303 

serving by re-election in 1906 and again in 1910. He still holds this 
position, his continued return to office indicating the value of his 
services and their acceptability to the public at large. 

Mr! Cook married, on the i6th of June, 1897, in Woodland, Cali- 
fornia, Miss Sadie Briggs, and they have three children, Mildred, 
Virginia and Carol, all of whom are attending public school. Mr. 
Cook gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fra- 
ternally is connected with Masonic order, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the Native Sons of the Golden West. He is also 
secretary of the Oakland Baseball Association. With him persever- 
ance, diligence and integrity have been the guiding principles of 
life, bringing him to the honorable position which he now occupies 
in the opinion of his fellow citizens among whom he has long lived 
and labored. 



ALPHONSE CARPENTIER. 

Alphonse Carpentier needs no introduction to the people of 
Alameda or San Francisco for during the twenty-nine years during 
which he has resided in the former city and done business in the 
latter, he has become widely and favorably known as a man wh(jse 
liigh integrity and excellent business ability constitute him a promi- 
nent factor in community advancement and progress. He is a native 
of Belgium and is a representative of one of the most honored fam- 
ilies in that country. 

Alphonse Carpentier was reared and educated in Belgium and 
after laying aside his books served fifteen years in the Belgian army 
as aide de camp. In 1884 he came to America and after his arrival 
in this country pushed directly westward to California, settling in 
Alameda w here he has since made his home. He established himself 
in the shipping and importing business in San Francisco and to this 
line of work he has given his attention for twenty-nine years, success 
steadily attending his well directed labors. Through energy, enter- 
prise and persistent purpose, he has developed a large and profitable 
business and has taken his place among the deservedly successful 
and able business men of the community, his name standing today as 
a synonym for straightforward and honorable methods, and high 
commercial standards. 

Mr. Carpentier married Miss Angelc Cobb of Belgium, a daugh- 
ter of |ohn and Marie Cobb, and thev have three children: Ciabrielle, 



304 HISTORY OF ALAMFJJA COUXTV 

Jcanne and Marguerite, all born in Brussels, Belgium. Mr. Car- 
pentier is a member of the San Francisco Commercial Club and is 
always active and interested in anything which tends to promote busi- 
ness activity and commercial growth. The culture of previous 
generations has left its impress upon him and his well developed 
intellectual powers and his breadth of view make him a favorite 
in social circles where intelligent men gather for the discussion of 
deep and vital questions. Alameda is proud to number him among 
her citizens, and he in turn is proud of the achievements of the city 
where he has resided for over a quarter of a century. 



GEORGE E. KLEEMAN, M. D. 

Dr. George E. Kleeman, in the practice of his profession, medi- 
cine and surgery, having specialized in the latter to a large extent, 
is acknowledged today as one of the most skilful and successful 
members of the profession in the Bay cities. Like a great many men 
of his profession, however, he has not devoted his entire time and ; 
attention to the same, having found time to engage in other business \ 
connections of a profitable nature. At the present time he is affiliated i 
with the Fulcher Concrete Block & Paving Company, a new indus- ] 
trial enterprise in the early, though not experimental, stages of j 
development which has a very promising future and is destined to \ 
revolutionize the building industry of the world. In addition he ! 
has come to be recognized as an authority in the pigeon industry, | 
having brought into existence some of the finest specimens of birds j 
which the western coast has been able to boast of. He was born in 1 
Oakland, California, April 3, 1876, and is the son of the late William 
Thomas Frederick and Natalie ( Fischer) Kleeman. His father was ' 
born in the province of Posen, Germany, December 21, 1829, and 
attended the public schools there, receiving his preliminary educa 
tion. After a further preparatory course in government schools he 
entered the army with a commission of first lieutenant, with which 
rank he served until he resigned at the age of twenty-three years. 
Hearing of the fabulous gold Helds of this state then opening up. lu' 
migrated to California hy way of the Isthmus of Panama. Thiv 
however, was not without its difficulties, for in addition to the storni\ 
and dangerous passage experienced in crossing the Atlantic oceaii 
he contracted the vellow fever together with twentv-one others in , 
the party. The entire party were cared for on the isthmus as well 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 305 

as was possible with the crude methods then existant, he being one 
of four to survive the terrible ordeal. Coming thence to San Fran- 
cisco, he very shortly followed the roving spirit of the early d.ay 
miners and located in Trinity county, where he began mining, 
accumulating enough to enable him at the end of five years to open 
a general merchandise store. In this he was eminently successful 
and at the end of five years sold same to enlist under his adopted 
country's flag in the war of the rebellion as a Union soldier. This 
was in 1861. His service was valuable in the cause in which he 
enlisted on account of his previous army experience. His entire 
period of enlistment covered four years, after which he was honor- 
ably discharged at Washington, D. C, in 1865. Again feeling the 
magnetism of his adopted state, he soon set forth for San Francisco, 
where he established a wholesale paper collar business, manufac- 
turing paper collars for men. This venture proved extremely profit- 
able owing to his large acquaintanceship, in fact, so much so, that 
the enterprising firm of Murphy & Grant, wishing to stifle competi- 
tion, in addition to buying out his business, paid him a bonus of five 
thousand dollars to permanently retire from said business. He was 
married in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Miss Natalie Fischer on 
the 29th day of May, 1874. She survives, but Mr. Kleeman passed 
away March 13, 1898, leaving his beloved companion well provided 
for against the worries of business life. 

Dr. Kleeman, whose name introduces this record, was a student 
in the grammar and high schools of Oakland until he graduated at 
the early age of seventeen years. In preparation for his medical 
career he immediately entered the Polytechnic College, remaining 
two vears. He afterward attended the University of Illinois as a 
medical student for three years, on the expiration of which period 
he returned to Oakland and matriculated in the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons of San Francisco, from which he was graduated 
with signal honors in 1903. Still deeming this insufficient from a 
theoretical standpoint, he immediately entered the Cooper Medical 
College of San Francisco, pursuing a post graduate course and spe- 
cializing in surgery. Upon completing his course he immediately 
opened offices in the Bacon block in the city of Oakland, where he 
remained until March, 1913, when on account of a disastrous fire 
which consumed to a large extent his medical instruments, he moved 
to the Blake block. The Doctor is progressive in thought as well 
as action and believes in keeping abreast with the latest discoveries 
in his profession, and in accordance with this view has endeavored 
to and has every two years since graduating attended some notable 



806 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

institution in the United States in quest of advanced kncnvledge. He 
has visited the famous Mayo Institution of Rochester, Minnesota, 
which is without a peer in the surgical world. He has also attended 
instructions in connection with the Polyclinic and Bellevue Hospital 
of New York City. His practice is now extensive and of a most 
important character, and his success has come as the direct result 
of his ability due to his broad study, research and wide experience. 
During the terrible conflagration at San Francisco in 1906 the doctor 
was one of those to sufTer, losing everything he possessed. Not to 
be daunted, however, he immediately got busy and since that time 
has gained wonderful success, so much so, that he might readily be 
termed a self-made man, a proud cognomen attached to men of 
American genius and ability. As before stated, he is prominently 
connected with the Fulcher Concrete Block & Paving Company, 
being a large stockholder. 

Dr. Kleeman was married in San Francisco on the 17th of May, 
1906, shortly after the fire and earthquake, to Miss Etta Tiedeman. 
and they have become the happy and proud parents of two children: 
George William and Marietta Martina, aged respectively six and 
two years. The doctor is a Protestant in his religious beliefs, and 
his political faith is allied with that of the republican party. In 
addition to being a member of the Native Sons of the Golden West, 
he is affiliated with the Elk's. Along strictly professional lines he 
is connected with the Alameda County Medical Society, the State 
Medical Association and the American Medical Association, which 
keeps him in close ttnich with the advanced thought of the profes- 
sion. Year by year his knowledge and ability have increased, and 
he is today one of the most successful physicians and surgeons on the 
Pacific coast. 



STEPHEN KULCHAR. 

Stephen Kulchar is now engaged in the manufacture of office 
and bank fixtures in Oakland and has a large and profitable business. 
There is great credit due him for what he has achieved, for he has 
reached an independent position in life entirely through his own 
efforts. Long years of experience along that line in this and foreign 
countries make him an expert, and some of the largest contracts ever 
let in Alameda county have been handled by his firm. Mr. Kulchar 
is vet a comparatively young man and is a worthy type of the sue- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 307 

cessful American business man of today. He was born in Austria- 
Hungary, March 12, 1876, and is a son of John and Julia Kulchar. 

Stephen Kulchar attended the public schools of his native city 
and subsequently was a student in the Polytechnic School until he 
had reached his sixteenth year. He then attended a manual training 
school, from which he graduated at the age of seventeen, and subse- 
quently worked as a cabinetmaker in various places in Hungary 
until 1896, when he went to Paris, France, where he followed his 
trade for one year. At the end of that time he crossed the channel 
to London, England, where he worked as a cabinetmaker for two 
and one-half years, and then came to this country, working at his 
trade in New York city for two years. At the end of that time, in 
1902, he came to Oakland, accepting a position as cabinetmaker 
for W. T. Veitch & Brothers, with which firm he remained for five 
years. Having acquired the means to make himself independent 
and having gained all the experience necessary, he then established 
himself in business and has since continued in the manufacture of 
office and bank fixtures. Among the many contracts which he has 
had are the following: The entire finishing of the Kahn Brothers 
store, at a cost of one hundred thousand dollars; the work in the 
Pantages Theater, which cost the same sum of monev; the work in 
the Young Men's Christian Association building, Heeseman's store, 
the Lem Williams store, the Bradden residence, the store of M. J. 
Keller, all of the woodwork in the Bercovich cigar stores and the 
Central National Bank. In addition he has done part of the work 
in practically all of Oakland's banks. He is a very reliable, trust- 
worthy man, and his work is of the highest class. In his particular 
line there is no one today in Alameda county who turns out finish- 
ings of better workmanship. 

At Newark, New Jersey, in 1900, Mr. Kulchar married Miss 
Sophie Misoebs and they have five children, George Victor, Helen, 
Sophie, Ruby and Alice, who are respectively twelve, ten, eight, 
six and five years of age. Fraternally Mr. Kulchar is a member 
of the council in the Masonic order and also belongs to the Royal 
Arch degree. He is likewise affiliated with the Oakland Commer- 
cial Club, in which he serves on the manufacturers' committee, and 
the Chamber of Commerce, and is in full sympathy with the pro- 
gressive movements of these organizations. He also holds mem- 
bership in the Young Men's Christian Association. Politically he 
is a republican and interested in the welfare of his party but not a 
politician, although he is ever ready to support enterprises which 
may prove of value to his city and county. His religious faith is 



;j()8 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUNTY 

that of the Unitarian church. Mr. Kulchar has won many friends 
since coming to Oakland, and all admire him for his steadfastness 
of purpose, his determination, his industry and his business ability. 
And yet while he has promoted his own interests, he has always been 
considerate of others and has never lost sight of the general welfare. 



JESSE PROUTY MEEHAN. 

Jesse Proutv Meehan, veteran of the Civil war, and today 
prominently connected with business interests of Oakland as presi- 
dent of the Yosemite Laundry Company, was born in Fort Edwards, 
Washington county, New York, January 12, 1^43, and is a son of 
John and Elizabeth Meehan. 

In the acquireniLMit of an education he attended school in Albany, 
New York, to which city his parents had moved, and continued 
until he was sixteen years of age. At that time he became connected 
with the New York Central Railroad and engaged in this work until 
April 29, 1 86 1, when he enlisted in Company R, Twenty-fifth New 
York Volunteers. After three months' service he himself raised a 
company for the Forty-third New York Volunteers, and with it 
served until the fall of 1862, when he received his honorable dis- 
charge. With a creditable militarv record he returned to Albany 
and resumed his connections with the New York Central Railroad, 
remaining with it until 1868. In that year he went to Chicago, 
Illinois, where he accepted a position with the Pullman Company. 
After one year his ability gained him advancement to the position of 
assistant superintendent, and he held this until 1883, when he was 
transferred to San Francisco as superintendent of the Pacific division. 
He has since remained an honored and respected resident of this 
community, and the years have been marked by continued success 
in managing the affairs of his responsible position. Hci retired 
from active service in 1902, after being with the company thirty-four 
years, eighteen of which were spent on the coast. 

He then associated himself with his brother-in-law, Josepii M. 
Kclley, and together they founded the Yosemite Laundry Company, 
of which Mr. Meehan has since become president. Their principal 
work is for the Pullman Company on all lines terminating in Oak- 
land, San Francisco and Richmond and they have a large and well 
managed plant, where seventy people are constantly employed. As 
president of this concern Mr. Meehan's executive and organizing 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 309 

ability has been called forth, and the success of the institution is due 
largely to his ability and foresight. 

In Chicago, on the 19th day of January, 1885, Mr. Meehan was 
united in marriage to Miss Kate M. Kelley. They are members of 
the Roman Catholic church, and Mr. Meehan gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party. He belongs to the National 
Union and is one of the charter members and hrst ex-president of 
California Council, also the Society of New Yorkers and is well 
known in the George H. Thomas Post of San Francisco, of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, of which post he is a member, thus keeping 
in touch with his comrades of fifty years ago. He has resided in 
Oakland for thirty-one years and has won during that time promi- 
nence and substantial fortune and that true success that lies in the 
confidence, regard and esteem of many friends. Mr. Meehan's first 
trip to the coast was in 1870, with the Boston Board of Trade excur- 
sion, which was the first one made after the completion and connec- 
tion of the Union and Central Pacific Roads at Promontory. At the 
present time Mr. Meehan is the oldest living officer of the Pullman 
Company, as he entered the service August ist, 1868, forty-six vears 
ago. 



JOSEPH CLEMENT BATES, Jr. 

Joseph Clement Bates, Jr., for twenty-five years a resident of 
Alameda, is known as one of that community's representative and 
honored citizens. He has left the impress of his work and person- 
ality upon the political history of the state and upon the public 
thought and opinion of the city where he makes his home, and 
today as cashier of the I'nited States mint occupies a position of 
distinction which he has won worthily and which he richly deserves. 
He is one of California's native sons, iiis birth having occurred in 
San Francisco, August 10, 1871. His father was J. C. Bates, who 
came to California in 1863 and who gained more than a local repu- 
tation as the author of a book entitled "Bench and Bar of California." 

Mr. Bates of this review remained in his native city until 1889 
and then moved to Alameda, where he has since resided. A few 
Years later he became prominent and active in local public life, 
winning election to the state assembly in 1903 and again in 1901;. 
In recognition of his able, beneficial and far-sighted work in the 
lower house he was in 1906 elected to the senate and served during 



310 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

the sessions of 1907 and 1909. His name figures conspicuously upon 
legislative records, and he has been a promoter of many projects 
which have found tiieir way to the statute books of tlie state. He is a 
fearless champion of whatever course he believes to be right, and his 
loyal defense of his honest convictions formed one of the strongest 
elements in his success in political circles. Mr. Bates left the senate 
in 1909 to become cashier of the Tnited States mint in San Francisco, 
a position which he now holds and the duties of which he discharges 
with ability and conscientiousness. 

Mr. Bates married Miss Caroline Williams of Concord, Cali- 
fornia, and they have two children: Edith, aged nine; and Joseph, 
six. Fraternally Mr. Bates is well known in the Masonic order, 
holding membership in the lodge, chapter, Oakland Commandery 
and the Mystic Shrine. He is identified also with the Native Sons 
of the Golden West, the Elks and the Woodmen of the World. Few- 
men have done more effective work in the public service, and the 
record of none lias been more faultless in honor. 



WALTER R. RIDEOUT. 

Walter R. Rideout, who enjoys recognition as one of the leading 
and enterprising business men of Oakland, has won merited suc- 
cess as president of the W. R. Rideout Company, engaged in general 
transportation. His birth occurred in Oak Valley, California, on 
the I ith of July, 1S67, his parents being J. R. and Alvira Rideout. 

Ill iS6g the family home was established in Marysville, Yuba 
couiitv, and there our subject pursued his education until eleven 
vears of age, when his parents removed to San Francisco, where he 
attended the public schools until a youth of sixteen. Subseiiuentlv 
he became a li reman in the employ of his father, who owned a river 
steamer, and later acted as engineer and then as pilot, being the only 
man holding an engineer's and pilot's license at the age of twenty- 
one. He ser\ed as pilot on the steamer Alvira until 1H93 and after- 
ward acted as pilot of the steamer 'I'rilby for a year and a half or 
until his father sold it to the Sacramento Transportation Company. 
He next served as pilot on the Pride of the River for a year and 
atferward built the steamer l^'ort Bragg, which he ran for two years 
and then sold to the Sacramento 'I'ransportation Company. Subse- 
(luently he joined his brotlicr, E. V. Rideout, for the coneluct of a 
shipping and transportation business in San Francisco, and in 1910 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 311 

Walter R. Rideout came to Oakland to establish the trans-bay 
shipping end of the business, organizing a separate company of which 
lie became president. The company in Oakland is known as the 
W. R. Rideout Company and does a general transportation busi- 
ness, operating three steamers, two barges and one tug boat. Walter 
R. Rideout is the first man to make the transportation business a suc- 
cess in Oakland. 

The following is an excerpt from a publication called Greater 
Oakland, published in 191 i : "One of the most progressive and larg- 
est concerns of its kind in Alameda county is the W^ R. Rideout 
Company, wliose big warehouse and yards are located on the water- 
front at the foot of Webster street. The business was established 
about live years ago, and under the able management of its hustling 
and progressive president, Walter R. Rideout, it has steadily grown 
to its present proportions. In 1910 Mr. Rideout established the 
trans-bay shipping end of the business, and the company is now in a 
position to handle the biggest contracts for the transportation of 
freight between San Francisco and Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley, 
riie concern operates the following freight boats: the Alviso, one 
hundred and fifty tons, and the Juliette, four hundred tons. About a 
year ago, following out its policy of doing everything possible ti) 
increase the efficiency of its service, the company inaugurated the 
use of auto-trucks for deliveries, and up to date have purchased six 
of these big trucks, which means the investment of nearly thirty 
thousand dollars for autos alone. The company gives employment 
to some seventy-two men, and the annual pay roll amounts to fifty- 
one thousand, two hundred dollars, which adds materially to the 
general prosperity of Oakland. The concern transfer from one hun- 
dred and fifty to one hundred and seventy-five tons of freight per day, 
doing mere business than all the rest of the transfer companies com- 
bined. The warehouse, which is situated directly on the water front, 
with excellent shipping facilities, is three hundred and fifty feet long 
by seventy-five feet wide. In addition to the auto-truck service, 
the company operate about fifteen teams. The company practically 
controls the trans-bay freighting business, doing all the work of the 
Pacific Hardware Company, Dunham, Carrigan & Hayden, Lally & 
Company, Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson, Haas Brothers, N. O. Nel- 
son, Whittier-Coburn & Company, Bass-Hueter Paint Company, 
N. R. Nason, Sherwin-Williams Company, Wellman-Peck Com- 
pany. J. H. Newbauer, Sussman-Wormser Company, Tillmann & 
Bendel, L. T. Snow, M. Getz, Getz Brothers, Hooper & Jennings, 
A. P. Hotaling, Italian-Swiss Colony Wine Company and iiun- 



:n2 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

dreds of others. Walter R. Rideout, the congenial head of this con- 
cern, is one of the best known and most popular business men in the 
citv. He is a man of generous proportions and big ideas. While 
shrewd and energetic in business matters, all those who know him 
find in him a good fellow, generous to a fault and a stanch friend." 

In politics Mr. Rideout is a republican, while in religious faith 
he is a Protestant. He is a valued member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Board of Trade and also belongs to the Woodmen of 
the \\'orld. His fellow townsmen recognize his merit and ability 
and his business colleagues and contemporaries entertain the warm- 
est admiration for his many good qualities. 



HERBERT P. GLASIER. 

Herbert P. Glasier is now president and manager of tiie Oakland 
Cream Depot, with which he hrst became identified as bookkeeper 
in 1892. His birth occurred in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on the loth 
of November, 1864, his parents being Rich and Anna Glasier. He 
attended the graded and high schools until fourteen years of age and 
subsequently went to Tower City, North Dakota, where he was 
engaged in farming for two and a half years. On the expiration of 
that period he made his way to The Dalles, Oregon, where he was 
employed as a hotel clerk for three years. He then followed farming 
in Washington territory for a few months and afterward carried on 
agricultural pursuits in the Sacremento valley of California for two 
years. Returning to The Dalles, Oregon, he was there employed as a 
drug clerk until 1892, when he came to Oakland, California, and 
secured a position as bookkeeper with the Oakland Cream Depot. 

In 1893 -^''"- Glasier began to institute needed reforms in the milk 
business. The hrst thing necessary was an accurate and detaild 
knowledge of cverv branch of tiie business, and lie accordinglx 
worked in every department until he knew not only all of the proc- 
esses used, but their relation to each other, and their elifect upon the 
quality of the product. He then began to institute beneficial change- 
and among other things did away with the use of preservatives in milk 
which was tlien common. Bicarbonate of soda and boracic acul 
were among those most frequently employed. He eliminated their 
use cntire!\ in the Oakland Cream Depot and built instead coolers 
which were found to be very efiicient and absolutely without injur- 
ious efiects. His plan is now generally used in this localitv. In 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 313 

1894 the enterprise was incorporated and Mr. Glasier became its 
secretary, while upon the retirement of the president, Mr. Bliss, 
in 1909, he was made chief executive officer of the concern. It 
employs thirty-eight people in Oakland, has eight cream buyers in 
the country and utilizes seven wagons and five automobiles. It is 
the largest butter manufacturing company in Alameda county and 
the oldest in the city. It was :.lso the first concern in the state to 
undertake the centralizing of butter making. Its brand is known as 
the O. C. D. and is a high grade product in all respects. The fineness 
of its quality is shown by the rapid growth in the number of pounds 
sold. The first year the output was two hundred and thirty pounds, 
but now four thousand pounds are used annually in Oakland and 
vicinity. Much of the growth of the concern is due to the able 
management and direction of Mr. Glasier, who is widely recognized 
as a man of excellent business ability and sound judgment. 

In June, 1894, i" Oakland, Mr. Glasier was united in marriage 
to Miss Carrie Hefty, by whom he has three children, namely: 
Harold, who is sixteen years of age and attends high school; Eunice, 
a maiden of fourteen, who is a high-school student; and Alice, ten 
years old, who is also attending the public schools. Mr. Glasier exer- 
cises his right of franchise in support of men and measures of the 
republican party, being convinced that its principles are most con- 
ducive to good government. He is a member of the Woodmen of 
the World and also belongs to the Junior Order. He is known as a 
steady, reliable, persevering man and whatever he undertakes he 
carries forward to successful completion. This reputation has made 
him a person on whom his associates can always depend and he is 
known for his upright character and his straight-forward dealings in 
both social and business circles. 



ALVIN W. BAKER. 



A period of connection with the Southern Pacific Railroad Com- 
panv dating from 1877 has brought Alvin W. Baker to a pt)sition 
of trust and responsibility with that great corporation, which num- 
bers him among its most reliable and worthy representatives. He 
has risen through department after department in the service and 
is now land and tax agent for the company at Oakland, a position 
which he lias filled with credit and ability since Tunc, 1910. 



.•!14 HISTORY OF ALA:\[1:DA COUNTY 

Alvin \y. Baker was reared at home and acquired a public- 
school education. He laid aside his books at the early age of six- 
teen and afterward worked for his brother, who conducted a drug 
store, postoffice and express office. Later Mr. Baker turned his 
attention to railroading, becoming connected with the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company in 1877 as telegraph operator, working 
at various points in California, Nevada and Arizona. In 1879 he 
was put upon the company's regular stafif of employes and rose 
rapidlv to a responsible position, being given charge of the main- 
tenance of way department in Oakland in 1884. For ten years 
thereafter he did capable and farsighted work in this capacity and 
at the expiration of that time was transferred to Oakland Pier as 
chief clerk. He held this position until 1903, when he was made 
assistant superintendent. In June, 1910, he was again transferred 
to the citv of Oakland and made land and tax agent at this point. 
He has learned the railroad business through long and practical 
experience in its various departments, and his executive ability and 
keen business insight well qualify him for the responsible position 
which he now holds. 

Fraternally Mr. Baker is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Masons and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is liberal in his political views and has never 
sought public office, although he is at all times interested in projects 
to advance the general welfare of the community. He has been 
instrumental in bringing a number of manufacturing plants and 
other concerns to Oakland and has done a great deal for the city 
along lines of progress and growth. He is largely responsible for 
his own success, which he has gained thr(Kigh his energy, ambition 
and ability — qualities which have established him among the repre- 
sentative men of Oakland. 



L. E. GRIMM. 



L. E. Grimm, a successful and prominent representative of real- 
estate interests in Oakland, has been a resident of this city since 
i(;()6. His birth occurred in Oakland Citv, Indiana, on the 8th of 
March, 1874, his parents being George \N'. and Sarah Grimm. He 
began his education in the public schools and subsequently attended 
Princeton College and the Oakland City College of his native town, 
while later he continuc^^ his stuiiies in the Indiana State Normal 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 315 

School at Terre Haute. He next pursued a course in law at the 
John Marshall Law School of Chicago and after leaving that insti- 
tution in 1894 embarked in the real-estate business in that citv, there 
conducting his interests until 1906. In the latter year he came to 
Oakland, California, and took the position of manager with the 
M. T. Minney Real Estate Company, and for a time was the high- 
est salaried man in the city, receiving a thousand dollars per month. 
In 191 1 he embarked in business on his own account and has since 
become very successful as a real-estate dealer, ranking among the 
leading representatives of that business in Oakland. 

In July, 1904, in Chicago, Mr. Grimm was united in marriage 
to Miss Martha L. Moore, by whom he has five children His polit- 
ical allegiance is given to the republican party, while fraternally he 
is identified with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, being a life member of the latter. He also 
belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and is a charter member of the 
Oakland Commercial Club. In social and business circles he is 
recognized as a man of genuine personal worth who well deserves 
the widespread respect and esteem which he enjoys. 



THOMAS KELLY 



Thomas Kelly, a well known and respected citizen of Oakland, 
has done valuable work as superintendent of St. Mary's cemeterv, 
which position he has held for the past fourteen years. His birth 
occurred in County Carlow, Ireland, on the nth of January, 1867, 
his parents being Thomas and Margaret Kelly. He attended the 
public schools of his native land until seventeen years of age and then 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States, first spending eight months 
in New York city as a freight handler in the service of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad. Subsequentlv he came to Oakland, California, 
here working in the car department of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company until iScj^, wiicn he was transferred to San Jose as car 
inspector. In 1 S99 he returned to Oakland and became superin- 
tendent of St. Mary's cemetery, the duties of which position he has 
ablv and creditably discharged to the present time. The cemetery 
comprises thirtv-fivc acres. When Mr. Kelly took charge it was in 
a state of neglect, but he has since transformed it into a beautiful 
garden spcH, setting out trees and making various other improve- 
ments. 



316 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

In ills political views Mr. Kelly is a republican and exercises 
his rii^ht of franchise in support of the men and measures of that 
party. He is a devout communicant of the Catholic church and 
also belongs to the Knights of Columbus, e.xemplifying the teachings 
of both in his daily life. 



HON. GEORGE SAMUELS. 

As one of the prominent citizens of Alameda county Hon. George 
Samuels of Oakland is assisting materially in the development of 
the be:t interests of the section, filling the position of judge of the 
police court, to which he was elected in 1903, and to which he has 
been continuouslv reelected since that time. He is a native of Leeds, 
England, born February 18, 1859, and is a son of Barnet Samuels, 
who many years previous to his death left England and came to 
America, feeling that this country ofifered better opportunities for 
himself and for his children. He took up his residence in Chicago 
in 1865 and there engaged in business until he came to Oakland, 
where he was numbered among the pioneer settlers. 

Judge Samuels acquired his education in the public schools of 
Chicago and in 1875 came to Oakland with the family. As a young 
man he engaged in the mercantile business here, but being ambi- 
tious and following his natural bent and inclination, he began the 
studv of law. He entered law school, where he made an excellent 
record as a student and passed his exarninations with high honors, 
winning his admission to the bar of the supreme court of California 
in 1S98. Almost immediately afterward he commenced practice, 
and in the field to which he then turned his attention has remained 
prominent and active since that time, the years bringing him suc- 
cess, prominence and many iionors. He soon distinguished himself 
for eloquence, for abilitv in argument and for comprehensive and 
exact knowledge of the principles of law, and his excellent (jualiti- 
cations drew to jiim extensive clientage and gained for him the place 
he occupies todav among the leading jurists in this section of the 
state. 

His record as an able, farsighted and discriminating lawyer drew 
public attention to his qualifications and accomplishments and led 
to his appointment in 1899 ^^ assistant district attorney of Alameda 
countv, thus beginning a public career which has extended over a 
period of fifteen years and which has been higli in its purpose and 




HON. GEOEGE SAMUELS 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 319 

beneficial and far-reaching in its results. In 1903 he was elected 
judge of the police court, and he has been reelected continuously 
since that time, giving to the people of the city the services of a prac- 
tical, strong and able lawyer as well as of an impartial, discriminat- 
ing and incorruptible judge. 

Judge Samuels married in Oakland in 1882 Miss Lily Steen, and 
they became the parents of three children: Mrs. Irving Magnes; 
Mervyn J., a graduate of the University of California College of 
Law and now a practicing attornev in Oakland; and Boris L., a 
student in high school. 

Judge Samuels is a member of the Oakland Chamber of Com- 
merce and is very prominent in fraternal circles, being past supreme 
representative of the Knights of Pythia?, past noble grand of Oak- 
land Lodge, No. 118, I. O. O. F., and past grand president of the 
Independent Order of B'nai B'rith. He is a member of the Brook- 
lyn lodge of Masons, belongs to Alcatraz Chapter, R. A. M., and 
is affiliated also with the Sons of St. George. He holds a high place 
in the confidence and esteem of the people of Oakland, and this has 
been won bv merit and abilitv and held by the maintenance of the 
principles of truth and honor upon which all of his life work has 
been based. A man of broad and liberal mind and effective public 
spirit, he does not only seek his personal advancement, but also gives 
his time and attention to the duties which fall to the lot of a loyal 
citizen. 



CHARLES D. BENNETTS. 

Charles D. Bennetts, living in Oakland, is serving as superin- 
tendent of the commissary department for the San Francisco-Oak- 
land Terminal Railwav. His birth occurred in lone, Amador 
county, California, on the 6th of October, 1H77, his parents being 
W. A. and Eva Bennetts. It was in 1865 that the father came to 
this state, settling in lone, where he conducted a general merchandise 
store until 1912. During the past two years he has lived retired in 
San Jose. 

Charles D. Bennetts attended the graded and high schools of 
Oakland until his graduation in 1897 and then returned to lone, being 
there employed as guard in the lone Preston School of Industry for 
one vcar. On the expiration of that period he came back to Oakland 
and tor five vears was engaged as clerk lor \\"ells Fargo & Companv. 



:?20 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Subsequently he became identified with the San Francisco-Oakland 
"Icrminal Railway as receiver, later was made storekeeper and after- 
ward superintendent of the commissary department, in which capac- 
ity he has since ably served. 

On the i6th of April, 1903, in Sacramento, California, Mr. Ben- 
netts was united in marriage to Miss Hazel Maude Luce, by whom 
he has two children, Stewart and lone, who are ten and seven years 
of age respectively. Both are public-school students. In politics 
Mr. Bennetts is a stanch republican, while his religious faith is that 
of the Methodist church. He is also a worthy exemplar of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to Live Oak Lodge. He is well 
known as a man of strict integrity and sterling worth, as well as busi- 
ness capacity and enterprise, and his many admirable qualities have 
placed him among the respected citizens of his communitv. 



THOALAS P. EMIGH. 



Thomas P. Emigh, engaged in the general insurance business in 
Oakland, has been continuously identified with that field of endeavor 
here since January, 1907, and is the county insurance expert. He 
was born in Rio Vista, Solano county, California, in December, 1878, 
a son of Thomas P. and Rachel (Lawhead) Emigh, the former a 
native of the state of New York and the latter of Ohio. The father 
came to California as one of the gold seekers of the '60s, but instead 
of spending his time in the mines* he saw that there were good oppor- 
tunities in the field of business Jand engaged in the mercantile end 
warehouse business at Rio Arista, Solano county, in which he con- 
tinued for many years, becoming one of the best known men of that 
county, where he built up a business of large and profitable propor- 
tions. He afterward removed to San Francisco, where he continued 
in business for fifteen years and then retired from active commercial 
life in 1902, having acquired a handsome CDmpetence which enabled 
him to spend his remaining days in the enjoyment of a well earned 
rest and enjov the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. From 
1874 he made his home in Oakland, there continuing until his death, 
which occurred in September, 1909, when he had reached the age 
of seventy-two years. He was a valued and highly respected citizen 
of Alameda county, where his memory is yet cherished and honored. 
His widow spends much of her time at Ben Lomond, where she has j 
a summer home. I 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 321 

In his political views Mr. Emigh was a stalwart republican, 
always active in support of the principles of the party yet never seek- 
ing office as a reward for party fealty. He was equally prominent in 
Masonry, holding membership in the craft for many years. He was 
a past master of Rio Vista lodge and held membership in the Knights 
Templar Commandery at Oakland. In all of his business afifairs he 
displayed sound judgment and unfaltering enterprise, and his finan- 
cial interests were varied and extensive. His opinions were highly 
valued by other business men, and he commanded the high regard 
and confidence of all with whom he came in contact. 

Thomas P. Emigh, whose name introduces this review, spent his 
boyhood days under the parental roof and in the acquirement of an 
education attended the graded and high schools of Oakland until the 
time of his graduation in 1899. Subsequently he spent three years as 
office man in the service of the British American Insurance Com- 
pany in San Francisco and then became country raan in the San Fran- 
cisco office of the American Central Insurance Company of St. Louis, 
Missouri, holding the latter position until January, 1907. At that 
time he came to Oakland and embarked in the local insurance business 
on his own account, representing the Continental Fire Insurance 
Company and the Globe Indemnity Company, both of New York. 
He has since won a gratifying measure of success in this connection, 
writing a large amount of insurance annually. 

In June, 1902, in Oakland, Mr. Emigh was united in marriage 
to Miss Mabel Holmes, by whom he has one child, Weldon, who is 
nine years of'age and a public-spirited student. He is a republican 
in politics and a Protestant in religious faith, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Masons, of which order he is a worthy exempler. 
He is likewise a charter member of the Oakland Commercial Club. 
Public-spirited and progressive, he takes part in all movements 
undertaken in the interests of the city and is ever ready to participate 
in the promotion of worthy public enterprises. 



REMY J. PAVERT. 



Remv ]. Pavert, who has been a successful and prominent repre- 
sentative of building interests in Oakland since 1905, acts as vice 
president of the Surety Mortgage & Building Company. His birth 
occurred in Amsterdam, Holland, in April, 186S, his parents being 
William \'an dc Pavert and Johanna Pcelen. He acquired his early 



322 HISTORY (Ji' AF.A.MI'IDA CUUXTY 

education in the public schools and subsec]ucntlv attended Liege Uni- 
versity until graduated from that institution in 1886. 

In that year he emigrated to the United States, settling first in 
San Antonio, Florida, where he purchased an orange grove which 
he operated for nine months. On the expiration of that period he 
sold out and removed to San Francisco, California, being there cm- 
ployed as a carpenter for one year by the firm of Keenan & Cranston, 
building contractors, while subsequently he acted as foreman in their 
service until 1893. He then embarked in business as a building con- 
tractnr on his own account, remaining in San Francisco until 1901. 
when he dispt)sed of his interests there and went to Baker City, Ore- 
gon. At that place he carried on the contracting business for four 
years, erecting fifty-two cottages which he sold on the easy payment 
plan. In 1905 he became a building contractor of Oakland, first 
erecting small cottages and gradually branching out into larger con- 
struction. He has erected many important structures of the city and 
has made a number of profitable investments. Purchasing the prop- 
ertv at the corner of Eleventh and Madison streets, he built three 
apartment houses tiiereon and sold them when completed. After- 
ward he bought the land at the corner of Eleventh and Brush streets, 
on which he also erected three apartment houses which were sold 
when completed, and likewise built and sold two apartment houses 
at the corner of Eleventh and Fallon streets. Next he purchased a 
piece of land seventy-five by one hundred feet on Twelfth street, be- 
tween Madison and Oak streets, and erected thereon a business block, 
which he sold. Subsequently he bought the southwest corner of 
Twelfth and Jackson streets, erecting thereon four garages which he 
sold when completed, and afterward purchased the property at the 
northwest corner of Thirteenth and Harrison streets for forty thou- 
sand dollars, selling it three weeks later for sixty-five thous- 
sand dollars. He next came into possession of a piece of property 
embracing one hundred bv one hundred feet at the corner of Fif- 
teenth and Jefferson streets, for which he paid seventy thousand dol- 
lars. On lifty by Hfty feet thereof he erected a handsome hostelry 
which is called the Sa\oy Hotel and in which he owns a half inferest. 
The property is now valued at three hundred and eighty thousand 
dollars. .Mr. I'avert also purchased lifty b\ seventy-five feet at the 
southwest corner of Sixteenth and Jelf'erson streets for twenty-live 
thousand dollars, and the property is toda\ worth si\t\-five thou- 
sand dollars. Some time ago he bought a piece of land, twentv-six 
bv eighty feet, facing three streets, at Se\enteenth and Broadway, 
for forty-five thousand dollars and sold it a year later for eighty 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 323 

thousand dollars. He has recently completed a one-story building 
on Fifteenth street, near Broadway, covering fifty by one hundred 
feet. He is widely recognized as a shrewd and able business man 
and one whose prosperity is the merited reward of his wisely directed 
undertakings. 

In 1893, in San Francisco, Mr. Pavert was united in marriage 
to Miss Clara Peterson, by whom he has one son, Frank. R., who is 
nineteen years of age and a student in the College of Agriculture 
of the University of California. Mr. Pavert is a democrat in politics 
and is identified fraternally with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. He has gained many friends in both business and social 
circles of Oakland, and his life record is creditable alike to the land 
of his birth and that of his adoption. 



THOMAS COOK STODDARD. 

Thomas Cook Stoddard, a representative and respected citizen 
of Alameda, now holds the responsible position of postmaster of 
that citv, to which he was appointed July 18, 1913. His birth 
occurred in Farmington, Iowa, on the 4th of February, 1855. His 
father, Asa Church Stoddard, who was born in Ohio on the 13th of 
August, 1826, came to California in 1873 and was engaged in the 
milling business for a great many years. His demise occurred on 
the 23d of June, 1909. His wife was Mrs. Sarah Hawkins, a native 
of Indiana, whose father, Mr. Cook, was one of the few slave owners 
(jf North Carolina who liberated his bondsmen. Mr. Cook removed 
to Indiana and later to Iowa and spent the remainder of his life in 
that state. Th(jmas C. Stoddard of this review is descended from 
Jonathan Stoddard, who came to the United States in 1639. General 
.Amos Stoddard, a descendant of this family, was the first governor 
I if Louisiana territory, being appointed by the president of the nation. 

Thomas C. Stoddard attended the public schools of liis native city 
until 1870 and subsequently held various positions for some time. In 
1873 he came to California and secured a position as telegraph oper- 
ator with the Western Union Telegraph Company in San Jose, while 
subsequently he spent a short time at l^jmbstone, Arizona. Return- 
ing to this state, he took up his abode in Alameda and for seven years 
was connected with the Narrow Gauge Railroad as telegraph oper- 
ator. On the expiration of that period he went to work for his father, 
who conducted a planing mill as a member of the firm of Stoddard 



324 HISTORY OF AT.AMEDA COUNTY 

& Barber. In 1893 Thomas Stoddard was appointed postmaster of 
Alameda, serving in that capacity for four and a half years and sub- 
sequently spending about a year in the insurance business. In 1899 
he became deputy county assessor under H. P. Dalton and served in 
that capacity until he resigned to accept appointment to his present 
position. His work in the office of deputy county assessor extended 
over a period of fourteen years of most creditable service. He be- 
longs to several prominent fraternal orders in Alameda and has won 
an extensive and favorable acquaintance during the many years of his 
residence in this county. 



JOHN MITCHELL. 



Among the prominent and highly esteemed citizens of Alameda 
county is John Mitchell, chairman of the state board of equalization 
and a resident of Oakland. He was born of Scotch parentage in 
Saint Andrews, Montreal, Canada, January i, 1862. He is a son of 
the Rev. Andrew and Elizabeth (Patton) Mitchell. His father was 
a Baptist minister who had been graduated from Andover (Mass.) 
Theological Seminary. For a time he was in Canada and then re- 
turned to the United States, serving his denomination until 1878, 
when he came to Oakland and retired to private life. It was there 
he died at the age of eighty-two years. 

Following the removal of the family across the border into the 
United States, Mr. Mitchell attended the public schools in Chester, 
New Hampshire, afterward becoming a student in the Chester Acad- 
emy, in which he continued until fifteen years of age. After leaving 
school he took up the study of shoe designing and was in the leather 
business for twelve years. He then came to Oakland and entered 
the shoe store supply business with S. H. Steward, under the firm 
name of Mitchell and Steward. This relation was maintained until 
1899, when Mr. Mitchell retired from the business. In 1896 Mr. 
Mitchell was elected supervisor of the Hfth district and served as 
such for twelve years, being for eight years chairman of the board 
of supervisors. Continuously he has held office for eighteen years 
and the record which he has made is most commendable. In 19 10 he 
was elected to the state board of equalization and following the 
resignation of Hon. A. B. Nye, he was elected chairman and still 
occupies the position. The important duties of the position are faith- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUXTY 325 

fully and capably discharged and fairness, justice and progress have 
characterized him in all of his official capacities. 

In 1903 he joined Jas. T. Gardner in the wholesale and retail 
grocery business under the name of the Gardner-Mitchell Company. 
They first established a place of business on Broadway and later on 
Telegraph avenue. 

In December, 1882. Mr. Mitchell was married in Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia, to Miss Minnie A. Gibbons, the daughter of Henry and Me- 
lissa (Merryfield) Gibbons, and unto them have been born five chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters: Elsie; Edna, deceased; John 
G.; Raymond A.; and Trueman H. 

He was one of the organizers of the Oakland Chamber of Com- 
merce, and served as one of the directors. 

Mr. Mitchell is a Mason, holding membership in the Live Oak 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is like- 
wise a member of the Athenian Club and the Nile Club and has 
served as one of the directors. In social connections he has gained 
many friends, while in his business and official life he has won the 
high regard, confidence and good-will of his colleagues and asso- 
ciates. 



NEAL J. V;cKEON. 



Neal J. McKeon, a well kncnvn and successful citizen of Oak- 
land, has been engaged in the real-estate business for the past si.\ years 
and prior to that time served as secretary and manager of the Oak- 
land Title & Abstract Company, a concern which he organized. He 
was born in San Francisco in August, 1872, and acquired his more 
advanced education in Christian Brothers College of Sacramento. 
After leaving that institution he came to Oakland and in the capacitv 
of office boy entered the employ of the abstract and title firm known 
as the Gustave L. Mix Company. Promotion came to him as he 
demonsti-ated his ability in the discharge of the duties intrusted to 
him, so that he filled positions of greater and greater importance and 
eventually acquired control of the business. 

In March, 1906, he organized the Oakland Title & Abstract 
Company, which was formed by the consolidation of a number of 
similar companies that had been in operation for from twentv to 
Hftv vears in this locality. The concern was capitalized for one hun- 



;326 HISTORY OF AT.AIMEDA COUNTY 

dred thousand dollars, and the following officers were installed: 
Charles E. Palmer, president; James P. Edofif, vice president; Neal 
J. McKeon, secretary and manager; and Arthur H. Breed, treasurer. 
In a local publication the company was mentioned as follows : "They 
are equipped for the most complete work in their line, having a com- 
plete set of books of all records of Alameda county in their office, 
and have proven themselves thoroughly in touch with all modern 
methods, system and despatch in conducting their work. The com- 
pany is regarded not only as the oldest and the most thoroughly re- 
liable in Alameda county, in all its dealings, but enjoys public ap- 
proval also for promptness and despatch with which orders are exe- 
cuted." On the igth of March, iqo8, Mr. McKeon disposed of his 
interest in that concern and embarked in the real-estate business, in 
which he has remained continuously to the present time with excel- 
lent success. Oakland has long numbered him among its most enter- 
prising, prosperous and esteemed citizens. 



W. T. BAKER. 



W. T. Baker is president of the W. T. Baker Company, a large 
concern engaged in the general painting and wallpapering business. 
Their patronage comes not alone from Oakland, but from all over 
the coast and the excellence of their work insures continued success. 
Mr. Baker is a native of Liverpool, England, born October 2, 1865. 
He attended the public schools of his native country until he reached 
the age of fourteen years and then went to sea. As a sailor he made 
the trip around Cape Horn to San Francisco, where he arrived in 
1880. In that year he was apprenticed to the painter's trade in 
Berkeley under \\'illiam Lingard, with whom he remained until 
1888, after which he came to Oakland. In this city he worked at his 
trade with various firms until 1890, when he engaged with ^^'. W. 
Tucker & Company as a painter. He worked his way upward un- 
til he became vice president of the company in 1908, and in 1912 
he sold his interest in that firm and formed what is now the W. T. 
Baker Company, of which he is the president. In March, 1913, 
they took over the business of W. W. Tucker & Company ami are 
now controlling an extensive trade. 

Mr. Baker was married in Oakland to Miss Annie Young, of 
V^irginia City, Nevada, on the 12th of November, 1891, and they 
have a pleasant home in Oakland, where w arm friendship is accDrded 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 327 

them by many who knew them. Mr. Baker has never had occasion 
to regret his determination to come to the United States, for in this 
country he found the opportunities which he sought and which, by 
the way, are always open to ambitious, energetic young men. He 
worked diligently to acquaint himself with the business in which he 
is now successfully engaged, and as the years have gone by he has 
worked his way steadilv upward in this connection until he is now at 
the head of one of the foremost enterprises of the kind on the coast. 



JOSEPH E. CAINE. 



There are few men better qualified to speak authoritatively upon 
commercial conditions and the methods of municipal commercial de- 
velopment than Joseph E. Caine, who for the past year has filled 
the important position of secretary and manager of the Oakland 
Commercial Club. He thoroughly studies the questions that have to 
do with business progress and exploitation, knows the best methods 
of holding out inducements and realizes the fact that at all times 
promises must be substantiated. 

His life record had its beginning in Salt Lake City, Utah, on the 
i6th of April, 1867. His father, John T. Caine, a pioneer resident 
of Utah, was for many years one of the most eminent and widely 
known public men of that state, which he represented in congress for 
eleven years, from 1882 until 1893. For several terms he was a mem- 
ber of the Utah senate and for a number of years was city recorder 
of Salt Lake City. It was he who drafted the statehood bill upon 
Utah's admission to the Union. 

Liberal educational opportunities were accorded Joseph E. 
Caine, who attended the University of Utah, the .ALaryland College 
near WashingtcMi, D. C, and the United States Military Academy 
at West Point. Upon his return to L'tah, he entered into active con- 
nection with newspaper work, securing a position on the Salt Lake 
Tribune, and during the period of his residence there he served for 
two terms as a member of the board of public works of Salt Lake 
City. When hostilities between Spain and the LInited States were 
inaugurated in 1898 he was commissioned as captain of cavalrv and 
given command of the First Troop LInited States Volunteer Cavalry, 
an independent troop of one hundred mounted men. When the war 
was over he was appointed superintendent ni the Voscmite National 



;528 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Park and marched from the presidio of San Francisco to the park, 
with his troop and a large pack train. He remained in the park 
for four months. 

In 1899 Mr. Caine returned to Utah and became casliier of the 
Utah Commercial & Savings Bank, which position he retained until 
1906. He then went to Nevada, where he had purchased some min- 
ing interests, located in the well known Mason district, in which he 
spent three years. In 1909 he returned to Salt Lake City and was 
elected a member of the board of governors in the Salt Lake Com- 
mercial Club. Following the death of the former secretary, Fisher 
Harris, he succeeded him in that position and his efforts were an 
influential element in the upbuilding of one of the strongest com- 
mercial organizations of the west. He also organized the Commer- 
cial Club Publicity Bureau, a subsidiary of the Commercial Club 
and the Utah Development League, an alliance of all the commercial 
clubs in the state of Utah. 

During his absence from Utah Mr. Caine had retained his resi- 
dence in that state and through the influence of his friends, in 1908 
he consented to become a candidate for state treasurer. He has no 
particular political ambition, however, and there are things about 
political management not entirely to his taste. In fact, he prefers 
to remain in the commercial club work, which he finds exceedingly 
agreeable and for which he is undoubtedly well adapted, as has been 
proven in the results which have attended his efTorts. While living 
in Salt Lake City he was a member of the University Club of that 
city. 

On the I St of June, 1913, Mr. Caine came to Oakland to enter 
upon the duties of secretary and manager of the newly created Oak- 
land Commercial Club, the interests and policv of which he has 
shaped and guided in its formati\e period. Ihe club was organized 
for the purpose of binding together the interests of Oakland's citi- 
zens, to promote its commercial and industrial development and to 
cultivate a more intense civic spirit and greater fraternalism among 
its business and professional men. In the Commercial Encyclopedia 
of the Pacific Southwest was the following: "Mr. Caine came to 
oLir citv thoroughly qualified by temperament and training to under- 
take this work. His recent association with the Commercial Club of 
Salt Lake City in the capacity of secretary and manager, in which 
he built up that body from a membership of a few hundred to over 
two tliDiisind, one of the strongest commercial bodies in the west, 
has gi\ en him recognition as one of the ablest authorities on develop- 
ment and upbuilding of western cities. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 329 

"He has traveled extensively to various cities throughout the west, 
studied the conditions and methods of publicity and encouraging in- 
dustries, and has often been called upon to speak before commercial 
bodies of the coast and mountain cities on the subject of civic develop- 
ment. His ready and thorough understanding of the many problems 
involved in development of cities and his natural aptitude for meet- 
ing and mingling with men have made him eminently qualified for 
the task to which he has been called, and has justified the judgment 
of the committee in their selection." 

Mr. Caine was married in 1889 to Miss Anna C. Hooper, of Salt 
Lake City, a daughter of Captain William H. Hooper, who removed 
to Utah during his association with Ben Holliday of Overland Stage 
fame. Captain Hooper was a prominent banker and railroad 
builder, and was one of the organizers and builders of the old Utah 
Central Railroad, which later became a part of the Oregon Short 
Line and the Los Angeles, San Pedro & Salt Lake Railroad systems. 
For a number of terms he represented Utah in the national halls of 
legislation and during his service as delegate to congress appointed 
to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Cadet Robley D. Evans, who 
afterward became the famous admiral, familiarly known as "Fight- 
ing Bob." Mr. and Mrs. Caine have four sons, three of whom are 
students in the public schools of Oakland. Although the period of 
residence of the family in this city has been brief, they have already 
made warm friends here, and the circle is growing day by day. Mr. 
Caine shows himself possessed of attractive social as well as business 
qualities and Oakland feels that she has made no mistake in placing 
him in his present responsible position, for his knowledge and energy 
well qualify him for the duties which devolve upon him. 



PATRICK A. KEARNEY. 

Since 1893 Patrick A. Kearney has been connected with the 
United States mint at San Francisco, and he has worked his way up- 
ward through successive stages of progress and advancement to be 
superintendent of the coining department, a position which he is 
now filling with credit and ability. He is a native of Minnesota, born 
in Heidelberg, February 22, 1871, and his father died when he was 
still very young, but the mother lived until 191 1, when she passed 
away in Alameda. At the age of three the subject of this review 
was brought to California, and he accjuired his education in the 



330 HISTORY OF AT.AMEDA COUNTY 

public schools of Alameda, completing the usual course and after- 
ward learning the machinist's trade at the National Iron X^'orks in 
San Francisco. In 1893 he entered the United States mint as engin- 
eer and proved able and conscientious in the discharge of his duties, 
winning quick recognition and rapid advancement through various 
positions of trust and responsibility to that of superintendent of the 
coining department, an office which he now holds. He is recognized 
as one of the able employes of the treasury department and to the 
discharge of the duties which devolve upon him he brings a keen 
business ability and discrimination and a power of handling and con- 
trolling men. Throughout the course of his active career he has 
steadily utilized all the opportunities which iiave come his way, and 
his success is the natural reward of earnest, well directed and per- 
sistent labor. 

In San Francisco, in 1894. Mr. Kearney was united in marriage 
to Miss Margaret May Reid, of that city, and they have four chil- 
dren: Miriam, Roderick, Norma and Elinor. Fraternally Mr. 
Kearnev is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose and is connected 
with the Unitarian Club of Alameda. In the city where he has made 
his home since he was three years of age he is well and favorably 
known, for his many sterling qualities of mind and character com- 
mand respect and esteem wherever they are known. 



JOHN M. \'AN EVERY. 

John M. Van Every, now engaged in the real-estate business in 
Oakland, was for twenty-one years closely identified with the minis- 
try ot the Methodist Episcopal church, in which connection he has 
dune important work for mankind. He was born in Smithville, Lin- 
coln county, Ontario, Canada, January 21, 1850, a son of John C. and 
Louisa Van Every. At the usual age he became a public-school stu- 
dent and afterward attended the high school until within a few weeks 
of sixteen years of age, when he began teaching a school of eighty 
pupils and thus continued for two years. He had this school engaged 
for a third year, but resigned for a better as teacher near his native 
town. He engaged in this profession until he reached tiie age of 
twenty years, when he entered the Missouri conference of the Meth- 
odi:it Episcopal church in 1870, having determined to devote his life 
to the work of preaching the gospel. Having spent two and a half 
vears in this conference, he was then transferred to the Detroit con- 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 331 

ference of Michigan, where he remained for fourteen years, seven 
ol which were spent on the Upper Peninsula in the Lake Superior 
district. 

]n 1872 he was sent to L'Anse, Michigan, which was a new town 
without a Protestant church. Here Mr. Van Every organized a 
society of five members and very soon erected a fine church, aiding 
the enterprise by rolling the barrels of lime, piling the lumber and 
soliciting and collecting money. He went to this place when twenty- 
tw'/ years of age, and while there he was not only busily engaged in 
building the church but was still pursuing his theological studies in 
addition to preaching twice each Sunday and also at some outlying 
points. One such point was a Welsh slate quarry, where he preached 
once in two weeks in the middle of the week and to which he walked. 
This quarry was fourteen miles from L'Anse, through a dense forest. 
On two of his trips he lost his way, once sleeping out all night and 
on the other occasion being unable to find the right direction from 
early morning to night. When in charge of the church at L'Anse, 
he also had the superintendency of the Chippewa Indian missions 
for two hundred miles on the south shore of Lake Superior. At Han- 
cock, in the Upper Peninsula, he made extensive church improve- 
ments and conducted a gracious revival. He also spent a pastorate 
at Ishpeming in the Lake Superior region, where he conducted a 
very fruitful revival, adding about one hundred and fifty persons 
to the membership. At Clayton and Dundee in Lower Michigan, 
he not only conducted successful revivals, but at the latter place the 
church experienced a phenomenal growth and increased interest in 
the Sunday school work. When at Northville, near Detroit, the 
church was wonderfuUv quickened under his ministry; and there. he 
succeeded in erecting a beautiful house of worship. 

Later he was transferred to Dakota, serving pastorates at such 
important centers as Wahpeton, Jamestown and Bismarck. In 1889, 
on account of the health of his wife, he came to California and ac- 
cepted a pastorate at Grace Methodist church in Oakland. On the 
expiration of this pastorate, in 1891, he retired from the active work 
of the ministry. Indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his 
nature, and as he could not content himself to remain without some 
pursuit or vocation, he entered the auditing department of the gen- 
eral offices of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company in San Fran- 
cisco, where he remained until June, 1912, when he was pensioned 
bv that company. Since that time lie has been engaged in the real- 
estate business in Oakland anti has negotiated a number of impor- 
tant property transfers. 



332 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

On the loth of September, 1873, Mr. Van Every was united in 
marriage at Akron, Xcw "^'ortc. to Miss Fanny Crampton, and they 
have become the parents of two children: Osmond, now a teller 
of the State Savings Bank of Oakland; and Irene, who is at home. 
On the 14th of April, 1903, Mr. Van Every became a member of the 
Oakland Presbytery, and for fifteen years he has been connected 
with the Knights of the Maccabees. His life has been strong, pur- 
poseful and resultant. As the years have gone by he has accomplished 
much good for mankind and for the organizations with which he 
has been affiliated. He is today well known in the Bay cities and 
his substantial traits of character have gained for him the warm 
regard of all with whom he has been associated. 



ANDREW W. McLIMONT. 

Through the successive stages of orderly progression Andrew 
W. McLimont has advanced to his present position of responsibility 
and importance as manager of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal 
Railways. Previous experience as electrical engineer and organizer 
of traction properties qualified him for his present position, and his 
ability brought him step by step upward until he attained the busi- 
ness heights on which he now stands. His fellow citizens speak of 
his thoroughness, capability and brilliancy in the control of impor- 
tant business interests and recognize the fact that the Key Route sys- 
tem will be carefully managed and directed not only for the benefit 
of the stockholders but also for the welfare of the general public. 

Mr. McLimont is a native of Quebec, Canada, born on March 
26, 1872. His father, Andrew W. McLimont, Sr., was also a native 
of Quebec, in which city he was reared and educated. He engaged 
in the wholesale dry-goods business as half-owner in the William 
McLimont Company and figured for many years as a leading and 
important factor in commercial circles. 

His son and namesake attended the public and normal schools 
and was graduated at the age of seventeen years. He then engaged 
with the Montreal Telegraph Company as operator in Ottawa, Can- 
ada, that business being a branch <if the Edison Telephone Company 
of the United States. In that connection he advanced and when he 
left the service he was acting as inspector of telephones. He ne.xt 
went to Nova Scotia as traveling inspector for the same company 
and after a year proceeded to Boston, Massachusetts, where he be- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 335 

came inspector of the New England Telegraph & Telephone Com- 
pany, which he represented in various capacities until he went to 
Lynn, Massachusetts, in the employ of the Thompson & Houston 
Electric Company, and an early recognition of his unusual business 
sagacity brought him quick advancement through the responsibilities 
of such positions as engineer in charge of construction and installa- 
tion of traction systems at Boston, Massachusetts, Nashville, Tennes- 
see, Brooklyn, New York, Coney Island, Springfield, Illinois, Rock- 
ford, Illinois, Dallas, Texas, Marquette, Michigan, Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, Houston, Texas, New Orleans, Galveston and other cities. He 
thoroughly mastered every task assigned him and his broadening 
powers fitted him for larger duties, while his fidelity won him ad- 
vancement. He secured a position in the foreign department of 
the General Electric Company and as such constructed electric sys- 
tems in Brazil, the Argentine Republic, Peru, Costa Rica, Mexico 
and other foreign countries. He afterward became consulting en- 
gineer for the Federal Electric Company at New York and later 
was in the employ of W. R. Grace & Company, by whom he was 
sent to South America to install electric trolley systems. In 1907, 
as electrical engineer, he became connected with the public service 
commission for the first district of New York and as such upon him 
devolved the task of making recommendations regarding the phys- 
ical properties of the surface, elevated and subway lines of the greater 
New York railway companies operating seven thousand electric cars, 
twenty-four car houses and several large power houses. While thus 
engaged with that commission he was also prominently connected 
with making the appraisals of the New York city lines. In 1Q09 
he left the public service commission to take the position of general 
manager and treasurer of the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad Com- 
pany. In June, 1910, he accepted the position of vice president and 
general manager of the Michigan United Railways, which now oper- 
ate three hundred and sixty miles of interurban and urban lines at 
Detroit, Michigan. Having become recognized as a standard au- 
thority in his field, possessing technical and practical skill of superior 
order, he was called into various districts and became vice presi- 
dent and general manager of the Georgia Power Companv, which 
operated a one hundred thousand kilowatt plant, located at Taliulah 
Falls, supplying power in and about Atlanta, Georgia. At Kenosha, 
Wisconsin, his interests centered in the Kenosha Railway & Light 
Company, of which he became vice president, and he also occupied 
the same position in the Vermont Consolidated Lighting Companies 
of Montpelier, Vermont, and had charge of the operation of the 



334 HISTORY OF ALA.MEDA COUNTY 

plants. All of these different properties are controlled by George G. 
Moore of Detroit, Michigan, and his associates. The business man- 
agement of all of these has been directed by Mr. McLimont, whose 
broad experience, ready adaptability and resourcefulness, whose keen 
insight and indefatigable energy are features which contribute to 
the growing and substantial success of any enterprise with which he 
becomes connected. Removing to Oakland, he took charge of the 
interests of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railways, recently 
acquired by George G. Moore of Detroit, and the policy which he 
instituted is bringing about excellent results in the development and 
improvement of the system, in keeping with the progressive spirit 
which is the basic element of California's rapid growth and develop- 
ment. After taking charge he instituted plans for the installation 
of up-to-date rolling stock, for the improvement of tracks and pave- 
ment, and at once began seeking a solution of the problem brought 
about by down-town congestion during the rush hours. He also 
took up the study of the completion of the down-town Washington 
Street Broadway loop system and has since carried forward the work 
of improvement and progress to a notable degree. 

On the qth of June, 1895, '''' New York city, Mr. McLimont was 
married to .Miss Lois yi. Shaffner, and they have a daughter, who 
bears the mother's name. Mr. McLimont is a member of the Athen- 
ian Club and the Sequoia Club and also of the Oakland Commercial 
Club. He is stil.l a comparatively young man, having not vet reached 
the prime of life. His career, however, is notable in that he has 
reached positions of management which might well be coveted bv 
many a man much his senior. He seems to grasp all the details of 
a situation almost at a glance and never loses sight of the important 
features of any business interest. He is watchful, alert and deter- 
mined and in his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. 



JOSEPH LORAN PEASE, D. D. S. 

Prominent among the representatives of the dental profession 
in Oakland is Dr. Joseph Loran Pease, who is, moreover, a repre- 
sentative citizen in various other connections. He was born at Boze- 
man, Montana, May 22, 1873. His father, Joseph Alonzo Pease, 
was a pioneer of that state and was closely identified with its upbuild- 
ing and progress. He possessed a broad acquaintance and enjoyed the 
high regard of all who knew him. for he was a man of unusually up- 




DR. .KlSKI'll 1.. I'KA^ 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 337 

right character and nobility. He married Orvilla Kimpton and to 
them were born nine children, all of whom reached manhood or 
womanhood before she passed away. She was a most devoted wife 
and mother and she was well known for her activity in church circles. 

After attending the grammar schools of his native city Dr. Pease 
of this review prepared at the Wisconsin Academy in Madison, Wis- 
consin, to enter the State University, in which he continued his stud- 
ies. His preparation for the profession of dentistry was made in the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated 
in April, 1897. He was a student for a time in Rush Medical Col- 
lege of Chicago and in 1901 took the degree of M. D. at the Pacific 
Coast College of Medicine. His educational training was not con- 
tinuous, however, for in early manhood he had followed stock-raising 
in Montana and in Chicago he had engaged in clerking in a hardware 
store. Since entering upon the active practice of his profession he 
has made continuous advancement and in 1898 was elected cliniciiin 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in San Francisco, which 
position he filled until appointed a member of the California Board 
of Dental Examiners, serving as president one term and as treasurer 
for four terms. For two terms he was honored with the presidency 
of the Alameda County Dental Society and he was president of the 
Oakland Dental Club, while recently he has been made an associate 
of the California Study Club. In addition to his practice, which 
returns to him a substantial annual income, he is interested in real 
estate, holding property in Oakland, in Fresno county, California, 
and in Montana. In January, 1906, he was made a member of the 
Board of Dental Examiners of California and continued in that office 
until April, 1914. His high professional standing is indicated in the 
fact that he has been made a member of the committee of organiza- 
tion of the Panama Pacific Dental Congress and is a director of the 
Pacific Dental Congress Commission of 1915. He holds to the high- 
est professional standards and his own efficiency and skill have con- 
stituted a stimulating example for others. 

In his political views Dr. Pease is a republican but has never 
aspired to local office, thinking that he can best serve the people of 
his state and the dental profession by close attention to his duties as 
a member of the board of dental examiners, with which he was con- 
nected during the administrations of Governors Pardee, Gillett and 
Johnson. He recently resigned to devote most of his time to the 
practice of his profession. 

At Oakland, on the 3d of June, 1903, Dr. Pease was married to 
Miss Mable 'I'hornton Cage, a daughter of Stephen T. (jage, wlio 



338 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

for many years was closely identified with the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road Company as a director. He was prominent in the early devel- 
opment of California and Nevada and is the only living electoral 
messenger who supported President Lincoln, having been sent from 
Nevada when but twenty-two years of age. Dr. and Mrs. Pease have 
one son, Loran Thornton, nine years of age, who is a leader in his 
classes in school and also possesses rare musical talent. He is a pupil 
of Madame Von Hergott. 

The parents hold membersliip in St. Paul's Episcopal church and 
Dr. Pease belongs to the Men's Club of the church. Fraternally he 
is a Mason, holding membership in Live Oak Lodge, No. 6i, F. & 
A. AL, and in the different branches of York and Scottish Rite Ma- 
sonrv. He is a past high priest of Aahmes Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also has membership in Oakland Lodge, No. 171, B. P. 
O. E., and belongs to Psi Omega, a Greek letter dental fraternity. In 
club circles he is well known as a member of the Commercial Club, 
serving as a member of the public health commission, and he also 
belongs to the Mount Diablo Park Club. Along strictly professional 
lines his associations are with the Alameda County District Dental 
Society and the California State Dental Association, having served as 
director and vice president of the same. Dr. Pease was much inter- 
ested in bringing about the Alameda county free clinic for indigent 
and needv school children. 



GAVIN AITCHISON. 



In IQ05, after an eventful period of close identification with 
milling interests in Alaska, Gavin Aitchison came to Alameda, turn- 
ing his attention to the contracting and building business, in which 
he has engaged continuously since that time. A spirit of enterprise 
and progress has actuatcil him in all he has done and success has 
steadily attended his well directed labors so that lie stands todav 
among the representative and substantial business men of the citv. 
He was born in Nova Scotia, July 9, 1855, and is a representative 
of one of the pioneer families of that province, his maternal great- 
grandfather having been one of the first settlers there and his. father. 
James Aitchison, having come from his native Dumfriesshire, Scot- 
land, to the province in 1834. He there turned his attention to gen- 
eral farming and followed that occupation successfullv until his 
death in 191 2. The mother of our subject was in her maidenhood 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 339 

Miss Ann Bell, a daughter of Gavin and Mary (Irving) Bell, of 
Scotland. 

Gavin Aitchison acquired his education in the public schools of 
his native province and at the early age of ten laid aside his books 
in order to learn the carpentering business, completing his appren- 
ticeship in 1879. He then became identified with mill work, taking 
charge of the Balfour mills of Waugh's River, Nova Scotia, whence 
after six months he came to the United States, settling in Boston, 
Massachusetts, in 1885. There he took up the carpenter's trade but 
after six months went to Waterbury, Connecticut, returning in 1886 
to Waugh's River. There he again became connected with saw- 
milling, which he followed for one year thereafter, going in 1887 
to Spring Hill, Nova Scotia, and there entering the contracting 
business for himself, thus beginning his independent career. He 
left Nova Scotia for California on the ist of January, 1888, and 
after his arrival in San Francisco obtained work as a carpenter for 
the Spring Valley Water Company. In 1889 he secured a position 
in the bridge department of the Southern Pacific Railroad and re- 
tained it for four years, proving capable, eflicient and conscientious 
in the discharge of his duties. From 1889 to 1898 he engaged in 
the carpentering business in San Francisco and in the latter year 
went to St. Michaels, where he worked as a carpenter on the con- 
struction of the Northern Alaska Transportation Company's hotel. 
From St. Michaels he went with dog teams to Gollivan bay as a 
prospector and was with the party that discovered Ophir Creek, 
a valuable property now owned and operated by the Northern Lights 
Mining Company. In all Mr. Aitchison made six trips to Alaska 
but in 1905 returned to California with the intention of remaining 
permanently. He went to San Francisco and almost immediately 
afterward came to Alameda, where he established himself as a gen- 
eral contractor and builder. In this occupation he has engaged 
since that time and the excellent work he has accomplished is the 
best evidence of his ability and skill. He has erected many fine 
homes and other structures in this city and in the neighborhood, his 
buildings showing always excellent workmanship and artistic design. 
As a result his patronage has steadily increased and it has now 
reached extensive proportions, Mr. Aitchison being numbered among 
the leading contractors and builders in this section of the countv. 

Mr. Aitchison married Miss Mary Belle Matheson, a daughter 
of Angus and Margaret (Monroe) Matheson, of Pictou countv. Nova 
Scotia. Mr. and Mrs. Aitchison are the parents of seven children: 
James Miller, aged thirty-three; Margaret Belle, thirty-one; John 



.•i4U HISTORY Ol'" AI.A.MEDA COUNTY 

Walter, twenty-nine; Alexander Gordon, twenty-seven; Ethel 
Louise, twenty-Hve; and Mabel Irene and Gretta May, twins, aged 
eighteen. 

Fraternally Mr. Aitchison is a member of Oak. Grove Lodge, 
No. 115, F. & A. AL, and he is president of the Alameda Improve- 
ment Club, a position in which he has accomplished a great deal of 
constructive and farsighted work. He is not a politician and the 
honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. He 
prefers rather to concentrate his attention upon his business affairs, 
in whicli he has been very successful, and much credit is due to him 
for the position he has attained among the substantial and represent- 
ative business men of Alameda. 



GEORGE H. HARRIS. 



George H. Harris of Oakland is widely recognized as one of the 
foremost railway and electrical engineers of the coast, being at pres- 
ent general superintendent of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal 
Railway, with head offices in Oakland. 

Mr. Harris was born in Rome, Georgia, October 22, 1873, and 
is a son of Frank H. and Sarah Harris. He attended the public 
schools, graduating from the high school at the age of sixteen, and 
then went to Cedartown, Georgia, where he took his degree from 
the Harris School of Technology at the age of twenty. Returning 
to Rome, he entered the engineering department of the Chattanooga, 
Rome & Columbus Railroad, with whom he remained for six months. 
He then went to Mississippi, where for a half year he was connected 
with tlie engineering department of the Georgia Pacific Railway. 
The next four moiitiis he spent in the same department of the Geor- 
gia, Florida (S: .Alabama Railroad at Quitman, Georgia, and then 
was for two months in the engineering department of the Brierfield, 
l^lockton >S: Birmingham Railroad. After aci]uiring this valuable 
experience he removed to Birmingiiam, Alabama, and engaged in 
civil and mining engineering, continuing along tiiat line for about 
half a year. He tiien became connected with the engineering de- 
partment of the Birmingham Railway & Electric Company, later, 
becoming chief engineer and remaining with that company until in 
\()n] tiiey consolidated with several other street railway and lighting 
companies, Mr. Harris becoming superintendent of transportation 
and ci]uipnient. The companv was then called the Birmingiiam 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY . 341 

Railway, Light & Power Company. Mr. Harris remained superin- 
tendent until 1903 and then became general superintendent, con- 
tinuing in this important position until January, 1914. He resigned 
his office at that date in order to accept the general superintendency 
of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railway in Oakland. Al- 
though he has held this office for a comparatively short time, it is 
quite evident that his vast experience will be of the greatest benefit 
to his new company. During the period from 1903 to 1914 he was 
also vice president and general manager of the Birmingham & Edge- 
wood Electric Railway Company. Mr. Harris is still a director and 
a member of the finance committee of the Merchants & Mechanics 
Trust & Savings Bank of Birmingham. 

On December 4, 1901, Mr. Harris married, at Rome, Georgia, 
Miss Eva V. Camp, and they have one daughter, Josephine. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Harris is a Knight of Pythias and along professional 
lines belongs to the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and 
the Engineering Association of the South, of which he is a past pres- 
ident. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church. The 
city of Oakland is to be congratulated upon having secured the serv- 
ices of such an efficient and experienced man as Mr. Harris. In his 
important office ha is in a position to greatly improve public trans- 
portation facilities and there is no doubt that he will use his best 
efforts in maintaining the standards of his road and in making its 
expansion keep pace with the fast growth of the city. 



LEROY W. POTTER. 



Leroy W. Potter holds the important position of freight and pas- 
senger agent of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway in Oak- 
land. Bv training and inclination he is a railroad man and has 
proven himself highly efficient in the office which he fills. He was 
born near Xenia, Ohio, May 20, i860, and is the son of S. L. and 
A. C. Potter. After completing his education he took up the study 
of medicine for three years, which he was compelled to give up on 
account of ill health. In 1882 he moved to South Dakota and 
entered the service of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 
at Vermilion as assistant agent, later being promoted to agent, and 
continuing in the service of that company in the various departments 
until iM()7, when he resigned to come to California. The same vcar 
he entered the service of the -Atcliison, Topeka & Santa Fe Raihvav 



342 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

in Los Angeles, serving in track, oil and station departments at vari- 
ous points until 1904, at which time he was transferred to Oakland 
as cashier and chief clerk, serving in that capacity until 1906, when 
he was appointed freight and passenger agent of the same system, 
which position he now holds. His wide experience in railroad work 
fits him eminently for this responsible position, which he tills to tlic 
entire satisfaction of his company, and of the public in general. 

Politically, Mr. Potter is a republican, but although interested in 
the welfare of his party, he is not a politician. He is widely known 
in fraternal circles, being a Mason of the York and Scottish Rites, 
having attained the thirty-second degree in the latter. He is also 
a member of and prominently identified with the Mystic Shrine. 
In addition to the above he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights 
of Pythias, the Independent Order of Foresters and the Modern 
Woodmen of America and holds membership in both the Oakland 
Commercial Club and the Nile Club. 

Mr. Potter has attained prominence in the railroad world by close 
application and incessant diligence in the exercise of his duties. 
These qualities, combined with his high principles, are the founda- 
tion of his success. He has many friends in Oakland, all of whom 
respect and esteem him, and he is popular with those who work 
with and under him, all of whom appreciate his justness and the 
integrity of his motives. 



BEXJAMIX H. PENDLETON. 

Following a period of progressive and able service as president 
of the city council of Oakland Benjamin H. Pendleton was made 
civil service commissioner and this important position he held for 
a number of years, discharging its duties in a prompt, capable and 
reliable manner. In addition to this he has held various other 
positions of public trust and responsibility, and he is besides con- 
nected with business interests of the city as proprietor of the whole- 
sale cigar house operated under the name of Horn & Company. 

Mr. Pendleton was born in Shanghai, China, October 20, 1862, 
and numbers among his ancestors several who occupied important 
places in the early history of the United States. Captain Ben Pen- 
dleton, from whom he is a direct descendant, fought in the cause 
of American independence and as a naval officer succeeded in cap- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 343 

turing a British warship. Although born in China Mr. Pendleton 
has spent most of his life in America. After completing his pre- 
paratory education he entered Yale University, where he took an 
academic course, graduating with high honors in 1884, at the age 
of twenty-two. Soon afterward he became associated with Horn 
& Company, who conducted a wholesale cigar house at 40 Drumm 
street, San Francisco. He has been identified with this enterprise 
since 1885 and is now its sole owner. He has developed this into 
one of the largest concerns of its kind in the city and is recognized 
as a man of unusual business ability and progressiveness. 

Since taking up his residence in Oakland Mr. Pendleton has 
always taken an active interest in public affairs and has done effec- 
tive and lasting work in various positions of public trust and respon- 
sibility. In 1898 he was appointed on the board of free public 
library trustees, and he served for four vears. In 1903 he was 
elected councilman on the republican ticket and was for two years 
president of the council, being the last to hold this office under the 
old form of government. Mr. Pendleton's record is an excellent 
one. He was the dominant figure in arranging the details of the 
Southern Pacific franchise on Seventh street and it was largely on 
account of his study and his untiring efforts that the matter was 
finally settled by the payment by the railroad company of a yearly 
rental for the use of the street, which is greater than is paid for a 
similar privilege by any other railroad in the United States. Mr. 
Pendleton was also a strong factor in securing for the city a reduc- 
tion in the water rates, after a great deal of argument and litigation 
of long standing. A graduated scale of reduction was brought 
about, which has meant a saving during a period of four years to 
the city of Oakland of about nine hundred thousand dollars. He 
was also very active in bringing about a settlement of the Western 
water front matter and it was he who suggested that the wharfing- 
out rights be recognized by the Western Pacific Railway Company 
bv the payment of a yearly rental, which principle, having been 
established, was later followed out to the great advantage of the 
citv, which exacted a like rental from the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany and the Key Route. It was Mr. Pendleton's suggestion also 
that the Oakland Mole and water front rights of the Southern Pa- 
cific Company revert to the city of Oakland at the expiration of its 
franchise. After the commission form of government was estab- 
lished in Oakland Mr. Pendleton was made civil service commis- 
sioner and he is now chairman of the municipal water commission. 



344 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

which has tdr its purpose the acquisition of the water company's 
plant. 

I\ir. Pendleton is president of the Associated Charities Associa- 
tion of Oakland, whicii is affiliated with the city government, and 
he is a member of several clubs and organizations, among which are 
the Nile Club, the I'niversity Club of San Francisco and the Sons 
of the American Revolution. He stands for progress at all times 
and seeks his own success and the city's advancement along lines of 
activity which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 



NORMAN LOGAN. 



Norman Logan, prominentlv connected with business interests of 
San Francisco and until lately secretary of the Northern Electric 
Company, was born in London, England, October 20, 1864, a son of 
William G. and Mary Louisa (Canham) Logan, also natives of that 
city. The father was for many years manager of Coutts & Company 
of London, England, the largest private banking establishment in 
the world, and was financial adviser to the Duchess of Teck, the 
mother of the present queen of England. He was one of the most 
prominent financiers in Great Britain and his ability carried him 
forward into important relations with banking interests and with gen- 
eral business life. He died in 1896. His wife was a daughter of 
John and Mary Canham, of London, England, and a granddaughter 
of John Canham, collector of the port of London for many years. 

Norman Logan acquired his education in Aldenham, Hertford- 
shire, England, in one of the Elizabethan schools founded by Richard 
Piatt during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. From this institution 
he was graduated in 1881 and after laying aside his books became 
interested in the real-estate business as an employe of the firm of 
Rogers, Chapman & Thomas, of London, with whom he remained 
for five years, proving himself even at this early period, reliable, re- 
sourceful and discriminating in business afYairs. When he left Eng- 
land Mr. Logan came to California, settling in Eldorado county in 
1887. He came to this country in order to take charge of a mining 
property owned by his father and in this way became interested in 
mines and mining, gradually concentrating his attention upon this 
line of work. In the latter part of 1887 he took charge of a mine 
in Placer county in the interests of an English syndicate and this he 
continued to operate until 1889. when he returned to England in 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 345 

order to place the Mammoth Bar mine on the English market. Re- 
turning to America in 1892, he settled again in California, purchas- 
ing a ranch in Placer county and engaging in farming and mining 
until 1 901, moving to various parts of the southwest from California 
to New Mexico during that time. Late in the latter year he joined 
E. R. Cowles and under the firm name of Cowles & Logan they en- 
gaged in the commission business, Mr. Logan retiring from this con- 
nection in 1906. In the same year he entered the auditing depart- 
ment of the Ocean Shore Railroad in San Francisco and in May 
joined the Northern Electric Company as assistant secretary, win- 
ning promotion to the position of secretary in 1907. This connec- 
tion has called forth his initiative and executive ability, much of the 
credit for the advancement and progress of the concern being due to 
him. He possesses organizing power, ability to coordinate different 
forces and to carry forward a difficult business project to successful 
completion, and these qualities have all been elements in a success 
which places him in the front ranks of progressive and able business 
men. 

Mr. Logan married Miss Lilian Leigh, a daughter of Frederick 
and Sarah Leigh, of Southampton, England, and they have two 
children: Shirley Muriel, aged nineteen; and Kenneth Norman, 
seventeen. Mr. Logan is an enthusiastic cricketer and is not only a 
member of the Alameda Cricket Club but is vice president of the 
Alameda Cricket Association. He is a member of the Olympic and 
the Merchants Exchange Clubs of San Francisco and does all in his 
power to promote general business expansion and progress. He has 
himself reached a creditable place in business circles, for he is broad- 
minded, progressive and enterprising and a valuable addition to the 
ranks of San Francisco's able and successful men. 



JEWETT CASTELLO GILSON. 

Jewett Castello Gilson, educator, business man and author, was 
born in the town of Rockingham, Windham county, V^ermont, May 
23, 1844. He acquired his education in the public schools and 
colleges of New England, attending Amherst College and sub- 
sequently pursuing a course of study in the astronomical department 
of Harvard University. When seventeen years of age he took up 
the profession of teaching and was an instructor in the common 
schools of Vermont and New Hampshire. For two years he taught 



;M6 history OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

mathematics in the Green Mountain Institute of South Woodstock, 
\'crmont, and for a similar period acted as principal of Allegany 
Institute at Almond, New York. He came to California in 1869 
and for two years taught school at Irvington, while for seven years 
he was thus identified with educational interests at Pleasanton. In 
1877 he was elected superintendent of the Alameda county schools 
and served in that capacity for three years, resigning to accept the 
position of superintendent of the Oakland city schools and acting 
thus for two terms. He then established a private normal and spe- 
cial training school in Hamilton Hall, which he had purchased in 
the meantime. This private institution was conducted by him for 
twelve years or until he was elected principal of the Swett school 
of Oakland, which position he held for nine years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he was transferred to the principalship of the 
Longfellow school, which institution he has ably served in that 
capacity for the past five years. As a side issue Mr. Gilson has for 
many years been interested in the electrical business. At the present 
time he acts as vice president of the Pacific States Electric Com- 
pany, which has business houses in the five largest cities on the Pa- 
cific coast, namely: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Oakland, Portland 
and Seattle. He has found time for travel as a means of recreation 
and has also made contributions to the public press. He is the author 
of "Wealth of the World's Waste Places," a work published bv 
the Scribners in 1913. He is especially interested in scientific and 
nature studies, having written many articles along those lines. 

In 1872, at Ogden, Utah, Mr. Gilson was united in marriage tn 
Miss Carrie T. Greene. His three children, Dr. Ray E., Cass L. 
and Rosse M. Gilson, reside in Oakland, where they are engaged 
in business. 



GEORGE H. BINKLEY. 

George H. Binklcy, chief engineer maintenance of way and struc- 
tures department of the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railway, 
was born in Richmond, Indiana, November 23, 1866, a son of 
Charles C. and Georgia H. Binkley. He attended the public schools 
until 1883, and upon leaving the high school entered De Pauw 
University at Greencastle, Indiana, where he pursued an engineer- 
ing course until 1886. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 347 

He next engaged with the Pennsylvania Railroad in the engineer- 
ing department on preliminary and location surveys and construction 
and maintenance work, being thus engaged in Indiana, Ohio, West 
Virginia and Pennsylvania until 1891, when he went to Chicago. 
There he was placed in charge of the surveys and grades depart- 
ment of the World's Columbian Exposition. In October, 1894, he 
entered into active connection with the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad and the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Rail- 
road, having charge of the design of subways in their joint track 
elevation work in Chicago. He was thus occupied until 1895, when 
he became connected with the bureau of streets of Chicago as assist- 
ant engineer. In the fall of the same year he entered into a contract 
with the Calumet Electric Railway of Chicago, having charge of 
all the construction and maintenance of track and overhead work 
until 1900. His next business association was with Kohler Brothers, 
contracting engineers, in the capacity of chief engineer of their rail- 
way department. He thus remained until 1904, when the went to 
Indianapolis, Indiana, where he organized and managed the Hadley 
Derrick Company until 1905. He next became vice president and 
chief engineer of the iVmerican Engineering Company of Indianap- 
olis, and in 1906 he went to Chicago, where he took charge of the 
construction and operation of the Southern Traction Company. In 
1907 he engaged with the Arnold Company as engineer, having 
charge of several of their projects, embracing irrigation, electric 
railway and hydro-electric plants. There he continued until 1912, 
when he went to Phoenix, Arizona, as chief engineer with the 
Chandler Improvement Company, having charge of all their oper- 
ations except sales of lands until May, 1913. Early in 1914 he 
accepted the superintendency of engineering and maintenance of 
way for the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railway in Oakland. 
Each step in his business career has been a forward one, bringing 
him broader opportunities and a wider outlook. Important proj- 
ects have been intrusted to his care and scientific and practical 
knowledge has enabled him to cope with intricate and involved 
problems. 

In Richmond, Indiana, on the 27th of func, 1893, Mr. Binkley 
was united in marriage to Miss Bertha K. Line, and unto them have 
been born three children: Joanna, at home; George Holland, fifteen 
years of age, who is attending high school; and Margaret, who is 
a public school pupil. Mr. Binkley holds membership with the 
Masonic fraternity. He has attained the thirty-second degree of 
the Scottish Rite and is likewise a member of the Mvstic Shrine. 



348 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

He belongs to the Phi Gamma Delta college fraternity, and he gives 
his political support to the republican party. Along strictly pro- 
fessional lines his connection is with the Western Society of Engi- 
neers and the American Society of Civil Engineers. He stands 
among those whose ability has spelled prominence and distinction 
in his chosen calling, his record being an honor to the profession. 



JUDGE HENRY A. MELVIN. 

Judge Henry A. Melvin, eminent lawyer and jurist, has been a 
member of the California bar since i8g2. The public offices which 
he has held have always been in the strict path of his profession, in 
connection with which he has won high judicial honors. 

He was born September 28, 1865, in Springfield, Illinois, and 
traces his ancestry back to one of the oldest Maryland families. 
His grandfather, James Melvin, was born in Cecil county, Mary- 
land, and died in Oakland, California. From early childhood he 
was a devout member of the Presbyterian church, the religious faith 
of the family being in accordance with the tenets of that denomina- 
tion. \\niile visiting his kinsmen. General Robert and Colonel 
William Patterson, of Philadelphia, Irishmen and Presbyterians, 
he met a Miss McMillan, a beautiful woman, who had gone to 
I'hiladelphia from her home in Belfast, Ireland. They were mar- 
ried and established their home in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, near the southern border of the state, and there James Melvin 
engaged in teaching school for a number of years. Their children 
were born in that localitv and included William, Samuel Houston, 
James, Robert, Loetitia Ann and Elizabeth. The family removed 
to Steubenville, Ohio, where James Melvin engaged in teaching 
and afterward in merchandising. He was also probate judge for a 
time. His wife died in early womanhood and he afterward married 
I^lizabeth Maple. In the late 'sos he removed to Illinois aiitl fol- 
lowed merchandising and also served as justice of the peace in 
Chatham, Sangamon countv, until 187s, when a removal was made 
to California, l^he remainder of his life was devoted to studv and 
to writing for the Presbyterian press and up to the time of his death 
he served as an elder in the Brooklyn I'resbyterian church of East 
Oakland. 

Only one of his children lived to adult age. This was Samuel 
Houston Melvin, M. D., who was born in Washington countv. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 349 

Pennsylvania, April 22, 1829, and died in Oakland, California, 
February 11, 1898. He attended school in Steubenville, Ohio, until 
lie reached the age of fifteen years, when he entered the employ of 
Dr. Sinclair, who was a druggist and a graduate of Dublin Uni- 
versity. Later Dr. Melvin attended a local medical institution 
called Medical Hall, from which he was graduated, and entered 
upon active practice in partnership with Dr. Sinclair. His health 
became impaired, however, necessitating a period of rest, which was 
folhnved by his re-entry into the drug business. 

While thus engaged he formed the acquaintance of Miss Sarah 
Amanda Slemmons, a daughter of Samuel Slemmons, of Cadiz. 
Ohio. The young lady was at that time attending Beatty's Sem 
inarv. The discipline concerning the visits of young men was very 
strict, but both Dr. Melvin and Miss Slemmons possessed excellent 
voices and became members of the church choir, which led to their 
frequent meetings and resulted in their marriage in 1853. Mrs. 
Melvin was born at Cadiz, Ohio, March 30, 1833, and passed away 
in Oakland, May 11, 1900. While they were living in Steubenville 
the following children were born unto them. Samuel Slemmons, 
rlie eldest, was born May 8, 1854, and passed away October 22, 1882. 
The second son, James Breed, born February 3, 1856, resides in San 
Mateo, California, and is connected with the California Fruit 
Canners Association in San Francisco. He is the father of two sons 
and two daughters and three of his children are married. Charles 
Stuart, born August 20, 1857, was graduated with the Bachelor of 
Science degree from Lafayette College at Easton, Pennsylvania, in 
the class of 1882, and died in Oakland, California, January 23, 191 1. 
William Patterson was born March 18, 1859, and died in Oakland, 
October i, 1899. After the family removed to Springfield, Illinois, 
where Dr. Melvin was engaged in the drug business, other children 
were added to the family. Of these Mary Lincoln, born December 
29, i860, became the wife of A. A. Dewing, of .Oakland, and the 
mother of three living sons and of twin boys who died in infancy. 
Tlie next member of the family is Judge Henry A. Melvin. Martha 
Barrett, born December 31, 1866, died in infancy. Alice Harvey, 
born July 12, 1873, passed away on the 19th of November of the 
same year. 

\^■hile the family were residents of Springfield Dr. Melvin was 
a neighbor, client and intimate friend of Abraham Lincoln. He 
and his father were ardent Union men, the former being at the head 
of the Union League. The Knights of the Golden Circle offered 
a large sum to anyone who would do away with him, but as it was 



350 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

known that the mild, quiet druggist could drive a ten-penny nail at 
ten paces with a derringer, no one earned the reward. When the 
war broke out ill health in the family prevented Dr. Melvin from 
joining the army, but he gave liberally of his means tor the care of 
wounded soldiers, and his wife was the state president of the relief 
society which did so much for the comfort of the wounded in the 
hospitals. 

After the war business prosperity in Illinois brought wealth to 
Dr. Melvin. After disposing of his drug business he became prom- 
inent in banking and railway circles and in the latter was associated 
with Colonel Thomas A. Scott, but financial misfortune brought 
about by those who proved unworthy of trust caused him to lose 
nearly all that he had acquired. At about that time physicians 
ordered Mrs. Melvin to California and in consequence the family 
removed to this state, but the prophecy that she would live but a 
year proved unfounded, as she traveled life's journey for a quarter 
of a century thereafter. For three years the family resided in St. 
Helena and then came to Oakland, where Dr. Melvin opened a 
drug store, conducting the business until his death. For many years 
he was the president of the state board of pharmacy and also the 
presiding officer of the State Pharmaceutical Society, which carried 
with it the presidency of the College of Pharmacy. In early life 
Dr. Melvin and his wife were of the Presbyterian faith but after 
removing to Oakland joined the First Congregational church, of 
which an old-time and dear friend. Dr. John K. McLean, was 
pastor. 

judge Henry A. Melvin was a young lad w'ho had not yet com- 
pleted has first decade when the family came to the Pacific coast. 
He attended the Franklin Grammar school, from which he was 
graduated in 1881, and three years later he completed a course in 
the Oakland high school. The following year was devoted to busi- 
ness and then, with the desire to prepare for a professional career, 
he entered the University of California. The Scroll, the official 
magazine of the Phi Delta Theta, wrote of his college days as fol- 
lows: "In that great institution he early attracted the attention of 
his college mates and the professors of the university by his ability 
and aptitude as a scholar. A member of a very notable class that 
produced Professor Charles M. Bakewell, soon to become distin- 
guished in metaphysics; Lincoln Hutchison, early to win honors 
in the science of political economy; Professor W. L. Jepscn, who 
quicklv showed eminence as a botanist; Dr. Herbert C. Moflit, who 
readilv became a leading physician of San Francisco; Professor 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 351 

Charles A. Noble, who won laurels in mathematics; Lincoln Stef- 
fens, the student of political and social conditions and relentless 
critic of corruption; and Thomas B. Sullivan, the gifted journalist 
— Judge Melvin at once won recognition as a leader of them all. 
He was in every sense an active member of California Alpha and 
contributed much to the high tone and prosperity of the chapter. 
He was editor of the college annual and easily took full college 
honors in his class. During his student days he cultivated thoroughly 
the wonderful voice with which he has often captivated those who 
heard him and was frequently heard at entertainments in behalf of 
charity." 

Following the completion of his university course, in which he 
had laid a broad and deep foundation upon which to build the 
superstructure of professional learning, Judge Melvin became a 
student in the Hastings College of the Law at San Francisco and 
completed his course bv graduation with the class of 1892. He 
entered upon a clerkship with the senate committee on county and 
township governments of the California legislature and served dur- 
ing the session of 1891. In March of the same year he was called 
bv appointment to the office of justice of the peace of Brooklyn 
township, Alameda county, and in 1900 he was appointed to the 
position of deputy attorney general of the state. All of his briefs 
on appeal to the supreme court of the state while in the office of 
attorney general were marked by clearness, accuracy and profound 
learning in the law. 

Judge Melvin became identified with the bench when in 1901 
the legislature decided up the addition of a fifth judge to the supe- 
rior court. The governor of the state chose Judge Melvin, who 
was indorsed by the bar and the general public, and who in No- 
vember, 1902, was elected to the office by the largest vote ever given 
a candidate for superior judge of Alameda county. We again quote 
from The Scroll: "His career on the bench has been characterized 
by a broad grasp of the principles of law and equity and a fine 
power of clear statement in his opinions, as well as firmness and 
dignity in his conduct. His high reputation as a jurist is not con- 
fined t(j his own county, but extends throughout the state and higher 
judicial honors for him are confidently foretold." Judge Melvin 
resigned to accept an appointment September 28, 1908, as associate 
justice of the supreme court to fill the place of T. B. McFarland, 
deceased, until the next general election. On November 3, 1908, 
he was elected to serve the unexpired term of Justice McFarland, 
which ended January, 191 1. On November S, 1910, Judge Melvin 



:352 



lllSTORV OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 



was re-elected for the full term of twelve years, beginning January, 
191 ]. He has also been professor of medical jurisprudence in the 
Oakland Medical College and is likewise widely known as a writer, 
his name being a familiar one in journalistic circles. The products 
of his pen are always characterized by clearness and purity and 
stamp him as a writer of well chosen and virile English. He has 
also written some songs, one of which has been a popular number 
in the university song book. 

Judge Melvin was married in 1893 ^'^ Miss S. Louise Morse, 
a niece of Governor Pennoyer, of Oregon. They have a son, Brad- 
ford, nineteen years of age, who is a student in Leland Stanford 
L'nivcrsity. Judge Melvin has been well known in the club life of 
the Bay cities and has been equally popular in college fraternity 
circles. He was elected to the Golden Bear, a senior society of the 
Univcrsitv of California, an invitation to membership being ex- 
tended to one or tw'o alumni each year. He is a most loyal member 
of the Phi Delta Theta, and in July, 1906, he was unanimously 
elected grand exalted ruler of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He has a well earned reputation for many-sided ability and 
for unfailing good nature and enjoys wide popularity. He is, more- 
over, regarded as one of the most substantial citizens of Alameda 
countv, Iiis record at all times being an honor and credit to the pro- 
fession which has honored him. 



JOHN M. SANTAXA. 



John M. Santana, who is now vice president and treasurer of the 
American Creamery Company, of Oakland, California, has also been 
engaged for years in the wool business and has been connected with 
banking interests. He was born in the Azores, April 16, 1864, and 
is a son of Joseph Santana, who in 1849, at the age of sixteen years, 
came to California by way of Cape Horn, the journey from his native 
land consuming three months.. Immediately upon his arrival he pro- 
ceeded to the mines in Shasta county and with three of his brothers 
acquired title to a valuable property. They operated the mine under 
a partnership agreement until Joseph Santana, the youngest of the 
four, was twenty-four vcars of age. His mother being in poor health 
and having expressed a desire to see her son, he sold his share to his 
brothers and returned to iiis island home. However, Mrs. Santana 



H.\ i[. SAXTAXA 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 355 

had passed away before he arrived. , He remained a year in the 
Azores, expending the one thousand dollars which he had received 
as his share of the mine in assisting the poor of the neighborhood 
and in other charitable work. He then secured the funds to return 
to California and resumed work in the mine. Two years later he 
again went to his native land, where he married, reared his family 
and continued to reside for the remainder of his life. 

John M. Santana came to America when a youth of sixteen years, 
landing in Boston. While still in his teens he came to California 
by train and after reaching the Golden state worked for six months 
on a ranch near Antioch and then herded sheep for a similar length 
of time in Fresno. His next position was on a ranch, where for a 
half year he tended cattle and did general work. By this time he 
had saved three hundred and ten dollars and after forming a partner- 
ship with a man who had four hundred dollars capital, purchased 
nine hundred sheep. x\fter two years they sold their flock and di- 
vided the net profit of six thousand dollars. Mr. Santana removed 
to San Francisco, arranging to take a course in Heald's Business Col- 
lege, but as there was an unprecedented boom in wool and mutton 
he never commenced his studies but reengaged in the sheep business 
in Fresno county. The two seasons which followed were very dry 
and therefore he and his partner were compelled to sell their sheep, 
which numbered between seven and eight thousand, receiving only 
one dollar per head and selling their wool at two and a half and three 
cents a pound. In this venture Mr. Santana suffered a great loss, but 
they succeeded in paying their debts, with the exception of a sum less 
than one hundred dollars. In 1899 he formed a partnership with a 
Mr. Perry and they entered the wool business under the firm name of 
Santana & Perry. This business was conducted for some time and in 
1906 Mr. Santana organized the California Sheep & Wool Company, 
of which he became president. He retired from the wool business 
in 1908. As early as 1905 he had taken a most important part in the 
organization of the Portuguese- American Bank of San Francisco and 
he is still interested in that enterprise, a branch of which will be 
opened in Oakland, in July, 1915, in the new I. O. O. F. building at 
Eleventh and Franklin streets. For a time Mr. Santana was more or 
less free from business cares but in 191 1 he acquired a half interest 
in the American Creamery Company, which was founded bv f. A. 
Silveria in 1898, and our subject now serves as vice president and 
treasurer of the company. He is a man of good executive capacity 
and one who is able to handle a great amount of detail work and 
because of these iiualities has been very successful in promoting the 



;]56 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

interests of the creamery company. He has always followed fair 
and square methods and in business circles his name stands high. 

On January 6, 1890, Mr. Santana married Miss Anna Joseph, a 
native of San Leandro, and their children are -Isabelle, John and 
Joseph. Mrs. Santana is a member of the Ladies of the Portuguese 
Society but she finds her greatest happiness at her own fireside and 
with her husband and children. 

Mr. Santana has resided in San Leandro for the past twenty-five 
years and has always showed a laudable interest in public progress. 
For the past six years he has been a member of the San Leandro 
school board and for four vears has served on the board of town 
trustees. He is a republican in a general sense but since Woodrow 
Wilson has occupied the presidential chair has developed a strong 
liking for the man in whose policy and sincerity he implicitly believes. 
Mr. Santana is a member of the U. P. E. C. and J. D. E. S. (Portu- 
guese societies) and the Knights of Pythias. He is popular in these or- 
ganizations and is considered one of the most prominent Portuguese- 
Americans of Alameda county. In him are combined the courtesy 
and politeness which are the heritage of his native race, with an 
aggressiveness and business judgment which are considered to be the 
chief American characteristics. 



GEORGE F. RICE. 



George F. Rice is prominent as a building contractor of Berk- 
eley and Oakland, having thus been successfully engaged in business 
for the past eleven years. He is a native of California, his birth 
having occurred in Sonoma county, this state, on the i8th of July, 
1877. His father, Jacob Rice, came to California in 1852 and be- 
gan mining in Angels Camp, Placer county. Subsequently he set- 
tled in Sonoma county and there devoted his attention to ranching 
throughout the remainder of his life, passing away in 1909. 

George F. Rice attended the graded and high schools of Santa 
Clara county until si.xteen years of age and then began the operation 
of a fruit ranch on his own account, conducting the same until he 
disposed of the property in 1898. In that year he embarked in the 
contracting business in the town of Santa Clara, there remaining 
until \()OT,, when he came to Oakland. Throughout the past eleven 
years he has met with gratifying success as a general contractor of 
Berkeley and Oakland, having erected some of the largest apart- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 357 

ment houses in Oakland as well as stores and a large number of 
handsome residences. That his ability is widely recognized is at- 
tested by the fact that many important contracts are awarded him. 
Mr. Rice is fraternally identified with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows of Oakland and the Foresters, being a member of 
Berkeley Lodge of the latter organization, and has filled all of the 
chairs in both' orders. He is popular in both business and social 
circles of his community and has won an extensive circle of warm 
friends here. 



MILLARD JOSEPHUS LAYMANCE. 

The life record of Millard J. Laymance entitles him pre-emi- 
nently to the distinctive title of one of the "builders" of his city, and 
as such he has contributed a notable share to the material progress 
of all the communities bordering on the bay of San Francisco. 
More than half his life has been spent in California, and he is still 
in his prime, wielding a substantial influence for the upbuilding of 
the city and possessing the respect and esteem of his fellows. 

Mr. Laymance is of southern birth and ancestry and was born 
at Tunnel Hill, Whitfield county, Georgia, November lo, 1856. 
His parents were Elijah M. and Adeline D. Laymance, the former 
being a native of South Carolina and for many years a planter and 
merchant of Georgia, whither he came with his father when a boy. 
The grandfather was born in France and coming to America, settled 
in South Carolina as a planter. On the maternal side, the great- 
great-grandfather of Millard J. Laymance came to this country from 
England and settled in eastern Tennessee. 

Millard J. Laymance spent his boyhood on his father's planta- 
tion and was instructed by private tutors until he was fourteen years 
of age, after which for five years he acted as clerk in a general store. 
At the age of nineteen years he was thrown upon his own resources 
and decided to carve out his career in the west. Accordingly, he came 
to California and settled in Sonoma county, where he engaged in the 
raising of wine grapes. In 1887 he went to Humboldt county, 
Nevada, and enlarged his holdings, becoming interested in raising 
cattle on a large scale. He continued in this business for seven 
years, at the same time becoming connected with several gold and 
copper mining enterprises, with gratifying success. In 1884 he be- 
gan raising wheat on a ranch of throe thousand acres in San Joatjuin 



358 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

county, and after three years he sold out his ranch and came to Oak- 
land. He then engaged in the real estate business, his offices being 
at Nos. 460-462 Eighth street, where he dealt in city and farm 
property under the firm name of M. J. Lymance & Company. A 
few years later the firm was incorporated, with Mr. Laymance as 
its president, under the name of the Laymance Real Estate Com- 
pany, and the corporation has since continued as one of the most 
important realty brokerage houses in Oakland, if not on the coast. 
The company has dealt in large tracts and valuable properties in 
Oakland and has engineered some of the most notable real-estate 
deals in the city. By reason of his extensive business Mr. Laymance 
has been foremost in the upbuilding of Oakland, "the Athens of 
America." He has erected many large buildings, among which 
may be mentioned the fine Orpheum Theater structure, and was one 
of the prime movers in the building of the Hotel Oakland — one of 
the finest hotels in the west. He is one of its directors and a member 
of the finance, building and furnishing committee. 

Besides his real estate business Mr. Laymance is heavily and 
extensively interested in a large number of other enterprises in the 
city of Oakland. Mr. Laymance has been identified with the oil 
interests of this state for the last fifteen years — was one of the orig- 
inal organizers and directors of the Associated Oil Company and 
was one of the pioneer oil operators at McKittrick in the McKittrick 
district, California, and is president and director of several large oil 
companies operating at Maricopa and the Midway oil fields. 

Mr. Laymance was married in July, 1884, ^o Mary L. Lemon, 
daughter of William S. Lemon, a pioneer of Oakland and of the 
state. To them were born four children: Ada, who married 
Edwards Hall Dodge; Blanche Leila, the wife of Leslie Rice; Miss 
Grace, and Hazel D., wife of Henry A. Heilbron, Jr., of Sacra- 
mento. 

Aside from his business activities Mr. Laymance has been ex- 
ceedingly prominent in civic afifairs. He was director for a number 
of years of the Oakland Chamber of Commerce, is vice president 
and director of the Oakland Commercial Club and director and 
member of the executive committee of the Tax Association. Has 
always taken great interest in the Oakland harbor and its develop- 
ment, as chairman of the harbor committee of the Oakland Com- 
mercial Club and for the past twenty years has devoted a great deal 
of his time and energy to the development of the harbor of the city 
of Oakland. As a member of the National Rivers and Harbors 
Congress he has attended a number of meetings of the congress in 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 359 

Washington. As a member of the California Development Board 
he has performed valuable service in advertising to the world Cali- 
fornia's immense resources and opportunities. He was president of 
the Alameda County World's Fair Association, which he rep- 
resented at the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893. 
In political affairs Mr. Laymance is a stanch democrat and 
served eight years as chairman of the Democratic County Central 
Committee. He occupies a prominent position as a clubman, being 
affiliated with the Sierra Madre Club of Los Angeles; the Southern 
Club of San Francisco; and the Oakland Commercial Club, Athen- 
ian and Nile Clubs of Oakland. He is also a member of Oakland 
Lodge, No. 188, A. F. & A. M., and the Oakland Chapter, R. A. M. 
He participates in all matters of civic endeavor and in a personal 
way is known as a cultured, refined and amiable gentleman, 
extremely popular in his choice circle of friends. 



EDWIN STEARNS. 



Edwin Stearns is the secretary of the Down Town Association 
and as such is widely and popularly known in Oakland. The width 
of the continent separates him from his birthplace, for he is a native 
of Boston, Massachusetts, born June 20, 1857, his parents being 
Nathaniel C. and Sarah A. Stearns. He attended the public and 
Latin schools of his native city until fourteen years of age, when 
he made his initial step in the business world by entering the employ 
of the Saturday Evening Gazette and Boston Post in a reportorial 
capacity. He afterward engaged with the Boston Globe in similar 
work, and his increasing ability brought him to the position of night 
city editor with the Boston Herald. He continued in that connection 
until 1891, when he became night manager of New England for the 
Associated Press. He thus remained until 1894, when, feeling that 
better opportunities might be secured upon the coast, owing to the 
rapid and substantial development of the west, he came to Cali- 
fornia and engaged in the real-estate and fire insurance business in 
Pasadena until 1898, when he again entered the field of journalism. 
He became connected with the Los Angeles Express in a reportorial 
capacity and as dramatic editor, remaining on the paper until 1901. 

Mr. Stearns then came to Oakland and was business secretary of 
the Oakland Board of Trade, which in 1906 was reorganized as the 
Chamber of Commerce. He continued in that capacity until Feb- 



ago HISTORY Ol' ALAMEDA COUXTY 

ruarv, 1909, when he resigned. In November, 1912, he became 
secretary of the Down Town Association, an organization which was 
formed by property owners and merchants to upbuild and maintain 
the business left in the section of the city south of Twelfth street, 
and he is doing excellent work in this connection. His former 
newspaper service enables him to rapidly acquire an accurate 
knowledge of the situation and his business ability enables him to 
utilize the means at hand in the accomplishment of desired results. 
On the 2ist of October, 1900, Mr. Stearns was married in Los 
Angeles to Miss Gertrude A. Howard. He is a charter member of 
the New England Association of California and an honorary life 
member of the Elks lodge at Boston. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party, and his religious faith is that of the 
Unitarian church. He has never regretted his determination to 
come to the coast, for here he has found the opportunities which 
he sought and, gradually working his way upward, stands today as 
a forceful factor in the improvement of business conditions in Oak- 
land. 



JOHN FORREST. 

A man who has by his own energy, ambition and enterprise, 
guided and controlled by sound and practical judgment, worked his 
wav upward to a place among the representative men of Oakland 
is fohn Forrest, prominently connected with the municipal govern- 
ment as commissioner of revenue and finance and ex-officio member 
of the board of educatiDii. He was born in Ireland in 1858 and 
came to America in 1S72, arriving in Oakland three years later. 
He has been dependent upon his own resources from an early age. 
beginning his active career in this city as a member of a construction 
gang on the old San Pablo cable road. Following this he was con- 
nected with the Southern Pacific Railroad Company for many years 
as car repairer and inspector of air-brake equipment. He left the 
employ of the Southern Pacific and became identified with the gas 
company, serving for a number of years in various capacities. Under 
Governor Pardee's administration he secured the position of water 
front paver and was later appointed to the office of trench inspector 
in the city of Oakland, this petition involving the duties of examin- 
ing and passing upon all trenches or openings in the citv streets or 
elsewhere made by the various utility companies for water pipes, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 361 

gas mains, telephone conduits and sewers. In this position Mr. 
Forrest did the careful, thorough and conscientious work which has 
come to be recognized as characteristic of him, bringing himself 
prominently before the public as a man upon whom public honor 
may safely rest. In view of his efficient and intelligent service in 
positions of trust and responsibility he was nominated a member of 
the Freeholders of Oakland, who framed the new charter, and served 
as chairman of the board during nearly all of its sessions. 

Mr. Forrest enjoys the distinction of having been elected a mem- 
ber of the present city council and was assigned to the department 
of revenue and finance, his position carrying with it membership on 
the board of education. Mr. Forrest has supervision of one of the 
most important departments in the city government and is giving 
to the public a conservative and businesslike administration. 

A feature worthy of the careful consideration of every resident 
of Oakland is the economy with which the office of revenue and 
finance has been conducted throughout Mr. Forrest's administration 
as commissioner of that department. It is equally interesting to 
know that ever since entering the employ of the city Mr. Forrest 
has had no other business affiliations and has received no salaries 
nor remuneration from any source other than his official salary. He 
has therefore devoted his undivided attention to the duties of his 
office and the success of his labors is evident to every person who has 
keenly observed the growth and ever increasing prestige of the city 
of Oakland. He has been a prominent labor man all his life for, 
having been a worker himself, he appreciates the needs and diffi- 
culties of all other workers, and has done much to further the cause 
of labor. He is at present the president of the Gas Workers' Union 
of Oakland, a position which he has filled for many years. He is 
well liked by all who know him because his success has made no 
change in his attitude toward his friends and the public has found 
him an unassuming, courteous and painstaking official. 



FRANCIS MARION SMITH. 

W'itliout invidious distinction, for it is tiie consensus of opinion 
on the part of his fellow townsmen, Francis Marion Smith mav be 
termed the foremost citizen of Oakland. Few there are, indeed, 
who would dissent from this opinion, and investigation into the 
historv of this section shows how clnsclv his name is interwoven with 



362 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

much that has promoted the material progress and developed the 
activities of Oakland and the state. His influence and reputation 
have extended far beyond even county and state lines, for the name 
of "Borax" Smith is known in every part of the civilized world. 
The history of Rome is practically written in the lives of a few 
men. and the history of any country is found in the biographies 
of its representative citizens. The history of Alameda county and 
particularly of Oakland, with its development and attending pros- 
perity, has its origin largely in the activities, enterprise and initi- 
ative of Francis Marion Smith. While upbuilding his individual 
fortunes he has ever been keenly interested in the upbuilding of 
the community. The plans which have brought him individual 
success have brought ever greater prosperity to the commonwealth. 
He has contributed liberally of his fortune, his time and his judg- 
ment to all matters relative to civic betterment and advancement and 
as the result of his sagacity, initiative and liberality Oakland has 
its modern traction and ferry — the Key Route system, which is 
acknowledged to be the best ferry system in the world. The Realty 
Syndicate, extensive, powerful and valuable, was of his conceiving 
and of it he is the president. Nearly all of the public utilities that 
have to do with water power, lumber, transportation and manufac- 
turing owe more to his co-operation than to that of any other man. 
He is a man of big heart and generous impulses, and his humani- 
trianism manifests itself in the practical way of assisting people to 
aid themselves. 

To begin at the beginning, however. Francis Marion Smith was 
born in Richmond. Wisconsin. February 2. 1846. a son of Henry G. 
and Charlotte (Paul) Smith. His maternal ancestor, William 
Paul, came from England to America in 1637. Francis M. Smith 
attended the common schools of his native city and later Milton 
College, Wisconsin. On the completion of his school work he left 
his father's ranch and, answering to the irresistible call of the west, 
he made his way toward the Pacific, visiting Idaho, California and 
Nevada, spending considerable time in mining and other work in 
those states, being a resident of Nevada for five years. While there 
in 1872 he located the great borax deposits at Teals Marsh. He 
had been working under a contract with several ore mills near Co- 
lumbus, locating and getting out timber for the various mining 
camps, and while so engaged made his discovery and location of the 
valuable borax claim. Up to that time the world's supply of borax 
had been small and the finished product was selling at thirtv-five 
cents per ounce. The Teals Marsh deposits soon became the world's 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 363 

principal source of supply and remained so for years. The activi- 
ties of Mr. Smith in developing the find and producing the finished 
product caused the hitherto almost prohibitive price to drop to but 
three or four cents per pound and brought borax to a wide com- 
mercial use in the world, as evidenced by the increase of the output 
from six hundred tons per annum to twenty-five thousand tons. 
Reading between the lines, one may learn the history of the devel- 
opment of a vast enterprise which has been of untold value in pro- 
moting the material progress of the sections in which he has ope- 
rated, while at the same time the work has placed Mr. Smith among 
the millionaires of California. 

On the 23d of June, 1907, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to 
Miss Evelyn Ellis, and of this union four children have been born, 
May Evelyn, Charlotte Dorothy, Mildred Alberta and Francis M. 
Their beautiful home, Arbor Villa, is situated in East Oakland, and 
the family spend their summers at Shelter Island, New York. 
As previously suggested, Mr. Smith's activities have been of the 
utmost benefit to Oakland, not only in a material way, but along the 
lines of benevolence and humanitarianism. He has erected near his 
home fully equipped homes for worthy girls. He is a trustee of 
Mills College. 

He established the Mary R. Smith Trust. Mary R. Smith, who 
was born in New York city, died on New Year's eve of 1905. 
Mr. Smith of this review had given her thirty acres of land, all in 
Oakland, for a Christmas present, and she converted this into the 
Mary R. Smith Trust and built several homes for friendless girls — 
nine cottages in all. This trust is governed by a board of trustees 
of women of the First Congregational church and the cottages were 
begun in 1901, one cottage having been built since the death of Mrs. 
Smith, who was the first wife of Francis M. Smith. His second 
wife has continued the activities along these lines and is now presi- 
dent of the cottage work, the board holding very closely to the plans 
of the founder. Any girl that is in need of a home and worthy 
of aid is admitted to the cottages and she is always allowed to stay 
as long as necessary. There are from five to eight in a cottage and 
the ages are from four to twenty-five years. There has only been 
one death on Cottage Hill since the work was undertaken and there 
have been five marriages there. All of the girls attend the public 
schools, several have been high-school graduates and one has been 
graduated from the university. Another has been a student in the 
San Francisco Art Institute and several attend the Normal School. 
The number includes nurses, stenographers and teachers. They 



364 illSTOkV OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

make most of their own clothes and help with the housework and 
have a real home life, under the direction of a matron in each cot- 
tai^e. The cottages were named for children whom Mrs. Smith 
had adopted and cared for. This is but one of the many charities 
undertaken by Mr. Smith's first wife. His second wife is likewise 
active in philanthropic work and all has the indorsement and 
cooperation of Mr. Smith. 



HOBSON & PAVERT. 



The enterprising and progressive city of Oakland finds active and 
energetic representatives of its business interests in the gentlemen who 
compose the firm of Hobson & Pavert, contractors and builders. 
They have made their business a prominent factor in commercial 
growth and development and, constantly adhering to progressive 
methods, to high standards of integrity and to a policy of constructive 
expansion and progress, have aided in the physical growth of the 
city and in the spread of that general commercial activity which 
means advancement. 

R. I. Pavert has been a resident of California since 1889. He was 
for six years with the large contracting firm of Clauson & Keating, 
of San Francisco, and he remained in that city until the spring of 
1906, when he came to Oakland and started his building operations 
in Fruitvale in a very small way, his limited finances not allowing 
him to extend the field of his activities to any great degree. At first 
he built and sold small cottages, realizing from each a considerable 
profit, and, thus gaining a little capital, he moved into the heart of the 
city and purchased at the corner of Eleventh and Madison streets a lot 
costing seventy-five luindrcd dollars. Upon this he erected three 
apartment buildings which he sold tor sixty-eight thousand dollars 
and then purchased a lot on the corner of Eleventh and Brush streets, 
lie here repeated his original transaction, building three apartment 
houses and disposing of them for sixty-one thousand dollars. This 
deal completed he bought a lot seventy-five by one hundred feet on 
Twelfth street, near xMadison, selling afterward half of this propertv 
for eighteen thousand five hundred dollars and building on the other 
half a fine business block which when completed brought twentv- 
eight thousand Wxc hundred dollars on the market. Continuing 
his operations along this line, Mr. Pavert bought on the southwest 
corner of Twelfth and lackson streets a seventv-fivc bv one iiundred 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 365 

toot lot, and the business block which he built upon this property 
sold for eighty-tive thousand dollars. This brought a high price, 
owing to some very unique features, the lower floor having been made 
into four stores, each a corner store and each with two street front- 
ages. Mr. Pavert's next purchase was a lot on the corner of Thir- 
teenth and Harrison streets fifty by one hundred feet in dimensions, 
and this he afterward sold for sixty-five thousand dollars and bought 
almost immediately afterward a lot one hundred by one hundred 
feet in extent on the corner of Fifteenth and Jefiferson streets. This 
is the site of the Savoy hotel, a fine modern, six-story structure, which 
is today worthy of rank with the best hostelries on the coast, and 
which was begun by Mr. Pavert and completed after he had associ- 
ated himself with Mr. Hobson. 

After work on the hotel and two adjoining business blocks was 
started on the 6th of May, 191 2, he formed a partnership with R. O. 
Hobson, a wealthy mining man and capitalist of Nevada, the business 
being reorganized under the name of Hobson & Pavert. Mr. Hob- 
son is a man of sound business judgment and his acumen and practical 
ideas have been of great aid to Mr. Pavert in the inauguration and 
completion of the important projects with which the firm was con- 
nected. The building of the Savoy hotel, completed by the firm of 
Hobson & Pavert, created a new business center in that section 
of Oakland, as is evidenced by the fact that the Pacific Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Los Angeles has loans of over a quarter of a 
million dollars for the erection of buildings in that part of the city 
in the near future. Soon after the partnership was formed Hobson 
& Pavert purchased the southwest corner of Sixteenth and Jefferson 
streets and a lot on the corner of Seventh, Broadway and Telegraph 
avenue, this being the most desirable ofiice-building location in 
Oakland. They intend to erect in the near future an eleven-storv 
mixlern structure upon this property and will also improve a fifty by 
one hundred foot lot on the north side of Fifteenth street and East 
Broadway, a property which they have recently purchased. 

The total valuation of the property held by the firm, including 
the Savoy hotel and the surrounding buildings which were built for 
investment and large tracts of downtown real estate, is valued at five 
hundred and thirty thousand dollars. Mr. Pavert has made a scien- 
tific study of land values and business locations, and the results of his 
thorough knowledge are seen in the success which has steadilv 
attended all his operations. Hobson & Pavert have accomplished 
a great deal of constructive work along business lines in Oakland and 
are rightly regarded as among the important forces in the growth 



366 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

of the city. They have demonstrated its advantages, have tested its 
possibilities and, with a belief in its future which has already to a 
large extent been justified, have stimulated the spirit of activity and 
progress which is the basis of municipal advancement. Both are 
able, discriminating, farsighted and progressive business men who 
are widely known and highly respected in the city where the name 
Hobson & Pavert stands for progress, for high standards of integrity, 
and for honorable business dealings. 



WELLS DRURY. 



Wells Drurv is unusually well qualified for his present position 
of secretary of the Chamber of Commerce of Berkeley, California, 
as he is intimately acquainted with the resources and possibilities 
of the Bay country. He has a still broader background for his work 
as he knows conditions throughout the state of California and even 
on the whole Pacific slope. The greater part of his life has been 
spent west of the Rockies, and he held editorial positions on many 
of the important papers in California, thus being brought into direct 
contact with present-day conditions in the state. He is making the 
Chamber of Commerce of Berkeley a potent force in the develop- 
ment of that beautiful university city and finds his knowledge of the 
country of value in his work. He is vice president of the Alameda 
County Exposition Commission and secretary of the Publicity Com- 
missioners of Alameda county, California. 

Mr. Drury was born in New Boston, Illinois, September i6, 1851, 
a son of Squire Thompson and Rebecca (Newton) Drury. His 
education was acquired in the high school of Olympia, Washington, 
and in Christian College located at Monmouth, OregcMi. In his 
youth he acted as interpreter for the superintendent of Indian affairs 
on Puget Sound, Washington, after the Medicine Creek treaty. He 
served an apprenticeship as compositor and pressman and worked 
at this trade in Seattle, Washington, and Portland, Oregon, from 
1 866 to 1870. After he had learned the mechanical part of the 
printing business he became editor of the Monmouth (Ore.) Mes- 
senger, holding that position from 1871 to 1873. I" 1873 he moved 
to San Francisco where he joined the staff of the Alta California. 
He was connected with a number of papers throughout the Pacific 
slope, being editor of the Carson City (Nev.) Dailv News from 
1876 to 1878 and of the Virginia City (Nev.) Daily Stage, 1879- 
1880. In 1 881 -I 882 Iie was city and managing editor of the Daily 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 367 

Territorial Enterprise of the last named city, and in 1888 we find him 
as city editor of the San Francisco Examiner. He founded the 
Daily Evening News of Sacramento, California, being also its editor, 
and so continued until 1893. In 1895-6 he was managing editor 
of the San Francisco Daily Call and from 1900 to 1901 he was man- 
aging editor of the Los Angeles Daily Record, after which he was 
in the period from 1902 to 1906 news editor of the Sacramento Union, 
becoming city editor of the San Francisco Daily Examiner in 1907. 
On the ist of August, 1908, he left the field of journalism to become 
secretary of the Berkeley Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Drury has written voluminously for newspapers and maga- 
zines aside from his work as an editor and is the author of "To Old 
Hangtown or Bust," published in 1912, and in conjunction with 
Aubrey Drury he compiled the "California Tourist Guide and 
Handbook," published in 1913. During his residence in Nevada 
he was deputy secretary of state from 1882 to 1886 and from 1887 
to 1889 a member of the Nevada house of representatives, of which 
he was speaker pro tem. He was for years a member of the First 
Regiment, National Guard, of Nevada, being a commissioned officer 
from 1877 to 1883, rising from second lieutenant to first lieutenant. 
He was captain and aid-de-camp of the First Brigade from 1883 
to 1887. Mr. Drury is a charter member and ex-president of the 
San Francisco Press Club and is an honorary member of the Typo- 
graphical Union, associations which keep him in touch with the 
field of newspaperdom. 



DR. JOHN A. LESOINE. 

Dr. John A. Lesoine, who in the practice of chiropody is ac- 
corded a liberal patronage, was born in New York state, October 3, 
1888, a son of John and Antoine L. Lesoine. He attended the pub- 
lic schools of Monroe county, Pennsylvania, to which place his par- 
ents had removed in 1893, when he was a lad of five years. He 
continued his studies to the age of fourteen and then worked as a 
clerk in a grocery store for six months. He was next employed in 
a wholesale grocery house as clerk for a year and a half, after which 
he went to Los Angeles and remained for four months, securing 
employment in a restaurant there. He next undertook the study of 
chiropody and was active in that line of work for one year. On 



:168 HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 

the expiration of that period he went to San Francisco and prac- 
ticed as a chiropodist for four months. He afterward returned to 
Monroe county, Pennsylvania, and remained with his parents for 
six months. Later he went to New York city and attended a chi- 
ropodist school for three months, when he again went to Los An- 
geles and was in the employ of a chiropodist of that city for three 
and one-half years. He then embarked in business on his own ac- 
count in Los Angeles, where he remained until July 21, 191 1, when 
he sold out and embarked in the wholesale fruit business, in which 
he continued for a year. Disposing of his interests in that line, he 
next went to San Francisco, where he practiced chiropody for five 
months, after which he came to Oakland, where he has since re- 
mained. He follows his profession and the excellence of his treat- 
ment is attested in the liberal patronage which is accorded him. 
He is very successful and his business is growing month by month. 
Dr. Lesoine belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the Wood- 
men of the World. He also belongs to the Sciots and to the Pedic 
Society of California. His political belief is that of the republican 
party, and his religious faith that of the Lutheran church. What- 
ever success he has achieved is the result of his own efforts and 
labors. Gradually he has advanced along lines which have brought 
him substantial results, and in all he has been actuated by a spirit 
that recognizes the fact that efficiency and capability are the only 
qualities which really entitle one to advancement. 



STUART S. HAWLEY. 

Stuart S. Hawley, a prominent business man of Oakland, engaged 
in the land development and general investment business, is a native 
of this city, born October 12, 1883. His father, George T. Hawley, 
was an early settler in California, having taken up his residence 
in this state in 1859. 

Stuart S. Hawley acquired his education in the public schools 
of Oakland and in the University of California, from which institu- 
tion he graduated with the class of 1905. 

Since that time he engaged for a time in banking and then in land 
development and general investment business, and is now the man- 
ager of the H. W. Meek Estate and the Hawley Investment Com- 
pany, with all their allied interests, covering lands and investments 
in Alameda, Los Angeles, San Diego, Tehama and Inyo counties. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 369 

He has had complete charge of the development of their different 
holdings, which have comprised over forty thousand acres, in addi- 
tion to their numerous other interests. 

Mr. Hawley married Miss Harriette E. Meek, and they have one 
son, Stuart M. Hawley. 

Mr. Hawley is a thirty-second degree Mason, a member of the 
Bohemian Club of San Francisco and the Commercial Club, Athen- 
ian Club, Claremont Country Club and Mystic Shrine of this city. 



M. J. KELLY. 



On the roster of county officials of Alameda county is numbered 
AL J. Kelly, serving with credit and ability as county treasurer. He 
is a native of West Virginia, born in Benwood, near Wheeling, April 
27, 1864, and came to California as a boy, beginning his independent 
career as a nailmaker's apprentice. He afterward followed this trade 
until 1894, when he was tendered a position in the United States 
mint in San Francisco. For thirteen years thereafter he remained 
connected with the mint, rising step by step through the various 
departments, being assistant smelter, dissolver, and weigher, in the 
assay department, and eventually humid assayer, in charge of the 
assaying of silver, a position which he held until the time of his 
appointment as Treasurer of Alameda county. During this time he 
had established an enviable record for honesty, reliability and effi- 
ciency and his resignation was received with regret when he tendered 
it to the mint officials in order to take up his broader work. In 
March, 1906, he was appointed by the board of supervisors to the 
office of treasurer of Alameda county to fill the unexpired term of 
A. W. Feidler, whose death occurred about that time. Mr. Kelly 
has since filled this office with his characteristic efficiency, and during 
the period of his administration he has inaugurated needed reforms 
which have corrected the loose methods prevailing in the past. The 
office is now conducted along the most approved and businesslike 
lines and courtesy has been made the first policy of the department. 
Mr. Kelly's popularity throughout Alameda county is unquestioned 
and the best evidence of this lies in the fact that he has been twice 
elected to his present position and at the last primary election he 
received the republican, democratic and union labor nominations for 
his present office. 



370 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

As a private citizen Mr. Kelly is noted for his kindly disposition 
and his desire to help whenever and wherever he can. A bachelor 
himself, with a strong friendship for boys, he has informally adopted 
a number of them and they have been largely those whom the great 
majority of people would not consider desirable. They have been 
young men that have lacked many of the advantages of birth, educa- 
tion and favorable environment; but the more they lacked, the more 
Mr. Kelly felt they needed a guiding hand. A man of broad charity, 
progressive views and high ideals, Mr. Kelly has made his influence 
felt as a constructive force in official and social circles of Oakland, 
where his many excellent personal characteristics have won him a 
wide circle of friends. 



ALBERT J. MAZURETTE. 

Albert J. Mazurette, a young and successful architect of Oak- 
land, who owes his present position entirely to his own efforts and 
ability, has here been engaged in business since 1910 and is president 
of the Melbourne Construction Company of Oakland and Alameda. 
His birth occurred in Detroit, Michigan, on the 17th of September, 
1888, his parents being O. A. and Bella (Robidoux) Mazurette, of 
Montreal. The mother passed away in 1895. Five years later the 
father came to California and in this state has since held positions 
in different sawmills. 

Albert J. Mazurette attended the public schools of Stockton and 
Oakland, California, until 1904 and then pursued a special course 
in drawing in the Polytechnic high school of Oakland, leaving that 
institution in 1905. His later valuable training was acquired in the 
"university of hard knocks." He first secured a position in a planing 
mill in Santa Clara, California, and there learned every branch of 
the business. In 1905 he left the mill and went to Stockton, entering 
the employ of the Enterprise planing mill as designer under R. P. 
Morrell, who is one of the foremost architects of Stockton and to 
whom he is indebted for the major part of his present knowledge of 
the profession. In February, 1906, Mr. Mazurette returned to Oak- 
land and was here employed by the Pacific Coast Lumber & Mill 
Company until 1907, while subsequently he was in the service of 
Karl H. Nickel, the "bungalow king," until 1910. In that year he em- 
barked in business as an architect on his own account and has since 
maintained oflices in the Baeon building in Oakland. In January, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 373 

1914, he organized the Melbourne Construction Company, of which 
he is president. This company has offices in both Oalcland and Ala- 
meda and specializes in heavy construction of all kinds, bridges, 
warehouses, factories, pumping plants, schools, amusement parks, 
wharves and docks all falling within the scope of their activities. 
They have the contract for and are building the Alameda-Venice 
swimming baths and amusement park, located on the shore of the 
bay at Almeda. The work involves an expenditure of three hun- 
dred thousand dollars and is the largest place of its kind west of the 
Rockies. The fact that the Melbourne Construction Company has 
been awarded the contract for this work is in itself proof of the 
splendid reputation which the company has already gained. The 
work is progressing splendidly under the direction of its able presi- 
dent and its completion will add greatly to the prestige of the com- 
pany. 

In fraternal and social circles Mr. Mazurette is popular. He 
belongs to Alameda Lodge, No. 1015, B. P. O. E., the Gamma 
Chapter of Sigma Omega Psi (an engineering fraternity), the 
Alpha Chapter of Delta Kappa Sigma and the Knickerbocker Club 
of San Francisco. 



BENJAMIN F. BERGEN. 

A man who achieved distinction as an official of the United 
States government and who later sustained a high reputation as a 
member of the bar of the Bay cities was Benjamin F. Bergen. 
A native of Schuyler county, Illinois, born in 1838, Mr. Bergen was 
the descendent of the early New Jersey Bergens, the first of whom 
came to America with Henrik Hudson in 162 1. The head of this 
family married the first white woman to be born in the province 
of New Netherlands. The great-grandfather of our subject was a 
soldier in the Revolution and his grandfather an officer in the War 
of 1812. His father, George S. Bergen, conducted a large stock 
farm in Schuyler county. He was a native of New Jersey, from 
which state he removed to Kentucky in 181 8, the same year that 
Illinois was admitted to the Union. Four years later he went to the 
liiucr state and entered Shurtleff College, which had just been 
founded. On completing his course of study there he settled at Jer- 
sey Prairie, near Jacksonville. At this time Illinois saw a large 



374 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

influx of people from the northern Confederate states, who settled in 
the country between the Wabash and St. Louis rivers, especially, 
in Vermilion, Edgar, Champaign, Sangamon and Morgan coun- 
ties. The mixture of these old families with those of the pioneers 
produced a race of people from which sprang many of the country's 
greatest men. 

Benjamin F. Bergen received his early education in the common 
schools near his home and at an early age decided to become a 
lawyer, lliis meant in those days long and steady application to his 
studies in a law office, but he persevered and was finally admitted 
to the bar. Although he was of an exceedingly studious turn of 
mind, bent on further perfecting himself in his profession, he found 
time to participate in politics, being affiliated with the democratic 
party. He possessed an aptitude for organization and had few peers 
in the state. As long as he remained in Illinois — nearly twenty-five 
years — he was a delegate to nearly every state convention of his party 
and he numbered among his associates such men as Hon. Virgil 
Hickox, Hon. William M. Springer, Hon. James C. Allen, Hon. 
William A. Richardson, Hon. O. B. Ficklin, United States Senator 
John M. Palmer, Hon. William R. Morrison and others who have 
left their impress upon the pages of history. He was a member 
of the democratic state central committee from the state at large for 
many years; a member of the executive committee of that 
body; and also secretary of the state central committee during 
the Tilden campaign, spending several months at the headquarters 
in Chicago. He called to order the memorable convention in the 
Windy City at which Tilden was nominated for president. 

In 1885 Mr. Bergen was sent to California and went to Eureka, 
Humboldt county, as special agent of the United States land office 
to investigate irregularities in the acquirement of certain redwood 
timber holdings, being commissioned by President Cleveland. He 
prosecuted several cases successfully in the federal courts and became 
the bane of the "land-sharks" of those days. In the course of this 
work he reclaimed many hundreds of acres of valuable timber lands 
which had illegally been taken from the government. When Cleve- 
land was succeeded as president by Harrison he resigned and began 
the practice of law in San Francisco. When first he tendered his 
resignation it was not accepted, the reasons for which are later seen 
in letters from Washington. He made his home in Berkeley until 
1910, when he moved to Alameda. Until 1896 he maintained his law 
office in San Francisco, achieving much distinction and handling 
much important litigation. Then he removed his office to Oakland, 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 375 

that he might be nearer his family, and continued to practice until 
his death, which occurred on June 22, 191 2. 

During his residence in Alameda county he took an active intei- 
est in local affairs and in 1894 was a candidate for the superior bench. 
He served several terms as member of the board of education of 
Berkeley and in 1898 was appointed a director of the Deaf. Dumb 
and Blind Institute in the college city. 

Mr. Bergen was first married at the age of twenty-three to Eliza- 
beth Ann Clark, daughter of David C. and Martha Ann Clark of 
Santa Rosa. She died in 1900. In 1910 he wedded Mrs. Louise 
(Briggs) Bigler of Alameda. Four children were born of the first 
union: Anna, who married James U. Smith, of Berkeley; M. Emily; 
Benjamin C. ; and Ethel, the wife of Frank N. Lowell of Berkeley. 

Among the records of his career as a government official which 
were treasured by Mr. Bergen and which go far to show that he had 
been one of its valued agents is a letter received bv him from the 
commissioner of the land office, on receipt of Mr. Bergen's resigna- 
tion, which is reproduced herewith: 

Washington, D. C, May 9, 1889. 
B. F. Bergen, Eureka, California: 

Dear Sir: — Referring to your request to have your resignation 
as special agent accepted as soon as practicable, I have to say that I 
regret very much to learn of your purpose to leave the service, and 
hope you will reconsider the matter and find it agreeable to remain. 
Your thorough knowledge of the land laws and the duties of your 
office have enabled you to render service which has been of incal- 
culable benefit to the government; and I feel it my duty to do and say 
whatever I can to keep you in the service. You have proven vour- 
self to be an honest and efficient officer, and the government cannot 
well afford to lose your services. The able manner in which you 
conducted the trial in the California redwood case is especially 
deserving of the highest commendation and praise. I shall therefore 
decline to recommend the acceptance of your resignation, as long 
as I believe you can be induced to remain in office. 

Yours very truly, 

S. M. Stocksleger, 
Commissioner, G. L. O. 

The "California redwood case" to which the foregoing letter 
referred was the prosecution of the California Redwood Company, 
or "Scotch Svdicate," in which he was bitterlv opposed bv the best 



376 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

legal talent procurable. It involved the title to some sixty thousand 
acres of redwood timber land in Humboldt county, valued at twenty 
million dollars. The case was long contested, over four hundred 
witnesses being examined, but Mr. Bergen won it for the government. 
In further recognition of his valuable services and summarizing well 
his career, William F. Vilas, then secretary of the interior, when 
Mr. Bergen's resignation finally was accepted, wrote to him: "An 
honorable record is your just reward for public labor." 

As a lawyer in after vears, in private practice, Mr. Bergen main- 
tained his high reputation for ability, integrity and faithfulness to the 
interests of those who intrusted their attairs to him. In social life 
he was one of the most companionable of men, of genial disposition, 
and popular among the host of friends who were privileged to know 
him. 



JOHN C. STOUT. M. D. 

For sixteen vears Dr. Jolm C. Stout has been located in Oakland, 
California, and is numbered among the city's foremost physicians, 
specializing in nervous diseases. He was born in Greene county, 
Illinois, January 27, 1846, and is a son of J. M. Stout, M. D., who 
never was a permanent resident of California, but once made a visit 
to this state extending over six months. John C. Stout, the son, was 
educated in the public schools of Greene county, at Illinois College, 
at Jacksonville, Illinois, and at ShurtlefT College, at Upper Alton, 
Illinois. He had begun the study of medicine, but when the war 
broke out, although but sixteen years of age, he enlisted in the Nine- 
ty-first Illinois Volunteer Regiment and served over three years, 
being discharged on account of disability due to a severe wound in 
the hand. While in the service he distinguished himself by faith- 
fulness to duty and bravery before the enemv. 

Upon his return to his Illinois home Dr. Stout became an employe 
in his father's drug store, again taking up the study of medicine at the 
same time. He came to California in 1874 and for one year was 
connected with the wholesale drug house of Langley & Michael, 
of San Francisco. He then went to Gilroy, where he practiced for 
two years and then returned east as far as St. Louis, Missouri, where 
he took a medical course in the American Medical College, graduat- 
ing in 1878. He next was engaged in practice in Edwardsville, 
Illinois, remaining there three years, and in 1881 again came to Cali- 
fornia, locating in San Jose, where he was successful, enjoying a large 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 377 

and profitable practice until July i, 1895, when he went to Los 
Angeles. Two years he remained in that city, but on March i, 1898, 
came to Oakland, where he has been located ever since. It is now 
sixteen years since he began practice in Oakland, and he has made 
for himself a place among the foremost physicians of this city. He 
makes a specialty of nervous diseases and is very often called in con- 
sultation on account of his deep knowledge upon this particular sub- 
ject. Dr. Stout has always remained a student of human nature and 
human ailments, and as the years have passed has gathered a vast 
amount of experience which entitles him to the consideration which 
he enjoys among his colleagues in the profession. While yet a resi- 
dent of the east he served as the first vice president of the Illinois 
State Medical Society and also was president of the Madison County 
Medical Society. He served for two terms as president of the State 
Eclectic Medical Society of California and for one year held the 
same office in the Santa Clara County Medical Society. He is still a 
member of the California State Medical Society and the National 
Eclectic Medical Association. He is a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and is past medical director of the Department of 
California, also regimental surgeon of D. D. Porter Post. 

On October 31, 1876, at Upper Alton, Illinois, Dr. Stout mar- 
ried Miss Gertrude L. Smith, a native of that city, who died May 
I, 191 1, leaving three children: Pearl H.; Arthur G., of Ogden, 
Utah; and Olive G. Dr. Stout is a lover of nature and throughout 
life has been a student of botany, having a fine appreciation of the 
wonders of plant life. He also has interested himself in mineralogy, 
although he has not taken up that study so exhaustively as the first 
mentioned. 

Politically he is a republican, conversant with the principles of 
his party, ever eager to promote its success, but not an active poli- 
tician. He served as commander in chief of the Army and Navy 
Republican League of California, in the days of its greatest influence. 
He has been offered that office on various occasions since but has 
always steadfastly refused. For the past forty years he has been a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in 1894 was 
one of the organizers of Observatory Lodge, I. O. O. F., at San 
Jose. He is a past grand, for many years has served as high priest 
of Golden Rule Encampment, and was made district deputy grand 
patriarch in 191 3. He is also regimental major of the grand can- 
ton. He is surgeon and captain of the uniformed rank of the 
Knights of Pythias and also is a past chancellor in this organization, 
of which lie has been a member for many years. He is also a past 



378 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

master of the \^'()()dmen of the World and has been a member of the 
Baptist church since boyhood, being now connected with the Twenty- 
third Avenue church, at Oakland. Dr. Stout is a man of robust 
physique, his strength and reserve force being greater than that of 
many a younger man. He has a liberal mind and broad sympathies 
and is interested in all measures and movements which have the 
betterment of humanity for their purpose or which are intended 
to improve living conditions. In a quiet way he has contributed 
to the development of Oakland and has been a valued factor in the 
development of Alameda county. 



WALTER EMERSON DENNISON. 

During a residence of thirty-four years in California VValter 
Emerson Dennison has closely identified himself with many repre- 
sentative business interests in different sections of the state and his 
successful career has had an important effect upon the later advance- 
ment of the commonwealth. The projects with which his name has 
been associated have all been progressive and useful ones, varied in 
kind and in purpose but all alike in this, that their successful com- 
pletion has constituted an element in the general growth and develop- 
ment. As president and managing director of the Steiger Terra 
Cotta & Pottery Works he today holds an enviable position in busi- 
ness circles of San Francisco, where his name has come to be regarded 
as a synonym for business integrity and enterprise and for progressive 
citizenship. 

Mr. Dennison was born near Kankakee, Illinois, August 17, 1856, 
and is a son of Walter Horace and Nancy Jane (Ransom) Dennison, 
both natives of Indiana. The family is of old New England origin, 
the paternal grandfather, Timothy Dennison, having been born in 
Freeport, Maine, and having in 18 18 emigrated to Indiana, where 
he settled in Ripley county. Mr. Dennison's mother is a daughter 
of Stillman and Eleanor Cole (Parsons) Ransom, the former a native 
of Vermont and the latter of Maryland. 

In the acquirement of an education Walter E. Dennison attended 
public school in his native community and later entered the Ohio 
Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio, graduating from that insti- 
tution in 1877 after completing the full classical course. Almost 
immediately afterward he turned his attention to teaching in the 
high school of Upper Sandusky. Ohio, and after one year was made 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 379 

superintendent of schools in that city. He resigned this office at the 
end of twelve months in order to enter the Cincinnati Law School, 
but he did not pursue the study of this profession, abandoning it in 
1880, when he came to California, settling in Los Angeles, where he 
opened an agency for the Continental Oil & Transportation Com- 
pany. After one year he was transferred to Stockton and in recogni- 
tion of his former able and competent work was given charge of the 
Stockton and Sacramento agencies, winning advancement in 1882 to 
the position of general superintendent of all agencies, with head- 
quarters at San Francisco. Being a man of initiative, enterprise and 
constructive ability, he proved eminently well qualified for this diffi- 
cult and responsible position which he held until 1884, when he 
resigned, accepting the appointment of guardian of the Yosemite 
valley for the state of California. This position he resigned in 1887 
to take charge of the Southern California agency for the Electric 
Development Company at Los Angeles, but in 1888 he severed this 
connection, turning his attention to mining, in which he engaged 
successfully until 1891. In that year he came again to San Fran- 
cisco and aided in the organization of the City Street Improvement 
Company, occupying the position of secretary until 1902, when he 
resigned this office, but remained as a director of the concern until 
the fall of 1912. While actively connected with the management 
of the City Street Improvement Company he took personal charge 
of the construction of the Humboldt Bay Jetty system, for which the 
national government appropriated one million, seven hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars. This work covered the period between 1894 
and 1899 ^"d was very successful both from a financial and an en- 
gineering standpoint. In 1898 the Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery 
Works were founded in San Francisco, and Mr. Dennison was made 
president and managing director. These positions he is now capably 
filling, evidencing in his discharge of the innumerable duties which 
fall to his lot as president of a great corporation an initiative spirit, 
a reorganizing power and a well-timed aggressiveness which have 
enabled him to make the business expand and grow until it is today 
one of the largest and best managed of its kind in the city. 

Mr. Dennison married Miss Isabella Ba.xter Richardson, a daugh- 
ter of Israel J. and Estelle T. (Pettibone) Richardson, natives of 
Delaware, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Dennison have become the parents 
of four children: Isabel, aged thirty-one; Leonidas, twenty-nine; 
Margaret, twenty-one; and Walter Emerson, Jr., eighteen. 

Mr. Dennison is well and prominently known in club circles of 
San Francisco, holding membership in the Pacific l^nion, tlic 



380 HISTORY OF .\LAMEDA COUNTY 

Bohemian and the Commercial clubs, in Beta Theta Pi and in the 
Sons of the American Revolution. He is in addition a member ot 
the Merchants Exchange Club and the Commonwealth Club, and in 
the spring of 1907 was appointed a member of the board of state 
harbor commissioners, winning his reapointment in 1909. Along 
lines of his business he is second vice president of the National Terra 
Cotta Society. No progressive public movement, no project insti- 
tuted for the benefit or welfare of the city lacks his cooperation and 
hearty support, his influence being always on the side of right, reform 
and progress. He uses the wealth which he has acquired by his 
own efforts in a capable and consicentious manner, not only support- 
ing public institutions, but also giving a great deal to private charity, 
his hand being- always outstetched to help the needy and affiicted. 
His friends in San Francisco are numerous and come from all ranks 
of life, the poor and lowly, who know his charity, esteeming him 
even more highly than his business associates, who respect his integ- 
rity and honor. 



CARL H. ABBOTT. 



Carl H. Abbott, one of the leading attorneys in Alameda county, 
prominently connected with important legal interests as a member 
of the firm of Fitzgerald, Abbott & Beardsley, was born in Boston, 
Massachusetts, August 4, 1867, a son of Granville Sharp and Susan 
(Davis) Abbott. The familv moved to California in 1877 and set- 
tled in Oakland, where Carl H. Abbott attended school, graduating 
from Oakland high school. He later enrolled in Brown University, 
Providence, Rhode Island, and received his degree of B. A. from that 
institution in 1888. Following this he became a student in the Hast- 
ings College of the Law, from which he was graduated in 1891, with 
the degree of LL. B. In the same year he was admitted to the bar 
of California and began the practice of his profession in Oakland. 
Four years later he entered into partnership with R. M. Fitzgerald 
under the name of Fitzgerald & Abbott and later moved to San 
Francisco, becoming a partner in the firm of Campbell, Fitzgerald, 
Abbott & Fowler. This association was dissolved in October, 1905, 
and Mr. Fitzgerald again became a partner of Mr. Abbott, the 
second firm of Fitzgerald & Abbott being organized in October, 
1901;. They practiced in San Francisco until April, 1906, and then 
moved their business to Oakland, where in 191 3 they admitted 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 381 

Charles A. Beardsley into partnership, the firm being now Fitz- 
gerald, Abbott & Beardsley. It is considered one of the strong and 
important law firms of the city, connected through an extensive and 
representative patronage with a great deal of important litigation. 
Mr. Abbott is a powerful and able lawyer, and his professional 
attainments put him in the front ranks of the legal fraternity in this 
part of the state. He is a member of the Athenian Club of Oakland 
and gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. 



HORACE AUSTIN JOHNSON. 

Horace Austin Johnson, active in the insurance and real-estate 
field in Berkeley, is thoroughly conversant with the different phases 
of a business that is bringing him prominently before the public as a 
successful, enterprising and progressive man. He was born in Fari- 
bault county, Minnesota, in 1870, a son of Rufus and Coralinn (Wil- 
liams) Johnson, both of whom were natives of the state of New 
York, the latter being a direct descendant of Roger Williams, that 
great apostle of freedom who, that people might have the liberty of 
worshipping God according to the dictates of their conscience, 
founded in 1636, a few miles from the Massachusetts line, the town of 
Providence. "Religious freedom" were the words on the tongue of 
every man and woman of that day. It was a desire for that which 
had brought them to this new land and constituted the guiding star 
of their lives. Roger Williams' idea of freedom, which in that 
day was without parallel, was tiie positive separation of the state 
and church, a principle that is today regarded as the cornerstone 
in the foundation of our mighty republic. In recognition of the 
distinctly individual and advanced belief of Roger Williams and 
his success in establishing a colony where his theory might be put 
into practice he is accorded a position among the most prominent 
of those who have shaped the history of the nation. 

Following the marriage of Rufus Johnson and Coralinn Wil- 
liams, which was celebrated in New York, they removed westward 
in 1857 to Minnesota, where they resided until 1871. In that vear 
they crossed the plains to California and settled in Santa Clara 
county, where Mr. Johnson engaged in farming. There the family 
lived for many years. In the later years of his life Mr. Johnson 
retired and in March, 1896, wishing to be with his children, who 
were still in the east, he returned to Minnesota, where in the fol- 



;}82 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

lowing summer he passed away. Mrs. Johnson now resides with 
one of her daughters in Alberta, Canada. 

Horace Austin Johnson began his education in the public 
schools of Santa Clara county, California, but received most of his 
educational training in Minnesota, his college work being done at 
Wheaton, Illinois, where he was graduated in 1899, with the degree 
of B. L. In the year 1899-1900 he took post-graduate work in 
science at the University of California. It was his purpose to engage 
in teaching school, but, abandoning that plan, he turned to other 
activities. Upon completing his studies he entered the real-estate 
field and, finding it most congenial, he has continued active in this 
line to the present time, confining his operations largely to handling 
Berkeley property. He also engages in the fire insurance business, 
representing the Springfield Fire & Marine Company of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, the Commercial Union of London and the Maryland 
Casualty Company. 

Society or club life has never found in Mr. Johnson a follower, 
but uppermost in his heart at all times is the cause of prohibition. 
From the period when he took up his residence in Berkeley he has 
been active in the behalf of that movement endeavoring in every 
possible way to promote and establish prohibition in his city and 
county. He is treasurer of the northern California executive com- 
mittee of the prohibition party and in 1908 was a candidate for presi- 
dential elector on that ticket. He has in many campaigns taken the 
platform and never hesitates to lend every possible assistance in the 
war that is constantly being waged against the liquor traffic. At one 
time he was president ofthe Anti-Saloon League of Berkeley and was 
one of the committee of si.x chosen by the reform element to supervise 
the enforcement of the law when the new plan of city government 
was inaugurated. Mr. lohnsoii is a trustee and is secretary of the 
Baptist Seminary of Berkeley, which is conducted under the auspices 
of the Baptist Theological Union. He has been a member of the 
First Baptist church of Berkeley since its organization and is one of 
its trustees. 

In 1904, at Wheaton, Illinois, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Johnson and Miss Helen Kennedy, a daughter of Thomas E. Ken- 
nedy, who was for many years connected with the departments of 
education of San Jose and San Francisco, having been interested in 
those matters until his death, which occurred in 1892. Mrs. Johnson 
is a native daughter of California. By her marriage she has become 
the mother of two children, Olive Coralinn and Rufus William. 
Mrs. Johnson holds membership in the same church as her husband 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 383 

and is active therein. In fact, their influence is always on the side 
of right, progress, truth and reform. They have never been content 
to choose the second best in anything, but have held to the highest 
ideals and the loftiest principles in personal conduct, in business and 
in citizenship. 



THOiMAS DYKES BEASLEY. 

Thomas Dykes Beasley was born at Woodbury, Cambridgeshire, 
England, June 23, 1850, and was educated at the Grantham grammar 
school, in Lincolnshire. In 1868, with two sisters, he came to Cali- 
fornia, crossing the Isthmus of Panama shortly after the completion 
of the railroad, and arriving in San Francisco just in time to be 
impressed by the big earthquake whih occurred in the spring of that 
year, but which he, viewing it as "the custom of the country," 
accepted as a matter of course. 

His first experiences were on a sheep ranch at Jolon, Monterey 
county, owned by his father, to join whom, he and his sisters had left 
the old country. His father being anxious to make a lawyer of him, 
at the end of a year, he came to San Francisco and studied faithfully 
in a lawyer's office, doing office drudgery the while, for two years, 
when arriving at the conclusion that the law was the profession for 
which he was the least suited, he abandoned Blackstone and Kent. 
After various experiences which included acting as tutor to the three 
sons of Mr. Edward Taylor of San Mateo, for many years and at the 
time of his death cashier of the Pacific Mail Company, he took up a 
timber claim in the heart of the Santa Cruz mountains, situated on 
the divide between Bear creek and the San Lorenzo river, becom- 
ing at the same time a citizen of the United States. 

Here he lived the life of a backwoodsman for seven or eight 
years, in a climate unsurpassed the world over for invigorating quali- 
ties, with the result that a somewhat weak constitution and slender 
physique, were toughened and rendered fit to cope with life's strug- 
gles. By the advice of friends he was induced to take a step, since 
much regretted, of abandoning a life which, but for occasional loneli- 
ness, lie much enjoyed and, returning to San Francisco, became in 
1 88 1 a draughtsman in the office of the United States surveyor 
general. The coming into power of the democrats under Cleveland 
led to the speedy decapitation of himself with many others in the 
office. After an interval of a few weeks spent in roaming the coun- 



384 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

try aloot he was employed by the Coronado Beach Company, among 
otlier things making the plat ot the town of Coronado. This work 
led to making the official map of San Diego county, followed by that 
of San Bernardino county. 

Becoming interested in literary work, in partnership with F. £. 
A. Kimball he founded in San Diego, and for four years edited a 
weekly illustrated journal. The Seaport News. The town, however, 
at this time, just after the collapse of the "boom," was little short of 
moribund. Greatly to his disappointment he was forced to abandon 
the enterprise and accepted the editorship of a new evening daily, 
The Tribune, still in existence. Being unable to accept corporation 
dictatorship, after a six months' experience, he resigned the editor- 
ship and though it was twice otTered him at intervals of time with 
the positive assurance he would be given a free hand, he abandoned 
journalism for good having found by bitter experience the tempta- 
tions that beset a man who tries to do his duty by the people, his con- 
science and his employers. 

Having by these ventures lost all the money he had accumulated 
by many years' hard work, he once more became a wanderer, spend- 
ing a year in the Hawaiian islands just after annexation. While 
there he made what is now the official map of the island of Oahu. 
Finding that the languid climate was sapping his strength, he aban- 
doned excellent opportunities and returned to California, vowing 
mentally he never again would forsake "God's country." 

Gradually he became absorbed in the drama, having written 
while in San Diego, in collaboration with a friend, a little Chinese 
tragedy, "The Golden Flower," afterwards successfully produced in 
Albany, New York, Miss Miriam Nesbit playing the heroine. 
Some years ago it was produced by the Centurv Club of San Fran- 
cisco to a fashionable audience of ladies only, all the parts being 
played by members of the club. It has also been produced by the 
Larchmont Club, New York. 

About this time, he wrote the libretto of a musical comedy, "The 
Ahkoond of Swat," for Gerard Barton, a well known composer, at 
that time organist of St. Stephen's Church, San Francisco, and later 
an organist of the Episcopal Cathedral, Honolulu, and professor 
of music at the Oahu College. This musical comedy under Mr. 
Barton's direction was produced in Honolulu with great success, the 
parts being taken by the leading society people of that city. 

The premature death of Gerard Barton — a cousin by the wav, 
of Fitzgerald, who w rote the beautiful translation of the Rubaivat of 
Omar Khayyam — a year later at Toronto, Canada, was a great blow 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 385 

to Mr. Beasley; for apart for his friendship for a man beloved by all 
who knew him, Mr. Barton was, when carried oflf by a sudden attack 
of pneumonia, arranging for a professional production of "The 
Ahkoond of Swat" at Toronto. 

Mr. Beasley had by this time reentered the service of Uncle Sam 
in his former capacity as a draughtsman in the office of the United 
States surveyor general, where he is, in fact, today employed. Dur- 
ing the past ten years he has worked steadily during spare hours 
on literary subjects, having among other things written two librettos 
of comic operas, to one of which, the music has been recently writ- 
ten by a composer of great professional experience. An inherent 
love of nature and an out-door life led to tramping as his chief form 
of exercise, amusement and study of human nature. A little volume, 
"A Tramp Through the Bret Harte Country," recently published by 
Paul Elder & Company, San Francisco, which is meeting with favor 
both from the press and the public, was a natural outgrowth of his 
love for "hiking" and the "hard highway." 

Shortly after the big fire Mr. Beasley was married to Miss Mar- 
garet Isabella McKellar, who was born in New Zealand, but came> 
as a child, with her parents and brothers and sisters, to the United 
States. Mr. McKellar made his home in New Mexico, going into 
sheep-raising on a large scale. His surviving sons and daughters 
still reside in that state. Mr. Beasley's father died in England many 
years ago. His sisters are living in Berkeley, the elder, now the wife 
of Charles \V. Jackson, has a beautiful home at Claremont Court; 
with her, his younger sister, Mrs. Dora Amsden, well known as the 
author of two books on Japanese art, is now residing. His own 
home is in Alameda, where he had resided for years previous to his 
marriage. There are also two sisters in England whom he has not 
seen for nearly half a century, but the fates permitting, he still hopes 
to at least bid "hail and farewell." 



DR. MEADORA AUSTIN-DERR FRITZ. 

Dr. Meadora Austin-Derr Fritz, physician, lecturer, author and 
educator and well known throughout the United States for her suc- 
cess in the treatment of diseases peculiar to women, is a native of 
New York state and a daughter of Dr. Benjamin Austin, a prominent 
physician and surgeon of Rome, New York. In early life she was 
united in marriage to Dr. A. D. Fritz, of Michigan, and under the 



386 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

guidance of her husband studied medicine, afterward practicing with 
him for some years. During practically her entire life she has been 
associated with physicians and is herself a competent, able and 
successful practitioner, as her large and representative clientele 
plainly shows. Dr. Fritz engaged in professional work in Phila- 
delphia, Chicago and Boston with steadily increasing popularity and 
at the time she closed her office in the last named city she had seven 
hundred and eighty-three people under treatment. Her husband 
died in 1901 and four years later she left the east and came to Cali- 
fornia, settling in San Francisco, where for some time she was at the 
head of a large and lucrative practice. She has made her home in 
Oakland since May, 1913, and has already become well established 
in practice, her reputation as a skilled and successful physician hav- 
ing preceded her. Dr. Fritz has some original theories regarding 
the cause and treatment of disease — theories which have been splen- 
didly upheld by the remarkably successful results which have 
attended her labors. She uses no medicine, curing by purifying 
mind and body and treating the latter through the medium of the 
former. 

Dr. Fritz is spoken of as a "counsellor to women" and a large 
proportion of her patients are women. She is an authority on sex 
hygiene and has studied the subject of marital happiness in its rela- 
tion to this science. She believes in physical beauty, in body poise 
and, being a fluent and forceful speaker, promulgates her belief 
from the platform. She has a large and enthusiastic following in 
California and her recent lectures in the Scottish Rite Temple in San 
Francisco were attended by over three thousand women. Dr. Fritz 
is a well known lecturer and her talks on Sex, its Functions and its 
Bearing upon Health, Happiness and Longevity, have added greatly 
to her reputation as a speaker and a thinker. In addition to this she is 
an author of great power and insight and has published many books 
of vital interest and significance. Among them may be mentioned 
"Do Men Understand Women?" "All Motherhood Divine," "Self- 
hood vs. Success," "Strength in Silence," "Girlhood Ignorance," 
"The Pirates Who Prey," "The Human Race," "Degenerates, and 
Why," "Basic Principle of Life," "The Science of Sex," "Self-re- 
liance," "Hope Without Fear," "Mind and Body Poise." "Mind 
Serene," "Troublesome Nerves are Monitors," "Obesity, its Develop- 
ment" and "A New Interpretation of the Birth of Christ and its Mes- 
sage." 

Dr. Fritz is also a composer of merit and ability and has written 
a number of popular songs, including the campaign song. "Sixteen 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 387 

to One," endorsed by the National Democratic Association and used 
during William Jennings Bryan's first race for the presidency. 
Among the sentimental songs she has written are some that have 
become very popular, her latest being "No Sweeter Then, Than 
Now," which is classed by leading authority as being equal, if not 
superior, to "Silver Threads Among the Gold," and the orchestra- 
tion of which is most beautiful. 

However, the Doctor gives most of her time to her professional 
work and to her lectures, these and her large practice leaving her 
little leisure for outside interests. However, she is vitally interested 
in woman's sovereignty and she has confidence in her own sex in 
their ability, integrity and in that greatest of all understanding — 
mother consciousness. She is also interested in economics and has 
spoken most forcefully on this subject. Her address upon "National 
Referendum" has startled the thinking world, and she is an ardent 
advocate of municipal and governmental ownership. Her religious 
belief is clearly outlined in the following: "Do not bow thy head. 
Stand upright in thy glory. Beest thou what thou wilt be. Glorv in 
thy strength. Bow thy head to no man less. divine than spirit and 
goest thou outward into the all divine." Her religion is also ex- 
pressed in the following beautiful lines: "Love is the king of the 
ages; patience is the throne; fidelity and sympathy united make us 
one. Through love we help each other in life's near race to win; 
there is no blood to separate, for we are all one kin." To know Dr. 
Fritz is to love her; to call her friend is to be enriched. 



CHARLES HADLEN. 



Charles Hadlen is numbered among the pioneers of West Berke- 
ley, where since very early times his activities have been a force in 
progress and his citizenship a valuable municipal asset. He first 
came to the city in 1868 and since 1875 has been identified with busi- 
ness interests. He is now proprietor of one of the largest grocery, 
hay and grain establishments in the city and controls an important 
and representative patronage. 

Mr. Hadlen was born in Hanover, Germany, and came to the 
United States a poor boy when he was nineteen years of age, making 
the journey by way of the Panama route. • He settled in San Fran- 
cisco in 1866, and at the end of two years moved to West Berkeley, 
finding employment in the old starch works. From 187:5 until 1875 



388 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

he mined in Alaska and Montana, but in the latter year returned to 
West Berkeley, where he engaged in the express business, conducting 
an express route between Oakland and Berkeley before the days of 
railroads. Afterward he worked in a planing mill and later became 
identified with the grocery firm of D. H. Burns & Company, under 
whom he learned the grocery business. In 1896 he opened an estab- 
lishment of his own at No. 945 University avenue, and he has since 
conducted this enterprise, dealing in groceries, hay and grain. He 
follows always the most practical and progressive business methods 
and in the conduct of his interests has met with constantly increasing 
success, being numbered today among the leading merchants of the 
community. 

Mr. Hadlen is married and has seven children, Annie, Charles, 
Julia, Herman, Fred, Mabel and Edward. He has served one term 
as township trustee of Berkeley. Since pioneer times he has taken 
an active interest in public afTairs and has made many valuable con- 
tributions to community development and growth. He built his first 
home in West Berkeley, in 1879, at a time when few streets had been 
laid out in the section, and he has watched the communitv develop 
along all lines, his interests touching closely social, political and busi- 
ness growth. A wide reader, especially of such volumes as deal with 
the history of the Bay cities, he has kept himself well informed 
regarding conditions on the Berkeley side of the bay and is consid- 
ered an authority on everything pertaining to the early settlement 
and later development of this section. He deserves great credit for 
what he has accomplished, for he started out in business life a poor 
boy and by his energy, enterprise and ambition has steadilv worked 
his way upward to success. 



E. F. GARRISON. 



One of the most progressive and capable men in public life in 
Alameda county is E. F. Garrison, who, in 1910, was elected to 
the office of county auditor. He was born September 7, 1873, in 
Sacramento, where his family had settled two years previously. 
The father was connected with the Southern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany as engineer for over thirty-two years. His death occurred in 
Oakland in 1904. 

The Garrison family moved to Oakland when E. F. Garrison 
was a child of five, and he has since remained a resident of this 




E. F. GARRISON 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 391 

city. After completing a public-school course he finished his educa- 
tion in St. Mary's College and then secured a position with the Cali- 
fornia Door Company. He began in a humble capacity, but being 
ambitious and attentive to his work, he soon mastered the details of 
the business and rose, step by step, through its various departments, 
becoming first timekeeper and finally estimator. 

Mr. Garrison began his public career in November, 1900, when 
he was appointed deputy city assessor and auditor under A. H. Breed. 
In this position he did efficient work for ten years and at the end of 
that time was elected to his present office. Since his installation as 
county auditor he has thoroughly systematized the work of his de- 
partment and the results are seen in the promptness and dispatch with 
which information may be had on all matters coming under Mr. Gar- 
rison's official jurisdiction. He has a selected staff of assistants whose 
past business experience has especially fitted them for their present' 
duties, and he is already in a fair way to realize his ambition of mak- 
ing his office one of the best conducted in the state. Something like 
sixty thousand warrants for salaries and other expenditures go 
through Mr. Garrison's hands during a year and no funds are paid 
out without his signature. The great responsibilities of his position 
are most apparent and Mr. Garrison is keenly alive to the importance 
of his work, always scrutinizing all of these warrants for the expendi- 
ture of public funds before affixing his name. One of the notable and 
commendable features of his incumbency is his adoption of a new 
svstem of accounts in the office of auditor of Alameda county, making 
it dovetail with the state accounts in accord with the requirements of 
state laws. It is hugely due to his efforts that the system is such a 
success and of this he is justly proud. Alameda county is the only 
one of the fifty-eight in California that has such a thorough system of 
accounts. The auditor's department is able at all times to know the 
true condition of the funds of the county. A trial balance is taken 
off each month and a report of the exact condition of the county 
funds is made to the public through the press. Another point in Mr. 
Garrison's service that is equally commendable is that he has always 
notified the taxpayers when there has been a refund due them on the 
tax on personal property unsecured by real estate, and he has likewise 
notified them when their property has become delinquent, thus doing 
work never before done by any auditor of Alameda county. He has 
discharged all of his duties in a thorough and businesslike manner, 
and it is to be hoped that further political honors will be accorded one 
so worthy. 



392 HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Garrison is prominent in fraternal circles, his connections 
being extensive and important. He is a member of Oakland Tent, 
No. 17, K. O. T. M., and is also state auditor of the Pacific jurisdic- 
tion of the same order. He belongs to Oakland Lodge, No. 171, 
B. P. O. E., and is chairman of its finance committee. He likewise 
belongs to Athens Parlor, No. 195, N. S. G. W., has been financial 
secretary of the Native Sons for the past twelve years, and was chair- 
man of the state board of relief and treasurer of the Native Sons Hall 
Association of Oakland. In addition to this he belongs to the Young 
Men's Christian Association and the U. P. E. C. and is financial 
secretary (jf Live Oak Council, No. 1 102, National Union. He is 
likewise junior past president of the Audit Association of California. 
It has been said of him: "He is a man of fine personal appearance, 
but, more than that, of fine character." He is alert and enterprising 
and ready to meet any emergency that may arise with the conscious- 
ness that comes from the right conception of things and a just regard 
for what is best in the exercise of human activities. 



KATHERINE McCLURG, M. D. 

Those who doubt the capacity of women for success in the profes- 
sions will hnd ample refutation of their opinion in the successful 
career of Dr. Katherine McClurg, who is today one of the leading 
phvsicians in Oakland. She was born in Ohio and spent her child- 
hood in her native state, coming to California with her parents in 
i<S93. Here she took up the training course for nurses in order to 
familiarize herself to some extent with the medical science, whicii 
had always attracted her. She never practiced as a nurse, however, 
but after completing tiie required course entered Cooper Medical 
College in San Francisco, from which she was graduated in 1903. 
She afterward practiced for a short time but, not considering her 
medical education complete, went to Baltimore, Maryland, where 
she took a post-graduate course at Johns Hopkins University, com- 
pleting it in 1910. 

In that year, splendidly equipped for the practice of her pro- 
fession, she returned to California and opened an office in Oakland, 
where she has since remained. She possesses a deep and compre- 
hensive knowledge of uiKicrhiiig medical principles and is con- 
scientious and practical in her application of it, having a svmpathv 
with lunnan suffering and a sense of personal responsibility which 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 393 

make her unusually able in her chosen field. Always a close and 
earnest student of her profession, Dr. McClurg keeps in touch with 
the most advanced practical thought through her membership in the 
American Medical Association and the state and county medical 
societies, and her ability is widely recognized in professional circles. 
She has secured a large and representative patronage, and her skill 
and ability are evervwhere evident in the excellent results which have 
followed her labors. 



TOM CARPENTER, V. S. 

A man who has made a comprehensive knowledge of the science 
of veterinary surgery and a phenomenal success in the practice of this 
profession the basis of a work of public service broad in extent and 
far-reaching in purpose is Dr. Tom Carpenter, who for more than 
nineteen years has been practicing in Alameda, his reputation spread- 
ing to all parts of California and his patronage extending through- 
out all the neighboring sections of the state. Aside from his great 
professional success he is known also as one of the organizers of the 
Oakland Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to iVnimals and the 
leading spirit in carrying forward its work, this forming one of his 
chief interests at the present time. 

Dr. Carpenter was born in Dartmouth, England, June 19, 1862, 
and is a son of William Henry and Harriet (Edwards) Carpenter, 
;i(nv deceased, who were former residents of San Francisco, where 
they settled in 1869. Their son was at that time seven years of age, and 
he soon afterward entered the public schools of the city, where he 
acquired his primary and grammar education. Later he received 
instruction in Latin ami French from a private tutor, interrupting 
his studies in 1H79 in order to accompany his parents to Europe. 
He returned to San Francisco in 1881 and resumed his education, 
laving aside his books finally in 1883. In that year he went to the 
northwest, visiting Puget sound and the Eraser river country and 
locating a pre-emption claim in Whatcom county, Washington. Re- 
turning home in the same year, he took charge of his father's veter- 
inary infirmary as superintendent and thus first became a student 
of veterinary science, a profession in which he has since achieved 
such remarkable and well-deserved success. As he grew more inter- 
ested in it, he broadened his studies and, in order to get the advantage 
of the best facilities offered along this line, went in r88q to Toronto, 



304 HISTORY ()!• .\I-.\mp:da county 

Ontario, and entered the Ontario Veterinary College, an institution 
established in 1862. During his vacations he practiced under the 
direct supervision of a practical veterinarian at Dayton, Ohio, and 
in college besides completing the regular general course, took a spe- 
cial course in veterinary dentistry, becoming in this way a master of 
all the branches of the profession which he intended to make his own. 
On the 30th of March, 1888, he received his diploma from the Onta- 
rio \'eterinarv College and the great honor of a certificate of Hon- 
orary Fellowship from the Ontario Veterinary Medical Society in 
acknowledgment of valuable contributions in the line of essays on 
disease. 

Being thus thoroughly equipped for the practice of his profes- 
sion, and having already proved himself possessed of more than ordi- 
nary ability along his chosen line. Dr. Carpenter returned to the 
coast and, settling near Oakland, established a veterinary inlirmary. 
l^his institution he conducted along with his general practice for two 
years, but his patronage grew so rapidly and finally reached such 
extensive proportions that he could not properly superintend the 
infirmary and was obliged to discontinue it. He has since that time 
devoted himself to the general practice of his profession, making his 
lionic in Alameda, although his practice is drawn not onlv from this 
city, but from San Francisco and Oakland also, and his services are 
in frequent requisition through the interior of the state from Shasta 
to San Diego. Upon an exhaustive and exact knowledge of the 
underlying principles of veterinary science, upon his constant studv 
of the new ideas and methods always being introduced into practice, 
upon his superior attainments in all branches of his profession, Dr. 
Carpenter has based a signal success, and it places him todav among 
the men of marked ability and substantial worth in his community. 
He keeps in touch with the most advanced thought of his profes- 
sion, and his practice, though large, is constantly increasing. 

>>.'ot content with achieving an enviable degree of individual 
prosperity Dr. Carpenter has striven always to make his ability and 
knowledge effective along lines of public benefit, and this he has 
succeeded in doing in the ccnirse of his nineteen years of continuous 
and able service as city veterinarian and food inspector of Alamed.i 
He was the first veterinarian in California to use Koch's tuberculin 
when, in 1894, he experimented on the dairy cattle of Alameda, dem- 
onstrating its great value as a diagnostic agent in tuberculosis. This 
is only one of many great and varied services which Dr. Carpenter 
has performed for Alameda and for California. He gained special 
distinction during the (ire and e:irth(]uakc of 1906, and after the di> 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY :W5 

aster, when he had charge of the supply wagons of the Masonic state 
board of relief. When the Elks took up the relief work, he installed 
an outfit for the purpose of aiding those quartered at the Elks' relief 
camp and brought hundreds of the refugees to Alameda, where they 
were cared for at the Elks' camp in this city. Dr. Carpenter went 
east in 1907 for the purpose of studying the pure food question in all 
its relations and of mastering the requirements of the new pure food 
law. He talked with experts in New York and Washington and on 
his return supplied the merchants of San Francisco with advance 
information regarding the requirements, aims and purposes of the 
new enactment, doing a great deal to promote its intelligent accept- 
ance in this section of the state. Making another trip east in 191 2 he 
continued his work of investigation regarding food and dairy prod- 
ucts. He has used his professional ability and influence intelligently 
and with public spirit, recognizing the obligations which his powxr 
and position entail upon him. He is at present deeply and keenly 
interested in the work of the Alameda Humane Society, which he 
aided in organizing. He is executive officer for the Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, and in this capacity has con- 
ducted a vigorous campaign against cock fighting, dog fighting and 
live-turkey shooting, and he has accompli^'hed some lasting reforms 
along this line. 

In St. Paul's church. New York city, on the 21st of May, 1889, 
Dr. Carpenter was united in marriage to Miss Annie Elizabeth Hix 
of Devonshire, England. After the death of his first wife he wedded 
Miss Helen A. Martin of Healdsburg, California, a daughter of the 
late John A. Martin and a granddaughter of Clark Foss, one of the 
earliest settlers of Sonoma county. Fraternally Dr. Carpenter is 
identified with the Masonic Order, belonging to Oakland Lodge, No. 
188, A. F. & A. M., and Alameda Chapter, No. 70, R. A. M. He is 
affiliated also with Alameda Aerie, No. 1076, F. O. E. ; Alameda 
Council, No. 734, National Union, and Alameda Lodge, No. 1015, 
B. P. O. E. He takes intelligent and active interest in the growth 
and advancement of Alameda along all lines, and iiis hcartv support 
is always given to progressive public movements. In 1911-12 he pre- 
sided over the North Side Improvement Club, which at that time 
was dealing with the question of harbor improvements in Alameda, 
and he is today keenly interested in the promotion of the subwav 
between Oakland and Alameda, acting as chairman of the sub\\av 
committee of the North Side Improvement Club. A man of varied 
interests, all of which he has made forces in the promotion of the 
public tievelopment, progress and advancement, Dr. Carpenter has 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 



thoroughly identified himself with tiie affairs of the city where he 
has so long made his home, and in so doing has gained the greatest of 
all successes — that which lies in the widespread honor and esteem 
which his character has commanded and in the confidence and trust 
of many friends. 



JOHN FECHTER. 

Inhn Fechter, general secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association of Oakland, is doing splendid work in this connection, 
the various activities being well organized and the work systematic- 
ally conducted so that the best possible results are obtained. Mr. 
Fechter is a native of Alma, Kansas, born October 23, 1874, and is a 
son of John and Hannah Fechter. The father was a native of Baden, 
Germany, born in December. 1832. He was educated in that land 
and later engaged in the tailoring business. He was a youth of nine- 
teen when he crossed the Atlantic to New York city, w^iere he was 
employed at tailoring, but subsequently he attended the Rochester 
Baptist Theological Seminary. He afterward went to Kansas, where 
he cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers, traveling over the state as 
a minister of the Baptist church and preaching at various places 
He next went to Salem, Oregon, and later to Sacramento, California, 
where his remaining days were passed, his death occurring on the 
ist of March, 191 1. 

John Fechter is indebted to the public and high schools for the 
educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He pursued his studies 
in Pasadena, California, and in Salem, Oregon, until fifteen years of 
age when he made his start in the business world as an employe in a 
dry-goods store in Salem, Oregon, where he remained until 1895. 
During that time he became a charter member of the Salem Young 
Men's Christian Association, thus entering upon a connection which 
has led him to his present position. He afterward went to Sacra- 
mento, where he entered the service of the Weinstock-Lubin Com- 
pany, dealers in dry goods, as salesman and buyer, continuing with 
that house for three years. He next went to Chicago, where he 
entered the Young Men's Christian Association College, and was 
graduated with the class of 1900. His deep interest in and prepara- 
tion for the work t]ualified him for the position of general secretary, 
to which position he was called in connection with the Young Men's 
Christian Association at Salem, Oregon, where he remained until 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 397 

1905, when he became secretary at Fresno, California. In 1910 he 
came to Oakland as assistant secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association and so continued until November, 191 2, when he became 
general secretary. L'nder his direction the work has been well organ- 
ized and is advancing rapidly and substantially. The association 
occupies a splendid building, seven stories in height, most tastefully 
furnished and fitted out for the purpose intended. A two-story addi- 
tion to the already spacious building was completed in November, 
1913, at a cost of fifty thousand dollars, the gift of Wallace M. Alex- 
ander, president of the association. The education department en- 
deavors to accommodate itself to the needs of employed men and 
boys and occupies the greater part of the third floor with fifteen regu- 
lar recitation rooms and a large study hall, well lighted and well fur- 
nished. Tablet armchairs are used in the regular classrooms. Draw- 
ing desks, commercial desks, and new visible typewriters have been 
added for the various departments. There is a course especially 
suited to the needs of the boys of Oakland who do not speak English, 
giving brief but thorough instruction in the use of words, pronuncia- 
tion and sentence building, paragraphing and letter writing. In ad- 
dition to this instruction, free talks are given on civic, good citizen- 
ship, laws of health and sanitation. In the commercial school, the 
courses include stenography and bookkeeping. There are also 
courses in English and music, mechanical drawing, plan reading and 
estimating, building construction, electricity and chemistry. If ten 
people desire instruction in any branch, a class is organized and 
teachers are selected u ith direct reference to their qualifications, the- 
oretical and practical. 

The social department of the association is equallv well organ- 
ized and in the rooms boys and men may find congenial, elevating 
companionship, with every facility for entertainment in the line of 
games, literature and motion pictures. There are four regulation 
bowling alleys, seven billiard and pool tables, and various other 
games. Four floors of the building are devoted to the dormitory, 
which has 180 rooms, providing accommodation for two hundred 
and fifty men, and all the rooms are furnished in an attractive and 
comfortable manner with steam heat, hot and cold water and private 
telephone service. There is also a cafeteria, where meals are fur- 
nished at moderate prices, and one of the most attractive features of 
the building is its natatorium, the floor graded in depth from four to 
eight feet. There is a splendidly equipped gymnasium, ball teams, 
fencing classes, etc. Never forgetting for an instant that this work 
has its root in the spirit of true religion, there are classes in Bible 



398 HISTORY OF ALAIMEDA COUNTY 

Study, and Sunday afternoon meetings. All of this is under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Fechter, who is thoroughly acquainted with every phase 
of tlie work, recognizing the opportunities and planning to meet the 
needs of the association in the most practical way. He believes in 
studying the individual member and giving the assistance most 
desired, and his geniality, sympathy and deep understanding, as well 
as training, have thoroughly equipped him for the position. 

On the 25th of March, 1903, in Salem, Oregon, Mr. Fechter mar- 
ried Miss Frances L. Lane, and they have three children — Lane, 
Frances and Gordon, all attending the public schools. Mr. Fechter 
is a member of the Rotary Club and of the Public Welfare Club. He 
also belongs to the Chamber of Commerce — associations which indi- 
cate much of the nature of his interests, the trend of his thought and 
the breadth of his view. . In politics he is a progressive republican 
and in religious faith a Baptist. In all of his work and activities he 
transcends, however, any spirit of denominationalism, reaching to the 
greater heights that are above the barriers of creed and dogma. 



E. T- COWING. 



E. J. Cowing is general manager of the Lehnhardt Candy Fac- 
tory, and thus an active factor in the commercial circles of Oakland. 
He was born in San Francisco in September, 1886, and is regarded 
as one of the more enterprising and progressive young business men 
of his city. His parents were E. H. and M. G. Cowing. The father 
came to California in i860 and settled in San Francisco, where he 
later engaged in the canning business. The son attended the public 
and high schools of Alameda until he reached the age of nineteen 
vears, when he entered the commission business in San Francisco, 
being active in that line until 1907, when he sold out and became 
general manager for the Lehnhardts at Oakland. The company has 
just completed a fine two-story brick building at the corner of 
Twenty-fourth and Grove streets, to be used as a factory for the 
manufacture of candy and ice cream. The building is modern in 
every sense of the word, is thorougiily e(]uipped along all lines, and 
has been supplied with every facility that will promote sanitary con- 
ditions or advance excellence in manufacture. That the product is 
of high grade is indicated by the growing patronage. The retail 
store is located on Broadway between Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
streets and is the leading confectionery establishment of Oakland. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 399 

Mr. Cowing was married in Oakland to Miss Edna Anita Lehn- 
hardt in October, 1908. They have two children — Marjorie Joel, 
four years of age, and Emil Joseph, two years of age. In his political 
views Mr. Cowing is a progressive. He does not seek nor desire 
ofiice, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business afifairs. 
He is yet a young man, and the progress that he has already made 
indicates the success which will come to him in the future, for he has 
selected as the foundation upon which to build prosperity the sub- 
stantial qualities of industry, determination and thorough under- 
standing of everything that he undertakes. 



FREDERICK CHRISTIAN POOCK. 

Frederick Christian Poock was one of those Germans who came 
to this country in order to profit by the larger opportunities w^hich 
are within the reach of those who are w^illing to work, to strive, and 
to deny themselves in order that they may attain a substantial posi- 
tion in life. Mr. Poock was a German-American who combined in 
himself the characteristics of both nations and who won success along 
honorable lines by following the highest principles. He was born 
in Hamburg, Germany, January 27, 1862, and was a son of Fred C. 
Poock of Hamburg. 

The subject of this review attended the e.xccllent public schools 
there until fourteen years of age, remaining in the famous Hanse 
town until he had reached his twentieth birthday, when he emigrated 
to America, making his entrance into this country by w'ay of New 
York city. Until 1890 he traveled over the country, acquainting 
himself with conditions and gaining valuable experience, journeving 
from city to city and working at various occupations. In the latter 
vear he arrived in San Francisco, and for two years held a position 
in a retail liquor store. He then came to Oakland and established 
himself independently in that business, conducting a place on Four- 
teenth street near Broadway, and there he continued until his death, 
on January 30, 1906, his demise causing sincere sorrow to his many 
friends, all of whom esteemed him for his good qualities of charac- 
ter. He was a courteous, obliging, kindly man who was ever ready 
to render a service to those in need and who would ever extend a 
helping hand when charity ofifered a plea. His genial manner, his 
heartiness, and the kindly spirit with whicli he judged his fellowmen 
won liim tile friendship of manv in tlic city of Oakland. 



400 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

In Oakland, in 1890, Mr. Poock was united in marriage to a Miss 
(ninth, who survives him. Mr. Poock stood high in Masonr>, in 
which he had reached the Royal Arch degree, and he was also a 
member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In religious 
belief he was a Protestant. In all the relations of life he proved him- 
self worthy of confidence and enjoyed in a large measure the respect 
of those who came in contact with him. 



ISAAC P. ALLEN. 



The force of Isaac P. Allen's ability in the world of finance, of 
his energv, enterprise, constructive power, his initiative, aggressive- 
ness and organizing skill has been felt in a vital way in banking cir- 
cles of San Francisco and, extending beyond local limits, has in no 
unimportant manner influenced the banking development of the 
world at large. He is known not only as the founder of the agencv of 
the Russo-Chinese Bank in America, but also as the founder of the 
Bank of Canton, Ltd., in Hong Kong, and he undoubtedly occupies 
a central position in financial circles of San Francisco, where since 
1907 he has been manager of the Canton Bank of that city. A spirit 
of enterprise and progress, dominated and controlled by keen busi- 
ness discrimination and sound judgment, has actuated him in all his 
undertakings and has brought him to the position which he occupies 
today among the captains of finance in this section of the state. 

Mr. Allen was born in Manchester, Massachusetts, November 2, 
1H4-, and is a son of Isaac S. Allen, a native of Cavendish, V^ermont. 
The fatlier was one of the early settlers in San FTancisco and was well 
known in the old city, with the business interests of which he was 
closelv identified for manv years. His wife, who was in her maiden- 
hood Miss Alice Jane Patten, was born in Hancock, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Isaac P. Allen was eight years of age when his parents moved to 
San Francisco and in the public schools of the city he acquired his 
education, completing the high-school course. He afterward studied 
cliemistr\ and became very proficient along this line, securing a posi- 
tion in I S64 with Reddington & Company. He later identified his 
interests with those of Heathfield, Bogel & Company, becoming a 
member of the firm and engaging in the wholesale drug business in 
this connection. When he retired from this association he purchased 
the interests of R. II. McDoiiaUi (5c Company of Sacramento and 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 401 

conducted the business successfully for some time, enlarging his con- 
cern by the establishment of a branch in Chico under the name of 
J. W. Scott & Company. On account of his failing health he was 
eventually obliged to sell this enterprise and in 1871 became con- 
nected with the Bank of California, thus beginning a financial career 
which has brought him prosperity and distinction and which has con- 
tributed substantially to general banking development. Acting in 
various capacities, he remained with the Bank of California until 
September, 1887, when sickness again compelled his retirement, his 
enforced inactivity lasting for about five years. After his recovery 
he acted as auditor for several eastern concerns, engaging in this line 
of work for about four years. In 1902 he accepted the agencv for 
the Russo-Chinese Bank and established a branch of this institution 
in San Francisco, this marking the first appearance of the concern 
in America. With ability, keen discrimination and enterprise, Mr. 
Allen directed its affairs, keeping it on a solid financial basis and 
developing it along modern and progressive lines until after the 
earthquake in 1906. He severed his connection with the Russo- 
Chinese Bank in March of the following year, after having done able 
work in its interests and in the interests of the city of San Francisco 
by aiding in forcing the German and Austrian insurance companies 
to pay to the extent of their ability losses incurred in the earthquake 
and fire. 

On the qth of October, iqoj, Mr. Allen opened the Canton Bank 
of San Francisco with four hundred and forty stockholders, located 
all over the world. He has been manager of this institution since 
that time, and in this position his excellent business and executive 
ability has been called forth, the credit for the remarkable growth 
and development of the enterprise being largely due to him. He has 
given unsparingly of his energy, his time and his ability to its afifairs, 
and the bank has steadily prospered, being today one of the strong, 
safe and conservative financial institutions in the west. Mr. Allen 
left San Francisco on the 27th of September, 191 i, for liong-Kong, 
and there he established the Bank of Canton, Ltd., with a capital of 
two million dollars. In this work he was assisted by four of the em- 
ployes of the Canton Bank of San Francisco, and when he left China, 
February 16, 1912, he had already placed the institution upon a busi- 
nesslike, safe and profitable basis, establishing it in strict conformity 
to the laws of Hong-Kong. He arrived in San Francisco on the 14th 
of March and reassumed his duties as manager of the Canton Bank. 
In the course of years his energy, enterprise and unsual ability have 
carried him forward into important business relations in this city 



402 HISTORY- OI' AI.A^rKDA COL'XTY 

and he has steadily extended the scope of his interests, being identi- 
fied with a great many of the most important corporate concerns. 
He recently assisted in establishing the Prudential Loan Society and 
has become its president, iiis name standing as a guaranty of the per- 
manence and reliability of the enterprise. The concern, \yhich has 
offices in the Phelan building, is patterned after the Collateral Loan 
Society of Boston, which has been in existence for oyer fifty years 
and which has been of inestimable benefit to the community at large. 

Mr. Allen married Miss Lizzie C. Fuller, a daughter of Hiram 
and Laurilla Fuller of Hancock, New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen haye three sons: Arthur, forty-four years of age; Sidney D., 
forty-two, and I. Christy, thirty-nine. The two younger are in busi- 
ness in San Francisco and the oldest is in Manila, Philippine Islands, 
and all are following in their father's footsteps, proying themselyes 
reliable, resourceful and enterprising business men. 

Mr. Allen is well known in the Masonic order, holding member- 
ship in Excelsior Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; in San Francisco Chapter; 
Golden Gate Commandery; and Islam Temple, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is a splendid type of the twentieth century American 
business man, keen, aggressiye and resourceful, modern in his \ lews, 
progressive in his ideals and actuated at all times by a sense of com- 
munity obligation and the necessity of making his individual success 
an element in general advancement. Throughout a residence of many 
years in San Francisco he has proved himself trustworthy and faith- 
ful in business, progressive in citizenship and loyal to the claims of 
friendship, and he has thus commanded and kept the esteem and high 
regard of all who are associated with him. 



ALVA F. .ALAINE, M. D. 

Dr. Alva F. >Ltine, who has been successfully engaged in the 
practice of medicine in Oakland since 1908, is well known as a rep- 
resentative of that class of progressive professional men who utilize 
the most advanced methods of medical science, his broad reading and 
earnest study keeping him in touch with the advancement that is 
being continually made by the profession. Dr. Maine was born in 
Newark, New Jersey, November 2, 1877. and is a son of Dr. A. P. 
and M. M. (Sheffield) Maine. The father is still an active and suc- 
cessful representative of the medical fraternity in \\'ebster. New 
York. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 40:5 

Alva F. Maine attended the public and high schools, being grad- 
uated from the latter when nineteen years of age. He was afterward 
employed by his father until he reached the age of twenty-one years, 
when, wishing to prepare for the pratcice of medicine, he entered 
the University of Buffalo, at Buffalo, New York, spending three 
years in its medical department. While a student there he was editor 
of tlie Iris, the second annual classbook of that school, issued by the 
graduating class of 1900. On leaving Buffalo he entered the Univer- 
sity of Louisville and after a year spent in the medical department 
was graduated. He then returned from Kentucky to New York and 
for a year was engaged in active practice at Webster with his father. 
Thinking, however, to try his fortune up<Mi the Pacific coast, 
he made his way to Redwood City, California, where he engaged in 
active practice and for two years filled the position of health officer. 
In 1904 and again in 1907 he went to New York city for post- 
graduate work in the Polyclinic. In the fall of 1908 he came to Oak- 
land and has been practicing here continuously since. His ability is 
widely recognized and is attested in the liberal patronage now ac- 
corded him. Anything which tends to bring to man the key to the 
complex mystery which we call life is of interest to him, and his 
reading has been wide and varied, covering all the phases of advanced 
medical and surgical science. He belongs to the American Medical 
Association, the California State Medical Society, and the Alameda 
County Medical Society, and through attendance at the meetings of 
these organizations keeps in touch with the work of eminent mem- 
bers of the profession. 

In addition to his practice Dr. Maine has become financially inter- 
ested in the Coin-Controlled Seat Company of San Francisco, of 
which he is the treasurer. This company is engaged in the manufac- 
ture and sale of seats which can be controlled and operated by means 
of a coin and is the only one of the kind upon the market. After a 
number of years of experimenting and the expenditure of thousands 
of dollars E. W. Allen of San Jose, Califprnia, has perfected, built 
and patented a coin-controlled seat or bench of simple design which 
will withstand the hard usage and exposure to which a seat of this 
kind is subjected. Such seats are intended for coast resorts, summer 
gardens, open-air theaters, ball parks and public parks, and the com- 
pany also manufacture specially designed seats or opera chairs for 
inside use, with coin box adjusted to accommodate any size coin from 
a nickel to a dollar. Other seats are manufactured with a canopv or 
umbrella. It is believed that the installment of such seats in public 
places will net a verv large income to tiie proprietc^rs, aiul indications 



404 



irrsTORV OF ai.ameda county 



arc that thousands of such seats will be in immediate use almost as 
soon as manufactured. Progressive and enterprising business meth- 
ods have been adopted by the officers of this company, who are: 
Peter Bacigalupi, president; Edgar W. Allen, vice president; Walter 
A. Chowen, secretarv; Dr. Alva F. Maine, treasurer, and Charles A. 
Beardsley, auditor. 

Dr. Maine was married, at Rochester, New York, to Miss Kath- 
rvne Smith on the 13th of September, 1902. He holds membership 
with the Knights of Columbus, and in politics he is independent, 
\oting as his judgment dictates, without regard to party ties. 



GEORGE FRIEND COMPANY. 

The beautiful and enterprising city of Berkeley owes a great deal 
of its later development and upbuilding to the activities of the George 
Friend Company, which since 1905 has controlled important real- 
estate interests in the city and the vicinity. It was founded in that 
year under the name of Irwin-Patten Company, and was later reor- 
ganized as the Newell-Hendrickson Company. In July, 191 1, Wil- 
liam C. Murdock and George Friend bought out Mr. Hendrickson's 
interests in the concern and the Newell-Murdock Company was 
formed. This continued until May i, 1913, when George Friend 
became sole proprietor of the business and manager of the companv 
which bears his name. 

The companv has alwavs been especially interested in subdivision 
and development work in Berkeley and three of the most attractive 
and beautiful residence districts of the city. Regents Park, North 
Brea and Thousand Oaks, have been exploited and developed by it. 
Mr. Friend is now giving practically all of his attention to this latter 
subdivision, which is known as the most beautiful residence park in 
California, and the artistic and lovely efifects which have been pro- 
duced here by adapting the architecture of the houses to the wild 
but beautiful forest scenery, defy description. The view from the 
heights of Thousand Oaks is magnificent. It embraces the entire 
western horizon from nortli to south — five counties, twelve cities 
and the bay from Alviso to Cart]uinez straits being in full view. A 
street car ride along Arlington avenue places this panorama before 
the visitor. This street with its double driveway, imposing con- 
crete ornamentation and geranium covered terraces, winds past the 
Spring estate and is destined soon to become one of the most famous 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 405 

drives in the west as it ,is already one of the most beautiful. Mr. 
Friend has striven to place the advantages of this garden spot 
within the reach of all, and a five thousand dollar house and lot 
may be bt)ught in Thousand Oaks for an initial pavment of six 
hundred and twentv-five dollars and monthly payments of fifty 
dollars. There is e.xcellent transportation service, one hundred 
and fifty-five trains each way, running between San Francisco and 
Thousand Oaks, while the finest electric suburban service in the 
United States connects the little community with all the Alameda 
county lines of the Traction Company. The streets in the subdivision 
are all parked and planted with grass or geraniums. Red-haw- 
thorne trees are set at short intervals, while in the parks and rock 
walled footways, ornamental stone benches and gigantic urns are 
placed, producing an efifect altogether delightful. The natural 
beauty of this spot, the excellent transportation facilities, the artistic 
landscape gardening, the proximity of the University of California, 
which is one and a half miles distant, all combine to make Thousand 
Oaks a most desirable resident section and its rapid development and 
upbuilding is assured. Mr. Friend has given a great deal of his 
time and attention to this project and has carried it forward to a most 
successful completion. He is regarded as a reliable, farsighted and 
progressive business man, and his activities have been for several 
years past potent factors in the development and upbuilding of the 
city where he makes his home. 



PASQUAL KISICH. 



Pasqual Kisich, who has been a resident of Oakland for more tlian 
a quarter of a century, is the well known proprietor of the beautiful 
Saddle Rock Cafe at No. 418 Thirteenth street. His birth occurred 
in Ragusa, Austria, on the i6th of October, 1869, his parents being 
Michael and Svieta Kisich. In the acquirement of an education he 
attended the public schools until fourteen years of age. He and his 
fatlier were awarded a contract to supply soldiers with food, and this 
work claimed his attention for three years. At the age of seventeen 
he emigrated to the United States and settled in California, being 
emploved on a ranch near Santa Clara for tliree months. He then 
came to Oakland and worked in a restaurant for two years. On the 
expiration of that period, in association with Joiin Marcovitch, he 
opened the Saddle Kock Cafe at the corner of Tweiftli and Wash- 



40fi HISTORY OF ALA.MKDA COUNTY 

ington streets and in 1893 purchased the interest of his partner. In 
1900 lie removed to Broadway, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
streets, there remaining until 1905, when he came to his present 
place of business at No. 418 Thirteenth street. Here he conducts an 
attractive and handsomely appointed cafe that is considered the best 
in Oakland. As the years have gone by he has won a measure of 
success that is well merited and that entitles him to recognition among 
the prosperous and representative citizens of his community. 

On the 1 2th of April, 1898, in Oakland, Mr. Kisich was united 
in marriage to Miss Nettie C. Stroinski, by whom he has three chil- 
dren, namely: Oliver, who is fourteen years of age and a high-school 
student; Bernice, eight years old, who is in school in a convent; and 
Pasqual, a little lad of three. 

Mr. Kisich is a republican in politics, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose. He is a 
member of organizations whose aim is to promote the expansion of 
Oakland, belonging to the Chamber of Commerce, the Oakland 
Commercial Club and the Merchants Exchange, of which lie is a 
director. In this citv, where he took up his abode more than a quar- 
ter of a centurv ago, he has gained an extensive circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 



CHARLES E. OILMAN. 

Charles E. Oilman, a prominent, prosperous and enterprising 
young citizen of Oakland, serves as vice president, general manager 
and director of the Union \\'ater Company, of which he was one of 
the organizers in February, 1910. His birth occurred in Oakland 
on the I St of August, 1880, his parents being C. H._ and Kate K. 
(Cullcn) Oilman. The father, who was born in Toronto, Canada, 
on the 17th of October, 1S38, acquired his more advanced educa- 
tion in McOill I'niversity and in 1857 went to Japan in a sailing 
vessel, being the first white man to attempt such a trip. In 1859 
he landed in San Francisco and there organized the firm of Gil- 
man & Danforth for the conduct of a warehouse, their business 
increasing to such an extent that at the time of his retirement in 
1896 thcv owned seven warehouses in San F"rancisco. His demise 
occurred in the vear 1899. He was a charter member of the Bohe- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 409 

mian Club of San Francisco, held several chairs in the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and also belonged to the Athenian Club 
of Oakland. 

Charles E. Oilman attended the graded and high schools until 
i8g5 and subsequently spent a year as a student in the Manzanita 
Hall Preparatory School for Boys at Pala Alto, California. He 
then entered Leland Stanford Junior University and while pursuing 
his education there acted as manager of the football team, leader 
of the Glee Club and track manager of the Delta Upsilon, being 
also a member of Psi Upsilon, Sigma Sigma and Snake and Keys. 
Following his graduation in 1900 he went to South America as 
engineer and geologist for the Braner-Agassiz Exposition, explor- 
ing the east coast of South America for six months. On returning 
to California he became manager of the Elizabeth Mining Com- 
pany in Shasta county and remained in that capacitv until iqoi. 
Subsequently he was appointed and served as field engineer and 
petrographer for the Washington State Geological Survey until 1902 
and was afterward engaged as mining engineer for the Crosbv- 
Ehrich syndicate at Colorado Springs, Colorado, until the winter 
of 1902. He then joined Mr. Wright in the firm known as the 
Wright & Oilman Company, mining engineers, and in 1903 be- 
came assistant chief engineer for the Bay City Water Company of 
San Francisco, acting in that capacity until 1904. Mr. Oilman next 
served for five months as consulting engineer for the Tonopah Water 
Company of Tonopah, Nevada. In the latter part of 1904 he in- 
vestigated all the power sites, power rights and land holdings of 
the Western Power Company and the Golden State Power Com- 
pany, spending four months in that way. He then went to Cudahy, 
Wisconsin, and there spent six months as mining engineer for the 
Power & Mining Machinery Company. On the 17th of April, 
1906, in San Francisco, he formed the Duryea, Heahl & Oilman 
Engineering Company and is still a member thereof. In February, 
1910, he was one of the organizers of the Union Water Company 
in Oakland and was made vice president, general manager and 
director of the cijrporation, which positions he still holds at the 
present time, displaying excellent executive ability in the discharge 
of his important duties. The company supplies three thousand homes 
with water. During the fire of 1906 Mr. Oilman was appointed 
first lieutenant of artillery and later became major, serving for ninety 
days. Governor Pardee complimented him for his executive ability 
and tiie commendable manner in which he maintained order through- 
out tile destroyed district in San Francisco. 



406 HISTORY- Ol' ALAMEDA COUNTY 

ington streets and in 1893 purchased the interest of his partner. In 
1900 he removed to Broadway, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
streets, there remaining until 1905, when he came to his present 
place of business at No. 418 Thirteenth street. Here he conducts an 
attractive and handsomely appointed cafe that is considered the best 
in Oakland. As the years have gone by he has won a measure of 
success that is well merited and that entitles him to recognition among 
the prosperous and representative citizens of his community. 

On the 1 2th of April, 1898, in Oakland, Mr. Kisich was united 
in marriage to Miss Nettie C. Stroinski, by whom he has three chil- 
dren, namely: Oliver, who is fourteen years of age and a high-school 
student; Bernice, eight years old. who is in school in a convent; and 
Pasqual, a little lad of three. 

Mr. Kisich is a republican in politics, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose. He is a 
member of organizations whose aim is to promote the expansion of 
Oakland, belonging to the Chamber of Commerce, the Oakland 
Commercial Club and the Merchants Exchange, of which he is a 
director. In this city, where he took up his abode more than a quar- 
ter of a century ago, he has gained an extensive circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 



CHARLES E. OILMAN. 

Charles E. Oilman, a prominent, prosperous and enterprising 
young citizen of Oakland, serves as vice president, general manager 
and director of the Union Water Company, of which he was one of 
the organizers in February, 1910. His birth occurred in Oakland 
on the 1st of August, iSSo, his parents being C. H. and Kate K. 
(CuUen) Oilman. The father, who was born in Toronto, Canada, 
on the 17th of October, 1S38, acquired his more advanced educa- 
tion in McGill Cniversity and in 1S57 went to japan in a sailing 
vessel, being the first white man to attempt such a trip. In 18^9 
he landed in San Francisco and there organized the lirm of Gil- 
man & Danforth for the conduct of a warehouse, their business 
increasing to such an extent that at the time of his retirement in 
1896 they owned seven warehouses in San Francisco. His demise 
occurred in the vear i89<;. He was a ciiartcr member of the Bohe- 



HISTORY OF AT.AMEDA COUNTY 409 

nian Club of San Francisco, held several chairs in the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and also belonged to the Athenian Club 
3f Oakland. 

Charles E. Gilman attended the graded and high schools until 
i8q5 and subsequently spent a year as a student in the Manzanita 
Hall Preparatory School for Boys at Pala Alto, California. He 
then entered Leland Stanford Junior University and while pursuing 
bis education there acted as manager of the football team, leader 
Df the Glee Club and track manager of the Delta Upsilon, being 
ilso a member of Psi Upsilon, Sigma Sigma and Snake and Keys. 
Following his graduation in 1900 he went to South America as 
engineer and geologist for the Braner-Agassiz E.xposition, explor- 
ing the east coast of South America for six months. On returning 
to California he became manager of the Elizabeth Mining Com- 
pany in Shasta county and remained in that capacity until 1901. 
Subsequently he was appointed and served as field engineer and 
petrographer for the Washington State Geological Survey until 1902 
and was afterward engaged as mining engineer for the Crosby- 
Ehrich svndicate at Colorado Springs, Colorado, until tiic winter 
of 1902. He then joined Mr. Wright in the Hrm ktiown as the 
Wright & Gilman Company, mining engineers, and in 1903 be- 
came assistant chief engineer for the Bay City Water Company of 
San Francisco, acting in that capacity until 1904. Mr. Gilman next 
served for five months as consulting engineer for the Tonopah Water 
Company of Tonopah, Nevada. In the latter part of 1904 he in- 
vestigated all the power sites, power rights and land holdings of 
the Western Power Company and the Golden State Power Com- 
pany, spending four months in that way. He then went to Cudahy, 
Wisconsin, and there spent six months as mining engineer for the 
Power & Mining Machinery Company. On the 17th of April, 
1906, in San Francisco, he formed the Duryea, Heahl & Gilman 
Engineering Company and is still a member thereof. In February, 
1910, he was one of the organizers of the Union Water Company 
in Oakland and was made vice president, general manager and 
director of the corporation, which positions he still holds at the 
present time, displaying e.xcellent executive ability in the discharge 
of his important duties. The company supplies three thousand homes 
with water. During the fire of 1906 Mr. Gilman was appointed 
first lieutenant of artillery and later became major, serving for ninety 
days. Governor Pardee complimented him for his executive ability 
and the commendable manner in which he maintained order through- 
out the destnned district in San Francisco. 



410 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

On the 8th of December, 1906, in San Francisco, Mr. Oilman 
was united in marriage to Miss Antoynette Granelli, who was a vol- 
unteer Red Cross nurse during the fire of 1906. They now have two 
children, Antoynette and C. E., Jr., who are six and two years of age 
respectively. Fraternally Mr. Oilman is a Scottish Rite Mason, and 
also belongs to the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise connected with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Nile Club and the Athenian Club 
and is a charter member of the Army and Navy Club. The sub- 
jective and objective forces of life are in Mr. Oilman well balanced, 
making him cognizant of his own capabilities and powers, while at 
the same time he thoroughly understands and meets his obligations 
and opportunities. 



W. A. CATTELL, C. E. 

W. A. Cattell is one of the foremost construction engineers of the 
Pacific coast, being located in San Francisco. He now tends to a 
large general practice, and is also consulting engineer to many enter- 
prises, his activities having an important influence upon the develop- 
ment of Alameda county and other parts of the state of California. 
Mr. Cattell was born in Princeton, New Jersey, June 16, 1863, and 
is a son of Thomas W. and Anna C. (Ashburner) Cattell. He 
attended various public and private schools until 1880, when he 
entered Lafayette College. From that year until 1884 he took the 
four years' course in civil engineering in the Pardee scientific depart- 
ment of Lafayette College, graduating in 1884 with the degree of 
civil engineer. 

He then accepted employment with the State Board of Railroad 
Assessors of New Jersey, becoming an assistant engineer under Colo- 
nel James Allen and later serving under Edlow W. Harrison in 
making resurveys and valuations of the railroad and canal property 
in the state. He was also later employed by the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe Railroad Company on preliminary and location surveys in 
Kansas and Indian Territory. In 1889 Mr. Cattell accepted the 
position of assistant chief engineer of the Long Island Railroad, 
being in charge of the construction department. He had supervision 
of the design and construction of bridges, buildings, docks, piers and 
terminals and the location and construction of the new lines. During 
this period, the road was practically reconstructed, many miles of 
new lines and double track were added and extensive improvements 
effected. 



HISTORY OF AI,.\MEDA COUNTY 411 

Mr. Cattell remained as assistant chief engineer with the Long 
Island Railroad until 1897 ^^'^ from that year until 1905 was en- 
gaged in general practice as consulting engineer in New York city. 
He acted in that capacity for the Brooklyn park department, super- 
vising the construction of steel and masonry bridges; for the Ohio 
Southern Railroad, on bridges and general improvement, and for the 
Manhattan Beach Company, on the installation of the electric light, 
power and refrigerating plants, the electric railroad, marine bulk- 
heads and shore protection. He assisted William Barclay Parsons and 
H. de B. Parsons in the valuation of a number of large manufacturing 
plants, aggregating many million dollars in value, among them the 
Rogers Locomotive Works and the William Cramp shipbuilding 
plant at Philadelphia; also on the report on a high-speed electric 
railway projected to run from Philadelphia to Atlantic City. He 
made examinations, estimates and reports on a large number of exist- 
ing and projected railroads, including a belt railway for the city of 
St. Louis and the proposed terminals for the Southern Railroad at 
Pensacola, Florida. He reported on the extensive irrigation project 
in New Mexico now being constructed by the United States reclama- 
tion service and on a number of minor water supply and power proj- 
ects in various parts of the United States. He made complete and 
detailed designs for the buildings and mechanical installations of 
several manufacturing plants, including a plant for the manufacture 
of sewer pipe which was erected at Shawmut, Pennsylvania. He 
prepared the estimate for bids for various construction concerns on 
extensive improvements, among them the Atlantic Avenue improve- 
ments of the Long Island Railroad and the section of the New York 
Rapid Transit Subway from the City Hall, New York, to Flatbush 
avenue, Brooklyn, including the tunnel section under the East river. 
He also made the estimates for the track elevation of the New 
York Central Railroad, Schenectady, New York. He assisted H. de 
B. Parsons in the examination of the new filtration plants, pumping 
stations and the aqueduct tunnel of the Philadelphia waterworks 
system in connection with the charges of graft in the construction of 
these works. He was appointed chairman of the commission to 
determine the cause of a fatal building collapse in Albany, New 
York, by the mayor of that city. He prepared preliminary plans for 
extensive improvements at Manhattan Beach, involving reinforced 
concrete sea walls, a large amount of hydraulic filling for reclama- 
tion, complete water supply and sewerage system, power plant and 
railway terminal facilities; also prepared the plans for a number of 
buildings, private residences, a casino and a hotel. 



412 HISTORY OF AT.AMEDA COUXTY 

During 1905 and 1906 Mr. Cattell was consulting engineer for 
E. H. Rollins & Sons (municipal and corporation bonds) of San 
Francisco, California, making examinations and reports on various 
steam and electric railroads, existing and projected, including the 
Western Pacific Railroad, and on many of the important hydro- 
electric developments of the state. He was president of the Petaluma 
& Santa Rosa Electric Railroad, operating thirty-four miles of inter- 
urban line, and also president of the Marin Terminal and Santa Rosa 
and Northern Railroads when they projected to build sixty-five miles 
of additional high-grade interurban lines. Construction work on 
these lines had been started shortly before the earthquake, but was 
suspended at that time and has never since been resumed. Since 1908 
Mr. Cattell has been engaged in general practice as consulting en- 
gineer in San Francisco. He was chief engineer of the Clear Lake 
power and irrigation project; made a reconnaisance survey and 
report for the Hirsch Syndicate, Ltd., of London, on the Valdez- 
Yukon Railroad project in Alaska (one hundred and sixty-four 
miles) ; a report on the terminal pier of the San Francisco-Oakland 
Terminal Railways, a double-track structure extending three miles 
out into San Francisco bay, with a special investigation of the effect 
of sea water on the concrete cylinders which supported a portion of 
the structure; and a reconnaisance survey for the United States for- 
est service of a railway line along the Klamath river, California, 
seventy-two miles in length. At this writing Mr. Cattell is chief 
engineer of the Trona Railway, a standard-gauge steam railroad in 
California of which thirty miles are nearly completed. He is con- 
sulting engineer for the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railwavs, 
operating two hundred and fifty-six miles of line in Oakland and 
adjoining cities, and engaged in the design and construction of the 
new terminals and harbor improvements for that companv. He is 
consulting engineer for the People's Water Company in connection 
with the litigation now in progress in the federal courts over water 
rates. He is consulting engineer for the Los Angeles Railway Cor- 
poration, operating three hundred and sixty-four miles of line in Los 
Angeles, California, in connection with the valuation of the propertv 
in the case now at issue before the State Railroad Commission. 

Mr. Cattell is connected with the following scientific and profes- 
sional associations: American Society of Civil P^ngineers, of which 
he is a director; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Amer- 
ican Institute of Consulting Engineers; Pacific Association of Con- 
sulting Engineers; American Water Works Association, and En- 
gineers' Club of San Francisco. His work has been of the greatest 



HISTORY OF ALA:MEDA COUNTY 413 

importance to the growth and development of Oakland and Alameda 
county, and his accomplishments will for years to come contribute 
to the prosperity of its residents. 



GEORGE WILLIAM PRICK. 

George W. Prick is one of the most prominent educators of Ala- 
meda county, having three times served in the position of county 
superintendent of schools, his first election taking place in 1890 and 
his second in 1907, since which time he has filled that position. Mr. 
Prick comes of a family which settled in California in pioneer days. 
It was established in this state by his father, George Washington 
Prick, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and a son of 
Abraham Prick, the latter a sturdy settler of German ancestry, whose 
death occurred in 1880, while his wife died some years earlier. In 
their family were six sons and two daughters. 

George W^ashington Prick, the father of the subject of this review, 
sought the opportunities of the middle west, removing to Illinois in 
1839, the family making their home on a farm near Galena. He 
received his education in the district schools there, and also studied 
privately, subsequently taking a course in the Mount Morris Semi- 
nary when about twenty years of age. In 1852, in Galena, Illinois, 
he married Miss Mary E. Bryant, and before the year was out they 
started for California, accompanied by her parents. They made the 
long journey without any serious adventures, although they expe- 
rienced the hardships and privations incident to such a trip. 
"Mother Bryant," as she was known, however, was crippled by an 
accident at the beginning of the journey, but was able to do the cook- 
ing for the party all the way across the plains. 

Arriving in the Golden state in 1853, Mr. Prick took up teaching 
in Santa Cruz, having charge of the first public school there for two 
terms, at the end of which time he removed to Centerville, Alameda 
countv, where he also followed this profession. He was one of the 
first republicans in the county and from the date of his arrival took 
an active interest in the afifairs of his party. In 1857 he removed to 
Sonoma county and purchased a ranch about three miles northeast 
of Petaluma, his property comprising one hundred and twenty acres. 
He continued to teach school, having charge of the Bethel school for 
one term. In i860 he became the candidate of the republican party 



414 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

lor sheriff, but later withdrew in order to better the chances of the 
union party candidate. He was active in the Union League move- 
ment during the Civil war and was the president of the Bethel Union 
League near Petaluma. He was also chairman of the Sonoma county 
delegation to the state convention which nominated George C. Gor- 
ham for governor. Although his county had a large democratic 
majority, he was twice elected supervisor, drawing many democratic 
votes because even his political opponents were absolutely sure of the 
purity of his motives and the sincerity of all his actions. For fifteen 
years he served as a school trustee, always taking an interest in the 
cause of education, and practically all his life he held an official posi- 
tion of one sort or another in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In 1 871 he sold his farming interests near Petaluma and in the 
following year located in Mendocino county. In 1874 he became a 
settler of Santa Barbara county, where he was identified with the 
Lompoc Temperance Colony, of which movement he was a pioneer. 
He conducted a mercantile establishment in Lompoc and also par- 
ticipated in the public life of the municipality as school trustee. It 
was largely due to his efforts that a five thousand dollar schoolhouse 
was erected, and he also was instrumental in the building of a church 
edifice for the Methodist Episcopal denomination. After disposing 
of his store in Lompoc he acquired title to about one thousand acres 
of land in the San Miguelito canyon, which he devoted to dairying, 
making the purchase in 1876 and locating upon the property about 
three years later. Subsequently, however, he leased this land and 
removed to Oakland in order to give his children the best educational 
advantages. 

Mrs. Frick, who in her maidenhood was Miss Mary E. Brvant. 
was a daughter of William Cowper Bryant of New England, who at 
an earlier day became a merchant of Galena, Illinois. He made sev- 
eral trips to California by way of Mexico and the Isthmus and while 
crossing the plains was shot by Indians and for some time carried the 
arrowhead in his breast, finally having it cut out with a butcher 
knife, as he was unable to reach a doctor. He was one of the pioneer 
draymen of San Francisco and while at his work fell through a 
wharf, receiving such serious injuries that he was crippled for life. 

His wife, Anna (Sterret) Bryant, was of German descent and 
became widely known throughout the state of California for church 
and charitable work. As "Mother Bryant" she was familiarly known 
to the inhabitants of San Francisco and the surrounding territory. 
She crossed the plains on crutches and lived to be about seventy years 
of age. Two of her sons, John and \^'iIliam, became ministers. Mrs. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 415 

Frick was president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union 
of Lompoc at the time of her death, which occurred May 3, 1884. 
Her husband passed away in Lompoc while on a visit, July 12, 1889, 
at the age of sixty-four years. In their family were the following 
children: George William, of this sketch; Laura A., who died 
December 3, 1888, at the age of twenty-seven; Abraham Lincoln, 
who is a lawyer by profession and served as deputy district attorney 
of Alameda county in 1891 and later became superior judge; John 
Frederick, who was graduated from the Oakland high school in 1888 
and later studied law; and Blanche. 

George William Frick was born in Santa Cruz, California, April 
4, 1854, and attended the Bethel district school in Sonoma county 
until fourteen years of age, when he became a pupil in Professor 
H. S. Lippett's scientific and classical institute at Petaluma. In 1870 
he attended grammar school for one term and in 1871 entered the 
Napa Collegiate Institute. In 1873, when he was nineteen years of 
age, he apprenticed himself to the printer's trade in a newspaper 
office in Napa and subsequently removed with his employer to San 
Jose, where he first began to write for the paper. He subsequently 
returned to Petaluma and then went to Lompoc, where he taught a 
private school and also followed newspaper work. Subsequently he 
studied law for nine months in San Francisco and then returned to 
Petaluma, where he again acted as compositor and writer and also 
studied for teaching, receiving his certificate in Santa Rosa in 1877. 
His first school was taught in Sebastapol. In 1879 he came to Ala- 
meda county and followed his profession for eighteen months in Cas- 
tro valley. He next was connected with the two department school 
at Mount Eden for three and one-half years, and in 1884 became head 
of the Hayward school of seven departments, and in 1886 of the San 
Leandro school of eight departments. In July, 1888, he was chosen 
bv the Oakland board of education to fill the principalship of the 
Tompkins school of eight departments, and in the fall of 1890 was 
elected county superintendent of schools. After serving his term he 
became principal of the Cole school of Oakland, and continued in 
that position for twelve years, being in 1906 again elected county 
superintendent and having since continued in that position. Mr. 
Frick has made many improvements since he has taken charge of the 
office. He has simplified the clerical work and has placed all of the 
affairs of the office upon a strict business basis. He makes it a point 
to visit all of the schools in the county, if possible, five or six times a 
year and keeps in close touch with the teachers and pupils in order 
to maintain that spirit of cooperation which is so necessary in order 



416 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

to insure success. He has also encouraged the introduction of indus- 
trial education in the country schools. 

]n Oakland, January i, 1885, Mr. Frick married Miss Rhoda 
Louise Tucker, who taught in the Hayward school when he was prin- 
cipal. Her parents were William J. and Sarah L. (Walker) Tucker. 
She was born in Brandon, Vermont, and came to California in her 
early life. She attended the public schools, and graduated as class 
poet from the University of California in the class with ex-Governor 
Pardee. Mr. and Mrs. Frick had two children: Gladys C, now 
Mrs. Shepherd and Raymond L. Mrs. Frick passed awav in 1H92, 
her death causing sincere sorrow, not only to her immediate family, 
but to her many friends, all of whom esteemed her for her womanly 
qualities of character. 

Mr. Frick is thoroughly devoted to his profession, which demands 
nearly all of his time. He is, however, interested in fraternal work 
and has been an active member of the Odd Fellows since attaining 
his majority, having held all of the chairs in the subordinate lodge 
and encampment. In 1890 he joined Oakland Canton, No. 11, of 
that order, and he is a past grand of Sycamore Lodge, No. 129, and 
a past chief patriarch of Alameda Encampent, No. 29, both of Hay- 
ward. For two terms he was district deputy grand master. He is 
also prominent in the Masonic order, being a past master of Euca- 
lyptus Lodge, No. 243, A. F. & A. ^L, of Hayward; is a member of 
Oakland Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M.; and the Order of the Eastern 
Star. He is a charter member and past exalted ruler of Oakland 
Lodge, No. 171, B. P. O. E., and is past president of Oakland Par- 
lor, No. 50, N. S. G. W. He also belongs to the Loval Order of 
Moose. In all the relations of life he has proven himself trustworthy, 
and he well merits the confidence the public places in him. He is a 
public-spirited and patriotic citizen who for many years has worked 
for the betterment of educational opportunities in Alameda county 
and who has achieved results which will tell in vears to come. 



CHARLES A. BEARDSLEY. 

Charles A. Beardsley, assistant city attorney of the City of Oak- 
land, and one of the able and prosperous young lawyers of Oakland, 
connected with important litigated interests as a member of the 
firm of Fitzgerald, Abbott & Beardsley, was born in Pennsylvania, 
January 14, 1882, a son of Ezra S. and May (Fleming) Beardsley. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 417 

Charles A. Beardsley came to California in 1892 and resumed 
his education, begun in Pennsylvania, in the public schools of this 
state, graduating from Campbell high school in 1901. He later 
entered Leland Stanford University, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of B. A. in 1906 and with the degree of Doctor of 
Law in 1908. He was admitted to the bar by the first appellate 
court of California in January, 1907, and on June ist of the follow- 
ing year began the practice of his profession in association with 
Fitzgerald & Abbott, the hrm name being now Fitzgerald, Abbott 
& Beardsley. Mr. Beardsley was made deputy city attorney of Oak- 
land in January, 191 1, and later was made assistant city attorney, 
which office he now holds, discharging the duties incumbent upon 
him in a way which reflects credit upon Ins ability, impartiality and 
public spirit. 

On the 9th of July, 191 i, Mr. Beardsley was united in marriage 
to Miss Agnes I. LalYerty. He is a member of the Nile Club and 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is a young 
man of energy, ambition and enterprise, who in professional, official 
and social relations holds steadily to high ideals, so that he com- 
mands the confidence and regard of all who are associated with him. 



CHARLES JURGENS. 



Charles Jurgens, who is one of the oldest business men still active 
in the commercial life of Oakland, was born in Waldeck, Germany, 
January 3, 1844. In that country he was educated, pursuing his 
studies to the age of sixteen years, when, in i860, he sailed for Amer- 
ica. Landing in New York, he made his way to Michigan and 
remained in that state for three years, at the end of which time he 
started for California by way of the Isthmus route. Crossing the bay 
from San Francisco on the steamer Clinton, which then made daily 
trips between the two places, he settled in Oakland when the city 
consisted of but four business blocks and the streets were of deep sand. 
He engaged as a clerk in a grocery house in what was then called 
San Antonio and in 1868 embarked in business on his own account 
as proprietor of a grocery store in Temescal, now known as North 
Oakland. After conducting the business for several years he sold 
out in 1 876 and built the St. Johns House, the first brick business block 
on Twelfth street, having a plate-glass front and a basement. The 
people generally considered the innovation foolish. He then built the 



418 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

present Globe Hotel, at Thirteenth and Broadway, conducting it 
until recently, when he leased it. 

In 1905 he bought out the W. M. Watson Company and called 
it the Winedale Company, of which he is the president. He is a 
director in many large banks and business establishments, has dealt 
extensively in real estate and is one of the very wealthy men of Ala- 
meda county. He is regarded as a very active, energetic business 
man, wide-awake to the conditions of trade and at all times alert and 
enterprising. Fraternally Mr. Jurgens is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and is popular in that organization. 
In 1870 he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Springer, who 
passed away in 1913, leaving two sons and two daughters. Mr. Jur- 
gens has witnessed and helped in the growth of Oakland and he 
marks as epochs in the city's development: 1863, when the Southern 
Pacific built the Seventh street line; 1868, when the Overland Rail- 
road was completed; 1876, Centennial year, when the city had a 
rapid and unusual growth; and 1906, when the city really awoke 
from a village to realize its true destiny. 



WILLIAM C. JURGENS. 

William C. Jurgens is secretary of the Winedale Company, con- 
trolling one of the largest wholesale and retail liquor houses in the 
county. He was born in Oakland (Temescal), California, Januar\ 
13, 1873, and is a son of Charles Jurgens. Reared in his native city, 
the public schools afiforded William C. Jurgens his preliminary edu- 
cational opportunities. He passed through consecutive grades until 
graduated from the high school, in December, 1892. He next entered 
the University of California and was graduated in 1897. He subse- 
quently had charge of the cooperative store at the university for five 
years, at the end of which time he and his father bought out the W. 
M. Watson Company, which they have since conducted under 
the firm name of the Winedale Company. Since that time William 
Jurgens has been secretary, and as such has been active in the control 
of a business which is growing along substantial lines. He is watch- 
ful of all indications concerning trade conditions, is energetic and 
determined in carrying out his plans, and as the years have passed on 
has achieved a measure of success which is the direct and merited 
reward of persistent, earnest effort. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 419 

In Oakland, on the 13th of January, 191 i, Mr. [urgens was united 
in marriage to Miss Gladys Thorpe. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He has never been a 
politician in the sense of office seeking, preferring to concentrate his 
energies upon his business affairs, which, capably directed, have 
brought to him substantial success. He has many friends in the city 
in which he has spent his entire life and attractive social qualities 
have made him popular among those with whom he is connected. 



FRANK C. FABENS. 



Throughout the years of an active business career Frank C. 
Fabens of Alameda has given all of his time and attention to the 
railroatl business and is today one of the most trusted and valued 
representatives of the Southern Pacific Railroad in California, ris- 
ing through the various departments to be manager of the pass bureau, 
a position which he has filled with credit and distinction since July 
28, 1913. He was born in San Francisco, July 7, 1874, and is a mem- 
ber of one of the well known California pioneer families, his father, 
George C. Fabens, having come around the Horn from Salem. 
Massachusetts, in 1864. He also was a prominent railroad official, 
spending many years of his active life in the employ of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad and holding the position of claim adjuster at the 
time of his death in 1905. 

Frank C. Fabens was tlirce years of age when his parents moved 
to Alameda in November, 1877. In the public schools of this city he 
acquired his early education and after completing the grammar- 
school course entered the Alameda high school, from which he was 
graduated in 1891. He was afterward a student in the Aydelotte 
Business College of Oakland, completing the course there in 1892. 
In the following year he became connected with the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, entering the claim adjusting department on January i, of 
that year and giving immediate evidence of unusual ability along 
this line. Advancement came rapidly but only in recognition of 
superior merit and accomplishments, and he was soon transferred 
to the operating department as private secretary to the general super- 
intendent and general manager. After the San Francisco fire he 
was made chief clerk to the general superintendent and as such acted 
until July 28, 19 13, when he was made manager of the pass bureau 
at San Francisco. This position calls for e.xecutive ability, business 



420 HISTORY OF ala:meda county 

discrimination and tact of a high order and upon his possession of 
these qualities Mr. Fabens has based a success which places him 
among the leading railroad men in the state. 

In April, 1910, Mr. Fabens was united in marriage to Miss Lucv 
Haviland Bates, and both are well known in social circles of Ala- 
meda. Mr. Fabens belongs to the Unitarian Club of Alameda and 
the Transportation Club of San Francisco and fraternally is identi- 
fied with the Oakland lodge of Elks and Halcyon Parlor, Native 
Sons of the Golden West. His many sterling qualities of mind and 
character are well known in Alameda, where he has so long resided, 
and tiiev have gained him the respect and confidence of his business 
associates and of all who arc in anv wav connected with him. 



P. FRANK BRADHOFF. 

P. Frank Bradhoff, of Oakland, acts as secretary of the General 
Contractors Association, which was organized in October, 1913. He 
was born in Oakland on the 28th of March, 1873, a son of J. H. and 
Katharine BradhofT. The father, who was first officer on a sailing 
vessel, first came to California prior to i8so and in 1861 permanently 
established his home in Oakland, but devoted his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits in Contra Costa county until the time of his 
retirement in 1906. His demise occurred in 1910, after a residence 
of about a half century in this part of the state, and in his passing the 
community lost one of its respected, esteemed and substantial citizens. 

P. Frank Bradhofif attended the public schools in the acquirement 
of an education until a vouth of fourteen and then worked on his 
father's ranch until seventeen years of age. He was subsequently em- 
ploved in the operating department of the Southern Pacific Railroad 
at Oakland until 1898 and afterward entered the service of the Cali- 
fornia Powder Companv, remaining with that concern for three and 
a half years and acting in various capacities. Embarking in the real- 
estate and building business, he was thus engaged in Oakland and 
Berkelev until January, 191 2, when he associated himself with the 
Contractors & Builders E.xchange and in tiiat year became secre- 
tarv of -the Oakland Builders Exchange, in which position he re- 
mained until April, 1914. He then took charge, as secretary, of the 
(ieneral Contractors Association, whicli was organized in October, 
\<)\T,. Its object is to foster the building industry in Alameda county 
and vicinity and to secure equitable dealing between owners, arclii- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 421 

tects and contractors in the several branches of construction work, 
thus serving the ends of equity, justice and fair dealing. It is in no 
way affiliated with or opposed to union labor, but instead endeavors 
to promote the harmonious cooperation of all. The association is 
necessarily in its infancy but has already registered a large member- 
ship of representative men in their respective lines, has won the favor 
of material men, specialty contractors and architects as well as that 
of the general contractors, and is accorded the respect and hearty 
cooperation of the local banking interests. In the capacity of sec- 
retary Mr. Bradhofif has promoted the interests of the organization in 
no small degree, and his resultant labors have established his reputa- 
•tion as a valued official of the association. He likewise organized 
the Berkeley Chamber of Commerce and is a prominent factor in 
business circles here. 

Mr. Bradhofif is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scotish Rite. 
He also belongs to the Mystic Shrine and is a past patron of the East- 
ern Star, is an Elk and a past royal patron of Amaranth. His entire 
life has been spent in Alameda county and in all itS relations he has 
been actuated by honorable, manly principles that have won him the 
confidence and esteem of those with whom he has been associated. 



BERKELEY LUMBER COMPANY. 

One of the representative business institutions in Alameda county 
is the Berkeley Lumber Company, which dates its origin from a 
time when West Berkeley was little more than a country village. 
Its growth has been coincident with the growth of the community, 
for since its foundation the business has been in the hands of pro- 
gressive, far-sighted and able men, under whose direction it has 
advanced to its present large proportions. 

The concern was founded about the year 1868 by F. B. Heywood, 
a member of the Heywood family, which has for years maintained a 
place of importance in the business life of California. F. B. Hey- 
wood was a native of Calais, Maine, and in 1850 sent his three sons 
around the Horn to California on the bark Ida. After a perilous 
vovage, during which thev were marooned for some time on an 
island, they arrived in this state and after mining for a time in Yuba 
county, acquired property in San Francisco. In the early '60s F. B. 
Hevwood followed his sons to the Pacific coast and in partnership 



422 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

with Mr. Jacobs entered into the mercantile business in Berkeley 
under the name of Heywood & Jacobs. They built the first wharf on 
the east side of San Francisco bay and established the first ferry line 
to San Francisco. One of F. B. Heywood's sons. Charles Heywood, 
engaged in the sheep business in the Napa valley for many years, 
driving his sheep to market from Napa to Oakland. In 1868 father 
and sons united in the foundation of a lumber business in West 
Berkeley, and they laid the foundation for the building of all of the 
cities on the east side of the bay. They furnished the lumber for 
many of the most important structures of the early times, these includ- 
ing the first building of the Universitv of California. The firm con- 
tinued for some time in a small way, but little by little extended its 
trade relations until it was finally sought after by many of the largest 
concerns on the coast. With the expansion of the business F. B. Hev- 
wood went to San Francisco, where he established a wh(jlesale lum- 
ber business, leaving the ^^'est Berkeley concern in charge of another 
companv under a lease. 

After the death of F. B. Heywood his sons conducted the busi- 
ness in San Frahcisco under the name of Heywood Brothers for 
several years. Later Samuel Heywood, one of his brothers, took 
charge of the Berkeley establishment, having as a partner at that time 
Thomas Richardson, who continued as secretary of the company 
until he sold his interests to Mr. Heywood. A corporation was 
formed in 1900 under the laws of the state of California, the concern 
becoming known as the West Berkelev Lumber Companv. and it 
was conducted by Charles D. Heywood, who was president of the con- 
cern, and Frank B. Heywood, the secretary and treasurer. In 1912 
the company was reorganized and reincorporated under the name of 
the Berkeley Lumber Company and it has since enjoyed its usual 
prosperity. In 1907 the company disposed of the original property 
and established its present quarters at the foot of University avenue, 
the buildings extending to the bay in order that large vessels mav 
come direct to the wharf for loading and unloading. January i, 1914, 
the Heywoods sold the business after it had been in the control of the 
family for forty-six years, during which time it became one of the 
large enterprises of Berkeley and kept pace w ith the rapid growth of 
the community, increasing its capacity as its growing trade justified. 
Charles D. and Frank B. Heywood are prominent in public affairs, as 
was their father, the latter having served for a number of years as a 
member of the board of trustees and also as a member of the board of 
education. The Berkeley Lumber Company has been for manv 
vears one nf the great single forces in the development of Berkeley 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 423 

and its inception and development were due to the energy, enterprise 
and business progressiveness which are characteristics of the Hey- 
wood family, and any mention of the company invariably brings to 
mind the family name with which it was so long associated. 



JOSEPH W. KRAMM. 



Joseph W. Kramm is identihed with business interests in Oak- 
land as secretary of the Golden West Brewery Company, which he 
assisted in organizing in 1910. His birth occurred in Oakland on 
the qth of September, 1880, his parents being Charles and Augusta 
Kramm. The father, who was born in Hanover, Germany, on the 
15th of November, 1836, there atended the public schools until 
fourteen years of age and subsequently emigrated to the United 
States and resided in New York for a short time. In i860 he came 
to Oakland, California, and here worked in a brewery for a few 
years. He then embarked in the brewing business on his own ac- 
count, conducting what was known as the Oakland Brewery at the 
corner of Ninth and Broadway until it was destroyed by fire in 
1870. In that year he erected a brewery at the corner of Nineteenth 
street and Telegraph avenue and there carried on business until he 
sold out to the syndicate in 1888 and retired. His demise, which 
occurred on the 20th of December, 1890, was deeply deplored, for he 
had won many friends in both business and social circles during the 
thirty years of his residence in Oakland. 

Joseph W. Kramm acquired his education by attendance at the 
public schools until 1894 ^"^ also spent a year as a student in 
Aydolett's Business College. Subsequently he was employed as 
brewer with the Anchor Brewing Company until 1902 and then pur- 
chased the plant, continuing its conduct until 1910. In that year, in 
association with several others, he organized the Golden West Brew- 
ery Company, of which he became secretary and the success of which 
he has since furthered in that capacity. The prosperity which has 
come to iiim, winning him recognition among the substantial and 
representative business men of his native city, is but the merited re- 
ward of ably directed effort and excellent executive ability. 

Mr. Kramm was married in San Francisco in 1905 and has four 
cliildrcn, one son and three daughters. Since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise Mr. Kramm has supported the men and 
measures of the republican partv, while fraternally he is identified 



424 HISTORY Ol' AT-A.MT.DA COUNTY 

with the Native Sons, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Loyal 
Order of Moose and the Sons of Hermann. He likewise belongs 
to the Turn Verein and the Knights of the Royal Arch. Energetic, 
diligent and persevering, he is always found reliable in all his busi- 
ness connections and stands for the progressive element in citizenship 
and for trustworthiness in every relation. 



HIRAM BAILEY. 



The life record of Hiram Bailey is interwoven with the history 
of Livermore and the valley. He is, indeed, one of the true pioneers 
of the county, having been one of the first men to locate in the valley 
where he still resides. He has now passed the eighty-fourth mile- 
stone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in the state of New 
York, January lo, 1830. 

He came alone to the west, making the trip by way of the Isthmus 
route and arriving in San Francisco on the 20th of March, 1852. He 
went to the San Ramon valley, where he spent the summers of 1852 
and 1 853, and later was for a time at Contra Costa. In August, 1855, 
he arrived in Livermore valley, at which time there were only two 
people in the immediate valley — Robert Livermore, the original set- 
tler, and a Scotchman by the name of Peter Wilson. Mr. Bailey 
took up carpenter work and his first job was the building of a house 
for Joseph Livermore. About 1865 he turned his attention to farm- 
ing, settling on a ranch five miles northwest of Livermore, where he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits for about eight years, cul- 
tivating a tract of two thousand acres. In 1873 he purchased another 
ranch of two thousand acres in Stanislaus county and operated the 
two ranches in conjunction for five years. His place was not used 
for grazing purposes, the greater part of it being under cultivation, 
and for several years he was farming approximately five thousand 
acres. He then retired and removed to Livermore, where he has 
since made his home, enjoying well earned and well merited rest from 
business cares during his later years. Throughout his active life he 
displayed sound judgment in the management of his business interests, 
was determined and unfaltering in carrying on his work, and througli 
his persistency of purpose won most gratifying success. 

Mr. Bailey was married in Livermore to Miss Casimira Liver- 
more, a daughter of Robert Livermore, who settled in the \allcy 
about 1 820 before the adxciit of anv otiicr white person. In 1914 Mr. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 427 

Bailcv was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who passed 
away in the month of April, leaving three of the eighi children who 
were born of their marriage. These are: Josephine, now the wife 
of Dennis F. Bernal of Livermore; Rebecca, the wife of J. A. Seg- 
bers of Dawson, Yukon Territory; and Mamie I., the wife of W. H. 
Hupers, a merchant of Livermore. 

In his political views Mr. Bailey has been a republican since 
the organization of the party and has been active in its support. 
When the law was passed making the office of towsnhip assessor an 
elective one he was chosen to that position and served for two years, 
while later he acted as deputy for a few years. He also served as 
supervisor of Murray township for ten years and for fourteen years 
was a trustee of the Livermore grammar school and for five years 
a trustee of the high school. He served during the twenty-seventh 
session in the state legislature, to which he was elected in 1886, with 
Judge Ellsworth, the speaker during that session being W. H. Jor- 
dan. Every public duty entrusted to him has been faithfully dis- 
charged and his record is most commendable. He is a member of 
Mosaic Lodge, No. 218, A. F. & A. M., and his life has been in har- 
mony with the teachings of the craft. He has lived to witness notable 
changes during the period of his residence in the Livermore valley, 
covering almost six decades, and he can relate many interesting inci- 
dents of the early days when he was a pioneer in this district, which 
is now thickly populated and highly cultivated. 



FRED WALTER FOSS. 

One of the most able, progressive and enterprising young men 
in public life in Alameda county is Fred Walter Foss, of Berkeley, 
now creditably serving as chairman of the finance committee of the 
board of supervisors. He was born in Lynn county, Missouri, on 
the I St of August, 1 87 1, and as a boy went to San Francisco, acquir- 
ing his education in the public schools of that city. He afterward 
entered the Commercial high school and, having obtained a thor- 
oughly practical education, accepted a position as bookkeeper with 
the Central Lumber & Mill Company, with whom he remained 
from 1887 to 1889. In the latter year he became yard clerk, book- 
keeper and salesman for the C. L. Dingley Company and from 1889 
to 1893 did capable and loyal work in those capacities. He was then 
offered a position by the Pacific Lumber Company and accepted it, 



428 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

remaining in this connection until 1895 and winning during that time 
the confidence of his superiors and the respect and esteem of all with 
whom he came in contact. Having mastered the details of the lum- 
ber business thoroughly, he determined to engage in business for him- 
self and accordingly came to Berkeley, founding the F. W. Foss Com- 
pany, of which he has since been president. This position has called 
forth his executive abilitv, his organizing power and his keen grasp 
of business detail, and in his management of the afifairs under his 
charge he has clearly demonstrated his possession of these qualities 
which have made his concern one of the well and favorably known 
business institutions in the community. 

It is not alone along business lines, however, that Mr. Foss has 
done splendid work for Berkeley, for he has been identified with 
public afifairs in the city for many years, his progressive ideas and 
the enterprising spirit which dominates all of his activities having 
proven helpful factors in community upbuilding. Mr. Foss is now 
a member of the county board of supervisors and as chairman of the 
finance committee has accomplished a great deal of important and 
constructive work. He has systematized and reorganized the afifairs 
of the department, putting them upon a strictly business basis, and he 
has used his influence unfailingly on the side of fairness and justice, 
giving everyone an equal opportunity for legitimate competition in 
the awarding of public contracts and the expending of public funds 
generally. He has been especially farsighted and discriminating 
in his use of all moneys for improvements of a permanent sort and 
is recognized as a man whose undoubtful business abilitv has formed 
the basis of valuable work in the public service. Mr. Foss is 
especially interested in securing for Alameda county a first-class 
public hospital and has progressive ideas concerning its building and 
etjuipment which his own words best describe. He says: "I believe 
tliat a community with the wealth of Alameda county should have 
an up-to-date and first class public hospital. The institution should 
be sanitary in every particular, with advanced scientific medical ap- 
pliances and conveniences and a credit to the county. I believe that 
this important measure should be submitted to the people for ap.- 
proval and provided for in a bond issue, the burden of which should 
be distributed ainono; those w lio will ha\c need of an institution of 
this kind in future years." 

In San Francisco, in 1893, Mr. Foss was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna M. Renwick, who passed away on New Year's day, 1910, 
leaving four children, Anita L., Lulu R., \\'illiam R. and Elmer R. 
In politics Mr. Foss is a stanch republican and was the first presi- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 429 

dent of the Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League of Berkeley. He 
is a member of the Berkeley Elks; Lodge No. 1002, L O. O. F. ; and 
the Woodmen of the World, and he is past vice chairman of the Hoo 
Hoos of California. He is undoubtedly one of the most able and 
prominent men of Berkeley and in business and in politics has made 
tangible and substantial contributions to municipal growth and de- 
velopment. 



HON. GEORGE C. PARDEE. 

An encomium upon the life and services of Hon. George C. 
Pardee is not needed in a volume presenting the representative 
citizens of Oakland, and indeed of the state of California, both of the 
past and present, for wherever the name is known it is honored as 
that of one of the forceful men of the younger generation who has 
made the accomplishment of his efforts the bulwark of our western 
statehood. The double honor of being the son of a pioneer and a 
native son of California belongs to Dr. Pardee, for his father, the 
Hrst Dr. Pardee of California fame, gave the strength of his man- 
hood's prime toward the upbuilding and development of the state. 
For the complete details concerning his life and the ancestry of the 
Pardee family refer to his personal biography. 

George C. Pardee was born in San Francisco, July 25, 1857, and 
received his primary education in the old City College, and later 
attended McClure's Academy and the College School of Oakland, 
whither his parents removed in 1867. Subsequently he took a three 
years course in the Oakland high school, after which he became a 
student in the University of California, first entering the fifth class, 
which was then and for some time afterward, maintained as a useful 
adjunct to the new institution of learning. His regular university 
course was taken during the years 1875 to 1879. The class which 
has given the state a governor, a justice of the supreme court, a pro- 
fessor of the university and other more or less distinguished citizens, 
was more numerous than any that had entered up to that time, and 
it was some years before any other of equal numbers followed it. Its 
members felt very proud when they graduated sixty-eight out of 
one hundred and fifty-nine who entered. It was a class which car- 
ried everything before it from the outset, for the seniors, juniors and 
sophomores were so much weaker in numbers that it was hardly 
worth while for them to attempt to withstand '79. In those days 



430 HISTORY OF AI.A.MKDA COUXTY 

baseball was the principal athletic sport of the university, and in this 
young Pardee exccUeil. retaining to the present day a fondness for 
the game. Charter day and class day were then celebrated with as 
much spirit as they are today, and in all of these diversions from the 
regular line of work he was ever found ready to take a part. Profes- 
sional studv in Europe was one of tiie objects wliich he had long had 
in mind, and after two years of preliminary work in Cooper College 
he went to Germanv and entered the University of Leipzig, from 
which he was graduated after three years. And not alone was this 
beneficial from a professiooal standpoint, but it served to give him a 
broader view of the world, a more complete understanding of human 
nature, and in diverse ways fitted him for the important positions he 
was afterward called upon to fill. 

Returning to his home in Oakland in 1885, Dr. Pardee began 
the practice of his profession in San Francisco and Oakland, married 
and established a home. It was not over two years, however, before 
he found himself interested in politics, manifesting the ability which 
was his both bv inheritance and training in his association with 
municipal affairs. In a short time he became a member of the Oak- 
land city board of health and made a strenuous campaign for the 
purification of the water supply. A popular demand was thus 
created that he should be a councilman, and in this capacity he in 
nowise lost the high regard in which he had come to be held. The 
highest office in the gift of the municipality was ne.xt his, and he 
entered upon the duties of mayor under discouraging labor condi- 
tions, which, however, he managed to surmount with credit to him- 
self and satisfaction to those who had entrusted him with the city's 
affairs, and upon retiring to private life carried with him the 
increased regard of the public. In 1898 he was a candidate for 
the republican nomination for governor of California, but was de- 
feated in the convention. On November 4, '.(y^i. he was elected on 
the republican ticket to th.e office of governor of California. As 
Governor, Dr. Pardee had a progressive administration. In fact, it 
was so progressive that tiie special interests who dominated politics 
at that time succeeded in defeating him for renomination. His na- 
tional reputation as a conservationist is attested by his having been 
selected to make the opening speech at the National Conservation 
Congress at St. Paul in 1910. 

Other official and scmi-ofHcial positions occupied by him have 
been regent of the State University; member of the National Con- 
servation Commission, under appointment by President Roosevelt; 
twice president of the National Irrigation Congress; delegate, sev- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 431 

eral times, to the National Conservation Congress; chairman of the 
Conservation Commission of the State of California; delegate to sev- 
eral national republican conventions; presidential elector; etc. 

He is an Honorary Thirty-Third Degree Mason, a Knight Tem- 
plar, a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of the 
Knights of Pythias, of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, of the 
State Medical Society, etc. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF OAKLAND. 

It has often been said that the banks of a community are a fair 
index of its commercial, industrial and financial prosperity. 
Especially is this true of the First National Bank of Oakland which 
dates its origin from a time when the citv was a mere countrv vil- 
lage and which has since that time been one of the important fac- 
tors in the financial development of the community. The institu- 
tion was founded on a policy of progressiveness, tempered by a safe 
conservatism, and this has been adhered to steadily through the 
years, the results being seen in the e.xcellent condition of the bank, 
which is today one of the leading financial enterprises in the country. 

The First National Bank of Oakland began its existence in 1S74 
and was the outgrowth of the Alameda County Savings & Loan So- 
ciety. In 1875 the bank was reorganized under the national system as 
the First National Gold Bank of Oakland. This was one of the few 
gold banks created, there being only nine in the entire United States 
— eight in California and one in Boston. A peculiarity of the gold 
banks was that they were permitted to take out circulation redeem- 
able in gold coin by the deposit of I'nited States bonds bearing inter- 
est payable in gold. All of the other national banks in the United 
States at that time were making no attempt to redeem their currency 
in gold, and consequently all currency was depreciating and could 
be exchanged for gold only at a great discount. After the govern- 
ment resumed specie payments, thereby restoring greenbacks to a 
parity with gold, there was no longer any reason for the special 
character of tiie gold banks, and they became like other national 
banks. Consequently in 1880, the word "gold" was dropped from 
the title of the First National Gold Bank of Oakland and thereafter 
It was known simply as the First National Bank of Oakland. Affili- 
ated with it is the First Trust ami Saxings Bank which, althougli a 



432 HISTORY OF AI.A.MMDA COL'XTY 

separate institution, is owned by the stockholders in the First Na- 
tional and managed by the same board of directors. 

Although this was organized only in 1908 it has now total deposits 
amounting to more than 'two million dollars and it is constantly 
expanding its resources and widening its sphere of influence. 

The officers of the two banks are as follows: P. E. Bowles, presi- 
dent; George D. Metcalf, vice president; L. G. Burpee, vice 
president; O. D. Jacoby, cashier; and J. F. Lange, assistant cashier. 
The board of directors is as follows: L. C. Morehouse, E. L. Dow, 
H. C. Morris, E. A. Heron, W. H. Taylor, L. G. Burpee, O. D. 
Jacoby, P. E. Bowles and George D. Metcalf. The capital and sur- 
plus of the First National Bank are six hundred thousand dollars, 
and its total resources are more than four million dollars. The First 
Trust and Savings Bank has a capital of five hundred thousand dol- 
lars and resources of over four million dollars. 

The present management took control in 1893 and under this 
administration the present modern building was erected at the inter- 
section of San Pablo Avenue, Broadway and Fourteenth streets. 
Believing that the function of the modern bank is to supply any 
banking need that any customer may possibly desire, the First Na- 
tional Bank has provided a fine and up-to-date safe deposit depart- 
ment, in which boxes for the keeping of valuable papers, jewelry and 
other things may be rented at a low price. The safe deposit vaults 
are unique in being situated on the street fiocjr, so that customers are 
not obliged to climb stairs in reaching their boxes. A storage vault 
in the basement provides facilities for the safekeeping of rugs, sil- 
verware, fine paintings and other valuables of a bulky nature. The 
officers and directors of the First National Bank are all men of in- 
sight and ability, main of whom arc proving their capabilities in 
other fields of endeavor. They have steadily adhered to the excel- 
lent policy upon which the institution was founded and their intelli- 
gent and able management has kept the First National a power in 
financial circles of this part of the state. 



ADDISON WOOD NAVLOR 

One of the most commanding figures in financial circles in 
Berkeley and Alameda county, California, as well as a man who 
his influenced even the state of California by his activities is Addison 
Wood Naylor, president of the First National Bank of Berkeley and 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 433 

the Berkeley Bank of Savings and Trust Company, the combined 
resources of which institutions exceed eight million dollars. An 
interesting history of the growth of these two concerns can be found 
on another page of this work, and therefrom can easily be gleaned 
an idea as to the ability of Mr. Naylor as a financier. Moreover is 
he identified with numerous other enterprises of Berkeley, occupying 
a foremost place in the business affairs of the city. Along financial 
lines he is also president of the South Berkeley Bank. 

Mr. Naylor was born in Morgan county, Ohio, August 27, 1841, 
of Quaker ancestry. In the acquirement of his education he attended 
the Quaker schools, finishing in the Mt. Pleasant Seminary, Ohi 
where he subsequently taught for a time. Ambitious to succeed and 
recognizing the value of a more thorough education, he then at- 
tended the Iron City College at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, from which 
he was graduated in August, 1864, and resumed teaching, joining 
the staff of the normal scho(jl at Chester Hill, Ohio. In 1865 he 
located in New Sharon, Iowa, where for a number of years he was 
engaged in the dry-goods business, and he established in 1873 a 
private bank in that city, the cashier of which was Miss Anna King, 
the first woman to ever occupy such a position in the United States. 
Mr. Navlor remained in New Sharon until 1878, when he sold his 
interests in order to seek the larger opportunities of Des Moines. 
There he assisted, in 1878, in the organization of the Capitol City 
State Bank, of which he became the first president, continuing in that 
capacity with highly gratifying success for ten years. Disposing of 
his interests in 1888, he came to the Pacific coast, making his first 
home in San Diego, California, and afterward living in various 
places until in 1891, when he permanently located in Berkeley. 
Here, in 1892, he became a prominent factor in the organization of 
The Commercial Bank, which soon was converted into the First Na- 
tional Bank, and the Berkeley Bank of Savings. In 1906 a trust 
department was also established under his direction and the name of 
the last mentioned bank was changed to the Berkeley Bank of Savings 
and Trust Company. He held the position of cashier and manager 
of these institutions until the death of the president, Mr. Shat- 
tuck, when Mr. Naylor succeeded him in that office. He has ever 
since discharged his important duties as chief executive of the banks, 
building up two of the strongest financial institutions within the con- 
fines of the state. In March, 1904, Mr. Naylor was instrumental in 
organizing the South Berkeley Bank, of which he was also elected 
president, having held the office ever since. To give an idea of his 
wonderful ability along financial lines, which really may be termed 



434 11ISTC)R^" OF AI.A.MMUA COUNTY 

genius, it is but necessary to mention that the First National Bank of 
Berkeley in January, 1892, had deposits amounting practically to 
forty-nine thousand dollars, while at the present writing the com- 
bined resources of the First National and Savings Banks amount to 
over eight million dollars. 

Near Marietta, Ohio, January 9, 1864, Mr. Naylor married Miss 
Rebecca Smedley King, a daughter of James and Deborah (Stevens) 
King. Her father passed away in that state in September, 1906, at 
the remarkable age of ninety years. Mr. and Mrs. Naylor became 
the parents of the following children: Flora May, who died in 1869^ 
at the age of three years; Frank L., vice president of the First 
National Bank and the Berkeley Bank of Savings, who until enter- 
ing upon his present position served as cashier of these institutions; 
and Jessie, who married Elmer K. Cole of Berkeley, cashier of the 
South Berkeley Bank. 

Although the business duties of Mr. Naylor are very confining, 
he ever finds time to e.xert his progressive spirit in the support of 
worthy public enterprises. He alwavs uses his power and influence 
toward promoting the good of the city, the county and the state and 
many beneficial measures have succeeded by his endorsement and 
through his backing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Naylor were reared in the faith of the Friends 
church, both having descended from an ancestry deeply imbued with 
these religious beliefs for hundreds of years. John Naylor, one of 
the early forebears of Mr. Naylor, was persecuted in every pos- 
sible way for preaching Quakerism and even endured torture for the 
sake of his Christianity. He came to America in order to escape 
these prosecutions and it was he who founded the familv on the east- 
ern shore of Maryland. Mrs. Naylor is equally sincere and zealous 
in her religion, having been instrumental in the organizing of two 
Friends churches, one in Des Moines, Iowa, and one in Berkeley. 
Mr. Naylor has always been in deep sympathy with the temperance 
movement, having joined the Good Templars lodge in New Sharon 
in 1876, and also belonging to the State Alliance. Casting his first 
vote in support of (ieiiera! (irant, he has ever since affiliated with 
tlie republican party. He still regrets the fact that he was not able 
to vote for Lincoln, as at tiiat time he was on his way from Ohio to 
Iowa. For some years Mr. Naylor was a member of the Berkeley 
library board and did valuable service in that connection, recogniz- 
ing the importance of educating the general public. He is ever 
.-.ctive in promoting the moral and intellectual status of the people 
and has proven a powerful factor for good along those lines. For 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 435 

many years he has served as Sunday school superintendent in the 
Friends church and has officiated as elder of his church for a long 
period. 



A. S. KELLY, ^L D. 



Dr. A. S. Kelly has since 1902 been engaged in the medical pro- 
fession in Oakland, having won in the course of years a gratifying 
practice. He is equally well known for his efforts on behalf of the 
hygienic welfare of the school children, making his work particularly 
effective as a member of the Oakland board of education. A native 
of Ontario, Canada, Dr. Kelly was born January 15, 1879, and is of 
English and Scotch parentage. His father, A. W. Kelly, was born 
in England and emigrated to America, later becoming a prominent 
citizen of Yolo county, California, where he located when Dr. Kelly 
was a boy of fifteen years, and there he conducted a profitable mer- 
cantile establishment for si.xteen years. The mother was a native of 
Scotland. 

Dr. Kelly spent his boyhood days within the borders of the 
Dominion, journeying with his parents to Yolo county, California, 
when fifteen years of age. He there remained until coming to Oak- 
land in 1896, his capital upon his arrival here consisting mainly of 
good health, energy and the ambition to succeed in the world. At 
times he worked for his board and on Saturdays and holidays earned 
the money to assist him in continuing his education. Of his own 
volition he entered the high school, graduating from that institution 
and supporting himself during the entire time. He also earned his 
way through the Cooper Medical College of San Francisco, from 
which he graduated in 1901. He began the practice of his pro- 
fession in Oakland in 1902, after a year's hospital experience. Care- 
ful in diagnosis, he is successful in applying the remedies a case 
requires and as the years have passed has not only succeeded in 
building up a gratifying patronage but has made a name for himself 
among his colleagues. He is at present surgeon to the Alameda 
County Hospital and is professor of operative surgery in the Oakland 
Medical College. He is a member of the County Medical Society, 
of which he was president in 191 1 ; the California Medical Society; 
the American Medical Association; and the California Academy of 
Medicine. Of a pleasing personality and sympathetic nature, Dr. 
Kellv inspires that confidence in his patients which is so necessary to 
obtain results and is popular on account of these ijualitics. 



436 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

A public-spirited man, Dr. Kelly has always been interested 
ill the general welfare and in April, 1907, was tendered the nomina- 
tion on the republican ticket for member of the board of education 
for the city of Oakland from his ward. He was elected by a large 
majority. Ever since he has been an untiring worker for the cause 
of education, having been largely responsible for the introduction 
of medical inspection in the public schools by a competent physician 
who devotes his entire time to the hygienic welfare of the children. 
It is now the dutv of this physician to not only examine general sani- 
tary conditions, but to give attention to sickly and backward children. 
In 1909 and 191 1 Dr. Kelly was again nominated and elected school 
director. As chairman of the high school committee he has taken a 
strong stand against secret societies and clubs in the high schools, con- 
sidering them a danger to the democracy and equality of schools, the 
principles on which xAmerican educational institutions are founded. 

He has been president of the board of education for the past two 
years. Dr. Kelly, however, has not occupied himself entirely with 
the ethical side of life, but takes a deep interest in the material wel- 
fare of the city and trade expansion, giving an impetus to new meas- 
ures undertaken in those interests as a member of the Commercial 
Club. His name is also carried on the roster of the Nile and Uni- 
versity Clubs. In the Masonic order he stands high and is a Shriner 
and is also a popular member of the Elks. There is much to be ad- 
mired in the career of Dr. Kelly, who by his own efforts has attained 
the position he now occupies, and his accomplishments are the more 
commendable as they have been largely consecrated to the public 
welfare. 



JUDGE GEORGE SMITH. 

Honored and respected by all, Judge (Icorge Smith occupies an 
enviable position in the regard ot his fellow citizens of San Lean- 
dro and Alameda county, where he has made his home since 1867. 
He was the si.xtli in order of birth in a family of seven children, his 
natal day being April ;. 1S22. He comes of Holland ancestry, his 
grandfather, George Schmidt, having been born in Holland in 1730. 
\\'hen a boy of ten years he accompanied his parents to .America and 
while serving in the I'rcneh and Indian war sustained a wound tliat 
caused his death twenty-live years later. He married Katrina \'an 
Alstine, and thev occupied the old stone tavern in Esopus, Xew "\'ork 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 437 

which the English army, under Sir Henry Clinton, failed to destroy 
when the town was burned, October 17, 1777. In that house the wife 
lived for one hundred and three years and there the father of Judge 
Smith was born, June 14, 1785. In 1810 he married Anna Ellis, who 
was born in Dutchess county, New York, October 20, 1793, a daugh- 
ter of Noah Ellis, who was born in 1763 and was of English lineage. 
When sixteen years of age he volunteered for service under General 
Washington and participated in the Revolutionary war to its close, 
acting a part of the time as one of Washington's life guard. In 1784 
he married Amelia Graham, of Highland Scotch descent. Noah 
Ellis was the pioneer settler of Rensselaerville, New York, he and 
his wife riding through the unbroken forest to their new home. He 
died in Middletown, Delaware county, New York, in 1859. For 
some time George Smith, father of the Judge, followed farming in 
Delaware county, but in 1822 he returned to the old stone tavern at 
Esopus. On the ist of May, 1823, the family started for Chautauqua 
county, New York, arriving there thirty days later. 

Judge Smith was reared and educated in his native state, attend- 
ing the Fredonia Academy, from which he was graduated in 1839, 
after which he took up the profession of teaching. In 1846 he be- 
came a teacher at Coldwater, Michigan, and afterward became one 
of the pioneer settlers at Hales Corners, Wisconsin, not far from 
Milwaukee. While there he strongly supported the state constitu- 
tion and urged the admission of Wisconsin into the Union. In 1848 
he returned to New York and followed farming and teaching at 
South Stockton. On the 24th of July, 1850, he married Eliza M. 
Fenner, and they became parents of six sons and three daughters. 
Mrs. Smith was the eldest daughter of C. C. Fenner, who was born 
December 5. 1801, and in 1825 married Lucinda Fross, who was born 
January 9, 1807, ^"^ was the eldest daughter of Rufus Fross, who 
settled in Chautauqua, New York, in 18 10. C. C. Fenner, a pioneer 
of South Stockton, built the first sawmill and the hrst grist mill of 
that section. 

On the I St of December, 1855, Judge Smith and his wife, after 
having tried dairy farming in New York, removed to Michigan and 
resumed teaching, which both had previously followed. In r8i;7, 
however, they once more took up dairy farming at Stockton, New 
York. Suffering from rheumatism, Mr. Smith was advised bv his 
physician to make an overland journey to California, and on the 
15th of April, 1861, left home for the far west, accompanied bv liis 
brothers-in-law, P. C. and \\'allacc Fenner, and his nephew, Alonzo 
Putnam. On reaching Toledo, Ohio, tliey learned that Fort Sumter 



438 HISTORY OF ala:\ikl)a colxty 

had been fired upon and on arriving at Chicago saw two companies 
armed and equipped leaving for the front. The company with which 
they were traveling soon joined with otlicrs, some from Illinois. In- 
tiiana. Wisconsin and Michigan, until there were one hundred men 
and nineteen women in the party. It was perhaps because of the large 
number in the party that they were not attacked when crossing the 
plains, for many other parties suftered as the result of the unrest 
among Indians at the time of the war. 

After reaching California Mr. Smith spent the winter with Sid 
Griggs at Sid's Landing, Colusa county, and that fall \i)ted for 
Leland Stanford, republican nominee for governor. In April, 1862, 
he engaged in teaching school at Fairfield and was appointed deputy 
county assessor and later deputy county clerk of Solano county. 
Pleased with California and its prospects, he- sent for his wife to 
join him, and she started on the ist of January, 1863, as a passenger 
on the ship Ariel. In May of that year Mr. Smith was one of the 
pioneers in the Washoe territory, where he engaged in teaming, and 
while there voted for the second time to convert California into a 
state. On the 17th of March, 1867, he and his wife took up their 
permanent abode at San Leandro, where he purchased a house and 
three blocks of ground from Socrates Hufi'. On this land was an 
orchard of cherry and pear trees, the cherry trees being some of the 
first planted in this county, and two of them are still standing and 
bearing fruit. 

In 1869 Mr. Smith was elected justice of the peace, the position 
being an important one, for San Leandro was the capital of the 
county. In 1871 he was re-elected, but at the ne.xt term, the courts 
having been removed to Oakland, he did not seek the position. In 
(872 San Leandro was incorporated and he was elected police judge, 
filling the position for four years. Twice he has been elected one of 
the five trustees of San Leandro and has taken an active and helpful 
interest in promoting the progress and upbuilding of the place. 

Neither the Judge nor his wife ever joined a religious organiza- 
tion, yet were active in the work of the Presbyterian church, which 
they attended, and several times he served as a trustee of the church. 
He was also elected and served for seven years as superintendent of 
the Sunday school and did much to further the growth and promote 
the progress of the church. He also ser\ed for three terms of tliree 
years each as trustee of the schools in San Leandro. On the 24th of 
|ulv, 1900, he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding, enter- 
taining one hundred guests. Their home. Rose Cottage, was deco- 
rated in exquisite and tasteful style, all in the color of gold, and re- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 439 

freshments were served in a vine-covered arbor near the house. It 
was a happy occasion, not only for the judge and his wife, but for all 
who were present. Judge Smith has considerable talent as a writer of 
verse and on the occasion of the golden jubilee read one of his origi- 
nal poems. His wife died December 14, 1906, at the age of seventy- 
eight years, after they had traveled life's journey together as man 
and wife for fifty-six years. 



GEORGE S. MEREDITH. 

A man of varied interests, forceful personality and effective abil- 
ity, George S. Meredith is numbered today among the most able 
financiers and public-spirited citizens of Oakland, where he is cashier 
of the Farmers & Merchants Savings Bank and active in various 
movements and projects designed to promote the permanent inter- 
ests of the community. Through successive stages of progress and 
advancement he has risen steadily in his chosen field of labor and 
occupies today a position of distinctive prominence in banking 
circles. He is a director of the bank as well as cashier and secre- 
tary; has been secretary of the Oakland Clearing House Association 
ever since its organization; and is a member of the executive council 
of the California Bankers' Association. 

Mr. Meredith was born in Sacramento, California, December 16, 
1865, and is a son of one of the early pioneers of Sierra county, from 
which he served as a member of the state legislature in 1865. He 
later moved into Oakland. In the public schools of the latter city 
George S. Meredith acquired his education and after laying aside his 
text books turned his attention to the newspaper business in St. Hel- 
ena, Napa county, where he remained for five years. At the end of 
that time, however, he returned to Oakland and took a position in a 
local bank. He entered the employ of the Farmers & Merchants Sav- 
ings Bank in 1902, beginning a career which has already brought him 
prominence and distinction. Soon after he became connected with 
this institution he was made its cashier, a position whicii he now oc- 
cupies and the duties of which he discharges in an able and con- 
scientious manner. He is recognized as a far-sighted and resource- 
ful financier of sound judgment and discriminating ability and since 
entering the Farmers & Merchants Savings Bank has been a helpful 
factor in its success. 



440 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Meredith is an authority on real-estate values and his promi- 
nence in this line is recognized throughout the county. He serves on 
the board of appraisers for schoolhouse sites in Oakland and has 
various other public and semi-public connections, his interest and 
enthusiasm having rapidly carried him forward into important rela- 
tions with general community life. He was at one time chairman of 
the republican city central committee, is secretary and treasurer of 
the Industrial Home for the Adult Blind, has been secretary of the 
Oakland Clearing-House Association since its formation in 1906 
and is a director and vice president of the California Mutual Invest- 
ment Association. 

Mr. Meredith married Miss Mary Xoyes, a native of San Fran- 
cisco, who is well known in social circles of Oakland. He belongs to 
the Nile Club and is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the 
native Sons of the Golden West. He is at this time potentate of 
Aahmes Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He is widely and favorably 
known in business circles of Oakland, where his ability, industry and 
integrity have gained him the respect and esteem of all with whom 
he comes in contact. 



FRANK W. BILGER. 



Business, fraternal, social and political interests of Oakland find 
a progressive and worthy representative in Frank W. Bilger, whose 
interests have extended to many fields touching closely the general 
development of this community. He is president, treasurer and gen- 
eral manager of The Oakland Paving Company and has a record of 
able and far-sighted service as president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He has been active in the support of various progressive 
public measures and his name has come to be regarded as synonymous 
with development and progress in this locality. 

Frank W. Bilger was born at Willow Springs, Jackson county, 
Oregon, August 2, 1868, a son of William F. and Pauline (Hauser) 
Bilger, both of German ancestry. His education was acquired in San 
Leandro, Alameda county, where the family moved in 1874 and 
where he remained until 1883, after which he spent two years work- 
ing upon Iiis father's farm at Vacaville, Solano county. Tiring of 
this, he secured employment in 1885 in Bowman's drug store in Oak- 
land as errand boy, window washer and general handy man. During 
this time he entered the department of pharmacy at the University 



I 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 441 

of California and was graduated in 1889 with the degree of Ph. G. 
Pending his intended entrance into the Cooper Medical College, he 
secured a position as collector for the Oakland Paving Company 
and, becoming interested in this line of work, rose rapidly to the posi- 
tion of bookkeeper. On the death of one of the owners he was elected 
a member of the board of trustees and later was made secretary, treas- 
urer and general manager. He is now president of the company, 
which position his initiative spirit and executive ability make him 
eminently well qualified to fill. In 1905 Mr. Bilger, with Anson S. 
Blake, organized the Blake & Bilger Company, contractors for all 
kinds of work connected with the paving business. Although he has 
labored for his individual success, he is also interested in the general 
business advancement of the city and for years promoted this in an 
intelligent and able way as a director of the Oakland Chamber of 
Commerce. During the period of his service the membership in this 
body was greatly increased and his work proved so valuable that hi 
1906, on the consolidation of the Chamber of Commerce with the 
Board of Trade, he was made first vice president of the organization, 
of which he was elected president in the following year. In his 
official capacity and as a private citizen he took an active part in the 
relief work following the fire of 1906 and was truly a Good Samari- 
tan to those afflicted in that disaster. Mr. Bilger organized the Har- 
bor Bank in 1907 and served as its first president, inagurating the 
policy of progressiveness, tempered by a safe conservatism, to which 
its directorate has since adhered. He is recognized in business cir- 
cles as a resourceful and discriminating man, whose sagacity is far- 
reaching and whose integrity is beyond question. 

In Oakland, on the 19th of December, 1894, ^^r. Bilger was 
united in marriage to Miss Carrie S. Siebe, a daughter of George 
Siebe. for many years an official in the San Francisco customhouse. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bilger have four children — Anson S., Marion A., Wil- 
liam F. and Frank W., Jr. 

Mr. Bilger is prominent in Masonic circles in California and was 
the organizer of the Alameda County Shriners Club. He was instru- 
mental in having the Imperial Council grant a charter for Aahmes 
Temple, Oakland's new shrine, and in 1910 was elected first illus- 
trious potentate of this temple. He is a member of the Yuerba Buena 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; Oakland Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M.; 
Oakland Commandery, K. T., and Oakland Consistory, A. & A. S. R. 
He is connected with St. Philip Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine, 
M. P. Sovereign. 



442 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Bilger is also well known in local republican politics and 
stands high in the councils of his party, his public service having been 
always of the most intelligent and discriminating kind. For a period 
of six years he was chairman of the city central committee and in 19(^5 
he managed Mayor Mott's campaign. He was also state campaign 
manager for Alden Anderson, candidate for governor in 1910, and he 
has done important political wx)rk along this line. Besides the Oak- 
land Chamber of Commerce he is a member of the Merchants Ex- 
change, the Oakland Commercial, the University of California, 
Athenian, Nile and Deutscher Clubs, the Woodmen of the World, 
the Loyal Order of Moose, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
the Union League and the Royal Rosarians of Portland. He is the 
tenth member of the Society of American Magicians and also a mem- 
ber of the Pacific Coast Society of Magicians and was one of the 
organizers and the first secretary of the Vernon Heights and Lake 
Shore Improvement Club. He also belongs to the Claremont Coun- 
try Club and is fond of outdoor sports, especially hunting and fishing. 
He is a member of the San Francisco Fly Casting Club, going to the 
Sierra Nevada mountains and to Lodge on the Truckee river. He is 
a man of varied interests, practically all of which he has made forces 
in progress, and for many years the influence of his ability and per- 
sonality have been a C(Mistructive element in the advancement of the 
community. 



GEORGE T. POMEROY, M. D. 

Dr. George T. Pomcroy, who has been actively engaged in prac- 
tice as a physician and surgeon of Oakland for the past seven years, 
is an able and representative member of the medical profession here. 
He was born in Whiteside county, Illinois, on the 8th of February, 
1877. the son of a Methodist minister. At the early age of thirteen 
years he began providing for his own support, going to Chicago and 
there working for a time in the office of Dr. A. B. Strong. There it 
was that his ambition to one day become a physician took root. In 
1892 he made his way to Arizona and in that state worked with a 
surveying crew. Always an omnivorous reader and deep student 
and anxious to augment his knowledge, he next attended both night 
school and business college in Los Angeles, California. Subsequently 
he went to Valparaiso, Indiana, and there began preparatory work 
in the studv of medicine. On returning to Arizona he became pay- 




DR. GEORGE T. POIIEROY 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 445 

master at the Commonwealth mine at Pearce. At the time of the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American war he entered the government 
employ, serving as quartermaster's agent for Fort Grant, Arizona, 
stationed at Wilcox, that state, and also as special revenue collector 
in Arizona. Subsequently he took up the study of mining and chem- 
istry, mastering a correspondence course at night. 

In 1902 Dr. Pomeroy came to Oakland, California, and here 
entered the Oakland College of Medicine and Surgery, being the 
very first student enrolled in the institution and a member of the 
first graduating class in 1906. The city of Oakland his since remained 
the scene of his professional labors, and the large practice accorded 
him is proof of his skill and ability in the line of his chosen voca- 
tion. For a year he acted as resident physician at Providence Hos- 
pital. In the summer of 1913 he took a post-graduate course at Rush 
Medical College of Chicago, and he has also kept in close touch 
with the progress which is being continually made by the profession 
through his membership in the Alameda County Medical Society, 
the California State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. 

In 1906 Dr. Pomeroy was united in marriage to Miss Grace 
Creasinger, of Los Angeles, California. He has taken an active part 
in church and Sunday school work, being one of the officials in the 
Methodist church of Oakland and an officer in the California State 
Association of Sunday Schools. He is likewise the youngest member 
of the board of trustees of the Young Men's Christian Association 
in Oakland. His record is that of a self-made man who has won 
recognition and success entirely by his own efforts and wisely directed 
energy and may well serve as a source of inspiration and encourage- 
ment to others. 



THEODORE GIER. 



One of the most prominent and widely known men in California 
is Theodore Gier, founder and president of the Theodore Gier Wine 
Company of Oakland. He has displayed both initiative spirit and a 
genius for organization and never fearing to venture where favoring 
opportunity has led the way, he has reached a commanding position 
in connection with one of the most e.xtensive and important produc- 
tive industries on the Pacific coast. One interest alone, however, 
docs not indicate the scope of his activities, for his efforts have ex- 



446 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

tended to many fields touching closely commercial, industrial and 
financial interests and aside from all of these lines of endeavor in 
which his labors have brought him profit, he has put forth efifective 
efforts for the benefit and upbuilding of his city, county and state, 
cooperating largely and generously where the welfare of the com- 
munity has been involved. 

Mr. Gier is a native of Peine, Hanover, Germany, and acquired 
his education in the public schools of that locality. He learned 
wine making in Peine and was afterward a wine salesman in various 
parts of Germany. In 1881 he came to America and after spending 
one year in Chicago traveled through various eastern states. In 1882 
he came to California and bought a small ranch at Anaheim, vshich 
he later sold, moving to Oakland, where he established himself in the 
grocery business. In 1890 he became identified with the wine mak- 
ing industry and in this field has since made rapid advancement to a 
position of distinction and importance. In 1893 he bought a vine- 
vard in Livermore, in 1898 another at Napa and in 1901 the second 
vineyard at Livermore. He owns also a vineyard at St. Helena, pur- 
chased in 1903. His extensive wine making interests are conducted 
under the name of the Theodore Gier Wine Company which was in- 
corporated a few years ago for one million dollars. This company 
operates vineyards aggregating over one thousand acres and has wine 
cellars capable of storing more than a million gallons at the dififerent 
vineyards. The general offices, salesroom and wine cellar at Nos. 
581-1^93 Eighteenth street in Oakland occupy a floor space of twenty- 
six thousand four hundred square feet. The local wine cellar is one 
of the most sanitary and best equipped in California. The company 
makes a most complete variety of wines and disposes of about three 
hundred thousand gallons every year, the Giersberger brands having 
become a standard article all over the United States. 

Some years ago Theodore Gier contribu^d a very interesting 
essay on wine culture for "Facts and Figures," of which the follow- 
ing paragraphs are extracts: 

"The numerous medals that have been awarded the wines of .Ala- 
meda county in competition with American as well as foreign wines, 
both in America and Europe, and the flattering commendations of 
connoisseurs, have established beyond a doubt the natural fitness of 
both soil and climate to the production of the highest grades of wines, 
especially of the Sauterne and Cabernet types. It is with pride that 
we speak of the numerous medals that were awarded our wines at 
the Paris Exposition in 1889, and latterly at our own Columbian 
Exposition in 1893. The encouragement of our achievements has 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 447 

given the industry renewed impetus and shown possibilities of greater 
success than was conceived of. 

"It is a sad commentary upon the American wine drinkers that 
dealers at times, in order to get the higher grades upon the market, 
have been compelled to sell them under foreign labels. I have known 
of higher grades of Alameda county wines being sold in the New 
York markets at enormous prices under foreign labels. In my opin- 
ion the time is not far distant when California will supersede the 
world in wines and Alameda county will be in the foreground. I 
have been associated with the production of wines the greater portion 
of my life and have had experience in other parts of the state, but 
believe Alameda county to have superior advantages, both in soil and 
climate, to most any other locality, especially in the production of 
the French varieties of Sauterne and Cabernet types. 

"In 1892, in company with two gentlemen from Rhode Island by 
the names of Barker and Chesbro, I traveled through Germany and 
Austria, visiting the leading wineries, inspecting their methods and 
studying their wines with a view of acquiring such information as 
might be of service in this country, and brought back much valuable 
knowledge, some of which I have been able to put to practical use; 
but, on account of the difference of our soil and climate, everything 
must be modified to suit our conditions. In my vineyard at Liver- 
more I have in bearing about two hundred twenty-five acres and am 
now adding about thirty acres more. 

"I have one hundred and twenty-five different varieties of grapes 
in all, many of which are for experimental purposes. Among the 
above varieties, from which my finer grades of wine are produced, 
are Cabernet, Sauvignon, Carbernet Franc, Verdot, Petit Sirrah, 
Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Petite Pinot, Petite Bouchet, Folle 
Blanche, Muscatel du Bordelaise, Green Hungarian, Grand Noir 
and Zinfandel. With two or three exceptions these grapes have been 
imported from France with a view of producing the Sauterne and 
Cabernet types, so popular among wine drinkers, and our success has 
far exceeded our expectations. There are in Livermore Valley about 
four thousand acres of producing vines, and the output in 1911 in 
round numbers was three and one-fourth of a million gallons." 

Mr. Gier married in 1886 Miss Ferdinande Hornung, a native of 
Marysville, California, and they have three daughters — Grace, Elsa 
and Amalie. Mr. Gier is connected fraternally with the Elks, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the various Masonic organ- 
izations, and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. 
As a public-spirited and progressive citizen he takes an intelligent 



448 HISTORY OF ALA.MKDA COUNTY 

and active interest in public afifairs and to iiis influence and energy 
is due the promotion of some of the most important public and semi- 
public enterprises in this part of California. He was one of the 
founders and is a director of the Security Bank & Trust Company 
of Oakland, aided in the establishment of the Merchants' Exchange, 
of which he served as president for several years and of which he is 
now director, and was one of the founders and still is a director in 
the Oakland Chamber of Commerce. He was one of the promoters 
of the Oakland Exposition in 1897 and served as vice president of 
the association and was president of the board of commissioners for 
Alameda county to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, at St. Louis. 
In addition to this he promoted the tunnel between Alameda and 
Contra Costa counties. In 1903 he was honored by Emperor VVil- 
helm of Germany, being presented by an order of the crown in recog- 
nition of services rendered during the Boxer war in China. Mr. 
Gier is easily the leader in the wine industry in California and is a 
splendid representative of the prominent manufacturer and capitalist 
to whom business is but one phase of life and who does not allow it to 
exclude him from active participation in the other vital interests 
which make up the sum of human existence. 



PHILIP E. BOWLES. 



Mr. Bowles, residing in Claremont, was born at Areata, Hum- 
bnldt county, California, in October, 1S59, and is a son of Joseph anil 
Sarah (Harding) Bowles, who came to this state from New Orleans 
and were among the early settlers of Humboldt county. In 1867 the 
family moved to Santa Clara. 

At the age of nineteen Philip E. Bowles entered the University 
of California, from which he graduated with the scientific degree in 
1882. He soon became associated in business with the late George 
W. McNear in the grain and shipping business, and his experien.ces 
in that enterprise covered a period of ten years. In 1893 he became 
interested in the First National Bank of Oakland and not long after 
was elected its president. In 1903 he organized the American 
National Bank of San Francisco, of which he is still president. Mr. 
B')\vles is also president of the First Trust and Savings Bank of Oak- 
hind and tile First National Bank of Vallejo. 

Ill 1S84 Mr. Bowles was united in marriage with Miss Marv A. 
.McNear, a daughter of George W. McNear, his former partner in 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 149 

business. They are the parents of four children. For more than 
twenty years Mr. Bowles' business activity has been confined to the 
field of banking, which has precluded his indulgence in other enter- 
prises. He is shrewd, diplomatic and known through the Bay Cities 
as one of the foremost men of his profession. 

Mr. Bowles is a man of strong physique, particularly fond of 
outdoor sports of all kinds, being especially interested in the manly 
sports of the Claremont Club, to which he belongs. He is also a 
member of the Pacific Union and University Clubs of San Francisco 
and for some time has been a member of the board of regents of the 
University of California. He is a courteous, genial gentleman and a 
man of sound business judgment, public-spirited and progressive, 
taking an active interest in works of charity and public beneficence. 
His business acumen leads him to a thorough investigation of every 
proposition to which he lends his support. His work is in San Fran- 
cisco as well as in Oakland and the demands of both cities receive his 
attention. 



JOHN RICHARD NYSTROM. 

The late John Richard Nystrom was for many years numbered 
among the prominent and valued citizens of Richmond, where he 
was regarded as a pioneer settler, his residence there dating from the 
year 1871. From that time on he was active in the real-estate busi- 
ness as the developer of several subdivisions and tracts and took a 
leading part in public aflfairs, lending the weight of his influence to 
all projects for the advancement and growth of the communiiv. 

He was a native of Finland, his birth having occurred August 24, 
1848. His parents, John and Johanna (Kallis) Nystrom, died in 
their native country. In their family were eight children, of whom 
the subject of this review was the eldest. 

John Richard Nystrom acquired his very early education under 
the instruction of his mother and later entirely by his own efforts in 
private study, and when he was twenty-three years of age emigrated 
to America, making a permanent location in California. Previous to 
this, however, he traveled over a large part of the world, visiting the 
land of the Midnight Sun and then journeying far enough south to 
see the Southern Cross. Having heard a great deal of the wonderful 
resources and matchless climate of California, he finally decided to 
locate in this state and after his arrival was first employed in boating 



450 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

on the bay. He had been a sailor before the mast and in his new 
work took charge of the vessel of his late captain, for whom he car- 
ried on a general freighting business for a period of nine years. In 
the meantime he had purchased seventy acres of land in Richmond 
and after retiring from boating he operated this until 1903, when he 
subdivided the property and sold it for building lots, retaining a part 
for his own home. Ail of the land is within the corporate limits of 
Richmond and is now fully ticvclnpcd and on it many houses are 
built. In addition to this Mr. Nystrom had an interest in seven other 
subdivisions in Richmond and did some important work in the line 
of land development. He was a member of the Richmond Industrial 
Commission and a director in the Mechanics Bank of Richmond. 

In 1881 Mr. Nystrom married Miss Mary Griffins, a daughter of 
Owen and Kate (Evans) Griffins, both of whom have passed away. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nystrom became the parents of eleven children — 
Alfred John, Edwin, Mary E., Mabel, Alice, William, Louise, 
Hazel, Edna, Raymond and Richard. The last named has passed 
away. 

Mr. Nvstrom was a member of the Masonic fraternity, having be- 
come a Royal Arch Mason at Berkeley and a Knight Templar at Oak- 
land. He was a trustee in the Presbyterian church of Richmond and 
gave his political allegiance to the republican party, having served for 
fifteen years as school director and for a long period as a member of 
the citv council. He was an intelligent, active and progressive citizen 
and in all official or personal relations held the esteem and confidence 
of those who were associated with him. On December 24, 19 13, Mr. 
Nvstrom passed away, after many years of usefulness in a community 
where he will long be remembered as an able, honest and kindly 
gentleman. 



HON. WILLIAM H. DONAHUE. 

One of the leading members of the Alameda County bar and a 
man who has demonstrated his knowledge, understanding and ability 
in various public positions along lines of his profession is Hon. Wil- 
liam H. Donahue, who, following a period of able service as district 
attorney, was in January, 1913. elected judge of the superior court. 
He is a native son of California, born in Mission San Jose, February 
13, 1870. In the acquirement of an education he attended various 
public schools in Alameda county and afterward entered Washing- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 451 

on College, graduating with the class of 1891. Following this he 
turned his attention to teaching, becoming identified with the faculty 
of Hopkins Academy, in Oakland, and later serving as principal of 
the Pleasanton schools. He resigned the latter position in order to 
take up the study of law under private tuition, he and Superior Judge 
Harris pursuing their studies together. In 1900 the well-remem- 
bered law firm of Harris & Donahue was established and the partner- 
ship proved a success in every particular, the firm becoming con- 
nected with a great deal of important litigation. 

Judge Donahue began his public career September 29, 1908, 
when he was appointed by the board of supervisors district attorney 
of Alameda county. His work in office for the first two years was of 
such a satisfactory sort that in the election of 1910 he had no opponent 
and was nominated by the democrats and republicans together, win- 
ning election without opposition and having over twenty-five thou- 
sand votes clear majority. He made an enviable record in the office 
of district attorney, handling a great many important criminal and 
civil cases with exceptional skill and ability. Prominent among these 
was the Delancy case, which won for him a state-wide reputation. 
The crime with which he connected Delancy was committed while 
the latter was acting as attorney for Public Administrator Gray. It 
consisted of the embezzlement of ten thousand dollars from the Hite 
Cook estate, which, together with other irregularities, was unearthed 
by Mr. Donahue after the discovery of the forgery of the name of 
undertaker, E. J. Finney, to a claim against the estate of the late A. L. 
Pounstone, a Grand Army veteran who died in the county infirmary 
and whose body was interred in the potter's field. There were eight 
indictments against Delancy for alleged crimes committed as attorney 
for the public administrator. This case was fought in the courts for 
weeks, and Mr. Donahue, after a skillful examination of all wit- 
nesses, bringing out the most damaging evidence, finished the case 
with a masterly address to the jury which, though convincing to the 
last degree, was free from malice or vindictiveness and he secured a 
conviction for the people. Another case in which Mr. Donahue did 
able and intelligent work was the recent Dalton bribery case, well 
known to everyone in this part of the country. Upon its completion 
Judge Brown established a precedent in Alameda county by com- 
mending the district attorney from the bench, as well as Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney Hyncs and the members of the grand jury. Judge Don- 
ahue's record in ofiicc may well set a new standard of efficiency for all 
future district attorneys to follow. His administration came to a 
close in January, 1913, when, on tiie retirement of Superior Judge 



452 HISTORY OF ALAMF.DA COUNTY 

John Ellsworth, he was elected as his successor for a term of six years. 
His work on the bench has been distinguished by his unusual disin- 
terested, capable and intelligent work and his decisions have been at 
all times impartial and based upon the principles of equity. 

Judge Donahue for a number of years before going on the 
bench was vice president of the California Bar Association and in 
1913 and 1914 was elected by the bar of California as its representa- 
tive to the American Bar Association meeting's. 



W. K. COLE. 



W. K. Cole is one of the leading bankers of Alameda county, con- 
trolling the Berkeley National Bank, its affiliated institution, the 
University Savings Bank, and a number of banks through northern 
California. He is a native of Indiana, but he spent his early manhood 
in New York citv, where he engaged in business until 1889, ^vhen he 
came to California, locating in Martinez, Contra Costa county. 
There in 1892 he married the daughter of B. Fernandez, a repre- 
sentative of one of the old pioneer familes of California. In 1899 
Mr. Cole removed to San Francisco, where for eight years he held 
the position of cashier of the United States mint. This responsible 
office he resigned in 1906 in order to turn his attention to banking, 
becoming associated with the Anglo-California Bank, Limited, of 
San Francisco, as manager of the Mission branch of that bank. He 
later organized the Anglo-California Trust Company and held the 
position of vice president and manager until 191 2, when he sold his 
interest in that bank to the Fleishhackers in order to give his entire 
attention to his banks throughout California. The institutions which 
are now under his control are the Berkeley National Bank and the 
University Savings Bank, both of Berkeley, with a combined capital 
and surplus of four hundred and fifty thousand dollars; the Vallejo 
Commercial Bank, with capital, surplus and undivided profits of one 
hundred and seventy thousand dollars; the Bank of Richmond, with 
capital, surplus and undivided profits of si.xty-five thousand dollars, 
and the San Ramon Valley Bank, at Walnut Creek, whose capital, 
surplus and undivided profits amount to ninety-three thousand dol- 
lars. Mr. Cole has also control of the branch of this latter organiza- 
tion at Danville, and also owns the controlling interest in the Bank of 
Concord. He is a director of the First National Bank of Martinez 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 453 

an institution which he founded, and he also holds a place on the 
directorate of the Bank of Pinole, with its branch at Crockett. 

To the two institutions at Berkeley Mr. Cole is devoting most 
of his energies, but in doing so he is not neglecting the interests of the 
other banks. The Berkeley banks in his list have been growing stead- 
ily, but, with the direct management of a man so energetic as their 
president, they are e.xpected to expand still more rapidly. The most 
recent statement of these institutions shows that with a combined 
capital of three hundred and fifty thousand dollars the two Berkeley 
banks have surplus and undivided profits amounting to one hundred 
and twenty-six thousand five hundred dollars and deposits totaling 
one million two hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars. The 
statement shown on this page shows a splendid year of progress 
in these two banks, the combined assets having increased one 
hundred and twenty-six thousand nine hundred dollars in one 
year. The total resources of the two banks have now reached 
the two million dollar mark. The Vallejo Commercial Bank, at 
Vallejo, California, in its statement shows a capital, surplus and 
undivided profits amounting to one hundred and seventy thousand 
dollars, which is also a good increase over the same time of last year. 
At Walnut Creek the San Ramon Valley Bank is known as one of 
the most prosperous of the interior banks of California. It was 
started as a private bank in 1906, and in June, 1907, through the 
efforts of its organizer, Joseph L. Silveira, and W. K. Cole, it was 
incorporated with a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars. This 
capital has since been trebled and strong gains in business have been 
made. The opening of the valley by the new electric line through 
the tunnel from Oakland has brought greatly increased business, and 
the future of this bank and its two lusty branches is of the brightest. 
Ten years ago, when Richmond was in its infancy and only the far- 
seeing business man was impressed with its possibilities as a manu- 
facturing center, the Bank of Richmond was started by W. R. Star- 
lev, and even though his friends tried to dissuade him with the state- 
ment that he could never make a prosperous bank there, he felt that 
his judgment was correct. He started the bank with a capital of 
thirtv thousand dollars, and now the bank has grown to such an extent 
that its capital has been increased to one hundred thousand dollars 
and is doing a business that is surprising even to the most optimistic. 
It has done a business that has enabled it to pay dividends to its stock- 
holders amounting to more than its capital. That the bank has at- 
tracted attention is evidenced by the fact that it has taken on new life 
through new blood, and the business methods that are strictly up-to- 



454 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

date have kept pace with the phenomenal growth of the citv of Rich- 
mond. All these banks are now so closely allied in their interests 
that they have become a strong chain of finance around the thriving 
manufacturing and agricultural district which lies to the north of 
San Francisco, touching on the shores of the bay. These institutions 
are destined to play a large part in the progress and upbuilding of 
the communities which they represent, and, with a central mind that 
looks to the general good of the communities as well as to the banks, 
California may look for rapid development in that part of the com- 
monwealth. 



HON. MORTIMER SMITH. 

Hon. Mortimer Smith, judge of the police court of Oakland, adds 
to his comprehensive knowledge of the law in the performance of his 
judicial duties a thorough familiarity with the forces and conditions 
which foster crime. He has made an extensive study of the many 
social evils that come under his notice and has in this way founded 
upon experience and knowledge a practically invaluable work of 
public service. 

Pennsylvania numbers him among her native sons, his birth hav- 
ing occurred in V'enango county, that state, June 9, 1872. His par- 
ents came west in 1876, taking up their residence in Oakland, where 
Judge Smith has remained continuously since that time. He acquired 
his preliminary education in the public schools of this city and after 
he had decided upon a legal career began the study of law in the office 
of his father, James Hume Smith, one of Oakland's foremost attor- 
neys. He showed a strong natural aptitude for the profession and 
passed a creditable examination, being admitted to tlie bar .August 
7. 1894. 

As a general practitioner he handled a number of important 
cases with exceptional skill, and it was his high rating as a rising 
young lawvcr which led to his being offered the nomination on the 
republican ticket for the otlke of judge of the police court, to which 
he was elected in 1898, at the age of twenty-six, and in which he has 
served by re-election since that time. He is probably the youngest 
man who was ever entrusted with the duties of this responsible posi- 
tion, and during the period of his service he has discharged these 
duties in an unusually intelligent and far-sighted manner, making a 
special study of criminal law and of the conditions which foster the 



HISTORY OF ALAAIEDA COUNTY 455 

evils which every day come to his notice. He fully appreciates the 
fact that our present social evils present a problem which has not yet 
been solved by the leading minds of the country, but in his adminis- 
tration of justice and in his bench decisions he has conscientiously 
sought to give every one a square deal and absolute justice according 
to the law. 

Judge Smith is well known in fraternal circles, being past presi- 
dent of Oakland xA.erie, No. 7, F. O. E. ; past master of Oak Leaf 
Lodge, No. 35, A. O. U. W. ; a member of Oakland Camp, No. 94, 
W. O. W. ; Bay View Lodge, No. 401, A. F. & A. M. ; Oakland Con- 
sistory, No. 2, Scottish Rite of Free Masonry; Aahmes Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine; Oakland Pyramid, No. 2, A. E. O. S. ; Oakland 
Lodge, No. 171, B. P. O. E., and No. 324, Loyal Order of Moose. 
He also holds membership in the Nile Club. He is a representative 
and valued citizen of Oakland and is without doubt one of the most 
popular and able men connected with the municipal government. 



JOHN W. BANKHEAD. 

John W. Bankhead is a successful business man of Oakland, being 
engaged in contracting. He was born in St. Louis, Sierra county, 
California, March 9, 1857, and is a son of Malcolm and Jane 
(Brown) Bankhead. The father was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 
1823 and educated there. Coming to America in his early manhood, 
he settled in Cape Breton, where he remained for a year, and then 
removed to Boston, Massachusetts, where he completed his appren- 
ticeship at the blacksmith's trade, continuing in that city for two 
years. At the end of that time he went to Maryland, working as a 
blacksmith for one year, and then went to West Virginia, in which 
state he resided until 1850. In that year he took up his residence in 
Missouri, where he followed the blacksmith's trade for one year, and 
then came to California, settling in Sierra county. There he mined 
until 1857, and from that year until 1863 followed the same occupa- 
tion in Janesville, California, coming at the end of that time to Oak- 
land and working as a machinist until 1865. He then turned his 
attention to the furniture business, and also acted as an auctioneer, 
being the first to take up that line of work in Oakland. He partici- 
pated in the commercial and business life of his city until his death, 
in 1875. Politically he was a republican and fraternally a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while he also belonged to the 



456 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

St. Andrew and Caledonian Clubs. His marriage to Miss Jane 
Brown took place in Maryland, and to them were born ten children. 

John W. Bankhead attended the public and high schools until 
fifteen years of age and then went to Virginia City, where he mined 
for two years. At the end of that time he went to Oakland with his 
father and for two years worked in association with him in business. 
Subsequent to that time he engaged in house moving and contracting, 
but in 1889 turned his attention to well boring, although he continued 
as a contractor. He is now engaged in well boring exclusively and 
is very successful, deriving a gratifying income from his occupation. 
For a quarter of a century he has now been engaged in this business 
and has put in the majority of the deep wells, soundings and elevator 
holes, of all of which he keeps correct data, to show the dififerent 
strata passed through. 

He bored the well of the Oakland Gas, Light & Heat Company, 
which is a sixteen inch well and produces between four hundred and 
fifty and seven hundred gallons per minute. He bored a twelve-inch 
well for the California Door Company — one of the best wells in Oak- 
land — producing four thousand and eighty gallons an hour. He also 
put in several wells for the Pacific States Refineries, each between 
two hundred and three hundred feet deep and producing from three 
hundred to seven hundred gallons a minute. He bored a sixteen-inch 
well for the Young Men's Christian Association, which is two hun- 
dred and seventy-four feet deep; also a sixteen-inch well at the Prov- 
idence Hospital, which supplies the hospital plentifully with pure, 
fresh, cold water. At the new home of the Little Sisters of the Poor, 
on East Fourteenth street, he bored a large well to a depth of three 
hundred feet, producing between three and four thousand gallons 
an iiour. He put in a well for Jake Pantosky at the free market that 
is two hundred and ninety feet deep, and in this he passed through 
the most remarkable strata of gravel that he has encountered in any 
of the Oakland wells. This well supplies the free market as well as 
the surrounding property. Mr. Bankhead has also put down most 
of the large wells for the various laundries in Oakland. The Excel- 
sior has a sixteen-inch well, which gives it ten thousand gallons an 
hour and is almost four hundred feet deep; the Crystal Laundry has 
a well two hundred and thirty feet in dcprh, producing between seven 
and ten thousand gallons an hour, and tiic Vosemite Laundry has a 
sixteen-inch well almost two hundred feet deep. The largest hand- 
bored well in the citv of Oakland is at Tenth and Webster streets, 
which Mr. Bankhead put down for .Mr. iutt. it is only twenty- 
four inches in diameter and eighty-four feet in depth and supplies 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 457 

about twenty-four flats. He also put down two large wells in the 
new Kahn store and one large, deep well in the handsome new build- 
ing of the First Trust & Savings Bank at Sixteenth and San Pablo 
streets. Another remarkable well put down by Mr. Bankhead is that 
of the Yosemite Bottling Company at First and Myrtle streets and a 
centrifugal pump is used, which is quite unusual. 

For most of the large buildings, subways, etc., he has put in sound- 
ings and elevator holes, having just finished the elevator hole for the 
Campanile at the University of California. He also put in the sound- 
ings for the main steel bridge of the Northwestern Pacific and all of 
the elevator holes for the Von Emon Elevator Company that have 
been sunk in Oakland. He is trustworthy and always to be relied 
upon to fulfill any contract to the letter and, therefore, enjoys a high 
reputation which has secured him many important deals. 

On October 19, 1878, Mr. Bankhead married Miss Carrie Ann 
Moskiman, the ceremony taking place in Oakland. To them were 
born five children: Mrs. F. W. Wetmore, of Oakland; Mathew B., 
who is an iron molder and a member of the Masonic lodge; Robert 
O., who is also an iron molder and a member of the Masonic lodge 
and the Native Sons; Minnie, a graduate of the high school; and 
Harold, who is attending the public schools. 

Politically Mr. Bankhead is a republican, but he has never been 
active along party lines. He is interested in the growth of the city 
and ever ready to bear his share in promoting advancement and de- 
velopment. He was the first grand treasurer of the Native Sons of 
California, holds a life membership in the Caledonian Club, which 
he won by excelling in athletics, and also belongs to the Rotary Club. 
He has many friends in these organizations and among the business 
men of the city and is trusted bv all because of his high principles. 



WALTER J. MATHEWS. 

Walter J. Mathews is one of the foremost architects of Oakland, 
iiaving drawn plans for some of the handsomest structures of that 
city. His reputation is of the highest and evidences of his skill and 
taste can be found on every haml. He was born in Markesan, Wis- 
consin, in May, 1850, and is a son of Julius C. and Pauline H. (Mc- 
Cracken) Mathews. The father was born in New York and edu- 
cated in South Bend, Indiana, where he remained until 1847. He 
tiien went to Markesan, Wisconsin, wiiere he engaged in the mer- 



458 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

cantile business, and in 1852 removed to San Francisco, where he 
continued along the same line until 1854, when he sold out and re- 
turned to Markesan, there continuing in merchandising until 1S62. 
His family removed from Markesan to Oakland in 1866 and the 
father subsequently gave his attention to architectural work, becom- 
ing quite prominent in that profession. He retired from active 
labor in 1896 and died in Oakland in May, 191 1. His marriage to 
Miss Pauline McCracken was celebrated in Markesan, Wisconsin, 
and to them were born nine children, of whom four are living as 
follows: Walter J., of this review; Frank Arthur, an artist of San 
Francisco; Edgar, an architect of San Francisco; and Caroline, of 
Oakland. 

Walter J. Mathews attended the public schools at Markesan until 
1866, when he removed to Oakland, where he pursued his public- 
school studies until 1868. Deciding upon the profession of architect, 
he went to Los Angeles and allied himself with Mr. Kysor, the firm 
name being Kysor & Mathews. He remained in that city until 1877 
and then returned to Oakland, becoming a partner of his father, 
which association was maintained until 1886, when he established 
business independently. He has been most successful in his profes- 
sion and has achieved a reputation which places him high among his 
associates. 

He combines intuitively artistic taste with utility and has drawn 
plans for a number of buildings which combined both of these quali- 
ties admirably. He has made the drawings for the Union Bank of 
Savings, the Central National Bank, the Bacon building, the Blake 
and Moffitt building, the Crellin Hotel and the M. K. Blake estate 
block, and was consulting architect for the Oakland Hotel. He was 
the architect for the Immigration Station at Angel Island, the San 
Luis Obispo and the Mono Hotels at San Luis Obispo, the Redondo 
Beach Hotel at Redondo, California, the Old Cathedral on Main 
Street, Los Angeles, the Methodist Church, Los Angeles, and the 
Orpheum Theatre, Elks Club, Athenian Club, the Key Route pier 
and the Unitarian and St. John's churches of Oakland. He is now 
general superintendent of the Oakland Auditorium under construc- 
tion. 'Hie residences of which he has had the building are of no 
less importance, including the beautiful Soule home, the William 
Pierce Johnson home at Monte Vista, the Goodell and Bailey resi- 
dences on Jackson street, the A. A. Moore house and the F. AL Smith 
mansion. His labors have not been confined to this side of the bay, 
however, for credit is due him for full\ forty of the most palatial 
homes of San Francisco. It is estimated that it all the structures of 
which Mr. ALathews has made plans or with the building of which 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 459 

he has been associated were placed in a row they would extend four 
miles. 

On the 24th of December, 1879, Mr. Mathews was married in 
Oakland to Miss Viola Gates Strawbridge, and they have two chil- 
dren: Pauline, who attended Mills College and is now the wife of 
Earl B. Henley, a graduate of Purdue College, Indiana; and Joseph- 
ine Hope, who was graduated from the University of California and 
is now the wife of Elliott Johnsone, of East Oakland, also a graduate 
of the University of California. 

Mr. Mathews is a democrat, loyally supporting the party, but has 
never aspired to political office. He is the oldest practicing architect 
in the San Francisco Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, 
and fraternally belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
He holds membership in the Oakland Chamber of Commerce and 
the Oakland Commercial Club, allying himself in these connections 
with men who have done much toward attracting new commercial 
and manufacturing enterprises to the city and promoting its trade 
interests and its commercial importance. Along more social lines he 
is a member of the Claremont Country Club, the Athenian Club and 
the Home Club. He has always taken a deep interest in charitable 
institutions and was formerly vice president of the California insti- 
tute for the deaf, dumb and blind. He is ever ready to extend a help- 
ing hand to those in need and largely gives his support to movements 
which are undertaken in order to better humanity. His recreation is 
fishing and he is a lover of the out-of-doors, seeking in the com- 
munion with nature that recuperation which renews his vital energy 
and again prepares him for taking up his arduous duties. 



BENJA^^N PEARSON. 

To Benjamin Pearson belongs the title of self-made man, for, 
starting out in life without experience or resources, he has through 
his own energy and initiative risen to be one of the leading business 
men of Berkeley, where since 1903 he has been well known as a con- 
tractor and builder. He was born in Sweden, March 24, 1866, and 
reared upon a farm in his native country. In 1884 he came to the 
United States, settling in De Kalb county, Illinois, where for two 
years he worked at agricultural pursuits in the employ of others. At 
the end of that time he removed to Chicago and was connected with 
a railroad company there until iSSS, when he came to California. 



460 HISTORY OF AT.AMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Pearson settled in Oakland, where he secured a position as 
driver of a milk wagon. Later he learned the carpenter's trade, 
working as journeyman for the California Sash & Door Company of 
Oakland. On resigning this position he came to Berkeley and worked 
at his trade until 1903, when he formed a partnership with Nels Ole- 
son in the contracting business. This association was dissolved after 
two years and since that time Mr. Pearson has engaged in business 
for himself, his large and growing clientage being the best proof of 
his success. He has erected a great many business buildings and pri- 
vate residences, his work in Berkeley including the Rex Theater, the 
two Morgan blocks, the Fitzpatrick and Ramsey residences and the 
beautiful homes belonging to Mr. Stillman and Mr. Bonicott in 
Piedmont avenue. He also erected the residence belonging to Mrs. 
Morgan on College avenue, those of Miss Sheperd and Mrs. Kerr on 
Hillside avenue, George Friend's home, and flats for Captain Siebe 
at Shellmond Park. In Oakland Mr. Pearson built the warehouse 
for the Paraffine Paint Company, flats for Mrs. Walsh and a modern 
residence for Stuart Hawley. He has done a great deal of important 
construction work in Piedmont also, having there erected residences 
for Frank Kelly and John F. Conners. In addition to this he has 
erected in Berkeley a factory for the American Photo Players Com- 
pany and residences for S. J. Sill, Bruce Cornwall, Mrs. P. B. Corn- 
wall, John G. Howard and Charles Fischel. 

In 1891 Mr. Pearson married Miss Annie S. Peterson and they 
have become the parents of two children, Agnes S. and Elmer B. 
Mr. Pearson is a member of the Swedish Benevolent Society and be- 
longs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen 
of the World. He deserves great credit for what he has accom- 
plished in a business way, for he started out in life empty-handed and 
through his own energy and perseverance has worked his way up- 
ward to success. 



JAMKS BESTOR MERRITT. 

James Bestor Merritt, one of the most highly esteemed and de- 
servedly respected citizens of Oakland, is living retired in his beau- 
tiful home at 1400 Jackson street, after many years of prominent and 
successful identification with important industrial interests here as 
one of the early developers and upbuilders of the large manufactur- 
ing business controlled hy the Coast Supply & Manufacturing Com- 




ilK. A.NU iIK«. JAMES B. MERRITT 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 46;j 

paiiy. The business was established in Connecticut in 1836, and the 
Ensign-Bicktord Company, as it was later known, was started in 
Ahimeda county in 1868 by the same men who were behind the 
Connecticut concern, but the California company was a separate or- 
ganization. The plant was built in Oakland by L. S. Ellsworth, a 
brother-in-law of the subject of this review, and it manufactured 
blasting fuse. 

Mr. Merritt is a native of Alabama, born in Spring Hill, Marengo 
county, on the 31st of December, 1839, his parents being James B. 
and Sarah Goodwin (Humphrey) Merritt, both of whom were 
school teachers. They were natives of Connecticut, descended from 
old families of that state, and there were three of the ancestors who 
took part in the Revolutionary conflict. The parents of our subject 
went to Alabama after their marriage. The father passed away a 
few days before the birth of his son, his funeral occurring on the 30th 
of December, 1839. The mother returned to Connecticut and made 
her home there until her death, with the exception of a visit which 
she made to Alabama, making the journey by wagon. 

James B. Merritt acquired his early education in the public 
schools of New England and afterward entered Wilbraham Acad- 
emy, studying there in 1853 ''^'"'d 1854 and preparing himself for 
Amherst College, where he afterward became a student. When he 
was but eighteen years of age he went as a pioneer to Illinois, which 
was then the western frontier, joining an uncle who resided near 
Quincy, and engaged in teaching in Adams county. He divided his 
time between that occupation and general farming and had many 
of the usual experiences of the pioneer. In 1864 he returned to the 
east and in Simsbury, Connecticut, operated a grist and sawmill for 
one vear, developing during that time a fine business. Disposing of 
this, he returned to Illinois and, purchasing a quarter section of land 
eighteen miles from Quincy, he set to work to clear it of the timber 
which was still standing and this done engaged in farming until 1871. 

In that vear Mr. Merritt rented his farm in Illinois and pushed 
westward to California, arriving on the 26th of October in what is 
now Oakland, where he took up his abode in the house in which he 
resided for thirty years thereafter. Soon after coming here he 
entered the plant for the manufacture of fuse for blasting purposes 
and this with many alterations and improvements is in operation at 
the present writing although it is now at Livermore, where it was 
moved recently. Mr. Merritt held this connection for thirty years, 
until his retirement in 190T, and although the concern underwent 
manv changes during that period he remained always the leading 



464 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

figure in its operation. For a number of years the factory was oper- 
ated by Toy, Bickford & Company and upon the death of Mr. Toy, 
in 1887, the name was changed to Ensign-Bickford & Company. 
Mr. Merritt remained active manager of the concern which his initia- 
tive spirit had built up until the year his son, Albert H. Merritt, 
succeeded to the position, incorporating the business under the name 
ol the Coast Manufacturing & Supply Company. This is an ofif- 
shoot of the Bickford, Smith & Davy Company, established in Eng- 
land, where a factory is still maintained. The first American branch 
was organized in Connecticut and later the California company came 
into existence. For twenty years Mr. Merritt sold the output of 
four plants in the United States but in 1899 the agreement providing 
for this terminated. He has considerable mechanical genius and 
invented many machines used in fuse making, including a machine 
for the measurement of the size of the fuse. After his retirement he 
spent two years in travel in Europe, Africa and Asia and soon after 
returning designed and built the home at 1400 Jackson street, where 
he now resides. 

On the 26th of May, 1863, in Illinois, Mr. Merritt was united in 
marriage to Miss Catharine E. Cormeny, a native of Pennsylvania 
and a daughter of George W. Cormeny. Their fiftieth wedding 
anniversary was celebrated on the 26th of May, 1913, by a reception 
and entertainment at the Home Club of Oakland. Three hundred 
guests congratulated the happy couple on this occasion, Mr. and 
Mrs. Merritt being assisted in receiving bv their five children, as 
follows: Sarah T., the wife of Edward C. Robinson, a prominent 
attorney of Oakland; Albert H., manager of the Coast Manufactur- 
ing & Supply Company; Mary Williston, the wife of Charles H. 
Cowell, who is connected with the gas company of Oakland ; Gertrude 
E., who married Claude M. Gardiner, in the employ of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company; and Augusta A., the wife of Thomas 
W. Norris, treasurer of the Coast Manufacturing & Supply 
Company. 

Mr. Merritt is especially prominent and active in the affairs of 
the Masonic fraternity, which he joined January 22, 1866, in Tarilif- 
ville, Connecticut, becoming at that time a member of St. Mark's 
Lodge, No. 36, A. F. & A. M. He is now connected with the lodge, 
chapter and commandery at Oakland and has been through all the 
chairs of the subordinate lodge and many of the chairs of the three 
grand lodges. He is grand master of the grand council and past 
grand patron of the Eastern Star. He belongs also to the Scottish 
Rite and the thirtv-third degree in Masonry was conferred upon him 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 465 

January i6, 1887. The new Masonic Scottish Rite cathedral, which 
was built in 1908, was designed by Mr. Merritt, who had the super- 
vision of its erection. It is a magnificent building with large and 
beautiful rooms and its systems of ventilation and water supply are 
of the best. The water comes from a well sunk three hundred and 
thirty-five feet in the earth. A fine bust of Mr. Merritt, the work of 
Gertrude Kanno, occupies a prominent place in the temple. Mrs. 
Merritt is prominent in the Order of the Eastern Star and has served 
as associate matron. In 191 2 Mr. and Mrs. Merritt traveled through 
Cuba, Newfoundland and many other places and visited at that time 
seven grand chapters besides various other Masonic bodies. 

He has always been active in politics and, representing the repub- 
lican party, has held many important positions of trust and responsi- 
bility. While a resident of Illinois he served as school trustee, as a 
member of the district school board and as justice of the peace, and 
this latter office he held in Oakland from 1873 to 1879. For twenty- 
seven years, from 1873 to 1900, he served as a member of the election 
board, his son succeeding him for several years on his retirement. 
As one of the early settlers in Oakland Mr. Merritt has many inter- 
esting recollections of the early days and can remember when he 
knew personally and could call bv name every one of the three hun- 
dred and forty-three voters who in 1876 resided in the section be- 
tween the city limits and San Leandro bridge. During the long 
period which has elapsed since that time he has never been found 
remiss in the duties of citizenship or unfaithful to any tie or obliga- 
tion of life and he can still be depended upon to further any move- 
ment brought forward for the advancement of the general welfare. 



WILLIAM PTNKNEY TOLER. 

The historv of California would be incomplete and unsatisfactory 
were there failure to make prominent reference to William Pinkney 
Toler, who was connected with one of tlie notable events that figure 
in the annals of the state — when Old Glory was first flung to the 
breezes at Monterey. He was a native of Caracas, Venezuela, born 
on the 23d of December, [826, at which time his father. Hopeful 
Toler, was serving as American consul in Lajara. He was a native 
of Virginia and fought in the war with England in 1812. The an- 
cestors came originally from England. When a young man Hopeful 
Toler went on business to Venezuela, where he was married to a 



466 HISTORY OI- AI..\.MI:DA COUNTY 

Spanish lady of tliat country. Two children were born unto them, 
\\'illiani P. and a sister, who became the wife of Judge L. \V. Hast- 
ings, a California pioneer, who figures prominently in the early his- 
torv of this state. During the period of the family's residence in 
Venezuela the father of William P. Toler was engaged in commer- 
cial pursuits for man\ vears. His mother died when he was only 
about three years of age. Subsequently the father returned to his 
native state and was afterward appointed United States consul to 
Porto Rico in the \\'est Indies, where he remained for many years. 
At a later date he returned to V^irginia and subsequently went to 
Washington, where he became connected with the diplomatic corps. 
It was under these circumstances and in the capital of the nation that 
William P. Toler was educated. As he advanced toward young 
manhood he became a clerk in the office of Attorney General John 
J. Crittenden, who was filling that position during the presidency of 
William Henry Harrison, who died shortly after his induction into 
that office, however, and was succeeded by John J. Tyler of Virginia. 
William P. Toler, however, had no idea of becoming a lawyer, 
for he preferred at that time "a life on the ocean wave" and decided 
to accept an appointment as midshipman in the I'nited States navy 
from Virginia, as that was his father's native state. .Much to his dis- 
appointment, however, the N'irginia quota allowed to the congres- 
sional district was full. At tiiat crisis he sought advice from his 
father, who recommended him to call upon Henry Clay. Kentucky's 
greatest statesman, and see what he could do for him in the emer- 
gency. Clay replied: "Young man, your father is a Virginian and 
so am 1 by birth, but I am now a Kentuckian, and, as we have no salt 
water excepting for deer licks and no place for naval operations and 
nobody just now from Kentucky who wants to go to sea. 1 will make 
a Kentuckian of you by adoption and send you to sea." Thus Mr. 
Toler secured his appointment as midshipman in the navy from Ken- 
tucky in 1 841, when but fourteen years of age. During that year, 
throughout the country, there were two hundred and fifty midship- 
men appointed to the liiited States navy when there was no naval 
academy, something that had never occurred before in the history of 
the countrv. William P. Toler was a fluent speaker and a writer of 
his native Spanish language, and at the request of Commodore 
Thomas Ap Catesby Jones was assigned and appointed aid-dc-camp 
on his itafi in 1841 and accompanied him to the Pacific station, which 
brings us direct to California history. 

At Callao, Peru, Commodore Jones received information from 
the American Minister, Hon. Mr. Pickett, at Lima, and, believing 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 467 

from the secret orders received that he had full authority to act, he 
sailed direct to Monterey, California, upon learning that war had 
broken out between the United States and Mexico, with the purpose 
of taking possession of the country. He arrived at Monterey on the 
i(Sth of October, 1842, in the frigate United States, which was his 
flagship, accompanied by the sloop-of-war Cyane, Captain String- 
ham in command. He at once sent a demand to Captain Silva, the 
commandant, to surrender, which demand was complied with. Then 
the Mexican flag was hauled down and the American flag was raised 
on the next day, October, 19, 1842, in which act Midshipman Toler, 
as aid-de-camp, hauled the stars and stripes to position in connection 
with the quartermaster. With him was a Mr. Larraintree, secretary 
of Commodore Jones. They had been ordered to search the office of 
the collector of customs in the old customs house at Monterey, but at 
first succeeded in finding no records of any value, as they had been 
carried away. After looking around Toler espied in the corner a 
dirty bundle of papers, which he dusted, and to his surprise found 
they had never been opened. He concluded to open the package and 
discovered some of the very latest news regarding the condition of 
affairs between the two countries and learned that Commodore Jones 
had been altogether too hasty in his conclusions and actions. Mr. 
Toler than placed the papers in the commodore's hands and upon 
examination thereof Commodore Jones, much to his mortification, 
had to recognize the fact that he had been over hasty in the matter. 
Accordingly, he sent Mr. Toler ashore on the 21st and he hauled 
down the American flag and hoisted the Mexican flag, which was 
saluted with twenty-one guns. Commodore Jones immediately sent 
word overland to Governor General Micheltorena at Los Angeles 
and the whole matter was to be referred to their respective govern- 
ments. He set sail for San Pedro and upon arrival there went to 
Los Angeles, where he held a personal interview with Governor Gen- 
eral Micheltorena, which concluded with festivities and a grand ball 
and entertainment, held in honor of the commodore and the other 
United States naval oflicers. Commodore Jones was recalled by the 
navy department on January 24, 1843, and Commodore A. J. Dallas 
appointed to succeed him. The retiring commodore took his departure 
for the United States, leaving Mr. Toler at the Pacific station. Mr. 
Toler retired from the navy in 1848. He remained in continuous 
connection with the Pacific coast and iiis name became prominent on 
various pages of California's history. He was assistant to the alcalde 
of San Francisco in 1850. He retired from active business in 1870. 



468 HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COUNTY 

On the 19th of October, 1853, Mr. Toler was married to Maria 
AiHoiiia Peralta, daughter of Ygnacio Peralta, the wedding being 
celebrated in the family home of her father near San Leandro. Thev 
became parents of one son, J. Hoyt Toler. Mr. Toler was made a 
life member of the California Pioneers and always took an active 
part in that society. Among the picturesque figures whose life rec- 
ords adorn the history of California William Pinkney Toler was 
notable, not only from the fact that he raised the first American flag 
at Monterey but because of his activity and prominence in other con- 
nections. Fifty years after he unfurled the stars and stripes to the 
breezes of Monterev, on tiie 7th of Julv, 1846, he again participated 
in a similar occasion — the semi-centennial celebration in 1896. 



ALONZO BRADFORD. 



Alonzo Bradford, filling the position of postmaster at Hayward, 
was born in Madison county, Ohio, December 9, 1841. The public 
schools of southeastern Iowa afiforded him his educational privileges 
following the removal of the family to that section. \Mien nineteen 
years of age he enlisted for service in Company F, Second Iowa Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He was later transferred to the First Regiment, 
Missouri Light Artillery, and remained with the Army of the Cum- 
berland for four years. Following the close of the war he returned 
to Iowa and there engaged in farming for one year. He ne.xt went 
to Missouri and purchased a farm, which he operated for three years. 
On disposing of his property he came to the coast and in 1873 estab- 
lished his home at Hayward, where he embarked in carpentering. 
Later, as he became known, he began contracting on his own account 
and continued in that business for several years. Following the elec- 
tion of President Benjamin Harrison he was appointed postmaster 
of Hayward and filled the position acceptably for four years and 
seven months. Upon his retirement from the office he once more 
engaged in contracting and building for a time ;ind in April, 1903, he 
was again appointed to the office of postmaster, in which position he 
has remained continuously since, covcrintj a period of nearly twelve 
years, so tliat his entire incumbency in the position covers sixteen 
years. His record speaks for itself. .Abrahani Lincoln has said: 
"You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people 
some of the time, but you can't fool all of the people all of the time," 
and when a man has been as long in public office as Mr. Bradford it 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 469 

is indication that the great majority have faith in his ability and effi- 
ciency and indorse his actions and his policy. 

In politics Mr. Bradford has always been a stanch republican, 
unfaltering in his allegiance to the party, and in addition to serving 
as postmaster, he was a member of the board of town trustees and for 
two terms was its president. He has also served as school trustee and 
is interested in everything that pertains to the welfare and progress 
of his community. 

In Van Buren county, Iowa, in 1865, Mr. Bradford was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Glascock, of West Virginia, and they have 
one son, Harry A., who is the first lieutenant of the Hayward Na- 
tional Guards and assistant postriiaster at Hayward. Mrs. Bradford 
is an active member of the Methodist church. Mr. Bradford has 
membership in Eucalyptus Lodge, A. F. & A. M., which he joined as 
a charter member on its organization in 1876. He is now treasurer of 
that lodge and is the only charter member still living. He likewise 
belongs to Lookout Mountain Post, G. A. R., and thus maintains 
pleasant relations with his old army comrades, with whom he loves 
to recount the incidents and experiences of the war, when, as "boys 
in blue" they followed the old flag upon the battlefields of the south. 
The same spirit of patriotism has ever characterized him in all of 
the relations of life and Hayward numbers him among its most val- 
ued citizens. 



FRANK A. LEACH. 



Frank A. Leach, who is manager and vice president of the Peo- 
ple's Water Company of Oakland, was for many years connected 
with newspaper work and also held a number of important official 
positions. By means of his papers he contributed much toward the 
growth and development of his state, and in many other ways he has 
been an important factor in the advancement of Alameda county. 

He was born in Auburn, New York, in August, 1846, a son of 
Edwin W. and Mary A. Leach. The family has been represented in 
America since 1639, the first to emigrate to this country being Lawr- 
ence Leach, a descendant of John Leach, a prominent surgeon of 
England. He took up his abode in Massachusetts. Edwin W. Leach, 
tlic father of our subject, was born in Vermont in 1824 and was cdu- 
1. atcd in the state of his nativity, there remaining until he reached his 
niaioritv, when he and his parents remo\ed to Cayuga county, \ew 



470 HISTORY OF ALA^IEDA COUXTY 

■^'ork, where he became connected with the wagon-making business 
with his father. In December, 1849, he started for California and 
reached San Francisco in the following September, being a passenger 
on an old steamer which consuiTied nine months in making the voy- 
age around the Horn. In San Francisco he followed the occupation 
of a carpenter for a year. At the end of that time he went to Sacra- 
mento, where he was engaged as a soda-water manufacturer until the 
big conflagration in 1852. He then again turned his attention to 
wagon-making and in 1857 removed to Napa, where he manufactured 
wagons and agricultural implements, residing there until 1870, in 
which year he retired and moved to Vallejo, which city remained his 
home until 1886. In that year he came to Oakland and here he passed 
away in 1901. His marriage took place in 1845, the maiden name of 
his wife being Mary A. RofTee. To them was born one son, Frank 
A. The mother died in Oakland in i8qo. In the spring of i8;2 she 
had come to this state with her son, the father having decided to estab- 
lish the family home here. 

Frank A. Leach attended private school in Sacramento and en- 
tered the public school on the first day that it was opened, continuing 
therein until he was eleven years of age. At that time the family 
removed to Napa, where our subject continued his studies, being a 
pupil in the public schools and in the academy until seventeen years 
of age. He then held a position in a printing office for two years, 
and there gathered the experience which enabled him to start the 
Napa Daily Reporter, which journal he successfully conducted until 
the spring of 1867. Upon selling out he removed to Vallejo. where 
he started the Vallejo Chronicle, and conducted the same until 1886, 
disposing of his interest in that year and coming to Oakland. In this 
city, associated with A. B. Nye and \V. F. Burbank, he founded the 
Oakland Enquirer and published and edited the paper until 1899. 
His long experience made him an ideal newspaper man, and he gave 
careful attention not only to the editorial policy of the paper, its news 
columns and its advertising pages, but always saw to it that it was of 
tb.e highest type of typographical workmanship. In his long news- 
paper career Mr. Leach pri)nioted many ni()\ements which were of 
benefit to the communities and districts in which he published his 
papers, and by means of his editorials educated the people to the 
highest sense of political responsibility and citizenship. 

In 1897 he was appointed by President McKinley superintendent 
of the mint in San Francisco and held that position for ten years, or 
until 1Q07, when he was appointed director of all the United States 
mints, with head office at Washington, D. C, holding that position 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 471 

until August, 1909, when he resigned in order to become president 
and manager of the People's Water Company of Oakland. He served 
as such until October i, 191 1, and then retired, but in July, 1912, 
upon the death of Judge Sweeney, who was superintendent of the San 
Francisco mint, the government officials requested him to accept the 
position because of his familiarity with the work, which he did with 
the understanding that he would remain in charge only until the next 
settlement of the afifairs of the mint. This he did and resigned Au- 
gust 15, 1913. In 1906, while Mr. Leach was in charge of the mint in 
San Francisco, the great fire disarranged finances and a plan of iielp 
was necessary. As the mint remained the only intact institution able 
to cope with the situation, the people naturally looked to it for aid 
and the bank officials through a committee came to consult Mr. Leach. 
He recommended that the banks through their credit with eastern 
institutions, secure telegraphic transfer of funds by the United States 
treasury orders on the mint and use such funds in establishing a tem- 
porary Central Bank representing all the banks of the city, the local 
banks to supply tellers and bookkeepers to carry on the business, 
quarters with vaults being furnished in the mint building. Within a 
week the plan was carried into execution, the banks of the city were 
the depositors and they supplied their customers with funds through 
checks drawn on their deposits. The Central Bank was a matter of 
great importance in reviving the business and financial interests of 
the stricken citv. The plan filled every expectation and continued 
in operation until the various banking institutions could open their 
vaults in the ruins, secure new quarters and resume business. As soon 
as the magnitude of the disaster was realized by the government 
authorities at Washington the secretary of the treasury wired Mr. 
Leach for a report on the situation, with a suggestion as to what the 
treasury department could best do to relieve conditions. He recom- 
mended free telegraphic transfer of funds from the east, payable in 
(jrders on the United States mint in San Francisco. The suggestion 
was immediately adopted. At the request of President Roosevelt, 
Mr. Leach acted as treasurer of relief funds until the general relief 
committee was organized. Independent of the banking arrangement 
described, Mr. Leach received and disbursed through this transfer 
system, over forty million dollars in six weeks' time and not one dollar 
was lost or unaccounted for. Personally he superintended the pay- 
ment of all this vast amount. He was in Oakland at the time of the 
earthquake, but bv a special boat furnished by the railroad company 
he got to the mint quickly and was able to direct affairs, I'ifty of 
the emploves responded to figiit the hrc whicii soon surrounded and 



472 HISTORY OF AI.AMEDA COUNTY 

threatened destruction of the building and through their able work 
and the good supply of water the building was saved. On his retire- 
ment from the mint the banks of San Francisco presented Mr. Leach 
with a costly watch, which they had suitably engraved, and also a 
set of resolutions and a fine library of about one thousand volumes. 

On February i, 1914, he became vice president and manager of 
the Peoples Water Company, which position he now holds. His large 
experience fits him well for this executive position and he is doing 
very valuable work in the interest of the city. 

InDecember, 1870, in Vallejo, California, Mr. Leach married 
Miss ALiry L. Powell, and to them were born four children: Frank 
A., Jr., manager of the Pacific Gas & Electric Company of Oakland ; 
Abe P., an attorney of Oakland; Edwin R., who is in charge of the 
metallurgical plant at Palo Alto, California; and Harrv, who prac- 
tices law in Oakland. 

Mr. Leach of this review has always been prominent in political 
circles and is a republican. For two terms, from December, 1879, 
until March i, 1881, he served as representative of Solano countv in 
the state legislature, doing valuable work in the interest of his con- 
stituents, and from 1882 until 1884 was postmaster of Vallejo. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason, being a member of the Lodge of Perfection. 
He likewise belongs to the Berkeley Club, a literary organization 
and one of the oldest in California. There is much that is commend- 
able in the career of Frank A. Leach, which shows us that prosper- 
ity, honors and distinction may be won simultaneously and may be 
achieved without jeopardizing the highest principles. 



THE WILLIAM HOVEY FRIEND FAAHLY. 

A sketch of his family, the first by that name in Oakland, where it 
had its beginning in iS6(>, invites brief mention of its original mem- 
bers, including the father, William Hovey Friend, the mother, Emma 
Rogers Babson Friend, the sister and aunt. Miss Marie Rogers Bab- 
son, and the two sons, William Nathaniel and Roger Berry Friend. 

William Hovey Friend was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts, 
February 6, 184(1, where he acquired an education, trade, and the 
usual longing of boys of tiiat locality for tlic sea. One voyage to 
the East Indies was. however, sufficient for him. In 1863 he set 
out for California, locating in San Francisco, where he associated 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 473 

himself with the wood and willow ware firm of Armes & Dallam 
until 1880, when, as one of the leaders in the congressional campaigns 
of Horace F. Page, he entered the custom house service. It was 
at this time that he reorganized the business department of the Oak- 
land Tribune. Later he engaged in the wholesale fish business, 
representing the Gloucester firm of John E. Pew & Sons. In 1884 he 
went into the wholesale tobacco business, forming the firm of Horn, 
Friend & Erskine. In 1886 he became cashier of the Sun Insur- 
ance Company of San Francisco and afterward its secretary under 
the presidency of Colonel C. L. Taylor, in which connection he con- 
tinued till the company retired from business in 1895. After manag- 
ing the S. G. Hilborn campaign for congress in the succeeding year 
he became postmaster of Oakland, serving till 1900. Always a strong 
supporter of the Pardee wing of the Republican party, upon the lat- 
ter's election as governor he went to Napa as business manager of the 
State Hospital. Upon retirement from this position he visited his 
native city for several vears, when he returned to Oakland to re- 
main until his death, which occurred February 9, 1914. iMr. Friend 
served for a term on the Oakland board of education. He was an 
exempt fireman, having in early days belonged to Howard Engine 
Company No. 3 of San Francisco. In 1880 he joined Oakland 
Lodge, No. 188, F. &'A. M., of which he became a life member. 
He afiiliated with Howard Presbyterian Church in San Francisco in 
1866 and upon settlement in Oakland he and all his family became 
active members of the First Presbyterian Church of this city. He 
took a leading part in the building of the edifice that for many years 
stood at Fourteenth and Franklin streets, was president of its society 
for over a decade and occupied the ofiices of trustee and deacon. 

Emma Rogers Babson Friend was born in Gloucester, Massachu- 
setts, and educated in the public schools and finished at Oread Insti- 
tute. She married William Hovey Friend June i q, 1869, immedi- 
ately starting for California with him in one of the first through 
Overland trains. She was one of the few original organizers of tiie 
Ebell Society in 1876, and thougii ever afterward an in\ali(i con- 
tinued actively in its affairs until her death, March 12, \i)n;. She 
also helped to organize the Oakland Chapter of the Daughters of 
the American Revolution and was a member of the General Society 
of the Mayflower Descendants. She was a great collector of china 
and an authority on the same. In the first campaign for woman's 
sufifrage in 1896 she took an active interest, and when the Spanish 
war broke out she was instrumental in organizing the Oakland Red 
Cross Society, the preliminary meeting, at which plans were adopted, 



474 IIISTOin- OF AI.AMKDA COUNTY 

occurring at her home. The scope of Iier religious activities was only 
limited by her health. 

Miss Maria Rogers Babson, sister and aunt, was born in (douccs- 
ter, Massachusetts, and educated with her sister in the school ot her 
native city and at Oread Institute. She came to Oakland in i S70, 
becoming a fixed part of the Friend familv through the prolonged, 
invalidism of her sister. She was a charter member of the Ebell 
Society and Club, its (General Curator, and indefatigable promoter 
for many years. In the Oakland Red Cross Society and the founding 
of the Convalescent Home during the Spanish war she took a promi- 
nent and originating part. -She was treasurer of the fund for the 
furnishing of the children's room in the Carnegie Librarv when that 
institution was erected. In the organization and perpetuation oi the 
Oakland Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution she 
was deeply concerned. Identified with the First Presbyterian church 
like the rest of the family from the beginning she took a large inter- 
est in its activities and also in the larger missionary work of the 
cliurch, being an honcn-ary member of the American Board and an 
active member of the Occidental Board of Foreign Missions. Her 
deatli occurred at the home of her nephew in San Francisco, May i. 
1914. 

Roger Berry Friend, the second son. was born in Oakland. 
December 8. 1H73. He was educated in the grammar and high 
school of the city and earlv went into the Sun Insurance Companv 
with his father. His rise in that business was rapid and popular, 
(poll the dissolution of the old Sun companv he served for a time 
with the Continental of New York, then with the Aachen and 
Munich, and afterward for a series of successful vears with Voss. 
Conrad & Company in the Thuringia of Germany. Here he showed 
his talents as a special agent and adjuster, being rated chee'rfully by 
his fellow adjusters as one oi their best known, best liked and most 
efficient members on the coast. The final retirement of his com- 
pany from business in America opened the way for his further ad- 
vancement to the management of the Providence and Washington. 
But the strain of the success achieved under grave responsibility, 
coupled with other business activities that he had engaged in. pro- 
duceti a nervous collapse in which he was suddenlv stricken bv death 
l'"ebruary 2T,. 1914. In tlie social life of younger Oakland he took a 
prominent part. lie was a member of Oakland lodge, commanderv 
and Shrine in .Masonry, of the Athenian and Reliance Clubs, and a 
favorite leader of the Deu.x Temps and other cotillion clubs. His 
church membership was with his family. 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 475 

William Nat. Friend, the surviving member of this family, was 
bi)rn in Oakland, April 5, 1870, graduating from the Oakland high 
school in 1889 and from the University of California in 1896, where 
he was president of the Associated Students and a member of Phi 
Delta Theta fraternity. He worked his way through college as a 
newspaper correspondent; then studied law and was admitted to 
practice; took a leading part in young men's politics in city, county 
and state for a while. Then he studied for the Presbyterian ministry 
at the seminaries at San Anselmo and Princeton and was a pastor at 
Golden, Colorado, for eight years and at Howard churcii in San 
Francisco for four years more. In the latter part of 1913 he pur- 
chased an interest in the Albert Brown Company, becoming its secre- 
tary and a managing director, and returned with his family to his 
native citv. In 1902 he married Miss Anna Coyle, daughter of the 
Rev. Robert F. Coyle, D. D., for many years pastor of the First 
Presbyterian church of Oakland, a graduate of Mills College and 
teacher therein and at East Denver high school, Colorado. Their 
family includes three children, Robert Coyle, Roger Berry and Eliz- 
abeth Gorham Friend. Mr. Friend is a Mason in both rites, an Elk 
and a Woodman. 



T. H. MOORE. 



T. H. Moore, one of the successful and prominent business men 
of Richmond, whose interests extend to many fields, was born in Lin- 
coln county, Missouri, in 1854, his father having gone from Kentucky 
to that state in pioneer times. The subject of this review was reared 
upon a farm in his native county and when he was twenty-si.v years 
oi age began his independent career, turning his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits. He understood farming in principle and detail 
and his long experience and practical methods brought him a gratify- 
ing degree of success, and he became finally one of the leading agri- 
culturists in Lincoln county. He owned three farms, one of two 
hundred acres, another of one hundred and twenty, and another of 
forty, and for thirtv-six vcars lie continued to develop these tracts, 
providing them witli substantial barns and outbuildings and neglect- 
ing nothing which would add to their appearance or value. 

For a number of years Mr. Moore made his home in Troy, Lin- 
coln county, and was well known in local democratic politics, holding 
the position of county coroner for eight years and of justice of the 



476 HISTORY Ol- ALA.AIEDA COUNTY 

peace for twelve. He was also a charter member and a director ot 
the Peoples Bank of Troy. In 1909 Mr. Moore came to Richmond, 
California, ami turned his attention to the teaming business, with 
wiiicii lie lias been successfulh identified since that time. He is 
also a real estate operator on an extensive scale and is a director in 
the Mechanics Bank of Richmond. His interests are all capably and 
progressively managed and liave brought him a gratifying measure 
of success. 

In 1880 Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Mattie Wyatt, 
a native of Missouri, and they have become the parents of eight 
ciiildren, Lulu A., Laura G., Lee D., William T., Florence B., 
Wright W., ALittie J. and Ray C. 

Mr. Moore is prominent in the ^Lisonic order, holding member- 
ship in the lodge and chapter, and he has been through all the 
chairs in the ^Modern Woodmen of America. He is a business man 
of insight, ability and capacity and holds a high place in business 
circles of the city. 



ALBERT J. BROWN. 



Albert J. Brown, president of the Albert Brown Undertaking 
Company, is a well known and representative business man of Oak- 
land, and he also has a wide act]uaintance in San Francisco, where 
club and social relations ha\c brought him into prominent connec- 
tion. He was born in Denver, Colorado, February 17, 1875, and is a 
son of Albert and Mary A. Brown. I'he father was a native of the 
northern part of New Jersey, born July 21, 1842. There his educa- 
tion was acquired and later he removed westward to Denver, Colo- 
rado, where he engaged in the building and contracting business until 
1874. He then embarked in the undertaking business, which he con- 
ducted at that place until 1881, when he sold out and made his way 
to Los Angeles, California, where he conducted an undertaking estab- 
lishment until 1886. He then disposed of his interests in that city 
and came to Oakland, where he purchased the undertaking estab- 
lishment of W. T. Hamilton, which had been founded in 1874. He 
conducted the business under liis own name until iq(i;, when it was 
incorporated under the iinn style of Albert Brown Cndertaking 
Company, of whicli he became president, ser\ing in that capacitv 
vnitil Ids death, whicli occurred in Januar\, 19(19. He was promi- 
nent in .Masonry, having attained the thirty-second degree of the 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 477 

Scottish Rite, and he was also a member of the Mystic Shrine. His 
fraternal relations were with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen and to their teachings he 
was ever loyal. His political allegiance was given to the republican 
party, but he preferred that other should hold office, while he con- 
centrated his energies upon his business affairs. 

In 1870, in Denver, Colorado, Albert Brown, Sr., was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary A. Downey, and unto them were born four 
children, including Albert J. Brown, whose name introduces this re- 
view. He was a lad of about six years when the family came to 
California, and he pursued his education in the public schools of Los 
Angeles and of Oakland, passing through consecutive grades until 
graduated from the high school in the latter city with the class of 
June, 1894. He next attended the University of California and was 
graduated in 1899. Since then he has been identified with the Albert 
Brown Undertaking Company and in January, 1909, following the 
death of his father, he was elected its president. The company con- 
trols a large and growing business and its success is well estab- 
lished. 

In San Francisco Mr. Brown was united in marriage, in Feb- 
ruary, 1906, to Miss Lois Rice, and they have one child, Barbara. 
Mr. Brown holds membership in the University of California Club 
of San Francisco and is well known in that city and in Oakland, hav- 
ing an extensive circle of warm friends. In fact, he is widely known 
throughout California because of his residence in Los Angeles, his 
attendance at the State University and his identification with tlie two 
Bay cities. 



JOSEPH T. HINCH. 



Joseph T. Hinch, who embarked in the real-estate business in 
Oakland in 1903, has here been successfully engaged along that line 
during the past decade. His birth occurred in Eureka, Humboldt 
county, California, on the 14th of August, 1879, his parents being 
Thomas and Eliza Hinch. The father came to California in 1873, 
settling in. Eureka, where he was actively engaged in the mercantile 
business until the time of his retirement in igo3. His demise oc- 
curred in 191 3. 

josepli T. Hinch attended the graded and high schools in the 
acquirement of an education and following his graduation, at the age 



478 HISTORY UF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

of nineteen, spent six months in the Eureka Business College. Subse- 
quently he purchased his father's stock in the firm of Hinch, Salmon 
& Walsh, general merchants, in which he still owns a third interest. 
In 1903 he came to Oakland and embarked in the real-estate busi- 
ness, of which he has remained an active and successful representa- 
tive to the present time. In the intervening decade he has erected 
three hundred cottages which he has sold on the easy payment basis. 
In San Francisco, on the 6th of February, 1901, Mr. Hinch 
was united in marriage to Mrs. Paulena Huck, by whom he has one 
child, Lucille. He gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party and is a member of the Oakland Commercial Club and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In matters of citizenship he is 
intensely loyal and public-spirited and gives his unqualified indorse- 
ment and cooperation to every movement inaugurated that will ad- 
vance the municipality or promote the welfare of the community 
along the various lines of human activity. 



HARMON BELL. 



Among the many brilliant, able and resourceful men who have 
gained positions of prominence and distinction at the bar of the Bay 
cities is Harmon Bell, practicing in Oakland and controlling mi- 
portant legal interests here and in San Francisco. He is recognized 
as the leader of the Oakland bar and is at the head of the law firm of 
Bell, Bell & Smith, with offices in the Thomson building. The 
record of liis career is the record of worthy and upright living, of 
strict adherence to high personal and professional standards, of native 
talents and powers well used for worthy ends. These things need 
not be repeated to the readers of a history of this section of Califor- 
nia, for Mr. Bell is one of Oakland's most progressive and successful 
native sons and his name has been known and honored here since 
pioneer times, his father having been one of the earliest and greatest 
ministers of the gospel in San Francisco. 

Harmon Bell was born on the 23d of March, 1855, and is a son 
of Rev. Dr. Samuel B. and Sophia (Walworth) Bell, the former a 
native of Orange county. New York, and the latter of Cleveland, 
Ohio, both descendants of families which were prominent in Revolu- 
lionarv times. A sketch of Samuel B. Bell appears on another page 
of tiiis work. Harmon Hell was reared at hnme and in the acquire- 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 481 

ment of an education attended Lyons Academy in Lyons, New York, 
and afterward Hillsdale College at Hillsdale, Michigan. He then 
enrolled in Washington College, a private school at Alameda, Cali- 
fornia, and at the age of twenty-two took up the study of law, a 
profession which had always attracted him. He entered the offices 
of Dirlam & Lehman in Mansfield, Ohio, whither he had gone with 
his father in 1875, and in the next year he moved to Kansas City, 
where he completed his legal studies in the office of Judge Turner 
A. Gill of that city. He was admitted to the Missouri bar on the 
ist of May, 1878, and opened an office in Kansas City, where he 
continued for twenty years thereafter, becoming known as one of 
the most prominent and successful attorneys in the state. Success 
in law brought with it prominence in politics and, representing the 
republican party, he was elected to the state legislature, serving from 
1881 to 1882 and leaving the impress of his personality and ability 
upon the political history of the state. Upon leaving Missouri, Mr. 
Bell came to San Francisco and in that city he met with his usual 
success in his profession, securing a large and representative clientage 
which connected him with a great deal of notable litigation. In 
1904, shortly before the fire, he became chief counsel for the San 
Francisco, Oakland & San Jose Railroad and for the Oakland Trac- 
tion Company, and he removed his home and office to this city, where 
he has since remained. He was for years chief counsel for these con- 
cerns, which absorbed the various smaller traction corporations and 
which have done much to promote general growth and development. 
Mr. Bel4 is known throughout the Bay cities as a strong and forcible 
practitioner, well versed in underlying legal principles and possessed 
of the discriminating ability necessary to make effective application 
of his knowledge. His mind is incisive, analytical and deductive, 
quick to grasp the most intricate details of a case, while his presenta- 
tion of his arguments is always clear and logical. He has thus risen 
to prominence in his chosen field, and his name has been coupled 
with the successful completion of a great deal of notable and im- 
portant legal work. 

In 1880 Mr. Bell was united in marriage to Miss Catherine 
Wilson, a daughter of A. C. J. and Margaret Wilson, who settled 
in Santa Barbara in pioneer times. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have become 
the parents of four children, two of whom, Walworth and Marjorie, 
died in early childhood. The elder son, Traylor W., is an attorney 
at law and is associated with his father, while the younger, Joseph 
Samuel, is still at school. The family belong to the First Presby- 
terian ciuirch of Oakland. 



482 HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Mr. Bell's interests are almost as extensive in San Francisco as 
in Oakland and he is a leading member of the city bar association. 
He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Knights 
Templar and the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and he is a member 
also of the Native Sons of the Golden West and the Sons of the 
American Revolution. He belongs to the Athenian, Sequoia and 
Claremont Country Clubs of Oakland and the Transportation and 
Commonwealth Clubs of San Francisco. Mr. Bell is a man of sterl- 
ing qualities of heart and mind and takes an active part in all mat- 
ters tending to the uplift and advancement of citizenship. In 1913, 
when the Oakland Commercial Club was formed, he was unani- 
mously chosen its president.. The aim of the organization is to pro- 
mote a greater harmony and a more united purpose in civic, com- 
mercial and industrial growth. No better selection could have been 
made for the head of such an organization than Mr. Bell. He at 
once became a power in its councils and it has grown to be a strong 
and potent factor in the business life of Alameda county. Mr. Bell 
was reelected president of the club in 1914. Politically he is a stanch 
adherent of the republican party and active, progressive and public- 
spirited in matters of citizenship, taking an intelligent interest in 
the advancement and growth of the community in which he resides. 
He is a man of great breadth of view, of progressive ideas, of high 
personal and professional standards and his wide experience and 
successful practice have placed him among the leading attorneys of 
the state. Those who come within the close circle of his friendship 
find him a broad-minded, large-hearted and liberal man, a supporter 
of public movements, an upholder of private morality — a man whose 
success has been well deserved and alwavs worthilv used. 



CHARLES PALMER. 



A pioneer in California was Charles Palmer, who died in 
Berkelev in 1897. He practiced law in San Francisco and Oakhind 
for many years and from this field his interests extended to many 
others touching closely public and business development. Mr. 
Palmer was born in Connecticut and after completing his prelimi- 
nary education was graduated from Yale I'niversity, where he 
studied law. In iSqo he came to California hv way of the Strait of 
Magellan and afterward mined in Nevada and Eldorado counties for 
some time. Later he removed to Folsom, Sacramento county, and 



HISTORY OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 483 

engaged in banking there until 1877, in which year he came to Ala- 
meda county, where he remained a resident until his death. He 
practiced law in San Francisco and Oakland, having been con- 
nected through a large patronage with much important litigation in 
the courts of the state. He founded the Oakland Paving Company 
and was its attorney for many years, the weight of his influence being 
felt in the direction of its policy and as a force in its continued growth 
and progress. 

Mr. Palmer married Miss Harriet Day, who came to California 
with her parents in 1855. Her father, Sherman Day, was a surveyor 
and mining engineer and surveyed the wagon road over the Sierras 
before the advent of the railroad. In the early days he engaged in 
mining and for a number of years he held the office of United States 
surveyor, located at San Francisco. He was one of the trustees and 
founders of the College of California, now the University of Cali- 
fornia. 

Mr. Palmer was a member of the Masonic fraternity and gave 
his political allegiance to the republican party. He was a man of 
ability, of unquestioned integrity and in the field of his profession 
he attained a position of distinction and honor. His death, which oc- 
curred in Berkeley in 1897, was sincerely mourned by a wide circle of 
friends. 



JONATHAN F. CHAMBERS. 

Jonathan F. Chambers is engaged in the real-estate business in 
Oakland and has found opportunities which he has utilized and 
which have brought him success. His birth occurred in County 
Cork, Ireland, January 31, 1883, his parents being Michael and 
Catherine (Moynihan) Chambers, both natives of the same county. 
The father came to America in 1884 and the mother in 1885 and es- 
tablished their home in Bufifalo, New York, where they passed away. 

Their son, Jonathan F. Chambers, remained in Ireland, where 
he attended the public schools until he was eleven years of age and in 
1894 came to this country, making his way to Bufifalo, where he im- 
mediately began work at the printer's trade. In 1901 he went to 
Cleveland as inspector for the Empire Typesetting Machine Com- 
pany and there he remained for over a year. He engaged in print- 
ing and newspaper work in New York city for several years and 
then went to Washington, D. C, where for two years he held the 
responsible position of superintendent of typesetting machines in 



484 HISTORY Ol'^ ALAMEDA COUNTY 

the government printing department. This department is one of the 
best managed enterprises under government control and the fact 
that he held a .position of authority therein is proof of his efficiency 
and reliability. During the time he spent in Washington he took a 
two years' course in the evening classes of the National University 
Law School. 

In 1907 Mr. Chambers came to California as coast representative 
for the Lanston Monotype Machine Company, opening offices on 
New Montgomery street, San Francisco, and continuing in that line 
for four ye