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Full text of "Past and present of Allamakee county, Iowa. A record of settlement, organization, progress and achievement"

PAST AND PRESENT 

OF 

Allamakee County 

IOWA 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME 



CHICAGO 
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1913 



THENEWYORy.. 

PusLic imM^Y.. 



ASTOR, LPW'!?X A^■D 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



D. J. MURPHY. 



One of the most able lawyers and business men of Waukon is D. J. Murphy, 
who during the twenty years of his residence here has actively identified him- 
self with the city's professional, financial and public life, winning each year in- 
creasing prominence in each field. He is today a leader at the bar and well 
known as an organizer and a force in local democratic politics, his name standing 
as a synonym for progress, growth and advancement. 

Mr. Murphy has been a resident of Iowa since 1889. He was born in New 
Diggings, Wisconsin, November i, 1867, and grew to manhood in that state 
and was there educated, graduating from the State Normal School at Platte- 
ville with the class of 1886. He afterward engaged in teaching, winning prom- 
inence in his profession, rising to be principal of the Highland high school, a 
position which he held for three years. In 1889 he came to Iowa and joined his 
brother, D. D. Murphy, at Elkader, where he read law until 1891, when he was 
admitted to the bar. He formed a partnership with his brother and they prac- 
ticed in Elkader for two years, Mr. Murphy of this review coming in 1893 to 
Waukon, where he has since been in active practice before the district and 
supreme courts. His ability and worth have become widely recognized during 
the twenty years and his success in handling important and difficult litigation has 
placed him in a leading position at the Allamakee county bar. 

It is not alone along professional lines, however, that Mr. Murphy has 
achieved success and prominence, for he is an able and far-sighted business man 
connected through investment or official service with various important enter- 
prises in the city. He built one of the finest business blocks in Waukon, the 
lower floors of which are occupied by a large department store, while the upper 
story is fitted up into fine offices. Mr. Murphy has his own suite of three rooms 
here, tastefully furnished and equipped with one of the finest law libraries in 
this section of the state. He was one of the organizers of the Peoples National 
Bank and is now a large stockholder and member of the board of directors. 
He is a stockholder and director in the Citizens State Bank and aided in form- 
ing the company which opened up and developed the iron mines in this vicinity. 
He was elected president of the concern and still holds the office. All of his 
business affairs are conducted in an able and discriminating way and the suc- 
cess to which he has attained is entirely the result of his own talents and powers 
which have been intelligently and worthily used. 

In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on November 8, 1894, Mr. Murphy was united 
in marriage to Miss Agnes Hay, who was born at Mineral Point, tliat state, and 

5 



6 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

who acquired her education in Platteville. For a time she was a teacher in 
the pubhc schools of Milwaukee. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy have three children: 
Lorna, who is a student at Mount St. Joseph's College of Dubuque : Robert H., 
also a student in St. Joseph's College in the same city ; and James P. 

Mr. Murphy has been affiliated with the democratic party since casting his 
first vote and is prominent in the party's councils. In 1912 he was a candidate 
for the office of district judge and, although not elected, was proud of the vote 
which he polled, carrying his home county by a majority of six hundred and 
eighteen, in the very center of a republican stronghold. Mr. Murphy is a mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic church and his upright life and sterling qualities of 
character have gained him the respect and esteem of all who are in any way 
associated with him. 



WILLL\M HARRIS. 

Among the residents of Postville who were at one time closely associated 
with the agricultural interests of Allamakee county and are now enjoying the 
fruits of their former toil in honorable retirement is William Harris, who was 
born in Morgan county, Ohio, June 19, 1847, a son of Elisha and Margaret 
(Patterson) Harris, both natives of Morgan county, where the father followed 
farming until 1854, when he came to Iowa. He was one of the first settlers in 
Lybrand, Post township, where he located on a farm which he continued to 
develop and improve until his death, which occurred about the year 1896. 
He was born in 1819 and was seventy-seven years old when he died. His wife 
died August 2, 1885. In their family were fourteen children, of whom the 
subject of this review is the second in order of birth. 

In the acquirement of an education William Harris attended district school 
at Lybrand and when not engaged with his books aided his father with the work 
of the farm. Until he was twenty-one years of age he remained upon the home- 
stead and he then began his independent career, buying land in Post township 
and turning his attention to its development. There he resided until 1904, trans- 
forming the property during that time into a rich and productive farm supplied 
with modern equipment and accessories. The place comprises five hundred and 
twenty acres and is neat and well ordered in every particular. Mr. Harris has 
the distinction of having brought the first Aberdeen Angus cattle to this vicinity 
and for about eighteen years he was one of the most extensive breeders of that 
breed of cattle in Allamakee county. He continued his personal supervision 
and practical work upon his property until 1905, when he moved into Postville, 
where he has since made his home. 

In 1869, Mr. Harris was united in marriage to Miss Charity McDonald, who 
was born in Postville, January i, 1849. She is a daughter of Duncan and Jane 
(Green) McDonald, the former of whom was born in Union county, Ohio, June 
30, 1818, and the latter in Rensselaer county. New York, March 18, 1827. The 
father, who followed farming as an occupation, went to Wisconsin at a very 
early date and his marriage occurred in Monroe, that state. He and his wife 
came to Iowa in 1841), settling on the present townsite of Postville, where they 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 7 

reMded for many years before removing to the vincinity of Nevada, Missouri, 
whence they went to Lawrence county. In that section of the state both passed 
away. They were the parents of three children, of whom Mrs. Hams is the 
hrst'in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Harris have six children. Herman How- 
ard, born October 7, iSCxj, married Miss Christina Willman, of Postville, and 
they have one child, Ossa, who was born February 20, 1896. Bertha, born 
January 12, 187 1, married Darius Orr, a farmer in Post township, and they have 
become the parents of four children: Ethel, born October 29, 1891 ; Edith, born 
September 13. 1892; Esther, born February 27, 1896; and Eva, born November 
14, 1899. Edith, born May 16, 1875, married Ernie Churchill, a plumber in 
Monroe, Wisconsin, and they have one child, Charlotte, born May 6, 1906. Edna, 
born March 18, 1879, married Fred Oehring, a jeweler in McGregor, and they 
have a daughter, Esther, born June 3, 191 1. Glessner, born March 25, 1889, is 
the wife of Arthur Webster, an electrician in Postville. Adelaide, who completes 
the family, was born October 23, 1893, and resides with her parents. 

Mr. Harris gives a general allegiance to the republican party but votes 
independently when he feels that the best interests of the community demand 
independent action. Although he has never sought nor desired public office he 
served for two terms on the Postville city council and discharged his duties m 
a most able and effective manner. He is a stockholder in the Bank of Postville 
and is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His wife 
is a member of the Royal Neighbors. He is well known in this community as 
an industrious, far-sighted and capable man who enjoys the confidence and respect 
of his neighbors. He resides in a modern and attractive home in Postville, where 
he is spending his retired life in the enjoyment of rest, earned by his long season 
of honest and successful labor. 



JOHN KRAMBEER. 



Among the many sturdy, straightforward and reliable citizens whom Germany 
has given to America is numbered John Krambeer, now engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock-raising upon a fine tract of land in Post township. He was born 
in Mecklenburg- Schwerin, on the 2d of November, 1854, and is a son of John 
and Dora (Schultz) Krambeer, also natives of that part of Germany, the former 
born on the 6th of December, 1831, and the latter on the 2d of June of the same 
year. The father owned and operated a small farm in Germany, which he sold 
in 1866 and came to America, settling on a farm in Garnavillo township, Clayton 
county. Iowa, in the same year. Upon this he continued to reside for a number 
of years, disposing of it finally in order to buy another tract of land one and 
a half miles north of Clayton Center, a property which he continued to develop 
and improve until his death, which occurred about 1881. His wife survived him 
some time, making her home with her son until 1900, when she passed away. 
To them were born five children, of whom the subject of this review is the 
second in the order of birth. 



8 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

John Krambeer was twelve years of age when he accompanied his parents to 
America and his education was largely acquired in the public schools of Garna- 
villo township, Clayton county, and in the German school of that locality. From 
an early age he assisted with the work of the homestead and afterward worked 
at farm labor in the employ of others until he was twenty-six years of age, 
when he assumed management of his father's property. After one year, how- 
ever, he purchased a farm near Hardin, in Post township, Allamakee county, upon 
which he continued to reside for eight years, selling it in order to buy his present 
farm, which was then known as the old Jamison property. He resided here until 
1903 and then retired from active life, moving into Postville. However, after 
four years he returned to his farm and has since continued to make his home 
upon it. At one time he owned three hundred acres of fine land, upon which he 
carried on general farming and stock-raising, but he has since disposed of the 
greater part of this property, his son buying the portion containing the residence 
and his son-in-law purchasing the greater part of the remainder. Mr. Krambeer 
is living practically retired, although he has important business interests in 
Postville, being a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store and the canning 
factory. 

On the i8th of March, 1881, Mr. Krambeer was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida Harnack, who was born on the 12th of December, 1862. To them have been 
born five children: Bertha, whose birth occurred on the 6th of December, 1881, 
and who is now the wife of H. C. Meyer, mentioned elsewhere in this work; 
Matilda, who was born on the loth of December, 1882, and married Rudolph 
Bugenhagen, residing on a portion of the Krambeer homestead; John H., who 
was born December 18, 1885, ^"d who is now operating a portion of the home 
farm; Emma, born July 3, 1890; and Hilma, born February 3, 1894. 

Mr. Krambeer does not affiliate with any particular party, voting indepen- 
dently according to his personal convictions. He is interested in public affairs, 
especially in the cause of education, and did able work in its promotion during 
his two terms as director of the school board and his three terms as its secre- 
tary. He is well and favorably known in Post township, where he has so long 
resided, and is now enjoying the reward of many years of active and well 
directed labor in the promotion of the agricultural advancement of the county 
where he makes his home. 



GEORGE W. SHERMAN. 

George W. Sherman is numbered among the pioneers in Allamakee county, 
his residence here dating from 1857. From that time until his retirement he 
was a force in agricultural development, his individual prosperity constituting 
an element in the general advancement. He is honored as a veteran of the 
Civil war, having served three years in that conflict, and in all the relations of 
life has proved loyal, courageous and straightforward. Mr. Sherman is a native 
of Pennsylvania, born in Erie county, February 8, 1834. He grew to manhood 
on a farm in that section and acquired his primary education in the public 
schools, supplementing this by a course in Albion Academy. He fitted himself 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 9 

for teaching and after laying aside his books followed that occupation for three 
terms before he was twenty-one years of age. In the spring of 1855 he left 
Pennsylvania and came west, settling first in Monroe county, Wisconsin, where 
he taught in the public schools for two years. He there married and came with 
his wife to Iowa, making a permanent location in Allamakee county in 1857. He 
was one of the pioneer teachers in this section of the state and for several years 
after his arrival followed his profession during the winter months, engaging in 
farming during the summers. He purchased forty acres of land near Rossville 
and this he improved and developed until August 11, 1862, when he enlisted in 
the L^nion army, joining Company A, Twenty-seventh Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. 
His regiment was sent to Dubuque, where it drilled for two or three months, 
and at the end of that time was transferred to Fort Snelling to assist in driving 
off the Indians at that point. It was later ordered to Memphis, Tennessee, and 
took part in many skirmishes, battles and forced marches, participating in the 
Red River expedition and the battles at Pleasant Hill, Fair Oaks, Fort DeRussy, 
Little Rock and Nashville. During all of this time, however, Mr. Sherman 
never carried a gun, having been detailed to hospital duty, serving for the first 
two years as nurse and for the remainder of his term of enlistment as acting 
hospital steward. With the exception of a thirty-day furlough he was contin- 
uously in service from the time of his enlistment until his discharge at the close 
of the war, having never lost a day's time through sickness or from any other 
cause. 

After the close of hostilities JMr. Sherman returned to his old home in Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, and spent a few months visiting his old friends and 
neighbors. However, in November of the same year he returned to Iowa and 
in 1866 resumed farming, engaging also in drilling and sinking wells. He has 
the reputation of having constructed the first drilled well in Allamakee county. 
After a time he sold his farm near Rossville and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres just adjoining the corporate limits of Waukon and this property he 
developed and improved for many years, his practical methods, his knowledge 
of farming, his industry, energy and success winning him a place among the 
substantial and representative agriculturists of the county. Eventually, how- 
ever, he sold his farm, disposing of it in five acre tracts, and retired from active 
life, moving into Waukon, w'here he purchased the home in which he and his 
daughter now reside. 

In Monroe county, Wisconsin, Mr. Sherman married Miss Katherine Round, 
who was born and reared in that section. She was a daughter of Zina Round, a 
pioneer in Wisconsin, having come to that state in early times from Vermont. 
Mrs. Sherman passed away in 1873, leaving four children : J. D., who is engaged 
in farming near Waukon; Lida L., who makes her home with her father; Airs. 
ATaggie E. Roberts, of Mason City, Iowa; and Lela, the wife of E. W. Goody- 
koontz, who is engaged in business in Waukon. 

Mr. Sherman keeps in touch with his comrades of the Civil war through his 
membership in John J. Stillman Post, No. 194. G. A. R., of which he has served as 
quartermaster for eighteen years. During the period of his residence in Alla- 
makee county he has taken an active part in local politics, having served as 
assessor and tax collector, as census enumerator and in various other positions 
of public trust and honor. He and his daughter are members' of the Baptist 



10 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 



church and the latter is active in church and Sunday school work. A resident 
of this section for fifty-six years and continuously identified with its growth 
and development, Mr. Sherman has become widely and favorably known in the 
locality as a man enterprising in business, progressive in citizenship and faithful 
to all the ties and obligations of life— one of Allamakee county's most honored 
pioneers. 



O. T. HAGER. 



O. J. Hager occupies a notable place in financial circles of Waukon as president 
of the First National Bank, while his connections with other leading institutions 
through investment or official service make him also one of the country's most 
conspicuously successful financiers. He is a native son of Iowa, born in Alla- 
makee county April 7, 1867, a son of Fred Hager, who was among the early 
settlers in Iowa and who came to this section of the state in 1849. He married 
here Miss Wilhelmina Helming and after the wedding took up a claim some six 
miles beyond Waukon which he cleared, broke and fenced and upon which he 
made many substantial improvements, replacing his original farm dwelling by a 
good brick residence and making his property one of the finest and most valuable 
m the section. When he left the farm he moved into Waukon and there spent the 
last years of his life, passing away November 4, 1909, having survived his wife 
since 1891. 

O. J. Hager was reared upon his father's farm and acquired his primary edu- 
cation in the public schools, supplementing this by a three years' course in Decorah 
College. After laying aside his books he taught for four years but at the end 
of that time came to Waukon, where he aided in organizing the First National 
Bank with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. Mr. Hager was made cashier 
and he served in that capacity for five years, advancing afterward to the position 
of president, an office which he still holds. The bank purchased an old building 
which they tore down and replaced by the present modern and commodious 
structure which is complete in furnishings and equipment and a worthy com- 
petitor with the finest financial institutions in the state. The capital stock has 
been increased to one hundred thousand dollars and an extensive and growing 
patronage has been built up, much of the success of the concern being due to 
Mr. Hager's able and far-sighted management. He is connected in an important 
way with various other banks in this vicinity, being president of the Waterville 
Savings Bank ; vice president of the New Albin Savings Bank, and a stockholder 
and director in the Dorchester Savings Bank. He is connected in a similar way 
with the Brownsville State Bank of Brownsville, Minnesota, and has come to be 
known as one of the authorities on finance in this part of the country, his stand- 
ing being based on twenty years of able work along financial lines. 

Extensive and important as are his banking interests, Air. Hager has yet 
found time to devote to other lines of activity and during the period of his resi- 
dence here has been prominently connected with many profitable business enter- 
prises. He is a real-estate dealer on an extensive scale, buying and selling Iowa 




0. J. IIAGEi; 



PAST AND PRESENT OK ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 



13 



and Minnesota lands and specializing in improved and unimproved farm proper- 
ties in which he has valuable holdings. 

" On September 20, 1900, Mr. Hager married Miss Ella Stevens, who was 
born, reared and educated in Waukon. She is a daughter of Peter Stevens, 
one of the original settlers in Allamakee county and for a number of years a 
prosperous farmer. He later moved to Waukon. Mr. and Mrs. Hager are he 
parents of two daughters, Helen and Anna. The family are members of the 
Presbyterian church and are well known in religious and social circles. 1 hey 
occupy a modern and beautiful residence in Waukon which Mr. Hager erected 
and which they have made a center of hospitality for their charming circle of 
friends. Fraternally Mr. Hager is connected with the Knights of Pythias and 
his political allegiance is given to the republican party. A man of high worth 
and sterling integrity, he is widely known throughout Allamakee county, a com- 
munity which has known him during his entire life. 



HON. JOHN F. DAYTON. 

There is scarcely a phase of legitimate activity in Allamakee county in which 
Hon John F Davton is not successful and prominent and to the advancement 
of which he has not by his ability, industry and enterprise made substantial 
contributions. He is one of the county's political leaders, an able and success- 
ful member of the bar, a force in the development of the fruit growing industry 
and each year of his activity since he came to Waukon in 1873 has witnessed his 
growing prominence in all of these fields of endeavor. 

Mr Dayton was born in Saratoga county, New York, January 10, 1849. and 
is a son of Dr. Simon N. and Lydia (Houghton) Dayton, natives of New York 
Dr Dayton spent his youth and early manhood in that state and afterward moved 
to Illinois locating in Rockford, where he engaged in the general practice of 
medicine until 1890. when he returned to New York and located in Corinth, 
where he spent the last years of his life, dying there in the fall of 1899. His 
wife survived him only a few months, passing away in February, 1900. 

John F Dayton grew to manhood in Rockford, Illinois, and acquired his 
education in the public schools, graduating from the Rockford high school with 
the class of 1867. He was afterward a student in Beloit College for three years 
and when he left that institution read law in Rockford. In 1873 he came to 
Iowa and settled in Waukon, where he was admitted to the bar. In the same 
year he formed a partnership with his uncle, Hon. Henry Dayton, and their 
association has continued since that time, the firm being today one of the strongest 
in the county, connected through its patronage with much important litigation. 
Mr Dayton served as county attorney for two years and in public life proved 
as able, far-sighted and progressive as he is in the private practice of his pro- 

fession. . ,, 

Aside from his work in the general practice of law Mr. Dayton is also well 
known in Allamakee countv as an extensive fruit grower. In 1878 he planted 
almost forty acres of land in grapes, strawberries and raspberries and later 
added a nursery, where he specializes in raising apple trees and others bearing 



14 PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

the hardy fruits. He issues an annual catalogue and does a large mail order 
business, shipping his products by express and freight. He owns a neat and well 
improved property of sixty acres, just outside the corporate limits of Waukon. 
and is numbered among the successful farmers and business men of the locality. 

On the 14th of October, 1875, Mr. Dayton was united in marriage, in Rock- 
ford, Illinois, to Miss Laura Hewitt, born and reared in that city, a daughter of 
John Hewitt, a pioneer of Winnebago county, who settled in that section in 
1833- 

Eminently public-spirited and progressive in citizenship. Mr. Davton has 
smce taking up his residence in Iowa been continuously identified with public 
life in the state and is an active and able politician. He was the first mayor 
of \\ aukon, giving to the city a constructive, efficient and businesslike adminis- 
tration, and he was afterward elected to the state legislature, serving in the 
twenty-second, twenty-third and twenty-fourth general assemblies. During his 
term of office he was connected with much constructive legislation, his vote and 
influence being always on the side of right, reform and progress. He was a 
member of a number of important committees, including the committee on rail- 
roads and commerce, and so efficient, far-sighted and businesslike was his work 
that he was named as the democratic candidate for speaker of the house in the 
twenty- fourth general assembly. His public career has been varied in service 
and faultless in honor and the work he has accomplished in the interests of the 
community is destined to find a place in its history. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias and has served through all the chairs of that organ- 
ization, being now past chancellor. He is also a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America and is one of the most popular men in Waukon, known to his 
personal friends as "Frank." In all respects his life has been exemplary and 
useful— the life of an upright, honorable and straightforward man and a pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen. 



ROBERT FREDERICK HECKER. 

Robert Frederick Hecker, proprietor of a large carriage factory in Postville, 
which he conducts in connection with an automobile repair shop, is one of the 
representative and successful business men of his community and his labors 
during the years of his active career have been potent forces in general industrial 
development. He was born in Baden, Germany, November 15, 1852, a son 
of Christian and \'eronica (Gerder) Hecker, natives of the same section of 
the fatherland. The father, who engaged in farming all during his active life, 
died in Germany and after his demise his widow and son crossed the Atlantic 
to America, locating in New York city in 1861. After one year they came west 
to Lansing, Iowa, where the mother married again, dying in this section about 
the year 1899. 

Robert F. Hecker completed an education, begun in Germany, in the public 
schools in New York city and in the district schools in the vicinity of Lansing, and 
continued to reside with his mother until he was twenty years of age. At that time 
he began learning the wagon-making trade and after two years went to Dubuc|ue 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 15 

and thence to Davenport, where he spent one year engaged in that occupation. He 
then returned to Lansing InU at the end of six months came to Postville, where he 
engaged in business for himself, manufacturing wagons and conducting a general 
repair and blacksmith shop. In the early days he made spring wagons, buggies, 
sleighs, etc., but he now does all kinds of automobile repair work and vulcaniz- 
ing. The business has grown steadily during the passing years and is now one of 
the important enterprises in the city, the credit f6r its rapid growth being entirely 
due to Mr. Hecker's untiring efforts. As his sons grew older and left school 
they were taken into the business and they now relieve their father of a great 
deal of the active work, so that he has more time to devote to his other interests. 
He has a tine farm of four hundred and twenty acres in Post townshii). which 
is rented on shares, and he is the owner of a great deal of valuable property. 

On the 6th of January, 1876, Mr. Hecker was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Hupp, who was born in Lansing, October 11, 1854, a daughter of Joseph 
Hupp. Her father was a native of Hesse, Germany, and her mother of Bavaria. 
They emigrated to America about the year 1853 and although the father was a 
stonemason by trade he engaged in farming in Allamakee county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hecker became the parents of five children. John C, born November 12, 
1876, is now associated with his father in business. He married Miss Lena 
Bedenbender, a native of Laporte, Iowa. Robert M., who was born December 
2, 1878, is also in partnership with his father. Joseph M., born September 22, 
1881, has also a share in his father's business. Josephine, born February 8, 
1885, married Lowell Moody, manager of a large dry-goods store in Montana. 
Marv passed away at the age of seven years. 

Mr. Hecker gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but has 
never sought nor desired public office. Although reared in the Catholic religion 
he is not now a member of any denomination. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Masonic order and is also a member of the Turner Society. In all the 
relations of life he has been honorable and straightforward and his example is 
well worthy of emulation. Prosperous in his business connections, he proves 
what may be accomplished by earnest and persistent labor, for he has worked 
his way steadily upward, improving every opportunity for advancement and 
standing today among Pcstville's substantial and representative citizens. 



ROBERT WAMPLER. 

Robert Wampler, honored as a pioneer in Iowa and as one of the few remain- 
ing veterans of the Civil war, has been a resident of Allamakee county since 
1852. He has, therefore, witnessed almost its entire growth and development and 
has borne an honored part therein, his work along agricultural lines having con- 
stituted one of the forces in local agricultural development. He was born in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, May 22, 1842, and is a son of Eli Wampler, 
also a native of the Keystone state. The father grew to maturit\- in Westmore- 
land county and there married Miss Mary Jane Luek, a native of the same section. 
They moved west in 1850 and settled as pioneers in Jackson county, where they 
resided for two years, moving in 1852 to Allamakee county. The father, however. 



16 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 



never arrived in this section for he died of cholera on a Mississippi river boat 
upon the journey, while two of his sons and one of his daughters died of the same 
disease after reaching Lansing, Iowa. Mrs. Wampler with her surviving chil- 
dren located on Clear creek, where she later married again. 

Robert Wampler remained with his mother until the outbreak of the Civil 
war, when, on October 15, 1861, he joined Company B, Twelfth Iowa Volunteer 
Infantry. The regiment was soon afterward sent to Dubuque, where it was 
organized and drilled for some time, and afterward it went to St. Louis, where 
it remained during the winter months. In the spring of 1862 it was sent down 
the river to Fort Henry, where Mr. Wampler was for the first time under fire. 
He later participated in the battle of Shiloh, where he was wounded in a peculiar 
manner. Having put his hand to his head to pull down his cap behind, a ball cut 
off his finger and gave him also a scalp wound across the back of his head. He 
was taken prisoner with General Prentiss and taken to Memphis, and later to 
Mobile and Montgomery, where he contracted typhoid fever so severely as to bring 
him near death and was placed in a hospital until his recovery. He was then 
paroled and sent to Chattanooga with about eleven hundred other soldiers to be 
exchanged, but it was not until October of that year that the exxhange was 
completed in Richmond. Upon his exchange he went to St. Louis, where he 
drew some money and received clothing and through the influence and kindness 
of Colonel Earl his company was sent home on a furlough to recuperate. After 
six weeks he returned to St. Louis and rejoined his command at Benton Barracks, 
the regiment being later ordered to Vicksburg. It participated in the siege 
preceding the fall of that city and also in the battle at Jackson. It later returned 
to Memphis and afterward took part in the raid at Holly Springs. Mr. Wampler 
was in the thick of the battle at Tupelo, Alississippi, fighting in a hotly contested 
engagement of three hours' duration. He later returned with his regiment to 
Memphis and from there to Eastport, where he remained in camp several 
months, returning to Memphis at the end of that time. The regiment was later 
sent down the river to New Orleans and after two weeks spent in Fort Jackson 
aided in the attack on the Spanish Fort. In that engagement Mr. Wampler 
was wounded by a shell, which exploded over him, a piece, one and a half inches 
long and three quarters of an inch wide, striking him in the back. His wound 
not proving serious, he returned to his regiment after a few days and served 
until the close of the war, when he was mustered out at Memphis and returned 
to Iowa, receiving his honorable discharge in Davenport on January 20, 1865. 
With this honorable military record Mr. Wampler returned to -Mlamakee 
county and purchased a forty acre farm, to which he later added the forty acres 
adjoining. For sixteen years he cultivated and developed this property and his 
practical and progressive methods were rewarded by success, his farm becoming 
one of the best improved and most valuable in this section of rhe state. Finally 
Mr. Wampler retired from active life and moved into Waukon. having earned 
leisure and rest by many years of honorable and worthy labor. He purchased 
a comfortable residence in the city and makes his home therein, having disposed 
of all of his farm property. 

While home on a furlough during the Civil war Mr. Wampler married, 
April II, 1864, Miss Margaret Duff, a native of Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, who was reared and educated in Allamakee county. Mr. and Mrs. 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 17 

Wampler have five children: Eli M., who is a resident of Sioux City, Iowa; 
L. O., of Waukon; Ella, married J. E. Mills, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota; 
Mary Agnes, the wife of L. F. Seelig, of Waukon; and Lillian, who was married 
December 25, 191 2. Two sons born to Mr. and Mrs. Wampler have passed 
away. James grew to maturity and married. He died in St. Paul, Minnesota, 
in 190 1. Warren met death by accident, having been killed by a horse when he 
was a young man of seventeen, his death occuring in i<S92. 

Politically Mr. Wampler is identified with the republican party and has been 
for many years an active worker in its ranks. He has been a delegate to 
numerous republican conventions and served for a number of years as city 
assessor. He is prominent in the afifairs of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
being connected with John J. Stillman Post, No. 194, of which he has served 
as commander and of which he is at present chaplain. Since he was a lad of ten 
years he has been a resident of Allamakee county and now at seventy-one can 
count among his friends many who have known him from boyhood. As a public- 
spirited and progressive citizen he has borne his part in the work of development 
and progress, displaying in all business, public and private relations of life the 
same loyalty and courage which marked his service on the southern battlefields. 



GOTTFRIED STAADT. 



Gottfried Staadt, a well known druggist of Postville, conducting a profitable 
and growing business, was born in Post township, Allamakee county, February 
21, 1857. He is a son of Anthony and Pauline (Verver) Staadt, natives of the 
Rhine Province, Germany, the father born January 7, 1821, and the mother, 
February 28, 1813. Anthony Staadt crossed the Atlantic in 1851, before his 
marriage, his future wife landing in New York a few months later. Their mar- 
riage occurred in that city and the father was afterward employed in a drug 
store there for a short time, retaining his position until he went to Wisconsin, 
settling in the vicinity of Sheboygan. In 1854 he came to Iowa, locating on a 
farm in Post township, two miles east of Postville, and this property he con- 
tinued to improve and develop for twelve years, at the end of which time he 
turned his attention to business pursuits, opening a drug store in Conover. In 
1866 he came to Postville, establishing a drug store in this city, which he con- 
tinued to conduct successfully until his death, which occurred in December, 1902. 
He was well known in local politics and was especially interested in school 
affairs, serving for several years as president of the school board. He had long 
survived his wife, who passed away January 3. 1890. They were the parents 
of two children: Anthony, who was born October 28, 1853, and who died in 
Milwaukee, December 16, 1871 ; and Gottfried, of this review. 

After acquiring an education in the public schools of Post township and Post- 
ville, Gottfried Staadt, at the age of sixteen, began his independent career, join- 
ing his father as a partner in the drug business in this city. He retained this 
connection until after his father's death, when he assumed entire charge of the 
enterprise, which he has since conducted alone. He carries a full stock of drugs 
and in addition has paid particular attention to his popular lines, which include 



18 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

toilet articles, paints and oils. His excellent business and executive ability has 
contributed in a large measure to the success which has attended this enterprise, 
making it one of the largest and most important pharmacies in the city. He 
is also a stockholder in both of the banks of Postville and is a director in the 
Postville State P.ank. He is connected with the Postville Clay Product Company 
and is the owner of some valuable farming property in Clayton county. 

Mr. Staadt married, on the 9th of February, 1893, Miss Anna Welzel, born 
in Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, September 13, 1872, a daughter of 
John and Savina (Thoma) Welzel, natives of Bavaria, Germany. They came 
to America in early life and were married in Grand Meadow township, where 
the father turned his attention to farming, although he had been a meat cutter 
in his native country. He later retired from active l)usiness life and moved into 
Postville, where he died on December 18, 1906. His wife survives him and makes 
her home in this city with her daughter, Mrs. Staadt. He was active and prom- 
inent in local public affairs and held various important offices, including that of 
school treasurer, in which he served for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Staadt 
became the parents of four children: Anthony, born January 24, 1894, a gradu- 
ate of Postville high school; Pauline, born January 16, 1896, who was graduated 
from the same institution in 1913 ; Edward, born October 23. 1899 ; and Catherine, 
born July 2, 1908. 

Mr. Staadt gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and served 
for one term as a member of the city council. He is especially interested in 
educational matters and has done a great deal to promote the spread of public 
education in Postville through his long period of service as secretary of the 
school board, a position which he has held since 1885. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Alasonic lodge, of which he is treasurer, with the ^Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a 
member of the Turner Society and president of the Maennerchor. A resident 
of Postville during practically all his life, he is recognized as a representative and 
enterprising citizen of the community and is widely known by reason of the 
excellent establishment with which he is connected. His business methods have 
been such as neither seek nor require disguise, being at all times straight- 
forward and honorable. 



JAMES M. BARR. 



Not only has James M. Barr seen .-Mlamakee county grow from a wilderness 
with only a few inhabitants into a rich agricultural district containing thousands 
of good homes and a number of growing towns, but he has participated in the 
slow, persistent work of development which, was necessary to produce the 
change which has been so complete that Allamakee stands in the front ranks 
of the leading counties of the state of Iowa. Mr. Barr is numbered among 
its most honored pioneers and is further entitled to a place in this volume as a 
veteran of the Civil war, to whom the country owes a debt of gratitude that 
can never be forgotten and never fully repaid. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 19 

Mr. Rarr was born in Glasgow. Scotland, June 26, 1843, and is a son of John 
C. Barr, of English ancestry Init a native of the north of Ireland. The father 
was reared in Scotland and there married Katherine Allen, also a native of 
that country, coming from a long line of Scotch ancestors. John C. Barr 
emigrated to America in 185^ and went by way of New Orleans up the Missis- 
sippi river to Dubucjue, where he worked in the lead mines for some time. He 
later came to .Allamakee county, locating in Hanover township, where he took up 
two hundred and forty acres of raw land, which he cleared, fenced and. improved, 
opening up a new farm, upon wliich he resided until his death. 

lames M. Barr's childhood was spent amid pioneer conditions and it was 
he who aided his father in breaking the raw prairie land. Me had a five yoke 
team of oxen and a large breaking plow, which cut an eighteen inch furrow, 
and with this he accomplished a great deal of the initial work in the improvement 
of the homestead. When he was eighteen years of age, in August, 1861, he joined 
the Union army, enlisting in Company H, Ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, as 
a private. With his command he went south to St. Louis and into Benton 
Barracks, where the regiment was drilled and its organization completed in 
preparation for active field duty. It later followed General Price through 
Missouri and was first under fire at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, under command of 
General Curtis. There Mr. Barr received a slight gunshot wound in the left 
shoulder and the next day was wounded in the right leg. Though disabled for a 
time he did not leave the field. During his term of service he participated in thirty- 
three different battles besides the guerilla fights through Arkansas to Helena. 
He was in the thick of battle at Vicksburg, Jackson and Meridian, met the enemy 
again at Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge and under General Sherman 
marched to the sea, fighting every day until Atlanta was reached. The regiment 
helped to drive General Johnson out of Resaca and was in the battles of Rome 
and Kenesaw Mountain. In the latter engagement Mr. Barr was wounded for 
the third time when a cannon ball struck the top of the rebel fortification knock- 
ing down a large log which struck Mr. Barr, causing serious and almost fatal 
injuries. He was confined to his tent for six weeks under treatment and was 
at death's door a number of times. However, he responded to roll call every 
day, his captain and comrades nursing and caring for him and answering to his 
name. This was not the only time Mr. Barr just escaped death, for in the 
charge at Vicksburg he received five bullets through his clothing, the shots com- 
ing so close that his skin was burned but not broken. He aided in taking Jones- 
boro and Atlanta and participated in the Carolina and Virginia campaigns. 
After Lee's surrender the troops marched to Richmond and thence to Washing- 
ton, where they took part in the grand review at the close of the war. Mr. 
Barr was later sent to Louisville, Kentucky, where he was mustered out, 
receiving his honorable discharge at Clmton, Iowa, July 26, 1865. 

After the war Mr. Barr returned to Allamakee county and purchased a 
threshing machine outfit, which he operated here, wearing out three machines 
before he abandoned that line of work. Eventually, however, he purchased 
land in Hanover township and opened up a new farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, upon which he continued to reside for a number of years. When he 
disposed of it he removed to Howard county, where he purchased a wagon 
and blacksmith shop, which he conducted until 1900, when he refitted the place 



20 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

for his sons, who now carry on the business. Mr. Barr resided in Howard 
county nineteen years but at the end of that time sold his interests there and 
removed to Duluth, where for two years he made his home with his daughter. 
At the end of that time he purchased forty acres of wild land in Douglas 
county, Wisconsin, on Eau Claire lake, a body of water clear as crystal, five 
miles in length, with a smooth and beautiful shore. Mr. Barr built a neat cabin 
near the lake and furnished it completely, making it an ideal summer retreat. 
He spends every summer on the lake shore, fishing in Eau Claire lake and 
hunting in the adjoining woods. In 191 1 he purchased a lot in Waukon and 
upon it built a neat aand comfortable home, in which he now resides, taking 
great delight in working upon and improving his place. He is his own house- 
keeper and has proven an excellent one, keeping his home neat and attractive 
in every respect. His leisure hours are spent in reading and his life is quiet, 
peaceful and happy, a fitting crown to his many years of honorable and useful 
labor. 

In Hanover township, in 1871, Mr. Barr married Miss Anna Anderson, who 
was born in Christiania, Norway, but who was reared in Iowa. They became 
the parents of seven children. John C. is an extensive landowner in Wisconsin. 
Robert T. is a plumber in Osage, Iowa. Alfred is engaged in merchandising 
in Leonard, North Dakota. Ella K. grew to maturity and married, but has 
passed away, leaving two daughters, Mabel and Mary Flo. James died at the 
age of twenty-five years in Denver, Colorado, and Nellie died in Wisconsin at the 
same age. Aldine died December i, 1910, when he was also twenty-five years 
of age. Mrs. Barr passed away in Howard county, July 26, 1903. 

Mr. Barr was formerly a member of the Knights of Pythias, having helped 
to organize the lodge at Elma, Howard county, and he was also at one time 
identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He belongs to John J. 
Stillman Post, G. A. R., and thus keeps in touch with his comrades of the 
Civil war. His life record has at all times been a creditable one and in matters 
of citizenship he has displayed the same patriotic spirit which he manifested as 
a soldier on the battlefields of the south. In politics he has always been a stanch 
republican since reaching manhood. 



HON. WILLARD CHAUNCEY EARLE. 

Probably no man is better known and more highly respected and esteemed 
in Waukon and throughout Allamakee county than Dr. Willard Chauncey Earle, 
for he is not only one of the pioneer physicians of this section of the state, but 
throughout a period of residence here covering fifty-nine years has been one 
of the greatest individual forces in its financial, commercial, political and moral 
development. His activities have touched and influenced in an important way 
practically every phase of municipal and county advancement and his great 
success has rewarded a life high in its purposes, beneficial in its effects and up- 
right and honorable in all its relations. Had he no other claim to the re- 
spect of his fellow citizens, his long and loyal service in the Civil war would 
constitute a valid and lasting one. 




.7 




WILLARD C. EARLE 



PAST AND PRIiSENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 23 

Dr. Earle has been a resident of Waukon since 1854 but was born in Hones- 
dale, Pennsylvania. October 7. 1833. llis family is of old English origin and 
the line can be traced back directly to a Saxon ancestor who livetl in Cireat 
Piritain before the Xornian conquest. It is also of old American estab- 
lishment, its tirst representative in this country having settled in Newport, 
Rhode Island, as early as 1634. Members of the family were prominent in 
that state for a number of years, later moving to Massachusetts where Calvin 
Earle, father of the subject of this review was born February i, 1790, his birth 
occurring in Hubbardstown. He there married Miss Betsy Foster and they 
later moved to Pennsylvania, locating in what is now Honesdale, that state. 
The father built the tirst house on the site where now stands a flourishing 
community of three thousand inhabitants. Calvin Earle made his home there 
until 1840 when he returned to Hubbardstown where he remained until he 
came west in 1858. joining his son W'illard C. in Waukon. He here spent the 
remaining years of his life, dying in October, 1872. 

In the acquirement of an education Willard Chauncey Earle attended public 
school in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts and later under a private tutor pre- 
pared to enter Brown University. He was obliged to abandon this intention 
on account of poor health, however, and instead joined his elder brother, J. W. 
Earle, and came west to Tififin, Ohio, where both engaged in railroad work. 
In 1854 Willard C. Earle came from Ohio to Iowa and in June of that year 
located in Waukon, where he has since maintained his residence. His first 
investment here was in a sawmill and for some time thereafter he engaged in 
the manufacture of lumber in association with a partner. He afterwards pur- 
chased his partner's interest and conducted the business alone with great suc- 
cess until i860. 

Dr. Earle was among the first to respond to President Lincoln's call for 
volunteers for service in the Civil war and in October, 1861, joined Company 
B, Twelfth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, being elected captain. The regiment was 
sent to Dubuque, where it was drilled for a time, later going to St. Louis and 
thence to the southern battlefields. He participated in numerous important 
engagements, among which were the battles of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, 
Shiloh, Jackson, Black River Bridge, Champion's Hill and V'icksburg. After 
the latter engagement Captain Earle was ordered to raise a regiment of colored 
troops, the headquarters of which were to be with General Joseph Mower. 
He carried this work forward to successful completion and, much to his sur- 
prise, received the commission of colonel of the regiment, which was entirely 
unsolicited on his part. He afterward learned that it was at the request of 
Colonel J. J. Woods, of the Twelfth Iowa Infantry, and through the influence 
of General James Tuttle and General Mower that this honor had come to him. 
General Mower laid Colonel Earle under many artd great obligations for ad- 
vice and instructions In organizing this regiment, the general being a graduate 
of West Point, an ideal and efficient officer and a true-hearted patriot. The 
regiment participated in the battle of Natchez and in the campaigns along the 
Mississijjpi river and remained in active service until the close of the war. 
Colonel Earle has always found the greatest satisfaction in the thought and 
it is the sweetest memory of his life that he was able to help Abraham Lincoln 
to destroy the most powerful and infernal labor trust ever conceived by man 



24 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

and, moreover, he finds his reward in the thought that the black man con- 
tinues in his upward development as the years roll on and that as times passes 
the civilized world will better and better appreciate the magnificent grandeur 
of thought and beauty of soul of that hnnest and remarkable man, Abraham 
Lincoln, as he expressed and exemplified them in his life and actions. 

With a creditable military record marked by brave, able and loyal service 
in the Union cause. Colonel Earle received his honorable discharge and re- 
turned to Waukon, whence he went to Chicago in order to enter Rush Medi- 
cal College. He took a course of lectures in that institution in 1865-1866 and 
during the following winter spent some time at the Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege at Philadelphia, where he completed his studies, graduating with the class 
of 1867. After receiving his degree he returned to Waukon and formed a 
partnership with Dr. I. H. Hedge, beginning the general practice of his pro- 
fession in this city. His partner, who was one of the earliest physicians in 
Waukon, had built up an extensive patronage here and in the vicinity, and to 
Dr. Earle as the younger man fell a large portion of the long rides and mid- 
night calls incident to a country practice. The two physicians later established a 
drug store and conducted it successfully for some time. Dr. Earle later pur- 
chased his partner's interest and in 1870 added to his stock a fine line of gen- 
eral merchandise, rapidly securing a lucrative trade. So steadily did this branch 
of his business e.xpand that after seven years he erected a fine brick business 
house, in which he continued to conduct a separate mercantile concern for a 
number of years. Even at this time, however, this was not his only business con- 
nection, for as early as 1867 he had formed a partnership with his brother in 
the buying and shipping of stock and grain. J. W. Earle remained the active 
manager of this enterprise until his death in 1885 when the business was taken 
over by the subject of this review who continued to carry it on for some years. 

Ever since beginning his active career Dr. Earle has been one of the leaders 
in all work of public development and many of the most important business and 
public institutions owe their inception and continued growth to his ability and 
enterprise. He was one of the promoters of the Waukon & Mississippi Rail- 
road Company, which was built by subscriptions from Waukon and Allamakee 
county citizens. Dr. Earle gave largely of his time and means to promote this 
project and was one of the greatest individual forces in its successful comple- 
tion. In Waukon he has built and is still the owner of a number of substantial 
business houses and has a comfortable residence in the city besides valuable hold- 
ings in Allamakee county farming land. All of his business interests are care- 
fully and conservatively conducted and in their management he has met with 
that success which always results from ability, enterprise and well directed 
organizing power. 

During his half a century of residence in this city Dr. Earle's interests have 
not been confined to lines of business development, for he has for many years 
been active in local politics, his influence being always on the side of progress 
and reform. After the close of the Civil war he identified himself with the 
republican party and supported its principles and policies for a number of 
years. In 1884, however, he allied his interests with democracy and, representing 
that party, was nominated and elected to the lower house of the nineteenth gen- 
eral assembly, receiving a majority of five hundred votes over his nearest oppo- 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 25 

nent. After serving one term he was elected to fill out an unexpired term occa- 
sioned by the election of Air. Larrahee to the office of governor, and he dis- 
charged his important duties with honor to himself and to the satisfaction of 
his constituents and friends. His political activity has always been of a con- 
structive and progressive kind, and his public service has been beneficial and far- 
reaching in its results. 

On January i, i860. Dr. Earle was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Augusta 
Hedge of W'aukon, a daughter of Dr. Isaiah H. Hedge, one of the pioneer 
|)hysicians of Allamakee county and one of the best known practitioners in 
Waukon for many years. Dr. and Mrs. Earle became the parents of three 
children. The eldest, Minnie Charlotte, is the wife of Grant C. Hemenway, 
for some time a lumber dealer in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and now a resi- 
dent of Paris, France. They have three children, Charlotte, Willard and Genette. 
Dr. Earle has one son Carlton Hedge, who is a prominent business man in 
Waukon, where he is well known as cashier of the Citizens' Bank. William 
Allison Earle, youngest son in this family, died April 21, 1866. 

Among the forces which have directed the growth of Waukon, and which 
have been the greatest contributing elements in the general advancement. Dr. 
Earle's fifty-nine years of continuous and well directed activity are of utmost 
importance, for they have affected politics, business and public morality and have 
elevated standards, along all lines. Dr. Earle is well known and highly esteemed 
in the community where he makes his home and his name stands for all that is 
honorable and loyal in citizenship and upright and worthy in business relations. 



CARL HOLTER. 



Mercantile interests of Postville find a progressive and able representative 
in Carl Holter, who for many years past has been closely connected with the 
clothing, gentlemen's furnishings and shoe business in the city, controlling today 
a, large and representative enterprise. A native of Norway, he was born in 
Christiania, June 30. 1847, a son of Ole and Martha (Oleson) Holter, both born 
in the vicinity of that city. The father spent his entire life farming in Norway, 
dying in that country in i8fio. The mother afterward crossed the Atlantic to 
America, settling in Postville in 1873, and continuing to make her home in the 
city until her death, which occurred about the year 1003. 

Carl Holter supplemented an education acquired in the public schools of 
Norway by one winter's attendance after he came to America. He had, how- 
ever, begun his independent career before crossing the Atlantic, having secured 
a position as clerk in a government office in his native country. After two 
years in that capacity he went to Christiania and was there employed in a 
grocery store, later becoming connected with a hat store in that capital. He 
came to the United States in 1869 and pushed westward to Chicago, where he 
remained for four months working at anything which would bring him an income. 
Having studied English while in Norway he had one advantage over manv of 
bis fellow emigrants and found that his knowledge of the language of the 



26 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

country was a valuable asset to him in the beginning of his career here. From 
Chicago he went to Memphis, Tennessee, and there worked for six months in 
a large bakery, returning at the end of that time to Chicago. After two months 
he came to Postville, working upon a farm near the city for two years there- 
after and then securing employment in a general store, a connection which he 
retained for ten years, althougii he spent one year during that time in River Falls, 
Wisconsin. Being ambitious to engage in business for himself, he founded the 
firm of Holter, Schultz & W'elzel but after one year withdrew from this con- 
nection and established the clothing firm of Armstrong & Holter. This associa- 
tion continued from 1883 to 1892, at which time Mr. Holter purchased his 
partner's interest and assumed entire control of the business. He has conducted 
it alone since that time and controls an important and growing trade accorded 
him in recognition of his full and complete line of goods, his modern and progres- 
sive business methods and his courteous service. Always a progressive and public- 
spirited citizen, he has taken a great interest in the growth of Postville's business 
institutions and aided in the organization of the Citizens State Baiik, of which he 
is now a director. He has not, however, varied outside interests, preferring to 
devote all of his attention to the conduct of his store, with the result that he 
is numbered today among the substantial merchants of the community. 

On the 22d of May, 1883, Mr. Holter married Miss Mary Marston, who 
was born in Post township, October 26, 1854, a daughter of James C. and 
Nancy Maria (Fisher) Marston, natives of New York state. The father was 
a prosperous farmer and also a local preacher. He came as a pioneer to Post 
township, he and his wife being among the first settlers there, and both died in 
the community where they had so long made their home. Mr. and Mrs. Holter 
are the parents of a daughter, Edna, born April 23, 1884. She is the wife of 
W. H. Burling, an attorney in Postville, and they have one son, Carl Frederick, 
born November 21, 1912. 

Fraternally Mr. Holter is connected with the blue lodge of Masons, in 
Postville, with the chapter at Elgin and the commandery at West Union. He 
was formerly connected with other important fraternal organizations but has 
now withdrawn from membership. He is a progressive republican in his political 
views and for twelve years did straightforward, able and businesslike work as a 
member of the Postville city council. He is one of the best known and most 
highly respected citizens of the community where he has so long resided. His 
record is, indeed, a commendable one and the most envious cannot criticise 
his business or political accomplishments. His course has been characterized 
by the strictest fidelity to principle and in social relations he displays an unfailing 
courtesy and cordiality which have won for him many friends. 



CARL WILLIAM MEIER. 

Carl William Meier is one of the enterprising merchants of Postville, where 
he is conducting a large dry-goods store, and this and his other business interests 
combine to make him a leading and enterprising citizen of the community, his alert 
and progressive spirit enabling him to carry forward to successful completion 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALT.AMAKEE COUNTY 27 

whatever he undertakes. He was born in Clayton county, May 14, 1850, and is a 
son of Christian J. and Elizabeth (Runger) Meier, natives of Germany, the former 
born in Prussia, May 13, 1825, and the latter in the province of Hanover, 
January 7, 1827. In early life the father turned his attention to farming. On 
coming to America he located in Ohio, near Portsmouth, in 1845 ^"*^ engaged 
in digging iron ore until he came to Iowa. He met with an accident while 
chopping wood, injuring his ankle and becoming incapacitated for heavy physical 
labor. He was therefore compelled to learn a trade and engaged in shoemaking 
for a time. It was in 1849 that he came to Clayton county, Iowa, and purchased 
land, but he lived upon the farm only a short time, returning then to Ohio. In 
April, 1850, he again took up his residence in this state and continued to reside 
on his first farm until January, 1866, when he bought another place, living 
thereon until he retired from active life in 1884. He spent his last days in Post- 
ville, where his death occurred in September, 191 1. He had survived his wife 
since 1906. They were parents of nine children, of whom the subject of this 
review is the oldest. 

Carl W. Meier attended school in Farmersburg township, Clayton county, 
and supplemented this by one term at National. He remained at home until 
1873 ''"d then purchased a farm, engaging in agricultural pursuits upon that 
property until 1883, when he removed to AJlamakee county, locating on an 
excellent tract of land in Post township. In 1892 he rented his farm and 
removed to Postville, where he engaged in the furniture business for two 
years, selling out in the fall of 1895 and conducting a similar establishment 
in Farmersburg for about one year. Turning his business over to his son at the 
end of that time, he returned to his farm in Post township but in 1902 again 
located in Farmersburg, where he conducted a large and important general 
merchandise store until 1908, when he disposed of his interests and came again 
to Postville. Here he purchased the remnants of a general stock of merchandise 
and he has since added to his store and enlarged his stock, carrying now a full 
and complete line of goods, his enterprise being one of the largest and best 
managed in the city. 

Mr. Meier was married, September 8, 187 1, to Miss Louisa Hedeman, a 
native of southern Illinois, born February 29. 1852. She is a daughter of 
Frederick and Helena (Breuner) Hedeman, natives of Oldenburg, Germany. 
The father crossed the Atlantic in the late '30s but after a few years returned 
to Germany, making his second crossing with his wife about 1843. For ten 
years thereafter they lived upon a farm in southern Illinois but in 1853 came 
to Garnavillo townshi[), Clayton county, Iowa, where the father became an 
extensive landowner and a prosperous farmer, giving all his attention to agricul- 
tural pursuits until his death, which occurred about 1893 or 1894. His wife 
survived him two years, her death also occurring upon the homestead. They 
had six children, of whom the wife of the subject of this review is the fourth 
in the order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Meier became the parents of six children: 
Louisa, the wife of F. L. Eaton, proprietor of a restaurant and cafe in Spencer; 
Christian, ex-county treasurer of Clayton county and now a prosperous farmer 
in Montana; Amanda, the wife of .\lonzo Phillips, clerking in the store of our 
subject; George J. and Irene M., who reside at home; and Wilbur, deceased. 



28 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Meier gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has held 
various important local offices, serving as trustee of Post township for three 
terms and for a number of years as constable. He belongs to the Masonic order 
at Farmersburg and is connected also with the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. All of his life has been spent in Iowa and although his career offers no 
spectacular chapters, he yet belongs to that class of substantial and representative 
citizens who constitute the real strength of any community by reason of their busi- 
ness activity, their loyalty in citizenship and the honor and integrity of their 
private lives. 



GILBERT SWENSON. 



Among the progressive and enterprising young farmers of Allamakee county 
is numbered Gilbert Swenson, who owns and operates a fine property in Post 
township. L'pon this he has resided since he was seven years of age and its 
excellent condition at the present time is largely due to the care, skill and prac- 
tical knowledge which he has displayed in its management. He was born in 
Franklin township, this county, on the 25th of February. 1878, and is a son 
of Jargen and Mary (Gilbertson) Swenson, natives of Norway, the former 
born on the loth of May, 1839, and the latter in Christiania on the 22d of October, 
1848. The father crossed the Atlantic when he was twenty-two years of age 
and, locating near Madison, Wisconsin, worked in the employ of others for 
about one year, after which he came to Iowa, settling in Grand Meadow town- 
ship, Clayton county, in pioneer times. He rented land in that locality and after 
a number of years purchased a farm in Franklin township, just across the line 
from Post township, and there he resided for ten years, becoming one of the 
representative and prosperous agriculturists of the community. Eventually, 
however, he removed to South Dakota, taking up his residence near Chamberlain, 
that state, but at the end of three months he returned to Iowa, settling on the 
farm where the subject of this review now resides. In October, 1912, he retired 
from active business life and removed to Clermont, where he still resides. 

Gilbert Swenson acquired his education in the West Grove district school 
of Post township. He has lived upon his present farm since he was seven years 
of age and from his childhood assisted with the work of its cultivation, early 
becoming familiar with the best agricultural methods. At twenty-three he 
rented and assumed the management of the home farm and in the fall of 1912 
bought the property, whereon he has continued to reside to the present time. 
Being progressive and enterprising, he has carried on its cultivation along modern 
and practical lines and has made substantial improvements upon it, erecting a 
modern residence, fine barns and outbuildings and installing the necessary 
machinery. He carries on general farming, giving a great deal of attention to the 
raising of cattle, horses and hogs, and his business interests, being carefully and 
capably conducted, have brought him a gratifying measure of success. He is a 
stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store and the canning factory in Post- 
ville and is connected also with the Luana Creamery Company and the Elgin 
State Bank. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 29 

On the 24th of October, 1912, Mr. Sweiison was united in marriage to Miss 
Tillie Gunderson, who was born in Clermont township, Fayette county, Iowa, on 
the 2ist of October, 1888. She is a daughter of ,\rney and Anna ((Junderson) 
Gunderson, natives of Norway, the former born on the 22d of February, 1848, 
and the latter on the 24th of February, 1845. At the age of nine the father 
crossed the Atlantic with his parents and located with them in Fayette county, 
where he grew to manhood, becoming an extensive landowner and a prosperous 
farmer. He served as county supervisor for one term and was also representative 
from his district to the state legislature. He is still prominent and active in 
public affairs and is doing capaljle and progressive work as a member of the 
school board. 

Mr. Swenson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and, although 
not an office seeker, is interested in the growth and development of his native 
county. He is still a young man but is already numbered among the progressive 
and successful agriculturists of Post township, and his record is a credit to 
a name that has been honored and respected in Allamakee county since pioneer 
times. 



PETER J. BEUCHER. 



Peter J. Beucher, mayor of Postville and connected with business interests 
as the proprietor of a profitable real-estate enterprise in Postville, is a native 
son of the city, born just across the line in Clayton county, May 17, 1865, his 
parents being Mathias and Louisa (Koevnig) Beucher. both of whom were 
born in Trier, Germany, the father. May 10, 1830, and the mother, December 
8, 1835. ' They came to Allamakee county in 1856 and were among the early 
settlers in this section, settling near what was then the early Old Mission, or 
Sixteen. The father turned his attention to farming, later moving to Springfield, 
where in connection with the conduct of his farm he operated a small brewery. 
In 1866 he came to Postville and was in charge of the city schools for some years, 
conducting also a profitable hardware store until 1883, when he put aside the 
cares of active life and lived retired until his death, August i, 1901. His wife 
survives him and makes her home in Postville, being now in the seventy-eighth 
year of her age. 

Peter J. Beucher was reared in Postville and acquired his education in the 
local schools. At the age of twenty-one he began his independent career, 
establishing himself in the hotel Inisiness. in which he continued for a short 
time, eventually trading liis hotel for land. At the same time he purchased a dray 
line which, after operating it for three years, he sold, turning his attention at 
that time to the butcher business. In this he engaged for a year or two, after which 
he became identified with the real-estate business, I)uying and selling city 
property and farming lands. He handles a great deal of city property and, being 
an excellent judge of land values as well as a resourceful and far-sighted 
business man, has made his enterprise jirofitable not only to himself but to his 
clients also. For fifteen years he was a wholesale dealer of Pabst beer but he 
has now abandoned that line of business. He is a director in the Citizens State 



30 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Bank of Postville and is connected with five other financial institutions, most of 
which are located in Iowa. He has extensive holdings in Minnesota lands and 
city property in Postville and recently disposed of a large tract in Fayette 
county. His business interests are conducted in a capable and progressive way 
and his success places him in the front ranks of the substantial men of this 
community. 

In December, 1886, Mr. Beucher married Miss Lena Olson, who was born 
in Norway in February, 1866. Her father died when she was still an infant 
and her mother married again, coming to America soon afterward. Mrs. 
Beucher died, May i, 1909, leaving si.x children. Louisa, born September 
17, 1887, married Lynn S. McEwen, cashier of the Citizens State I'.ank of 
Postville. Otto J. operates a dray line in this city. Leo is paying teller in the 
Citizens State Bank. Charlotte lives at home. Harry and Helen are attending 
school. 

Although Mr. Beucher has been very successful in business affairs he has 
not by any means confined his attention to this one line of work but has con- 
stituted himself also an active force in local politics. He gives his allegiance 
to the democratic party but is capable of independent action when the occasion 
demands it. He is now in the second term of his service as mayor of Postville 
and is giving to the city a straightforward, progressive and constructive admin- 
istration. Fraternally he is connected with Decorah Lodge, No. 443, B. P. O. E., 
and with Postville Lodge, No. 204, F. & A. M., being thoroughly in sympathy 
with the principles of brotherly love upon which these orders are founded. He is 
a man of high integrity and business and political honor and he enjoys in the 
highest measure the respect of all who know him. That many of his stanchest 
friends are those who have known him from childhood is an evidence that his 
has been an honorable and upright life and that he is in every way worthy of 
the respect and esteem in which he is uniformlv held. 



JOHN H. HALE. 



One of the early residents of Waukon and a man who has many claims to the 
honor and respect of his fellow citizens is John H. Hale, who came to the city 
in 1865 after a long and honorable period of service in the Civil war and who 
from that time to the present has been a central figure in mercantile circles here. 
For almost half a century he has witnessd the work of development and progress 
which has transformed the community and to an important extent has been 
identified with it, working along constructive and progressive lines through many 
active and honorable years until today he stands among the suljstantial and 
successful men of the city he aided in upbuilding. 

Mr. Hale was born in Hartford, Connecticut, September 26, 1838, and 
acquired his education in Wilson Seminary in Massachusetts. He took a course 
in civil engineering and after completing it came west to Wisconsin in the fall 
of 1856, locating in La Crosse on the loth of October of that year. He there 
engaged in important engineering work on the Milwaukee Railroad and afterward 
was identified with the construction of the Root River Valley Road. In 1859 





lollX II. IIALK 



PAST AND PRESENT OI- ALEAMAKEE COUNTY 33 

he went to Texas and practiced his profession there until the outbreak of the 
Civil war. In 1861 he enlisted in the Union army, joining Company D, 
Thirteenth Michigan \'o]unteer Infantry, and as a private was sent to the front. 
He participated in numerous engagements, including the battles of Shiloh, 
Chickamauga and Mission Ridge and was with Sherman on his march to the 
sea. At Chickamauga he received a gunshot wound in the leg. He came 
to Waukon and married in February, 1864, and almost immediately after- 
ward returned to the front and, rejoining his command, served until the close of 
the war. He won promotion from the rank of private to that of second and then 
first lieutenant and was afterward captain and acting major through the 
Carolinas. He marched with his regiment to Washington, where he took part 
in the famous grand review, afterward receiving his honorable discharge at 
Jackson, Michigan, on July 25, 1865. John H. Hale was related to Nathan Hale 
of Revolutionary fame. 

With this credible military record Mr. Hale came to Waukon and soon after- 
ward engaged in merchandising, an occupation with which he has now been 
identified for forty-eight years. Under the firm name of J. H. Hale & Company 
he established a small business which he enlarged with his increasing trade until 
he now has one of the largest dry-goods concerns in the city. For years C. W. 
Jenkins was a member of the firm and since his death the name of the firm 
has been J. H. Hale & Sons. A few years ago he erected a fine modern building 
to accommodate his growing patronage and on two of the floors carries an im- 
mense stock of goods which is well selected and tastefully arranged. Each year 
has seen an increase in the volume and importance of his business, which now 
amounts to more than fifty thousand dollars annually. Many changes have 
been made in the firm name since 1865, the title being today J. H. Hale & Sons, as- 
sumed when Mr. Hale admitted his two sons as partners. 

Although he has won notable success as a merchant Mr. Hale has done 
equally important work in civil engineering during the years of his residence 
in Waukon. When the Waukon & Milwaukee Railroad was built into the city 
by private subscription he had charge of the engineering and construction work 
and he was also assistant engineer in charge of the construction of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy and the Wisconsin Central. In his early years he delighted 
to leave his store and go into the open to work on engineering projects and he 
continued his activity in this line until 1905, when he met with an accident, 
having been run over by an engine and sustaining the loss of his right arm. He is 
numbered among the notably successful men of Waukon, owning, besides his 
business and the property upon which his store is located, a fine modern residence. 

In February, 1864 Mr. Hale married Miss Henrietta M. Huestis, a native 
of Nova Scotia, who came here with her parents when young, and they have 
three children: Emily H., the wife of E. F. Wedary, of whom further mention 
is made elsewhere in this work ; and Charles J. and W. H., partners in their 
father's business. Charles J. Hale is married and has four children, three sons 
and a daughter. Mrs. John H. Hale has since been called to her final rest. 

Mr. Hale has been for many years identified with the republican party and 
is in sympathy with the progressive wing of the organization. He is a member 
of the Loyal Legion of Honor. His wife belonged to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He has been at all times interested in the welfare of the citv and has 



34 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

given his active cooperation to many movements for the pnbHc good, while his 
efforts in behalf of general improvement have been effective and far reaching. 
Living in Waukon for forty-eight years, he is one of the best known citizens in 
the locality, being widely recognized as a man of tried integrity and worth, of 
business enterprise and unfaltering diligence. His fellow townsmen honor and 
respect him and wherever he is known he has an extensive circle of friends. 
Moreover, he deserves mention in this volume as one of the veterans of the Civil 
war, to whom the country owes a debt of gratitude that can never be fully repaid. 



ARTHUR S, RURDICK. 

There is no one more popular or better known in Post\-ille, Iowa, than 
Arthur S. Burdick, who for the past twelve years has been the faithful and 
efficient postmaster of that place of which he is a native son, born July i8, 1875. 
He has been identified throughout his entire life with the interests of that 
locality, where he attended the public schools as a boy, worked at various 
occupations and served an apprenticeship in the office of the Post\ille Review. 
He also took a course at \'alder r,usiness College to round out his education. 
Shortly after the death of his father, who was then postmaster of Postville, he 
was appointed to that office, having the unique distinction of being the youngest 
man ever called upon to fill such a position by presidential appointment. Mr. 
Burdick was first appointed by President McKinley. was reappointed by Pres- 
ident Roosevelt and received his third appointment at the hands of President 
Taft. Conscientious, capable and painstaking, he is accurate in the performance 
of his duties and accommodating in his ways with the public. He is intensely 
loyal to Postville, and has taken an active part in various enterjjrises which 
have gained for his city the reputation of a live and progressive community. 

Mr. Burdick is a son of William Nelson Burdick, without mention of whom 
no history of Allamakee county would be complete. One of the pioneer editors 
of this district, the father was a man of more than local fame, for his influence 
in politics and journalism was felt throughout the state, especially among news- 
paper men, and he was readily recognized as one of the strongest and most 
able editorial writers in Iowa. His command of English, his clear thought and 
fearless expression marked him as one of the great writers of the country press 
and it is not too much to say that for many years Postville was largely known 
throughout the state of Iowa as the home of Burdick, of the Post\ ille Review. 
Mr. Burdick was born near Buffalo, New York, in 1835. and migrated with 
his family to Illinois when still a youth, later coming to Iowa and settling near 
West L'nion. Later he removed to New Oregon, Howard countv, at a time 
before the railroad had penetrated that section and all supplies were brought 
by team from McGregor. When the railroad came Mr. Burdick removed with 
other inhabitants of New Oregon to the new town of Cresco, of which he 
became the first postmaster and where he began his remarkable career as a 
publisher, editing the Howard County Times. He later published the Win- 
neshiek County Register and in 1875 moved to Postville, purchasing the Review 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 35 

and there beginning the work which gained him such a reputation among the 
thinking people of the state. * 

While in Cresco W. N. Burdick was married to Miss Amy E. Halstead, the 
loving helpmate who survives him and who was to him such a loyal, helpful 
and intelligent coworker in all that he undertook. In 1897 he was appointed 
postmaster of Postville, a position which he filled most acceptably without re- 
linc|uishing his editorial work until his death, which occurred in 1899. His 
memory is still revered and held dear by the people of Postville and hundreds 
of old-time friends in all parts of the state. 

Arthur S. Burdick the subject of this review, was, on May 10, 1899, united 
in marriage to Miss Lillian Riley and their home has been blessed by a son, 
Edward, who is now a promising lad of thirteen years. A man of strongly 
marked character, Mr. Burdick has become a forceful element in the business 
and public life of his community where his sterling traits of character have won 
him the high regard and confidence of all who have had social or business 
relations with him. He is a loyal son of his native city, in the advancement 
and development of which he has been a serviceable factor and which he iias 
served in an official capacity for so many years with faithfulness and with 
conspicuous ability. 



JAMES BRIAR. 



Throughout a period of residence of fifty-eight years in Allamakee county 
James Briar has gained the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens, being 
numbered today among the section's most honored pioneers. He has been one 
of the greatest forces in agricultural development for more than half a century, 
making substantial contributions to the county's resources by opening u]5 and 
developing two fine farms. He is, moreover, entitled to representation in this 
volume through his worthy and loyal service on southern battlefields during 
the Civil war. 

Mr. Briar is a native of New York and was born in Albany, October 28, 
1838. When he was only five years of age he moved with his parents to Oswego 
county, where they located upon a farm and where he grew to manhood. He 
acquired his education in the district schools, attending during the winter months 
and spending his summers aiding in the operation of the homestead. He gained 
in this way a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the details of farming 
and this early experience has been invaluable to him in the course of his later 
career. In 1855 he came west as a young man and located in Allamakee county, 
where for several years he worked out on a farm, his principal duties consisting 
of breaking the ])rairie land with ox teams. He continued at this occupation 
until August 13, 1862, when he joined the L'nion army, enlisting in Company 
A, Twenty-seventh Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. Soon after his company was sent 
to Dubuque, where its organization was completed and where it drilled for some 
time, afterward being sent north to Minneapolis as a guard to the paymaster, 
who brought money to the Indians. The company was afterward sent to 
Memphis, Tennessee, where it spent the winter, and in the following year it 



36 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

participated in the siege of Vicksburg and under General Sherman went to 
Jackson, Mississippi. Returning to Memphis, it was made a member of Banks' 
expedition up the Red river and it took part in a two days' battle and in numerous 
skirmishes and minor engagements before it was again sent to Memphis and 
thence to Tupelo, where it was in the thick of battle. Mr. Briar afterward 
went with his regiment to St. Louis and was in the raid through Missouri after 
Price's army, driving that general out of the state. He then returned to St. 
Louis and from there went down the river to New Orleans and thence to Mobile 
and Spanish Fort. He aided in the capture of Fort Blakely and was afterward 
sent to Montgomery, Alabama, where his regiment remained until the close of 
the war. After Lee's surrender it was sent north to Clinton, Iowa, and there 
mustered out, Mr. Briar receiving his honorable discharge. 

After the close of the war Mr. Briar returned home and for three years 
engaged in farming, cultivating the old home place. At the end of that time 
he moved to Waukon, where for five years he engaged in teaming, later again 
turning his attention to general farming. He purchased a tract of land three 
miles south of the city, which he farmed and improved for some time, exchang- 
ing it finally for a larger place. To this he made substantial additions from time 
to time, owning finally two hundred acres of productive land. This he fenced 
into six fields surrounded by barbed wire fences, erected a large residence, a 
substantial barn and a number of outbuildings, making it one of the best 
equipped and most valuable farming properties in this vicinity. He continued 
to reside thereon until 1894, when he moved to Waukon, where he has since 
made his home. He later sold his farm and retired from active life, having 
earned leisure and rest by many years of honorable and worthy labor. 

In the fall of 1865 Mr. Briar married Miss Sarah A. Gates, a daughter of 
Samuel Gates and a sister of Mrs. Hugh McCabe, of whom more extended 
mention is made elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Briar was born in Decatur 
county, Indiana, but came to Allamakee county when she was thirteen years of 
age. She and her husband became the parents of eleven children, ten of whom 
are still living: William H., who is in the real-estate business in Mason City; 
Samuel D., who resides in Sawyer, South Dakota ; Joseph H., who is in business 
in Winona; Julia, the wife of A. P. Denning, of Heyburn, Idaho; James Elmer, 
who served as bugler in a Waukon company during the Spanish-American war 
and who is now engaged in farming in Buford, North Dakota; Charles C, of 
Berthold, North Dakota; Adelia May, the wife of E. R. Pierce, of Idaho; Asa 
L., who is associated with his brother, Joseph H., in the marble business in 
Winona; Arthur L.. a commercial traveler with headquarters in Minneapolis; 
and A. J., a farmer in Buford, North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Briar lost a 
daughter, Elizabeth, who died in infancy. 

Politically Mr. Briar is afliliated with the republican party and has always 
taken an active part in public afifairs. While still upon his farm he was elected 
township trustee and road supervisor and for many years has been identified 
with school matters, serving as one of the school directors. He has been a 
delegate to numerous county conventions and has done able work on the grand 
and petit juries. Fraternally he is connected with John J. Stillman Post, G. A. 
R., and is now senior vice commandei". His wife is a member of the Women's 
Relief Corps and has been on the official board for a number of years. Mr. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 37 

Briar has resided in Allamakee county for nearly sixty years and his interests 
are thoroughly identified with those of this section. He has witnessed a great 
deal of the growth and development of the county and in all work of progress 
has borne his full share both by his individual labors and his active cooperation 
in progressive public measures. No man in Waukon is more widely and favor- 
ably known than he, whose good citizenship displayed on southern battlefields 
has survived unabated for over half a century. 



JOHN HARNACK. 



John Harnack, one of the most wealthy and prominent citizens of Postville, 
where he lives retired, was born in Clayton county, Iowa, October 29, 1857, and 
is a son of Christ and Dora (Sasz) Harnack, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, 
the former born July 21, 1817, and the latter November 11, 1822. Both crossed 
the Atlantic in the same vessel but did not meet until they reached Clayton county, 
Iowa, the mother having made the journey with her uncle, who settled in Guten- 
berg. The father also became a resident of that community and there worked 
at cutting cord wood during the winters and spending his summers as a lal)orer 
in a stone quarry, receiving for this work fifty cents per day. After his marriage 
he worked for several years in the employ of others but eventually was obliged on 
account of his failing health to turn his attention to farming. He rented land 
near Garnaxillo, in Clayton county, and remained upon it for a few years, later 
purchasing an eighty acre tract of land near Elkader. This was entirely unim- 
proved, but with characteristic energy Mr. Harnack set himself to the task of 
developing it. With a yoke of oxen he made trips to McGregor and there 
purchased lumber, with which he built the first house upon the homestead, in 
which he lived five years. There he carried on the cultivation of his farm, facing 
with confidence and courage the hardships and difficulties incident to pioneer 
existence. During the first years he was obliged to keep his seed corn under his 
bed in order to save it from the depredations of the many squirrels which fed 
upon it if it were left uncovered. Eventually he replaced his first house by a two- 
room cabin of hewed logs and a few years later he sold the farm for two thousand 
dollars, having in the meantime cleared and improved it to a remarkable extent. 
He afterward purchased a one hundred acre farin in the same vicinity and upon 
it he resided for three years, at the end of which time he sold the property, buying 
one hundred and sixty acres in the same township near Clayton Center. This 
he improved and developed until 1878, when he disposed of the land and pur- 
chased two hundred and seven and three quarters acres in Grand Meadow town- 
ship, Clayton county, upon which he resided until 1886, when he rented the farm 
and moved into Postville, where he has since lived retired. For some time he 
owned another farm in Fayette county, just across the county line, but this he sold 
to his son in 1885. He and his wife still make their home in Postville, where they 
are numbered among the prominent and representative citizens. In their family 
were seven children : Bernhardt, who died in infancy ; John, of this review ; 
Sophia, the wife of August Dahl, a retired farmer living in Postville; Ida, whp 
married John Krambeer, who lives upon his farm in Post township; Anna, the 



38 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

wife of Joseph Schultz, a farmer of Winneshiek county ; Emma, who married 
Louis Meier, engaged in farming in Post township ; and Mary, who after the 
death of her first husband, Henry Brandt, wedded John Schroder, a retired 
farmer Hving in Postville. 

John Harnack spent his childhood upon his father's farm, dividing his time in 
his youth between his studies at the Garnavillo district school and work in the oper- 
ation of the homestead. He afterward spent two winters in the German school at 
Clayton Center and was still later a student in the district school near Clayton. He 
remained at home until after his marriage, which occurred in 1885, and he then 
purchased from his father eighty acres of land in Fayette county. After one 
year, however, he returned home and rented his father's homestead, oper- 
ating both farms for some time and finally selling his own eighty acre tract. 
He afterward purchased a farm one mile west of Postville, his two hundred 
acres lying partly in Winneshiek and partly in Allamakee county. Upon this 
property he carried on general agricultural pursuits for eight years, his industry 
and practical methods winning for him a gratifying degree of success, and 
gaining him a place among the representative and substantial agriculturists 
of the region. At the end of that time, however, he rented out the property 
and moved into Postville, where he became connected with business interests 
as an employe of Henry Eckert in the latter's implement concern. He made 
good use of his time and opportunities, and his industry, diligence and energy 
resulted in his acquiring a comfortable competence, which enabled him to lay 
aside the cares of active business life. He now makes his home in one of the 
most modern and attractive residences in the city and he gives most of his 
time to the management and supervision of his extensive real-estate interests, 
which include not only his two hundred acre farm but also his residence and 
a number of valuable lots in Postville. 

On the 14th of April, 1885, Mr. Harnack married Miss Maggie Thoma, who 
was born in Reed township, Clayton county, June 17, 1864. She is a daughter 
of Fred and Katherina (Pesch) Thoma, both natives of the kingdom of Bavaria, 
Germany, who in early life crossed the Atlantic to America, settling in Clayton 
county on a farm. This proi)erty the father operated until about the year 
1887, when he moved to Postville, where he lived retired until his death, 
which occurred in 1893. He had long survived his wife, who passed away 
in 1878. Mrs. Harnack was one of nine children, two of whom died in infancy. 
The others are: George, a farmer in Post township; ./\nna, the widow of Charles 
Schultz, formerly a retired farmer living in Postville ; Conrad, a resident of 
Chicago ; Savina, the wife of Louis Saulsgaber, a resident of Minnesota ; Fred, 
who makes his home in Omaha, Nebraska; and John, also a resident of Omaha. 
After the death of his first wife the father was again married, and to this union 
was born one child, Paulina, who married Bruce Klingman, steward of the 
Elks Club at Clinton, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Harnack became the parents of four 
children: Sadie K. E., who was born June 8, 1887, and who died November 26, 
1894; Libbie, whose birth occurred on the 4th of November, 1888, and who died 
November 22, 1894: Fred, who was born February 11, 1892. and died Novem- 
ber 22, 1894; and Hulda, who was born January 3, 1896, and who is now 
attending the Postville high school, from which she was graduated in June, 1913. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 39 

Mr. Harnack gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and, 
although he has never aspired to public office, he served for four years as a 
member of the city council. Fraternally he is connected with the Turner 
Society at Postville and his religious views are in accord with the doctrines of 
the Lutheran church. He stands high in the regard of the people of this 
community and his j)rogressive spirit, his high standards of honor and integrity 
and his many sterling c|ualities of mind and character have won him the respect 
and esteem of all who are in any way associated with him. 



GEORGE WATERS. 



One of the most able, active and progressive of Allamakee county's native 
sons is George Waters, who now owns and operates a fine farm of one hundred 
and forty acres in Post township and who in partnership with his brother has 
other extensive holdings in this locality. No one is better known as a successful 
breeder and shipper of registered cattle and high-grade horses and the business 
affairs which claim his attention are all well managed and systematically con- 
ducted, bringing to him a prosperity which places him among the men of worth 
and affluence in this section of the state. 

Mr. Waters was born in Ludlow township, this county, on the 21st of 
August, 1858, and is a son of George and Sophia (Hill) Waters, natives of 
County Wicklow, Ireland, the former born October 23, 1824, and the latter 
July 29, 1832. In early life the father was a member of the police force in 
County Wicklow but in 1854 crossed the Atlantic to America, settling first in 
Pennsylvania, where for four years he worked in the coal mines. In 1858 he 
came west to Iowa and purchased a small farm of thirty acres in Ludlow town- 
ship, Allamakee county, which he improved and cultivated for a number of years. 
In the spring of 1870 he disposed of that property and removed one mile north in 
the same township, engaging in farming there until his death, which occurred 
January 4, 1887. His wife survived him some time, dying October 3, 1910. 
In their family were eleven children, of whom the subject of this review is 
the third in the order of birth. 

George Waters acquired his education in the district schools of Ludlow 
township and from an early age was a practical and able agriculturist, having 
aided in the operation of the homestead and afterward working at farm labor 
in the employ of others. When he was about twenty-four years of age he 
operated a threshing machine throughout his locality and afterward purchased 
eighty acres of land, which he cultivated and improved for two years. At the 
end of that time he sold his property and rented his present farm, afterward 
purchasing this tract of land, upon which he has resided continuouslv since that 
time. This comprises one hundred and forty acres and in addition Mr. Waters 
is a partner with his brother Edward in the ownership of the Willow Lawn 
Stock Farm, a highly improved property of three hundred and forty-nine acres. 
The brothers are extensively engaged in the cattle and horse business here, 
breeding registered Hereford cattle, which they ship to all parts of the United 
States, their principal markets being the central states. They are also large 



40 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

buyers and shippers of all kinds of horses and both are reliable, enterprising 
and successful business men, managing capably the important concerns with 
which they are connected. In addition to his work as a stock-raiser and 
agriculturist Mr. Waters is also a professional auctioneer and has attained a 
wide reputation in this field, being frequently called to other states. He is a 
stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Company at Postville and in the 
Citizens State Bank of that city and his activities, extending to many fields, are 
important as elements in the general advancement. 

On the 13th of December, 1882, Mr. Waters married Miss Eliza Eaton, who 
was born in Post township on the 13th of December, 1861. She is the daughter 
of Wells and Mary (Wood) Eaton, natives of Nova Scotia, Canada, the former 
born March 2, 1822, and the latter April 14, 1825. The father in early life 
worked at calking vessels in Nova Scotia but in 1845 came to the United States, 
locating in Walworth county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming. He 
was also a pioneer in Iowa, coming to this state in 1853 and locating upon a 
farm in Post township, Allamakee county, whereon he continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred on the 6th of May, 1881. He was one of the leading 
promoters and organizers of Bethel church, was elected a member of its first 
board of trustees and served in that position until his death. His wife afterward 
removed to Postville, where her death occurred May 14, 1904. They were the 
parents of eleven children, of whom the wife of our subject is the eighth in the 
order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Waters have two children: Cloy E., who was 
born April 27, 1894; and Eaton A., born July 29, 1902. 

Mr. Waters is a member of the American Hereford Cattle Breeders Asso- 
ciation of Kansas City, Missouri, but beyond this has no fraternal or club 
affiliations. He is a man of exem]ilary character and genuine personal worth 
and his long residence in this part of Iowa has brought him success in business 
and the respect, confidence and regard of all who are associated with him. 



JAMES McEWEN. 

On October 31, 1912, occurred the death of James McEwen and thereby was 
removed from the life of the city of Postville a man greatly beloved and greatly 
trusted. As financial adviser and friend he stood in the same relation to the 
people as does a family physician or spiritual adviser. They gave him their 
entire confidence and he never betrayed a trust or failed a friend, for the keynote 
of his character was scrupulous and conscientious honesty. He was quiet, kindly, 
liberal in his views, conservative in action and stanch in the support of what he 
believed to be right. 

The story of his life is an interesting one. It began in Canada, at River 
Rouge, in the province of Quebec, July 25, 1830, his parents being William and 
Catherine (McClaren) McEwen, both of Scotch descent. The parents were of 
the plain people Init they bequeathed to their son those good old traits of 
Scotch character — thrift, industry, hardiness, honesty and enterprise. 

James McEwen worked with his father in his early youth, taking advantage 
of the public-school courses offered in the vicinity and at the early age of sixteen 



r L--'^i^ 



^,.-.- '1^ 



ASTOR, LENOX A.NO 
TILDEN FOUNDATION*. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 43 

engaged in teaching. In 1854 he came to the United States, spending his first 
year in Wisconsin working on various farms, and in 1855 came to Iowa, after 
which time his life was identified with the history of Winneshiek, Clayton and 
Allamakee counties. The next few years were spent in teaching during the 
winter months and in work for various people during the summer. In i860, 
like many another adventurous youth, he became inspired with the desire to 
go to the west and court fortune in a search for precious metals. He spent a 
year prospecting in the vicinity of Pike's Peak and it was there that fortune 
stood at his elbow, but he knew it not. Working with meager results, he became 
dissatisfied and sold for five dollars a claim which in a short time made wealthy 
the man who bought it. What would have been Mr. McEwen's history had he 
worked that claim but a few days longer, no man may know, but this we do know 
—that while this good fortune was withheld from him, it was still reserved for 
him to lead an honored, helpful and useful life and fill an important place in 
the history of development of Allamakee county. 

Returning to Iowa, the next winter found him at Milliken's Bend, Mississippi, 
chopping wood, for he was not afraid of work, and teaching, for that was second 
nature to him. This time, however, he taught little colored children and the 
children of the planter with whom he lived. It was unlawful to teach the negro 
children in the state of ^Mississippi in those days, but he did it, and we believe 
he never regretted that he broke the law. At this time came the outbreak of the 
great war. It was unsafe for a northern man and an abolitionist, such as Mr. 
McEwen was, to remain in the south, and upon the friendly advice of the planter, 
he hastened to leave Mississippi, running the blockade on the last boat that came 
north. He returned to Iowa and resumed his former work. He was not a 
naturalized citizen of the United States at that time and he did not feel it his 
duty to enter the army. He attended Fayette College for a short time, being 
in the same class with Hon. D. B. Henderson, but war conditions closed the 
school and Mr. McEvven returned to work. 

On the 17th of October, 1863, Mr. McEwen was married to Miss Maria 
Styles, a daughter of Timothy and Hannah (Shaw) Styles, well known pioneers 
of Allamakee county. They were from New York state and Mrs. McEwen was 
born at Whitesville, that state. At the time of her marriage to our subject 
the family lived at Henderson Prairie, a postoffice in Fayette county. The young 
people went to housekeeping on a farm, Mr. McEwen still engaging in teaching 
during the winter months. In 1867 they purchased a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres about a mile east of Postville and here they lived and prospered, 
moving to the city in 1878. Mr. McEwen entered into two partnerships about 
this time. Under the name of Styles & McEwen he became interested in a 
drug business which was conducted at Postville for about a year, when the 
stock was removed to Calmar. At the same time he was also interested in a 
dry-goods store under the firm name of Skelton & McEwen in Postville. To 
this latter enterprise he gave his personal attention, succeeding well as a mer- 
chant. In 1887 several business men of Postville established the Northeastern 
Iowa Loan & Trust Company and Mr. McEwen succeeded to the management 
of this concern, which was in successful operation for about five years. At the 
end of this time the charter expired and the business had grown to such an 
extent that it was considered best to carry on its affairs through the medium 



44 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of a bank, and the Citizens State Bank of Postville was accordingly organized, 
Mr. McEwen being made the cashier upon the establishment of the institution 
and serving as such to the time of his death. He gave to the bank his personal 
and careful attention and there was no detail connected with the business too 
unimportant to be solicitously considered. He became one of the foremost 
financial men and one of the largest factors in the life of Postville and could 
always be found in the front rank of those promoting the interests of the city- 
material, moral or intellectual — although he was too modest to seek political 
honors and too philosophical to care for their possession. However, he never 
shirked responsibility and, being especially interested in the cause of education, 
served his community faithfully and well as a member of the school board for 
thirty-five years, as mayor of the city, as alderman, and in many capacities, gain- 
ing him the confidence of the people. All these offices came to him unsolicited, 
it being a case of the office seeking the best man available. His influence >vas 
always for good and helpful measures. He was liberal in his support of civic 
improvements, church and school. He was a deep reader, but not onl\- a reader 
of books but also a reader of human nature and a student of life. 

It was in the year 1877 ^'''^t great grief came into his life, a grief wli'ch 
tinged all his succeeding years, although time ameliorated its cutting edge, making 
him a tenderer, truer, more sympathetic man than he had even been beforo. 
It was before the discovery of antitoxin had robbed diphtheria of much of its 
terror tiiat the black "scourge" fell upon the land, fifty little graves in the Post- 
ville cemetery marking the visitation of the grim destroyer and three of these 
marking the resting places of his beloved children : Frederick Eugene, in his four- 
teenth year : Bertha May, aged eight, and Omar Lee, aged five, all of whom were 
taken within three weeks. It was one of those staggering, unfathomable blows 
of fate that time may mellow but cannot cure, and only faith and hope can 
mitigate. Two children remained to them in the later years: Mrs. Ethel Marsh, 
of Chicago: and Lynn Shaw McEwen, now assistant cashier of the Citizens 
State Bank. 

It was in the afternoon of October 31, 1912, that Mr. McEwen died. In the 
midst of a busy day he sat down to read and rest : a favorite magazine was in his 
hands, and the wife, loved companion of so many years, was close beside him, 
when there was a little gasp and life had flown, bringing to an end a career rich 
in usefulness, rich in attainments — a life which had contributed much toward 
elevating the fellow spirit in humanity. 



BRADSHAW W. RATHBUN. 

An excellent farming property of one hundred and thirty acres stood as an 
evidence of the industry and well directed efforts of Bradshaw \V. Rathbun when 
on March 4, 1910, he was called to his final rest after many years devoted to 
agricultural pursuits. Practically his entire life was spent in this part of Iowa, 
in either Winneshiek or Allamakee counties, for he came here as a child, grew 
to manhood here and became known as a man of excellent business ability, 
sound judgment and high standards of honor and integrity. 



PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 45 

lie was born in New York state in February, 1836, but when still a mere 
boy was brought by his parents to Iowa, the family settling on a farm three 
miles west of Postville. In the district schools of Winneshiek county he ac- 
quired his education, studying during the winter months and in the summers 
aiding his father with the operation of the homestead. In this way he early 
became familiar with the best agricultural methods and was a practical farmer 
before he reached maturity. After the death of his parents he became the sole 
owner of the farm and continued to carry forward the work of its develop- 
ment, his success coming as the logical result of industry, energy and perse- 
verance. As he was able he added to his property holdings until at the time of 
his death he was the owner of one hundred and thirty acres of rich and valuable 
land. He also owned extensive tracts in Canada which, however, he sold before 
he died. He early realized the fact that labor is the basis of all success and his 
close application and sound judgment enabled him to acquire a competency which 
left his family in the comfortable circumstances they now enjoy. 

i\Ir. Rathbun was twice married. He wedded first Miss LiJjbie Hall and six 
children were born to their union : May, who resides in Los Angeles where she 
is assisting her brother who is in the mercantile business; Hall, a merchant in 
Los Angeles ; Fred, who makes his home near Ossian where he works in the 
employ of others; Bessie, who became the wife of Welton Cornell, a farmer 
near Ossian ; Blake, who resides on the home farm ; and Charles Herbert, who 
is engaged in general farming five miles northwest of Postville. Mr. Rathbun 
married for the second time in July, 1900. when he wedded Mrs. Florence 
Lozette (Clark) Miller, who was born in Waukon, a daughter of John Thompson 
and Elizabeth (Blakesley) Clark, natives of New York. The parents were 
married in that state and in the late '30s came west to Iowa, where the father 
took up the study of law. He was admitted to the bar and took up the practice 
of his profession in Waukon where he remained until 1849 when he went to 
California, making the journey overland. After two years, however, he re- 
turned to Iowa, having been unsuccessful in the California gold fields, and in 
this state again began practicing law, being located at diflferent times at Lansing, 
Decorah, Fort Atkinson and Waukon. He never made a permanent location, 
always following where favoring opportunity led the way, and thus he became 
well known throughout the state, building up a large, representative and lucra- 
tive practice in criminal law of which he made a specialty. That he was well 
known and fa\orably regarded in professional and public circles of the state is 
evidenced by the fact that he was chosen a member of the committee appointed 
to draw up the first Iowa constitution. I'ntil within a short time before his 
death he was practicing at Cresco but when he became ill he came to Postville 
where he died about the year 1883. He was at one time an extensive landowner 
in this part of the state, Init before he passed away disposed of all of his hold- 
ings. His wife survived him for four years, dying in 1887. In their family 
were ten children of whom Mrs. Rathbun is the youngest in the order of birth. 
.She was reared in this section of Iowa and in 1880 married Thomas M. Miller, 
a native of Ohio, born February 29, 1848. When he was a mere boy he came to 
Iowa with an older sister and her family and in this state grew to manhood, 
learning the carpenter's trade which he followed for many years. He afterward 
turned his attention to savvmilling and engaged in this occupation until his death 



46 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

which occurred in May, 1881. He was at that time a resident of Postville, where 
he owned a comfortable home, a number of town lots and the mill property. By 
this marriage Mrs. Rathbun had three children: Emma, who was born January 10, 
1 881, and who became the wife of Frank Handgartner, a farmer residing five 
miles southwest of Postville; Katie, who was born August 16, 18S3, and who 
married John Laros, who with his father and brothers owns a carriage factory 
in Grinnell; and Florence, who was born January 10. 1887, and who is a teacher in 
the Onawa high school, making her home with her mother. Fraternally Mr. 
Miller was affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Legion of Honor and the Modern Woodmen. 

Mr. Rathbun gave his allegiance to the democratic party but he never 
desired political honors, as his interests centered in his farming operations, 
which under his able management brought him a gratifying and richly deserved 
success. His great business ability would have won him prosperity in any voca- 
tion that attracted his interest and in the one which he chose he made sub- 
stantial contribution to growth and development. He was a kind parent, a 
true friend and a firm upholder of the law — a citizen whose life and work 
made a lasting impression upon those with whom he came in contact and upon 
the progress of the region where he had so long resided. 



T. C. LEWIS, M. D. 



Dr. J. C. Lewis, one of the most prominent and deservedly successful phy- 
sicians and surgeons in Waukon, has been a resident of the state of Iowa since 
1864. He is, however, a native of Wisconsin, born in Dunkirk, April 20, 1858, a 
son of U. F. Lewis. The father was a native of New York state and went as 
a pioneer to Wisconsin, where in the early days he engaged in carpentering. 
He there married Miss Eliza J. Stillwell, a sister of C. S. and H. H. Stillwell, 
of Waukon. In 1864 U. F. Lewis moved to Iowa and located at Buckland, 
where he worked at his trade for some time, later establishing himself in the 
grocery business there. He continued to make his home in Buckland until he 
moved to Waukon, where the last years of his life were spent. His wife survived 
him only a short time. In their family were two children: Dr. J. C, of this 
review; and Jessie M., who is well known in educational circles of this county 
as one of the most efficient teachers in the Waukon schools. 

Dr. Lewis was still a child when he came with his parents to Waukon and 
he was here reared and educated, supplementing a course in the public schools 
by four years' attendance at the State University, where he completed a medical 
course, graduating with the degree of M. D. in 1889. He immediately afterward 
located in Ridgeway, in Winneshiek county, where he began the practice of 
his profession and where for twenty-two years he continued to reside, becoming 
well known as an able and successful physician. While still a resident of that 
city he served as a member of the town council and as mayor and was for some 
time a member of the board of health. In 191 1 he returned to Waukon where he 
has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. He has demonstrated 
his skill in the successful handling of a number of complex medical problems 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 47 

and has already built up a good practice. Dr. Lewis is a far-sighted business 
man as well as an able physician and has made some excellent investments in 
Florida lands as well as in Waukon city property and in Iowa farms, and has 
now extensive and important real-estate holdings. 

In 1886 Dr. Lewis was united in marriage to Miss May B. Lowe, who was 
born, reared and educated in Waukon. She is a daughter of Hosea Lowe, a 
pioneer merchant in that city, who was identified with the hardware business 
here for a number of years. Dr. and Mrs. Lewis became the parents of two 
children. The elder, Laura J., was educated in the Ridgeway high school, 
where she finished the course and was graduated. She died August 18, 1908. 
at the age of seventeen. The other daughter, Elizabeth M., is now a student 
in the Waukon high school. 

Dr. Lewis is a Master Mason and well known in the local lodge of the 
fraternity. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
Mrs. Lewis being a member of the auxiliary societies and an active Sunday 
school worker. Dr. Lewis is a member of the official board and is also acting 
as steward. He is a man of exemplary life, of generous standards and high 
principles, and his industry, ability and enterprise have found a rich reward in 
the high esteem his acquaintances place upon him as a man and a physician. 



JAMES W. STEELE. 



One of the most prominent of the younger business men of Postville is James 
W. Steele, now engaged in the conduct of a large restaurant and confectionery 
store in the city. He was born here, January 2, 1880, and is a son of Joseph and 
Margaret (Ryan) Steele, natives of Illinois, where the father followed farming 
for many years. The parents came from that state to Iowa and located on a tract 
of land about one mile and a half northeast of Postville, where the father still 
owns and operates a farm, to the conduct of which he gives his entire time and 
attention. His wife passed away March 2, 1913. They were the parents of 
thirteen children, of whom the subject of this review is the fourth in the order 
of birth. 

James W. Steele acquired his education in the district schools of Post town- 
ship and in his childhood divided his time between his studies and work upon 
his father's farm. He remained with his parents until he was twenty-eight years 
of age and then went to South Dakota, where for two years he engaged in 
farming. When he returned to Postville at the end of that time he established 
himself in the restaurant and confectionery business, to which he still gives his 
entire attention. By close application, energy and careful supervision of his 
business he has secured a large patronage and is now the proprietor of one of 
the leading restaurants in the city. The confectionery department has also 
proven profitable and is an important source of income to him. The entire 
enterprise is carefully and systematically conducted and has brought to Mr. 
Steele a degree of success which places him among the representative and sub- 
stantial business men of his native citv. 



48 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COL'XTY 

On the 25tli of April, igi i, Mr. Steele was united in marriage to Miss I'rances 
Bromelkamp, a native of Monona, Clayton county, born April 29, 1882. She is 
a daughter of Bernard and Christina (Miller) Bromelkamp, natives of Hanover, 
Germany, whose marriage occurred in McGregor, Iowa, six weeks after the 
father's arrival in America in the spring of 1881. He worked in a carriage 
factory for one summer and then turned his attention to carpentering, later 
removing to a farm in Clayton county, where he and his wife still reside. In 
their family were four children, of whom Airs. Steele is the eldest. Mr. and 
Mrs. Steele have one son, Joseph Bernard, who was born February 25, 1912. 

Mr. Steele is a member of the Roman Catholic church. Politically he is identi- 
fied with the democratic party and, although he never takes an active part in 
public affairs, is yet loyal in matters of citizenship. He devotes his entire time, 
however, to his business and, although he is still a young man, he has already 
gained that success which follows earnest, persistent and well directed labor. 



WILLIAM LEUI. 



Banking interests of Postville are ably and well represented by William Leui, 
one of the prominent and progressive citizens of that community and the presi- 
dent of the Postville State Bank. Forceful, active and aggressive, he is giving 
the large interests, of which he is the head, the strictest and most careful atten- 
tion. A native of the neighboring county of Clayton, Mr. Leui was born in Grand 
Meadow, September 5, 1856, and is a son of Jacob and Susan (Shield) Leui, well 
known and highly respected pioneers of Clayton county, where he was reared on 
his father's farm. In the acquirement of his education he attended the schools 
of the neighborhood and in his leisure hours and vacations helped his father 
with the work of the farm until he was nearly grown to manhood. However, 
there was in him a desire for better things and, always wishing for a better 
education than the locality afforded, he realized his ambition when he spent one 
year at Fayette College, taking a business and commercial course, from which 
he graduated, and also spending six months at the State University at Iowa 
City. Better prepared for life's battle, he returned to Postville, where he 
clerked for four years in the general store owned by F. W. Roberts and then 
formed a partnership with Frank Orr. engaging in the hardware and implement 
business. He was so engaged for a number of years, during which time the firm 
prospered, and created for himself a splendid reputation among the people of 
the community. It was during this time that he bought his first farm of one 
hundred and thirty-seven acres, constituting part of the old home farm in Grand 
Meadow upon which he was born. His means increasing and expanding, he 
purchased two years later an additional one hundred and fifteen acres and the 
management of these farms and his other business interests kept him busil\- and 
successfully engaged until January i, 1912, when he became president of the 
Postville State Bank. Under his able supervision the institution has continued 
to prosper and expand in remarkable degree and in May, 191 2, one of the best 
business locations in the city was purchased and the ground broken for a fine 
two-story brick bank building to take care of the increased business of the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 49 

institution. Tliis building is now occupied by the Postville State Bank and gives 
it the verv best i|uarters in the city besides adding greatly to the im])rovement 
and appearance of the community. An outlay of fifteen thousand dollars was 
necessitated for the completion of the new building, which stands as evidence 
of the stability of the institution, the bank being one of the strongest in this 
section and deservedly popular with the people, who have every confidence in 
it and its officers. It has a capital of fifty thousand dollars, and an undivided 
surplus of an even amount makes it one of the most responsible financial enter- 
prises of this part of the state. Its deposits now exceed four hundred and 
twenty-five thousand dollars and are rapidly approaching the half million mark. 
Mr. Leui was married in i8S6 to Miss Jennie Orr, a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Tames Orr, highly respected pioneers, who came to Allamakee county in 
1855 and who are now residents of Postville. To Mr. and Mrs. Leui two 
daughters have been born, Hattie S. and Helen M. Their home is one of the 
handsome residences of the city and there they often meet their extensive circle 
of charming friends, who delight to partake of their hospitality. In his political 
affiliations Mr. Leui is a progressive republican and although he is not active 
in politics, takes that interest in the afifairs of the government that should be 
demanded of every right-minded citizen and is an ardent champion of all move- 
ments and measures undertaken in the interests of Allamakee county, his locality, 
and his city. As he is progressive in politics he is progressive in business, although 
he lets not one interfere with the other. The rapid advancement and development 
of Allamakee county is largely due to the individual efiforts of such aggressive 
men as Mr. Leui, who by their efiforts have made this one of the most prosperous 
sections in the country — a locality which not only excels for material wealth but 
which also carries high the banner of moral and intellectual advancement. 



JOHN PEARL ELLIS. 



John Pearl Ellis is the owner of a large and complete blacksmith shop in 
Postville and his success in the conduct of this enterprise is the natural result of his 
industry and enterprise. He was born in the city where he now resides, June 18, 
1878, and is a son of Jonathan and Lydia A. (Dow) Ellis, the former born in 
Ohio in 181 3 and the latter in New Hampshire in 1842. In his early years the 
father engaged in the hardware business in Postville but later turned his attention 
to dealing in real estate, becoming afterward identified with agricultural pur- 
suits in Post township. He continued farming until 1885, when he returned to 
the city and lived there retired until his death, which occurred in 1901. The 
mother survives him and makes her home in Postville. They were the parents 
of two children : Gertrude, the wife of W. Krambeer, a blacksmith in Charles 
City, Iowa : and John Pearl, of this review. 

In the acquirement of an education John Pearl Ellis attended public school 
in his native city but his advantages along this line were extremely limited, for 
he has been earning his own livelihood since he was fourteen years of age. The 
independence and self-reliance which his early life engendered in his character 
have remained among his most prominent qualities and constitute one of the 



50 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

chief sources of his present success. Before he was sixteen years of age he began 
learning the blacksmith's trade and after he had mastered it worked in the employ 
of others for about eight years and a half, at the end of that time embarking in 
busmess for himself with a partner. Their association continued for over hvc 
years and then Mr. Ellis purchased his partner's interests, becoming in this way 
sole proprietor of a large and well equipped establishment. He makes a spe- 
cialty of horseshoeing and plow repairing but he does also all kinds of repair 
work, employing two skilled mechanics to assist him. His shop is equipped 
with all the newest gasoline and electrical appliances, for he keeps constantly in 
touch with the trend of modern progress along the line of his business and 
never allows the work done in his establishment to be inferior because of in- 
sufficient equipment. A progressive and able business man and in addition a 
specialist in his chosen field, he has been accorded a large and liberal patronage 
and this is constantly increasing as the quality of his work becomes more widely 
known. 

Mr. Ellis was married on the 2d of July, 1901, to Miss Carrie J. Taylor, a 
native of Lincoln, Nebraska, and a daughter of Harland and Jane (Bray) Taylor, 
the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Iowa. The father was for many 
years employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad but is now a 
resident of Hopkins, Minnesota. His wife has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ellis became the parents of five children, Lyle, Clifford Keith, Kenneth, Ruby 
Evelyn and Naomi, all at home. 

Mr. Ellis belongs to Brotherly Love Lodge, No. 204, A. F. & A. M., and is 
identified also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen and the Modern Brotherhood of America. He is one of the 
prominent business men of Postville, identified with its growth and development, 
and he is well known in Allamakee county as one of its progressive and public- 
spirited citizens. 



• EDGAR R. A. BRAINARD. 

During his life Edgar R. A. Brainard was widely and favorably known in 
Allamakee county as one of the foremost agriculturists near Postville, where he 
owned a valuable farm of two hundred and fifteen acres which he successfully 
cultivated until death claimed him December 5, 1909. He was one of the first 
in this section to engage in bee culture and proved that such an enterprise could 
be profitably prosecuted here. The success that came to him was entirely brought 
about by his own efforts, for he started out in life at the age of sixteen and 
unaided made his way in the world to a position which brought him the confi- 
dence and good-will of all who knew him. 

Edgar R. A. Brainard was born in McHenry county, Illinois, near Huntley, 
May 9, 1851, a son of Isaac and Arvilla (Austin) Brainard, natives of New York 
state, both born in Washington county. The date of the father's birth was April 
5, 1816, and that of the mother, August 13, 1824. During his active life Isaac 
Brainard always followed farming and he and his wife came to Iowa on June i, 
1855, locating at what was then known as Cleveland, where he bought land, in the 



•gNOliVQNnOj M3aTA. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 53 

cultivation of which he coiitinuetl until his death. He passed away September 
24, 1880, his wife surviving him until October 11, 1896. In their family were 
six children, of whom our subject was the third in order of birth. 

In the acquirement of an education Edgar R. A. Brainard attended school in 
Postviile township and also a business college at Waukon, having been brought 
by his parents to this section before he attained school age. He early assisted his 
father with the work of the farm and when only sixteen years of age began to 
take charge of its operation, becoming thereby the mainstay of the family. While 
he devoted the summer months to farming, he taught school for several years 
during the winter seasons and also worked in the employ of others until his 
marriage, when he by purchase acquired forty acres of land, still continuing, 
however, to teach school during the two following winters. He then had the 
means to build a small house and began keeping bees, being the first in this 
section to engage in such an enterprise. As his financial means accrued he added 
to his farm from time to time until he owned two hundred and fifteen acre.5 of 
land, all of which he cleared and which he developed and brought to a high state 
of productivity. The buildings upon his farm were substantial and modernly 
equipped, his residence comfortable, and the latest machinery was provided for 
labor-saving purposes and in order to increase the yield of the fields. He was 
considered one of the most substantial agriculturists of his section when death 
claimed him December 5, 1909. He was closely attached to his farm, having 
never been away from home with but one exception, when he was called to 
Dubuque in order to do jury service. Having begun bee culture, he continued 
along that line, becoming a leader of the industry and being extraordinarily 
successful therein. As his means increased he invested judiciously in other 
enterprises and became a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store and the 
Cooperative Creamery of Postviile. His stock-raising interests were also con- 
siderable. 

On September 22, 1879, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Brainard and 
Miss Barbara McWilliams, a native of Scotland, born January 21, i860. She 
is a daughter of Nathaniel and Mary (Yule) McWilliams, also natives of Scot- 
land, who crossed the ocean in 1867 and after making their way into the interior 
of the country, located on Henderson prairie in Clayton county, Iowa, where 
they resided for several years before removing to Post township, where the father 
rented land and worked for Mr. Hart. He bought his first land in Post town- 
ship, where they resided for several years before moving upon the farm near 
where Mrs. Brainard now lives, but later sold out and removed to Postviile, 
where the father died November 7, 1896, the mother surviving him until February 
27, 1905. In their family were nine children, of whom Mrs. Brainard is the 
eldest. Mr. and Mrs. Brainard became the [larents of eight children ; Mary, 
who was born July 22, 1880, and is now the wife of C. A. Simons, a farmer and 
dairyman in Marengo, Illinois: Millie, who was born May 15, 1883, and is the 
wife of Martin \'ickery, engaged in farming in Post township : James E., who was 
born February 25, 1885, and died October 30, 1897; Arvilla, who was born 
August 13, 1887, and is at home; Nellie, born September 28, 1891, also at home; 
George, born December 18, 1893: Ralph, born April 6, 1898; and Genevieve, 
whose natal day was December 18, 1905. 



54 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Brainard was a devout member of the United Brethren church, in the 
work of which he was actively and helpfully interested, having been class leader 
and trustee of the church, and teacher and superintendent in the Sunday school 
for many years. His political allegiance was given to the repuljlican party 
and he gave evidence of his public spirit by serving as school director and treas- 
urer as well as township assessor for two terms. I-"raternally he was affiliated 
with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Brotherhood of 
America. The death of Mr. Brainard was the cause of widespread regref among 
his many friends who sincerely mourned his loss and still cherish his memory as 
one whose manly qualities demand respect and esteem. Mrs. Brainard still 
resides upon the homestead and continues its operation in the same able manner 
as it had been conducted during her husband's life. In February, iqi2. mis- 
fortune befell her when the family residence burned down but, undaunted, she 
erected a new and modern residence more comfortable and convenient than 
that which had been taken by the elements. She enjoys the highest esteem and 
good-will of all her neighbors and has many friends in Postville who admire her 
for her excellent womanly qualities as well as for her business abilitv in suc- 
cessfully continuing an extensive agricultural enterprise. 



JOHN C. BEEDE. 



John C. Beede, who is living retired in Waukon after more than fifty years 
of prominent identification with farming interests in the vicinity, is numbered 
among the pioneers in Allamakee county, his residence here dating from 1857. 
He has been one of the greatest individual forces in the agricultural development 
of this section, has always been interested in its expansion along other lines 
and for more than half a century has been recognized as a public-spirited and 
progressive citizen as well as a prosperous and successful business man. 

Mr. Beede was born near Augusta, Maine, November 23, 1835, and spent 
his early childhood in that city. He had no school advantages in his early life and 
is entirely self-educated, his knowledge coming from his private study and wide 
reading in mature years. When he was fourteen years of age he went to sea, 
joining a fishing crew and engaging in cod and mackerel fishing off the New- 
foundland coast during the summers and in the winters working in a store. After 
he was twenty-one he followed a sea-faring life for some time and advanced 
rapidly, becoming first mate of his vessel. During some period in his early life 
he had learned the shoemaking trade and this he followed for a few seasons in 
Maine after coming ashore. He married in that state in 1857 ^nd soon after- 
ward moved to Iowa, where he joined his brother-in-law, Chester Caton, in 
Allamakee county, where he has since resided. They farmed together for two 
years and at the end of that time Mr. Beede purchased an eighty acre tract of 
raw land in L^nion Prairie township which he proceeded to break, fence and 
improve. Ujjon it he built an attractive residence, a good barn and sub- 
stantial outbuildings and did everything in his power to make it a valuable and 
productive property. Here for over half a century he carried on general 
agricultural pursuits, each year with increasing success, becoming at length one 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALEAMAKEE COUNTY 55 

of the prt)S|)crous aiul successful fanners of the comiuunily. liy well directed 
labor and jiractical methods and strict adherence to high standards of business 
integrity he accumulated a comfortable fortune which enabled liini to retire 
from active life. Accordingly, in igio he sold his farm and mo\ed to W'aukon, 
where he jiurchased an attractive hoiue in which he now resides. 

Mr. Beede has been twice married. His hrst union occurred in Maine in 
1857 and to it were born eight children: .\rthur S.. now a resident of Oregon: 
LeKoy J., of South Dakota: Edgar L., also of Oregon; Angie M., the wife of 
E. A. I [eath, of Alaska : Mrs. Cora L. Campbell, of North Dakota : Nellie, the 
wife of Professor L. W. Alibott, for fourteen years superintendent of schools 
in Nobles county, Minnesota: Albert \\'., who lives at home: and Fred, who 
resides in W'illiston, North Dakota. The mother of these children passed away 
on January 13, 1876, and on the 26th of May, 1877, ^^^- Keede wedded Miss 
Mary T. Ryan, a native of Massachusetts, who was reared in Union Prairie town- 
ship, Allamakee county, and is a daughter of Thotnas Ryan, who was one of the 
pioneers in this jiart of the state. Mr. and Mrs. lieede have three children: John 
C, a business man in Waukon : Minnie, the wife of W. J. Raymond, also of 
Waukon, and Myrtle Irene, who married Ernest Raymond, of Nora Springs, 
Iowa. One son born to Mr. and Mrs. Beede, William H., grew to maturity and 
died in 1910, at the age of twenty-nine. They also lost a daughter, Lizzie, who 
passed away in 1898, when she was twenty years of age. 

Fraternally Mr. Beede is connected with the Odd Fellows, which he joined 
in 1870, and he has passed through all the chairs in the subordinate lodge and is 
now past grand. He and his wife are members of the Rebekah lodge and Mrs. 
Beede has served in all of the chairs of the order, being at present past vice 
grand. W. J. Raymond, Mr. Beede's son-in-law, is now noble grand of the 
W'aukon lodge and his wife is noble grand of the Rebekahs. 

Mr. Beede cast his first vote for John C. Fremont in 1836 and since the forma- 
tion of the republican party has voted for every republican nominee for the 
presidency. He takes an active interest in local affairs, especially in school 
matters, and while on the farm was elected in 1838 a member of the school 
board, servitig continuously for fifty-two years. He is numbered among the 
real builders of Allamakee county, for he has borne an active and honorable 
part in the work of its development and for more than half a century has con- 
sistently supported all progressive public movements. He commands the con- 
fidence and respect of his neighbors and well deserves the retirement which he 
now eniovs, for it is the fruit of long vears of honest and successful labor. 



MOSES AYERS BOLLMAN. 

For more than half a century Moses Ayers Bollman was a resident of 
Winneshiek county and during the greater part of that period was identified 
with the farming interests. Although he never sought to figure prominently 
in public life, he proved his loyalty to his country in the time of her greatest 
need in the dark days of the Civil war and he was classed with those citizens 
whose sterling worth, earnest purpose and fidelity to the duties which come day 



56 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

by day make them valued residents of the community. He was born in Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio, January i6. 1837, and was a son of WiUiam and Ehzabeth 
(Hardin) BoUman, the former a native of the same section. The father, who 
was a farmer by occupation, came to Iowa about the year 1853 ^"^ located just 
northwest of Postville, where he purchased land upon which he continued to 
reside until his death in 1873. His wife survived him several years, dying 
in 1879. 

Moses Ayers Bollman was one of a family of nine children. He grew up 
on his father's farm, acquiring his knowledge of the best agricultural methods 
by practical experience, and at the usual age entered the district schools of Post 
township where he gained an excellent education. He began his independent 
career at the age of sixteen when he began working as a farm hand, continuing 
thus until 1861, when, his patrotic spirit being aroused, he volunteered for 
service in the L'nion army, joining Company K, First Regular Iowa Cavalry. 
He saw a great deal of active service, remaining at the front until after the 
close of hostilities when he was mustered out with honorable discharge, returning 
to Iowa with a creditable military record. He bought land six miles northwest 
of Postville in Winneshiek county, whereon he continued to reside until his 
death, his practical methods, his energy and close application bringing him as the 
years passed a gratifying measure of success, and his high integrity and honor 
and his sterling personal worth winning for him the respect, confidence and 
esteem of all with whom he came in contact. 

Mr. Bollman was twice married. He first wedded Miss Nancy Harris, a 
sister of William Harris, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. Bollman's first wife passed away in 1871. leaving three children: 
Rena Belle, the wife of Amos McMartin, a farmer in Ellendale, North Dakota ; 
Willard Ellery. engaged in farming in Bruce, South Dakota ; and Maggie Ellen, 
who married Edward Green, a farmer residing seven miles northwest of Post- 
ville. 

On the 24th of March, 1874, IMr. Bollman was again married, his second wife 
being Miss Carrie Brown, who was born in Laporte, Indiana, July 3, 1852. She 
is a daughter of Luther and Mary (Walrath) Brown, both natives of that 
section, tlie father born November i, 1823, and the mother, October 11, 1830. 
They came to Iowa in 1854 and in that year located on a farm five miles north- 
west of Postville, whereon they continued to reside until January 5, 1862, when 
the father died. Mrs. Brown and her children moved into Castalia, where she 
passed away, October 11, 1865. Their daughter, Mrs. Bollman, is one of a 
family of four children. She grew up on her father's farm near Postville and 
attended what was then known as the old red school house, located one mile from 
her father's home. This school, now called the Oak Ridge school, is attended 
by her own children. By this second marriage Mr. Bollman had eight children : 
Fenton, who is engaged in farming near Caldwell, Idaho : Parker, a farmer re- 
siding at Basin. Wyoming : Stella, the wife of Hayes Hougland. a farmer and 
rancher near Republic, Washington ; Talcott, who makes his home with his 
mother; Farrcll, a farmer near Cottonwood, South Dakota; \'era, the wife of 
B. Post, a farmer in the vicinity of Caldwell, Idaho ; \'ives, a photographer re- 
siding in Postville ; and Oberton, who is studying butter making at the State 
Agricultural College at Ames. After the death of her husband Mrs. Bollman sold 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 57 

tlie farm and came to Postville where she ]nirchased a comfortable and attractive 
residence in wliich she expects to spend the remainder of her life. She is a 
devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is affiliated with the 
Ladies Aid Society, in which she has accomplished much useful and beneficial 
work. 

Mr. IJollman gave his political allegiance to the republican party and was 
never neglectful of the duties of citizenship, cooperating readily and willingly 
in all movements and projects for the general welfare. For a number of years 
he served on the school board and was for some time road supervisor, dis- 
charging his i)ublic duties in a capable, far-sighted and conscientious way. He 
was a member of the United Brethren church and his life was ever upright and 
honorable, commanding the confidence and good-will of all who knew him. He 
lived to witness a remarkable change in Allamakee and W'inneshiek comities dur- 
ing the long period of his residence in this part of Iowa and throughout the 
entire period his influence was always on the side of progress, truth, justice and 
right. 



JOHN M. COLLINS. 



John M. Collins, a well known grocery and real-estate dealer of Waukon and 
one of the early settlers in Allamakee county, was born in Lewis county. New 
York, July 19, 1S43. His parents later moved to Kentucky and resided in Mason 
county, that state, until 1856, when they moved to Iowa, making a permanent 
location in Taylor township, Allamakee county. Here the father owned one 
hundred and si.xty acres of land, broke the soil, fenced his property and began the 
work of development, which he carried on along progressive lines for many 
years, dying upon his homestead at an advanced age. 

John M. Collins was a boy of thirteen when he came with his parents to 
Allamakee county and his childhood was spent amid pioneer conditions. He 
aided in the opening up of the new farm and afterward in its improvement and 
development, spending all of his time when not engaged with his books in 
agricultural pursuits. He acquired his primary education in the public schools 
and supplemented this by outside study and reading, fitting himself for teaching, 
an occupation which he followed for twelve consecutive terms, becoming well 
known in educational circles of the state. He afterward entered public life, 
accepting in 1880 the position of deputy county auditor and serving in that 
capacity for four years. In 1884 he was elected auditor and at the end of his 
first term reelected, afterward serving for nine consecutive years in the office, 
He was later again deputy auditor and in all served as deputy and county auditor 
for seventeen years, his public service being at all times loyal, efficient and dis- 
interested. During his long term in office people from all parts of the county 
came to Waukon to consult him and to lay before him matters which needed his 
attention and he was never known to neglect any phase of his public duty. In 
this way he acquired an extensive circle of friends, all of whom hold him today 
in the highest honor and esteem. In 1898 Mr. Collins went to Minneapolis and 
there engaged in the mercantile business, at the same time purchasing a half 



58 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

interest in a dry-goods store at Prairie du Chien. He gave his attention to the 
conduct of both concerns for one year and then sold out his interests and 
opened a grocery store in Waukon which in the course of fourteen years he 
has made one of the largest and most important institutions of its kind in the 
city. He carries a complete and well selected line of goods and has secured 
an enviable reputation as a careful and discriminating man of business whose 
success is the direct result of the energy, honesty and straightforward dealing by 
which it was attained. Mr. Collins is also well known as a real-estate dealer in 
Waukon, for he specializes in the buying and selling of improved Iowa, .Minne- 
sota, North Dakota, Montana and Missouri farming lands. He has made some 
very judicious private investments and is now the owner of fourteen hundred 
acres, part of which is improved land. In 1883 he purchased a residence in 
Waukon and has made it his home continuously since that time with the excep- 
tion of a year and a half during which time he lived in I'rairie du CJiien. 

On the 1st day of February, 1874, Mr. Collins married Miss P>. T. Prazell, a 
native of Canada, who came to the United States in i860. They have three sons 
and two daughters, as follows : John B., who is married and who assists his 
father in the grocery store; Michael L., a farmer in Nortli Dakota; William J., 
who is also employed in his father's store ; Mrs. Mary Regan, a widow, who 
makes her home in Minneapolis; and Nellie, who assists in the conduct of the 
grocery. Mr. and Mrs. Collins had one other son, Albert, who died in 1900 
at the age of fifteen years. The family are members of the Roman Catholic 
church, and Mr. Collins is a member of the Knights of Columbus. For over 
half a century he has been a resident of .-Mlamakee county and his labors have 
been a cooperant factor in the development and advancement of the section. He 
is numbered among the public-spirited and progressive men of Waukon, giving 
largely of his time, means and influence in the promotion of projects for the 
general good. He occupies a prominent position in business, social and political 
circles and has always shown an interest and ability which have made him a 
valued member of the community. 



RONNEBURGER & HOESLY. 

Among the foremost newspaper enterprises in Allamakee county and, in fact 
one which has a large influence in four counties and throughout the state, is the 
Iowa Volksblatt, a weekly journal printed in the German language at Postville. 
This paper is a great favorite with the sons of the fatherland located in this 
section and the citizens of German descent and is housed in a finely equipped 
ofifice, having a wide circulation, including a large number of readers in Germany. 
The Volksblatt was established in 1892, by the Rev. John Gass, and later was 
edited by Dietsch & Brechler, Mr. Dietsch becoming the sole proprietor in 1895. 
In 1908 it was purchased by the present owners, Paul Ronneburger and Samuel 
Hoesly, under whose management the paper has enjoyed a history of uninter- 
rupted success and prosperity. Although an important factor in promoting 
public progress and advancing the interests of the section in which it circulates, it 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 59 

is independent in politics and devotes its attention largely to the news of Postville 
and the four counties in which its readers are located. 

The senior member of the firm, I\iul Ronnehurger, is a German born and 
bred, having first seen the light of day in the capital of the empire, ISerlin. He 
enjoyed the splendid and ilKinnigh educational advantages of the German public 
schools, attended the printers' trade school and became an expert in the printers' 
art in the fatlierland. The year 1892 marks his advent in America, where he 
worked at his trade in Milwaukee, being for a time employed in the office of the 
\'orwaerts. the well known paper edited by ex-Congressman X'ictor Berger. 
After seven years in Milwaukee, Mr. Ronneburger worked for one year with 
the Bellville (Texas) Wochenblatt and then became connected with the Banner 
at Mayville, Wisconsin, and subse(|uently with the Green County Herold of 
^lonroe, that state. It was here that he met his future partner, Samuel Hoesly, 
and the two young men then decided to strike out for themselves, purchasing the 
Iowa \'olksblatt. 

In 1903 Mr. Ronneburger paid a visit to the old country and on October 26, 
1910, he was married'to Miss Margarete Wersinger, of Berlin, Germany. Mr. 
Ronneburger is an ideal newspaper man — a forceful writer, an excellent busi- 
ness man and a strong factor in his community. 

Samuel Hoesly, the junior partner in the concern, is of Swiss descent, his 
father having come to America in 184S, and via New Orleans and up the 
Mississippi, went to New Glarus, Wisconsin, where he made his home. It was in 
Clarno, Wisconsin, on December 4, 1876, that Samuel Hoesly was born. He 
received an excellent public-school education and at the age of fifteen entered the 
office of the Green County Herold of Monroe, Wisconsin, where he learned every 
branch of the printer's art, remaining with the one office from 1892 to 1908 with 
the exception of the time he served with the First Wisconsin \'olunteers during 
the Spanish-American war. At that time he was stationed at Jacksonville, Flor- 
ida, under the command of General Lee, and in all he served eight years with 
the Wisconsin National Guard. 

Mr. Hoesly was married March 9, 1912, to Miss Edna Brouillet, a young 
lady of French parentage. Mr. Hoesly is highly accomplished in printer's work 
and has a decided talent for the artistic, the elements in the characters of both 
partners and their accomplishments giving promise of a most successful future 
for the firm. 



HENRY OR IN DAYTON. 

Henry Orin Dayton was born at Hadley, Saratoga county. New York, 
November 10, 1834, and died at his home in Waukon, Iowa, January 24, 1901, of 
typhoid fever. His boyhood days and early manhood were spent in his native 
village. He received his education at Greenwich, New York, and at the semi- 
nary at Charlotteville, that state. 

In 1856 Mr. Dayton came to Iowa, arriving at Hardin on July i, where he 
engaged in surveying, assisting his brother, Joel Dayton, who was county sur- 
veyor. His first work was on the town plat of Hardin. He followed surveying 



60 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

henceforth as his chief occupation, ahhough engaging in various other enterprises. 
In the winter of 1857-8 he taught the Decorah school, at forty dollars per month. 
He had one hundred and eighteen pupils enrolled, and one assistant, a Miss 
Farmer. He proved very successful, and his school exhibition on the closing 
day, April 2, 1858, drew a very large crowd. In 1858 he taught the summer 
school at Hardin, after which he again took up surveying until December, when 
he commenced teaching at Milton, or \'illage Creek, where he taught three win- 
ters, and then took the Lansing school for two years. During the intervals be- 
tween schools he put in his time surveying. 

In the fall of 1864 Mr. Dayton organized a stock company for establishing a 
woolen factory, and the following year they built a large stone building and 
commenced operations early in 1866. Severe floods interfered with their work 
from time to time, and the mill was twice destroyed by fire, the last time in 1875. 

Mr. Dayton was often honored with offices of trust. He was county super- 
visor from Lafayette township two years ; county surveyor eight years ; and 
clerk of the district court si.x years. When elected clerk of the courts in 1874 
he removed to Waukon, where he continued to reside until his death in igoi. 
Here he served several years on the Waukon school board. After his third term 
as county clerk he operated a creamery at Village Creek, and later at Waukon, 
where he also established and operated a canning factory. LTpon retiring from 
this he again took up civil engineering, in which he was actively engaged up to 
the time of his last sickness. 

On August 27, 1866, Mr. Dayton married Miss Maria Aldrich, a most de- 
voted wife and mother, and a woman loved by all who knew her. Mrs. Dayton 
died June 3, 191 1. To them were born six children, of whom three remain, viz: 
Walter, of Salt Lake City ; Mrs. Leona Heath, of Dallas, Texas ; and Mrs. Anna 
Davenport, of Clear Lake, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Dayton were members of the 
Methodist Ejjiscopal church of Waukon, and he was one of the official board 
for a quarter of a century. It may be truly said that Mr. Dayton was known 
throughout .Xllamakee county, in his home life, as a neighbor, as a citizen, and as 
a public official, and that no man in the county had more friends than he in all the 
walks of life. 



JAMES BROWN McWILLIAMS. 

With the passing of James Brown McWilliams on March 11, 1896, Allamakee 
county lost one of its valued pioneers. His career furnished a link between 
the past, when crude conditions still prevailed, and the more modern era of the 
coming civilization of the twentieth century. A sturdy agriculturist, he passed 
practically his entire life in that vocation and attained to success by reason of 
his industry and energy. Although over seventeen years have passed since 
his demise his memory is still cherished by the older generation and the seed 
he has sown as one of those who have I>een prominent in the agricultural develop- 
ment of his district is still bearing fruit. 

James B. McWilliams was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, near Mason- 
town, February 6, 1832, a son of Samuel and Sarah (Huston) McWilliams, both 




tJAMES B.M = WILLIAMS 



THE NEW YORK 
PU?LIC LiSRARY 



ASTOR, LFN9X AND 
Tl'-D-N FOUNDATIONS. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 63 

natives of Pennsylvania, in which state they passed their entire lives. The 
father was an agriculturist by occupation and prominent in his district. James 
B. McWilliams attended school in his native state and there was reared and 
grew to young manhood, marrying on March 15, i860, Sarah E. Neeling, who 
was born at Mount Vernon, Chester county, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1840, a 
daughter of James and Anna (Cameron) Neeling. The father was also born 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania, but the mother called Maryland her native stale. 
The father always followed agricultural pursuits and they came to Iowa in 1854, 
locating at National, Clayton county, wliere he engaged in the hotel business. 
Later the parents moved to Algona and invested in land which the father culti- 
vated with such good success that he was enabled to spend the latter part of 
his life in retirement in Algona, where he and his wife passed away. 

The father of our subject had died in his native state when Mr. McWilliams 
was but two years of age and when about twenty-two. he came to Iowa accom- 
panied by a brother and his wife. Me first located at Colesburg, in southern 
Iowa, but after a few years returned to Pennsylvania. A year later, how- 
ever, he and a brother returned to Clayton county, Iowa, taking up land in 
Meadow township, and there he continued until he came to Postville, where 
for five years he made his home, when a removal was made to a farm near this 
city, to the cultivation of which he gave the rest of his life. For thirty-seven 
years he made his home in this district and during that long residence gained a 
reputation as a straightforward, reliable and honorable man in all of his deal- 
ings. He built up a substantial fortune and upon his death left his wife and 
children sufficient to set them up independently in life. Mr. and Mrs. McWil- 
liams became the parents of ten children, of whom si.x, four sons and two 
daughters, survive. Those born to this union were : Huston, who died at the 
age of eleven months ; George, a resident of Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, 
where he is engaged in the real-estate business and is a large landowner ; May, 
the widow of Edward Clough, residing in Eureka, Montana ; Edgar, who passed 
away in June, 1896, at the age of twenty-five years; Minnie, who died at the 
age of five ; Zilla, whose death occurred at the age of three years ; Vergil, an 
assistant bank cashier, who resides at Chester, Iowa ; Carey, a druggist of that 
city ; Emmet, cashier of the German Savings Bank of Chester ; and Ethel, the 
wife of F. J. Thoma, who is engaged in the grocery business at Postville. 

The death of Mr. McWilliams occurred on March 11, 1896, and was caused 
by a lamentable accident brought about through ptomaine poisoning. All of 
the family were taken sick but Mr. McWilliams was afflicted so severely that 
he was unable to withstand the shock and after two weeks' illness passed away, 
deeply mourned by his immediate family and a large circle of friends who had 
learned to esteem him for his manly qualities of character, his sturdiness, his 
straightforwardness and for what he had done in promoting advancement and 
development. His political adherence was at first given to the democratic party 
but he later affiliated with the republicans, always keeping intelligently informed 
upon all public questions, although he never desired public office. Fraternally 
he was a member of the Masonic lodge at Garnavillo and of the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen. It was on March 13, 1896, that the last remains of Mr. 
McWilliams were laid to rest in the Postville cemetery, the Rev. L. S. Hand 

Vol. II— 4 



64 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

officiating. A large gathering of friends and neighbors had come to do the 
last honors to one who had been much to them and who had ever had their full 
esteem and confidence. Mrs. McWilliams survives and now makes her home 
in Postville. where she is highly esteemed and respected for her womanly quali- 
ties of character and that sweet, charitable view of life which makes her 
beloved by all who know her. 



CHRISTOF SANDER. 



Christof Sander, carrying on general farming and stock-raising upon two 
hundred acres of land in Post township, comprising one of the finest agricultural 
properties in the locality, is numbered among the earlier settlers in Iowa, his 
residence here dating from 1870. He was born in Hanover, Germany, on the 
i6th of January, 1849, and is a son of Juergen and Dora (Sander) Sander, also 
natives of that province. They never came to America. The father engaged 
in farming in his native country during all of his active life, owning a fine 
property of one hundred and sixty acres in Hanover. 

Christof Sander spent his early childhood in the fatherland and attended 
school there for eight years. When he was sixteen years of age he turned his 
attention to farming, working at that occupation in the employ of others until 
1867, when he left Germany and came to America, landing in New York, May i 
of that year. He pushed immediately westward to Wisconsin and located in 
Sac county, where he worked upon farms for three years, coming at the end 
of that time to Clayton county, Iowa, near Postville. His capital at that time 
consisted of seven dollars. He obtained work as a farm laborer and as such 
continued for four years, after which he rented land for twelve years. During 
that time by the exercise of unremitting industry and practical economy he 
saved enough money to purchase a farm of eighty acres and to this he has since 
added from time to time, the place now comprising two hundred acres, all under a 
high state of cultivation. Success has steadily rewarded his well directed labors 
and his farm is today one of the finest in this section of Iowa, well eeiuipped 
with modern buildings and machinery and reflecting in its excellent condition his 
many years of care and labor. Mr. Sander engages in general farming and 
stock-raising on an extensive scale, keeping hogs, cattle, sheep and horses. He 
is also interested in chicken raising and is a stockholder in the Farmers Coopera- 
tive Store of Postville. 

On the i6th of April, 1875, Mr. Sander was united in marriage to Miss Caro- 
line Schultz, who was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, on the 30th of January, 
1859, a daughter of Jochen and Katherine (Miller) Schultz, who came as pioneers 
to Clayton county, Iowa, but later removed to Winneshiek county, the father fol- 
lowing farming. Both have passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Sander became the par- 
ents of eleven children : George, who was born on the 24th of May, 1876, and 
is now engaged in farming in Franklin township : Emma, whose birth occurred 
February 13. 1878, and who married John Dederick, a farmer of Winneshiek 
county; Ida. who was born on the 12th of April, 1880, and is the wife of 
Charles Schute, a farmer in Clayton county: Otto, who was born September 14, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 65 

1882, and is a carpenter in Postville; Carl, who was born December 27, 1885, 
and is also engaged in carpentering in that city ; and Konrad. born April 23, 1888 ; 
Walter, August 30, 1892; Esther, October 14. 1895: Mahala, January 5, 1897; 
Eldo, January 6, 1900: and Caroline, May 25, 1904. 

I-'raternally, Mr. Sander is affiliated with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and the Modern Brotherhood of America. A resident of this part of 
Iowa for over forty years, he is well and favorably known, his business integrity, 
loyalty in citizenship and sterling c|ualities of character having gained for him the 
respect, confidence and esteem of all his associates. He is one of Allamakee 
county's successful men and his prosperity is the more creditable to him since it 
has been gained entirely through his own energy, hard work and unremitting 
industry and is the result of many years of well directed and practical labor. 



RAY F. TOPLIFF, D. D. S. 

One of the most able and progressive dentists in Allamakee county is Dr. 
Ray F. Topliff, now practicing in Postville. He is a native of this county, born 
two miles west of the city. May 19, 1884, a son of John Nelson and Rachel 
Elizabeth (Reed) Topliff. The father was born in Newark, New Jersey, on the 
24th of July, 1836, his parents being Elias and Sarah (Woodworth) Topliff, the 
former of whom was born August 30, 1801, and died November 26, i860, while 
his wife died on the 4th of May, 1854. It was in the fall of 1847 that John 
Nelson Topliff' accompanied his parents on their removal from ]\Iilford, Ohio, 
to Iowa, the journey being made with two two-horse teams and one single horse. 
They arrived at Monona on the 26th of November, 1847. that being just south of 
the Winnebago reservation, and Elias Topliff took up the first claim on that 
reservation before it was surveyed and before they had the protection of the 
government from the Indians, as the red men did not move from the territory 
until the follow'ing June. In the family of Elias Topliff' were six sons and four 
daughters, of whom three sons and two daughters are still living. 

In early life John Nelson Topliff" engaged in teaming prior to the advent of the 
railroad, and during those pioneer days he experienced many of the hardships 
and difficulties which came to those who settled on the frontier. For two years 
after his marriage he made his home in Waukon and then removed to the old 
homestead farm two miles west of Postville. where he resided until 1891, since 
which time he has lived retired in Decorah, Iowa. In connection with general 
farming he also engaged in the nurser\' and fruit business and met with excel- 
lent success in his undertakings. On the 2d of January, 1869. he became a 
Master Mason, joining the lodge at Postville, and has since been an exemplary 
member of that order. 

On the 1st of July, i860, in Waukon, John N. Topliff' was united in marriage 
to Miss Rachel Elizabeth Reed, who was born in Ohio, June 21. 1841, a daughter 
of David ami Mary (Allen) Reed, the former of whom was born June 2"], 1799, 
and died in March, 1880, while the latter was born May 9, 1814, and died 
February 4, 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Topliff' became the parents of the following 
children: Charles Louis, born December 28, 1862: John Nelson, Jr.. born 



66 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

November ii, 1863 ; Anna Grace, who was born July 3, 1868, and died November 
25, 1877; Frank Rolla, who was born February 6, 1875, and died October 25, 
1877 ; and Ray F., the subject of this interview. 

In the acquirement of an education Dr. Topliff attended the Decorah pubhc 
schools and after graduating from the high school entered the dental college of 
the Northwestern University at Chicago, graduating with the degree of D. D. S., 
in 1906. He began the practice of his profession in West Union, but after one 
year came to Postville, where he has since engaged in practice. His office is 
one of the most modern and best equipped in this part of the state and his prac- 
tice is very large, requiring the constant services of an assistant. He is at present 
furnishing and equipping a new office in the bank building on Main street and 
expects shortly to move to his new location. He is a constant student of the mod- 
ern and advanced methods which are being at all times introduced into the prac- 
tice of dentistry and he is today one of the most able exponents of these methods. 
His large patronage is a proof of the excellent results he has already accomplished 
and in his ability and knowledge he possesses a guarantee of future professional 
progress. 

Dr. Topliff was married on the loth of November, 1910, to Miss Josephine 
M. Lennon, who was born in Decorah, August 26, 1885, a daughter of Joseph 
M. and Alice (Webster) Lennon, the former a native of Racine, Wisconsin, and 
the latter of Decorah. Her father, who followed farming during all of his active 
life, came to Iowa in early times and grew to manhood in this state, acquiring 
his education in the public schools in the vicinity of Decorah. He began his inde- 
pendent career by purchasing land between Decorah and Frankville and became 
in time an extensive landowner. He retired from active life about the year 1897 
and removed into Decorah, where he and his wife still reside, but he still super- 
vises the management of his landed interests. 

Dr. Topliff is a member of the Iowa State Dental Society, of the Alumni 
Association of Northwestern University and of Xi Psi Phi. He belongs to 
Brotherly Love Lodge, No. 204, A. F. & A. M., and is identified also with the 
Order of Eastern Star. He is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is well known in social and 
fraternal circles of the city, where his many fine qualities have gained him high 
regard, while in his profession he has won that pro'minence which comes only in 
recognition of merit and ability. 



AARON B. COOK. 



In 1907 after more than thirty-eight years' close identification with farming 
interests in Allamakee county, Aaron B. Cook moved into Postville where he has 
since lived in retirement, having earned rest and leisure by many years of earnest, 
honorable and well directed work in the past. A spirit of enterprise and deter- 
mination has actuated him in all that he has done and his work has been of a high 
order, touching and influencing the trend of agricultural development in this part 
of the state. He was born in St. Joseph county, Michigan, September 15, 1840, 
and is a son of William and Ursula (Burr) Cook, natives of New York, born 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 67 

near Utica. The father was one of the pioneers in Michigan, going there when 
the present state was still a territory, and identifying himself with general farm- 
ing in St. Joseph county where he remained until 1868 when he went to Mott- 
ville, where he turned his attention to the real-estate business in which he con- 
tinued until his death, September 5, 1878. He was prominent in public affairs 
in St. Joseph county and held various positions of trust and honor, serving for 
several years as county commissioner. He had long survived his wife, who passed 
away in 1849. In their family were eight children, of whom the subject of this 
review is the sixth in the order of birth. 

Aaron B. Cook acquired his early education in the public schools of Mott- 
ville and was later a student in White Pigeon Seminary. When he was nineteen 
years of age he began teaching, spending the winter months at this occupation and 
attending school during the summers. Afterward, however, he turned his atten- 
tion to farming, buying land in Elkhart county, Indiana, where he remained 
about two years. He followed this by two years upon his father's farm in 
Michigan and then, in 1867, came to Iowa, having since continued a resident of 
the state. At first he rented land in Ludlow township, Allamakee county, but 
after two years purchased eighty acres in Post township, whereon he resided 
continuously for thirty-eight years, becoming, in the interval, one of the most 
prominent and substantial farmers in this section of the state. When he took up 
his residence upon this property it was wild and unimproved, but with character- 
istic energy he set himself to the task of clearing and developing it, steadily carry- 
ing forward the work along practical and scientific lines. From time to time he 
bought more land and added it to his holdings until they today comprise two 
hundred and eighty acres of fine farming land. In connection with the work of 
the farm, he not only threshed for himself and neighbors during the season — 
owning successively three threshing machines — but he also taught in the district 
schools during the winter season, becoming, through his able and successful 
work, one of the leading educators of the county. He was, as may readily be seen, 
an indefatigable worker, possessed of the ability to divide his energies without 
impairing their force and he had, moreover, that knowledge of men and the 
power of judging their capabilities, which enabled him always to hire efficient 
and honest employes, a great deal of his success being due to this fact alone. In 
addition to the activities above mentioned, he was also for some time president 
of the publishing company which controlled the District Post, the second paper 
in Postville and known as the greenback paper of this district. Mr. Cook is at 
present manager of the cooperative Postville canning factory and has proven 
himself a reliable and far-sighted business man as well as a successful educator 
and a capable farmer. In 1907 he removed from his farm into Postville and is 
now living practically retired, giving most of his attention to the supervision of 
his extensive interests. 

Mr. Cook married, on the ist of April, i860. Miss Caroline Machemer, who 
was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1838. She is a 
daughter of William and Catherine (Seeman) Machemer, natives of that section 
of the Keystone state. For many years the father followed farming, but in later 
life turned his attention to the mercantile business, operating a large store in 
Constantine, Michigan, whither he and his wife went in 1855. There the mother 
died in 1878 and she was survived by her husband until 1893, his death occurring 



68 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

when he was eighty-seven years of age. Of their family of eleven children, 
Mrs. Cook is the sixth in the order of birth. She grew to womanhood in Penn- 
sylvania and acquired her education in the public schools of that state. She and 
her husband became the parents of seven children. Flora, the widow of O. D. 
Franklin, of Postville, was born May 7, 1861. She is now a teacher in the Post- 
ville public school. James Albert was born December 8, 1862. He is a resident 
of Keller, Washington, where he is engaged in teaching. He married Myrtle 
Hoagland, a native of Chickasaw county, Iowa. Carrie L.. who was born Sep- 
tember 29, 1866. is the widow of Orrin M. Franklin and makes her home in 
Waterloo, Iowa. Myrtle M., born February 14, 1872, became the wife of Elmer 
McGhee, of the European Hotel, of Cedar Rapids. Perry E. was born Novem- 
ber 25, 1874, and still resides on the home farm. He married Miss Stella Uhl. 
Charles B. was born October 17, 1877, and died May 21, 1908. His wife was in 
her maidenhood. Miss Estella Hammel. Gwendolyn, youngest child born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Cook, was born I'ebruary 10, 1882. She is the wife of Walter Camp- 
bell, secretary of the Cooperative Creamery Company of Postville. 

Mr. Cook attends the Methodist Episcopal church, although he is not a mem- 
ber of any religious denomination. He gives his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party and is actively interested in public affairs, being always ready and 
willing to cooperate in mo\emeiits for the genera! welfare. He has held impor- 
tant offices, serving with credit as justice of the peace for sixteen years, as town- 
ship trustee and as secretary of the school board. In all relations of life he has 
proved honorable, upright, straightforward and efficient and. in the county where 
he has resided for almost forty years, his name is a synonym for progressive 
citizenship, business ability and high standards of personal and political integrity. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON HANKS. 

Through a residence of about thirty years in Allamakee county, George Wash- 
ington Hanks firmly entrenched himself in the affection and regard of those 
with whom he came in contact, while his business ability gained him a place 
among the representative and valued residents of this section of the state. From 
1862 until his death in 1891 he resided continuously upon his farm lying partly 
in this and partly in Clayton county and each year added something to his high 
standing in the community to the agricultural development of which he made 
such substantial and lasting contril)utions. He came to Iowa in 18^9. 

Mr. Hanks was born in West .\lmond, Allegany county. New York, on the 
8th of October, 1834, and is a son of Rufus F. and Cynthia (Knight) Hanks, 
natives of Greenwich, Connecticut, the former born, September 4. 1802, and the 
latter, September 29, 1799. The father was a cooper by trade and an expert car- 
penter and joiner, as well as a blacksmith, and he worked at all of these occupations, 
first in Connecticut, and then in Pennsylvania, whither he went in 1837. In that 
State he also followed farming, owning an excellent property which, however, 
was largely operated by his sons. He was one of the pioneers in Iowa, locating 
in Wayne township, Crawford county, in early times and making his residence 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 69 

there until his death, which occurred in 1880. He had survived his wife only a 
short time, her death iiaving occurred six weeks previously. 

George Washington Hanks was the eighth in a family of twelve children. 
He acquired his education in the district schools in Pennsylvania and at the same 
time became a proficient and capable farmer, learning the best and most practical 
agricultural methods by personal experience upon his father's property. Under 
his father he also learned the cooper's trade, becoming an expert carpenter, 
joiner and blacksmith, and he did a great deal of this kind of work in his father's 
different shops. On the 24th of April, 1859, he left Pennsylvania and came 
to Iowa, settling in Clayton county where he rented land, turning his attention 
to general farming. He was very successful and was eventually able to purchase 
a fine property of his own upon which he moved June 12, 1862, and whereon he 
continued to reside until his death. For a time he worked at his trade in con- 
nection with his farming operations, but later concentrated his attention upon 
the development of his land, becoming one of the most prosperous and successful 
farmers in this part of the state. Starting with forty acres, he added to his 
holdings as his financial resources increased and he owned finally two hundred 
and seventy-three and one-third acres, one hundred and thirteen of which lay 
in Clayton county and the remainder in Allamakee. Upon it he made substan- 
tial improvements, his progressive and modern spirit leading him to introduce all 
the newest and best machinery, and to keep the buildings which he erected in 
good repair. In addition to the development of his fields, he gave a great deal 
of attention to stock-raising and eventually operated the farm as a general stock 
farm, whereon he bred and raised pure-blooded animals. It was he who intro- 
duced Polled Angus cattle in this vicinity and he did a great deal of important 
work in improving the breed. For thirty years he steadily carried forward the 
work of developing his homestead and his well directed and practical labors 
were at length rewarded by a success which placed him in the front ranks of the 
county's progressive farmers. 

On the 3rd of July, 1856, Mr. Hanks married Miss Mary Ann Banister, who 
was born in Cherry Creek, Chautauqua county. New York, September 15, 1834. 
She is a daughter of William and Priscilla (Stewart) Banister, natives of Wind- 
sor county, Vermont, the former born August 12, 1808, and the latter, Septem- 
ber 12, 1804. They moved across the Green mountains to New York in 1830 and 
in that state engaged in farming, an occupation which he followed all during his 
active life. In 1837 ^^ moved to Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and there 
resided until his death, which occurred November 8, 1890. He had survived his 
wife since March 29, 1879. Although Mr. and Mrs. Hanks had no children of 
their own, they adopted a nephew, W. James Hanks, son of the brother of the sub- 
ject of this review. He was born in Franklin county, Iowa, August 31, 1871, and 
grew to manhood in this state. He married Miss Agnes Dunn, also a native of 
Iowa, and they have two sons: George L. and Harry Newell, who reside with 
their father in Postville. W. James Hanks is engaged in the piano and jewelry 
business in that city and is one of the progressive and enterprising young busi- 
ness men of the community. 

The death of Mr. Hanks occurred upon his farm January 12, 1891, after a 
residence of nearly thirty years upon the property. After his demise Mrs. Hanks 
remained upon the homestead until the following December, when she disposed 



70 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of the property and moved into Postville, where she has since resided, being well 
known and highly esteemed in the community. Mr. Hanks gave his political alle- 
giance to the republican party and was progressive and public-spirited in matters 
of citizenship, cooperating heartily in all measures which he deemed would be 
of benefit to the county or state. He served for a few years as justice of the 
peace in Post township and in Postville was a director of the District Fair Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Hanks was also a great lover of music and quite proficient in that 
art. He taught it in early times to the great benefit of the young people, never 
receiving any remuneration for his work, but teaching with a view of bringing 
something beautiful into their lives. 

He was about fifty-seven years of age at the time of his death which caused 
deep regret among his many friends who had learned to esteem him for his 
genuine personal worth and his sterling qualities of heart and character. Although 
he did not seek to figure prominently before the public, he came to be known 
throughout the community as an exemplary citizen, a faithful husband and a relia- 
ble and trustworthy business man. 



WIN FIELD S. WEBSTER. 

Energy, application and unremitting industry have been the watchwords of 
the career of Winfield S. Webster, who for many years has been identified with 
the insurance business in Postville and who is today numbered among the prom- 
inent, representative and deservedly successful business men of the community. 
He was born in Schoharie county, New York, June 15, 1842, and is a son of 
Daniel D. and Jane (Malick) Webster, also natives of that part of the Empire 
state. The father was born in 1806 and m early life turned his attention to 
merchandising, later abandoning this occupation in favor of farming. He uas 
a brigadier general in the New York State Militia and held the rank until 1851, 
when he left the state and moved west to Iowa, locating in the old town of 
Moneek, in Winneshiek county, where he purchased land which he developed 
and improved until he moved to Ossian. While on his first Iowa farm he hod 
also engaged in the insurance business and he now turned his attention entirely 
to that line of work, continuing in it until his death, which occurred May 10, 
1892. He had long survived his wife, who died September 16, 1876. They 
were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this review is the 
fifth in order of birth. 

Winfield S. Webster acquired his education in Moneek and in the grade 
schools of Waukon and after completing it remained at home with his parents 
until he was twenty-two years of age. He began his independent career as 
salesman for a history of the Civil war which was published at that time but 
after three months turned his attention to the insurance business, traveling as 
a special agent through northeastern Iowa, his territory covering a quarter of 
the entire state. He was thus occupied for two years and at the end of that 
time came to Postville, engaging in the insurance business for himself, a line 
of work in which he has been active since that time, building up a large and 
representative patronage which he has proved very successful in conducting 







&IL^ J. WZl^' 



'U^ 



PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 73 

He is in addition a dealer in real estate ; is a stockholder in the Clay Products 
Company; the Citizens I5ank, which he helped to organize; the local Canning 
Factory, and he owns valuable city property in Postville and extensive farming 
lands in the west. A spirit of enterprise and progress actuates him in all that 
he does and his unremitting industry, his unquestioned integrity and his known 
reliability have been salient elements in his success. 

Mr. Webster married on the 1st of January, 1874, Miss Ellen L Clark, a 
native of Rock county, Wisconsin, born September 30, 1847, and a daughter of 
Andrew and Laura (Bush) Clark. The father, who was a native of Bennington, 
Vermont, born January 5, 1807, spent his entire active life in farming. He went 
to Rock county, settling near Johnstown at an early date, and later moved to 
Albert Lea, Minnesota. Erom there he came to Castalia, Iowa, and there pur- 
chased a farm upon which he resided until within a few days previous to his 
death. His demise occurred January 12, 1890, in Postville, where he had gone 
to visit his daughter. He was well known in local affairs, having held some 
important township offices, and he was known as a representative of one of 
the oldest families in America, his father having been a soldier in the Continental 
army during the Revolutionary war. His wife, who was born in Sheridan, .\ew 
York, August 2, 1812, passed away in May, 1896. They became the parents 
of ten children, of whom Mrs. Webster is the eighth in order of birth. Four 
of their sons served in the Civil war and one was promoted to the rank of 
second lieutenant, dying, however, before he received his commission. Mr. and 
Mrs. Webster became the parents of three children : Roy Clark, who was born 
July 7, 1876, and who died December 3, 1885 ; Ruby W'., born December 17, 1877; 
and Arthur C, an electrician, who was born August 12, 1884, and who married on 
December 26, 1912, Miss Glessner Harris. 

Mr. Webster gives his political allegiance to the republican party but has 
never sought nor desired public office although he has served ably on the town 
council. He is well known in the Masonic order, having attained the thirty- 
second degree in that organization. He has resided for many years in Postville 
and he expects to spend the remainder of his days in the community, where he 
is honored as a man who has worked his way upward to success by upright and 
worthy means and who uses his prosperity not alone for his own benefit but for 
the best interests of the city at large. 



CASSIUS P. SMITH. 



A spirit of enterprise and progress actuates Cassius P. Smith in all that he 
does. He has worked diligently and persistently to develop and improve his farm, 
which is today an excellent property, lying partly in Allamakee and partly in 
Clayton counties. He was born in Clayton county, near National, on the 14th 
of January, 1866, and is a son of Benjamin and Abigail (Wilkinsj Smith, natives 
of Essex county, New York. The father came to Iowa in the early '50s and set- 
tled in Clayton county, where he entered government land, upon which he con- 
tinued to reside for a number of years. His marriage occurred here and he and 



74 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

his family afterward removed to I'ost township, Allamakee county, where his 
death occurred in 1887. His wife survived him many years, dying in 1907. 

The public schools of Clayton county and the Postville high school afforded 
Cassius P. Smith his educational oi)i3ortunities and when he was not occupied 
with his books he aided his father with the work of the homestead. After he 
had attained his majority he rented land in Post township and two years later 
purchased the farm upon which he now resides. His holdings comprise sixty 
acres in Post township, Allamakee county, and seventy-seven acres just across 
the line in Clayton county. However, his son operates the Clayton county farm 
in connection with his own projaerty. Air. Smith has made substantial improve- 
ments upon his land and engages in general farming and stock-raising, keeping 
cattle, hogs and horses. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store 
and the canning factory in Postville. and his business interests are carefully con- 
trolled, so that he has now reached a plane of affluence, being numbered among 
the substantial citizens of this community. ' 

On the 17th of January, 1888. Mr. Smith was imited in marriage to Miss 
Lticy A. Webb, who was born in Post tow^nship, a daughter of Henry Webb, of 
whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
are the parents of two children. The eldest. Leighton, was born in i88g and is 
now engaged in farming in Clayton county. His wife was, in her maidenhood, 
Miss Carrie Swenson. Esther was born in 1895 and is now attending school. 

Fraternally Mr. Smith is a member of P)rotherly Love Lodge. A. F. & A. M., 
of Postville, and is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
the Modern Brotherhood of America. He is independent in his political views, 
voting always in favor of progressive and constructive public measures. His 
entire life has been characterized by devotion to manly purposes and honorable 
principles and in business dealings he is straightforward and reliable, enjoying to 
the fullest extent the confidence and good-will of those who know him. 



\\ILLL\M H. EBENDORF. 

William H. Ebendorf, who for the past sixteen years has been one of the 
leading tailors in Waukon, is a native of Iowa, born in Clayton county, June 11, 
1873. He was reared and educated in his native section and after laying aside 
his books learned the tailor's trade at Elkader, later attending a cutting school in 
Chicago, where he finished the course, becoming a skilled and expert workman in 
this line. L'pon his graduation he returned to Iowa, settling in Elkader in 1896. 
He established himself in business there, but remained only one year, coming at 
the end of that time to Waukon, where he has since remained. His patronage 
increased rapidly as his fine workmanship and reasonable prices became more 
widely known and in 1907 Mr. Ebendorf was obliged to purchase his own l)usi- 
ness house, in which he today conducts a large and growing tailoring concern. 
In connection with this he does French dry cleaning and has secured a liberal 
patronage. 

Mr. Ebendorf married. January 25, 1898. Miss, Anna Beer, a native of 
Elkader, and they have three children. Lura May, Harry and Herbert. Mr. 



PAST A\n I'RI'.SI'.XT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 75 

Ebendorf is a member of the Masonic fraternity, holding memhershii) in tlie 
lodge and chapter, and he has held various important official positions in the 
organization. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and is serving as 
chancellor commander. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and in 
that organization served as national delegate to the convention held in Buffalo, 
New York, in June, 191 1, and to the Chicago convention held in January, 1912. 
He is prominent in local republican politics, being now in the third term of his 
able service as township trustee, his official life being distinguished by the same 
qualities of energy, enterprise and sterling integrity which form the basis of his 
successful business career. 



HENRY C. MEYER. 



One of the most active, progressive and successful farmers in the vicinity of 
Postville is Henry C. Meyer, who since 1901 has owned and operated a fine 
property of one hundred and thirty-eight acres, eighty rods beyond the corpora- 
tion limits. The land lies partly in Clayton and partly in Allamakee counties 
and is a well improved and valuable property, reflecting in its neat and attractive 
appearance the careful supervision and careful methods of the owner. 

Mr. Meyer is a native of Iowa, born in Fayette county, November 5, 1878, a 
son of William and Louisa (Meyer) Meyer, natives of Hanover, Germany. As 
a young man the father crossed the Atlantic to America and, coming immediately 
to Iowa, located at Guttenberg, Clayton county, where he worked at farming in 
the emplov of others for some time, later removing to Garnavillo in the same 
countv and then to National. He there married, and afterward farmed as a renter 
for a number of years, removing eventually to Fayette county and purchasing 
land. I'pon that farm he still resides and is active in its cultivation, being the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres, substantially improved and well equipped. 
He and his wife had nine children, two of whom died in infancy. The others are : 
Minnie, who married Fred H. Brandt, a farmer in Clayton county ; William A., a 
farmer near Castalia ; Caroline, the wife of John C. Weike, who is engaged in 
farming in Grand Meadows township, Clayton county; Henry C, of this review; 
Anna, who married Fred Kuhse. a farmer in Grand Meadows township, Clayton 
county : Charley, who resides with his parents ; and Bertha, who married Charles 
H. Schroeder, a resident of Fayette county. 

In the acc|uirement of an education Henry C. Meyer attended the old Hender- 
son Prairie school, named in honor of David B. Henderson, who was a jnipil 
there, and he supplemented this by four months in the German Lutheran school. 
Until he was twenty-two years of age he remained upon the homestead, assisting 
his father in its operation, but, March 21, 1901, he purchased land of his own, 
upon which he has resided since that time. He bought one hundred and thirty- 
eight acres, eighty rods beyond the corporation limits of Postville. the land lying 
in Clayton and Allamakee counties, and upon this he has steadily carried forward 
the work of improvement, erecting modern buildings and installing fine farm 
machincrv. Success has attended his well directed efforts in the cultivation of his 
land, for his methods are always practical and modern and, therefore, productive 



76 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of excellent results. The farm is today one of the finest in this part of the state 
and its owner is counted among Allamakee county's progressive and substantial 
agriculturists. He is a stockholder in the Postville Canning Company and in the 
Cooperative Creamery Company and his business interests are carefully managed 
and always profitable. 

On the 2ist of March, 1901, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Piertha Krambeer, who was born in Reed township, Clayton county, December 6, 
1881, a daughter of John and Ida (Harnack) Krambeer. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer 
became the parents of four children: Ethel, who was born January 12, 1902, 
and who, on the "th of January, 1910, was killed by a train on the railroad cross- 
ing near her home; Lawrence, born March 16, 1903; Hilda, born February 17, 
1905 ; and Amy, whose birth occurred on the 21st of November, 1909. 

Mr. Meyer is a member of the German Lutheran church and, politically, gives 
a general allegiance to the democratic party, voting independently, however, when 
he deems the best interests of the community require such action. He is not 
active as an office seeker, but is interested in school affairs and is at present acting 
as secretary of his school district. He is progressive and public-spirited, never 
withholding his ready and hearty cooperation from movements to promote the 
general advancement and development and, by his industrious and upright life, 
has made his name honored and respected in the community where he makes 
his home. 



AUGUST SCHULTZ. 



A life of hard and unremitting labor, guided at all times by a great deter- 
mination and persistency of purpose, has brought August Schultz to a position 
of prominence among the men who, for the past twenty years, have made sub- 
stantial contributions to the agricultural development and progress of Allamakee 
county. At eight years of age he was a hired laborer in his native country — 
Germany — and his childhood was filled with hardships and privations, while later, 
his life was filled with hard work and industrious striving after the success 
which he enjoys today. He owns two hundred acres of land near Postville, 
which by his practical and modern methods of development he has made a valua- 
ble and productive property worthy of comparison with the finest farms in this 
section of the state. 

Mr. Schultz was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, on the 28th of 
August, 1867, a son of Deitrich Schultz, who for many years was employed on a 
trading vessel on the river Elbe. He served his term of enlistment in the 
German army and never left his native country. 

At the early age of eight years August Schultz was hired out as a farm 
laborer, spending his summers at this work and attending school during the winter 
months. This continued until 1884 and, during that period, he became a practical 
and able farmer, learning the best agricultural methods and all the details of farm 
operation. In July, 1884, he left Germany and came to America, settling imme- 
diately in the vicinity of Postville, Iowa, where he secured employment as a farm 
hand, and being ignorant of the English language, he spent two winters in school 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 77 

in order to acc|uire it. During all of this time he saved money and by frugality 
and economy, accumulated enough to buy land. He purchased ninety acres in 
Post township, to which he later added forty acres, carrying forward its cultiva- 
tion along modern and progressive lines until it was one of the finest farms in 
that locality. He sold that property in 191 1 and bought his present farm of two 
hundred acres, a mile north of Postville, and this he has also substantially 
improved, erecting new buildings and installing the necessary farm equipment. 
Mr. Schultz is a practical farmer, having learned the details of farm operation 
through many years of hard work in the fields and the results are evident in the 
excellent condition of his property today. He is a large shareholder in the 
Cooperative Creamery Company and the Cooperative Mercantile Association of 
Postville and is known in the town and the vicinity as a reliable, resourceful and 
far-sighted business man. 

On the 25th of December, 1895, Mr. Schultz was united in marriage to Miss 
Dora Schultz, who, although she bore the same name, is no relative. She was 
born in Grand Meadows township, Clayton county, near Postville, August 14, 
1877, and is a daughter of William and Rieke (Moll) Schultz, natives of Ger- 
many. The parents came to America in 1870, locating first in Mauch Chunk, 
Pennsylvania, where the father engaged in railroad work. They moved later 
to Alabama and then to Iowa, settling in this state about the year 1S73. After 
several years of railroad work, William Schultz purchased a small farm in Clay- 
ton county, and from that time to the present has engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, success steadily attending his well directed labors. He and his wife became 
the parents of seven children, of w^hom the wife of subject of this review is the 
second in the order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. August Schultz have nine children : 
Velma, who was born March 13, 1897; Pjertha, April 8, 1898; Lawrence, Sep- 
tember 2, 1900: Roy, May i, 1902; Milda, April 14, 1903; Elmer, December i, 
1905; Harry, July 2, 1908; Kenneth, July i, 1910; and Gertrude, February 28, 
1912. 

Mr. Schultz is a member of the Lutheran church and fraternally is con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen of America. He gives his political allegiance 
to the democratic party. A resident of this locality for more than a quarter 
of a century, his many sterling qualities of mind and character have become widely 
known here and his honorable and upright life has commanded the respect 
and confidence of all with whom he has had business or social relations. 



PHILIP H. LETOURNEAU, M. D. 

Dr. Philii) H. Letourneau, ])racticing in Waukon along modern and scientific 
lines, is recognized as an able e.xponent of his profession and the liberal patronage 
accorded him is proof of the confidence reposed in him by the general public. 
He is a native of Illinois, born in Bourbonnais Grove, Kankakee county, April 20, 
i860, and is a son of Hon. George R. Letourneau, born in Canada, of French 
ancestry. George R. Letourneau came to the United States and settled in 
Illinois, where he was one of the pioneers in Kankakee county. In 1849 he 
crossed the plains by wagon train going to California, but at Fort Laramie was 



78 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

seized with typhoid fever and was obliged to remain there for six weeks, his 
partner and friend nursing him through his illness. Upon his' recovery they 
journeyed on horseback to the gold mines of California and for some time 
engaged in freighting from Sacramento to the gold fields, a distance of two 
hundred miles. Mr. Letourneau later turned his attention to mining and after 
three years returned to Illinois with about five thousand dollars in gold, which 
he invested in land near Kankakee. He purchased two hundred and forty acres 
and opened up a new farm, clearing and fencing the property and improving 
it with a fine residence, a barn and substantial outbuildings. He farmed 
there for a number of years, eventually selling his property at two hundred and 
fifty dollars per acre. During this time he also engaged in the grain business in 
Kankakee, building a large elevator, which he afterward sold. He was one of the 
prominent men of affairs in Kankakee county and left the impress of his work 
and personality upon its political history. He served for a number of years 
as supervisor and was afterward for two terms in the state senate during 
Governor Altgeld's administration. He made an honorable record in this and 
other official positions of trust and honor and was county treasurer of Kankakee 
county at the time of his death. His wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss 
Elodie Langlois, passed away in 1896, and was survived Ijy her husband until 
December, 1907. In their family were twelve children, six sons and six daugh- 
ters, of whom nine grew to maturity. 

Dr. Philip H. Letourneau was reared in Kankakee, Illinois, and acc|uired 
his preliminary education in the public schools of that section. After completing 
the high-school course he studied medicine in Northwestern University, grad- 
uating from the medical department with the class of 1881, when he was 
twenty-one years of age. He returned home and spent the following summer 
in Kankakee county, moving in the fall of that year to Chippewa Falls, where 
he opened an office and began the practice of his profession. He remained 
there for twelve years and secured a gratifying and lucrative patronage in 
recognition of his ability and the excellent results which attended his labors. 
For the last seven years of that time he was connected with St. Joseph's Hospital 
and for two years served as county coroner. When he left Chippewa Falls 
Dr. Letourneau moved to Dubuque, where he practiced his profession for one 
year, going at the end of that time to Lowden, Iowa, where for one year he 
managed the practice of one of the old physicians there. From Lowden he 
came to Waukon and in 1896 opened an office here, where he has since been 
an honored member of the medical fraternity. From the beginning he was 
accorded a liberal patronage, which has increased yearly, being now of gratifying 
proportions. Dr. Letourneau is an earnest and scientific student of the underlying 
principles of medicine and never considers his professional education complete, 
keeping in touch with the most advanced medical thought by taking post- 
graduate courses from time to time. He is an exhaustive reader along pro- 
fessional lines and in his practice his labors have been attended with excellent 
results viewed from both a financial and professional standpoint. He owns a 
good home in Waukon and valuable farming jirojierty near San Antonio, Texas, 
upon which Bermuda onions are extensively grown. 

Dr. Letourneau married, in 1897, Miss Angelia Dodge, who was born and 
reared in Wisconsin. Mrs. Letourneau is a member of the Waukon Methodist 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 79 

Episcopal church and well known in religious and social circles. The Doctor is 
interested in community affairs and is a public-spirited citizen, who has done 
effective work for the welfare of the community. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias. A student of the signs of the times, he keeps in touch with the 
trend of modern thought concerning matters of general interest as well as of 
professional advancement and has made a creditable record as a member of the 
medical fraternity. 



GEORGE ALBERT McCLINTOCK. 

Among* the residents of Post township who are numbered among the 
substantial farmers and representative citizens and who have achieved success 
and prosperity by their own exertions and persevering efforts, George Albert 
AlcClintock occupies a leading place. His industry and enterprise together 
with good management have enabled him to acquire one hundred and sixty-five 
acres of excellent land, which he has for many years past kept under cultivation 
and from which he has derived bountiful harvests. 

Mr. McClintock is numbered among Allamakee county's native sons, his 
birth having occurred in Ludlow township, February i8, 1872. He is a son of 
William and Ann (Cleverley) McClintock, the former a native of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, and the latter of New York state. The father, who spent his 
entire active life engaged in farming, came to Allamakee county at an early 
date and purchased land which he continued to develop and improve until he 
removed to Winneshiek county, where he passed away in September, 1871. His 
widow disposed of the farm in the following February and purchased land 
in Allamakee county, but this she has also sold and now makes her home with 
her daughter Bertha, the wife of Mortimer Deering of Post township. She 
is the mother of four children, of whom the subject of this review is the 
youngest. By a former marriage William McClintock had one son, Joseph, 
who resides at Northwood, Worth county, Iowa. 

George Albert McClintock accjuired his education in White schoolhouse 
No. 8, Post township, and in Evergreen school, which he attended for one 
winter. He began his independent career at the age of fourteen, working as a 
farm laborer and receiving at first only seven dollars a month for his services. 
When he was twenty-one he turned his attention to other pursuits, driving the 
stage between Waukon and Postville for a period of three years and a half 
thereafter. At the end of that time he formed a partnership with his brother 
and together they rented a farm near Fort Atkinson, Winneshiek county, which 
developed and improved for two years. George Albert McClintock then removed 
into Post township and here purchased one hundred and sixty-five acres of 
land about a mile and a quarter beyond Postville. a property which he has since 
operated. He engages in general farming and gives particular attention to 
stock-raising, breeding high-grade shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. 
His farm is capably and carefully managed for he is a practical agriculturist, 
following always the most modern methods and reaping his reward in the neat 
and attractive appearance of his place and the profitable income he derives 



80 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

therefrom. He is a stockholder in the Postville Canning Factory and is well 
known to the business men of that city. 

Mr. McClintock has been twice married. On the 13th of February, 1898, he 
wedded Miss Mary B. Swenson, who was born in Post township, in April, 1872. 
She was a daughter of Jerdon and Alary (Gilbertson) Swenson, natives of 
Norway. The father crossed the Atlantic in early manhood and settled in Iowa, 
wJiere at first he worked at farming in the employ of others, later becoming a pros- 
perous landowner. He now resides retired at Clermont, Fayette county. Mr. 
McClintock's first wife died February 18, 1910, leaving one child, Fernie, who 
was born in January, 1899. Air. AlcClintock was married on the 28th of August, 
191 2, to Mrs. Efifie (Belcher) Banks, a daughter of John Belcher, who was 
born in Illinois and came from that state to Story county, Iowa, where he is 
still engaged in farming. In February, 1898, jMrs. AlcClintock had wedded 
James Banks, a native of Iowa, and by their union were born three children : 
Horner, Ross and Charles, who make their home with their mother and 
stepfather. 

Air. AlcClintock gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
fraternally is affiliated with the Alodern Brotherhood of America. He is a fine 
type of the self-made man and, always evidencing a willingness to work and 
ambition to succeed, he has, step by step, made his way upward in the world 
until he has risen to a position where he is numbered among Allamakee county's 
substantial farmers and most highly respected citizens. 



HON. DANIEL HAMPTON BOWEN.* 

One of the most powerful and virile forces in republican politics in the state 
of Iowa, one of the most able and successful physicians and surgeons in Allamakee 
county and one of the biggest, most broad-minded and most generally beloved men 
of Waukon is, beyond all question. Dr. Daniel Hampton Bowen, who for more 
than a third of a century has give of his best energies, powers and talents towards 
the promotion of state and municipal development along professional, political, 
social and fraternal lines. His success and prominence are only the natural reward 
of his many years of earnest and well directed labor. 

Dr. Bowen was born on a farm near Decatur, Green county, Wisconsin, Sep- 
tember 6, 1850, and is a son of Jared Ingersoll and Lacy Ann (Fleek) Bowen, 
the former of Welsh and Scotch-Irish descent and the latter of Dutch ancestry. 
The paternal branch of this family has been in America for many generations, 
its representatives having crossed the Atlantic long before the Revolutionary 
war. The father was born in Pennsylvania just across the \'irginia line and in 
his youth learned the carpenter's trade which, however, he followed only a short 
time, most of his life having been spent in farming. He came west in 1844, 
settling in that year in Wisconsin where the remainder of his life was passed. 
His wife, still active and hearty at the age of eighty-nine, makes her home at 
Brodhead in that state. 



* The sketch uf Ur. Bowen was prepared by a friend. 




I)l;. DAMKl. II IKiWKX 



1 FUBl'- 



l=lTC.R: '-^ 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 83 

Dr. P.owen spent his childhood on his father's Wisconsin farm and his youth 
was passed amid such conditions as usually fall to the lot of the farmer's boy. 
In the winters he attended district school and in the summer months assisted 
with the work of the homestead, alternating in this way until he grew to manhood. 
He was ten years of age at the outbreak of the Civil war but was not too young 
to have some understanding of the important issues involved, which formed his 
political belief, in future life. After completing the course in the public schools 
he turned his attention to teaching, following this occupation for several terms. 
At the end of that time he took up the study of medicine under the tutorage 
of Dr. R. Broughton, to whose able teaching he owes much of his professional 
success. Three years in the physician's office were followed by a course at Rush 
Medical College in Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1876 with the 
degree of M. D. Coming west in search of a suitable professional opening he 
settled at Rossville, Allamakee county. From the beginning he met with a 
gratifying degree of success, building up a large and lucrative practice and 
becoming well known as an able physician and surgeon. He remained in Ross- 
ville until 1880 when he moved to Waukon where through many honorable and 
worthy years, filled with useful achievements along professional and public lines, 
he has since made his home. In the beginning he practiced in partnership with 
Dr. Mattoon but since their association was discontinued has been alone. He is 
numbered among the pioneer physicians of Allamakee county, having taken up 
his residence here long before the railroad reached Waukon and in his practice 
has had the varied experience which commonly falls to the lot of the country 
practitioner. Dr. Bowen has been honored by his professional brethren in many 
ways. He served as president of the Alumni Association of Rush Medical 
College and also was president of the Allamakee County Medical Society. He is 
at present a trustee of the Iowa State Medical Society and an alternate delegate 
to the American Medical Association from the state society. The Doctor was 
honored by appointment of Governor Shaw to represent Iowa at the international 
congress of tuberculosis held at London, England, in 1901. 

Although he has attained such distinction in professional circles it is not alone 
along this line that Dr. Bowen has done good work for Allamakee county and 
for Iowa, for since taking up his residence he has been one of the greatest' indi- 
vidual forces in local republican politics, his activities touching and affecting 
the political growth of the state. In Waukon he has held many offices of trust 
and honor, having served as alderman and mayor of the city and as a member of 
the school board, holding the latter position for twenty years. In 1878 he 
served as county coroner, doing able and efficient work for two terms. His 
brilliant legislative career began with his election to the twenty-sixth general 
assembly and he served with credit through this session and during the special 
session held for the purpose of revising the code of Iowa. At this time he was 
chairman of the committee on public health and as such was responsible for the 
amending and codifying of that portion of the laws of the state dealing with ques- 
tions of health and safety. So well did he accomplish this important work that 
but few changes, and those minor ones, have been made since that time. In 
recognition of the importance of his services and their effectiveness in promoting 
the best interests of the state, Dr. Bowen was reelected to the legislature at the 
end of his first term and in the twenty-seventh assembly was again made chair- 



Vol. n— 5 



84 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

man of the committee on public health, displaying in the discharge of his duties 
an integrity, political ability and high conscientiousness which constantly deep- 
ened his popularity and gained him a place in the ranks of Iowa's statesmen. 
Upon his reelection to the twenty-eighth general assembly he was one of the 
republican candidates for the office of speaker of the house, his opponents being 
such distinguished lowans as Hon. ^L L. Temple, Colonel W. G. Dows, Hon. 
Mahlon Head and Senator W. L. Eaton. A spirited contest ended with the 
member from Allamakee county the winner and it is said of him that no more 
broad-minded, just and liberal man ever held the gavel in the Iowa house of 
representatives. Always a stanch and loyal republican and popular with the 
rank and file of the party, Dr. Bowen became a candidate for the office of 
alternate at large to the national convention of 1904 and was elected. He was 
elected in 1908 presidential elector from the fourth district by a majority of 
twenty-five although the opposing faction carried the district by a majority of 
four thousand. Thus it will be seen that during the years he has made his 
home in Iowa Dr. Bowen has been prominent in the councils of his party and 
has become a well known figure at state and district conventions — a man held 
in high honor by reason of his personal integrity, his public standards, his am- 
bitions and ideals and by reason also of the usefulness and benefit of his public 

service. 

Dr. Bowen married in Albany, Wisconsin, in February, 1877, Miss Hettie E. 
Burns, who has proven a worthy helpmate to him on his journey through life, 
sharing in all his successes, joys and sorrows. They have two children. The 
eldest, a son, Albert Sidney Bowen was born in Rossville, July 28, 1879, and 
after completing the course in the public schools of Waukon attended the State 
University at Iowa City. He afterward studied medicine at Northwestern Uni- 
versity, Chicago, and then spent three years as a partner with his father in the 
practice of his profession. He then took the civil service examination, passing 
with great credit, and was assigned to hospital service at Colon, Panama. After 
two years in this service he took examination for entrance into the regular army 
as a surgeon and was sent by the government to Washington, D. C. where he 
entered the army medical school, later receiving his appointment as army surgeon. 
He has served at Fort Snelling, at Fort Sam Houston and is now in the foreign 
service in the Philippines with the rank of captain. 

The other child born to Dr. and Mrs. Bowen is a daughter, Mary Charlotte, 
and she has had a no less successful career than has her brother. She was born 
in Waukon, August 14, 1885, and acquired her education in the city schools, later 
teaching for a time in the public schools of Worth county. She afterward 
attended the State University where her splendid work won for her not only the 
degree of B. A. but also a scholarship providing for a year's post-graduate work 
at the end of which she received her Alaster of Arts degree. A special course 
in normal training completed her preparation and she is now employed as a 
teacher of German and English in the State Normal School at Bellingham, Wash- 
ington. In his children Dr. Bowen renews his youth, which indeed he has never 
lost, and he rejoices in their success more than in his own. 

Dr. Bowen has also taken an active part in the work of two great fraternities, 
the Masons and the Knights of Pythias, in which he has held the highest offices 
within the gift of the local lodges, representing them with credit and ability in 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 85 

their state conventions. He is widely known and very popular in the sections 
where he is known and most of all where he is best known. Many friends who 
love and honor him have grown to depend upon his wisdom and kindly counsel, 
and their opinion combines with that of the state at large that he is one of the 
most substantial and loyal-hearted men that Allamakee county has ever known. 



AUGUST H. MEYER. 



August H. Meyer, who for many years has been influentially associated with 
farming and stock-raising interests in the vicinity of Postville, owning today a 
fine farm of two hundred and twenty-six acres, is a native of Iowa, born in 
Clayton county, September 2, i860. He is a son of Henry and Dora (Kluss) 
Meyer, both of whom were born in Mecklenburg, Germany, the former Febru- 
ary 14, 1824, and the latter January 16 of the same year. The father worked as 
a farm laborer in early years, crossing the Atlantic about the year 1854. He 
located in Clayton county, Iowa, and purchased land near Giittenberg. which, 
however, he later sold, removing to Post township, Allamakee county. Ke after- 
ward made his home in Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, where he 
resided upon rented land until his death in February, 1886. His v/ife survives 
hmi and makes her home in F'ost township. To them were born two children : 
Lena, who married Charles Thies, of Clayton county; and August H., of this 



review. 



In the acquirement of an education August H. Meyer attended district 
school in Clayton county and the public schools of Guttenberg and from his 
childhood aided in the operation of the homestead, becoming familiar with the 
best agricultural methods. When he was twenty-one he hired out as a farm 
hand, continuing thus for four years, after which he rented land in Clayton 
county, one mile south of Postville. Afterward, however, he removed to Alla- 
makee county, buying the farm he now owns, and since that time he has given 
practically all of his attention to its improvement and cultivation until it is now 
one of the finest agricultural properties in the locality. It comprises two hundred 
and twenty-six acres of land, under a high state of cultivation, equipped with 
an excellent barn and substantial outbuildings and with modern labor-saving 
machinery. Mr. Meyer engages in general farming and is also extensively 
interested in stock-raising, keeping over one hundred head of sheep and also 
cattle, hogs and horses. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Shipping Company 
and in the Postville Canning Company. 

On the 28th of September, 1886, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Krambeer, who was born in Germany on the 6th of April, 1863. a 
sister of John Krambeer, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have become the parents of five children : Amanda, 
who was born in 1887, and is now the wife of Henry Kruse, of Monona 
township. Clayton county; Gustav, a farmer in South Dakota, who was born 
in 1888, and married Miss Elsie Fisher; Bennie, who was born October 26, 
1891; Ervin, born February 21, 1893; and Walter, January 26, 1897. 



86 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Meyer is a member of the Lutheran church at Luana and he gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party. He is interested in the growth of 
the community, especially in the cause of education, which he has aided in pro- 
moting through his two terms of service as a director of the school board. 
His life has been such as to give him high standing in the eyes of the com- 
munity and he is generally recognized as a man whose long years of active 
labor in Post township have not only contributed to his own prosperity but have 
also been of great value to the community at large. 



OTTO P. MARTIN. 



Otto P. Martin, well known in business circles of W'aukon as a member of 
the firm of Martin & Sons, proprietors of a well appointed furniture and under- 
taking establishment, is a native son of the city, born July 20, 1878. His grand- 
father, Walter Martin, was born in Prussia and in that country grew to man- 
hood and married. With his family, including his son, Henry Martin, father 
of the subject of this review, he came to America in 1855 and located in She- 
boygan, Wisconsin, where his death occurred. Henry Martin was born in 
Prussia in 1850 and was only five years of age when he accompanied his parents 
across the Atlantic. He remained in Wisconsin until he was sixteen years of 
age and then came to Iowa, spending a number of years thereafter upon a farm. 
Returning to Wisconsin he learned the carpentering trade and worked for two 
years as a journeyman carpenter, coming at the end of that time to Iowa and 
locating in Harpers Ferry, where he established himself in the furniture business. 
After a few years he disposed of his interests there and moved to Waukon, 
where he rented a business house and established a furniture concern. His 
business prospered exceedingly and he was soon able to purchase land and build 
his own substantial and commodious store, two stories of which are occupied 
by a well selected stock carried by Martin & Sons. In 1873 Henry Martin 
married Miss Sophia Bieber, a native of Germany, who passed away leaving 
two children: Otto P., of this review: and Hulda, the wife of Paul Dannenburg, 
of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. After the death of his first wife Mr. Martin married 
Miss Barbara Sandry, a native of Germany, and to their union were born three 
children: IMarguerita, who lives at home: and Wayne H. and J. Willard, both 
of whom are associated with their father in the conduct of the store. 

Otto P. Martin was reared in Waukon and acquired his education in the 
city schools. He practically grew up in his father's store and mastered the 
business in principle and detail. Since he was eighteen years of age he has 
shared the responsibility of the conduct of the establishment and in 1899 was 
made a partner with his father. Wishing to establish an undertakmg depart- 
ment in connection with the furniture concern, he went to Chicago, where he 
attended a course of lectures, later going to Des Moines to further pursue his 
studies. He was a member of the first class in embalming in the state of Iowa 
and in 1900 passed his examination and received a license as an undertaker 
and funeral director. He has now been engaged in this line of work for twelve 
years and has proved himself thoroughly qualified for the business. Martin & 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 87 

Sons keep a well selected line of funeral goods and their parlors are well equipped 
in every particular. They have two hearses and carry a fine line of caskets 
and funeral supplies, a liberal patronage having been accorded them in recogni- 
tion of their reasonable prices and straighforward business dealings. 

On January 20, 1904, Mr. Martin was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
Hausmeier, a native of Waukon, and they have two children, Ralph H. and 
Howard F. Mr. Martin is a member of the Knights of Pythias and both he and 
his wife belong to the German Reformed church and are held in high regard 
by all who know them. 



SANDER O. SWENSON. 

One of the substantial, prosperous and deservedly successful farmers of Post 
township is Sander O. Swenson, who owns and operates a fine property of two 
hundred and sixty acres of land, upon a portion of which he was born March 
-5- 1875. He is a son of John and Oline Swenson, natives of Norway, both 
born in the vicinity of Christiania, the former on the 13th of February, 1845, 
and the latter on the 23d of July, 1844. Their marriage occurred in Norway 
in 1868 and they afterward came to America, settling first in Franklin town- 
ship, Allamakee county. They later removed to Post township and here the 
father purchased land, buying one hundred and eighteen acres, upon which he 
carried forward the work of improvement and development until his death, 
which occurred on the ist of December, 1891. 

Sander O. Swenson acquired his education in the Highland district school, 
which he attended until he was thirteen years of age. He was still very young 
when his father died but he afterward assumed the entire management of the 
farm, which he has continued to further improve and develop since that time. 
He has added to the improvements made by his father, erecting a number of 
modern buildings, installing a windmill and equipping the property with all the 
necessary labor-saving machinery. In addition to the work of the fields he en- 
gages extensively in stock-raising and this has come to be one of the most import- 
ant sources of his income. He is a practical, modern and able farmer, and his 
labors through the years have been crowned by success, his farm being today 
one of the finest agricultural properties in this part of Iowa. 

On the i8th of October, 1898, Mr. Swenson was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora A. McGhee, who was born in Franklin township, near Hardin, November 
TO, 1876, a daughter of Lucius and Ruth (Eaton) McGhee, the former a native 
of Ohio, born July 17, 1852, and the latter of Iowa, born February 17, 1849. 
Throughout his entire active life the father engaged in farming, becoming one 
of the largest landowners in Franklin township and continuing to manage his 
property there until his retirement. Mr. and Airs. Swenson have four children: 
Lloyd Lucius, whose birth occurred on the 12th of March, 1900; Harlin Willard, 
born July 26, 1903: Ruth May, born November 9, 1904; and Alice Lenora, born 
March 28, 1908. 

Mr. Swenson is a member of the I'nited lirethren church and fraternally is 
connected with the Yeomen. He gives his political allegiance to the republican 



88 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

party but has never sought office, preferring to concentrate his attention upon 
the conduct of his farm. He is one of the most successful and capable business 
men and substantial farmers of the locality and is a native son of whom Post 
township has every reason to be proud. 



■ THURE T. ERICSON. 

Thure T. Ericson, who is now in the tenth year of his able service as justice 
of the peace in Waukon, was born in Sweden, April 2. 1862. He is a son of C. 
J. Ericson, also a native of Sweden, who grew to manhood there and married, 
his wife having been in her maidenhood Miss Wilhelmina Charlotte Mattsson. 
They came to America in 1867 and in June of the same year settled in Center 
township, Allamakee county, where the father purchased a small farm and 
turned his attention to agricultural jiursuits. From time to time he bought more 
land and added it to his original holdings until he owned five hundred acres 
well improved and developed. Upon that property he raised his family and 
there died July 3, 1908. His wife survives him. 

Thure T. Ericson was reared upon his father's farm and in his childhood 
aided in its operation. He acquired his preliminary education in the public 
schools of the section and supplemented this by a course in a commercial school 
and one term under Professor Loughran. After laying aside his books he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits upon the homestead for some time, 
afterward going to LaCrosse, where he secured emjiloyment in the lumber mills. 
While on the farm he gave a great deal of his time to the manufacture of sorghum 
and during one fall made over four thousand gallons. He spent only two sum- 
mers in the lumber mills and was afterward for ten years manager of a farm 
belonging to Dr. W. C. Earle. This property comjirised two hundred acres and 
was conducted as a dairy farm, being ecjuipped with all modern, sanitary and 
labor-saving machinery. There was a cream separator and a large churn. The 
output was from one hundred to two hundred pints of cream into butter each 
week. He made an exhibit of his dairy products at the county fair and took 
first premium on butter. 

Mr. Ericson moved into \\'aukon in 1902 and at first turned his attention 
to the real-estate business, buying and selling town pro]ierty and Dakota, Iowa 
and Minnesota lands. In the fall of the same year, however, he was elected 
justice of the peace and has been reelected each succeeding term for ten years, 
discharging his duties in an able, conscientious and far-sighted way. He still 
deals to some e.xtent in real estate and owns his own residence on Pleasant 
street which is comfortable and attractive in every particular. 

Mr. Ericson married in Center township, March 16, 1892, Miss Hannah 
Swenson. a native of Allamakee county and of Swedish |)arentage, her father, 
P. J. Swenson, having been born in that country and having come as a ])ioneer 
to .Allamakee county. Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are members of the Piaptist church 
of Waukon and are well known in religious and social circles of the city. Mr. 
Ericson is a musician of great talent and ability and is entirely self-educated in 
this art. having studied it bv himself after he reached maturitv. He has been 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 89 

identified with several bands which were well known in this section of the 
state and for years was a member of a cornet Ijand. He was for three years 
with the band connected with the Fifty-third Regiment of Iowa and was the 
organizer of the Center Band, of which he was the director for nine years. This 
was composed of from twelve to sixteen musicians. Politically Mr. Ericson gives 
his allegiance to the republican party and is intelligently interested in public 
afifairs, although not a politician in the sense of office seeking. Having lived in 
this section since his childhood, he is widely and favorably known here, and in 
the course of an honorable and upright life has gained the respect and esteem of 
all who are associated with him. 



FRED H. STOPPERAN. 

Among the younger generation who are making their mark in agricultural 
circles of Allamakee county is numbered Fred H. Stopperan, who was born in 
Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, Iowa, January 23, 1879, and who 
is now conducting an excellent farm near Postville. He is a son of Carl and 
Elizabeth (Schroeder) Stopperan, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, the former 
born in 1835 and the latter in 1845. The father crossed the Atlantic about the 
year i860 and located in Pennsylvania, where for some time he worked as a 
deck hand on a boat. He later came to Iowa, settling in Grand Meadow town- 
ship, Clayton county, where he rented land, which he developed and improved 
for four years, later purchasing a farm. He bought at that time one hundred 
and twenty acres and upon it he continued to reside until 1903, when he retired 
from active life and removed into Postville, where he died about three months 
afterward. His wife survives him and makes her home in that city. They were 
the parents of ten children, of whom eight are yet living, the subject of this 
review being the seventh in the order of birth. 

Fred H. Stopperan acc|uired his education in district school No. 7, Grand 
Meadow township, and in his childhood divided his time between his books and 
work upon his father's farm. He remained in Clayton county until he was 
twenty-two years of age and then went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he spent 
one summer in the employ of others. Returning to Postville, he secured a 
position as driver of an ice wagon for Mr. Buecher, for whom he continued to 
work for three years, resigning his position in order to learn the cement and 
mason's trade. Ai this he became very proficient and he continued to give his 
entire time to it for five years, after which he turned his attention to farming, 
purchasing ninety-seven acres of land, which he now owns. His farm is highly 
improved, being provided with a fine barn and the necessary outbuildings, to- 
gether with adequate labor-saving machinery. In addition to tilling the fields 
he also pays considerable attention to stock-raising and keeps on hand a number 
of fine cattle and hogs, which he feeds for the market. His fields are very 
productive and the excellent condition and attractive appearance of the entire 
farm is an evidence of the careful supervision and practical labor he has ex- 
pended upon it. He is a shareholder in the Farmers Mercantile Association at 



90 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Postville and is well known in the city as a reliable and straightforward busi 
ness man. 

Mr. Stopperan was married on the 17th of March, 1910, to Miss Lena 
Brockmeyer, who was born in Westphalia, Germany, April 8, 1888, a daughter 
of Carl and Henrietta (Lampa) Brockmeyer, also natives of that part of Ger- 
many, the former born January 28, 1843, and the latter February 13, 1849. The 
father was a butcher, a farmer and a weaver in his native country but after 
he came to America in 1896 he gave his entire attention to agricultural pursuits, 
purchasing a farm in Fayette county, Iowa, and later moving to Post township, 
Allamakee county, where he and his wife now reside. They are the parents of 
five children, of whom the wife of the subject of this review is the youngest. 

Mr. Stopperan is a member of the German Lutheran church and politically 
gives his allegiance to the republican party, serving at present as school director. 
He is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen of America and is well known in local fraternal circles. He inherited 
the industry and integrity of his German ancestry and aside from being num- 
bered among the substantial farmers of the community he is also acknowledged 
to be one of the representative citizens of his township. 



EVAN SWENSON. 



An unflagging purpose, strength of character, industry and perseverance, 
combined with, a firm determination to achieve an honorable destiny, have 
actuated Evan Swenson in all the activities of his varied and eventful career and 
have brought him such substantial and well merited success that today no history 
of the agricultural development of Allamakee county would be complete without 
the record of his life. Starting at the bottom of the ladder, penniless, friendless 
and in a strange country, he has steadily worked his way upward to prosperity, 
constantly overcoming almost overwhelming obstacles and difficulties and stand- 
ing today among the substantial and representative farmers and able business 
men in the vicinity of Postville, where he makes his home. 

He was born near Christiania, Norway, on the 20th of June, 1849, and is a 
son of Swen and Maria (Olson) Swenson, also natives of that country. The 
father was a tailor by trade and also cultivated a small tract of land in Norway 
and, although he was crippled from the time he was one year old by the loss of 
an arm, was a man of remarkable strength and accumulated a comfortable com- 
petency. The mother passed away in 1863 and in 1871 the father came to 
America, locating near Postville, Iowa, on a farm in Post township, where he died 
in 1898. He had a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this review 
is the youngest. 

Evan Swenson attended school for a short time in Norway but his advantages 
along this line were limited, for at the early age of fourteen he began working as 
a farm laborer, and the independence and self-reliance thus developed in him 
remain important elements in his character at the present time. For a while he 
received eight cents per day for hard work in the fields, his wages never going 









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PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 93 

above ten cents a day, and after two years he was hired out to a farmer for a 
period of eighteen months, receiving at the end of that time six dollars in money 
and a suit of homespun clothes. Afterward he spent a similar period working 
by the day and then rented a small piece of land, which he operated for one 
season, giving all of the proceeds of the farm in payment for six months' rent. 
His crop of hay he did not harvest, selling it all at public auction. The season 
of 1867 was late and Mr. Swenson did not get in his crops until the 7th of June 
and when harvested he realized for his summer's work only sixteen dollars. In 
view of these conditions and the hardships which surrounded his life in Norway 
he determined to leave the country and, having spent all of the money he had 
made in the summer for living expenses during the winter, he borrowed in the 
spring of 1868 enough to purchase a ticket to Quebec, Canada. He left Norway 
with enough food to live on during the ocean journey and with a little over one 
dollar and twenty-five cents in money and he landed in Quebec on the 20th of 
June, 1868, on his nineteenth birthday, without one cent in his pocket. Mr. 
Swenson was unfamiliar with the English language but borrowing ten dollars, 
he managed to make his way west to Chicago, the journey consuming ten days, 
and there met a cousin, who loaned him five dollars and gave him his supper. 
From Chicago he pushed on to Madison, Wisconsin, where he borrowed seventy- 
five cents to take him to Black Earth, and from that point he walked twenty 
miles to Perry township, Dane county, where he hired out to a farmer for 
twenty-five dollars a month. After two months he received eighteen dollars a 
month until the winter time and he then continued with his former employer, 
working for his board and lodgings. During the next season he again received 
eighteen dollars a month and he continued to hold this position until November i, 
1869, when he came to Iowa, having with the exception of a short time since 
remained a valued resident of this state. He located in Postville but in the fall of 
the same year went to McGregor, where he obtained a position chopping cord 
wood on what is called Bloody Run for Mr. Lonsburg. After three weeks at 
this work he returned to Postville and made his home with the family who were 
operating Judge W'illiams' farm in Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, 
remaining there until the spring, when he became a hired laborer in the employ 
of Duncan AIcDonnell, for whom he worked for two months. In April of the 
same year he returned to Judge Williams' property, working upon it for one 
year thereafter at twenty dollars per month, and at the end of that time he re- 
entered Mr. McDonnell's employ, remaining with him for six months. After 
spending another period on Judge Williams' farm Mr. Swenson purchased a 
yoke of oxen and went with it to Rock county, Minnesota, where he took up a 
homestead claim two and a half miles from the county seat. It was a raw and 
unimproved tract and Mr. Swensdn broke two acres of the soil, dug a well and 
erected a sod shanty. He, however, did not continue the development of this 
farm but after a month sold his outfit, gave up his title to the land and walked 
to Worthington, whence he took the railroad to Mankato and came from there 
to Postville. In the following fall he took charge of Judge Williams' farm, 
then comprising twenty-three hundred acres, one of the largest agricultural 
properties in this section of the country. He continued to superintend this place 
for two years, earning during that time forty dollars per month, the highest 
salary he had yet received. He married in 1875 and afterward rented Mr. 



94 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

McDonnell's farm of five hundred acres for two years and at the end of that 
time realized a long cherished ambition, buying one hundred and twenty acres 
for fourteen dollars an acre. He cleared it of scrub and timber and with char- 
acteristic energy and ability carried forward the work of its development and 
improvement for nineteen years, selling it at the end of that time for fifty-three 
dollars per acre. He afterward bought a farm two miles north of Postville, then 
known as the Perry farm, paying for it sixty dollars per acre and selling it after 
a three years' residence at a profit of ten dollars per acre. When he disposed of 
this property he bought a farm near the Bethel church, the property being known 
as the J. M. Harris farm, and he paid for this sixty dollars per acre. Upon this 
property he has since resided, his holdings now comprising two hundred and eight 
acres, and by his careful management, practical methods and unremitting industry 
he has made it one of the finest farms in this part of Iowa, his success following 
many years of earnest and well directed labor. L'pon his farm he has made 
substantial improvements in buildings and equipment and has the entire tract 
under a high state of cultivation. His attention is given for the most part, 
however, to his stock-raising interests, which are extensive and important, his 
high grade shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs commanding high prices and 
a ready sale upon the market. Mr. Swenson is connected with the Cooperative 
Creamery Company of Postville and is a stockholder in the Citizens State Bank, 
and his ability is widely recognized in business and financial circles. 

C)n the 6th of February, 1875, Mr. Swenson was united in marriage to Aliss 
Eliza McWilliams, who was born near Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 6th of 
December, 1856, a daughter of Nathaniel and Isabel McWilliams. Mr. and Mrs. 
Swenson became the parents of twelve children : Arthur W., who is operating 
three hundred and fifty-eight acres of land in Franklin township; Maria, wife of 
Arthur A. Dresser, a farmer in Post township; John F., who resides near Frank- 
ville, Winneshiek county ; Harry S., engaged in farming in North Yakima, Wash- 
ington ; Katie, who married Jerome Van Allen, a mail carrier in Chicago ; Amy, 
the wife of Chester B. Davenport, now a resident of Roseville, Illinois, and for- 
merly teller of the First National Bank in Lincoln, Nebraska ; Frank L., a 
soldier in the regular army, stationed at San Francisco, California ; Alma, 
formerly engaged in teaching, who resides at home ; Hall L., who is attending 
the Postville high school: Allison E., a student in the same institution; and Ethel 
and Lillian, who are also attending school. 

Fraternally Mr. Swenson is affiliated with the Masonic order, holding member- 
ship in Brotherly Love Lodge, No. 304. He has been a member of the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen since 1875 and of the Modern Woodmen of America 
for the past seventeen years. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and he has always been interested and active in public afl:"airs, rendering his 
township and county able service in various capacities. He was for thirty years 
a justice of the peace and has done a great deal of far-reaching and beneficial 
work on the school board, having served as president and director of that body 
and now as treasurer. He is one of the most prominent, representative and 
successful men of this part of Iowa, where he lias resided since pioneer times 
and to the development and upbuilding of which he has made such tangible and 
substantial contributions. His life furnishes splendid examples of the value of 
industry, determination and honoraljle purpose in the achievement of success, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 95 

for by his own unaided exertions he has readied the goal of prosperity, his 
success and the methods by which it was attained having gained him a high place 
in the confidence and esteem of all who know him. 



JOHN BARTON JONES. 

John Barton Jones needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for 
he is well known in Waukon and Allamakee county, where he has resided since 
1875. He is one of the active business men and public-spirited citizens of the 
community, where for a number of years he has been in the grain and coal 
business, winning in the conduct of his affairs that success which always follows 
earnest and persistent labor. 

John Barton Jones was born in Newport, England, of English and Welsh 
parentage, and was left an orphan when he was four years of age. At the age 
of eighteen years a friend of the family from Wisconsin visited England and 
persuaded him to come to America and he accordingly crossed the Atlantic, ac- 
companying his friend to the vicinity of Bloomington, Wisconsin, where he 
worked upon the farm. He subsequently clerked for a short time in a store, 
continuing at that occupation until 1875, when he left Wisconsin and moved 
westward seeking a favorable locality to make a permanent location. However, 
not liking the country, he began his return journey to Wisconsin, but on his 
way east arrived in Waukon. He was at that time obliged to work at anything 
which would bring him an income. He secured a position as a member of the 
construction department of the narrow gauge railroad then being built into 
Waukon and he later worked with Mr. Hale on the surveys, aiding also in im- 
portant bridge construction work. He continued in this line of employment until 
the spring of 1876, when he joined C. O. Howard and George Stoddard in the 
building of an elevator in the city. After the completion of this building he 
took charge of Mr. Howard's grain business and from 1880 until 1890 worked 
ably in his interests. In the latter year he resigned in order to enter the county 
auditor's office and after serving one term was reelected, acting as auditor for 
four consecutive years. After leaving the office he formed a partnership with 
M. W. Eaton and they purchased the elevator known as elevator No. i in 
Waukon, }.Ir. Jones taking charge of the grain and elevator business. The firm 
also deals extensively in coal and building material and has secured an exten- 
sive patronage. Much of the credit for the expansion of the business is due to 
Mr. Jones' energy and enter])rise and he is known in Waukon as a resourceful, 
far-sighted and progressive business man, whose judgment is seldom if ever at 
fault. 

Mr. Jones married, in Waukon, Miss Ada J. Goodrich, who was born and 
reared in Allamakee county. Her father, Lyman W. Goodrich, was one of the 
pioneers in this section of Iowa, having located here in 1852. He was a native 
of New York, born in Chautauqua county in 1824, and in his early youth moved 
with his parents to Illinois, residing in Cook and later in Kane county. He 
married, in 1850, Miss Julia Merrian, a native of Canada, and after his mar- 
riage turned his attention to farming, coming in 1852 to Allamakee county. 



96 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAAIAKEE COUNTY 

where he resided until his death. Mr. and Mrs. Tones became the parents of 
three children: Alfred G., who makes his home in North Dakota; Stella F., who 
is a teacher in the public schools in IMontana ; and Lyman B., who died at the 
age of five years. Mrs. Jones is a member of the Presbyterian church of 
Waukon. 

In politics Mr. Jones is a stanch republican and has supported the party 
since casting his first vote. Aside from his service as county auditor he has 
also done able work on the board of township trustees and is progressive and 
public-spirited in matters of citizenship. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Knights of Pythias in Waukon and his religious views are in accord with the 
doctrines of the Episcopal church. He is numbered among the successful and 
prominent men of Waukon and his prosperity is the more creditable to him 
since it has been attained through his own determination, energy and enterprise, 
for he started out in life empty handed and, by the force of these qualities in 
his character has worked his way upward to success. His business enterprise has 
carried him forward into important commercial and financial relations and his 
friendly spirit has gained him the warm and lasting regard of those with whom 
he has been brought in contact. 



CHARLES HERBERT RATHBUN. 

Although yet a young man, Mr. Rathbun has already entered the ranks of 
the landowners of Allamakee county by purchasing, in 1912, an eighty-acre 
farm, upon which he engages in general agricultural pursuits, giving consider- 
able attention to the raising of high grade shorthorn cattle. A native of Winne- 
shiek county, Iowa, he was born three miles west of Postville, November 4, 
1885, and is a son of Bradshaw Rathbun, a native of New York state. His 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Hall, was born in Iowa. In 1843 the 
father became a resident of Iowa, locating on the farm upon which our subject 
was born and on which he settled with his father, Bradshaw Rathbun, Sr., 
thereby establishing title to the family as early pioneers of the state. Upon 
this farm the father grew to manhood and there he continued in his agricultural 
pursuits until he retired to Postville. Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw Rathbun had six 
children : May, a resident of Los Angeles, California, where, in connection with 
her brother, she conducts a mercantile establishment ; Hall, of Los Angeles ; 
Frederick, who resides in W'inneshiek county, Iowa; Bessie, the wife of Welton 
Cornell, who owns a farm on the Military road, near Ossian, Winneshiek 
county; Blake, on the home farm; and Charles Herbert, our subject. 

In the acquirement of an education Charles H. Rathbun attended the dis- 
trict school in his home township in Winneshiek county. He remained at home 
until the age of twenty-one and then worked as a farm hand, saving his earnings 
so that he was enabled in the spring of 1912 to purchase the eighty-acre farm 
upon which he now resides and which is highly improved and cultivated. Sub- 
stantial buildings can be found upon his place and he has installed the latest 
machinery to facilitate the farm labor. He makes a specialty of shorthorn 
cattle, as his father did before him, and keeps a number of high-grade stock on 



PAST AND PRESENT OP ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 97 

hand. Practically all of his attention is given to the improvement of the farm 
and he has already succeeded in such a measure that a bright future may be 
prophesied for him. 

On February 23, 1912, Mr. Rathbun was united in marriage to Miss Hattie 
Nancy Huffy, who was born in Clermont, Fayette county, Iowa, January 3, 1890, 
a daughter of Charles and Ella (Gordon) Huffy, both natives of this state. The 
mother, however, is at present residing in Allamakee county. 

The political views of Mr. Rathbun are independent, his support being given 
to the best candidates available, irrespective of party lines. He shows a deep 
interest in the cause of education and at present efficiently serves as president of 
the school board of the Highland district in Post township. Yet a young man, 
he has already attained to a position of financial independence and is as highly 
esteemed and respected for the success he has attained thus far as for those 
qualities of his character which have made that success possible. 



FRED T. HEINS. 



Among the most prominent, able and deservedly successful of the younger 
farmers of Allamakee county is numbered Fred J. Heins, who owns and oper- 
ates a fine property of one hundred and fifty acres in Post township. He was 
born in Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, Iowa, October 5, 1884, and 
is a son of Fred and Dora (Schultz) Heins, natives of Germany, the former 
born in Hanover, September 15, 1847, 'i^d the latter in Mecklenburg, May 
30, 1851. In his early manhood the father crossed the Atlantic to America 
and settled immediately in Clayton county, Iowa, where he purchased land. 
When he disposed of his interests in that section he removed to Allamakee 
county and here in 1890 he bought the farm upon which the subject of this 
review now resides, devoting all of his attention to its improvement and develop- 
ment until his death, which occurred on the 31st of December, 1900. He and 
his wife became the parents of seven children, of whom the subject of this 
review is the sixth in the order of birth. 

Fred J. Heins was reared in Clayton county and acquired his education in 
the district schools. In his childhood he divided his time between his studies 
and work upon the homestead and when he was twenty-one assumed entire 
management of his father's farm, having since ably carried forward the work 
of development and owning today one of the best managed and most valuable 
properties in the locality. He has one hundred and fifty acres of improved land 
and in addition to the work of the fields engages e.xtensively in stock-raising 
and dairying, disposing of his cream to the Cooperative Creamery Company, 
of Postville, in which he is a large stockholder. He is connected also with 
the Farmers Cooperative Mercantile Company and the Postville Canning fac- 
tory and is well known in that city as a thoroughly reliable, straightforward and 
progressive business man. 

Mr. Heins married, on the 27th of February, 1906, Miss Anna Neuhring, 
who was born in Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, July 16, 1887. She 
is a daughter of Dietrich and Louise (Fischer) Neuhring, natives of Germany, 



98 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

who after their marriage came to America, locating first in Clayton county. 
There the father engaged in farming in the employ of others for a number of 
years, later renting land and finally purchasing a farm, which he continued to 
develop and improve until he retired from active business life. He is now a 
resident of Postville. Mr. and Mrs. Heins became the parents of four children: 
Edna, who was born on the 3d of May, 1907; Harland, born November 8, 1908; 
a twin to Harland who died in infancy; and Aurelia, born January 7, 1913. 

Mr. Heins gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is now a 
member of the school board, being actively interested in educational atifairs. 
He is still a young man but has already left his impress upon the agricultural 
develo[)ment of this section of Iowa, and he possesses in his energetic, progressive 
and enterprising spirit a guarantee of continued progress in his chosen field. 



JOHN WATERS. 



A business turning over a quarter of a million of dollars annually is no 
small afifair and no small man could handle successfully such an enterprise. 
Therefore, respect is due to John Waters for what he has attained as mana,<jer 
of the Postville Farmers Cooperative Society, which yearly handles this vast 
amount of business and of which he is the head. Active and popular, he has 
become known as one of the foremost business men of Postville and his position 
is based on just claims, for it rests on natural ability and a thorough experience 
of conditions in Allamakee county — an experience which he has gathered in the 
fifty-three years of his life which he has spent here, being born in Ludlow town- 
ship, August 29, i860. His parents were George and Sophia (tlill) Waters, 
both of whom have passed away, but are still lovingly remembered by their 
many old-time friends and neighbors. George Waters was a north of Ireland 
man and came to America in 1849, living a few years in Pennsylvania, and in 
May, 1856, came to Allamakee county, where he began his life work on a forty- 
acre tract which he purchased in Ludlow township. There he spent the remain- 
der of his life on his farm, gradually wresting prosperity from the soil and 
becoming one of the prosperous and substantial men of his locality. 

John Waters was born amid the primitive conditions of the frontier. In 
winter he attended the old log school and in summer worked on the farm, 
assisting his father in the hard work of converting timber land into an agricul- 
tural property. Remaining at home until he had grown to manhood, he then 
went on a place of his own, and it was not until he was twenty-nine years of 
age that he left the farm to engage in the hardware business in Postville. He 
retired from that line in 1901 and in the same year was elected one of the sujier- 
visors of Allamakee county. He served the people so faithfulh' and well that 
three years later he was reelected, serving on the governing board of the county 
for a total period of six years. In 1907 he returned to his early work and for 
three years engaged in farming, but on January i, 1910, was elected manager of 
the Postville Farmers Cooperative Society. Conscientious, ambitious, alert 
and industrious, he has been very successful in promoting the growth of the busi- 
ness of this institution and enjoys the entire confidence of the members of the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 99 

society and of the farmers of the community as a whole, at the same time retain- 
ing the good-will of the business men of Postville. Under his able management 
the business has largely increased, the stockholders receiving good financial 
returns and every patron being satisfied. While many cooperative societies have 
failed, or partially failed, in their mission, the one at Postville has thrived and 
it is but fair that a portion of the credit for this be given to Mr. Waters for the 
wise direction of its affairs. 

The Cooperative Society was founded in July, 1904, with a paid-up capital 
of one thousand dollars. It was composed entirely of the farmers living near 
Postville and its chief business was the handling of live stock, which it sold on 
commission for its members. Today the capital stock is nine thousand, four 
hundred and fifty-five dollars and it owns its building and deals in flour, feed, 
coal, salt, cement and similar products in car load lots and its store is well filled 
with a large stock of groceries and farm necessities. The volume of business 
last year was two hundred and forty-si.x thousand, six hundred and one dollars 
and thirty-two cents, this sum including the handling of one hundred and seventy- 
three cars of live stock, the shipments being nine thousand and thirty-five hogs, 
one thousand and ninety-seven calves, six hundred and sixty-five head of cattle 
and eiglit hundred and thirty-two sheep. The value of these shipments was tv.-o 
hundred and one thousand, seven hundred and one dollars and ten cents. The 
officers of the corporation are: G. W. Harris, president; R. J. Laughlin, vice 
president: J. C. Weihe, secretary; W. J. H. Schultz, treasurer; and F. H. 
Schultz, R. B. Waters, A. F. Marston, F. W. Meyer, W. H. Schroeder, Albert 
Zieman, Arthur Behrens, John Lydon and Frank Haugartner, directors. 

John Waters is a kindly and genial man, popular with his fellows and well 
liked by people in all walks of life. At the same time he is a thorough business 
man, aggressive in attaining his ends and conservative in his policy, giving 
careful attention to all details, even the smallest, that come up in cht course of 
the business. He was married, February 5, 1885, to Miss Minnie Early, and 
theirs is one of the pleasant, hospitable homes of Postville, from which radiates 
natural, true, warm-hearted hospitality — a hospitality which is cheerfully 
extended to the many friends which Mr. and Mrs. Waters have in the com- 
munity. 



FRANK H. MOLUMBY. 

Frank H. Molumby, who for the past eighteen years has been identified 
with business interests of Waukon as a furniture dealer and undertaker, has 
today one of the largest and best equipped stores in the city and controls an 
important business. He was born in Clayton county, May 22, 1866, and was 
reared upon a farm in that section, spending his childhood and early youth aid- 
ing in the operation of the homestead. 

After acquiring a public-school education Mr. Molumby left the farm and 
began his independent career, obtaining a position as clerk in a business house 
in Elkader, where he remained for six years, coming to Waukon in 1895. In 
this city he purchased an interest in a furniture and undertaking business and, 

63S6S0 



100 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

commencing with a small stock, he gradually built up the business until it was a 
large and profitable enterprise. In order to fit himself more thoroughly for his 
work Mr. Molumby took a course in embalming and, in 1907, passed his exam- 
ination before the state board, receiving his license in the same year. In 1909 
he moved to his present location, where he occupies a double business house, 
with two large rooms filled with a complete and well selected stock of furniture 
and undertaking goods. He has his own hearse and carries a full line of caskets, 
and both branches of his business are very profitable, for he has been accorded 
a liberal patronage in recognition of his reasonable prices and his upright and 
honorable commercial methods. 

Mr. Molumby married, in Waukon, in November, 1896, Miss Nellie Fitz- 
gerald, who was born and reared in this county, a daughter of Maurice Fitz- 
gerald, a well known farmer of Allamakee county. Mr. and Mrs. Molumby 
became the parents of six children: Mary, Pearl, Dolores, Frances and Helen; 
and Gerald, who died in 1900, at the age of eleven months. The family home 
is located in one of the finest residence districts of the city and is an attractive 
and comfortable dwelling, which Mr. and Mrs. Molumby have made the center 
of hospitality for their many friends. They are members of the Waukon Cath- 
olic church and Mr. Molumby belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters. His 
life has ever been upright and honorable and he has at all times endeavored to 
deal justly by his fellowmen and to shape his conduct in accordance with the 
principles of good citizenship. 



JOHN H. GERICKE. 



John H. Gericke, a successful farmer and expert machinist, owning a fine 
property of one hundred and si.xty acres in the vicinity of Postville, was born 
in Clayton county, near National, on the 3d of July, 1874. He is a son of John 
and Mary (Klinge) Gericke, natives of Germany, the former born in Prussia and 
the latter in Mecklenburg. The father crossed the Atlantic about 1869 and 
settled first in Chicago, where for a short time he worked in the employ of 
others, later removing to Iowa and engaging in railroad construction work 
between McGregor and La Crosse, Wisconsin. He abandoned this in favor 
of agricultural pursuits, working as a farm hand in Clayton county until his 
marriage, after which he rented land and engaged in farming for himself. 
Success steadily attended his labors and he was eventually able to purchase a 
fine property in Post township and to this he has added from time to time until 
he now owns two hundred and twenty acres. He has of late years laid aside 
the cares of active life and is living retired, his sons developing and cultivating 
the farm. He and his wife became the parents of ten children : John H., of 
this review ; Ida, the wife of Chris Meyers, who operates the farm adjoining 
Mr. Gericke's ; Fred, who is engaged in farming in Franklin township ; Bertha, 
the wife of Wendell Wagener, a farmer near Castalia, Winneshiek county ; 
Amelia, who married Otto Sanders, a carpenter in Postville ; Matilda, who lives 
at home ; Henry, who resides with his father on the homestead ; Amanda, who 




JOHN H. GEK1CK1-: 



PAST AND PRKSKXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 103 

became the wife of William Sebastian, a farmer in Franklin township ; Senda, 
who lives at home ; and William, who resides on a farm in Post township. 

John H. Gericke acquired his education in the district schools of Clayton 
county and began his independent career when he was eighteen years of age, at 
which time he formed a partnership with his brother William and purchased a 
threshing machine, which he operated during the threshing seasons, spending 
the remainder of his time assisting in clearing the homestead. He continued 
thus until he was twenty-seven years of age and again in partnership with his 
brother William purchased a half interest in two hundred and sixty-four acres 
of land. This property they cultivated for three years, and at the end of that 
time Mr. Gericke of this review sold his interests to his brother. He then 
purchased the farm on which he now resides, his one hundred and sixty acres 
being principally fine timber land, although he has a small tract cleared and 
under cultivation. In addition to general farming he operates a sawmill, a 
threshing machine, a silo filler and cutter and a corn shredder and has developed 
a natural mechanical ability until he is today an expert machinist, never needing 
any assistance in setting up or operating his machinery. 

Mr. Gericke is a member of the Turner Society of Postville and is well 
and favorably known in that place. His life has been such as to give him high 
standing in the locality where he makes his home; and he is generally recognized 
as a man whose industry, ability and well directed labors have not only contributed 
to his own prosperity but have also promoted the growth and advancement of 
the community at large. 



CARL WILKE. 



Through well directed business activity and enterprise Carl Wilke has gained 
recognition as one of the prosperous farmers of Allamakee county. He owns 
and operates a highly improved tract of land of one hundred and forty-six and 
one-quarter acres near Postville. Since 1880 he has lived in this county, during 
which time his labors have not only contributed to his own prosperity but have 
proven effective forces in the advancement of the general welfare. Mr. Wilke 
was born in Germany, December 18, 18C0, and is a son of John and Louisa 
Wilke, natives of Mecklenburg. They never came to America, the father 
spending his active life working in the factories of his native province. 

Carl Wilke acquired his education in the public schools of Germany and 
as a young man obtained work as a farm laljorer in Mecklenburg, retaining that 
position until he crossed the Atlantic to America in 1880. Coming immediately 
to Iowa, he worked as a farm hand near Postville for five years and then bought 
a farm in Franklin township, this county, upon which he resided for eleven years. 
He eventually sold that property and bought one hundred and forty-six and one- 
quarter acres near Postville, upon which he still resides. He has made substantial 
improvements upon the property and upon it carries on general farming and stock- 
raising, both branches of his activities being well directed and profitable. In 



104 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

addition to his homestead Mr. Wilke owns one hundred and twenty acres in Frank- 
lin township, which is operated by his son. 

On the i8th of November, 1887, Mr. Wilke married Miss Louisa Schuhz, 
a native of Mecklenburg, Germany, born February 10, 1864. She is a daughter 
of John and Louisa Schultz, both of whom have passed away. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilke have six children : William, who is married and engages in farming in 
Franklin township ; and Ella, Nora, Bertha, Edna and Thelma, all of whom live 
at home. 

Mr. Wilke is a member of the Lutheran church in Postville. He gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party and although he has never sought 
nor desired public ofifice, has in the promotion of his individual prosperity con- 
tributed in substantial measure to the progress and development of this section. 
He has depended upon no outside aid or influence but has wrought out his own 
success along well defined lines of labor and achieved his prosperity by industry 
and perseverance. 



CHARLES H. MEIER. 



Charles H. Meier has, ever since old enough, been prominently connected 
with agricultural pursuits and now owns five hundred and fifty-five acres near 
Postville, which he mostly rents out, although he still retains eighty acres for 
himself, devoted to hay and pasture. Ever progressive and enterprising, he has 
become one of the most substantial men of his section and is also largely con- 
nected with other enterprises, especially along financial lines. A son of H. 
William and Minnie (Koster) Meier, he was born in Garnavillo township, 
Clayton county, Iowa, on February 12, 1862. The father was born in Prussia, 
March 20, 1836, and the mother in Hanover, Germany, in 1844. She passed 
away in 1901 at the age of about fifty-seven years. At the age of sixteen the 
father crossed the ocean to America. During his active life he followed agri- 
cultural pursuits, working in the employ of others around Postville for a time, 
but later he removed to Minnesota and subsequently, having by thrift and in- 
dustry, acquired the means, bought a farm in Clayton county, Iowa, where he has 
since resided, now living retired. Charles H. Meier is the oldest of his seven chil- 
dren, there being twenty-six years between his birth and that of the youngest child 
in the family, and there also is a difference of twenty-six years between his and 
his father's age. 

In the acquirement of his education Charles H. Meier attended school in 
Garnavillo township, Clayton county. He early assisted his father with the 
work of the farm and learned methods and details under his able guidance. He 
worked on the home farm until twenty-two years of age, when he rented his 
father's land for one year and then bought a farm belonging to him in Post 
townshij), Allamakee county. On that farm Charles 11. ?ileier remained until 
1903, when he bought eighty acres one and a half miles from Postville and 
removed to that place. That success has attended his labors is evident from the 
fact that he now owns five hundred and fifty-five acres of highly improved land 
in Post township. He operates eighty acres himself, while he rents out the rest 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 105 

of his holdings, receiving a gratifying income from this source. He has extended 
his interests to other lines and is a stockholder in various banks in Postville and 
other places as well as a director in the creamery and the Farmers Cooperative 
Store. 

On September i6, 1884. Mr. Meier was united in marriage to Miss Amelia 
Splies, a native of Garnavillo township, Clayton county, where she attended the 
same school as her husband. She is a daughter of Jacob and Christina ( Brooker) 
Splies, the father a native of Switzerland and the mother of Ohio. Mr. Splies, 
who was a farmer by occupation, located in Garnavillo township, Clayton 
county, where both he and his wife passed away. In their family were six 
children, of whom Mrs. Meier is the fifth in order of birth. Mr. and Airs. Meier 
have three children: Vina Hermina, born October 23, 1886, at home; Lester, 
born July i, i8qo, who died December 17, igo6; and Orma, born June 28, 1892, 
who resides with her parents and teaches in the district schools of Post town- 
ship. 

It is but natural that a man of the energy and activity of Mr. Meier should 
take part in the public afifairs of his district and he has served efficiently as trus- 
tee of Post township and also in the capacity of road superintendent. He gives 
his allegiance to the republican party, ever upholding its principles and support- 
ing its candidates at the polls. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran 
church, in which he holds membership at PostviUe. A successful man in every 
sense of the word, Mr. Meier has not only attained prosperity, but has made 
many friends in his locality by reason of his high qualities of mind and character, 
which gain for him the respect and confidence of all who know him. 



FRANK W. AMES. 



Frank W. Ames, carrying on general farming and stock-raising on sixty 
acres of fine land in Franklin township, was born in Cattaraugus county. New 
York, on the 23d of August, 1856. He is a son of Alphonso and Matilda 
(Wheeler) Ames, the former born in Genesee county, New York, September 
23' 1833, and the latter in Erie county, that state, in April, 1837. In early life 
the father worked as a river lumberman and, possessing great ability in the 
handling and controlling of men, made a success of that occupation. Later he 
used this ability as the manager of large gangs of workmen engaged in railroad 
construction in Pennsylvania. He afterward turned his attention to carpenter- 
ing, contracting and building, trades in which he had served an apprenticeship, 
and in 1872 he came west to Iowa, intending to make a permanent location in 
the southwestern part of the state. However, he never carried out this plan, 
dying one month after his arrival here. He had been twice married, his second 
wife having been Mrs. Dorlesca (Hinman) Wilcox, widow of a veteran of the 
Civil war. She has also passed away. By that union were born two children : 
George, who resides in South Dakota; and another child now deceased. 
Alphonso Ames had also two children by his first marriage, the subject of this 
review being the elder and the only one now living. 



106 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

In the acquirement of an education Frank W. Ames attended school in Cat- 
taraugus county, New York, studying in the public schools of Little Valley and 
afterward in those of Hardin, Allamakee county, Iowa. He began his indepen- 
dent career at the early age of fourteen years, working for some time as a farm 
laborer before and after coming to Iowa. He was later engaged in railroad con- 
struction, but at the age of twenty-three rented land in Floyd county, beginning 
the development of this property on the ist of September, 1879. After three 
years he went to Monona township, Clayton county, where he had previously 
purchased land, and at the end of a similar period of time rented another farm 
in the same township. Eventually he removed to Chickasaw county and then to 
Oelwein, Fayette county, remaining in the latter locality for three years. He 
afterward spent six years in Luana and then bought the farm where he now 
lives. He cultivated it successfully for two years and then returned to Luana, 
where he remained for six years, coming back to his farm at the end of that 
period. L'pon this place of sixty acres of highly cultivated land he engages in 
general farming, success steadily rewarding his well directed labors and practical 
methods. From 1904 to 191 3 he served as rural mail carrier and he is well 
known throughout this section of Iowa, holding a high position among the 
respected and able citizens. 

On the 2 1 St of June, 1S79, Mr. Ames married Miss Allie Wilcox, who was 
born in New York, August 14,^858. She is a daughter of Hiram and Dorlesca 
(Hinman) Wilcox, the latter of whom became the second wife of the father of 
our subject. Hiram Wilcox was a native of Pennsylvania and at an early date 
came to Iowa, settling near Monona, from which section he enlisted for service 
in the Civil war, dying in an army hospital in the south. His first service was 
in Minnesota, when, as a member of the Twenty-se\enth Iowa \^olunteer Infan- 
try, he fought against the hostile Indians. Mr. and ]Mrs. Ames have a daugh- 
ter, Edna, who w'as born June 25, 1880. She is 'now in the tenth consecutive 
year of her service as a teacher in the public schools, having acted in this capac- 
ity in Luana, in Guttenburg and in Hardin, where she is now employed. 

Mr. Ames gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has ren- 
dered his township excellent service as constable and as road supervisor. He 
devotes most of his attention, however, to his farm, which he has made the 
equal of the finest in his part of the county, its excellent condition gaining for 
him a high place among progressive and able agriculturists. 



DARIUS S. ORR. 



Still residing on the old homestead which his uncle entered many years ago 
and which Darius S. Orr subsecjuently acquired by purchase and where he has 
gained prosperity, he is not only prominent in agricultural circles of Allamakee 
county, but has to his credit a long and distinguished service in the National 
Guard of the state, in which he served for a number of years with the rank of 
lieutenant colonel. A native of Post township, he has grown up with this sec- 
tion and has not only been a witness of the wonderful transformation that has 
taken place as primitive conditions have given way to the onward march of 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 107 

civilization, but has been a helpful and cooperant factor in bringing about the 
prosperous conditions which the present generation enjoys. 

It was in a small log house one mile northeast of Postville that, on June 4, 
1859, Darius S. Orr saw the light of day, his parents being James and Margaret 
A. (Ellison) Orr. The father was a native of the north of Ireland, where he 
was born March 15, 1829, while the mother was born in New York state in 1834. 
When a boy eleven years of age the father crossed the ocean with his parents, 
the family locating in Schuyler county. New York, at the head of Seneca lake, 
where he grew to manhood. He received his education in the common schools 
of Schuyler county and at the Plattsburg and Starkey Seminaries and for several 
winters followed teaching in New York, while in the summers he assisted his 
father with the work of the farm. In Iowa he also taught for six terms. The 
year 1855 marked his arrival in Allamakee county and here he was married on 
January i, 1856. The home farm upon which the father settled had been 
entered from the government a year or two before his arrival by a brother, and 
there James Orr continued successfully in farming and stock-raising until 1898, 
when he and his wife removed to Postville, where they still live retired. The 
father has passed the age of eighty-four and the mother is seventy-nine years 
of age, and both are highly respected and esteemed as among the early pioneers. 
James Orr was prominent in public life in his days, having held the offices of 
township trustee and assessor, besides other positions. He and his wife are the 
parents of seven children, of whom Darius S. is the second in order of birth. 

In the acquirement of his education Darius S. Orr attended public school in 
Postville and after laying aside his text-books, worked for his father until 
twenty-one years of age. He then rented the homestead for ten years, his 
labors being attended with such good success that he was enabled to buy the 
place and there he still resides in the cultivation of two hundred and twenty- 
five acres of highly improved land. He has added to the improvements by the 
erection of modern buildings and has installed modern machinery and imple- 
ments in order to facilitate labor and improve the productivity of the soil. He 
gives considerable attention to stock-raising, breeding shorthorn cattle and Shire 
horses, as well as Poland China hogs. Progressive and energetic, he follows 
the most approved methods and, by scientific rotation of crops and fertilization, 
keeps his land in the best condition. 

On November 26, 1889, Mr. Orr wedded Miss Bertha Harris, a native of 
Grand Meadow township, Clayton county, born January 12, 1871. Mrs. Orr 
is a daughter of William and Charity (McDonald) Harris, the former a prom- 
inent retired farmer of Post township. In their family are six children, of 
whom Bertha is the second in order of birth. The others are : Herman How^ard, 
who resides in Postville : Edith, the wife of Ernie Churchill, of Monroe, Wis- 
consin ; Edna, who married Fred Oehring, of McGregor, this state ; Glessner, 
the wife of Arthur Webster, of Postville: and Adelaide, residing with her par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Orr have four children, as follows: Ethel, whose birth 
occurred October 29, 1890 ; Edith, who was born September 13, 1892; Esther, 
born February 27, i8g6; and Eva, who was born November 14, 1898. All are 
still under the parental roof. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Orr is a republican, stanchly upholding the 
candidates of that party at the polls. Although he never personally aspired to 



108 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

political honors, he served for some time efficiently as township assessor. He 
has given a considerable part of his time to a worthy cause by rendering, for 
twelve years, service in the Iowa National Guard. In the six years after his 
enlistment he had, by gradual stages, attained the rank of lieutenant colonel 
and as such commanded the Fourth Regiment. He has ever been interested in 
matters military and has willingly given his time and attention to that branch 
of the state government, recognizing its importance and beneficial influence upon 
the young men. Fraternally he is a member of the .\ncient Order of United 
Workmen. \'iewed from every side, the career of Mr. Orr is worthy of the 
highest commendation and may serve as example for the younger generation. 
While he has made himself financially independent by close application to the 
work on hand, he has been an important factor along lines of progress not only 
as an agriculturist, but also in moral and intellectual upbuilding. He is recog- 
nized as a forceful element in his locality and enjoys the highest esteem and 
fullest confidence of all who come in contact with him in a business or social 
way. 



; EDWIN R. LIVINGOOD. 

Edviin R. Livingood has become one of the substantial farmers of Post town- 
ship, owning a valuable agricultural property of olie hundred and eighty-six 
acres near Postville. He was born in Franklin township, Allamakee county, 
December ii, 1858, his parents being Greenburg J. and Abigail ( Ewing) Livin- 
good. The father was born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1820, 
and the mother in Cannelton, Indiana, January 2, 1821. In early life Greenburg 
J. Livingood followed the trade of cabinet-maker. With his parents he removed 
from his native state to Ohio and then to Indiana, where he married, and from 
there came to Iowa in 1852, locating in Ludlow township, this county. Later in 
the same year, however, he went to Lebanon, Illinois, and did not return to this 
county until the fall of 1864. He settled on the farm, to the cultivation of which 
he devoted the rest of his life, passing away in 1898. His wife survived him 
about seven years, her death occurring in 1905. In their family were four chil- 
dren, of whom two are living, the sister of our subject being ]\Iary Jane, who 
now resides in Waukon. She was the eldest of this family. 

In the acquirement of his education Edwin R. Livingood attended district 
school in Franklin township and for six months studied at the Elkader high 
school. LTntil twenty-one years of age he assisted his father with the farm 
work, but then took active charge of the place, which he operated until his twenty- 
fifth year, when he bought the farm, and there he now lives. It then comprised 
ninety-two acres, but he has since increased its boundaries, his property now 
consisting of one hundred and sixty-eight acres, all highly improved. He gives 
his attention to mixed farming and also engages in stock-raising. Here he has 
resided continuously with the exception of about two years, which he spent in 
the western part of the state, and he has devoted all of his life to farming inter- 
ests. Modern and substantially built barns, outbuildings and sheds are pro- 
vided and the farm is otherwise thoroughly equipped with up-to-date machinery 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 109 

to facilitate the labor and increase the yield. As prosperity has come to him he 
has made judicious investments and is now part owner in the Cooperative 
Creamery at Postville and a stockholder in the Fanners Cooperative Store of 
that town. 

On October 21, 1882, Mr. Livingood married Miss Matilda Pechia, a native 
of Post township, born December 9, i8(')4. She is a daughter of Joseph and 
Martha ( Smith ) Pechia, the father a native of \'ermont and the mother of 
Indiana. They were among the earliest settlers of Allamakee county. The 
mother was a daughter of Reutien Smith, one of the pioneers on the Yellow 
river. Mr. Pechia became a well known and prosjierous agriculturist of Post 
township and continued in that occupation until his death. He and his wife 
had ten children, of whom eight are now living and of whom Mrs. Livingood 
is the fifth in order of birth. Mr. Pechia passed away December 7, 1885, having 
survived his wife for about five years, her death occurring May 28, 1880. 

Mr. and Mrs, Livingood have ten children: Maud Eleanor, who was born 
June 24, 1884, and married Frank Miller, an agriculturist of Ludlow town- 
ship; Willard Sidney, whose birth occurred on August 30, 1885, and who mar- 
ried Effie Miller and is farming in Ludlow township on the old Livingood 
homestead, which was entered as a government claim ; Charles B., born Febru- 
ary 8, 1887, who married Esther Lee, and is now farming near Detroit, in 
Becker county, Minnesota ; Stella Rosela, whose natal day was July 23, 1888, 
and who is the wife of Gerald Moose, a farmer of Winneshiek county, this 
state ; Earl Rinaldo, born August 25, i8go, who married Sophia Hager and 
farms in Winneshiek county; Abigail Blossom, who was born April 8, 1892, 
and is at home; Cecil Edwin, born May i, 1897; Caroline Dora, July 13, 1899; 
Nellie Esther, May 3, 1903 ; and Lynn Mayhew, April 25, 1906. The five last 
named are yet under the 'parental roof. 

In his political views Mr. Livingood is independent, giving his support to such 
candidates as he considers best able to fill the offices. In former years, however, 
he was a republican. He has done valuable work as an agriculturist in Alla- 
makee county, which not only has brought him success but has been a factor 
in general development. 



PETER RISER. 



Upon the role of Allamakee county's honored dead appears the name of 
Peter Riser, who at the time of his death in 1902 was one of the substantial 
agriculturists and large landowners of Lansing township. Although born across 
the water, practically his entire life was spent in Iowa among whose pioneers 
he is numbered and to whose development and progress he made important 
contributions through the years. 

Mr. Riser was born in Switzerland, May 31, 1838, and when he was four 
years of age was brought to the United States by his parents who established 
Iheir home in Illinois. They there remained until their son was fourteen years 
of age when they came to Iowa settling in Allamakee county in pioneer times. 
Here Peter Riser grew to manhood, aiding in the clearing, opening and develop- 



110 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

ing of the homestead and becoming a practical and able agriculturist. At the 
age of twenty-one he began his independent career, turning his attention to the 
occupation to which he had been raised and winning success as a general farmer. 
Upon the death of his father he inherited a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres and upon this property continued to reside until his death, each year adding 
to his prosperity and to the high regard in which he was held by his neighbors 
and friends. As circumstances justified he added to his holdings, finally acquir- 
ing three hundred and sixty acres of land upon which he made substantial im- 
provements, erecting a large barn and all the necessary outbuildings and in- 
stalling the needed farm equipment. The old log cabin in which the family 
made their home in the early days still stands upon the homestead, but the 
present residence is a fine, modern brick structure erected some years ago. 

In Allamakee county Mr. Riser was united in marriage to Miss Catherine 
Marti, who was born in Switzerland, February 4, 1844, a daughter of Henry and 
Catherine (Blumer) Marti, who came to the United States in 1853. They 
settled in Allamakee county and here made their home until their death, the father 
passing away in 1871 as a result of a stroke of paralysis suffered seventeen years 
before. Mr. and Mrs. Riser became the parents of the following children : 
Marie Anna, who died October 17, 1871, when she was seven years of age; 
John Henry, who is engaged in farming near New Albin, Iowa; George William, 
a farmer of Lansing township ; Julius Edward, who passed away on January 
10, 1900, at the age of twenty-eight; Emma, the wife of John Babler; and Philip 
and Barbara Catherine, both of whom live at home. 

Mr, Riser was ever stanch in his support of the republican party and although 
he never sought nor desired office took an intelligent interest in community 
affairs and could always be relied upon to further progressive public movements. 
He was public-spirited and loyal in all matters of citizenship, cooperating heartily 
in tliose measures and projects which had for their object the upbuilding and 
development of the county wherein he had so long resided. Thus it was that 
at his death which occurred November 11, 1902, Allamakee county lost one of 
its representative and valued citizens. Mrs. Riser survives her husband and 
makes her home on the farm, which is now conducted by her son Philip. She 
is a member of the Methodjst church to which her husband also belonged and 
is a lady whose many excellent traits of heart and mind have won her the 
affection and esteem of all who know her. 



BENEDICT TROENDLE. 

Benedict Troendle has lived in Allamakee county for si.xty-one years and he is 
one of the very few who have so long witnessed its growth and development. 
During the time he has made substantial contributions towards its upbuilding by 
opening up and developing a number of fine farms, and by his upright dealings, 
his high integrity and his honorable and worthy life has aided in raising standards 
of business and of citizenship. As a result he is known and honored all over 
this section of Iowa and is today one of the leading and representative citizens 
of Waukon where he is living practically retired. 




MR. AND INffiS. BENEDICT TROENDLE 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 113 

Mr. Troendle was born in Baden, Germany, March 25, 1831, and acquired an 
excellent education in his native city where he remained until he was nineteen 
years of age. He became proficient in Latin and French as well as German 
for he studied for the priesthood, never, however, taking orders. In 1850 he 
emigrated to the new world, going immediately to Ohio and joining his brother, 
Sales,' in Huron county. There he went to work on a farm, engaging in agri- 
cultural pursuits during the summer months and in the winter attending an 
English school. For two years thereafter he continued as a farm laborer and 
then in 1852 came with his brother to Iowa and settled in Allamakee county 
where he has since resided being today one of the earliest living residents. They 
purchased eighty acres in French Creek township and also twenty acres adjoin- 
ing, buying this latter tract from a neighbor in order to get the benefit of a 
spring of clear, cold water which supplied enough for all domestic purposes ard 
also for watering the stock. The land was raw and unimproved but with 
characteristic energy the brothers set about the task of developing it, clearing 
it of timber, breaking the soil, and fencing the property into convenient fields. 
In 1856 Benedict Troendle purchased his brother's interest and continued the 
work of improvement alone, erecting the necessary outbuildings and tilling the 
fields in the most practical manner, his progessive methods and well directed 
industry bringing him a substantial measure of success. He continued upon 
this farm until 1865 when he disposed of the property and purchased another 
tract of land of one hundred and twenty acres, slightly improved. He made 
this also a valuable and productive enterprise', selling it in 1868 and buying in 
the same year eighty acres in Makee township near Lycurgus. To this he 
later added another two hundred acres of which a part was improved when it 
came into his possession, and he cleared this property and fenced it into fields, 
continuing upon it for twelve years and making it eventually one of the finest 
and Ijest improved farms in this part of the country. It was during the period 
of his residence upon it that he was made postmaster of Lycurgus and he held 
this office for many years, discharging his duties in an able, straighforward and 
systematic manner. He is numbered among the pioneers in French Creek town- 
ship and was long a potent force in its development, cooperating heartily in 
movements for the general good and giving his active support to all progressive 
public measures. He helped in the organization of the first school, donating a 
half acre of land for the schoolhouse and also became a leader in founding the 
first independent school in Lycurgus. Always interested in the cause of educa- 
tion, he gave freely of his time and talents in this direction, accomplishing much 
far-sighted, discriminating and beneficial work during a long period of service 
as a member of the school board. Mr. Troendle erected a comfortable residence 
upon his farm wherein he continued to reside until 1892 when he laid aside the 
cares of active life, moving into Waukon where he has since lived retired. 

On the 29th of July, 1855, Mr. Troendle married Miss Hedwig .Vicrling, 
also a native of Germany, born and reared in Prussia. She is a dauylUer of 
Anton Nierling, who emigrated to America and made a permanent location in 
Allamakee county in 1854, purchasing land in Makee township and turning his 
attention to general farming. Mr. and Mrs. Troendle became the parents of 
five children : Julia, who married Gus Kerndt, a farmer of French Creek town- 
ship, passed away in 1910 when she was forty-eight years of age. Caroline became 



114 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

the wife of J. W. Rice of Waterloo, Iowa. Mary married John Miller of 
Waukon. Johanna became the wife of Dan Haas. Gustave. youngest mem- 
ber of this family, owns and operates the old home farm in Makee township. On 
the 29th of July, 1905, Mr. and Airs. Troendle celebrated the completion of 
fifty years of a peaceful and happy wedded life, their golden wedding anni\er- 
sary being attended by their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren to 
the number of thirty-two, who together with o\'er two hundred friends, gathered 
at the home in Waukon, making the day one of gladness and rejoicing. They 
presented many tokens as souvenirs of the occasion, endeavoring in this way to 
express in some slight degree the love and veneration in which they held these 
worthy people, to whom they were bound by many ties of love and friendship. 
Few if any men of Allamakee county are more widely known or more highly 
honored throughout this section of the state than is Mr. Troendle, who for over 
sixty-one years has lived in the county and who during all of that period has 
honorably borne his share in the work of upbuilding and development. \'iewed 
from any stand])oint, his life may be termed successful, for he has accumulated a 
comfortable fortune, has drawn to himself many loyal and faithful friends and 
has made his name an honored one wherever it is known. 



JACOB HIRTH. 



Jacob Hirth makes his home on a fine farm of one hundred and seventy- 
eight acres on section 29, Lansing township — a property which his father pur- 
chased in pioneer times and upon which he himself has resided since his child- 
hood. He is one of the earliest settlers in this section, which he has seen develop 
from a frontier wilderness, and in all of the work of upbuilding he has borne 
an active and useful part, his labors constituting elements in general agricultural 
progress. Germany numbers him among her native sons, his birth having 
occurred in Baden, on the 3d of r)ctober, 1837. He is a son of John Adam and 
Margaret (Kircher) Hirth, also natives of Germany, where the mother passed 
away March 6, 1853. In the same year the father and children crossed the 
Atlantic to America and, after arriving in this country, came west to Iowa, set- 
tling in Dubuque, and thence coming to Allamakee county. Here John Adam 
Hirth purchased one hundred and sixty acres of unimproved land and, with 
characteristic energy set himself to cultivate and develop it. He built a log 
cabin u])on his holdings and for many years made his home therein, eventually 
erecting the present frame farm house. The old log cabin, however, still stands 
• — a reminder of the hardships and inconveniences of pioneer times. The father 
was reared in the Protestant religion in Germany and after coming to America 
became a member of the Congregational church. He was a democrat in his 
political beliefs and actively interested in the growth of the community he had done 
so much to upbuild. He died upon his farm in Lansing township in 1896, having 
reached the advanced age of ninety-one years. He and his wife became the 
parents of four children, only one of whom, the subject of this review, survives. 
Magdalena, who became the wife of Conrad Steibert, has passed away. She 
and her husband lived for many years in La Fayette township. George was 



PAST AND PRESENT (JF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 115 

drowned in the Mississippi river when he was twenty-one years of age. Adam 
died on the ocean wliile on the journey to the United States. He was at that 
time two years of age. 

In tlie puljlic schools of Germany Jacob Hirth ac(|uired his education and 
after laying aside his books accompanied his father to America and after the 
family settled in Allamakee county assisted with the work of the farm until 
after the death of his father, when he assumed ownership and control. Since 
that time he has steadily carried forward the work of improvement and the 
results of his many years of care and labor are evident in the neat and attrac- 
tive appearance of the place. He has increased his holdings to one hundred 
and seventy-eight acres and upon this carries on general farming, harvesting 
excellent crops and engaging to some extent in stock-raising. 

Mr. Hirth has been twice married. In i86g he wedded Miss Katie Leppert, 
by whom he had two children : Johannah, the wife of George Wendel, of 
Lansing township, who became the mother of five children; and ]\Iagdalena, 
the deceased wife of John Decker, by whom she had one daughter. Mr. 
Hirth's first wife passed away in 1874 and three years later he married her 
sister, Josephine Leppert, by whom he has five children: John J., who resides 
in North Dakota ; Clara Emma, the wife of George Wendel, of Cerro Gordo 
county, Iowa ; Charles E., who married Emma Decker ; and Roy Andrew and 
William George, who live at home. Mrs. Hirth is a devout member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Hirth is a democrat in his political beliefs and is interested in the 
growth and welfare of this section of the state, although he never seeks public 
office. He is numbered among the real pioneers of the county, having come 
to Lansing township when there were only a few scattered settlements and 
when the Indians were still numerous on the prairies, while game abounded in 
the forest and pioneer conditions were everywhere evident, there being no 
schools and, indeed, no need for educational institutions. He has watched 
the evolution which has transformed this wilderness into a populous, wealthy 
and growing community and has been to a great extent identified therewith. 



CHARLES B. BACHTELL. 

Although a native of Pennsylvania, Charles B. Bachtell has practically spent 
his entire life in Iowa, where for many years he was prominently connected 
with agricultural pursuits, actively operating a large and profitable farm of two 
hundred and forty acres. In 1909, however, he removed to Postville, where 
he now resides in a handsome residence set in a plat of five acres, still super- 
vising the operation of a two hundred and twenty-five acre farm, which he cul- 
tivates by the means of hired help. Mr. Bachtell also has other valuable prop- 
erty in Postville. He was born April 23, 1849, ^ native of Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania, and a son of David and Susanna (Davis) Bachtell, both natives of the 
same county of the Keystone state. The father was born December 18, 1818, 
and the mother. May 6, 1819. In early life the father followed the trade of 
butcher, but gave up that line in favor of farming when he came to Iowa in 1853. 



116 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLA^IAKEE COUNTY 

He settled at National, Clayton county, later buying land and, in the course of 
years, becoming one of the leading agriculturists of his section. He continued to 
reside there, near Elkader, and passed away on February 17, 1891. his wife's 
deinise occurring within one month, on March 13. In their family were ten chil- 
dren, of whom Charles B. of this review is the fifth in order of birth. 

Charles B. Bachtell was brought by his parents to Iowa when but four years 
of age and, in the acquirement of his education, attended school at Elkader, 
making use of such opportunities as were afforded pupils at that pioneer period. 
He subsequently attended district school near there in Clayton county. At the 
early age of sixteen Mr. Bachtell tried his hand at farming and, hiring out, 
worked for others until thirty years of age. carefully saving his earnings during 
that time with a view toward independence. He then married and bought a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres, upon which he resided for thirty-one 
years, profitably engaged in general farming and stock-raising. As his means 
permitted, he had added to this farm until he owned two hundred and forty 
acres. In September, 1909, he removed from there to Postville, buying a com- 
modious residence set in a beautiful five-acre tract. However, he still operates 
a farm of two hundred and twenty-five acres with hired help. Mr. Bachtell is a 
stockholder in the Canning Factory and also in the Cooperative Creamery of Post- 
ville. Moreover, he is interested in the Citizens Bank of this city. 

The marriage of Mr. Bachtell and Miss Carrie Carrithers occurred on Feb- 
ruary II, 1879. Mrs. Bachtell is a native of Post township, where she was born 
August 3, 1859, a daughter of William H. and Elizabeth (Smith) Carrithers. 
The father was born in Ohio county, West \'irginia, on December 29, 1829. 
and the mother in Indiana, at or near Perry sville, on Alay 23, 1833. Their mar- 
riage occurred in 1851, in Allamakee county, whence he had come in that year 
on horseback, the mother arriving in 1849. The father always followed agricul- 
tural pursuits and here took up government land, which he cleared, improved 
and developed, spending the balance of his life, with the exception of two years 
in the early part of his career, in this county. During those two years he worked 
in a mill in Clayton county. He was prominent and favorably known in his local- 
ity and for some years served as county supervisor. His marriage was per- 
formed by Judge Topliff, who was the first judge of Allamakee county. Both 
he and his wife resided in the home which he first prepared for sixteen years. 
when he built the residence as it now stands and which is known as the Car- 
rithers homestead. He made a specialty of stock-raising in connection with gen- 
ral farming. Mr. and Mrs. Carrithers had three children, of whom Mrs. Bach- 
tell is the youngest. She grew up on the home farm amid the primitive condi- 
tions of pioneer life, under the able guidance of her worthy parents and received 
her educational advantages in the district school of Post township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bachtell became the parents of three children : Elmer C, who was born 
October 11, 1880, and died at the age of eleven months: one child, born in 1882. 
who died in infancy; and Ralph William, born March 18, 1889, who resides at 
home. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Bachtell is a republican and, at a period about 
twenty years ago, served efficiently as township trustee of Post township for 
three terms, doing valuable work in promoting public interests at that early 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUXTY 117 

period. A man of progressive tendencies and sound principles, he has based 
his success upon determined endeavor and honesty, and the financial indepen- 
dence which has come to him is well merited. Public-spirited and progressive, 
he has ever been considerate of the general welfare and by his work has done 
much toward promoting agricultural development. He enjoys the confidence 
and good-will of all who know him and there are many in the Postville district 
who are proud to call him friend. 



HANS SIMENSON. 



Farming interests of Hanover township lost a progressive and worthy rep- 
resentative and Allamakee county an honored and worthy pioneer citizen when 
Hans Simenson passed away on his farm on section 21. He was known and 
recognized as one of the representative agriculturists of this vicinity — a man 
whose success was an important element in general development, and he was 
honored also as a veteran of the Civil war to whom the country owes a debt 
of gratitude which can never be forgotten and never fully repaid. 

Mr. Simenson was one of the many sturdy and industrious citizens whom 
Norway has given to America, his birth having occurred in that country in 
1840, his parents being Ole and Anna Simenson. They came to America in 
1851 and settled in Winneshiek county, this state, where the father died in 1876. 
His wife survived him some years, dying at the home of the subject of this 
review in 1883. They were the parents of seven children, of whom one, a 
son, still survives. 

When Hans Simenson was eleven years of age he accompanied his parents 
to America and settled with them in Winneshiek county. Four years later he 
moved to Allamakee county and here he afterwards began farming for himself, 
buying land on section 21, Hanover township. For a long period thereafter 
he improved and cultivated this property, the years bringing him success, 
prominence and substantial fortune and a place among the prominent and 
representative agriculturists. From time to time he added to his holdings and 
finally accumulated three hundred and sixty acres of land, of which one hundred 
and eighty were in a high state of cultivation. In its development he adhered 
always to the most progressive and practical methods and his farm became one 
of the finest in this vicinity, reflecting in its neat and attractive appearance 
the many years of careful supervision and practical labor which the owner had 
expended upon it. 

In i86g Mr. Simenson was united in marriage to Miss Patrena Larson, 
a native of Norway and a daughter of Christian and Anna Larson, who came 
to America in 1852 and settled in Allamakee county. The father purchased 
land in Hanover township and operated it until his death. His wife survives 
him and makes her home in Waukon, being now eighty-seven years of age. 
They were the parents of ten children of whom four still survive, the wife of 
the subject of this review being the first in order of birth. Air. and Mrs. 
Simenson became the parents of four children : .Sarah, the wife of W. H. 
Allen, a rancher in California ; Oscar C, a farmer in Winneshiek county ; Jane, 



118 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

who married E. \V. Allen, engaged in the transfer business in Waukon ; and 
Alfred, who owns the old homestead. The latter his added to his father's hold- 
ings, owning now three hundred and seventy-eight acres of land, on which 
he carries on general farming and stock-raising. Mrs. Simenson survives her 
husband and makes her home with her son. She is a lady of many excellent 
traits of mind and character and is widely known and highly respected, her 
upright life having won for her the confidence and good-will of all who 
know her. 

In the life of Hans Simenson was a creditable military chapter. In 1861 
he enlisted in Company H, Ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry and went to the 
front as a private. He participated in many of the most important engagements 
of the Civil war, serving four years, and at the close of hostilities was mustered 
out as corporal. He was always a most earnest and patriotic citizen, manifesting 
these qualities at home as well as on the battlefield and he was never known 
to withhold his support from any progressive public project. He served with 
ability and distinction in almost all of the township oflices, considering it the 
duty of every citizen to serve his fellowmen when called upon to do so. His 
upright life was guided by the doctrines of the Presbyterian church of which 
he was a devout member and he kept in touch with his comrades of fifty years 
ago through his connection with the Waukon Post of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. Mr. Simenson's death occurred on his farm in Hanover township, and 
it deprived this part of Iowa of a representative and valued citizen — a man of 
proved patriotism, loyalty and uprightness, whose life was guided and directed 
by high ideals and whose accomplishments were important as factors in the 
general development of this part of the state. 



WILLIAM H. KERNDT. 

William H. Kerndt, a successful and prominent farmer of French Creek 
township and a worthy representative of one of Allamakee county's most honored 
pioneer families, was born on the farm which he now owns December 19, 185Q. 
He is a son of Herman Kerndt, a native of Schlesien, Germany, born in 1823, 
and one of five Kerndt brothers who came to Allamakee county in 1853. Herman 
Kerndt purchased two hundred acres of unimproved land in French Creek 
township and devoted the remainder of his life to general farming, becoming 
one of the substantial and representative agriculturists of the community. His 
first home, a little shanty upon his holdings, was afterward replaced by a log 
cabin and still later by the frame dwelling now occupied by the subject of this 
review. This in turn he intends to replace next spring by a fine modern dwelling, 
for which he has the material already upon his place. The father became a 
successful and prosperous farmer and as his financial resources grew added 
to his holdings until his farm comprised three hundred and ninety acres of land 
lying on section 36. Herman Kerndt married Miss Godlieba Breuer, also a 
native of Germany, and both passed away upon this farm, the mother dying 
February 21, 1901, and the father, January 12, 1911. They were the parents of 
eight children: Alvina, who lives in Lansing; Maria, who is now Mrs. Haas; 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 119 

Jennie, who died at the age of twenty-two ; Charles, who met his death by drown- 
ing when he was about twenty years of age ; Gustave H., a farmer of Lansing 
township; Emma, now Mrs. H. R. Weirking, of Mankato, Minnesota; Annie, 
who is housekeeper for her brother, Gustave H. ; and William H., of this review. 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Kerndt were devout members of the Congregational 
church and the father was a stanch supporter of the republican party. 

William H. Kerndt was reared upon his present farm and acquired his 
education in the district schools of Makee township, in the independent district of 
Lycurgus. During the last years of his father's life he assumed the management 
of the homestead and after his death bought the interests of the other heirs 
and has since been the sole owner. There are excellent improvements upon the 
place, Mr. Kerndt having steadily carried forward the work of development 
until the farm is today a valuable and productive property. 

On the 19th of May, 1891, Mr. Kerndt was united in marriage to Miss Lena 
Nierling, a native of Allamakee county and a daughter of Anton and Mary 
(Buck) Nierling, both of whom have passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Kerndt have 
become the parents of six children : Herman, Maria, Leslie, Theodore, Willard 
and Clarence, all of whom are at home. The parents are devout members of 
the Congregational church and are liberal contributors to its support. Mr. 
Kerndt gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is keenly inter- 
ested in local advancement and development, although this interest never takes 
the form of office seeking. A resident of French Creek township since his 
birth, he is largely familiar with the history of the county and has an intimate 
knowledge of the events which have changed its annals and affected its policies. 
His work and accomplishments entitle him to mention among the representative 
men of this community. 



CHRISTIAN FRAHM. 



The history of the pioneer settlement of Allamakee county contains the 
record of no more honorable, worthy and upright man than that of Christian 
Frahm, who, landing in America with only one dollar in his pocket, has worked 
steadily and courageously during the intervening years, winning finally success, 
prominence and an honored name. He is one of the earliest settlers in Allama- 
kee county, his residence here dating from 1856, and he has borne an active 
part in the work of progress which has since reclaimed the wilderness for 
purposes of civilization. He was born in the province of Holstein, Germany, 
December 23, 1830, and in 1853 took passage aboard a three-masted vessel 
called Hemisphere, sailing from Liverpool. After a long journey he arrived 
in New York and pushed westward to Chicago, landing in the latter city with 
a capital of one dollar. He found employment in Chicago, working at any- 
thing he could find to do. his occujiations including the plowing of a cornfield which 
grew where the business section of the city now stands. From Chicago he made 
his way to Dubuque, Iowa, and there worked on the railroad and at other occupa- 
tions until he came to Allamakee county, settling in Lansing, November 10, 
1856. He proceeded to Waukon, where he spent three months, but in the spring 



120 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of the same year obtained a position as a farm laborer on what is now known 
as Lansing Ridge. He later was employed by his brother in Lansing township 
and afterward was for seven years on the Adam Hirth farm. Being ambitious, 
economical and energetic, he saved his money, gradually accumulating enough 
to rent land. Me engaged in farming in this way for one year and then, on the 
7th of March, 1864, purchased the farm, buying at that time si.xty-two acres, 
about forty of which could be cultivated. He erected a home upon this property 
and with confidence, courage and steadfast purpose carried forward the work 
of development, replacing the old buildings by new ones when necessary so 
that only one of the original structures now remains. He later added forty 
acres to his holdings, so that his farm now comprises one hundred and two 
acres. It is said that in the early days he could \Aow a straighter furrow across 
eighty acres of land with a yoke of oxen with no reins nor anything to guide his 
team but "gee" and "haw" than can be done today with a team of horses and 
the best plow manufactured. He engaged in general farming for many years, 
success steadily attending his well directed and practical labors, and he accumu- 
lated finally a comfortable competency, on which he was able to retire from 
active business life. He has given over the management of the homestead to 
his son and daughter, who care for their father in his old age. 

In Lansing township, in 1868, Mr. Frahm married Miss Mary \\'essel, born 
in Hanover, Germany, August 7, 1840. When a young woman she crossed the 
Atlantic to America, landing in this country after a journey of forty-nine days. 
After her arrival she worked for wages in order to obtain the money to pay 
for her passage over, and her life was afterward filled with the hard work 
always to be found upon a farm. .Ml difficulties she faced with confidence and 
courage, proving a worthy helpmate to her husband and aiding him materially 
in his struggle upward to success. She passed away in Lansing township, August 
8, 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Frahm became the parents of five children, two of 
whom survive, Sophia and Henry. They live upon the homestead, Henry 
managing the work of the farm and Sophia taking charge of household matters. 

For the past fifty years Mr. Frahm has been a member of the German 
Methodist church. He affiliated with the republican party until the election in 
November, 191 2, when he allied his interests with the progressives. He is a 
splendid example of the self-made man, for, unaided by capital or influential 
friends, he has worked out his own success. His life of toil and labor has been 
crowned with a gratifying measure of prosperity and by his perseverance, industry 
and integrity he has won an honored name as well as success. 



CHARLES H. KRL'.MM. 

No citizen in Allamakee county has achieved greater success as a general 
agriculturist and stock-raiser than Charles H. Krumm. whose attractive home- 
stead lies in Post township and comprises one hundred and eight acres of land. 
He was born in Mechlenberg. Germany, September 6. i860, and is a son of 
John and Caroline (Freil) Krumm, natives of the same locality, where the 
mother died in 1870. Eight years later the father crossed the Atlantic 



J^ ^ 




CHARLES H. KRUMM 




MRS. CHARLES H. KRUMM 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 125 

to America, joining his son who had located in Iowa some years before. He 
settled on a farm south of Garnavillo, where he remained for seven years, retiring 
from active life at the end of that time and making his home with his sons until 
his death in 1885. In Germany he had served in the regular army, having begun 
his term of enlistment in 1848. He never neglected any of the duties which fell 
to his lot as a man and as a citizen, and his death was widely and deeply regretted 
in the community where his many sterling traits of character had become well 
known. 

Charles H. Krumm acquired his education in the public schools of Germany 
and when he was eighteen years of age accompanied his father to America, 
settling in Clayton couniy, Iowa, where for a number of years he engaged in 
farming in the employ of others. He was ambitious, industrious and energetic 
and by the time he was twenty-two had accumulated enough money to rent land, 
following farming as a renter until he purchased his present property of one 
hundred and thirteen acres in Allamakee county. Upon this he has since made 
substantial improvements, erecting modern buildings, installing the neccessary 
equipment and steadily carrying forward the work of development along prac- 
tical and progressive lines. In addition to this property he owns a five acre 
timber tract two miles north of his farm and a large amount of stock in the 
Postville Clay Products Company and in the Cooperative Creamery. Most of 
his attention is, however, given to his stock-raising interests, which have contin- 
ually increased in volume and importance and which now form one of the most 
profitable sources of his income. He makes a specialty of breeding and 
raising full blooded Poland China hogs and his shipping business has expanded 
rapidly, his markets last year covering^ fourteen dififerent states. For a number 
of years he bred cattle on an extensive scale but he has since discontinued this 
branch of his business and now raises only milch cows for dairy purposes. His 
business interests are always carefully and capably conducted, gaining him a 
gratifying measure of success and a place among the representative farmers 
and stock raisers in this vicinity. 

On the 1 6th of January, 1882, Mr. Krumm married Miss Minnie Schierholz, 
who was born in Garnavillo township, Clayton county, November 11, 1856 a 
daughter of Herman and Anna (Taugeman) Schierholz, natives of Germany 
the father born in Oldenburg in 1805 and the mother in the province of Hanover 
in 1816. Mr. Schierholz came to America when he was twenty-eight years of 
age, spending three months on the Atlantic. Landing in New Orleans he walked 
from that city to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and there secured emplovment as 
a cabinet-maker and carpenter, trades which he had learned in the fatherland 
Later he removed to Ohio, settling on a farm near New Bremen, whereon he 
resided until 1845, when he came as a pioneer into Iowa, taking up a grant of 
government land in Garnavillo township, Clayton county. He steadily carried 
forward its improvement and cultivation until 1890, when he retired from active 
life and moved into Garnavillo where he passed away in 1897, at the remarkable 
age of ninety-one years, nine months and thirteen days. His wife had died 
in 1891. He was one of the first settlers in Garnavillo township and no man 
was more familiar with pioneer conditions in that section of the state than he 
for he made his first settlement there when it was a mere frontier district and 



126 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLA.MAKEE COUNTY 

when the Indians were yet numerous on the prairies. He witnessd the great 
government round-up of three thousand Indians at Garnavillo and he liought 
the first reaper ever used in this part of Iowa. In his death, Clayton county 
lost one of her honored pioneer citizens and his passing was sincerely regretted by 
all who were fortunate enough to come within the close circle of his friendship. 

Mr. and Mrs. Krumm became the parents of six children, three of whom 
are deceased. Those living are: Alice, who was born March 13, 1887, and who 
married H. F. Schmidt, superintendent for the Johnson Brothers Manufacturing 
Company at Madison, Wisconsin; Minnie Elizabeth, who was born August 27, 
1888, and resides at home; and Effie Roselea, whose birth occurred on the 5th 
of November, 1894. 

Fraternally Mr. Krumm is aiifiliated with the Masonic order, holding member- 
ship in Brotherly Love Lodge at Postville. the chapter at Elgin, the commandery 
at West Union and the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Cedar Rapids. He is 
identified also with the Modern Brotherhood, the Yeoman and the Turner 
Society. His religious views are in accord with the doctrines of the German 
Lutheran church and politically he is independent, voting according to his per- 
sonal convictions without regard to party lines. .Mthough he has never sought 
nor desired public office he was for a number of years treasurer of the school 
board and during that time did a great deal of important work in school affairs. 
He is a progressive, enterprising and loyal citizen and, having thoroughly 
identified his interests with those of this part of Iowa, has made substantial and 
lasting contributions to its agricultural growth and ])rogress. 



THOMAS ELLINGSON. 

Among the many upright, able and rejiresentative citizens whom Norway 
has given to America is numbered Thomas Ellingson, whose entire active life has 
l)een devoted to agricultural ])ursuits in Iowa. In association with his wife he 
owns four hundred and si.xty-two acres in Hanover township and extensive 
holdings in \\ inneshiek county and he has gained a high place in agricultural 
circles of this vicinity, where he is recognized as an al)le and progressive farmer. 
He was i)orn in Norway in 1869 and with his parents came to America in 1873, 
settling with them in .Mlamakee county. The father here turned his attention 
to farming and continued to engage in that occupation until his death, which 
occurred in i8<)3. His wife survives him and makes her home in Winneshiek 
county. ']"() their union were born eleven children, eight of whom still sur- 
vive. 

Thomas I'"llingson remained at home until he was nineteen years of age and 
then Ijegan his independent career, working as a farm laborer for six years 
thereafter. At the end of tliat time he began farming for himself and he has 
since accumulated valuable land holdings, which he owns in association with 
his wife. The home farm comj^rises four hundred and sixty-two acres lying in 
Hanover township and is an excellent and well improved property, equipped with 
fine buildings and modern machinery. Mr. Ellingson owns also one hundred 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 127 

and sixty acres in Winneshiek county and Iiis business interests are carefully 
and capably conducted. 

In April, 1894. Mr. Ellingson was united in marriage to Miss Ella Hanson, 
who was born in Hanover township, this county, in 1873. She is a daughter of 
Hans A. and Maren Hanson, natives of Norway, who came to America and 
settled in Allamakee county, Iowa, where their marriage occurred. The father 
bought a farm on section 29 and gave his entire attention to its development 
and improvement until 1897, when he retired from active life, purchasing a home 
in Waukon, in which he resided until his death, which occurred in 1910. He 
was at that time the owner of five hundred and eighty-two acres of improved 
land, two hundred of which were in a high state of cultivation. He was very 
active in local republican politics and held various positions of trust and respon- 
sibility, filling almost all of the township offices. His wife passed away in 
1898. To their union were born nine children, six of whom still survive. Mr. 
and Airs. Ellingson have become the parents of eight children : Harris M., who 
was born in 1895; Mabel H., whose birth occurred in 1898; Kenneth T.,' born 
m 1900; Mildred A., in 1903; Alden E., in 1904; Carl J., in 1907; Lester M., 
in 1909; and Ella T., in 1913. 

Mr. Ellingson is a member of the Lutheran church and is a man of exemplary 
character, guiding his honorable and upright life by the principles in which he 
believes. Indefatigable energy is perhaps his strongest characteristic and it has 
led him forward in his business relations to a prominent place among the success- 
ful farmers of his township. 



LOUIS HIRTH. 



No farmer m Allamakee county has achieved greater success in agricultural 
pursuits and stock-raising than Louis Hirth, now operating the farm in Lansing 
township upon which he was born. A spirit of enterprise and progress actuates 
hmi in all that he does and his well directed energies have brought him to a place 
among the well-to-do and substantial men of this community. He was born 
on the farm where he now resides January 24, 1858, and is a son of Adam and 
Margaret Hirth, natives of Germany. The father was born in Baden and in 
1853 came to America, settling on a farm on section 18, Lansing township, in 
that year. One of the first settlers in that section, he found pioneer conditions 
everywhere surrounding him but, undiscouraged by this, turned his attention with 
characteristic energy to improving and developing his property. Upon the three 
hundred and twenty acres which he bought he built a log cabin, later replacing 
this by a second and more commodious log house. .As the years went bv he 
prospered in his undertakings and upon his death in 1864 was considered one of 
the most substantial and successful farmers of this vincinity. He was a member 
of the German Methodist church and a republican in his political beliefs. He 
and his wife became the parents of six children: Mary, who married Adam 
Decker, of Lansing township; Adam, who lives in Dubuque, Iowa; Barbara, 
who married William Wendell, of Lansing township: -Annie, a resident of 
Vancouver island, British Columbia, and the widow of William May, who was 



128 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

killed in a snow slide; Louis, of this review; and Andrew, who makes his home 
in Lansing. 

In the district schools of Lansing township Louis llirth acquired his early 
education, later attending for one term a school at Galena, Illinois. His child- 
hood was spent upon the homestead and even before he laid aside his books he 
assisted with its operation, later giving his entire time to aiding his mother. 
When he was twenty-one years of age he and one of his brothers purchased 
the interests of the other heirs and for several years thereafter conducted the 
homestead. Eventually Air. Hirth of this review disposed of his share of the 
farm to his brother and went to Hanover township, where he purchased land. 
After farming successfully in that section for ten years he returned to the old 
home and bought the farm from his brother, now owning the original tract of 
three hundred and twenty acres, which has been in possession of his family for 
sixty years. Upon this he has made substantial improvements, building a new 
and attractive residence, a barn and a silo and all the necessary outi)uildings. 
Since the beginning of his active career he has engaged extensively in the breed- 
ing of high-grade Percheron horses and keeps registered stallions and mares. 
He also raises full-blooded Poland China hogs and Aberdeen Angus cattle, his 
stock-raising interests constituting an important source of his income. 

On the 27th of February, i88g, Mr. Hirth was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Wild, a native of Allamakee county and a daughter of George Wild, of 
French Creek township. Mrs. Hirth passed away December 19, 191 1, leaving six 
children : Frank, who lives at home ; Cora, who recently married Ed Lentz, 
with whom she makes her home in Minnesota ; and Xora, Flavia, Christina 
and Kermit, all of whom live at home. 

Mr. Hirth is a progressive republican in his political views and is interested 
in public affairs, keeping himself always well posted on national and local issues. 
He is active and able in business, progressive in citizenship and upright and hon- 
orable in all relations of life — a native son whose life record is a credit to the 
community in which he was born. 



FRED W. DU\'AL. 



A young man not yet thirty years of age, Fred W. Duval has already estab- 
lished himself as one of the substantial agriculturists of Allamakee county, 
cultivating a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, near Postville, which is 
highlv improved and by its appearance gives evidence of the successful efforts of 
its owner. Born in Ludlow township, Allamakee county, on October 16, 1884, 
Fred W. Duval is a son of Henry and Anna (Menke) Duval, the father a native 
of Germany, where he was born in the city of Bremen, and the mother of 
Wisconsin. In early life the father learned and followed the carpenter's trade 
and upon coming to this country as a young man located in Allamakee county, 
east of Waukon, where in the employ of others he followed his occupation. He 
was so engaged until his marriage, when he purchased a farm in Ludlow town- 
ship, in the cultivation of which he successfully continued until his death, which 
occurred in 1896. The mother still resides on the home farm in Ludlow town- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 129 

ship. In tlicir family were eight children, of whom Mr. Duval is the third in 
order of birth. 

In the acquirement of his education Fred W. Duval attended district school 
in Ludlow township and subsequently made his home with his mother until about 
twenty-one years of age, when he began his independent career, hiring out as 
a farm hand and so continuing for three years. Thrift and industry brought 
him the means with which he was enabled to buy the farm upon which he now 
lives and which comprises one hundred and twenty acres of fertile land. All 
of his acres are under high cultivation and devoted to general farming, although 
he specializes in stock-raising to some extent. His thorough work, and energy 
and industry, have brought him rich harvests and, although yet young in years, 
he is on the high road to prosperity. 

On January 17, 1907, Mr. Duval w-as united in marriage to Miss Lena 
Klepper, a native of Ludlow township, this county, who was born December 9, 
1886. Her parents are Fred and Johanna (Bollhafer) Klepper, both natives of 
Germany. The father was reared to and always followed agricultural pursuits 
and upon coming to this country in the early '80s acquired land in Post township, 
which he later sold to our subject, buying subsequently a farm near Frankville 
in Winneshiek county, where he now lives, still actively engaged in the cultiva- 
tion of his farm. Mr. and Mrs. Klepper have six children, of whom Mrs. Duval 
is the oldest. Mr. and Mrs. Duval are the parents of two children : Clarence, 
born March 21, 1908; and Viola, born August 19, 1910. Mr. Duval is a member 
of the German Reformed church at Ludlow. Enterprising and progressive, he 
has in a few years builded a success which might well be envied him, for there 
are many who in a lifetime do not accomplish as much as he has done. He has 
become a valuable factor in his locality and, while he is careful of his own inter- 
ests, he ever finds time to promote worthy public enterprises and gladly bears 
his share of time and money in promoting the welfare and advancement of 
his district. 



FRED RISER. 



Upon the list of Allamakee county's honored pioneers appears the name of 
Fred Riser, whose residence in this section dates from 185 1 and whose active 
career has been closely identified with its growth and development. He has borne 
an honorable and worthy part in the work which has transformed the region from 
a wilderness into a populous and wealthy community and he is today one of the 
most prominent and popular men of Lansing township, wdiere he is living retired. 
He was born in Berne, Switzerland, June 14, 1834, and is a son of John and 
Barbara (Orli) Riser, natives of that country, who emigrated to America about 
1843 ^nd settled on one hundred and sixty acres of government land in Madison 
county, Illinois. In 185 1 they sold the farm and moved to Allamakee county, 
Iowa, after the father and his son John had made two trips to this state and to 
Minnesota looking for a suitable location. Having finally determined upon 
Lansing township John Riser purchased three hundred and twenty acres of 
school land, unimproved, and while he was engaged in building a stable upon 



i:iO PAST AND PRESENT OI' ALLAMAKEE COUXTV 

this property he and his family lived in a rude shanty on the Andrew T. Sandry 
property. They made their home in the stable for some time after it was com- 
pleted and then moved into a frame and log dwelling which they had erected 
and which still stands with the additions that have since been made. Both parents 
have passed awav. the mother dying in Madison county. Illinois, and the father 
in Lansing township when he was seventy-nine years of age. lie was a member 
of the Reformed church in Switzerland and in .\merica a devout adherent of the 
German Methodist Episcopal religion. In his family were five children besides 
the subject of this review: .Anna and Elizabeth, who passed away in Illinois; 
Christ, a retired farmer living in Lansing township ; John, who passed away in 
1907; and Peter, who died in 1902. 

Fred Riser was nine years of age when he was brought to the L^nited States, 
his ninth birthday having been spent on the Atlantic ocean. The family landed 
in New York, July 4. 1S43, after fifty-two days- on a sailing vessel, and from 
there they pushed onward to Madison county, Illinois, where the subject of this 
review remained until he was seventeen years of age and where he acquired 
such education as could be gained during a few months attendance at a country 
school. He came to Allamakee county with his father and assisted with the 
work of the homestead until after the latter's death, when the land was divided, 
Mr. Riser receiving as his share one hundred and si.xty acres, including the build- 
ings upon the farm. He made further improvements, erecting one of the largest 
barns in the township, and he steadily carried forward the work of development 
through the years, becoming one of the ]irosperous and substantial agriculturists 
of this vicinity and winning a competence sufficient to enable him to retire from 
active life. He sold his farm to his son Otto, with whom he continues to reside. 
Mr. Riser has been twice married. His first union occurred July 10, 1S54, 
when he wedded Miss Barbara Marti, a native of Switzerland, who passed away 
in 1862, leaving five children; John, deceased, who was a minister in the 
Methodist Episcopal church; Kate, the wife of John Sharff, of St. Paul, Min- 
nesota ; Fred, a practicing physician residing near Denver, Colorado ; Henry 
William, who formerly engaged in the jiractice of dentistry and who resides in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Jacob, a dentist of Spokane, Washington. On the 
lOth of March, 1864, Mr. Riser was again married, his second wife being Miss 
Eva Margaret Swartz, who has also passed away. She became the mother of 
thirteen children: (ieorge, deceased; Wesley, who resides in California; Matilda, 
also deceased, who was married and had two children, Fred and Theodore 
Fisher, the latter of whom makes his home with his grandfather, the subject of 
this review; Edward, who has passed awaj' ; Lidia, the wife of .Albert Ross, 
of Washington; Julia, who married Fred Sharff and makes her home with her 
father ; Otto, who recently jjurchased his father's farm ; Ida, who married John 
Long, of Montana ; Benjamin ; Selma, the widow of John \\"\\(] ; Gertrude, who 
married Philip Rogcnsack, of North La Crosse; Manda, who married Ben 
Feuerhelm. of Lansing township; and Adeline, who makes her home in Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Riser is a member of the German Methodist Episcopal church and helped 
in the erection of the church building. He was for many years in his early life 
a democrat in his political beliefs but of late has affiliated with the republican 
party. He was for some time a member of the board of school directors and 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 131 

served ablv and efficiently for one term as township assessor. At the age of 
seventy-nine he enjoys remarkable health considering his life of hard and unre- 
mitting work and in spirit and interests seems yet in his prime — a straightforward, 
honorable and progressive citizen, thoroughly alive to the best interests of the 
community he has aided so greatly in upbuilding. 



HENRY GRAMLICH. 



Henry Gramlich, one of the progressive and representative farmers of Alla- 
makee county, residing on a well improved property of two hundred acres on 
sections i8 and 19, Lansing township, was born upon this farm September 2~, 
1859. He is a son of Ernst F. Gramlich, one of the pioneers in Iowa, his resi- 
dence in this state dating from 1856. He was born in Baden, Germany, February 
22, 1826, and as a young man emigrated to America, where he first located in 
Ohio. He learned there the blacksmith's trade and worked at it successfully 
until he came to Iowa, purchasing in 1856 eighty acres of unimproved land in 
Allamakee county. He steadily carried forward the work of developing this 
property, building upon it a log house, in which he and his family lived for many 
years and which is still standing upon the homestead. Later Mr. Gramlich 
built a comfortable frame residence and in this made his home until he retired 
from active life about twenty-five years ago. The declining years of his life 
were spent at the home of his daughter Mrs. Frank Goettle, of Lansing town- 
ship, and he there died December 16, 1905. He was a man of exemplary char- 
acter and sterling worth, holding membership in the German Methodist Episcopal 
church, helping in the organization of the congregation and in the erection of the 
house of worship. He married in Ohio Miss Mary Kutcher, a native of (jcrmany, 
born May i, 1826. She passed away in Allamakee county in 1907. They became 
the parents of six children : George, who was born in Ohio and who passed away 
when he was still a child; John, a native of Allamakee county, also deceased; 
Mary, the wife of Henry Lenz, of Center township; Henry, of this review; 
Katie, who died at the age of eighteen ; and Emma, who married Frank Goettle, 
of Lansing township. 

Henry Gramlich acquired his education in the district schools of Lansing 
township and his childhood was similar to that of most farmers' sons in those 
days, his time being divided between his studies and work upon the homestead. 
After his father died he purchased the interests of the other heirs and assumed 
entire control of the farm, which is his today and which by practical and well 
directed labor he has made one of the finest properties in this vicinity. The 
land lies on sections 18 and 19 and comprises two hundred acres, upon which he 
engages in general farming. 

Mr. Gramlich married, in Allamakee county. May 22, 1888, Miss Christina 
Kumpf. a daughter of Fred and Dorothea Kumpf, natives of Germany. The 
parents were married in Dubuque, Iowa, and came to Allamakee county at an 
early day, and the father here engaged in farming until his death. His wife has 
also passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Gramlich became the parents of four children : 
Flora Emma, the wife of Ed Wessel. of Clayton county. Iowa; and Ella Jean- 



132 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

nette, Ed Frederick and Henry Dewey, all of whom live at home. The parents 
are members of the German Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Gramlich is a stanch republican in his political views and has held some 
responsible official positions, serving for twenty years as secretary of the school 
board and for twelve years as school director. In 1912 he was elected township 
trustee and is still serving, discharging his duties in an able and conscientious 
way. A resident of Allamakee county since his birth, he is well known here and 
by a life upright and honorable in all its relations has won the favorable regard 
of his neighbors. His success in the conduct of his farm places him in the 
front ranks of progressive agriculturists and he is undoubtedly a native son 
of whom the county has every reason to be proud. 



IRA E. SMITH. 



Ira E. Smith, a worthy native son and representative agriculturist of Alla- 
makee county, is the owner of an excellent farm of three hundred and sixty 
acres on section 9, Post township. He was born in that township, near his 
present farm, on the 5th of December, 1871, his parents being David and Marena 
(Barham) Smith, natives of Cole county, Indiana. Throughout his active busi- 
ness career the father followed general agricultural pursuits. When a boy he 
came to Iowa with his father, who built the old stone house and also erected the 
first sawmill in this vicinity. This was as early as 1838. David Smith grew 
to manhood here and experienced all the hardships and privations of pioneer life, 
in later years recounting many tales of frontier existence in a district which was 
but thinly settled and was still the habitat of wild animals. Much arduous 
toil was necessary before the land was ready for the plow. Mr. Smith devoted 
his attention to the work of grubbing and clearing and in the fall seasons operated 
a threshing machine. When about twenty years of age he became a landowner 
and during the remainder of his active life was busily engaged in the work of 
the fields. In 1900 he took up his abode in Frankville and there died in March 
of the following year. The period of his residence in this part of the state 
covered about six decades and in his passing the community lost one of its 
honored pioneers and esteemed citizens. His widow still survives and makes 
her home at Frankville. They were the parents of two children : Ida, who lives 
with her mother ; and Ira E., of this review. 

In the acquirement of an education Ira E. Smith attended school at Myron 
in Post township. When twenty years of age he secured employment as a 
farm hand and about a year later purchased one hundred and sixty-seven acres 
of land and started out as an agriculturist on his own account. He remained 
under the parental roof until twenty-four years of age, when he was married 
and took up his abode on his farm, residing thereon for seven years. On the 
expiration of that period he bought the old homestead property and subsequently 
lived thereon for eight years or until March, 191 1, w-hen he purchased an addi- 
tional tract of one hundred and twenty acres on section 9, Post township, where 
he has remained to the present time. He has disposed of some of his original 
holdings but still owns three hundred and sixty acres of valuable land and cul- 





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PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 135 

tivates all of it with the assistance of tenants. He raises both grain and stock 
and keeps high-grade horses, cattle and hogs, at times dealing in stock to a 
considerable extent. His work is conducted along practical and progressive 
lines and he is systematic in all he does, so that there is no loss of labor 
or material, and the fields annually pay tribute to his efforts in rich and bounteous 
crops. 

On the 19th of November, 1895, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
Jennie Smith, whose birth occurred in Post township on the 9th of July, 1875, 
her parents being John N. and Susan (Lee) Smith, born in the years of 1828 and 
1838 respectively. The father, a native of New York, was a stage owner in 
early manhood, driving from Decorah to McGregor until twenty-five or twenty- 
six years of age. At that time he located on a farm in the eastern part of Post 
township, continuing to reside thereon until called to his final rest in July, 1895. 
His widow makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Ira Smith. The latter was the 
youngest in their family of eight children, of whom but two are now living, 
namely : Ida, the wife of Samson A. Harris, a sketch of whom appears on 
another page of this work; and Mrs. Smith, the wife of our subject. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ira E. Smith have four children, as follows: Lester D., whose natal day 
was December 18, 1897; Pearl R., whose birth occurred February 28, 190 1 ; 
Clinton E., born June 20, 1905 ; and Ethelyn L., who was born on the 14th of 
March, 1909. 

Mr. Smith is a republican in his political views and held the office of trustee 
for one term but declined to serve longer. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the United Brethren church at Bethel, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Modern Brotherhood and the Woodmen. Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith have an extensive acquaintance in the county where they have always 
resided, and it is therefore with pleasure that we present this record of their 
lives to our readers. 



DAVID W. DOUGLASS. 

The real builders and promoters of Allamakee county have largely been the 
men who came into this region when it was an unimproved tract and utilized 
its natural resources, transforming the wild prairie land into rich and productive 
fields, the products of which constitute the chief source of the county's wealth. 
David W. Douglass, now residing in W'aukon, is one of those who have contrib- 
uted in substantial measure to the country's development and advancement, for 
he opened up and improved a number of new farms, which he developed in 
accordance with modern agricultural methods. He is further entitled to a 
place among the honored men of this section as a veteran of the Civil war. 
Mr. Douglass has been a resident of Iowa for sixty years but was born in .Vyr- 
shire, Scotland, September 3, 1838, and is a son of David and Catherine Douglass, 
also natives of Scotland. The father crossed the Atlantic to America about the 
year 1849 and located in Lake county, Illinois, where he was joined by his wife 
and son in 1851. Two years later they moved to Iowa and located in Ludlow 



136 PAST AND PRESEXT OE ALLAMAKEE COUXTY 

township, Allamakee county, where the father purchased an eightv acre tract 
of land, which he cultivated and improved until his death. 

David W. Douglass was a lad of fifteen when he came with his parents to 
Iowa. He grew up on his father's farm and in his childhood broke the raw 
soil with ox teams and aided in the development and improvement of the property. 
On the nth of April, 1862, he joined the Union army, enlisting in Company B, 
Sixteenth Regular L^nited States Infantry. Second Battalion, and with his com- 
pany was sent to Columbus, where a camp of instruction was maintained. The 
regiment remained there only a short time and was then ordered to the front, 
where it participated in fourteen important engagements, including that of Stone 
River, where it went into battle one thousand strong and came out with one hun- 
dred survivors, the others having been killed, wounded or taken prisoner. He took 
part in the battles of Chickamauga, the first and second engagements at Buzzards 
Roost, the engagement at Resaca, Georgia, at Xew Hope church, at Kenesaw 
Mountain, Rough Station, Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro and Atlanta. At Stone 
River Mr. Douglass received a gunshot wound in the breast but was not disabled, 
continuing his active service until the close of the war. He was mustered out, 
above the clouds on the top of Lookout Mountain, April 11, 1865, two days after 
Lee's surrender, having gained promotion from the ranks to the position of 
corporal in December. 1864. He later served on detached duty at brigade head- 
quarters, acting for the First Division of the Fourteenth Army Corps. 

After his discharge Mr. Douglass returned to Iowa and made his home upon 
his father's farm. In the following year he fitted out a breaking outfit, consist- 
ing of a large breaking plow and a five-yoke team of oxen, and with this he 
engaged in breaking the prairie soil for one season. He married in 1867 and 
in the same year purchased one hundred and sixty acres of raw land, of which 
he broke eighty, selling the other half of his property. He farmed upon this 
tract of land for ten years, disposed of it at the end of that time at a profit and 
moved to Worth county, low^a, where he rented land and farmed for one year. 
Returning to Allamakee county, he purchased eighty acres in the vicinity of 
Waukon and spent ten years upon the property, bringing it to a high state of 
development. He eventually sold this farm also and for two years thereafter 
rented land, buying at the end of that time another tract near Waukon. This 
was already improved to some extent but Mr. Douglass carried forward the 
work of development along modern lines and when he disposed of it received 
fifty dollars per acre. At that time he moved into Waukon and purchased a 
home but afterward sold it and went to Oklahoma, where he again turned his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits, purchasing a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres, which he held for a time and later sold at a handsome profit. Since 
taking up his residence permanently in this city he has bought and sold a great 
deal of residence property and also bought and sold another farm. His unre- 
mitting diligence has brought him success, which enables him to put aside further 
business cares, and he is now living retired, having earned leisure and rest by 
many years of well directed labor. 

In 1867 Mr. Douglass was united in marriage to Miss Adaline D. Ewing. who 
was born in Perry county, Indiana. She is a daughter of James B. Ewing. a 
native of Ohio, who grew to manhood in that state and there married Elizabeth 
French, of Kentucky. Mr. Ewing moved into Iowa in 1853 and was one of the 



PAST AXD I'RESKXT Ul'" ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 137 

early settlers in Eranklin townshi]), Allamakee county. He became well known 
as the tallest man in this part of the state, being six feet, eight inches in height, 
and he was universally known as Uncle Jim Ewing. Mr. and Mrs. Douglass 
became the parents of three sons and four daughters. James L, makes his home 
in South Dakota. Mary is the wife of George Ralston, of Jefferson township, 
Allamakee county. Alexander W. acted for some time as superintendent and 
manager of an eighteen hundred acre grain farm in North Dakota, near James- 
town. He was a soldier in the Spanish-American war, serving first as corporal 
and later as lieutenant of militia. He now resides at home. William W. is a 
farmer in .\llamakee county. Anna became the wife of Charles Welch, of 
Beulah Station. Jessie married Robert Adams, of Lincoln, Nebraska. Agnes 
grew to maturity and was for some time a stenographer in Chicago. She died 
February 2, 1907, at the age of twenty years. 

Mr. Douglass has been affiliated with the republican party since its organiza- 
tion and is one of its most loyal and earnest supporters. He is a member of 
John J. Stillman Post, G. A. R., and for years has served as officer of the 
day at all functions and parades of the organization. Few men in Allamakee 
countv are more widely and favorably known than Mr. Douglass, who has 
made his home here since he was a lad of fifteen and who in the sixty years 
which have since intervened has opened up and developed several new farms, 
his labors constituting an important element in the general agricultural advance- 
ment. Now, that he has passed the seventy-fourth mile-stone on life's journey, 
he is enjoving a well earned rest, which is the natural reward of his former life 
of toil. His fellow townsmen honor and respect him and wherever he is known 
he has an extensive circle of friends. 



WILLIAM Mclaughlin. 

Although thirty years have elapsed since William McLaughlin passed away 
on his farm in Hanover township, there are many in this vicinity who still 
remember his sterling qualities of character and his business progressiveness and 
who respect the substantial contributions which he made to the agricultural 
development of this part of the state. He was one of the pioneers in Allamakee 
county, coming here in 1856, and in the work of progress and expansion he bore 
an active and honorable part through the years, becoming known as one of the 
substantial and representative farmers of his township. 

William McLaughlin was born in Ireland in 1820 and he spent his youth 
and early manhood in his native country. In 1852 he came to America, and 
settling in New York, followed railroad contracting for a few years. In 1856 
he came to Iowa and made his home in Allamakee county in pioneer times. After 
a year he bought land on Bear creek, Hanover township, and from that time until 
his death continued to engage in farming, success coming as a natural result 
of his energy, ability and enterprise. Pioneer conditions prevailed throughout 
the countv at the time of his location here, but the hardships and privations of 
this life were met with confidence and courage. From time to time he bought 
more land, his last purchase being a fine tract on the Iowa river upon which he 



138 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

continued to reside until his death. He passed away on the 14th of May, 1883, 
and since that time his wife and one of his sons have operated the homestead 
which comprises four hundred and twenty acres lying on sections 4, 3 and 9. 
They have ably carried forward the work which Mr. McLaughlin began in pioneer 
times and have today a productive, well improved and well equipped farm, evi- 
dencing everywhere the many years of care and labor which have been spent 
upon it. Mrs. McLaughlin and her son operate this as a stock farm, making 
a specialty of raising and selling high-grade cattle, horses and hogs. 

Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin became the parents of seven children. William 
makes his home in Ryder, North Dakota. Margaret is teaching school. 
Katherine is a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota. John is engaged in farming 
in Hanover township. He married Miss Mary O'Meara, a native of Allamakee 
county, and they have seven children : Donald, born in 1900; Mary Bernice, born in 
1905; John Bertrand and Dorothy Marie, twins, born in 1907; James Melvin, 
1909; Ralph Edmond, 191 1; and Genevieve J., 1913. Thomas, the fifth child 
born to Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin, lives upon the homestead. Josephine resides 
in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Celia, the youngest, became the wife of William 
Collins of this county. 

Mr. McLaughlin was a devout member of the Roman Catholic church and 
was a democrat in his political beliefs, taking an active interest in public ai?airs. 
He served for two terms as assessor of his township and proved able, conscien- 
tious and reliable in the discharge of his duties. He was a man of many sterling 
traits of character, trustworthy in business, progressive in citizenship and faith- 
ful to all ties and obligations of life — and thus it was that in his passing Alla- 
makee county lost one of her most valued and useful citizens. 



HENRY MARTL 



Henry Marti has been in an influential way for many years connected with 
farming interests of Lansing township and his labors have contributed much 
toward the agricultural development of the community. He owns four hundred 
and eighty acres lying on section 31, a well improved and valuable property, 
reflecting in its neat and attractive appearance the careful supervision and prac- 
tical methods of the owner. 

Mr. Marti was born on what is known as the old Jacob Marti farm in Makee 
township, September 23, 1863, and is a son of Jacob Marti, of whom further men- 
tion appears elsewhere in this volume. He acquired his education in the district 
schools of his native section and after laying aside his books remained upon the 
homestead until he was twenty-seven years of age, at which time he went to 
Le Mars, where for two years he engaged in business. Returning to Allamakee 
county at the end of that time, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
buying the Roth farm of two hundred and thirty-six acres in Lansing township. 
Since that time he has engaged in farming and stock-raising and success has 
steadily attended his well directed activities. In 1913 he purchased the Kefiler 
farm, this transaction making him the owner of four hundred and eighty acres 
of good land, upon which there are two complete sets of improvements. His 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 139 

methods are practical and, therefore, productive of good results and his pros- 
perity places him today among the substantial and representative farmers of the 
community. 

In 1893 Mr. Marti married Miss Emma Roth, who was born upon the farm 
where she and her husband now reside. They have nine children, Gara Elizabeth, 
Selma Catherine, Walter Jacob, Roy Henry, Elsie Sophia, Harry William, Albert 
Herman, Willard George and Mildred Emma, all of whom live at home. The 
parents are devout members of the Congregational church. 

Mr. Marti is not affiliated with any political party, preferring to vote inde- 
pendently according to his personal convictions. He is especially interested in 
educational affairs and has done much to promote the cause of educational 
advancement through his able service as school director. He is connected with 
business interests of this section as a director in the Cooperative Creamery Com- 
pany. .A. man of broad experience, his labors have not only proven an element 
in his own progress and prosperity but have also constituted a feature in the 
development of the township, while his genial and social disposition and his 
unfailing courtesy have made him very popular among his fellow citizens and 
have gained for him their warm regard and friendship. 



LEWIS DRAKE. 



Lewis Drake, now serving as clerk of Center township, is not only a popular 
and able official but also one of the most progressive and successful farmers 
of Allamakee, his native county. He owns two hundred acres of land on 
section 23 and upon this farm he was born March 9, 1871. His father, John 
Drake, was a native of Canada but was reared in New York state, where he 
remained until he was twenty-four years of age. From New York he went to 
Michigan, working in the lumber camps in the winter and in the sawmills in 
summer and continuing thus until 1868, when he came to Allamakee county. 
Here he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of slightly improved land, erected 
thereon good buildings and engaged in general farming until his death, which 
occurred March 17, 1908, when he was seventy-three years of age. He was a 
republican in his political beliefs and active in local politics, holding various 
important township offices and acting as township clerk at the time of his demise. 
He married, in Michigan, Miss Sarah J. Curley, who was born in Canada but 
reared in the Wolverine state. They became the parents of five children : 
Frank, engaged in the real-estate business in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Lewis, 
of this review ; Jennie, who died at the age of twenty-four : C. C, a traveling 
salesman with headquarters in Sedalia, Missouri; and Clarence, who died in 
childhood. The mother passed away February 5, 1904. She was a member of 
the Presbyterian church. 

Lewis Drake acquired his education in the district schools of Center township 
and grew to manhood upon his father's farm, learning at an early age the various 
details connected with the operation of the homestead. After his father's death 
he purchased the interests of the other heirs and is now sole proprietor of the 
home place, which is called Lyndale and which is today one of the tmest farms 



140 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

in this locality. Since the death of his father Mr. Drake has been serving as 
township clerk and has proven eminently well qualified for the office, discharging 
his duties in a conscientious, able and progressive way. 

Mr. Drake married Miss Grace M. Phipps, a native of Allamakee county and 
a daughter of M. T. Phipps, a prominent farmer of La Fayette township. They 
are the parents of a daughter. Myrtle E., and a son, John Lewis. Mr. Drake 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party and in matters of citizenship 
is progressive and public-spirited, taking an active interest in everything pertain- 
ing to the general growth and development. He has spent his entire life in 
this part of Iowa and his honorable connection with its official life and its agri- 
cultural interests, combined with his many excellent personal characteristics, have 
gained him an enviable reputation in the regard of those with whom he is 
associated. 



HENRY ENGELHORN. 

Henry Engelhorn, an enterprising farmer and stock-raiser of Allamakee 
county, is a native of the county and was born on the farm he now occupies, June 
13, 1875. He is a son of Mathias Engelhorn, a native of Germany, who was 
brought to America by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Engelhorn. They were 
among the early settlers of Lansing township, residing for many years upon a 
farm adjoining the ])lace now owned by the subject of this review. Mathias 
Engelhorn grew to manhood there and afterward engaged in farming on his 
own account, purchasing two hundred acres of land slightly improved. The old 
log house which he erected upon his holdings still stands but he later built 
a larger frame dwelling, now occupied by his son. The father died upon this 
farm April 16, 1896. He had been twice married. His first wife was in her 
maidenhood Miss Margaret Schmidt, by whom he had three children : Abraham, 
who makes his home in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin ; Sam, who died in Oregon ; 
and George, who passed away when he was a child. A'lathias Engelhorn's second 
wife was Miss Dora Westphal, a native of Germany, who died at the home of 
her son on the 7th of March, 191 1. She was the mother of six children: Henry, 
the subject of this review; Elizabeth, the wife of Theodore lieyer, of Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin; Bertha, who married J. W. Wendel, of Lansing township; Emma, 
who died in childhood; Annie, the wife of Ben Decker, of Church, Iowa; and 
Sophia, the deceased wife of William Mueller, of Davenport, Iowa. 

Henry Engelhorn spent his childhood on his father's farm, dividing his time 
between his studies at the district school and the work upon the homestead. 
Having been reared upon a farm, he naturally turned to agricultural pursuits 
for a life work and after the death of his father purchased the interests of the 
other heirs to the property and assumed the ownership and control. He owns 
two hundred and twenty-two acres on sections 31 and 32, Lansing township, 
a valuable property with good improvements all made by himself and his father. 
He is a practical and progressive agriculturist and his well directed labors have 
been rewarded by a substantial degree of success, placing him among the men 
of prominence in this community. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 141 

On the 23d of December, 1902, Mr. Engelhorn married Miss Frances Spieler, 
a daughter of Jacob Spieler, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Engelhorn became the parents of three children : Clarence, 
who died in infancy; and Walter and Oscar. The parents are members of the 
Congregational church. 

Mr. Engelhorn is one of the well known men of this township, where his 
entire life has been spent and where his upright and honorable qualities of 
character and his genuine personal worth are known and honored. A republican 
in his political lieliefs, he has never sought to figure prominently in public life but 
in business has proven capable and reliable, and his intense and well directed 
activity is now bringing him a gratifying measure of prosperity. 



FRANK GALLAGHER. 

Among Hanover township's extensive landowners and prosperous farmers 
and among Allamakee county's most progressive and prominent native sons is 
numbered Frank Gallagher, who owns and operates six hundred and fifty-three 
acres of fine land, the neat and attractive appearance of which is a visible evidence 
of his life of industry and thrift. He was born in 1866 and is a son of Patrick 
and Ellen (Butler) Gallagher, natives of Ireland, who came to America at the 
age of twenty-six and eighteen respectively. Shortly after their arrival in this 
country their marriage occurred and they settled in New York state, where they 
continued to reside for fourteen years. In 1854 they moved to Iowa and settled 
in Union Prairie township, Allamakee county, where the father purchased land, 
which he operated until 1879. In that year he disposed of his holdings and came 
to Hanover township, where he again purchased land, operating this farm, which 
comprised one hundred and fifty-three acres, until he retired from active life. 
He was one of the early settlers in this part of Iowa and when he first took up 
his residence upon his farm in Hanover township his nearest market was at 
Lansing, twenty-seven miles away. He still makes his home in Iowa and is one 
of the venerable men of this state, having passed the age of one hundred years. 
He has long survived his wife, who died in 1890. Seven children were born to 
their union, of whom five are still living: Johanna, the wife of James Ryan, of 
Frankville, Iowa; Mary, at home; Thomas, of Allamakee county; Eliza, the wife 
of James Martin, also of this county; and Frank, of this review. 

The last named acquired his education in the public schools of Allamakee 
county. He was reared at home and by assisting with the work of the farm 
acquired at an early age a practical knowledge of the details of farm operation. 
When he was twenty-eight he assumed the conduct of his father's homestead and 
has managed this property since that time, although he has added largely to his 
holdings. At present he owns six hundred and fifty-three acres of well improved 
land, with four hundred acres in a high state of cultivation, besides an interest 
in a two hundred and forty acre tract in Minnesota. The Iowa farm lies on 
sections 28 and 33, Hanover township, and is an excellent property in every par- 
ticular, equipped with a fine residence, barns and outbuildings and the necessary 
machinery. Mr. Gallagher devotes practically his entire time to its cultivation 



142 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

and has been very successful, standing today in the front ranks of able and 
prosperous agriculturists. 

In 1890 Mr. Gallagher was united in marriage to Miss Maria Collins, who 
was born in Allamakee county, a daughter of James and Mary Collins. Mr. 
and Mrs. Gallagher have become the parents of five children : Patrick, who was 
born in 1892 and is at home; Loretta, born in 1895, the wife of A. Goshie, of 
South Dakota; James, whose birth occurred in 1896; and Francis and Leo, both 
deceased. Mr. Gallagher is a member of the Roman Catholic church and he 
gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. He has served his township 
capably as trustee and is always ready to cooperate in progressive public move- 
ments. There are few men in Allamakee county more widely and favorably 
known than he. for he has made his home in this part of Iowa since his birth and 
his upright and straightforward life has gained him the warm and lasting regard 
of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



ALONZO MARTIN MAY. 

Alonzo Martin May was born in the village of Scio, Allegany county, New 
York, on the 20th of March, 1838. He is a descendant of Sir Thomas May, of 
Mayfield, county of Sussex, England, located about forty miles south of London. 
In the family records the name has been written Mayes, Mays, Maies and May. 
Dorothy May, of this family, was the wife of William Bradford, who became 
governor of the Plymouth colony. She died on the voyage to America. The 
line of descent is: Thomas May, born at Mayfield, England, in 1590; John; 
Samuel ; Samuel, second of the name ; Eleazer ; Theodore ; Ellis ; Philander 
Franklin ; and Alonzo Martin. Theodore moved from Dedham, Massachusetts, 
to Washington county. New York, served in the Revolutionary war and was 
present at Burgoyne's surrender. Ellis followed farming at Union Village, 
Washington county, until 1832, when he moved to Allegany county. New York. 
He married Mary Wells and their fifth child was Philander Franklin. In 1835 
he married Laura Ann Matthews, of Wyoming county, New York, a descendant 
of one of the Pilgrim fathers and also of Revolutionary stock. To them were 
born seven children, the second being Alonzo Martin, of this review. When he 
was five years old his family moved west, the trip being made from New York 
overland in a prairie schooner, a covered wagon drawn by two horses. The 
party passed through Canada from Lewiston to Detroit, the Niagara and Detroit 
rivers being crossed on horse ferry boats. They reached Will county, Illinois, 
thirty-five miles south of Chicago, in .August, 1843, and there with five hundred 
dollars in silver the father purchased a quarter section of land and built upon 
it a fourteen by twenty frame house, one and a half stories high, the lumber 
having been hauled from Chicago. In 1846 he moved to Rock county, Wiscon- 
sin, and engaged in the manufacture of steel plows at Janesville, the first steel 
plows in the country having been made by his brother Harvey H. May, of 
Galesburg, Illinois. Disposing of this business in February, 1851, the father 
went to Green Lake county, where he again turned his attention to farming. 
There Alonzo Martin May completed a common-school education when he was 




ALONZO M. MAY 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 145 

fifteen years of age, having begun his studies in a select school over a wagon shop 
in New York state. The first school which he attended in Illinois was in a 
house made by setting up small trees or bushes, ten or twelve feet high, around 
a space about fifteen feet square, the roof being leafy branches of trees. Mr. 
May afterward attended Ripon College in Ripon, Wisconsin, and from there 
went to Reloit College, completing the course in that institution in 1864. In 
April, 1861, when the news came that Fort Sumter had been fired upon by the 
rebels, he with a large number of other students tendered his services to the 
government under the call for three months' men, and his company was assigned 
to the Second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers. L'nder the call the regiment 
did not see service in the field and Mr. Mav was afterward sworn in as a member 
of a regimental band at Beloit. He was taken sick when this band went to the 
front and secured a substitute, being, however, held to fill a vacancy should one 
occur. At the end of a year the regimental bands were mustered out and he went 
to Janesville, Wisconsin, to enlist, failing, however, to pass the medical examina- 
tion. .\gain. early in 1864. with a large number of students and professors in 
the colleges, he enlisted in Company D. Fortieth \\'isconsin Volunteers, his regi- 
ment being widely known as the "Students Regiment." Mr. May was at that 
time a member of the senior class, the seniors enlisting having passed their final 
examinations ahead of time for the purpose of going to the front and finding 
upon their honorable discharge their diplomas waiting for them at Beloit.' 
Alonzo Martin May's father also served for some months in the L^nion army and 
a brother, Isaac M. May, was for three years at the front, dying in a military 
hospital in Chicago while on his way home after having been mustered out. 

In 1867, having completed the course of study in the L'nion Theological 
Seminary in New York city, Alonzo Martin May was ordained by Bishop Potter 
of New York to the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal church and came west, 
locating in Waukon, Iowa, as rector of St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal church in 
that city. The membership, small at that time, was soon further depleted by 
removals and, Waukon being more than adequately provided for in the number 
of churches, Mr. May discontinued his services at the end of five years and 
transferred his membership to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
has since been an active member. He has been leader of the music and a chor- 
ister for more than fifty years and occasionally has served as a substitute for other 
pastors. He has always taken an active interest in the cause of education and 
has done much to promote its spread in Waukon, especially during the year of 
1868-9, when he had charge of the Waukon public schools. 

In January, 1868, Charles B. McDonald brought a newspaper plant from 
Blairstown to Waukon and established in this city the Waukon Standard. Mr. 
May, being familiar with the newspaper printing business, at once became 
identified with it and at the end of three months bought the outfit and may, 
therefore, properly be called the founder of the paper. He continued its principal 
proprietor and its editor for thirty-three years thereafter, making it one of the 
greatest forces in the promotion of numicipal progress and growth. At the 
end of that long period, on account of nervous prostration, he sold the plant to 
his son, Robert Bruce May. During the first year after Alonzo M. May assumed 
control his brother-in-law. R. L. Hayward, was associated with him in the busi- 
ness and afterward for nine years E. M. Hancock, who had learned the printing 



146 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

business in the office, was associated with him as a partner, taking principal 
charge of the operation of the journal, while Mr. May filled the position of 
official shorthand court reporter for the tenth judicial district of Iowa, compris- 
ing six counties. This office he resigned after thirteen years of capable service. 
During the last four years of this time his wife had principal charge of the edi- 
torial work and proved herself a capable and far-sighted business woman. ]\Ir. 
May was admitted to the bar, having passed the required examinations in June, 
1872, but never actively entered upon the legal profession. 

At Beloit, Wisconsin, on the 26th of July, 1865, Mr. Alay was united in 
marriage to Miss Augusta Mary Hayward, the second daughter of Hon. Paul 
Davis Hayward. who was born at Port Hope, Canada, although his parents were 
natives of the United States. A member of the family to which he belongs served 
in the Revolutionary war and signed the Declaration of Independence. Paul 
Davis Hayward married on October 14, 1837, at Norwalk. Ohio, Miss Anna 
Langford, a native of Ireland, and in 1841 they moved to Green Bay, Wisconsin, 
and thence to Kingston, in the same state, where Mr. Hayward was register 
of the U. S. land office and also county recorder of deeds. He became very 
prominent in state politics and was afterward elected to the legislature, serving 
for two terms with great ability and efficiency. He was in the Civil war as a 
member of the Union army and died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. 
R. J. Alexander, in Waukon, November 24, 1890. He had long survived his 
wife, who passed away in Canada, May 6, 1863. Their eldest son. George 
Washington Hayward, was born in Huron. r)hio, August 31, 1838, and was 
graduated from the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1861. He 
served in the Civil war, attained the rank of captain and died while on duty at 
Alexandria, Egypt, January 16, 1886. Their eldest daughter, Anna E. Hayward, 
is now Mrs. J. S. Gray, of Detroit, Michigan. Airs. May, the wife of the 
subject of this review, was born at Green Bay, Wisconsin. June 8, 1842. For 
seventeen years the family resided at Kingston, Wisconsin, where she attended 
the public schools, and she was also afterward a student at Ripon College. The 
next daughter, Ella M., was born August 5, 1844, and was for some time a 
resident of Waukon. She married Hon. D. F. ^Morgan, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, a member of the state senate for some years. Both have passed away. 
Richard L. Hayward was born August 5, 184(1, ^"fl in the Ci\il war fought as a 
member of the Fortieth Wisconsin Infantry, and was afterward connected with 
the first Wisconsin Cavalry. In i86g, after a year as foreman of the Standard 
office and partner in the controlling company, he went south on accoimt of 
failing health and died in Texas in 1882. Paul Davis Hayward, Jr., was born 
at Kingston. Wisconsin, in 1849, attended college at Beloit and in 1870 located 
in Chicago, where for twenty years thereafter he was prominentlv connected 
with a wholesale paper firm. He died in Brockville, Ontario, lune 7, 1890. 
Emma E. Hayward was born August 15, 1851. Sarah V. was born September 
25, 1852. They are now residing in Detroit, Michigan. Carrie L. was born 
June 30. 1857. and came to Waukon with her sister Mrs. J\Iay in 1867. She was 
a student of Cornell College, Iowa, and at Olivet College, Michigan. She 
married R. J. Alexander at Waukon, June 2j. 1883. For more than a third of 
a century Mr. Alexander has been one of the most successful clothincr merchants 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 147 

of the country and for many years has been an active member of the school 
board. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo AL May became the parents of eight children. Frank 
Hayward, the eldest son. was born in New York city, May 8, 1866. He learned 
the printing business and for some years was a partner in the Standard at 
Waukon. For the past twelve years he has held an important position with 
the Northwestern Newspaper L'nion of Chicago. Anna Laura was born in 
Floyd county, Iowa, August 4, 1867. She was graduated from the Waukon high 
school and afterward learned the printing business. She married, November 
20, 1888, Rev. G. N. Keniston, of the Methodist Episcopal church, and she died 
at Elkader, April 29, 1890. Jessie Ella was born in Waukon, October, 15, 1868, 
and acquired her education in the Waukon grammar and high schools. For ten 
years she has been confidential secretary to the New York manager of the 
United States Steel & Wire Company in New York city. Robert Bruce was 
born June 20, 1870. After completing his education in the public schools he 
learned the printer's trade and for some years thereafter was associate publisher 
and editor of the Standard and is now foreman of the Iowa Falls Sentinel. Lie 
married, October 4, 1893, Miss Lucy Taylor Stoddard, of Waukon, and they 
have one son, Robert Bertrand. Winifred was born September 21, 1874, and 
after graduating from the Waukon high school attended the Nora Springs 
Seminary and Cornell College. She also learned the printing business 
On the 5th of October, 1899, she married Ben D. Helming, one of the successful, 
progressive and substaintial farmers of this county. He is a son of Simon 
Helming and was born on the home farm, three miles west of Waukon, January 
29, 1874. Their children are as follows: Carolyn Elizabeth, born June 30, 1900; 
Dorothy Hager, born January 6, 1902: Paul Hayward, July 15, 1903; Benjamin 
David, Jr., August 10, 1905 ; Robert Bruce, February 20, 1907 ; Frederick, April 
25, 1910; and John Albert, March 28, 1912. Paul Davis was born March 18, 
1876, and after com])leting a high-school course was for some years connected 
with the Washburn-Moen Company of Chicago, after which he spent one year 
as purser of the United States ship Tacoma during the Spanish-American war. 
For three years he had charge of over three hundred miles of telegraph and 
telephone lines as a member of the United States signal service in the Philippines 
and he was for three years government clerk and storekeeper in the Panama 
canal zone. For a similar period of time he has been clerk in the United States 
adjutant general's office in Washington. He married in 1908 Miss Caroline 
Hansen, of Chicago. Langford was born in Waukon, February 5, 1878, grad- 
uated from the Waukon high school and took a two years' course at Cornell 
College. He was for several years in the employ of the Washburn-Moen Com- 
pany at Worcester, Massachusetts, and upon leaving that connection went to 
Meriden, Connecticut, where he became associated with the Columbia Roller Shade 
Company, acting as supervisor of construction of plants for that concern in 
Chicago and in Oswego, New York. In the summer of 19 12 he became superin- 
tendent of construction of an immense plant for the H. W. Johns-Manville 
Alanufacturing Company at Finderne, New Jersey. He married at Worcester, 
Massachusetts, Miss Florence Scott, and they have two children. Marian, the 
youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo M. May, was born March 7, 1880, and 
after graduating from the high school took a course in domestic science in Drexel 



148 PAST AKD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Institute, Philadelphia. On the 26th of December, 1908, she married Dr. Einar 
Onsum and after residing for a few years in North Dakota they went to his 
native city, Christiania, Norway, where he has now a large practice. They have 
one son, Einar Frederick, l)orn I-'ebruary 6, 191 1, and one daughter, born January 

19. 1913- 

Politically .^lonzo AI. May came into the republican party "on the ground 
floor," though not yet a voter when the first republican club, the beginning of 
the party, was organized March 20, 1854, at Ripon, Wisconsin, by Major A. E. 
Bovay. Mr. May has been in sympathy with the progressive element in the 
party represented in Iowa by such men as Larrabee, Cummins and Kenyon, and 
he has been at all times active and public-spirited in matters of citizenship. 
For some fifteen years he has served as clerk of the grand jury and at Des 
Moines was elected bill clerk of the house of representatives of Iowa for the 
1906 session. During the session of 191 1 he served as chief doorkeeper and was 
doorkeeper for the 1913 session, but these offices have been tendered to him 
without his seeking, for he has never been an active politician in this sense, 
although he has taken an active part in temperance work and in everything 
relating to the public welfare. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic 
lodge and Independent Order of Odd Fellows, organizations of which he has 
been an active member for some forty-three years. In 1883 he became a charter 
member of John J. Stillman Post, No. 194, G. A. R., and has been adjutant of 
the post for about thirty years, thus keeping in touch with his comrades of fifty 
years ago. Throughout a period of residence in this section of the state dating 
from pioneer times Mr. May has firmly entrenched himself in the respect and 
confidence of his fellow citizens and has taken an active, helpful and worthy 
part in the work of upbuilding and development. He has steadily adhered to the 
highest principles of business, personal and public integrity and has behind him 
a record of service that has been varied in activitv and faultless in honor. 



PATRICK DELANEY. 



Among Allamakee county's substantial and progressive agriculturists is num- 
bered Patrick Delaney, who since 1898 has resided upon his fine farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres in Hanover township. He was born in 1866 and is 
a son of James and Margaret Delaney, natives of Ireland, both of whom upon 
coming to America settled in Indiana, where their marriage occurred. They 
later removed to Iowa and in 1856 the father purchased land in Hanover town- 
ship, Allamakee county, a property which he operated until his death in 1906. 
His wife passed away in the same year. To their union were born ten chil- 
dren, eight of whom survive: Johanna, the wife of William O'Meara, of Minne- 
sota; Katherine, who married John Fitzgerald, of Tacoma, Washington; Ter- 
rence, of Hanover township; Patrick, of this review; Thomas, a merchant in 
Allamakee county; Mary E., who married Bryan Mahony, of Allamakee county; 
John, who resides in Hanover township; and James, who is operating his father's 
homestead. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAAIAKEE COUNTY 149 

Patrick Delaney was reared at home and he learned the details of farm 
ojieration through practical experience upon his father's property. At the age of 
twenty-seven he began farming for himself, renting land upon which he operated 
for five years thereafter. He then purchased one hundred and twenty acres in 
Hanover township and upon this property has resided since that time, steadily 
carrying forward the work of improvement and development and gaining recog- 
nition as one of the substantial and able men of this locality. 

Mr. Delaney was married in 1901 to Miss Anastasia Byrnes, a native of 
Allamakee county and a daughter of Thomas and Katherine Byrnes, natives 
of Ireland. The parents have passed away, the mother dying in 1908 and the 
father many years previously. Nine children were born to their union, as fol- 
lows : Eugene, who resides in North Dakota ; Annie, the wife of Thomas Collins, 
of Allamakee county ; Katherine, who married Michael Bresnahan, of Alla- 
makee county : Lawrence and Thomas, also of this county ; Anastasia, wife of 
the subject of this review; Ella, who married Michael Burke, of Allamakee 
county; Margaret; and Mary, the deceased wife of William Gavin, of Alla- 
makee county. Mr. and Mrs. Delaney became the parents of four children: 
James, born in 1903; Thomas B., who died when he was ten months old; John 
J., who died in infancy; and Margaret. The family are devout members of the 
Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Delaney is a stanch democrat and takes an intelligent interest in com- 
munity affairs, cooperating heartily in all measures for the public good. His 
life has been one of well directed activity, resulting in the attainment of a fair 
measure of success, and wherever he is known he is respected and esteemed 
by reason of his genuine personal worth. 



J. P. BECKER. 



Probably one of the best known and most popular men in Lansing township 
is J. P. Becker, familiarly known as "Colonel" Becker to his many friends. For 
thirty-six years he has been engaged in auctioneering here and now has a most 
important and extensive business of this kind, being associated with his son under 
the firm name of J. P. Becker & Son. He occupies a fine home upon a farm of 
two hundred and forty acres on section 34, a well improved and valuable property, 
reflecting in its neat and attractive appearance the care and skill of the owner. 
Air. Becker was born in Luxemburg, Germany, April 3, 1838, and is a son of 
Henry and Barbara (Fischer) Becker, who lived and died in the fatherland. Of 
their six children the subject of this review is the only one now living. A 
brother, Henry, came to America and was a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil war, enlisting from Eau Claire, Wisconsin. 

J. P. Becker acquired his education in the German public schools and after 
laying aside his books came to America, his nineteenth birthday having been 
passed on the ocean. After landing in New York he made his way westward 
to Ohio, where he spent three months, going from that state to Dubueiue, Iowa, 
and thence to La Crosse, Wisconsin. After spending a short period in each 
of those communities he was for two years a rafter on the Mississippi river and 



150 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

he afterward spent some time in St. Louis, returning north just before the 
outbreak of the Civil war. He purchased at this time eighty acres of land in 
Lansing township and upon this built a frame house which was later destroyed 
by fire. It was replaced by a second dwelling which still stands upon the prop- 
erty. In 1893 Air. Becker disposed of his original homestead and purchased on 
the same section one hundred and sixty acres of land, constituting the home 
of his wife's parents, upon which they had lived and died and upon which he and 
his wife now reside. For the past thirty-six or thirty-seven years Mr. Becker 
has been an auctioneer and is considered one of the most able men engaged in 
this line of business in Iowa. At one time he cried an auction in which four 
hundred and twenty-two sales were made during the day and he has often con- 
ducted large and important sales for three days in succession without apparent 
fatigue. He conducts his business in partnership with his son under the firm 
name of J. P. Becker & Son and he has secured a large patronage, for it is known 
that his business methods are honorable and upright, his integrity unquestioned 
and his ability of a high order, as is evidenced by the excellent results which 
have attended his labors. 

In Lansing township, on the 17th of December, 1862, Mr. Becker was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Hirt, a native of Luxemburg, Germany, born March 
24, 1839.. She is a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Yager) Hirt, who came 
to America in 1856 and in the same year settled on the farm now occupied by 
the subject of this review. Mr. and Mrs. Becker became the parents of nine 
children, of whom four are still living. Three died in infancy. Mary, who has 
also passed away, was the wife of Joe Duchien. Elizabeth, also deceased, mar- 
ried James Riley. Those living are : Henry W., who is serving as assessor of 
Lansing township and who lives on a farm adjoining that of his father; Barbara 
C, who lives with her Ijrother Henry; John H., an auctioneer associated with 
his father m business; and Louisa C., the wife of Joe Chamberlain, of Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Mr. Becker is affiliated with the democratic party, and is a member of the 
Roman Catholic church. He has lived for many years in Allamakee county and 
is widely and favorably known here, his many sterling qualities of mind and 
character having gained him the respect and esteem of all with whom he comes 
in contact. To his many friends he is known as "Colonel" and he has made the 
name a synonym for high standards of business honor, for progressive citizen- 
ship and for unquestioned personal integrity. 



JACOB SPIELER. 



In a history of the pioneer settlement and agricultural growth, develojiment 
and upbuilding of Allamakee county it is imperative that mention be made of 
Jacob Spieler, who is not only one of the oldest men in this section of the state 
but was also one of the first settlers. That his life history is a record of success 
is due to the persistent efforts and intelligently directed industry he displayed 
during the years of his connection with farming interests here, and the retirement 



PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 151 

which he is now enjoying is the natural reward of his energy and determination 
in tiie past. 

Mr. Spieler was born in Canton L'nterwalden, Switzerland, September 8, 
1825, and is a son of Frank and Anna Marie (Seibert) Spieler, both of whom 
lived and died in their native country. There Jacob Spieler remained until he 
was twenty-seven years of age and then, in 1852, crossed the Atlantic to America, 
locating first in Illinois and later in Iowa, where he spent some time in Muscatine 
and Dubuque. He w'as afterward employed in various capacities in Stillwater, 
Minnesota, and was then for eight summers cook on a raft on the Mississippi 
river, going as far south as St. Louis and meeting with many unic|ue and re- 
markable adventures on that historic stream. He delights in recalling these 
days and the incidents which made them interesting and he relates many stories 
of the life and condition of the river men of those times. When he left the 
Mississippi he came again to Iowa and, settling in Allamakee county, worked for a 
time as a farm hand, being employed by Albert Hess and Fred Riser for a 
number of years. He was also for three years engaged as a cheesemaker on 
the farm belonging to Jacob Marti. An ambitious, energetic and determined 
man, he steadily worked his way upward to prosperity and saved his money, 
purchasing land of his own in 1872. At that time he bought one hundred and 
ten acres, slightly improved, lying on section i, Makee township, and with char- 
acteristic energy he began its further development, success steadily attending 
his well directed labors. He took rank among the substantial, able and progres- 
sive agriculturists of this section of the state and made his farm one of the 
finest properties in Allamakee county, neat and attractive in appearance and 
equipped with all the buildings and accessories found on a model agricultural 
enterprise. He continued to reside upon this property until 1906, when he pur- 
chased a house and three acres of land near Lycurgus. Here he and his wife now 
reside, Mr. Spieler having well earned the leisure and rest he enjoys. 

Jacob Spieler has been twice married. In June, 1871, on the day when 
the first train ran through Lansing after the completion of the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul Railroad, he wedded Miss Mary Feller, a native of Switzer- 
land, who came to the United States with her mother and sister. To this 
union were born five children, three of whom died in infancy. The others are : 
Jacob J., who makes his home upon the Spieler homestead; and Frances, the 
wife of Henry Engelhorn, of Lansing township. The mother of these children 
died March 25. 1879, and on the 9th of October of that year Mr. Spieler was 
again married, his second wife being Miss Louisa Zimmerman. She was born 
in Wittenberg, Germany, April 19, 1853, and with her parents crossed the 
Atlantic in 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Spieler became the parents of a son, Carl 
William, who makes his home with his half-brother, Jacob J. 

The homestead is now in charge if Jacob Spieler, Jr., who was born there 
on March 5, 1874. He acquired his education in the district schools of Makee 
township and from his early childhood was familiar with the best agricultural 
methods, having learned farming through practical work upon his father's 
property. When the older Mr. Spieler retired he purchased the farm and has 
since carried forward the work of developing and improving it, being numbered 
today among the enterprising and progressive agriculturists of this vicinity. He 
married, in September. 1906, Miss Anna Gruber, a daughter of Thomas Gruber,' 



152 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work. They have three 
children, Katie, Francis and Elsie. The house in w'hich this family reside is 
one of the old landmarks of Allamakee county, for it was one of the first 
buildings erected on the ridge and in the early days served as a schoolhouse and 
church, the first school and the first meeting having been held in the building. 
It has since been remodeled but the old house forms a part of the new structure. 
Jacob Spieler, Jr., who has proven himself a worthy son of his father, both being 
men who have never faltered in the performance of any duty whether of a public 
or private character, and who have long since proven themselves worthy and 
valued citizens of Allamakee county, their labors constituting elements in the 
general progress and improvement. 



JOHN A. DECKER. 



After a period of loyal and faithful service in the Civil war John A. Decker 
identified himself with agricultural interests of Allamakee county and for over 
forty years thereafter developed and improved his property in French Creek 
township, winning during the time a high place in the regard of his neighbors 
and finally rest and retirement as a reward for his honorable and well directed 
labors. He now makes his home w-ith his son in Lansing township and has 
many friends throughout Allamakee county, to whom he is familiarly known as 
Adam. He was born in Wittenberg, Germany, August 9, 1833, and is a son 
of George and Mary Decker, natives of that country, who in 1847 came with 
their family to America. They made the journey on board the sailing vessel 
Quebec, which started from London, and after a voyage of thirty-five days landed 
in America, having been delayed by a severe storm. From New York the 
Decker family pushed west to Ohio, settling near Cleveland, where the father 
purchased forty acres of land, upon which he engaged in farming for the 
remainder of his life. He and his wife became the parents of ten children, only 
one of whom, the subject of this review, survives. 

John A. Decker was reared to manhood in Ohio, acquiring his education in 
the public schools of that state. He came to Allamakee county a few years 
before the outbreak of the Civil war but almost immediately afterward went to 
Fillmore county, Minnesota, in search of a location for a farm. The open 
prairie country not appealing to him, he returned to Lansing and there worked 
as a fireman and later as an engineer in a sawmill. From that city he enlisted 
in 1861 in Company B, Twelfth Iowa Volunteers, and served as a musician, 
holding this position in his regiment until he was seized with illness, which 
obliged him to go to the hospital at Mound City, Illinois. There he was given 
a position as engineer on a stationary engine and continued to hold it until he 
was discharged from the hospital. He continued his military service until 
1866, in which year he obtained his honorable discharge at Davenport, Iowa. 

With this creditable military record Mr. Decker returned to Allamakee county 
and in French Creek township purchased eighty acres of unimproved land, to 
which he later added one hundred acres. For many years thereafter he steadily 
carried ''orward the work of developing this property, which in time became 




iJit. AXIJ .Mi;s. .JOHN A. JJECKEl! 




PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 155 

one of the best farms in this locality as a result of his practical methods and his 
untiring industry. Eventually he gave it over to the management of his son 
John and about the year 1907 sold the homestead and moved with his wife to 
his son's farm in Lansing township, where he now lives in retirement, spending 
the evening of his life in well earned rest. 

Mr. Decker married. May 15, 1867, Miss Mary Eichhorn, who was born in 
Germany, May 6, 1846, and who came to America with her brothers and sisters 
when she was six years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Decker became the parents of 
six children. John A. was born in Lansing township in 1868. He is now one 
of the prosperous farmers of this township, owning a fine property on section 
30. He married in 1894 Miss Lena M. Hirth, and they have a daughter, Edna. 
With this family Mr. and Mrs. John A. Decker are spending their retired life. 
Maggie married Joe Martin, of Church, Iowa. George makes his home with 
his brother Samuel in the same city. Samuel married Annie Bechtel. Ben is 
a general merchant in Church. Emma became the wife of Charles Hirth, of 
Lansing township. Mr. and Mrs. Decker are devout members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

For years Mr. Decker affiliated with the republican party but at the election 
of 1912 he voted the democratic ticket. There are few citizens in Allamakee 
county more widely and favorably known than he, for he has made his home here 
for over forty-five years, during all of which period his life has been upright, 
straightforward and honorable in all its relations. He has gained a comfortable 
degree of worldly prosperity, while his genial manner and unfailing courtesy have 
won him the warm and lasting regard of those with whom he has been brought 
in contact. 



HENRY LENZ. 



Henry Lenz owns and operates a fine farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres on section 4, Center township, a property upon which he was born, and 
his genuine personal worth and excellent business qualifications entitle him to 
mention with the representative citizens of the community. Moreover, he is 
one of the successful stock-raisers in this section of the state and his interests 
along this line are extensive and important. He was born August 22, 1855, 
and is a son of Fred Lenz, a native of Prussia, Germany. The father served 
for three years in the German army, taking part in the revolution of 1848, 
and afterwards came to America, making his first location in Waverly, Ohio. 
After three years in that city he came to Allamakee county and purchased from 
the government one hundred and twenty acres upon which the subject of this 
review now makes his home. Papers show that this land was filed June 15, 
1854. Fred Lenz became a successful and prominent farmer, winning a place 
among the substantial residents of this section. In the early days he erected log 
buildings upon his property and some of these are still standing. He after- 
ward added one hundred and sixty acres to his holdings but the farm has now 
been reduced to its original proportions. He died upon this farm August 18, 
1894. He had married at Waverly, Ohio, Miss Barbara Vogler, a native of 



156 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Bavaria, Germany, who passed away April 20, 191 1. Both were members of 
the German Methodist Episcopal church. They became the parents of six 
children, two of whom are now living, namely: Henry, the subject of this 
review ; Mrs. Emma Engelhorn, of Spokane, Washington. Those deceased 
were : Katie, who died at the age of twelve ; Mary, who passed away when 
she was six years of age; John, who died at the age of four; and William, 
whose death occurred when he was two years of age. 

Henry Lenz acquired his education in the district schools of Center town- 
ship and afterward attended the Methodist Episcopal Church College at Galena, 
Illinois. He made his home with his parents as long as they lived and after 
their deaths purchased the old home place, upon which he has resided during 
his entire life. Upon it he has made substantial improvements and it is today 
a valuable and productive property, worthy of comparison with the best farms 
in Allamakee county. For the past twenty years Mr. Lenz has dealt extensively 
in registered pure-blooded Poland China hogs which he breeds and raises, and it 
is said that he has done more than any other man to improve the breed of hogs 
in this locality. He has exhibited at state fairs in Wisconsin and Iowa and has 
disposed of some fine animals at excellent prices. All of his business interests 
are capably conducted and his success places him among the men of affluence 
in this community. 

In Allamakee county, in 1S76, Mr. Lenz married Miss Mary Gramlich, a 
daughter of Ernst Gramlich, of whom more extended mention is made elsewhere 
in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Lenz are the parents of eight children: Emma, 
who married William Parks, of Gillette, Wyoming; William, who resides in 
Church, Iowa ; Nettie, the wife of Charles Yahnke, of Klemme, Iowa ; Theo- 
dore, who is engaged in farming at Eagle Bend, Minnesota; Ed, who is fol- 
lowing agricultural pursuits at Eagle Bend, Minnesota ; Clara, the wife of 
Fremont Bauman, of Lansing township; and Harry and Edna, who live at 
home. The parents are members of the German Methodist Episcopal church. 

Until the election of 1912 Mr. Lenz gave his political allegiance to the 
republican party but at that time he allied his interests with the new progressive 
partv. He has always been active and interested in public affairs and has held 
various responsible official positions, including those of township assessor, 
school director, and treasurer and secretary of the school board. He is a man 
of genial nature, broadly educated, well informed and an interesting and fluent 
talker, and he has gained an enviable place in the favorable regard of his fellow 
citizens, among whom his entire life has been passed. 



FRANK L. MINOR. 



As manager and superintendent of the large manufacturing plant operated by 
the Postville Clay Product Company, Frank L. Alinor occupies a prominent place 
in industrial circles of Postville and the vicinity, a jiosition which he has 
achieved by reason of especial skill and long training in the line of work to 
which he is now devoting his attention. He was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, 
September 28, 1867, and is a son of Samuel D. and Hannah (Garlick) Minor, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 157 

tlie foriner born in what is now West \'irginia, in the Panhandle district, October 
28, 1828, and the latter in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 5, 1840. In early life 
the father worked as a pilot on boats on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers but 
later became a brick manufacturer, operating a large fire brick factory at Empire, 
Ohio, for twenty-two years and finally retiring from active life and moving to 
Wellsville, where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred on the 
25th of December, 1912. His wife has also passed away, her death having 
occurred in the same place. May 7, 1900. The father never sought to figure 
in any way in public life, never seeking political office and even refusing to 
accept a first lieutenant's commission ofl^ered to him during the Civil war. He 
preferred to concentrate his attention upon his business affairs and these be- 
came extensive and profitable, bringing him a comfortable competency and 
a high place in industrial circles of the city. He and his wife became the par- 
ents of seven children, the subject of this review being the fourth in the order 
of birth. 

Frank L. Minor acquired his early education in the public schools of Empire 
and he afterward attended the Ohio State University at Columbus, graduating as 
a ceramic engineer with the class of 1891. When he became of age he entered 
his father's factory as manager and superintendent and continued in that posi- 
tion until his father's retirement, proving an expert in everything relating to his 
special line of work and also a far-sighted, discriminating and able business 
man. When Samuel D, Minor sold his factory the son continued in the employ 
of the purchasing company as manager and superintendent but after four years 
resigned his position and went to Leavenworth, Kansas, where he became mana- 
ger for the Pittsburgh Paving Brick Company, being afterward transferred to 
Fairmont, West Virginia, where he u-orked in the same capacity for two years. 
At the end of that time he established himself in business as a ceramic engineer 
and soon built up a profitable and extensive patronage, erecting brick works at 
Spokane and Seattle, Washington ; Portland, Oregon ; Oakland, California ; 
and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, as well as in Port Credit, Canada. After accom- 
plishing a great deal of important work along this line and winning for him- 
self a reputation as an expert in every branch of industrial ceramics he aban- 
doned his independent interests and identified himself with the Postville Clay 
Product Company as salesman and erecting engineer. He came to Postville in 
August, 191 1, and erected in the city the plant for the company he represented 
and after its completion remained in charge as manager and superintendent, 
positions which he has occupied since that time. The Postville Clay Product 
Company manufactures all kinds of hollow building blocks and fireproof build- 
ing material and controls an important and growing trade throughout the middle 
west. To the local branch of the business Air. Minor devotes his entire time 
and much of the credit for the continued growth and expansion of the Postville 
factory is due to his initiative spirit, his modern and practical methods and the 
skill with which he applies his knowledge of everything pertaining to the busi- 
ness to the further advancement of his employers' interests. He is today con- 
sidered one of the most able business men in Postville and the place which he oc- 
cupies in business circles has been well earned and is richly desferved. 

Mr. Minor married, on the 27th of June, 1894, Miss Ida McLean, who was 
born in Toronto, Ohio, on the 5th of February, 1868. She is a daughter of 



158 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

James and Eliza (Jackman) McLean, the former a native of Scio, Ohio, and the 
latter of Knoxville, in the same state. In early life James McLean learned the 
hatter's trade but he never followed this occupation, turning his attention to 
general farming and continuing to engage in it during his active life. He served 
in the Thirteenth Ohio \'olunteer Cavalry for three years during the Civil war 
and during all of that period was never wounded or confined in a hospital. He 
and his wife became the parents of twelve children, of whom the wife of the sub- 
ject of this review is the fifth in the order of birth. Mr. Elinor gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and fraternally is connected with the Knights 
of Pythias and the Masonic lodge. Although one of the later arrivals in Postville, 
he is interested in the welfare of the comnumity and has already won for himself 
a creditable position as a valued citizen and business man. 



HON. WILLLA.M S. HART. 

Hon. William S. Hart, of Waukon, ranks as one of the prominent men of 
Iowa, as a lawyer, orator, soldier, political leader and legislator. He was born 
in a pioneer log cabin in Cherry Mount settlement and Allamakee county has 
been his lifetime home. His parents, William and Alicia (Conway) Hart, were 
early settlers in that part of Paint Creek township. 

William S'. Hart acquired his education in the district schools of his native 
township and at the early age of sixteen began teaching a country school, follow- 
ing this occupation until he was elected clerk of the district court just after com- 
ing of age. His able service won him reelection but he resigned the office soon 
afterward to practice law, having studied this profession while serving as clerk 
under the preceptorship of Henry and John F. Dayton. Few men at his age 
have attained more brilliant success as an attorney, notably in jury trials and in 
cases tried before the supreme court. As a specialist in telephone and electric 
law his services are in wide demand and papers and addresses by him upon this 
branch of his profession have been published by the International Telephone Asso- 
ciation. He is also consulted and retained as special counsel in all of their 
important cases by some of the largest fraternal insurance societies in America. 

Mr. Hart's success at the bar has been accompanied by his growing promi- 
nence in politics and along this line he has done a great deal of constructive and 
far-sighted work in the public service. As a member of the twenty-ninth and 
thirtieth general assemblies he gave special attention to labor, railway, military 
and telephone legislation and also to that on behalf of the dairy interests and the 
State Agricultural College. He was chosen by the stock shippers of Iowa to 
father the law compelling railroads to transport stockmen and to furnish sani- 
tary equipment on stock trains and by the dairy interests of the state to champion 
legislation favorable to that industry. As chairman of the military committee 
he rewrote the military code of Iowa and a philanthropical state organization of 
which Mrs. A. B. Cummins was at that time president selected him to write and 
take charge of a child-labor law which is regarded as a model of its kind. The 
legislative committee of the Iowa Federation of Labor thanked him in its pub- 
lished report for his services as a legislator on behalf of the laboring men, while 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 15!) 

in the interests of the State Agricultural College he vigorously and successfully 
to the end of his service resisted the central educational board law and other legis- 
lation then regarded as unfavorable to that institution. 

Mr. Hart married Miss Nellie M. Holahan, a daughter of James Holahan, a 
pioneer implement dealer and capitalist of Waukon. Mr. and Mrs. Hart became 
the parents of six children: James; William S., Jr.; Malcolm J.; Nellie M. ; 
Catherine ; and Ivan, who died in childhood. In the life of Hon. William S. 
Hart there is a distinguished military chapter, which includes service in the Iowa 
National Guards, his rank ranging from that of private to captain. He served 
during the entire Spanish-American war in the LInited States Volunteers as a 
member of the Forty-ninth Iowa Regiment and took part in the subsequent mili- 
tary occupation of Cuba. The greater part of his United States service was spent 
on detail duty as judge advocate, general court martial, Second Division, Seventh 
LInited States Army Corps, under General Fitzhugh Lee, at Jacksonville, Florida, 
and at Marianao, Cuba. Mr. Hart's reputation as a public speaker extends far 
beyond the borders of Iowa and many of his addresses and speeches have been 
printed and widely circulated. He is one of the most prominent and best known 
attorneys, statesmen and men of affairs in the middle west and, being broad-mind- 
ed, large-hearted and liberal, his influence has been a force for good in the 
upbuilding of state institutions and in their development along constructive, logical 
and progressive lines. 



CHARLES J. HAAS. 



A highly profitable and productive farm of two hundred and eighty acres on 
section i6, French Creek township, Allamakee county, is evidence of intelligent 
labors along agricultural lines undertaken by Charles J. Haas, who was born 
upon this property October 4, 1872. As his father, who settled upon this prop- 
erty, was one of the most progressive men of his time, he follows in his foot- 
steps and is considered the most modern and up-to-date agriculturist in French 
Creek township. 

Joseph Haas, the father, a native of Germany, came to America when about 
twenty years of age, entering upon his first work at West Point, New York, 
whence he subsequently removed to St. Louis, where he was engaged in railroad 
work as stone mason and stone cutter. Later he took contracts for putting in 
culverts and laying of steel and finally by branching out was enabled to make 
agreements which covered complete jobs of railroad construction. In 1851, 
Joseph Haas came to .Allamakee county to see his mother, who had preceded him 
here and during his sojourn assisted in completing the building of the stone ele- 
vator at Lansing. Returning to St. Louis, he remained there until 1856, when 
a brother in Allamakee county wrote him that a railroad was then to be built 
from the junction to Waukon. Packing up his tools and instruments, he came 
with his outfit and teams to .\llamakee county in order to be on the spot if con- 
struction should begin, Imt although the road had been surveyed its building was 
delp.\-ed for several years. He therefore turned his attention to agricultural mat- 
ters and purchasing three hundred acres of land in French Creek township set- 



160 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLA:^IAKEE COUNTY 

tied thereon. About thirty-five acres of this tract were under cuUivation and a 
primitive log shanty was upon the farm. Jn 1857-8 Mr. Haas erected the stone 
house which still stands and here made his home, engaging in the breaking of the 
land and placing his acres under cultivation, continuing in general farming until 
his demise on August 31, igoo. Careful management and thorough and ])ro- 
gressive methods resulted in gratifying financial returns and he was enabled to 
extend the boundaries of his farm until it comprised six hundred and eighty 
acres. It was said of him by his old-time neighbors that he was the most up-to- 
date farmer in French Creek township, for it was he who installed upon his farm 
the first mowing machine, the first riding plow and the first threshing machine. 
In fact it was he who was always first to own any new machine, to try out its 
merits, and always first to adopt any new method. That he was successful his 
ensuing prosperity was the soundest proof. Joseph Haas was united in marriage, 
in St. Louis, to Miss Julia Remstein, a native of Germany, who came to the 
United States in the company of friends when a young woman, and at the time 
of her marriage was employed in St. Louis. She was a true helpmate to her 
husband during all her life, and after his demise made her home in Mankato, 
Minnesota, passing away at an advanced age in April. 1913. It is but natural 
that a man of such advanced views as Mr. Haas should have taken an active 
part in the public life of his township, and he held all the township offices with 
the exception of that of assessor, ever discharging his duties to the satisfaction 
of his constituents. He gave his support to the democratic party and both he 
and his wife were members of the Catholic church. In their family were ten 
children : Joseph, who died at the age of twenty : Lawrence, of Hammer. North 
Dakota ; George, of Jackson Junction, Iowa ; Ferdinand, a salesman for the 
International Harvester Company; Mary, the wife of Henry Shulte, of Kansas; 
Matilda, of Great Falls, ^Montana ; Julia, who married S. J. Bray, of Helena, 
Montana; Henry, of Waukon, this state; Charles J., the .subject of this review; 
and Katie, the wife of Joseph Schultz. of \\'ilmont. Minnesota. 

Charles J. Haas was reared under the parental roof and there were early 
instilled into his boyish consciousness the old-fashioned virtues of honesty and 
industry. In the acquirement of his education he attended the district schools and 
later a business college at Waukon, Iowa, and at La Crosse, Wisconsin. Early 
he became acquainted with agricultural pursuits. ac(|uiring thorough methods un- 
der the able guidance of his father and assisting him until his own marriage, after 
which he continued along the same line. He lost his wife soon afterward and 
then attended Upper Iowa L'niversity, after which he was for one summer cm- 
ployed by the Atlas Art Studio of Chicago, for which concern he solicited orders 
for photo enlarging. The following summer he was employed as fireman by 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, running out from Eagle Grove. Iowa, 
and for the following two years held a jjosition with the Piano Manufacturing 
Company, being stationed as agent in North Dakota. When his father passed 
away in upo he was appointed administrator of the estate and returned home. 
After the afi^airs were settled none of the other heirs wishing to take over the 
farm, he purchased the interests of the others and has since continued the opera- 
tion of the old homestead with ever increasing success. He owns two hundred 
and eighty acres, all of which is in a high state of cultivation, and engages in 
general farming, planting grains most suitable to soil and climate, and giving a 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 161 

great deal of his attention to stock-raising. His buildings are modern and 
up-to-date, substantial and suitable, and the latest machinery and implements can 
he found upon his farm in order to facilitate the labors that increase the yield 
of the land. Mr. Haas follows in every way in the footsteps of his father as a 
progressive agriculturist, and he has the distinction of being the first in French 
Creek township to own an automobile. 

The first wife of Mr. Haas was Miss Alice O'Brien, a native of Allamakee 
county and a daughter of James O'Brien. Of this marriage one son was born, 
Charles James, at home. Mr. Haas was again married, his second union being 
with Aliss Helen Tilzenberger, a native of St. Lucas, Fayette county, Iowa. They 
have six children: \'iola Laona, Anna Marie, Evelyn Eleanora, Daniel Ferdi- 
nand, Bernard John and Merill Joseph. 

In his political views Mr. Haas reserves independent judgment giving his 
indorsement to whatever candidates he considers best suited to the offices to 
which they aspire. He has efficiently served as township trustee and as school 
flirector has done much toward promoting the cause of education. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Catholic church, to which they give helpful support, 
and are highly respected and esteemed in French Creek township for their 
qualities of mind and character. While Mr. Haas has attained individual pros- 
perity and is considered one of the most prosperous agriculturists of his dis- 
trict, he had done much toward promoting general advancement and has proven 
a serviceable factor in making this section one of the richest in the state. He is 
public-spirited in the best sense of the word and is ever glad to bear his share 
of time and money in promoting any worthy public enterprise. 



SAMUEL WATERS. 



A native of Allamakee county, Samuel Waters was born in Ludlow township 
on June 27, 1873, and has devoted practically all of his active life to agricultural 
pursuits, now owning a valuable farm of one hundred and twenty acres near 
Postville. His parents were Samuel and Catherine (Lyons) Waters, the former 
a native of County Wicklow. Ireland, where he was born on May 26, 1833, and 
the latter born not far from Dayton, in Montgomery county, Ohio, on August 
6, 1845. When sixteen years of age the father came with his parents to the new 
world, the family making settlement at Pittsburg. Samuel Waters had already 
worked in the lead mines of Ireland and took up similar work near Pittsburg, 
continuing so until 1852, when he came west to Iowa and purchased land from 
the government in Ludlow township. For thirty years he resided thereon, bring- 
ing it to a high state of cultivation, and then made removal to Clayton county, 
having put his old homestead into pasture. There he operated a farm of several 
hundred acres until 1891, when he returned to the homestead, where he remained 
for another seventeen years active in its cultivation, when he went to Frankville, 
Winneshiek county, where he now lives retired. The mother passed away on 
February 7, 1910. Mr. Waters, Sr., had been previously married to I\Iiss .Anna 
Overholt, by whom he had four children. Of the second marriage eight chil- 
ilren were born. 



162 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

In the acquirement of his education Samuel Waters attended district school 
for three terms in Ludlow township and subsequently the district schools of Clay- 
ton county. He remained at home until about twenty years of age, when he hired 
out as a farm hand in Frankville, Winneshiek county, for one year. He then 
rented land in Ludlow township, successfully cultivating it for two years, and 
then removed to Emmet county, Iowa, where for ten years he rented, returning 
at the end of that time in order to assist his father for two years with his work 
on the old homestead. He then bought one hundred and twenty acres of land 
where he now lives. The farm was but partially improved at that time but he 
has since lirought it to a high state of productivity, has erected a modern and 
comfortable residence, a substantially built barn and other necessary buildings 
which greatly increase the value of the property. He engages in general farm- 
ing and in addition to his holdings rents eighty acres, which he also operates. He 
is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store at Postville and also in the 
Cooperative Creamery. 

On March 13, 1895, Mr. Waters married Miss Jennie Hughes, who was Ijorn 
near Red Cloud, Nebraska, on November 21, 1873, her parents being Frank and 
Emily (Early) Hughes. The father is a native of Indiana and the mother was 
born in Post township, this county. Mr. Hughes always followed agricultural 
pursuits, coming from Indiana to this county and later removing to Nebraska. 
About iScjo he proceeded to Oklahoma, where he took up government land, re- 
taining his Nebraska land, and he now lives at Hartwell, Arkansas, still active 
in his occupation. The mother passed away in 1884. In the family of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hughes were three children, of whom Mrs. Waters is the oldest. Mr. and 
Mrs. Waters have one daughter, Clara Catherine, born August 6, 1902. The 
religious faith of Mr. Waters is that of the L'nited Brethren church and he is 
helpful in its work and expansion. Politically he is independent, giving his sup- 
port of the best men available without considering party affiliations. How- 
ever he inclines toward the jjrohibition party, taking a firm stand upon matters 
which concern the liquor question. While he has attained success, he has 
been a factor for good in his community and has contributed towards the 
upbuilding of moral and intellectual standards as well as to agricultural develop- 
ment. 



ANTON T. NIERLING. 

Signal ability, energy and steadfast purpose have formed the watchwords in 
the life of Anton T. Nierling, who stands as a central figure in financial circles 
of Allamakee county through his connection with many important banking 
enterprises. Through steps of orderly progression he has made his way upward 
in the business world, being today cashier of the First National Bank of Waukon 
and identified also with various other financial and commercial concerns. He was 
born in French Creek township, February 8, 1872, and is a son of Anton Nierling, 
born in Germany on the river Rhein in 1826. The father came to America when 
he was a young man after having served three years in the German army and 
after his arrival came immediately to Iowa, locating in Lansing about 1849, 




ANTON T. NIKRLIXG 



TlLDtH l-OUNuAflOK*. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 165 

where lie lived for three years, after which he settled on Lansing Ridge, coming 
two years later to h'rench Creek township. He was a miller l)y trade and fol- 
lowed that occupation in his native country for several years, but he abandoned 
it after settling in Iowa, gi\'ing all of his attention to the clearing and improving 
of his two hundred and sixty acres of wild land. He married in Lansing Aliss 
Mary Buck, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and they became the parents of 
a large family of children. The father never left the homestead which he de- 
veloped, dying upon his farm in 1888, when he was sixty-two years of age. His 
wife survived him for a number of years, passing away in 1902. 

Anton T. Nierling was reared upon the home farm and from his early child- 
hood assisted in carrying on the work of the homestead. He acquired his primary 
education in the district schools and later completed his studies at the Breckinridge 
School at Decorah. After laying aside his books he engaged in teaching in Alla- 
makee county but after two years entered the Bayless Business College at 
Dubuque, from which he graduated, receiving a thorough business training. 
When he had completed it he formed a partnerhsip with Otto J. Hager and aided 
in the organization of the First National Bank of Waukon, an institution founded 
with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, which has recently been increased to 
one hundred thousand dollars. Mr. Nierling first took the position of bookkeeper 
and assistant cashier, but for the past ten years has been cashier, serving ably 
and efficiently in the discharge of his duties. In this connection his excellent 
business and executive ability have been called forth and the success of the 
institution is in large measure due to him. As the years have passed Mr. Nierling 
has extended the field of his activities and is now connected with a great many 
important financial concerns, being president of the New Albin Savings Bank, a 
director in the Waterville Savings Bank and in the Dorchester Savings Bank. 
From the time of its organization in 1903 to January, 1913, he was a director 
and manager of the Farmers Stock & Produce Company, which he aided in 
organizing and promoting and of which he served as treasurer. The object of 
the organization is purely for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a good 
stock market for Waukon which object it accomplished during the time of his 
ten years' management, to January i, 1913. In Waukon he is known as a man of 
resourceful and discriminating business ability, basing a distinct success in the 
world of finance upon an exhaustive knowledge of his business and upon the 
aggressiveness, energy and enterprise which makes this knowledge efifective in 
financial circles. 

Mr. Nierling married, February 3, 1896. Miss Winifred Taylor, who was 
born and reared in Waukon, a daughter of G. W. Taylor, a pioneer in the 
settlement of Allamakee county and a veteran of the Civil war, now a well known 
resident of Waukon, where he is living retired in the eightieth year of his age. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nierling became the parents of three children, Gertrude, Shirley 
and Paul A. 

.Since casting his first vote Mr. Nierling has been a member of the republican 
party but has never aspired to public office, although he served in a creditable and 
able manner as city treasurer and also as school treasurer. He has also the honor 
of serving as trustee of Upper Iowa University. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, holding membership in the Waukon blue lodge, in the chapter and in 
Decorah commandery. In both the lodge and chapter he has served in a number 



166 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of official positions and he is also well known in the affairs of the Knights of 
Pythias, of which he is now vice chancellor. He and his wife are members of the 
Rathbone Sisters lodge, O. E. S. Mr. Nierling is undoubtedly one of \\'aukon"s 
most representative and successful men and his citizenship is of that loyal and 
public-spirited kind which evidences itself in far-sighted and constructive work 
in the public service. No movement which has for its object the betterment 
of municipal conditions or improvement of the city along any line lacks his 
cooperation and hearty support and he is especially interested in the w'ork of 
the committee on public improvements and paving, of which he is now acting 
as chairman. A man of broad and modern views and high ideals, he is leaving the 
impress of his work and personality upon the city both along lines of material 
welfare and upbuilding and in standards of citizenship, and his name is respected 
and esteemed wherever it is known. 



ALBERT D. LARSON. 



Albert D. Larson, who since 1912 has served with credit and ability as 
sheriff of Allamakee county, has for a number of years past been identified in 
an important way with agricultural interests of Hanover township and still 
owns his valuable farm of three hundred acres in that locality, although he 
makes his home in the sheriff's residence in this city. He was born in Hanover 
township, December 31. 1867, and is a son of Christian Larson, one of the 
earliest settlers in Allamakee county, of whom more extended mention is made 
elsewhere in this work. 

Albert D. Larson was reared upon the family homestead and acquired his 
primary education in the district schools, supplementing this by two years" at- 
tendance at the Waukon high school. When not engaged with his books he 
assisted in the operation of the homestead and when he was seventeen years of 
age assumed entire charge of the farm, acting as manager until after his father's 
death, when he purchased the interests of all the other heirs. He thus came into 
possession of one hundred and twenty acres of fine farming land and to this he 
later added other tracts, owning today three hundred acres. Upon it he built 
a fine new residence, a barn, a silo and other outbuildings and he fenced and 
cross-fenced his place into convenient fields with woven wire. He gave his at- 
tention to general farming and stock-raising and was also a shipper on an ex- 
tensive scale. Success steadily attended his well directed labor and in the 
course of time he gained an enviable degree of prosperity, winning recognition 
as one of the prominent, substantial and representative farmers of his locality. 
He was one of the promoters of the Farmers Stock & Produce Company of 
Waukon and is still a stockholder and director in the concern. 

Although Mr. Larson is an able farmer and an influential business man it 
has not been along these lines alone that he has accomplished useful and bene- 
ficial work, for he is one of the leaders in local politics and an active force 
in republican circles of this vicinity. He has served as assessor of Hanover 
township and as township trustee and for a number of years was deeply inter- 
ested in school affairs, serving for twelve years as president of the board of 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 167 

education. In the fall of 1912 he was nominated sheriff of Allamakee county 
and after a hard fought campaign against two opponents was elected to the 
office by a gratifying majority. He is now serving and has proved capable, 
efficient and businesslike in the discharge of his duties. He moved to Waukon 
upon assuming office and, although he owns the old Todd homestead in the city, 
he now occupies the sheriff's residence. 

In Waukon, on the 4th of October, 1899, Mr. Larson was married to Miss 
Louisa M. Todd, who was born and reared in the city and who was later for 
nine terms a teacher in the Waukon schools. She is a daughter of Frank and 
Margaret Todd, of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Larson, having no children of their 
own, have adopted and reared two, a son and a daughter : Oscar Williams, whom 
they adopted at the age of thirteen and who has now reached maturity and 
is in business for himself ; and Julia Flather, whom they took into their home 
when she was a child of four and who is now a student in the Waukon schools. 
Mr. Larson's mother is also a member of this family. She has now reached 
the age of eighty-seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Larson are members of the Waukon 
Presbyterian church and fraternally Mr. Larson is affiliated with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is widely and favorably known throughout the sec- 
tion where he was born and where his entire life has been spent and in his various 
responsibilities as a business man and as a public official has discharged his 
obligations so as to merit and receive the respect of all who know him. 



MICHAEL QUILLIN. 



In 1862 Michael Ouillin bought his first tract of land in Hanover township, 
Allamakee county, and this formed the nucleus of the extensive tract which he 
now owns. He has become well and favorably known in this part of Iowa, 
and the years have brought him prominence and substantial fortune, so that he 
stands today among the representative and able agriculturists of the section 
where he has so long made his home. He was born in Ireland in 1842 and is a 
son of Philip and Nancy Quillin, who came to America in 1848 and settled at 
Lambertsville, New Jersey, where the father followed the stonemason's trade 
until 1854. In that year he came west, and settling in Dubucjue, Iowa, con- 
tinued in his former occupation for two years and a half. Removing from that 
city to Lansing, in Allamakee county, in 1856, he preempted eighty acres of 
government land in Iowa township and when he disposed of that property 
bought two hundred and forty acres on the Minnesota line. This also he after- 
ward sold and removed to South Dakota, where he proved up a homestead and 
a tree claim, continuing to develop this property until his death in 1888. His 
wife, surviving him some years, died in 1896. To their union were born eight 
children, si.x of whom lived to maturity: Michael, of this review; Mrs. Mary 
Fitzgerald; Thomas, of Minnesota; John, of Kimball, South Dakota; Mrs. 
Bridget McGraw, who has passed away ; and Mrs. Ann Conklin, also deceased. 

Michael Ouillin accjuired his education in the public schools of New Jersey 
and of Dubuque, Iowa, and remained with his parents until he was twenty-two 
years of age. Previous to that time he spent several summers as a river man 



168 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

on the Mississippi, but finally turned his attention to farming, buying in 1867 
an eighty-acre tract on section 34. Hanover township. From time to time he 
added to this property, and although he has recently given eighty acres to his 
son still owns three hundred and twenty acres, which his skill, ability and 
industry have made one of the finest agricultural properties in this vicinity. 
One hundred and eighty acres are under a high state of cultivation and the farm 
is well managed and well equipped in every particular, evidencing the many 
years of care and labor which the owner has bestowed upon it. 

Mr. Ouillin married, in 1867, -^I'ss Rosa A. McGinnis. a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and a daughter of Michael McGinnis, who settled in Iowa in 1857 and 
followed farming in this state until his death. Mr. and Mrs. Ouillin became the 
parents of fifteen children, twelve of whom survive: Phillip J., a farmer of Alla- 
makee county, who engaged in teaching previous to his luarriage ; John J., of 
Harpers Ferry, Iowa; Mary, the wife of Albert Lilliard, of Union Prairie town- 
ship, Allamakee county; Anna Laura, the wife of Ed Collins, of New Albin, 
Iowa ; Thomas, of Allamakee county, Iowa ; Celia, who is single and living at 
home ; Ella, the wife of Fred Hancock, of Allamakee county, who taught school 
previous to her marriage; M. J., of La Crosse, Wisconsin, a traveling salesman 
for the .Swift Packing Company; Edward, at home; William, attending the State 
Normal School at La Crosse ; Rose Mary, a stenographer, at home ; and Leon- 
ard, at home. 

Mr. Quillin is a member of the Roman Catholic church and gives his politi- 
cal allegiance to the democratic party, taking an intelligent interest in community 
afl:airs without being active as an office seeker. Since 1867 he has resided upon 
his present farm, and his industry and well directed efforts through the years 
have been rewarded by prosperity, prominence and that true success which lies 
in the respect and esteem of his many friends. 



ERNST P. LAYER. 



Ernst P. Layer, living in Lansing township, is one of the progressive and 
substantial farmers of Allamakee county, owning about eighty-three acres of 
land on section ^^. Born in Center township on the 29th of September, 1863, 
he is a son of one of the earliest settlers in Allamakee county, his father, John 
Layer, having come to this part of Iowa in the early 'sos. He purchased a farm 
in Center township and gave his entire attention to its development and im- 
provement until about the year 1896, when he retired from active life and 
moved to La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he now makes his home. He tells many 
interesting incidents concerning pioneer days in this section and remembers the 
time when the Indians were numerous upon the prairies and when it was no 
uncommon sight to witness an Indian deer hunt. He was himself an enthusi- 
astic sportsman and in his youth often wandered far from home, following 
the trail of the deer. He witnessed practically the entire development of this 
section of the state and is numbered among its most honored and successful 
pioneers. He married in Germany and soon after he came to the United States 
lost his wife. Returning to the fatherland some time afterward, he was again 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 169 

married, his second union being with Miss Louisa Souer. By his first marriage 
he had one son, George, who resides at Osage, Iowa. To his second union were 
born eight children, five of whom are hving, namely : Louisa, the wife of Joseph 
Blumer, of North Dakota; Elizabeth, who married William Blumer, also of 
North Dakota ; Ernst P., of this review ; Herman, who makes his home in 
Sacramento, California; and John, a resident of North Dakota. 

Ernst P. Layer was reared upon his father's farm in Center township and in 
his childhood divided his attention between his studies at the district school 
and work upon the homestead. He remained with his parents until he was 
thirty-two years of age and then began his independent career, renting land in 
Center township. He continued to develop and improve this property until 
about the year 1907, when he purchased the farm of eighty-three and one-tenth 
acres on section 33, Lansing township, upon which he resides. This is a well 
improved and valuable property and upon it he engages in general farming, his 
well directed and practical labors having been rewarded by a gratifying degree 
of success. 

In Lansing township, on the 15th of October, 1895, Mr. Layer was united 
in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Roth, a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Fischer) 
Roth, early settlers in Lansing township. The father has passed away but the 
mother survives and makes her home at Church, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Layer 
have three children, Clara E., Theodore John and Herbert E. The parents are 
members of the Congregational church. 

Mr. Layer gives his political allegiance to the republican party and although 
not an office seeker, has served capably and conscientiously as school director. 
He is connected with business interests of this section as a stockholder in the 
Calhoun Creamery Company. His energies have been largely concentrated, 
however, upon the development of his farm which is a valuable and productive 
property, bringing him a gratifying annual income, so that he is now one of 
the prosperous citizens of this community. He is a man of genial nature and 
genuine personal worth and has gained the favorable regard of his fellow citizens 
during the long years of his residence in Allamakee county. 



L\MES HOLAHAN. 



Waukon numbered James Holahan among its capitalists. He became a factor 
in its business circles as a pioneer implement dealer and eventually developed his 
business to include the manufacture of wagons and carriages. His trade e.xtended 
throughout northeastern Iowa and southeastern Minnesota and his well merited 
success made him one of the substantial and respected residents of the state. 

Mr. Holahan was numbered among the worthy citizens that Ireland furnished 
to Allamakee county, his birth occuring in Kilkenny. He was but a child in 
years, however, when the family emigrated to America, making settlement at 
Naugatuck, Connecticut, where the years of his youth were passed. He made 
his initial step in the business world by learning the trade of a decorator and 
painter. He was employed in that capacity in a clock factory of Naugatuck for 
some time but eventually the family came to Iowa, settling at Decorah, so that 



170 PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

from that point onward to the time of his death Mr. Holahan was a resident of 
this state. In 1863 he took up his abode in Waukon. The Holahan homestead 
consists of a magnificent forest park fifty acres in extent, planned and planted 
by Mr, Holahan, and surrounds a stately, old-fashioned mansion. It is one of 
the show spots of the city. After becoming a resident of Waukon Mr. Hola- 
han opened one of the first implement establishments of the town, becoming a 
pioneer in that line of trade. He Was not long in winning recognition for his 
business ability in a growing patronage. He also began the maufacture of wagons 
and carriages, conducting an extensive enterprise along that line. The trade not 
only covered Allamakee county but extended into adjoining counties until it had 
covered northeastern Iowa and southeastern Minnesota, and throughout the 
entire district his name was household word for more than a generation. He was 
known as a most enterprising and progressive business man, carefully formulat- 
ing his plans and carrying them forward to successful completion. Obstacles 
and difficulties in his path seemed but an impetus for renewed efifort that never 
faltered until his purpose was achieved. 

Mr. Holahan was united in marriage to Miss Kate Fenelon, a native of Car- 
low, Ireland, and they became the parents of five sons and four daughters, namely : 
W. J., who is now living in Mason City, Iowa ; John, who is located at Havana, 
Cuba: iM. F.. a resident of Atlanta. Georgia; L. J., living in Dixon, Illinois; 
James, who is located at Victoria, Illinois; Nellie M., the wife of the Hon. Wil- 
liam S. Hart, a prominent lawyer and legislator of Allamakee county ; Anna ; 
Gretta ; and Mamie, who is Sister M. Benoit in St. Xavier's Academy of Chicago. 

Such in brief is the life history of James Holahan, one of the most worthy 
and highly esteemed pioneer citizens of Allamakee county. He early recognized 
the fact that there is no royal road to wealth and that there is no excellence with- 
out labor. He, therefore, put forth effective effort to secure his advancement 
and the methods which he followed and the course which he pursued commended 
him to the confidence, good-will and honor of all with whom he came in contact. 



JOHN HAMMEL. 



John Hammel," carrying on general farming and stock-raising upon a fine 
tract of land of two hundred acres near Postville, was born in Frankville, Winne- 
shiek county, August 21, 1856, and is a son of John and Margaret (Jokers) 
Hammel, natives of Baden, Germany, whose marriage occurred in America. The 
father crossed the Atlantic in 1855, settling first in Boston, where he remained 
for a few months, going at the end of that time to Frankville, Winneshiek county, 
Iowa. There he spent one year and then purchased a farm in Post township, 
Allamakee county, a portion of which his son now owns. He and his family 
continued to reside thereon until the mother's death, after which he retired from 
active business life, spending most of his time traveling through different parts 
of the United States. He lived in Virginia for one year and was for three years 
in the Soldiers' Home in Milwaukee. Later, however he returned to Iowa and 
made his home with the subject of this re\iew, dying in the year 1903. He had 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 171 

survived his wife for seven years. He was honored as a veteran of the Civil war, 
having served in that conflict for nine months. 

John Hammel acquired his education at the West Grove school in Post town- 
ship and remained at home until his marriage. In 1881 he bought eighty acres 
of his father's farm and also conducted the entire homestead until after the 
death of his mother, when he moved to his own property. Later he became 
the owner of the homestead, adding to his own farm and acquiring in this way a 
tract of two hundred acres which he still operates. Having been connected with 
farming since his early childhood, he is thoroughly familiar with the best agri- 
cultural methods and understands every detail connected with the operation of 
the farm. His practical labors have been rewarded by well deserved success and 
he is today known as one of the most progressive farmers and stock-raisers in 
this part of Allamakee county. 

On the 4th of February, 1881, Mr. Hammel was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline Harris, a native of Post township and a daughter of Elisha Harris and 
a sister of George Harris, of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Hammel have become the parents of eleven children. Stella 
is the widow of Charles Cook and resides in Postville. Ralph is in the employ 
of the Standard Cream Separator Company and makes his home in Milwaukee. 
Verna is the wife of Andrew Stockman, of Milwaukee, who is employed by the 
John Deere Machine Company. Bertha is the wife of Lee Folsom, who resides 
near Postville. Charles is also a resident of Milwaukee and is employed as chauf- 
feur for the Solvay Coke Company. Leonard resides on a farm southeast of 
Postville. Ruby and Ruth are twins. The former is the wife of Frank Lawson, 
a farmer in Franklin township, and the latter married LaRue Webster, also en- 
gaged in farming in that township. Earl is operating a farm in Franklin town- 
ship. Augusta and Pearl are both residing at home. It is a remarkable incident 
that the eleven children of Air. Hammel, all of whom are living, attended in the 
acquirement of their education the same school' as their father, namely the West 
Grove school in Post township. 

Mr. Hammel is a large stockholder in the Canning Factory at Postville. Fra- 
ternally he is afifiliated with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has 
been a resident of this part of Iowa since his childhood and is well and favorably 
known here, his business reliability, his genuine personal worth and his sterling 
<|ualities of character commanding for him the respect and esteem of all who come 
in contact with him. 



WILLIAM HART. 



The pioneer history of Allamakee county would be incomplete were there 
failure to make prominent reference to William Hart, who for fifty-six years 
resided within its borders, taking up his residence in Paint Creek township in 
1852. He was then a young man, ambitious and energetic, looking forward to 
w^hat the future might hold in store for him as a reward for his industry and 
determination. A few years after his arrival here he married and established a 



172 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

home and throughout his remaining days continued a resident of this section of 
the state. 

Mr. Hart was a native of Ireland, his birth having occurred in County Gal- 
way. In the year 1849 'ic crossed the Atlantic to the new world and after three 
years spent elsewhere made his way to Allamakee county in 1852, taking up his 
abode in Cherry Mount settlement in Paint Creek township. He found here a 
district largely wild and undeveloped. Much of the land was still in possession 
of the government and was covered with the native prairie grasses, starred with 
a million wild flowers in the month of June and in mid-winter covered with one 
unbroken dazzling sheet of snow. Mr. Hart at once took up the arduous labor 
of developing new land and from that time forward was closely associated with 
agricultural interests in this county. 

It was on the ist of November, 1S55, that William Hart was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Alicia Conway, who was also a native of Ireland, having been 
born in County Roscommon. She left the Emerald isle for the purpose of mak- 
ing her home with a brother who was then living in Paint Creek township, Alla- 
makee county. She continued with him until her marriage and then went to her 
husband's home in the Cherry Mount settlement, where their remaining days were 
passed. They began with their domestic life in one of the jjrimitive old-time log 
cabins, which stands as a venerable relic upon the farm which is now the prop- 
erty of their son Hon. William S. Hart. Year by year the father carefully tilled 
the fields and cultivated his crops and success rewarded him as time passed on. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart became the parents of a large family but lost two daugh- 
ters, Sarah J. and Nellie, in early womanhood. Their surviving children are: 
M. J., a resident of Waterville ; J. P., who makes his home in Saskatchewan, 
Canada; William S. ; John ].. of Waterville; Mary A., who resides in Success, 
Saskatchewan ; and Mrs. Katie Lloyd, of Linton township. The death of the 
mother occurred on the 1.2th of June, 1897, when she was sixty-eight years of 
age. Her husband survived her for about eleven years, departing this life on the 
1st of April, 1908. He had reached the venerable age of eighty-three years and 
was one of the oldest residents of the county at the time of his death, not only 
in point of longevity but also in length of his connection with this part of the 
state. His life was a busy and useful one. There was nothing spectacular in 
his career but he bore his part in jthe work of general improvement and lived 
to see many notable changes as log cabins were replaced by commodious and 
substantial frame and brick residences, as primitive farm machinery was sup- 
planted by the modern cultivator, reaper and harvester and as churches and schools 
were built, thus developing the intellectual and moral forces of the community. 



T. G. FAEGRE. 



T. G. Faegre owns four hundred and eight acres of rich land on sections 9 
and 3, Center township, constituting the farm upon which he was born. It is 
a valuable property, well improved, and in its further development the owner is 
giving evidence of a thorough understanding of the most modern and progressive 
methods of agriculture. He was born August I, 1859, and is a son of Gilbert 




Ml!. AM) -\11!S. lill.HKltT II. FAEGRE 



V\Jb- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 175 

H. and Catherine ( Hendrickson ) Faegre, natives of Norway, where their mar- 
riage occurred and where their two eldest children were born. They emigrated 
to the United States in 185 1 and in that year located on the farm in CenteP 
township. Allamakee county, Iowa, whereon their son now resides. Their first 
home was a cave dug in the side of a hill, but they later built a log house, which 
they afterward replaced by a comfortable frame dwelling. From the govern- 
ment the father purchased two hundred and eighty acres of land and he con- 
tinued to de\elop and improve it until his death, which occurred February 14, 
1904. He was survived by his wife only a few weeks, her death occurring 
March 10, of the same year. Both were members of the Norwegian I^utheran 
church and in politics Gilbert H. Faegre was a loyal republican. In their familv 
were seven children: Martin and Hans, natives of Norwav, both of whom are 
deceased ; Mrs. S. O. Nordvold, of Pierre, South Dakota ; Kasper, who lives in 
New York city ; Albert, deceased ; T. G., of this review ; and Lena, who has 
passed away. 

T. G. Faegre was reared upon his father's farm in Center township and 
acquired his education in the district schools. Before his father's death he 
assumed charge of the homestead and later bought the property, which he has 
since continued to develop. He has made several additions and improvements 
and he now owns four hundred and eight acres, the neat and attractive appearance 
of which evidences his careful supervision and practical methods. In addition 
to general farming he buys and sells land to some extent and this proves a 
profitable source of income to him. 

Mr. Faegre married Miss Sarah Thorstensori, born in Allamakee county, a 
daughter of Ole and Gunhild Thornstenson, natives of Norway, the former of 
whom has passed away, while the latter makes her home in ' Paint Creek town- 
ship. Mr. and Mrs. Faegre became the parents of six children, two of whom 
died in infancy. The others are (iilbert. Florence, Selma and Goldie. The 
parents are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and Mr. Faegre gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party. He has served as township trustee 
and school director and his influence is always given for the furtherance of 
education and other interests which he deems essential to the welfare and upbuild- 
ing of the county. 



JOSEPH DIXON. 



Joseph Dixon, a prosperous and successful agriculturist of Hanover town- 
ship, owns and operates one hundred and forty acres of valuable land on section 
12, and in its cultivation has met with gratifying and well deserved success. 
He is a native of this state, born in Winneshiek county in 1861, his parents being 
William J. and Celia Dixon, natives of Ireland. They came to America at an 
early date and settled in Massachusetts where their marriage occurred. In 
1858 they settled in Winneshiek county, Iowa, and there remained until 1869 
when they moved to Allamakee county, where the father died in 1913 at the 
age of ninety-eight years. The mother passed away in August, 1878, at the 
age of sixty-one years. 



176 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Joseph Dixon acquired liis education in the district schools of Allamakee 
county and remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age. He then 
turned his attention to railroad construction work and followed this line of 
activity imtil 1898 when he entered the shops of the L'nion Pacific system. 
In 1901 he made an entire change in his active interests, turning his attention 
to agricultural pursuits in which he has engaged successfully since that time. 
He owns one hundred and forty acres on section 12, Hanover township, and 
upon this fine property follows general farming and stock-raising, success steadily 
rewarding his earnest, straightforward and persistent labor. 

In i8g8 Mr. Dixon was united in marriage to Miss Anastacia Fitzgerald, who 
was born in Allamakee county, a daughter of Peter and Catherine Fitzgerald, 
natives of Ireland and early settlers in this part of Iowa. Both have passed 
away. Mr. and ]\Irs. Dixon have six chidlren : Celia C., born in 1899; Marie, 
born in 1900; Joseph F., igoi ; Alice. 1905; William, 1907; and James A., 1913. 

Politically, Mr. Dixon is affiliated with the democratic party and his religious 
views are in accord with the doctrines of the Roman Catholic church. He is an 
upright man. interested not only in the financial but also in the moral standing 
of the community, and has gained the confidence and respect of his neighbors 
both as a substantial farmer and a useful citizen. 



PATRICK WHALEN. 



Among the most profitable farms located in Allamakee county is that of Pat- 
rick Whalen, comprising four hundred and forty-one acres on section 26, French 
Creek township. He is one of the early pioneers of this section, where he was 
brought by his mother in 1858. A native of New York, he was born in Oneida 
county on April 13, 1851, and is a son of Thomas and Nora (Carney) Whalen, 
natives of Ireland, in which country they were married. The father with his 
family emigrated to America and established a home in Oneida county, New York, 
but lived but a short time after coming to this country, passing away when his 
son Patrick was but an infant. In 1858 his widow and her children came to 
Allamakee county and here she purchased forty acres of unimproved land on 
section 35 in French Creek township. Courageously taking up her duties of pro- 
viding for the family, she undertook the cultivation of her farm and there her 
children grew to maturity. The mother ever continued to make her home on 
that property, where she passed away several years ago. Of her six children two 
are now living: Patrick, of this review; and Peter, who makes his home in 
Decorah, Iowa. Those deceased are : Elizabeth, who became the wife of John 
Lauchlin, of French Creek township : William, who enlisted from Oneida county, 
New York, for service in the Civil war and was killed during that conflict ; 
Thomas, who died on the old homestead in 1888; and James, who passed away 
at the age of twenty-one in this county. 

Patrick Whalen was the voungest of these six children. He was educated in 
the district schools and early began to take up life's duties by assisting in the 
work of the farm and driving teams in order to break the land. At the age of 
twenty-six he had acquired the means to purchase one hundred and sixty acres, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 177 

slightly improved, and by close application and following modern and up-to-date 
methods has succeeded in gaining such gratifying results that he was enabled 
to extend the boundaries of his farm from time to time until it now includes four 
hundred and forty-one acres of fertile land. He has greatly improved his prop- 
erty and lias erected thereon suitable and substantial barns, outbuildings and 
sheds and his residence is comfortable and commodious. The latest farm machin- 
ery and implements can be found upon his property and he is ever readv to 
take up new methods which promise greater yields from his acres. 

In 1876 Mr. Whalen was united in marriage to Miss Julia Reagan, a native 
of Center township, Allamakee county, and a daughter of Daniel Reagan, one of 
the earliest pioneers of this section. Mr. and Mrs. Whalen have nine children, 
all of whom are living: Nora, the wife of P. J. McCauley, of French Creek 
township : Daniel ]., a plumber of La Crosse, Wisconsin ; James, who is study- 
ing for the priesthood ; and William T., Mary, Peter, Charles, Frank and Angela, 
at home. 

Mr. Whalen has always supported the democratic party and is well informed 
upon all matters of a public or political nature. For three terms he served effi- 
ciently as township trustee and while in the office of school director gave evidence 
of his interest in the cause of education. He and his family are devout communi- 
cants of the Catholic church, in the work of which they take an active and help- 
ful interest. The career of Mr. Whalen is proof of the fact that success is 
but ambition's answer and what he has attained is but the natural outcome of 
industry and energy dominated by a progressive spirit. He is highly respected 
and esteemed for what he has attained, and the confidence and good-will which 
he receives from his friends and neighbors are highlv merited. 



MORTEN C. DEERIXG. 

One of the most alert, enterprising and progressive young agriculturists of 
Post township is Morten C. Deering, who now operates three hundred and thirty- 
six acres of fine land in this vicinity, comprising the farm upon which he was 
born on the 2d of October, 1880. He is a son of Charles and Caroline Deering, 
natives of Germany, the former born on the 12th of October, 1833, and the 
latter in 1837. When he was about twenty-one years of age the father crossed 
the Atlantic and after arriving in the United States settled on the shores of Lake 
Superior, in Michigan, where he engaged in burning charcoal until he came to 
Iowa about 187 1. In this state he purchased the farm in Post township, Alla- 
makee county, whereon his son now resides, finding it an unimproved and wild 
tract, which he cleared of timber before he could begin the work of develop- 
ment. This he carried forward with characteristic energy and determination, 
developing a fine farm, upon which he continued to reside until his death, which 
occurred on the 20th of September, 191 2. He had survived his wife some years, 
her death having occurred in July, 1902. In their family were five children: 
Laura, the wife of Oliver Mackey, a farmer near Odebolt, Iowa; Frank, who is 
an undertaker in Washington: Minnie, the wife of Richard lames, of Harvey, 



178 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

North Dakota ; Hattie, who married James Maloney, a farmer near Esmond, in 
the same state ; and Morten C, of this review. 

The last named acquired his education in the Evergreen school near his 
father's farm and his childhood was spent upon the homestead. From an early 
age he assisted with the farm work, becoming thoroughly familiar with the best 
and most practical agricultural methods, and at the age of seventeen he began 
his independent career, working at farm labor in the employ of others for some 
time. When he was twenty-one years of age he purchased the homestead of two 
hundred and thirty-four acres, to which he has since added from time to time, 
his holdings now comprising three hundred and thirty-six acres. Upon this prop- 
erty he has made substantial improvements, erecting new barns and outbuildings 
and installing modern labor-saving machinery. He carries on general farming 
and stock-raising and both branches of his enterprise, being well conducted, are 
also profitable and important. A progressive and enterprising young man, Mr. 
Deering keeps in touch with the trend of modern advancement in agricultural 
methods and ideas and his work has been important as an element in the later 
farming development of his native section. 

On the nth of October, 1903, Mr. Deering was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha LThl, a native of Franklin township, born October 11, 1881. She is a 
daughter of John and Ann (Cleverley) Uhl, the former a native of Brooklyn, 
New York, born March 22, 1854, and the latter born in England, on the 21st 
of October, 1840. The father acquired his education in the public schools of 
his native city and after the death of his parents came in 1872 to Iowa, where he 
worked as a farm hand for a short time. Later he purchased property of his 
own in Post township and also a number of acres across the line in Franklin 
township and upon this farm he continued to reside for the remainder of his 
life, his death occurring June 20, 1905. His wife survives him and makes her 
home with the subject of this review. She had been previously married and by 
her first union had four children: Adeline, deceased; Fred; Gertie, and George. 
M; . and Mrs. John Uhl had three children: Stella, who married Perry Cook. 
a larmer in Post township ; Bertha, the wife of the subject of this review ; and 
Jesse, residing on the home farm in Post township. To the marriage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Deering have been born also three children: Irving Charles, whose 
birth occurred on the ist of June, 1907; Dorothy Irene, born on the loth of 
February, 1909; and Esther Stella, born April 12, 191 1. Mr. Deering is a mem- 
ber of the Modern Brotherhood of America but his fraternal affiliations are not 
extensive, his attention being centered upon the development of his farm, which 
is one of the finest and best managed in this vicinity. 



PROFESSOR W. L. PECK. 

Professor \V. L. Peck is now engaged in the fourth term of his able serv- 
ice as superintendent of schools of Allamakee county and in this connection is 
giving the benefit of his broad knowledge and unusual ability to his chosen field 
of labor, winning for himself recognition as one of the foremost representatives 
of educational interests of Iowa and taking a vital and active part in the pro- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 179 

motion and spread of public education throughout the state. He was born at 
Ossian, Winneshiek county, August 25, 1872, and is a son of James Peck, whose 
birth occurred in Oswego county. New York, June 14, 1832. The father grew 
to manhood in his native locahty and there married Miss Lucinda Borst, also 
a native of the Empire state. They moved west to Iowa in 1862 and located in 
Winneshiek county, where the father engaged in farming for a number of years. 
He later moved into Frankville and there lived retired until his death, which 
occurred April 24, 1902. His wife survives him and makes her home with a 
son in Frankville. 

Professor W. L. Peck was reared in Winneshiek county and acquired his 
primary education in the public schools. He later attended school in [■"rankville 
and spent one year at Lenox College, going from there to the Iowa State Teach- 
ers College. After two years in that institution he turned his attention to teach- 
ing, following this occupation first in the country schools, where his ability and 
success won him promotion to the position of principal of the Frankville schools. 
He did creditable and progressive work in that capacity for five years and then 
came to Waukon as assistant principal of the Waukon Business College, spending 
eight years in that responsible ofilice. L^pon the expiration of this period he was 
elected county superintendent of schools of Allamakee county and he has served 
continuously by reelection since that time, his return to ofilice evidencing the value 
of his services and their acceptability to the public at large. A brief glance at 
the record of his career shows plainly his preeminence in both the administrative 
and more purely scholastic phases of his chosen work. Llnder his able man- 
agement he has succeeded in bringing all the schools of the coimty up to a higher 
standard of efficiency. This has been accomplished mainly through systematizing 
the work and by carrying it forward along practical and progressive lines. Pro- 
fessor Peck keeps a complete record of every one of the one hundred and sixty- 
one teachers in the county's employ and of every pupil in every school in the 
county, these latter records showing not only the standing of the student but the 
progress he makes from term to term. Professor Peck pays a visit to each 
school once a year, thus keeping in personal touch with the teachers and pupils, 
and he has initiated many substantial improvements in the methods of teaching 
and also in the branches taught. His methods are at all times practical and he 
inspires the teachers under him with much of his own zeal and enthusiasm. 

During the course of his identification with the educational interests of Alla- 
makee county Professor Peck has not confined his attention to the duties which 
have devolved upon him in his responsible position but has also exerted a potent 
and helpful influence in promoting general intellectual advancement in this local- 
ity. In 1910 he organized the Farmers Institute, which holds a session each year, 
and he also manages the county spelling contest held annually, when each town- 
ship sends its most proficient scholar to represent it. He has inaugurated town- 
ship teachers' meetings and in his office keeps a well selected professional library 
for the benefit of his teachers. He has himself taught summer schools and insti- 
tutes both in Winneshiek and Allamakee counties for the past fifteen years and 
conducts personally a teachers' institute in Waukon every year. He never con- 
siders his own education complete but remains always a close and earnest stu- 
dent, following out exhaustive courses of study and taking many correspondence 
courses also. Practically his entire life since attaining his majority has been 



180 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

given over to educational work and he has become a recognized leader in this 
field. 

Professor Peck is a Master Mason and holds membership in the blue lodge at 
Frankville, where he joined the order. He stands preeminent among Iowa edu- 
cators, for he combines with a broad, exhaustive and comprehensive knowledge 
the faculty of imparting it readily and clearly to others and an executive ability 
upon which he has founded his success in the administrative branches of his 
work. He gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but has never 
been a politician in the usually accepted sense of the word. He is, how-ever, 
never neglectful of the duties of citizenship and his influence has been a tangible 
force for good in this community. 



DAVID VINE DUNNING. 

Among the most progressive, representative and deservedly successful native 
sons of Allamakee county is numbered David Vine Dunning, who owns and oper- 
ates a fine property in Franklin township, constituting the farm upon which he 
was born on the 17th of January, 1864. His name has long been an honored 
one in this community, his parents, William H. H. and Emeline (Jemison) Dun- 
ning, having come to this part of Iowa in pioneer times. The father was born 
at Ashtabula, Ohio, on the 25th of October, 1840, and went with his parents to 
Wisconsin about 1851. A few years later he came to Iowa, settling in Allamakee 
county about the year 1854, and here he grew to manhood, becoming afterward 
an extensive landowner and a prosperous farmer in Franklin township. He 
continued active in the development of his jiroperty in this vicinity until 1880 and 
then moved into Clayton county, near Luana, where he continued until i8gi, 
going in that year to Oklahoma. He purchased a farm in that state and con- 
tinued to reside upon it until 191 1, when he retired from active life, moving into 
Guymon, Oklahoma, where he passed away February 2"], 1913. His wife, who 
was a native of Pennsylvania, born October 20, 1844, now makes her home in 
Enid, Oklahoma. To their union were born six children, of whom the sub- 
ject of this review is the eldest in order of birth. 

David V. Dunning attended district school No. 4, Franklin township, and 
afterward took a commercial course in a business college at Fayette. After lay- 
ing aside his books he remained with his parents until he was twenty-one years 
of age, acquiring by practical experience upon his father's farm a comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the best agricultural methods, .\fter he had attained his 
majority he rented the Oathout farm and developed it for two years, after which 
he purchased the home place, upon which he has since resided, having added 
to the property until it now comprises one hundred and twenty acres, practically 
all under cultivation. Substantial impro\ements have been made upon it, excel- 
lent Iniildmgs erected and modern machinery installed, and it is today one of the 
best ec|uipped farms in this part of Iowa, Mr. Dimning standing in the front 
ranks of progressive agriculturists. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Coopera- 
tive Shipping Company of Luana and also in the Creamery Company there and in 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 181 

business circles is known as a resourceful, far-sighted and discriminating busi- 
ness man. 

On the 17th of February, 1886, Mr. Dunning was united in marriage to Miss 
Eliza Jane Lytle, who was born in Clayton county, a few miles southeast of 
Luana, on the i6th of September, 1866. She is a daughter of Mathew S. and 
Josephine (Oathout) Lytle, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 
of New York. The father, who during his entire active life engaged in farm- 
ing, came west when a young man and became an extensive landowner in Clayton 
county, continuing active in the management of his holdings until his death, which 
occurred in 1904. His wife survives him and resides upon the Lytle homestead. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dunning became the parents of two children: Roy Lytle, who 
was born January 29, 1891, and who is assisting his father with the work of the 
homestead; and Jessie \'ine, who was born September 12, 1896, and who is now 
attending school in Waukon. 

Mr. Dunning is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
fraternally is connected with the Modern Brotherhood of America. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and has served as township trus- 
tee and school director, doing able and constructive work in both capacities. He 
never, however, aspires to public office, preferring to concentrate his attention 
upon the development of his excellent farm. Fie is highly esteemed and 
respected in his native township and in the course of years has made many sub- 
stantial contributions to its agricultural development. 



ANDREW LEPPERT. 

Among the large landowners of Allamakee county is Andrew Leppert, who 
owns a valuable farm of seven hundred and forty acres on section 14, French 
Creek township. His handsome residence and substantial farm buildings are 
evidences of his prosperity and proof of his incessant labors and the progressive 
methods which he follows. He was born upon this property on September 19, 
1858, and is a son of Andrew Leppert, a native of Bavaria, Germany, whence 
he accompanied his parents to the new world when fourteen years of age. The 
family settled at first in Utica, New York, and there the father grew to manhood 
and married. In the early '50s he came to Galena, Illinois, where he lived for 
two years, at the end of which period he settled on a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in French Creek township, among the pioneers, the farm being left 
to his wife by her brother. The land was but slightly improved and he cleared 
and developed it, transforming it into a highly productive agricultural enterprise. 
As his means increased he added thereto and at the time of his death, which 
occurred at the age of fifty-six, he owned seven hundred acres. He was one 
of the foremost agriculturists of his day, was a member of the German Metho- 
dist church and prominent in public afifairs, having held every office in his town- 
ship. He gave his allegiance to the republican party. In New York state 
Andrew Leppert married Miss Johanna Henry, a native of Saxony, Germany, 
who passed away in French Creek township at the age of thirty-six years and 
four months. The father subsequently married again and his widow now resides 



182 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAAIAKEE COUNTY 

at Church, Iowa. Of the children born to his first union, three are living, those 
beside our subject being Mrs. Jacob Hirth and Mrs. Jacob Ebner. 

Andrew Leppert was reared under the parental roof on the home farm and 
early trained to agricultural pursuits under the able guidance of his father. In 
the acquirement of his etlucation he attended the neighboring schools. When 
twenty-two years of age he and his brother Charles purchased the old home- 
stead and for several years farmed it in partnership. At the death of his brother 
he acquired the widow's interest and has since conducted its operations alone. 
He has made many impro\ements uijoii the property and his farm is considered 
today one of the model enterprises of its kind in the county. His land is largely 
under cultivation and planted in the most suitable grains and he also gives .atten- 
tion to stock-raising. His residence is comfortable and commodious and the 
whole appearance of the property bespeaks the prosperity of its owner. 

Mr. Leppert was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ann Bulman, a native 
of Union City township, Allamakee county, and a daughter of G. W. Bulman, 
who resides in that township and is a member of one of the early families who 
settled in the county. Mr. and Mrs. Leppert have ten children, all of whom are 
living: James H., Ralph H., Emma A., Jesse A., Oscar S., George Dewey, Lydia 
J., Cora A., Willard A., and Gilbert Taft. Mr. and Mrs. Leppert are members of 
the Presbyterian church, taking a deep interest in the organization. His political 
faith is that of the republican party and he has served as school director of his 
district, giving evidence of his interest in the cause of education. He enjoys 
the high respect and esteem of his neighbors, to which he is fully entitled, as he 
has not only attained an individual position of prominence but has been a factor 
in promoting general advancement and development. Although he has never 
cared to publicly participate in government affairs, he is ever ready to give his 
support to worthy enterprises of a public character and is glad to bear his share 
of time and money in bringing about growth along material, intellectual or moral 
lines. 



ELBA B. LAMBORN. 



Elba B. Lamborn, a prominent and progressive farmer of Franklin town- 
ship, owning and operating two hundred and forty acres of fine land, was born 
in Champaign county, Ohio, on the 28th of May, 1850, and is a son of Nathan 
and Laura (Burnham) Lamborn. The father was born in Chadds Ford, Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1824, and the mother in Champaign county, Ohio, 
March 2, 1823. The father was eleven years of age when he removed with his 
parents to Ohio and in that state he grew to manhood. At the age of eighteen 
he was apprenticed to a carpenter and worked for three years for his board and 
clothing, after which he followed his trade in Champaign county until 1855. 
In that year he came to Iowa and in the spring purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land. He returned to Champaign county and brought his family to 
Iowa, settling first in Hardin, where he engaged in the grocery business for two 
years. In 1863 he took up his residence upon his farm and continued its develop- 
ment and improvement uiuil liis death, which occurred May 10, 1907. He was 
prominent and well known in local jiublic aft'airs, serving for a number of years 




ELBA B. LAMBOllX 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 185 

as township trustee and as township clerk, and in his passing this section lost one 
of its earliest pioneers and one of its most valued and representative citizens. 
He and his wife became the parents of two children, the elder of whom died in 
Ohio at the age of three years. 

Elba B. Lamborn was still a child when his parents came to Iowa and in the 
public schools of Hardin and Waukon he acquired his education, attending school 
during the winter of 1868-9 with E. M. Hancock. Later Air. Lamborn attended 
a business college in Milwaukee, conducted by R. C. Spencer, and after laying 
aside his books he remained upon the homestead, assisting his father with its 
operation until 187 1. In that year he removed to Luana, where for a time he 
clerked in a store but later engaged in various occupations until 1881, when he 
opened a mercantile enterprise of his own in that city, continuing active in its 
conduct for four years thereafter. In 1885 he sold out and after residing on 
the farm for a short time went to Chicago, where in 1888 and 1889 he was 
employed by the American Express Company in their transfer department. He 
returned to Iowa at his father's request, the latter's health being in an impaired 
condition, and took charge of the homestead, continuing to develop and improve 
it along modern, practical lines until November, 1908, when he purchased the 
property upon which he now resides, his youngest son taking charge of the orig- 
inal farm. Mr. Lamborn owns two hundred and forty acres of fine land in 
Franklin township and he has improved this with substantial barns and out- 
buildings, a comfortable residence and all the equipment necessary to facilitate 
the work' of the fields. He and his son operate the two farms together, carry- 
ing on general agricultural pursuits and giving a great deal of attention to the 
breeding and raising of high-grade stock. 

Mr. Lamborn has been twice married. On the 17th; of December, 1872, he 
wedded Miss Mary J. Van Kirk, who was born in Danville, Illinois, November 
II, 1852, a daughter of Enos M. and Catherine (Carithers) Van Kirk, natives 
of Vermilion county, Illinois. They removed to Kankakee county, the same 
state, and there the father engaged in farming until his death. Mrs. Lamborn 
passed away on the 14th of July, 1890, leaving three children. Belle was born 
on the 7th of September, 1875, and married Charles H. Simonds, engaged in 
the ice and coal business in Momence, Illinois. Harry V., born June 7, 1878. is 
now foreman in the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company's works in Minneapolis. He 
married Miss Helen E. Jacobson. The youngest son, Don E., was born March 
9, 1890, and is now cultivating the family homestead. He married Miss Libbie 
M. Clark on the 27th of January, 1913. Mr. Lamborn's second marriage occurred 
on the 4th of June, 1894, when he wedded Miss Gertrude Eliza McClintock, born 
in Winneshiek county, near Frankville, on the 26th of April, 1869. She is a 
daughter of William and Ann (Cleverley) McClintock, the former born in Penn- 
sylvania, near Philadelphia, and the latter in London, England, about the year 
1840. Her father has passed away, his death having occurred in 1871, when 
he was seventy-one years of age. By his second marriage Mr. Lamborn has one 
daughter, Imo A., who was born on the 27th of July, 1902. She is attending 
district school No. 4 at North Grove, two miles distant from her father's farm, 
and has not missed a day or been tardy once in nineteen weeks. 

Mr. Lamborn is a member of the Modern lirotherhood of .\merica and he 

gives his political allegiance to the republican party. For eight years he did excel- 
voi. n— 1 



186 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

lent work as township clerk but has never aspired to public office, although he 
is progressive and loyal in matters of citizenship. In this section where a great 
deal of his life has been passed he is well known and highly respected, his genuine 
personal worth and sterling qualities of character having gained for him the 
esteem and regard of all who are associated with him. 



THEODORE B. STOCK. 

Theodore B. Stock, prominently identified with financial interests in W'aukon 
as president of the Peoples National Bank and with business afifairs as president 
of T. B. Stock & Company, dealers in hardware, is one of the best known men 
in the city, his varied interests connecting him with practically every phase of 
community life. He was born in Jefferson township, this county, December 31, 
1871, and is a son of William Stock, a native of Germany, where he remained 
until after he had reached maturity. As a young man he crossed the Atlantic 
and came directly to Allamakee county, where he purchased a farm in Jefiferson 
township. Here he afterward married Frederica Dravis, also a native of Germany. 
Mr. Stock, father of the subject of this review, continued to develop his fine 
property, adding to it from time to time until he owned two hundred and sixty- 
five acres of land. Upon the homestead he raised his family and there spent 
the last years of his life, dying about 1900. His wife survived him for some 
time, passing away in 191 1. In their family were nine children: William, of 
Howard, South Dakota ; Minnie, who married Fred W. Steffin, of Diller, 
Nebraska ; Henry, who resides in Howard, South Dakota ; Charles and August, 
farmers in Allamakee county ; Sophia, who makes her home in Waukon ; Theo- 
dore B., of this review ; Louis, who is engaged in farming in this county ; and 
Edward, who resides in Oakes, North Dakota. 

Theodore B. Stock was reared upon his father's farm in Jefferson township 
and acquired his education in the public schools. When he was a young man 
he came to Waukon and began his independent career as a clerk in the employ 
of H. F. Opfer & Brother, with whom he remained for six years, receiving 
a thorough and practical business training which has been invaluable to him in 
his later career. When he resigned his first position he formed a partnership with 
P. A. Anderson and for eight years engaged in the boot and shoe business, selling 
out his interests at the end of that time in order to organize the T. B. Stock & 
Company, who for over twelve years have been prominently identified with 
hardware interests here, controlling an important and growing trade along this 
line. They have a large storeroom filled with a well selected line of stoves, shelf 
and heavy hardware and building material and they do also a large plumbing 
business. Much of the credit for the continued growth of the concern is due 
to Mr. Stock's ability and business foresight and to the excellent way in which 
his business affairs are managed. In addition to this he is connected with the 
Peoples National Bank and as its president is a central figure in financial circles 
here. He was one of the promoters of the institution, which has a capital 
stock of fifty thousand dollars and is one of the safest and most conservative 
banks in the county. The officers are: T. B. Stock, president; L. T. Hermanson, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 187 

vice president ; and P. E. O'Donnell, cashier, and the bank occupies a modern 
and commodious building, finished in 1912. A general banking business is trans- 
acted and a progressive poHcy maintained, tempered, however, by a safe con- 
servatism and a constant regard for the best interests of the depositors. Air. 
Stock devotes his entire time to the affairs of the institution and in his position 
as president his organizing and executive abiHty have been called forth and he 
has labored earnestly and intelligently to make the concern one of the substantial 
moneyed institutions of the community. 

Mr. Stock married, in W'aukon, on June 11, 1896, Miss Katherine Bieber, 
a daughter of Peter Bieber, a pioneer in Allamakee county. Mrs. Stock was 
born and reared in Waukon and here acquired her education. She and her hus- 
band have one daughter, Dorothea, who is now a student in the Waukon public 
schools. 

Politically Mr. Stock is identified with, the democratic party and has served 
as a member of the city council for a number of years. He was mayor of Waukon 
and by giving to the people a straightforward, constructive and efficient admin- 
istration did much to promote the advancement and growth of the city. He is 
well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in the Knights of Pythias, 
in which he has been through all the chairs and is past chancellor. He repre- 
sented his lodge in the grand lodge of Iowa. Always an active religious worker, 
Mr. Stock has done a great deal for the advancement of the German Reformed 
church in this county and as secretarj' and treasurer of the building committee 
was one of the leaders in securing the new church building, which is one of the 
finest of its kind in Waukon. He has also been a liberal contributor to the 
building funds of the other Waukon churches and his life has been upright and 
worthy in all respects. A successful business man, a far-sighted financier, a 
public-spirited citizen, he has for many years labored earnestly and intelligently 
in the best interests of the city and has today reached a position of prominence 
and achieved a degree of success which places him among the men of substantial 
worth and marked ability. 



FRED L. H. GERICKE. 



Fred L. H. Gericke, whose operations along agricultural lines are proving 
highly successful, is the owner of two hundred and twenty acres of land in 
Franklin township, Allamakee county. He is one of Iowa's native sons, his 
birth occurring in Clayton county, near Farmersburg, on the 13th of September, 
1878, his parents being John and Mary (Klinge) Gericke. He was reared to 
agricultural life, early becoming familiar with the tasks that usually fall to the 
farm lad. In the acquirement of an education he attended school in Marion 
township, Clayton county, and later was a student at Wesgrove, Post township, 
this county. At the comparatively early age of seventeen years he left school and 
began working as a farm hand in the employ of neighboring farmers, in the 
meantime, however, continuing to reside with his parents. Thus he continued 
until his marriage, when, desiring to engage in agriculture on his own account, 
he purchased a farm and began its operation. From the very first he has been 



188 PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

successful and is now the owner of a fine tract of land of two hundred and 
twenty acres, twenty acres of which are in timber. The remainder of the tract 
is all under cultivation and has been highly developed, owing to the careful 
supervision and progressive methods of Mr. Gericke. General farming and 
stock-raising fully occupy his time and attention although he is interested as a 
stockholder in the farmers store, the Postville Creamery and the Canning Factory. 
It was on the 26th of March, 1907, that Mr. Gericke was united in marriage 
to Miss Lucy Heins, who was also a native of Clayton county, born April 7, 
1889, a daughter of William and Minnie (Lange) Heins. The father was born 
near Clayton Center, March 5, 1863, while the mother's birth occurred in Ger- 
many, July 24, 1866. The father has been a lifelong farmer and at an early 
day became a landowner in Clayton count}-. He has resided on his present 
farm since 1887 and is still active in its operation, de\-oting his entire time and 
attention to general farming and stock-raising, although in the past he has held 
various local township offices. His daughter Lucy was the second in order of 
birth in a family of four children, and in early life attended the Springfield 
school, near Postville, in the acquirement of her education. By her marriage to 
Mr. Gericke she has become the mother of two children, ]\Iilo W. J. and Clinda 
M. L., the former born on the 14th of April, 1908, and the latter on the 22d 
of May, 19 10. The family are members of the Lutheran church of Postville, 
and Mr. Gericke gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. He has 
never aspired to any office, although he is public-spirited in a large degree, pre- 
ferring that iiis political service should be fulfilled as a private citizen rather 
than as a public servant. Manifesting, from the very beginning of his business 
career those traits — energy, industry and perseverance — that seldom fail to accom- 
plish gratifying results, he has won for himself an e.xcellent place among the 
younger generation of agriculturists of Franklin township, while the honorable 
principles which he has ever followed in his relations with his fellowmen have 
won for him the confidence, respect and good-will of all with whom he has 
come in contact. 



ELLISON ORR. 



Ellison Orr, prominently connected with business interests in Waukon as 
superintendent of the Standard Telephone Company, has been actuated through- 
out all of his business life by a spirit of enterprise and initiative and has advanced 
step by step to be one of the most substantial and representative men of the 
community where he makes his home. He was born on the Orr farm near 
^McGregor, Iowa, June 15, 1857, and is a son of James and Margaret Orr, of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. The father emigrated from Ireland at the age of twelve 
and settled with his parents in New York state, coming to Iowa in 1856 and 
purchasing a farm one and one-half miles northeast of Postville, whereon he 
resided for many years. 

Ellison Orr grew to manhood upon this farm and acquired his education in 
the Postville public schools. After laying aside his books he taught for a number 
of winter terms in the district schools in the vicinity of h.is home and from 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 189 

January, 1891, to June, 1893, was teacher of the seventh and eighth grades of 
the school in Postville where he attended in his youth. After three years devoted 
to educational work he accepted the position of clerk in the Postville State Bank 
and retained it for a similar period of time, later again turning his attention to 
farming, an occupation which he followed until 1898. In that year he was elected 
clerk of the court for Allamakee county and he did such able and effective work 
that he won reelection to the office, serving in all from January i, 1899, to January 
I, 1903, and proving discriminating, far-sighted and conscientious in the dis- 
charge of his duties. On the ist of January, 1904, Mr. Orr was appointed general 
manager and superintendent of the Standard Telephone Company and in the 
fall of the same year he moved to Waukon, where he has since resided. He 
possesses an initiative spirit and an executive ability which have been important 
factors in his success in his present position and under his able management the 
affairs of the concern have prospered exceedingly, the business has increased in 
volume and the details of operation have been put upon a modern and business- 
like basis. 

Mr. Orr married, November 2, 1881, Miss Belle Makepeace, whose parents 
resided in Winneshiek county. To their union were born four children : Fred, 
a construction foreman for the Standard Telephone Company ; Harry, a civil 
engineer in the employ of the Missouri Iron Company; Florence, who is engaged 
in teaching; and James, at school. 

Always interested in anything pertaining to questions of public education and 
anxious to do his part in promoting educational facilities, Mr. Orr has accom- 
plished some beneficial work in matters relating to the public schools and espe- 
cially as a member of the board of trustees of the State College of Agriculture 
located at Ames, a position which he held from July i, 1904, to July i, 1910. 
He was for thirteen years a member of the State Militia, resigning in 1897, ^'^ 
the time of its reorganization, as first lieutenant and quartermaster of the Fourth 
Regiment. He belongs to the Presbyterian church of Waukon and has been a 
Mason since attaining his majority, being now a Knight Templar. He cooperates 
in all movements for the material, intellectual and moral progress of the com- 
munity and is recognized as one of the foremost business men of the city, his 
remarkable success in an important capacity placing him in an enviable position 
in business circles. 



FREDERICK SEGRIST. 

Frederick Segrist, carrying on general farming upon eighty acres of fine land 
on section 7, Franklin township, is one of Allamakee county's most progressive 
and successful native sons, his birth having occurred just across the county line 
in Hardin, on the 5th of February, 1883. He is a son of Louis and Mary Ann 
( Toyce) Segrist, the former born in Massachusetts in 1835 and the latter in 
Indiana some seven or eight years afterward. As a young man the father came 
to Iowa and his marriage occurred in Allamakee county, after which he worked 
in the employ of others for some time. He later became an independent land- 
owner in Franklin township and from there moved to Post township, where his 



190 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

death occurred in igo2. His wife survives him and makes her home in Franklin 
township. In their family were nine children, of whom the subject of this review 
is the youngest. 

Frederick Segrist was reared upon his father's farm and from an early age 
assisted with the work of its cultivation, becoming thoroughly familiar with the 
best agricultural methods and with everything pertaining to the work of the 
fields and the care of the grain and stock. The occupation in which he had been 
reared was the one to which he turned his attention upon reaching manhood and 
upon the death of his father he assumed charge of the homestead, continuing to 
develop and improve it until 1906. In that year he sold the property and bought 
eighty acres on section 7, Franklin township, upon which he still resides. He 
engages in general farming and stock-raising and devotes his entire time to his 
agricultural pursuits, his farm evidencing in its neat and attractive appearance 
his practical methods and well directed labors. 

Mr. Segrist married, on the ist of May, 1904, Miss Zelma Lawson, who was 
born in Franklin township, March i, 1886. To their union have been born two 
children, twins, Bertha Louise and Bessie Lucile, whose birth occurred September 
16, 1908. Mr. Segrist is independent in his political views and interested in the 
growth and welfare of the community although never an office seeker. He is 
well known throughout the township as a man of alert and enterprising spirit, 
possessed of the resolute will which enables him to carry forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. His methods are at all times practical and 
progressive and his success, rewarding earnest and persistent labor, places him 
among the most prosperous and able of Allamakee county's native sons. 



ROBERT J. ALEXANDER. 

For thirty-four years Robert J. Alexander has been connected with mer- 
chandising in Waukon, where during that time he has built up a large and 
profitable patronage as a dealer in clothing and men's furnishings. He is one of 
the active arid progressive business men of the city, where his long residence, 
his sterling qualities of character and his straightforward business dealings have 
made him widely known and honored. He was born in Linn county, near Mount 
Vernon, July 18, 1852, and is a son of Charles Alexander, a native of New York, 
who went south with his parents when he was still a child and settled in Missis- 
sippi, where he grew to maturity. As a young man he came to Iowa, locating 
in Linn county, where he married Miss Susan Smyth, a native of Ireland but 
reared in the United States. Her parents came to Iowa and settled in Linn county 
when she was sixteen years of age. Charles Alexander was subsequently one of 
the earliest settlers in Cedar county, where he opened up a tiew farm, which he 
improved and developed into a valuable agricultural property. He reared his 
family upon the homestead and there spent the remainder of his life. 

Robert J. Alexander spent his childhood upon his father's farm, aiding in the 
work of the lields and acquiring his education in the public schools. He supple- 
mented this by three terms at Cornell College and upon laying aside his books 
taught for three winter terms, engaging in farming during the summer months. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 191 

In 1879 he came to Waukon, where he formed a partnership with Levi Armstrong 
under the firm name of Armstrong & Alexander. They put in a large and 
complete stock of clothing and men's furnishings and opened for business in the 
same building now occupied by Mr. Alexander, where he has conducted a pros- 
perous mercantile concern for thirty-four consecutive years. The association 
continued for twelve years and at the end of that time Mr. Alexander purchased 
his partner's interest and since 1891 has conducted the business alone. He carries 
a complete line of clothing and men's furnishings, his stock being varied and 
well selected, and he has gained a large and growing patronage, accorded him in 
recognition of the excellent quality of his goods, his upright and honorable busi- 
ness methods and his reasonable prices. Mr. Alexander is doing an annual 
business amounting to thirty thousand dollars and is one of Waukon's most suc- 
cessful merchants and most progressive business men. 

In 1882 Mr. Alexander was united in marriage to Miss Carrie L. Hayward, 
who was born in Wisconsin but who was reared in Waukon, in the home of her 
sister, Mrs. Alonzo M. May. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander have two daughters : 
Susan, who married B. H. Keeler, a civil engineer in Kansas City, Missouri ; 
and Ruth, who is a student in Cornell College. They lost two children, Emma 
and Hayward, both of whom died in childhood. The family residence is located 
on Wooster street, near the public school, and is modern and up-to-date in every 
particular, Mr. Alexander having recently remodeled it throughout. 

Mr. Alexander attends the Methodist Episcopal church of Waukon and is 
a man of exemplary character. A resident of Iowa all during his life and of 
Waukon for over one-third of a century, he has thoroughly identified his inter- 
ests with those of the community with the result that his name stands as a 
synonym for progressiveness in business, for public-spirited citizenship and for 
all that is honorable and upright in every relation of life. 



FRANK ROFFMAN. 



Frank Roffman, actively engaged in general farming and stock-raising, is one, 
of the best known agriculturists of Franklin township, his fine farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty-seven acres lying on section 7. In the management and conduct 
of this property he displays excellent business ability, and his enterprise, care- 
ful control and keen discernment are the factors which have gained him the 
substantial place which he now occupies among the leading business men of his 
community. He was born in Germany, on the 22d of December, 1871, and is a 
son of John and Minnie (Blank) Roffman, also natives of that country. The 
father spent his entire life engaged in farming, coming to America in 1875 ^^^ 
locating immediately in Post township, Allamakee county, where he purchased 
land, whereon he continued to make his home until his death, which occurred on 
the 20th of August, 1882. The mother survives him and makes her home in 
Franklin township. 

The Evergreen school in Post township afforded Frank Roffman his educa- 
tional opportunities and in his childhood he divided his time between his studies 
and work upon the farm. He began his independent career at the age of twenty- 



192 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

one, hiring out as a farm laborer, and he continued thus for nine years, after 
which he purchased land of his own. He bought one hundred and twenty-seven 
acres on section 7, Franklin township, and since he was thirty years of age has 
been active in its cultivation. Upon his property he has made many substantial 
improvements, erecting barns and outbuildings, all of which present a neat and 
attractive appearance. Success has steadily rewarded his well directed labors 
and he is today one of the prosperous farmers and substantial business men of 
this vicinity. 

On the 5th of December, 1900, Mr. Roffman was united in marriage to Miss 
Lucy Segrist, a daughter of Louis and Mary Ann (Joyce) Segrist, the former 
a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and the latter of Indiana. More extended 
mention of these parents is made on another page in this work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Roffman have four children; Harold, who was born October 14, 1903; E^rl, 
born January 17, 1907; Otto, born January 21, 1909; and Mabel, born July 20, 
1912. 

Mr. Roffman is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store at Postville 
and is connected fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and has been road supervisor and 
a member of the school board, laboring effectively in that office to promote the 
cause of education. As one of the large landowners and successful farmers and 
business men of Franklin township he is well known, for his life record shows 
what may be accomplished by a determined spirit and by unfaltering enterprise. 
He has carefully noted and utilized each opportunity and his example of unre- 
mitting industry and perseverance is one well worthy of emulation. 



JOHN EDMUND O'BRIEN. 

John Edmund O'Brien, controlling an important and representative business 
as a dealer in real estate in Waukon, was born in Oneida county, New York, in 
i860, and was one of nine children born to Michael Smith O'Brien and Henrietta 
Alice Jenkins, who emigrated from Ireland in the early 'sos and were married in 
Oneida county. They afterwards came to Iowa, settling in Ludlow township, 
Allamakee county, where the father still resides upon his farm. 

John Edmund O'Brien was ten years of age when his parents came to Iowa. 
He worked on farms in this vicinity for several years and then engaged in car- 
penter work in various parts of the state, being employed in the construction 
of the buildings on the Illinois Central Railway between Onawa and Sioux 
Falls, .\fterwards he spent two years working at his trade in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama, and Jackson, Mississippi, going from the latter city to Chicago, Illinois 
where he assisted in the erection of the exhibition buildings at the World's 
Columbian Exposition and served for six months in the Columbian Guards. In 
the winter of 1893 he went to California and put up the Canadian exhibits at the 
Midwinter F,xi}osition in San Francisco. Returning to Iowa, he established him- 
self in the building business at Waukon and his ability l)econiing widely recog- 
nized, he soon secured a large and representali\e patronage. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 195 

Mr. O'Brien served in Company L the Waukon company, Iowa National 
Guards, under Captains Gibbs, Nichols and Stewart. In 1898, a few days after 
the declaration of war with Spain, he went to Pensacola, Florida, and with Paul 
D. May, enlisted in the United States Navy for one year as carpenter's mate, 
first class. He served on the LInited States ships Tacoma, Lancaster and Cassius, 
under commanders Sutherland, Very-Perry and Lieutenant Waters of Commo- 
dore Remy's fleet. At his own request and through Senator Allison's influence 
he received his honorable discharge at Norfolk, Virginia, at the close of the 
Spanish-American war. Returning home he studied law first at the Iowa State 
University and then at Drake University at Des Moines and was admitted to 
practice before the state and federal courts in igoo. In the following year how- 
ever he turned his attention to the real-estate business and in this he has since 
continued, his patronage in Waukon being today profitable and important. He 
is known as an expert judge of land values and his opinion has come to be regarded 
as an authority on matters of this character. He is resourceful, far-sighted, ca- 
pable and energetic and his sagacity is far-reaching and his integrity beyond 
question. 

At Medford, Oklahoma, March ig, 1903, Mr. O'Lirien was united in marriage 
to Miss Decorah Grattan. a daughter of Henry G. Grattan, a pioneer in Allamakee 
county and for many years one of the most prominent citizens in this part of 
Iowa. He was born at New Haven, Oswego county, New York, June 28, 1826, 
and was of English descent, a son of Amos and Abigail (Guyant) Grattan. The 
former, a blacksmith by trade, was born in Berkshire county, Massachusetts in 
1797 and died in Ludlow township, Allamakee county. Iowa, June 2, 1889. In 
1835 he took up a claim and built the first log cabin where Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
now stands. He was for fifty years a member of the liaptist church and voted 
with the first organization of the old abolitionist party. He fought in the War 
of 1812. His wife, who was in her maidenhood Abigail Guyant, was born Sep- 
tember 8, 1794, in Canterbury, Connecticut, and died in Ludlow township, Alla- 
makee county, in 1886. She was for a time the only white woman in Kenosha, 
Wisconsin. One child was born to the union of Mr. and Mrs. Amos Grattan — 
Henry Guyant. 

Henry Guyant Grattan was for many years well known in agricultural and 
journalistic circles of the middle west and as a leader in many public movements 
of a progressive and constructive character. He founded and published the 
Janesville (Wis.) Gazette, the Mt. Carroll (111.) Mirror and the Sterling(Ill.) 
Gazette. He also did considerable literary work after coming to Iowa, but in 
this state was chiefly interested in scientific agriculture, in the promotion of 
which he was one of the greatest individual forces of his time. He was a member 
of the board of trustees of Iowa Agricultural College and took a great interest 
in the work of that institution, organizing several new departments, among which 
may be mentioned that of domestic science. His own farm in Ludlow township 
was a practical exemplification of his theories and was one of the best equipped 
and most scientifically managed in the township. 

Henry Grattan was married three times, first to Jane Trask who died in 
1849, then to Phoebe Jane Tisdel, who died in 1865, and to Rosanna Russell who 
survives him. She was born in Shetiford, Canada, and is of French and English 
parentage, the daughter of Francis and Susannah (Griggs) liryant. Previous to 



196 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

her first marriage which united her with Frankhn Russell who was killed in the 
Civil war, Mrs. Grattan engaged in teaching. She was married to Henry Grattan 
on the 9th of December, 1865. Henry Grattan's children are as f oHows : Marvin 
Trask, born in Janesville, Wisconsin, in 1848; Jane, who was born in Freeport, 
Illinois, in 185 1 : C)rlando Tisdel, born in ]\It. Carroll. Illinois, in 1855; Bertha, 
born in Ludlow township, in 1868; John, born in Ludlow township, in 1869; and 
Decorah, the wife of the subject of this review. The last named was born at 
Waukon, Iowa, December 20, 1871, and acquired her education in the public 
schools of the city, in the South Dakota Agricultural College and at Drexel 
Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was a teacher of Domestic Science 
for several years at Toronto, Canada, in St. Thomas Alma College and at Buf- 
falo, New York. Mr. and Mrs. John E. O'Brien have two children ; Henry Grat- 
tan, born April 2, 1904: and John Gordon, born January 23, 1908. 

Mr. O'Brien is today one of the well known business men of Waukon, for he 
possesses as salient elements in his character, the energy, resourcefulness and 
sound judgment necessary to business success. His associates respect his integ- 
rity and honor and his straightforward dealings and his many sterling traits 
of mind and character have gained for him the esteem and confidence of a wide 
circle of friends. 



ANTON C. LARSON. 



Anton C. Larson, a prominent real-estate dealer in Waukon and well known 
in business and political circles of the city, is a native of Allamakee county, born 
June 2, 1857. His father, Christian Larson, was born in Norway and there grew 
to maturity and married. He and his wife emigrated to the United States in 1853, 
coming direct to Iowa, where they settled in Hanover township, Allamakee 
county. The father entered an eighty acre tract of land which he broke, fenced 
and improved, later purchasing more property to which he added from time to 
time until he owned a fine farm of two hundred acres. Upon this he made sub- 
stantial improvements, erecting a good residence, barns and other outbuildings and 
installing all of the necessary machinery and equipment. He made his property 
valuable and by his practical and progressive methods secured for himself a 
place among the prosperous and successful farmers of Hanover tow-nship. He 
spent his last years upon the homestead, dying at the advanced age of eighty-two. 
His wife survives him and makes her home with one of her sons on the old farm 
where she has lived for the past fifty-nine years. She is now in the eighty- 
seventh year of her age. 

Anton C. Larson was reared upon his father's farm in Hanover township and 
as a child aided in the operation of the homestead. He attended the district 
school and later supplemented this by a course in a commercial college in Minne- 
apolis. He afterward went to Yellow Medicine county, Minnesota, where he 
clerked for three years, at the end of which time he returned home and clerked in 
a general store for five years, receiving during this time a thorough and practical 
business training. Returning to Yellow Medicine county, he engaged in busi- 
ness at Canby, where he made his home for five years, disposing of his interests 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 197 

at the end of that time in order to come to Waul<on, where he has since remained. 
He soon became prominent in local politics, winning the appointment to the office 
of deputy county treasurer, a capacity in which he served ably and efficiently for 
six years, resigning only to accept the office of county treasurer. At the end 
of his first term his able work was rewarded by reelection and in all he served 
in this office for four years. Upon the completion of his last term he opened 
a real-estate office in Waukon and has since given his entire time to the conduct 
of his business. He deals in Allamakee county improved farming lands and 
town properties and handles also Dakota and Canadian real estate. He has 
bought and sold numerous farms in this section of Iowa and has negotiated the 
sale of a great many business houses and residences in Waukon. Possessing a 
just comprehension of land values, he has so conducted his business as to make it 
profitable not only to himself but to his clients also. 

On the 17th of November, 1885, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss 
Matilda Larson, a native of Norway but reared and educated in Iowa and Minne- 
sota. To their union were born three children : Myrtle, who lives at home ; 
Ralph, who is a student in the Waukon high school ; and Alden, also pursuing 
his studies. 

Fraternally Mr. Larson is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Yeomen. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party, with 
which he has been affiliated since casting his first vote. Aside from the public 
offices before mentioned he was for five years a member of the common council 
while a resident of Canby and he is known as an eminently puljlic-spirited and 
progressive citizen. For many years he has been a force in public affairs in this 
section and his efficient services in various positions of public trust have had an 
important eflect upon local political conditions. His interests have been thoroughly 
identified with those of Waukon and Allamakee county and no progressive public 
project seeks his support in vain. In business and politics he has won success 
and at the same time has gained the regard and esteem of all who are associated 
with him. 



JULIUS A. KROUSIE. 



Julius A. Krousie, who in an influential way has for many years been identi- 
fied with farming interests in b'ranklin township and whose enterprise has con- 
tributed much toward the agricultural development of the community, was born 
at Lansing, Allamakee county, March 17, 1873, a son of Gotlieb and Julia 
(Schellschmidt) Krousie, lioth born near Berlin, Germany. In the latter part 
of the year 1872 they crossed the Atlantic to America, locating in Lansing, where 
the father passed away the same year. In his native country he had always been 
a farmer and during the short period of his residence in Iowa followed agricul- 
tural pursuits. His wife survived him many years, dying in 1909, at the age of 
seventy-nine. 

Julius A. Krousie attended the public schools in Lansing and was afterward 
a student at district school No. i, Ludlow township, supplementing this by three 
terms at the Waukon Business College. When he was nine years of age he was 



198 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

taken into the home of J. E. Nash in Ludlow township and there continued to 
reside for eleven years thereafter. Eventually he began earning his own live- 
lihood as a farm hand, but after ten years of work in the employ of others pur- 
chased land of his own on section 7, Franklin township, upon which he has 
since resided. He purchased first forty acres of unimproved land and was so 
successful in its cultivation that he was able to add to his holdings from time to 
time, owning today one hundred and sixty acres, the greater part of which is 
under cultivation. He has made substantial improvements here, erecting the 
necessary buildings and installing the needed equipment, and the condition of 
his fields and meadows indicates his careful supervision and practical labor. 
He is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Store and in the Farmers Tele- 
phone Company of Postville and in business circles is known as a reliable, far- 
sighted and discriminating business man. 

On the 2d of April, 1902, Mr. Krousie was united in marriage to Miss Julia 
Swenson, born in Post township, February 12, 1883. She is a daughter of 
Anton and Anna (Halverson) Swenson, natives of Norway, of whom further 
mention is made elsewhere in this work. The father now makes his home in 
Ludlow township, having survived his wife since 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Krousie 
became the parents of four children: \'iolet, who was born September 12, 1904; 
John, who was born July 10, 1906, and who died in October, 1908; Allen, born 
June 28, 1909; and one child born June 7, igii. 

Mr. Krousie gives his political allegiance to the republican party but never 
seeks public office, although he is always ready to further any measure which will 
in any degree promote community growth and advancement. He is a man of 
high moral character, industrious and enterprising, and his honesty and integrity 
have merited for him the confidence and esteem of all with whom he comes in 
contact. 



PETER SMITH. 



A splendid farm of four hundred acres represents the life work of Peter 
Smith, who proudly can look back upon his achievements, which were attained 
by his own efforts and no outside help. A native of the state of New York, he 
was born March 12, 1853, and is a son of Peter Schmitt, a native of Bavaria, 
Germany, who was born in that state. May 22, 1822. The lather employed the 
German spelling "Schmitt," but when Peter and his brother grew to maturity 
they decided to Americanize the name, changing it to its present form. When a 
young man the father emigrated to the United States and engaged in farming and 
also did work in a smelter in New York. Later he removed to Ohio and in 18(12 
came to Allamakee county, where he bought eighty acres of unimproved land in 
French Creek township near where his son now lives. Diligent and industrious, 
he settled down to hard work, breaking the land and placing his acres under 
cultivation, and as he obtained results he increased his holdings until he at one 
time owned four hundred acres. He died on the old home farm on March 8, 1879. 
His marriage to Catherine Schift'hauer occurred in New York state on April 25, 
1852. The mother, who was a native of Saxony, Germany, was born October 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 199 

I, 1829, and lias also passed away, her death occurring on the home farm on 
June 20, 1890. They were the parents of six children: Peter, our subject; Charles 
J., deceased: Mary ^L, who resides in Waukon ; Catherine, the wife of John 
Enders, of Picrrien county, Wisconsin ; Sophia, deceased, who was the wife of 
Patrick Donohue ; and John, of Rice Lake, Wisconsin. The parents were devout 
communicants of the Catholic church. 

Peter Smith came with his parents from New York, via Ohio, to Allamakee 
county, and received his education largely in the district schools near his father's 
farm. In the spring of 1876 he set out upon his independent career, engaging as 
a farm hand for neighbors. He married in 1876 and subsequently rented land 
for a number of years. In 1885 he acquired by purchase one hundred and sixty 
acres, yet in a wild state, and there he has since resided, increasing his holdings 
as occasion otifered and his means permitted, until he now owns four hundred 
acres, which are all put to profitable use. Much of his land is under high culti- 
vation and good improvements can be found upon his farm. His buildings are 
suitably equipped and substantial and his residence is commodious and com- 
fortable. He engages in general farming, dividing his time between grain culture 
and stock-raising. 

Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Melinda Hoffman, a native of 
Cascade township, Dubuque county, Iowa, where she was born on September 7, 
1854, a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Haas) Hoffman, later residents of French 
Creek township. Mr. Smith lost his wife on August 27, 1912, when her death 
ensued on account of a fatal automobile accident. He and his wife had the 
following children : Melinda, who married C. P. Nierling, a well known agri- 
culturist of this county : Mary J., the wife of F". A. Roth, of Brooklyn, Iowa ; 
C. M., of Zearing, this state ; Joseph, of State Center, Iowa ; Katie J. who mar- 
ried C. W. Lane, of French Creek township; John H. of State Center; Ann, at 
home ; Benjamin J., of State Center ; William, also of that place ; and Frank, at 
home. Mr. Smith and his family are members of the Catholic church and he 
gives his jjolitical adherence to the democratic party. While he has attained a 
substantial position among the farmers of his district and has individually become 
prosperous, he has been a servicealjle factor in promoting the growth of his 
locality and his citizenship has in every way been productive of good results. 
He enjoys the high esteem and regard of all who know him and has made many 
friends in the countv. 



ARTHUR T. STILLMAN. D. D. S. 

r3r. Arthur T. Stillman, who for almost a (|uarter of a century has practiced 
dentistry in his offices above the Citizens P.ank, is one of the earliest residents in 
Allamakee county and the oldest dentist in active practice in Waukon. He was 
born in Cortland county. New York, November 13, 1851, and is a son of John 
Stillman, also a native of Cortland county. The father grew to maturity there 
and married Miss Mary Nesmith, afterward following general farming for a 
number of years. Six of his children were born in Cortland county and in 1853 
he came with his family to Iowa, making a jiermanent location in Center town- 



200 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

ship, Allamakee county. Here he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
raw land, which he cleared and broke, opening up a new farm. In the course 
of years he placed upon it substantial improvements, erecting a comfortable resi- 
dence, a good barn and the necessary outbuildings and he became one of the pros- 
perous and successful agriculturists of this vicinity. He later moved into 
Waukon, where he spent the last years of his life, serving as justice of the peace 
for some time. He died in February, 1893, and was survived by his wife for 
three years. Both are buried in Oakland cemetery. They were the parents of 
three sons and three daughters. John J. Stillman enlisted in Company B, Twelfth 
Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and went south with his regiment, participating in the 
battle at Fort Donelson, where he was killed. His body was brought home for 
burial and in his honor the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic was 
given his name. Linus Stillman also joined the Union army, enlisting in Company 
F, Sixth Iowa Cavalry, and serving through the entire war. He received his hon- 
orable discharge after Lee's surrender and returned home, later buying the home- 
stead, which he improved and developed for some years. After he sold the 
farm he purchased land near Emmetsburg and continued to reside upon it until 
his death. Of the other children born to Mr. and Airs. John Stillman only one 
besides the subject of this review still survives. She is Mrs. Jackson Smith, of 
Waukon. 

Dr. Stillman was reared upon his father's farm in Allamakee county and 
acquired his primary education in the public schools, supplementing this by a 
four years' course in the Waukon high school. He later engaged in teaching for 
four years and was then a clerk in a hardware store in Waukon for some time. 
Having determined, however, to practice dentistry, he went to the State University 
and took a course in dental surgery, graduating with the class of 1889. He 
returned immediately to Waukon, where he secured an office in the Citizens 
Bank building, where he is still located, having occupied the same rooms for 
twenty-four years. Although one of the oldest dentists in active practice in 
the city. Dr. Stillman keeps in touch with the most modern thought of his pro- 
fession. Throughout the years his patronage has grown steadily. He has a 
well equipped office, supplied with all the most modern dental appliances, and is 
numbered among the leaders in his profession in this section of the state. 

On the 20th of February, 1878, Dr. Stillman married Miss Anna M. Pottle, 
a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and a daughter of W. R. Pottle, who came as 
a pioneer to Iowa and became one of the first business men in Waukon. Mrs. 
Stillman was reared and educated in this city and later spent some time as a 
teacher of music and art. Mr. and Mrs. Stillman became the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Hazel, who acquired her education in the public schools of this city and 
took a four years' course at Cornell College. She is now a teacher of history and 
English in the Waukon pulilic schools. Mrs. Stillman died August 20, igcx), and 
was laid to rest in Oakland cemetery. Immediately after his marriage Dr. Still- 
man purchased a home on Allamakee street, which he rebuilt and remodeled, 
making it one of the most attractive in the city. 

Fraternally Dr. Stillman is connected with the Masonic order, holding mem- 
bership in the lodge and chapter. He at one time belonged to the Decorah com- 
mandery but has now demitted. He belongs to Waukon lodge, K. P., and has 
served through all the chairs of that organization, is now past grand chancellor 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 201 

and has represented his lodge in the grand lodge of Iowa. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and served as trustee for a number of years, his 
wife having been also an active church and Sunday school worker. She served 
as organist in the Waukon church for thirty years. Always interested in school 
matters. Dr. Stillman has done able work in the cause of education in Allamakee 
county, being now in the twenty-first year of his service as a member of the 
school board and in the eighteenth year of his activity as president of that body. 
During the many years of his residence in Waukon he has been constant in his 
support of progressive public measures and his loyalty to the general good is 
unquestioned. He holds to high ideals in his profession, is conscientious in the 
performance of his duties and has thoroughly proved that his knowledge of 
dentistry is of a practical as well as a comprehensive nature. 



EUGENE A. READ. 



Eugene A. Read owns and cultivates a large farm in Franklin township and 
by constant application has surrounded himself with an enviable degree of pros- 
perity. His two hundred acres lying on section 6 constitute the farm upon which 
he was born on the 27th of May, 1852, his parents being Charles B. and Caroline 
(Dawson) Read, the former born in Massachusetts in 1823 and the latter in Jef- 
ferson county, New York, February 23, 1828. The father was a son of Charles 
Read, born in Massachusetts in 1795, he being the son of Joseph, born in 
ALissachusetts in 1750. Joseph Read was a son of Thomas Read, who was 
born in England in 1727 and who died in Oxford, Massachusetts, all being 
descendants of Thomas Read, who passed away in Colchester, England, in 
1616. Charles B. Read, father of the subject of this review, was a resident of 
Illinois. He married Caroline Dawson, of Algonquin, Illinois, in 1850. He was a 
doctor by profession and enjoyed a good practice until his death, which occurred 
in 1879. The mother came to Iowa, late in the fall of 1851 with her parents, 
Alexander and Jane Dawson. The latter preempted three hundred and twenty 
acres of land in Allamakee county, Franklin township, section 6. Caroline 
(Dawson) Read taught in the Allamakee county public schools for twenty years. 
Her death occurred on March 3, 1876. 

Eugene A. Read acquired his knowledge of agriculture upon his mother's 
farm in Franklin township and obtained his education in the district schools. He 
laid aside his books at the age of twelve and began chopping cordwood on the 
farm upon which he now resides, hauling it afterward to Postville and selling it 
in the markets of that city. After he attained his majority he became a land- 
owner and when his mother died he purchased the homestead, whereon he has 
since resided. He finished the clearing of this property and has now one of the 
finest and most highly improved farms in this section of Allamakee county. Of 
his two hundred acres, one hundred are principally in maple timber, and he oper- 
ates only part of the remainder, the rest being rented to desirable tenants. The 
portion whereon he makes his home is beautified with running water and wood- 
lands and I\Ir. Read has provided it with a comfortable residence, barns and out- 
buildings so that his premises are among the most desirable in the community. In 



202 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

addition to general farming he specializes in the raising of a fine quality of corn 
and in the breeding of hogs, making this a very remunerative department of his 
business. 

On the 14th of February, 1891, Mr. Read was united in marriage to Miss 
Myrtle Cutshaw, who was born in Lancaster, Grant county, Wisconsin. She 
is a daughter of David and Adele (Herrington) Cutshaw, the latter born in 
New York city, April 27, 1849. The father passed away when Mrs. Read was 
only one year old and the mother afterward married Albert Carson, now a resi- 
dent of Austin, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Read have become the parents of four 
children: \'iolet C, who was born January 4, 1892, and is now attending the 
Southern Minnesota Normal College: Rosamond A., born October 2, 1895, who 
is a pu]iil in the Waukon high school ; Laverne L., who was born October 28, 
1897, and died July 2, 1898: and Opal Adele. whose birth occurred ]\Iay 

Mr. Read is independent in his political views, voting according to his per- 
sonal convictions without regard to party lines. Locally he is interested in the 
betterment of the community and for a number of years rendered the township 
excellent service as justice of the peace and school director. He is a man of 
manv sterling traits of character — able in business, progressive in citizenship and 
at all times trustworthy and reliable. 



WILLL\M HOWES. 



Among the pioneers of .\llamakee county is William Howes, who is prom- 
inent in the agricultural history of this section and now has valuable farming 
interests in French Creek township. He has not only been an interested witness 
of the changes that have taken place here as primitive conditions have given way 
to the onward march of civilization but has been an active and cooperant factor 
in bringing about that transformation and laying the foundation for the civiliza- 
tion that is enjoyed by the present generation. Born in New York state in 1842, 
he is a son of Thomas and Phoebe (Harrington) Howes, natives of England, who 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States in the early '30s. The father was a 
mechanic by trade and worked along that line while moving westward. During 
his career he lived in Syracuse and Buffalo, New York, coming subsequently 
to Chicago and Amboy, Illinois, and in 1859 to Allamakee county, Iowa, where 
he located on four hundred acres of land which he had entered from the govern- 
ment in 1835. He later bought an additional four hundred acres. On this farm 
he built the first frame building to be erected in French Creek township, but 
the management of his farm was soon turned over to his son William, while 
the father remained actively engaged at his trade. He was highly respected in 
his locality and passed away at the age of seventy, his wife being eighty years of 
age at the time of her death. In their family were four sons and two daughters : 
William, of this review ; John, who makes his home with a son-in-law in Union 
City township, Allamakee county: E. H., of North Dakota: Ruth, who makes 
her home with her brother, E. H.: and two who died in infancy. 




^J^aLLTAM HOWES 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 205 

William Howes received his education by attending the public schools in 
the different places where his parents resided and was seventeen years of age 
when the family came to Allamakee county, assuming at that time the manage- 
ment of the father's farm. He later came into possession of four hundred and 
sixteen acres of the land and here he has since made his home, engaged in general 
farming. He has placed substantial, buildings upon the land and his residence 
is comfortable and commodious. The latest machinery can be found upon the 
place in order to facilitate the labor and improve, the yield of his acres. He 
has become recognized as one of the foremost agriculturists of his section and 
his success is the more creditable as it has been largely brought about by his own 
labors and entirely unaided. 

In W'aukon, Iowa, Mr. Howes was united in marriage to Miss Catherine 
Mockley, a native of Elgin, Illinois, who passed away about five years ago. She 
bore her husband twelve children : William and John, of Makee township ; Josie, 
of L^nion City township ; James and Edward, of Waukon ; Margaret, Helen, 
Albert and Cecilia, at home ; Mary, of Winnipeg, Manitoba ; and Catherine and 
Thomas, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Howes are members of the Catholic church 
and politically he has long voted the democratic ticket, although he supported the 
Taft administration at the last election. He has been prominent in public life, 
having served as township trustee, road supervisor and school director. He 
enjoys the full confidence and esteem of all who know him and, while he has 
attained prosperity for himself, has been a serviceable factor in promoting agri- 
cultural interests and making Allamakee county what it is today — one of the 
richest farming communities in the state. His career is proof of the fact that 
success is but ambition's answer and that honesty, industry and energy lead to 
the goal. He has ever been public-spirited and has given evidence of that char- 
acteristic while holding official positions, in which capacities he has ever labored 
for progress and advance. Every worthy enterprise finds in him a champion and 
the interests of French Creek township and Allamakee county have profited by 
his labors. 



GEORGE WILLIS. 



George Willis, carrying on general farming and stock-raising upon one 
hundred and seventy-three acres of land lying partly in Franklin and partly in 
Jefferson township, was born in Lincolnshire, England, June 9, 1849. He is a 
son of George and Mary (Copeman) Willis, also natives of that part of England, 
the father born in 1824. He gave his attention to agricultural pursuits during all 
of his active life, dying in Lincolnshire in 1868. His widow afterward married 
again and came to America, locating in Colorado, in which state she made her 
home until her death, at the age of sixty-six. 

George Willis was reared in his native community and acquired his educa- 
tion in its public schools. He afterward served an apprenticeship as a locomotive 
and stationary engineer and at the age of eighteen began working at this occupa- 
tion, following it successfully until he came to America. He crossed the Atlantic 
in 1875 and pushed his way westward to Colorado, locating twenty miles north 

Vol. n— 1 1 



206 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of Denver, where he became' connected witli the L'nion Pacific Railroad as loco- 
motive engineer on the run between Denver and Boulder. Here he remained 
for seven years, after which he turned his attention to farming in Colorado, 
buying a tract of land in that state, and upon it he resided until 1898, when he sold 
and came to Iowa, buying his present farm. He owns and operates one hundred 
and seventy-three acres of land, eighty of which lie in Franklin township and 
ninety-three in Jefferson, and the property is in an excellent state of cultivation, 
reflecting everywhere his careful supervision and practical methods. Aside from 
general farming Mr. Willis is also extensively interested in stock-raising and he 
is very attentive to his interests along this line which under his able management 
has proven profitable and important. 

On the 5th of June, 1873, Mr. Willis was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Bowen, who was born in Durham, England, June 16, 1855, a daughter of John 
and Margaret Bowen, natives of that section. The father followed the carpen- 
ter's trade for many years, making his home ahvays in England, where he and his 
wife both passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Willis are the parents of five children : 
Abraham, who married Miss Minnie Dorsey and who is engaged in farming near 
his father's farm ; Mary Anna, the wife of Richard Whaley, who is a butcher 
in Waterloo : Elizabeth, the wife of Edward Ewing, who is operating a farm 
near the old homestead ; Anna, who married William Ewing, of Jefl^erson town- 
ship ; and George, who resides at home. 

Mr. Willis is a member of the United Brethren church and gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party. He is one of the successful men of Franklin 
township and his prominence and prosperity are the more creditable to him since 
they have been attained through his energy, courage and perseverance. In all of 
his dealings he has been thoroughly reliable and in matters of citizenship helpful 
and progressive, giving his aid and influence to many measures for the public 
good. 



JOHN ECKERT. 



John Eckert is engaged in general farming in Franklin township, owning and 
cultivating one hundred and seventy acres of land. He has brought his fields 
to a high state of cultivation and his place presents an attractive appearance, 
constituting one of the pleasing pictures in the landscape. He was born in Clayton 
county, near Guttenberg, October 7, 1872, a son of Christian and Anna (Nicolai) 
Eckert, natives of Germany, the former born in 1821 and the latter in 1824. When 
he was a young man the father crossed the Atlantic to America and, coming 
directly to Iowa, located first at Guttenberg and after a time became an extensive 
landowner, giving his attention to general farming in the vicinity of that city 
until 1876. In that year he moved to Franklin tow^nship, Allamakee county, 
and purchased a five hundred acre farm, upon which he continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred in 1877, less than one year after his arrival here. Fol- 
lowing his demise the mother operated the farm with the help of her sons for 
a number of years and later made her home with her children until her death, 
which occurred on the 8th of December, 1910. 



I 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 207 

John Eckert is the youngest of seven children born to his parents. He was 
reared at home and in his childhood assisted with the work of his mother's farm, 
becoming at an early date familiar with the best agricultural methods and with 
everything connected with the work of the fields. After his marriage he rented 
the homestead for seven years and then purchased land of his own on section 9, 
Franklin township, upon which he still resides. He now owns one hundred and 
seventy acres of tine land, upon which he carries on general farming and stock- 
raising, both branches of his business being important and profitable. He follows 
the most modern and progressive methods in the cultivation of his property and 
that his labors have been practical is indicated by the results he has achieved, 
owning now one of the best farms in this community. 

On the 20th of March, igoo, Mr. Eckert was united in marriage to Miss Edith 
Roffman and they became the parents of two children : Bernice, born January 2, 
1907; and Florence, born June 16, 1910. Mr. Eckert is a stockholder in the 
Farmers' Shipping Association of Luana and in the Monona State Bank and his 
ability is widely recognized in business circles. His political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party and he has rendered his township excellent service as 
school director although he never seeks public office. His life has been a busy, 
useful and active one and his success is indicated in the fact of his ownership 
of one of the valuable farming properties in this community. 



MAYHEW W. EATON. 

Mayhew W. Eaton, one of the earliest residents of Allamakee county and 
today one of the most successful business men of Waukon, is extensively engaged 
in the buying, selling and shipping of live stock. He is interested also in the 
grain business and connected through investment with many of the most im- 
portant business and corporate interests of the city, his activities forming valuable 
elements in the general municipal development. He has resided in Allamakee 
county since 1857 but was born in Wisconsin, August i, 1852. His parents were 
born in Nova Scotia, where they grew to maturity. After their marriage they 
came to the United States and about the year 1848 settled in Wisconsin, where 
they resided for a number of years, removing later to Illinois. In that state they 
made their home in De Kalb county but later returned to Wisconsin, whence 
in 1857 they moved to Allamakee county, Iowa. Mr. Eaton purchased land in 
Franklin township and developed there an excellent farming property, upon which 
he continued to reside until his death, which occurred when he was eighty-three 
and a half years of age. He had survived his wife a little over nine years. 

Mayhew W. Eaton was a boy of five years when he came with his parents to 
Allamakee county. He was reared upon his father's farm in Franklin township, 
acquiring his primary education in the district schools and supplementing this by 
a three term course in the Waukon high school. After he laid aside his books 
he engaged in teaching during the winter terms, spending his summers working 
upon the farm, but eventually he left Iowa and went to South Dakota, where he 
took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres. Upon that property 
he spent a part of one year and then returned to Waukon, where he formed a 



208 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

partnership in the conduct of a boot and shoe business. During the three years 
in wliich he was interested in merchandising he engaged also in the grain and 
stock business, owning an interest in a grain elevator. He later formed a partner- 
ship with J. I'). Jones, purchasing elevator No. i in Waukon, of which the firm 
is still the proprietor. Mr. Eaton, however, is not personally active in this branch 
of the business, Mr. Jones superxising the conduct of the elevator and the buying 
and selling of the grain. Mr. Eaton gives all of his time to his extensive live-stock 
interests. He has by his energy, industry and success made secure for himself 
a place of prominence among men of marked ability in Waukon. He is a stock- 
holder, director and vice president of the Waukon State Bank, an institution with 
which he has been connected for a number of years. 

In 1879 ^Ir. Eaton married Miss Ella Alinert, a native of Allamakee county 
and a daughter of John Minert, a pioneer in the section. He located in Post 
township in early times. Mr. and Mrs. Eaton are the parents of seven children: 
Nellie, the wife of Ray Slitor, who is connected with the Great Northern Rail- 
road in St. Paul, Minnesota : Dora, who is an accomplished vocalist and teacher; 
Arthur J., who is jsracticing law in South Dakota and who married Lisle Stewart, 
daughter of Colonel A. G. Stewart : Guy W., also engaged in the practice of law 
in Waukon : Ruth, the wife of Dennis Cota, proprietor of the Cota Theater of 
Waukon ; and Lucile and Marion, who are students in the Waukon high school. 
Immediately after his marriage Mr. Eaton purchased a residence in the southern 
part of the city and made his home there for twenty-five years. At the end of 
that time he sold his property and jiurchased Judge Granger's residence, which 
is one of the most attractive in the city. 

Politically Mr. Eaton gives his allegiance to the republican party and has 
been affiliated with it since casting his first vote. For a number of years he served 
as a member of the city council and was for seven years mayor of Waukon. He 
served as delegate to both state and county conventions and for ten consecutive 
years was a member of the board of supervisors, holding the record for length of 
continuous service in Allamakee county. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masonic order, holding membership in the Ijlue lodge, chapter and commandery, 
and he has served in various important official capacities in the blue lodge and 
chapter. Mrs. Eaton is a member of the Waukon Methodist Episcopal church 
and active in church and Sunday school work. A resident of Allamakee county 
since his childhood, Mr. Eaton is well and favorably known in this part of 
Iowa, where his business activity has effected general business growth and his 
progressive spirit influenced political standards in an important and beneficial 
way. 



RICHARD COLVIN. 



A substantial measure of prosperity is the logical reward of a busy and use- 
ful life on the part of Richard Colvin, a progressive and enterprising farmer 
of Franklin township, Allamakee county. He was born in Jo Daviess county, 
Illinois, on the 12th of June, 1847, a son of William and Margaret (Markland) 
Colvin, natives of Pennsylvania and Kentucky respectively. In 1822, in young 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 209 

manhood, the father went to Jo Daviess county, Illinois, where he found employ- 
ment in the lead mines, but later took up farming, which occupation proved his 
real life work. He was thus engaged until 1849, in which year he went to Cali- 
fornia and for three years worked in the mines, after which he returned to Illi- 
nois, spending his remaining days in Jo Daviess county. He was one of the pio- 
neers of that state and served throughout the Black Hawk war. He died in 
1880, surviving his wife for twelve years. 

Richard Colvin, the younger of two children born unto his parents, attended 
the Mount Hope school in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, while at the same time 
he received thorough practical training under the direction of his father. He early 
became acquainted with farm work and remained with his father, assisting him 
in the cultivation of the home farm, until eighteen or nineteen years of age, when 
he began earning his own livelihood, being employed as a farm hand for some 
time. At the time of his marriage, however, he went to Decatur county, Iowa, 
and purchased land. That district was still largely a wilderness and after a 
residence of one year he returned to his native county, where he was engaged in 
farming for five years. At the expiration of that period he went to Minnesota 
and there conducted a mercantile business for a time, after which he sold out 
and became a landowner, following agricultural pursuits in that state for five 
years. L^pon his return to Illinois he took up his abode on the old homestead, 
which he cultivated for about thirteen years, and then rented a forty acre tract 
in Delaware county, which he operated for four years. It was at the end of 
that time that Mr. Colvin came to Allamakee county, taking up his home in the 
southern part of Franklin township, where he resided for seven years, after which 
he bought his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres, located on section 
6, this township, to the operation of which he has since given his entire attention. 
He carries on general farming, and the progressive methods which he follows are 
meeting with most excellent results. His farm is a well developed and highly 
improved property, equipped with modern conveniences and indicative in its 
neat appearance of the thrift, industry and system of its owner. 

Mr. Colvin was married, on the 12th of April, 1868, to Miss Sylvia E. Allen, 
who was born in St. Lawrence county. New York, April 30, 1847. Her parents, 
George W. and Theresa (Mitchell) Allen, were natives of St. Lawrence county, 
New York, and came west in 1855, locating in Jo Daviess county, Illinois. The 
father, a lifelong farmer, rented land in that state for a time but later purchased 
property where he resided throughout the remainder of his life. Their daughter 
Sylvia was the eldest of a family of thirteen children and by her marriage to Mr. 
Colvin has become the mother of ten children, as follows : Jesse, born October 24, 
1870, who is a farmer by occupation and resides two and a half miles north of 
Postville; Phoebe, born in July, 1873, who now makes her home with her 
parents; Lottie M., born December 11. 1874, now the wife of Charles Davis, a 
farmer of Myron ; Frank, born September 23, 1876, who is engaged in agricultural 
pursuits on a farm adjoining his father's home; Bert, born July 26, 1881, resid- 
ing with his father; Tillie, born June 6, 1884, who married Benjamin Davis, 
a farmer who resides south of Waukon ; Edward, born May 30, 1889, residing 
with his brother at Myron ; and three who have passed away. 

Mr. Colvin gives his support to the democratic party but aside from casting 
his vote for its men and measures at the polls is not active in politics, preferring 



210 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

to concentrate his energies upon his personal affairs. That he has been successfu' 
is indicated by the place which he occupies among the substantial and prosperous 
agriculturists of this district while the respect and regard entertained for him are 
inspired by his excellent traits of character. 



D. D. RONAN. 



A native of Allamakee county, having been born in French Creek township 
on August 15, 1858, D. D. Ronan has become one of the foremost agriculturists 
of his district and his success is the more commendable as it has been largely 
brought about by his own efforts. He now owns a highly improved farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres on section ^2 and also one hundred and thirty acres on 
section 29. He is a son of John and Margaret (Ring) Ronan, natives of Ireland, 
where they were married. They came to the United States in the early '50s 
and in this country the father first engaged in railroad construction work in New 
York and Freeport, Illinois. In May, 1858, he came to Allamakee county and 
settled on one hundred and sixty acres of wild land which he had purchased in 
May, 1855. There were no improvements made on the place as yet and he built 
thereon a log house which was later supplanted by a second structure of a 
similar kind. Subsequently he erected a stone house which still stands, although 
it suffered at one time heavily through fire, being almost entirely destroyed 
except the walls, but was rebuilt by our subject. Settling amid pioneer conditions, 
the parents and children experienced many hardships, but gradually the father 
succeeded in wresting a valuable farm from the wilderness. He died on this- 
property at the age of sixty-seven, the mother reaching the advanced age of 
eighty-seven years. Both were members of the Catholic church and the father 
was prominent in local public life, having served as school director and justice of 
the peace. Politically he was a democrat. D. D. Ronan was the fifth of six 
children, the others being: M. E., of Waukon, Iowa; G. F., of Kansas City; 
Charles, who died at the age of two years ; James, who passed away at the 
age of twenty-six ; and Johanna, who married Thomas Foley and is also 
deceased. 

D. D. Ronan was reared under the parental roof and educated in the dis- 
trict school near his father's farm, the Lansing high school and also received les- 
sons in the private school conducted by Professor J. Laghren in Waukon. Well 
prepared for the profession, he taught school for twelve terms and also learned 
telegraphing and the railroad business, but as the father died at about that time, 
he returned to the home farm in order to take charge of its management. He 
later bought out the other heirs and now owns the homestead, comprising one 
hundred and sixty acres, all of which are highly improved. His buildings are 
substantially and modernly ecjuipped and his farm machinery is of the latest 
type. His acres yield him rich returns and as the years have passed Mr. Ronan 
has come to be considered one of the most substantial men of his neighborhood. 
He also owns one hundred and thirty acres of land on section 29. 

Mr. Ronan was united in marriage to Miss Anna Devitt, a daughter of Martin 
and Mary Devitt. She passed away leaving three children : Anna Grace, Charles 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 211 

D. and Mary Irene, all of whom are at home. Subsequently Mr. Ronan married 
Mary McGahn, a native of Illinois and a daughter of John McGahn, who with 
his family subsequently came to Allamakee county. Of this union were born 
two children, Gertrude and James. 

Mr. Ronan is one of the most up-to-date agriculturists of Allamakee county 
and has not only attained individual prosperity but has been instrumental in 
forming agricultural standards and promoting agricultural growth. Politically 
he is a republican and is now serving in his second term as county supervisor. 
He has likewise been a member of the school board for a number of years and 
for the past twelve years has acted as treasurer of the board. For one year he 
served in the capacity of justice of the peace. He and his family are devout com- 
municants of the Roman Catholic church. ^Ir. Ronan enjoys the full confidence 
and respect of his friends and neighbors and has made himself effectively felt 
in the advancement that has taken place in Allamakee county as primitive con- 
ditions have given way to the onward march of civilization. He has proven 
himself a good, useful and valuable citizen and his success lies as much in the 
regard in which he is held by his fellowmen as in his material achievements. 



PETER S. NARUM. 



Peter S. Narum. who for the past nine years has been postmaster of Waukon, 
proving reliable, efficient and conscientious in the discharge of his duties, is a 
native son of Allamakee county, born in Paint Creek township, x\pril 15, 1867. 
His father, Sven Narum, was a native of Norway, born in 1832, and he remained 
in that country until he was nineteen years of age. Crossing the Atlantic, 
he made his way to Iowa and within the same year permanently located in Paint 
Creek township, Allamakee county. He entered land there, which he cleared, 
fenced and improved, opening up a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. To 
this he later added more land and finally owned two hundred acres, highly 
improved and developed, one of the finest agricultural properties in this section of 
the state. He married Miss Karen Gaarder, a native of Norway, who came 
to the United States when she was five years of age and who grew to woman- 
hood in Wisconsin. After his marriage Mr. Narum erected a comfortable resi- 
dence upon his farm and steadily carried forward the work of improvement, 
erecting a barn and the necessary outbuildings. He reared his children upon 
the homestead and there died in 1889. His wife survived him for some time, 
passing away in 1896. In their family were nine children, five sons and four 
daughters, all of whom with one exception still survive. 

Peter S. Narum was reared upon his father's farm, which in his childhood 
he helped to improve and cultivate. He acquired his primary education in the 
public schools of Paint Creek township and supplemented this by a two years' 
course in the Decorah high school. After laying aside his books he went to 
Eldora, where he clerked in the employ of his uncle for two years, at the end 
of that time purchasing his uncle's interest in the store. He carried on the 
business alone for two years and then disposed of his interests, returning to 
Allamakee county. He later came to Waukon and for eight years engaged in 



212 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

the hardware business here, his well selected line of goods, his straightforward 
dealings and his honorable business methods securing him a liberal and repre- 
sentative patronage. In 1904 he was appointed postmaster of Waukon by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt and after four years reappointed. In 1912 President Taft again 
named him for the position, which he has now held for nine years. Since taking 
ofifice he has accomplished a great deal of constructive work, improving the man- 
agement of the department and putting its affairs upon a businesslike basis. In 
1904 there were three rural routes out of Waukon and there are now five, with 
the probability of two more in the near future. Its expansion is due to a great 
extent to Mr. Narum's energy and well directed labors and is in itself a suffi- 
cient proof of his efficiency in office. He was one of the promoters of the 
Peoples National Bank, in which he is now a stockholder and .director, and he 
is otherwise identified with important business interests here. 

On the 9th of September, 1897, Mr. Narum married, in Waukon, Miss Lena 
Anderson, who was born in Paint Creek township, Allamakee county. She was 
educated in her native section and for some years previous to her marriage 
engaged in teaching music. Her father, Thomas Anderson, was born in Norway 
and crossed the Atlantic to America in. early times, making his first location in 
Wisconsin. About the year 1848 he came to Allamakee county and was one of 
the first settlers in Paint Creek township. He turned his attention to farming, 
acquiring in the course of his life four hundred acres of valuable land, which he 
developed and improved for many years, dying upon his homestead in 191 2, 
at the advanced age of ninety-one years. He was one of the best known and most 
highly respected citizens of Paint Creek township and one of Allamakee county's 
honored pioneers. Mr. and Mrs. Narum reside in a comfortable, modern resi- 
dence in Waukon and have made their home the center of a charming social 
circle. They are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church of Waukon. 

Politically Mr. Narum gives his allegiance to the republican party and served 
for one term as a member of the Waukon town council. He is a public-spirited 
and progressive citizen, giving his cooperation to every movement which tends 
to promote the intellectual, moral or material welfare of the city and county, and 
by reason of his many sterling qualities of character has won the regard and 
esteem of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



WILLIAM M. LAWSON. 

The life record of William M. Lawson is not only written in the terms of 
success but also in the terms of enterprise and honor, for while he has attained 
prosperity, becoming one of the substantial farmers of Franklin township, he has 
also won for himself an e.xcellent reputation as a man of high principles. His 
entire life has been passed in Allamakee county, for his birth occurred in Frank- 
lin township October 27, 1857. His parents, John D. and Sarah (Chambers) 
Lawson, were natives of Michigan but were married in Illinois. The father's 
parents passing away in Michigan when he was a mere boy, he later went to 
Illinois to live with a brother, with whom he made his home for some time. 




7: 



QNV XCN3T 'U0i.s* 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 215 

Subsequently he engaged in farming on his own account in tliat state and was 
there married. He then came to Allamakee county, Iowa, and was numbered 
among the very first pioneer settlers. Purchasing a tract of land in the northwest 
corner of Franklin township he there made his home for many years, clearing and 
developing the land and converting it into a productive farm. Later he crossed the 
line into Post township, where he made his home until his retirement from 
active life, when he went to live with a daughter, in whose home he passed away 
March 14, 1913, when eighty-seven years of age. His wife had passed away 
March 11, 191 1. when about seventy years of age. In their family were eight 
children, of whom the subject of this review was the fourth in order of birth. 

William M. Lawson, whose name introduces this review, attended district 
school in Franklin township in the acquirement of his education, but his oppor- 
tunities in this direction were limited for at the very early age of ten years he 
put aside his text-books and began working out as a farm hand. In the mean- 
time, however, he lived with his parents, and continued to make the old home 
farm his place of residence until he had attained the age of twenty-five years, 
when he was married and took up farming on his own account, renting a farm 
in the southeastern part of Franklin township, which he continued to operate for 
two years. Being desirous of engaging independently in agricultural pursuits 
he then purchased forty acres of undeveloped land which formed the nucleus of 
his present fine farm, which he immediately set about clearing and improving. 
From the very first his efiforts were most successful, and as he prospered in his 
undertaking he bought more land, adding to his original purchase until today 
he is the owner of one hundred and ninety-two acres of rich and arable land 
located on section 7, Franklin townshiJD. This farm Mr. Lawson has highly im- 
proved, introducing upon it all of the modern equipment and accessories for 
facilitating farm labor, and it is today one of the valuable and desirable farming 
properties of the district. He engages in general farming and stock-raising, and 
is a stockholder in the farmers" store at Postville, in the Postville Creamery and the 
Farmers Shipping Association. 

On April 2, 1883, Mr. Lawson was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Hoff- 
man, who was born in Germany in i860, a daughter of John and Minnie Rofifman, 
who came to America in that year. They located first in Michigan but later, 
in 1866, came to Iowa, taking up their home on a farm in Post township, adjoin- 
ing Franklin township. There the father passed his remaining days, his death 
occurring August 10, 1883. He is survived by his widow, who now makes her 
home in Franklin township with a daughter, Mrs. Van Carder. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawson have become the parents of nine children, as follows : Fred and Elmer, 
twins, born January 4, 1884, of whom the former married the daughter of William 
Harris, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume, and who reside in 
Post township, while the latter makes his home with his father ; Zelma, born 
March i, 1886, who married Fred Segrist, a farmer of Franklin township: Sher- 
man, born June 17, 1888, a carpenter by trade, residing at home: Frank, born 
on the 27th of January, 1893, who married Ruby Joan Hammel, and resides in 
Jeflferson township: John, born October 6, 1895, living with his father; Vera, 
born April 25, 1897, and Leonard, November 27, 1900, attending school at 
Evergreen schoolhouse ; and Alta, born July 25, 1903, who is also pursuing her 
education. 



216 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Lavvson gives his support to the republican party, but aside from serving 
as a member of the school board he has never held, nor desired to hold, public 
office. He is a member of the Woodmen and is active in the affairs of that order. 
Beginning the battle of life at the tender age of ten years, he early developed 
those virtues of self-reliance, self-control and persistence which conduce to sound 
judgment and lead to ultimate victory and today he stands as one of the substan- 
tial, progressive and desirable citizens of Allamakee county, within whose borders 
his entire life has been spent and among whose citizens he numbers many warm 
friends. 



JOHN M. BOWLING. 



Among the few remaining veterans of the Civil war and early settlers of 
Allamakee county is John M. Dowling, residing on section lo, French Creek 
township. A native of Somersetshire, England, he was born February 4, 1836, 
and when a young man emigrated with his brother to America, coming in 1859 
to Allamakee county, where he purchased a tract of eighty acres of wild land. 
However, when the demand for troops became insistent he patriotically offered 
his services to his country and on October 10, 1861, enlisted at Lansing, Iowa, 
in Company B, Twelfth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He discharged his duties faith- 
fully and distinguished himself for bravery and courage, and during his enlistment 
was promoted to the rank of corporal. The rendezvous of the company was at 
Dubuque, Iowa, and from there they proceeded to St. Louis, where the winter 
was spent. The following are some of the engagements in which Mr. Dowling 
participated : Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and the battle of Shiloh, after which 
he was taken prisoner and imderwent the hardships of incarceration from April 
6th until October, when he was discharged and again joined his company. He 
then took part in the sanguine battles of Nashville, Spanish Fort and Tupelo 
(Miss.), at which latter place he received a gunshot wound in the thigh, as a 
result of which he spent two or three months in a hospital at Memphis, Tennessee. 
During the battle of Tupelo the man on his right was killed and his comrade on 
the left had his teeth shot out, while he himself was left on the battlefield to die 
or to be taken prisoner, when one of his comrades insisted on taking him with 
him and carried him from the field. This man was Adam Decker, who still 
resides in Allamakee county. Frank Hancock, a brother of the well known editor, 
was also in his company and Dr. Earle of Waukon was his first captain. After 
serving for three years Mr. Dowling was veteranized and continued in service 
until January, 1866, when he was mustered out with honorable discharge at 
Memphis, Tennessee. 

Returning to Allamakee county, he disposed of the eighty acres of land, to 
which he had acquired title before the war, and purchased from a brother an 
adjoining eighty acres, to the breaking and cultivation of which he gave his 
entire time. Following progressive methods, his labors soon resulted in financial 
returns and gradually all of his land was brought to a high state of cultivation. 
He erected suitable and substantial buildings, giving his active labor to the work 
of the fields until age compelled him to turn over the more arduous duties to a 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 217 

younger generation. All his buildings were destroyed by fire at one time, but 
undaunted by this misfortune he again set to work to rebuild his barn and out- 
houses and residence, and his farm today must be numbered among the most 
productive of its size in the county. 

Mr. Dowling was twice married, his first union being with Miss Charity 
Hartley, a native of England, who passed away soon after her marriage. He 
then married Mrs. Russell Lane, who died May lo, 1913. She was in her maiden- 
hood Miss Esther Pollard and a native of Worcester, Massachusetts. Her 
parents were John and Sarah (Buckley) Pollard, who in 1866 became residents 
of Allamakee county. Both have passed away. By her former marriage Mrs. 
Dowling had two sons : Russell Lane, who married Barbara Hahn, by whom 
he has four children, \'erne, Florence, Jessie and Russell ; and Charles Lane, 
who married Kate Smith, by whom he has three children, Ethel, Lillian and 
Esther. Both Russell and Charles Lane live on the Dowling homestead and 
the latter looks after the active management of the farm. 

Mr. Dowling is highly respected and esteemed in his locality, not only for 
what he has achieved along material lines but for the splendid service which he 
rendered his country at the most critical period of its existence. The principles 
which caused him to take up the Union cause at the time of the Civil war he 
has always upheld politically and has ever voted the republican ticket. Many 
years ago he served several terms as township assessor, but otherwise has not 
actively participated in political life. He is a member of the Grand Army Post 
of Waukon. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, of which 
denomination he has been a lifelong adherent and in the work of which he takes 
a helpful interest. Viewed from every point, the life record of John M. Dowling 
shows that he has fulfilled his duties in every respect to the best of his ability : 
that he has contributed to agricultural growth ; that he has given evidence of 
his patriotic spirit, and that he has accomplished something which has a part in 
the advancement the American race has made. 



PETER PAULSON. 



Among the early Norwegians to settle in Allamakee county is Peter Paulson, 
who has done much toward promoting the agricultural growth of his district, 
still owning a valuable farm of three hundred and five acres on section 32, 
Center township, although he has for the past twenty years lived retired. Nearing 
the age of eighty-five, he is among the patriarchs of the Norwegian race who 
settled in this part of the state, and is one of those few remaining pioneers who 
ha\e done so much towards bringing about the present prosperous conditions. 
Mr. Paulson was born at Nordre Land, Norway, on August 19, 1828, and is a son 
of Paul and Elizabeth (Hanson) Halverson. In 1853 ^^^ parents came to 
America and made their way to Allamakee county in 1854, where the father 
passed away in the same year. The mother attained the extraordinary age of 
one hundred and three years, ten months and twenty-six days. 

Peter Paulson came to the United States in 1852, empty in pocket but rich 
in resources and possessed of industry and energy to realize on them. He even 



218 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAAIAKEE COUNTY 

owed for his passage after coming to America. Making his way inland he worked 
for one year on the first railroad running west out of Chicago, at the end of 
which period he drove a team to Rock county, Wisconsin, there engaging in lum- 
bering until 1854, when he came to Allamakee county. Denying himself all 
pleasures, he had acquired the means to purchase one hundred and twenty acres 
of wild land in Center township, and thereon he made his home for twelve years, 
devoting his labors to breaking the land and putting it under cultivation. He 
subsequently came to his present farm, eighty acres of which he had previously 
acquired. He has since made his home here and has passed his years in improv- 
ing the property, adding substantial buildings and bringing his acres to the highest 
state of fertility. From time to time he added to his land, his farm now com- 
prising three hundred and five acres. For the last twenty years he has turned 
over the active cultivation of the farm to his sons and in the evening of life enjoys 
rest from arduous labor, — a rest well merited by reason of many years of close 
application. 

On November 19, 1862, in Allamakee county Mr. Paulson was united in 
marriage to Miss Sophia Bakkum, a daughter of Erick Bakkum, of whom a sketch 
appears elsewhere in this volume, and who was one of the early Center township 
farmers. Mrs. Paulson was born in Nordre Land, August 10, 1844, and passed 
away at the age of nearly sixty-eight years, on July i, 191 2. In their family were 
seven children: Mrs. Peter Hagen, of Paint Creek township; Gustav and Gilbert, 
at home ; Mrs. Ole Storla, of Paint Creek township ; Mrs. Oscar Hesla, deceased ; 
and Pauline and Emma, at home. 

Mr. Paulson has been a lifelong member of the Lutheran Synod church, 
helped to organize the society and assisted in building their house of worship 
here, which stands on his land. He has ever borne his share of time and money 
in promoting public welfare and is highly respected and esteemed by all who 
know him. In his political views he is a republican, stanchly upholding the candi- 
dates of that party. He is influential among his countrymen, among whom he is 
a Nestor, and great credit must be given him for directing the steps of many 
of Norway's sturdy sons to this part of the state. Nature has been kind to him, 
for he has never abused her laws. One usually thinks of old age as a period 
when mental as well as physical powers weaken, but there is an old age which 
grows stronger and brighter mentally and morally as the years go by and gives 
out its rich store of wisdom and experience for the benefit of others. Such has 
been the life of Peter Paulson, who is not only one of the most venerable but also 
one of the most honored citizens of Allamakee county, respected wherever known 
and most of all where best known. 



MICHAEL J. BARTHELL. 

A power of initiative, ambition, energy and a progressive spirit, directed into 
important business channels, have carried Michael J. Barthell forward into close 
relations with the general business life of Allamakee county and of Waukon, 
where he makes his home. Under the firm name of Barthell Brothers he is 
associated with his brother in the conduct of one of the largest and most profitable 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 219 

real-estate enterprises in this county and he is also a force in agricultural circles, 
owning and developing two tine farms in Winneshiek county. His enterprise 
and business aggressiveness, dominating and influencing all the activities of his 
career, have made the various interests with which he is connected successful 
and profitable and place him today among the leading and influential men of 
Allamakee county. 

A native of this county Air. r.arthell was born on a farm in Makee township, 
April 6, 1871, a son of John Al. I'.arthell. who is numbered among the earliest 
settlers in Iowa, having located in Allamakee county in pioneer times. For many 
years he was a prosperous farmer in Makee township but later he removed to 
Waukon where he turned his attention to the live-stock business, becoming a 
dealer and shipper on an extensive scale. His death occurred in the city, March 6, 
1902, and he is survived by his wife who makes her home in the family residence 
in Waukon. They were the parents of ten children, six sons and four daughters, 
all of whom grew to maturity. Of this family four sons and four daughters still 
sur\ive, the sons being: M. J., B. F., and Charles, who live in Allamakee county; 
and George, who makes his home in the state of Washington. 

Michael J. Barthell was reared on the home farm in Makee township and from 
his childhood aided in the operation of the prpperty, gaining in this way a practi- 
cal knowledge of the best agricultural methods, which has been invalualjle to him 
in his present farming operations. He acquired his education in the district school 
but is largely self-educated, having made up for his early deficiencies in this line 
by reading, observation and study since reaching mature years. When he left 
the farm he came to Waukon and for a few years thereafter was associated with 
his brother in the conduct of a hardware business. This enterprise they later 
sold and turned their attention to the real-estate business in which they are now 
engaged under the firm name of Barthell Brothers. They handle a great deal of 
valuable property, dealing extensively in Waukon residence and business property 
and in Allamakee and Winneshiek county farming lands, and they control an 
im[)ortant and growing trade having won the confidence of the public at large 
by their straightforward and honorable business methods. They conduct also a 
loan department in connection with their real-estate enterprise and have done much 
to stimulate general business activity in this way. Michael Barthell and his 
brother also own and operate two fine farms in Winneshiek county, which they 
have improved and developed along modern and scientific lines, making their 
properties among the best and most profitable in this part of the state. Along 
the lines of his interests Mr. Barthell has proved himself a reliable, far-sighted 
and resourceful business man, modern in his views, progressive in his ideas and 
honorable and upright in his standards. He has done a great deal of important 
work in the development of the county where he was born and his private pros- 
perity is counted a public asset. 

In Waukon, on the 27th of December, 1905, Mr. Barthell was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Jessie Stilwell, a daughter of C. -S. Stilwell, one of the well known 
lawyers of Waukon, of whom further mention is made on another page in this 
work. Airs. Barthell was born and reared in this city and after graduating from 
high school took a two year kindergarten course. Air. and Airs. Barthell have 
a daughter, Barbara Elizabeth. 



220 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Politically Mr. Barthell is identified with the republican partv but has never 
sought nor held public office, preferring to devote all of his time to his business 
affairs. He belongs to the Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge, 
chapter and commandery, and in his religious views he is a devout Presbyterian. 
He and his wife attend the Presbyterian church in Waukon to which he is a 
contributor, although he has also given generously toward the building of the 
Baptist and German churches. He is preeminently a business man and the 
energy, aggressiveness and determination necessary for success in business life are 
dominating forces in his character. Waukon is fortunate in numbering him among 
her citizens, for his work has been a potent force in the city's development and 
the record of his career is worthy of a place in a history of its successful and 
able men. 



OLIVER A. DIXON. 



As superintendent of the Allamakee county farm Oliver A. Dixon has gained 
the commendation of his fellow citizens, for his efforts in behalf of those who 
have come under his care during his incumbency in office have been of a character 
to awaken public appreciation and regard. He was born in Winneshiek county. 
May 15, 1865, and is a son of William J. Dixon, a native of County Mayo, Ire- 
land. As a young man the father crossed the Atlantic and located in Massachu- 
setts, working at anything which would bring him an income. He married in 
that state Miss Celia Curran, also a native of Ireland, and they moved west to 
Iowa, settling in Winneshiek county, where Mr. Dixon purchased land and opened 
up a farm. Three of their children were born in that section but they later sold 
their property there and in 1869 moved to Allamakee county, buying two hundred 
and forty acres in Hanover township. They continued to make their home upon 
that farm for several years, the mother dying in 1877. The father later made 
his home with his daughter, with whom he now resides, havmg reached the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-six. 

Oliver A. Dixon was reared upon his father's farm and accompanied his 
parents to Allamakee county. From his early childhood he assisted with the work 
of the homestead and after reaching maturity took entire charge, remaining as 
manager until 1903. In that year he moved to California and located in San 
Bernardino, where for one year he was employed by a gas company, remaining 
a resident of that city for four years. Returning to Iowa in 1907, he made his 
home in Waukon and soon afterward was appointed superintendent of the county 
farm, assuming his duties in the same year. In that institution Allamakee county 
cares for both its poor and its insane and the home has now thirty-five inmates, 
all of whom are under Mr. Dixon's care. With the help of his wife and another 
married couple he operates the farm, the products of which in 191 1 netted the 
county over twenty-two hundred dollars. The property comprises two hundred 
and forty-nine acres and under Mr. Dixon's management has been greatly im- 
proved, the home having been remodeled and repaired, a number of water towers 
and a hose house erected, a silo built and cement walks laid wherever needed. Mr. 
Dixon is proving himself competent in the performance of the duties that have 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 221 

devolved upon him in connection with this position and the institution under his 
direction is being conducted in a manner whicli wins him the commendation of 
all concerned. He is carrying on its affairs in a most businesslike way, following 
the methods most approved in the conduct of public institutions of this char- 
acter, and at all times he has an eye for the comfort and well-being of the inmates, 
a fact which makes him a popular official. 

Mr. Dixon married in Hanover township Miss Kathryn Sullivan, a native of 
Lafayette township, Allamakee county. She acquired her education in the public 
schools of her native section, in the Lansing high school and later in a commercial 
college at Waukon. After her graduation she taught in the public schools of 
Allamakee county for several years. Since her husband has had charge of the 
county farm she has proven an able, energetic and efficient assistant and much 
credit for the good management and excellent condition of the institution is due to 
her. Mr. and Mrs. Dixon have three children: May and Kathryn, who were born 
in San Bernardino, California ; and Frances, a native of La Crosse, Wisconsin. 
The family are members of the Catholic church of Lycurgus and Mr. Dixon is 
affiliated with the Catholic Order of Foresters. His political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party but he has never sought office and aside from his present 
position has never been connected with public life. In private relations he has 
been actuated by the principles which govern honorable and upright manhood and 
the same high ideals have ever been manifest in his dealings with those with whom 
he has been connected in an official capacity. 



JAMES W. BELL. 



James W. Bell, living practically retired upon his eighty acre farm in Frank- 
lin township after many years of close identification with agricultural interests 
of Winneshiek county, is a native of this part of Iowa, born at Frankville. June 2-], 
1854. He is a son of Thomas and Kizan (Williams) Bell, the former born in 
Dumfrieshire, Scotland, June 22, 1801, and the latter in Tennessee in 1830. The 
mother passed away when the subject of this review was nine days old but 
the father survived her many years, dying April 4, 1871. In early life he was a 
ship carpenter and followed this occupation until about 1840, when he came to 
America, locating first in Canada and later in Galena, Illinois, where he engaged 
extensively in lead mining. About the year 1852 he moved to Iowa, locating in 
Frankville, in Winneshiek county, where for several years thereafter he was em- 
ployed in a store. He was a man of exceptional education and special training 
at the carpenter's trade and he had no difficulty in securing employment. In 1856 
he moved to Allamakee county and turned his attention to his trade in Franklin 
township until his death. He was well known in public affairs, having been 
carried forward into important political relations during the long period of his 
residence here and he was honored by his fellow citizens by election to various 
positions of trust and responsibility, rendering his township excellent service as 
justice of the peace, notary public and township assessor. He and his wife be- 
came the parents of two children : George, who resides in West Union, Fayette 
county ; and James W., of this review. 



222 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

James W. Bell was reared in the home of his aunt, Mrs. Alary Clark, a resi- 
dent of this township, who took him wlien he was nine days old. At the age of 
twelve he began aiding with the operation of the homestead and thus at an early 
age became familiar with the best and most practical agricultural methods. After 
his marriage he purchased his aunt's farm and upon it for many years cultivated 
the soil as an indeyjendent landowner, during which time his industry, abilitv and 
perseverance brought him substantial and well merited success. In igii he sold 
the property and moved to Waukon, making his home just on the corporation line 
for one year, after which he bought his present farm of eighty acres lying on sec- 
tion 9, Franklin township. This he has rentefl to his son and is living in practical 
retirement, his period of leisure rewarding many years of active and earnest 
labor in the past. 

On the 30th of December, 1875, Mr. Bell was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
M. Johnson, who was born in \\'est \'irginia. May 9, 1859. She is a daughter 
of Samuel and Alary ( Beall ) Johnson, the former a veteran of the Civil war, who 
was killed in the battle of Richmond. The mother afterward came west and 
located in Jefferson township, near Rossville, where she married Oliver Adams, 
with whom she moved into Franklin township, making her home there until her 
death. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have become the parents of six children. .Anna, born 
June 28, 1878, is the wife of George E. Decker, a resident of Franklin township, 
this county. Alta, born October 16, 1880, married James E. Graham, a farmer 
in Stevens county, Alinnesota. Edna, born April 16, 1882, married Ernest 
Decker and is now deceased. Arlie, who was born October 14, 1884, is the wife 
of A. Henthorn, a farmer in this vicinity. George, born December 9, 1890, is 
assisting his father with the operation of the home farm. Gail, who completes 
the family was Ijorn June 9th, 1893, and is attending school in Waukon. 

Mr. Bell is connected fraternally with Rossville Lodge, No. 172, L O. O. F., 
and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. He was justice of 
the peace for eight years, closing his service with his resignation, but he has never 
desired and has always avoided political preferment. He is numbered among 
Allamakee county's most progressive and successful native sons and has many 
friends in this community, all of whom have learned to respect and esteem him 
highly by reason of a life upright, straightforward and honorable in all its 
relations. 



SILAS TROENDLE. 



Allamakee county lost one of the most deservedly honored and most highly 
respected of its pioneer citizens when Silas Troendle was called to his final rest, 
Alay 5, 1900. He was at that time seventy-four years of age and practically his 
entire active life had been spent in this part of Iowa so that he was among its 
oldest residents, having been a witness of its growth and development since 
pioneer times. He saw the broad prairies claimed and converted into productive 
farms, he saw the founding of towns and the building of cities and witnessed 
the growth of the county as it became settled by a prosperous people. In all 
the work of progress he was an active participant and his well spent life, which 




SU.AS IIJUEXDLE 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 225 

would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny, gained him the unqualified 
respect and honor of his fellowmen. 

Mr. Troendle was numbered among the many active, industrious and upright 
citizens whom Germany has given to the new world, for he was born in Baden, 
January 28, 1826, remaining in his native country until he had reached maturity. 
As a young man he emigrated to the United States and after working on a 
farm in Ohio for three years, came to Iowa, making his home with his brother 
in Makee township, Allamakee county, for a short time. Afterward however 
he purchased land of his own, buying one hundred and si.xty acres on section 9, 
Center township, a farm which he continued to develop and improve until his 
death. When Mr. Troendle came to Iowa pioneer conditions prevailed every- 
where and pioneer hardships and difficulties had to be met with and conquered. 
His own farm was a wild and unimproved tract, which he had to clear before the 
work of cultivation could be begun. Upon it he built a crude log house in which 
he and his family lived for many years, it being eventually replaced by a second 
log cabin which still stands upon the property, although it has been plastered 
and weather-boarded and made to look like a frame dwelling. After the work 
of breaking his land and opening up a new farm was completed, Mr. Troendle 
turned his attention to general farming and stock-raising and the years brought 
him prosperity as the reward of his close application and honorable labor. With 
confidence and courage he carried forward the work of development, building 
the necessary farm buildings and installing the needed machinery, keeping con- 
stantly in touch with the trend of agricultural progress and in time making his 
farm one of the finest and best equipped in this section. 

Mr. Troendle married in March, i860, Miss Anna Mary Kehr, a native of 
Germany, who when she was three years of age was brought to America by her 
parents Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kehr. Mr. ahd Mrs. Troendle became the parents 
of eleven children, seven of whom are still living: Frank S., a farmer of Center 
township ; Anna Mary, the wife of William Hansmann of Waukon ; Matilda, 
who married Christ Schach ; William, who resides in Excelsior, Minnesota ; 
George, who operates the old homestead; Elizabeth, who married Ferdinand 
Gruber of Lansing township; and Louisa, the wife of Gust Doehler of North 
Dakota. 

Silas Troendle died upon the farm whereon he had so long resided on the 
5th of May, 1900, and his passing deprived Allamakee county of one of the 
earliest and most worthy of her pioneers. He gave his political allegiance to 
the democratic party and although he never aspired to public office, served 
capably in those positions to which he was elected, acting as school director and 
as road supervisor. He was a devout member of the Roman Catholic church 
and in his upright and honorable life exemplified the doctrines in which he 
believed. For many years he was closely associated with work of development 
and progress in this part of the state and he remained throughout his life an 
esteemed and loved resident of Allamakee county. 

Mrs. Troendle survives him and makes her home with her son George, who 
is carrying on the work of the homestead, being today recognized as one of the 
active and progressive young farmers of this section. He was born on the farm 
which he now owns on the 30th of July. 1871, and acquired his education in 
the district school. For many years before the death of his father he managed 



226 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

the farm and after the latter's demise purchased the interests of the other heirs 
and is now sole proprietor of two liundred and eighty acres of well improved and 
productive land. He is practical and progressive in his methods and therefore 
successful, his farm being one of the finest agricultural properties in the 
county. 

George Troendle married, in Allamakee county. Miss Frances Rettinger, a 
native of Lansing township and a daughter of Christ and Catherine ( Rehberger) 
Rettinger, the former of whom has passed away. The widow now makes her 
home in Lansing. Mr. and Mrs. George Troendle have five children, Silas L., 
Louisa Alice, Otto Harold, Carl Henry and George C. Mr. Troendle gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party and is a devout member of the Catholic 
church. A practical and capable farmer and a loyal and ujiright citizen he has 
ably carried forward the work his father began and his excellent record is a 
credit to a name that has been honored in Allamakee county since pioneer times. 



ALBERT C. JOHNSON. 

Albert C. Johnson, one of the prosperous, enterprising and substantial agri- 
culturists of Allamakee county, owns and operates a fine farm of two hundred 
acres, a well improved and valuable property three miles beyond Waukon. He is 
a native son of this section of Iowa, born in Union Prairie township, July 27, 1869, 
his parents being Charles and Helen ( Ruen ) Johnson, natives of Norway. The 
father grew to manhood in that country and after reaching maturity crossed the 
Atlantic to America, first locating in Winneshiek county, Iowa, where he was 
numbered among the earliest pioneers. He purchased land and opened up and 
developed a new farm, later selling his property and moving to Allamakee county, 
where he purchased two hundred acres of land, upon which he lived for many 
years, rearing liis children there and there spending the remainder of his life. His 
death occurred in 1907, when he was seventy-five years of age. His wife sur- 
vived him for a few years, dying in 191 1. 

Albert C. Johnson was reared upon his father's farm in Union Prairie town- 
ship and from his early childhood aided in its operation, gaining thus a thorough 
and practical knowledge of the best agricultural methods. When he began his 
independent career he purchased two hundred acres on section 35, in the same 
township, constituting the farm upon which he now resides. The property was 
slightly improved but he has steadily carried forward the work of development, 
erecting a large, two-story frame house, three good barns, a silo with a capacity 
of one hundred and thirty tons and fine outbuildings. He has the latest improved 
machinery and in equipment and accessories his farm is worthy of rank with the 
best agricultural properties of the state. He has paid particular attention to 
its attractive appearance, putting out groves of forest and evergreen trees and 
keeping a beautiful lawn in front of his house. He makes a specialty of raising 
and feeding stock for the market and also conducts a profitable dairy, his busi- 
ness interests being carefully and capably managed and his success placing him 
among the substantial and progressive farmers of this vicinity. He was one of 
the promoters of the Farmers Stock & Produce Company and is still a stockholder 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 227 

in the concern. He is a member also of the Ludlow Cooperative Creamery Asso- 
ciation and is a stockholder in the Peoples National Bank of Waukon, which he 
aided in organizing. 

In Winneshiek county, October 14, 1897, Mr. Johnson married Miss Clara 
Rockswold, who was born and reared in that section. They have three chidlren, 
Carl Alvin, Earl A. and Albert C, Jr. The parents are members of the Lutheran 
church. Mr. Johnson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and he 
served for two years as township assessor and is now treasurer of his school dis- 
trict. He is a careful and conservative business man and by his own labor and 
good management has accumulated a valuable and well improved property. Perse- 
verance, diligence and integrity have constituted the guiding qualities of his life, 
bringing him to the honorable position which he now occupies in the opinion of 
his fellowmen among whom he has long lived and labored. 



CLARENCE R. THORNTON. 

Clarence R. Thornton, the owner of an excellent farm of two hundred and 
thirty-seven acres on section 10, Franklin township, enjoys an enviable reputa- 
tion as one of the progressive and substantial agriculturists of the community. 
His birth occurred in Post township, Allamakee county, on the 5th of June, 1875, 
his parents being Alonzo and Eliza (Minnick) Thornton, natives of Ohio and 
Pennsylvania respectively. The former was born on the 23d day of March, 1834, 
while the latter's natal day was December 3, 1835. Alonzo Thornton was married 
in Ohio and in 1861 came to Iowa, settling near Hardin and securing employ- 
ment as a tarm hand. In 1862 he enlisted for service in the Civil war as a mem- 
ber of Company A, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, remaining with that com- 
mand as a private for three years. He was wounded in battle in Louisiana, being 
shot through the jaw and neck, and was confined in a hospital. After being 
honorably discharged from the army he returned to Hardin and resumed his 
labors as a farm hand, working for others during the remainder of his life. His 
demise occurred in June, 1904. His widow, who makes her home with her chil- 
dren, is well known and highly esteemed throughout the community in which she 
has now resided for more than half a century. 

Clarence R. Thornton, the youngest in a family of eight children, attended 
the district schools of Post township and also pursued a course of study at Post- 
ville. When a youth of thirteen he began working as a farm hand and at the age 
of eighteen was married and established a home of his own. He continued work- 
ing for others until 1907 and then rented a tract of land, being actively engaged in 
its cultivation until 1912. In that year he purchased the farm of two hundred and 
thirty-seven acres on section 10, Franklin township, which he is now operating. 
His careful supervision is manifest in the neat appearance of the place, and the 
well tilled fields annually yield bounteous harvests in return for the care and labor 
which he bestows upon them. 

On the 27th of December, 1893, Mr. Thornton was united in marriage to Miss 
Mattie Entwisle, who was born in Jefferson township, this county, on the 7th 
of June, 1875, her parents being William and Martha (Hancock) Entwisle. The 



228 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

father's birth occurred in England on the i8th of August, 1826, while the mother 
was born in Indiana on the 15th of September, 1831. When a youth of twelve 
years William Entwisle accompanied his parents on their emigration to the United 
States, the family home being established in Iowa. He grew to manhood in Alla- 
makee county and became a landowner of Franklin tow-nship, maintaining his 
residence there until called to his final rest in i8()2. His wife passed away in 
March, 1905. In their family were twelve children, Mrs. Thornton being the 
tenth in order of birth. By her marriage she has become the mother of eight 
children, as follows: Ross, whose birth occurred on the 28th of December, 1894: 
William, who was born October 6, 1896, and passed away July 22, 1903: George, 
whose natal day was October 25, 189S; Henry, whose birth occurred on the 22d 
of July, iQOi : one who was born on the 6th of September, 1903, and died in in- 
fancy ; Ruth .Mice, born July 10. 1905; \'ernie, whose natal day was October 9, 
1908; and Daisy, born July 6, 191 1. In his political views Mr. Thornton is a 
stanch republican. With him perseverance, diligence and integrity have consti- 
tuted the guiding posts of his life, bringing him to the honorable position which 
he now occupies in the opinion of his fellow^men in the county, among whom he 
has spent his entire life. 



H. E. BAKKUM. 



H. E. Bakkum, who was born on the farm on which he now resides on January 
9, 1856, is to be numbered among the more substantial agriculturists of Center 
township, where he owns a valuable farm of one hundred and seventy-four acres. 
He is a son of Erick Bakkum, a native of Nordre Land, Norway, who came to the 
United States in 185 1, and after spending one year in Rock county, Wisconsin, 
in 1852 located on the land upon which his son now resides. He first acquired 
title to eighty acres of wild land, where he erected a log shanty in which the 
family lived until 1869, when his present home was built. The father added to 
his lands from time to time until he was able to give each of his sons a good-sized 
farm. He was prominent in his locality and highly esteemed, passing away on 
May 23, 1897. He had married in Norway Miss Gunel Engen, who passed away 
on the farm about thirteen years later than her husband, on June i, 1910. The 
parents were members of the Lutheran church and the father gave his support to 
the republican party. In their family were six children : Andrew E., of Paint 
Creek township ; Sophia, the deceased wife of Peter Paulson ; Carrie Martha, who 
died at the age of eighteen; H. E., our subject; Hannah Drogsett, deceased; and 
E. E., of Center township. 

H. E. Bakkum was reared under the parental roof and grounded by iiis par- 
ents in the old-fashioned virtues of honesty and industry. In the acquirement 
of his education he attended the district schools and early began to assist his 
father with the work of the farm. He has always remained at home and subse- 
quently came into possession of the old farm residence and one hundred and 
seventy-four acres of land. He has done much towards improving this property, 
has installerl modern machinery and implements and in every way has increased 
the yield of his land. He is today esteemed as one of the most substantial agricul- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 229 

turists of his locality and such success as has come to him is highly commendable, 
as it has largely been the result of his own labors. 

In Allamakee county Mr. Bakkum was united in marriage to Miss Matilda 
Ericson, who was born in this county and is a daughter of Andrew Ericson. They 
have four children, Gusta, Annette, Eilert and Eleanor. Mr. and Mrs. P.akkum 
are members of the United Lutheran church and his political allegiance is given 
to the republican party. While Mr. Bakkum has attained individual prosperity, 
he has never lost sight of the general welfare and has done as much as any other 
citizen in promoting worthy public enterprises. He enjoys the confidence and 
esteem of all who know him and is considered a serviceable factor in his com- 
munity. 



MRS. E. A. SHATTUCK. 

Mrs. E. A. Shattuck is well and favorably known in Allamakee, her native 
county, as a woman of excellent business ability, for with the assistance of her 
sons she manages her extensive landed holdings in Union Prairie township, em- 
bracing two hundred and eighty acres on section 25. She was born in Allamakee 
county and is a daughter of Marcus Clark, a native of Massachusetts and one of 
the pioneer settlers in Union Prairie township. He married for the second time 
in this section and here reared his family, dying at an advanced age. 

His daughter was reared and educated in Allamakee county and remained 
upon her father's farm until October 24, 1874, when she gave her hand in mar- 
riage to Lyman Shattuck. The latter was a native of Vermont and there grew 
to maturity, later coming west and locating in Indiana where his first marriage 
occurred in 1855. Soon afterward he moved to Iowa and settled in Winnshiek 
county where he purchased land which he continued to develop and improve for 
ten years thereafter, making it a valuable and productive property. When he 
sold this farm he moved to Allamakee county and in LTnion Prairie township 
bought two hundred and eighty acres of land, whereon his wife and children now 
reside. It was a tract of raw and unimproved property, which Mr. Shattuck 
broke, fenced and cultivated, opening up a new farm. Upon it he later built a 
large, two story brick residence, good barns and outbuildings and steadily car- 
ried forward the work of improvement. His first wife died here and he after- 
ward married the subject of this review by whom he had two sons, Louis and 
Collins C, who for the past six years have assisted their mother in the opera- 
tion of the homestead. Mr. Shattuck became one of the prosperous and substantial 
farmers of Allamakee county and his death in 1893 was a distinct loss to agri- 
cultural interests in this part of the state. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. Shattuck rented out the farm for a 
number of years, but in 1906 she again assumed its management, having since 
carried forward the work with the help of her sons. She owns a neat and well 
improved farm located one mile beyond Waukon, on section 25, Union Prairie 
township, the attractive appearance of which indicated her constant supervision 
and careful labor. In connection with general farming she and her sons engage in 
stock-raising on an extensive scale, raising pure-blooded and high-grade Durham 



230 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

cattle and Poland China hogs. They also keep a number of fine milch cows in 
the dairy and they have made this branch of their business important and profit- 
able. They are known as practical and progressive farmers and success has 
steadily followed their well directed labors. Mrs. Shattuck has acquired a com- 
fortable competency which she does not hoard selfishly but is generous in her 
helpfulness to the needy aiid charitable toward every good cause. She has many 
friends in Allamakee county where her entire life has been s])ent and all who 
know her have for her none but words of praise and commendation. 



ARTHUR A. JONES. 



Arthur A. Jones, a worthy representative of one of the honored pioneer fami- 
lies of Allamakee county, is the owner of a well improved farm of one hundred 
and eighty acres on section 9, Franklin township. His birth occurred in Makee 
township, this county, on the 30th of July, 1868, his parents being Charles and 
Elizabeth (Lane) Jones. The father was born in England in 1832, while the 
mother's birth occurred in Pennsylvania in 1836. When a young man Charles 
Jones crossed the Atlantic to the United States, first locating in New York and 
working on the canal. Subsequently he made his way westward and for a number 
of years sailed on the Mississippi river. In 1852 he came to Iowa and in 1854 
entered a tract of land just north of Waukon, the district being then a wilderness. 
After residing there for a number of years he moved into Franklin township and 
here purchased another tract of land, retaining possession of his original liome 
place, however, until 1893, wdien he disposed of the property. He remained a 
resident of Franklin township until his death in 1898, when the community lost 
one of its esteemed pioneer settlers and representative agriculturists. He held 
various township offices and ever discharged the duties devolving upon him in a 
prompt and able manner. His widow is still living and resides in Franklin town- 
ship with her sons. 

Arthur A. Jones, the seventh in order of birth in a family of twelve children, 
began his education in Makee township and later entered the Red schoolhouse, a 
district school. After putting aside his text-books he assisted his father in the 
operation of the home farm and also worked for others at intervals. When a 
young man of twenty-two he secured employment as a stonecutter in the quarries 
of Clayton county and worked therein for about ten years. During this period he 
acquired sufficient capital to invest in land, and while working at the stonecutting 
trade also devoted some attention to farming. He now gives his entire time to the 
operation of his farm of one hundred and eighty acres in the Yellow river valley of 
Franklin township, carrying on general agricultural pursuits with gratifying re- 
sults. In 191 1 there was raised a crop of corn yielding one hundred and seven- 
teen and a half bushels to the acre. That he keeps in touch with the modern 
spirit of progress which is manifested in agricultural lines and that his knowledge 
of farming is both thorough and comprehensive is indicated by the highly im- 
proved appearance of his place, upon which are found substantial buildings and 
all of the modern accessories necessary for facilitating farm labor. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 231 

On the 13th of November, 1895, Air. Jones was united in marraige to Aliss 
Nannie B. McShane, who was born in FrankHn township on the nth of March, 
1869, her parents being Cornehus and Margaret (Durr) McShane, the former a 
native of Alonongaha county. West Virginia, and the latter of Greene county, 
Pennsylvania. Cornehus McShane followed general agricultural pursuits through- 
out his active business career. In 1851 or 1852 he came to Iowa, acquiring and 
locating on a tract of land in Linton township, Allamakee county. About two 
years later he took up his abode in Franklin township and there spent the re- 
mainder of his life, passing away on the 7th of February, 1907. His wife was 
called to her final rest on the 29th of January, 1905. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jones 
have been born six children, as follows : Nellie Fern, Lottie Grace, Charles Sam- 
uel, Ethel Gladys, Stella and one who died in infancy. 

In politics Mr. Jones is independent, supporting men and measures rather 
than party. He has served as a school director for his district and has manifested 
his public-spirited citizenship in many other ways. He has been identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since twenty-two years of age and also 
belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of America. Mr. and Mrs. Jones enjoy the 
warm esteem and friendship of many with whom they have come in contact and 
the hospitality of the best homes of the locality is cordially extended them. 



BENJAMIN DAVID HELMING. 

Benjamin David Helming, one of the progressive and active farmers and 
stock-raisers o.f Allamakee county, owns and operates a fine property of one 
hundred and sixty acres lying in section 34, Union Prairie township. This farm 
has been in possession of members of his family for many years and upon it 
his birth occurred on the 29th of January, 1874, his parents being Simon and 
Augusta (Simmonsmeier) Helming. The father was born in Westphalia, Ger- 
many, and came to America in the '50s, settling in Iowa. On the 14th of October, 
1852, he purchased of Dennis Haley the northwest quarter — one hundred and 
sixty acres — of section 34, in township 98, north of range 6, Union Prairie town- 
ship, for a consideration of two hundred and fifty dollars. This is now the 
homestead belonging to the subject of this review. For this land Thomas Haley 
received on the ist of October, 1852, a United States patent signed by Millard 
Fillmore, president of the L^nited States, and the quarter section has never been 
owned by any other than the Haley and Helming families. 

Benjamin D. Helming attended country school and the public schools of Wau- 
kon, later spending one year at Cornell College at Mount Vernon and another 
at the State Agricultural College at Ames. He was reared upon his father's farm, 
his education supplementing practical experience in agricultural work, so that 
when he began his independent career he was already an able and progressive 
agriculturist. His farm today reflects in its neat and attractive appearance his 
competent supervision and practical methods in its cultivation and is a valuable and 
productive property. In addition to general farming Mr. Helming breeds and 
raises shorthorn cattle, Duroc Jersey hogs and good horses, and his stock-raising 
interests are extensive and an important source of income to him. 



232 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

In Waukon, on the 5th of October, 1899, Mr. Helming was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Winifred Augusta May, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. May, 
of that city. She was graduated from the Waukon high school in 1893 and at- 
tended the Nora Springs Academy for one year thereafter. She was also a student 
at Cornell College for a similar period of time and was then for three years 
employed in the office of the Waukon Standard, of which her father has been 
editor for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Helming have become the parents of seven 
children, Carolyn Elizabeth, Dorothy Hager, Paul Hayward, Benjamin David, 
Robert Bruce, Frederic Simon and John Albert. 

Mr. Helming was a member of Company I, Iowa National Guards, of Waukon, 
for two years and he is connected fraternally with the Knights of Pythias. He 
gave his political allegiance to the republican party until June, 1912, when he joined 
the progressive party under the leadership of Theodore Roosevelt. He has always 
taken an active part in public affairs, cooperating heartily in measures of advance- 
ment and progress and rendering his township excellent service in various posi- 
tions of trust and honor. He is well and favorably known in Union Prairie town- 
ship where he has resided since his birth and having .steadily adhered to high 
business and personal standards, enjoys the respect and confidence of all who have 
associated with him. 



HENRY T. WILKE. 



Henry J. Wilke, who since 1892 has been connected with agricultural interests 
of Allamakee county, owning today two fine farms in Post township, is a native 
of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Elkader, Clayton county, July 2, 1868. He 
is a son of Fred and Mary ( Kamin ) Wilke, both of whom were born in Germany, 
the father May i, 1844, and the mother July 15, 1838. The former crossed the 
Atlantic with his parents when he was about ten years of age and located with 
them on a farm in Clayton county, Iowa, where he grew to manhood, continuing 
to reside there until 1893. In that year he removed to a farm in Dallas county, 
near Des Moines, whereon he now lives retired, his sons managing the property 
and all his business interests. His first wife passed away in 1878, leaving only 
one child, the subject of this review, and he later married again, becoming, by this 
second union, the father of three children. 

Henry J. Wilke was reared on his father's farm in Clayton county and in his 
childhood divided his time between the work of the homestead and attendance 
at district school. He remained at home until he was twenty-four years of age 
and then began his independent career, buying land in Post township, upon 
which he resided for a number of years, making it in the meantime a well 
improved and valuable property. About 1907 he sold his farm and bought forty 
acres which he still owns. He purchased also another farm of one hundred 
and four acres, eighty rods distant, and the two properties are connected by a 
roadway, making it possible for him to give personal supervision to the 
development of both. He carries on general farming, raising fine crops of hay 
and grain and engaging extensively in stock-raising, keeping high grade cattle, 
hogs and horses. The farms are substantially improved and neat and attractive 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 235 

in every particular, evidencing in many ways the owner's practical methods 
and his well directed care and labor. 

On the 2 1 St of February, 1893, Mr. Wilke was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Ziegler, who was born in McGregor, Iowa, December 18, 1871. She 
is a daughter of George and Mary (Bierbaum) Ziegler, natives of Germany, 
where her father learned the carpenters' trade. In early life he followed that 
occuijation but later turned his attention to farming, purchasing land near 
Luana, Iowa, whereon he resided until his death, which occurred about the year 
1893. His wife survived him some years, dying in 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Wilke 
became the parents of two children: Wilbert, who was born in 1894; and Mabel, 
born March 3, 1898. 

Mr. Wilke is a member of the Lutheran church of Postville and his upright 
life has always been in closest harmony with his professions. He gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party and, as a loyal and public-spirited citizen, 
takes an intelligent interest in community affairs. He is especially interested 
in the promotion of public education and since 1898 has been a member of the 
school board, accomplishing a great deal of valuable and important work during 
that time. His attention is, however, chiefly concentrated upon the development 
of his farms and by his able work along agricultural lines he has made substantial 
contributions to the growth and progress of the community where he makes his 
home and where he is counted among the representative and valued citizens. 



E. E. BAKKtJM. 



In the rich agricultural state of Iowa there is no section more fertile than that 
of Allamakee county, and in that county no farm which bespeaks more thorough 
methods or returns better yields than that of E. E. Bakkum, who farms one hun- 
dred and ninety acres on section 19 in Center township. He is a son of a pioneer 
and was born on the farm upon which his father settled, on February 5, 1861, a 
son of Erick Bakkum, who is mentioned at greater length in another part of this 
work. 

In the acquirement of his education E. E. Bakkum attended the district schools 
and subsequently a Waukon school, completing his training by a course at Breck- 
enridge Institute in Decorah. Early he learned agricultural methods from his 
father and when old enough the latter gave him property comprising one hun- 
dred and fifty acres, upon which E. E. Bakkum engaged independently and where 
he has since made valuable improvements and installed modern machinery in order 
to increase the yield of his acres. He engages in mi.xed farming, giving attention 
to grain raising and his live-stock interests, and that his work is crowned with suc- 
cess is evidenced by the fact that he has been enabled to add forty acres to the 
original tract. 

In Allamakee county Mr. Bakkum was united in marriage to Miss Isabelle 
Sevatson, a daughter of Severt Sevatson, and they have five children, Ida K., 
Melinda G., Selma E., Egbert R. and Emily I. -Ml of these are yet at home. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bakkum are members of the Lutheran church and ever interested in 
its expansion and beneficial work. He gives his allegiance to the republican party 



236 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

and keeps intelligently informed upon all questions that affect his locality, his 
county and his state. Mr. Bakkum has ever shown a laudable interest in educa- 
tion and has given evidence thereof by his service as school director of his town- 
ship. Of an old pioneer family, he has preserved the family tradition by a worthy 
career and is highly respected and esteemed in his community, enjoying the con- 
fidence and good-will of all who know him. 



FRANK L. MAY. 



Allamakee county is fortunate in numbering among her public officials so able, 
efficient and far-sighted a man as Frank L. May, now serving as county attorney. 
He is in addition a successful and able lawyer, practicing at the bar as a member 
of the firm of May & Dempsey and connected through his representative patron- 
age with much important litigation. He was born in Crawford county, Kansas, 
Marcii 29, 1873, and is a son of Roan C. May, who was born in Summit county, 
Ohio, in 1838, and was a representative of one of the pioneer families in Iowa, 
his father, John May, having moved from Ohio to Allamakee county in 1852. He 
settled in Lansing township, on what is now known as ^May's Prairie, and there 
entered land, opening up and developing a new farm. His son Roan was four- 
teen years of age when the removal was made and he spent the remaining years 
of his childhood and youth in helping in the work of clearing and improving the 
property. He later engaged in farming for himself in Lansing township but 
finally moved to Crawford county, Kansas, where he purchased land. Upon this he 
resided for seven years but at the end of that time moved back to Iowa and located 
in New Albin, where he now resides in retirement. He married in Allamakee 
county Miss Elizabeth Yeoman, a native of Illinois and also an early settler in 
Iowa, having come to this state in 1853. 

Frank L. May was reared in his parents' home and acquired his primary edu- 
cation in the public schools. After completing it he became a teacher and engaged 
in that occupation for five years before going to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he 
took up the studv of law. After receiving his degree he went to South Dakota, 
locating at ]Madison, where he opened an office and began the practice of his pro- 
fession, remaining there for one year. At the end of that time he returned to 
Iowa and made his home at Lansing, where he secured a large and representa- 
tive patronage and won recognition as a strong and able practitioner, whose 
ability in the handling of intricate legal problems justified his classification with 
the most successful lawyers in the state. iMr. May remained in Lansing until 
1910, when he was nominated and elected county attorney of Allamakee county. 
After the expiration of his first term of office he was reelected to the position,' 
which he is now filling, discharging his duties in an energetic and able way. He 
is connected also with the general practice of law here, for in 191 1 he formed a 
partnership with J. W. Dem])sey, a young man of e.xcellent education and unusual 
legal ability, under the firm name of May & Dempsey. The partners are con- 
nected with much important litigation and the firm is known as strong and 
reliable. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 237 

Mr. May married, near Lansing, on the 2d of April, 1896, Miss Marie Goettle, 
who was born and reared in Allamakee county, a daughter of Carl Goettle, of this 
vicinity. Mr. and Mrs. May have one daughter, Marie H. E. Mr. May is a 
Master Mason, holding membership in Evergreen Lodge, No. 144, F. & A. M., 
at Lansing. He has proven himself in professional and official life an efficient 
and forceful worker, possessing a strength of perseverance which enables him 
to overcome difficulty and conquer obstacles. His analytical mind has proven 
valuable in his practice as well as in his public service and, whatever line claims 
his attention, his judgment is always sound and his methods practical. 



DE VILLO A. HOLMES. 

De Villo .\. Holmes has been since 1896 prominently connected with business 
interests of Lansing as the proprietor of a harness manufacturing and selling 
establishment, his progressive metliods, his industry, honesty and ability bring- 
ing him a substantial measure of success. He carries also a fine stock of gentle- 
men's furnishings and he has made both branches of his business important and 
profitable. 

Mr. Holmes is numbered among Allamakee county's native sons, his birth 
having occurred in La Fayette township, June 9, 1869, and he is a son of Oliver 
Wendell Holmes, who was born in Oneida county, New York, May 5, 1835. 
The father was reared on a farm in his native community and after acquiring 
a fair education in the public schools came west to Iowa in 1853, settling in 
Dubuque where he engaged in teaming. He married in that city Miss Catherine 
Treanor, a native of Dubuque, born in 1845. They moved to Allamakee county 
in 1861 and in La Fayette township the father purchased a tract of raw land 
which he cleared, broke and fenced, opening up and developing a new farm. He 
was successful in his agricultural operations and from time to time bought more 
land owning finally a farm of two hundred and forty acres upon which was a 
fine residence and barn and all the necessary outbuildings. Failing health obliged 
him eventually to leave the farm and go west to Denver, Colorado, where he died 
February 6, 1891. He is buried in the Catholic cemetery at Lansing. 

De Villo A. Holmes was reared on his father's farm and from his early child- 
hood aided in the operation of the homestead becoming thoroughly familiar with 
the best agricultural methods. After reaching maturity he took charge of the 
farm and continued to manage it even after he moved into Lansing where he 
learned the harness making trade. He abandoned farming, however, when he 
purchased an established harness business in the city, conducting it first upon a 
small scale and gradually expanding his enterprise to meet the demands of his 
growing trade. He now carries a complete stock of factory-made harness and 
he also makes fine goods to order. He sells also robes, horse blankets and all 
the other articles to be found in a first-class harness establishment. Since 1908 
he has also dealt in gentlemen's furnishings and has secured a profitable trade 
in this line, his patronage coming to him in recognition of the excellent qualities 
of his goods, his reasonable prices and his progressive and honorable business 
standards. His entire stock is valued at five thousand dollars and his business 



238 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

house is one of the finest in the city, a substantial brick structure whicli he bought 
in 1897. 

In Allamakee county on the 12th of November, 1895, Mr. Holmes was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Regan who was born in Lycurgus, a daughter of Dan 
Regan, one of the well known pioneers of this part of Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. 
Holmes have four children, Cornelius D., Daniel O., Mary K. and Joseph G. 
The family are members of the Lansing Catholic church. 

Mr. Holmes gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but he is 
not active as an office-seeker although he takes a deep and intelligent interest 
in public afifairs. He is one of the progressive and representative business men 
of the community, adhering always to high standards of commercial ethics and 
managing his interests in a careful and conservative manner, and his success 
rewards many years of honest, capable and well directed labor. 



FRANK J. SPINNER. 



Frank J. Spinner, senior member of the firm of Spinner Brothers, dealers in 
farm implements, gasoline engines, automobiles, wagons, buggies, etc., is one of 
the progressive, straightforward and enterprising business men of Lansing, his 
own initiative, determination and dominating ability having brought him a suc- 
cess which places him in a position of influence in commercial circles. He is a 
native of Allamakee county, born in Village Creek, July 17, 1861, a son of Peter 
Spinner, a native of Germany. The father left that country when he was fifteen 
years of age and came to America, settling first in Davenport, Iowa, where he 
worked at the blacksmith's trade which he had learned in Germany. After a few 
years he moved to Allamakee county and located at \'illage Creek in 1855. He 
there built a shop and did general blacksmithing and repairing for several years, 
building up a large and profitable business. Eventually, however, he turned his 
attention to farming, purchasing raw land which he cleared, fenced and improved, 
his sons assisting him upon the homestead and also with the work of the shop 
during the busy seasons. Peter Spinner married in Ohio, Miss Katherine Markt, 
a native of Germany, and they became the parents of a number of children. The 
family was reared in Village Creek and the father spent the last years of his 
life on the farm there, dying in 1890. His wife survives him and makes her 
home in Lansing with one of her daughters. 

Frank J. Spinner was reared in \'illage Creek and learned the blacksmith's 
trade from his father. He moved with the family to the farm and assisted with 
its operation until he was twenty-four years of age when he formed a partnership 
with his brother and they opened a shop in Waterville where for four years they 
carried on a blacksmith, wagon and repair business. At the end of that time 
Mr. Spinner of this review sold out his interests to his brother and went to 
Helena, Montana, where for a year and a half he worked at his trade, finding 
business conditions much better there and wages higher. Upon his return to 
Iowa he took charge of his father's shop at Village Creek and there carried on a 
profitable business until 1895, when he came to Lansing and formed a {partner- 
ship with his brother Fred — an association which has continued to the present 



PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 239 

time. At first their enterprise was a blacksmith, wagon and repair shop but they 
soon added a full line of farm implements and they now carry a complete and 
well selected stock of these articles, such as gasoline engines, cream separators, 
automobiles, wagons and buggies. The brothers own their own shop and con- 
trol a large and representative trade for their goods are the best that can be 
found on the market, their business standards are progressive and honest and 
their methods practical and modern. Their large and well managed enterprise 
is the more creditable to them in that they began on a small scale and by industry, 
frugality and good business judgment have become successful, being now ranked 
among the city's able and substantial business factors. Frank J. Spinner was 
one of the organizers of the Peoples State Bank of Lansing and is now one of 
the large stockholders in the institution. He was formerly for many years iden- 
tified with mercantile interests of Waterville as a partner with his brother C. A. 
Spinner in the conduct of a general store. The association was formed about 
1894 and Mr. Spinner of this review continued as a silent partner until February, 
1913, when he sold his interests. 

In Waukon, on the 27th of March, 1894, Mr. Spinner married Miss Kate 
McGeough, a daughter of E. McGeough, one of the early settlers in Allamakee 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Spinner became the parents of nine children, Francis 
Earl, Raymond ]., Katherine Leonette, William D., Marie J., Edward P., Frank, 
Kenneth and James. The family are members of the Catholic church of Lan- 
sing. Mr. Spinner gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and he 
served eight years as a member of the city council, discharging his duties in an 
earnest, straightforward and capable manner. An able and discriminating busi- 
ness man he carries forward to completion whatever he undertakes and his name 
on the list of promoters of any enterprise is a guaranty of its weight and impor- 
tance as well as of its ultimate success. 



H. R. BAKKUM. 



H. R. Bakkum, a well known agriculturist of Center township, Allamakee 
county, who was born upon the farm which he now owns, is of Norwegian stock, 
his father, Andrew A. Bakkum, being a native of Nordre Land, Norway, whence 
he came to America when a young man, locating in Allamakee county in 1852 
or 1853. Here he bought one hundred and twenty acres of wild land, upon which 
he first erected a log house, which he later supplanted with a brick residence 
which still stands. All his active life he spent in agricultural pursuits and died 
here, highly respected and esteemed, at the age of seventy-eight years. He mar- 
ried, in Allamakee county, Miss Bertha Reiarson, a native of Norway, who is 
also deceased. In their family were six children : Mrs. Olans Peterson, of Swift 
county, Minnesota; H. R., of this review; C. M., of Ulen, Minnesota; Albert, of 
Kerkhoven, that state; G. A., of Fosston, Alinnesota : and Hannah Gilbertson, of 
Makee township, this county. 

H. R. Bakkum was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement of 
his education attended the schools in the neighborhood of the homestead. He 
early assisted his father with the farm work, acquiring thorough methods of 



240 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

agriculture. Subsequently he came in possession of the home farm and now owns 
and cultivates one hundred and sixty-two acres located on section 30, where he 
engages in general farming. His property by its appearance bespeaks the pros- 
perity of its owner and Mr. Bakkum has made some extensive improvements 
since his father's death. His land brings him annual returns of gratifying pro- 
portions and he has come to be considered one of the foremost agriculturists 
of his locality. 

In Allamakee county. Mr. Bakkum was united in marriage to Miss Carrie M. 
Larson, a daughter of Ammund Larson, of Makee township. Mr. and Mrs. Bak- 
kum have three children, Arnold, Roy and William. In his political views 
Mr. Bakkum inclines toward the republican party, whose measures and candi- 
dates he upholds at the polls. His religious faith and that of his family is 
of the Lutheran denomination, of which church he and his family are mem- 
bers. Of township offices he has served in the capacity of school director, 
giving every evidence of his interest in the cause of education. He is public- 
spirited and progressive in his tendencies and the success which has come to him 
is but the natural outcome of incessant energy and industry, and is highly merited. 



EDWARD L. KRUEGER. 

Edward L. Krueger, the owner of an excellent farm of one hundred and 
seventy-five acres on section 14, Franklin township, is widely recognized as an 
enterprising and progressive agriculturist. His birth occurred near Viroqua, 
Vernon county, Wisconsin,' on the 29th of July, 1882, his parents being Charles 
and Carolina (Lefler) Krueger, natives of Germany. The father did the required 
service as a soldier of the German army and during his active career followed 
general agricultural pursuits. In 1873 he crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States, locating in Dayton, Ohio, where he secured employment in the paper mills 
and resided for ten years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Vernon 
county, Wisconsin, purchased land and there followed farming during the remain- 
der of his life, his demise occurring in 1897. His widow remained on the farm 
until 191 2, when she disposed of the property and took up her abode in La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, where she has since resided. They were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, seven of whom survive. 

Edward L. Krueger, who was the fourth in order of birth in his father's fam- 
ily, obtained his education in the schools of his native county. He remamed at 
home until twenty-five years of age and then spent a year in La Crosse, Wis- 
consin, working for Mitchell Brewer as coachman and in other capacities. Sub- 
sequently he came to Iowa and here worked for his brother Charles for one 
year, while later he spent a similar period in hauling cream. He next rented the 
farm of Henry Hahman for one year and then purchased a tract of one hundred 
and seventy-five acres on section 14, Franklin township, where he has since car- 
ried on general agricultural inirsuits with gratifying success. The property is 
well improved in every particular and in its neat and thrifty appearance gives 
evidence of the care and progressive spirit of its "owner. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 241 

On tlie 27th of October, 1910, Mr. Krueger was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Hahman. who was born in Clayton county, Iowa, on the i6th of August, 
1881, her parents being Henry and Augusta ( Wittenburg) Hahman, more 
extended mention of whom is made on another page of this work in connection 
with the sketch of Amos W. Nagel, a brother-in-law of Mrs. Krueger. Our 
subject and his wife have one son, Henry, whose natal day was January 16, 
1912. Mr. Krueger gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while 
his religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. He is well known through- 
out the community and his many friends esteem him highly for his personal worth. 



OLE L. REMA. 



Ole L. Rema owns and operates a highly improved farm of one hundred 
and ninety-five acres on section 34, Center township, which is the old family 
homestead. He has remained within the borders of Allamakee county from his 
birth to the present time, having been born in Paint Creek township on the 3d 
of October, 185 1. His parents, L. O. and Guri (Opheim) Rema, were natives 
of Aal, Praestehjeld, Hallingdal, Norway, and were married in that country in 
1836. The father's birth occurred on the 15th of September, 1805, while the 
mother's natal day was February 12, 1811. Four daughters were born to them 
in Norway. In 1849 they crossed the Atlantic to the United States, spending 
two years in Rock county, Wisconsin. In 185 1 they came to Allamakee county, 
Iowa, and during the first summer lived on what is now the Swenson farm 
in Paint Creek township. L. O. Rema then homesteaded a tract of eighty 
acres in Center township, which is now included within the boundaries of his 
son's farm. That place remained his home during the remainder of his life and 
in its operation he won a gratifying and well merited measure of success. His 
son-in-law, John S. Bryson, in compiling a genealogical record of the Bryson and 
Rema families, wrote of the latter : "They saw hard times of pioneer life, but 
by hard work and economy made a good home and succeeded in raising and edu- 
cating a family of four girls and a boy." Mr. Rema gave his political allegiance 
to the republican party, while his religious faith was indicated by his member- 
ship in the Lutheran church, to which his wife also belonged. His demise occurred 
at Village Creek on the i8th of March, 1885, while his wife passed away on the 
old home farm on the 2d of February, 1892, the community thus losing two of 
its respected pioneer settlers and representative residents. Their children were 
as follows: Julia L., born in Norway on the 13th of December, 1837, who 
wedded Paul Halverson on the 26th of April, 1857, and is now a widow residing 
in Baudette, Minnesota; Margaret L., born in Norway on the 13th of July, 1840, 
who is the widow of Andrew Strand; Tilda L., whose birth occurred in Norway 
on the 7th of April, 1844, and who is the widow of John S. Bryson; Cecile L., 
born in Norway on the 5th of August, 1846, who wedded Stengrim Hesla and 
after his demise gave her hand in marriage to David Skinner, of Sioux Rapids, 
Iowa ; Ole L., of this review ; and Tolef B., who was born in Center township 
on the 1st of May, 1854, and died there on the 9th of November, 1858. 



242 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Ole L. Rema attended the district schools in the acquirement of an education 
and after attaining his majority came into possession of the old family home- 
stead. His holdings now embrace one hundred and ninety-five acres of rich 
and productive land on section 34, Center township. General agricultural pursuits 
have claimed his attention throughout his entire business career and his efforts 
in this direction have been attended with excellent results. His land is well im- 
proved in every particular and annually yields good crops which find a ready sale 
on the market. 

In .-Mlamakee county, on the 13th of June, 1871, Mr. Rema was united in 
marriage to Miss Bertha J. Swain, a native of Norway, by whom he has five 
children, namely : Julia, the wife of Gilbert Jeglum, of Paint Creek township ; 
John T. and Henrietta, both at home; Emeline, the wife of Gilbert Leikvold, 
of Taylor township ; and Leonard S., w'ho is still under the parental roof. The 
last named and his brother John T. now own a valuable tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in North Dakota. 

Mr. Rema is a democrat in politics and during the years 1907, 1908 and 
1909 did able service as a member of the county board of supervisors, making a 
creditable and enviable record in that connection. In 1913 he was once more 
elected to the office and will again assume its duties on the ist of January, 1914. 
He and his family are devoted members of the Lutheran church. Mr. Rema 
is widely known in the county where his entire life has been spent and the ster- 
ling qualities which he has displayed in his social and business relations have 
gained him a high place in the regard and good-will of his fellow townsmen. 



HON. OTTO A. HELMING. 

Hon. Otto A. Helming is the present representative of his district in the 
state legislature and is accounted one of the most able, far-sighted and dis- 
criminating men in public life in Iowa. In Allamakee county he is known also 
as a progressive and successful agriculturist and a stock breeder and dealer 
on an extensive scale, his activities having done much to promote the develop- 
ment of the farming industry along modern and scientific lines.- He was born 
upon the farm where he now lives March 9, 186S, and is a son of Frederick 
W. Helming, a native of Germany, who grew to manhood in that country 
and settled in pioneer times in Allamakee county, Iowa. He purchased land 
in Ludlow township and developed there a valuable and productive farm upon 
wliii'li he spent the last years of his life, dying in 1873. 

Olio A. Helming is one of a family of five children. He was reared upon 
the home farm and acquired his j^rimary education in the district schools of 
Ludlow township, supplementing this by two winter terms at the Waukon 
Seminary. After his father's death he and his brother, Charles G., took charge 
of the home place and operated it together for some years, becoming well known 
as stock breeders and dealers. Eventually, however, Mr. Helming of this 
review purchased the interests of the other heirs and retained the homestead, 
whereon he has since resided. He gives a great deal of his attention to stock- 
raising and has a fine herd of pure-blooded Aberdeen .\ngus cattle and a number 
of fine Percheron horses and Chester White hogs. He is also active in the 




OTTO A. HELMINC; 



PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 245 

dairy business and was one of the principal promoters of the Ludlow Coopera- 
tive Creamery Association, of which he served as vice president and later as 
president for a number of years. He is very much interested in the modern 
and scientific aspects of farming and has been for many years identified with 
tlie Agricultural Short Course at Waukon, serving as director of that body. 
His own farm exemplifies the scientific principles of which he has made a close 
study, for it is one of the most productive and highly improved in this town- 
ship and reflects everywhere his competent supervision and careful management. 
He has added to and remodeled the house, built a new barn and several out- 
buildings and steadily carried forward the work of development in an able 
and practical way. 

It is not alone along agricultural lines, however, that Mr. Helming is widely 
and favorably known, for he is one of the leaders in republican politics in this 
state and has had a varied and important public career. L'pon the republican 
ticket he was elected for six consecutive years assessor of Ludlow township and 
in 1912 was elected by a large majority to the state house of representatives. 
He has served with ability and distinction since that time and has left the 
impress of his work and personality upon a great deal of important legislation. 
He has served on numerous important committees, including those of school 
and te.xtbooks, the Soldiers & Orphans' Home, public charities, agriculture, 
the School for the Deaf and the committee on federal relations, these connec- 
tions indicating something of the scope of his interests and the weight of his 
political influence. 

In Richfield, Wisconsin, on the 12th of November, 1902, Mr. Helming was 
united in marriage to Miss Lena Whittenberger, who was born, reared and 
educated in that state. Mr. and Mrs. Helming have two children, Clara and 
Florence. The parents are members of the Ludlow Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Helming is a man of varied interests but these all lie along lines of 
progress and improvement. He is a broad-minded man who places a correct 
valuation upon life and while in business affairs he has achieved a gratifying 
measure of prosperity, he has also been a force in the political development 
of the state, his activities in various fields proving of benefit to the community 
at large. He stands today among the men of marked ability and substantial 
worth in .Allamakee county. 



CHRISTIAN ECKERT. 



Christian Eckert, an enterprising and up-to-date agriculturist of Franklin 
township, is the owner of a modern and well improved farm of seventy-nine acres 
on section 14. His birth occurred in Clayton county, Iowa, on the 26th of March, 
1S68, his parents being Christian and Anna (Nicolai) Eckert, who are mentioned 
at greater length on another page of this work in connection with the sketch of 
John Eckert, a brother of our subject. Christian Eckert of this review obtained 
bis education in the district schools of Franklin townshi]) and remained under the 
parental roof until twenty-five years of age. Subsequently he operated the home- 
stead place for one year and then purchased a farm of seventy-nine acres on 



Vol. n— 1 3 



246 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

section 14, where he has since carried on his agricultural pursuits. Practically 
all of the improvements thereon were made by him and the place is now a model 
and up-to-date farming property, equipped with modern and substantial buildings 
for the shelter of grain and stock. The land is rich and producti\-e and the welt 
tilled fields annually yield golden liarvests in return for the care and labor which 
is be.stowed upon them. Mr. Eckert makes a specialty of the production of corn 
and the raising of Poland China hogs and in all of his undertakings has won a 
well merited measure of success. He is a stockholder in the Luana Creamery 
the Luana Shipping Association and the Monona State Bank. 

On the 30th of November, 1894, Mr. Eckert was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Roffman, who was born in Michigan, on the 17th of March, 1873, her 
parents being John and Minnie (Blank ) Roffman. They are mentioned at greater 
length on another page of this work in connection with the sketch of Frank Rofif- 
man, brother of ]\lrs. Eckert. Our subject and his wife have one son, Lloyd, 
whose birth occurred on the 8th of September, 1897. ^^i"- Eckert is a demo- 
crat in politics but has never sought the honors and emoluments of office. Both 
he and his wife have spent their entire lives in this part of the state and enjoy 
an extensive and favorable acquaintance here. 



OSTEN JOHNSON SORUM. 

Osten Johnson Sorum, deceased, was an honored pioneer and prominent agri- 
culturist of Allamakee county, where he owned nearly five hundred acres of valu- 
able land and made his home for a period of fifty-seven years. He reached the 
venerable age of eighty-five years, having been born in Norway in 1824 and pass- 
ing away April 25, 1910. In 1850, when a young man of twenty-six years, he 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States and spent two years working on a log 
raft on the Mississippi river and at Monona. In 1852 he came to .Allamakee 
county, Iowa, and purchased eighty acres of unimproved land in Makee town- 
ship, erecting a log house, fourteen by sixteen feet, which remained the family 
home for many years. Coming here in pioneer times, he endured all of the hard- 
ships and privations incident to life in a sparsely settled and undeveloped dis- 
trict. The nearest trading point was McGregor and in making the trip, which 
consumed two or three days, he usually went to Harpers Ferry and then down 
the river on the ice. While he was absent on one of these trips his family were 
driven from their log house by a fire which totally destroyed the little home. 
As the years passed and his financial resources increased, owing to his capable 
management and untiring industry, he purchased an additional tract of land on 
section 31, Center township, and erected thereon a frame dwelling, barns and out- 
buildings. Here he spent the remainder of his life, devoting his attention to 
general agricultural pursuits with excellent success. His holdings embraced 
nearly five hundred acres of land, which was divided among his sons a number 
of years prior to his demise. He was a man of powerful physique and was able to 
do a great amount of work, though for years he was handicapped by a broken hip 
which had been left to grow crooked. In his demise the communitv lost one of 



PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 247 

its respected pioneers and most esteemed citizens and one whose labors had been 
a potent element in the work of upbuilding and development here. 

It was in Allamakee county that Mr. Sorum was united in marriage to Miss 
Gunhild Bakkum, a native of Norway, who passed away on the old home farm 
in October. 1909. They became the parents of three sons. Andrew, the eldest, 
inherited the original family homestead in Makee township and wedded Miss 
IJertha Marie Johnson. He is deceased but his widow still resides on the old 
farm. John and Christ Sorum were born in the log house in Makee township and 
now reside on the farm in Center township. Their property is well improved 
in every particular and tiiey carry on general farming with gratifying success, 
having gained an enviable reputation as substantial and enterprising citizens of 
their native county. The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran 
church. 



HILAS C. BURNHAM. 



Hilas C. Burnham, who owns and operates a fine farm of one hundred thirty- 
two and one-fourth acres on section 32, Franklin township, has been a resident 
of Allamakee county since his birth and the greater part of his active life has 
been devoted to agricultural pursuits. A spirit of enterprise and progress actu- 
ates him in all that he does and he now owns one of the productive and well 
managed farms of this vicinity and is classed with substantial and progressive 
agriculturists. Fie was born in Franklin township, August 24, 1864, and is a son 
of Charles and Elizabeth (Dee) Burnham, natives of Ohio, both born on the 
line between Union and Champaign counties. The father spent his entire life 
engaged in farming, coming at an early date to this township and county. After 
one year he returned to Ohio, where he married, afterward settling again in 
Franklin township, where he resided on the farm which now forms the Lam- 
born homestead. He purchased the land in an unimproved condition and with 
characteristic energy turned his attention to its clearing and cultivation, he and his 
wife spending the remainder of their lives upon the property. The mother 
passed away in 1879 and the father in 1891. Fie had been prominent in local 
public afifairs, having held practically all the township offices, including those of 
trustee, tax collector, assessor and justice of the peace, filling the latter position 
with credit and ability for twenty years. He and his wife were the parents of 
four children : Pearl, deceased ; Hilas C, of this review ; Elma M., the wife of 
W. E. Hinman, of Franklin township ; and Edna, who died in infancy. 

In the acquirement of an education Hilas C. Burnham attended district school 
in his native township and from his early childhood aided his father with the 
work of the homestead. At the age of eighteen he became a farm laborer, living 
at home, however, until he was twenty-one. Having attained his majority, he 
engaged in hauling cream, but after one year married and turned his attention 
to farming. He went to Ford county, Kansas, one hundred miles northwest of 
Wichita, spending one summer in that vicinity. Returning to Iowa at the end of 
that time, he rented a farm in Allamakee county and continued to reside upon 
it for two years, moving then to a farm in Clayton county, near the dividing 



248 PAST AXD PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COL'XTY 

line. In the spring of 1894 he purchased forty acres of land on section Ti2, Frank- 
lin township, in Allamakee county, and this formed the nucleus of his present 
farm. To it he has made suljstantial additions from time to time and owns today 
one hundred thirty-two and one-fourth acres of e.xcellent land. Upon it he has 
erected fine buildings and he has installed modern equipment, nothing being 
neglected which will add to the value or attractive appearance of tiie place. He 
operates his land as a general stock farm, raising high-grade cattle, horses and 
hogs. He is a stockholder in the Cooperative Creamery at Luana and was one 
of the promoters of the Farmers Cooperative Shipping Association and is a 
director in the Luana Savings Bank, being respected in business circles as a man 
of unusual ability, integrity and enterprise. 

On the 31st of March, 1887, Mr. Burnham was united in marriage to Miss 
Carrie May Sawyer, who was born in Franklin townshii), March 9, 1863. They 
have become the parents of two children. Ray Hilas was born Alay 3, 1890, and 
makes his home with his parents. He holds the position of rural mail carrier 
from the Luana postoffice. Bessie M. was born June 19, 1891, and is now attend- 
ing Carlton College at Xorthville. Minnesota. Both are graduates of the Post- 
ville high school. 

Mr. Burnham is a member of the Modern Brotherhood of .America and he 
gives his political allegiance to the republican party, never seeking office but tak- 
ing an active and intelligent interest in community affairs. A resident of this 
part of Allamakee county since his birth, his upright and honorable life has com- 
manded for him the respect and esteem of his neighbors and his success has 
placed him in the front ranks of progressive and substantial agriculturists. 



FRANK DOLPHIN. 

Frank Dolphin, one of the prominent and deservedly successful business men 
of Lansing, was born in La Crosse county, Wisconsin, and there acquired his 
education in the public schools. With his father he came to Iowa in 1886 and 
settled in Lansing where they worked in a sawmill and engaged in the manu- 
facture of lumber for two years. Mr. Dolphin of this review later bought a drill- 
ing outfit and for five years thereafter worked at drilling wells, building up a 
large and profitable patronage along this line. 

Being ambitious for a broader field of labor and for a wider and more suit- 
able scope for his activities, Mr. Dolphin determined to study electrical engi- 
neering and accordingly took a correspondence course in this science, becoming an 
expert practical engineer. Upon receiving his degree he joined William Nopper, 
who was in charge of the installation of the electric light and power plant at 
Lansing which was later merged into the Upper Iowa Electric Light & Power 
Company in which Mr. Dolphin is now the manager of the Lansing plant. He 
is also associated in business with Mr. Olson with whom he owns a steam power 
machine and a large blacksmith and wagon and repair shop, a large patronage 
being accorded them in recognition of the excellent quality of the work done and 
their straightforward and honorable methods. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 249 

Mr. Dolphin married in Waukon on the loth of October, 1904, Miss P>ertha 
Magnusson, who was reared and educated in Lansing. They occupy a com- 
fortable and modern residence just adjoining the business plant and shop and 
they have made their home a center of warm-hearted hospitality. Mr. Dolphin 
is a Master Mason and belongs to the blue lodge in Lansing. He is identified also 
with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Yeomen. In politics he is 
independent, voting according to the dictates of his personal judgment, and while 
he is not in any sense an office seeker he is now in the second term of his able 
service as a member of the city council. In Waukon, Lansing and throughout 
Allamakee county he is known as a man of good business ability, of strict integ- 
rity and moral worth — an active, progressive and public-spirited citizen whose 
official record is marked by the same energetic, straightforward and conscientious 
work which has distinguished and made successful his business career. 



FRED F. KRUSE. 



Since 1895 Fred F. Kruse has lived upon his present farm of one hundred and 
eighty acres on section 33, Franklin township, and since 1901 has owned the 
[property, which in its neat and attractive appearance reflects everywhere his care- 
ful supervision and practical labors. He is one of the many sturdy, industrious 
and enterprising citizens whom Germany has given to America, having been born 
near Berlin, June 6, 1859. He is a son of Fred and Sophia (Brunstein) Kruse, 
also natives of that locality, the former born October 22, 1839, and the latter in 
1840. In his native country the father worked in the employ of others and for 
a time served in the army, taking part in the war with France. He crossed the 
Atlantic in 1871 upon the close of hostilities and came directly to Iowa, settling 
in Garnavillo township, Clayton county. After working in the employ of others 
for some time he purchased land of his own and for many years thereafter 
engaged in farming in that locality. He now lives retired and makes his home 
in Guttenberg, having survived his wife since June, 1908. 

Fred F. Kruse is the eldest in a family of seven children. He was about 
thirteen years of age when he crossed the Atlantic with his parents and he com- 
pleted an education begun in Germany in the district schools near Elkader. After 
laying aside his books he worked in the employ of others for a few years, giving 
his father all of his earnings until he was twenty-one years of age. After attain- 
ing his majority he continued at farm labor until 1895, when he rented the farm 
which he now occupies. In 1901 he bought the property, which comprises one 
hundred and eighty acres on section 33, Franklin township, and which under his 
able management has become one of the finest agricultural properties in the 
vicinity. He is a member of the Luana Shipping Association and is a stock- 
holder in the Luana Creamery. 

In 1882. Mr. Kruse was united in marriage to Miss Minnie H. Pileatz, 
who was born in Blaeswitz, near Berlin, Germany, October 23, 1859, 
a daughter of Charles and Caroline (Radloff) Bleatz, natives of the same sec- 
tion, the former born June 15, 1826, and the latter February 18 of the same year. 
The father served the required term in the German army and afterward came to 



250 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLA:.IAKEE COUNTY ■ 

America, locating near Clayton Center in 1872. He died in 18S7, having sur- 
vived his wife for ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Kruse became the parents of seven 
children. William Fred was born on the 7th of December, 1882. He married 
Miss Bertha Bleatz and is now engaged in farming in Franklin township. Henry 
was born October 7, 1884, and is engaged in farming in Clayton county. His 
wife was in her maidenhood Miss Amanda Meyer. Alice, whose birth occurred 
on the 2ist of December, 1887, became the wife of John Nuehring, a farmer near 
Luana, in Clayton county. Fredrick was born May 6, 1890. and lives at home. 
Etta was born January 18, 1893. George was born May 23, 1895. Mabel, the 
youngest child in this family, was born November 8, 1900. 

Mr. Kruse owes a great deal to his wife, who has been his able assistant in 
the development of the farm, cooperating in all of his ])lans for its improvement 
and development. He is a member of the Lutheran church at Luana anfl he 
gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, being active and progressive 
in matters of citizenship, although never seeking public office. His many friends 
in this county respect his ability and honor his sterling integrity of character, 
according him a high place among representative citizens and substantial farmers 
of this locality. 



ALBERT G. WINTER. 



Farming and dairying interests of Ludlow township tind a progressive and 
worthy representative in Albert G. Winter, who owns and operates the Pleasant 
View homestead, a neat and well improved place of eighty acres on section i. He 
has been a resident of Iowa since 1876, but was born in Dodge county, Wis- 
consin, Deceml)er 8, 1858. His father, Rev. H. A. Winter, a minister in the 
Presbyterian church, was born in Germany and came to America when a young 
man, settling in Wisconsin, where he remained for many years. 

Alliert G. Winter acquired his education in the public schools of Wisconsin, 
graduating from the Madison high school and later attending Mount Carroll 
College. In 1876 he came to Iowa and here turned his attention to farming, 
working in the harvest fields for a few seasons and afterward renting land. 
Eventually he bought the Pleasant View homestead, a property with some improve- 
ments, to which he steadily added. He also remodeled the house and erected 
in 1912 a large and commodious barn. He installed also a wind pump and built 
a silo with a capacity of ninety tons, making the property one of the finest and 
best equipped in this vicinity. In addition to general farming Mr. Winter engages 
in dairying and stock-raising, keeping a fine herd of milch cows and feeding a 
number of high-grade hogs every year. ■ Both of these departments of his busi- 
ness are ably and carefully conducted and under his competent supervision have 
become important and profitable. The farm is today one of the most attractive 
in the township, the house being set in the midst of a fine level lawn broken here 
and there by groves of evergreen and forest trees. Mr. Winter was one of the 
promoters of the Ludlow Cooperative Creamery Association and served as secre- 
tary and treasurer of that body. He is identified with the German Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, of which he was for a time secretary and treasurer, and 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 251 

he aicied in the organization of tlie Farmers Cooperative Stock & Produce Com- 
pany. 

In Ludlow township, in 1883, Mr. Winter was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary ^L Pieper, a stepdaughter of Carl Pieper. They became the parents of 
five children : Carl S., of Lexington, Nebraska, who is married and has one 
son ; Helen, the wife of James G. Smith, of Lexington, Nebraska, by whom she 
has one son ; Marion E. ; Fred B., a student in the University of Iowa ; and Earl 
A., a student in the Waukon high school. Mr. artd Mrs. Winter are members 
of the German Presbyterian church of Ludlow. 

Mr. Winter is connected fraternally with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is interested in everything pertaining to the 
growth and progress of Allamakee county and his labors have been forces in the 
agricultural development of the township which has been his home for over thirty- 
five years and where he is held in high regard by reason of his business enter- 
prise, his integrity and his sterling personal worth. 



JOSEPH FRANCIS MITCHELL. 

Joseph Francis Mitchell is carrying on general farming and stock-raising 
upon one hundred and eighty acres of excellent land in Hickory Creek valley, a 
valuable tract which owes its present well improved and productive condition 
entirely to his many years of careful supervision and competent management. 
Mr. Mitchell is a native of Iowa, born in Clayton county, on the Military road, 
near Monona, April 8, 1871. His parents, Jackson and Bridget (Welsh) Mitch- 
ell, were born in Green county. Wisconsin, near Alonroe, in 1846 and the mother 
passed away in 1874. The father spent practically all his active life engaged in 
farming, although for three years during the Civil war he engaged in buying and 
selling horses, being at that time a mere boy. After the close of hostilities, about 
the fall of 1865, he came to Iowa and for some years thereafter worked as a farm 
hand, later becoming a landowner. From the year 1870 until 1906 he continued 
to improve and develop his excellent farm and secured an enviable place in the 
ranks of progressive and substantial agriculturists. In the latter year he moved 
to Monona, where he has since lived practically retired, having sold his farm 
in 191 1. He was three times married, his first wife having been Miss Catharine 
Stapleton, by whom he had one child. By his second marriage, to the mother of 
the subject of this review, he was the father of two children, and liy his third wife, 
who was Mrs. Sarah (Flack) McGoon, he had five daughters. 

Joseph F. Mitchell acquired his education in district school No. 10, Franklin 
township. He remained at home until he was nineteen years of age and then 
married, purchasing soon afterward forty acres of land on section 28, Frank- 
lin township, this tract still forming a portion of his present farm. L'pon it he 
resided for eleven years and at the end of that time added to his holdings, remov- 
ing his residence to its present location. He has now one hundred and eighty 
acres of valuable land and upon it he carries on general farming and stock-raising, 
keeping high grades of cattle, horses and hogs. He is preparing to specialize in 
dairy work and intends to make this an important branch of his business. He 



252 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

devotes practically his entire time to his farm and has few outside connections, 
although he is a stockholder in the Monona Union Cooperative Creamery. 

On the 31st of August, 1890, Mr. Mitchell was united in marriage to Miss 
Cleopatra \'iola Baughman, who was born in Wyandot county, Ohio, November 
12, 1869. She is a daughter of John and Susan ( Heddington ) Baughman, the 
former born in Boone county, Kentucky, January 5, 1818, and the latter in Ohio, 
February 21, 1832. Both have passed away, the father dying March 4, 1901, on 
the anniversary of his wedding, and the mother May 10, 1889. John Baughman 
as a young man acted as overseer on a large plantation in Kentucky and he after- 
ward went to Ohio, where he turned his attention to farming. He there married 
his first wife, who afterward died in that state, leaving one child, Electa, who 
passed away in Nebraska. The father afterward came to Iowa, locating in Win- 
neshiek county in 1869. He here became an extensive landowner and continued 
a resident of the state until his death. To his second union, which united him 
with Mrs. Mitchell's mother, he had six children, of whom the wife of the 
subject of this review is the second youngest. Mr. and Airs. Mitchell became 
the parents of seven children: Ray Aretus, who was born May 29, 1892; 
Perry Montus, born November 2, 1894; Cloa Elva, born September 14, 1896; 
David Patterson, born June 19, 1899; Frances Pearl, who was born September 
20, 1900, and who died February 25, 1901 ; Lillian May, born February 15, 1902; 
and Dennis Jackson, born April 28, 1905. Mr. Mitchell is one of the most pros- 
perous and substantial farmers in Allamakee county and his success is the more 
creditable to him since he depended on no outside aid or influence in its attain- 
ment but achieved prosperity through his well directed and practical labors. He 
gives great credit to his wife for his achievements and concedes that much of 
his success is due to her able collaboration, her sound advice and good judgment. 



G. KERNDT & BROTHERS. 

One of the most familiar names in Allamakee county is that of Kerndt, 
honored and respected, as generation has followed generation, to the present 
day, for what members of the family have done in advancing the interests of 
the section in various ways. We first present a chronological record of these 
distinguished pioneers and their descendants, who played so great a part in 
the history of this county for sixty years and builded a reputation which is 
more lasting than tomes in stone and marble. Their history reveals an inter- 
esting bit of the early life and early settlers in the middle west. It gives a 
vivid picture of the trials and hardships of the early pioneer and to what tasks 
and occupations one had to turn in order to gain a living and a foothold in a 
new country yet unsettled. The story increases the respect one has for the 
early settlers who developed civilization out of a wilderness and made possible 
the prosperous conditions the present generation enjoys. Our particular story 
tells how a familv courageously set out from hearth and home in order to find 
new opportunities and improve them, and furnishes a worthy example of inspi- 
ration to the young men of today, being a spring of hope to everyone who 





,/\^y^'-y-U(f(M^-^ 



THE NEV^ YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LFNfJX AND 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 255 

labors under difficult conditions and an incitement to again take up the burden 
of the daily tasks, no matter how discouraging. 

The first ancestor to be here recorded is Johann August Kerndt. He was 
born in 1801, in the province of Silesia, Germany, married in 1822, and of this 
marriage were born five sons and three daughters. Herman was born in 1823, 
married in Germany in 1846, his wife passing away in 1901, leaving five chil- 
dren. Herman Kerndt died on his farm in 191 1. Gustav, the second in order 
of birth, was born in 1825. He emigrated to America in 1849 and died on 
January 5. 1873. He held the office of supervisor for ten years, was elected, 
in 1865, president of the First National Bank of Lansing and held the office 
until his death. William Kerndt was born in 1826 and married in Germany 
in 1852. His wife arrived in Lansing in 1866 with three children. They are 
two daughters, who are married, and one son, G. W. Kerndt, the present vice 
president of the State Bank of Lansing. William Kerndt died in 1898 and his 
wife followed him to the better land in 1905. Moritz Kerndt was born in 1830, 
married in 1863 Mary Nimsgern, who was born in Alsace-Lorraine, at the time 
of her birth a province of France but now a part of Germany. They were the 
parents of eleven children, of whom three died, four sons and four daughters 
growing to maturity. Moritz Kerndt was a member of the city council of Lan- 
sing for eleven years and in 1873 was elected president of the State Bank, 
holding the office until 1893, when he retired, remaining a director. Of his sons, 
Charles married, in 1891, Frieda Grulich, of Milwaukee. The oldest daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Moritz Kerndt was married in 1901 to M. F. Healy, of Fort 
Dodge, this state, and the second was married in 1895 to H. F. Grau, of Mil- 
waukee. Moritz Kerndt, Jr., was in 1908 married to Miss Mary Martin, of 
Oskaloosa, Iowa. The next son of Johann August Kerndt was Julius, born in 
1834, who married Margaret (Gretchen) Gruber in 1857. He died in 1871 and 
his wife in 1872. Thev had five sons, four of whom, after they had grown to 
manhood, engaged in business in Kansas. Theodore, the youngest, is at pres- 
ent a partner in the firm of Nielander & Company. Clara Kerndt was born in 
1838 and in 1858 married Jacob Haas. She died in 1877, leaving one son and 
one daughter, the latter marrying Jacob Keffler, both settling in Sturgis, South 
Dakota. Jacob Haas died in 1882. He was engaged in the brewing business 
with Julius Kerndt as his partner. The oldest daughter of Johann August 
Kerndt was married to John Rieth, in Dubuque, in 1855, and the second in 1856 
to Eduard Boeckh. Mrs. Rieth died in 1873, leaving six children, and Mrs. 
Boeckh in 1910. leaving the same number of descendants. Eduard Boeckh died 
in 1910. Mr. Rieth and Mr. Boeckh were partners in the foundry business and 
both built a large brick factory in 1868 in Lansing, Iowa. 

Jacob Haas, engaged in the brewing business, removed to the "old building" 
in 1869 and subsequently erected a large new brick brewery building at a cost 
of fourteen thousand dollars, the whole cost of the plant, including malt house, 
ice house, power house, underground vaults and residence, being about forty 
thousand dollars. In 1886, when the prohibition law was enforced, the brewery 
was closed and it stood idle until 1903, when the whole property was sold for 
one thousand dollars, so that his two children received but one thousand dol- 
lars from the father's estate — an example of how a law generally beneficial 
worked a great hardship upon one who legitimately followed an honest calling. 



256 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

In 1820, when nineteen years of age, the father. Johann August Kerndt, 
inherited a small tannery in Germany which he operated for a few years, at 
the end of which time he branched out into contracting and building. This 
venture, however, by a peculiar accident, proved most lamentable for the fam- 
ily. A small village in the fatherland, including church and schoolhouse, had 
burned to the ground when he made a contract to reiniild, and all went well 
until the work was nearly finished, when, on a dark night, coming home on 
horseback, his pony stumbled and he fell. They brought him to his home and 
for five days he lay unconscious, passing away without recognizing a member 
of the family after the accident happened. As the work was then not finished 
and had to be completed by others, his death also resulted in the loss of his 
fortune to the family, it taking seven years for two guardians, who were ap- 
pointed, to settle the estate, and after the intricate law problems were worked 
out there was left not much beside the little tannery which was given him by his 
father. Johann August Kerndt was a broad-minded man. a man far above ordi- 
nary intelligence in his time and a man with a wonderful memorv— not one who 
had gained his knowledge in books but a man of the world who had learned in 
the university of life and was gifted with mother wit and natural abilities. To 
gain a living for the large family the mother carried on the tannery in order 
to educate her children, who attended sciiool to the age of fourteen, when they 
were turned out to make their way in the world. Herman embarked in the same 
business as his father— that of building. Gustav apprenticed himself to learn 
the grocery business and had to stay for six years under contract. William 
learned the tanner's trade and so did :\Ioritz. Julius, who had an advantage in 
regard to educational opportunities, became an architect. The two oldest daugh- 
ters also had to work out in order to be self-supporting and contribute to the 
family exchequer. 

In 1849. when twenty-four years of age, Gustav Kerndt decided to emigrate 
to America to test out the stories which he had heard of the advantageous con- 
ditions prevailing in this country and to gain, if such were within the reach 
of possibility, a position of substance. He had not enough money to engage 
in business in the fatherland and saw no road ahead of him which would lead 
to independence. Therefore taking a step in an unknown and uncertain future, 
he came to Schenectady. New York, where he soon found work in a broom 
factory, being so engaged for two years. He then learned to make cigars and 
afterward kept a little cigar stand. Industriously applying himself to the task 
in hand and thriftily laying dollar upon dollar, he became encouraged with the 
outlook and in 1852 wrote to the family in Germany that it would be well for 
them to emigrate. In the spring of 1853 he became more insistent and advised 
them to sell out as quickly as possible and that Moritz should come at once to 
find a place where the family could settle. Encouraged by these reports. Moritz 
started out immediately and landed in New York in October, 1853. staying there 
until early in spring, when he left for the west, going by railroad to Cincinnati 
and thence by the steamer Franklin on the Ohio river to Cairo and St. Louis, 
where he made a sojourn of a couple of days. He then went to Fort Madison 
and. in order to become acquainted with land conditions, there hired out to an 
American farmer for six dollars a month or about twenty cents a day. this 
munificent remuneration giving an idea how hard it was in those times to lav a 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 257 

foundation for independence. The farmers at that early time could really af- 
ford to pay no more for helj). as eggs in those days were sold at the rate of three 
cents a dozen and dressed pork at the price of one and one-half cents a jjound. 
For two and a half months he so worked, benefiting by learning the English 
language, which he was forced to speak, as there was no one near him who 
could speak his mother tongue. This experience he always considered one of 
the best parts of his American education, as it helped him not only to learn the 
native tongue but also to become acquainted with American methods of agri- 
culture. While near Fort Madison he heard of Dubuque and that railroad con- 
struction was going on there, a road being built from Chicago. When he came 
there the railroad had been built about twenty-five miles east of the river and 
Dubuque was but a small place. The outlook seemed discouraging, as work was 
not easily to be had and money was scarce even for those days. Moritz Kerndt, 
however, made up his mind to succeed at whatever cost and after a week of 
assiduous hunting for work he found a place of employment at Harmony Hall, 
the remuneration being thirteen dollars per month. He then wrote to Gustav, 
who was still in New York, that they all should come from Germany. They 
had sold out their little interests in the meantime and in July, 1854, the family 
arrived by sailing vessel, after a long, tedious, even perilous journey of six 
weeks, in New York. Gustav had also sold out his cigar stand and the family 
arrived in Dubuque in August by the old Walker stage coaches, the emigrant 
company consisting of about thirty people. The family included the mother, 
Herman with his father and mother-in-law and five children, Gustav, William, 
Julius and the three daughters. The party also included the Ruprecht family 
and the Ritter family. Herman Kerndt and Mr. Ruprecht began at once to 
look for a suitable farm property on which to settle and in search of the new home 
they came to Allamakee county, where Herman bought land at Lycurgus. Mr. 
Ruprecht also stayed at a farm near there but subsequently moved to Lansing, 
where he entered in the hotel business. Herman came to Dubuque after his 
family had settled there in September, 1854, and Gustav then rented a store 
building, where he and his brother William made cigars. Moritz stayed on his 
place until 1856, and Julius, in the spring of that year, also went to Lansing 
to build a store and broom shop. This was finished by October and the whole 
family then settled in Lansing in 1856, Messrs. Rieth and Boeckh, the 
two sons-in-law, coming frotu Dulnique in 1857. Gustav and William 
manufactured cigars and made brooms, the material for which came 
from Herman's farm, and Moritz attended to the selling end of the busi- 
ness bv conducting the store. To begin with Moritz had a very small stock 
which some friends in Dubuc|ue had let him have and, though all worked hard, 
the returns were but small. The winter from 1856 to 1857 was severe in the 
extreme, with much snow, many deer being destroyed by the extreme weather 
and many starving to death. In 1857 the farmers, on account of the severe 
weather, had little to sell and even for what there was no price could be ob- 
tained, oats and corn selling for ten and twelve cents a bushel and wheat at the 
price of thirty-five cents. In 1838 the neighborhood became settled more quickly 
and there was plenty of grain, prices rose and the goods in the store could be 
moved. However, the broom business was not a financial success and money 
was yet scarce, so that often the Kerndts turned back in thought to their little 



258 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

comfortable home in the fatherland and discouragement well nigh overtook 
them. Another incident which added to the sorrows of the family was 
the death of the beloved mother, who died in November, 1856, when they 
came to Lansing. In the fall of 1858 a gentleman from Galena, William Ryan, 
came into the store and inquired after business conditions. Moritz told him 
that goods could be sold then if he had them, but that they as yet had not the 
means to acquire a large stock. Mr. Ryan, being convinced of the honesty of 
purpose of these sturdy sons from the German soil, said: "I will give you the 
goods ;" and sold a big bill of various merchandise on long credit. This was 
the beginning of the firm of G. Kerndt & Brothers, the personnel of the con- 
cern consisting of Gustav, William and Moritz. In 1859 they bought a lot on 
the levee and built a warehouse, branching out into the grain business, and in 
1861 they built a substantial brick store, twenty-five by eighty, three stories in 
height, quite an improvement over the little broom stand where Moritz had at 
first attended to an occasional customer. In 1866 an addition was built cover- 
ing the same amount of space as the original store and making in all a building 
fifty by eighty feet. In 1868 they removed the frame warehouse where grain 
was stored and constructed a brick elevator. Already in 1862 they had added to 
their line of groceries dry goods and crockery, and after 1865 the Kerndt broth- 
ers conducted a regular department store, as good as could be found in the 
county. During war times business was good and farmers came to Lansing 
with grain twenty or even thirty miles away. Although there were fourteen 
warehouses, farmers had often to wait in line to unload. As the years went by 
the business grew in volume, in financial stability and in the variety of goods 
carried, having become one of the foremost enterprises of its kind in this part 
of the county. In 1885 William Kerndt was enabled to retire from the firm 
and gave his interest to his son, G. W. The firm was incorporated with a 
capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars, the stock being divided between 
Moritz, his sons and G. W. In 1900 G. W. Kerndt sold out and the business 
was then carried on under the name of G. Kerndt & Brothers by Gustav, Wil- 
liam and Moritz, Jr., sons of Moritz, the same names under which it was 
started in 1856. In 1908 the Kerndt Brothers Savings Bank was founded by 
M. Kerndt and his four sons with a capital of thirty thousand dollars, its offi- 
cers being: Gustav Kerndt, president; Charles Kerndt, cashier; Moritz, Jr., vice 
president; and Moritz Kerndt, Sr., and William M. Kerndt, directors. The 
bank has wonderfully prospered ever since its foundation and as the name of 
Kerndt has had for sixty years the highest reputation in the county, is well 
entitled to the confidence it is given liy its patrons. All members of the fam- 
ily connected with the bank are capable, earnest and conscientious, ever observ- 
ant of the smallest detail that might contribute to the prestige of the institu- 
tion, careful in the investments of the resources of the bank and ever ready 
to extend credit to a worthy applicant. 

As indicated in the first part of this sketch, many meml)ers of the Kerndt 
family have taken active part in the public life of the county and this section 
and have ever been consjjicuous for their pulilic spirit and their liberality in 
contributing to a public cause. That tenacious, fighting spirit peculiar to the 
German race has stood them in good stead and brought them to the fore among 
the most influential citizens of the county. What they have achieved personally 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY . 259 

is worthy of the highest commendation and worthy of their efforts, yet their 
real importance hes in the pioneer work they have done and the role they have 
played in advancing the interests of Allamakee connty, having been not only 
witnesses of the wonderful transformation that has occurred here I)ut helpful 
and cooperant factors in the general advancement along material, moral and in- 
tellectual lines. 



FRANK E. TEEPLE. 



The Spring Valley Stock Farm, a fine property of two hundred and seven- 
teen acres lying on section ii, Ludlow township, is the property of Frank E. 
Teeple, one of the most prominent farmers and stock-raisers and most progressive 
citizens of Allamakee county. He is a native of Iowa, born in Winneshiek county, 
Octolier 8, 1854, and is a son of George Teeple, a native of New York, who in his 
childhood went to Canada with his parents, where he remained until he was twenty 
years of age. The father came to the states when a young man and spent some time 
in ^Michigan and Illinois, arriving in Iowa in September, 1852. He located in 
Glenwood township, Winneshiek county, and there purchased land and opened 
up a farm, afterward buying and disposing of several agricultural properties in 
that vicinity. In 1864 he moved to .■\llamakee county and bought the Spring Val- 
ley Stock Farm which he improved and developed with the other lands he 
held until his death, which occurred in 1877. He had married in Winneshiek 
county on the 22d of October, 1853, Miss Annette Pentield, who was born in 
Pennsylvania, where she was reared and educated. She later came to Iowa and 
was the first teacher in Glenwood township, Winneshiek county. She passed away 
in 1875, tv.'o years before the death of her husband. 

Frank E. Teeple is the oldest in a family of five sons. He was ten years of 
age when he came with his parents to Allamakee county and the greater part of 
his life has been spent on the Spring Valley Stock Farm. He assisted his father 
with its operation until the latter's death and then purchased the interests of the 
other heirs and succeeded to the management of the homestead, whereon he has 
continued to reside to the present time. There is an excellent residence upon the 
property, fine barns and outbuildings and labor-saving machinery, while three 
good springs furnish an abundance of water for stock and domestic purposes. 
Mr. Teeple is a stock-raiser on an extensive scale, keeping high-grade milch cows 
for dairy purposes, one hundred head of Durham cattle, Poland China hogs and 
Norman and Belgian horses. In addition to this farm he owns another fine prop- 
erty of one hundred and sixty acres in Franklin township, this being a well 
improved and well managed stock farm. He was one of the promoters of the 
Ludlow Cooperative Creamery and has served as a director, vice president and 
president of this association, to which he sold more cream than any other mem- 
ber. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Hog & Produce Company, of which 
he has been auditor for several years, and in business circles his resourcefulness, 
energy and ability are recognized and respected. 

In Ludlow, on the 29th of April, 1879, Mr. Teeple was united in marriage to 
Miss Lucinda Fuller, who was born, reared and educated in Winneshiek county 



260 . PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAIMAKEE COUNTY 

and who previous to her marriage taught in the public schools. She passed away 
November 17, 1901, leaving four daughters: Angie, who is her father's house- 
keeper ; Cora, the wife of J. E. McCabe, a prominent farmer of Jefferson town- 
ship : Ida, who married J. E. Wittenberger. station agent at East Dubuque for 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad ; and Bessie, a graduate of Fayette 
College. Mr. Teeple's four daughters are all well educated and cultured women, 
having completed full college courses. They and their father are devout members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which Mrs. Teeple also belonged. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Teeple is connected with the Masonic lodge and chapter. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and has held various important 
positions of public trust and honor. He is one of the well known and sub- 
stantial farmers and stock-raisers of Allamakee county and is besides a public- 
spirited and progressive citizen, cooperating heartily in all movements for the 
growth, advancement and development of the section in which he has so long 
resided. 



SETH N. STAFFORD. 



Seth N. Stafford has been a resident of Allamakee county since pioneer times 
and is today accounted one of the successful agriculturists of Franklin township. 
He owns three hundred and forty-six acres of valuable land on section 23 and 
success has rewarded his well directed efforts in its cultivation, so that it is now 
a valuable and productive property. Mr. Stafford was born in \'irginia, on 
the Monongahela river, near Morgantown, on the ist of June, 1848, and is a son 
of James Harrison and Christina (Trisler) Stafford, also of the same state and 
locality. In early life the father was a boatbuilder and a river man in the Old 
Dominion, but in 1852 came to Iowa, making the journey by boat up the Mis- 
sissippi river and thence overland to Allamakee county. He located next in 
Linton township and entered government land, which he cleared of timber and 
continued to operate for a few years. Eventually he bought a saw and grist mill 
at Smithfield and was active in its conduct for some time, although he still gave 
a great deal of attention to the development of his farm. About the year 1859 
he sold his mill and went to Pikes Peak in Colorado, where he remained until 
the spring of i860. He then returned to Iowa but in the following year went 
again to Colorado, this time taking his son, Seth N., with him. They returned 
to Allamakee county on the loth of June, 1862, and soon afterward the father 
bought a carding mill, which was located on what is now a portion of his son's 
homestead. This he operated for two or three years thereafter but at the end 
of that time left this neighborhood, his death occurring some time afterward. 
His wife died in 1887. 

In the acquirement of an education Seth N. Staft"ord attended [niblic school in 
Smithfield and has spent practically his entire life in Allamakee county with the 
e.xception of the one year which he passed with his father in Colorado. At the 
age of nineteen he assumed charge of the homestead and continued to develop 
it for a number of years, residing thereon until his marriage. During this time 
and for a long period thereafter he also operated a threshing outfit and made this 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 261 

a profitable source of income to him. When he left the homestead he purchased 
eight acres of land in Eranklin township and this still forms a portion of his pres- 
ent farm. To it he added from time to time until he acquired a tract of over 
four hundred acres, one of the finest farms in this vicinity. Eighty acres of 
this has been given to his son and eighty acres he has sold, his holdings now 
comprising three hundred and forty-six acres. This he operates with the aid of 
his sons, carrying on general farming and also engaging extensively in stock- 
raising, keeping at times as many as one hundred head of cattle. Success has 
rewarded his well directed efforts and his farm is today a valuable property, 
evidencing everywhere his constant and careful supervision. 

Mr. Stafford has been twice married. He wedded on the 25th of February, 
1873, Miss Mary White, who was born in Franklin township in 1850, a daugh- 
ter of John and Mary Ann White, natives of Ireland. They came as very early 
settlers to Allamakee county and the father became an extensive landowner, 
engaging the remainder of his life in farming. Mrs. Stafford passed away in 
1876, leaving two children : Edna May, the wife of Peter Hefner, a farmer 
in Linton township ; and David E., who is residing on the home farm. On the 
1st of January, 1879, Mr. Stafford was again married, his second wife being 
Miss Betty C. Entwisle, born in this township in 1858, a daughter of William 
and Martha (Hancock) Entwisle, the former a native of England and the latter 
of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford have been the parents of seven children : 
Ethel, the wife of Roy Palmer, of this township; Roy, a resident of Waukon ; 
Jessie, the wife of Clarence Henderson, engaged in farming in Franklin town- 
ship ; Bert, who resides with his father and who married Miss Henderson ; Cath- 
erine, who died in childhood: Ollie. the wife of William Nebaugh, who resides 
near Monona, Clayton county : and Ernest Hampton, who makes his home with 
his parents. 

Mr. Stafford is a stockholder in the Monona Creamery and the Farmers 
Shipping Association. He gives his political allegiance to the democratic party 
and he is progressive and public-spirited in matters of citizenship without being 
active as an office seeker. His long residence in this township has made him 
widely and favorably known throughout the community. 



G. B. OLSON. 



G. B. Olson, who devotes his attention to general agricultural pursuits, is 
the owner of a well improved tract of land comprising one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 35. Center township. It was on this farm that his birth occurred, 
his natal day being July 2, 1867. His father. Peter S. Olson, was born at Gol, 
Hallingdal, Norway, and when a lad of ten years accompanied his parents on 
their emigration to the Cnited States, the family home being established in Min- 
nesota, where he grew to manhood. In the early '50s he came to Allamakee 
county, Iowa, and was here married to Miss Betsey Larson, a sister of L. O. Lar- 
son, of Taylor township. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of wild 
land, erected thereon a log house and here made his home for many years. .Sub- 
sequently he removed to Mower county, Minnesota, and six years later went to 



262 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUXTY 

Nebraska, where he preempted a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. Keep- 
ing this tract, he later homesteaded another one hundred and sixty acres near 
AlHance. Nebraska, and there spent the remainder of his life. Unto him and 
his wife were born fourteen children, as follows : Mary Ann, who is the wife of 
August Jahnke and resides in Canada; Oscar, who is deceased; Oliver, living 
in Nebraska ; Josephine Matilda, who is the widow of John Peterson and resides 
in Fargo, North Dakota; G. B., of this review; Ida, the wife of Peter Rensvald, 
of Alliance, Nebraska ; Louis, who when last heard from was in Alaska ; Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Albert Rensvald, of Alliance, Nebraska ; Emma, who died in 
childhood ; Rosa, living in Salt Lake City ; Addie, who is the wife of John J. 
Zwingle and resides in Canada ; Sophia, the wife of Henry Rabbit, of Alliance, 
Nebraska ; Stanley Washington, who was killed by a horse in Wyoming when 
twenty-eight \-ears of age : and Isabel, who passed away at the age of eighteen 
years. 

G. B. Olson spent the first eleven years of his life on the home farm in 
Center township, this county, and then accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Minnesota, while later the family home was established in X'ebraska. Twenty 
years ago he returned to the old homestead in Center townsliip, this county, pur- 
chasing the property from his father. The place comprises one hundred and 
sixty acres and he has made all of the improvements thereon, erecting a sub- 
stantial frame residence and barns. Success has attended his efforts as an 
agriculturist, the well tilled fields annually yielding bounteous harvests in return 
for the care and labor which he bestows upon them. He and his son, William, 
each have a cream route, hauling cream to the Waterville and Calhoun creameries 
respectively. 

At Alliance, Nebraska, Mr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss Inger 
Kaasa, a native of Winneshiek county, Iowa, and a daughter of Tosten Kaasa, 
who was an early settler of that county. They have seven children, namely : 
William, at home ; Tilda, who is the wife of Walter Huffy ; and Gunda, Jhalmer, 
Inga, Evelyn and Clara, all of whom are still under the parental roof. The 
family belong to the Synod church. In politics Mr. Olson is a democrat, stanchly 
supporting the men and measures of that party. He is widely and favorably 
known throughout the community and enjoys an enviable reputation as one of 
the substantial agriculturists and respected citizens of his native county. 



JOHN FREDERICK MILLER. 

John Frederick Miller is one of the most extensive landowners in Franklin 
township, his holdings comprising several fine farms, all in a high state of cul- 
tivation. Upon his home property of one hundred and twenty acres he carries 
on general farming and stock-raising and, being influenced at all times by a 
spirit of enterprise and initiative, has achieved a gratifying measure of success. 
He has lived in this part of Iowa since he was six years of age, but was born 
at Frankville, Winneshiek county, February 13, 1S58, a son of John Casper 
and Catherine Barbara (Merkel) Aliller, natives of Baden, Germany, the former 
born January 2, 182 1, and the latter November 29, 1836. The father acquired his 
education in the public schools of Germany and at the age of fourteen began 




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PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 265 

learning the blacksmith's trade, at which he worked for some time in Switzerland 
and other European countries. He crossed the Atlantic in early life and settled 
first in New York, later in Pittsburg and then in Dubuque, whence he went to 
Frankville, \\'inneshiek county, Iowa, about 185 1. He set up a blacksmith shop 
in Frankville and followed his trade there until 1864, when he came to Franklin 
township, Allamakee county, buying forty acres of land on section 19 and 
turning his attention to general farming. L^pon this property he built a log 
house and brush-thatclied sheds, his stock at this time consisting of one horse. 
The breaking of the soil was done by hired men with ox teams and after it was 
accomplished Mr. ^filler turned his attention to the further development of 
his land, continuing to reside upon it until his death, which occurred on the 
2d of May, 1874. His wife survived him some time, dying April 19, 1909. To 
their union were born four children, of whom the subject of this review is the 
eldest. 

John F. Miller acquired his education in district school No. 7, Franklin 
township. When his father died he assumed the entire management of the 
homestead, transacting all the business connected with its operation and proving 
himself a practical and able agriculturist. About 1886 he purchased a farm 
adjoining the homestead. In 1898 he bought the farm upon which he now 
lives and in 1909, after his mother's death, purchased the homestead, where he 
was reared. He has improved his farm with a fine modern residence and sub- 
stantial barns and outbuildings, installing also labor-saving machinery. In addi- 
tion to the cultivation of the fields he is also extensively interested in stock- 
raising, breeding pedigreed stock and dealing in pure-bred shorthorn cattle. He 
now owns altogether four hundred and forty acres of farming land in Franklin 
township, operating one hundred and twenty in his home farm and supervising 
the management of about half the remainder. The other half is rented to 
responsible tenants and brings him a gratifying annual income. Mr. Miller is 
a director and vice president of the Luana Savings Bank, president of the Luana 
Shipping Cooperative Society and a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative 
Creamery of Luana, and his ability is widely recognized in business circles. 

On the 13th of December, 1888, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss 
Nettie Sawyer, who was born in this township March 7, 1866, a daughter of 
Cuyler and Elizabeth (Wartenbe) Sawyer, natives of Ohio, the former born in 
1822 and the latter at Defiance in 1832. They emigrated to Wisconsin and settled 
near Janesville, whence they came after one year to Iowa, locating in Monona 
township, near Hardin, in Clayton county, in 1852. They soon afterward moved 
to Franklin township, Allamakee county, where the father became an extenisve 
landowner and prominent in public affairs, serving as township trustee and 
school director for several years. He died upon his farm on the 4th of November, 
1883, and was survived by his wife until April 2, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
Ijecame the parents of six children. Winnie May, who was born December 17, 
1889, is a graduate of the Highland Park College at Des Moines and is now 
a stenographer in Kellogg. Iowa. Frank Leslie, whose birth occurred on the 
7th of May. 1891, is operating a portion of his father's property. Florence 
Annetta, born January 5. 1895, is attending high school at Postville. Earl Fred- 
erick, who was born August 8, 1897, is also attending the high school at Post- 
ville. Ross Caspar, born December 19. 1900, and Harva Oscar, born December 
18, 1903, are both pupils in the school at Hardin. 



266 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Miller is a devout member of the United Brethren church and his politi- 
cal allegiance is given- to the republican party. He is public-spirited and progress- 
ive in matters of citizenship and has held various responsible public positions, 
serving from 1879 to 1913 as school director. He has been also township trustee 
and township assessor and his public service has been at all times capable, loyal 
and disinterested. He has made substantial and important contributions to the 
agricultural development of this part of the county and during the long period 
of his residence here has commanded and held the confidence and high regard 
of all his associates. 



JONATHAN JENKINS. 

A history of the pioneer settlement of Allamakee county contains the record 
of no more worthy, upright and honorable man than Jonathan Jenkins, who came 
to this part of Iowa in 1852 and who has since that time borne an active and 
useful part in its upbuilding and development. Through his untiring energy, 
industry and well directed activity he has evolved from an unimproved tract 
the valuable farm in Ludlow township which is his today and has achieved a 
success which places him among the men of weight and influence in the town- 
ship where he makes his home. 

Mr. Jenkins was born in Ireland and he grew to manhood in his native coun- 
try, acquiring a public-school education. As a young man be crossed the Atlantic 
to America and soon after his arrival settled in Iowa, working at any occupation 
which would bring him an income. He soon afterward purchased land in Ludlow 
township, Allamakee county, and began clearing the timber, making his home in 
a wagon under an oak tree while doing this work. With the logs which he cut 
down he erected a little cabin and here he resided for many years thereafter, 
steadily and with characteristic energy carrying forward the work of clearing, 
improving and developing his land. He erected fences around his fields and in 
the course of time built a substantial residence, a connnodious barn and the neces- 
sary outbuildings, developing from an uncultivated tract a modern and produc- 
tive farm. The years brought him not only success but the esteem, confidence 
and high regard of his neighbors and he is today one of the prosperous and sub- 
stantial men of Ludlow township. He owns one hundred and sixty acres in the 
home place and two tracts of pasture land adjoining, one comprising eighty acres 
and the other two hundred. He carries on general farming and also engages in 
dairying and stock-raising, feeding hogs and cattle and keeping also high-grade 
milch cows and a number of horses. He was one of the promoters of the Lud- 
low Cooperative Creamery Association, in which he is now a stockholder, and his 
ability is widely recognized in business circles. 

Mr. Jenkins married Miss Catherine Evans, a native of Pennsylvania, who 
came in her childhood to Allamakee county. She was born December 31, 1836, 
and passed away December 11, 1908, within a few days of her seventy-second 
birthday, which would also have been her fiftieth wedding anniversary. Their 
marriage occurred in Waukon, when that thriving city was only a crossroad vil- 
lage. Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins became the parents of seven children now living. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 267 

Joseph W. and John W. are aiding in the operation of the home farm. John 
W. is married and has three children, Catherine, John C. and Herbert M. The 
other children born to Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins are as follows : Sarah, who mar- 
ried W. A. Wamsley, of Dexter, Kansas ; Ellen, the wife of L M. Peterson, of 
Mclntire, Iowa ; Martha, who married R. H. Waters, of Frankville, Iowa ; Eliza, 
the wife of L. L. Miller, of Ludlow township ; and Mary, who is her father's 
housekeeper. Miss Mary Jenkins was educated in the schools of Waukon, 
Decorah and Fayette and engaged in teaching in Allamakee county for ten years. 
She and her brother John are members of the Waukon Methodist Episcopal 
church and Mr. Jenkins is also a regular attendant and member, guiding his 
honorable and upright life by the principles in which he believes. A resident of 
Allamakee county for over sixty years, he has witnessed a great deal of the 
development of this section of Iowa, his own labors proving valuable forces in 
promoting growth. He is widely and favorably known in Ludlow township and 
holds a high place in business and farming circles as well as in the ranks of Iowa's 
honored and successful pioneer citizens. 



ADAM HERMAN. 



F"or almost a half century Adam Herman has been a resident of Allamakee 
county, and he is today numbered among the most prosperous and successful 
farmers and stock-raisers of this section of the state, owning a well improved 
tract of two hundred acres, located on section 21, Makee township. He was 
i)orn near Centerville, Wisconsin, December 18, 1861, a son of George and Caro- 
line ( Lukee ) Herman, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father 
came to the new world as a young man, first locating in Wisconsin. He was 
married in that state, and subsequently located in Allamakee county, the year 
of his arrival here being 1865. He purchased one hundred and twenty acres 
of land in Union Prairie township, only twenty of which were cleared. He 
eventually cleared the entire tract, erected buildings and made it a valuable 
place. He continued to make his home on the farm until the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1895. He had survived his wife for many years, her death 
having occurred in 1873. 

Adam Herman was a little lad of three years when the family removed from 
Wisconsin to Allamakee county. He was reared to farm labor, assisting in the 
work of the fields during the spring and summer seasons, while in the winter 
months he pursued his education in the district school. He remained with his 
father until the time of his marriage in 1891, after which he located on leased 
land. He then purchased a tract of raw land in Union Prairie township. He 
broke the sod and prepared the fields for cultivation, fenced the land and erected 
buildings, making his home thereon for a long period. In 1904 he disposed of 
that tract and purchased his present farm of two hundred acres located on section 
21, Alakee township. Since coming into possession of this place he has made 
many improvements, has built a modern home, and outbuildings for the shelter 
of his grain and stock, and in addition to farming and dairying he raises good 
grades of stock, making a specialty of Holstein cattle and Berkshire hogs. He 



268 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

is likewise a stockliolder in the Farmers Cooperative Creamery Company at 
Waukon, and is one of the board of directors of the company. 

As above stated, Mr. Herman was married in 1891, the lady of his choice 
being Miss Eliza Svebakken who was born in Paint Creek township, of Norwegian 
parentage. Of this marriage four sons and three daughters survive. The sons 
are Roland O., Clarence C, John L., and Harold J., while the daughters are 
Luella, Stella G. and Esther E. Benjamin and Ruth M. died in infancy. Mrs. 
Herman has also passed away, her death occurring March 26, 1913, 

Mr. Herman gives his political support to the republican party but he has 
never held political office. He has, however, served as school director. In relig- 
ious faith he is a Presbyterian, belonging to the church in Waukon. Owing to 
his long residence in Allamakee county, Mr. Herman is thoroughlv familiar 
with the progress and development that has here been made, and has himself 
done much to advance the best interests of this section of the state. 



EDWARD HAM ANN. 



Edward Hamann owns and operates a tine farm of eighty acres on section 
34, Franklin township, constituting the homestead upon which he was born, July 
2, 1S.S5. He is a son of Christof and Louisa (Haas) Hamann, natives of Ger- 
many, born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, the former July 18, 1843, and the latter 
December 17, 185 1. The father worked at farming in the employ of others in 
his native country and in 1871 crossed the Atlantic to America, locating at 
Prairie du Chien. Wisconsin, where he remained for one year. At the end of 
that time he came to Iowa, settling in McGregor, and after six years he removed 
to Monona, renting a farm in the vicinity of that city. Upon the expiration of 
ten years he purchased land on section 34, Franklin township, an entirelv unim- 
proved tract, which he had to clear of a heavy growth of timber before begin- 
ning the work of cultivation. This work, however, he carried forward with 
characteristic energy and determination, improving the farm with modern and sub- 
stantial buildings and installing the necessary equipment. Here he remained an 
active and able agriculturist until he retired from active life, removing to Monona, 
where he and his wife now reside. They are the parents of four children : John, 
who is engaged in carpentering ; Charles, a mason by occupation ; Christof, a 
resident of Mason City, Iowa ; and Edward, of this review. 

The last named was reared at home and from an early age assisted his father 
with the operation of the homestead, learning the best agricultural methods 
and becoming a progressive and able farmer. He continued to help with the 
work of the home property until 1913, when he purchased a farm whereon 
he has since carried forward the work of develo])ment along progressi\e and 
modern lines. He keeps everything about the place in excellent condition and 
its neat and attractive appearance reflects everywhere his careful supervision 
and careful management. His parents frequently drive from Monona and spend 
the night upon the old homestead, assisting Mr. Hamann, who is unmarried, 
with the household duties. This assistance, although appreciated, is not very 
badly needed, for Mr. Hamann has proved very capable in the management 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 269 

of his home, being able to bake a loaf of bread and provide a meal worthy of 
comparison with those of a most competent housewife. 

Mr. Hamann is a stockholder in the Luana creamery and the Luana Ship- 
ping Association, and is recognized as a resourceful, progressive and able busi- 
ness man. He gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is a 
member of the Lutheran church. Although still a young man, he has attained 
a gratifying measure of success and his record is a credit to a name that has long 
been an honored one in this locality. 



ASAHEL P. ARNOLD. 



A fine farm of one hundred and thirteen acres on section 24, Ludlow town- 
ship, is the home of Asahel P. Arnold and wife, which has rewarded their indus- 
try and thrift by constantly increasing productiveness and value. Mr. Arnold 
was born in Lake county, near Cleveland, Ohio, June 22, 1846, and is a son of 
Jonathan J. Arnold, a native of Connecticut, who as a young man went to Ohio, 
where he later married Miss Cordelia Crosby, who was born in New York 
state. The father was a farmer and shop keeper in Ohio but after he moved 
to Illinois purchased land and turned his attention to farming. He afterward 
came to Iowa and after spending a few years in Mitchell county moved in 1872 
to Allamakee county, where he made his home until he retired from active life. 
He then returned to Alitchell county, where his death occurred. 

Asahel P. Arnold was ten years of age when he came to Iowa with his par- 
ents and in the public schools of Mitchell county he acquired his education. 
After he grew to manhood he turned his attention to farming, operating two 
different properties with constantly increasing success. In 1872 he moved to 
Allamakee county and after renting for a time purchased the farm on section 24, 
Ludlow township, upon which he has since resided. He made this property what 
it is today, for it was entirely unimproved when it came into his possession and 
he cleared it of timber and broke the soil before beginning the work of develop- 
ment. This he has steadily carried forward since that time and the property 
is today one of the finest in this section of the state. He has added to his hold- 
ings from time to time and he and Mrs. Arnold now own one hundred and thirteen 
acres of valuable and productive land. Upon it he first erected a small house and 
barn, which was later replaced by a commodious and substantial residence and a 
large basement barn. He has made other substantial improvements in buildings 
and e(|uii)nient and the entire property reflects everywhere his many years of ■ 
careful supervision. Mr. Arnold engages in general farming and stock-raising 
and is especiallv interested in breeding high-grade cattle and Norman horses. 
Since he was a young man he has been engaged in the contracting and building 
business in Allamakee, Winneshiek, Howard and Clayton counties, confining 
his attention to the construction of bridges. He has developed a large and im- 
portant ]3atronage along this line and has accomplished a great deal of important 
work. He was one of the promoters of the Ludlow Creamery. 

Mr. .Arnold married, in Mitchell county, April 15, 1864, Miss Eliza Teeple, 
who was born in Canada and reared in Iowa. They became the parents of ten 
children, seven of whom survive: W. S., who is engaged in farming and dairying 



270 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

in Jefferson township : John, a farmer and stock buyer of Waukon ; ElHs Grant, 
who is following agricultural pursuits in North Alberta, Canada ; Ida, who became 
the wife of H. G. Miller, of Jeft'erson township; Ella, the wife of Mills Fuller, 
residing near Sioux Falls, South Dakota : Grace, who married John West, of 
Waukon ; and Ruth, at home. 

Politically Mr. Arnold gives his allegiance to the republican party. He is a 
Master Mason, holding membership in the Waukon blue lodge, and is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. He is well known in Allamakee county, where his 
upright and honorable life has commanded for him the respect, esteem and confi- 
dence of his neighbors and friends. 



JEREML\H LEAS. 



Allamakee county numbers among its representative and successful pioneer 
citizens Jeremiah Leas, of Rossville, who came to this part of Iowa in 1856 and 
who was for forty-six years thereafter one of the greatest individual forces in the 
agricultural development of Linton township, where he made his home. The years 
have brought him success, prominence and a substantial fortune, upon which he 
has been able to retire from active life, his period of leisure rewarding earnest 
and untiring labor in the past. 

Mr. Leas was born in Harrison county. Ohio, on the 23d of January, 1830, 
and he grew to manhood in that vicinity, acquiring his education in the common 
schools and becoming, before he was of age. a practical and progressive agri- 
culturist. He had very limited educational advantages but has supplied his early 
deficiencies along this line by study and reading, since coming to mature years, 
and is now a well informed and well educated man. In his early manhood Mr. 
Leas operated his father's farm in Ohio for several years but in 1856 came to 
low'a, locating in Allamakee county in pioneer times. He purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Linton township and partially cleared it of timber, 
adding to his holdings from time to time until he owned at length four hundred 
acres. He cleared over two hundred of these of a dense growth of trees and 
upon it built a fine residence and good barns and outbuildings, making it one 
of the valuable and well equipped properties in this section of the state. He 
continued to make his home thereon for forty-six years thereafter, engaging in 
general farming and stock-raising, breeding high-grade cattle, hogs and horses 
and keeping also a flock of three hundred and sixty-five sheep. He sold the 
farm in 1902 and in that year moved to Rossville, where he has since lived 
retired. 

In Ohio, in the fall of 1853, Mr. Leas was united in marriage to Miss Susanna 
Henderson, who was born near Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, but reared in Ohio. 
They became the parents of nine children : .\lbertus, who resides in Rossville ; 
George, who owns and operates the home farm : John, who resides in Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota : Seldon, aLso of Minnesota : \\'illiam Leslie, of North Dakota ; 
Margaret lane, the wife of H. C. Campbell, a farmer of Jeft'erson township; 
Estella, the wife of A. D. Emmerson, of Minnesota : Finley. who grew to mature 
years and engaged in farming in Jeft'erson township, meeting death by accident 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 271 

in 1909: and Mary, who died in early life. The parents are members of the Pres- 
byterian church, of which Mr. Leas has served as trustee and treasurer. 

A stanch democrat, Mr. Leas has always been interested in public affairs 
and has cooperated heartily in all movements for the advancement and growth 
of Allamakee county. In 1857 he was elected road supervisor and afterward 
township trustee, and he served also as township clerk and township collector 
for two terms. He was for nine years justice of the peace and for three terms 
township supervisor and he held various other important positions of public 
trust and responsibility. Since coming to Rossville he has made some judicious 
investments and is always ready to stimulate industrial activity by lending his 
money where he considers that circumstances justify such action. He is one of 
the most prominent and deservedly respected citizens of that community and in 
his retired life is enjoying the fruits of many years of untiring and well directed 
labor. 



CLARENCE A. EVANS. 

Clarence A. Evans, one of the industrious and substantial farmers of Jeffer- 
son township, owns and operates a fine property of one hundred and eighty acres 
on sections 9 and 10 and is also farming a large tract of land adjoining. One 
hundred and sixty acres constitutes the homestead upon which he was born 
March 31, 1871. He is a son of Charles Evans, who was born in Ireland in 
1832 and who remained in his native country until he was six years of age. He 
then crossed the Atlantic to America and in 1853 settled in Allamakee county, 
Iowa. For some time thereafter he followed teaming and by the exercise of 
thrift and economy managed to save enough money to purchase an eighty acre 
tract of land in Paint Creek township. He made some improvements upon it 
and farmed there for several years, later disposing of his holdings and entering 
a government claim of forty acres. This property formed the nucleus of an 
extensive farm, for he added to it from time to time and eventually became the 
proprietor of one hundred and sixty acres. This he cleared, fenced and im- 
proved, making it a valuable and productive farm and becoming one of the well 
known and prosperous agriculturists of this township. He still resides upon his 
holdings. He married Mrs. William Bordwell, nee Martha Beeman, a daughter 
of Cvrus Beeman, who was numbered among the first settlers in this part of- 
Iowa. 

Clarence A. Evans is one of a family of two children by his father's second 
marriage, the other being a daughter, Elvida, the wife of Rev. A. Allison, a 
minister of the Presbyterian church and now pastor at Oregon, Wisconsin. 
Clarence A. Evans was reared upon his father's homestead and acquired his 
education in the public schools of Jefferson township. From his childhood he 
assisted with the farm duties and after he had attained his majority assumed 
charge of the property, upon which he still resides and which under his careful 
supervision is daily increasing in value. He owns one hundred and eighty acres 
of land, successfully engaging in general farming and stock-raising. He is es- 



272 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

pecially interested in the conduct of his dairy and raises fine cattle and a number 
of hogs and horses every year. 

Mr. Evans married, on the 21st of November, 1900, Miss Edith Durant, who 
was born and reared in Winnebago county and previous to her marriage taught 
in the pubhc schools. Mr. and Mrs. Evans have two sons, Horace and Leslie. 
Mr. Evans is widely and favorably known in the township where his entire life 
has been spent and where his industry, honesty and success have gained him 
place with the representative and substantial agriculturists and the progressive 
and public-spirited citizens. 



W. O. BOCK. 



W. O. Bock, well known in New Albin by reason of many years of capable, 
intelligent and faithful service as postmaster of the city, was born in Sweden 
in 1859, and is a son of Charles J. and Mary E. Bock, natives of that country. 
The parents crossed the Atlantic to America in 1868 and came immediately to 
Iowa, settling in Lansing, where the father followed his trade until his retirement 
from active life, when he moved to New Albin, where he made his home until 
his death, which occurred when he was eighty years of age. The mother had 
also reached the age of eighty when she passed away. Of the eight children 
born to their union seven survive, the youngest having died in infancy. The 
others are: Charley, who resides in New Albin; Julius, of Dubuque, Iowa; Al- 
fred, who makes his home in Wausau, Wisconsin; Andrew, of Waukon ; W. O., 
of this review; Mary, who married W. A. Cutting; and Edward, a resident of 
New Albin. 

W. O. Bock was nine years of age when his parents settled in Lansing and 
there he grew to manhood, acquiring his early education in the district schools 
and later attending high school, where he completed the full course. .\t the 
age of sixteen he began his business career, securing a position as clerk in a 
store and continuing this connection for sixteen years, the last four of which 
he spent as manager. In 1888 he formed a partnership with J. M. Tartt, and 
they opened a grocery and drug store in New .Albin. continuing to conduct it 
until the fall of 1912 and securing in the meantime an important and repre- 
sentative patronage, accorded to them in recognition of their upright and honor- 
able business methods and their earnest desire to please their patrons. Mr. 
Bock was first appointed postmaster of New Albin in 1888 by President Har- 
rison and at that time he served for four years in a capable and thoroughly 
satisfactory manner. He was appointed to the position for the second time in 
1903 and he has since served, having in the meantime accomplished a great 
deal of constructive and beneficial work, managing the department under his 
charge with ability, foresight and public spirit. For the past two vears he has 
been connected with business interests in the city as the proprietor of a profit- 
able real-estate business and he has handled a great deal of valuable property, 
his judgment being considered sound and reliable on all matters relating to 
present or future land values. His business career has been successful because 
his methods are both practical and modern and because he has won the confi- 





W. 0. BOCK 



I;: 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 275 

dence of his patrons and the public at large by his straightforward and uijnght 
dealings throughout the years of his residence here. He has valuable individual 
holdings, owning a quarter of a section of land in North Dakota, four hundred 
acres, well improved, in Minnesota and a fourteen hundred acre tract in one 
of the best agricultural districts of Montana. He owns also a fine home in 
New Albin and is connected with important business interests here. Having 
come to the city in the days of its pioneer settlement, he took advantage of the 
opportunities for investment, and purchased a great deal of property on the town 
site, being today part owner of all of the vacant lots within the original town 
limits. His business interests are at all times capably conducted and his success 
has followed as a natural result of his earnest, straightforward and persistent 
labor. 

In 1881 Mr. Bock was united in marriage to Miss Cora E. Tartt, a native 
of Allamakee county and a daughter of James and Phoebe Tartt, the former 
born in Tennessee and the latter in Illinois. They spent the last thirty years 
of their lives in New Albin, the father dying in this city at the age of seventy- 
five and the mother passing away at the age of seventy-four. In their family 
were seven children, of whom three survive, as follows: Walter B., of Prairie 
du Chien, Wisconsin; Oscar C, also of this city; and Cora E., the wife of the 
subject of this review. Among those deceased was Mrs. H. F. Hutter, the 
former wife of Dr. Hutter, of New Albin. Mr. and Mrs. Bock became tne 
parents of two children, the eldest of whom died in infancy. The other is 
a son, Forest W. M., who was born in 1892. He is a graduate of the New 
Albin high school and is now attending college at Mount Vernon, Iowa. The 
family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Mock is an 
active and successful religious worker, having for the past twenty-five years 
served as Sunday school superintendent and a member of the official board. 
Fraternally Mr. Bock is connected with the Masonic lodge and his wife is a 
member of the Eastern Star at Lansing. He gives his political allegiance to 
the Republican party and is at all times interested in the growth and develop- 
ment of Allamakee county, cooperating heartily in movements for the general 
advancement and expansion. The period of his residence in New Albin covers 
a quarter of a century and the many sterling traits of his character are, there- 
fore, well known to his fellow-townsmen, the great majority of whom number 
him as a friend. 



WILLIAM D. BIGGS. 



Among the honored and respected residents of Franklin township and among 
Allamakee bounty's most progressive and able native sons is numbered William 
D. Biggs, who owns and operates one hundred and sixty acres of fine farming 
land on section 34. He was born in Linton township, December i, 1865, and is 
a son of David and Elizabeth ( Fitch ) Biggs, the former born in Holmes county, 
Ohio, November 4, 1831. and the latter in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 18, 
1840. In early life the father went to Ohio, and from that state in Jan- 
uary, 1853, came to Iowa, settling in Volney, where he operated a sawmill 



276 PAST AND PRESEXT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

for a number of years. He formed a partnership with his father and a brother 
and they conducted this enterprise together with excellent results. About the 
year i860 he went overland to the Rocky mountains and remained for two 
months in the vicinity of Pike's Peak. L^pon the expiration of that time he 
returned to Iowa and in Linton township purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, which he continued to improve and develop until 1908, becoming 
during that time a prosperous and successful farmer. In that year he retired 
from active life and moved into Rossville. where he and his wife now reside. 
The paternal branch of this family has been in America since Revolutionary 
times, William D. Biggs' great-grandfather having come to the colonies as a 
soldier in the English army to fight in the Revolutionary war. After his ar- 
rival, however, he and his brother joined General Washington, allying their inter- 
ests with the Continental cause and serving with ability and credit throughout 
the war. The great-grandfather later married and had eight children, all sons, 
each of whom he named after some officer in Washington's army. The father 
of the subject of this review is well known among the old Iowa pioneers, who 
delight in telling a story of his connection with the naming of Big Foot school- 
house and of the entire section known as Big Foot. In early times, while he 
was on a hunting trip, he noticed in the deep snow which lay over everything 
tracks made apparently by a man with enormously large feet. There was at 
that time a famous Indian chief called Old Big Foot, who frequently came to 
the vicinity and invariably committed some depredation here, being much dreaded 
by the earlv settlers. Mr. Biggs' father followed the trail for a short distance 
and then came upon a hunter who in order to keep out the cold had wrapped 
his feet in rags, this accounting for the large tracks made in the snow. The inci- 
dent proved a much appreciated joke in the community and resulted in the naming 
of the district Big Foot, a title under which it is known today. 

William D. Biggs acquired his education in Big Foot school, Linton town- 
ship, and spent his childhood upon his father's farm, becoming familiar with the 
best agricultural methods by assisting in the operation of the homestead. When 
he was twenty-three years of age he built upon the property a small factory, 
wherein he engaged in the manufacture of rustic chairs, selling these throughout 
the surrounding states for ten years thereafter and developing a large and im- 
portant patronage. He was also at this time interested in the real-estate business 
and was well known and highly respected in business circles. Eventually, how- 
ever, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, renting in Franklin town- 
ship the farm owned by D. J. Murphy. He cultivated this for one year and then 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 34. Franklin township, 
whereon he has since resided. He engages in general farming and is also ex- 
tensively interested in stock-raising, keeping high-grade cattle, sheep, hogs and 
horses. He is a stockholder in the Cooperative Creamery at Monona and is known 
as a resourceful, far-sighted and progressive business man, who owes his suc- 
cess in life entirely to his own well directed efforts. 

On the ist of January, 1896, Mr. Biggs was united in marriage to Miss Effie 
Diamond, who was born in Clayton county, Iowa, near McGregor, in 1874. She 
is a daughter of John and Ellen (Barnhouse) Diamond, the former a native of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, born February 10, 1848, and the latter of Ohio, born 
May 30, 1848. The parents came to Iowa separately in 1852 and located five 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 277 

miles southwest of McGregor, where afterward their marriage occurred. The 
father became an extensive landowner in that vicinity but later sold his holdings 
and moved to the vicinity of Summerfield, Kansas, whence after a short time he 
went to Wisconsin, spending eight months in Iowa county. At the end of that 
time he went to Monona, Iowa, and he has since lived retired in that city. Mr. 
and Mrs. Biggs have three living children: Carrie Ellen, born October 29, 1897; 
Dorothy Amelia, born October 14, 1902: and Lois Althea, born March. 30, 1907. 
One, born July 16, 1900, died in infancy. 

Mr. Biggs is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and gives his 
political allegiance to the republican party, serving as township trustee and school 
director. He takes a great interest in public affairs and since the beginning of 
his independent career has been active in promoting the permanent interests of 
the community, bearing an honorable and worthy part in the work of upbuilding. 
His sterling qualities of mind and character have gained him many friends in 
Franklin township and the high regard in which he is held merits his classifica- 
tion with the representative and honored citizens of his native county. 



ROBERT BOYCE. 



Esteem and veneration is due to Robert Boyce not only for what he has 
achieved along agricultural lines and for the financial successes which have come 
to him but also for the service which he rendered his country at the time of the 
Civil war, for he is one of that fast disappearing band of volunteers who willingly 
offered his life in order to preserve the unity of the nation. A native of Penn- 
sylvania, Robert Boyce was born in McKean county, August 23, 1841, a son of 
Samuel and Betsy Ann (Hall) Boyce. Both parents were natives of County 
Armagh, Ireland. The father always followed agricultural pursuits and in his 
early manhood became a resident of Pennsylvania, wdiere he resided about one 
year before coming to Iowa. Here he located at Garnavillo, Clayton county, 
where he remained only about a year, when he died. The mother subse- 
quently married again, her second husband being Charles Lord, and they soon 
thereafter came to Allamakee county and settled near the mission house in Lin- 
ton township. Later they came to Franklin township and there Mr. and Mrs. 
Lord resided on the farm which is now a part of our subject's holdings. Both 
spent their latter lives retired in Monona, where they passed away. 

Robert Boyce is the fifth in order of birth of the six living children born to 
his mother's first marriage. Of the second marriage there were born three chil- 
dren, all of whom have passed away. Robert Boyce attended school in Clayton 
countv, receiving his lessons in the district school of Reed township, and later 
continued his lessons in the schools of Franklin township. When eighteen years 
of age he bought forty acres of his present farm from his father and engaged 
independently in agricultural pursuits until on February 18, 1862, he enlisted with 
Company H, First Battallion, Sixteenth United States Regular Regiment, as a 
private. He valiantly served his country for three years, enduring the hardships 
of the campaign and the dangers of battle and camp until he was mustered out at 
Lookout Mountain, Tennessee. He was never wounded but contracted sickness, 



278 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

spending some time in a hospital at Keokuk, Iowa. After being discharged from 
the service he returned to the farm and has continued here ever since, having 
increased his holdings as prosperity has come to him and now owning one hun- 
dred and eighty acres. His fields are under high cultivation and his buildings 
kept in good repair. The most rriodern machinery has been installed upon the 
place and his methods have resulted in a gratifying degree of prosperity to him. 
Mr. Boyce also owns valuable property in Monona. He is a stockholder in the 
Citizens Bank of that place and has other interests. 

On September ii, 1866, occurred the marriage of Mr. Boyce to Miss 
Mary Jane Tapper, who was the first white child born at Fort Atkinson, Iowa, 
her day of birth being January 16, 1841. She is a daughter of James and Ellen 
(Irwin) Tapper, the father a native of England and the mother of Ireland. The 
father was one of the pioneers in this section and for many years was in the 
employ of the United States government at Fort Atkinson as a carpenter. He 
was prominent and highly esteemed in his locality, holding several township 
offices, serving as trustee, justice of the peace and supervisor. 

Although Mr. Boyce has never aspired to public office, he has been prevailed 
upon to serve as trustee of Franklin township and in that capacity discharged 
his duties with conspicuous ability. His political faith is that of the republican 
party and he ever upholds its candidates and principles. He keeps in touch with 
his comrades of the battlefields of the south as a member of Grand Army Post, 
No. 445, at Monona. The spirit of patriotism which led him to follow the flag 
at the time of the great civil conflict has never left him and he is today, in times 
of peace, as much a force for good as he was when he upheld the L^nion cause 
in the south. He is ever interested in worthy public enterprises and ever ready 
to give of his means and influence in the support of the same. Such prosperity 
as has come to him is but the natural result of well applied labor and there is 
none who begrudges him his present affluence. On the contrary, he is highly 
respected for what he has achieved and is venerated and beloved for his sterling 
traits of character. 



WILLIAM WURTZEL. 



William Wiu'tzel. whose residence in Allamakee county covers more than 
a third of a century, is now numbered among the substantial and representative 
agriculturists of his community, owning and operating a well improved farm 
of one hundred and nine acres on section 35, Center township. His birth oc- 
curred in Brandenburg, Germany, on the nth of March, 1848, his parents being 
Carl and Elizabeth (Beymert) Wurtzel, who came to this county with their son 
Gustave in 1881. They made their home with him throughout tiie remainder of 
their lives, both passing away when seventy-nine years of age. Their family 
numbered three sons and three daughters, as follows : Caroline and Augusta, both 
of whom died in the fatherland; Henrietta, who is deceased, as is also her hus- 
band, Ernst Kuehn ; Carl, who is supposed to be still in Germany : \\'illiam. of 
this review ; and Gustave, a successful agriculturist of Center township. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 279 

William Wurtzel spent the first thirty years of his life in his native country, 
being there reared, educated and married. In 1878, in company with his wife 
and two children, he crossed the Atlantic to the LTnited States, arriving in the 
new world with a capital of less than one hundred dollars. He here worked by 
the month as a farm hand for two years and on the expiration of that period 
purchased a tract of one hundred and nine acres in Center township, Allamakee 
county, Iowa, which had but poor improvements. The property has since re- 
mained in his possession and he has remodeled the residence and other buildings 
thereon and generally improved the place until it is now a neat and model farm. 
He cultivates the cereals best adapted to soil and climate and annually gathers 
good crops which find a ready sale on the market. As the years have gone by 
he has prospered in his undertakings and is now recognized as one of the sub- 
stantial and esteemed citizens of the community. 

While still a resident of the fatherland Mr. Wurtzel was united in marriage 
to Miss Amelia Schoenl)eck, a daughter of Ludwig and Caroline Schoenbeck, 
both of whom are deceased, having passed away in Germany. Lhito Mr. and 
Mrs. Wurtzel have been born five children, as follows: William, a native of 
Germany, who wedded Miss Clara Hermann and resides on a farm in Center 
township : Carl, also born in Germany, a resident of this county ; Fred, a native 
of .\llamakee county, Iowa, who passed away in January, 191 2, at the age of 
thirty-two years ; Louise, the wife of Gustave Dee, of French Creek township : 
and Herman, at home. 

yir. Wurtzel is a republican in his political views but at the last election 
supported Wilson and Marshall. He and his family are devoted members of the 
(German Reformed church at Waukon. Coming to the new world in early man- 
hood, he eagerly availed himself of the greater opportunities here afforded 
and has gradually worked his way upward to a position among the successful 
and representative residents of Allamakee county. 



GEORGE B. RALSTON. 

George B. Ralston, serving as township trustee of Jefferson township and 
numbered among the progressive citizens and successful farmers of that locality, 
was born in Ludlow township, this county, February 21, 1869. He is a son of 
John Ralston, who was born in Scotland and who remained in his native country 
until he was seventeen years of age. He then came to America and resided for 
three years in New York city, where he became very proficient as a brown-stone 
setter, working for his uncle. Eventually he moved to Illinois and there worked 
on a farm for three years, coming about the year 1854 to Allamakee county, 
Iowa. In Ludlow township he purchased a tract of eighty acres and this he 
cleared of timber, broke the soil and began the work of development. After 
he had made it a valuable and productive farm he disposed of the property and 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres in the vicinity, and this also he substan- 
tiallv improved, erecting a fine residence, good barns and outbuildings. He en- 
gaged in general farming upon that place for some years, but later moved to 



280 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAAIAKEE COUNTY 

Waukon, where he spent his retired Hfe, dying in that city about 191 1. His 
wife survives him and makes her home with her daughter in Waukon. 

George B. Ralston was reared upon his father's farm in Ludlow township 
and early became acquainted with the best agricultural methods, for he aided in 
clearing, improving and developing this property. For one year after his mar- 
riage, which occurred in 1892, he remained upon the homestead, but at the end 
of that time bought eighty acres of land on section 21, Jefferson township. 
This was at that time a raw tract, but with characteristic energy Mr. Ralston 
carried on the work of its improvement, clearing the timber, grubbing up the 
stumps, breaking the soil and fencing the fields. He later erected a substantial 
residence, a large basement barn and good outbuildings. He also set out an 
orchard, planting a number of fine trees, and he has neglected nothing which 
would add to the attractive appearance or the value of the property. In addi- 
tion to genera'l farming he is a stock breeder on an extensive scale, keeping 
high-grade cattle, Poland China hogs and a number of good horses. He was 
one of the promoters of the Waukon Cooperative Creamery, to which he sells 
the product of his dairy which he has been operating for a number of years. 

In Waukon, on the 14th of February, 1892, Mr. Ralston was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Douglas, a daughter of David Douglas, a veteran of the 
Civil war and for many years a prosperous farmer in Allamakee county. A more 
extended mention of his career appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralston became the parents of nine children : Earl J., who is assisting his father 
on the farm ; John D. ; David G. ; Ruth ; Jessie ; Marie ; Florence : Eugenia : and 
Doris. 

Mr. Ralston is a republican in his political beliefs and is interested in public 
affairs, cooperating heartily in movements for the general good. In 1910 he 
was elected trustee of Jefferson township and has served by reelection since 
that time, discharging his duties in a way which reflects credit upon his ability 
and his public spirit. The cause of education finds in him a stanch champion, 
and he did effective work along this line during the years which he served as 
president of the school board. He is connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and has held various official positions in the lodge of that organiza- 
tion. He and his wife belong to the Rebekahs at Rossville and the entire family 
attend the Rossville Presbyterian church. Mr. Ralston has won substantial 
success, but it has come as the result of earnest labor, unfaltering industry, and 
sincerity and honesty of purpose. No one envies him his prosperity, so worthily 
has it been won, and he ranks today among the respected and representative citi- 
zens of Allamakee county. 



LARS J. LARSON. 



Lars J. Larson, now serving his second term as assessor of Jeft'erson town- 
ship and connected with agricultural interests in this locality as the owner of a 
valuable and well improved farm on section 11, has been a resident of Iowa 
since 1854, his birth having occurred in the vicinity of Christiania, Norway, 
January 6, 1S50. His father, John Larson, was also a native of that country 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 281 

and there grew to maturity and married Karen Johnson. Later he and his wife 
crossed the Atlantic and located in Wisconsin, where the mother passed away in 
the summer of 1853. In the fall of that year Mr. Larson and his children came 
to Iowa, making a permanent location in Jefferson township, Allamakee county. 
He was numbered among the pioneers in this locality and homesteaded an eighty- 
acre tract of land, upon which he built first a log house in which he resided while 
the work of improving and developing the farm was carried forward. He mar- 
ried here in 1857, Miss Anna Bondelie, also a native of Norway, and he con- 
tinued to make his home upon his farm in Jefferson township until his death in 
1866. His wife survived him many years, living to be almost a hundred years 
of age. By his first wife John Larson had two children : Lars J., of this review ; 
and M. J., a substantial farmer in Jefferson township. 

Lars J. Larson was reared in this vicinity and acquired his education in 
the district school. His childhood was spent among pioneer conditions and he 
early became familiar with the best methods of farming and developing raw 
land. After the father's death the brothers carried on the operation of the home- 
stead for some time, but later Mr. Larson of this review purchased his brother's 
and his mother's interests and succeeded to the home place. This he has since 
greatly improved, having erected a neat and modern residence, a large barn, 
a granary, corncribs and sheds, and having installed the necessary labor-saving 
machinery. He engages in general farming and is an extensive stock-raiser, 
keeping high-grade shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs and good horses. He 
was one of the promoters of the Waterville Cooperative Creamery Association 
and is still a stockholder in this concern, of which he was one of the first mem- 
bers of the board of directors. He has also of late years been extensively 
interested in dairying and his ability and resourcefulness are recognized and 
respected in business circles. 

In April, 1872, in Jefferson township, Mr. Larson was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna P. Osgard, who was born in Norway, and who lived in that country 
until she was sixteen years of age. She then moved to the LInited States with 
her parents and settled in Allamakee county. Mr. and Mrs. Larson became the 
parents of nine children. The eldest son, Julius, who is married and engages in 
farming near Stillwater, North Dakota, has three children. Albert, Paul and 
Ludwig are all known in business circles of Waukon as joint proprietors of the 
Model Restaurant in that city. Carrie married Ole Albert, a railroad engineer 
in Minnesota, and they are the parents of a daughter. Annie became the wife 
of Albert Johnson, who assists Mr. Larson in the operation of his farm. Henry 
passed away when a young man of thirty-two years. Another son died in infancy, 
and Carrie passed away at the age of two years. 

It is not alone in agricultural circles that Mr. Larson has gained prominence 
and recognition, for he has always taken an active part in politics and has ren- 
dered his township excellent service in various positions of trust and responsi- 
bility. He served for a number of years as township trustee and as justice of the 
peace and has been a delegate to state, county and congressional conventions. For 
a number of terms he was on the grand and petit juries. He was elected asses- 
sor of Jefferson township and after serving one term was reelected in 1912, his 
return to office indicating the value of his work and its acceptability to the public. 
His influence is found always on the side of right, reform and progress, and 



282 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 



his cooperation is never lacking in any movement to promote general advance- 
ment. In Jefferson township, where he has spent practically his entire life, he 
IS regarded as a conscientious and progressive citizen' and one whose record is 
a credit to a name that has long l)een an honored one in this community. 



HENRY WEBB. 



Henry Webb will long be remembered as one of the most successful farmers 
Allamakee county has known and as a man of remarkable ability whose judg- 
ment was seldom at fault and whose fidelity to trust and sincerity in anything 
which he undertook were never questioned. For forty-one years he was a resi- 
dent of this section of Iowa and here he spent an active, useful and honorable 
life, terminating in his death on the 27th of March, 1905. He was born in Liv- 
ingston county. New York, September 26, 1839, and was a son of lohn and 
Elizabeth (Webb) Webb, of Irish descent, who resided on a farm near Mil- 
waukee. Wisconsin, for a number of years. In the fall of 1864 they came to 
Iowa and in this state spent the remainder of their lives. The father was born 
in 1803 and died in 1870, while the mother was born in 1797 and died in 1887. 
Henry Webb acquired his education in the public schools of Wisconsin and 
there grew to manhood. In the spring of 1864 he came to Iowa, settling near 
Postville, where he obtained a position in a grain elevator but was later employed 
at the depot. In the year of his arrival here he was married and he made his 
home with his wife's parents until the following spring, when he rented a farm one 
mile east of Postville, upon which he continued to reside for one year. At the 
end of that time he purchased the property, which comprised one hundred and 
twenty acres, and upon this he carried forward the work of cultivation for ten 
years, finally selling the farm and buying another, upon which his widow now 
resides. Mr. Webb turned his attention with characteristic energy to the improve- 
ment and development of his land, carrying on the work along progressive and 
modern lines, success steadily rewarding his well directed labor. The property 
became a valuable one, equipped with fine buildings and labor-saving machinery 
and reflecting everywhere the care and supervision of a practical and able agri- 
culturist. Mr. Webb built his home in the midst of a beautiful evergreen grove 
and here he resided until his death, which occurred March 27, 190s. 

On the 29th of November, 1864, Mr. Webb was united in marriage to Miss 
Rozilla Dresser, who was born in Champaign county, Ohio, on the i8th of Feb- 
ruary, 1845. She is a daughter of Calvin and Sallie (Hawkins) Dresser, the 
former a native of Canada and the latter of New Hampshire. The father, who 
spent his entire active life engaged in farming, remained a resident of Ohio, until 
1855, when he located on a farm just north of Postville, which he cleared and 
improved, developing an excellent and valuable farm. There he died May 14, 
1892, when he was seventy-eight years of age. His wife survived him only a 
short time, dying when she was eighty-one. In their family were twelve chil- 
dren, of whom Mrs. Webb was the eighth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. 
Webb became the parents of six children: Lucy Augu.sta, who was born July 16, 
1869, and married C. P. Smith, a farmer living in the vicinity of Postville; 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 285 

Melissa Arvilla, who was born on the ist of December, 1870, and is now the wife 
of Jean Owen, a farmer in Winneshiek county ; Ida Jane, whose birth occurred on 
the 29th of N'ovember, 1872, and who became the wife of John Staadt, engaged 
in farming near Ottawa. Kansas: Herman D., who was born January 14, 1875, 
and resides at home; Bertha May, who was born July 3, 1877, and married 
Adolph Thias, a clerk in Portland, Oregon ; and Eva Blanche, who was born 
April 24, 1879, and married George Fay, a druggist in Postville. Since the 
death of her husband Mrs. Webb has added forty acres to the homestead and 
manages the property in an able and successful manner. She is a woman 
of high ideals and lovalile character and holds the respect, confidence and high 
regard of all with whom she comes in contact. 

Mr. Webb gave his allegiance to the republican party but never desired 
political honors, his interests centering in his home and his farming operations. 
He was a kind parent, a true friend and firm upholder of the law, a citizen whose 
work made a lasting impress upon those with whom he came into contact and 
upon the region where he made his home. 



MICHAEL KANE. 



Among the substantial agriculturists of Allamakee county is Michael Kane, 
who owns a valuable farm of one hundred and eighty acres in Franklin town- 
ship. A native of Ireland, he was born in County Limerick in 1848 and is a 
son of Michael and Bridget (Benson) Kane, both born in the same county. The 
father always followed farming and about 1852 crossed with his family to the 
United States, locating in Ohio, where he passed away. In that state the Kanes 
resided near Columbus. They only remained a short time in Ohio, whence they 
removed to Iowa. A sister of our subject, after her marriage, had gone to 
McGregor, this state, and the family soon followed. The mother located near 
McGregor but later removed to this vicinity where she spent the remainder of 
her life, passing away in 1896. To Mr. and Mrs. Kane were born six children, 
of whom Michael Kane of this review was the third in order of birth. 

Michael Kane attended school in McGregor and at Monona, receiving but 
a limited education, as the facilities in those primitive pioneer days were not 
the best. After laying aside his schoolbooks he worked for a time for a Mr. 
Humphries in Monona, having started out in life when but eleven years of age 
in order to help his mother with the support of the family. He continued to 
contribute to the family exchequer until 1873, being employed as a farm hand, 
in which latter year he was enabled to acquire forty-five acres of land in Franklin 
township. This tract is now a part of the farm. As the years have passed pros- 
perity has come to him as the result of his good judgment and his incessant labor 
and he now owns one hundred and eighty acres of the most fertile land to be 
found in this section, one-half of which he rents out, while he operates the 
balance himself. He engages in general farming and also gives some attention 
to stock, deriving a gratifying income from both lines of endeavor. He is a 
stockholder in the Cooperative Creamery Company and also belongs to the 
Shipping Association of Monona. 



286 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

In September, 1898, Mr. Kane was united in marriage to Miss Mary Tiernan, 
a native of Ireland, where she was born in March, 1871. She is a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Tiernan, who always remained in the Emerald isle. Mrs. 
Kane arrived in this country about one year before her marriage, residing in 
New York city before arriving here, the ceremony taking place about one year 
later. To Mr. and Mrs. Kane have been born three children: Mary, whose birth 
occurred in May, 1900; Michael, who was born in April, 1902; and John, bom 
in June, 1905. Mr. Kane is a devout member of the Roman Catholic church, 
attending in Monona. Politically he is a democrat but has never aspired to 
public office, although he takes a laudable interest in local affairs. For some time 
he has served as school director and has done the best in his power to improve 
educational facilities here. Much credit is due him for what he has achieved, 
for he started out in life empty-handed and even handicapped, as he not only 
had to support himself from earliest childhood but had even to help his mother 
to rear the younger children. He enjoys in a large measure the esteem and 
respect of all who know him. and such prosperity as has come to him is but the 
just reward of intelligent and incessant labor. 



JOHN E. McCABE. 



One of the finest farms in Allamakee county is that owned by John E. 
McCabe. It is known as the Jefferson F'ark Stock Farm and comprises one 
hundred and sixty acres, being in many respects a model property and reflecting 
everywhere the careful labor and constant supervision which its owner has ex- 
pended upon it. Mr. McCabe was born on this property, March 16, 1873, being 
the eldest son of Hugh McCabe, of whom further mention is made elsewhere 
in this work. 

In the acquirement of an education the subject of this review attended the 
common schools in Jefferson township, supplementing this by one season in 
Waukon Business College. He is, however, largely self-educated, having made 
up for his early limitations along this line by constant study and reading since 
reaching mature years. He was reared upon his father's farm and at the age 
of fifteen took part charge of the property, which he purchased when he was 
twenty-six years of age and upon which he has since made extensive and sub- 
stantial improvements, planting a beautiful grove of pine trees and cultivating 
a neat and level lawn which surrounds the attractive residence. The buildings 
are all nuidern and in good repair, and the fields are fenced and cross-fenced 
with woven wire between cedar posts — in short nothing has been neglected which 
will add to the attractive appearance or the value of the place. Mr. McCabe makes 
a specialty of raising shorthorn cattle, keeping twenty-five pure-blooded animals 
and some valuable high-grade stock, his entire herd comprising between one 
hundred and sixty and seventy head. He raises also high-grade Percheron 
horses and Poland China hogs. He is a large stock-feeder, and as he is a good 
judge of live stock and understands his business thoroughly he usually receives 
the best prices quoted for his grade of stock on the market. In addition to 
general farming and stock-raising, he also conducts a large dairy business and 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 287 

is a stockholder in the Waukon Cooperative Creamery, his ability being widely 
recognized and respected in business circles. 

On the 3d of September, 1912, Mr. McCabe was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora Teeple, who was reared and educated in Allamakee county, a daughter of 
Frank E. Teeple, mentioned elsewhere in this work. Mrs. McCabe is a well 
educated and refined woman and before her marriage taught for several years 
in the public schools of her native county. Mr. and Mrs. McCabe made a wed- 
ding tour, visiting the state fair at Minneapolis, Minnesota, and then going west 
crossed the continent by way of the Northern Pacific Railroad to Portland, 
and down the coast to Los Angeles. They have one child, Alice Margaret, born 
Tune 18, 1913. Mr. McCabe holds membership in the Catholic Order of Fores- 
ters and is a member of the Catholic church. He is well known as a careful, 
conservative and reliable business man and enjoys a high reputation throughout 
Allamakee county, where his sterling characteristics and his upright and honor- 
able life have won him an extensive circle of friends. 



JACOB G. RUPP. 



A well tilled and highly cultivated farm on section 17, Jefferson township, 
pays tribute to the agricultural skill of Jacob G. Rupp, who is there engaged 
in general farming and stock-raising. His property is known as Evergreen Stock 
Farm and comprises two hundred and forty acres of valuable land, reflecting 
everywhere the careful supervision and practical labor which the owner has 
bestowed upon it. Mr. Rupp's birth occurred upon this property, August 4, 
1869, his parents being Jacob and Mary (Negel) Rupp, natives of Germany, 
the former bom in 1833. The father grew to manhood in his native province 
and about the year 1855 came to America, settling first near Rochester, Xew 
York, where for some years he worked upon a farm. About 1866 he came to 
Iowa and bought one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 17, Jefiferson 
township, a property which he cleared and improved. He afterward added to 
his holdings from time to time until he accumulated two hundred and forty 
acres, upon which he continued to reside until 1908, when he rented the home- 
stead and retired. He is now making his home in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His 
wife, who was born in Germany and came to America in her childhood, died 
in Iowa about the year 1910. 

Jacob G. Rupp was reared upon his father's farm and in his childhood learned 
the best agricultural methods by aiding in its operation. He married when he 
was twenty-eight years of age and then rented land which he developed and 
improved for three years. In 1900 he removed to Winneshiek county, this state, 
and there rented two hundred and forty acres, upon which he resided for twelve 
years. During that time, however, he had iiurchased the old homestead from 
his father and in December, 1912, moved on to the property, turning his at- 
tention to its further improvement. He has fenced the fields with wo\en wire 
fences, has added to the buildings, which he keeps always in good repair, and 
has erected a fine new garage. In addition to general farming he conducts also 
an extensive business in buying and shipping stock, dealing in cattle, hogs and 



288 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

a good grade of Belgian horses. His dairy interests are also large and are well 
managed, for Mr. Riipp is a man of resourcefulness and business ability, and 
most assiduous in the conduct of his interests. 

In Jefferson township, in the same house in which he now resides, on the 
15th of September, 1897, Mr. Rupp was united in marriage of Miss Leona 
Davis, who was born and reared in Allamakee county. They have become the 
parents of six children : IMabel C. who is a student in Waukon high school ; 
Frank M. ; Doris L. : Gladys L. : John Jacob ; and Helen Irene, who died in Winne- 
shiek county in 1905, at the age of six months. 

Mr. Rupp is a devout member of the Presbyterian church and he gives his 
political allegiance to the republican party. A capable business man as well as 
agriculturist, he has so intelligently directed his labors during the period of his 
active career that he is now recognized as one of the substantial and representa- 
tive citizens of the communitv in which he resides. 



CHARLES CUMMINGS. 

There is no one in Allamakee county who has more truly earned the title of 
self-made man than Charles Cummings, a prosperous farmer owning one hun- 
dred and seventy-four acres in Franklin township and a carpenter by trade, 
which occupation he followed in earlier years for some time with gratifying 
success. He was born at Forest City, Iowa, May i, 1879, and is a son of Thomas 
and Alice (Van Horn) Cummings, the father a native of Ireland, where he was 
born in County IMeath, September 10, 1832, and the mother of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania, where her liirth occurred March 21, 1848. Both have passed away, 
the father's death occurring November i, 1905, and that of the mother June 17, 
191 1. The father in early life followed the occupation of a sailor on the Great 
Lakes and on the Mississippi river. He had come to this country with his 
father when a boy of but ten years of age, their first location being New Jersey. 
Later they came to Allamakee county, where Thomas Cummings subsequently 
married and became a landholder. Still later he went to western Minnesota, 
there engaging successfully in farming for twenty years, at the end of which 
period he returned to Franklin township in 1889. Here he settled upon a farm 
upon which he continued until his death, the mother also remaining there until 
she passed away. The father was ever interested in the welfare of his locality 
and prominent and influential with his fellow citizens, although he never aspired 
to public office. 

Charles Cummings was the sixth of a family of seven children. He attended 
school at Walnut Grove in Monona township, Clayton county, and remained with 
his mother until 1903, when he moved to Monona, having previously learned the 
carpenter's trade. He worked at that occupation there for three years and then 
rented his mother's farm for seven years. In 1912 he bought the farm upon 
which he now resides. It comprises one hundred and seventy-four acres of 
fertile land, devoted to general farming and stock-raising. His buildings are 
kept in good repair and his land brings him rich harvests. He is modern and 
progressive and follows the latest methods, having installed up-to-date niach- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 289 

inery and equipment upon his place. Mr. Cummings is also a stockholder in 
the Farmers Cooperative Creamery at Monona and in the Farmers Commission 
Company of that place, both of which organizations were founded in order to 
facilitate a more profitable disposal of farm products. 

On March 26, 1903, Mr. Cummings was married to Miss Exa White, a native 
of Farmersburg, Clayton county, where she was born July 27, 1879, a daughter 
of Edward and Martha (Cast) White. The father was born in New Jersey, 
December 28, 1843, ^"c' •^I'^'^l August g, 1891, and the mother was a native of 
Indiana, her day of birth being August 2, 1841, and her death occurring April 
30, .1913. The father came with his parents to Iowa, where they made settlement 
near Farmersburg, in Clayton county. There he grew to manhood, learning the 
carpenter's trade, which he followed all his life. He died in that vicinity and 
the mother subsequently moved to Monona, where she made her home until her 
demise. Mrs. Cummings was the sixth in their family of seven children. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cummings have become the parents of two children : Evelyn Maxine, 
born May 15, 1904; and Thomas Edward, born February 7, 1906. 

Politically Mr. Cummings is a democrat, taking an intelligent interest in all 
matters that aflfect the government. He has never aspired to official honors, how- 
ever, preferring to give his support to worthy public measures as a private citizen. 
He is a member of the Modern Brotherhood of America but has no other fraternal 
associations. Such prosperity as has come to him is well merited, as it is but 
the outcome of intelligently applied efforts and what he has achieved is not only 
a source of satisfaction to him, but as part of the agricultural development which 
has taken place in Allamakee county, is a factor in the growth and progress that 
makes up this rich district of the middle west. 



JOHN S. RYAN. 



John S. Ryan, the owner of Lilac Lawn Farm, comprising one hundred and 
forty acres and one of the finest agricultural properties in Jefferson township, 
is numbered among the earlier settlers in Allamakee county. He was born at 
Troy, on the Hudson river. New York, July 26, 1848, and later moved with his 
parents to Clinton county, where they resided until about the year 1861, when they 
removed to Iowa, settling at McGregor. There John S. Ryan engaged in team- 
ing and in railroad construction work for several years, but afterward came to 
Allamakee county with his father, who located in Taylor township. He there 
purchased land and Mr. Ryan of this review then turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, aiding in the improvement and development of his father's 
property. He afterward purchased his father's interest in this farm and has 
since made his home upon it. In the beginning this was a tract of raw land, 
covered by a heavy growth of timber and brush, and John S. Ryan cleared a 
space upon which he built a small frame dwelling with lumber hauled from 
Lansing. With a five-yoke team of oxen he broke his own land and for some 
years thereafter did this work for his neighbors, also engaging in this business 
for some time during the breaking season. He also broke out a residence lot in 
Waukon. .As a result of his unflagging labor through the years, he has his farm 



290 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

today in excellent condition, its neat and attractive appearance reflecting every- 
where his careful supervision and practical labors. He has divided his one hun- 
dred and forty acres into convenient fields with fences and cross fences of woven 
wire, and has provided it with a large, neat, two-story house, a double barn, 
granaries, cribs and other outbuildings, including a buggy shed and a hoghouse. 
He has also sunk a good well, provided with a wind pump, and has neglected 
nothing which will add to the attractive appearance or the value of his place. 
He raises high-grade stock, cattle, horses and hogs, and has for a number of 
years been operating a large and well managed dairy, all branches of his enter- 
prise proving important and profitable under his able supervision. 

In Allamakee county, in 1871, Mr. Ryan was united in marriage to Miss 
Catherine Manning, who was born in Franklin county. New York, and who came 
to Iowa when she was twelve years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Ryan were the par- 
ents of the following children. The eldest, John I''., owns and operates a farm 
near the family homestead. He is married and has three children. William is 
engaged in the life insurance business in Cedar Rapids. Edward owns a farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres in Jefferson township ; he is married and has 
one son. James is engaged in farming upon his father's property. Thomas died 
at the age of twenty-five. Leo passed away when he was one year old. Margaret 
at the age of five, May at the age of six months, Irene at the age of thirteen years, 
and Lizzie at age of fourteen. 

Mr. Ryan gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and has held 
various important public offices, serving for two terms as township trustee, for 
a time as roadmaster, and for a number of years as a member of the school board. 
His hearty cooperation is given always to improvements of a character to advance 
the permanent interests of the community, and he is known as a progressive and 
public-spirited citizen, who during a residence of over fifty-one years in Iowa has 
done much to i)romote general development while advancing his individual 
interests. 



GUSTA\^E WURTZEL. 

Among those of foreign birth who came to the new world in search of the 
superior opportunities oflrered by this country and who through hard labor, well 
directed efiforts and unfaltering perseverance realized their expectations in sub- 
stantial manner is Gustave Wurtzel. As the name indicates he is of German 
descent and in his life has ever exemplified the sturdy characteristics of that race. 
Born in Brandenburg, Germany, January 22, 185 1, he is a son of Carl and Eliza- 
beth (Beymert) Wurtzel, also natives of the fatherland. The parents accom- 
panied their son Gustave to the new world in 1881 and continued to make their 
home with him throughout their remaining years, both passing away at the age 
of seventy-nine. 

Gustave Wurtzel was reared to manhood in his native country and in German 
schools acquired a good education. There he was married to Miss Augusta Wil- 
helmina Schwock, a daughter of Carl and Johanna Louise (Beck) Schwock, 
and in 1881, with his wife and two children, came to the L'nited States. The 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 2!)1 

young couple had not been particularly successful in the struggle for a living in 
their native country, and when they arrived in Iowa their entire worldly posses- 
sions consisted of but se\en hundred dollars. Hope was strong within them, 
however, and neither feared hard work, and for two years after they took up 
their home in La Fayette township, Allamakee county, both worked out for wages. 
At the end of that period their combined savings permitted Mr. Wurtzel to pur- 
chase eighty acres of land in Center township, which is now known as the Thomas 
Zeglum farm. At the time it came into his possession it was a wild tract, but, 
with characteristic energy, he set about clearing and improving it and when at 
the end of twelve years he sold the land it had been converted into rich fields, 
productive of good harvests. After disposing of that property he invested in 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 36, Center township, upon which he still 
makes his home. It had been but slightly improved but under his supervision 
has become a highly cultivated tract. He remodeled the house, built commodious 
barns and outbuildings, introduced modern machinery to facilitate the work of 
the fields and in many ways made it a model farm. He carries on general farm- 
ing and his energy, industry and thrift are meeting with excellent results. 

As the years passed Mr. and Mrs. Wurtzel became the parents of eight chil- 
dren, of whom five are now living: William, who was born in Germany and 
there passed away ; Gustave, who was also born in the old country but died after 
the arrival of the family in the United States; Marie, the wife of Herman 
Schultz, of Traer, Iowa ; Louise, who married William Schultz, of Paint Creek 
township; Otto and Bernard, both at home; Julius, deceased; and Robert, also 
at home. The members of the family belong to the German Methodist church. 
Mr. Wurtzel gives his political support to the principles of the republican party. 
He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, 
for here he found the opportunities which he sought and in their utilization has 
been signally successful. 



HIRAIM F. DENNING. 



Hiram F. Denning, who is one of the well known farmers and successful 
stock-raisers of .Allamakee county, owning and operating eighty acres of valu- 
able land in Jeft'erson township and one hundred and six acres in Makee town- 
ship, was born in Linton township, this county, September 26, 1857, a son of 
Samuel Denning, who was born in Harrison county, Ohio, March i, 1831, and 
whose father passed away in that state when Samuel Denning was still a child. 
The latter grew to manhood in his native county and in 1851 joined his mother 
in Allamakee county, Iowa, buying land in Linton township. This he operate! 
for a number of years, later selling it in order to buy a farm in Jefferson town- 
ship, upon which he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 1909. 
He married Aliss Elizabeth Frances, who was born in Wisconsin and who came 
to Allamakee county when she was still a child. She died in Iowa some years 
after her husband's demise. 

Hiram F. Denning is one of a family of ten children, all of whom grew to 
maturity and five of whom still survive. He was reared upon his father"^ farm 



292 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

and acquired his education in tlie district schools, spending a great deal of time 
when not engaged with his books in aiding in the operation of the homestead. 
When he began his independent career he rented a farm and operated this until 
some time after his marriage, which occurred in 1884. He then purchased eighty- 
acres of fine land on section 16, JeiTerson township, and upon this property he 
has since made his home, carrying forward the work of improvement and develop- 
ment along modern and progressive lines. He repaired the buildings upon the 
place and erected others, including a good two-story residence, a large barn 
and a number of outbuildings. In addition to this he planted a fine orchard and 
a number of ornamental trees, neglecting nothing which would add either to the 
attractive appearance or the value of the property. Besides general farming Mr. 
Denning has also engaged in stock-raising on an extensive scale, raising high- 
grade Poland China and Chester White hogs and shorthorn cattle. In addition 
to his home farm he owns also one hundred and six acres in Makee township 
and he gives a great deal of his time to its operation with the result that it is 
today one of the finest farms in the locality. 

In Jefferson township, on the 9th of September, 1884., Mr. Denning was 
united in marriage to Miss Margaret Jennewine, who was born in West Virginia, 
a daughter of Jacob Jennewine, one of the early settlers in Jefferson township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Denning became the parents of eight children, of whom the fol- 
lowing are deceased: Eva, who died at the age of five years; Mary Ella, who 
passed away when a year old ; and Percy, who died at the age of six or seven 
months. Those who survive are : Paul, who makes his home in North Dakota ; 
Fred, who is engaged in farming in Makee township ; Hobart, who is assisting 
his father in the operation of the home farm ; Francis ; and Marie, at home. The 
family attend the Presbyterian church at Waukon. 

Mr. Denning gives his political allegiance to the republican party but has never 
sought nor desired public office, preferring to concentrate his attention upon his 
business affairs. He has been connected with farming interests of Jefferson 
township during practically all of his active life and has made substantial con- 
tributions to farming development, his individual prosperity forming an impor- 
tant factor ill the general growth. 



CHARLES H. BARTHELL. 

Charles H. Barthell is known as one of the most extensive and successful 
breeders of pure-blooded Aberdeen Angus cattle in Allamakee county, where he 
is prominently connected with agricultural interests as the owner of a fine farm 
of two hundred acres and another tract of sixty acres on section 21, Union 
Prairie township. He is in addition a member of the firm of Barthell Brothers of 
Waukon, controlling an ini])ortant real-estate business in that city and by his 
integrity, his upright and honorable methods and the standards by which he has 
directed his activities he has made his labors a source of prosperity to himself and 
of profit to the community at large. 

Mr. Barthell was born in Winneshiek county, December 29, 1866, and as 
a child came to Allamakee county where he was reared, acquiring his education in 




CHAlil.KS II. r.AirniKLL 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 295 

the public schools and at a select school in Waukon. When he was fifteen years 
of age he made his home with his brother Jonathan, with whom he remained until 
his marriage. Upon the death of his father he inherited two hundred acres of 
land upon which he now resides and after he was married he moved to this 
property, which he has made one of the finest farms in this section of the state. 
Upon it he made substantial improvements, erecting a commodious frame house, 
a basement barn and the necessary outbuildings and carrying on its operation 
along the most modern and practical lines. After eight years, however, he 
rented out the farm and moved into Waukon where he joined his brother in the 
conduct of a hardware business, later selling his interest in order to deal in farm 
implements, wagons, buggies and gasoline engines. He built up a large and 
profitable business along this line, managing it successfully for five years and 
purchasing in the meantime a fine residence and business house in Waukon. In 
1907, however, he disposed of his interests in Waukon and moved back upon the 
farm whereon he has since made his home. He brought with him a few pure- 
blood Aberdeen Angus cattle and established himself as a breeder and shipper, 
giving the greater part of his attention to the development of his herd. This now 
numbers one hundred and five head, all pure-blooded or high-grade animals and 
they ^command a high price and a ready sale in the market. In addition to stock- 
raising Air. P>arthell carries on general farming and dairying and he has made 
all branches of his business important and profitable. He was one of the promo- 
ters of the Waukon Cooperative Creamery Association, of which he has served 
as director and of which he is now a large stockholder, and he is besides a part- 
ner with his brother AI. J. Barthell, in the real-estate business. Under the firm 
name of Barthell Brothers they control extensive holdings in Winneshiek and 
Allamakee counties and valuable business and residence property in Waukon. 
Mr. Barthell's interests are always carefully and conservatively conducted and 
his success in the management of his enterprises proves him a resourceful, far- 
sighted and discriminating business man who thoroughly understands modern 
business condition and possesses the aggressiveness, the energy and the personal- 
ity necessary to cope with them. 

In Union Prairie township on the 14th of April, 1891, Mr. Barthell married 
Miss Mary Engrav, a native of that section and a daughter of Haulver Engrav 
who was born and grew to mature years in Norway. He afterwards came to 
the United States, settling in Allamakee county where he is numbered among the 
earliest residents. Mr. and Mrs. Barthell have five children: Martha J., a 
graduate of Waukon high school and now engaged in teaching in Allamakee 
county ; Irene, also a graduate of the Waukon high school ; Grant O. ; Esther ; 
and Mary Charlotta. The family attend the Waukon Presbyterian church, of 
which the parents are members and liberal supporters. 

Mr. Barthell does not adhere to any particular political party, preferring to 
vote according to his personal convictions without regard to party lines. Although 
not an office seeker he has at different times been honored by election to office 
having served seven consecutive terms as township assessor, and one term as 
a member of the school board. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge, 
chapter and commandery, while his wife and daughter, Martha, belong to the 
Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. Barthell is essentially a man of aff'airs, his broad 



296 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

and \aried interests touching many important phases of Inisiiiess and pohtical 
progress and Iiis individual prosperity forming an element in commnnitv growth 
and advancement. 



HENRY A. KRUGER. 



That this is a land of opportunity' is evidenced from the career of Henry 
A. Kriiger, who came to this country in 1890 from Germany and in 1895 came 
to Iowa, where he has since prospered along agricultural lines. He now owns a 
valuable farm of one hundred and forty-three acres in Linton township which 
he has highly improved with modern buildings and from which he derives a grati- 
fying income. He was born in Pomerania, Germany, April 3, 1869, a son of 
William and Albertina ( Rosien) Kriiger, both natives of that province. The father 
was born February 13, 1833, and the mother August 3, 1835. They crossed the 
Atlantic in 1890 leaving home and friends in order to profit by the advantages 
which are offered here to all who are willing to work. The father located in Chi- 
cago, where he and his wife resided until their deaths, his demise occurring on 
October 20, 1912, and that of his wife on February 18, 191 1. 

Henry A. Kriiger attended school in Germany and after laying aside his text- 
books there engaged as a farm hand, remaining in that country until he came 
to America in the fall of 1890. He made his way to Chicago with his parents 
and there engaged in driving a team for a stone quarry and also worked in the 
stock yards for a time, later finding employment with a lumber company and a 
coal yard, in which latter position he remained for two years. At that time he 
was unable to speak English, a great handicap to his progress in life, but by self- 
study he soon overcame this difficulty. He came to low'a on February 18, 1895. 
and bought a farm of sixty acres in Franklin township, having by thrift and 
industry accumulated the means to make possible the purchase. There he resided 
for one year and then sold his share in the property to his wife's father and for 
two years rented land in the same township. He then removed to a farm in Clay- 
ton county, near Luana, where he remained for four years, and then went to 
Mclntire, Mitchell county, where for one year he rented' land. From that place he 
removed to another farm in the same county farther west on the state line and 
remained there for six years, at the end of which time he bought his present 
place. It comprises one hundred and forty-three acres and he has since consider- 
ably added to its value by making improvements, putting up modern buildings 
and erecting a large and well appointed barn. In 1912 he also built a new 
machine house which furnishes added facilities for his undertakings. He oper- 
ates the farm along general Mines, giving considerable attention to stock-raising, 
and is also a shareholder in the Farmers Cooperative Creamery Company at 
Monona and the Shipping Association of that place. Thrifty, energetic and indus- 
trious, Mr. Kriiger has in a comparatively short time attained a high degree of 
success and his achievements are the more commendable for having been accom- 
plished entirely through his own efforts. 

The marriage of Mr. Kriiger to Miss Mary Heller occurred on July 30, 1892. 
She is also a native of Pomerania, her birth having occurred on July 2, 1871. She 



PAST AND PRESENT OE ALLAMAKEI': COUXTY 



297 



is a daughter of August and Wilhelmina (Haas) Heller, both of that province, 
where the father was born Tulv 2. 1835. and the mother December 13, 1837. 
Thev came to America in April, 1892, and located in Chicago, where the father 
worked for a time as a wagon maker, later coming to Allamakee county, where 
he settled in Eranklin township. The death of the mother occurred here m June 
1807 and the father subsequently went to Kewanee, Illinois, where he resided 
with 'a son until his demise in October, 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Kruger have become 
the parents of ten children: Lizzie, born April 15. 1893: Anna, November 26, 
1804 • Minnie, August 26, 1896; Ida, March 3, 1898; Helene, December i, 1899; 
Margarita. April 25. 1901 ; Ella, May i, 1903; Willie, March 15, 1905 : Lorence. 
December 3, 1909; and Otto, Eebruary 11, 1912. 

Mr Kru-er and his wife are members of the Lutheran church at Monona. 
Pie -ives his political allegiance to the democratic party and although he has 
never aspired to public ofSce he is interested in all worthy measures undertaken 
in the interests of the general welfare. Coming to this country a little over 
twentv vears ago practically empty-handed, he has attained to an enviable degree 
of prosperity and his achievements are not only a source of satisfaction to him- 
self but hav'e plaved a part in the growth and development that have occurred 
in this district along agricultural lines. Mr. Kruger has made many friends since 
locating here who appreciate him and esteem him for his high qualities of mind 
and character. 



PETER P. HEFNER. 



A valuable stock farm of two hundred and nineteen acres in Lmton and 
Eranklin townships, located in the Yellow river valley, stands as a monument to 
the labors of Peter P. Hefner, a native of Linton township, where he was born 
May 30 1870. He is a son of Peter and Emilie (Soler) Hefner, both natives 
of Bavaria Germany, where they were born. They crossed the ocean and came 
to the middle west about 1857, making their home near McGregor for one year. 
They then bought a farm in Linton township, where they resided for a number 
of vears. subsequently removing to the farm upon which our subject now resides. 
Both parents there passed away. The father died on May 30, 1888, and the 
mother about fifteen years later, in October, 1903. While yet in Germany the 
father served in the regular army, wearing the two-colored doth, as all Ger- 
man citizens are compelled to do. Although he was prominent in his community, 
he never aspired to public office, preferring to use his influence for good in a 

private way. 

Peter P. Hefner, of this review, is the seventh in a family of eight children. 
He attended district school in Linton township and since seventeen years of age 
has been independent. At first he rented part of the homestead and looked after 
the estate for his mother until twenty-one years of age, when he bought the prop- 
erty Here he has continued ever since with increasing success and now has two 
hundred and nineteen acres in the Yellow river valley, part of his land running 
into Eranklin township. His farm is mostly devoted to stock-raising and he 
gives particular attention to high-grade Durham cattle, although he also raises 



298 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

hogs and horses. As the result of his ability and his determined efforts he has 
become one of the substantial men of his neighborhood. He is a stockholder 
in the Monona Creamery Company and also profits by his membership in the 
Farmers Shipping Association of that place. 

On March 29, 1893, Mr. Hefner married Miss Edna Stafford, oldest child 
of Seth N. Stafford, a prominent farmer of Franklin township, by his first wife, 
who before her marriage was Miss Mary White, the ceremony taking place on 
February 25, 1873. Her mother passed away in 1876, and the father, subse- 
quently married Miss Betty C. Entwisle, by whom he had seven children. Mrs. 
Hefner also has one brother, David E., who resides on the Stafl'ord home farm, 
making his home with his father. Mr. and Mrs. Hefner have five children: Ezra 
Muriel and Hazel Pearl, twins, born March 21, 1894; Elmer Gerald, born Octo- 
ber 24, 1897; Leo Wayne, whose birth occurred August 21, 1899; and Clara 
Elfrieda, born August 24, 1902. All of the children are yet at home. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hefner are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of 
which they take an active and helpful interest. 

Politically Mr. Hefner is a democrat but has never aspired to office. He is, 
however, intensely interested in all that affects his locality and is ever ready to 
place his influence and means at the disposal of the public when worthy objects 
are to be obtained. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to Rossville Lodge, No. 172, and also belongs to the 
Modem Woodmen of America at Rossville. He is popular in these organiza- 
tions, in which he has many friends. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hefner are widely and 
favorably known in Allamakee county and particularly in their neighborhood and 
are most highly esteemed by those who know them best and are most appreciative 
of their high qualities of mind and character. 



L. T. CHRISTIANSEN. 



L. T. Christiansen, one of Center township's energetic and progressive farm- 
ers, is one of Allamakee county's native sons, his birth occurring on the old fam- 
ily homestead in Paint Creek township on the nth of May, 1857. He was the 
third in order of birth in a family of seven children born to Thyge and Inge- 
borg Larson (Lien) Christiansen, natives of Norway, both of whom are now 
deceased. More extended mention is made of the parents in another part of this 
volume in connection with the sketch of C. T. Christianson. 

L. T. Christiansen received a good education in the district schools while his 
father's farm was the training ground where he received practical experience 
in agricultural pursuits. He has always engaged in general farming and now 
owns one hundred and twenty acres located on section 34, Center township, 
which he inherited from his father. He has greatly improved the place since it 
came into his possession and erected all of the buildings which now stand upon 
the property. They are neat and substantial and the general appearance of the 
farm bespeaks a life of industry, energy and thrift upon the part of the owner. 

Mr. Christiansen was married, in Allamakee county, to Miss Mary Ann 
Thompson, a native of Norway and a daughter of Torsten and Annie Guneld- 



son 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 299 

Mr. and Mrs. Christiansen are the parents of five children now living, 
namely: Amanda Idelia ; T. T. ; Luella M. ; Inger M. ; and Annie G. One 
daughter, Ruth, died in infancy. Had Mr. Christiansen followed the custom 
of his native land his sirname would have been Thygeson, but he followed the 
American custom and has borne his father's sirname. Wishing, however, to 
honor his father, he has made arrangements whereby his children shall bear the 
name of Thygeson. The family hold membership in the Lutheran church. Mr. 
Christiansen gives stalwart support to the republican party. He has resided ni 
Allamakee county from his birth to the present time and has ever enjoyed in 
the fullest degree the respect and confidence of his fellowmen, his worth as a 
man and citizen being widely acknowledged. 



ALBERT G. MOSIER. 



Albert G. Mosier, a well known farmer of Jefiferson township and a success- 
ful stock breeder and dealer, owns and operates on his home place one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land on section 22, and by following practical and pro- 
gressive methods has surrounded himself with a gratifying measure of success. 
He was born in Franklin township, this county. May 16, 1852, and is a son of 
Jacob Mosier, a native of Fayette county, Pennsylvania, born in 182 1. The 
latter was reared in that locality and there married Miss Malinda Phillips, also 
a native of Pennsylvania. The parents came west to Iowa in 1852 and the father 
bought one hundred and twenty acres of raw land in Franklin township, turn- 
ing his attention with characteristic energy to breaking the soil, clearing it of 
timber and improving the property. He made it in the course of years very valu- 
able and productve, and when he sold it purchased a farm in Jefferson township, 
becoming one of the well known and prosperous agriculturists of this locality. 
His death occurred in Jefferson township in 1908, he having survived his wife 
for ten years. They were the parents of two children : Albert G., of this review ; 
and Jennie, the deceased wife of William Clark. 

Albert G. Mosier grew to manhood on his father's farm and in his child- 
hood learned the best agricultural methods. He later assumed entire charge of 
the homestead, caring for his father in his declining years, and he remained 
upon this property until after his marriage. He then located on a farm, which 
he operated for three years thereafter, moving at the end of that time to the 
vicinity of Postville, where he remained for one year. He next purchased one 
hundred and twenty acres of land near Rossville and there resided five years, 
selling his property at the end of that time in order to purchase the one hun- 
dred and twenty acre tract on section 22, Jefferson township, upon which he now 
resides. To this he has since added, and his farm is today one of the 
neatest and best improved in this locality. Upon it Mr. Mosier has made 
extensive improvements, erecting an attractive two-story residence and substan- 
tial and modern barns and outbuildings, which he keeps always in good repair. 
Realizing the advantages of a grove, he has set out a number of evergreen trees 
and these with his well kept and level lawn add greatly to the beauty and pleas- 
ant appearance of his homestead. In addition to general farming, Mr. Mosier 



300 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

engages extensively in stock-raising and is a well known dealer in pure-blood 
cattle, high-grade shire horses and Poland China hogs. 

On the 13th of November, 1877, Mr. Mosier was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Beall, who was born in Pennsylvania but reared and educated in Allamakee 
county, a daughter of Conrad Beall, a pioneer in this part of Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mosier are the parents of two children : Alden R., who is married and 
engages in farming ; and Earl, who is assisting in the operation of his father's 
homestead. 

Mr. Mosier is a republican in his political beliefs and is active in politics, hav- 
ing been honored by his fellow citizens by election to various positions of trust 
and responsibility. He has served as a delegate to numerous county and con- 
gressional conventions and has been on the petit jury a number of times, while 
for fifteen years he did conscientious and capable work as township trustee. In 
the county where his entire life has been passed he is widely esteemed and 
respected, being recognized as an able farmer, a careful, conscientious business 
man, and a public-spirited and useful citizen. 



FRANK C. MIELKE. 



Crossing the Atlantic from Germany in 1885, Frank C. Mielke came directly 
to Iowa and here has attained to a prosperity which entitles him to be numbered 
with the well-to-do agriculturists of Allamakee county. He owns a stock farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Linton township and for nearly two decades 
has given his time and attention to the improvement of this property. He was 
born in Pomerania, Germany, on December 19, 1853, and is a son of August 
and Caroline ( Christopher ) ]\Iielke, both natives of the same province. The 
parents never came to America, the father passing away in 1870, in Germany, 
where the mother still makes her home. 

Frank C. Mielke attended school in his native country and when twenty 
years of age entered the army and served for three years as a bugler. Laying 
aside his uniform, he then worked for two years for his mother and also for 
others until he came to America in 1885 in order to profit by the opportunities 
which he had heard were waiting for all who came here ready to work deter- 
minedly and persistently. He came directly to Iowa and to this county, where 
for a few years he made his living in the employment of others and then rented 
a farm in Clayton county, which he operated for three years. His dreams came 
nearer to realization when he was enabled at the end of that time to buy his 
present farm, which comprises one hundred and sixty acres of fertile land. It 
is largely devoted to stock-raising and as the years have passed Mr. Mielke has 
made it a valuable property. He is a stockholder in the Monona Cooperative 
Creamery and also belongs to the Shipping Association. 

In October, 1880, when still in the fatherland, ]\Ir. Mielke married Miss 
Matilda Czech, also a native of Pomerania, born ;\Iarch 10, 1854, whose parents 
spent their entire lives in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Mielke became the parents 
of nine children : Charles, who resides near Sixteen, Linton township, and 
engages in agricultural pursuits; Otto, born July 2, 1882, who farms near \'ol- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 301 

ney, this state; Paul, born March i, 1884, at home; Fred, the first to be born 
in this country, his date of birth being March 22, 1886, at/iome; Emma, born 
March 5, 1888, who married Paul Levenhagen, a farmer of Fairview township; 
Leo, born September 20, 1889, at home; Frank, whose birth occurred February 
6, 1892, also at home; Anna, who was born May 9, 1895, and married Frank 
Hertramps, who follows agricultural pursuits in Linton township; and Lena, 
born October 9, 1898, at home. Mrs. :\Iielke, the wife and m.other, passed away 
on May 16, 1905, deeply mourned by her family and a large circle of devoted 
friends. 

Mr. Mielke is a member of the Lutheran church and reared his family in 
that faith. Politically he is not a party man, preferring to vote independently, 
following his own judgment in supporting candidates. Although Mr. Mielke 
had to begin under disadvantages, including his inability to understand English, 
he has become a prominent and substantial citizen of this section of Allamakee 
county and today stands high in the regard and esteem of all who know him. 



WILLL\M H. SELBERG. 

Allamakee county numbers among her progressive and substantial farmers 
and her successful native sons William H. Selberg, who owns and operates a 
tine farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 18, Jefferson township. He 
was born in Ludlow township, -March 20, 1868, and is a son of Henry Selberg, 
a native of Germany, who remained in that country until he was fifteen years 
of age. He then crossed the Atlantic with his parents and after his arrival 
settled in Wisconsin, where he grew to maturity. His marriage occurred in 
that state and he later moved to Iowa, buying one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Ludlow township, this county. Upon this he continued to reside for a 
number of years, carrying forward the work of improvement and development 

until his death. 

William H. Selberg, is one of a family of seven children. He was reared upon 
his father's farm and educated in the Ludlow township district schools. From 
his childhood he assisted in the operation of the homestead and for a time man- 
aged it in partnership with his brother. However, in February, 1901, he pur- 
chased the farm upon which he now resides, this property comprising one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of valuable land on section 18. He has repaired the build- 
ings and remodeled the house, has fenced the entire place with woven wire, and 
has made many other substantial improvements, adding materially to the value and 
attractiveness of this property. In addition to general farming he engages also 
in stock-raising, keeping fine herds of shorthorn and polled cattle and raising 
also Chester White hogs and high-grade horses and sheep. For the past fifteen 
years he has operated a model sanitary dairy and milks at the present time from 
fifteen to twenty cows. The dairy products are sold to the Farmers Cooperative 
Creamery Company of Waukon, in which he is a stockholder. 

Mr. Selberg married Miss Lisette Straate, who was born and reared in Jeflfer- 
son township, and they have become the parents of two sons, Elmer C. and 
Leo H. Air. and IMrs. Selberg are members of the German Reformed church of 



302 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Waukon and are people of exemplary character, holding the respect and high 
esteem of all who kyow them. Mr. Selberg is independent in his political views, 
supporting always men and measures which he deems most worthy without 
regard to party lines. He has remained a resident of this community from his 
birth to the present time and enjoys an enviable reputation as an enterprising 
agriculturist and a representative citizen. 



JACOB MARTL 



The list of Allamakee county's pioneers contains the names of many upright, 
enterprising and courageous men whose labors have been potent forces in upbuild- 
ing and development. None, however, has displayed more energy in business 
relations, more integrity and honor in personal life, than Jacob Marti, who has 
resided here since 1855. He was born in Canton Glarus. Switzerland. June 12. 
1842, and is a son of Henry and Catherine ( Blumer) Marti, the former born in 
1800 and the latter in 1803. They emigrated to .\merica with their live children 
in 1855 and established a home in Allamakee county on a farm belonging to a 
cousin. Henry ^larti suffered a stroke of paralysis and was an invalid for seven- 
teen years prior to his death, which occurred at the home of bis son Jacob when 
he was seventy years of age. His wife survived him some years, dying at the 
age of eighty-three. They became the parents of five children : Henry, who 
died upon the ocean : Jacob, of this review ; Mrs. Fred Riser, deceased ; Mrs. 
Peter Riser, who resides in Lansing township: and Mrs. Blumer. who has passed 
away. 

Jacob Marti was thirteen years of age when he was brought to America by 
his parents. He remembers well the journey across the ocean which was made 
in a sailing vessel, the John Hancock, and which was the last trip of this 
vessel as a passenger carrier. Thirty-three days were spent on the journey from 
Liverpool to New York city and from there the family pushed westward to 
Dubuque, whence after a short stop they came to Allamakee county. Jacob, 
however, remained for sometime with an uncle in Dubuque. He had acquired 
a common-school education in Switzerland and after coming to America spent 
three months in a German school in Dubuque and three months in the public 
schools of Allamakee county. He remained with his parents until he was twenty 
years of age and then began his independent career as manager of a farm 
belonging to the widow of his cousin. Frederick Marti. He subsequently married 
the widow, who was in her maidenhood Miss Catherine Wilhelm and who had 
two children by her former marriage: John, who lives on a farm in Makee 
township; and Casper, living in Minneapolis. Minnesota. By her marriage to 
Jacob Marti she had five children : Henry, who resides upon a farm in Lansing 
township : George, engaged in agricultural pursuits in the same locality : Catherine, 
the wife of \V. R. Gaine, of Chicago, Illinois: William, a resident of Kasson, 
Minnesota: and Emma, who died at the age of eighteen. Mr. Marti's first wife 
passed away at the age of forty years and he afterward married Miss Sarah 
Iverson, a native of Norway. They have three children : Jacob J., who is em- 




JIK. AND :\ii!s. ,iAn»ii .\iai;ti 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 305 

ployed in the postoffice at Mason City, Iowa ; Anna, the wife of Charles Alfred 
Petrehn of Austin, Minnesota ; and Philip, a farmer in Allamakee county. 

Since the farm came into Mr. Marti's possession he has continued to conduct 
it successfully, owning at the present time four hundred and fifty- four acres of 
good land upon which is one of the finest sets of buildings in the county. The 
original residence was burned down about ten years ago and in its place he has 
erected at a cost of over four thousand dollars a large modern home. It is 
finished on the inside in oak and is complete in furnishings and accessories, one 
of the finest private residences in this section of the state. Mr. Marti engages 
in general farming and is interested in the conduct of his dairy, which is well 
equipped and sanitary in every particular. For a number of years he made a 
great deal of cheese which he sold in the Dubuque markets, where it commanded 
a high price and a ready sale. A rnan of broad views and modern ideas, well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day, Mr. Marti is probably one of 
the most popular of Allamakee county's pioneer citizens and his place in the 
respect and esteem of his fellowmen has been won by reason of an honorable, 
upright and worthy life, the activities of which have contributed in an important 
way to the development of the section. It is said that he never knowingly 
wronged any man, and his name is today a synonym for kindness, geniality and 
courtesy. 



JOHN J. ARNOLD. 



The advanced and scientific methods which have of late years practically 
revolutionized agricultural pursuits find a progressive and worthy representative 
in John J. Arnold, one of the extensive landowners and most prominent stock 
breeders and shippers in Allamakee county. In association with his brother he 
owns one hundred and eighty-five acres of land in Jefl^erson township, another 
tract of one hundred and thirty acres, and another tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres, and has proven far-sighted and practical in the conduct of his important 
interests. For the past fifteen years he has bred stock on an extensive scale and 
also devotes a great deal of time to buying, selling and shipping, and his busi- 
ness afl:"airs, being carefully conducted, have resulted in a success which places 
him among the leading men engaged in this line of work in this part of Iowa. 
He was born in Mitchell county, this state, July 6, 1870, and is a son of A. P. 
Arnold, a well known farmer and bridge contractor, of whom more extended 
mention is made elsewhere in this work. 

John J. Arnold was three years of age when he came with his parents to 
Allamakee county. He was reared in W'aukon and in Ludlow township. He 
acquired his primary education in district school, supplementing this by a term 
in the Waukon high school, after which he devoted practically all of his time 
to assisting his father with the cultivation of the homestead and in his bridge- 
building operations. After three years, however, he turned his attention to buy- 
ing and shipping stock, and he has been connected with this line of work for the 
past fifteen years. His land holdings are today extensive and important, com- 
prising three fine farms, one of one hundred and eighty-five acres, another of 



Vol 11— 1 c 



306 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

one hundred and thirty, and another of one hundred and sixty, Iving principally 
in Jefiferson township. In connection with his brother he operates these as model 
stock farms, and upon the one hundred and eighty-five acre tract has erected a 
fine residence and a modern silo with a capacity of one hundred and sixty tons. 
His barns house fifty cows and a fine herd of high-grade cattle. His property 
here is today one of the finest and best equipped in the township. Mr. Arnold, 
however, makes his home in the vicinity of Waukon, where he has rented eighty 
acres of land, upon which is a comfortable and attractive residence. Mr. Arnold 
makes his home upon this property because of its proximity to the Waukon 
stock yards, and he is well known in business circles of that city, owning a half 
interest in a local meat market and a half interest in an ice business there. 

In Waukon, on the 21st of June, 1910, Mr. Arnold was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Elsie Ashbacher. who was born and reared in Allamakee county, and 
a daughter of James Thompson. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold have become the parents 
of a daughter, Florence, and Mrs. Arnold has two children by her former mar- 
riage, Leora and Harriet. 

Mr. Arnold is a member of the Presbyterian church of Waukon. to which 
he is a liberal contributor. He is connected fraternally with the Knights of 
Pythias, taking an active interest in the affairs of that organization. He has 
constantly and earnestly labored to stimulate the interest of his neighbors in all 
that tends to promote progress along agricultural lines, demonstrating in his own 
success the result of practical methods and well directed industry. His pros- 
perity is well deserved and Allamakee county numbers him among her most pro- 
gressive, prominent and desirable citizens. 



CHARLES L. KEENAN. 

Among the men widely known in Allamakee county as breeders of pure- 
blooded and high-grade cattle is Charles L. Keenan, who from his youth has 
been closely identified with this line of work and who is today the owner of the 
Maple Leaf Stock Farm of one hundred and fifty acres and of fine herds of 
shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs and Percheron horses. A spirit of enterprise 
has distinguished all the activities of his career and has brought him today to 
a gratifving position in his chosen line. Mr. Keenan was born upon the farm 
which he now occupies on the 27th of February, 187 1, and is a son of Patrick 
Keenan, one of the first settlers in Jefferson township, having located here in 
1847. The father ])urchased wild land, securing over five hundred acres, and 
this he cleared of timber, Ijreaking the soil and improving the place with sub- 
stantial buildings. He became in the course of years one of the well known men 
in Allamakee county, continuing to make his home in this part of Iowa until his 
death, which occurred March 14, 1878. In 1854, in Allamakee county, he mar- 
ried Miss Catherine Scanlan, who survived him for a number of years, carry- 
ing on the operation of the homestead and becoming the owner of one of the 
first herds of shorthorn cattle in Allamakee county. She passed away Septem- 
ber 14, 1909. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAAIAKEE COUNTY 307 

Charles L. Keenan, who is one of a family of nine sons and three daughters, 
was reared upon the family homestead in Jefferson township and acquired his 
primary education in the country schools. He supplemented this by a business 
course at La Crosse Business College and then returned to the farm which he 
aided his mother in operating for a number of years, continuing as assistant 
until the estate was settled, when he succeeded to the portion of the farm 
which contained the homestead. From his youth up he was closely connected 
with stock-raising interests here and is today one of the leading stock men in 
the township. His stock is all high grade and his herd of cattle varies from ten 
to forty animals. In business circles Mr. Keenan is known as one of the pro- 
moters of the Farmers Cooperative Stock & Produce Company of Allamakee 
county and also has stock in the Paint Creek Telephone Company. 

In Jefferson township, on the 25th of June, 1901, Mr. Keenan was united in 
marriage to Miss Katherine Ryan, who was born and reared in Jefferson town- 
ship, a daughter of John S. Ryan, who is ninnbered among the first settlers in 
this locality. A mpre extended mention of his life is found elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Keenan have become the parents of four children, John 
Cyril, Mary Lorraine, Katherine Estella and Cecilia. The family are members 
of the Waukon Catholic church and Mr. Keenan belongs to the Catholic Order 
of Foresters and the Knights of Columbus. He is numbered among the suc- 
cessful farmers and stock-raisers of Allamakee county and among its most pro- 
gressive business men, his success coming as the direct result of the sound judg- 
ment and keen discrimination which have distinguished the activities of his entire 
career. 



FRED S. HANSMEIER. 

That Fred S. Hansmeier has been found reliable, conscientious and efficient 
in positions of public trust is indicated by the fact that he is now in the eighth 
consecutive year of his service as assessor of Makee township, and that he is also 
an able agriculturist and a progressive business man his fine farm of one hundred 
acres on section 2"] gives ample testimony. He has been a resident of Iowa 
since 1869, but is a native of Germany, born in Lippe. June 13, i860, a son of 
Fred L. Hansmeier, also a native of that principality. The father married there 
Minnie Kollinge, who was born and reared in Lippe, and the family emigrated 
to America in 1869, settling directly in Iowa and making a permanent location 
in Allamakee county. One year later Fred L. Hansmeier purchased one hun- 
dred acres of land provided with a log house and with a few acres under culti- 
vation. For many years thereafter he continued to reside on this property, add- 
ing to it the adjoining farm and carrying forward the work of improvement and 
cultivation. He died upon his holdings in 1909, having survived his wife three 
years. 

Fred S. Hansmeier is the eldest in a family of seven children, all of whom 
reside in Allamakee county. He was reared and educated here and remained 
upon the homestead until he was twenty-one years of age, aiding in the work 
of its development and improvement. He afterward learned the carpentering 



308 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

trade and for some years engaged in lousiness as a contractor and builder, many 
of the finest residences in Waukon and upon the farms in the vicinity of the 
city standing as evidences of his architectural skill. Eventually he succeeded to 
the old home place and he has since resided thereon, giving his attention to its 
further development and improvement. He has erected upon it a fine modern 
residence, good barns, a granary, a corncrib and a henhouse, and has besides sunk 
a well three hundred feet deep, provided with a gas engine to pump the water to 
Oak Ridge Farm, Ijy which name it is known. As the result of his efforts he has 
one of the finest agricultural properties in this vicinity, nothing being neglected 
which will add to its attractive appearance or its value. Mr. Hansmeier is num- 
bered among the able exponents of enlightened and scientific agricultural methods. 
In addition to general farming he is also a stock-raiser on an extensive scale, 
breeding a good grade of shorthorn cattle, Chester White hogs and Shropshire 
sheep. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Creamery of Waukon and 
is now in his fourth year of service as president of that concern, to which he sells 
the products of the model and sanitary dairy which he operates. 

In St. Paul, Minnesota. November 27, 1887, Mr. Hansmeier was united in 
marriage to Miss Annie Umbriet, who was born in Wabasha county, that state. 
They were the first couple married in North St. Paul and in the Presbyterian 
church there, an edifice which Mr. Hansmeier aided in erecting. Seven children 
have been born to their union : Clara, the wife of Ed Raymond, of Waukon ; Ella ; 
Calvin A.; Esther; Lillian; Alfred L. : and Arna. Mr. and Mrs. Hansmeier and 
their children are members of the Waukon German Reformed church. 

Mr. Hansmeier is a stanch republican in his political beliefs and takes an intelli- 
gent interest in public affairs, cooperating heartily in all movements to promote the 
permanent interests of the community. In 1901 he was elected assessor of Makee 
township and after serving one term was reelected. After an interval of one 
term he was again elected to the office and has since served eight consecutive years, 
discharging his duties in a capable, reliable and energetic way. He has been a 
resident of Allamakee county since 1869 and the intervening years have brought 
him success, prominence and fortune and a place among the substantial agri- 
culturists and men of aft'airs. 



MARTIN I. LARSON. 



Alartin T- Larson, wdio has resided in Allamakee county since 1854. is today 
numbered among the prosperous, substantial and progressive agriculturists of 
this part, owning and operating the liig Spring Stock Farm, a fine property of 
eighty acres which in its neat and attractive appearance is a visible evidence of 
his life of industrv and thrift. He was born in Norway, near Christiania, Feb- 
ruarv 4, 1852. and is a son of John and Karen (Johnson) Larson, who came 
to America at an early date and settled in Wisconsin in 1853. There the mother 
died and the father afterward came as a pioneer to Iowa, making a permanent 
location in left'erson town.ship, Allamakee county. .^ more extended mention 
of his career will be found on another page in this work. 



PAST A\D PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 309 

Martin J. Larson was reared upon his father's farm in Jefferson township 
and after his father's death operated the homestead in association with his brother 
for a number of years. After his marriage, which occurred in 1875. '^^ rented 
land and continued to develop it until he went to North Dakota, where he spent 
one season. Upon his return he purchased the property which he now owns 
and turned his attention to breaking the soil and clearing it of timber. His 
property is known as the Big Spring Farm and comprises eighty acres of land, 
well tilled and equipped with substantial improvements. It was Mr. Larson who 
made this farm what it is today, for he broke the soil, felled the trees and has 
since carried forward the work of development with characteristic energy and 
with e.xcellent results. He has divided his land into''fields of convenient size 
enclosed with barbed wire fences, has erected a neat residence, a large barn with 
a basement, and a spring house and has neglected nothing that will add to the 
attractive appearance or value of the place. He makes a specialty of breeding 
and raising high-grade stock and controls also extensive dairy interests, selling 
the dair\- products to the W'aterville Cooperative Creamery, in which he is a 
stockholder. He is connected in the same way with the Peoples National Bank 
of Waukon, the Farmers Cooperative Stock & Produce Company and the Farmers 
Paint Creek Telephone Company, and his business ability has been a helpful 
factor in the development of these concerns. 

On the 20th of May, 1875, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Rachel 
Sando, a native of Norway, who came to the United States when she was thir- 
teen or fourteen years of age and grew to womanhood in Allamakee county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Larson have become the parents of six children: John E. ; Helmer, 
of Berlin, North Dakota ; Melvin R.. who is aiding in the operation of the home- 
stead ; Caroline L., the wife of Ed Smeby, of Jefferson township ; Rosa, who 
married A. A. Koontz, of Berlin, North Dakota ; and Alma J. The last named 
supplemented a public-school education by three terms at a college in Austin, Min- 
nesota, and has been for fifteen terms a teacher in Winneshiek and Allamakee 
counties. 

Mr. Larson is a member of the old West Paint Creek United Lutheran church 
and he is a republican in his political beliefs, having served for about twelve 
years at different times as township trustee. He is a progressive, loyal and enter- 
prising citizen, a capable business man and a progressive farmer and during the 
many years of his residence in .'\llamakee county has commanded and held the 
respect and high esteem of all who have come in contact with him. 



EMIL H. PUFAHL. 



Emil H. Pufahl, who is engaged in dairy farming in Linton township on a 
property comprising one hundred and sixty acres, has taken his place among 
the substantial farmers of his district. He understands the dairy business thor- 
oughly, having for many years been manager of various creameries, and as the 
years have passed has made his farm one of the most attractive and paying in 
the neighborhood, his particular grade or brand of cattle being high-grade Guern- 
seys. He was born in Guttenberg, Clayton county, Iowa, December 21, 187 1, 
and is a son of Gottlieb and Wilhelmina Pufahl, both natives of the province 



310 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of Posen, Germany. The father was born April 2, 1831, and passed away Alay 
9, 1913, having passed his eighty-second birthday, and the mother is still resid- 
ing at Guttenberg. They crossed the Atlantic in 1871, coming directly to Gut- 
tenberg, where the father worked for others in a sawmill and continued in 
that occupation until he retired in 1898. From that time until his death he 
lived in the enjoyment of a comfortable competency, which his former labors 
had brought him. While yet in Germany he served with the army and often 
delighted to recall incidents from his early military life. Mr. and Mrs. Pufahl 
had eleven children, of whom six are living and seven grew to maturity : Gustav, 
who resides in Luana, Clayton county, and follows farming; Bertha, who mar- 
ried Fred Williams and Tesides at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, where her hus- 
band is engaged in the hotel business ; Julius, who made his home near Gutten- 
berg until his death on November 7, 1910; Herman, who resides at Bolivar, Mis- 
souri, where he is a prominent attorney: Emil H.. of this review; Otto, who is 
an art decorator at Butte, Alontana: and Hulda, the wife of Orrin Burke, of 
Los Angeles, California. The four others died in infancy. 

Emil H. Pufah! received his educational advantages in Guttenberg, where 
he attended high school. He left that institution at the age of seventeen and then 
for one year worked in Chicago, Illinois, where he operated a milk route. Com- 
ing back to Clayton county, he was employed on a farm for a short time and 
then became manager and secretary of the Luana Creamery Company, continu- 
ing so for si.x years. At the end of that time he set himself up independently, 
conducting a creamery at Nora Springs, Iowa, for four years. Upon selling 
his plant he bought his present farm comprising one hundred and sixty acres of 
valuable land, which he operates as a dairy farm, keeping a number of high- 
grade Guernsey cattle. His barns and buildings are substantially built and mod- 
ernly equipped and in every way sanitary. Air. Pufahl is a progressive farmer 
in the best sense of the word and is ever ready to embrace new methods if they 
promise improvements over older ones. He has made his propertv one of the 
most valuable and profitable in his section, and this is the more creditable to him 
as it has been brought about by his own labors alone. Mr. Pufahl is a stock- 
holder in the Farmers Creamery Company at Monona, an organization formed 
with the object of affording the farmer an opportunity to dispose of his products 
in the best possible way. 

The date of the marriage of Air. Pufahl was May 30, 1900, when he wedded 
Miss Carrie Biggs, the ceremony taking place at McGregor, Iowa. She is a 
daughter of David and Elizabeth (Fitch) Biggs, the former born in Holmes 
county, Ohio, November 4, 1831. and the latter in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
June 18, 1840. In 1853 the father came to Iowa, settling in \'olney, where 
for a number of years he engaged in sawmilling. He conducted an enterprise of 
this kind in partnership with his sons with excellent results until i860, when 
he went to the Rocky mountains, spending two months in the vicinity of Pike's 
Peak. Upon his return to Iowa he purchased one hundred and sixty acres in 
^ Linton township, which he continued to cultivate until 1908, becoming a pros- 
perous farmer in this neighborhood. In that year he retired and now he and 
his wife reside in Rossville. David Biggs comes of an old American family which 
has been in this country since Revolutionary times, his grandfather hav- 
ing come to the colonies as a soldier in the English army. After his arrival here. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 311 

however, he and his brother joined General Washington and they gave their 
service to the Continental cause. Mr. and Mrs. Pufahl have three children : 
John Kenneth, born October i", 1903; Paul Wesley, May 16, 191 1 ; and Florence 
Eugenia, August 19, 1912. 

Mr. Pufahl was born in a Lutheran family and reared in that faith, although 
he is not now a member of any church. Politically he is a republican, giving his 
allegiance to the progressive movement in that party. He serves at the present 
time as clerk of Einton township. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern 
Woodmen of America, holding membership in the Nora Springs camp. Care- 
ful of his own interests, Mr. Pufahl is always considerate of those of others 
and ever views his actions from the point of their effect upon the general pros- 
perity. He has done much toward raising agricultural standards in Allamakee 
county and is therefore a forceful factor in community life. 



EMMETT LEROY PALMER. 

A thorough and experienced agriculturist and a good manager, Emmett 
Leroy Palmer takes a prominent place among the younger farmers of Allamakee 
county. Since 19 10 he has owned his present property, comprising one hundred 
and twenty acres, and within a few years has brought it to a high state of culti- 
vation, his fields yielding rich harvests and being fenced into suitable tracts. His 
buildings are substantial and modern and the latest farm machinery and imple- 
ments can be found upon his place. Mr. Palmer is a native of Iowa, his birth 
occurring at Elkader, Clayton county, on September 21, 1878. He is a son of 
Aaron V. and Emma (Niblock) Palmer, the former a native of Pennsylvania, 
born about 1851, and the latter of Allamakee county, her birth having occurred 
near Waukon about a year later. In early life the father followed the trade of 
cooper but also engaged in teaming and farming and eventually settled on a 
property near Waukon, in Jefferson township, where he engaged in agricultural 
pursuits and where he still resides. Enjoying good health, he is still active and 
is now enjoying a prosperity which his long years of incessant labor have brought 
him. He also was engaged for a time in carrying mail from Elkader to West 
Union and to Postville, making these routes for about thirteen years. 

Emmett L. Palmer is the second in a family of nine children, all of whom 
are living. He attended school in Clayton county and also in Jefferson township, 
this county. He was early reared to an agricultural life by his father and from 
him learned the thorough methods which now bring him such gratifying results. 
He remained at home until eighteen years of age, when he started out upon his 
independent career by working as a farm hand for others and also engaging in 
other work until married and then rented land which he operated until November, 
1910, with such good results that he was enabled to buy his present farm. He 
owns one hundred and twenty acres in Franklin township and operates the same 
in a general way. The farm is now fully equipped with modern buildings, is 
conveniently fenced and its appearance in every way betrays careful manage- 
ment and well applied labor. Mr. Palmer is also a stockholder in the Farmers 



312 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Cooperative Creamery Company at Monona and in the Farmers Shipping Asso- 
ciation. 

The marriage of Mr. Pahiier to Aliss Ethel Stafford occurred on September 
4, 1901. She is a daughter of Seth N. Stafford and is just nine days younger 
than her husband, her birth occurring on September 30, 1878. Mr. Stafford is 
a pioneer of Allamakee county and one of the representative agriculturists 
of Franklin township. He owns a valuable farm of nearly three hundred and 
fifty acres on section 23 and there has gained prosperity. .V native of Virginia, 
he was born near Morgantown, on the Monongahela river, on the ist of June, 
1848, and is a son of James Harrison and Christina (Trisler) Stafford. In his 
early youth he came to Allamakee county, where he spent all his active life with 
the exception of one year which was passed with his father in Colorado. As 
the years passed he attained to prosperity and has become one of the prominent 
citizens of his district. He was twice married and to his first union, with Miss 
Mary White, two children were born, a son and a daughter. Later he married 
Miss Betty C. Entwisle, who was born in Franklin township in 1858 and is a 
daughter of William and Martha (Hancock) Entwisle, the former a native of 
England and the latter of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford became the parents 
of seven children, of whom Ethel, the wife of our subject, is the oldest. Mr. 
and Mrs. Palmer have four children: Everett Merle, born August 31, 1902; 
Emmett Earl, August 18, 1907; Greta L., April 21, 1910; and Crayton James, 
October 17, 1912. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Palmer is a democrat and although deeply 
interested in the affairs which aft'ect the community, he has never aspired to office. 
He is a member of the Inde])endent Order of Odd Fellows lodge at Monona and 
both, he and his wife, belong to the affiliated order of Rebekahs at Rossville. 
Mr. Palmer also holds membership in the Modern Woodmen of America and in 
that connection has a life policy and also has protected his family by taking out 
insurance with other organizations. Mr. Palmer is public-spirited and progres- 
sive in all his actions and, as he is a man of natural ability, has already attained a 
success which many an older man might well envy. He enjoys in full measure 
the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens and is recognized as a forceful factor 
for good in his locality. 



ALBERT L. CHAMBERLAIN. 

Agricultural interests of Franklin township find a progressive and worthy 
representative in Albert L. Chamberlain who has for many years owned and 
operated a fine farm of one hundred and ninety acres in this locality, the excellent 
condition of the property reflecting his careful supervision and practical methods. 
He -was born in Hastings, Dakota county, Minnesota, on the i8th of December, 
1858, and is a son of Theodore and Caroline (Felton) Chamberlain, natives of 
Pennsylvania, the former born in Pittsburg in 1810 and the latter in Susquehanna 
county in 1830. The father was a great lover of horses and an able horseman, 
driving stage over the mountains from Pittsburg in his early days. He went 
to Minnesota in 1853 and entered government land, turning his attention to 




:MR. AXn MKS. ALBERT L. CHAMBERLAIN 



-ATICN*. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 315 

the clearing;, improving and developing of this property. The years brought him 
steady and well deserved success and he became well known as a prosperous and 
able agriculturist, dying upon his property in Dakota county in 1859. In addition 
to the work of his farm he also engaged in teaming for some time, hauling goods 
from Dubuque to Hastings and St. Paul over the ice of the Mississippi river during 
the winter months and becoming known as the best driver in that section of Min- 
nesota. His wife has also passed away, dying in 1888 upon the Dakota county 
farm. She was a representative of one of the earliest pioneer families in that 
vicinity. Her father served as the first coroner of Dakota county, her mother 
was the first white woman who ever baked a loaf of bread there and her sister 
was the first bride in the county. After the death of her first husband, Mrs. Cham- 
berlain wedded Frederick Myers, a resident of Dakota county, and they became the 
the parents of four children. By her first husband she had seven children, of 
whom the subject of this review is the youngest in the order of birth. 

Albert L. Chamberlain acquired his education in the public schools of Dakota 
county, ]\Iinnesota, and later entered a business college at Winona, that state, 
which he attended for one term. His childhood was spent upon his father's farm 
and he assisted from an early age with the work of its operation. After his 
father's death he remained upon the property until he was twenty-eight years of 
age, assisting his elder brother in the operation of the homestead. Afterward he 
worked as timekeeper for a local railroad contractor for one year and then 
turned his attention to farming, renting land near Castle Rock, Minnesota. At 
the end of one year he went to the vicinity of New Orleans, Louisiana, and there 
engaged in the strawberry business for one season, coming at the end of that 
time to Iowa and purchasing a farm of ninety acres in Allamakee county, near 
Luana. He found this a practically unimproved tract, forty acres of which 
were cleared, but with characteristic energy set himself to develop and cultivate 
the land. Success attended his well directed efiforts and from time to time he 
added to his holdings until he owns today one hundred and ninety acres, all 
highly cultivated. Mr. Chamberlain has one of the best equipped farms in the 
township, provided with a modern residence and substantial barns and out- 
buildings, all of which he keeps in good repair. He specializes in the breeding 
and raising of high-grade stock, keeping fine herds of shorthorn cattle, his animals 
commanding a high price and ready sale upon the market. He is a member of 
the Cooperative Shipping Association of Luana and of the creamery company 
of that city and his ability is widely recognized in business circles. 

On the 31st of January, 1889, Mr. Chamberlain was united in marriage to 
^liss .Anna Sutcliffe, who was born in Hastings, Dakota county, Minnesota, on 
the 19th of January, 1863, a daughter of James and Anna (Wilde) Sutcliffe, 
natives of England. The father was born in Yorkshire, March 8, 1835, and the 
mother, who was some years younger, was left an orphan at an early age and 
reared by her grandfather. The father was a contractor and builder by trade 
and at the age of twenty-two crossed the Atlantic to America, going directly to 
Chicago. Illinois, where he engaged in business until about the year 1855. He 
then moved to Hastings, Minnesota, and at the outbreak of the Civil war enlisted 
under C.cneral La Due, going south as an army cari)enter. He served for two 
years and after his discharge returned to Minnesota, where he entered land, con- 
tinuing active in agricultural pursuits in Dakota county until 1S82. In that year 



316 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

he moved to Franklin township, Allamakee county, Iowa, and became a large 
landowner, residing in the vicinity of Postville until about 1905, when he moved 
to Michigan, where he is now residing retired in \'anderbilt. His wife passed 
away when Mrs. Chamijerlain was still a child. The father had been previously 
married and to his first union were born seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Chamber- 
lain have two sons. William LeRoy, born May 11, 1890, married Miss Helen 
Laughlin and is now engaged in farming in Post township. Leon E., who was 
born September 16, 1892, is residing with his parents. 

Mr. Chamberlain is affiliated with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
the Modern Brotherhood of America. He gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party and served as township clerk for two years, although he has 
never been active as an office seeker. ]Mr. Chamberlain gives much credit for 
his success to the able assistance, helpfulness and sound advice of his faithful 
wife and helpmate but much must also be attributed to his own energy, enter- 
prise and pulilic spirit. He is today one of the most prosperous farmers of this 
township, enjoying in large measure the confidence and regard of all who know 
him. 



AARON V. PALMER. 



One of the highly successful farmers and stockmen of x^llamakee county is 
Aaron V. Palmer, who owns and operates the Orchard Flill Farm, comprising two 
hundred and forty acres of valuable land on section 27, Jefferson township. He 
is numbered among the early settlers in Iowa, his residence in the state dating 
from iS()3, while he has made his home in this township since 1893. He was 
born in Crawford count)', Pennsylvania, May 23, 1851, and is a son of John Pal- 
mer, who was born in New York state, February 12, 1830. As a young man 
the father moved to Pennsylvania, where for a number of years he engaged in 
the manufacture of shingles, being a cooper by trade. In Crawford county, that 
state, he married Miss Sophrona J. Coon, a native of Pennsylvania, and two of 
their sons were born there. In 1853 the family moved to Wisconsin and located 
in Marquette county, where the father purchased a tract of land, which he cleared 
of timber, and grubbing up the stumps opened a new farm. For ten years there- 
after he developed and improved this property, but in 1863 moved to Iowa, where 
he located in the vicinity of Elkader, where he farmed and followed the cooper's 
trade. He died in Rossville, October 10, 1009. having survived his wife since 
1892. 

Aaron Y. Palmer was twelve years of age when his parents moved to 
Elkader, and he attended the public schools in that city. His advantages, how- 
ever, along this line were limited and he is largely self-educated, having made 
up for his early deficiencies by study and reading in later years. For a time 
he worked upon a farm and also as stage driver between Postville and Elkader 
and on other routes. He later turned his attention to the livery business, estab- 
lishing an enterprise of this kind in Waukon. He remained in that city for a 
time and then returned to Elkader, where he resumed his livery business, con- 
tinuing at it until 1893. He had previous to this time bought a farm of two hun- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 317 

dred acres on section ■>■], Jefiferson township, and upon this farm property he 
then located, turning his attention to its improvement and cultivation. He has 
since added forty acres to his holdings and the Orchard Hill Farm is today a 
large and well managed enterprise, reflecting everywhere the owner's careful 
supervision and practical labor. One hundred acres are in hay and grain and 
the rest affords pasture for Mr. Palmer's fine herd of cattle and his Shropshire 
sheep. He is a stock breeder on an extensive scale, raising also a good grade of 
Poland China hogs. In addition to this he keeps milch cows and operates a 
modern and sanitary dairy, a branch of his business which, like all the others, is 
important and profitable. Upon his farm Mr. Palmer has made extensive and 
substantial improvements, including a comfortable residence and a fine barn, in 
which there is room for twenty-four horses and thirty cows, and which is pro- 
vided with a loft where fifty tons of hay may be kept. Mr. Palmer is a fruit- 
grower, also, and has a fine orchard of selected fruits, with one hundred bear- 
ing trees. His business interests are all carefully conducted along progressive 
lines and his success has come as the result of sound judgment, keen discrimi- 
nation and well directed labor. 

On the 24th of August. 1875, in Waukon, Mr. Palmer was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emma Niblock, who was born and reared in Allamakee county, a 
daughter of William Niblock, who came from Wisconsin to this part of Iowa 
in 1851 and is numbered among the earliest settlers. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer 
became the parents of nine children : Emmett Leroy, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in Franklin township ; Fred Carl, who lives at home ; James Raymond ; Charles, 
who is engaged in teaching; Merton R., who is assisting in the operation of 
the homestead: Sophrona Jane, the wife of I. E. Woodmanse, of Waukon; 
Maggie, who married xA.lden Mosier, a farmer of Jefferson township ; Bessie, the 
wife of Ora Mitchell, a farmer of Jefferson township; and Doris Etta, who is 
still at school. 

Mr. Palmer is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Rossville and belongs to the Fraternal Brethren. He is a devout member of the 
Baptist church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He 
served on the school board in this township for a number of years and for eight 
years as school director in Elkader, Ambition, energy and perseverance are his 
most prominent characteristics and they have brought him recognition as one 
of the successful farmers and prosperous stock-raisers of Jefferson township. 



CHARLES J. KNUDTSON. 

Of the native sons of Allamakee county, none have taken a deeper interest 
in its welfare than has Charles J. Knudtson, who is numbered among the progres- 
sive farmers of Makee township. He was born on the homestead farm, on which 
he still resides, December i, 1867, a son of Knudt Knudtson, who was born in 
Norway. September 28, 1818. After reaching mature years the father emigrated 
to the new world, first making his home in Wisconsin. Subsequently he removed 
to Iowa and spent his remaining years in Makee township. His wife bore the 
maiden name of Rhenild Ambrose. She was likewise a native of Norway, and 



318 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

by her imarriage became the mother of seven children, four of whom are living: 
Mrs. Cornelia Banks, a widow, residing in Tacoma, Washington ; Mrs. Anna 
Johnson Engrav, of Waukon ; Thomas, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work ; 
and Charles J., of this review. The parents are now deceased, the father passing 
away in August, 1902. when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-three 
years. The mother died about 1887. 

Charles J. Knudtson was reared on the home farm and was early trained in 
the work of plowing, planting and harvesting. After reaching mature years he 
more and more largel_y assumed the responsibility of the farm and cared for his 
parents in their declining years. He eventually succeeded to the east half of 
the homestead and now has a tract of one hundred and sixty acres. Since coming 
into possession of the place he has made further improvements, having remodeled 
'the house, barn and other outbuildings, and is today numbered among the suc- 
cessful farmers and stock-raisers of Makee township. He raises Chester White 
hogs and Percheron horses and also does some dairying. 

Mr. Knudtson was married on the iith of June, 1895, to Miss Amelia Engu- 
burtson, who was born and reared in Taylor township, Allamakee county. Two 
children have been born of this union, Clyde J. and Beulah. 

In politics Mr. Knudtson is a stanch republican, and he and his family are 
members of the Lutheran church. He is not only a successful farmer but is a 
public-spirited man, loyal to the best interests of Makee township and Allamakee 
county. 



L. COPPERSMn'H. 



Not only as one of the foremost merchants of Dorchester, and as such 
prominent in the business circles of the city, but as a veteran of the Civil war 
is L. Coppersmith entitled to special mention in a history of Allamakee county. 
He was born in New Jersey in 1843, a son of Louis and Mary Co[)persmith, 
both natives of Germany. The mother died in 1846. during the childhood of 
her son. As a young man the father had come to the United States, locating 
first in New York, but later removing to New Jersey. In the latter state he 
followed the trade of wagon making until the latter '60s, when he made his 
way across the country to Iowa and took up a farm near Melbourne. That farm 
remained his home until his death in 1886, and in its operation he was veiy 
successful, accumulating through his well directed eft'orts valuable property 
holdings. In his family were four children, but only two, the subject of this 
review, and his sister, Carrie, survive. The latter is the widow of Oscar Evans, 
of Rochester, Minnesota. 

The period of his boyhood and youth were spent by L. Coppersmith in the 
state of his nativity, and in the schools of New Jersey he acquired bis educa- 
tion. He entered the business world at the early age of sixteen years, when he 
became a clerk in a store, being thus employed for about four years. In the 
meantime, however, his patriotic spirit had been aroused by the attempt of 
the south, to overthrow the Union, and in 1863, a youth of twenty years, he 
enlisted in Battery H, Second Illinois Artillery, and thus served throughout the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 319 

remainder of the war. At the close of hostihties he was honorably discharged 
at Springfield, Illinois, and returned home with a most creditable military 
record. He again took up clerking, in which occupation he was engaged until 
the early '80s, when in partnership with a brother he opened a store at Dover, 
Minnesota, being desirous of entering business on his own account. Four years 
later, however, he sold his interest to his brother and came to Dorchester, Iowa, 
here entering into a partnership with T. C. Smith for the purpose of conducting 
a general mercantile store. This relationship continued until 1908. when his 
partner died, since which time Mr. Coppersmith has owned and operated the 
store alone. This was the pioneer store of the town, having been established in 
1854, and at that time operated by G. W. Hayes. It is now a well equipped 
emporium, handling a modern and select line of goods, and in its operation 
Mr. Coppersmith, who is a man of progressive tendencies, is meeting with 
well merited success, for he has sought in every way to meet the desires and 
wishes of his customers, recognizing the truth of the fact that satisfied patrons 
are the best advertisement. As Mr. Coppersmith has prospered in his enterprise 
he has become the owner of valuable land, holding title to his business property 
as well as his home, and also a tract of land in Union City township. 

In 1868 Mr. Coppersmith was united in marriage to Miss C. E. Smith, who 
was born in Pennsylvania and in childhood was adopted by T. E. Smith, with 
whom she made her home until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Coppersmith have 
become the parents of eight children, of whom five survive, namely: George, 
who was born in 1870 and is a merchant of Des Moines, Iowa; Nora, who was 
born in 1S77 and is the wife of Dr. M. B. Yeoman, of Lansing, Iowa; Leroy B., 
born in 18S0 and still at home; Pearl, born in 1884, who married Christian 
Plambeck, of Dorchester; and Catherine, born in 1891, the wife of John Whit- 
linger, who is engaged in the bakery business at Santa Barbara, California. In 
religious i)elief Mrs. Coppersmith is a Salvationist, while in fraternal relations 
Mr. Coppersmith belongs to the Masonic order, in which he has filled a number 
of chairs up to the third degree. In politics he usually supports the democratic 
ticket, but is independent in his views and reserves the right to vote for any man 
or measure, regardless of party ties, if his judgment so sanctions. He has 
served as covmty supervisor of Allamakee county for two terms and is an 
efficient and capable iniblic servant. He is eminently jniblic-spirited in his citi- 
zenship, warmlv ad\ocating all those movements which have for their object 
the permanent upbuilding of the community, and is as faithful to the interests 
of his countrv in times of peace as when he followed the old flag on southern 
battlefields. 



G. F. WILD. 



G. F. Wild, manager of the New Albin Manufacturing Company, Inc., and 
since iQoS mayor of the city, is numbered among the men who have been active 
in shaping its business and political development, and along both lines of his 
interests has proved capable, efficient and public-spirited, leaving the impress of 
his work and personality upon general progress and advancement. He is one 



320 -PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

of Allamakee county's native sons, his birth having occurred at French Creek 
in 1875. His parents, George and Katie Wild, settled in that community imme- 
diately after their marriage and have there resided since that timfe, a period of 
almost half a century. To their union were born twelve children : William, of 
New Albin : George, who makes his home in Lansing; Emma, the deceased wife 
of Louis Hirth ; Rose, who married E. J. Saddler, of Union City township ; 
G. F., of this review; John, who has passed away; .Mrs. Louisa Berkland, of 
Bowman county. North Dakota ; Mary, who married Thurlow Hopp, of Spo- 
kane, Washington ; Elizabeth, the wife of J- ^^^ Snow, of Montana ; Gustavc, 
who is residing on the family homestead near French Creek; E. L., who resides 
near the home farm; and Clara, the wife of Oscar Smerud, of Houston county, 
Minnesota. 

G. F. Wild acquired his education in Allamakee county, and in his child- 
hood divided his time between work upon his father's farm and attendance at 
the district school. After he had laid aside his books he turned his attention to 
the occupation to which he had been reared, following general farming until 
1897, in which year he made an entire change in his active interests, becoming 
identified with industrial pursuits. Forming a partnership with C. J- Bjorkkmd 
and John Wild, he assisted in the foundation of a manufacturing plant in New 
Albin, wherein is done all kinds of interior finishing and cabinet work, and he 
established in connection with it a lumber business, which has since assumed 
extensive proportions. The concern was incorporated April 15. 1913, untler the 
name of the New Albin Manufacturing Company, and has the following officers : 
^^'illiam Thompson, president; R. G. May, secretary; L. H. Garder, treasurer: 
and G. F. Wild, manager. The board of directors is as follows: William 
Thompson, G. F. Wild, C. E. Kester, William Wild and H. H. Holmes. Since 
the foundation of this enterprise Mr. Wild has given a great deal of his time 
and attention to the conduct of its affairs, and the credit for its rapid growth 
and present prosperity is due in large measure to his ability, initiative and enter- 
prise. He has worked along progressive and practical lines, studying modern 
business conditions and applying his knowledge to the different departments of 
this concern, making it today well managed in every particular and profitable 
because it is run on a businesslike and sound basis. 

In 1904 Mr. W'ild was united in marriage to Miss Emma Cox, a native of 
Allamakee county and a daughter of Joseph and Adaline (Ferris) Cox, both 
of whom have passed away, leaving three children : Emma, the wife of the 
subject of this review; Margaret, who married J. W. Ross, of Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota ; and Adaline, who lives in New Albin. Mr. and Mrs. Wild became the 
parents of five children: Neva L, who was born in 1905: Howard E., born 
April 17, 1908; George F., whose birth occurred in jVIarch, 1910; Marion, who 
passed away at the age of seven months; and Charles Joseph, born May 7, 
1912. The family are devout members of the ^Methodist Episcopal church. 
They reside in one of the finest homes in New .-Mbin, and this they ha\e made 
the center of hospitality for their many friends. 

.\lwavs a stanch and loyal republican, Mr. Wild has taken an active part 
in local public affairs, supporting always progressive i)ul)lic measures and con- 
tributing substantiallv to projects of reform, improvement and advancement. 
L'pon many different occasions he has served as a member of the city council 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 321 

and he has also been treasurer of his school district. Since 1908 he has been 
mayor of New Albin, giving to the city a practical, businesslike and constructive 
administration, characterized by a great deal of important work, accomplished 
in the public interest. His official record is one of which he has every reason 
to be proud, for it has been varied in service and beneficial and far-reaching in 
its results, distinguished at all times by able, practical and progressive work 
and a constant consideration for the welfare o'f the people he serves. In both 
business and political relations ]\Ir. Wild has proved honorable, reliable and 
efficient, advancing his individual interests along practical lines but making at 
the same time substantial contributions to general progress. 



THOMAS KNUDTSON. 

Through well directed business activity and enterprise Thomas Knudtson has 
gained recognition as one of the progressive farmers of Allamakee county. He 
owns a highly improved tract of land of one hundred and sixty acres on section 
15, Makee township, and has here resided since 1893, during which time his labors 
have not only contributed to his own prosperity but have proven effective forces 
in advancing the general welfare. He is a native of Allamakee county and a 
representative of one of the most honored and highly respected pioneer families 
in the state, his father having settled in Makee township in 185 1. Thomas Knudt- 
son was born upon the home farm September 8, 1862, his parents being Knudt 
and Rhenild (Ambrose) Knudtson, natives of Norway, the former born Sep- 
tember 28, 1818. He grew to manhood in his native country and in 1847 crossed 
the Atlantic to America, locating in Wisconsin, where he spent four years. In 
1851 he bought two yoke of oxen and, placing some household goods in a covered 
wagon, drove across the plains to Iowa. On the way he lost his frying-pan and 
this much needed article of daily use he was obliged to replace by a flat stone 
which he heated and upon which he prepared his meals for some time thereafter. 
Knudt Knudtson purchased a claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Makee 
township, this county, and settled upon it when pioneer conditions prevailed 
everywhere, when the wilderness stretched around him for miles in all direc- 
tions, when there were no neighbors within walking distance and when the Indians 
were frequent visitors to his cabin. With characteristic energy he cleared the 
timber, broke the raw soil and began the work of development which gradually 
transformed his property into an attractive and productive farm. He built upon 
his holdings a little log cabin in which he resided until 1856, when he replaced it 
by a modern dwelling which still stands upon the property. The years brought 
him steadily increasing success and from time to time he added to his holdings, 
accumulating three hundred and thirty acres. By virtue of his energy, ability and 
perseverance he won a place among the substantial agriculturists of this com- 
munity, commanding and holding the high respect and esteem of all who were 
associated with him. His death, which occurred on his farm in August, 1902, 
when he was eighty-three years of age, was therefore the occasion of deep and 
widespread regret and deprived Allamakee county of one of her valued and rep- 
resentative citizens and one of the earliest and finest of her pioneers. Knudt 



322 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Knudtson married in Lansing Miss Rhenild Ambrose, a native of Norway, and 
they became the parents of seven children, of whom four are living: Mrs. Cor- 
nelia Banks, a widow, residing in Tacoma, Washington ; Mrs. Anna Johnson En- 
grav, of Waukon, Iowa, who has a son, Robert Johnson Engrav, a talented pianist ; 
Thomas, of this review ; and Charles, who owns the old home farm. 

Thomas Knudtson was reared upon the home farm and accjuired his educa- 
tion in the country schools and in Decorah College. In his childhood and youth 
he helped to improve and operate the farm and upon his twenty-first birthday 
his father gave him one hundred and sixty acres of the estate, upon which he has 
since resided. The land lies on sections 15 and 16, Makee township, and Mr. 
Knudtson has carried forward the work of development in an intelligent and 
able manner, erecting substantial barns and outbuildings and installing modern 
machinery. The farm is valuable and well improved in every particular, its 
owner being a practical and able agriculturist who never neglects anything that 
will add to the attractive appearance or value of his place. In addition to raising 
grain Mr. Knudtson does an extensive dairy business and has important stock- 
raising interests. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Creamery of 
Waukon, of which he served as first vice president, and also in the Farmers Stock 
& Produce Company, and in business circles is regarded as a resourceful, far- 
sighted and able man. 

In Makee township, on March 8, 1893, Mr. Knudtson was united in marriage 
to Miss Clara Hansen, who was born and reared in Winneshiek county, and they 
have become the parents of five children : Rosa M., of Waterloo, Iowa ; and Lulu 
K., Anna C, Hazel J., and Thomas C, at home. Mr. Knudtson gives his political 
allegiance to the democratic party, having cast his first vote for Grover Cleveland 
and his last for Woodrow Wilson. He has never sought nor desired public office, 
preferring to devote his attention to his lousiness aff^airs, which, being carefully and 
capably conducted, have brought him a gratifying measure of success. 



OLE LARSON. 



Ole Larson, honored as one of the early pioneers and worthy citizens of Alla- 
makee county, took up his abode in this section of the state in 1S50, at which 
time he settled in Taylor township, Allamakee county. From that time until 
his death he was closely associated not only with the material but also with the 
moral development of the region and left the impress of his individuality for good 
upon the community. He was born in Hallingdal, Norway, in 181 1, was there 
reared and in that province married Miss Anne Stenerson, who was also a 
native of the same locality. At length he determined to try his fortune in 
America, believing that he would have better opportunities in the United States, 
the voyage being made under hard and trying conditions. The vessel in which 
they crossed was known as the Draphna, and Captain Ekersberg, who was in 
command, told Mr. Larson to take a goat on board the vessel in order that they 
might have milk to mix with the medicine for tlie sick. This was accordingly 
done and the precaution proved its value in the course of the voyage. At length 
the Draphna dropped anchor in New York harbor, and from the eastern me- 



1 •,^^Jl,vJ,•^:J •■' a-'J. 



,^JHiJ 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY . 325 

tropolis the Larsons proceeded by way of the Erie canal and the Great Lakes 
to Chicago. They found very poor accommodations were accorded emigrants 
there. The children slept on a corded bedstead and in the morning all were on 
the floor, having slipped through the cords during the night. 

The Larsons spent the first winter on Rock prairie in Rock county, Wis- 
consin, and in the spring of 1850 came to Allamakee county, their home being 
established upon a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of wild land on sections 
9 and 17, Taylor township. With characteristic energy the father began the 
improvement and development of this property and each year witnessed his 
increasing prosperity until he became one of the substantial farmers and ex- 
tensive landholders in his vicinity. He made" good use of his opportunities and 
not only achieved individual success but contributed to the upbuilding and up- 
lifting of his section. 

LInto Mr. and Mrs. Ole Larson were born eleven children. Birgitte, who 
was the eldest of four children brought by the parents to America in 1849, was 
born at the family home, Unde Bergo, which in peasant parlance means "below 
mountains," in Gol, Hallingdal. Norway, in 1839. In early girlhood she attended 
public schools and later continued her studies in Madison, Wisconsin. In com- 
mon with all pioneer children she assisted in the early '50s in all kinds of farm 
work, in which men and women engaged, including the milking of the cows and 
hunting the herd in the primitive pastures which nature provided at that time 
In common with girls and women of the period she made her dresses by hand, 
no experienced modiste being needed to fashion the cheap calico garments. The 
daughters of the household had no time to spend on music and the only musical 
instrument in the home was the father's monochord "salmodikon," which he 
played at their Sabbath morning devotions. Arriving at years of maturity, Bir- 
gitte Larson, whose name was anglicized to Betsey, taught school for some time 
and in i860 she was joined in wedlock to Peter S. Olson (Noes), the wedding 
ceremony being performed by Judge White in Waukon. For some years they 
lived on section 35, Center township, and then removed to Rose Creek, Minne- 
sota, afterward to Holt county, Nebraska, and later to Alliance, where Mrs. 
Olson passed away in 1898, leaving a large family of children and a husband, 
who followed her to the grave in 1913. Louis O. Larson, christened Lars, was 
the second in the family. Stener, called Stanley, another of the family, is 
deceased. Ingeborg, called Isabelle, born in Norway, February 22, 1845, was the 
fourth and the youngest of the children born in Norway and brought to America 
by their parents in 1849. She spent her girlhood in the Larson home in Taylor 
township and in early womanhood taught school for some years. She afterward 
followed others of the family to the county of Saline, Nebraska, where she became 
the wife of John V. Ainsworth, who conducted a mercantile business at Friend 
there for some years and afterward removed to Tobias, Nebraska, where he 
operates an elevator. He also owns a half section of land joining the town. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ainsworth have a. son, Frank, who is married and lives near his parents, 
while a daughter, Anna May, is the wife of Dr. W. S. Wiggins, of Dewitt, 
Nebraska. The other children of Mr. and Mrs. Ole Larson, Sr., were as follows : 
Birgitte and Ragnild. known as Betsey and Rachel, twins, were born January 5, 
1850, in Rock county, Wisconsin, and were the first addition to the family of Ole 
and Anne Larson in America. They spent their girlhood at home and after attain- 



326 . PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

ing womanhood Betsey engaged in teaching for a number of years, after which 
she became the wife of Julius Englehorn and lived in Lansing township for several 
years. She afterwards accompanied her husband to the west, the family driving a 
team to Hoquiam, Washington. There Mrs. Englehorn and her two daughters, 
Mrs. Ada Crawford and Mrs. Eva Johnson, still reside. The husband and father 
has left home and is presumed to be dead. Rachel, twin sister of Mrs. Englehorn, 
also taught school in .Allamakee county in iier girlhood. She became the wife of 
George Campbell and they removed to Saline county, Nebraska. Mrs. Campbell 
owns a farm near Milford but lives in the city, where she also owns property. 
Her husband died about a year ago. One son, Washington, lives on a ranch, and 
another, Andrew, is a resident of Chicago. The only daughter, Lilian, is now 
matron in the Soldiers' Home at Milford, Nebraska. Ole, Jr., called Olen, the next 
member of the family of Ole and Anne Larson, died and was buried in New Mex- 
ico. Extended mention is made of him on another page of this volume. He was 
the first of the family born in Iowa. Ambjor, called Emily, was born April 21, 1853, 
at the family home in Taylor township and in early womanhood engaged in teach- 
ing school. She was married on the first of July, 1874, to John S. Englehorn and 
they lived on the Lansing ridge for a number of years, after which they re- 
moved to Alliance, Nebraska, where Mrs. Englehorn passed away, in April, 1903, 
leaving a son and two daughters, the latter being Minnie, now the wife of Odie 
Shofield, and Mrs. Hattie DeVenny, of Seattle, Washington. Anne Larson, 
the next of the family, was born June 17, 1854, and like the other sisters, en- 
gaged in teaching school. She became the wife of O. A. Dalberg. at ISaldwin, and 
died at Dorchester, Wisconsin, in July, 1888, her remains being there interred. 
She is survived by her husband, a son, Arnold, and three daughters, Edith, 
Hattie, and Grace, the last named being Mrs. Louis Crane. All of these 
daughters are graduates of the Stout School at Marinette, Wisconsin, and are 
domestic science teachers. Sophie Larson was born September 9, 1856, and 
lived at the parental home until her marriage to Hans Moe in Paint Creek town- 
ship. Her husband died ten years ago, leaving four young sons: Arnold, Her- 
bert, Olvin. Clement, and two daughters, Hattie and Alice. The family reside on 
a quarter section of land in Paint Creek township, save Clement, who owns a 
farm in Amanda, North Dakota. Andreas, called Andrew, was the youngest 
in the family of Ole and Anne Larson, and after reaching mature age he turned 
his attention to mining in Colorado. After a few years, however he abandoned 
that pursuit, was married and took up his abode upon a ranch, but is now in 
business in Antonito, Colorado. They became the parents of four children, but 
one girl Navada, died in early girlhood. 

The father of this family died upon his farm in Taylor township at the age 
of eighty-seven years, and the mother passed away when eighty-two years of 
age. He was a man of more than ordinary ability and intellectual force, was 
well educated and widely read, and took a most active and helpful interest in 
religious work. He made it a custom to hold religious services for the benefit 
of the children in his neighborhood, and largely through his influence Christianity 
received its first impetus in this section. He was numbered among Allamakee 
county's earliest and most worthy pioneers, for at the time of his arrival here 
the house at Thompson's Corners was the only one between his homestead and 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 327 

Lansing, a distance of ten miles. In his deatli the county lost one of its most 
honored pioneers, a man of high integrity, of unquestioned honor and exem- 
plary moral character. 



LOUIS O. LARSON. 



Louis O. Larson has been a resident of Allamakee county since 1850 and is 
therefore numbered among its early pioneers, while his business qualifications 
have won him a place among its substantial ajnd valued citizens. He has wit- 
nessed almost the entire growth and development of this section of the state, 
for few settlements had been made within the borders of the county at the 
time of his arrival. He was reared amid the usual conditions and environments 
of frontier life and experienced the hardships and trials incident to pioneer exist- 
ence. Since attaining manhood he has thoroughly indentified his interests with 
those of this section and in the course of a long, active and honorable life has 
made substantial contribution to its agricultural development. 

Mr. Larson was born in Rotnem, Gol, Hallingdal, Norway, March 25, 1841, 
his parents being Ole and Anne Larson, of whom extended mention is made 
above. He was christened Lars, but later Americanized the name into Louis. 
The parents brought their family to the new world in 1849, when the subject 
of this review was a lad of eight years, and at nine years of age he came with 
the family to Allamakee county. He attended the district school and after- 
ward continued his studies in the Lansing high school. In his childhood he 
divided his time between the duties of the school room and the work of clearing 
the land and developing and improving the homestead. He was ambitious 
to advance intellectually and made such good use of his opportunities that he 
became a successful teacher, following that profession for ten terms following 
his graduation from the high school in Lansing, where he had studied under 
Professor Haven in 1861-2. In the fall of the former year he obtained a teachers' 
certificate from Professor Loughran, of Waukon, who was then superintendent 
of schools. He secured the position of teacher for six months in the Climax- 
Excelsior district and in succeeding years he taught in the Storla, Dahl, Water- 
ville. Little Paint and Climax schools. While teaching in the winter seasons 
and farming in the summer he also hunted the \'irginia deer in the open sea- 
sons and trapped the predatory animals for fur and bounty, deriving also much 
sport therefrom in the ascents and descents of the precipitous hills in the town- 
ships bordering on the Mississippi river. In fact there are few phases of pioneer 
life with which Mr. Larson is unacquainted. Thirty years ago Tom Dunlevey, 
associate publisher of the Allamakee Journal, dubbed him "the mighty hunter 
with sword and pen" and the sobriquet has clung to him in the same manner as 
"magniloquent vagueness" has been pinned to President Wilson's coat-tail bv 
a Chicago Inter-Ocean cartoon. Mr. Larson has also been designated "the 
peacemaker" because of his settling lawsuits which had been taken to the dis- 
trict courts, and furthermore has been termed "the savant of Little Paint" 
because of his contributions to the newspapers. Eventually he concentrated his 
efforts upon agricultural pursuits, in which he has met with a gratifying meas- 



328 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

ure of prosperity, success steadily rewarding his well directed efforts through 
the years. He now owns and controls four hundred acres of land on sections 
17 and 9, Taylor township, operating a quarter section and renting the remain- 
der. Upon the homestead he has made many substantial improvements. He 
employs the most modern methods in carrying forward his farm work, using 
the latest labor-saving machinery. He rejoices in his success because of what 
it enables him to do for his family, yet he has never regarded the acquirement of 
wealth as the real end and aim of life, the education of his children being his 
chief endeavor, and he has made heavy sacrifices to achieve this end. 
That he has realized his ambition is evident from the fact that at the Rema 
Grove P'ourth of July celebration his was pronounced the "nicest family" and 
Judge L. E. Fellows, of Lansing, said to him : "What a fine family you have 
raised!" The Larson family have ever been noted for their interest in those 
things which have a broadening effect and are of educational value. Eleven of 
the family visited the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, three saw the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis and one the Portland Exposition. 
In 1905 Louis O. Larson rode over the trails in Idaho as an Argonaut in com- 
pany with his brother Stanley, viewed the interior of the Mormon Tabernacle 
in Utah and swam in the great Salt Lake. 

Air. Larson married, on June 29, 1862, Miss Mary Ingebretson, a daughter 
of There Ingebretson, an early settler of Center township. Allamakee county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Larson became the parents of thirteen children. Edmond Victor, 
the eldest, born December 9, 1863, is a graduate of Slack's Business College of 
Decorah. He was married at the age of twenty-one years to Miss Caroline 
Ellefson (Turkop) and lives at Pierre, South Dakota. He has a family of one 
son and four daughters. Clarence Othello Theodore, the second son, was born 
in Taylor township, February 3, 1866. was there reared and after attaining his 
majority became a solicitor for the Ladies' Home Journal, traveling in the in- 
terests of that publication in every state in the Union and receiving a two thou- 
sand dollar prize for getting more subscribers than any other agent in the United 
States. He had first made his headquarters in Fremont, Nebraska, where he 
attended a Sunday school class taught by William Jennings Bryan, our secre- 
tary of state at Washington, D. C, and he always spoke in the highest terms of 
praise of Mr. Bryan. He was afterward in Portland, Oregon, and frequently 
visited his early home in Taylor township. After a visit to his parents he started 
for his Portland home January 2. 1899, and in the spring of that year started with 
some Young Men's Christian Association comrades for the Klondike. He was 
not in search of gold but in quest of knowledge concerning this country. His 
health succumbed before the rigidity of the Alaska climate, following his arrival 
in Dawson City, and he returned to Seattle, Washington, spending seven weeks 
in a hospital there. During his convalescent period he purchased a team of 
burros and started for Arizona, thinking that the climate of the southwest would 
benefit his health. He seemed to improve greatly there for a time, but he was 
extremely ambitious and energetic and indulged in long walks in the hot sun. 
During one of these he overtaxed his strength and passed away at Tucson. It 
is said that to gain strength he would daily walk down the valley for a mile and 
a half to see a friend, C. Brady, in the cool of the afternoon. Not arriving at 
the usual hour, on the 24th of May, 1900, Mr. Brady proceeded uj) the road and 







o 



V. 




PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 331 

lo his horror found his friend's lifeless body. In all the relations of life Clar- 
ence O. T. Larson was known as a man of integrity, manliness and kindliness, 
which qualities won for him the fullest confidence and the highest esteem. His 
life was well worthy of emulation and his words and deeds will live in the 
memory of all who knew him, more enduring than any chiseled monument or 
tablet of bronze. The Bible was his constant companion and guide and he lived 
a model Christian life. He belonged to the Young Men's Christian Association 
and to the Christian Endeavor Society. With the craving for knowledge, he 
possessed a very retentive memory and was as well versed in the history of the 
world as upon topics of current interest. His remains were returned to Allama- 
kee county for interment and the large funeral cortege indicated how highly he 
was esteemed by those among whom he had been reared. Emma Victoria Lar- 
son, the third of the family, was born February 14, 1868, and after attending 
the home school she studied in the high schools at Waukon and Nora Springs. 
After teaching for several years she married a cousin, Peter Bieber, of Rock 
county, Minnesota, where she now resides. She owns four hundred acres of 
land there and also a house and lot in Jasper, Minnesota, where she and her 
three sons, Edgar, Clarence and Lloyd, live. Her husband died about five years 
ago. Lily Idelia, the ne.xt member of the family, was born January 12, 1870, 
attended the home schools and in early womanhood became the wife of David 
W. Martin. They lived in Waukon for a time, after which Mr. Martin went 
away. Mrs. Martin is now living in La Crosse, Wisconsin, where she is engaged 
in dressmaking, while her daughters, Ilvarine and Naomi, are attending the State 
Normal School. Another son of Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Larson was Louis Edward 
Larson, who passed away in St. Paul in 1907. He was born June 5, 1872, at 
the family home on section 17, Taylor township, Allamakee county. Thirteen 
years of his life were spent in St. Paul, five years as a street car conductor and 
eight years on the police force. He occupied a lofty plane in the police depart- 
ment, being known as one of the most reliable men on the force. Others were 
dropped from the payrolls when incapacitated by sickness from duty but when the 
condition of L. E. Larson was mentioned the chief would reply: "Don't worry 
about Larson, we will take care of him," and this proved true, as his pay was 
continued until his death. It was written of him: "He was loyal and true to 
all trusts committed to him, for honor was his guiding star and he trod the 
path where virtue walks." For four years he battled with the dread disease 
tuberculosis but at length succumbed to the arch enemy of man, and his remains 
were interred in the cemetery of the Old East Paint Creek church in .Allamakee 
county. The profuse floral offerings sent at the time of his death indicated how 
highly was he esteemed among those who knew him. Following his demise the 
Policemen's Association of St. Paul acted in the capacity of pallbearers, the chief 
of police also escorting the remains to the St. Paul depot, where tliev were 
shipped home for interment. He made friends of all with whom lie came 
in contact, for his salient traits of character were such as men everywhere admire 
and honor. The si.xth member of the family was Orange A. Larson, who died in 
childhood. The seventh member, also named Orange, died in infancy. Helen 
.Annelia, born .-Xpril 26, 1877. attended the public schools and also the schools of 
Waukon and Decorah. She successfully engaged in teaching for a number of 
years and then became the wife of Henry Hanson, after which thev conducted 



332 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

a store in St. Paul, Minnesota. They are now residents of Lewiston, Montana, 
and have a family of three sons, Henry, Harold and Russel. Minnie Cornelia 
Larson was the tirst of the five daughters of Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Larson to be 
called from this life, her death occurring in the Swedish Lutheran hospital, Pjeth- 
seda, St. Paul, December 2, 191 1. She was born in Taylor township, November 
12, 1878, and in her girlhood regularly attended the public schools and also 
studied at Waukon, Decorah and the Iowa State Normal. Following her grad- 
uation from the last named, she taught school for several years in Allamakee 
county and in Minnesota. She was ever the pride and joy of the family and a 
favorite among her schoolmates. At the Normal it is said that tlie faculty as 
well as the students clustered about her, being delighted to be near her owing to 
her sweet and loving disposition. It was on the i8th of October, 1905, at the 
home of her brother, Orange, near Jasper, Minnesota, that she became the wife 
of A. M. Fields, then of Cedar Falls, Iowa, and entered upon a most happy 
married life covering six years. She never knowingly offended or wronged any- 
one nor deviated from the path of rectitude throughout her entire life, so that she 
did not fear the coming of death. It was said that she was the most perfect em- 
bodiment of all those virtues which are the jewels of the soul and which reflect 
a pure and noble heart. She left beside her husband four children, Helen, Charles, 
Dorothy and Minnie, and the parents, brothers and sisters with whom she was 
once so closely associated in the old home in Allamakee county, where her re- 
mains were interred in the family burying ground. William Orange, born July 
I, 1880, supplemented his study in the home school by a course in the Waukon 
high school and in the Iowa State Normal and for a time he conducted a store 
at Hardwick, Minnesota. He now owns a section of land near Regina, Sas- 
katchewan, Canada, which he has rented out while he makes his home with his 
I)arents. Clara Luella also studied at Waukon and in the State Normal School 
and is now the wife of J. J. Martin, of Chicago, and the mother of one son, 
Jack. Wilmer Lawrence, after attending the district school became a student 
in the Central high school of St. Paul, from which he was graduated. He also 
spent some time in the medical department of the Minnesota State University 
and is now teaching school near Lewiston, Montana, where he owns a quarter 
section. Lester Arlington, born May 28, 1887, was also a student in the St. Paul 
central high school and in the Iowa State Normal School at Cedar Falls. He is 
now at home with his parents. The father lived a strenuous life as a farmer 
in order to provide for and educate his children and has certainly done a good 
part by them. 

Mr. Larson has been a lifelong member of the Lutheran church, loyal to its 
teachings and exemplifying in his life his Christian faith and belief. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party. He inherits his father's love of 
learning, is an extensive reader, a student and deep thinker, and is considered 
one of the best educated men in his section of the state. His well developed 
qualities and talents have made him one of the forceful, representative and hon- 
ored men of his community. He delights in recalling the incidents of pioneer 
times, which are still fresh in his memory, and since 1850 he has lived in Allama- 
kee county, his life forming a connecting link between the primitive past and 
progressive present. He is a most public-spirited citizen, taking an active inter- 
est in community affairs, although he does not seek public office as he is too in- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 333 

dependent and would never condescend to importune anyone to vote for him as 
a reward for party fealty. He has given hearty cooperation to many movements 
for the general good and Allamakee county owes her development to such men, 
who have dared to face and endure the hardships of pioneer life and who have 
reclaimed this region for the purpose of civilization. 



ARNE HILMO. 



Arne Hilmo has spent almost his entire life in Allamakee county, covering a 
period of more than half a century, so that he is familiar with its history from 
pioneer times to the present. He is today the owner of two hundred and seventeen 
acres of valuable farm land, located on section i6, Makee township. Mr. Hilmo 
is one of a family of four children born to Mr. and Mrs. John Hilmo, the former 
a native of Norway, born in 1829. He was reared and married in his native 
country and there two children were born ere the family emigrated to the new 
world in 1855. Mr. Hilmo first located in Lansing, this county, and at the time 
of his arrival in Makee township the Knudtson family was the only one residing 
in this section of the county. Mr. Hilmo worked for the latter for some years as 
a farm laborer, at seventy-five cents per day, or twelve dollars per month. After 
a number of years spent in this way he managed to save enough money to pur- 
chase a tract of raw land and he at once gave his attention to its clearing and 
development, eventually making it a desirable piece of land. After eight years, 
however, he disposed of that tract and purchased the farm on which the son 
now resides. This tract, containing two hundred and seventeen acres, was also 
raw land, but Mr. Hilmo cleared it of the brush, fenced and cultivated the fields, 
erected a good house, barn and outbuildings, and made his home thereon through- 
out his remaining years. His death occurred December 6, 1900, when he had 
reached the seventy-second year of his age. His wife survived for only about 
two years, passing away August 29, 1902, and thus the county lost two of its 
highly respected pioneer citizens. 

Arne Hilmo was reared on the home farm, giving his father valuable assistance 
in clearing and developing a new place, and the knowledge he gained at that time 
has proven a valuable asset to him in his later life. After the death of his father, 
he purchased the interest of the other heirs in the homestead and is now the 
owner of two hundred and seventeen acres of splendid farming land, situated on 
section 16, Makee township. Of this he has one hundred and sixty acres under 
cultivation. He raises good grades of stock and also engages to some extent in 
dairy farming, having thus been identified for the past thirty years. He was one 
of the promoters of the Farmers Cooperative Creamery Company at Waukon 
and is now one of the stockholders. 

It was on the 25th of November, 1878, that Mr. Hilmo was united in marriage 
to Miss Rebecca Holden, who was born and reared in Norway. The three sur- 
vivinsj;- children of this marriage are: Julia, at home; John, who assists his father 
on the farm ; and Ludwic, who is assistant cashier and bookkeeper in a bank at 
Dazey, North Dakota. One daughter, Louisa, died May 30, 1900. 



334 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Hilmo adheres to the repubhcan party on national issues, but locally he 
is independent. He belongs to the Lutheran church in Paint Creek township. He 
has always worked hard and well deserves the succcess which is today his. He 
is not only a prosperous farmer and dairyman of the county, but is one of its 
highly respected citizens, for he has always been honest and upright in his deal- 
ings with his fellowman and all who know aught of his career speak of him in 
the highest terms. 



WILLIAM H. NIEHAUS. 

William H. Niehaus, one of the leading financiers of Waukon, where he is 
cashier and general manager of the Citizens State Bank, was born in Clayton 
county, Iowa, August 5, 1872. His father, D. H. Niehaus, was a native of Han- 
over, Germany, and was there reared to manhood, learning the ship carpenter's 
trade, which he followed for some time. When he crossed the Atlantic he came 
immediately to Iowa, locating in Guttenberg about the year 1855. He there 
married Miss Anna Margaret Mahlstaed, and after his marriage located on a 
farm in Clayton county. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of timber 
and brush land and with characteristic energy set himself to clear and im- 
prove it. After he had cut down the trees, he fenced his property and erected 
upon it the necessary buildings, steadily carrying forward the work of develop- 
ment until he was the owner of a valuable and productive property. Eventually 
he disposed of his holdings and retired from active life, moving to Guttenberg, 
where his wife died in 1898. He afterward made his home with his son upon the 
farm and there his death occurred February 26, 1912. 

William H. Niehaus was reared in Clayton county on his father's farm. He 
acquired his primary education in the public schools, later completing the high- 
school course at Guttenberg. This he supplemented by a course in a commercial 
college at Dubuque and, after completing it, accepted a position in the Clayton 
County Bank at Guttenberg, thus gaining his first experience in the banking 
business. He advanced from the position of bookkeeper to be cashier of the 
institution and later resigned that position and came to Waukon, where he be- 
came connected with the Citizens State Bank as assistant cashier. He soon 
demonstrated his ability and efficiency and gained promotion, becoming cashier 
and general manager, a position which he still holds. He has aided materially 
in keeping the bank upon a sound financial basis and has been an active and 
prominent factor in its substantial growth. He is widely recognized as one of 
the leading financiers of this section of the country and has earned for himself 
an enviable reputation as a careful and conservative man of business. He is 
e.xtensively interested in Iowa and North Dakota farming lands and has some 
valuable holdings in both states. 

Mr. Niehaus married, in Waukon, in June, 1899, Miss Ruby Dayton, a daugh- 
ter of Hon. Henry Dayton, one of the most prominent men in northern Iowa and 
a successful and able lawyer of Waukon. Mrs. Niehaus was born and reared in 
this city and acquired her education in Cornell College. Mr. and Mrs. Niehaus 
have four children, H. Dayton, Marion, Margaret and Ruth. The family resi- 




WILLIAM H. NIEHALS 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 337 

dence is on Pleasant street in Waukon and is the center of an attractive social 
circle. 

Mr. Niehaus has always been prominent and active in local public affairs and 
as a member of the city council for four years did able work in the interests of the 
city. He was also for two terms treasurer of his school district. His fraternal 
affiliations are extensive and important. He belongs to the Masonic order, hold- 
ing membership in the lodge, chapter and commandery, and has held various 
important positions in the organization. He and his wife are members of the 
Eastern Star and are active in the work of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
Niehaus is a man of exemplary habits and strict integrity and all who know him 
entertain for him the highest regard and esteem. 



ALFORD B. HAYES. 



In the death of Alford B. Hayes, which occurred in 1899, the state of Iowa 
lost one of her most worthy and successful pioneer citizens, and agricultural 
interests of Allamakee county were deprived of a progressive and leading repre- 
sentative. For over forty years he had lived upon his farm two miles beyond 
New Albin, bringing it to a high state of cultivation and, by reason of his prac- 
tical methods and the honorable and upright standards to which he steadily 
adhered, winning a place among the promoters and upbuilders of the section 
where he made his home. 

Mr. Hayes was born in Ohio, in 1826, and is a son of William Hayes, who 
was for many years a well known blacksmith in Youngstown, that state, where 
he and his wife passed away. Their son acquired his education in the public 
schools of Ohio and there remained until 1854, in which year he came to Iowa, 
settling in Lansing in pioneer times. He secured a position as clerk in a store 
in that community, but after holding it for three years resigned and came to 
Iowa township, turning his attention to general farming, an occupation to 
which he devoted the remainder of his life. He purchased two hundred and 
forty acres of land two miles beyond New Albin and for forty years steadily 
carried forward the work of improving and developing it, adding to his hold- 
ings from time to time until he owned five hundred and seventeen acres, con- 
stituting one of the finest farms in this vicinity. In addition to the cultivation 
of the fields he engaged extensively in the raising, feeding and shipping of 
stock, and this department of his activities increased in volume and importance 
year by year, forming one of the principal sources of his income. At all times 
industrious, enterprising and progressive, Mr. Hayes prospered steadily in his 
business affairs, success coming as a result of his practical methods and his 
excellent management, and he long held a place of honor and prominence 
among the leading citizens of Iowa township. 

In 1858 Air. Hayes was united in marriage to Miss Isabelle Manderscheid, 
who was born in Germany and who came to the United States with her parents. 
Christian and Magdalene (Hurt) Manderscheid, when she was nine years of 
age. They settled in Dubuque county, Iowa, later moving to Allamakee county, 
where the father operated a farm until his death, which occurred at the age of 



338 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

eighty-two. The mother, who died four years later, was also eighty-two years 
of age at the time of her demise. In their family were : Eva, the wife of 
Andrew Lepper, of Allamakee county ; Conrad, deceased ; John Adam, oi 
Dubuque ; Isabelle, the wife of the subject of this review ; Magdalene, who has 
passed away; George, also deceased; and Jacob, who lives in California. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hayes became the parents of six children: William J., who was born 
in 1859, is now a resident of Elkton, South Dakota; John W. is a car inspector 
on the Pacific coast; George 'SI. is operating his father's homestead; Alford B. 
met death by drowning in 1888 ; Jacob attended Nora Springs Seminary in Iowa 
and later was graduated in law from Kent College, Chicago. He is now prac- 
ticing in Kansas ; Verona is a graduate of Nora Springs Seminary and later 
studied stenography in a Wisconsin business college at La Crosse ; she is the 
widow of Louis Tabatt, who died in 1909, leaving three children: Alford L., 
who was born in 1906; Marian I., born in 1908; and Louis E., born in 1909. 

Mr, Hayes was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his 
wife and children also belong. Politically he was affiliated with the republican 
partv and he took an active and intelligent interest in the affairs of the com.- 
munity. although he never sought public office. He died upon his farm in Iowa 
township in 1899, being at that time one of the substantial agriculturists and 
large landowners in the county. His memory is cherished by all who were 
fortunate enough to come within the close circle of his friendship, and his name 
is high on the list of the honored dead of this community, to the development 
and progress of which he made such substantial and lasting contributions. 



WILLIAM SCHWARZHOFF. 

Among those men whose efiforts are proving forces in the advancement of 
agriculture in Allamakee county is William Schwarzhofl:, owner of a valuable 
farm of three hundred and fifty-seven acres. He was born in Waterloo town- 
ship, this county, in 1863, a soui of William and Mary Schwarzhofl, both natives 
of Germany. In early life they came to the United States, settling at Dubuque, 
Iowa, in 1856. A year later they arrived in Allamakee county, taking up their 
abode in Waterloo township, where the father preempted land about two miles 
southwest of Dorchester. There he carried on general agricultural pursuits 
until his death, and also for a number of years, in connection with his three 
brothers, operated a brewery near his homestead. He was accidentally killed 
in 1864, and his widow passed away in Wisconsin a few years later. Unto 
them had been born two sons, but the younger, Herman, passed away in infancy. 

The elder son, William Schwarzhoff, of this review, was a little lad of but 
five years when left an orphan through the death of his mother, at which time 
he went to live with an uncle. He received a good education in the public 
schools of Allamakee county and for many years continued to reside with his 
uncle, under whose direction he received thorough training along agricultural 
lines. In 1889 he came into possession of his father's farm, upon which he 
took up his abode and upon which he has since continued to live. He is now 
the owner of three hundred and fiftv-seven acres of valuable land, two hun- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 339 

dred and seventy-five acres of which are highly developed and in a good state 
of cultivation. He has been progressive and systematic in his methods, and his 
well directed efforts, proving productive in results, have brought to him a grati- 
fying measure of success. As he has prospered he has taken up other interests, 
and is now a stockholder, director and vice president of the Dorchester Savings 
Bank. 

Mr. Schwarzhoff laid the foundation for a happy homelife through his mar- 
riage, in 1889, to Miss Sophia Schulte, who is also a native of Allamakee county 
and a daughter of August and Caroline Schulte, the father born in Germany and 
the mother of German parentage. They settled in this county in 1856, and 
the father is now a resident of Caledonia, Minnesota, but the mother passed 
away in 1906. Their daughter Sophia is one of nine children born unto them 
and by her marriage to Mr. Schwarzhoff she has become the mother of five 
children, namely: Mary, born in 1895; Clara, born in 1898; Florence, in 1900; 
V'erna, in 1902; and Estella, in 1907. All yet reside at home. The family are 
communicants of the Roman Catholic church, in the work of which Mr. 
Schwarzhoff is deeply interested. He is today numbered among the substantial 
farmers of his native township, and his prosperity is well merited, for, with a 
propensity for hard work, his success has found its root in unfaltering industry 
and a perseverance that never flags. 



EDWARD C. BELLOWS. 

Prominent among the successful, active and able farmers and extensive lanu- 
owners of Allamakee county is numbered Edward C. Bellows, now the pro- 
prietor of two fine farms, one in Union City township and one in Iowa township. 
He is a native of Illinois, born in 1846, a son of Porter and Angeline Bellows, 
both of whom were born in the New England states, where their marriage also 
occurred. In 1850 they came west to Iowa and settled in French Creek town- 
ship. Allamakee county, in pioneer times. The father took up a government 
claim of a quarter section of land and also preempted a large tract, adding to 
his original holdings from time to time until at his death, which occurred in 
1875, he owned eight hundred acres, highly improved and developed. His wife 
survived him many years, dying about 1895. To their union were born eight 
children, three of whom have passed away. The others are: George, who 
makes his home in Waukon ; Charles, who resides in New Albin : Emily, the 
widow of Nicholas Betsinger. of La Crosse, Wisconsin; Edward C, of this 
review ; and Elmer, who lives in Allamakee county. 

Edward C. Bellows was only four years of age when his parents removed 
to French Creek township, and in Allamakee county he was reared and educated, 
pursuing his studies in the district schools. He began his independent career 
at the age of twentv-one and for some time thereafter engaged in various 
occupations, including work in a Wisconsin pine lumber camp, where he re- 
mained for two vears. After he returned to Iowa he conducted a livery business 
in Lansing for four vears, and then turned his attention to farming, following this 
occupation for ten years thereafter as a hired laborer. Eventually, however, he 



340 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

purcliased land of his own, buying three hundred and forty acres in Union City 
tcwnship, a tract which forms a part of his present farm. From time to time 
he has increased his holdings and now owns seven himdred and forty-five 
acres seven miles from New Albin, divided into two fine farms, both substan- 
tially improved. He engages in general farming and stock-raising, and the 
tv/o branches of his activities have proven a gratifying source of revenue to him, 
his good business ability and close application having gained him rank among 
the progressive and prominent agriculturists of the county. He is in addition 
a stockholder in the Farmers Savings Bank of New Albin and connected with 
other important business interests. 

; Mr. Bellows married, in 1882, Miss Ida Conkey, who was born in Allamakee 
county, a daughter of O. H. Conkey, district judge for many years. He passed 
away at an advanced age and his widow still survives him, being now more than 
ninety years of age. In their family were five children : Heck, who resides 
in Michigan; Effie, who makes her home with her mother in Sanborn, Iowa; 
Ida, the wife of the subject of this review; Mary, the wife of Herman Canburg, 
of Sanborn; and Nettie, who has passed away. Mrs. Bellows died in 1884, 
leaving one son, Arthur C. He was born in 1884, and acquired his education 
in the public schools af Allamakee county. He married Miss Emma Meyers, a 
native of Germany, and they have three children : Ida, Allie and Harold. The 
family make their home on a portion of the Bellows homestead. 

Mr. Bellows gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, but has 
never sought nor desired public office. He has lived to witness remarkable 
changes in Allamakee county during the years of his residence here, and that 
many of his stanchest friends are numbered among those who have known 
him from boyhood is an indication that his has been an honorable and upright 
life and one which well entitles him to the respect and esteem in which he is 
uniformly held. 



J. H. LARKIN. 



I. H. Larkin, the efficient cashier of the Dorchester Savings Bank, is num- 
bered among the promising young business men of this town. He is a native son 
of Allamakee county, his birth having occurred in Taylor township in 1S85, his 
parents being Michael and Mary A. Larkin. The father came to Allamakee 
county in i860, locating on a farm in Taylor township, which he operated for 
a number of years and which he still owns. During his active life he was most 
successful and accumulated a fine property of four hundred and forty acres, 
all improved, and one hundred and twenty-five acres of which is under cultiva- 
tion. He is now living retired at the age of seventy-five years, enjoying in well- 
earned rest the fruits of his former toil. His wife passed away March 4, 1913. 
They became the parents of eight children, all of whom are yet living, namely : 
J. H., of this review; and Michael, John C, Joseph, Mary C, Anna T., Roger 
W. and Aloysius T., all yet at home. 

In the common schools of Allamakee coimty J. H. Larkin received his 
preliminary education, and at the Valder Business and Normal School of Deco- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 341 

rah acquired thorough training for the responsible duties of business hfe. After 
his graduation therefrom he worked at farming for five years, and then, on the 
2d of September, 1912, accepted the position of cashier of tlie Dorchester Sav- 
ings Bank, which office he still occupies. This bank was organized in 1912 
with a capital of ten thousand dollars and the following officials at its head: 
William Kumpf, president; ^Villiam Schwarzhoff, vice president; and Matt 
Flynn, cashier. Mr. Larkin is capable and efficient, promptly and faithfully 
performing his duties, and is popular with the patrons of the bank. He owns 
an interest in the old homestead, but his attention is given fully to his work 
at the jjank. 

Although liberal in his political views, Mr. Larkin usually supports tiie 
republican party, but has never been an office seeker. He is a communicant 
of the Catholic church and fraternally is connected with the Knights of Colum- 
bus and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

A voung man, prompted by laudable ambition and possessing the spirit of 
progress, he has already attained a position in the business world which augurs 
well for a successful future. 



JOSEPH HAMMEL. 



The history of Allamakee county's agricultural growth and development 
would be incomplete without mention of the career of Joseph Hammel, who 
since 1879 has been engaged in general farming in Iowa township, to the progress 
and advancement of which he has made many substantial and lasting contribu- 
tions. He was born in New York in 185 1, and is a son of Raymond and Mary 
(Long) Hammel, the former a native of Switzerland and the latter of Alsace, 
Germany. Their marriage occurred in Switzerland, and in 1851 they crossed the 
Atlantic to America, settling first in New York and removing shortly afterward 
to Ohio, where they settled at Bufifalo, the father following the railroad business 
for a short period. In 1854 they came to Iowa, settling on May's Prairie in 
early times, and there Raymond Hammel engaged in general farming for three 
years, removing at the end of that time to Iowa township, where he purchased 
land. He bought at that time one hundred and thirty acres, which he increased 
from time to time, owning at the time of his death in 1902 four hundred acres 
of well improved and valuable property. He had survived his wife several years, 
her death having occurred in 1894. To their union were born four children: 
Joseph, of this review ; Josephine, who resides in Iowa township ; Annie, who 
became the wife of Charley Obitz, of La Crosse, Wisconsin ; and Elizabeth, 
who married John Blank, of Oregon. 

Joseph Hammel was still an infant when his parents removed to Iowa, and 
in this state he grew to manhood, dividing his time in his childhood between 
the work upon the homestead and attendance at district school. He continued 
to assist his father upon the farm until he was twenty-eight years of age, begin- 
ning his independent career in 1879. Naturally he turned his attention to the 
occupation to which he had been reared and, buying one hundred and thirty 
acres of land in Iowa township, six miles south of New Albin, engaged in 



342 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

general farming. This tract forms a portion of his present farm, but he has 
added to it as his prosperity increased, owning today five hundred acres of 
highly cultivated land. He has, besides, another tract of three hundred and 
sixty acres in Lansing township, and is one of the extensive landowners in this 
part of the county. Being thoroughly familiar with the best agricultural methods, 
he has directed his efforts intelligently through the years, success steadily 
attending his labors until today his farms are productive and valuable properties, 
and he himself is numbered among Allamakee county's substantial and progres- 
sive agriculturists. 

, Li 1880 Mr. Hammel was united in marriage to Miss Paulina Troentle, who 
was born in Baden, Germany, and who was brought to America by her parents 
when she was two years of age. They settled in Lansing township. Allamakee 
county, where the father purchased land, engaging in general farming there 
until his death, which occurred in 1895. He had survived his wife since 1887. 
They became the parents of eleven children, all still living: Lebold, who 
resides in Canada ; Verona, the wife of Frank Billymire, of Canada ; Mary, who 
married John Grow, a resident of the same country; Paulina, the wife of the 
subject of this review; Adaline. who married John Intlehc.ifer, of New Albin ; 
.•\nnie, the deceased wife of Frank Tablet, who has also passed away ; Katie, 
who died at the age of eighteen; Minnie, who married John Gruber, of Lansing; 
Fred and Joseph, both of whom reside in Canada ; and Joseiihine. who married 
Robert Glenn, of Lansing. Mr. and Mrs. Hammel have six children: Joseph, 
who was born in 1881, and who is married and lives near Lansing; ]\Iinnie, the 
wife of Frank Donovan, of Freeburg, Minnesota; Flora, who became the wife 
of George Mauss. of Allamakee county; Fred, who was born in 1887, and who 
still resides in Allamakee county; and George, born in 1892, and Cornelius, born 
in 1894, both of whom are still at home. The family are members of the Roman 
Catholic church. 

Mr. Hammel gives his political allegiance to the democratic partv, but has 
never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate his attention upon his 
business affairs, which are bringing to him a substantial measure of success. 
Having resided in Allamakee county since his childhood, he is well and favor- 
ably known here, his many excellent qualities of mind and character gaining 
for him the respect and confidence of all who are associated with him. 



CARL RUDNICK, 



Carl Rudnick, a progressive and enterprising farmer of Iowa township, 
where he owns a fine tract of land upon which he has resided since 1887. is a 
native of Germany, where he was born in 1857, one of a family of seven chil- 
dren, of whom he and one sister, who makes her home at La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
are the only surviving members. He spent his earlier life in his native country, 
there acquiring a public-school education, and in 1884 crossed the Atlantic to 
America, settling at New Albin, where he remained for three years. At the 
end of that time he bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres six miles 
southwest of the city, and upon this property he has since resided, winning in 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 343 

the course of years a substantial measure of success and a prominent place 
among the representative agriculturists of the locality. He has added forty 
acres to his original holdings, and upon this property engages in general farming 
and stock-raising, both branches of his activities being profitable and important. 

In 1886 Mr. Rudnick married Miss Anna Krunkalfeld, who was born in Ger- 
many in 1869, and who came to America in 1884. They have become the parents 
of five children: Adolph, who was born in 1886 and who lives at home; Mary, 
who was born in 1889 and who is the wife of William Gady, of Winona, Minne- 
sota ; Charley, who was born in 1893; Martha, born in 1898; and one who died in 
infancy. 

Mr. Rudnick is a democrat in his political beliefs, voting in general witli his 
party, but preserving the right of independent action should occasion warrant. 
He has served as township trustee of Iowa township, but is not active as an 
office seeker, preferring to devote all of his attention to his personal alifairs, 
which are ably conducted, making him today one of the prominent farmers and 
substantial citizens of the community where he has so long made his home. 



CLAUS E. EIDE. 



Claus E. Eide has given his energies and activities all during his life to agri- 
culture, cultivating at the present time a valuable farm of two hundred acres in 
Waterloo township, Allamakee county. He was born in this county in 1859, a 
son of Elling and Inga Eide, both natives of Norway, who came, however, to 
the United States in 1857. They established their home in Allamakee county, 
the father purchasing speculator's land on section 31, Waterloo township, and 
later becoming the owner of land on section 30, upon which he resided until his 
death in 1892. His wife survived for many years, her death occurring in 191 1. 
In their family were five children, of whom the subject of this review was 
the second in order of birth. The others are: Martha, who married John P. 
Morstad, and resides on the old homestead ; Ole, a resident of South Dakota ; 
Annie, the wife of Iver Johnson, of Spring Grove; and Jacob, of North Dakota. 
No event of special importance came to vary the routine of life for Claus 
E. Eide during the period of his boyhood and youth. He was reared on the old 
homestead, amid the wholesome environment of farm life, and under the direc- 
tion of his father early learned the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 
for the crops. He was twenty-seven years of age when he first became a land 
owner, his initial purchase giving him possession of an eighty acre tract which 
forms the nucleus of his present fine farm. Later he bought an adjoining forty 
acres and subsequently eighty acres more, so that now he has two hundred 
acres located on section 30, Waterloo township. This is a well improved prop- 
erty, equipped with modern machinery and substantial farm buildings, and its 
neat appearance bespeaks a life of industry and thrift on the part of its owner. 
He carries on general farming and stock-raising and his systematic methods 
and well directed efforts are proving potent forces in the acquirement of a cred- 
itable success. 



344 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Mr. Eide was married in 1889 to Miss Thea Stensgard, who was born in 
Norway, and when seventeen years of age came to the United States with her 
parents, the faniilv home being estabUshed in Allamakee county. Here her 
parents have since resided and here the father for a number of years engaged in 
farming, but is now living retired. In his family are six children, all of whom 
are yet living, Mrs. Eide being the fourth in order of birth. Unto Mr. and Airs. 
Eide have been born six children, as follows : Elmer, who was born in 1889 
and lives in North Dakota; Amanda, born in 189 1, who makes her home with 
her parents; Arthur and Alfred, twins, born in 1893, also at home; and Theo- 
line and Clarence, born in 1898 and 1906, respectively, who are attending school. 
The family attend the Lutheran church and are highly thought of in the com- 
munity in which they have so long resided. 

Mr. Eide is a republican, but has never sought nor desired office as a reward 
for party fealty. For more than a half century he has resided in Allamakee 
county, and has a wide acquaintance throughout the district in \\hich he lives, 
being highly esteemed and respected. His business methods are upright and 
straightforward and they have combined with his long experience and his 
detailed knowledge of agricultural methods in the promotion of a distinct and 
substantial success. 



ALBERT D. BENDER. 



Albert D. Bender needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, 
having been practically a lifelong resident of Allamakee county and closel) 
associated with its agricultural and commercial interests for many years. He 
relates many an interesting tale concerning the early days and the changes 
which have occurred as time has passed on. He was born in Clayton county, 
Iowa, near Monona, December 14, 1858, a son of Charles Wesley and Anna 
(Calkins) Bender. The father was born .April 18, 1832, and in early life be- 
came a carpenter, following the trade for a number of years. In fact, he was 
connected with that pursuit much of his life, although at ditferent times he en- 
gaged in farming. The family was established in this section of Iowa by his 
father, David Bender, who secured a tract of government land. Not a furrow 
had been turned nor an improvement made upon the place. In June the prairie 
was starred with a million wild flowers and in December was one dazzling and 
unbroken sheet of snow. Charles VV. Bender related many an interesting tale 
concerning the early days and the experiences of the pioneers. The family had 
come from Wisconsin to Iowa and after nearly a week spent at the new home 
the boy, who was acting as the party cook, began to feel very homesick. One 
Saturday his father called him : "Charlie, bake up something today and we will 
start home tomorrow." The thought flashed across his mind, "I'll make some 
fried-cakes just like mother used to." He knew she put eggs in them, but 
where to get eggs was the problem as there were no hens within several miles. 
Just above the Pagin spring was a slough and wading in he found blackbirds 
eggs on the grass. He used the eggs but years afterward described the fried- 
cakes as "just about as blue as the line on the paper which my ])en follows and 




MR. AND iir.S. Al.P.F.irr I). liKNDEK 



?u. 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 347 

as heavy as lead ... By main strength I fired them on the prairie." Mr. 
Bender in later years also described the first Fourth of July celebration held 
on Washington prairie, saying that as the national birthday of 1852 approached 
patriotic feelings thrilled in the breasts of the pioneers and a few made ar- 
rangements to celebrate the day. Mr. lender, with a yoke of oxen, went to a 
grove of pine trees, cut two, peeled them and made a flag pole between sixty 
and seventy feet high. At Moneek red and white cloth was purchased and a 
yard of blue cloth and the mothers of the neighborhood cut out white stars 
and made a fine flag, the first that ever floated over Washington prairie. This 
was hauled to a high ridge and everything made ready to raise the pole and 
unfurl the flag on the Fourth. The programme was carried out as planned and 
someone proposed: "Now let us name our beautiful prairie Washington 
prairie." After some years spent in Allamakee county, C. W. Bender again 
became a resident of Clayton county. He also lived in Nebraska for a short 
time — and after about a year spent in Clayton county he again came to Alla- 
makee county, settling in Franklin township. He soon afterward became a 
landowner and remained upon his farm for a number of years. Subsequently 
he removed to Dickinson county, Iowa, near Milford, where he continued for 
about five years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Allamakee 
county, making his home in Franklin township until his death, which occurred 
March 26, 1913. He was one of the best known pioneer settlers of this part of 
the state, honored and respected by all with whom he came in contact. He had 
long survived his first wife, who was born .-November 21, 1837, and passed away 
November 21, 1865. For his second wife he chose Miss Mary Jane Young, who 
lived near Monona, Clayton county, and who died May g, 1903. In early life 
the father engaged in merchandising for a short period at Frankville, but dur- 
ing the greater part of his life had been connected with the building business 
and had also been numbered among the enterprising farmers of his district. By 
his first marriage there were four children: Arthur, who died in 1908; Albert 
D. ; Honora, the wife of Louis Monty, of McGregor, Iowa ; and Flora, who died 
September 14, 1903. There were seven children of the second marriage: Henry 
Ward, who was born July 28, 1867, and is a farmer, residing in Luana ; Welthy 
May, who was born April i, 1869, and died May 16, 1869; Orlen Bert, who was 
born in November. 1872, and passed away December 6. 1875 : Owen L.. born 
April 9, 1874, residing at Forest Mills, where he follows carpentering; William 
Cressy, who was born May 8, 1876, and is a master mechanic of Waukon, Iowa; 
Elmer C, who was born June 25, 1878, and is a farmer and landowner, living 
at Forest Mills; and Percy Lee, who was born September 16, 1881, and makes 
his home at Forest Mills. 

Albert D. Bender began earning his own li\ing in the spring following the 
ninth anniversary of his birth. He was employed at trapping for two years. 
Pocket gophers were plentiful in those days and he received a bounty of ten 
cents a head from the farmers in the vicinity in addition to his board. In the 
winter time he worked for his board and the privilege of attending school. 
Subsequently he was employed as a farm hand and later engaged in clerking 
in a general store. When sixteen years of age he began contracting in a general 
way, employing men even at that early age. He possessed natural mechanical 
ingenuity and in carrying on that business was following in the business foot- 

Vol II— IS 



348 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

steps of his father. He was thus engaged up to the time of his marriage, which 
occurred when he was in his twenty-fourth year. He rented a farm for one 
year and then purchased a small farm near Forest Mills, making his home 
thereon for two years. At the end of that time he sold out and removed to 
Dickinson county where he cultivated a rented tract for two years. He after- 
ward spent a similar period in the herding business and later leased a ranch 
of ten thousand acres, on which he had fourteen hundred and fifty head of cattle 
under his care, employing three men to assist him. Because of failing health he was 
obliged to sell his lease and then returned to Franklin township, purchasing a 
small farm which he operated. He also engaged in contract work and in 1898 
he established a general store, of which his daughters took charge. He con- 
tinued his operations there until the fall of 1910, when he disposed of his 
property and business interests at Forest Mills and jiurchased his present farm of 
one hundred and twenty-three and forty-two hundredths acres. He carries on 
general farming, but gives the greater part of his attention to the live-stock 
business. He also still continues in the contracting business, with which he 
has been identified from the age of sixteen years. He now handles contracts 
in road building and devotes the greater part of his attention to contract work, 
his son looking after the farming interests. His has been a very active, busy 
and useful life. He has accomplished what he has undertaken and his life work 
shows what may be done when energy and determination lead the way. 

On the I2th of January, 1882, Mr. Bender was united in marriage to Miss 
Lydia Smith, who was born in Franklin township, December 18, 1863, and is 
a daughter of Robert and Clara (Clark) Smith, who were also natives of 
Allamakee county and of Scotch-Irish descent. The father, who was a farmer 
and landowner, is now living in Emmet county, Iowa, but the mother has 
passed away. Unto Mr. and IMrs. Bender were born four children: Edith M., 
the wife of Frank Russell, who is engaged in merchandising in Forest Mills; 
Clara A., the wife of Ernest Decker, a farmer of Franklin township ; Arthur 
F., who married Dottie Gibson and is residing on his father's farm in Franklin 
township; and one who died in infancy. Mr. Bender holds membersliip with 
the Modern Woodmen. He is a very prominent and influential citizen, having 
spent his entire life in this section of the state. The years have brought him 
success as a reward of his industry, determination and unabating energy. He 
well deserves mention among the leading citizens and worthy pioneer settlers. 
and few men are able to speak with more authority or accuracy concerning 
the early events which shaped the history of this part of the state. 



LEONARD ALDEN HOWE. 

The educational advantages which qualified Leonard Alden Howe for the 
duties of life were only such as the public schools afiford. Although not educated 
for any special line of work he has never feared to venture where opportunity has 
led the way, and the simple weight of his character and ability has carried him 
into important relations. As president of the Waukon State liank he ranks 
with the leading business men of the city, in which he has made his home 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 349 

for nearly a half century, for although born at Lansing, Iowa, he was only about 
a year old when brought to Waukon, where he has since lived. His birth 
occurred March ii, 1863, and he is descended from a long line of New England 
ancestry. His father, Leonard Henry Howe, traced his lineage back to John 
Howe, who settled in Sudbury, Massachusetts, in 1639, while the mother, Char- 
lotte E. (Spooner) Howe, is a descendant of William Spooner, who settled at 
Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1637. Leonard Henry Howe, son of Eli Howe, 
was born April 30, 1831, at Springfield, Vermont, and in the spring of 1857 
became a resident of Lansing, Iowa, where he entered upon the study of law in 
the office and under the direction of Samuel Kinne. In January, 1858, he was 
admitted to the bar and engaged in practice in Lansing with good success until 
1861, when he was elected treasurer and recorder of Allamakee county, the 
duties of both positions being at that time entrusted to one incumbent. He 
proved most capable and faithful in ofiice, making a creditable record in that 
connection to the time of his death, which occurred July 27, 1863. It was on the 
31st of January, 1861, that he had wedded Charlotte E. Spooner, a daughter 
of Colonel Jeduthan and Betsey (Webb) Spooner. Her father was born at 
Hardwick, Massachusetts, July 6, 1799, and for many years was the publisher of 
The Repository, a weekly paper which he removed from Burlington to St. 
Albans, Vermont. He continued a resident of New England until 1837, when he 
sought the opportunities of the growing west and took up his abode upon a farm 
in Walworth county, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1853, when he went 
to Waterville, Iowa. At that place, in company with his son Alden, he engaged 
in merchandising and also conducted a tannery and gristmill, the latter being 
still seen in the town, although long since abandoned for milling purposes. On 
the death of his son Alden on the 17th of April, 1857, Colonel Spooner removed 
to Lansing, Iowa, and afterward came to Waukon, where he died March 9, 
1867. His wife survived him for six years, passing away at Waukon, September 
29, 1873. Colonel Spooner was a brother of Wyman Spooner, who served as 
lieutenant governor of Wisconsin from 1864 until 1870. Mrs. Charlotte 
(Spooner) Howe was born in St. Albans, Vermont, September 6, 1836, and 
accompanied her parents on their removal to Wisconsin and later to Iowa. 
After the death of her first husband, Leonard Henry Howe, she became the 
wife of his brother, Lewis Eli Howe, on the loth of May, 1865. Her long life 
has been spent in active and useful work, her influence being one of positive 
uplift in the home and the church and an influence for good among all with 
whom she has come in contact. She is still living near her children in Waukon. 
Her second husband, Lewis Eli Howe, was born in Norridgewock, Maine, Sep- 
tember 13, 1822, and with his brother Leonard went to Lansing, Iowa, in 1857, 
removing to Waukon in 1865. He served as deputy county treasurer under his 
brother Leonard and afterward engaged in the real-estate business in Waukon 
for many years. He was an influential participant in many of the changes that 
took place during the early settlement of Allamakee county and was everywhere 
recognized as a man of sterling integrity and character. He died May i, 1885, 
leaving three children: Lewis L., who was born April 17, 1866, and died August 
27, 1889; Bessie S., who was born June 25. 1868, and was married September 
27, 1892, to .\rthur E. Pratt, their home being in Waukon ; and Horace A., who 



350 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

was born December 14, 1875. ^^^ married Evy Gibbs, November 2, 1898, and 
for a numljer of years has been engaged in the life insurance business. 

Leonard Alden Howe, who was the only child of his mother's first marriage, 
was brought to W'aukon by his mother and maternal grandfather soon after the 
death of Leonard Henry Howe. At the usual age he eiUered the public schools 
of this city and advanced through consecutive grades. In the school of experi- 
ence he has learned many valuable lessons, and has made his life one of use- 
fulness and activity. \\'hile he has advanced his personal success, he has also 
contributcfl to the general welfare in his advocacy and support of many meas- 
ures for the public good. His initial step in the Inisiness world was made on the 
1st of January, 1883, when he eiUered the W'aukon Bank as clerk and book- 
keeper, since which time he has been continuously connected with financial inter- 
ests. The bank was then a private institution owned by L. W. Hersey, G. VV. 
Stoddard and C. T. Granger, In April, 1892, the business was incorporated under 
the state law as the Waukon State Bank, at which time Mr. Howe became a 
stockholder and the assistant cashier. Two years later he was promoted to the 
position of cashier and so continued until the death of JMr. Hersey in 1903, 
when he was elected to the presidency of the bank and is still at the head of 
the institution. He recognizes the fact that that bank is most worthy of public 
confidence which most carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors and his 
progressive methods are tempered by a conservatism that maintains an even 
balance. Mr. Howe has been interested in other business enterprises in Waukon, 
and is recognized as a man of sound judgment, keen discrimination and unfal- 
tering energy. From 1S85 until 1888 he was associated with E. J. Spaulding in' 
the lumber lousiness, and from 1892 until 1900 he was in partnership with R. J. 
Alexander in the clothing business. However, his attention was largely given to 
the banking business, while his association with other concerns was that of an 
investor. In 1887 he became the local agent of the Northwestern Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Milwaukee and won success along that line, l)Ut in 1901 
turned this agency over to his brother Horace. 

Mr. Howe has been twice married. On the 14th of June, 1892, he wedded 
Miss Vesta Greer, who was born in W'aukon on the 23d of September, 1872, 
her parents being Isaac and Ann (Hatch) Greer. She was a graduate of the 
W^aukon high school in the class of 1891. By her marriage she became the 
mother of a daughter, \'esta. whose birth occurred April 14, 1894, and wrio 
passed away on the 4th of May following. The wife and mother died April 22. 
1894, only a few days after the birth of her child. Ten years later, on the 15th 
of September, 1904, Mr. Howe was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Blanche Hinkley. who was born in Cherokee county, Iowa, on the 31st of 
August, 1876, her parents being Myron and Anna (Briggs) Hinkley, of Mount 
\'ernon, Iowa. She is a graduate of the Le Mars Normal School of I.e Mars. 
Iowa, and also graduated in the three years' course in the college at Cedar 
Falls. In 1902. on the completion of the regular classical course, she won the 
degree of B. A. from Cornell College of Mount Vernon, Iowa. For two years 
prior to her marriage she acted as assistant principal of the high school at 
W'aukon. Mr. and Mrs. Howe have one child, .\lden, born May 3, 1909. 

yh. Howe belongs to W'aukon lodge, A. F. & A. M.. of which he was master 
in IQO^ :uid 11)04, •""''fl ^'"^ '''•'s also been high priest of Markwcll Chapter, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 351 

R. A. M., for eight years. He joined the Iowa National Guard in 1882 as a 
member of Company I of the Fourth Regiment, organized at Waukon. He 
remained a member of the company for alaout five years and afterward served 
as a non-commissioned officer on the staff of Colonel Thrift and of Colonel 
Stewart for about five years longer. Mr. and Mrs. Howe hold membership in 
the Presbvterian church, of which he is a trustee, while for thirty years he has 
been a church treasurer. His influence is always on the side of progress, reform 
and improvement. He has faithfully and capably performed the duties that 
each day has brought, and in every relation of life has measured up to the 
highest standards of manhood and citizenship. 



R. G. MAY. 



Various important business interests have at different times claimed the 
attention of R. G. May, and all have profited greatly by his energy, enterprise 
and ability. Today he is not only one of the progressive farmers, successful 
stock-raisers and extensive landowners of Iowa township, where he has resided 
since 1879, but he is likewise prominent in local politics and is classed with 
those citizens whose sterling worth, earnest purpose and fidelity to duty make 
them valued members of the community. 

Allamakee county numbers Mr. May among her native sons, his birtli having 
occurred on May's Prairie in 1858, his parents being John and Juliana May, the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of Delaware. Their marriage occurred 
in (3hio, and in 1852 they came to Iowa, settling in Lansing township, Allamakee 
county, where the father engaged in farming, buying a large tract of land, which 
he improved and developed until his deatli, which occurred when he was si.xty- 
five years of age. His wife has also passed away, having survived her husband 
for a numljer of years. Of their family of thirteen children five still survive : 
Henry and Roan C, of New Albin ; Margaret, who married Charles Feuerhelm, 
of May's Prairie; and Lois E., the wife of E. W. White, of Nebraska. 

R. G. May was reared upon his father's farm on May's Prairie and acquired 
his early education in district school No. 2, supplementing this by a course in 
business college at New Albin. After laying aside his books he turned his 
attention to farming, having already gained a practical knowledge of the best 
agricultural methods by aiding his father with the work of the homestead. He 
hafl also learned the carpenter's trade and this he followed in conjunction with 
agricultural pursuits until 1885, abandoning both lines of activity in that year in 
order to establish -a drug store in New Albin, an enterprise which he success- 
fully conducted for two years. At the end of that time he engaged in carpen- 
tering and contracting in that city and secured a large and profitable patronage 
as his abiliy and skill became widely known. In 1891 he disposed of all his 
business interests in New Albin and purchased, in partnership with C. N. Steel, 
a portion of the farm which he now owns. Their association still continues, 
and together they are the proprietors of over twelve hundred acres of well 
improved land, upon which they make a specialty of raising stock, their animals 
being of high grade and commanding a ready sale on the market. Mr. May 



352 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLA^IAKEE COUXTY 

owns also a great deal of improved property in New Albin and is connected 
with many of the most important Inisiness concerns in that city, being secretary 
of the New Albin Cooperative Creamery, secretary and a stockholder in the New 
Albin Manufacturing Company and a director in the New Albin iS: Irish Hollow 
Telephone Company. His business interests are at all times carefully and capably 
conducted and have been a source of great individual prosperity besides consti- 
tuting valuable elements in community advancement. 

Mr. May is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally is 
connected with the Yeoman and the Masonic lodge. Although he is a suc- 
cessful, reliable and discriminating liusiness man. lie has not by any means 
confined his attention to this one field, but has extended the scope of his activi- 
ties to include participation in public affairs, his influence being at all times on 
the side of right, reform and progress. He gives his political allegiance to the 
rcpuljlican party and has held various important positions of trust and responsi- 
bility, being at the present time secretary of the school board and city clerk 
of New Albin. His interests are largely identified with those of this section 
of the state, where he has resided since his birth, and at all times he is readv 
to lend his aid and cooperation to any movement calculated to benefit the section 
or advance its development. 



C. P. NIERLING. 



A native of Allamakee county, C. P. Nierling was born on December i6, 
1867, upon the farm of two hundred and ten acres on sections 27, 28 and 33, 
French Creek township, which he now owns. He is one of the substantial agri- 
culturists of his locality, and what he has achieved is largely due to his pro- 
gressive methods and the industry and energy which he has expended in the 
development of the property. His father was Anton Nierling, a native of Ger- 
many, who with his parents emigrated to America as a young man, after having 
served three years in the Germany army. He was born on the river Rhine in 
1826, and after his arrival in America, in about the year 1849, located in Lansing, 
where he lived for three years, after which he settled on Lansing Ridge, going 
two years later to French Creek ownship. He was a miller by trade and fol- 
lowed that occupation in the fatherland for several years, but upon coming 
to Iowa took up agricultural labors. Acquiring title to a tract of wild land 
of two hundred and sixty acres, he settled thereon, devoting his energies to 
clearing the land, breaking the soil and placing his acres under cultivation. He 
erected substantial buildings upon his land and continued in his pursuits with 
ever increasing success until his death, which occurred upon his farm in 1888, 
at the age of sixty-two years. He married in Lansing, Iowa, Miss Mary Anna 
Buck, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, who survived him for a number of 
years, passing away in VVaukon in 1902, at the age of sixty-eight years. In 
their family were ten children: J. J., of Jamestown, North Dakota; Mrs. M. 
Tillmony, of Ledyard, Iowa; Mrs. L. T. Tillmony, of Wells, Minnesota; Carrie 
M., of Ledyard, Iowa; Mrs. W. H. Kerndt, of Allamakee county; Herman, who 
died at the age of seven years; C. P., our subject; H. G., of Jamestown, North 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 353 

Dakota; A. T., a prominent banker and business man of W'aukon, of whom 
further mention is made elsewhere in tiiis work ; and \\\ F., of Algona, Iowa. 

C. P. Nierling was reared under the parental roof, and in the acquirement 
of his education attended the schools of the neighborhood. He early began to 
assist his father in the work of the home farm, acquiring thorough methods of 
operation, and ten years after the father"s death acquired the interests of the 
other heirs and now owns two hundred and ten acres of well improved land. 
The buildings are modern and up-to-date and perfectly suited for their purpose, 
while he has installed the most modern machinery in order to facilitate labor 
and improve the yield of his crops. As the years have passed Mr. Nierling has 
become recognized as one of the most substantial agriculturists of his district, 
and his success is well merited, as it is the outcome of close application, aug- 
mented by progressive methods. 

Mr. Nierling was united in marriage to Miss Barbara Keffler, a native of 
Allamakee county, by whom he had two children, Irene and Meta. After the 
death of his first wife he married Miss Melinda Smith, and of this union were 
born seven children : Anton, Myrtle, \'iola, Carlton, George, Leona and Arthur. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nierling are members of the Catholic church, to which they give 
their helpful support, and in his political faith he is a democrat. He has served 
for four years as township assessor and for one year as trustee, discharging 
his duties in a most satisfactory manner. Highly respected and esteemed, Mr. 
Nierling enjoys the good-will and confidence of his friends and neighbors for 
what he has accomplished and also on account of those qualities of mind and 
character which have made possible his success. 



WILHELM WIEMERSLAGE. 

During his entire active career Wilhelm VViemerslage has been engaged in 
farming in Allamakee county, and each year has brought him increased success 
in his chosen field of labor, so that he is today one of the leading representatives 
of agricultural interests in Iowa township, where he makes his home. He is 
one of the many sturdy, industrious and enterprising citizens whom Germany 
has given to America, his birth having occurred in the fatherland in 1868. When 
he was a young man he came with his parents to America, settling in Union 
City township, Allamakee county, Iowa, where the father purchased land and 
engaged in farming until his death, in 1886, the mother passing away some years 
later. To their union were born eight children, six of whom survive: Henry, 
who resides in Germany ; Gerhardt, of Union City township ; Wilhelm, of this 
review ; and August, Frederick and George, all of whom reside in Union City 
township. 

After his arrival in America Wilhelm Wiemerslage spent four years assist- 
ing in the work of the homestead, and in 1S93 purchased land of his own in 
Union City township, where he developed a profitable and well improved farm 
upon which he resided until 1906, when he moved into Iowa township, where 
he has since made his home. Here he purchased two hundred and seventy- 
four acres of land two and one-half miles west of New Albin, and he has one 



354 PAST AND PRESENT OP ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

hundred and thirty-five acres under cultivation, substantial harvests anruic'ily 
rewarding the practical care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. He 
has made excellent improvements upon the property which is today a profitable 
and productive one, and by many years of practical work and straightforward 
business dealings has made secure for himself a place among Allamakee county's 
representative and prosperous agriculturists. 

Mr. Wiemerslage married in 1893 Miss Emma Stehr, who was born in 
Wisconsin, a daughter of John and Katherina (Scheitel) Stehr, natives of Ger- 
many. The parents came to America in 1S68 and subsequently settled in Union 
City township, where the father passed away in 1910, the mother still making 
her home upon the farm. In this family were six children, five of whom sur- 
vive: William and Dora, who reside in Union City township; Emma, the wife 
of our subject; and Herman and Lena, also residing in Union City township. 
The deceased member of the family is August. Mr. and Airs. Wiemerslage 
are the parents of five children: George, who is now residing in Nebraska; 
and John, Albert, Ella and Leo, all of whom reside at home. The family are 
members of the Lutheran Evangelical church. 

Fraternally Air. Wiemerslage is connected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and he is a democrat in his political beliefs, taking an active interest 
in public affairs, although never seeking public office. In the county where he 
has resided for a quarter of a century he is well and favorablv known, his 
upright and honorable life and his high standards of business and personal 
integrity having gained for him the high respect, esteem and confidence of all 
who are associated with him. 



JAMES GREGG, 



Since 1893 James Gregg has conducted a profitable business in building 
material in Postville and by his energy, close application and unremitting industry 
has gained for himself a high place in business circles of the citv. He was born 
at Monona, Clayton county, Iowa, August 23, 1859, and is a son of John and 
Janet (Ferguson) Gregg, both of whom were born near Strathroy, Canada, the 
father's birth occurring December 28. 1817. The parents were married in 
Canada and in 1846 came to Iowa, locating on a farm at Monona, among the 
very earliest settlers in that section. The father continued to improve and 
develop his homestead until his death, which occurred in 1882, he having sur- 
vived his wife since 1864. They were the parents of six children, of whom the 
subject of this review was the youngest. 

In the acquirement of an education James Gregg attended public school at 
Walnut Grove and at Monona and after laying aside his books remained upon 
the farm until he was twenty years of age. At that time he went to work on 
a railroad but after a few months hired out as a farm laborer, working on 
neighboring properties for about eight years. When he was twenty-eight he 
formed a partnership with his brother and for four years thereafter engaged 
in the lumber business at Monona, at the end of that time selling out his interests 
to his brother. He continued, however, to reside in the cit\- until 1893. \\'hen he 




JAMES GREGG 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 357 

came to Postville, buying out the business belonging to J. H. Sanders, which 
he has since continued to conduct. He deals in all kinds of building material, 
cement, plaster and lime, and as a result of twenty years of honorable business 
dealing and unquestioned integrity now controls an important and profitable 
trade. He is a stockholder in the Citizens State Bank and in the Postville brick 
yard and his business interests, always carefully and capably managed, have 
brought him a gratifying measure of success. 

On October 3, 1883, Mr. Gregg married Miss Lydia Siglin, who was born 
near Scranton, Pennsylvania, June 11, 1862, a daughter of Daniel and Elmira 
(Englert) Siglin, both natives of the Keystone state. They came to Monona 
in 1867 and there the father engaged in farming, continuing to reside upon his 
property until his death, which occurred .'\ugust 21, 1902. He was survived by 
his wife until March, 1904. In their family were six children : Frederick, 
deceased ; John, who is a farmer near Alta, Iowa ; Nelson, a mechanic and con- 
tractor at Aurelia ; Lydia, wife of the subject of this review; Phineas Page, a 
druggist in Rexburg, Idaho; and Allan, a farmer near that city. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gregg are the parents of two children. John Loren, who was born August 17, 
1884, is now in the dray and transfer business in Postville. He married Miss 
Bertha Miller, a native of Post township, and they have one son, Keith Miller, 
born October 18, 1912. Guy Page, who was born January 13, 1888, is pitcher 
in the Three I Baseball League and when not thus engaged assists his father. 

Mr. Gregg gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has been 
a member of the school board and is now serving ably and conscientiously on 
the city council. He is connected with the Masonic lodge in Postville and has 
taken the thirty-second degree in Masonry at Cedar Rapids. He is connected 
also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He takes a great interest in 
the welfare and growth of the communit}- and is recognized as a loval, public- 
spirited and progressive citizen. In business life he is well known for his alert 
and enterprising spirit, and his salient characteristics are such as always win 
a gratifying success. 



THEODORE ROERKOHL. 

Although more than a decade has passed since Theodore Roerkohl has 
departed this life there are many who remember him as one of the prosperous, 
progressive and representative agriculturists of Waterloo township. He was 
a native of Germany, where he was born in 1829, and in 1S66 came to .America, 
locating first in Ohio, where he resided for two years. At the end of that time 
he came to Iowa and five years later established his home in Allamakee county, 
where he bought land and subsequently married. Throughout his entire life 
he followed agricultural pursuits, but for a period of six years he also operated 
a brewery in connection with his farming. He was energetic, industrious and 
thrifty, possessing in large measure those sturdy characteristics of the German 
race, and as the years passed his incessant labor and well directed efl^orts were 
fruitful of good results, returning to him a most gratif}-ing measure of success. 
At the time of his death he was the owner of two hundred and forty acres ot 



358 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

highly improved land in Waterloo township, three miles west of Dorchester 
upon which his widow still resides at the age of fifty-eight years. 

In 1877, in Allamakee county, Mr. Roerkohl was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Wensing, who was born in Germany and came to America when a little 
maiden of one year, with her parents, who established their home in Racine 
county, Wisconsin. Shortly afterward, however, they removed to Iowa, where 
the father died. The mother and her children then went to Dakota and there the 
mother's death occurred. In their family were eight children, of whom four 
survive, Mrs. Roerkohl being the youngest of the living children. She received 
her education in the schools of Wisconsin and Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Roerkohl 
became the parents of eight children, all yet living, namely : Joseph, of Cale- 
donia, Minnesota, who married Tillie Schulte and has two children, Herold and 
•Mary; Theodore, also of Caledonia, who married Therese Hill and has two 
children, Lionel and Howard ; Bernard, who operates a portion of the home- 
stead farm and who married, in 1907, Miss Anna Schulte, who by her mar- 
riage became the mother of one daughter, Bernadine; Henry, residing in Cale- 
donia, Minnesota ; Elizabeth, who married John Schiltz, of Houston county, 
Minnesota, and they have two daughters, Marcella and Helen ; Mary, the wife of 
Ben Schulte, of Dorchester, Iowa, by whom she has two daughters, Veronica 
and Mary ; Margaret, at home ; and William, operating, the homestead farm. 
All of these children received their education in the schools of Allamakee county. 
The family are communicants of the Catholic church, in the faith of which 
Mr. Roerkohl passed away in 1902, his remains being interred in St. Mary's 
cemetery in Waterloo township. 

In politics Mr. Roerkohl gave stalwart support to the democratic party, 
although the emoluments and honors of office held no attraction for him. All 
projects, having for their object the welfare of the community, however, found 
in him a ready champion and he was public-spirited in large degree. He had 
passed the Psalmist's allotted span of threescore years and ten ere departing 
this life, and with his demise Waterloo township lost one of its honored, repre- 
sentative and highly respected citizens. 



THEODORE ROUSTER. 

Prominent among the industrious, enterprising and successful farmers of 
Iowa township is numbered Theodore Rouster, the owner of two hundred and 
forty acres of rich and arable land upon which he has resided since 1903. His 
birth occurred in Luxemburg, Germany, in i860, and his parents both died 
there. In their family were four children : Theodore, of this review ; Michael, 
whose death occurred in Germany ; John, who is engaged in farming in Iowa 
township ; and Nicholas, a farmer in Jefferson township. 

In 1888 Theodore Rouster left Germany and crossed the Atlantic to America, 
coming immediately to Iowa township, Allamakee county, and turning his atten- 
tion to farming. He rented a tract of land located five miles west of New Albin 
and upon this he continued to reside for fifteen years, becoming during that time 
thoroughly familiar with the best agricultural methods and taking his place 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 359 

among the progressive and able farmers of this vicinity. In 1908 he purchased 
land of his own, buying two hundred and forty acres in the same township, and 
he has resided thereon continuously since that time. Upon the property he 
has made substantial improvements, erecting fine barns and outbuildings, and 
he makes a specialty of dairying and stock-raising, giving also a great deal of 
attention to raising chickens. Being a practical agriculturist, his labors are at all 
times intelligently directed and therefore productive of excellent results, all 
branches of his activities being important and profitable. He is a stockholder in 
the New Albin Creamery and in the Farmers Store of New Albin, and in busi- 
ness affairs is always progressive, able ami discriminating, qualities which form 
the basis of all his success. 

In 1888 Air. Rouster married Aliss Catherine Boltz, a native of Germany, 
who came to America in 1885, and after a short period of residence in Wiscon- 
sin, where she made her home with her brother, went to Minnesota, removing 
from that state to low-a. Her marriage occurred in Minnesota. She is a daugh- 
ter of Michael and Mary Boltz, both of whom died in Germany. In their family 
were twelve children, four of whom came to America. Mr. and Mrs. Rouster 
became the parents of ten children: John, who was born in 1889, and who is at 
home; Celia, who has passed away; Nicholas, who was born in 1892, and who is 
yet at home; Peter, who was born in 1896, and who also resides with his parents; 
a child who died in infancy; Jacob, who was born in 1898; Charley, who died 
in infancy; Mary, born in 1902; Joseph, born in 1904; and Elizabeth, born in 
191 1. The family are devout members of the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Rouster gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is 
active and progressive in matters of citizenship, although he neither seeks nor 
desires public office. He has resided in Allamakee county for twenty-five vears 
and is well known as a progressive and able agriculturist and a reliable and 
straightforward business man, fully meriting the confidence and good-will which 
are extended to him by his fellow-citizens. 



THOMAS E. BYRNES. 



Thomas E. Byrnes owns a fine farm of three hundred and seventy acres on 
sections 1 1 and 14, Hanover township, and in its cultivation is meeting with 
that success which rewards earnest, intelligent and persistent .labor. He is one 
of Allamakee county's most progressive and successful native sons, and the 
farm which he now owns constitutes the homestead upon which he was born in 
1875. He is a son of Thomas and Catherine Byrnes, natives of Ireland, who 
previous to their marriage came to Iowa. They settled first in Winneshiek 
county, where the father purchased land, and they afterward moved to Alla- 
makee county, where they continued to reside until their deaths. The father 
purchased a farm in Hanover township and was successful in its operation, 
dying upon his holdings in 1895. His wife survived him for many years, passmg 
away in 1909. To their union were born nine children: Eugene, who resides in 
North Dakota ; Annie, the wife of Thomas Collins, of Allamakee county ; Cath- 
erine, the wife of Michael Bresingham, of Allamakee county; Lawrence, who is 



360 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

operating part of the old homestead ; Thomas E., of this review ; Mary, the 
deceased wife of WilHam Gavel, of Allamakee county; Stacia, who married Pat 
Delaney ; Ellen, who became the wife of Michael Burke, also of Allamakee 
county ; and Margaret, who resides in St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Thomas E. Byrnes was reared under the parental roof and acquired his 
education in the district schools, learning farming by practical experience upon 
his father's property. He has never left the homestead, in the operation of 
which he continued to assist until his father's death, when he succeeded to the 
property, which he has since improved and developed. The farm is located on 
sections ii and 14, Hanover township, and two hundred and twenty-five acres 
are in a high state of cultivation, the entire property- reflecting the owner's per- 
sonal supervision and careful management. Mr. Byrnes engages in general 
farming and stock-raising and in addition operates a threshing outfit, all branches 
of his activity being profitable and important. 

In 1906 Mr. Byrnes was united in marriage to Miss Bridget McKenna, a 
native of Allamakee county and a daughter of Patrick and Margaret McKenna, 
the former born in Ireland and the latter in Iowa. For many years they resided 
in Allamakee county on a farm, and upon this property the father's death oc- 
curred in i(So2. His wife survives him and makes her home in Minnesota. To 
Mr. and Mrs. McKenna were born six children: Mary, the wife of John Blake, 
of Allamakee county; Margaret, who married Dennis O'Malley, also of Alla- 
makee county; Bridget, the wife of the subject of this review; Elizabeth, who is 
now Mrs. James Delaney, of Allamakee county ; Martin, deceased ; and Patrick, 
a farmer in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Byrnes have three children : Cyril P., 
born in 1907; Margaret, born in 1909; and Catherine M., born in 1912. 

Mr. Byrnes Ijelongs to the Roman Catholic church and politically affiliates 
with the democratic party. He is, however, not active in public afl:'airs, as he 
prefers to devote his entire attention to his farming interests, which are capably 
managed, bringing him a creditable position among Allamakee county's repre- 
sentative and substantial agriculturists. 



GEORGE W. HARRIS. 



The agricultural development of Allamakee county has been greatly stimu- 
lated by the activities of George W. Harris, who owns a valuable farm of two 
hundred and thirty acres in Postville township, on which he still lives, although 
he has now retired from active labor, leaving the most arduous duties of oper- 
ating his land to his son-in-law. As evidence of his success, it may be cited that 
he is also president of the Farmers Cooperative Company of Postville and of 
the Cooperative Creamery Company of this city. Moreover, he has other inter- 
ests and is a stockholder in numerous prosperous enterprises. 

George W. Harris was born in McConnelsville, Morgan county, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 22, 185 1, and is a son of Elisha and Margaret (Patterson) Harris, both 
natives of the same county. The father, who always followed agricultural pur- 
suits, came in 1854 to Iowa, locating at Lybrand, Post township, where he con- 
tinued successful in the operation of his farm until his demise in 1898. The 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAA/fAKEE COUNTY 361 

mother had passed away about five years previous to that time. In their family 
were fourteen children. 

George W. Harris was brought by his parents to Iowa when but a child and 
received his educational advantages in the district schools of Post township, 
the first school which he attended being conducted in an old-fashioned log 
schoolhouse located near what is now known as the Minert cemetery, so named 
for Mrs. Minert, who was the first to be buried there. Mr. Harris early began 
to assist his father with the work of the farm and acquired detailed information 
regarding agricultural operations. After laying aside his text-books he remained 
at home until twenty-one years of age, when he was married, continuing, how- 
ever, after that event, to operate his father's land for one year, at the end of 
which time he purchased part of the farm he now owns. When he acquiretl title 
to this property it was but a wilderness improved with a little log house and a 
small thatched stable. Courageous and persevering, however, he set to work 
breaking acre by acre until his land brought him gratifying returns. He began 
with eighty acres and, as his financial resources increased gradually, added thereto 
until he now owns a farm of two hundred and thirty acres highly improved and 
well under cultivation. His barns, outbuildings and sheds are modern and suit- 
ably equipped, liis residence is comfortable and all modern conveniences can be 
found therein, while he has installed the latest type of farm machinery in order 
to facilitate the labor and improve the productivity of the soil. Although Mr. 
Harris has retired from the more strenuous duties of the farm, leaving that 
part of the work to his son-in-law, he still supervises in a general way his farm- 
ing interests. The land is largely devoted to mixed farming, raising the grain 
suitable to soil and climate, but his live-stock interests are also important, he 
having given a number of years to the improvement of his strain of high bred 
Poland China hogs. As is but natural for a man of the business ability, enter- 
prise and alertness such as Mr. Harris possesses, he has become connected with 
allied and other interests and at present serves as president of the Farmers Coop- 
erative Company of Postville and in the same position in the Postville Cream- 
ery Company, being not only a large stockholder in these institutions, but also 
having done valuable work as an executive officer in promoting their growth 
and eft'ecti\'e operation. Mr. Harris is also a stockholder in the Clay Products 
Company, the canning factory of Postville. and is interested in the Piano Inter- 
national Machinery Company of Piano. Illinois. It is a cooperative concern 
formed by farmers in order to furnish them with machinery of the best grade 
at the lowest cost. Moreover. Mr. Harris is a factor in financial circles of 
Postville. being a stockholder in the Citizens Piank. 

The marriage of Mr. Harris to Miss Ella Laughlin occurred Alay 4. 1872. 
Mrs. Harris was born in Post township in 1853. on the farm which adjoins her 
present home. She is a daughter of John and Jane Laughlin. natives of 
Scotland, who became early settlers in this county, where the father attained 
prosperity as the result of a long, useful and active life as a farmer. Roth he 
and his wife passed away on the farm located next to Mr. Harris' and which 
is now occupied bv their son. J. R. Laughlin, Mr. and Mrs. Harris became 
the parents of six children: Warner, who married Miss Rachel Folsom and is 
now engaged in farming in Post townshiji : Nina, the wife of .Arthur \Y. Swen- 
son, an agriculturist of Franklin township: Hazel, who married Alonzo Folsom, 



362 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

who now has charge of the actual operation of Mr. Harris' farm; Mabel, the 
wife of Richard Folsom, a farmer of Franklin township; Gerald, at home; and 
Roger, deceased. He was the youngest of the family and a promising young 
boy of ten years, who lost his life by being accidentally shot. 

Although Mr. Harris has withdrawn from the most arduous labors in con- 
nection with farm work, he remains an important factor in the agricultural 
advancement of Allamakee county, to the development of which he has con- 
tributed in a considerable degree, while at the same time promoting his private 
interests. He is honored and respected in his vicinity as one who, by his own 
efforts, attained to a substantial place and one who always was as considerate 
of the interests of others as of his own. 



SAMSON A. HARRIS. 



Among the prosperous agriculturists of Allamakee county is Samson A. 
Harris, who has extensive holdings near I'ostville, owning a farm of three hun- 
dred and thirty acres. He is also interested in a number of important enter- 
prises. He was born at Caldwell, Ohio, March 24, 1862, and is a son of David 
McGary and Rosanna (Floyd) Harris. Both parents were also natives of Ohio, 
the father being born in Noble county. He always followed agricultural pur- 
suits in his native state and there passed away in 1892. The mother still makes 
her home in Ohio. David Harris made a distinguished military record in the 
war of the Rebellion, serving with valor and devotion for nine months and his 
death resulting from the effects of an affliction which he had contracted during 
the service. In his family were nine children, of whom our subject is the third 
in order of birth. 

Samson A. Harris, in the acquirement of his education, attended public 
school in Noble county, Ohio, which state he left in 1S81 in order to come to 
Iowa, where he accepted employment with his uncle, Elisha Harris, there 
remaining for four years. By thrift and energy- he acquired the means which 
enabled him to purchase the farm upon wliich he now lives, the nucleus of his 
holdings consisting of sixty-seven acres, to which he has since added at various 
times until his property now comprises three hundred and thirty acres. He 
devotes his attention to general farming and also gives a good deal of his time 
to stock-raising. His buildings are modern and up-to-date and his equipment 
and machinery of the latest type. The appearance of his place speaks well for 
the methods he employs and stands as ex'idence of his prosperity. Mr. Harris 
has become interested in other enterprises and is a stockholder in the Postville 
Canning Factory and in the Clay Products Company. He also holds stock in the 
Farmers Implement Company of Piano, Illinois, and the Citizens Bank of Post- 
ville. 

On September 22, 1885, occurred the marriage of Mr. Harris and Miss Ida 
Smith. She was born in Post township in 1864 and is a daughter of John N. 
and Susan (Lee) Smith, both natives of New York. They came to Iowa before 
their marriage and the father resided a short time in Decorah before removing to 
Post township. Here he acciiiired land, to the cultivation of whicli he devoted 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 363 

the remainder of his Hfe, passing away in 1895. Plis wife still survives, residing 
in Post township. In their family were eight children, of whom but two are 
now living, including Mrs. Harris. Mr. and Mrs. Harris have two daughters : 
Lila, who is teaching school at Waukon and resides at home ; and Leone, who 
pursues her education in Toledo, Iowa. 

Mrs. Harris and daughters are members of the United Brethren church, to 
which Mr. Harris gives his helpful support. His political faith is that of the 
republican party and, although he keeps intelligently informed upon all issues 
involved, he has never aspired to public ofifice. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
Starting out in life with no particular advantages, Mr. Harris has again proven 
the fact that success is but ambition's answer and that industry and honesty 
will win the day. While he has become one of the most prosperous agriculturists 
of his section, he has been a factor in the general advancement, and is recognized 
as a forceful element in the community, where he is highly respected and esteemed 
bv all who know him. 



THOMAS FOLSOM. 



Thomas Folsom, one of the most progressive and well known farmers of 
Post township, owns and operates a fine property of one hundred and twenty 
acres, upon which he has resided since 1887. He was born in Ripley county, 
Indiana, on the i6th of April, 1849, and is a son of Benjamin and Sarah (Web- 
ster) Folsom, both natives of that state, the former born May 15, 1816, and 
the latter on the 29th of May, 181 8. In early life the father engaged in milling 
in Indiana. He came to Iowa in 1865, turning his attention first to farming and 
afterward to his former occupation, becoming connected with the Myron mill, 
wherein he remained employed for ten years thereafter. At the end of that 
time he secured a position in another mill a short distance down the river but 
after five years there was taken sick and retired from active life, dying on the 
29th of October, 1883. In addition to his activity as a miller he was also a 
well known Baptist minister, preaching the doctrines in which he believed, at 
intervals, for many years although he never had charge of any church. His 
wife survived him a number of years, dying on the 5th of January, 1912. They 
had a large family of children, of whom the subject of this review was the 
fifth in order of birth. His oldest brother was killed during the Civil war on the 
Chickamauga battlefield. 

Thomas Folsom accjuired his education in the district schools of Indiana and 
came with his parents to Iowa in 1865. When he was fifteen years of age he 
began working as a farm hand by the day and month and so continued until 
he was' twenty-eight years, when he married and rented a farm in Post town- 
ship which he developed and improved for some time, buying in 1887 the land 
in Post township upon which he still resides. The years have brought him 
steadily increasing success in his farming operations, for his methods have 
been at all times practical and progressive and his industry unflagging. He is a 
successful grain grower and an extensive stock-raiser and his farm is one of 



364 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

the finest in this part of Allamakee county, its excellent condition reflecting 
his many years of care and labor. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Co- 
operative Store at Postville and in the Cooperative Creamery and is known as 
a far-sighted, reliable and discriminating business man. 

On September 30, 1877, Mr. Folsom married Miss Eliza N. Ewing, who was 
born in Post township, this county, October 24, 1857. She is a daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Clark) Ewing, natives of Hamilton county, Indiana, 
the father a plasterer and mason by trade. They came to Iowa in the spring 
of 1858 as pioneers and located on Yellow river, in Post township, where 
Thomas Ewing purchased land. He later sold his holdings and thereafter 
worked at his trade until his death, which occurred on the 22d of September, 
1887, when he was sixty-one years of age. He and his wife became the parents 
of twelve children, of whom Mrs. Folsom is the fifth in order of birth. Mr. 
and Mrs. Folsom have ten children. Lonnie, who was born August 10, 1878, 
married Hazel, a daughter of George Harris and they now reside on the Harris 
farm. Rachel, born September 4, 1879, married Warner Harris, of whom 
further mention is made elsewhere in this work, William, born September 25, 
1881, is a painter by trade. He married Miss Josephine Getkins and they re- 
side in Postville. Lee, who was born September 20, 1883, married Miss Bertha 
Hammel and they make their home on a farm two miles southeast of Postville. 
Richard, whose birth occurred on the 3d of February, 1886, married Mabel 
Harris, a daughter of George Harris, and they reside on a farm near Hardin, 
in Franklin township. Melbert, who was born February 9, 1888, resides 
at home. Austin, born May 3, 1890, is also at home. Angle, born September 
5, 1892, is the wife of Earl Hammel, a farmer in Ludlow township. Gilbert, 
born November 16, 1894, is residing on the home farm. Milo. the youngest 
member of the family, was born August 19, 1897. 

Mr. Folsom affiliates with the Modern Brotherhood of America. He devotes 
practically his entire time to his farm and his labors during the twenty-six 
years of his residence upon it have been rewarded by success, so that he stands 
today in the front ranks of successful and progressive agriculturists. 



JAMES T. BULMAN. 



James T. Bulman needs no introduction to the readers of a history of 
Allamakee county, for his name has long been an honored one in this section 
of Iowa, to which his father came as a pioneer and where he himself has 
through his industry, honesty and success won a high place among the pro- 
moters of its agricultural development. He is at present operating a fine farm 
in Union City township and gives a great deal of his time and attention to its 
further cultivation. He was born in Allamakee county, October 6, 1S57, and 
is a son of Thomas Bulman, whose birth occurred in Thetford, Cambridgeshire, 
England, on the 6th of April, 1828. The father spent his boyhood and youth 
in that country and there worked as a farm hand and at railroading. On the 
6th of October, 1848, he married Miss Phoebe Stocks, also a native of Cam- 
bridgeshire, and on the 31st of the same month they sailed for America on the 











^-5 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 367 

W. \'. Kent, a sailing vessel, which arrived at New Orleans on the 9th of De- 
cember, it requiring five weeks and four days to make the voyage. After re- 
maining in that city for a short time they went to Evansville, Indiana, in the 
spring of 1849 and there Mr. Bulman served an apprenticeship as a bricklayer 
and plasterer, at which occupations he worked until October 6, 1854, when he 
started for Iowa, driving overland by team and arriving in LTnion City township, 
Allamakee county, on the last day of October. There Mr. Bulman entered land 
and at once began the construction of a log cabin. He continued to live upon 
that farm until his retirement from active business life in 1888. He had in the 
meantime accumulated eight hundred acres and this property he sold in that year 
to his two sons, James and Thomas, and took up his home in Waukon, where he 
now resides, having reached the age of eighty-five. His wife passed away in 1892. 
He and his wife became the parents of the following children ; Mary, the 
deceased wife of William Cummings; Mrs. Alice Green, the widow of L. M. 
Green, of Montana ; Emma, who married Alfred Beardmore ; James T., of this 
review ; Thomas S., who resides in Pawnee county, Oklahoma ; Carrie, the wife 
of Benjamin Hartley, of Allamakee county; Jason C, who resides in Waterloo 
township; Walter W., an attorney of Chariton, Iowa; Anna P., who married 
William Rayburn, of Portland, Oregon; John, who has passed away; Samuel, 
who died in infancy, and Phoebe, who is also deceased. 

James T. Bulman spent his childhood upon his father's farm, attending dis- 
trict school, and when not engaged with his books, assisting with the cultivation 
of the homestead and becoming in this way before he had attained his majority 
a practical and able agriculturist. He began his independent career by renting 
a portion of the home farm and this he continued to develop until after his 
father's retirement, when he purchased three hundred and sixty acres, which 
he still owns. Upon it he has made substantial improvements, erecting the 
necessary barns and outbuildings and installing modern machinery, and he has 
by his well directed and practical labors made the farm a productive and 
profitable property, evidencing everywhere the care and skill of an able agri- 
culturist. Mr. Bulman has six hundred and forty acres of Canada land. He is 
a stockholder in the First National Bank of Waukon and is well known as a 
resourceful, far-sighted and progressive business man. 

In 1880 Mr. Bulman was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Hartley, a 
native of Allamakee county and a daughter of Francis and Hephzibah Hartley, 
who were born and married in England and who came to America in a sailing 
ship, being seven weeks at sea. They landed in New York and, making their 
way inland, settled in Wisconsin and came to Iowa in the early '50s, living in 
Allamakee county until their deaths. Of the large family of children born to 
their union five survive besides the wife of the subject of this review: John 
W., who lives in Allamakee county ; Susan, who married Henry Allpress, of 
Nebraska ; Alice E., the wife of Thomas Henderson, of California ; James W., 
of Lansing, Iowa ; and Francis, who lives in Los Angeles. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bulman became the parents of seven children: Frank T., now serving as 
county treasurer of Allamakee county; Ethel and Mabel, who died in infancy; 
Nellie, who married Robert Weymiller, of Allamakee county; and Leonard T-. 
Alfred C. and A. J., who live at home. The family are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. 



368 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

^Ir. Bulman is connected fraternally with the ^lasonic lodge, the Modern 
Brotherhood of America and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a 
republican in his political views and has served in various important official 
positions, including those of township trustee and sheriff of .Allamakee county. 
He is interested in all that pertains to the general progress and growth of his 
native community, being at all times a progressive and public-spirited citizen, 
and in his business life he has illustrated the value of integrity and industry, 
having won his prosperity through intense and well directed energv. 



LAMES \V. HARRIS. 



James W. Harris, who has devoted his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits throughout his entire business career, is the owner of a well improved and 
valuable farm of two hundred and eighty acres on section lo, Post township. 
His birth occurred in Noble county, Ohio, on the 24th of March, i860, his par- 
ents being David M. and Rosanna (Floyd) Harris, likewise natives of the 
Buckeye state. The father spent his entire life in Ohio and followed farming 
during his active business career. At the time of the Civil war he valiantly 
defended the L'nion as a member of an Ohio regiment. His widow still resides 
in that state. 

James \V. Harris, v.-ho was the second in order of birth in a family of nine 
children, obtained his education in the schools of his native state and remained 
under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. Subsequently he 
worked as a farm hand for about five years and then purchased a tract of hind 
in Post township, Allamakee county, Iowa, continuing its cultivation for about 
ten years. On the expiration of that period he disposed of the property and 
bought the farm on which he has resided continuously since and which comprises 
two hundred and eighty acres of rich and productive land on section 10 in Post 
township. He operates the place as a general stock farm and has won a gratify- 
ing measure of success in his undertakings. It is a model and modern farming 
property, and all of the improvements thereon stand as monuments to his thrift 
and enterprise. Mr. Harris is a stockholder in the farmers' store and the Post- 
ville creamery and is widely recognized as a substantial and representative citizen 
of the community. 

On the 17th of February, 1887, Mr. Harris was united in marriage to Miss 
Carrie L. Segrist, a daughter of Louis and Mary Ann (Joyce) Segrist. The 
father's birth occurred in Ohio in 1832, while the mother was born in Indiana 
on the 29th of September, 1842. Louis Segrist, whose father died before he 
was born, came to Iowa in boyhood. He followed agricultural pursuits during 
his entire business career, being first employed as a farm hand and later becom- 
ing a landowner in Post township, where his demise occurred on the 22d of 
January, igo2. His widow now makes her home with her children. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harris are the parents of nine children, as follows: Martin E., who was 
born on the 14th of May, 1888, and resides at home; Mae Rose, born February 
6, 1890, who is the wife of Joseph Evans, of Postville : Ethel M., whose birth 
occurred on the Tith of June, 1891, and who gave her hand in marriage to William 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 369 

Fast, of Zanesville, Ohio; Obert, born January 13, 1893, who wedded Miss 
Clara Klein and follows farming in Post township ; Ella Caroline, who was born 
on the 3d of April. 1894, and is the wife of Fred Lawson, a farmer of Post 
township; Dora Irene, who was born March 19, 1899, ^""^1 is attending school; 
John Frederick, whose birth occurred on the 22d of January, 1901, and wiio 
is likewise attending school; Florence, whose natal day was December 21, 
1903; and Marie Lucile, whose birth occurred June 13, 191 1. 

In politics Mr. Harris is a republican, but the honors and emoluments of 
office have never had any attraction for him. His fraternal relations are with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has many friends in the community 
which has been his home for more than a quarter of a century, and well merits 
the regard and esteem which are uniformly accorded him. 



JAMES H. BEARDMORE. 

James H. Beardmore, who has for seventeen years been prominently con- 
nected with farming interests of Allamakee county and who is today considered 
one of the most able and progressixe agriculturists of Union City township, is a 
native of this section of Iowa, born in i86g. His parents. William and Sarah 
Beardmore. were natives of England and were married in that countrv, where 
their three eldest children were born. They came to America in 1853 and after 
about ten years spent in the eastern states came to Iowa, settling in Union City 
township in 1865. Here the father o])erated a ferry boat across the Ui)per 
Iowa river and at the same time conducted a blacksmith shop, dividing his atten- 
tion between the two occupations until he turned his attention to farming, at 
which time he abandoned the operation of the ferry but continued to manage 
his blacksmith and horseshoeing establishment. He made additional purchases 
of land from time to time, finally accumulating two hundred and sixty acres, 
which he developed and improved along modern and practical lines until his 
retirement in 1897. In that year he laid aside the cares of active business life 
and moved to Xew Albin, where he now resides. His wife passed away in 
April, 1896. They became the parents of ten children ; twins, who died in in- 
fancy ; and three. Ambrose. Agnes and Laura, who have also passed away. The 
others are: William, .-Mfred and Lynn T., of Union City township; John, who 
is a butcher in Charles City, Iowa; and James H., of this review. 

After acquiring a good education in the public schools of Union City town- 
ship James H. Beardmore turned his attention to farming and in 1896 bought 
the family homestead of two hundred and twenty acres, upon which he has since 
resided, giving most of his time to its improvement and development. The 
farm is situated ten miles and a half above New Albin and Mr. Beardmore has 
one hundred and forty acres under high cultivation. Upon it he has made sub- 
stantial improvements, erecting the necessary buildings and installing the needed 
equipment, and his farm is today one of the finest in this section of Allamakee 
county, reflecting in its neat and attractive appearance the careful supervision 
and practical methods of its owner, who is a progressive and able agriculturist. 



370 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

In addition to general farming he is also a stock buyer and seller on an extensive 
scale and is connected as a director with the Farmers Store of New Albin. 

Mr. Beardmore is affiliated with the republican party but. although he served 
for twelve years as a member of the school board, doing able and conscientious 
work, he never seeks public office. In the community where he was born and 
where his entire life has been spent he is well and favorably known and his in- 
dustry and enterprise have not only enabled him to attain prosperitv InU have 
won him a high place in the respect and esteem of his neighbors. 



J. S. QUANDAHL. 



J. S. Quandahl, owner of the Ouandahl Mercantile Store, the largest enter- 
prise of its kind in Allamakee county outside of Waukon, is one of the best 
known business men in Waterloo township and his record in the control of his 
extensive interests is a credit to a name that has here been honored and re- 
spected since pioneer times. He is one of Allamakee county's native sons, his 
birth having occurred in Waterloo township in 1876, his parents being Nels and 
Julia Quandahl. The parents came to America in 1854 and after settling in 
Winneshiek county came from there to Waterloo township, Allamakee county, 
in the early '70s. In the community which is now known as Quandahl the father 
bought a mercantile store which since that time has been one of the strong and 
reliable commercial institutions in this vicinity. The father remained active in 
its conduct until his death in 1910, having survived his wife one year. To their 
union were born nine children: Lena, the wife of Henry Opheim, of Water- 
loo township: J. S., of this review; Clara, deceased; Ella, the wife of Charles 
Johnson, of Canada ; Martha, who married Val Lopshire, of Minnesota ; Nettie, 
who lives at home ; Arthur, who has passed away ; Edward, a resident of Canada ; 
and Arthur, who lives at home. 

J. S. Quandahl was reared in his parent's home and acquired his education 
in the public schools of Allamakee county, supplementing this by a business 
course at Decorah, Iowa. After laying aside his books -he entered into partner- 
ship with his father in the conduct of the Quandahl Mercantile Store and their 
association continued until 1906, during which time Mr. Quandahl of this re- 
view became known as a resourceful, far-sighted and progressive business man, 
thoroughly familiar with every detail connected with general merchandising. 
Upon the death of his father he purchased the entire stock and the store, and 
he is now carrying on the business alone, a large and constantly increasing 
patronage being accorded to him in recognition of his upright and honorable 
business methods, his known reliability and his earnest desire to please his 
patrons. Mr. Quandahl owns also the old homestead of sixty acres in Water- 
loo township and a fine modern residence. He is treasurer and a large stock- 
holder in the Arctic Springs Creamery Association and his ability is widely 
known and respected. 

In 1904 Mr. Quandahl was united in marriage to Miss Petra Seines, a native 
of Winneshiek county and a daughter of Edward and Anna Seines. The par- 
ents were born in Norway and came to America in i860, just before the outbreak 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 371 

of the Civil war. The father served for four years in that conflict and after 
receiving his honorable discharge returned to Iowa, settling in Highland town- 
ship, Winneshiek county, where he purchased land. He became a prominent 
and successful agriculturist, operating his extensive holdings until his death, 
which occurred in 1913. His wife survives him and resides upon the home- 
stead. To their union were born nine children, seven of whom survive, the 
wife of the subject of this review being the third in order of birth. She ac- 
quired her education in the public schools of Iowa, and was also for a time a 
student at an agricultural school in Minnesota. She and her husband have two 
daughters: Alma J., who was born in 1905; and Norma E., born February i, 
1913. The family are members of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Quandahl is a republican and always a stanch upholder of the prin- 
ciples and policies of that party. The cause of education finds in him an intelli- 
gent champion and he has done much toward its promotion through his able 
service as president of the Bear Creek school district. He has made an excellent 
record as a merchant and farmer and conducts his interests in such a way that 
each year adds to his prosperity. Energetic and efficient, always mindful of his 
duty to others and known as a progressive and useful citizen, he is a native son 
of whom Allamakee county has every reason to be proud. 



D. J. KELLEY. 



Farming and stock-raising interests of Allamakee county find a progressive 
and worthy representative in D. J. Kelley, who owns a fine property of one hun- 
dred and sixty-five acres in Iowa township. He is one of Allamakee county's 
native sons, his birth having occurred in 1S69. His parents were Patrick and 
Bridget Kelley, natives of Ireland, who came at different times to the United 
States, both settling in New York city, where their marriage occurred. Imme- 
diately afterward they came west to Iowa and in Iowa township, Allamakee 
county, rented land, upon which they resided for a time, later purchasing a farm 
six miles southwest of New Albin, which the father continued to develop and 
improve until his death, which occurred in 1910, becoming during that time one 
of the leading and representative agriculturists of this section of the state. His 
wife survives him and resides upon the homestead, being now eighty years of 
age. To their union were born five children, four of whom still survive: D. }., 
of this review; John F., of New Albin; Annie, who makes her home with her 
mother ; and Edward, who also lives upon the homestead. 

D. T. Kelley grew to manhood upon his father's farm in Iowa township, 
acquiring his early education in the district schools and later attending a busi- 
ness college at Waukon. At the age of twenty-five he began his independent 
career, turning his attention to the occupation to which he had been reared, 
renting land near the old homestead and continuing to develop and improve it 
for a number of years. In 1908 he bought eighty acres in the same vicinity and 
to this he has since added, being now the owner of one hundred and sixty-five 
acres, which he has brought to a well improved and excellent condition. In 
connection with the tilling of the soil he engages extensively in raising and 



372 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

breeding high-grade stock and this forms one of the most important sources of 
his income. He is also a stockholder in the New Albin Creamery, a director 
and stockholder in, the Farmers Telephone Company and secretary of the New 
Albin & Irish Hollow Telephone Company and is well known in business circles 
of the city as a resourceful, able and progressive lousiness man, who always car- 
ries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

In 1899 Mr. Kelley was united in marriage to Miss Ella Morgan, a daughter 
of Lawrence Morgan, who passed awa,y, leaving a widow, who resides in New 
Albin, and six children, as follows: Mary, the wife of Mathew Flynn, of Dor- 
chester, Iowa; Ella, the wife of the subject of this review; Maggie, who married 
Michael Donovan, of New Albin; Theresa, now Mrs. William Beckwell. of the 
same city ; Alice, a sister in St. Francis Convent : and Francis, who makes his 
home near New Albin. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley are devout members of the Roman 
Catholic church and Mr. Kelley is affiliated with the Catholic Order of Forest- 
ers. Always a stanch supporter of democratic policies and principles, he has 
done a great deal to promote his party's cause in Allamakee county and in 1912 
was elected township assessor, a capacity in which he is still serving. He is a 
believer in pure and clean politics and never withholds his support from any 
enterprise which he Iielieves will advance the moral or material welfare of his 
citv or countv. 



WILLIAM SADLER. 



The death of William Sadler in 1891 deprived agricultural interests of Alla- 
makee county, and indeed of the state of Iowa, of a most progressive and worthy 
representative, for he settled on his farm in Union City township in pioneer times 
and for thirty-six years continued to carry forward the work of improvement, 
making substantial and tangible contributions to the general expansion and 
progress of this section of the state. 

Mr. Sadler was born in Cambridgeshire, England, on the 27th of ^^lay, 1827, 
and in his native country acquired his education, there remaining until he was 
twenty- four years of age. In 185 1 he crossed the Atlantic to America, settling 
first in Indiana, where he remained for four years, removing at the end of that 
time to Iowa. He settled in Allamakee county in 1855 and purchased land in 
Union City township, a property upon which he continued to reside until his 
death. Throughout the years he steadily carried forward the work of cultivation, 
facing at first the obstacles and difficulties incident to pioneer existence with con- 
fidence and courage and gradually developing a fine farm, well improved and 
highly productive, and worthy of comparison with the best in this state or else- 
where. From time to time he added to his holdings and at the time of his death 
was the owner of three fine farms in this township, whereon in addition to culti- 
vating the fields he engaged extensively in stock-raising, feeding and fattening 
cattle as well as sheep and hogs. He became known as one of the section's 
most representative, progressive and substantial agriculturists, leading in all proj- 
ects or measures for the general advancement and lending the weight of his in- 
fluence to movements of reform and progress, and thus it was that at his death, 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 373 

in i8yi, Allamakee county lost not only a practical and successful farmer but also 
a public-spirited and loyal citizen. 

Mr. Sadler married, in 1855, in Indiana, Miss Mary Bulman, also a native of 
Cambridgeshire, England, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Bulman. The father 
died in England and afterward in 1874 the mother came to America, settling in 
Union City township, where her death occurred in 1885 when she was eighty-one 
years of age. In this family were twelve children, four of whom survive : Thomas, 
of Waukon ; Mary, the widow of the subject of this review ; George, of Allamakee 
county: and Ann, the widow of James Goose, of England. Mr. and Mrs. Sadler 
became the parents of seven children : Eliza, who died when she was twenty-one 
years of age ; Joseph G., who is farming part of the old homestead ; Mary E., the 
wife of William Beardmore, of Union City township; William M., who also lives 
upon the homestead ; John B., who passed away when he was thirty-one years of 
age; J. Edward, who cultivates a portion of his father's farm; and Ada J., the 
wife of John Martin, who is engaged in farming near the Sadler homestead. 

J. Edward Sadler is today considered one of the most progressive and, 1 de- 
servedly successful farmers in this part of Allamakee county and in the cufti- 
vation of his portion of the homestead is ably carrying forward the work which 
his father began in pioneer times. He now owns more than five hundred acres 
of fine land in Union City township which he has improved and developed along 
modern lines, winning in its cultivation that success which rewards earnest, well 
directed and persistent labor. He married in 1895 Miss Rose Wilde and to their 
union were born five children: Clyde E., who was born in 1898 and who is a 
graduate of the public schools; Myrtle F., who was born in 1900 and who is at- 
tending school; Alton B., who died in infancy: Helga M., born in 1905; and 
Arthur William, born in 191 1. Mr, and Mrs. Sadler have also reared an orphan, 
Elmer W. Bailey, now twenty-three years of age and a resident of Elgin, Iowa. 

William Sadler was always a stanch adherent of the republican party and as a 
progressive and public-spirited citizen supported loyally all movements for the 
promotion of general progress, advancement and reform. His name stood for 
reliability in business, fidelity in citizenship and honor and loyalty in all relations 
of life and his memory will long be cherished by those who knew his genuine per- 
sonal worth and were fortunate enough to have come within the close circle of 
his friendship. 



FRED N. MEYER. 



Fred N. Meyer, who since 1890 has lived upon his present farm in Allamakee 
county, where he is numbered among the prominent and representative agricul- 
turists, was born in Germany in 1853. He is a son of Fred and Hanna Meyer, 
both natives of Germany, where the mother died in 1886. In the following year 
the father came to .America and settled in .\llamakee county, Iowa, where the re- 
mainder of his life was spent, his death occurring in 1908. 

At the age of thirty Fred N. Meyer left Germany and crossed the .Atlantic to 
America, settling in .Allamakee county in 1883, and for two years thereafter he 
worked as a farm laborer, following this by three years' connection with rail- 



374 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

reading. In 1888 he again turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, working 
in the employ of others for two years, after which he bought land of his own, 
the tract which he purchased constituting a portion of his present farm. It was 
raw and unimproved and he had to clear it of timber before beginning the work 
of cultivation. This, however, he has steadily carried forward through the years, 
and adding to his holdings as circumstances justified he owns today two hundred 
and tw'enty-two acres of the finest and best improved land in Iowa township. 
There are excellent buildings upon the property where Mr. Meyer carries on 
diversified farming, his stock-raising interests being an important source of in- 
come to him. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Bank of New Albin, the 
Farmers Produce Cooperative Company and the Farmers Telephone Company, 
and his business investments have always been made with discrimination and 
have therefore resulted profitably. 

Mr. Meyer married in 1886 Miss Kate Krukenberg, who was born in Ger- 
many and who came to America in 1883. They have become the parents of seven 
children, Dora, George, Herman, Emma, Minnie, William and Laura, all at home. 
The family are members of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Meyer is a republican in his political beliefs and has always taken an 
active interest in public aft'airs, serving in various responsible official positions. 
He was elected township trustee in 1908 and is now in his third term and he is 
in addition secretary of the township school board. He is a progressive, reliable 
and enterprising citizen and is well known and favorably regarded in the com- 
munity, to the agricultural development of which he has made substantial con- 
tributions in the past twenty-five years. 



CHARLES G. HELMING. 

Charles G. Helming is one of the most prosperous and successful farmers 
and stock-raisers of Allamakee county and the Pleasant Grove Stock Farm 
comprises one hundred and eighty acres of fine land on section i, Ludlow town- 
ship, a visible evidence of his life of industry and thrift. He is a native son of 
this county and was born on a farm adjoining the one he now owns on the 27th 
of January, 1864. His father, Frederick W. Helming, was born in Germany 
in 1823 and grew to manhood in his native country, marrying there Miss Char- 
lotte Kruckenberg. After the birth of their two oldest children they crossed 
the Atlantic to America, settling in Allamakee county, Iowa, in 1854. In Ludlow 
township Mr. Helming bought an eighty-acre tract of land and continued its 
development for a number of years, later purchasing property adjoining this 
place and becoming eventually the owner of one hundretl and sixty acres. Upon 
this he built a fine residence, a good barn and convenient outbuildings and here 
he spent the remaning years of his life, dying on the property January 24, 1875. 
His wife survived him many years, passing aw'ay in 1900. They were the par- 
ents of five children : William, who grew to maturity and jiassed away in Alla- 
makee county at the age of thirty-six ; Emma, who died at the age of eleven ; 
Minnie, the wife of Rev. H. Sill, a minister of the Reformed church and now 
located in South Dakota ; Charles G, of this review ; and Otto A. 




CHARr^ES G. HELJUNG 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 377 

Charles G. Helming was reared upon the home farm and there remained 
until some years after the death of his father, he and his brothers operating the 
property and becoming well known as breeders of Aberdeen Angus cattle, 
Percheron horses and Chester White hogs. Their partnership continued until 
1903, when it was dissolved, Mr. Helming moving upon a property which he 
had purchased in the previous year and upon which he still resides. With char- 
acteristic energy he turned his attention to its improvement, remodeling the 
house, erecting a fine barn and installing the necessary equipment. He now has 
two well equipped barns upon the premises and in 1912 erected a silo with a 
one hundred ton capacity. The Pleasant Grove Stock Farm reflects everywhere 
in its neat and attractive appearance his careful supervision and competent man- 
agement and is altogether one of the finest and most profitable agricultural 
properties in the section. Mr. Helming engages in general farming but is also 
extensively interested in stock-raising, keeping fine herds of Aberdeen Angus 
cattle and breeding also Percheron horses and Chester White hogs. 

In 1891, at Newton, Jasper county, Iowa, Mr. Helming was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Charlotte Silwold, who was born and reared in this state. She 
passed away in 1905, leaving three children : Harry Fred, a student in the Iowa 
State University at Iowa City; Marguerite; and Carl. In 1907 Mr. Helming 
was again married, his second wife being Mrs. L. Walter, who was born in 
Illinois, a daughter of Henry Winter, now a resident of Independence, Iowa. 
She was reared in her native state and at Independence married her first hus- 
band, by whom she has two children. Lawrence and Lois. 

Politically Mr. Helming is identified with the republican party and has 
served for nineteen consecutive years as township clerk. He has also held 
various other positions of trust and honor and is recognized as a progressive 
and public-spirited citizen. He is known in business circles as the secretary and 
treasurer of the German Farmers Insurance Company and was one of the pro- 
moters and is now a stockholder and director of the Peoples National Bank of 
Waukon. He aided in the organization of the Cooperative Creamery Associa- 
tion of Ludlow and is at present a director in that institution. He and his wife 
are members of the Ludlow Presbyterian church. Mr. Helming served as chair- 
man and treasurer of the building committee during the construction of the 
present church edifice and has always been an active religious worker. In the 
township where he has always resided he is widely and favorably known, his 
upright and honorable life having won for him the respect and esteem of all 
with whom he comes in contact. 



JAMES GORDON. 



Twenty-seven years have been added to the cycle of the centuries since James 
Gordon passed away and yet there are many who remember with pleasure his 
sterling integrity, his many fine (|ualities of mind and character as well as the in- 
dustry and enterprise which made him one of the valued and respected farmers 
of Allamakee county, where for twenty-one years he made his home. He was 
born in Ireland in 1840 and was brought to America by his parents when he was 



378 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

still a child. They settled in Xew York state, where they resided for a number 
of }'ears, later returning to the Emerald isle, where both passed away. To their 
union were born three children, all of whom are now deceased. 

James Gordon spent his childhood in the Empire state and after his marriage 
came west to Iowa, settling in 1865 in .\llamakee county, where he purchased 
land in Iowa township, which he developed and improved for twenty-one years. 
By constantly following the most progressive methods and directing his labors 
along practical lines he made his farm productive and profitable and important 
as an element in the community resources. His long residence in this part of the 
state, dating from 1865 until the time of his death, made him very widely known 
and his sterling (jualities gained him the good will and confidence of all with 
whom he was associated in business or social relations. He left to his family 
the priceless heritage of an untarnished name and to posterity an example that is 
well worthy of emulation. He passed away in 1886. He was a devout member 
of tlie Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally was connected with the V. 
A. S. He gave his political allegiance to the democratic party and took an active 
and intelligent interest in community affairs, supporting with his vote and in- 
fluence any project which he believed would promote general |>rogress and 
advancement. 

Mr. Gordon married, in Xew York state, in 1863, Miss Mary A. Ferris, a 
daughter of Alvali and Phoebe Ferris, natives of that communit_\-. They emi- 
grated to Iowa in the early "60s and settled in Allamakee county, where the father 
engaged in farming until his death in i88g. He had survived his wife for a num- 
ber of years, her death having occurred in 1867. Of the eight children born to 
their union three still survive: Mary A., the widow of the subject of this review; 
Anna, the wife of Daniel McDonald, of Xew Albin ; and Sylvester S., of Spencer. 
Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon became the parents of four children: William J., 
who was born in 1867 and who now follows farming in Lansing township: Ida, 
who has passed away; Edward, whose birth occurred in 1871 and who now lives 
upon the homestead; and Jennie, the widow of John Jarvis. Airs. Gordon sur- 
vives her husband and is the proprietor of the homestead, consisting of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of highh- improved land, located two miles beyond Xew 
Albin. She has proved very capable in the management of her important affairs 
and is well known throughout this section of the state, where her circle of friends 
is almost coextensive with the circle of her acquaintances. 



SAM EISENLA. 



Sam Eisenla. whose farm of one hundred and thirty acres in Waterloo town- 
ship is one of the finest and best improved agricultural properties in .\llamakee 
county, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1855, ^ *0" of Bal- 
thazar and Catherine Eisenla, the former a native of Germany and the latter of 
Pennsylvania. In that state they lived for several years after their marriage and 
then spent two )-ears in Xew York, after which they were for one summer in 
Ohio. From there they came in 1866 to Allamakee county, settling in Dorchester, 
remaining there for two years. At the end of that time the father l:)ought a por- 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 379 

tion of the farm now owned and operated by the subject of this review, pur- 
chasing tirst eighty acres and adding to his holdings from time to time until at the 
time of his death, in 1896, he owned one hundred and twenty acres. His wife 
has also passed away, her death having occurred in 1893. To their union were 
born two children : Louisa, the widow of John Peeper, of Dorchester, Iowa ; and 
Sam. of this review. 

Sam Eisenla acquired his education in the public schools of Pennsylvania, 
New York and Ohio, and studied for a time also in Iowa. He became familiar 
with all the details of farm operation through practical experience in assisting 
his father and when he was twenty-six years of age rented the homestead, upon 
which he has resided during practically all his life. In 1897 he bought the prop- 
erty, which then consisted of one hundred and twenty acres lying on section 12, 
Waterloo township. To this he has since added and owns today one hundred 
and thirty acres, ninety of which are in a high state of cultivation. Upon the 
property Mr. Eisenla has made substantial improvements, erecting modern build- 
ings and installing the necessary equipment, making it a very desirable property. 
He raises and feeds stock and has made this an important branch of his business, 
his animals commanding high prices and a ready sale upon the market. 

In 1881 Mr. Eisenla was united in marriage to Miss Hilda Martin, who was 
born in Norway in 1864 and who came to America with her parents when she 
was nine years of age. They settled first in Winneshiek county and came from 
there to Allamakee county, whence in 1882 the parents moved to South Dakota, 
where the father died in 1902, having survived his wife for some time. To their 
union were born four children: Mrs. W. D. Gillett, of Pennsylvania; Hilda, the 
wife of the subject of this review; Martin A., of Spring Grove, Minnesota; and 
Carl, who resides in Portland, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Eisenla have become the 
parents of six children: Bessie, whose birth occurred in 1882; Mabel, born in 
1884; Belle, 1890; Frankie, 189-I ; Kathleen, 1898; and Minnie, who was born in 
1902. 

Mr. Eisenla is a stanch democrat and is interested in community aiifairs, espe- 
cially in the cause of education, which he did much to promote during his term of 
service on the school board. Throughout his life he has been guided by high and 
worthy aims and he receives his reward in the esteem in which he is held by the 
entire community, of which he has so long been an honored resident. 



JOHN P. MORSTAD. 



John 1'. Morstad, who since 1886 has resided upon the farm which he now 
occupies in Waterloo township, is one of the most successful and able farmers 
in this vicinity, each year of his residence here having witnessed his increasing 
prosperity and prominence. He was born in Norway in 1857 and his parents 
lived and died in that country. He there acquired his education and in 1878 
crossed the Atlantic and came to America, settling immediately in Allamakee 
county, Iowa, where for a time he worked at various occupations. Eventually, 
however, he turned his attention to farming, buying in 1886 the property whereon 
he has since resided. He owns ninetv-three and a half acres in \\'aterloo town- 



380 PAST AXD PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

ship and has here a well improved farm, with forty acres in a high state of 
cultivation, yielding him a gratifying annual income. 

In 1887 Mr. Morstad married Miss Martha Eide, a native of Allamakee 
county and a daughter of Elling Eide, who was born in Norw-ay, and who came 
among the early settlers to this section of the state. He and his wife died upon 
the farm which the subject of this review now owns. He was one of the most 
extensive landowners and prosperous farmers of this vicinity, owning two hun- 
dred and eighty acres, upon which he carried on general farming and stock- 
raising. Mr. and Mrs. Morstad became the parents of five children. Ella, born 
in 1888 who was a trained nurse, married Alfred Rognlien, of Aneta, North 
Dakota. Edgar, whose birth occurred in 1889, is residing in Waukon, where he 
is district clerk. Leonard, who was born in 1891, is a resident of MinneapoHs, 
Minnesota. Nellie, the next member of the family, was born in 1893. James 
was born in 1896 and is attending school. The family are all members of the 
Lutheran church. 

Mr. Morstad gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is 
public-spirited and progressive in matters of citizenship, taking an active interest 
in movements for community growth and advancement. He has served as town- 
ship trustee and as a member of the school board for many years, his duties in 
both connections being discharged in a capable and far-sighted way. Throughout 
his entire life he has been actuated by worthy aims and high standards and he 
receives his reward in the esteem in which he is held by the entire community, 
of which he has been long an honored resident. 



WILLIAM ROBINSON. 

Although forty-one years have elapsed since the death of William Robinson 
upon his farm in Waterloo township his personality was too strongly impressed 
upon the community, where he had resided for many years, to be readily for- 
gotten. A man of rare ability and force of personality, he left the impress of his 
work upon the history of the agricultural development of this section of the state 
and was perhaps as well known as a citizen who was always ready to contribute 
to the promotion of any movement for the general good of the community. Mr. 
Robinson was of Scotch descent but was born in Ireland in 1827. As a child he 
came to America with his parents and with them settled in New York, where his 
father passed away. The mother afterward removed with her children to Wis- 
consin and in 1851 came to Allamakee county, Iowa, where she continued to re- 
side until her death, in 1893. In this family were six children, of whom Mr. 
Robinson, of this review, was the eldest, and of whom three yet survive. 

William Robinson was still a child when he was brought by his parents to 
America. He acquired his education in the public schools of Wisconsin and from 
there came in 1851 to Allamakee county, Iowa, where from that time until his 
death he remained an honored and deservedly respected citizen. For a time he 
clerked in stores but eventually purchased a tract of school land located on sec- 
tion 12, Waterloo township, and comprising one hundred and seventy acres. He 
turned his attention to the development and improvement of this property, the 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 381 

years bringing him success, honor and a substantial fortune. His farm became 
one of the best improved and most productive properties in this section of the 
state and upon it in addition to general farming and stock-raising he operated a 
sawmill for a number of years. By following the most progressive and prac- 
tical methods in the conduct of his interests he became successful and his success 
brought him prominence and a high standing among his fellow citizens, so that 
his death, which occurred in 1872, when he was forty-five years of age, cut off 
in its prime a busy life and useful career. 

In 1858 Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to Miss Armenia Smith, who 
was born in New York state in 1836, a daughter of Isaac and Sophronia Smith, 
also natives of that state. The parents went to Indiana shortly after their mar- 
riage and remained in that state for seven years, after which they moved to 
Wisconsin, where the father followed the cooperage trade in various sections. 
In the early '60s he moved to Allamakee county, Iowa, making his home first 
in Lansing and later in New Albin, where he lived retired until his death, which 
occurred in 1878. His wife has also passed away, dying in 1893. Fifteen chil- 
dren were born to their union, only two of whom survive, namely : Mrs. Armenia 
Robinson, and Sophronia, who married Louis Hayes, of Jefferson, Minnesota. 
Mrs. Robinson has one daughter, Minnie, the wife of George Lapham, a farmer 
of Waterloo township. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Robinson operated 
the homestead successfully until 1903, when she rented the property and re- 
tired. She is a woman of many excellent qualities of mind and character and is 
highly esteemed and respected wherever she is known. 

Mr. Robinson gave his political allegiance to the republican party and was an 
earnest champion of the cause of education. He took an active and commend- 
able interest in every phase of public affairs, doing all in his power to promote 
the permanent interests of the community in which he had so long made his 
home and thus it was that in his passing Allamakee county lost one of its most 
representative and valued citizens. 



ANTON A. POSSUM. 



Anton A. Fossum is numbered among the prosperous farmers and stock-rais- 
ers of Allamakee county, making his home on section 36, Makee township. He 
was born in Lands Prestegjeld, Norway, May 17, 1854, a son of Arne and Mary 
COdde) Fossum, who were likewise natives of that country. In 1857 the par- 
ents came to America, and the father purchased a tract of one hundred and thirty 
acres in Makee and Center townships. He cleared this land and erected a log 
cabin, beginning life in the new world in true pioneer fashion. As time passed 
he prospered in his business and in due time the pioneer home was replaced by 
a brick dwelling, which, however, was not completed at the time of his demise 
in 1902. The wife and mother survived for only a few years, passing away in 
1907. 

Anton A. Fossum is the only survivor of a family of three children, and was 
but three years of age at the time the family emigrated to the new world, so that 
he has practically spent his entire life in Allamakee county. He was reared on 



382 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

the home farm, assisting in the work of the fields from an early age. He 
received his primary education in the country schools near his home, and later 
spent three years in the Lutheran College at Decorah, and three months at high 
school in Waukon. He subsequently engaged in teaching for a few terms, but 
eventually returned to the farm, caring for his parents until they departed from 
this life. Mr. Possum then came into possession of the home farm, since which 
time he has remodeled and completed the house, built a good barn and other out- 
buildings, and now has a good tract of land comprising one hundred acres. Here 
in addition to raising grain, he is engaged in raising shorthorn cattle and shire 
horses, and is meeting with well deserved success in both branches of his business. 
Mr. Possum took an active part in the promotion of the Parmers Cooperative 
Creamery Company of Waterville and is one of its stockholders. He also en- 
gages to some extent in dairy farming. 

It was on the 9th of June, 1880, that Mr. Possum was married in ]\Iakee town- 
ship to Miss Anna Olswold, who was born in Loiten, Hedemarken, Norway, 
and there made her home until she had reached the age of eighteen, when she 
came to America. Ten children have been born of this marriage, but four are 
deceased. Those who survive are : Albert, who is engaged in farming in Pierce 
county, near York. North Dakota ; Elmer B., who assists his father on the home 
farm ; Caspar, who is in North Dakota with his brother Albert ; Clara, who has 
received a good education and is now engaged in teaching at Lamberton, Alinne- 
sota ; Annetta, who is a nurse in a Chicago hospital : and Nina, who, since com- 
pleting her education in the college at Madison, Wisconsin, is engaged in teach- 
ing in Dresser Junction, Wisconsin, The deceased members of the family are: 
Oscar, who died in 1902, at the age of seventeen ; Mary, who died in 1900, when 
nineteen years of age ; Bertha, who died at the age of two years, in 1886, and Ethel, 
who died in 1904, at the age of four years. 

Politically Mr. Possum is a republican, while in religious faith he is a Lu- 
theran. He has been school officer in the church and has held other official posi- 
tions therewith. Knowing the value of a good education, he has always been 
deeply interested in the schools and for many years served as president of the 
school board. He is a public-spirited man, possessing many noble traits of char- 
acter, and is held in the highest esteem by his neighbors and friends. 



WILLIAM BEARDMORE. 

William r,eardmore, who for the past forty-seven years has owned and 
operated a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 20. L'nion City 
township, is known as one of the most progressive and substantial agriculturists 
of this part of Allamakee county, his labors through the years having been valu- 
able as factors in the general development and advancement of the state. He 
was born in England in 1849 ^"d is a son of William and Sarah Beardmore, also 
natives of that country. The parents came to America with their family in 1853 
and settled first at Wheeling, West \'irginia, v/here for a time the father worked 
as a forger in a rolling mill. In 1865 they came to Iowa and William Beardmore, 
Sr., purchased a farm in Union City township, operating this property and also 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 383 

conducting a profitable blacksmith's shop until his retirement in 1903. Afterward 
he lived in Lansing for a short time and then moved to New Albin where he 
now resides, having reached the advanced age of ninety-one years. His wife 
passed away in 1896 at the age of seventy-three. To their union were born ten 
children : William, of this review ; Alfred, of Union City township ; Agnes, the 
deceased wife of John J. Gilchrist, who has also passed away ; Lynn, who resides 
in Union City township ; twins, who died in infancy ; John, a butcher in Charles 
City, Iowa : Laura, the deceased wife of Joseph Sadler of Union City township ; 
Ambrose, who has passed away; and James Harvey, of Union City township. 

William Beardmore was brought to America by his parents in 1853 and ac- 
companied them in 1865 to Iowa where he has since remained a prosperous and 
highly esteemed resident. In 1866 he purchased land of his own in Union City 
township, buying one hundred and sixty acres, thirteen miles up the river from 
New Albin, and upon this property he has since remained, having developed it 
during the forty-seven years into one of the finest and most productive farms in 
this part of the state. C)ne hundred and sixty acres are under high cultivation, 
abundant harvests annually rewarding Mr. Beardmore's careful supervision and 
practical methods. In addition to tilling his fields, he is also extensively inter- 
ested in stock-raising, 'breeding and fattening cattle and hogs and raising horses. 

Mr. Beardmore has been twice married. In 1876 he wedded Miss Eliza A. 
Sadler, who was born in Allamakee county and who passed away in 1879, leaving 
one son, William Edward, a stone mason in Union City township. In 1883 Mr. 
Beardmore married Miss Mary Elizabeth Sadler, a sister of his first wife, both 
being daughters of William and Mary Sadler of whom further mention is made 
elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Beardmore have ten children: Harold E., 
who is connected with the First National P.ank of Butte, Montana ; Eben A. and 
Arthur A., who live at home; M. Hazel, engaged in teaching; and Stanley C, 
Charles G., Floyd A., Leonard J., Joseph J. and Frances D., all of whom 
live at home. 

Mr. Beardmore gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is 
stanch in lii.s support of its principles and policies although he never seeks public 
ofifice. He is, however, now filling the office of justice of the peace and is prov- 
ing conscientious, able and efficient in the discharge of his duties. He is num- 
bered among the early settlers in tlijs part of Iowa and has witnessed the greater 
part of its expansion and development, assisting in it in a substantial and im- 
portant way through the work along lines of agricultural progress which he has 
accomplished during the forty-seven years of his active identification with farm- 
ing interests. 



JUDGE L. E. FELLOWS. 

Judge L. E. Fellows, whose demise occurred on the 17th of July, 1912, was a 
pioneer in Allamakee county and for many years one of the most prominent 
and worthy men in public life in this section of the state. His birth occurred 
in Corinth, Orange county. \'ermont, on the 22d of August, 1834, his parents 
being Hubbard and Mary Ann Fellows. He spent his childhood on his father's 



384 PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

farm, acquiring an excellent education in the public schools, which he supple- 
mented by a course in an academy. As a young man he carne west in 1857 ^'id 
in that year made a permanent location in Allamakee county, securing a position 
as clerk in the coimty offices. He devoted his spare time to reading law and 
mastering the profession, won his admission to the bar of Iowa. May 29, 1862. 
He took up active practice, becoming rapidly successful and rising steadily to 
a position of prominence and importance. He became well known in public 
life and, when he turned his attention to politics, did able work in this field, 
winning election to the lower house of the state legislature. Upon the close of 
his second term in this office, his ability, his progressiveness and his firm stand 
on the side of legislation looking toward advancement and reform, were rewarded 
by his election to the senate, where he served with honor and distinction for four 
years, accomplishing a great deal of efficient and constructive work. He was 
honored by his fellow citizens by other official positions of trust and distinction, 
serving as a member of the board of trustees of the hospital for the insane at 
Mount Pleasant and as trustee of the Upper Iowa University at Fayette. In 
1899 he was appointed judge of the thirteenth judicial district to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Judge C. T. Granger, and he was later elected to 
this position, serving by reelection for five consecutive ter^us and winning wide- 
spread recognition for his broad-minded, discriminating and judicious work. 

In 1861 Judge Fellows was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary S. Reed, of 
VVaukon, who survives. In their family were eight children : Wilson R. ; A. M., 
a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work; Laura F. ; Mary F. ; 
Ella S.; Roger L. ; Jennie; and Liberty E. 

In addition to his accomplishments along political and judicial lines, Judge 
Fellows was also keenly interested in the work of the Masonic order and was an 
active and useful member of the local organization. He held a number of high 
official positions and in 1893 was elected grand master of the grand lodge, winning 
reelection in the following year. His life was at all times honorable and upright 
as well as useful and beneficial, and his death, which occurred July 17, 1912, 
at the age of nearly seventy-eight years, was a great loss to Iowa in the ranks 
of her pioneer settlers and of her honored public officials. 



MRS SABINA McCRYSTAL. 

That the true pioneer spirit is as manifest in women as in men is evident from 
the life record of Mrs. Sabina McCrystal, who was born in Linton township, 
Allamakee county, about three and a half miles from what is now Rossville, in the 
days when the most primitive conditions yet prevailed in this part of the state. 
Mrs. McCrystal has proven herself as capable as any man in the management of 
her one hundred and twenty acre farm, which she personally superintends and in 
its cultivation has found a gratifying measure of success. She is a daughter of 
Moses and Fannie (.Snook) Marble, both of whom were born in New York state, 
the former in 1814 and the latter in 1820. In 1835 they moved westward to Trum- 
bull county, Ohio. In his early manhood the father followed the wagonmaker's 
trade but later gave his attention to farming. Seeking the opportunities of the 



^»'°'''',!;.,v,DAT40N». 




MRS. SABIXA McCRYSTAL 




ELLKRY E. ROGERS 



PAST AND PRESENT OF ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 389 

middle west, he next removed to Illinois and thence to Iowa, making settlement 
in Clayton county in 1845. The year i860 marked his arrival in Linton township, 
Allamakee county. There he became an extensive landholder, his farm lying near 
what is now Big Foot School, and there he continued in agricultural pursuits 
until 1883, when he moved to a place on sections 16 and 17, Linton township, in 
the cultivation of which he continued until his death in 1887. His wife had pre- 
ceded him to the Great Beyond about one month. At the outbreak of the Civil 
war Moses Marble enlisted in a volunteer company in Ohio but was never called 
upon for active service. In matters of citizenship he was loyal and conscientious 
and ever ready to serve his country. For a number of years he held the position 
of township trustee and was also elected to the office of justice of the peace, al- 
though he did not qualify for the office. He and his wife had seven children, 
among them, beside Mrs. McCrystal, being Charles H. Marble, who now operates 
the home farm in Linton township. 

The memory of Mrs. McCrystal reaches back to the times when the rich farms 
of the present day were still broad prairies and wild animals and game were plen- 
tiful. She recalls to mind that often bear meat and venison were served on the 
family table, and a picture transfixed in her memory is that of her mother bend- 
ing over the old fireplace, broiling bear meat and venison. When about six years 
of age she and her brother, Charles H., of whom more extended mention is made 
in another part of this work, experienced an adventure which has remained vivid 
with her on acount of the danger of the situation. The two children were sent 
to a near-by spring, in what was called the McGew hollow, for water, when hap- 
pening to look up they saw a large lyn.x crouching on the limb of a tree, ready 
to spring at the children. They hurriedly left the pail, making their way to safety 
and their father, who immediately fired a signal which brought the neighbors. 
Soon seven or eight of them had gathered, and going back to the place where the 
children had seen the lynx found the beast and succeeded in killing it. It certainly 
was one of the largest of its tribe, for measuring it with a fence rail they found 
that it was two feet longer than the rail. In the latter '50s, when the hunters 
used lo come to that vicinity they made Moses Marble's place their headquarters. 
The first to come would build a log hut as long as one length of logs : the next 
would build his cabin onto the first one; the next would do likewise, and at one 
time this log building measured a length of twenty-seven logs and comprised 
twenty-seven compartments for the hunters. Mrs. McCrystal still well remembers 
all these details of the early pioneer times, the vast unbroken prairies and the 
wild nature of the surrounding hills. In fact there is probably no other resi- 
dent in this vicinity who has as clear a remembrance of the early times, as she 
is among the few who spent her childhood among these conditions. 

Mrs. McCrystal resided with her parents until her first marriage, which took 
place on December 3, 1875. Her husband, Ellery E. Rogers, was born in Massa- 
chusetts on the loth of June, 1848, a son of William Pitt Rogers. His mother 
died when he was a young man but he had before this event come to Iowa with 
his parents at the age of about sixteen. After he had passed his seventeenth 
birthday he began work for himself, finding employment in the pineries during 
the winter and doing grubbing during the summer months. He was so occupied 
until his marriage, carefully husbanding his savings, and at that period was able 
to buy a farm of fifty acres in Dry Hollow, Linton township, where Mr. and Mrs. 

VoL n— 2 



390 PAST AND PRESENT OP^ ALLAMAKEE COUNTY 

Rogers made their home until about 1886, their agricultural labors resulting in 
gratifying financial returns. In that year they sold the farm and removed to 
Waukon, where Mr. Rogers engaged to some extent in the real-estate business, 
buying lots upon which he built and then selling them. He was so engaged for 
about two years, when he proceeded to northern Wisconsin, where he spent a 
season in the pineries and the remainder of the year at Oshkosh. Perceiving an 
opportunity to profit by building transactions in La Crosse, Wisconsin, he removed 
to that place, buying lots upon which he built and which he improved and later 
sold. After engaging about a year along that line he formed a partnership with 
a Mr. Hannerberg, and they bought a sawmill, which they brought to Scott H