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Full text of "Past and present of Appanoose County, Iowa : a record of settlement, organization, progress and achievement"

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Past and Present 

OF 

Appanoose County 

IOWA 



ILLUSTRATED 



I , L , "^ I , , . - ■ • 5 <■ ■ 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1913 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

A8T0B, LENOX AND 

TILO-N FOUNDATIONS. 

R '813 L 




fi^Anir; i;. i-ou-n:!; 



Biographical 



CLAUDE R. POR lEH. 

Prominent amon^' the- democratic leatlers ot Iowa, distinpiished bv rea- 
son of his patriotic and progressive service in the assembh- and honored by 
reason of his abiht\ in the practice of huv, which he has made his chosen 
life work. C'huuie R. Porter has left and is leaving the impress of his indi- 
viduality upon the history of the commonwealth. He was born in Moul- 
ton, Iowa. July 8, 1872, his parents bein>,' George D. and Hannah (Rod- 
man) Porter. The father was born in Williamstown, Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, September 18, 1846, and was a son of the Rev. George D. and 
Sarah Jane ( McCo)) Porter, the former of Irish and the latter of Scotch 
ancestry. In 18^1 George D. Porter accom[xinied his parents to Tipton, 
Cedar count), Iowa, where his father, who was a Presbyterian clergyman, 
became pastor ot the church of his denomination there. In that city George 
D. Porter was reared to young manhood and in the interim pursued his 
education in the intermediate and high schools. When eighteen years of 
age he began teaching school in Cedar count)- and later followed the pro- 
fession in Ray county, Missouri, until 1870, when he entered upon the 
study of law in the office of the Hon. George \\'. Dunn, of Richmond, 
Ray count)-, Misso\iri. The same xcar he wa> admitted to the bar And 
located at Moulton, .Appanoox- count), Iowa, where he practiced until 
the fall ot 1877, when he came to Centerviiie, where he was accorded a 
liberal clientage. He gave his political support to the republican party 
until 1877, when In- joined the independent movement. In 1S70 lie IkuI 
been elected city solicitor at Richmond, Missouri, and served for one term. 
In 1883 he was cho.sen mayor of Centerviiie and as its chief executive 
guided the interests of the city through one term. On the 6th of June, 
1871. he was married in Richmond, Missouri, to Miss Hannah R. Rod- 
man, a daughter of J. H, ind Lydia (Jennings) Rodman. The)- became 
the parents of five children. Claude R., Sadie L., Northa I., (ieorge McCoy 
and .Anna M. George D. Porter diet! in Centerviiie. Februarv 11. i8()C). 

5 



6 HISTORY OF .\l-r.\.\(K)SE COUNTY 

Passing throuj^'h const-turive grades in the public schools Claude R. 
Porter was graduated from the CVnterville high school with the class of 
i8(S9, and for one year was a student in Parson's College at Fairfield, 
Iowa. He also spent a year in the St. Louis (Mo.) law school and follow- 
ing liis :uinii>si()n to rhc bar in 1893 has practiced continuously in Center- 
ville. The date of his admission was the 6th of October, of that year, at 
which time he became junior member of the firm of Porter >5i: Porter, of 
Centerville, whicli became one of the strongest law firms in southern Iowa. 
Time brought changes in the partnership relations, he being now senior 
partner of rlie firm of Porter .^ Greenleaf. The ability and careful man- 
ner in which he prepares his cases is evidenced in the strength with which 
he presents his cause before court or jury. He seems never at a loss for 
a reply and prepares tor defense as well as for attack. Moreover, he 
holds to a high standard of professional ethics and leases his reasoning 
u[)on a connjrehensive understanding of the [)rinciples of jurisprudence 
and correct application thereof to the points in litigation. In addition 
to his professional interests Mr. Porter is connected with various finan- 
cial concerns including the Farmers & Merchants Bank of Piano, the Exline 
Savings Bank of Exline, and ftie Mystic Intlu.strial Savings Bank of 
Mystic, Iowa. Mr. Porter, however, has perhaps become even more widely 
known through his jwlitical activity, at least to the people at large through- 
out Iowa. Elected to the state legislature, he took his seat in l8g6 and 
the indorsement of his first term's service came in reelections which con- 
tinued him in office until 1900. He was then chosen state senator for a 
four years' term and again took active and helpful interest in shaping 
Iowa's legislation through another four years. In 1898 he was the candi- 
date of his [)arty for secretary of state and was gubernatorial candidate in 
K)o6 and 1910. On three difierent occasions in igoB, 1909 and 1910 he 
has received the democratic support of the Iowa legislature for the office 
of I'nited States senator. He was one of the members of a committee 
apjiointed by the state legislature in 1897 to visit the state institutions 
of Iowa, out of which grew the present board of control law. His mili- 
tary record covers service as sergeant major of the Fiftieth Iowa \'oJun- 
teer Infantry during the Spanish-American war. 

On the 27th of December. 1899, Mr. Porter was married to Miss 
Maud L. Boutin and to them have been born four children, George, Julia, 
Northa and Dorothy. 'I'lic faiuilx atti ini the Presbyterian church in which 
Mr. and Mr>. Porter tiold membership. 

In its various lines of work he ha> been active and helpful, serving 
as one of the elders of the church and as superintendent of the Sunday 
.school. He has taken high rank in Masonry and is a member of the Mystic 



HISTORY Ul" AI'l'AXOOSE COUNTY 7 

Shrine at Davenport. He also belon;js to the Elks lodge ot Centerville. 
Mr. Porter has tigured prominently before the [)ublic tor many years for 
when he wa.s first candidate for state legislator on the populist and demo- 
cratic tickets in the fall of iSg^ he was but twenty-three years of age. 
Since that time he has been a leader in public affairs and he has never low- 
ered his standard for the sake of public policy or to cater to public ojiinion 
in any wav. His ideals of citizenship are high and his efforts to embody 
these in practical service have been untiring. He commands the respect 
of even those opposed to him politically while his ability and pergonal 
(|ualities have won liim popularit} among a large circle of friends. 



WILLIAM KENNETH CIRRIE. 

William Kenneth Currie is a member ot the tirm oi Currie &: Dewey, 
owners of the Journal of Centerville, Mr. Currie devoting his attention 
to its management and to editorial duties. He was born at Oak Grove, 
Dodge count)-, Wisconsin, December 18, 1870, his parents being John and 
Sarah Ellen (Byersj Currie. The father was a native of the state of New 
York and was of Scotch descent. The inotlicr was born in \'irginia and 
was a representative of one of the old families that settled near James- 
town at a very early epoch in the colonial history of the country. John 
C. and Sarah E. Byers were married at Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1868, 
and removed westward, becoming residents of Wisconsin. Subsequently, 
however, the) established their home at Mount .\\ r, Iowa, and there in 
the public schools William Kenneth Currie pursued his education. In 
early manhood he became connected with hotel interests and remainetl 
in that business for a number of years as proprietor of one of the hotels 
at Mount Ayr. Subsequently he became connected with journalistic inter- 
ests and was associated with the Hearst newspapers in Chicago for six 
years. He severed that connection in January, 1910, after which he 
engaged in promotional work for a year and a half in central Illinois and 
northern Ohio. In November, i()i i, he came to Centerville and entered 
into partnership with Walter H. Dewey of Chariton for the publication 
of the Centerville Journal which is the only democratic paper in Appan- 
oose county. During the pre-convention campaign of 1912 the Center- 
ville Journal was one of the strongest newspaper sup[)orters of NN'oodiow 
Wilson in that state and Mr. Currie was one of the executive board of 
the Iowa-Wilson league. In his editorials he clearly sums up the situa- 
tion as he sees it and presents concisely and forcibly the vital principles 



8 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

and questions at stake. He cast his tirst presidential vote for Grover 
Cleveland, supported William . Jennings Br^an three times, and in the 
fall of 1912 as a progressive democrat voted for Woodrow Wilson. His 
fraternal relations are with the Brotherhood of American Yeomen and 
with the Masonic lodge. He is a typical American citizen of the present 
age, alert and enterprising, keeping in touch with the significant questions 
and situations of the country and casting his influence on the side of 
advancement along the lines of reform and improvement. 



]U)BKHr CUAWFORD FORSYTH. 

Robert Crawford Forsytii is one of the oldest among the merchants of 
Appanoose count}, having passed the eightieth milestone ot life's journey, 
but he still remains an active factor in commercial circles as the senior 
partner in the firm of Forsyth & Son, druggists, and as such has con- 
tributed largely to the commercial activity and consequent prosperity of 
Mystic. He was born in Ajrshire, Scotland, June 2, 1832, a son of James 
and Margaret (Crawford) Forsyth, who always remained residents of 
the land of hills and heather. The father was a weaver, working at a 
hand loom throughout his entire life. Their son, Robert, was the youngest 
in a family of twelve children, six of whom reached years of maturit}- 
but he is now the onh one surviving. He remained at home imtil he 
reached the age of seventeen 3ears but \\hen fourteen }ears of age he 
entered a drug store where he was emplo)ed tor three years. .\t the end 
of that time he went to sea to improve his health which had become great!}- 
impaired, and for nearly ten years he remained upon the water. In 1857 
he was married to Miss Betsy Stewart Butter. 

Leaving his bride at her old home, Mr. Forsyth two weeks after his 
marriage came to ,\merica on a sailing vessel as a ."^eaman. He left the 
ship, however, at Quebec and went to Montreal where he joined a pro- 
peller, sailing on the Great Lakes until winter caused a cessation ot navi- 
gation. Mr. Forsyth passed the winter in Kingston, Canada, after which 
he sailed on the lakes until June, but thinking to find better business 
opportunities in the interior of the country he made his way to Rock Lsland, 
Illinois, where he lived with his sister and brother-in-law. Soon after- 
ward he secured employment in a stone ijuarrx in Mercer county. Illinois, 
at seventy-five cents per da} and also took out the coal which was used 
in the operation of a grist mill. For twent}-three years he engaged in 
digging coal through the winter seasons and spent the summer months at 



IIISTORV OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 9 

farm labor. In two years he had saved enough to send tor his wite who 
joined him in Mercer county, Illinois, and in 1866 he came to Iowa and 
for three years met with different experiences in mining and farming in 
Mahaska county and then removed to What Cheer, where he continued 
for twenty-four years. There he followed coal mining and also general 
agricultural pursuits and during the latter part of that period purchased 
a farm, which he found was underlaid to some extent with coal so that 
he again engaged in mining as well as in the development of his fields. 
Eventually, however, he entered the drug business and for twenty-eight 
years has been engaged in that line of trade in this country. It was the 
business to which he first turned his attention on starting out in the world 
and his earl}- experience served him in good stead when he once more 
became a druggist. In 1893 he removeti to My>rit-. where his son David 
h:ul located in a drug store and, joining his son, has since been carrying 
on business here as a member of the firm of Forsyth & Son. Following 
the disastrous fire which occurred in Mystic he erected his present building, 
a fine two-story brick structure, twenty four by one hundred feet, at the 
corner of Second and Main streets. He also owns a half interest in two 
other business blocks and has, furthermore, become identified with business 
interests in this town as a director of the Mystic Savings Bank, to which 
jjosition he was elected on its organization, becoming at that time one ot 
its stockholders. He and his son are also interested in farm lands in 
Texas and Iowa and in city property in Mystic. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Forsyth were born nine children: James, who is 
engaged in the drug business at Xuma. Iowa; Donald William, who is a 
hardware merchant of Mystic; David, who is in partnership with his 
father; Isabella, who became the wite ot Tliomas Glendenning, and died 
in Minnesota. leaving four children; Mar), the wite ot Robert Maxwell, 
of Keokiik count}', Iowa; Robert, a tinsmith ot M\stic; Mrs. Jessie Cooji, 
who is with her father; Elizabeth, the wite of William Keffner, of Jerome, 
Iowa; and Dougald R.. who is engaged in the drug business at Redfield, 
Iowa. In \(.)\ I the taniih were calletl upon to mourn the h)ss ot the 
wife and mother, who died on the 6th ot January of that year. 

Mr. Forsyth has been a life-long republican, supporting the party 
since becoming an .\merican citizen. He has never held otHce. however, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business duties which have 
been ot constantly growing volume and importance. Mr. Forsyth is a 
Master Mason ami also an (Xid Fellow. He belongs to the Presbyterian 
church, to the teachings of which he has ever been loyal. No history 
in this volume, perhaps, indicates more clearh' what can be accomplished 
through a resolute will, unfaltering perseverance and carefully directed 



10 HISTORY OI- APPANOOSE COUNTY 

efforts. He worked hard iiml persistently year alter jear, scorning not the 
earnest toil which is the basis ot all success. Gradually he advanced until 
his industry and econoni} placed him on the high road to success and 
from that point forward his progress has been assured, bringing him at 
length to a prominent position among the successful business men of his 
adopted country. His record may well serve as a source of inspiration 
and encouragement to others, showing what nia\ he accomplished when 
energy and determination lead the way. 



GEORGE WEST NEEDELS. 

George West Xeedels who has been instrumental in making the Center- 
ville Citizen a prosperous daily paper, in which connection he has become 
widely known in this city and county, was born December 3, 184Q, at 
New Albany, Franklin county, Ohio, his birthplace being about sixteen 
miles northeast of Columbus. His father was a member of the state 
board during the Civil war and his occupation was that of farming, 
which he carried on about tour miles from New Alban)'. Two sons of 
the family, John and S. I. Needels, are residing near the old home. The 
four sisters are: Mrs. Eve Whiten, residing at \'an Wert. Ohio: Rene 
Kirts, of Johnstown, Ohio; Mrs. Sarah Ross, of California: and Mrs. 
Alice Ross, of Portland, Oregon. 

George West Needels supplemented his education acquired in the dis- 
trict schools by a term's study at the Albany school. When seventeen 
years of age he started westward and was employed at railroading in 
Wisconsin, Nebraska, Kansas and Te.xas, being connected with the con- 
struction department as one of the superintendents for five years. He 
afterward traveled for the Kilbourn-Jacobs Compan)-, a wheel scraper 
company, for three years through Indiana. Illinois and Iowa, and it was 
this which led him eventually to settle in Centerville. for being pleased 
with the city and its future he resolved to locate here, and did so in 1879. 
On the 31st of July, of that )ear, he purchased a livery barn which he 
conducted successfully until it was destroyed b)- tire. He next entered the 
Citizen's office and in i8c)2 he erected his present business block. In the 
meantime he gave careful study and attention to the [niblication of the 
paper which at that rime was iirought out as the Centerville Weekly 
Citizen but at tlu- present writing a daily paper is published, having an 
extensive patronage and thereby returning to the owner a good jirotit. 

On the 2()th of August. 188^. in Centerville. Iowa. Mr. Needels was 



HISTORY OF Arr.AXOOSE COUNTY 11 

married to Miss Margaret Crosby Jones, a dauj^hter of Mrs. Eleanor 
(Crosbv) Jones, and their children are three in numbt-r: Otis Crosby, 
born November 17, 1886; Kieanor C, July 13, 188S; and Samuel Lyman, 
who was born February 12, i8gi, and died in infancy. Mr. Needels 
holds to the Unitarian faith and he is a charter member of the Knif.;hts 
of Pythias Lodge, No. 64, in which he has held all of the chairs. In poli- 
tics he has ever been a republican since age conferred u|)on him the right 
of franchise. He has been a member of the city council for two terms 
of three and two vears each, and h<- has been a member of the build- 
ing and loan association, ^^'hether in oHice or out of it he stands for 
that which has most to do with the welfare and upbuilding ot the city, 
advocating at all times progressive measures which work for the material, 
intellectual, social and moral progress of the community. 



WILLIAM BRADLEY. 



No history of Centerville would be complete without extended ref- 
erence to William Bradley who for many years was a controlling factor 
in business circles not onh ot this city hut ot this section ot the country, 
his operations covering southern Iowa antl northern Mi.ssouri. In tact he 
became one of the successful business men of the state and his lite record 
illustrates most clearly what can be accomplished when determination 
and energy lead the way, although one is ham|)ereil at the outset by lack 
of opportunities. He was, indeed, a self-made man, deserving all the 
praise and honor which that term implies. 

A native of Pennsylvania, William Bradley was born near Pittsburg, 
on the 18th of December, 1825, a son of James and Phoebe Bradley. 
The father was a carpenter in very moderate circumstances ami as his 
son William was the eldest in a family of seven children it became nec- 
essary that he early provide for his own support. As soon as old enough 
to assist in the work of the farm he took his place in the fields and was 
occupied with the plowing, planting and harvesting in sjiring. summer 
and tall, leaving him only the winter months in which to atteml school 
and ac(]uire .such education as the schools of his locality afforded, i !• 
was about twelve years of age at the time of his mother's death and tor 
two months thereafter he worked on the Weatherspoon farm near his 
old home. He atterward went to Lrankfort .Springs, where he remained 
two years in humble labor that left him no leisure. He washed dishes, 
aided in the cooking and |)erformed the work of a hostler. \\'hile his 



12 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTY 

services brouj^hr liiin lirrlc pa) the spirit ot industry and diligence was 
developed in him with a recognition that earnest, persistent effort will 
eventual!} win. As a tarm hand in the employ ot Robert Patterson, near 
Burgettstown, he earned three tlollars per month during the summer season 
anti in the winter worked tor his board and the privilege of attending 
school. There he remained tor three years when he received an increase 
ot a dollar per month for his services as a tarm hand with a man living 
near Florence, Penns) Ivania. Again he utilized the winter seasons in the 
attainment of an education. .Atter a }ear and a half there passed he 
entered the government emplox in carrying the mail trom Washington 
to Georgetown, the distance made during the week being two hundred 
and forty miles, while his compensation was six dollars per month and 
board. He remained in this .service for six months and saved all his 
earnings, ambitious and eager to avail hiniselt ot better opportunities, 
and when he thought he saw a chance tor improving his condition he 
eagerly embraced it. Leaving the government service, at which time his 
capital consisted of thirty-six dollars, he began peddling. Going to 
Pittsburg he invested twenty-tive dollars in novelties and started out to 
dispose of his goods, traveling trom house to house. Four years thus 
passed, during which time he sold his goods at a profit, and he thus made 
an upward step on the journey of life. .After he ceased peddling he 
spent a year in Burgettstown, Penns)lvania, and then turned his attention 
to the buying and selling of live stock. 

Like hundreds of other }oung men Mr. Bradley was attracted to 
Calitornia by the discovery ot goki and the consequent increa.sed business 
activity along various lines resulting from the great influx of settlers. 
In the spring of 1S49, therefore, he started for the west by the overland 
route and atter a wearisome journe}- of ninetj- days reached Sacramento 
on the 15th of July, 1850. He then sought a favorable business opening 
and purchased an interest in a fisher}-, but after a short time sold out and 
purchased a team and began hauling hay to the mountains. With him. 
liowcver, as with the great majority of others, the mines proved an ir- 
resistible attraction and he made his wa} to what was known a> the 
Yankee Jim mines. In his search for the precious metal he met with 
fair success but after twenty-one months disposed of his interests there 
and returned to New York b}- way of the isthmus, reaching his old home 
at Burgettstown, Penn.sylvania. on the ^th of December. 1892. There 
through the following year he engageii in b\i} ing and shipping wool and 
stock but in the spring of 18^4 determined to remove to Iowa, having 
heard tavorable reports of the countr} And its opportunities. .\t Pitt.s- 
burg he purchased watches, jewelry ami table linen and at Cincinnati 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNT V 13 

added to his stock some oilcloths. Thus equii)[)ed he arrived at Keokuk, 
Iowa, about the first of May and tor a month pedtlled goods in that city. 
He then sent part ot his stock to Kddyviile while he started on foot, 
peddling his goods along the way. He had disposed of the entire amount 
before he reached F^ddyville and then taking the goods that he had shipped 
to that place upon his back he started for Des Moines, reaching that city 
with nothing of his stock remaining except one watch. He then traded 
watches with a hack driver who agreed to take him in his hack to Iowa 
Cit\. From that point he walked to Muscatine, proceeded b) boat to 
Rock Island and thence by train to his old Pennsylvania home. At 
Steubenville, Ohio, he had built a peddling wagon according to his own 
ideas, calling it the Star of the West. By this time his peddling business 
had reached considerable proportions and he admitted a partner, John 
Fugate, an old California friend. Purchasing a stock of goods at Phila- 
delphia they shipped them with the Star of the West to Keokuk and 
after reaching that city purchased a team of horses and started out upon 
the trip which brought them through southern Iowa, visiting en route 
Bloomfield, Centerville, Corydon, Leon and Garden Grove. At the last 
named place Mr. Bradley purchased his partner's interest and con- 
tinued in the peddling business until he had disposed of all his stock. 
The next spring he again purchased a stock in Philadelphia and once 
more went upon the road. Later he traveled for two years with Mabrj's 
Menagerie and Sands & Nathan's Circus, auctioneering goods at the 
various towns visited. After leaving the show he shipped his stock trom 
place to {)lace where he did an auctioneering business. 

It was about that time, or in the fall of 1855, that Mr. BratlU) was 
married to Mi.ss Amanda T. Campbell, who was born in \irginia and 
in the spring of 1855 accompanied her parents to Iowa, the family settling 
near Winterset, in Mailison county. In the spring following their mar- 
riage .\Ir. and Mrs. Bradley arrived in Centerville where he purchasetl 
a lot and erected a store building twenty-two by one hundred teet. During 
the course of its construction lie rt ntcil a room ami sold goods. His 
business had increa.sed to such an extent that he now employed several 
salesmen and two men drove ox teams in hauling his building material 
and goods from the river. With the completion of his store he went to 
Philadelphia where he purchased a stock of goods valueil at rhiri((ii 
thousand dollars. He then continued merchandising until the tall ot 
18^9, when he traded his store for a tract of land a mile and a (|uarter 
east of the city and in the following spring took up his abode upon the 
farm, .\fter crops had been planted, however, he returned to the east, 
again purchased a large stock of goods and resumed merchandising in 



14 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

the Iniildirif^ wliich hr had previously erected. He was thus identiried 
with commercial activity in Centerviile until 1864, when he sold out. 
In the nicantinu- he had embarked in another tield of activitx. having in 
February, 1863, organized the First National Bank. From that time 
until his death he was closely associated with banking, with farming and 
with the live-stock business. From the establishment ot the bank his 
success was almost phenomenal and the prosperity which attended that 
undertaking led him to extend the scope of his activities into other fields. 
In 1870 he establishetl a bank in Trenton, Missouri, soon afterward one 
at I'rinceton, Missouri, 'and later one at Allerton. None of these four 
banks tailed or suspended during the financial j)anic of 1873, owing to 
the conservative business polic) which Mr. Bradley instituted and fol- 
lowed. On the contrary, he soon afterward added to liis interests by 
founding the Bradley Bank of Bloomheld: this was followed by the First 
National Bank of Milan. Missouri; the National Bank at Unionville, 
Missouri, in 1884; a bank at Eldon, Iowa, in 1888; one at Moulton, in 
1891; and the Mystic Bank, in 1892. He afterward disposed of his 
interests at Trenton and at Milan but remained a factor in the ownership 
and conduct of the eight other banks, becoming recognized as one of the 
most prominent financiers of the .state. His judgment was sound, his 
enterprise unfaltering and whatever he undertook he carried forward to 
successful completion. He also won substantial prosperity along agri- 
cultural lines, becoming the owner of ten thousand acres of very valuable 
land in Iowa, his farms all being well stocked with high-grade cattle 
and horses. 

Mr. Bradley would never brook obstacles that could be overcome b} 
determined, earnest and honorable effort. When one avenue seemed 
clo.sed to him he would hunt out another path which would lead him to 
his destination. Moreover, he never regarded any step as final but rather 
as the starting point for further accomplishment. But it was not alone 
his success that iikuIc Mr. Bradley one of the most prominent ami honored 
residents of southern Iowa. His personal characteristics commended him 
to the confidence and good-will of all. As a citizen he worked for the 
continuous upbuilding and development of Centerviile. withholding his 
cooperation from the movement which he bclic\cd wouUl contribute to 
its material growth and improvement or to its intellectual and moral 
advancement. He held membership with the Presbvterian church and 
was an earnest. Christian man, unostentatious yet loyal in his professions 
and exemplifying in his daily walks of life the teachings of his church. 
He gave freely where aid was needed, was ever ready to speak a word 
of encouragement or to extend a helping hand. There wen- imleed in 



HISTORY OF APrAXOOSE COFXTY 15 

Ills lite record nian\ traits worthy of emulation. He passed away May 
1 V i8c)6, and was survived by his wife until the 14th of February, 1904. 
Hf had for forty years been a resident of C'enterville, honored and 
e>teenied bv all, the simple weight of his character and ability having 
carried him into important relations with large projects. The benefit of 
his influence, his activity and example is ininicasurable bur all accord to 
him prominence as one whose efforts have been ot great value ami worth 
in the upbuilding ot the county. 



ELDRIlXrE HALL SAWYERS. 

Appanoose county numbered Eldridgc Hall Sawyers among its repre- 
sentative, honored and valued citizens. He did much to uphold law and 
order here and to promote public progress, and in his life displayed many 
sterling traits of character. He was born in Giles county, Tennessee, 
Mav 14, 1828. his parents being Allen and Martha Louise (Stinson) 
.Saw\ers. The father, who was of Scotch descent, was born in 1804 and 
learned and followed the wagon-maker's trade. In 1824 he wedded 
Martha L. Stinson, who was born in 1801 and was of Welsh lineage. 
The paternal grandfather. David Sawyers, was a native of Tenne>see. 
The maternal grandparents were .-\le.\ander and Elizabeth (Bradley) 
Stinson, the former born in 1776. The latter was a daughter of Francis 
Bradle\. w ho was murdered near his home in Pennsylvania by four Tories 
at the time of the Revolutionary war. Francis Bradle}- had wedded 
Mary Patterson, a native of Germany, so that the blood of Scotch, Welsh 
and German ancestors mingled in the veins of Eldridge H. Sawyers. In 
the year 1846 his parents left Tennessee and came to Iowa, settling in 
the vicinity of Tro\, Davis count)-, where they li\til tor a tew \ears. but 
in 184C) they came to .Appanoose county, casting in their lot with the 
pioneer residents of this section ot the state. The tather purchased a 
farm near West Grove and also entered considerable land for many ot 
the broad acres of the count) were then in possession of the government. 
The old homestead is still owned by the family and upon that farm both 
the father and mother remained until called to their final rest. Allen 
Saw)ers passed away December 15, 1884, having tor a long period sur- 
vived his wife. They were accounted worthy and representative residents 
here and took an active part in the early development of this .section of 
the state as well as in promoting its later day progress and improvement. 
They had a family of ten children, namely: Ophelia. James, Eldridge 
Hall, Electra, Marv. Martha. Louisa. John. Dell and William. 



IG 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSF. COUNTY 



Eldridge H. Sawyers was a youth of eighteen when he accompanied 
his parents to Iowa and arrived in Appanoose count) about the time he 
attained his majority. His education was acquired in the district schools 
and when not bus}- with his text-books he aided his father in the work 
of the fields, continuing upon the home tarm until twenty-seven years of 
a"-e, when he began farming on his own account, cultivating a tract of 
land near West Grove, Iowa, until 1861, when he removed to Orleans, 
where he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits for two years. He 
afterward lived at Moravia for a year and following the close of the 
Civil war came to I'nionville, where he worked at the wagon-maker's 
trade. He always led a busy, active and useful life. He had tew idle 
or leisure moments and he always accomplished what he undertook. 
Called to public office, he was kept busy during his service as constable 
in warring on the horse thieves that then infested this region, helping to 
drive them out of Appanoose county. At one time he served as deputy 
sheriff of Davis county and for several terms was justice of the peace in 
Udell township, this county. He proved capable, efficient and trustworthy 
in office and in every relation of life commanded the respect, confidence 
and cood-will of those with whom he was associated. His political al- 
legiance was always given to the democratic party but in the discharge 
of his duties he was no partisan and performed his public service fearlessly 
and faithfully. This was in keeping with the aid which he rendered his 
country in days of war, for during the period of hostilities between the 
north and the south he was captain of a company of border guards. He 
helped to organize the company, was elected to its command and was 
busily engaged at times in preventing invasions of the enemy into southern 
Iowa. With his command he took part in a number of lively skirmishes. 

On the 10th of June, 1855, Mr. Sawyers was married, in Bloonificld, 
Iowa, to Miss Margaret Stoner, who was born October 28, 1838, a daugh- 
ter of Christian and Margaret (Moses) Stoner. The father, a native of 
Pennsylvania and of Dutch descent, made farming his life work. His 
wife was also born in the Keystone state and came of Dutch ancestr)-. 
They were married in Penns\ Ivania and removed to Ohio, their daughter, 
Mrs. Sawyers, being born at Ashland, Ohio, where Christian Stoner con- 
tinued to reside until his death. His widi)w afterward came to Iowa. 
settling in Davis count} . and was married in Ohio to Isaac ^'an Xordstrand. 
Subsequenr]\ rhcv rcnioxcti to Kansas, where both died. Mrs. Sawyers 
came to Iowa from Ohio in iS^-4 with her hrotlier Henry Stoner and her 
sister Elizabeth, and they settled on a farm near Bloomfield. Davis county, 
where they were living at the time of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Saw- 
yers, who became the parents of seven children. Minnie, the eldest, is 



HISTORY OF Al'l'A.XOOSE COUNTY 17 

the wife of J. A. Collins, a grocer and fVt-d nierchant of Kansas City, 
Missouri, by whom she has five children, Allen, William, Kathryn, Claude 
and Margaret. Ida May died in infancy. Orville married India Christy, 
has one child, Le Rex, and is now agent tor the Rock Island Railroad 
Company at Seymour, Missouri. Thomas died in infancy. Lou is at 
home with her mother. May Belle is the wife ot D. C. Horton, who is 
conducting a sfone quarry at .lacksboro, Texas, and they have four chil- 
dren, Helen, Harold, Fet and Margaret Hall. Roy Allen, a railroad 
man of Newton, Kansas, married Gertrude Vermilya, of Inionville, and 
they have three children, Beryl, Doris and Robert Hall. 

Mr. Sawders always gave his political allegiance to tiie democratic 
party and his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
ot whiih he was a devout member. His wife is now prominently and 
actively connected with the church at Inionville and her labors have con- 
stituted an important element in its growth and progress. She is connected 
with the Ladies Aid and the Home Missionary Societies of her church 
and cooperates in various other departments of the work. Mr. Sawyers 
belonged to the Knights of Labor of Unionville and to the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Bloomheld. He passed away April 17, igog, and is survived 
by his widow, who occupies a pleasant residence in Unionville. For sixty 
years he had lived in Appanoose county and none of its citizens was per- 
haps more tainiliar with the hi,>t()r}- of this secfion of the state as the work 
ot licvclopmcnf and improvement was carrictl on. He stood for all that 
is progressive in citizenship, for all that is honorable in business life and 
for all that works for the betterment of the individual and the community 
at large. Those who knew him found him kindly in spirit and action and 
he had a host of friends in Appanoose county, liiniteil only In the circle 
ot his acquaintance. 



B. FRANK STrRDI\ANr, M. D. 

College training well (|ualiti<il Dr. B. Frank Sturdivant for the onerous 
and responsible duties connected with the practice of medicine, to which 
he gives his attention in Centerville. his native city. He was born June 
30, 188:5, his i)arents being Dr. John M. and Elizabeth (Wood) Sturdi- 
vant, who were natives of Iowa ami Ohio respectively. In 1861 the father 
removed to Cincinnati, this county, and there entered upon the practice 
of medicine and surgery, in which he continued until 1882, when he 
opened an office in Centerville, here practicing for eight years or until his 
death in 1890. His wiilow survives and is now seventy-two years of age. 



18 • HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Dr. Sturdivaiu was rcarttl aiul cducart-d rii CVnt('r\ille, completing 
rlic hi^h-school course by graduation witli the class of 1903. Desirous 
ot enjoying further educational opportunities, he then matriculated in 
Drake I'ni versify at Dcs Moines, which he attended tor a year. He next 
entered the Northwestern Metlical College at Chicago and. completing 
his course in th.it in>rirution, was graduated in .lune, 190S. Immediately 
afterward he returned to Centerville and became associated with Dr. J. L. 
Saw}er, V, ith whom he practiced lor two )ears or until the ] ^th of Feb- 
ruary. 11)11. when he opened an independent office and has since been 
alone. In rhc interval he has secured a liberal practice which is indicative 
of the contidence and trust reposeti in his professional skill. He keeps in 
touch with the advanced work that is being done by the profession through 
his member-hip in the Appanoose and Iowa State Medical .Societies. 

Dr. Sturdivant was married on the 24th of May, 1910, to Miss 
Cecil Blackburn, a daughter of Noel C. and Mary (Houston) Blackburn, 
wl'.o are native- ot Oliio ami Iowa respectively. The father came to this 
state with his parents when about three years ot age. He was the son 
of a Baptist minister and when old enough he turned his attention to 
farming and also worked to some extent at the carpenter's trade. At 
different times school teaching constituted a source of income to him and 
he also delivered on a rural mail route here tor eight }ears. Both he and 
his wife are now living in Centerville. 

Dr. and Mrs. Sturdivant occupy a nice home at No. 408 South 
Main street. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
att.iin<'d the Knight Templar degree, and his political faith is indicated 
by the support which he gives to the democratic party. His wife is a 
member of the Methodist church and both are highh- esteemed here, where 
tluy have man}' friends not only among the Aounger but also among the 
ol'.lcr citizens ot Cenrer\ille. 



HON. SILAS W . BRYANT. 

Hon. Silas \V. Br\ ant, accejitably filling the office of mayor of Center- 
\ ille. was tormerh" closely ami proniincnri) itlentified w irli business affairs 
here and at all times has been a progressive citizen, who.se labors have been 
a factor in the upbuilding of this part of the state. He was born in the 
town of Cincinnati, this state, October 14, 1873. a son of William ami 
Hannah K. ( Bogart ) Bryant, the former a native of Iowa and the latter 
of Intiiana. The father became a resident of Appanoose county at a ver\ 




fSlLAS W. I i It V ANT 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 21 

early period, settling here prior to the Civil war, in vvhidi he enlisted as 
a member ot Company G, Thirty-sixth Iowa Intantry, serving from 1861 
until 186). He was only seventeen years of age when he joined the army 
but no veteran ot twice his age showed greater loyalty or bravery. He 
participated in a number of hotly-contested battles and with the close of 
hostilities he returned home. He then began working tor his father who 
operated a flourmill called the Old Shoot mill, located near Exline. There 
Mr. Bryant was employed as a stationary engineer and always followed 
that business until 1902, when he was appointed city marshal of Centerville, 
acting in that capacity for two years, at the end ot which time he accepted 
a position with the government in looking atter the postotlice building. He 
served in that ca[)acity luuil his death, which occurred in March, IQ09, 
while his wife passed away in Jul\, 1907. 

Silas \V. Bryant was reared and educated in Centerville and in start- 
ing out in the commercial world secured employment in connection with 
the ice business, which he tol lowed tor five years. He and his brother then 
began to work tor the l^iamorid Mine Compan\, installing machinery for 
four years. On the ex [miration of that period Silas VV. Bryant formed a 
partnership with S. A. Martin and purchased an ice business, which they 
conducted under the rirm style of Bryant i: Martin. Mr. Bryant remained 
a factor in that business for thirteen years and met with a creditable and 
gratifying degree of success in the undertaking. In u;i 1. however, he sold 
out to his partner and a month later or in March he was elected mayor of 
Centerville, which otHce he has since filled, discharging his duties with 
tairness and impartiality. He seeks the welfare of the city and brings to 
bear in his official capacity the same sterling qualities which gained him suc- 
cess as a business man. Mr. Br} ant has also serM-d two terms of three years 
on the school board and was elected in March, 1912, for another term. 

In May, 1896, Mr. Bryant was married to Mi.ss Sarah Bales, a daugh- 
ter of P. M. and Nancy (Underwooti) Bales, who were natives of Ten- 
nes.see. The tatlier was a farmer and followed that occupation until his 
tleath, which occurred in his native state in 1882. The mother afterward 
removed to Princeton, Missouri, where she resiih-d until called to her final 
rest in l()04. Into Mr. and Mrs. Bryant have been born two children. 
I I;iri\ \N . and In iic, agitl respectively fourteen antl eleven )cars. In atidi- 
tion to his tine home at No. 614 West Garfield street, Mr. Bryant owns 
two good residence properties in Kansas City, Mis.souri. He is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Court of Honor, and his 
political allegiance is given to the republican party. He and his family 
hold membership in the Baptist church and are people of social prominence 



Vol. II— 2 



22 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

here, having an extensive circle of warm friends among Centerville's best 
residents. Mr. Br}ant is at all times an approachable man, genial and 
courteous in manner, and his unfeigned cordiality and sterling worth have 
made him one of the popular as well as valued citizens of the community. 



D. C. BRADLEY. 



Honored and respected by all, D. C. Bradley occupies a prominent 
position in commercial and financial circles in Centerville, nor are his 
efforts and activities limited by the confines of this city. He is connected 
with banking interests in various sections of the state and the respect 
entertained for him is not less the result of his success than of the straight- 
forward, honorable business policy that he has ever followed. His busi- 
ness activities never seek nor require disguise, having been based upon 
the rules which govern strict integrity and unfaltering industry. Mr. Brad- 
ley is, furthermore, recognized as a leader in the progressive movements 
which have for their object the welfare and upbuilding of Centerville. 
There are many tangible evidences of his public spirit and his practical 
efforts in behalf of the city and as one of its councilmen he has exercised 
his official prerogatives in support of projects of reform and improve- 
ment. He was bom in this city, August 13, 1858, and is a son of William 
and Amanda T. (Campbell) Bradley, of whom extended mention is made 
on another page of this volume. His }outhful days were passed under 
the parental roof and his public school education was supplemented by a 
course in Parson's College at Fairfield, Iowa, and turrher study in Mon- 
mouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois. His more specificall} business 
training was received in Duff's Commercial College at Pittsburg. Penn- 
sylvania, from which he was graduated with the class of 1876. Upon his 
return home he made his initial step in the business world in connection 
with the First National Bank, previously founded and conducted by his 
father. From that time to the present he has been active in the conduct 
of the bank, assuming more and more largely the responsibilities of man- 
agement and control, and at the present time he is vice president and the 
largest stockholder in the institution. His success in this held ha- led 
him to extend his efforts over a wide territory in connection with the bank- 
ing interests of Iowa and he is now president of the Fairfield National 
Bank at Fairfield, of the First National Bank at Seymour, the Planners 
State Bank at Promise City, Bradley Savings Bank at Fxline. and Brad- 
ley's Bank at Mystic. He is likewise the vice president anil a large stock- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 23 

holder of the Iowa State Savings Bank of Centerville, of the Moravia State 
Savings Bank of Moravia, thi- National Bank of Bloomheld and is also 
interested in six other Iowa banks. Still this ilocs not indicate the extent of 
his activities nor of his resourcefulness for lie owns a controlling interest 
in the Centerville Light ,.\: Traction C"<iniiian\, oiu-raring street-car lines in 
Centerville and an interurban line between this i)lacc and My.-tic. a 
distance of six miles. It also furnishes the electric lighting tor both Center- 
ville and Mystic and furnishes the electric power for the operation of 
the gas and heating plants. It was through the efforts and sound judgment 
of Mr. Bradley that all of these enter[)rises were made possible and he 
was likewise the founder and promoter of the Pure Ice Compan}', becom- 
ing associated with S. A. Martin in the erection of an ice plant, the firm 
being the only ice dealers of the cit\. Mr. Bradl(\ likewise organized the 
Centerville Brick Compan} in which he owns a controlling share of the 
stock and he is luavil) interested in the coal industry in this vicinity, hav- 
ing been identihed with the development of coal properties in this sec- 
tion for the past twenty years. One of his mines known as No. 30 has a 
capacitv of five hundred tons dail}'. .\s he thus continually extended 
his industrial and financial interests Mr. Bradley has also made judicious 
investment in realties and is now one of the largest land owners of the 
state, having considerable holdings in farm lands in .Appanoose county. 
In all of his business affairs he looks beyond the exigencies of the moment 
to the opportunities of the future. He seems to have almost intuitive 
perception as to the possibilities for successful accomplishment in any 
given connection, recognizing both the difficulties and the chances which 
his sound judgment weighs to a nicety, foretelling with remarkable accur- 
acy the result. 

In December, 1885, Mr. Bradley was married to Miss Cora M. Stubbs, 
a daughter of D. I', and Carrie H. ( Hollingsworth) Stubbs. who are 
natives of Indiana. I'he father, a lawxcr by profession, removed to Fair- 
field, Iowa, at an earl\ day and beianie one ot the most noted and success- 
ful members of the Iowa bar. practicing continuously in Fairfield until his 
death, which occurred May 5, 1905. His wiilow still resides in that 
city. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley have become jiarents of two children: Bet- 
tina, twenty-three years of age, the wife of T. M. Stuart, assistant attorney 
general of Colorado, their home being in Denver; ami William S., four- 
teen years of age, a student in the Centerville schools. The Bradley resi- 
dence is a [)alatial one, having been erected in U)0{) at No. ^ U) Drake 
avenue. Its furnishings are all that wealth can secure and refined taste 
suggest, and its hospitality, cordial and unfeigned, is one of its most attrac- 
tive features. In the building of th\^ beautiful hom<- Mr. Bradley di.s- 



24 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

plavfd his tairh in C'cntervillc and its tururc He has ever been active 
and earnest in his efforts to promote the welfare of the city, cooperating 
in every movement which works for its betterment. He has served for 
a number of years as a member of the city council and through his efforts 
many public improvements have been introduced. For the past nine years 
he has been president of the school board and to his efforts may largelj' 
be contributed the erection of the present high school building which is 
a credit and ornament to the city. His political allegiance has ever been 
given to the democratic party but his interest in good citizenship is above 
partisanship. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Presbyterian church to which he contributes liberally, seeking the 
moral as well as the material and intellectual progress of the city. He has 
accomplished much in public affairs as well as in private life. After all 
there has been nothing spectacular in his business career, his success being 
founded upon close application, indefatigable energ}- and keen sagacity. 
At the outset of his career he realized the eternal truth that industry wins 
— and industry became the beacon light of his life. He is a typical man 
of the times, representing the progressive spirit of the age. Starting out 
in life without any vaulting ambition to accomplish something especially 
great or famous, he has followed the lead of his opportunities, doing as 
best he could anything that has come to hand and seizing legitimate advan- 
tages as they have arisen. He has never hesitated to take a forward step 
when the way was open and although content with what he attained as 
he went along he has always been read) to make an advance. Fortunate 
in possessing ability and character that have inspired confidence in others, 
the simple weight of his character and ability have carried him into import- 
ant relations with large interests. 



GEORGE F. SEVERS, M. D. 

Dr. George F. Severs has tor more than two decades been engaged 
in the practice of medicine at Centerville and has won and maintained an 
enviable reputation as a skilled and able representative of his profes- 
sion. His birth occurred on a farm near Moulton, Appanoose county, 
Iowa, on the 2orh of April, 1898, his parents being William P. and 
Elizabeth (McPherson) Severs, both of whom were natives of Kentucky 
and were of Scotch-Irish descent. The father came to this countv on 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 25 

the 4th ot July, 18) 1, purchasing a tanii two and a halt miles southwest 
of Moulton, whereon he made his home for five years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he removed to a farm five miles north of Moulton, 
diere carrying on general agricultural pursuits for tour years and then 
returning to his former place. Subsequently he settled on a tarm a 
mile anil a half west of Moulton, continuing to reside there until 1875, 
when he removed to Davis count)-, Iowa, where he made his home until 
1880. In that year he took up his abode on the old homestead at 
Orleans, where he spent the remainder ot his life, passing away on the 
18th of April, 1890. His widow survives hiixi and makes her home at 
Moulton in this county. 

George F. Severs obtained his early education in the district school 
near Moulton and subsequently attended a graded school in Davis 
county. Having determined ujion the practice of medicine as his life 
work, he entered the medical ii( partnient of Drake University at Des 
Moines in the fall of 1889 and was graduated therefrom with the degree 
of M. D. in the spring ot 1887. He won the highest mark in a class of 
eighteen at the commencement examination and was elected valedictorian. 
He asked the special privilege of writing his own valedictory and, though 
such a request liad never been made before, the taculr\ tolil him that 
if he wrote a satistactory one they would allow him to use it. The address 
which he jirepared won both their approval and commendation. It was 
at Dean, Iowa, that he first began practice and he remained there for 
two years. Going to Cincinnati, Ohio, he entered the Eclectic Medical 
Institute and was graduated theretroni on the 4th ot June, 188c;. .\fter 
spending a short time in West Grove, Davis county, this state, he came 
to Centerville, Iowa, on the 11th of December, i88y, and has here made 
his home continuously since, with the exception ot a year and a half spent 
at Houston, 'rexa>. in iSc/) and iSc^y he went to Chicago and pursued 
a special course in surgery and gynecology at the Chicago Poljclinic. 
On the completion of a course in psychology at the Chicago School of 
I'sycholog)' he was given the degree ot V. D. Continually ticnionstrat- 
ing his .skill and ability in the line of his chosen profession, he has enjoyed 
a liberal ami lucrative practice and i> \\iilel\ know 11 as a popular and 
successtul practitioner. He belongs to the .■\p[)anoose Countv Mcilical 
Society, the Iowa State Medical Society and the .American Meilical .Vsso- 
ciation and is a member of the Iowa state board of health and the Iowa 
state board of examiners. 

On the lorh of March, 1878, Dr. Severs was united in marriage to 
Miss Phoebe J. McAfee, a daughter ot Oliver and Sarah ( lauidy) Mc.\tee, 
both ot whom w<n natives ot \'an Buren count\. Iowa, ami were of 



26 HISTORY ()!• APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Scotch-Iri>h dcscciu. Oliver McAtec, who toUowed general agricultural 
pursuits throughout his active career, passed away in 1902 on a farm 
three miles east of Moiilron. Hi^ w itlow resides in that tit\. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Severs have been horn five children. Agnes is the wife of 
lulward B. Isett, a lumber dealer of Wickes, Arkansas, by whom she 
has three children, Donald, Margaret and Stanton. Blanche gave her 
hand in marriage to Orrie B. Forman, a bookbinder of Centerville. Iowa. 
Madge is at home with her parents. Essie pa.ssed away at the age of 
si.x years and Georgia died when but nine months old. 

Dr. Severs is a democrat in politics and was the candidate of his party 
for the' office of county coroner in 1912. Both he and his wife are con- 
sistent members of the Methodist ?3[)isc()pal church at C'enrerviMe. Fra- 
ternally he is identihed with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
belonging to Lodge No. 76 at Centerville, and his wife is a member of the 
Kebekahs. He is well known in social, professional and political circles 
in the county of his nativity and the force of his character and his enter- 
prising spirit have gained him influence. 



JOHN LANKFOKD. 



For almost forty-seven years John Lanktord was engaged in the fur- 
niture and undertaking business in Centerville and throughout the entire 
period ranked as one of the leading, enterprising and progressive mer- 
chants of the city. Honored and esteemed by all. he is now living retired 
at the age of eight\-five years, his well spent life having gained for him 
a high place in the regard of his fellow townsmen. He is one of the ven- 
erable residents of Appanoose county, his birth having occurred in Indian- 
apolis, Imliana. aliout a mile east of the courthouse on what wa> known 
as Pogues Run, March ^1. 1S27. His parents were Robert F. and Sarah 
(Street) Lankford. The father, a native of \'irginia, was born near 
Petersburg of English ancestr\ and became a car[)enter and cabinet- 
maker by trade. He ciied in Missouri in 1883 while his wife jnissed away 
near Intiianap(ili> in 18^5. 

Their son. John Lankford. attended a district school about seven 
miles from Indianapolis and in his youthful da)s learned the carpenter's 
trade under the direction of his father. When nineteen years of age he 
went to I'reble coniitv. Ohio, where he worked on the construction of 
the courthouse in 1 84(^-^0. He spent tour \ear^ in carpentering in Preble 
count)- and then ^rarreil wcstwanl. tra\<-ling by stage coaih to Hamil- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 27 

ton, Ohio, b\ bus to Cincinnati and by boat to Sr. Louis, where he remained 
for three days, after which he proceeded by boat to Keokuk, Iowa, and 
then walked across the country to Ottumwa, that state. This was in 1850. 
He was employed in carpenter work in that city from June until Decem- 
ber and on the 1 >th of the latter month arrived in Centerville, Iowa. The 
town had been laid out and at that time contained a po[)ulation of 
about om hundred. Appanoose county, however, was a frontier district 
and contained only one hundred and fifty voters. Much of the land was 
still in possession of the government for only here and there settlement 
had been made, showing that the work of civilization and improve- 
ment had been begun. During the winter following his arrival Mr. Lank- 
ford conducted a shoe shop and in the spring began work ar the car- 
penter's tratie which he followed for tifteen jears. In 1865 he engaged 
in the furniture and undertaking business, buying out the store ot Pen- 
dington i: Houston. From that time until 1912 he was ar the head ot 
the business and hi> < iitcrprising methods, his sound judgment, his energy 
and his industry were factors in his growing success, making him ulti- 
mately one of the prosperous residents of the city. In 1912 he sold out 
to his son Roj, who is today the leading furniture dealer of Centerville, 
conducting a large ami well-equipped store and enjoying an extensive 
patronage. 

On the 2 1st of September, 18^2. Mr. Lankford wa> uiiircil in mar- 
riage to Miss Nancy Jane Henderson, a daughter ot William S. and 
Sarah Henderson, both of whom were natives of Kentucky and were 
representatives of old American faniilio. Mr-. Lanktord was born in 
the Blue Grass state and when a cliikl accompanied her parents on their 
removal to Indiana. Subsequentl} she became a resident ot Iowa and 
was married in Centerville. On the 2isr of Sejjtember, 1902, this vener- 
able and highly esteemed couple celebrated ftuir golden wedding anni- 
vcr--ar\ in their pleasant home at No. I 12 Ka^-t Maple street, antl on Sep- 
tember 21. 1912, thev passed their sixtieth \ear ot a harmonious mar- 
ried life, the diamond jubilee, surrouniled by members ot the tamily and 
among many friends, neighbors and well-wishers. It is seldom that a 
man and wife travel life'> )ourne\ rogerhcr tor sixty )ears. and the event 
was a most unusual and interesting one, greatly enjoyed h\ all who were 
present, including their living children, their three grandihildren and 
one great-grandchdd. .\ sum()tuous meal was served and the britle and 
groom of sixty years before received a number ot beautiful ami taste- 
ful gifts as mementos of the occasion. Mr. and Mrs. Lankford were 
the parents of eight chiUlren. William S. is a retired furniture dealer of 
Centerville, conducting a business here independent ot his tather tor 



28 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

many jears. Sarah became the wife ot W. G. Clarke, an attorney and 
real-estate dealer of McAllister, Oklahoma, and they have four children: 
Ethel and Robert, lioth of McAllister; Harry E., now of Albia; and 
George, of McAllister. Hebcr Lankford, who was a railroad conductor, 
died January 13, 1907, at North Judson, Indiana. He married Lulu 
May Amnions, who now resides in Salem, Oregon, and they were the par- 
ents of a son, John Ammon Lankford, who is with his mother. Beatrice 
is the widow of John B. Spooner, who was foreman of the Chicago, Bur- 
lington & Ouincy railroad shops in Centerville, where he died in 1898. 
Mrs. Spooner and her daughter Jessie now make their home with her 
parents. Grace is the wife of E. E. Tyner, a city mail carrier of Indian- 
apolis, and they have four children, Earl, Adrian, Melvin and Robert. 
Carl, a painter and tlccorator of Centerville, married Annie Cheeseman, 
of this place. Roy, who succeeded his father in business, marriecf Orpha 
Albright, of Unionville, Missouri. He is prominent in fraternal circles, 
belonging to the lodge, chapter and commandery in Masonry, to the 
Mystic Shrine and also the Modern Woodmen camp of Centerville. 
Leona, the youngest of the family, is the wife of Claude Henaman, of 
Centerville, manager of the A. E. Wooden clothing store. They have 
one child, Mary Frances. 

Mr. Lankford has been a republican since the organization ot the 
party. His first presidential vote, however, was cast for General Taylor 
and in 1912 he voted for the reelection of President Taft. His sons are 
also true-blue republicans, unfaltering in their advocacy of the party prin- 
ciples. Mr. Lankford became a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Eaton, Ohio, in i<S;o. and joined Centerville lodge as a 
charter member — the only one now living. He is today the oldest Odd 
Fellow in Iowa. He has paid dues into the lodge for sixty-two years and 
has never drawn a single dollar in benetits. He likewise holds member- 
ship with the Masons, belonging to both the blue lodge and commandery 
of Centerville. His religious faith is that of the New Light church and 
his wife is a member of the First Church of Christ. When in 1912 he 
retired from active business at the age of eigty-five years he was the oldest 
active undertaker in the I'nited States. He is indeed a remarkable man, 
one of strong character and ot marked individualit) . He has never worn 
an overcoat, yet he has been ill but tew times in his lite. His mind is 
yet exceedingly alert and lie keeps in touch with the questions and inter- 
ests of the day. He has built many of the palatial homes in .\ppanoose 
county, a number of which are still standing, and with the development, 
progress and improvement of the county along many lines he has been 
closeh' associated. He was a member ot the first citv council ot Center- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 29 

ville and was school director tor a number of years, but in his later years 
has never cared for nor desired office and when elected justice of the 
peace refused to serve. Nature has been kind to him because he has never 
abused her laws. One usually thinks of old age as a period when mental 
as well as physical powers weaken, but there is an old age which grows 
stronger and brighter nunrall} and iiiorally as the years go by and gives 
out of its rich store of wisdom and experience tor the benefit of .others. 
Such has been the record of John Lankford, who is not only one of the 
most venerable but also one of the most honored citizens of Appanoose 
county — honored and respected wherever known and most of all where 
he is best known. 



ABK GOLDSTEIN. 



Abe Goldstein is well known in mercantile circles in Centerville, being 
one of the proprietors of a department store which he conducts in con- 
nection with Lewis Salinger. A spirit of enterprise actuates him in all 
of his business interests and is winning tor him substantial success. He 
was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, December 25, 1880, and is a son of 
Reuben and Esther Goldstein, who were natives of Russia. The father 
came to this country at an early day, settling in St. Paul, Minnesota. He 
had engaged in teaching in his native land but after arriving in the new 
world turned his attention to merchandising which he carried on in St. 
Paul for several years. He then removed to Omaha, Nebraska, where he 
continued in the same business to the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1896. His widow is yet a resident of that city. 

Abe Goldstein was reared and cilurarcii in the cities ot St. Paul and 
Omaha and when his schooldays were over secured a situation in a drug 
store in which he remained for two years. He then went to Fairbury, 
Nebraska, and was emjiloyed in a dry-goods store belonging to his brother- 
in-law, remaining with him rhcrc and in Nebraska City for seven years. 
On the expiration of that period he came to C'enfcrvillc in igo2 and entered 
into partnership with Lewis Salinger in the ()|)erarion ot a department 
store which they have since successtully conducted, carrying a large and 
well selected line of goods and enjoying a liberal patronage. They also 
own and carry on the Grand Leader which is likewise a department store. 
The two establishments are verj^ complete, carrying everything to be found 
in their line, and their enterprising and progressive business methods have 
brought them a continuously growing trade. Mr. Goldstein is also a 



30 HISTOR\- (J[^ APPANOOSE COUNTY 

stockholder of the Centerville Gypsum Company, the Hercules Manutac- 
turing Company and in the Centerville i!i: Mystic Interurban Railwa} 
Company. 

On the 28rh of Ajiril, 1903, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Gold- 
stein and Miss Anna Chaj)nian, a daughter of H\nian and Esther Chap- 
man, natives of Russia. I'he father settled in Centerville at an early 
period in its development and engaged in peddling for a number of years, 
after which he turned his attention to the real-estate business and in its 
conduct attained a gratifying degree of wealth. He passed away Januar}' 
18, K)I2, and is survived by his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Gold.stein have but 
one child. Rosaline, now six years of age. They own a nice home at No. 
500 Drake avenue and Mr. Goldstein is well known in fraternal circles, 
holding membership with the Modern Woodmen of .America, with the 
Iowa State Traveling Men's Association and with the I. B. O., a Jewish 
lodge. He hokis to the religious faith of his fathers, his membership being 
in B'nai Israel. His political support is given to the republican party and, 
recognizing the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizen- 
ship, he does all in his power to advance the welfare and upbuilding of 
the community. He has made a creditable record in business circles for 
one of his years, for he started out empty-handed and through persistent 
effort and energ}' has reached a position among the substantial business 
men and merchants of his adopted city. 



CLARENCE S. WYCKOFF. 

Clarence S. WyckofF, who in January. 1913, assumed the office of 
count)' attorney to which he has been recently elected, has since 1898 
engaged in the practice of law in Centerville, making continuous progress 
as the result of tlcxt-loping jiowers based upon wide study, practical experi- 
ence in the work of the courts and thorough preparation of each specific 
case. Appanoose coimty claims him as a native son, his birth having occur- 
red in Cincinnati, June 6, 1870. His parents were George \V. and Jose- 
phine (Stanton) WyckofF. The father was born in Illinois. Manh 4. 18^8. 
and was of Engli>h lineage. In the earl\ "40^ hi> parents riino\cd with 
their famil\- to Iowa countw this state, and later went to l^lrnam count). 
.Missouri, but in the late '^os George W. W)ckofF returned to Iowa and 
settled on a farm near Cincinnati which is still his place of residence. Dur- 
ing the earh part of the Ci\ il war he was married to Josephine Stanton. 
\\ho was horn in Marion. Marion count). Ohio, in 1842. ami is of Scotch- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 31 

Irish lineage. She came to Appanoose counr\ in rhe early '50s with her wid- 
ow ed mother, settling on a farm west of Cincinnati. She was educated in 
the .schools of Cincinnati and afterward successfull} engaged in teaching 
in the public schools of this county. Just prior to their marriage Mr. 
Wyckotf purchased the farm ui)on which they are now living and which 
he has continu()u>l} developed and improveil up to the present time, save 
for the period of his service in the Civil war. when he was made captain 
of Compan\ D, Eighteenth Missouri \olunrer Infantry. He is not 
only numbered among rhe leading agricultiuists ot the covmt}- but has also 
left his impress upon the legislative hi.story of the state, having tor three 
terms represented Appanoose count) in the gcmral assembl\ . 

Liberal educational o[iportunities were accorded Clarence S. Wyckoff, 
who supplemented his public-school course by study in Amity College at 
College Springs, Iowa, where he was graduated on the 14th ot June, 1894, 
with the degree of B. S. He then entered upon preparation for the bar. 
having determined to make the practice of law his life work, and on the 
8th of June, 1898, was graduated from the State University of Iowa with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. On the 1st of August of the same year 
he opened an office in Centerville and has devoted his time and attention 
exclusively to his profe.ssional duties since that day. While advancement 
at the bar is proverbially slow no dreary novitiate awaited him, for he 
soon demonstrated his ability to cai)ably handle intricate and important 
law problems anti each year his practice has grown in volume and impor- 
tance so that he now has a large and satisfactory clientage. He was 
appointtxl b\ Jutlg( NN'ool.son. judge of the I'nited States district court, 
as referee in bankruptcy for the district of Appanoose and Monroe, a 
jiosition which he tilled until the state was rcdistricted and the afore- 
mentioned counties were merged into a larger district. His public service, 
however, iliil not cease with his retirement troin that oHiic. For one 
term he served Centerville as its mayor and it was during his administra- 
tion that the city began the building of sanitar\ sewers and the work ot 
street paving. His administration was characterized b) orlicr needed 
improvements and reform measures for he stood at all rimes for the wel- 
fare of the mimicipality. On the •,-tli of November, i()i2. he was elected 
county attorney of Ap[)anoose count) and entered upon the duties ot the 
oflice on the 6th of .January, 1913. He has always been a stalwart sup- 
porter of the republican party since attaining his majority and has taken 
an active interest in the political campaigns, doing all in h\> power to pro- 
mote the growth and insiirc the successful adofuion ot the principles 
for which the party stands. 



32 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

In Centervilk- on the 2i.sr of October, 1903, Mr. \N'yc-koff was mar- 
ried to Miss Kate Ogle, a daughter of B. A. and Minerva (Arnold) Ogle. 
Their children arc: Helen Louise, aged eight years, her birth occurring 
August 20, 1904; Frederick Ogle, aged six years, born June 27, 1906; and 
Ruth \'irginia, a little maiden of three, born September 14, 1909. The 
parents are members of the First Methodist church of Centerville and 
have been most active in its various lines of work, Mr. Wyckoff serving 
as a member of the official board tor the past ten years, while his coopera- 
tion along other lines has been a factor in the excellent work being done by 
the church. He holds membership in the Masonic fraternit}- and has 
attained the Knight Templar degree. He also belongs to Centerville 
Lodge, No. 76, L O. O. F., and the Flks lodge, and in the Knights of 
Pythias lodge of Centerville he has filled all of the offices. While all 
these varied interests lead to the development of a well-rounded charac- 
ter it is after all his profession that claims the majority of his time and 
energies, and Mr. Wyckoff ever holds to a high standard of professional 
ethics. He is entirely free from ostentation or displa\ but the simple 
weight of his character and ability have carried him into important public 
relations, especially as an active factor in the work of the courts. 



CHARLES A. STANLEY. 



Charles A. Stanley is capably filling the position of postmaster at 
Unionville and is a well known and highly respected citizen of this com- 
munity, who as a public officer and in private life has made a creditable 
record. He was born in this count}, >Lirch 30, 1874, ^^i* parent> being 
William and Ruth (Buckmaster) Stanley. He represents one of the old 
pioneer families of this part of the state, his father having been a farmer 
of LMell township and at one time also postmaster of Unionville. 

Charles A. Stanley completed his education in the Unionville high 
school when sixteen years of age. He afterward remained upon the home 
farm tor a time, assisting his father in the work of the fields until he 
attained his majority. He did not wish to make agricultural pursuits his 
life work, however, and when he reached manhood came to Unionville, 
where he worked in a livery stable tor one }ear. In 1905 he was appointed 
rural mail carrier and was on his route for two years. He then determined 
to resume farm work and rented a tract of land, which he continued to 
cultivate and improve until the fall of 1912. On the 1st of October he 
was appointed postmaster and assumed the duties of the office, which he 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 33 

is now filling in a manner that reflects credit upon himself and is entirely 
satisfactory to his constituents. 

In igoo Mr. Stanley was married to Miss Grace Vaughr, a daughter 
of Andrew J. and Mary (Ogle) \'aught, the former a farmer of Douglas 
township. Her father was born in Appanoose count)-, October 8, 1856, 
and is, therefore, a representative of one ot the old [)ioneer families here. 
He was of Dutch descent and was married in this county in 1875 to Mary 
Ogle, who was born just across the boundary line in Missouri, December 
27, i860. Following his marriage he purchased a large farm in Appa- 
noose county and carefully and successfully cultivated it until 1897, when 
he sold the place and purchased a flourniill at Blakesburg, Iowa. , He 
operated the mill until 1900, when it was burned to the ground and he 
lost practically everything he had. He then returned to Douglas town- 
ship, Appanoose county, where he rented land, on which he now carries on 
general farming. His daughter Mrs. Stanley was born in Douglas 
township, August 4, 1880, and by her marriage became the mother of 
four children: Clarence, who was born May 2g, iQOi ; Fred, March 14, 
1903; Mildred, June 23, 1905; and Robert, February 19, 1911. The 
three eldest are in school. 

Mr. Stanley is a stalwart republican, giving unfaltering sup[)ort to 
the party and doing everything in his power to secure the adoption of its 
principles. He has served as township trustee for four years and as as- 
sessor of Udell township for a similar period, and he is now a member of 
the school board of l^nionville, in addition to which he is proving an 
eflficient officer in the position of postmaster. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Odd Fellows lodge at I'nionville and with the Modern Woodmen 
camp. His wife is connected wirli the Rebekahs and i> a nicnilicr of rlic 
Methodist Episcopal church, which Mr. Stanley also attends. They are 
both native residents of Appanoose count)- and arc held in high esteem 
here by an extensive circle ot friends. 



AUGUST POST. 



The salient characteristics of August Post are such as to entitle him* 
to mention among the representative business men of Appanoose counf\ 
where he is widely known, being a member of one of Moulton's highly 
esteemed [)ioneer families. The first fourteen years of his life were passed 
in the state of Illinois, his birth having occurrcil at Piano, Kendall county, 
on the 28th of .-Kugust, 18^4. He is a son of Henr) aiul Margaret 



34 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

(Schmidt) Posr, \\ ho were born, reared and married in Nassau, Germany, 
which was the birth j)hice of the three eldest of their eleven children. 
The father, who was the son of a farmer and landowner in the old country, 
was early trained to agricultural pursuits to which he devoted hi> energies 
during the remainder of his active life. Concluding that America afforded 
better opportunities to men in limited circumstances, he took in 1853 
passage for the llnited States, accompanied by his wife and family. He 
went direct to Kendall count}-, Illinois, where for a time he farmed as a 
renter in the vicinity of Piano. Later he bought land in DeKalb county 
which he cultivated until 186S, when he disposed ot his interests there 
and removed to Appanoose county, Iowa. Upon his arrival in this county 
he purchased a tract of land in Washington township, a portion of which 
forms the site of the present village of Moulton, and there passed the 
remainder of his life. In connection with the cultivation of his fields 
he engaged in stock-raising, making a specialty of the breeding of Clydes- 
dale horses, being the first importer of that breed in this section of the 
state. He met with success in his undertaking and became one ot the 
best known agriculturists and stockmen in the county. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Post are now deceased. The members of their famil\ \\ho lived 
to attain maturity are as follows: Ferdinand, who is a resident of Biloxi, 
Mississippi; Caroline, the deceased wife of Herman Martin, ot Moulton, 
and the mother of three children; Mrs. Lizzie Brown of Biloxi, Missis-- 
sippi; Phoebe, who married H. H. Martin, of Biloxi; August, our subject; 
Lewis and Frederick, who are also residents of Moulton; and .Amelia, the 
widow of W. E. Caldwell, of Des Moines, Iowa. 

The education of August Post was acquired in the public schools of 
Illinois and Iowa. In common with the majority of lads who are reared 
in the country he was early trained in the duties of the agriculturist, and 
at the age of eighteen years engaged in the breeding and raising of fine 
horses with his father. He is not only diligent and enterprising but 
possesses more than average business ability, all of which qualities he early 
manifested in the pursuit of his undertaking. He subsequentl}- purchased 
what is known as the Wayside Farm, which comprises two hundred and 
forty-five acres of land adjoining Moulton. anil there for man) years he 
successfully engaged in diversified farming and stock-raising. His 
energies were not confined to agricultural pursuits, however, but were 
directed along other lines, and in 1888 he went into the wholesale binding- 
twine business. He is still identified with this enterprise, which has 
developed in a most gratifying manner and now makes shipments to all 
sections of the United States and Canada. He was one of the organizers 
of the First National Bank ot Moulton in U)oo, and was a member of its 



HISTORY Ui- APPANOOSE COUNTY 35 

board of directors until iQio. In the year last named, together with Mr. 
Stickney, he purchased the controlling interest in this institution and has 
ever since held the office of president. Since assuming the duties in this 
connection he has practically withdrawn from agricultural pursuits, in 
which he was actively engaged for thirty years, but still owns his farm 
adjoining Moulton. From time to time he has made judicious invest- 
ments in real estate in tiitferent sections and holds the title to a thousand 
acres of land locatcti in various states. He is a man ot keen discernment 
in matters of business to the support of which he brings the energ}' and 
tenacitv of purpose that pave the wa\- to success, and to the exercise of 
these qualities must be attributed the prosperity he is now enjoying. 

In 1879, Mr. Post was married to Miss Mary V. Rudd, of Washing- 
ton, Iowa, at which place her birth occurred in 18) ^ her parents being 
Major \V. and Rhoda (Shirk) Rudd. The father, who was a member 
of an old Maine family, came to Iowa about 18^0, and located in Wash- 
ington county. There he engaged in farming during the remainder of 
his active life and he was also a school teacher. The Shirk family were 
natives of Indiana. To Major and Mr-, l^udd were born six children, 
Mrs. Post being the tifth in order of birth. The other members of the 
family are as follows: Emma, the wite ot Dr. J. T. Atkinson of Kansas 
City, Missouri; Annis M., the widow of Captain Dana, a Civil war vet- 
eran, of Ottumwa, Iowa; Martha V... who is teaching school in Belpre, 
Kansas; Samuel .1., who is also a resident of Belpre; and Olive, deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Post have had six children, two of whom died in infancy. 
In order ot birth those who are living are as follows: \'ivian, who married 
L. E. Erlewine, of Spokane, Washington, and is the mother of one child; 
Edwin R.. who married Edna Stickney, also a resident of Spokane; Paul 
A., who married Lulu P. Blosser and has one child: and Marjorie, who 
is living at home and attending school. 

Mr. Post is an active worker in the l'resb\ terian church ami has been 
superintendent ot the Sunda\ School for several years. Mrs. Post is a 
member ot the Baptist church and is interested in the work of its various 
organizations. She also belongs to the P. E. O. Society. In his political 
views Mr. Post is a republican. He was sergeant-at-arms at the national 
convention at St. Loui.s, when William McKinley was nominated for 
president, and was regarded as a possible appointee to the |iost of .secretary 
of agriculture during the first term of that president. He has always 
taken an active interest in all movements affecting the agriculturist, and 
was .secretary and treasurer of the National Earmcrs' Alliance and secretary 
and business agent for the State Farmers' Alliance. Mr. I'ost has always 
figured quite prominently in local public life and w a- a member and 



36 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

secretary of the commission appointed by Governor Bois to revise the 
revenue laws of the state ot Iowa. He possesses high standards of 
citizenship and all questions affecting the general welfare of the com- 
munity enlist his attention, particularly those of an educational nature, 
and he served for a long period as a member of the school board, during 
a portion of which time he was president of that body. Mr. Post is held 
in high repute as a private citizen because of his active cooperation in 
all public movements, as a business man because of the honorable and 
upright methods along which he conducts his transactions, and as a public 
official because of the capable and efficient manner in which he meets 
his responsibilities. 



JOSEPH J. FRANKEL. 



No man occupies a more enviable position in business circles of Center- 
ville than Joseph J. Frankel, proprietor of the large and flourishing dry- 
goods store which bears his name. He is respected and esteemed by all who 
know him, not alone by reason of the success he has achieved but also ow- 
ing to the fact that his business methods have been constantly straight- 
forward and honorable. He is a dependable man under all circumstances 
and the simple weight ot his character and ability have carried him for- 
ward into important business relations. A native of Poland, Mr. Frankel 
was born November 30, 1873, and is a son of Joseph and Eve ( Margolis) 
Frankel, both ot whom were born in that country. The lather was a con- 
tractor and grain dealer and was unusually successful in both branches of 
activity. He never came to America but passed away in Poland in Feb- 
ruary, 1904, at the age ot sixty-six. Later his widow came to America and 
settled in Peoria, Illinois, where she now resides, having reached the age of 
seventy-seven. 

In the actjuirt-menr ot an rtlucation Joseph J. Frankel attended school 
in his native country. He was nineteen years of age when he came U 
America, settling in Peoria in i8c)2. He secured a position in a clothing 
store and retained it until 1900. when he came to Centerville, where he has 
since resided. At first he worked in a department store operated b\- A. 
Grinspan and he continued this identification until July, igoi. when he 
returned to Peoria and established himself in the wholesale men's turnish- 
ing business, under the name of the Peoria Mercantile Company. This 
enterprise he conducted successfully until February, 1905, when he sold 
the concern and came again to Centerville, joining Mr. Grinspan in the 




MK. AM) MKS. .1. .1. I'H.WKKI, 



rt,; 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 39 

management of his general store. Their association continued until Jan- 
uarj', 1910, when Mr. Grinspan was obliged to go west on account of his 
failing health. Mr. Frankel at that time purchased his interest in the busi- 
ness and has operated the store ever since. His establishment comprises a 
fine double store and basement at Nos. 116-118 West Jackson street and 
is one of the finest of its kind in Centervillc. Mr. Frankel carries a large 
and complete line of stock and strives in every way to keep pace with 
metropolitan progress, bujing new goods as they come upon the market 
and never selling anything not favored b} the newest fashion. This pro- 
gressive spirit is one of the factors in his success, secondary in importance 
only to the standards of unwavering integrity and honesty to which he has 
steadily adhered. He has ever utilized his opportunities to the best ad- 
vantage and, making steady progress in the business world, has to- 
day reached a position of prominence and influence. Mr. Frankel has at 
this writing under contemplation [)lans for using the entire building in 
which his store is now located and on realization of this project will own 
and occup}- the largest dr)-goods emporium in southern Iowa. Doubtlessly 
his trade will increase to warrant such enterprise for which he deserves all 
success, as he is a man who ver\ trul) can be called the salt of the 
earth, one whom it is a pleasure to meet and one v\hom all who know him 
only wish the best of success. He is a stockholder in the Centerville & 
Mystic Interurban Railroad and in the Centerville Gypsum Company and 
is besides extensively interested in the Hercules Manufacturing Company 
of Centerville. He owns a beautiful home at No. 700 Drake avenue. 

On the 12th of July, igoo, Mr. Frankel married Miss Minnie Grins- 
pan, a daughter of Aaron and Leah (Starovolsky) Grinspan. natives of 
Knyshin, Russia, where the father was born October 20, 1847. He was 
reared and educated in his native city and there learned the weaver's trade, 
which he followed for many years, gaining rapid advancement and finally 
becoming sujierintendent of a factory. He remained in Russia until 1882 
and then came to America, settling first in Brooklyn, New York. After 
a short period of residence there he went to Des Moines, Iowa, and there 
secured a position as superintendent of Sherman Brothers Woolen Mill, 
continuing in this position tor a number of years. Later he came to Center- 
ville and for some time peddled dry goods. Being ambitious, energetic, 
well educated and intelligent, he was rapidly successful and had soon saved 
a sufficient sum of money to establish himself in business. He opened a 
small store near the Burlington depot and after conducting his enterprise 
in that location for some time moved to a more favorable location, estab- 
lishing himself at No. 1 16 West Jackson street, where Mr. Frankel is now 
located. He continued active in the management of this enterprise until 



40 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

his litalrh failed and he was obliged to go west to recuperate. He died in 
Seattle, Washington, July 25, 1910, at the age of sixty-three, and is buried 
in St. Joseph, Missouri. His widow survives and makes her home in 
Seattle, having reached the age of sixty-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Frankel 
have become the parents of a daughter, Helena Josephine, who was born 
May 19, 1904. 

Mr. Frankel gives his allegiance to the republican part}- but is not ac- 
tive in political affairs, although he is public-spirited and loyal to a marked 
degree. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias and to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and with his family is a devout member of the 
Congregation B'nai Israel. As a resident of Centerville he has been loyal 
in his support of everything ]iertaining to the welfare of the city and has 
made some substantial contributions to its development and progress. 



JOHN C. ASHBY. 



Appanoose county numbers among its most substantial, progressive 
and influential citizens and among its most worthy native sons John C. 
Ashby, who since 1903 has been engaged in the real-estate and insurance 
business in Centerville. He was born near this city on the 1 ith of August, 
1866, and is a son of E. G. and Sarah (Hollingsworth) Ashby, the former 
a native of Indiana, born October 4, 1840, of Scotch-Irish stock. The 
mother of our subject was also born in Indiana, her natal daj- being June 
22, 1849. She is of English and Irish ancestry and she came to Appanoose 
county in the early '^os. The father of our subject settled in this part of 
Iowa before the Civil war, beginning his independent career as a school- 
teacher. He served in the Federal army and after hi< discharge he returned 
to .'\ppanoose count}-, where he married and engaged in farming. He fol- 
lowed general agricultural pursuits for a few years but final 1}- abandoned 
this occupation in favor of teaching, in whkh he engaged until his death, 
which occurred on the 1 ith of August, 1894. He became gradually promi- 
nent in educational circles of the section and was for a number of years 
coimty superintendent of schools, serving with ability and conscientiousness. 
After his demise his wife moved to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where she still 
resides. 

John C. Ashby is in all essential respects a self-made man, for he began 
his independent career at the early age of fourteen } ears, and has been de- 
pendent upon his own resources since that time. He learned independence 
and self-reliance in the school of experience and the lessons have been of 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 41 

utmost value to him in the development of his later career. When he laid 
aside his books he obtained a position in a grocery store conducted b) Drake 
& Lane in Centerville and remained in their employ tor twenty-two years, 
gaining steady advancement. He was economical and farsighted and 
saved a great deal ot the money which he earned until he had accumulated 
a sufficient sum to establish himseit in business. In 1902 he became engaged 
in the real-estate and insurance business at Centerville and is still con- 
nected with both lines ot activity, giving close attention to the manage- 
ment and control of his enterprise. He has proven himself a man of 
great ability, strong and determined purpose and undaunted energ}', and 
\)'\- business judgment is rarely it ever at fault. Consequently, in the 
course of }ears he has won success and is numbered among the representa- 
tive men ot his community. 

In 1891 Mr. .\shby married Miss Eunice Gunn, a daughter of Isaac 
!•". and Johanna ( Rowden) Ciunn, the tormer a general contractor and 
builder of Centerville. Mrs. Ashby's father was born in Illinois and 
moved from that state to Missouri, where his marriage occurred. Later 
he and his wite came to Centerville and remained here until 1900, when 
they moved to Oklahoma. There the father's death occurred in 1906. 
His widow makes her home w itli flu- subject of this review. Mrs. Ashby 
is a native ot Missouri, her birth having occurred February 20, J870. She 
and her husband have one son. Max R., who was born October 10, 1892. 
He was graduated from the Centerville high school in 1912 and is at 
present in Pittsburgh,' Pennsylvania, studying architecture and drawing. 

Mr. .Ashby gives his allegiance to the republican party and from 1903 
to 1905 served on the Centerville city council, working earnestly and con- 
scientiously in the interests of the public. He belongs to the Masonic lodge 
and his religious views are in accord with the doctrines of the Methodist 
church. He is one of the most enterprising men in Centerville, always 
ready and willing to do what he can for the general upbuilding and 
growth, and is held in high respect as a progressive and inriutnrial busi- 
ness man. 



MRS. SARAH S. WKI^S'I KR. 

At different periods Mrs. Sarah S. Webster has been closely associated 
with the educational progress and intellectual development in Apiianoose 
county where she is now filling the position of superintendent of schools. 
H»'r labors have been of far-reaching and bcnifu i:il 1 ffi 1 1 and in her work 



42 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

she has held to hij^h standards of practical achievement as a preparation 
tor the responsible duties of life. Iowa may be proud to number one of 
her force and ability among her native daughters. Mrs. Webster was 
born in Monroe county, this state, October 26, 1858, her parents being 
John W. and Nancy J. (Stoops) Clodfelter, who were natives of Putnam 
count}, Indiana. The father came to Iowa during the pioneer period in 
the development of this state, settling in Monroe county, where his father 
entered land trom the government, securing a wild tract which he con- 
verted into rich and productive fields. John W. Clodfelter was reared and 
educated on the old family homestead, earl}' assisting in the plowing, plant- 
ing and harvesting when not busy with the duties of the schoolroom. He 
continued with his parents until after the outbreak of the Civil war when 
his spirit of patriotism prompted his enlistment and he became a mem- 
ber of Company A, Thirty-sixth Iowa Infantry, with which he served for 
about two }ears. He then became ill, his death resulting from expos- 
ure. His widow survives and now resides at Moravia, Appanoose county, 
at the age of seventy-three years. 

Mrs. Webster was reared and educated in Monroe county, attending 
the district schools and afterward entering the Albia high school. She 
began teaching school when but sixteen years of age and after two years 
of successful work in the schoolroom was married, in July, 1877, to 
Alvah Webster, a son of Alvah and C}nthia (Legg) Webster, who were 
natives of New York. The father was a farmer and became one of the 
early residents of Illinois, where he secured a tract of wild land, entered 
as a claim from the government, and began farming, devoting his remain- 
ing days to agricultural pursuits near Kankakee, Illinois, in which city 
he also conducted a general store for a number of }ears or until his death. 
His wife has also passed away. Their son, Alvah Webster, Jr.,. is a cheese 
maker by trade and followed that business continuously and successfully 
until January, 1899, when he suffered from a stroke of paralysis which 
incapacitated him for further business activities. Mr. and Mrs. Webster 
have one child, Claudia M., the wife of William P. Schrock, engaged 
in the manufacture of medicinal remedies at Piano, Iowa. Thev have 
four children. Ha/el, Beatrice, Leonard and Sarah. 

Mrs. Webster taught school continuously from 1883 until 1907, when 
she was elected count}- superintjendent of schools, being the first woman 
chosen to that position in Appanoose county. She was the candidate on 
the democratic ticket and was again elected for the office in 1912. Her 
efforts in behalf of the schools have been resultant of great good. She 
holds to high standards of instruction and believes in thorough training 
without the unwise adoption of school fads \\hich often [irevent a pupil 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 43 

from becoming thoroughly groundcil in the tuiulanicntal principles of 
school work. As far as possible she makes a study of each pupil and 
labors for individual benefit. Wide reading keeps her in touch with 
advanced methods emplo\ed by educators throughout the country and her 
labors have at all times been fruitful of results. 

Mrs. Webster is a stockholder in tlu- Centerville Light & Traction 
Company, owning and operating an interurban line between Centerville 
and Mystic, a distance ot six miles. She is also the owner ot a nice resi- 
dence where she and her husband reside at No. 912 Drake avenue and a 
good residence property in Moravia, low a. She holds membership in the 
Women's Relief Corps and her religious faith is that of the Christian 
church. Her standards ot lite are high and her influence is ever cast on 
the side of righteousness, reform, truth and improvement. 



THOM.AS G. FEE. 



The name of Fee has long figured prominent!) in connection with the 
bench and bar of Appanoose county and in the practice of law Thomas 
G. Fee, whose name introduces this review, has won for himself a credita- 
ble position as an able lawyer whose wide knowledge of the principles 
of jurisprudence is supplemented by the ability to accurately apply those 
principles. He is now practicing in Centerville, his native city. He was 
born August 2f, 1877, a son of Thomas Milton and Marie (Barker) Fee. 
The father's birth occurred in Feesburg, Brown county. Ohio, April 18, 
1840, and his parents, Thomas J. and Sarah (Hastings) Fee, were of 
English and Irish descent respectively, the former being a well known 
merchant and manufacturer of Ohio, whence he removed to Illinois with 
his family in 184Q. In the latter state Thomas Milton Fee was reared and 
educated, remaining there until i860, when he became a resident of 
Ottumwa, Iowa, where he engaged in teaching school. He also took up 
the study ot law in that city under the direction ot Colonel .S. W. Sum- 
mers but in May, 186a, removed to Centerville and on the 8th of August 
of the same year offered his services to the government, enlisting in Com- 
pany G, Thirty-si,\th Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He took part in various 
engagements with the Thirteenth, Sixteenth and Seventh Army Corps 
and was captured at Mark's Mills, Arkansas, after which he was for ten 
months confined in a rebel prison at Tyler, Texas. In September, 186^, 
he was mustered out and was honorably discharged at Davenport. Fol- 
lowing his return from the war he establisheii himself in the practice of 



44 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

!a\\, wliicli he tol lowed continuously to the time of his death save for 
the period spent ujjon the bench. For a time he served as superintendent 
of public instruction in Appanoose county and for a term of four years 
was district attorney for the second judicial district of Iowa. In those 
connections he displayed unfaltering devotion to duty as well as great 
energ}' and ability. In 1894 he was elected district judge and remained 
upon the bench until .lanuar)-. 1902, when he resigned and resumed the 
private practice of law with his son Thomas as his partner. His decisions 
had ever been strictly fair and impartial, based upon the law and the 
equity in the case, and he was regarded as one of the most capable judges 
ever presiding over the district court. In politics he was a republican, 
deeply interested in the success of the part}- because of his firm belief in 
the efficacy of its principles as factors in good government. He belonged 
to the Masonic fraternity, in which he attained high rank, becoming a mem- 
ber of the Mystic Shrine. He was also a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and of the Grand Army post and was a ])romi- 
nent representative of the county bar association. In 1881 he lost his 
first wile and later married Mrs. Cill McGregor, of Centerville, who now 
resides at Rice's Landing in Pennsylvania. Judge Fee passed away in 
Centerville, April 13, igio, honored and respected by all who knew him. 
Hi? children were seven in number, namely: William, who [massed away 
at the age of five years; Frank, w'ho died when twenty-one years of age; 
John, who acts as car inspector for the Santa Fe railroad at Bakersfield, 
California; Marsa, who is the wife of J. W. \'oorhees, a fruit ranchman 
residing at Bakersfield, California; Thomas G., of this review; Eugenia, 
at home; and John M., an agriculturist of Vermillion township, who mar- 
ried Ethel Barber, of Chicago. 

Thomas G. Fee completed his preliminary education by graduation 
from the Centerville high school with the class ot 1896 and then entered 
the law department of the Iowa State University. For a jear he pursued 
a special course of stud} and later was graduated from the law depart- 
ment as a member of the class of 1899 with the degree of LL. B. He at 
once opened an office in Centerville and for two years practiced alone, but 
with his father's retirement from the bench joined him as junior partner 
in the firm of Fee & Fee, a connection that was maintained until the spring 
of 1909, when Thomas G. Fee went to Los Angeles, California, as spe- 
cial representative for some oil companies. He lived at Los .\ngeles and 
at Bakersfield until 1912 and then, returning to Centerville, resumed the 
practice of law in this city. 

In June, 1904, Mr. Fee was married to Miss Janet Gray, a daughter 
of J. R. and Sarah (Cyphers) Gray, the former a native of Scotland, while 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 45 

the Inter is of Scotch lineage. They reside in Centerville, where Mr. 
Gray is employed as engineer by thi- Chicago, Burlington i: Ouincy 
railroad. For the [xist t\\ent}-six years he has been upon one run, between 
Keokuk and Centerville. Mr. and Mrs. Fee have become parents of a 
daughter and son: Margaret, who was born April 26, 1905, and is now 
a pupil in the public school; and Thomas, who was born October 14, 
1907, and was named for his father, grandgather and great-grandfatlur. 

Mr. Fee holds membership with Centerville Lodge, No. 940, B. P. O. 
E., and also belongs to the Masonic fraternity, while his wife is a mem- 
ber of the Order of the Eastern Star. She is also connected with the 
P. E. O., and both are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Fee gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
been somewhat active in its local ranks, serving for three terms as chair- 
man of the county central committee. In the fall of 1904 he was elected 
county attorney and through reelection served for two terms. He occupies 
a creditable and enviable position at the Appanoose county bar, for he 
prepares his cases with great thoroughness and skill and presents them 
with clearness and force, so that he never fails to command the attention 
of court or jury and seldom fails to win the verdict desired. His reason- 
ing is clear, his deductions sound and he is seldom surprised by an unex- 
pected attack of an adversary. 



HON. L. L. TAYLOR. 



Hon. L. L. TaNJor ha> ably represented the third Iowa district in 
the state senate since first elected to rhar body in 190V He has been 
a resident of Appanoose count)- for more than six decades, and has made 
his home in Centerville for a third of a century. His birth occurred near 
Munfordville, Hart county, Kentucky, his parents being John M. and 
Nancy A. (Wilson) Taylor, who were natives of South Carolina and 
\'irginia, respective!}. His paternal grandparents were John and Susan 
(Moberly) Taylor, the former born in Maryland on the ist of May, 
1772, and the latter a native of South Carolina. John Taylor was a 
gentleman of Scotch descent. His first wife passed away in Hart county, 
Kentucky, in 1808, and eight years later he wedded Miss Susan Trotter, 
whose demise occurred in Davis county, Iowa. He was called to his 
final rest on the 7th of June, 1897, in Appanoose county, at the age of 
eighty-five years, one month and six days. His first wife bore him eight 
children who lived to maturity, and by his second marriage there were 



46 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

nine, who lived to maturity. William and Nancy Ann ( Park.sj Wilson, 
the maternal grandparents of our subject, were natives of \'irginia, and 
became early settlers of Hart county, Kentuck\-, where both passed 
away. William Wilson reached the ripe old age of eighty-five years. 
He and his wife reared a family of five children. 

John M. Taylor, the father of the Hon. L. L. Taylor, was a farmer 
by occupation, and also followed carpentering and contracting. W'hen 
two years of age he was taken by his parents to Hart county, Ken- 
tucky, and was there reared. In 1849 he came to Appanoose county, 
Iowa, locating in \\'ashington township, where he entered land from the 
government, developed and improved a farm and reared his family. Dis- 
posing of that property, he purchased another farm a mile and a half 
west, and thereon spent the remainder of his life. His demise occurred 
on the 14th of April, i88g, but fourteen days before his eighty-fifth 
birthday. His wife, who survived him for a number of years, passed 
away on the 2d of September, 1896, when more than eighty-five years 
old. Both were Baptists in religious faith. John M. Taylor held various 
township offices and was widely recognized as a representative and 
esteemed citizen of this count}', within the borders of which he resided 
for four detades. Unto him and his wife were born nine children, seven 
sons and two daughters, seven of whom grew to adult age. as follows: 
William J., who passed away on March 28, 1910; Holland P., whose 
demise occurred on the 16th of July, i860; Lewis L., of this review; 
Isaac W., who resides near Blythedale, Harrison county, Missouri; James 
N., deceased; Mary Jane, who is the wife of William S. Beggs, and lives 
near Moulton, Iowa; and Nanc}- Alice, the deceased wife of Frank 
Hughes. 

Lewis L. 1 aylor, whose name introduces this review, was brought 
to Appanoose county when a small boy, and has resided within its borders 
since 1849. He was reareti on his father's farm, and attended the district 
schools in the acquirement of an education. He began teaching when 
twenty years of age, and tavight thirty terms of school, altogether, impart- 
ing clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired. 
In 1879 he was elected clerk of the district and circuit courts, and held 
that office for four terms, or eight years. He took up his abode at Center- 
ville in November, 1879, and has lived in the town continuously since. 
At the end of four terms' service as clerk of the courts he entered the 
First National Bank of Centerville as bookkeeper and teller, acting in 
the dual capacity for several years. In 1903 he was elected state senator 
of the third district, comprising Appanoose ami Davis counties, and by 
reelection has been continuetl in tliat office to the present time, his record 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 47 

fully justifying the confidence of his constituents and winning general 
approval. He held various minor offices in former years, and has long 
enjoyed an enviable reputation as one of the leading and valued citizens 
of the community. In \N'aehington township, this county, he owns a well 
improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres. 

On the 26th of May, 1864, Mr. Tu) lor was united in marriage to Miss 
Miriam Siler, a native of Shelby county, Illinois, and a daughter of Ben- 
jamin H. and Jane (Fleming) Siler, who passed away in Davis county, 
Iowa, where they had established their home, in 1847. Mrs. Taylor was 
one ot a family of six daughters and two sons, who reached mature years, 
the others being as follows: Lucy A., William Henry, Levi, Amanda, 
Joanna. Mary E. and Ellen. Unto our subject and his wife were born 
two children, namely: Henrietta, who was active in Sunday school and 
Endeavor work, and passed away at the age of thirty- four years; and 
John B.. who wedded Miss Katharyne Eby, January g, 1907, and is now 
serving his second term as county auditor. Mr. Miriam Taylor was 
called to her final rest on the 30th of March, igo6, at the age of sixty- 
two years, one month and two days. She had long been a member of 
the Christian church, and her life had been in consistent harmony with 
its teachings. Her surviving husband has been an elder in the Central 
Church of Christ of Centerville for many years. 



WILLIAM EVANS. 



William Evans, who passed away in Centerville on the 4rh of Septem- 
ber. 1898, was a pioneer citizen of Appanoose count)-, who was for many 
years prominently identified with important business interests and also 
won an enviable reputation in financial circles here as cashier of the First 
National Bank of Centerville. Among the public offices which he held 
was that of county treasurer, in which capacity he was retained for four 
terms. His birth occurred near Salem, Washington county, Indiana, on 
the 12th of May, 1829, and it was in that year that his parents took up 
their abode in (jreencastle, Putnam county, Indiana, where his boyhood 
was spent on a farm. In 1849, when a young man of twenty, he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Monroe county. Iowa, and there 
continued to reside until February, 1864. At that time he came to Appa- 
noose count}-, Iowa, settling in Iconium. where he was engag<'d in tlie 
mercantile business until December, 1871. when, having been elected 
treasurer of the county, he took up his abode in Centerville and here 



48 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

made his home until his death. As the democratic candidate tor that 
ofBce he overcame the normal republican majority and thus received tan- 
gible evidence of the confidence and trust reposed in liiin by the voters. 
That his record fully justified the faith of his constituents is indicated 
in the fact that he was three times reelected, gaining and maintaining a 
reputation as one of the county's most competent and trusted officials. 
At the end of eight years' service as treasurer he was offered tlie position 
of cashier of the First National Bank of Centerville and proved a valued 
representative of that institution by reason of his wide acquaintance, ex- 
cellent business ability and sterling integrity. The period of his residence 
in Iowa covered about a halt century and most of that time was spent 
in Appanoose count}-. In 1888 he had removed to Topeka, Kansas, but 
returned two years later. He was appointed postmaster of Centerville in 
1894 but at the end of three years resigned on account of impaired health, 
spending the winter of 1897-98 in Texas. Returning to Centerville, he 
passed away here on the 4th of September, 1898. His widow has since 
continued to reside in Centerville. He had won the high esteem and 
friendship of all who knew him, and in his demise the community lost 
one of its prominent, respected and representative citizens. 

On the 25th of November, 1852, Mr. Evans was united in marriage 
to IVliss Margaret Jane Vestle, who was born in Purnamville, Indiana, on 
the 9th of March, 1831. They became the parents of six children. 
Sarah Elizabeth, whose birth occurred in Monroe county, Iowa, on the 
3d of September, 1854, gave her hand in marriage to William H. Everson 
on the 3d of September, 1873, *i"d passed away at Pratt, Kansas, on the 
13th of March, 1901. She was the mother of four children, as follows: 
Pearl, who was born in Centerville, Iowa, in December, 1874, and wedded 
Tenny Rogers, b}- which union there is one child, Eugene Everson: Jennie, 
who was born at Centerville in 1877 and gave her hand in marriage to 
Jess E. Dickinson, by whom she has a son, Frank Dickinson; Frank, who 
was born at North English, Iowa, in 1879, and passed away at Pratt, 
Kansas, in 1902; and Goldie, who died in 1908 and who was the wife of 
Clifford Roberts, by whom she had a daughter. Elizabeth Roberts. Mar- 
garet Esther Evans, whose birrh occurred in Monroe county on the 30th 
of January, 1856, became the wife of James Cain Bevington on the I2th 
of March, 1874, and died in Centerville. Iowa, on the 6th of May. 1883. 
She had two children, namely: William M., who was born in Centerville, 
Iowa, in May, 1875, and wedded May Brooks, by whom he has one 
daughter, Esther Bevington; and Lois, whose birrh occurred ar Centerville, 
Iowa, in June, 1879, and who became the wife of Dennis L. Fleak in 
1900. Lucy Ann Evans, who was born. in Monroe countv. Iowa, on the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 49 

iith of November, 1857, passed away at Centervillc on the 3d of Sep- 
tember, 1892. In July, 1879, she gave her hand in marriage to Richard 
C. Stewart, b}- whom she had a daughter, Ida Margaret Stewart. William 
Franklin Evans, whose birth occurred in Monroe county on the 16th of 
November, 1859, makes his home in St. Louis, Missouri, and acts as 
general solicitor for the Rock Island and Frisco lines. Maria Belle Evans, 
who was born in Iconium, Iowa, on the 26th of November, 1863, became 
the wife of Hubbard Milton Cyphers in April, 1885. They have one 
daughter, Beulah Evans, who was born on the 18th of January, 1887, 
and who wedded Harold H. McLucas in 1910. Ida Evandale Evans, 
whose birth occurred in Iconium, Iowa, on the 8th of February, 1867, 
was married in 1883 to Clarence William Walton. Their daughter, Lucy 
Estelle Walton, was bom on the 4th ot Maj', 1888, and gave her hand 
in marriage to Hugh N. Fogle in 1911. 

As above stated, William Evans was a stanch democrat in his political 
views. While a resident ot Iconium he served as postmaster for eight 
\ears, and he also acted as township clerk and assessor for several terms. 
His religious faith was indicated by his membership in the Baptist church, 
to which his widow also belongs. He served as deacon and trustee of 
the church and exemplified its teachings in his daily life. Fraternally he 
was identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to 
Lodge No. 76 and Encam[)ment No. 24 and being a past grand of the 
former. He manifested in his character that admirable combination of 
qualities which caused him to work diligently and do well whatever he 
undertook. He was a useful citizen, interested in every worthv enter- 
prise, responsive to every moral obligation, and in his dealings with men 
showed that he recognized the true significance of life and sought to meet 
and assume its higher and nobler duties. 



J. W. WILLIAMS. 



J. W. Williams, a representative and respected resident of Centerville 
wi'.o is now living practical!} retired, won recognition and success in busi- 
ness circles as the founder of the Williams Piano & Organ Company of 
Chicago, which owns two factories in the metropolis and is now conducted 
by him and his sons. His birth occurred in Freeport, Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, on the 12th of July. 1833, his parents being Jacob and 
Eliza (Bowtr^) Williams. The father, who was a native of Maryland 
and of Dutch descent, worked at various occupations. .About the time 



50 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

of the outbreak of the Civil war he made his way down the Ohio river by 
boat, landing at Cairo, Illinois. Continuing his journey westward, he 
located at Cenlerville, Iowa, and here both he and his wife lived until 
called to their final rest. 

J. W. Williams spent the first twenty-one years of his life in the 
state of his nativity and had but limited educational opportunities in his 
youth. His knowledge has been continually augmented, however, through 
reading, experience and observation. In 1854 he came west to Center- 
ville, Iowa, and having learned the tinner's trade in Pennsylvania, opened 
a tin shop in partnership with E. Washburn of Ottumwa. At the end 
of two years he purchased his partner's interest, conducting the business 
for several years in a shop near the northeast corner of the square. Sub- 
sequently he embarked in the hardware and implement business and grad- 
ually became identified with the organ and piano business. In 1887 he 
admitted into partnership with him his oldest son, H. B. Williams, and 
later his son, C. S. Williams. The firm began the manufacture of organs 
in Chicago in 1893 and in 1898 began to make pianos. The Williams 
Piano & Organ Company owns two factories in Chicago and has a capacity 
of twenty pianos and thirty-five organs per week. J. W. W^illiams won 
an enviable reputation as a successful and enterprising business man and 
was one of the well-known piano men of Chicago. At the present time 
he is living retired at Centerville in an attractive home on North Main 
street. 

In 1855, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Mr. Williams was joined in wed- 
lock to Miss Mary Elizabeth Bradley, a native of Belfast, Ireland, of 
Scotch-Irish descent, who came to the United States when a young girl. 
Our subject was married after establishing his home in the west, return- 
ing to Pittsburg for his bride. To them were born six children. H. B. 
Williams, of Evanston, Illinois, wedded Miss Lulu Corkhill, by whom 
he had two children. John C, who died at the age of twenty-five years; 
and Lucy. Ella V. is the wife of George W. Randle, of Centerville. and 
the mother of five children. Lulu, Ruby, Bess, Albert and Raljih. Lena 
is the wife of J. K. Huston, of Pasadena, California, by whom she has 
two children, Florence V. and Donald M. Carl S. wedded Miss May 
Weir, who died leaving three children. Faith, Weir and Bradle)'. For 
his second wife he chose Miss Elizabeth Bonnell. Mrs. Anna (Wil- 
liams) Hinshaw, who died at the age of thirty-seven years, was the 
wife of Professor Hinshaw, of \'alparaiso, Indiana, and the mother of 
four children, Carl W., William \\'.. .lohn T. and Marie. Albert E. 
Williams passed away when a youth of nineteen. 

Mr. Williams is a republican in politics but has never sought nor 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 51 

desired office as a reward for his party fealty. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to the lodge at 
Centerville. Both Mr. and Mrs. Williams are prominent members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church at Centerville, the former having been 
for many }ears a class leader, steward and trustee. Coming to this 
countr} almost six decades ago, he has witnessed the wonderful trans- 
fomiation that has occurred as pioneer conditions have given war before 
the onward march of civilization. He has now passed the seventy-ninth 
milestone on life's journey and his career has ever been such that he 
can look back upon the past without regret and forward to the future 
without fear. 



ALVAH S. DUKES. 



Alvah S. Dukes, holding a position of prominence and responsibility 
in financial circles of Unionville as cashier ot the Unionville Savings 
Bank, was born on a farm three miles southwest of Centerville, August 
20, 1870. He is a son of Henry L. and Sophia M. (Lantz) Dukes, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania, of New England ancestry, and the latter 
born in Ohio of German parents. Their marriage occurred four miles 
southwest of Centerville, Henry L. Dukes having come west with his 
parents at an early date. He famied for a number of years upon a tract 
of land three and one-half miles southwest of the city, carrying on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits upon this property until his death, in 1S72. 
He was making a ramrod for a gun and the weapon was accidentally 
discharged, the bullet penetrating Mr. Dukes' right lung, and from the 
effects of this injury he died one week later. Afterward his wife re- 
turned to the home of her parents and ten years later was united in 
marriage to A. H. Pool, now deceased. Mrs. Pool is living with her 
daughter, Mrs. Ola L. Potts, of Garden Grove, Decatur county. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Dukes were born three children: Winifred M., 
treasurer ot Ajipanoose county; Alvah S., of this review; and Ola L., 
who married H. \\'. Potts, a druggist of Garden Grove, Iowa. By her 
second union the mother of our subject had one daughter, Edith M.. who 
married Walter Miller, a merchant of Garden Grove. 

In the acquirement of an education Alvah S. Dukes attended the 
district school in Appanoose county and the public school at Unionville. 
After he had laid aside his books he remained npon the home farm until 
twenty-five years of age and then secured a position as clerk in the gen- 



52 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

eral store of Miller &. Dukes, in Unionvillc, his brother, Winifred M. 
Dukes, being at that time junior member of the firm. Later Mr. Dukes 
of this review entered into partnership with his brother and this connec- 
tion was maintained for some time. During the period ot their associa- 
tion they had established a store in Henry county, Iowa, and Alvah S. 
Dukes took charge of this enterprise, disposing of it after two jears and 
returning to Unionville, where he and his brother again conducted a mer- 
cantile establishment under the firm name of Dukes Brothers. \\'hcn 
this business was sold Alvah S. Dukes was appointed deputy county 
treasurer under his brother and served for three years, or until 1912, when 
he was elected cashier of the Unionville Savings Bank of Unionville, 
which position he now holds. He has proved himself a valuable and 
reliable official and his judgment has come to be regarded as practical 
and sound concerning the complex problems of banking and finance, for 
his progressiveness is tempered by safe conservatism and based upon a 
thorough understanding of modern business principles. 

In 1893 Mr. Dukes was united in marriage to Miss Mazie V. Buck- 
master, a daughter of E. A. and Emma (Stanley) Buckmaster, the former 
ot whom was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, June 16, 1837, a son of 
Richard and Elizabeth (Mattocks) Buckmaster, both of German ancestry. 
E. A. Buckmaster enlisted at Bloomfield, Iowa, in April, 1861, joining 
Company G, Second Iowa \'oluntcer Infantry. After serving for six 
months he was discharged on account of sickness but in the following 
year reenlisted in Company I, Third Iowa Cavalry, serving as sergeant 
and seeing much active service. He was in the thick of the battle at the 
siege of Vicksburg and was wounded at La Grange. He served until the 
close of hostilities and was mustered out at Keokuk, Iowa, ^^'hen he 
returned home he established himself in the harness business in Unionville 
and remained in it until 1872, when he purchased a farm in Utlell town- 
ship. He later gave up agricultural pursuits in order to operate a sawmill 
on Soap creek and this in turn he disposed of and opened a harness and 
shoe shop in Unionville which he is now conducting and is also acting as 
agent for the Yorkshire Creamery Company of Ottumwa. He married 
on January 1, 1867, Miss Emma Stanley, a daughter of Moses and 
Barbara (Hoffman) Stanley, pioneer settlers of Van Buren county, Iowa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dukes have become the parents of two children: Harrv, 
who was born July 4, 1899, and who is attending school in I'nionville; 
and Doroth). born August 19, 1906, who is also pursuing her studies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dukes are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of 
Unionville, :unl both liclong to the Order of the Eastern Star and the 
Yeomen. In addition Mr. Dukes is affiliated with the blue lodge in 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 53 

Miisonn. He gives his allegiance to the republican party and is at the 
present time serving as treasurer ot the I'nionville Independent school 
district. Trustworthy and taithtul in business, progressive in citizenship 
and loyal to the claims of friendship, he has thus displayed many good 
qualities which have gained him widespread regard. 



RE\'. MARTIN M. LOFTUS. 

Rev. Martin M. Loftus has been rector of St. Mary's Catholic church 
of Ccnterville for the past eight years and has labored zealously and 
effectively to foster its growth and influence. His birth occurred in Bur- 
lington, Iowa, on the gth of August, 1875, his parents being John and Ellen 
(McCormick) Loftus, the former a native of County Mayo, Ireland, and 
the latter of County Roscommon. John Loftus, a contractor by trade, 
emigrated to the I'nited States in 1862 and took up his abode in Newark, 
New Jersey. In 1870 he came to Burlington, Iowa, where he embarked 
in business as a contractor and where he has resided continuously since. It 
was in Mount Pleasant. Iowa, that he wedded Miss Ellen McCormick, 
who had made her way direct to Burlington after landing on the shores of 
the United States. Unto them were born the following children : Thomas, 
who is rector of St. Mary's Catholic church at Oskaloosa, Iowa; Martin 
M.. ot this review; John, who is engaged in business as a contractor at 
Burlington in association with his father; and Elizabeth, at home. 

In the acquirement of an education Martin M. Loftus attended Lourdes 
.\cademy at Burlington, Iowa, and also St. Ambrose College at Davenport. 
Later he entered St. Paul's Seminary at St. Paul, Minnesota, and subse- 
(juently completed his studies at St. Mary's Seminary of Baltimore, Mary- 
land. From September, igoi, until November, 1902, he was actively 
identified with educational interests as professor of Latin, history and 
(ireek in St. Ambrose College of Davenport, Iowa. In 1902 Rev. Loftus 
went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, as assistant to Father Smythe at St. Francis 
Xavier church ot that city, remaining there until July, 1904. when he came 
to Centerville. On the seventeenth day of that month he became rector 
of St. .Mary's church of Centervilh. whidi has since remained under his 
su[)ervision and has steadily grown in membership and as an influence 
for good. The cliunh and parish hou-c are pleasantly located on .South 
KiL.'hteenth street. 

In his political views Father Loftus is independent, not desiring to be 
botmd by party ties when helping to .select men and measures to further 



54 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

the general welfare. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of 
Columbus, belonging to Loras Council at Davenport, Iowa. He has 
labored with consecrated zeal to promote the spread of Catholicity here 
and has won the love and support of his parishioners in an unusual degree. 



LEWIS SALINGER. 



Lewis Salinger needs no introduction to the readers of this volume for 
he is well known to the residents of Centerville, where he has resided since 
1895. He is one of the active business men and public-spirited citizens 
and his work as a partner in the dry-goods business conducted by Salinger 
& Goldstein has closely touched the general business development of the 
community. He was born in Poland, March 7, 1865, and is a son of 
A. M. and Tina H. (Rosuck) Salinger, natives of that country, where the 
father conducted a hotel until his death, in 1896. The mother of our sub- 
ject died in the following year. 

In the acquirement of an education Lewis Salinger attended school in 
Poland but laid aside his books at the age of seventeen years in order to 
come to America. He crossed the Atlantic and on the 7th of July, 1882, 
reached Des Moines, Iowa, and soon afterward secured work as bookkeeper 
in a wholesale house. For two years he held that position and then in 
March, 1885, left Des Moines and went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where 
he was connected with the jewelry business until 1891. In January of 
that year he traveled west to Idaho and located at Pocatello where he was 
employed in a clothing store for one year. Leaving Pocatello he went to 
Montpelier in the same state, working, however, in the interests of his 
former employers and establishing there a branch of their business. He 
acted as treasurer of the company lor three years but eventually disposed 
of his interests and in 189^ moved to Centerville, being influenced in this 
removal by the failing health of his wife. He established himself in the 
general merchandise business and continued to conduct a profitable enter- 
prise of this kind alone until 1903, when he formed a partnership with 
Abe Goldstein, of Nebraska City, and the business is now conducted 
under the firm name of Salinger & Goldstein. Their enterprise is 
conducted in a fine modern liuiKiing two stories in height, with a 
basement, and in it is found everything necessary for the successful 
conduct of a modern mercantile establishment. The lines of goods 
are complete and the stock is always tastefully arranged, so that 
the store presents many of the aspects of a metropolitan concern. The 




m:\vis sai.inckh 



pue^^^ 



\.\o- 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 57 

firm has made courtesy and constant consideration for the wishes of their 
customers the jiolicy of the house and has as a result secured a substantial 
patronage which is steadih' increasing. Besides the main store the firm 
of Salinger & Goldstein conducts also what was formerly called The Grand 
Leader, dealing in dry goods, carpets and cloaks, succeeding J. J. Strickler 
in the management of this enterprise. 

Mr. .Salinger, being a man of resourceful business ability, enterprise, 
discrimination and of wide interests, has naturally been carried forward 
into important relations with the general business life of Centerville. He 
is a stockholder in the Centerville Gypsum Company, in the Centerville 
&: Mystic Interurban Railroad Company, and is president of the Retail 
Merchants Association. He is one of the public-spirited men of the com- 
munity and gives active and hearty cooperation to those movements whicli 
have for their object the promotion of growth ami developmcnr. In this 
relation he is a member of the Booster committee of the Centerville Com- 
mercial Club, which was instrumental in securing for the city electric lights 
around the main square, and he is at all times a force in the work of civic 
improvement. 

On the 1 ith of August, 1890, Mr. Salinger married Mi.ss Rose Gott- 
stein, a daughter of Simon and Hannah Gottstein. natives of Poland. The 
father came to .America in early life and located first in New York, whence 
he went to Des Moines, Iowa, where for thirty-five years he conducted a 
store. Later he went to Minneapolis, Minriesota, and finally to Detroit, 
Michigan, where he died in the fall of 191 1. He had long survived his 
wife, who passed away in iSjc). Mr. and Mrs. Salinger became the par- 
ents of a daughter, Honora, who has reached the age of twenty-one. Mrs. 
Salinger passed away May 16, 1905, after an illness which had extended 
over a period of eight or nine years. 

Mr. Salinger has extensive property interests in and around Center- 
ville, owning his home at No. 412 Drake avenue and a fitty-acre tract one 
mile cast of the town. He gives his allegiance to the republican party but 
is never active as an office seeker, preferring to work along lines of public 
welfare without desire for official recognition. He has extensive fraternal 
relations, being a blue lodge Mason and belonging also to the chapter, and 
is likewise prominent in the affairs of the Knights of Pythias. He is a 
devout member of the congregation B'nai Israel and is its president. Mr. 
Salinger takes an active interest in all kinds of religious and charitable 
work. He is a national director in the Jewish Consumptive Relief Society 
of Denver and this is by no means the extent of his work along lines which 
directly aid the needy and suffering. There arc few citizens in Centerville 



58 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

more widely and favorably known than Mr. Salinger, for his business 
enterprise has carried him into important commercial and financial rela- 
tions, while his genial manner and unfailing courtesy have gained him the 
warm and lasting regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



WILFORD FRANCIS BERRY. 

The life record of Wilford Francis Berry is that of a man of stalwart 
purpose and untiring activity, who in the pursuit of his career has won the 
advancement which invariably rewards well organized methods when intel- 
ligently and persistently pursued. For practically twenty-five years he has 
been identified with the business interests of Moulton, where he has met 
with constantly increasing success and is now numbered among the foremost 
representatives of the commercial fraternity of Appanoose county. Mr. 
Berry is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Wapello county 
on the 2 1st of April, 1863. In the paternal line he is descended from 
one of Kentucky's pioneer families, his father, Austin Ferry Berry, having 
been born in Bourbon county, that state, November 11, 1824. There 
the grandfather, Joseph Berry, was born, reared and married, but in 1825 
he removed with his family to Zanesville, Ohio, where he made his home 
for about twenty-four years. In 1849, he continued his journey west- 
ward to Wapello county, Iowa, and there passed the remainder of his 
life. Upon his arrival in that county he took up a tract ot government 
land in Adams township and thereafter engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
although he was a mechanic by trade. To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berry 
were born seven children, the three eldest being natives of Kentucky. 
In order of birth they are as follows: Nye, the deceased wife of Henry 
Van Ness, of Wapello county; Isaac, who is a resident of California; Austin 
Perry, the father ot our subject; Lydia Ann, the widow ot Joseph Ralston, 
of Oskaloosa, Iowa; George, who is residing in Montana; Eliza, the 
widow of Page White, of Wapello count) ; and Loraine, the widow of 
John Biven. of Wapello, Iowa. 

Austin Perry Berry was only an infant when his parents removed to 
Ohio in which state he was reared. His education was obtained in the 
public schools of Zanesville, following which he learned the carpenter's 
trade and cabinet-making, following these occupations during the greater 
part of his active life. He accompanied his people on their removal to 
Wapello county, where he subscqucnth' acquired forty acres of land, which 
he improved and cultivated while following his trade. In 1870, he came 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTY 59 

to Moulton and established a tiiriiiture factory, which he operated "with a 
fair measure of success for many years. He also followed his trade and 
engaged in contracting and building, many of the residences and business 
buildings of that period having been erected by him. He was an earnest 
Christian and zealous worker in the Baptist church, and in addition to his 
many other duties often hlled the pulpit of some church of that denomina- 
tion on Sunday. Not only was he largely instrumental in founding the 
Baptist church of Moulton, but he assisted in the erection of the church 
edilice, and always took an active interest in the work of its various organ- 
izations toward the support of which he liberally contributed. Mr. Berry 
was a man of more than average versatility and possessed many admirable 
qualities, his sterling worth and integrity making him a desirable acquisi- 
tion to the community, where he was held in high esteem and had hosts 
of friends. He went to the front with an Ohio regiment during the 
Mexican war, and served until the close of hostilities. During the Civil 
war he again offered his services to the country, serving as a private in 
the Thirteenth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He always took an active and 
helpful interest in all movements affecting the intellectual, moral or ma- 
terial welfare of the town, and accorded his support to every worthy 
enterprise. Mr. Berry was married at Zanesville, Ohio, on the 9th of 
February, 1849, to Miss Harriet Euphemia Dickinson, who was born and 
reared in Ohio. The Dickinsons located in that state during the pioneer 
days, and were among the early settlers of Zanesville, where the maternal 
grandfather followed the silversmith's trade. The family of Mr. and 
Mrs. Austin P. Berry numbered eleven, eight of whom lived to attain 
maturity, as follows: Anna, the wife of Samuel Jennings, of Ccnter- 
ville, Iowa; Mary, the widow of A. R. Price, of London Mills, Illinois; 
James Perry, who was drowned in 1877 in Des Moines, where he was 
employed on the Daily Register; George L., national presiilenr of the 
National American, a fraternal organization, who resides in Kansas City; 
Wilford Francis, our subject; Abel Sherman, who makes his home in 
California; Luretta, the wife of J. W. Haldcn, postmaster at Moravia, 
Iowa; and Lydia B.. the wife of O. E. Soule, of Tacoma, Washington. 
The parents are both deceased. 

As he was only a lad of seven years when he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Moulton, Wilford Francis Berry has passed the greater 
part of his life in this city. He pursued his education in the public schools 
and upon completing his high-school course obtained eniplos ni<nt in a 
drug store at Moulton, where he diligently applied himself to tiie study 
of pharmacy, being awarded his certificate by the state board of pharmacy 
on the 22d of May. 1882. He continued in the employ of others for 



60 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

about' six years tliereafter and in 1888 entered in business for himself at 
Moulton, where he established the store he is now conducting. Owing 
to his limited means he had to begin in a very small way, but as the years 
have passed he has prospered and has enlarged his establishment until he 
is now the proprietor of one of Moulton's most thriving enterprises. 
About 1900 he began the manufacture of a preparation known as Berry's 
Barb Beater, to be used for wire cuts. As it is a remed)^ of unquestionable 
merit the demand for it has steadily increased until he now makes con- 
signments to twenty-five states. He has the largest mailing list of any 
manufacturer in the count}', his postage frequently amounting to five 
hundred dollars per month. He not onh- does a large business with the 
wholesale drug houses of the middle west, but he carries the names of 
over ten thousand retail dealers on his ledger. Mr. Berry possesses the 
initiative and resourcefulness essential to success in any field of endeavor, 
and to the support of these qualities he brings the determination of pur- 
pose and tireless energy which win achievement. Having unlimited con- 
fidence in the future of Moulton, as opportunity has afforded, he has 
acquired extensive property interests here, in both the residence and busi- 
ness sections. He also owns and operates two farms in Appanoose county. 

In Moulton on the 26th of June, 1886, Mr. Berry was married to 
Miss Lillian Moore, who was born in Hollidayburg, Pennsylvania, on the 
16th of December, 1862, and is a daughter of Ithimer and Katharine 
(Malloy) Moore. The father, who was of Irish lineage, removed with 
his tamily to Iowa about 1869, first locating in Fairfield. In 1870, they 
removed to Moulton, where Mr. Moore conducted a hotel until a few 
years prior to his death. Mrs. Berry, who is the second in order of birth 
in a family of seven, is the mother of five children, as follows: Alfred 
Keene, who is engaged in the drug business in Kansas City, Missouri; 
Herbert Trevor, who is in business with his father; Marguerite, who is at 
home; and Bertram Bernard and Wilfred Gerald, who are attending 
school. 

The family are members of the Presbyterian church of which Mr. 
Berry is one of the trustees. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic 
order, belonging to the blue lodge of Moulton, chapter and commandery 
of Centerville, and the shrine at Davenport. He is also a member of the 
Order of the Eastern Star, of which he was elected associate grand patron 
for Iowa, and of the Modern ^^'oodmen of America. He is a trustee of the 
last named order and also of the Masonic lodge. Although he takes an 
active and helpful interest in all local matters Mr. Berry has never figured 
prominently in political affairs, the extent of his private interests precluding 
the possibility of his meeting the requirements of an official position. He 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 61 

is public-spirited and progressive in matters of citizenship, however, and 
is alwajs ready to cooperate in promoting the development of any worthy 
enterprise, extending his indorsement to all movements that will advance 
the general welfare of the community. 



BRYANT BROTHERS. 



Bryant Brothers, engaged in the automobile business, are well known, 
enterprising young men who arc proving that energy and industry consti- 
tute a substantial toundation on w hich to build success. They are natives 
of Davis county, Iowa, Thomas J. Bryant having been born in October, 
1880, while Charles W. Bryant was born in March, 1882. They are sons 
of Alfred and Elizabeth (Peninger) Bryant, also natives of Iowa. The 
father, who was born in Davis county, owned and operated a farm there 
until 1891, when he came to Centerville, where he engaged in teaming 
until 1903. He then turned his attention to the butchering business and 
IS .still conducting a meat market on South Eighteenth street, near the 
Burlington depot. 

Thomas J. and Charles \\'. Br}ant attended the public schools of 
Davis county and of Centerville, and in his youthful days the latter served 
a four years' apprenticeship to the machinist's trade in flu; Keokuk & 
Western Railroad shops here. He afterward spent four years in the employ 
of the government as a machinist in the Rock Island arsenal. Thomas J. 
Bryant also turned his attention to industrial pursuits, learning the black- 
smith's trade in the same railroad shops as his brother, after which he fol- 
lowed his trade in the shops and in the mines ot this locality for about 
six years. He afterward spent one year at his trade at a power plant in 
Canon City, Colorado, and in 1907 joined his brother in the automobile 
business in Centerville. They have since conducted a garage and also are 
sales agents for some cars. They have secured a gratifying patronage in 
this connection antl their interests are continual]) increasing. The firm 
are today the oldest dealers in their line in the town. They operate a 
garage ninety-five by forty feet and they handle the Studebaker cars 
exclusively, in which connection they have developed a very large and 
gratifying business. 

Thomas J. Bryant was married May 18, 1902, to Miss Mayme \'an 
Xuter, a daughter of A. D. and Kate (Replogh) \'an Nuter, who are 
natives of Iowa. The father was a carpenter by traile and at an early 
day came to Centerville, where he followed his trade for some time. He 



62 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

afterward turned his attention to farming, owning and cultivating a tract 
of land until 1900. He subsequently li\'ed in the town tor five years and 
then went to Clarksville, Iowa, where he and his wife still reside. Three 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Bryant: Hugh K., nine 
years of age; Robert M., aged seven ; and Mary C, aged one. 

In May, 1904, Charles W. Br} ant married Miss Grace Ryals, a daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Anna Ryals Barger. The father had died when Mrs. Bryant 
was but two years of age and the mother had afterward married again. 
There is one child ot this union, Luella, seven years of age. 

Thomas J. Bryant owns a nice home at No. 1602 South Twenty- 
first street and Charles W. Bryant is pleasantly located at No. 310 East 
Terry street. Their religious faith is that of the Methodist church. Polit- 
ically they are identified with the progressive party, being warm admir- 
ers of Theodore Roosevelt and stanch adherents of the platform formu- 
lated by the party, w hich movement many regard as one of the most hope- 
ful political signs ot the times. It shows conclusively that the American 
citizen is alive to the issues of the day and that many will not blindly 
follow a party leadership but are thinking out along lines relative to the 
best welfare of the country at large. The Bryant Brothers are also pro- 
gressive men in other connections, especially in business life, and what 
they have accomplished represents the fit utilization of their time and 
talents. They recognize the fact that success has its root in unfaltering 
industry and it is through close application and careful management that 
they are working their way upward to prosperity in their present business 
connection. 



DAMD \\'. PROBASCO. 



Among the successful and representative farmers whose work along agri- 
cultural lines may be regarded as a force in the development and upbuild- 
ing of Appanoose county is numbered David W. Probasco, who has 
resided in this part of Iowa since 1868 and who since reaching manhood 
has devoted his attention to general fanning and stock-raising. He 
owns one hundred and seventy-seven and one-third acres of land and has 
been very successful in its management and development. He was born 
in Putnam county, Missouri. Juh 11, 18^5. and is a son of Noah C. 
Probasco, who later moved to Macon count} in the same state. There 
the father of our subject purchased the Green Top flour and sawmill, 
which he operated for five years, later selling the enterprise and return- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 63 

ine: to Putnam county, where he made his home until 1868. In that 
year he came to Appanoose count) anil [lurchased the tarm upon which 
his son now resides. He was a veteran of the Civil war, having served 
for four }ears in the Second Missouri Cavalry. After coming to Appa- 
noose county he resided for some time in Wells township but later moved 
to Caldwell township, where he purcha>ed land. This he operated and 
improved for a number of years but spent the later years of his life in 
retirement in Exline, where his death occurred in igio. His wife sur- 
vives him and resides in Exline. 

David W. Probasco inherited his father's sterling integrity and his 
capacity for hard and effective work and the prosperity which he today 
enjoys was won in former years by the labor of his hands and has come 
as the reward of his perseverance and determination. He was a lad of 
twelve years when he came to Appanoose county with his parents and 
here he was reared to manhood. When he was still a bo} he was earn- 
ing his own livelihood b}- working as a monthl}' farm laborer and he 
continued in this occupation until after his marriage, when he rented 
a farm which he developed for two years. He then purchased forty 
acres in Wells township and to this his father-in-law added forty acres, 
the nucleus of Mr. Probasco's present tine tract. Since that time he 
has given a great deal of his attention to his farming operations and 
has carried forward steadily the work of improvement, adding to his 
holdings from time to time until he is now the owner of one hundred 
and seventy-seven and one-third acres of productive and fertile land. 
Upon this he has erectetl a tine residence and good barns ami has fenced 
and cross-fenced his property into fields of convenient size. He has 
erected the necessary outbuildings and in addition has planted a fine 
orchard and made other substantial improvements. He is extensively 
interested in stock-raising, buying young animals and feeding and fat- 
tening them for the market. He has large herds of cattle, hogs and 
horses and at present has fifteen high-grade colts. 

In Appanoose county, on October 2y, 1876, Mr. Proba.sco was united 
in marriage to Miss Alta Rochford, a native of Wells township and a 
daughter of Alexander Rochford, one of the first men to enter laml in that 
section, where he later became well known as a prospierous farmer. Mr. 
and Mr>. Probasco are the parents of nine sons and three daughters, 
namely: Fred, a farmer and mechanic, of Colorado; Alexander and 
Noah, liorh of whom arc ojxraring farms in Wells towIl^hip: Thomas 
R., who lives at home artd assists his father with the work of the fields; 
Roy O.. a farmer and mechanic of Colorado; David E., who is engaged 
in the plumbing business in Lubbock, Texas; Lloyd, E.sco and John, all 



64 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

of whom reside at home; Florence, the wife of William Elliott, of Moul- 
ton, Iowa; Flossie, the wife of Andy Gwinn, Jr., a farmer in Appanoose 
county; and Verna, at home. 

Since casting his first vote Mr. Probasco has affiiliated with the repub- 
lican party, voting this ticket always on national questions, although 
in local affairs he casts an independent ballot. He has become promi- 
nent in official circles, having served for some time as road supervisor. 
In 1910 he was elected to the township board as a trustee and is still 
serving in this capacity. He has been a resident of Appanoose county 
from his }outh and has seen many changes during the period, his activity 
being a powerful element in the general advancement. He has won 
by his own labor and a life of toil and industry an enviable degree of 
prosperity and a position among the successful, influential and public- 
spirited men of his community. 



JOSEPH TURNER. 



Industrial activity in Appanoose county finds a prominent and worthy 
representative in Joseph Turner, proprietor of the Centerville Granite & 
Marble Works. Moreover, his life record is proof of the opportunities 
that America offers to ambitious young men, enabling them through indus- 
try and determination to work their way upward. Mr. Turner was born 
in Staffordshire, England, November 12, 1845, a son of Joseph and Honour 
(Turner) Turner, who were also natives of that country. The father was 
throughout his life a mine superintendent and in 1898 he passed away at 
the venerable age of eighty-six years. His wife survived him until 1909, 
dying at the ripe old age of ninety years. 

Joseph Turner was reared and educated in England and when a >oung 
man went to work in the coal mines, being thus emplojed until May, 
1869. Thinking to find better and broader business opportunities in the 
new world he then crossed the Atlantic and again sought employment in 
mines, working in Pennsylvania until 1875. That year witnessed his 
arrival in Centerville, where he was a mine worker until 1876, after which 
he was similarly employed in Missouri until October. 1882. Then return- 
ing to Appanoose county, in partnership with two others he purchased 
forty acres of coal land at Brazil, while later additional purchases were 
made. The business was at length reorganized under the name of the 
Phoenix Coal Company, with Messrs. Turner and Freese as proprietors. 
They continued together for fourteen years, on the expiration ot which 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 65 

period Mr. Freese sold out to Mr. Campbell, who remained a partner of 
Mr. Turner in the coal mine business for thirteen years, when they sold out 
and established a granite and marble business. A few months later, how- 
ever, Mr. Turner bought his partner's interests and since has remained 
alone, being sole owner of the Centerville Granite & Marble Works. He 
has a large plant and enjoys an extensive business which is represented on 
the road by a traveling salesman. Energy and determination are salient 
features in the success which has attended his labors. He came to the new 
world practically empty-handed but he possessed courage and willingness 
to work and those qualities often conquer when others fail. Year bv year 
he has slowly but steadily advanced and is now at the head of a large, 
growing and well managed business which is bringing to him a substantial 
financial return. He is likewise a stockholder in the Centerville & Mystic 
Interurban line and is owner of a nice residence property at No. 410 West 
State street. 

On the 19th of November, 1870, Mr. Turner was united in marriage 
to Miss Ruth Martin, a daughter of John A. Martin, a native of England, 
who became a coal miner in Pennsylvania and always resided there until 
his death in 1880. His wife passed away when her daughter Ruth was 
but four years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Turner became the parents of two 
children, of whom John A., born in October, 1871, died in 1877. The 
daughter, Lottie, bom in August, 1875, '^ the wife of Arthur Draper, who 
is agent for the Burlington Railroad Company at Stanford, Nebraska. Mrs. 
Turner passed away in March, 1877, after a two weeks' illness. In July, 
i(S7i;, Mr. Turner married Rosa L. (Root) Moore, a daughter of Levi 
and Mary (Stewart) Root, who were natives of Athens county, Ohio. 
Her father was a farmer and for a number of years owned and cultivated 
a tract of land in Ohio. In 1872 he removed to Missouri where he again 
engaged in general farming. He has now passed away but his wife resides 
in Gait, Missouri. To the second marriage of Mr. Turner were born four 
children: Joseph L., a traveling salesman residing in Centerville; Frank 
K., a miner; Robert L., who is employed in a grocery store in Brazil; and 
IVarl, who died in July, 1881, and was a twin sister of Frank. By her 
former marriage Mrs. Turner had two children, Minnie Mae and James H. 
Moore, the latter a traveling salesman. 

Mr. Turner votes wMth the republican party and is a stanch advocate 
of its principles but does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concen- 
trate his energies upon his business affairs, in which he has made a signal 
success. He is loyal to the teachings and tenets of the Masonic fraternity 
with which he affiliates and he is also a consistent member of the Methodist 
church. There have been no spectacular phases in his life record but his 



66 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

histon" is one whitli may well inspire and encourage others, showing what 
nvd\ be accomplished when energy and ambition lead the way. Moreover, 
his record proves that success and an honored name may be won simul- 
taneously. 



HENRY \V. BLACHLEY. 

For forty-two years Dr. Henry \\'. Blachley has been a practitioner of 
dentistry in Centerville and throughout the entire period has kept m 
touch with the improvements in dental methods made by the representa- 
tives of the profession. He was born in Independence, Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, October 19, 1849, a son of Oliver B. and Eleanor 
J. (Creacraft) Blachley, who were natives of the same county. The 
father was a capitalist of Independence but in 1872 left the east to become 
a resident of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he remained until his death, 
which occurred in 1889. His wife had passed away ten years before. 

Dr. Blachley spent his boyhood and youth in Pennsylvania and Ohio, 
pursuing his preliminary education in the public schools of the two states 
and afterward entering Mount Union College, a Methodist school at 
Mount Union, Ohio. In 1867, in Fredericktown, Ohio, he took up the 
study of dentistry under the direction of the firm of Swingley & Bonar, 
capable dentists of that place, and in 1870 he came to Centerville, where 
he entered upon active practice in connection with Dr. R. S. Glenn, with 
whom he remained for a year. The partnership was then dissolved, after 
which Dr. Blachley practiced alone until his son Carl joined him, having 
prepared for the profession. Theirs is a well-equipped office, supplied 
with modern appliances and the most improved instruments, and the 
work being done by father and son is according to the most advanced 
scientific methods. Their patronage is extensive and is well merited. Dr. 
H. \^^ Blachley having throughout the forty-two years of his residence 
here conducted a large practice which has brought to him a gratifying 
financial return. 

On the 5th of March, 1873, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Blach- 
ley and Miss Lillian E. Wentworth, a daughter of Caleb and Eliza 
(Baldridge) Wentworth, the former a native of Maine and the latter of 
Tennessee. The year i860 witnessed the arrival of the father in Center- 
ville, where he engaged in merchandising, conducting the business until 
)86v He had previously been justice of the peace, serving in that 
capacity in all for a quarter of a century. His death occurred in this city 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 67 

in 1877 and his wife passed away in the '60s. The tour children of Dr. 
and Mrs. Blachley are: Owen D., who died in 1875; Olive B., who was 
born June 21, 1876, and is the wite of Dr. J. R. Pennington, of Chicago, 
Illinois; Carl W., who was born July 2, 1878; and Tracy W., who was 
born July 23, 1884, and is a physician and surgeon of Centerville. The 
d; ughtcr, Mrs. Pennington, has been highly educated in music, being a 
graduate of the Goldbeck Musical College of St. Louis, Missouri, and 
the Chicago Musical College. The elder son, Carl W., is a graduate 
of the dental de[)artment of Drake University at Des Moines of the 
cl.iss of 1902 and is now actively engaged in practice with his father 
in the conduct of a business that is constantly growing in extent and 
importance. He was married June 28, 1905, to Miss Edna Stanton, a 
daughter of Colonel C. A. and Emma (Houston) Stanton, both of whom 
are natives of Appanoose county and now residents ot California. Her 
father enlisted from this county and served throughout the Civil war. 
He engaged in merchandising here for a number of years and subse- 
quently removed to \'icksburg, Mississippi, where he conducted a lum- 
ber business for several years. He then retired and, as previously stated, 
is now located on the Pacific coast. 

The family residence of Dr. Blachley is a tine home at No. 910 
W'^st State street, in addition to which he owns a number ot residence 
and business properties here, having made judicious investment in real 
estate. Dr. Blachley was formerh' connected with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellow- bvir is not affiliated with any lodp- at the present time. 
His wife is a member of the Methodist church. Politically he is a 
democrat, voting for the men and measures of the party yet not seeking 
or desiring office. He has always concentrated his energies upon his 
professional duties and his labors in that direction have brought him well- 
deserved prominence and success. 



HARR^ E. Ll'THER. 

Harry V.. Luther is proprietor of the largest garage in Centerville and 
in addition is sales agent for the Ford and Oakland automobiles. He estab- 
lished this business in 1907 and has met with growing success in its con- 
duct. His birth occurred in Clinton, Iowa, May 23, 1880. his parents 
being Charles E. and .-\nna R. (Hoilgson) Luther, the former a native of 
Illinois and the latter of Canada. In early life the father followed farm- 
ing but soon after his marriage turned his attention to railroading, run- 



68 



rilSTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 



ning a train for a time. Subsequently he took- up construction work and 
finally removed to Clinton, Iowa, where he was employed on construc- 
tion work by the Northwestern Railroad Company. His next place of resi- 
dence was at \\'hat Cheer, Iowa, where he embarked in the hotel business, 
conducting the Clifton House there for three years. On the expiration of 
that period he returned to railway service in connection with construction 
work for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company. After 
some time he left that business and removed to Birmingham, Missouri, 
where he continued for a year. He next bought a farm near Burlington, 
Iowa, which he cultivated for a year, and then returned to Clinton in 
1892. For six years thereafter he lived retired but indolence and idleness 
were utterly foreign to his nature and at the end of that period he took 
another position in connection with construction work with the North- 
western road when that company was laying its double track from Boone 
to Council Bluffs, a task that required a A'ear for its completion. At the 
end of that time Mr. Luther once more retired and is now comfortably sit- 
uated in Clinton. 

Harry E. Luther was reared and educated in that city, attending the 
public schools. He afterward learned the plumber's trade which he fol- 
lowed for three years in Clinton and for one year in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri. He next returned to Clinton and took charge of the sporting goods 
department of the wholesale hardware house of C. E. Armstrong & Com- 
pany, remaining there for three years. Going to the isthmus of Tehuantepec 
he there joined his brother and took charge of the mechanical department 
of the Tehuantepec Rubber Culture Company with which he was connected 
for three years. On his return to the United States he made his way north- 
ward to St. Louis, where he entered the employ of the Simmons Hardware 
company. That was during the year of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition 
there and Mr. Luther did all the decorating for the ten thousand dollar 
exhibit of the company at the fair. He afterward came to Centerville 
where he engaged in the hardware business on his own account until 1907, 
when he sold out, turning his attention to the automobile business. For 
five years he handled the Ford machine exclusively but now also handles 
the Oakland car and conducts the largest garage in the city, receiving a 
liberal patronage. 

In IQOO Mr. Luther was married to Miss Rosa Pauline Flynn. a daugh- 
ter of Michael and Hattie Flynn. The father died when Mrs. Luther was 
an infant and she was quite young at the time of her mother's demise. By 
her marriage she has become the mother of two children : Arthur E., 
eleven years of age; and Pauline ^L, aged five. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 69 

Mr. Luther owns several residence lots here and has a pleasant and 
attractive home at No. 315 North Fifteenth street. He holds membership 
with the Elks lodge and gives his political support to the republican party. 
His has been an active and useful life and while he has never been actu- 
ated by the spirit of vaulting ambition he has never hesitated to take a 
forward step when the way was open. Thus gradually he has advanced 
and he is now at the head of a business which is constantly growing and 
bringing him a substanti.il income. 



JOSEPH P. GRIBBEN. 



For more than a third of a century Jose{)h P. Cr ribbon has been a resi- 
tlcnt of Centerville and has made an excellent record in connection with 
the abstract business. Moreover, in every relation of life he has won 
and merited the respect and confidence of those who know him, proving 
himself at all times a progressive, reliable citizen and a man worthy of 
the trust and confidence of his associates. He was born in Huron county, 
Ohio, in August, 1839, and has therefore passed the sevent)-third mile- 
stone on life's journey. His parents were George and Eliza (Perry) 
Gribben, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of New York. In 
the '5bs the father came to Iowa, settling at Benton, where he worked 
at his trade for a number of years. He then removed to Cameron, Mis- 
souri, where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 1879. 
His wife survived him for a quarter of a century, passing away in 1904. 

Joseph P. Gribben is indebted to the public-school system of his native 
state for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. In his youthful 
days he learned the painter's trade and subsequently spent some time on 
the Pacific coast, locating upon his removal to Missouri, in 1870, at Cam- 
eron, where he remained for six years. On the expiration of that period 
he came to Centerville, where he has since made his home. Here he opened 
a set of abstract books and continued in the business for almost a third 
of a century or until 1908, when he retired, enjoying now a rest which 
he has truly earned and richly deserves. The only interruption to his active 
and well directed business affairs came at the time of the Civil war, when 
in response to the country's call for aid he offered his services and was 
assigned to duty with Company I, First California Regiment, with wiiich 
he continued for four years. He had come to California at an early tlay 
and it was there that he joined the boys in blue. 



70 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Following the close of the war Mr. Gribben was married, on the 6th 
of December, 1866, to Miss Caroline Holloway, a daughter of Ira and 
Achsah (Bouton) Holloway, the former a native of Ithaca, New York, 
and the latter of Lorain county, Ohio. Her father was a farmer by occu- 
pation and when he removed to the Buckeye state he purchased a tract of 
land which he cultivated and improved, carrying on farming successfully 
for many years. Eventually, however, he sold that property and went to 
Michigan, where he bought another tract of land, continuing his farming 
operations there throughout the remainder of his days. He died Septem- 
ber 3, 1887, and his wife's death occurred on the 27th of November, 1907. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gribben became the parents of four children: Ira G., aged 
forty-four years, who is engaged in railroading and lives in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri ; Percy C, aged forty-two years, who makes his home in Pueblo, Colo- 
rado; Harry E., aged thirty-eight years, a resident of Los Angeles; and 
Ralph, who died on the 8th of February, 1885. Mr. Gribben and his 
wife occupy a pleasant modern residence at No. 403 South Main street 
and its hospitality is greatly enjoyed by their many friends. Mr. Grib- 
ben served as city clerk of Centerville for six years, proving a capable and 
efficient officer, and his political allegiance has always been given to the 
republican party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days 
of the Civil war and has been a party of reform and progress since. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Grand Army of the Republic and thus 
maintains pleasant relations with those who like himself wore the blue 
uniform during the darkest hour in our country's history. He has ever 
been loyal in citizenship, manifesting the same fidelity which he displayed 
when he followed the old flag. 



BARTON A. OGLE. 



In a history of Centerville's representative citizens mention should be 
made of Barton A. Ogle, although thirty years have 'come and gone since 
he departed this life. In an early period in the history of Centerville he 
figured as one of its prominent and influential citizens and won a credit- 
able position in business circles. He was born in Indiana. December 10, 
1835, and is a son of John and Mary Ann (Johnson) Ogle, both of whom 
were natives of Tennessee, the father being a representative of an old New 
England family, while the mother came of German lineage. In 1831 they 
removed to Indiana, where the father followed the miller's trade for about 
a quarter of a century. He then in 1856 came to Iowa with his family, 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 71 

fettling near Leon, Decatur county, where he remained for three years and 
thence came to Appanoose county in i860. Here he again followed his 
trade but did not own the mill. Both he and his wife spent their last 
days in Centerville. 

Barton A. Ogle attended school in Indiana and came with his parents 
to Iowa about the time he attained his majority. He remained for some 
time in Leon and was married there in 1859. The following year he 
removed to Centerville, where he worked in the mill with his father. How- 
ever, about two years later he put aside all business cares and personal 
considerations in order to aid his country in the struggle to preserve the 
Union, enlisting in 1862 at Cincinnati, Iowa, as a member of Company I, 
Thirty-sixth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, with which he remained until the 
close of hostilities. He participated in a number of important engage- 
ments leading up to the final victory which crowned the Union arms and 
at the close of the war was honorably discharged. 

With a most creditable military record Mr. Ogle returned to Appanoose 
county and for three years thereafter worked in the mill at Relay. Ini86g, 
however, he was elected auditor of Appanoose county on the republican 
ticket and came to Centerville. He discharged his duties so efficiently and 
capably during his first term that he was reelected and retired from office 
at the end of the second term as he had entered it — with the confidence 
and good-will of all concerned. He then worked for his brother for a 
time in the livery business and was afterward employed in a foundry. 
Later he accepted a position w irh the Ireland Iron & Bridge Company in 
the interests of which he traveled up to the time of his death on the 14th 
of July, 1882. 

It was on the 1st of September, 1859, that Mr. Ogle was united in 
marriage to Miss Minerva E. Arnold, a daughter of Moses and Jemima 
(Barnes) Arnold. The father who was a native of Maryland, was of Irish 
descent and was a farmer by occupation. The mother, who was born in 
\'irginia, was of Dutch lineage. In 1855 they removed to Ohio and sub- 
sequently to Indiana, later settling on a farm near Leon, Iowa, where they 
lived until 1 87;, when they went to Harrison county, this state, spending 
their last days in Modale. The father, who was born in 1795, passed 
away in 1884, while the mother, born in 1813, reached the age of eighty 
years, dying in 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Ogle became the parents ot nine 
children: Charles W., a machini"st by trade, now living in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; Almeda May, who died at the age of five years; Albert Francis, who 
died when thirty-nine years of age; Wesley Harlan, who is raising chickens 
on a ranch four miles north of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and who mar- 
ried Lulu Moore; John, who is engagecl in the jewelry business in Seattle, 



72 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Washington; James, who is manager of the Regal Laundry and who mar- 
ried Bertha McClure of Centerville, they now making their home with 
his mother; George B., who married Grace Scott and is proprietor of the 
Regal Laundry; Kate, who is the wife of Clarence Wyckoff, an attorney 
of Centerville; and Bulah, at home. The daughters Kate and Bulah are 
members of the Order of Eastern Star at Centerville. 

Mr. Ogle was an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity 
and also held membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and with the Grand Army post. His political support was always given 
to the republican party, for he believed it to be the party of reform and 
progress and it was ever his earnest desire to further through political 
measures the best interests of city, state and country. He held member- 
ship in the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his widow still belongs 
and his was an upright and well-spent life, gaining for him the confidence 
and good-will of many. He sought at all times to follow the golden rule, 
to speak highly, to deal justly and to promote the social, intellectual and 
moral progress of the community in which he made his home. 



SILAS W. MARING. 



The life record of Silas W. Maring stands in contradiction to the old 
adage that a rolling stone gathers no moss, for while Mr. Maring has again 
and again changed his place of residence it has been because in each change 
he has seen broader opportunity for advancement and in the utilization 
of this opportunity he has gradually worked his way upward until his 
success enabled him to retire from business life. He is now resting in the 
enjoyment of the fruits of his former labor, his competence being sufficient 
to supply him with the necessities and comforts and some of the luxuries 
of life. He was born in Belmont county, Ohio, September lo, 1845, and 
is a son of Samuel and Alma (Hall) Maring, of whom further mention 
is made in connection with the sketch of M. B. Maring, on another page 
of this work. The family came to Iowa in 1851, when the subject of this 
review was a lad of about six years. A location was made in Van Buren 
county but after one year, or in 1892, they came to Appanoose county, so 
that in the schools of this county Silas W. Maring acquired his education. 
His early experiences were those which usually fell to the lot of the farm 
boy of that period. He was soon acquainted ^\irh the best methods of 
plowing, planting and harvesting and remained with his parents on the old 
home farm until he was twenty }ears of age. ^^•hen with a large party travel- 




SILAS \V. MAK'TNG 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTY 75 

ing in fifteen wagons he left Centerville in 1865 and crossed tlie plains to 
Oregon. There he began work as a farm hand but after a short time made 
his way to the gold mines. He remained in the Pacific northwest until 
December 6, 1867, when he returned home by way of the water route and 
the Isthmus of Panama, reaching Appanoose county on the 25th of Janu- 
ary, 1868. He then rented a farm which he cultivated for a year, after 
which he purchased forty acres of land that he cultivated for some time. 
He next removed to southwestern Missouri, where he bought and improved 
a forty-acre tract of land, living upon it about four years. He then returned 
to Iowa and rented a farm for three years, after which he went to Kansas 
and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. With charac- 
teristic energy he began its improvement and lived thereon for a number 
of years, when he rented the property and went to the state of Washington, 
purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land near Seattle. After a 
year, however, he traded that farm for another in Kansas and returned to 
the Sunflower state, where he again carried on farming for four years. He 
then sold both of his farms and went back to Washington, where he pur- 
chased ten acres of land at one hundred and fifty dollars per acre and for 
two years engaged in raising hops and potatoes. He then sold and went 
to Oregon, where he invested in forty acres ot river bottom land which 
he improved and cultivated for eleven years, producing good crops. On 
the expiration of that period he returned to Centerville and purchased 
propertv on South Main street but after a year he again went to Missouri, 
where for three years he cultivated a farm belonging to his wife. In 
Februarv, 1908, he returned to Centerville and invested in several residence 
properties. He now resides in a fine home at No. ijo8 West Jackson street, 
where for almost five years he has lived retired. 

On the 7th of April, 1868, Mr. Maring was married to Miss Martha 
Kirby, a daughter of Sharp Kirb\, a native of Missouri. There were two 
children of that marriage: Alma, who died in 1872; and Samuel E., who 
died three da}s after his mother, who passed away in 1874. In 1876 Mr. 
Maring wedded Miss Jane E. Simmons, a daughter of Richard Simmons, 
a native of Indiana. They had five children, as follows: Flora, who mar- 
ried Harvey Bailey, of Oregon; Rose, who is the wife of Henry Wilkins, 
of Spokane, Washington; Josephine, who married Harry Nimmons, of 
Seattle, Washington; LeRoy, who is operating a farm in Kansas; and WiW 
liam S., a locomotive fireman residing in Moulton, Appanoose county. The 
wife and mother was called to her final rest June 23, 1892, and for his 
third wife Mr. Maring chose Mrs. Nancy E. Dobbins, a daughter of Mrs. 
Ellen (Maring) Flick. Her father died before her birth. The thirii mar- 
riage of Mr. Maring was celebrated June 2g, 1903. 



voi. n— r. 



76 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Mr. Maring is a member of the Independent Order ot Odd Fellows 
and has many warm friends in the fraternity. His political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party but the honors and emoluments of office 
have no attraction for him. His attitude in life toward his fellowmen 
and toward all public interests has found its root in his faith as a member 
of the Methodist church. He possesses attractive social qualities which 
have made him popular and well liked in the various localities in which he 
has lived and in Centerville he is most highly esteemed. In his business 
career all days have not been equal!}- bright, yet he has persevered as the 
years have gone by and his judicious investments and untiring industry 
have brought him a substantial measure of success. 



JAMES ARTHUR DILLON, D. O. 

The practice of osteopathy has enlisted the services of many energetic, 
progressive young men who recognize that the development of this science 
has been a step in advance toward checking the ravages of disease. Care- 
fulh trained for practice. Dr. James Arthur Dillon is following the prac- 
tice in Centerville and is meeting with substantial success in his under- 
taking. He was born in Lancaster, Missouri, May 23, 1880, and is a 
son of Thomas H. and Mary C. (Wilson) Dillon, who are mentioned at 
length on another page of this volume. Doctor Dillon in the acquirement 
of his education completed a course in the Centerville high school with the 
class of 1899 and the same year entered the American School of Osteopathy 
at Kirksville, Missouri, where he pursued the regular course and was 
graduated with the degree of doctor of osteopathy in 1902. Since that 
time he has continuously practiced and has made constant progress in his 
chosen calling as further study and experience broadened his knowledge 
and promoted his efhcienc}'. 

Doctor Dillon was married in 1904 to Miss Minta Dawkins, a daughter 
of Alpheus and Sarah Jane (Smith) Dawkins. Her father who was of 
Scotch descent, was born in Kentucky, Juh 18, 1848, and the mother, 
who came of English lineage, was born in Illinois, April 6, 1845. ^^ his 
bovhood days Mr. Dawkins accomixmied his parents on their removal to 
Missouri and the lady whom he afterward made his wife also went to that 
state with her parents. There they became acquainted and were married, 
after which they began their domestic life upon the farm which Mr. Daw- 
kins continued to cultivate until his death. In 1898 his widow came to 
Centerville and now makes her home with Doctor and Mrs. Dillon. In 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 77 

the Dawkins family were six children: Florence, the wife of Ed Everett, 
a plumber of Grinnell, Iowa; Herman, engaged in farming at Scotts Bluffs, 
Nebraska; Mina, deceased; Mrs. Dillon; Lola, who married Harry Con- 
ner, an insurance and real-estate dealer ot Ottumwa, Iowa; and Lutlier, 
a merchant of Centerville, Iowa. To Doctor and Mrs. Dillon have been 
born three sons: John Lc Roy, who was born September 7, lC)o:, and is 
now in school; Joe, who died in infancy: and James Arthur, born Janu- 
ar}- 19, 1910. 

Doctor Dillon has helil no [niblic offices. He belongs to the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and to the blue lodge of Masons at Centerville, 
and both he and his wife are connected with the Order of the Eastern Star. 
His wife is a member of the Baptist church, interested and active in its 
work, and doing all in her power to extend its influence and promote its 
growth. Doctor Dillon is a member of the Atlas Club of Kirksville, Mis- 
souri, and in politics he is a republican. While he is neglectful of none of 
the duties and interests ot life he concentrates his efforts upon his profes- 
sional services and has been accorded a liberal patronage which is bringing 
to him substantial success. 



SCHIYLER C. BROWN. 



Schuyler C. Brown, proprietor of a livery stable in Centerville, is well 
known in Appanoose county, of which he is a native. His birth occurred 
in a log cabin on a farm in Sharon township, August 22, 1855, his parents, 
Samuel L. and Mary A. (Collins) Brown, having been pioneer residents 
of this part of the state. The father was born in Virginia and the mother 
in New York. He was a tailor and worked at his trade for some years 
in Indiana, to which state he removed when it was a frontier section. 
.\frcrward he came to Iowa and took up his abode in Appanoose county, 
again becoming associated with pioneer lite, for this county was then but 
sparsely settled. He entered from the government one hundred and twenty 
acres of land five miles east of Centerville, on which not a furrow had been 
turned or an improvement made. He at once began to clear and culti- 
vate the place and succeeded in transtorming it into rich and productive 
fields. Upon that farm he continued to make his home until his death, 
both he and his wife passing away in 1888. 

.Schuyler C. Brown was reared and educated on the old home place, 
early becoming familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot ot 
the agriculturist. In the winter months, when the work of the farm was 



78 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

largely over for the year, he attended the district schools and he remained 
with his parents until they were called from this life, after which he pur- 
chased the interests of the other heirs in the old home property. He then 
carried on general agricultural jjursuits on his own account until December, 
1903, when he sold the farm and came to Centerville. For a year there- 
after he engaged in teaming and then established a livery barn which he 
has since conducted. He keeps a number of horses and a tine line of 
vehicles and in all of his business dealings is enterprising and reliable, so 
that a liberal patronage has been accorded him. 

In April, 1895, occurred the marriage of Mr. Brown and Miss Rachel 
Shepard, a daughter of Mrs. .Sarah Shepard, a native of Missouri, who is 
now making her home with Mr. and Mrs. Brown, at the age of sixty-six 
years. Four children were born to our subject and his wife: Ruby, who is 
sixteen years of age; Doud, aged fourteen; Lucille, whose death occurred 
in J 901;; and Crystal, aged five. 

Mr. Brown tilled the ofifice of township clerk in Sharon township, while 
living upon the farm, and has always been an ardent republican in poli- 
tics but never an active politician. He and his wife hold membership in 
the Methodist church and are interested in its work and the expansion of 
its interests. They reside at No. 101 1 South Eleventh street and are well 
known here. Mr. Brown has been a resident of the county for fifty-seven 
years and has therefore witnessed practically its entire growth and develop- 
ment, for in his boyhood there were still tracts of land owned bj- the gov- 
ernment, while the work of cultivation and improvement seemed scarceh'' 
begun. He has lived to witness the building of railroads, the introduc- 
tion of the telegraph and the telephone and the establishment of man)'^ 
modern improvements, which indicates that the county is in ever}- respect 
abreast with the improvement of the present day. 



ALEXANDER J. WELLER. 

Alexander J. Weller, j)artner in the Red Cross Drug Company, is one 
of the many business men of modern times who base their success upon long 
familiarity with one line of work and special efficiency in its details. A 
spirit of energ}" and determination has characterized his career since enter- 
ing the business world and has brought him a degree of success which places 
him among the representative business men of Centerville. He is a native 
of Iowa, having been bom in Sigourney, November 2, 1873, and he is a 
.son of Richard F. and Jennie (Shaffer) Weller, the former a native of 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 79 

Nelson count} . Kentucky, and the latter of Ohio. His father was a pioneer 
in Keokuk county, coming to that section when Iowa was still a territory. 
In the early '40s he began teaching school, receiving for his services a dol- 
lar and lifty cents per month trom each pu[)il. His attention was given 
to this work for some time, but he later abandoned it and established him- 
self in the general merchandise business at Richland. In 1870 he settled 
in Sigourncy and opened a general store in that town, which he operated 
until his death, which occurred in March, 1880. His wite survived him 
many years, dying in May, lyoo. 

Alexander J. VVeller was reared at home antl attended the public schools 
in Sigourney. Later he took a course in pharmacy at the Northwestern 
University in Chicago, receiving his degree in i8()v Being thus splendidly 
equipped for what he had determined to make his life work, he returned 
to Iowa anil conducted a drug store in Sigourney for six years. In 1902 
he sold this enterprise and came to Centerville. w here Ik- has since resided. 
He purchased a drug business from Carl Weeks and one year and a half 
later entered into partnership with H. C. .Adams, under the firm name of 
the Red Cross Drug Company. Ihe store is located at 116 East Jackson 
street and is one of the most modern pharmacies in the town. The drug 
and medical department contains ever\ thing necessary to fill the most diffi- 
cult prescriptions, while the more popular lines of goods are kept full and 
complete. Mr. Weller is a progressive, able and enterprising business man 
an'.l these qualities in his character have been felt as vital forces in the 
liuilding up of the extensive patronage which the Red Cross Drug Company 
enjoys. 

On .April 21. 1896. .Mr. Weller married Miss Stella H. .Adams, a 
daughter of Henry C. and Sophronia (Minteer) Adams, natives of Iowa, 
the father being the first white child born in Washington county. When 
he grew to maturit}' In- followed the lihukMiiith\ trade in hi> native sec- 
tion and from 1878 to 1882 .served as sheriff of Keokuk and Washington 
counties. He enlisted in Company D. Thirteenth Iowa \'olunteer Infan- 
tr\, in 1861, and served for four years, after which he returned to Iowa 
and resumed his trade. The latter years of his life were spent in the 
Indian service, to which he was ajipointed by President Cleveland. For 
a number of years he hail his headijuarters at Fort Defiance, Arizona, 
and later went to Fruitland, New Mexico, where he was accidentally 
drowned in 189^. Mr. and Mrs. WcUrr have one daughter, Mildred, who 
was born April 30, 1898. The family residence is at No. 904 West Majile 
street. 

Fraternall), Mr. Weller holds nicnibership in the Masonic order and 
is past exalted ruler of the Benevolent Protective Ordir of KIk-. He gives 



80 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

his support to the principles of the democratic party and has served ably 
and conscientiously on the town council, working for the promotion of 
measures of general benefit. With him perseverance, diligence and integrity 
have been standards, bringing him to the honorable position which he now 
occupies in the respect and esteem of his many friends. 



JAMES DUREE. 



James Duree, who during the later 3ears of his life lived retired in 
Centerville, was formerly connected with farming interests and contrib- 
uted in substantial measure to the agricultural development of his district. 
He was born in Kentucky, March 2g, 1822, his father being Peter Duree. 
The father, also a native of the Blue Grass state, was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and spent his last da}s in Missouri, where the mother also died. In 
his youthful days James Duree attended school in Kentucky and also in 
Indiana, to which state the father removed with the family, settling on a 
farm near Greencastle. At an early date the}- went to Missouri and estab- 
lished their home in Mercer county, where the father passed away. At a 
later date James Duree came to Iowa, locating near Xuma, where he 
bought land and engaged in farming. Subsequently he took up his abode 
on what became known as the Duree farm and was married there. Fol- 
lowing his marriage he settled upon the old home place belonging to his 
wife's family, six miles west of Centerville on the state road and there 
they resided continuously until 1894, when the\- rented the farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres and came to Centerville. Mr. Duree had brought 
the land to a high state of cultivation, improved his fields according to 
advanced and progressive methods and annual!)- gathered therefrom rich 
harvests. The last six 3'ears of his life were spent in quiet retirement and 
he passed away March 4, 1896. He had purchased town propert}- which 
he had remodeled, making a comfortable home that is now occu[)ied by 
his widow, who also owns the farm from which she derives a good rental. 

Mr. Duree was married in 1879 to Mrs. Lucy Jane (Parks) Felkner, 
the widow of William S. Felkner. who died in 1874. Mrs. Duree is a 
daughter of Robert and Sarah (Lowe) Parks, natives of Kentucky. Mr. 
Parks was a farmer and after living for a time in Illinois, where he mar- 
ried Sarah Lowe, came to Iowa, settling in Davis county. In 1865 they 
removed to Appanoose county, establishing their horhe in Pleasant town- 
sliip, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits. Later he retired 
from active business life and passed away at the home of his son, in Cen- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 81 

terville, May lo, lyo^, having tor little more than half a year survived 
his wife, who died on the i8th of October, 1902. They were among the 
early settlers of this part of the state and took an active interest in fur- 
thering its upbuilding and progress. At the outbreak of the Civil war he 
offered his services to the government in defense of the Union but was 
rejected on account of his health. By her first marriage Mrs. Duree had 
four children: Oilman Fclkner, now living on a farm in this county; Leslie, 
of Ccnterville; Chloe, who married P. W. Duree, who died in 1912, while 
his widow lives in Centerville; and Seldon E. Felkner, who died in 1905. 
Mr. and Mrs. Duree have but one son, Otis R., who married Mabel Hall, 
a daughter of A. P. Hall, of Centerville. They are residents of Sioux 
City. Mrs. Duree was born in Davis county, Iowa, March 13, 1848, 
and attended school there but was married in .Appanoose county, where she 
has since made her home, occupying a pleasant residence at No. 615 East 
State street at the present time. Mr. Duree was a republican but without 
ambition for office. He held membership in the Methodist church, while 
his widow belongs to the Christian church. Her parents were also earnest 
Christian people, holding membership in that church and were numbered 
among the worthy and valued citizens of this part of the state. For many 
years Mr. Duree ranked with the highly respected and representative agri- 
culturists of Appanoose count}- and through his diligence and business integ- 
rity won the success that enabled him in his later years to live retired. 



WILLIAM M. DINES. 



On the roll of Appanoose county's honored dead appears the name of 
William M. Dines, who for twenty-eight years followed the stonemason's 
trade in Centerville and who is also entitled to grateful remembrance by 
reason of his service in the Federal army during the Civil war. He was 
born in Ohio, February 27, 1838, a son of Archibald and Margaret (Mor- 
rison) Dines, natives of that state. The father was a stonemason by 
trade and spent his entire active life engaged in that occupation, passing 
away in Ohio. His wife also died in that state. 

In the acquirement of an education William Dines attended the public 
schools of his native section and after laying aside his books learned the 
stonemason's trade vmdcr his father. He worked at this in Ohio until 
1877 and after that spent two years in Kans'as before finally settling in 
.Appanoose covmty, Iowa, in 1879. He was in Ohio at the outbreak of the 
Civil war and enlisted immediately in Company E, Thirty-second Ohio 



82 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Infantry, serving tour years. 'I'ln- hartlships ot his service and the priva- 
tions which he was obliged to endure greatly impaired his health and his 
illness compelled his retirement from business some years before his death. 
He passed away May 31, 1907. Throughout the years of his active busi- 
nes career and in every relation of his life he enjoyed the confidence, esteem 
and loyal friendship of all with whom he was associated and his death was 
the occasion of deep sorrow and widespread regret. 

In January, 1863, Mr. Dines married Miss Susan Miller, a daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Cox) Miller, natives of Pennsylvania. The father 
went to Ohio when he was a young man and engaged in farming in that 
state, purchasing property which he operated until his death in 1892. 
He had survived his wife many years, she having passed away in 1862. 
Their daughter, the widow of the subject of this review, was born in 
Ohio in 1837. She and her husband had six children: Eliza C, the wife 
of George Peabody, of Centerville; Margaret, who resides with her mother; 
James E., a stonemason in Centerville; Carrie Estella, the wife of Albert 
Yant, of the same city; John William, deceased; and a child, who died 
in infancy. 

Mr. Dines held membership in the Grand Arm}" post and was affiliated 
with the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias. He gave his allegi- 
ance to the republican party but never sought political preferment. He 
was, however, loyal and public-spirited in all matters of citizenship, taking 
an interest in those projects which had for their object the upbuilding and 
development of the count}", and thus it was that in his passing Centerville 
lost one of its representative and valued citizens. 



LLOYD B. PEAVEY. 



Lloyd B. Peavey, who passed away in Centerville on the 17th of 
March, 1901, was long engaged in railroad service and for a few years 
prior to his death served as freight conductor on the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad. His birth occurred in Bangor, Maine, on the 2d of 
June, 1848, his parents being Thomas Howard and Aborine (Reynolds) 
Peavey, who were likewise natives of that state and came of Yankee 
stock. The father served as a captain of Sharpshooters during the period 
of the Civil war. After the cessation of hostilities between the north and 
the south he established his home at Epworth, Iowa, and there spent the 
remainder of his life as a cabinet-maker and })hotographer. His wife also 
passed away at that place. Their chiUiren were three in number, namely: 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 83 

Robert H.. who is a retired agricuturist of Marcus, Iowa; Lloyd B., of this 
review; and Allard C, who resides on the old home place at Epworth, 
Iowa. 

Lloyd B. Feavey obtained his etiucation in the schools of Bangor, 
Maine, and at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war, when but a youth 
of thirteen, ran away from home and endeavoretl to enlist. He told the 
rec-uiting officer that he was old enough to enter the army but was rejected 
on account of being too short. He made another attempt to enlist, 
however, at the camp of his father, Captain Peavey, who sent him home. 
When the war was over he came with his parents to Iowa and continued 
his education at Epworth. After {Hitting aside his text-books he learned 
the gunsmith's trade and then went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he 
worked at that occupation for a time. Subsequently he went to Illinois 
and entered the railroad service as passenger conductor on the Iron Moun- 
tain road, being thus employed for a number of years. Later he removed to 
Creston, Iowa, and was there employed as a freight conductor until 1898, 
when he came to Centerville. From that time until his death he acted as 
a freight conductor on the Chicago, Burlington i: Quincy Railroad. He 
died of Bright's disease on the 17th of March, 1901, and is survived by 
hi? widow, who resides with her children on East Maple street in Cen- 
terville. 

Mr. Peavey was united in marriage to Miss Ada Crowe, a native of 
Yorkshire, England, and a daughter of George H. and Mary J. (Sudgen) 
Crowe, who were likewise born at that place. George H. Crowe, a machin- 
ist by trade, brought his family to the United States in 1869, locating 
first in Brooklyn, New York, whence he afterward removed to Winona, 
Minnesota, where he now makes his home. He lost his first wife in 1903, 
at Fort Matlison, Iowa, where at that time he was in the service of the 
Santa Fe Railroad as a machinist. To George H. and Mary J. Crowe 
were born the following children: Mrs. Ada Peavey; Harry \'., a machin- 
i-t of Texas; and Bertram, who is a machinist of Oklahoma. In 1908 
Mr. Crowe was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Emma 
Crockett. Mr. and Mrs. Peavey have four children. Harry B.. who was 
bom on the 20th of January, i88>, is a mechanic in the service of the 
Chicago, Burlington .i' Quincy Railroad at Centerville and acts as cor- 
poral in Company E, Fifty-fourth Regiment, Iowa National Guard, of 
Centerville. Howard L., whose birth occurred on the 7th ot October, 
1887, is employed as fireman by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road Company at Centerville and is also a member of Company E, Fifty- 
fourth Regiment, Iowa National Guard. Vvv.i M.. whose natal day was 
March 6, 1891, is a student in Success Business College of Ottumwa, 



84 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Iowa, and will be graduated therefrom as a stenographer in 1913- Don- 
ald G., who was born on the 18th of April, 1893, is employed in the Bur- 
linf;ron roundhouse at Centerville. Harry B. Peavey is a member of 
Centerville Lodge of Masons, A. F. & A. M., of this city, while Howard L. 
Peave)- belongs to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen & Engineers 
of Centerville. 

Lloyd B. Peavey gave his political allegiance to the republican party, 
exercising his right of franchise in support of its men and measures. He 
belonged to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and was also a mem- 
ber of the Order of Railway Conductors at Cairo, Illinois. His widow is 
a member of the Episcopal church but attends the Christian church of 
Centerville, as there is no Episcopal church in the city. She belongs to 
the Order of the Eastern Star and the Degree of Honor in this city. She 
is well known and highly esteemed here and has a circle of friends almost 
coextensive with the circle of her acquaintances. 



ALVA STALEY. 



Among those whom Appanoose county once numbered among her 
citizens but who have now passed to the Home Beyond was Alva Staley, 
who through much of his life engaged in carpentering here. He also made 
a creditable record as a veteran of the Civil war, enlisting in the army 
as a musician. Ohio claimed him among her native sons, his birth having 
occurred in Perry county, on the 4th of June, 1831. His parents were 
Joel and Matilda Staley, also natives of the Buckeye state, where the 
father followed the occupation of farming until he came to Appanoose 
county at a very early day. He then bought land, which he improved 
and cultivated throughout the remainder of his life with the exception of 
a short period in which he engaged in the manufacture ot flour. 

With the removal of the family to Iowa, Alva Staley became one 
of the pioneers of Appanoose county, arriving here, however, in his child- 
hood days. He acquired his education in the public schools and after he 
had put aside his text-books began learning the carpenter's trade, which 
he thereafter followed in order to provide for his own support and that 
of his family. He was an industrious and energetic workman and gained 
for himself a creditable place in industrial circles. Mr. Staley possessed 
much natural musical talent and following the outbreak of the Civil war 
enlisted as a musician with the Third Iowa Cavalry. 

It was on the 13th of January. 1856, that Mr. Staley was united in 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 85 

marriage to Miss Mary Smith, a daughter of Alexander and Mary (Smith) 
Smith, who were natives ot Irehind. The father was a farmer by occu- 
pation and operated a tract of land on the Emerald isle throughout his 
active life. Following his death his wife and children came to the new 
world, settling first in Canada, where Mrs. Smith spent her remaining 
days. Mrs. Staley is the only one of the family now living. By her 
marriage she became the mother of seven children but two of the num- 
ber died in infancy. The others are: Mary, residing with her mother; 
Minnie C, the wife of L. M. Campbell, a farmer of this county; Bingham 
S., a contractor of Centerville; Owen W., who follows farming in this 
county; and Rollin M., who resides in Kansas City, Missouri. Mrs. Staley 
owns a pleasant home at No. 520 North Ninth street, but at the time of 
her husband's death the} were living on a farm of one hundred and one 
and a half acres which he had purchased and was cultivating. Since his 
demise, however, Mrs. Staley has sold that property and resides in the 
city, where she also owns a good dwelling just north of her home. She is 
a consistent and faithful member of the Baptist church, as was Mr. 
Staley, and he was also a worthy member of the Odd Fellows society. His 
political support was given to the republican part}- and he kept well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day but did not seek nor desire 
office. He passed away April 1, i8()2, after a residence of about fifty 
years in Appanoose county, during which period he had witnessed its 
development as wild lands were converted into productive farms and as 
towns and villages sprang up. He had always been deeply interested in 
the changes which occurred and he bore his share in the work of general 
progress and improvement. 



GKORCiK W. THOMPSON. 

George W. Thompson was a well known and highly respected resi- 
dent of Centerville and also had a wide acquaintance in other parts of 
the county. He was in the seventy-fourth year of his age when called 
to his final rest on the 20th of March, 1910, his birth having occurred in 
Dearborn county, Indiana, September 7, 1836. His parents were George 
and Alice A. (Murray) Thompson, the former a native of Yorkshire, 
England, while the latter was born in Zanesville, Ohio. George Thomp- 
.son was a farmer by occupation and when eighteen }ears of age came to 
the I'nited States with his father, settling first in Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he rcmainetl iinfil the time of his marriage, when he removed to Guilford, 



86 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Indiana. There he purchased a tarni whiiii he at once began to develop 
and improve, living iqwn that place througlunit his remaining days and 
converting it from a wild tract into one of rich fertility. He died there 
in 1876, at the age of seventy-two years, while his widow survived until 
September, 1888. 

George W. Thompson, who was born at Guilford, spent his youthful 
days in his native state, acquiring his education in the district schools and 
when not bus}' with his text-books working in the fields. After he left 
school his entire attention was given to farm work on the old homestead 
until the opening j'ear of the Civil war, when he offered his services to the 
government and joined the boys in blue of Company K, Twenty-sixth 
Indiana Infantry. He served for three years and three months and was 
often in the thickest of the fight, his regiment doing active duty at various 
points in the south. When the war was over and the country no longer 
needed his military assistance he returned home and began working at 
the carpenter's trade, which he followed in connection with farming, 
which he carried on on the old homestead in partnership with his brother 
until 1867. In that year George W. Thompson was married and removed 
to Missouri, where he engaged in carpentering until 1876. He then entered 
the eniplo}- of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company as 
foreman ot a bridge gang and came to Centerville in 1876. living here for 
three years. He was then transferred to Cameron, Missouri, and con- 
tinued in that capacity until 1897, when he left the railroad company 
and again came to Centerville, where he did carpenter work for the 
Centerville Block Coal Company, with which he continued until 1907. 
He then retired and built two houses in Centerville. so that his widow 
now owns two attractive residence properties here, occupying the one at 
No. 406 East State street and renting the one next door at No. 402 
State street. 

It was on the 1st of January, 1867, that Mr. Thompson was mar- 
ried to Miss Catherine C. Lockridge, a daughter of Steward and Hannah 
(Perrine) Lockridge, natives of Kentucky and New York respectively. 
The father was left an orphan at an early age and removed from his native 
state to Lawrenceburg, Indiana. He entered business life as a traveling 
salesman and was thus emplo\cd tor nian\ years. In fact he was but 
twenty-one }ears of age when he went upon the road and devoted his 
remaining days to that vocation. He died in June. i86v and was long 
survived by his widow, whose death occurred on the 24th of October, 
1900. Their daughter, Mrs. Thompson, was born in Lawrenceburg, Indi- 
ana, October 18, 1847, and by her marriage she became the mother of five 
children but four have passed away, the living son being Ralph B.. a 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSF. COUXTY 87 

window decorator at Denison, Iowa. The others were: Truman, who 
died in 1875; Jennie, in 1889; Freddie, in i8c)o; and Murray, in 1895. 
The death ot the husband and father occurred March 20, 1910, after an 
illness lasting but a single day. The news of his demise came as a great 
shock to the communit}- and brought a sense of sincere regret to all, for 
he was highly esteemed as a man of sterling worth. He held to the high 
principles inculcated by the different lodges to which he belonged. He 
was a member of the Grand Army post, of the Masonic fraternity, the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Degree of Honor and the local 
carpenters' union. His widow became a member of the Rebekah lodge, 
the women's auxiliary of Odd Fellowship, and also of the Degree of 
Honor, .serving as financier of the last named for ten years. Mr. Thomp- 
son gave his political allegiance to the republican party and kept thor- 
oughly informed on rhe questions and issues of the day but did not seek 
nor desire office. His religious belief was that of the Methodist church 
and his was an upright, honorable life, worthy the friendship, confidence 
and good-will always extended him. 



ISAAC S. LANE. 



Isaac S. Lane, deceased, was for many years engaged in carpentering 
in Appanoose county and there are many who remember him as a citizen 
of genuine worth, {jossessing many admirable, manly traits that gained 
for him the friendship and kindly regard of all who knew him. Mr. Lane 
was born in Brown county, Ohio, in February, 1835, ^ son of John and 
Anna (Dawson) Lane, who were natives of Virginia. The father was a 
cabinet-maker by trade and sought a home in this county at an carl\- 
period in its development, the remainder of his life being here passed. 

Isaac S. Lane was reared and educated in Ohio, becoming a resident 
of Ajipanoose county in 1854. He, too, was a cabinet-maker, having 
learned the trade with his father, and he followed that pursuit until after 
the inauguration of the Civil war, when his patriotic spirit was aroused 
and he enlisted in an Illinois regiment, with which he served for one 
year. On rhe expiration of that period he joined the navy, with which 
he served for about three years. He next went to St. Louis, w here he took 
up the trade ot ship carpentering and was upon the river, running from 
St. Louis to New Orleans. A few years thus passed, after which he 
returned to Centerville and with the capital acquired from his labors 
he establi.shed a grocer}' store. Later he embarkeil in the meat business, 



88 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

conducting a market for ritteen years or more, but eventually he retired 
from that line of merchandising and again took up carpentering, which 
he followed until he was unable to work an} longer. His life was ever 
a busy, active and usetul one, in which he made good use of his time and 
opportunities. He was ever honest in his dealings and energetic and per- 
sistent, and whatever he accomplished was the reward of his earnest 
labor. 

On the 25th of November, 1897, Mr. Lane was married to Mrs. Susan 
(Wales) Majors, a daughter of Leonard and Elizabeth (Dougherty) 
Wales, who were natives of Maryland and Kentucky respectively. The 
father was a farmer by occupation and came in pioneer times to Appanoose 
county, where he secured land which he transformed into rich and pro- 
ductive fields, cultivating it continuously until his death in 1869. His 
wife survived him for twenty years, passing away in January, 1889. By 
a former marriage Mrs. Lane had three children: Sophia, who is the wife 
of Thomas Croxton; Catherine, who gave her hand in marriage to Louis 
Roth; and James Majors, a resident of Centerville. 

The death of Mr. Lane occurred January 13, 1911, and was the occa- 
sion of deep regret to many friends. He had nearly passed the sevent}-sixth 
milestone on life's journey and all who knew him esteemed him for his 
sterling worth. He voted with the democratic part}-, believing its princi- 
ples most conducive to good government, and his religious faith was that 
of the Presbyterian church, in which he long held membership. He was 
also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and Mrs. Lane belongs 
to the Women's Relief Corps. She owns a nice home at No. 41 1 North 
Twelfth street, where she is now pleasantly situated. There was nothing 
particularly spectacular in the history of Mr. Lane but he always did his 
duty, lived peaceably with his fellowmen and followed the Golden Rule, 
and such men are the real strength of the community in which they reside. 



FRANK P. WHITSELL. 



Among the men who for man} years were active factors in shaping 
and directing the business life of Centerville was Frank P. Whitsell. who 
died May 28, 1908. Since he was six years of age he made his home in 
this commvmity and his active career was closely connected with its general 
development. His death was, therefore, a distinct loss, depriving Center- 
ville of one of its most active, representative and enterprising men. Mr. 
Whitsell was a native of Pennsylvania, born in Beaver county, May 14, 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 89 

1852. His parents were Lawrence and Isabelle (Earl) Whitsell, also 
natives of Pennsylvania, rht- tormt-r a hatter by trade. He followed this 
occupation in his native state but abandoned it about 1858, when he came 
to Appanoose county and bepan farming. He purchased land just north 
of Centerville and operated this enterprise successfully for a number of 
vears. Afterwanl he moved into the town and became identified with 
the hotel business, conducting what was known at that time as the Key- 
stone Hotel. He was active in the management of this house for several 
years but final !)■ abandoned it in favor of farming. He resumed his 
agricultural operations upon three hundred and sixty acres of land which 
he owned and this property he developed until he retired from active life. 
He moved into Centerville and there made his home until his death, 
which occurred in 1897. He had long survived his wife, who passed 
away in 1854. 

Frank P. Whitsell was educated in the public schools of Centerville, 
for he was only six years of age when the family moved to Iowa. After 
completing his studies he worked in his father's hotel and when he moved 
back on the farm assisted in the work of cultivation and improvement. 
In 1875 he began his independent business career, conducting a livery 
stable in Centerville. His intelligently directed energies brought him 
success and he continued in this business until his death on May 28, 1908. 
He was a man of excellent ability and sound judgment and in the con- 
duct of his affairs met with a degree of success which placed him among 
the leading business men of Centerville. 

In Januar), 1877, Mr. Whitsell married Miss Cora E. McCreary, a 
daughter of John and Martha (Pennington) McCreary, natives of \"\T- 
ginia. The father came to Centerville in 1858 and there worked at the 
carpenter's trade until his death, which occurred in 1859, one year after 
he took up his residence here. His widow survives and is making her 
home with her daughter. She has reached the advanced age of eighty 
\(ars. Mr. and Mrs. Whitsell became the parents of two children: 
Llo}d L., aged thirty-five, who is in the livery business in Centerville; 
and Roy R., aged thirty-two, who is deputy county treasurer at Trini- 
tiad, Colorado. Mrs. Whitsell inherited a comfortable competency upon 
the death of her husband and now has some valuable business interests 
in Centerville. She owns her attractive home at 202 West Maple street 
and the livery business which her husband formerly conducted. She is a 
member of the Ea.stern Star ami an adherent of the Christian Science 
religion. Her many fine qualities of heart and mind have gained her 
a wide circle of friends in the citv in which she lives. 



90 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Mr. Whitsell was a member of the Masonic lodge and his political 
allegiance was given to the democratic party. He was public-spirited and 
loj'al in all matters of citizenship, taking a deep interest in all projects 
which had for their object the further development of his community. He 
made good use of his time and opportunities and as the years passed 
gained prosperity, and at his death left to his children the record of a 
blameless life and the memory of an untarnished name. 



N. J. MAIN. 



One of the leading and influential men of Taylor township is N. J. 
Main, who since he began his active career in 1878, at the age of twenty- 
one, has been an individual force in the agricultural development of this 
section and whose well-directed work since that time has been a source of 
continual and substantial success. Today he is living in a beautiful home 
in Moravia and is surrounded by all the comforts and luxuries which his 
work has brought him, giving his time to the supervision of his three fine 
farms. During the years he has made steady advancement in prosperity 
and wealth but his labors have had an even broader significance than this, 
for they have constituted one of the greatest factors in the development of 
a fine farming section. Mr. Main is a native of Appanoose county, born 
March 1, 1857, a son of John W. and Sarah E. (Thackery) Main, the 
former a native of Monroe county, Ohio, and the latter, of I^nion county, 
Indiana. Their marriage occurred in the latter state, to which the father 
had removed with his parents when he was still a boy, and afterward Mr. 
and Mrs. John W. Main came west to Iowa, buying a farm in Chariton 
township, four miles west of Moravia, in 1855. Upon this property they 
resided until 1885, when the father retired from active life and moved 
into the town, where his declining )ears were spent. John W. Main was 
twice married and became the father of twelve children. His first wife, 
who was the mother of the subject of this review, died on September 30, 
1890, aged sixty-two years, eight months and nine days. She had been a 
lifelong member and an ardent worker in the United Brethren church and 
was a woman ot exemplary life and high standards. After her death the 
father of our subject was united in marriage to Mrs. E. J. Sumner, who 
survived him for twelve years. She later married again, her last union 
being with her fifth husband. The father of the subject of this review was 
a loyal republican and very radical, voting always for the men and meas- 
ures for which the party stands. While he never sought public office, his 




.\ii;. AM) .\ii;s. N. 1. \i\i\ 



HISTORY UF Al'l'AXOOSE COUXTY 93 

ability yet carried him forward into prominence in public lite and he served 
for man)- \ears as township trustee. He died September 30, 1894, at the 
age of seventy-three years, three months and nineteen days. He was a 
man of high principles, sterling integrity and upright life, giving a devout 
adherence to the United Brethren church. He was for many years class 
leader and one of the trustees of the church, exemplitying in his life and 
practicing always the doctrines he professed. His death removed from 
Appanoose count)- one of its most widely known and honored citizens and 
was attended by deep and sincere regret. 

N. J. Main was reared at home and acquired his education in the public 
schools of Appanoose count)-. At the age of twenty-one he began his active 
career, renting land upon which he raised corn but still continuing to re- 
side at home. He worked in association with his father, who had given 
him some stock and was assisting him in his start in life. Mr. Main of 
this review married in .1882 and immediately afterward settled on seventy- 
two acres of land in Monroe county, which he and his tather had purchased 
in partnership some time before. This property w^as in a run-down condi- 
tion and consequently the selling price was very low, Mr. Main and his 
father paying for it eight hundred dollars. With characteristic energ)' and 
well directed labor N. J. Main applied himself to making the farm prof- 
itable, following the most progressive agricultural methods and the most 
upright business standards, and today the land is worth one hundred dol-. 
larsper acre. Mr. .Main lived upon this farm for eleven years, after which 
he traded it for a tract of one hundred acres. In -the meantime he had ac- 
quired another farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Monroe county 
and he joined the two tracts and in compan)- with others fomied a stock 
company and built a cheese factory. This venture was extremely success- 
ful and at times Mr. Main milked twenty head of cows. Subsequently, 
however, he traded the one hundred and twenty acre farm and the seventy- 
two acre tract in Monroe county tor two hundred acres in Chariton town- 
ship, Appanoose county, to which he removed and upon which he resided 
until 1903, when he moved into Moravia, still continuing to operate his 
holdings. He owns two hundred and forty acres in Chariton township, 
one hundred and sixty acres, less the railroad right-of-way, on the out- 
skirts of Moravia, and seventy-two acres on the line between Monroe and 
Appanoose counties. Upon his one hundred and sixty acre farm he re- 
cently erected one of the most modern homes in Taylor township and in 
this he is residing, giving personal supervision to the management ot his 
agricultural interests. All of his business affairs are conducted ably, in- 
telligently and along progressive lines and as a result Mr. Main has at- 
tained a gratifying prosperity which places him in the tront ranks of 
successful men in Apfianoose county. 



94 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

On the 1st of January, 1882, Mr. Main married Miss Mary A. Stark, 
a daughter of David T. Stark, who was born in Scott county, Indiana, and 
who came as a young man to Appanoose county, settling here some time 
prior to 1898. In that year he married Miss Sarah A. Buroughs, who came 
with her parents at an early date to Appanoose county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Main became the parents of seven children: Linnie Maud, the wife of O. 
C. Smith, who is now operating one of the farms belonging to the subject 
of this review; Otha E., who lives at home; Elva R., who is attending 
Leander Clark College in Toledo, Iowa: Iva Merle. Ross Forrest and Freda 
Belle, all of whom reside at home; and John David, deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Main are members of the United Brethren church and 
Mr. Main is on the board of trustees. He is a republican in his political 
beliefs and takes an active part in public affairs, having served in the office 
of assessor of Chariton township and as a member of the town council of 
Moravia. Fraternally he is affiliated with East Moravia Lodge, No. 510, 
I. O. O. F. His life has been well spent in all its relations. He has been 
true to high and honorable principles and has therefore made his name 
respected and esteemed in the section in which he was born and in which 
he has so long resided. 



DAVID C. O'NEIL. 



David C. O'Neil, a prosperous and highly esteemed citizen of Center- 
ville, has here made his home for three decades and for the past five years 
has been successfulh" engaged in the real-estate and insurance business. 
His birth occurred in St. Lawrence county. New York, on the 6th of June, 
1859, his parents being David and Jane (Hatley) O'Neil. The father 
was a native of Ireland, while the mother, a lady of Irish descent, was 
born in New York. David O'Neil became a sailor boy when but twelve 
years of age and made three trips to the United States, remaining here 
after reaching American shores for the third time. Landing in New 
Orleans as a youth of fourteen, he there began work on a farm and later 
secured employment on a boat. Eventually locating in the state of New 
York, he was there married in 1835 to Miss Jane Hatley, a farmer's 
daughter. Turning his attention to general agricultural pursuits, he 
remained in the Empire state until i860, when he removed to Illinois. In 
1880 he came to Appanoo.se count}-, Iowa, and here spent the remainder 
of his life, devoting his attention to the work of the fields with excellent 
results. His wife, who survived him tor several }ears. was called to her 
final rest in igoo. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 95 

David C. O'Xcil obtained his education in the district schools and 
after putting aside his text-books assisted his father in the operation of the 
home farm. In 1882 he came west to Iowa, locating in Centerville, Appa- 
noose county, and tor a period of fifteen years worked in the coal mines. 
Subsequently he went u[K)n the road as traveling salesman for a whole- 
sale liquor house. In u;o7 he embarked in the real-estate and insurance 
business and his undertakings in this connection have been attended with 
a gratifying measure of success. He purchased a coal mine from the 
Trio Coal Company in igio but disposed of it about three months ago. 
His home, which he owns, is one of the most attractive residences in 
Centerville. 

In 1884 Mr. O'Neil was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Burns, 
who was born in Illinois in i860, her parents being Patrick and Mary 
(Stratton) Burns, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Illinois. 
Patrick Burns emigrated to the United States when a youth of sixteen and 
took up his abode in Illinois, where he was married. A few years later 
he removed to Wapello county, Iowa, and resided on a farm near Ottumwa 
until 1894. when he returned to Ireland and there passed awav. His 
widow makes her home in the northern jiart of Iowa with her brother, 
James Stratton. Mr. and Mrs. O'Neil have three children, as follows: 
Mary Jane, who was born in 1886 and is still at home; Emmet D.. who 
was born in 1887 and is a ])lumber of Centtrville, this count}-; and John 
H.. whose birth occurred in i8yo and who is a plasterer residing in Cen- 
terville. 

Mr. O'Neil is a .stanch democrat in politics but has never sought nor 
desired office as a reward for his party fealty. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Knights of Pythias, while his religious faith is that of the Chris- 
tian church, to which he and his family belong. In business life he is 
well known tor his alert and enterprising spirit, and his salient qualities 
and (h.iracteristics are such as win honor and success. 



MARTIN BOIGHNKK. 



The lite span ot Martin Boughner covered eighty-five years and the 
record was one which brought him respect and gooti-will, for while he 
never sought to figure [)rominentl\ m imlilie lite he was in all of his busi- 
ness dealings reliable and enterjirising and the success which he won was 
gained through honorable, straightforward methoiN. He was born in 
IVnnsylvania, .September 1 ^ 1826, a son of Kichani and Marv ( Robb ) 



96 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Boughner, the former a native of New .Terse}- and the latter of Pennsyl- 
vania. In early life the father went to Germantown, Indiana, where he 
engaged in the liotel business, spending his remaining days there. He was 
born in 1801 and departed this life in 1888, having for about four years 
survived his wife, who died in 1884. 

Martin Boughner remained a resident of Pennsylvania until seven- 
teen years of age, and during that period acquired a good common-school 
education. He then went with his parents to Indiana where he learned 
the carpenter's trade, at which he worked until the spring of 1855, when 
he removed to the vicinity of Centerville, Ajipanoose county. A year later 
he took up his abode in Centerville, where he remained tor a year, work- 
ing at his trade. He afterward purchased eighty acres of land near this 
city and set about developing and improving it, making his home thereon 
until 1878, when he and his sons went to Kansas where he entered a claim 
from the government. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improve- 
ment made upon their property but with characteristic energj- they began 
to till the soil and cultivate the fields, Mr. Boughner remaining there until 
his death, which occurred September 10, iQii, when he had reached the 
venerable age of eighty-five years. 

He was a young man of twenty-five jears when on the 1 2th of Janu- 
ary, 1852, he married Catherine Hittle, a daughter of Henry and Cath- 
erine (Bohrer) Hittle. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1809 and 
there' he learned the blacksmith trade. In 1844 he removed westward to 
Germantown, Indiana, where he engaged in blacksmithing, conducting his 
shop until the death of his wife. He had married Catherine Bohrer. who 
was born in Germany in 1807 and passed awa}- in 1863. Mr. Hittle 
afterward made his home with his children in different places, thus pass- 
ing his time until his death, which occurred in 1880. At the time of the 
Civil war his patriotic spirit was aroused by the attempt of the south to 
overthrow the Union and he enlisted with the regiment known as the 
Iowa Graybeards, being composed of elderly men whose age would have 
exempted them from military duty had they so desired. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boughner were the parents of three children. \'iola, 
the eldest, became the wife of Samuel Conger on the 2^d of February, 
1871. Her husband was for many years engaged in farming in this 
count}- but is now living retired in Exline, having acquired a handsome 
competence that enabled him to put aside other business cares. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Conger have been born the following children who are yet living, 
while one, Chloe C, who was born July 28, 1872, died in Livingston county, 
Missouri, March 9, 1877. The others arc Kmnia R., Roxie C, Elsa B., 
Martin I.. Jacob R., Marv M., Ruth E., Benjamin W. and Clifford R. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 97 

William Henry Boufzhncr. the elder son ot Martin Bouj^hner, is the 
owner of a tour hundred and tort}- acre farm near Downs, Kansas, while 
Jacob \V., now retired, owns a farm ot litteen hundred and twenty acres 
in Kan-^as. 

Martin Boughner at one time served as justice of the peace in this 
county and his political allegiance was always given to the republican, 
party from the time of its organization until his- death. His religious 
faith was that ot the Methodist church to which he was ever loyal, con- 
tributing generously to its support and aiding in its work. His widow 
and her children are also members of that church. Mr. Boughner was 
respected wherever known and most of all where he was best known. He 
lived a consistent, earnest. Christian lite and the many sterling qualities 
of manhood and citizenship which he displayed gave him firm hold upon 
the atfectinnafe regard ot triends and neighbors as well as his tamil}-. 



ALFKKD KOSS WILCOX. 

On the long list of the brave men who went to the front as soldiers 
of the Civil war appears the name of Alfred Ross Wilcox. Unscathed, 
he faced death again and again on southern battlefields but met it at 
length by drowning when a passenger of the ill-fated steamer Golden 
Eagle that burned near Johnstown when making a trip on the Mississippi. 
Mr. Wilcox was a native of Gallia county, Ohio, born March i, 1835, a 
son of Hiram and Elizabeth Alvia Wilcox, the latter a native of the 
Buckeye state, and the former born in the town of Chenango, Tioga 
county. New York, November 9, 1 797. 1 hey never came to Iowa but 
S|)ent their entire lives in Ohio, where they passed away in the same year. 
The father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

.Alfred Ross Wilcox pursued his education in the schools of his native 
county, was there reared to manhood and took up the occupation of tann- 
ing. He continued to carry on general agricultural pursuits, following his 
removal to Iowa in 1890. at which time he located on Village creek near 
Ottumwa. There were still many evidences of frontier lite in that section 
ot the state at that day. With characteristic energ)- he began the develop- 
ment and improvement ot his farm and converted the plains into rich and 
productive fields. He was living thereon when he responded to the coun- 
try's call for aid, enlisting as a member of Company K, Fifteenth Iowa 
Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served until the close ot hos- 
tilities. He participated in many hotly contested battles, took part in the 



98 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

long, hot marches and the weary waiting in winter quarters. At the bat- 
tle of Shiloh he was wounded in the left leg but as soon as able he resumed 
his place in the ranks and remained in that command until mustered out. 

When the war was over Mr. Wilcox returned to the home farm near 
Ottumwa, having been married before that time to Miss Sarah .\lc.\Iillen, 
.who died while they were living in Ottumwa, and was buried there. 
There were five children of that marriage: Alvenza, of Ottumwa; Mary, 
the wife of Harvey Bigford, of Kansas City, Missouri; Cora, who is the 
wife of Charles Keating, of Des Moines; Alvia, who died at the age of 
twenty-four years; and William, who was a twin brother ot .\lvia and 
died at the age of thirty years. Coming to Appanoose count)- Mr. \\\\- 
cox was here married to Anna Cole, who died at Lineville, Iowa. They 
had three children of whom one is now living, Josie, a resident of Des 
Moines. On the 3d of June, 1877, Mr. Wilcox was united in marriage 
to Louisa J. Crews, a daughter of James and Delania (Allard) Crews. 
The father, a native of Chattanooga, Tennessee, was of Dutch and Irish 
descent and throughout his life followed the occupation of farming. His 
wife was a native of New York and belonged to one of the old American 
families. On removing westward they located on the Goshen prairie in 
Missouri near Lineville, Iowa, where the father carried on farming for 
a few years and then took up another claim to which he removed five 
miles north of Lineville. They were among the early settlers of that 
section, locating in Wajne count}', Iowa, seventy-five }ears ago. Thev 
built their cabin out of logs and experienced the usual hardships and priva- 
tions of pioneer life at that early period. The father died in Holt county, 
Missouri, in 1881, and the mother passed away in Kansas in 1910, having 
survived him for almost three decades. 

Alter Mr. Wilcox's third marriage he removed to I'nionville, Iowa, 
where he lived for two years and then established his home at Eldon, 
Iowa, where he worked as a section boss until he was run over and had 
his left toot cut off. This left him in a cri[)pled condition for life, ren- 
dering further labor of that kind ini[iossible, so that he established a 
grocery and dr}-goods store in EKlon. This he conducted with a fair 
measure of success until 1880, when he started for St. Louis for the pur- 
pose of purchasing an artificial leg. He took passage on the ill-fated 
steamer the Golden Eagle that caught fire and burned to the water's edge 
opposite Johnstown. His body was never recovered. Mrs. Wilcox con- 
ducted the store for a short time after his death and then closed out the 
stock, removing in 1883 to Centerville, purchasing here a nice home at 
No. 1012 West Maple street, where she has since lived. The children of 
the third marriage are: Lucy L.. the wife of Cliarles Wilson; ami Louisa 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 99 

J., of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson make their home with their mother 
and they have two children: Earl, twelve years of age; and Frankie. nine 
years of age, both attending the Central high school. 

Mr. Wilcox was a re[iublican but had no aspirations for office. He 
held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church to which his widow 
belongs and he was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Grand 
Army post at Unionville. He had many friends among his fraternal 
brethren and enjoyed in large measure the confidence and trust of those 
with whom he was associated in the various relations of lite. He always 
endeavored to live peacefully with his fellowmen, to do unto others as 
he would have they do unto him and was known as a reliable and enter- 
prising merchant, a loyal citizen, a faithful friend and a devoted hus- 
band and father. 



BURTON W. SHUTTS. 



Burton W. Shutts was well known to the patrons of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad on the Centerville division, for through a 
long period he served as railroad conductor and was known as a courteous, 
obliging official, ever ready and willing to look after the interests of the 
corporation which he represented. These qualities won him high regard 
and gained for him many friends in this part of the state. His birth 
occurred in Milford, Oswego county, New York, January 14, i860, his 
parents being Nelson and Sarah (Wells) Shutts, who were also natives 
of the Empire state. The father was a lumber dealer and in early life 
removed to Pennsylvania where he conducted a lumber business, operat- 
ing extensive sawmills. He built up a business on large and gratifying 
proportions and gained therefrom a most satisfactory income. In 1897 
he retired from business and now makes his home at Starrucca, Pennsyl- 
vania, his former interest and activit\ in manufacturing circles providing 
him with a hamlsome competence that enables him to enjoy all comforts 
of life. His patriotic spirit was manifest at the time of the Civil war, for 
he enlisted as a member of Companj F, One Hundred and Twenty-first 
New York Volunteer Infantry with which he served throughout the period 
of hostilities, participating in a number of hotly contested battles. Both 
he and his wife are living and both have reached the age of seventy-five 
years. 

Burton W. Shutts spent his youthful days in Pennsylvania and its 
public schools afforded him his educational privileges. He worked for his 



fOO HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

father until he had attained maturity and was then married and started 
out in life on his own account. This was in 1H79. In 1886 he and his 
wife removed to Frankford, Missouri, where he took up railroading as an 
employe of the Hannibal & St. Louis Railroad Company, acting in the 
capacity of brakeman for six months. He was then promoted to the 
position of conductor and remained with that road for six years, after 
which he entered the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road Company as a brakeman. Two jears passed and he was then pro- 
moted to the position of conductor, after which he removed to Burlington, 
where he resided for a year. He was next transferred to Moulton, Appa- 
noose covmt), where he remaincci tor ten jears, when Centerville was 
made the division point ot the road and in consequence Air. Shutts removed 
to this city, where he remained until his death, which resulted from an 
accident that he sustained while getting on his train on the 12th of Jan- 
uary, 1909. He had made an excellent record in railway service and 
enjoyed the full confidence and trust of the corporations which he rep- 
resented. 

On Christmas Day of 1879 Mr. Shutts was united in marriage to 
Aliss Sarah Eleanora Driggs, a daughter of Sherman and Rowena (Mey- 
ers) Driggs, the .former a native of Nicholson, Pennsylvania, and the 
latter of Providence, that state. In early life the father learned the 
trades of shoe making and carpentering and devoted his life to industrial 
pursuits. Going to Green Bay, Wisconsin, he built a large dock there and 
was assisted in the same by Mr. Shutts. In 1884 ^^'"- Driggs removed to 
Frankford, Missouri, and accepted the responsible position of road master 
of the Hannibal & St. Louis Railroad. Finally, however, he ceased to 
engage in railroading and opened a shoe store at Frankford, where he 
continued successfully until 1891, when he retired, making his home, how- 
ever, in Frankford up to the time of his death. He was born December 
2, 1831, and was therefore almost seventy-two years of age when he 
passed away in August, 1903. His wife died January 16, 1902. Mr. 
Driggs was connected with the construction corps all through the Civil war 
and remained throughout his life a loyal and progressive citizen, actively 
interested in the welfare of his country. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shutts became the parents of three children: George, 
a musician residing at Muscatine. Iowa; William, who is manager of the 
Brick Material Company of Centerville; and Edward, who is now assist- 
ant cashier of the First National Bank. The mother has everj' reason to 
be proud of her three sons. Mrs. Shutts was horn at Nicholson, Pennsyl- 
vania. April I. 18^8, and acquired her education in the schools there. Her 
two eldest children were also born in that place. She now resides at No. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE CoUXTY 101 

605 North Ninth street where she has erected a fine modem brick bunga- 
low. Mr. Shutts held membership with the Masonic lodge and his wife 
belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star. He belonged also to the Order 
of Railway Conductors and he gave his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party. His religious faith was that of the Methodist church, to 
which his widow and children belong. In all his actions he followed the 
Golden Rule, and the companies which he represented found him trust- 
worthy and capable. His associates knew him to be a faithful friend and 
his family found him a most devoted husband and father. His life was 
well spent and his untimely taking off was deeply regretted by all who 
knew him. 



JOSPTH PEACH. 



Joseph Peach had a wide acquaintance in Centerville and throughout 
the surrounding country, and qualities of sociability and geniality made 
him popular wherever he was known. He spent the greater part ot his 
life in this state but was born near Bellefontaine, Ohio, in April, 1844, 
his parents being William and Mary (Mail) Peach, who were also natives 
of the Buckeye state. The father was a farmer by occupation and became 
one of the pioneer residents ot Wapello county, Iowa, settling there when 
the work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun. He 
entered land from the government and although not a furrow had been 
turned nor an improvement made upon the place he at once began its devel- 
opment, converting it into rich and productive fields and continuing the 
operation of the farm until his death, which occurred in 1852. His wife 
survived him until i8cj8. 

Joseph Peach was but a \oung lad when brought to Iowa and in the 
schools of Wapello county he mastered the branches of learning which 
usitally constitute the public-school curriculum. .After putting aside his 
text-books he worked for his uncle until after the outbreak of the Civil 
war, when he offered his aid to the government and went to the front with 
the boys in blue of Company D. Thirty-si.xth Iowa Infantry, with which 
he served until the close ot the war, participating in all ot the many hotly 
contested engagements in which his regiment took part. For a } ear he was 
held prisoner in Tyler (Texas) prison and suffered many hardships dur- 
ing his captivity. When victory had crowned the I'nion arms and hos- 
tilities had ceased he returned to Wapello county where he purchased a 
tract of land and improved the farm, continuing its operation for eighteen 



102 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

years. He then sold out on account ot the condition of his health and 
removed to Centerville, where he first secured employment as engineer in 
a brickyard, remaining there for four years. He then accepted a position 
as bookkeeper and collector with Dr. Reynolds, with whom he remained 
until the doctor's death, after which he occupied a similar position with 
Dr. Bamford until his own death, which occurred April 12, 1907. 

Mr. Peach was married in March, 1870, to Miss Emma Sackett, a 
daughter of Alexander and Cornelia (Gilbert) Sackett, the latter a native 
of New York city and the former of Indiana, in which state he engaged in 
farming until after the outbreak of the Civil war. He, too, was thrilled 
by the spirit of patriotism called to life by the attempt of the south to 
overthrow the Union, and he enlisted as a member of Company B, Eighth 
Iowa Cavalry. Accordingly he marched to the front but never returned, 
laying down his life upon the altar of his country. His widow survived 
until July, 1908. 

Mr. Peach always maintained pleasant relations with his old army 
comrades through his membership in the Grand Army post. He was a 
strong republican, believing that the party platform contained the best 
elements of good government. His religious belief was that of the Uni- 
versalist church while Mrs. Peach is a member of the Christian church. 
She resides in a nice home at No. 922 Drake avenue. The business inter- 
ests of Mr. Peach brought him into contact with many and wherever known 
his genial qualities gained him friendly regard. 



GEORGE B. OGLE. 



George B. Ogle is one ot the young business men of Appanoose county, 
whose enterprise has carried him forward to success. He is proprietor of 
a laundry which he is capably conducting and there are other creditable 
chapters in his life record, including service in the Spanish-American war. 
Centerville numbers him among her native sons, his birth having occurred 
in this city February 4, 1875. His parents were Barton A. and Minerva 
E. (Arnold) Ogle, natives of Indiana and Ohio respectively. The father 
was a miller by trade and came to Centerville, Iowa, prior to the Civil war. 
Here he worked at his trade for some time and later turned his attention 
to the foundry business, which he carried on for several years. His fel- 
low townsmen, recognizing and appreciating his worth and ability in 
matters of citizenship, elected him to the office of count)- auditor and 
gave indorsement of his first term's service in reelection, so that he 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 103 

remained in the position for two terms. At the time of the Civil war, 
however, he put aside all business and personal considerations, for he felt 
that his first dut}- was to his country and enlisted as a member of Company 
I, ThirtA-sixth Iowa Infantry, with which he served until the close of the 
Civil war. He continued to reside in Centerville until his death, which 
occurred in February, 1882. His widow survives and has now reached 
the age of sevent\-three years. 

George B. Ogle was reared and educated in Centerville and when his 
school days were over he secured employment in a dr\ -goods store, being 
thus occupied for ten years. That the fires of patriotism burned as brightly 
in his breast as in his father's was indicated when the countr}- again became 
involved in war, tor with the outbreak ot hostilities between the United 
States and Spain he enlisted as a member of Company E, Fiftieth Iowa 
Infantry. Following the close of hosrilities he returned home and engaged 
in the laundry business, purchasing the Cook Laundry, which he is now 
operating under the name of the Regal Steam Laundry. He purchased 
this business in 1899 and has since conducted it with excellent success. 
He also has a drj-cleaning department and both branches of the under- 
taking are proving profitable, being carefully and systematically man- 
aged by Mr. Ogle and his partner, N. V. Craig. Their patronage is 
growing year by year and they use as the basis tor their prosperity excel- 
lent work and fair dealing. Mr. Ogle is also a stockholder in the Company 
E armory, a two-story building sixty by one hundred feet, whicli is now 
being erected. He is likewise a stockholder in the Centerville Gypsum 
Company and in the Centerville Savings Bank, and he is the owner of the 
building in which the laundry business is conducted and also of a pleasant 
residence at No. 712 West Washington street. 

On the 27th of September, 1901, Mr. Ogle was united in marriage 
to Miss Grace Scott, a daughter of Mrs. Eugenia (Murphy) Scott Elliott. 
The father died when Mrs. Ogle was very young and the mother has since 
married again and still makes her home in Centerville. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Ogle became the parents of three children: George Lawrence, seven )ears 
of age; William Scott, aged tour: ;nnl one, who ditil in infancy. 

Mr. Ogle belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken 
high rank, being a member of the Mystic Shrine. He belongs also to the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias, while 
his political faith is indicated in the support which he gives at the polls 
to the republican party. His religious views accord with the teachings of 
the Methodist church, of which he has long been a member. His interests 
and activities are wide and varied and his unfaltering enterprise has 
brought him to an enviable position in business circles. There has been 



104 HISTORY Ol' APPANOOSE COUNTY 

nothing spectacular in his life hisroi}-, but the substantial qualities ot pro- 
gressiveness, laudable ambition and unabating energy have borne fruit 
and he has gained a place among the prominent and representative resi- 
dents of Centerville. 



MOSES H. BEER. 



Liberal college training fitted Moses H. Beer for the work which he 
has done in the held of pharmacy. He is now j)roprietor of a well-appointed 
drug store in Centerville, where he also has other financial investments. 
He was born in Livingston, this county, January 14, 1880, and is a son 
of Joseph and Emma (Fuller) Beer, who are natives of Ohio and Iowa 
respectively. The father came to this county in 1856, when but four years 
of age, his parents settling with their family near Livingston. Upon the 
home farm Joseph Beer was reared to manhood, being well trained in the 
work of the fields, and eventually he came into possession of his father's 
farm, which he cultivated until 1888, when he retired and removed to 
Cincinnati, this county, where he and his wife are now living. 

Their son ^L H. Beer was a pupil in the public schools of Cincinnati 
until graduated from the high school with the class of 1896. His early' 
commercial training came to him in a drug business and later he entered 
Highland Park College at Des Moines, where he pursued a course in 
pharmacy. With the completion of his college training he removed to 
Centerville, where he entered the emplo}- of \N'illiam McCreary & Son, 
with whom he continued for eight years. In June, 1906, he bought the 
store, of which he is now proprietor, and for more than six years he has 
successfully managed this enterprise. He has a well-equipped establish- 
ment, the neat and tasteful arrangement ot which is a feature in its suc- 
cess, combined with his reliable business methods and reasonable prices. 
Gradually his trade has increased until his patronage is large, and he 
derives therefrom a substantial annual income. He is also a stockholder 
in the Hercules Manufacturing Company of this city. 

In January, ic)oo, Mr. Beer was married to Miss Nellie Swearingen, 
a daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Bryant) Swearingen. Her father 
was one of the early settlers ot Appanoose county and for many jears 
engaged in the grocery business here. He still lives in Centerville and is 
cultivating a small farm in addition to doing house moving. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Beer have been born two children, Paul S. and Joseph F., aged 
respectively nine and six years. The family residence is a nice home at 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUXTY 105 

No. 612 West Maple street and its hospitality is greatly enjoyed by the 
many friends ot the family. 

Mr. Beer is well known in traternal circles, holding membership with 
the Elks and with the Knights of Pythias, belonging to both the subordi- 
nate lodge and the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan. Politi- 
cally he is a democrat but the honors and emoluments of office have had 
no attraction tor him. as he has always preferred to concentrate his energies 
upon his business affairs, in which he has met with signal success. His 
religious faith is that of the Christian church, to which both he and his 
wife belong. They are well known throughout Appanoose county and 
possess the social, genial qualities which render them popular wherever 
thev are known. 



LOYD L. WHITSELL. 



One of the progressive and enterprising young business men of Center- 
ville is Loyd L. VVhitsell, who is also a graduate in dental surgery. He is 
a native of this city, born October 25, 1877, and is a son of Frank P. and 
Cora (McCreary) Whitsell, the former for many years prior to his death 
closely connected with business interests in Centerville. For many years the 
father of our subject conducted a livery stable in the city and continued his 
identification with this enterprise until his death, which occurretl on the 
28th of May, IQ08. His widow survives and is making her home in Cen- 
terville with her mother who has reached the age of eighty years. More 
extended mention of Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Whitsell is found an another 
page in this work. 

Lo)d L. Whitsell of this review acquired his primary education in the 
I-viblic schools and was graduated from the Centerville high school in 1897. 
Alter lajing aside his school books he worked tor some time as bookkeeper 
for the Centerville Block & Coal Company but in 1902 resigned his posi- 
tion in order to enter the State University at Iowa City, Iowa, graduating 
in 190^:. with the degree of D. D. S. He located for practice in Center- 
ville and .secured a gratifying patronage, the results he obtained being the 
best proof of his ability. .Vftcr the death of his father, however, Mr. 
Whitsell gave up his dental practice and assumed charge of the livery 
bu.siness, working in the interests of his mother. In business affairs he 
has proved capable ami reliable and has won a measure of success which 
[ilaces him among the substantial ami representative men of this com- 
munitv. 



106 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

On the 14th of September, 1909, Mr. W'hitsell was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Daisy Estes, a daughter of Henry C. and Sophronia (Minteer) 
Adams, natives of Iowa, the father being the lirst white child born in 
Washington county. After he grew to maturity Henry C. Adams followed 
the blacksmith's trade and worked at it successfully until he was elected 
sheriff of Washington and Keokuk counties, at the time when these were 
united. He served with conscientiousness and ability from 1878 to 1882 
and afterward was appointed to the Indian service, being stationed first 
at Fort Detiance. Arizona, and later at Fruitland, New Mexico. He was 
an honored veteran of the Civil war, having served through four years of 
that conflict as a member of Company D, Thirteenth Iowa \'olunteer 
Infantry. His death occurred in New Mexico in 1893, in which year he 
was accidently drowned. His wife survived him two years, dying in 1895. 
Mrs. Whitsell has one child by her first marriage, a daughter, Marjorie, 
who attends school in Centerville. 

Mr. Whitsell has attained high rank in Masonry, holding membership 
with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a republican in his political 
beliefs and takes an active and helpful interest in community affairs, 
although his public spirit never takes the form of office seeking. He has 
made good use of his time and of the opportunities which have come to 
him and has in this way gained prosperity, holding a place of prominence 
and importance in business circles of Centerville. 



JAMES W. CAMPBELL 



James W. Campbell, a wholesale dealer in coal whose careful man- 
agement and indefatigable industry have brought to him a good business, 
came to Centerville in 1881 and, although his residence here has not been 
continuous, he has alwa}s been well known in this locality since his arrival 
in Appanoose count)- more than three decades ago. He was born in 
Glasgow, Scotland, in August, 1848, a son of William and .\nna (Law) 
Campbell, who were natives of the land of hills and heather. The father 
worked in a brewery there and later turned his attention to farming, 
cultivating a tract of land for many years. He eventually came to 
America in 1871, settling in Pennsylvania, where he lived until his death, 
which occurred in 1882. His wife passed away in Centerville in 1892. 

The boyhood and youth of James W. Campbell were spent in his 
native city and after he left school he sought a position in the coal mines, 
being thus employed until 1869, when at the age of twent)-one }ears he 



HISTORY Ui" AiTAXOOSE COUNTY 107 

came to the United States. He was afterward employed in the coal mines 
of Pennsylvania for some time and later removed to La Salle, Illinois, work- 
ing in the mines there until 1881. The latter year witnessed his arrival in 
Centerville but subsequently he went to Brazil where he worked in the 
mines until 1886. In the meantime he carefully saved his earnings, hoping 
to one day engage in business on his own account. The year 1886 saw the 
fulhllment of this hope for at that time he bought a stock of merchandise 
from John Freeze and thereafter conducted the business for about seven 
years. He then began dealing in coal in connection with Thomas Phillips, 
with whom he remained for several years, when they sold out and Mr. 
Campbell entered into partnership with Joseph Turner. They were 
associated in coal mining interests for thirteen years, at the end of which 
time they sold our and purchased the marble and granite works of Center- 
ville. A few months afterward, however, Mr. Campbell disposed of his 
interests in that business to his partner and went upon the road for the 
Southern Iowa Coal Compan)-, which he represented for a short time. 
He then once more embarked in business on his own account as a whole- 
sale dealer in coal and has since continued in this line. He now has a 
partner, J. L. Turner, who represents the business on the road under the 
firm name of J. W. Campbell & Compan}-. They have secured a liberal 
patronage, their straightforward dealings and promptness in delivery being 
important factors in their success. 

On the 15th of May, 1874, Mr. Campbell was married to Miss Susan 
Williams, a daughter of Richard and Sarah (Gilmore) Williams, the 
former a native of Wales and the latter of Ireland. The lather came 
to this country at a very early day, settling in Pennsylvania. He was a 
track layer in the mines and after coming to this country remained in 
the Keystone state until his death, which occurred in 1900. His wife 
survived until 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell became the parents of ten 
children, namely: Grace, the wife of J. H. Moore, a traveling salesman; 
William, a street car conductor in Centerville; Ella, who married J. L. 
Turner, the business partner of Mr. Campbell; Richard, a miner; Katie, 
who lives at home; James, who also engages in mining; Susie, engaged 
in teaching school; Mary, the wife of Elmer Sharp, a hardware merchant 
of Centerville; Earl, who died in 1894; '^"<-^ Harry, now attending school. 
The family reside at No. 1 1 ; North Tenth street, in a residence which 
Mr. Cam[)bell owns. 

Mr. Cam|)bfll has been a member of the Masonic lodge in this county 
since 1869 and while in Scotland served as Master Mason. For twenf\- 
seven years he has been identified with the Independent Order ot Odd 
Fellows. His political support is given to the re[niblican party and he 



108 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

served as township trustee tor nine years, hut while he has ever been 
loyal to the best interests ot the coninninit\ he has preferred that his 
public service should be done as a private citizen rather than as an official. 
His religious faith is that ot the Methodist church and its teachings have 
guided his life, shaping his conduct in all of his relations with his fellow- 
men. He has never been afraid of work, knowing that earnest, honest 
labor is the basis ot all honorable success. All days in his career have 
not been equally bright yet he has pushed his way steadily forward and 
is now at the head of a substantial and profitable business which is re- 
turning to him a good income. 



WILLIAM NORMAN SHAFFER. 

Almost four decades have come and gone since William Norman 
Shatfer passed away, but he is yet remembered b}- the older settlers as a 
progressive and enterprising farmer ot \'ermillion township and his widow 
yet remains here, his wife and children having taken an active and helpful 
part in promoting public progress along many lines. Mr. Shatfer was born 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, December 23, 1844, his parents 
being Michael and Mary (Enfield) Shatfer. The father, a native of Penn- 
sylvania and of German descent, was a carpenter by trade and eventually 
took up contracting. On his removal to Iowa he settled in Appanoose 
county, locating on land which he purchased in Vermillion township in 
1868. His wife was also a native of Pennsylvania and of German lineage. 
She died upon the farm in \'ermillion township in 1878, having for six 
years survived her husband, who passed aw'aj' in 1872. 

William Norman Shatfer attended the public schools of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, and also Swickley Academy in that city. After leaving 
school he took up the protession of teaching, which he followed in Donegal, 
Pennsylvania, but in 1868 came west with his parents and settled with 
them upon the farm. For two years he worked on the farm through the 
summer months and in the winter seasons engaged in teaching. In 1870 
he leased from his father eighty acres of land upon which he lived for four 
years, this being located near Shawville mine, in \'ermillion township. 
There he passed away on the 20th of June, 1874. He practiced industry, 
and energy was always one of his salient characteristics while in all of his 
business relations he was thoroughly reliable. 

Following the death of Mr. Shaffer, his wife and children purchased a 
house and forty acres of land trom his tather and occupied the place for 




W ll.l.lA.M \. -II \l I I i; 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 111 

four years, the home being situated three miles southwest of Centerville. 
Mrs. Shaffer then bought eighty acres four miles southeast of Centerville 
and occupied that farm for seventeen )ears, except when she was away 
educating her children. She took up the business of raising fruit and veg- 
etables and annually gathered good crops. At length, however, she dis- 
posed of that property and purchased her present homestead of eighty 
acres. She still lives upon this place but rents the land, deriving therefrom 
a substantial annual income. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer were born three children. Pearl M. and Carl 
J., twins, were born May 12, 1872. The former attended the district 
school of \'ermillion township and later the State Normal School at Cedar 
Falls, Iowa, from which he was graduated with honors in the class of 1894. 
He then went to the state reform farm at Eldora as military instructor and 
at one time he was military instructor in the state college at Manhattan, 
Kansas, being appointed to that position over a competitor who was a West 
Point graduate. He was detailed for two years' service there but was so 
well liked that he was asked to return artd remained for the four years' 
limit, ^^'hile acting as instructor at Eldora he was appointed second lieu- 
tenant of the United States army. During the Spanish-American war he 
served in the Philip[iines but was taken ill and returned home. He has 
served there under three enlistments since and at the present time is Cap- 
tain of Company B, of the Twentieth Regiment of United States Regulars, 
now on detached duty at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He married Miss 
Zepherine Towne, of Saratoga Springs, New York. Carl J. attended the 
district school in \'emiillion township and was for four years a student in 
the State Normal at Cedar Falls. Following his graduation he took up the 
profession of teaching which he followed for two years, and then entered 
upon the study of medicine in the State University of Iowa City, being 
graduated with the M. D. degree. He afterward pursued a post-graduate 
course of stud}' in Chicago and then located in Carson, Iowa, where today 
he enjoys a large and growing practice. He was married to Miss Florence 
Flint, of Council Bluffs. Fannie, the only daughter ot the family, was 
bom April 27, 1874, and is now in California. Like her brothers she at- 
tended the district schools and the State Normal at Cedar Falls until grad- 
uated. For nine }ears she was a teacher in the public schools of 
Des Moines, Iowa, and then went to Los Angeles, California, where she 
pursued a four years' course of study in osteopathy. She then practiced 
for a year in New York but because of impaired health returned to 
California. 

Mr. Shaffer was a democrat in politics and his religious faith was in- 
dicated by his membership in rlic Wesley Chapel Methodist Episcopal 
Vol. n— 7 



112 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

church of Vermillion township, to which his widow still belongs. She is 
also a member of the Ladies Aid Society of that church and takes an active 
and helpful interest in the various lines of church work, doing all she can 
to further the cause and to promote the upbuilding of the denomination., 
having been cla.ss leader for nine years. Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer have long 
been held in high esteem here and at his death the former left to his tamily 
the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



ELISHA S. DEXOON. 



Elisha S. De Noon, proprietor of the Appanoose Cafe and one ot the 
most influential, able and successful business men in Centerville, is a native 
son of Appanoose count}^ born October i6, 1859, on a farm in Bellair 
tOM'nship. He is a son of E. S. and Julia Ann (Fonts) De Noon, the for- 
mer a native of Hagerstown, Mar} land, of German and French ancestry. 
The father of our subject had learned the cooper's trade and worked at it 
for some time, eventually, however, abandoning it in favor of teaching, in 
which he engaged for twent}- years. He was a well educated and cul- 
tured man, a wide reader and a deep thinker and was therefore successful 
in his chosen work. He held a certificate issued by the board of education 
in 1837. When he was still a child he left his native state of Maryland 
and went to Ohio, locating in Ashland count}, where he grew to manhood 
and began his independent career. In June, 1846, he came to Appanoose 
county and as a pioneer settler located two miles southwest of Numa, 
where he entered one hundred and twenty acres of land. Upon this prop- 
erty he lived until 1862, when he sold the farm and moved to Lincoln 
township, where he became prominent in business affairs. Later he removed 
to Seymour, Iowa, and helped open the first stock of goods in the first 
general store in that city, clerking in the same establishment for over 
fifteen years. After he came to Bellair township he gradualh" became well 
known in many different lines of activity, serving for twelve years as 
justice of the peace. He was one of the organizers of the first Baptist 
church in Appanoose covmty and was at all times interested in the spread 
of Baptist doctrines. The last years of his life were spent with his chil- 
dren and his death occurred in 1881, in Wayne county, Iowa, at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Blacklidge, who resides two miles 
west of Corydon. During the course of a long, useful and active career 
he left the impress of his marked individuality upon the community affairs 
and his death was felt as a distinct loss to the general interests of this sec- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY liy 

tion ot the state. His wife passed away in Bellair township in March, 
i860. 

Elisha S. De Noon acquired his education in the public schools of 
Lincoln township and in SeAiiiour. Iowa. stud}in^ in the latter city when 
the first graded schools were established. His childhood was spent upon 
his father's farm and he remained at home even after he had 
attained his majority. When he was twenty-five years of age, however, 
he came to Centerville and for man)' years was employed as a clerk, 
securing his first position with the firm of Lloyd &: McCoy. He was 
afterward connected with an establishment owned by Ike Brooks and 
later worked for J. M. W'ilKi-. For four and one-half years he clerked 
in a \\ holesale grocery store conducted by T. R. Riggs & Company but in 
igo8 established himself in business independently. He opened a restau- 
rant on one of the principal streets in Centerville and was very successful 
in its conduct, selling out at a profit after two years to A. Zanning. After 
disposing of his business Mr. De Noon became connected with a well 
known flour house of Kansas City as a traveling salesman and for a num- 
ber of Aears represented their interests throughout all of southwestern 
Iowa. On the 26th of October, 1912, however, he resigned his position 
and opened the Appanoose Cafe in Centerville, having already secured a 
gratifying patronage. Much ot liis success is due to the fact that he 
possesses that executive force and power of control which is necessar\' in 
the management of any large business enterprise, while his strict integrity 
of character and straightforward business methods have also been important 
factors in his prosperity. 

On the 17th of .Ajiril, 1880, Mr. De Noon was united in marriage to 
Miss Rosa A. Campbell, a daughter of Luther M. and Cinderella (Dud- 
ley) Campbell, the former born in Lee county, Iowa, and the latter in 
Ohio. Mrs. De Noon's father is of New England ancestry, his father 
having been a native of Vermont. At an < arly date Luther M. Campbell 
came west to Iowa and took up government land three miles northwest of 
Centerville, upon which h<' established a sawmill. He also did work as 
cabinet-maker, having learned that trade and also that of millwright in 
his youth. For many years he has made his home upon his Iowa farm and 
has now reached the age of seventy years. During the period of his long and 
active career he has been one of the great individual forces in the upbuild- 
ing and development of Apjianoose count)', to which he came as a pioneer. 
His first wife passed away in 1878 and in 1880 Mr. Campbell wedded 
Miss Minnie Sraley. a daughter of Alva Stale)', a farmer and carpenter, 
who formerly made his home just north ot Centervilh-. Mr. and Mrs. 
De Noon became the parents of two children. Clarence E., a window 



114 HISTORY OF yXPPANOOSE COUNTY 

trimmer in North Platte, Nebraska, married Miss Claudie E. Patrick. He 
is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in the Elks and 
in the Modern Woodmen ot America. The other son born to Mr. and 
Mrs. De Noon is Luther E., who is associated with his father in business. 
He is prominent!) connected with the Court of Honor in Centerville. 

Mr. and Mrs. De Noon are devout adherents of the Baptist church 
and are well known in the community in which they reside as people of 
exemplary character and ujjright lives. Mr. De Noon has protessed the 
doctrines of the Baptist church for the past twenty-seven years and during 
that time has made his influence felt in religious circles. Fraternally he 
belongs to Centerville Lodge, No. 3553, M. W. A., and to the Court of 
Honor. His wife also belongs to the latter organization. Mr. De Noon 
gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and takes an intelli- 
gent interest in public affairs, although he has never sought official prefer- 
ment. Centerville numbers him among her most valued residents and the 
respect and esteem in which he is held by his many friends is an indi- 
cation that his life has been at all times honorable, upright and straight- 
forward. 



STEPHEN A. KELLY. 



'At the time of his death Stephen A. Kelly was connected with the coach 
and car department of the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad Company 
at Centerville. He was always a resident of the middle west and pos- 
sessed the enterprising spirit which has been the dominant feature in the 
development and upbuilding of the upper Mississippi vallej-. He was 
born in Hancock county, Illinois, August 30, 1843, and is a son of John 
and Margaret (Bo}d) Kelly, who were natives of Ireland and of Penn- 
sylvania respectively. On crossing the Atlantic to the new world, attracted 
by the broader business opportunities which he believed might be secured 
on this side of the Atlantic, the father made his way to the interior of the 
country, settling in Hancock count), Illinois, in the '30s. There he 
entered land from the government and at once began to turn the sod and 
prepare the tract for cultivation. Throughout his remaining days he car- 
ried on farm work there, his life's labors being ended in death in 1862, 
when tift)-five )ears of age. 

The youthful days of Stephen A. Kelly were passed in Illinois and 
his education was acquired in the district schools. He lived upon the home 
farm, earlv becoming familiar with tlu- duties and labors incident to its 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 115 

development and culrivarion. Attcr his parents died he purchaseti the 
interests of the other heirs in the property and continued the cultivation 
of the fields until November, 1889, when he sold his interests in Illinois 
and came to Centerville, Iowa. Here he entered the emplo)- of what is 
now the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Companj-, in connection 
with the car and coach department, and thus continued throughout his 
remaining days or tor a period of twenty years. His long continuance 
with the company well indicates his efficient workmanship and his fidelity 
to the interests ot those whom he represented. He died in May, 1908, 
after a short illness, leaving Ix-himl him many warm friends. 

It was in October, 187 V tliar Mr. Kelly was united in marriage to 
Miss Amanda M. Riggs, a daughter of William and Amelia Riggs, who 
were natives of West \'irginia. Her father was a farmer by occupation 
and upon his removal to Illinois in 1855 purchased a tract of land in Han- 
cock county, which he cultivated and improved until he was called to his 
final rest, passing away in Januarj', 1883. His wife survived him until 
November, 1900. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelh became the parents ot three children: Chloe, who 
is the wife of Dr. W. B. Miller, of Centerville; Jennie M., who is the 
wife of John B. McNeal, superintendent of the Eg\-pt Coal Company of 
Mystic, Iowa; and P'rank L., who is employed as an engineer on the 
Chicago, Burlington >S: Ouincy Railroad. Mrs. Kelly holds membership 
with the Methodist church but her husband was a member of the Catholic 
chunh. In politics he was a democrat but did not seek nor desire office, 
for other duties and interests always claimed his time and attention. He 
did not seek to figure prominently in an)- public connection but those who 
knew him recognized his genuine worth and entertained for him warm 
regard. 



MORGAN ED\\.UU3.S. 



At different times through an active business life Morgan Edwards 
was engaged in the flour, feed and milling trade and in farming, but 
whatever occupied his attention was sure to claim his energies anti in- 
dustr)- to the utmost, for he was an enterprising man, prom|)ted by laud- 
able ambition in all that he undertook, ami it was only when ill health 
forced him to retire that he put aside business cares. His birth occurred 
in Centerville. Ohio, his death in Centerville, Iowa. Tlis natal day was 
September 1. iS4(). and his [larents were John .\brahain and .Anna 



IK) HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

(Morrisj Edwards, both ot wliom were natives ot Great Britain, the 
tonner born June 16, 1821, and the latter in 1815. Both came to the 
United States in 1838, ami John A. Edwards settled in Gallia county, 
Ohio, where later he wedded Anna Morris. For several years there- 
after they remained residents of the Buckeye state and in 1859 came to 
Iowa, locating in Monroe count) . The lather was a miller by trade and 
met with substantial success in that undertaking, becoming owner ot milling 
properties at Centerville and Moulton in Appanoose county and at Albia 
in Monroe county, remaining in tiuit line of business throughout the rest 
of his days. 

Morgan Edwards was a youth of ten 3ears when his parents came to 
Iowa and acquired the greater part of his education in the schools of Monroe 
county. He there learned the miller's trade of his father and later he 
and his brother engaged in the milling business on their own account at 
Albia, Iowa, operating a mill there until the ill health of Morgan Edwards 
forced him to retire. He then operated a farm, in Appanoose county, 
belonging to his father and took up his abode thereon, giving to it careful 
supervision until 1907, when he became a resident of Centerville and 
established a Hour and teed business. That undertaking claimed his time 
and energies until his health again tailed, when he retired, spending his 
remaining days in Centerville, where he passed away in January, 1911. 
He had made a creditable record as a business man, was energetic and in- 
dustrious, and his honorable dealings were also a potent factor in his 
prosperity. 

On the 17th of February, 1870, Mr. Edwards was united in marriage 
to Miss Frances Ann Clark, who w as born near Albia, Iowa, Februar}' 13, 
1851, a daughter of John and Sarah (Bishop) Clark, the former born 
near Oxford, Massachusetts, December 9, 1817. and the latter at Bedford, 
Lawrence county, Indiana, May 2, 1832. They were married near 
Albia. January 3, 1850, the father having become a resident of Iowa 
in 1841, at which rime he took up his abode in Monroe county. There 
he continued to reside until called to his final rest on the 2d of August, 
1906. His wife survived him for less than a year and died near Center- 
ville, March 5, 1907. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwards became the parents of ten children. Mary 
Gertrude, born November 11, 1871, was married October 10, 1901. to 
Albert A. Stewart, who died March 4, 1902. Ira Evan, born Februarv 9, 
1873, was married February 14, 1900, to Mae Kerchner and died June 
20, 1903. Frederic Arthur, born April 24, 1874, was married December 
24, 1903, to Katherine Cobb and now resides at Mount Ayr, Iowa. John 
Clark, born Marcli 8, 1876. after completing his education in public 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 117 

schools ot low a. worked upon the home t'arni tor his father until he was 
thirty }ears of age, when he came to Centerville and accepted a position 
with the Adams Express Comj)an>-. After acting as driver for a short 
time he was appointed agent and has had charge of the interests of the 
company here continuously since. He was also interested in the flour and 
feed business with his father for a short time and is known as a repre- 
sentative business man of the city, enterprising, progressive and deter- 
mined. He is a valued and popular member of the Elks lodge, the Modern 
Woodmen camp and the Royal Arcanum. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party and he holds membership with the Presby- 
terian church. Grace Ann, horn November 2, 1877, became the wife of 
Ray D. McCauley, April 15. 1896, and rhey reside at Moravia. Kate, 
born October 24. 1879, ^^'^^ married November 13, 1900, to Charles 
Pewthers and they reside in Indianola, Iowa. Charles, born June 15, 
1882, was married in Ma}-, 1906, to Mae Bouse and they reside in Center- 
ville. Martin Clever, born April 29, 1887, was married April 7, 1908, 
to Birdie Turtle and they also live in Centerville. Dora Lynn, born 
January 1;, 1891, is at home. Harry, born December 2, 1892, died 
at birth. Mrs. Edwards resides at No. 508 South Twelfth street with her 
two daughters antl her son, John C. The family has long been well 
known in this city and throughout the county and Mr. Edwards was 
numbered among the men of sterling worth, a well spent and upright 
life gaining for him the high regard, confidence and good-will of all with 
whom he was associated. The years of his business activity brought him 
substantial success and he left to his family not only a comfortable com- 
petence but also the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



JAMES M. ZIMMER. 



James M. Zimmer, long in public office, is filling the position of 
justice of the peace, in which connection his decisions are strictly fair and 
impartial, being based upon both rhe law and the equity in the case. His 
official record has always been commendable by reason of his imtaltering 
hdelitv to duty. Judge Zimmer is a native of Caldwell county, Missouri, 
born April 14, 1841. His father. John H. Zimmer, was born in New 
York anil at an early perioti in the development of Missouri became a 
resident of that state, where he worked at the carpenter's trade for some 
time. He afterward enlisted for service in the Indian war under General 
A. C. Dodge. He 1 aine to Iowa in 1841. when rliis state was still vmder 



118 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

territorial rule, and took up his abode in Davis county. In 1848 he re- 
moved to Appanoose tounry, which was still a tronticr district, the greater 
part of the land being wild and undeveloped, while only here and there 
a little cabin was to be seen showing that the work of civilization and 
improvement had begun. He entered one hundred and sixty acres of 
government land and at once began the arduous task of turning the fur- 
rows and cultivating the fields. In early manhood he had wedded p]liza 
D. Jackson, a native of Monroe county, Ohio, and atter the}- had lived 
upon the Appanoose county farm for two years she was called to her final 
rest in iS^'o. Mr. Zimmer subsequently married again and bought an- 
other farm six miles north of Centerville, which he operated until 1862. 
He then enlisted as a member of Company F, Thirty-seventh Iowa In- 
fantry, known as the Graybeard Regiment, with which he served until the 
close of the war, doing duty mostly at Rock Island, Illinois, in guarding 
prisoners. He then returned to his home, but his health had become 
greatly impaired during his service and eventually resulted in the loss of 
his mind, so that he passed away in the hospital at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, 
in 1875, when seventy-two years of age. 

James M. Zimmer was but eight years of age when he came with his 
parents to Appanoose county, where the greater part of his life has been 
spent. His education was largel}- acquired in the schools here and his 
youthful experiences were those that usually fall to the farm lad. There 
were four sons in the family and they as well as the father all enlisted, 
James M. Zimmer becoming a member of Compan} D. Sixth Iowa In- 
fantry, with which he served for four years, doing active dut\- on many 
a southern battlefield. He was captured in the engagement at Shiloh 
and was held as a prisoner of war in Alabama. 

When victory had crowned the Union arms Mr. Zimmer returned to 
Centerville and for some time was empkned in a printing office, after 
which he engaged in driving stage for a year west of this city. He next 
worked on railroads as a member ot an engineering corps for about three 
years, after which he went to I^nionvillc. Mi-ssouri, where he conducted 
a livery barn for five years. Subsequentl) he was employed in the woods 
of that state for three years and in 1884 he returned to Iowa. Since 
1890 he has almost continuously filled office, having in 1890 been elected 
constable, in which position he was retained by reelection for eight years. 
He was then elected justice of the peace and served for two years, after 
which he was defeated. In 1905 he was once more chosen for the office 
and has served since, presiding in able manner over the justice court. 

On the 30th of May, 1894, Mr. Zimmer was married to Ella Morgan 
Sturdivant, a daughter of Timothy Sturdivanr and Bridget (O'Donneil) 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 119 

Morgan, who were natives of Ireland. The father came to America at 
an early day, settling first in Ohio and subsequently in Missouri, where 
he continued the cultivation of a farm to the latter part of his life. He 
died when ninety years of age and his wife has also passed away. Mr. 
and Mrs. Zimmer occupy a pleasant and attractive home at No. 516 North 
Third street, which he owns, and in addition he is a stockholder in the 
Centerville Interurban Company. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican party, which finds in him an earnest and active worker. He 
belongs to John L. Bashore Post, No. 122, G. A. R., and thus maintains 
pleasant relations with his old army comrades, with whom he delights to 
recall scenes and incidents connected with the war. He is ever as true 
and loyal to his country as when he followed the old flag upon the battle- 
fields of the south, bravely endeavoring to preserve the Union. 



SOL UOSENBAIM. 



Among the men of Centerville who have attained an honorable place 
in business circles because of their ability, shrewdness and dominating 
ambition is Sol Rosenbaum, who is operating a large furniture store in 
the town. He was born in Russia in November, 1870, and is a son of 
Moses and Etta (Rosenbaum) Rosenbaum. both natives of that country. 
In Russia the father was a successful grain dealer but in 1883 emigrated 
to America and settled in Omaha, whence after two years he went to 
What Cheer, Iowa. After four }ears in that city he went to Oskaloosa 
and there worked as a peddler for about seven years. When he came to 
Centerville he followed the same occupation liut after five years went to 
Ottumwa, where he engaged in the shoe business, in which he is still active. 

Sol Rosenbaum acquired his education in Russia and in 1886 came to 
America and joined his parents in What Cheer, Iowa. He accompanied 
them to Oskaloosa and then to Centerville, where he engaged in the second 
hand furniture business. Gradually he eliminated the second hand line 
and now deals exclusively in new goods, handling a modern, complete and 
up-to-date stock. His store is located at 308 North Twelfth street and 
occupies two stories and a basement. In its management Mr. Rosenbaum 
has shown a practical business instinct, which, controlled by his shrewd 
ability and ambition and guided by his high integrity and honesty of pur- 
pose, has won him a large patronage and made him very successful in its 
conduct. 



120 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

On October 25, 1896, Mr. Roscnbauni married Mis^ Rebecca Ritchel, 
a daughter of Max and Rosie (Zetlovski) Ritchel, natives of Russia. 
The father was a farmer in his native countn,- but abandoned this occupa- 
tion after coming to America. He crossed the Atlantic in 1890 and 
located in Centerville, where he was active in the grocery business until 
his retirement in 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Rosenbaum have three children: 
John Lewis, aged fifteen; Harrj, fourteen years of age; and Mildred, 
aged five. Mr. Rosenbaum has in the course of years been drawn into 
important relations with the general business life of Centerville and is 
one of the best known men in business circles of the city. He owns an 
attractive home at 312 East Wall street and two other fine residences, 
which he rents out. He is also a stockholder in the Centerville Gypsum 
Company and his aid can always be relied upon in the promotion of worthy 
enterprises. He belongs to the Knights of the Maccabees but beAond this 
has no fraternal affiliations. He holds membership in the B'nai Israel 
congregation and is loyal in his adherence to the faith of his fathers. His 
political allegiance is gi\ en to the republican party but he is never active 
in official life. His success has been accomplished by the sheer force of 
hard work and not even the most envious could begrudge it to him. so 
worthih- has it been won and so well used. 



GEORGE S. PRATT. 



With the early development and improvement of Iowa George S. 
Pratt was closely associated. He was one of the stage proprietors of 
pioneer times and later a hotel proprietor in Centerville. He watched 
with interest the progress of events resulting in the transformation of the 
country and at all times bore his share in the work of progress and im- 
provement. He was bom in New York. August 17. 1822, a son of John 
and Martha Pratt. His education was acquired in the Empire state and 
he drove a stage there from the age of twelve years until he came to 
Iowa with his parents in 1849. The family home was established in 
Jefferson count)- where the father engaged in business and there George 
S. Pratt again became a stage driver, being thus employed in the southern 
part of Iowa for a number of years or until the building of the railroad. 
He then turned his attention to the hotel business in Centerville. con- 
ducting a hostelry for a number of years and running a liver)' stable in 
conjunction therewith, after which he went to Nebraska and carried on 
farming for a few jears. In all that he undcrttxik he met with pros- 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 121 

{verity, owing to capable management and wise direction of his in- 
terests. Upon his return from Nebraska to Centerville he retired from 
business life, spending his remaining days in the enjoyment of well 
earned rest. 

On the 1st of January, 1895, occurred the marriage of Mr. Pratt and 
^liss Belle Fischer, a daughter of Isaac and .\raminta (Fisher) Fischer, 
the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Ohio. Mrs. Pratt 
was born in Louisville. Kentucky, .\ugust 4. 1853, and came to Iowa 
with her mother in 18^7. They went to live on a farm with her grand- 
father near Cor}don. Iowa. Her father, who was a physician, removed 
to Ohio in early life and there practiced medicine until his death, which 
occurred in l8;>. His widow long survived him. passing away August 24, 
1891. 

The death of Mr. Pratt occurred November 7. 1906, and was the 
occasion of deep regret to many friends. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt had no 
children but by a former marriage Mr. Pratt had one son. .\lfred. who 
resides in Centerville. where he was formerly engaged in the hotel business. 
Mrs. Pratt also reared her sister's son. who was left motherless when but 
ten days old. His name is George Williams and he is now attending 
high school in Center\ille.at the age of seventeen years. 

Mr. Pratt was one of the oldest members of the Masonic fraternity 
in Centerville and was always loyal to the teachings and tenets of the 
craft. He belonged also to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
His political allegiance was given to the democratic part}-, but the honors 
and emoluments of office had no attraction for him. He held to the 
religious faith of the Christian church while his wife is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. His was an upright, honorable life, in which he 
held to high principles of manhood and citizenship and thus won the 
esteem and kindly regard of those with whom he came in contact. Mrs. 
Pratt owns and occupies a pleasant home at No. ;2, North Ninth street 
and many friends enjoy its hospitality. 



THOMAS CROXTON. 



Thomas Croxton is conducting a hotel and boarding house at Center- 
ville. continuing in the business for the past three years. He was bom 
in Ohio. January IQ. 1852, a s<in of Thom.x>^ and Lydia ( Gaston ) Croxton, 
who were also natives of the Buckeye state. The father devoted his 
life to farming, which he carried on until his death, which occurred a 



122 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

few months before the birth of his son Thomas. The mother survived 
until January, 1888. She came to Appanoose county in 1854 and re- 
sided here throughout her remaining days, being well known in pioneer 
times and in the later period of development here. 

Thomas Croxton was but two years old when brought b)- his mother 
to Iowa, and in this county was reared and educated. When old enough 
to earn his living he started out for himself as a farmer, renting a tract 
of land which he cultivated for a few years. He then bought and im- 
proved eighty acres which he also operated for some }ears, and on selling 
out he once more rented land. His time and energies were given to farm- 
ing until igo8, when he removed to Piano, this county, and for one year 
was engaged in the livery business there. He next returned to Centerville 
where he opened a hotel and boarding house on West State street. For 
more, than three } ears he has now conducted the business and throughout 
the entire period has been accorded a liberal and well merited patronage. 
He makes a close study of the comforts and wishes of his patrons and 
thus has always been able to have his house well filled. 

On the 9th of March, 1876, Mr. Croxton was married to Miss Sophia 
J. Wales, a daughter of John and Susan (Wales) Wales, who were 
natives of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Croxton had six children, as follows: 
Israel B., a farmer of Appanoose county; Walter, who makes his home at 
Piano; Blanche, the wife of George Ware, of Centerville; Lydia I., who 
married Henry Chuesberg; and two, who passed awav in infanc\-. 

Mr. Croxton votes with the republican party and keeps in touch with 
the questions and issues of the day, but does not seek nor desire office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business undertakings. 
Practically his entire life has been spent in this county where for almost 
six decades he has been a witness of the growth and changes which have 
transformed it from a wild frontier region into a populous and prosperous 
section. He can relate many interesting incidents of the early days and 
as one of the pioneer residents of Appanoose county he well deserves 
mention in this volume. 



MRS. MELISSA A. HENRY. 

Mrs. Melissa A. Henry, of Centerville, was born near \A'heeling, West 
Virginia, March 8, 1844, when that state was still a part of the Old 
Dominion. Her parents were Samuel and Mildred (Mitchell) Haught, 
the former a native of West Virginia and the hitter of Ohio. The father 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 123 

was both a miller and wagon maker by trade and his activities in industrial 
lines included blacksmithing and carpentering. He followed those dif- 
ferent pursuits in West \'irginia for a number of years but became a 
resident of Appanoose county during the pioneer epoch in its history and 
purchased two hundred and forty acres of land in Johns township. This 
he at once began to clear, cultivate and improve, continuing its operation 
up to the time of his death, which occurred on the 9th of March, 1897. 
His widow long survived him and died in 1912. 

Their daughter, Melissa A., spent her girlhood days in her native state 
and began her education in the public schools there, but in her girlhood 
she had the mistortune to have her feet frozen and this forced her to 
remain at home tor three years, passing the time largely in stud)'. She 
is therefore a self-educated woman. She remained with her parents up 
to the time of her first marriage, which occurred in 1S61. when >hf became 
the wife of Jacob Cumberledge, a son of George and P>lizaberh (Lance) 
Cumberledge, who were natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Cumberledge was 
a farmer by occupation and in 1872 removed with his family to Ap- 
panoose county, where he invested in two hundred and forty acres of land 
in Johns township. He immediately began the development and further 
improvement ot this place and was soon recognized as one of the enter- 
prising, progressive and highly respected farmers of the locality. To his 
original purchase he added another tract of one hundred and thirty acres 
and continued the cultivation of all of his land up to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1894. The only interruption to his business career came 
at the time of the Civil war, when he enlisted as a member of the One 
Hundred and Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania Infantrj-, serving for nine 
months. He afterward became a member of the Grand Army post, thus 
maintaining pleasant relations with his comrades who wore the blue uni- 
form at the darkest hour in the history of the country. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cumberledge became the parents of nine children: 
Alice, who is deceased; Samuel G., a druggist of Oklahoma: Mary E., 
uho is the wife of Ed Harrington and resides in I'tah: Calista, who 
makes her home in Webb City, Missouri; Effie, the wife of William Elgin, 
ot Walnut. Iowa: George F., a resident of Oklahoma: \'aliska and Leona. 
both ot whom have passed away; and Isora, who is the wife of J. E. 
Moore, a fanner of Ajipanoose county. The death of the husband and 
father in 1894 ^^'^s the occasion of deep regret nor only to his immediate 
family but also to many friends, for he lived an upright and honorable 
life, was straightforward and progressive in business, loyal in citizenship 
and possessed many [ileasing social qualities. 



124 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

After the death of her first husband Mrs. Cumberledge became the 
wife of Absalom Henry, who is now in Nebraska. She owns and occupies 
a pleasant residence at No. 802 West Washington street and also owns 
another residence property at No. 724 West Washington street. Her long 
residence in the county has made her widely known and she has many 
warm friends who esteem her highly for her sterling worth. 



H. CLAY ADAMS. 



H. Clay Adams, partner in the Red Cross Drug Compan}- and well 
known in Centerville as an active, able and progressive business man, is 
a native of Iowa, born in Sigourney, March 4, 1882. His parents were 
Henry C. and Sophronia (Minteer) Adams, both natives of Iowa, the 
father having the distinction of being the lirst white male child born in 
Washington county. He grew to maturity in that section and for a num- 
ber of years worked at the blacksmith's trade. Later he was elected 
sheriff of Keokuk county and served with ability and conscientiousness 
from 1878 to 1882. Under President Cleveland's administration he was 
appointed to the Indian service and was stationed first at Fort Defiance, 
Arizona, and later at Fruitland, New Mexico. He was an honored vet- 
eran of the Civil war, having served through four years of that conflict 
as a member of Company D, Thirteenth Iowa Infantry. His death 
occurred in New Mexico in 1893, in which year he was accidentally 
drowned. His wife survived him two years, dying in 1895. 

H. Clay Adams acquired his education in the public schools of Sig- 
ourney and when he laid aside his books secured employment in a drug 
store and continued in this position for three years, registering in 1902. 
In 1903 he came to Centerville and entered into partnership with A. J. 
W^eller, under the name of the Red Cross Drug Compan}'. The enterprise 
which thej- conduct is run along progressive and modern business lines and 
the success of the undertaking is attributable in no small measure to Mr. 
Adams, whose careful and S)'stematic methods and keen business discern- 
ment constitute an important element in the attainment of prosperity. 
Since coming to Centerville Mr. Adams has made some judicious invest- 
ments and has now important realt}' holdings, including his fine home at 
704 West Washington street and other valuable residence propert}-. He 
is a stockholder in the Centerville Savings Bank. 

On the 20th of April, 1904, Mr. .Adams married Miss Effie M. Wendt, 
a daughter of David O. and Emma (Heiscr) Wendt. natives of Pcnn- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 125 

sylvania. The father followed farming in that state for a short time but 
came to Sigourney in early times and bought land, which he has operated 
since that time. Mr. and Mrs. Adams became the parents of a son, Henry 
C, who is six years of age. Mrs. Adams is a devout member of the Meth- 
odist church and fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Royal Arcanum. He gives his political 
allegiance to the democratic party but never seeks public office. Early 
realizing that persistent labor is the basis of all honorable success, he has 
put forth diligent effort and has secured a gratifying trade by reason of his 
honest dealing and his sincere desire to please his patrons. 



WILLIAM B. HAYS, LL. B. 

William B. Hays, one of the younger and popular members of the 
legal traternity in .Appanoose county, has won an enviable reputation in 
professional circles as a practicing attorney of Centerville. His birth 
occurred in Guernsey county, Ohio, on the 15th of April, 1875, his parents 
being Harry H. and Mary (Bo\d) Hays, who are likewise natives of that 
county. The father comes of Yankee stock, while the mother is a lad}- of 
Scotch-Irish lineage. They were married in Guernsey county, Ohio, and 
are living on a farm there, Harry H. Hays being a farmer and stock dealer. 
The paternal great-grandfather of our subject, was a soldier in the Rev- 
olutionary war and suffered with the patriots at Valley Forge. 

William B. Hays, who was the first born in a family of three sons and 
two daughters, obtained his early education in the district school of his 
home locality and subsequently attended the high school at Martins Ferrv, 
Ohio, being graduated therefrom in 1895. During the following ten 
years he taught school in order to defray the expenses of a college course, 
teaching for one year in the district school of his home locality, for a sim- 
ilar period in district school of Wayne county, Iowa, and for eight years 
in the high school at Corjdon, Iowa. In the summer months he had 
attended summer sessions at Drake I'nivcrsity of Des Moines and at 
Central University of Pella, Iowa. In the fall of 1907 he left the 
Corydon high school as principal and entered the law department of the 
University of Iowa, being graduated therefrom with honors in 1910 and 
winning the degree of LL. B. Coming to Centerville, lie opened an office 
here and has since been successfully engaged in the practice of his chosen 
profession. The /eal with which he has devoted his energies to his pro- 
fession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his clients and an 



126 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases, have 
brought him a large business and made him very successful in its con- 
duct. He is a member of the Appanoose County Bar Association. 

In 1901 Mr. Hays was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle Lowe, a 
daughter of John and Ann Lowe. Ihe father was a native of Ken- 
tucky and an agriculturist by occupation. He gave his political allegiance 
to the democracy until the outbreak ot the Civil war and then joined the 
party of Lincoln, supporting its men and measures until his demise, which 
occurred at Corydon, Iowa, in 1903. His widow, who is a native of Mis- 
souri and comes ot Yankee stock, now resides in Centerville witli her 
daughter, Mrs. Hays. 

Mr. Hays is a stanch democrat in politics and in 1912 was made the 
candidate of his party for the office of county attorney. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Centerville, to which his wife also belongs. They enjoy the warm regard 
of many friends and the hospitality of their own home is greatly appre- 
ciated by those who know them. 



GEORGE W. DEAN. 



A man lo}al in friendship, faithful in citizenship and honorable in 
all business relations passed away when George W. Dean was called to 
his final rest in Unionville, February 28, 1909. He had then reached the 
age of nearly seventy years and practically his entire active life was spent 
in Appanoose county, so that he was among its oldest residents, having 
been a witness of its growth and development and an important factor 
in it. As a successful farmer and the owner of the Peerless Hereford Stock 
Farm he made his influence felt upon the advancement of two of the most 
important industries in the state and in all work of progress he was an _ 
active particij)ant, his honorable, upright and well spent life gaining him 
the unqualified respect and esteem of his fellowmen. Mr. Dean was born 
in Schuyler county, Missouri, Ma) 24, 1839, a son of Levin Dean, one of 
the pioneer settlers in Appanoose county. The father was a native of 
Kentuck}- and in that state was reared and educated, removing as a young 
man to Howard county, Missouri, where he married Miss Missouri Ann 
Evans, also a native of Kentuck)-. In 1846 they came to Appanoose 
county, casting their lots with the pioneers who were reclaiming the wild 
land for farming purposes. With characteristic energy and resolute pur- 
pose the lather ot our subject opened up a new farm just west of I'nion- 




MR. AND MRS. GEORGE W. DEAN 




l,i:VIN KHAN 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 131 

ville and >teadil} carried torvvard the work ot its development and im- 
provement until his death, making it finally one ot the most valuable 
properties in the state. His wife survived him tor many years, dying in 
Moravia at the advanced age of eighty-seven. In their family were seven 
children: Fllizabeth, deceased; Jesse, who died in the Rebel prison at 
Tyler, Texas, during the Civil war; Sarah and George W., our subject, 
both of whom have passed away; Mrs. Mary Harn, of Glendale, Cali- 
fornia; Mrs. Martha McCaule)-, deceased; and Erastus, who is living 
in Unionville. Levin Dean was one of the prominent figures in local 
whig politics during pioneer times and after the birth of the republican 
party gave active support to its principles and policies. He and his wife 
were devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

George \V. Dean spent his childhood upon his father's farm in Udell 
township and continued to assist in its operation tor many years. In a 
little log schoolhouse he began his education which he sup[)lementcd and 
broadened by wide and careful reading, deep thinking, experience and 
observation. In .\ugust, 1862, he offered his services to his country as a 
member of Company C, Thirt}-sixth Iowa \'oluntcer Infantry, and went 
immediately to the front. He was wounded in the engagement at .Marks 
Mills and taken pri.soner and held by the Rebels until September, 1865, 
when he was honorably discharged from the service, holding the rank 
of sergeant. Previous to his enlistment Mr. Dean, in i860, had located 
on a farm which had been given to him and his wife by her father. 
After the war, however, he settled on eighty acres he had bought himself 
and continued to reside upon this property until 1Q06. He added to his 
holdings trom time to time and finally acquired two hundred and twenty 
acres of well improved land, one mile south of the town, and became 
widely known as one of the most successful farmers in the state. Early 
in his career he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, R. M. Hicks, 
mnv ot Centerville, and began the breeding of registered Hereford cattle, 
afterward becoming one of the most prominent representatives in this line 
of work in Iowa. When Mr. Hicks removed to Centerville Mr. Dean pur- 
cha.sed his interests and conducted the enterprise alone. His property 
was called the Peerless Hereford Stock Farm and his herd of from sixty 
to one hundred high-grade animals was known all over the state and rep- 
resented standard quality. Mr. Dean sold for breeding inirposes alone. 
Later he took his son, Emil, into partnership with him and in k)o6 turned 
over to him the farm and moved into I'nionvillc, where he died on the 
28th of Februar)-, 1909. 

On January 1 i, i860, Mr. Dean was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet C. Baldridge, a native of T(nnc.s.see, and a daughter of \V. C. and 



132 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Harriet Jane (Miller) Baldridge, who came to Iowa in pioneer times, 
settling in Appanoose county, five miles west of Unionville, in 1849. 
There the father bou^'ht a farm which he afterward sold and moved to 
the vicinity of Iconium, where he and his family resided tor some time. 
Later he returned and purchased property near his original location and 
there remained until his death in 1867, when he was forty-seven jears 
of age. He was a stanch democrat and active in his adherence to the 
partys' principles. His religious views were in accordance with the doc- 
trines of the Methodist Episcopal church. After his death Mrs. Bald- 
ridge married William Miller and they continued to reside upon the farm 
for a number of years, Mr. Miller finally retiring and moving to Union- 
ville, where his death occurreil. His widow survives and has reached 
the age of eighty-seven. Mr. and Mrs. Dean became the parents of 
eight children. William F., the eldest, is a physician and surgeon in 
Osceola, Iowa. He married Miss Rachel Smith and after her death 
wedded Mrs. Jossie Dukes, who had one child, Marie, by her former 
husband. Maggie J. is the wife of J. C. Campbell, of Hastings, Nebraska, 
who is employed in a lumberyard at that place. Ralph L. died at the 
age of eight years. Ella D. is the wife of Jacob B. Smith, a farmer and 
rural mail carrier of Udell township. They have three children, .-Mta, 
Dean and Dwight L. Arietta married Henry E. Morrison, of Topeka, 
Kansas, and both are deceased. The}- had two children, Paul B.. who is 
married, and Mildred, both residing in Topeka. Earl M. is a graduate of 
the Iowa Wesleyan College at Mount Pleasant. He is residing at present 
in the vicinity of Nyssa, Oregon, where he owns and operates a large ranch. 
He married Miss Stella Hale, of Kansas City, and they have one child, 
Dorothy. Emil E. attended the State Agricultural College at .\mes, Iowa, 
and is now residing in Payette, Idaho, where he owns and operates a fruit 
farm. He married Miss Mattie Allen and they have one daughter. Mar- 
garet. Lucile D., who studied music in the Iowa Wesleyan College, is 
the wife of A. M. Johnston, a fruit grower of Payette. Idaho, and they 
have one son, George Finley. 

In his wife Mr. Dean found a worth}- helpmate who at all times has 
proven a blessing to the household and in an important wa}-, by her 
counsel and wise management, has forwarded the best interests of the 
family. She and her children are devout members of the Methodist Epi.s- 
copal church of ITnionville and for many years she has taught in the 
Sunday school. Her mother ami her daughter are also active in this work 
and four generations of the family are today factors in the spread of 
Methodist Episcopal doctrines in this section. Mr. Dean also gave devoted 
adherence to this religion, accepting its principles as one of the funda- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 133 

mental beliefs of his life and basing his actions vipon his faith. He was 
a stanch republican antl from the time he cast his first vote for Abraham 
Lincoln gave helpful and progressive sup[)ort to its principles and policies. 
Mr. Dean was a charter member of the Masonic lotfgc and for nine years 
.served as worthy patron of the Order of the Eastern Star. He was one 
of the oldest residents in this section of Iowa and was continuously con- 
nected with its development and advancement, watched its progress from 
pioneer times and took a leading part in all that [icrtained to the general 
good. 



JACOB B. SMITH. 



Jacob B. Smith, the owner of an excellent farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres on section 4, I'dell township, has for the past six )ears served 
as a mail carrier on R. F. D. Route No. 2 out of Unionville. His birth 
occurred on Soap creek, Davis county, Iowa, on the 6th of June, 1864, 
his parents being Paris S. and Nancy Jane (Jones) Smith, who are natives 
of Ohio and ^'irginia respectively. The paternal grandfather of our sub- 
ject was of Dutch descent and a native of Philadeljihia. Coming to Iowa, 
Paris S. Smith took up his abode near Bloomfield, Davis county, where he 
purchased land and carried on general agricultural pursuits until the time 
of his retirement in 1902, when he removed to Blakesburg. He has now 
attained the venerable age of eight}-four Aears, while his wife is eighty 
years of age. On the 1st of April, 1911, at Blakesburg, they celebrated 
their sixtieth wedding anniversary. 

Jacob B. Smith obtained his early education in the district schools of 
his native county, later attended the high school at Bloomfield ami sub- 
sequently pursued a course of study in the normal school at that filace. 
He then followed the profession of teaching for two years and on the 
expiration of that period took up a homestead in Rawlins county, Kansas, 
where he resided for one year. Returning to this state, he was here 
married and then took his bride to Kansas, where he remained tor five 
years and proved up his claim. After again returning to Iowa he settled 
in Appanoose county and for twelve years devoted his attention to the 
operation of rented farms west of Unionville. In 1906 he sold his Kans;*.!!. 
claim and purchased and locatcti on his present farm of one humircil 
and twenty acres which lies just south of ITnionville. He leaver the 
active management of the property to his sons, his time having been largely 
occupied during the past six years by his duties as a mail carrier on R. V. 



134 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

D. Route No. 2 out of Unionville. Mr. Smith and his son Dwight carry 
on general farming ami breed registered Hereford cattle from the Peer- 
less herd of Herefords raised and bred in this county for years by his 
father-in-law, George W. Dean. 

On the 7th of January, 188^, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to .Miss 
Ella Dean, her father being George \\\ Dean, a farmer and stockman of 
Udell township, who is deceased and a sketch of whom appears on another 
page of this volume. Mr. antl Mrs. Smith lune three children, Alta L., 
Dean and Dwight L. 

Politically Mr. Smith is a republican. He is widely recognized as a 
public-spirited and progressive citizen. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Masons and the Modern Woodmen of America at Unionville, while 
he and his wife and daughter are all members of the Order of the Eastern 
Star at that place. Both Mr. and Mrs. Smith and their children belong 
to the Methodist Episcopal church at Unionville, Mrs. Smith and her 
daughter Alta forming the younger half of the four generations that are 
active workers in that church. The life of Mr. Smith has been one of 
continuous activity, characterized by close application, untiring persever- 
ance and well directed effort, and success has come to him in substantial 
measure. 



WILLIAM H. BROW N. 



One of the well known and highly esteemed residents of Centerville is 
William H. Brown, who since igoo has been connected with the store 
of M. B. Mating. He was born in Ogle county, Illinois, December 12, 
1853, and is a son of David and Louisa (Brooks) Brown, the former a 
native of Indiana and the latter of Ohio. The father was a carpenter by 
trade and in the '40s went to Ogle count}-, where he was connected with 
building operations until 1899. He then removed with his familv to 
Kansas when it was yet a territory and there worked at his trade in a 
town called Black Jack, receiving fifty cents per day for his labor. After 
two years they were driven out b}- the Indians and the famine, Mr. Brown 
trading his homestead of one hundred and sixty acres for a team of horses, 
harness and wagon, with which he traveled to Missouri. That was in 
the spring of i860. Soon afterward he offered his services to the gov- 
ernment as a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting in Companj- D, 1 wenty- 
second Missouri Cavalry, with which he remained for four and one-half 
years, or until victory crowned the Union arms. He then returned to 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 135 

Missouri, purchased a home and worked at his trade a part of the time 
while the remainder of his time was devoted to general agricultural pur- 
suits. He cultivated rented land in addition to his forty acre tract and 
for a number of years he successfully carried on farming in that state. 
In 1895, however, he came to Mystic, Appanoose county, where he lived 
retired until his death, which occurred in April, 1899, when he was seven- 
ty-live )ears of age, for he was born on the 9th ot February, 1824. His 
wife, who was born January 10, 1823, passed away April 21, 1885. 

William H. Brown was reared ami educated in Missouri and wlun 
seventeen years of age began earning his living as a farm hand, in which 
capacit} he was employed for two )ears. He was then married and began 
his domestic life upon a rented farm in Appanoose count)', to which he 
had removed in 1872. He carried on general agricultural pursuits here 
for twelve years and then removed to Mystic, where he licgan mining 
coal, continuing in that business for about hve years. Later he served a 
four years' apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, at which he afterward 
worked for about three years, when he returned to the mines, this time 
as a pit carpenter. He was thus engaged at Rathbun tor tour \ears, after 
which he removed to Centerville in 1900 and entered into his present 
business connection. 

Mr. Brown was married on the 1st of December, 1873, to Miss Louisa 
J. O'Neil, a daughter of George W. and Corellia Ann (Potteroff) O'Neil. 
The father, who followed farming in Appanoose county during the greater 
part of his life, died in 1907, while the mother passed away in 1890. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown have been born seven children: John F.. who was 
born February 19, 187^, and is engaged in farming in South Dakota: 
Mona A., born November 24, 1876; Lyda .\., born NLirch 11. 187S: 
Laura E., born May 15, 1881 ; George VV., born March 23, 1883; Thomas 
C, born in September, 1884; and Mar}-, born .\ugust 11, 1887. The 
wife and mother [xissed away in 1889 after a two }ears' illness and on 
the 14th of January, 1893, ^^'"- Brown was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Mary L. Mclntyre, a daughter of Alfred and Eliz:x- 
beth E. (Gillespie) Mclnt\re, natives of Indiana. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and at an early period in the development ot Monroe 
county, Iowa, cast in his lot with its i)ioneer settlers and there he cultivated 
a farm imtil 1866, when he came to Apjianoose count), purchasing forty 
acres of land which he began to develop and improve, giving his attention 
to its cultivation since. Most of the time he has also rented other laml. 
He is living on the farm, at the age of eighty years, and his wife is seventy- 
nine years of age. By the .second marriage of NFr. Brown there were 
two children: Eiiirh I., who was born .August 17. 189^: and Ernest C. 



136 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

who was born September 2, 1898, and lived only twelve da)s. Mrs. 
Brown is a native of Monroe county, Iowa, born November 3, i860. .The 
family residence, a comfortable home at No. 904 West State street, is 
proverbial for its warm-hearted hospitality and good cheer. Mr. Brown 
served as road commissioner of Lincoln township and while at Rathbun 
was for four years a member of the school board. He has always been 
actively interested in matters relating to the public weltare and gives 
hearty and helpful aid to manj' movements for the general good. Politi- 
cally he is a democrat, and his religious faith is that of the Methotlist 
church. To his profession he is always loyal and his has been an hon- 
orable, upright life, commending him to the good-will ot all who know 
him. 



SAMUEL P. HAYS. 



Farming and bookkeeping occupied the attention of Samuel P. Hays 
during his active business life and his was a well-earned success gained 
through honorable methods and unfaltering enterprise. He was one of 
the worthy citizens that the Keystone state furnished to Iowa, for his birth 
occurred near Paris, Pennsylvania, January 31, 1844, his parents being 
Davis and Martha (Campbell) Hays, both of whom were natives of Y'lr- 
ginia. In the schools of his native city the son pursued his education until 
necessity forced him to make his own wa}- in the world owing to his 
father's failure in business, leaving the family in straitened circumstances, 
so that he had to provide for his own support. He attended school in the 
winter months, eagerly availing himself ot the opportunity' to acquire 
an education and worked out in the summer seasons. When nineteen 
years of age he went to California, where for seven }ears he worked in 
the gold mines. He traveled by the water route to the Pacific coast and 
after a long journey sought success in the gold fields. He met with 
a gratifying measure of prosperit}-, earning the money that enabled him 
eventually to purchase his laml in Appanoose count} . For seven jears he 
continued upon the coast and then returned to his native state. In 1876 
he came to Iowa, where he invested his savings in land, becoming owner of 
one hundred and forty acres in Appanoose county, two and a half miles 
east of Centerville. Upon that place he resided until 1894, when he 
took up his abode in the county seat. He had carefully tilled and cul- 
tivated his fields, making the place very productive and to his original 
holdings he had added until within the boundaries of his farm were com- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 137 

prised two liundred and twenty acres of land. On his removal to the 
city he rented the farm and thus materially added to his income. On 
taking up his abode in Centerville he accepted the position of botikkeeper 
in the Wells & Bradley Mills, there continuing until 1902. The remain- 
ing three }ears of his life were spent in quiet retirement and he passed away 
on the 19th of April, 1905. 

Mr. Ha)s was devoted to the welfare and happiness of his family 
and found his greatest pleasure in ministering to their comfort. In Octo- 
ber, 1876, he wedded Wilhelmina Campbell, a daughter of Alexander 
and Martha Campbell, both of whom were natives of Virginia. The father 
made farming his life work and in the "60s arrived in Appanoose county, 
Iowa, purchasing land a mile and a half east of Centerville. There he 
and his wife lived imtil called to the home beyond and were numbered 
among the worthj- and highly respected farming people of the community. 
The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hays was celebrated in Chariton, Iowa, 
and to them were born two children, Martha and Mary, the latter at home 
with her mother. The elder daughter is the wife of John L. Wilson, 
a nurseryman and lumber dealer of Centerville and they have two chil- 
dren: Mabel, six years of age, attending Central school; and Samuel Hays 
Wilson, five years of age. 

Mr. Ha)s voted with the republican party and was ever loyal to its 
teachings and its purposes, feeling that its platform contained the best 
elements of good government. In early life he was a member of the 
United Presbyterian church and later became a member of the Presby- 
terian church at Centerville, to which his widow now belongs. In both 
he served as elder. He lived an honorable, upright, Christian life, at all 
times consistent, his actions being ever guided by his Christian belief. So 
high were his ideals and motives and so honorable his actions that he com- 
manded the regard and confidence of all wlio knew him and no resident 
of Centerville was more justly honored and esteemed. 



JAMES WILCOX. 



James Wilcox is actively and successfully identified with the business 
interests of Unionville as proprietor of a large livery stable and is justly 
accounted one of the leading business men of the town. He is a native 
son of Iowa, born at P<-iia, Marion county, September 12, 186^, his par- 
ents being John and Sarah (Masters) Wilcox, the former a native of 
New York and the latter of Ohio. The father of our subject was left 



138 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

an or})han at an early age and was reared b\- a family in New York. In 
Indiana his marriage occurred and afterward he removed to Illinois, where 
for a number of years he engaged in farming. He came to Iowa in the 
early '60s, locating on land in Marion count}-, and from there went to 
Missouri, where he remained until his death, which occurred on the 14th 
of August, 1893. The mother of our subject makes her home with her 
son Philip, who is a well known farmer in Appanoose county. 

James Wilcox acquired his education in the public schools of Prince- 
ton, Missouri. He remained at home until he was twenty-one years of 
age, at which time he began his independent career, renting a farm which 
he improved and developed tor a number of jcars. Later, however, he 
purchased hft)- acres of land in Union township and moved upon his 
property which some time afterward he sold and moved into Unionville, 
having determined to devote his time to business pursuits. He spent 
about twelve years dealing in timber but in igio purchased the livery 
stable belonging to Frank Neff and this enterprise he has since conducted, 
his energy and ability being rewarded by a patronage which is constantly 
increasing in volume and importance. 

In 1887 Mr. Wilcox was united in marriage to Miss Delithia May 
Edison, a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Cooper) Edison, both natives 
of Quincy, Illinois, and of English ancestry. The father was a success- 
ful farmer and an honored veteran of the Civil war. His marriage 
occurred in Illinois and afterward he moved with his wife to Mercer 
county, Missouri, and from there to Grund}- count}, Kansas. Mrs. Jacob 
Edison passed away in the latter state and after her death her husband 
returned to Mercer county, where he is still residing. He was later 
united in marriage to Miss Mar} A. Br}anf. who passed aw^n . ami in 
1911 his third marriage occurred. Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox have become 
the parents of six children: Roy, who was born in December. 1887, and 
who is engaged in farming in Aji])anoose count} ; Bertha, who was born 
May 13, i88c), teaching in this county: James Ray. born April ig. 1H92; 
Ralph E., whose birth occurred on the 29th of September, 1894. and who 
graduated from the Unionville high school in 1912: Nina Gretchen. who 
was born January 1, 1901, and who is attending school; and Greta Mar- 
garet, born August 25, 1911. 

Mr. Wilcox gives a stanch allegiance to the republican part} and has 
held various township offices, and for several years was a member of the 
school board. However, he never seeks political preferment, although 
he is a most loyal and public-spirited citizen, giving active and hearty 
support to public measures in whicli he believes. He belongs to Yeomen 
lodge of Unionville, and with his wife attends the Methodist Episcopal 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 139 

church. His salient characteristics are such as have gained him the regard 
and good-will ot all with whom he has been associated through either 
business or social relations and he is justly entitled to a foremost place 
among the successful and representative men of Unionville. 



JOSEPH W. CAL\'ERT. 



Joseph W. Calvert has devoted much of his life to railway service and 
for eighteen years has been station agent at Mystic where he is regarded 
as a courteous and obliging official. He was born in Darlington, Lafay- 
ette county, Wisconsin, December 13, 1858, and is a son ot John and 
Lavinia (Chicken) Calvert. The father was a native of Durham county, 
England, born March 28, 1822, and rht- mother's birth occurred 
in Devonshire, England, in 1829. Crossing the Atlantic John Cal- 
vert became a resident of Galena, Illinois, when twenty-three years 
of age. At New Diggings, Lafayette county, Wisconsin, he formed the 
acquaintance of Lavinia Chicken who when sixteen years of age came to 
the United States with her parents with Chicago as their destination. 
They went from that city to Shullsburg, Wisconsin, and in the latter city 
the acquaintance was formed which resulted in marriage at Galena, Illi- 
nois, on the 4th of July, 1847. Mr. Calvert was first employed in a 
tannery at Galena, Illinois, spending a year in the service of the father 
of U. S. Grant. He afterward worked in the lead mines during the early 
development of mining interests at New Diggings. In his prospecting 
he was successful and through his efforts in the Galena fields he accumu- 
lated enough to purchase a farm in Willow Springs township, Lafayette 
county, Wisconsin. He made his home upon that place until the death 
of his wife in 1902, after which he removed to the city of Darlington, 
Wisconsin, where he spent his remaining days, passing awa)- Januar)' 7, 
1909. After he ceased his work in the mines his attention was given 
exclusively to the development and improvement of a farm in a new 
countr)-. This necessitated his meeting many hardships and privations 
but he prospered in his undertaking with the result that his place became 
one of the valuable farm properties of the county. He was actively 
interested in the political situation of the state and aided in the election 
of Dewey as the first governor. He Ik Kl ro an independent course in 
politics, having supported candidates whom he thought best qualified for 
office whether they were affiliated with the democratic or republican |)art\'. 
He held membership in the Episcopal church and was one of its earnest 



140 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

workers, unfaltering in his efforts to promote its growth and extend its 
influence. Unto him and his wife were born eight children: Sarah A., 
living in Darlington, Wisconsin; John H., of Whitewater, Wisconsin; 
Robert C, of Lucerne, Missouri; Hannah A., who died at the age of five 
years; Joseph W., of this review; Mrs. Ella E. Tighe, a widow living 
in Darlington, Wisconsin; P>emont A., who is occupying the old home- 
stead near Darlington; and Prudence E., the wife of William Godfrey, 
a prosperous farmer living near Darlington. 

Joseph W. Calvert remained with his parents until seventeen years 
of age, spending his youth in the usual manner of farm lads, his summer 
months being devoted to the work of the fields and the winter seasons to 
the acquirement of an education in the district school. Desirous, how- 
ever, of enjoying better educational opportunities he was for three years, 
between the ages of seventeen and twenty years, a student in the State 
Normal School at Platteville, Wisconsin. He spent the next eighteen 
months in traveling through the west and in pioneering in Colorado. At 
length, however, he returned to Wisconsin, where he took up railroading 
as an employe of the Mineral Point Railroad Company. He acted as 
clerk to the general superintendent, George W. Cobb, until the road was 
sold to the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company in 1879. 
He has since been with the latter corporation which he has represented 
as agent and assistant traveling auditor. He has hlled the position of 
agent for the past thirty }'ears, spending four years of that time at Sey- 
mour, two jears at Chillicothe, Missouri, and short periods at Braymer, 
Lawson and Liberty, Missouri. He came to Mystic eighteen years ago 
and as station agent in this place he has rendered very satisfactory service 
to the public as well as to the company. To the patrons of the road he 
is always courteous and pleasant, while to the corporation he represents 
he is ever loyal. 

On the 30th of May, 1886, in Onawa, Iowa, Mr. Calvert was married 
to Miss Elizabeth B. Clemmer, who was born in Monroe, Green county, 
Wisconsin, in 1867, a daughter of Dr. J. N. Clemmer. The eight children 
of this marriage are: Mabel Elizabeth, residing at Faith, South Dakota: 
Hazel May, who is the wife of Earl E. Jones, of Lucerne. Missouri ; 
John William, a brakeman with the Great Northern Railro;ui Company, 
living at Havre, Montana; Blanch A., student in the Centerville high 
school; Daniel Webster, also in school; Sarah Marie; ^Llio^ Clemmer; 
and Reta. 

Mr. Calvert has been a lifelong republican and a most active worker 
in support of the party. For the jxist four Acars he has been chaimian 
of the republican county central committee and at different times and in 



HISTORY OF APrANOOSE COUNTY 141 

different places he has capably filled various local offices. He was mayor 
of Braymer, township trustee at Seymour and has held other local posi- 
tions. In fact he has alwajs been an earnest worker in behalf of civic 
interests, seeking ever to promote reform and progress and to secure the 
practical adoption of high ideals. He is prominent in the Masonic fra- 
ternity and has been honored with most of the offices in the local or^janiza- 
tion with which he is connected. He now holds membership with Walnut 
Lodge, No. 588, A. F. & A. M., has taken the chapter degree at Seymour 
and is a member of St. John's Commandery at Centerville and Kaaba 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Davenport. He is a member of the 
Elks Lodge, No. 347, at Ottumwa, Iowa, and he filled all the chairs in 
the subordinate lodge of the Knights of Pythias but is not affiliated there- 
with at the present time. He was captain of the Uniformed Rank at 
Liberty, Missouri, for two years, and has been very active in the different 
fraternal organizations with which he was or is connected. He believes 
thoroughly in the beneticent principles which underlie these organizations 
and exemplifies in his life the spirit of mutual helpfulness and brotherly 
kindness. 



WILLIAM I. MORRISON. 

William I. Morrison is a leading merchant of Appanoose county, con- 
ducting a turniture and hardware business in Unionville, where he carries 
a large stock and has a well appointed store. This county numbers him 
among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Udell township, Jan- 
uary 3, 1873. His parents were Irvin Andrew and Amanda (Noland) 
Morrison, of whom mention is made on another page ot this work. Spend- 
ing his youthful days under the parental roof, William I. Morrison 
pursued a public school education, which was continued until lie li;ui 
mastered the branches of learning taught in the Unionville high school. 
His early experiences were those which come to the farm boy and after 
he had put aside his text-books he assisted his father in the work of further 
developing and improving the old home place up to the time of his mar- 
riage. He then began farming on his own anoimr and wlicn he iiad 
saved a sufficient sum from his earnings he [)urchased eight} acres, his 
wife having the same amount, making one humlred and sixty acres of 
land on section 22, Union township. This he carefully and systematically 
cultivated and success further attended his labors, so that in igot; he was 
enabled to purchase an additional tract of one hundreti and twenty acres 



142 HISTORY OP APPANOOSE COUNTY 

situated on section 3, Udell township, troni William Bra}'. To that 
farm he removed and still makes his home there. At a later date he 
sold eighty acres of his first farm, but he still owns two hundred acres of 
rich and valuable land in this county and his home place is a well improved 
property which he operates himself. On the 1st of June, IQU, in part- 
nership with his brother-in-law, John Moore, he purchased the under- 
taking, furniture and hardware business of J. R. Stewart, formerly the 
property of A. T. Bishop. As one of the owners of this store, Mr. Morri- 
son is accounted one of the leading merchants of Unionville. They carry 
a large and well selected line of goods, their prices are reasonable ami 
their business methods honorable and straightforward. In 1907 Mr. 
Morrison went to Stanley county. South Dakota, where he homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, and after making all payments upon 
this place he gave it in trade as part payment upon his store. He is an 
energetic, enterprising business man, carefully utilizing his opportunities, 
and his keen discernment and sound judgment are important features in 
his success. 

Mr. Morrison was united in marriage August 22, 1895, to Miss Essie 
B. Voorhees, a daughter of Richard D. and Maggie (Middleton) Voorhees, 
who were natives of New Jersey and Ohio respectively. The father was 
a farmer by occupation but at the time of the Civil war put aside all 
business and personal considerations to aid in the struggle tor the preserva- 
tion of the Union. Both he and his wife removed to Illinois with their 
respective parents during childhood and were there reared and married. 
In the late '60s they came to Appanoose county and Mr. \'oorhees began 
farming in Udell township, owning at the time of his death two hundred 
acres of productive and well improved land. He remained upon this 
farm until his death in February, 1905, after which his widow took up 
her abode in Unionville, where she is now living. Their daughter, Mrs. 
Morrison, was born in Appanoose county, June 21. 1871. The marriage 
of Mr. and Mrs. Morrison has been blessed with seven children, as follows: 
Byrl M., who completed the course of study in the Centerville high school 
in 191 1 ; Merrill B., Sunbeam, Enid, Richard and James, all of whom are 
attending school; and Wayne. 

Mr. Morrison votes with the democratic party and, keeping well in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the day, is able to support his 
position by intelligent argument. He served as township trustee of Union 
township for about five years and for several years was a member of the 
school board. His official duties have always been promptly and capably 
performed and he is interested in the welfare and upbuilding of township 
and county. He and his wife are members of the United Brethren church 



HISTORY OF ArM'ANOOSE COUNTY 143 

and rhtir lives are in harnion\- with their professions. Mr. Morrison is 
accounted one of the enterprising business men of his community, care- 
fully and capably directing his interests and activities with the result that 
success is now his, in substantial and desirable measure. 



HOWARD F. McDonald. 

Howard F. McDonald, a man of strong and torceful individuality, 
has at an early age worked his wa} upward to an important place in busi- 
ness circles of Centerville and each step in his career has brought him a 
broader outlook and wider opportunities. He has carefully noted and used 
his ad\antages for progress and is today one ot the successful men. oi his 
part of the county, being engaged in the shoe business and otherwise in- 
rtuentially associated with the general business life of his community. 
He is a native of Appanoose county, having been born in Walnut town- 
ship, April 6, 1880. His parents are George W. and Sarah A. (Longl 
McDonald, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of Missouri. 
The father of our subject came to Iowa with his parents when he was still 
a child, settling in Appanoose county in 1853. He grew to maturity in 
that section and was educated in the public schools, engaging in farm- 
ing after laying aside his books. He first rented a forty acre tract and was 
so successtul in its development and cultivation that he was later able 
to buy the property, which he im{>roved until igoo. From time to time 
he bought more land and added it to his original tract, his holdings finally 
comprising six hundred and sixty acres. This farm he developed until 
his retirement in 1900, \\ Ik n he moved to Centerville, where he has resided 
since that time. He owns a great deal ot town property, holding the title 
to five residences in the town limits. 

In the acquirement of an education Howard F. McDonald attended 
the public schools of Walnut township and was graduated from the Center- 
\ille high school. .After this he began his active business career, 
securing emplo\nient in a wholesale grocery conducted by T. R. 
Riggs and he continued in this position for some months. Later 
he was employed in the shoe store conducted by R. A. McKec and retained 
this connection tor two jears. In November, 1903, he accepted a [losi- 
tion with the First National Bank as collector and his ability, energ)- and 
industry soon gained him advancement to the position of assistant cashier. 
During this time he was also secretary of the Citizens Coal Com[>any. In 
1908 he resigned his position with the First National Bank and accepted 



144 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

his former position in the shoe store operated by K. A. McKee. He did 
able work as a salesman until September 16, 1910, when he j)urchased 
the shoe business formerly conducted bj- T. L. Greenleaf, which he has 
managed since that time. He carries a large and well assorted stock, 
the lines of which are kept up-to-date and complete, and he enjoys a large 
patronage. In business affairs he has been found practical as well as 
progressive, and his energy and determination have enabled him to over- 
come all obstacles and difRculties in his path. He owns a beautiful mod- 
ern home in North Ninth street in Centerville and has valuable property 
holdings in Boise City, Idaho. He is also connected with some of the 
most important business enterprises in Centerville, being a stockholder 
in the Mutual Telephone Company and also in the Centerville Gypsum 
Company. 

On May 30, 1910, Mr. McDonald married Miss Myra M. Simpson, 
a daughter of Andy M. and Hattie (Powers) Simpson. The father came 
to Iowa in pioneer times and operated a farm in Washington county until 
1906, when he came to Appanoose county and purchased two hundred 
and forty acres which he is developing and improving.' Mr. and Mrs. 
McDonald are the parents of one child, Marion B., who is now sixteen 
months old. 

Fraternally Mr. McDonald belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. His religious views are in accord with those of the Christian 
church, and politically he adheres to the democratic party. In business 
he is progressive, carrying forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes and utilizing the opportunities that are presented for progress, 
and he has thus gained a creditable position in business circles and the 
honor, respect and esteem of his manv friends. 



GEORGE E. CI.TMTE. 



George E. Climie, one of the well known and representative citizens 
of Centerville, has spent his entire life in this county and in former years 
was actively and successfully identified w ith agricultural pursuits. Since 
1902, however, he has been engaged in business as a dealer in pianos and 
in this connection has enjoyed a gratifying patronage. His birth occurred 
on a farm six miles east of Centerville on the 1st of April, 1867, his 
parents being Andrew and Araminta (Loop) Climie, who were of Irish 
and Scotch descent respectiveh'. The father was born in Canada in 
January, 1835, while the mother's birth occurred in that countr\- on the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 145 

26th of October, 1838. Andrew Cliinie came to Iowa as a young man 
but at the end of a year returned to Canada and was there married. In 
1858 he removed to \an Buren county, this state, and the following year 
came to Appanoose county, entering one hundred and sixty acres of land. 
As his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and 
capable management, he extended the boundaries of his farm by purchase 
imtil it comprised several hundred acres. He was actively engaged in 
the work of the' fields until 1909, when he disposed of his land and took 
up his abode in Cehterville, where his demise occurred in 191 1. His wife 
was called to her final rest in 1910. Both were devoted and consistent 
members of the Baptist church of Centerville. Andrew Climie was a 
resident of Appanoose county for more than a half century and gained a 
wide acquaintance as one of its honored pioneer settlers. 

George E. Climie obtained his early education in the district schools 
and later continued his studies in the Centerville high school. Subse- 
quently he spent five terms as a district school teacher and then purchased 
a farm of three hundred acres in Vermillion township, being successfully 
engaged in its operation until 1898. In that year he was elected sheriff 
of Appanoose count}-, leased his farm and came to Centerville. On the 
expiration of his first term as sheriff he was reelected, ably serving in 
that capacity for four years. In 1902 he embarked in his present busi- 
ness, having since handled the Chase. Kimball, Milton, Hammond, 
W'inktl, Kohlcr, Campbell ami Cliirkcriiig [jianos. He is likewise a stock- 
holder in the Mutual Telephone Company of Centerville and has long 
been numbered among the prosperous business men and substantial citizens 
of his native county. 

In 1890 Mr. Climie was imited in marriage to Miss Lottie Dale, a 
daughter of James and Malinda (Long) Dale, natives of Indiana. The 
father was born in Madison county in 1840, while the mother's natal 
}ear was 1843. James Dale came to Appanoose county, Iowa, when a 
youth of seventeen and it was here that he married Miss Malinda Long, 
w ho had come to this county about the same time. Throughout his active 
business career he was engaged in farming and stock buying and became 
one of the most extensive landowners of the county, owning twelve him- 
tlred acres ot well improved and valuable land at the time of his demise. 
He made a specialty of raising and shipping cattle on an extensive scale 
and retired from active business in 1899, coming to Centerville. where he 
made his home until called to his final rest on the 2d of Januar), 1902. 
After losing his first wife, in 1863, he married Miss Ida Bobo. who passed 
away a tew years later. Subsequently he wetldcd Miss Sarah Kirkman, 
who survives him and resides in Cent< rviilc. Mr. and Mrs. Climie have 



146 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

two cliildren, namely: Clyde, who was born on the loth of October, 
1891, and is employed as clerk in the store of J. J. Frankel at Centerville; 
and Llo}d Dale, who was born September 8, 1894, and is now a senior 
in Centerville high school. 

Mr. Climie gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
fraternally is identified with the Knights of Pythias, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He is interested in various measures 
relating to public progress and improvement and his cooperation can be 
counted upon to further projects for the general good, jet his time and 
attention are chiefly concentrated upon his business affairs. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Climie have always lived in Appanoose county and have an 
extensive circle of friends here. 7 



IRMX ANDREW MORRISON. 

Irvin Andrew Morrison, who is living in retirement in Unionville 
after having spent thirty-eight years in agricultural pursuits and stock- 
raising in Union township, is a native son of Appanoose county, born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1847. His parents were Andrew and Mary (Byers) Morrison, 
the former a native of Ireland who came to the United States with his 
mother when he was still a child, locating in Pennsylvania. The mother 
of our subject was a native of that state, born in Mercer county, Novem- 
ber 11, 1812, of an old New England family. The parents married in 
the Keystone state and in 1846 removed to Appanoose county, where the 
father took up one hundred and sixty acres of government land in Udell 
township. With characteristic energy he cleared the property, put the un- 
broken soil under the plow and gradually developed a model agricultural 
enterprise. He remained upon his property until his death, which occurred 
in 1874, being long survived by his wife, who passed away in 1890. To 
their union were born eight children: Caroline and William Calvin, both 
deceased; John D., a retired merchant of Topeka, Kansas; Elizabeth and 
James H., both of whom have passed away; Irvin Andrew, of this review; 
Marv, who married John McMurray, a fruit raiser of .\uburn. California; 
and Esther, the wife of James Leitzell, a farmer of Altamont, Illinois. 

Irvin .Andrew Morrison acquired his education in the subscription and 
public schools of Appanoose county and grew up on his father's farm, 
becoming early familiar with the pioneer conditions which then existed 
and with the details of practical argriculture. In 1869 he and his two 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 149 

brothers purchased two hundred acres of land on section 23, Union town- 
ship. Later Mr. Morrison purchased his brothers' interests and to this 
tract added eighty acres, of which he afterward sold forty. I'pon the 
remainder of the tract tor a number ot jears he engaged in general farm- 
ing which he abandoned in 1907, when he rented the farm and came 
to Unionville, where he {purchased a beautiful home in which he lives 
retired. He owns two hundred and forty acres on section 23, Udell town- 
ship, upon which he has made all the necessary improvements and to 
which during the days of his activity he gave his earnest attention, making 
it one of the most valuable properties in this part of the county. 

In 1870 Mr. Morrison was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Noland, 
a daughter of Joshua and Frankie ( Lowe) Noland, both of whom were 
born in Estill county, Kentucky, the former on the 22d of February, 
1812, and the latter on the 10th of January, 1814. The father was of 
English, French and German ancestry and the mother of Scotch, Irish 
and Dutch stock. Her ancestry can be traced back in a direct line to Joe 
Proctor, the noted Indian fighter of Kentuck}-. Joshua Noland was a 
tanner and followed this occupation in Kentucky until after his marriage, 
which occurred in 1852. He then came to Davis county, Iowa, and bought 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, to whicli he later added, acquiring 
in all two hundred acres. He remained upon this [)ro[5erty until his death, 
which occurred April 4, 1884. His wife survived him only a few weeks, 
dying on the 20th of the same month in the same year. To their union 
were born seven children: Mary E., John N., William and Ann. all of 
whom are deceased; Amanda, the wife of the subject of this review; Daniel, 
who makes his home in Big Eddy, Oregon: and Samuel, a merchant of 
Everdell, Minnesota. 

Mr. Morrison's married life has been singularl) happy and during the 
tortv-three years of its continuance he has found in his wife a charmin" 
companion and a loyal helpmate. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have six chil- 
tlren and twenty-eight grandchildren, all of whom are worthy of the 
honored name they bear. Their eldest daughter, Frankie, who was born 
July 14, 1871. is the wife of Walter Whistler, a farmer of Udell town- 
ship. William M., born January 3, 1873, '^ a merchant in I'nionville. 
NFary, born June 4, 1874, became the wife of Andrew Eslinger, of Foster, 
Monroe county, and is deceased. Samuel, born July 22, 1876, is employed 
in a florist's shop at Des Moines. Walter, bom August 21, 1878, is assist- 
ing his father in the operation of the home farm. The youngest daughter, 
Lucy Ann, was born September 8, 1883. She is the wife of John O. 
.Moore, a merchant of Unionville. NFr. and Mrs. Morrison are members 
ot the Methodist church. 



150 HISTORY Ul'" Ai'l'AXUOSE COUNTY 

Mr. Morrison gives his allegiance to the democratic party and has 
served as trustee of Union township for a number of years and has also 
been a member of the school board. He is well known throughout Ap- 
panoose county, where his entire life has been spent, and after his long, 
useful and active career can look back without regret on a life, whose 
purposes have always been high and sincere. 



HENRY T. PHILLIPS. 



Henrv T. Phillips will long be remembered as one of the most active 
and successful merchants of Unionville and as a man of unusual ability 
whose judgment was seldom at fault and whose fidelity to trust and high 
sincerity of purpose were never questioned. For fifty-two years he was a 
resident of Appanoose county and here his entire active career was spent, 
terminating with his death on the i6th of April, 1911. Mr. Phillips 
was born in Lexington, Indiana, August 17, 1844, a son of James H. and 
Elizabeth (Robertson) Phillips, the former a native of Montgomery 
county, Kentucky, where his birth occurred on August 19, 1820. When 
he was a year old he was brought by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Brannock 
Phillips, to Jefferson county, Indiana, and in 1831 he removed to Jennings 
county in the same state, where he subsequently entered the mercantile 
business, continuing in it until 1854. In that year he moved into Iowa, 
locating in Appanoose county, and in 1862 took up his residence in Union- 
ville, where he conducted a general store until his death, which occurred 
in 1875. He married in 1843 Miss Elizabeth Robertson, who was bom 
in Jefferson county, Indiana, in 1823, the youngest daughter of one of 
the earliest pioneer settlers in that part of the state. Four children were 
born to their union: Henry T., the subject of this review; Mary E., bom 
in 1847; Emma J., born in 1850; and Eddie M.. born in 1866. The 
father of our subject was for many years postmaster of L^nionville and 
proved himself a capable and efficient public servant. His father. Bran- 
nock Phillips, was a member of the state legislatures of Indiana and Iowa. 
Henry T. Phillips attended district school and supplemented this by a 
course in the Burlington (Iowa) Business College. He made his first loca- 
tion in this state in i860, when he accepted a position in his father's store 
at Eddyville, Iowa. This he held until the 9fh of August, 1863. when he 
enlisted in the Thirty-sixth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, although he was not 
yet nineteen years of age. However, he was stricken with typhoid fever 
and prevented by his serious illness from joining his command. When he 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 151 

recovered he and his father came to Unionville and opened a general 
store, with the conduct of which Mr. Phillips of this review was asso- 
ciated until he was again able to offer his services to his country. He 
enlisted in 1864 in the Forty-seventh Iowa N'olunteer Infantry and was 
mustered into service on June 4, serving until the end of the war. After 
his honorable discharge he returned to Unionville and again resumed the 
conduct of his mercantile enterprise, with which he was identified from 
that time until his death. No breath of suspicion was ever cast u})on 
the integrity of his business methods or the honor of his character and his 
name stood always as a synonym for upright and straightforward dealings 
and was honortd and respected wherever it was known. Mr. Phillips 
passed away on the 16th of .April, 1911, and after his demise his son 
Ralph, who for several jears previous to this had been associated with 
him, remained in charge of the concern, buying out the interest of his 
uncle, Edward Phillips, and today he is one of the leading merchants 
of Unionville. 

On .August 17, 1869. Mr. Phillips was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha J. Sawyers, a daughter of Elisha and Emma E. (Stinson) Sawyers, 
the former born in Rockbridge, \'irginia, on the 7th of January, 1805. 
He later moved into Tennessee and after his marriage in that state, on 
the 15th of February, 1831, followed the tailor's trade there for some 
years, coming to .Appanoose county in 1847 as one of the pioneer settlers. 
He entered land in Udell townshij) and upon it carried on general farming 
until his death, which occurred ar the advanced age of ninety-seven years. 
His wife was born near Charlotte, North Carolina. She was badly in- 
jured in a runaway accident at West Grove, Iowa, in 1871. and died 
from the effects of the accident. Her daughter, the wife of the subject 
of this review, was born in Giles county, Tennessee, and was one of the 
earliest settlers in Udell township. Her grandfather, Alexander Stinson, 
married Miss Elizabeth Bradley and her grandmother on the paternal 
side was Miss I<"li7.abeth Pa.xton. who could trace her ancestry back to 
the year 1250 A. D., at which time the family was entitled to bear a coat 
of arms. Mrs. Phillips attended school in Centerville, studying in the old 
courthouse when it had two rooms, one upstairs anti one downstairs. Mr. 
and Mrs. Phillips became the parents of four children. The eldest. Ralph. 
was born on the 3d of May, 1870. He is proprietor of the store formerlv 
()[)erated by his father and is one of the representative business men of 
Unionville. He is prominent in religious circles, being a member and 
trustee of the Presbyterian church. Ray, a twin of Ralph, passed away 
when two weeks old. Estella Elizab<th was born June 17. 1876. She 
married -Arthur L. Lyon, superintendent of schools of Humeston. and 



152 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

they have two children: Carolyn Elizabeth, born October 20, 1905; and 
Leonard Phillips, born November 7, 1909. The fourth child born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillips was a son, who died in infancy. 

Fraternally Mr. Phillips belonged to the blue lodge in Masonr>- and 
was prominent in the affairs of the Grand Army of the Republic. He 
affiliated with the rejniblican party from the time he cast his first vote 
and served as clerk of Udell township until within a few years of his 
death. He was a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
was in hearty sympathy with all movements, social or religious, which 
had as their object improvement and advancement. He was a fine 
example of an honorable and loyal citizen, actuated always by worthy 
ideals which he successfully applied to the practical duties of life. 



SAMUEL D. KNOX. 



Samuel D. Knox is proprietor of a harness business in Mystic, with 
which line of trade he has been continuously connected since 1884, al- 
though his present enterprise was not established until 1891. He was born 
in Keokuk county, Iowa, where the town of Hedrick now stands, on the 
5th of February, 1851, his parents being William 1). and Amanda J. 
(Doughty) Knox. The mother was born in Indiana, May 26, 1826, while 
the father's birth occurred in that state, December 12, 1822. They were 
married in Iowa on the 15th of November, 1846, and throughout the 
entire period of their married life, save for two years spent in Hancock 
county, Illinois, they resided in Jefferson county, Iowa. He followed 
both farming and merchandising and his was an active, usetul lite. His 
wife passed away in 1880. In their family were five children: John M., 
who is a resident of Winheld, Kansas; Washington W., living in Abing- 
don, Iowa; Samuel D., of this review; Arthur M., who died in infancy; 
and Norris S., who makes his home in Rock Island, Illinois. 

Samuel D. Knox resided with his parents in Jefferson county, with 
the exception of two years spent in Illinois, up to the time when he came 
to Appanoose count)-. He learned the harness-making trade in Abingdon, 
and applying himself closely to the business became a good workman. 
He has been engaged in that line of trade since 1884 and on the 13th of 
November, i8gi, he came to Mystic where he has since made his home. 
He is now one of the oldest residents of the town, which was founded in 
1887 — four years before his arrival. He has figured continuously as a 
factor in its commercial enterprise for twenty-one Aears and is a wide- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 153 

awake, alert, energetic business man, who closely watches and utilizes his 
opportunities for the attainment of success. 

In politics Mr. Knox is a democrat, having closely adhered to the 
principles ot the party since ape conferred upon him the right of franchise. 
He served as postmaster in Abingdon under President Cleveland's first 
administration ami he has been mayor of Mystic for one term. He is 
well known in fraternal circles, having been identified with the Masons 
for twenty-one years and is a past master ot Walnut Lodge, No. 588. 
A. F. & A. M. of My>ric. His iilcnrification with the Odd Fellows dates 
from October, 18H4. ami he is a niemher of Marwin Lodge, No. ^^s, of 
Mystic. In his lite he is loyal to the teachings of these organizations, 
recognizing the duties and obligations of his fellowmen and extending to 
them a hel[iing hanil when occasion arises. 



LE\\IS WEST. 



Lewis West, whose famih are now residing in Appanoose county, was 
horn in Clinton county, Ohio, December 10, 1829, his parents being Har- 
mon and Lucinda West. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, 
never left his native state but after his death his widow came to Iowa and 
for a time made her home with her son Lewis. Later, however, she returned 
to Ohio and her last days were spent in Clinton county. 

The educational op[iortunities enjoyed by Lewis ^^'est were those 
afforded by the public schools of his native state and after he had put 
aside his text-books he learned the carpenter's trade and subsequently took 
up building and contracting. Removing westward, he settled first at Gales- 
burg, Illinois, where for several years he engaged in carjientering, and 
then came to Iowa, establishing his home in Mahaska county, where he 
became acquainted with and married Miss Sarah Ann Gray, the wedding 
being celebrated on the iSrh ot Sejitember, 18^6. Mrs. West is of Scotch 
ilescent. Her grandfather. William (ira)-. came from Scorlaiul to rlic 
new world and settled in Tennessee. He was a saddler by trade and long 
followed that pursuit. He lived to the remarkable old age of one humlred 
years, while his wife, Mrs. .Ann Gray, reached tlie advanced age of ninety- 
five years. Their son Taswell Gray was born in Tennes.see and learned the 
tanner's trade but became a minister of the German Baptist or Dunkard 
church. He afterward not only worked at his trade but engaged in preach- 
ing the gospel, and his influence was a potent force for good in many com- 
munities in which he lived. He was born October 26. 1811, and after 



154 HISTORY OF APl'AXOOSE COUNTY 

arriving at years of maturity wedded Priscilla Dillman, who was born 
in \'irginia, November 14, 1808, and was descended trom New England 
and Irish ancestry. They were married in Ohio and in 1855 came to 
Iowa, settling upon a farm in Mahaska county, which Mr. Gray pur- 
chased. He carefully and systematically tilled his helds and also con- 
tinued his church work, establishing a number of Dunkard churches in 
different parts of the state. At length, because of his wite's tailing health, 
he sold the farm and removed to Schuyler county, Missouri, where he 
purchased other land. When the Civil war was at its height, however, 
rendering existence in that district perilous, they left the border state 
of Missouri and took up their abode in Udell township, Appanoose county, 
where Mr. Gray invested in eighty acres of land, which he cultivated tor 
a time but afterward removed to Unionville, where both he and his wife 
passed away, the latter dying September 2, 1883. Their children were 
eight in number but only three are now living: Mrs. Lewis West; Mrs. 
Hannah West, of Lancaster, Missouri ; and Albert Gray, a resident farmer 
of Udell township. 

It was subsequent to his marriage that Lewis West removed to Mis- 
souri, where he remained until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when 
he came to Appanoose county and settled on a farm south of Unionville. 
He rented land there for seven years, after which he went to Schuyler 
county, Missouri, where he invested in one hundred and sixty acres, upon 
which he lived until his death January 27, 1882. At the time of his 
demise he was preparing to return to Appanoose county, expecting to make 
his home in Udell township. He had sold his Missouri farm, had packed 
his goods and was ready to come to Iowa when he was taken ill and 
passed away. His widow carried out their plans, removing to Appanoose 
county and taking charge of the farm which her husband had purchased 
in Udell township. After a year, however, she rented the land and came 
to Unionville, where she purchased a lot and built a new home, which 
she now occupies. She still owns the farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres, from which she derives a good rental. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. West were born two children. Alfred H.. whose 
birth occurred in Mahaska county, August 1 1, 18^7, is now living at Las 
Vegas, New Mexico, and for twentj-five years has been a railroad con- 
ductor. He married Miss Nettie Ely, and they have two children, Ever- 
ett and Nellie. Albert, a twin brother of Alfred, is an invalid in the 
State Hospital at Mount Pleasant. Mrs. West ado[ned a daughter, Clara, 
the daughter of William West, her husband's brother, the mother having 
died when the child was only eight da)s old. Clara ^^'est grew to voung 
womanhood knowing Mrs. Lewis West as a mother and is as dear to her 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 155 

as an own chiltl could be. She became the wife of Frank Crow, of Ottum- 
wa, Iowa, and the}' have five children, Bertha, Alfred, Mary, Jessie and 
Dorothy. 

Lewis West is remembered by many of the older settlers of Appanoose 
county. He was one of the pioneer residents of the state and took active 
and helpful part in its early development, sharing in the hardships and 
privations of pioneer life and doing all in his power to promote the improve- 
ment and upbuilding of the district in which he lived. For a year atter 
his marriage he and his wife were living north of Oskaloosa, at which 
time the Indians were numerous but were always friendly. They often 
brought prairie chickens to Mrs. West. While residing in that locality 
Mr. West was a member of the Odd Fellows locfge at Oskaloosa. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican party and at one time 
he was a member of the Dunkard church of ITdell township, with which 
his widow is still connected. He lived an upright, honorable life and 
left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



GEORGE C. ELLIOTT. 



George C. Elliott, serving for the fourth term as clerk ot the courts 
of Appanoose county, has a record as a public official which any man might 
well envy, for in his long connection with public office capability, efficiency 
and promptness have ever characterized his service. He was born in 
Drakcsville, Davis county, Iowa, in May, 1874, his parents being John 
and Nancy ( Morgan) Elliott. The father was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, September 30, 1837, and the mother's birth occurred in 
Switzerland county, Indiana, March 25, 184). With his parents John 
Elliott removed to Davis county, Iowa, in 18; 1, and there learned the 
carpenter's trade, which he afterward toUowed until the outbreak of the 
Civil war. He enlisted as a member ot Company A, Third Iowa Cavalry, 
and was at the front until the close of hostilities, participating in many 
hotly contested battles, in which he [iroved his loyalty to the old flag. 
When the war was over he returnetl to Davis county and settled ujion a 
farm owned by him and a brother. He then turned his attention to the 
nursery business, which he conducted for six years, and on the expira- 
tion of that period removed to Drakcsville, where he engaged in the lumber 
and grain business, which he carried on with substantial success until 1882. 
He then sold out and came to Centerville, accepting a position as travel- 
ing salesman with the Osborn Machine Company, which he represented 



156 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

for some time. He next turned his attention to the sale ot nursery stock, 
in which business he continued tor a considerable period, atter which he 
was called to public office, being elected county clerk of Appanoose county. 
He tilled that position capably for four years and following his retire- 
ment was elected and served as mayor of Centerville tor two years. Soon 
afterward he was elected to the office of justice of the peace and served tor 
two years. He likewise tilled the position of councilman for several terms 
and in that connection exercised his official prerogatives in support of 
many progressive public movements and reforms. Entering the insurance 
field, he followed that business throughout his remaining days, passing 
away March g, 1908, at the age of nearly seventy-one years. His widow 
is living in Centerville with her son and daughter at No. 530 North Eighth 
street. In the family were four children: Jennie, who was born in 1867 
and died in 1873; Allie, who was born in 1870 and is at home with her 
mother; George C, of this review; and Stella, who was born in 1879 and 
is the wife of J. P. Mason, who is traffic superintendent for the Bell Tele- 
phone Company at Des Moines. 

George C. Elliott began his education in the schools of his native city 
and when but a boy came with his parents to Centerville, where 
he completed his public-school course. He was eighteen years of age when 
his father appointed him to the position of deputy county clerk and he 
thus obtained his initial experience in the office which he is now filling. 
With his father's retirement from the position of clerk four years later 
George C. Elliott entered the abstract business, in which he continued 
for a year, and was then appointed deputy county treasurer under Noah 
M. Scott, with whom he continued for four years, and was then again 
appointed to the position under J. T. Sherrard. After eight years' service 
in the treasurers office Mr. Elliott became delinquent tax collector and 
so continued for several years. Prior to entering the treasurer's office he 
was appointed county clerk to fill an unexpired temi of a year. \\'hen he 
left the position of delintjuent tax collector he was once more deputy county 
treasurer under J. A. Moss and on his retirement from the position was 
elected county clerk. Since that time he has been thrice reelected — a fact 
which stands as incontrovertible proof of his capability and fidelity. He 
was called to the position for the fourth term in November, 1912, so that 
he will remain the incumbent in the office until iqi v Mr. Elliott has 
almost continuously filled public positions since eighteen years ot age 
and over his record there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion ot evil. 
He also has business interests, being secretary and treasurer of and owner 
of a fourth interest in the Appanoose Abstract & Title Company of Center- 
ville. He has never faltered in his allegiance to the republican party and 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 157 

has always kept well intormed on the (juestions and issues of the day, 
so that he is able to support his position by intelligent argument. He is 
well known in the membership of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks, of which he is a worthy representative. He was reared in the Meth- 
odist faith, his father having joined the church in 1868, becoming a most 
active and earnest worker therein. 



JOSIAH SAMl'EL WAILES, M. D. 

Dr. Josiah Sanuiel Wailes, actively engaged in the practice of medicine 
in Mystic, the toundation for his success being laid in a thorough course 
of stud}' in the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Keokuk, Iowa, is a 
native of Wellsboro, Indiana, born June 21, 1848. His parents, John 
Perry and Sarah (Wilson) Wailes, were both natives of Prince George 
county, Maryland, but were married in Kentucky, where they remained 
until 1830, when they removed to Indiana, living there for twenty years. 
The father entered a tract of eighty acres ot wild land ami developed a 
farm on which he eventually platted the town of Wellsboro, which bears 
his name although a different spelling is followed. His wife was a grand- 
daughter of James Wilson, one of the signers of the declaration of inde- 
pendence. The year 1853 witnessed the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. 
Wailes in Appanoose count), at which time they took up their abode in 
Chariton township, where the)' remained for an extended period. About 
three months before his death, however, John P. Wailes removed to Marion 
county, Kansas, where he passed away October 11, 1882, at the age ot 
eighty-seven years. The mother died on the old homestead farm in Chari- 
ton township in August, 1861, when forty-one years of age. Mr. Wailes 
had always followed farming, thus providing for the support of his fam- 
ily, numbering a wife and nine children, namely: James W., deceased; 
George W., a Civil war veteran who is now living retired in Mystic; Mary 
Elizabeth, who died at the age of eighteen years; Margaret Ann, who is 
the widow of Tilghman Davidson, and resides in Walnut township; Josiah 
S. ; Lavinia, the wife of C. H. Hanson, of Florence, Kansas; Susan, the 
wife of A. L. Whitlock, also of Florence; John P., living in Piano, .Appa- 
noose county; and Sarah, who tiied at the age of four years. 

Dr. Wailes was a lad of five summers when he came w irh his parents 
to Iowa. He resiiled in .Appanoose county until 1874 and in that jieriod 
acquired a good public-school eiiucation. He was reared to farm life and 
early became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 



158 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

for the crops. He was twenty-six years of age when he left Iowa for 
Marion county, Kansas, where he remained for a number of years, when he 
returned to Appanoose county. In the meantime he had practiced medicine 
for fifteen years in Kansas, receiving a state certificate which permitted his 
following the profession. Wishing, however, the benefits of further college 
training he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk and 
was graduated therefrom in 1889. It was at that time that he returned 
to Appanoose county where he has since practiced with good success. He 
is a member of the Appanoose and Wayne Counties Medical Societies and 
at all times he keeps in close touch with the advancement that is being 
made by the profession as scientific investigation adds to the knowledge 
of its representatives. 

In 1871 Dr. Wailes was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Jane Cross, 
a native of Bartholomew county, Indiana, with whom he traveled life's 
journey for twenty-eight }ears, being then separated by the death of the 
wife in Mystic in 1898 when she was fifty- four years of age. They were 
the parents of the following children: William M., who is living in \'an 
Wert, Iowa; Ida, the wife of LaFayette Bates, a resident of Mystic; Mabel, 
who is the widow of James Wakefield and is living in Mystic; Ellen, the 
wife of R. B. McMahan, of Mystic; Myrtle, who died in Kansas at the age 
of four years; and Lizzie, the wife of Charles Morman, of Mystic. 

Dr. Wailes on attaining his majority gave his political allegiance to 
the republican party and remained thereafter one of its supporters until 
about twenty years ago, when he joined the ranks of the democratic party. 
He has, however, never sought nor desired public office. He holds mem- 
bership with the Foresters and with the Yeomen and he is interested in 
all matters of public-spirited citizenship. He holds to high standards in 
his professional service, gives his patrons the benefit of conscientious and 
earnest effort and has long been accorded a liberal patronage. 



EUGENE G. WENT WORTH. 

Eugene G. Wentworth, owner of coal deposits extending under one 
hundred and twenty acres in Center township and well known in this part 
of Appanoose county as an extensive and successful coal operator, was 
born in Elliott, Maine, on the 13th of February, 1856. He is a son of 
Cyrus G. and Sarah C. (Bartlett) Wentworth, the former bom in Lebanon, 
Maine, December 18, 1827, and the latter in Elliott, in the same state. 
Both were of English ancestry, the Wentworth family having been founded 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 159 

in America by William Wentworth, who came from Great Britain early 
in the seventeenth century and settled in New England. The father of 
our subject was a brick manufacturer, a contractor and builder and worked 
at all of these occupations in Maine until 1848, when he went to Cali- 
fornia and worked in the mines for two years. In 1850 he returned to 
his native state and was there married, coming in 1857 to Iowa and locat- 
ing at Centerville. Here he worked at brick manufacturing for a num- 
ber of years but in i860 went to Boise City, Idaho, and engaged in freight- 
ing, driving oxen from that city to Walla Walla, Washington. In 1863 
he returned to Centerville and a few years later, in partnership with Joseph 
(toss, opened a brickyard here. Their association continued for three 
years, at the end of which time Mr. Goss sold out his interest to his part- 
ner, who conducted the enterprise alone for some time. Later he became 
engaged in contracting and building and in this relation was identified 
with the construction of some of the most important business and resi- 
dence structures in the city and to a great extent built Centerville. He 
erected the First National Bank and two other buildings for important 
financial institutions as well as a great many private residences. He con- 
tinued to engage successfully in this line of work until a tew years previous 
to his death, which occurred September 29, 1906. His wife passed away 
on the 26th of December, 1907. The father of our subject was a keen 
and able business man and always quick to recognize true business oppor- 
tunities. As a result he noted the rising value of Appanoose county lands 
and invested in them extensively, owning at the time of his death one 
hundred and twenty acres of valuable coal propery in Center township, 
which he leased to the Rock \'alley Coal Company. He was prominent 
in fraternal circles, being a member of the blue lodge of Masons and 
Lodge No. 76, I. O. O. F., at Centerville. 

Eugene G. W^entworth acquired his education in the public schools ol 
Appanoose county and in the Centerville high school, and he remained 
with his father until he was twenty years of age. In that year he began 
his business career and through the successive stages of progress and develop- 
ment, through many changes in location and interests, has advanced step 
by step until he is now one of the leading business men in this part of the 
county. At first he entered the drug store belonging to Dr. Stephen 
Wright in Centerville and there studied phannacy for three years, 
iiecoming skilled and expert in this science. He eventually purchased 
a half interest in the business and two years later, when Dr. Wright 
sold his stock to S. S. Cole, conducted the concern with the new partner 
for one year. At the end of that time, however, he sold his interest to 
Mr. Cole and went to Essex, Iowa, where h<' obtained nnployinent in the 



160 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

drug store owned by Mr. Barlow. After eighteen months he returned to 
Centerville and after working one year for his lather removed to Guthrie 
Center, Iowa, and there clerked in the drug store for A. 1). Lcmnion, 
working in his interests for three years. When he again returned to 
Centerville he secured a position as clerk in J. W. Clark's drug store and 
made such good use of his opportunities that he was later able to purchase 
his employer's interest. The store was located near the Burlington station 
and there Mr. Wentworth continued in business for three years, after which 
he moved upon the farm in Center township, which belonged to his father. 
Atter a short time, however, he abandoned agricultural pursuits and estab- 
lished himself in the grocery business in partnership with Tom Manson, 
continuing in this connection for one year and a half. In 1911 he recalled 
the lease on his coal mines from the Rock Valley Coal Company and has 
since operated the coal mines himself. In this he has met with gratifying 
success, being regarded as one of the most substantial as well as one of 
the most progressive and reliable business men of Centerville. In addi- 
tion to his mining property he owns seventy-nine acres of land in Mis- 
souri and twenty-five acres in Center township. 

Mr. Wentworth was united in marriage to Miss Arthelia Wertz, a 
daughter of Isaac and Lavina (Spitler) Wertz, the former a native of 
Indiana and the latter of Ohio, both of German ancestr}'. They came to 
Appanoose county in early times with their parents and grew to manhood 
and womanhood in this section. Mrs. Wentworth's paternal grandfather 
became one of the extensive landowners in this part of the state, holding 
title to over eight hundred acres of valuable farming property near Center- 
ville. Mrs. Wentworth's parents married in Appanoose county and settled 
upon a farm in this section. In 1862 the father offered his services to 
the government as a volunteer in the Federal arm}- and died in the hos- 
pital at Fort Scott, Kansas, in August of the following year. Afterward 
the mother married again, her second husband being John Banks, the sheriff 
of Appanoose county at that time. The) later moved to Kansas and from 
there to Golden City, Missouri, where Mr. Banks passed away in 1892. 
After his death the mother moved to Webb City, Missouri, and there 
remained until her demise. To her first union were born two children: 
Perry A., who passed aw a} at the age of eighteen months: and Arthelia, 
the wife of the subject of this review. By her second husband she had 
seven children: Charles, who has passed away; Lynn, who resides at 
Webb City, Missouri; Clem, deceased; Wylie, also of Webb City; Lucy; 
Ray, who is a minister of the Baptist church and lives in Indiana: and 
Pearl, who has passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Wentworth was born 
one daughter, Leah M.. whose hirtli occurrcti on the 9rh of .T:uiuary. 1887. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 161 

and who is at home with her juirents. They have also a foster son, Gilbert 
K. Mcintosh, who is a railroad engineer ot Centerville. 

Mr. VVentworth is connected with Lodge No. 76, I. O. O. F., and 
Appanoose Camp, No. 3593, M. W. A. Both he and his wife are 
members of Anna Rebekah Lodge, No. 95, of the Rebekahs of Centerville 
and Mrs. Wentworth is a member of the Arthelia District Court of Honor, 
No. q8, a lodge which was organized vmder her leadership and named in 
her honor. The family are devovit adherents of the Presbyterian church, 
holdmg membership in Centerville. Mr. Wentworth gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and is a man ot high integrity and honor 
in all rhe relations of his life, enjoying in great measure the respect of his 
associates and friends. 



NLVnsON S. EDWARDS. 



One of the successful and widely known business men of Moulton is 
Matison S. Edwards, who is a member of an estimable pioneer family of 
Appanoose county, where he has passed the greater part of his lite. For 
many years his entire attention was devoted to diversitied farming and 
stock-raising, in which he is still interested, but since 1903 he has been 
president of the Moulton State Savings Bank, an institution he was largely 
instrumental in founding. Mr. Edwards was born in Laurel county, Ken- 
tucky, his natal day being the 1 ith of April, 1850, and his parents William 
and Marilla (Elliott) Edwards. The father was also a native of Laurel 
county, Kentucky, his birth there occurring on the 29th of January, 1811, 
while the mother's natal day was January 29, 1816. The Edwards family 
originally came from Tennessee, but they were among the first settlers of 
Kentucky, our subject's grandfather, William Edwards, having taken up 
a homestead in Laurel county in his early manhood and there passed the 
remainder of his life. His son, William Edwards, Jr., was born, reared 
and married in Laurel county, where he resided uiuil 18^0. wlun lie re- 
moved with his family to Iowa. They first settled in Van Buren county, 
but in the s[)ring of 1851 they came to Appanoose county. The father 
took up a homestead in Wells township, where he continued to increase 
his landed interests until at the time of his ilearh his holdings aggregated 
tive hundred acres, a hundred and sixty ot which was timber land. The 
remainder of his active life was devoted to the improvement and cultiva- 
tion ot his farm, which he transformed from a tract of prairie land into 
one of the valuable properties of the county. Upon his retirement he 



162 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

removed to Moulton, where he made his home until his death. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwards there were born nine children, one ot whom, Andrew, 
died in infancy. In order of birth the other members of the family are 
as follows: Elizabeth, the widow of S. P. Elam, of Moulton, Iowa; 
James W., captain of Company B, Second Missouri Cavalry, during the 
Civil war, who passed away in the Indian territory in the vicinity of 
Caney, Kansas, from wounds received in the service; Mary Ann, the 
deceased wife of Isaac A. Coffman, of Wheatland, Missouri ; Lewis, a 
veteran of the Civil war and a member of the Iowa Home Guards, who is 
now residing in Erie, Kansas; Daniel, a member of a Missouri regiment 
during the Civil war, who is now residing in Moulton, Iowa; William, a 
Civil war veteran, of Moulton; Isaac Calvin, a resident of Appanoose 
county, deceased; and Matison S., our subject. 

As he was still in his infancy when he accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Appanoose county, practically the entire life of Matison S. 
Edwards has been passed in the immediate vicinity of his present home. 
He was reared on his father's farm in very much the same manner as other 
lads of the pioneer perioci, and at the usual age began his education in the 
district schools in the vicinity of the old homestead. He completed his 
course of study in the Centerville high school, and then turned his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits with which he was already familiar. At the 
age of twenty he rented twenty acres of land trom his father and began 
farming on his own account. His efforts in this direction proved so suc- 
cessful that at the end of two years he was able to purchase an adjoining 
tract of forty acres. This small holding formed the nucleus of a farm, the 
boundaries of which he continued to extend until he had acquired the title 
to five hundred acres of land. As the years passed he increased the value 
of his property by the addition of various improvements, and there engaged 
in diversified farming and stock-raising and feeding until i8gi. In the 
year last named he disposed of that farm and subsequentl}- removed to 
a place he had previously purchased adjoining Moulton. He still owns 
and operates this place, which contains four hundred and forty acres of 
land and has been developed until it is one of the best equipped and most 
valuable properties in the county. Mr. Edwards there continued general 
farming and stock-raising, engaging extensively in feeding, until 1897, 
when he removed to Moulton, where he has since resided, but still directs 
the operation of his homestead. In February, 1903, he joined other 
local capitalists in the organization of the Moulton State Savings Bank, 
of which he has been president since it was founded. 

Mr. Edwards has been twice married, his first union having been with 
Miss Martha W. Lane, the event occurring on the 31st of March. 1870. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 163 

She was born in Ohio in 1851 and is a daughter of W. H. and Cassandra 
(Albert) Lane, likewise natives of Ohio, whence they removed to Iowa in 
1867, locating in the vicinity of Centerville. Of this marriage were born 
six children, two of whom died in infancy. In order of birth the others 
are as follows: Burton, who passed away in 1898, at the age of twenty- 
seven years, in Wray, Colorado; Fred C, a Methodist minister located at 
Brooklyn, Iowa, who married Mabel Anderson, a daughter of Reuben 
Anderson, of Pulaski, Iowa, and has one child; Marian L. Ethel, the wife 
of W. R. \'otaw, ot Bowie, Texas, and the mother of two children; and 
Carl, who died at the age of fifteen years. The mother passed away Decem- 
ber 26, 1901, and in .A[)rii, 1904, Mr. Edwards was married to his present 
wife, whose maiden name was Etta Wight. She is a native of Brashear, 
Missouri, her birth occurring on the 24th of September, 1873, ^"<^ 'S a 
daughter of John M. and Sarah (Elliott) Wight. The family removed 
to Iowa many years ago, locating in the vicinity of Troy, Davis county, 
but the father, who is a veteran of the Civil war, has now retired and he 
and the mother are residing in Moulton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwards are active members of the Methodist church, 
and he is a member of the board of trustees. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, 
while Mrs. Edwards is most worthy matron of the Moulton Order of the 
Eastern Star, and she is also an officer in the Rebekahs. Mr. Edwards 
has always taken an active interest in local politics, and was at one time 
a member of the board of supervisors of Appanoose county. Different 
members of his family have figured in public life, one of his nephews, 
Don C. Edwards, having formerly been United States senator from Ken- 
tucky. During the long period of his residence in Appanoose countv Mr. 
Edwards has made an excellent record for upright manhood and honorable 
citizenship, and his fellow townsmen accord him the respect and esteem 
ever extended to men of worth and integrity. 



J. LOGAN McCLURE. 



An excellent tarm ot two hundred acres situated on section 8, Pleasant 
township, is the property of J. Logan McClure, who in addition to cultiva- 
vating his fields deals in and ships live stock. He has been a resident of 
Appanoose county since 1902. his birth having occurred across the border 
in Putnam county, Missouri, September 1 1, 1873. His father was one of 
the pioneers of that county and became an enterprising and prosperous 



164 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

farmer there. Upon the old homestead the son was reared, early becoming 
familiar with all of the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the farm 
boy who divides his time between the work of the fields, the duties of the 
schoolroom and the pleasures of the playground. His educational ad- 
vantages, however, were somewhat limited and he is largely a self-edu- 
cated man, having learned many valuable lessons in the school of 
experience. He continued to assist his father on the old homestead to the 
time of his marriage and practical training qualified him to carry on farm 
work on his own account. 

It was on the 27th of December, 1898, in Putnam county, Missouri, 
that Mr. McClure was married to Miss Catherine Dail\-, who was likewise 
a native of that county and a daughter of Timothy Daily, one of the well 
known farmers there. Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. McClure 
began their domestic life upon a rented farm in Putnam county, where 
they lived for four years, and in addition Mr. McClure engaged in the 
raising and feeding of stock. In 1902 he purchased the place upon which 
he now resides and took up his abode thereon. During the ten years of his 
residence here he has wrought a considerable transformation in the place, 
which is mostly seeded to blue grass, affording excellent pasturage for his 
stock, for he is largely engaged in stock-raising, buying and selling for a 
number of years. He ships from both Centerville and Cincinnati and also 
to some extent from Unionville, Missouri. He is a well-known live-stock 
dealer and his success is well merited because of his close application, his 
sound judgment and his indefatigable industry. He is an excellent judge 
of stock, seldom fails to appraise correct weight and can accurately estimate 
the value of the animals which he purchases and ships. 

Mr. and Mrs. McClure have a family of two sons and a daughter: 
Francis, Ruth and Lawrence. The parents are members of the Catholic 
church at Unionville, Missouri, and in politics Mr. McClure has been a 
life-long republican but has never sought nor desired office, preferring to 
give his undivided attention to his business affairs which, capably con- 
trolled, are bringing to him substantial financial returns. 



CALLOWAY C. BAKER. 



Through a residence in Ap[)anoose coun} dating trom pioneer times 
Calloway C. Baker firmly entrenched himself in the affection and regard 
of those with whom he came in contact, while his activity in general farm- 
ing and cattle raising and shipping gained him a high place among the rep- 




C. C. BAKKR 



PUBLIC LI: 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 167 

resentative and valued citizens ot the community. He was born in Han- 
cock county, Tennessee, near the Virginia line, April 26, 1834, a son of 
George VV. and Martha (Lockmiller) Baker, both natives ot that state. 
The father, of New England stock, and the mother, of German ancestry, 
lived and died in their native county, where the former followed general 
agricultural pursuits. 

Calloway C. Baker acquired his education in the district schools of his 
home section and for a time after he had laid aside his books worked upon 
his father's farm. He then went to Texas and in 1852, came to. Appa- 
noose county, locating on land two miles south of Unionville. He found 
here pioneer conditions upon every side, tor the country around Udell 
township was sparsely settled and the only trading facilities were offered 
by a little log store conducted by "Uncle" John Miller. Mr. Baker pur- 
chased a one hundred and sixty acre farm and gave his attention entirely 
to agricultural pursuits, attaining a gratifying degree of success. In 1865 
he went to Washington count}-, Arkansas, and there opened a general 
store but after five years he sold this enterprise and returned to A[)panoose 
countA', where he purchased a homestead and farmed upon this property 
continuously until his death, on July 28, 1905. In addition to his general 
agricultural pursuits he was extensively engaged in buying and shipping 
stock, his cattle commanding a ready sale in the Chicago markets. 

On the 24th of May, 18^7, Mr. Baker was united in marriage to Miss 
Lucy J. Bishop, a daughter of William and Nancy (Clark) Bishop. When 
the wife of our subject was ten years of age her parents determined to 
locate in Iowa and, accordingly, they .set out upon the journey. The 
father, however, died in McLean coimty. Illinois, and was buried in that 
section. His widow and children were lett with the teams, tor Mrs. Baker's 
brother Robert had also succumbed to typhoid fever. .She therefore wrote 
to her son, Joseph Bishop, who was then in Iowa, ami he joined her in 
Illinois and drove the teams into Appanoose county. The widow here 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres in Udell township, the property 
which the subject of this review afterward bought and developed. She 
died upon this farm on September 26, 1891. She and her husband had 
seven children: Judy .Ann, Joseph .lackson. Robert, William W. and 
Louis N., who have passed away; Lucy J., the wife of the subject of 
this review: and Putnam F., formerly of Moravia. .Appanoose county, who 
died December 9, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Baker became the parents of three 
children. Nancy Isabella, bom August 8, 1862. married A. .1. Dickson, a 
ranchman and stockman of Beaver county, Oklahoma, and tin y have one 
daughter, -Anna. Martha Elizabeth, who was born Januarv 14. 1874, is 
the wife of William Miller, a fanner of I'dell township, and they have 



168 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

tour children, Claudius C, Marian Mildred, Max and Neil. William 
Russell was born September 6, 187^, and died February 2, 1876. After 
the death of her husband Mrs. Baker moved to the home of her daughter, 
Mrs. William Miller, of Udell township, and there resided for one year, 
after which she sold her farm and purchased a residence in Unionville, 
where she now makes her home. 

Mr. Baker was a firm democrat in his political beliefs and his religious 
views were in accord with the doctrines of the Missionary Baptist church, 
to which his wife also belonged. She has now, however, transferred her 
membership to the church in Unionville. Mr. Baker was for many years 
assessor of Udell township and school director ot his home district. Frat- 
ernally he was affiliated with the Masonic lodge of Unionville and he 
was a diligent, enterprising and resourceful business man, whose labors 
along constructive lines brought substantial results. W'hatever he under- 
took he carried forward to successful completion and became one of the 
most progressive factors in local affairs. His death occurred on the 28th 
of July, 1905, after a residence of over fifty years in this county. He 
was in all things loyal to high ideals, progressive in citizenship, able in 
business, and prized above all the companionship and regard of his wife 
and children. He was known throughout the community as an exemplary 
citizen. 



PIERCE WILSON. 



Among the residents of Centerville who at one time were closely asso- 
ciated with agricultural and coal-mining interests of the surrounding dis- 
tricts and who are now enjoying the fruits of their former toil is num- 
bered Pierce Wilson. He is a native of Iowa and a son of one of its earliest 
and most prominent pioneers, and his entire lite has been spent in the 
state where he makes his home. His birth occurred in Lee county, on 
May 23, 1852, his parents being Robert P. and Mahahi (Harper) Wilson. 
The father was born in Cabell county, Virginia, on the 1 ith of July, 1813, 
and the mother in Pendleton county, in the same state, on May 12, 1820. 
The paternal branch of this family is of Scotch ancestry and has been for 
two generations in America. The mother is of German stock, her grand- 
parents having been born in the fatherland. Robert P. Wilson remained 
in what is now "West \'irginia until he grew to manhood and then moved 
to Wisconsin, where for a number of years he worked in the lead mines. 
In 1839 he came to Lee county, Iowa, among the early settlers in the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 169 

state. He took up government land and in 1H41 brought his young wife 
to live upon the tann. They remained there until 1847, in which year 
they came to Appanoose count) ami entered nine hundred acres of hmd 
in Lincoln township. Alter building a log cabin upon this property the 
father returned with his family to Lee county and there remained until 
l8>2, when he made a permanent settlement in Appanoose county. From 
that time until his death he made substantial contributions to the develop- 
ment and advancement of this section ot the state ot Iowa and when 
he passed away in 1896 his death was felt as a distinct public loss. 
In every relation of his lite he was true to the obligations and responsi- 
bilities which rested upon him. He served his state faithfully in the Black 
Hawk war under General Henrj Dodge and was tor one term a repre- 
sentative in the Iowa state legislature, displaying in his official life the 
same high courage and conscientiousness which marked his activities upon 
the battletield. His wife died in 1894. ^^e had come to Iowa with her 
uncle, Abe Hinkle, in 1838, having made the journey from West \'ir- 
ginia on horseback. She remained a resident of this state until her demise. 

Pierce Wilson acquired his education in the district schools of .\ppa- 
noose county and remained with his parents until his marriage, which 
occurred in 1879. In that year he purchased two hundred acres of land 
in Franklin township and made his home upon it. To this he later added 
three hundred adjoining acres and one hundred and twenty acres of his 
father's estate. The last tract was valuable coal land and is now leased to 
the Xuma Block Coal Company. I'pon the remaining portion of his farm 
Mr. Wilson resided until 1909 and during the period transformed it into 
a rich and productive property, supplied with modern equipment and 
accessory. In 1909 he rented the farm and moved into Centerville. where 
he has since resided. 

In 1879 Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Sarah G. Hol- 
brook, a daughter of Luther R. and Mary A. (Mitchell) Holbrook, the 
former bom in Tolland county, Connecticut, on the 27th of August, 1813, 
and the latter in New York state, February 3, 1814, both of old New 
England families. Their marriage occurred in 1838 and in the same year 
they removed to Lee county, Iowa, where the father entered a tract of 
government land, which he developed and improved until i8>o, when 
he came to Appanoose county and took up a large tract in Pleasant town- 
ship, upon which he built the first log cabin on the prairie. In 1863 he 
changed the trend of his activities from general farming to the conduct 
of a nursery and he continued in that business for over twenty years, start- 
ing as a pioneer and becoming in time one of the leading representatives of 
this occupation. He remained upon his farm in .\[ipanoose county until 



170 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

his death, which occurred in 1891. He had survived his wife for some 
time, her death having occurred in 18H0. The wife of our subject is a 
native of Appanoose county, where she was born on the 27th of August, 
1853. She was educated in the Centerville graded schools and supple- 
mented this by a two years' course in the Iowa State College at Ames. 
Previous to her marriage she taught in the public schools of her native 
county, doing able work for twenty terms. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson became 
the parents of three children. Mary was born in Appanoose count)-, Octo- 
ber 4, 1885, ^nd is the wife of B. W. Crossley, a dairyman of Council 
Bluffs, Iowa. Both are graduates of the Iowa State College. Halle was 
born February 20, 1888, and is now in training at the Murray Hos[)ital 
in Butte, Montana. The youngest child, Faye, was born March 28, 1892, 
and after completing the course in the Centerville high school, in 1911, 
entered the Iowa State College, taking a course in domestic science. Mrs. 
Wilson and all the children in this family are members of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution at Centerville. 

Fraternally Mr. W'ilson is affiliated with Centerville Lodge. No. 940, 
B. P. O. E., and in politics is a democrat. He has, however, never sought 
nor desired public office, although he is public-spirited in matters of citi- 
zenship and loyal in his support of progressive public measures. He is 
interested in the welfare of Centerville and as the years have gone by has 
won for himself a creditable position as a valued citizen and business 
man. 



WILLARD JOSHUA FENTOX, M. D. 

Careful training and conscientious service in the practice of medicine 
has made Dr. Willard Joshua Fenton one of the leading physicians not 
only of Mystic but of Appanoose county. He was born in Lancaster, 
Missouri, February l, 1881, and is a son of J. B. and Susan E. (Tucker) 
Fenton, both of whom were natives of Missouri, and now reside in 
Columbia, that state. Their entire lives have been passed in Missouri, 
where Mr. Fenton for many )ears toUowed farming but is now living 
retired. In the family were three children, of whom Dr. Fenton is the 
eldest, the others being: Oden L., also of Columbia; and Laura Campbell, 
who is doing post-graduate work at the State l^niversity of Missouri. 

Dr. Fenton was reared at the place of his birth and in the acquirement 
of his education passed through consecutive grades in the public schools 
until graduated from the high school at Lancaster, with the class of 1900. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 171 

He then entered the medical department of the Missouri State University, 
in which he spent one year, and further prepared for his chosen profession 
by study in the Keokuk College of Physicians .Jc' Surgeons, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1904. He then located for practice 
in Mystic, opening an office here in May, 1904, and in the intervening 
period of ei^ht years he has successfully followed his profession, proving 
his capability as a factor in successfully combating disease. He is one of 
the local surgeons for the Milwaukee railroad and he is a member of the 
County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. His connection with the different medical 
societies keeps him in close touch with the advanced work that is being 
ilone by the i)rofession, and he is quick to adopt new methods which his 
judgment sanctions as of vital worth and force in checking the ravages 
of disease. He has business interests aside from the practice of medicine, 
being now president of the Mystic Mutual Telephone Company. He is 
also local examiner for four of the leading insurance companies. 

In June, 1903, Dr. Fenton was united in marriage to Miss Zilla 
Heaton, a native of Lancaster, Missouri, and a daughter of J. J. Heaton, 
a druggist of that place. They now have two children, Heaton J. and 
Dorothy M. Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Dr. 
Fenton has supported the democratic party but manifests only a citizen's 
interest in politics, his time and attention being fully occupied by his 
professional duties, which are constantly growing in volume and import- 
ance. Dr. Fenton is a .Mason and has taken the degrees of both the lodge 
and chapter. He also holds membership with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights and 
Ladies of Security, and both he and his wife are connected with the 
Eastern Star and with the Rebekahs. His acquaintance is wide and rlu- 
opinion entertained for him b\- rliose who know him is most favorable, 
arising from his admirable personal (jualitics and his close adherence to 
high professional standards. 



WILLIAM EDWARDS. 



Among the honored veterans of flu- Civil war in .Appanoose county 
appears the name of William Edwards, who for more than forty years 
has been idcntitied with the agric\iltural and business interests of Moulton. 
Although the greater part of his lite has been passed in Iowa, he is a native 
of Kentucky, having been born in Laurel county, that state, on the 19th 



172 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

of December, 1843. He is a son of William and Marilla (Elliott) 
Edwards, who are likewise natives of Kentucky, the father's birth ha%'ing 
occurred in Laurel county on the 29th of January, 1811, while the 
mother's natal day was January 29, 1816. The Edwards family orig- 
inally came from Tennessee, but they were among the early pioneers of 
Kentuck}', locating in Laurel county, where they took up some government 
land. There the grandtather, William Edwards, lived and died. Wil- 
liam and Marilla Edwards were reared and married in Kentucky, where 
they made their home until 1850, when they came to Iowa. They first 
settled in \'an Buren county, but in the spring of 1851, they came to Ap- 
panoose county, and the lather took up a tract of government land in 
Wells township.. He continued to increase his acreage from time to time 
until he owned about live hundred acres, a hundred and sixty of which 
was timber land. Upon retiring from active life he removed to Moulton, 
where he passed awa}'. The mother is also deceased. Of their marriage 
were born nine children, one of whom, Andrew, died in infancy. The 
other members of the family were: Elizabeth, the widow of S. P. Elam, 
of Moulton; James Wesley, a captain in Company B, Second Missouri 
Cavalry, who passed away in the Indian territory in the vicinity of Caney, 
Kansas, from injuries received in the service; Mary Ann, the deceased 
wife of Isaac A. Coffman, of Wheatland, Missouri ; Lewis, a member of 
the Iowa Home Guards during the Civil war, who is now residing in Erie, 
Kansas; Daniel, a member of a Missouri regiment during the Civil war, 
now residing in Moulton; William, our subject; Isaac C, a former resident 
of Appanoose county, who is deceased; and Matison S., who is more full)- 
mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

William Edwards was a lad of about se\en \»'ars when he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Iowa, where he has ever since 
made his home. He obtained his education in the public schools and 
assisted with the cultivation of the home farm until the breaking out of 
the Civil war. When the first call came for troops he responded bv 
enlisting for six months as a member of Compan}' B, Second Missouri 
Cavalry, in which he was promoted to the rank of sergeant. At the 
expiration ot his period of enlistment he reenlisted and remained at the 
front until the close of hostilities. He participated in many of the notable 
conflicts of the war, having been .present at Pierce's Mills, Kirksville, 
Cape Girardeau, Pilot Knob, Bloomfield. Hickory Ridge, and he also took 
part in the campaigns against Generals Marmaduke, Price and Quantrell. 
When mustered out he returned to Iowa and continued his education in 
the high school at Centerville, following which he taught for two terms. 
In 1870. he came to Moulton and engaged in buying, feeding and ship- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY " 173 

ping cattle and hogs, in which business he has continued to engage winter 
and summer tor tortj-two years. He has met with more than an average 
degree of success and during the intervening years has acquired a valuable 
farm of three hundred and twenty acres located a half mile from Moulton. 
He engaged in the cultivation of this place until four years ago, when 
he turned it over to his son, and has since been devoting his entire attention 
to his stock business. 

On the 1st of Januarj-, 1867, Mr. Edwards was married to Miss Mary 
A. Floyd, a daughter of William and Martha (Storms) Floyd, natives 
of Laurel count)-, Kentuck)-. The family came to Iowa about 1850, 
locating near Bloomtield, Davis county, where they resided for nearly 
tifteen years. At the expiration of that time they went to Hilltown, 
Iowa, and about 1870 they removed from there to Milan, Missouri. In 
1880, they went to Peru, Kansas, where the mother continues to reside, 
but the father passed away in 1909. They had seven children, the second 
in order of birth being Mrs. Edwards. The others are as follows: Frank, 
who resides in Peru, Kansas; Jesse, who lives in Syracuse, Kansas; James, 
also of Peru ; Addie, the wife of George Baker, of Cane)', Kansas ; Hattie, 
who married John Mertz, of Sedan, Kansas; and Effie, the wife of Claude 
Clements, of Peru. To Mr. and Mrs. Edwards were born nine children, 
three of whom are deceased: Belle, whose death occurred at the age of 
ten years; and two, who died in infanc)-. Those living are as follows: 
Ulysses, a farmer, who married Martha Black and is residing in Paw- 
huska, Oklahoma; Martha Ma)-, the wife of the Hev. George E. Tifft, a 
minister of the Methodist Episcojxil church, located at Parsons, Kansas, 
and the mother of one child; Charles Wesley, a member of the United 
States navy for four years and a veteran of the Spanish-American war, 
having served on the Montgomer)-, who married Jessie Elam and has one 
child, now managing his father's farm; Clyde \'., who married Carrie 
Knittle and has one child, a resident of Moulton; Clarence, a real-estate 
dealer at Ness City, Kansas, who married Nellie Baldridge and has one 
child; and James H., operating a farm near Moulton, who married Iva 
Ciar) and has two children. The wife and mother [)assed away on the 
3d of March, 1898, and in 1901, Mr. Edwards was married to his present 
wife, whose maiden name was Maude M. Taylor. She is a daughter 
of Phineas and Susan M. Taylor, and is descended from one of the pioneer 
families of Appanoose county. The |)aternal grandfather, William 
Taylor, removed to this county from near Cleveland, Ohio, in the early 
'jos, and located in Washington township, where all of his children were 
born. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwards express their religious belief through their con- 



174 ■ HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

nection with the Methodist E[)isc()pal church with which he united in 1S57. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with the Grand Army ot the Re{)ublic and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has never figured prominently 
in political affairs, but served as justice of the peace and township trustee, 
discharging his duties in both capacities in a capable manner. He assisted 
in the organization and is a director of the Moulton State Savings Bank. 
Mr. Edwards has always led an active life, directing his undertakings 
with the foresight and sagacity which invariably bring success in an}- field 
of endeavor, and is numbered among the substantial citizens of his com- 
munity. His honesty of purpose, fidelity to duty and honorable method 
of conducting his transactions have won him the esteem and respect of his 
fellow townsmen and business associates, among whom he numbers many 
friends of long years' standing. 



JOHN J. TAYLOR. 



John J. Taylor, a prominent and influential resident of Udell, is 
engaged in business as a banker and farmer, owning five hundred and 
forty acres of well improved and valuable land. His birth occurred in 
Guernsey county, Ohio, on the 3d of June, 1861, his parents being King 
P. and Asenath (Cox) Taylor, who were of English and German descent 
respectively. The father was born in the northern part of North Carolina 
in 1815, while the mother's birth occurred in Guernsey county, Ohio. 
The paternal great-grandfather of our subject was a native of England and 
a Quaker. James Taylor, the grandfather, served in the Revolutionary 
war and was wounded in the battle ot Brandywine, dying a few vears 
later as a result of his injuries. King P. Taylor, the father of John J. 
Taylor, removed to Ohio with his widowed mother when a jouth of 
eighteen, having lost his father in North Carolina when he was but eight- 
een months old. He was married in the Buckeye state and in 186^ 
removed to McDonough county, Illinois, where he purchased land. In 
1874 he took up his abode in Clarke county, Iowa, and purchased a farm 
of three hundred and sixty acres, continuing its operation until called to 
his final rest in 1891. The demise of his wife occurred in i88c). Both 
were devoted and consistent members of the Baptist church of Science 
Hill, in Clarke county, Iowa. 

John J. Taylor obtained his education in the district schools and when 
a youth of sixteen began teaching, acting as a public school instructor 
for two years and spending the summer seasons in the normal schools at 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 175 

Aurora, Illinois, and \'alparaiso, Indiana. In 1880 he was elected prin- 
cipal ot the high school at Murray, Clarke county, serving in that capacity 
tor live years, at the end ot which time he was chosen county su[ierin- 
tendent ot schools. In 1886 he resigned that position and removed to 
Broken Bow, Custer county, Nebraska, where he took charge of the public 
schools. In the fall of 1888 he went upon the road as traveling salesman 
for Harper Brothers, jiublishers ot New York city, remaining in the 
service of that concern for one year. In 1889, because of the failing 
health of his parents, he returned home and took charge of the farm, con- 
tinuing its operation until after the death of both his father and mother. 
In igoo the home place was sold and Mr. Taylor came to Udell, bujing 
one hundred acres on section 17 and engaging in the real-estate business. 
In 1903 he purchased his present bank of R. P. Jordan and has since 
conducted the institution in a manner that has insured its continued growth 
and success. He has augmented his landed holdings by additional pur- 
chase and now owns tive hundred and forty acres that yield him a gratify- 
ing annual income. Enterprising, alert and energetic, his undertakings 
both as a banker and agriculturist have been attended with prosperity and 
have won him a place among the leading and substantial citizens of the 
community. 

In 1890 Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Chastina Elliott, 
who was born in Illinois on the 25th of April, 1864, her parents being 
William and Sarah (Andrews) Elliott, natives of Ohio. William Elliott 
lost his father when a small boy. His mother was a school teacher. Re- 
moving to Oswego, Iowa, William Elliott purchased two hundred and 
forty acres of land and through its cultivation made sufficient monev to 
educate his brothers and sisters. Sarah Andrews removed to Illinois 
about the same time and in that state gave her hand in marriage to 
William Elliott, and they resided on the same farm for fifty years. Prior 
to her marriage she had followed the profession of teaching. She passed 
away in Illinois, in 1907, but Mr. Elliott survives and makes his home 
with our subject. Mrs. Taylor was graduated from Jennings Seminary 
at Aurora, Illinois, in 1884, and prepared for the profession of teaching 
in Central Nonnal College at Danville, Indiana, acting as a teacher for 
three years altogether. In 188,- she went to Murray. Iowa, as principal 
of the high school at that place and the two following years served as 
school superintendent. She likewise taught in a summer school in Custer 
county, Nebraska, and was very successful as an educator, imparting 
clearly and readily to others the knowledge that she had acquired. Mr. 
and Mrs. Taylor have four children. Isabella Asenath, who was born 
on the 31st of October, 1891, completed the high-school course at Des 



176 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Moines in 1909, assisted her father in the bank for three years and is now 
editor of the Udell American. William King, whose birth occurred on 
the 6th of March, 1893, is a senior in the Centerville high school. Mary 
Ida, whose natal day was March 28, 1895, is a senior in the Des Moines 
high school. John Judson was born on the 6th ot March, 1909. 

Mr. Taylor has given his political allegiance to the republican party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Masons, belonging to the blue lodge at Unionville, 
Appanoose county, and the conimandery at Osceola, Clarke county. He 
is also a member of Lodge No. 713 of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Udell, while his wife belongs to the Rebekah Lodge at that 
place. His religious faith is indicated by his affiliation with the Brethren 
church at Udell, to which his wife and children likewise belong.. What 
he has accomplished represents the fit utilization of the innate talents 
which are his and the directing of his efforts along lines where mature 
judgment is leading the way. 



LINCOLN KNAPP. 



Probably no man is better known throughout Appanoose county as 
a breeder of high-grade heavy draft horses than Lincoln Knapp, who has 
made his home in Centerville since 1881 and in the intervening years has 
become widely recognized as a progressive, able and resourceful business 
man. He is a native of Appanoose county, born August 22, 1861, and is 
a son of Jacob and Frances (Allen) Knapp, the former a native of Ohio, 
where his birth occurred May 3, 1827, and the latter of Massachusetts, 
born January 13, 1824. The father was of German ancestry and when 
he had reached maturity worked in his father's tannery in Madison county, 
Ohio, for some time. Later he learned the shoemaker's trade, but after 
his marriage, which occurred Januarj- 1, 1846, he went farther west, 
locating in Centerville, Appanoose count}', where he purchased land. He 
bought forty acres, upon which a part of the city now stands, and there 
opened a shoe shop which he conducted for two years with gratifying 
success. He invested the profits of this enterprise in five hundred acres 
of land in Chariton township and began fanning and dealing in horses. 
Gradually he abandoned the general aspects of his agricultural pursuits 
and centered his attention upon horse breeding, becoming well known as 
an importer and raiser of heavy draft horses. Being a man of excellent 
training and with a gift for writing, he made his knowledge more truly 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 177 

effective by contributing many articles to tlu- breeders' journals and 
gazettes. In 1881 he rented out his farm and returned to the city, buying 
twenty-four acres within the town limits. The property which he pur- 
chased was the old Waddington homestead, a beautiful, picturesque home 
built in the southern style of architecture and one of the largest houses 
in the city. The father of our subject took up his residence there and 
continued his horse-breeding business until his death, which occurred on 
the 6th of March, 1896. His widow resides in Independence township 
with her daughter, Mrs. D. O. Scott. 

Lincoln Knapp acquired his education in the country schools in Chari- 
ton township and from his childhood was familiar with the principles of 
scientific stock-breeding. He remained on the farm with his father until 
1881 and then accompanied his parents into the city, where he has lived 
continuously since that time. After his marriage, which occurred in 1882, 
he bought a home at No. 903 West Maple street and went into partner- 
ship with his father in the breeding of draft horses. After the death of 
Jacob Knapp his son carried forward the work which he had begun and 
now gives his entire attention to the breeding of Percheron horses. In 
this he has met with a success which is the natural result of his long 
familiarity with his business, his great natural ability and his scientific 
methods. 

In 1882 Mr. Kna[)p was united in marriage to Miss Zada Slater, a 
daughter of William K. and Rachel (Hanold) Slater, the former of whom 
was born in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, on the 22d of July, 1833, and the 
latter in Portage county, Ohio, February 8, 1843. Mrs. Knapp's father 
is of English ancestry, her grandfather having come from the British Isles 
when he was fifteen years of age and settled in Philadelphia. On the 
maternal side Mrs. Knapp is of Scotch descent. Her father left his native 
state of Pennsylvania when he was sixteen years of age and went to North 
Benton, Ohio, where his marriage occurred. He taught school there for 
several years and later followed the same profession in the jiublic schools 
of \'an Buren county, Michigan, laboring in that section from 185:6 to 
1876. Being a man of keen s[Mritual perception and of a logical mind 
religiously inclined, his attention was attracted to the higher things of 
life and he felt himself inspired to proclaim religious truths. He was 
ordained in the Christian church and preached in Wisconsin, Missouri, 
Illinois and later in Appanoose county, being aided in his work by his 
broad culture, wide reading and retentive memory. He remained in Iowa 
until 1899 and then returned to Michigan, where he died on the 28rh of 
September, 1904. His wife is living on the home place in Michigan, 
but spends her winters in Iowa with Mr. and Mrs. Knapp. Mrs. Knapp 



178 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

is the only child born to their union, her birthplace being Van Buren 
county, Michigan, and her natal day June 24, 1861. Our subject and 
his wife have one daughter, Eva, who was born in Missouri, March 7, 
1883. She is the wife of Harry C. Bradley, by whom she has two chil- 
dren: Dorothy, born March 20, 1906; and James K., whose birth occurred 
July 8, igi 1. 

Mr. Knapp has no fraternal affiliations and although he gives loyal 
support to the republican party, has never sought public office. He early 
realized that success must be purchased at the price of earnest and well 
directed labor and his record has been one of indefatigable effort and close 
application to business. 



LOUIS ANDERSON. 



Louis Anderson, manager and treasurer of the Center Coal Company, 
is a well known and prosperous business man of the city. His birth 
occurred in Karlstad, Sweden, on the 27th of March, 1861, his parents 
being Andrew and Annie Anderson, who spent their entire lives in that 
country. The father followed agricultural pursuits throughout his active 
career. 

Louis Anderson spent the lirst twenty-one years of his life in the land 
of his nativity and in 1882 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, 
locating at Reed City, Michigan, where he entered the service of a large 
lumber concern as inspector. Alter having served in that capacity for 
about three and a half years he returned to Sweden and spent one year 
in a business college of that country. In 1886 he again came to the 
United States and, making his way to the northern part of Wisconsin, 
began working in the iron mines. In the fall of 1887 he came to Appa- 
noose county, Iowa, and here worked in the coal mines until 1888, when 
he was elected secretary of the newly organized Anchor Coal Company. 
In 1889 the concern sold out to Jim Wilson, St., and Mr. I'hillips, of 
Centerville, and Mr. Anderson went back to Wisconsin, remaining in that 
state until 1893. In that year he returned to Centerville. this county, 
engaging in coal mining until 1901. At the time of the organization of 
the Exline Coal Company he was chosen its secretary and manager. In 
igio he went to Laneville, Appanoose county, and embarked in business 
on his own account as a coal miner and shipper. In July. 1912. he became 
identified with the Center Coal Company as manager and treasvirer and 
has since served in the dual capacity, his efforts being a potent factor in 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 179 

the growth and success of the concern. He is a nuin of splendid business 
ability and keen discernment and well merits the prosperity which has 
come to him. 

In December, 1890, Mr. .Vnderson was united in marriage to Miss 
Kmma Johnson, who was born in Sweden on the 1st of December, 1862, 
her parents being John and Emily (Peterson) Johnson, likewise natives 
of that country. They emigrated to the United States in 1883, locating 
first in Wavne county, Iowa, and later coming to .\ppanoose county, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives. John Johnson devoted his atten- 
tion to farming throughout his life. To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have 
been born nine children, as follows: Matilda, whose birth occurred in 
Wisconsin on the nth of August, i8gi, and who is the wife ot George 
Shinonegel. of Centerville; Walter, Abbie and Luella, all of whom are 
deceased; Gerhard, who was born on the 27th of December, 1897; Loyce, 
whose natal day was May 23, 1899; Theodore, born November 28, 1900; 
\ioler, whose birth occurred on the 28th of August, 1902; and Herman, 
born December 11, 1905. The two oldest children were natives ot 
Wisconsin, while the remainder were born in Appanoose county, Iowa. 

Politically Mr. Anderson is independent, while his religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Swedish Lutheran church of Center- 
ville, to which his wife also belongs. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Independent Order of 
Odd P\'llows of Centerville. Coming to the new world in early man- 
hood, he eagerly availed himself of the opportunities offereti in a land 
unhampered by caste or class and has worked his way steadily upward to 
a place among the prosperous and esteemed citizens of his community. 



THOM.VS H. DILLON. 



In the latter years of his life, Thomas H. Dillon figured in the com- 
mercial circles of Centerville as a grocer. He was well known as a rep- 
resentative and energetic business man, as a progressive citizen and a 
consistent Christian, his salient qualities being ever such as commanded 
for him the respect and good-will of those with whom he was brought 
in contact. He was born in Lake county, Illinois, October 16, 1844, and 
was a son of Thomas and Abigail (Davis) I)iIlon, the former a native 
of Ireland and the latter of England. The father, who was a shoemaker 
by trade, settled on Long Island on coming to the United States and later 
removed westward to Lake county, Illinois, where he took ii]) farming, 
^pending his remaining days in that Iwalit). 



180 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

The boyhood and youth of Thomas H. Dillon were passed upon the 
home farm in Illinois, and he attended the district schools there through 
the winter seasons, while the summer months were devoted to the work 
of the fields, so that he early became familiar with all the duties and 
labors incident to farm work. In 1867, when about twenty-three years 
of age, he removed to Missouri and engaged in farming near La Plata. 
Subsequently, however, he went to Bloomrield, but after a year returned 
to Missouri, settling in Lancaster. In August, 1892, he arrived in Cen- 
terville, where he had erected a new residence for his family and his 
remaining days were passed in this city. For twenty years previous he 
had been a salesman on the road, representing a wholesale grocery house 
of Keokuk, Iowa, and this gave him intimate knowledge of the business 
in which he afterward engaged, for in 1900 he established a grocery store 
in Centerville, conducting it successfully up to the time of his death, which 
occurred on the 9th of October, igo8. His daughter Grace then took 
charge of the store and is capably managing it today. 

It was in 1867 that Mr. Dillon was married in Waukegan, Illinois, 
to Miss Mary Wilson, a daughter of S. D. and Polly ,\nn ( Matteer) 
Wilson. The father, a native of Pennsylvania, was of Irish and German 
descent, and was a carpenter by trade but lived upon a farm, his .sons, 
however, cultivating the fields while he worked at carpentering. His 
wife was also a native of Pennsylvania and was of Scotch and Dutch 
lineage. Thej- became residents of Chicago, where the father passed 
away in 1896, the mother afterward removing to Centerville in 1904 and 
making her home with Mr. and Mrs. Dillon, until her death in 1907. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Dillon were born eleven children. Emma, who was 
born in La Plata, Missouri, and became the wife of George Moore, died 
in 1897, leaving two children, Charles and Florence. Kie owns and con- 
ducts a millinery store. Carrie is the wife of Garrett De Motte, a real- 
estate man of Hull, Iowa, and they have three children. Esther, Carroll 
and Scott Dillon. Anna is the wife of J. T. Sharrod. a banker of Plano, 
Iowa, and their children are Gail and Joseph Dillon. Dot is a student 
of osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri. Maude is living in Los Angeles, 
California. Thomas, a farmer of Coal City, Iowa, married Lottie Hall 
and has two children, Thomas and Robert. .Arthur, who is practicing 
osteopathy in Centerville, married Minta Dawkins and they have two 
children, John and James. Paul is a railroad man of Kankakee, Illinois. 
Grace became the wife of l>uther Dawkins and they are now carrying on 
the store formerly owned by her father. Abbie, the youngest of the 
family, is studying music in Chicago. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 181 

Mr. Dillon was for several j'ears treasurer of the Centerville Retail 
Grocers Association and stood high in the regard of his colleagues and 
contemporaries in the business circles ot Appanoose county. He was 
always enterprising, reliable and energetic and well merited the success 
that came to him. His political support was given to the republican 
party and after his removal to Centerville he served as a member of its 
city council. He belonged to Centerville Lodge, No. 400, B. P. O. E. ; 
Centerville Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of which he was worshipful master 
for a number of years; and both he and his wife were members of the 
Order of Eastern Star. He held membership in the Christian church 
and his wife in the Methodist Episcopal church. Theirs was a hospitable 
home, whose good cheer was greatly enjoyed b)- their many friends. Mr. 
Dillon commanded the respect of all with whom he came in contact in 
fraternal, political, business, social or church relations, and the sterling 
traits of character which he displayed constituted an example well worthy 
of emulation. He was always loyal to duty, faithful to his friends and 
devoted to his family, ever regarding home ties as most sacred. 



N. E. MURDY. 



Prominent among the leading progressive and substantial business men 
ot Moravia is N. E. Murdy, a registered pharmacist, who since 1904 has 
been engaged in the drug business, his activity contributing not only to his 
individual success but constituting also a factor in general development. 
Mr. Murdy is a native of Appanoose count}-, born in Moulton, May 5, 
1878, and is a son of William. M. and Emeline (Wamsley) Murdy, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Indiana. The father 
came to Iowa in 1857, bringing with him his widowed mother, his father 
having died in Pennsylvania. The mother of our subject came to this 
state with her parents in 1848, her father, Wendell Vincent Wamsley, 
being one ot the earliest settlers in Washington township. He took up 
land in that section when his nearest neighbor, John Cupp, was two and a 
quarter miles away, the next nearest, Mr. Sutton, residing at a distance 
of six miles. When the father of our subject came to this state he bought 
land in Washington township and in the course of years added to his 
holdings, acquiring three hundred acres, which he still owns. However, 
he has now retired and he and his wife make their home in Moulton. 
Mrs. William E. Murdy is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

N. E. Murdy was reared at home and acquired his education in the 



182 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUMTY 

district schools of Washington township and in the Moulton high school, 
from which institution he was graduated in 1899. Afterward he taught 
school for two years, but in 1901 took up the study of pharmacy under C. A. 
Powers, of Moulton. Continuing in the employ of Mr. Powers for a time, 
he then went west to Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he worked in a drug 
store for a year, returning at the end of that time to Moulton. On the 5th 
of April, 1903, he passed his examinations and received his diploma as a 
registered pharmacist. Having bought the business conducted by his former 
employer, he had managed it alone for six months, when he sold back to Mr. 
Powers a half interest, and shortly afterward disposed of his other half in- 
terest, and in May, 1904, came to Moravia, where he purchased the drug 
business owned by F. C. Smith & Company, to the management of which he 
has given most of his time and attention tor the past eight years. He is an 
able, resourceful and enterprising business man and his methods are at all 
times practical and progressive. As a result his patronage has extended 
rapidly and has reached gratifying proportions, placing him among the 
men who are an influence in business circles of the city. 

On the 14th of October, 1903, Mr. Murdy married Miss Elma Painter, 
of Kirksville, Missouri, and to their union were born three children, two 
of whom are living, Paul Painter and Newton Gordon. Mr. and Mrs. 
Murdy are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Murdy is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership 
in Antiquity Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and in the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He is a loyal democrat and active in public life, being a member 
of the present town council and of the Moravia school board, bringing to 
the discharge of his official duties the same well-directed energ}' and good 
judgment which have distinguished the activities of his business career. 
In all of his dealings he is thoroughly reliable and straightforward, and 
in matters of citizenship helpful and progressive, giving his aid and in- 
fluence to many measures for the public good. 



WILLIAM T. MYERS. 



One of the most prominent, successful and representative citizens of 
Appanoose county is William T. Myers, who has lived in this section 
since i8f2 and in the course of a long, honorable and worthy career has 
gained the unqualified respect and confidence of all with whom he has 
been associated. For many years he was clo.sely and influenrially con- 
nected with agricultural pursuits and was at one time an extensive land- 




WILLIAM T. MYERS 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUXTY 185 

owner but since 1905 has lived retired in Centerville, having earned rest 
and comfort by well directed work in the past. Mr. Myers is a native of 
Indiana, born in January, 1832, his parents being Joseph and Mary 
(O'Connor) Myers, the former a native of Germany and the latter of 
England. The father was a farmer and emigrated to America in his 
early life, settling in Indiana, in pioneer times. There he acquired land 
and gave his time and attention to its improvement and cultivation until 
his death, which occurred in 1838, when he was only thirty years of age. 
His wife survived him for some time, passing away in 1844. 

William T. Myers acquired his education in the public schools of 
Indiana and then he laid aside his books and began serving an appren- 
ticeship at the tanner's trade. However, he found this occupation not to 
his liking, abandoning it in order to work as a farm laborer. For four 
years he served in the employ of others and at the end of that time was 
able to rent a farm, which he operated successfully until 18^2, when he 
came to Appanoose county and entered a claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Center township, which is now Walnut township. With char- 
acteristic energy he began improving and developing his property, plant- 
ing the fields in the most suitable grains, and gradually his work was 
rewarded by abundant harvests. As his financial resources grew he added 
to his holdings until his farm comprised eleven hundred and fifty acres 
of fine land. He still owns this property but in 1905 gave up its active 
management and moved into Centerville, where he has bought a com- 
fortable home at No. 531 West Maple street. No man in Centerville is 
more honored and esteemed than he, for his entire life has been influenced 
by high standards of integrity and great sincerity of purpose and in all 
of its relations has been upright, straightforward and honorable. 

Mr. Myers has been twice married. In December, 1858, he wedded 
Miss .Anna Osborne, a daughter of William Osborne, a preacher, mechanic 
and farmer, who came to Appanoose county in early times and remained 
in this section for a number of years, following all of his various occupa- 
tions. When he left Iowa he went across the plains to Colorado, joining 
the rush of gold seekers to that state, and there he made his home until 
h\^ death. By his first wife Mr. Myers had three children: Mary, the 
wife of William Gillespie, whose son Carl is operating part of the home 
farm ; Amanda, the wife of Frank Cate, of Centerville ; and Rosie, deceased. 
Mr. Myers' first wife passed away in December, 1894, ^^^^ "" fhe 26rh 
of September, 1896, he was again wedded, his second union being with 
Mrs. Eliza (Matheny) Sherrard, a daughter of Joseph and Jane (Sterrett) 
Matheny, the former a native of Worcester, West N'irginia, and the latter 

of Beaver county, Pennsylvania. The father went to Pennsylvania in 
Vol. n— 1 1 



186 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

early times and there established himself in the salt business, operating 
his original enterprise along this line until his death, which occurred April 
18, 1838, when he was twenty-six years of age. His wife passed away 
April 30, of the same year. Mrs. Myers is a native of Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, born February 16, 1838. By her first marriage she had 
three children: Ella, the wife of J. H. Robinson, of Stillwater, Oklahoma; 
Albert L., who resides in Centerville; and Elmer R., a farmer in Payne 
county, Oklahoma. Mr. and Mrs. Myers are devout members of the 
Christian church. 

Mr. Myers gives his allegiance to the republican party and since cast- 
ing his first vote has been loyal in his support of its men and measures. 
He served for years as trustee and was nominated for the position as mem- 
ber of the county board but failed to qualify. He is public-spirited and 
progressive in his citizenship and is always willing to lend his influence 
and aid to movements for the public good. Having reached the age of 
eighty years, he has earned the retirement he is now enjoying, having 
labored sincerely and earnestly to make it possible. He is in all things 
a dignified and courteous gentleman, of kindly spirit and strongly marked 
convictions, who in the course of more than sixty years' residence here 
has left an impress for good upon his community. 



JOSEPH H. ROBERTSON. 

Joseph H. Robertson, a representative of an honored pioneer family 
of Appanoose county, was in former years extensively and successfully 
identified with general agricultural pursuits as a farmer and stockman. 
For the past decade he has made his home in Centerville, where he is 
still actively engaged in business as a buyer and shipper of stock, but not 
on such a large scale as previously. His birth occurred in this county on 
the 8th of January, 1858, his parents being Moses C. and Elizabeth 
(Streepyj Robertson, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of 
Knox county, Indiana. Moses C. Robertson was of Irish lineage, while 
Elizabeth Streepy came of German and Scotch descent. Throughout his 
active business career the former was successfully engaged in farming, 
stock-raising and shipping. When but a boy he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Indiana, remaining under the parental roof until he 
was married and started out as an agriculturist on his own account. In 
the fall of 1854 he came to Iowa, locating in Appanoose county, where 
he purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land. As his financial 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 187 

resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and capable manage- 
ment, he augiTiented his holdings by additional purchase until they em- 
braced more than eight hundred acres. He there engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising. In 1884 he put aside the active work ot the 
helds and took up his abode in Cincinnati, this county, where he spent 
the remainder ot his lite in honorable retirement. He lost his first wife 
in 1862 and subsequently married Mrs. Sarah Patterson, a daughter of 
Briggs Shepherd, who was an agriculturist of Appanoose county and 
passed away in 1894, aged eight)-two jears. Mrs. Sarah Robertson 
passed away at Cincinnati, this county, in i8y8. 

Joseph H. Robertson attended school in Cincinnati, this county, until 
fourteen },ears of age and then began providing for his own support, 
assisting his brother in the work of the helds for some time. Subsecjucntlv 
he spent two years at work in a blacksmith shop at Numa, this county, 
and on the expiration ot that period took a trip to Indiana. Returning 
to Appanoose county, he was here married in 1878 and began farming on 
his own accoimt. He first bought eighty acres of land a mile west of 
Cincinnati and trom time to time extended the boundaries of his place 
b) additional jjurchase until it comprised about four hundred acres. It 
was in 1887 that he embarked in business as a bujer and feeder of stock, 
feeding trom two hundred to eight hundred head of cattle yearly, for a 
period of fifteen to twenty-five years. In 1902 he placed his farm in 
charge of a tenant and has since made his home in Centerville, where he 
still buys and ships stock to some extent. In his undertakings as an 
agriculturist he has met with an enviable and well merited measure of 
prosperity-, and he has long been numbered among the substantial and 
representative citizens of his native county. 

In 1878 Mr. Robertson was united in marriage to Miss Emma Marth 
Stevenson, who was liorn in Ohio on the ^oth of November, 1857, her 
parents being Parkhili and Mar}- (Cnmder) Stevenson, of Irish and 
German descent respectivclv. The father's birth occurred near Pittshurc, 
Pennsylvania, while the mother was a native of Darke county, Ohio. 
Mr. Stevenson, a shoemaker by trade, was married in Ohio and in 1868 
came west, locating at Hibbsville, Appanoose county, Iowa. In 1S74 he 
removed to Cincinnati, this county, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, passing away in 1902. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity and 
was a worthy exemplar of the craft. The demise of his wife occurred at 
Cincinnati, this county, in 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Robertson arc the parents 
of three children. Ava .!.. who was born in this county on the 30th 
ot May, 1879, was graduated from the Cincinnati high school in 1898 
and is the wife of Harry Talbot of Centerville. Ora B., whose birth 



188 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

occurred in Appanoose county on the gth of June, 1881, gave her hand 
in marriage to J. G. Madden, an attorney of Lineville, Iowa. Joie C, 
born in Appanoose county on the 11th of June, 1891, is a farmer of 
\'ermillion township, this county. He married Miss Ruth Bradley, a 
daughter of Henry and Carry (Abernathy) Bradley, the former being at 
one time county superintendent of schools here. 

In politics Mr. Robertson is independent, supporting men and meas- 
ures rather than party. For two years he served as alderman at large in 
Centerville, making a creditable record in this connection. He is identi- 
fied with the Masons and the Benevolent Protective Order ot Elks and 
both he and his wife are members of the Eastern Star. Mr. Robertson's 
entire life has been spent in Appanoose county and his acquaintance here 
is a wide one, so that this record cannot tail to jirove of interest to many 
of our readers. 



CHARLES H. MEYERS. 



Charles H. Meyers, early settler in Iowa and a representative of one 
of the honored pioneer families of the state, has for many years been 
identified in an influential way with farming interests in Pleasant town- 
ship, and his enterprise and well-directed work have contributed substan- 
tially to the progress in this locality. He was born in Hancock county, 
Illinois, August 3, 1859, and is a son of George Meyers, a native of Bavaria, 
Germany, who grew to maturity in that country and came to America as a 
young man. He located in Hancock count}. Illinois, in pioneer rimes and 
there married Miss Kate Schneider, also a native ot Ciermany, born in 
Hesse-Darmstadt. They remained in Illinois until 1868, in which year 
they moved to Iowa and located in Franklin township, Appanoose county. 
Here the father of our subject purchased a tract of wild land and with 
characteristic energ}' and determination set about the task of opening up 
a farm. He fenced his fields, brought the land under the plow and was 
soon gathering abundant harvests. As his prosperity grew he added to 
his holdings until he owned three hundred and eighty acres of land, which 
he managed so carefully and ojierated along such practical lines that he 
became one of the substantial and wealthy residents of this part of the 
state. He gained widespread respect and esteem by reason of his honor- 
able standards and upright business methods, and when he died upon the 
homestead his passing was widely and tlceply regretted. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTV 189 

Charles H. Meyers came to Iowa with his parents in pioneer times, 
being at the time of his arrival a hul ot nine years. At intervals he 
attended the public schools, but his advantages along this line were ex- 
tremely limited and, although he is today a well-informed and cultured 
man, this is due almost entirely to his own efforts in reading and observa- 
tion. As a boy he aided in the hart! labor of breaking the soil anti tie- 
veloping the farm, but was atterward obliged to devote himself to minor 
tasks owing to his tailing health. At the age of twenty-one he left home 
in order to seek recuperation in less strenuous work, and accepted a position 
as driver of a medicine wagon for S. Baker. For one year he journeyed 
throughout Iowa anil then went to Lewistown, Fulton count), Illinois, 
where he drove a wagon for the Thompkins Medical Company for a number 
of years, traveling over seventy-five counties in that state and dealing 
with wholesale and retail dealers and private residents. He accomplished 
his aim of recovering his health, and later returned to the old home in 
Franklin township, where he joined his father in the operation ot the 
farm. He married in i(S88 and he and his wife began their domestic 
lite upon a tract ot land which Mr. Meyers had previously purchased. 
He farmed this in connection with rented land and was successful. How- 
ever, after a time he sold the property and moved to Colorado Spring.s, 
Colorado, returning to Iowa after ten months. He purchased a farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres in Appanoo.se county and upon this he 
still resides. The land lies on section l8. Pleasant township, and is in a 
high state of cultivation, the farm being well kept in every particular and 
[irovided with all the requisites for carrying on a model agricultural enter- 
prise. Mr. Meyers has erected a good residence, a barn and substantial 
outbuildings and has also planted a fine orchard of selected trees. In 
addition to general farming he engages extensively in stock-breeding, 
raising high grade cattle and hogs, some of which he prepares for the 
market. 

On the ^th of September. i8SS, Mr. .Meyers was united in marriage 
to Miss Emma Condra, who was horn and reared in .Appanoo.se county. 
where the father is a pro.sperous farmer of Franklin township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Meyers have four children: .\nna: Uicliard I... who i> aiding in the 
operation of the homestead: Minnie, who is a student in the Cincinnati 
high school; and Mary, who attends district school. Our subject and his 
wife are members of the Methoiiist ch>irch and attend Simpson chajiel. 

Mr. Meyers has important fraternal relations, being a Master Mason 
and a member of the Independent Order of Oiid Fellows, in which he has 
attained a place of prominence, having served in all the chairs and being 
a past grand. He is eminently progressive in matters of cifi/<'nship and 



190 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTY 

since attaining his majority has given loyal support to the republican 
party. For eight years he served as justice of the [)eace of Pleasant town- 
ship and was for three years a member of the county board of supervisors. 
He is a man whose industry, ability and success have made him influential 
in the affairs of the township and county and, being possessed of fine 
qualities of character and a progressive public spirit, he takes a deep in- 
terest in the general welfare of the community and commands the respect 
and confidence of his fellow citizens, being a substantial factor in the 
community. 



WILLIAM B. STICKLER. 

In a history of the agricultural development of Appanoose county it 
is imperative to mention William B. Stickler, who owns a fine farm of 
nearly four hundred acres in Pleasant township and has been well known 
for many years as a progressive agriculturist and a successful live-stock 
dealer. He is numbered among the old settlers in Iowa, having lived in 
Appanoose county since 1856, but his birth occurred in Miami county, 
Ohio, on the 4th of October, 1839. He is a son of John Stickler, who 
was born, reared and educated in Ohio and who there married Miss 
Nancy Wralson, who passed away when the subject ot this review was 
only one year old. The father of our subject was a carpenter by trade 
and followed this line of work and also engaged in farming during his 
entire active life. He moved to Iowa in 1856 and located in Appanoose 
county. 

William B. Stickler acquired his education in the public schools ot 
Appanoose county, but his advantages along this line were limited, as he 
had no chances to attend school beyond the primary grades. However, 
he has made up for all deficiencies in his early education by study and 
observation during his later years and is today a well-informed man. He 
remained at home and worked at various occupations until he was twenty- 
three years of age, in which year his marriage occurred. He then pur- 
chased forty acres in Franklin township and operated and improved that 
property for three or four years, selling it in order to move to Pleasant 
township, where he purchased sixty-seven acres ot slightly improved land, 
upon which were no buildings. He concentrated his energies upon the 
development of this property, adding to it from time to time, until he 
now owns three hundred and eighty-seven acres, highly improved. 
Since locating here he has erected an excellent residence, a bam and the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 191 

necessary outbuildings, all of which are in good repair, and he has in 
addition planted a large orchard. Besides general farming Mr. Stickler 
is extensively engaged in feeding and shipping stock and is one of the 
best known men in that business in this section of the state. His affairs 
are conducted along modern lines and in accordance with the highest 
standards of commercial integrity, and the success which has been the 
rf>uk places him among the substantial and representative men of this 
conununity. 

Mr. Stickler has been twice married. In 1862 he wedded Miss 
Caroline Beer, who was born in Ohio but was reared in Iowa. She passed 
away in 1890 and is buried in North cemetery in Cincinnati. To this 
union were born eight children: William M., who is farming in Pleasant 
township and who holds the position of township trustee; George L., a 
famier in Oklahoma; C. A., who owns and operates a valuable property 
in Pleasant township; J. C, who is married and who engages in farming 
upon the homestead; Daisy, the wife of W. H. Streepy, a farmer in 
Pleasant township; Harriet S., who married Samuel Stollebarger, who 
passed away leaving one daughter; Josephine, who became the wife of 
Moses Adson and who upon her death left one son and one daughter; 
and one, who died in infancy. In 1896 Mr. Stickler was united in 
marriage to Mrs. Mary Parks, who passed away on the 7th of September, 
1910. She had four daughters and one son by a former marriage. 

Mr. Stickler gives his allegiance to the democratic party and served 
as township trustee for six consecutive years, having held the same office 
from time to time ever since. He has served as delegate to numerous 
county conventions and is active and progressive in all matters of citizen- 
ship. He is seventy-three years of age, but is still an important factor 
and active in agricultural circles, a man whose life has always been in 
keeping with high standards and influenced by worthy aims and ambitions. 



S. JOHN O. MORK. 



S. John O. More, manager of the undertaking department of the 
firm ot More & Morrison, is one ot .\ppanoose countj's native sons, born 
July 19, 1875, his parents being Matthew and Elizabeth (Smith) More. 
He acquired his early education in the district schools of Apjianoose 
coimty and in 1895 entered the Southern Iowa Normal School and 
after completing a thorough business course rcturneil home and re- 
mained with his parents until 1899. ^" ^^'^^ > *''•'" '^*" ^^'^nt to Des Moines 



192 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

and secured a jjosition in a wholesale house, where he remained tor two 
years, returning to Appanoose county at the end ot that time and engaging 
in farming in Union township. In the spring of 1908 he moved to 
Unionville and obtained employment in the undertaking and hardware 
store operated by A. T. Bishop. In June, 1911, he formed a partnership 
with William Morrison. The firm purchased the interests of Mr. More's 
former employer, A. T. Bishop, and since that time the subject of this 
review has had charge of the undertaking department. They carry a 
complete line of caskets and funeral supplies and he is known in the city 
as a business man of strict integrity and reliability. 

In 1900 Mr. More was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Morrison, 
a daughter of Irvin Andrew and Amanda (Noland) Morrison, of whom 
further mention is made elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. More 
became the parents ot five children: Mabel, born in April, 1901 ; Jacob, 
whose birth occurred in August, 1903; Mattie, born in June 1906; Ruth, 
in February, 1909; and Omar, born in April, 1912. 

Mr. More gives his allegiance to the democratic party and served for 
one term as township trustee of Union township and was for some time 
a member of the Unionville school board. He belongs to Unionville 
Lodge, No. 665, I. O. O. F., and he and his wife are members of the 
Eastertide Lodge, No. 155, of the Rebekahs. Both belong to the 
Methodist Episcopal church in Unionville and their religious faith finds 
expression in their straighforward and worthy lives. Mr. More is a man 
who has faithfully discharged every duty imposed upon him, met fully 
the obligations and responsibilities of life and won for himself a high 
position in business, social and political circles. 



JOHN B. TAYLOR. 



John B. Taylor was born in Washington township, Appanoose county, 
Iowa, and moved with his parents to Centerville, Iowa, November 19, 
1879, where he has since resided. He is a son of Senator Lewis L. Taylor 
and Mrs. Miriam Taylor, the latter a daughter of Benjamin H. and 
Jane Siler. 

John B. Taylor attended the public schools of Centerville, after which 
he took a thorough course in the College ot Pharmacy, in the Northwestern 
University of Chicago, Illinois. Since that time he has been engaged in 
the drug business until the year 1910, when he was elected to the office 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 193 

of county auditor of Appanoose county. He was reelected to the office 
at the general election, November 5, 1912. 

On the 9th of January, 1907, John B. Taylor was married to Miss 
Katharine Eby, who was born in Moulton, this county, and is a daughter 
of S. J. C. and Grace Eby, whose maiden name was Grace Price. Mr. 
and Mrs. John B. Taylor and her parents are members of the Christian 
church. 



SOLOMON \\ . BEKR. 



Solomon W. Beer, one of the well-known and prosperous farmers of 
Pleasant township, owns and operates a tract of land of three hundred 
and twenty acres, which is known as the Highland Stock Farm and which 
is one of the most valuable and productive properties in this part of 
Appanoose county. He is a native son of Iowa, born in Walnut town- 
ship, December 31, 1861. His father, Joseph Beer, was born in Miami 
count}-, Ohio, and grew to maturity in that section, coming to Iowa when 
he was a young man. He made permanent location in Appanoose county 
and soon after his arrival bought land in what is now \\'alnut township. 
He was married in Kansas to Miss Sarah Sheets, a native of South Carolina, 
where she was reared ami educated. They began their wedded lite upon 
the vmdeveloped tarm which Mr. Beer had purchased and worked to- 
gether through the years, finally winning prosperity and success. The 
father of our subject improved one hundred and sixty acres and later 
added to this tract, becoming finally the owner of two hundred acres, which 
constituted one of the best farms in Walnut township. He died upon his 
property in 1899 and was survived by his wife until 1902. In their family 
were four sons and one daughter : S. W., of this review ; one son, who died 
in infancy; Ed, who is a farmer in .\ppanoose county; Martha, who resides 
in Missouri; and Dr. Cieorge Beer, deceased, who was an osteopath, located 
in Minnesota. 

Solomon ^^'. Beer grew to manhood upon his father's farm in \\'alnut 
township, acquiring his education in the district schools. After he had 
attained his majority he purchased eighty acres of land, slightly improved, 
in Pleasant township, which constitutes a portion of his present holdings. 
He at once began to cultivate and improve this tract, built a fine two-story 
residence, two large barns and an entire set of improvements for the use 
of a tenant. He has also planted an orchard and, as his financial resources 
grew, added to his original tract, becoming finallv the owner of three 



194 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

hundred and twenty acres. He keeps everything about the place in ex- 
cellent condition and is numbered among the progressive and enterprising 
agriculturists of this section of the state. In addition to the cultivation 
of the land he is extensively interested in raising good grades of stock, 
keeping tine herds of Hereford cattle, Duroc Jersey hogs and a good grade 
of draft horses. He owns also one hundred and sixty acres in Brown 
county, South Dakota, and is prominent in business affairs of Numa, Iowa, 
being one of the promoters and stockholders of the bank in that com- 
munity. 

On February 12, 1884, Mr. Beer was united in marriage to Miss 
Arthela Haines, who was born and reared in Appanoose county. She is a 
daughter of David Haines, one of the pioneers in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. 
Beer have three children: Henry Irving, who resides in South Dakota; 
Frank R., of Des Moines, Iowa; and Grace Ethel, the wife of E. C. 
Woodburn, a druggist of Watsonville, California. The family are mem- 
bers of the Christian church of Cincinnati. 

Mr. Beer gives his allegiance to the democratic party, with which 
he has been affiliated since casting his first vote. He is interested in 
school matters and for a time served as a director on the board of education. 
He has spent his entire life in Appanoose county and his upright and 
honorable methods and standards have gained him a wide circle of friends. 
Although he is not an active politician, he keeps in touch with the trend of 
modern thought in matters of general interest and of local importance 
and his record of well-directed activity, with its resulting success, is a 
proof of what industry, diligence and business ability will accomplish. 



JAMES W. HIBBS. 



Among the successful and prominent native sons of Appanoose county 
may be numbered James W. Hibbs, mayor of Numa, who since 1883 
has conducted a general store and has become in the course of years a 
power and a force in business circles of that communit}-. He was born 
at what was then known as Hibbsville, in Franklin township. February 2, 
1859, and is a son of James and Martha E. (Cooley) Hibbs. natives of 
Indiana. The father came to Appanoose county in the early dajs of its 
settlement and purchased land. He turned over the management of his 
extensive property interests to his sons and he himself engaged in the 
general merchandise business in Hibbsville. a town which was named in 
his honor. He was gradually carried forward into important relations 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 195 

with its business lite and for forty years conducted his mercantile enter- 
prise there, serving in addition as postmaster. At the outbreak of the 
Civil war he enlisted in an Iowa regiment and served for nine months, 
returning at the expiration ot that time and resuming the conduct of his 
business affairs. He died August 14, 1904, and his death was regretted 
throughout the section in w hich for many years he had made his home, as 
it was felt to be a distinct loss to business and financial development. 
He had survived his wife only eight months, her death having occurred 
December 21, 1903. 

James W. Hibbs was reared and educated in Appanoose county, where 
he attended district school. Until he was twenty years of age he assisted 
his father with the work of the farm and then began his independent 
career, giving his attention to business affairs. He worked at bridge 
building and at coal mining until 1883, when he came to Numa and 
established himself in the general merchandise business, in which he has 
since engaged. He carries a large and complete stock of goods and 
occupies one ot the finest business buildings in the city, a store which he 
erected in 1899 and which was the first brick building in the town. He 
has been accorded a liberal patronage owing to his reasonable prices, his 
honorable methods of dealing and his earnest desire to please his patrons. 
Being a far-sighted and able business man he has from time to time made 
judicious investments and has just completed the erection ot a large brick 
hotel building, forty-four by fifty-six feet, which is situated on the public 
square of the town ami is now occupied by a hotel, restaurant and barber 
shop. In addition to his activity as a general merchant Mr. Hibbs also 
served as postmaster under President Cleveland's administration. He is 
prominently and influentially connected with the general business life of 
the community, being a stockholder and director in the Numa State 
.Savings Bank and well known in the affairs of other important enterprises. 

In November, 1883, Mr. Hibbs was united in marriage to Miss Hannah 
Leek, a daughter ot Francis and .Sarah (Whitsell) Leek, the former a 
native of England and the latter of Indiana. The father came to Appa- 
noose county before the Civil war and purchased a farm in that section, 
which he improved and operated until his death, which occurred April 
20, 1907. His wife survived him until January 16, 1911. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hibbs became the parents of three children: Grace May, who died 
in 1886; Teddy E., aged ten; and Frances, aged five. 

Fraternal I \ Mr. Hibbs is connected with the Masonic order, belonging 
to the Order ot the Eastern Star and is also well known in the Knights 
of Pythias and the Order of Foresters. His political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party. He is progressive and public-spirited in all 



196 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

matters of citizenship, taking an active part in the affairs of the commvinity 
in which he has resided for so many years. At the present time he is 
serving as mayor of Numa, his administration being characterized by able, 
businesslike and straightforward work. His business career is one of which 
he has every reason to be proud, for he has placed his dej)endence upon 
the substantial qualities of energy, self-reliance and high integrity. Thus 
he has steadily advanced in the business world until he is now one of 
the leading and representative men of Numa. 



ADAM BURKHISER. 



Adam Burkhiser is one of the active, sturdy and enterprising citizens 
whom Germany has given to America and he stands high in the list of 
notable pioneers in Iowa, having come to the state in 1855. He is today 
a successful and prominent farmer of Franklin township, where he owns 
a tract of two hundred and forty acres on section 7, eighty acres on section 6 
and one hundred and sixty-seven acres on section 2 and where his work 
for over fifty years has been an important factor in agricultural develop- 
ment. He was born in Bavaria, Germany, August 25, 1834, ami is a son 
of Sebastian Burkhiser, also a native of the fatherland, who grew to man- 
hood, married there and there passed away in 1843, when the subject of 
this review was only nine years of age. Afterward the mother married 
again and with her family crossed the Atlantic to America, locating in 
West Virginia in the spring of 1850. 

Adam Burkhiser was reared in the fatherland and West Mrginia and 
attended the public schools, there working upon a farm when not engaged 
with his books. He married in West \'irginia in 1853 and in 1855 came 
west to Iowa, locating in Lee count} among the very earliest settlers there. 
He worked by the day and by the month for a short time, hut liuring the 
Civil war enlisted as a member of the Border Brigade, a cavalry regiment, 
and was mustered into service in Missouri. He served with loyalty and 
courage during his period of service and after his discharge went to Van 
Buren county, where he preempted forty acres of land. In order to enter 
his claim to the pro{)erty he was obliged to walk over one hundred miles 
to the land office, a long, hard journey through a sparselv settled country. 
The pioneers along the way helped him with friend!} hos[)itality, but 
even with this aid Mr. Burkhiser spent ten or twelve days upon the journey 
and the walk is indelibly stamped upon his memory as one of the hardest 
of his early pioneer experiences. When he had proved his title lie Mtrled 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 197 

upon his tort) acre tract and carried forward the work of improvement 
until 1865, when he sold the farm and moved into Appanoose county. 
In the same year he purchased eighty acres in Washington township, forty 
acres ot which were under cultivation and the whole slightly improved. 
To this he later added forty adjoining acres and farmed upon his one 
hundred and twenty acre tract until 1870, repairing the buildings and 
making other needed changes. When he sold this property he bought 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 7, Franklin township, upon which 
he still resides. This was another tract of raw land and Mr. Burkhiser 
has added its improvement and development to a long list of his sub- 
stantial contributions to the agricultural advancement of Iowa. He broke 
the soil, fenced and drained the property, erected the necessary buildings 
and began the work ot development. P^rom time to time he added to his 
holdings and is now tlie proprietor of four hundred and eighty-seven 
acres which is dividtnl into tour farms, all well improved. He has built 
a substantial residence upon the home place, two fine barns and convenient 
outbuildings and in addition has set out an orchard which has proved a 
valuable source of income. Mr. Burkhiser is likewise extensively in- 
terested in stock-raising, in which he has been engaged for a numlier of 
years, and annually ships large herds of steers to Chicago, where they 
command a high price and a ready sale. He has also bred some high- 
grade horses and this torms another important source of income to him. 
Mr. Burkhiser commenced his life in Iowa with a capital of three dollars 
and by his own labor and industry has accomplished a gratifying degree 
of success. The struggle for prosperity was a long and hard one and made 
constant demands upon his patience, industry and courage. These qual- 
ities, however, were strong elements in his character and were supplemented 
by quiet determination, independence and self-reliance w Inch eventually 
brought their just reward. Mr. Burkhiser stands today among the sub- 
stantial and influential men of Franklin township and his career may 
serve as an inspiration to those who follow <ifter him. 

Mr. Burkhiser has been three times married. His first union occurrcil 
in West \'irginia in 1853, in which year he marricil Miss Catherine Dayton, 
who passed away in 1873, having met death bv an accident. 'I'o this 
union were born seven children: Mrs. May Ann Prophet, a widow with 
three children; .Mice, who became the wife of James Harris, of Mills 
county, Iowa: I'd, who is married and is engaged in operating one of his 
fathers' farms; H. G., a railroad agent and telegraph operator at Mystic; 
Sarah, the wife of Thomas Bales, of Franklin township; :ind two, who 
ilied in childluKxl. Mr. Burkhiser's second union was with Miss Elvira 
Hickenbottom, whom he wedded in Appanoose count}- in 1873. Her 



198 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

death occurred in 1888, and afterward Mr. Burkhiser married his present 
wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Rosa Shabley, a native of Germany 
but reared and educated in Ohio. At the time of her marriage to the 
subject of this review she was the widow of Ferdinand Graber. Mr. 
and Mrs. Burkhiser have a son, Charles, who for the past five or six years 
has operated a portion of the Burkhiser farm. He married on October 
17, 1912, at Humeston, Miss Stella Davidson, who was born in that city. 
Mr. Burkhiser gives his political allegiance to the republican party 
and is progressive and active in community affairs, although he never 
seeks public office. He and his wife are members of the Mount Olive 
Christian church and are widely known as people of exemplary character. 
Mr. Burkhiser is affiliated with the Farmers Society of Equity, with head- 
quarters at Indianapolis, and still retains his membership, although the 
local lodge is now disbanded. No man in Appanoose county has been 
more closely identihed with its pioneer development or a more powerful 
force in its later expansion. Mr. Burkhiser enjoys the trust and confidence 
of people among whom he has lived for so many years and who know the 
historj- of the struggle by which he worked his way upward to prosperity. 



THOMAS WESLEY KILLION. 

Journalism finds a worthy representative in Thomas Wesley Killion, 
owner and publisher of the Centerville Weekly Sun. He was born in 
Orleans, Appanoose county, Iowa, July 7, i860, a son of Thomas Jefferson 
Killion, who was engaged in general merchandising at Orleans at the 
time of the birth of his son Thomas. He also held the position of justice 
of the peace there and was prominent in democratic circles before the 
war, being regarded as a local oracle in political connections. He married 
Jeannette Ann Killion, a most consistent Christian woman. 

In earlv life Thomas Wesley Killion took up the occupation of farming 
which he followed continuously until thirt)-rive years of age. His con- 
nection with journalism began on the 1st of March, 1898, when he estab- 
lished the Semi-Weekly Sun at Moulton, continuing its publication at 
that place until February, 1911, when the plant was removed to Center- 
ville, where the paper is still published as a weekly. He likewise estab- 
lished the Centerville Weekly Sun on the 14th of February, 1912, and 
has succeeded in building up a large circulation as well as developing ;i 
good job printing business. His office is well equipped with everything 
necessary for turning out high-class job printing as well as for the publica- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 199 

tion of a/paper. To these lines Mr. Killion gives his entire attention w ith 
the result that his patrons receive a most readable journal, attractive from 
the standpoint of the printer's art as well as a medium of general and 
local news. 

On the 2d of April, 1885, at Centerville, Iowa, Mr. Killion was 
married to Miss Sarah F. Clark, a daughter of William A. Clark, in whose 
honor the Grand Army post at Moulton was named. Her father was a 
veteran of the Civil war and also a noted Methodist minister. For 
several years prior to her marriage the daughter was successfully engaged 
in teaching in Appanoose county. To Mr. and Mrs. Killion have been 
born four children: Carl Ct., who married Miss Myrtle Benson, of Albia, 
Iowa; E. Floyd, who married Miss Minnie Ward, of Centerville Iowa; 
Paul E., a graduate of the Moulton high school of the class of igi2; and 
Pearl E., a freshman in the high school. 

Mr. Killion votes with the democratic party and is recognized as one 
of its prominent local leaders. He was chairman of the Appanoose county 
democratic central committee tor three }ears, during which time capable 
management succeeded in drawing out and increasing the vote of that 
party largely. In 1908 he was named for county recorder and ran tar 
ahead of the regular party vote. He held the office of justice of the peace 
for three years, beginning in 1887. He was appointed postmaster at 
Moulton, Iowa, by President Cleveland, and took possession of the office 
December 1, 1893, holding it until February 5, 1898. He stands strongly 
in support of all he believes to be right and is a worthy representative of 
other organizations outside of political ranks. He became a charter mem- 
ber of Moulton Camp, M. W. A., and on its organization in April, 1896, 
was elected to the office of worthy advisor, so serving for two terms. He 
was afterward chosen venerable consul and held that office for three con- 
secutive years. He was elected excellent banker and so served during the 
year 1910. In 1900 he became a member of the Brotherhood of .American 
Yeomen, joining the order at Moulton and tilling the office of correspond- 
ent for five years and that of master ot ceremonies for one year. He helped 
to organize the order in Centerville and is now its honorable foreman. 
He has been a delegate to all its state conclaves and to two of its supreme 
conclaves, the last one being held in Minnea[K)Iis in 1909. Christian 
principles have also long formed a guiding spirit in his life. When sixteen 
years of age he became a member of the Christian church and held the 
office of church deacon during the years 1909-10. Good business qualifi- 
cations with a talent for making a newspaper have made him a successful 
journalist and jMiblisher, and a keen interest in the welfare of his coimtry 
has led him to become a stanch champion of parry principles which he 



200 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

deems essential to the welfare of state and country. He lives up to a 
high standard of ethical teaching as found in the tenets of the fraternities 
with which he is connected and he has been a cooperant factor in that 
labor which seeks the moral progress of the community. 



ALFRED J. PRATT. 



Iowa sent her full quota of soldiers to the Civil war and among the 
boys in blue who went to the front from this state was Alfred J. Pratt. 
Later he became widely known as a hotel proprietor in Centerville, 
where he also had other business interests. He was born in the state 
of New York, November 8, 1848, a son of George and Emeline (Delano) 
Pratt, the former a native of the Empire state, while the latter was 
born in Montreal, Canada. The father was a stage driver and came to 
Iowa at an early day, settling at Mount Pleasant before the building of 
the railroads. He drove a stage from that place to Burlington and was 
thus engaged until the building of railway lines put him out of busi- 
ness. He then removed to Centerville, where he established a hotel, becom- 
ing well known as its proprietor. He conducted the business from 1858 
until 1886, when his wife died and he withdrew from the hotel. He 
then turned his attention to the livery business, which he carried on tor 
a time but later went to Nebraska and afterward to Kansas. Following 
his return to Centerville he married again and here made his home until 
his death, which occurred on the 6th of November, 1906. He had a 
wide acquaintance here and was favorabh- known. 

Alfred J. Pratt was reared and educated in Centerville, Iowa, and 
also attended and graduated from the normal school at Ypsilanti, Michi- 
gan. He was a youth of but sixteen years when he offered his services 
to the government in defense of the Union cause, enlisting in 1864 as a 
member of Company B, Forty-seventh Iowa Infantry, for one hundred 
days' service. On the expiration of that term he again came to Center- 
ville, where he was employed in diiferent ways until 1886, helping in 
two surveys for the line of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railway 
from Centerville through Iowa and Nebraska. In 1886, however, he 
engaged in the hotel business, which he carried on continuously and suc- 
cessfully until June 24, 1911. The name of Pratt was therefore long 
connected with hotel interests in Centerville and ever stood as a synonym 
for enterprise and capable service in that direction. At length Mr. Pratt 




MI!. AM) Mi:^. A I ri; \ri' 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 203 

retired and is now making; his home at Xo. 533 East Elm street, where 
he owns a f^ood property. 

On the 8th ot November, 1886, occurred the marriage ot Mr. Fratt 
and Mrs. Eunice (Brouj,'h) Creigo, a daughter of John and Nancy E. 
(Carper) Brough, the former a native of Ohio and tlie hitter of \'irginia. 
Her father was a carpenter by occupation, coming to Ap[)anoose county 
in an early day. His wife died in 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt have no 
children but bj- her former marriage there was a daughter, Emma, now 
the wife of C. E. Delaniler. 

Mr. Pratt votes witli the democratic [)art) anti has three times rep- 
resented his ward on the board of city aldernun, exercising his ofiicial 
prcrogati\es in support of many progressive public movements. He holds 
membership with the Grand Army post at Centerville and his wife is a 
member of the Christian church and the Women's Relief Corps. For more 
than a half century he has lived in Appanoose county and has therefore 
been a witness of the greater part of its growth and develo|)ment. He 
has seen its wild lands converted into good farms, its primitive homes 
replaced by modern dwellings, its villages developed into thriving towns 
and cities, and as the years have gone b) he has cooperated in many 
movements contributing to the progress that has placed Appanoose among 
the leading counties of this great commonwealth. 



JAMES M. D.\LE. 



The records of the agricultural development of Appanoose county 
contain no more honored and worthy name than that of James M. Dale 
whose memory is jet cherished by those who knew him, although ten 
years have passed since he was calletl to his hnal rest. A native of Indi- 
ana, Mr. I^alc was born in Hendricks county, November 20, 1841, and 
is a son of John and Charlotte (Columbia) Dale, natives of Kentucky. 
The father farmed in that state for some time but came to Indiana at 
an early date and there engaged in general agricultural [)ursuits until 185 J, 
w h( n he came to Appanoose county and purchased a farm just northeast 
of Centerville, which he improved antl operated for the remainder of his 
life. He difil in i8i)2. having long survived his wife, who passed away 
in 1873. 

James M. Dale acquired his early education in Imliana and was four- 
teen years of age when he came to Appanoose county. He com[)leted his 
studies in the district schools and after laying aside his books worked 
upon his father's farm (mfil he attained his majority. He then began 
his independent career, purchasing land from iiis lather. He operated 



204 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

this farm tor the r(.'niainder ot his lite, giving a great deal of attention 
to its improvement and development along progressive and practical lines. 
From time to time he added to his holdings until he possessed thirteen 
hundred acres of land, comprising one of the finest farms in this part of 
Iowa. He passed away January 2, 1902, leaving a large circle of friends 
to mourn his loss. 

In 1861 Mr. Dale married Miss Malinda Long, who was born in 
1844. She is a daughter of \'alentine and Fanny Long, natives of Indi- 
ana, where the father farmed before he came to Appanoose county among 
the early settlers. Here he purchased land and operated a model agri- 
cultural enterprise until his death in 1877. He was survived by his wife 
for ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Dale became the parents of four children. 
John, the eldest, resides in Centerville. Hattie G. is the wife of George 
B. Steele whom she married on the 8th of July, 1887. They became the 
parents of three children: Jessie Opal, who is eighteen years of age; 
Charlotte Dale, aged fifteen; and one child, who died in infancy. Mrs. 
Steele owns and operates a large skating rink in CVnterville, her building 
being one hundred feet by eighty feet. She also holds the title to a fine 
residence at No. 514 West State street, in which she resides with her 
family. The third child born to Mr. and Mrs. Dale is Charlotte, the 
wife of G. E. Climie, a piano dealer in Centerville. The youngest child 
in this family is Lemuel, who is. connected with the grocery business in 
the employ of M. B. Maring. The mother of these children passed away 
in 1872 after a short illness. 

Mr. Dale was a devout member of the Christian church, and polit- 
ically supported the democratic party. In all the relations of his life he 
worked toward high ideals, seldom failing to accomplish what he under- 
took. The extent and importance of his business interests and his fidelity 
to the principles of honorable and upright manhood made him a valued 
and honored citizen and his death caused widespread and sincere regret 
which was a genuine tribute of sorrow at the close of a worthy life. 



P. S. DA\IS. 

The Sunnyside Farm on section 10, Franklin township, is the property 
of P. S. Davis, one of the representative agriculturists and prosperous 
business men of Appanoose county. Throughout his entire life he has 
followed the occupation of farming and is now the owner of eighty acres 
of good land, and the neat and attractive appearance of his place is proof 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 205 

of his careful supervision and practical methods. Mr. Davis is a native 
son of Iowa, born in Wapello county, September i, 1853, his father being 
James Davis, who came to Iowa as a young man and located in Wapello 
county, where he resided for some years. Later he moved into Appanoose 
county and made his home in Pleasant township, where he purchased 
a farm and engaged in general agricultural pursuits. He spent the later 
years of his life upon this {property and died about 1900. His wife 
survived him some time, passing away in 1911, at the home of her son. 

P. S. Davis was still a child when his father moved to Apfianoose 
county and his etiucation was, therefore, received in the public schools 
of this section. He remained at home until he was seventeen years of 
age and then began his independent career, securing work at breaking 
prairie land. For one summer he drove a five yoke team of oxen over 
undeveloped farms in the neighborhood, getting them into condition for 
the first planting, and afterward worked as a monthh farm laborer for five 
} ears, remaining in the employ of one man during the entire period. He 
married in 1880 and in the same year rented a farm in Franklin township, 
and after develoi)ing this property for two years moved upon the land 
owned bv his wife's family, upon which he carried on general farming 
for some time. Later he purchased the eighty acres upon which he now 
resides and immediately began the further cultivation of this property 
and has added to his activities the development of the Baker farm of 
eighty acres adjoining. Upon his own tract he has built a modern resi- 
dence, with a southern exposure, and has carefully tended the lawn which 
surrounds it and beautified it with shrubs and plants. He has erected a 
good barn and substantial outbuildings and has installed the necessary 
equipment, being today the owner of a model farm. In all of the con- 
struction work done upon the property Mr. Davis has aided materially, 
for he is a mechanic of unusual skill and ability and capable of doing 
the most delicate work on machinery. For a number of years he has 
conducted a blacksmith shop upon his property and does a great deal of 
the black.smith work ot the neighborhood in addition to his own. More- 
over, for a time he owned and operated a threshing machine, which he 
ran for sixteen years, and during the winter seasons engaged in butchering 
for his neighbors. 

Mr. Davis married, in Centerville, Iowa, on the 1 9th of FVbruary. 
1880, Miss Penelo[ie J. Baker, a daughter of H. H. Baker, of Cincinnati. 
one of the early settlers in that community. Mr. Baker is a blacksmith 
by trade and for over fifty years has conducted a shop at Cincinnati, being 
one of the well known and widely pojnilar men in this part of. .•\p|)anon>e 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have adopted two daughters: Pearline. 



206 HISTORY Ol" APPAXOOSE COL' XT V 

who is married and has two children; and Laura May, a teacher in the 
public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Davis are members of the Christian church. 
Mr. Davis gives his allegiance to the republican party and has been 
stanch in his adherence to its principles and policies since casting his first 
vote. He has resided in Appanoose count}' for a number of years and 
has spent his entire life in the state of Iowa. During the time he has 
identified himself with the best interests of his community and is regarded 
as a valuable addition to the ranks of its citizenship, for in business deal- 
ings he is reliable and straightforward and in all the relations of his life 
honorable, progressive and upright. 



BINGHAM S. STALEY. 



Bingham S. Staley, architect and builder, whose prominence in the 
field of his chosen calling is indicated by the importance ot the contracts 
awarded him, is one of the native sons of Appanoose count)-, his birth 
having occurred on the 15th of November, 1871, a son of Alva and Mary 
(Smith) Staley. The father was born in Perry county, Ohio, June 4, 
1831, and for a long period was identified with building operations in 
Centerville, but is now deceased. Extended mention ot him is made on 
another page of this wark. 

In the district school Bingham S. Staley pursued his education, and 
when seventeen years of age started out in lite on his own account. From 
that time forward he has depended upon his labors and resources and 
whatever success he has enjoyed has arisen therefrom. He learned the 
carpenter's trade and for some time worked for wages in the employ of 
others, after which he began contracting and building on his own account. 
He has since continued in this business and ranks with the most prominent 
in his line in Centerville. having erected a large number of the different 
homes of the city, also the present postoffice. a new courthouse and a 
number of business blocks. At the [)resenf time he is engaged on the 
erection of the big [)lant for the Hercules Manufacturing Company. The 
character and importance as well as the volume of his work indicates his 
high standing and his success in his chosen ticKl. \\'hen he started out 
he was determined to thoroughly master the work at hand and to perform 
every duty taithtully, and the same spirit has ever characterized him in 
the exercise of his contracts, winning for him, therefore, a [irominent 
position in. the business circles of the city. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 207 

Mr. Staley was married to Miss Mary B. Smith, a daughter of Thomas 
M. and Amanda (Joiner) Smith, who are mentioned at length in connec- 
tion with the sketch of K. N. Smith, on another page of this volume. 
Mr. and Mrs. Staley have become the parents of six children: Frederick 
Paul, who is a graduate of the Centerville high school of the class of 1912 
and is now working with his father; Robert A., who was born October 16, 
1895, and is attending high school; Howard R., who was born December 
16, 1900, and is also a high-school student; Mary L., born December 25, 
1902; Thomas D., bom February 9, 1904; and Donald Kieth, horn 
August 7, 1908. The wife ami mother, who was a native ot J^iirheld, 
Iowa, passed away in Centerville on the 8th of September, 1908, and 
her death was deeply regretted by many friends who recognized her 
sterling traits of character and many good qualities of heart and mind. 
Mr. Staley holds membership with the Elks and Masonic lodge of Center- 
ville. He has never had any political ambition but has always voted 
with the republican party and is unfaltering in his loyalty thereto. He 
is a member of the Christian church and it is well known that his influence 
has always been on the side of right, progress, justice, truth, and improve- 
ment. 



SCOTT PEACOCK. 

Scott Peacock, well known in business circles of Centerville as pro- 
prietor of the business formerly operated by the Capital Printing Company, 
was born in ^Missouri, August 6, 1879. ^e is a son of Gordon and 
Margaret (Bennie) Peacock, natives of Scotland, the former of whom 
followed mining in that country for some time. At an early day the 
father of our subject came to America and eventually settled in Mi-ssouri, 
where he bought land. For a number of years he gave his entire atten- 
tion to the improvement and development ot his tarm, making it finally 
one of the most attractive properties in his section of the state. When 
he left his farm he retired from active lite and came to Centerville, where 
he now resides. He is well known as a veteran ot the Civil war, having 
■^erxed during that conflict as a member of Company K, one hundred and 
Thirty-third Illinois \'olunteer Infantry. His wife passed away in 1900. 

Scott Peacock was six years of age when his father same to Centerville 
and consequently his education was received in the public schools of the 
town. After laying his books aside he learned the printer's trade with 
the firm ot Barrows ^^ Son, then proprietors ot the lowegian, and he 
continued in their employ for five years. At the end of that time he went 



208 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

to Springfield, Illinois, and from there to various cities throughout the 
middle west. For hfteen years he worked at his trade in different local- 
ities and then, in October, 1911, returned to Centerville and purchased 
the business operated by the Capital Printing Company. He bought the 
concern from H. B. Frink, its former owner, and in one year has met 
with a gratifying degree of success in its conduct. He has a well equipped 
office, in which is found all the machinery for job printing, Mr. Peacock 
confining his attention to this branch of work. He has excellent business 
ability, an expert knowledge of his trade, fine discrimination and good 
judgment, and these qualities have been the most important features in 
his success. 

Mr. Peacock married, in June, 1902, Miss Barbara E. Underf anger, 
a daughter of John and Emily (Taintor) Underfanger, natives of Spring- 
field, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Peacock have become the parents of two 
children: Gordon, seven years of age; and Margaret, aged one year and 
a half. Mr. Peacock belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
holding membership in Springfield, Illinois. He gives loyal support to 
the republican party, but official life has never had any attraction for him. 
He prefers to concentrate his energies upon the conduct of his present 
affairs, in which he is most successful, and much credit is due him for the 
position he has attained among the substantial and prosperous business 
men of his community. 



H. E. BUNKER. 



Among the real promoters and upbuilders of Appanoose county H. E. 
Bunker deserves special mention, for he has lived here since 1862 and 
since reaching manhood has given his time and attention to those things 
which have developed and promoted religious, intellectual and material 
progress. For a number of years he was closely connected with agri- 
cultural interests, but has recently given up active pursuits and lives in 
Exline in comparative retirement, although he engages to some extent in 
the insurance business. He was born in Quincy, Adams county, Illinois, 
March 13, 1849, and is a son of Dr. Samuel Bunker, a native of New 
Hampshire, who remained in that state until he was eighteen vears of age. 
The father of our subject was a man of excellent education and broad 
culture. He came west to Illinois, locating in Quincy, and later began 
the study of medicine, taking a course at the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical 
College under Dr. Cutler. When he had completed his studies he prac- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 209 

tic'ed his profession at Quincy tor some time, but then moved to Astoria, 
Illinois, where he practiced until he came to Iowa in 1862 and located on 
a farm in Caldwell township, Appanoose county. Here he also engaged 
in the practice ot medicine, but after four years moved to Omah, Missouri, 
where he purchased the practice of a local physician and became prominent 
and successful in his chosen field of work. He later located at Central 
City, Missouri, and still later at Mill Grove. His death occurred while 
on a visit to Centerville in 1893. 

H. E. Bunker was a lad of thirteen when he came with his parents 
to Appanoose county. Here he was reared and here he received his 
primary education in the public schools, supplementing this by work at 
Unionville, Missouri, and later by a course in the Kirksville Normal 
School. After receiving his certificate he engaged in teaching in the schools 
of Missouri, Kansas and Iowa, following this profession for a number 
of years. In 1872 he went to Kansas and homesteaded near Abilene, 
where he lived for seventeen years, but in 1889 he located on the Meeker 
place near Exline, a farm belonging to his wife. Upon this he engaged 
in agricultural pursuits for nineteen years, winning a high place in the 
ranks of progressive and successful agriculturists. Later, however, he re- 
tired from active life and moved into Exline, where he bought a fine resi- 
dence lot and upon it built an attractive dwelling, in which he has since 
resided. Mr. Bunker was one of the promoters of the Appanoose County 
Mutual Insurance Association and was the first president of that body, 
serving for four years. He has of late years given his attention to solicit- 
ing fire, lightning and cyclone insurance and has built up an extensive 
business along this line. Mr. Bunker was also one of the organizers of 
the Exline Savings Bank and served as its first president. 

Mr. Bunker was married in 1889 to Miss Helen M. Meeker, a native 
of Vermont, who came to Appanoose county in 1863 and who, like her 
husband, had been for a number of }ears engaged in teaching in the public 
schools of Missouri and Iowa. Mr. Bunker gives his allegiance to the 
republican party, adhering to the progressive branch of that body, and has 
always been more or less active in local affairs. He is serving at the 
{^resent time as councilman on the village board and has been for many 
years a prominent figure in school matters. For a number of terms he 
was president of the school board, has been school treasurer and has held 
many other positions of trust and honor. He has been a resident of Appa- 
noose county for almost half a century and has been closely identified with 
its growth and development, giving his attention always to beneficial and 
important enterprises and as a consequence he has gained a high place 



210 HISTORY OF Al'i'AXOOSE a)U.\"TY 

among the representative and public-spirited men of this part of the state 
and is held in high esteem and warm regard by many friends. 

Mr. Bunker is a man of deep and sincere religious feeling and his 
beliefs are of the practical kind which influence the work and ideals of his 
every-day life. He is a member of the Christian church and has for years 
been a leading figure in the affairs of the Christian Church Missionary 
Association in this section and has served as its president for twelve or 
fourteen years. This society holds regular conventions in various parts 
of the count} to discuss conditions and the means of building up and 
promoting missionary work throughout the state, and Mr. Bunker's serv- 
ices have been of great and lasting usefulness. He and his wife are 
teachers in the Sunday school, of which he served for a time as superin- 
tendent. During the many years of his labors in this vine3'ard he has 
accomplished work of inestimable value, giving his services freely to a 
great cause without hope or desire for remuneration. His religion leavens 
his life, making him upright in business, loyal in citizenship and in all 
things a worthy and honorable Christian gentleman. 



IRA L. LONG. 



Ira L. Long, who is cashier of the Numa State Savings Bank and who 
controls other important business interests in Numa, is numbered among 
the most able, energetic and ambitious young men of that community. He 
is a native of Appanoose county, born in \'ermillion township, November 
lo, 1889, and is a son of Charles and Marietta (Miller) Long, also born 
in the same section. The father was reared upon a farm and after attain- 
ing his majority followed agricultural pursuits, operating a valuable prop- 
erty until his death, which occurred on the 18th of October, 1912. The 
mother is still living. 

Ira L. Long acquired his early education in the district schools of Ver- 
milion township and later entered the Centerville high school, graduating 
from that institution with the class of 1909. Deciding to continue his 
studies he went to Wesleyan University at Mount Pleasant and was thus 
thoroughly equipped to begin his independent career. After laying aside 
his books he came to Numa and was appointed cashier of the Numa State 
Savings Bank, with which he has been connected since that time. He has 
proved himself in the discharge of his important duties a far-sighted and 
reliable business man and an able financier and is regarded as one of the 
most valuable men connected with the bank. He has other important 




CHARLES I_ONO 



^^^< 






y':^^^^ 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 213 

financial interests, being a stockholder in the First National Bank of Sey- 
mour and the owner of a large automobile livery business in Xuma. In 
addition he holds title to eighty acres of improved farm lantl in Lincoln 
township, just adjoining the town. 

Fraternally Mr. Long is affiliated with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, acting as financier of that organization. His religious views 
are in accord with the doctrines of the Methodist church, and politically he 
gives allegiance to the democratic party, supporting always its men and 
measures, although he never seeks office for himself. He is well known in 
this county where he has lived since his birth and has a wide acquaintance 
here, having won uniform trust and good-will by reason of a life which in 
all of its phases is upright, straightforward and honorable. He is still a 
young man but has proven himself able, ambitious and energetic and he 
cannot fail of continued progress and increasing prominence in the financial 
world. 



DKXTKK A. SPOOXER. 



Among the men who were active in the business development of Appa- 
noose county was Dexter A. Spooner, who for over half a century was 
prominently identified with the transfer business in Centerville. His 
deatli. therefore, removed from the city one whom it could ill afford to 
lose, a man of signal sincerity and integrity of purpose, whose individual 
work was an important factor in general development. Mr. Spooner was 
born in Indiana in August, 1832, and was a son of Benjamin and Martha 
(Ware) Spooner, the former a native of New York, and the latter of 
Kentucky. The father worked at the saddler's trade in that state for a 
number of years but came to Centerville in the early '40s and established 
himself in the grocery business. Prior to that time, however, he had been 
prominent in agricultural circles of Appanoose county. After moving into 
the town, however, he never resumed his agricultural pursuits and spent 
the remainder of his life engaged in the grocery business. He passed away 
in 1872 and was survived by his wife until 1884. 

Dexter A. Spooner was still a child when his parents moved to Appa- 
noose county and therefore his education was acquired in the public schools 
of this part of the state. After he laid aside his books he worked on his 
father's farm until he had attained his majority and then moved into 
Centerville and established himself in the transfer business. As time passed 
his enterprise grew and finally assumed large proportions, owing to his 



214 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

untiring and well directed efforts during half a century. He was a man 
of sound judgment and excellent business ability and in the conduct of 
his affairs met with well deserved success, indirectly assisting in a material 
way in the upbuilding of the community. He died November 4, 1907. 

In Maj', 1871, Mr. Spooner married Miss Claudine B. Stratton, a 
daughter of J. F. and Laura VV. (Foster) Stratton, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania and the latter of Massachusetts. The father was a civil 
engineer and his business took him to Michigan at a time when that state 
was still a territory. He worked at his profession there for a number of 
years but finally came to Centerville, Iowa, and served for many years 
as county surveyor of Appanoose county. Later he was elected county 
clerk and held this office for some time, showing in all the relations of 
his public life the same energ}', ability and keen discrimination which 
marked his professional career. He died in 1884 and was survived by 
his wife until 1888. Mrs. Spooner, the widow of the subject of this review, 
has extensive property holdings in Centerville, owning an attractive home 
at No. 303 East Washington street and a controlling interest in the 
Spooner Transfer Companj'. She makes her home in the house which 
her father built in 1858, and intends to spend the remainder of her life 
in this house which is endeared to her through long association. Her 
father was one of the earliest settlers in Centerville and helped to lay out 
the town, as he did also the city of Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Mr. Spooner was well known in the Masonic order and for many 
years was active in the affairs of that organization. He gave his allegi- 
ance to the republican party and was a member of the Methodist church, 
molding his life in accordance with its doctrines. The years of his active 
career had been spent in honorable and worth}- work in Centerville and 
his death brought to a close a life of genuine and unostentatious use- 
fulness. 



WILLIAM H. McCABE. 



Among the men who came to Appanoose county in the period of its 
pioneer development and who for man)- }ears have been identified with the 
progress and upbuilding of this part of the state is William H. McCabe, 
who made his first settlement here in 1856. He has given his attention 
almost entirely to agricultural pursuits and is now the owner of four hun- 
dred acres of valuable lam! on section 9, Franklin township, a portion of 
which is the family homestead. He was bom in Saratoga county. New 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 215 

York, on the 25th of June, 1853, and is a son ot John and Eleanor (Angle) 
McCabe, both natives of the Empire state. The father farmed in Sara- 
toga county for a number of years but in 1856 moved west to Iowa and 
located in Appanoose county, where he purchased land upon which his son 
now resides. His tract at that time comprised eighty acres and was all 
prairie, which Mr. McCabe was obliged to break before beginning the work 
of development. He got the land under the plow and gradually carried 
forward the work of improvement, building the necessary farm buildings 
and a comfortable dwelling. At the outbreak of the Civil war, however, he 
left the farm and enlisted in an Iowa company, being later transferred to a 
Kansas cavalry regiment. He served for eighteen months and was then 
discharged on account of disability. Returning home, he again settled 
upon his farm, but soon afterward died from the effects of his military 
service. His wife, left alone, bravely faced the hardships of pioneer life 
and reared her family of two sons and two daughters, namely: Peter, a 
farmer of Franklin township; Clara, who became the wife of Peter Bales, 
also of Franklin township; Mary, the wife of D. W. Pettigrew, of Lincoln 
townshi[); and William H., of this review. 

The last named was in his childhood familiar with pioneer conditions 
in the state and even as a small boy aided in breaking the soil in the devel- 
opment of his father's farm. He had very few school advantages and is 
largely self-educated, having gained the greater part of his knowledge 
through reading, experience and observation in later years. As soon as he 
was able he obtained work by the day or month and labored in this way 
for several years, saving his money and accumulating a comfortable sum 
With this he purchased the mterests of the other heirs in the old homestead, 
which he has since continued to operate. He did not tear earnest and per- 
sistent work and steadily carried forward the work of development 
in which he had assisted since childhood, adding to his holdings until the 
farm comprises four hundred acres. He replaced the early dwelling with a 
modern two-story residence in iSgj, while barns and out-buildings were 
also erected, the farm thus becoming a model property. The fields are 
carefully tilled and Mr. McCabe has secured the latest improved machin- 
erj' to facilitate his work. He gathers large harvests and the stock which 
he keeps is of good grades, commanding a ready sale, and he is numbered 
among the men of affluence in this community. He owns in addition to 
the homestead twenty-two acres of timber land in the vicinity. 

In Lincoln township, on September 1, 1875, ^^^- McCabe was united 
in marriage to Miss Margaret Lowr}-, who was born and reared in Appa- 
noose county, a daughter of R. S. Lowry. They became the parents of 
seven children: W. H., .Ir., who attended the Seymour high school .ind 



216 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

who is now assisting his father in the operation of the farm; Nettie, the 
wife of Frank Armntrout, of Marshall county, Indiana; Ethel, who mar- 
ried Hosea Phillips, a farmer of Franklin township; Anna, who became 
the wife of John Kirkpatrick, of Johnson county, Iowa; Ola, who teaches 
music; Hallie, a graduate nurse and a resident of Iowa City; and Eula, 
who attends the Seymour hi^^h school. Mr. McCabe's first wife passed 
away in August, 1904, and on the 7th of June, 1911, he was again married. 
His second wife was Mrs. Emma Fox, of Lemonville, Missouri, who was 
born and reared in Franklin township. She is a daughter of Joseph Melson 
and the widow of William Fox, by whom she had five children. Of this 
family two, Ray and Lilly, are living with their mother. Mrs. McCabe 
is a devout adherent of the Baptist church. 

Mr. McCabe gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
is prominent and active in local affairs, being particularly interested in 
school matters. For a number of }'ears he has been a member of the board 
of education and has been influentially identified with the betterment of 
the schools. He was township trustee for six Acars and has served as dele- 
gate to numerous county conventions and has done conscientious work upon 
petit and grand juries. He was formerly a member of the Masonic order 
in Seymour, where he held membership in the blue lodge and chapter, and 
was affiliated with the Royal Arch Masons. The record of his career ex- 
tends back to pioneer history and his activities have been connected closely 
with the development of the county. While his life has been quietly 
passed, it has been useful and beneficial in its results, showing what may be 
accomplished by a determined and persistent spirit and honorable dealing. 
He occupies a place of prominence among the representative citizens of 
Appanoose county, but the most envious cannot grudge him his success — 
so worthily has it been won. 



CHARLES F. PARKER. 



Appanoose count)- numbers among her prominent and successful native 
sons Charles F. Parker, the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and eighty 
acres in Franklin township, who is in addition a power and a dominating 
force in the public life of the section. He was born on the farm which he 
now operates, March 18, 1856, and is a son of L. G. Parker, a native of 
Jefferson county, New York, who was born February 7, 1815. The father 
of our subject grew to manhood in the Empire state but when a ) oung man 
went to Ohio, where he married Miss Nancv J. Barnev, also born in New 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 217 

York. He was a man of excellent education, ot college training, being a 
"•raduate civil engineer, and after he moved to Ohio became prominent in 
school circles. He engaged in teaching for a number of years in that state 
and during his period of residence gave most of his time and attention to 
that occupation. In 1854 he moved to Iowa and located on the farm now 
owned b) the subject of this review. This was a part of a tract of six hun- 
dred acres which had been previously entered by his father-in-law, Ben- 
jamin Barney. Mr. Parker settled upon this property, broke the soil and 
carried forward the work of development, making it a model agricultural 
enterprise. After a time he resumed teaching and was gradually carried 
forward into important relations with educational affairs, and in this line 
of work as in all the otlurs u irh which he was identified became prominent 
and influential. He reared his family of children in Appanoose county and 
spent the remainder of his life upon his farm, dying in March, 1905. He 
had survived his wife for some years, her death having occurred in 1894. 

Charles F. Parker is one of a family of six sons. He remained upon his 
father's farm until he was fifteen years of age and then in comjxm)- with 
an older brother went to Kansas, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits 
for three years. For two years he was a resident of Newton, Kansas, but 
at the end of that time returned to Iowa and worked upon the homestead 
and in the mines for two years. He then made another journey into Kan- 
sas, where he homesteaded a claim in Finney county and proved upon it 
until he had completed payment, when he sold the property. He returned 
to Appanoose county and married here in 1883 and immediately afterward 
located on part of the home farm, to which he has since added, being now 
the owner of a large portion of the original tract. He has made extensive 
and substantial improvements upon the property which he has provided 
with a good residence and excellent barns and out-buildings and in addi- 
tion has planted a good orchard which is now in bearing. In connection 
with general farming Mr. Parker is making a specialty ot raising pure- 
blooded Durham cattle and Poland China hogs. His animals command a 
ready sale in the markets, this portion of Mr. Parker's business being an 
important source of his income. 

On the 8th of April, 1883, Mr. Parker was united in marriage to Miss 
Ilia Harl, who was reared and educated in Appanoose county. She was the 
eldest daughter of J. T. Harl, a prominent pioneer in Iowa. Mrs. Parker 
passed away in 1904, leaving four children. Pearl lives at home. John 
G., who is aiding in the operation of the home farm, is married and has 
one son. Ray Harl. The two youngest children are Neil J. ami liia Harl. 

Mr. Parker is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America and 
hoKI^ an oHicial position in the local lodge. Kminenfly progressive in his 



218 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

citizenship, he has for many years taken an active part in the political life 
of his community and his work along public lines has been felt as a force in 
general development. For eighteen years he has served as justice of the 
peace, having been first elected in 1894 '"^*^1 reelected at the expiration of 
each term. He has served as county committeeman and as a delegate to 
numerous conventions and in November, 1912, was elected a member of 
the board of county supervisors. He has made an honorable and worthy 
record in all his official relations, standing today among the prominent men 
in public life in this part of Appanoose county. 



ELMER J. MODEN. 



Elmer J. Moden is an active business man of Numa, where for a num- 
ber of years he has conducted a tirst-class restaurant, his work along lines 
of advancement making him a factor in the general business development 
and progress of the town. Appanoose county has numbered him among its 
residents since his birth, and he is regarded in Numa as a valuable addition 
to the ranks of progressive business men. He was born in Brazil, Bel lair 
township, November 29, 1885, and is a son of John and Carrie (Stirts) 
Moden. The father came to Appanoose county in pioneer times and was 
one of the first settlers in the town of Brazil. He was an experienced coal 
miner and after coming to Iowa engaged in that occupation during the re- 
mainder ot his life, passing away in 1895. His widow still makes her home 
in Brazil. 

Elmer J. Moden was reared at home and acquired his education in the 
district schools ot Bellair township. After completing his studies he also 
engaged in coal mining and for thirteen years continued his connection with 
that line of work. At the end of that time he went to Piano, \Valnut 
township, and established himself in the restaurant business, conducting a 
flourishing enterprise tor one year, after which he sold out at a profit and 
came to Numa. Here he resumed his occupation and is now operating the 
only first-class restaurant in the town. His business interests are carefully 
conducted and his sound judgment, industry and enterprise are manifest 
in the prosperity which comes to him. 

On the 1 ith of September, 1909, Mr. Moden was united in marriage to 
Miss Ida Philby, a daughter of George and Emma (Rothwell) Philby, 
natives of England. The father came to .\merica with his parents w hen he 
was a child and as soon as he was old enough he engaged in coal mining. 
In 1882 he came to Appanoose county and resumed his former occupation. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 219 

He now resides in Piano. Mr. and Mrs. Moden have two children: Edith 
L., two years of age ; and Ruth V., aged one. 

Mr. Moden gives his allegiance to the republican party and his religious 
views are in accord with the doctrines ot the Methodist church. Frater- 
nally he is affiliated with the Foresters of America. Mr. Moden is also the 
organizer and leader of the band at Numa, and is an accomplished music- 
ian, being an artist on the clarinet. He is still a young man but possesses 
m his character the qualities upon which success is founded and his con- 
tinued advancement is, therefore, assured. As a resident of Numa he has 
been loyal in his advocacy of everything pertaining to the welfare of the 
town and has already made some substantial contributions to its develop- 
ment and progress. 



MARION McCRORY. 



Marion McCrory, engaged in business at Moravia as a dealer in teed, 
was born in Davis county, Iowa, Februar} lo, 1872, a son of Winn and 
Mary (Shepard) McCrory. With their respective parents they removed 
from Ohio to Davis county, Iowa, where they were married, and there made 
their home for some years. The mother died in that county but the lather 
passed away in Missouri. He was a lifelong farmer and had reached the 
age of fifty-two years when, in 1898, he was calliil to his final rest. 
Marion McCrory was but nine days old at the time of his mother's demise. 
He has spent the greater [nirt of his life in Moravia and its vicinity, being 
reared by his grandparents, Thomas and Catherine McCrory, whose last 
days were spent in Moravia. 

Marion McCrory acquired his education in the public schools and was 
early trained to recognize the value of industry, economy and honesty. For 
several years after attaining his majority he engaged in farming, but for 
the past three years has conducted a feed store at Moravia. He buys antl 
ships grain oi all kinds and sells teed to the local trade, in whiih connec- 
tion he has built up a profitable and growing business. 

On the nth of April, 1893, Mr. McCrory was united in marriage to 
Mi>,> Anna Wright, who was born in Davis county, Iowa, June 7, 1872, 
a daughter ot Robert Wright. They have become parents of six children: 
William, who was drowned at the age of fifteen years; Minnie; Ethel; 
(reorge and Georgiana, twins, the latter dying in infancy; and Mattie. 
The family are well known in Moravia and theirs is a hospitable home, the 
good cheer ot which is greatly enjoyed by their many triends. Mr. Mc- 



220 HISTORY OF APl'AXOOSE COUNTY 

Crory votes with the democratic party, to which he has given his allegiance 
since age conterred upon him the right of franchise. His traternal rela- 
tions are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masons, in 
the work of which lodges he is interested, recognizing the high principles 
which underlie their tenets and their teachings. 



JOHN PAYTON. 



John Payton, who has resided in Appanoose county tor more than two- 
thirds of a century, is the oldest living settler within its borders and is 
familiar with its annals from pioneer times to the present. He is now 
living retired in Centerville, where tor many years he worked at the plaster- 
er's trade. His birth occurred in Shelby county, Missouri, on the 23d of 
October, 1835, his parents being John and Emily (Townsend) Payton. 
The father was a native of Lexington, Kentucky, while the mother was born 
in Tennessee in 1805. John Payton, Sr., accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Tennessee as a young man and there began farming. He was 
married in that state and a few years later removed to Shelby county, Mis- 
souri, where he met death by accident in 1837, being thrown from a horse. 
His widow was thus left with the care of live small children. In the spring 
of 1844 she sold the farm in Missouri and came to Appanoose count)-, Iowa, 
here entering one hundred and sixty acres of land. At the end of six 
years, in 1850, she disposed of the place and took up her abode in Center- 
ville, where she continued to reside until called to her final rest in 1863. 

John Payton was a lad of nine years when he came to this county with 
his widowed mother, Centerville at that time containing but tour houses. 
He attended school there and when twelve years of age carried the mail 
on horseback from Centerville to Ottumwa — a distance of forty miles. He 
carried mail for three years and worked at any t)th(T employment that he 
could hnd. On the 14th of February, 1862, at Centerville, Iowa, he enlisted 
for service in the Union arm}- as a member of Compan}- D, Sixth Iowa 
V^olunteer Infantr}-, commanded b) Captain Waldron. He participated in 
twent}-seven of the principal engagements of the war, including those of 
Shiloh, Champion's Hill, \'icksburg. Mission Ridge and Lookout Moun- 
tain. He was wounded at Atlanta, Georgia, on the 28th of July, 1864, and 
on the 10th of June, 186^, was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, re- 
ceiving his honorable discharge at Davenport. Iowa, on the 25th ot .August, 
1865. Mr. Payton was a lo\al and valiant soldier, always found in the 
thickest of the fight and never faltering in the performance of any task 




JOHN PAYTOX 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 223 

as>i>,'nfd him. After returning to Centerville he learned the plasterer's 
trade, working at that occupation throughout the remainder ot his active 
business career. During the past tew years, however, he has lived retired, 
spending the evening of life in well earned rest. He owns an attractive 
home in Centerville and receives a pension of thirty dollars per month. 

On the 4th of March, 1858, Mr. Payton was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Mar}- Jane Swearengin, a daughter of Samuel S. and Temperance 
Ann (Pearson) Swearengin, both of whom were natives of Maryland. 
They came west in the early '40s, locating on a farm in Davis county, 
low a. In i8;2 Mr. Swearengin established his home in A()panoose county 
and built a flour and feed mill on the Chariton river in Sharon township, 
here continuing to reside until he passed away in 1857. A few years later 
liis wife died at the home of her son (reorge in Centerville, this county. 
I'o Mr. and Mrs. Payton were born the following children: Isaac, who is 
deceased; Josephine, who is the widow of George Halden, a merchant of 
Centerville, Iowa, and now resides in Spokane, Washington; Albert, who 
conducts an opera house in Centerville; Ella, the wife of Rev. Stevens, of 
Spokane, Washington; George, who is at this writing a candidate for the 
office of sheriff in Appanoose county; and Claud, in New York city. The 
wife and mother was called to her final rest in 1901 and since that time Mr. 
Payton has had a family living with him, to look after the household. 

In politics Mr. Payton is a stanch republican, having ever supported 
the party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the 
Civil war. He attends the services of the Methodist church and his life 
has been upright and honorable in its various relations. He has now passed 
the seventv-seventh milestone on life's journey and enjoys the distinction 
of being the oldest living settler in the county. 



F. S. .SHARP 



F. S. Sharp is the owner ot an excellent farm ot two luindKd and 
ninety acres on section 15, Taylor township, and his careful management 
IS evidenced in its well kept appearance and in the substantial crops which 
are annualh garnered. It was in this township, on the 3d of January, 
186^. while his father was at the front in the Civil war, that F. S. Sharp 
was born. He is a son of F. M. and Maggie R. (Beaty) Sharp. The 
father's birth occurred in Washington cnimfy, Pennsylvania, .lanuarx 26, 
18^9, while the mother was born in Marshall county, IllinoiN September 
19, 18^8. In 1855 F. M. Sharp came to Taylor township, Ap|unoose 



224 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

county, with his parents, J. \V. and Anna Sharp, Ix-inp at that time a lad 
of sixteen years. His father secured the hist piece of hind open for entry 
in the township and there developed a farm, upon which he and his wife 
spent their remaining days. They had ten children, seven sons and three 
daughters, of whom F. M. Sharp was the eldest. He was reared in the 
usual manner of farm lads and always carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits. He purchased eighty acres of the present homestead, which at that 
time was a tract of raw land, but with characteristic energ}' soon trans- 
formed it into fertile fields, to which he added from time to time until two 
hundred and eighty acres were comprised within the boundaries of his 
place. He continually carried on general farming here until ten }ears ago, 
when he sold the old home to his son F. S. Sharp and went to Missouri to 
live in the Ozark country for the benefit of his health. He was a valued 
and highly respected resident of this part of the state, honored and esteemed 
wherever known and most of all where he was best known. He enlisted 
on the 24th of June, 1861, as a member of Company D. Sixth Iowa \'oluii- 
teer Infantry, and served for more than four years, or until the close of the 
war, being mustered out at Washington, D. C, where he took part in the 
Grand Review, the most celebrated military pageant ever seen in the west- 
ern hemisphere, thousands of victorious troops marching through the streets 
of the city, between the ranks of a cheering multitucie that welcomed their 
return. Mr. Sharp participated in man}- hotly contested battles, never 
faltering in the face of the gravest danger. In days of peace he was a loyal 
and progressive citizen and filled a number of local offices, while at one 
time he was a candidate for the legislature and also for county superinten- 
dent of schools on the democratic ticket. Although his partj- was largely in 
the minority, such was his personal popularity that he came within a few 
votes of being elected. He and his wife were active members of the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian church and he was a valued member of the Grand 
Army post here. In Masonry he had also attained high rank, being a mem- 
ber of the Knight Templar commander}- and the Mystic Shrine. Unto him 
and his wife were born eight children: F. S., of this review; J. E., a hard- 
ware merchant of Centerville; Lillie R., the wife of J. W. Yates, 
of Thomasville, Georgia; Annie, the wife of William Spencer, of Albia. 
Thomas P., of Thomasville, Georgia; Luella, the wife of T. E. Robinson, 
of Elkhead, Missouri; John G., living in Tampa, Florida: and Alberta, the 
wife of W. H. Blake, of Tampa. 

F. S. Sharp, whose name introduced this review, has always resided 
upon the old homestead, devoting his life to general agricultural pursuits. 
He acquired a public-school education and when his text-books were put 
aside he concentrated his energies upon farm work and ultimately became 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 225 

the owner of the farm which had long been the property of his father, com- 
prising two hundred and ninety acres of rich and productive land on section 
15, Taylor township. Upon this place his father had put many improve- 
ments and Mr. Shar[) keeps it in excellent condition, devoting his attention 
to the cultivation of grain and the raising of stock. He has also been a 
director of the Moravia State Savings Bank since its organization. 

On the 21st of July, 1895, Mr. Sharp was unitcii iiv marriage to Miss 
Josephine Hilton, who was born in Monroe county, Iowa, near the Hilton 
postotfice. which was named in honor of her father. Judge James Hilton, 
who came to this part of the state in 1841. Mr. and Mrs. Sharp have two 
children, Mary and James Hilton. Mr. Sharp votes with tiit- democratic 
])art}- but the honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. 
He is, however, an exemplar)' representative of the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has attained the Knight 'remplar degree and has also crossed the 
sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. A lifelong resi- 
dent of Taylor township, he is. indeed. widel\- known and his man\ ad- 
mirable characteristics have gained for him the warm regard of those with 
whom he is associated. 



J. H. McCAULEY 



In various offices J. H. McCauley has proven his hdelity to the best 
interests of the community and at all times has been a loyal and \ alued 
citizen of Appanoose county during the forty-five years of his residence 
here. The greater part of his life has been spent in Iowa, although he 
is a native of Columbiana county, Oliio, his birth occurring December 4, 
1838, about twelve miles southwest of New Lisbon in a little log cabin 
which he visited in igii. finding it still well preserved after all those 
years. His parents. Patrick and Elizabeth (Brown) McCauley, were 
natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania respectively, the former becoming 
a resident of the Keystone state when he accomj)anied his parents to the 
new world in his childhood days. The Brown family is of Scotch lineage. 
It was in 1843 that Patrick McCauley left Columbiana county, Ohio, 
with his family and drove acro.ss the country to Jefferson countv. Iowa, 
with a plug team and linchpin wagon. He located north of Fairfield, 
where he .spent the first winter in a primitive hou.se with no floor. The 
little building >heltered father, mother and eleven children. After nin<- 
years sfient in Jefferson count). Mr. McCauhy removed to A[i!ianoo.se 
county, where with a land warrant he secure,! three hundred and twenty 



226 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

acres tour miles southwest of Iconium. He died at the home of his son, 
J. H. McCauley, at the ripe old age of eighty-five )ears, while his wife 
passed away in this count}- at the age ot sixty-five years. All of the 
eleven children reached adult age and were married save the youngest 
brother, T. C. McCauley, who was wounded at Marks Spring, Arkansas, 
and died there. He had enlisted for service in the army with an Iowa 
rcyiment, but had been transferred to the Sixth Compau) before his death 
m 1863. The eldest son of the family, John McCauley, served for three 
years in defense of the Union and then veteranized, remaining with the 
Third Iowa Cavalry until the close of hostilities. The only members 
of the family now living are J. H. McCauley and his sister Matilda, who is 
the widow of S. J. \'an Horn and resides in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Since the 1st of October, 1843, J. H. McCauley has made his home 
in this state, arriving here when not <]uite five years of age. He is there- 
fore one of Iowa's honored pioneers and has lived to witness the greater 
part of the growth and progress of the state as it has emerged from frontier 
conditions and taken rank with the leading states of the Union. His 
residence in Appanoose county covers forty-five years and throughout the 
entire period his sterling qualities of manhood and citizenship have won 
him high regard. He has been a farmer and stockdcaler during the greater 
part of his lite, but for three years was upon the road as a traveling sales- 
man, making Burlington his headquarters, and for some time was a retail 
merchant at Iconium, where he remained for eleven }ears, and while con- 
ducting his mercantile interests there he also engaged in farming. For 
thirty-six years he has been an auctioneer and during that time has never 
missed but two dates. Since he disposed of his commercial interests about 
thirty years ago he has given his attention to overseeing his farm and 
live-stock interests and his auctioneering business. These different con- 
nections have made him widely known and wherever he has gone he has 
made friends, for he is a man of genial disposition and kindly spirit. At 
different times he has been called to public office, serving as postmaster 
at Iconium for four }ears, as school treasurer there for ten )-ears and also 
as school director for a number of years. His political allegiance has 
alwaj^s been given to the democratic party, for he is a firm believer in 
its principles. 

In September, 1865, occurred the marriage of Mr. McCauley and 
Miss Mattie Dean, of Unionville, Iowa, a daughter of Liven and Susan 
Dean. Mrs. McCauley died in Fehruar}-, iQOv at the age of fift}-six 
years, leaving three sons and a daughter: Ray D., of Moravia: Charles. 
of Chicago; Ned, who is cashier of the Moravia State Savings Bank; and 
Stella, the wife of H. C. Reich, of Moravia. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 227 

Mr. McCauley attributes much ot his success to the influence, assistance 
and encouragement ot his wife. He did not know the letters of the 
alphabet when nineteen years of age. He had only six months' schooling 
and his wife became his teacher. He mastered the lessons which she 
assigned with the same thoroughness that has characterized him in every 
relation of life. He has never faltered in the accomplishment of any task 
to which he has set himself and his resolute spirit has been one ot the 
strongest elements in his growing success. His life has ever been a busy, 
active and useful one. .Although he is now seventy-four years of age, he 
is still closely ami prominently associated with Inisiness affairs and recently 
during a period of seven weeks he purchased twenr\ -eight carloads ot heavy 
cattle feeders, one hundred and twenty }earlings and two carloads ot cattle 
for butchering. At the same time he has conducted his farm and sales busi- 
ness, manifesting energy and perseverance equal to that of many a man of 
half his age. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal cluirch 
and for thirty-eight years he has been a faithful member of the Masonic 
fraternity, true to its teachings concerning mutual helpfulness and broth- 
erly kindliness. He certainh- deserves much credit for what he has accom- 
plished for with no advantages at the outset of his career he placed his 
dependence upon the substantial qualities of hard work and dcrcrniinarion 
and those qualities in the course of years have brought him substantial and 
well deserved prosperity'. 



OSCAR W. JOHNSON. 



Among the active and progressive business men of Exline is numbered 
O-rar W. Johnson, postmaster and well known as a partner in rlic tirni ot 
Frcclnirg \ .Johnson, general merchants. He was born in Sweden. March 
2<S, 187S, antl when he was only nine years of age was brought to .\merica 
b}- his father, who came with his family across the Atlantic and pushed on 
to Iowa, locating in Centerville. 

Oscar VV. Johnson grew to maturity in Centerville and was educated 
in its iMiblic schools. In his early lite he worked in the coal mines and later 
clerked tor tour years, receiving in this way an excellent business training. 
Later he was made superintendent at the Dewey mine and after two years 
of able work in this capacity resigned and formed his present partnership 
with R. M. Freeburg. Mr. Johnson came to Exline as active manager of 
the general store which the firm conducts and by virtue of the prosperity he 
lias achieved occupies today an enviable position in business circles. He 



228 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

carries a complete stock of well selected goods and has secured a liberal 
patronage because of the honest and upright commercial methods to which 
he has steadily adhered. He divides his time between the conduct of his 
mercantile establishment and his duties as postmaster of Exline, to which 
position he was appointed in 1909. He has proven himself able, sys- 
tematic, prompt and reliable in this capacity and is widely popular through- 
out the district which he serves. Mr. Johnson owns some valuable resi- 
dence property and has made many profitable real-estate deals, having 
bought and sold three residences in the town. 

In Burlington, Iowa, on the 5th of November, 1903. Mr. Johnson was 
united in marriage to Miss Gussie Nelson, who was born in Des Moines 
county, Iowa, of Swedish parents. To their union were born three chil- 
dren, Elvira, Lucille and Nabine. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of 
the Christian church. Mr. Johnson gives his allegiance to the republican 
party and in addition to his work as postmaster is also serving as council- 
man on the Exline town board. He is especially interested in school mat- 
ters and has been identified with many projects relating to public-school 
expansion, having served for many years on the board of education. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
is well known in this part of Iowa, where he was reared to manhood, 
standing today among the most valued and representative men of this 
community. 



JOHN W. MARTIN. 



Among the able, jirogressive and far-sighted business men ot Niima is 
John \V. Martin, who conducts a large general store and likewise controls 
other important business interests throughout Appanoose county. His 
career has been marked by steady advancement along legitimate lines and 
he has gained a high degree of prosperity which is the direct outcome of 
his stead}' work and his effective ability. He was born in Putnam county, 
Missouri, September 28, 1871, and is a son of Neal and Pcrmelia (Lane) 
Martin, the former a native of Randolph county, Missouri, and the latter 
of Ireland. The fatlur moved to Putnam count} at an earl} date and 
there engaged in the general mercantile business in Martinstown, a com- 
munity which was named in his honor. For forty-six years he conducted 
this enterprise, evidencing in all of his business relations the integrity and 
high standards of business morality u[ion \\ hich his prosperit}' was founded. 
He died in Martinstown, Januar} 12, 190^. at the age of seventy-six, and 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 229 

his death was deeply mourned and regretted b)- a wide circle of friends. 
He h:ul long survived his wife, who passed away in 1873. 

John W. Martin was reared in Putnam county, Missouri, and actjuired 
his earlv education in the public schools ot that section, completing it in 
Kirksville, Missouri. After he had laid aside his books he engaged in the 
general merchandise business in partnership with his father for a year and 
a half, after which he sold out his interests and moved to Coatsville, Mis- 
souri. This was the first of a series of changes in location, all of which 
materially advanced Mr. Martin's interests. He spent two years in tlie 
hardware business in Coatsville and. then moved to Graysville, where he 
purchased his uncle's general store which he operated for two years. Dur- 
ing that time he became well known in local political circles of that (ilace 
and his loyalty and progressive spirit were recognized in his election to the 
office of county treasurer. When he had completed his term of service he 
moved to Hartford, Missouri, and there engaged in the general merchan- 
dise business. After two years, however, he sold his enterprise and in May, 
i8c)7. came to Xuma, where he has since resided. He i)urchased a general 
store and has since been success! ul in the conduct ot this enterprise, man- 
aging in addition a profitable hardware concern. These, however, form 
onl)- a small portion of Mr. Martin's extensive business interests in Appa- 
noose county. In 1904 he purchased a coal mine operated at that time by 
the Walnut Coal Company and atter developing this successfully tor tour 
years sold out at a profit and bought another mine at Pleasant Plain. .Atter 
he had operated this for one year he disposed of it for seventeen thousand 
dollars and later bought what was known as the Jim White farm, com- 
prising two hundred and forty acres, and also owns the coal and mineral 
rights to tour hundred and eighty acres. He is president and manager of 
the Martin Block Coal Compan}- of Numa. This concern has a paid up 
ca[)ital of fitty thousand dollars and is one of the important commercial 
enterprises in this part of the state. Mr. Martin has proven himself an 
eminently capable, far-sighted and discriminating business man and finan- 
cier, who recognizes and uses each favorable opportunity, who correctly 
judges commercial conditions and who has ably converted his knowledge to 
his own advantage. Everything which he does is done capably and well 
and his prosperity today is the visible evidence of his energ}', reliability and 
well directed ambition. His interests in Appanoose county extend over a 
wide field, making him one of the leading and representative business men 
ot this community. 

On the >th of July, iScSq, Mr. Martin was united in marriage to Miss 
Rebecca E. Warwick, who was born in Putnam county, Missouri, Septem- 
ber I V 1S73. ami who ;:rew to womanhood there. She is a daughter of J. 



230 HISTURV Ul' Ai'i'AXOUSE COUNTY 

M. and Frances (Hatfield) Warwick, natives of Kentucky, who moved to 
Missouri in early times. The father bought hmd in Putnam county and 
at one time owned and operated ten thousand acres, being one of the most 
prosperous agriculturists and extensive lamiowners in the locality. He re- 
finti from active life in 1902 and has since made his home in Numa. He is 
an honored veteran of the Civil war, having served throughout that con- 
flict as a member of a Missouri cavalry regiment. His wife also survives. 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin have become the parents of five children: Mamie O., 
the wife of W. B. Russell, who manages Mr. Martin's hardware store; 
John Neal, who is studying medicine in Chicago, Illinois; Ola Blanche F., 
the wife of Mat Folwell, of Numa; Ophie (jrace, the wife of Robert Ross, 
who resides in Numa and operates the mine belonging to the subject of 
this review; and Winnifred I'., who is attending the Centerville high 
school. 

Fraternalh Mr. Martin is connected with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic order, being well 
known and popular in all of these organizations. He is a devout member 
of the Methodist church. His political allegiance is given to the republi- 
can party and for a number of years he served upon the Numa town coun- 
cil, discharging his duties conscientiously and always with a view to the 
best interests of the general public. He is public-spirited and progressive, 
eager for the welfare of his community and giving active and helpful coi 
operation to any movement which tends to promote it. 



WILLIAM MORRISON ELLIS. 

LTpon the roll of Appanoose count}'s honored dead appears the name 
of William Morrison I'"Jlis, who is hclil in loving and gratetul remembrance 
by his many friends in this section, although thirteen )ears have passed 
since his death. He was tor a long perioil one of the substantial and pro- 
gressive agriculturists of this .section of the state and through the jears of 
his honorable and upright career he gained the respect and confidence ot all 
with whom he came in contact. Mr. Ellis was a native ot Kentucky, born 
on the 13th ot January, i<S^o, his parents being Marcellus and Nancy 
Ellis, both natives of Kentucky. The father farmed in that state for some 
time but eventually came north and settlcil in Indiana, whence in l8^^ he 
came to Caldwell township, Apjianoose county, where he [)urchased land 
and engaged in general agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his 
life. 




WII.IJAM M. KI.I.IS 




MRS. M. A. 1:1.1 I •■ 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 235 

William M. Ellis acquired his education in the public schools of Ken- 
tucky and of Harrison count)-, Indiana, and grew to manhood in the latter 
section. He left Harrison covmty about the year 1850. trading' his prop- 
erty in that state for a land warrant for fort}- acres in Sharon township, 
Appanoose county, to which he added eighty acres entered from the govern- 
ment. For a number of years he concentrated his attention upon the im- 
provement and development of this farm, making it in all respects a model 
agricultural enterprise. When he left Sharon township he moved into 
Caldwell township, purchasing eighty acres, and upon this property he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits. His intelligently directed energies 
brought him success and he continued to cultivate his farm until his death, 
which occurred in 1899. His widow now lives upon the homestead, which 
for some time she rented out but which her grandson \'ernie L. Ellis is now 
operating for her. 

On the 25th of December, 1849, Mr. Ellis was united in marriage, in 
Harrison county, Indiana, to Miss Margaret A. Ellis, a daughter of 
Daniel and Mar}- Ellis, natives of Kentuck}-, whose ancestors came from 
\'irginia and were originally of Dutch, Irish and Welsh extraction. Daniel 
and Mary Ellis went from Kentuck\ to Imiiana and >p<in riu- remainder ot 
their lives on a farm in Harrison county. The mother died in iS^i. atter 
which Daniel Ellis married Mrs. Patsy Bunch, of Harrison county, who 
has passed away. 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Ellis became the parents of six children. 
The eldest, America, passed away at the age of fifteen. Perr}-. a farmer of 
\'ermillion township, married \'iolinda Eddy and they became the parents 
of eight children, Lloyd, Floyd, Ella. Bessie, May, Alta. and \\'illiam and 
Russell, both of whom have passed away. Jesse, the third chiKl born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis, is a farmer in \'ermillion township. He married Belle 
Grimes and by her has six children, Lonnie, Maude, Pearl. Hazel. Hygene 
and Fitz. Laura married Clinr Tone}-, a farmer of Sublett. Missouri. 
They have seven children, .John, Ha'/.el, Pansy, Ivy, Nora, Marion and 
-Arthur. Millard is a cement worker in Centerville. He has been married 
three times, hi- fhirtl wife being Miss Rose Hitchcock. B\ his first union 
he is the father of five children, Ernest, Clyde, Vernie, Ethel and Shirley, 
and by his third marriage has one son. Harold. The youngest child born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Ellis is Cora Delia, who married Harry Bennefield, a 
stockman in Oklahoma, by whom she has four children, Otis, Blanche, 
Elsie and William. Mrs. Ellis has now reached the age of eighty-two 
years but is still active and vigorous and enjo}s the best of health. She 
comes of a long-lived family. Her grandfather. John Ellis, lived to be 
one hundred and one years old and then met his death by accident, having 



236 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

been thrown out of a bugfiv and killed. Her <xrcat-grandtather was struck 
by lightning and killed at the age ot one hundred and two years. 

William M. Ellis was loyal in his support of the men and measures of 
the democratic party and, although he was no office seeker, he was never- 
theless identified with many local enterprises and was known as a cooper- 
ant factor in many measures that directly benefited the community. He 
was for several terms director of the school board and fraternally was 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd P'ellows. He gave devout 
adherence to the doctrines of the Christian church, exemplifying in his up- 
right life the principles in which he believed. Those things which are 
most worthy and commendable in life made strong appeal to him and the 
standards of honorable manhood found worthy expression in his career, 
gaining for him widespread respect and esteem and man}- friends. 



MATHEW MORE. 



Mathew More, owning one hundred and sixty acres of land in Union 
township, upon a portion of which he has resided tor thirty years, is a 
native of Ohio, born in Clark county, December 5, 1847. His parents 
were John and Mary E. (Moor) More, natives of England, both of whom 
were born in Yorkshire. Their marriage occurred in that section and im- 
mediately afterward they crossed the Atlantic to America, settling in New 
York state in 1832. Subsequently they pushed westward to Ohio and es- 
tablished a residence in Clark county in 1848. At the time the tide of 
emigration swept toward Iowa the father of our subject joined the throngs 
who were going westward and located in Davis county, where he took up 
one hundred and sixty acres of government land. He and his wife re- 
mained upon this property until their deaths, the father passing away in 
1865 and the mother in i8c;o. Both were devout members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. In his politics John More was a loyal democrat 
and a man of influence and weight in local party councils, having served 
for several years in various important capacities. 

Mathew More was reared at home and acquired his education in the 
public schools. After his marriage in 1874 he left Davis county and rented 
land in .Appanoose county, near Moulton. upon which he resided for one 
year. He spent the next four }ears upon rented land in Wapello county 
but in 1880 returned to Appanoo.se county and purchased eighty acres in 
Union township, which constitutes a portion of his present farm. With 
characteristic energy he began the work of developing and cultivating his 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTV 237 

fields and. his methods being progressive and his standards of business in- 
te"rity high, his work was rewarded by well deserved success. From time 
to time he added to his holdings and today owns one hundred and sixty 
acres, constituting one of the finest and most profitable agricultural cnter- 
[)rises in this part of the state. 

In Davis county in 1874 Mr. More married Miss Mary E. Smith, a 
daughter of Paris Smith, one of the early settlers in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. 
More became the parents of ten children, nine of whom are still living: 
John Orville, of Unionville, Appanno-c county; William Kvcrett, a resi- 
dent of Des Moines; Paris E., whose home is in Unionville; Jessie M., 
who married Charles Tomlin, of Davis county; Ruby, the wife of Eugene 
Boyer, of Union township; Addie, the wife of Clarence Swain, also of 
Lnion township; Nannie, the wife of Olin Swain, of Udell township; 
Nettie, who married Joseph Harrington, of Davis county; and Ora, a 
teacher in the district schools of Union township. Mr. and Mrs. More arc 
devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Eminently progressive in his citizenship, Mr. More gives a loyal sup- 
port to the democratic party and takes a helpful and active interest in all 
movements which have for their object the public welfare or the growth 
and advancement of the section in which he has so long resided. Although 
not an office seeker he has never been known to shirk his public duties and 
in their discharge has been found constantly loyal and public-spirited, an 
earnest worker in the service of the people. For the past ten or twelve 
years he has been secretary of the school board and has been township as- 
sessor, township clerk and town.ship trustee, serving in .some one of these 
three offices for over twentj- )ears. He stands todaj- among the men of 
weight in this community and during the thirty years of his residence here 
his infiuence has never Incn given to a dishonorable cause and has never 
been unworthily used. 



JAMES E. HENDERSHOT. 

James E. Hendershot has for twenty years been closely associated with 
commercial interests of E.xline as a member of the tirm ot Hendershot & 
Uoble)-, merchants, and with the general business interests of the com- 
numity through his identification with all the leading iirojecfs and enter- 
prises which directly affect advancement and development. He was born 
in Caldwell townshij^, Appanoose county, June l ^ 186^ and was reared 
upon his grandfather's farm. His early education was acquired in the pub- 



238 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

lie schools of the locality and he was later tor one term a student in the 
University of Kansas. When he laid aside his books he engaged in teach- 
ing in the public schools of his native section but after six years abandoned 
that occupation and farmed near Sedan for one year. At the end of that 
time he located in Exline and has since given his attention to business con- 
cerns. He bought a small stock of goods and established himself as a gen- 
eral merchant. He soon became well known on account ot his upright and 
honorable business methods, his fair dealing and his constant courtesy and 
consideration for the wishes of his customers, and as a result his business 
grew. Year by year he added to his stock and continued to conduct the 
enterprise until igo6, meeting with steadily increasing prosperity. Even- 
tually, however, he sold his business interests and went upon a pleasure 
trip to the Pacific coast, journeying through Washington, Oregon and Cali- 
fornia. When he returned at the end of three months he became interested 
in the Exline Savings Bank, which he promoted and built up and served as 
its president for some time, being still a large stockholder. At one period 
in his career he purchased a ranch in Texas and in 1911 moved to the Pan 
Handle, near Amarillo, and resided upon his property for about three 
months, after which he returned to Exline. Here he formed a partnership 
with E. S. Roble)- and bought out the Exline Cash Store, the business be- 
ing now conducted under the firm name of Hendershot ^' Robley. They 
carry a fine line of goods and are conducting a business which is constantly 
growing in volume and importance. They have now a liberal patronage 
and their trade is increasing, owing to the straightforward business methods 
and the reasonable prices which have become recognized as a policy of this 
business house. Mr. Hendershot has other extensive and important busi- 
ness interests in Exline, being a stockholder and a director of the Exline 
Savings Bank and the owner of valuable propert}- holdings. He holds 
title to a number of resicfence lots, upon which he has built some eight or 
ten houses which he rents and in addition to this owns also extensive busi- 
ness property. During the course of his twenty years of activity in Exline 
he has aided greatly in the ujibuilding and development ot the town, lend- 
ing the weight of his influence to the promotion of projects which affect 
material progress and public advancement. 

Mr. Hendershot married near Sedan, Iowa, in January, 1892. Miss 
Lily Wood, who was born, reared and educatetl in .\ppanoose count}' antl 
who taught in the ])uhlic schools [irevious to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hendershot have three children: Marie, who is stuti} ing in Davenport; 
Carl Elton; and Kenneth. Two of the children born to this union died in 
infancy. 

Mr. Hendershot has been affiliated w ith the democratic party since at- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 239 

taining his majority and has held many positions of responsibility and 
trust. He has served as township clerk and as township trustee and has 
besides been a delegate to many county conventions, proving himselt al- 
ways a forceful and efficient public servant. He is a progressive business 
man who seems to recognize the value of every situation and to make the 
most of his many opportunities. Through legitimate lines of trade he has 
built up a growing business that is indicative of his spirit of enterprise and 
determination. 



RALPH E. WILSON. 



Ralph K. Wilson, conducting a barber shop in l-nionvilie, has been a 
resident of Appanoose count}' since his childhood. His birth occurred in 
Knoxville, Knox count). Illinois, May 18, 1879, his parents being Jacob 
and Katherine E. (Brain) Wilson. The father was born in Greene county, 
Ohio, January 23, 1849, but the grandfather on the paternal side, John H. 
Wilson, was a native of \'irginia. His birth occurred on September 14, 
1816, and he died in Illinois, September 15, 1893. His wife was in her 
maidenhood Miss Isabella Hogue. She was born in Greene county, Ohio, 
in 1818 and died in Knox county, Illinois, in 1858. The father of our 
subject came to Illinois in September, l8j6, with his [larcnts and there 
grew to manhood. He married on the 25th of December, 1873. Miss 
Katherine E. Brain, a daughter of George and Ellen (Cox) Brain. Both 
were born in Gloucestershire, England, in which county their marriage oc- 
curred. They came to the United States in 1852 and located first at Yel- 
low Springs, Ohio, and later in Knox county, Illinois. In 1878 they came 
to .Appanoose count}- and here the father purchaseti two huntlred and hft\' 
acres of land in Udell township which he improved and developed until his 
death in 1899. His widow makes her home with the father of the subject 
ot this review. The mother of our subject was born in Knox countv, Illi- 
nois and atter her marriage came with her husband to Appanoose county, 
locating in this section in Februar}, 18S0. Lor some time they lived upon 
a rented farm but in 1883 Jacob Wilson moved into Unionville and pur- 
chased the livery stable then conducted by William Crow. He was suc- 
cessful in the management of this enterprise, in which he continued until 
188) and then bought a hardware and furniture store in Unionville. In 
1892 he took .\. v. Bishop into jiartnership with him bur two years later 
repurchased his partner's interests. He later disposed of the furniture and 
undertaking department but retained the hardware and imjilement end of 



240 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

the business and in 1898 added groceries and gentlemen's furnishings, con- 
ducting this business at present. He handles a fine general stock of goods 
and in addition complete lines of buggies and farm implements. In 1901 
he joined with C. I. Harrison in the purchase of a grist and sawmill from 
the Joshua Riggs estate and seven years later the father of our subject was 
injured in this mill and later sold out his interest to his partner. He has 
served as postmaster of Unionville for four years and was for some time a 
member of the school board in Unionville. He served as tax collector and 
township clerk in Knox county, Illinois, and is in all matters of citizenship 
eminently progressive and public-spirited. Fraternally he is affiliated with 
Blue Lodge, No. 719, A. F. & A. M. He gives his allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party, and his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. They 
are the parents of three children: Frederick, whose birth occurred Novem- 
ber 3, 1874, and who is now a merchant of Unionville; Ralph E. : and 
Estella B., born May 17, 1889, at home. 

Ralph E. Wilson came to Appanoose county when he was a child and 
grew to manhood in this part of Iowa. He received his early education in 
the public schools and completed a course in the Unionville high school in 
1897, after which he spent one year in the Capital City Commercial Col- 
lege in Des Moines. In the fall of 1899 he began his active career, secur- 
ing a position as stenographer and bookkeeper for the firm of Hicks & Cree, 
dealers in real estate in Centerville. He remained with them for three 
months, after which he returned to Unionville, worked in his father's store, 
until in 1902, when he purchased a barber shop from P. V. Underwood 
which he has since successfully conducted, his prosperity being the direct 
result of his own energy and business ability. In 1905 he was editor ot the 
Unionville Chronicle and conducted the same for three years. 

On the 22d of April, 1902, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara B. Bishop, a daughter of Archibald T. and Jane ( Hicks) Bishop, 
the former of whom was born in Lee county, Mrginia. in 1848 and the 
latter in Jefferson county. Iowa, July 17, 1850. Mrs. Wilson's grand- 
parents on the paternal side were Joseph and Polly Ann (Hopkins) 
Bishop, natives of Virginia and Tennessee. Her maternal grandparents 
were James T. and Elizabeth (Rogers) Hicks, both of whom were born in 
Lee county, ^'irginia. Mrs. Wilson's father came to Appanoose county 
with his parents when he was a child and grew to manhood in this section, 
where he still resides. In 1869 he rented a farm and conducted it so suc- 
cessfullv that he was soon able to purchase one hundred and sixt}' acres in 
L^nion township. In 1900 he rented this property and came into Union- 
ville, where he engaged in the mercantile business for some time, trading 
his store in 1911 for a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Allen county. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 241 

Kansas. On the loth of April, 1912, he fonned a partnership with Paris 
E. More and they purchased the general merchandise store belonging to 
R. M. Creech, which they have since conducted. Mr. Bishop has held var- 
ious township offices, supporting always the democratic party, and frater- 
nally is affiliated with Unionville Lodge, No. 665, I. O. O. F. Mrs. 
Bishop belongs to Unionville Lodge, No. 1 95, O. E. S., and she and her 
husband are members of the Baptist church. To them six children were 
born: Millie and Joseph P., both of whom are deceased; Etta, the wife of 
George Brain, a farmer of LMell township, Appanoose county; Florence, 
who married Fred Wilson, a merchant of Unionville; Clara B., now Mrs. 
Ralph E. Wilson; and Laura, the wife of Paris More, a merchant 
of Unionville. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson became the parents of three chil- 
dren: Genevieve, born June 30, 1905; John Russell, whose birth occurred 
August 7, 1908; and Edith May, who was born September 7, 1909, and 
died October 29, of the same j^ear. 

Fraternally Mr. Wilson belongs to I'nionville Lodge, No. 66 v L O. 
O. F., and to I'nionville Lodge, No. 4248, ^L W. A. He is a member of 
the Presbyterian church, and his political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party. As a citizen he is public-spirited and whatever tends to pro- 
mote the best interests of the community receives his indorsement and 
hearty support. 



JAMES B. WERTZ. 



James B. Wertz is one of the able and progressive men of Numa, 
where he conducts a general store and is otherwise connected with im- 
portant enterprises which have been factors in the general development 
and progress of the town as well as a source of gratifying income to him. 
He is a native of Appanoose county, born in Bellair township, September 
24, 1871, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Sarah ( Hubler) Wertz, the 
tornuT born in Ohio and the latter in Indiana. The father came to 
Ap|)anoose county in 1854 among the early settlers and purchased land in 
Bel lair township, operating a valuable and protitablc farm for many years. 
In 1902 he went to Oregon and in that state his death occurred in Sep- 
tember, 191 I. His widow still re.sides in Oregon. 

James B. Wertz was reared upon his fathers farm in Bellair town- 
>hi[i and accjuircii his education in the district schools. .After laying; aside 
his books he obtained a position in a coal mine, working in that capacity 
until he was twenty-five years of age. At that time he acce[ited a position 



242 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

as clerk in the general store conducted b) .1. \N'. Martin, and when he 
resigned it went to Kansas, where he worked for two years. Returning 
to Numa, he entered the employ of J. W. Hubbs, acting as clerk in his 
general store for two years and a half. In all of his subordinate posi- 
tions Mr. Wertz worked diligently and intelligently, gaining the broad 
experience which has proven the foundation for his success as an inde- 
pendent business man. In 1909 he established himself in the general 
merchandise business and has conducted his enterprise since that time. 
He carries a complete line of stock and enjoys a large patronage as a 
result of his upright and honorable methods of dealing and his high 
standards of business integrity. He has displayed sound judgment in all 
that he has undertaken and his energy has been one of the powerful features 
in his progress. He is also a stockholder in the Numa State Savings Bank 
and has valuable property interests in the town, displaying in all business 
matters keen insight and good judgment. 

In April, 1907, Mr. \\'ertz was united in marriage to Miss Maude 
Kewley, a daughter of Thomas P. and Hanna F. (Allen) Kewley. The 
father was a farmer and stock-raiser and followed both occupations in 
Appanoose count)-, to which he had come in early days. However, he 
afterward abandoned agricultural pursuits and moved into Numa, where 
he engaged in the mercantile business until his death, which occurred in 
1895. His wife still makes her home in this community. 

Mr. Wertz gives his allegiance to the republican part}- and takes an 
active interest in the growth and w-elfare of the communit}-. He served 
for a number of years as treasurer of the town of Numa, displaying in 
his official work the same energ}', enterprise and integrity which influenced 
and hastened his business success. He has important fraternal affiliations, 
being a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the Foresters of America. He is one of the prominent 
business men of Numa, interested in the growth and development of this 
community and identified with it and is well known throughout his native 
county as one of its public-spirited and progressive citizens. 



ISAAC BROKAW. 



Isaac Brokaw, now- seventy-nine years of age, is living retired in Center- 
\illc, but tor many years he was closely associated with business interests 
as a manufacturer and farmer. Moreover, as a veteran of the Civil war 
he is entitled to representation in this volume, for during the dark hours 




ISAAC RROKAW 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 245 

ot our rounrry's history he espoused the Union cause and carried arms in 
its defense. He was born in New Jersey, December ii, 1833, a son of 
John and Eunice (Whitenack) Brokaw, both of whom were natives of 
New Jersey and of German descent. The father was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and at an early day removed from the east to Indiana, purchasing 
hmd in Hancock county, that state. For some time he continued the culti- 
vation and development of his farm there, after which he removed to 
Ohio, where he spent the remainder of his lite in general agricultural [nir- 
suits, his death there occurring in i8>2. His wife was accidentally killed 
by a falling tree ten years before. 

Isaac Brokaw was but four years of age when taken b)- his parents 
to Indiana and in the public schools of that state he obtained his education, 
but his opportunities were somewhat limited owing to circumstances over 
which he had no control. At the time of his mother's death, which occurred 
when he wa,N not quite ten }ears of age, his father put him out to work 
and from that time forward he depended upon his own labors and resources 
for a livelihood. In the fall of 1862, however, he put aside all busi- 
ness and personal considerations in order to respond to the country's call 
for aid and enlisted as a member of Company E, Thirty-fourth Indiana 
Infantry, with which he served for two years and two months, when he was 
honorably discharged on account of disability. His health had become 
greatly impaired during his strenuous military service and for a long time 
after the war he was unable to do much work. Final!)', however, he pur- 
( ha>(ci land in Indiana which he improved and cultivated for a long time. 
He also engaged in the manufacture of tile there for nine years and 
through his carefully directed business affairs met with a substantial suc- 
cess. In 1882 he came to Appanoose county and purchased one hundred 
and fifty-one acres of land in Bel lair township. This he at once began 
to improve and develop, continuing its cultivation for nine years, at the 
I nd of which time he rented the place and retired from active business 
life. Establishing his home in Centerville. he purchased a residence at 
No. 718 Ea>r Stare street which he entireh rciiKKlcled and has since 
occupied. 

On the 16th of August, l8> ^ ^''■- Brokaw was married to Miss Eliza- 
beth Hughes, who was born February 24, 1836, in Ireland, a daughter of 
William and Maria (Stinson) Hughes, who were natives of the north of 
Ireland and were Protestants in religious faith. The father was a farmer 
l>y ocx:upation and came to the United States in 1838. .After a short resi- 
dence in Ohio he removed to Indiana, where he bought and improved a 
farm near .\ndi-r>on. continuing its cultivation fhrougho\if the n-maimler 

Vol II- 1 1 



246 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

ot his days. He died in 1882 and ior eiphr years was survived by his 
wife, who passed away in 1890. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brokaw became the parents of seven children, as toUows: 
William, who is engaged in the real-estate business in Wyoming: Charles, 
a merchant of Albia, Iowa; Kdward F., a resident of Centerville, Iowa; 
Cyrenes, the proprietor of a restaurant at Centerville ; John Emery, who 
passed away in 1864; one, who died in infancy; and Eunice Maria, whose 
demise occurred in 1893. 

Mr. Brokaw maintains pleasant relations with his old army com- 
rades through his membership in the Grand Army post. He votes with 
the democratic party but has never sought or desired office, preferring 
to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs while he was still 
an active factor in commercial and agricultural circles. He and his wife 
are members of the Methodist church and have lived earnest, consistent 
Christian lives. They are people of the highest respectability and their 
circle of friends in Appanoose county is an extensive one. They have 
now traveled far on life's journey and can look back over the past with- 
out regret, for they have made good use of their time and opportunities 
and in their relations with their fellowmen have always attempted to 
follow the Golden Rule. 



PETER BALES. 



Peter Bales is classed among the substantial pioneer residents of Appa- 
noose county, dating his residence here from 1 85 1 . He owns and operates 
a well improved and valuable farm of three hundred and thirteen acres, 
located on section 3, Franklin townshij), and has so carried forward the 
work of development that his activities are regarded as important factors 
in local agricultural growth. He was born in Tennessee, near Knoxville, 
November 23, 1849, and is a son of Washington and Mary (HufFaker) 
Bales, both natives of that state. The father of our subject was a farmer 
in Tennessee and remained upon his property there until 1851, when he 
came as a pioneer to Iowa, w here he preempted land. He later filed upon 
four hundred and eighty acres in Franklin township, upon which he made 
permanent location. This was all raw prairie land when it came into his 
possession but with characteristic energ}- he at once began its improvement 
and development. He broke the soil, fenced the fields and built a small 
log cabin in which he made his home until it was replaced bv a more mod- 
ern dwelling. ITpon the outbreak of the Civil war he left the farm and 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY • 247 

enlisted in Compan) I, Thirty-sixtli \olunteer Intantry. He was mus- 
tered into service and went south, where he served for six or eipht months, 
at the end ot which time he was taken sick and sent hack on a furlough. 
He never reached his home but died at Keokuk, where he was buried. His 
wife, bravely took up the work of the farm and reared her five sons, all 
honorable and upright men and themselves the fathers of large families 
today. 

Peter Bales, the eldest in this family, grew to maturity upon the home- 
stead. He received his education in the common schools and was for a 
time in the Davenport Orphans' Home. .\t an early age, however, he 
returned to his mother and aided her in the operation of the farm, so that 
whatever success he enjoys today is due enrircl\ to his own efforts. In 
early life he inherited forty acres of the home farm, upon which he located 
in 1871 and whereon he has since made his home. He began the work 
of development along practical lines and has steadily carried it forward 
for over forty years, being today one of the most prosperous and substan- 
tial agriculturists of this locality. He built upon his farm a commodious 
residence and a bam and outbuildings and, in addition to the orchard which 
he set out, planted beautiful shade and ornamental trees, for he has always 
paid special attention to the attractive appearance of his place. From 
time to time he added to his holdings and now owns three hundred anil 
thirteen acres of fertile land under cultivation, with the exception of one 
hundred acres in timber and pasture. The farm is well fenced and cross- 
fenced into fields of convenient size and, in addition to general farming, 
Mr. Bales engages also in stock-raising, feeding and fattening fine herds 
of high-grade Shorthorn cattle, Poland China hogs ami raising horses. 

Mr. Bales married in Franklin township on December 22, 1871, Miss 
Clara McC'abc, who was born in Saratoga county. New York, and is a 
sister of W. H. McCabe, a prominent farmer in Franklin township, of 
whom more extended mention is made elsewhere in this work. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bales are the parents of three children. Laura Winnifrcd, the eldest, 
is the wife of E. Harl, a prosperous farmer ot Franklin rownsiiip. ami 
they have rive children, Bessie B., Edna C".. John T., Herbert Peter ant! 
(jrace Lillian. Luella B. married Estes Desper, also a farmer in Franklin 
town.ship. .Mda A., who completes the family, is the wife of Edwarti E. 
Condra, who is operating a farm in the same section. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bales are both active in religious work and are members of the Baptist 
church, Mr. Bales acting as deacon and was superintemlent of the Sunday 
school. Mrs. Bales is a Sunday .school teacher and in all the relations of 
her life exemplifies the doctrines in which she believes. 

Mr. Bales gives his allegiance to the republican party, and altliough 



248 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

he has never sought or desired public office, he has often been called upon 
to serve in an official capacit)-. He is especially interested in school work 
and for a long time served as school treasurer, promoting in an able and 
conscientious way the cause of public-school expansion. He has also been 
a delegate to a number of county conventions and has proved his loyalty 
and progressive citizenship by his efficient work. During the long period 
of their residence in Appanoose county Mr. and Mrs. Bales have made 
for themselves a real home upon their farm and have kept alive within it 
the warm spirit of hospital it)' which marked the pioneer era in Iowa. Their 
numerous friends find alw ays a hearty welcome at their fireside, good cheer 
and happiness and as a result they are held in high regard and have the 
confidence and friendship of the entire community. Through the years 
of an active, industrious and useful life Mr. Bales has watched the develop- 
ment of the great commonwealth and in an important way has been iden- 
tified with it, being counted among the notable pioneers of Iowa. 



BARRACK E. TURNER. 



Barrack E. Turner owns one of the finest farms in Taylor township, 
a well-improved property of three hundred and sevent)-five acres, upon 
which he has resided since 1892. Appanoose county numbers him among 
her native sons and here he has spent his entire lite, becoming in the course 
of years, by reason of steady work and well-directed ambition, a successful 
and influential man, a force in agricultural development and general up- 
building. His birth occurred October 22, 1863, and he is a son of William 
and Jemima (Parsons) Turner, both natives of North Carolina, where 
they were reared and married. Two of their children were born in that 
state, but in 1852 the)' came west to Iowa, locating on a farm in Taylor 
township, where the father resided continuously for over lorty years. 
After a long, useful and successful career he retired from active lite and 
moved into Moravia, where his death occurred in the spring of 1905. 
His widow survives and makes her home in Moravia. She is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and widely known as a woman of ex- 
emplary life. 

Barrack E. Turner was reared at home, acquiring his education in the 
district schools. After his marriage, which occurred in 1886, he began 
farming for himself and tor six vears cultivated land which he rented. 
In 1892, however, he invested his savings in a farm of his own, buying a 
tract two miles south of Moravia, upon wliich he has since resided. He 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 249 

owns three hundred and seventy-five acres which is conceded to be one of 
the best improved farms in Taylor township and in its management has 
displayed that excellent judgment and resourceful business ability which 
are the secret of his success. 

On the 27th of Februan,', 1886, Mr. Turner married Miss Cora Gordon, 
a daughter of William and Susan (Bryant) Gordon, natives of Kentucky, 
who moved from that state to Illinois and thence to Iowa, settling here 
about the year 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Turner have four children, Fairie, 
Frank, Flossie and N irgil. .Ml of these children are still with their parents, 
the two latter being students in the Centerville high school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Turner are members of the Methodist Epi.scopal church 
and Mr. Turner is serving as trustee. He is a progressive in his political 
beliefs and is interested in everything pertaining to the advancement of 
the section, and movements for the public good never seek his aid in vain. 
Moreover, in his career he has demonstrated the value and worrh of un- 
flagging perseverance, determination and unsullied business integrity and 
he enjo}s in full measure the respect and confidence of all with whom he 
has had business or social relations. 



\\AL'I"ER H. MOKHISOX. 

Walter R. Morrison resides on section 26, Union township, where he 
owns and cultivates two hundred and thirt)-nine acres of rich and pro- 
ductive land. It was upon this farm that he was born August 21, 1878, 
his parents being Irvin Andrew and Amanda (Nolan) Morrison. The 
father was also a native of this county, born in 1847, his parents having 
been among the first settlers of this section. They came to Iowa from 
Pennsylvania, while the Nolan family were originally from Kentucky, 
arriving in Appanoose county about 1851. The year following their 
marriage Mr. and Mrs. Irvin A. Morrison settled upon the farm where 
their son Walter now resides and there they lived until the spring of 1907, 
when they turned the operation of the farm over to their son and estab- 
lished their home in Unionville, where they are still living, the father 
having put aside business cares. In politics he has always been a democrat 
and for many years he served as township trustee. He is one of the well- 
known and highly esteemed residents of this section and he and his wife 
are valuable members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Walter R. Morrison was reared at home, acquiring his education in 
the public schools and working in the fields when not busy with his text- 



250 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

books. He was married in Peoria, Illinois, on the I2th ot August, iyo2, 
to Miss Pearl Stigall, a daughter of James Stigall, a prominent farmer 
of Cass county, Illinois. Mr. Morrison was employed in the Parlin 
& Orendorf Plow Factory at Canton, Illinois, at the time of his mar- 
riage, and there remained for a year and a half after his marriage, 
continuing his work in the plow factory. On the expiration of that period 
he removed to Peoria, where for two and a half years he was employed in 
a boiler shoj). In December, 1906, however, he returned to the home 
farm and the following year took charge of its operation, being now busily 
engaged with its further cultivation and development, annually gathering 
good harvests, for his methods are both practical and progressive. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have been born three children, Roscoe, 
Lenora and Viola. In politics Mr. Morrison is a democrat and at the 
present writing is clerk of Union township. He has never been very 
active as a politician, yet is ever loyal to the principles in which he believes. 
Both he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church and in 
its teachings he iinds the guiding spirit of his life. He is now serving 
as superintendent of the Sunday school and takes an active interest in 
other departments of the church work. He is justly accounted one of the 
progressive, enterprising and highly esteemed young men of Union town- 
ship. 



JOHN c. McDonald. 



The real builders and promoters of Appanoose county have largely 
been the men who came into the region when it was unbroken prairie, and 
utilizing its natural resources transformed the unimproved land into rich 
and productive fields. In a history of the pioneer development of any 
state certain family names stand forth prominently, by reason of the 
influence, which the lives and activities of the men, who bore them, had 
upon general progress and advancement. In Appanoose county the name 
of McDonald has been an honored and respected one since pioneer times 
and the work which the early settlers did in development, the present 
generation is carrying forward in expansion. Among the most notable 
members of the family at the present time is John C. McDonald, one of 
the substantial, prominent and influential business men of Cincinnati, Iowa, 
as well as one of the most public-spirited and progressive of its citizens. 
The record of the family in .\merica extends back many 3'ears, to William 
McDonald, who founded the familv in the states, coming in earlv times 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 251 

from his native Scotland to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, where he made 
a permanent location. From him was descended Daniel McDonald, the 
progenitor of the family in Iowa and the father of the subject of this 
review. He was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, March lo, 1814, 
and there grew to maturity, acquiring his education in the public schools, 
lie married Miss Mary Stewart, a native of Ireland, and afterward re- 
[ sided with his wife in Mercer county for a number of years. In 1852 he 
moved west to Iowa, locating first in Lee county, where he engaged in 
farming for two years. In 1854 he moved to Appanoose county and 
there located upon the present site of the village of Cincinnati, which has 
now grown to be one of the prosperous comnmnities of Appanoose county. 
The father of our subject took up a tract of raw prairie land, broke the 
soil and began the work of development, which he carried forward stead- 
fastly and along progressive lines until his death, holding a high place on 
the list of honored Iowa pioneers of the past. 

John C McDonald was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, .Inly 
1^, 1845. He has been a resident of Iowa for sixty years, having come 
to Lee county in 1852, while his residence in Appanoose county dates 
from 1854. He was eight years of age at the time his parents located 
here and acquired a limited education in the pioneer schools. From child- 
hood he aided in the hard labor of breaking the soil and in the making 
ot a farm, and he continued active in this line until 1863, when he enlisted 
in the Federal army. He joined Company E, Seventh Iowa N'olunteer 
Cavalr}. and as a jirivate was sent west and fought the Indians on tlie 
plains, taking part in many sharp skirmishes and displaying so much courage 
and coolness in the face of danger that he earned promotion, being dis- 
charged on the 17th ot May, 1866, as sergeant major, \^'ith this creditable 
military record he returned to the farm in Iowa and resumed his work, 
aiding his father in the operation of the homestead. He married in 1S70 
and he and his wife began their domestic life upon a farm upon whicli 
Mr. .McDonald carried on general agricultural pursuits for ten years, 
in 1880, however, he turnetl his attention to business affairs and has since 
been a substantial tactor in tlie commercial development of Cincinnati, 
where he makes his home. He and his brother engaged in the furniture 
and undertaking business for two years and afterward added to their 
activities by selling timber, taking their father also into [lartnership. In 
1885 John C. -McDonald purchased his father's and brother's interests 
and continued to conduct the enterprise alone, until he formed a partner- 
ship with another brother, under the firm name of J. C. McDonald & 
Brother. This association continued for some years, the [partners gradually 
cxtentling their activities to include almost every phase of busine.ss in the 



252 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

town. They organized and promoted the Citi'/ens Bank of Cincinnati, w ith 
W. S. McDonald as cashier, John C. McDonald being also a high official. 
He continued active in the banking business for a number of years, but 
eventually the institution changed hands, although Mr. McDonald still re- 
tains his connection with it as a stockholder and director. He is a man 
of enterprise and marked force of character and there is no movement 
formulated in the township for the benefit of the communitj- along lines 
of substantial upbuilding that does not receive his indorsement and hearty 
support, his labors being a cooperant factor in the work of improvement. 

Mr. McDonald has been twice married. In 1870 he wedded Miss 
Mary Boylcs, a native of Ohio, born in Belmont county, and a daughter 
of John Boyles, of that section. She died on the 30th of March, 1895, 
and in 1896 Mr. McDonald married Miss Alice Reed, a native of Jackson, 
Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald are well known in religious circles 
and hold membership in the Congregational church. 

Mr. McDonald is prominent fraternally, holding membership in the 
Masonic order and in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Living in 
Iowa for sixty years and in Appanoose county for fifty-eight, he is one 
of the best known citizens of this locality, being widely recognized as a 
man of tried integrity and worth, of business enterprise and unfaltering 
determination, true to the traditions of his pioneer ancestors. His fellow 
townsmen honor and respect him and wherever he is known he has a wide 
circle of friends. Moreover, he deserves mention in this volume as one 
of the veterans of the Civil war, to whom the country owes a debt of 
gratitude that can never be fully paid. 



ALMN F. PIXLEY. 



Throughout practically all the years of a long, quiet, straightforward 
and upright life Alvin F. Pixley has worked at the trade ot a blacksmith 
and has now the distinction of being the oldest blacksmith and veterinary 
surgeon in Centerville. He began working at his trade at an early age, 
interrupting his labors only for his period of service in the federal army 
during the Civil war, and now, at the age of seventy-one, is still active 
and vigorous, his prosperity being the visible evidence of a well spent and 
useful life. If success means a career in which the chief activities have 
been honorable and worthy ones, in which the aims have been high and 
the ambitions upright and the final reward a comfortable competence, 
widespread esteem and many friends — then Mr. Pixlej' ma}' be pronounced 



> 

2J 




'^'■'■:.\r \.V^'' 



>;jv>v-\^ 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 255 

a distincth- successful man, and his courageous service during the dark 
days ot the Civil war is only another strong addition to his many claims 
to prominence and respect. He was born in Canandaigua, Michigan, Aug- 
ust 3, 1841, and is a son of Joseph and Aurelia (Halej Pixlcy. On the 
paternal side the family is of English origin and the maternal line is of 
Irish and English stock. The father of our subject was by trade an edge 
tool blacksmith and sharpened by hand the picks which were used in grind- 
in" Hour. He became rapidly so skilful in this occupation that his reputa- 
tion spread throughout the surrounding districts and picks were sent to 
him from a distance of over one hundred miles to be sharpened. Although 
both he and his wife were natives of upper Canada, most of their lives were 
spent in Hudson, Michigan, where the mother passed away in i88g and 
the father in 1890. 

Alvin F. Pixley acquired his education in the district schools of Michi- 
gan, attending classes when he could be spared from his father's shop. 
At the age of fifteen he began learning the trade of an edge tool black- 
smith and for four years followed it also learning to shoe oxen, as horses 
were not used there at that date. In 1861 Mr. Pixley was twenty years 
of age and just beginning to become known as a blacksmith and to achieve 
some degree of prosperity, but at his country's call he did not hesitate to 
sacrifice his personal interests and on the 7th of November, 1861, enlisted 
in the Eleventh Michigan \'olunteer Infantry, serving three years without 
a furlough in the Army of the Cumberland. He was in the thick of the 
battles at Stone River, Tullahoma, Elk river, Chickamauga, Lookout 
Mountain, Missionary Ridge. Ringgold. -'Buzzards Roost, Resaca, Peach 
Tree Creek and the siege of Atlanta. During the latter siege his term 
of enlistment expired but he volunteered to st^y until the city fell. In 
the army he served as regimental blacksmith and had charge of ninety 
mules and twenty-five horses as well as numerous wagons to keep in repair. 
He was wounded three times at Murfreesboro and was mustered out at 
Chattanooga. Tennessee, with honorable discharge. It is to men like Mr. 
Pixley to whom the countrj- owes the preservation of the Union and the 
upholding of the national integrity, and this debt can never be forgotten 
and never fully repaid. 

After his discharge Mr. Pixley returned to Michigan but in 1866 left 
the state and went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where for seven years he 
worked as a railroad blacksmith for the Sioux City Railroad and in the 
Northwestern shops. In 1873, equipped with all the skill which natural 
ability and varied and thorough experience and training could give him, 
he came to Centerville. opened a blacksmith shof) and has worked at his 
traile here continuously since that time — a period of almost forty years. 



256 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

His work in caring for the teet of horses suggested inquiry into the diseases 
of animals and, being a versatile, able and intelligent man, he soon became 
interested in veterinary surgery, studied it thorough!)- and thirty years ago 
began his work along this line, being now a registered practitioner. In 
both lines of his activity Mr. Pixley has gained prominence and success 
and his shop on the rear of his residence lot on Drake avenue is well 
patronized by everyone in Centerville who has need ot the services of an 
expert blacksmith. Mr. Pixley is not only skilled in his trade and well 
versed in the underlying principles of veterinary surgery but lie is also 
an energetic, straightforward and upright business man, who adheres con- 
stantly to high standards ot business integrity and whose high sincerity of 
purpose has never been questioned in forty years. 

On the 2oth of November, i860, Mr. Pixley married Miss Harriett 
Palmer, a daughter of Robert and Mahala (Young) Palmer, both born 
east of the Green mountains in Vermont, of Good Yankee stock. The father 
was a cobbler by trade and made with his own hands all his children's 
shoes. Later the family moved into Ohio and then to Michigan, where 
the father died in 1852. His widow came to Harrison count) . Iowa, driv- 
ing through with teams and spending five weeks upon the journe)'. She 
bought a farm in Harrison county, two and a half miles from Magnolia, 
and upon this property resided until her death in 1879. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pixley have three children. The eldest, Ellis Arthur, a graduate of Center- 
ville high school, is a clerk in the Centerville postoffice. He has the dis- 
tinction of being a veteran of the Spanish-American war, having served as 
musician of Company E, Fifty-fourth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, earning 
promotion to the rank of first sergeant before the close of his service. He 
married Mary Dunlap, of Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and they have one child, 
Arthur, aged twelve. Bert, the second son born to Mr. and Mrs. Pixie)-, is 
also a graduate of the Centerville high school and is now acting as citv mail 
carrier. He resides on a farm in Center township with his wife, who was 
in her maidenhood Miss Cora Reddig. They have two children: Marv, 
who is eight years of age; and Robert, aged eight months. Clarence the 
youngest child born to Mr. and Mrs. Pixley, is a graduate of the same 
high school. He is following the profession of an electrical engineer and 
resides at home. Mr. and Mrs. Pixley are members of the Christian 
church, both having joined that religion at the age of eighteen. 

Mr. Pixley is well known in the Grand Army of the Republic, being 
a charter member of John L. Bashaw Post, No. 122, of Centerville. 
He served as commander for one year, for four years was officer of 
the day and served for one year as vice president. He is now in the 
fourth rear ot his activitv as surgeon and in tlic inith \<ar of his service 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 257 

as chairman of the relief committee. His wife shares this interest with 
him also, being well known as a charter member of Women's Relief 
Corps, No. 32, of Centerville, which was organized twenty-six years ago. 
She has held every office except that of chaplain and treasurer in the 
organization and is now serving her third term as guard. 

On the 20th of November, 1910, Mr. and Mrs. Pixley completed the 
fiftieth year of their married life and at their home at 201 Drake avenue 
observed their golden wedding anniversary. They invited to the celebra- 
tion all the members of the Grand Army post and the Women's Relief 
Corps besides their numerous friends in Centerville. Ninety-six people 
responded to the cordial invitation and spent the afternoon with Mr. and 
Mrs. Pixley in social conversation and in delightful reminiscences of early 
rimes. At five o'clock refreshments were served and at seven the ladies 
of the Relief Corps gave the bride and groom of half a (.enrur) ago 
an old fashioned charivari. Mr. and Mrs. Pixley received a number of 
valuable presents from the Grand Army of the Republic, the Women's 
Relief Corps and from their children and acquaintances. One hundred 
postcards reached them during the day from friends who could not attend 
and, indeed, everyone who had ever luui ttic pleasure of knowing these 
charming, genial and lovable people took a great pride and [pleasure in 
remembering them with gifts and good wishes upon their wedding anni- 
versarv. Mr. Pixley has reached the age of seventy-one and has earned 
retirement but is still laboring, displaying in all of his activities the same 
([uicr intelligence, uprightness and courage which distinguished liini upon 
rlie southern battlefields. His life has been well spent, for in all of its 
relations he has been true to high and honorable jirinciples, working his 
waj- upward through the years to final triumph and counting his truest suc- 
cess in the love and confidence ot his man^- friends. 



THOMAS E. HOPKINS. 



The farming interests of I'nion townshi(i find a worthy representative 
in Thomas E. Hopkins, who is living on section 22. He was liorn in Han- 
cock county, Tennessee, April 9, 1843, and is a son of Adam and Nancy E. 
(Guess) Hopkins. The grandfather, Zabez Hopkins, went from French 
Broad to Hancock count}-. Tennessee, about 1804, when his son Adam was 
l)ut four years of age, his birth having occurred in 1800. Nancy E. Guess 
was a native of .Mabama and s[)ent her girlhooii largely in that state. She 
later removed to Tennessee and there became the wife of Adam Hopkins. 



258 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

In 1849 they left the south and came to Iowa, settling in Union township, 
Appanoose county, and the following year xMr. Hopkins' parents also ar- 
rived in this county. A few months later, however, the grandmother of 
our subject died and the grandfather afterward went to Decatur county, 
Iowa, where he made his home until his demise. While Mr. and Mrs. 
Adam Hopkins were en route for Appanoose county the latter was taken 
ill with cholera on the boat up the river and died after a day's travel out 
from Keokuk, her grave being made at Zelma, Iowa, in 1849. Adam Hop- 
kins continued on his way and established his home on the farm on section 
22, Union township, on which his son Thomas now resides. He devoted 
his life to general agricultural pursuits and stock-raising and also worked 
at the trades of cabinet-maker and wheelwright. His was an active and 
useful life and he passed away at the venerable age of eighty-five years. 
His children were ten in number: Polly Ann, who died in Arkansas; Mrs. 
Orlena Martin, a widow, residing in Union township; Mrs. Margaret 
Strunk, deceased; Helen Minerva, who died before the removal of the 
family to Iowa; Roanna, who died in this county in early life; Jabez, 
who was killed by lightning in i860; James F., Perry and Commodore, 
all now deceased; and Thomas E. 

The last named has resided in Union township since 1849, or for a 
period of more than sixty-three years, he and his sister being among the 
oldest residents of the township. He was but six years of age at the time 
of his arrival here and throughout the ensuing years he has largely followed 
farming and stock-raising. He has also shipped stock quite extensiveh 
and he has become well known as a breeder of mules, owning to good jacks. 
He has also raised horses, cattle, sheep and hogs and his live-stock interests 
have proven an important and profitable feature of his business. His place 
comprises one hundred and sixty acres of land that is rich and productive, 
his property being known as the Green Valley Stock Farm, conducted 
under the firm name of T. 1^. Hopkins & Son. 

In the fall of 186 J Mr. Hopkins was married to Miss Elizabeth Drake, 
who was born in Ohio in 1846 and when five years of age came to this 
county with her parents, George and Mary Ann (Stiles) Drake. The 
father died in California and the mother in Kansas. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Hopkins have been born the following named: Andrew Jackson, who 
died at the age of three years; Sarah Jane, the wife of William Under- 
wood, of Unionville; Rosetta, the wife of John Burnette, of Kay county, 
Oklahoma; Ida, the wife of David Caylor, of Union township; Charles, 
at home; and Estella, the wife of Henry Herman, of Udell township. 

Mr. Hopkins has been a lifelong democrat and his fellow townsmen, 
appreciative of his worth and ability, have called him to most of the town- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 259 

ship offices. He was clerk for many years, has been assessor and has been 
official 1} connected with the schools, serving his district as secretarj- of the 
school board for thirty consecutive years, during which period he has given 
ample evidence of his deep interest in the cause of education and his desire 
to improve the schools. He is a supporter of the United Brethren church.- 
His has been a well spent life, active and honorable in its purposes, and 
fruitful in its results. He has won individual success and at the same time 
has labored effective! )■ and earnestly to promote the welfare of the 
communit^•. 



JOHN FRANK I. IX GRAY. M. D. 

A history of the medical fraternity of Appanoose county would be in- 
complete were there failure to make mention of Dr. John Franklin Gray, 
who is engaged in the practice of medicine and surger}- in Moravia. 
Throughout the }ears of his connection with the profession he has made 
steady j)rogress and has proven his knowledge and capability in the exxel- 
lent results which have attended his labors. He came to Moravia in 1906 
and has since devoted his attention to the performance of his professional 
duties. He is a native son of Iowa, born in Monroe county, September 20, 
1873, his parents being Samuel and Mary A. (GriHin) Gray, the former a 
native of County Derry (Londonderry) Ireland, and the latter of Zanes- 
ville, Ohio. The parents of our subject were married in Monroe county, 
whither her mother had come as a girl with her parents and to which the 
father had emigrated as a young man. After settling in Iowa, Samuel 
Gray devoted all of his time to farming and still resides ui)on hi.-> home 
farm five miles north of Albia, having reached the age of eighty-seven. He 
is very proud of the fact that in the course of a long career he has never 
been involved in a law suit and has never been a witness nor a juryman, 
preferring to accept the losing end of an argument rather than to have re- 
course to legal proceedings. 

Dr. .lohu 1'. Ciray was reared at home and acquired his education in the 
public sch(x»ls. This was supplemented by a three years' course at Penn 
College in Oskaloosa, Iowa. His medical training was received at the 
Iowa State Iniversit}' at Iowa Cit), from which he was gratluatctl on .April 
1, igo2, with the degree of M. D. Following his graduation he was made 
physician in charge of the mines belonging to the White Breast Fuel Com- 
{)any at Hilton, Iowa, and he acted in this capacity tor five years, doing 
able work ami gaining valuable exjierience. In 1906 Dr. Gray came to 



260 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Moravia and has since built up an extensive practice here. Tlie consensus 
of public opinion regarding his professional skill is altogether favorable, 
for it is well known that he is most careful in the diagnosis of cases and 
never neglects an)'thing which will be of value in checking disease and 
promoting health. 

On the 24th of June, 1906, Dr. Gray married Miss Beulah T. Cum- 
mins, of Moravia, a daughter of Rufus E. Cummins, at that time post- 
master of the town, and a granddaughter of Captain Ephraim Cummins, 
one of the prominent political leaders and well known men in public life 
in southern Iowa. Dr. and Mrs. Gray have two children: Charles; and 
Samuel Francis, who received the second state health prize at the Iowa 
state fair in 1912 in his class of towns of under ten thousand, as the most 
perfect child in the state. 

Dr. Gray is extensively interested in fraternal affairs and has many 
important affiliations. He belongs to Antiquity Lodge, No. 252, A. F. & 
A. M., and he and his wife belong to Moravia Chapter, O. E. S. Dr. Gray 
is identified also with Monroe Chapter, No. 125, R. A. M., at Albia, Iowa, 
and holds membership in Moravia Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; Moravia Camp, No. 4204, M. W. A.; and Homestead No. 346, 
Brotherhood of American Yeomen. Mrs. Gray is a devout member of the 
United Brethren church. Dr. Gray has made an excellent professional rec- 
ord, as is evidenced by the lucrative practice now accorded him, and he is, 
moreover, known in Moravia as a progressive and public-spirited citizen. 



ANDREW BURKLAND. 



Andrew Burkland passed away at his home, 1013 South Main street, 
on the 5th of April, 1912, after a lingering illness induced by stomach 
trouble, aged seventy years, ten months and eight days. 

Mr. Burkland came to this city more than a third of a century ago. 
and became one of its prominent and successful contractors as well as 
mine operators. His record is an excellent illustration of the power of 
industry and perseverance in the attainment of success, for his early lite 
was one of hardship and privation and the obstacles which he encountered 
would have utterly discouraged many a man of less resolute spirit. 

His birth occurred in Vestergotland, Sweden, on the 29th of May, 
1841, his parents being Andrew and Breta Bjolund, who were likewise 
natives of that country. The father died when our subject was still a 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 261 

chikl. His parents were very poor, and as soon as old enough to work 
he was hired out to a tarnier tc^r three years, and therefore he had prac- 
tical !}• no time to attend school and never learned to write, but in spite 
ot this handicap won success in the business world, by reason of his native 
intelligence, keen discernment and indefatigable energy. As a young man 
he began working on a railroad section and a short time later was made 
foreman. In 1868, when twenty-seven years of age, he crossed the Atlan- 
tic to the United States with a contingent of men sent here to work on 
railroad construction in Michigan. Soon afterward, however, he engaged 
in lumbering in the Michigan woods and subsequently made his way to 
Chicago, where he again found employment with railroads. Leaving tor 
St. Louis, Missouri, he worked there and became foreman of a steel gang. 
After the road was completed, the compan}- wanted him to take charge of 
a construction train but he declined to take the offer on account of his 
inability to write. The superintendent tried in vain to change his view 
and accept, saying it would be very easy to find a timekeeper, but diffi- 
cult to get a man who understood how to run a construction train, pa) ing 
him the compliment that he was the best man he had ever had in his 
emplo). However, he persisted in his refusal and left for Chicago, where 
he stayed but a short time, then coming to Ladsdale, Iowa, where he 
worked as a coal miner, for three years. In 1877 he came to Centerville, 
Iowa, which has since been his home. His first employment was as a 
coal miner, but subsequently he took up the stone mason's trade and later 
engagetl in contracting in connection with mine operations, but for the 
last twenty-five years had been engaged more extensively in the coal busi- 
ness, being instrumental in organizing several local coal companies. He 
was one ot the organizers ot the Scandinavian Coal Company when it was 
founded and helped start the Anchor Mine. No. 1 and later with a [)art- 
ner, organized the Happy Coal Company. He sunk the White Oak mine, 
being sole owner for a number ot years and then selling out. Subse- 
quently he sank another mine in the south part of the city and he and his 
son, Alfred, were operating this enterprise at the time of his death, under 
the firm style of A. Burkland & Son. He Iku! also taken at various times 
a number of contracts for public improvements, having graded the p\iblic 
square and fair grounds, also the city street car line, and had constructed 
the water works reservoir, and built the foundation for the >tand pipe. 
also grading the new cemetery. He further executed a number of con- 
tracts for the railroad, in and around Centerville. His success in all lines 
was most gratifying and came as the direct result of his enterprising and 
able management. 



262 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

In October, 1874, in Chicago, Mr. Burkland was united in marriage 
to Miss Louise Peterson, also a native of Sweden. To them were born 
six children: Alfred, Anna, Agnes, Albert, and Carl, who with their 
mother, are left to mourn his death; and one son, Isaac, who died twelve 
years ago. The family reside in their comfortable home at 1013 South 
Main street. The children were all born and reared in Centerville and 
educated in the Centerville schools. In 1907, Alfred became associated 
with his father as coal operator, and since the latter's death, he with his 
two younger brothers, Albert and Carl, are conducting the business inter- 
ests of the family. Anna is bookkeeper and Agnes is employed as clerk 
in one of the large department stores of the cit}-. 

In politics Mr. Burkland was a stanch republican, loyally supporting 
the men and measures of that party at the polls. His religious faith was 
indicated by his membership in the Swedish Lutheran church, of which 
he was a life-long member, and he was a charter member of the Center- 
ville church, giving it his loyal support. His life was upright and honor- 
able and his large circle of friends and acquaintances who had anxiously 
concerned themselves about his illness, heard with sincere regret of his 
passing from the scene of action, as he was a good citizen, temperate in 
his habits, strong of character and kind of heart. He was influential and 
interested in matters looking to the improvement of the cit}- and the better- 
ment of the communit}-, and his demise was the occasion of deep ami wide- 
spread sorrow. 



PERRY WYCKOFF. 



Perry Wyckoff is now living retired in Centerville but for many years 
was closely associated with agricultural interests and in the tilling of the 
fields gained the substantial competence which enabled him at length to 
put aside arduous labor and enjoy the fruits of his jirevious toil. He was 
born in Johnson county, Iowa, October 8, 1845, when this state was 
still a territor)-, his parents being John and Maria J. (Merrill) Wyckoff, 
who ^vere natives of Ross county, Ohio. The father devoted his life to 
farming and became one of the pioneer residents of Illinois, settling 
within its borders when the Indians were still numerous there and when 
the northern part of the state was practically uninhabited. He continued 
to reside in Illinois until 1838. when he again established his home upon 
the frontier, settling in Johnson county. He afterward went to Iowa 




l'i;i;i;\ w ^^■|<()|.■|.■ 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 265 

county, where he once more entered land from the government and also 
bought some property, adding to his original holdings until he had three 
hundred and twenty acres which he improved and cultivated until 1856. 
He then sold out and removed to Putnam county, Missouri, where he pur- 
chased land which he successfully farmed until his death, on the 30th of 
March, 1897. His widow afterward took up her abode in Unionville, 
Missouri, where she lived until called to the home beyond, on the 12th of 
August, 1Q05. 

Perry Wvckotf spent his youthful days largely in Iowa count), this 
state, and in Putnam county, Missouri. No event of special importance 
occurred to \iir\ the routine of farm life for him until he was sixteen years 
of age, when he offered his services to the government in defense of the 
Union cause, enlisting as a member of Company G, Eighty-tourth Illinois 
Infantry. He remained at the front until wounded in battle, after which 
he was honorably discharged and returned home, where he remained until 
he was once more able for active duty. He then reenlisted, this time becom- 
ing a member of Company C, Forty-.second Missouri Infantry, with which 
he continued until after the close of hostilities. On the rirst day of Jan- 
uary, 1863, he was captured and was incarcerated in Libby and Ander- 
sonville prisons until the following June, undergoing all of the hardships 
and privations of southern prison life. He participated in the battle of 
Perr)ville, Kentucky, when only seventeen years of age. and although 
but a youth when he enlisted he manifested valor and loyalty equal to that 
of many veterans of twice his years. His father was a captain in the 
I'nion army and Mr. \\'yckofF has now in his possession various souvenirs 
of his father's and his own service. 

When the country no longer needed his service Mr. Wyckofl returned 
home and for two jears engaged in farming for his father. \\'hile at the 
front he had saved his earnings as a soldier and sent the money home with 
which ro purchase a farm. After two years he began the development of 
that propertv and continued to cultivate the tract of one hundred and 
twenty acres until his success enabled him to extend its boundaries. Prom 
time to time he purchased other land and is now the owner ot a valuable 
farm of three hundred and seventy-nine acres which he continued to till 
imril 1899, when he retired and took ui) his abode in Cincinnati, this county. 
There he lived for eight years, after which he came to Centerville where 
he has since made his home. He worketl ililigently and persistently while 
upon the farm, bringing his fields under a very high state of cultiva- 
tion and annually gathering good crops as a reward for the care and labor 
he bestowed upon his land. His methods were at once practical as well 
as progressive and his farm ever presented a neat and thrifty appearance. 



266 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTY 

On the 9th ot May, 1867, Mr. Wyckoff was married to Miss Angeline 
Stewart, a dauf;;hter of Perry and Emma (Myers) Stewart, who were 
natives of Indiana. They came Co Appanoose county in 1856 and the 
father carried on merchandising, conducting a store until 1898, when he 
sold out and went to the west. During his leisure time while engaged 
in business he studied for the ministry and became the first preacher of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Centerville. On starting west across the 
country he had become ill with typhoid fever and died at Xuma, this 
county, November 13, 1858. His wife survived him until August 15, 
1867. Mrs. Wyckoff was born at Greencastle, Indiana, February 7, 1848, 
and by her marriage she became the mother of nine children: Charles S., 
who is engaged in the automobile business at Sioux City, Iowa; William 
M., a barber of Centerville, who is also a horse dealer; Elbert and Elza, 
twins, both ot whom are engaged in farming, the former in Montana and 
the latter in Putnam county, Missouri; Jesse M.. a contractor of Lovilia, 
Iowa; Josephine, who married Jay C. Colburn, who is engaged in the music 
business at Webster City, Iowa; Stewart A., a rural mail carrier residing in 
Cincinnati, Iowa; Edna, who is still at home; and Arthur, who died May 
19. 1893. Mr. Wyckoff holds membership in John L. Bashore Post, No. 
122, G. A. R., and his wife is a member of the Women's Relief Corps. 
They attend the Methodist church and Mr. Wyckoff votes with the republi- 
can party. His attention, however, has always been concentrated upon 
business affairs rather than upon public matters, his activity in citizenship 
being merely in support ot the principles, in which he believes, by the 
exercise of his right ot franchise at the polls. He now resides at No. 313 
West Maple street where he has a pleasant home. Years of earnest, per- 
sistent labor, intelligently directed, brought him a substantial measure 
of success and he is now in possession ot a comfortable competence, which 
supplies him with all of the necessities and manv of the luxuries of life. 



JACKSON LUSE. 



Jackson Luse needs no introduction to the readers of this volume for 
he has spent his entire life in this county and his conduct has ever been 
actuated by high principles, with due regard for the rights of his fellow- 
men. He belongs to that class of substantial agriculturists who constitute 
the real strength and stability of any community and are the builders 
of its progress and prosperity. Born on the old homestead farm on the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COLXTV 267 

8th ot April, 1855, Jackson Luse has therefore been a resident of Appa- 
noose count) for more than tifty-seven }ears. He represents one of the 
old pioneer families here, being a son of Aaron Luse, a native ot Iruni- 
hul! county, Ohio, who was horn on the 1 2th of March, i8u;. The 
grandfather, William Luse, was a native of Pennsylvania and on remov- 
ing trom that state established his home in Ohio, where he continued to 
reside until called to his final rest. Aaron Luse was reared in Ohio to the 
age of nineteen years when he went to Missouri and afterward to Illinois. 
Subsequently he arrived in \^an Buren county, Iowa, and there when a 
young man of twenty-two years was married to Miss Martha Smith, who 
was born near Cleveland, Ohio, October 26, 1821, and came to Iowa witli 
her parents when the state was still undei territorial rule, the family 
home being established in \'an Buren county. Ten years after their mar- 
riage, which was celebrated on the 24th of January, 1841, Mr. and Mrs. 
.\aron Luse came to Appanoose which was still a frontier district, much 
of the land being then in possession of the government. Mr. Luse entered 
a claim which he transformed into one of the best farms of the township 
and in addition to the cultivation of the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate he successfully engaged in raising stock. He also planted an 
orchard which soon came into good bearing and throughout the years 
of his residence here took an active and helpful interest in the agricul- 
tural and horticultural development of this part of the state. He erected 
upon his place a commodious and attractive home, also barns and other 
necessary outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock and in all of his 
business dealings was found to be thoroughly reliable as well as enter- 
prising and progressive. His many sterling traits of character comiiKuulcd 
for him the confidence and good-will of all who knew him. His death, 
which occurred August 25, 1881, when he was sixty-two years of age, 
was a cause of deep regret to all those who knew him. His wife sur- 
vived him for about seventeen years, dying August 3, 1898, when she 
was about seventy-seven years of age. The}- were for many Aears active 
and valued members of the Methodist Episcopal church, taking a help- 
ful part in its work and contributing generously to its support. Mr. Luse 
served as church steward and also as superintendent of the Sunday school 
tor a number ot years. The cause of education foimd in him a champion 
:\nd he advanced the interests of the schools while serving on flic board. 
He was likewise township assessor, township trustee and justice of the 
peace and discharged every duty devolving upon him, whether of a 
public or private nature, in the most capable and satisfactory manner. 
The family numbered eight children: Mrs. Rosetta Cline, whose husband 



268 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

died of disease contracted in the Civil war, while she passed away in 
Moravia, Iowa, April 13, 1911, at the age of sixty-nine years; Mrs. 
Sarah J. Skinner, who died at Main, Iowa, January 13, igo6, when sixty- 
one years of age; Mrs. Martha Foster, a widow living in Tajlor town- 
ship; Laura E., the wife of Rev. George M. Andrews, of Kenesaw, Adams 
county, Nebraska; W. J., of Garden Grove, Iowa; Jackson; Mary, the 
wife of T. J. Turner, of Moravia; and Douglas, who died at the age of 
eleven months. 

The experiences which came to Jackson Luse in his boyhood and 
youth were those which usually fall to the farm lad who is trained in 
a home where energy, economy and industry are regarded as important 
factors in life. As opportunity offered he pursued his education in one 
of the old-time log schoolhouses and in the school of experience he has 
since learned many valuable lessons. He was married when twenty-one 
years of age to Miss Mina Kaster, who was born in Chariton township, 
Appanoose county, and was reared and educated here. Her father, Robert 
Kaster, was a native of Pennsylvania and lived for some time in Indiana 
before coming to Iowa. On his arrival in this state he cast in his lot 
with the earl}- settlers ot Appanoose county and became well known and 
prominent here. He had wedded Mary McDaniel, who was also a native 
of Pennsylvania. His death occurred October 6, 1895, when he was 
seventy-four years of age, while his wife died January 24, 1912, at the age 
of eighty-six. Mr. Kaster voted with the democratic party and his religious 
faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church of which his wife was 
also a consistent and loyal member. For a number of years he was a 
class leader in the Fairview church, taking an active part in its work and 
giving generously to its support. Mr. and Mrs. Kaster were the parents 
of ten children: Nancy, who died at the age of nine years; Mrs. Hulda J. 
Worthington, of Hamilton county, Nebraska; Mrs. Mary E. Bojer, of 
Chariton township; Robert H., of Appanoose county: Mrs. Luse; James 
M., of Monroe county, Iowa; Mrs. Hannah E. (iladfelder, of Chariton 
rownship; William and Benjamin, both deceased; and Mrs. Australia 
Worthington, who passed away at York, Nebraska. 

Throughout his entire life Jackson Luse has carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits and the nursery business, save for two years which he 
spent in the village of Main and one year in Nebraska. The habits of 
industry and perseverance whicli he formed in his }outh have remained 
salient features in his success. He is today the owner of two hundred 
and eighty acres of good land which includes the old homestead farm. 
His fields are carefully tilled and produce substantial crops and as the 
years have gone by he has won that prosperity which is the reward of 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 269 

earnest, persistent and honorable labor. In i8y2 he established a nursery 
which he conducted successtully tor almost ten }ears, after which he 
closed out the business in order to devote his attention more exclusively 
to the cultivation of grain. For two years he conducted a store in Main 
and also served as postmaster durinj; that time. His attention, however, 
has been hirgely given to his farm which is a splendidly improved prop- 
erty. In addition to a new home upon the place he has three large and 
substantial barns. A fine orchard ot ten acres is enclosed by a half-mile 
of evergreen trees which serve as a wind-break as well as add to the 
beauty of the place. The greater part of the land is under cultivation, 
producing excellent crops each year, and Mr. Luse is justly regarded 
as one ot the most enterprising and progressive farmers of his locality, 
keeping in touch with the trend of modern progress. He utilizes the 
latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields, has always 
practiced rotation of crops and employs other modern and scientific meth- 
ods the value of which has been proven bj- practical experience. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luse have become parents of seven children: Effie V., 
the wife of J. \\'. McDaniel. of Chariton township; Elbert Aaron, Robert 
E., Lloyd E. and Gus E., all ot whom are married and have homes of 
their own upon farms in Taylor township; and Cody Jackson and Coy E., 
who are yet with their parents. The son Elbert A. was married February 
26, ic)02. to Miss Bertha Mae Stockwell and they became the parents of 
a son and two daughters: Doyle and Freda, at home; and Ruby, who died 
at the age ot fitteen months. Robert E. was married May 30, 1903. to 
Miss Glennie Mae Hixon. and they had a daughter, Glennie Marie, who 
died in infancy. LUnd K. wa> marricil .April 3, lyia. to Erma H. Glick. 
Gus E. was married June 24, 1909, to Miss Edna A. Tisue, who departed 
this life July 22, 1909, and on the i i:th of February, K)i i, he was again 
married, his second union being with Miss M;ie ,T. .Jones, bv whom he 
has one son, Thomas Jackson. To Mr. ami Mr>. McDaniel ha\c been 
born six children, four sons and two daughters, William G., Rym;m .Luk- 
^on, L}ndon Luse, Lloyd E., Bertha Gladys and Daphne \'ioIa. 

The parents are members of the .Methodist Epi.sco[)al church and 
their lives are guided by its teachings. For a quarter of a centur\ Mr. 
Luse has served as one ot the church trustees, has also been Sunday school 
superintendent and church steward. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party and he is a prominent worker in its local ranks. He 
filleil the office ot townshij) assessor for six consecutive years, was town- 
ship trustee for three term.s, has ticcn justice ot the peace and a niemher 
of the school board. In every relation of lite he has commanded the con- 
fidence and good-will of those who know him, for hi-- life has been upright 



270 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

and honorable and he holds to high ideals. He has lived to witness 
remarkable changes in the county during the fift\-seven years of his resi- 
dence here, tor its wild lands have been claimed and cultivated, towns 
and villages have sprung up, schools and churches have been built and all 
modern improvements have been introduced. As the years have gone by 
he has ever borne his share in the work of advancement, giving his sup- 
port and indorsement to all measures for the material, social, intellectual 
and moral benefit of the community. 



JOHN HOUSE. 



John House, engaged in blacksmithing in Centerville, was born in 
Missouri in March, 1858, his parents being John and Mary (Abbey) 
House, who were natives of Germany. The father was a farmer and on 
coming to the new world settled in Missouri, where he purchased and im- 
proved a tract of land, continuing to make his home thereon throughout 
the remainder of his life. He died in 1897 and the death of his wife 
occurred in 1899. 

John House was reared and educated in Missouri, and thinking to 
find other pursuits more congenial than farming, he turned his attention 
to the trades. He learned blacksmithing and was employed in that way 
in Missouri for several years. He afterward removed to Montrose, Iowa, 
where he conducted a shop for some time but afterward returned to his 
native state and carried on blacksmithing at Unionville for a few years. 
In 1894 he came to Centerville, where he opened a shop in partnership 
with a Mr. Pixley, with whom he was associated for two years. On the 
expiration of that period Mr. House began working for the Centerville 
Coal Company as a blacksmith and continued with them until 1910. 
when he once more embarked in business on his own account and is now 
conducting a shop which is liberally patronized, for he does excellent 
work, is reasonable in his prices and straightforward in all his dealings. 

In February, 1885, Mr. House was married to Miss Charlotte Hard- 
wick, a daughter of Hiram and Elizabeth (Beswick) Hardwick. who were 
natives of Indiana. The father was a tanner and at an earh period in 
the settlement of Missouri removed to that state, where he purchased 
a farm and cultivated it continuously and successfully until 1892. He 
then retired from active life and he and his wife are now living in Frank- 
fort, Missouri. Unto Mr. House and his wife were born eight children, 
four of whom have passed away. Those living are Thurman, Boyce, Mil- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 271 

lard and Madge. Mr. House holds membership with the Foresters of 
America. In the political campaign ot igi2 he announced himself as a 
"Bull Moose." He had |)reviously supported the republican party, but 
not liking the policy adopted, he became a follower of the progressive 
wing which is seeking strenuously to better conditions and release the 
counrr\ from the party rule, which seems to cater to class rather than to 
promote the welfare of the great American populace. He attends and 
supports the Presbyterian church, in which he and his wife hold member- 
ship, and their many good qualities have gained tor them the friendly 
regard and good-will of the man}- who know them. 



W. F. EVANS. 



W. F. Evans, of St. Louis, general counsel for the Frisco lines and 
general attorney for the Rock Island railroad, is well known in Appanoose 
county. He was bom in Monroe county, Iowa, October li, 1859, as the 
only son of William and Margaret J. (Vestal) Evans, of whom mention 
is made elsewhere in this volume. The boy was but five years of age 
when his [Kirents removed to .Appanoose count)', where he acquired a good 
public-school education in Oconium and Centerville, the tamily home 
being established in the latter city when W. F. Evans was a lad of twelve 
years. He started out in the business world as a clerk in the general mer- 
cantile store owned by Major Staunton at Centerville and during the 
years 1877 ''"<^ 1878 he served as deputy county treasurer vmder his father. 
In 1880 he took up the study of law in the otfice of \'ermilion *!i: Wrmilion 
in Centerville, but did not enter upon active practice at once when ad- 
mitted to the bar. Instead, he accepted the position of assistant cashier 
in the First National Bank ot Centerville and in 1884 he went to Milan, 
Missouri, as assistant cashier ot the First National Bank ot that city. In 
1SS5, he returned to Centerville and became associated with his former 
preceptor, W !■". \'ermilion, in active law [iractice. In -March ot the 
same year he was elected city solicitor and the capable manner in which 
he performed his duties led to his reelection in 1886. He has since prac- 
tically given undivided attention to his duties as a member of the legal 
profession, specializing in the field ot railroad law. On hi> retirement 
from the office ot city solicitor he went to Tojieka, Kansas, where he 
became assistant to the general attorney of the Rock Island Railroad Com- 
jiany and his experience in that connection well (jualified him tor the 
responsibilities which he assumed when in 1902, he removed to St. Louis 



272 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

to become attorney for the Frisco lines. He has since acted in that capa- 
city, being now chief counsel in the law department of the Frisco system, 
and is also general attorney for the Rock Island road. He is a director of 
the Central National Bank of St. Louis and occupies a prominent and 
enviable position in professional and financial circles. His ability, nat- 
ural and acquired, has been constantly developed through study, research 
and experience and he stands today as one of the toremost legal represen- 
tatives of railway interests in the middle west. 



GEORGE W. NOLAND. 



George W. Noland is one of the enterprising citizens of Appanoose 
county, making his home in Udell. He was born December 22, 1872, in 
Udell township, his parents being John N. and Emma C. ( Boyer J No- 
land. The father's birth occurred in Estill county, Kentucky, in 1842, 
and the mother is a native of Coles county, Illinois. John X. Noland is 
of English descent and is a prominent stockman and fruit-raiser. When 
a child he came to Iowa with his parents, the family settling in Davis 
county, since which time he has been a resident ot this state. The mother 
arrived in Iowa with her parents about the same time and they were mar- 
ried in Davis county, whence they removed to Appanoose county, October 
1, 1863. Mr. Noland purchased eighty acres of land in Udell town- 
ship, to which he afterward added forty acres, residing upon that place for 
fourteen years and developing it into an excellent tarm. On account of 
failing health, however, he sold out and removed to Arkansas, but after 
a short time returned to Iowa and invested in one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in Davis county, on which he passed away in 1883. His widow 
survives and is now acting as housekeeper tor her son George. 

Alter acquiring his preliminary education in the district schools George 
W. Noland entered the Western College at Toledo, Iowa. September 18, 
1891, to prepare himselt tor the ministr} . He was a bright, precocious 
child and a general favorite with ever3^one and during his school da}s had 
made steady progress in his studies, which was supplemented !■)} an ex- 
cellent record during his college course. Before entering college, however, 
he had attended five terms of summer school at the Southern Iowa Normal 
College at Bloomfield in order to prepare himself for teaching. In 1893 
he entered upon the active work of that profession and taught ten terms 
of summer school in ortUr to meet the expenses of his own education. Dur- 
ing his college days he was known as an excellent student and a fine de- 




MK. AMI MHS. GEOKCiK W. NOLAND 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 275 

bater and held the chair ot iriric in the Scylomathian Literary Society of 
Western College. Being interested in literary and journalistic work, he 
was given a position in 1894 on the reportorial staff of the Ottumwa Cour- 
ier. In 1895 he made a tour of the state of Iowa and he s[)ent one winter 
in traveling for a wholesale dealer in novelties at Ottumwa, 
Iowa. He was later given a position on the reportorial staff of the Bur- 
lington Hawkeyc and subsequently served in a similar capacity on the Des 
Moines Capital and the Chicago .American. In the spring of igoo he went 
to Bloomtield, where he opened an otHce and a racket store. The same 
fall, however, he removed to Darby vi lie, Missouri, where he engaged 
in merchandising, and while there he was appointed postmaster. On the 
iSt of June. 1906, he removed to Salina, Kansas, and it was while 
living there that he composed and brought out a number of popular songs, 
one entitled " 'Neath the Cotton Woods of Sunny Kansas Land" and 
another called i Don't Want to Trade You Off for An\ Other Girl." 
Soon after the publication of his music a paper commenting upon his picture 
said: "In this portrait we see fine organic qualit}-. a high degree of the 
mental temperament, with the intellectual, moral and esthetic elements 
quite strong. Ideality and the poetic faculty predominate, giving a love 
of beauty in nature and art and a great imagination. It is a fine picture 
for character study." 

.After living in Salina, Kansas, for about a year Mr. Noland went to 
Brookville, Kansas, where he purchased a shoe store, added to the stock 
and built up a good trade, but eventually sold our there and in 1908 went 
to Mountain Grove, Missouri, as pastor of the Christian church. Later 
he returned to Darbyville, Missouri, where he opened a general store and 
was again appointed jiostmaster. In 1910 his wite's health tailed and, 
hoping to benefit her thereby, he returned to Mountain Grove. Missouri, 
settling on a farm, bur Mrs. Noland passed away nor long afterward. 
Mr. Noland then went to Des Moines, Iowa, where he remained with his 
mother until October 16, 1911, when they all removed to I'dell. Here 
he rented a store room and put in a new stock of general merchandise 
and dry goods. He is enjoying a growing busine.ss here and is num- 
bered among the enterprising merchants of the town. 

It was in 1900 that Mr. Noland was married to Miss Li/ette Boyer, 
a daughter of Madison and Mary B. (Moore) Boyer, both of whom were 
natives of Illinois. They were married in that state and removed to 
Appanoose county, where the father taught in the public schools and al.so 
engaged in preaching in the Christian church. During the Civil war he 
acted as hospital clerk and drummer boy and some time after hostilities 
had closed drew a pension. .\t the close of the war he returned to 



276 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Appanoose county, where he continued teaching. Later he removed to 
Davis county, where Mrs. Noland was born in 1874. While the family 
were living there he served as county treasurer two terms and was a 
prominent and influential citizen ot that locality. His wife died in 
Davis county and Mr. Boyer passed away at the home of his brother in 
Udell. Their daughter Mrs. Noland was a talented musician and com- 
poser and wrote the music for her husband's songs. By this marriage 
were born two children: Edna, born at Salina, Kansas, October 17, 1906; 
and 'John M., in Darby ville, Missouri, in 1909. 

Mr. Noland is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Bloomtield, 
Iowa. He gives his political support to the democratic party but has 
never been a politician in the sense of office seeking. He has always 
been deeply interested in the stud\ ot phrenolog)'. \\'hen a boy he 
obtained possession of a publication of Fowler & Wells, which he read 
with great interest; he studied his schoolmates and on entering college 
had access to the library, which contained the works of Spurzheim, George 
Combe, Neison Sizer and the Fowlers, which he eagerly read, becoming 
an advocate of phrenology. He has lectured quite extensively on this 
subject through the middle west and at different times has followed 
this science. Now, however, he devotes his attention to merchandising 
and is building up a good trade in Udell. Church work has also long 
interested him. At an early age of fifteen he began preaching and was 
called "the boy preacher." He was an eloquent speaker and drew large 
congregations to hear him and many joined the church under his teach- 
ings. His has been an active life, fruitful of good results along many 
lines, and wherever he has gone he has been known as a student, whose 
reading and researches have been deep. 



DAMD LODWICK. 



A spirit of enterprise and progressiveness in business characterizes the 
activities of David Lodwick, one of the partners in the Lodwick Brothers 
Coal Company, now owning and operating five mines at Mystic. This is 
one of the most important industries of this section of the county, adding 
materially to its wealth in that it furnishes employment to a large num- 
ber of workmen while at the same time returning a substantial income to 
the proprietors. Mr. Lodwick is a native of the little rock-ribbed country 
of South Wales, his birth having occurred at Pun D}ram, near Dowlais, 
January 7, 1864. His parents were William and Ann (James) I^idwick, 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 277 

both ot whom were born in 1824, the former in Cardiganshire and the 
latter in Pembrokeshire. In 1S70 the entire family came to the United 
States, settling first at Akron, Ohio, and a short time thereafter they went 
to Youngstown, remaining in the vicinity of that city for about twenty 
years. They were also for several years in Shawnee, in Perry county, but 
finally returned to Youngstown, where both the father and mother passed 
away, the former dying in 1887, while the latter survived him for twenty 
years, de[)arting this life in 1907. William Lodwick engaged in coal 
minmg throughout his entire lite. Unto him and his wite were born seven 
children: John B., still living at Youngstown, Ohio; Rachel, the wife of 
John Llewellyn, of Mystic; L. L., who is in partncrshij) with his brother 
David, and makes his home in Ottumwa, Iowa; Margaret, who married 
Lewis E. Lewis and is living in Youngstown, Ohio; \V. B., a resident of 
Greeley, Colorado; David; and Martha Ann, who is the wife of John D. 
Williams, of Sherodsville, Ohio. 

David Lodwick was a lad of but six years when the family crossed 
the.\tlantic to the new world. He remained with his parents until he had 
attained his majority and his boyhood days were largely spent around the 
mines. For four years, however, he was employed in the rolling mills at 
Youngstown bur during the remainder of his life he has been identified 
with mining interests. He dug coal for many years and did everything 
connected with the mining of that product so that he thoroughly knows 
the business in principle and detail. In 1889 he came to Mystic with his 
brother William and has now made his home here for a period of twenty- 
three years. His brothers, J. B. and L. L. Lodwick, had preceded him to 
this district in order to lease some coal land and had succeeded in leasing 
one hundred and sixty acres from John M. Elgin. David I>odwick ami 
his brother William then opened two drift mines on the property above 
mentioned and David Lodwick has since been actively engaged in the 
o[)eration of the mines, giving his j)ersonal supervision to the work. He 
is associated in the business with his brothers, L. L. and J. B., the three 
forming the Lodwick Brothers Coal Company of Mystic. They are now 
operating five mines in this district, having a capacity of eight hundred 
and fifty tons of coal per day. One of these mines was opened and devel- 
oped entirely by David Lodwick. his brothers, however, being associated 
with him in the operation of the other four. He is the active partner in 
the business and has complete charge of the mines. He also conducts two 
supply .stores in connection with the mines and employs altogether about 
five hundred workmen. His long experience has matle him familiar with 
every phase of mining and mine equipment as well as mine operation and 
he is today one of the prosperous residents of the county, having attained 



278 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

a measure of success which is the direct result of his unfaltering industry, 
his perseverance and his determination. He has platted Roosevelt 
Heights, an addition to Mystic, and he is also the owner of a half interest 
in Fruitland, an addition which he opened in connection with T. R. Sedg- 
wick. In 1911 he built and now owns the Masonic Temple here and he is 
also the owner of a corner block on Second and Main streets. 

Mr. Lodwick has always been most active in the affairs of the town, 
contributing in large measure to its upbuilding and improvement and to 
the establishment of a high moral tone here. His political allegiance has 
ever been given to the republican jxirty and he has filled several offices. 
He assisted in the corporation of the town of Mystic in 1890 and for 
several years acted as city clerk. He was also a member of the city coun- 
cil for a number of years and was mayor two years, during which period 
he gave to the city a faithful, businesslike administration. He has always 
stood for progress and reform and has shown his deep interest in the cause 
of education by active service on the school board of which he was presi- 
dent for several years. He has taken a most helpful part in suppressing 
the liquor traffic and he was untiring in his efforts to secure the admission 
of the interurban line when it was opposed by the merchants of the town. 

In 1891, Mr. Lodwick was united in marriage to Miss Marjorie Grif- 
fiths, who was born in Wales in September, 1864, and came to the I'nited 
States in 1869 with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Griffiths. The 
children of this marriage were six in number: William G., who is attend- 
ing college in Mount Pleasant, Iowa; John S., a high-school student; 
David, Charles T, and Albert, all yet at home; and Mary Evelyn, who 
died at the age of eight years. The parents are members of the Episcopal 
church and Mr. Lodwick has served on the official board. He is a Master 
Mason, belonging to Walnut Lodge. No. 588. A. F. & A. M.. and is also 
connected with the Woodmen. His interests are broad, his activities 
resourceful, his public spirit unfailing^. He has accomplished much that 
is beneficial to the city and his business enterprises have always contrib- 
uted to public prosperit}- as well as to individual success. 



ALEXANDER OUR. 



Alexander Orr is a retired coal operator of Mvstic. He was not alwavs 
a mine owner, for in early life he was himself an active worker in the 
mines and it was through his determination, perseverance and intelligently 
directed efforts that he gradually advanced until he became the possessor 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 279 

ot certain valuable coal-bearing properties which were operated success- 
fully, bringing to him a substantial measure of prosperity that enabled 
him at length to live retired. He was bom in Ayrshire, Scotland, March 
25, 1844, and is a son of Robert and Margaret (Nicol) Orr. His father 
was also a native of Ayrshire, while the mother's birth occurred in the 
highlands of Scotland. She died in that coimtry in 1859 when about 
fifty-three years of age, after which the father came to the United States 
with his son Alexander in 1863. He made his way to Colchester, Mc- 
Donough county, Illinois. The following year they removed to Bush- 
nell, Illinois, and in 1875 established their home at What Cheer, Iowa, 
where the father spent his remaining days, passing away June ig, 1881, 
at the age of seventy-two years. In his early life he learned and followed 
the weaver's trade and later was employed in connection with the opera- 
tion of coal mines. In his family were three children: Robert, who died 
in Bushnell, Illinois; William, who died in M_\stic; and .\Iexander. 

In 1854, when a little lad of ten years, Alexander Orr began trapping 
in the mines, and from that time forward until his retirement from active 
business life, he was connected with coal mining. After arriving in Amer- 
ica, when nineteen years of age, he engaged in coal-mining in different 
sections of Illinois and in other places, and in 1887 he and his brother 
William came to Mystic. In the meantime their industry had secured 
them advancement in the business world and the measure of prosperity 
which rht)- had attained enabled them, on coming to Mystic, to open the 
Iowa and Missouri mine which they operated continuously and success- 
fully for three years, or until 1900. This was the first mine o()eneit in 
Mystic on land belonging to D. Vankike. The brothers had opened what 
became known as the first railroad mine at What Cheer, operating it until 
1879. when they sold to the railroad company. Those were the largest 
coal works in Iowa at one time. In 1900 Mr. Orr and his brother o[iened 
another mine a mile and a half east of Mystic, known as the Orr Brothers 
mine. They found there a good grade of coal which the)- took out in 
large (juantities, operating the mine until 1907, when the brother died 
and .Mexander Orr sold out. The mine, however, is still being actively 
and profitably worked. The two brothers entered info partnership in 
187; anil were closely identified in all their business interests from that 
rime imtil the death of William Orr, following which .Mexander Orr 
retired from active life and has since rested from fvirther labor. 

On the 29th of December, 1876, occurred the marriage of Alexander 
Orr and Miss Harriet A. France, who was born in Kendall county. Illi- 
nois, on the 7th of April, 18^7, a daughter of William and Eli/abeth 
r Farrow) France, who were natives of England and were married in 



280 HISTORY OF Al'l'AXOOSE COUNTY 

Newark, New Jersey. The mother died in Seattle, Washington, where 
the father still resides. In his younger days he was a miner and weaver. 
Mr. and Mrs. Orr became the parents of rtve children: Margaret E., the 
wife of Abner Harris, of Mystic; Alexander, living in Centerville; George 
James, also of Mystic; Robert William, of Aberdeen, South Dakota; and 
Minnie N., at home. The last named was born in Mystic and the others 
in What Cheer. 

The family is well known here and is prominent socially, their home 
being the abode of a warm-hearted and cordial hospitality. Mr. Orr is 
a stalwart republican in politics, serving the party since he became an 
American citizen. He made out the first poll books in Mystic and served 
on the first city council. His fraternal relations are with the Masons and 
the Odd Fellows, being a charter member of Walnut Lodge, No. 588, 
A. F. & A. M., and of Merriam Lodge, No. 555, L O. O. F. He is also 
connected with the Order of Rebekahs. He is among the worthy repre- 
sentatives of his native land who through the national characteristics of 
strength, industry and reliability, have won success. He never had any 
false ideas as to the best methods of attaining prosperit}- but early recog- 
nized that industry is the basis of all business advancement and accord- 
ingly he worked persistently and energetically in order that he might 
gain that prosperity which is the legitimate goal of all business endeavor. 



JAMES A. SHANKS. 



James A. Shanks, one of the progressive and enterprising young busi- 
ness men of Centerville, is the proprietor of a well appointed and well 
patronized drug store at No. 1109 South Eighteenth street. He is num- 
bered among the worthy native sons of Appanoose count}-, his h'wth hav- 
ing occurred in Centerville on the 25th of June, 1886, and his parents 
being Albert C. and Mary E. (Wyatt) Shanks. The father is a native 
of Ohio and a carpenter by trade. He came to Centerville when it was 
but a small village and for a number of years worked as a bridge car- 
penter in the service of the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy, Wabash and 
Rock Island Railroads. After abandoning railroad work he followed 
carpentering in Centerville and at the present time resides with his son. 
Clyde C, on East Maple street in this city. It was here that he wedded 
Miss Mary E. W'yatt, a native of Appanoose county, who passed awa> at 
her home in Centerville in 1908. 

James A. Shanks attended the public schools of Centerville in the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 281 

acquirement of an education, completing the high-school course in 1906. 
In 1907 he entered the Highland Park College of Des Moines and the 
same year passed the examination required by the state board of pharma- 
cists. During the tour previous years he had been employed as a clerk 
in the Red Cross drug store and after passing the state examination he 
spent three years in the McCreary drug store. On the 19th of January, 
1911, he opened a store of his own at No. 1 109 South Eighteenth street, 
where he has since been located as the [)roprietor of an up-to-date drug 
establishment. He carries a large and well selected line of drugs and 
druggists' sundries and enjoys a liberal and lucrative patronage. 

On the 19th of Jul\, 1911, Mr. Shanks was united in marriage to 
Miss Delia Hill, of Moulton, Iowa, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. 
Cramer Hill, the mother being a Miss Peck before her marriage. The 
father, who comes of Yankee stock, is a retired agriculturist residing at 
Moulton. The demise of his wife there occurred in 1903. 

Politically Mr. Shanks is a democrat, believing firmly in the prin- 
ciples of that party. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Methodist Episcopal church at Centcrville, while his wife belongs 
to the church of that denomination at Moulton. He is likewise a mem- 
ber of Centerville Lodge, No. 941, B. P. O. E., and in the line of his 
profession is connected with the Iowa State Pharmaceutical Association. 
He is well known in the section of the county where he has always lived 
and his many good qualities have gained for him the friendship and regard 
of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



JOHN QUIGLEY. 

John Quigley, city marshal of Centerville, was born in Canada in 
May, 1863, but as the family name indicates comes of Irish ancestry. His 
parents, Dennis and Ann (Gleason) Quigley, were both natives of Ire- 
land and the father, coming to America in early life, settletl in Canatla, 
where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1S67. He then 
removed with his family to Illinois, where he resumed farming, making 
his home in that state until his death, which occurred in 1878. His 
widow is still living and now makes her home in Jacksonville. Illinois, 
ar the age of seventy-two years. 

John Quigley was a little lad of but four years when the family went 
to Illinois, where he was reared, pursuing his education in the district 
schools of Morgan county. The limited financial resources of the family 



282 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

made it imperative that he earn his own living at an early age and he 
began work in the coal mines, following that business in Illinois, Missouri 
and Iowa until 1902. In 1894 he came to Centerville, where he again 
secured work in the mines, being thus engaged for eight years, at the end 
of which time he was appointed a member of the police force. He has 
since been in the employ of the cit}' and at the present writing is filling 
the office of marshal. He had also served as deputy marshal for about 
six years. 

In January, 1888, Mr. Quigley was married to Miss Kate Monroe, 
a daughter of Curt and Sarah Monroe, who were natives of Ohio. The 
father was a farmer and on coming to Iowa cast in his lot with the early 
residents of Appanoose county. He died in 1884 but the mother is still 
living on the home farm near Exline at the age of eighty years. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Quigley was born one son, John, who is now twent\-three 
years of age. He is a printer by trade and resides in Chicago. Mr. Quig- 
ley owns a comfortable residence at No. 521 East Elm street. His reli- 
gious belief is that of the Catholic church and his political faith that of 
the democratic party. His has always been a useful life and to his own 
labors may be attributed whatever success he has achieved and enjoyed. 



AMOS BAILEY. 



Amos Bailey needs no introduction to the readers of a history of 
Appanoose county, for he has been known as a force in the agricultural 
development of the section since he began his active career and has attained 
local prominence by reason of the splendid work he has done in his efforts 
to evolve a higher grade of corn. He has lived in this part of Iowa prac- 
tically all his life, for he was born on his father's farm in Davis county, 
near the Appanoose county line. His birth occurred May 20, 1872, and 
he is a son of Sylvester and Euphane (Tate) Bailey, both of whom came 
to Iowa among the early settlers. The father came into the state in com- 
pany with his brother. Orange Bailey, and the mother of our subject 
made the journey with her parents. Both families settled in Davis county, 
where the marriage of the parents of our subject occurred. Afterward 
they located on a farm in Marion townshi[). near the .\ppanoose county 
line, which the father entered from the government. There they resided 
for many years, the mother dying in 1876 and the father in 1886. 

Amos Bailey was fourteen years of age when his tather died and for 
some years afterward he made his home with his brother, Simpson Bailey. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COL'XTV 283 

However, even as a child he was ambitious and energetic and very soon was 
earning his own livelihood, not wishing to accept outside support. He 
married in 1894 and immediately afterward located on the old home farm 
whieh he operated tor tour years, after which he moved to \V. J. Steckel's 
farm in Davis county, cultivating the soil as a renter. For three years he 
remained upon this property but in the tall of 1901 bought his present tract 
of one hundred and forty acres in Union town^hip and in January ot the 
following year moved into the new home which he had built upon it. 
Here ne has resided since that time with the exception of one year which 
he spent in South Dakota, where he proved up on a homestead in Stanley 
county. He still owns this property but in igo8 returned to Iowa and 
again settled on his farm which today is one of the tinest agricultural 
properties in this part of the state. 

(3n the I2th of April, 1894, Mr. Baile\ married Miss May Hopkins, 
a daughter of William F. and Sarah (N'andover) Hopkins, the former a 
native of Tennessee and the latter, of Indiana. Both came to Iowa before 
their marriage and after that event located on a tarm in Davis county, 
where Mr. Hopkins died in 1901. His widow still resides upon the family 
homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey became the parents of five children, three 
of whom are living, Flora Euphane, Sylvester Ellsworth and Bertha May, 
all attending school. 

For a number of years past Mr. Bailey has devoted a great deal of his 
attention to the development of a better and more perfect grade of corn 
and has accomplished some very gratifying results along this line. So 
successful has he been indeed that he is now regarded as an authority 
upon everything connected with corn cultivation and his work has received 
state-wide appreciation and recognition. For the past three years he has 
exhibited at the state corn show and two years ago won the prize for the 
best corn shown by farmers from Appanoose county. He was fourth in the 
state contest, missing the grand champion prize only by four points and 
taking several of the other prizes otfered. The exhibition that year was 
held at Des Moines but the last show was in Newton, Iowa, and there 
Mr. Bailey won three prizes on corn. He took fourth place among the 
exhibitors of one class of corn and received as his share a cash prize of 
one hundred dollars, the premiums on that class amounting to six hundred 
dollars. In recognition of his work along this line Mr. Bailey was ap- 
pointed one of the judges for the corn show held by the Iowa Corn Growers' 
Association. His family share in his ambition and enthusiasm along this 
line and have united their labors with his with successtul results. His son 
Ellsworth received the second prize at the Farmers' Short Course at Ames 
in January, 1912, anil won the Grand Champion Sweep Stakes over all 



284 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

states except three, namely. Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska, with the 
best single ear of corn exhibited at Topeka, Kansas, in the Capper Boys' 
Corn Club, held December 14, 1912. The prize was a large silver trophy 
with his name engraved thereon and was given by Arthur Capper. The 
daughter. Bertha, now nine years of age, who possesses judgment rare in 
a child of her years and who has worked with her father for some time in 
the selection of seed corn, took first prize in 1911 and 1912 at the Farmers' 
County Institute held at Centerville for the best selected ear of corn. She 
herself had both times chosen the ear for exhibition from the crop of a 
large field. Mr. Bailey and his son Ellsworth received both the first and 
second prizes at the County Institute held at Centerville in 1911 and 
1912, and Mrs. Bailey is not far behind her husband when prizes are being 
awarded, for she took both first and second honors in watermelons at 
Centerville and at Moravia, afterward selling one wagon-load of her 
melons for twenty dollars. 

Mrs. Bailey is a devout member of the Baptist church and one of the 
best known and most widely popular women in this section of Appanoose 
county. Mr. Bailey is a republican in his political beliefs and active in 
his support of the men and measures of that party. In local affairs he 
takes a considerable interest and for some time served as a member of 
the school board. He is now in the prime of life and enjoys to the 
fullest extent the many advantages afforded to the farmer in the present 
da)^ and, being progressive and a man whose life has always been in 
keeping with high standards, he justly deserves the full measure of con- 
fidence and respect entertained for him by all who know him. 



BENJAMIN F. BR.\DLEY. 

Among the respected and valued residents of Numa is numbered 
Benjamin F. Bradley, who for over fifty years has lived in Iowa. This 
has covered the period of the state's greatest growth and progress and 
in the work of general advancement Mr. Bradley has borne his full 
share as the years have gone by. Of late he has lived retired, although 
for a long time he gave his attention and energ}' to his business interests, 
which were extensive and important. A native of Indiana, he was born 
in Morgan countj^ August 18, 1846, a son of John and Sarah Jane (Elliott) 
Bradley, the former a native of Clark county, Indiana, and the latter of 
Kentucky. The father was a farmer by occupation and when he came to 
Appanoose county in 1854 ^^ purchased land in Lincoln township and 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 285 

gave his entire attention to its development and improvement tor man} 
years, winning at length honorable retirement. When he abandoned 
active life he moved into Seymour and there resided until his death, which 
occurred in 1897. ^'^ wife survived him two years, dying in 1899. 

Benjamin F. Bradley was eight years ot age when he came to Ap- 
panoose county with his parents. He was reared and educated in Lincoln 
township, where he attended district school. During the period of the 
Civil war, being no longer content to remain at home while the issue 
of the struggle was doubtful, he enlisted in Company I, Third Iowa 
Cavalry, joining his regiment in February, 1863, and serving until the 
close of the war. He participated in many hotly-contested engagements 
and on the field of battle gave unmistakable proof of his valor and loyalty. 
He was mustered out at Atlanta. Georgia, in August, 1865, and afterward 
returned to Appanoose county and engaged in farming. For ten or tittcen 
years he gave his attention entirely to agricultural pursuits and then moved 
into Numa, where for some time he operated a coal mine. After fifteen 
years he sold out his interests to the Centerville Block Coal Company 
and was elected a member of the board of county supervisors. He served 
for three years and when his term of office expired retired from active life 
and has since lived in Numa, enjoying the rest and comfort \\ hich are the 
reward of his well directed work in the past. However, he still gives 
personal supervision to his important business interests, es[ieciali\' those 
connected with the Numa Mutual telephone Company, of which he is 
president. 

On the 31st of December, 1867, Mr. Bradley was uniteil in marriage 
to Miss Anna E. Adamson, a daughter of Joseph and Mary A. ( Walker) 
Adamson, natives of Ohio, who came to Appanoose county in 18^6. The 
father [)urchased land here and operated a profitable general agricultural 
enterprise until his death. He was born in England, near Leeds, and 
learned the cabinet-makers trade in his native coimtry. Coming to America 
in 1801 he first settled near Cincinnati. Ohio, being there more or le.ss 
connected with his trade, although most ot his time was given to his 
farming operations later. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bradley became the parents of nine children: Cjcrtrudr. 
the wife of J. W. Richardson, of Oregon; Minnie, who marrieil George 
Humphrey, a tanner in ■•\ppanoose coimt)-; Sadie, who marrieil William 
Thompson, of Washington state; Laura, now Mrs. E. W. Porter, of 
Numa; Lawrence B., who is engaged in fanning in .Appanoose county; 
John F., who is a barber in Centerville; Ida. the wife of Perry Cooley, of 
Centerville: and Allie and Ethel M., both of whom have passetl away. 



286 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

Mr. Bradley is a member of the Methodist church and belongs to 
Centerville Post, G. A. R., delighting to meet his old comrades and 
recall the events which occurred on the southern battlefields. He was in 
the last engagement of the Civil war, which took place at Columbus, 
Georgia, at nine o'clock on the night of the i6th of April, 1865. Three 
hundred members of his regiment forced their way into the breastworks 
guarded by thirty-five hundred rebels and after a sharp conliict took pos- 
session of the enemy's post. Twenty-five men were killed in the engage- 
ment, but Mr. Bradley escaped with his life. However, owing to the 
hard conditions of living during the days of the war he contracted stomach 
trouble and his health has been affected by this since that time. Mr. 
Bradley has always been stanch in his support of the republican party and 
has served as trustee of Bellair township and is at present justice of the 
peace. Always a loyal and public-spirited citizen, he is interested in the 
growth and advancement of his community and has given his cooperation 
to many movements for the public good. Unflagging industry and deter- 
mination have constituted the basis of his success, enabling him as the 
years have passed to so conduct his business interests as to win honorable 
retirement and a high position among the representative and prominent 
men of Appanoose county. 



SAMUEL C. COOK. 



Samuel C. Cook, a man of enterprise and marked force of character, 
who throughout his business life has made good use of his opportunities, 
is the owner of one of the largest mercantile concerns in Exline and is 
numbered among the men who have been factors in the general business 
development of the community. He is engaged in the hardware, furniture 
and undertaking business and carries also a complete line of high-class 
pianos. 

A native son of Iowa, Mr. Cook was born in Mahaska coimt}'. Novem- 
ber 29, 1868, and was reared in that section, acquiring his education in 
the public schools. For several years after laying aside his books he 
aided his father in the operation of the home farm bur later turned his 
attention to commercial pursuits, becoming identified with the timber 
business in the employ of the Davison Company, with whom he remained 
for seven years. At the end of that time he came to .\ppanoose coimty and 
located at Dean, where he purchased land and engaged in farming for 
four years. When he sold his property he came to Exline and bought 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 287 

the established hardware, implement, carriage, furniture and undertaking 
business conducted by Clarke & Berger. Since that time he has concen- 
trated his energies upon the further expansion of this concern and as his 
patronage has increased his activities have constantly broatlened. Today 
he does not confine himself to the original lines of trade but buys anything 
a farmer has to sell, dealing extensively in grain, hay, stock, butter, eggs, 
chickens and all kinds of farm produce. His business has reached six 
thousand dollars per year and is still growing, the patronage increasing as 
Mr. Cook's upright methods and strict integrity become more widely 
known. 

Mr. Cook is a member of the Exline lodge, I. O. O. F., and has filled 
all the chairs, being a past grand. He is also affiliated with the Rebekahs 
and holds a prominent place in Eddyville lodge, of the Knights of 
Pythias. He is well known in this locality as an able, enterprising and 
resourceful business man, while as a citizen he is public-spirited, giving his 
unqualified indorsement and hearty support to whatever tends to promote 
the best interests of the community. 



JOSEPH N. KERSCHNER. 

Joseph N. Kerschner, who has owned and operated a grocery store in 
Centerville since 1908, is numbered among the diligent and enterprising 
young business men of the community. He was born in Clarinda, Page 
county, Iowa, on the 4th of August, 1877, his parents being William A. 
and Catherine (Barnthouse) Kerschner. The father, who was of German 
lineage, was born in Montpelier, Indiana, on October 15, 1830, and there 
he was likewise reared and educated and subsequently learned the cabinet- 
maker's trade. The mother, who is of French extraction, is a native of 
Ohio, her birth having occurred in Tuscarawas coimty on the 25th of June, 
1836. When a girl of about titteen years she removed with her parents to 
Indiana, where she was later married. In the early '90s Mr. and Mrs. 
Kerschner came to Iowa, settling in the vicinity of Cincinnati, Appanoose 
covmry, where the father purchased forty acres of coal land. .After oper- 
ating his mines for several years he disposed of his holding and removed 
with his family to Cass county, Nebraska. There he purchased a well 
improved farm of a himdred and twenty acres and turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits, which he followed for ten years. He next removed 
to Lincoln, that state, and resumed his trade, residing in the latter city 
until 1894. On August 1, of that year, accompanied by his wife and 



288 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

family, he went to Fitzgerald, Florida, making the journey, a distance of 
three thousand miles, in a covered wagon. They reached their destination 
in the month ot December and there passed the winter. The next spring 
they returned to Iowa, but after a brief sojourn here, the father again 
started westward, Portland, Oregon, being his next place of residence. 
There he passed awa} in 1902. The mother, however, is living and con- 
tinues to reside in Portland, making her home with her children. 

The early years of Joseph N. Kerschner were passed in the parental 
home. In the acquirement of an education he attended the public schools 
in the various places where the family resided, completing his course of 
study in the high school of Lincoln, Nebraska, from which institution he 
was graduated with the class of 1894. He went south with the family 
that fall, returning to Iowa with them in the spring of 1895, and here he 
has ever since made his home. When he came back to Centerville he 
obtained a clerkship in the store of Drake & Lane, continuing to work 
for them and various other grocers in the city until 1908. He applied 
himself earnestly to a thorough mastery of the business and as he was 
industrious and thrifty during that time he also managed to accumulate 
a small capital. It was his ambition to have an establishment of his own, 
his desire in this direction being realized four years ago when he purchased 
the grocery stock of Isaac Brooks. As he carries a good line of staple and 
fancy groceries, which he offers at reasonable prices, he has succeeded 
in building up a trade that gives him every reason to feel assured of a 
constantly increasing business. He is gracious and accommodating in his 
treatment of patrons and in the conduct of his store has adopted a policy 
that commends him to the confidence of those with whom he has trans- 
actions, all of which qualities are uniting in winning well deserved suc- 
cess. 

In 1898, Mr. Kerschner was married to Miss Clara \'ought, a daughter 
of Larkin and Malissa Vought, the father a native of Indiana and the 
mother of Mrginia, whence she came to Iowa with her parents when a 
child. They were married in Keosauqua, this state, and very soon there- 
after located on a farm near Udell, where the father still resides with his 
son George. The mother passed away in 1912. Mrs. Kerschner was 
bom in Udell in 1878, and was reared, educated and married in this 
county. Of this marriage there have been born two children: Mabel, 
whose birth occurred in September, 1900; and Marion, who was born in 
January, 1902. 

The parents manifest their religious faith through their connection 
with the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Kerschner is a member of the 
blue lodge and chapter of the Masonic order, and he also belongs to the 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 289 

Royal Arcanum and the Modern Woodmen of America, being clerk of the 
local camp of the last named organization. Politically he supports the 
republican party and is a member of the school board. Mr. Kerschner is 
a young man of earnest purpose, upright principles and reliable methods, all 
of which qualities he daily manifests in the conduct ot his business. Such 
success as has come to him is well deserved and has been won through his 
individual efforts, as he has made his own way in the world since he was 
a youth and merits much commendation for the excellent use he has made 
of his opportunities. 



GEORGE B. ADAMS. 



George B. Adams was a life-long resident of Appanoose county, long 
associated with industrial interests here, his last emplojment being with 
the foundry of Joseph Goss. He was born near Numa, this count}', June 
24, 1864. His father, Isaac Adams, was a native of Kentuck}-, and became 
proprietor of a stone quarry in Appanoose count} at an earl} period in 
the development of this section of the state. He continued in business 
here throughout his remaining days, passing away in 1885. In early 
manhood he had wedded Rachel Stevens, a native of Ohio and, surviving 
him, she now resides in Davenport, Iowa. 

George B. Adams spent his }outhful days in Appanoose county and 
when old enough began to earn his living by working in connection with 
mining interests, although his employment was outside of the mines. He 
was thus engaged for twelve years, at the end of which time he entered the 
service of the Chicago, Burlington >lt Quincy Railroad Company in their 
car repairing department. He remained with them for some time and then 
went to work for Joseph Goss in the foundr}'. continuing there throughout 
the remainder of his life. He was always diligent, energetic and industrious 
and those whom he served found him ever faithful and reliable. 

In September, 1884, Mr. Adams was united in marriage to Miss Louisa 
Swinford, a daughter of George W. and Louisa M. (Campbell) Swinford. 
The father was a farmer by occupation and following his arrival in .Appa- 
noose county when it was still a frontier district, he bought a farm which 
he improved and cultivated for many years. He worked diligently to 
make his land productive and at length with a comfortable competence 
acquired through his own labors, retired from active life and removed to 
Centerville, where he continued to make his home until he passed away 
February 7, 1907. He had long survived his wife, who died in 1879. In 



290 HISTORY OF Al'I'AXOOSli COL'XTY 

the family of Mr. and Mrs. Adams were eight children: Lawrence, who 
is employed as an engineer on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road; Harry H., who is fireman with the same road; George B., who is 
also a fireman; Pearl H., who is working in the Burlington shops in Cen- 
terville; William Glenn, a student in the high school; Walter, who is also 
attending school; one, who died in infancy; and Owen, who died in Feb- 
ruary, 1906. The death of the husband and father occurred Fcbruar)- 27, 
1907, after an illness with pneumonia of twenty-one days. He was a 
member of the Foresters lodge and had many warm friends within that 
organization. He served in the fire department here and was interested 
in the activities which were potent forces in promoting the welfare and 
progress of the city. He always voted with the democratic party and 
kept well versed on the questions and issues of the day. He held mem- 
bership in the Christian church, to which Mrs. Adams also belongs. She 
owns a pleasant home at No. 710 South Seventeenth street and is comfort- 
ably situated in life. 



JAMES C. HOPKINS. 



James C. Hopkins, now living retired in Unionville, enjoying a well 
earned rest after a life of labor, is numbered among those who have con- 
tributed in substantial measure to the development and advancement of 
Appanoose county, for he was for many years closely identified with 
important agricultural interests. His long life has been marked by strict 
adherence to the principles of honorable and upright manhood, by earnest, 
straightforward work in times of peace and by valor and loyalty in times 
of war, for he belongs to that fast lessening band ot veterans who 1 ought 
in defense of the Union fifty years ago. A native of Tennessee, Mr. Hop- 
kins was born on the 19th of February, 1837, and is a son of William and 
Eliza (Stegall) Hopkins, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter born in Tuscumbia, Alabama, in 1817. The paternal branch of 
the family is of English ancestry, the grandfather of our subject, Stephen 
Hopkins, having come from Great Britain at an earh- date and located in 
New York state, thus founding the family in America. Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hopkins were married in Tennessee and for some time lived ujion 
a farm in Hancock county, upon which the father died of yellow fever 
contracted during the Mexican war. Later the mother was again married, 
her second husband being Le Roy Busic, of Tennessee, and in 1850 they 
removed to Davis county, Iowa, whence they came in the spring ot 




.1. f. TIOPKINS AM> I'AMII.V 



PUBLIC 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 293 

185J to Appanoose count}-. Here the}- rented a farm in Union township 
and Mr. Busic developed and improved this property for some time, later 
adding to his agricultural labors the duties of constable. A few }ears 
afterward he removed with his family to Miller county, Missouri, and 
there remained until his death, which occurred at the age of eighty-four. 
His wife passed away when she was seventy years of age. 

James C. Hopkins attended school only three months during his entire 
life, his education having been acquired from his mother, who spent a 
great deal of her time teaching her son. When he was eleven years of age 
he came west to Appanoose county and made his home with an uncle, 
who resided in this section of Iowa, for one year, returning to Tennessee 
at the end of that time. In i8>o he came with his mother and stepfather 
to Davis county and remained there until iH^y, when he went to Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, and engaged in hauling freight trom that city to Fort 
Scott, Kansas. For eighteen month? he engaged in this occupation but 
finally returned to Appanoose county and made his home with his parents 
until the outbreak of the Civil war, when his patriotic spirit was aroused 
and, feeling that the country needed his aid, he enlisted at I'nionville, 
on the 6th of June, 1861, in Company I, Third Iowa \'olunteer Cavalry, 
under Captain T. J. Taylor. His regiment saw active service at the front 
and while he was a member of it Mr. Hopkins was wounded at I'ea Ridge, 
where he was in the thick of battle with seven thousand Indians. A short 
time after this he was transferred to Company G, Thirty-sixth Iowa \'ol- 
unteer Infantry, and took part in many of the principal battles of the 
Civil war, including the siege at Fort Pemberton, the battles of Helena, 
Little Rock, Elkins Ford, Prairie d' Ann, Camden, Marks Mills and Jen- 
kins Ferry, having been present at forty-five battles and skirmishes during 
his four years of service. His regiment was captured at Marks Mills, 
Arkansas, but he with others later escaped and waded through four miles 
of swamp on his way to rejoin the L'nion forces. He suffered many liard- 
ships and privations and was for five days lost in a strange country with 
nothing to eat but sassafras sprouts, upon which he .sustained his life. He 
was mustered out at Little Rock, Arkansas, on June 21, 1869. He had 
participated in the long hard marches, arduous campaigns and the hotly 
contested battles and, therefore, with a creditable military recortl he 
returned to .Appanoose count}- to resume his business lite. For some time 
he worked at anything which would bring him an income, but later went 
to Davis county and purchased eighty acres of land, which he farmed until 
1873. H*^ returned in that year to Appanoose count} ami bought a t;irm 
of forty acres in I dell township, upon which he made his home for a 
number of years, steadily carrying forward the work of improvement and 



294 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

development along modern lines. From time to time he added to his 
holdings until he owned tour hundred acres, all in a high state of cultiva- 
tion. In 1907, however, he sold this property and went to California, 
where he visited his daughter and his son, who are living in Shasta county. 
Upon his return he bought a small place near Unionville, upon which he 
resided until the 5th of September, 1912, when he came into the city 
and has since lived retired, having earned comfort and freedom from busi- 
ness cares by unremitting and well directed work in the past. 

On the 5th of September, 1865, Mr. Hopkins was united in marriage 
in Appanoose county to Miss Cornelia Margaret Close, a daughter of 
Jacob and Sarah (Johnson) Close, natives of Indiana, the former of 
Dutch-Irish ancestry and the latter of Holland stock. Their marriage 
occurred in Indiana and in 1840 they came to Iowa, locating in Davis 
county, whence after a few months they removed to Louisville, Kentucky. 
The father was a shoemaker by trade and followed this occupation in 
the various sections to which he removed, but upon returning to Davis 
county in 1861 he took up one hundred and sixty acres of government land 
and engaged in farming. Later, however, he sold the property and went 
to Indiana, but finally returned to Iowa and worked at his trade in Davis 
county for some time. After a brief period of residence in Appanoose 
county he went to Promise City, Wayne county, and there remained until 
his death. His daughter, the wife of the subject of this review, was the 
first white girl born in Davis county and her brother John the first white 
child born in that part of Iowa. Mrs. Hopkins' birth occurred on the 30th 
of June, 1844, her brother having been born one year previous. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hopkins became the parents of seventeen children. They have fiftj-- 
six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Of their immediate 
descendants nine are living, as follows: William J., a farmer of Union 
township; Sarah E., the wife of Henry Peek, who is engaged in famiing 
near Moulton, Iowa; John F., a farmer of Kansas; Andrew L., who is 
engaged in general agricultural pursuits in Davis county; George W., a 
carpenter of Unionville; Stephen Allen, who is farming in Davis county; 
James G., an electrician in Shasta county, California; Joseph J., who 
operates a farm in Davis county; and Hulda Jane, who married David 
Covey, of Shasta county, California. 

Mr. Hopkins gives his allegiance to the progressive party and is at 
ill times progressive and public-spirited in his citizenship, although he 
iiever seeks public office. Through his membership in the Grand Armv of 
the Republic he keeps in close touch with his comrades of the Civil war. 
He has been always interested in the welfare of Appanoose county and has 
given active cooperation to many movements for the jniblic good, his 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 295 

efforts being effective and far-reaching. Living in Iowa for so many years, 
he is one of the best known citizens of this locality, being widely recognized 
as a man of tried integrity and worth and of business enterprise and 
unfaltering diligence. Now that he has passed the seventy-rtfth milestone 
on life's journey, he is enjoying a well-earned rest, for his life has been 
long and honorable both in deeds and years. 



JOHNSON BROTHERS. 



Among the most progressive, reliable and intelligently managed busi- 
ness houses in Centerville is that conducted by Johnson Brothers, dealers 
in groceries, meats, flour and feed. Ihe development of their enterprise 
has been a part of the development of the city and an important factor in 
it, and its increasing expansion is today a direct force in general com- 
mercial advancement. The three brothers, Lewis R., Adolph and Oscar, 
o\\ners of the business, are fine t)pes of the upright, straighttorward and 
progressive business man and are distinct additions to the ranks of citizen- 
ship in Appanoose county, all having gained high places among men of 
marked ability and substantial worth. Axel Johnson, the fourth brother, 
not connected with the above mentioned tirm, is successful as farmer and 
miner. 

Lewis R. Johnson is the active manager of the concern, the other 
lirothers being silent partners. He was born in Skutskar, Sweden, October 
18, 1884, and is a son of Nels and Caroline (Rostrom) Johnson, both 
natives of that countr}-, where their marriage occurred. They came to 
the United States in 1887 and located immediately in Centerville, Ai)pa- 
noose county, where the father worked in a coal mine for one year. He 
has passed away but his widow still resides in Centerville, making her 
home with her son Lewis in an attractive residence on South Twentieth 
street. 

Lewis R. Johnson was two years of age when he came with his parents 
to America. He was reared in Centerville and acquired his education in 
its public schools, laying aside his books at an early age in order to work 
in the mines. He followed this occupation for three years, after which 
he began clerking in the store conducted by Poulson & Pearson. Here he 
remained for six years and then went upon the road as traveling salesman 
for the Scandinavian Coal Company of Centerville. He worked in their 
interests for one year, but on the 7th of November, igio, formed a part- 
nership with his brothers, .\dolph J., and Oscar W. They bought the 



296 HISTORY OF Al'l'AXOOSE COUNTY 

store belonging to J. B. Perry at 1197 South Eighteenth street, where the 
enterprise is still located. It is one of the representative business concerns 
ot Centerville, conducted along lines of honesty, fair dealing and constant 
progress and is a substantial contribution to the city's resources. The suc- 
cess which the partners have achieved is evidenced in their growing patron- 
age, which in turn is the direct result of the honorable commercial methods 
they have ever followed and the high standards of business integrity to 
which they have steadily adhered. Lewis Johnson has other important 
business connections, among which ma}- be mentioned the Centerville 
Gypsum Company, in which he is a stockholder. He is a republican in his 
political beliefs and has the unqualified respect and esteem of a wide circle 
of friends and, indeed, of all, who have had business or social relations 
with him. 

Adolph Johnson, the second partner in the firm of Johnson Brothers, 
was born in Sweden, June 23, 1876, and came with his parents to Appa- 
noose county and entered the Centerville public schools, where he acquired 
his education. He began his independent career as a digger in the coal 
mines but abandoned this in order to accept the position of weigh master 
for the Scandinavian Coal Company, in which position he has served for 
the past eleven years discharging his duties in an able, conscientious and 
efficient manner. He married on the 2d of August, 1900, Miss Bertha 
Freberg, a daughter of John and Caroline Freberg, natives of Sweden. 
The father is a shoemaker by trade and after he came to the United 
States in 1880 followed this occupation in Illinois for a number of years, 
coming to Centerville in 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Johnson have two 
children: Hugo, who was born on the 22d of February, 1902, and is 
attending the Garfield school ; and Robert, born May 2, 1904. who attends 
the McKinley school. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson reside at 1500 Drake avenue, 
where they have a cozy and attractive home, which is the center of hos- 
pitality for their many friends. Both are members of the Swedish Con- 
gregational church and Mr. Johnson gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party, being active and progressive in all matters of citizen- 
ship. 

Oscar W. Johnson was born March 28, 1878, in Sweden, and was 
nine years of age when his parents came to the Ignited States. He entered 
the public schools of Centerville and after completing his education secured 
work in a mine. He continued in this position iintil 190^ when he formed 
a partnership with Robert Freberg, a brother of Mrs. Adolph Johnson, 
and with him opened a general store at E.xline, Appanoose county, known 
under the name of Freberg & Johnson Brothers. Mr. Johnson is the 
active manager of this enterprise, while Mr. Freberg is connected with it 
as a silent partner, making his home on a farm near Rolfe. Iowa. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 297 

Oscar ^^ . Johnson married Miss Augusta Nelson, a daughter of Charles 
Nelson, a blacksmith in Sperry, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have three 
children: Elvira, who was born October 7, 1905; Lucille, whose birth 
occurred June 9, 1907; and Nadine, born August 16, 1911. For some 
time Oscar Johnson was superintendent of the Dewey Coal Mine at Cen- 
terville, but has recently severed his connection with that enterprise. He 
is a republican in his political beliefs and takes an active interest in all 
movements which ha\e for their object the advancement and progress of 
the section in which he has lived since his childhood and where he is well 
known and widely respected. He is postmaster at Exline. 

The fourth brother. Axel Johnson, is also a native of Sweden, born 
May 30, 1880. He came to the United States with his parents when he 
was seven years of age and acquired his education in the public schools of 
Centerville. After laying asitie his books he worked for some time in the 
mines but afterward took up farming, engaging in agricultural pursuits 
upon a fine tract of land two miles south of Exline, where he now resides. 
During the summer months he gives his attention to the development and 
improvement of this tract and devotes his time in the winter to work in 
the coal mines. In both lines of occupation he has proved himself an 
able and conscientious worker and a far-sighted and resourceful business 
man, and his efforts have been attended by a gratifying degree of success. 
He is a member of the Mine Workers Union at Exline. Axel Johnson 
married Miss Nina Johnson, a daughter of a farmer in this county who 
has now passed away. They have two children: Essie, who was born June 
3, 1905; and Carl, whose birth occurred on October 26, 191 1. 

The Johnson Brothers maintain the utmost harmony in their business 
relations and this is, indeed, one of the factors in their success. All are 
shrewd, far-sighted, capable and energetic business men and the entire 
county has profited by their activities in various fields of endeavor, while 
the enterprise which marks their point of contact is in all respects worthy 
of their talents and abilities. 



CHARLES H. ELGIN. 



Charles H. Elgin is a member of the firm of Howell & Elgin, enjoy- 
ing the largest law practice in Centerville. He is, moreover, a representa- 
tive of one of the old and prominent [lioneer families of .Appanoose coimty. 
That his has been a well sjient life is indicated in the fact that many of 
his stanchest friends are those who have known him from his bovhood to 



298 HISTORY OF Al'l'ANOOSE COL'XTY 

the present time. He was born in this city, August 31, 1874, a son of John 
M. and Mary J. (Silknitter) Elgin, both of whom were natives of Indiana. 
The father came to Centerville from Martinsville, Indiana, with his par- 
ents in '50s and here resided until after the outbreak of the Civil war, 
when his patriotic spirit aroused, he offered his services to the government 
and joined the boys in blue of Company F, Thirty-sixth Iowa Infantry, 
with which he served until the close of the war, participating in many 
hotly contested engagements. With the restoration of peace he returned 
to Appanoose county and purchased a farm near Mystic, at once beginning 
the work of clearing and improving the tract, which he operated success- 
fully until 1872. He was then called to public office, being elected sheriff, 
in which position he served through the ensuing two years. With his 
retirement he returned to the farm and again engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits until 1895, when he put aside business cares and once more 
became a resident of Centerville, remaining here until his death, which 
occurred April l, igoo, when he was tifty-eight years of age. His widow 
is still living in Centerville at the age of seventy. 

The youthful days of Charles H. Elgin were spent under the parental 
roof, and the district schools afforded him his educational privileges until 
he reached the age of seventeen, when he entered school at Lincoln, 
Nebraska. He afterward attended Drake University for some time, then 
served for a time as deputy county clerk and subsequently went south 
participating in the Spanish-American war. Finally, however, he became 
a student in the State University, at Iowa City, and was graduated there- 
from with the class of 1900 on the completion of the law course. At that 
time he returned to Centerville and for thirty days was in the office of the 
county attorney, after which he entered into partnership with C. F. Howell, 
one of the most able and learned members of the Appanoose count}- bar. 
Their association has since been maintained under the firm style of Howell 
& Elgin and they enjoy a very extensive practice, with offices at loo'/2 
West Jackson street. Mr. Elgin is thorough ami painstaking in all his 
legal work, preparing his cases most carefully and losing sight of no point 
which will tend to further his cause. 

In March, 1899, Mr. Elgin was married to Miss Isal Strickler, a daugh- 
ter of John J. and Mary E. (Williamson) Strickler, who were natives of 
Indiana. The father arrived in Centerville in 1862 and engaged in the 
dry-goods business, remaining one of the foremost merchants of the city for 
thirty-four years. He is now living retired. His wife died January 14. 
1911. Mr. and Mrs. Elgin have two children, John Robert and Mary 
Elizabeth, aged twelve and nine years. 

Mr. Elgin is the owner of considerable real estate in Centerville, includ- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 299 

inga pleasant home at No. 427 East State street. He is a member of the 
Masonic lodge, also of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. His 
political indorsement is given to the republican party but without desire 
for office as a reward for party fealty. The religious faith of the family is 
that of the Christian church. The good-will and confidence of many friends 
is theirs and the professional prominence of Mr. Elgin is the result of 
well developed powers in the field of law. 



WILLIAM R. BRYANT. 



Among the most progressive and able of the joungcr business men of 
Centerville is William R. Bryant, who is engaged in partnership with his 
father in the conduct of one of the largest meat and grocery concerns in 
the city. He is a native son of this state, born in Davis county, May 28, 
1886, his parents being Alfred M. and Mary Elizabeth (Penningerj 
Bryant. The grandparents of our subject were Williamson Thompson and 
Sarah (Duzan) Bryant, the former a native of Kentucky and a farmer by 
occupation, who came to Indiana and from there to Davis county, Iowa, 
in early times. In that section he purchased land three quarters of a 
mile east of the Appanoose county line and carried on general agricul- 
tural pursuits with increasing success until his death. He was of Scotch 
ancestry and was a relative of Abraham Lincoln. His wife was a native 
of Kentucky, who came in her girlhood to Indiana, where their marriage 
occurred. She died on a farm in Davis county. 

Alfred M. Bryant, the father of the subject of this review, was born 
on his father's farm in Davis county, January 21, 1855, and acquired his 
education in the district schools. In i8go he came to Centerville and 
engaged in teaming for a number of years, finally abandoning thi^ line of 
occupation in 1905 in order to establish himself in the retail meat business, 
with which he has been identified since that time, being now in partnership 
with his son. He is one of the thoroughly ui)right, honorable and straight- 
forward business men of the city and has gained a gratifying measure of 
success as a result of his well directed work and persevering industry. He 
married in Davis county, Iowa, Miss Mary E. Penninger, a daughter of 
.Jacob and Annie (Justice) Penninger, the former a native of Richmond, 
\'irginia, of Irish ancestry, and the latter born in Indiana, of German 
parents. Their marriage occurred in the latter state and later they came 
to Jefferson county, Iowa, where Jacob Penninger followed farming. He 
came to Appanoose county in 1854 and located in Sharon township, five 



300 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

miles east of Centerville, removing from there in 1874 to Davis county, 
where his death occurred. His widow is now living with her daughter, 
Mrs. William Hurd, on a farm in Appanoose county. 

William R. Bryant came with his parents to Centerville when he was 
still a child and acquired his education in the city schools. When he laid 
aside his books he learned the butcher's trade under W. S. Games, remain- 
ing in his employ for two years and a halt, after which he joined his father 
in the management of the latter's butcher shop. In July, 1910, he took 
charge of the store located at 1019 South Eighteenth street, where besides 
all kinds of meats he carries a tine line of staple and fancy groceries and 
canned goods. Both departments of his enterprise are in a prosperous 
condition, the meat market being one of the largest and most important 
in town. Mr. Bryant enjoys a gratifying patronage because he keeps his 
lines of goods complete and of excellent quality, and, moreover, is always 
cordial, courteous and considerate in his dealings with his customers. 

On the 10th of June, 1906, Mr. Bryant married Miss Jessie Shankster, 
whose father was a veteran of the Civil war and died when Mrs. Bryant 
was only seven years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Bryant became the parents of 
three children: William, born March 5, 1907, who attends the McKinley 
school in Centerville; Lucile, born January 9, 1909, who lives at home; 
and Mabel, whose birth occurred on the 6th of April, 1912. 

Mr. Bryant's political support is given to the men and measures of 
the republican party but he has never desired political preferment. He is 
an energetic and progressive business man and to these qualities and his 
untiring industry may be attributed his success. He is thoroughly reliable 
in all transactions and has become widely and favorably known in busi- 
ness circles. 



ALFRED G. TREMBLY 



Among the enterprising and highly successful young business men of 
Centerville must be mentioned Alfred G. Trembly, senior partner of the 
Trembly-Huston Electric Company. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, 
on the 5th of March, 1891, and is a son of Sylvester M. and Luc}- E. 
(Briggs) Trembly. The father was a native of Ohio, his birth having 
occurred near the Pennsylvania border in i8>4. but he was of New England 
extraction. He came to Iowa in early childhood and his boyhood and 
youth were passed in Des Moines. In 1888, he went to Grinnell. Iowa, 
as local representative for the Singer Sewing Machine Company, remain- 
ing there for three years. At the expiration of that period he was trans- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 301 

ferred to Centerville, but he later withdrew troni the service ot the Singer 
company and engaged in the grocery business with John Zook. He con- 
tinued to be identified with local coinnicrcial circles until his death, which 
occurred on the 5th ot January, 1898. At Freeport, Illinois, in i88y, Mr. 
Trembly was married to Miss Briggs, who was born at Olmstead, in the 
vicinity of Cleveland, Ohio, and is a daughter of the late John and Hester 
Briggs. The father was born in the state of New York, while the mother 
is a native ot Ohio, but both were of New England extraction. John 
Briggs passed the greater part of his life in the railway service. In his 
early manhood he was employed on the tirst railroad constructed across 
the Isthmus of Panama, and at the time ot his death he was foreman of 
the round house at Freeport. He passed away in Ma), 1895:, and is buried 
at Freeport, where his widow still resides. Mrs. Trembly makes her home 
at No. 531 North Ninth street, Centerville, with her son. 

Altred G. Trembly, who is an only child, was less than a year old when 
his parents removed to Centerville, and here he has ever since made his 
home. He was reared in the parental household and acquired his education 
in the public schools, terminating his student days when graduated from 
the high school in 1909. He earl} manifested unusual mechanical skill 
and was deeply interested in electricity, in which business he resolved to 
engage before leaving school. For two years, thereafter, he engaged in 
the mail-order business in electrical appliances, in which he met with a 
fair measure of success. He next established the Trembly Electric Com- 
pany, which he conducted until October, igi2, when he went into part- 
nership with George M. Huston, under the firm name of the Trembly-Hus- 
ton Electric Company. Mr. Huston, who is a son of William P. Huston, 
and a young man of twenty-nine years, takes able charge of the mechanical 
end of the business, being well fitted therefore by the experience which he 
gained during the ten years he was connected with the Centerville Electric 
I.iilht v.\: Power Com[iany. He is popular and well known in Apjianoose 
county, where he has man\- friends who esteem him for his high qualities 
of mind and character. Their establishment is located on the north side 
of the .square, where they carry a carefully selected stock of electrical sup- 
jilies and they also take contracts for wiring and the installing of all kinds 
of electrical apparatus. .Although he is not yet twenty-two years of age, 
Mr. Trembly has won a name and jKisition tor himself in local business 
circles, where all who know him prophesy for him a promising future in 
his cho.sen held of activity. He is a young man ot marked foresight and 
sagacity in matters of business, thoroughly honorable and reliable in 
his transactions and applies himself to his work with the imremitting 
diligence which invariably wins success in any undertaking. 



Vol n— IT 



302 HISTORY OF Ai'i'AXUOSE COUXTV 

Mr. Trembly is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
fraternally he is affiliated with the Yeomen, while he accords his political 
support to the democratic party. He is well known in this vicinity where 
he has many stanch friends, the majorit}' of whom have known him since 
boyhood and have watched witli interest the development of his career. 



CiORDON PEACOCK. 



Ihrough successive stages of progress Gordon Peacock has made con- 
tinuous advancement in the business world until he now occupies the posi- 
tion of superintendent ot the Centervillc Water Company. His history 
indicates clearly what may be accomplished when determination and energ)' 
are strong characteristics of the individual. A native of Illinois, Mr. Pea- 
cock was born in Morgan county, November 14, 1870, and is a son of 
Gordon and Margaret (Bennie) Peacock, natives of Scotland. The father 
was a miner in that country and came to America at an early age, locating 
finally in Missouri, where he bought a farm, which he improved and 
operated until 1885. In that year he retired from active life and moved 
to Centerville, where he is now living, enjoying the respect and confidence 
ot a wide circle of friends. He is one ot the honored veterans of the Civil 
war, having served one }ear during the conflict as a member of Com- 
pany K, One Hundred and Thirty-third Illinois \'o]unter Intantr}'. His 
wife passed away in igoo. 

In the acquirement of an education Gordon Peacock attended public 
school in Illinois and Missouri, bur his advantages along this line were 
limited. At the age ot fourteen he laid aside his books and for tour years 
worked in the coal mines in Illinois and Iowa, finally abandoning this oc- 
cupation in favor of railroading. His first position in the new field was as 
torcnian of the Culvert gang, in the employ of the Rock Island >ystem, 
and he did able work in this capacity tor tour years. At the end of that 
time he came to Centerville and worked in the mines in the vicinity of the 
town until 1905, when he secured a position with the Centerville Water 
Company. Advancement came rapidly. In 1908 he was made assistant 
su[)rintendcnr and in ujio, superintentlenr. holding that position at the 
present time. He has been active in the management and control of the 
departments under his charge and has pro\ed a courteous, obliging and 
capable official, whose personal popularity constitutes one of the elements 
in the prosperity ot the corporation which he serves. 



HISTORY OF Al'l'AXOOSK COL'X 1 '^• 303 

On rh( nth ot October, 1893, Mr. Peacock marrird Miss Katlicrine 
O'Leary, a daughter of John and Mahala OLeary, the fornur a native of 
Irehxnd and the latter of Missouri. At an early age the father emigrated 
ro America and served in both the Mexican and the Civil wars. He fol- 
lowed the stone mason's trade in various parts of the country, passing 
away in Texas in 1899. He had long survived his wife, who died in 
1885. Mrs. Peacock is a native of Woodbury counf\. Iowa, liorn in 1S72. 
She and her husband became the parents of three children: John William, 
who was born .lanuary 10, 1895, and who died in Ma}-, 1905; Marie, aged 
fifteen; and Agnes, thirteen years of age. Mrs. Peacock and her two 
daughters are devout members of the Roman Catholic church. FnUernalh 
Mr. Peacock is a member of the Foresters of America and for the last 
twelve years has been treasurer of that organization. He belongs also to 
the Iowa Legion of Honor. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party and for two }ears he served on the town council, showing in his 
public work the same detemiination and integrity which have marked the 
various phases of his business career. 



W. S. BAILED . 



\\ . S. liaiky carries on general farming on section 13, I'nion town- 
ship, and the excellent appearance of his place indicates his careful super- 
vision and practical methods. He was born in Marion townsiiij). Davis 
county, Iowa, a half mile from his present home, February 6, 1861, and 
he is now the owner of a part of the old homestead farm, upon which his 
birth occurred. His parents were Sylvester antl Ku[)liain ( Taitej Baile}, 
both deceased. The father was born near Columbus, Ohio, in 1821. and 
died in September, 1886, when in the sixty-sixth year of his age. His wife, 
who was born in Kentucky, was brought to Iowa by her parents during 
her childhood and died in 1876. S}lvester Bailey arrived in this ^tafe in 
184^ and entered from the government a tract of land upon which his son, 
W. S. Bailey, was born. He convtrrcd the uiKl huul into rich and pro- 
ductive tields and continued to remain u[)on that tarm. comprising one 
luindred and seventy-tour acres, throughout the rest of his life, being well 
known as one of the energetic and progressive agriculturists of his com- 
numity. Into him and his wife were born .seven children. W . S. : Smith, 
who died in infancy; Mrs. Amanila Mclntyre, decea.scd; Letitia, the wife 
of Louis Swaim, ot Marion township, Davis county; Mrs. Annie Kenvon, 
who has |)assed away; Amos, a resident of this coimty; and Orange, who 
died in childhood. 



304 HISTORY' OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

VV. S. Bailey has spent his entire life in this part of the state and has 
alwa3'S engaged in farming. He owns tour hundred and fifty acres in 
one body, embracing a part of the old homestead. His residence is sit- 
uated on section 13, I'nion township. Appanoose county, and much of his 
property lies within that township but fifty acres is across the boundary 
line in Davis county. He carries on general agricultural pursuits and 
stock-raising and in connection with his sons is engaged extensively and 
successful 1\ in the breeding of Hereford cattle. He also raises other 
kinds of good stock and that branch of his business is proving a profitable 
source of income. His business metliods are such as will bear close investi- 
gation and scrutiny, for he is reliable as well as enterprising and at all 
times is actuated by a spirit of progress and improvement. 

In 1885 Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Eva Roland, who 
was born in Warsaw, Missouri. May 26, 1868, but has spent the greater 
part of her life in this county. Her parents, William and Perlina Roland, 
are both deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Bailey have been born eleven chil- 
dren: Eli, living in Chariton, Iowa: Harrison: Jack: Ada; Tillie; Clara; 
W. S., Jr.; Carrie; Emery; Alice Mildred, who died in infancy; and Hal- 
bert. 

In politics Mr. Bailey has been a lifelong republican and has .served 
as township trustee, as clerk of the election board and as a member of 
the school board. He has a wide acquaintance and many friends in this 
county and is well known as a representative citizen and farmer. His 
carefully managed business interests have won him substantial sviccess and 
indicate what may be accomplished when determination and energ\- lead 
the wav. 



JOHN M. HICKS. 



Among the citizens of Appanoose count) who have attained an hon- 
ored place in the community through their acknowledged ability and [)er- 
sonal worth and whose business activities have been important enough to 
affect the general development of the city is John M. Hicks, one ot the 
most extensive stock buyers and shippers in this part of Iowa. His birth 
occurred in Hancock count). Tennessee, on the )6th of March. 1851, his 
parents being Gabe and .Sarah (Seals) Hicks, both natives of that state.. 
The paternal grandfather was of German-English lineage, and the grand- 
mother Scotch-Irish, and both came to this country at an early day. The 
marriage of the parents occurred in Tennessee and in the spring ot 18^7 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTV 305 

they came west, locating in Appanoose county, low a, w lu-re the father pur- 
chased two hundred acres of well-improved farm land near Unionville. 
He carried on general agriculture for some time but finalh- concentrated 
his attention upon raising stock, which he shipped to the eastern markets. 
He remained upon the tarm until his death, which occurred in 1870, after 
which his wife removed to Unionville, where she passed away. In their 
family were tour children: .Andy and Larkin, who have passed away; R. 
M., a resident of Centerville; and John M., of this review. 

John M. Hicks was a small child when he was brought to Appanoose 
county by his parents. When he had attained the usual age he entered 
the district school and there accjuircii hi> cducarion. aiding liis tathcr with 
the work of the tarm when not engaged with his hooks, .\fter the death 
of Gabe Hicks, the subject ot this review came to I'nionville with his 
mother and here worked with a section gang until 1876, when he formed a 
partnershi}) with J. B. Morrison with whom he engaged in the hoop- 
manufacturing business for some time. In 1887 h^* left Iowa and removed 
to Perkins county. Nebraska, where he purchased land and engaged in 
farming. However, he returned in the fall of 1890 and bought three 
hundred and twenty acres of land in Udell township, upon which he 
engaged extensively in raising high-grade stock. In 1895 ^'^ house was 
torn to pieces by a severe cyclone and one year later he sold the farm to W. 
C. Miller and moved into ITnionville, his present home. However, he 
still continues active in stock dealing, upon which he has concentrated his 
attention for a number of years, shipping to the Chicago market. .All of 
his business affairs are judiciously carried forward, showing discriminat- 
ing business judgment and a marked spirit of enterprise, and prosperity has 
come as a natural result of his ability which commanded it. 

On the 22d of February, 1876. Mr. Hicks was united in marriage to 
Miss Laura .1. Miller, a daughter of Claudius and Martha J. ( Baldridge) 
Miller, the father born in Hickman county, Tennessee, December i, 1824. 
The paternal grandparents ot Mrs. Hicks were Nathaniel and Sarah ( Mar- 
tin ) -Miller, natives of North Carolina. On the maternal side the grand- 
parents were Andrew and Margaret Baldridge, early settlers in Tennessee, 
where the father followed the trailc of inillwrighr until his death. Mrs. 
Hicks' father. Claudius Miller, attended a subscri|>tion school in Hick- 
man county, Tennessee, and his education was e.\tremely limited and has 
been largely acquired throvigh reading and observation in later years. He 
married in Tennessee in April, 184^, and three years later came to Iowa, 
locating in .Appanoose county as a pioneer and taking up government land 
in Union township. On .August 22, 1862. he enlisted in Company C, 
Thirtv-si.xth Iowa \'olunteer Infantrv. troin" to the front as second .sertreanf. 



306 I1ISTUR\' Ol' APl'AXOOSl': CUUXTY 

He won promotion to the position of first sergeant on the 7th of March, 
1863, and on the 3d of February, 1865, was made first lieutenant, with 
which rank he was mustered out on the 24th ot August, 1865, at Devall 
Bluff, Arkansas. He returned home and for a time engaged in the general 
merchandise business in Unionville, conducting a profitable enterprise for 
a number of years and finally selling it in order to go to Nebraska, where 
he took up farming. In 1893 ^^ returned to Unionville and opened a 
general store which he conducted successfully until igo6, when he retired 
from active life. His first wife passed away in Appanoose county in 1875. 
To their union were born nine children: Benjamin G., whose birth 
occurred in 1848 and who died in Iowa about 1906; Joseph, who was born 
in Appanoose count), October 27, 1850, and who is engaged in farming 
in Kidder, Missouri ; John, who was born in A[ipanoose count}', Septem- 
ber 3, 1853, ^^'^ ^^''^^* ^i^<i August 16, 18^4; Laura J., the wife of the 
subject of this review, born May 27, 18^9; Amanda, who was born April 
9, 1857, and who is the wife of John E. Miller, a carpenter in Unionville; 
Sarah, who was born September 20, 1859, and who is the wife of George 
Stutevoss, a stock-raiser, of Elsie, Nebraska, who died October 14, 1895; 
Snow, who was born July 19, 1861, and died in infancy; W. C, who was 
bom August 20, 1862, and who is engaged in farming in Udell township; 
and Rosa, who was born June ig, 1866, and who is the wife ot Wyke 
Large, of Sapulpa, Oklahoma. After the death of his first wife Mr. Miller 
married Miss Dorcas E. Jennings, a daughter of Percy and Lydia (Casey) 
Jennings, the former a carpenter of Greene county, Pennsylvania, where 
both parents passed away. Mrs. Miller came to Iowa previous to her mar- 
riage and taught for some time in the schools of LTnionville and Moulton. 
She died in 1899, leaving two children: Mabel, who was born January 
2. 1882, and who is the wife of Frederick Koehler, a dairyman of Ratoon, 
Mexico; and Agnes, who was born September 18, 1883, and who is resid- 
ing at home. Mr. Miller is one of the well-known and prominent citizens 
of Unionville. For man} years he has taken an active part in local repub- 
lican politics and has served as county supervisor and as state representa- 
tive. He is a member of the blue lodge of Masons, and his religious views 
are in accord with the doctrines ot the Methodist Episcopal church, which 
direct and influence the activities of his every-day life. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hicks has been born a son, Claudius R., whose natal da}' was December 
9. 1878, and who is at present acting as train dispatcher at Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. He married Miss Annette Hawn, of ^'inton. and the}' have two 
children, Mildred Maurice and Laura Jeannette. 

Mr. Hicks is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to 
wliiili his wife also l-)elongs. He is conncircil with the liluc lodge of 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 307 

Masons and stands hi^h both in business and social circles, tor he is a 
man who commands the confidence and high regard of all with wlioni he 
is brought into contact. His political support is given to the democratic 
j)artv and as a public-spirited citizen he takes a commendable interest in 
the welfare and growth ot the comnuinity. although this never takes the 
torm ot office seeking. 



II.VKLKY C. MlANKLI.Y. 

Harley C Mc.\nrll\ whose home farm is an excellent tract of land of 
three hundred and tift) acres in Franklin township, is engaged in the teeding 
and -hipping of stock in connection with the cultivation ot the soil and is 
well known as one of the practical and progressive agriculturists of his 
community. There is a valuable deposit of coal upon a portion ot his 
farm and of late years he has been giving more and more attention to the 
development of the vein, having met with a gratifying degree of success 
in hi- mining operations. 

Mr. .McAnelly is a native of Iowa, born in Wayne county, June 23, 
1M7 V He was reared upon liis father's farm and received his primar\ edu- 
cation in the district .schools. However, he is largely .self-educated, hav- 
ing gained the greater part of his knowledge through reading, experience 
and observation since attaining mature years. Mr. McAnelly began his 
indepencient career by purchasing eighty acres ot lain! in .\ppanoose county, 
which he developed for three years, after which he rented out the place 
and went to the state of Washington, where he purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres and engaged in general tarming tor two years. When he 
sold his Washington property he returned to Iowa and settled on a tariu 
in Franklin township, this county. From time t,) rime lie addiii to his 
original tract and finally acquired three hinulred and titty acres, u[)on 
which he made substantial improvements, remodeling the residence ami 
building a good barn and outbuildings and making it in all respects a valu- 
able and desirable projjcrty. Mr. McAnelly is likewise extensively inter- 
ested in stock-raising and has met with much success with his standarci-bred 
horses and his graded cattle and hogs. Of late years he has given special 
attention to the development of the rich coal deposits which underlie a 
large jwrtion of his property and in lyia he sunk a •-liatt and o|)rn(il up 
a coal mine, which has already reached a dei)th of one hundr< d and sixty 
feet. The vein is rich, varying in thickness from two to three teet. and it 
adds ver\- materially to the value ot the property. 



308 HISTORY Ol' Ai'l'ANOOSE COUNTY 

Mr. McAnelly married, in Wayne county, Iowa, March 23, 1899, Miss 
Hartie Fortney, a native of Adair county, Missouri. .She received her 
])rimary education in the district .schools of that section and was later grad- 
uated from the Kirksville Normal School. Mr. and Mrs. McAnelly have 
adoptetl a son, Lawrence. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, attending Simpson chapel. Mr. McAnelly is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and in both fraternal and social relations 
has won and merited high regard, while in his business life he has met with 
well-deserved prosperity. 



SETH JOHNSON. 



Seth Johnson is a retired farmer living at Moravia. He has passed the 
seventy-fifth milestone on life's journey and his has been an active and 
useful life, largely devoted to general agricultural pursuits, but since igoo 
he has engaged in no business although he is still the owner of a valuable 
farming property in Franklin township, Monroe county. He was born in 
West Columbia, Mason county, West Virginia, December 27, 1837, his 
parents being James and Margaret (Van Meter) Johnson. The father 
was a native of Pennsylvania vho was married in West \'irginia, which 
was probably the native state ot his wife. In 1852 he came with his fam- 
ily to Iowa, settling five miles northwest of Moravia in Monroe county. 
The district was then a frontier region, the work of civilization and devel- 
opment having scarcely been begun in that locality. He had visited the 
state in 1848, at which time he entered land from the government, and in 
1850 he returned and built a house upon this claim, bringing his family to 
the new home in April, 1852. He traveled by way of the water route to 
Alexandria, Missouri, and thence drove across the country to his farm. 
He and his wife remained upon the old homestead there until called to 
their final rest. Mr. Johnson gave his early political allegiance to the whig 
party and following its dissolution joined the ranks of the new republican 
party. He and his wife held membership in the United Brethren church 
and their well spent lives gaineti tor them the warm regard of all who 
knew them. In their family were nine children, all born in West \'irginia. 
One of the number died in infancy while the other eight accompanied their 
parents to Iowa. There were six .sons and the surviving members ot the 
family are Seth and his brother, W'illiam H. Johnson, of Moravia, while 
a sister, Mrs. Jane Funkhouser, of \'alley, Nebraska, has recenth passed 
away. 




MK, AM) Mi;S. SKIII .liill\M)\ 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 311 

Seth Johnson has resided in this county since 1852, arriving here when 
a youth of fourteen years. The experiences of his early life were those 
which fall to the lot of the farm lad as he assists in the work of tilling the 
fields and caring for the crops. He shared in the hardships and privations 
of frontier life in Iowa and when he started out in business on his own ac- 
count it was to continue in farm work, to which he devoted his energies 
until 1900, when he removed to Moravia. He was an active, energetic 
farmer, working persistently and diligently as the years went by in his 
efforts to develop and improve his fields and gather therefrom good har- 
vests. While he left the farm in 1900 to take up his abode in Moravia, he 
is still the owner of three hundred and eighty acres situated five miles 
northwest of the city in Franklin township, Monroe count) . This place 
includes one hundred and twenty acres, which was formerly owned by his 
father. 

On Christmas day, 1862. Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Rebecca 
Catharine Clodfelter, who was born in Indiana, September 17, 1838, and 
came to Iowa with her parents in 1844. She was a daughter of William 
and Malinda (Miller) Clodfelter. who drove across the country from In- 
diana and settled north of Albia. Iowa was still under territorial form of 
government then and there were vast unsettled tracts of land while bands 
of Indians roamed in different sections of the state. Mr. and Mrs. John- 
son traveled life's journey happily together for almost forty-six years, be- 
ing separated by the death of the wife on the 27th of August, 1908. Mr. 
Johnson votes with the republican parr\ whirl) h( has long supported but 
has never sought nor desired office. His religious faith is that of the United 
Brethren church. He is one of the esteemed, honored citizens of Appa- 
noose county, having a wide acquaintance in this part of the state, while 
his good qualities have gained for him the confidence and friendship of 
those with whom he has become acquainted. 



NICHOLAS \N . WILSON. 

Among the men who have contributed to the business, agricultural and 
political development of Centerville and the surrounding country. Nich- 
olas W. Wilson holds a high place. He owns eighty acres of land just 
outside the corporate limits of the village and is there carrying on a mod- 
ern and carefully managed agricultural enterprise, being ranked amonj: 
the progressive and successful farmers of this locality. In addition he is 
doing able service on the board of town.shij) trustees, his official activity 



312 HISTORY Ol" APPANOOSE COUNTY 

directly intluencing the public weltare. in all ot his business interests 
he displays keen discernment, energ\- and ambition and has, therefore, 
advanced step by step to prosperity. He was born in Monroe county, 
Indiana, October 29, 1858, and is a son ot Christopher and Cynthia Jane 
(Wilson) Wilson, natives of Kentucky, of Scotch lineage. The father 
was a well educated and broadly cultured man, whose keen intelligence 
enabled him to recognize opportunities and whose executive force enabled 
him to take advantage of them. He was successively a lawyer, merchant 
and farmer in Indiana, where he removed as a young man. For some time 
he taught in the public schools and in this way gained sufficient money 
to defray his expenses in attending State University. After he left 
Indiana he went to Iowa, settling there before the state was admitted into 
the Union. However, he did not remain long, returning to Indiana after 
a short time. At the outbreak of the Civil war he offered his services to 
the federal government, enlisting at Indianapolis and serving for three 
months. After his discharge he went to Missouri and there again enlisted 
and this time continued at the front almost until the close of the war, 
receiving his discharge on account of disability. Atter he was mustered 
out he located in Lewis county, Missouri, and opened a hotel at Monti- 
cello. He conducted this enterprise successfully for some time but aban- 
doned it later in favor of farming. In 1876 he moved to Chariton, Iowa, 
and there lived a retired life, passing away in 1874. His wife died in 
the same rear. During the period of their residence in this state their 
line qualities of mind and character gained them man}- warm friends and 
they were ranked with the leading and representative citizens of the com- 
munity. 

Nicholas W. W^ilson was still a child when his father settled in Lewis 
county, Missouri, and his education was acquired in the public schools 
of that section. During his childhood he aided in the operation of his 
father's farm and continued at this work until he attained his majorit}-. 
His training at farm labor was comprehensive, bringing him into close 
touch with all branches of agricultural work, so that his practical under- 
standing enables him today to direct wisely the details of his farm opera- 
tions. When he was twenty-one years of age Mr. Wilson bought land in 
Lucas county, Iowa, and afterward removed to Knox county, Missouri, 
where he followed farming. In 1902 he came to .Appanoose covmt>- and 
located at Udell, where he engaged in the general mercantile business, 
conducting in addition a hardware and furniture store at Kellogg. .-After 
two years he disposed of both enterprises and bought one humlred and 
twentv acres east of Udell, giving his entire attention to general farming. 



niSTORV OF AI'I'ANOOSE COUNTY 313 

In 1908 he sold the property and purchased eighty acres in close proximity 
to the village limits of Centerville and he has since remained upon this 
farm, his labors being attended with substantial success. Mr. Wilson has 
built a tine modern home upon his property and has made other impor- 
tant improvements in building and equipment. By close application and 
good management he has steadily progressed and is today one of the sub- 
stantial and representative citizens of this part of the state. 

Mr. Wilson has been twice married. On the 14th of February, 1SS2, 
he wedded Miss Nettie Scovel, who passed away in 1897. To this union 
were born six children: Pearl E., who passed awa\- at the age of one year 
and two months; Edith M., formerly a teacher in Appanoo.se county, who 
is now attending Dcs Moines College; Amy L., the wife of E. M. Bishop, 
a farmer of \'ermillion township, by whom she has two children, Mar- 
jorie and ^'ivian; Xerric Olive, who married Ralph Atkinson, a farmer of 
Udell, by whom she has two children, Ivan and Orene; Delia/on M., who 
is aiding in the operation of the home farm; and Adelia J., the wife of 
Ernest Paul C'aylor, a farmer of Udell township. Mr. Wilson was mar- 
ried for the second time in i8q8, in which year he wedded Miss .Anna 
Williams, a daughter of Parkcrson and Sarah Jane (Essex) \\'illiams. 
the former a native of Indiana, of Welsh ancestry. He was a veteran of 
the Civil war and afterward one of the prominent farmers of this part 
of Iowa. He died in Chariton in iyi2. Mr. and Mrs. \\'ilson hatl three 
children: Sterling Harold, who was born April 4, 1900, and who now 
attends the Wright school in \Vrmillion town.ship; Sarah Ruth, who 
passed awa}' at the age of two months; and Kenneth, born February 4, 
1907, who also attends the Wright school. The family are devout mem- 
bers of the First Baptist church, which all of the children joined before 
the\ were ten years of age, some of them having been converted at the 
family altar. Mr. \\'iIson has always taken an active part in church 
work, has guidetl his life by its principles and for a long period has srrveil 
as" deacon. His wife is a member of the Foreign and the Ladies Home 
Missionary Societies. Mr. Wilson's political allegiance is given to the 
republican part\ and on several occasions he has been called upon to serve 
in local offices. He was assessor in Lucas count), Iowa, for two terms 
and also clerk of his township. In Chariton, Iowa, he served as street 
conunissioner and, in the fail of 1912. was elected to the board of town- 
ship trustees of \'ermillion township. He has ever manifested a deep ami 
heljiful interest in those projects which are of vital significance to the 
welfare of the community and his cooperation in them has been beneficial 
ami far reaching. Mr. WiKon belongs to the Indcpemlenr Onii-r of (VKl 



314 HISTORY OF AJ'J'AXUOSE COUNTY 

Fellows in Udell and is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
in CVnterville. His course has at all times conformed to the highest prin- 
ciples and most honorable methods, and his business integrity as well as 
his prosperity forms a fitting crown of a well spent life. 



ROLL W. SMITH. 



Roil \V. Smith, admitted to the bar in 1900, has since 1906 engaged 
m the practice of law and from 1908 rilled the office of county attor- 
ney, his term expiring on the 1st of January, 1913. He was born in 
Wayne county, Iowa, in April, 1874, a son of Thomas M. and Amanda 
M. (Joiner) Smith, who were natives of Illinois and Indiana, respectively. 
The father became a resident of Wajne county, Iowa, at an early period 
m Its development and engaged in farming, purchasing and improving 
a tract of land which he cultivated for many years, bringing the fields 
to a high state of development. He finally left the farm, however, and 
took up his abode in Centerville, where he engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness and, extending his etforts, he conducted a yard not only in Centerville 
but also in Mystic. His activities in this direction reached large propor- 
tions and he continued in the business until his death, which occurred 
September 4, 1901. His wife, surviving him for about eight years, died 
November 1, 1909. 

Roll W. Smith was reared and educated in Centerville and after com- 
pleting his preliminary education in the public schools, accepted a posi- 
tion as court reporter. He followed that pursuit for twelve years and 
while thus engaged his interest was awakened in the practice of law and 
he began studying with the purpose of one day following the profession. 
His reading was pursued under the direction of Judge I->e and he was 
admitted to the bar in 1900. In 1906 he entered actively upon the prac- 
tice of law in Centerville and the experience which he had alreadv had 
in the work of the courts enabled him to so conduct the litigated inter- 
ests entrusted to his care that he was not long in building up a good 
practice. In 1908 he was elected county attorney for a four years' term 
and in the office has made an excellent record, carefully safeguarding the 
leeal interests of this county. In 1906 he formed a partnership with 
J. M. Wilson, who has recently been elected state senator, and the law 
firm of Wilson & Smith has since occupied a prominent place in the legal 
circles of Appanoose county. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COU'XTY 315 

In September, 1895, Mr. Smith was niarrii-d to Miss Nellie Bryan, 
a daughter ot D. \N'. and Elizabeth ( Hammock j Bryan. The father 
was a farmer by occupation and on coming to Appanoose count}' at an 
early day secured a tract ot land which he carefully cultivated and im- 
proved tor many years. At one time he tilled the office of county recorder. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born two children, Dorothy and 
Marjor}, who are fifteen and twelve }ears of age, respectivel)-. The par- 
ents are members of the Methodist church and .Mr. Smith belongs to the 
Masonic lodge and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In [)olitics 
he has ever been a republican but the only offices he has held have been 
in the line of his profession. In his cho.sen calling his progress has been 
continuous and enviable and it is well known to the public and his col- 
leagues that he prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care, so 
that his presentation in the court is clear and forcible. Court and jury 
listen to him with attention and he seldom fails to win the verdict desired. 



HARRY S. (tREEXEEAE 



Harry S. Greenleaf, one of the promising young attorneys of A[ii)a- 
noose county, is practicing his profession in Centerville as junior mem- 
ber of the law firm of Porter & Greenleaf and is also serving for the second 
term as city solicitor. His birth occurred at Unionville, this county, on 
the 10th of July, 1881, his parents being Stejihen and Mary Lillian (Saw- 
yers) Greenleaf, who came of Scotch-Irish lineage. The father was born 
at Bloomtield, Iowa, on the 24th of June, i8>3, a son of Dr. Daniel C. 
and Amanda C. (Young) Greenleaf. Dr. Daniel C. Greenleaf, a native 
of Indiana, was a physician and surgeon by profession and served as such 
during the period of the Civil war. 

Stephen Greenleaf, the father of our subject, was graduated from the 
Kentucky Medical College of Louisville in 1876 and studied for a time at 
Mi)iinr Pleasant, Iowa. It was in Bloomtield, Iowa, rhar he began the 
practice of medicine and surgery, while subsec]uentl) he ojiened an olfice at 
.Ash Grove. At the time of his demise, which occurred in 1886. he was a 
resident physician of Milton, Iowa. It was on the 28th of September, 
1876, at I'nionville, Appanoo.se county, that he wedded Miss Mary Lillian 
Sawyers, a daughter of Dr. S. H. and Mary F. (Miller) Sawyers, both 
of whom were natives of Tennessee. She was a maiden of fourteen when 
her parents established their home in I'nionville. Her father was one 
of the pioneer physicians and surgeons of this county, practicing his pro- 



316 HISTORY OF AiT'AXOOSE COUXTV 

tession at Iconium and Milledgeville before he located in Unionville, 
where his death occurred in 1892. His widow lives in Centerville with 
her daughter, Mrs. George Barnett. 

Harry S. Greenleat completed the public-school course in Unionville 
in 1899 and then entered Parsons Academy at Fairfield, while subse- 
quently he continued his studies in Parsons College, being graduated from 
that institution in the spring of 1905 with the degree ot B. S. Having 
determined upon the practice of law as a life work, he tlun went to Iowa 
City, entered the College of Law of the State University of Iowa and 
won the degree of LL. B. in 1908. He then came to Centerville and one 
month after the date of his graduation entered the law office of the Hon. 
Claude R. Porter as junior member of the firm of Porter & Greenleat", in 
which connection he has since been engaged in general practice. At no 
time has his reading ever been confined to the limitation of the questions 
at issue. It has gone be} ond and compassed every contingency and pro- 
vided not alone for the expected but for the unexpected, which happens 
in the courts quite as frequent!}" as out of them. He is a member of the 
bar association of this count}- and enjoys an enviable reputation as an 
able representative of his profession. 

In politics Mr. Greenleaf is a republican. He was elected city solicitor 
of Centerville in 1909, and being reelected in 1911, is serving in that 
capacity. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Pres- 
byterian church, while fraternally he is identified with the Yeomen of 
Centerville. He resides with his mother in an attractive home at Xo. 416 
South Fifteenth street. 



JESSE M. BECK. 



Jesse M. Beck, senior partner of the firm of Beck & Needham, has not 
only been active and successful in developing and promoting the interests 
of the lowegian Printing Company, publishers ot one ot the leading papers 
of the southern part of the state, but has also proven a valued cooperant 
factor in the conduct of other interests and business enterprises that con- 
stitute important features in the upbuilding and prosperit}- of the state. 
He was born on a farm in Keokuk county, near the Mahaska and Wapello 
county lines, November 8, 1873. His father, George \^'. Beck, born in. 
Hocking county, Ohio, December 13, 1842, was a son of David Beck, a 
native of Wurtemberg, Germany, whence he came to America in 183;. 
Sixteen years later or in 18^1 David Beck removed witli his faniil} to 



HISTORY Ol- Al'l'AxVOOSE COUXTV 317 

Mahaska county, Iowa, and sincr that time George W. Beck has been a 
resident of Mahaska, Keokuk or Wapello counties. About 1875 the latter 
removed to a farm in Wapello county, eight miles north of Ottumwa, and 
as his financial resources increased he extended tin- boundaries of his place 
from time to time until it now comprises four hundred acres. He con- 
tinuously cultivated the place until he retired from active business life, 
establishing his home in Fremont, Mahaska county, where he now resides. 
In early manhood he wedded Lottie McFail, a daii^'hter of Gideon B. and 
Mary (Xewsome) McFall, who came to Iowa from Indiana in 1846. 
Mrs. Beck was born in Mahaska county, near Fremont. April 2^. 1849. 

In the district schools Jesse M. Beck bepm lii^ ctlucation and supple- 
mented his early studies by preparatory college work in Ptnn College at 
Oskaloosa, Iowa, and b) a collegiate course in the Iowa W'esieyan College 
at Mount Pleasant, trom which he was graduated in l8yy with the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. Throughout this entire period from 1875 he had 
lived on the old homestead farm with his parents and for one year ere 
com[)Iering his college course he engaged in teaching. Following his 
graduation he left the farm and did reportorial work on the Ottumwa 
Courier for a short time in 1900, and later on the Muscatine Journal, of 
which he became managing editor in 1901 ;ind so continucti until March. 
1903. At that date he was joincii by John R. Needham, of Sigourney. in 
the purchase ot the CentervilJe lowegian. of which Mr. Beck became and 
has since remained editor. Ihe tirm has [)rospered in the conduct ot the 
business ot the lowegian Printing Company. The circulation of the paper 
has grown to thirt\ -eight hundrcil and riie departments of the business have 
increased very materialh. Moreover, the firm has given financial support 
to various Centerville enterprises, being liberal sub.scribers to the Mystic 
Interurban railroad, becoming stockholders in the Centerville Savings Bank 
on its organization and also of the Gypsum Company \\ Inch is now develop- 
ing an important industr}'. Furthermore, they ha\c become owners of a 
choice business lot on which they are contemplatinu' the erection of a new 
building soon, aild they also own a tarm ot (uic hutnlred and sixt}' acres in 
Walnut and Chariton townships. 

On the 11th of September, 1901. in Sigourney. Iowa. Mr. Beck was 
united in marriage to Miss F.dna Paviline Xeedham. a daughter of .Mr. and 
Mrs. William H. Xeedham. Her tather was formerly connected with the 
publication ot the Oskaloosa Herald and later was owner and editor of the 
Sigourney News. He Iikewi.se served as postmaster of Sigourne} for 
.some time and during the Civil war was a member of the Twenty-seconil 
Iowa Cavalry Regiment in which he became a lieutenant. Mrs. Beck 
pos.sesses natural musical talent- which have b<cn iu!fi\atetl b\ studv. 



318 ?iisTf)RV OF .\pr.\xonsE rnuxTv 

being a graduate of rhc Iowa Wesleyan Conservatory at Mount Pleasant, 
of the class of 1899. She takes an active interest in club work, beinj^ 
a member of the P. E. O. Society, the VVednesda}- Club and the M. X. L. 
Society. Mi', and Mrs. Beck have two sons, Haroki Xeedha'm and Paul 
Ralph, aged respectively eight and five jears. 

The parents are members of the Methodist church, active and help- 
ful in its work, Mr. Beck serving as superintendent of the Sunday school 
and as chairman of the board of stewards. He was a delegate from the 
Iowa conference in 1912 to the general conference of the church in Min- 
neapolis which meets once in four years to legislate for the church and 
elect its bishops and leading officials. His fraternal relations are with 
the Masons and his political support is given to the republican party. 
He is a believer in its principles, in its past record, in its {^resent ability 
to meet the problems of the day and in its future possibilities for pro- 
moting good government. He stands as a stanch and helpful advocate 
of various projects and measures which have contributed to the welfare 
and upbuilding of Centerville. He was a director of the Commercial 
Club and later of the Booster committee. He was secretary of the Chau- 
tauqua during its entire existence of six years, was a member ot the school 
board for three years and is president of the Drake Free Public Librar}- 
board. A spirit of progress actuates him in all that he does and while work- 
ing toward high ideals he utilizes practical methods in their attainment. 



MILES BATEMAN. 



Miles Bateman is a prominent and well known representative of man- 
ufacturing interests in Centerville, his success having come to him as 
the direct and logical result of unfaltering enterprise and industry guided 
by sound judgment. He was born in England in November, 1855, his 
parents being Thomas and Elizabeth (Askew) Bateman! who were also 
natives of the same country. The father was a farmer and always fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits in England. He represented one of the old 
families of his county, his ancestors having occupied one house upon the 
old homestead farm for three hundred years. There Thomas Bateman 
passed awav in 1870, having for five years survived his wife, whose death 
occurred in 186 J. 

Miles Bateman remained a resident of England until fifteen years of 
age and during that period pursued a public-school education. He then 
crossed the Atlantic to the new worUl and, settling in Omaha, where he 




.Mll.KS l'..\ TKMAN 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 321 

had relatives, learned the moulder's trade. Desirous for a better educa- 
tion that should further quality him for the responsibilities and duties 
of life he attended ni^ht school during that period. He remained in 
Omaha for rive years, after which he returned to England, where lie con- 
tinued to live for three years. Once more, however, he came to the new 
world, this time settling in Moline, Illinois, where he entered the employ 
of the John Deere Plow Company, working at his trade in their factory 
for a \ear. He was afterward employed in various places until 188^, 
when he came to Centerville and secureti a position as foreman in the 
Kirchman foundry. He served in that capacity for six years, after which 
he engaged in business on his own account in connection with B. A. Fuller, 
conducting a foundry and machine shop. This was successfully carried 
on for four }cars, at the end of which time Mr. Bateman disposed of his 
interest to his partner. He then went to Lone Tree, Iowa, where he organ- 
ized a business that is now conducted under the name of the Zimmerman 
Steel Company. He was in active connection therewith for three years 
and on selling out returned to Centerville, where he again became a part- 
ner of Mr. Fuller, organizing the Hercules Manufacturing Compan_\ for 
the manufacture of stump pullers. The business has since been incorpo- 
rated and they are now controlling the largest stump-pulling and land- 
clearing machinery plant in the world, their output being sent to all 
parts of the countr}. Mr. Fuller is president and treasurer of the com- 
pany with Mr. Bateman as vice president. The plant is splendidly 
equipped with the latest improved machinery needed in their work and 
the business is growing steadily year by year, Mr. Bateman's practical 
knowledge of mechanics as well as his business experience constituting 
an important factor in its success. In addition to his manufacturing 
interests Mr. Bateman is a stockholder in the Centerville Gypsum 
Company and is the owner of considerable valuable real estate here, 
including a fine home at No. 423 Bank street. 

In June, 1881. Mr. Bateman was married to Miss Florence Lindsa}-, 
a daughter of Mace and Elizabeth Lindsay, who were natives of Ohio. 
In 1868 the father came to this state, settling at Oskaloosa, where he 
worked at the blacksmith's trade, continumg to make his home in that 
city until his death in 1872. His widow is still residing there. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bateman have three children: George, twenty-nine years of age, who 
is a mouUler by trade emplo\ed by the Wcstinghouse Electric Comjian\' 
at Cleveland. Ohio; Harold, twenty-seven years of age. who is a locomo- 
tive engineer running west out of Rock Island, Illinois; and Walter. 
twenty-two years of age, a student in the State ITniversity at Iowa City. 

Mr. Bateman votes with the democratic party and keeps well informed 



322 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

on the issues and questions ot the day but does not seek not desire office. 
His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and he is always loyal 
to its teachings. He came to the new world practically empty-handed, 
his capital consisting mostly of courage and determination; but upon those 
qualities he has builded his success and although the way has at times 
seemed hard, he has gradualh advanced along the path of prosperity 
until he now occupies an enviable position. 



GEORGE GLADFELDER. 

By reason of a life of useful and worthy labor along progressive lines, 
influenced by high standards of integrit\ and honor, George Gladfelder 
has gained the unqualified respect and esteem of all with whom he has 
been associated. Moreover, he has another claim to a place in the public 
regard, for his name stands high on the long list of men who fifty years 
ago sacrificed their personal interests in order to serve their country during 
the dark days of the Civil war. Mr. Gladfelder is a native of Ohio, born 
in Noble county, July 25, 1836, and is a son of William and Mary (Cline) 
Gladfelder, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter ot \'ir- 
ginia. Their marriage occurred in Ohio, to which state both had removed 
in childhood. The father was a carpenter by trade and attained a fair 
degree of success in this occupation until 1853, when he left Ohio and 
came to Iowa, purchasing one hundred and sixty acres of land in Chariton 
township, Appanoose county, upon which he resided until his death in 
1881. His wife survived him for some time, passing away in 1888. 

George Gladfelder was reared at home and acquired his education in 
the public schools. As a youth he learned the carpenter's trade under his 
father's instruction and at the age of twenty began his independent career. 
He worked at carpentering until one year after the outbreak of the Civil 
war, enlisting on August 27, 1862, in Company C. Thirty-sixth Imva Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He served with courage and abilit) until the close of 
hostilities and received his honorable discharge at Duval 1 Bluff. .Arkansas, 
on the 24th of August, i86v He arrived at his home in Iowa on .Septem- 
ber 11, of the same year, and resumed carpentering and building work. 
in which he continued until 18S1. meeting with a gratifying degree of 
success. Mr. Gladfelder has a record of thirt)- years' activity in this occu- 
pation, his work being interrupted only by his period of military service. 
In 1872 he bought from the heirs their interest in the estate of his tather- 
in-Iaw's farm, upon which he has made his residence since that time, and 



lilSTURV Ul' Al'l'AXOOSE COUNTY 323 

has given his attention to its further development, nieetin<i with the suc- 
cess which always attends earnest and well-directed labor. 

In 1861 Mr. Gladtelder was united in marriage to Miss Tamsey J. 
Callen, a daughter of Edward Callen, who came to Appanoose county 
from Tennessee in 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Gladtelder became the parents 
of three children: George R., who has passed away; Brittle, the wife of 
C C. Phillips, ot .Appanoose county; and Harry C, who makes his home 
in Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Gladtelder are devout adherents ot 
the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Gladtelder is a mcnilier ot rlie 
board of trustees. He gives his allegiance to the republican party and 
for four years served as assessor, discharging his official duties in an able 
and conscientious manner. He is especially interested in educational 
affairs and has a record of twenr\-rhree years' continuous service as sec- 
retary of the school board. He keeps in touch with his comrades of fifty 
)ears ago through his membership in the Samuel Sumner Post, Xo. 398, 
G. A. R., of which he has served two terms as commander and is now in 
his tenth year as adjutant. Mr. Gladtelder has passed the seventy-sixth 
milestone on life's journey and can look b.uk upon man\' years of active, 
worthy and u.seful work. His fellow citizens esteem and resjiect him as 
a man whose labors have been a powerful force in develo[)menr and whose 
life has been made successful by reason of talent and ability, given to 
honorable cau.ses and never unworrhih used. 



CHARLES ALBERT HORNADAY. 

No history of .Apiianoose coimty would be complete w'ithout a review 
of the career of Charles Albert Hornada) , one ot the founders of the town 
of Udell and since its organization one of the greatest individual forces 
in its continued dcvclopniciir. ad\ amcnunr ami growth. He is in ;uidi- 
tion one of the prominent and iniportant farmers and stock-raisers in his 
rown>hi[), when- he owns one huntlred and sixty acres ot well improved 
land on section 18, and by his progressive method.s, his scientific work and 
his well-de.served .success has constituted himself a powerful factor in 
agricultural circles. .Appanoose county numbers liim among her native 
sons, for his birth occurred in Washington rownshi|), January 27, 186^ 
his [)arents being Elisha and Emily C. Hornaday, natives of Hendricks 
county, Indiana. But little is known of the earlier history of this family 
be\()nd the fact that the first rcpre.sentatives probably came from Inland. 
In addition to the members ot the taniil\ now living in .\ppanoo.se county 



324 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

there is anorlur branch at Fort Scott, Kansas, to which Grant C. Horna- 
day belongs, and another at Keokuk, Iowa, where Calvin Hornada)- re- 
sides. Another member of this family, William T. Hornaday, is manager 
of the National Zoological Park at New York City. 

Charles A. Hornaday acquired his early education in the public schools 
of Appanoose county and afterward attended Oskaloosa College in Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, for three years. He began his independent career by teach- 
ing school, in which occupation he engaged for seven terms, after which 
he took up his residence on his present farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 18, I 'dell township, and engaged in general agricultural 
pursuits and stock-raising. Both branches of his business prospered ex- 
tensively under his able management and in 1903 he added to his activities 
by becoming interested in the seed business, which now forms one of his 
most important interests. He is progressive, modern and practical in all 
that he does and in consequence his efforts have been rewarded by gratify- 
ing prosperity, his success placing him today among the men of marked 
ability and substantial worth in this part of the state. 

During the entire period of his active career Mr. Hornaday has been 
prominent in all movements which had for f:heir object the further develop- 
ment, improvement and upbuilding of this section and he has figured 
influentially in all progressive public enterprises. He was one of the 
founders of the thriving little town of Udell and was largely instrumental 
in inducing the Rock Island Railroad to build and maintain a station 
here. He represented the citizens of his district before the board of rail- 
road commissioners of the state at a hearing at Udell, January 31, 1894, 
appearing against Mr. Brayton, who represented the Rock Island Rail- 
road. Important testimony was introduced by other leading citizens, 
among whom were J. J. Wall, D. W. Bean. J. B. Stuckey, James Mc- 
Donald, John B. Powell and A. H. Stuckey, and after all the evidence 
had been heard the board decided that it was the duty of the Rock Island 
Railroad to provide reasonable shipping facilities to the section of Appa- 
noose county surrounding Udell and that a new town be founded, where 
the road should build a depot, provide an agent and install sidetracks and 
stock yards. From this beginning the flourishing community of Udell 
has grown and has advanced rapidly, taking high rank toda}- among other 
towns of similar size in point of extent of shipments of live stock, grain 
and seeds, especially timothy seed. 

On the 17th of March, 1889, Mr. Hornaday was united in marriage 
to Miss Irene D. Caylor, a daughter of William Caylor. of Udell town- 
ship. To this vmion were born three children: William Le Roy. whose 
birth occurred January 6, 1890; Charles A., born .\ugust 18, 1891; and 



HISTORY OF Al'PAXOOSE COUNTY 325 

Bonnie Lee, who was born February 12, 1893, and who on Marcli 17, 
1912, married Fay Cleo Staly, a son ot Chiy Staly, ot Dou<:his township. 
Mr. Hornada}'s first wife passed away on the 20th ot Februar)-, 1894, 
and on Sej)tember 9, 1896, he was again wedded. His second union was 
with Miss Nellie B. McConnell, a daughter ot V. P. McConnell, of Udell 
township. They became the parents ot tour children: Homer Preston, 
who.se birth occurred June 30, 1897; Finley Leedom, born May 29, 1900; 
Irnia Sadie, whose birth occurred January 5, 1903; and Olive \'ega. born 
Jul}- 1, 1907. 

Mr. Hornaday is a devout and active member ot the Christian church 
and has served as its trustee tor ten years. He has tor a long time taken 
an important part in Sunday school work and at ditTerent periods has 
taught classes and served tor three years as superintendent of the Bible 
school. He gives his allegiance to the democratic party and is active in 
local atfairs, having served as school treasurer continuously for over 
twenty years. He is always ready to do his part in advancing the inter- 
ests of the county along many lines of development and upbuilding and 
gives his hearty cooperation to movements tor the good of I'dcll and the 
surrounding district. He holds a high place among progressive and suc- 
cessful men, for his enterprise, indefatigable energ}' and business probity 
are the salient features in his career. 



ALEXANDKU MITCHELL. 

Scotland has sent many of her sons into various sections ot the world 
to become factors in the colonization and the later development and prog- 
ress of the districts with which they become identified. Among the sons 
of Scotland who have been residents of Appanoose count}' was Alexander 
Mitchell, now deceased. He was born in the land of hills and heather 
in 1855, his parents being Alexander and Mary Mitchell, also natives of 
Scotland. The father was a grocer in the old country, conducting a store 
there throughout his entire lite. Both he and his wite died in Scotland. 

Alexander Mitchell was reared and etiucated in that country and in 
early lite began mining coal. He wa> niarrieti to Miss Margaret McFee, 
a daughter ot Alexander McF^ee, a native of Scotland, in which country 
he spent his entire lite. .Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell began housekeeping in 
their native country and there remained until after the birth of five of 
their children, when in 1881 they came to the new world, settling first 
in Lucas county. Iowa, where the father engaged in coal mining. In 



326 HISTORY OI' APPANOOSE COUNTY 

1889 he rniiovcd to CVntcrvillc, where he resided until hi^ dcarh. He was 
connected with coal-mining interests thr()u},'h()\it the entire periotl ot his 
residence in the new world and atter coming to Appanoose county he also 
engaged in farming for some time. Industry and enterprise were num- 
bered among his salient characteristics and constituted the foundation 
upon which he huildetl his prosperit}'. 

Mr. antl Mrs. Mitchell became the parents ot nine children, namely: 
Alexander; Christina, deceased; James; Frank; Charles; .Andrew; Eli'/.a- 
beth; John; and William. Andrew Mitchell was born in Lucas county, 
Iowa, in 1884, and is now engaged in the butchering business at No. 
1012 South Eighteenth street in Centervillc. He has a well-equipped 
meat market and enjo}s a large and growing patronage. The family 
circle was broken by the hand of death when in igo2 Alexander Mitchell, 
St., passed away at the age of fifty-seven }ears. His widow survives and 
is fifty-seven years of age. She owns and occupies a fine home at No. 
1008 South Eighteenth street. Mr. Mitchell voted with the republican 
part)- but never sought the honors and emoluments of office as a reward 
for party fealty. However, he kept well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day and never neglected his duties of citizenship. Religiously 
he was identified with the sect known as Believers, of which Mrs. Mitchell 
is also a member. He possessed many of the sterling characteristics of 
the sons of Scotland, including that thrift which manifests itself in care- 
ful management, and wherever he went he won th*" friendly regard of all. 



ANDREW J. SHOl LTZ. 

Andrew J. Shoultz is one of the prosperous farmers and progressive 
business men of Franklin township, where he owns and operates a well 
improved and valuable farm of two hundred and twent}-five acres. The 
larger portion of this property has been in possession of members of the 
Shoult/ tamilx tor nunn years ami is known throughout .\ppanoose 
county as the Washington Shoultz homestead. He was born in Franklin 
township, November 1. i86v ;ind is a son of Marion Shoultz, a native ot 
Indiana, who came to Iowa with his fattier in 18^0. The grandfather 
of our subject accjuireil soldiers" warrants tor tour huntlreil and twenty 
acres of land in Franklin to\\n>hip antl broke the soil and developed a 
profitable ami productive farm, upon which M;irion Shoviltz grew to 
manhood. He became one of the substantial men of the locality and was 
greatly respected b\ ;ill who knew him. In 1864 he married Miss Mar- 



HISTORY OK Al'I'AXOOSE COUM N 327 

garct Pcastcr, a native ot Gcrnianx, and to them were born tour cliildren: 
Andrew J.; Jackson A., who died in infancy; Jacob; and Mary. 

Amlrcw J. Shoiiltz \\a> reared m the home ot his uneh- ami aunt, in 
Franklin rownshi{), and acquired his education in the district schools. His 
uncle died in 188 1 and he continued to live with his aunt until the latter 
also passed awa}'. His a<.i\anta^es alon^ educational lines were very lim- 
ited and although he is t()da\ a \\ell-int()rmc(.l man. most ot lus culture 
has come b}- wide readin<^ and close observation. When nor engaged with 
his books he aided in the operation of his aunt's farm and after her death 
inlierited the one hundred acres upon which he lives. He also tell heir 
to a forty-acre tract given him by his uncle and later he bought out his 
lister's and brother's share ot his father's farm and has now combined 
the holdings info one tract ot two hundretl ami twent\-h\-e acres. 
'Ilie buildings alreatl} upon the pr()[)erry lie repaired ami remoiieled. 
erected new ones, built a modern home and a tine stable and in manj 
other wa}s made substantial improvements. He has a number of acres 
planted in orchard and is in addition cxtensivelv interested in stock breed- 
ing, keeping fine thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle, good horses and hogs. 
His tarm is neat and attractive in a[)pearance and in all ot its details 
evidences the thorough care and supervision which Mr. Shoultz has 
bestowed upon it for man\ years. Of late years he has rented out a large 
portion of his farm and employs the leisure time thus obtained in looking 
after the repairs and improvements. 

Mr. Shoultz is a stanch democrat on all national issues but casts an 
mdependent ballot on local questions. He is a member of Seymour Lodge, 
No. 35?.. I. O. (). I'"., and has served in all the chairs ot that organiza- 
tion, being a past grand. He is recognized throughout Appanoose count}' 
as one of its representative agriculturists and progressive citizens, whose 
labors have proven beneficial and effective in the upbuilding and develop- 
ment of this section of the state. 



FOSTER C. MOlUxAN. 

Foster C. Morgan has for the past six \cars been successtully engaged 
in the drug business at C'enterville, being associated with Kverett O. Mo.ss 
in the conduct of the Continental Drug Compan\. His birth occurred in 
Decatur county, Iowa, on the iy\ of August, 188;, his |)arents being 
David and Nellie (Mullinix) Morgan, who are of Welsh antl Knglish 
descent respecti\'ely. The father was born in New ^'ork in 1S60. while 



328 HISTORY ol' AI'I'AXOOSE COLXTY 

the mother's birth occurrctl in Indiana in 1862. David Morgan came to 
Iowa with his parents when but a child, the family home being estab- 
lished on a farm in Decatur county. It was there that he wedded Miss 
Nellie MuUinix, who had been brought to Decatur county when but five 
years of age. He followed general agricultural pursuits in that county 
until 1888, then leased his farm and removed to Leon, Decatur county, 
where he embarked in the hardware business. Subse(]uentl}- he sold out 
and removed to Des Moines, Iowa, where he still resides, being employed 
as traveling salesman for the F. P. Light Hardware Company of that 
city. 

Foster C. Morgan completed the high-school course at Leon in 1903 
and two years later was graduated from Northwestern University with 
the degree of Ph. G. In 1906 he came to Centerville and, in partnership 
with Everett O. Moss, bought out the Continental Drug Company, which 
he has conducted to the present time with gratifying success, enjoying a 
liberal and well-merited patronage. 

In 191 1 Mr. Morgan was joined in wedlock to Miss Marion G. Phillips. 
Her father was a native of England, while the mother's birth occurred in 
Canton, Fulton county, Illinois, her maiden name being Eggleston. Mr. 
Phillips emigrated to the United States as a )'oung man and located in 
Fulton county, Illinois, where he was married and spent the remainder of 
his life, acting as editor of a newspaper at Canton. His widow gave her 
hand in marriage to John Walling, of Illinois, and they still reside at 
Canton, that state. 

In politics Mr. Morgan is a stand pat republican, loyally supporting 
the men and measures of that party. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Presbyterian church of Centerville, to which his 
wife also belongs. Fratemalh^ he is identified with the Masons and the 
Elks, acting as secretary of the Centerville lodge of the latter order. He 
is popular in both business and social circles of his community and has won 
a creditable measure of prosperity for one of his years. 



BERNAIU) A. FULLER. 



Bernard \. Fuller is a prominent and inriuenrial factor in industrial 
circles of Appanoose county as president and treasurer of the Hercules 
Manufacturing ComjKmy of Centerville, owning the largest stump-pulling 
and land-clearing machinery plant in the world. His birth occurred in 
Muscatine, Iowa, on the 28th of February, 1869, his parents being Ber- 




1!. A. l-l I.I.KI! 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 331 

nard and Kli/abeth ( Mushoff ) Fuller, who were born, reared and married 
in Germany. The father was a grocer by trade. In 1852 he crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States, locating in New Orleans, Louisiana, 
where he remained for eighteen months. Subsequently he spent two years 
in St. Louis, Missouri, and then took up his abode in Muscatine, Iowa, 
where he passed awaj- in 1894. His widow yet makes her home in that 
city. 

In the acquirement of an education Bernard A. Fuller attended the 
St. Mathias parochial school of Muscatine. After putting aside his text- 
books he served an apprenticeship at the iron moulder's trade in Mus- 
catine and later began work at the trade in Kansas City. He afterward 
worked in Chicago for a jear and then spent two ) ears in the foundry at 
the government arsenal at Rock Island. In 1893 he came to Centerville, 
Iowa, and embarked in the foundry business in partnership with Miles 
Bateman, whose interest he purchased at the end of eighteen months. 
Subsequently he combined his foundrj with the machine shop of the Smith 
Brothers and then organized the Centerville Foundry & Machine Corn- 
pan}', acting as president of the concern for three years. On the expira- 
tion of that period, in association with his former partner. Miles Bate- 
man, he organized the Hercules Manufacturing Compan}-, which is todav 
the largest stump-pulling and land-clearing machinery plant in the world. 
This concern, of which Mr. Fuller is the president and treasurer, was 
reorganized and reincorporated in 1912 and is now building a capacious 
new i)lant. Our subject has acted as manager of this important enter- 
|)rise since its organization and is well known as a prominent and lead- 
ing business man of the community. He is a stockholder in the Center- 
ville Gypsum Company and the Centerville Electric Railway Company. 

On the 20th of June, 1901, Mr. Fuller was united in marriege to Miss 
Cora M. Jackson, a daughter of L. H. and May (Ferjue) Jackson, who 
reside on a farm southeast of Centerville anil are well known throughout 
Appanoose count). Jackson Perjue, the maternal grandfather of Mrs. 
Fuller, was the first sheriff of Appanoose county. Mrs. Fuller was a 
teacher in the public schools of Centervillt! at the time of her marriage 
and had taught in the local schools for six years. She is the mother of 
three children, namely: Bernard, who wa^ horn on the ist of January, 
1904; P'dmund Lee, whose birth occurred on the 2^th of February, 1906; 
and Cicnevieve. whose natal day was October 31, 191 1. 

In politics .Mr. Fuller is a stanch democrat, having supported the men 
and measures of that party since age conferred upon him the right of 
frjinchise. He joined the Centerville Boosters Club at the time of its 
organization and has since remained one of its valued members, doing 



332 HISTORY OF APPA.VOOSF. COUXTY 

everything in his power to promote the growth and development of the 
town. Both he and his wife are devout communicants of St. Mary's 
Catholic Church at Centerville. Mr. Fuller deserves much credit for what 
he has accomplished. By sheer force of character, strong purpose and 
laudable ambition he has forged ahead and commands the respect which 
is ever accorded those whose success has been honorably won. 



CHARLES IRMN HARRISON. 

Charles Irvin Harrison is a well known business man ot Lnionville 
where he is operating a grist and sawmill, of which he is sole proprietor. 
He was born in Courtland county, New York, November 18, 1855, and 
is a son of David and Julia E. (Peck) Harrison, both of whom were 
natives of Courtland county. New York, the latter of Scotch-Irish and 
German lineage. The father was a farmer by occupation and in early life 
removed to Illinois where he remained for five or six years, after which 
he returned to New York. At the close of the Civil war he again went 
to Illinois and in i86g came to Appanoose county. Two years later his 
parents, Orrin and Mary Harrison, also removed from Illinois to Appa- 
noose county, settling in Udell township, where they purchased land, 
spending their remaining days upon that farm. David Harrison also 
invested in property, buying eighty acres in Johns township, to which he 
afterward added another eighty-acre tract. He carefully and continuously 
carried on general agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1873- His 
widow afterward became the wife of James True, of Centerville, and 
after living upon the old home farm for a few years they removed to the 
county seat where they continued to resicfe until called to their final rest. 
Mrs. True passing away in 1896. Unto Mr. and Mrs. David Harrison 
were born five children, as follows: Adelbert, deceased; Charles Irvin, 
of this review; Orrin D., who has also passed away; Frank M.. a railroaii 
operator of Gridley, California; and Stella Belle, the widow ot \V. S. 
Douglass, now making her home in St. Louis. Missouri. 

Charles I. Harrison was a youth of about fourteen years when he 
came with his parents to Iowa and when fifteen years of age started out 
in the world on his own account, licginning work as a tanii hand. His 
education had been actjuired through previous attendance in the public 
schools. He has led a life of industry and usefulness. In 1878 he started 
west and worked his way through to the coast, .\fter remaining for five 
years in that section of the country he returned to his grandfather's farm 



HISTORY OI- Al'l'ANOOSE COUNTY 333 

in I'dfll rownship and later came into possession of this property which 
was deeded to him. He remained upon the farm for five years, then rented 
the land ami removed to I'nionville, where he engaged in teaming for 
a}eai. In u;oi he formed a partnership with Jake Wilson and purchased 
the grist and sawmill belonging to the estate ot Joshua Riggs. In the 
intervening period ot eleven years he has been continuoush' connected 
with the conduct of the business and since 1908 has been sole proprietor, 
having in that \<-ar purchased the interests of his partner who had been 
injured in the null. In the conduct of the business he displays character- 
istic enterprise combined with skill and energy which are bringing him 
success. He is a progressive, enterprising business man ancf is well known 
as a reliable and highly respected citizen of Appanoose county. In adtii- 
tion to his milling interests he owns eighty acres of timber land on x-ition 
28. Ideil townshij), and eighteen acres in Ifnionville. 

In i8c)o Mr. Harrison was united in marriage to Miss Adda Louise 
Brain, a daughter of George and Ellen (Cox) Brain, who were natives 
of Ciloucestershire, England, where they were reared and married. In 
1852 they crossed the Atlantic to the United States, settling at Yellow 
Springs. Ohio, and in that locality the father engaged in farming until 
18)8, when he removed to Knox county, Illinois. After twenty years 
there passed they came to Iowa in 1878, settling in Appanoose county. 
He purcha-cd one lumdred acres of land in Udell township and as he 
prospered in his farming operations extended the boundaries of his prop- 
erty b)- an additional inirchase of one hundred and fifty acres. He devel- 
oped one of the excellent farms of the district and remained thereon until 
his death in 1899. His widow afterward rented the place and came to 
Inionville. now making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Jake Wilson. 
.Mrs. Harrison was born in Knox coimty. Illinois. April 24, 1865. and for 
five terms was a teacher in the public schools ot Appanoose covmt\. hav- 
ing charge of the first .school in Udell township. By her marriage she 
luiN become the mother of four ilnldrcn: Forest, born October 28. 1892, 
who assists his father in his business interests; Lois, who was born Jan- 
uar\ 28. 1896. and died November 13, l8c;9; Marguerite, who was born 
June 18. 1901. ami is now attending school; and Frank, whose birth 
occurred December ^. 1907. 

Mr. Harrison gives his political support to the democratic party and 
keeps well informed on the (juestions and issues ot the day. He served 
as township trustee for a number of years and as constable tor one term, 
discharging his duties in those connections with [iromptness ant! tuielit\-. 
His interests in, and supjiort of the cause of, public education was seen 
in nine \ears' service as a member of the ^thool board, during which |ieri(Hi 



334 HISTORY OF APl'AXOOSE COL'XTY 

he did everything in his power to promote the interests of the schools and 
raise their standard of excellence. At one time he held membership with 
the Masonic lodge in Unionville but does not attend at the present time. 
His wife, however, is connected with the Eastern Star chapter of Union- 
ville. He and his family are members of the Methodist church, in the 
work of which he takes a most active and helpful part, serving now as 
secretary of the board of trustees and as superintendent of the Sunday 
school. His has been a well-spent life, honorable and upright in its 
varied relations, and his influence and labors have constituted a potent 
force for progress along material, political, social, intellectual and moral 
lines. 



HENRY A. RUSSELL. 



For many years Henry A. Russell has been a well known resident ot 
Centerville, occupied at different times with important mercantile inter- 
ests and at other times with public affairs. He stands for progress and 
improvement along many lines and is accounted one of the representative 
citizens of Centerville. He was born near Jefferson, Greene county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 23, 1851, and is a son of James and Sarah (Wathen) 
Russell, who were natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a farmer 
by occupation and cultivated a tract of land in Greene county for about 
tifty years. He then sold his property- and removed westward to Iowa, 
settling at West Grove, Davis count)-, where he bought and improved a 
farm, carrying on general agricultural pursuits there until his death, which 
occurred in January, 1881. His wife passed away in November, 1871. 
In their family were ten children. 

Henry A. Russell was a lad of eight years when he accompanied his 
parents to Iowa and in the schools of Davis county he largely acquired 
his education. Afterward, however, he entered college at Mount Pleasant, 
Iowa, and when he had put aside his text-books went to Arkansas, living 
with a brother for six years. On the expiration of that period he came 
to Centerville and purchased a drug store from his brother, conducting 
it with capability and success from 1876 until 1888. At the same time 
he was agent for the United States Express Company in this city and 
though he has now sold his drug store, he remains as agent for the express 
company, having occupied the position continuously since 1876. In 1881 
he erected a modern, double, two-story brick building, now occupied by 
Latimer Brothers with a stock of dry goods. He conducted his drug 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 335 

business in that building for a number of years but finally sold the prop- 
erty. His place of business is now at No. 207 East State street. 

On the 16th of January, 1883, ^^^- Russell was married to Miss 
Theresa Rogers, a daughter of Dr. W. D. and Charlotte (Black) Rogers, 
both natives of Pennsylvania. The father engaged in the practice of 
medicine in Greene county, that state, for many years, his life's labors 
being ended in death in 1893. His wife survived him until 1904. Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell became the parents of three children, of whom one died 
in infancy and Miles \V. passed away in 1908 at the age of twelve year:^. 
The surviving daughter, Elizabeth, is the wife of Dr. H. J. Shulze, a 
practicing dentist of Eveleth, Minnesota. 

Mr. Ku^>(ll has served on the town coimcil for four years and has been 
otherwise connected with public interests of importance. He was sec- 
retary of the Centerville Street Railway Company during its building 
and for some time when the cars were operated by horse power. He also 
was president and secretary of the County Fair Association for eight years 
and did much to stimulate an interest therein. He is now a stockholder 
in the Centerville lS: Mystic interurban line and he owns considerable 
town property, including an interest in a ten-acre tract called Highland 
Park. His home is at No. 203 West Washington street, where he has 
lived for thirt\-six years. It is an attractive property and his residence 
has always been noted for its warm-hearted hospitality. Mr. Russell votes 
with the republican party, of which he has been an earnest and consistent 
advocate since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. His reli- 
gious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, in which he takes an active 
and helpful interest, serving as one of its elders since 1880. In its teach- 
ings have been foimd the motive springs of his conduct, guiding him in 
all of his relations with his fellowmen. His life has indeed been well 
-pent and the sterling traits of his character have won him high regard 
wherever he is known. 



BENJAMIN ER.\NKIJN SILKNITTER. 

Benjamin Franklin Silknitter has made a cretiitablc record as an otli- 
cial and business man. He is now engaged in handling live stock and is 
the owner of valuable farming property near Centerville. .\r clitfcrrnr 
times he has put aside business cares to perform the duties ot office ant! 
in other connections has proved faithful and loyal to the trust reposeti 
in him. He was born in Indiana. March i >, 184;, ami is a son .of 



336 HISTORY OF Ai'l'AXOOSE COL'XTV 

Solomon and Catherine (Carter) Silknitter, the former a niitive of Penn- 
sylvania and the latter of Maryland. In the year 1850 Solomon Silknitter 
came to Appanoose county which was still a frontier district in which the 
work ot development and improvement had scarcely been begim. Much of 
the land was still in possession ot the government and he entered one hun- 
dred and sixty acres to which he afterward added from time to time until 
his holdinj^s embraced six hundred acres. After obtaininf^ his original 
claim he at once began to clear and cultivate it and devoted his remain- 
ing days to his agricultural pursuits. He died in March, 1865, while 
his wife passed away in 1897. 

Benjamin Franklin Silknitter was a lad of but five years when brought 
by his parents to Iowa, and was reared upon the home farm in Appanoose 
county, while the public schools afforded him his educational opportun- 
ities. After his text-books were put aside he devoted his entire time to 
the farm until elected to the office of sheriff in 1876. He filled that posi- 
tion for three terms, his reelection being incontrovertible proof of the 
confidence reposed in his ability and faithfulness. On his retirement 
from office he turned his attention to the coal trade and operated a mine 
at Brazil and another at Mystic for a number of years, or until 1894, 
when he was again elected sheriff, serving for one term. He has since 
been engaged in the live-stock business, handling a large number of cattle 
each year. His property holdings embrace a farm of four huntired and 
ten acres west of the town on which his son resides, while Mr. Silknitter 
makes his home in the city where he also owns considerable property. 
Whatever he has undertaken he has carried forward to successful com- 
pletion, for his energy and industry enable him to overcome all difficulties 
and obstacles and gradually advance him to the goal of prosperity. 

In September, 1877, Mr. Silknitter was married to Miss Sallie Bell, 
a daughter of David and Nancy Bell. Her father was a carpenter by 
trade and followed that pursuit in Centerville for many years, and later 
retired, continuing, however, to make his home in this city to the time 
of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Silknitter became the parents of five chil- 
dren: Jennie, the wife of H. S. Phillips, of Texas; George F.. who is 
employed by the Union Meat Company at Portland. Oregon: Robert M., 
employed by Crane & Compan}-, also of Portland. Oregon; Roscoe C. 
residing on his father's farm; and Richard, also making his home in Port- 
land. Oregon. Vhv wife and mother passed awa}' in February, IQ09, 
after a short illness, and her death was deeply regretted by many friends 
who entertained for her warm regard. 

In the life record ot Mr. Silknitter is a creilitable military chapter. 
On the 9th of May, 1864. when he \\ a^ but nineteen years of age. he 



HISTORY Ol- Al'l'.WOOSE COUNT V 337 

ottered his .services ro the eountr} tor one huiuirctl ila}s, enlisting as a 
member of Company B, P'orty-seventh Iowa Infantry. His religious 
faith is that of the Presbyterian rhunli aiui he has ever been loyal to his 
professions. He gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and 
in addition to serving as sheritf he has been chief of police of C'entervilie 
and a member of the town council. The Masonic fraternity finds in him 
an exemplary member and a well-spent life has gained for him the w arm 
reeard of all with whom he has been associated. For more than six dec- 
ades he has lived in this county and has been an interested witness of its 
growth and develojmient. He has cooperated in many movements relating 
to the general welfare and his influence has ever been on the side of right, 
justice and progress. 



.MOSES MAKING. 



Moses Maring, who lives just across the state line in Missouri, is the 
owner of a tine farm of three hundred acres in Putnam county and by 
his progressive methods ami the success which has attended his efforts has 
made his influence felt upon the agricultural development of this section. 
He was born in Belmont county. Ohio, October g, 1849. and is a son of 
Samuel and .Alma (Hall) .Maring, of whom mention is made elsewhere 
in this work. They came to Iowa at an early date and settled on a rented 
farm in \'an Burcn county, removing after two years to Appanoose county. 

Moses Maring acquired his education in the common schools of .Appa- 
noose county and in the Central high school, which he attended until he 
was seventeen years of age. B)' close attention to his books and by outside 
reading and observation he fitted himself for teaching and followed this 
vocation for four years before engaging in the general merchandise busi- 
ness. He was successful in this line of work for five years but at the end 
of that time traded his store for a farm in Putnam county, just across the 
state line. I'pon this property, which comprises three hundred acres, he 
has resided since that time, concentrating his attention upon its develop- 
ment, and meeting with a w( II merited and gratifying degree of prcs- 
perity. His success is the roult of his and his good wife's untiring 
industry and capable business management and the fact that it has been 
accomplished, in spite of his crippled condition, is a greater tribute to his 
determination, his courage and his high enthusiasm, ami the cooperation 
of his life partner. 



338 HISTORY DF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

In 1876 Mr. Maring was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Hutchi- 
son, a daughter of A. J. and Eliza A. (Hutchison) Hutchison, the former 
a pioneer in Appanoose county. Mr. and Mrs. Maring became the par- 
ents of thirteen children: Zetta, who married Archie Richardson; Mary V., 
who is Mrs. \'an Pugh; May, who became the wife of Clyde Ryals; 
Josephine, who married Sanford Pugh; Olive, who became the wife of 
Alex Hudson; Essie, who is Mrs. E. J. Beard; Milton B., who married 
Fern Hart; Alma, who became the wife of Sherman Conger; Moses, 
Charles and Katie, who live at home; one child, who died in infancy; and 
Clyde R. 

Mr. Maring is one of the directors of the Exline Savings Bank in 
Exline and he and his wife are devout members of the linited Brethren 
church. He is a stanch democrat and, although he has never held public 
office, is interested in all that pertains to the welfare and progress of the 
community and gives loyal support to many measures for the public good. 
His worth as a man of business is widely acknowledged and in his career 
he has proven that energy and diligence constitute a safe basis upon which 
to build success. Until June 1, 1912, Mr. Maring was one-third owner 
and president of the Prairie Block Coal Company, near Centerville, one 
of the best mines on the Rock Island Railroad. Starting out in life under 
a heavy handicap, he has faced the conditions he has met with confidence 
and courage, standing today among the substantial agriculturists and the 
men of wealth in his community. 



STEPHEN HOPKINS. 



During the latter years of his life Stephen Hopkins lived retired in 
Unionville, but for many years previously had been actively engaged in 
farming in this county and was a prominent representative of agricultural 
interests here. He was also on many different occasions in public office, 
his service covering a long period, and the record of no citizen of Appa- 
noose county has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and 
stainless in reputation. He was born in Claiborne county, Tennessee, 
October 15, 1822, his parents being Jaba and Rachel (Clouse) Hopkins, 
who were also natives ot that state and were of English descent. They 
came to Iowa in the spring of i8ijo, accompanied by their son Stephen 
Hopkins and his wife. They established their home three miles south 
and a mile east of Unionville, the father purchasing a half section of 
farm laml there, atter which he carried on general agricultural pursuits 
until the dcarii of his wife, subsequent to which tinu- he left the old 




Ml;. AMt ,\ll:S. VIKIMIKN linI'MNS 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 341 

homestead and removed to Decatur count}-, Iowa, where he spent his last 
years with his youngest son, Martin Hopkins. 

In the schools ot Tennessee Stephen Hopkins pursued his education 
and after putting aside his text-books worked upon the home farm and 
engaged in teaching school. He was married on the 8th of June, 1843, 
and lived in happy wedlock for a period of sixty-seven years, three months 
and seventeen days with Poll}- Ann Hopkins, who is a daughter of George 
\^'. and Polly (McFarland) Hopkins. Her father, who was a native of 
Tennessee, came ot English and German ancestrj'. In early life he worked 
m a sawmill and after following that occupation for some time began 
farming. He was a soldier ot the \N'ar ot iSi 2 and was at all times a loyal 
and progressive citizen. In Kentucky he married Polh- McFarland, who 
was born in that state but was descended from a northern famih'. In 
1850 the}- removed to Iowa, settling in Davis county, and some years 
afterward the}- became residents of Worth county, Missouri, where they 
remained until called to the home beyond. The wife of Stephen Hopkins 
was a granddaughter of another Stephen Hopkins who with his father, 
Nehemiah Hopkins, became a resident of New York city when it was a 
comparatively small place and was one of the first tailors there. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stephen Hopkins, of this review, celebrated their sixtieth wed- 
ding anniversary, and few, indeed, are the couples who travel life's 
journey together for so long a period. Their mutual love and confidence 
increased year by year and they were held in the highest esteem by all 
because their lives were well spent. They reared the following family: 
Annie, who became the wife of T. J. Harden, w ho is a section foreman of 
Noble, Oklahoma, and has three children, Ella, W. O. and \'iola 
(Harden) Palmer: Mahala, the wife of Charles Buckmaster, a farmer of 
Sasakwa, Oklahoma, by whom she had nine children, five of whom are 
living, Sarah, Frank, Stephen, Andrew and Richard; Jasper Newton, who 
died at the age of three years; John N., who died in 1895 at the age of 
torty-seven years: Allen, a farmer living near Stillwater. Oklahoma, who 
married Rachel Buckmaster and has three children, William, Maude, and 
Blanche; William H., who died in 1884 at the age of twenty-nine years; 
Eli, who died in 189; at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving a widow who 
was tormerly Minnie Hvmt and who is now living near Humboldt, Kan- 
sas, with her two children, Louella M. Foster and John W. ; Marv R., who 
died January 29, 1883, at the age of twent} -three years; Sarah Jane, at 
home with her mother; George W., who died October 18, 1887, at the age 
of twenty-two years; and Margaret E.. who passed away November 4, 
1 886, at the age of eighteen years. 

Vol. n— 19 



342 HISTORY OF APrAXOOSE COUNTY 

Following their nuirriafj;e Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins lived for about seven 
years in Tennessee and in 1850 came to Iowa, settling on a farm near his 
father's place. He purchased one hundred acres of land on section 14, 
Udell township, and thereon resided troni August, 1850, until March 25, 
1898, when he retired from active life, sold his farm and removed to 
Unionville, purchasing residence property which he occupied to the time 
of his death, which occurred September 2^, 1910. He was ill less than 
a week and with little suffering and no regrets passed from this life. His 
had been a beautiful Christian character and his record is one crowned with 
honor and respect. For lortx-cight years he carried on farming and a life 
of industry, thrift and earnest toil brought him success. He placed his 
fields in a high state of cultivation and added many modern improvements 
to his tarm which was converted into a valuable property. He took great 
delight in placing his land in a fine comlition and he also made stock- 
feeding an important branch of his business. He was a member of the 
Grange and Farmers Alliance for a time and was interested in all that 
pertained to improvement in farm methods. He never allowed business 
affairs to interfere with his duties in other directions, however. He was 
always mindful of his obligations to citizenship and sought to promote pub- 
lic progress in many ways. He voted with the democratic party and for 
eighteen years rilled the office of treasurer of the schools of Udell township, 
for many years was justice of the peace and for several terms was clerk of 
the township. He also acted as trustee imtil he refused to serve longer, 
when he resigned on account of old age. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins 
were members of the xMethodist Kpi.scopal church, to the teachings of which 
they were most loyal, their lives being guided by their religious faith 
and belief. It was a memorable event in the history of Unionville when 
they celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary on the 8th of June, 
1903, on which occasion sixty-two guests were present, the day being spent 
in social converse while all partook of a boimtiful meal. A handsome cane 
was presented to Mr. Hopkins and a rocking-chair to his wife. The pre- 
sentation speech was made b) the Hon. J. B. Stuckey. of Udell town- 
ship, while the Rev. A. S. Downs led in jiraxcr and all joined in singing 
"In the Sweet Bve and B-\e."' On that occasion there were fourteen crand- 
children and fifteen great-grandchildren present. There are now two chil- 
dren of the fifth generation of the family living. Mrs. Hopkins survives 
as a representative of the first generation \\ bile the second is represented by 
her daughter, Mrs. Mahala Buckmaster, the third by the Jatter's daughter. 
Mrs. Sarah A. Walton, the fourth by Mrs. Walton's daughter, Mrs. 
Myrtle Sisson, who has two children. No history of Appanoose countv 
would be complete without extended reference to Mr. and Mrs. Ste[ih(n 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 343 

Hopkins. They were among the county's most worthy pioneer settlers 
and the wife still remains a witness of the progress and changes which have 
occurred here. Their lives were at all times exemplary, the career of Mr. 
Hoj)kins being an expression of earnest Christian faith. All who knew 
liim entertained tor him warm regard and cherish the same feelings of 
kindly consideration for his widow who is one of the most venerable inhab- 
itants of Appanoose county. 



THOMAS J. CASE, Ml). 



Among the able and progressive members of the medical fraternity 
in Appanoose count}- is numbered Dr. Gliomas J. Case, who has been 
practicing in Unionville since 1898, his well developed skill and laudable 
ambition gaining him a prominent place in the ranks of his profession. 
He was born in Pierceton, Indiana, October 13, 1862, and is a son of 
Ihomas and Jane (Wagoner) Ca.se. the former born in Stark county, Ohio, 
in 1830, and the mother in Wajne county in the same )ear. On the pater- 
nal side Dr. Case is of Welsh ancestry, his grandparents having come to 
.\merica from Wales. His maternal ancestors, however, were of German 
birth. The father of our subject was a soldier in the federal army during 
the Civil war. He began his active career teaching school in Ohio, engag- 
ing at the same time in general contracting and building. Later he aban- 
doned teaching and established himself independently as a contractor. 
He married in Ohio but in 1898 removed to Indiana and there taught 
school and followed the carpenter's trade until 1873. In that year he 
removed to Hamilton count}-, Nebraska, and homesteaded one hundred 
and sixty acres of land, upon which he is still living with his son Edward, 
his wife having passed away on the 23d of February, 1907. Eor a time 
the father of our subject followed his trade and engaged in school-teaching 
in Nebraska in addition to his agricultural pursuits, but a few years ago 
retired from active life and is now enjoying the comforts earned during 
a long and prosperous business career. 

Thomas J. Case accompanied his father on his various removals, 
attending public school in the different states. He completed his high- 
school course in Aurora, Nebraska, in 1882 and afterward took special 
work at the Nebraska State University. Having determined to make the 
practice of medicine his life work, he entered Rush Medical College in 
Chicago and in 1889 was graduated with the ilegree of M. D. He locateii 
for practice at Ciilrnrr. Nebra>ka. and there nnKiin<'tl until 1898, when he 



344 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

came to Unionville, where he has since made his home. He has been 
accorded a liberal patronage and his skill and ability are evidenced in the 
excellent results which havefollowed his labors. Along lines of his profes- 
sion Dr. Case belongs to the Iowa State Medical Societj', the Appanoose 
County Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and in the 
interchange of thought in those organizations and in the discussion of 
vital questions relative to health, gains much valuable knowledge and thus 
promotes his efficiency in his chosen field. 

Dr. Case has been twice married. In 1891 he wedded Miss Bertha 
Galliton, a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Kimball) Galliton, natives 
of Virginia, where their daughter was born. The mother died in that state 
and the father afterward removed to Nebraska, wiiere his death occurred. 
Dr. Case's first wife died in Nebraska October 17, 1897, leaving one 
daughter, Gail, who was born at Giltner, Nebraska, on September 27, 
1893. She is the wife of Harry Scott, a mail carrier of Bloomfield, Davis 
county, Iowa. After the death of his first wife Dr. Case was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary F. Hard, who was born in Appanoose county, 
May 23, 1869, and who previous to her marriage was a teacher in 
the public schools. She is a daughter of Henry and Sarah A. (Sigler) 
Hard, the former born in Jackson county, Ohio, on March 27, 1828. 
He was of old English stock and could trace his ancestry back in a direct 
line to Benedict Arnold. Mrs. Case's mother was born in Ross county, 
Ohio, in 1830. She was of German descent but her parents were natives 
of Pennsylvania. The father was for many years a railroad contractor 
and builder in Ohio but in 1857 came west to Iowa, locating in Appanoose 
county, where he remained one year before he returned to Ohio. In 1868 
he made his second settlement in Appanoose count}-, bu}ing land in Union 
township, where he engaged in farming for some time. Later he sold 
out this property and made his home with the subject of this review until 
his death in 1910. He was prominent in local public affairs and held 
various township offices. He was also active in fraternal circles and 
especially prominent in the blue lodge Masons. He and his wife were 
members of the Methodist cluircli of Unionville, Iowa. In their family 
were nine children: James, Joseph and Latilla, all of whom have passed 
away; Jacob H., who was born in Ohio, June 22, 1854, and who is now 
pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Osburn, Nebraska; Charles 
and Ellanettie, who have passed away; Anna, who was born in Ohio, June 
22, 1864, and who is now the wife of John Glazebrook, who is residing 
in Idaho for the benefit of his health; Mary P., the wife of the subject 
of this review; and Sarah, twin to Mary P., who married Samuel Hudgens 
a farmer and school teacher in Appanoose county. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 345 

P'raternall} Dr. Case has important connections, being affiliated with 
Unionville Lodge, No. 665, I. O. O. F., and with the Modern Woodmen 
of America. He also belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and his wife is a member of Eastertide Lodge, No. 155, of the Rebekahs. 
Dr. Case gives his allegiance to the republican party but has never sought 
nor desired office, his attention being concentrated upon his professional 
duties. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. He conforms closely 
to the highest standards of medical ethics and is most conscientious in 
the performance of his professional duties. 



MILTON B. MAKING. 



Milton B. Maring is a self-made man who from a humble position 
in the business world has worked his way steadily upward, making good 
use of his time and opportunities. He has had many difficulties to over- 
come and has met many obstacles, but gradually he has advanced by rea- 
son of his industry and perseverance and since 1900 has been conducting 
a prosperous business as proprietor of a grocery store and meat market in 
Centerville, Iowa, while since 1906 he has also been identified with coal- 
mining interests. He was born in Van Buren county, Iowa, January 8, 
1852, a son of .Samuel and Alma (Hall) Maring, who were natives of 
Ohio. The father came to this state in 1850, .settling in \'an Buren county, 
where he carried on farming for two years, removing in 1852 to Appanoose 
county, where he entered from the government one hundred and sixty 
acres of prairie land and forty acres of timber. With characteristic energA' 
he began the cultivation and development of his property, added many 
improvements thereto and continued his farm work upon that place to 
the time of his death in July, 1902. He had long survived his wife, who 
died in 18^6. 

The usual experiences of a farm lad fell to the lot of Milton B. Mar- 
ing, who spent his youthful days on the old homestead and attcndetl the 
district schools. He early became familiar with the best methods of 
plowing, planting and harvesting and continued to work with his father 
until he attained his majority. He then started out to earn his own living 
as a farm hand and was also employed at railroad work for some time. 
Later he .secured work in the coal mines, spending ten years in that wav. 
and at the same time engaging in business with his brother, with whom 
he held a partnership in a general store at Kxline, this county. This ven- 
ture in merchandising was made possible by the ind\istrv and economv 



346 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

which he had disphiyed in previous }ears. He was ever ambitious to 
engage in business on his own account and bent every energy toward that 
end, making wise use of his time and ojiportunities. After six years 
devoted to mercantile pursuits the brothers exchanged their business for 
a farm of one hundred acres just over the line in Missouri and M. B. 
Maring began the imj)rovement of the place, where he spent five farm- 
ing seasons in cultivating, continuing his work in the mines during the 
late autumn and winter months. He then sold his interest to his brother 
and went to Unionville, Missouri, where he accepted a position as clerk 
in a general store, in which he remained for two years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he returned to Centerville and became manager of 
the general store of Major C. A. Stanton, with whom he remained for 
seven years. He was then elected sheriff of the county and served for 
one term. On his retirement from office he reentered the mercantile field 
as proprietor of a store at Rathbun, which he conducted for three years. 
During that period he also opened a shoe store at Centerville with J. C 
Huggins as manager. In 1900 he purchased Major Stanton's business 
and has since conducted a grocery and meat market with phenomenal suc- 
cess, having a liberal and well deserved patronage. In 1906 he further 
extended his business activities by purchasing an interest in the Prairie 
Block Coal Company and operated a mine five miles southwest of the 
city serving as secretary, treasurer and general manager, until June 1, 
1912, when he sold that property. He has developed there one of the 
best mines in this coal district, with a caixicity ot five hundred tons of 
coal per day. He still conducts a general store at the mines and he is one 
of the largest stockholders in the Scandinavian Coal Company, operat- 
ing a mine at Piano, Iowa, and one at Centerville. It will be seen that 
Mr. Maring has made steady progress since starting out in business on 
his own account. Whatever he undertakes he carries forward to success- 
ful completion and he is now the owner ot one ot the largest groceries 
and meat markets in the city, his location being at No. 214 North Twelfth 
street, Centerville. In addition to his commercial and mining interests 
he has made investments in real estate and is the owner of some good 
residence property in Centerville. 

Mr. Maring has always given his political allegiance to the democratic 
party and is recognized as one of the prominent and influential local 
leaders, having served as chairman of the democratic count}' central com- 
mittee for fifteen years. He was a delegate from this, the eighth con- 
gressional district, to the democratic national convention held at St. 
Louis in 1904 and was also nominated a candidate for elector in the same 
year. He has attended four national conventions and every democratic 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 347 

-tate convention ot the past twenty years. He is a prominent Mason, 
having attained high rank in the order, and he was fomnerly connected 
w irh the Odd Fellows and Elk lodges. 

Mr. Maring is possessed of a warmth and heartiness of manner that 
easily wins him friends, and among his employes and all, with whom he 
has had business association, he is a revered man. Unfailingly generous, 
readily forgiving a personal wrong, he is possessed with a kindness of heart 
I that sets him apart from his contemporaries. Having marked ability as 
a mixer and a promoter he might easily have become one of the county's 
very richest men, but for this generosity. His has been a well spent life, 
useful, active and honorable in all business relations, and Mr. Maring 
is indeed numbered among the valued and worthy citizens of Centerville 
and .\ppanoose count}'. 



FRANK H. (iLICK. 



Frank K. Glick, who has been elected recorder of Appanoose county 
and assumed the duties of his office in January, 1913, is a native of this 
section, born October 29, 1882. His parents are Daniel and Martha 
(Hanniman) Glick, the former a native of Indiana and the latter ot Ohio. 
The father of our subject was seventeen )ears of age at the outbreak of 
the Civil war and he enlisted in Company H, Twelfth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantrv', serving for three years. After he was mustered out he went 
to Missouri and there engaged in general agricultural pursuits tor a 
short time, later coming to Appanoose county, where he bought a farm 
in Douglas township. This [property he has improved and operated for 
many years and upon it he and his wife are still residing. Daniel Glick 
has reached the age of seventy and his wife is sixty-three years of age. 

Frank R. Glick of this review was reared at home and was educ;Tted 
in the public schools of Appanoose county. His childhood was spent 
\ipon his father's farm and he aided in its operation until he reached the 
age of twenty-one, when he began contracting for the sinking of coal 
tiaft>. In this occupation he continued to engage for tive years and then 
went to Colorado, where he worked in the coal mines. After one year, 
however, he had the misfortune to meet with a severe accident which dis- 
abled him. his back having been dislocated by a blow from a tailing piece 
of coal. He wa.s obliged to discontinue his work and on the 14th of 
November, IQ08, went to an osteopathic hospital at Kirksvillr, Missouri. 
He remaincti -ix iiiontli^. raking a course of trcariin'iu and nrurned won- 



348 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

derfully improved but still in a iTi])pl(ci (.ondition. He is obliged to go 
everywhere in a wheeled chair bur has not allowed his misfortune to 
cast a cloud over his career, facing the altered conditions of his life with 
contidence and courage and winning the respect and honor of his many 
friends by his valorous struggle against adversity. At the general elec- 
tion held on the 5th of November, K)12, Mr. Glick was elected recorder 
of Appanoose county and will assume the duties of his office in January. 
His friends predict for him continued progress in this line of work and 
a long and successful political career. 

On the 8th of April. 1908, Mr. Glick married Miss Mabel Conger, 
who was born in Appanoose county in August, 1887, a daughter of H. G. 
and Ella (McCollum) Conger, the former a native of Monroe county, 
Iowa, and the latter of Missouri. The father came to Iowa at an early 
date and for many years carried on general agricultural pursuits, winning 
at last a comfortable competence. A short time ago he abandoned farm- 
ing and is now engaged in county road work. He has reached the age of 
fifty-one, while his wife is forty-eight years old. Mr. and Mrs. Glick 
are the parents of a son, Frank Doyle, who is four years of age. Mrs. 
Glick is a member of the Methodist church. 

Fraternally Mr. Glick is connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the United Mine Workers of .America. He is a stanch 
supporter of the republican party and is interested in everything pertain- 
ing to the welfare of his native section. In all the relations of his life 
he is upright, high-minded and honorable and has won a high place in 
the respect and esteem of all who are in any way associated with him. 



EDWARD BROSHAR. 



.Deeds of valor, as displayed b) rlie soldier on the battlefield, have 
been the theme of song and story since the world began. No greater 
braver}- has ever been displaced than was manifest by the I'nion veterans 
of the Civil war when they marched to the south to defend the stars and 
stripes — the emblem of an undivided country. Among this number was 
Edward Broshar, who joined an Iowa cavalr\ regiment and thus defendeil 
the cause which he espoused. He was born in Indiana, .\ugust 26, 1838, 
a son of John Broshar, mIio was a farmer b) occupation and owned and 
tilled a tract of land in the Hoosier state until 18^ ^ ^vhen he disposed ot 
his property there and came to low a, settling in Appanoose county, where 
he purchased a farm which he continued to make his home throughout his 
remaining days. 




EDWAKD liKOSHAK 



W. II. XrCODEMUS 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 351 

Edward Broshar was lar^'ely rearctl and educated in Indiana, being 
seventeen years of age when he came to Appanoose count) w ith his parents. 
He worked on his father's farm for a number of years and then went to 
Kansas, where he engaged in farming on his own account for three years. 
He then bought and improved a tract of hmd in Appanoose county which 
■he cultivated for an extended period, but at length ill health, the result 
of paralysis, forced his retirement and he removed to Centerville, purchas- 
ing a home in the city. He thereafter rested from further labor. His life 
up to that time had been an extremely busy and usetul one and his energy 
and industry were the basis of the success he achieved, making him the 
possessor of a comfortable competence. The only interruption to his 
continued activity in business up to the time of his retirement came when 
he enlisted for service in tlie Civil war on the 15th of August, 1861, joining 
Company M, Third Iowa Cavalry, with which he served until the 9th of 
August, 1865. He participated in a number of hotly contested engage- 
ments and never faltered when facing the foe, so that he returned home 
with a most creditable military record. 

The first wife of Mr. Broshar was Miss Minerva Funkhauser, who 
nas bom in Iowa, December 5, 1839, and reared there. She was a woman 
of many excellent traits of character and became the mother of ten chil- 
dren. She died in May, 1898. On the I2th of August, 1900, Mr. Broshar 
was married to Mrs. Mattie E. Smith, a daughter of William H. and Ruby 
(Co'zad) Nicodenms. Her father was born in Maryland, August 23, 1835, 
and her mother in West Virginia, October 24, 1841. He was a farmer 
by occupation ant! in 1854 became a resident of Des Moines county, Iowa, 
where he lived for five years. In 1859 he went to Henry county, this 
state, where he was employed as a farm hand imtil after the outbreak of 
the Civil war, when he enlisted as a member of Company G, Eleventh Iowa 
\'olunteer Infantry. With the boys in blue of rliat regiment he marched 
to the front and served throughout the perioti of hostilities, taking part in 
the long, hard camjiaigns and in many hotl\ contested battles. He was 
mustered out at Touisville, Kentucky, July I ^ 1865. and for a year there- 
after remained in that city but in the fall of 1866 came to Appanoose 
county and purchased one hundrt-d acres of land in Independence town.ship. 
This he at once began to improve and cultivate, operating his farm imtil 
1879, when he soUi out and came to Centerville. Iowa. Here he was 
employed in different ways until the time of his retirement. He is now 
living with his daughter at No. 315 East Van Buren street, having long 
survived his wife, who passed away in .August, 1889. He is a member of 
the Grand .-Xrmv of rlie Rciiublic. B\ her former marriage Mrs. Broshar 



352 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COL'XTV 

had one son, Fred H. Smith, who is now r\\cnr\-fliree years of age and is 
a photoj^rapher of Denison. Iowa. 

l^he death of Mr. Broshar occurred on the 31st of March, lyoy, and 
he left behind him man)' friends. .While not a member of an}' particular 
church, he had a strong leaning toward the Christian church and contrib- 
uted to its sujiport. His widow is a member of the Methodist church. 
Politically Mr. Broshar was a republican, supporting the party which was 
ihe defense of the I'nion'during the dark days of the Civil war. He held 
the office of notary while living at Walnut and was a member of the board 
of supervisors in Appanoose county. He belonged to the Grand Army 
post and found pleasure in meeting with his old comrades among the boys 
in blue. He was always as faithful and loyal to duties of citizenship in 
times of peace as in days of war and was a man in whom many sterling 
traits of character gained him high regard. 



JOHN G. CLARK. 



John G. Clark is a worthy native son of Appanoose count)- who has 
twice served as sheriff of the county and since retiring trom that office 
has been engaged in business as the proprietor of a feed stable at Center- 
ville. His birth occurred on the 13th of March, 1858, his parents being 
William A. and Mary (Kennick) Clark, who were of Irish and Dutch 
descent respectively. The father was born near Indianapolis, Indiana, 
on the 23d of April, 1830, while the mother's birth occurred in North 
Carolina on the 29th of January, 1832. William A. Clark was born 
and reared on a farm and attended the district schools for a time but 
acquired his knowledge largely through reading, experience and observa- 
tion. Mary Kennick was a maiden of twelve years when she accompanied 
her parents on their removal to Indiana and it was there that she gave 
her hand in marriage to \\'illiani A. Chuk on the ^ofh ot October. 1849. 
In 1854 they removed to Davis county, Iowa, and a )ear later came to 
Appanoose county, locating on a farm af forty acres, three and a half 
miles northwest of Moulton. By additional purchase Mr. Clark extended 
the boundaries of his place until at the time of his death, in 1885, it 
embraced two hundred and torty acres of well improved land. He was 
a veteran of the Civil war and a most loyal and public-spirited citizen, 
ably serving as justice of the peace in W'ashington township tor two 
terms and as assessor for four terms. His wife was called to her final 
rest on the 26th of October, 1893. Their children were nine in number, 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 353 

as follows: Laura, who was born on the 3otii ot March, I1S51. and is 
the wite ot T. C. Kueker, a retired agriculturist ot Centerville; Sarah, 
whose natal day was October 23, 1855, and who gave her hand in mar- 
riage to T. W. Killion; John G., of this review; Susan, who was born on 
the 31st da} of May, i860, and is the wife of Phenis Taylor, a farmer 
of this county; Alice I., deceased; William G., who was born on the 26th 
of December, 1864, and follows fanning in Bellair township, Appanoose 
county; Elijah, who is an agriculturist residing at Moulton, this county; 
James P., who was born on the n^d of October, 1869, and is likewise an 
agriculturist of Moulton; and Louie Eva, whose birth occurred on the 10th 
of December, 1872, and who gave her hand in marriage to Benjamin Wells, 
a farmer of Roger Mills. Oklahoma. 

John G. Clark rcmaineii under the jjarcntal roof until twenty-one 
years of age, when he was married and establisiied a home ot his own, 
living on a rented farm in Appanoose county for about three years. On 
the expiration of that period he removed to Kansas and there tollowed 
farming until the winter of 1888, when he returned to Appanoose count}- 
and has here remained continuously since. He is now engaged in business 
as the proprietor of a feed stable at Centerville and is enjoying a liberal 
patronage in this connection. 

In 1879 Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Wool- 
ridge, who was born in Appanoose count)', Iowa, in 1863, her parents 
being \Mlliam and Susan (Jessey) Woolridge, the former a farmer of 
this county. In 1884 they removed to Elk county, Kansas, and there 
resided until they passed away. Unto John G. and Margaret (Wool- 
ridce) Clark were born two children, namelv: Defsv Crrace, whose birth 
occurred in January, 1881, and who is the wife of Madison Howell, an 
agriculturist of Guthrie, Oklahoma; and LeKoy, who was born on the 
24th of November, 1883, and was killed on the 18th of August, 1903, 
by the accidental discharge of a revolver. riic wife and mother passed 
away in this county on the 6th of May, 1891, and in 1896 Mr. Clark 
was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Fluta A. Ward, the 
widow of Harvey Ward of this county and a daughter of George and 
Talitha I. Wilson. Her father is a farmer of Appanoose coimty. 

In politics Mr. Clark is a stanch republican, having supported the 
men and measures of that party since age conferred upon him the right 
of franchise. He has held various township oUices and in 1906 was 
elected sheriff of Appanoo.se count), proving such a capable official that 
he was reelected in 1908. On tiic 29th of Jul), \<.)\o. it fell to his duty 
to hang at the state penitentiary John Junkins. a colored man, tor the 
murder of Clara Roisein. a Swedish woman ot Ottumwa, Iowa, and so 



354 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

became the instrument of justice in atonement of an atrocious crime. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
ot Centerville and the Yeomen, while both he and his wife are devoted 
members of the Methodist church of Centerville. He has gained many 
stanch friends in both social and business life and his record is a creditable 
one inasmuch as his success is attributable to his own efforts. 



JOHN L. PHARES. 



John L. Phares, a well known and prosperous resident of Centerville, 
is proprietor of the Centerville Poultry & Produce Company, an extensive 
and important concern which was establishtd on the i6th of November, 
1912. It was in Centerville that his birth occurred on the 17th of Novem- 
ber, 1868, his parents being A. J. and Jennie (Brough) Phares. The father, 
a gentleman of German and Irish descent, is a native of Keokuk, Lee 
county, Iowa, while the mother, who is of Dutch extraction, was born at 
Amit}-, Ohio. Their marriage was celebrated in Centerville, this county. 
For several years A. J. Phares drove a stage between Fort Madison and 
Burlington and after removing to Centerville, in 1862, drove stage from 
there to Moravia and Leon, Iowa. Subsequently he took up the butcher's 
trade, also dug coal and conducted a restaurant. In 1890-91 he served as a 
member of the city council. In 1907 he put aside active business cares 
and with his wife has since lived retired in Centerville. Our subject had 
ten brothers and sisters and there was no death in the family until all had 
reached adult age and were married. Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Phares have 
lived in Appanoose county for a half century and enjoy an extensive and 
favorable acquaintance within its borders. 

In the acquirement of an education John L. Phares attended school 
at Centerville and after putting aside his text-books learned the butcher's 
trade. He was also employed for a time as motorman on a street car in 
Centerville and for several years acted as a stationary engineer. In Novem- 
ber, 1908, he became connected with the poultry business as foreman for 
the firm of Hurd & Company and at the end of a } ear accepted the posi- 
tion of local manager for the Iowa Produce Company. He held the posi- 
tion continuously until he engaged in business on his own account under 
the name of the Centerville Poultry & Produce Company. He makes 
shipments to Chicago, New York. Boston and Philadelphia and sends out 
on an average of five thousand live chickens and four cars of dressed 
poultry per month. At times he ships from two to three cars of eggs per 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 355 

week. Mr. Phares buys all the produce on his own account and all pro- 
ceeds from eastern sales return directly to Centerville. He devotes his 
attention exclusively to his growing business interests and in their control 
is winning a gratifying and well merited measure of success. 

On the 19th of October, 1890, Mr. Phares was united in marriage 
to Miss May Goldsberry, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Gilbert) 
Goldsberr\ . The father is a veteran of the Civil war and an agriculturist 
by occupation. He was a resident of Cincinnati, Iowa, at the time of 
his daughter's marriage to Mr. Phares but subsequently came to Center- 
ville, where both he and his wife still make their home. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Phares have been born the following children. Guy \V., whose 
birth occurred on the 2d of October, 1891, and who is now a substitute 
city mail carrier, wedded Miss Isel Critzer of Centerville, by whom he 
has two children, Barnard and Clyde. Raymie, whose natal day was 
November 9, 1893, ^^^^ as foreman for his father. Alfred, who was born 
on the 30th of October, 1896, is also in the employ of his father. Jennie, 
whose birth occurred on the 6th of October, 1906, attends the Gartield 
school. Paul, who was born November 14, 1908, is at home. Four gen- 
erations of the Phares family are now living. 

Mr. Phares exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the democracy, believing firmly in the principles of that 
party. He is a supporter of the Christian church and his wife is a mem- 
ber of the assembly. Fraternally he is identified with the Foresters of 
America, belonging to the Centerville lodge. He is one of the prosperous 
and capable business men of Centerville, where he has passed his entire 
life and has a host of warm friends. 



BURT STONE. 



Burt Stone, closely connected with business interests of Piano as a 
successful general merchant, is a native son of Appanoose county, bom 
in Johns township, on the 15th of February, 1877, his parents being J. J. 
and Sarah E. fCole) Stone. The father was a native of Ohio and the 
mother ot Intliaiia, and they came to Appanoose county separate!)' in 
1855. The father established himself in 1859 in the general merchandise 
business in Piano and also engaged in farming. He operated his store 
successfully until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted in a 
Kansas regiment and served for four years. Afterward he resumed his 
former occupation and engaged in it until 1892, when he moved his estab- 



356 HISTORY OF Al'l'ANOOSE COUNTY 

lishment to Mystic and after a short time retired. He has now reached 
the age of seventy )'ears, while his wife is sixty-nine. 

Burt Stone was educated in the public schools of Piano and after 
completing the usual course worked in his father's store until 1896. In 
that year he accepted the position as superintendent of the Juckett Coal 
Company's mine in Mystic and was later an independent general mer- 
chant in Diamond. He conducted this enterprise from 1899 '^o '9°! t)ut 
in the latter year sold his interests and established a restaurant in Mystic, 
which he operated until 1903, when he and his brorlier formed a partner- 
ship and purchased the Evansville mine, which they developed for some 
time. In 1905 Mr. Stone purchased the Mystic Letter and made this an 
excellent weekly journal, both the news and the business departments be- 
ing in a flourishing condition under his able management. In the fire 
which destroyed most of the business section of Piano the plant was con- 
sumed and Mr. Stone turned his attention to other pursuits. In March, 
1911, he came to Piano and here established a general store, which he 
has since conducted. In business affairs he has met with excellent suc- 
cess and has steadily prospered, being regarded as one of the most pro- 
gressive and reliable business men in the community. 

Mr. Stone married, on the 1 <^th of July, 1896, Miss M. Frogle, a 
daughter of Peter and Matilda (Long) Frogle, natives of Missouri, 
where the father followed mining until his letirement. He is now living 
in Keokuk, Iowa. Mr. Stone gives his allegiance to the democratic party 
and his religious views are in accord with the doctrines of the Methodist 
church. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. He is a man of high integrit)- and commercial honor, who enjoys in 
highest measure the respect of all who know him. That man\- of his 
firmest friends are numbered among those who have known him from 
boyhood to the present time is an indication that his has been an honor- 
able and upright life and one well worthy of the highest esteem. 



CHARLES S. CONGER. 



-Charles S. Conger is a worthy representative of one of the earliest 
pioneer families of Appanoose county and is well known in this section, 
where he was born. His popularity is due to definite attainment in agri- 
cultural pursuits and in the held ot public life and his success and [iromi- 
nence have rewartlcd an active, useful and honorable business career filled 
with hard work ami persevering labor. He was born on the farm which 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 357 

he now operates and which he calls the Hillside Stock rarm. Au^'ust 8, 
1862, and is a son of Elias Conger, a native ot Ohio. The grandfather 
of the subject ot this review, Enos Conger founded the family in Iowa, 
moving to this state in the early period of its pioneer development and 
making a detinite location in Appanoose county when the father of our 
subject was still a child. About the year 1844 he preempted land in this 
section of the state, upon the present site of the town of Exline, which 
is now a thriving and [jrosperous village. Enos Conger later left his 
original tract and located upon the farm now owned by his grandson, 
this propert}- having therefore been in possession of the family for three 
generations. The grandfatlur owned two hundred acres wliich was all 
raw land when it came into his possession. He broke the soil and made 
substantial improvements and in the work of development was aided by 
his son, Elias, who was reared ypon the farm and who after the death 
of his father continued its operation. At the outbreak of the Civil war 
the father of our subject enlisted in the Eighteenth Iowa \'olunteer Cavalry 
and served for three years and six months in the Federal arm}-. After- 
ward he received his honorable discharge and returned home, where he 
remained for a short time, later going to the Pacific coast. His wife, who 
was in her maiilcnhood Miss Jane Ireland, was also a representative of a 
well known [jioneer family. She died in 1868 and afterward Elias Conger 
went to Washington, where he engaged in the timber business on a large 
scale and where he resided until he moved to Texas. 

Charles S. Conger remaincii at home until after the death of his 
mother, when he was bound out to a Mr. Tibhr. a farmer of Putnam 
county, Mis.souri, from whom he received kind treatment and where he 
found a good home, and a quiet but strong affection sprang up between 
master and employe. After serving his time Mr. Conger remained upon 
the farm which he operated, carrying forward the work of improvement 
and caring for Mr. Tibler in his old age. He thus grew familiar with 
the details of practical farming and became in time an able agriculturist. 
Later he purchased the farm and operated it for a number of \cars, dis- 
posing of it in 1886. Ill that \car he left Missouri and rcrurned to Appa- 
noose county, where he purchased eighty acres of the old homestead, which 
he began to farm and further improve. As his circumstances justified he 
purchased more land ami is now the owner of two hundretl anil forty 
acres, all fenced, drained and developed, and most of which is under 
cultivation. Mr. Conger first erected a fine residence and later a good 
barn which stands diagonally across the road from the house. He has 
excellent outbuildings for the shelter of stock and grain and has planted 
a number of acres in orchard, from which he harvests fine crops annuallv. 



358 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

He has made a specialty of raising and feeding stock and sometimes ships 
his animals direct to the markets, where they have a readj- sale. A man 
of quiet, steady industry, sound judgment and conservative business meth- 
ods, he has advanced step by step from poverty to wealth and from a 
humble position to one of prominence, being ranked today among the 
men who establish and promote agricultural standards in this parr of the' 
state. 

Mr. Conger marricil in Putnam county, Missouri, December 15, 1884, 
Miss Betty Spe^ik and they became the parents of six sons, of whom Roy 
N. met death by an accident in lyii, when he was twenty-five years of 
age. Those who survive are Finis T.. Ira I., Benona, Lowell E. and 
John L. 

Mr. Conger gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
has always been a force in community affairs although he has never 
desired political preferment. In 1910, however, he was elected township 
trustee of Pleasant township and has served also as a delegate to numer- 
ous county conventions. For years he has been identified with educational 
work, being especially interested in school expansion and his activities 
in this and in all other public relations have been such as reflect great credit 
on his progressiveness, his political conscientiousness and his public spirit. 



SANFORD P. MARING. 



Sanford P. Maring has been identified with the growth and develop- 
ment of Exline for many years and his work has been a force in advance- 
ment, since he has steadily promoted and built up enterprises which di- 
rectly affect growth, by furthering commercial, industrial and financial 
activity. Since the organization of the Bradley Savings Bank in 1905 he 
has been its cashier and has attained a place of prominence and influence 
in local banking circles. He is a native son of the county, born in Cald- 
well township, October 23, 1858, his father being Samuel Maring, a na- 
tive of Monroe county, Ohio. In that district the father of our subject 
grew to manhood and there married Alma Hall, .\bout 1890 he and his 
wife moved to Iowa, among the earliest pioneers in the state, and located 
in Caldwell township, Appanoose count}-, where Samuel Maring filed on 
one hundred and sixty acres of lantl and after proving his title opened up 
a farm. He gradual h- became well known and prosperous, engaging be- 
side agricultural lines in buying and selling of land. His first wife passed 
away during his period of residence here anil he later married Mrs. Juliza 




!•. M \i;iN(; 



UOi'if^"'^ 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 361 

\ an Dyke, a native of \'irginia, who was reared and educated in that state. 
Samuel Maring died upon the home farm, July n, 1901, having survived 
his wife since 1881. 

Sanford P. Maring was reared at home and at an early age acquired 
familiarity with the best methods of farm operation. He aided his father 
with the work of the tiekis until his marriage, which occurred in 1880, in 
which year he and his wife commenced their domestic life upon the Mat- 
ing homestead, which the subject of this review rented from his father. He 
later purchased one hundred and eighty acres and still owns this property, 
upon which he has erected a tine residence, a good barn and convenient 
outbuildings and installed the necessary farm equipment. The property 
is made especially valuable on account of the rich deposits of coal with 
which a part of it is underlaid. The Iowa Block Coal Company has sunk 
a shaft upon the land and has touched a rich vein from which for the past 
eight or ten }ears they have taken out large quantities of fine coal. 

After he had lived upon his farm for some time Mr. Maring became 
interested in the town of Exline, recognizing in its growing prosperity and 
ex{xmsion a good business opportunit}-. He purchased a tract of land just 
adjoining the town, platted it as a subdivision, laid out streets and walks, 
surveyed lots and put them up for sale. In his promotion of this enter- 
prise he showed his fine business ability and executive force, tor lie tarrictl 
it forward to successful completion, his addition being now an integral 
part of the town. He has built and sold several fine residences and has 
eight dwellings rented to tenants, owning besides valuable residence and 
lousiness property. When the Bradley Savings Bank was organized in 
itpi Mr. Maring was one of the leading figures in the promotion of the 
enterprise, ot which he was made manager and cashier. He is thoroughly 
conversant with the banking business in principle and in detail and his 
capable control of the Bradley Savings Bank is manifested in its growing 
prosperity. It is one ot the reliable financial institutions in this part of 
the state and conducts all kinds of banking business. 

Mr. Maring has been twice marrietl. On October 10. 1880. he wciiiled 
Miss Ella Hollenbeck, a native of Pennsylvania, who afterward came to 
Appanoose county. She passed awa)' on Januar) 26, 1907, leaving three 
children: Nadie, the wife of T. C. Kline, of Exline; John I..; and Claude 
S. On the 14th of Sejitember, 1907, Mr. Maring was again marrieil, his 
second wite being Miss Kate Kinkaid, who was born in Monroe county, 
Ohio, but who was educated in Exline and Centerville. Previous to her 
marriage she was a teacher in the public schools ot Appanoose county and 
was well known in local educational circles. 



362 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Mr. Maring gives his |)()lirical allrgiance to the democratic party, with 
which he has been affiliated since casting his first vote. He has been elected 
to a number of important local positions of trust and honor, in all of which 
he has served capably and conscientiously, bending his energies to the pro- 
morion of projects which affect the public growth. He is a member of 
Exline Lodge, No. 726, I. (). (). F., and he and his wife belong to the Re- 
bekahs. Both are members of the Christian church and are well known in 
the community, their home being the center of a charming circle ot friends. 
Mr. Maring gives his influence and aid to progressive public measures and 
is a stanch supporter of the business, social and political institutions of the 
community which he has done so much to upbuild. 



JOHN TILLMONT. 



John Tillmont, engaged in general farming on section, 6, Taylor 
township, is the owner of three hundred and fourteen acres of rich and 
productive land, upon which he has made many improvements so that the 
farm is one of the attractive properties in his part of the count}'. A native 
of New York, he was born in New Bremen, Lewis county, October 10, 
1864, his parents being Stephen and Elizabeth (Bach) Tillmont, who 
were natives of Alsace-Lorraine, but were reared and married in Lewis 
county, New York. The father came to the United States when tour- 
teen years of age and the mother was but a little girl at the time of her 
arrival in the new world. They remained in the Empire state until their 
son, John, was three years ot age, when they removed westward to Mich- 
igan. After a year and a half, however, they returned to New Bremen, 
where their remaining days were spent. The father followed farming 
throughout his entire life and at different times he also held some local 
offices, including that of highway' commissioner, overseer ot the poor and 
inspector ot elections. In politics he was ever a stanch democrat. Unto 
him and his wife were born eight children: Kate, who died in Centerville, 
Iowa, in 1911; John; ^Llr}•. the wife of John C. Bardo, of New Bremen. 
New York: P. J., who died in Iowa in iQio; Emma, living in Center- 
ville; J. B., who died in Oregon in IQOQ; Jennie, the wife of Charles 
Walter, of New Bremen, New York; and Dr. C. P. Tillmont, of Center- 
ville. 

John Tillmont remained under the parental roof to the time of his 
marriage and the experiences of farm life in the Empire state were his. 
His educational opportunities were those afforded by the public schools 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 363 

and he learned lessons of industn-, economy and enterprise upon the old 
homestead. On the 4th ot March, 1886, he married Miss Sarah Mills, 
who was born in New Bremen, New York, April 14, 1861, a daughter of 
David and Magdalene (Lodenberg) Mills, the former a native of Ger- 
many and the latter of France. They were married, however, in New 
York, where the father followed shoe making and where both he and his 
wife died. Mr. and Mrs. Tiilmont became parents of five children, Nina, 
Fred, C'elia, David and Magdalene. 

It was in the year 1899 that Mr. Tiilmont came with his family to 
Iowa, settling in Taylor township, .\ppanoose county, where he has since 
carried on general agricultural pursuits. He is now the owner of three 
hundred and fourteen acres of rich and ferriic land and the place is well 
improved with substantial buildings and all modern equipments, includ- 
ing the machinery necessary to facilitate and promote the work of the 
fields. He raises the cereals best adajited to soil and climate and is 
very successful in his undertakings. His political support is given to the 
democratic party and while living in New York he filled a number of 
township offices, but since coming to the west has concentrated his ener- 
gies upon his farm work with the result that he is meeting with sub- 
stantial success in his undertakings and is accounted one of the leading and 
representative agriculturists of Taylor township. 



ELZA W. ADAMSON. 



Elza W. .\damson, representative of one of the oldest pioneer fam- 
ilies in Appanoose county, a native son of this section and today one of its 
active and progressive farmers and public-spirited citizens, was born in 
Pleasant township, December 23, 1868. His father, Henry Adamson. 
was a native of Fayette county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. From 
that state he moved into Iowa in 1848 and came as a pioneer to .Appa- 
noose county, dating his residence in this locality from Ma}- 1. 1892. In 
that year he preempted six hundred and forty acres of land and turned his 
attention to general farming, being obliged to break the soil before he 
could begin the work ot development. He married in Lee county, Iowa, 
near Fort Madixm. .Miss IVnthesilea Frost, a native of Ohio, who grew 
to womanhood in Lee coimty. She was active in religious circles and a 
charter member ot the First Christian chunh in the state of Iowa, wliich 
was founded at Lost Creek. Mr. ami Mr>. Henrv .\damson have both 



364 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

passed awa), the tornur d) ing November 18, 1911, at the advanced age 
of ninety-four, and the hitter on the 15th of October, 1894. 

El'/a \\'. Adamson is the youngest in a family of nine children, all 
of whom married and became heads of tamilies. Mrs. J. \V. Shively, an 
only sister, died on the 14th of January, 1906. J. B. Adamson, a brother, 
was killed in a railroad accident on the 1st of May, 1912. Elza VV. 
Adamson was reared upon his father's farm in Pleasant township and 
received his primary education in the public schools, supplementing this 
by a course in the Centerville high school. Later he attended the \\'estern 
Normal at Shenandoah and at the age of eighteen received his certificate 
and began teaching in the common schools of his native section. He 
later followed the same occupation in Cincinnati, teaching in the gram- 
mar grades and doing work which won him wide recognition and promo- 
tion to the position of principal of the Unionville schools. After three 
years he was elected school superintendent for Appanoose county, served 
one term and was reelected in 1897 for another term. He reduced the 
affairs under his charge to a definite organized system and in this way 
accomplished effective and far-reaching results, holding institutes every 
year with the assistance of some of the best educators in the state. In 
this way he brought the county teachers closeh" in touch with the advance- 
ment of educational methods and in a noticeable way raised the standard 
of efficiency in the profession throughout Iowa. He was connected with 
the schools of Appanoose county for a period of twenty years. 

Since leaving office Mr. Adamson has devoted most of his attention 
to the further development of his fine farm of one hundred and eighty 
acres on section 27, Franklin township, upon which he engages in general 
farming and stock-raising, being ranked among the most successful and 
progressive agriculturists of Appanoose county. 

In Lincoln township, on the 15th of November, 1892, Mr. .\damson 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary Condra, a native of Appanoose 
county and the only daughter of Franklin Condra. whose famih- was 
numbered among the first settlers in the state, coming here as early as the 
year 1848. Mr. and Mrs. Adamson had six children. The eldest, Esther, 
died at the age of ten months. Neil C. completed the course in the Sey- 
mour high school and is now in his first year in the Iowa State University. 
U. Gene completed the course in the country schools and is now attending 
the Seymour high school. The other children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Adamson are Elsie Luvey, Ersel and Thelma. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adamson united with the Christian church at Center- 
ville in Januar)', 1896, and remained members there until they removed 
to their present farm in Franklin township, where they have been actively 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 365 

identitied with the Mt. Olive church since 1904. Mr. Adamson has since 
served continuously in the capacity of Sunday school superintendent and 
also as an olficial ot rhe church board. He gives his political allegiance to 
the republican party and is now serving with ability and conscientiousness 
as township trustee. He has tor many years been active in the public life 
ot the district and has been chosen delegate to numerous count)' conven- 
tions. In his busine.ss dealings he has ever been straightforward and reli- 
able, enjoying the full confidence of those with whom he has been asso- 
ciated, and he is in every sense ot the word one of the representative citizens 
ot A[ipanoose county. 



ROBER I BEKCHER CARSON. 

Among the estimable pioneers of Appanoose county, who belong to 
the rapidl}- thinning ranks of the honored men who donned the blue 
and went to the tront in defense of their country's flag, must be mentioned 
Robert Beecher Carson. He began his career as an agriculturist, but 
more than forty years ago he came to Moulton and engaged in the grain 
business. Later he established the lumber and fuel business he is still 
conducting, and he was also one of the founders of the State Savings 
Bank, ot which he is now vice president. Mr. Carson has passed the 
greater part of his life in Iowa, but he is a native of Indiana, his birth 
having occurred in Shelby county on the 1st of October, 1842. He is a 
son of William Tatman and Sarah (Cosier) Carson, who located in this 
state more than sixty years ago. The father, who was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, on the 29th of August, 1817, passed away in April, 1904, 
but the mother, who is in her eighty-ninth year, having been born July 5, 
1823, is still living and makes her home in Bloomtield, Iowa. The Car- 
son family is of Scotch-Irish extraction, but have long been residents of the 
United States, some ot the toretathers having sought refuge from religious 
persecution in southern Pennsylvania during colonial days. There the 
grandfather, John Carson, was born on the 1 itli of May. 1788. In early 
life he removed to Miami county, Ohio, going from there to Shelby county, 
Indiana, where he passed away in 187^. His father was a veteran of the 
Revolutionary war. Accompanied by his wife and family, in 18^1 Will- 
iam r. Carson came to Iowa and preempted a quarter section of land in 
Davis count)-, which is still in possession of the family. The family of 
Mr. and Mrs. Carson numbered ten. two of whom ilicd in infancy. Those 
who lived to attain maturitv arc as follow^: James, a resident of Davis 



366 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

county, this state, who is deceased; Robert B., our subject; Elsina, the 
deceased wife of E. B. Kinnick, of Davis county, Iowa; Florence A., 
who married Jacob Abka, of Bloonifield, Iowa; Mar)- C, who is unmar- 
ried and residing at home; John \V., a minister in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, located at Waveland, Iowa; Alice, who married \V. J. Baldridge, 
of Bloomfield, Iowa: and J()M])h (i.. a resident of Seattle, Washington. 

The tirst nine years in the life of Robert Beecher Carson were passed 
in his native state. In the acquirement of his education he attended the 
district school for two terms, continuing his studies in a select school at 
Troy, this state. He was reared in very much the same manner as all 
countr)' }Ouths during the pioneer period and earh' became familiar with 
the duties of an agriculturist. After laying aside his text-books he assisted 
with the cultivation of the home farm until the fall of 1861, when he 
enlisted as a private in Company G, Second Iowa Infantry, remaining 
at the front for three years and eight months, during which time he par- 
ticipated in some of the notable engagements of the war. He was in the 
charge up the hill at Fort Donelson, Pittsburg Landing, siege of Corinth, 
where he was wounded in the leg, battle of Inke and the Atlanta cam- 
paign. He was with Sherman on his famous march and was in the 
Grand Review of the troops at Washington at the close of hostilities. 
When mustered out he returned home and resumed the duties of civil life 
as a farmer. He assisted with the cultivation of the old homestead until 
1872, when he came to Moulton and went into the grain business, in 
which he met with a fair measure of success. About 1883 he extended the 
scope of his activities by putting in a stock of lumber and coal and has 
ever since continued in this line of business, carrying a full line of building 
materials. He assisted in the organization of the Moulton State Savings 
Bank in 1903 and is now vice president of this institution. Mr. Carson 
is an industrious man of principles and trustworthy bu>iness methods, which 
qualities have served to rank him with the representative members of 
the commercial fraternity of Moulton. 

In 1873, Mr. Carson was married to Miss Elizabeth May Deeds, who 
was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, in iS^i. and is a daughter of 
Isaac and Mary Jane (Bryan) Deeds, who were likewise natives of 
Pennsylvania, where they passed away during the childhood of Mrs. Car- 
son. Mr. and Mrs. Carson have four children, as follows: Guy R., who 
is married and residing in Des Moines; Craig, who married V'erna Lee 
and is residing in Moulton; Helen, the wife. of J. B. Sneed, of Moravia, 
and the mother of one child; and George T.. who is still at home. 

The parents are members of the Presbyterian church, and fraternally 
Mr. Carson is affiliated with the Grand .Army of the Republic, the Masonic 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 567 

order and the Ea.-^tern Star, ut which Mrs. Carson is likewise a member. 
He once served as township trustee, but has never figured prominently 
in local politics, although he is not remiss in matters of citizenship and 
can be relied upon to support every worthy enterprise or commendable 
movement. He is a stanch republican, having upheld the principles of 
this party, for which he fought at Civil war times, since attaining his 
majoritv, and its measures and candidates find in him a stalwart champion. 
Mr. Carson is widely and favorably known in this vicinity, where he has 
man}- friends w ho accord him the respect and esteem he merits by reason of 
the honorable and upright manner in which he has directed his career. 



GEORGE M. SMUH. 



George M. Smith has been a resident of Pleasant township since 1893 
and was for a number of years closelj- associated with business interests in 
Cincinnati. Of late, however, he has turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits and as the owner of a well improved farm of two hundred acres 
holds a high place in farming circles. He was born in Bevier, Macon 
county, Missouri, on the 2gth of December, 1872, and is a son of Charles 
E. Smith, a native of Indiana, who came west to Iowa with his parents 
when he was still a boy and from there moved to Missouri, where he 
arew to maturitv. In Macon county- he married and afterward obtained 
work in the mines, rising to the position of foreman. His wife passed 
away in 1894 and he now makes his home with his son, the subject of 
this review. 

George M. Smith was reared upon his father's farm in Macon county 
and remained at home until after he had reached manhood, acquiring his 
education in the public schools. When he began his active career he 
came to .Appanoose county and formed a partnership with Charles Claw- 
son, with whom he engaged in the butcher business in Cincinnati tor over 
sixteen years. The partners also engaged extensively in dealing in real 
estate and in handling stock. After a time Mr. Smith purchased his part- 
ner's interest in both enterprises and continuetl to operate them until 191 l, 
although he had moved on to his farm one mile south ot the city some 
years before. Since disposing of his business interests he has directed his 
attention almost entirely to the development of his land, the results of 
his care and supervision being apparent in the excellent condition of 
the farm. Mr. Smith has erected a fine house upon his projicrty. has 
fenced hi< fields and made other substantial improvements and is 



363 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

ranked today among the most active and progressive farmers of this part 
of the state. He gives special attention to raising and feeding stock and 
his success in this branch of his work is the result of long experience and 
thorough knowledge. His business methods will bear the closest scrutiny 
and his integrity stands as an unquestioned fact in his career. 

Mr. Smith married, in Cincinnati, November 5, 1907, Miss Luella 
James, a native of Ohio, who came to Iowa with her parents and later 
moved to Nebraska. Afterward, however, the famih- returned to this 
state and located in Appanoose county. Mrs. Smith is a daughter of 
Samuel James, now a resident of Cincinnati. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have 
three children, Georgia, Mary and Doris. 

In his political views Mr. Smith is a loyal democrat and has been 
affiliated with the party since casting his first vote. While a resident of 
Cincinnati he was elected to the town board and served with ability and 
conscientiousness for two or three terms. He is well known in the affairs 
of the Knights of Pythias and has served through all the chairs, being now 
past grand chancellor. He has also represented his lodge in the grand 
lodge of the state at different times. He stands high in both business and 
social relations and deserves special mention as one of the representative 
agriculturists of Appanoose county. 



JERRY A. REPLOGLE. M. D. 

Dr. Jerry A. Replogle, engaged in the practice ot medicine in Ldell, 
for which work he was carefully and thoroughly trained in a college 
course, was born in Udell township, Appanoose county, October 10, 
1859, his parents being George B. and Catherine (McGee) Replogle. 
The father was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, October 3, 1831, 
and the mother was a native of Washington City, Maryland, born March 
10, 1831. They were of French and Irish lineage respectiveh' and were 
married in Baltimore, Maryland, December 19, 1852, after which they 
established their home upon a farm in Bedford county, Pennsylvania. 
In 1856 they became residents of Davis county. Iowa, and a year later 
removed to Appanoose county, George B. Replogle renting a farm in 
Udell township. As he prospered in his undertakings he purchased land 
in Vermillion township which he cultivated until 1863, when he removed 
to Moulton, where he engaged in dealing in grain. In 1874, however, 
he returned to his farm and from that time on gave his attention to bee 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY ;j71 

culture and to tiic care ot hii urcliard, which was one ot the linest in the 
count} . He had an extensive apiary and was well known in that respect, 
having many hives and gathering theretroni each year a large amount 
ot honey. For a number ot years he tilled the office of township clerk 
and was alwajs a progressive and public-spirited citizen, supporting many 
measures and movements tor the general good. His wife died on the old 
homestead farm in Vermillion township in 1892, after which he left the 
old place and made his home with his children, dying at the residence ot 
his son John in Udell township, February f, 1910. l^nto him and his 
wife were born eleven children: Martin L., who is a retired tarmer and 
stock dealer of Longbeach, California; Jemima M., who was born August 
3, 1854, '*'^'^' '^''*'^' October 17, 1871; David M., who was born .\pril 9, 
1856, and died April 16, 1857; John A., who was born August 25, 1857, 
and is a resident farmer of Udell township; Jerry A., of this review; 
Abraham J., who was born August 2, 1861, and is engaged in selling 
oranges at Santa Ana, California; Louise Elnora, who was born March 
5, 1863, and is the wife of Richard Downing, chief clerk in the freight 
department of the Frisco railroad offices at St. Louis: Henry M., who was 
born April 3. 1869, and was graduated from Rush Medical College of 
Chicago in 1895 ^•'^h the M. D. degree, after which he practiced his 
profession in Udell until his death May 29, 1904; Silas M.. horn .lan- 
uary 19, 1871, who died November 10, 1872; Leah, born July 28. 1874, 
who died October 9, 1874; and Geneva, who was born March 20. 1876, 
and died April 6, 1891. 

Dr. Replogle spent his youthful days under the [xirental root, remain- 
ing at home until 1881, when at the age of twenty-two years he went 
to Pottawatomie county, Kansas, and in partnership with his brother 
purchased a ranch of one thousand acres. For a few )ears he lived in the 
Sunflower state and then returned to Udell township, where he carried 
on general farming until he resumed studies in preparation for a |>n)- 
fessional career. He was graduated from the Iowa State College at Ames 
in 1892 with the degree of Doctor of \'eterinary Surgery and located tor 
practice at Centerville in 1893. At length, however, he resolved to engage 
in the practice of medicine and became a student in the college at Iowa 
Citv, Iowa, completing the course in the mediral department in 1898, 
when the M. D. degree was conferred upon him. He then returned to 
Centerville, where he practiced until 1904, when he removed to Udell, 
where he has since been located. He is constantly advancing in his pro- 
fession as his ability increases through experience, reading ami investiga- 
tion, and his jiractice is now extensive and gratitying. 

On the 9th of October, 1893. Dr. Rejilngle was married to .\Ii.-..n .Mag- 



372 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

gie Gedney, a daughter of C'a])tain J. B. and Sarah (Laseur) Gedney, 
the tormer a retired tanner living in Centerville. Mrs. Replogle died 
only eighteen months and t\vent)-one days after their marriage and on 
the 14th of October, 1900, the Doctor was married again, his second 
union being with Miss Christina Mitchell, a daughter of Alexander and 
Maggie Mitchell, both ot whom were natives of Scotland, while the 
father became a coal miner of Centerville. In 1903, Dr. Replogle was 
again called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who passed away in Center- 
ville on the 12th of March. The following year he removed to Udell, 
where he has since made his home. By his first marriage he had one child, 
who died in infancy. 

In addition to his growing practice, which claims much of his time 
and attention, Dr. Replogle gives his supervision to a farm of one hun- 
dred and forty acres which he owns. This is a well-improved tract of 
land on section 7, Udell township, and in \he spring of 1912 he further 
increased his possessions by the purchase of a forty-acre tract of fruit land 
in Hidalgo county, Texas. He has never been an office seeker but gives 
his political support to the republican party and keeps well informed 
on the questions and issues of the day. He belongs to the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Udell and the Rebekah degree and is also a member of the Court 
of Honor. He was formerly identified with several other fraternal organ- 
izations but has withdrawn. His religious faith is that of the Christian 
church, of which he is an active and valued member, serving as an elder 
in the church of Udell. His life has indeed been well spent, his useful- 
ness and worth being acknowledged by all, and in his profession he is 
meeting with the advancement and success which follow capability and 
close application. 



CORSE PAYTON. 



Corse Payton, prominently known in theatrical circles throughout the 
country and successful in his efforts in this great department of public 
entertainment, was born in Centerville, December 18, 1866, a son of 
Joseph and Elizabeth Payton. The father was born in Shelby county, 
Missouri, November 12, 1836, and was a son of John ami Emily Payton. 
He came to Appanoose county in 1844 and five years later took up his 
abode in Centerville, where the remainder of his life was passed, covering 
a half century. He was one of the pioneer settlers here and took active 
and helpful part in promoting the work of public progress and improve- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 373 

ment. Attcr enlisting in 1862 as a member ot Company D, >'Sixth Regi- 
ment of Iowa \'olunteer Intantry, he served tor three years, after which 
he reenlisted and remained at the front until illness forced his resignation 
and he was obliged to return home. In 1877 he was elected city marshal 
of Centerville and served for two terms. He was also at one time street 
commissioner ot Centerville and was numbered among the prominent rep- 
resentatives of the republican part\ in Appanoose county. He ever rec- 
ognized the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizen- 
ship and sought to promote public welfare through the exercise of his 
franchise and in man}' other ways. He was an honored member of the 
Cirand Arm}' post at Centerville and also belonged to the (3dd Fellows 
and Knights ot Pythias lodges, exemplifying in his life their beneficent 
sjjirit and high purpose. He passed away September 30, 1899, after a 
halt century's residence in Centerville and hfty-four years' connection 
with Ap{)anoose county. He was married in 1858 to Mrs. Kli'/.abeth 
(Swearingen) Manson, who was born in Springfield, Illinois, August 6, 
183O, and still occupies the old Payton homestead in Centerville. She is 
a lady of man} splendid traits of character and her good qualities of 
heart and mind have endeared her to all with whom she has come in 
contact. B}' her former marriage she had a daughter, Mary Manson, who 
is the widow of S. Spooner and a resilient of New York city. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Payton were born four children. James, the eldest, who is a 
miner, married Jennie Fischer, now deceased, and he and his four children 
make their home with his mother. Center passed awa}' at Salem Ohio, 
and Henry was killed at the Centerville depot. 

Corse, the youngest member of the family, pursued his education in 
the schools of Centerville and since starting out in the business world has 
devoted his energies and attention to theatrical interests, in which con- 
nection he has become widely known. He was the founder ot the popular 
ten-twcnty-thirty-cent theatrical entertainment, the pertormances given 
by stock companies. He saw .splendid possibilities in that ilirection tor 
placing upon the boards capable companies and thus giving to the [lublic 
a high class of entertainment ot a character that could not be done where 
companies have to meet heav} traveling expen.ses. Fn tlii- uiuii rraking he 
has displayed e,\<-cutive ability and nuuh initiative spirit. His labors 
have made him widely known in theatrical circles throughout the country 
and he is a member of various organizations tormed among theatrical 
})eople, including the White Rats of America, the P>iar.s, the \'audeville 
Comedy Club, the Actors Society and the Managers As.sociation. Hi- is 
also a member of the New York Press Civib and is a charter member of 
the Rrooklvn lodge of Elks and a member of the Masonic frafernir\ . The 



374 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

military chapter in his life history covers service in the Iowa Xationa\ 
Guard. His political faith is that of the republican party and his religious 
belief that of the Baptist church, his membership being in New York. 

Mr. Payton was married to Miss Etta Reed, a native of Ohio. His 
frequent visits to Centerville have made him widely known in this city 
where his acquaintance with many old friends is maintained while at all 
times he is constantly adding new ones. He is known in his professional 
connections from one end of the country to the other and is very popular 
with theatrical people as well as managers. Business ability, executive 
force and keen insight have been features in his success which is of sub- 
stantial and enviable character. 



WILLIAM F. ORGAN. 



During a residence of twenty-two years in Iowa William F. Organ 
has improved and developed three fine farms and has made substantial 
contributions to the agricultural development of the state. He stands 
among the progressive and representative farmers of Pleasant township, 
where he owns and operates two hundred acres of land on section 16, 
which by his own well directed energy and intelligent management he 
has made a model property. He was born in Derby, England, Novem- 
ber 20, 1864, and acquired his education in his native community, where 
he remained until he was eighteen years of age. In 1882 he took passage 
at Liverpool on a steamer bound for New York and arrived in that city 
in October of the same year. He pushed westward to Brookfield, Mis- 
souri, where he obtained employment upon the old Hannibal & St. Joseph 
Railroad and afterward for five or six years did mason work on bridges. 
In the hope of bettering his financial condition he came to Iowa and set- 
tled in Lee county, where he worked for some time in a rock quarry. 
After two years, however, he went to Grafton, Illinois, and resumed his 
quarrying, continuing in that line of work until he went to Farmington, 
Van Buren county, Iowa, where he engaged in coal mining. His mar- 
riage occurred in that section and immediately afterward he came to Pleas- 
ant township and located on five acres of land near his present farm. 
This property he later sold and purchased eighty acres, which he developed 
only a short time, after which he bought a tract of one hundred and 
fifty-five acres, built a residence upon it and continued to develop and 
improve it for some time. W^hcn he sold this fami he moved to his present 
property, upon which he has since made substantial improvements. He 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 375 

has erected a fine residence, good barns and outbuildings, has fenced his 
hind into convenient fields and planted a number of acres in orchard. 
In addition he gives special attention to raising, feeding, buying and sell- 
ing stock, his herds containing many high-grade animals. He owns also 
a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in New Mexico, four miles iron^ 
[^as \'egas, upon which he has been installing an excellent system ot irri- 
^'ation and which is rising in value every year. 

Mr. Organ married, in \'an Bunn county, December 6, l8c)i. Miss 
Klla VN'aderas, who was born in Ohio but who came to Iowa when she 
was six or seven years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Organ have three sons and 
four daughters, Blanche Ruth, Fern Eliza, Flossie M., Virgil W., Glen, 
C'lirtditl (r. and Irnia. Mrs. Organ is a devout adherent of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. Organ is independent in his [lolitical views and votes always 
for the man whom he considers best fitted for the position without regard 
to party affiliations. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias in Cincinnati 
and is also a charter member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
His career has been identified with the later period of agricultural develop- 
ment in Appanoose county, where he has gained prosperity and success and 
where he is an honored and respected citizen. 



BELFOKU .\LEXAM)EU \\.\LKEK. 

Belford Alexander Walker is now living retired in Mystic but for 
many years he was actively associated with agricultural interests in south- 
ern Iowa, the energj- and industrj- which he manifested in the conduct of 
his business affairs bringing to him the substantial measure of success 
uhirii now enables him to rest from further labor. He was born in 
Morgan county, Missouri, February 14, 1844, a son of Simon and Mar- 
garet (Br\an) Walker. The father was born in Ohio in 1809, and the 
mother in Pennsylvania in 1818, and they were married in the latter 
fate. After a two-)ears' residence in Ohio they removed to Morgan 
(ounty, Missouri, in the fall of 1839 and there resided until 185^ when 
they came with their family to Walnut townshij), ,\fipanoose county, where 
their remaining days were passetl. The father secured here a farm, one 
mile anil a half northwest of Walnut City, and converted it into a rich 
and productive place. He also worked to some extent at the cari»entcr's 
trade. His political support was given to the democratic party until 
Stephen A. Douglas became its presidential canilidate. after which he 



376 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

voted with the republican party. He was a loyal member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and his life was ever honorable and upright. He 
died at about the age of ninety-four years and six months and his wife 
passed away when ninety-four years of age. They were the parents of 
eleven children of whom one died in infancy, the others being: James N., 
a general merchant of Walnut City, Iowa; Sarah Ellen, the widow of 
Nehemiah Swift and a resident of Washington; B. A., ot this review; 
Mary Elizabeth, who is the widow of S. H. Smith, of Walnut City; 
Marshall, of Nebraska; Simon, whose home is in Coon Rapids, Iowa; 
R. B., of Walnut township; Harriet C, the wife of Jasper Stoltz, of 
Mystic; B. F., of Johnson township; and Lucy, the wife of John Bland, 
of Oklahoma. 

Belford A. Walker was a lad of eleven years when in 1855 the family 
home was established upon a farm in Walnut township. He has since re- 
sided in Appanoose county save for a period of three years spent as a soldier 
in the Civil war. In August, 1862, when a lad of about eighteen years, 
he enlisted as a member of Company F, Thirty-sixth Iowa Infantr\-, and 
served until the close of hostilities, being mustered out at Duval's Bluff, 
Arkansas, in 1865. He was a brave and patriotic soldier, never faltering 
in the performance of his duty whether on the lonely picket line or fighting 
on the firing line. . On his return to this county he began farming and 
was actively connected with agricultural interests until 1911, when he 
retired and took up his abode in Walnut City. Year after year he care- 
fully, systematically and successfully conducted his farming enterprise 
and his well managed business interests brought to him the desirable 
competence which is now his and which enables him to live retired. He 
is still the owner of two hundred and sixty-three and a half acres of 
land lying along the Chariton river on section 28, Walnut township, and 
for thirty years he resided upon that place. 

On the 28th of March, 1867, Mr. Walker was married to Miss 
Luoinda Bartlett, who was born in Walnut township, January 21, 1849, 
and is a daughter of Joseph and Catharine (Childress) Bartlett, the former 
a native of Illinois and the latter of Kentucky. The}- were married in 
Bloomfield, Iowa, the mother having come to this state with her parents 
when a little maiden of nine summers. Mr. Bartlett died in Keokuk while 
a member of the army, having enlisted in the same company in which 
Mr. Walker served. Mrs. Bartlett passed awa} in .Appanoose count}. 
November 14, 1891, at the age of sixty-three years. They were the par- 
ents of eight children, four sons and four daughters, ot whom six are now 
living. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Walker have been born five children: Frank- 
lin, a resident of South Dakota; Mary, the wife of Arthur Scott, of Chari- 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 377 

ton township; Olive, the wite ot Charles Scott, of Lucerne, Missouri; 
Simon, who married Jessie Haines and makes his home in \\'ainut town- 
ship; and Gertrude, the wite of Harrison McLeod of Walnut township. 
The parents are members of the Christian church and have a circle of 
warm friends that is continuously expanding as the circle of their acquaint- 
ance widens. Mr. Walker votes with the republican party and he holds 
membership with the Grand Army of the Republic. He is as true and 
loval in all of his duties of citizenship as when he followed the old flag 
on southern battlefields, proving his fidelity to his country during the 
darkest hour in her history. 



REMEMBRANCE H. CIRL. 

Remembrance H. Curl, who owns and operates a farm of four hundred 
acres, one of the best improved and most valuable properties in Franklin 
townshijx has long been a resident of Iowa, having settled in Washington 
county in 1878. His birth occurred in Peoria county, Illinois, July 20, 
18^8, and he was reared upon his father's farm, acquiring his education in 
the public schools. When he reached manhood he left Illinois ;unl eanie 
to Iowa, locating in Washington county, where he remained for a number 
of years. He there purchased a farm of sevent)-eight acres and gave his 
entire attention to its further improvement and development, adding to 
his holdings the eighty adjoining acres. After twelve years he sold this 
property at a profit and moved into Clarke county, where he acquired one 
hundred and sixty acres, which he developed for a time. When he dis- 
posed of that propert}' he bought two hundred and sixty acres in the same 
locality and farmed upon it until igo2, when he moved to Appanoose 
county and bought four hundred acres, upon which he now resides. Upon 
this jirofierty he has built a new two-story house, a large barn, besides 
convenient outbuildings for the care of the stock and grain. He has 
fenced and cross-fenced his fields, dividing them into convenient size, and 
ha^ planted a number of acres in orchard. .\s a result ot his well directed 
activity he now owns a well improved tann. which in all ot its details 
shows the careful supervision ot an expert and e\|nTienc-ed agriculturist. 
In addition to general tanning .Mr. Curl is extensively interested in raising 
stock for the market and is especially well known as a breeder of standard 
Percheron horses. 

In 1882 Mr. Curl was united in marriage to Miss Gerenia \'an .\tta, 
who was born and reared in \\'ashington covmt). The) became the |>;ir- 



378 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

ents ot seven children. The eldest, Walter R., is a farmer in Franklin 
township. He is married and has two children, Lloyd and Harry. John 
W. is operating a tract of land in Pleasant township. He is married and 
has a daughter, VVilma. A married daughter, Mrs. Jessie Beer, has a son, 
Donald W. Vera and William Hughes reside at home. Elmer passed 
away in infancy at the age of seven weeks and Lee Roy when eight years 
old. Mr. and Mrs. Curl are devout members of the Mount Olive Chris- 
tian church. 

Mr. Curl gives his allegiance to the republican party, with which he 
has been affiliated since attaining his majority. He served for some time 
as township trustee and has also been a delegate to numerous county con- 
ventions. He has thus done not a little to promote public advancement 
and to mold public policy in Appanoose count}-, and his cooperation has 
always been given to projects and movements which have for their object 
improvement and substantial progress. 



WILLL'^M M. SCOTT, M. D. 

Dr. William M. Scott for many years was a capable ph}>ician with 
large practice in Centerville but since 1894 has lived retired. He was 
born February 25, 1836, in Iowa, when this state was still undt-r terri- 
torial rule, his birthplace being in what is now Lee county. His parents 
were James and Sarah (Grant) Scott, natives of Kentuck)-. The father 
came to Iowa in 1835 and from the government entered a tract of wild 
land which he cleared and improved, carrying on farming for man}" years. 
He also ran a stage coach in the early days which antedated railroad travel 
in this part of the country, and he likewise carried mail across the country. 
He continued to live there for years or until he retired, when he removed to 
Burlington, making his home with his son until his death, which occurred 
in 1897, when he had reached the remarkable old age of ninety-seven years. 
For two decades he had survived his wite, who passed away in 1877. 

Their son, Doctor Scott, was reared and educated at West Point, Iowa, 
and also attended Mount Pleasant College. He later entered the Keokuk 
Medical College at Keokuk, Iowa, in order to accjuaint himselt with the 
principles of medical practice and in i860 he removed to Knoxville, Iowa, 
where he practiced until the time ot his enlistment for service as a surgeon 
of the Thirty-third Iowa Regiment in the Civil war. He was on active 
duty until the close of hostilities and his professional skill and ability 
proved a boon to many a suffering soldier. 



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HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 381 

With rhc closf of tin- war Doctor Scott came to Ccntervillc louii. 
where he entered upon the practice ot meclicine, in which he continued 
active!) until 1894, ^^'hen he retired. He has never recovered from disease 
contracted in the service ot this country. 

On the 2d ot June, 1861, Doctor Scott was married to Miss Sarah K. 
\euse, a daughter of Frederick and .\nna (SatFell) Ncuse, the tormer a 
native ot Maryhmd and the latter ot \irginia. In the year 1847 ^^^- Neuse 
came to Iowa, settling in Keokuk. He was a cabinet-maker by traile and 
developing a ver}' extensive trade leading to the establishment ot lumber 
yards all over Iowa and also in Missouri. He thus became one of the 
[iromincnr representatives ot lommcnial interests in Keokuk, where he 
continued to make his home until his death, which occurred on the 2d of 
April, 1891, when he was seventy-eight years of age. He had for a num- 
ber of years survived his wife, who died in 1880 at the age ot sixty-three. 
They were the |>arents of eight children, ot whom Mrs. Scott is the only 
one now living. The Doctor ami his wife have but one child, Laura B., 
the wife of O. B. Wallace, a prominent silver and lead mine operator, in 
whose honor the town of Wallace, Idaho, was named. They became the 
[larents of five children, three of whom have passed away. Those still 
living are Walter S. and Helen, antl the latter, now seven years of age, 
i> attending school in C'enterville. The former is a practicing physician 
of Newport, Wa--hington, where he has his own hospital, and married 
Wrna Starbird. b\ whom he has one child. Mercedes, who is a great-grantl- 
child of Doctor and Mrs. Scott. The home ot Hie doctor and his wife is 
a large and beautiful residence at No. 20> West Franklin street, in addi- 
tion to which he owns seven other dwellings in this city and two excellent 
farms in .Appanoose county. At one time he had the largest practice in his 
part of the count), and many were loath to give up his services when he 
retired. He held to the highest professional standards and performed every 
tlut) .vifh a sense of conscientious obligation, while throughout the years 
of his iractice he ke|)t in close connection with the advancement being m'aile 
by the members of the medical traternit). He is still a member ot the 
Appanoose Coimty Meilical Society and he also belongs to tin Masons and 
the Benevolent Protective Onh r of KIk>. His political allegiance is given 
to the republican party and he and his wite hold membership in the Presby- 
terian church. There are no residents ot C'enterville more highly esteemed 
than this worthy couple, who for more than a half century have traveled 
lifes journey together, sharing with each other its joys and .sorrow.s, its 



Vol II— 2 I 



382 HISTORY Ol- Al'l'AXOOSE COUNTY 

adversity and its prosperity. Their high character worth, their broad intel- 
ligence, their kindly spirit and their genial hospitality have won them the 
friendship and warm regard of all who know them and no historj ot Cen- 
terville would be complete without reference to Doctor and Mrs. Scott. 



AARON S. WHISTLER. 



Aaron S. Whistler, a successful agriculturist and representative cit- 
izen of Appanoose county, owns and operates a well improved tarm of 
three hundred acres on section 18, Udell township. He is a native son ot 
this county, his birth having occurred on a tarm two and a half miles east 
of Udell, in Udell township, on the 31st of December, i860. His parents, 
Henry and Margaret (Clemens) Whistler, were both of Pennsylvania 
Dutch descent. The father, who was born near Rockbridge, Mrginia. 
on the 28th of September, 1824, accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Montgomery county, Ohio, in 1831 and four }ears later went to Wa}ne 
county, Indiana. He was married in 1846 and in 1850 established his home 
in Appanoose count}-, Iowa, on the farm where our subject was born, hav- 
ing purchased one hundred and sixty acres of school land at Centerville 
by public auction at a dollar and a quarter per acre. On that place he 
spent the remainder of his life, devoting his attention to the pursuits of 
farming and stock-raising with excellent success. His demise occurred in 
Udell township on the 31st of October, 1899, and thus the community 
lost one of its respected and substantial citizens who had made his home 
here for almost a half century. He gave his political allegiance to the 
democracy and was a consistent and devout member of the German Bap- 
tist Brethren church, which he joined in 1848. It was on the ^th of Novem- 
ber, 1846, in Wayne county, Indiana, that he wedded Miss Margaret 
Clemens, who is a native of Montgomery county, Ohio, and removed to 
the Hoosier state in company with her parents. She died March 30, 1904, 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Ullrick, on a farm a 
mile southwest of Udell. Her religious belief was that of the German 
Baptist Brethren church. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Henry Whistler were born 
ten children, as follows: J. M., an agriculturist of Fremont county, Iowa; 
Mary Ann, who is deceased; Sarah Elizabeth, the wife of C. A. Ullrick. 
who is a farmer residing near X\lell : Jacob R., who is engaged in farming 
four miles east of Udell; Isaac B., living in Missouri; David M.. who is 
a resident of Centerville; Aaron S., of this review; Catharine and Ella 
May, both of whom have passed away: and Henry A., of California. 



HISTORY OF Al'PAXOOSE COUNTY 383 

Aaron S. Whistler obtained liis education in the district schools ot his 
native township and remained on the home farm with his parents until 
twenty-three years of age, when he started out as an agriculturist on his 
own account, purchasing and locating on a tract ot eight)' acres near the 
old homestead and cultivating the same tor three years. On the expiration 
ot that period he disposed of the property and removed to Fremont count), 
this state, where he purchased another tarni ot eighty acres, devoting his 
attention to its operation for three years and then selling the place. In 
1890 he returned to this county and purcha.sed the farm of three hundred 
acres on which he has resided to the present time. The pro|>erty lies just 
outside the corporate limits of Udell and is highly improved in every 
respect. Mr. Whistler carries on general farming and stock-raising, breed- 
ing Aberdeen Angus cattle and feeding both cattle and hogs for the market 
on quite an extensive scale. He has long enjoyed an enviable reputation 
as one of the prominent agriculturists of Udell township and is well 
known as a successful and esteemed citizen of the community. 

In 1885 Mr. Whistler was united in marriage to Miss Mattie King, a 
daughter of William and Fannie (Watkins) King, both ot whom were 
natives of Indiana, the former being of Crerman and the latter of English 
descent. They were married in the Hoosier state and in the early '50s came 
to Appanoose county, Iowa, locating one mile southeast of Udell, where 
Mr. King purchased land and carried on general agricultural pursuits until 
called to his tinal rest in i8t)4. His widow spent the last years of her 
life in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Whistler, pa.ssing away in iQoG. Mr. and 
Mr-. King were the parents of ten children, namely: Mrs. John McFall. 
who is deceased; Mrs. Lea Swank, of Kansas; Abraham, of Barnard. 
Kansas; Mrs. Nancy Good, of the same place; David and Charles twins, 
also of Kansa>; .1. H. King, ot Udell; G. C. who makes his home near 
Moulton. Iowa; Mrs. Mattie Whistler; and \'incent, who is decea.sed. 
Unto our Mibjecr antl his wife have been born nine children. Merron. 
whose birth occurred on the \ ith of Februar). 1886. is a farmer ot Uilell 
township. He married Mi.ss Sadie Price ant! has one daughter, .Myrtle. 
Delia, who.se natal day was August p. 1887, is the wife of Guy Mc- 
C'onnell, a farmer of Jasper, Missouri, by whom she has one ihild. Feme. 
Maude, who was born in l88g, died when but sixteen months old. Ross. 
whose birth occurred on the "^d of December. l8()i. assists his father in the 
operation of the home tarm. \'erna. born December i^ '^94. g;ive her 
hand in marriage to John Burger, an agriculturist ot Udell township, by 
whom she has two children. Merle and Doroth). Blanche, whose natal 
dav was Jime 29. 1897, is a .student in the Uilell schools. Floyd, who.se 
birth occurred on the 19th of January, 1900. likewi.se attends school at 



384 HISTORY OF Al'I'AXUOSR COUNTY 

Udtll. Orro, born August 22, u;o2. is a |)uhlic-school student at Udell. 
Ivo, whose hirth orcurred on the 7th ot Ma\', IQ06, is also attending school 
in I'dell. 

Mr. Whistler is a stalwart democrat in politics and has served as 
school director at Udell tor htteen }ears, acting in that capacity before 
this was made an independent district. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the German Baptist Brethren church of I'dell town- 
ship, to which his wife also belongs. Both are widely known through- 
out the district in which they have resided for so many }ears, and their 
many excellent traits ot heart and mind liave gained for them a wide circle 
of acquaintances and a host of warm friends. 



AARON WASHINGTON KINCADE. 

Appanoose county numbers among its most prominent and successful 
native sons Aaron Washington Kincade, who owns two hundred and 
eighty-seven acres near Moravia, a portion of which constitutes the place, 
on which he was born November 1, 1866. He is a son of Francis and 
Martha (Luse) Kincade, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of 
Taylor township, Appanoose county. The maternal grandfather of our 
subject, Aaron Luse, came to Iowa from Ohio about the year 1851, while 
the paternal branch of the family was founded in this section of the state 
by Washington Kincade, who settled in Taylor township about the year 
1862, coming to this section from his native state of Illinois. Francis 
Kincade passed away when the subject of this review was only six months 
old and his widow with her son made her home with her father. Aaron 
Luse. Later the mother of our subject married Evan L. Foster but Aaron 
W. Kincade continued to make his home with his grandfather, by whom 
he was reared to manhood. 

Aaron W. Kincade acquired his education in the public schools of 
Appanoose count) and upon the death of his grandfather inherited eighty 
acres of land, which constitutes a portion of his present farm, .-^t the 
age of eighteen he began his independent career and after his marriage, 
which occurred less than one year afterward, he built a home upon his 
eighth acres. Additions to this first tract have been made from rime to 
time, Mf. Kincade owning at present two hundred and eighty-seven acres 
of land, [irovided with a fine residence, barns and outbuildings and every- 
thing necessary for the conduct of a modern farm. He engages in general 
agricultural pursuits but gives special attention to the breeding of Poland 



HISTORY ()|- APPANOOSE COUNTY 385 

China hogs and Shorthorn cattle, his animals commanding a higli price 
and ready sale upon the market. During the years Mr. Kincade has 
cultivated the soil his work has always been progressive, able and intelli- 
gently carried forward and has resulted in the very gratifying measure ot 
prosperit} which he enjo\s today antl w hich places him among the represen- 
tative men ot this locality. 

On the 9th ot September, 1885, before he had reached his nineteenth 
year, Aaron W. Kincade was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Hiner, 
a daughter of Abraham Hiner, who came to A[)[)anoose county in early 
times from Indiana. He locateti in Taylor township, where he resided until 
the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Kincade became the parents of four 
children: Bessie, the wife of Ira F. Bdshak, of Chariton township; Rus- 
sell, who passed away, leaving three children, Goldie, Herbert and Ker- 
mit; Rissie, who married Grover C. Kaster, of Taylor township; and 
Ernest, who lives at home. Mrs. Kincade is a devout member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Kincade gives his political support to the republican party and 
has served in various important positions, including those of townshi[) 
assessor, constable and a member of the school board. He has done 
efficient work along public lines, being at all times progressive and public- 
spirited in his citizenship, while as a business man he has gained a notable 
place because of his keen discernment, his unremitting energ}- and his 
untiring industr\'. His place in agricultural circles of Appanoose coimty 
is a prominent one and is the more commendable as it lias been achieved 
bv honorable and continuous effort. 



JOHN HKNKY COOE. 



John Henr\ Cool is the owner ot one hundred and forty acres ot rich 
farming land on section 12, Franklin township. It is a well improved and 
valuable pro[)erty and in its further development the owner is giving evi- 
ilence of a thorough understanding of the most modern anil progressive 
methods of agriculture. Mr. Cool is one of Iowa's native sons, horn near 
Eibertyville, in .Fetferson county, October 17, l8>o. His father, Marcus 
E. Cool, was a native of Kentucky but as a child moved with his parents 
to Indiana, where the grandfather. Jacob Cool, engaged in farming in 
Orange county. I hen- the father of our subject grew to the age of seven- 
teen ami then came to Iowa, making his first settlement in Eee county, 
where he workeil b\ the month as a farm laborer. He later marri<il in 



386 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

Jefferson counr) Miss Rosanna Jenninps, a native of Ohio, and iarmcd in 
that section tor some years, later movin;^ to Wayne county. In that part 
of the state he entered one hundred and twenty acres of land, which was 
unbroken prairie when it came into his possession. He cleared the brush 
with which it was overgrown, broke the soil, fenced it into fields and 
began the work ot development, carrying it forward steadily through the 
years until it finally became one of the most valuable farming properties 
in the localit}-. Upon it Marcus Cool spent his declining years and there 
died in January, 1884. He was survived by his wife twenty-two years. 

John H. Cool was reared upon his father's farm and from his childhood 
was familiar with the best and most progressive agricultural methods. 
When he reached maturit}- the fatfier purchased a tract of land, which he 
divided between his two sons, J. H. Cool receiving as his portion forty-seven 
acres. This he farmed in connection with other property which he rented 
and became rapidly successful, saving in time enough money to purchase 
the homestead. At that time he owned eighty-seven acres and upon this 
tract in 1893 he built a good house and repaired the barns and outbuild- 
ings, carrying forward the work of cultivation until 1899, when he dis- 
posed of the land and bought one hundred acres, upon which he now 
resides. To this he added forty adjoining acres, rebuilt and remodeled the 
house, built a fine barn and a smoke house with an excellent cellar and 
erected other necessary buildings. He fenced and cross-fenced his fields 
and stocked the place with good grades of cattle, horses and hogs, which 
he makes a specialty of breeding and raising. Mr. Cool was reared to 
the occupation ot farming and has alwajs followed that pursuit in its 
various phases. His methods are, therefore, practical and productive of 
good results and his success has come by virtue of his well directed activi- 
ties. His farm comprises one of the finest properties in this section of 
Appanoose county and is kept in excellent condition, the buildings being 
modern and his stock of good grades. 

Mr. Cool married, in W^ayne county. Iowa, on April 13. 1876, Miss 
Sarah Francis, who was born in Lee county, Iowa, and who was reared in 
Wapello and Davis counties. Mr. and Mrs. Cool became the parents of 
thirteen children, ten of wliom are living: Flora I,., the wite of Joe Kes- 
terson; Frata Ellen, who married William Bettis: Rosa, who became the 
wife of Bert Bums; Opal J., who married Linzy Bettis; Elsie, who mar- 
ried Lee Burkhiser; Omar C. who is married and is eng.iged in farming; 
Osie, the wife of John Curl; Orvillc O., who is aiding his father in the 
operation of the home farm; Everett G.: and Charles L. Three of the 
children horn to Mr. and Mrs. Cool have passed away. Two died in 
infancv and the death of Dora L. occurred when she was one and a half 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 387 

}ears ot age. Mr. and Mrs. Cool arc tkvimt adherents ot the Mount Olive 
Christian church and both are active religious workers, acting as deacon 
ami deaconess. 

Mr. Cool has been a republican since casting his first ballot and, 
although he has never sought nor desired office, his influence is always given 
tor the turtherance ot all projects which he deems essential or desirable 
tor the welfare and upbuilding of the community. 



ALEXAXDKK M. Dl CK. 



Alexander M. Duck, who died in 1899, was for many years a resident 
of Appanoose county and his memory is still cherished by his many triends 
in this section. He is held in grateful remembrance not only for his work 
along business lines and the upright standards by which it was directed 
but also for his four years' able service in the federal army during the Civil 
war. He was born in Ohio, February 17, 1838, and was a son of Philip 
and Jane ( Smithj Duck, the former a native of Germany and the latter 
of Scotland. The father was a potter by trade and worked at this occupxi- 
tion in his native country and also after he came to America. He settled 
in Indiana in pioneer rime^ anti refilled in that state tor the remainder of 
his lite. 

Alexander M. Dui k was reared and educated in Ohio. .\r rlie out- 
break of the Civil war he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and 
Thirty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantr)-, and served through the tour years 
of the conflict as first lieutenant, finally receiving an honorable discharge. 
.\fter the close of hostilities his family moved to Indiana and there .Alex- 
ander M. Duck followed the stone mason's and cutler's trades, which he 
had learned in his youth. After some years in Indiana he went to Minne- 
sota but remained in that state only one year, returning to Imliana at the 
end of that time. There he resided vmtil 1882, when he came to Iowa, 
locating in Bra/iK .Appanoose county, where he worked in the coal mines 
tor five years. He became known as a man of strict conscientiousness, high 
standards of honor and unblemi.shed integrity anil he made his name hon- 
ored and respected wherever it was known. In 1887 he retired from 
active life and moved into Centerville. He died in January, l8()^-, and 
his death brought to a close an active, useful and honorable career. 

On June i. 1867. Mr. Duck married Miss Margaret Moore, a daugh- 
ter of James and Julia ( Micewonder) Moore, natives of \irginia. The 
father farmeil in that state for some time and came as a pioneer to Indiana. 



388 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

residing there during the remainder of his life. He was killed in an acci- 
dent in December, 1881, and his wife survived him two years. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Duck have been born the following children: Mary, who died in 
February, 1869; Philip, who passed away in April, 1912; Cora, whose 
death occurred in 1890; Julia, who is the wife of Thomas Newcome and 
resides in Canada; Maggie, who is the wife of John Ash and lives in the 
state of Washington; James, who makes his home with his mother; George, 
living in Illinois; Bertha, who passed away in May, 1912; Mattie, who is 
the widow ot Prank Wilson and resides in Centerville; William, who 
lives with his mother; Alexander, whose death occurred in 1896; Grace, 
who was called to her final rest in 1897. 

Mr. Duck did not have extensive fraternal affiliations but delighted 
in keeping in touch with his comrades ot the battlefield through his mem- 
bership in the Grand Army of the Republic. He was a stanch republican 
in his politics but never sought nor desired public office. Upright and 
honorable in all the relations of his life, he won the regard and esteem of 
those with whom he came in contact and his death was deeply mourned by 
a large circle ot friends. His widow makes her home in Centerville, at 
428 East Jackson street. She is a devoted member of the Methodist church 
and exemplifies its teachings in her daily life. 



RE\'. AXEL W. P. ELFSTROM. 

A philosopher has written, "Not the good that comes to us but the 
good that comes to the world through us is the measure of our success," 
and judged by this standard, the life of Rev. Axel W. P. Elfstrom was 
a most successful one. His time and energies were devoted to the min- 
istry and he was not denied the full harvest nor the aftermath of his 
labors. His influence was tar-reaching and beneficial, his words of wis- 
dom bearing fruit in the lives ot many with whom he came in contact. He 
was born March 29, i860, in Ullervad, Vestergotland, Sweden, a son 
of Gustave Elfstrom, who was also a native of that country and a manu- 
facturer by occupation. Liberal educational opportunities were accorded 
the Rev. Axel W. P. Eltstrom, who. after attending high school in 
Falkoping and Skotde, Sweden, spent several terms in stud} in the col- 
lege at Gottenborg. In the fall of 1884, then a young man of twenty- 
four years, he came to America and at once entered Augustana College, 
at Rock Island, Illinois, there pur'^iiing a classical course for two years. 
In 1886 he matriculated in Augustana Theological Seminary and was 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 389 

aradiiattd with the class ot 1H88. The same \ear he was ordained to the 
ministry of the Swedish Lutheran church and accepted the pastorate of 
Algona, Bancroft and Swea, making his home at Algona, Iowa, where 
he remained for fourteen years, doing excellent service in the upbuild- 
ing of the church and the extension of its influence there. In 1902 he 
accepted a call to the pastorate of the Swedish Lutheran church in Cen- 
terville and that he was equally honored here and that his services proved 
highh acceptable to the church is indicated in the fact that he was pastor 
to the time of his death on the 16th of August, 1910. Wliile an active 
representative of the Swedish Lutheran ministry for twenty-two years 
he had but two pastorates during that period. His influence and labors 
were of far-reaching effect. He was an earnest and ofttimes an eloquent 
speaker and had the qualities which are so acceptable in pastoral work, 
a social disposition, kindly spirit and an understanding and sympathetic 
nature. He was a prominent member of the Iowa conference ot Augus- 
tana s) nod of his denomination and was recognized throughout the state, 
in which he lived and labored, as a student and man of scholarly attain- 
ments. He kept in touch with the world's work along all the lines of 
vital significance to mankind. 

On the 5th of Decenibcr. 1S90. rtic Rev. Axel W. V. EHVtrom was 
married to Miss Marikia Carlson, a daughter of Carl and Johanna Carl- 
son, both of wliom were natives of N'estergotland, Sweden. The father 
was a farmer by occupation and died when his daughter Matilda was but 
four vears of age. The mother is still living in Sweden, at the advanced 
age of eighty-nine years. Mrs. Elfstrom came to the United States in 
1885 and took up her residence in Chicago, where she was married. Since 
her husband's death she has continued to live in Centerville. Their chil- 
dren are: Gustav Sigfrid, who was born November 11, 1891, and is 
clerking in the Mating grocery store in Centerville; Hanna, who was 
born September 18, 1893, graduated from the Centerville high school, 
in 1911, and is a teacher in the Garfield school of this city; Ester, who 
was born May 24, 189,-, and will graduate from the Centerville high 
school with the class of 1913; and Carl, who was born December 27, 
1897, and is a high-school student. 

The familv arc all members of the Swedish Lutheran chiirch and 
their influence is always on the side of right, progress, reform and truth. 
Rev. Elfstrom gave his political allegiance to the republican party, nor 
was he neglectful of the iluties of citizenship. He stood for all that is 
highest and best in material things ami in intellectual activities while 
working untiringly for the moral progress of the community in which he 



390 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

made his home. His influence was ot no restricted character. He was 
regarded as one ot the strong preachers of his denomination and his work 
added much to the moral tone of the community. He embodied the 
words of the spirit of Abraham Lincoln who said, "There is something 
better than making a living — making a life," and therefore he put forth 
untiring effort in the great field of character building. 



J. H. LUSE. 



Since the }ear 1864 J. H. Luse has been a resident of Appanoose county 
and is therefore qualified to speak with authority of the events which have 
shaped its history and have had important bearing upon its progress. He 
is now filling the office of postmaster at M\ stic and has held other public 
positions, the duties of which he has ever promptly and faithfully dis- 
charged. He was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, September 20, 
i860, a son of Boan and Hannah (Horner) Luse, who were also natives 
of the Kevstone state, the father having been born in Greene county and 
the mother in Fayette county. The family comes of French ancestry on the 
father's side and is of German lineage in the maternal line. The grand- 
father, Henry A. Luse, was a native of New Jerse} , served as a soldier of 
the War of 1812 and led an active business life, devoting the greater part 
of his time and attention to farming, his mterests in that line being so 
carefull}- conducted that in time he became a wealthy man. He con- 
tinued a resident of Pennsylvania until his death. 

In the }ear 1864 Boan and Hannah Luse lett their native state and 
came to Iowa, taking up their abode in Walnut township, Appanoose 
county, about a mile and a half north of Mystic. They settled on the 
farm that is now owned and occupied by their son, James F. Luse, and 
both died upon the old home place. They had for thirty-seven years 
lived in the county when the father passed away in 1901, at the age of 
seventy-seven years. His wife also reached the age of seventy-seven, 
her death occurring in 1906. He had made farming his life work and 
as he prospered in his undertakings he extended the boundaries of the 
home place until he owned tour hundred acres in one body. He was a 
very quiet, resourceful man, of retiring disposition but genuine worth 
gave him the warm regard of those who knew him. In the family were 
four sons, while the only daughter, Ella, who was the third in order of 
birth, died in Pennsylvania when but a year old. The sons are: Henry 
A., who died in 1876. at the age of twenty-two years; Joseph R.. a resi- 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 391 

dent of Seymour, Iowa; J. H., ot this review; and .lames Frank, a farmer 
ot this county. 

J. H. Luse was but four years ot age when the tamily arrived in 
Iowa, and the experiences of his youth and bo}hood were those which 
usually fall to the lot of the fami lad. When not in the school room, 
his time and attention were largely taken up with the work of the fields 
and he continued with his parents until 1885. He then started in the 
business world as a clerk and was employed in various stores in Mystic 
for eight or ten vears. In the meantime he took an active interest in 
politics and his fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, 
elected him to the office of mayor of Mystic in 1892. He served for one 
term, or two years, and afterward went upon the road as a traveling sales- 
man, representing the Lodwich Brothers Coal Company for three years. 
He then held the office of assistant postmaster for one year ;ind during 
the past rive vears has been postmaster of Mystic. He also rilled the posi- 
tion of township assessor for one term in the '80s. His political sup- 
port has ever been given to the republican party. He was reared in that 
faith and has never seen occasion to change his principles. 

Mr. Luse has been married twice. In 1884 he wedded Flora B. 
Stevens, who was born in Wapello county. Iowa, and died in Appanoose 
county in i88q, when twenty-six years of age. leaving a little daughter, 
Jessie M.. who died at the age of four years. In 1806 Mr. Luse was again 
married, his second union being with Malina A. Fuller, who was born in 
Appanoose county in 1858. There are four children of this marriage. 
May. Helen, Marjorie and John Boan. The parents are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which they are actively 
interested, while to its support they contribute liberally. Mr. Lvise is now 
serving on the official board and otherwise manifests his interest in the 
growth of the church and in promoting its influence. He is a Master 
Maxin. belonging to Walnut Lodge. Xo. 588, at Mystic, and his ridelity 
to its teachings makes him a worthy exemplar of the craft. 



JOSEPH S. Hl'GHES. 
Jo.-eph S. Hughes makes his home in Cenferville, owning and occupy- 



onj. 



ing an attractive residence at 1401 North Ninth street. He has 1 
been the owner of farming property and at one time was very active in 
its cultivation. Hi>- birth occurred in Johnson county. Indiana. Jime 26, 
1847. his parents being Jtihn and Charity W. ( Sr. John) Hughes. The 



392 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

father, a narivc of Indiana, was born July 31, 1822, while the mother's 
birth otrurred near Cincinnati, Ohio, August '2, 1820. The paternal 
grandparents were natives of Tennessee and the great-grandfather came 
from Ireland. In the maternal line some of his ancestors were among the 
earliest settlers of New JeriSe}', locating there in 1664 after a previous 
residence in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Charity St. John removed to Indi- 
ana with her grandparents and there, in 1843, she gave her hand in mar- 
riage to John Hughes, who was a farmer by occupation and carried on 
general agricultural pursuits in that state until 185:5, when he came with 
his family to Iowa, settling in Appanoose county. He purchased one hun- 
dred acres ot land in Pleasant townshij) and later entered forty acres more. 
To this he kept adding from time to time until he owned about seven 
hundred acres and carried on farming on an extensive scale until 1878, 
when he divided his land among his children and took up his abode in 
Centerville, where he lived retired until his death in i8()2. He had for 
three years survived his wife, who passed away in March, 1889. He was 
greatly and actively interested in public affairs, contributing to the welfare 
and upbuilding ot the community, and for several years served as a 
member of the school board and was also justice of the peace. Unto him 
and his wife were born five children, namely: William M., who was killed 
in battle at Atlanta, Georgia, and was buried there; Joseph S., of this 
review; Jacob A., a retired agriculturist residing in Portland. Oregon; 
Jesse r., who follows farming in Pleasant township, Appanoose county; 
and Mary E., who lives with a cousin at Dillon, Montana. 

Joseph S. Hughes was but eight years of age when brought by his 
parents to Appanoose county, where he has remained continuously since. 
He attended the Centerville schools and when nineteen years of age began 
teaching, which profession he followed for six years in the district schools. 
He then began farming in \'ermillion township and in 1878 removed to 
Pleasant township, occupying a part of the old home place — a tract of 
one hundred anci sixty acres which his father had given him. He capably 
managed his farm and met with success in its operation but in 1883, on 
account of ill health, he rented the land and removed to Centerville, estab- 
lishing his home on North Eleventh street, where he lived until l8c)o, when 
he removed to his present residence at No. 1401 North Ninth street just 
outside the corporation limits. He continued to rent his farm until i8g6, 
when he sold the })lace and invested in town property. 

In 1873 Mr. Hughes was united in marriage to Miss Harriett J. Brooks, 
a daughter of Thomas and Mary (McMurray) Brooks, the former a farmer 
of Wayne county, Iowa. He was born in Tennessee and was ot German 
descent. \\'hen ten years of age he removed with his mother and steptather 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 393 

to Kentucky and was married in that state to Mary McMurray, who was 
born in Kentucky and was of Irish lineage. In the early '40s thej removed 
westward, settling in Mahaska county, Iowa, where Mr. Brooks engaged 
in farming. In 1853 he went to Wayne county, Iowa, where he again 
secured a tract of land which he continued to develop and improve until 
the time of his death in F"ebruar}. US75. His wife passed away at almost 
the same hour and they were laid to rest on the same day. Mrs. Hughes 
was born in Mahaska county, Iowa, September 28, 1849, and was the 
youngest of a family of eight children, the others being as follows: Mar- 
garet, George, John, Joseph and James, all of whom are deceased; Mar_\, 
who is the wife of William Rogers, a farmer residing at Alba, Missouri; 
and William, who has passed away. 

Mr. Hughes has held various townshij) offices, the duties of wliich he 
has discharged with promptness and fidelity, and his political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party. He and his wife are widely and favorably 
known, having a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of 
their acquaintance. 



EDWARD TRENTON PHINTZ. M. D. 

The medical profession of Moulton finds a worthy representative in 
the person of Dr. Edward Trenton Printz, who for twenty-six years 
has been actively engaged in practice in Appanoose county, where he is 
recognized as a physician and surgeon of more than average ability. He 
was born in Newton, Jasper county, Illinois, on the 6th of November. 
1856, and is a son of Solomon and Sarah (Kibler) Print/, natives of 
Virginia, the father's birth having occurred in the year 1816 and that 
of the mother in 1812. In the paternal line the family is of Dutch 
extraction, but they have long been residents of \'irginia, the grandfather, 
Peter Print/ having been born in Page county, that .state. He was a mill 
owner and also had a large plantation and many slaves. His entire lite 
was passed in the state of his nativity where he reared a large family, all of 
whom remained in the south with exception of the son Solomon. .Accom- 
panied by his wife and four children the latter brought a colony of \'ir- 
ginians to Illinois in 1848, locating in Ja.sper county, when- hi- took up 
a large tract of government land. The remainder of his active life was 
devoted to the cultivation of his farm, where he passed away in 1S76. 
He was one of the prominent pioneers of that section, and took an active 
and helpful interest in all community affairs, contributing his quota 



394 HISTORY Ul' APPANOOSE COUNTY 

toward promoting the progress and development of the country. He 
served with efficiency in various township offices, and was knov\n as a 
man ot high principles and progressive ideas, who was accorded the esteem 
and respect of his neighbors and fellow townsmen. It was in \'irginia 
Mr. Printz was married to Miss Kibler, a daughter of John Kil>ler, also 
a \'irginian, who came to Illinois with his son-in-law's colony, in 1848 
and purchased an extensive tract of government land in Jasper county, 
where he passed the remainder of his days. Mrs. Printz lived to the ad- 
vanced age of seventy-five years, her death occurring in 1887. ^he was 
the mother of eight children, four of whom were born in \'irginia, in order 
of birth they are as follows: Calvin F., who died in Jasper county, Illi- 
nois; Jane, who passed away at the age of twelve years; Sarah, who was 
eight at the time of her death; Hiram, who is a resident of Newton, Illi- 
nois; Lj'dia, the deceased wife of Albert Strole, of Jasper county, Illinois; 
John, a farmer and stock-raiser of Jasper county; Edward Trenton, our 
subject; and Mary, the deceased wife of P>ank Davis, of Jasper count)-. 

There was no event of especially importance to vary the routine char- 
acteristic of farm life during the period of Dr. Printz's minority. His 
early education was obtained in the public schools, following which he 
attended the normal school at Newton and then taught for five jears. 
He early decided to adopt a professional career and in 1881 matriculated 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Chicago, Illinois, from which 
institution he was awarded the degree of M. D. with the class of 1884. 
Immediately thereafter he returned to his home town and engaged in 
practice until 1886, when he came to Moulton and established an office, 
which he has ever since maintained. As he is a man of studious habits and 
has continually promoted his efficiency by keeping in close touch with 
the i^rogress of his profession, Dr. Printz has met with more than an 
average degree of success and has built up a large and profitable practice. 
He has had ample opportunity to manifest his ability, both as a general 
practitioner and surgeon, during the long period of his connection with 
the medical fraternity ot this county, and is held in high repute by the 
fellow members of his profession and the community at large, among 
whose citizens he numbers many close friends. 

Dr. Printz has been married twice. His first union was with Miss 
Lizzie Marshall, whose father is mentioned at greater length elsewhere 
in this work. They were married in 1888, and in 1890 Mrs. Printz 
passed away. One child was born to them but it died in infancv. In 
l8g5. Dr. Printz married Miss \'erna Dye. Of this marriage were born 
two children: Esther and Edward Trenton. Jr.. who are attending high 
school. Tlic mother passed away in iQoo. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 395 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, ot which Dr. Trintz 
is a member. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic order, and the 
Independent Order ot" Odd PVllows, while he maintains relations with 
his tellow practitioners through the medium ot the Appanoose County 
Medical and the Iowa State Medical Societies. His political support he 
gives to the republican party, and he is now a member ot the local school 
board. Dr. Printz is widely and favorably known in the county by reason 
of his sterling worth and integrity as well as because of his skill as a 
practitioner and the high protessional standard he maintains. 



C. F. HOWELL. 



One ot the strong and torcefui members of the Appanoose county 
bar is C. F. Howell, practicing at Centerville, as a member of the tirm of 
Howell & Elgin. He possesses all the qualities requisite for advance- 
ment in the legal protession — comprehensive knowledge of the principles 
of jurisprudence, analytical power and a ready recognition of the relation 
ot cause and etfect. The ease with which he solves intricate problems has 
given him command of a large practice, in the conduct of which he has 
won man} notable verdicts. 

Centerville claims him as a native son, for he was here born March 
1), i860, his parents being C. H. and Lavina (Ward) Howell, who were 
natives ot New York. The father, however, became one of the pioneer 
residents of this city, arriving here in 1847 and establishing the second 
mercantile enterprise ot the town. He continued in business for almost 
a third ot a century, or until 1879, when he retired, spending his remain- 
ing days in the enjoyment of well earned rest. He died in 188S, while 
his wife passed awa) in 1882. 

C. F. Howell was reared and educated in his native city and after 
attending the public schools entered Iowa College at Grinnell, where his 
more specifically literary course was pursued. He entered upon the 
study ot law in the office and under the direction of Tannehill ^^ Fee, 
with whom he continued from 1880 until 1882, when he was admitted 
to the bar and at once entered u[ion active practice here. Thirty }ears 
have since come and gone and almost from rlic beginning he has main- 
tained a prominent position as a representative of the legal profession in 
his native county, his record standing in contrailistinction to the old adage 
that a prophet is never without honor save in his own countrv. In l()09 
he was joined in partnership by Charles H. Elgin, and they are now prac- 



396 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

ticing under the firm style of Howell & Elgin, commanding a very exten- 
sive and important clientage, and their loyalty to the interests thereof is 
proverbial. 

In November, 1883, Mr. Howell was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Maddox, of Frankfort, Kentucky, a daughter of H. and Maria 
(Jones) Maddox, who were natives of \'irginia. The parents never 
came to this state and both are deceased, the father having passed away 
in 1879, «i"d '^he mother in 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Howell have become 
parents of three children, Winifred, Max and Ward. They have a pleas- 
ant and hospitable home and its good cheer is enjoyed by their man\- 
friends. 

Aside from his law practice Mr. Howell has other interests, being a 
stockholder in a bank at Promise City and another at Numa. Mr. Howell 
votes with the republican party and is a stanch advocate of its principles. 
The only office he has held, however, has been in the strict path of his 
profession — six }'ears' service as county attornei,-. He belongs to the 
Aiasonic lodge, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and he holds firmly to the religious faith of the Presbyterian 
church. His influence is always on the side of progress, reform and im- 
provement and his activities have constituted a potent force in the upbuild- 
ing and development of this section. 



CHARLES P. TILLMONT. 

Dr. Charles P. Tillmont, who has been a successful medical practi- 
tioner and surgeon for the past twelve years in Centerville, is prominent in 
both professional and social circles of the community and is now serving 
a second term as county coroner and is president ot the Appanoose County 
Medical Society. His birth occurred in New Bremin, Lewis county. New 
York, on the 13th of February, 1871, his parents being Stephen and Eliza- 
beth (Bach) Tillmont, both natives of France, and whose ancestors were 
of French nobility, meeting disaster in the French revolution. The par- 
ents and grandparents emigrated to the I'nited States in 1842, locating 
in northern New York, in which state they subsequently resided, the 
father's death occurring in 1906 and the mother's in 1904. 

Charles P. Tillmont obtained his early education in the public schools 
of his native town and subsequently attended the Lowville Academy at 
Lowville, New York, and later the Dixon Business University at Dixon, 
Illinois. From there he made his way to Detroit. Michigan, where he 




1)K. C. r. TIl.I.MdNT 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 399 

entered the eniplo)- of H. S. Robinson & Company as a traveling sales- 
man, covering the states of Illinois, Indiana and Iowa. In 1897, having 
determined upon the practice of medicine, he entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of the University of Illinois and graduated from 
that institution in June, 1901, with the degree of M. D. During his 
college years he had service at Cook County Hospital, Chicago, Illinois; 
at Cook County Infinnary, Dunning, Illinois; and at Oakwood Sanitarium, 
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, under Dr. Oscar A. King at that time superin- 
tendent. In September, 1901, he opened an office in Centerville, Iowa, 
which has remained the scene of his professional labors to the present 
time, his practice steadily growing as he has demonstrated his skill in 
coping with the intricate problems which continuously confront the physi- 
cian in his efforts to restore health and prolong life. Through his mem- 
bership in the Appanoose County Medical Society, of which he is now 
president, the Iowa State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association, he keeps in close touch with the progress of his profession. 

In 1900 Dr. Tillmont was united in marriage to Miss Kather\n Con- 
ners, of Dixon, Illinois, her parents being John and Martha (Davlin) 
Conners, who come of Irish and Dutch descent and are still residents of 
Dixon. The father, John Conners, was horn in New York city, October 
10, 1848. He left there when seventeen years of age and went alone 
to Dixon, Illinois. Soon afterward he enlisted in the Seventh Illinois 
Cavair}- and at the close of the war was mustered out at Chattanooga, 
having in the meantime participated in man}- battles. Following his return 
to Dixon he married Martha Davlin, a daughter of James and Catherine 
Klizabeth (Holister) Davlin, of Dixon, whose ancestry can be traced 
back to a soldier of the Revolutionary war. The Davlin family was 
established in Pennsylvania in colonial days. Mr. Conners is still living 
in Dixon, where he is well known as a contractor. In 1911 he came to 
Centerville and built a beautiful home for his daughter, Mrs. Tillmont, 
at 119 South street. This is one of the fine homes of the city. He and 
liis wife occupy their own home in Dixon. In religious faith they are 
Catholics and in politics he is a democrat. He belongs to the Grand Army 
of rhe Republic, the Knights of Columbus and the Ancient Order of 
I nited Workmen and of the last named is a charter member. His daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Tillmont, is eligible to membership with the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. 

Into Dr. Tillmont and his wife have been born four children: Martha 
Elizabeth, whose birth occurred January 10, 1902, and who is a student 
in the C<nrerville [lublic schools; John, born January iv 1904: Marv 
Josephine, born \o\cmber 2. 190>. who i-^ likewi<e a stuil<-nf in the pub- 



400 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

lie schools; and Elizabeth Ann, whose natal day is December 17. 1909. 
The second child died in iniancy. 

In politics Dr. rillniont is a republican, loyally supjjorting the men 
and measures of that party. He acted as city physician tor tour years 
and is now serving the second term as coroner of Appanoose county. 
Fraternally he is identifieti witli the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 
Lodge No. 741. He is likewise a member of the Country Club. The 
Doctor and his wife are devoted members of the Catholic church and the 
families on both the paternal and maternal side, as far back as they have 
been traced, have been devoted adherents to the Catholic faith. Dr. Till- 
mont maintains the strictest conformity to the highest professional ethics 
and enjoys in full measure the confidence and respect of his professional 
brethren, as well as the general public. 



RINEHART BROTHERS. 



Among the extensive landowners, prominent farmers and progressive 
and enterprising business men of Appanoose county James \V. and David 
H. Rinehart hold places of weight and influence. Since the beginning ot 
their active careers they have been in partnership and this association has 
been effective of lasting results, gaining for the two brothers a substantial 
measure of success. Both are natives of Monroe county, James ^^'. having 
been born in January, 1862, and David H. on the 17th of February, 1864. 
They are sons of Samuel and Eliza (Potts) Rinehart, natives of \'irginia, 
the former of whom came to Monroe county in 1858 and entered land from 
the government. He gave his entire attention to the development and 
improvement of this property during the remainder ot his lite, becoming 
a successful agriculturist and an extensive landowner. He had valuable 
holdings in both Monroe and Ajipanoose counties and tor the last twenty 
years of his life resided in the latter section. He died in October. 1900, 
and was survived by his wife until May, 1909. 

Both of the Rinehart brothers had the same educational advantages. 
They were still very young when their parents moved into Appanoose 
county and there they attended district school, later graduating trom 
the Moulton high school. Alter completing his education James ^^'. 
Rinehart taught in the graded schools of Appanoose county for eiglu 
years and did such able work along lines of public education that he was 
elected county superintendent of schools, holding this office tor two years 
and accomplishing a great many lasting and beneficial results. On August 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 401 

1, 1892, James W. and David H. Rim-liart tormcd the partnersliip which 
has existed since that time. They have been engaged in many important 
business enterprises and have gradually become forces in the growth ot 
Appanoose county, always working together in harmony, each supple- 
menting and aiding the other's work in an effective way. Immediately after 
their association was formed they engaged in the newspaper business, pur- 
chasing the Centerville Journal, which was at that rime a weekly democratic 
organ. The Rinehart brothers, however, published the paper semi-weekly, 
James W. acting as editor and David H. as foreman. For nineteen years 
they conducted this enterprise, doing much during that time to raise 
the standards of local journalism and to influence and direct public 
thought and opinion along worth} lines. In .\ugust, lyii, they sold the 
Centerville Journal and have since devoted their entire time to the 
management of their extensive farming interests and their valuable tracts 
of town propert}. At the present time they own and operate three hun- 
dred acres of land just across the state line in Missouri and they also 
have large coal mining interests in that state. The latter part of their 
interests is under the personal supervision of David H. Rinehart, while 
his brother manages their two hundred and sixt}- acre farm in -Appanoose 
lounty, upon which they are extensively engaged in raising mules. Both 
are able, resourceful ami progressive business men of acknowlcdgid abil- 
ity, capable of forming plans readily and determined in their execution, 
and accordingly in the course of )ears they have won a degree of suc- 
cess which places them among the representative citizens of this part of 
Iowa. 

On the 13th of October. i(SS4, James W. Rinehart married Miss 
Ida Boal, a daughter of Dr. and Susan (Mills) Boal, natives of Ohio, 
where the father practiced his profession before he went to Bloomtield, 
Iowa. There he secured a gratifying patronage as a physician and sur- 
geon ami was very successful in the conduct of his affair^ until hi^ death, 
which occurred in i8()2. His wife still resides in Bloomheld. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rinehart became the parents of three children: Delmar I)., aged 
twenty-six, who is now in the newspajier business in Chicago; P2arl. aged 
twenty-two, who is also a Chicago journalist ; ami Ruby, who is the wife 
of A. Ziver, well known in the cement business in Des Moines, Iowa. 
Ruby Rinehart inherited nuich of her father's news instinct and reportorial 
talent ami before her marriage did some truly remarkable work in journal- 
i>m. Of her ability in this direction one of the local papers wrote in jiart 
as follows: "Ruby Rinehart. rlu' twelve-year-old daughter of Editor J. 
W. Rinehart of the Centerville Journal, experienced the unu.sual event 
that won for her the distinction of being the \(iungest newspajier wofiian 



402 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

in the world. Each da}' at the [iress table in the Centerville courthouse 
sat little Miss Rinehart, covering the murder case of John Junkin for her 
father's paper. All the horrible details of the murder of Clara Rosen by 
John Junkin were diligently recorded by the little newspaper woman, 
who covered the assignment in the absence of her father, who was other- 
wise engaged. Little Miss Rinehart is the youngest feminine reporter in 
the world, but this is only shown in her youthful appearance. Her 
stories have that degree of clearness and accuracy that would do credit to 
many older men. experienced in the profession. Her position at the press 
table placed her immediately in front of the accused negro, who was 
sentenced to hang, but she was too much engrossed in her work of report- 
ing the case to be bothered by anything like that. Miss Rinehart has 
been doing regular work for her father since the death of her mother, 
some two years ago, and she hesitates not a moment in recording the most 
difficult stories for her paper. The youngster when but seven )'ears old 
won the Demarest medal in a declamation competition and aside from 
her talents as an elocutionist she possesses a strong soprano voice. Her 
father has been in the newspaper business for seventeen years and little 
Miss Rinehart has practically had nothing but a newspaper environment 
her entire life." Mrs. James W. Rinehart died on the 23d of December, 
1906, after a long illness. 

The Rinehart brothers are lo} al democrats and James W. was for 
twenty years chairman of the democratic committee. He also served for 
a number of years on the Centerville board of education, discharging his 
official duties in a conscientious and straightforward way. Both James 
W. and David H. Rinehart are members of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and belong to the Christian church. In numberless ways 
they have assisted in advancing the permanent welfare of this commun- 
ity and no record of Appanoose county would be complete without a 
review of their lives and of their long and honorable business association. 



JOHN R. BRADLEY. 



Through well-directed activity and enterprise John R. Bradley has 
gained a high place in the business circles of Centerville. where since 
1892 he has been engaged in general contracting and building. He was 
born in Morgan county, Indiana, August 9, 1850, and is a son of William 
H. and Martha (Elliott) Bradley, the former born in Clark county, 
Indiana, January 30. 1826, and the latter in Kentucky, February 20, of 
the same year. Mr. Bradley's paternal grandfather was Benjamin Brad- 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 403 

ley, a native ot the south. His wite was born in Ireland. The mother 
of our subject removed from Indiana to Kentuck\- when she was still a 
child and there her marriage occurred. Immediately afterwaril Mr. and 
Mrs. William H. Bradley came to Iowa, locating in Appanoose county, 
where they purchased eighty acres of land in \'ermillion township, adding 
to it trom time to time until the tarm comprised six hundred and eighty 
acres. Upon this the father engaged in general farming but later gave 
much attention to bu\ing ami shipping stock, carrying on an extensive 
business along this line for a number of years. His wife passed away in 
1881 and six years later the father sold ihe farm and went to Xuma, 
where he engaged in the mercantile business. He remained there for 
eight years and then sold his business interests and moved to Centerville, 
where he made his home with the subject of this review. Later he moved 
to Mount Pleasant and there his death occurred at the home of his daugh- 
ter. Melvina Boydston. For many years he was active in the Masonic 
order, holding membership in Centerville Lodge, No. 42, F. & A. >L 

John H. Bradley acquired his education in the district schools of 
Appanoose county and in the Centerville high school. After he laid aside 
his school books he helped his father with the work of the farm until he 
was married, after which he moved upon a portion of the homestead, 
which he developed anil inij)rovcd tor some time. In 1884 he Itarneti 
the carpentering trade and worked at it for wages' for eight years, after 
which he e^tablished himself inde[)endently as a contractor and builder, 
in which work he is still active. He has erected some of the finest and 
most attractive business houses and residences in Centerville and the sur- 
rounding district and has handled much valuable property, doing a very 
extensive and profitable business. 

Mr. Bradley has been thrice married. His first wife was in her maiden- 
hood Miss Mary Crist, a daughter of John and Mary .\nn Crist, the 
former a farmer in Appanoose county. The first Mrs. Bradley died one 
year later and in 1884 the subject of this review wedded Mrs. Martha 
C. Brown, a daughter of Addison and Rhoda (Bryant) \'each, the former 
born in West \'irginia and the latter in Cialesburg, Illinois. Both came 
to Appanoose county in the early '5.0s and there the father learned the 
blacksmith's trade, later opening a shop in Centerville. Afterward lie 
removed to Numa and engaged in the same business until his death, 
which occurred in i8c)v His widow returned to Centerville and d'wd 
in that city at th<- home of the subject of this review. Mrs. Martha 
Bradley passed away on the 1 irh of Febru.iry. 1902, ami on the 2()rh ot 
December, of the following year, Mr. Bradley was again married. His 
third union was with Miss Ann Spooner, a daughter ot JauK--^ B. and 



404 HISTORY Ol' AI'i'ANOOSE COUNTY 

Catherine (Bryant) Spooner, the tormer a native of" Indiana, horn in 
1828, and the latter of Galesburg, Illinois,, where her birth occurretl in 
1833. I'he father came to Iowa in 1846 and entered eighty acres of 
government land in Center township, A})panoose county. A few years later 
the mother came and in this section their marriage occurred, after which 
they settled upon the farm, where they jxissed the remainder of their 
lives, the mother dying in 1898 and the father on the 2yth of April, 1905. 
Mr. Bradley had one daughter b)- his second marriage, Martha, who was 
born May 10, i8go. and who died October 9, 1911. During her life she 
was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star at Centerville. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bradley are devout members of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Bradley gives his allegiance to the republican party and has held 
various responsible township offices, for he never seeks to avoid the duties 
of citizenship. Fraternally he is connected with Centerville Lodge, No. 
42, F. & A. M. Throughout his business career he has always faithfully 
discharged any obligation devolving upon him and has thus establi.shed 
a reputation for integrity and reliability, his name being an honored one 
wherever it is known. 



LEM McDonald henry. 

Among the estmiable pioneer citizens of Centerville who donned the 
blue and went to the front in defense of their country's flag must be 
mentioned Levi McDonald Henry, who is now living retired but was 
for many years activel}- engaged in business here. He is a native of 
Martinsburg, Knox county, Ohio, his birth having occurred on rlie 11th 
of September, 1828. His father, Robert Henr)', was of Irish and Welsh 
extraction but was born in Huntington, Pennsylvania. When a small lad 
he removed with his parents to Knox county. Ohio, where he made his 
home until his death in 1877. He was married in the town of Martins- 
burg to Mi.ss Mar} Ann McDonald, who was of Scotch descent, her 
parents both having been born in the city of Edinburgh. Scotland. She 
only lived a few years after her marriage, and for his second wite Mr. 
Henrv chose Rebecca Dillon, who had been married before, and was a 
daughter of Robert and Martha Dillon, nrircd tanning people of Martins- 
burg, where Mrs. Henry passed away in 1906. 

Reared in a home of limited means the early advantages of Levi 
McDonald Henry was very meagre. His schooling was confined to a 
few terms of irregular attendance in his home district, but as he always 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 403 

was a close observer aiui a wide reader, lie has aecjiiired a lar^e turn! ot 
general information, which marks him as a well educated man. In his 
earh \outh he went to Mount \'ernon, Ohio, where he began his appren- 
ticeship at the tailor's trade, completing his period ot service in Columbus, 
that state. Feeling that he was qualified to develop a business ot his own, 
he went in the spring of 1851 to Washington, Missouri, where he estab- 
lished and maintained a shop tor a time. From there he went to Spring- 
field, Illinois, but six months later he made a tour ot the south. In 1H53. 
he returned to Springfield, where he was married the same year. His 
next removal was to Minnea[K)lis, Minnesota, ot which city he became a 
resident in 1854, remaining there for two years. At the expiration ot 
that time he returned ro Illinois, locating at Bloomfield, where he resided 
until 1863. when he removed to Centerville, and opened a tailor shop. 
The same )ear Mr. Henry enlisted in Company F. Thirty-sixth Iowa 
\'olunteer Infantry, and went into camp at Camden. Arkansas. He was 
captured by the enemy at Marks Mill and was held for a }ear prisoner at 
Camp Frith, Texas, being released in February, 186^. He was mustered 
our at Davenport. Iowa, on July 27. of that year, and upon receipt of his 
discharge returned to Centerville and engaged in the clothing business. 
Mr. Henry was successfully identified with the commercial develop- 
ment of this city for many years thereafter, and upon his retirement from 
active life sold his store to his son, George A., who has since passed away. 

The ladv who now bears the name of Mrs. Henry was known in her 
maidenhood as Mi» P^leanor Boyd, and was born in Ohio on the 4th of 
July. 183V her parents being Alexander and Margaret Boyd, farming 
people of Coshocton county, that state. The father was murdered during 
the childhood of Mrs. Henr\, who was reared by an uncle, Lyman Shaffer, 
ot Springfield. Illinois, and lost all trace of her mother many years ago. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Henry were born two sons: John \\'.. who was born in 
Minneapolis, on Christmas day, 1854: and George A., whose birth oivurrril 
on the 17th of March, 1857. 'it Bloomington, Illinois. They are both 
deceased. The last named married Miss Jessie Sjwoner and to them wen- 
born two children: William, decea.sed; and Cora, the wife ot C. H. 
Wvman, of Sheridan, Wyoming, and the mother of two chiKlnn. Jessie 
and John Henry. 

In religious faith Mr. and Mr-. Henry arc Presbyterians, and are 
consistent members of the local church of that denomination. Fraternally 
he has attained high rank in the Masonic order, being a member of the 
blue lodge, commandery and shrine. He is also affiliat<d with the Royal 
Arcanum, and the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic. His 
political support he .accords to the democratic party, but has never held 



406 HISTORY Ol-' APPANOOSE COUNTY 

a public office. In Appanoose count)-, of which ht; has been a resident for 
practically a half century, Mr. Henry is held in favorable regard, having 
been known as a straightforward, reliable business man, progressive and 
patriotic citizen, and a loyal and trustworthy friend. He is passing the 
evening of life in honorable retirement, enjoying the ease and comfort 
provided b}' the accumulations of an active and intelligently spent life, 
and the respect and esteem of a large circle of acquaintances. 



PEARL A. WHITE. 



Pearl A. White, tilling the office ot city clerk, is recognized as one of 
the prominent republican leaders of Appanoose county. He was born on 
a farm two miles north of Moulton, in \\'ashington township, Appanoose 
county, Iowa, December 30, 1878, and is a son of John W. and Mary F. 
(Hollingsworth) White. The father was born in Indiana -and both were 
of Scotch English descent. He devoted his life to farming and to the 
real-estate business. The grandfather, John White, was born in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, February 22, 1816, and was a son of Abraham White, a 
soldier of the Revolutionar}' war. In 1849 John White, the grandfather, 
removed from Indiana to Iowa, settling in Douglas township, .Appanoose 
count}', where he preempted a claim which he purchased when the land 
was placed upon the market. To his original holdings he added from 
time to time until he was the owner of nearly two thousand acres. He was 
also an extensive stock trader and real-estate dealer and his business af- 
fairs were so carefully, systematically and wiseh' managed that success 
resulted in large measure. Deeply interested in the moral progress of the 
community, he built the Methodist Episcopal church at Salem. His wife 
was a native of Kentucky. Their son, John W. White, came to Iowa with 
his parents in 1849, at which time the family home was established in 
Douglas township. Some years afterward he wedded Mar}- F. Hollings- 
worth, who was brought to Appanoose county b}- her parents in 1847, 
settlement being made in Vermillion township. The young couple began 
their domestic life upon a farm in \\'ashington township. .Apixinoose 
county, Iowa, and John \\'. White, like his father, becanie in time an ex- 
tensive landowner and stock-raiser, his holdings embracing over six hun- 
dred acres. In 1894, however, he disposed of his farm propert} and re- 
moved to Centerville, where he opened a real-estate office and is still ac- 
tive in the business. He has never sought nor desired political preferment 
but by his ballot supports the republican party. His children are six in 



PIISTORY UF APPANOOSE COUNTY 409 

number, namely: Ella, who is the wile ot C. E. Snyder, a carpenter of 
Centerville; Myrtle, who gave her hand in marriage to William Nye, a 
barber of Centerville; Pearl A., of this review; John, at home; Clarence 
L., a graduate of the Centerville high school and the Iowa State Uni- 
versity, who is now city engineer of Dallas, Oregon; and Harry, who is 
a barber of Centerville. 

Pearl A. White, pursuing his education in the public schools of .Moiil- 
ton, became a high-school pupil but when in his junior year entered the 
Kansas State Normal, continuing his studies there for a year. On the 
expiration ot that period he returned to Centerville and studied law, his 
reading being directed for three years h\ Claude K. Porter and C. E. 
Howell. He afterwanl taught for four rcriii^ in the district school and in 
1907 he was called to public office in his election as mayor of Centerville. 
He served tor one term and his administration was characterized by many 
needed retorms and improvements. In 1911 he was appointed city clerk 
and is still the incumbent in that office. He is regarded as one of the party 
leaders in this section of Iowa and in the spring of 1912 was elected secre- 
tar}- of the republican county central committee. His fraternal relations 
are with Centerville Lodge, No. 940, B. P. O. E., in which organization 
he has many friends. He attends the Methodist church and is well known 
throughout Centerville and Appanoose lounry In reason of his active and 
hearty support of many measures and movements for the public good. He 
is at all times actuated by a public-spirited citizenship and his labors have 
been an effective force for the welfare and beneht of the communitv. 



ZIBA B. NIGHSWONGEK. 

Ziba B. Nighswonger, who is serving his third term as a member of the 
board ot supervisors of Appanoose count}-, is numbered among the suc- 
cessful agriculturists and stockmen of Moulton, where he owns a well 
cultivated farm of two hundred and eighty acres. He was born in Mar- 
shall county, Illinois, on the 23d of February, 1862, and is a son of Rea- 
son and Ellen (Gregory) Nighswonger. The father, whose birth occurred 
in the vicinity of Richmond, \'irginia, on the 20th of January, 1819, 
belonged to an old colonial family, but was of German extraction. His 
grandfather emigrated to this country in early manhood and located in 
Pennsylvania, where his wife and two children were mas.sacred by the 
Indians. He subsequently married again and of this union was born a 
son, al-o called Reason Nighswonger, and the grandfather of our subject. 



410 HISTORY Dl" Al'I'AXOOSE COL'XTV 

The great-grandfather was a veteran ot the P'rench and Indian war. In 
early lite Reason Nighswonger, Sr., removed to \'irginia and engaged in 
tanning and also ratted logs. He lost his lite on the Ohio river in the 
'30s. leaving a widow, who in her maidenhood was known as Susan ButKng- 
ton, and nine children, all of whom lived to attain maturity. Some years 
atter the death ot her husband Mrs. Nighswonger and her family removed 
to Illinois, locating in Pike county, that state, in the late '30s. One mem- 
ber of this family, Asa Nighswonger, is still living and resides in Marshall 
county, Illinois. Reason Nighswonger, Jr.. who was the fourth child 
born to his parents, obtained his education in the subscription schools of 
Virginia. He assisted his brothers in clearing and cultivating the fam- 
ily homestead in Illinois, and he also worked in the lumber woods and 
rafted logs to St. Louis. On the 12th of October, 1843, he was married 
to Miss Ellen Gregory, a daughter of Robert and Nancy (Broyles) 
Gregory. The family were natives of Tennessee, whence the father removed 
to Illinois in 1830, and passed away in Marshall county, that state, about 
1867. He was a son of John Gregory. His widow subsequently removed 
to Iowa and here passed her latter years. About 1850 Reason Nigh- 
swonger removed with his wife and two eldest children to Marshall county, 
Illinois, and bought government land, which he cultivated with a fair 
measure of success until 1876. In the latter year he came to Appanoose 
county, and purchased a farm southeast of Moulton, where he later 
acquired extensive holdings. Although he lived practically retired dur- 
ing his latter years he continued to make his home on his farm, where 
he passed away on .\pril 23, 1904. He was survived by his widow until 
the 1st of March, lyoy. Mr. Nighswonger was a very devout man and 
a zealous worker in the Christian church of which his wife was also a 
member. To this worth\^ couple were born twelve children, two of whom 
died in infanc\. In order of birth the others are as follows: David, 
who pas.sed away in 1867, a volunteer in a company of Illinois infanrr\ 
during the Civil war and for thirteen months confined in the Confederate 
prison at Tyler, Texas; Melissa, the wife of W. B. Hoskins, of Orient. 
Iowa; Minerva, the deceased wife of J. B. Teagarden, of Fairfield. 
Nebraska: Elizabeth Ann. who married A.' S. Hoskins. of Hiawatha. 
Kansas; Charles D.. who is residing in the vicinity ot Wildon. Decatur 
county, Iowa; Robert, who died ar the age of thirteen; Addie, the wife 
of John P. Stansberry, of Moulton. Iowa; Ziba B.. our subject; William 
F., who is residing in Leroy, Kansas; and Eva, the deceased wif<- ot J. P. 
Stan.sberry. of Moulton, Iowa. 

The first fourten years in the life of Ziba B. Nighswonger were passed 
in the state of his nativity. He w.as reared in verv much the manner of 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 411 

all tarmer lads ot that period, and in the acquirement of his education 
attended the public schools ot Illinois, the high school ot Moulton and 
the State Normal School at Kirksville, Missouri. While engaged in the 
mastery ot the various branches ot learning he was also litting himself 
for the career of an agriculturist by assisting his father with the cultivation 
ot the tields and care ot the stock when not occupied with his lessons. He 
cultivated his father's land until about 1890, when he purchased eighty 
acres on section 1, township 67, where he continued his agricultural pur- 
suits for three years. In 1893, he removed to his present farm, which is 
located on section 24, township 68, where he made his home until 1910. 
In the year last named he removed to Mouhon where he has since resided, 
hut >till superintends the operation ot his farm. His fields, which are 
planted to such cereals as he deems best adapted to the soil, annual 1\ \ k Id 
abundant harvests and in connection with diversified farming he engages 
in stock-raising. He deals largely in sheep and hogs, and as he is a capable 
man, of practical ideas and good business judgment, is meeting with more 
than an average degree of success. 

On the 23d of September, 1883, Mr. Nighswonger was married to 
Mi.-> Hattie M. Guile, whose birth occurred on the l ^th of February, 
i860, her parents being Richard and Hannah (Finley) Guile. The father 
was born in the vicinity of Columbus, Ohio, where he resided until a youth 
ot about tourteen years, when his parents removed to Indiana, rturc the 
grandtather passed the remainder of his life. Richard Guile was reared 
to manhood in Indiana, where he was married and made his home until 
185). In the latter year accompanied by his wife and three children he 
removed to Davis county, Iowa, where Mrs. (iuile passed away in 1894. 
\ (-r\ soon thereafter he came to Moulton, making his home here until his 
tleath in 1905. To Mr. and Mrs. Nighswonger have been born three 
children, as follows: Floy, the wife of Ira Powell, of Moulton, Iowa; 
Blanche, who married Rama C. Dye. ot Moulton, and has one child five 
years of age; and Mildred Naomi, who is living at home. 

The family are members ot the Christian church, and fraternally Mr. 
Nighswonger is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odtl Fellows, 
Modern Woodmen ot America and the Brorherhood ot American Yeomen. 
U( has served with efficiency as town.ship a.ssessor, road supervisor and 
.school trustee ami tor three terms he has been a member of the boanl ot 
supervisors. In the execution of his official duties he manifests the same 
foresight, >^agacity and capability which characterize him as a business 
man. His public career has been noticeably free from any taint of sus- 
picion as to his integrity, nor has there ever been ca.st at him any of the 



412 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

aspersions, whirh often fall to the lot of those in official life. Mr. Nigh- 
swonger has passed the greater part of his life in this immediate vicinity 
where he is widely known and enjojs the esteem and regard of a large 
circle of friends. 



JAMES M. WILSON. 



James M. Wilson is a graduate of the law department of the Iowa 
State University and since his admission to the bar has been actively 
engaged in practice in Centerville, where he has won a well merited and 
enviable reputation. He was born September 8, 1866, near the city of 
Monmouth, Warren county, Illinois, and is one of the four living chil- 
dren of James and Elizabeth (Welsh) Wilson, both of whom were of 
Scotch descent. His early educational training was received in the com- 
mon schools and with the removal of the family to Centerville in 1882 
he went to work as weigh master in the coal mines with which his father 
was connected. He was then sixteen years of age. Desiring, however, 
to enjoy better educational privileges, he later attended the Centerville 
high school and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1885. He 
next entered Monmouth College in which he spent two years and upon 
his return to Iowa took up an}- honest work which wouUl \ ieici liini a 
living and enable him eventually to carry out his cherished ambition 
of preparing for a professional career. For one year he engaged in rail- 
roading and was clerk in the United States railway mail service. He 
afterward took up the profession of teaching which he followed tor one 
year in \'ersailles, Illinois. He displayed much versatility, thoroughness 
and ability in all of these branches but gradually his attention concentrated 
upon the law and he began reading under the direction of the Hon. T. M. 
Fee. He then entered the law department of the Iowa State University 
at Iowa City and was graduated in 1906 as president of a class of one 
hundred and three members. He had been admitted to the bar, however, 
in iHg;, and has since engaged in practice in Centerville, where he is now 
accorded a large clientage, connecting him with much ot the most impor- 
tant litigation tried in the courts of the district. He is in partnership with 
R. W. Smith, the present county attorney, under the firm style of Wilson 
& Smith. In i8g6 Mr. Wilson was elected county attorney on the repub- 
lican ticket and was reelected in the fall of i8q8. He had previously 
served as city attorney of Centerville and in 1901-2 he was reading clerk 
at the state convention held in Iowa. In everj' relation his official record 



HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 413 

has been an excellent one and he ha> also gained prominence at the bar, 
again and again demonstrating his ability to handle important questions 
and rinding a correct solution tor involved judicial problems. 

On the 24th of December, 1891, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage 
to Miss Flora M. White, a daughter of James A. White, a very promi- 
nent citizen of Centerville. They became the [)arents of two children: 
Eva, born October 13, 1892; and Jean, born July 12, 1894. Mr. Wilson 
is prominent in fraternal circles, especially in Masonry. He has served 
as high priest of Euclid Chapter, No. 4^, R. A. M., is a Knight Templar 
and also a member of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias lodge and both he and his wife are members of the 
Methodist church. High principles actuate him in every relation of 
life and his sterling traits of character have gained for him a most credit- 
able position in the regard of his fellow townsmen. The different interests 
of his life are well balanced and in his profession he has gained a creditable 
place, owing to the careful, thorough and systematic manner in which he 
prepares his cases, and his fidelity to the interests of his clients which has 
become almost proverbial. 



JOHN A. -McMURR.W 



John A. McMurray, a well known resident of Centerville, is num- 
bered among those who have contributed to the upbuilding and develop- 
ment of the state of Iowa and his work along business lines has been tor 
manv years of an important and influential character. He has resided in 
this part of the middle west during practical!) all of his lite and with the 
exception of a few years spent in Missouri has been in Iowa since 1849. 
In all of his activities he has proved his worth as a loyal and progressive 
citizen and is, moreover, entitled to esteem and honor as a veteran of the 
Civil war. He was born in Ro.ss county, Ohio, August 5, 1845, and is a 
.son of John and Eliza (Shockey) McMurray, the former a native of 
Ohio, horn .\ugust 24, 1812, and the latter of Penn.sylvania. The grand- 
father of our subject on the paternal side was a native of Irelaml, who 
came to the I'nited States in 1808 and located in Ohio. In i84() he 
started with his family for Jefferson county, Iowa, making the journey 
with wagon.s, in which he brought his household goods and farming 
implements. He was, however, seized with illness at Decatur, Illinois, 
and died in that city. The father of our subject i)ushetl westwartl and 
finallv locateil in Jefferson county, taking up a government claim, pur- 



414 IlISTOKV UF Al'l'A.XOUSE COUXTV 

chasing the land when it came into the market. In i86y he sold hi> hold- 
ings and moved into Livingston county, Missouri, where he resided until 
his death, which occurred in i8c)6. He was a veteran of the Mexican war 
and a man always loyal and progressive in matters of citizenship. He 
had long survived his wife, who passed away in 1876. 

John A. McMurray was a child of four years when he came with his 
j)arents into Iowa and practicall) his entire life has been spent in this 
state. He acquired a district-school education but laid aside his books 
at an early age to helj) his father on the farm. On the gth of Ma}-, 1862, 
when he was seventeen years of age, he enlisted at Fairfield, Jefferson 
count}', in Compan}- E, Fortieth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, and was almost 
immediately afterward mustered into service, taking part in the battles 
at Helena, Arkansas, Marks Mills, Prairie du Chien and Jenkins Ferry. 
In the latter engagement, which took place on the 30th of April, 1864. 
he was captured by the rebels and taken to the prison at T}ler. Texas, 
where he was confined until the end of the war. He was mustered out 
at Fort Gibson on the 16th of September, 1865, and after his discharge 
returned to Jefferson county, where he took up mining, which he followed 
for a period of forty-five years, although his activity in this line of work 
was not continuous. In 1877 he went to Marion count} and there engaged 
as a mining engineer for four years, removing at the end of that time to 
Missouri, where he spent a similar period as foreman on a railroad. In 
1889 he returned to Iowa and located at Mystic, Appanoose county, 
where he again followed mining. However, he eventually abandoned 
this occupation and opened a grocery store in Mystic, conducting this 
enterprise successfully until he disposed of it and bought a brick}ard. 
In igio he sold all of his business interests in Mystic and came to Center- 
ville, purchasing two acres of land. Since that time he has lived prac- 
tically retired, although he still does some gardening. During the entire 
course ot his business career his work has been at all times so earnest, 
progressive and straightforward that it has not only contributed to his 
own prosperit}' but has constituted also a force in general upbuilding. 

Mr. McMurray has been twice married. His first union occurred on 
the gth of March, 1865, when he \vedded Miss Elizabeth A. Hawthorn, 
a daughter of Jesse and Hannah (Barnett) Hawthorn, the former a 
native of Tennessee and the latter of North Carolina. Mrs. McMurrav's 
grandfather on the maternal side was a slaveholder in the south before the 
Civil war and the family is well known in North Carolina. Jesse and 
Hannah Hawthorn came north to Iowa after their marriage in 1840 anil 
located in Jefferson county, where the father preempted land, upon which 
he resided imtil his death in 1S76. His wife survived him two years. 



HISTORY Ul- Al'I'ANOOSE COLXTV 415 

Mr. McMurrays first wite was born in Jefferson county, Iowa, on the 
6th of November, 1844, and died in Mystic on the 27th of September, 
1904. She left four chiidrtn: Otto, born May 2.4, 1866, who is a miner 
in Springfield, Illinois; Mrs. Lepper, of whom further mention is made 
elsewhere in this work; Elmer, whose birth occurred on the 14th ot June, 
1873, and who is a miner in Mystic; and Bertha, born December 28, 1876, 
the wife of Ed Warrington, weigh boss in a coal mine at Decatur, Illinois. 
After the death of his first wife Mr. McMurray wedded Mrs. VAhi Walker, 
a tiaughter of Hiram and Susanna (Medley) Hooper, natives of Indiana, 
who removed to Kansas in 1875 and in iyo2 went to Washington, where 
they now reside. Mr. and Mrs. McMurray are members of the United 
Brethren church. 

Mr. McMurray is well known in fraternal circles, having gained a 
place of distinction in the Improved Order of Red Men, of which for 
two years he was great chief and great prophet. For a number ot years 
he belonged to the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Oskaloosa but has since 
given up this identification. He keeps in touch with his comrades of the 
Civil war through his membership in Post No. 122, G. A. R., of Center- 
ville, of which he is commander. He gives his allegiance to the republican 
party and in 1876 was justice of the peace in Jefferson county. He has 
always given a lo\al support to various measures tor thi- public good, his 
labors constituting an element in general advancement. Wherever he 
is known he is respected for his unfaltering allegiance to principles of 
honorable manhood, which he has manifested in his business and social 
relations and in his public-spirited citizenship. 



HON. W AHHKN I. DANIELS. 

Hon. Warren T. Daniels, one of rlic well known men in public lite 
in Iowa, who has recentl) completetl one term in the state general assembly 
anil who was reelected in November, iyi2, is a prominent and influential 
citi/en of W^ells township, where he 1ki> made his home since 1891. H< 
was born in Jackson county, Ohio, .September 23, i8^f), a son of William 
Daniels, a native of Pennsylvania, born in Pittsburg in 1812. The fatiier 
grew to maturity in his native city but in 1848 or 1849 crossed the plains 
with ox teams to California and spent three years in the mines ot that .state, 
meeting with a fair degree of success. He gave up this occupation, however, 
and again cros.sed the country, settling this time in Jackson county. Ohio. 
There he married Miss Marv Jane H' :i,|. \\\u> w a> born, reareil ami 



416 HISTORY OF APPAXOOSE COUNTY 

educated in Columbiana county, Ohio. After his marriage he turned his 
attention to farming. He developed and improved his tract of land for 
twent)-five years, gaining a place among the substantial and rejiresenta- 
tive agriculturists of Jackson county. In 1881 he left Ohio and moved 
to Iowa, locating in Wells township, where he purchased land. He oper- 
ated this farm during the remainder of his lite and upon it passed away 
in igo6. He had many warm friends in this section of the state and his 
passing was widely and deeply regretted. 

Hon. Warren T. Daniels grew to manhood in Jackson county, Ohio, 
and acquired his education in the public schools. He spent his child- 
hood and youth uj)on his lather's farm and even after attaining his 
majority aided in the operation of the homestead. Alter his marriage, 
which occurred in 1881, Mr. Daniels engaged in farming in Jackson 
county lor ten years, developing a property of one hundred and ten acres 
along progressive modern lines. In i8c)i, however, he sold his Ohio 
land and moved to Iowa, joining his father in Appanoose count)-. He 
soon afterward acquired a tract of timber land, erected a sawmill upon 
it and engaged in cutting lumber and selling it in the local markets. For 
five years he carried on this business, at the end of which time he pur- 
chased one hundred and eighty acres, upon which he now resides. ■ Later 
he sold his first tract and gave his entire attention to the improvement 
and development of his present farm which he has made in the course 
of years one of the most valuable and highly productive in this part of 
the state. To it he has added from time to time and now owns four hun- 
dred and fortj-six acres, which he has named the Plainview Stock Farm. 
The residence which was upon the place Mr. Daniels has built to and 
remodeled, has erected a good barn and installed modern machinery, includ- 
ing an engine to pump water lor the stock and to nm a wood saw. He has 
sunk a well of one hundred and sixteen feet in depth and this affords 
sufficient water for every purpose. Mr. Daniels gives most of his atten- 
tion to stock-raising, feeding and shipping high-grade animals to the Chicago 
markets, his yearly average being from one to three carloads. He raises 
a high grade of cattle, hogs and horses. As a larmer he is regarded as one 
of the most progressive in the township, his success coming as a natural 
result of his practical modern methods and his well directed labor. 

On November 30, .1881, Mr. Daniels was united in marriage to Miss 
I'Ji'/a Craig, who was born and reared in Ciallia count). Ohio. The) 
have become the parents of four children: Lizzie, who married A. R. 
Probasco, a farmer of Wells township; Craig, who is a partner with his 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 417 

tather in the operation ot the home farm; Emma, who is employed as a 
bookkeeper in Des Moines; and Ward T., at home. 

Mr. Daniels i,s a Master Mason and has rilled all ot" the chairs in the 
Indcj)endent Order of Odd Fellows, being past grand of his lodge. Mr. 
and Mrs. Daniels and their daughter Lizzie hold membership in the order 
ot the Kebekahs, and the family are all devout adherents of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Mr. Daniels gives his political allegiance to the 
republican part\ and has gained a position of prominence and distinction 
in official circles of the state. In 1910 he was elected to represent Appa- 
noose county in the general assembly and he did such able, conscientious 
and public-spirited work that in 1912 he was reelected b)- a large major- 
ity. At the present time he is a member of the committees on intemper- 
ance, on school text-books, on mines and mining, and the telegraph and 
telephone committee and is active in the atfairs of all. Never havin^r 
been content to be a mere figurehead in politics, he works fearlessly, dili- 
gently and intelligently in support of the movements in which he believes 
and in this way has gained the respect and esteem which the public always 
accords to high integrity and evident sincerity of purpose. 



I 



WILLIAM L. DOWMXG. M. D. 

Dr. William L. Downing, who is regarded as one of the representa- 
tive members of the medical fraternity of Appanoose county, has for 
twent}-two }ears been successfully engaged in the practice of medicine 
in Moulton. He is a native of Iowa, having been born in Davis county 
on the nth of March, 1862, and is a son of Samuel Bell and Felitha P. 
(Starkj Downing, both of whom are deceased. The paternal grand- 
tather was born, reared and married in Scotland, whence he emigrated 
to America prior to 1830. His energies were always devoted to agri- 
cultural pursuits, and when he rirst came to this country he located in 
Pennsylvania in the vicinity of Pittsburg. His family numbered ten, 
seven sons and three daughters, all of whom were born in America. In 
1849, rive ot the sons and two of the daughters went to Oregon, settling 
near Salem. They are all deceased, but many of their descendants are 
residing in that vicinity. Samuel B. Downing was born on his father's 
farm near Pittsburg, obtaining his education in the common schools of 
that section. He early terminated his student days and went to work as 
a farm hand near where he was reared. When a lad of fifteen \ears he 
came to Iowa, locating in Van Burcn county, whence he later removed to 
Davis county. He continued to work out as a farm hand until h<' had 

Vol. n— 2 3 



418 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUxVTY 

attained his majority when he entered a tract of government land on 
which he settled and began his independent career as an agriculturist. The 
remainder of his active life was devoted to the further improvement and 
cultivation of his farm on which he resided until his death, which occurred 
about 1903. He was thrifty antl industrious and as his circumstances 
permitted he added to his land until his holdings aggregated thirteen 
hundred and eighty acres. He was a consistent Christian and a zealous 
worker in the Christian church, in which he was a laj- minister and 
assisted in the organization of many of the churches of that denomination 
throughout this section of the state. In matters of citizenship Samuel 
B. Downing was public-spirited, and took an active interest in every 
movement designed to forward the development of the countrj- or promote 
the welfare of its citizens. For three successive terms he represented his 
district in the state legislature, having been a member of that body in the 
'80s. He was a veteran of the Mexican war, having served throughout 
the period of hostilities, and during the Civil war he was a member of the 
local guard that looked after bushwhackers on the Missouri border. It 
was in Davis county Mr. Downing met Miss Stark who subsequently 
became his wife. She was born in Frankfort, Indiana, of which state her 
parents were likewise natives. The family came to Iowa in the early 
days and were among the first settlers of Davis county. Of the eleven 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Downing, ten lived to attain maturity. In 
order of birth the children are as follows: John W., a resident of Davis 
county; Abner A., who for twenty-seven years has been steward of the 
Davis County Poor Farm; Temperance E., the wife of Calvin J. Moss, 
a retired farmer of Eldorado, Kansas; India L., the wife of J. M. Kutch, 
a farmer and stock buyer of Drakeville, Iowa ; Ida, who married Charles 
Jones, who is a farmer of Drakeville, this state; Anna, who became the 
wife of Perry Ralston, a farmer of Drakeville; Mary L.. the wife of 
Henry H. LeMaster, a general merchant of Purcell. Oklahoma; June, the 
deceased wife of Elmer Morris, of Drakeville; Etta, who died at the age 
of eleven years; William L., our subject; and Sherman G.. who is also a 
resident of Drakeville. 

The boyhood and youth of William L. Downing were very much 
like those of other lads who were reared in the rural sections ot Iowa 
during the pioneer period. He obtained his preliminary education in the 
local schools and while engaged in the mastery of the common branches 
assisted with the cultivation of the home farm. Upon completing hi< 
course of study, he engaged in teaching for a few years, and then took up 
the study of medicine in the office of Drs. S. H. and J. L. Sawyer, father 
and son, in ITnionville. Iowa. He subsequently matriculated in Rush 
Medical College, Chicago, being awarded his degree from that institution 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 419 

with the class ot 1886. Immediatt-ly thereafter he went to I'nionville, 
Missouri, and established an office, which he maintained for four years. 
In 1890, he came to Moulton, where he has ever since been located. Dur- 
ing the long period of his residence here Dr. Downing has succeeded in 
building up a large practice, as he is not only a physician of more than 
average efficienc}", but is very conscientious in his devotion to his patients. 

In 1887, Dr. Downing was married to Miss Martha A. Coons, who 
was born in 1865, and is a daughter ot R. P. ami Elizabeth (Pile) Coons. 
The family are pioneers of Davis county, where the paternal grandfather 
located in the '40s. Mr. Coons now lives retired and he and his wife are 
residing in Moulton. Dr. and Mrs. Downing have two children: Inez, 
a graduate of the Moulton high school and of Drake University at Des 
Moines, where she completed a tour-year course in liberal arts in 1911, 
being awarded a scholarship in history in the Illinois State University in 
which institution she took a post-graduate course the same year; and 
Wendell L., a graduate of the Moulton high school, who is attending 
Drake University. 

The family are members of the Christian church, and fraternally Dr. 
Downing is a member of the Masonic order and the Independent Onlei* 
of Odd Fellows. He maintains relations with his fellow practitioners 
through the medium of his membership in the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Tri-.State and Des Moines Valley Medical Societies, and the 
Iowa State and Appanoose County Medical Societies and also belongs to 
several other professional organizations. He is also local surgeon tor the 
Wabash and the Chicago, Burlington \: Quincy Railroads. Owing to the 
exactions of his large practice Dr. Downing has never figured prominently 
in local public affairs, but he always meets the requirements of good citizen- 
ship by appearing at the polls on election day, and extends his support to 
every worthy enterprise or commendable movement. His genial manner, 
pleasing personality and unfeigned cordiality have won him many friends 
in this community, wlio hold liiin in tiigh regard by reason ot his profes- 
sional ability as well as because of his sterling worth of character. 



GKORGK T. PTT.MAM. 



George T. Pulliani, who is now living retired in .Moulton, where for 
many years he was engaged in the clothing business, belongs to that cla.ss 
of men who owe their advancement and success to persistent and intelli- 
gently directed effort. H<- was born in Pike coimty, Illinois, on the 1st 



420 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

of November, 1849, and is a son of James and Charity (Hindi J Pulliam. 
Ihe lather, who was a native of Barron count}', Kentucky, was born on 
the 31st of December, 1818, while the mother's natal day was the 11th 
of February, 1822. The paternal grandfather, William Pulliam, who 
was of Welsh extraction, married a Miss Decker and located in Kentucky, 
where for many years he engaged in farming. Accompanied by his fam- 
ily he subsequently removed to Pike count)-, Illinois, where both he and 
the grandmother passed the remainder of their lives. James Pulliam made 
his home in Illinois until about 1853, when he came to Iowa, lirst locating 
in the vicinity of Eddyville. The next year he purchased some land near 
Orleans, Davis county, on which he settled. About two }ears later, in 
1856, he extended the scope of his activities by establishing a general 
mercantile store at Orleans, which he conducted in connection with the 
cultivation of his farm and also bought and sold live stock. He continued 
to be identified with these various enterprises until 1864, when he dis- 
posed of his store and farm and removed to a place he had purchased 
two miles southeast of Moulton, now known as the George Ballew sheep 
farm. There he passed away in 1869. The mother's death occurred at 
Orleans in 1858. Mr. Pulliam was an industrious man of keen business 
ability and sterling worth and integrity. He possessed high standards of 
citizenship and took an active interest in all things pertaining to the 
welfare and progress of the community. He was one of the pioneers of 
this section who actively participated in breaking up the organized band 
of horse thieves operating in Illinois, Iowa and Missouri, and was shot 
and severely wounded in a fight with this gang of outlaws. To Mr. 
Pulliam and his first wife, the mother of our subject whom he married in 
Pike county, Illinois, were born six children, who lived to attain maturity. 
In order of birth they were as follows: W'illiam H., a member of the 
Twenty-first Missouri Infantry and later of the Eighth Iowa Cavalry 
during the Civil war, who participated in the Battle of Shiloh and was 
killed in a skirmish in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia, July 31, 1864; 
Elizabeth, the wife of George M. Bunten, of Drakeville, Iowa, who was 
also a member ot the Eighth Iowa Cavalry and was taken prisoner at 
the same time his hrother-in law was killed; ^Iary J., the widow of J. F. 
Wooldridge, of Phoenix, Arizona; George T., our subject; Orlando S., a 
resident of Custer county, Nebraska; and James W., of Lyons, Nebraska. 
After the death of the mother of these children, the father married Miss 
Dorcas W'ooldridge, of Bloomfield, Iowa, who passed away the next year. 
For his third wife he chose Miss Eliza Gale, of Orleans, Iowa, and of 
this marriage were born three children: Eva, who died at the age of 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUXTY 421 

three years; E. Burton, who passed away when he was tort)-six; and 
Emma (PuUiam) Hickman, of Moulton, Iowa. 

In the acquirement ot his education George T. I'uiliam attended the 
public schools ot Iowa, completing his course of study in Moulton. .\ttcr 
the death of his father, which occurred when he was twenty years ot 
age, he started out to make his own wa)- in the world, first engaging in 
the buying and shipping of live stock. About the same time he went into 
the clothing business in Moulton, subsequently devoting his entire energies 
to this enterprise. He continued to be identified with this activity until 
1898, during a portion of which tinu- he had as his partner J. F. Wool- 
dridge, his brother-in-law, whose interest he purchased in 1894. Mr. 
PuUiam conducted the business alone thereafter imtil 1898, when he dis- 
posed of it and has since lived retired. 

On the 21st of June, 1885, Mr. Pulliam was married to Miss OUie M. 
Gates, who was bom in Minerva, Essex county. New York, her parents 
being David L. and Rosetta (Hough) Gates. The father was of Scotch- 
Irish extraction and the mother of English and German lineage. The 
family removed from Essex county, New York, to Iowa in 1856, locat- 
ing in Jefferson county in the vicinity of Fairfield, where the father bought 
some land which he cultivated for many years. By profession Mr. Gates 
was an architect and when he first located in this state was employed 
by the Rock Island Railroad Company to construct the bridges on their 
line between Washington and Centerville. Mr. and Mrs. Gates were 
the parents of eight children, two of whom died in infancy. Those who 
reached maturit}- were as follows: Addie, the deceased wife of George 
Metzler, of Fairfield; Jennie, the deceased wife of George \V. Culli.son, 
of Harlan, Iowa; Mrs. Pulliam; Ellen V., the deceased wife of James A. 
Dunshee, of Troy, Iowa; David M., a resident of Jordan, Missouri; 
ami Mary I., who married George W. Cullison, an attorney of Harlan, 
Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Pulliam have no children of their own but reared 
and educated her nephew. Jay D. Dunshee, who is a physician at Ke\st()n, 
Iowa. 

Their religious faith they manifest through their connection with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which they taki' an active 
interest. Fraternally Mr. Pulliam is afliliated with the Knights of 
Pvthias, Modern Woodmen of America and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. Mrs. Pulliam was one of the organizers of the P. E. O. ot 
Iowa, and the local chapter of this order was organized in her home. She 
is a woman of marked culture and refinement and for fifteen years was 
a teacher, the last four years of that period having been spent in the 
schools of Moulton ju.st prior to her marriage. Mr. Pulliam has never 



422 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

actively participated in local politics, although he is not at all remiss 
in matters of citizenship, and has always been interested in educational 
matters. For forty-two years he served as secretary of the local school 
board, in which capacity he gave most efficient service, establishing a 
record as a public official that is seldom equaled. A desire to withdraw 
from all public duties and responsibilities prompted him to offer his 
resignation, which was most reluctantly accepted, in igi2. Mr. PuUiam 
has led a life of intelligently organized and capably directed activity, and 
is now able to spend his latter years in well earned ease and comfort. 



GEORGE D. LYNCH, M. D. 

Dr. George D. Lynch, who since igoi has engaged in the practice of 
medicine, opening an office in Moravia in 1905, is one of Iowa's native 
sons, his birth having occurred in Monterey, Davis county, February 21, 
1872. His parents are William and Catherine (MoyerJ Lynch. The 
father was born in Kentucky, January 8, 1840, and the mother's birth 
occurred in the same state in 1841. They came to Iowa with their re- 
spective parents at an early age and were married in Davis county. The 
father resided at Hilltown until the time of his marriage and engaged in 
the operation of a mill at that place, but for many years has carried on 
farming and now owns and occupies a good tract of land in this county. 
In their family are the following children: Amarilla, the wife of J. S. 
Horn, of Moulton, Iowa; John S., also of that place; George D.; Etta, 
the wife of Ambrose Horn, of Moulton; and Marine, the wife of Bud 
Henson. 

Dr. Lynch resided at the place of his birth until 1899, spending his 
Aouthful days in the usual manner of farm lads whose time is occupied 
with the work of the fields and the duties of the schoolroom. He was 
liberally educated, supplementing his early advantages by a course of 
study in the Southern Iowa Normal School at Bloomfield, in which he 
completed the teacher's course by graduation with the class of 1890. He 
then taught for sixteen terms, between 1890 and 1898, after which he 
entered the Keokuk Medical College, in which he studied for two years. 
He next became a student in Barnes t^niversity at St. Louis, where he 
completed his medical course in 1901. Dr. Lynch located for practice 
at Tindall, Missouri, where he remained until igov when he came to 
Moravia, where he has since engaged in general practice. He is capable, 
earnest and conscientious in the performance of his professional duties 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COLXTY 423 

and is accorded a liberal patronage, tor he has demonstrated his ability 
to successfully cope with the intricate {)roblems that continuously confront 
the physician. He has some business interests outside of his profession, 
being a stockholder in the Farmers State Bank at Trenton, Missouri, and 
is also the owner of excellent farm land hrtween Moravia and Center- 
ville. 

In 1891 Dr. Lynch was united in marriage to Miss Mattie A. Davis, 
a native ot Wayne county and a daughter of \\'. M. and Emma Davis. 
They have one child, Fanchen Pauline. Dr. Lynch gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and at one time was candidate for 
nomination for state senator from the district comprising Appanoose and 
Davis counties. He is lo}al in his service of the party and through 
political activity seeks to further the best interests of good government. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, but after all it is his professional duties which claim the 
greater part of his time and attention and to the end of promoting his 
knowledge and efficiency in the line of his chosen profession he is a member 
of the countv and state medical societies. 



JOHN H. MAY. 



John H. May,, prominently identitied with newspaper publication in 
Appanoose county as editor and owner oi the Cincinnati Review and 
as owner and publisher of the Exline Messenger, was born in .Adair 
county, December 26, 1859, his parents being James Washington and 
Mary Ann (Forrest) May. The father was born in the eastern part of 
Tennessee, .\ugust 8, 1805, and was a grandson of John Sevier, the first 
governor of that state and also its first member of congress. He served 
as governor for fourteen years and aided largely in shaping the policy 
of the commonwealth. He was equally distinguished as an Indian fighter 
and as an officer of the Revolutionary war, being one of the American 
officers in command at the battle of Kings Mountain. In the maternal 
liiK John H. May is a representative of an old Missouri family. His 
mother was born in Pike county, near the birthplace of Mark Twain, in 
1817, before the admission of the state to the l^nion. 

In the public schools of Cincinnati, Iowa, John H. May pursued 
his education, the family removing to .Appanoose county in his boyhood 
days. He completed his course in 18S1 and for about twelve years there- 
after devoted his time to farming and teaching. He proved cap.ablc and 



424 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

efficient in each line bur in .Iul\, 1893, turncti his attention to news- 
paper publication, becoming editor and owner of the Cincinnati Review. 
He made this a popular journal with a large local patronage and in Mav, 
igio, he extended the scope of his activities to include the publication 
of the Messenger of Exline, Iowa. Capable management and under- 
standing of the public desire in connection with newspaper publication and 
unfaltering energy and perseverance have brought to Mr. May a sub- 
stantial measure of success. 

On the 1st of February, 1894, at Council Grove. Kansa-. was cele- 
brated the marriage of John H. May and Miss Anna B. Fo.x, a daughter 
of John and Sarah J. Fox. Mrs. May v.-as born in Cincinnati, Iowa, 
September 4, 1862, but for a number of years resided in Morris county, 
Kansas. By her marriage she has become the mother of three chil- 
dren: Elbridge F., Jennie Pauline and Erma Josephine. The family 
attend the Christian church, of which Mr. May became a charter mem- 
ber on its organization. He also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Rebekah degree, is a past noble grand and has filled 
all of the chairs in the local organization. In politics he is a republican 
with tendency toward the progressive wing rather than the stand-pat 
branch of the organization. He is an admirer of, and supported. Senator 
A. B. Cummins and also Colonel Theodore Roosevelt. He has held 
some local offices including that of assessor, member of the city council 
and trustee, and for ten years has been a member of the Cincinnati school 
board of which he is now serving as president. He isat all times deeply 
and actively interested in affairs relating to the material, intellectual, 
political and moral progress of the community and his influence and 
efforts have been a potent force in advancing the general good. 



CHARLES A. MONTGOMERY. 

For rhirry-seven years Charles A. Montgomery, of the firm ot Mont- 
gomery Sons, has been actively connected with the commercial circles 
of Moulton, of which city he has been a resident since 1872. He was 
born in New Lexington, Perr}- county, Ohio, on the 2d of March, 1850, 
and is descended from one of the pioneer families of the Buckeje state. 
His father, John C. Montgomery, who was born in the earh ^os. removed 
to Iowa about 1852, locating in Henry county, where he bought a farm. 
Three years later he removed to Agenc\, Wapello count)-, this state, and 
established a general mercantile store, which he conducted until 1869. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 425 

In the year last named he removed to Adair county, Missouri, where he 
continued to engage in the mercantile business until the spring ot 1872. 
His next removal was to Moulton and here he founded the grocery store 
now owned and operated by his son and grandsons. Mr. Montgomery- 
passed away in July, 1875, -^^ the age of about fifty-eight years. He 
was married in New Lexington, Ohio, in 1847, to Miss Susan Turner, 
who was born on the 1st of June, 1826, and was a daughter of Hiram 
Turner. The father, who \^ as a farmer and lay preacher in the Methodist 
Episcopal church removed from Ohio to Iowa in the early days, and was 
residing about two miles from Burlington at the time of his death. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery were born six children, as follows: Mary 
F., who is deceased; Charles A., our subject; Margaret J., the wife of 
R. M. Brashear, of Kirksville, Missouri; Victor E., of Moulton, Iowa, 
deceased; and Timothy and John, who died in infancy. Mrs. Mont- 
gomery passed away on April 16, 1910, at the age of eighty-three years. 

The bojhood and youth of Charles A. Montgomery were passed in 
the parental home, his education being obtained in the public schools 
of Agency, Iowa. He came to Moulton in 1872 and entered the employ 
of the Moulton Bank, remaining there until the death of his father, fol- 
lowing which he and his brother, Victor E., took over the management of 
the store. They conducted this enterprise on a partnership basis until 
the hitter's death in 1003, when the sons of Charles A. Montgomery were 
admitted to the firm, which has since been conducted under the name of 
Montgomery Sons. It is one of the oldest and largest groceries in the 
city and as it is the policy of the company to conduct their business in 
a manner which commends them to the confidence of the communit)- they 
enjoy a large patronage. 

On August 6, 1876, Mr. Montgomery was married to Miss Josephine 
T. Dome, who was born in Harrison county, Indiana, July g, 1855, '^"^ 
is a daughter of Hiram and Sarah (Parker) Dome. The parents were 
both natives of Indiana, where they passed their entire lives. Of this 
marriage have been born four children, as follows: C. Ward, of the firm 
of Montgomery Sons, who married Olive Ma\- Reisncr anil has one child, 
Pauline; Arthur E., who is also a member ot the firm ot Montgomery 
Sons; John C. ; and LaFayette D., who is likewise engaged in business 
with his father and brothers. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church in which the par- 
ents hold membership. In matters of citizenship Mr. Montgomery is 
public-spirited and rakes an active interest in all local affairs, particularly 
of a political nature. He has served for several terms as township clerk 
and he has also been school director and a member of town coimcil. His 



426 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

commercial career has been characterized by the honesty of purpose and 
rehable methods, which invariably win permanent advancement and an 
honorable name, and both as a business man and private citizen he enjoys 
the esteem and respect of a large circle of acquaintances among whom he 
has won many stanch friends during the fort}-one years of his residence 
in the community. 



EDWIN L. STICKNEY. 



Edwin L. Stickney, who for eight years has been cashier of the First 
National Bank of Moulton, is a native of Aplington, Butler count)-, Iowa, 
his birth having occurred on the 22d of August, 1871. In the parental 
line he is descended from an old New England colonial family, and is 
a son of William C. Stickne}-, who was born in Prince Edward count}', 
Ontario, June 8, 1842. The American branch of the Stickne\- family 
is descended from one William Stickney, who was born in England in 
1592. He emigrated to America during the early colonial days and located 
in Massachusetts, where he passed away in 1665. He was the father of 
Samuel Stickne)-, who was born in 1633, and who in 1663 became the 
father of another Samuel Stickney. The next in line of descent was 
Richard Stickney, who was born in 1709, and in 1844 became the father 
of John Stickney. The last named was a veteran of the Revolutionary 
war, having enlisted on the 15th of January, 1777,' in Captain Moses 
Greenleaf's Company of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment, in which 
he served until discharged on January 15, 1780. His son, John Stick- 
ney, Jr., who was born in 1772, in his earh- manhood removed to the 
province of Ontario, Canada, and there was born, in 1805. Walter H. 
Stickney, our subject's grandfather. He married Phoebe Christy and 
they became the parents of William C. Stickne)% who was born on the old 
family homestead in Ontario, in the same house where his father's birth 
and death occurred. The family were Quakers in religious belief and 
largely followed agricultural pursuits. William C. Stickne)- was reared 
in his native province and educated in the public schools. When he was 
twenty-four years of age he crossed the border into the state of New 
York, where he resided for about a year. About 1867 he removed to 
Illinois, settling in Nora, Jo Daviess coimty, where he remained until 
he came to Iowa in 1870. He first settled at Aplington, Butler countv, 
where he bought some land, but the following year he disposed of his inter- 
ests at that point and returned to Canada. He remained in his native 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 427 

country five years and then came back to Iowa, locating in Hcnipton, 
Franklin county, where he engaged in the implement business. In 1885, 
he removed to Sheffield, Iowa, and identitied him>elt with the banking 
business. Two }ears later he came to Moulton and established the 
Moulton Bank, which he conducted for three years. In 1891 iu- >()Id 
this enterprise to William Bradley and it was known as Bradley's Bank 
until it was incorporated as the First National Bank ot Moulton. Mr. 
Stickney went to Denver, Colorado, in 1904, and engaged in the box 
manufacturing business, but he later removed to Spokane, Washington, 
where he is now living retired. On the 13th ot October, 1870, he was 
married to Miss Nancy E. Coble, who was born in Janesville, Wiscon- 
sin, on the 15th ot January, 1845, and is a daughter ot William Coble. 
The family removed from Wisconsin to Iowa in 1869, settling in Butler 
count)-, where the father engaged in farming until his retirement. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Stickney there were born four children, as follows: Kdwin 
L., our subject; Arthur R., who is engaged in the oil business at Fuller- 
ton, California; Walter C, a graduate of the University of Colorado, 
now engaged in the practice of law in Spokane and residing with his par- 
ents, and Edna L., the wife of Edwin R. Post, of Spokane, Washington. 

Edwin L. Stickney was reared at home and educated in the public- 
schools of Moulton and the Swarthmore College, of Philadalphia, Penn- 
sylvania. He began his business career in the Moulton Bank, where he 
was employed from the time he left school until January, 1897, when he 
went to East St. Louis, Illinois, where he engaged in the live-stock com- 
mission business for a time. In 1900, he returned to Moulton, and upon 
the organization of the First National Bank was made assistant cashier. 
He retained this position until 1904, when he was made cashier, in which 
capacity he has ever since served, and he is also a member of the board of 
directors. 

On the 4th ot June, 189^, Mr. Stickney was married to Miss Kath- 
arine Guinn, who was born on the loth of March, 1874, and is a daugh- 
ter of James T. and Nancy C. (Dameron) Guinn. The father's family 
came from Kentucky to Iowa in the early pioneer days and were among 
the first settlers in A[)panoose county. To Mr. and Mrs. Guinn were 
born two children, the elder ot whom is a son, George, who is a resident 
of Muskogee, Oklahoma. Mr. and Mrs. Stickney have two sons, H. 
CMiinii, who is attending the Interlaken School near I.a Porte, Indiana: 
and Alan C, who is ar home. 

The family attend the Methodist Episc()|)al church ot which tlie p.ir- 
ents are members, and fraternally Mr. Stickney is affiliated with the 
Masonic order and the Independent Order of Odil Felows. He is also 



428 TTISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

a member of the Iowa Bankers Association and the American Bankers 
Association. He takes an active interest in local politics and served for 
six years as treasurer of Moulton. Mr. Stickncy is a man of many com- 
mendable qualities and in his business transactions has manifested those 
principles which well entitle him to the confidence of the people with 
whom he is associated. In matters of citizenship he is progressive and 
public-spirited, extending his support to every worthy enterprise and 
indorsing such movements as he considers designed to promote the wel- 
fare of the community and the interests of the people at large. 



GEORGE A. SINGLEY. 



George A. Singley, cashier of the Moulton State Savings Bank and 
vice president of the Exline Savings Bank, is a native of Appanoose 
county, his birth having occurred on his father's farm in Washington 
township, on the 1st of January, i860. 

The family is of German extraction, the paternal great-grandfather 
having been born and reared in the old country, whence he emigrated to 
America in colonial days. He located in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and 
there passed the remainder of his life. He was a strong advocate of the 
rights of the colonists and valiantly served in the ranks during the Rev- 
olution. His sort, George, was born March 28, 1772, in Lawrence county, 
Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1829, when he removed to Johns- 
town, in the same state, at which place he owned and operated a canal 
boat until 1840, when he removed to Nauvoo, Illinois. He came to Appa- 
noose county in 1854 and took up a tract of governnunr land in Washing- 
ton township, where he engaged in farming and also followed the trade 
of a gunsmith until age compelled his retirement. He died at the age 
of one hundred and nine while his father lived to the advanced ace of 
one hundred and ten and his mother was one hundred and five j'ears of 
age at the time of her death. 

His son, George W. Single}', whose natal year was in 1818. was the 
father of our subject. He was born and reared in Pittsburg, Pennsjl- 
vania, where he learned the machinist's trade and was for some years em- 
ployed in the Baldwin Locomotive Works of that city. In 18^8 he came 
to Iowa and, purchasing a tract of government land in Washington town- 
ship, turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. In connection with 
farming he worked at the machinist's and gunsmith's trades and installeii 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 429 

He was married September, 1843, in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, to 
Miss Mary A. Treftz, whose natal day was the 8th of March, 1824. She 
is also of German extraction, her father, Adam Treftz having been born 
and reared in the old countr}- where he served as a member of the king's 
body guard. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Singley were born nine children, our subject being 
the sixth in order of birth, the first, Sophia, having died at the age of two 
years. The other members of the family are as folows: William H., 
who resides in Bloomdale, Ohio; Lowman and Jennie, who are deceased; 
Alice, who married Robert R. Wilson and now resides at Moulton; Ella, 
the wife of W. C. Kapp of Warrensburg, Missouri; Mary F., who is 
at home with the mother; and Matilda, the wife of A. H. Corey, of Des 
Moines. The father passed awa)- in September, 1892, but the mother is 
still living and will celebrate the eighty-ninth anniversary of her birth, 
.March 8, 1913. 

George A. Singley was reared at home and at the usual age began 
his education in the public schools. He subsequently attended the Lean- 
der Clark College at Toledo, Iowa, then known as \\'estern College, at 
which institution he completed a four-year course. During his student 
days he became quite well known in college circles by reason of holding 
the office of president of the Iowa State Oratorical Association. I'pon 
completing his education he returned to Moulton and tor twenty-three 
years thereat ter was in the employ of R. B. Carson. He established the 
reputation of being a trustworthy and reliable man of business and in 
1908 was called to the position of cashier of the Moulton State Savings 
Bank, of which he is one of the directors. He is likewise a stockholder 
and vice president ot the Exline Savings Bank. 

On the 30th of January, 1898, Mr. Singley was married to Miss 
Eva Barnes, a daughter of J. T. and Cynthia (Wood) Barnes, who resided 
in Parke county, Indiana, at the time of her birth, November 15, 1869, 
and later removed to .A[){ianoose count)'. The father and mother are now 
living in Moulton. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Singley have been born .seven children, as follows: 
George C, Thomas E. who died in infancy; William Clifford; .Albert H.; 
Helen Roberta; and Maude Etta and Mary Eva. who are twin>. 

The family attend the Presbyterian church and faternally .Mr. Singley 
is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Iowa 
Bankers Association, through the metlium ot which he keeps in touch 
with those who are actively connected with the banking int«-rests ot the 
'-fate. Mr. Singley has for twenty-eight years hern secretary of the school 
board of Washington township. He has never sought public honors or 



430 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

political preferment. He is a man of good principles, commendable busi- 
ness methods and high standards of citizenship, all of which have united 
in winning him the respect and esteem of his fellow townsmen, many of 
whom were friends and comrades of his boyhood. He now resides on the 
old homestead north of Moulton, where he was born. 



JAMES MADISON LEPPER. 



In every line of activity hard work, determination and ambition are 
the foundation of success and upon them James M. Lepper has built up 
his prosperity in the general contracting and building business in Center- 
ville. He has been engaged in this line of occupation during all of his 
active life and has gained a proficiency in it which, combined with his 
straightforward and honorable principles, makes him one of the leading 
business men of his community. He is a native son of Appanoose county, 
born February 23, 1861, his parents being James and Mary Ann (Clark) 
Lepper. The father was born in New York state. May 31, 1821, and at 
an early age became acquainted with the ■ hardships and responsibilities 
of life, being burdened when he was still a child with the support of his 
parents. He faced the obstacles in his path with confidence and courage 
and at the age of sixteen was able to bring his father and mother west 
to Waverly, Pike county, Ohio, where he rented a home and secured 
employment as a farm hand. Being ambitious, energetic and economical, 
he saved his money and was eventually able to rent land which he devel- 
oped and improved successfully for a number of years. He married in 
Ohio in 1855, his wife being a native of Jackson county, that state, born 
December 15, 1827. Later the father of our subject came to Appanoose 
county and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Walnut 
township, whereon he resided until his death, which occurred in 1895. 
After his demise his widow remained upon the farm, making her home 
with her son Barton. She passed away in September, 1912. James 
Lepper's career offers many splendid examples of the value of determina- 
tion and resolute purpose in the accomplishment of success, for he started 
out without money and destitute of outside help or influence and grad- 
ualh- worked his way upward until he became known as one of the 
most prominent breeders of Durham cattle in Appanoose county. In 
official circles, too, he made his name honored and respected and held 
various township ofBces, representing always republican doctrines and 
principles. He was a man of upright character and exemplified in his 
life the doctrines of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he believed. 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 431 

James M. Lepper of this review attended the district schools and spent 
his childhood upon his father's farm. After he had attained his majority . 
he went to Mystic and there learned the carpentering trade, working at 
it for wages for one year. He soon, however, abandoned carpentering 
in order to engage in contracting and building and in this way he gained 
valuable experience in his chosen line of activity. In the fall of 1903 
he came to Centerville and established his office in this city. With char- 
acteristic energy he applied himself to his duties, bending his energies to 
the building up of a representative patronage. In this he has succeeded, 
for his ability soon made him widely known and today he occupies a place 
among the leading contractors in tha city. He does a great deal of resi- 
dence work and has built many of the finest homes in Centerville, all of 
which are attractive in design and substantial in construction. Mr. Lepper 
has carefully watched his business interests, noting his opportunities for 
success, and the }ears have brought him gratifying prosperity as reward 
for his well directed labors. 

On the 4th of Oecember, 1889, Mr. Lepper was united in marriage to 
Miss Louisa McMurray, a daughter of John A. and Elizabeth (Haw- 
thorn) McMurra}-, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Lepper have become the parents of a son, Jesse, 
whose birth occurred in Appanoose county, July 19, 1892, and who is 
now assisting his father. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lepper are devout members 
of the First Methodist Episcopal church and both are well known in the 
affairs of the Woman's Relief Corps. Mr. Lepper is a republican in pol- 
itics and has always been interested in the growth and advancement of 
Appanoose county, although his public spirit never takes the form of 
office seeking, and he is a progressive man who seems to realize the value 
of ever\- situation and to make the most of his many opportunities. 
Through legitimate lines of expansion he has built up a growing business 
which is indicative of his spirit of enterprise and determination. 



CHARLES WEBER. 



Charles Weber is a well-known resident of Udell and an enterprising, 
progressive business man who carries forward to successful completion 
whatever he undertakes. He is proprietor of a gristmill in rlic town and 
he also deals in farm implements and wind pumps. He was bom in Ger- 
many, May 12, 1861, and is a son of Phillip and Minnie (Fulton") Weber, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. The father, who was a physician. 



432 ' HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

died in that country in 1861 and the following year the mother with three 
. of her children came to the United States, settling hrst in New York city, 
where she went to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Minnie Drummyer, 
who with two ot her brothers had come to America two years before. 
Later Mrs. Weber removed to Illinois, where she resided until her death 
in 1894. 

Charles Weber was only a jear old w hen brought to this country and 
when only six years of age began to earn his own living. He herded cattle 
in Illinois tor twenty-five cents per week and that he was faithful, even 
though so )oung, is seen in the fact that he remained with the same man 
tor two years. He afterward herded cattle for another man for fifty 
cents per week and when he was ten years of age he began working as a 
farm hand and was thus employed for five years. He afterward removed 
to Washington Heights, Illinois, where he learned the butchering busi- 
ness, and when eighteen jears of age he came to low a, settling in Poweshiek 
count}-, where he entered the employ of Craver, Steele v5i: Austin, manufac- 
turers of grain headers. After seventeen months spent in that employ he 
went to Des Moines, Iowa, and became a brakeman on the Rock Island 
Railroad. He next removed to Moulton and afterward to Moberly, 
Missouri, where he worked on the Wabash Railroad for a few months, 
and then returned to Moulton, where he engaged in house moving and 
well drilling. He next turned his attention to farming in Douglas ^own- 
ship and tor five )-ears remained upon that place. In 1905 he went to 
Davis county, Iowa, and bought eight}- acres of land which he afterward 
traded tor a hardware store at Moulton. He had been engaged in mer- 
chandising there for only a brief period, however, when he sold the store 
and bought one hundred and ten acres of land in \*an Buren county, Iowa, 
where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1907. In that 
year he sold the farm and came to his present home in Udell, purchasing 
of John McConnell the gristmill which he yet operates, carrying on a 
successful business. He also deals in farm implements and wind pumps 
and has a good sale for this product. 

On the 20th of December. 1884. Mr. Weber was married to Miss Sarah 
Morrow, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Miller) Morrow, natives ol 
Pennsylvania and of Dutch descent. The latter accompanied her aun- 
on her removal to Davis county, Iowa, in the early 40s and John Morrov 
went with his parents to the same county a few years later. There th 
young people became acquainted and were married in i8?2. Subsequent! 
the}' removed to Appanoose count}- and settled upon a farm which cor 
tinued to be their home until their life's labors were ended in death, hot 
passing away in this county, in 1909 and 1910 respectively. It was ' 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 433 

Appanoose county that Mrs. Weber was born, May 2, 1868. By her mar- 
riage she has become the mother of rive children: Etha, who died in 
infancy; ^ irgil, born April 27, 1887, who lives at home; Carl, who was 
born August 24, 1889, and is a traveling salesman in the employ ot the 
Haw i Simmons Hardware Compan} ot Ottumwa, Iowa; Owen Orval, 
born September 26, 1891, teaching in the public schools ot this county; 
and Frank, whose birth occurred on the I2th of November, 1893, and lives 
at home. He taught school tor a time in Monroe county, Iowa. The 
parents are members ot the Christian church, to the support ot which they 
contribute liberally, and take an active part in its work. 

In politics Mr. Weber is a progressive and is now serving as marshal 
of the village of I'dell. At one time he was a member of the school board 
of Douglas township and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart 
champion. He likewise belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge and the .Modern 
Woodmen camp, and in every relation of life he commands the respect, 
confidence and good-will of his associates. While he has lived in many 
places the greater part of his life has been pased in this section of Iowa 
and he has been an interested witness of its growth and improvement and 
has taken an active and helpful [)art in advancing its welfare and progress. 



JAMES W . .MASON. 



James W. Mason is now acting as mail carrier on the rural tree de- 
livery route out of Udell. He has a wide acquaintance in the county and 
many friends. He was born in Caldwell township. May 23, 1857, and is 
a representative of one of the old pioneer families here, his parents being 
William and Phoebe Ann (Wells) Mason. The father was born in 
Mcadville. Pennsylvania, July 2,-. 1831. and was of Scotch-Irish descent, 
while the mother was bom in Randolph county, Missouri, December 6, 
1831. In the year i8p William Mason went to Davis, Iowa, with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert .Mason. ;uui his grandfather, Isaac Mason. 
The last named was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and is [lossibly 
the onl\ representative of that conflict who now lies buried at Drakeville, 
Davis county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Robert .Ma-on. after living in this 
city for a time returned to Titusville, Pennsylvania, and there pass<d 
away. The maternal grand[)arents, Mr. and Mrs. James WclN. were 
among the first settlers in .\(>panoose covmty, arriving here in 18^7. This 
region was a gnat wilderni-ss, into which they penetrated, and Jamrs 
Well.s together with three of his .son.s, took up a large tract of govern- 



434 HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 

ment land on the Chariton river, where Cole City now stands. James 
Wells was a Christian preacher and organized the first church in Appa- 
noose county, known as the Hilltown church of Wells township. He 
proved a potent force in the moral development of this section of the 
state and was also concerned with its material progress and upbuilding, 
erecting the first grist and sawmill of the county in 1839. In many 
other ways he promoted public j)rogress and improvement here and his 
name is inseparably associated with this part of the state. Wells town- 
ship being so called in his honor. Both he and his wife died here and 
were laid to rest in Appanoose county, near Cole City, Mr. Wells pass- 
ing away in February, 1857. 

The marriage of William Mason and Phoebe Ann Wells was cele- 
brated in 1856 and they began their domestic life upon a farm in Cald- 
well township. Year after year he carefully tilled the soil and developed 
his property until 1884, when he sold out and went to Thomas county, 
Kansas, where he took up one hundred and sixty acres of government 
land. Both he and his wife remained upon that farm until called to 
their final rest, Mr. Mason dying in 1895, while his widow survived 
until 1908. 

James W. Mason completed his education in the Moulton high school 
and afterward engaged in teaching for seventeen jears in the public 
schools of this county and in Thomas county, Kansas, and Missouri, 
proving a capable educator, imparting clearly and readily to others the 
knowledge that he had acquired. He was married in 1883, after which 
he removed to Thomas county, Kansas, where he secured a homestead 
claim of one hundred and sixty acres of government land. He tau; 
school during the winter months, while the summer seasons were devo 
to farm work. For thirteen years he remained upon that place and t' 
returned to Appanoose county, taking up his abode in the village 
Udell, although he continued to follow farming until 1906, when 
was appointed rural mail carrier, to which position he is now giving 
time. 

Mr. Mason was married in 1883 to Miss Sarah Jane Taylo 
daughter of William and Martha (King) Taylor, who were native 
Ohio. The mother was born near Zanesville, April 2 5, 1829, and 
parents were natives of east Tennessee. With them she removec 
Davis county, Iowa, in the late '40s anil about the .same time 
Taylor became a resident of Appanoose county. He had lost his f: 
in Ohio, after which he came to Iowa and purchased one hundred 
sixty acres of land in Washington township, Appanoose county, 
was prior to his marriage. Later he bought forty acres in Davis ct 



HISTORY OF APPANOOSE COUNTY 435 

and was closcl) connected with the agricultural development of this 
section of the state tor a long period. It was in Ap[):in()ose county that 
Mr. and Mrs. Taylor were marrieii and u[)on the tanii in Washington 
township they began their domestic lite. Three years later he invested 
in one hundred and sixty acres on section 7, IMell township, just north 
ot his original purchase, and afterward became the owner ot one hun- 
dred and tort}' acres in \\'ashington township, on which he took up his 
abode. .A tew years later he returned to the old home place and there 
passed away in 1864. His widow sold the tract in Washington town- 
ship but still owns the old homestead ot one hundred and sixty acres on 
section 17, Udell township, to which she removed after the death of 
her husband. She is living on that i)lacf with two of her children. 

Unto Mr. antl Mrs. Mason have been born five children. Clara Alice, 
born November 20, 1884, is the wife of Frank Honar, a farmer of Doug- 
las township. William T., born December 23, 1887, is a barber in 
Badger, Iowa. Oscar D., born February 5, 1891, is at home. Miles 
F., born March 13, 1893, is a barber at Moravia, Iowa. Chester B.. born 
August 2, 1896, is at home. 

Mr. Mason belongs to the Odd Fellows Lodge at I'dell, and he and 
his family are members of the Christian church. He gives his political 
support to the republican party and is well informed on the viral ques- 
tions and issues of the da\. For tift\-hve years he has lived in this 
section of Iowa and has, therefore, been a witness of practically the en- 
tire growth and development of Appanoose county. He has seen it trans- 
formed from a frontier district into a populous and prosperous .section of 
the state and rejoices in what has been accomplished as the years have 
gone by. He is one of the enterprising citizens of this section and a man 
who.se worth is acknowledged by his man\ friends. 



INDEX 



Adams, a. B 289 

Adams, H. C 124 

Adamson. K. W 363 

Anderson, Louis 178 

Ashhy. .1. C II' 

Uailey, Amos 283 

Bailey, W. S 303 

Baker, C. C 16-* 

Bales, Peter 246 

Bateman. Miles 318 

Beck, J. M 316 

Beer, M. H 104 

Beer, S. W 193 

Berry, W. K 58 

Blachley. H. W 66 

Boujfliner. ilartin 0."> 

Bradley. B. F 284 

Bradley. D. C 22 

Bradley, .T. R 402 

LradU-y, William 11 

Brokaw, Isaac 242 

Broshar, Kdward 348 

Brown. S. C 77 

Brown, W. H 134 

Bryant Brothers 61 

Bryant. S. \V ix 

Bryant. \V. R 299 

Bunker, H. K 20S 

Bnrkliiwr. Ailam 196 

Burkland, Andrew 260 

Calvert. T. W 139 

Campbell. .1. W 106 

Carson. K. B 36."i 

Case. T. I 343 

Clark. . I. (i 3.-.2 

Climie, I!. E 144 

Conger. C. S 356 

Cook, ,S. C 286 

Cool, .1. H 3R.'> 

Croxton, Tliomas 121 

Curl. R. It 377 

Currie. W. K 7 



Dale, .J. M 203 

Daniels. W. T 415 

Davis. P. S 204 

Dean. (i. W 126 

I)c Noon, E. S 112 

Dillon. .1. A 76 

Dillon. T. H 179 

Dines, W. M 81 

Downing, W. L 417 

Duek. A. M 387 

Dukes, A. S 51 

Duree, James 80 

Edwards, Morftan 115 

Edwards. M. S 161 

Edwards. William 171 

Elfstrom. A. W. P 388 

Klfrin. C. H 297 

Elliott, G. C 155 

Ellis, W. M 230 

Evans, William 47 

Evans. W. V 271 



Fee, T. Li 

Kenton. W. J 

Korsytli. R. C 

Krimkel. .J. .1 

E\iller. B. A 



43 

170 

8 

36 
328 



Cladfelder, Oeorgc 322 

Click, F. R 347 

Goldstein. Abe 29 

Gray, ,T. F 259 

Grecnieaf, H. S 315 

Gribben, 1. P 6" 

Harrison, C. 1 3,32 

Hays. .S. P 136 

Hays. W. B 125 

llendersliot. .T. E 237 

Henry, h. McD. ■•O* 

Henry. Melissa A... 122 

Hilibs. .r. W 1"< 



4:j7 



438 



INDEX 



Hieks, J. M 304 

Hopkins, J. C 290 

Hopkins, Steplipn 338 

Hopkins, T. E 257 

Hornaday, C. A 323 

House, John ; 270 

Howell, C. F 395 

Hughes, J. S 301 

Johnson Brothers 29.'> 

Johnson, O. W 227 

Johnson, Seth 308 

Kelly, S. A 114 

Kerschner, J. N 287 

Killion, T. W 198 

Kincade, A. W 384 

Knapp, Lincoln 176 

Knox, S. D 152 

Lane, I. S 87 

Lankford, John 26 

Lepper, J. M 430 

Lodwiek, David 276 

Loftus, M. M 53 

Long, I. L 210 

Luse, Jackson 266 

Luse, J. H 390 

Luther, H. E 67 

Lynch, G. D 422 

McAnelly, H. C 307 

McCabe, W. H 214 

McC'auIey, J. H 225 

McClure, J. L 163 

MeCrory, Marion 219 

McDonald, IT. F 143 

McDonald. J. C 250 

McMurray, J. A 413 

Main, N. J 90 

Maring, Moses 337 

Maring. M. B 345 

Maring, S. P 358 

Maring, S. W 72 

Martin, J. W 228 

Mason. .1. W 433 

May, J. H 423 

Meyers, C. H 188 

Mitchell, Alexander 325 

Moden. E. J 218 

Montgomery, C. A 424 

More, Mathew 236 

More, S. J. 191 

Morgan, F. C 327 

Morrison, LA ". 1 Hi 

Morrison, W. I ; . . . . 141 

]\[orrison, \V. R 249 



Murdy, N. E 181 

Myers, W. T 182 

Needels, G. \\' 10 

Nighswonger, Z. B 409 

Noland, (i. W 272 

Ogle, B. A ._ 70 

Ogle, (i. B .' 102 

O'Neil, D. C 94 

Organ, W. F 374 

Orr, Alexander 278 

Parker, C. F 816 

Payton, Corse 372. 

Payton, John 220 

Peach, Joseph 101 

Peacock, Cordon 303 

Peacock, Scott 207 

Peavey, L. B 82 

Phares, J. L 354 

Phillips, H. T l.',0 

Pixley, A. F 252 

Porter, C. R S 

Post, Augu.st 33 

Pratt, A. J 200 

Pratt, G. S 120 

Printz, E. T 393 

Probasco. D. \V «2 

PuUiam, C. T 419 

Quiglcy. John 281 

Replogle, J, A sis 

Rinehart Brothers 400 

Robertson, J. H 186 

Rosenbaum. Sol 1^9 

Rus.sell, H. A 334 

Salinger. Lewis ,'i4 

Sawyers, E. H 15 

Scott, \V. M 378 

Severs, G. F r 24 

Shaffer, W. N 108 

Shanks, .L A 280 

Sharp. F. S 283 

Shoultz. A. J 386 

Shutts, B. W 99 

Silknitter, B. F 335 

Singley, G. A 428 

Smith. G. M 367 

Smith, .L B 133 

Smith. R. \V 314 

Spooner. D, A 213 

Staley, Alva 84 

Staler. B. S 206 

Stanley. C. A 32 



INDEX 



439 



Stickler, \V. B I'.iO 

Stifkney, E. L l-'ii 

.Stone, Burt ■i''^ 

Sturdivant, B. F 17 

Taylor, J. B l'J2 

Taylor, J. .1 174 

Taylor, L. L t.') 

Thompson, G. W 15 

Tillmont, C. P :;'.if. 

Tillmont, John . M'-l 

Trembly, A. G '. :iOO 

Turner, B. E 24S 

Turner. .Joseph 'i J 

Wailes, .J. S 157 

Walker, B. A :i7.'; 

Weber, Cliarles 431 

Webster, Sarah S 41 



Weller, A. .) 7S 

Wentworth, E. G 158 

Wertz. J. B 211 

West, Lewis 1S3 

WhisOer, A. S :i8a 

White. P. A 400 

Whitsell. F. P SS 

WhitMll. L. 1 105 

WiUox, A. K 97 

Wiluox, Jame.t 137 

Williams, .J. W 49 

Wilson. .1. M 412 

Wilson. X. W 311 

Wilson. Pierce 16S 

Wilson. R. E 2.19 

Wyckoff, C. S 30 

WyckolT, Perry 26i; 

Zinimer. .1. M 1 IT 



^v