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Full text of "Past and present of Greene County Missouri; early and recent history and genealogical records of many of the representative citizens"

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PAST AND PRESENT 

OF 

GREENE COUNTY 

H MISSOURI 



Early and Recent History and Genealogical Records 
of Many of the Representative Citizens 



BY 

JONATHAN FAIRBANKS 

AND 

CLYDE EDWIN TUCK 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



1915 

A. W. BOWEN & COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS 



DEDICATION. 
This work is respectfully dedicated to 

THE PIONEERS, 

long departed. May the memory of those who laid down their burdens by 

the wayside ever be fragrant as the breath of summer flowers. 

for their toils and sacrifices have made Greene county 

a garden of sunshine and delights. 



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* 







FOREWORD 



All life and achievement is evolution ; the wisdom of today comes from 
past experience, and present commercial prosperity is the result of former 
exertion and sacrifice. The deeds and motives of the men that have gone 
before have been instrumental in shaping the destinies of later communities 
and states. The development of a new country was at once a task and a 
privilege. It required great courage, privation and suffering. Compare the 
present conditions of the people of Greene county, Missouri, with what they 
were three-quarters of a century ago. From a trackless wilderness and a 
virgin prairie, less than a century ago, it has been transformed into a center 
of prosperity and advanced civilization, with millions of wealth, modern 
railroad facilities, great educational institutions, splendid industries, and 
immense agricultural productions. Can any thinking person be insensible to 
(he fascination of the study which discloses the incentives, hopes, aspirations 
and efforts of the early pioneers who laid so firm a foundation upon which 
has been reared the magnificent prosperity of later days? To perpetuate 
the story of these people and to trace and record the social, political, and 
industrial progress of the community from its first inception to the present 
time has been the function of our historians. A sincere purpose to preserve 
facts and personal memoirs that are deserving of perpetuation, and which 
unite the present with the past, is the motive for this publication. While 
the actual writing of most of the work was done by Clyde Edwin Tuck, the 
data was gathered by many trained assistants and the finished product ap- 
proved by competent local authorities, to prevent possible errors, Jonathan 
Fairbanks being the principal editorial advisor, while special chapters were 
written by Edward M. Shepard and others well equipped to prepare such 
articles. A speciallv valuable department has been devoted to the sketches 
of representative citizens of this county whose records deserve perservation 
because of their worth and accomplishments. The publishers desire to ex- 
tend their thanks to all who have aided in any way in making this under- 
taking a success, and to express their gratitude for the uniform kindness with 
which the citizens of Greene county have regarded their efforts and for the 
many services rendered in obtaining necessary information. 

In placing "Past and Present of Greene County, Missouri," before the 



citizens, the publishers can conscientiously claim that they have carried out 
the plan as outlined in the prospectus. Every biographical sketch in the 
work was submitted to the party interested, for correction, and therefore 
any error of fact, if there be any, is solely due to the person for whom the 
sketch was prepared. Confident that our efforts to please will fully meet 
the approbation of the public, we are, 

Respectfully, 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I— PREHISTORIC RACES IN GREENE COUNTY- 25 

Evidence of Cave Dwellers and Mound Builders — Indian Implements — 
Characteristics of the Osages, Delawares and Kickapoos — Indian Trails — 
Early Explorers — First Settlers — Under Flags of Spain and France — The Old 
Louisiana Territory. 

CHAPTER II— GEOLOGY, LOCATION AND TOPOGRAPHY- 59 

Altitudes — The Ozarks — Various Rivers and Streams — Caves — The Differ- 
ent Formations — The Geological Ages — An Interesting Region for the Stu- 
dent of Geology and Archaeolgy. 

CHAPTER III— ECONOMIC GEOLOGY 85 

Water — Springfield Water Supply— Mineral Waters— Building Stones — 
Sandstones — Limestone — Ornamental Stones — Lime — Soil — Road Material — 
Coal — Iron — Lead — Zinc — Copper — Silver — Gold — Petroleum — Local Mines. 

CHAPTER IV— ORGANIZATION OF COUNTY 120 

Official Acts Connected with Its Formation — Beginning of the Various 
Townships — Giving Greene County a Legal Existence — Unique Court Docu- 
ments. 

CHAPTER V— EARLY SETTLEMENT 12» 

Where the Pioneer Settlers Emigrated From— Where They First Effected 
Their Settlment— The Early-day Mills— Early Roads— Pioneer Schools- 
Churches— Customs and Manners— Going to Market— Mail Facilities. 

CHAPTER VI— COUNTY GOVERNMENT 156 

First Set of Officers— Pioneer and Later Court Houses— Jails and Care for 
the Unfortunate Poor — Bond Issues— Roads and Bridges — Finances at Dif- 
ferent Periods — A Glimpse of Early Court Proceedings. 

CHAPTER VII— TRANSPORTATION 185 

Railroad Building and Freighting — How Early Merchants Obtained Their 
Goods — First Train Into Springfield— Old Gulf Railroad— The Bolivar 
Branch — Springfield Traction Company — Stage Coaches. 

CHAPTER VIII— FARMING AND STOCK RAISING 196 

Pioneer Methods of Farming — Old Time Implements — Smaller Farms Now 
— Greater Diversity of Crops — Improved Methods — Stock Raising — Products 
Shipped Out of the County. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER IX— VARIOUS DIVISIONS OF GREENE COUNTY 204 

History of Each Township — The Original Townships — Changes in the Civil 
Subdivisions — Population at Various Periods — Early Settlement of Each 
Township — History of Towns and Villages — Special History and Events. 

CHAPTER X— COUNTY GROWTH AND PROGRESS 211 

Miscellaneous Events of Interest — Population by Decades — Population by 
Last Federal Census by Townships and Precincts — First Events in the 
County — Market Quotations at Different Periods — The "Rough Side of Life." 

CHAPTER XI— MILITARY HISTORY 229 

Revolutionary Soldiers — Indian Troubles — Soldiers — The Mexican War — 
Beginning of the Civil War — Coming of General Lyon — Battle of Wilson's 
Creek in Detail — Springfield Under Federals and Confederates — Zagonyi's 
Charge — The Battle of Springfield — Trials and Troubles of the People Dur- 
ing the Long Struggle — Conditions Immediately After the War — Greene 
County's Part — The Spanish-American War. 

CHAPTER Nil — HISTORY OF PUBLIC EDUCATION IN SPRINGFIELD.. 409 
First Public Schools — High School and Various Ward Schools — Number of 
Pupils — Drury College — State Normal School — Old Normal School — Carne- 
gie Public Library — ( )ther Schools of the county. 

CHAPTER XIII— BENCH WD BAR 443 

Prominent Early Lawyers and Jurists — Characteristics of the Members of the 
Greene County Bar in Pioneer Days and the Present — Names and Records 
of Attorney- and Judges During the Entire History of the Local Bar. 

CHAPTER XIV— THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN GREENE COUNTY- 485 
Growth of the Science — Nanus and Characteristics of the Pioneer Doctors 
— Later General Practitioners, Surgeons and Specialists — Dentists — Veter- 
inarians — Osteopaths — Chiropractors — Hospitals. 

I II \PTER XV— BANKS AND BANKING 509 

Amount of Deposits — Annual Clearing House Figures — First Bank — First 
National Hanks — Names of Leading Bankers of the Early Days — History 
of Various Hanks of the Fast and Present. 

CHAPTER XVI— THE NEWSPAPERS OF THE COUNTY 519 

The First Published in What Was Originally Greene County — Names of 
Early and Later Publications — A Brief History of Each — Names of the 
I 'ublishers. 

CHAPTER XVII— SECRET SOCIETIES 524 

History of Masonry and Its Co-ordinate Branches in Greene County — Var- 
ious Lodges — Sons of tlic Revolution — Grand Army Organizations — National 
( 'emetery —Confederate ( Irganization — Confederate Cemetery — First Decora- 
tion— Y. M. C. A.— Y. W. C. V 

CHAPTER XVIII— WOMEN'S CLUBS 560 

Interest Manifested in Intellectual Development After the Civil War — Names 
of Charter and Present Members of the Various Organizations — The Growth 
ol tin i lub Movement— Some of the Things \ccomplished. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XIX— CHURCH DENOMINATIONAL HISTORY 579 

The Methodist, Baptist, Christian, Presbyterian, Congregational, Evangeli- 
cal, Lutheran and Other Churches — Colored Churches — Catholic Church 
History. 

CHAPTER XX— MANUFACTURING 663 

Its Beginning, Growth and Present Condition — Early Plants and Shops — 
Modern Mills, Foundries and Other Centers of Activity — A Comparison Be- 
tween Pioneer and Modern Methods. 

CHAPTER XXI— CITY OF SPRINGFIELD 682 

Its Founders — Incorporation — Early-day Business Interests — Growth — Re- 
cent Years — City Governments — List of Mayors — Street Making — Fire De- 
partment — Water Works — Electric Light and Power Plants — Other Items 
of Interest. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



Agriculture 196 

Altitude of Springfield 59 

Ash Grove 208 

Banks and Banking 508 

Growth of Banks in Springfield 508 

First Banks 510 

National Banks 512 

North Side Banks 515 

Trust Companies 516 

Banks of the Smaller Towns 516 

Baptist Young Men's Organization. 652 

Baptist Young People's Union 617 

Bench and Bar 443 

Early Lawyers 443 

Early Judges 443 

Brief Mention of Former and 

Present Practicing Lawyers 471 

Criminal Court 451 

Congressmen 464 

Lawyers in Springfield Before the 

War 457 

List of Present Active Practition- 
ers 483 

Oldest Member of the Bar 469 

Bois D'Arc 210 

Boone, Nathan 140 

Brotherhoods 617 

Campbell Camp 552 

Carnegie Public Library 428 

Cave Spring 208 

Chiropractors 499 

Christian Endeavor 616 

Churches, Catholic 618 

Immaculate Conception 619 

Sacred Heart Parish 622 

St. Agnes 635 

St. Joseph's 638 

Churches, Protestant 579 

Christian 585 

Baptist 595-650 

German, and others 608 

Methodist Episcopal __579-600-639-644 



Methodist Protestant 584 

Congregational 603 

Protestant Episcopal 607 

Presbyterian 588-646 

Colored, Baptist 611 

Other Denominations 660 

Country Churches 639 

Civil War 239 

Before the War Began 239 

News of Ft. Sumter 242 

Federal Troops 245 

General Lyon 249 

Expedition to Forsyth 252 

Engagement at Dug Springs 253 

Confederate Troops 256 

Federal Account of Battle of Wil- 
son's Creek 257 

Battle in Detail 266 

Death and Burial of Gen. Lyon 270 

Col. Sigel 274 

Confederate Account of Battle 281 

McCulloch's Fight with Sigel— 288 

Losses 290 

Care of Wounded and Burial of 

Dead 292 

Greene County Men in Battle 293 

Federals Evacuate Springfield 295 

Confederate Troops Enter Spring- 
field 297 

Influence of Battle 300 

Col. T. T. Taylor 309 

Gen. John C. Fremont 311 

Major Zagonyi 312 

General Hunter 324 

Gen. Sterling Price 307 

State Militia 336 

Greene County Men at Pea Ridge- 337 

Military Hospital 341 

Fortifications 342 

Battle of Springfield 344 

Col. Sheppard's Account 360 

Losses 362 

Provisional Regiment 368 

Gen. J. B. Sanborn 378 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



After the War 382 

Farewell to the Military 387 

Clans. Gathering of 244 

Confederate Cemetery 5S4 

Confederate Monument 555 

County Government 156 

Permanent County-seat 158 

First Court House Burned 161 

Historic Court House Torn Down 164 

County Court 16/ 

Plans and Construction of Present 
Court House 169 

Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion 577 

Delaware Indians. The 38 

Dentists 496 

De Soto 48 

Divisions of Greene County. The 

Various 204 

Drake Constitution. The 3' v ."> 

Drury College 417 

Organization 417 

Location :— 419 

Scholarships 422 

Presidents 424 

Early Explorations 44 

Early Hunters and Pioneers 52 

Early Settlement 129 

Pioneer Settlers 129 

Settlements 131 

Delawares 131 

Frontier Life 143 

Early Roads 145 

hirst Churches 147 

Log Cabin Schools 149 

Early Travelers. Record of 46 

Ebenezer 207 

Education 409 

First School Building in Spring- 
field 409 

First Public School 410 

Movement to Establish a System 

of Public Education 410 

Present School Buildings 414 

Enrollment in Schools 415 

Teachers 416 

Members of Board of Education.. 416 

Epworth League 617 

Fair Grove 208 

Farming 196 

Pioneer Methods 196 



Smaller Farms 199 

Improved Methods 200 

Products Shipped Out 202 

Crop Failures 221 

High Prices 221 

Federation of Churches 614 

"Firsts'' in Greene County 216 

General Election in Autumn of 1864 380 

Geology 66 

Stratigraphy 66 

Cambro-Ordovician Age 66 

Stones 67 

Devonian Age 69 

Carboniferous 70 

Tertiary Age "i^ 

Pleistocene 77 

Geology. Economic 85 

Springs ■ 85 

Springfield City Water Supply 89 

Mineral Waters 90 

Stones 90 

Soils 94 

Coal 101 

Road Material 100 

Clays 101 

Moulding Sand 104 

Iron 104 

Lead and Zinc 106 

Mines Worked Long Ago 107 

Deposit of Ore HO 

Local Mines 113 

Copper, Gold and Silver 118 

Petroleum 119 

Grand Army of the Republic 546 

Greene County Sunday School As- 
sociation 661 

Growth and Progress of County— . 211 
Statistics 211 

Guerrilla Raiders. The 375 

Headlee Murder. The 226 

Hospitals 500 

Springfield 501 

Burge Deaconess 503 

Southwest 505 

St. John's 506 

Frisco Employee's 507 

Indian Implements 29 

Indian Trails 41 

Ingram's Mill 138 

Journal. A Pioneer's 135 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Kickapoo Indians, The 39 

Kickapoo Settlement 40 

Levy-Wolf Dry Goods Company 1685 

Manufacturing 663 

Early Growth 664 

Primitive Industries 666 

Metropolitan Improvements 672 

Public Service Corporations 675 

Medical Profession 485 

Pioneer Physicians 486 

Present Active Physicians 488 

Mexican War 235 

Survivor, The Only 237 

Military History 229 

Mob Violence 122 

National Cemetery MS 

First Decoration 550 

Newspapers 519 

Nichols 210 

Organization of County 120 

Boundaries of First Townships 125 

Formations of New Townships 205 

Osage Indians, The 30 

Dress 31 

Characteristics 32 

Lodges 36 

Favorite Haunts 36 

Treaties 37 

Osage War 230 

Osteopaths 498 

Pawnee Indians, The 41 

Percy Cave 946 

Piankashaw Indians, The 41 

Poorhouse, The 177 

Prehistoric Races in Greene County 25 

Cave Dwellers 25 

Mound Builders 26 

Regulators, The 224 

Republic Township 702 

Republic 209-703 

Public School 704 

Flour Mills 705 

Banks 705 

Custom Mill 706 

Revolutionary Soldiers 229 

Rough Side of Life, The 222 

Salvation Army, The 618 

Sampson Bass' Mill 151 



Sanitarium, Johnson 1622 

Sarcoxie War 233 ' 

Schools of Greene County and Out- 
side of Springfield 430 

First School 432 

Schools of the Different Town- 
ships 434 

Sequiota Cave 955 

Societies, Secret 524 

Fremasonry 524 

Odd Fellows 531 

Woodmen 533 

Benevolent and Protective Order 

of Elks 536 

Improved Order of Red Men 537 

Knights of Columbus 539 

American Yeomen , 540 

Court of Honor 541 

Loyal Order of Moose 542 

Eagles 542 

Knights of Pythias 543 

Sons of the Revolution 544 

Spanish-American War 388 

Maine Disaster 390 

Roosevelt's Rough Riders 391 

National Guard Requirements 393 

Farewell Reception 394 

Off for Chickamauga 396 

Epidemic of Typhoid 398 

Officers of Company K 404 

Officers of Company M 406 

Springfield 682 

First Settlers 682 

Incorporation 690 

Traveling Facilities 692 

After the War 695 

Municipal Bonds 697 

Wholesale Center 701 

Springfield Baking Company, The._ 680 
Springfield Jobbers' and Manufac- 
turers' Assn. 673 

Springfield Normal School, The 428 

Springfield Wagon Works 676 

St. Agnes School 637 

Stage Coaches 692 

State Normal School 426 

Enrollment 426 

Graduates 426 

St. De Chantal Academy 1907 

Strafford 209 

Topography 59 

Watercourses 60 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Hydrography 63 

Caves, Sinks and Natural Bridges 64 

Transportation 184 

Steamboats 184 

First Railroad 180 

Stages 187 

First Train 188 

Old Gulf Railroad 190 

Bolivar Branch 193 

Missouri Pacific Railroad 193 

Springfield Traction Company 195 

Townships, Original Boundaries of- 125 
Tucker-Ferguson Warehouse and 

Transfer Co. 1926 



Under Three Flags 57 

Union League, The 377 

Veterinarians 497 

Walnut Grove 209 

Water Power 144 

Welsh Packing Company 678 

Willard 210 

Woman's Missionary LTnion 615 

Women's Clubs 560 

Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion 558 

Young Men's Christian Association. 557 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Abbott, Alfred S 1273 

Albert, Jake 1896 

Albright, M. D., Win. E 1871 

Alden, John 8S0 

Allebach, Newton V 1291 

Allen, Charles H 443 

Allen, John D 1071 

Anderson, Henry S 1699 

Anderson, Joseph G 1911 

Andrew, Paul E 1533 

Anthony, George W 711 

Anthony, James 854 

Armstrong, Frederick W 1882 

Armstrong, Tom W 1255 

Arnett, R. L 1290 

Atherton, M. D„ J. LeRoy 1550 

Atherton, M. D., Mary Jean 1556 

Atteberry, James O 1789 

Atwood, George Albert ^ 936 

Atwood, George Hammond 936 

Aumoth, Joseph G. 822 

Ausherman, Martin 8i76 

Bacon, Rev. John T 1522 

Bair, James 1356 

Baker, J. 454 

'Baker, S. A 1664 

Banfield, Lewis F. 920 

Banister, Theodore 988 

Barnes, M. D., George W 1436 

Barrett, John 1840 

Barrett, Robert Franklin 1252 

Barron, Willard M 1704 

Barton, James H 776 

Barton, William H 778 

Bass, Sampson 1008 

Bassett, Louis N 1092 

Bassett, Samuel H 1093 

Bates, Percy J 1305 

Baxter, Hendry 1727 

Baxter, Kirk 989 

Beal, Daniel N 772 

Beal, M. D., Edward L 764 

Beal, George T 764 



Beal, Capt. George T 771 

Beatie, Maj. John W. F 1676 

Beckerleg. John 1799 

Bennett, H. S 867 

Benson, Richard H 1733 

Berry, James A 1120 

Berry. James Blaine 1333 

Berry, Gustavus F 1756 

Beyer, Frank A 1050 

Billasch, William C 1195 

Bishop, Franklin T 1722 

Bissett, James 1124 

Blanchard. Green I 1846 

Bodenhamer, Andrew J 1496 

Bodenhamer, Emsley L 1091 

Bodenhamer, Joseph J - 1499 

Bodenhamer, Louis F 1498 

Bomgardner, D. V. S., George I.— 1399 

Bon, Ira Carl 1310 

Booth, Waldo Cornwell 1669 

Bowland, Robert A 1187 

Bowman, Benjamin 1570 

Boyd, M. D., John R 970 

Boyd, S. H 447 

Boyer, Ray C 1841 

Bradley, Thomas H 1047 

Brazill, James B 1749 

Briggs, Cecil Alvin 1504 

Bright, John C 1823 

Brower, Madison A 1845 

Brown. Addison 1875 

Brown, Frank E 1588 

Brown, Harry F 1334 

Brown, James M 1317 

Brown, John D 1044 

Brown, Joseph Addison 1043 

Brown, Thomas T. 1472 

Brown, M. D., William McF 1040 

Bryant, Arthur W 1221 

Burge, Mrs. Ellen A 708 

Burge, George W 707 

Burge, James T 709 

Busch, Charles R 1314 

Butler, Nelson Garrett 1502 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Butler, Stephen E 1303 

Butts, James M 1344 

Camp, Warren N 1811 

Camp, William P 1738 

Campbell, Irvin H 1194 

Campbell, John Polk 1478 

Cantrell. James T 1374 

Carroll, Frank P 1299 

Carter, Charles W 1613 

Carter, M. D„ William C 1697 

Cass, Dudley 1768 

Cass, Mason 1768 

Chaffin, John C 1741 

Chalfant, Ephraim 893 

i 'happell, Lewis E 1660 

Clark, M. D., James W 1818 

Clark, Clarence M 906 

Chavose, Charles C 1901 

Claypool. Luther M 1888 

Chrisman, John Maloney 1632 

Christman. Matthias 1294 

Childress, James G 1806 

Clements, M. D., Christopher C.__„142S 

Clements, Oscar S 845 

Cloud, Daniel E. 1539 

Cloud. William B 1643 

Coffelt, M. D„ Theodore A 1 245 

Cole. Stephen Henry 1495 

Collier. P. V 1163 

Colvin, Hugh P 1804 

Condon, George W 1147 

Constance. Walter 1323 

( oon, Walter A 781 

Cooper, George 1307 

Cooper. Ilarry 1597 

Cornell. William C. 1214 

Counts. Benjamin B 1834 

( owan, John 993 

Cowan, John Maxwell 992 

( owden, James S 1798 

Cowden, M. D., William H 1409 

Cowell, John 1337 

Crane, M. D., Thos. V. B 1873 

Crawford. A. B._„. 918 

Crawford. William J 1161 

Crenshaw, Louis A. D 1406 

Crenshaw. Thomas T 1711 

Crow, J. W 945 

Crnwdus, Charles _. 1645 

Culler, George W 942 

Curran, Rev. Father Francis 623 

Curry, Rev. Father George 628 



DeBoard, Elisha 1856 

DeGroff, Moses R 840 

DeLange, William 1886 

DeWitt, Edward J 1843 

Dabbs, Thomas E. 1675 

Dade. Davney C 870 

Daggett, William A 1226 

Daigler, George 759 

Dale, Harris K 1858 

Dando. Charles E 1283 

Daniel, William R 980 

Danzero, Domino 1219 

Darby, Ezra Faucett 1170 

Darby, D. D. S., Robert Ezra 1168 

Dark, Melville E 1552 

Davis, Emil O 1812 

Deaton, John P 856 

Deaton, John W 856 

Deeds, James C 1748 

Delaney, T. J 460 

Delzell, M. D., William A 1554 

Demuth, Capt. Albert £08 

Dennis, Benjamin F 1760 

Dennis, John E 1672 

Dennis, William A 833 

Devereaux, James 864 

Devereaux, Mrs. Mary 865 

Dewey, M. D.. James E 1765 

Dift'enderffer, David M 1714 

Diffenderffer, David R , 1714 

Diffenderffer, Harry W 1715 

Diggins, Hiram W 1642 

Dillard, George E 1779 

Dingeldein, Edward P 1509 

Dingeldein, Sebastian 1216 

Donnell. Francis M 1894 

Donovan, William F 1394 

Doran, Thomas H 1682 

Douglass, Gaylard 1877 

Dozier, Duerrett W 848 

Dozier, John 848 

Draper. Charles 825 

Draper, John N24 

Draper, Joseph N 824 

Drift, John R 1302 

Drury, Charles J 1094 

Dulin, James E 1102 

Duncan, Andrew B 1826 

Durst, Harry D 1752 

Eagleburger, Joseph S 1625 

Earnest. C. W 1535 

Earnest. James Howard 1460 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



East, Howard B 787 

East, Sidney 788 

Eaton, Henry 1362 

Edmonson, Walton E 1529 

Eisemnayer, Andrew J 1380 

Elson, Edwin Wiggins 1006 

Elson, William Penn 1064 

Emerson, Walter P 982 

Emery, Alonzo W 1101 

Emery, Edgar T. 1628 

Ennis, Edgar E 1619 

Ernst, Louis P 1531 

Eslinger, Jas. E 1766 

Eslinger, Samuel L 1766 

Evans, M. D., E. L 1074 

Evans, Owen M 11S8 

Everett. Richard E._ 1610 

Fairbanks, Jonathan 961 

Fallin, Walter Augustus 1011 

Fallin. Wilbur M 1010 

Farmer, Edward ; 1318 

Farmer, Oscar F 1583 

Farmer, Samuel A 1594 

Farmer, William C._— — - L__i— 1640 

Harrington, J. S 456 

Fawcett, Leonard 1431 

Fay, Edwin L 1788 

Fellows, Erastus _' 737 

Fellows. Col. Homer F.' 1364 

Fellows, Norris W .___.. 736 

Fenton, Jeremiah 1917 

Ferguson. Ernest N 1890 

Ferguson, George W 1758 

Ferguson, John R 1115 

Fielder, Benjamin F 1128 

Finch; Edward Swayzee 997 

Finch, Harry H 1430 

Fine, Alphonsus F 1055 

Fink, Charles H 752 

Fink. Richard M 752 

Finley, Elder Newton 882 

Finney, Frank L 1621 

Fitch, James W 1571 

Fogarty, Thomas 1500 

F'ortune, Rev. Father T. J 626 

Foster, Jr., Jesse J 1455 

Fowler, J. W 1627 

Frame, M. D., Homer G 1470 

Freeman. John Guy 1651 

Freeman, Rederick F.__ 1648-49 

Freeman. William 1648 

Freeman, William B ' 1648 



French; John 1331 

Frey. Frank A 1184 

Fricke, George W 842 

Fry, William A 1512 

Fulbright, Charles R 757 

Fulbright, John L 741 

Fulbright, John Y 758 

Fulbright, William 741 

Fulbright, Willam H 740 

Furrow, Calvin 1005 

Gallagher, Francis A 1138 

Galloway, Jesse E 1696 

Gann, J. W 1288 

Gardner, James Coleman 1037 

Carton, Jacob W 1708 

Garton. John H 1536 

George, C. M 1149 

Gideon, James J 1131 

Gideon, Thomas J T22 

Gideon, William C. 722 

Gifford, M. D., Anson H 1537 

Glass, Albert M 1820 

Glass, John Baker 896 

Glassmoyer, Howard S 1850 

Goode, R. L 455 

Goodwin, Oliver Smith 880 

Gorman, Daniel C 790 

Gorsuch. William R 1341 

Gosney, Napoleon 1206 

Granade, John A 912 

Grant. William W 1475 

Gray, James H 1336 

Gray, Josiah J 1584 

Green, George 1293 

Greenwade, John T 1384 

Greenwade, Weldon 1386 

Grier. Azzo B 1104 

Grier, Samuel S 1328 

Griffin, John P 1688 

Groblebe. Charles I 1067 

Grubel, Frank 1254 

Gustin, Walter P 1899 

Hall. John M 1376 

Hall. William Alexander 1417 

Malstead. Capt. John 1925 

Hammond, Clyde L 1898 

Hankins, William T 1296 

Hannah, Ezra F 844 

Hansell. Jefferson E 1166 

Han.^ell. William M 1783 

Hanson. Albert N 1076 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Hanson, M. D., Richard H 984 

Harman, M. D., William Roby 904 

Harrison, John B 1098 

Hart, Andrew Thomas 1510 

Hart, Rpswell K 1630 

Hartt, John W 1209 

Hasler, Thomas L 1117 

Hasten, John 11 1150 

Haswell, Alanson M 720 

Haswell, James M 720 

Haun, George N 1719 

Haun, Walter 1463 

Hawkins, Kirk 929 

Hayden, John C 850 

Hayden, Joseph H 853 

Haynes, Ernest D U89 

Hayward, Hubert H 1923 

Headlee, Blondville D _ 1034 

Headlee, Claude Leslie 1033 

Headlee, Judge Elisha 1411 

Headlee, James Ward 1034 

Headlee. Samuel W 1032 

Headley, Frank E 933 

Healy, Rev. Father D. L 632 

Heckart, Henry M 1197 

Heckenlively, James L 1837 

Hedges, James H 716 

Hegarty, John 872 

Henderson, Walter H 1782 

Hendricks, I.ittleberry 445 

I U ndrickson, George W 1229 

Henshaw, John E 1566 

Herman, Daniel H 1027 

Herrick, Samuel 1848 

I I Mil. Reuben J 1803 

Hibler, Elihu 1227 

Hickman, Isaac M 909 

Hilderbrand, James N 782 

Hinerman, J. II 1618 

Hpbbs, John J 1424 

Hogeboom, M. D., R. W 495 

Holden, Harry Clyde 991 

Holland, Charles 1827 

Holland. Gen. Colley B .1744 

Holland, T. Blondville 976 

Hood, James D 1520 

Hooper, Samuel A 1932 

Hoover, John W 1573 

House, Merton C 1842 

Houston, Jerome A 1324 

Howard, Harvey W 1448 

Howell. William 1403 

Hubbell, Lucius W 1377 



Hubbard, W. D 449 

Hudnall, John R 828 

Hudnall, M. D., M. L 828 

Hummel, Lynn 897 

Hurd, Rev. Fayette 1144 

Ingler. Hugh B. 1702 

Jackson, George W 1691 

Jackson, John S. C 1700 

James, David 1088 

James, Jason R 1089 

James, Nancy 1090 

James, Thomas 1089 

James, William C 900 

James, Winfrey 1090 

Jaquith, Jesse D. 1297 

Jared, Flemin T 1516 

Jenkins, Robert 1222 

Jennings, William T 799 

Jewell, Harry Sanford 1371 

Johnson, John H 836 

Johnson, M. D., Samuel A 1022 

Johnson, Silas M 1791 

Johnson, U. G 479 

Johnston, A. J 1808 

Johnston, James B 1634 

Jones, Capt. George M 792 

Jones, Henry B 1889 

Jones, Henry T 794 

Jones, James 792 

Jones, John 1807 

Jones, John H 1154 

Jones, Joshua L 1703 

Jones, William J 1602 

Kanning, Charles F 1258 

Kauffman, Stanley K 1900 

Keller, W. Robert 1785 

Kelley, Prof. Edwin H 1562 

Kellcy, Jesse Marion 1559 

Kelly, John 1276 

Kemmling, Ernst 1725 

Kennedy, Henry F 863 

Kennedy, Lee C 1743 

Kerr, Andrew B. 1099 

Kerr, Charles W 1449 

Kerr. M. D., Ulysses F 1922 

Kershner, Capt. Wm. H 797 

Kilkenny, Rev. Father Peter 627 

King, Charles L 1208 

King. M. D., Thomas M 1526 

Kinser, Jefferson 1739 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Kinser, John 1739 

Kirby, Guy D 975 

Kirkey, William L 1332 

Kirkpatrick, Robt. A 1770 

Kissick, Robert F 1029 

Kite, Robert B 1575 

Klingensmith, Peter 1862 

Klingner. John W 1408 

Klingner, M. D., Thomas O 1238 

Knabb. M. D., Enoch 1586 

Knelle. George 885 

Knighten, Amnion 1824 

Knowles. M. D., John T 739 

Knox, Alexander 1024 

Kohler, Edward F 1557 

Kucker, L. S 1 1038 

LaBounty, Charles F 1918 

LaFollette, Ransom S 1763 

Lane, John M 1157 

Langsford, John 1565 

Langston, Jackson P. C 1218 

Lee, Bert S. 1666 

Leedy, Joseph W. 766 

Leeper, George 1590 

Lehr, John Henry 1122 

Levy, M. 1685 

Lilly, Rev. Father John J 621 

Lincoln, Azariah W 1230 

Linney, William Burts 1387 

Lloyd, Charles Lee 1929 

Lloyd, Samuel Mack 1422 

Love, Robert 1048 

Love, D. V. S., Robert B 1051 

Love. Thomas B 784 

Love, Col. Thomas C 784 

Lowe, M. D., H. A 1490 

Luper, James E 1810 

MacElveny, Andrew W 1647 

McAfee, Judge Charles 922 

McCammon, John P 1351 

McCarty, Luther Q 1056 

McClernon, Hugh 1515 

McCluer, James H 755 

McCluer, John 756 

McCollum, George A 826 

McConnell, John Aaron 1568 

McConnell, Milton C 1713 

McCraw, Gabriel 1735 

McCrory, James 1729 

McCroskey, Charles W 1904 

McCurdy, Thomas 1121 



McCutcheon, L. C 847 

McCutcheon, O. J 847 

McDonald, Alexander 873 

McElhany, George LaFayette 1440 

McGinty, William H 1736 

McGuire, Guy H 1139 

McHaffie, M. D., Charles H 735 

Mcllvin. James S ' - 1018 

Mclntire, Cyrus B 830 

Mcjimsey, Elmer E. E 1345 

McKay, Elmer A 1926 

McKee, Roy 1379 

McKerall, William 1000 

McLinn, Albert S 1432 

McMaster, Cyrus J 1426 

McMaster, Walter Weir 1396 

McMehen, John A 1165 

McMehen, William A 1158 

McMillan, Otho D 958 

McMurtry, James Gilmer 1353 

McNabb, John T 1488 

McNeill. E. B 1289 

McQuiston, Brandt 1118 

Mack, Clarence S 1087 

Mack. Clyde B 126D 

Mack, J. W. D. L. F 458 

Mack, Rowan E. M 996 

Maddox, Elisha B 1780 

Magill, James G 1860 

Major, Will J 1014 

Malley, John P.__ 1301 

Martin, Harry E 1205 

Mason, James H 1717 

Mason, John F 1831 

Mason, Robert T 1717 

Massey, Frank R 1914 

Massey, Richard 1927 

Maxwell, William M 1624 

Mellon, Henry G 919 

Mercer, Carver O 1541 

Meyer, B. E 1372 

Meyer. John F 1816 

Miller, William S 1797 

Mills, Andrew D 1287 

Ming, Emmett M 1068 

Minto, Robert 1775 

Mitchell, Harry H 901 

Mitchell, Obadiah C 1192 

Moomaw, H. M 1152 

Moon, James A , 1518 

Moore, Anderson T 1916 

Moore, George W 1105 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Moore, Robert A 986 

Morckel, Charles W 1921 

Morgan, Harry C 1066 

Morice, Leon 1635 

Morton, William M 1549 

Moser, John A 1329 

Murry, Harvey 1223 

Murray, Thomas 1404 

Murphy, William C 1480 

Murray, William Penn 1080 

Murphy, Lawrence J 744 

Murphy, Michael J 1285 

Xee. Daniel Martin 1241 

Nelson, Marion A 1183 

Newbill, John Glenn 1433 

Newton, Edward F 1360 

Xewton, Job 1786 

Nichols, A. D 763 

Nichols, Capt. Danton H 760 

Nichols, George W 883 

Nichols, Matthias H 760 

Niederhuth. George W 1135 

Noland, George L 1450 

O'Bryant, George W 1456 

O'Bryant, James H 973 

O'Byrne, James 1178 

Olendorf, George F 1270 

O'Neal, Andrew J 1694 

< I'Neal, George W 1686 

O'Neill, Rev. Father Francis 622 

O'Reilly, Rev. Father J. J 629 

Ormsbee, M. D., James L 725 

Orr, W. J 480 

Orr, William J 866 

Ott, Theodore 1146 

Owen, Charles J 1605 

Owen, John S 1878 

t (wen, Joseph L 1592 

Owen, Stephen A. D 1596 

i >wens, Jerry W 1919 

Page, Judge Alfred 1350 

Patterson. M. D., Wm. P 746 

Paxson. Ely 1016 

Peak, M. D., Oscar 1 1062 

Pepperdine, George 467 

Perkins, Leonard B 858 

Perkins, Judge Wm. H 1339 

Peterson, Harvey E 953 

Phelps, Hon. John S 1175 

Phillips, Lorenzo 1039 



Pickering, Charles B 1893 

Pickering. Clayton R 1801 

Pierce, M. D., Charles E 1693 

Pigg, Herbert W 1653 

Pike, M. D., Columbus J 1212 

Pipkin. Lewis F 1853 

Pollack, Calvin 1545 

Porter, Henry Webb 1654 

Potter. M. D.. Ambrose 1474 

Potter, James Elmer 1358 

Potter, Nicholas 1470 

Potter, W. C 1368 

Potter, W. H. F — 878 

Powell, William P 1311 

Preston, L. W 1659 

Price. Isaac 1321 

Price, Thomas W 1867 

Price, W. C 444 

Proserpi, Henry 1136 

Prugger, August F 1507 

Pursselley, M. D., Walter L 1524 

Putman, Mansel 1160 

Quinn, John 1600 

Quinn, James 1600 

Race, Edward F 1865 

Ragsdale, Howard 1012 

Ramsey, James A 1608 

Ramsey, Robert L 979 

Rathbone, B. F 1163 

Rathbone, William H 1468 

Rathbun, Col. George S 889 

Rauch, Fred William 1022 

Raum, Egmont 1493 

Raymond. George E 1880 

Redfearn, Jesse O 1851 

Rebori, Louis L 1680 

Reed, Samuel A 1398 

Reilly, James W 1211 

Renshaw, Moses M 1553 

Rhodes, Clarence J 1275 

Rhodes, C. I 1256 

Rhodes, Eugene J 1107 

Rhodes, Jr.. Eugene J 1263 

Rhodes. Ira G 1107 

Ricketts, Lemuel C 1002 

Risser, Omer E 1190 

Ritter, Aaron M 1864 

Ritter, David M 1832 

Robberson. M. D., Edwin T 718 

Robberson, Walter B 713 

Roberts. John 1046 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Roberts, Prof. John R 1348 

Robertson, Charles L 1232 

Robinson, David H 832 

Robinson, Henry D 1343 

Roper, William Fry 1513 

Rosback. John 1772 

Rose. John W. 1277 

Rose, Reuben R. 1684 

Ross, Bennette J 804 

Ross. David Edward 1443 

Ross, J. B. 926 

Ross, LaFayette A. 1248 

Ross, M. D.. Leonidas C 1242 

Roudebush, Marshall 959 

Ruffin, J. B 1114 

Rule, Charles W 1577 

Rullkoetter, William 1638 

Rupprecht, George C 1086 

Russell, Columbus B 1678 

Ryan, Rev. Father James 625 

Salts. Robert A 1823 

Sanders, Emiel 1434 

Sanford, William B 800 

Sanford, Wyatt 801 

Sartain, James S 983 

Scharff, Max 1180 

Schofield, Albert L 1320 

Schofield, Thomas 1143 

Schreiber. William H 1910 

Scott, Andrew J. 868 

Self. William R 1773 

Shackelford, John H 1236 

Sheedy, Mike 1269 

Shelton, W. B 916 

Shepard, Edward M 728 

Shepard, Harriett E 732 

Sherman, M. D., David U 1662 

Sheridan, Rev. Father J. M 636 

Shumaker, George M 754 

Sidman, Wesley C 1225 

Sidman, Rev. Wm. D 1202 

Sisk, John M 1616 

Sjoberg, John 1486 

Skelley, William W 1312 

Small, George W 1217 

Smith, David 1282 

Smith, Harrison Milton 1416 

Smith, Isaac N 1777 

Smith, James E 1084 

Smith, James M 810 

Smith, M. D., John R 1280 

Smith, Mitchell C 1383 



Smith. M. D., Onas 1390 

Smith, Russell G 1391 

Smith, William F 1306 

Smith, M. D., William M 1234 

Smith. William Y 1673 

Snider, Otis Everett 1438 

Southworth, Marvin H 1724 

Spandri, John 1072 

Spencer, Edward A 875 

Spencer, George W 940 

Spencer. James D 888 

Squibb, Elmer D 1829 

Squibb, James Caleb 15S1 

Stafford, Bertha 1758 

Stafford, S. R 1757 

Stahl, Charles H 1252 

Stahl, William F 1251 

Staley, Weldon E. : 1543 

Stancill, Godfrey C 1266 

Starks, Charles L 708 

Steinert, John A 1721 

Stemmons, F. B 1173 

Stephens, John G 1742 

Stephens, William M 1906 

Steury, Rudolph 1615 

Stewart, William R 1446 

Stone, M. D., Murray C 727 

Stoughton, James A 886 

Studley, Joseph 1903 

Stutzman, Frank P 1272 

Tatlow, W. D 472 

Tefft, M. D., J. E 487 

Tegarden, Benjamin F 1883 

Terry, M. D., Norman F 714 

Thompson, Abner D 1458 

Thompson, William E 1547 

Thurman, George W 1689 

Tillman, Joseph A. M 1731 

Tillman, Samuel T 1731 

Tracy, Isaac T 1869 

Trenary, Alvin B 1279 

Trevitt, Claudius E 1728 

Triece, George 1035 

Trogdon. John Parker 1504 

Trogdon, William C 1528 

Tucker, Edward G 1822 

Turk, Joseph Henry 1030 

Turner, Granville W 1078 

Turner, M. D., William L 1657 

Underhill, John F 1730 

Underwood, Flavius J 1082 

Underwood, John J 1814 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Van Bibber, Alfred H 1572 

Van Bibber, James D 1563 

Vaughan, Judge James R 449-1413 

Vestal, Charles W 837 

Vinton, Madison C 1112 

Vogel, Rev. Father William 628 

Waddell, James S 1637 

Waddill, John S 446 

Wadlow, Charles E 1466 

Wadlow, Elijah G 775 

Wadlow, Elmer G 774 

Wadlow, John W 1454 

Walker. James T 1392 

Walker, Leonard 1400 

Walker. Robt. II 1754 

Wallis, John A 1870 

Walsh, James T 1421 

Washburn, Mason C 1579 

Watson, Gilbert R 779 

Watson, James 928 

Watson, M. D., Lorenzo 813 

Watson. William R 1792 

Watts. Henry T 1181 

Watts. James 812 

Watts. James W 820 

Wear. A. H 462 

Wear, Sam M 1930 

Weaver, Samuel 768 

Weaver, Maj. Wm. M 768 

Westmoreland, H. H 1264 

Whalen, Jr.. Richard F 1326 

Whaley, William W 1261 

White, J. A "72 

Whitlock, Arthur L 1 

Whitlock, Lambert I 1097 

Whitlock, Thomas J 1096 



Whitlock, Williamson P 861 

W ilder. Frederick C 1025 

Wiley, George P 807 

Wilhoit. Sidney Edwin 1268 

Wilkerson, M. D., James M 1462 

Williams, Elwood A. 1019 

Williams, Frank B. 1200 

Williams, John W 750 

Williams, M. D., X. C.__, 1243 

Williamson, John P 1S55 

Willier, Thomas E 1913 

Wingo, Irvin W. 1155 

Winters, George F 1198 

Wilson. Alfred H 914 

Wolf, David 1750 

Wolf. Martin V 1750 

Wood, Albert 1204 

Wood, James G 816 

Wood, John 816 

Woodson, James A 1126 

Woodward, Jacob 1836 

Woodward. Ransom B 1835 

Woodruff, John T 473 

Wooldridge, Edward W 1140 

W right, Foster P 444 

Wright. Marion D 1603 

Wrightsman, Timothy J 1003 

Wygal, Frank 1201 

Yancy, Charles S 444 

Yeakley, George 1491 

Yeakley, John 1483 

Yeakley. Thomas 1482 

Young, Henry C 1794 

Young, Walter B 1710 

Voungblood, James P 747 

Youngblood, Theodric B 748 



BIOGRAPHICAL— Continued 



JONATHAN FAIRBANKS. 

The name of Jonathan Fairbanks recalls the history of the public school 
system with which he has been identified for forty years and the successful 
development of which is due largely to his untiring efforts and capable ad- 
ministration as superintendent. A man of enlightened views, he has been 
eminently practical while liberal in his consideration of the various proposi- 
tions which enter into the scheme of modern education. Mis pupils and 
those who have been under his general care as head of the schools are filling 
places of honor and trust in all the walks of life in this community and else- 
where. Some who have been prepared in these schools for prosecution of 
their studies in higher institutions of learning in a manner which has re- 
flected credit upon all concerned while the great majority whose period of 
tutelage ended with the completion of courses in the common schools have 
found themselves well ecjuipped on entering the University of Life to con- 
tinue their progress in a maner which has given an insight into its lessons 
enabling them to reach attainments in which they are not far behind the 
graduates of many colleges. 

Early in his career, "Professor" Fairbanks, as the head of the schools 
was called in the old days, made his mark as a disciplinarian. And. yet, he 
was gentle while firm. Fie insisted on strict observance of the rules and 
regulations prescribed for the students but he was so human in his treatment 
of dereliction that he won the good will as well as the esteem of all. No 
stickler fur the text, he was insistent on a knowledge of the principles of 
the subject with the result that the pupils of the schools became imbued with 
the love of knowledge for its own sake rather than with the desire for credits, 
diploma^ and degrees, the value of which is problematical. This disposition 
has been made manifest also to those who have come in contact with him 
in his capacitv of county superintendent ami the various associations of 
school teachers. Always a student, he will lie found today reading scientific 
works embracing the latest discoveries of the world's specialists on all that 
relate to the problem of life in its various aspects. This is the habit of a 
(61) 



962 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

life-time and he has always given freely of what he has received from what- 
ever source. In fact, he has regarded himself more as an instrument for 
the transmission of knowledge than as the possessor of it. He has been a 
fellow student with his pupils and teachers, rather than a preceptor, just 
as in his discipline he appealed to the self-esteem and ambition of all to 
keep them from delinquency and attain high standards of deportment. 

He is public spirited to a degree and has forgotten more about politics 
than has ever been learned by some who have attained leadership in differ- 
ent parties. He is progressive in his views on this subject, but as on all 
others, he has never permitted himself to become dogmatic in his expressions 
therein. He is a modest, kindly man whose open friendship for all he 
meets has won him favor on every hand. He is a humanitarian, a student, a 
teacher, all that is implied in the fullest significance of these words. 

The boys and girls of other days in Springfield have in the course of 
their lives and in the pursuit of knowledge met various teachers, professors 
and eminent specialists but the quiet unpretentious man who directed them 
early in the paths of learning holds a place in their memory and claims an 
influence 011 their careers, greater perhaps than that of any other with whom 
thev have come in contact. The people at large, in view of the visible re- 
sults, are prone to believe that Jonathan Fairbanks is entitled to a niche in 
the local hall of fame which shall bear testimony fur many years to his 
efficiency, general worthiness and the great popular esteem in which he is 
held by all classes of people in the city of Springfield, in Greene county, 
and wherever he has been known. 

'i"he man who has tlm- endeared himself to the people here, comes 
-if one of the oldest New England families whose members have displayed 
singular talents and virtues wherever their lots have been cast in the great 
country to which thev haw assisted in bringing the blessings of civilization 
during a period of three hundred years. 1 lardy pioneers, they have liven 
noted for patriotism, public spirit, devotion to the ideals of the republic and 
persistent application to tasks through which they sought the attainment of 
the higher end- of life. \ will kept book of their genealogy brings the 
record of then lives in orderly precision and ample detail down to die present 
time showing that they have been prominent in each succeeding generation 
.if people who in the proper conduct of business and the manifestation ol 
care for the general welfare have led in the upbuilding of communities and 
the development of the country in various ways. A majority of them ha 
Followed the pursuits of agriculture returning thereto often after adventures 
in business which have not proven profitable, sustaining reverses with equa- 
nimity, and bravelj beginning the reconstruction of their fortunes after the 
failures which so often come in the magical changes of American life 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 963 

which none are so well prepared as those who are imbued with the spirit of 
the patriot pioneers which has been the making of the Great Republic. 

Their work in this country was begun by an immigrant family the head 
of which is known in their genealogy as Jonathan Fairebank (Fairbank, 
Fairbanks), of Dedham, Massachusetts, a town which he helped to establish 
after coming to Boston from England in 1033. He came from Sowerby 
in the West Riding of Yorkshire, lie was born prior to 1 1 ,00. The family 
had an interesting history in the old country, mementoes of which are found 
among the heirlooms of the old Fairbanks home at Dedham, built in 1036, 
and now preserved as a memorial after having been continuously occupied 
by the builder and his lineal descendants longer than any other homestead 
in Xew England. The first Jonathan Fairbanks passed from the scene of 
pioneer activities to another life at Dedham in 166S. In the fifth generation 
another Jonathan Fairbanks was horn at Holliston, Massachusetts, March 
29, 1755. He was a soldier of the Revolution and died after a long and 
useful life at Sudbury. Massachusetts, February 28, 1840. One of his sons 
was Joseph Bradley Varnum Fairbanks, father of our Jonathan, who engaged 
in wool manufacturing at Andover, Massachusetts, and Fort Edwards, New 
York. With the assistance of two brothers, he built up an extensive busi- 
ness but when they were stocked up with a surplus they were bankrupted 
by a change in the tariff in 1833. Joseph Bradley Varnum Fairbanks mar- 
ried Miss Margaret Haclden in 1827. She was born in Scotland. February 
25, 1803. They had three children. Jonathan, born in Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, January 7, 1828; James Dexter, born in Monroe. New York, August 
H), 1830; Joseph Bradlev Varnum, Jr., born in Sudbury, Massachusetts, 
August 29, 1833. The head of the family never recovered from the shock 
of his disastrous failure in business. He died at Monroe, New York. 
shortly afterward. May 20, 1833. The youngest child followed soon after- 
ward, October 31, 1833. The mother had taken him to Boston, where she 
had gone to live, the two elder boys being placed in charge of relatives. The 
family had thus been reduced from affluence to poverty and broken up in a 
very short time. The widow made her home in Boston for a number of 
vears and afterward moved to Worcester. Massachusetts, where she died 
October 19, 1865. 

Jonathan Fairbanks was just five years old when with his younger 
brother, Tames Dexter, he went to live with James Quinn and his wife, an 
aunt of the boys. Beginning to learn the hardships of country life at this 
tender age. he mastered all the details of the work so thoroughly that his 
relatives parted with him reluctantly when the time came for him to leave 
the farm at the age of nineteen. He had up to that time received no com- 
pensation for his labor except his board and clothes and the privileges of the 
district school, taking advantage of the meager advantages thus afforded for 



964 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

obtaining an education with such earnestness that there was little left for 
him to learn there. 

Realizing the necessity of seeking a betterment of his condition he 
struck out for himself with resolution. In starting away he passed through 
a field in which James Reilly, a nephew of his wife's husband was working. 
"Where be y' going 'Jonton,' " said the Irish lad. "To look for a job." 
"But y' have no moneys, here's a 'sovroir for you." " 

The gift was accepted in proper spirit, for the boys were somewbat of 
■comrades. It was the first money Jonathan Fairbanks had ever received 
and he took it with the intention of returning it, although he had spent all 
the years of his young life in labor on the farm which Reilly was to inherit. 
Jonathan went to Boston, where he called on his mother and remained five 
days, after which he returned to the neighborhood in which he had been 
raised and went to work on the farm of another relative, Nelson Fairbanks, 
wild paid him wages at the rate of ten dollars per month. 

In the meantime James Dexter had left the Quinn farm after remaining 
there a short time and gone to Concord where he grew up, learning the 
painter's trade in shops where be was under the tutelage of skilled work- 
men and became an expert, afterward making his mark in the business. 
lie was wounded while serving a second term a- a veteran volunteer in the 
Civil war and died October in, [864. He had married Olive Green, Novem- 
ber 2, [855. They bad live children. The widow moved to Worcester, 
Massachusetts, where she died June 11. 1886. 

Jonathan remained with his cousin. Nelson Fairbanks, a year, working 
eight months of the time and attending school four months. He had an 
excellent tutor here, w In > in addition t" assisting Jonathan to rapid advance- 
ment, induced him to prepare for entrance to the academy at New Ipswich, 
an institution famous as a training school for teachers and preparing students 
fur college. Hither the two journeyed together the nexl year, master and 
pupil, to complete their education in the same excellent school. Jonathan 
took widi him fifty dollars, the savings from his first year of work as a wage 
earner. lie had received eighty dollars for eight months' work and had 
spenty thirty dollars fur clothing, books and other necessities. He was now 
twenty years of age. He remained at Xew [pswich two years, working his 
way, and at the completion of his course there started oul as a teacher. He 
was successful in his firsl application for a position. He spared no pains 
when he entered upon his work at Ashby. He taught night school tour 
nights in the week for the benefit of ambitious students, specializing in arith- 
metic, penmanship and rhetoricals and preparation for a greal exhibition at 
the end of the year. The people said that they had never had such a school 
and that the young tutor would never teach such another. They took it for 
granted that he was working for a reputation, when as a matter of fact his 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 965 

single purpose had been to do all he could for his pupils. But that first 
year's work opened the way to great opportunities. The president of the 
school board at Wilmington, Delaware, had written to his father-in-law at 
Ashbv to send him the name of .some young man whom he could recommend, 
some up-to-date teacher who could come down to Wilmington and "wake 
'em up." Jonathan Fairbanks was mentioned in complimentary terms and 
correspondence led to his employment at Wilmington. He says, speaking 
of his experience at that place : "1 spent four years at Wilmington. It was 
like a heaven on earth. 1 was told that if I would get married and settle 
down m Wilmington the people would build me a house. I formed lifetime 
friendships there and have corresponded with one of my pupils of those days 
for sixty years." 

Put he was persuaded to go west with his old teacher, George G. 
barker, and so they went together to Ohio, as they had gone to attend the 
academy at New Ipswich. Mr. barker stopped at Dayton but there was no 
school for his friend to be found at that place. Never dismayed Jonathan 
Fairbanks continued his quest and began seeking; a country school. Finally, 
after meeting Mr. Parker again at Piqua. he was informed of an opening 
at St. Man's and started over in company with Ardivan Rogers. Passing 
through the Ohio woods, a land of leaf and moonshine, he seemed to come 
under a mystical influence in which he received an impression of something 
unusual about to happen. He was in no desperate straits but repeated fail- 
ures to find employment at this time had been discouraging. He arrived 
in a canal town, St. Mary's, at 3 :oo A. M. There he was informed that 
they wanted an assistant teacher. Without waiting to sleep after his long 
ride he called on the members of the board as soon as they were awake, with 
the result that be was engaged. Rogers was employed as principal and 
instituted an unusual division of the pupils. The bovs of the school who* 
worked on the canal part of the time had the name of being a hard lot. 
The people said they knew when school was let out, because they could hear 
for a distance of two miles the noise made by the boys as they came down 
stairs. One teacher after another had failed to restrain the disorder and it 
was said that nobody could discipline that school. Now the principal turned 
over the boys whom he could not handle, the larger ones in a body to his 
assistant, himself taking charge of the older girls while the smaller boys 
and girls were left in charge of lady teachers. The first thing Mr. Fair- 
banks did was to get well acquainted with his boys and explain to them the 
advantages of having order in the school, showing how it would promote 
their advancement and the interests of all concerned. The boys fell in with 
his ideas and he soon had them coming in and going out in orderly fashion 
with their arms crossed behind them. This kept their hands from meddling 
with those in front of them. After a couple of days there entered school a 



966 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

taciturn stubborn boy and there were knowing smiles when the teacher began 
to question Luther Bradley, who it was soon learned had been the leader 
in mischief in the school. Luther was cross-eyed and the teacher could not 
tell where he was looking, at him or the grinning boys. To the questions, 
have you studied this and have you studied that he answered a reticent 
"yes, sir" or "no, sir" without any particular respect in voice or manner. 
He was told to take his place and after a little was dismissed for recess with 
the rest of the boys. When they came back all entered in order with their 
arms crossed behind them, all except Luther, who despite instructions, came 
swinging his arms. The new teacher stepped up to him quickly. The boy 
was stocky and almost as large as the teacher, but the wiry little man grabbed 
the delinquent by the coat collar, gave him a jiu jitsu twist and the lad's feet 
lieu out from under him. I Ie went up in t lie air and bumped his head hard 
<>n the floor as he came down. It was a hard jolt but he was not hurt badly, 
but all the rebellion had been knocked out of him. The punishment was 
nune severe than the teacher had intended. He merely meant to give the 
Imy a good shaking but lost hi- hold on the coat collar with the result 
described. After helping Luther to his feet the teacher restored order and 
everything moved smoothly during the rest <>i the day. 

That evening some one on the street who had heard of the occurrence. 
asked one of the reputed tough boys how they were getting along with the 
new teacher. "I dunno, he don't punish, he kills 'em." 

Mr. Fairbanks never had to "shake" another boy in that school. But 
the irrepressible Luther Bradley came in for it just one more time. Passing 
along in Mont of the class looking out of the corner of his eye. the teacher 
saw Luther drop a paper wad into his pocket. Quick as a Hash he turned 
and grabbed Luther and shook him till his teeth chattered and the bones in 
his body seemed to he unjointed. Never again did Luther trouble the 
teacher, hut on the contrary they became fast friends. At the end of the 
year. Mr. Fairbanks was offered fifty dollars a month to teach the school in 
the summer time but he had made an engagement to teach at the Piqua high 
school, an exclusive private institution. There he had for pupils fifty-seven 
fine boys and it was a pleasant and profitable year for all concerned. Then 
he returned to St. Mary's as principal of the schools. He remained there 
seven years, leaving behind him an enviable reputation when he resigned for 
the purpose of engaging in another business. He had acquired an interest 
in a new patent steam engine and was to put it on the market. The time 
was not propitious however. The Civil war had upset business throughout 
the countrv. Mr. Fairbanks then accepted an invitation to return to Piqua, 
where he remained teaching during the next five years. At the end of that 
time he received all kinds of offers to continue teaching. Almost any position 
in the public schools of Ohio was open to him. But he had other ideas. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 967 

The best that was offered to the school teacher in those days in the way of 
remuneration was but meager compensation compared to the rewards of 
ability and energy in business. Air. Fairbanks had received a flattering offer 
from the West, a place called Springfield, in the heart of the Ozark region 
and the principal cit) of southwest Missouri, from J. C. Wilber, who was 
close in (.i'l. John M. Richardson, then prominent in the affairs of the city. 
The school teacher, who was bent on changing his vocation, arrived in 
Springfield, November 10, i860. He found a prosperous town of two thou- 
sand in the midst of a region of such great resources that he was satisfied 
there would be extraordinary development. There was so much building in 
progress that there was an unprecedented demand for lumber and when Fair- 
banks and "Wilber opened up in the sawmill and planing business they had 
all the orders they could attend to. They increased their facilities and their 
business expanded rapidly. Mr. Fairbanks worked early and late. Some 
weeks he would leave home Monday morning and eat, sleep and work at 
the mill until Saturday night. He and his partner prospered for nine years, 
while his family grew up around him, he built a comfortable home and the 
prospects of life were fair from every point of view. Then came the hard 
times following the panic of 1873, in which men possessed of property amply 
sufficient to secure all their obligations under ordinary circumstances were 
made bankrupt before they knew it. Mr. Wilber had borrowed fifteen hun- 
dred dollars and Mr. Fairbanks had signed a note for the amount and in the 
general crash of credits be was called upon to meet the obligation for its 
payment. Friends tried in vain to help him. The holder of the note, per- 
haps himself pressed by creditors, was inexorable and the money had to be 
forthcoming. The real estate owned by Mr. Fairbanks embraced one hundred 
and ten acres located in what is now a populous part of the city between 
Washington avenue and the National boulevard. Different tracts and 
numerous town lots estimated at the time to be worth eight thousand dollars 
were sold to satisfy the note for fifteen hundred. John M. Richardson pur- 
chased much of the land, which was resold at great advances. Mr. Fair- 
banks, acting as agent for Colonel Richardson, afterward sold forty thousand 
dollars worth of property. He bought back his old homestead from the 
Richardson heirs and still lives there. Following the climax of his mis- 
fortunes which came in 1874, Mr. Fairbanks made preparations to leave 
Springfield. He was on the point of returning to Ohio, when Hon. John 
McGregor, president of the Springfield school board, following a suggestion 
made by Hon. L. H. Murray, came to him with a proposition to take charge 
of the schools of this city. Mr. Fairbanks accepted, assuming the duties of 
superintendent the next year. From that time down to the present, forty 
wears, his work in connection with the schools of this city is well known. 



968 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

However, it may not be amiss to recall some of the incidents connected 
with this part of his extraordinary career. 

There had been half a dozen superintendents of education during the 
years immediately preceding the beginning of the forty years administration 
of Jonathan Fairbanks. The chairman of the school board complained that 
the board had been called together nearly every week for a while to consider 
cases which should have been disposed of by the superintendent. On com- 
ing into office one of the first things which Superintendent Fairbanks noticed 
was the absurdity of some of the rules which had caused trouble. 

The pupils were forbidden by one of these from entering the school 
building after a certain number of minutes during the noon hour when a 
number of them who lived at a distance hail no other place to eat their 
lunches. This rule was quickly abrogated, the children being left free to 
enter the building at the noon hour and special provision was made fur their 
comforl 111 other ways. The students of the high school were put on their 
honor, the pupils of the lower grades were treated with consideration, the 
schools were in a manner reorganized on a basis of reciprocal justice and 
kindness. Changes were made in the course of study by which the interests 
of practical education were conserved with continuous progress in liberal- 
izing and otherwise improving it. Various other changes were made to 
meet the demands of the times and the efficiency and popularity of the 
schools continued to increase from year to year. The teachers of the Spring- 
held schools welcomed the change to an enlightened administration at the 
beginning of Superintendent Fairbank's first term and became loyal sup- 
porters, lie was re-elected without opposition For another term, and again 
and again until his re-election at the end of each consecutive year became a 
mere matter of formality. In politics, Mr. Fairbanks has been a Republican 
all his life, though liberal-minded, progressive and independent in his views. 
In view of this fact, the Greenbackers having made great progress in this 
section in 1N7N. and wishing to put out a stmng county ticket, sent a com- 
mittee to Mr. Fairbanks soliciting him to allow them to use his name as 
their candidate for county school commissioner. As a concession to the 
spirit of reform represented by their movements, he gave his consent with 
the result that he was elected by a majority of four hundred. Results similar 
to those which had followed his assumption of the duties of city superin- 
tendent followed throughout the county. The teachers of the country 
schools, as those of the city, had so. ,n felt the inspiration of Jonathan Fair- 
banks' presence and helpfulness in all their works. So he was re-elected 
county commissioner at the end of the term, lie was re-elected continuously 
during a period of twenty year- until the office was merged in that of county 
superintendent. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 969 

In the last election he received one thousand seven hundred majority 
over three other candidates for county commissioner. In the administration 
of that office he did much toward the complete systematization of the county 
schools. Among other things, he kept a complete record of the proceedings 
of the boards and everything done in connection with the county during the 
twenty years of his incumbency. The record was unfortunately lost in a 
lire in Superintendent Bradley's office in recent years. 

Superintendent Fairbanks never made a practice of punishing boys for 
fighting. His plan for dissipating this kind of trouble was to call them up 
and make them explain their differences and come to some kind of an under- 
standing. Some interesting stories are told in this connection. Other 
problems which have vexed less capable minds were disposed of in a similarly 
happy manner. 

Summarizing his observations on the subject of discipline Superintend- 
ent Fairbanks said in a recent conversation : "Teachers should assume as far 
as possible that there are no bad pupils. Boys and girls will do the best 
they know how. The thing to do is to make clear to them the reasons for 
the requirements made of them. They often do wrong when they think 
they are doing right. Reason and consideration will go farther in securing 
compliance with the wishes of the teacher than anything else. There is 
not nearly leniency enough in the world." 

The Jonathan Fairbanks of today is as busy as though he had but begun 
his life's work at the end of the three-score years and ten allotted to man. 
He is still a student teacher and reader, though no longer under necessity 
of hearing sixteen recitations a day. the first one at 7 A. M. and often 
continuing his ta<ks by lamplight and then getting up at 2 A. M. to go over 
the lessons in advance of his classes in preparation for the work of the fol- 
lowing day as he used to do at the beginning of his career as superintendent 
of the Springfield schools. 

Much of the success and happiness of this venerable man's life is at- 
tributed to the helpfulness of the excellent woman who became his wife in 
youth and journeyed with him far toward the final rewards. Jonathan Fair- 
banks and Miss Angie Bowker were married September 3, 1856, in Sudbury, 
Massachusetts. She was born there June 13, 1832. She was a daughter 
of the Puritans, her parents, Samuel X. and Mary Earl Bowker. being 
descended from early settlers of New England, of ScotchAYelsh extraction. 
Children of Jonathan Fairbanks and Angie (Bowker) Fairbanks: Grace 
Ida, born in St. Mary's, Ohio, June 4, 185;. died October 1. 1858'. Joseph 
Maybin. born in St. Mary's, Ohio. March 12. 1859, died May .19, 1865. 
Mary Caroline, born in St. Mary's, Ohio, April 7, i860, died February 5, 
1862. Alban Bradley, born in St. Mary's, Ohio, June 22, 1862, died in 
191 1. Annie, born in Piqua, Ohio, March 20, 1866, died June 21, il 



'97° GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

George Bowker, born in Springfield, Missouri, April 16, 1868. John Wilber, 
born in Springfield, Missouri. November 13, 1870. James Otis, born in 
Springfield, Missouri, October 30. 1873. George Bowker Fairbanks is en- 
v.ed in the general merchandise business at Foose, Dallas county, Missouri. 
lie married Sarah Davis, July 31, i<;io. Two children have been born to 
them. Perry George Fairbanks. September 23, 191 1, who died March 11, 
1 913; and an infant daughter, Harriet. 

John Wilber Fairbanks married Annie Jugram, June 5, 1902. They 
have one child. John Howard Fairbanks, born March to. 1904. James 
Otis Fairbanks married Miss Golden Sands, January 13. 1913. 

Mrs. Fairbanks died December 29, 1912. She was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. 



JOHN R. BOYD, M. D. 

It is not always easy to discover and define the hidden forces that move 
a life of ceaseless activity and a large professional success; little more can 
be done than to note their manifestation in the career of the individual under 
consideration. In view of this fact, the life of the physician and public- 
spirited man of affairs whose name appears above affords a striking example 
of well defined purpose with the ability to make that purpose subserve not 
only ln> own end- but the good of his fellow men as well. Doctor Boyd has 
long held distinctive prestige in a calling which requires for its basis sound 
mentality and intellectual discipline of a high order. In his chosen field of 
endeavor Doctor Boyd has achieved success and his present eminent standing 
among the leading medical men of southwest Missouri is duly recognized and 
appreciated, not only in Springfield and Greene county, where he has been 
engaged in the | ractice for the past score of years, but also throughout this 
section of the state. 

Dr. John R. Boyd was born in Logan county, Kentucky. December 16, 
1854. He is the son of R. G. H. and Isabella ( 1 [erndon I Boyd, both natives 
•of Kentucky. 

The father was a land owner and ranked among the leading citizens of 
his community. His wife's people, the Herndons, were also extensive land 
owners in the Blue Grass state. The death of Mrs. Boyd occurred when her 
son, John R., was only six weeks old. She was a devout member of the 
Baptist church. To R. G. H. Boyd and wife four sons and four daughters 
were born. Three sons and one daughter survive. The living daughter 
makes her home in Lawton, < Iklahoma. ( >ur subject's surviving brothers are 
engaged in farming in Kentucky and Oklahoma. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 9/1 

Doctor Boyd grew up on the farm and received his early education in 
the common schools and in Auburn Academy. He remained in Kentucky 
until 1879, when he came to Jackson county, Missouri, where he taught school 
and began reading medicine. He spent one year in the Bellevue Medical Hos- 
pital College of New York City and completed his medical education in the 
University of Louisville, Kentucky, from which institution he graduated with 
the class of 1886, later taking a post-graduate course from the Post Graduate 
School in Chicago, also a post-graduate course from the Polyclinic Institute 
of Chicago. He began the practice of his profession at Butler, Bates county, 
Missouri, in 1886, where he remained until 1895, when, seeking a larger 
field for the exercise of his talents, he removed to Springfield and has since 
been successfully engaged in the general practice of medicine, being success- 
ful from the first, and during this period of nearly twenty years has occupied 
an envied position among his professional brethren. 

In 1901 Doctor Boyd was elected state medical director of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, which important office he still holds with much credit 
to himself and satisfaction to all concerned. He was one of the promoters of 
the Missouri Fidelity and Casualty Company, at the organization of which 
he was elected a director, also medical director, and in 19 12 was elected presi- 
dent of the company. He is now a director of the Southern Surety Company 
of St. Louis, Missouri. Several years ago he was president of the Greene 
County Medical Society for one term. He still holds membership in the 
Greene County Medical Society, the Southwest Missouri Medical Society, 
and the Missouri State Medical Association. Doctor Boyd was one of the 
founders of the Springfield Hospital, and has been a director in the same from 
the first, and for the first few years was treasurer and is now secretary of 
the same. 

He maintains a modern suite of rooms in the Holland building, Spring- 
field. He has been very successful in a financial way and has been interested 
in numerous business enterprises and has been influential in the latter-day 
upbuilding of the Queen City. Politically, he has always been a stanch Demo- 
crat, and, fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order, including the Council 
and the Royal Arch degrees. He also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America, and has always been 
actively interested in lodge affairs. 

Doctor Boyd was married in 1883 to Nannie M. Montgomery, of Leba- 
non, Kentucky, in which state she grew to womanhood and received her edu- 
cation. She is a daughter of a farmer and stockman and an excellent old 
family. She has been prominent in the best social circles since coming to 
Springfield, and is an active member of several clubs. 

The union of Doctor Boyd and wife has been blessed by the birth of one 
daughter. Lillian Boyd. She is a young lady of exceptional talent and refine- 
ment. She was graduated from the Academy of Drury College and after- 
ward received the degree of A. B. Cum Lauda from that college. 



97 2 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Miss Boyd spent a year at the College of Hawaii, Honolulu, Territory 
of Hawaii, where she specialized in science, taking the degree of B. S. She 
was an enthusiastic member of the college fraternities, Mu Beta and Pi Bi 
Phi. 

The Doctor is a gentleman whom it is a pleasure to meet, at once im- 
pressing you with his polished Southern manners, his directness, frankness 
and learning, also his unpretentious simplicity. 



J. A. WHITE. 



The automobile business is a comparatively new line of human endeavor. 
It has not been so very many years ago since the first automobile made its 
appearance in Springfield. The business has grown with perhaps greater 
strides than any other line in the twentieth century. These autos are not 
only to be found in the larger cities, but in almost every city and town in 
the Union, and even on the wide plains of the West and in mountainous dis- 
tricts. One finds them in many of the rough, poor sections of the Ozarks. 
People not only enjoy riding in them, but they realize that they are time 
savers and thus in many instances money makers. Those engaged in this 
line of business, whether in manufacture, selling or repairing, are making a 
success. One of this number is j. A. White, manager of the Western Alotor 
Car Company of Springfield. 

.Mr. White was born in Springfield, Missouri, August 21, 1879. He 
is a son of J. A. and Lou (Proctor) White. The father was a native of 
Tennessee and the mother was born in Louisville, Kentucky. They left their 
native states when young and came to Springfield, Missouri, where they 
were married, ami here J. A. White, Sr., engaged successfully in the con- 
tracting and building business. During the Civil war he enlisted at Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, in the Twelfth Kansas Cavalry, and made a gallant soldier 
for the Union, being promoted for meritorious conduct to second lieutenant. 
He went out the first year of the war and remained in the service over three 
years, taking part in many engagements and campaigns. Politically, he was 
a Democrat and was active in party affairs. He was at one time a member of 
the city council of Springfield. His death occurred here in 1884. His widow 
is still living in this city. Three children were born to these parents, namely: 
J. A., Jr., of this sketch: Mrs. May Costella, and George P. 

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood in bis native city, and here 
he attended school, receiving, however, only a meager education. He first 
engaged in the bicycle business in Portland, Oregon, being naturally of a 
mechanical turn of mind, and believing that the Far West held greater op- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 973 

portunities than his own country. He was. however, later convinced that 
this was not the fact, and after spending four years there, during which he 
got a start in life, he returned to Springfield on October 8, 1900, and here 
he continued the bicycle business until 1905 with much success, and in that 
vear he turned his attention to the automobile business, and during the ten 
years that he has been engaged in this line he has met with ever-growing and 
excellent success. He was first connected with Holland Keet. He is now 
manager of the Western Motor Car Company, and is agent for the Chalmers 
machine. His place of business is located at 411-13-15 South Jefferson 
street, where he has one of the largest and most complete and modernly 
equipped repair shops in the Southwest. He is prepared to do promptly and 
well all kinds of repairing and has in his employ a number of practical and 
highly skilled mechanics. He also maintains here a charging station for elec- 
trics. He is doing a large and lucrative business, and he enjoys the good will 
and confidence of his hundreds of patrons, who know him for a prompt, hon- 
est and obliging man of affairs. 

Mr. White was married on June 28. 1904, to Alzora Sedgwick, a native 
of Kansas and a daughter of A. C. and Anna ( Palmour) Sedgwick. To 
this union one child has been born, Charles S. White, whose birth occurred 
August 17. 1910. 

Politically. Mr. White is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Masonic order, including the Knights Templar and the Ancient Arabic Or- 
der of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is prominent in local club life, be- 
ing a member of the Springfield Club, the Young Men's Business Club, the 
Country Club and the Springfield Gun Club. 



JAMES H. O'BRYANT. 



There is an habitual tendency in human nature to live in and for that 
which is perishing, hence the necessity for something that shall remind us 
of what is abiding, something that shall enable us to realize our larger duties 
and higher destiny. The life of the masses of the people tends to become 
commonplace, and the only way to give color _ and zest and interest and 
beauty to the things around us is to be able to view them from the inside 
of a rich, splendidly furnished intellectual home. This is possible no matter 
in what line of work we are engaged. James H. O'Bryant is one of the 
citizens of Springfield who realized these facts long ago. and he has thus 
sought to develop his mind along general lines while engaged in his routine 
of daily tasks. 

Mr. O'Bryant was born in Greene county, Missouri, August 20, 1866. 



974 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

He is a son of George W. and Mary C. (Howard) O'Brvant, natives of 
Tennessee and North Carolina, respectively, the father's birth occurring in 
1823, and the mother's in 1830. They received limited educations in the 
old-time subscription schools, and when young they accompanied their par- 
ents from their respective communities in the South on the long overland 
journey to Greene county, Missouri, both the O'Bryants and Howards being 
pioneer settlers here, and here the parents of our subject were married. 
George \Y. O'Brvant was a successful farmer and stock raiser and became 
owner of three hundred and sixty acres of good land near Republic, and 
there his death occurred in 1866. His widow survived about thirty-seven 
years, dying in July, 1903, at the old homestead in Brookline township at an 
advanced age. Mr. < ('Bryant was a member of the State Militia during the 
Civil war and was an active Union man, but served only in one important 
engagement — the battle of Springfield, fought on January 8, 1863. His fam- 
ily consisted of ten children, namely: Sarah Jane is deceased; Alan- Frances 
lives in Polk county; John C. is deceased: Martha A., deceased, was the wife 
of Judge Phillips, of this county; William and Delila. twins, both live in Re- 
public; Alice A. is deceased; Nancy C. lives in California; George W. lives 
near Republic, and James H., of this sketch, who is the youngest of the 
family. 

James H. O'Brvant grew to manhood on the home farm in Brookline 
township ami he received his education in the common schools. He remained 
on the home farm, of which he owned one hundred and forty acres, until 
1899, when, alter a successful career as general farmer, he sold out, and 
in that year was appointed superintendent of the Greene County Farm, serv- 
ing four years in a manner thai reflected much credit upon himself and to 
the satisfaction of all concerned, doing much the meanwhile to improve the 
general condition of the farm and inaugurating an excellent system of man- 
agement. In February, [903, be began working as salesman for the J. T. 
Carter Vehicle Company. Since then, or for nearly eight years, be has been 
engaged in the mail messenger service in Springfield. 

Mr. O'Brvant was married May 24, [891, in Republic, to Maggie L. E. 
Hood, who was bom in Greene county, Missouri, July 31, [873. She is a 
daughter of James D. and .Mary E. (Clack) Hood. Her father was born 
111 this county on December 31, [848, and here he attended school, married 
and has spent his life. lie is still living on a farm northwest of Republic. 
His wile was born in Tennessee, in 1N56. These parents have always lived 
on the farm. To Mr. and Mrs. O'Brvant eight children have been born, 
namely: Nellie A., born March 21, 1892, is teaching school in the state of 
Washington; Earle J., born December 30, [893, lives in Oregon; Leta I-"., 
born December 25, 1805. is married and lues in Kansas City; Elias !'>.. born 
November 9, 1897, died August 15. 1900; Mary T., born February 15. [902, 



( i K E E N E CO U N 1 Y , M I SSO URI. 975 

is attending school ; John R., born August 15, 1905, died May 3, 1910; Helen 
[... born September 19, 1907; Hazel C. burn September 30. 1911. 

Politically, Mr. O'Bryant is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Masonic order, including the Chapter and the Order of Eastern Star,, 
while Mrs. O'Bryant is a White Shriner and was treasurer, also worthy 
matron in the Order of Eastern Star, and is very active in lodge work. Our 
subject and wife belong to the Grace Methodist Episcopal church. 



GUY !). KIRBY. 



As a lawyer ( iuy I >. Kirby, now judge of the Circuit Court of Greene 
county, for many years stood at the front of his profession at the Springfield 
bar, his career being noted for strength, fidelity and honor in his character. 
The relations between him and his clients are ever loyal and genuine. He is- 
ever steadfast, sure and true. Among his professional brethren he is noted 
fi >r his thorough knowledge of the law, not only of its great underlying prin- 
ciples, but also for its niceties and its exacting details, and for his faculty of 
clearly presenting to court and jury the law and facts of the case. On the 
bench his painstaking, laborious review and study of each case, and his accu- 
rate recollection of precedents always keep him in thorough preparation, and 
his profound legal erudition and sound judgment prevent him from resting 
on any hazardous or uncertain ground. In every sphere he demonstrates the 
individual unit and creation of himself. Rectitude, moral force, integrity, 
innate love of justice, exalted sense of honor, and unflinching advocacy of 
that which is right, are well defined elements of his personal character. Add 
to these industry and mental equipment, and we have the key to his success 
as a lawyer and as a judge. 

Judge Kirby was born in Springfield, Missouri, March 3, 1873. He is 
a sun of William M. and Virginia (Parrish) Kirby, the father being burn in 
Baltimore, Maryland, in' 1846. and the mother's birth occurred in Springfield, 
Missouri, in 1847. William M. Kirby spent his earlier years in the Monu- 
ment City and received a good practical education, and when a young man 
came to Springfield, Missouri, and ran a drygoods store here for several 
years, then held various positions under county officers for a number of 
years, and, in 1881, began his long career as traveling salesman, which he 
has continued to the present time, being one of the most widely known com- 
mercial salesmen in the Southwest. On December 22, 1870, he and Vir- 
ginia Parrish were married here. She grew to womanhood and was edu- 
cated in her native county, receiving an excellent education. T<> the parents 
of our subject four children were born, namely: William C. is deceased: Guy 



9/6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

D., of this sketch; Anne L. and Lellah V. These children were all given 
excellent educational advantages in the Springfield schools. 

Judge Kirby grew to manhood in his native city and here attended the 
ward and high schools, later was a student in Drury College. Leaving 
school in 1895, he began the study of law with the late John O'Day as pre- 
ceptor, and, having made rapid progress, was admitted to the bar in Decem- 
ber, 1896. After that he continued studying law, lint did not begin the 
practice of his profession until 1900. He continued active practice in the 
local courts for ten years with much success, or until he was elected judge 
of the circuit court in 1910, since which time he has discharged the duties 
of this important position in a manner that has reflected much credit upon 
himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents and all concerned, being 
generally regarded as one of the best men ever on this bench. 

Judge Kirby has remained unmarried. Politically he is a stanch Demo- 
crat and active in local political affairs. He belongs to the Baptist church. 



T. Pd.nXDYlLLE HOLLAND. 

True biography has a more noble purpose than mere fulsome eulogy. 
The historic spirit, faithful to the record; the discerning judgment, unmoved 
by prejudice and uncolored by enthusiasm, are as essential in giving the life 
of the individual as in writing the history of a people. Indeed, the ingenuous- 
ness ol the former picture is even mure vital, because the individual 
is the national unit, and if the unit lie justly estimated the complex organism 
will ben niie correspondingly intelligible. The world today is what the lead- 
ing men of the past generation have made it. and this rule musl ever In 'Id 
g 1. From the past comes the legacy of the present. Art. science, states- 
manship and government are accumulations. They constitute an inheritance 
upon which the present generation have entered, and the advantages se- 
cured from so vast a bequeathment depend entirely upon the fidelity with 
which is conducted the study of the lives of the principal actors who have 
transmitted the legacy. Tin- 1- especially true of those whose influence 
has passed beyond the confines of locality and permeated the larger lite of 
the stale. h such a careful study are the life, character and service of the 
late T. Blondville Holland pre-eminentl) entitled. no1 onl) on the part of 
the student of biography, but also of every citizen who. guided by example, 
would in the present build wisely for the future. In studying a clean- 
cut, sane, distinct character like that of the subject, interpretation follows 
fact in a straight line of derivation. There is small use for indirection or 
puzzling. Ilis character is the positive expression of a strong nature. As 



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J/ O H 6-U 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 977 

has been said of him, "he was distinctively one of the notable man of his 
day and generation, and as such is entitled to a conspicuous place in the 
annals of his city, county and state." Mr. Holland was a member of one 
of the oldest, best-known and must influential families of Greene county, 
Missouri, and in his lifetime had engaged widely in various business pur- 
suits, and as head of the great banking company which has long borne his 
name, he wielded a potent influence in financial circles of the Southwest. 
1 )espite the fact that his father was a wealth}- man, he began early to make 
his own way. He traveled by horse long distance in his youth in live stock 
deals and by exceptional ability in his efforts became wealthy in his own 
right. His name had become a household synonym of conservativeness, 
as trustworthy as a gold bond. 

Mr. Holland was a sun of Gen. C. B. and Emiline H. (Bigbee) Hol- 
land, the latter a daughter of I apt. John S. Bigbee. T. Blondville Holland 
was burn in Robertson county. Tennessee, January i, 1836. He immigrated 
to Springfield. Missouri, with his parents in the spring of 1841, and here 
spent the rest of his life. The family made the tedious journey from across 
the Tennessee plains and the rugged range of the Ozark mountains. At 
that time Springfield had only a few small log huts, one of which the father 
of our subject rented. As no furniture could be bought, the elder Holland 
made his own furniture out of walnut rails from a fence nearby which he 
purchased from John P. Campbell, who donated the original townsite where 
Springfield now stands. With General Holland and family also came John 
L. Holland, his brother, who still lives in Springfield at the advanced age 
ol ninety-five years. He and the General were among the first merchants 
in this city. The two brothers married sisters. Lee Holland, a son of 
J. L. Holland, was a double cousin to T. B. Holland. 

In the beginning of the Civil war our subject enlisted in the Union 
Army under his father. Gen. C. B. Holland, and served with distinction 
throughout the war. He was at one time offered and refused an officer's 
commission. He took much pride in the military history of his ancestors 
and was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. His father 
being a self-made man, he believed in boys assuming responsibilities in earlv 
life, and at the age of eighteen years. T. B. Holland started in a small 
mercantile business for himself at a point which at that time was in Taney 
county, now near the town of Rome, Douglas county, Missouri. Although 
the business proved successful, after two years he disposed of same and re- 
turned to Springfield, where he later entered into a partnership business with 
his father under the firm name of C. B. Holland & Son, which proved suc- 
cessful. Both dealt in live stock also, and later added the hanking business. 
(62) 



97§ GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

The partnership was continued until the death of the father in 1901. During 
the early partnership before the war our subject several times drove horses 
and mules overland clear through from Springfield to New Orleans. After 
the war a general mercantile business was conducted in Springfield by C. B. 
Holland & Son which was continued until 1870. In the year 1875 the 
banking business was established as a private bank, which was likewise 
conducted under the firm name of C. B. Holland & Son and continued 
until 1896, when it was incorporated as the Holland Banking Company 
and has been conducted under that name ever since. Our subject was 
associated with the bank until his death and was president of the same 
the latter years of his life. .Mr. Holland was a strong character of sterling 
worth whose integrity and honor was his religion, and it was largely these 
characteristics injected into the business that won the Holland Banking Com- 
pany the high standing in the community which it enjoys today. .Mr. Hol- 
land was the first president of the Springfield Clearing House Associa- 
tion. 

The domestic life of T. B. Holland began in [860 when he was united 
in marriage with Matilda Dade, a young lad) of St. Louis and a sister 
to the late Dabney C. Dade, of Springfield, and a daughter of Judge John 
hade. She died in [875. This union resulted in the birth of five children. 
two of whom died in infancy, and two sons, T. 1). and VV. C, died after 
reaching manhood. The eldest daughter, Cora 1!.. died in [901. She was 
the wife of William I!. Sanford, now president of the Holland Banking 
Company. To Mr. and Mrs. Sanford one child was born, Grady II. San- 
ford. T. 11. Holland was remarried in 1S77 to Miss I'.. \. Hamilton, who 
survives him. with four children, all living and married: they are: Charles, 
proprietor of the Holland Stock and Dairy Farm near Springfield: Mrs. 
Will Darby, who resides with her mother in Springfield; Mrs. Manney 
Simmons, and Mrs. Clifford Jarrett. 

In ion Mr. Holland sold a controlling interest of stock of the Holland 
Banking Company to William I'.. Sanford. 

Mr. Holland was prominently identified with the making of Springfield, 
doing as much as am other man for the material upbuilding of the city 
in which he always had implicit faith and took so great a delight. He 
was a large contributor i<> all public enterprises and charities but avoided 
publicity therewith, lie was a member of the first board of trustees of Drury 
College and remained a close friend of this institution throughout his life, 
especially through Us early struggles until it was well on the road to success. 
In the big fire that visited the heart of the business district of Springfield 
in the spring of [913, Mr. Holland was the heaviest property loser, he 
having accumulated considerable property in this section of the city. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 979 

After a period of ill health T. Blondville Holland was summoned to 
close his earthly career at the Holland home on St. Louis street, Springfield, 
on July 30, 1913, in his seventy-eighth year, after a long, useful, successful 
and honorable life, fraught with much good to his county, city, himself, 
family and the world, and the young man of today might well emulate 
his example, not only in a business way but in all walks of life, for his 
career presents to the contemplative mind many lessons of value. 



ROBERT L. RAMSEY. 



In his efforts he. who essays biographical or memorial history, rinds 
much of profit and much of alluring fascination when he would follow out. 
in even a cursory way, the teachings of an active, rightly lived life, seeking 
to find the keynote of each respective personality. These efforts and their 
resulting transmission cannot fail of value in an objective way, for in each 
case may the lesson of life be conned, line upon line, precept upon precept. 
The late Robert L. Ramsey was a man who lived to good purpose and while 
laboring for his own good and that of his immediate family, helped others 
on the road that leads to the mystic goal ahead 

Mr. Ramsey was born in Lewis county, Missouri, in 1836. He was a 
son of Silas and Elizabeth (Brown) Ramsey, natives of Kentucky, where 
they grew up and were married and from there removed to Missouri, being 
among the early settlers of Lewis county, where the family has been well 
and favorably known to the present time. Seven children were born to 
them, all now deceased but one. namely: John; Martha is the only survivor; 
Thomas; Sarah; Lucy; Robert L., of this sketch, and Samuel, the youngest. 
Silas Ramsey, the father, was twice married, our subject having been by 
Ins first union, lie became one of the leading farmers of Lewis county, and 
owned three sections of fine land there. 

Robert L. Ramsey grew to manhood in his native county and assisted 
his father with the work on the farm, and he received a fairly good educa- 
tion in the common schools. He was by nature an excellent mathematician. 
He began life for himself as a fanner, but believing that the business world 
held greater inducement for him he went to Canton, county-seat of Lewis 
county, when a young man, about [869, and there began his mercantile 
career, which he continued with ever-increasing success for over twenty 
years, enjoying an extensive trade with the town and surrounding country. 
He always carried a good stock of merchandise and dealt fairly and cour- 
teously with his customers, and thereby retained their confidence and good 
will. His health failing, he retired from active life three or four years 



980 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

prior to his death, being at that time one of the oldest and best known mer- 
chants in Canton. 

Mr. Ramsey was married in his native county, February 3, 1859, to 
Sarah E. Ray, who was born in Lewis county, Missouri, March 22, 1839. 
She is a daughter of Judge M. and Sarah ( Brown) Ray, the former a native 
of Tennessee and the mother of Kentucky. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey six children were born, two of whom are 
living, namely: M. Beatrice; Mattie L. ; Lula E. ; Roberta; Sarah and Eliza- 
beth, twins, are the only survivors; Sarah married Walter \Y. Baxter, who 
is mentioned in the sketch of Kirk Baxter on another page of this volume; 
Elizabeth married George H. Baxter, who is living a retired life in Spring- 
field. 

The death of Robert L. Ramsey occurred in Canton. Missouri. Sep- 
tember 19, 1900, at the age of sixty-four years. His widow subsequently 
removed to Springfield, this state, to live with her two daughters. She 
purchased a home on South Eremont street, and there spent the rest of her 
days, being called to join her husband in the Silent Land on April 13. [914. 
The daughters now occupy the cozy home she left. 

Mr. Ramsey was a Democrat, and religiously he was a member of the 
Baptist church. Fraternally he belonged to the Masonic Order, and Ins 
father-in-law was the first Mason in Lewis comity. Mr. and Mrs. Ramsej 
were excellent people, religious, neighborly and charitable and were beloved 
l>\ all who knew them. 



WILLIAM R. DANIEL. 



No matter what line of work one is engaged in he should strive to 
become an expert in it, which will not only result in better remuneration, 
hut a greater degree of satisfaction and pleasure all around. If one goes at 
his worl< in a half-hearted, slip-shod manner very little good will he accom- 
plished and little satisfaction gotten out of it. In fact, it is not too much 
to say thai poor work should never be done, for it is very often worse than 
nothing — detrimental. William R. Daniel, the skilled coach carpenter in the 
Frisco's new shops at Springfield, realized these facts when he made up his 
mind when a young man to become a carpenter, lie knew tin- world was 
full of wood workers in various lines and that to achieve anything really 
worth while he would have to become a superior workman. Years ,,f patient 
and careful work have made him one. 

Mr. Daniel was born on October ;, 1857. in Savannah. Tennessee. He 
is a son of Calloway and Caroline (Hutton) Daniel, natives of Tennessee 
and Alabama, respectively. They grew Up in the South, attended school 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 981 

and were married in Tennessee, from which state in tS6i they removed to 
Illinois, where they lived during the Civil war, and, in 1865, came to New 
Madrid county, Missouri, where they spent the rest of their lives on a farm, 
dying near the town of New Madrid, the father in 1883, and the mother in 
1893. Politically, Calloway Daniel was a Democrat, and he belonged to the 
Granger order. His family consisted of ten children, namely: Emily and 
Elsie are living; Thomas is deceased; James is living; Patrick is deceased; 
William R. of this sketch; Jane, Alice, Benjamin and George are all de- 
ceased. 

William R. Daniel was four years old when he left his native state of 
Illinois and was about nine years old when his parents brought him to New 
Madrid county, Missouri, where he grew to manhood on a farm and there 
worked during the summer months, attending the district schools in the 
winter. He followed farming in that county until 1884, when, on August 
12th of that year, he came to Springfield, this state, and engaged in car- 
penter work for a few years. On November 23, 1890, he went to work 
for the Frisco System at the old North Side shops, in the coach department 
as a carpenter, where he remained until 1009, when the new shops were 
opened, at which time he was transferred to the latter and promoted to 
coach carpenter, which position he still holds, giving eminent satisfaction, 
for he is not only exceptionally skillful, hut is a fast and painstaking work- 
man, always conscientious in bis work. 

Mr. Daniel was married on December 22, 1880, in New .Madrid, Mis- 
souri, to Fanny V. Edmondson, who was horn there June 26, 1804, and was 
reared and educated at that place. She is a daughter of John and I.avina 
S. (Freeman) Edmondson. Her father was born in Louisville, Kentucky, 
November 10, 1820, and her mother was born in North Carolina. December 
1, 1834. They grew up in the South, were educated and married there, 
finallv removing to Springfield. Missouri, where the death of Mr. Edmond- 
son occurred on February 3, 1901 ; his wife died in Kansas City, May 8, 
1904; they are buried in Springfield. Mr. Edmondson, who devoted his 
life principally to agricultural pursuits, was a well-read man. Politically he 
was a Democrat. His family consisted of four children, namely: Mrs. 
Elizabeth J. Warrington lives in Kansas City, Missouri: Laura is deceased; 
Fanny V., wife of Mr. Daniel of this sketch, and William, who is the 
youngest. 

To our subject and wife two children have been born, namely: Laura 
Lavina. was born in 1882, and died when a year old; the second child died 
in infancy, unnamed. 

Mrs. Daniel is a well educated and accomplished woman, who is prom- 
inent in local club life. She is an active and influential member of the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union. She also belongs to the Progressive 



982 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Workers' Club. She was first vice-president of the Children's Home when 
it was first organized in Springfield. She is a member of the Pickwick Sew- 
ing Club, and is a member of the Young Men's Christian Association 
Auxiliary, and belongs to the Second Presbyterian church, of which Mr. 
Daniel is also a member and an elder. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Masonic Order, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Maccabees. Polit- 
ically he is a Democrat. 

Mr. Daniel owns a cozy home on YVeller street, Springfield. 



WALTER P. EMERSOX. 

One of the enterprising and deserving young men of Fair Grove, Greene 
county, is Walter P. Emerson, who is filling very acceptably the position of 
postmaster and is also conducting a store there. He was formerly a resi- 
dent of Springfield and has spent most of his life in this count}-. 

Mr. Emerson was born in Jasper county, Missouri, November 14. [880. 
He is a son of James Daniel and Sarah Ann Frances (Wheeler) Emerson. 
The Father was born in [852, in Greene county, this state, spending his first 
years in Franklin township, in fact, with the exception of one year spent 
in Jasper county, be spent his entire life in his native county, and made 
general fanning his vocation, owning a good farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres, all under improvement, in Jackson township, and there his 
death occurred in May. 1904. Politically he was a Democrat, and while 
active in the affairs of his party was never an office holder. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, at Fair Grove, in which 
he took much interest, and in which he was a deacon for years. He was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at hair Grove. His wife 
was a native of Tennessee, and when young in years she came to Greene 
count}-, Missouri, with her parents, James T. and Nancy A. (Andrews) 
Wheeler. This was during the period of the ('ivil war. The family located 
at Hickory Barrens, anil secured one hundred and forty acres of good land 
in that vicinity, where Mr. Wheeler carried on general farming. During 
the war he was a private in a Missouri regimenl in the Union arm}-, later 
being promoted to corporal and was honorably discharged and mustered out 
as such. He saw considerable service and had a horse shot from under him 
in an engagement. He was in St. Louis at the close of the war. He en- 
listed on the road from Tennessee to Missouri and his wife continued on to 
Greene count}-, where he joined her after the war and resided the rest of 
his life. 

Three children were horn to Tames i '. Emerson and wife, namely: 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 983 

Walter P., of this sketch; Airs. Alary Alexander Yancy, and John Reed, 
who is one of the country school teachers of this county. 

Walter P. Emerson grew up on the home farm and assisted with the 
general work there. He was one year old when his parents brought him 
from Jasper county to Franklin township. He was educated in the district 
schools here, later taking a course in the Springfield Business College, from 
which he was graduated in 1902. He lived in Springfield six years, work- 
ing as a street car conductor for four years, and as a teamster for two 
years. He moved to Fair Grove in March, 1908, where he has since resided. 
He has for some time been conducting a small general store, and in the 
spring of 1914 took the civil service examination and was appointed post- 
master at Fair Grove the following July. He is discharging the duties of 
the office in a highly acceptable manner to the department and the people. 
Mis store is next door to the office. He is an honest, obliging and courteous 
young man, and his appointment to this office was highly pleasing to the 
citizens of Fair Grove and vicinity. 

Air. Emerson was married October 9, 1901, to Pearlie Blair, a daugh- 
ter of Thomas A. and Malinda ( Sharp) Blair. To this union five children 
have been born, namely: Audra Preston, James Thomas, Zelma Hazel, 
Flma Dazel and Claude Elwyn. 

Politically, Air. Emerson is a Democrat. He is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the World, both at 
Fair Grove, and his wife is a member of the Baptist church. 



IA.MES S. SARTAIN. 



From the great Prairie state, where lived such renowned men as states- 
men, warriors, men of business and authors, comes James S. Sartain, en- 
gineer of the Fruit Dispatch Company, of Springfield. He has not tried to 
emulate in his life work the eminent men of his native state only in that he 
has tried to do something well, not desiring the plaudits of the world in a 
public way, and so he has done his allotted work on earth just the same as if 
his name was inscribed high on the honor roll of the nation, for all good 
work by mankind is viewed as a part of the plan of creation, and we are 
taught that "each thing and person in their place is best." 

Air. Sartain was born October 18, 1868, in Pike county. Illinois. He 
is a son of Charles and Matilda (Ham) Sartain. The father was born in 
North Carolina, in 1845, and the mother was born in Pike county, Illinois, 
in 1854. These parents received common school educations and were mar- 
ried in Pike county, Illinois, whither the father removed from the South 



9§4 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

when young. He devoted his active life to general farming and stock rais- 
ing. He remained in Illinois until 1880, when he removed to Bates county, 
Missouri. During the Civil war he served a full term of enlistment, par- 
ticipating in a number of battles, and was captured at Arkansas Post. His 
death occurred in Bates county, this state, in 1909. His family consisted of 
nine children, seven of whom are still living. 

James S. Sartain grew to manhood on the home farm and received his 
education in the public schools of Bates county and the high school at Adrian, 
that count}-. He lived on the home farm until he was eighteen years old, 
then engaged in the threshing business for several years. He also became a 
stationary engineer. In 1908 he moved to Springfield from Butler, Bates 
county, and here he has since been running an engine, at the present time 
being engineer at the plant of the Fruit Dispatch Company. He is regarded 
as an expert in his line and likes the work; moreover, he has proven to be a 
thoroughly trustworthy employee. 

Mr. Sartain was married on November 18, 1889. in Adrian. Missouri, 
to Eulalia McCraw, who was born, reared and educated there, the date of her 
birth being February 27, 1874. She is a daughter of James and .Margaret 
(( alland) McCraw. who were natives of Pennsylvania, but who came West 
in early life. The father is still living, but the mother is deceased. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sartain, namely: Grace, 
born Februar) 3, 1892, and Fred, born May 2, 18.14. 

Politically, Mr. Sartain is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias. 



RICHARD HENRY II \XS<)\. M. D. 

It was the great Thoreau who said thai men would be better if they had 
sufficient vision to look below the surface of things. This vision is not 
vouchsafed to many, but one of the favored in this respect is Dr. Richard 
Henry Hanson, a well known homeopathic physician of Springfield, whose 
long and useful career has been an interesting and varied one and of much 
good to humanity. We find that he was a gallant soldier in the defense of 
the Union, a worthy minister in the Methodist church for many years, an 
effective worker for the cause of temperance, a potent influence in the state 
legislature where lie served two terms, and enterprising merchant and for 
more than three decades ;i successful man of medicine, both a pharmacist 
and physician, and withal a true gentleman who deserves the high respect in 
w Inch he is universallly held. 

Doctor Hanson was born in Tent. Clinton county. New York, June r. 




t vyyi , 



m 




(PlA^d 




GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 985 

1842. He is a son of Cyrus and Luanda (Hill) Hanson, natives of New 
England, the father born near Dover, New Hampshire, and when a boy he 
ran away from home and went to Vermont and later removed to near Peru, 
Xew York, where lie followed farming the rest of his life. The mother of 
our subject was reared in Vermont and her death occurred in Minnesota. 
Dr. Richard 11. Hanson grew to manhood on the home farm in Xew 
York state and there he received a common school education, later attending 
Malone Academy, at Malone, X. Y. He remained on the farm until he was 
twenty years of age, then studied chemistry and photography, the daguerreo- 
type method. When the Civil war came on be enlisted in Company L, Sixth 
New York Heavy Artillery, and saw considerable bard service. He was 
among the troops which was detailed to guard the wagon trains of the Federal 
army during the battle of Cedar Creek, but the company he was a member 
of was annihilated. However, be effected his escape, was taken sick and 
spent the latter part of the war in a hospital in Philadelphia. After he was 
honorably discharged from the army he returned to bis home in Xew York 
state and soon thereafter bought a country store, which he conducted a few 
years, then came to Springfield. Missouri, in the early seventies. Later taking 
up the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church, he joined the St. Louis 
conference and spent thirteen years in the ministry, during which time he 
was regarded as one of the most earnest, faithful and able members of the 
conference and a leader in this denomination in southern .Missouri. He was 
for a time connected with the school of this denomination at Marionville, 
and among his charges were Ash Grove, Marshfield, Windsor. Sedalia, 
Bloomfield. Iberia, Dixon and Hartville. In all these places he did a most 
commendable work and greatly strengthened the church in each. During the 
latter part of his ministry he studied medicine and finally abandoned the 
pulpit, much to the regret of those who had occasion to know of his splendid 
work in the gospel, and took up the practice of homeopathy, which he has 
continued with pronounced success for the past thirty years, and is one of 
the best-known men in this branch of medical science in the Southwest. He 
was duly licensed as a homeopath and was also given a pharmacy license, 
having made himself familiar with that profession also. While living in 
Wright county he served as coroner for a period of eight years in an emi- 
nently successful manner. He led the campaign for local option in Wright 
county, which won by a majority vote of over twelve hundred, the credit 
for this victory being due very largely to him. On the strength of his labors 
in this line he was elected representative from Wright county to the state 
legislature on the Republican ticket, and his record there was so highly sat- 
isfactory and commendable that he was elected for a second term by a much 
larger majority than previously. He was an ardent supporter in locating 
the State Normal School at Springfield, also was chairman of the emigration 



986 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

committee, which appropriated $io.cco toward bringing emigration to Mis- 
souri. In fact, for many years Dr. Hanson has been a power in the Repub- 
lican party in southern Missouri. 

Dr. Hanson located in Springfield in November, 1912. He is a member 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, of which he is past chaplain. 

Dr. Hanson owns and runs a sanitarium on North Main street, which 
is a spacious, fine building, with a fine, well-kept yard and grove. Dr. Han- 
son also has a fine 500-acre farm in Wright county, Missouri, which is also 
very valuable mineral land. 

Dr. Hanson was a teaher in Aurora, Missouri, and taught on ground 
that has since proven to be rich mineral land. 

The doctor was married in Bolivar, Polk county, Missouri, in 1878. to 
Zillah F. Holt, a daughter of John L. and Joanna Holt. Her father was a 
spy for the Union army during the Civil war. He devoted his life to cabinet 
making, and was surveyor of Lawrence county for a number of years. Five 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hanson, Viola, widow of Edward 
McXealy ; Perry L. lives at Hartville, Missouri; Golden lives at home, now 
Mrs. William Curry; (ialen lives in Springfield and Daisy lives at home. 



ROBERT A. MOORE. 



Eminent business talent is composed of a combination of high mental 
and moral attributes. It is not simply energy and industry; there must be 
sound judgment, breadth of capacity, rapidity of thought, justice and firm- 
ness, the foresight to perceive the drifting tides of business and the will and 
ability to control them, and, withal, a collection of minor but important quali- 
ties to regulate the details of the pursuits which engage attention. Robert 
A. Moore, superintendent and manager of the Moore Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Springfield, affords an exemplification of this talent, if not in its 
highest development, yet an extraordinary character, and notwithstanding the 
somewhat limited theater of his operations he has achieved a reputation 
which places him in the front rank of ( ireene county's progressive successful 
men of affairs. 

Mr. Moore was born in Wayne county, Xew York, May 11, 1846. Ik- 
is a son of Robert X. and Sarah ( Pollok ) Moore. The father was burn in 
Duchess county, Xew York, in 1818. received a good education in his native- 
state and there married and engaged in farming, later becoming a capitalist 
and was a promoter in agricultural lines in the Smith until the war. Ili> 
death occurred at Burlington, Iowa, in 1870. llis wife was a native of 
Wayne county, Xew York, and the date of her birth was 1823. She grew 



GREEXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 98/ 

to womanhood in her native locality and received an excellent education, in- 
cluding a course in the Elmira Seminary, from which institution she was 
graduated. She was a woman of culture and many praiseworthy attributes. 
Her death occurred in Richmond, Virginia, in 1858, when still a young- 
woman. To Robert N. Moore and wife four children were born, namely: 
James Z., Robert A., Frank P. and Mary. 

Robert A. Moore received a limited education in the public schools of 
his native state, but this early deficiency has more than heen made up by 
wide home reading and contact with the world in later years. He found it 
necessary to leave school when he was sixteen years old, and, taking Horace 
Greeley's advice, went West to seek his fortune. He located in Burlington, 
Iowa, in 1863, and there began railroading with the bridge and civil engineer- 
ing department of the Chicago. Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company, with 
which department he remained for five or six years, then took up contracting, 
which he followed until the death of his father in 1876. He remained in 
Burlington working as a millwright and superintendent until 1886, when he 
came to Springfield, Missouri, where he continued to work as millwright. 
In [892 he opened a manufacturing business at 600 East Phelps avenue, be- 
ginning the manufacture of school and church furniture. The business was 
a success from the first and it was incorporated in 1893. He has continued 
in this line of endeavor to the present time with ever increasing success, and 
the Moore Manufacturing Company is now widely known throughout the 
Southwest and has a capita! stock of twenty-five thousand dollars. Its prod- 
ucts find a very ready market owing to their high-grade workmanship, finish 
and quality, seating, fine cabinet work and machinery being specialties; also 
school and church furniture, office fittings, tahles, desks, law cases, opera 
chairs, assembly chairs, hall seatings, railroad seatings, lawn seatings, etc. 
In connection with the wood work the company handles machinery for vari- 
ous kinds of wood work manufacturing and a large trade is also enjoyed in 
this department. The plant is a large, well equipped and substantial one, 
modern in its various appointments, and a large number of skilled mechanics 
and artisans are constantly employed. Only the best grade of material is 
used and only the highest grade of workmanship is permitted to go out of 
the factory. The officers of the company are: Flora L. Moore (wife of our 
subject), president: Robert A. Moore, superintendent and manager; H. A. 
Hutchins, secretary; Charles I. Moore and Frank P. Moore, directors. 

Robert A. Moore was married twice, first in 1871, to Christiana Morgan, 
whose death occurred in 1879. To this union three children were born, name- 
lv: Charles I., born in 1872, lives on a farm in Laclede county. Missouri; 
Frank P.. horn in 1877, is in business with his father; Julia L., born in 1879, 
died in May, 1900. In October, 1888, Mr. Moore was united in marriage to 
Flora L. Hutchins, in Springfield. Missouri. She was born in Greene county, 



988 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

this state, March 5, 1868, and was reared and educated here. She is a daugh- 
ter of Thomas A. and Eliza A. ( Bowker) Hutchins, both natives of Massa- 
chusetts, the father born in June, 1824, and died in Arizona in February, 
1893; the death of the mother occurred in Springfield, Missouri. July 11, 
1901. Eight children were born to Thomas A. Hutchins and wife, namely: 
Howard B. is deceased; Mary E., Edward W., Angeline, Harriet. Flora L., 
Clara E. and Francis S. 

Four children were born to Mr. Moore's second marriage, namely : Fred 
N., born in 1889, lives in Oklahoma and is in the employ of the Frisco Lines; 
Ester I., born in 1892, is principal of the high school at Miller. Missouri; 
Ruth \Y., born in 1895, is attending Drury College, and Katherine >.. born in 
1 901, is also attending school. 

Politically, Mr. Moore is a Democrat, and he and his family are mem- 
bers of Calvary Presbyterian church. 



THEODORE BANISTER. 

From the "banks of the Wabash far away" hails Theodore Bani>ter. 
and no doubt, in the language of Paul Dresser's famous sung, "oft his mind 
reverts to the happy scenes of childhood" in that fair country where " 'round 
his Indina homestead wave the cornfields" with "scent of new-mown hay" 
and sycamore bottoms and all that; for it is indeed a desirable country, and,, 
of course, seems better to those whose youth was spent there. It is not only 
a picturesque country, but it has produced some of our best American 
citizens, men of industry, courage and honesty, so that they have been wel- 
comed into whatever communities they have cast their lots. Not many of 
them have settled in Greene county, but Mr. Banister has found it to his 
advantage to do so. 

Our subject was burn in Wabash county. Indiana. February 28, 1 S40 
He is a son of Nathaniel and Emiline (Dale) Banister. The father was 
born December 13, 1818, in Nicholas £Ounty, Kentucky, in which state he 
spent his earlier years, finally emigrating to Indiana in an early day and 
locating in Wabash county. They were married in Fayette county, Indiana. 
February 9, 1841, and there began life in typical pioneer fashion, he enter- 
ing eighty acres of land from the government, which he cleared and de- 
veloped into a farm, making general fanning his life work. He lived On 
one farm for a period of forty-six years, and was a well-known man in his 
locality. His farm in Wabash county consisted of one hundred and sixty 
acres of excellent land. There his death occurred many years ago, but his 
widow survives, having attained at this writing the unusual age of ninety- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 989 

four years, still making her home in the Hoosier state. Politically, Nathaniel 
Banister was a Democrat, and he was at one time trustee of his township. 
His family consisted of ten children, seven of whom are still living, namely: 
Merritt. who has remained in Wabash county, Indiana: Theodore, of this 
sketch; Louis. Alfred, Horace, San ford and Alice, all live in Indiana; the 
other three children died in early life. 

Mr. Banister, of this review, grew up on the home farm, where he 
worked when a boy, and he received Ins education in the public schools of 
his vicinity, the first school he attended being in a log cabin. He followed 
farming until he was twenty-one years old, then began learning the car- 
penter's trade, for which he had unusual natural talent. He remained in 
his native state until in [880, when he came to Springfield, Missouri. He 
has continued in carpenter work all the while and is a fast and high-grade 
workman, and his services are in good demand at the highest wages. 

Mr. Banister was married on November 7, 1884, in Springfield, to 
Laura Loveless, who was born in the central part of Ohio, May 1, 1863, 
and there she grew to womanhood and was educated near Bellefontaine, 
removing to Springfield, this state, when young, and finishing her educa- 
tion here. Her parents, George and Sarah ( Outland ) Loveless, spent most 
of their lives on the farm. The father was born September 7. [823, and 
died here July 16, 1892. The mother was born June 30, 1823, and died 
in Springfield July 18, 1886. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Banister three children have been born, namely: 
George E., born July 3, 1886, is a traveling salesman and resides in Spring- 
field ; Ralph, born December id, 18XS, who is employed in Snyder's cloth- 
ing store in this city; Theodore, Jr., born October 21, [896, works in 
Holland's blank, this city. 

Politically. Mr. Banister is a Democrat. He is a member of the South 
Street Christian church, in which he is a deacon, and be has long been 
active in church work. He has a cozy home on East Elm street. 



KIRK BAXTER. 



The late Kirk Baxter will long be remembered by the people of Spring- 
field as a minister in the Christian church, and as a teacher, a man who was 
imbued with the deepest and most helpful altruistic spirit, and he gave his 
best years to the furthering of the movements calculated to uplift and make 
the world better. Pure, constant and noble was the spiritual flame that 
burned in and illumined the mortal tenement of the subject of this memoir, 
and to the superficial observer can come but small appreciation of bis in- 



990 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

trinsic spirituality, his faith having been fortified by the deepest study, and 
the Christian verities were with him the matters of most concern among the 
changes and chances of this mortal life. No man with his intellectual vigor 
and the love of truth which marked him could live long without inevitably 
being brought to investigate the great moral laws governing life, in fact, 
he was a strong man in every respect and was successful in all he under- 
took. 

Mr. Baxter was born in New York City, in the year 1836. His parents 
were natives of England, where they grew up and were married, finally 
emigrating to America, and both died in New York City, when their son, 
Kirk, who was the youngest o\ three children, was small, his two brothers 
being William and George Baxter. They are all now deceased. 

Kirk Baxter received his education in his native city, through the assist- 
ance of his oldest brother, William Baxter, but while still a boy, the three 
brothers went to the Southland, locating in Louisiana, where our subject 
continued his education in a college, and there entered the ministry of the 
Gospel, and for many years preached at various places in the South. He- 
went to Mississippi after leaving Louisiana, and later located in Arkansas, 
where he remained a short time, and, in 1868, moved with his family to 
Springfield, Missouri, and became minister of the local Christian church, 
holding this charge for many years, during which he was one of the most 
popular ministers in this city. He also taught school, private classes, here 
for some time, and as both preacher and educator his work was high-grade. 
He was a man of learning, of advanced ideas, was well versed in the Bible 
and was a forceful and entertaining speaker. 

Mr. Baxter was married in Louisiana to Emma F. lackson, a native 
of that state, and a daughter of Jarrett E. Jackson and wife, and she grew 
to womanhood and was educated in her native locality, and she proved to 
he an excellent helpmate to her gifted husband. They became the parents 
of eight children, namely: Charles W.. who died January 30, 1014: Mary 
lives in the state of Washington; Lena lives in Oklahoma: William II. died 
in 1879; Rosa lives in the state of Washington; George H.. horn February 
5, 1867, received his education in the Springfield schools and the old Ash 
Grove College, and on December 2j, 1898. he married Elizabeth Ramsey; 
he lives in Springfield, travels for a large St. Louis shoe house, and fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the 
Royal Arcanum. Curt, the seventh child in order of birth, is living in Mon- 
tana; Walter W., the youngest of the family, was born February 3, 1872, in 
Springfield, and here grew to manhood and was educated; on December 28, 
1899, he married Sarah Ramsey, which union was without issue; he was for 
some time general manager of the Springfield orifice of R. G Dunn & Co.; 
his death occurred in January, 1901. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



991 



Politically Kirk Baxter was a Democrat. For a period of twenty-five 
years he was prominent in the upbuilding of Springfield, especially along 
civic and moral lines, and during that period few men did more for the edu- 
cational development of Greene county. He started the first Girls' Sem- 
inary in Springfield, and was the founder of the Ash Grove College. He 
was a man of whom it may be said, "truly his works do follow him." He 
was summoned to his eternal rest in 1 89 s - 



HARRY CLYDE HOLDEN. 

One of the young men of Springfield who has found it to his advantage 
to remain in his native city rather than seek opportunities in other places is 
Harry Clyde Holden, foreman of the mill shop at the new Frisco shops in 
this city, where, by persistency and prompt and faithful service, he has 
climbed up from the bottom round of the ladder. 

Mr. Holden was born in Springfield, .Missouri, March 23, 1871. He is a 
son of George and Elizabeth (O'Bannon) Holden. His mother was born in 
Charlestown, West Virginia, in 1841. and her death occurred in Springfield, 
Missouri, in 1893. George Holden. the father, was born in England, near 
London, the world's greatest city, in 1839, and his death occurred in Spring- 
held, Missouri, April 12, 1908. He spent his early life in his native land and 
there received his education, emigrating to the United States when a young 
man and locating in Charlestown, West Virginia, where lie was married. He 
remained in the East until the close of the Civil war. when, in the year 1865, 
he moved to this city, after spending some time in Union City, Missouri. He 
participated in this war by serving in the Union army, taking part in many 
important battles, proving to lie an excellent soldier in everv respect. He 
learned the carpenter's trade when a young man, and this he followed the rest 
of his active life, being a very skilled workman. Politically, he was a Repub- 
lican. I lis family consisted of six children, all of whom are still living, name- 
ly: Florence, Emily, George, Hannah, Harry C. and Dwight. 

Harrv C. Holden grew to manhood in his native city and received his 
education in the local public schools. When a boy he went to work in the 
box car department of the Frisco shops, being only sixteen years of age at 
that time. After working in that department for some time he w r ent to the 
pattern shops in the old North Side shops of this road, where he remained 
until 18Q2, when he went to St. Louis, where he secured employment in the 
St. Louis Car and Wheel Company's works, in the pattern department. Re- 
turning to Springfield in 1893, he resumed work in the pattern department at 
the old shops, where he remained about a year, then went to Cincinnati, Ohio. 



992 GREENE COUXTY, MISSOURI. 

remaining in that city until 1909. when he returned to Springfield, at the 
opening of the new Frisco shops, where he has since been employed as mill 
and cabinet foreman, the duties of which important position he is discharg- 
ing in an eminently satisfactory manner, having a large number of men un- 
der him, whom he directs in such a manner as to get the best possible results 
and at the same time retain their good will. Me understands most thorough- 
ly every phase of the work in his department. 

Mr. Holden was married July 2. 1901, to Anna Moeller, in Dayton, Ohio. 
She was born in Cincinnati, that state, and is a daughter of August and Louisa 
( Bradermyer) Moeller. 

To our subject and wife one child has been born, Harry William Hol- 
den, whose birth occurred March 19, 1905. 

Politically, Mr. Holden is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Masonic blue lodge and the Junior Order of American Mechanics. He is a 
member of the Baptist church. 



JOHN MAXWELL COWAN. 

There is nothing in the world more beautiful than the spectacle ><i a life 
that has reached its late autumn with a harvest of good and useful deeds. 
It is like the forest in October days when the leaves have borrowed the richest 
colors of the light and glow in the mellowed sheen of the Indian summer, 
reflecting in their closing days all the radiance of their earthly existence. 
The man who has lived a clean, useful and self-denying life and has brought 
into potential exercise the best energies of his mind that he might make the 
world brighter and better for his being a part of it. while laboring for his 
individual advancement, cannot fail to enjoy a serenity of soul that reveals 
itself in his manner and conversation. When such a life is preserved in its 
strength and integrity so that even in age its influence continues unabated. 

it challenges the added admiration of those whose g 1 fortune it is to be 

brought 111 contact with it. Such a life has been that of John Maxwell 
Cowan, who has played no inconspicuous part in the affairs of Springfield 
and Greene county since he cast his lot in our midst over a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago. and now in the ninety-third year of a life that has been noted for 
its sterling honesty, industry and devotion to family, church and his country, 
he can look backward with no compunction of conscience for misdeeds and 
forward to the mystic Beyond with no fear. Such a life merits a record of 
its deeds, that the debt due it may be acknowledged, and that it may serve 
as a stimulus to others to endeavor to emulate it. But his record is too 
familiar to the people of the locality of which this history treats to require 




MRS. .inllX M. COWAN. 




JUDGE JOHN M. COWAN. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 993 

any fulsome encomium here, his life-work speaking for itself in stronger 
terms than the biographer could employ in polished periods. There is no 
doubt but that his long life has heen due to his conservative habits, whole- 
some living and pure thinking. He is hospitable and charitable, his many 
acts of kindness springing from his altruistic nature rather than from a desire 
tn win the praise of his fellow men. 

Air. Cowan springs from a sterling old family on both sides of the 
house, which may be traced back to the old Colonial days in American his- 
tory, ile was born December 6, [821. He enjoys two distinctions worthy 
of note, one is that he was the first white child born at Indianapolis, Indiana, 
and he is the oldest living graduate of Wabash College, one of the oldest and 
most important schools id" the Hoosier state. He is the only child of John 
and Anna I Maxwell) Cowan, and he is of pure Scotch ancestry and inherits 
the sturdy qualities of his forefathers who were all frontiersmen of Vir- 
ginia, in Colonial and Revolutionary time--, who helped blaze the trails into 
Kentucky and Tennessee. John Cowan was born in Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, in 171 >N, and at an early age went to Tennessee, locating at Knox- 
ville, where many of his family still live. ! ; nnn there he went to Charles- 
town, Indiana, and joined the army under Gen. William Henry Harrison, 
remaining in the service during the entire campaign against the Indians in 
tSii, taking part in the famous battle of Tippecanoe, November 9, 1811. 
He was a mounted ranger dining the war of r8l2. He was a son of Samuel 
and Ann 1 Walker ) Cowan, both natives of Virginia. Samuel Cowan was 
killed by the Indians while working in the harvest field, and his wife was 
taken prisoner the same day and held a captive many years, was finally ran- 
somed and returned to her home in Virginia. John Cowan married first, 
Margaret Weir, in Virginia, [769, and his second wife was Anna Maxwell, 
who was born in Albemarle county, Virginia, in 1781. They were married 
in Jefferson county. Indiana, December 30, 1819, and she died in Indiana, in 
1854, and he died in 1832 in Indiana. Anna Maxwell was a daughter of 
Bezaleel and Margaret (Anderson) Maxwell, the former born in Albemarle 
count}'. Virginia, in 1751. the latter born in Virginia in 1755; the)' were 
married in 1775: his death occurred in iN_>4. and she died in 1834. Bezaleel 
Maxwell was a son of John and Fannie (Garner) Maxwell, and Margaret 
Anderson was a daughter of John and Ann (Irwin) Anderson, the former 
born in Virginia in 17.23 and died in Kentucky in 1796. Ann Irwin was a 
daughter of Matliew and Elizabeth Irwin; the father died in .Augusta county, 
Virginia, in 17(12. John Maxwell, who was a son of Bezaleel and Rebecca 
( Boyd) Maxwell, became a captain in the Revolutionary war, and both he 
and his son fought at the great Indian battle of Point Pleasant. John Ander- 
son, mentioned above, was also a soldier in the war for independence and 
•63) 



994 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

these three men all fought in the battle of King's Mountain and other en- 
gagements. 

John M. Cowan, of this sketch, grew to manhood in Montgomery county, 
Indiana, where his parents removed soon after his birth, locating near Craw- 
fordsville, where he received his early education in the common schools, 
later attending Wabash College there, from which institution he was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1842 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, the degree 
of Master of Arts being conferred on him later by that college. As before 
stated he has been the oldest living graduate from that school for many years, 
it having been seventy-two years, more than the Psalmist's allotted life for 
a man, since our subject received his degree there. Deciding upon a legal 
career he then entered the law department of the University of Indiana, from 
which he was also graduated in 1845. Immediately thereafter he began 
practicing law at Frankfort, Clinton county. Indiana, and became one of the 
leading lawyers in western Indiana, enjoying an extensive and lucrative 
practice. He was judge of the eighth judicial circuit in Indiana for a period 
of twelve vears, the duties of which responsible position he discharged in 
a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satis- 
faction of all concerned, his long retention being sufficient criterion of his 
efficiency and popularity. His decisions were noted for their profound 
knowledge of the basic principles of jurisprudence and for an unbiased fair- 
ness to all parties concerned, and they seldom met reversal at the hands of 
higher tribunals. lie held this office from [858 until 1S70. Retiring from 
the bench he resumed the practice of law. entering into partnership with 
Thomas M. Patterson, who eventually became a United States senator from 
the state of Colorado. Subsequently our subject formed a partnership with 
lion. M. I). White and his second sun. James 1'. K. Cowan. He carried 
on his practice with greater success and popularity than ever until 1881, 
when he retired from the profession owing very largely to his wife's failing 
health, and he and his wife removed to Springfield, Missouri, in search of a 
better climate. Col. W. D. Crothers, an old-time friend, having settled in 
the Ozarks, which country he pronounced decidedly healthful, was instru- 
mental in bringing the Judge here. Soon thereafter, our subject purchased 
the old Murray farm, two miles south of Springfield, one of the finest and 
must desirable farms in dreene count}, and he became one of our largest 
agriculturists and stock men. In (889, Judge Cowan built an attractive city 
home on South Jefferson street, and he purchased The Springfield Repub- 
lican, which his two sons. James and William, edited and managed suc- 
cessfully for some time. The Judge was a pioneer in the development of 
Walnut street as a business center, which has rapidly gained on the other 
business centers during the past few years until it bids fair to soon surpass 
all competitors. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI.' 995 

Judge Cowan was married at Stockwell, Indiana, November 13, 1845, t0 
Harriet Doubleday Janney, who was born July 29, 1826, and was a daughter 
of Abel and Margaret (Porter) Janney. She was a descendant of a Quaker 
family of that name in Virginia, and her maternal ancestors were from the 
Porter family of Lancaster county. Pennsylvania and the Judahs of Switzer- 
land. Mrs. Cowan was a woman of strong intellect and many estimable 
characteristics. She was called to her eternal rest. June 28, 1905. 

To Judge Cowan and wife the following children were born: Edward 
Howard Cowan, born December 21, [846, was graduated from Wabash 
College. Crawfordsville, Indiana, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, later 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Miami Medical College; he 
married, November [3, 1877. Lucy L. Avars: they live at Crawfordsville, 
where he is a successful physician, and they have had two children, John 
Avars Cowan, horn August 11, 1880. died September 27, 189] ; Elizabeth L. 
Cowan, born June jr. 1884, is a teacher of domestic science in the high 
school at Crawfordsville. Indiana. James Porter Ellis Cowan, second son 
of the Judge, was born October 20, 1848; he received the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts and Master of Arts from Wabash College (was the first grandchild 
of that institution); he is a special pension examiner in Washington, I). C. 
lie married, first, Louana Burnett, January 30. 1N73, and to this union was 
born Harriet Janney Cowan, November 12, 1873. She married Lewis T. 
Gilliland, November T3, iqoo; they live in Portland, Oregon, and have one 
child, Maxwell Porter Gilliland, horn August [5, 1901. James P. E. Cowan's 
second marriage was on December 31, 1883, to Lalula R. Bennett, and to 
this union three children were born, Janet L. Cowan, horn July 7, 1885; 
Mary Bennett Cowan, horn July 20, [888; \nna J. Cowan, horn August 18, 
1891 : they all three live at Marietta, Ohio. Laura Anna Cowan, third child 
of Judge Cowan and wife, was born March 14, 1851, was educated at Glen- 
dale Female College in Ohio, lives in Springfield, Missouri, is a member of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution and Daughters of the War of 
1812: she married on February 16, 1876, Allen Trimble Blaine, who was 
born November 13. 1846, and died April 26, 1880. He was a soldier in the 
Seventy-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, later veteranized and was a 
member of the Twenty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry; to Mr. and Mrs. 
Blaine was born Mary Maxwell Blaine, October 3, 1877; she was graduated 
from Drury College with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1898, and 
Master of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania in 1900. She lives in 
New York City: was married February 14, 1906, to Rudyard S. Uzzell, 
who is an A. B. and a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity from 
the University of Denver; to Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard L T zzell two children 
have been born, William Cowan L T zzell, born January 14, 1910; and Rud- 
yard S. Uzzell, Jr., born June 26. 1912. John William Cowan, the youngest 



996 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

child of the Judge and wife, was horn October 6. 1853, is unmarried and lives 
in Springfield, Missouri. 

Judge Cowan was formerly a strong Whig and later just as strong a 
Republican. He has been a life-long Presbyterian. He is a member of 
the Society of Colonial Wars, and is a member of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. -Although past his four score years he is hale and hearty and 
as active as many men at fifty. He is a grand character and is beloved by 
all who know him. 



ROWAN E. M. MACK. 



Another of the successful business men of Springfield who is a native of 
Greene county, where he has been content to spend his life, is Rowan E. M. 
Mack, well known groceryman. Much of his active life has been spent in 
agricultural pursuits, alternated with the grocery business, and in each he 
has made a pronounced success, owing to his willingness to closely apply him- 
self to his affairs, lead an honest life and depend upon himself rather than 
waiting for others to assist him or for fate, to provide for him. 

Mr. Mack was born in this county. May 11, 1865. He is a son of Wil- 
liam L. ami \rmenta (Dew) Mack. The father was born in Tennessee in 
[832, and the mother's birth occurred in that state in 1836. They were 
brought to Greene count}-. Missouri, by their parents in the early forties and 
here they grew up. attended school and were married. William L. Mack 
was by nature a fine penman and was a well read man for his day and gen- 
eration and was influential in his community. His earlier life was devoted 
to farming and stock raising, but he quit the farm upon being appointed dep- 
uty sheriff under Jack Potter, and removed lii- family to Springfield. Later 
he served as deputy under Probate Judge W. A. Lincoln for a period of eight 
years. He gave entire satisfaction in both these positions. He was always 
a strong Republican in his political affiliations, Ill- family consisted of six 
children, four of whom are living at this writing, namely: Maude E. is de- 
ceased; lona i- deceased; Rowan E. M., of this sketch: Caddy S., IMward 
W. and Lilly. 

Rowan E. M. Mack is an excellent example of a -elf-made man. He re- 
ceived only about six months' schooling, but he has made up for this lack of 
early training by wide home study, and is now a well informed man. He as- 
sisted hi- father with the general work on the farm when he was a boy, be- 
ing eighteen years old when he removed to Springfield. Here he worked in 
various stores, in each of which he sought to learn something of what was 
going on about him, so when he was only twenty years of age he was en- 
abled to launch out in the grocery business for himself, in a location at the 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 997 

corner of South and Walnut streets. However, after five years in this line 
he decided to return to farming, and for five years tilled the soil near this 
city, then came back to Springfield and engaged in the grocery business five 
years, after which he engaged in farming again for four years. On Febru- 
ary 28, 1904. he opened a grocer\ store at his present location, corner of 
High and Grant streets, and the fact that he has remained here ten years in- 
dicates that he has been successful and has enjoyed a good trade all the while. 
He has a well arranged and neat store and carries a large stock of Staple and 
fancy groceries, also a large line of teed. 

.Mr. .Mack was married <>\i July _'4. 1800, in Springfield, to Norma E. 
Dutton, a daughter of H. J. and Louise ( Brinsdon ) Dutton. She was born 
in Cedar county. Missouri. June 22, 1N71. Her father was one of the early- 
day merchants in Springfield. 

Seven children, all living, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mack, name- 
ly: Lester 11., born June _>o. [891, married on February 28, 1014. to Leone 
A. I'arnitter; Lundy A., born December 9, [892; Harvey K., born Septem- 
ber 31, 1895; Carl R., born June 30, 1898; Edith L. bom September jo. 
1901; Elva M., born February 1, [904, and Ernest T., born November 4, 
1 906. 

Mr. Alack owns his store building and also a comfortable and substan- 
tial home nearby. lie also owns three farms, two of which arc located in 
Polk county, the other in Greene. His farms in Polk county consist of three 
hundred and twenty acres, which he is maintaining as stock I arms. 

Politically, he is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen, the Modern Brotherhood and the Knights and Ladies of Security. 
He and his wife are members of Woodland Heights Presbyterian church. 



EDWARD SWAYZEE FINCH. 

One of Greene county's well known and successful business men is Ed- 
ward Swavzee Finch, manager of the Metropolitan Hotel, Springfield, for 
a decade in its early history, later operator of a large farm and now conduct- 
ing a big store in Ash Grove. His earlier history in the wild West reads 
like an adventure story and as a soldier in the war between the states he 
proved himself a man of courage, but like thousands of his comrades he 
has laid aside all animosity. For in the fulness of time there has been 
blotted from the bosoms of men all sentiment toward men of another sec- 
tion. No longer do we measure prejudice by the metes and bounds of a 
river of imaginary lines. Those who fought and won. and those who fought 



99§ GREENE COUNTY; MISSOURI. 

and lost have mutual admiration for the courage and patriotism of the other. 
The very issues of the contest have almost passed from memory. Today 
one can not tell whether the boy who wears the uniform of a united country 
came from a sire who wore the blue or the gray. In these uncertain days, 
when there are rumors of war. there is no question as to who will do his 
duty when the clouds have lowered and the reign of death begins. There 
is no suspicion in the minds of men that any one section of our land will 
sulk, but from every point of the compass will come the men of stout 
hearts and ringing patriotism to redeem from insult the common banner of 
a common people. 

Mr. Finch was born in Columbus, Ohio, February 2, 1849. He is a son 
of Wallace M. and Martha (Comstock) Finch. Wallace M. Finch was 
born in Maryland in 1820, and was a son of Mathew Finch and wife. 
Mathew Finch was also a native of Maryland but removed from there to 
New York where he followed contracting until his death. He was a captain 
during the war of 1812, and his father was a captain in the Revolutionary 
war. When a young man Wallace M. Finch went to Chillicothe, Ohio, and 
began in the mercantile business in a small way, later establishing himself in 
Columbus, where he became a very successful wholesale merchant. He re- 
tired from business on account of ill health in 1857 and until his death spent 
his winters in the South and summers in the North. His death occurred in 
1863. Politically he was a Whig and during the last few years of his life 
a Republican. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Episcopal church. He and Martha Comstock were married 
about 1845. She was born in 1X26 in Columbus, Ohio, and died in 1903. 

Edward S. Finch left Columbus, Ohio, when seven years of age. He 
received common school education and later was a student at Racine Col- 
lege, Racine. Wisconsin. In December. 1863, he enlisted in Company I, 
Second Wisconsin Cavalry, and saw considerable hard service in the South, 
proving to be a courageous and gallant soldier. He was wounded in the 
battle of Black River in the right arm. and later was again wounded in the 
same place while on patrol duty. He was honorably discharged in August, 
1865. After the war he attended a commercial school for some time, then 
went to Richmond, Indiana, where he worked in the office of a wholesale 
grocery company as shipping clerk, also salesman. He then went to Mexico, 
Missouri, where he engaged in the grocery business in 1872-3. then came 
to Springfield, this state, where he worked as clerk in the Metropolitan 
Hotel tor six months, then spent five years on the western frontier as a 
miner, prospector, stage-driver anil lie was the first sheriff of Ouray county, 
Colorado, when it required a man of nerve, tact and courage to fill such an 
office. He had many thrilling and interesting experiences (hiring his career 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 999 

in the West. He came back to Springfield in the spring of 1879, his mother 
having purchased a two-thirds interest in the Metropolitan Hotel, our sub- 
ject later purchasing the remaining third. The hotel building he operated 
successfully for a period of ten years, during which it was one of the most 
popular and best appointed hostelries in southwest Missouri. In 1889 ne 
left the hotel and engaged in the real estate business, and to him and others 
is due the credit of opening the Pickwick addition and securing the Elm 
street car line and also the Old Normal School. And for many years he 
was identified with every movement for the upbuilding of Springfield and 
a large contributor to the same. In 1896 he traded his interests in Spring- 
field for the old Gates farm, Greene county, and engaged in general agri- 
cultural pursuits nn a large scale until K)i4 when he purchased the Smith 
Brothers' store in Ash Grove which he is now conducting and is enjoying 
a large trade. He carries a complete line of merchandise, everything found 
in an up-to-date store of this kind. By his fair dealings and courtesy he has 
not only retained the customers which the store formerly had but is securing 
new ones constantly. He employs a number of capable assistants, and his 
store would be a credit to cities much larger than Ash Grove He was one of 
the ten men who signed the guaranty that brought the "Gulf shops" to 
Springfield. 

Mr. Finch was married on October 26, 1889, to Brella Sherwood, who 
was born in Springfield, Missouri. She received a good education. She is 
a daughter of Judge T. A. and Mary E. (Young) Sherwood, one of the 
prominent old families of Greene county. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Finch six children have been born, namely : Mary, 
wife of \\". A. Hennington, lives in Springfield; Martha, who is a stenographer 
and student in the State Normal school at Springfield; Florence is at home; 
Constance is also a student in the State Normal; Elenore and Adele are 
both at home. 

Politically. Mr. Finch is a Democrat. He belongs to Capt. John Mat- 
thews post. Grand Army of the Republic at Springfield. Religiously, he is 
an Episcopalian. He is one of the active and prominent Masons in this part 
of the state. He was made a Master Mason in 1881 in Solomon Lodge, and 
has now demited to the Ash Grove Lodge. He is a member of the Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, and St. John's Commandery No. 20, Knights Templar, 
■of which he was captain general for ten years, then was eminent commander 
for some time and again became captain general. He also belongs to Abou 
Ben Adhem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
and at this writing is captain of patrol and has been for ten years. By his 
daily life he seems to strive, in an unobtrusive manner, to inculcate the 
sublime principles of Masonry, and his example as a man and citizen might 
well be emulated by the vouth whose characters are vet in the making. 



I COO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

WILLIAM McKERALL. 

The annals of Greene county do not present to the historian a name 
mure worthy of laudation than that of the late William McKerall, a hue 
type of the old-time chivalrous Southern gentleman, one of the largest land 
owners of this county for many years and in his earlier career a lawyer of 
distinction and a soldier of talent, having been a West Point product and 
an officer in the Mexican war. His life was one of hard study and un- 
selfish industry, whose laborious professional duties in the various relations 
in which he was placed, led to a high position in the esteem of the public, 
which gave evidence that the qualities which he possessed afforded the means 
of distinction under a system of government in which places of honor and 
usefulness are open to all who may be found worthy of them, lie passed 
over the troubled sea of life like a galleon through the phosphorescent Spanish 
Main, leaving in its wake a pathway of illuminating radiance. 

Mr. McKerall was born in Orange county, North Carolina, lune 17, 
[824. He was a sun of John Wilson McKerall and Lorena McKerall. a 
prominent old family of the Carolinas. The father of our subject was born 
at Norfolk, Virginia, in 1771. His father was a Scotch sailor and was lost 
at sea. I luring John McKerall's early life, his folks moved to North Caro- 
lina and his mother was married to a man by the name of Childs. While 
Mr. McKerall was in Tennessee attending to business, the children of his 
mother's second marriage, influenced his creditor- to push their claims, 
which they did. and John McKerall lost bis entire estate, lie was a lawyer 
but gave up bis practice late in life and was recorder in Orange county. 
North Carolina. He was commander of a company in the War of 1812. 
His sister was the wife of one of the governors of North Carolina. Tohn 
McKerall died of apoplexy in 1834 on the way from bis borne to bis office 
in Hillsboro. 

Our subjecl grew to manhood and attended school in Orange county, 
North Carolina. When sixteen years of age he entered West Point Mili- 
tary Academy and was in the same class with Winfield S. Hancock, who 
became a famous general and was called the "hero of Gettysburg." Owing 
to failing health, our subject was compelled to leave West Point before 
he finished the course. He returned to his home in North Carolina and 
later entered Caldwell Institute. When the Mexican war began, he en- 
listed as a volunteer and was elected first lieutenant of Company E, in a 
North Carolina regiment. Later he was promoted to captain. On one 
occasion he commanded a detachment on escort and conducted a supply 
train one hundred and eighty miles without loss or mishap. He was a most 
capable and faithful officer, trusted and admired alike by bis men and' 




WILLIAM ill KEKALL, Deceased. 




MARY A. McKERALL. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. [CO] 

superior officers. He was honorably discharged at Old Point Comfort, 
Virginia. He then took up the study of law and settled in Louisiana, and 
practiced his profession in Texas for some time, moving to Waco in 1854. 
After a successful career at the bar, lie engaged in merchandising and raising 
cattle on a large scale. The same year he was appointed to till an unexpired 
term as chief justice of McLennan county, Texas. He discharged his judicial 
duties in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent 
satisfaction of all concerned. 

Our subject was married twice, his first wife being a Miss Sedbury 
and tn their union two children were horn, Nannie and William. In the 
summer of 1868 he came to Greene county, Missouri, and married Mrs. 
Alary Roan (Danforth) Campbell, widow of Capt. John Al. Campbell. She 
was horn February 22, 1838, and was reared and educated in Greene county. 
She was the daughter of J. F. and Latitia Danforth. Her first husband, 
1 apt. John Al. Campbell, was burn in Springfield, November 17, 1832. 
When fifteen years old, he joined the Cnited Stales army when the Mexican 
war began and served in that conflict with credit, taking part in a number 
■ if engagements, His father was also a soldier in that war, at the close 
of which, the latter was made bearer of dispatches to Washington City. The 
< 'ampbells were honorably discharged al the close of the war. Five children 
were burn to Mis- William Mekerall by her marriage with Captain Camp- 
bell, namely: Louisa. Argyle and John, all deceased; Finley lives in Cali- 
fornia; ami Airs. Mary Schaffer lives in New Mexico. 

In the union of our subject and wife, four children were born, Josiah 
Danforth is living in Greene county; Fannie Elizabeth, widow of Thos. 
Jackson Bennett, who died November 8, 1013. lie was a native of Dallas 
county ami was a farmer and capitalist. Airs. Bennett is living on the 
homestead with her mother. Daisy is the wife of Jei O'Kino, to whom 
she was married December 19, 1913.. He is a graduate of the Imperial 
University of Tokio and is a gentleman of rare ability. Airs. O'Kino is 
also making her home with her mother; and John Wilson, who is the 
youngest of the family. After the marriage of our subject and wife, they 
settled 011 land inherited by Airs. McKerall, northeast of Springfield. Air. 
McKerall prospered as a general farmer and stockman and at one time 
owned seven hundred acres of valuable land in this county and for vears 
ranked among our most progressive men of affairs and influential and 
honored citizens. The house in which the widow and her two daughters 
reside was built in 1849 and is of the Colonial type. 

Politically, William ATcKerall was a Democrat. He was a member of 
the Alasonic Order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He be- 
longed to the Methodist Episcopal church. Personally, lie was a scholarly,, 
broad-minded, gentleman of never-failing courtesy. 



1002 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

LEMUEL C. RICKETTS. 

In pioneer days when farming implements and machinery were of 
the crudest kind, requiring a goodly supply of both muscle and grit to 
use them to advantage, brawn, more than brains, was needed in the business 
of farming, in order to rescue the fertile soils from the wilderness of forest 
and prairie growth. In these modern days of worn and worn-out soils and 
the abandoned farm, with the most improved labor-saving farm machinery, 
the business of farming needs brains more than brawn, that our soils may 
be rescued from the wilderness and desert or wasted fertility that has stifled 
and depleted them. One of the farmers of Jackson township, Greene 
county, who is evidently intelligently applying himself to his vocation, is 
Lemuel C. Ricketts, who not only uses his brains, but is a hard worker with 
his hands, and therefore has succeeded. 

Mr. Ricketts was born in Fairfield count}, ( >hio, November 3, 1873. He 
is a son of Jesse M. B. and Othelia (Chaney) Ricketts, both natives of that 
county and state also, each born near the town of Carroll, the father's birth 
having occurred in 1819. There they spent their earlier years and attended 
the common schools. Jesse M. B. Ricketts also went to school in Columbus. 
Ohio, studied law. and later practiced his profession at Einley and Lan- 
caster, that state, with success. He retired from his professional life at 
the age of sixty-five years, and moved to a farm in Greene county, Missouri, 
his place here consisting of eighty acres. His death occurred in Colorado 
at the advanced age of eighty years. His family consisted of three children. 
namely: Mary Ella, deceased; Lemuel C, of this sketch; Airs. Viola M. 
Russell lives in Billings, .Montana. 

Lemuel ( '. Ricketts was reared in Ohio. lie was thirteen years of age 
when he removed with the family to Greene county, .Missouri. He received 
a good education, lie hired out most of the time until he was twenty-one 
years old. In [897 he went to the West, where he worked for some time 
as a contractor, returning to Greene county in 0,07- Scum thereafter he 
purchased the farm of two hundred and twenty acres where he now lives, 
He has a well-improved and productive place, which gives every indication 
of good management. lie has been very successful in a business way and 
is one of the substantial and influential citizens id" this section of the county. 
He is president of the Hank of Stafford, which he helped to organize and 
which, under his able and judicious management, has become one of the 
popular and sound banking institutions of this part of the state. He has 
been president since its organization. It has had a constant and satisfactory 
growth and a general banking business is carried on. He has built an attrac- 
tive home on his farm. This place was settled in 1S45 by F.rskin Danforth. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOO3 

Mr. Ricketts was married, January 6, 1899, to Estella Palmer, who was 
born in Wisconsin, August 19, 1N70. She is a daughter of Randolph and 
Marira (Dearth) Palmer. She spent her early life in Iowa, Kansas, Ar- 
kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri. She received a common school educa- 
tion. 

The father of Mrs. Ricketts was a soldier in the Civil war, having 
enlisted in Company D, Sixty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and he 
served in the Georgia campaign under General Sherman, with whom he 
marched to the sea. Pie is now living in Joplin, .Missouri. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ricketts. namely: Hugh, 
born October 25, 1899, lives at home: Lemuel E., born October 29, 1901, 
died October 20, 1908; Jesse Paul, born January 17. 1905, is at home: 
Arthur P., born July 6, 1907, is at home; Helen May, born August 7, 1910, 
is at home: Ralph Randolph, born July 4. 1912. died March 3, 1915. 

Politically, Mr. Ricketts is a Republican. Fraternally, he is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



TIMOTHY J. WRIGHTSMAN. 

"Through struggle to triumph" seems to be the maxim which holds swav 
with the majority of people, that is, those who attain to a successful goal at 
all, must find it after arduous effort. And, though it is undoubtedly true that 
many fall exhausted in the conflict, a few, by their inherent force of character 
and strong mentality, rise above their environment, and all which seems to 
hinder them, until they reach the plane of affluence toward which their face 
was set through the long years of struggle that must necessarily precede any 
accomplishment of great magnitude. Such has been the history, briefly stated, 
of Timothy J. Wrightsman, one of Greene county's pioneer business men 
and Civil war veterans, who, after a long, busy and useful life, is living in 
honorable retirement in his attractive home in Springfield, spending the De- 
cember of his years in quiet, as he is now in his seventy-seventh year. 

Mr. Wrightsman is the scion of an old Southern familv and hails from 
the Old Dominion, "the mother of Presidents." his birth having occurred in 
Roanoke, Virginia, November 13, 1838. He is a son of Joseph and Kesia 
(Beckner) Wrightsman, both natives of Virginia, also, the father's birth hav- 
ing occurred in 1808, and the mother was born there in 181 8. They grew 
to maturity in their native state, attended the early-day schools and were mar- 
ried there, and devoted their lives to agricultural pursuits, and the father was 
also a cabinet maker by trade, and made a great deal of fine furniture in his 
early life, thereby getting his start in the business world. He remained in 



!' :| GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Virginia until about [849, when he removed hi> family to Illinois, remaining 
in that state until the year 1857. when he brought his family overland to 
Greene county, Missouri, locating a few miles south of Springfield, where he 
spent the rest of his life in farming and was drowned in a small creek in that 
vicinity in January, 1883. His wife had preceded him to the grave twenty 
years, having died in [863, in Illinois. To these parents ten children were 
horn. six of whom are still living, namely: Sarah and Julia are both de- 
ceased; Timothy J., of this sketch; Ann lives in Ozark, Missouri; Lear is de- 
ceased: George lives in Florida; Abbie lives in Webb City, .Missouri: Susan 
lives in Kansas; Rebecca lives in Rich Hill, Missouri, and Edward is deceased. 

The Wrightsman family is of German descent, the paternal grandfather 
of our subject, Alexander Wrightsman, being born in Germany, from which 
country he emigrated to the United States in Colonial days and located in 
Virginia, where he became well established through his industry. lie was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war, taking part in a number of the principal 
engagements. 

Timothy |. Wrightsman was nine years old when his parents removed 
from Virginia to Illinois, and there he grew to manhood, living there for a 
period of eight years, when he removed with his father and the rest of the 
children to Greene county, .Missouri, in [857, since winch time he has been a 
resident of this locality, ami during that period of nearly sixty years he has 
seen great changes "come over the face of the land." the forests changed into 
productive farms, the wild prairies reclaimed on which peaceful herds now 
graze, and small villages grow into cities of wealth anil renown. In his hoy- 
hood days h( worked hard on the farm, and attended the rural schools, receiv- 
ing a limited education, hi 1 S75 he began operating a flouring mill at Wal- 
nut Grove, Greene county, which he continued for four years, then ran a 
grocery store at Shell City, Missouri, for four years, then, in the fall of 
[883, he came to Spring.field and engaged in the grocery business on East 
I ommercial street, continuing this line tl en for a period of twenty-six years. 
during which time he enjoyed a large and lucrative trade, ranking among the 
best known and most popular grocers on the north side, lie always carried 
a large and well selected stock of fancy and staple groceries and dealt honestly 
and courteously with his hundreds of customers, retaining their confidence 
and good will to the last. He accumulated a comfortable competency through 
his judicious Inismcss management and retired from active life in 1003. since 
which time he has been living a quiet life, merely looking after his various 
real estate holdings. He has a line residence on North Campbell street. 

Mr. Wrightsman served three years during the Civil war in Company 
E, Third Missouri Cavalry, Confederate army, under Captain Thompson. 
He first served under old "Dick" Campbell, having enlisted in the fall of 
1861. .He saw considerable hard service, including the battle of Pea Ridge, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOO5 

his first real engagement, lie did not participate in the battle of Wilson's 
(reek, being held a prisoner in Springfield by the Federals at that time. 

Mr. Wrightsman was married on January 1 1, 1870. in Christian county. 
Missouri, to Mildred Chestnut, a daughter of Judge Chestnut, one of the 
first judges of that county. He and his wife were natives of Ohio, from 
which they removed to Taney county, this state, in [833, and were therefore 
early pioneers of the Ozark region. James Chestnut, brother of Mrs. 
Wrightsman, was the first man killed in Christian county, on account of the 
Civil war, he having been murdered by bushwhackers, while serving as 
deputy sheriff. 

Five children have been horn to Mr. and Mrs. Wright-man. namely: 
Fred, horn in 1871, is a freight conductor on the Frisco, and lives in Spring- 
field: Walter, horn in 1873. lives in Texas and is employed by the Dean 
Drug Company; Frank, horn in 1S70, lives in Oklahoma; Herbert, horn in 
1878, lives in Monett, Missouri; Cora F... horn in 1880, is the wife of S. 
O. Duemler, and they reside in Springfield. 

Politically, Mr. Wrightsman is a Republican, hut he has never been 
active in public affairs, preferring to leave the troubles of public office to 
others, merely striving to do his duty as a fair-minded citizen. 



CALVIN FURROW 7 . 



The varied, interesting and often exciting experiences of Calvin Fur- 
row, would make a fair-sized volume should they he told in detail by some 
of our writers of Western adventure stones. Out of all these experiences 
he received much good, such as an accurate knowledge of the world, courage 
to fight life's battles, and coolness as well as decision, which a man had to 
possess in order to survive if lie lived in the wild West forty or fifty years 
ago; but unfortunately space forbids us giving more than a brief resume 
of his unusual life record within the pages of the present volume. 

Mr. Furrow was born in Folk county, Iowa. August 15, 1848. He is a 
son of John and Lydia (Johnson) Furrow. In those pioneer days in Iowa 
educational advantages were limited and young Furrow was not permitted, 
under the circumstances to obtain the text-book learning that he otherwise 
would have been glad to have embraced. He grew to manhood on the farm 
and spent his early youth engaged in farming and handling live stock, later 
taking up farming in Kansas; but not long thereafter went on to Fort Sill, 
Indian Territory (as the eastern part of Oklahoma was then known), and 
from there went on to New Mexico, finally located in FT. Worth, Texas, 
in which vicinity he worked as a cowboy until 1871, then returned to Iowa 



1006 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and for ten years was in the employ of the Wabash railroad. We next find 
him in the Black Hills of South Dakota, where he engaged in mining for 
awhile, but his principal work there was as a cowboy. He remained in that 
picturesque country for a period of over twenty-five years. Leaving the 
Black Hills country in 1906 he came to Greene county, Missouri, and has 
since been successfully engaged in farming, making his home in Boone town- 
ship. He owns eighty acres in Greene county and one hundred and twenty 
acres in Wright county, all well improved and valuable land, and he is re- 
garded as one of the best farmers in this section of the county and is well 
fixed in the way of worldly goods. 

Mr. Furrow was married in December, 1868, to Martha E. Kensler, a 
native of Fulton county, Indiana, and a daughter of John and Louisa Kens- 
ler. She was born on June 22, 1851. She was a member of the Christian 
church at Ash Grove. Mrs. Furrow died September 20, 1914. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Furrow one child was born, Louisa Furrow, who 
was burn in the central part of Iowa on March 24, 1879. She received a 
good education, and in the year 1901 was married to Marion Arment, and 
they now reside in Sand Hills, Nebraska. 

Politically, .Mr. Furrow is a Democrat, but he has never sought politi- 
cal honors, although not lacking in proper patriotism. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Masonic Order, including the Blue Lodge, and the Ash Grove 
Lodge No 124, Royal Arch Masons, and is active in this order. 



EDWIN WIGGINS ELSON. 

In the person of Edwin Wiggins Elson, Greene county has a farmer and 
stockman of ideas of such a progressive nature that his methods might well 
be studied by the younger generation of agriculturists, for his fine farm in 
Boone township has lYu equals as to improvement and high state of culti- 
vation, lie has been a resident of this locality for more than thirty-five 
years, during which time he lias advanced by his own labors and sagacious 
plans from a comparatively modest beginning to a position in the front rank 
of agriculturists in the Ozark region, and in matters pertaining to the wel- 
fare of his township, county and state, he is deeply interested, and his 
efforts in behalf of the general progress have been far-reaching and bene- 
ficial. 

Mr. Elson was burn in Stark county, Ohio, April 8, 1850. He is a 
son of John H. and Osee (Wilson) Elson. The father was born in Brooke 
county, West Virginia, October 14. 1806, and was a son of Capt. John R. 
and Margaret (Wiggins) Elson. Captain Elson was also born in what 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOO7 

is now Brooke county. West Virginia, but which at that time was a part 
of Virginia proper — 1769. He was a son of Richard Elson, who was born 
in Scotland, from which country he emigrated to Virginia in Colonial times, 
and there entered four hundred acres of government land, taking up a 
"tomahawk claim," which he cleared and placed under cultivation and on 
which he spent the rest of his life, and there reared his family of four 
sons and three daughters. Capt. John R. Elson served in the War of [812, 
also in the Indian wars with a most creditable record. His death occurred 
in 1820 in Starke county. Ohio, where the family removed a few years 
before his death. His widow survived until 1N47. John 11. Elson, father 
of the subject of this review, when twelve years of age, moved to Starke 
county, Ohio, where he engaged in farming the rest of his life, dying in 
1898. He and the mother of our subject were married in [833. She was 

horn May 15. 1815, and received a g 1 education, being a wide reader, 

and her death occurred in 1894. They wire people of intelligence, industry, 
hospitality and popular among their neighbors. 

Edwin W. Elson was reared on the home farm, where he worked when 
a boy. He received a good education in the public schools and .Mt. Union 
College at Alliance, Ohio, after which he turned his attention to general 
farming in Ohio, where he remained until 1N7N, getting a good start in the 
meanwhile, and in that year came to Greene county, .Missouri, where his 
brother, William P. Elson. (a sketch of whom appears on another page of 
this work) had preceded him shortly after the close of the Civil war. 
Upon reaching his new locality our subject bought a farm of one hundred 
anil sixtv acres in Boone township and was soon actively engaged in general 
farming and stock raising, and, prospering with advancing years by his 
close application and good management, he has added to his original holdings 
until he now owns six hundred and forty acres of productive and highly 
improved land, all under cultivation, constituting one of the most valuable 
and desirable farms in this section of the state. He has an attractive and 
commodious home in the midst of pleasing surroundings, and nearby may 
also be seen a group of convenient outbuildings. He is an excellent judge 
of all kinds of live stock, and is one of the best known stockmen in the 
western part of the county. He makes a specialty of jacks and Percheron 
horses, and at present owns seven jacks and one Percheron registered. His 
animal sales will average twenty mules, and he has now sixty mules on 
hand and ten brood mares. He also feeds large numbers of hogs for the 
market, and each year sows a vast acreage of wheat. 

Mr. Elson was married January 29, 1880, to Mary Belle Jones, who was. 
born in Greene county. Missouri. August 31, i860, and here she grew to 
womanhood and received her education. She was a daughter of Benjamin 
G W. and Kittura (Cossey) Jones. The father was horn in Tennessee, 



I008 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

February 26, 1822, and died in this county July 2j, 1898. Mrs. Elson's 
mother was born in Indiana, and also died in this county. The father was 
a farmer all his life. This union was blessed with thirteen children, six 
of whom are still living. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Elson nine children have been born, named as fol- 
lows: Benjamin F.. born February 20, 1881. is farming in Walnut Grove 
township, this county; Edna Myrtle, born February 28, 1883. died when 
three months old: Thomas E., born June 8. 1884: Nora, born June 12. 1886, 
is the wife of William Marsh, and they live in Fair Play, Missouri; Sher- 
man, born April 5, 1888. is farming in this township; Joshua C. born 
August 7, 1890; Mae, born December 2, [893; Ruth, born August 24, 1897; 
and Helen, born December 2, 1900. The younger children are at home. 

Politically. Mr. Elson is a Republican and has been more or less active 
in local political affairs. He has been school director in his district for 
about thirty years. Religiously, the family attend the Methodist church. 
Among those in whose midst he has so long resided he is held in the 
highest esteem by reason of his public-spirit, his upright life and his obliging 
and neighborly disposition. 



SAMPSON 1! \SS. 



One of the oldest pioneers of Greene county is Sampson Bass, one of 
the best-known citizens and substantial farmers of Jackson township, who 
has Spent nearly all of his long life of eighty-seven years in this county, 
which he has seen come up to its present position from the wilderness where 
roamed the red man and wild beast and where very few white people were 
t'> he found. To all this change lie has been an interested and by it> means 
a passive spectator, having sought t" d his full share in the work of progress 
in the locality where he has been contented to abide through many decade-, 
lie talks most interestingl) of the early days when customs and manners 
were different, men and women were different — everything, in fact, unlike 
what our civilization is today, lie and other earl) settle;- are of the opinion 
that thos ( - were better, at least happier, times than now, and this is. in the 
main, true, lie might well he compared with the character represented by 
the American poet, Oliver Wendell Holmes, in hi- beautiful lines. "The Last 
Leaf." for Mr. Pass ha- lived to see his early acquaintances and friends 
perform 'heir allotted acts in the local drama of civilization and then pass 
hi to rest, coming down to us from a former generation. 

Air. I'.ass was born in Marion county. Tennessee, on December 8. 1827. 
lie i- a si in ot Andrew- and Ellen 1 Smith I Bass. The father was a native 




SAMPSON BASS. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOO9 

of Georgia, from where he removed to North Carolina, thence to Tennessee 
when a small boy, and he grew to manhood in the last named state on a 
farm, and there received a limited education. He emigrated with his family 
td Missouri in 1830 and, by mistake, settled on land belonging to the Indians, 
who subsequently drove him off and he settled in Greene county in the fall 
of 1830, securing eighty acres at first. He started with practically nothing 
in this state, but being a man of exceptional ability, he became wealthy for 
those times and owned fourteen hundred and forty acres of land at the time 
of his death, having acquired his property by hard work and good manage- 
ment, and he died in 1867 on the place where our subject now lives. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife was a native 
of Marion county, Tennessee, and there grew up on a farm, received a limited 
schooling and there she married Mr. Bass. She was a pioneer woman in 
every respect, working hard assisting her husband to get a start in the wilder- 
ness, spinning and weaving, molding candles, making soap and the thousand 
and one things about the house, of which the modern woman knows nothing 
except by tradition. She was also a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Her death occurred on the homestead here in 1862. To these 
parents fourteen children were born, namely : Sampson, our subject, is the 
oldest; John, Henderson, Jackson and James are all deceased, Martin V. 
lives in Greene county, Newton, McCord and Leonard H. are deceased, Lila 
lives in Polk county, Missouri: Leda, deceased; Narcissus, deceased: Mar- 
garet is living in Greene county; Ellen also lives in this county. 

Mr. Bass, of this sketch, was three years old when his parents brought 
him to Missouri and he was reared in Greene county and here received such 
limited educational advantages as those early times afforded. He worked 
hard assisting his father clear and develop the home farm, remaining under 
the parental roof tree until he was twenty-one years old, when, in 1849, he 
married Ann Rogers, who was born in Tennessee on October 11, 1830, from 
which state her parents brought her to Greene county, Missouri, when she 
was a child, and here she grew to womanhood. Her death occurred in 
1866. Mr. Bass married a second time, in 1888, to Eliza Lowder. who 
was born in Greene county, Missouri, October 8, 1850, a daughter of George 
H. and Juda (McCall) Lowder. She is a member of the Baptist church, 
as was also Mr. Bass' first wife. To the first union nine children were born, 
namely: Elizabeth, deceased; Jane. Polly, Riley, Sampson H., Jr., deceased; 
Dave J., deceased; the three youngest children died in infancy. To Mr. 
Bass' second union two children were born, Roy and Wright. 

After his first marriage Mr. Bass went to work as a wagon maker, later 
bought forty acres. His father then gave him eighty acres, and later he 
(64) 



lOIO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

entered forty acres. He worked hard and managed well and therefore pros- 
pered with advancing years. He continued to buy land until he accumulated 
seven hundred acres, constituting one of the finest farms in the county, which 
land he placed under an excellent state of improvement and cultivation and 
established a commodious home. In i860 there was no mill in this part of 
the county and one was badly needed, so Mr. Bass invited his neighbors to 
his home on Christmas day of that year for the purpose of talking over a 
proposition to establish a mill in the neighborhood. It finally devolved 
upon Mr. Bass to build a mill in section 15, Jackson township, and for years 
he carried on a large and successful business with his combined flour and 
sawmill, sawing lumber for residents in adjoining counties, as well as for 
those who lived in Greene. This was in i860 and was the first steam mill 
to be operated in Greene county. During the Civil war he ground flour for 
the armies in this part of the state. He sold his mill in 1866 and resumed 
farming. The town of Bassville in this township was named for our subject. 
Politically Mr. Bass is an uncompromising Democrat. He is a member 
of the Masonic Order, and religiously belongs to the Baptist church. 



WILBUR M. FALLIN. 



The Missouri mule has a reputation throughout the world. That repu- 
tation in some sections is not the kind that would be pleasing to him if he 
but knew, for there are times when he is unruly, stubborn and inclined to 
show his displeasure by means of his heels. But nevertheless, when it 
comes to quality and line points in his anatomy he is nut excelled on the 
globe and he has done much to advertise the "Show Me" state abroad. 
There are few foreign armies where he is not found, and nearly every war 
of importance increases his demand. However, by nature he is not a war- 
rior and no doubt prefers the peaceful plantations and the lazy negro 
drivers of the cotton and cane districts of the South, where, for three- 
quarters of a century these animals have been sold in ever increasing num- 
bers. Throughout this state men may be found who devote their exclusive 
attention to dealing in mules, finding it a desirable and profitable business. 
Among these the linn of Fallin Brothers of Springfield, composed of 
Wilbur M. and Walter A. Fallin, is the best known in southwestern Mis- 
souri, and is one of the oldesl and most successful. 

Wilbur M. Fallin was bom March 31, [872, in Greene county. Missouri. 
He is a son of Joseph S. and Polina (Reed) Fallin. The father was born 
in middle Tennessee in 1841, and there grew to manhood and attended 
school, emigrating to Greene county, Missouri, in the early sixties, where he 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. IOII 

established the future home of the family, and here his death occurred on 
March 26, 1909. He was a stone mason by trade, but devoted most of his 
life to general farming and stock raising. He left his farm in 1884 and 
moved to Springfield. His wife was born in 1843, and she died in 1877. 
They were married in Arkansas. To this union five children were born, 
namely: Anna died about 1889; Minnie lives in Springfield, Missouri; 
Wilbur M., of this sketch; Emma Belle lives in Springfield; Walter A M 
who is a member of the firm of Fallin Brothers. 

Wilbur M. Fallin received his education in the ward and high schools 
of Springfield. He had an inclination toward the livestock business when 
very young and began his career by buying and selling hogs and calves. 
He also learned the trade of stone mason under his father, but did not 
follow this long until he returned to the livestock business and also engaged 
in farming a few years. In the year 1900 he formed a partnership with his 
brother, Walter A. Fallin, who gave up his position as machinist in the 
Frisco shops, and they engaged in the horse and mule business, under the 
name of Fallin Brothers, buyers and sellers, and were successful from the 
first. They have continued in this line of endeavor ever since and have 
built up an extensive and lucrative business. They were first located on 
the south side of the city lot, remaining there until 19 14, when they bought 
and built three commodious and substantial barns, including the erection of 
a modern two-story brick building, one hundred and twenty by one hundred 
feet, on Market street and Mule alley, where they are at present located, 
owning two hundred feet on Market street and one hundred and seventy- 
five on Mule alley. They keep a large number of high-grade mules on hand 
at all seasons, buying and shipping to various markets continuouslv. 

Wilbur M. Fallin was married on December 10, 1902, to Mary Eliza- 
beth Roper, who was born in Polk county, ■ Missouri, June 12, 1884. She 
is a daughter of J. W. Roper and wife, who live on a farm in Polk county. 
Mr. Roper's wife was known in her maidenhood as Vine Davis. Mr. Roper 
moved from his farm to Springfield and engaged in mercantile pursuits for 
some time, and he is still living in this city. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Fallin, namely: 
Wesley Edwin, born September 7, 1904; Alfred M., born August 18, 1906, 
died December 10, 1909; and Orin, born August 29, 1909. 

Politically, Mr. Fallin is a Republican, and he and his family belong 
to the Christian church. 

Walter Augustus Fallin, of the firm of Fallin Brothers, was born October 
2 3- i&77< at the Fallin homestead near Springfield, and here he grew to 
manhood and attended the ward and high schools. He learned the ma- 
chinist's trade when a boy and for some time worked at the same local 
Frisco shops, where he remained until 1900, when he formed a partner- 



IOI2 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ship with his brother and began dealing in horses and mules, as related in 
a preceding paragraph. He was married on April 7, 1901, to Hattie G. 
Price, who was born in Greene county, August 29, 1882, and was here reared 
and educated. She is a daughter of William K. and Ellen (Gregory) Price, 
the father a native of Ohio, and the mother was born in Greene county, 
Missouri. Mr. Price came to Springfield when a young man and has long 
been employed in the local Frisco shops, where he has charge of a depart- 
ment. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. Fallin, named as 
follows: Lawrence A., born September 25, 1903; Walter Harold, born June 
12, 1908; Joseph Price, born March 31, 1912; Earle Augusta, born August 
9, 1914. 

Politically, Mr. Fallin is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Court of Honor, the Maccabees, the Independent Order of Odd Fellow s 
and the United Workmen, also the Travelers' Protective Association. He 
is a member of Central Christian church. 

The Fallin boys are excellent judges of mules and horses, and have 
gained and retained a reputation for prompt and fair dealings, consequently 
have always enjoyed the good will and confidence of their score of regular 
customers and patrons. 

Both Wilbur and Walter Augustus served ten months in the Spanish- 
American war, enlisting for service, and on May 3, 1898, were called out. 
Their company went first to Jefferson Barracks, then to Chickamauga, Ten- 
nessee, and from there to Lexington, Kentucky, then to Albany. Georgia, 
where they were mustered out, March 3, 1899. 



HOWARD RAGSDALE. 



In the list of present day lawyers of Greene county, the name of How- 
ard Ragsdale, of Ash Grove, must not be overlooked. He has passed the 
half-way house along the thoroughfare of the human years, and has rapidly 
risen to an influential and prominent place in his profession in both Greene 
and Dade counties. He is a well read lawyer, a ready debater, an industri- 
ous, indomitable worker, and a skilful tactician. The mighty Julius plead- 
ing at the bar was greater than when thundering in the war. He conquered 
nations with his invincible legions : ' Tis of more renown to save a client 
than to save a town." .Air. Ragsdale's arguments to the courts embody no 
surplusage, but are direct, terse and incisive; to the jury they are plain, 
logical, matter of fact, compactly presented. He cares more for a rod of 
truth than for a mile of rhetoric, more for a principle than for a thrilling 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOI3 

climax, more for a fact than an acre of verbal felicities ami gems. He has 
a clientage in the courts that older practitioners would be pleased to com- 
mand. He is a man of -firm and decided convictions, whether in law, poli- 
tics, or in any department of thought or action employing his time and at- 
tention. 

Mr. Ragsdale was born in Dade county, Missouri, August 16, 1869. 
He is a son of Benjamin F. and Nancy E. (Buckner) Ragsdale. The father 
was born in Greenfield, Missouri, in October, 1843, and was a son of Joshua 
and Sarah Ragsdale. Joshua Ragsdale emigrated from the Carolinas in a 
very early day, the early thirties, and located in Dade county, where he en- 
tered twelve hundred acres of land from the government and here he fol- 
lowed general fanning the rest of his life, and became a prosperous and in- 
fluential citizen. He had married before leaving his native country, a woman 
who also first saw the light of day under Dixie skies. Benjamin F. Rags- 
dale grew up on his father's broad acres, which he assisted in getting ready 
for cultivation and he helped with the general work of the farm when a boy. 
He was given the usual educational advantages of the times. During the war 
of the states he enlisted in a Dade county company in the Union arm)- and 
was captured by the Confederates but subsequently paroled. He spent his 
life in Dade count)', successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits and was 
widely known there. His death occurred on November 25, 1899. Politi- 
cally he was a Republican. He and Nancy E. Buckner were married in 
1867. She was born in Lawrence county, Missouri, in 1852 and her death 
occurred in July, 1910. 

Howard Ragsdale grew to manhood in his native county and received 
a good common school education; later was a pupil at Ozark College, Green- 
field, Missouri, lie began life for himself by teaching school a few terms 
with satisfaction, then began studying law with E. 1'. Mann, of Greenfield, 
with whom he remained two years, and in 1807 was admitted to the bar of 
Missouri, and soon thereafter he began the practice of his profession at 
Everton, Dade county, where he remained thirteen years, enjoying a large 
patronage and ranking among the leading attorneys of that county. He 
served a term as prosecuting attorney of Dade county in a manner that re- 
flected credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. In 
1909 he located in Ash Grove and has remained here to the present time and 
has from the first enjoyed a satisfactory and growing practice throughout 
this locality. 

Mr. Ragsdale was married in September, 1899, to Ellen Finley. wdio 
was born in Greenfield, Missouri, February 1, 1879, and there grew to 
womanhood and received a good education. She represents one of the old 
prominent families of that town, and is a daughter of Milton Finley and wife. 

Politically, Mr. Ragsdale is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to 



IOI4 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

the Masonic Order, the Blue Lodge at Everton, and the Royal Arch Chapter 
at Ash Grove. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is a man 
of excellent mental endowments and commanding personality, a man who 
has ever stood well in this locality. 



WILL J. MAJOR. 

"The gay will laugh when thou art gone, 
The solemn brood of care plod on, 
And each one, as before, will chase 
His favorite phantom; yet these shall all 
Leave their mirth and their employment, 
And shall come and make their bed with thee." 

The above lines, penned by America's great poet of Nature, in his in- 
comparable "Thanatopsis," strikingly sets forth in a few phrases a picture 
of death. Since the beginning of the world death has been looked upon as 
"the king of terrors." Why this should be so. since it is as common as birth 
or any other natural occurrence, the biographer leaves to more philosophic 
minds. The manner of laying the dead away has been given much thought 
by the various peoples of the earth, and many and diverse methods have 
been promulgated; in fact, all times, and places and customs are noted by 
the historian, from the methods of certain savage tribes, who suspend their 
dead in tall trees to the present rapidly-growing method of cremation, when 
all that is earthly of a mortal quickly disappears in a wave of white heat. 
It has always seemed to be the prevailing desire of most nations to preserve 
the bodies of the dead a-- long a- possible, ami, this being -". thinking men 
began devising means whereby this could best be accomplished, and thus 
resulted the art of embalming, ages ago, and although the methods have un- 
dergone changes from time to time, it is doubtful it the twentieth century 
undertaker can do his work any more effectively than did the Egyptian em- 
balmer in the days of Pharaoh. The most advanced ami satisfactory meth- 
ods of embalming are employed by Will J. Major, well known undertaker 
of East Commercial street, Springfield. 

Mr. Major was born in Iroquois county, Illinois, December 19, 1861. 
He is a son of Robert 1). and Ellen (Hitchcock) Major. The father was 
born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, about 183"), and was a son of James 
Major and wile. James Major was born in Indiana back in the days of the 
first settlers ami there he grew up, but finally located in Illinois where his 
death occurred in 1877, after an active" life as a fanner. His wife, who 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOI5 

was a native of Pennsylvania, preceded him to the grave by several years. 
Robert D. Major learned the carpenter's trade in early life and followed 
this in connection with fanning for a livelihood. He remained in Illinois 
until 1883 when he went to Montana and followed his trade, remaining there 
until 1885, when he came to Springfield, Missouri, where he continued car- 
pentering practically until his death in 1896. Politically, he was a Repub- 
lican, was a member of the Baptist church, and belonged to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which he passed all the chairs in the local lodge. 
Ellen Hitchcock, mother of our subject, was born near Niagara Falls, New 
York, March 30, 1832, a daughter of John and Eliza Hitchcock. She died 
in St. Louis, Missouri, September 4, 19 14, at the age of eighty-two years 
and six months. 

Will J. Major received a common school education, spending two years 
in the high school at Aurora, Illinois. He remained on the home farm until 
he was eighteen years of age, then began learning carpentering and cabinet 
making, at which he worked until 1898, having attained a high degree of 
skill in each. He then spent four years as assistant custodian in the Spring- 
field postofhce. Then went to work for J. M. White, a pioneer undertaker 
of this city, and, making a careful study of the business, he passed the state 
board examination in 1909, and was duly qualified to enter the profession, 
and has since been in business for himself at 230 East Commercial street, 
and is now one of the busiest and most popular undertakers in Springfield, 
maintaining large, modernly equipped and well furnished parlors and his 
treatment of his patrons is always courteous and honorable. 

Mr. Major was married April 15, 1886, to Anna B. Reynolds, who was 
born in Nebraska, October 1, 1869. She was a daughter of a highly re- 
spected family, and she received a good education, and proved to be an ex- 
cellent helpmeet. This union has been blessed with three children, namely : 
Mabel, born July 4, 1890, is the wife of John Hulse, of Springfield; E'Uene, 
born in September, 1892, is the wife of Lee Donald, of Kansas City; Helen, 
born July 25, 1897, i s a t home. 

Mr. Major is prominent in fraternal circles, belonging to Springfield 
Lodge No. 218, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is past 
grand, has been district deputy grand master for three years, and has been 
secretary of the same for the past eighteen years; he is a member of the 
Empire Encampment, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is 
past chief patriarch; also Springfield Canton No. 23, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He is a member of Julia Lodge No. 72, Daughters of Re- 
bekah. He also belongs to the Loyal Order of Moose, Bears, Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, Knights and Ladies of Security, Modern Woodmen of 
America, Woodmen of the World, Modern Brotherhood, Knights and La- 
dies of Honor, and the Court of Honor. 



I0l6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ELY PAXSON. 

From the days of the Egyptian mummies, when the old Pharaohs were 
elaborately embalmed, to the present time this science — embalming — has 
gone through various stages of development, but it is doubtful if it is any 
better today than when the body of the great Rameses was prepared for the 
tomb, for the student of history finds that the ancients knew many things 
which we do not know, the "lost arts" being a theme which has engaged 
much thought by moderns. In various museums, notably the British, mum- 
mies are to be seen which have withstood the ravages of many thousands 
of years. The manner of laying away the dead has differed widely in 
different ages and with different nations. The ancients preferred sepulchers 
hewn from solid rock, some were buried in upright positions, some with 
their heads to the east, others to the west. We read of the Hindus casting 
their dead into the Ganges river, of bodies being deposited in trees by the 
Indians of North America and the natives of Africa. It was once the desire 
to so prepare the body that it would retain its material form forever; now 
many desire that this house of clay shall be dissolved as quickly as possible 
after it has been cast aside by the inscrutable something we call spirit or 
soul, hence cremation is now a well-established business. The universal 
civilized manner of burial demands skill of a high nature, and so in every 
city and town in Christendom we find undertakers and embalmers. One of 
the most adroit, learned and successful, as well as best known and popular, 
of those who are engaged in this line of endeavor in Springfield is Ely 
Paxson, whose experience of half a century entitles him to a position in the 
front rank of undertakers in Missouri. 

Mr. Paxson was born near Findlay, Ohio, January 17, 1847. He is a 
son of Morris and Mariah (Shipman) Paxson, and a descendant of an old 
English family of Colonial stock. Ely Paxson, the paternal grandfather of 
our subject, was a native of Pennsylvania and received bis christian name 
from the old Ely family. He grew to manhood in the old Keystone state 
and there became a successful farmer and useful citizen, remaining there 
until [833, when he removed with his family to near Findlay, Ohio, where 
he continued farming until his death, which occurred about 1876. His son, 
Morris Paxson, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Burks 
count}', Pennsylvania, September 26, 1 825, and he was eighl years of age 
when the family removed to Ohio. He grew to manhood in Hancock 
county and assisted his father with the work on the farm, and he received 
his education in the pioneer schools there. When a boy he learned the black- 
smith's trade, at which he became quite expert. lie remained in the Puck- 
eye state until 1867, when he came to Missouri, arriving in Springfield in 




£> 




'Us^Otm- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOI7 

May of that year, and here he spent the rest of his life, becoming well known 
to the business world here in that early period of the city's development. 

His death occurred January 17, 1893, in his sixty-eighth year. He was 
an honest, hard working man whom everybody respected. He was a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, and religiously he belonged to the Methodist 
church. He and Mariah Shipman were married at Findlay, Ohio, where 
she had spent her girlhood and was educated. To this union seven children 
w ere bom. 

Ely Paxson, the immediate subject of this sketch, spent his boyhood at 
Findlay, Ohio, and there received his education in the common schools, and 
later learned the cabinetmaker's trade, also the undertaking business, for 
which he seemed to possess from the outset decided natural ability, such as 
industry, tact, steady nerves, kindness, promptness and integrity, and these 
qualities with others have resulted in great success in later years. In 1868 
he came to Springfield. Missouri, and for two years worked as a journey- 
man cabinetmaker in the establishment of Julius Kassler on College street, 
then entered into partnership with his employer, and in March, 1880, bought 
him out, and has continued in the undertaking business ever since alone, his 
business growing with advancing years until it has long since reached very 
extensive proportions and Mr. Paxson's name is known over all southwestern 
Missouri, and in his dealings with the people here for a period of over forty- 
five years he has maintained a reputation for honesty, courtesy and good 
citizenship, enjoying all the while the good will and esteem of his fellow 
men. His establishment was destroyed by fire in 1875 and again in 1885. 
In 1888 he erected the substantial two-story brick structure which he still 
occupies, and which is modernly equipped in every respect for the successful 
and prompt carrying on of his business, and here he employs assistants of 
the highest skill. 

Mr. Paxson was married on March 20, 1873, to Anna Belle Keet, 
daughter of James Keet, a prominent business man of southern Missouri, 
the Keets having been among the leading families of Springfield for many 
years, and here Mrs. Paxson grew to womanhood and received an excellent 
education. She is a lady of culture and is prominent socially. 

Politically, Mr. Paxson is a Republican and has been more or less active 
in public affairs. lie was coroner of Greene county for two terms, the 
duties of which office he discharged with ability and satisfaction. Frater- 
nally, he is a well-known Mason, having attained the thirty-second degree 
in that order. For a number of years he was recorder of St. John's Com- 
mandery No. 20. Knights Templars, of which he is past eminent commander. 
He is treasurer of the latter body and Solomon Lodge. Free and Accepted 
Masons, and treasurer of Springfield Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. He is 



IOl8 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

also past master of the Blue Lodge. He and his wife are members of Grace 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is treasurer. 

Mr. Paxson has always had the welfare of Springfield at heart, and 
his aid in furthering the best interests of the same has never been withheld 
in all laudable movements, and he is not only one of the best known men in 
this citv and count} - , but is one of the most highly respected for his industry, 
public spirit and exemplar}" record as a man and citizen. 



JAMES S. McILVIN. 



The great Empire state ( which seems to have been given a most ap- 
propriate sobriquet) has sent large numbers of her enterprising citizens into 
the great West, where they have made commendable records in every walk 
of life, being people who believe not only in doing things but in doing- them 
well; they seem to be, almost without exception, men and women who 
combine the proper elements of character and innate qualities to make good 
and useful citizens. James S. Mcllvin, a locomotive engineer of the Frisco 
Lines, living at Springfield, is one of this number. 

Mr. Mcllvin was born at Rochester, New York. May 16, 1856. He 
is a son of Robert and Rosine E. (Richards) Mcllvin. both parents natives 
of New Hampshire, each representing an old Xew England family. They 
grew to maturity in their native state, attended the common schools there 
and were married in Xew Hampshire, but removed from that state to the 
state of Xew York aboul the middle of the nineteenth century. The 
father of our subject was a carpenter by trade and he followed carpentering 
and building during the latter part of his life, but his earlier years were 
devoted to farming. His death occurred at West held. Xew York, about 
ten years ago. He removed his family to Kansas when that state was being 
settled by Eastern people and there the mother of our subject died, in the 
town of Lacygne, in 1872. To these parents two children were horn. 
namely: Herbert, a conductor on the Southern Pacific railroad, lives in 
Dallas, rexas; and James S., of this sketch. 

James S. Mcllvin was taken to the state of Kansas In- his pari 
when he was a small boy and there he grew to manhood and received his 
education in the common schools. He began his railroad career in [877, 
in Pennsylvania, on the Bessemer railroad, which at that time was known 
as the old Alleghany road. He began as fireman and remained with this 
road about five years, then came to Kansas and worked out of Dodge City 
a short time as fireman on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe road. He 
removed to Kansas City, Missouri, in 1NS1, ami began firing on the Kan 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOIO. 

City, Ft. Scott & Memphis railroad. He was sent to Springfield by this 
road in 1882 and worked on the Ozark division. He assisted in track 
laying from Cedar Gap to Mammoth Spring. In 1883 he was given a regu- 
lar run as engineer on this division. He remained with the old "Memphis 
Route" until it was leased to the Frisco Lines in 1900. when he went with 
the latter road, with which he has remained to the present time. He is 
now engineer on a freight train, between Springfield and Thayer. He has 
given excellent satisfaction in the various positions he has held with different 
railroads, being capable, alert, conscientious and trustworthy. 

Mr. Mcllvin was married in Mercer, Pennsylvania, October 23, 1883, 
to Ida A. McGinnis, who was born in Y T enango county, Pennsylvania. 
She is a daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Jolly) McGinnis. The father is 
deceased, but the mother is living at the advanced age of eighty-five. Air. 
McGinnis devoted his life to farming. Mrs. Mcllvin's maternal grand- 
father, Capt. Thomas Jolly, was a soldier in the War of 181 2, in which 
he made an excellent record. He lived to the unusual age of ninety-three 
years. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mcllvin, namely: Gert- 
rude is the eldest; Annetta is teaching in the public schools of Springfield; 
Mary, Hazel. Edith K., and June are all at home. 

Our subject owns an attractive and well furnished home at 1820 Dem- 
ming Place, Springfield. 

Politically, Mr. Mcllvin is a Republican. He belongs to the Masonic 
order and the Order of Eastern Star, he and his wife being charter mem- 
bers of Crescent Chapter. No. 21. The family belongs to the Cumberland 
Presbyterian church. 



ELWOOD ALAMANDO WILLIAMS. 

It was Charles Kingsley, the noted English author, who said that every 
morning we should remember to be thankful that we have something to do 
during the coming day, whether we like it or not. Being forced to work, 
and forced to do our best, will breed in you temperance and self-control, 
diligence and strength of will, cheerfulness and content, and a hundred 
virtues the idle will never know. Elwood Alamando Williams, a farmer 
near Ash Grove, is one of the citizens of Greene county who takes delight 
in his work and is therefore happy and prospering. 

Mr. Williams was born on a farm in Carroll county, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 23, i860. He is a son of Mortimer H. and Jennie S. (Gale) Will- 
iams. The father was born in Monroe county, Ohio, June 20, 1837. and 
was a son of William and Martha (Hurd) Williams. William Williams 



1020 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

was born near Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1809, and followed farming until. 
1S48, when he began running a boat down the Ohio river to the Mississippi, 
then up that stream and up the Missouri river to Boonville and later to 
Carroll county, Missouri, carrying freight and passengers, each trip re- 
quiring several weeks. He was a cooper and cabinet maker by trade and 
was also a physician of the old school. After locating in Missouri he made 
a professional trip to Ohio. He was a learned man and remained a close 
student all his life, one of his favorite studies being astronomy and he 
became an amateur astronomer of no mean ability. He entered eighty 
acres of land in Carroll county, this state on which he spent the rest of his 
life, dying there in 1887. Politically, he was first a Whig, later a Republican. 
He was an ardent worker in the cause of education and helped in the matter 
of establishing schools. Fraternally, he was a member of the Masonic 
order, and he was a free thinker and broad-minded man. His wife was 
also born near Wheeling, West Virginia, the year of her birth being 1812, 
and her death occurred in 1859. 

Mortimer H. Williams had only such educational advantages as the 
frontier schools could furnish in his day, but his father taught him much 
and furnished him many books, so he became a well-informed man, and 
he taught school in Carroll county, this state, for a number of years, and, 
learning the blacksmith's trade, followed that for some time. In 1873 he 
moved to Chillicothe, Missouri, where he followed his trade for about ten 
years, then went to South Dakota, continuing blacksrnithing there about 
six years, then engaged in mining in the Black Hills a few years, after 
which he made three trips to Alaska, finally locating in Rapid City, South 
Dakota, where his death occurred in 1909. Politically, he was a Republican; 
religiously, a Universalist, and fraternally a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His wife, Jennie S. Gale, whom he married in 1859, 
was born in Chautauqua county, New V'ork, on farm where the first chau- 
tauqua in the United States was held. Mr-. Jennie Williams was burn Janu- 
ary [3, 1S40, and her death occurred in [883, To these parents five children 
were born. 

Elwood A. Williams received a fairly good education up to the tenth 
grade in the Chillicothe schools. When seventeen years old he went to 
Deadwood, South Dakota, where he worked a- a freight driver, having 
charge of a nine-yoke team hitched to three wagons, and this work he con- 
tinued about a year, then went to a lumber camp for a year, then was 
superintendent ami bookkeeper for a lumber camp for several years, after 
which he came to Rapid City, South Dakota, and was head of the lumber 
yards there for three year-. During this time he filed on one hundred and 
sixty acres and proved up on the same, -old out and filed mi a homestead 
of one hundred and sixty acres, and proved up on it, and lived on the same 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1021 

for seven years or until 1900, when he sold out and came to Greene count}', 
Missouri, purchasing one hundred and sixty acres in Boone township, and 
has since resided here. He owned over one thousand acres of land in 
Dakota, which he finally sold. He is making a specialty of live stock, 
raising a fine grade of mules, horses, sheep, cattle and hogs for the market, 
and no small portion of his annual income is derived from this source. 
He is one of the substantial men of Boone township, and has made what 
he has solely by his own efforts. 

Mr. Williams was married on November 29, 1888, to Maggie M. Trim- 
mer, who was born in South Dakota, October 1, 1872. She was born near 
Chamberlain, that state, and there reared to womanhood and was educated, 
She is a daughter of George M. and Mary 1 Boyua ) Trimmer. Mr. Trimmer 
was born near Cheona, Illinois, November 8, [844, and was a son of Nicholas 
and Mary Trimmer, who lived and died on a farm in Illinois. George M. 
Trimmer received a common school eduction, working on the home farm 
during the summer months, and when a young man lie went to the eastern 
part of South Dakota and began wood contracting for steamboats on the 
Missouri river. In 1876 he went to the Black Hills, and there engaged 
in mining and fanning. He was a sterling pioneer, and helped establish 
trails, towns, did freighting and was incidentally a renowned hunter. He 
was a stanch friend of the Sioux Indians, who liked him. He was the 
first settler in Hot Springs, South Dakota, and he did much toward making 
it one of the best towns in that state, and at this writing he owns a tine 
orchard of one hundred and sixty acres near there, which was the first 
orchard set out in that region. He is one of the prominent and influential 
men of eastern South Dakota and has been offered many political posi- 
tions of importance in the state, but has refused them all. Politically, he 
is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and is an enthusiastic worker in the same. On November 8, 1871, 
he married Mary Boyua, who was born March 4. 1847. Grandfather Boyua 
was an early French trader on the Missouri river. 

Mrs. Trimmer was the real discoverer of the springs in what is now 
known as Hot Springs, and cut the first bathing "tub" out of a rock. When 
a child she was present at the New Ulm massacre in Minnesota, and was 
taken prisoner by the Sioux Indians and carried to the head of the Missouri 
river. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Elwood A. Williams three children have been born, 
namely: Blanche G., born December 20, 1889, was given good educational 
advantages; Barney B., born April 20, 1892, was also well educated in the 
schools of Ash Grove, Missouri; M. Cleopatra, born September 26, 1897, 
graduated from the Ash Grove high school with the class of 1915. These 
children are all at home with their parents. 



1022 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Politically, Mr. Williams is a Progressive, and is liberal in his public 
views. Fraternally, he is one of the leading Masons of this locality, being 
a member of Ash Grove Lodge No. ioo, Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; Ash Grove Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; and Zabud Council No. 
125, Royal and Select Masters; he also belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He has for some time been a member of the local school 
board, and religiously he holds membership in the Presbyterian cll'urch. He 
has had a vast experience in the world's affairs and talks most entertainingly 
of his life in the picturesque pioneer days of the North, and it is a pleasure 
to visit him in his neat, hospitable home. 



FRED WILLIAM RAUCH. 

Spake full well in language quaint and olden, 

One who dwelleth by the castled Rhine, 
When he called the flowers so blue and golden 

Stars that in earth's firmament do shine; 
Stars they are in which we read our history 

As did astrologers and seers of eld, 
Yet not wrapt about with such awful mystery 

As were the burning stars which they beheld. 

Thus wrote the poet Longfellow in his line poem on the flowers, which 
have been a favorite theme of poets since the days of Homer, and it has ever 
been the opinion of the thinkers of the world that he who does not love 
and admire these "stars of earth" has little good in him. No vocation could 
be more conducive to pure and high thinking, and consequently right and 
wholesome living, as a natural sequence of such thoughts, as floriculture. 
Most of the flower gardens and green-houses in this country are conducted 
by Germans. We offer no theory as to why this is so. Suffice it to add that 
we are greatly indebted to our brothers of Teutonic blood in many respects, 
and especially because they keep us supplied with their beautiful and neces- 
sary "hot-house" products during the "winters of our discontent." 

Fred William Ranch, a young German-American, is one of the success- 
ful florists of Springfield. He was born on July 7, 1881, in Springfield, 
Ohio, and is a son of Peter and Caroline (Winter) Ranch. The father was 
born in Hessedarmstadt, Germany, April 26, [854, and there he grew to 
manhood and received a common school education. He remained in the 
Fatherland until tX;.^ when he emigrated to America with a brother, and 
settled in Urbana, Ohio. He learned the blacksmith's trade when a young 
man, also was a tool dresser and he followed his trades in a machine shop 
in Urbana a short time, then removed to Springfield, Ohio, where he con- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO23 

tinued working at his trade until 1884, in which year he came to Billings, 
Missouri, located on a farm near there, which he operated four years. He 
then returned to Urbana, Ohio, and followed the cigar manufacturing busi- 
ness for eleven years, then came back to Billings, this state, and for the past 
fifteen years has engaged in farming there. He has been very successful in 
a business way and owns a good farm and is highly respected by all who 
know him. Politically, he is a Democrat. He has been school director at 
Billings for a number of years, having received every vote in that place ex- 
cept his own in the elections for director. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is 
a member of the German Evangelical church. He and Caroline Winters 
were married in 1877. She was born in Baltimore, Maryland, December 31, 
1859, and she received a good common school education. She is a daughter 
of William Winters and wife. Mr. Winters is a baker by trade and is still 
living, making his home with Mrs. Rauch at Billings. His wife died about 
fifteen years ago. 

Eight children were born to Peter Rauch and wife, namely: George 
is a florist at Monett, Missouri; Fred W., of this sketch; Lulu is the wife of 
Frank Dean, of Billings; Charles is a florist in Monett; Katie lives in Mo- 
nett; Anna and Philip are at home with their parents; William died when 
six years old. 

Fred W. Rauch received a good education in the common schools, and 
when a boy learned broom making and worked at the same about four 
years, after which he worked on a farm near Billings, Missouri, for four 
years, then came to Springfield and worked for a florist about two and one- 
half years, meanwhile learning the ins and outs of the business, then was 
employed at the Chalfant conservatories a year, then, with two brothers 
built greendmuses and laid out gardens at Monett where they are still in 
business, his two brothers remaining there and operating the business, while 
our subject stays in Springfield, where he returned in 191 1 and began 
operating the Chalfant conservatory and later established offices in the Co- 
lonial Hotel under the firm name of Rauch Brothers, and he has built up a 
large and constantly growing business. 

Mr. Rauch was married March 10, 1907, to Bertha Kemm, a native of 
Springfield, born April 10. 1880, in Wisconsin. She received a good edu- 
cation in the public schools. She was a child when her parents, Karl and 
Mary (Schmith) Kemm, brought her to Springfield. Her father's active 
life has been devoted to the ministry. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rauch one child has been born, Frances Rauch, whose 
birth occurred on April 21, 1908. 

Politically, Mr. Rauch is a Democrat, and religiously he is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. He is a prominent Mason, being a member of 
Gate of the Temple Lodge No. 422, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; 



1024 GREKNE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Vincent Council, Royal and Select Masters; St. John's Commandery No. 20, 
Knights Templar; Abou Ben Adhem Temple and Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. One would judge from Mr. Rauch's daily in- 
tercourse with his fellow men that he is endeavoring to live up to the sublime 
precepts of Masonry. 



ALEXANDER KNOX. 



Born on the far-away heaths of bonnie Scotland, that picturesque coun- 
try, famed in song and story, familiar to us principally through the versatile 
descriptions of such immortals as Scott, Burns, Stevenson and Miller, but 
spending the major part of his life in America, the late Alexander Knox, a 
descendant of the famous British statesman, John Knox, is deserving of 
mentions in these pages. His long life of usefulness and commendable acts 
winning for him the sincere regard of all those with whom he came in con- 
tact, it is meet that his life record should be preserved in proper form. He 
possessed many of the traits of character of his sterling Scotch ancestors. 

Air. Knox was born in Scotland, January 26, [848. He was a ><>n of 
George Knox and wife, who were natives of Scotland, where they grew up 
and were married and spent their lives. 

Alexander Knox grew to manhood in his native land and there received 
a -'"id education, taking a high literary course in one of the best schools 
of the country. When twenty-one years of age. in [869, he immigrated to 
the United States alone, and first settled in the South, hut after a short time 
lie came to Missouri, lie began life fur himself as a general farmer, which 
line of endeavor he followed until about [875, then entered the employ of 
the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company, first as fireman and 
later he became an engineer, and finally was engineer on ;i passenger train, 
which position he held for many years, or until his health failed. He was 
regarded as one of the most faithful and competent of the company's 
employees, and was popular with officials and his fellow employees. 

Mr. Knox was married on January n. [873, to Maria E. Ball, who 
was horn near London, England, April 11. [856, She is a daughter of 
Frederick and Margaret (Price) Ball, both natives of England, where they 
grew up. were married and established their home, and where they resided 
until 1S70. when they immigrated to America, first locating in Illinois, later 
moving to Missouri, and here Mr. Ball began working for the St. Louis 
and San Francisco Railroad Company in their shops at Springfield. He 
was a skilled blacksmith, having as high as four and six helpers under him 
all the time, and was looked upon by his officials as one of their most valu- 
able men. 1 [e did a great deal in his department to make it up to date, and 




^/£%W a*t,0C& *- J pi *V 




I 



/t^ „ 'tj . J'S^^c^ 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1025 

he was given credit for many things of importance. He was a man who 
was held in high regard by all who knew him. He remained in the local 
shops until his death in the year 1882. His family consisted of six chil- 
dren, three of whom are still living, namely: Frederick, Mrs. Agnes Havens, 
and Mrs. Maria E. Knox, widow of our subject. 

Mrs. Knox spent her girlhood in England and was educated in the 
common schools there and in the schools of St. Louis, .Missouri. She was 
fourteen years of age when the family moved to America. 

Two children were born to Alexander Knox and wife: Alice M., born 
on September 29, 1879, married first to Charles Schneider, who 'lied about 
fourteen years ago; later she married T. P. Nichols, and they live in St. 
Louis. They have two children. Josephine and Charles A. George F. born 
on July 8, 1882, married Courtney Gustin, who is engaged in the shoe busi- 
ness in Springfield. Our subject and wife also raised James D. Knox, from 
the time he was five years old, and shortly after our subject's death Airs. 
Knox adopted the child, who was burn on November 18, 1880; he married 
Maude Walker; he is connected with the Frisco shops and lives in Spring- 
field. They have three children. Charles Vere. Maxine and Margaret. 

Alexander Knox was a Republican. He belonged to the Brotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers, and was secretary of the local order for a period 
of fifteen years, performing the duties of the office most faithfully. He 
was a member of the Masonic Order, the Blue Lodge, Gate of the Temple 
( Masonic ) and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, being a charter mem- 
ber of the same. He was a member of the Royal Arcanum Lodge, and 
belonged to the First Congregational church. 

The death of Mr. Knox occurred on August 14, 1899, when scarcely 
past the half-century mark. Mrs. Knox has a cosy home on Washington 
avenue, Springfield. 



FREDERICK CHARLES WILDER. 

One of the public-spirited citizens of Ash Grove who withholds 
his cooperation from no movement which is intended to promote public 
improvement in that city and vicinity is Frederick Charles Wilder, who 
for the past fourteen years has been engaged successfully in the livery busi- 
ness there and is one of the best known men in this line of endeavor in 
Greene county, and what he has accomplished illustrates his steadfastness of 
purpose. In his earlier years he was a farmer and also worked as iron 
molder. 

Mr. Wilder was born near Carpentersville. Illinois. August 9, 1865. 
(65) 



1026 GREEXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

He is a son of Thomas and Catherine (Tubbs) Wilder. The father was 
born in the state of New York, in October, 1828, was there reared to 
manhood and educated in the district schools and he devoted his active life 
to farming. He joined the tide of "forty-niners" for the gold fields of 
California and remained in that state a few years, finally returning to Illi- 
nois, his trips across the great trackless plains being without particular 
incident. He resumed farming and remained in the Sucker state until in 
1869, when he removed with his family to Lawrence county, Missouri, 
where he bought one hundred acres which he farmed until 1881, when he 
went to Barry county, Missouri, and homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres, which he cleared, improved and farmed until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1902. Politically, he was a Republican, and religiously a Metho- 
dist. Catherine Tubbs, mother of the subject of this sketch, was burn in 
1837. It is not certain whether in Illinois or Wisconsin, and her death 
occurred in 1875. 

Frederick C. Wilder grew to manhood on the home farm, where he 
worked when a boy, and he received his education in the district schools. 
He spent four years in Dundee, Illinois, working for the Illinois Iron 
Bolt Company, learning the molder's trade, from 1894 to 1898, after which 
he returned to the home farm in Lawrence count}', Missouri, not caring 
to continue the molder's trade as a livelihood. lie engaged in general 
farming until fourteen years ago, when he came to Ash Grove and started 
in the liver}- business, which he has continued here and in Mt. Vernon, 
Lawrence county, to the present time, and his is now the only livery business- 
in Ash Grove. He lias a well-equipped barn, including such vehicles as 
his needs require and a large number of good horses. His barn is popular 
with the traveling public, prompt and honest service is his aim. 

Mr. Wilder was married March 17. [887, to Emma Bowman, who 
was horn in Christian county. Missouri, August 4, [869, and was reared 
on the farm and educated in the public schools. She is a daughter of Will- 
iam P. and Sarah Bowman. The father was a pioneer of Christian count) 
and the mother was born there. 

Five children have been horn to Mr. and Mrs. Wilder, namely: Oma, 
born January 1. [888, is cashier at Bourguenot's confectionery in Spring- 
field; Dade, horn May 20, [889, is employed by the Aurora Milling Company 
at Aurora, Missouri; Nellie, horn February 5, [892; she married Richard 
M. Ryan and they live in Hot Springs. Arkansas: Luna, horn .March [9, 
[894; and Clyde, horn May 17, [897. 

Politically, Mr. Wilder is a Republican. Fraternally, he i- a member 
of the Knight- of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
the W Imen of the World. Religiously, the Family attends the Presbyte- 
rian church. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1027 

DANIEL H. HERMAN. 

For a period of thirty-five years the name of Daniel H. Herman has 
stood for the highest grade of tailoring known in southwest Missouri, and 
his business advancing with the years has long since assumed very large 
proportions, and, owing to the excellent quality and style of the work from 
his establishment, his prestige is such that many of his customers come from 
nearby towns, and the fact that many of them have remained with him fur 
a quarter of a century or more is a criterion of not only good service but 
courteous and honest treatment. Mr. Herman has devoted practically his 
life to this line of business and no one is more thoroughly conversant with 
the various phases of the same than he. As a man of affairs and a citi- 
zen he has been one of the influential men of Springfield for many years, 

Mr. Herman was born June _\ [857, in Syracuse, New York. He is a 
son of Henry and Hannah (Stern) Herman. The father, a native of Bavaria, 
Germany, emigrated to the United States about [832 ami settled i,. Syra- 
cuse, Xew York, where he was an extensive live stock dealer until 1868, 
when he went to Chicago, where he continued the same business. In 1871 
he went to Rochester. Xew York, and followed the same vocation, subse- 
quently moving to Elmira, that state, where his death occurred in [904, at the 
home of his daughter, and he is buried in the lot adjoining that containing 
the grave of Mark Twain. His wife, Hannah Stern, was also born in the 
province of Bavaria, Germany. She came to America when young and mar- 
ried Air. Herman in Syracuse, New York. Her death occurred in 1894 > n 
Rochester, that state, but she was buried in Chicago. Air. and Airs. Henry- 
Herman were the parents of rive children, namely: Hannah is the wife 
of Albert Samuel, of Elmira, New York; Fanny is the widow of Henry 
Klopfer, the great Chicago packer; Benjamin lives in Rahway, Xew Jersey; 
Daniel H., of this review: and Charles, who lives in Xew York City. Politi- 
cally, the father of these children was a Democrat. He belonged to the 
Alasonic order, and he was a member of the Hebrew Reformed church. 

Daniel H. Herman spent his boyhood in Rochester, Xew York, and 
there received a good common school education. 'When sixteen years old he 
went to Elmira, that state, and began learning- the tailoring trade and clothing 
business in which he seemed to have a decided natural bent ami consequently 
made rapid progress. He remained there until he was twenty-two years old, 
1N70, in which year he came to Spring-field. Missouri, and opened a tailoring 
and clothing establishment on Boonville street ami has continued in this line 
to the present time. Successful from the first, he managed his affairs with 
honesty and good judgment until in due course of time he became one of the 
substantial business men of the city, and now his establishment would be a 



1028 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

credit to cities many times the size of Springfield. He had the distinction of 
setting up and running the first full page advertisement in a newspaper in 
this section of the country, for which he paid ten dollars per month. On 
his opening day here he hired a brass band to play in front of his estab- 
lishment and an orchestra on the inside. Later he opened branches in the 
same line at Lamar, Joplin, St. Louis, Ft. Smith, Arkansas ; and Dallas, 
Texas, all of which were successful under his able management, and pro- 
gressive methods. In a few years he opened up where the Globe Clothing 
Company is now located on South street and the public square. In 1885 he 
sold out on the public square and devoted his business on Boonville street 
to tailoring exclusively, then moved where the Union National Bank m >\v 
stands. Selling, his lease there he moved on South street, where he remained 
four years, and in 1912 moved to his present location on St. Louis street, 
where he has a modernly appointed, neat, inviting and convenient estab- 
lishment and carries an extensive and carefully selected stock of goods and 
employs several skilled tailors, including two expert cutters and about forty 
other employees. Prompt and high-grade sen ice is his aim as it has ever been. 
In 1889 the company was incorporated as the Herman Tailoring Company. 
Mr. Herman and family are sole owners. They handle all the best domestic 
and imported cloths, which are made up for an exclusive clientele from 
southwest Missouri, southeastern Kansas and northwestern Arkansas. The 
firm has patrons even from New York City, Boston, St. Louis. Kai 
City, the tar West and Mexico. They have also unquestionably the highest 
class of haberdashery in this part of the United States. They are ex- 
clusive agents for Crofut & Knapp, Knapp fell and the Dobbs hats, Keyser 
cravats, Mark-Cross gloves, Vassar underwear, Manhattan shirts, S. Stein 
& Company, importers of woolens. Burberry'- of London, England; Water- 
house & Resher Company, of New York City. 

Mr, Herman was married. June 10. [885, to Nellie Langsdorf, of 
St. Louis. She was born, December 7. [864, and i- a daughter of Morris 
and Hannah (Rosenstine) Langsdorf, an old and prominent family of the 
Mound City, where Mrs. Herman grew to womanhood and was educated. 
She is a lady of culture and has long been a favorite in the besl social 
circles of St. Louis and Springfield. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Herman has been graced b) the birth 
of four children, namely: Hortense, wife of Nathan S. Rose, of St. Paul. 
Minnesota; Edgar S., who is in business with his father, was born in Spring- 
field, Missouri, November 25, 1:888, was graduated From the common schools, 
after which she spent a year in high school and a year in Drury ('"liege: 
from a mere child be has shown an aptness and interest in cutting, fitting 
and designing clothes and now has full charge of that department of the 
Herman Tailoring Company; at the age of twenty-one years he took his 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I02Q 

first honors at the National Clothiers' Association in New York City. He 
has refused flattering offers from large tailoring concerns in Chicago and 
New York to act as their designer at a large salary. His ideas are always 
in advance of others and he is indeed a genius in his line. The third child 
of our subject and wife is Blanche I)., who is attending Soldon high school 
in St. Louis; Ruth, the youngest of the children, is at home and attending 
Springfield high school. 

Air. Herman has always been a supporter of laudable movements for 
the general improvement of Springfield, whose interests he has had at heart 
from the beginning of his residence here, and he has ever enjoyed the good 
will and confidence of his fellow citizens as a result of his industry, public 
spirit and manly principles. 



ROBEK 1' FRANK KISSICK. 

L'pon the shoulders of a train dispatcher rests grave responsibilities. A 
little mistake on his part may, and often does, result in most revolting dis- 
asters, so that it behooves one thus employed to keep a clear head and a 
steady nerve, be wide-awake when he is on duty and also a conscientious 
worker. Such a man is Robert Frank Kissick, train dispatcher for the 
Frisco Lines at the Springfield North Side shops. He is a man in whom 
the head officials repose the utmost confidence in every respect. 

Mr. Kissick was born in Holt county, Missouri, in January, 1873. He 
is a son of William and Jane (McKane) Kissick, both natives of the Isle 
of Man, a British possession. The father was born in 1827, and the mother 
first saw the light of day in 1839. They grew up in their native country 
and there attended school, emigrating to the United States when young and 
they were married in Illinois, where they resided on a farm until 1871, when 
they removed to Holt county, Missouri, remaining there on a farm until 
1886, when they moved to Kansas, in which state the father spent his last 
days in general fanning and died there in 1892; the mother is now making 
her home in Hutchinson, Kansas. To these parents eight children were 
born, namely: Mary Jane lives in Wisconsin, Ida C, William E., Walter 
S., deceased; Lottie E., Robert F., Fannie F. and Daisy P. 

Robert F. Kissick grew up on the home farm in Holt county, this 
state, where he worked when a boy and there he attended the common 
schools. In 1890 he entered railroad service for the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe at Nickerson, Kansas, as call boy. remaining with that road in 
various capacities until 1900. He remained in Nickerson until August, 1892, 
after which he was telegraph operator at Sterling, that state, working in this 
capacity there, at Great Bend and Dodge City, Kansas, for a period of 



IO3O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ten years. After this he worked for the Rock Island railroad in Kansas 
and Texas when that company was building its line to California. He was 
in the building department and remained with that road until August, 1901, 
when he came to Springfield, Missouri, and began working for the Frisco as 
telegraph operator. Thus employed for three years he was promoted to 
extra train dispatcher and then promoted to regular train dispatcher at the 
North Side shops, which position he holds at this time. He has given emi- 
nent satisfaction with each of these three roads in every position he has 
filled. 

Mr. Kissick was married in June, 1905, in Springfield to Eva Skates, 
who was born in Union county, Missouri. She is a daughter of Robert 
and Mary Skates. Her father is a carpenter and contractor by trade, 
and has done a great deal of this kind of work for railroads. He now 
lives in Kansas City, Missouri. 

To our subject and wife one child, Roberta Jane, has been born, the 
date of her birth being October 22, 1913. 

Politically, Air. Kissick is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Modern Woodmen of America and the Masonic order, in which he has 
taken all the degrees except that of the Scottish Rite. He is well known in 
Masonic circles. 



JOSEPH HENRY TURK. 

It is oftentimes considered by those in the habit of superficial thinking 
that the history of so-called great men only is worthy of preservation and 
that little merit exists among the masses to call forth the praises of the his- 
torian or the cheers and appreciation of mankind. A greater mistake was 
never made. No man is great in all things and very few are great, even es- 
pecially competent, in many things. Some by a lucky stroke achieve lasting 
fame, who before that had no reputation beyond the limits of their neigh- 
borhoods. It is not a history of the lucky stroke that benefits humanity 
most, but the long study and effort which made the lucky stroke possible. It 
is the preliminary work, the method, that serves as a guide for the success 
of others. Among those enterprising men of Greene county who have 
forged ahead along well-established lines, gradually mounting to the lad- 
der's summit by earnest, honest endeavor is Joseph Henry Turk, the present 
efficient and popular postmaster of Ash Grove and for many years a well- 
known hardware dealer of that city. 

Mr. Turk was born in Lawrence county, Missouri, October 18. 1871. 
He is a son of Thomas B. and Sarah Jane (Stotts) Turk. The father was 
born in Cumberland county, Kentucky, in 1834. and there grew to man- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO3I 

hood, received his education and resided until about 1865 when he emi- 
grated to Missouri and located in Lawrence county, where he engaged in 
general farming until about eighteen years ago when he returned to Ken- 
tucky, and engaged in the real estate and insurance business in Bowling 
Green, that state, until his death on August 14, 1914. Politically, he was 
a Democrat. He belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
was a member of the Presbyterian church. He and Sarah Jane Stotts were 
married in 1865. She was born in Cumberland county, Kentucky, about 
1840, and there she was reared and educated and they were married in their 
native locality. Thomas B. Turk and wife were'the parents of five boys and 
• one girl, namely: James; Joseph H. ; Lee; Luther; Loren and Hiram. 

Joseph H. Turk, of this sketch, grew up on the home farm where he 
worked when a boy, and he received his education in the common schools. 
Having a natural inclination to machinery he secured a position in an im- 
plement house, and later was a traveling salesman for a champion implement 
linn for three years, giving it entire satisfaction and doing much to increase 
its prestige in the territory to which he was assigned. In 1892 he launched 
out in the hardware business in Ash Grove where he has remained ever 
since and has built up a large and growing trade which extends all over this 
section of the country. He has always carried a large and well-selected 
stock of general hardware and farming implements. 

Mr. Turk has manifested an interest in public affairs fur smue time, ami 
on July 13, 1913, he was appointed postmaster at Ash Grove, and is dis- 
charging the duties of the same in a manner that reflects much credit upon 
himself and to the satisfaction of the people and the department. Politi- 
cally, he is a Democrat, and he has been a committeeman for eight years 
and is active and influential in the affairs of his party. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Masonic order, and is now worshipful master of the local 
Blue Lodge; he is also a member of the Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, Zabud 
Council, Royal and Select Masters, and the Order of the Eastern Star. He 
is one of the active and prominent Masons in this part of the state. Re- 
ligiously he belongs to the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Turk was married on April 22, 1896, to Laura Barham, who was 
born in Ash Grove, in September, 1873, and here grew to womanhood and 
was educated. She is a daughter of Mr. W. F. and Mrs. T. E. Barham, 
natives of Missouri. Mr. Barham devoted his active life to farming. His 
family consists of six children. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Turk the following children have been born: Seth, 
who is attending the Springfield high school ; Harold is attending the high 
school in Ash Grove; Richard is in the public school; Geraldine is also a 
public school pupil; and Llelen, who is the youngest. 



I0 3 2 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

SAMUEL W. HEADLEE. 

As one reviews the history of Greene county and looks into the past 
to see what people were prominent in its early development, he will find 
that for more than three-quarters of a century, the period covering its first 
settlement to the present time, the Tennesseeans have been closely connected 
with the progress and advancement of this section of the state. Wild was 
the region into which they came. Its forests stood in their primeval strength, 
the prairie land was still unbroken, and the Indians still roamed through 
the woodlands and over the plains, seeking the deer and lesser game which 
could be found in abundance. The Headlee family, while not so early as 
some, yet figured in the early-day development of this locality. The late 
Samuel W. Headlee was of this number, and for a long lapse of years he 
was one of the most prominent men of the county, playing well his part in 
the local drama of civilization, not only clearing and developing the land, but 
aiding in the establishment of schools and churches, and was a public servant 
of unquestioned ability and integrity; in fact, the various members of this 
sterling old family have ever manifested the characteristic thrift of the emi- 
grants from the old state of "Hickory" Jackson, and justly entitled to rep- 
resentation in this work. 

Samuel W. Headlee was born in Maury county, Tennessee, March 6, 
[823. He was a son of Caleb and Mary (Steele) Headlee. His parents 
were from North Carolina, but emigrated to Tenneesee in a very early day, 
where they lived until 1X36, when they emigrated overland to Missouri and 
settled in Greene county, began life in true pioneer fashion, and here Caleb 
Headlee spent the rest of his life engaged in farming, dying in 1847. Samuel 
W. Headlee was thirteen years old when he accompanied his parents to 
Greene county. He grew to manhood on the farm and received such educa- 
tional advantages as the schools of those early days afforded, and for some 
time taught school in this county. In 1850, having caught the "gold fever." 
he crossed the great western plains to California, where he spent four vears, 
engaging successfully in mining. Upon his return here he purchased the 
old homestead upon which he spent the rest of his life, and was regarded 
as one of the county's leading farmers of that period. He was elected to 
the lower house of the state Legislature by the Benton Democracy, re-elected 
in 1862 and in 1S1.4. In 1866 he was elected by the Republicans to the 
state Senate, and in iS;j. lie. to heal the breaches in his party, became a 
candidate for the lower house, and was elected by a handsome majority. 
He was again elected to the Legislature in 1870- In all that period of six- 
teen years he voted as his conscience and judgment dictated, and won for 
himself the applause and approval of all good men, doing much for the 




i 



H 







GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO33 

general good of his county and looking carefully after the interest of his 
constituents. He was a faithful and conscientious servant of the people, and 
his long retention in important official positions would indicate that the people 
here reposed implicit confidence in his ability and honesty. During the Civil 
war he took an active part in the service of the Union and in 1862, to that 
end, was commissioned captain of a militia company. From 1803 to the 
close of the war, he was captain in the Sixteenth Alissouri Cavalry of the 
Federal army. In 1874 he was complimented by a nomination by the peo- 
ple's committee as their candidate for lieutenant-governor upon the ticket 
headed by Major Gentry. After retiring from public life he devoted his 
attention to general farming on a large scale, and in the decline of a long, 
useful and honorable life enjoyed the satisfaction of peace with himself 
and the full confidence of those who knew him best. His death occurred 
on February 6, 1900. 

Samuel \Y. Headlee was married May 2, 1855, to Emily L. Armor, a 
daughter of Washington and Nancy S. (Kerr J Armor, natives of Georgia 
and North Carolina, respectively. They immigrated to Alissouri in 184O and 
settled in Polk county. After remaining their until about 1848, the Armor 
family removed to Greene county and here the parents spent the rest of 
their lives, being long since deceased. 

To Samuel W. Fleadlee and wife nine children were born, namely: 
Warren E., born on July 27, 1857; Arthur 1!., born on April 12. 1858, died 
in infancy; Margaret E., born on July 4. 1859; Blondville 1)., born on Sep- 
tember 4, 1 861; Samuel M., born on February 5, 1865, died on August 14. 
1887; James W., born on July ji<, 1867; Claude L., born on November 20, 
1871 ; Cora M., born on June 16, 1873, died on November 20. 1903; she 
was the wife of Avery Robards, and to their union one child was born, 
Jessie Margaret, whose birth occurred September 30, 1903; she was taken 
by her grandmother when six weeks old and is still living in her home. 
Jessie E. Headlee, youngest of our subject's children, was born on Septem- 
ber 13, 1875, and died on August 26, 1899, 

Claude Leslie Headlee was born on November 20. 1871, on the home 
farm in Franklin township, Greene county, and here he grew to manhood and 
received his education in the district schools. He has been a life-long 
farmer ; however, he learned the carpenter's trade when a young man and 
has since followed it to some extent. He is the owner of one hundred and 
thirty acres of good land, eighty-five acres of which is under cultivation. He 
lives but a short distance from the old residence where he was born. He 
married, on January 24, 1879, Lona M. Knighten. a daughter of Amnion 
and Alan- E. (Dotson) Knighten. Mr. Knighten is one of Franklin town- 
ship's leading farmers and stockmen, and formerly was engaged in black- 



1034 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

smithing and mercantile pursuits at Hickory Barrens, this county. A cuin- 
plete sketch of himself and family appears on another page of this volume. 
iu Claude L. Headlee and wife three children have been born, namely: 
Arthur Harry, Samuel Leslie and William B. Politically, Air. Headlee is a 
Republican. His wife belongs to the Baptist church at Pleasant Hope, Polk 
county. 

Blundville D. Headlee, son of the immediate subject of this sketch, was 
born on September 4, 1861, on the homestead in Franklin township, this 
county, and here he spent his boyhood and was educated in the common 
schools, remaining on his father's farm until he was thirty years of age. 
On February 3. 1892, he married Nanny Norman, who was born near 
Brookline, Greene county. She is a daughter of William and Mary (Gib- 
son) Norman. To this union two children have been born, Frank and 
Grace, both at home. Mr. Headlee has devoted his life to general fanning, 
making a specialty of grain and live stock. He owns a well-improved place 
of one hundred and ten acres. Politically, he is a Republican. His wife is 
a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian chinch at Mt. Comfort. Her 
father, William Norman, was burn on August 4. 1823, in Maury county, 
Tennessee, and in an early day he came with his family from his native 
slate to Missouri and settled in Greene county, developing a farm in Brook- 
line township, where he owned a large tract of land and was a successful 
farmer. Here he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring October 24, 
1895, three miles from Nichols Junction, in the western part of the county. 
Politically, he was a Democrat, and was a member of the Brookline Congre- 
gational church. His wife was born in Tennessee and died in this county 
in 1879. She was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, and was 
buried in the cemetery ai Brookline. To Air. and Mrs. Norman eight chil- 
dren were born, three of whom are now living — Frank X.. who makes his 
home in Oklahoma City; Marshall is a resident of Shawnee, Oklahoma; and 
Nanny, wife of Blondville 1). Headlee. 

James Ward Headlee was born on the old homestead here, and here he 
-rew to manhood and was educated in the public schools at Hickory Barrens. 
He, too. has devoted his life to general farming, and is now owner of a 
very productive place of eighty-three acres, which lies close to the old home- 
stead. He learned the blacksmith's trade when he was a boy and this he 
has followed to some extent ever since, following the same fourteen years 
111 connection with farming, maintaining his shop at his home place. He is 
a natural mechanic, and is regarded as a very highly skilled blacksmith. On 
December 2, 1 894, he married Dora Kesterson, a native of Greene county, 
and a daughter of David C. and Minerva (Ketcherside) Kesterson. natives 
•of Ohio and Georgia, respectively. They came first to Arkansas, and from 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO35 

there to Missouri, locating on a farm in Franklin township, Greene county, 
where Mr. Kesterson spent the remainder of his days engaged in general 
farming. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company K, Second Arkansas 
Cavalry, was appointed second corporal of his regiment on April 28, 1864, 
and was mustered out of the service and honorably discharged at the close 
of the war at Memphis, Tennessee. He was in the command of Col. John 
E Phelps, of Springfield, Missouri. Mr. Kesterson was born on March 18, 
1837, and died on November 8, 1911. He was a tanner by trade, which he 
followed in Arkansas and also for a time after coining to Greene county, 
but after his marriage devoted his attention to farming. He came to this 
county immediately after the close of the war, in 1805. His wife was born 
on September 14, 1841. She was a daughter of James and Genette I Scab- 
berry ) Ketcherside. Her death occurred in November, 1903. He died at 
the Soldiers' Home at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, while her death occurred 
on the farm in Franklin township. James and Genette (Scabberry) Ketcher- 
side were both natives of Tennessee, but from that state they moved to 
Georgia, where they spent the remaining years of their lives. David C. 
Kesterson' s family consisted of seven children, of whom Mrs. Dora Headlee 
was the fourth in order of birth. She has three brothers living at this writ- 
ing — John E., of Kansas City; Arthur U., who is farming near Hickory 
Barrens, this county; and Arvel 1)., of Los Angeles, California. Politically, 
Mr. Headlee is a Republican, and he belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church at Mt. Comfort, to which Mrs. Headlee also belongs. 

The Headlees have always enjoyed excellent reputations, being neigh- 
borly and honorable in all the relations of life. 



GEORGE TRIECE. 



It was nearly thirty-five years ago that George Triece came to Ash 
Grove, and he has ever since been a resident of Greene county, and has 
been an interesting spectator to the general development of this vicinity. A 
Hoosier by birth, his earlier life was spent in that state, and most of his 
active life has been devoted to general farming, but the latter part has been 
spent as a hotel keeper. He is one of the honored veterans of the great war 
between the states, having proved his patriotism to his country by fighting in 
defense of the Stars and Stripes on many a sanguinary field, and he was 
one of the sufferers at Andersonville prison. 

Mr. Triece was born in Vermilion county, Indiana, March 26. 1841. 
He is a son of Samuel and Sarah (Missemor) Triece. The father was born 
in 1801, in Pennsylvania, and he was a son of Henry Triece, a native of 



IO36 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Pennsylvania and of German descent. The latter came from his native 
state to Vermilion county, Indiana, in 1832, and entered three hundred and 
twenty acres of land which he farmed until his death in 1850. His son, 
Samuel Triece, came to Indiana at the same time, and spent the rest of his 
life farming in Vermilion county, dying there in i860. The mother of the 
subject of this sketch died in 1872 at the age of sixty-nine years. Politi- 
cally, the father of our subject was a Democrat, and in religious matters 
he was a Methodist. 

George Triece grew to manhood on the old homestead in Indiana and 
there worked hard when a boy, and he received his education in the com- 
mon schools. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted in August, 1861, 
in Company K, Seventy-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served 
one year and was transferred to Company K, Sixth Indiana Cavalry. In 
fact the former regiment was merely changed into the latter. As infantry 
the regiment fought at Richmond and Muldo Hill, Kentucky, and as cavalry 
at Knoxville, under General Burnsides; Kenesaw Mountain, Resaca, Buz- 
zard's Roost, and was with General Stoneman on July 20, 1864, on his raid 
to Macon, Georgia, where our subject was captured and sent to Anderson- 
vine for three months, then to Florence. South Carolina, for two months, 
from which prison he was paroled and sent to Savannah, thence to Mary- 
land, and on home, and was mustered out and honorably discharged June 
27, 1865. 

After the war Mr. Triece returned to Vermilion county, Indiana, and 
resumed farming which he carried on along general lines until 1880 when 
he came to Ash Grove, Missouri. He was deputy postmaster here for three 
years, then operated the Grove House twelve years and the Commercial 
House nine years, then conducted a grocery store and restaurant two years. 
He also spent two years in Springfield, and during the past two years has been 
running a boarding and rooming house in Ash Grove. He has become one 
of the most widely known men in his vocation in this part of the country, 
and the traveling public have always found him a genial, obliging and hon- 
est host. 

Politically, Mr. Triece is a Republican. He belongs to the John Mat- 
thews Post, Grand Army of the Republic at Springfield. 

Air. Triece was married May 22, 1866. to Lydia McBuey, who was 
born May 16, 1851, in Fountain county, Indiana. She is a daughter of 
Daniel and Mary (McKewn) McBuey; they came from Ireland. Mrs. 
Triece received a limited education. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Triece four children were born, three of whom are 
deceased, namely: Charlie L., Millard; the third died in infancy, and Man- 
drid M. Triece, the surviving child, is living in T-ong Beach, California. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I°37 

JAMES COLEMAN GARDNER. 

Among those whose military records as valiant soldiers of the great 
war between the states reflect lasting honor upon them and their descendants 
is James Coleman Gardner, who has had a varied career and has long been 
engaged as trustee and receiver in bankruptcy at Springfield, where he has 
won an honored name by virtue of his consistency to truth, honesty and 
right living. It was fifty-eight years ago that he first came to the present 
capital of the Ozark region, then a mere village on the frontier, and he has 
been identified with the growth of the place ever since, taking a delight 
in its progress. 

Mr. Gardner was born near Santa Fe, Murray county. Tennessee, on 
November- 17, 1832. He is a son of Britton D. and Jeanette (Oakley) 
Gardner. The father was born, September 1, 1808, and was a son of Na- 
than and Nancy ( Gardner. Nathan Gardner was of German descent, and 
in an early day he went west to make his fortune. Britton D. Gardner grew 
to manhood in Murray county, Tennessee, and there devoted himself to 
general farming. When the Civil war came on he enlisted in the First Regi- 
ment. Tennessee Cavalry. Confederate army, and fought gallantly for 
the cause until killed while fighting in General Forest's brigade at Thomp- 
son's Station, Tennessee, March 23, 1863. Politically, he was a Democrat, 
and religiously belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church, South. His 
wife was born in Murray county, Tennessee, August 22, 1X14. She did 
not long survive after the death of her husband. Their home, which was in 
the heart of the country overrun by the opposing armies, was destroyed by 
fire; she was ill at the time, and died from the effects of the exposure. 
October 17. 1863. Both subjects' great-grandfathers were soldiers in the 
Revolutionary war. 

James C. Gardner grew up on the farm and received a limited edu- 
cation, attending the district schools about fifteen months, but later in life 
he educated himself by general home reading. He worked on the farm 
until 1854, when he went into the dry goods business in Santa Fe, Ten- 
nessee, for a year. On May 23. 1850, he arrived in Springfield, Missouri, 
and clerked for some time in a dry goods store. In September, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company H, Sixty-first Regiment, Tennessee Volunteers, Con- 
federate arm)-, and proved to be a brave soldier, taking part in numerous 
engagements, including Chickasaw Bayou, where he was under fire eight 
days and nights continuously, and also during the siege of Vicksburg he 
was under fire at one time continuously for forty-seven days and nights. 
He had the distinction of firing the first gun in the battle of Black River. 
He surrendered with the balance of General Pemberton's army of thirty 
thousand men at Vicksburg, July 4, 1863. He had been promoted to first 



IO38 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

lieutenant for meritorious conduct. He returned to Springfield in 1866 and 
clerked in a store until 1872, when he went into business for himself, where 
the Aladdin Theatre is now located. Later taking a farm in Greene county, 
he moved thereto and continued general farming until 1881, when he moved 
back to Springfield and resumed clerking. During the past twenty-two 
years he has been working in the bankruptcy business, as trustee and re- 
ceiver, and is regarded as an expert in this line and his services have been 
in great demand. 

Politically, Mr. Gardner is a Democrat. He* is a member of Campbell 
Camp, No. 488, United Confederate Veterans, which camp was organized 
by himself and Dan Campbell, and he has been active in its work ever since. 

Mr. Gardner was married. January 31, 1866, to Mrs. Mary ( Evans) 
Shackleford. She was born in Tennessee, January 31, 1833, and died 
August 18, 1898. She was a woman of line Christian sentiment. 

To Mr. Gardner and wife three children were born, namely: Minnie 
is at home; Henry E. has also remained a member of the family circle; 
and Lillian is the wife of J. W. Quade. 



L. S. KUCKER. 



A man of unc|uestioned artistic temperament is L. S. Kucker, who. 
although practically a new-comer in Springfield, i- one of our best known 
and must highly accomplished photographers, and a man who has made 
many friends since casting his lot with the people of Greene county. 

Mr. Kucker. of this review, has made the photograph business a life 
study and therefore ha- kept well abreast of the time- in all phases of the 
work as new discoveries and advancements have been made, and he is there- 
fore mie of the most up-to-date photographer- in the Southwest. He first 
began the business in Alta, Iowa, when about twenty year- old. He was 
successful from the start, and, seeking a broader tield for the exercise of 
his talents he removed later to St. Louis, Missouri, ami accepted a position 
as special demonstrator for the Eastman Kodak Company, and he made St. 
Louis his headquarters until he came to Springfield on December 1. [909, 
where he has since remained, and has built up a large ami lucrative busi- 
ness here. He has been in the same location ever since coming here — 
314 Boonville street, buying an old studio there. While this place was fairly 
well suited to his needs, he moved into one of the mosl attractive and con- 
venient studios in the state in May. 1915, in the Fraternity building on St. 
Loui- street, a handsome new structure, where he will have modernly ap- 
pointed, conveniently located and attractive quarter- with new and attractive 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IOjQ 

equipment. He will spare neither pains nor expense in his new studio and 
will doubtless rank with the best in the Middle West in every respect. 

Aside from his regular portrait work. Mr. Kucker does a great deal 
of commercial photography, which has a certain distinctness about it not com- 
monly found anil he is very successful in both lines and is always a very 
busy man, yet never slights any part of his work, planning to do his h I 
always, but promptness and courtesy as well as honesty are his watchwords, 
He does every kind of work which one can have done at any first-class, 
up-to-date studio. He is a firm believer in advertising and does a great deal 
of it, always judiciously- He is a member of the advertising trio watch, "300 
Green," "Walkover," and "'Take 'em all." He is a memher of the Spring- 
field Club, the Young Men's Business Club, and the Retailers' Association. 



LORENZO PHILLIPS. 



Among the high-grade and straightforward business men of a past 
generation who helped to make Springfield the suhstantial commercial city 
which we of the present generation take such delight in, was the late Lo- 
renzo Phillips, who for man)- years was one of the city's best known gro- 
cerymen. He was a man who bore a reputation for wholesome living in all 
walks of life and was therefore deserving of the material success he achieved 
and also the social prestige which was unquestionably his. 

Mr. Phillips was born in Greene county, Missouri, September 23, 1866. 
He is a son of Thomas and Elizaheth Phillips, who were natives of the state 
of Fennessee where they grew up, were educated and married. Thomas 
Phillips became a prosperous farmer and extensive mule dealer in his na- 
tive state, from which, however, he finally removed to Greene county, Mis- 
souri, where his death occurred a number of years ago. His family con- 
sisted of eleven children, seven of whom are still living-, namely: Marion, 
Monroe, Jesse, Thomas, Warrie, Vida and Lorenzo. 

Lorenzo Phillips grew to manhood in Greene county and received his 
education in the common schools and here he engaged in farming until his 
marriage, after which he went into the grocery business in which he con- 
tinued with ever-increasing success up to within two years of his death. The 
L. Phillips Grocer}-, located on South street, Springfield, of which he was 
proprietor, was well patronized by the best people of the city, for there they 
always found a large and well-selected stock of staple and fancy groceries 
and were dealt with in a courteous and honest manner. The last two years 
of our subject's life were devoted to the bakery business with equal success. 

Mr. Phillips was married on November 21, 1886, to Laura Hardest)-, 



I0 40 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

who was born in Audrain county, Missouri, December 18, i860. She is a 
daughter of Felix and Catherine (Gurton) Hardesty, the former a native 
of Missouri and the latter of Kentucky. They have both been deceased for 
some time. Mrs. Phillips received good educational advantages and she 
taught school several terms. Her father devoted his active life to mercantile 
pursuits. He located in Springfield when Mrs. Phillips was sixteen years 
of age and her education was obtained here. 

Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, namely : Curt, born 
on August 14, 1887, married Bessie Codel and they live in Springfield; Al- 
bert, born on July 19, 1889; Marie, born on August 28, 1891, died Septem- 
ber 23, 1895; Pearl, born on September 25, 1893, is at home; Georgia, born 
on December 4, 1895, > s at home. These children received good educations 
in the Springfield schools. 

Politically, Mr. Phillips was a Republican. He remained active in 
business affairs up to his death which occurred on December 24, 1898. He 
left his family well provided fur, including a pleasant home on South Main 
street. 



DR. WILLIAM McFARLAXD BROWN. 

The strength of a man is in a way measured by the amount of perse- 
cution he can stand, his weakness is never thus tested. Dr. Win. McF. 
Brown is a broad-minded symmetrically developed man, whose interest in the 
public welfare is potent ami salutary. He has so thoroughly demonstrated 
the sincerity of his attitude as a physician and citizen that he now stands 
secure in the confidence and esteem of a very wide circle of friends and 
patrons. An insight into the true character of Dr. Brown, may be obtained 
by noting his application of the following words. 

The importance of human relation can lie no more admirably exempli- 
fied than in the instance wherein one man can lie of just benefit to another 
man. A good character is the greatest worldly asset of mankind and that 
whoever seeks to destroy it is worse than lie who would steal away your 
property in the darkness of night. .Man's morality is evidenced by a reason- 
able degree of self-sacrifice and unassuming display of sympathy and charity 
commensurate with his ability to act. His bravery by his straightforward 
way of doing things subservient to a will that meets a moral obligation 
and a true measure of his success by what he has accomplished. 

In contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor 
save in his own country, particular interest is attached to the career of Dr. 
Wm. McFarland Brown, he having been born, reared and has lived his 
entire life within the confines of the county of which this historical com- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO4I 

pendium treats and that he has so directed his ability and effort as to have 
gained recognition as one of our respresentative citizens and worthy scion 
of two of our sterling pioneer families. 

Dr. Brown has not only kept in close touch with the trend of current 
medical thought and research, but is an appreciative student of all social 
public and scientific subjects being thus one of the leading physicians in a 
locality noted for its medical talent. 

He is a plain unassuming gentleman who has a greater desire to be use- 
ful than to gain the admiring plaudits of his fellow men. He so much 
enjoys the discovery of good in other people that he has become a close 
observer of human character and disposition and depends much more upon 
what he observes that what he hears, especially self praise or soliloquy, the 
former being considered by him as inexcusably foolish and funny as the 
latter except, perhaps, on occasion when the soliloquist wants to hear a smart 
fellow talk awhile. 

He was born in Greene county on what is known now as the Duff farm, 
about ten miles southeast of Springfield, on the 24th day of August, 1861. 
From childhood he was remarkably vivacious and active, taking a great 
amount of physical culture which, together with his active farm work during 
earlv manhood resulted in the upbuilding of a vigorous constitution which 
has doubtless served him well during his strenuous professional life, and 
which in part solves the mystery of his wonderful endurance. He is regular 
in evervthing except eating and sleeping, yet he eats and sleeps to live and 
not to be considered otherwise in a single instance. He is ever content to 
depend upon his natural reactionary powers for relief from those tired 
feelings to the exclusion of all other agents. 

He obtained his literary education in the schools here and vicinity and 
.at Morrisville College, after which, upon urgent request by Dr. Robberson, 
Dr. Tefft. Dr. Rose and his father, he early decided to follow in the foot- 
steps of his father in a professional way and having had a decided natural 
predilection in this worthy field of endeavor, he studied medicine under his 
father until 1882, when he entered the Missouri Medical College at St. 
Louis, where he made an excellent record and from which institution he 
graduated with honor in the class of 1885. 

Immediatelv after graduation he located in Springfield, this county, 
where he practiced for about a year then moved a short distance east among 
the people who had known him from childhood. Here he met with great 
encouragement and gained universal confidence which still endures. In the 
vear 1890 he moved on a few miles east to the town of Strafford, this coun- 
tv, where by meritorious professional work and conduct he built up a very 
(66)' 



IO42 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

extensive practice and where lie remained until the year 1909, when seek- 
ing a broader field for the exercise of his talents he located in Springfield, 
where he has since resided, at once taking his place in the front ranks of the 
leading practitioners ; he has thus stood secure in the confidence and esteem 
of the people of this city and community, both as to his professional ability 
and his personal worth, and is deserving in every way of the Large success 
he has achieved. He has remained a diligent student of all that pertains to 
his profession and has kept fully abreast of the times in every phase of the 
same. He has acquired a large amount of real estate, including several 
farms, a commodious residence on Benton avenue, Springfield, and other 
city property. 

The domestic life of Dr. Brown began on December 18, 1890, when he 
was united in marriage with Alta Catherine Love, the daughter of Robert and 
Margaret (Piper) Love, a prominent family of Strafford. The father was 
born in Pike count}', .Missouri, and the mother was a native of Greene coun- 
ty, Missouri ; they became the parents of ten children. ( See sketch and por- 
trait on another page of this work.) 

Mrs. Brown was horn in 1866. at Strafford, where she grew to woman- 
hood and received her education. She is a lady of many praiseworthy attri- 
butes of head and heart. The union of 1 )r. Brown and wife has been 
blessed with four children, namely: Mary, who was educated in the public 
school of Stratford, and at Drury College, married on November [6, [912. 
to Junius \V. Houston, son of I'.dward and Florence 1 Wilson 1 Houston, a 
well-known family of Springfield. Mr. Houston is a talented electrician and 
a promising young business man. having charge of the electrical supplies of 
the Frisco railroad at the present time, lie resides in Springfield and has 
one child, a daughter. Meredith Brown Houston, who was born on January 
6, 1914. The other children of Doctor and Mrs. Brown are Robert Addison 
Brown, who was educated in the public school at Strafford and Drury Col- 
lege, and is now living at home: Hermosa Rose Brown, who is in Ward- 
Belmont College, Xashville. Tenn.. and Maxie Eleanor, who is at home. 

Politically. Mr. Brown is a Democrat, but is duly considerate and appre- 
ciative of friendship, efficiency and true manh 1 wherever found, lie is a 

church member, member of the Independent Qrder of * >dd Fellows, Knight-, 
of Pythias. Eagles, Court of Honor, Woodmen of the World, Woodmen 
Circle. Rebekahs, Modern Woodmen of America, Royal Neighbors, Knights 
and Ladies of Security, Ben-Hur and Society of Colonial Wars. He is a 
man of warm sympathetic impulses, obliging, companionable, and uniformly 
courteous, with high conceptions of good citizenship and right living. 

When young in years the father of our subject came with his parents 
on the long and wearisome overland journey from his native state to Greene 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO43 

county, Missouri, when the locality was but little developed and settlers 
were very few. He first attended school at Green Mountain, North Carolina, 
and later at Ebenezer Academy, this county, after which he taught school 
for a few years, then studied law for two years ; then took up the study 
of medicine under Dr. G. P. Shackelford and completed his medical educa- 
tion at the McDowell Medical College of St. Louis, Missouri. He entered 
upon the practice of his profession near and at Springfield. Missouri, before 
the Civil war, where he continued during and for some time after hostilities 
had ceased, thereafter maintaining his home on a fine farm near the Na- 
tional Cemetery, where he continued practicing until near the end of the 
century. He was one of the oldest and best and most widely known physi- 
cians in this count)', and a man whom to know was to respect and honor, 
not only for his ability as a physician, but for his unswerving integrity. 
Although of southern birth and breeding, be remained neutral during the 
war between the states, prescribing and caring alike for Federals and Con- 
federates, which attitude resulted in making him many enemies who did all 
in their power to annoy him and obstruct his freedom and progress, even 
their persecutions continuing for years after the war bad ended. 

And these enemies had to cope with the insurmountable effort, and influ- 
ence of his many true friend-, exemplified in one instance when John Pickle, a 
Union man, yet his friend and brother Mason, walked in a roundabout way 
five miles barefooted in the dead hours of night to bis home, to apprise him 
of the plot of a gang of bushwhackers and their appointed hour to take 
his life, thus enabling him to escape unharmed. And in another when Dr. 
E. T. Robberson, who was the physician in charge of the Federal hospital, 
which occupied the old building which still stands at the George M. Jones 
place between Sherman street and Springfield avenue, extended to him a 
hand in friendship ami professional fellowship, thus lending him material 
aid in his efforts to obtain a living, and at whose hands the climax of assist- 
ance came when he sent Doctor Brown, accompanied by wife ami a guard, 
to treat Col. John A. Lee, who was sick at Galena, Missouri, with pneumonia, 
where he remained at the bedside of the colonel until convalescent, leaving 
his two children, Alice and William McFarland, at home in the care of Will- 
iam Porter's family, wdiereupon Col. John A. Lee enjoyed the discovery of 
the sterling qualities and medical ability of Doctor Brown, and in prompt 
accord therewith sent orders to headquarters at Springfield to immediately 
and continuously remove all obstacles to his necessities, liberties and pleas- 
ures to the peril of all violators. 

Rut he was of an amiable and peaceful disposition, which doubtless 
prevented him from receiving harsher treatment at the hands of his ene- 
mies. He was a member of the Masonic order and occupied a high position in 



1044 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

all circles in which he moved. He lived to reach an advanced age, death result- 
ing from pneumonia at his home on the 17th day of February, 1894, after 
a useful and commendable life, and his name will be perpetuated in local 
history as being one of Greene county's ablest and most popular pioneer 
physicians. He was of English descent by both parents, having descended 
through his mother from Rev. Stephen Batcheler. of England, an Oxford 
graduate who founded the city of Hampton, New Hampshire, and who was 
presented to the living of Wherwell County Haunts by Sir Thomas West, the 
second Baronet De LaYYare, father of Lord Delaware, who gave his name to 
the Delaware river, for sixteen years he was vicar of Wherwell. 

Dr. Joseph Addison Brown, the father of our subject, was a blood 
relative to John G. Whittier, the poet ; Daniel Webster, the statesman ; Hon. 
Justin S. Morrill. United States senator from Vermont ; Hon. M. B. Allison. 
United States senator from Iowa; Gov. Benjamin F. Butler, of Massachu- 
setts; John Bachelder, the inventor of indispensable parts of the sewing 
machine, and many other noted people. 

John D. Brown, LL. D., the paternal grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was a native of Randolph county, North Carolina, and a son 
of Henry Brown, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary army, as shown 
by Colonial Records of North Carolina, Vol. XVI, page 1022. From the 
old Tar state he removed to Arkansas in a very early day, and soon there- 
after came on to Greene count}'. Missouri, locating on a large tract of wild 
prairie land a few miles southwest of the hamlet of Henderson, which land 
he converted into an excellent farm by persistent and careful management, 
and there spent the remainder of his life, dying of smallpox in the vear 1863. 
He was a dignified and courageous gentleman, possessed of a great amount 
of natural intelligence and tact and, by profession, a lawyer. 

Politically, he was a Democrat and a local leader in his party, but was a 
man who always considered the public good first. He took an active interest in 
public life both in North Carolina and Missouri. While in North Carolina 
he tilled the following offices and positions, namely: Justice of the peace. 
l>eing appointed by the governor of the state: probate judge of Randolph 
count}-; president of Springfield Female College, and later judge of the 
court of chancery until he left the state. While in Greene county. Missouri. 
he was justice of the peace, county school commissioner fur several years, 
and twice his party's candidate for representative. 

He was very successful in a business way. and at the breaking out of 
the war of the rebellion was one of the wealth}- men of the county, but he. like 
nearly all of those who lived in this locality during those troublous days, lust 
heavily. His widow, whose maiden name was Jean Bray, survived him 
three decades, being well past her ninetieth birthday when she was summoned 
tn the Silent Land as a result of pneumonia. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO45 

To John D. and Jean (Bray) Brown, the following children were born: 
Emeline married William Jessup, who established their home at Jamestown, 
Arkansas; Lydia, who has long been deceased, was the wife of Anderson 
Pendleton, of Christian county, Missouri, and at her death left one child; 
Jane married Eli Jessup, also of Christian county; John D., Jr., who located 
at Lead Hill, Arkansas, served through the Civil war in the Confederate 
army under Gen. Sterling Price, and was once wounded; Dr. Eli B., who 
became a physician at Billings, Missouri, also served in the Confederate army 
and was shot through the shoulder in one of the numerous engagements in 
which he participated; William T. was a soldier in the Union army about 
a year, and was honorably discharged on account of having suffered a sun- 
stroke, which thus disabled him from further service; Dr. G. P. S., who 
was graduated from the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons, estab- 
lished himself in the practice of his profession at Nixa, Christian county, 
and Dr. Joseph A., father of the immediate subject of this sketch. The 
wife of John D. Brown is credited with the honor of naming Christian 
county. John D. Brown, together with Gov. John S. Phelps, was sent at 
one time as special delegate to interview President Jackson in the interest 
of this part of the country, being accompanied by his son, the father of our 
subject. 

To Dr. Joseph A. and Martha A. ( McFarland) Brown, parents of our 
subject, the following children were born : Alice, who married Joseph Dan- 
forth, of Greene county, and who died April 2, 1914, of tetanus, the germ 
having been received into a small finger wound while preparing garden; 
Dr. William McFarland, who is next to the eldest; Henry and James both 
dying in infancy, James having died at the age of one year as a result of 
swallowing glass; Jamie married C. J. Edmondson, of Greene county; Joseph 
Edwin, who resides in Springfield; Martha, who is deceased; and Daniel 
Keating, who is in California. 

Hon. William McFarland, the maternal grandfather of the subject of 
this review, removed from Cooper county, Missouri, in a very early day, 
settling at the big Jones spring, where he built and operated one of the first 
grist mills in this country and where the old mill race foundation still stands, 
as a landmark of his ingenuity and industry. Here he received and gratified 
patrons from the country far and near. He was successful in this business. 
Later he became an extensive farmer and stockman and became quite wealthy, 
owning about a thousand acres of fertile land, a great many slaves, and an 
abundance of other personal property. His home was situated four miles 
southeast of Springfield, being the same as was later owned and occupied 
by Dr. Joseph Addison Brown, the father of our subject. A part of his 
land joined up with that of Gov. John S. Phelps, just outside of the city 



IO46 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

limits. He was a tine example of self-made man, a natural born leader, who 
was possessed of rare ability and general information, and was an eloquent 
and forceful public speaker, whose personality, knowledge and evident inter- 
est in the public welfare placed him in demand on many occasions, especially 
during political campaigns. Politically, he was originally a Whig, but became 
a Republican at the birth of that party, which held him in abiding faith 
the remainder of his life, death resulting from poisoned water, which set 
cooling out on a shelf, thus rendered, it was believed, by the fiendish impulse 
of an intractable slave whom he had sold on account of gross disobedience. 
Although a slave owner, he was merely such by custom and apparent neces- 
sity and not by principle, for he was a man imbued with the spirit of sym- 
pathy and humanity, never having struck a slave but one time in his life, 
and that was Stephen, the neighborhood hddler, upon the violation of his 
orders by proceeding to play for a dance at a house of questionable repute. 
This occasion brought tears to the old master's eyes while pleading with 
Stephen to be honorable and thus avoid the obligation of treating a man as 
some men treat an animal. 

He took an active part in the political affairs of this county, being twice 
elected to the state Legislature, defeating the paternal grandfather of our 
subject in both campaigns. He was also at one time sheriff of this county. 
His wife was Patsy Roberts, one of the two children of John and Rebecca 
(Langley) Roberts, who removed from Kentucky to Greene count}-. Mis- 
souri, about the year 1830. John Roberts was a typical pioneer, very 
strong, and a man whose courage was never doubted. He delighted in the 
crucial tests of physical manhood, and gloried in his ability to surmount the 
obstacles allotted to his pathway. He was a great hunter, in the pursuit of 
which he felt no terror at the sight of a redskin crunched behind a rock or 
the vicious inhabitants of the woods nearby, having at one time near a sink 
hole in the east field of what is now known as the Joe McCraw farm down 
by old Mt. Pisgah church, attacked and killed a large bear with no other 
weapon than his dirk knife. 

He lived and conducted a mill and distillers- at the big Jones spring, 
where he prospered for a number of years, and later was coroner of Greene 
county. He was shot and killed by an enemy on the public square of Spring- 
field whom he had previously frightened by a fun-making snap of his spec- 
tacle case. His enemy had threatened him, which only served to stimulate 
his mischievous attitude and he was unarmed when the fatal moment came. 
His bodily remains still rest on the hilltop by that noted spring marked by 
a tomb hewn from the native rock by the hands of a fellow pioneer. 

The wife of John Roberts was a good, industrious woman, bearing, 
it is said, a strong resemblance to Gen. Winfield Scott, and who lived to the 



GREENE COUNTY, .MISSOURI. 104/ 

advanced age of about ninety years, and died suddenly while sitting in a 
chair. She left a great many nice things of her own handiwork, which are 
still in existence, scattered among her posterity, and the occasional display 
of which serves to remind us of her great worth and importance in a genera- 
tion long gone by. Patsy McFarland evidently inherited her father's nerve, 
as shown on an occasion of her return from the Holland bank to her home 
late one evening, when she was attacked by a highway robber, whom she- 
beat into a state of insensibility with her walking cane, when old and very 
decrepit. The children of Hon. William and Patsy (Roberts) McFarland 
were: Rebecca, the wife of John Pursley, who is deceased; Harriet Green- 
lee, who was honored with the title of "Mother of Springfield" before her 
death; George, who is still living in Greene county; John T. ; William; 
Nancy, wife of Abner Galbraith; Lucinda, wife of Robert A. Mack; all 
being deceased, and James, a prosperous resident of Tulare, California. 

Dr. William McFarland Brown is a direct descendant of Christopher 
Ilussey, who married a daughter of Stephen Bachiler, who would only give 
his consent to the marriage on condition that they would sail with him for 
America. This agreement was complied with and, about 163 1, they 
embarked for America. About the year 1639, Christopher Hussey was 
appointed a justice of the peace in New bury. .Massachusetts, a position of 
dignity and importance in early days. He was also one of the purchasers 
of Nantucket, Massachusetts, but did not remove there. He and his father- 
in-law were proprietors of Hampton, New Hampshire, where they finally 
settled, and from 1658 to 1672 was deputy or representative to the general 
court, having been elected to this position. 



THOMAS H. BRADLEY. 

One of the chief concerns of every man in the productive period of his 
life is to accumulate sufficient means to enable him to properly care for him- 
self and family in old age. Many men start out with the best of intentions, 
but err in business judgment and find themselves penniless in old age. Others 
seem to be followed by unfortunate circumstances classified under the gen- 
eral heading of "hard luck." Thomas H. Bradley has exercised such sound 
judgment and persistency in his active career that he has been able to earn 
a good livelihood and rear his family in comfort and respectability, notwith- 
standing the usual adversities that occasionally beset the pathways of every 
mortal. 

Mr. Bradley was born in Sumner county. Tennessee, September 17, 
1844. He is a son of Isaac F. and Sarah (Maberv) Bradlev, an excellent 



IO48 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

old Tennessee couple who devoted many years to successful farming in Sum- 
ner county. The father received excellent educational advantages and was 
a good scholar. He was born in 1820 and died March 8, 1879. Mrs. Brad- 
ley was born in 1820 and died March 9, 1906. 

Thomas H. Bradley grew up on the home farm. As a lad he was not 
very strong and his education was limited. He left his native state early in 
1855, and arrived in Greene county, Missouri, on April 5th of that year, 
locating on a farm near Springfield, when the place was a small village. He- 
continued to follow farming here until 1879, when he established a livery 
business in Springfield, which he conducted until 1886, when he sold out and 
went back to farming, which he carried on with his usual success until 1894, 
when he moved back to Springfield and did a general live stock and trading 
business until in October, 1913, when he bought a livery, feed and sale stable 
at 1220 North Campbell street, which he conducted until recentlv. 

Mr. Bradley enlisted during the early part of the Civil war in Greene 
county, in the Seventy-second Regiment, State Militia, in which he served 
for some time, later enlisting in Company E, Sixteenth Missouri Cavalrv, 
under Captain Headley, serving ten months, but was in it in any engagements. 
During the latter part of the war be married and hired a substitute to fill out 
his military service. 

Air. Bradley married in Greene county, in September 16, 1863, Mary 
Louisa Akin, who was a daughter of Lafayette and Patsey ( Stricklin) Akin, 
wliu were both born in Tennessee, east of the Cumberland mountains. 

Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bradley, named as follows: 
Thomas Franklin is the eldest; John Harvey is deceased; Mrs. Lola May 
Smith, William \\\. Samuel L., Robert Lee lives in Kansas City; Mrs. Evella 
Stocker lives in Kansas ( ity; Luella is deceased; Elsie is also deceased. Our 
subject owns several valuable pieces of city property here. 

Mrs. Bradley is a member of the Baptist church. Politically, our sub- 
ject is a Republican. 



ROBERT LOVE. 

The history of Greene county reveals the handiwork of many a noble 
soul who wrought heroically and unselfishly. Her smiling fields and splen- 
did homes, her high-grade institutions, her happy, prospering people speak 
volumes of some one's steadfastness of purpose, of some one's strength of 
arm, courage of heart, activity of brain — of some one's sacrifice. But time, 
that ruthless obliterator. before whose destroying fingers even the stubborn 
granite must, in the end succumb, is ever at bis work of disintegration. Be- 
neath his blighting touch even memory fails, and too often a life of splendid 




Ml! AMI NIKS. i:< IBK1IT l."\ E 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1049' 

achievement is forgotten in a day. Lest we forget, then, as Kipling ad- 
monishes us in liis superb "Recessional," regarding a number of important 
things that should not be forgotten, this tribute to the memory of the late 
Robert Love is penned. Pioneer merchant, successful agriculturist, a public- 
spirited, brave, kindly, generous man, it is the desire of the biographer, as it 
must be of all who knew him, that his deeds and his character be recorded 
for the benefit of those who follow after. 

Mr. Love was born in Pike county, Missouri, which picturesque locality 
has been made famous by the late Secretary of State, John Hay, in his 
"Ballads from Pike," the date of the former's birth having been March 26, 
1839. He was a son of Andrew and Mary Ann (Muir) Love, both long 
deceased. Our subject was one of four children, namely : Harrison, de- 
ceased; Mrs. Margaret Dunn, deceased; Mrs. Sarah J. McCullister, de- 
ceased; Robert of this memoir. 

Robert Love was reared in his native county and there received a com- 
mon school education. At the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion, he 
joined the Union army and was such a brave and efficient fighter for the 
cause that he was promoted to lieutenant. He took part in many engage- 
ments, including the battles of Pea Ridge and Springfield, and was honorably 
discharged at the close of the war. Before the war he had removed with 
his stepfather to Greene county on a farm. He sold this place not long after 
the war and began the mercantile business, selling dry goods at Strafford, 
being the first store-keeper in that place. He built up a good trade with the 
surrounding country, his many customers remaining his friends owing to 
the honest and courteous treatment he accorded them. He was the fir^t 
man to buy a lot in Strafford. After remaining in business there about a 
year he resumed farming, but eventually returned to Strafford where he 
spent the last days of his life and died there on October 29, 1905. 

Mr. Love was married November 26, 1864, to Margaret C. Piper, who 
was born near Strafford, April 28, 1842, and there grew to womanhood on 
a farm. She received a good education in the local schools. Since the 
death of her husband she has shown rare business tact in managing success- 
fully her various affairs. She has lived in Strafford twenty-nine years. 
She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. She is a daughter of 
Samuel and Sarah (Smith) Piper, both now deceased. Mr. Piper was a 
successful farmer and stock raiser, well and favorably known in this locality. 
He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. They 
emigrated here from Virginia in 1839 an< ^ were among the early settlers in 
Greene county, where Mr. Piper entered land from the government and 
developed a large and productive farm. 

Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Love, namelv : Mrs. Alta C. 



IO5O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Brown lives in Springfield; Mrs. Sarah N. Dishman lives in Jackson town- 
ship; Florence H. lives at home; Mrs. Mary E. West lives at Nogo, Mis- 
souri ; Mrs. Margaret K. Ivepley lives in Taylor township ; Maude May died 
February 4, 1896. 

Politically, Mr. Love was a Democrat. He was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, and belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
was a man of fine personal character. 



FRANK A. BEYER. 



When we are told that such and such a man is a general foreman of no 
matter what, we know at once that he is a man who possesses native talent and 
that he has not attained his position at a single bound, but that he has spent 
years in close application and careful preparation; that he has been faithful 
to every trust reposed in him and that he is a man of self-reliance and forti- 
tude. Without any attempt to unduly praise Frank A. Beyer, general foreman 
of the locomotive department of the new Frisco shops at Springfield, we can 
truthfully say that he is such a man as we have here indicated. 

Mr. Beyer, who has spent his active life in railroad service, is a man of 
Teutonic origin, his birth having occurred in Germany, August 5, 1877. He 
is a son of Joseph and Margaret ( Fleysch ) Beyer, both natives of Germany, 
the father's birth having occurred on November jj. 1861, and the mother was 
born in 1865. There they grew to maturity, attended school and were married 
and spent their earlier years, emigrating to America more than three decades 
ago. The mother died in Topeka, Kansas, in 1904, and in that city still resides 
the father. He is a machinist by trade. It was in the early eighties that 
he came to that city from his native country and there he has since resided. 
He soon found employment in the shops of the Santa Fe railroad in Topeka 
and he has since worked there in this capacity. I lis family consists of live 
children, namely: Frank A. of this review, he being the only one born in 
the old country; Rosa, Tressey, Anna and Emma. 

Frank A. Beyer was a small boy when he came to the United States, 
and he grew to manhood in Topeka, Kansas, and there attended the common 
schools, the high school and a business college, and was thus well equipped 
when he began life for himself. When a boy he began his career as rail- 
roader, serving his apprenticeship in the Santa Fe simps at Topeka, and 
later worked at many different places on that system, during a period of 
eight years. In 1904 he came to Springfield and began working as ma- 
chinist in the North Side -hops. When the new shops were opened he was 
promoted to the position of erecting foreman and in 1910 was promoted to 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO5I 

general foreman of 'the locomotive department which responsible position 
he still holds, having a large number of skilled mechanics under his direction. 

.Mr. Beyer was married on August 17, 1899, in Topeka, Kansas, to 
Carrie Mohmeyer, who was horn in Louisville, Kentucky. September 7, 
1882. She is a daughter of Henry and Anna (Sutter) Mohmeyer. Her 
father is a trunk maker by trade. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Frank, 
born August 24, 1900, is attending Springfield high school; and .Mary Etta, 
born October 1, 1906. 

Politically, Air. Beyer is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Woodmen of the World, the Eagles and the Germania Hall Society. He 
is also a member of the Masonic lodge, including the Shriners. 



ROBERT B. LOVE. D. V. S. 

Greene county has never had a more efficient, progressive and popular 
veterinary physician and surgeon than Dr. Robert B. Love, a man of state- 
wide reputation, who seemed to have a natural aptitude and liking for this 
calling when a mere boy, and from that time to the present he has left no 
stone unturned whereby he could advance himself in the same, remaining 
a close student of everything" pertaining to this science, observing, investi- 
gating and experimenting. His counsel has been frequently sought by his 
professional brethren and invariably followed with gratifying results, his ad- 
vice in any phase of the profession being accepted as unqualified authority. 
His modernly equipped hospital in Springfield is known to all horsemen in 
southwest Missouri and he has built up an extensive and lucrative patronage 
during his long years of residence here. An admirer and expert judge of 
borses of superior breed he always keeps a number of animals, owning three 
stallions at this writing which have few peers in the country. 

Dr. Love was born in Webster county. Missouri, February 5, 1873. He 
is a scion of a sterling ancestry, some of the Loves having been distinguished 
military men in the early wars of the nation and influential citizens of 
Virginia and Tennessee. He is a son of Thomas C. and Sallie Jane ( Rodgers ) 
Love. The father is a retired resident of Springfield, having been a suc- 
cessful farmer in Webster county during the active years of his life, and 
in that county his birth occurred in 1844, soon after his parents, Thomas 
B. and Elizabeth (Barnard) Love settled there, having emigrated from Ten- 
nessee. Thomas B. Love was born in North Carolina and was a son of 
Gen. Thomas Love, who was a native of Ireland, from which country he 
emigrated to the United States in old Colonial days and he became a sol- 



IO52 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

dier in the Revolutionary war, finally become coloner of a North Carolina 
regiment. Later he moved into Tennessee and became a general of militia 
and a great man there, serving thirty years consecutively in the state legis- 
lature. His oldest son, Robert, was a colonel in the War of 1812 and fought 
under Jackson at New Orleans. The family has always been lovers of 
liberty and have unhesitatingly taken an active part in the wars in which 
this country has been involved at various times. Thomas B. Love, grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, entered six hundred acres of land upon 
his arrival in Webster county, and this he cleared and developed and thereon 
established the permanent home of the family. His son, Thomas C. Love, 
father of our subject, became owner of the homestead, which he retained up 
to a few years ago, when he sold it, retiring from active life as a farmer 
and moving to Springfield, as before indicated. Thomas B. Love owned 
about two dozen slaves at the time of his death, which occurred in 1852, 
after a residence of only a decade in the Ozarks. He was a man of humani- 
tarian impulses and was also very considerate in his treatment of his slaves. 
His family consisted of nine children. The oldest son joined a company 
for the Mexican war. became a first lieutenant, but died on the march 
to Mexico. The widow of Thomas B. Love died in 1869. Thomas C. 
Love, mentioned above, grew to manhood on the home farm in Webster 
county, and when the Civil war came on he enlisted in the Confederate army, 
a Missouri cavalry regiment, under General Marmaduke and proved to be a 
gallant soldier. He still carries a pistol ball received in a battle in Arkansas. 
He was also in prison on two different occasions for some time. When his 
brigade was defeated in battle at .Mines (.'reek. Kansas, where General Mar- 
maduke and Cabell and a large number of the men were captured, be made 
a sensational escape by swimming a dangerous stream, and later joined a 
reorganized body of the same troops in Texas and served until the close of 
the war, surrendering at Shreveport, Louisiana, in June. 1865. After the 
war he devoted three years to the management of a plantation in Texas, 
raising cotton, then returned to Webster county. Missouri, and carried on 
general farming and live stock raising until [892, when be turned bis farm 
into an apple orchard. He first moved to Springfield in 1883 to educate 
bis children, moving back to the farm in [899, and in [91] again took up bis 
residence in the Queen City. Me was formerly active in the Democratic 
party and served one term in the state legislature in 1882. In 1893 he was 
appointed postmaster at Springfield, which office he held four years. 

The mother of Dr. Robert B. Love was a daughter of R. W. Rodgers 
and wife, of Texas county, Missouri. This family is of Scotch-Irish de- 
scent and became known in the New World at an early day. The grand- 
father of Mrs. Love took up bis residence in Texas county long before the 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO53 

opening of the Civil war and became an extensive lumberman and well known 
to the early pioneers of that section. Mrs. Love grew to womanhood in her 
native locality and received her education in the early schools there. Her 
death occurred May 20, 19 12. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Love, namely : 
Dr. Joseph W., of Springfield; Dr. Robert B., of this sketch; Thomas B., 
an attorney, of Dallas, Texas; Ralph M., a banker, of Mt. Pleasant, Texas; 
Edgar P., a manufacturer, of Dallas, Texas; two sons died in early life. 

Dr. Robert B. Love grew to manhood on the homestead in Webster 
county and there did his share of the general work when he was a boy. 
He received his early education in the district schools. He came to Spring- 
field in 188 1 and served as money-order clerk at the postoffice for three 
and a half years. Prior to that time he spent a term in Drury College, after 
which he entered the Western Veterinary College at Kansas City, where 
he made rapid progress and from which institution he was graduated in 
1898-99. He was valedictorian of his class. Returning to Springfield lie 
opened an office and has been engaged in the practice of his profession 
here ever since, each year showing a further advancement than the preceding. 
He has maintained the same office all the while, his hospital on Convention 
Hall avenue is equipped with all up-to-date appliances and apparatus to in- 
sure prompt and high-grade service. He has kept fully abreast of the times 
in his chosen line of endeavor and has long ranked among the leading 
veterinary physicians and surgeons of the state, and for many years has 
held the office of deputy state veterinarian of Missouri, having served in 
this capacity under the past five governors of the state. His long reten- 
tion is evidence of his ability and satisfaction. In 1899 he took a post-gradu- 
ate course in the Western Veterinary College. He has had a large practice 
here from the first, and is often called to various parts of the state on 
consultation. He was placed in charge of all the territory south of the 
Frisco lines on the tick-eradication work several years ago. 

During the Boer war. Doctor Love was hired by the British govern- 
ment as chief veterinarian in charge of steamship Kelvingrove, which carried 
a load of mules from New Orleans to Cape Town. South Africa, for the 
army. He did his work so thoroughly and ably that the English officials 
complimented him highly, reporting that he had made the best record in 
transporting animals from New Orleans to South Africa ever made for the 
British government up to that date. He lost but two mules out of nine 
hundred and ninety-nine on the entire voyage. While in South Africa Doctor 
Love was offered a position as chief of veterinary hospital and outfitting 
army station at Queenstown. After traveling over the southern portion 
of the Dark Continent he visited the important cities of England, visiting 
Paris during the World's Fair in 1900. 



1054 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Doctor Love was married, July 11, 1894, to Mable M. Williams, who 
was burn in Springfield, December 19, 1873. She is a daughter of John and 
Julia ( Vinton) Williams, a prominent family of this city, the father having 
been a leading hardware merchant here for many years, but is now living 
in retirement. A complete sketch of this family a-ppears on another page 
of this volume to which the reader is respectful referred. Mrs. Love 
grew to womanhood in this city and received a good education in the local 
schools. The union of the Doctor and wife has resulted in the birth of 
three children, namely: Robert W., born July 2, 1896. is attending high 
school; George McDaniel, born October 18, 1901, is in school; and John 
Thomas, born March 17, 1905. is also a student. 

Politically, Doctor Love is a Democrat, but professional duties have 
prevented him from taking a very active part in political affairs. Fra- 
ternally, he belongs to the Loyal Order of Moose, having passed all the 
chairs in the local lodge up to dictator. He was brought up in the faith of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, South, the family attending the Christ 
Episcopal church. For recreation the Doctor formerly devoted considerable 
time to rod anil gun. and is an expert shot, but of late years he has had 
little time to devote to sportsmanship owing to his extensive practice. 

Our subject is an ardent lover of good horses and is an enthusiastic 
breeder of thoroughbred and saddle horses, and has sold more of them than, 
perhaps, any other breeder in Missouri. He has often acted as judge at 
various count}- fairs within a radius of two hundred miles of Springfield. 
He is at this writing owner of three of the finest and most valuable stallions 
in the state, namely: "P. J." 0107, is one of tin- fastest and best breeding 
combination stallions, ami one that has sired more high-class, level-headed 
family horses than any other horse in this section, a horse that has shown 
two-minute speed and possesses unquestionable disposition for which his 

gets are also noted. The year 1 k shows that "P. J." was one of the 

gamest and most successful race horses in his daw He has been shown 
in almost all the streel fairs and show rings in the vicinity of Springfield and 
has never met defeat. His last appearance was at the Springfield show, 
October 9, 1909, for combination stallion with five of his gets, competition 
advertised open to the world. "Peacock Chief" [585, is the durable saddle 
stallion that has been advertised without successful contradiction, to show- 
more gaits both under the saddle and in bis gets than all the rest of the 
saddle stallions in Greene county combined. Chief has sired more high- 
priced saddle colts than any other saddle stallion ewer having made a season 
in Greene county, many of his colts having sold from one thousand to 
eighteen hundred dollars. "Hot" 70049 (79746) Percheron stallion, was im- 
ported from France for the Charles Holland stock farm, and purchased by 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 10 



.-o 



Doctor Love in January, 1914, whose pedigree shows him to be one of the 
richest bred Percheron stallions in the United States, and unquestionably the 
best stallion for this section ever imported by the Holland stock farm, one 
of the most noted farms of its kind in the state. 



ALPHONSUS F. FINE. 



One of the best known retail grocerymen in Springfield is Alphonsus 
F. Fine, who has been engaged in this line of endeavor on the South Side 
for a period of twenty-five years, during which time his prestige as a 
straightforward and conscientious business man and substantial citizen has 
constantly increased. He did not begin his career with the get-rich-quick 
idea, but sought to advance himself along steady and legitimate lines, so 
shaping his course that each succeeding year has found him further ad- 
vanced and with a wider circle of friends. 

Mr. Fine was born in Greene county, Missouri. January 30. 1871. 
He is a son of Felix F and Martha (Gesford) bine. The father was born 
in St. Louis county, Missouri, in 1833, and he is now making his home 
with our subject in Springfield, having attained the advanced age of four 
score years. His wife was born in St. Francis county, this state, in 1840, 
and her death occurred in Springfield in [886, when forty-six years of age. 
These parents received limited education in the early-day schools and were 
married in St. Louis count)' in [858. They removed to Greene count)- in 
1867 and here Felix F. Fine went into the nursery business, the Fine 
Nurseries being located three miles west of Springfield, and he made a 
success of this business, enjoying a large patronage, sending his trees all 
over this portion of the state. He studied the business thoroughly and 
understood even' phase of it, and took great pleasure in the work. Mr. 
Fine formerly took considerable interest in political matters, and was elected 
judge of the county court in [882 and re-elected in [884, on the Democratic 
ticket and he filled the office most acceptably and satisfactorily. He is a 
member of the Catholic church. He is well known throughout the county 
and highly respected. He and bis wife bad but the one child, our subject. 

Alphonsus F. Fine grew to manhood in Greene county and assisted his 
father with the nursery business when he was a boy. He obtained his edu- 
cation in the district schools for the most part, and in 1890 engaged in the 
grocery business with his father, who was connected with YV. F. Durbin 
under the firm name of Fine & Durbin. In 1897 he engaged in this business, 
for himself at the corner of College and Market streets, where be remained 
twelve years, and five years ago moved to his present location at 329-331 



IO56 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

East Walnut street, where he has a modernly appointed, well-stocked and at- 
tractive store, carrying a complete line of staple and fancy groceries and 
employs a number of assistants. He enjoys a very large trade, including" 
many of the leading families of the city. 

Mr. Fine was married, October 20, 1897, in Springfield, to [Margaret 
Coughlin, who was born in Paola, Kansas, August 10, 1875. She received a 
good common school education. After the death of her father she re- 
moved with her mother to Springfield. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fine five children have been born, namely: Gesford 
F., born March 9, 1899; Margaret, born December 25, 1901 ; Eululie, born 
June 10, 1903; Marion, born July 14. 1906; and Martha, born July 1, 1912. 

Politically. Mr. Fine is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Royal Arcanum and the Modern Woodmen. Religiously, he is a member of 
the St. Agnes Catholic church. 



LUTHER QUIXTER McCARTY. 

The name of the late Luther Ouinter McCarty needs no introduction to 
the readers of this volume, if indeed, it needs any formal presentation to 
readers anywhere, for that name has been printed repeatedly throughout 
the world, and it has attracted much attention and aroused both admiration 
and regret — admiration owing to his physical prowess, and regret that his 
brilliant career as one of the greatest athletes of modern times should 
have terminated so soon and so tragically. P>ut we are reminded of the 
saying of the ancient Creeks, the wisest people the earth has ever pro- 
duced, that "whom the gods love die early." Those same Greeks, also 
the Romans, were great admirers of athletes, and the latter nation 
especially boasted of its line specimens of manhood. The Olympic games 
held in those remote days were national affairs and attended by emperors, 
senators, famous generals and men of letters, and the victors at these great 
fetes — the winning athletes — were lionized by the fashionable and cultured, 
and myrtle wreaths were placed upon their brows a- symbols of victory, 
these wreaths being coveted almost as much as crowns of royalty. And 
from that epoch down to the present, the world lias never ceased to admire 
and applaud the man who is capable of showing superior physical ability 
just as much as Ik- who achieves fame in the realm of intellect. Many- 
thinking people of today are saying that we, as a nation, neglect the phy- 
sical development of the youth of the land and place too much emphasis 
upon business qualifications, and are advocating that more encouragement 





^^^^F 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IC>57 

be given to a stronger, purer physical manhood. Surely no one could object 
seriously to clean athletic spurts, and the man who excels, as did Mr. 
McCarty, is entitled to the plaudits of his fellowmen. Physically he was an 
Apollo, and personally a prince of good fellows; no kinder heart or broader 
sympathy could have been found among the young men in this country. His 
career was short, but it was brilliant, like the meteor that flames along the 
horizon for a moment, then disappears in darkness. 

Luther O. McCarty, for some time white heavyweight champion pugi- 
list of the world, was born on a ranch near Omaha, Nebraska, March 17, 
1892. He was a son of Aaron and Margaret McCarty. The mother died 
when our subject was an infant, and the future champion lived in various 
homes when a boy, but later the father remarried and the boy was partly 
reared by his stepmother. The father, Dr. Aaron McCarty, known as 
"White Eagle, the Indian doctor," spent his earlier life in Nebraska, but for 
a number of years he has made his home in Ohio and he and his second 
wife are residents of the city of Piqua, that state. Dr. McCarty is a giant 
in size, measuring six feet and eight inches and weighing three hundred and 
fifteen pounds. 

Luther O. McCarty received a meager education in the public schools 
of Nebraska, and later in life became a well-informed man by wide travel 
and contact with the world. He was endowed with good common sense 
and learned quickly. He was the right kind of man to make a good 
pugilist. He never had the bad habits that wreck so many of the young 
men of the world. There was no taint of easy living to be worked out 
of his system. He was a working man from the start. He was brought 
up on the farm, where he lived in the open air all the time, riding horses, 
herding cattle, working hard, and it was this free life on a western ranch 
that aroused in him a love for horses which characterized his subsequent 
career, and, useless to add, that he was an expert rider and horseman. 
Nothing delighted him more than to "break" an unruly broncho. When a 
pood lad, he admired the great saddles of the cowboys, and it was his ambi- 
tion to own one when he grew up. This desire was gratified beyond his 
youthful dreams, for during the last year of his life he had made to order 
a very fine saddle, beautifully studded with silver and various trappings 
that would have been the envy of any Indian chieftain in the country, paying 
the sum of seven hundred dollars for the saddle and a special trunk in 
which to keep it. 

When he left the ranch, Mr. McCarty went to sea, where he lived 

the hard life of a common sailor for two or three years. After that he 

became an iron worker, a bridge builder. This kind of work required 

nerve, strength and courage and it made McCarty's sinews like the iron he 

(67) 



IO58 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

handled. When he left that trade, having had his leg broken in an accident, 
he went back to the West again and took up the old cowboy life. There 
he accidentally had occasion to take on a glove fight and discovered that he 
was fitted for the profession that brings in the money faster than any other 
open to a man without a college training. He not only had the physical 
strength and agility, but he had also one of the most important qualities 
which a boxer can have — intelligence. When in the ring he needed no 
coaching or advice from his seconds, he used his own brains. 

Entering the ring when about eighteen years old, his first fight was 
at Swift Current, for which he received only fifteen dollars. His rise was 
perhaps the most rapid of any prize ring star in the history of pugilism, 
and his last battle, about eighteen months after his first, brought him many 
thousands of dollars, and during that brief period he earned about one 
hundred thousand dollars. In all he engaged in twenty-three battles and 
won sixteen of them with knockouts. Four of the other seven were ten- 
round, no-decision bouts, two were six-round, no-decision bouts, and one,, 
the last, was to have been a ten-round fight. He won over such widely 
known pugilists as Carl Morris. Al Kaufman. Jim Flynn and Al Palzer. 
Upon the defeat of the last named at Los Angeles, California, January 1^ 
1913, he was given a diamond-studded belt, valued at five thousand dollars, 
and was the recognized white heavyweight champion of the world, which 
honors he retained five months, or until his untimely death. 

Air. McCarty was married at Sidney, Ohio, May 28, 1907, to Rhoda 
Wright, who was born November 9, [888, in Sidney, Ohio, and there grew 
to womanhood and was educated in the common schools. She is a daugh- 
ter of Theodore and Amanda (Stumpff) Wright, both natives of that 
place, also where they grew up. were educated, married and established their 
home. The father was born January 23, 1 S 5 5 . and his death occurred at 
Sidney, February _'<>. 11)14. The mother was born March 23, 1852, and 
she still lives in Sidney. Mr. Wright devoted his active life to general 
farming, also operated a threshing machine. Politically he was a Democrat, 
and fraternally a member of the Masonic Order. His family consisted of 
six children. 

To Luther Q. McCarty and wife one child was born, a daughter, Cor- 
nelia Alberta McCarty, the date of whose birth was February 14. 191 1. 
Mrs. McCarty and daughter make their home in Springfield. The deceased 
champion was very fond of his little daughter, and intended retiring from 
the ring on her account after he had amassed a sufficient fortune to live 
comfortably the rest of his life and provide for her in every way, especially 
giving her an excellent education. He left a large bank account and 
valuable property at Venice, California, and elsewhere. 

The death of Luther O. McCarty occurred at Calgarv. Province of 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO59 

Alberta, Canada, May 24, 1913. The exact cause has never been fully 
determined. He was engaged in a bout with Arthur Pelkey, and in less than 
three minutes after the opening of the engagement McCarty fell to the 
mat and expired almost immediately. It seems certain that he was not 
killed by a blow from his antagonist. However, such a blow probably had 
its effects in causing the champion's tragic end. It was at first believed that 
heart failure was the cause, but this was later doubted by physicians, who 
found that a dislocation of a vertebra in his neck had taken place, and it was 
the accepted theory by most that this injury had been caused a few days 
previous when the champion was riding a bucking mustang and that Pelkey's 
blow caused a further dislocation, resulting in death. 

The remains of the great athlete were sent to Piqua, Ohio, for burial. 
The body was viewed by thousands as it lay in state. Beautiful floral 
tributes were sent by admirers from all over the country. Interment was 
made in the family lot in Forest Hill Cemetery. The city of Piqua never 
saw so large a crowd at a funeral. Newspaper representatives from big 
dailies throughout the country were there covering the funeral, as well as 
magazine writers of national reputation. 

The following obituary, written by Billy McCarney, manager of the 
subject of this memoir, during his successful ring career, appeared in The 
Ozark Magazine in its issue of June, 1913: 

" 'Luther McCarty. Springfield, Missouri,' were the last words ever 
written by the lamented heavyweight champion who went to his death in 
an orthodox ring engagement with Arthur Pelkey, at Calgary, Alberta, 
Canada, May 24th. The night preceding the bout, McCarty remained in 
the city of Calgary instead of returning to his training camp. Where 
he elected to stay was the best hotel the city of Calgary affords, the Royal 
King George, and it was on the register of the hotel he inscribed his name 
and home town. Luther McCarty was essentially a product of the Queen 
City of the Ozarks. He was heard continually referring to Springfield as 
the grandest place in the world and no matter when his trips across the 
country were being routed, he always tried to have it so arranged that he 
could go through the city he loved. When we were leaving the East to 
make the trip through Calgary, Luther asked me to try and arrange it so 
that we could go by way of St. Louis and Springfield, but it was so much 
out of the way and meant such a sacrifice of time that I declined changing 
the ticket routing and we made the run by the shortest route, via Chicago. 
I am sorry that I refused his request. 

"The sudden and unlooked for death of McCarty jarred the whole 
world, but nowhere did it hit with such teriffic heart aches as it did in 
Springfield. They loved the big good-natured boy in the city he loved to 
call home. They had seen him in his budding days, saw him blossom the 



IOOO GREENE COl'XTV, MISSOURI. 

night he tumbled Carl Morris to the mat and later when he returned from 
his triumphal, sensational, astounding tour of the West, with the champion- 
ship of the world in his keeping, it was the people of Springfield who 
gave him his greatest reception. McCarty returned in full bloom to greet 
his friends of the early struggling days. Despite the fact that he had won 
the greatest honor a man of his chosen profession could acquire, he returned 
to Springfield as just the same plain Luther McCarty they had known here 
in the days of privation. He did not run to grasp the hands of the big men 
of the city. It was not his way. With the reception over he jumped on the 
same horse he had ridden in the early days and rode from place to place 
meeting the friends he called friends when he was just one of the common 
herd. His success never turned his head and he never forgot anyone who 
befriended him in the early days. The religious element did not take kindly 
to the reception planned for the return of the lad who went forth from 
Springfield to conquer and, incidentally, placed Springfield on the map. and 
headed by one individual they made the home-coming of the champion some- 
what different from what it was planned, but McCarty never once referred 
to it as an unpleasant memory. His idea of life was that we all travel 
in our own grooves and it hurt him to know that he had been spoken 
of so illy by the man who fought the giving of a reception for him. It 
was not the individual; it was not a combination of forces working against 
him: it was not the stout-hearted friends who battled to have him received 
properly, that stood out in his mind. It was simply that he loved Spring- 
field. Despite the harsh things said of him by the man who opposed his 
being received properly. I am glad to say Springfield loved Luther McCarty. 
Not Springfield alone, but the world loved the big boy. The world admires 
a winner, but some are better liked than others, and Luther McCarty was 
loved to the fullest. I do not recall him ever speaking mean of anyone. 
He lived a temperate life, was free frmn profane language, loved his fellow- 
man and was ready at all times to benefit one in need. The Golden Rule 
was his motto and he never was so well pleased as when, in his days of 
prosperity, he was able to help one of those in need. His charity was not 
ot the noisy kind. lie was unostentatious in the performance of good 
deeds and his enjoyment was in knowing he had done something for some- 
one, that he at some time in his early life would have appreciated having 
done for him. 

'"In the death of Luther McCarty the world lost a noble character. 
His loyalty to a friend was unbounded. Appreciation of good done for 
him was paramount and the one way to awaken him to a point of showing 
his temper was to have anyone speak disparagingly of his friends. As a 
companion he was truly lovable. Of a sunny disposition, he loved the good 
things of life and wanted those nearest to him to share his every pleasure. 



GREEXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I06l 

His treatment of myself was so perfect and our days of close association 
so crowded with sweet memories that he will live in my mind for all time. 
1 loved him as a son and Ik- respected me as an obedient son would a 
father. In our eighteen months of daily association we never had a cross 
word. I did at times chide him for some of his recklessness, hut he never 
answered me back. He knew 1 had his interest at heart. By his death I lost 
the dearest pal man ever had, one who knew no wrong. His equal in manly 
principles will never again grace the profession he adopted. May the dust 
rest lightly over him." 

It would require volumes ti > hold all that was published about him. 
The Springfield Daily Leader, in its issue of June 8, 1913, contained an 
article under the caption of "McCarty and Ketchel," which we deem worthy 
of reproduction here: 

"With the sad taking off of Luther McCarty, the name of his home 
town, Springfield, Missouri, became temporarily the most talked of place 
in America. Twice before the Queen City was the central focus point of 
the Union. The night Carl Morris went down to defeat from the powerful 
right of Luther McCarty and the day Stanley Ketchel was done to death 
were the two occasions when, everywhere over the country, this city was 
foremost in the topics being discussed. Speaking of Ketchel and .McCarty, 
two of the most senational men who ever gained distinction in the sport 
world, it is strange that this city should have to do with the end of one 
and the rise of the other. They were two grand characters standing out in 
bold relief from all others of their profession. Each bore a name, one 
Stanley, the other Luther, new to listiana. They both rose meteorically, 
astonished the world by the character of their ring work, champions of the 
never-to-be-forgotten kind, and after brief careers each went to a sensa- 
tional death. From the beginning of their lives to their untimely end these 
two men, lovable socially and dreaded when in the roped enclosure, traveled 
in almost parallel lines. Disciples of Nomad by choice, stout-hearted to the 
point of recklessness, with the love for adventure uppermost in their hearts, 
it was but natural when they took to boxing' that their very temperaments 
would carry them to the front ranks of their new profession. Both men 
sprang into prominence from the unknown class over night. It was Joe 
Thomas, then welter-weight champion of the world, who was the stepping- 
stone for Ketchel, while Carl Morris answered the same purposes for 
McCarty. 

From the first time they attracted attention, McCarty and Ketchel were 
lionized by the public. Their care-free ways won people to them. The 
newspapers of Xew York attacked both men, but was the result of work on 
the part of their managers demanding what they figured the right price 
for services of the men wanted by the Xew York clubs. The un justness 



IO62 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

of their attack on McCarty was so palpable that many other papers took 
sides with the big boy, and the unwarranted abuse of the New York sport 
writers cut deep into McCarty's sensitive brain, but he never once com- 
plained. Both McCarty and Ketchel survived the attacks and when away 
from New York were idolized. They both thrived on the adulations they 
received, loved to be in the limelight and the very air they breathed, they 
exhaled with a sensational flavor. Dying sensationally as they did, they lived 
their parts right to the very last earthly move. Even in death, the eyes of 
the world were focused on them. The train bearing McCarty's remains 
was met all along the line by throngs of people who stood about, sad-eyed, 
talking of the good traits of the boy they all loved. Just so with Ketchel. 
When the former, on his tour, visited Grand Rapids, Michigan, he made the 
trip to the Polish cemetery and paid his respects to the grave of Ketchel — 
the man whom he had always looked upon as his hero. May the memory of 
both be kept green forever." 



OSCAR L. PEAK, M. D. 

The name of Dr. Oscar L. Peak, of Springfield, will be held in lasting 
honor as one of the able physicians who has given loyal service in behalf of 
suffering humanity in Greene county. Those who know him best are unre- 
strained in their praise of his genial disposition and his ability as a physician. 
The large success which has crowned his life work, coupled with his ripe ex- 
perience and kind heart, has enabled him to bring comfort, hope and confi- 
dence to the sick room and he has brought sunshine into many a home. 

Doctor Peak was born in P.uffalo, Dallas county. Missouri, November 
20, 1849. He is a son of Reuben T. and Juliet I'". (Johnson) Peak. The 
father was born in McMinn county, Tennessee, in 1824. and his death oc- 
curred in St. Joseph, Missouri. June 11, 1907. The mother was born in 
Steubenville, Ohio, July 16. 1828, and her death occurred August 2, 1852, in 
Buffalo. Missouri. The Doctor's father received a good college education 
in Illinois, and after coming to Missouri in pioneer times be taught school 
in Buffalo. lie was also a minister in the I'.aptist church in later life. A 
part of his earlier life was devoted to merchandising. I lis family consisted 
of six children, namely: Dr. Oscar L., of this sketch; Loren J., deceased; 
Marv A. lives in St. Joseph, Missouri; William ('. lives in Aline, Oklahoma; 
Edward C. lives in Modena, Utah, and Dr. Frank is a practicing physician in 
I 'ratt, Kansas. 

Dr. Oscar L. Peak received a good common "school education, later at- 
tending Shurtleff College in Illinois, after which be took a course in a medi- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I063 

•cal college in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was graduated with the class of 
1878, and in 1886 he took a post-graduate course in St. Louis, Missouri. He 
began the practice of his profession in Pratt county, Kansas, in 1878, and 
remained there until 1893. He took an interest in public affairs there and 
was county superintendent of public instruction of Pratt county, Kansas, in 
the eighties. He was United States pension surgeon in Pratt county for over 
ten years. He enjoyed a good practice in that field, but in 1893 he left it 
and took up his residence in Springfield, Missouri, where he has since re- 
mained. He first established his office on the south side of the public square, 
later moving to the north side of the city, with an office at 4103^ East Com- 
mercial street, where he is still located. He has built up a large practice 
and is one of the best known general practitioners in the county. 

Doctor Peak was married, April 13, 1880, in Pratt, Kansas, to Eliza- 
beth Viola Moore, who was born in Van Buren county, Iowa, June 6, 1862. 
She is a daughter of Thaddeus S. and Samantha A. ( Richey) Moore. The 
latter was a daughter of James E. and Elizabeth (Parker) Richey. Mr. 
Moore was a cabinet maker by trade. He was born in 1834 and is now liv- 
ing in California. He is a first cousin of Thomas Moore, the famous Irish 
poet. The mother of Mrs. Peak was born in 1837 and died September 
8, 1885. Mrs. Peak is a graduate of the Woman's Medical College of St. 
Louis. This college suspended operations several years ago. 

Five children have been born to Doctor Peak and wife, namely: Burt, 
born February 22, 1881, in Pratt, Kansas, died February 28, 1882; Bird C, 
born May 20, 1882, married William A. Minor, superintendent of Lieut W. 
Weiler's force pump factory at Rochester, New York, and they are the par- 
ents of one child, Oscar E. Minor; Bessie O., born September 12, 1883, mar- 
ried, June 1, 1912, Rev. Paul B. Waterhouse, of Pasadena, Cal., a graduate 
of Princeton, and they are now living in Hachiman, Japan, where they are 
engaged in missionary work in Omi Mission. A son was born to them in 
Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 1915. He was christened Gordon Merrill. Mrs. 
Waterhouse is a graduate of Drury College, where she was'an honor student. 
She is also a graduate of Hartford (Connecticut) Theological Seminary 
Reuben T., born April 30, 1891, lives in Springfield. He attended Drury 
•College, after having graduated in the Springfield high school, later being 
graduated from the Western Dental College in 1914. He was married in 
October, 1914, to Miss Helen V. Trenary, of this city. He has an office with 
his father and is making a good start in his profession; Oscar L., Jr., born 
May 2^, 1893, died June 13, 1893. 

Doctor Peak is a Republican, of the progressive wing of the party. 
Fraternally, he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, the Knights and Ladies of Security, in which 
he has been financier for a period of ten years. He is also a national trustee 



I064 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

of this order. He and his family are members of the First Congregational 
church. Mrs. Peak is president of the Greene county district of the Women' 
Christian Temperance Union. They are both very active workers in the 
temperance cause. 



s 



WILLIAM PENN ELSON. 

It was nearly a half century ago that William Penn Elson came to 
Boone township, Greene county, Missouri, from the old Buckeye state and 
here he has resided ever since, doing his part in the general change that has 
come 'over the face of the land," and his labors have benefited alike the com- 
munity about Ash Grove and himself, for he had little of this world's goods 
when he took up his residence on a small farm here just after the close of 
the war between the states, but by close application and honest dealings he 
has become one of the substantial agriculturists of the township and owns a 
large and well stocked farm. 

Mr. Elson was born in Stark county, Ohio, September cj, 1837, and is 
therefore now getting well along in years — seventy-seven in number — but 
is still comparatively hale and hearty, having led a careful life. He is a son 
of John Harris and Osee (Wilson) Elson. The father was born in Brooks 
county. West Virginia, October 14. [806, and was a son of Capt. John 
Harris and Margaret (Wiggins) Elson. Captain Elson was also born in 
the last named county and state, the year of his birth being 1701). He was a 
son of Richard Elson. The latter was a native of Scotland and (.migrated 
to America in old colonial da_\s, and took up a "tomahawk claim" of four 
hundred acres from the government, in the Old Dominion, now a part of 
the state of West Virginia, and there he spent the rest of his life engaged 
in fanning, clearing his land and rearing his family of four sons and three 
daughters. Captain John Harris Elson was an officer in the war of [812 
and also served in the early Indian wars with distinction. His death 
occurred in [820. The subject of this sketch is now in possession of his 
poll-book and many of his papers, llis widow survived until [847. When 
twelve years of age John Harris Elson, father of our subject, moved to 
Stark county, Ohio, and there he engaged in farming the rest of his life, 
dying in 1898. Politically he was first a Whig and later a Republican. He 
and Osee Wilson were married in 1833. She was born May 15, 1815. She 
was a woman of rare intellectual attainments for those days anil was a great 
reader. Her death occurred in [891. The parents of the subject of this 
sketch were excellent types of the sturdy citizens of Ohio during the century 
that is past. 




WILLIAM P. KI.SON. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. [065 

William P. Elson grew to manhood on the home farm where he worked 
when a hoy and he received good educational advantages, having attended 
the common schools and later Mt. Union College at Alliance, Ohio, after 
which he engaged successfully in teaching for a number of years in Ohio, 
Indiana and Illinois. Later he worked at the insurance business in Illinois, 
and in the town of Fidelity, that state, lie clerked and acted as postmaster 
for three years, then returned to Ohio, where he remained until 1X66 when 
he came to Greene county, Missouri, and purchased eighty acres in Boone 
township, and here he has since been engaged in general farming and stock 
raising, and, having prospered with advancing years, is now owner ol a fine 
farm containing two hundred and forty acres under cultivation and forty 
acres in timber, constituting one of the choicest farms in this part oi the 
county. It is productive, well improved and has on it a large, well-furnished 
residence and numerous substantial barns and other buildings. 

.Mr. Elson was married. November 2, [875, to Elizabeth C. Frame, who 
was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, February 13. [860, and came to 
Greene county with hei father and mother, Samuel Park and Elizabeth E. 
(Harshburger) Frame when she was nine years of age. They settled in 
(enter township and were substantial citizens of the early days. .Mrs. Elson 
received her education in Greene county. She has proved to be an excellent 
helpmeet in every respect. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Elson, namely: Vinnie 
Ream, born December 23, 1770, is the wife of F. J. Hawkins, a farmer of 
Boone township; they have three children, Elson C, Carrol and Paul. |ohn 
Harris, born March 1 X, 1X71), who is in the commissary department of the 
United States army, is at present stationed at Vera Cruz, Mexico. He is 
married and has one child. Vinnie. Charles II., born July 1, [881, is assist- 
ing with the work on the home farm; married Laona Wheelock and they 
have three children. John Harris. Martha !•"., and Robert B. William 
Robert, born December 9, [893, lives on a farm in Boone township; married 
Frances Hawkins, and they have had two children, Louise and one deceased. 
Richard P., born November 13, 18X7, lives in Fayetteville, Missouri; mar- 
ried Jessie White and they have two children. Vera and William Penn. 
Archie died at the age of nineteen in the West. 

Politically, Mr. Elson is a Republican and religiously a Presbyterian. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the 
Masonic order. He has been more or less active in public affairs and has 
had charge of the Boone Township Republican Committee, and he once 
made the race for presiding judge of the county court. He is a man of 
influence in his community and no one is better or more favorably known in 
the western part of this county. 



1066 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

HARRY CARRIGAN MORGAN. 

In few branches of art or science have such developments or perfected 
improvements been made as in photography and few establishments in Greene 
county and this section of Missouri show more conclusive proof of this 
assertion than that of Harry Carrigan Morgan, whose studios are located 
on West Commercial street, Springfield. He has long been a close student 
of art, and his splendid work is pronounced by those best capable of judging, 
to be fully equal to that of his co-workers in this field of endeavor in this 
locality. He has won a growing reputation over this country for securing 
for those who sit before his camera, a natural pose and pleasing expression 
and in all his work is shown the skilled hand of the adroit artist. No one 
is more qualified to execute work in this direction than Mr. Morgan and no 
one has the happy faculty of meeting the requirements of all more than he. 

Mr. Morgan was born near Logansport, Indiana, February 29, 1872. He 
is son of Rees and Alice (Carrigan) Morgan. The Morgan family is of 
Welch descent and the first emigrant took up his residence in America several 
generations ago. Rees Morgan was born in the same locality in the Hoosier 
state as was our subject, the former's father having been a pioneer citizen 
of Cass county and there he developed the home farm on which the father 
of our subject was born in 1847 and on which he was reared to manhood. 
He received his education in the common schools of his community, and 
when a young man learned the carpenter's trade and followed this and 
contracting for a livelihood. He remained in Indiana until 1883, when lie 
removed to Rolla, Missouri, where he carried on his line of business with 
success fur a period of seventeen years, meanwhile engaging in farming 
also. In [900 he came to Springfield, where he lived until 1908, working 
as a builder, then he and his wife located in California, where they now 
make their home. Politically he is a Republican, and religiously is a member 
of the Christian church. 

Harry C. Morgan was eleven years old when hi- parents moved from 
his native state to Missouri, and grew to manhood on the home farm near 
Rolla. Missouri, where he worked when a hoy. and received his education in 
the district schools there, and also studied photography, having manifested 
a decided natural talent in this direction when but a child. He remained 
with his parents on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age. He 
worked in the city of Rolla a year, then came to Springfield and formed a 
partnership with S. H. Wickizer, and they conducted a studio for two years, 
but since that-time Mr. Morgan has been in business alone, and is now lo- 
cated on West Commercial street, where he has a neat and modern equipped 
studio and is doing a good business, many of his customers coming from 
neighboring towns and adjoining counties.. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO67 

Politically, Mr. Morgan is a Republican, and religiously he holds mem- 
bership in the Christian church. 

Mr. Morgan was married, August 12, 1897, to Minnie E. Pierce, of 
Shelbyville, Illinois. She was born in 1878. She received a good public 
school education. To the union of our subject and wife two children have 
been born, namely: Harold, born March 28, [899; and Edgar, born Jan- 
uary 2, IQ05; they are both attending school. 



CHARLES I. GROBLEBE. 

Springfield has long been noted lor a lumber center, and ever since 
the days of the Civil war large yards have been located here, and this line 
has been one of the leading assets of the city, which is a distributing point 
for the vast Ozark lumber region, and although much of both the pine and 
hardwood forests have been denuded of their best trees, in southern Mis- 
souri, the lumber business here has not abated, but the supply of lumber 
is obtained in more remote sections of the country, for the most part. One 
of the most successful of the younger lumbermen here is Charles I. Grob- 
lebe, whose place of business is located on South Campbell street. 

Mr. Groblebe was born October 2, 1879, in Carroll county. Arkansas. 
He is a son of Charles and Mary (Mitchell) Groblebe. The father was 
born in March, 1844, in German)-, from which country he emigrated to the 
United States in his youth and settled in St. Louis. He served in a Mis- 
souri regiment in the Confederate army during the Civil war. After the 
war he went to Arkansas and engaged in the lumber business at Eureka 
Springs, and became a well known lumberman throughout northwestern 
Arkansas. He is now 71 years of age and is still active. His wife. Mary 
Mitchell, was born August 24, iS'50, and reared in Arkansas, and her death 
occurred September 12, 1883 when our subject was four years of age. He 
has three brothers, namely: George was born April 4, 1870, lives in Arkan- 
sas; Earl was born July 7, 1879, and lives in Elgin, Washington; Edward, 
born August 6, 1881, is employed on the Missouri & Northern railroad. 

Charles I. Groblebe grew to manhood in Arkansas and when a boy 
he worked with his father in the sawmill or on a farm, and he received 
his early education in the public schools of his native state. He was a 
poor boy and fought his way up from the bottom, and he is deserving of 
a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished in the face of obstacles 
that would have discouraged many. He had to work hard when a boy. 
often in severe winter weather, when scantily clad, and he attended school 
only three months of the year. He came to Springfield. Missouri, in 1902, 



[O68 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and in order to better equip himself for the battle of life, took a course in 
the Queen City Business College, remaining there a year, after which he 
worked two years in the local lumber yards, the meanwhile mastering the 
various phases of the lumber business, and in 1905 he went into the busi- 
ness for himself, and prospered from the first, his success growing with 
advancing years until today he is one of the widely known lumbermen of 
southwest Missouri. He is one of the few in this line who own their own 
property where their yards and buildings are located, and is the only dealer 
in Greene county owning an auto truck for the delivery of lumber. He 
carries a thirty thousand-dollar stock, which is extensive and complete, 
and he aims at prompt and honest service whoever he deals with. 

Air. Groblebe was married in 1906 to Kate Brown, who was born, 
reared and educated in Springfield. She is a daughter of Thomas Brown 
and Mahalia (Stutzman) Brown. She is one of three children, the other 
two being Alberta and Frank. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Kath- 
erine. born May 5, 1907; and Annabell, born August 2, 1913. 

Politically Mr. Goblebe is a Democrat. He is a member of the Spring- 
field Club, and is a member of the board of directors of the Young Men's 
Christian Association and Young Men's Business Club. Fraternallv he 
belongs to the free and Accepted Masons, and is a Knight Templar. He is 
an active member of the South Street Christian church, and has been a 
member of the official board of the same since too~. He teaches the largest 
adult woman's Sunday school class in Springfield, lie is a man of genial 
personality and is popular in the circles in which he moves. 



EMMETT McDONALD MING. 

1 low shall we recall the fond memories that cluster about our beloved 
dead? I low -hall we portray the nobleness of his character, the purity 
of. his life, the gentleness of his disposition? I low shall we describe his 
affection as father, his tenderness as -on and brother, his devotion as hus- 
band, his sincerity as friend? How shall we impart the patience of his 
suffering, the unfailing fidelity of his trust in the great Healer of all our 
infirmities, the sorrow and desolation that, at his death, fell like a dark pall 
upon the hearts of the loved ones left behind? We know that all that is 
must share his destiny; that the brief term of mortal existence is but a pass- 
ing dream — a story that is briefly told — and man's spirit drifts away on the 
bosom of that tranquil river that winds with noiseless murmurs through the 
-loom shaded shadows of the Valley of Death. To eulogize the <\e^i\> and 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOUKJ. IO69 

preserve the memory of our dead from oblivion is at once our privilege and 
our sacred duty. Since the dawn of civilization men have made expression 
at the death of their fellows, whether such dead were citizen, statesman or 
soldier. Realizing that "all flesh shall perish together, and men shall turn 
again unto dust," we are naturally inspired with the desire that we may 
be remembered after death; that after our earthly remains shall have been 
laid away to sleep throughout the silent centuries yet to come, awaiting the 
final day, we are fed by the hope that some human heart that yet beats may 
cherish a memory of us, may yearn for one touch of "a vanished hand and 
the sound of a voice that is still." Prompted by such feelings we come to 
chronicle the lamented death, "in that he died so young," of Emmett Mc- 
Donald Ming. 

Air. Ming was born at Gray's Summit, Franklin county, Missouri, De- 
cember 3, i860. He was a son of Judge James Morris and Jemima (Os- 
borne) Ming, the father a native of Virginia and the mother of Missouri. 
Judge Ming was a descendant of that chivalrous race of men who peopled 
the Old Dominion, but in an early day he emigrated to Franklin county, 
Missouri, and there became one of the leading and influential citizens of 
that section of the state, and he at one time represented that county in the 
state legislature and later was elected judge, serving as such for a number 
of years. His wife belonged to that class of noble Christian women and 
true type of womanhood found in the South in the happy days before the 
Civil war. Both the judge and his wife reached ripe old ages and spent 
their declining years serenely in their cozy home at the cjuiet town of Wash- 
ington, Franklin county, where they were ever known as good neighbors, 
hospitable and helpful. They reared a large family of sons and daughters, 
Emmett M. of this review having been the youngest. 

The subject of this memoir grew to manhood at the town of Washing- 
ton, and spent his boyhood days upon the farm, close to nature. As a young 
man he was industrious, honest and everybody liked him. for even at that 
tender age he had a kind word for everybody, a helping hand for those in 
need, and a word of cheer for the disconsolate. He had the advantage 
of an excellent education, having passed through the common schools in 
Franklin count)-, and later took a regular course in Central College. Fayette, 
Missouri. 

Mr. Ming began life for himself on a cattle ranch in Arizona, which 
he owned, but after his marriage he engaged in the lumber business, and 
later in the hardware and furniture business at Yinita, Oklahoma ( then In- 
dian Territory ) , having selected Yinita as his future home. He built up a 
large and lucrative trade with the people of that town and locality and was 
doing much for the material welfare of the same, and at the time of his 
death his furniture establishment there would have been a credit to any 



IO/O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

city. He was a stockholder and promoter of the first artesian well at Vinita,. 
and was regarded by all who knew him as a business man of rare foresight 
and acumen. 

Mr. Ming was married November 18, 1891, to Emma Wallis, a daugh- 
ter of Christopher and Elizabeth (Hoover) Wallis, a well-known family of 
Marshfield, Missouri, where Mrs. Ming grew to womanhood and was edu- 
cated. After their marriage they established their home at Vinita, in the 
Cherokee nation. Their union was blessed by the birth of two children, 
namely: Christopher, who was born at Vinita, October 20, 1892, and who 
is now a prominent young business man of Springfield, Missouri; and Mar- 
tha Lelia, whose birth occurred at Vinita, July 18, 1896. 

In 1899 Mr. Ming built a comfortable home for his family in Vinita, 
surrounding them with all the comforts of life and preparing a place for 
them and for himself in his old age. No man was ever more happily mar- 
ried and his affection for his wife and children was tender and strong. He 
was never happier than when at home with his family. His devotion to his 
father and mother was genuine as well as was his love for his brothers and 
sisters, and he was never known to falter in his loyalty to a friend. He 
was an active member of the Knights of Pythias, and belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, South, at Vinita. His life was ever an open 
book, and no one ever heard him say anything derogatory regarding his 
fellow man. 

Air. .Ming was called to his eternal rest in St. Anthony's hospital, St. 
Louis, Missouri, August _». 1900, when lacking a few months of his fortieth 
birthday, lie had been in failing health for some time. He was buried at 
his old home near Washington, Franklin county, "ii the old Ming home- 
stead, on a beautiful bluff overlooking the Missouri river. 

Something of the high standing of Mr. Ming in the community hon- 
ored by his citizenship, may be gained from the following resolutions, passed 
by the Knights of Pythias at Vinita, Oklahoma, shortly after his death: 

Whereas, God in His infinite wisdom has deemed it best to remove 
From the scenes of his earthly home our beloved friend and co-worker. 
Brother E. M. Ming, be it 

Resolved, That while we bow in humble submission to His supreme 
will, yet we mourn the death of our fellow-worker, fully realizing our lodge 
has lost a faithful member, the community a true patriotic citizen and his 
family a good husband and father. His many sterling qualities of head 
and heart, the blameless character, and pure name won the love and admira- 
tion of all who knew him. 

Resolved, That we extend to the sorrowing family our heartfelt sym- 
patic in their bereavement, praying the all-wise Father to lighten the deep 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO/I 

sorrow that has fallen upon them, by shedding into their hearts and lives 
that blessed peace and comfort which man can not give. 

Resolved, further, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the 
minutes of the lodge, that a copy of the same be sent to the local newspaper 
and also a copy to his bereaved family. 



JOHN D. ALLEN. 

The wanderlust, like a siren, calls to every youth to forsake his an- 
cestral hills and halls and go out in quest of a better country. Many have 
heeded the summons to their advantage, but perhaps more have answered to 
their doom. In such a county as Greene that young man is fortunate who 
has the sagacity to remain at home. The call very frequently leads men to 
forsake the "land of milk and honey" and go in search of a never-to-be- 
attained oasis of a mirage, ultimately finding instead the barren, sand-swept 
waste of a Sahara; often, too, after it is too late to return and establish 
themselves in their own native locality in a proper manner. John D. Allen, 
foreman of the tin department at the new Frisco shops, Springfield, is one 
of our native born sons who has been prudent in remaining in his native 
county. 

Mr. Allen was born at Cave Spring, Cass township, Greene county, 
March 18, 1870. He is a son of Stephen G. and C. N. ( l'enley) Allen. The 
father was born in Georgia, April 15, 1845, and is still living at Cave Spring, 
w hither he removed from Dixieland in the year 1868. He has a good small 
farm here and has followed agricultural pursuits for some time but being 
a carpenter by trade his earlier life was devoted to work in this line. He 
served in the Confederate army in the Civil war, enlisting before he was 
eighteen years old. lie was wounded in the battle at Atlanta. Georgia, 
August 11, 1864. After the war, he located in Marion county, Tennessee, 
where he was married, August 10, 1867, to C. N. Penley, a native of Ten- 
nessee. In 186S, Air. Allen came to Greene county, locating at Cave Spring, 
where he has since resided and here has reared his family of seven children, 
namely: J. Charles, John D., Laura. Louis M., Stephen G., Mary A. and 
Katy J. The latter died at the age of four years. Mr. Allen, at the age of 
seventy years, is a hale, hearty man and enjoys caring for his little farm. 
Politically, he is a Democrat and belongs to the Universalist church. 

John D. Allen grew to manhood on the home farm in Cass township 
where he worked when a boy and he received his education in the district 
schools at Cave Spring. He remained on the farm until he was nineteen 
years of age, then came to Springfield and went to work in the office of the 



IO/2 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Springfield Republican, later he worked at the barber's trade for a short 
time. In 1890 he began work in the Xorth Side Frisco shops where he 
learned the tinner's trade, remaining there three and one-half years, then 
spent over six years in the South Side shops at his trade, after which he re- 
turned to the shops on the Xorth Side and has remained in the tin depart- 
ment litre, being now foreman in the new shops, which responsible position 
he has held since the opening of the new shops. He has a large number of 
men under his direction, and he is not only a most capable and highly skilled 
workman but is a man of considerable executive ability. 

Mr. Allen was married on December 5, 1892. in Springfield, to Delia 
Gee, who was born in Indiana, April 12, 1871. She is a daughter of Amos 
and Nancy Jane Gee. The father was a native of Indiana and was born in 
1845 and the mother was born in 1850. They are still living and reside on 
a good farm near Alva. Oklahoma. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. .Mien, namely: Wade, 
born on March n, 1895; Gladys, born on July 15, 1899; and Louise, born 
on August 9, 1909. 

Politically. Mr. Allen is a Democrat and fraternally he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He and wife belong to the Knights and 
Ladies of Security. 



JOHX SPANDRI. 



In the following .-.ketch is strikingly illustrated the force of well-directed 
energy, steadfast purpose and never-ceasing effort for the accomplishment 
of noble ends, and the successful overthrow of those obstacles which beset 
the progress of every young man who, unaided and alone, starts out to combat 
life's stern realities and hew his own way to distinction and fortune. It is 
the story of a successful life, and from the study of such a record tin- dis- 
couraged youth may gain lessons of ultimate value, lessons that are calcu- 
lated to inspire new zeal in his faltering heart and new courage in his darkened 
spirit. It shows that it take- grit, perseverance and honesty to win in life's 
battle rather than the help of wraith or influential relative-- or friends. In 
other wonb. it is better to rely 011 ourselves and map out our own paths than 
in rely upon others and follow a career dictated by Others. 

Mr. Spandri hails from the wonderful little republic of Switzerland, a 
country from which many of the so-called great nations of the earth might 
take valuable lessons. His birth occurred in the southern part of that country 
on December 1. i860. He is a son of Peter and Mary (Vanini) Spandri. 
both natives of Switzerland, where they were reared, educated, married and 
established their future home. The paternal grandfather of our subject 






'i^CL^^&d^- (2^r^cf ^J-ot^P^^l^^ 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO73 

was a native of Italy. Peter Spandri was a collier by trade, his work being 
chopping timber, which he burned by a process to make charcoal. His death 
occurred in his native land before our subject left there and the mother 
survived until about seven years ago, having reached an advanced age. To 
these parents four children were burn, namely: Juditta is living in Italy, 
Frank is deceased, John, of this sketch, and Giacomo lives in Europe. 

John Spandri spent his boyhood in Switzerland and he received a limited 
education at home, which has been greatly supplemented in later life by 
contact with the world and by wide miscellaneous home reading until today 
he is a well informed man and an excellent conversationalist. When a boy 
he worked with his father in the woods, but when only fifteen years of age 
he left home and began working for wages. Believing that America held 
greater opportunities for the poor boy with pluck, he bade a final adieu to 
his native hills in the autumn of 1882, crossed the great Atlantic, landing in 
New York in the month of November. He did not tarry in the great city, 
but came 011 West to Rolla, Phelps county, Missouri, reaching the goal of 
his long journey with only ten dollars and twenty-five cents in his pocket. He 
soon found employment and went to work with a will. Six months later 
found him a contractor, in business for himself. In May, 1883, he came to 
Springfield and began contracting to build foundations for houses and build- 
ings in general. Pie prospered at this and continued in this line until a few 
years ago. Among the foundations he laid for well-known buildings were 
those of the South Street Christian church. Meyer's Model Mills, the round 
liouse at the North Side shops, St. John's church and many others. Some 
years ago he turned his attention to other lines of contracting, such as railroad 
•construction work and sewer building. His first work in the former line was 
in 1901, when he turned out jobs for both the St. Louis & San Francisco 
and the Missouri Pacific railroads. It was in 1909 that he began sewer work, 
and during that year put in about three miles of sewer in Springfield, then 
took a large contract for the Frisco in Texas in building arch culverts. At 
this writing he is confining his attention to sewer construction. He has been 
a careful student of modern ways of contract work along his lines and his 
work is always highly satisfactory, being well done in every respect. He is 
well equipped in the matter of modern machinery and tools and employs a 
large number of skilled hands. He gives personal attention to every detail 
of his business, which is under a superb system. He has been very successful 
in a business way and is one of the substantial men of affairs of the Queen 
City of the Ozarks. He deserves a great deal of credit for what he has 
accomplished, which has been done in the face of obstacles. He owns an 
imposing home and office at 520^ East Commercial street. 

Mr. Spandri was married on January 15. 1885. in Springfield, to Eliza 
(68) 



10/4 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Carmack. She was born in Phelps county, Missouri, on July 10, 1861, and 
is a daughter of William Carmack, a native of Indiana, where he grew up 
and married, removing with his family to Phelps county, this state, in an 
early day, and there he became a well-to-do farmer. Mrs. Spandri spent her 
girlhood in Phelps county, and she was given the advantages of a good 
education. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, both deceased: 
they were named, John, whose birth occurred on December 28, 1886. re- 
ceived a good education in the Springfield ward and high school and Drury 
College; he met an untimely death in a railroad accident on May 15, 1910: 
he had married Blanche Morrison, by whom one child was burn. Walter J., 
whose birth occurred on September 8, 1909. William, our subject's second 
son, was born on November 22, 1888, received a good education in the Spring- 
field schools and died on August 19, 1901. They were both very promising 
young nu-n and their early deaths were much lamented by their family and 
friends. 

Politically Mr. Spandri is a Democrat and he has long taken an active 
interest in public affairs. However, has never been an office-seeker. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Masonic Order, including the Knights Templars and 
the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

.Mr. Spandri won the Springfield Republican trophy cup in the first 
annual ( )/.ark motor tour of three hundred miles on June 27th to 29th, inclu- 
sive, 1910. using his favorite car — E. M. E, a make of the Studebaker Com- 
pany. He gets a great deal of pleasure and diversion out of motoring. He 
is a gentleman of sociable inclinations, obliging, public-spirited and com- 
panionable, which traits, added to his unassuming manner and high sense of 
honor, make him popular among a wide acquaintance. 



E. L. EVANS, M. D. 



The medical profession of Greene county has no abler exponent than 
Dr. E. E. Evans, universally liked by all with whom he comes in contact. 
His friends feel deservedly proud of his success in his profession, for he 
ha- studied hard, worked diligently and liven self-sacrificing when there 
was need. He possesses excellent judgment of men and things, well balanced 
by knowledge and experience. He is a gentleman of good personal appear- 
ance and courteous address, and is certainly entitled to mention with the 
representative citizens of Springfield and Greene county. 

Doctor Evans was born in Boone county. Indiana. January 2. 1867. He 
is a -on of John and Sarah Jane 1 Clark) Evans. The father was a contrac- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO75 

tor and died here on December 17, 1913; the mother is living on St. Louis 
street, Springfield, Missouri. Grandfather Samuel Evans was a farmer and 
one of the early settlers of Boone county, Indiana. His death occurred at 
the age of eighty-four years. His wife was a Miss Wilson. The maternal 
grandfather, Ezra Clark, married Harriet Hancock. They were both na- 
tives of Ohio in which their parents were early settlers, and there Ezra Clark 
and wife grew up and were married, and soon thereafter moved to Boone 
county, Indiana, where they established the family home on a farm, and 
were among the first settlers. 

Dr. Evans of this review has two brothers and one sister living, namely : 
Dr. Emery Evans, is a practicing physician in St. Louis; Dr. Harry T. 
Evans is engaged in the practice of his profession in Springfield, and Mrs. 
Ella Speer, also lives in Springfield. 

Dr. E. L. Evans is one of those self-educated, successful, self-made 
men, commonly met in America. When a boy he earned his own way, 
working at various things to earn an honest dollar to assist in defraying the 
expenses of an education, and when he had gone far enough in the public 
.schools of his native county to enable him to teach he took up that line of 
endeavor and taught several terms most satisfactorily, working meanwhile, 
during the summer months, on the farm or at other things until he suc- 
ceeded in obtaining his professional education. He received his primary 
education in the schools of Harrison, Arkansas, where he removed from 
Indiana when a boy, and later he attended the Rally Hill Academy, and in 
1892 he entered the Marion Simms Medical College in St. Louis, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1895. Soon thereafter he re- 
turned to Harrison, Arkansas, where he began the practice of his profession, 
in partnership with Dr. Kirby, and remained there eleven years, during 
which he enjoyed a large and constantly growing practice, and was one of 
the leading general physicians of Boone county throughout which his name 
was a household word. Seeking a larger field for the exercise of his talents 
he came to Springfield, Missouri, in April, 1906, and has been engaged 
successfully in the general practice from that time to the present, each suc- 
ceeding year finding him further advanced and more popular than the 
preceding. 

Doctor Evans is a member of the Greene County Medical Society, the 
Southwest Missouri Medical Society, the Missouri State Medical As- 
sociation and the American Medical Association. He was for some time 
president of the Boone County Medical Society when he lived in Arkansas, 
and was also secretary of the same for many years, resigning the office upon 
his removal to Springfield. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic 
order, including the Chapter, Commandery and the Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to the Knights of Pvthias 



IO76 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and other lodges. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a member of the 
Si nUh Street Christian church. 

Doctor Evans was married March 19, 1897, to Nora Kirby, who was 
born in Harrison. Arkansas, in September, 1876, and there grew to woman- 
hood and received her high school education in Harrison, Arkansas, and 
graduated from Christian College at Columbia, Missouri. She is the scion 
of a prominent family of that place, and is a daughter of Dr. L. and Vir- 
ginia (Crump) Kirby. 

To. Doctor Evans and wife the following children have been born: 
Virginia, born January 11, 1898; Harry C, born March 17, 1899; Frances 
Irene born June 17, 1900; Dorothy Lee, born July 11, 1902; Lenore, born 
July 26, 1903; Kirby, born June 23, 1909, and Ezra Levi, born January 
29, 191 1. 



ALBERT X. HANSON. 



All credit is due a man who wins success in his chosen fields of en- 
deavor in spite of obstacles, who, by persistency and energy gains a compe- 
tence and a position of honor as a man and citizen. The record of the late 
Albert X. Hanson, for many years a well-known contractor of Springfield, 
is that of such a man, for he came t<> this city in the days of her rapid growth 
and here worked his way up from the bottom to definite success and inde- 
pendence. He quickly adapted himself to the conditions which he found 
here and labored so consecutively and managed so judiciously thai he finally 
became the manager of a thriving business, which he ever conducted along 
honorable lines and all the while was establishing a reputation among his 
acquaintances and friend- for sound judgment, honest dealings and good 
citizenship. I lis tragic death was a matter of sincere regret to all who 
knew him. 

Mr. Hanson was born on October 17. 1848, in Hancock county, Illi- 
nois, lie is a sun of Nichols and Adalize (Hubbard) Hanson. The father 
was burn in the state of New York and the mother was a native of the 
province of Nova Scotia, Canada, from which she came to the state of New 
York when young where she met and married the elder Hanson. He was 
a blacksmith by trade in his early life, but later turned his attention to gen- 
eral farming. He and his wife removed from New York to Michigan, later 
to Illinois where they remained until within a few years of their deaths, 
having removed t<> Nebraska, where the death of Xichols Hanson occurred 
in iijoo at an advanced age. and his wife passed away soon after. During 
the Civil war he was quartermaster of the Twenty-sixth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry under Hen. Kim C. Fremont, having enlisted in [862. Seven 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. 1077 

children were born to Nichols Hanson and wife, namely: Ellen, Charles, 
Louis are all deceased; Allien X., subject of this memoir; Mary E. Lewis 
lues in Springfield, Illinois; William is deceased; Florence, the youngest, lives 
in Turon, Kansas. 

Albert N. Hanson received a common school education, and later at- 
tended a business college in Michigan about six months, lie was all his 
life a wide reader of good literature and in this way and by coming in con- 
tact with the business world he became a well-informed man. In bis early 
career he followed farming fur the most part until he came to Springfield, 
Missouri. He had engaged in railroading also for a time during his younger 
days, and was in the mercantile business awhile. After living in Kansas 
several years he moved t<> Shannon county, Missouri, where be .spent a few 
years, locating in Springfield in 1888. Here he engaged in contracting, 
general building and railroad construction work. When the Missouri Pa- 
cific built its branch from Crane, .Missouri, to this city be secured the con- 
tract for the excavation between Alain and Campbell streets in Springfield, 
also built the Washington avenue subway at the intersection of that thor- 
oughfare and Commercial street. During a period of twenty years he kept 
in his employ a crew of from ten to fifteen men, working at various places all 
the time. Having through his able management and close application ac- 
cumulated a competency for his declining years he partially retired from 
active life a few years before his death and lived quietly in his beautiful 
home on Guy street, Springfield. 

Mr. Hanson was twice married, first, on December 30, 1867, in Han- 
cock county, Illinois, to Aarie Mintle, who was born in Ohio, from which 
state she moved to Illinois when a child. She was born on April 19, 1846, 
and was a daughter of Aaron P. and Mary Ann ( Ward) Mintle. To our sub- 
ject and his first wife the following children were born, namely: Jessie, born 
on March 30, 1870, died on December 22, 1874; Frank and Fred, twins, 
born on December 8, 1872. both live in Springfield; Flora, born on October 
15, 1876, lives in Springfield; Fffie, born on April 14, 1870, lives in Spring- 
field; Mrs. Pearl Rueter, born on June 29, 1882, lives in Springfield; 
Harry E. and Harvey E., twins, born on December 20, 1884, the former 
lives in Springfield and the latter died in infancy; Mrs. Stella Revnolds, 
born on June 20. 1887, lives in Springfield. 

The mother of the above named children was called to her rest on 
March 24, 1910. On September 25, 1910, Mr. Hanson married Mrs. Etta 
B. Merchant, who was born in Ohio, October 25, 1862. She grew to wom- 
anhood in her native state and received a common school education. She 
first married W. W. Merchant on March 25, 1883, in Ohio. He died on 
March 12, iqio. Two children were born to this union, Maurice E., born 
on October 26, 1885. He married Odilia Branch on September 18, 1910. 



IO/8 GREENE COUNT V, MISSOURI. 

They live in Kansas City. Missouri. They have one child, Donald J., born 
on September 24, 191 1, and died on May 24, 1914. The second child is 
Leister H., born on August 16, 1890. 

Mrs. Hanson is the daughter of Erastus Lockwood and Emily R. Bax- 
ley. They were both born in Ohio, the father on September 12, 1833. He 
died on February 7, 1891, in Ohio. The mother was born on August 19, 
1840, and is still living in Raymond, Ohio, at the old home. 

Politically, Mr. Hanson was a Republican, and he was always loyal in 
his support of the party. He served as street commissioner of the city of 
Springfield under Mayor Bartlett, also Mayor Malotte. He discharged the 
duties of this important position in a manner that reflected much credit 
upon himself and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. Fraternally, 
he was a member of the Knights of Pythias. Air. Hanson enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Sixty-fifth Illinois Regiment Volunteer Infantry, in the ninety-day 
service. However, he served till the close of the war and was discharged 
at Jonesboro, North Carolina. 

The death of .Mr. Hanson occurred on April 16, 191 5. as the result of 
an accident. He was driving across the street in bis automobile when a 
street car crashed into his machine, hurling him from hi- seat a distance of 
some twenty feet, his head striking the curbing. Burning oil from the 
gasoline tank id" the automobile was scattered ever him and the oil took 
fire, igniting his clothing. Help reached him immediately, but he remained un- 
conscious to the end which came a few hours later, as a result of injuries to 
the head. 

Personally Mr. Hanson was an admirable character, kind-hearted, com- 
panionable, charitable and always a high-minded gentleman. He was be- 
loved by the hundreds of men who had been in his employ during his long 
business career. I lis work was always honestly done and all who knew 
him esteemed him highly as a result of bis main commendable characteristics. 



GRANVILLE W. TURNER. 

To be employed nearly a half century by one linn, continuously, is a 
record ol which few citizens id Springfield and Greene county can boast, but 
Granville \\ . Turner has been connected with the bridge building depart- 
ment of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company since 1866, 
and for forty years has been in charge of that department. He would not 
onl\ have had to proved himself to be an expert in his line, but also a man of 
courage, fidelity, integrity and industry to have been retained during so long 
a period, I te 1- one of the most widely known Frisco employees. He is a man 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I< ^79 

who has always valued his good name and today takes pleasure in feeling that 
he has won the respect of his fellow workers and acquaintances by his course 
in life. 

Mr. Turner was born in Knox count)-, Missouri, January 3, 1843. He 
is a son of Granville D. and Maria (Taylor) Turner. The father was born 
in the mountains of Kentucky and the mother was a native of Ohio, but she 
came to Harrison county, Kentucky, when young. These parents were mar- 
ried in Quincy, Illinois. Our subject's father and the first governor of Illi- 
nois came to Quincy together. Mr. Turner became a large land owner. He 
was a cabinet maker by trade. Leaving the Prairie state in an early day, 
he located in Knox county, Missouri and he and his wife died in this state. 
He was a minister in the Christian church, an old-time circuit rider, and 
preached among the pioneers. Politically, he was a Democrat. I lis family 
consisted of nine children, named as follows: The eldest child died in in- 
fancy; William is deceased; Mary; Emma; Granville W., of this sketch; 
James, deceased ; Reuben, deceased ; George and May E. 

Mr. Turner of this review received a limited education in the common 
schools, and he grew up on the farm in Knox count)-, where he worked when 
a boy. He has worked hard and is a self-made man in the best sense of the 
term. In his youth he learned the carpenter's trade. In September, 1861, 
he enlisted for service in the Civil war, at Rolla, Missouri, under Captain 
Rich and Colonel Phelps, and although his term of enlistment was but for 
six months, he served nine months, lie saw considerable service during that 
brief period, including a number of skirmishes and the battle of Pea Ridge, 
Arkansas. He was honorably discharged in April, 186.2, then went to work 
for the government, building pontoon bridges, corrals, barracks, coffins, etc. 
He continued in this work until the close of the war, gaining valuable ex- 
perience which stood him well in hand in his subsequent career. He began 
work for the Frisco at Rolla in 1866. in the bridge building department, with 
which he has been connected ever since, being head of the department for the 
system for some four decades. In 1913 he was retired by the company on 
a pension. However, he is still doing special work in his department, re- 
porting direct to the general manager. He long ago mastered every phase 
of the art of bridge building and has kept well abreast of the times in this 
line of endeavor. 

Air. Turner was first married in June, 1879, to Malissa Trower, in St. 
Louis, her native city. She was a daughter of Samuel Trower, a farmer and 
stock raiser, a pioneer of the Mound City, where, for a number of years, he 
was justice of the peace, also holding other minor offices. Mr. Turner's 
first wife died October 10, 1889. leaving five children, namely: Walter G. 
married Gertrude Singleton in St. Louis and he is a civil engineer by pro- 
fession; Mary Agnes married Mr. Greenridge and they live in Douglas, 



IOSO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Arizona; George R. married Goldie Holder and they live in Walnut Grove, 
Missouri ; Nellie E. married Thomas Wommock, an employee of the Frisco, 
and they live in Springfield; Lillian F. married G. Marks, who is also con- 
nected with the Frisco and lives in Springfield. Mr. Turner's second mar- 
riage was consummated in February, 1893, m Carthage. Missouri, when he 
was united in marriage to Mrs. Agnes L. Brown, a daughter of John and 
Eliza Deyell, of St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada. To this second union two 
children have been born, namely, William E. and James D. 

Politically, Mr. Turner is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Masonic order, Gate of the Temple blue lodge and St. John's Commandery. 

Mr. Turner made his headquarters in Springfield in 1873 and moved 
here to make his home in 1879. In 1872 he was made assistant superintend- 
ent of the bridge and building department of the old Atlantic & Pacific rail- 
road, later known as the Frisco. In 1875 he was made general superintend- 
ent of this department. He has had something to do with the building of 
nearly every bridge on the entire Frisco system. 



WILLIAM PEXX MURRAY. 

The deft shuttle which weaves the web of human life and human destiny, 
constantly and ceaselessly flies backward and forward, and into the vast and 
checkered fabric is woven the individuality, the efforts, ambitions and achieve- 
ments of each man — of all men. Within this web may be defined the lines of 
personality, be the}' those that lend the beautiful crystal sheen of honest merit 
and worthy effort, or dark, curving and deflecting ones, which penetrate warp 
and woof, and mar and efface the composite beauty of their darkened threads. 
The life record of the late William 1'enn Murray, for many years one of the 
most progressive agriculturists and stock men of Franklin township, Greene 
county, indicates that the fabric of which his individuality was woven was 01 
the best and purest, and consequently he left behind him "that which is rather 
to be chosen than much riches — a good name." 

Mr. Murray was born in Wyandotte county. Ohio. June 4. 1867. He 
was a son of David C. and Hulda I Dow) Murray. David Murray, who was 
also a native of the localit) in which our subject was born, grew to manhood. 
was educated and married there, and in 1869 he removed from the old Buck- 
eye state to Greene county, Missouri, with his family, locating in Robberson 
township, on a farm of three hundred and twenty acres which he purchased 
and on which he followed general farming and handling live stock in a suc- 
cessful manner. I le Ik cante well known here and was considered a man who 





'iAst/vbcxsys' 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. Io8l ; 

was uniformly fair in all his dealings with his fellow men. and here his death 
occurred in 1873, when our subject was six years old. His wife, who was also 
a native of Wyandotte county, Ohio, also died on the home farm 111 Greene 
county, being summoned to her rest in 1879. 

William I'enn Murray was two years old when his parents brought him 
to Greene county and here he grew to manhood on the homestead where he 
worked when a boy, ami he received his early education in the common 
schools. February 18, 1891, he married Jennie Stiver, who was born January 
5. 1870, a daughter oi Isaac and Susannah (Horner) Stiver. Isaac Stiver 
was born March [6, 1826, m Pennsylvania. After his marriage he moved to 
Elkhart county, Indiana, and was living there when Mrs. Jennie Murray was 
born, and there he engaged in farming fur twenty-two years, then sold out 
and removed with his family to Greene county, Missouri, locating seven miles 
northeast of Springfield, buying one hundred and twenty acres of good land, 
and here followed general farming until his death, July 24, 1897. He was a 
Republican and a Lutheran. His wife was born December 30, 1835, near 
Dayton, Ohio, and her death occurred on the home farm in Greene county, 
June 20, 1908. To Isaac Stiver and wife twelve children were born, namely: 
Daniel J. lives in Newcastle, Indiana; Jacob M. is deceased; Louis J. is prac- 
ticing dentistry in Ft. Wayne, Indiana; Mrs. Mary L. Risk, of Amsterdam, 
Xew York; Isaac X. is deceased: Wesley M. lives in Campbell township, 
( ireene county; William H. lives in Indianapolis; Jennie, widow of the subject 
of this memorial review ; Harrison G. lives in Springfield, Missouri; James 
is living but his address is not known at this writing; Edward and Calvin J. 
are both residing in Springfield. 

William P. Murray devoted his active life to general farming and 
handling live stuck. lie owned a valuable and well kept place of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Franklin township; however, his principal business 
was raising, buying and trading in livestock, especially cattle, and in this he 
was very successful, being an exceptionally good judge of all kinds of stock 
and dealing honestly with his fellow men so that he retained their confidence 
and good will, lie owned over one hundred head of good cattle at the time 
of his death. March 9, 193 1. 

Mr. Murray's family consisted of three children, namely: Mrs. Mazie 
Newton, born November 20, 1891, wife of R. H. Newton, first lieutenant of 
No. 2. Springfield fire department, of Springfield; Ralph, born January 15, 
i, v <)3, died October 16, 1893; and Norman B., born September 2T,, 1895, w ^o 
is living with his mother on the home farm which he operates. 

Politically, Mr. Murray was a Democrat and served for some time on 
school board. While he was not a member of any church he was religious at 
heart and a good honest man in every respect, a kind husband and an indulgent 



I082 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

father and a man whom his neighbors admired and respected. He was super- 
intendent of Sunday school at Pleasant Valley for several years and a man 
who delighted in extending a helping hand to those in need, and he will long 
be greatly missed from his neighborhood. 



FLAVIUS JOSEPHUS UNDERWOOD. 

The world owes much to the plain, plodding worker who, uncomplain- 
ingly, does his whole duty as he sees it; but beyond his labors there is a 
sphere of activity wherein the workers are few and the products produced 
more rare — that of genius. Through the medium of this subtle, sublime, 
elusive thing, possessed of certain favored ones, all the great treasures of 
art, music, invention, literature and science have been given to the world. 
Those who know him best do not hesitate to pronounce Flavius Josephus 
Underwood, a venerable inventor and business man of Springfield, as a 
genius of high order, although it is doubtful if many who know him appre- 
ciate this fact to the fullest extent. His fertile brain has given humanity 
many helpful things, which will continue for all time to be a hlessing to the 
race. For considerably more than a quarter of a century he has been one 
of our leading men of affairs, for man)- years a wagon manufacturer and 
later a contractor, but now in view of his advanced age, he having passed 
his eighty-fourth mile-post, he is living in retirement at his cozy home on 
North Grant street, although he is hale and hearty and in possession of his 
faculties, his lusty old age being due no doubt to the fact that he has led 
a busy, temperate and wholesome lite. 

Mr. Underwood is a scion of one of the oldest American families, who 
lived in New England for many generations, where the first of the family 
landed from the ( lid World nearly four centuries ago, and from that remote 
period to the presenl time the various members of his descendants have 
played well their parts in pushing forward the wheel- of the car of civiliza- 
tion in the western hemisphere. 

Flavius J. Underw 1 was horn in Hardwick, Caledonia county. Ver- 
mont, March o, [830. lie was a son of Silas and Lucy Warner (Leslie) 
Underwood, the latter a granddaughter of Roberl Leslie, an Irish peer, 
who immigrated to America in the earl) period of the country's history and 
located in New Hampshire. Silas Underwood was born at Westford, 
Massachusetts, December 7. 1783; he devoted hi- life to agricultural pur- 
suits, and hi- death occurred in March, 1869. He was a son of John Und 
wood, of Bradford, Vermont, who was horn October 28, 1755. and was a 
01 of Joseph Underw 1. born 0,1 September 15. [727, at Westford, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. [083 

Massachusetts; the latter was a son of Joseph Underwood, born on May 28, 
1681, at Watertown, Massachusetts; he was a son of Joseph Underwood, 
who was born in 1650 at Watertown, Massachusetts, and was a son of Jo- 
seph Underwood, the emigrant, who crossed the Atlantic from England, 
his native country, and took up his residence at Hingham, Massachusetts, 
in 1637, later removing to Watertown. He was the founder of the Under- 
woods in America, now quite numerous, having dispersed to all states of the 
Union. 

Flavins J. Underwood of this review, was the youngest of ten chil- 
dren ; he grew to manhood in Vermont, assisting his father with the general 
work about the farm, and during the winter months he attended the district 
schools and an academy, and he began life for himself by teaching school 
in his native locality. Remaining in Vermont until he was twenty-two years 
of age he, following the advice of Horace Greeley, editor of the New York 
Tribune, came west, locating at Milton. Pike count}-, Illinois, and operated 
a farm in that vicinity several years. In i860 he went to Rock Island, that 
state, where he resided until 1871. having turned his attention to the manu- 
facturing business, and became superintendent of Buford's Plow Works. 
Forty-three years ago he left Rock Island and came to Springfield, Missouri, 
where he has since resided, and where, with James M. Wilhoit, he started a 
wagon manufacturing plant, and made a success of this venture, operating 
the plant for many years with much success, there having been a great de- 
mand for their products owing to the high-grade workmanship and superior 
quality of their wagons. Our subject finally gave up the manufacturing 
business and turned his attention to contracting, which he followed with 
satisfactory results up to his retirement from active life a few years ago. 
But it has been as an inventor that Mr. Underwood has figured most con- 
spicuously and for which he is deserving of the most credit. He has se- 
cured about twenty patents. While at Rock Island he built the first suc- 
cessful two-horse cultivator 1 , which has revolutionized agricultural work, es- 
pecially in the corn producing states, lie enjoys the distinction of being the 
first person to advocate and demonstrate the circulation of steam for the 
purpose of heating buildings, which method is now so universally employed. 
Among his man}' inventions is a coal chute which he patented in 1904 and 
which is widely used. He believes his best invention is a machine for 
I Hiring out hubs in which to insert boxes. His name is deserving of a high 
place among the successful inventors of his day and generation. 

Mr. Underwood was married at Hardwick, Vermont, July 8, 1851, to 
Daphna Josephine Hortense Bridgman, who was born in that town and 
there grew to womanhood and was educated. She, too, is a representative 
of an excellent old family of New England. Our subject and wife have 
traversed the life-path which leads through sun and shadow, for nearly 



IO84 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

sixty-three years. Theirs have been an ideal domestic life, mutually help- 
ful and pleasant, and now, in the December of their years they can look 
backward with no compunction for wasted hours or misdeeds and forward 
with the hope of the just. Their union was blessed by the birth of four 
children, but only one survives, Airs. Ida M. Jenkins, who lives at Xobo, 
Greene county, Missouri; she has three children. Our subject and wife 
have seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. The following 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Underwood: Genevieve Leslie, born 
on November 19, 1853, died November 9, 1854; Ida May, born in April, 
1856, married Grovner A. Shinn, September 19, 1873, and three children 
were born to them, John B., Grover L., and Nellie U. ; Inez Belle, born on 
October 18, i860, married George B. Garlick, and to them two children 
were born, Harold U., and Ruth; Nellie Maud, born, January 6, 1864, mar- 
ried William Sheffield, and to them two children were born, Hortense and 
Cornelia. 

Politically, Mr. Underwood has always been a loyal Democrat. He 
has served as a member of the city council. He was at one time candidate 
for the state legislature, and for many years he has taken an active part in 
political affairs. During campaigns he lias frequently taken the stump in 
Greene and adjoining counties and won a reputation as a forceful speaker. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order, and is active as a member of 
St. John's commandery, and served as eminent commander several years 
ago. Mrs. Underwood is a member of the Order of Eastern Star of which 
she \\a-> formerly worthy matron when it was first organized. 

This grand old couple are well known and highly esteemed by a very 
wide circle of friends in Springfield. (Mr. Underwood's death occurred on 
May 4. [914, after the above sketch was written.) 



JAMES E. SMITH. 



It is a good sign when a county like Greene can boast of so many of her 
enterprising business men and farmers who arc native sons, for it indicates 
that there are to be found all the opportunities necessary to insure success 
in the material affairs of life and that her native sons, unlike so many if mi 
various sections, have found it to their advantage to remain at home. They 
have been wise in doing this for nature has offered the husbandman unusual 
advantages here and has seldom failed to reward the earnest worker with 
gratifying results, and when the tillers of the soil are prosperous all lines 
of business flourish, consequently not only the fanners have succeeded in this 
locality hut also the merchants, millers, lumbermen, stock dealers, and many 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO85 

others, and the county ranks well with the most thriving sections of this or 
any other state. 

One of the native-born business men of Springfield is James E. Smith, 
whose birth occurred in this city, July 28, 1868. He is a son of David and 
Mary (Fulton) Smith. The father was born in Glasgow, Scotland, as was 
also the mother, and there they grew to maturity, were educated and mar- 
ried, and when young immigrated to America and located in Greene county, 
Missouri. The elder Smith was a well driller and he operated the first well 
drill in the vicinity of Springfield. It was in 1858 that they located here 
and they spent the rest of their lives in Springfield, the father's death occur- 
ring here in 1870. To them thirteen children were born; the following are 
still living, namely: Maggie lives in Pennsylvania: David, a machinist, in the 
employ of the Frisco, lives in Springfield: Joseph lives in Kansas City: 
James E., of this sketch, and Jennie E. (twins), the latter also lives in 
Springfield : Robert makes his home in this city. 

James E. Smith grew to manhood in his native city and here received 
a common and high school education, and when young served his apprentice- 
ship as machinist and followed this trade at the old foundry at Mill and 
Boonville streets, where he learned the trade. After remaining there about 
three years he secured a position in the Springfield Wagon Works, in the 
paint department, later drove a grocery wagon for ten or twelve years. 
In i8qo he went into the grocery business for himself on Boonville street, 
also cigars and confectionery, remaining in that stand until 1894. However, 
prior to that year he was for some time in the employ of the Frisco, working 
as brakeman between Springfield and Memphis. In 1897 he went to work in 
the city fire department, where he remained until 1000, then opened his 
present grocery store at 831 North Campbell street and has built up a large 
and constantly-growing business, carrying at all seasons a large and well- 
selected stock of fancy and staple groceries. 

Mrs. Smith was married, August 13, 1890. to Anna Miles, who was born 
in Hannibal, Missouri, September 17, 1870. She is a daughter of William 
A. and Malinda (Snyder) Miles, both natives of Pennsylvania, being early 
settlers in Missouri, locating on a farm. Mr. Miles served five years in the 
Civil war, participating in many hard-fought battles. Mrs. Smith grew to 
womanhood in her native city and received a good common school educa- 
tion in Hannibal. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Smith three children have been born, namely: James 
E.. Jr., born May 16, 1891, lives at home: Jennette, born March 19, 1896, 
died the same year: Genevieve, born November 10, 1898. 

Mr. Smith is prominent in fraternal affairs, being a member of the Ma- 
sonic Order, Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, the Roval 
Arcanum, Highlanders, also the Woodmen of the World and the Mod- 



1086 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ern Woodmen of America. He has been clerk of the Woodmen of the World 
for the past eighteen years and is active in Woodmen circles. Politically, 
he is a Democrat, and for the past three years has been councilman from the 
Sixth ward and has done much for the general good of the city. He was 
formerly secretary of the Retail Merchants' Association. His wife is a 
member of the Woodmen Circle and the Pythian Circle. Air. and Mrs. 
Smith belong; to the Catholic church. 



GEORGE C. RUPPRECHT. 

It is not enough to be all right in this world, but it is necessary that 
we look all right as well, because two-thirds of success is making people 
think we are what we profess to be and can be depended upon. Success 
in life also depends a great deal in selecting the line of work for which 
we are best fitted by nature. How many third-class ministers, lawyers, 
physicians there are who might have made remarkable success as agricul- 
turists or merchants, or as inventors, railroad men or mechanics. George C. 
Rupprecht, foreman at the Steineger Saddlery Company, Springfield, studied 
himself and found out what he was capable of doing and what he was un- 
fitted for, so he wisely selected a practical calling and has made a comfortable 
living all the while. 

Mr. Rupprecht was born October 4, 1865, at Wurzburg, Bavaria, a 
province of the German Empire. He is a son of John and Barbara (Seu- 
bertj Rupprecht, both natives of the same locality where they grew up. 
were educated, married and established their permanent home. There the 
death of the mother occurred in 1S71 at the early age of thirty-three Years! 
The father became somewhat prominent in public affairs and was a city 
official and held other public offices. He was also a commissioned officer 
in the 'regular arm}- there for a period of sixteen years. His death occurred 
in his native land in 1882. Her father, Michael Seubert. was also a Ba- 
varian and spent his life in the Fatherland. He was a bleacher and master 
of bleachers, also a riverman for years. To John and Barbara Rupprecht 
four chidlren were born, namely: Carl, Anna, Barbara and George C. 

Mr. Rupprecht, of this sketch, spent his boyhood in his native land 
and attended school until he was thirteen years of age, then went to work- 
learning the saddlery trade in the city of Wurzburg. After serving his ap- 
prenticeship he entered the Seventy-sixth Infantry of the German army, 
at Hamburg, ami served two years. Then he followed his trade in differ- 
ent towns of the Empire until 1892, when he came to America, landing at 
Baltimore, Maryland, and from there made the long journey to central 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO87 

Texas, where he followed his trade until 1899, when he came to Spring- 
field, Missouri, where he has since resided, and for over fifteen years he 
has been in the employ of the Steineger Saddlery Company, working for a 
year as saddle maker, then was promoted to foreman in 1900, which re- 
sponsible position he has continued to hold to the present time, giving 
eminent satisfaction to his employers. He is an expert in his line and is 
reliable and trustworthy. At present he has twenty-four hands under his 
direction. He has saved his earnings and owns a good home on Cherry 
street. 

Mr. Rupprecht was married in Springfield in 1900, to Cecelia Guettin- 
ger, who was born in Zurich, Switzerland, from which country she emi- 
grated to America when young. This union has resulted in the birth of 
four children, namely: Carl is deceased; George is now twelve years of 
age ; Walter is eight, and Cecil is three. 

Politically, Mr. Rupprecht is an independent voter. He formerly be- 
longed to the Catholic church. He is a member of the German-American 
Alliance, being now president of the local order of the same ; he is also 
secretary of the German-American Beneficial Society of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. He is also prominent in the Masonic order, being a member of 
Solomon Lodge No. 271. in which he has held all offices. He is al a 
member of Springfield Chapter No. 15 and has also held all offices, being 
at this writing high priest. 



CLARENCE S. MACK. 



By a life of persistent and well applied industry, led along the most 
honorable lines, Clarence S. Mack has justly earned the right to be repre- 
sented in a work of the character of the one in hand, along with other pro- 
gressive men of affairs of Greene county who have made and are making 
their influence felt in their respective communities. He is widely known 
as a wholesale dealer in tobacco and other lines, and is a creditable repre- 
sentative of two of the old families of this locality. 

Air. Mack was born in Springfield, Missouri, April 7, 1876. He is a 
son of James B. and Elizabeth (Shackelford) Mack, both natives of Spring- 
field also, the father born in April, 1854, and the mother born in May, 1855, 
and here they grew to maturity, attended the local schools and have always 
resided. James B. Mack started in the drug business when only thirteen 
years of age, for the Hall Drug Company, and he continued successfully in 
this line for many years. About thirty years ago he began traveling on the 
road for the Myers Drug Company, of St. Louis, and is still thus engaged, 



lo88 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

being one of the best known commercial travelers in this portion of the Mid- 
dle West. His family consists of but two children, Clarence S., of this 
sketch, and Georgia. 

Clarence S. Mack grew to manhood in his native city and here received 
a high school education. When eighteen years of age he went into the retail 
cigar business on his own account, and this he continued with gratifying re- 
sults until 19 10, when he entered the wholesale cigar, tobacco, candy and 
chewing gum business, also soda fountain supplies. His present place of 
business is 309 McDaniel avenue, where he has a neat, modernly appointed 
and attractive store and is carrying on a large and lucrative business which 
extends over a large portion of the Ozark region. 

Mr. Mack was married on April 7, 1906, in Springfield, to Cyrena Jones, 
who was born in Piatt City, Missouri. She is a daughter of George T. Jones 
and wife. She received a common school education. 

To Mr. and Mrs. .Mack two children have been born: Margaret, whose 
birth occurred .May 14, 1907, and Nancy Elizabeth, born August 17, 1914. 

Politically, Mr. Alack is a Republican, lie belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and is a member of the Christian church. 
He is a sociable and genial gentleman who is well liked about town. 



THE JAMES FAMILY. 



This is one of the earliest pi< neer families in Greene count)-, where, lor 
a period of three-quarters of a century its members have been active in various 

circle.-, doing their lull parts in the upbuilding of the locality and leading 
public-spirited and exemplary lives, so that they have ever borne the best of 
reputations and haw in every way deserved the material success they have 
been blessed with, as well a- the high esteem in which they are universally 

held. 

We first hear of David James, a native el' Wales, who, when a child, 
crossed the Atlantic ocean to the New World in an old-time sailing vessel, 
the trip requiring man) week-. Me located in Virginia, from which state he 
moved to South i arolina, thence to North Carolina, from there to Tennessee, 
later to Kentucky, then to western Tennessee, where his death occurred. ft 
is believed he was married in South Carolina to Nancy Atchison. He was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. was wounded in battle and he carried the 
bullet in his arm the resl of his life. He was a blacksmith by trade. One of 
liis mar relatives settled in Ohio, and he also had a brother. Enoch, and it is 
believed that the .Mr. James of President Garfield's cabinet was one of the 
( )hio branch of the familv. It was u, Henrv county, Tennessee, that David 




JASON R. JAMES. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I089 

James spent his last days and died in 1842. His wife, Nancy Atchison, was 
born in Ireland, but when an infant, was brought to South Carolina and there 
grew up and married. Her brothers were Sirgenner, John. Robert and Wil- 
liam Atchison. In later years most of the Atchison family moved to Arkansas, 
some going on to Texas. Mrs. Nancy ( Atchison) James died on the old 
homestead in western Tennessee, about 1840. To David and Nancy James 
these children were born, Thomas; Polly, who married a second cousin by the 
name of James, from the Ohio branch of the family ; Mrs. Parmelia Wadkins 
of Kentucky; Mrs. Malinda Hall of Kentucky; Mrs. Aurelia Good, Joseph, 
John and Robert, all of Tennessee; David was killed when a boy, in Ken- 
tucky, by lightning, which struck a tree under which he took refuge during a 
storm which came up while he was out hunting. 

Thomas James was born in South Carolina, December 21, 1792, but he 
grew up and was educated near the Kentucky and Tennessee line. He served 
as justice of the peace in Madison county, Tennessee, before removing to 
Missouri. He was a life long farmer, clearing and developing a good farm 
from the wilderness. It was in 1835 that he removed with his family to 
Greene county, Missouri, and his death occurred in Missouri while returning 
from his old home in Tennessee, on November 9, 1837, when a comparatively 
young man. He married Nancy (lately and their family consisted of nine 
children, all of whom are now deceased, namely: Mrs. Parmelia Wallace died 
in Greene county: Irwin David died when young in d'ennessee ; Levi also died 
in early life in Tennessee; Mrs. Minerva Putman died in Greene county ; Win- 
frey died in Oregon after the family moved to Greene county; Aurelia died 
in this county, November 6, 1844; Jason Robert, born February 2^. 1827, in 
Madison county, Tennessee. Jason R., seventh child in order of birth, was 
about eight years old when he removed with the family in December. 1835. 
to Franklin township, Greene county, Missouri, and here he grew to manhood 
and was educated and when only ten years of age assumed charge of and 
farmed the homestead after the death of his father. His mother also died 
on the homestead here. April 11, 1863, aged about seventy. During the Civil 
war, Jason R. was a soldier in the Union army under Captain Jenkins, in the 
Missouri State Militia, and took part in the battle of Springfield, January 8, 
1863. After the war he continued farming here until his death at an advanced 
age, March 21, 1908. The eighth child in order of birth of Thomas and 
Nancy (Gately) James was Susan Jane, whose death occurred in Greene 
county, February 1, 1845; Thomas, the youngest child, died April 14, 1858; 
he was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church. South. He married 
Elizabeth Patterson, by whom one child was born, Nancy Arbelia, who now 
lives on the old James homestead in Franklin township, this county, operating 
the entire James estate of two hundred acres, and she has one hundred and 
(69) 



IO9O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

two acres of her own which she farms with the assistance of her cousin, 
Robert James, the son of John and Martha (FutrellJ James. Nancy James 
was educated in the township schools and has lived on the home place most 
of her life. Winfrey James, mentioned above, was a Methodist minister, 
having preached all over Greene county, where he was widely known 111 
pioneer days, but later moved to the state of Oregon, where he continued 
preaching and where his death occurred September 17. 1897. He became a 
presiding elder of a conference of his denomination in that state. He mar- 
ried Sarah Jenkins, first, and later married Jane Williams, after the death of 
his first wife. The first union was without issue, but four children born of 
the second marriage, namely: Charles Wesley, who lives in Oregon; John 
Fletcher lives in that state: Sarah Jane, who married Thomas Bailev, is de- 
ceased; for his third wife he married Malinda Baisley and by this union had 
two children, both living in or near the state of Oregon. Thomas died in 
early life. Parmelia James, mentioned above, married John Wallace, by 
whom one child was born. Henry James Wallace, who married Tina Harkne-^. 
of Franklin township. Greene count}-, and three children were born to this 
union, namely: Blondville, Mrs. Flora Vaughn is deceased ; Mrs. Lellian 
Bryan. Blondville Wallace married Pearl Logan and they have two chil- 
dren, Chesney and Flora Lee. Lellian Wallace married Bert Bryan and they 
have one child. Helen. Minerva James, mentioned above, married Man-el 
Putman, a farmer, late of Franklin township, and to this union one 
child was born. Alary Jane Putman. who married Amnion Knighten, a sketch 
of whom appears on another page of this volume. Both Mr. and .Mrs. Mansel 
Putman are deceased. 

Little is known regarding the Gately ancestry. The great-great-grand- 
father Mercer seems to have been stolen when a child from his home. 
|i — ilily in the British Lies, and reared b) seafaring men. taught when a child 
to assisl "i! a sailing ship, especially in tying knots in the rigging. When 
lie was supposed to be about twenty-one years of aye lie was given hi- freedom 
and a tine cup (silver, lined with gold) was presented him, and be took bis 
own name. It i< believed that he eventually located in the state of Tennessee. 
His daughter, Jemima, married John Gately. an Italian. In North Carolina, 
the great-great-grandfather Mercei was living with great-grandfather Gately 
sometime after the year 170.V The former bid a considerable Mini of money 
and could not remember where be put it. and thinking bis son-in-law. John 
Gateb had stolen it. finally killed him. but afterward found the money where 
he 1 VTero r) had hidden it. Mercer had a son who was at one time a Con- 
gressman. Tbe son helped his father out of his trouble without punishment 
Great-grandmother Gately later moved to Kentucky, where -lie settled. Her 
children were John. James, Polly, Susan, Nancy, Crecy, Jemima and Phoeba. 



GREENE C0U XT V, MISSOURI. IO9I 

|iihn married Rebecca Watt and one of his sons was named John i lately also. 
Polly married William Atchison, a brother of great-grandmother James. 
Susie married William Jenkins. Nancy married Thomas James. Crecy 
married William Tedford. Jemima married Sam Bradshaw. Phoeba mar- 
ried Jesse Grace. 



EMSLEY L. BODENHAMER. 

By a life consistent in motive and action and because of his many com- 
mendable personal qualities. Emsley L. Bodenhamer, for many years a suc- 
cessful farmer and stock raiser in Greene county, who is now connected with 
one of the leading implement houses of Springfield, lias earned the sincere 
reeard of all who know him. He came from an ancestry that distinguished 
itself in pioneer times, having had in them that unrest of the old world 
races that drives humanity ever westward on its great adventure, globe- 
girdlers and zone-conquerors. His progenitors were courageous, large-mus- 
cled, a stolid sort of people, in whom acute imagination was coupled with 
immense initiative, and who possessed, withal, loyalty and affection as sturdy 
as their own strength. He has inherited many of their commendable at- 
tributes. 

Mr. Bodenhamer was born on December 27. 1872, five miles east of 
Springfield, on the old homestead. He is a son of Andrew J. and Charlotte 
Elizabeth (Wharton) Bodenhamer, the former a native of Greene county 
and the latter of South Carolina, from which state she came to Missouri 
overland in an early day with her parents. The parents of Andrew J. Bo- 
denhamer were among the pioneer settlers of Greene county, locating on a 
farm which they developed by hard work, enduring the usual hardships of 
life on the frontier. On the farm our subject's father grew up and worked 
when a boy, and he attended the early-day schools in his vicinity. He has 
devoted his life successfully to general farming, in which he is still engaged. 
He and his wife are both now advanced in years. His farm formerly con- 
sisted of one hundred and sixty acres, but is now only one hundred acres, 
he having disposed of the balance, not caring to be burdened with so much 
land in his old age. During the Civil war he enlisted, in 1861. in the Eighth 
Missouri Volunteer Infantry, in Springfield, and he served three years in a 
faithful and gallant manner. 

Six children, all living, have been born to Andrew J. Bodenhamer and 
wife, namely: Alice, William. Tenny, Josephine, Emsley L. and Ira G. 

The subject of this sketch grew up on the home farm and there he as- 
sisted his father with the general work when a boy, and in the winter months 
he attended the common schools in Seymour and his native vicinitv. He 



IO92 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

made his start in life on the farm. When twenty years of age he went to 
Tulare, California, where he spent three years, then returned to Greene coun- 
ty and resumed farming on a place containing two hundred and ten acres, 
near the old homestead. He continued general farming and stock raising 
on a large scale for eight or nine years, then sold out and moved to Spring- 
field, in 1906, bought city property and went to work for the Diffenderffer 
Implement Company, at Market and Walnut streets, and has been employed 
by this firm continuously to the present time. He has proven to be a most 
energetic, capable and trustworthy employee and has drawn a great deal of 
trade for the firm. 

Mr. Bodenhamer was married on December 18, 1895, to Mattie L. 
Quisenberry, who was born in Greene county. Missouri, June 10, 1878, and 
here she grew to womanhood and was educated. She is a daughter of El- 
cano and Ellen ( Vandergrift) Quisenberry. 

One child has been born to our subject and wife, Minnie K. Boden- 
hamer, whose birth occurred on June 28, 1897. She is attending the State 
Normal School here and is taking a course in music, having decided natural 
ability in this line. 

Politically, Mr. Bodenhamer is a Democrat, and, fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 



LOUIS X. BASSETT. 



Every human being either submits to the controlling influence of others 
or wields an influence which loaches, controls, guides or misdirects others. 
If he be honest and successful in his chosen field of endeavor, investigation 
will brighten his fame and point the way along which others may follow with 
like success. Consequently a critical study of the life record of the gentle- 
man whose name forms the caption hi tins paragraph may be beneficial to 
the reader, for it has been one of usefulness and honor and indicates how 
one may rise to positions of responsibility in the industrial world while yet 
young in years if he directs his energies along proper paths and is controlled 
b) pn 'per ideals. 

Louis X. Bassett, superintendent of terminals of the Frisco Lines at 
Springfield, is a worthy representative of a distinguished family, lie w : as 
born August jo. 1874, in Allen county, Ohio, and is a son of Samuel II. and 
Mary (Whipp) Bassett. The father of our subject was born in Ohio, in 
October, 1848, and there grew to manhood and received a limited education, 
and there he married and spent his earlier years. His wife was also horn 
and reared in the stale of Ohio and was educated there, the date of her birth 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO93 

being in September, 1850. To these parents eight children were born, name- 
ly : Ollis O., Mrs. Rosie Buchanan, Sarah (deceased), Louis N. (subject), 
Clara, Samuel, Jr., DeWitt and Glen. 

Samuel H. Bassett is a line example of a successful self-made Ameri- 
can. He made up for his early lack of education of a higher order by wide 
home study and by contact with the world until he became an exceptionally 
well informed man. and, choosing a military career, has attained a promi- 
nent place in the United States navy, having been connected with the navy 
department since 1896, and is now occupying the responsible position of au- 
ditor of the navy, with offices in Washington, D. C, and is discharging his 
duties in a manner that reflects much credit upon himself and to the satis- 
faction of his superiors in that department. During the Civil war he joined 
the Federal army in the fall of 1863 and served very gallantly as a private 
in the Twenty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company I. He saw a 
ereat deal of active service in the far South, and was with General Sherman 
in his campaign about Atlanta ami was on the memorable inarch to the sea. 
At the close of the war he was mustered out and honorably discharged. Many 
years ago he worked in the internal revenue department in northwestern Ohio 
and from that went into the navy, in which his rise has been rapid. He has 
shown much natural ability, and this, combined with keen observing powers 
and the fact that he has been a diligent student of everything that pertained 
to his work, has made him very efficient as well as popular in this branch of 
the government service, and he is popular and well liked in government cir- 
cles in Washington. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 

Louis N. Bassett grew to manhood in Allen county, Ohio, and there 
received a good common school education, later studying at the Ohio State 
Normal, at Ada, that state. He began his railroad career in 1896 in Kansas 
City, Missouri, as messenger boy for the Frisco in the terminal department 
there, and he has remained with this road to the present time. Being dili- 
gent, quick to learn, faithful and reliable in all his work, he has been pro- 
moted until he now holds a very responsible position. He became chief clerk 
in that department, which position he occupied until in 1908, when he was 
appointed superintendent of terminals at Springfield, and has since held this 
post in a manner that has proven him to be entirely capable and worthy of 
the high degree of trust and esteem in which he is held by the company. He 
looks after the operation of trains, both passenger and freight, also the yards, 
tracks and station. He is regarded as one of the best men, in this particular 
field, the Frisco has ever had. and he is frequently complimented by his su- 
periors for his efficient and prompt work. 

Mr. Bassett was married April 3, 1895, m Ohio, to Genevieve Murray, 
who was born in Allen county, that state, where she was reared and well edu- 



1094 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

cated. She is a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Depler) Murray. Mr. 
Murray was one of the oldest residents of Allen county and was twice mar- 
ried and reared a large family. To his second wife eight children were born, 
three of whom were triplets. Dr. Robert D. Murray, the brother of our 
subject's wife, was, at one time, government physician, specializing in yel- 
low fever, and was United States surgeon for many years and was located 
at Ship Island, Mississippi, for a time, and then went to Macon, Georgia, and 
was instrumental in wiping out the yellow fever epidemic at New Bruns- 
wick, Georgia, and in 1903 died in Key West, Florida. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bassett, namely: Clif- 
ford, born September 19, 1904, and Howard, bom August 29, 1906. 

Politically, Mr. Bassett is a Republican. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the Masonic order, including the blue lodge and other degrees of the Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and including the latter. He 
is active in the affairs of the order, in which he stands high. Religiously, 
he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Personally, he is a man 
of fine character, is a good mixer, and has made a host of friends since lo- 
cating in Springfield. 



CHARLES J. DRURY. 

There is a great deal in being born under a good eye, one that watches 
and guards off the error and folly that overtake so many young men. The 
parents thai are able to infuse into their children the spirit of the Spartans 
—the spirit that can meet any fate and make the most of the world — will 
see their children grow to years of maturity with excellent habits and splen- 
did principles, and see them become exemplary citizens. Charles J. Drury, 
former superintendent of the North Side machine shops for the Frisco, and 
a man who had an envied record in his special line of endeavor, although a 
young man. was fortunate in having broad-minded, honest and painstaking 
parent-, so dial he looked out upon the world from a sane, intelligent and 
comprehensive viewpoint. 

Mr. Drury was born September 17, 1878, at Chicago Junction, Ohio. He 
is a son of M. J. and Mary (Cook) Drury, the former a native of England 
and the latter of Wesl Virginia. M. J. Drury was born in May, 1849. He 
spent his earlier years in his native land and received a good common school 
education, but was young when he came to the United State-. He has spent 
his life in railroad service. He served his apprenticeship at Parkersburg, 
West Virginia, in the shops of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. 
Later he went to Kansas and was general foreman at Parsons in the shops 
of the Missouri. Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, from 1880 until 1886, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO95 

after which he was gang foreman until 1892 for the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe Railroad Company, was general foreman for this road at La Junta, 
< Colorado, until 1895. From that year until 1902 he was general foreman at 
Arkansas City, Kansas, for the same road, and from 1902 to 1906 he was 
master mechanic for the same road at Winslow, Arizona. He then was 
master mechanic for about a year at Raton, New Mexico, for the same road, 
and from 1907 to 1912 he was mechanical superintendent at La Junta, Colo- 
rado, and since then has been at his present location, Topeka, Kansas, as su- 
perintendent of shop. The mother of the subject of this sketch died in Jan- 
uary, 1907. 

Charles J. Drury, who was the only child of M. J. Drury and wife, re- 
ceived his education in the schools of Kansas City, Missouri ; Topeka, Kan- 
sas, and La Junta, Colorado, attending the high school in the last named 
place, lie entered railway service July I, 1895, from which time until July 
1, 1909, he was machinist apprentice for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
railroad, at Atchison, Kansas. After serving his four years there he was, 
until July 1, 1900, machinist for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, 
Southern Pacific Company, Kansas City Southern railway, El Paso & South- 
western railroad, Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific railroad and other roads. 
From July 1, 1906, to July 1, 1908, he was roundhouse foreman of the 
Santa Fe at La Junta. Colorado. From November, 1908, to September, 1910, 
he was general foreman of the same road at Albuquerque, New Mexico. 
From September 1, 1910, to April 1, 191 1, he was master mechanic on the 
Oklahoma division of the same road at Arkansas City, Kansas. From April 
1, 191 1, until January. 1913, he was master mechanic of the Plains division 
of that road at Amarillo, Texas. From January, 1913, until July of the 
same year he was general foreman for the St. Louis & San Francisco rail- 
road at Fort Smith, Arkansas, and from that date until July, i<;i4^ he was 
general foreman in the Springfield shops of this company, and at his death 
was master mechanic of the machine shops at Sapulpa, of the < >klahoma di- 
vision. He was a master of his special line of work and made a fine record 
in the responsible position which he held as he did in all previous positions. 
His death occurred October 19, 1914, as a result of typhoid fever. 

Air. Drury was married, in February, 1903. in San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, to Julia McKenry, who was born in Wisconsin, in August, 1880. She 
is a daughter of William and Mary McKenry, who reside in Wisconsin. 

Five children, four of whom are still living, have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Drury, namely: Mary, born December 25, 1904, died in January, 
1908; Florence, born March 11, 1907; Jack, born \ugust 17, 1909; Charles, 
born March 13, 1910; Frances, born January 12, 1913. 

Politically, Mr. Drury was a Republican. He was a member of the 
•Catholic church, and, fraternally, he belonged to the Knights of Columbus. 



IO96 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ARTHUR LAFAYETTE WHITLOCK. 

This is the age of the expert. In every walk of life there is an insistent 
demand for the man who has made a particular study of one thing, whether 
it be in science, medicine, architecture, agriculture, horticulture, or, in fact, 
any other field of human endeavor. In the few short years, however, that 
the soil expert has been a recognized factor in the success of American agri- 
culture, he has demonstrated beyond dispute that he is. of all the experts, 
the most valuable, for, upon him. as upon no one else, depends the success or 
failure of America's most important citizen, the farmer. There are some 
who cling to their old-fashioned methods and ideas and refuse to heed the 
advice of the expert, all to their own detriment. But such progressive farm- 
ers as Arthur Lafayette Whitlock, of Franklin township, Greene county, avail 
themselves of the advice of the expert and, in fact, utilize all practical in- 
formation regarding their vocations and are therefore making a success as 
general farmers. 

Air. Whitlock was bom .March 27. 1870, in the above named township 
and county, lie is a son of Lambert L. and Mary J. ( Harkness) Whitlock. 
The father was born in Tennessee, April 23, [832. He was a son of Thomas 
J and Elizabeth Ann (Montgomery) Whitlock. Thomas J. Whitlock was 
a native of North Carolina, from which state he emigrated to Tennessee, 
and finally came on to Greene county. Missouri, in [832, when Lambert L. 
was six months old. Thomas J. located on a farm here among the early 
pioneers and became an influential citizen. He devoted his entire life to 
general farming and stock raising and. being a man of rare judgment and 
industry, accumulated much wealth, was one of the largest land owners in 
this county. lie was the possessor of a number of fine farms at the time of 
his death. He was associated with C. P.. Holland in the horse and mule 
business in Springfield for some time, and before the Civil war it was his 
custom to buy up large herds of live stock and drive them to the South where 
be disposed of them at a good profit. During the gold rush to the California 
Eldorado, Thomas J. Whitlock joined the throng that crossed the great 
plains of the west in [849 and remained on the Pacific coast two years. 
Upon returning home he sent his sons, Lambert L. and Samuel T. to Cali- 
fornia with a drove of cattle and they drove them across the plains succi 
fully. At one time. Thomas J. Whitlock owned sixteen slaves, for whom he 
refused an offer of sixteen thousand dollars. Pie was a man of charitable. 
hospitable and liberal impulses, and was a power for good in his community. 
Everybody admired him and respected him. His advice was Frequently 
sought on various questions. IPs death occurred in Greene county at the 
advanced age of eighty-four Avars. His wife, who was also a native of 
Tennessee, died in this county at a ripe old age. During the war of the 




THOMAS .T. WHITXOCK. 





r.. i.. wiirn.ocK. 



\iai:y .1. WHITLOCK. 



GREENE COUNTY, .MISSOURI. 1097 

Rebellion, Thomas J. Whitlock owned and operated a grist mill at Marsh- 
field, Webster county, also owned and operated a grist mill and a saw-mill 
in Greene county. He was identified with nearly evcr_\' enterprise that bad 
for its object the upbuilding and advancement of the county in any way. 
He was widely known, a good mixer, made and retained friends easily and 
was loyal in Ids friendships. He bad no superiors and few equals among 
tbe pioneers as a business man and public-spirited citizen. 

Lambert L. Whitlock grew to manbood on his father"s farm, in tbe 
development of which be bad a band, making himself useful during the crop 
seasons, and during the winter attending tbe township schools; he was a life- 
long farmer and stock man. inheriting many of tbe sterling characteristics 
of his fatber. He became owner of one hundred and sixty acres of excellent 
land and was one of the best general farmers in his township, and with the 
exception of two years spent in California, be lived his entire life within 
three miles of the homestead where the family located when be was a child. 
Politically, he was a Democrat. He belonged to the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church, in which he was a deacon for many years. His death occurred 
on the home farm January 4, 1906, at the age of seventy- four years, after a 
successful and honorable life. During tbe Civil war he served in the militia. 
His wife, Mary J. Harkness, born December 23. 1832, in Tennessee, came 
to Greene county, when twelve years old, where she grew to womanhood and 
was educated, and here her death occurred August 30, iS'ijn. She too. was 
a devout member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Mt. Comfort. 

To Lambert I.. Whitlock and wife nine children were born, five of whom 
died in infancy. Those living are, Anna, who has remained on the home 
farm; Arthur L. of this review: Finis E. is deceased: Mrs. Ollie Freeman 
lives in Robberson township, this count} - . 

Arthur I.. Whitlock spent his boyhood on the homestead and there 
assisted with the general work. He obtained his education in the rural 
schools of his community, and here he has continued' to reside, following 
general farming. In December. 1898, he married. Lula Wharton, a daugh- 
ter of J. William and Louise (Beckner) Wharton, the former a native of 
Greene county and the latter of Laclede county, Missouri. Mrs. Whitlock 
was born. August 7. 1866, and was reared and educated in Greene county. 
To our subject and wife one child has been born, William Arthur Whitlock, 
born October 7. 1903. 

A year after his marriage, Mr. Whitlock purchased the farm on which 
he now resides, and. during Iris residence of over fifteen years on this ex- 
cellent farm, he has brought it up to a high state of cultivation and improve- 
ment, until today, it ranks with the best in Franklin township. It consists 
of two hundred and ninety acres of rich land. He harvests a large acreage 
of grain annually and raises large numbers of Shorthorn cattle. Jerseys and 



!i:i:N GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

other live stock, of which he is a good judge. He has a pleasant home and 
numerous convenient outbuildings. 

Politically, he is a Democrat and while he is interested in local as well 
as national public affairs, like his honored father before him, he takes no 
active part and has never held office. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, No. 4975, of Springfield, and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows of Fair Grove. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist church at Oakland, east of Springfield. 



JOHN B. HARRISON. 

Scattered here and there among Greene county's population of over 
seventy thousand people are men and women who claim, with a degree oi 
pride as well they may, the state of Kentucky as the place of their nativity. 
There is a certain distinction in being a native of the line old Blue ( hass 
state, which has furnished many great men to our national life and has for 
a century been a potent factor in the affairs of the Union. One of those 
who hail from within her borders is John B. Harrison, foreman for over a 
quarter of a century of the great Meyer mills of Springfield. 

Mr. Harrison was born at Bowling Green, Kentucky, August 2. [862. 
He is a son of William H. and Lucinda (Poor) Harrison, the father a 
native of Virginia and the mother a native of [reland, she having emigrated 
from that country when young and met and married the elder Harrison in 
the East. The father of our subject died when his sun, John I'... was about 
twelve years of age, and the latter was small when his mother passed away 

in Missouri, 50 he was reared to manh 1 in the home of his grandfather. 

Benjamin Harrison, who was one of the early pioneers of southeastern 
Missouri. There our subject received a common school education and worked 
on the farm when a boy, until he was about sixteen years of age. then went 
away with Sells Bros, circus, with which he traveled for two years, during 
which he gained much valuable knowledge of the world first handed. He 
then secured employment driving a street car in St. Louis. In 1SN1 he came 
to Springfield and here drove one of the first "mule ears" ,,f the local street 
railway, continuing in this work for about four ami one-half years, then 
began working in the grain milling business for Fox & Rienman at the 
old Gulf .Mill, which stood at the corner of Jefferson and Mill streets. He 
remained there two yeai . duri hich he mastered the various ins and 

outs of the milling business, then went to work for Clark & Russell, with 
which company he remained until the panic during President Clevelan 
.administration, at which time the mill was -old t . . the Meyer Milling Com- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IO99 

pany and Mr. Harrison has been with this concern ever since, his long ser- 
vice indicating that he has been most faithful and capable in this line of 
work. For a period of twenty-six years he has been foreman and grain 
buyer of this well-known mill, and is one of the most widely known men 
in his line in the Southwest. 

Air. Harrison was married nil October 4, 1884, in Springfield, to May 
Edmondson. who was born in this city, August 7, 1864. She is a daughter 
of R. II. and .Martha A. (Mathews) Edmondson, an old family of Spring- 
field, both parents of our subject'-- wife having long been deceased. Mr. 
Edmondson was in the employ of the Frisco railroad for nearly forty years 
here. Mrs. Harrison grew to womanhood in this city and was educated 
in the local schools. 

Five children have been born to our subject and wife, all living, namely: 
Eugene <'.. born November 5, 1885, is connected with Fred Harvey at this 
place; Beatrice, born on March 8, 1888, married F. J. Green, who is em- 
ployed here by the Frisco; Nellie Shaw, born on February 14, 1801. mar- 
ried 11. K. Tegarden, a farmer living northwest of the city; John 11, Jr., 
born on November 6, 1894, married Jessie Hartley and he also works for 
Fred Harvey in this city; Ralph Ashley, born on September 14, 1897, ' s 
attending high school at this writing. 

Mr. Harrison owns a good home at 071 Robberson avenue. Politi- 
cally, he is a- Republican. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World, 
and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



ANDREW B; KERR. 



In going through a large establishment like the new Frisco shops in 
Springfield one is impressed at the sight of such a large number of beardless 
youths, and this is true all over the country, whether one visits machine 
shops, factories, foundries mi- whatever kind of industrial establishment, be- 
ing constantly reminded that this is, according to the oft quoted phrase, "the 
age of voting men." It is not the mission of the biographer to here expatiate 
on reasons or causes or explanations why this has come about, but the fact 
remains nevertheless that elderly men are much in the minority in such places. 
Andrew B. Kerr, while yet young in years, is discharging the duties of an 
important and responsible position, that of instructor of apprentices of the 
Frisco shops. 

Mr. Kerr was born February 27, 1885. in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He is a son of William J. and Margaret (McCracken) Kerr. They 
were both born in Pennsylvania, the father in 1861 and the mother in 1863, 



JIOO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and there they grew to maturity, were educated and married and are still 
living in Allegheny county, that, state, near Pittsburg. After attending a 
college, which is now the University of Pittsburg, William J. Kerr took 
up the study of law, but has never followed that profession, devoting his life 
to railroading. He was a call boy for the Pennsylvania railroad and has 
since held various positions with this company in the transportation depart- 
ment, and at this writing holds the responsible post as general yardmaster 
for that road in Pittsburg. His family consists of ten children, namely : 
Andrew B., of this sketch, is the eldest; John, Katharine, Herman, Margaret, 
William, Isabel, Herbert, Merideth and Norman. They are all living at this 
writing. Politically, the father is a Republican, and. fraternally, is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Malta. 

Andrew B. Kerr grew to manhood in his native state and there attended 
the public schools, but quit school when fourteen years of age and began 
work carrying mail in his locality. He later learned telegraphy in the rail- 
road office there, and served his time in the Pennsylvania shops at Verona, 
as machinist, remaining there from May 21. 1901, to January 8, 1906. Not 
being satisfied with the education he had obtained, he quit the shop in the 
last mentioned year and entered Purdue University, at Lafayette, Indiana, 
made a good record and was graduated from that institution June 28, 19 10, 
with the degree of bachelor of science; also received a degree from the me- 
chanical engineering department. After leaving the university he began 
w< irking as assistant engineer at the car barns of the Pittsburg Street Rail- 
way Company at Homewood, Pennsylvania. Later he went to work for the 
American Steel and Wire Company, in Pennsylvania, as machinist. From 
there he went to Yoakum, Texas, as a machinist on the San Antonio & Aran- 
sas Pass Railroad, in 191 1, being with this company but a short time when 
he took up a position as instructor and representative of The International 
Correspondence Schools, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, in Yoakum, and in the 
spring of 19 1-' went to Omaha, Nebraska, as instructor and text book writer 
of the educational bureau of the Harriman lines, and in the spring of 1913 
came to Missouri. He came to Springfield, Missouri, July 12, 1913, and 
secured employment as machinist in the Frisco shops. His ability was soon 
recognized and he was made instructor of apprentices of the shops of this 
company in Springfield, which position he is holding to the satisfaction of 
all concerned, being a young man of advanced ideas, capable, energetic and 
trustworthy. He has charge of all the apprentices, having under his care 
one hundred and twentj boys at the present time. He makes use of two 
class rooms, one at the old plant and another at the new plant. Each boy 
is required to attend his respective class two hours each week. They are 
given sufficient instruction to enable them to gain a general idea of all shop 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IIOI 

work. Mr. Kerr is making a great success in this undertaking and has 
aroused much enthusiasm in the work in his classes. 

Mr. Kerr was married July 3, 191 1, in Lafayette, Indiana, to Grace 
Ullman, who is a native of Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and a daughter of 
Emanuel and Caroline Ullman; the father is deceased, but the mother sur- 
vives and still makes her home in Tippecanoe county, where Mrs. Kerr grew 
to womanhood and received good educational advantages. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Kerr is a Republican and a member of the Presbyterian 
■church. He is a young man of fine mind and progressive ideas, and the fu- 
ture evidently lias much of promise for him in his special sphere of endeavor. 



ALONZO W. EMERY. 



Among the large numbers of conductors of the Frisco system, none is 
performing his duties more faithfully or satisfactorily than Alonzo W. 
Emery, who has devoted the principal part of his active career to railroad 
service, for which he early in life manifested a decided liking, and every one 
knows that we must like our work if we succeed in it to any appreciable de- 
gree. 

Mr. Emery was born in Brooklyn, New York, November 6, 1864. He 
is a son of George D. and Maria Thresa (Van Arsdel) Emery. The father 
was born in New Hampshire and the mother was a native of Summerville, 
New Jersey, the date of the former's birth being December 4, 183 1, while 
the latter was born in October, 1840. She received a good education. The 
latter part of her life was spent in Springfield, Missouri, where her death 
occurred March 21, 1888. George D. Emery's educational advantages were 
limited, lie devoted the principal part of his business career to the furni- 
ture business, and for years maintained a store on the South Side, Spring- 
field, to which city he removed with his family in 1870. and on September 
7. 1914, died at his residence, having reached the advanced age of nearly 
eighty-three years. His family consisted of only two children, namely: 
Alonzo W., of this sketch, and Frank E. 

Alonzo \Y. Emery was six years of age when, in 1870, he removed with 
his parents front Brooklyn, New York, to Springfield, Missouri, and here he 
grew to manhood and received his education in the ward and high schools. 
When a boy he clerked in various stores, and in 1885 went to Colorado and 
followed ranching two or three years, returning to Springfield in 1888, and 
began braking on a freight train for the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis 
Railroad Company, commonly known as the "Gulf road." which was sold to 



I 102 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

the Frisco system in 1900. After working for that company a year, he re- 
turned to the West and worked on the Oregon Short Line until 1892, when 
he came back to Springfield, and went to braking again, which he followed 
until 1895, when he was promoted to conductor of a freight train. After 
live years of this work he was promoted, in 1900, to passenger conductor, his 
run being between Springfield and Memphis, and he still continues on his 
regular run on this division. 

Mr. Emery has been twice married, first, on June 15. 1890, to Marion 
Cummins, in Huntington, Oregon. She was born in Wisconsin, and her 
death occurred in Springfield, Missouri, in 1906. To this first union two 
children were born, namely: Clifford, burn December 16. 1897, and Albert, 
burn April 2j, 1899. Mr. Emery's second marriage was consummated on 
.March 4, 191 1, his choice of a companion being Wanda Lasley, a widow, 
who was born in Logan county, Ohio, November 6, 1880, and is a daughter 
of James L. and Maria (Franks) McKinnon, both natives of Ohio, and the 
parents of each came from New York state. Mr. McKinnon was born in 
1846 ami his death occurred in Urbana, Ohio, in 1884. Mrs. McKinnon was 
born in 1850 and she is still living, making her home in Webster county Mis- 
souri. Mr. McKinnon was an architect and builder of superior skill, and 
won a wide reputation in his line of endeavor in the state of Ohio. His fam- 
ily consisted of three children, namely: Mrs. Nettie M. Littleton, who re- 
sides in Springfield, Missouri; Alva, who makes his home in Kansas, and 
Wanda, who married Air. Emery of this sketch. 

Politically, .Mr. Emery is a Democrat. He belongs to Division 321, 
Order of Railway Conductors, and is a member of the Masonic order, in- 
cluding the Knights Templar degree and the Ancient Arabic < >rder of Nobles, 
of the Mystic Shrine. Religiously, he belongs to the Presbyterian church. 
Mr>. Emery is a member of the Christian church. 



JAMES E. DULIN. 



It requires men of grit, courage, coolness and decision to make a suc- 
cessful locomotive engineer. It takes nerve on many occasions to meet the 
unexpected which the engine driver often encounters — wrecks, washouts, 
train robbers and various situations where one must think rapidly and do the 
right thing at the right time. One of these men is James E. Dulin, well 
known in railroad circles of this locality, one of the oldest engineers on the 
Frisco running out id' Springfield. 

.Mr. Dulin was born October 26, 1856, at Aledo, Illinois. He is a son 
of Edwin R. and Sarah I Artz) Dulin. The father was born April 28. 1825, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I I O 5 

iii Columbus, Franklin county, Ohio, and the mother was born in Wood- 
stock. Shenandoah county, Virginia, March 13. [828, and she moved with 
her parents from the Old Dominion to Delaware county, Ohio, in Septem- 
ber, 1 S34, when six years of age, and there she grew to womanhood and 
married Mr. Dulin. They both received good educations for those times, 
Airs. Dulin becoming a tine scholar. From Ohio the parents of our subject 
moved to Illinois, where they lived on a farm. Leaving that state, they set- 
tled in Missouri and continued farming for a while, then moved to Kansas 
City, where Mr. Dulin followed the trade of cooper and carpenter, and there 
the death of the mother occurred March 22, 1897; the father died Septem- 
ber 19. igoo. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are still 
living, namely: Ernestine; Josephine is deceased; Elwy died February 7, 
1015; James, of this sketch; Archie died in infancy; May, Ettie. Lester 
and Jesse. 

When James 1-".. Dulin was ten years of age the family located in Mis- 
souri, locating in Johnson count)-, where he grew to manhood and received 
his education in the common schools. Fie was of a mechanical turn of mind, 
and his first work was in a woolen mill, where he spent one summer. He be- 
gan his railroad career in Urbana, Illinois, in 1S73. in the shops there, later 
began as fireman on the Indianapolis, Bloomington & Western railroad; he 
then went to Kansas City, Missouri, and went to work for the Missouri 
River, Ft. Scott & Gulf railroad, in March, 1S74, as fireman, running be- 
tween Kansas City and Ft. Scott, Kansas, and while on this run was pro- 
moted to engineer on March 8, 1880, and transferred to Springfield, Mis- 
souri, on November 7, 1883, to remain here only thirty days, helping out on 
the new lire; hut he remained, and has been running on the Ozark division, 
between Springfield and Thayer, and is the oldest engineer in point of serv- 
ice on this division. This road was purchased by the Frisco System in 1900. 
Thirty-one years is an exceptionally long time for a railroader to work for a 
company on the same division, and Mr. Dulin's long retention on this line 
would indicate that he is efficient, trustworthy and faithful. In all, Mr. Dulin 
has been with the same company for forty-one years. 

Mr. Dulin was married June 16, 1881, in Kansas City, to Lillah H. 
Hagerty, who was horn in Princeton. Illinois. December 25, i860. She is 
a daughter of Rev. T. II. Hagerty. of St. Louis, a minister of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He has answered the roll call sixty-two consecutive 
times in St. Louis ("(inference and is ex-chaplain-in-chief of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. At present he is chaplain of the Ransom Post Grand Army 
of the Republic, of St. Louis. Missouri. His wife, who was a Hull before 
her marriage and a daughter of Rev. H. Hull, a Presbyterian minister, has 
been deceased several years, her death occurring July 15. 1872. After her 
mother's death she was reared in the family of J. Radle. Esquire, of Meade- 



II04 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ville, Pennsylvania, and there received her education. Mrs. Dulin received 
a good education, being a graduate of Lewis College, Glasgow, Missouri. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dulin, namely: Elsie, 
born June 7, 1882, died April 29, 1884; Jamie H., born October 24, 1883, 
was educated in the Springfield schools, graduating from Drury Academy. 
He now lives in Chicago and is a designing artist, maintaining a studio of 
his own there, where he turns out some very fine work in his line. He mar- 
ried Dorothy Sessna; Everett, born January 23, 1899, is a junior at this 
writing in the Springfield high school. 

Politically, Mr. Dulin is a Republican of the Progressive wing. He 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and is a member of Division 378 
Brotherhood of Engineers. Fraternally, he is a Mason, and for the past 
twenty-four years has been a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. 



AZZO B. GRIER. 



As a rule when we observe men changing from one line of work to 
another it indicates that he has not made a very marked success of his former 
calling, if indeed he has not failed outright. However, this is not always 
the case, as may lie observed in the career of Azzo B. Grier, who has suc- 
ceeded as farmer, educator and merchant, at present engaged in the drug 
and grocery business in Strafford. Greene county, where he is widely and 
favorably known and is regarded as a useful and public-spirited citizen. 

Air. Grier was born near the town in which he now resides, just across 
the line in Webster county, on May 1 1. [870. He is a son <>f Samuel R. and 
Elizabeth (Morton) Crier, the father horn in North Carolina on November 
23, [834, and the mother was born in Greene county, Missouri, on May 29, 
[849. The former came to Missouri when a small boy and was reared on a 
farm in Webster county and there received a limited education. Fifty years 
ago he purchased the farm when' he still lives, his farm now containing two 
hundred and fifty-four and one-half aero. He is one of the successful and 
progressive men of his locality. During the ('ivil War he served sevent) days 
in the state militia. His wife was reared on a farm in this county and 
attended the common schools'. Site is still very active for one of her age. 
Only two children were horn to this couple. \//o 1',,. of this sketch, and 
Lorenzo, who lives in Tulsa, < >klahoma. 

Mr. Grier, of this review, grew up on the home farm, lie received a 
good common school education, lie worked on the farm until he began 
teaching in [888, ami he taught eight terms during a period of ten vcars 
with gratifying success. He ha- a record of teaching fortv-nine months 




A. B. GEIEE. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IIO5 

without losing a day on account of sickness. He came to Strafford in 1898 
and engaged in the drug and grocery business with Dr. I. H. Mason, later 
selling out and teaching another term of school, then came back to Strafford 
and bought back his old mercantile business from his former partner, Dr. 
vdason, and he is still engaged in the drug and grocery business, enjoying a 
large trade with the surrounding country. He has been continuously engaged 
in business in Strafford longer than any other man. 

Mr. Grier was married in December, 1898, to Hettie Langston, a native 
of Greene county, where she was reared and educated. She was a daughter 
of Jackson P. C. and Phronie (Comstock) Langston, a sketch of whom 
appears on another page of this volume. Mrs. Grier's death occurred on 
November 2, 1909, and our subject was subsequently married to Mary Lu 
Mullinax, who was born and reared on a farm near Strafford. She is a 
daughter of Martin and Mariah (West) Mullinax. She received a good 
education in the local schools and taught school six terms with much success. 
Two children were born to Mr. Grier and his first wife, Roberta, born on 
December 16, 1899, and Orville, born on November 26, 1902, both of whom 
live at home. One child was born of the second union, Mildred, born on 
June 17, 191 1, who is at home. 

Politically Mr. Grier is a Democrat, and fraternally he is a member of 
the Modern 'Woodmen. 



GEORGE W. MOORE. 



To successfully discharge the duties of general car foreman for the 
great Frisco shops of Springfield, as George W. Moore is doing, indicates 
that such a man has improved well his every opportunity in his chosen voca- 
tion, and also that he is reliable and energetic. It is a position that not every- 
one, although skilled in this line of work, could successfully fill, for it re- 
quires something more than technical knowledge to superintend a large shop 
and handle a number of employees so as to get the best results promptly and 
at the same time retain the good will of all connected with the establishment, 
but our subject has done this for some time. 

Mr. Moore was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, January 1, 1874. He 
is a son of Charles and Josie (Newman) Moore. The father was born in 
Indiana in 1841, and he died in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1893. The mother 
was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1853, and her death occurred in Decem- 
her, 1910. Charles Moore left the Hoosier state when young and came to 
St. Joseph, Missouri, where he and Josie Newman were married. He was a 
•cooper by trade. When our subject was- two years old he removed with his 
(70) 



I I06 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

family to Kansas City, Missouri, where he continued his trade, and for some 
time was assistant foreman of the cooper shop for the Armour Packing Com- 
pany. His family consisted of eight children, namely: Frank is the eldest; 
George W., of this review; Aland is living; Claud is living; Charles, de- 
ceased ; Hettie, deceased ; Jesse and Josie are the two youngest. 

George W. Moore grew to manhood in Kansas City and there received 
his education in the public schools, which has been supplemented in later 
life by self-culture. He was only seventeen years of age when he went to 
work for the old Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwestern Railroad Com- 
pany (now a part of the Missouri Pacific), in the shops, serving his time as 
an apprentice there, then went to the Armour Car Lines Company in the 
same capacity, remaining with the latter firm until October 3, 1897, tnen 
went to work for the Frisco System as car repairer and car inspector, and 
as checker of piece work. Leaving Kansas City, he went on the road as 
traveling car inspector, July 30, 1909, and remained in this work until May 
10, 1912, when he was transferred to Memphis, Tennessee, as general car 
foreman. October 9 of that year he was sent to Kansas City in the same 
capacity, remaining there until May 22, 1914, when he was transferred to 
Springfield, where he is now engaged in the same work in the North Side 
shops. He has given eminent satisfaction in all the above named positions,, 
being a skilled workman, faithful and industrious. He is regarded here as 
one of the most efficient general car foremen the Frisco has ever had. 

Mr. Moore was married .May 30, 1895, m Kansas City, Missouri, to 
May E. Stewart, who was born in Boonville, Missouri, December 2j, 1873. 
She is a daughter of William H. and Maggie F. 1 Brown) Stewart, natives 
of Wisconsin and Boonville, Missouri, respectively. Mr. Stewart is a pat- 
tern maker by trade and is a noted inventor, his best known invention being 
the "Monarch scales." lie also invented many other tilings of use to hu- 
manity, lie lives in Kansas City. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Moore one child has been born. Ward C. Moore, 
who.se birth occurred April _m . [896. He is at this writing an apprentice to 
the machinist's trade in the Kansas City shops of the Frisco company. 

Fraternally. Mr. Moore is prominent in the Masonic order, having at- 
tained the thirty-second degree in the same. lie belongs to the blue lodge, 
Xo. 522, at Kansas City; the Scottish Rite, No. 21, of Memphis. Tennessee; 
the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Kansas City. 
He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the Royal League and the Iowa State Travelers' Association. 
Politically, he is a Democrat. 

Although Mr. Moore has not long been a resident of Springfield, he is 
winning friends rapidly by his pleasing manners and general attitude of 
brotherly kindness. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I IO7 

EUGENE JOSEPH RHODES. 

There could be no more comprehensive history written of a community 
or even of a state and its people than that which deals with the life work of 
those who, by their own endeavor and indomitable energy, have placed them- 
selves where they well deserve the title of progressive, and in this sketch will 
be found the record of one who has outstripped the less active plodders on 
the highway of life, one who lias not been subdued by the many obstacles and 
failures that come to every one. but who lias made them stepping stones to 
higher things and at the same time that Mr. Rhodes has been winning his 
way to the front in business affairs he has gained a reputation for upright- 
ness and honor. 

Eugene Joseph Rhodes, a well known citizen of Springfield, formerly 
of northern Arkansas, was born in Jefferson county, Iowa, March 17, 1845. 
He is a son of Ira G. and Ann Emelia ( Botts) Rhodes. Ira G. Rhodes was 
born in the state of New York, on August 29, 1X14, but when a child he 
was brought to Trumbull county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood and re- 
ceived his education. His father was of German ancestry, his mother Eng- 
lish, though the former was born in Massachusetts and the latter in Con- 
necticut. The family record shows that John Rhodes, grandfather of Ira 
(]., was born .May 2, 1779, and died June 24, 1819. His wife, Hannah 
Graves, was born June 17, 1783, and died September 10, 1835. Their son, 
Joseph, father of Ira G., was married to Polly Waters, February 15, 1801. 
The parents of Polly Waters were named Guerdon and Eliza, the former 
dying December 25, 1813. and the latter dying January 24, 1819. Joseph 
and Polly Rhodes were the parents id' eight children, live girls and three 
boys, Ira G. being the sixth child. The exact place of his birth is not known. 
In 1814 his parents left Connecticut to go to Ohio, and while en route this 
son was born. It seems that the trip from the old Nutmeg state to the Buck- 
eye state required quite a long time, and when the family reached Ohio their 
infant son was one year old. Thus it was in 1815 that the Rhodeses took up 
their residence in what was then the western frontier or wilderness, still the 
domain of the red men, and there endured the usual hardships and privations 
of early pioneers. There Ira G. Rhodes' parents spent the rest of their lives 
and there their children grew to maturity and then left the old home to be- 
come themselves pioneers in the still farther West. Ira G. remained with 
his parents until twenty-one years old, working on the farm in summer and 
attending district school in winter. Although he had no other schooling than 
was afforded by the common schools of Ohio, yet he prepared himself for a 
successful teacher and taught several terms of school before he became of 
age. His first school was a winter term of three months, at eleven dollars 
per month, and "board around," which necessitated going to the poorest 



IIOS GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

cabins, sleeping with dirty children, with scant covering, and in huts where 
through the cracks between the logs the snow sifted in winter and the stars 
were visible through the roof, and the usual fare nothing but "hog and hom- 
iny." Though his early life was that of the farm boy, he eventually had 
good training, his parents being people of sturdy character and strong minds. 
In his early life Ira G. Rhodes was a Whig and first cast his vote for Gen. 
William Henry Harrison; following his father, however, he later joined the 
Free Soilers and became a Republican on the organization of that party. He 
was all his life a stanch advocate of temperance. His father died at the 
old farm in Trumbull county, Ohio, December 30, 1853, and his mother died 
there on November 1, 1848. 

Soon after reaching the age of twenty-one, Ira G. Rhodes, with only a 
capital of one hundred dollars, started West to seek his fortune, traveling 
horseback through the states of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, locating in Han- 
cock county in the last named state, where he engaged in teaching school for 
seven years. Here he met and married Ann Emelia Botts. She was born in 
Kentucky, May 14. 1820. Her ancestors were originally from England. 
Her father, Joseph Botts, was the ninth child of John and Lucy (Gaines) 
Botts, and was born in Virginia. He married Sabra Wilkes, of Boone coun- 
ty, Kentucky, and they became the parents of twelve children, of whom Ann 
Emelia was the fourth. She lived with her parents on the farm in the old 
Blue Grass state until she was sixteen years of age, when they emigrated to 
Hancock county, Illinois, the journey requiring four weeks, Ann Emelia 
riding the entire distance on horseback. Illinois was then principally a wild, 
unbroken prairie, with a settlement here and there. Mr. Botts was a slave 
owner in Kentucky, but finally freed his slaves and sought a country where 
slave holding was nut the custom. He was a minister in the Baptist church 
for over a half century and a great preacher among the pioneers. 

It was on January 15, 1843, tnat ^ ra '■■ Abodes and wife were married, 
and in April of that year they went to Iowa to make their future home, set- 
tling in the timbered lands bordering the Skunk river in the northeast cor- 
ner of Jefferson county. Here, six years before Iowa became a state, on the 
outskirts of civilization, where the tracks of the Indians were still fresh in 
the soil, far away from relations and friends, with only a few scattered 
neighbors, they began housekeeping and homebuilding. On that farm in 
the woods, carved out of Nature's raw material by their own hands, they 
lived for nearly fifty years, rearing their family of eight children, their way 
being hard and toilsome, but it was always cheerful and hopeful. By per- 
sistent, well directed labor and judicious economy, they won prosperity and 
secured a competence, so they were enabled to spend their old age in quiet 
and comfort. Mr. Rhodes was always active in school matters, and for many 
years after he gave up teaching he was a school director. He was a good de- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IIOO, 

bater and took an active part in all literary and debating societies of the 
neighborhood. Before and during the Civil war he took great interest in 
politics and was active in his locality. In 1874 he allied himself with the 
Grangers and was elected by that party county treasurer, holding the office 
two years in an able manner, this being the only public office he ever held, 
and this he did not seek. However, he was often urged to become a candi- 
date for the legislature, but always refused. Upon his election to the office 
of county treasurer he abandoned his farm and moved to Fairfield, the coun- 
ty-seat. At the close of his official career he purchased a home in Brighton, 
four miles from the old home, and there they continued to reside, spending 
a portion of each year visiting their children in Missouri, Arkansas and other 
places. Mr. Rhodes was a robust man physically, was never known to be 
sick. He never used tobacco and liquor or indulged in profane language. 
He was a kind husband, father and neighbor and beloved by all who knew 
him, as was also his good wife. He was a man of liberal religious views 
and never belonged to any church, although his daily life was that of an 
honest, upright man and his character was always exemplary. He was a 
thinking man and all his life he was true to himself and the world. Mrs. 
Rhodes also shared her husband's views on religion, and they believed in 
right for right's sake, opposing the dogmas and creeds of orthodox churches. 
They both closed their days in Jefferson county, Iowa, his death occurring 
in March, 1898, and she followed him to the grave on November 9, 1912. 

To Ira G. Rhodes and wife nine children were born, all of whom grew 
to manhood and womanhood but the fifth, Helen Louise, who died in in- 
fancy. Lucilia Jane Rhodes, the oldest child, was born October 22, 1843, 
taught school three years prior to her marriage, which occurred October 23, 
1863, to R. H. L. Barricklow, a farmer of her own neighborhood, and to 
this union six children were born, Grace, Irvin Ernest, James Luther, Dell 
Eugene, Ira G., and Lulu Lillian; the Barricklow family removed from Iowa 
to Arkansas in 1887 and settled at Stuttgart. Eugene J. Rhodes, the imme- 
diate subject of this sketch, was the second child in order of feirth. The 
next in order was Luther Graves Rhodes, whose birth occurred February 
24, 1847, was educated for a teacher, which profession he followed nearly 
twenty years in Iowa, Illinois and California; February 28, 1877, he mar- 
ried Sadie Irvin, and to them three sons were born, Claudie Irvin, Glenn 
Vernon and Lester Ray; after giving up teaching, Mr. Rhodes located in 
Yolo county, California, and engaged in horticultural pursuits and official 
work. Mary Sophronia Rhodes, the fourth child, was born February 8, 
1849, an d engaged in teaching for a short time before her marriage, which oc- 
curred on November 11, 1868, to John W. Townsley; to this union one 
child was born, Xettie ; her second husband was A. S. Bailey, whom she 
married December 28, 1879. and to this union three children were born, 



I HO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Homer Garfield. Ralph Emerson and Faith. Mr. Bailey is now engaged in 
newspaper work in Iowa at Shenandoah, where he is active at the age of 
eighty years. William E. Rhodes was born May 31, 1853. and was also 
educated for a teacher, which profession he followed many years in Iowa, 
Kansas and Alabama, in which state he established his permanent residence, 
where he finally engaged in the jewelry business and merchandising, also was 
farmer, justice of the peace, postmaster, surveyor and now a banker at Lin- 
den, Alabama; he married Sarah Emma Miller, and to them four children 
were born, Ray Gustavius, Charles Eugene. Ira George and Carrie Alvaretta. 
Myrtle Ann Rhodes was born January 5, 1856, taught school a while before 
her marriage, on December 24, 1873, to Gideon G. Sampson, a native of 
England, who followed teaching for twenty years, finally removing from 
Iowa to Boone count}-, Arkansas, in 1890, and to this couple four children 
were born, Ernest Eugene, Fred Vernon, Grace Helen and Myrtle Agnes. 
Florence Alvaretta Rhodes was Born September 2, 1858. the youngest 
daughter; she married, May 14, 1887, Nathan A. Heacock, for many years 
engaged in the United States postal railway service, and to the union of this 
couple one daughter was born, Florence Natalie. Homer Ellsworth Rhodes, 
youngest of the nine children, was born November 18, 1861, married Ida 
Barricklow, on September 27, 1882, and to this union the following children 
wire born: .Mabel Irene. Farl Edwin. Margaret Ann (deceased), Hazel 
Adline, Victor William 1 deceased 1, Arthur. Marie, Gladys, Garland, Mil- 
dred and Lucile. After their marriage this couple lived on a farm in Iowa 
until 1889, when the) emigrated to Arkansas, establishing their future home 
at Stuttgart, where Mr. Rhodes engaged in the hardware business, and is 
n< i\\ living retired. 

Eugene J. Rhodes, of this review, grew to manhood on the old home- 
stead in Jefferson county, Iowa, where he assisted with the general work 
during the summer months and during the winter he attended the district 
schools, remaining at borne until be was twenty-one years of age; then he 
entered Eastman's National Business College, at Poughkeepsie, New York, 
where he made an excellent record and from which institution he was grad- 
uated in the spring of [867. He then attended the State University of 
Iowa at Iowa City, graduating from the normal department of the same in 
June. 1869. In July of that year he left his native state and located in John- 
son county, Arkansas, where he engaged in teaching school for a short period ; 
locating in Fayetteville, two years later, he was appointed register of the United 
States land office at Harrison, removing the office from Clarksville, and he 
began upon his duties in 1S71. After filling this office very acceptably for 
a period of three years, during which his ability and faithfulness, courtesy 
ami high integrity commended him to all concerned, he went to California, 
in May. 1873, where he engaged in teaching for four year- and also in book- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. Ill I 

keeping for some time. In 1878 he returned to Arkansas and located in 
Boone county, and on November 14, 1878, was married there to Mattie 
Keener, who was born in Pennsylvania, September 30, 1859. She is a 
daughter of Judge William Keener, w ho removed with his family from the 
old Keystone state to Missouri when she was a child, and here and in 
Arkansas she grew to womanhood and received a common school educa- 
tion; in 1872 the Keener family removed to Arkansas. 

After his marriage Mr. Rhodes resided some time in Harrison and 
later moved to the pinery, where he resided a number of years, enjoying 
the comforts of a home in the pine-clad, picturesque hills, and engaged suc- 
cessfully in the manufacture of lumber and in commercial orcharding. Here 
he owned a tract of land comprising three thousand one hundred acres and 
man)' acres of mining land, and was also engaged in farming, stock raising 
and operating his mines, besides discharging the duties of United States 
mineral surveyor for a period of ten years for the state of Arkansas. In 
his locality he held the office of justice of the peace and also that of notary 
public. He was always a stanch Republican and was influential in public 
affairs in Boone count v. having been for some time an active member of the 
county central committee. While there he was a director of the Boone 
County Bank. His principal business for a number of years there was the 
manufacture and sale of pine and oak lumber, and he was president of the 
Arkansas Zinc and Lead Company, which was incorporated in 1890 to op- 
erate in the mining regions of Arkansas, and which had control of twelve 
hundred acres of rich mining land in Marion county. He was half owner 
of the well-known Diamond Cave in Newton county, Arkansas, and it can 
of truth be said of him that he has done as much as any man in Arkansas to 
push forward the zinc and lead industry. He was regarded as one of the 
most substantial and foremost citizens of Boone county, and owned one of 
the finest homes and one of the largest orchards in that county. 

Mr. Rhodes left Arkansas in 1895 anc l located in Springfield, Missouri, 
where he has since resided, and has been engaged extensively in the lumber 
business here, both retail and wholesale, his business extending over a vast 
territory of the Southwest. He has also engaged in the coal and wood busi- 
ness on a large scale, and has done considerable engineering work for vari- 
ous railroads, also surveying, having served as deputy surveyor under Sur- 
veyor Phillips and also Alassey, and ten years ago he was elected county 
surveyor of Greene county, serving one term with ability and general satis- 
faction. At this writing he is extensively engaged in the ornamental and 
concrete business, and he was the first person to introduce the manufacture 
of artificial marble, a splendid imitation of marble. He is regarded as one 
of the leading men of affairs of this localitv and is a man who has always 



1 1 12 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

enjoyed the good will and confidence of those with whom he has come in 
contact. He owns much valuable property here. 

Seven children, five sons and two daughters, have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Eugene J. Rhodes, named as follows: Homer, born September 23, 
1879, died September 6, 1880; Florence Ethel, born February 3, 1881, teach- 
ing in Harrison, Arkansas; Eugene Joseph. Jr., born March 26, 1883, is en- 
gaged in business in Springfield; William Ira, born January 12, 1885, is 
engaged in the feed and fuel business in Springfield; Clarence Julius, born 
February 1, 1887, lives in Springfield and is engaged in business here; Carrie 
Lena, born March 17, 1889, married Trevor Sanks, and lives in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania; Arthur Clyde, born September 18. 1891, is in the motorcycle 
business in Springfield. 



MADISON CAMPBELL VINTON. 

Although the business of farming requires, in its operations, constant 
industry and the exercise of thought and study in its every detail, in order 
to make it successful, yet it affords greater opportunities for the best and 
right living and the achievement of happiness than any other business. 
Realizing this fact. Madison Campbell Vinton, one of the leading agricul- 
turists and stuck raisers of Jackson township, < ireene county, left the city of 
Springfield, where he had become a successful merchant, and turned his 
attention to farming many years ago. In the country he has found not only 
a large- degree of material success, but health and contentment. He has no 
desire to return to the commercial world and the city. 

Air. Vinton was born three miles smith of Springfield on the Campbell 
street road on September [8, 1855. He is a son of Samuel S. and Margaret 
Eugenia (Campbell) Vinton, one of the well-known and highly esteemed 
old families of this locality. The father was born in Baltimore. Maryland, 
nil January 28, [828, and the mother was born in Tennessee. Samuel S. 
Vinton came west with .Major Barry when fourteen years of age. and he 
finally became owner of a fine farm of three hundred and twenty acres south 
of Springfield, when' he engaged in general farming and stock raising and 
trading on an extensive scale. He was a very successful man of affairs. For 
some time he followed merchandising in Springfield, where his death occurred, 
January 16, 1890. His wife died when the subject of this sketch was four 
years old. To these parents three children were born, namely: Mrs. Juliet 
R. Williams lives in Springfield; Madison C. of this sketch: and Samuel S., 
Jr., of Springfield. 

Madison C. Vinton was taken to St. Louis by his father when he was six 
vears old. where he lived until he was fourteen years "Id. when he returned 






M. C. VINTON. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



Ill 



td his native county. He received a good education. He began his business 
career by clerking in a store in Springfield, going to Marshfield, Webster 
county, about a year later, and worked in a store for seven years, later went 
into the grain business for himself. He subsequently returned to Springfield, 
where be engaged in merchandising in 1880. Selling out he started a shoe 
store and for a number of years enjoyed a good business on the south side of 
the public square, under the firm name of Vinton-Baxter Shoe Company, "The 
Jumbo Shoe Store." Selling out in [887, he bought the farm in Jackson 
township where he now lives, which contains two hundred and eighty acres. 




VINTON 1'I.ACE. 

which he has brought up to a high state of improvement and cultivation and 
which ranks among the best farms of Greene county. He has a beautiful 
In une and large and convenient barns and other buildings, and he carries on 
general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale, paying particular 
attention to the raising of a good grade of live stock, handling a large number 
of mules annually. For some time he operated a dairy on his place. 

Mr. Vinton was married, first, in 1878, to Elizabeth McGinty, by whom 
four children were born, namely: Harry C, who lives in Texas, working for 
the National Lumber Company ; James K. lives in Denver, Colorado, and 
works for the Colorado Southern Railroad Company; Walter B. lives in 



1 1 14 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Greene county; William A. is at home. The mother of these children died 
December 8, 1893, in Springfield, Missouri, and Mr. Vinton married Bessie 
Dabbs by whom one child has been born, Juliet Lee Vinton, whose birth 
occurred July 24, 1904. His first wife was a daughter of A. C. McGinty and 
wife, and the present Mrs. Vinton is a daughter of William P. Dabbs and wife. 
Politically, Mr. Vinton is a Democrat. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the Royal Arcanum lodge. He is a self-made man, well informed and a 
pleasant gentleman to meet. 



J. B. RUFFIN. 



Among the large percentage of Southern people in Greene county is 
J. B. Puffin, and, like most of them, is the possessor of the personal charac- 
teristics of those bred in fair Dixie land, which makes him a desirable citi- 
zen, one who wins and retains friends easily. From his early youth he has 
been a lover of horses and has become an expert judge of them and also 
an expert in their successful handling, and he is at this writing the owner 
of a number of good ones which he keeps in his modernly appointed livery 
stable in Springfield. «. 

Mr. Puffin was born in Panola county, Mississippi, September 2, 1866. 
He is a son of James and Mary (Brahan) Ruffin. The father was born in 
Hardman county, Tennessee in 1838, and the mother was born in Missis- 
sippi in 1848. They each represent old families of the South and grew to 
maturity in their respective communities, received good educational advan- 
tages, were married and have always lived in the South, still living at Sar- 
dis, Mississippi, where they are widely and well known. James Ruffin at- 
tended medical college when a young man and received his degree of Doctor 
of Medicine and became a successful practitioner, engaging in the practice in 
Tennessee and Mississippi for many years. Having accumulated a com- 
fortable competency he is now living retired. Having been long a prominent 
and influential Democrat in his locality he was in 1906 elected deputy sheriff 
nf his county, and was also elected a representative to the state legislature 
in Mississippi, serving one term of two years in a highly creditable and 
satisfactorj manner. During the war between the states he enlisted in the 
Confederate army and was promoted from time- to time for his gallantry 
and merit until he became captain of his company and served all through 
the war. taking part in many important engagements. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Masonic order, lie is a fine type of the Southern gentleman 
nf the old school, and his descendants may well lie proud of his record as a 
soldier, physician, public servant and citizen. His family consisted of nine 
children, all still living but one. namely: I. P>. of this sketch; Maggie I'.ellc, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I I 1 5 

Rosa, Mary, Willie, Sallie, Haywood, Mrs. Catherine Lee, and one who 
died in infancy. 

J. B. Ruffin grew to manhood in the Smith and he received his early 
education in the common schools in Mississippi, also attended high school. 
He began his active life by selling goods, later going into the live stock 
business, paying particular attention to race horses, and he has owned a large 
number of fine ones, with excellent records. He engaged in farming and 
stock raising in Tipton county, Tennessee, for some time and his operations 
met with gratifying results. He remained there until 1006 when he came 
to Missouri and located in Aurora where he engaged in the livery business 
on a large scale, which he followed until 19 12 when he came to Springfield 
and continued the same line of business, his present location being at 310 
Boonville street, where he has a large and modernly equipped barn, keeping 
some of the finest horses and buggies in the city, and maintains a boarding 
stable in connection, everything being first-class, and promptness and uni- 
form courtesy are watchwords with him. He is enjoying a large and rap- 
idly growing patronage. 

Mr. Ruftin was married in February, [892, in Tipton county, Tennessee, 
to Mamie J. Culbreath, who was born in that county and state on October 
28, 1873, and she was reared and educated there. She is a daughter of J. 
Llark and Sallie (Cockrell) Culbreath, natives of western Tennessee, where 
they grew up, were educated and married. Her father served all through 
the Civil war in the Confederate army. 

Four children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: James 
is now a student in Drury College; J. B., Jr., is attending the Springfield 
high school; Josephine and Clark are both in the ward schools. 

Politically, Mr. Ruffin is a Democrat. He is a member of the Wood- 
men of the World and the Loyal Order of Moose. He belongs to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. South. He and his wife have made many friends 
since locating in Springfield. 



JOHN R. FERGUSON. 



John R. Ferguson, who is a scion of a sterling old Southern family, 
was born near Louisiana, Pike county, Missouri, on February 10, 1842. He 
is a son of John S. and Elizabeth (Allison) Ferguson, the father born in 
Virginia and the mother in Franklin county, Kentucky. John S. Ferguson 
was a soldier in the war of 1812, and he came to Missouri before or about 
the time this state was admitted into the Union, and was therefore one of 
the pioneers of the state, locating in Pike county upon land bought of the 



1 1 16 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

government, which land he converted into an improved farm and there 
resided until his death about 1852. On this old homestead the subject of 
this sketch was born and spent his early boyhood. His parents died when 
he was less than twelve years of age, and the farm was then rented out by 
the administrator of the estate, who also was guardian of our subject. He 
worked on farms of the neighborhood, and attended short terms of school 
during the winter months until he was about eighteen years of age, when, 
with the consent of his guardian, he contracted, in the fall of i860, with a 
St. Louis medicine manufacturing concern to travel and "peddle" their goods, 
which he did for one year. At the termination of his contract he returned 
to his native county and enlisted in the Fifth Missouri Militia, in Col. T. J. C. 
Fagg's regiment for six months, and at the expiration of this service he 
enlisted for three years or during the war in Company E. Tenth (later the 
Third) Missouri Cavalry, State Militia, in April, 1862, at Louisiana, Mis- 
souri. For meritorious conduct Mr. Ferguson was promoted first to cor- 
poral, in 1863, and in 1864 to sergeant. He proved to be a faithful and 
courageous soldier in defense of his state. He was mustered out of the 
service at Macon City, Missouri, on April 14, 1865, at the expiration of his 
term of service. In May, 1865, he was appointed clerk in the paymaster 
general's office at Jefferson City, which position he held until his resignation 
111 the spring of 18(17, allt ' soon engaged in the drug business at Ironton, 
thi> state, and in [869 removed to Springfield and followed the same business 
for ten years. After twelve years of diversion in farming and politics, he 
returned to the drug business in 1891, becoming a member of the Hall- 
Ferguson Drug Company, wholesale, of Springfield, now the Hall Drug 
( ompany, and he took the road as a traveling salesman for the firm, later 
Mild hi> stock in this company, and accepted a position as traveling salesman 
for a wholesale drug company in St. Louis, which position he held for over 
twelve years. He gave this (inn eminent satisfaction in every respect and 
was one of their most faithful and trusted employees. He is now living 
practically retire':, keeping a set of mercantile books and doing the chores 
abi lit his pleasant home on East Elm street. 

Mr. Ferguson was married on .May ( X, 1867, to Virginia Anna Smith, 
a daughter of Jared F. ami Roberta I Mack) Smith, of Springfield, Missouri, 
ami to this union the following children have been born: Dora Roberta, died 
in infamy; Ernest X.. Mrs. Florence Morris, deceased; Jared E., deceased; 
Mrs. ( )iiv Elizabeth Tucker. John R., T. Franklin, Mrs. Virginia C. Andres, 
Charles A. and Mrs. Mary X. Hilt. 

Mr. Ferguson is a Republican and has long been active in the affairs 
of his party. He has been a member of the city council, was treasurer of 
Springfield, was clerk of the circuit court for eight years, and was recorder 
of deeds of Greene county four years. At this writing he is secretary of the 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. Ill 7 

board of managers of the State Federal Soldiers' Home of Missouri, on 
which board he is serving his third term as a member. As a public servant 
his record is without blemish. He is a member of Capt. John Matthews Post, 
No. 69, Grand Army of the Republic. Fraternally he belongs to Solomon 
Lodge, No. 271, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He is a member of 
the South Street Christian church and is an elder in the same, and has long 
been active in the work of the church. His wife is also a devout member of 
this congregation. 



THOMAS L. HASLER. 



The fair Oriole state, while not so rich or vast in area as some of her 
sisterhood in the Union, is one of the best beloved. "Maryland, My Mary- 
land," has long been a favorite song, formerly more so than now, however; 
but all of us, from whatever section of America we may hail, admire the 
state that has produced so many splendid citizens. From the early Colonial 
days down to the present she has given to the nation leading men and women 
in all walks of life. Among the citizens of Greene county, Missouri, who 
originally came from within her borders, is Thomas L. Hasler, one of the 
well known locomotive engineers of the Frisco System, with which road he 
has been connected for a period of forty years, and it goes without saying 
that he has been capable and trustworthy, for that is a very long time to re- 
main with one company. 

Air. Hasler was born in Baltimore, Maryland, July 14, 1852. He is a 
son of Eli and Maria (Divine) Hasler, the father, of Pennsylvania Dutch 
stock, having been born in the Keystone state in 1825, and his death oc- 
curred October 12, 1903. The mother of our subject was born in Ireland 
in 1820, immigrated to the United States when young in years, and her death 
occurred March 21, 1909. These parents received limited educations in the 
common schools and they were married in Pennsylvania. Eli Hasler was a 
cabinet maker by trade, which he followed in a number of the large cities of 
the East, finally locating in St. Louis, where he lived a while, and in i860 
moved to Phelps county, Missouri, where he purchased a farm and there 
spent the rest of his life, but his widow spent her last years with her son, our 
subject, in Springfield. During the Civil war Eli Hasler was a member of 
the Home Guards at St. James, this state. His family consisted of eight 
children, namely: William lives in St. James, Missouri; Thomas L., of this 
review; Marira, George, Agnes, John and Frank are all living; Edward is 
deceased. 

Thomas L. Hasler was but a boy when his parents brought him to Mis- 



I I l8 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

souri and he grew to manhood in this state and received his education in the 
schools of St. James. He worked on the home farm until 1873, then began 
his railroad career on the Atlantic & Pacific railroad, which subsequently be- 
came known as the Frisco. He began as fireman and worked his way up to 
engineer on a passenger train, in which capacity he is still employed, his run 
being between Springfield and Fort Smith, Arkansas. He has long been re- 
garded by the company as one of the safest and most capable of its engineers, 
sober, reliable and careful. 

Mr. Hasler was married on September 3, 1879, in Springfield, to Lucy 
E. McCleane, a native of Illinois, and a daughter of Archie and Lucy E. 
(Bird) McCleane. The father's death occurred in Jefferson county, Mis- 
souri, and the mother of Mrs. Hasler died in England. Mrs. Hasler received 
a good common school education. 

To our subject and wife seven children have been born, namely: Allen 
is employed in the Frisco shops here; Mamie; Archie is employed in the 
Frisco shops; George is also a machinist in the local railroad shops; Agnes, 
Delia and Eli, the latter working in the Frisco shops. 

Politically, Mr. Hasler is a Democrat. He belongs to Division 83, 
United Brotherhood of Engineers. He is a member of the Knights of * 
lumbus, and he and his family are Catholics. 



BRANDT McOULSTOX. 



Works of biography and history, for the most part, record the lives 
of only those who have attained military, political, literary or professional 
distinction, with now and then a captain of industry, or those who in any 
other career have passed through extraordinary vicissitudes of fortune. But 
the names of men who have distinguished themselves in their day and gen- 
eration, in the ordinary walks of life, for the possession of those qualities of 
character which mainly contribute to the success of private life and to the 
public stability — of men who. without special talents or genius, have been 
exemplary in all their personal and social relations, and at the same time 
enjoyed the confidence and esteem, the respect and good will of those with 
whom they associate or come in contact — ought not to be permitted to per- 
ish; for all are, or should be, much benefited by the delineation of those traits 
of character which find scope and exercise in the common walks of life. 
Among the individuals of this class of a past generation in Greene county 
was the late Brandt McQuistpn, for a long lapse of years one of the best 
known locomotive engineers on the Frisco system. Those who knew him 
well say that his life history was marked by the most substantial qualities of 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. Ill') 

character and exhibited a long and somewhat strenuous career, and his mem- 
ory will continue to be cherished by his many friends fur many years to 
come. 

.Mr. McOuiston was born on October 22, 1859, in Indiana where he 
grew to manhood and received a common school education. He came to 
Springfield. Missouri, when a young man and went to work as fireman for 
the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis Railroad Company, which was leased 
by the Frisco system in 1900, later he went with the Frisco as passenger 
engineer, his run being between Springfield and Thayer. He was then pas- 
senger engineer for the former road, commonly known as the "Gulf" from 
[886 until this road was absorbed by the Frisco and he continued in his 
regular run after that for the latter road until his tragic death on October 1, 
1903. He met death in a head-end collision between extra freight train 
No. 251, going east on the Southern division, and passenger train No. 202, 
bound from Memphis to Kansas City, at half-past five o'clock in the morn- 
ing of the above mentioned date, at Horsesln le Curve, five miles north of 
Thayer, Missouri. It is the supposition that the freight had mistaken its 
order and was running on the passenger's time. A sort of mist or fog pre- 
vailed at the time, which added to the darkness of night and prevented the 
crews from seeing very far ahead of their trains, which were running at 
full rate of speed. The two trains were almost totally wrecked and a section 
of the track about the length of four cars was torn up. Mr. McOuiston, 
engineer of the passenger train and his fireman. Ernest White, were instantly 
killed, while John Finch, engineer of the freight, and John Tune, the fire- 
man, both died soon thereafter. Some of the other members of the train 
crews and passengers were badly hurt. Our subject was spoken of at the 
time by the press as one of the oldest and best engineers running out of 
Springfield. One of the sad features of his death was the fact that he was 
soon to retire from the road, having purchased a good farm in Greene county 
and was preparing to remove thereto and spend his old days quietly. He 
had made his home on the South Side until the consolidation of the freight 
business on the North Side. He was buried with Masonic honors. 

Mr. McQuiston was married on October 16, 1882, to Agnes L. Wright, 
a daughter of Charles James and Wells (Lee) Wright, who were born in 
England, from which country they emigrated to the United States in early 
life; the father became a successful physician and also a minister in the 
Episcopal church. Mrs. McOuiston is still residing at the old home place- 
on College street. 

To our subject and wife three children were born, namely: Kenneth, 
born on July 10, 1884. married Jessie Petty, and he is a machinist in the- 
new shops of the Frisco in Springfield; Arthur C, born on March 31, 1889, 
has marked natural talent as an artist, and he is living in San Francisco, Cali- 



1120 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

fornia, where he is a paint salesman; Janet W., born on August 12, 1891, 
was graduated from the local high school, later attended Drury College and 
the University of Missouri at Columbia, specializing in languages, paying 
particular attention to German; she is one of the successful teachers in Gal- 
latin, Missouri, schools, being exceptionally well qualified for her chosen 
work. 

Politically, Mr. McOuiston was a Republican. He belonged to the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. Fraternally, he held membership 
with the Royal Arch Masons and the Knights of Pythias. 



[AMES A. BERRY. 



Since [ames A. Berry, well-known farmer and stock breeder of Frank- 
lin township, Greene county, located in this vicinity over sixty years ago he 
has noted many changes — among others, a change 01 climatic conditions — 
the seasons are not so dependable now as formerly, consequently, the farmer 
has had to change his methods. One of the most serious conditions now to 
be met with is a drought at some period during each growing season. But 
he, with others, have learned that when crops are grown in rotation and 
proper tillage methods are followed, they will suffer les-~ from dry weather 
than when thev are grown continually; that crop rotation is usually of more 
importance than the method of tillage used in this respect, although both 
are important. 

Mr. Berry was born, January [, 1842, in South Carolina. He is a 
son of William I'.. and Martha 1 Latham) Kerry. The father of our subject 
was a native of Alabama and was a son of Robert Berry, who located in 
South Carolina when a young man, where he married, after which he moved 
to Tennessee, remaining in that state until 1852, when he emigrated to 
Greene county, Missouri. The subject '>t' this sketch was two years old 
when he left his native state with his parents, and his early boyhood was 
s]>ent in Tennessee. William B. Berry was a life-long farmer, and owned 
a good farm in Greene county, and here his death occurred on the home- 
stead September 21, iS<)_>. Politically, he was a Republican, but was never 
active in public affairs. The mother of our subject was also a native of 
South Carolina, and her death occurred on the home farm in Greene county 
in 1891. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Mt. 
Comfort, and she and her husband were both buried in the cemetery near that 
church. They were the parents of eight children, named as follows: James 
A., of this sketch; Mrs. Calverna Win Runnells, deceased; Mrs. Emily Run- 
nells, deceased: Mrs. Mary lane McCurdy; Mrs. Dora Lay lives in Center 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 121 

township, this county; Mrs. Etta Newton, deceased; the two youngest chil- 
dren died in infancy. 

James A. Berry was eleven years of age when he accompanied the rest 
of the family to Greene county, Missouri, and he worked on the home farm 
in Franklin township, and was educated in the township schools. He re- 
mained on the home farm until his marriage, then moved to his present farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres. He also owns forty acres west of his 
home farm, which lies near the old home place. He has been very success- 
ful as a general farmer and live stock raiser, making a specialty of grain 
and trading in horses and mules, and formerly he raised large numbers of 
hogs annually, but of late years has not made such an extensive effort along 
this line. He has an excellent group of buildings. In the fall of 1912 he 
built a breeding barn, thirty-six by forty-eight feet, with box stalls — modern 
and complete. He is one of the best-known horse breeders in this part of 
the county and owns some fine stock, including a beautiful black Percheron 
stallion, "Charley," which is a splendid saddle horse, registered. He also 
owns "Roscoe," six years old, fifteen hands high; weight, fourteen hundred 
pounds. He also owns two fine jacks; one, "Black John,'" is a coal black, 
seven years old, and fourteen and one-half hands high. 

Mr. Berry was married on December 18. 1800, to Elizabeth Katherine 
McCurdy, a (laughter of Thomas and Nancy .M. (Appleby) McCurdy. Air. 
McCurdy was born in Tennessee, December 5, 1820, and removed from that 
state to Arkansas when he was eleven years of age. Remaining in that 
slate until he was twenty years old, lie came to Greene county, Missouri, 
married the following year and located on a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres, of well-improved land in Franklin township, and here his death oc- 
curred August 28, 1904, at the advanced age of eighty-seven vears. Ili> 
wife was born in Tennessee, July ij, 1821, and died on the home farm in 
Greene county, Missouri, July 3, 1901. Thomas McCurdy was a soldier 
in the Civil war, having enlisted in Company K, Seventy-second Missouri 
Volunteer Infantry, in 1861. He did guard duty mostly, and was kept with 
the garrison in Springfield most of the time. He had several very narrow- 
escapes from serious wounds and at one time holes were shot through his 
hat and cape, and at another time a grape-shot narrowly missed his foot, 
but he went through the conflict unscathed, and was honorablv discharged 
in 1865. 

Fourteen children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Berrv, namely: 

Leroy McClelland was killed by a falling log at the age of seventeen ; Oliver 

DeW'itt lives in Franklin township; Rolland Pate lives in Pittsburg, Kansas; 

Mrs. Calverna Ann Patterson lives in Springfield; Gustavus Antioch Fink- 

(70 



1 122 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

linburg is a member of the real estate firm known as the Ozark Land Com- 
pany, Springfield; Mrs. Fidelia Cornell lives in Springfield; James Blaine 
lives in Springfield and is a member of the firm of the Ozark Land Com- 
pany, being in the real estate business with his brother; John Logan lives in 
Springfield; the other six children died in infancy. 

During the Civil War Mr. Berry enlisted for service in the Federal 
army in 1861, in Company K, Seventy-second Missouri Volunteer Infantry. 
He drove a team most of the time, however he took part in the battle of 
Springfield when Marmaduke and Shelby attacked the town, on January 8, 
1863, and he was also in several skirmishes. He did guard duty for some 
time about the commissary. He was mustered out and honorably discharged, 
August 20, 1865. He remained in Springfield during his entire service. He 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He has always been a Re- 
publican but now votes independently in local affairs. His wife is a member 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Alt. ( lomfort. When a young man, 
just before the breaking out of the Civil war. Mr. Berry hauled lumber for 
the old court-house, also hauled sand from the James river for the same, driv- 
ing six yoke of oxen. He recalls many interesting reminiscences of the early 
days, and it is a pleasure to visit his home. 



JOHN HENRY LEHR. 

John Henry Lehr, now living in honorable retirement in his comfort- 
able home on East Elm street, Springfield, is worthy of mention in the pages 
of a volume of the province of the one in hand for various reasons, not the 
least of which is the fact that he is one of the loyal sons of the North who 
offered his services and his life, if need be, to perpetuate the Union, during 
its greatest crisis, a half century ago. He has spent his active life princi- 
pally as a carpenter, builder and agriculturist, and, being a persistent worker 
and doing his work thoroughly and well, he accumulated a competency for 
his declining years and is now spending his days quietly. 

Mr. Lehr, as the name indicates, is of German descent, and of an Ohio 
family, his birth having occurred near Tuscarawas, in the count}' of that 
name, in the state of Ohio, December 9, 1845. ^ e * s a son °f Michael and 
Catherine (Gnagie) Lehr. Michael Lehr was born in Oldenbach, Germany, 
in June, 1809, and there he grew to manhood and received his education. 
When twenty years of age he immigrated to the United States and located in 
Tuscarawas county. Ohio, where he worked at his trade of cabinet maker 
which he had learned in the old country. He was an expert workman and 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 11^3 

was always busy. Catherine Gnagie was also born in Oldenbach, Germany, 
and there grew up and was educated, and there she and Mr. Lehr were mar- 
ried in 1828, and for a wedding trip they came to America. These parents 
have long been deceased. 

John Henry Lehr grew to manhood in his native county in the Buckeye 
state and there he assisted his father with the general work on the farm. 
He received his education in the common schools of his day, and when the 
Civil war came on he enlisted for service with the National troops, al- 
though he was but sixteen years of age, but, according to his comrades he 
proved to be as good and faithful a soldier as his older companions in his 
regiment. It was on August 6, 1862, that he enlisted in Company G, Ninety- 
Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He saw much hard service ami partici- 
pated in numerous important engagements, including the battles of Perry- 
ville, Kentucky, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Peach Tree Creek, 
Atlanta, and from that city marched with Sherman to the sea at Savannah, 
thence up through the Carolinas, and fought at the battle of Bentonville. He 
was never sick, captured or wounded, and was with his regiment every day, 
and never shirked his duty no matter how dangerous or arduous. He was 
commissioned corporal for his faithful service, and was so mustered out in 
June, 1865, after he had marched in the grand review in Washington City. 
He was honorably discharged and returned to his home in Ohio where he 
continued farming until 1869 when he came to Livingston county, Missouri, 
where he worked at the carpenter's trade, and in 1870 purchased land there 
and resumed farming which he carried on with his usual success until 1906 
when, on account of failing health, he sold his farm and went to Colorado 
Springs, Colorado, where he remained three months, then came to Spring- 
field, Missouri, retired from active life and has since made his home here. 

Mr. Lehr was married in December, 1870, to Mary Umphrey, a native 
of Illinois. Her death occurred in 1901. To this union five children were 
born, namely: Oscar V. lives in Chillicothe, Missouri; Clay E. is deceased; 
Margaret E. is the wife of A. D. Miller, of Gault, Missouri; Esther D. is 
the wife of Dr. L. Hopper, of Ft. Scott, Kansas; Grace E. is the wife of 
H. L. Atherton, of Oklahoma City. 

Mr. Lehr was again married in December, 1906, to Ellen Affolter, of 
Tuscarawas, Ohio, where her birth occurred on August 26, 1876. She is a 
daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Affolter. The father was a soldier in the 
Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war, also served in a 
battery. Mrs. Lehr grew to womanhood and was educated in her native 
vicinity. 

Politically, Mr. Lehr is a Republican. He belongs to the Grand Army 
of the Republic, and the Grace Methodist Episcopal church. 



1 124 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

JAMES BISSETT. 

The pioneer railroader, for many years master mechanic in the Spring- 
field shops, the gentleman whose life history is herewith outlined, was a 
man who lived to good purpose and achieved a large degree of success, solely 
by his individual efforts. By a straightforward and commendable course 
Mr. Bissett climbed to a responsible position in his calling, winning the 
hearty admiration of his fellow workmen and earning a reputation as an 
enterprising, reliable, trustworthy and efficient man of affairs which a num- 
ber of the leading railroad officials of the country were not slow to recog- 
nize and appreciate, and those who knew him best will readily acquiesce in 
the statement that he was eminently deserving of the good things which fate 
brought him during his life. 

James Bissett was born in Scotland, May 15, 1840, and had many of 
the characteristic traits of the noble race of Scots. His birth occurred within 
two blocks of the house in which Andrew Carnegie first saw the light of 
day. but his family brought him to America when he was a child and he was 
reared in Madison. Indiana, receiving his education in that town and in In- 
dianapolis. However, his schooling was limited, and his knowledge, which 
was considerable and general, was acquired chiefly by experience in the prac- 
tical affairs of life. He was a son of Thomas and Mary ( Walker) Bissett, 
both natives of Scotland, where they grew up and were married. The father 
died in Madison. Indiana. He was a machinist by trade. His family con- 
sisted ot" seven children, five of whom are still living, namely: Thomas is 
deceased; Elizabeth; William; Robert; David; Ellen, and James of this 
sketch, who was the second in order of birth and who died on November 11, 
1914. 

James Uissett returned to Madison, Indiana, after he left school in In- 
dianapolis, and went to work in the railroad shops of North Madison, re- 
maining there as an apprentice about four years, or until 1858, then went to 
Nashville. Tennessee, and from there to Huntsville, Alabama, where he was 
fixing when the war between the states began. He returned to Nashville 
ami went to work in the Memphis & Nashville machine shops there, later 
ran a locomotive between Huntsville, Alabama, and Brownsville, Mississippi, 
and while thus engaged was captured at Hunts\ ille by the Federals, the Fourth 
Ohio Cavalry, under Col. < >. M. Mitchell. The invaders were later driven 
out ot that city, and our subject went to Chattanooga, Tennessee, arriving 
there while General Bragg was crossing the river with his army, just prior 
to the battle of Chickamauga. He went on to Atlanta, being with Bragg's 
army most of the time. All the while he had been running an engine for 
the Confederates, and he look his engine from Atlanta to Macon, Georgia, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 1 25 

later, where, the fire box giving out, he left it, and from there went to Selma, 
that state, and worked on the Blue Mountain route. From there he went to 
Birmingham, Alabama. He was captured at Selma by "Billy" Wilson. 

After the war Mr. Bissett came to Nashville and went to work on the 
Nashville & Chattanooga railroad as engineer, but in 1865 he returned to his 
old home in Madison, Indiana, then went to work for the Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad Company. Later he was in the employ of the Chicago, Bur- 
lington & Quincy Railroad Company, with headquarters at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, and from there he went to Omaha, Nebraska, for the Union Pacific, 
which company sent him to Wyoming, in [868, that country then being a 
territory. He ran an engine for some time and later was foreman of the 
company's shops at Laramie, remaining there three years, then came to 
Moberlv. Missouri, and took charge of the old North Missouri shops, re- 
maining there some time, then went with the Santa Fe road, ami was the 
first master mechanic on that road west of Topeka, Kansas, his headquarters 
being at Dodge City, where he remained two years, after which he went to 
Los Angeles. California, in 1876, from which city he ran an engine to and 
from Wilmington. Later he went to Colton, at the edge of the desert, which 
was at the end of the road, which was only <>ne hundred miles long. It was 
a private road at that time, but is now a part of the Southern Pacific. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Bissett ran a locomotive for the Missouri, Kansas & Texas 
Railroad Company between 1 'arsons, Kansas, and Hannibal, Missouri. Leav- 
ing this company, he ran an engine out of Marshall, Texas, for the Texas 
Pacific road, and later was given an engine on the International Great North- 
ern. He came to Kansas City in 1883 and was made foreman of the Mis- 
souri River, Ft. Scott & Gulf shops, remaining in charge of the same until 
October, 1890, when he came to Springfield, Missouri, as master me- 
chanic for the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis road, remaining with 
the same until 1901, when this road was purchased by the Frisco System. 
He remained in the same capacity with the latter road, discharging his duties 
with his usual fidelity and success and to the eminent satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. When the old Gulf shops on the South Side w T ere closed, he was re- 
tired with a pension, having reached the age limit. 

Mr. Bissett was married on December 25, i86n, in Madison, Indiana, 
to Levena Aigner, who was born in Jefferson county, Indiana. November 13, 
1844. She is a daughter of M. C. Aigner and wife, her mother dying in the 
year 1865. She grew up in her native city and had the advantages of an ex- 
cellent education. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bissett, two of whom are 
living, namely: James, born in Galesburg, Illinois, is deceased; Harry, born 
in Laramie, Wyoming, February 13, 1871, was graduated from the high 
school in Kansas City, after which he came to Springfield and went to work 



1 126 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

for the Frisco, beginning at the bottom, and is now foreman of the South 
Side shops. He married, on June 27, 1900, Emma Weaver, daughter of 
Major Weaver and wife, and they have one child, Marion, born September 
7, 1903; Clyde, youngest child of our subject, was born March 19, 1876, and 
is living in Kansas City. 

Politically, Mr. Bissett was a Democrat. He was an interesting talker 
on early railroading in this country, and his vast experience in so many 
places, made his reminiscences entertaining and instructive. His death was 
a great loss to the community and he will long be remembered as one of 
Springfield's best citizens. 



JAMES A. WOODSON. 



Some families seem to be born mechanics, just the same as men are 
born with a bent toward any other vocation, and the children of such are 
as a rule very precocious in the lines which they are destined to follow, their 
inclination being shown in their toys and in their play often when they can 
scarcely talk or walk. This bent should be carefully encouraged by the 
parent, whose child may become in due course of time a man of rare talent, 
if not an inventor of useful devices, at least a man of great service in some 
way or another, capable of doing exceptionally good work in some useful 
line and therefore be a blessing in a general way to the human race. James 
A. Woodson, general foreman of the South Side Frisco shops, Springfield, 
came from such a family and was such a child. He has followed up his 
natural liking for mechanical work with the result that he is one of the 
ablest mechanics on the great system for which he works. 

.Mr. Woodson was born at Roanoke, Howard county, Missouri, May 10. 
1859. He is a son of William B. Woodson, who was born in the state of 
Virginia where he grew up, attended school and learned the carpent< 1 - 
trade when a boy, later, in 1842, removing to Missouri and establishing 
his future home. He was of Scotch-Irish descent, and he became a well- 
known and successful contractor and builder in Howard and Randolph 
counties, this state, maintaining his office at Roanoke, under the 'firm name 
of Woodson & Phelps. II is death incurred in 1893 at the age of seventy- 
four years. Politically, he was originally a Whig, later a Democrat. He was 
a member of the Baptist church. He married Martha C. Lockridge, who lived 
near Roanoke. She was a daughter of William Y. Lockridge, who was one 
of the first tanners in .Missouri, who later became a manufacturer of shoes 
and handled leather ami leather ^««K, being well known in Howard county. 
Archer W. Woodson, our subject's paternal grandfather, was a farmer near 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1-7 

Gordingville, Roanoke county. Virginia. Nine children were born to Will- 
iam B. Woodson and wife, namely: Willie married P. A. Frederick, a 
broker and real estate man of Kansas City; Emmett L., who died in 1909, 
was a traveling salesman for Swift & Company; James A., of this sketch; 
Lutie is 'the wife of a Mr. Mowinkle, traveling auditor for Swift & Com- 
pany out of Chicago; Ruth, Charles and Harry are all deceased; Bessie is 
the wife of C. A. Carrier, who is engaged in the manufacturing business in 
Kansas City; Maud, who has remained single, is with the secretary of the 
Relief Board of Kansas City. 

James A. Woodson grew up in Howard county and there received a 
common school education, and when but a boy he began work as a machin- 
ist at Moberly, Missouri, where he served his apprenticeship in the St. Louis, 
Kansas City & Northern Railroad shops, beginning there on March 8, 1874, 
and remained with that company until 1880, then went to Mt. Vernon, Illi- 
nois where he worked a year as machinist for the Louisville & Nashville 
Railroad. He then worked at Tracy, Tennessee, as machinist for the Ten- 
nessee Coal & Iron Company, was division foreman there for three years. 
He then went to Chattanooga, Tennessee, where he worked as machinist for 
the Southern railroad for a short time, after which he came back to Mo- 
berly, Missouri, where he worked in the Wabash railroad shops for awhile 
at his trade, then went to Kansas City and found employment with the 
Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis Railroad Company, beginning as ma- 
chinist there on October 1, 1884, and remained there until October 1, 1890, 
then came to Springfield for this company, working in their shops here 
until October 1, 1891, when he was appointed machine shop foreman. In 
March, 1907, he was promoted to general foreman of the South Side shops 
which position he has occupied to the present time, and was placed in charge 
of the round house here on August 11, 191 1. He has under his direction 
on an average of one hundred men. Everything is under a splendid system 
of modern management and he is a man of such fine executive ability that he 
gets the best results possible from his men and at the same time wins and 
retains their good will and friendship. 

Mr. Woodson was married in 1889 to Julia D. Wray, a daughter of 
Joseph A. and Christiana ( Rea) Wray, who were born near Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. To this union two children have been born, namely: Doro- 
thv L. is a student of piano under Miss Afwood, of Springfield, and she has 
decided musical talent; Gladys is a student in Drury College. 

Politically, Mr. Woodson is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Masonic order. Solomon Lodge; also the Royal Arcanum, and the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. He is a member of Calvary Presbyterian church, 
in which he was a deacon for some time. He has long been active in church 
-work. 



1 128 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN FIELDER. 

That period of the nineteenth century embracing the decades between 
1830 and the breaking out of the Civil war was characterized by the immi- 
gration of the pioneer element which made the great state of Missouri what 
it is today. The immigrants were sturdy, heroic, sincere and, in the main, 
upright people, such as constitute the strength of the commonwealth. It is 
scarcely probable that in the future of the world another such period can 
occur, or, indeed, any period when such a solid phalanx of strong-minded 
men and noble, self-sacrificing women will take possession of a new country. 
The period to which reference is made, therefore, cannot be too much or 
too well written up. and the only way to do justice to such a subject is to- 
record the lives of those who led the van of civilization and founded the 
institutions which today are the pride and boast of a great state and a strong 
and virile people. Among those who came to (ireene counts- when it was 
still largely in its primitive wildness was the late Benjamin Franklin Fielder, 
who was not only a leading actor in the great drama which witnessed the 
passing of the old and the introduction of the new conditions in this locality. 
but who enjoyed an excellent reputation that penetrated to adjoining counties 
during his career here of over sixtv vears. He devoted his life, which em- 
braced the unusual span of ninety years, to agricultural pursuits, and by close 
application he established those habits of industry and frugality which insured 
his success in later years. With the able assistance of his estimable life com- 
panion he forged ahead, extended the acres of cultivable land and in due time 
found himself Upon the high road to prosperity with a good farm in his 
possession and all the comforts and conveniences of hie surrounding him. 
He was regarded as an enterprising and typical fanner of the progressive 
type. His thorough system of tillage, the good order of his fences, the well- 
cared-for condition of his fields, the commodious and comfortable buildings. 
all demonstrated his successful management and substantial thrift, and his 
long residence in the vicinity of Springfield won for him a very high place in 
the confidence and esteem of his neighbors and friends. 

Mr. Fielder was born in Maury county, Tennessee, on February 7. 1X24. 
He was a son of John and Mar) ( Denton) Fielder, one of the old families 
in that section of the South, and there they spent their lives, dying in Maury 
county. The father of our subject was a successful farmer and was influential 
in public affairs. He was at one time sheriff of Maury county. His family 
consisted of eight children, all now deceased, namely: Mrs. Martha Speer. 
Thompson Benjamin F., Mrs. Mary Wilkes, Samuel I'.. Ellen, Louisa and 
the youngest died in infancy unnamed. 

Benjamin F. Fielder grew to manhood on the home farm in Tennessee 
and there worked when a boy. He received a limited education in the rural 




BENJAMIN F. FIELDER. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI 1120' 

schools of his neighborhood, and remained at home until he was about thirty 
years of age, when he came overland to Greene county. Missouri, in the year 
1853, and settled on a farm about three miles southeast of the business center 
of Springfield, which was then a mere village, but which has now spread 
almost to the Fielder homestead. However, he had learned the carpenter's 
trade in bis native state and followed this for some time after coming to 
Greene county in connection with farming, in fact, be liked to use tools so 
well that he worked at his trade ai times during all his active life. Being 
industrious and managing well, he prospered and became owner of a number 
of good farms in this count}', all of which he placed under high-grade im- 
provement and an excellent state of cultivation. His widow still owns the 
old home place, lying just east of the National cemetery, and which fine farm 
contains one hundred and live acres. Old age finally rendering him unlit 
for the strenuous work of the farm, he removed to a comfortable dwelling 
on East State street, Springfield, which he purchased, and here he resided 
from [913 until his death, which occurred on December 4, 1914. lie was 
twice married, first in Tennessee to Mary Fstes, about 1X51. Four children 
were born to this union. Alary A. Brown, living near Ozark. .Missouri: Roxie, 
deceased; William Thomas is living in this count}-, and Andrew J. is living 
in Lindsay. California. 

Mr. Fielder was married on February 0, 1S77. on his farm in this 
count}', to Mary S. Barnes. She was born in Greene county, .Missouri, on 
September 28, [846. She is a daughter of Matthew ('. and Luceta A. ( Town- 
send) Barnes. Her father was born in Indiana on January 18. 1X23. Ik- 
spent his earlv life in that state, eventually removing to Greene county, Mis- 
souri, where he spent the rest of his life on a farm, dying here on December 
7, 1908. He was thirteen years old, when he came here, Springfield at that 
time being a small trading center on the wild prairies. Mr. Barnes became a 
minister in the Methodist Episcopal church and was prominent in that de- 
nomination in the earl}' days in this locality when most preachers were also 
farmers. I le i-- remembered as a man of fine characteristics, beloved by all 
who knew him. and he did much for the moral and general uplift of the 
county. His wife was born in Logan count}'. Kentucky, on August 20, 1X27, 
and her death occurred about twenty-seven years ago near Monett, in Barrv 
county. Missouri, when she was in the prime of life. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Bani'es eleven children were born, nine daughters and two sons; five of them 
are still living, namely: Mrs. Alary S. Fielder, widow of our subject; Mrs. 
Virginia Thomas, Mrs. Ellen Decker, Mrs. Lula Williams and Mrs. Geneva 
Tharp. 

.The union of Benjamin F. Fielder and wife resulted in the birth of four 
children, named as follows: Mrs. R. L. Matthews lives in Springfield, Cor- 
delia lives at home, Benjamin F., Jr.. resides in Springfield, Mrs. G. W. 



I I3O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Chapman lives at Hunter, Missouri. These children all grew up on the home- 
stead southeast of the city and all were given good educational advantages. 

Thompson Fielder, a brother of our subject, was also an early settler 
in this county and he was a soldier in the Mexican war. 

Benjamin F. Fielder was a member of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal 
church, South. In earlier life he was a Democrat, but in later years voted 
for prohibition. He was lung an active member of the Masonic Order, having 
in earl}- life united with Polk lodge at Columbia. Tennessee. He led a quiet 
home life, never taking an active part in politics and was never a candidate 
for office. 

The following article on Mr. Fielder's death occurred in the Sprin</ficld 
Republican in its issue of December 6, 1914: 

"Away back in '^3 a prairie schooner pulled by a span of horses rattled 
and creaked its way across the country from Maury count} - . Tennessee. A 
jolly party was in the schooner. lien F. Fielder and his brother. T. F. Fielder, 
with their wives and babies, were searching for a new home. Both had been 
married less than two years. It was autumn and the whole world looked 
brigbt. 

"For days the part}' looked over the Missouri country — and drove on. 
Arriving in the Ozarks, the Fielders drove more slowly, having been enamored 
with the beauty and prospects of the hillsides. Arriving in a little village of 
log cabins on November 17. 1853, they made their camp. That was the town 
of Springfield. 

"Yesterday morning one of the pioneers of Greene count} p.i-M-d away. 
It was "Uncle lien" Fielder, the lasl "i" the four grown-ups who traveled 
across the country in the schooner to Springfield, lie died at the family 
home on Easl State street. For the last month "Uncle Ben," as he was 
known to hundreds of people in the count}', had been failing in health. He 
grew weaker, but firmly believed to the last that he would recover and again 
go about among his friends. Prior to the beginning of the month of illness 
"Uncle lien" was hale and heart} and walked about town unassisted. He 
was known here as the oldest Mason in Missouri. 

"Soon after the close of the Civil war Mr. Fielder joined the South 
Side Mount Pisgah church and for years was the superintendent of the 
Sunday school. Years ago the pupils of the class he taught presented a 
beautiful Bible to him. which was at his side on his death lied." 

We aNo quote the following article from the Springfield Daily Leader, 
under date of December 6, 1014: 

"Benjamin F. Fielder, whose funeral will be held this afternoon at the 
family home, was a member of the famous Seventy-sixth Regiment. Missouri 
Militia, which successfully frustrated the attack on Springfield on January 8, 
18*13. attempted under order of General Marmaduke. The engagement at 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I I3I 

the southern and western outskirts of the city was the only active service 
experienced during the Civil war by Mr. Fielder. 

"The decedent's activity in the memorable battle was given last evening 
by Martin J. Hubble, a Greene county pioneer. 

" 'I first met Mr. Fielder in the town of Columbia, Tennessee, in the vear 
1852,' said Mr. Hubble. 'I was clerking in a country store there at the time 
and Mr. Fielder purchased a razor from me. From that time until the death 
of Mr. Fielder we were firm friends and he was often a guest at my home 
after his removal to Missouri. He was in possession of the razor at the 
time of his death. 

" 'My friend came to Springfield in the early fifties. He was induced to 
come to Greene count) by the obvious opportunities for a farmer here. Land 
was much higher priced in Tennessee than it was in this state. Mr. Fielder 
was never active in politics, as he was of a retiring disposition. Recognition 
should be given his moral characteristics. His word was as good as his bond, 
and he was a devoted prohibitionist ; in fact, he was one of the noblest men 
with whom I have ever been associated.' " 

Mr. Fielder, despite the fact that he was nearly ninety years of age at 
the time of his death, was unusually well preserved, lie was able to read 
without glasses, and until a short time before he died he made daily walks 
about the city. 



JAMES J. GIDEON. 

The name of Judge James J. Gideon has been a prominent and honored 
one in Greene county for many decades and he is still in the front rank- of 
the local bar. His force and effectiveness are strongly emphasized in his argu- 
ments to the jury, as he seems not so much to look at them, as to look through 
them, less for the purpose of seeing how they felt, than to rivet their attention, 
and, as it were, to grasp their attention by the compass of his own. The calm 
and masterly manner in which he disposes of the preliminary considerations 
is the reminder of the experienced general, quietly arranging his forces and 
preparing to press down with overwhelming force upon a single point. His 
manner becomes aroused; his action animated. It is first the expression of 
extensive views and the enunciation of general principles applicable to the 
case; then the application of those to particular facts, examining the testimony 
of each witness, showing its weakness, the suspicions attaching to it and its 
inconsistency either with itself or with the other parts of the evidence. As a 
judge he was an active, hard worker. Always careful, painstaking and 
prompt, he was a valuable member of the court — always sustained himself 
well on the bench. The decisions made bv him were alwavs short, clear and 



I 132 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

to the point, disposing of cases rapidly and satisfactorily. Possessed and 
imbued as he is to a large degree with the elementary principles of the law, 
he was able in his written opinions to make them models of perspicuity and 
force and plain to the comprehension of all. But while he has distinguished 
himself as a lawyer and jurist, he has a far greater claim to the respect of 
the people of Springfield and vicinity in his sturdy integrity of character and 
his life-long course as a friend of justice. 

Judge Gideon was born on Ozark Mountain soil, was reared in the latter 
part of the pioneer period and he springs from a sterling Irish-Scotch ancestry 
of Colonial American stock. His birth occurred in Taney count}", in a section 
that is now a part of Christian county, Missouri, on December 11. 1846. He 
is a son of William C. and Malinda (Byrd) Gideon. James Gideon, the 
great-grandfather of our subject, was the founder of the branch of the family 
in America. He came from Dublin. Ireland, with his brothers. Reuben and 
Edward, and bringing his wife. Nancy. His sons were Edward. William, 
[sham, James and John. They all settled on land in southwestern Xew York. 
Edward, brother of James, was killed in battle during the Revolutionary war. 
All of the family moved to North Carolina about 1781 and settled on the 
Yadkin river. James Gideon moved to what is now Hawkins count}-. Ten- 
nessee, in 1821, where be settled on wild land and there established the family 
home, cleared and developed a farm. He took with him the apple trees with 
which to plant his orchard. Several members of the Gideon family went 
with him besides his own immediate family. He was a substantial farmer 
and lived to be an aged man. pa-sing the remainder of his days in Tennessee. 
William Gideon, bis son and the grandfather of our subject, was born in 
the -tate of Xew York in ijNij, and went with the rest of the family to North 
Carolina, and there he married .Matilda Wood, and to them these children 

were born: James II.. Burton A.. William ('.. Francis M., W Ison T., 

Green I'... John A.. .Minerva and Elizabeth. Mr. Gitleon moved to Tennessee 
in iNji and engaged in fanning, although lie was a batter by trade. He was 
a member of the Baptist church and was an elder in the church for forty 
years. However; in his old age he became a Universalist. In the spring of 
[836 be came to Missouri and settled on land north of ( 'zark, entering two 
hundred acres of wild land two miles from that town and here began life in 
true pioneer fashion. He became a successful farmer here and a well-known 
and highly respected citizen. His death occurred in [868 at the age of 
seventy-nine years. Hi-- -on. William ( '. Gideon, our subject's father, was 
born in Hawkins county. Tennessee, on February 15. (824, and received a 
limited education in the schools of his day, and was but twelve years old 
when he came with bis father to Missouri, and was reared among the fron- 
tiersmen of this state in a rugged and primitive environment. When twenty- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. II33 

one vears old he married Malinda Byrd, a daughter of James Byrd and wife, 
and to this union eight children were born, namely: Thomas J.. James J., 
Francis M.. William \Y.. John M., Martin \\, George B. and Matilda. 

William C. Gideon settled on a farm in what was then Taney county, 
now Christian county. Missouri, and during his life lived on a number of 
different farms in this locality. He was a hard worker and managed well. 
and even prior to the breaking out of the war between the states he owned 
four hundred and eighty acres of land in Christian county. He cleared up 
several farms. During the war he was obliged to remove his residence to 
Greene county, settling four miles south of Springfield on account of the 
depredations of guerrillas. His sympathies were with the Union, and during 
the war he served in the Home Guards, three months under Capt. Jesse Gal- 
loway, and on March 5. 1862, he enlisted in Company F, Missouri State 
Militia, and was mustered into L'nited States service. He was promoted to 
sergeant and detailed as recruiting officer at Springfield, Missouri, for Rabbs' 
Battery, having been transferred to the Eighth Missouri State Militia. While 
in this service, he was killed by a hand of guerrillas, in Christian county, at 
the home of his father on December id, [863, at the early age of thirty-nine 
years. He had participated in the battle of ( )zark and the battle of Springfield 
when Marmaduke and Shelby made their raid and attempted to capture the 
town on January 8. 1863. He was also in other engagements and proved to 
he a brave and gallant soldier. In religion he was a Methodist. lie was a 
man whose judgment was respected by the people and he was influential in 
his community. He served as justice of the peace four years. In politics he 
was a Douglas or war Democrat, hut after the war began became a Repub- 
lican. He was a man of quiet and peaceful disposition, was honorable in 
character, and had the confidence of the community in which he lived. 

Judge James J. Gideon grew to manhood on his father's farm in Christian 
county and there worked hard when a boy. He received his earlv education 
in the common schools, and when a boy. being fired with the patriotism of 
the youth of this country during the Civil war. he ran away from school at 
the age of sixteen years, and on June 20. 1003, enlisted at Springfield in 
Battery A. First Arkansas Light Artillery. After serving a short time in 
this batten- he re-enlisted in Company H. Sixteenth L'nited States Cavalry, 
in which he served twenty months. While in this regiment he was in the 
tight at Boonville against General Price, at the battle near Jefferson City, at 
Big Blue, where General Marmaduke was captured. Independence and in the 
Newtonia fight and many skirmishes, in all of which he deported himself as 
creditably as did any of the veterans of his regiment. He was promoted to 
corporal and was honorably discharged on July 1. 1865. During his service 
he was neither wounded nor imprisoned. At the close of the war he was 



11^4 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

elected captain of Company E, Ninety-ninth Regiment, Missouri Militia, but 
saw no active service as such. After his military career he returned home, 
attended school and fanned. On December 29, 1868', he married Mary S. 
Ball, a daughter of Captain Jackson and Elizabeth (Keltruer) Ball. To Judge 
and Mrs. Gideon the following children were born: Percy P., Frederick E., 
Nora (died when thirteen years old). Kate M.. who died on November 20, 
1900, and Mary, born on January 1, 1894, died on March 10. 1907. 

After his marriage Judge Gideon settled on a farm near Ozark, but 
agricultural pursuits were not exactly to the tastes of a man of his active 
mind and laudable ambitions, and he began the study of law during his spare 
moments, and, making rapid progress, he was admitted to the bar in January, 
1872, and immediately began the practice of his profession at Ozark, where 
he soon had a good practice and where he continued until 1886. During this 
time he won the confidence of the people of his county and filled the office of 
public administrator and prosecuting attorney for eight years. He also rep- 
resented his county in the state Legislature one term and was elected to the 
state Senate from the Nineteenth Senatorial District in 1884 and served one 
term, giving his constituents entire satisfaction in both offices. On July 26, 
1886, he removed to Springfield, where he still resides and where he was 
successful in the practice of his profession from the start and his ability 
recognized, in 1888, by his election as prosecuting attorney for one term and 
in the year 1902 by his election as judge of the criminal court. In November, 
1900, he was again elected judge of the criminal court for one term, which 
important office he filled to the satisfaction of the people. It is said that 
under his administration the business of the criminal court was dispatched 
expeditiously, as indicated in the beginning of this article, and that wisdom 
accompanied his judgments, which were tempered with mercy. Judge Gideon 
is -widely known throughout southwestern Missouri as a stanch leader in 
the Republican party and a successful politician. He has never been defeated 
before a convention or at the polls for any office for which he has seen fit 
to run except in the free silver craze of 1896. He is still active in the 
practice of hi-- profession. Fraternally he belongs to Solomon Lodge of 
Masons at Springfield and at Ozark held all the offices of Friend Lodge, Xo. 
3^2. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is an 
active member of Capt. John Matthews Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 
Springfield, of which he has been commander, and he was at onetime assistant 
inspector general of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

ludge Gideon's life record might well be emulated by the ambitious 
youth whose fortunes are yet in the making, for our subject is an example 
of the self-made man who came up from the soil and has battled his way 
to the front unaided and along honorable lines. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. II35 

GEORGE WESLEY NIEDERHUTH. 

The evolutions in the industrial world and the improved modes of manu- 
facturing things have been marvelous in the past half century, and scarcely 
an industry exists that has been left untouched by the spirit of reform. The 
demand of the age is for labor-saving devices, improved appliances, machin- 
ery, and short cuts generally to desired ends. George Wesley Niederhuth, 
chief engineer at Drury College and agent for a number of standard makes 
of motorcycles, is one of Springfield's young men who is giving much 
thought to these things and has a comprehensive understanding of modern 
mechanical industries in general. 

Air. Niederhuth was born on August 2, 1889, at Eldora, Iowa. He is 
a son of Rev. Otto Niederhuth, who was born in Hanover, Germany, on 
February 12, 1862, where he spent his boyhood and attended school, emi- 
grating to America when eighteen years of age, and he became a minister 
in the Methodist Episcopal church, having studied theology at Wesleyan 
Academy at Wilbraham, Massachusetts, in 1884; also studied at the Ger- 
man college and the Iowa Wesleyan University at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa; then, 
being well equipped for his serious life work, he went to Bismark, North 
Dakota, having charge of the Grand Forks Mission, extending sixty miles 
north and south and one hundred and fifty miles east and west. He drove 
over this large field with horse and buggy and during winter often with 
thermometer registering thirty degrees below. Later he filled appointments 
at Crookston, Minnesota, Eldora, Iowa, also Olderbolt, Colesburg. Burt and 
Burlington, of that state; Brighton, Illinois; Hermann, Mt. Vernon and Trux- 
ton, Missouri, being still the pastor of the German Methodist church at the 
last named place. He has done an excellent work in all these charges and 
is a learned and eloquent expounder of Holy Writ. Politically, he is a 
Republican, and fraternally a member of the Modern Woodmen. His wife 
was known in her maidenhood as Louisa Launroth, a native of Burlington, 
Iowa. To them nine children were born, and were named as follows : Lulu 
is the wife of Rev. Herman Langer, a Missouri Methodist minister; George 
W., of this sketch; Esther is the wife of Louis Schultz, a farmer of Madi- 
son, Nebraska; Oscar, deceased; Otto, deceased; Irwin, deceased; Raymond, 
Earl and Alberta are all three at home with their parents. 

George W. Niederhuth received his education in the common schools, 
then studied two years at Central Wesleyan College at Warrenton, Mis- 
souri, and after that took the International Correspondence School course 
in electrical and mechanical engineering. His first employment was at No- 
komis, Illinois, as assistant night engineer at the electric power plant there, 
later being promoted to engineer and then to the position of chief engineer,. 



I I36 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

remaining there three years. He then came to Hermann, Missouri, as assist- 
ant engineer at the Starr Roller Mills, where he remained nearly a year, then 
went to Warrenton, Missouri, and entered college, working his way through, 
and also worked at spare times at the city electric plant there. He then 
came to Springfield, and secured a position as engineer at the Woodruff 
building in January, 1911, filling this position until December nth follow- 
ing, then accepted his present position, that of chief engineer at Drury Col- 
lege. He has given entire satisfaction in all these places, being faithful, 
trustworthy and having an excellent working knowledge of both electrical 
and mechanical engineering. He has for some time also been agent for the 
best makes of motorcycles and does high-class motorcycle repairing at his 
home at 1090 East Harrison street. He handles motorcycle accessories, such 
as lamps, tires, horns, etc., and he has built up a good business in this line. 
He has furnished motorcycles to the special police of this city for some time. 

Mr. Xiederhuth was married on September 14, 191 1. to Ella Boehm, 
a daughter of John Boehm, a veteran of the Union army, formerly of Her- 
mann, Missouri, now of Springfield. 

To our subject and wife two children have been born, namely: John 
Wesley and Allvn Edison. 

Politically, Mr. Xiederhuth is a Republican. Fraternally, he formerly 
belonged to the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a member of the 
National Association of Stationary Engineers, lie holds membership with 
the Cumberland Presbyterian church. 



HENRY l'R( ISERPI. 



It is not strange that the little republic of Switzerland should lose many 
of u- enterprising citizens who come to the United States and establish their 
homes, for our institutions are similar to their own and they do not have 
such a hard time adjusting themselves here as do the emigrants from other 
countries of Europe, horn and reared under conditions which are just aboul 
the antithesis of our own. The port-- of entry of America have ever beer 
freely Opened to the Swiss, and having thus extended to them a hearty hand 
(if welcome, they have been coming to our shores for two centuries or more, 
and their substantial home- now adorn the towns, hills and plains in ever) 
state in the Union. They have been loyal to our institutions and have proven 
!<• lie splendid citizens in every respect. Thus they have aided us in pushing 
forward the civilization of the western hemisphere and we have helped them 
in main ways, giving them every opportunity, which they have not been slow 
to grasp, being people of thrift, tact and energy. 

One of the worthy ela-s mentioned in the preceding paragraph is Henry 







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MRS. HKNKY L'KOKEIU'I. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 137 

Proserpi, who is engaged in cement contracting in Springfield, his birth 
Inning occurred in Switzerland on October 25, 1855. He is a son of Balyds- 
our and Christina (White) Proserpi, both these parents being born in Canton 
Fazeno, Switzerland, and there they grew to maturity, were educated in the 
common schools and were married and they spent their lives in their native 
country, the death of the father occurring in 1873, and the mother passed 
away in 1871. They were the parents of ten children, of whom Henry, of 
this sketch, was the youngest. Six of these children still survive. 

Henry Proserpi grew to manhood in Switzerland and there received a 
public school education, which was somewhat limited, and he may be classed 
with our self-made men. He emigrated from his native land when he was 
twenty-rive years of age, in r88l, coming to the United States and pene- 
trating the interior to Springfield, Missouri, arriving here with but seven 
dollars and fifty cents as his sole capital, and unable to speak a word of 
English. But he had a trade and plenty of grit and determination, so it was 
not long until he was on his feet. I le began working at the cement and stone 
business when fourteen years of age. and he has followed the same ever 
since, mastering the various ins and outs of the same when but a boy. He 
started on his own account here in [884 and has become widely known in 
Greene county in his special line of endeavor. He has done numerous big 
jobs for the Frisco railroad, and among the notable larger jobs which he has 
had was the Landers Theater, on which he did all the cement work, and the 
auditorium at Drury College, lie is known to be a man of advanced ideas 
and does his work promptly, neatly and honestly. He has been very suc- 
cessful in a financial way. 

Air. Proserpi was married on December 20, 1884, to Belle Hopkins, a 
daughter of James Hopkins, a farmer of Phelps county, Missouri, and she is 
one of a family of twelve children, six sons and six daughters. Mrs. Pro- 
serpi's father was from Tennessee. He died in Phelps county, and the 
mother was Fanny Morrow and was born in Indiana. She is still living in 
Phelps county. Missouri. 

Seven children, two sons and five daughters, have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Proserpi, namely: Rosa Gertrude, born on November 2, 1885, married 
-Clyde Sperry, a real estate and insurance man of Springfield, and they have 
one child. Harold Eugene Sperry; Daisy Christina, born on Xovember 8, 
1887, is at home; Joseph Franklin, born on November 6, 1889, died in in- 
fancy: Jessie May, bom on November 6, 1890, died in infancy; Charles 
Ernest, born on January 27, 1894: Georgia F., born on November 28, 1897, 
and Mamie A., born on February 21, 1900. 

Politically Mr. Proserpi is a Democrat. Fraternallv he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America and. the Woodmen of the World. He and 
his family attend the Baptist church. Their home is at 2133 Benton avenue. 
<7- 7 ) 



1 138 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

FRANCIS A. GALLAGHER. 

The career of Francis A. Gallagher, superintendent of the Springfield 
Traction Company, has been a varied one, with success in every line to 
which he has turned his attention, for at the outset he realized that to 
achieve anything worth while in this world one must not only have big ideas 
of a practical and sane nature, but there must also be courage, sound judg- 
ment, persistency and close adherence to high ideals. He has never waited 
for some one else to do his planning or to execute his plans, but has been 
self-reliant and resourceful, and so it is not surprising that he is now filling 
a very responsible position while yet a young man. 

Mr. Gallagher was born February 17, 1875, in Bradford county, Penn- 
sylvania. He is a son of Francis A. and Winifred ( Collom ) Gallagher. 
The father was born at Painesville, Ohio, in 1850, and the mother's birth 
occurred in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1851. These par- 
ents grew up in their respective communities and received common school 
educations, and when young in years the father went to Titusville, Penn- 
sylvania, where he established his home, and there he engaged in the oil 
business. He became a prominent man in politics. He was a member of 
the Catholic church. His death occurred at Titusville, November 17. 1874, 
when a young man. His widow still survives, and makes her home in Brad- 
ford, Pennsylvania. 

Francis A. Gallagher, only child of his parents, grew to manhood in 
his native state and there received a common school and college education. 
When but a boy he began his railroad career by taking a position with the 
Erie Railroad Company, working at different office positions. He then went 
to the Standard Oil Company, working at different places in Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. In 1896 he went into construction 
work for the Pierce Construction Company, building street railways, etc. 
This firm was located at Bradford, Pennsylvania. Later our subject went to 
Michigan in the same business for the Marquette Railway Company, re- 
maining there until 1907 when he came to Springfield, Missouri, and took a 
position as superintendent of the Springfield Traction Company, which he 
has rilled to the present time with his usual eminent satisfaction that has 
marked all his work in the past. Since coming here he has rebuilt the sys- 
tem, relaying even - foot of track, constructing new barns, etc.. and has 
given the people of Springfield a modern and satisfactory street railway, 
lie maintains his offices at 1405 Boonville street. He has always been a 
close observer and a deep student of his line of work and has therefore kept 
well abreast of the times in his special field. 

Mr. Gallagher was married on June 26, i<)Oi. in Bradford. I'ennsyl- 



!> 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I: 39 

vania, to Edna Holmes, a native of that place, where she was reared and 
educated, including both the public schools and a college course of several 
years. She is a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Venetti) Holmes, both 
natives of Pennsylvania, where they grew up, were educated and married 
and established the family home at Bradford where they are well known 
and influential. Mr. Holmes was engaged in the oil business for many 
years there. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher three children have been born, namely: 
Francis A.. Jr., born on May 17, 1902, in Bradford, Pennsylvania; John H., 
born on June 10, 191 1, and Mary Elizabeth, born on June 28, 1913. 

Air. Gallagher and family are members of the Catholic church. Frater- 
nally, he belongs to the Knights of Columbus and to the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks; at the present time he is state trustee of the latter 
order, and is one of the active and prominent Elks of Missouri. He and his 
wife have made many friends since locating in Springfield. 



GUY H. McGUIRE. 



Whenever an attempt is made to write the history of a successful en- 
terprise or the worthy career of any man, it has been found that ability, 
backed by energy and push, has been the basis of it all, and this fact can 
not fail to impress itself upon the writer of history proper, or that branch 
of history which consists of the biographies of those who have achieved suffi- 
cient distinction to make the record of their lives of interest to the public. 
Guy H. McGuire, a well-known North Side groceryman, is one of Spring- 
field's business men who owes his success in life to his own fighting qualities 
—the fighting ability that overcomes obstacles. 

Mr. McGuire was born at Brighton, Polk county, Missouri, October 9, 
1878. He is a son of Henry and Margaret (Cunningham) McGuire, both 
natives of Tennessee, the birth of the father occurring on January 1, 1849, 
and the mother's birth occurred on August 22, 1857. They grew to ma- 
turity on the farms of their parents in their native state and in Polk county, 
this state. They attended the old-fashioned schools, and were children when 
their parents brought them to Missouri, each locating in Polk county. The 
father devoted his active life to general farming near the village of Brighton, 
but he and his wife are now living in Springfield. They have always been 
known as plain, honest, church-going people, highly respected by all who 
know them. They are the parents of five children, named as follows : Mrs. 
Nora Page lives in Springfield ; Guy H. of this sketch ; Mrs. Grace Randalls 
is also a resident of this city; Jessie is the wife of R. W. Coleman and lives 



II-jO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

in Springfield; Esther married \Y. T. Font and lives in this city. These 
children all received common school educations and they are all well situ- 
ated in life. 

Guy H. McGuire spent his early childhood on the farm in Polk county, 
and when nine years of age removed with his parents to Springfield, the 
family locating on Commercial street, and here he received his education 
in the public schools. He began his career in the grocery business when but 
a boy, first driving a wagon ; he then engaged in farming a few years in both 
Polk and Greene county, as well as other sections of the Southwest. He 
went into the grocery business for himself in 1906 on Commercial street, 
this city, later moving to his present location, 318 West Commercial street, 
where he has built up a large business and maintains one of the most mod- 
ernly appointed and attractive grocery stores of its size in Springfield. He 
carries a complete line of staple and fancy groceries at all seasons, and he 
always aims at honesty and promptness in dealing with his many customers. 

Mr. McGuire was married on February 17. 1004, in Springfield, to 
Margaret Wells, a native of Webster county. .Missouri, and a daughter of 
P. P. and Alary (Humphrey) Wells, the father a native of North Carolina 
and the mother was born near Lead Hill, Arkansas, and her death occurred 
in Springfield on February 8, 1913. Mr. Wells is fixing retired in this city. 
In his earlier life he dealt extensively in the cattle business, later was a 
merchant. 

To Air. and Mrs. McGuire one child has been born. Jack P., whose birth 
occurred on September 5, 1906, in Kansas City. 

Politically, Mr. McGuire is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to 
the Modern Woodmen. 



EDWARD WAYNE WOOLDRIDGE. 

Practical industry, wisely and vigorously applied, never fails of success. 
It carries a man onward and upward, brings out his individual character and 
acts as a powerful stimulus to the efforts of others. The greatest results 
in life are often attained by simple means and the exercise of the ordinary 
qualities of common sense and perseverance. This fact having been recog- 
nized early in life by Edward Wayne Wooldridge, for many years one of 
the well-known members of the Frisco office force in Springfield, he seized 
the small opportunities that he encountered on the rugged hill that leads to 
life's lofty summit where lies the ultimate goal of success, never attained 
by the weak, ambitionless and inactive. 

Mr. Wooldridge was burn at Stockton. Cedar county. Missouri, on 
Fridav, August 10. i86(>. He is a son of Madison Brasher and. Ann filiza 



GREENE ClirXTV, MISSOURI. I 1.(1 

(Morgan) Woolridge, the father a native of Christian county. Kentucky, 
where his birth occurred on December 22, 1832; and the later was born in 
eastern Tennessee, October 27, 1847. His great-grandfather was Edward 
Wooldridge, born on April 30, 1789, and his maternal great-great-grand- 
father was Thomas Brasher. Each side of the house may be traced back to 
sterling old Southern ancestry. The parents of our subject grew to maturity 
in Dixie land, received such educational advantages as the times afforded, 
and in pioneer days joined the numerous train of emigrants to southwest 
Missouri, locating in Cedar county, where they became well and favorably 
known for their industry, old-fashioned hospitality and general spirit of 
altruism. The father, who was born and reared a Southerner, was at heart 
a stanch Unionist, and, like man)" another during the polemic civil drama 
of the early sixties, had conflicting opinions as to his duties, lie first served 
six months in the Confederate cause, then enlisted in Company A, Fifteenth 
Missouri Volunteer Infantry. He always said the hardest battle in which 
he ever took part was the "parting of the ways," when having to decide be- 
tween love for the South and its traditions and institutions and his con- 
science. A physician by profession, he served at the front as surgeon, was 
in man}- of the great battles of the war ami was several times wounded. 
He once performed the operation of trephining on a wounded comrade, with 
only an ax for an anvil, a pair of old scissors and an old-time half-dollar 
which he shaped to nearly lit the broken skull; a shell from the enemy's 
ranks had just destroyed what crude surgical instruments he then pos- 
sessed. But the patient recovered and is at this writing living at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-nine years, Strong and health}-. The wound was washed 
in dirty water through which a cannon had but recently been drawn, but 
the same kind of water often made a very fine cup of coffee, an experience 
which thousands of soldiers on both sides had. After the close of the war 
Doctor Wooldridge returned to Stockton and resumed the practice of his 
profession and for many years his name was a household word in Cedar 
count}-, throughout which he enjoyed a good practice. His death occurred 
in 1899, ami his wife passed away in 1892. They were the parents of the 
following children: Edward Wayne Wooldridge, Clara May Davis. ( arrie 
Lee Harris, Lula Margaret Wooldridge, John Franklin Wooldridge and 
Madison Bruce Wooldridge. 

Edward W. Wooldridge grew to manhood at Stockton and received 
his earl_\- education in the public schools there and the Stockton Academy, 
later attending the Southwestern Telegraph Institute, in Sedalia, Missouri, 
the Southwestern Business College in Springfield, Missouri, the Berlitz School 
of Languages in St. Louis. Missouri, the Strasburg Conservatory of Music, 
Washington University of St. Louis, and the Cincinnati Phonographic Insti- 
tute. He thus obtained a high education, making an excellent record in each 



1 14- GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

of these institutions, in fact, he has remained a student all his life and is 
familiar with the world's best literature, the sciences, the arts and the cur- 
rent topics of the age. 

The major portion of Air. Wooldridge's life has been spent in railroad 
service; however, when a young man he was a banker, a mine owner and 
a teacher. He is now interested in the Joplin lead and "Jack" (zinc) 
fields. He always taught young men who could not afford the expense of 
special training. His specialty was rapid mathematical calculations, in which 
he is commonly spoken of as one of the highest proficiency. He entered the 
employ of the Frisco System in 1891, filling various positions in the general 
offices at Springfield and St. Louis until promoted to his present position, 
chief clerk of the car service department. Owing to his fidelity, accuracy 
and trustworthiness he has always been regarded by the head officials of the 
road as one of their most efficient and worthy employees. 

Mr. W'ooldridge was married on December iS. 1909. to Beatrice Van 
Derford, a lady of many estimable characteristics. She is a daughter of 
Monroe and Belinda ( Britton) Van Derford, a prominent family of Neosho, 
Missouri. To this union one child has been born, namely: Wayne W'ool- 
dridge. 

Politically, Mr. Wooldridge is a Democrat, but always votes indepen- 
dently in local elections. He never aspired to any political office, not even 
having been judge or clerk at elections. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Christian church, or Disciples of Christ. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the Masonic order, both branches of the York and Scottish Rites, a past 
potentate of Abou Ben Adhem Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, a past master and past high priest in the Ma- 
sonic Blue Lodge and Chapter. He holds beautiful jewels presented by each 
of these bodies in honor of long years of devoted service to the cause and in 
recognition of his having been presiding officer of the several bodies. He is 
one of the best known and most influential Masons in southern Missouri, and 
one would judge from his daily life that he endeavors to live up to the high 
precepts of this time-honored order. He is also a member of the Woodmen 
of the World and a vice-president of the Frisco Railroad Club of Spring- 
field. He was offered a Carnegie hero medal, for what his modesty calls "al- 
leged" heroism in rescuing a boy and an old man from drowning in icy 
waters at St. Louis in the year 1898, when he plunged into the stream and 
after two trips brought them safely to shore; however, the experience was a 
dear one as be was not only badly cut and mangled by the heavy pieces of 
floating ire, but be suffered a long time from the exposure. Personally, he 
is a plain, unassuming gentleman of genial and courteous address, makes and 
retains friends readily, being esteemed for his true worth by all with whom 
he Ci unes in contact. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1 43 

THOMAS SCHOFIELD. 

Among the sturdy characters which the British Isles has sent to the 
new Republic of the West is Thomas Schofield, a retired railroad man of 
Springfield, who has inherited many of the line qualities of the Anglo-Sax- 
ons and has therefore succeeded in his active life work and at the same time 
been a good citizen. The United States always welcomes such men to her 
shores and offers them opportunities very often greater than they enjoyed 
in their native land. 

Air. Schofield was born May 15, 1841, in the town of Failsworth, near 
Manchester, England. He is a son of James and Amelia (Johnson) Scho- 
•fielcl and a grandson of Joseph Schofield. They were all horn, reared, edu- 
cated and married in their native land. The grandfather devoted his life 
to general farming, and the father, who emigrated to America with his 
family about a half century ago, was a stone mason by trade; also followed 
farming in Illinois for some time. He established the family home at the 
town of Bellville that state. He was killed by a locomotive on the Bellville 
& St. Louis Railroad when sixty-seven years of age. His family consisted 
of eight children, only two of whom grew to maturity, Thomas, of this 
sketch; and Betsy, who married Joseph Tungue. who lives in England. 

Thomas Schofield grew to manhood in his native land and there re- 
ceived a common school education at Failsworth, leaving school when thir- 
teen years of age. After working on the farm with his father, he began his 
career as railroader with the Lancanshire & Yorkshire railroad, spending a 
year in the goods department, then emigrated to the United States, arriving 
here February 22, 1864, during the Civil war period, landing in New York 
City, where, however, he did not long remain, coming direct to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where he went to work for the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad Company, 
in the freight department, repairing and building freight cars. This road 
later became the Baltimore & Ohio by which name it is now known. Mr. 
Schofield remained with the road for a period of twenty-five years, during 
which he was connected with a number of different departments, being fore- 
man and in charge of the caboose gang, later in the coach department for four 
or five years, then was passenger carpenter in the shops of that road, rank- 
ing among the most skilful in the coach department. In September, 1888, 
he was employed by the Frisco Railroad in the coach department as carpen- 
ter. He also remained with this road for a period of twenty-five years, when 
in June, 1913, he was retired on a pension. He worked both in the old north 
side shops and the new shops. He has evidently been not only a very highly 
skilled workman but also trustworthy and conscientious else he could not 
have spent a half century in one line of work, during which period he was 



I 144 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

employed only by two different companies. In 1909 Mr. Schofield made a 
trip to England, visiting and sightseeing. 

Our subject was married. June 18, 1867, to Jane Schofield, a daughter of 
James and Mar)- ( Swift) Schofield. She was born in England only a 
fourth of a mile from the birthplace of our subject and there she grew to 
womanhood and was educated. .To. Mr. and Mrs. Schofield four children 
have been born, namely: Lillie A. married Harry Fenton, a cabinet maker 
in the new shops of the Frisco and they live in Springfield; Emma J. is the 
wife of Clarence Warner, a fireman on the Frisco ami they live in Spring- 
field; Albert L.. a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work, 
is also a Frisco employee of this city; Farl B. married Carrie Thompson and 
lie is employed in the local Frisco offices. 

Politically, Thomas Schofield is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, which he joined on May 26, 1879, thirty-six years 
ago, being a member of Oriental Lodge No. 86. Subject and wife are mem- 
bers of the Second Presbvterian church. 



REV. FAYETTE I II" PI). 

The life of a man like Rev. Fayette Hurd C worthy of emulation by the 
youth of the land whose destinies are yet to be determined, for it has been led 
along high planes of endeavor, inculcating right thinking and therefore right 
living, fur the world is rapidly coming to understand the Biblical phrase, 
" V a man thinketh so is he." Rev. Hurd is a scion of a sterling old family 
of Michigan, but the latter part of bis long and useful life lias been spent in 
tin- Southwest, in leaching and in the ministry of the gospel, and while he is 
now living retired from active work, making his home in Springfield, he still 
"goes about doing goi "i." 

Reverend Hurd was born at Burlington, Michigan, August i_>, 1835. 
lie is a -on of Homer C. and Sarah Jane 1 McGee) Hurd. The father was 
bom in 1 onnecticut, August 23, t8o8, and his death occurred at Burlington, 
Michigan, February 12. 1873. The mother of our subject was born in War- 
ren county, New York, ( »ctober 24, 181 1. and her death occurred on Septem- 
ber 17. [888. These parents grew up in their respective states and received 
common school educations, as good as could be procured in those early days 
The) were married in Spring Arbor. Michigan, I leceml er J. [833, and. locat- 
ing on a farm in the township of Burlington, devoted their active lives to 
leral farming. Politically, Homer C. Hurd was a Republican, and was 
twice a member of the lower house of the Michigan Legislature, besides 
serving several years as supervisor of Burlington township, lie led a quiet, 




REV. FAYETTE TIERD. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 145 

honest home life. His family consisted of five children, two of whom are 
still living, namely: Rev. Fayette llunl, of this review ; Mary Elizabeth is 
deceased, as is Sarah Janette; Edward 11. is living in Union City, Michigan; 
( Jeorge l\, deceased. 

Rev. Fayette Hurd grew to manhood on the home farm in Michigan, 
where he worked when a boy, and in the winter time he attended the public 
schools of Union City, Michigan, alter which he entered the University of 
Michigan at Ann Arbor from which institution he was graduated in 1859. 
From this institution, after a course of special graduate studio, he secured, 
in 1891, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He then studied theology at 
Andover Seminary in Massachusetts, in preparation for the ministry of the 
Congregational church, and he was graduated there in 1863, having made an 
excellent record in both the above named schools. Returning to Michigan 
he was pastor of a number of churches of his denomination, then went to 
Iowa and filled the pulpits of .Montour and Cherokee, in that state, subsequently 
returning to his native state, continuing the work of the ministry there until 
[891, when he went to Vinita, Oklahoma, where he taught three years in an 
academy, and in [894 came to Springfield, Missouri, where he has since lived 
practically retired from active work, although continuing a prominent worker 
in church affairs. In all his charges he built up the church and strength- 
ened the congregation and was popular wherever his work took him. for he 
was regarded from the first as an earnest, conscientious worker for the 
genera] good of the church, and as a scholarly, logical, forceful and eloquent 
pulpit orator. 

Reverend Hurd was married on June 19, 1886, to Julia T. Robinson, 
at Ascutneyville, Vermont. She was born in New Hampshire, and is a 
daughter of Williams D. and Mary 7.. ( Clement ) Robinson, a highly esteemed 
family who spent their lives in Xew Hampshire, where she grew to woman- 
hood and received a good education, completing her schooling at Mary 
Sharp's College in Tennessee. 

To our subject and wife one child was born, a son, Carlos F. Hurd, a 
distinguished journalist, whose birth occurred in Iowa, September 22, 1876. 
After passing through the public schools he entered Drury College at Spring- 
field, Missouri, from which institution he was graduated in 1807. and soon 
thereafter began his career as a newspaper man, and most of his work has 
been in St. Louis. He has for some time been a member of the editorial 
staff of the Post Dispatch. He was abroad with his wife in the spring of 
1912 and he was the only newspaper man on board the Carpathia, which 
re- cued part of the passengers of the ill-fated Titanic, and had the distinc- 
tion of being the first to report to the world that great disaster, perhaps the 
greatest news from the newspaper man's standpoint of modern times. He 
was married on November 29, 1906, to Catherine Stewart Cordell, a native 



1 146 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

of Missouri, and the daughter of John H. Cordell, of Marshall, Missouri, 
where she was educated. To Carlos F. Hurd two children have been born, 
namely : Clement R., and Emily V. Hurd. This family has for some time 
resided in St. Louis, while the immediate subject of this sketch has a home 
on Summit avenue, Springfield, though planning on early removal to St. 
Louis. 

Reverend Hurd is a Republican politically. He holds membership with 
the First Congregational church of this city and has been for some years 
and till quite recently, clerk of the same, and active in the general work of 
the church. He is one of the charter members of the Springfield chapter 
of the Sons of the Revolution and has been for some years an active and 
enthusiastic member of the Trinity Tyrants, a local literary and social club 
of men and women which is organized and conducted on somewhat original 
lir.es. When in the university he was a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. 



Tiii'.i mi >ki. ( i'j r. 



Theodore Ott was born on November u. 1845, near Cologne, in the 
Rhine country, Germany. He is a son of Adam and Mary Ott, natives of 
Germany, where they grew up and were married, and made their home until 
1857 when the family emigrated to America, locating in Calumet county, 
Wisconsin, where the elder Ott became owner of a large farm, farming 
having been his business in the old country. He continued this line of en- 
deavor until 1805 when he removed to Chicago and lived with his son, 
Theodore, of this sketch, until his death at the age of seventy-three years 
and he was buried in Chicago. His family consisted of nine children, namely: 
Gertrude married John Smith, a fanner of Calumet county, Wisconsin; 
Helena married William French, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, he being now 
deceased; Henry is engaged in fanning in Calumet county, Wisconsin; Theo- 
dore of this sketch. The other five children are deceased. 

Theodore < Ht was twelve years old when his parents brought him to 
the United States, lie assisted his father on the farm in Wisconsin until 
1863. He received a common school education. When eighteen years of 
age he went to Chicago and worked in a furniture factory as wood shaper 
and sawyer, for the Thayer & Tobey Furniture Company, with which firm 
he remained until 1873 when he began working for the McClusky & Craig 
Company, also furniture manufacturers, remaining with this concern a year 
and a half, as shaper and sawyer, and while there lost a finger in a saw. He 
then went to Nashville, Tennessee, in 1871 and worked for the \. 11. Field 
& Nashville Furniture Company as win id moulder and sawyer, in fact, did 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 147 

all kinds of wood work for one year, then went to Humboldt, Tennessee, 
where he worked in the factory of the Humboldt Furniture Company for 
nine months, when the plant was destroyed by lire. This firm also operated 
a plant there in which were manufactured wagons, buggies and fruit box 
materials and our subject worked in this three years, after which he went to 
Kansas City, Missouri, and worked six months in the planing mill of Rich- 
ardson & Heinz. He came to Springfield in 1887 and began working for 
the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis Railroad Company in their shops 
which are now controlled by the Frisco lines. The year he came he pur- 
chased a lot at the corner of Brower and Grant streets and built a comfort- 
able home. He has been running a wood working machine for twenty-seven 
years and has long been regarded an expert in this line of work. He was 
journeyman for a number of years, and when the Frisco took over these 
shops he was promoted to foreman of the mill room which responsible posi- 
tion he still holds, having an average of ten men under his direction. 

Mr. Ott was married in November, 1865, to Elizabeth Bower, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Bower, a farmer in Wisconsin at that time. Mrs. Ott was 
born in Canada. 

Besides owning a good home on Brower street our subject owns a valu- 
able farm adjoining Hazelwood cemetery. His family consisted of the 
following children, namely: Mary, Annie, Adam, Frank, Josephine are all 
deceased; Abbie married George Creiger, an Iowa farmer; Anton is a wood 
worker in a box factory in Los Angeles, California; Allois, a barber by trade, 
lives at Ozark, Missouri, where he also conducts a moving picture show; he 
is married and has three children, Louis, Allois and Elizabeth. 

Politically, Theodore Ott is a Democrat. He belongs to the Catholic 
church, the Catholic Knights and was formerly a member of the Knights 
of Pythias. 



GEORGE W. CONDON. 



The fair Sunflower state just to the west of us is a land of great oppor- 
tunity and a pleasant place in which to live, therefore not a very large per- 
centage of her native sons leave her prairies for other climes; however, some 
find it to their advantage to do so, and this is well for the communities in 
which the}' locate, for the native Kansasan is almost without exception a 
man of energy, tenacity of purpose, ingenuous and withal a good citizen. 
We have been fortunate in securing a number of them in Greene county, 
among whom must consistently appear the name of George W. Condon, 
foreman of the Oxweld plant of the reclamation department of the Frisco's 
South Side shops, Springfield. 



IiaS" GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Air. Condon was born at Osage City, Kansas, Feruary 4, 1880. He is 
a son of Charles and Catherine (Hett) Condon; the mother is a native of 
England, and is now fifty-eight years of age. The father is sixty years old 
and lives at Hanna, Illinois. He is a native of the state of Xew York from 
which state he moved to Pennsylvania where he grew to manhood, and was 
for some time employed as telegraph operator with the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, at Williamsburg, Pennsylvania, later worked in the same 
portion at Osage, Kansas, lor a year, then went into the coal business for 
himself at the last named city, operating a soft coal mine for about five 
years, then worked for three years as a coal miner, after which he went to 
Hanna, Illinois, and was a manager in the coal mining fields there for five 
years, then he engaged in the insurance business t<>r a period of ten years, 
representing the Home Insurance Company of Xew York, and was also in 
the real estate business. He is at this writing assistant state mine inspector 
for the state of Illinois, which position he has held some time. He has made 
his home at the town of Hanna for the past ten years. He was justice of 
the peace there for some time, and was also elected police justice which 
position he now holds. Politically, he is a Democrat. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason and a member of the Shrine and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. Hi- family consists of eleven children, namely: Charles 
died when seven years of age; William died when nineteen years old; the 
next three children died in infancy: Thomas is a lawyer in San Francisco; 
George W. of this sketch: Robert is engaged in coal mining in North Da- 
kota; Mary is the wile of Charles Wise, a carpenter and contractor at Anna, 
Kansas; Margaret married Ear] Welling, who is engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness at West Carlisle, Ohio; and Joseph who is engaged in the plumbing 
business in Des Moines. Iowa. 

George W. Condon was educated in the common schools, leaving school 
when fifteen years of age and worked as clerk in a grain and feed -tore at 
Osage City. Kansas, for three years, and then engaged in coal mining there 
for six years, then operated a coal mine there two years, after which he en- 
gaged in the laundry business there for four years. After this he began 
railroading, working for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad in its 
hops at Topeka. in ioi<>. as machinist helper for about six months, then he 
was promoted to acetylene welder which position he held until [913. In 
June of that year he went with the < >xweld Acetylene Company of Chicai 
as demonstrator, and remained in that position until October 1. 1913, then 
came to Springfield, Missouri, and in-tailed this system for the Chicago 
company in the Frisco shops and now he is foreman of that department, 
and has ten men under his direction. The plant is under the general direc- 
tion of the reclamation department of the South Side shops. 

Mr. Condon was married on June 16, [908, to Mary Clerico, a daugh- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1 49 

ter of Louis and Anna Clerico, of Osage City, Kansas, where she grew to 
womanhood and was educated. To this union one child, Marguerite Con- 
don, has been born. 

Politically, Mr. Condon is a Democrat. He belongs to the Catholic 
church, and fraternally is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Condon has the distinction of being the first man to use the Oxweld 
system on any railroad in the United States. 



C. M. GEORGE. 



There is such a fascination in railroad work that those who once enter 
it seldom abandon it for some other vocation, and it is not by any means an 
uncommon thing to find that men are still working at this line of endeavor 
who have perhaps been offered better positions in other lines. Many will 
remain active in the work until old age compels them to retire or the com- 
pany voluntarily retires them on a pension. The}' evidently do not remain in 
the work because it is easier than anything else or because the element of 
danger is lacking, but the fascination is there, nevertheless, and, too, the re- 
muneration is good and certain, better, perhaps, than in most lines. 

One of the most capable and well known engineers on the Frisco, run- 
ning out of Springfield is C. M. George, who has been in the train service 
here for a period of twenty-five \cars, although he is scarcely a middle-aged 
man. He was born in Montgomery, Illinois, March 20, 1870, and is a son 
of I. E. and Mary (Tevbaugh) George. The father was born in Henry 
county, Indiana, in the year 1837, and the mother was born in Illinois in 
1S48. Her death occurred in Springfield, Missouri, December 31, 191 1. 
I. E. George began railroading early in life and for a period of thirty years 
was an engineer. He came to Springfield in 1888 and began working for 
the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis road, and later worked in the com- 
pany's shops here, and subsequently was employed in the Frisco shops on 
the North Side. His family consisted of five children, namely: C. M., of 
this sketch; E. E. is deceased; John W. is deceased; Delia is deceased, and 
Bessie, who is deceased. 

C. M. George spent his boyhood in Illinois and there received his educa- 
tion in the public schools, remaining in his native state until the fall of 1888, 
when he came to Springfield, Missouri, where he has made his home ever 
since. In March, 1889, he began firing on a freight for the Kansas City, 
Ft. Scott & Memphis road, with which he remained as fireman until 1897, 
when he was promoted to engineer, and has worked in this capacity ever 



II5O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

since, being in the employ of the Frisco for many years, this road having 
purchased the old "Gulf road" in 1900. Mr. George is regarded as one of 
the ablest and most trustworthy engineers on the system and he has long had 
a regular freight run from Springfield to Thayer on the Ozark division. 

Mr. George was married on December 22, 1898, at West Plains, Mis- 
souri, to Mamie Buchanan, a native of Texas, who came to Missouri with her 
parents when she was a child. She received a high school education. She 
is a daughter of W. A. and Belle Buchanan. 

Three children have been born to our subject and wife, namely : Albert 
V., born in August, 1901 ; Mary Margaret, born January 5, 1905 ; and Rose- 
belle, born in 1908. They are all attending school. 

Politically, Mr. George is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
.Masonic order, and he is a member of Division No. 378, Brotherhood of 
Engineers. He resides in a neat cottage on North Grant street. 



JOHN H. HASTEN. 



Everyone, in addition to his ordinary workaday life, whether it be pro- 
fessional, political, commercial, or one of manual labor, by which he earns 
his dailv bread, needs to have something aside from his material existence 
to which he can turn for relaxation. If he is to escape the limitations of a 
humdrum, commonplace, provincial, and narrow existence, he must build for 
himself a home in the realm of the ideal. Thus he will be able to escape 
when he wishes from the ordinary environment of business or professional 
life and become a citizen of the world, living in a sense a life as wide as that 
of humanity. John H. Hasten, president of the Springfield Bakery Com- 
pany and for many years a well known business man of this city, is one who 
knows the value of good ideals — an intellectual abode, and thus he is not 
only a successful man of affairs but is a citizen who is highly appreciated 
by those who know him. 

.Mr. Hasten is a worthy representative of one of the sterling pioneer 
families of Greene county, and his birth occurred in Cass township, in the 
northern part of this county, on August 27, 1869. He is a son of Isaac N. 
Hasten, also a native of that vicinity, where he grew to manhood, attended 
the district schools and engaged successfully in farming many years, later in 
life locating in the village of Cave Spring, not far from the Hasten home- 
stead and there he engaged in general mercantile pursuits for a period of 
twelve or fifteen years, enjoying a large trade with the surrounding locality, 
dealing honestly and courteous with his many customers and carrying a large 
and well selected general stock of g Is at all seasons. Finally he removed 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1 5 I 

to Springfield and engaged in the retail grocery business on West Commer- 
cial street with his usual success until his death about five years later, in 
July, 1897, at the age of fifty-seven years. He was not only a capable busi- 
ness man but an influential citizen and active in public affairs. For a period 
of nearly twenty years he served Cass township as justice of the peace in a 
manner that reflected much credit upon his ability and to the eminent satis- 
faction of the people, his decisions being characterized by a uniform fair- 
ness and sound principles of jurisprudence. He was also a member of the 
school board in his district and was a great advocate of good education, do- 
ing much to encourage better schools in his part of the county. Politically, 
he was a Republican. During the Civil war he enlisted in this county in 
the Forty-sixth Missouri Cavalry and saw three and one-half years of faith- 
ful and commendable service for the Union, proving a gallant and intelli- 
gent soldier. 

The mother of the subject of this sketch was known in her maidenhood 
as Mary Jennings, who was born on August 22, 1850, in Neosho, Missouri. 

Mrs. Mary Hasten, our subject's mother, is still living, now at an ad- 
vanced age, and makes her home with her son, John H, of this sketch, who 
is the youngest of her three children, her daughter being Docia, who mar- 
ried Joseph B. Wilson, a farmer and stock raiser of Cass township; the 
eldest child, William, died in infancy. 

John H. Hasten grew to manhood on the home farm in Cass township 
and there he worked when a boy. He received his education in the district 
schools of his community and in Morrisville College in Polk county, later 
attending Drury College, Springfield, and finally took a business course 
in this city. When nineteen years of age he went into business with his 
father and helped manage the grocery store on Commercial street which 
was a success from the start. He was in partnership with his father 
and upon the latter's death he bought out the heirs and continued to con- 
duct the store until 1901 when he sold out to South Brothers, and en- 
gaged in the grocery and seed business on East Commercial street, in part- 
nership with R. A. Fisher under the firm name of Hasten & Fisher. They 
continued successfully until 1007 when our subject sold out, having other 
business interests which took the major portion of his time. In 1905, with 
others, he organized the Springfield Bakery Company, of which he has since 
been president and he has been the principal spirit in building up one of the 
largest, best equipped and popular bakeries in the Southwest. Further men- 
tion of this industry is made on another page. 

Mr. Hasten was married on August 28, 1891, to Josie N. Lee, a daugh- 
ter of Robert and Ruth (Watson) Lee. Mr. Lee was a successful farmer 
of Cass township, Greene county, where Airs. Hasten was born, grew to 



J I 5- GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

womanhood and educated. Later Mr. Lee moved to California and engaged 
in the vineyard and fruit raising business. 

Fraternally. Mr. Hasten is a member of the Masonic order, including all 
branches, such as the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine 
and the Order of Eastern Star; he also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen and the Court of Honor. He was a 
member of the school board of Cass township for two wars. Religiously he 
belongs to the Baptist church, to which bis wife also belongs, and in which 
he was formerly trustee and is now deacon. He is active in church work 



H. M. MOOMAW. 



Among the substantial farmers living in Brookline township is H. M. 
Moomaw, a man who has an interesting life record. He originally came 
from the Old Dominion, his people on both sides of the house having been 
among the residents of that grand old state in the early (laws, but little of 
our subject's life has been spent there, he having been lured across the conti- 
nent when a boy to the far West, where he sought that elusive yellow metal 
— gold — that has both made and ruined its thousands, and the last forty-live 
years of his life have been devoted to general agricultural pursuits in Greene 
county, Missouri, where he started in a modest way and eventually has 
become one of the leading farmers of this locality. 

Mr. Moomaw was born in Virginia, December 13. 1841. He is a son 
in Christian and Frances (Noffsinger) Moomaw, both natives of Virginia 
but of German descent. They grew t" maturity in their native state and 
were married there, and established their home on a farm and lived there 
until their son. II. M., was six years of age. when they removed t<> northern 
Indiana, where the family resided aboul seventeen years on a farm, and 
there our subject grew t" manhood and received his education in the public 
schools of his district. In 1864 our subject left his parental home in the 
Hoosier state and made the long, hazardous overland journey across the 
plains to Virginia City, Montana, where he remained six months, then went 
mi t<> Portland, < Iregon, remaining there about seven months, and then went 
to Idaho, where he spent about four years, during which time he did i"ii- 
siderable prospecting fur gold, then went back to Portland. Oregon, and 
from there to San Francisco. After remaining in California awhile he took 
a ship on the Pacific ocean for the Isthmus of Panama. After crossing the 
isthmus he took ship for New York City, and from there went to South 
Bend, Indiana. Remaining at home about six months, he came, in 1869, to 




MRS. H. M. MOOAI.SW. 




H. M. MOOMAW. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



"53 



Greene county, Missouri, and located permanently, after his extensive wan- 
derings, during which he gained a vast knowledge of the world, lie located 
on a farm about seven miles northwest of Springfield, purchasing one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of railroad land on which he lived about four years, 
then sold out and moved to Brookline, this county, and in [88l bought a fine 
farm of two hundred and twenty acres, all tillable but a few acres, which 
embrace a small oak grow. Ik- made many important improvements here 
with advancing year-, and carried on general farming and stock raising on 
an extensive scale, rotating his crops scientifically and becoming known as 




JIAPT.E GKOYE FARM — RESIDENCE OF II. M MOOMAW. 

one of the most progressive farmers of his township. In November, 1913. 
his four thousand dollar home was destroyed by fire. 

Air. Moomaw was married in November, 1872, to Mary Dale, in Greene 
county, Missouri. She was born in Pennsylvania, June 4. 1846, and was a 
daughter of Solomon and Catherine (Zink) Dale, both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, where they grew up and were married, but when Mrs. Moomaw was 
a young girl the family moved to Greene county, Missouri, and here the 
parents spent the rest of their lives on a farm, dying several years ago, 
and here their daughter, Mary, grew to womanhood and attended the public 
schools. Mrs. Moomaw died on April 28, 1914. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Moomaw eight children were born, all of whom are 

(73) 



I J 54 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

living at this writing, namely: William, Lottie, Arthur, Dot, Erne, Homer, 
Curtis and Earle. 

Politically, Mr. Moomaw is a Democrat, but he has never been active 
in the affairs of his party, devoting his attention to his farm and his home. 



JOHN H. JONES. 



We are glad to note in this series of biographical articles that so many 
of the progressive citizens of Greene county have been born and reared 
here, for this is an indication of at least two things — that they are men of 
keen discernment, being- able to see and appreciate present conditions as 
they are, and that the county is indeed one of the favored sections of the 
great commonwealth of Missouri, else these people would have sought 
opportunities elsewhere. As it is they did not need to heed the call of the 
wanderlust that is heard at some stage or other in the lives of all young 
men. One of this number who has been contented to spend his life in his 
native locality is John H. Jones, the energetic druggist at Fair Grove, 
Jackson township. 

Mr. Jones was born in this county on November 4, 1877. He i- a -on 
of James T. and Rachael A. 1 Norton) Jones. The father was born in 
Dallas county, Missouri, November 14, 184(1. and there he grew to man- 
hood on a fa mi and attended the rural schools. Remaining in that county 
until 1870, he removed to Greene county and entered government land 
which he improved into a good farm and on which he establishd a com- 
fortable home and here our subject was horn. The place first consisted of 
eighty acres. As the elder Jones prospered through good management, he 
added to his original holdings until he now ha- a Farm of two hundred 
and fifty-five acres, which is well improved and productive, lie has. how- 
ever, retired from active life and keeps his land rented, and is residing in 
Fair Grove, where he moved ten years ago, buying a good home there. 
He devoted all his active life to general farming and raising live stock and has 
been very successful in his life work. IF- was married in [868 to Rachel 
A. Norton, who was horn in Tennessee, .May [4, 1840. and when young in 
years her parents brought her to Missouri, the family locating in Webster 
count) and there she grew to womanhood on a farm and she attended the 
country schools. She is a member of the Baptist church. To these par- 
ents four children have been born, namely: William < ',. lives in Greene 
county; Messer F. is deceased; John II. of this -ketch; and Mrs. Vada 
Bass, of this county. 

John H. Jones was reared on the home farm in his native com- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 155 

munity and there he assisted with the general work during the summer 
months, and attended the district schools in the winter. Be continued to 
work on the farm until the fall of 1901. The following year lie entered the- 
St. Louis College of Pharmacy, where he made a good record and from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1906. Soon thereafter he went 
into the drug business at Fair drove, which he has continued with ever- 
increasing success to the present time, having built up an extensive trade, 
lie has a neat store which is stocked with a full line of drugs and drug 
sundries. He has been very successful in a business way and owns several 
lots and buildings in Greene county and a forty-acre farm in Dallas county, 
also a town lot in Oklahoma. 

Mr. Jones has remained unmarried. Politically, he is a Democrat. 
Fraternally, he belongs to the Independent Order of ( )i\d Fellows and the 
Woodmen of the World. 



IRV1X W. WINGI >. 



Widely known in Greene and Dallas counties, Irvin W. Wingo, of near 
Fair Grove, is a man deserving of a conspicuous position for his biography 
in a work of the province of the one in hand, for his career has been fraught 
with a large measure of success both as an educator and agriculturist. Over 
three decades of his career were devoted to school work with most com- 
mendable results, and for many years as county superintendent of schools 
in the latter county he did much to raise the standard of work in this held 
and place the county high in the list of those of southwestern Missouri do- 
ing good educational work. Although a school man in the broadest and 
best sense of the term and as such, making every other consideration secon- 
dary to his professional and official duties he never became narrow or 
pedantic as have so many whose lives have been spent in intimate association 
with the immature minds within the four walls of the school room, lie re- 
mained a well rounded, symmetrically developed man. fully alive to the 
demands of the times, thoroughly informed on the leading questions before 
the public and has ever taken broad views of men and things, and is there- 
fore a useful and influential citizen in his locality. 

Mr. Wingo was born in Dallas count}-, Missouri, July X, [861. He is 
a son of Jasper and Nan (Johns) Wingo, both natives of Tennessee, the 
father born in the middle section of the state, October 24. [838, and the 
mother's birth occurred in Weakly county, February 24, 1842. They came 
to Missouri when young in years, with their parents, and here grew to ma- 
turity on farms and were educated in the early-day common schools and were 



1 1 56 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

married in Dallas county, in 1859. During the war between the states 
Joseph Wingo joined the Union army under Captain Kershner, in Company 
A, Eighth Missouri Calvary, and he saw considerable service, taking part 
in the battles of I'rairie Grove and Brownsville and a number of minor en- 
gagements. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged at St. 
Louis, after which he returned to Dallas county and resumed farming. He 
owned one hundred and sixty acres. He is now living in Fair Grove, 
Gr.eene county, in retirement, being advanced in years. His wife also sur- 
vives. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and 
are highly respected by a wide circle of friends. Two children, were born 
to them, Irvin \\\, of this review ; and William W. of Springfield, who is 
employed by the Frisco Lines. 

Irvin \Y. Wingo was reared on the homestead in Dallas county and 
there worked hard when a boy during the crop seasons, and in the winter 
time he attended the common schools, receiving thereby and through his 
individual efforts at home a good education. He began teaching school 
when only sixteen years of age, teaching twelve years in rural schools, then 
entered the Missouri State Normal at Warrensburg, taking a full course 
in teachers' work, graduating in 1889. lie was then fully equipped for 
his chosen profession. Returning to his native county he was elected princi- 
pal 1 if the schools at Buffalo, county-seat of Dallas county, remaining in that 
position five years. He then taught one year in the old Springfield Normal, 
then taught three years at Cassville, Missouri, after which he came to Fair 
Grove and taught until 1911, thus, out of a period of thirty-four years, lie 
engaged in teaching thirty-two years, during which his services were in 
large demand and he gave eminent satisfaction wherever he was employed, 
being progressive in his ideas and building up the work in general. He 
was elected school commissioner of Dallas county for two terms, without 
opposition, and was offered a third term hut declined. This js sufficient 
criterion thai his official duties were ably and satisfactorily performed. 

Finally tiring of the school room, Mr. Wingo moved to his fine farm 
of four hundred and twenty acres which he had purchased while teaching 
and has since devoted his time and attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits with gratifying results, now specializing in the dairy business for 
which he is well equipped in every respect ami he finds a very ready market 
for his products. Everything is kept in an up-to-date ami sanitary condi- 
tion. His place is well improved along all lines and he has a commodious 
home in the midst of attractive surroundings. He is one of the progres- 
sive and substantial men of his community and one of the most influential, 
ami vet is a man of entirely unassuming manners. 

Mr. Wingo has been twur married, first, on < >ctober 10. [881, to Ollie 
J. Wills, by whom three children were born, namely: ['"red. who is em- 



GREENE (<>i my, Missouri. 1 157 

ployed in Springfield; Elbert lives in Springfield; and Mrs. Gertrude Jones, 
also of that city. The wife and mother was called to her eternal rest on 
September 15, 1886. She was a daughter of Jack and Mollie (Goss) Wills, 
•On December 26, 1889, Mr. Wingo married Julia McKee, a daughter of 
Melvin and Phoebe Ann (Grimes) McKee, both now deceased. To this 
second union eleven children have been born, named as follows: Glenn 
is living at home; Carl W., -Mrs. Bessie Albright, Russell is teaching school, 
Ruth is attending high school at Fair Grove, Ralph, Charles is deceased, 
Jewett, Jasper, Phoebe Ann, and an infant son,- deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Wingo is a Republican. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Masonic Order, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Mrs. Wingo is a member of the Christian chinch. 



JOHN M. LANE. 

Successful farming calls for the best of judgment. It means good 
crops, good live stock well fed and handled, and a thoroughly balanced busi- 
ness in every way. John M. Lane, a farmer of Jackson township, Greene 
county, seems to know what constitutes success in agriculture and is there- 
fore making a good living on the place where he has been privileged to 
spend his entire life. That he knows what to do and when to do it is evi- 
denced from the fact that this farm is today as productive as it was when 
it first came into possession of the Lane family over a half century ago. 

Mr. Lane was born on the home place in the township and county 
above mentioned, September 8, i860. He is a son of William and Sarah 
(Rudde) Lane. The father was born in Tennessee on a farm and there 
he was reared and was educated in the rural schools in his native commun- 
ity. He came to Missouri when a young man, and located in Greene 
county at an early day. When the war between the North and South 
began he cast his lot with the Union army, as first lieutenant in Company 
E, Seventy-second Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and he proved to be a 
brave and efficient soldier. He fought in the battle of Springfield, January 
8, 1863, U1 which he was gallantly engaged in defending the city from Mar- 
maduke's raiders when he was severely wounded from the effects of which 
he died eleven days later. During the gold fever days of the early fifties he 
had made two trips across the great western plains to California, driving a 
herd of cattle to the West. He secured a farm of two hundred and sixty- 
five acres in Greene county and was a man of much industry. His wife 
was born in Caswell county, North Carolina, and her parents brought her 
from that state to Greene county, Missouri, when she was a young girl and 



X I5S GREEXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

here she grew up on a farm and received her education in the common 
schools. After the death of her husband she managed the home farm un- 
til her marriage to John McCabe. Her death occurred in 1889 on the home- 
stead. She gave thirty acres for the town site of Stafford. She was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Her father, Joseph Rudde. 
was a large slave owner in the early days and he settled the place where 
our subject now lives. 

To William Lane and wife three children were born, namely : Thomas, 
deceased; John M. of this sketch; and Edward, of Kansas City. 

John M. Lane was reared on the home farm and attended the neigh- 
borhood schools. He has never left the homestead and owns one hundred 
and fifty-five acres of the same, which he has kept well cultivated and well 
improved, and although the land has been in the Lane family for seventy- 
five years it has been so carefully tilled and handled that it is still pro- 
'ductive and more valuable than ever before. General farm products and 
live stock are raised. 

.Mr Lane was married in 1888 to Tobiatha Winn, which union resulted 
in the birth of three children, namely: Sadie R.. William and Mrs. Jane 
Hessie. The wife and mother passed away in 1898. She was a daughter 
of Richard M. and Martha Winn. Our subject subsequently married Mrs. 
Allie (Fitch) Lane, widow of his deceased brother. By this second union 
one child has been burn, Joe. By her first marriage the second Mrs. 
Lane became the mother of five children, namely : James, Richard, Blue 
is teaching school in Strafford; Thomas, and John. 

Politically, Mr. Lane is a Republican. His wife is a member of the 
Baptist church. 



WILLIAM A. McMEHEN. 

The student interested in the history of the northwestern part of Greene 
county does not have 1" carry his investigations far into the annals of 
Walnut Grove township before learning that William A. McMehen has long 
been an active and leading representative of its tine agricultural interests 
and that his labels have proven a potent force in making this a rich farming 
region. Through several decades he has carried <m diversified farming and 
stock raising, gradually improving his extensive farm, and while he has 
prospered in this he has also found ample opportunity to assist in the 
material development of his locality, and his co-operation has been of value 
to the general good. 

Mr. McMehen is one of the few Canadians in Greene county, and, like 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. JI 59 

all of his follow countrymen, is energetic and resourceful. His birth oc- 
curred in the province of Ontario, Canada, April 30, 1864. He is a son of 
James and Hannah ( McConnell ) McMehen. The father was born in same 
locality as was our subject, April 26, 1826, and the mother was also born in 
Canada. There these parents grew to maturity, each received fairly good 
educations in the schools there and were married in that country. Remov- 
ing from Ontario in 1865 they first located near Champaign, Illinois, where 
they spent live years on a farm, then came on to Greene county, Missouri, 
and here James McMehen became owner of a good farm of two hundred and 
forty acres, to which he later added sixty acres, and was a successful gen- 
eral farmer, and here his death occurred in February, 1908. The mother 
of our subject is still living, now advanced in years, and makes her home in 
the town of Walnut Grove, on part of the old homestead. She is a member 
of the Methodist church, of which Mr. McMehen was also a member. They 
were the parents of eight children, one of whom is deceased, and named as 
follows: .Mrs. Barbara Rice, Andrew M., Charles A., William A., Mrs. 
.Minnie E. Keger, John A., and James. The other child died in early life. 

William A. McMehen was six years old when his parents removed with 
him from Canada to Illinois and there he spent his early boyhood, being 
six years old when the family established their future home at Walnut 
Grove, Missouri, and here he grew to manhood on the farm where he now 
lives, and attended the public schools. He worked for his father until he 
was twenty-one years old, then bought a part of the homestead, to which 
he has added until he now owns one of the finest and best improved farms 
of Walnut Grove township, comprising three hundred thirty-two and one- 
half acres, where he has been very successful as a general farmer and stock 
raiser, making a specialty of shorthorn cattle and he also deals extensively 
in live stock especially mules and cattle, being, like his brothers, an excel- 
lent judge of both. 

Mr. McMehen was married in 1892 to Nattie Waltz, who was born in 
Polk county, this state, and reared there on a farm. She received a good edu- 
cation and in her girlhood taught school very successfully for some time. 
She is a daughter of Elias and Helen (Britton) Waltz, the father now de- 
cased but the mother is still living. 

The union of our subject and wife has resulted in the birth of one child, 
Ena Lee McMehen, born on December 20, 1907. 

Politically, Mr. McMehen is a strong Democrat, loyal to the party in 
"both victory and defeat. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic order, 
including the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is 
a member of the Methodist church. He is one of the influential men of this 
section of the county. 



Il6o GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

MANSEL PUTMAN. 

The social, business and political history of this section is filled with 
the deeds and doings of self-made men, and no man in the pioneer period 
of Greene county was more deserving of the appellation than was Mansel 
Putman, who has long been sleeping the sleep that knows no waking, like 
the Scottish hero of "The Lady of the Lake," for Mr. Putman marked out 
his own career in his youth and steadily followed it to the final ending of 
his mortal career, his success having been attributed to his earnest and per- 
sistent endeavor, and to the fact that he consistently tried to follow the 
teachings of the "Golden Rule." 

Mr. Putman was born on January 12, 1S22, in Marshall county, Ten- 
nessee, and there he grew to manhood and resided until 1842 when he immi- 
grated to Greene count}', Missouri, at the age of twenty years, with his 
parents, John and Polly (Garrett) Putman. The family located seven miles 
north of Springfield, where John Putman bought a claim on which he farmed 
until his death, September 27, 1867, at the advanced age of eighty-four 
years. The land was mostly in the rough, but he was a hard-working man 
and cleared most of it. Politically he was a Benton Democrat, and religiously 
he was a member of the Primitive Baptist church, being a member of the 
Zion congregation. 

Minerva James, wife of Mansel Putman, was born on August 8, 1820, 
in Madison county, Tennessee, and she and Mr. Putman were married Feb- 
ruary 15, 1849. She came to Greene count} - . Missouri, with her parents, 
Thomas and Nancy ( ( lately ) James, and her death occurred on the home- 
stead farm in this county, November 2j. 1905. Mary Jane Putman was 
their only child. She is the wife of Amnion Knighten, a sketch of whom 
appears on another page of this work. 

The death of Man-el Putman occurred on November 9, 1895, on a 
farm in Franklin township, where Mrs. Knighten \va> born and reared and 
has lived all her life, having .succeeded to the ownership of the homestead 
upon the death of her mother in 1905. She was educated in the rural 
schools. 

Politically, Mr. Putman was a Republican, and he was in sympathy with 
the Union during the Civil war. He was a member of the Home Guards, 
and while the war was in progress he was taken from his home and shot 
by a band of General Price's soldiers, but he finally recovered from his 
wounds. 

He belonged to the L T nion League and the Grange. He was a member 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Alt. Comfort. His wife also held 
membership there, and the}- were both active in the affairs of the church, lib- 
eral in their support of the same. 



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GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. Il6l 

Mr. Putnian was a very successful farmer and a highly respected citi- 
zen. He was one of a family of fourteen children, all now deceased but 
John G. and Josepji Edward Putman. The former is engaged in fanning 
in Franklin township; he was born in Marshall county, Tennessee, and came 
with his parents to Missouri in 1842. After devoting his active life to gen- 
eral farming he is now living in retirement, and has reached the advanced 
age of eighty-six years. -His son. Seth Jerome Putman, operates the home 
farm. John G. Putman has seven children, namely: Mrs. Alary C. Porter 
lives on a farm in Greene county; one son died in infancy; Man' S., who 
was the wife of William Clark, died in 1913: -Mrs. Xellie Saltsgaver, Seth 
Jerome, Norma Alice and Nancy Ellen. 



WILLIAM J. CRAWFORD. 

William J. Crawford was born on June 18, 1862, at Coshocton, Coshoc- 
ton county, Ohio. He is a son of Robert Crawford, who was born in Steu- 
benville, Ohio, and he grew to manhood and attended school in his native 
state. When a young man he engaged in the cooperage business at Coshoc- 
ton, making barrels in large numbers, later he was in the real estate business 
there, owning considerable land, and was a successful business man. He 
engaged in farming on an extensive scale, not only operating his own vast 
acreage but rented some land and worked it on the shares. At times he em- 
ployed over one hundred hands. He was a prominent and influential man in 
his community. Politically, he was a stanch Democrat of the Jackson type 
and took much interest in politics, holding numerous offices, such as that of 
overseer of roads, township treasurer, a member of the school board in his 
district, of which he was president for a period of twelve years, during 
which he did much for the educational uplift of the township. He was at 
one time urged to become candidate to the state legislature but declined. 
He was a man of fine personal character. His word was as good as his 
bond and he enjoyed the confidence and respect of all who knew him. He 
loved his home and was best contented when by his own fireside and was 
never known to neglect his family in any way, which was a mutually helpful 
and happy one. He was a well-read man and a good debater, and was in 
deportment epiiet and unassuming. He reached an advanced age and was 
active up to the last, dying in 1903 when past his eighty-first birthday. He 
married Evelyn Daugherty, a daughter of George Daugherty, of Belmont, 
Ohio. Her death occurred in 1904 at the age of seventy-seven years. She 
was a woman of fine Christian sentiment, helpful and neighborly. To these 
parents five children were born, namely: George died in infancy; John 
M., who was in the employ of the Frisco system, died in 1912; Lenore, who 



IIOj GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

taught school for some time, died in Ohio; William J. of this sketch; and 
Harriet E., who is the wife of J. N. Edwards, a traveling salesman of 
Springfield. 

James Crawford, paternal grandfather of the subject of this review, 
engaged in the cooperage business at Steubenville, Ohio, for many years, 
making iron-bound barrels which he shipped to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
and he was very successful as a business man. He lived at Steubenville until 
his death. 

William J. Crawford grew to manhood at Coshocton and there he at- 
tended the common and high schools, leaving school when seventeen years 
of age to enter the milling business at his home town, serving an apprentice- 
ship of two and one-half years in the Empire Mills there. He then came to 
Topeka, Kansas, where he had charge of the Shawnee Mills for a period 
of nine years, being head miller, and he was responsible for the prestige and 
general popularity of these mills during that period. Next we find him at 
Newton, Kansas, where, for fifteen months he operated the Newton Mill & 
Elevator Company's plant. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in the latter 
nineties and while here enlisted for service in the Spanish-American war, 
on August jo, 1898, in Company A, Thirty-second United States Volun- 
teers, and served in the army until 1901 with a most creditable record, hav- 
ing seen active service in the Philippine Islamic taking part in several cam- 
paigns on the island oi Luzon, and fought in the battles of Tarlac, Orami, 
Colcobin and others, also was 111 many skirmishes. He was injured while in 
the service and was for two months in a hospital in San Francisco, in which 
city he was mustered out in May. [901. Soon after he went to his old home 
in Ohio, and from there returned to Springfield and entered the employ 
-1 the Frisco railroad, first a- (luck- clerk in the freight department, then 
became chief of the delivery department in the inbound freight department 
which responsible position he -till holds. 

Mr. (raw ford was married in [902 to Mary E. Voorhees, a daughter 
of George W. and Elizabeth (Bretzl Voorhees. lie was a captain in the 
Union army during the Civil war, having enlisted at Scio, Harrison county. 
Ohio. Mrs. I 'raw ford'- uncle. Richard Voorhees, is at this writing circuit 
judge in Ohio, his circuit embracing the counties of Coshocton, Muskingum 
and Summit. The Voorhees has long been a prominent family in Ohio and 

Indiana. Mrs. Crawford was horn in Ohio, grew to womanb ': there and 

was educated in the common schools. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Crawford is a Democrat in principle, but he votes inde- 
pendently, lie i- a member of the Knights of Pythias, and he belongs to 
the Presbyterian church, lie resides on Washington avenue in a pleasant 
hi line. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



I 163 




MR. P. V. COLLIER, 

The Walk-Over shoe man of Springfield, Mo., who lias one of the best ami mosi up-to- 
date shoe stores in the State of Missouri, which carries a complete line of 
men's and women's "Walk Over" shoes. Located at 312 South SI reel. 



B. F, RATHBONE. 



Many minds labor under the misapprehension that real patriotism 
is peculiar to men of high genius or the favorites of fortune. The true 
patriot is one who, from love of country, does, or tries to do, in the proper 
sphere, all that appears necessary to promote her honor, prosperity and 
peace. The substantial elements of this precious virtue which underlies 
the welfare of every nation, and especially of one professing to be free, 
like our own, are furnished by men in every walk of life, who step out of the 
realm of mere self-love, and seek to further and augment the commonweal. 
Among those who fill the highest seats, and prove themselves most deserv- 
ing of public gratitude, many have been the farmers of the land, who have 
redeemed this great country from the wilderness and made even the rocks 
drip with fatness and blessing; or they may have, many of them, come 
from the ranks of tradesmen, doing their allotted tasks in the shops and 
factories of the country, in fact a patriot and useful citizen may spring 
from any walk of life. B. F. Rathbone, formerly an agriculturist, and for 
many years one of the Frisco's dependable shop employees, was born under 
alien skies, but he has spent most of his life in America, fifty-seven years 
of which have been lived in Greene county. 



1 164 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Mr. Rathbone was born March 13, 1848, in Birmingham, England. 
He is a sun of Thomas H. and Sarah Ann (Warr) Rathbone, a sketch of 
whom will be found on another page of this work. The father of our 
subject immigrated to the United States in the spring of 185 1, and the 
family followed during the autumn of that year. They all remained in 
New York City until 1858, when they removed to Greene county, Missouri, 
and established their permanent home. 

B. F. Rathbone, of this sketch, was three years of age when his parents 
brought him from England. He spent his boyhood in New York City, 
where he attended school. He also went to school after coming to Greene 
county, having attended the Capt. John R. Kelso Academy. However, his 
education was limited, the Civil war having interfered with his studies. 
The family settled at the old Rathbone spring, northeast of Springfield, and 
there our subject worked on the farm when he was a young man, in fact, 
he followed general farming until 1882, in which year he removed to 
Springfield, and in August of that year began working in the old North 
Side Frisco shops. His first work for this road was the hauling of all 
the rock for the culverts from Springfield four miles east of the city. His 
first work in the shops proper was as blacksmith's helper. He remained 
in the shops until 1888, when he was elected constable of Campbell town- 
ship, and he became deputy sheriff under Joe C. Dodson, however, he served 
but a short time in this capacity when he was appointed to a position on the 
police force. He served in all twelve years in the various official posi- 
tions, proving to be an efficient and dependable officer. He then returned 
to the shops and finished learning his trade. About nine years ago he was 
as>igned to the work of spring maker at the North Side shops, and this 
position he has continued to hold to the present time, having long since 
become an expert in his line. 

Mr. Rathbone was married March 13. 1871, in Springfield to Emily 
Rush (Woods), a daughter of Samuel Woods, a well-known citizen here 
a few decades ago. He came to Greene county from Tennesee in an early 
day and devoted his attention to general farming. During the latter years 
of his life he served one term as county treasurer, and prior to that was 
deputy sheriff. He made a good official and was well liked by all who 
knew him. lie was a gentleman of the old school. Our subject's wife's 
mother was known in her maidenhood as Mary Ragsdale. To their union 
six children were born, only three of whom are living at this writing. Mrs. 
Rathbone was born at Springfield, reared to womanhood and educated here. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rathbone six children were born, all of whom sur- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I165 

vive, namely: Emma R., burn March i, 1872, is the wife of Albert L. 
Schofield; Ernest G.»born January 9, 1874, married Erma Smith, and they 
reside in Springfield; Harold H., born August 29, 1877, married Ida Robin- 
sun, to which union two children were born, Milton and Marjorie; John I)., 
burn May 24, 1879, married Mary Culler, and they have two children, Erma 
and Dorothy; Walter G., born September 9, 1884, married Clara Parker, 
and they have two children, Ross and Emily; Edith L.. born January 18, 
[891, married Brandt Gaffga, and they have one child, Emily L. 

Politically Mr. Rathbone is a Republican and he has always been 
loyal in his support of the party. He is a member of the Orient Lodge No. 
Nil. Knights of Pythias, and he served a- captain of Ascolon Division No. 15. 
Uniform Rank. Knights of Pythias, and Lodge No. 218, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, having passed the chairs in both these orders. He 
also belongs to the Blacksmiths' Union. The family holds membership in 
tin- Benton Avenue Methodist Episcopal church. 



JOHN A. McMEHEN. 

At the outset of Ids career John A. McMehen. well-known farmer and 
stockman of Walnut Grove township, Greene county, recognized the fact 
that it takes self-reliance, perseverance and fortitude to win success in any 
line of human endeavor, so he did not seek any shady lanes to the goal of 
prosperity, but began to work diligently and along honorable lines to advance 
himself and the result is that he is now numbered among the successful and 
progressive citizens of his locality, and is a creditable representative in every 
way to the McMehen family, one of the must influential in the vicinity of 
Walnut Grove for the past forty years or more. 

Mr. McMehen was born on a farm near Champaign, Illinois. Novem- 
ber 12, 1869, some four years after his parents, James and Hannah R. ( Mc- 
Connell) McMehen, settled there. (See sketch of William A. McMehen on 
another page of this volume for further mention of parents.) 

John A. McMehen grew to manhood on the home farm, being a small 
boy when the family removed here from Illinois, and he received his educa- 
tion in the local public schools. He remained on the home farm until he 
reached young manhood, doing his share of the general work, then started 
out for himself, buying seventy-three acres from his father and at the pres- 
ent time he owns a productive and well-kept place of one hundred sixty-nine 
and one-half acres. In connection with general farming he handled live 



H66 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

stock on an extensive scale, especially mules, and is one of the well-known 
and successful stockmen of the county, being all excellent judge of them- 

Mr. McMehen was married on December 24, 1893, to Jessie B. Roun- 
tree, who was born in Cedar county, Missouri", October 22, 1874, and there 
she grew up and was educated in the public schools. She is a daughter of 
Thomas B. and Dorothy (Haley) Rountree, both of whom still live on the 
homestead in Cedar count}-, and are actively engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Cain Hill, Missouri. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McMehen six children have been born, namely: The 
first child died in infancy, unnamed; John A., Jr., born August 26, 1898; 
Rountree, born on September 7, 1900; Blon, died on April 29, 1902; Jessie 
B., born March 23, 1903, and Andrew M., born December 30, 1912. 

Politically, our subject is a Democrat, fraternally a member of the Ma- 
sonic order, and he belongs to the Methodist church. His wife is a member 
of the Christian church. 



JEFFERSON E. H AX SELL. 

One of the popular, capable and courteous passenger conductors of the 
Frisco System is Jefferson E. Hansell, a man who is universally liked not 
only by railroad men but by all with whom he comes in contact. He has 
had charge of passenger train-- between Springfield and Memphis for twen- 
ty-five years for the Frisco and the old "Gulf" railroad, and it stands to rea- 
son thai in' "iK- c<mld retain such a responsible position a quarter of a cen- 
tury were they not capable, honest and trustworthy. 

.Mr. Hansell was born July 1, 1856, in Marion, Lynn county. Iowa. 
He is a son of Joseph and Hannah (Leeka) Hansell, both natives of Ohio, 
the father born near Cincinnati. They grew up in the Buckeye state, re- 
ceived such educational advantages a- the schools of those early times af- 
forded, and there they were married. Joseph Hansell learned the carpen- 
ters trade when a ydung man and became a successful carpenter and con- 
tractor, and in later life was a traveling salesman. He was a soldier in the 
Civil war, enlisting in [861, in Company K. Iowa Volunteer Infantry, un- 
der Captain Christian, Mr. Hansell having located in Iowa in 1855. He 
served three years in the Union army, principally against the hostile Indians 
of tin' West, and he saw a yreat deal of hard, active service. After the war 
he returned to Marion, Lynn county, Iowa. His family consisted of four 
children, namely: Francis M. was a soldier in the Union army during the 
Civil war: Mary Elizabeth, William Madison and Jefferson E. of this 
sketch. These children are all living at this writing. Politically Joseph 
Hansell was a Republican, and he was a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. l\6j 

Jefferson E. Hansell grew to manhood at Marion, Iowa, and received 
his education in the public and high schools. After leaving school he drove 
a team across the great western plains to Salt Lake City, Utah, and back. 
In 1881 he began his career as a railroader, which he has continued to the 
present time, a period of thirty-three years. He first secured employment 
with the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy, first as freight brakeman, then was 
promoted to freight conductor. In [886 he came to Springfield, Missouri, 
with his family and went to work for the Frisco railroad, first as brake- 
man, and for three weeks worked on the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Mem- 
phis railroad, which road was purchased by the Frisco Railroad Company 
in 1900. On December 25, 1889, Mr. Hansell was promoted to passenger 
conductor and placed in charge of a train between Springfield and Mem- 
phis, and this has been his rim continuously to the present time. He took 
the first train over the mammoth bridge across the Mississippi river at Mem- 
phis, May 12, 1902. 

Mr. Hansell was married, May 17, t88l, 1" Minelte Risser, w In > was 
burn at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, October 15, 1862. She is a daughter of Daniel 
and Martha (Foarisend) Risser. Mr. Risser was born in Germany, from 
which country he emigrated with his parents to the United States when 
he was five years old. The family first located at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
there Daniel Kisser grew to manhood and received his education, and from 
there he moved to Salem, Iowa. He was born in 1832, and died in 1904. 
J lis wife was born in Richmond, Indiana, and came west in 1845 to Iowa. 
She was born in [842, ami is still living, making her home in Springfield, 
Missouri. She and Mr. Risser were married in Salem, Iowa. Politically, 
Mi. Risser was a Democrat, and he served for some time as justice of the 
peace, and was also postmaster for a while at Pilot Grove, Iowa. His fam- 
ily consisted of eleven children, five of whom are still living, namely: Mi- 
nette, wife id' Mr. Hansell of this sketch; < '. H.. Omer E., Mamie and 
Etna. Mrs. Hansell grew to womanhood in Mt. Pleasant. Iowa, and there- 
received her education in the public schools and an academy, under Profes- 
sor Howe, completing the teacher's course, but was married before she 
could begin a career as teacher. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hansell, all living, 
namely: Bertha, born December 2. 1882. is the wife of Mathew H. Gait; 
Emma E., born December 2, 1885, is single and is living at home; Jeffer- 
son E.. born October 25, 1891, is a reporter on the Springfield Republican; 
Don M.. born May 1. 1893. ' s m tne hardware business and lives at home. 

The Hansell home is a beautiful new brick structure at 1440 Fast Wal- 
nut street. Politically, Mr. Hansell is a Republican. He belongs to the 
Masonic order, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree. He is. 
a member of the Order of Railroad Conductors and the Springfield Club. 



I I 68 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ROBERT EZRA DARBY, M. D.. D. D. S. 

No doctor of dental surgery is better known in southwestern Missouri 
than Dr. Robert Ezra Darby, of Springfield, and certainly none are his 
superiors and few his equals in applying this branch of science for the 
good of humanity. He has for years ranked as one of the leaders among 
his professional brethren in Greene county and in the state of Missouri. 

1 )r. Darby is descended from a sterling old American family. 
Daniel Darby, his paternal grandfather, was born near Ripley, West Vir- 
ginia, October 31, 1799, and died on November 27, 1862. He married 
Phoebe Evans, of Ohio, September 12, 1822. She was a daughter of Jona- 
than and Sarah (Faucette) Evans. Mrs. Phoebe Darby was born on Novem- 
ber 13, 1803, and died January 18, 1880. Her great-grandfather came to 
America from Wales. The names of her brothers were. Ephraim, Jona- 
than, Samuel, Robert, Edward and Mark, the latter dying in childhood; and 
her sisters were Mrs. Ellen Stoots, Mrs. Margaret Starcher, Mrs. Tabitha 
Wright, .Mrs. Sarah Starcher. Mrs. Lydia Eong, Mrs. Priscilla Beezlev, 
Mrs. Ann Stoots. Thirteen children were born to Daniel Darbv and wife, 
four of whom died in infancy, namely: Jedediah, Jonathan, Sarah Ann, 
and Cynthia; the nine reaching maturity were. Elizabeth, who married Noah 
Bray, was burn in West Virginia, September 29, [823, died January 21, 
1851; Rebecca, born in West Virginia, December 23, 1826, died January 
24, 1842; Joseph Wright, who became a Baptist minister, was born in Indiana, 
May 9, [832, and .lied in Cedar Mill, Texas, January 2^,. 1863; Ezra Fau- 
cette, father of the subject of this sketch, was next in order of birth: Ruarni, 
born in Vermillion county. Illinois. April 4, 1N37. died December 24. [913, 
having remained unmarried; Ephraim Evans, a minister in the Methodist 
Episcopal church, South, was born in Hickory county. Missouri, December 
10. [839, and lives in (.'enter Point, Texas; William Henry, a farmer and 
carpenter, was born in Hickory county, this slate. April iS, 1842, now lives 
in Dallas county, Missouri; George Washington, farmer, born in Hickory 
county, May 13, 1844, lives in Corpus Christi, Texas; Isabella Jane, who 
married Rev. Samuel Lopp, was born in Hickory county, February 1. 1847, 
lives with a daughter in Pennsylvania. The four last named reared large 
families. / 

Daniel Darby was a mechanic of unusual ability and served the new- 
country wonderfully well. His early manhood was spent in Ohio, Indiana 
and Illinois. He made a model of one of the first mowing machines which 
clipped the grass in his own yard to the delight of the patentee. He bad 
a wagon shop in Danville. Illinois. He also made furniture and wooden 
clocks: one of the latter lie brought with him to Missouri in 1838. He set- 







CO 

- 




- 



- 

a 




EZRA P. DAKl'.Y AND WIFE. 




WENDELL EZRA DARBY. ROBERT STEMMOXS LARKY. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. Il6o, 

tied in that part of the state which later was made a part of Hickory county. 
There he established a tannery of thirty vats and manufactured and sold 
leather. He built a grist-mill with a forty-foot tread wheel on which the 
weight of walking oxen turned the machinery that ground the wheat into 
flour and the corn into meal. He also established a nursery farm, from 
which he supplied the country for miles around with fruit trees. He also 
had his own blacksmith shop as well as carpenter shop. He supplied the 
needs of the country with everything from a plow, spinning wheel or fan- 
ning mill to a wooden clock. The power to become skilful with tools seems 
to have been inherited by Doctor Darby. 

Jedediah Darby, the paternal great-grandfather of Doctor Darby of 
this sketch, was a native of Vermont, and at the age of twelve years he 
was bound out to a millwright to learn the trade. He was then living in 
Pennsylvania, but subsequently moved to West Virginia. He married 
Rebecca Sayers, and in later life removed to Iroquois county, Illinois, where 
his death occurred while he was in his eighties. Six sons and four daughters 
were born to Jedediah Darby and wife, namely: Daniel, Owen, Moses, 
Aaron. Elijah, Elisha, Hannah, Eliza, Sarah and Nancy. Longevity is one 
notable characteristic of this family, two members of which live to be well 
into the nineties — one of them still living. 

Samuel Darby, father of Jedediah, was a soldier in the. Revolutionary 
war. He lived in Pennsylvania, and when last heard from was one hundred 
and one years old. His ancestors came from England. The older stock of 
Darbys were tall, strong men, with great endurance. 

Our subject's maternal family also goes back through many genera- 
tions of excellent citizens. The Andrews family came to America from 
England. Adam Andrews lived near Petersburg, Virginia. He died of the 
"black plague" while a soldier during the War of 1812. This family, 
although living near Richmond, the Confederate capital, were always op- 
posed to negro slavery. Dr. Mark Andrews, a son of Adam Andrews, grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Chesterfield count}-. Vir- 
ginia, December 28, 1812. He married Martha Ann Griggs, April 12, 1835. 
She died on February 21, 1836. One child was born of this marriage — Mar- 
tha Ann Eliza, the mother of the subject of this sketch. Martha Griggs had 
two brothers and one sister who came West. Joseph went to California, 
William to Greenfield, Missouri. The sister married Jacobs, a well-known 
merchant and banker of Greenfield, Missouri. Dr. Mark Andrews later 
married Virginia Thompson, August 25, 1836. They came to Missouri in 
1840 and located at Buffalo, Dallas county. Here she taught the first school 
ever taught in that town : was also a teacher in the Sunday school. Thev 
moved to the farm near Urbana in 1850. Doctor Andrews lived a very 
(74) 



I I7O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

active life in the practice of his profession and became very prominent. 
Overwork and exposure hastened his death which occurred on June 31^ 
1865. His family consisted of eleven in number, namely: Mary Elizabeth, 
who married William Howard, was born June 16, 1837, and died in 1885; 
Robert Jones, born December 31, 1838, died while a soldier in the Union 
army, July 6, 1864; Virginia Atkinson, born June 11, 1840, married C. P. 
Fletcher, lives in Meade. Kansas; Emily Frances, born July 13, 1843, > s 
the wife of W. H. Darby, of Urbana, Missouri; Lucy Jane, born July 4, 
1845. is the wife of I. N. Reser, of Urbana, Missouri; Dr. John Polk 
Andrews, born July 14. 1847, lives at Marionville. Missouri; Harriet Yer- 
linda. born March 7, 1850. is the wife of VV. B. Coon, of Republic, Mis- 
souri; Jesse Edwin, born February [9, 1852, died June 18. 1853: Joseph 
William, born September 11, 1854, was a farmer, and died in 1893; Susan 
Buchanan, born March 4, 1857, is the wife of Charles Darby, of Medford, 
Oregon: Mark Lafayette, born Jul}" 7, 1859, is a farmer of Urbana, 
Missouri. 

Ezra Faucett Darby, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Vermilion county, Illinois. October 30, 1834. In 1838. when he was but 
four years old, his father came to Missouri, and settled in that part of the 
state which was later organized into Hickory county. There he grew to 
manhood and devoted his active life to general farming, stock raising, ship- 
ping and also fruit growing. He became one of the most influential citizens 
there, taking a very active part in public affairs, always striving to better 
general conditions of living; he was a friend to education, the church and 
everything that made for advancement, lie was ever broad-minded and a 
man of charitable impulses. He enlisted in the Federal army at Urbana, 
Missouri, in the fall of 1863, in Company A, Eighteenth Iowa Volunteer 
Infantry, under Captain Stonaker. He was at once sent with the regiment 
into Arkansas, the first stop being at Fort Smith. He was in the cam- 
paign to Camden, that state, in [864. He took part in a number of skir- 
mishes. He was ordered from his regiment to the United States hospital 
at Little Rock, as ward master, in May, [865. While in the army be demon- 
strated what he taught, that one can live the life of a Christian, and of tem- 
perance, even in the face of adverse circumstances. He married Martha 
Andrews, April 14. 1859. She was born in Dinwiddie county, Virginia, 
January 29, 1836. Her father moved to Missouri in 1840. and settled in 
Buffalo, where she attended school. She was a woman of strong mind and 
line Christian sentiment. Like her husband she was a member of the Meth- 
odist church more than fifty years. She grew up in the days when every- 
body worked in establishing and maintaining the home, in the days of the 
spinning wheel, carding machine and loom and she hel|>ed make the cloth- 
ing worn by the family, doing her full share of the household duties. She 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. II7I 

was a helpmeet beyond reproach, one of the most devoted of mothers, with 
great forethought for others and hut little for herself. This splendid old 
couple retired from farm life in 1898 and came to Springfield. They built 
a cozy home in a suburban orchard tract where they enjoyed a quiet life un- 
til necessary to break up housekeeping, in 1912. The}' then went to live 
with their daughter in Fort Scott, Kansas, where Mrs. Darby died Sep- 
tember 26, [914. Of their children the first born died in infancy: Ira Bar- 
ber, born January 4, 1876, died January 28, 1878; the other h\x- children 
reached maturity and have families of their own. They arc, Mark Evans, 
born June 12, 1862, lives in Springfield, and he has been appointed to the 
fifth two-year term as state inspector of apiaries; Robert Ezra, subject of 
this review; William Daniel, a merchant at Marionville, Missouri, was born 
June 22, 1866; Vernon Kingsley, a merchant, lives at Marionville also, and 
he was born on June 2, 1871 ; Alary Alice, horn on June 25, 1873, ' s trle 
wife of W. O. Pardue, of Ft. Scott, Kansas. 

Doctor Darby was born in Hickory county. Missouri, March 31, 1864. 
There he grew to manhood on the home farm and assisted with the general 
work. He received his early education in the public and private schools, later 
entering Marionville Collegiate Institute at Marionville, Missouri, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1X8(1. Filtering the Missouri State Univer- 
sity, he was graduated from the normal department in 188S. He taught 
school a few terms, then studied dentistry and medicine. He was graduated 
from the Western Dental College in Kansas Citv in iNo_>, and from the 
University Medical College of Kansas City in 1893. He began the practice 
ot dentistry in Hickory count)', remaining there and in the adjoining county 
of Dallas until he came to Springfield in April, 1895, anc ^ established his per- 
manent business, which has gradually increased with advancing \ ears until 
he has long since taken a position in the front rank of his profession in ( ireene 
county, and has been busy from the first. He is a member of the lecture 
staff at Burge-Deaconess hospital. He has been a trustee of Marionville 
College several years. He was one of the organizers of the Springfield 
Dental Society, and was its second president. He joined the Missouri State 
Dental Association in 1892. He has read papers and given many clinics 
before it. He is also a member of the National Dental Association. He 
was elected president of the Missouri State Dental Association in 1909 in 
Kansas City ; and presided over and was one of the leading spirits in the 
annual meeting in St. Louis in May. lgro, when the association was reorgan- 
ized to affiliate more closely the National Dental Association. That was a 
memorable event, being a -part of a general move to raise the standard of the 
profession in the entire United States, and make it a greater power for good. 
In all these positions of trust he has discharged his duties with fidelitv 
and an ability and soundness of judgment that has reflected much credit 



WJ2 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

upon himself and lo the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. Doctor 
Darby is a learned and forceful writer on subjects of interest to his profes- 
sion. They have been published in the leading professional journals and some 
of them widely copied — one of which we chanced to see in the British Jour- 
nal of Dental Science, published in London. 

Politically, Doctor Darby may be classed as an independent Democrat. 
In religious matters the same independence is strongly characteristic. He 
thinks for himself and makes his own interpretations. He has a good 
library, and is a good reader on a wide range of subjects. He is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was a member of the building com- 
mittee when the present structure of the Dever Benton Avenue Methodist 
church was built, and he was superintendent of the Sunday-school for ten 
years ; the school was noted for being well graded, studious, and for its 
system and well-ordered management. He has served the church in many 
official capacities and is at present a trustee. 

Doctor Darby was married on May 22, 1895, to Mattie Stemmons. n 
daughter of F. B. Stemmons, deceased, for many years a prominent farmer 
and stock raiser near Golden City, Jasper county. Missouri. There Mrs. 
Darby grew to womanhood and was educated in the public schools, later 
attending Marionville Collegiate Institute, from which she was graduated 
in 1887. She then spent two years in the Missouri State University, but 
prior to that she had taught one term in Lawrence county. She had intended 
to follow teaching, but her mother's death occurring after she left the 
Marionville school she remained at home to help her father. After his sec- 
ond marriage she then entered the University at Columbia. Mrs. Darby 
was a teacher in the Sunday school for many years, taking an active part in 
church work. She being a great home woman, with a wide circle of friends, 
Mrs. Darby has been of incalculable assistance to her husband, her encour- 
agement, sympathy as well as counsel resulting in much of his success. To 
our subject and wife three children have been born, namely Winfred, born 
March 12, 1898, and died April _>_\ 1899; Wendell Ezra, bom May 17. 
1900: and Robert Stemmons, burn August 20, [913. 

Mrs. Darby has an interesting ancestry. Martin and Alexander Stem- 
mons. two brothers, came to this country from ' Germany. Martin never 
married. Alexander's wife was of Scotch-Irish descent. To them four s<>ns 
were born, namely: Jacob, Martin. Henry and Stephen. We find these 
names running through all the families "i succeeding generations. Martin, 
Mexander and the latter's oldest son, Jacob, who was Mrs. Darby's great- 
grandfather, were in the Revolutionary war under General Washington. 
One descendant never used glasses and could read line print and write well 
at the age of ninety years. He had one son who moved t'> Lagrange, Texas, 
where he and his wife died, childless. They left by their will, except enough 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I I 73 

for a monument to themselves, fourteen hundred and twenty-five acres of 
land and all property to found an orphans' home and for other charitable 
purposes. 

Jacob Stemmons was horn in Virginia. He died in Logan county, Ken- 
tuck}', at the age of seventy years. He married Nancy Stovall and settled 
in Campbell count)-, Virginia, in 1790. He manufactured bells, and was a 
silversmith. They were the parents of ten children, one of whom died in 
infancy; the other nine are, Elizabeth married Isaac Lewis; Mary G. mar- 
ried William Gallian; Lucinda P. never married; Alexander Henry became 
a Methodist minister; Jaquillian Martin became a physician; Mrs. Dorothy 
H. Armstrong; Martha Wesley married William B. Hamilton; M. Ann 
Benton married Doctor Stephens ; and Harriet Madison married Thomas 
Noll. 

Dr. Jaquillian Martin Stemmons was born in Logan county, Kentucky, 
in 1803. He was killed during the Civil war, in March, 1861. He was 
twice married. His first wife was Harriet Allen, a daughter of Doctor 
Allen of Logan county, Kentucky, in which county their children were all 
burn. Doctor Stemmons and family came to Jasper county in 1854. Two 
years later a scourge of flux swept the count}-, taking his wife and three 
daughters. Eleven children lived to be grown and also the two half brothers, 
making in all thirteen. Their children were named as follows ; William 
Henry, a blacksmith, lived to be eighty-three years of age; John Martin, who 
was a lawyer in Dallas, Texas, for many years, died at the age of seventy 
years; Anna C, who married Robert Seymour, died at the age of seventy 
years; Jacob died when a child; Mary Etta died when twenty years of age; 
Thomas Jefferson is still living at the age of seventy-five years; Wilbur 
Eisk, an insurance and real estate dealer in Golden City, Missouri, died when 
about seventy years of age; Martha died at the age of eighteen years; 
Redford was just entering young womanhood when she died; Felix Beverly, 
a farmer, died at the age of fifty-five years; Napoleon L., a blacksmith, is 
living at the age of sixty-eight years; James B., a farmer, is now sixty-two 
years old. 

Doctor Stemmons' second wife was known in her maidenhood as Susan 
Pane, and she was a native of Virginia. To this last union two children 
were born, namely : Alexander Clay, who is engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business in Carthage, Missouri ; and Jaquillian Martin, a physician 
of Oologah, Oklahoma. Two sons of the first marriage served in the South- 
ern army and four in the Union army during the Civil war. 

F. B. Stemmons, son of Dr. Jaquillian Martin Stemmons, Sr.. and 
father of Mrs. M. Darby, was a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Jas- 
per county, Missouri. He was a man who loved the good and the beautiful 
and was always a friend to the needy and those in distress. He was a mem- 



I IJ4 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

ber of the Methodist church for many years. He married Eliza J. Clark, 
March 6, 1867, She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church 
but after her marriage united with the Methodist Episcopal church. She 
was a woman loved by all who knew her, was devoted to her home and 
family. She lived a consistent Christian life for years and strove to train 
her children in Christian service. Her children were named, Mattie Ann, 
born December 22, 1867; Jaquillian Orange, born August 25, 1870, died 
when a child; James Monroe, a farmer near Colden City, married Ahce 
Parker; he was born January 16, 1872; Marietta, born April 25, 1875, and 
died October 7, 1894; Mrs. Clara Allman, born March 20, 1879, lives in 
Glasgow, .Montana; Luther Beverly, born May 1, 1882, is a farmer in 
Nebraska, and is unmarried; Mrs. Maggie Bell Marshall, born November 

14, 1884, lives in Regina-, Canada; three children died in infancy, unnamed. 
F. B. Stemmons was twice married. His second wife was Mrs. Lvdia 
Wilson, and to this union one child was born — Ruth Stemmons, born |ulv 

15, 1891, and lives in Carthage, Missouri. The death of F. B. Stemmons, 
father of Mrs. Darby, occurred September 2j, 1897. 

Of Mrs. Darby's maternal ancestors, we mention Orange R. (lark. 
her grandfather, who was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, February 6, 
[820. He was the twelfth and youngest child of Alexander and Mary 
Clark, lie was a Union soldier during the Civil war. and was killed July 
21 , [864. lie was well educated for his time and had a good library. He 
was elected county judge of Jasper county in i860 but because of the Civil 
-war never served his term. Alexander Clark was born March 17. 17(12; 
Mary, his wife, was born February 2. 1777. The following children were 
born to them: John, whose birth occurred August 2. 1703; James, born 
September 2;. 1705; Patience, born January 22. 1798; Thomas, born Sep- 
tember [8, [799; Harvey, born June 12. [802; Mary, born November 29, 
1804; William Alexander, born February [6, 1N07: I). Franklin, born April 
26, 1809; Elizan, born February 19, 1N11: Pamelia, born January 7, 181.4; 
Henry B., born February 3, 1N17: Orange Rector, horn February 6, 1N20. 

Martha l.ewallen, daughter of S. L. I.ewallen, was horn in Bowling 
Green, Kentucky. November 13. [818. Her grandfather came to America 
from Scotland. In an early day her family emigrated to Missouri, locating 
m Pike county, where she later married ( ). 1\. (lark, February 20, 1S40. 
She and Mr. ('lark moved the same year to Jasper county, this state, and 
settled on a farm near While Oak where their children were born. Her 
death occurred November 11. [880. Their children were. Mary .Margaret. 
born October 2-. [840, and died July 29, [860; Thomas Kerr, bom Decem- 
ber 5, [841, died January 1, 1N42. Three girls, triplets, were born October 
2. [843; one died October 2. [843; the other two also died in 1843: Will- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I I 75 

iani B., born September 13, .1845, and died March _>y, 1873; Eliza Jane, 
burn September 6, 1849. <llei1 February 16, 1889; she was the wife of F. 
B. Stemmons, and they were the .parents of Mrs. Darby. John F. Clark 
was burn March 26, 1852, lie became a minister in the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church; Martha Frances Clark, burn July 7, 1855, and died Sep- 
tember 15, 1856; James O. Clark, burn October 4, 1858, is farming near 
Craik. Saskatchewan, Canada. He is growing this year (1915) eight hun- 
dred acres of wheat. 

The Stemmons, Allen, Clark and Lewallen families were industrious, 
Law-abiding, temperate, God-fearing people. By occupation, they were farm- 
ers, for the must part, but there have been editors, physicians, ministers and 
merchants among them. 

Doctor Darby, when asked about the secret of his success, gave clue 
credit tu the wisdom of his good father and mother who instilled within 
him high ideals in life and brought him tu manhood with noble purposes. 
Other traits in his family history are important, two of which are typified 
in his grandfathers — the one a physician, with splendid training for scien- 
tific thought, the other a genius in mechanical construction. The combining 
of scientific knowledge and ability in construction is said to be of the great- 
est importance in his profession. 



HOX. JOHN S. PHELPS. 

The grand old state of Connecticut has sent out thousands of her sons 
in the founding and upbuilding of new communities in the West. Many 
of these have served their adopted states long and well, and have left the im- 
print of their character and courage upon the history of their times, carving 
their names and fame upon the very foundation stones of many of the great 
commonwealths. But never did the old state make a better gift, never did she 
send out a better man, a brighter intellect, than when she gave John S. Phelps 
to Missouri. The prominence, both state and national, of this most dis- 
tinguished citizen of Greene county of a past generation, may well serve 
as a reason why this sketch is given a conspicuous position in this volume. 

Mr. Phelps was burn in Simsbury, Hartford county, Connecticut, De- 
cember 22, 1814. He was a son of Elisha Phelps, who was a lawyer of 
great prominence in the old Nutmeg state, who served his fellow citizens 
in the state Legislature, state offices and four terms in the national Con- 
gress. Noah Phelps, our subject's paternal grandfather, was first a cap- 
tain, then a colonel in the Revolutionary war and a must successful scout 
and spy. He was one of the "committee of safety" that planned the cap- 



1 176 GREENE COUXTV, MISSOURI. 

ture of Ticonderoga. Like his son and grandson he, too, served the people- 
in legislative and other capacities of public trust. 

John S. Phelps was reared in his birthplace, receiving his education 
in the public schools and in Washington (now Trinity) College at Hart- 
ford, completing his course there in 1832, graduating when seventeen years 
old. Subsequently he studied law under his father for three years, and 
was admitted to the bar on the twenty-first anniversary of his birth. After 
a year and a half of practice in Hartford, be married there and determined 
to come West and seek a better and wider field for an ambitious young 
lawyer. Acting with that wisdom and foresight which ever characterized 
him in both public and private life, he chose the newly admitted state of 
Missouri, and in 1837, set foot upon her soil. It was necessary to be re- 
examined, before being enrolled as a member of the Missouri state bar, and 
young Phelps went to Boonville, where Judge Tomkins of the Supreme 
court had agreed to meet and examine him ; the judge, however, failed to 
come, and Mr. Phelps mounted a horse and proceeded to Jefferson City, 
where the judge resided. Here again was a disappointment for Judge 
Tompkins was some distance in the country at a sawmill, and there, sitting 
on a log in the woods in Cole county. Missouri's future governor was ex- 
amined and licensed to practice in all courts of record, the license being 
written on a leaf torn from an old blue ledger, that being the only paper in 
the mill camp. Armed with this document, the young lawyer started for 
the great Southwest, locating at Springfield, then a mere hamlet with but 
fourteen white families. He at mice entered upon a good practice. When here 
less than a week he was retained to defend Charles S. Yancey,, who after- 
wards became circuit judge. He rapidly ruse to the bead of his profession, 
practicing over a district extending from Warsaw on the north to Forsyth 
"ii the south and from Waynesville on the east to Neosho on the west. He 
was soon recognized as the leading member of the bar in that section, for 
young as he was. his great legal attainments enabled him to cope success- 
fully with the most experienced lawyers. 

His public life began at an early age. In 1840 he was chosen to rep- 
resent Greene county in the General Assembly of Missouri, and but little 
of his life was spent in retirement from that time until his death. In 1844 
he was elected to Congress, and For eighteen consecutive vears, served in 
the same high position of public trust, lie was the father of the postage 
stamp. Any attempt at a full statement of his acts comprised in those 
years — his many valuable services — would far transcend the limits of this 
work: but the bare fact that for twelve years he was a member of the com- 
mittee on ways and means — always the most important committee of a 
legislative body — and part of the time its chairman, is, in itself, the best 
evidence of the esteem and confidence reposed in him 011 the part of his co- 



GREENE COUNTY, .MISSOURI. ll 77 

workers in Congress. He believed in a tariff for revenue only, and voted 
for the tariff of [846, a measure denounced by the protectionists as one 
fraught with destruction to the manufacturing interests of the country. 
In about ten years thereafter, when a further reduction of duties was advo- 
cated and carried, the leading manufacturers of the country besought Con- 
gress not to interfere with the duties established in 1846. Mr. Phelps 
favored the measure granting bounty lands to soldiers, lie favored the 
granting of lands by the general government to Missouri to aid in building 
a railroad from St. Louis to the southwest corner of the state. In 1853 
when Congress was discussing the building of a trans-continental railway, 
Mr. Phelps favored the construction of a road through the Indian country 
to Albuquerque, thence to San Francisco, on which route a road was later 
built. 

During his last term in Congress, which was in Abraham Lincoln's 
first administration, he was part iff the time in the field, the great Civil war 
being then in progress; and he was appointed on the committee of ways 
and means before he had been sworn in as a member, a compliment never 
before tendered to any other citizen, in 1861 he raised a regiment, known 
as the "Phelps Regiment," which did valiant service for six months, and 
was commanded by Colonel Phelps in person at the memorable engage- 
ment at Pea Ridge, in which it suffered such heavy loss. Without solici- 
tation on his part Colonel Phelps was appointed military governor of Ar- 
kansas, in 1862, which he accepted, but ill health soon necessitated his re- 
turn to St. Louis. In 1864 he resumed the practice of law in Springfield, 
his Congressional career having closed in 1863. He was nominated for 
governor of Missouri in 1868 on the Democratic ticket, but he failed of 
election but he ran 12,000 ahead of his ticket, but eight years afterwards 
he was elected to this high office by a larger majority than any governor of 
this state ever received up to that time, and no man ever did greater honor 
to that highest office than he, and no lady ever did the honors of the gov- 
ernor's mansion with more becoming grace than did his daughter. Mrs. 
Mary Montgomery. Had not the constitution fixed the one term limit on 
the governor's office, there is no doubt but that Mr. Phelps would have been 
re-elected, had he been willing. In the convention of 1876, no less a per- 
sonage than the Hon. George G. Vest — Missouri's greatest senator since 
Benton — was defeated by Governor Phelps for the Democratic nomination. 
After the expiration of his gubernatorial term Governor Phelps lived in 
partial retirement, only occasionally giving legal advice in some very im- 
portant cases. He spent considerable time in travel, including northern 
Mexico and Oregon. President Grover Cleveland tendered him the posi- 
tion as American minister to any country in Europe, excepting the four 
great powers, but he declined the honor owing to failing health. 



IIjS GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Few men had greater conversational powers or enjoyed more keenly 
the social intercourse of friends, than did Missouri's great governor, from 
Greene county. He enjoyed a large circle of distinguished acquaintances 
from various parts of the Union, and when he was summoned to his eternal 
rest in 1886 he was mourned not only by the state but by the nation as well. 

David R. Francis, mayor of St. Louis, afterwards governor of Mis- 
souri, declared a half-holiday in St. Louis and came in person to attend 
the funeral. 

Great, genial, magnanimous, easy of approach, and yet dignified withal, 
scholarlv, brilliant and a genteel gentleman in all the relations of life, Gov- 
ernor Phelps was just the style of a man that a whole people delighted to 
honor and revere, following his lead with the implicit confidence which is 
ever the surest criterion in pronouncing him a great man. 



JAMES O'BYRNE. 

Springfield has long been headquarters for a great number of commer- 
cial travelers. Men representing a wide diversity of firms maintain their 
homes here, which some of them have an opportunity to visit only infre- 
quently. It is a good residence town for their families, 1- conveniently and 
centrally located in one of the best sections of the Union, and salesmen go 
■ nit in all directions in the adjacent territory, representing not only local 
houses but companies in many of the eastern and northern cities. Of this 
number the name of James (J'Byrue should have specific mention, as lie is 
not onl) one of the most successful but one of the best known traveling men 
out of the Queen City of the Ozarks. 

Mr. O'Byrne is a native of northern Ireland, and is a son of Patrick 
O'Byrne and wife. I lis paternal grandfather, lames O'Byrne. emigrated 
from the Emerald Isle to America in an earl) daj and proved his loyalty to 
the United State- b) enlisting in our army during the War of iSu. and he 
foughl at the memorable battle of New Orleans under Gen. Andrew Jack- 
son. He was a fanner and also a manufacturer of Irish linen of a su- 
perior quality, lie finally returned to Ireland, where his death occurred at 
the unusual age ol one hundred and three years, and was buried beside his 
wife, lie spent ten or twelve years in the United States. I lis son, Patrick 
O'Byrne, father of our subject, was born in Ireland, where he learned the 
machinist's trade when a young man. After emigrating to America he fol- 
lowed his trade in New York City, working in one shop for a period of 
seven year-. \ fter spending ten years in tin- country he returned to his 
native land. Hi- wife was known in her maidenhood as Margaret McCal- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. U?9 

lig, a daughter of Hugh McCallig, a native of Ireland. Two sons and one 
daughter were horn to Patrick O'Byrne and wife, James, our subject, being 
the only one living and the only one to come to America. The death of the 
father occurred at the advanced age of ninety-eight years. 

lames O'Byrne spent his boyhood in Ireland and received a good com- 
mon school education. He has always been a commercial man, and he 
came to the United States before the Civil war. On April 17, [861, at 
New Orleans, he enlisted in the Confederate army, among the first to of- 
fer his services, and as a private in the Third Louisiana Volunteer Infantry 
he served with valor and credit all through the struggle of four hard year-, 
participating in many important campaigns and nearly all the great battles. 
After the war he remained in the South until the spring of 1867, reaching 
Springfield, Missouri, on March 17, and lie has made his home here ever 
since. He has traveled in even' state in the Union, also Central America 
and South America and Australia, having a record as a commercial trav- 
eler which few can equal in the United States. He lias no doubt traveled 
more miles as a salesman than any other man in the Middle West, lie has 
met with uniform success, no matter what territory was assigned to him, 
and has been faithful and trustworthy at all times, ever alert to the good 
of the firm he represents. lie is a man of tact, diplomacy and earnestness, 
a good mixer and makes and retains friends easily. He is one of the most 
widely known commercial travelers in the country. lie has long owned a 
nice home in Springfield. 

Mr. O'Byrne was married, September 27, 1876, in this city, to Mar- 
garet Hayes, a daughter of James Hayes, who owned a livery stable on 
Boonville street, Springfield, for many years, or up to a few years of his 
death. Mrs. O'Bvrne was horn in Mexico, Missouri, where she received a 
good education. 

To our subject and wife eleven children have been born, nine sons and 
two daughters, namely: James Patrick died when twenty-six years of age; 
Ann married I'M ward L. Maurice, who has long operated a confectionery 
on South street, this city, and recently added a cafe; John, who lives in 
Springfield, Missouri, is a widely known race horse man, having for years 
participated in races in the United States and Canada; Margaret Ellen is 
engaged in the coal business with her brother in Springfield ; Leo, who lives 
in Texas, is a commercial traveler; Edward Emmett is engaged in the coal 
business on Main street, this city; Joseph William is a member of the firm 
of Walker-O'Byrne Electric Company on East Walnut street, Springfield; 
Eugene is an attorney-at-law, with an office in this city ; Lawrence is a 
salesman for the W'alker-O'Byrne Electric Company; Francis Xavier is em- 
ployed in Mr. Maurice's cafe; Hugh Vincent lives in Lewistown, Montana. 

Politicallv, Mr. O'Bvrne is a Democrat. He is the oldest Catholic 



Il8o GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

resident in Springfield. He is a stanch friend of Father Lilly. Fraternally, 
he belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He holds membership in the 
Church of the Immaculate Conception. He is also a member of the Illinois 
Commercial Travelers' Association. He recalls with much satisfaction his 
meeting with Count John A. Creighton, of Omaha, Nebraska, on the last 
birthday of that well-known gentleman. During his residence of nearly a 
half century in Springfield our subject has seen many important changes 
take place here and has always been interested in the city's general wel- 
fare. Although his vocation has made it necessary for him to be absent 
from the city a great deal during this long period, nevertheless he is well 
known here and has a host of good friends. 



MAX SCHARFF. 



Among the enterprising citizens of Springfield who originally came 
from the German Empire is Max Scharff, the major portion of whose active 
career as a man of affairs has been spent in America, having for a number 
of years been a resident on a plantation of the far South before casting his 
lot with the people of the Queen City of the Ozarks. 

Mr. Scharff was born in Esslingen, Rhinepfalz, Bavaria, September 9, 
1854. There he grew to be seventeen years of age, and received his educa- 
tion, emigrating to the United States shortly after the close of the Franco- 
Prussian war, in 1871. lie was then seventeen years of age. He landed in 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, subsequently locating in Louisiana on a sugar plan- 
tation, where he resided until 1891, in which year he came to Springfield, 
.Missouri, and engaged in business on South street for one year, then moved 
to the northwest corner of Campbell and Walnut streets after the new build- 
ing was completed here, in i8<)_> and this has been his location ever since. 
Ills industry and good management has resulted in success. He owns a 
modern and attractive home in this city. 

Mr. Scharff was married September 6, 188 J, to Rosa Scharff. of 
Natchez, Mississippi. She was a daughter of Daniel and Carolina (Wert- 
heimer ) Scharff. Her father is a native of Germany. To our subject and 
wife four children have been born, two sons and two daughters, namely: 
Daniel is engaged in business with his father; Clarence is a traveling sales- 
man with headquarters at Vicksburg, Mississippi; Clara is the wife of M, 
A. Ullman, a member of the firm of the Ullman-Netter Dry Goods Com- 
pany of Springfield: Fay is the wife of Marx Xetter, a member of the firm 
of the Ullman-Netter Dry Goods Company. 

The mother of the above named children died in Louisiana in October, 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IlSl 

1889, and Mr. Scharff was married in Cincinnati, Ohio, on September 1, 
1895, to Carrie Hart, of that city. She is a daughter of Meyer Hart, a 
native of Villmar, Nassau, Germany, on the river halm. There lie grew 
to manhood and was educated. He came to America in 1896, and his death 
occurred in Springfield, Missouri, in 1907. 

Mr. Scharff is a member of the Masonic blue lodge, Acacia, No. 116, at 
Plaquemine, Louisiana. He also belongs to the Royal Arcanum and to the 
Knights of Pythias, also Florence lodge of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. Politically, he is a Democrat; however, he is somewhat of 
an independent voter and does a great deal of "scratching" on his ballot, 
his aim always being to support the best man for the place sought, and his 
method is one to be commended to the voters of all parties. He is a mem- 
ber of the Temple Israel of Springfield, being vice-president of the same, 
and has been influential in the work here for years. He has led a quiet, 
law-abiding life, never having served mi a jury, and has never been sued 
or had to stand a law suit. 



HENRY T. WATTS. 



Restlessness causes many of us to leave our parental halls and seek our 
fortunes in distant lands. Some people feel this wanderlust spirit so strongly 
that they have no control over it. Offer to them whatever inducements you 
please — wealth, honor, a pleasant home — they will not yield to them, but 
rather struggle against the hardships which the building up of a new domicile 
in a foreign land implies. It is exactly this hardship that attracts them. 
They dislike nothing more than the monotony of a well-regulated life, and 
consider themselves well repaid for their troubles by the charms which ever- 
chaftiging enterprises offer them. Another cause for emigration is the attrac- 
tion which another occupation holds out to the new-comer. It is the outcome 
of the excellent and infallible law of supply and demand. These are doubt- 
less some of the reasons that have brought millions of Europeans to America, 
among them being the Watts family, of which Henry T. Watts, foreman of 
the air room at the Frisco's North Side shops, Springfield, is a creditable 
representative. 

Mr. Watts was born in London. England. December 18. 1868. He is 
a son of Robert Watts, a native of Summersetshire, his birth having occurred 
near the town of Yoeville, England, and there he grew to manhood, was edu- 
cated and married. He was there engaged in wool buying until he emigrated 
with his family to the United States, in 1872. having first traveled through 
Canada, and located in St. Louis, Missouri, where he took up the carpenter's 



Il82 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

trade and worked as a journeyman. After remaining in St. Louis ten years 
he removed to Springfield, in 1882, where he followed carpentering, con- 
tracting and building for a number of years; also worked as coach carpenter 
and bridge builder for the Frisco railroad for many years. His death oc- 
curred at his home here in 1908 at the age of sixty-eight years, and he was 
buried in Hazelwood cemetery. He was a member of St. John's Episcopal 
church in England, but after coming to Springfield he united with the Baptist 
church. His wife, who was known in her maidenhood as Emily Baker, was 
born, reared and educated in the same locality in England of which he was a 
native. She is residing in Springfield with her unmarried daughter at their 
home on Sherman street, and she will be seventy-two years of age on July 4. 
1915. To these parents the following children were born: Alice, Mollie, 
Bessie, Henry T., Frederick, Minnie and Frances. 

Henrv T. Watts was four years old when his parents brought him to 
America, lie spent his boyhood in St. Louis and received a common school 
education, which was very limited, for he went to work when only nine years 
of age, and has supported himself since that time, his record being one of self- 
reliance, grit and unswerving perseverance, and be is deserving of much 
credit for what he has accomplished. When a boy he worked for the news- 
paper known as the Springfield Southwest, the name of which was later 
changed to the Southweslcr. He held the position of "printer's devil" for 
three years, then worked as pressman for some time at the plant of the 
Springfield Patriot, and later was pressman on the Springfield Republican. 
As pressman he turned out the first daily paper in Springfield, in the building 
opposite the Metropolitan lintel on College street. He remained in the em- 
ploy nf the Republican five or si\ vears. From there he went to Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, in [886, and was there during the memorable flood, then went 
to Pittsburgh, but later returned to Johnstown. He subsequently worked as 
machinist at Rankin. Pennsylvania, with the Braddock Wire Company, and 
learned his trade there. Returning to Springfield on a visit, he accepted a 
position at his trade in the Frisco's North Side shops, first being under in- 
structions, then worked during the year of [888 as regular machinist, and 
continued as journeyman for sixteen or seventeen years, when he was trans- 
ferred to the round-house as air-brake inspector in the North Side shops, 
which position he held for four years, then was promoted to foreman of the 
air room there, in July, mot), and is still holding this position, and discharg- 
ing his duties in an able and acceptable manner. He has ten men under his 
direction. They do repair work for the entire system. 

Mr. Watts lives at 1^52 Clay street, where he bought a lot and had a 
neat dwelling erected according to Ids own plans. He was married, in 1880, 
to Minnie Sterling, a daughter of John and Mary (Shepard) Sterling. Her 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1 83 

father is a farmer near Crocker, Missouri. She grew up in this state and 
received a common school education. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Watts is a Republican. He is prominent in fraternal 
circles, being a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Royal 
Arch, the Blue Lodge, the \\ hire Shrine and the Order of the Eastern Star; 
also the Woodmen of the World, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Inter- 
national Association of Machinists. 



M \KIOX A. XELSOX. 



We do not find many Greene count}- people who originally came from 
Arkansas. The reason is perhaps that they have as good a country as ours 
and find it to their advantage to stay at home. Arkansas is a great state 
in e\ p erv respect, greater than most citizens in other states ever dream. This 
is due partly to the fact that there has never been a "boom" there, the rail- 
roads have not put forth much effort to advertise it, as they have had such 
overrated states as Oklahoma, Florida and California, consequently the 
general public does not really know of the vast resources and opportunities 
to be found in the slate just to the south of us. Marion A. Nelson, en- 
gaged in the life insurance business in Springfield, is one of the enterprising 
young nun from that state who has cast his lot with the people of Greene 
county. 

Mr. Nelson was born at Wilmar, Drew count}-. Arkansas, November 
20, 1875. lie is a S..11 ,if Thomas D. and Maggie X. (Alexander! Nelson. 
The father was born in Tennessee, in which state he grew to manhood and 
there enlisted in a regiment in the Confederate army during the Civil war, 
serving with credit until the close of the conflict. After the war he came 
to Arkansas and engaged in the lumber business until 1882, when he went 
to Louisiana, where he has since made his home, and there he is still en- 
gaged in business. His family consisted of nine children. The maternal 
grandfather of our subject was a native of the state of Mississippi, and 
during the Civil war he was a soldier in the Confederate army and was 
killed in battle. His family consisted of three children, all now deceased. 
His daughter, Maggie X. Alexander, mother of our subject, died April 25, 
1 9 14, in Dubach, Louisiana. 

Marion A. Nelson spent his childhood in Drew county, Arkansas, be- 
ing seven years of age when he removed with his parents to northern Louis- 
iana, where he grew to manhood and received his education in the public 



I 184 • GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

schools there. After graduating from the high school in his community he 
began his career by entering the lumber and mercantile business, continuing 
these lines with ever-increasing success in northern Louisiana and southern 
Arkansas until 1909. when he took a position with the Equitable Life As- 
surance Society, in which his advancement has been rapid, and he now oc- 
cupies the responsible position of agency manager for this district, with 
headquarters at Springfield, and he is discharging his duties in an able and 
faithful manner that is highly satisfactory to the company. 

Air. Nelson was married on February 17, 1902, to Pearl Hale, at Junc- 
tion City, Arkansas, and they resided at that place until 19 13, when they 
removed to Springfield, Missouri, where they have since made their home. 
They are the parents of four children, namely: Marion Hale, James Den- 
ny, .Maurice Sanders and Rose Elizabeth. 

Politically, Mr. Nelson is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Masonic order, including the Royal Arch degree. He has long been 
quite active and influential in this order, and while in Arkansas was deputy 
grand master. He has also been a member of the Knights of Pythias for 
many years, and has been equally active and prominent in this order, hav- 
ing passed all the chairs while living in Arkansas. He is a member of St. 
Paul's Methodist Episcopal church. South, in Springfield. He and his wife 
have made many warm friends since locating in this city. 



FRANK A. FREY. 



The chief characteristics of Frank A. Frey, prominent agriculturist and 
stock man of Taylor township, Greene county, who also maintains a home 
in Springfield, are keenness of perception, an unflagging energy, honesty of 
purpose and motive and every-day common sense, which have enabled 
him nol only to advance his own interests in a most gratifying manner, 
but also to largely contribute to the moral and material interests of the 
community. He worked his way from a modest beginning, having landed 
from a foreign strand on our shores many years ago, "a youth to fortune 
and to fame unknown." step l>v step to a position of no mean importance, 
by his individual efforts, which have been practically unaided from hoy- 
hood, which fact renders him the more worthy of the praise that is freely 
accorded him by his fellow men. I lis life has been one of unceasing in- 
dustry and perseverance, and the honorable and systematic methods he has 
ever employed are commended to others, if they court the goddess Suc- 
cess. 

Mr. Frey was horn in Alsace, France, March 9, 1853. He is a son of 




MRS. FRANK A. FREY. 




FRANK A. FREY. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 185 

Francis Joseph and Christina (Herd) Frey, both natives of Alsace, for- 
merly a part of France, now a province of Germany. There they grew up, 

were educated and married, and spent their lives, and to them two sons 
were born, Aloys Frey, now deceased, and Frank A. Frey, of this sketch. 

Frank A. Frey sent his boyhood in his native land, and there received 
his education. When eighteen years old he emigrated to the United States, 
in 1871, landing in Xew York, where he remained only a month, then came 
on west to St. Louis, where he spent one year, then spent two years in 
Terre Haute, Indiana, where he was engaged in the butcher business, then 
went to 1'aris, Illinois, where he worked for George Mullins in the meat 
business for five years, then started in the same business for himself, and 
continued to operate successfully a meat market there for nine years, when 
he sold out and went to Grand Island, Nebraska, where he continued his 
former vocation for two years, then sold out and came to Springfield, Mis- 
souri and here established a meat business, which he carried on with his 
usual success for seven years, then sold out and started in the live stock 
business in connection with general farming in Taylor township, a lew- 
miles from Springfield, where lie owns a valuable and productive farm of 
two hundred and forty acres, which he has placed under modern improve- 
ments and a high state of cultivation, and there carries on general agri- 
cultural pursuits and stock raising on an extensive scale, and has become 
one of the leading fanners of Greene county. He keeps large numbers of 
various kinds of live stock of a good grade, and there is no better judge 
of stock in the county than he. A substantial, convenient and attractive set 
of buildings are to be seen on his farm, and everything about the place 
denotes good management, thrift and good taste. Mr. Frey also owns a 
fine new residence in Freemont street in Springfield, wdiere his family re- 
sides, and from there he makes frequent trips to his rural home. His hold- 
ings contain over thirtv-five acres inside the city limits, some of which is 
platted and is very valuable. 

Mr. Frey was married first, in 1 881, in Paris, Illinois, to Emma Ormis- 
ton. whose death occurred twenty-two years later, on January 31, 1903. She 
was a daughter of David and Harriet Ormiston, who lived in Paris, Illi- 
nois, in which city Mrs. Frey grew to womanhood and was educated. To 
this first union one son was born, Paul A. Frey, who is engaged in farm- 
ing two miles south of Springfield. In 1909 our subject was married a 
second time, his last wife being Mrs. Susie Smith, of Greene county, Mis- 
souri, widow of Samuel Smith, and a daughter of John and Julia (Miller) 
Harpster. She was born on April 29, 1856, and she received a common 
school education in White county. Illinois; where she was born and reared. 
This last union has been without issue. 
(75) 



u86 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



Mrs. Frey's first husband was S. R. Smith, an old railroad man. In late 
life he was injured, losing his right arm, and with his wife, went to farming 
in Taylor township, Greene county, and from a small beginning he and his 
wife accumulated two hundred and eighty acres. Mr. Smith died in 1904., 
leaving his widow with two hundred and eighty acres of land in Greene 
county and a heavy mortgage to pay. It is greatly to her credit as a man- 
ager, as well as to Greene county's wonderful resources, to state that in 
one year Mrs. Smith had paid up the mortgage, cleared her property and 
had an abundance of stock and property free of debt. 

Politically. Mr. Frey has been a Democrat since old enough to exer- 




RESIDBNCB OF FRANK A. FREY. 



rise the righl of suffrage, However, he has never cared for public office, 
having no time to take from his private business affairs. Fraternally, lie is 
a member of the Masonic order. Air. Frey, in [882, and again in 1886, 
crossed the Atlantic to visit his native land. 

Mr. Frey's grandfather served in the French wars under Napoleon for a 
period of fourteen years and attained the rank of second lieutenant, and took 
part in the great battle of Waterloo, seeing the fall of the mighty Corsican. 
( hir subject is the possessor of a number of interesting relics and heir- 
looms, including a number Of grim reminders of the terrible wars of his 
native country a century or more ago. Among these is a sword carried 
by his grandfather, who was with Napoleon during the last years of the 
emperor's career in France. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I187 

ROBERT A. BOWLAND. 

Robert A. Bowland has established a reputation for honesty and in- 
tegrity which is attested by the high estimation in which he is held by his 
fellow citizens, being a citizen and neighbor highly honored in his locality, 
and in his sphere of life, nobly and faithfully, has he performed every duty 
that presented itself. Formerly he was one of our efficient school teachers, 
and later served Greene county many years as treasurer, and thus is well 
known over the city and county. He is a man of positive temperament, 
firm in his convictions, forcible and fearless in his adhesion to principles, 
and is regarded by all who know him as an honorable man and obliging gen- 
tleman. 

Mr. Bowland was born in Morrow county, Ohio. He is a son of Boyd 
M. and Mary Elizabeth (Colmery) Bowland, both natives of Pennsylvania, 
from which state they moved to Ohio when young and were married in the 
latter state, and were educated in the public schools. The mother of our 
subject taught school for some time prior to her marriage. Boyd M. Bow- 
land devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. He moved his family from 
Ohio to Greene county, Missouri, when his son, Robert A., of this sketch, 
was a small child. Politically, the elder Bowland was a Republican. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he was a soldier in the Union army, and after the war 
he served for some time as postmaster at Iberia, Morrow county, Ohio. 

Eleven children were born to Boyd M. and Elizabeth Bowland, eight 
of whom are living at this writing. They were named as follows: Charles 
C. and Harry C. are the two eldest; Boyd M., Jr., is deceased; Robert A., 
of this sketch; William B. is deceased; David M., Cora E., Edward B., 
Leroy R. and Calvin are all living; and Samuel M., the youngest, is de- 
ceased. 

Robert A. Bowland grew to manhood on the home farm and there as- 
sisted with the work when a boy. He received a good education in the 
public schools and the normal school in Springfield. He began life for him- 
self by engaging in farming for a few years, then taught school a number 
of years with much success, and later was a deputy assessor, and served as 
such in the Greene county court house for three years under W. A. Smith. 
During that time he mastered thoroughly the ins and outs of the office, and 
in 1904 made the race for county treasurer and was elected by a large ma- 
jority. His record as a public official in this connection was so highly com- 
mendable and he proved to be such a careful, honest and obliging public 
servant, that he was re-elected and held the office eight years, to the satis- 
faction of all concerned. Mr. Bowland owns a good home in Springfield, 
which is tastily kept by a lady of refinement, known in her maidenhood as 
Emma V. Kerr, whom Mr. Bowland married in 1895. She is a native of 



Il88 GRF.EXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Kansas, and when she was but a child she came with her parents to Greene 
county, Missouri, locating on a farm near Republic, where she completed 
her education in the Republic high school. To this union one child was 
born, Robert Paul, born at Republic, Missouri, August 19, 1900, and is at 
home attending public school. Her parents were born in Indiana and went to 
the Sunflower state many years ago, but remained only a few years. 

Politically, Mr. Bowland is a Republican. He and his family are 
members of the First Baptist church, in which he is a deacon and an active 
worker. Fraternally, our subject belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Modern Woodmen. Mrs. Bowland is a charter member 
of the Wild Rose camp. Royal Neighbors, of Republic. 



OWFX M. EVANS. 



There are not many Vermonters in Greene county, notwithstanding the 
fact that this New England state is one of the oldest in the American Union, 
and has been sending her population westward for over a century to_ help 
build up and develop the newer sections of our country. The}- have the record 
of being good citizens wherever they have located, being industrious, intelli- 
gent and law-abiding, for the must part. Owen M. Evans, chief engineer at 
the Springfield Wagon Works, and one of Greene county's honored citizens. 
is such a man. 

Mr. Evans was born in Castleton, Rutland county, Vermont, December 
27, 1862. He is a son of Moses Evans, a native of Wales, the little rugged 
country where all the numerous family of Evanses originated. There he 
grew to manhood and from there emigrated to the United States in the fifties, 
locating at once in the Famous Vermont quarry district. He engaged in pros- 
pecting and got out roofing slate for himself, owning and operating slate quar- 
ries at Castleton. ilis death occurred in [897, at the age of sixty-five years, 
and he was buried at Fair Haven, Vermont. Before leaving Wales he joined 
the Independent Order of odd Fellows. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian church, and was for many years active in church work. Politically, he 
was a Republican. Ilis wife, who was known in her maidenhood as Jane 

Williams, was also a native of Wales, where she spent her early childh 1. 

emigrating to America when thirteen years of age, and lived with her brother 
in Vermont until her marriage. Her mother died some time before she left 
her native land. She was a daughter of < )wen Williams and wife. She died 
in [910 at the age of seventy-two years and is buried at Fair Haven, Ver- 
mont. To Moses and Jane Evans thirteen children were born, named as Fol- 
low: Annie married William Peck, a carpenter and contractor at Stamford. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. II89 

Connecticut, where they still reside; Owen M., of this sketch; John is en- 
gaged in farming in Pennsylvania; Laura married William Owens and they 
live in New York City; jane, widow of John Tackebury, lives in New Ro- 
chelle, New York; William is engaged in the grocery business in New York 
City; Moses is engaged in the bakery and confectionery business in West 
End. Xew Jersey; Elizabeth has remained single and is engaged as book- 
keeper for the Bell Telephone Company at New Rochelle, New York; Mar- 
garet, widow of Llew Perrv, lives in Xew York City; Katie, who lives in 
Florida, is a twin sister of Nellie, who married Harry Owens, a slate operate 
at Poultnev, Vermont ; Winifred is unmarried and makes her home at Xew 
Rochelle, Xew York. 

The paternal grandfather of the above named children, whose name was 
Owen Evans, was a native of Wales, where he spent his entire life; he was 
a slate operator, and this business has been the principal vocation of many of 
his descendants. 

Owen M. Evans, of this sketch, grew to manhood in his native state, 
and there attended the common schools, and when twelve years of age he 
went to work cutting stone, continuing for three years, then worked as a 
farm hand in that community for three years, after which we find him oper- 
ating pumps and engines at the slate quarries at Castleton. subsequently 
working as engineer for the Castleton Milling Company, holding this posi- 
tion one vear. Leaving Vermont when twenty -eight years of age, in 1890, 
he came to Springfield. Missouri, and soon thereafter secured employment 
with the Dunlap Construction Company, later worked for the Metropolitan 
Street Railway Company, then was trimmer and lineman for the Springfield 
Lighting Company. In March, 1893, be was employed by the Metropolitan 
Electric Railway as chief electrician at the power house, and he held this 
position until the spring of [900, when he went with the Springfield Brewing 
Company as chief engineer, leaving there in July, 1901, and began working 
as night engineer for the Springfield Ice and Refrigerator Company. In 
November of that year he went with the Springfield Wagon Company as 
chief engineer, which position he has continued to fill to the present time, 
giving his usual satisfactory and faithful service. When he began with the 
last-named firm, steam was used throughout the plant, but Mr. Evans de- 
voted his spare time for years to the study of electricity and has become 
a capable and thorough electrician, and, at his solicitation, the company in- 
stalled an electric power plant in 1914. In January, 1913, Mr. Evans was 
promoted to the position of assistant superintendent, the duties of which he 
ably discharged for a period of two years, but finding the work too engross- 
ing, he resigned, preferring the position of chief engineer. He has been in 
the employ of the Springfield Wagon Works thirteen years. 

Mr. Evans was first married in [886, to Annie Fox, a daughter of Henry 



I IC)0 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and Margaret Fox. Her death occurred in 1909, at the age of forty-six 
years. This union was without issue. In 191 1 Mr. Evans married Millie 
Grantham, widow of Howard M. Grantham. This union has also been 
without issue. 

Mr. Evans is a member of the National Association of Steam Engineers, 
in which he has long been active and influential; in fact, he has the honor of 
being known as the founder of this new important and widely known asso- 
ciation, of which he has for some time been president. He belongs to the 
Masonic order, including the Knights Templars. He is also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of 
the World, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of 
Pythias Sisters, the Order of the Eastern Star and the Royal Neighbors. He 
is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and politically is a Re- 
publican. He is chairman of the board of stationary engineer examiners. 
He was twice elected city councilman from the Sixth ward and served two 
terms of four years in this capacity. He is known as the father of the Con- 
crete Paving Company, of Springfield. He is devoted to the work of citv 
progress, and he was one of the prime factors in starting the movement that 
led to the paving of our streets. He has always been conservative in the 
expenditure of the city's money; in fact, has done much for the general and 
permanent good of Springfield in many ways, and in all the positions of 
trust which he has occupied he has proven himself to be most capable, ener- 
getic, honest and trustworthy, meriting" the esteem in which be is universally 
held, and he ranks with the most representative and useful of our citizens. 



OMER E. RISSI R. 



Among the well known and popular railroad men of Springfield is 
Omer E. Risser, passenger conductor, who has been connected with the 
Frisco for over a quarter of a century, and his long retention by the sys- 
tem would indicate that he is a man of ability and worthy of the trust re- 
posed in him. He is of German descent on his father's side and has in- 
herited many of the commendable qualities of those people, and his suc- 
cess in life has been due entirely to his own efforts. 

Mr. Risser was born in Mt. Pleasant, [owa, July 26, 1864. He is a 
son of Daniel and Martha (Tbwnsend) Risser. The father was born in 
Germany in [830, and there he grew to manhood and had the advantages 
of a good education, and he served three years in the army, as is the cus- 
tom in that country of every able bodied man when he becomes of certain 
age. He was a shoemaker by trade, which he followed for a livelihood. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. II9I 

and became quite an expert workman. He emigrated to the United States 
when a young man and spent several years in Indiana, where he was mar- 
ried; later lived in Iowa during a protracted period, but finally removed 
to Springfield, Missouri, where his death occurred in 1898. The mother of 
the subject of this sketch was born in 1832, in New England, of Quaker 
parents, and was reared in their faith. She is now living on East Walnut 
street, Springfield, Missouri. To Daniel Risser and wife eleven children 
were born, five of whom are living at this writing, namely: Mrs. J. E. Han- 
sell, of Springfield (a complete sketch of Mr. Hansell and family appears 
on another page of this work) ; Dr. C. H. Risser lives in North Manches- 
ter, Indiana; Omer E. Risser, of this sketch; Mamie Risser is living with 
her mother in Springfield; Airs. A. T. Moore, who lives on West Walnut 
street, Springfield. 

Omer E. Risser received his education in the public and high schools 
of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, and when but a boy he took up railroading as a 
career, first working, however, for the American Express Company, in the 
office at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. In 1883 he went to work for the Chicago, 
Burlington & Ouincy Railroad Company, with which he remained until 
1886, in January of which year he came to Springfield, Missouri, and went 
to work for the Frisco system as brakeman, his run being between Spring- 
field and Newburg, Missouri. In 1888 Superintendent W. A. Thomas re- 
quested our subject to go to the southwestern division, at Talihina, Indian 
Territory (now Oklahoma), and after working there a short time he was 
promoted to freight conductor. Mr. Risser worked between Talihina and 
Paris, Texas, until 1893; then returned to Springfield and went to work 
on the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis railroad as brakeman behind 
twenty-six extra conductors. In 1897 ne was promoted to the regular crew 
again as conductor of a freight, and in 1903 he was promoted to extra pas- 
senger conductor, and for many years his run has been between Spring- 
field and Thayer, this state. He has been very successful as a conductor 
and is one of the best known and most popular men of his division. 

Mr. Risser was married June 19, 1889, in Springfield, to Rose Con- 
lin, who was born in St. Louis, December 11, 1864. She is a daughter of 
Thomas and Ann (Mooney) Conlin, both born in Ireland, from which 
country they came to America in early life and were married in Auburn, 
New York. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Risser, namely: 
Ralph D., born March 2$, 1892, is at present employed in the city engineer's 
-office, Springfield: Kathrvn. born January 8, 1896, and Marjorie. born De- 
cember 28, 1899. 

Politically, Mr. Risser is a Democrat. Tn i8go he joined Division 30, 
Order of Railroad Conductors, and when on the old Gulf road was trans- 



IIQ2 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

f erred to Division 321. He joined the Masonic order in 1907. is a Knight 
Templar and became a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine in 1908. In 1910 he was elected councilman from the 
fifth ward and served two years with much credit. Since 1907 he has been 
secretary of the local Order of Railway Conductors, and was a delegate 
to the annual meetings of the order at Jacksonville. Boston and Detroit. 
He has long been an active and influential worker in the same. 



OBADIAH CLARK MITCHELL. 

Few can draw rules for their guidance from the pages of Plutarch, but 
all are benefited, one way and another, by the delineation of those traits of 
character which find scope in the common walks of the world. The unos- 
tentatious routine of private life, although in the aggregate more important 
to the welfare of the community, than any meteoric public career, can not, 
from its very nature, figure in the public annals, though each locality's his- 
tory should contain the names of those individuals who contribute to the 
success of the material, civic and mural welfare of the community and to 
its public stability; men who lead wholesome and exemplary lives which 
might be profitably studied by the oncoming generation. In such a class 
must consistently appear the name of Obadiah (lark .Mitchell, the present 
efficient and popular postmaster of Springfield, Missouri, a man who has 
led a plain, industrious life, a large part of which has been in government 
service, and suffice it to say that his record is without blemish, fur he has 
always endeavored to do his duty faithfully, deal honestly with everyone 
and contribute somewhat to the general public good in an unobtrusive man- 
ner. He is one of the best examples in Greene county of the successful 
self-made man, and is deserving of a great deal of credit fur what he has 
accomplished in the face of obstacles, having climbed, step by step, from 
an environment nunc too promising in his youth to a position of promin- 
ence in the affairs of the capital city uf the Ozarks. llis example might be 
studied with profit by the youth, discouraged and hesitating at the parting 
of the ways. 

Mr. Mitchell was born in Dallas county. Missouri, October 20, 1858. 
He is a son of Greenberry Mitchell and Sarah (Williams) Mitchell, both 
natives of the slate of Tennessee, the father born in [819 and the mother 
in 1822. They each represented line old families of that state. There they 
grew to maturity, received such educational advantages as^the early days 
afforded and there they were married. At the age of twentv-three vears 
Greenberry Mitchell began the ministry of the Missionary Baptist church. 




O. C. MITCHELL. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1 93 

About the year 1850 he moved to Missouri as a missionary of his church, 
and was one of the pioneer ministers of this section of the state. He was a. 
man of sterling character, a powerful preacher of the old school and he 
did an excellent work among the frontier settlers here, some of the older 
citizens yet remember him and revere his memory tor his kind, helpful and 
unselfish life. He was called to his reward in the Silent land in [S'88. His 
wife died in Greene count)- in 1882. They are both buried at the Union 
Grove cemetery, near Fair Grove, Missouri. 

To Rev. Greenberry Mitchell and wife nine children were born, six 
suns and three daughters, two ot the sons and one of the daughters being 
now deceased. Those living are. Samantha is the wife of H. A. Highrield, 
and they live at Highrield. Arkansas; David 11. lives at Marshfield, Mis- 
souri; Rebecca A. is the widow of George W. Cooksey, of Strafford, Mis- 
souri; Robert G. lives in Cassville, Missouri; Allen J. makes his home at 
Pladd, this state; and Obadiah (A, of this review. 

The subject of this sketch received a common school education and 
spent one year in Morris\ ille College, in Polk county, Missouri, after which 
he engaged in farming until March 0. 1887. when he came to Springfield 
and secured employment with the Frisci railroad with which he remained 
two years, then secured a position on the police force under Mayor Walker, 
which he held for two years, discharging his duties most faithfully, then 
engaged in the grocery business for a year. In [893 he was appointed mail 
carrier, in which capacity he served in a highly satisfactory manner to all 
concerned until in February, 1914. when he was appointed postmaster at 
Springfield, and he is proving to be a most faithful, conscientious and calla- 
ble public servant, giving eminent satisfaction to both the department and 
the people. He has served the government faithfully for a period of twen- 
ty-one years. 

Mr. Mitchell was married October _', 1878, to Elizabeth Donnell, who 
was born in Greene county, Missouri, March 26. 1858. She was reared 
to womanhood and educated in the public schools of her native community, 
and she has proven to be a most faithful helpmate. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Mitchell one child has been born, John E. Mitchell, who is employed in the 
Frisco shops at Springfield. 

Politically, Mr. Mitchell is a Democrat and has been a worker in the 
party since attaining his majority. He has been a member of the Baptist 
church since 1877. He is a member of the Ozark Mountain Branch, No. 
203, National Association of Letter Carriers. He has been president of the 
same for ten years, and has lieen a delegate to the state and national con- 
ventions af the .order. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the RoyaL 
Arcanum and the Woodmen of the World. 



1194 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

IRVIN H. CAMPBELL. 

The old Keystone state has furnished many of her good citizens to 
the newer western states who have been of inestimable value in develop- 
ing them, for it seems that they have ever been people noted for their en- 
terprise and courage. Although poor when they came into the wilder west, 
many of them, a few years finds them in possession of good homes, for 
they work with a will, are not thwarted by obstacles and make good citi- 
zens in general. One of this number was the late Irvin H. Campbell, for 
many years a successful agriculturist, later devoting his time to railroad- 
ing, and was one of the trusted employees of the Frisco Svstem for a num- 
ber of years. 

Mr. Campbell was born in Huntington, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1848. 
He is a son of Armstrong Campbell and wife, both natives of the state of 
Pennsylvania, where they grew up, were educated in the early-day schools 
and married, later removing to Ohio, and from that state moved finallv to 
Illinois, the mother, however, dying while the family lived in Ohio. Arm- 
strong Campbell devoted his life to general farming. His death occurred 
in 1893. H c was twice married, the only child by his first wife being Irvin 
H., the subject of this memoir. Four children were born to his second 
marriage. 

Irvin H. Campbell grew to manh 1 on the home farm and he as- 
sisted his father with the general work on the same during the crop season, 
and during the winter attended the district schools in Ohio. However, he 
had little opportunity to receive an extensive education in his boyhood, but 
he developed himself ami always depended upon his individual resources. 

Mr. Campbell was a soldier in the days immediately following the 
Civil war. having enlisted, in May, [865, in Company 1. One Hundred and 
Thirty-second Regiment, < >lii< > National Guard. This was during the re- 
construction period and his service was aboul the same as if he had enlisted 
during the regular period of the Civil war. in which he would gladly have 
served had he been old enough. He saw some service, however, and was 
in one skirmish. He was honorably discharged, and not long thereafter 
came west to Bureau county, Illinois, where his father had previously lo- 
cated, and there he took up farming, which he followed until March 8, 
1881, when he came to Springfield, Missouri, where he first secured employ- 
ment in the Queen City Mills, with which he remained some time, then went 
to work for tin- Frisco railroad, remaining with this company until about 
a year prior to his death, when he retired from active life, after a faithful 
and successful career as railroader. 

Mr. Campbell was married June 5. [869, in Illinois, to Anna S. Ott. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I I95 

who was born in Maryland, April 21, 1853. She is a daughter of Jacob 
D. and Margaret Ann (Houck) Ott, both natives of Maryland and repre- 
sentatives of old Southern families. Mr. Ott was a tanner by trade. When 
the wife of our subject was five years old the Ott family moved to Illinois, 
and later came to Missouri, where the death of the father occurred in 1904. 
The mother is still living, making her home in Springfield. Mrs. Camp- 
bell is the oldest of ten children, all living. She received a good education 
in the common schools in Illinois. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, namely: Eva M, 
born October 30, 1870, makes her home in Springfield; Blanche E., born 
April 30, 1872, married J. E. Ledman, and they have one child, Margaret 
Ann, born March 17, 1913; Lillian B., born August 30, 1874, has remained 
unmarried; William E., born October 8, 1885, died in infancy. 

Politically, Mr. Campbell was a Republican in his earlier years, but 
later was a Socialist. He was a Christian Scientist in his religious beliefs, 
and he was formerly a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, but in 
later years dropped his membership in the same. He was a man of fine 
character and had a large number of friends here. 



WILLIAM C. BILLASCH. 

Parents should carefully consider the inclinations of their children. 
The great mistakes of life are owing in a large measure to the fact that 
young people adopt professions or enter businesses for which they have no 
natural ability. It is easy to see that if young men could start out in early 
life in the pursuit for which nature has best adapted them, and if they 
should persist in that line industriously and energetically, success would be 
assured in every instance, no matter if they were not possessed with bril- 
liancy or unusual ability ; persistence in this one line will bring success. 
William C. Billasch, foreman painter of the Springfield Wagon Works, has 
followed his profession from boyhood, having been fortunate in selecting 
the vocation for which he seems to have been well qualified by nature. 

Mr. Billasch was born in Dubuque, Iowa, June 18, 1856. He is a 
son of George F. Billasch, whose death occurred in Dubuque in 1910 at 
the age of eighty-three years. He had been inspector in a leather factory 
there and previously held a similar position in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
He was a native of German}-, from which country he came to America when 
young and settled in Philadelphia, where he became superintendent of a 
large tannery. He came west at the age of twenty-nine years, establish- 
ing his future home in Dubuque, Iowa. After working there and at Sioux 



[IQ6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

City for some time as leather inspector in factories, he worked as round- 
house foreman for the Illinois Central Railroad Company for a period of 
fort} - years, retiring five years prior to his death. While living in Phila- 
delphia he also engaged in the cooperage business for six or seven years. 
Politically, he was a Republican. He was a life member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, by which ludge he was buried. He belonged to the 
Lutheran church. His wife, who was Henrietta Louise Reinicka before her 
marriage, was a native of Germany, from which country she emigrated to 
the United States when a girl, locating in Philadelphia, and there she and 
.Mr. Billasch were married. Her death occurred also in the year 1910, at 
the age of eighty-one years. These parents were an excellent old couple, 
industrious and honest. They were the parents of seven children, namely: 
William C, subject of this sketch; Theodore died when fourteen years of 
age; George is engaged in mercantile pursuits in Dubuque, Iowa: Edward 
1- superintendent of a hardware factor}' in Chicago; Albert lives in Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, where he is in the employ of the Indianapolis Railway and 
Construction Company; Henry Louis is deceased: he and Henrietta Louise 
were twins: -he is the wife of August Northdorf, who is employed as fore- 
man for the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company, of Chicago. 

William C. Billasch received a common school education and took a 
course in a business college in Chicago. He studied two years at a night 
school. When thirteen years of aye he went to work in the A. A. Cooper 
Wagon Works at Dubuque, Iowa; then worked three years in Chicago in 
the Schuttler Wagon Works, two and one-half years of which were spent 
in the painting department, and then was foreman 111 the plant of the W r eb- 
ber Wagon Compan) in Chicago tor a period of seventeen years, in the 
painting department, and in that city he also worked a year in the Staver 
Manufacturing Company. From there he came to Springfield, Missouri, 
in the fall of 1895, a,1( ' took a position as foreman painter in the plant of 
lie Springfield Wagon Works, assuming charge of that department, which 
position he has held continuously for a period of twenty years, which fact 
would indicate that he has been not only an expert in his line hut faithful 
iinl reliable all the while. 

Mr. Billasch was married August 30, 1879, to Catherine Wyant, a 
daughter of Peter and Christina ( Eckert ) Wyant. To our subject and 
wife six children have been born, one of whom is deceased. The}' were 
named as follows: Christina, deceased: Henrietta is the wife of A. A. 
Scott, a traveling salesman, and they live in Kansas City, Kansas; Louise 
is the wife of William Powell, who is engaged in the grocery and meat busi- 
ness in Kansas City, Kansas: George is record clerk for the telephone com- 
pany at Springfield; Fred is clerking in Repp's dry goods store, Spring- 
field; Gertrude, who has remained unmarried, lives at home and is em- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IJ 97 

ployed as stenographer at the office of the Hall Drug Company, Spring- 
Held. 

Politically, Mr. Billasch is a Democrat and he has been more or less 
influential in local public affairs since coming to this city, and for two 
terms he served as a member of the city council from the fourth ward, un- 
der both Mayor Blain and Mayor Lee. His record as councilman was emi- 
nently creditable and satisfactory. Fraternally, he belongs to the Loyal Or- 
der of Moose and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, his membership 
in the latter being in Chicago. He is a member of the Reformed Lutheran 
church. 



HENRY M. HECK ART. 

For a period of thirty-four years the name of Henry M. I leckart was 
a synonym in Springfield ami this section of Missouri for high-class jew- 
elry, for be maintained an extensive jewelry store here during that period, 
and was known as one of our leading business men and a friend to the 
Queen City on every occasion, and his influence for promoting the devel- 
opment of the city along material ami civic lines was most potent, yet this 
was done in his usual quiet, unobtrusive manner, for he was not a man who 
sought the limelight of publicity, merely endeavoring to lead a useful life 
as a citizen and win success along legitimate lino, and although he was 
compelled to relv upon himself entirely from boyhood, he exercised such 
discretion and perseverance as to bring to him a large measure of prosperity, 
and he will Jong be missed from the commercial circles of the city and 
county. 

Mr. Heckart was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1855. 
He was a son of John and Nancy (Pool) Heckart, both natives of Penn- 
sylvania, of Dutch ancestry, both being old families of the Keystone state. 
The father of our subject devoted his active life to the lumber business. He 
and his wife grew to maturity in their native state, wdiere they received 
such educational advantages as the early-day schools afforded, and there 
they were married, but the latter part of their lives was spent in Missouri, 
where they died. To these parents eight children were born, five of whom 
are living at this writing. 

Henry M. Heckart grew to manhood in his native city and there re- 
ceived a limited education in the public schools. This lack of early train- 
ing, however, was subsequently made up by contact with the business world 
and by wide home reading. When lint a boy he decided upon the jewelry 
business as a life work, and began in this line in a modest way in Marsh- 
field, Webster count)', Missouri, and there got a good start. Seeking a 



I I98 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

larger field, he came to Springfield in 1878 and established a jewelry store,, 
which gradually grew in volume of business with advancing years until it 
became one of the most extensive and best known in southwestern Mis- 
souri. He remained on the public square all the while, and at the time of 
his death his was the oldest business of its kind in Greene county. He car- 
ried an extensive, carefully selected and up-to-date stock of everything 
found in the large jewelry stores in the important cities of the country. He 
also maintained a repair department in which only artisans of the highest 
skill were employed. 

Mr. Heckart was married, December 26, 1878, to Belle Jarrett, who> 
was born in Sedalia, Missouri. She is a daughter of Edward and Rebecca 
(Jones) Jarrett, both parents natives of Huntsville, Alabama. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Heckart two children were born, namely Bessie, 
born January 8, 1880, died November 27, 1891, and Harry E., born May 
29, 1884, married Maurine McClintock. and they make their home in Los 
Angeles, California, where he is engaged in business. 

Henry M. Heckart was a home man and a business man, and there- 
fore cared little for political life. He was a member of Grace Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he was an active worker and for a number of 
years was a member of the board of trustees. He was a man of honest 
principles and good habits and was respected by all who knew him during 
the more than three decades that he lived in Springfield and conducted his 
jewelry store. His death occurred November 17, 1912. 



GEORGE F. WINTERS. 

It is the men of bread and comprehensive views who give life, to com- 
munities — men who have foresight and energy, pluck and energy to for- 
ward whatever enterprises they are interested in and who still retain an 
untarnished reputation through it all. Such a man is George F. Winters, 
superintendent of the Springfield Wagon Works. He is deserving of a 
great ileal of credit for what he has accomplished, for he has mounted the 
ladder of success without the aid of any one and by honest efforts, having 
from the beginning of his career s, mght to do well whatever be undertook. 

Mr. Winters was born September 13, 1873, at Cincinnati, Arkansas, 
lie is a son of Charles Winters, who was born in Dayton, Ohio, and who 
is now living in retirement in Springfield, after working for the Spring- 
field Wagon Works about twenty-four years. He came to this city in 
[883, having previously been employed by the James Oats Wagon Works 
at Cincinnati, Arkansas, making wagon gears under contract. He learned 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 1 99 

the wood worker's trade when a young man and became quite expert in 
the same. On March 9, 191 5, he reached the age of eighty years. He is a 
self-made man, has always been a great reader, and when nineteen years 
old taught school for some time in Chicago. For a period of nine years 
he was in the employ of the government, making wagons, and worked at 
this during the Civil war in Springfield. However, he spent three years 
of the war period as a private in an Iowa volunteer infantry regiment. Po- 
litically, he is now a Democrat, but in his earlier life was a Republican. He 
belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, and is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church. His wife was known in her maidenhood as Lucy Moller, 
a daughter of William Moller, of Springfield. To Charles Winter and 
wife eight children were born, namely: Delia is the wife of F. L. McClel- 
lan, who is in the postoffice service in Omaha, Nebraska; William is en- 
gaged in the poultry business at Houston, Texas; Charles, Jr., is connected 
with the wagon works at Fort Smith, Arkansas; George F., of this sketch; 
Samuel died in infancy; Hazel died in infancy; Winnie is the widow 7 of 
Lawrence Denman, deceased; Bert is engaged in the poultry business in 
Springfield. 

George F. Winters grew to manhood in Arkansas and received his 
education in the schools of Fayetteville. He left school when seventeen 
years of age and went to work in a grocery store, then sold hay for six 
months, after which he came to Springfield on October 23, 1890, and soon 
thereafter found employment at the Springfield Wagon Works, laboring in 
the yards for sixty cents a day, then worked in the wood shop there until 
1900, at bench work, and ran a wood shaper. He was then promoted to 
foreman of the mill room or the wood shop, which position he held until 
1914, when he was promoted to the responsible position he now holds, that 
of superintendent of the entire plant, the duties of which he is discharging 
in a manner that reflects much credit upon his ability and fidelity and to the 
entire satisfaction of all concerned. He has on an average one hundred and 
twenty men under his direction, and he knows how to handle them so as to 
get the best results and at the same time keep on the best of terms with 
them. He understands thoroughly every phase of the business and is a 
conscientious, industrious workman, who has been the recipient of the high- 
est trust from the head officials of the plant from the first. He has been 
employed continuously in this widely known plant for nearly twenty-five 
years. 

Mr. Winters was married in 1900 to Letha Van Hoosen, a daughter of 
Alex Van Hoosen, a traveling salesman, who was born in North Carolina. 
The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Winters is a Democrat. He carries large life insur- 
ance. He belongs to the Presbyterian church. 



1200 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



FRANK BOYDEX WILLIAMS. 



Une ui the must successful and Dest known members of the Greene 
county uar is I 1 rank ttoyden Williams, whose name tor years has figured 
prominently in important cases in local courts.. 

mr, wniianis was born at .Golden City, Barton county, .Missouri, 
Aovemuer 23, 1609. fie is a son of i*rank and Maria B. ^lviorganj Vvm- 
lams, natives of .Memphis, Tennessee, and Burksville, Kentucky, respec- 
tively. They grew to maturity in the South and were educated and married 
there, and made their home in Kentucky until soon after the close of the Civil 
war, when they removed from the Blue Grass state to Cedar county, 
Missouri. The father of our subject devoted his life to farming and stock 
raising. He removed from Cedar to Barton county and owned a good 
farm near Golden City. During the war between the states he was a lieu- 
tenant in Company T, Second Mississippi Cavalry, Confederate Army, 
under Gen. Nathan B. Forrest, one of the greatest military geniuses the 
war produced on either side, and Mr. Williams proved to be a faithful 
and gallant officer under this great chieftain until he was mustered out 
1 )ecember 2, 1862. 

Frank B. Williams received his education at Sparta, Wisconsin, and 
Watertown, South Dakota, attending the common schools there, later was 
a student at Yankton College, Yankton, South Dakota, then entered the 
law department of Washington University, St. Louis, .Missouri, where he 
made a good record and from which institution he was graduated, June 
20, 1895. lie was admitted to the bar at Searcy, |#kansas, soon after his 
graduation, and in 1896 he located for the practice of his profession at 
Springfield, Missouri, enrolling as an attorney-at-law, Greene county bar. 
March 9th of that year, and here he has remained to the present time, en- 
joying a good practice. He was elected a member of the Springfield city 
council in April. [898, and was re-elected in [900, and during that period 
he looked well to the interests of the city in every way. He was elected 
probate judge of Greene county, in November, i</>_\ and served one term 
of four years, after which he re-entered practice of the law, January 1, 1007, 
and in December, mu, he formed a partnership for the practice of his 
profession with Matthew 11. Gait, under the firm name of Williams & 
Gait, which still continues, with offices in the Woodruff buildine. 

a 

On June 27, 11)05. he united in marriage with Harriett E. Kellond, 
daughter of William A. and Fanny J. Kellond, a highly respected family 
ot Springfield, and to tin's union three children have been born, namely: 
Frances Kellond Williams. Harriett Morgan Williams, and (Catherine Sel- 
fridge Williams. 




JUDGE FRANK I!. WILLIAMS. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1201 

Politically, Judge Williams is a Democrat and is active in the affairs 
of the party. Fraternally, he belongs to the united lodge of Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen 
of the World, also belongs to the University Club, the Springfield Club, 
and the ( Country Club. 



FRANK W'VGAL. 



In most cases when a young man or a young woman starts out in life, 
they are at a loss to know what to undertake, and the consideration of what 
they are best intended for by nature is the last thing which they consider. 
They are apt to be guided by circumstances, choosing the undertaking or 
enterprise that offers itself must conveniently, or are governed by considera- 
tions of gentility, selecting something that is genteel, or so considered, or 
taking- up enterprises or professions that seem to offer the greatest reward 
for the least effort, or that give the most promise of social position. Frank 
Wygal, foreman blacksmith at the Springfield Wagon Works, selected a 
trade for which he was well qualified by nature, one that he liked, and, not 
being afraid of hard work, he has made a success at it. 

Mr. Wygal was born on March 17, 1854. at Newcastle, Pennsylvania, 
tic is a son of Daniel Wygal, who was born in western Pennsylvania, where he 
grew up, attended school, and learned the wagonmaker's trade, and finally 
went into business for himself at Newcastle, then came west, and continued 
his business in Eldora, Iowa, later moved to Cass. Missouri, then to Paola, 
Kansas, being in business for himself all the while, and under the firm name 
of Wygal & Sons he operated a large concern at Paola, his sons, Frank and 
Sylvester, being associated with him. His death occurred in Kansas at the 
age of seventy-six years, having remained active in business to the end. He 
was active in Republican politics, and he was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. His wife, who was known in her maidenhood as Mary Cubberson. 
died at the age of seventy-four years. To these parents ten children were 
born. 

Frank Wygal received a common school education. He spent his early 
boyhood in Pennsylvania, being eleven years of age, when, in 1865, about 
the close of the Civil war, his parents took him to Iowa. He went to work 
when eighteen years of age with B. Miller, manufacturer of wagons and 
buggies, with whom he remained three years, learning the trade, at which 
he became an expert in due time. He was then for a period of eight years 
associated with his brother and J . W. Miller in the same line of endeavor. He 
came to Springfield in 1884 and on August 1st of that year began working 
0°) 



[202 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

for the Springfield Wagon Works, as foreman of the blacksmith department, 
which position he has held continuously to the present time, a period of over 
thirty years, which fact is certainly a criterion of his fidelity, ability and good 
habits. He mastered all phases of the work in his department before coming 
here, and he has been quick to adopt new methods from time to time, thus 
keeping fully up-to-date, and he has done much to establish the sound repu- 
tation of this firm over the southwest. At present he has thirty hands under 
his direction. He resides in his own cozy home on Poplar street, which was 
built according to his own plans. 

Mr. W'vgal was married in [882 to Katie A Bigelow, a daughter of 
Seth G. Bigelow and wife, and to this union two children have been born — 
Winnifred C, who is secretary of the Young Women's Christian Association 
at Reno. Nevada. She has been highly educated, having attended the Spring- 
field high school, Drury College and the Normal, also the University of 
Xevada and took a post-graduate course at Columbia University, in Yew 
York. Olive, the youngest daughter, who was educated in the common and 
high schools of Springfield, is the wife of R. M. Humble, a farmer of Stone 
county, Missouri. 



REV. WILLIAM D. SIDMAN. 

Any conflict waged on our planet between good and evil belongs to 
the basic work of divine mind before it belongs to us. The "power not 
ourselves that makes for righteousness," is more interested in the success 
of the good cause than we can be. The constitution of this moral universe 
is against evil and oppression and injustice. The stars in their courses eter- 
nally fight against Sisera. The thought should gird one with strength for 
mortal endeavor. He who strikes with a hammer finds all the force of 
gravitation adding force to his blow. And he who combats any of the 
gigantic evils under the sun has the support of infinite and invincible al- 
lies. Let the fact nerve the arm and cheer the spirit of each halting re- 
former to the end of time. May it encourage us all to believe with Tenny- 
son in that "one far-off divine event to which the whole creation moves." 

Believing in the above theory, Rev. William 1). Sidman. superintendent 
of the Springfield district of the St. Louis Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, left a lucrative practice as a physician to take up the work 
of the ministry of the gospel in order that he might accomplish more good 
"between these walls of time," to which Longfellow referred in his poem, 
"The Builders." Rev. Sidman was born in Vinton county, Ohio, June 9, 
[860. He is a son of Wesley C. and Rebecca (Rose) Sidman. The father 
was born near Syracuse, .Yew York. September 11. [834. When a small 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I203 

boy lit- came to Ohio, where' he grew to manhood and received a common 
school education. He was a carpenter and cabinet maker by trade and be- 
came a very skilled workman. When the Civil war broke out he joined the 
Union army, in which he served four years, after which he returned to 
Ohio, but later removed to Illinois, where he continued to work at his trade, 
then went back to Ohio, and after spending a few years there came to 
Springheld, Missouri, and worked at his trade for some time, lie retired 
from active life six years ago. His wife, Rebecca Rose, was born near 
Logan, Hocking county, Ohio, where she grew to womanhood and received 
a common school education. Her death occurred September 27, 1909. To 
these parents seven children were born, namely: William D., of this sketch; 
John W. lives in St. Louis; Airs. Elizabeth Hamilton lives in Carterville, 
Missouri; Airs. Delia Jones lives in Springfield; Robert R. is deceased; Mrs. 
Captolia Irving resides in St. Louis, and l'.essie Al. is teaching in Spring- 
field, 

William D. Sidman grew to manhood in Ohio, and there he received 
a good education, was graduated from the Xelsonville high school, later 
studied medicine and was graduated from the medical department of the 
University of Cincinnati in 1884. He began the practice of his profession 
soon thereafter at Rushville, Ohio, and he came to Springfield. Missouri, in 
1887. He engaged successfully in the practice of his profession for a period 
of six years, building up a large practice as a general physician, but. believ- 
ing that the ministry was his true calling, he abandoned the practice of med- 
icine and joined the conference of the Alethodist Episcopal church in 1895, 
and has remained in the same to the present time, having had charge of 
churches of this denomination at the following places: Stockton, Republic, 
Greenfield, Osceola, Poplar Bluff and Marionville, Missouri. 

He is at present superintendent of the Springfield district of the St. 
Louis conference, to which responsible post he was assigned on March 18, 
1913. He is widely known throughout the conference as an aide and earn- 
est church worker and a learned theologian and forceful and accomplished 
pulpit orator. 

Rev. Mr. Sidman was married February 23, 1882, to Ina M. Carnes, 
who was born in Nelsonville, Ohio, and there grew to womanhood and 
received a high school education. She is a daughter of Alfred H. and 
Emily (Bridges) Carnes. Mrs. Sidman is a lady of admirable Christian 
character and is an active member of the various societies of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and she has made a host of warm personal friends since 
coming to Springfield, as has also her husband. Their union has been 
blessed by the birth of one child, Emma, who was born February 5, 1885, 
who has remained single and is living at home. 

Fraternally, our subject is a member of the Alasonic order. 



1204 GREENE COl'XTY, MISSOURI. 

ALBERT WOOD. 

From the farms of Greene county the city of Springfield has drawn its 
best citizenship during the past half century. The farmer boy, tiring of what 
he considers drudgery, is often glad of an opportunity to leave the plow and 
take a position in the city, no matter if the work is really harder than his 
former work. Often he is wise in making the change; again, it is questiona- 
ble if he betters his condition. The railroad shops here have absorbed the 
larger number of these young men from the rural districts. Employing such 
large numbers of men and paying good wages, the prospective employee has 
usually found a place waiting for him in some one of the many departments 
of the Frisco's local plants, and if he has been energetic, wide-awake and 
trustworthy, he has found his services appreciated and has been advanced 
accordinglv. Albert Wood is one of the boys who left the farm and went 
to work in the shops, and, while yet a young man, he has risen to the position 
of foreman of the steel car repairing department in the North Side Frisco 
shops. 

Mr. Wood was born in Franklin township, Greene county, on February 
22. 1886. He is a son of Alec J. and Sarah (Johnson) Wood, the mother, 
a daughter of Zadock Wood, is now fifty-two years old. The father was 
born and reared in this county, four miles from his present farm in Frank- 
lin township, where he owns fifty acres, and has always engaged in general 
farming, lie is fifty-four years old. Politically, he is a Republican, and 
for ten vears was road overseer in his community, and has done more for the 
good roads movement there than any other one man. Me is a member of the 
Xew Salem church. 

To Alec J. Wood and wife four children have been born, namely: 
Roxie is the wife of Julius Webber, a farmer of Franklin township; Albert, 
of this sketch; Clarence is employed in the North Side Frisco shops; Madge 
lives at home. 

James Wood, paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of 
England, having been born in the world's greatesl city — London. He emi- 
grated to America when a young man. locating hrst in Xew Orleans. Lou- 
isiana, where he lived tor some time, finally coming to Missouri in an early 
day. lie entered a homestead in Franklin township, Greene county, and here 
established the future home of the family, and developed a farm from the 
wilds. He served in the Federal army during the Civil war in the Home 
( mards. 

Albert Wood yrew to manhood on the homestead and there worked 
when he was a boy. He received his education in the district schools, and 
remained with his parents until U) n ~. when he came to Springfield and secured 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 205 

employment in the freight yards of the Xorth Side Frisco shops as laborer. 
Three months later he went to work at steel car repairing, and remained at 
this until 1912, when he was appointed foreman of the steel car repairing 
department there, and has held this responsible position ever since, giving 
splendid satisfaction. He has forty-two hands under his direction. 

.Mr. Wood was married in December, 1910, to Effie Bleckledge, a daugh- 
ter of Frank Bleckledge and wife. To this union two children have been 
born, namely : Thelma and Alice. 

Politicallv Mr. Wood is a Republican. He belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and to the Methodist Episcopal church. 



HARRY E. MARTIN. 



In all ages of the world industry, perseverance and energy, where intel- 
ligently applied, have achieved results which could only have been gained 
by having one end in view, and by improving every opportunity of ultimately 
attaining that object. Harry E. Martin, chief engineer of the Springfield 
Furniture Company, is an example of what can be accomplished when the 
spirit of determination is exercised in connection with the every -day affairs 
of life. 

Mr. Martin was born on March 17, 1879, at Richland, Missouri. He is 
a son of John H. and Mary ( Young) Martin, the latter a daughter of Pres- 
ton Young, and she is now about fifty-four years of age, the former being a 
year older, and they now make their home near Richland, Pulaski county, 
this state, where Mr. Martin is a machinist by trade. He formerly lived 
in Springfield, where he was chief engineer and master mechanic for the 
Davis planing mill for a period of twenty-five years, and for ten years he 
worked as a machinist at the Springfield Wagon Works. He is at this writ- 
ing building a corn-mill at Brumley, Miller county. He owns and operates 
a large farm in Pulaski county. His family consists of three children, 
namely : Harry E., of this sketch ; Icy is the wife of Arthur Bryant, a farmer 
of near Richland. Missouri : William lives in St. Louis, where he is working 
as electrician for the street railway company. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Charles Martin: he was 
a wagon manufacturer by trade, an early settler of Miller county, this state, 
and died there many years ago. 

Harry E. Martin received his education in the public schools of Rich- 
land and Springfield. He worked for some time in the Davis planing mill, 
where he finallv became fireman, but his principal work there was as an ap- 
prentice machinist under his father. Later be worked on a farm which his 



I2o6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

father owned. When only eighteen years old he was filling the position of 
engineer for the Culver Lumber .Manufacturing Company at Kansas City. 
In 1903 he returned to Springfield and became engineer for the Springfield 
Furniture Company, and in a short time was promoted to chief engineer, 
which position he still holds, discharging his duties with his usual fidelity 
and ability. He is also master mechanic at this plant, and has many hands 
under his direction. He is an expert machinist and does all the machine 
work for this large factor}-. He has kept well up-to-date both as a machinist 
and engineer, and has no superiors in either line in Greene county. He has 
also found time to make himself an expert electrician, and was instrumental 
in obtaining the new electric plant lor the concern with which he is now con- 
nected. He is a self-made man. and learned to be an electrician through ex- 
tensive home study, taking the course of the American Correspondence 
School. 

Air. Martin was married in December. i<)OC to Lillian Bergstresser. a 
daughter of Charles and Ellen (East) Bergstresser. of Harlan, Iowa. This 
union has been without issue. Mr. and Mrs. Martin own a pleasant home 
on the National Boulevard, where they operate a chicken hatchery, composed 
of thirty-eight incubators. 

Politically, Mr. Martin is a Democrat. Me belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias, Woodmen of the World, and to the National Association of Sta- 
tionary Engineers. lie is now serving In-- second term as treasurer of the 
local order of the latter. Religiously, he is a member of the First Christian 
church. 



NAPOLEON GOSNEY. 



It is the dreams ahead that keep hope in us all. To some it is dreams 
of financial success, to others political power; still others, perhaps, it is 
dreams of health, pleasure, fame or the chance to be of service to mankind. 
To those who. in earl) life, fate lias not been overly kind, it has been the 
dreams of the possible opportunities held by the mystical future that has 
given them hope to continue the battle, often against seemingly overwhelm- 
ing odds. Napoleon Gosney, for many years one of the leading contractors 
of Springfield, who fur some time has been living retired, had dreams when 
he was a hoy, ami these led him to a useful and succesful life in a material 
way, as well as caused him to so shape his ends as to become a helpful 
citizen. 

Mr. Gosney was born at Ottawa, Canada, May 24, [852. He is a son 
of Andrew and Delphine Gosney. The father was horn near Montreal, 
Canada, and the mother was horn at Ottawa. They grew in their native 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I207 

localities and received common school educations, and were married in Ot- 
tawa. Andrew Gosney was a contractor in stone and lime, and was also a 
stone cutter. He died at the age of forty-five years, when our subject was a 
small boy. 11 is wife survived to the advanced age of ninety years, and her 
parents lived to he over one hundred years of age. To .Andrew Gosney 
and wife eleven children were born, named as follows: Delphine, deceased; 
Severe died in 1910; Henry, Emma and Leon, all deceased; Napoleon, of 
this review; Emily, deceased; Lenore lives in Minnesota; Mrs. Eugenia 
Dugan is living near Cleveland, Ohio; Exzelda lives in Ottawa, Canada, 
and one died in infancy. 

Napoleon Gosnev grew to manhood in Canada and received a common 
school education. He followed in the footsteps of his father in a business 
way and learned to be a stone cutter and mason. When seventeen years of 
age he left Canada and moved to Akron, Ohio, where he lived about four 
vears, then traveled over the East and South working at his trade. He 
came to Missouri in 1877, locating in Springfield later, and here engaged in 
construction work, organizing at different times several construction com- 
panies and became one of the best known men in this line of endeavor in 
this section of the state. He has done an immense amount of construction 
work for the Frisco. Operating for many years on an extensive scale, giv- 
ing his close attention to his affairs and exercising good judgment and fore- 
sight, he accumulated a comfortable competence. He retired from active 
life about eight years ago on account of failing health. 

Mr. Gosney was married at Carthage, Missouri, September 10, 1878, 
to Josephine A. Smith, who was born in Winchester, Indiana, August 16, 
1858, and she spent her girlhood days in the Hoosier state and was edu- 
cated there. She removed with her parents in 1872 to Jasper county, Mis- 
souri, where the family home was established. She is a daughter of George 
A. Smith and Nancy Ann Paxton, who were born in Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Smith was a millwright by trade. He bought a large farm in Jasper coun- 
ty, Missouri, and was a successful farmer, and there his death occurred 
about 1884. His wife was a native of Pennsylvania, and she was reared 
and married in Cleveland, Ohio. She died in 1892 at the family home near 
Carthage. 

Five children have been born to Napoleon Gosney and wife, namely: 
Eugenia May, wife of William Henry McCowan, was born March 5, 1879, 
and is at present living in Springfield. She has six children: Josephine 
Anna, born September 5, 1904; William Henry .McCowan. Jr.. born March 
6. 1907: Frances Eugenia, born March 15, 1910; Richard Gosney, born 
July 16, 1911; Mary Eileen, born April 19, 1913. and Xell Genevieve, born 
June 25, 1914. Vera Pearl, wife of O. B. McGlothlan, was born October 
19, 1.88 1, and is living on a farm in Webster county, Missouri. She has 



I208 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

three children: Loriene Josephine, born May 14, 1904; Lucile Donella, 
born December 30, 1905, and Vera Cordus, born December 24, 1907. Les- 
ter S., born August 5, 1883, is working in Kansas City at this writing. 
Josephine and Reynold are both deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Gosney is a Republican and has been loyal to the party 
through both victory and defeat. During his residence in Springfield of 
twenty-two years he has become well known and has always been regarded 
as a good and honorable citizen in ever}' respect. The family belong to the 
Christian church, to which Mr. Gosney gives liberal support. 



CHARLES LOUIS KING. 

For many years Charles Louis King has occupied a prominent place in 
the business circles of Walnut Grove and few men are better known in 
Greene, Polk and Dade counties. As merchant, stock man and banker, each 
role having been successfully followed by him, his career has been charac- 
terized by industry and sound judgment, and fair dealing is his watchword 
in all his transactions. He has for a decade been president of the Citizen's 
Bank at Walnut Grove. He is optimistic, looking on the bright side of life 
and never complains at the rough places in the road, knowing that life is a 
battle in which no victories are won by the slothful, but that the prize is to 
the vigilant and the strong of heart. 

Air. King was born at Walnut Grove. Missouri. February 7. 1868. He 
is a son of John M. and Nancy E. (Carlock) King, the father born at Walnut 
Grove on November 12. 1839, and the mother was born at Dadeville, this 
state, on October 5. [845, each representatives of pioneer families in this 
section of the Ozarks. They grew to maturity amid frontier scenes, were 
educated in the earlv-dav subscription schools, and upon reaching maturity 
married and established their home at Walnut Grove, where Mr. King spent 
his life, engaged in various pursuits, such as farming and operating a hotel, 
and was always well and favorably known throughout this locality. During 
the Civil war John M. King enlisted in Company K. Sixth Missouri Infantry. 
Federal army, and served faithfully as a private for two years, when he 
was discharged on account of disability. 

Charles L. King grew to manhood in his native community and received 
his education in the Walnut Grove schools, and here he has spent the major 
portion of his life. When twenty years of age he went to California and 
herded cattle on one of the large ranches of that state for a period of five 
years, during which time he became an excellent judge of cattle, and. upon 
returning to Walnut Grove, bought and shipped live stock for a period of six 




CHARLES L, KING 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 209 

years with much success, then operated a drug store here for three years, 
enjoying a good trade. He then went to Oklahoma, where he engaged in 
the hardware business for a year, then returned to Walnut Grove and organ- 
ized the Citizen's Bank, and from that time to the present he has been presi- 
dent, a period of ten years, during which his able management and conservative 
policy have resulted in the building up of one of the sound and safe hanking 
institutions in this part of the state and a large business is carried on with 
the country, a general banking business being done along the most approved 
and modern methods of banking. Mr. King also finds time to deal extensively 
in the mule business. 

On December 31, 1912, Mr. King was united in marriage to Audrey B. 
Morgan, of Humansville, Missouri, a daughter of Daniel \Y. and Eliza A. 
Morgan, a highly respected and well-known family of that place. 

Politically Mr. King is a Democrat and has been more or less active in 
local partv affairs, although not as a candidate for public honors. In 1907 
he united with the Presbyterian church at Walnut Grove, of which he has 
since been a consistent member. Fraternally he belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks at Springfield and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Walnut Grove. He is a good mixer, friendly, obliging and 
has no trouble in retaining the many friendships which he forms everywhere 
he goes. 



JOHN W. HARTT. 



In these days of large commercial transactions, when credits cut a 
large factor in the daily round of business, the province of the banker is 
very wide and very important. The excellence of the banks of the pres- 
ent compared with those of the past gives to all classes of business men 
first-class security for their deposits, assistance when they are in need of 
ready money to move their business, and a means of exchanging credits- 
that could be accomplished in no other way. In a large measure the suc- 
cess of the present time in all branches of business is largely the result of 
the present banking methods. One of the flourishing and substantial banks 
of Greene county is the Bank of Strafford, of which John W. Hartt is the 
present able and popular cashier. 

Mr. Hartt was born in Hardeman county, Tennessee, February 19, 
1869. He is a son of John S. and Eliza A. (Johnson) Hartt. The father 
was born in Missouri, August 10, 1839, and was reared on a farm in this 
state. He received a limited education in the public schools. When a young 
man he learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed in later life. He 
also devoted considerable time to the butchering business, maintaining the 



& 



T2IO GKEENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

same in several different parts of his native state, his last location being 
.Fair Grove, Greene county, where his death occurred in the year 1889. He 
was a member of the Baptist church. His wife was born in Hardeman 
county, Tennessee, January 13, 1841, and there she grew to womanhood 
and was educated, coming to Missouri in 1876. She survived her husband 
two years, dying in hair Grove. She, too, was a member of the Baptist 
church, 'i o these parents seven children were born, namely : Joseph, de- 
ceased; Amanda, deceased; John W., of this sketch; James, deceased; 
Frank, deceased; Margaret; Mrs. Mae Putman lives in Springfield. 

The first seven years of our subject's life were spent in Tennessee. 
He lived with his parents in different parts of Missouri until he was six- 
teen years old, when he came with the family to Fair Grove. He received 
a common school education and when a young man worked on the farm 
and also learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for some time. 
He worked for some time in different stores, including the Long Brothers' 
general merchandise .store at Fair. Grove. He then carried the mail for 
eighteen months; then went into the drug business for himself; later be- 
came assistant cashier of the Bank of Fair Grove, in which he remained 
two years, and then went to Strafford and assisted in organizing the Bank 
oT Strafford, of which he is the present cashier. Me has done much toward 
building up a popular and sound banking institution which would be a credit 
to any community. It has a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, is ex- 
cellently housed and modemly equipped and managed under safe and con- 
servative methods, and has a large list of depositors. A general banking 
business is carried on. The directors of the bank are L. C. Ricketts, Theo. 
Thorson, A. 1!. drier. I '. A. Womack, I. 1. Foster, Jr.. W. P. (amp. J. YV. 
Hartt. The officers are: L. C. Ricketts, president; Theo. Thorson, vice- 
president; J. W. Hartt, cashier, and T. F. Womack, bookkeeper. 

Mr. Hartt came to Strafford in February, [911, and on the 14th of 
that month the hank began business, which lias increased gradually in vol- 
ume ever since. 

Our subject was married September 15. [896, to Sarah !. Minor, who 
was born in Kansas in [877. She is a daughter of William and Amanda 
Minor. They spent their lives on a farm and are now deceased. 

Mrs. Hartt grew to womanhood on the home farm and received a good 
education. One child has been born to our subject and wife. Pauline Hartt, 
whose birth occurred October _>4, 1907. 

Politically, Mr. Hartt is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Masonic order, and in religious matters he is a member of the Baptist 
church. He is a man who has relied very largely upon his own resources 
and has succeeded in life despite obstacles that would probably have thwart- 
ed the purpose of a man of less ambition and determination. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 121 I 



JAMES W. REILLY 



'Die name Reilly has long been a familiar one among railroad men of 
Springfield, for both our subject and bis father before him were long on 
the Frisco payrolls in this city, having come here from the great Crescent 
City of the far South shortly after the cli.se of the war between the states. 
The one is now living in retirement and the other has passed on to his eternal 
rest. 

James W. Reilly was born on January 25, 1856, at Xew Orleans, Lou- 
isiana, lie is a son of John and Bridget ( Fitzpatrick) Reilly, and, as the 
names would indicate, his Irish blood comes from both sides of the house. 
The father of our subject was born in County Cavan. Ireland, where he spent 
his boyhood days, emigrating to Xew York City when a young man, and 
from there went south to Xew Orleans, working some time as a laborer and 
gang foreman. Coming to Missouri in the sixties he assisted in building the 
St. Louis & San Francisco railroad line from St. Louis to Springfield, work- 
ing from Rolla to Xeosho. Later he became gang foreman in the North Side 
shops, Springfield, having long been connected with the blacksmith depart- 
ment, and was numbered among the Frisco employees for a period of twenty 
years. Mis death occurred in [897 at the age of sixty-seven years, and be 
was buried in St. Mary's cemetery, lie and his wife were both members 
of the Catholic church. The mother of our subject died in 1886 at the age 
of fifty-five vears. The following children were born to John Reilly and 
wife, namely: James W.. of this sketch; Charles, who was a car repairer 
in the Frisco shops at Springfield, died when forty-nine years of age; Man- 
is the widow of Warren Reed, deceased, and lives with her children in St. 
Louis; Eugene died in infancy; John is a car repairer in the Frisco's Xorth 
Side shops, Springfield; Ellen married John Lowell, a traveling engineer 
for the Chicago \- Eastern Illinois railroad and lives at Danville, Illinois. 

lames W. Reilly was twelve years of age when he came to St. Louis. 
Two vears later be was employed as water-boy. when the road was being 
built into Springfield, having thus begun his railroad career at a tender age, 
after a brief schooling. However, it was not long until his father removed 
with him to a farm, where they remained some time, then young Reilly re- 
turned to the city and went to work in the North Side railroad shops, learning 
the trade of car repairer. He worked as foreman for sixteen years in the 
North Side shops, also as journeyman for some time. At intervals he had en- 
gaged in farming for short periods. In September, ign, he left the road 
permanently and has since lived in retirement. He owns several valuable prop- 
erties in Springfield, which he keeps rented. Fie now lives on the site where 
his father built the first bouse for the family upon coming here, it being one 



1212 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

of three homes in the section of the city now known as "the North Side." 
Our subject erected his present splendid residence in 191 1. 

Air. Reilly was married in 1879 to Mary E. Hooper, a daughter of 
Spencer and Harriet F. (Kane) Hooper. Her father was a native of North 
Carolina, from which state he came to Missouri in 1845, located in Greene 
county, and the Hooper family lived on a farm on the Cherry street road, 
near Springfield. Mrs. Reilly grew to womanhood in this locality and was 
educated in the common schools of Greene county. 

To our subject and wife six children have been born, namely: Paul 
married Hattie Dodson and is employed as switchman in St. Louis for the 
Iron Mountain railroad; Kate married T. E. McKenna, a Springfield switch- 
man, and they have four children, Francis, Thomas, Elenore and Paul ; James 
L. is a switchman for the Cotton Belt at Jonesboro, Kansas. He married 
Maud Gaffker and they have two children, Clifford and Louise; Charles died 
in infancy: Ralph is engaged in the grocery business on Jefferson street, this 
city ; he married Annie Connelly and they have two children, Connelly and 
Clarence; Clarence died on May 26, 191 4. 

Politically, Mr. Reilly is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Catholic Knights and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



COLUMBUS JEFFERSON PIKE. M. D. 

Proper intellectual discipline, thorough professional knowledge and the 
possession and utilization of the qualities and attributes essential to success 
has made Dr. Columbus Jefferson Pike, of W'illard. Greene county, eminent 
in his chosen calling, and he has by his own efforts risen to a place in the 
front rank of the enterprising general practitioners in a county long distin- 
guished for the high order of its medical talent. 

Doctor Pike was born at Brighton, Polk county. Missouri. March 12, 
[861. He is a son of James M. and Polly ( DeRossett) Pike. The father 
was born in [808 in Montgomery county, Tennessee, and in that state he 
spent his boyhood days and received his education in the town iff Clarksville. 
remaining in his native state until 1835, when he emigrated to Missouri and 
settled on a farm in Polk county. He had married in Tennessee and three 
of his children were born there before he removed with his family to Mis- 
souri. Upon coming to this state he tirst settled on one hundred and sixty 
acres near Morrisville, where he lived for seven years, then sold out and 
bought about three hundred acres near Brighton, and lie operated this excel- 
lent farm until 1N54. when he entered the mercantile business at Brighton, 
which he continued until [863, when his store was burned, and he returned 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1213 

to his farm, where he resided until his death in 1878. He was a prominent 
man in that community. He was a Democrat and a Southern sympathizer 
during the war between the states, and religiously he belonged to the Bap- 
tist church. James M. Pike was twice married, first to Miss Mallard, by 
which union twelve children were born, namely : William, born in 1830, died 
in 1904; Sarah lives in Slagle; James M., Jr., died in 1912; Mrs. Mary Jane 
Slagle died in 1862; the fifth and sixth children, twins, died in infancy; Mrs. 
Lucy Brvant is deceased; Mrs. Rebecca Slagle lives at Brighton, Missouri; 
Pollv Ann is deceased: George W. lives in Texas; Carney and Joseph J. both 
reside at Slagle, Polk county. Polly DeRossett was the second wife of James 
M. Pike, and to this union ten children were born, namely : Mrs. Lora Lick- 
lider lives at Slagle, Polk county; Richard lives at Cliquot, Missouri; Emily 
died May 25, 1014; Thomas Leander lives at J'leasant Hope, Polk county; 
Ransom is a merchant at March, this state; Sebain is a Baptist preacher and 
lives at Bolivar, Polk county; Dr. Columbus J., of this sketch; the eighth and 
ninth children, twins, died in infancy; Robert I... the youngest of the twenty- 
two children, is engaged in farming at Rocky Ford, Colorado. The mother 
of these children. Polly DeRossett, was born in Tennessee in 1825. and her 
death occurred in 1905. 

Dr. Columbus J. Pike, of this sketch, spent his boyhood days on his 
father's farm, and he was seventeen years old when the death of his father 
occurred. He received his early education in the public schools at Slagle, 
Polk county. He began life for himself by entering the drug business at 
Brighton, which he continued four years, reading medicine the meantime, 
and finally entered the Kansas City Medical College, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1890. having made an excellent record there. He began at once the 
practice of his profession at Pleasant Hope, his native county, where he got 
a good start, but remained only eighteen months, when he located at North- 
view, Webster county. Missouri, and practiced there for a period of eight 
vears in a most satisfactory manner, then came to Willard, Greene county. 
Desiring to further add to his medical knowledge, he took a post-graduate 
course in the New York Post-Graduate College, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1904, after which he returned to Willard. and has since been con- 
tinuously engaged in the general practice of medicine, enjoying all the while 
a lucrative practice, and uniform success has attended his work in his voca- 
tion. He stands high with the people and his professional brethren in this 
section of the state, as may be surmised from the fact that he was president 
of the Southwestern Missouri Medical Society for the year 1913, his office 
expiring in April, 1914. In this responsible position he discharged his duties 
in a manner that reflected credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. He is also a member of the Missouri State Medical Association. 
the Greene County Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 



1 2 14 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, fraternally a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Court of Honor, both at Willard; and in religious 
matters he belongs to the Baptist church at Willard, of which his wife is also 
a member, and in which she takes an active part. 

Dr. I'ike was married, August 15, 1880, to Mollie Ryan, who was born, 
reared and educated in Polk county. She is a daughter of William Ryan, an 
early settler and prominent in Polk county. 

Three children have been born to Dr. Pike and wife, namely: Ethel, 
who married Horace Dameron. a farmer of Rogersville, Missouri, has one 
child, Lucile; Charles R., who married Gettie brazier, a native of Greene 
county, is engaged in the drug business at Willard, and they have two chil- 
dren, Lillian Belle and Robert Kay; Arbaleta is at home with her parents. 



WILLIAM G. CORNELL. 

it is not everyone that can make a success of the real estate business. 
Some men fail at it no matter how long and hard they may try. Those who 
enter this line of endeavor should study themselves carefully, weigh their good 
and bad qualities accurately and be influenced rather by sound reason than by 
impulse. If he has a mind capable of grasping situations quickly and accu- 
rately, if the arithmetic is the easiest to him of all text-books, if be likes the 
work better than anything else, ami, finally, if he is willing to be uniformly 
courteous, pleasant and honest, then be may open an office and announce the 
fact that he has entered the real estate field as his serious occupation. We do 
not know whether William C. Cornell did all this or not, but as manager of 
the National Land and Investment Company, of Springfield, he has shown 
himself to be a capable real estate man in every respect, well suited by nature 
for the work which lie has chosen. 

.Mr. Cornel] was born in Greene county, Missouri. January 3, 1^74. and 
he comes .if one of our honored old families, being a son of Leonard W. and 
Elizabeth ( Witherspoon ) Cornell, the latter still living at the age of sixty- 
seven years, the father having died in 1914 at the age of seventy-two years, 
lie was a sun of ( harles < ornell, a native of the state of Michigan, who died 
tl ere at an advanced age. 

Leonard W. ('ornell was a soldier in the Union army, having enlisted 
in [861, soon after the outbreak of the Civil war. in a Michigan cavalry 
regiment, but owing to sicknes- overtaking him he did not get to the front 
aCnd was discharged for disability, but upon bis recovery be re-enlisted in 
a different company and regiment and served until the close of the war with 
an excellent record, lie is remembered as a quiet, home loving man and 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I2r 5 

a guild neighbor. Our subject's maternal grandparents were William and 
Mary Witherspoon, who were well known Greene count)' farming people, 
the former having died in [882, but the latter is still living, having attained 
the unusual age of ninety-four years, and she is in possession of all her 
faculties and enjoying good health. To Leonard \Y. Cornell and wife 
seven children were born, four suib and three daughters, namely: Arthur, 
John, Hiram, William C, Mrs. E. O. Rogers, Mrs. Xettie Jones and Mettie 
Cornell. 

William C. Cornell spent his early life on the farm, removing with the 
rest of the family from Greene county to Kansas when he was young, and 
in that state he attended the public schools and later was a student at Union 
College, Lincoln, Nebraska. His father was engaged in the wholesale hay 
and grain business, and our subject assisted him in this work until he was 
twenty-three years of age. and then began life for himself by engaging in 
the livery business in Springfield, Missouri, fur two years, after which he 
was associated with the Deering Harvester Company until this concern con- 
solidated with the fnternational Harvester Company, and he continued with 
the last named firm until [909, giving eminent satisfaction to both. In that 
year he began his career as a real estate dealer in Springfield and has con- 
tinued in this line to the present lime with ever increasing success, and is 
at this writing manager of the National Land and Investment Company, 
which is doing an extensive business under his able guidance. 

Mr. Cornell was married on October 21, 1897, to Delia Berrv, a daugh- 
ter of James and Elizabeth (McCurdy) Berry, both still living in Greene 
county, at the home where the subject of this sketch was born. They were 
among the early pioneers of this count)'. Mr. Kerry was born in North 
Carolina, January 1, 1841, and he made the long overland journev from 
that state to Greene count) - , Missouri, with his parents when he was eight 
years of age. and he has since resided in this county. The original farm, 
which the grandfather entered from the government, is still in possession 
of the family. Elizabeth McCurdy was a daughter of Thomas McCurdv, 
and she was born in this county, February 3, 1842, and here she grew up 
and married Mr. Berry in i860, shortly before the breaking out of the 
Civil war, in which he served as a member of the Home Guards of Spring- 
field. His father, William Berry, was a native of North Carolina, where 
he spent his earlier years and married. He spent his latter years in Greene 
county, dying here at the age of seventy-four years. To James and Eliza- 
beth Berry the following children were born: O. D., R. P., G. F., J. B., 
Mrs. L. F. Patterson, and Delia, wife of our subject. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Cornell has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Cornell is a Democrat. He belongs to the United 
Commercial Travelers, and is a member of the Presbvterian church. 



I2l6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

' SEBASTIAN DINGELDEIN. 

The late Sebastian Dingeldein, for many years a well known business 
man of Springfield, afforded in his life and its success and other evidence 
that industry, economy and straightforward dealings constitute the keynote 
to honorable competency. Pre-eminence is a goal that most men strive to 
attain. No matter what field, whetber it lie literature, art, science or com- 
merce, the ambition of the true man will push him to such endeavor that 
his success shall stand out with glaring distinctness and his position shall 
be above all others. 

.Mr. Dingeldein. as the name implies, was of Teutonic blood, his birth 
having occurred in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. October 15, 1842, and was 
one of a large family, seven daughters and six sons, and there he grew to 
manhood and received his education. He learned the trade of brewer and 
traveled around for some seven years. Emigrating to America, he landed 
at New York City. October 6, 1867, and went from there to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and in October, i8(><X. he went to St. Louis. Missouri. He 
worked in the largest breweries and malt houses in that city for over eight 
years, and then came to Springfield, this state. Here he engaged in the 
brewery business the rest of his active life, the brewery in question having 
been built in [872 by Buehner & Finkenauer. Mr. Dingeldein leased this 
property in October, [876, for ten years, and in June. [882, bought it before 
the lease expired, and for a period of fourteen rears he was owner of the 
Southwest brewery, located on College street. It is a substantial plant with 
walls of the best rock and laid in cement, the cellar having a capacity of 
twelve hundred barrels. When first started the brewery turned out eighl 
hundred barrels per day. but Mr. Dingeldein increased its capacity until, in 
1882. it made twenty-one hundred barrels per day. He thoroughly under- 
stood every phase of the business and built up a large and lucrative trade. 
shipping bis products all over the country. He retired from active life a 
tew years prior to bis death, which occurred on March 24. [904. His 
father died in Germany in [859 and his mother died in [862. 

Mr. Dingeldein was married in St. Louis to Dora Stuedt, who was 
born in Keppeln, Prussia, April 5. 1N44. She is a daughter of Peter and 
Annie (Greisher) Stuedt. whose family consisted of eight children, four 
of whom are still living — Mrs. Dingeldein, of Springfield; two daughters in 
Illinois, and one in Prussia. Mi's. Dingeldein grew to womanhood in Ger- 
nianv and received her education in the common schools there: however, 
her textbook training was very limited. Her teacher was a man who had 
taught in the schools for over fifty years, teaching all grades, and it was 
compulsory for children to attend school two years to the local minister for 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 12 1 7 

Bible education, Bible history, etc. Airs. Dingeldein is known to her many 
friends as a woman of kindness, charity and hospitality, and her beautiful 
home on College street is often visited by her many friends. Religiously, 
she is a Protestant and belongs to the German Evangelical church. 

To Mr. and Airs. Dingeldein four children were born, namely: Julius 
\\ .. born in St. Louis on January 24. 1870; Peter Edward, born in St. 
Louis on December- 25, 1873; Amelia Margareta, horn in 1882 in Spring- 
field, and William Sebastian, horn in Springfield, August 18, 1885, the last 
named being deceased. 



GEORGE W. SMALL. 



Americans are often spoken of as a restless race, and this is unques- 
tionably true. Thousands of trains are constantly speeding from one place 
to another, carrying families to new localities — everybody hunting a bet- 
ter place to live. Most of them would be Letter off to remain in their old 
communities. So when we find a man like George \\ . Small, of Jackson 
township, Greene county, who has spent his entire life of sixty-eight years 
on the same farm, we arc ready to extend our congratulations, for such a 
man is worthy of admiration. It shows that he has had stability and a wise 
foresight. 

Mr. Small was born on the farm where be now resides, ( (ctober 16, 
1846. He is a son of Robert B. and Martha R. ( Donnall) Small, natives of 
Rockingham county. North Carolina, but when small children they moved 
with their parents from that state to Tennessee, where they were reared on 
farms and received common school educations, and they were married in 
that state and remained there until the year 1833, when they emigrated to 
Greene county. Missouri, being among the first settlers, and here our sub- 
ject's father entered land from the government and owned seven hundred 
acres at the time of his death. He was a very successful farmer and was 
one of the substantial men of his locality and influential in county affairs. 
His death occurred August 7, 1861. His widow survived many years, dy- 
ing July 17, 1897, mi the home place. These parents were members of the 
Presbyterian church. Ten children were born to them, namely: Mrs. 
Sarah Ross, deceased; Airs. Mary J. Barnes; James B. is deceased: Mrs. 
Cordelia Duke is deceased; Columbus lives in Greene county; George W., 
of this sketch; Mrs. Christina Cavin, deceased; Julia is living with the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Willie and Robert, deceased. 

George W. Small grew to manhood on the home farm and was edu- 
cated in the district schools. When twenty-one years of age he bought the 
^77) 



1215 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

homestead, which he has kept well improved and well tilled. He has one 
of the choice farms of the township, consisting of five hundred and forty- 
six acres. He carries on general farming on an extensive scale and has 
prospered by his able management. He keeps an excellent grade of live- 
stock of all kinds and is a believer in progress in all lines. 

Mr. Small was married in 1876 to Harriett A. Pipkin, who was born, 
reared and educated in Greene county. She was the daughter of Louis and 
Frankie (Roberts) Pipkin, highly respected farming people of this county, 
the Pipkin family having long been a well established one here. The death 
of Mrs. Small occurred January 7, 1878. The union of our subject and 
wife was without issue. Mr. Small has never remarried. 

Politically, Mr. Small is a Democrat. He belongs to the Masonic 
order, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He has never 
been especially active in public affairs, but has always been influential for 
good in his community. 



JACKSON P. C. LANGSTON. 

A man like Jackson P. C. Langston, farmer of Jackson township, 
Greene county, is deserving of a great deal of credit, who. thrown upon 
his own resources at a tender age, and in a number of ways handicapped 
for the battle of life, lias, nevertheless, forged ahead and kept the even 
tenor of his way until he is not only regarded as a successful farmer but as 
a good citizen in every respect. 

Ah - . Langston was horn in Christian count}-. Missouri. October 11, 
1856, near the town of Linden. He is a son of George W. and Elizabeth 
(Hayden) Langston, the father born near Nashville, Tennessee, in 1836, 
and the mother was horn near Bowling Green, Kentucky. George \V. Lang- 
ston was brought by his parents to Greene county, Missouri, when a small 
child and here he grew to manhood on a farm and received a common 
school education. Ills wife was but a child when she accompanied her 
parents from the Blue < irass state to this county, and here she grew up on 
a farm and was educated in the district schools, and here they were mar- 
ried in [855. Mr. Langston worked on the farm when young and later 
handled a great deal of live stock and was a good business man. While 
driving cattle to St. Louis at the age of twenty-three years he was seized 
with an illness and returned home and died on April [2, 1858. His widow 
later married John P. Simpson, but she. too, was fated to till an early grave. 
She left two children, Jackson P. ('.. of this sketch, and a daughter by her 
last marriage, Mrs. Sarah Comstock. 

The subject of this sketch was but a child when he lost his parents, and 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1219 

he was reared by his grandparents, having been six years old when taken 
into their home. He grew up on the farm, learned to work there, and was 
given the advantages of a fairly good education. He remained with his 
grandparents until a young man, then began life for himself by renting 
different farms and thereby got a start. In 1879 he bought a farm near 
Strafford, Greene county, which he later sold and bought another farm 
west of that town. Selling it, be purchased the place where he now re- 
sides, owning eighty acres of productive land, which lie keeps well tilled 
and well improved and on which is to he found a cozy cottage and conven- 
ient outhouses; in fact, he built his own modern home and made practi- 
cal lv all the improvements now seen on the place. He has lived in Jackson 
township forty-five years. He handles a great deal of live stock from year 
to year. 

Mr. Langston was married in 1877 to Sophronia Comstock, • who was 
born in Tennessee, in March, 1858. She was brought -to Greene county, 
Missouri, when small ami was reared here on a farm, that of her parents, 
and attended the rural schools. She is a daughter of Luther B. and Nancy 
( Ferguson) Comstock, both now deceased. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Langston, namely: 
Hettie, who was the wife of A. B. Grier, now deceased; Arby J. lives in 
Springfield; Mrs. Mazie Sweetin lives in Cuba, Missouri; Inez is single 
and at home with her parents. 

Politically, Mr. Langston is active in Republican affairs. He served 
very acceptably as deputy sheriff of Greene county for two years, was also 
constable at Stafford for a period of six years, and he was a committeeman 
from Jackson township for twelve years. In all three capacities he proved 
faithful, alert and energetic and was highly praised by his fellow partisans. 



DOMINO DANZERO. 



From the far-away land of purple peaks and turquois skies, the genial 
clime of sunny Italy, the favored haunt of authors and painters, bails Dom- 
ino Danzero, who is proprietor of a popular bakery in Springfield. Inherit- 
ing many of the commendable traits of head and heart of the respectable 
middle classes of the realm of the once mighty Caesars, be has proven to be 
a good citizen of Greene count)-, a man of industry, good habits and proper 
decorum, and while he at times longs for the subtle beauties of his pic- 
turesque home land, as is quite natural and right, he nevertheless appre- 
ciates the opportunities in this our land of the free and is content to re- 
main in the broad republic of the west. 



I 2 JO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Air. Danzero was born near Turin, Italy, January 13, 1871. He is a 
son of Jack and Angelina Danzero, both natives of the same vicinity in 
which our subject was born, and there they grew to maturity, received com- 
mon school educations and there married and established their home, and 
the father is still living in his native land and is still active, being a painter 
and decorator by trade and is a highly skilled workman. The mother died 
when our subject was rive years of age. To these parents two children 
were born, Domino, of this sketch, and John, who died when eleven years 
of age. 

Domino Danzero grew to manhood in Italy, and there he received a 
good common school education, attending high school two years. When 
nineteen years of age he emigrated to America and settled in Chicago, Illi- 
nois, where he worked in a bakery for four years, during which time he 
mastered the various phases of this business. From there he came to St. 
Louis and traveled for a bakery there for a period of seven years, giving 
his employers entire satisfaction, being energetic and courteous to the trade. 
He then came to Springfield, Missouri, where he has since made his home. 
At first he managed a restaurant of his own, then opened a bakery on Jer- 
ferson street, and about two years ago built his own bakery at Elm and 
Pearl streets, which he has since operated with ever increasing success and 
ba< built up an extensive trade owing to the superior quality of his products 
which find a very ready market. His plant is sanitary in every respect and 
is modernly equipped and only skilled employees are to lie found here. Prompt 
and honest service is Ins aim and he has therefore won the good will of 
the people. 

.Mr. Danzero was married in St. Louis, \ugust iS, 1902, to Bridget 
Roetto, who was born near Monett, Missouri, February 19. 1883. and there 
grew to womanhood and received a good education. She is a daughter of 
Charles and Katherine Roetto, both natives of Italy (born in 1852 and 
1S57. respectively), where they spent their earlier years, but emigrated to 
the United States in an early day and settled in Missouri. Mr. Roetto has 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in this Mate for a period of forty-two vears, 

has become wealthy through his g 1 management and wise foresight, and 

is the owner of several finely improved and valuable farms near Monett. 
where he and his wife are still living and are well and favorably known in 
that locality. Mr. and Mrs. Roetto are the parents of nine children. 

'I wo children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Danzero. namely: An- 
gelina, born September 26. [903, and Leola, born June 14, 1907. 

Politically. Mr. Danzero is a Republican. Religiously, he is a member 
of the Catholic church, and. fraternally, he holds membership in the Knights 
ot Columbus and Modern Woodmen. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 22 1 



ARTHUR W. BRYANT. 



In reading over the record of the lives of many of the leading citizens 
one becomes impressed with the fact that certain families show at the outset 
a strong inclination toward books and learning generally, or in at least 
keeping up with the times on current topics, especially dealing with national 
affairs. The Bryant family, which has long been well established in Greene • 
county, is one of this type, and we find that Arthur W. Bryant, at present a 
progressive merchant of Strafford, was formerly a successful educator and 
is a well informed man on current topics. 

Mr. Bryant was born near Fair Grove, Missouri, August 10, 1870. lie 
is a son of Junius A. and Sarah J. ( Harkness) Bryant. The father was 
born in North Carolina, June 9, 1834, and when a child his parents re- 
moved to Maury county. Tennessee, where he grew to manhood and at- 
tended school, receiving an excellent education for those times. He spent 
his early life on the home farm. When twenty-two years of age he emi- 
grated to Missouri and located in Greene county, near Fair Grove, where 
he purchased a farm and engaged successfully in general farming and stock 
raising. He taught school a number of years with much success. Being 
successful, the last few years of his life were spent in retirement from ac- 
tive work. His death occurred January 6, 1910. During the Civil war 
he was a soldier in the Eighth Missouri Cavalry, Union army, serving two 
years in Company C, proving to be a gallant soldier in every respect. He 
was honorably discharged in St. Louis on account of disability, lie took 
part in a number of minor engagements, lie was a member of the Baptist 
church. The mother of our subject was born in Tennessee, February 13, 
1841. and when an infant her parents brought her to Missouri, where she 
grew to womanhood on the home farm near Fair Grove and was educated. 
She and Mr. Bryant were married April 6, 1858. She was a member of 
the Baptist church. Her death occurred December 10, 191 1. 

Seven children were born to Junius A. Bryant and wife, namely: 
Columbus N.; Mrs. Nannie Dyer, deceased; John F ; Walter W.; Arthur 
W., of this sketch; William S. ; Viola, deceased. 

Arthur W. Bryant grew to manhood on the home farm and worked 
there during his boyhood, receiving a good common school education. He 
began life for himself by teaching school four years, after which he began 
his career as merchant in Strafford in 1896, and has continued in the same 
line with ever increasing success to the present time, enjoying a large and 
lucrative business with the town and surrounding country, and always car- 
rying a well selected stock of general merchandise at all seasons. His aim 
is to deal courteously and fairly with all. 



1222 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Mr. Bryant was married March 22, 1897, to Lola M. Bass, who was 
born near Bassville, Greene county, December 22, 1877, and th ere she was 
reared on a farm. She is a daughter of Martin V. and Edith (Allen) 
Bass, who are living still on the old home place and are well known in 
this part of the count)-. Mrs. Bryant received a good education and in her 
girlhood taught school several years. She is a member of the Baptist 
church. 

Five children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Junius 
S., born January 2j, 1898; the second child died in infancy; Nola M., born 
April 6, 1905; the fourth child died in infancy; Marion W., born April 
I, 1911. 

Politically, Mr. Bryant is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Modern Woodmen and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is 
also a member of the Baptist church, and has always borne an excellent 
reputation as a man and citizen. 



ROBERT JENKINS. 



Not many Canadians are found within the borders of Greene county, 
which is a fact to be deplored, for we who are conversant with these ster- 
ling people know that no better citizens are to be found than they, and that 
community is indeed fortunate who can boast of a colony of them, for they 
are, without exception, thrifty, persevering, painstaking, and. as a rule, law 
abiding and honorable in all walks of life. One such is Robert Jenkins, a 
successful farmer of Jackson township. 

Mr. Jenkins was born in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, January 6, 1849. 
He is a son of William and Sarah (Gordon) Jenkins. The father was 
born in Paisley, Scotland, and was reared in that country and received a 
good education. Wlu-n a young man he learned the iron molder's trade, 
which he followed during his active life. He was a member of the Pres- 
byterian church. His wife was also a native of Scotland, where she was 
reared, and there they were married and from that countrv emigrated to 
Canada about a year before the birth of our subject, and the family moved 
to Michigan in 1850, and there the death of the father occurred in 1854. 
The mother, who was a native of the city of Glasgow, died in Sarnia, On- 
tario, in 1858, to which place she returned after the death of her husband. 
To these parents four children were born, namely: Robert, of this sketch; 
Mrs. Mary Craw James and William. The last named is deceased. 

Robert Jenkins was reared in Canada and Michigan until he was four- 
teen years old, at which age he joined the United States army, in the fall 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1223 

of 1863. and fought with the Federals in our great Civil war, under Cap- 
tain Steele, of the Eighth Michigan Cavalry. He remained in the army 
until the close of the war, seeing considerable hard service. He was with 
Sherman on the march to the sea through Georgia, took part in the battles 
of Knoxville, Tennessee, and others, and was honorably discharged at 
Raleigh, North Carolina. After the close of the war he went to St. Louis, 
and later to Kansas, where he learned the bricklayer's trade. From there 
he went to Texas, thence to Mississippi, then returned to Missouri and lo- 
cated in Greene county in 1872, where he has since resided, owning a good 
farm in Jackson township. 

Mr. Jenkins has been twice married, first, to Mary Blankenship, by 
whom three children were born, namely : Inez, Mrs. Mazie Baxter, and 
the youngest died in infancy. The mother of these children passed away 
while living in Springfield. Mr. Jenkins then married, on February 27, 
1890, Mrs. Ida M. (Underwood) Shinn, widow of Grovener A. Shinn. She 
was born in Milton, Illinois, April 2, 1856. She is a daughter of F. J. and 
Daphna J. H. (Bridgeman) Underwood. Mrs. Jenkins was reared in Illi- 
nois and received a good education. She came to Missouri in 1871 and 
was married in 1873 to Mr. Shinn, by which union three children were born, 
namely: John, Grovner Leslie and Mrs. Nellie U. Gross. Mrs. Jenkins' last 
marriage has been without issue. 

Politically, our subject is a Democrat. He belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias, and is a member of the Episcopal church. 



HARVEY MURRAY. 



The name of the late Harvey Murray stood out distinctly as one of 
the central figures in professional circles in Greene county. Continuous ap- 
plication through many years gave him a clear and comprehensive insight 
into the philosophy and basic principles of jurisprudence, and the largest 
wisdom as to the method and means of attainment of ends, and he achieved 
success in the courts when most young men are just entering upon the form- 
ative period of their lives. A high purpose and a strong will, together with 
virile mental powers, close application to books and devotion to duty made 
him eminently useful. His individuality was impressed upon any work with 
which he was connected, and he was always ready to assume any amount of 
responsibility and labor incurred in accomplishing his ends, when once he 
decided that he was right. He is remembered as a broad-minded, manly 
man, a credit to his profession and one of the leading citizens of Ash Grove 
during the generation that is past. 



1224 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Mr. Murray was born on a farm near Ash Grove, Greene county, Mis- 
souri, February 6, 1864, and he was a scion of one of the prominent old 
families of this part of the county. He was a son of William and Malinda 
(Stone) Murray, natives of Tennessee. The father died in Ash Grove and 
the mother lives in Ash Grove. The father was a farmer. 

A sketch of T. J. Murray, of Springfield, a brother of our subject, 
will be found on another page of this work. 

Harvey Murray grew to manhood on the home farm and there assisted 
with the general work when a boy. He enjoyed good educational advan- 
tages in the schools of Ash Grove, later studied law and was in due course 
of time admitted to the bar and established himself in the practice of his 
profession in Ash Grove. He was successful from the first and his busi- 
ness increased until it assumed large proportions and he ranked among the 
leading lawyers of the county. He was painstaking, earnest and diligent, 
kept fully abreast of the times in all that pertained to his profession and 
all fully recognized and appreciated his character for personal and profes- 
sional integrity. He never failed to fulfill all proper obligations and ap- 
pointments in all the relations with bis fellow men, and he was ever "ready 
to identify himself with his fellow citizens in any good work and extended 
a co-operating hand to advance any measure that bettered the material, civic 
and moral condition of his home community, 

Mr. Murray was married in Bois D'Arc, Missouri, October 19. 1898, 
to Fannie Lambeth, who was born in Lawrence county, Missouri. She is 
a daughter of Jennings \V. and Julia (Bymaster) Lambeth, a highly es- 
teemed family, who finally removed from Lawrence county to Bois D'Arc, 
where the father of Mrs. Murray became a prosperous merchant, and there he 
and his wife spent the rest of their lives, both dying a number of years ago. 
And it was there that Mrs. Murray grew to womanhood and received a 
good education in the common schools. She has an attractive home in 
Springfield, which is a favorite gathering place for Iter many friends, who 
never fail to find her a genial, entertaining and charming host. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Murray was blessed by the birth of one 
child. Marjorie Murray, whose birth occurred on December 25, 1899. She- 
is attending high school at this writing, and is a young lady of much promise. 

Politically, Mr. Murray was a Republican, and influential in local party 
affairs. Fraternally, he belonged to the Masonic order. 

The lamentable and untimely death of Harvey Murray occurred on 
September 5, 1899, by accident, resulting from a fall from a stairway in the- 
business section of Ash Grove. His death was a shock to the people of this 
community where he was regarded as a leading citizen and an able and suc- 
cessful attorney, a man who was universallv liked and respected. 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. !_'_ 



WESLEY C. SIDMAN. 



Worry comes from failure to think properly, so we are commanded to 
consider, be still and know, and to remember that we live and move and have 
our being in the same universal spirit which has expressed itself in all the 
wonders of the material universe. Even a flower is the unfolding of a vast 
divine plan. We are, therefore, not to worry about our life, but to take up 
our duties from day to day, as we know and understand the right and — 
wait. The long and honorable life of Wesley C. Sidman. now living in re- 
tirement in Springfield, in the fulness of his four score years has lived along 
such a plan, for he knew from the start that the best he could do was to 
work industriously, live nobly, and, therefore, worry has had little place in 
bis nature. 

Air. Sidman was born near Syracuse, Xew York, September 11. 1834. 
He is a son of John 11. and Alary (Quick) Sidman. both natives of the state 
of Xew York, where they were reared and received limited educations, and 
there they were married. 1 hey were living in l )hio at the time of the father s 
death, and the mother died in Jasper county, Missouri, a few years after 
moving there from the East. They were the parents of seven children. 

Wesley C. Sidman grew to manhood in Athens count)', Ohio, and there 
received a common school education. In Ins youth he learned the carpen- 
ter's and cabinetmakers trade, at which be became quite expert, and followed 
the same throughout his active career, lie remained in Ohio until [888, when 
he came to Springfield, Missouri, and here be worked for the St. Louis & 
San Francisco Railroad Company for a period of six years, in the coach de- 
partment of the North Sick- shops, giving satisfaction in every respect. He 
then continued his trade, working for public schools until he retired from 
active life some six years ago. 

Mr. Sidman was married, September 9, 1N58, to Alary R. Rose, who. 
was born near Zanesville, Perry county. Ohio, where she grew to woman- 
hood and received her education in the public schools. She proved to be a 
most faithful helpmate and was a kind and generous-hearted woman, who 
left behind a host of good friends when she passed to her eternal re>t in Sep- 
tember. [90S'. 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Airs. Sidman, namely: William 
D.. a Methodist minister, living in Springfield, is represented in a separate 
sketch in this volume; John W. lives in St. Louis; Robert R. died on No- 
vember jo. 1903; ATrs. Alary Elizabeth Hamilton lives in Carterville, Mis- 
souri; Airs. Delia Jones resides in Springfield ; Mrs. Captolia Irving lives in 
St. Louis; Bessie M. has remained at home with her father. 

Politically. Air. Sidman is a Republican. He is a member of the Grand 



122< > GREENE COUNT V, MISSOURI. 

Army of the Republic by virtue of the fact that he served four years in the 
Federal army, having enlisted in 1861 in Athens county, Ohio, in Company 
H, Eighteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer infantry, and he saw much hard 
service with the army in the South, taking part in numerous engagements 
and fighting gallantly for his country. He was honorably discharged in Vin- 
ton count)", Ohio, on September 24, 1865. Religiously, he is a member of 
the Benton Avenue Methodist Episcopal church. 



WILLIAM A. DAGGETT. 

Believing with Longfellow that "within ourselves is triumph or de- 
feat," William A. Daggett, the present librarian at the Springfield State Nor- 
mal school, determined at the outset of his career to so shape his course that 
when life's goal was reached he could look backward along the labyrinthin 
highway without compunction or regret, and so far he has left no stone un- 
turned whereby he might honorably advance himself. 

Mr. Daggett was born on March 14, 1876, at Waldoboro, Lincoln 
county, Maine. He is a son of Athern E. and Helen M. (I'arsons) Dag- 
gett, both natives of Maine, each representatives of old families there. These 
parents grew up and were educated in tin- early-day schools of that state 
and were married there in 1875 and have since resided near their early 
day home. To this union, one son, William A., was born. The mother was 
a daughter of William and Margaret (Fitzgerald) Parsons, descendants of 
English emigrants who established the future home of the family among 
the earl) settlers of Maine. The father of our subject was reared on the 
farm of his parents and he devoted the major portion of his active life to 
agricultural pursuits; however, he engaged in other line- of endeavor, in- 
cluding the confectionery business, for a period of twenty years. Politically, 
he is a Republican and lie belongs to the Congregational church. 

William \. Daggett attended the public schools in his native state and 
when fourteen years of age left there and -pent two years in Tabor Acad- 
emy at Marion, Massachusetts, then came to Springfield, Missouri, in 1893 
and studied two years in Drury Academy and four year- in Drury College, 
from which institution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts in [899. Soon thereafter he accepted a position as assistant princi- 
pal at Rogers Vcademy, Rogers, Arkansas. He taught mathematics and 
science there for two years. Ills advancement as an educator was rapid and 
it was n, it long until his services were in demand in other and larger fields 
than the one at Rogers where he won such a creditable record during his 
two years at that place as an instructor. Learning of his success the board 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 122J 

•of the Springfield high school tendered him the position of instructor in 
history, which position he accepted, and in which he accomplished a work 
of far-reaching importance, such as had probably never before been attempted 
here and more signally successful than his former efforts as teacher. After 
spending six years in this school in the department of history, he was se- 
lected librarian at the Springfield State Normal, the duties of which position 
he has since discharged in an able and highly satisfactory manner, and at 
the same time has taught some in the history department; however, he has 
had no classes for two years, his increasing work as librarian claiming all 
his time and attention, including his committee work in the school and the 
library instruction course by him. He has also held positions as an instruc- 
tor in athletics and physical culture, in which lines he has pronounced natu- 
ral ability of a high order. 

Air. Daggett was married on June 12, 1900, to Evelina Park, youngest 
daughter of Dr. William H. Park, a pioneer doctor of Greene county, Mis- 
souri, also a prominent business man of Springfield. Mr. and .Mrs. Daggett 
are the parents of two children, Athern, born on January 10, 1904, and 
Algoa, born on April 11, 1906, and died January, 19 14. 

Politically, Professor Daggett is a Republican, and a member of the 
First Congregational church, in the work of which he has been active and 
influential for a number of years, having been identified with the various 
branches of the church of this denomination in Springfield. Personally be is 
an unassuming, accommodating and likable gentleman. 



ELIHU HIBLER. 



Referring to agriculture, one of the earliest bards of the English- 
speaking race wrote the following: "In ancient times the sacred plow was 
employed by the kings and fathers of mankind ; and some, with whom 
compared your insect tribes are but the beings of a summer's day. Have 
held the scale of empire, ruled the storm of mighty war with unwearied 
hand, disdaining little delicacies, seized the plow and greatly independent 
lived." He might also have added that agriculture has been from the days 
of Cain, the greatest of all the arts of man, for it is the first in supplying 
his necessities. As an agricultural region. Missouri has no superiors. No 
state has a more natural system of natural drainage, or a more abundant 
supply of pure, limpid water than this state. Both man and beast may slake 
their thirst from a thousand perennial fountains that form our "blue, rejoic- 
ing streams that catch the azure of the skies." And here Nature has p.lao 
generously bestowed her attractions of climate, soil and scenery to please 



[228 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and gratify man while earning his bread by the sweat of his brow. Being 
thus munificently endowed. Missouri offers superior inducements to the 
farmer, and bids him reap varied harvests from her broad domain and 
avail himself of her varied resources. One of the men of a past generation 
who wisely decided to devote his career to tilling the soil in this, his native 
state, was the late Elihu Hibler. and he was not only amply repaid for his 
toil, but found comfort in his close communing with Nature, and this in 
turn made him a peaceable and kind-hearted citizen who always had the 
good will and respect of his neighbors and acquaintances. 

Air. Hibler was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, July jo, 184O. He 
was a son of Alton and Mary A. (Baxter) Hibler and was one of a family 
of six children, an equal number of sons and (laughters, namely: Leora, 
tsadore and William are both deceased: Elihu, subject of this memoir; 
Pamella is the wife of J. W. Hoggs, of Springfield, and George, who lives in 
Kansas City. 1 he father of the above named children devoted his active 
life to general fanning in St. Louis county, this state, and there his death 
occurred many years ago. 

Elihu Hibler grew to manhood in his native community and assisted 
his father with the work on the farm and there laid the foundation for his 
future success as a husbandman. He received bis early education in the 
common schools of bis district, and he remained in St. Louis county until 
the deatli of his father, when he removed to Bates county, Missouri, and in 
the year [S'84 he purchased a farm there, which he operated successfully 
many years, finally moving to Liberal. Barton count}, this state, where he 
purchased a farm, on which he spent the rest of bis life, and was known as 
one of the leading general farmers and stock raisers of that locality. 

.Mr. Hibler was married on July 25, [889, in Hates county, to Frances 
J. .Maxwell, a daughter of I'.dley t '. and Rebecca J. I Lark) Maxwell. The 
father was a native of Virginia, wl ere he spent bis early life, finally remov- 
ing to Hales county, Missouri, where be purchased a farm, and there be 
and bis wife still reside, highly respected citizens. Their family consisted 
of seven children, live daughters and two sons, namely: John Beauregard 
lives in Ft. Scott. Kansas: William P. died in infancy; Frances J., widow 
of Mr. Hibler, subject of this memoir: .Mrs. Lucy Coon, of Ft. Scott. Kan- 
sas, is the mother of seven s,,us and one daughter; Betty lived with her 
parents on the farm; and Leila May. who died when twenty-seven years 
of age. 

Three children were born to Elihu Hibler and wife, namely: Edith 
Lamella, born October 29, [890, was graduated from the State Xormal ; 
she is married and has one son. William Elihu, named after bis grandfather, 
our subject, be being the tenth William in the family line of descent, and 
his birth occurred June 14. [913; she has made herself proficient in music. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. IJJ() 

especially in voice culture, and she lias for some time been a successful 
instructor in music. Jessie Gladys, second child of our subject and wife, 
was born October 15, 1894, was graduated from the State Normal at Spring- 
field, specializing in domestic science and music. Mary Rebecca, the youngesl 
child, was born Jul}' 2^, [897, is now a student in the Springfield schools 
and expects to take the course in the State Normal. These daughters have 
all been given excellent educational advantages, which they have duly appre- 
ciated and properly improved. Their father, our subject, was a great 
advocate of education, and himself a great reader and student all his life. 

Religiously, Mr. Hibler belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He was summoned to his eternal rest on January 11, 1906. 



GEORGE W. HENDRICKSON. 

Faithfulness to duty, persistence in the pursuit of a worthy object and 
a desire to be of service to those about him while laboring for his own ad- 
vancement have been some of the principles which have been dominating 
factors in the career of George W. Hendrickson, the present able assistant 
postmaster at Springfield, in which city he has made his home for a period 
of twenty-five years, and where he was formerly engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits. Like many of our best citizens he hails from the fine old Blue Grass 
state and possesses many of the winning traits of his progenitors, who were 
Southerners. 

Mr. Hendrickson was born in Lewis county, Kentucky, January 6, 
[860. He is a son of John T. and Jemima (Myers) Hendrickson, and was 
one of ten children, an equal number of sons and daughters, all now deceased 
but four sons. John T. Hendrickson. the father, was a native of Kentucky, 
where he grew up, was educated in the early-day schools, married and spent 
his life as a general merchant and died there in 1896. Jemima Myers, 
mother of our subject, was of Pennsylvania German stock. She met and 
married John T. Hendrickson in Lewis count}-, Kentucky, and spent the 
rest of her life there, dying in [866. 

George W. Hendrickson grew to manhood on the home farm in Lewis 
count}', Kentucky, where he worked when a boy and there he received his 
education in the common schools during the winter months, remaining on 
the farm until he was eighteen years of age, when he went to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where he secured employment with a paint company, with which he 
remained for a short time, then secured a position as clerk for the Cincin- 
nati & Memphis Packet Company, which he retained for ten years, then, 
in 1889, he came to Springfield, Missouri, and he and his brother engaged 



I23O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

in the grocen- business for four years, after which he sold out to his- brother 
— John F. Hendrickson, and entered the political arena. He was first em- 
ployed in the sheriff's office, where he spent two years. Then served as 
deputy circuit clerk for three years, after which he accepted a position, in 
1898, as assistant postmaster, which he has retained to the present time, 
his long retention being sufficient evidence of his satisfactory service, hav- 
ing discharged the duties of this responsible position for a period of eighteen 
years in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the satis- 
faction of all concerned, being accurate, alert, painstaking and a man whose 
integrity has never been questioned. 

In 1887, two years before Mr. Hendrickson left his position with the 
Cincinnati Packet Company in Ohio, he married Mary Rittenhouse, of 
Evansville, Indiana, a daughter of Thomas H. Rittenhouse, whose family 
consisted of three children. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hendrickson four children have been born, namely: 
Alberta, born on November 4, 1888, is librarian at the Springfield high 
school; Willa died in infancy; Georgia, born on June 10, 1806, was educated 
in the Springfield public and high schools, later attending Drury College; 
John I"., born on July 11, 1900. 

Politically, Mr. Hendrickson is a Republican, and has been loyal in his 
support of the party. He served for three years as a member of the local 
board of education with Prut. J. Fairbanks. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He and bis family attend the Presby- 
terian church. 



\V. AIM. Ml WILLIAM LINCOLN. 

One of the best known members of the Greene county bar is Azariah 
William Lincoln, who has been practicing law in Springfield for thirty years, 
during which time he has met with continued success and has kept well 
abreast of the times in bis profession. Concerning the sincerity of purpose, 
the unquestioned probity and uprightness of conduct and character, the 
ability and honesty of Mr. Lincoln, it may be said, they arc as well known 
and recognized as bis name. It occurs occasionally that a peculiar accent 
accompanies the declaration, when it is said of anyone, that he is honest, 
as it' to imparl a whisper of suggestion that the quality is rare or exotic. 
In its application to men in responsible public position it is not true: the 
reverse of ii is. In its application to lawyers, as a body, which is not infre- 
quently done, it is false; the reverse of it is true. Both Mr. Lincoln and 
his s.m. Harold T. Lincoln, a rising young lawyer, are known to be advo- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 123I 

cates of strict honest}- in all relations of life, and this has been one of the 
main secrets of their success. 

Azariah W. Lincoln was born in Iowa count) - , Wisconsin, September 
25, 1851. He is a son of Thomas Lincoln, a native of Pennsylvania, who 
went to Wisconsin with his parents when a child, and after his maturity 
he removed to Ohio in 1862, and engaged in farming. His death occurred 
in May, 1890. lie was a son of Azariah Lincoln, who died in Ohio in the 
earl)' sixties 

Air. Lincoln, of this review, received his education in the common 
schools of Ohio and the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware. Ohio, from 
which institution he was graduated. He began studying law with James E. 
Wright, of Columbus, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar in 1881, before 
the supreme court of that state, but instead of devoting his attention to 
practice he engaged in educational work, was elected county superintendent 
of schools, which responsible position he held for three years with satis- 
faction to all concerned. He then came to Springfield, Missouri, in 1884, 
and began the practice of law. which he has continued to the present time, 
and has been very successful all along the line and ranked among the leaders 
of the bar here from the first. He was judge of the probate court from 
[887 to 1895. and was judge of the criminal court for two years. As a 
jurist he more than met the expectations of his friends and discharged his 
duties in a manner that reflected much credit upon his ability and fidelity, 
his decisions being noted for their fairness and profound insight into the 
basic principles of jurisprudence, as well as his familiarity with the statutes. 
He is senior member of the firm of Lincoln & Lincoln, and with his sun 
enjoys a large practice. 

In April, 1885, tnc marriage of Judge Lincoln occurred to Jennie M. 
Adams, a native of Mt. Gilead, Ohio, a daughter of Henry H. Adams, a 
merchant, who at present resides with his daughter, Airs. Lincoln, in Spring- 
field. Missouri. His wife was know in her maidenhood as Isabel I - . Swaner. 

To the union of our subject and wife three sons were born — William 
Lincoln, born in Springfield, in January. 1887. was graduated from the 
local high school, later attending Drury College several terms; he married 
Pauline Burns in 1908; she is a daughter of F. M Burns, and to this union 
one child has been born, William Burns Lincoln, whose birth occurred in 
January, 1910. Harold Thomas Lincoln, second son of Judge Lincoln 
and wife, was born in Springfield November 11, 1888. He was graduated 
from the Springfield high school and from the Columbia Law School in 
Ohio, and commenced the practice of his profession with his father in 1909, 
and he is regarded as one of the leaders of the younger generation of the 
Greene county bar. In December, 191 1, he married Maggie Sims, and to 
this union one daughter has been born, Margaret Lincoln. Harold T. 



'123- GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Lincoln is a Republican. He was appointed city tax attorney, which position 
he held two years, and was assistant prosecuting attorney of Greene county 
under James H. Mason. Urged by his friends, he was a candidate for city 
attorney in 19 14, and his election was regarded from the first as most 
probable, since he is popular with all classes, and his record as a public 
servant in his former capacities was most commendable in every respect. 

Elwyn Russell Lincoln, youngest son of the Judge and wife, was born 
in Springfield, October 26, 1896, and died October 27, 1913. 

Mr. Lincoln is a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic order 
and the Improved Order of Red Men. Religiously he belongs to the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 



CHARLES L. ROBERTSON". 

Year has been added to year ami decade to decade until seventy-seven 
years have been numbered with the past since Charles L. Robertson, a ven- 
erable and highly honored farmer of Murray township, came to Greene 
county, this long span of years embracing nearly the whole of his life, which 
has been .-.pent in this locality. Upon the arrival of the Robertson family 
this section of the state was largely an undeveloped region, awaiting the 
awakening touch of the sturdy pioneer- to transform its wild lands into 
rich farms and beautiful and comfortable homes, to establish churches and 
schools, and in many other ways reclaim the country for the use of man. 
Our subject has played well his part as a citizen of enterprise and public 
spirit, has lived to see and take part in the transformation of the county, 
whose interests he has ever had at heart, and, having been a close observer 
all the while, he is an interesting talker on what the vicissitudes of time has 
wrought here. 

Mr. Robertson was born in Hamilton county, eastern Tennessee, April 
5, [837. He is a son of Jefferson and Mary Ann (Lodspeach) Robertson, 
representatives of very old Southern families. Jefferson Robertson was 
born in Roam- county, Tennessee, in [806, and there he grew up and mar- 
ried and made his home until [837 when he came to Greene county, Mis- 
souri, with his family. Springfield then being known to many of the settlers 
as "Stump Town." In [839 he purchased two hundred acres of laud where 
our subject now lives, the latter owning forty acres off this tract. The 
lather devoted bis life to general farming, and here he resided until his 
death in 1877, was known to his neighbors as an honest, hospitable and hard 
working man. He was a Democrat, and belonged to the Methodist Epis- 
COpal church, South, first, when the services of this denomination were held 
in Murray school house later, when a church house had been built at Willard. 
he attended there. His wife was born in Greene county, Tennessee, and 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 233 

when nine years old she left there with her parents and the family located at 
Sweetwater, Tennessee, where she grew to womanhood and married. She 
was born in 1817 and died May 9, 1908, at the unusual age of ninety-one 
years, having outlived her husband thirty-one years, he having died in the 
inline of life. She was a grand old lady, beloved by all who knew her. 

To Jefferson Robertson and wife eleven children were born, t namely : 
Charles L. of this review; Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Young of Willard, Greene 
county; .Mrs. Nancy Caroline Grant of Polk county, Missouri; Mrs. 
Armeldia Potter of Oklahoma; John Lindsay of Oklahoma; Mrs. Josephine 
Gilmore, of Cave Spring, Cass township, Greene county ; Mrs. Eliza Jane 
Snider, who lives on the old homestead in Murray township; Mrs. Sally 
Murray, of Murray township; Mrs. Martha Frances Philips, of Panhandle, 
Texas; the two youngest children died in infancy unnamed. 

Charles L. Robertson was alumt two years old when his parents brought 
him from the mountains of Eastern Tennessee to the vicinity where he now 
resides and here he grew to manhood on his father's farm and there worked 
hard when a boy in assisting to clear and develop the place, and dining the 
winter he attended the brief >essions of the old-time subscription schools in 
his locality. He remained on the homestead until he was twenty-one years 
of age then began farming fur himself, settling on a part of what he now 
owns and has lived here continuously to the present time, successfully] 
engaged in general farming and stock raising. He owns one hundred and 
twenty-acres, one hundred acres .if which is under cultivation. He has 
heen a hard working man all his life and has a well improved and well 
kept place and a good group of outbuildings. He always keeps an excellent 
grade of various kinds of live stock and is one of the best known men n\ 
the township, respected by all his acquaintances. 

Mr. Robertson was married May 10, 1857, to Eliza Ann Wittenburg, 
a native of Greene county, Missouri, and a daughter of Phelix and Nancy 
(RobbersorO Wittenburg, both natives of Eastern Tennessee, the father 
born August 17. 1810, and the mother August 15, 1820. The latter was 
eleven years old when her parents brought her to Missouri and she died here 
October 5, 1844. 

Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Robertson, all dying in early 
childhood but two, who are still living. Mrs. Mary Caroline Olinger, of 
Murray township, this county; and William J., who lives in Walnut Grove, 
Missouri. 

Politically Mr. Robertson is a Democrat, but has never aspired to office, 
preferring a quiet home life. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church South, at Pearl, Cass township, where his wife and daughter also 
hold membership. During the Civil war he served three months in the 
Confederate army in a very creditable manner. 
(78) 



1234 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

WILLIAM M; SMITH, M. D. 

One of the best-known physicians of the city of Springfield, an hon- 
ored veteran of the Civil war, and for a quarter of a century one of the 
respected citizens of Greene county, is Dr. William M. Smith. He chose 
medicine as his life profession and life purpose and pursuit. The environ- 
ment of his earlier years, its discipline, his college course and drill, the 
culture that comes from books and study and travel, the success with which 
he has met as a physician, and the standard in his profession to which he 
has risen — all testify to the wisdom of his choice. 

Dr. Smith was born in Barnesville, Ohio, June 7, 1S42. He is a sou 
of John C. and Hannah (Thompson) Smith. The father was born in 181 7, 
was reared a Quaker, and was a carpenter and contractor during his active 
life. Toward the early part of the Civil war, although then advanced in 
years, he enlisted for service in the Union army in August, 1862, in the 
One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Col. 
John H. Howe, and he served in the battles around Yicksburg, Mississippi, 
but the hardships of army life proved too much for him and he died before 
his term of enlistment had expired and was buried in the National cemetery 
at Mound City, Illinois. The mother of our subject was born January 18, 
181S. in Huntington county, Pennsylvania, and was a daughter of Amos 
Thompson, a farmer. She came with her family to Ohio when she was a 
child, and her parents both died in that state. She spent the latter part of 
her life at the home of our subject in Springfield. Missouri, where her 
death occurred in 1889, and was buried in Hazelwood cemetery here. Some 
of the maternal great-great-uncles of our subject were soldiers in the Revo- 
lutionary war. The family is of German-English, Scotch and Irish ancestry. 

Dr. Smith was reared in Ohio and there he received his early education 
in the common schools, later graduating from the Kewanee Academy, at 
Kewanee, Illinois, and was preparing for college at the time of his enlist- 
ment in the Federal army, in September, 1861, in Company A, Forty-second 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Col. Stewart, later serving under Col. 
Northrop. He saw considerable hard service and proved to be a gallant 
defender of the flag, participating in the battles of Farmington. Stone River, 
and the great battle of Chickamauga, in which he was wounded and taken 
prisoner, but was later paroled and sent to General Hospital in St. Louis. 
He \\a> honorabl) discharged at St. Louis at the expiration of term of 
enlistment and later re-enlisted. February 7, 1865, in the Ninth Illinois 
Cavalry, serving until October, 1865, and was discharged at Selma. Alabama. 
After his career in the army Dr. Smith returned home and taught school 
for several terms, devoting his spare time to the study of medicine, and in 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I235 

1868 he entered the Keokuk Medical College, at Keokuk, Iowa, later entering 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1870. 
He first began the practice of his profession at Atkinson, Illinois, remaining 
there nine years, and had a good practice; he then went to Sterling, Illinois, 
and practiced three years, after which he moved to Beadle county, South 
Dakota, where he practiced six years, and in 1888 came to Springfield, 
.Missouri, where he has remained to the present time, enjoying an excellent 
practice all the while and ranking among the leading general practitioners 
in the county. 

Dr. Smith is a member of the Greene County Medical Society, the 
Southwest Missouri .Medical Society, the Missouri State .Medical Asso- 
ciation and the American Medical Association. He was president of the 
first named society for one term. He belongs to the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He has been secretary of the local board of pension examiners 
for the past sixteen years. Politically he is a Republican and religiously is 
a member of the Congregational church. 

Dr. Smith married Viola M. Ferrin, December 15, 1870. She is a 
daughter of Isaac and Maria ( Bailey) Ferrin, both natives of New England. 
Mrs. Smith's father died when she was an infant. The mother spent her 
last years with our subject and died at his home in Springfield in 1890. 

Four children have been born to Dr. Smith and wife, namely: Wells 
Ferrin, born in Atkinson, Illinois, in 1871, was educated in the Springfield 
high school and Drury College, later was graduated from Beaumont Medical 
College, in 1898, and he began his practice in Springfield, securing a position' 
in the Frisco Hospital, where he remained two vears, then removed to 
Arkansas, and is now division surgeon for the Iron Mountain Railroad, 
with headquarters at Little Rock. He married Robbie Blythe, of Clarks- 
ville, Arkansas, in 1905. and they have four children, Helen, John, Elsie 
and Elizabeth. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, and is a fine surgeon. 
Charles Wilbur Smith, second son of our subject, was born in Atkinson, 
Illinois, in 1873, was educated in the Springfield high school and Drury 
College, also studied at the Beaumont Medical College, graduating with the 
class of iqoi, later, in 1902, taking a post-graduate course, in the St. Louis 
Hospital. He began the practice of his profession at Keota, Missouri, in 
1902, and remained there six years, then came to Springfield and has been 
engaged in practice here ever since, and is one of the most successful of our 
younger surgeons and general practitioners, doing a great deal of surgery. 
He is a member of the Greene County Medical Society, the Missouri State 
Medical Association, the Southwest Missouri Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. He was at one time health commissioner 
of the city of Springfield. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, and also 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias and B. P. O. E. He married Mary Helen 



121,6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

\"ail in 1902. She is a daughter of Edward Vail, superintendent of a local 
coal company. One child has been born to Dr. Charles W. Smith and wife, 
a daughter, Vail Smith, whose birth occurred in 1903. Amy Jessie Smith, 
daughter of the subject of this sketch, was born in Atkinson, Illinois, was 
educated in the Springfield high school and graduated from Drury College. 
She married Alfred H. Mansfield, an attorney, now chief claim agent of 
the Missouri Pacific Railroad ; they reside in St. Louis. To this union one 
child has been born, Elizabeth, born on August 8. 1914. Winifred Elizabeth 
Smith, youngest of our subject's children, was born in South Dakota, was 
educated in the Springfield high school and Drury College, and she married 
O. J. McCutcheon, president of the McCutcheon Bros. Vehicle & Harness 
Company, of Springfield; to them one child, Elizabeth, was born in 1910 in 
this city. The above named children were given every advantage as to 
education and general preparation for life, and they are all popular wherever 
thev are known, and are well situated in life. 



JOHN H. SHACKELFORD. 

The Shackelford family has been known in Greene and Webster coun- 
ties during the past three-quarters of a century, the father of the subject of 
this review having established the future home of the family here in the 
year 1840 when Springfield consisted of a few log huts, lately the site ot 
the Kickapoo Indian village: when the county was sparsely settled and very 
little development had been done, the virgin soil being covered with im- 
mense woods or rank wild grass, the haunts of many kindreds of the wild. 
So the elder Shackelford was an important factor in the early civilization 
of the county, f"r he was a builder by profession and was a man who never 
quailed at hardships and loved to see reclaimed this region of promise. From 
that early day l<> this the name of the family here has been one against which 
11. > aspersions could be cast, and has always stood for good citizenship. 

One of the best known of the present generation is John H. Shackel- 
funl. widely known contractor of North Campbell street. Springfield, who 
was horn on October 7, 1855, in Greene county. Missouri, and who has 
spent his life here and in the adjoining county of Webster. He is a son 
of Garland and Mary E. (Forren) Shackelford, and is a scion of old Vir- 
ginia people on his father's side. Garland Shackelford was born in Vir- 
ginia, January 16, 1816, and there he grew to manhood and spent his life 
until 1840 when he emigrated overland to Missouri, reaching the present 
site of Springfield on June 17th of that year, lie had learned the carpen- 
ter's trade when a young man in his native state and he at once began 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. l2 2>7 

working at the same in his new community, and had the distinction of build- 
ing the first frame house in Greene county, which was erected for Major 
Powell, father-in-law of Martin J. Hubble. He did a great deal of carpenter 
work and contracting and built many of the best houses in this locality in 
the pioneer days. In 1850 he joined the gold seekers across the great 
western plains, making the perilous journey to California, with Rip Weaver 
and Joe Farris. He returned to Springfield in 185 1, on account of sickness, 
making the return trip by way of the Isthmus of Panama. Upon his arrival 
here he purchased a farm two miles from town, and continued building and 
farming for six years, and in 1857 removed to Marshfield, Webster county, 
this state, where there was a better field for his contracting and building 
business. There he also bought a fanning and carding mill. He became 
one of the leading men of that county, and there he spent the rest of his 
life, reaching the advanced age of ninety-two years, his death occurring on 
July 9, 1908. He was twice married, Alary E. Forren being his first wife, 
and to this union thirteen children were born, six sons and seven daughters, 
six of whom, two sons and four daughters survive, namely: Garland C, 
of Springfield; Mrs. Mattie Robertson, of Marshfield; Mrs. Loma Darby, 
of Center Point, Texas; Mrs. Amelia McKnight, of Nevada, Missouri; Mrs. 
Josephine E. Lyon, of Marshfield, Oregon, and John H., of this review. 
The mother of these children was born in Tennessee where she spent her 
girlhood, coming to Springfield when twelve years of age, her mother hav- 
ing died some time previously. She came to this locality with her father 
who was a farmer, and here he died during one of the scourges of cholera 
which swept the country at intervals in those early times. The death of 
Mrs. Shackelford occurred on January 14. 1892, and the father of our 
subject subsequently married Miss Elian Whiticar. His last union was 
without issue. 

John PI. Shackelford was two years old when his parents removed with 
him from Greene to Webster county in 1857, and he grew to manhood at 
Marshfield where he received his education in the common schools. He 
assisted his father with his general work as a carpenter, contractor and mill 
man while growing up, and upon reaching maturity engaged in business for 
himself first as a farmer and later, March 16, 1883, he came to Springfield 
and here he has resided ever since, engaging in business, for the most part 
as a contractor for gravel and composition roofing. His present establish- 
ment is located at 968 North Campbell street, where lie is well equipped 
for the prompt and successful carrying on of his line of endeavor, and he 
has built up an extensive and constantly growing business and employs a 
large number of skilled workmen. He has a reputation for honest, high- 
grade and quick work and is one of the popular contractors of Springfield. 
He always handles the best of materials and his prices are reasonable. 



I238 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Mr. Shackelford was married on July 4, 1886, to Emma Donald, a 
daughter of William Donald, of Saline county, Missouri. His family con- 
sisted of five children, namely : Mrs. Julia Shelby, of Springfield, was twice 
married, first to ex-senator S. R. Bridges; she has three children; Mrs. 
Ella Louder is deceased; Emma, who is the wife of Mr. Shackelford of this 
sketch; Leander McCord Donnell, of Springfield, married Rosie Roberts, 
and they have four children; Royal, who is engaged in farming in Saline 
county, this state, married Mattie Crowder, and they have two children. 

To John H. Shackelford and wife two children have been born, namely: 
Bessie E. Tolia Shackelford married Lake H. Gibson, of Springfield; he 
is city salesman for the G. D. Milligan Grocery Company, and Louis C. 
Shackelford, who was born on May 24, 1892. was educated in the Spring- 
field schools and Christian Brothers College, St. Louis; he is engaged in the 
same line of business as his father — gravel and composition roofing, and is 
a promising young business man. 

Politically, Mr. Shackelford is a Democrat. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Royal Arcanum and the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his 
family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. 



THOMAS OTIS KLINGNER, M. D. 

Whether in the substance of our human nature or the spiritualities of 
an expectant future being, mankind is inclined to cling, with fierce tenacity, 
to not 1 mly the hope that the ego may not disappear, but that the tangible, 
if dissolving personally, may he fittingly remembered. To rescue, preserve 
and perpetuate was the mission of the ancient Chronicle.-, and this is the 
province of history; and equally so, of biographic narrative. "Man's so- 
ciality of nature." says Carlyle, "evinces itself, in spite of all that can be 
said, with abundant evidence by this one fact, were there no other: the 
unspeakable delighl he takes in biography." So when a man like Dr. 
Thomas Otis Klingner, one of the best-known specialists of his class in 
Greene county, ha- reached the honored position in the vicinity which he 
ha- attained, it is meet that something of hi- individuality he set forth. 

I )r. Klingner was horn near Fair Grove, Greene county, Missouri, 
March 3, 1874. fie i- a -on of John and Mollie ( Shade 1 Klingner. The 
father was born at North Vernon, Indiana, in [844, and there he -pent his 
earlier years working on the farm and attending the district schools during 
the winter months, and later he began teaching in the rural school-, which 
vocation, in connection with farming part of the year, he continued for 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. I -\iO 

some time. He eventually emigrated to Missouri and located in Greene 
county, where he purchased a farm near the village of Fair Grove and there 
he still resides, having developed a good farm and reared his children in 
comfort, giving them proper educational advantages. For many years he 
has served his community as a local preacher in the Methodist church, in 
which he is an earnest and influential worker, and is called on by all denomi- 
nations to conduct funerals and marriages. He is widely known in his end 
of the county and everybody is his friend. Flis good wife, who has proven 
to be a most worthy helpmeet, was born in 1845. 

This family is of German descent, as the name would indicate, the 
paternal grandfather, August Klingner, having been a native of Bingen, 
Germany, from which country he emigrated to America in an early day, with 
his wife, and settled at North Vernon, Indiana, where he engaged in farming, 
and there he and his wife spent the rest of their lives. The maternal grand- 
father, Henry Shade, who was of Scotch descent, was a machinist by trade, 
and he resided at many different places, but spent the latter part of his life 
on a farm near Fair Grove, Missouri. 

Seven children were born to John Klingner and wife, named as follow.-: 
Dr. Thomas Otis, of this sketch: Henry Augustus resides at Wray, Colorado, 
where he is engaged in the mercantile business; John W. lives in Spring- 
field, Missouri, and is engaged in the undertaking business; Charles E. is a 
farmer and has remained on the homestead with his parents; George Mack, 
of Roswell, New Mexico, is professor of English in the high school there; 
Mamie Louise, who has taught school for about twenty years, has remained 
single and lives at home; Florence Elizabeth, also unmarried, lives with her 
parents on the farm. 

Dr. Thomas O. Klingner was reared on the home farm and there did 
his full share of the work during the crop seasons, and during the winter 
he attended the district schools, later entered Morrisville College, at Morris- 
ville, Polk count}', Missouri, where he completed the course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, however, was not graduated. When about 
eighteen years of age he commenced life for himself by earning his own 
living and obtaining money by teaching with which to educate himself, also 
followed other pursuits, and in 1895 ne entered the Missouri Medical Col- 
lege at St. Louis, where he made a good record and from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1898 with the highest honors in that class. 
Returning to Greene county, he began the practice of his profession at 
Willard, where he remained three years as a general practitioner, then spent 
two years at Walnut Grove, this county, enjoying a good practice at both 
places. In 1903 he took the civil service examination and went to Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he was given employment in the medical department 



I24O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

of the Pension Bureau, remaining there three years to the eminent satis- 
faction of the department. The last two years there he had the management 
of the eye and ear department. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in 1906, 
established an office on Commercial street, which he has maintained for the 
past nine years, building up a large and lucrative practice, which is rapidly 
growing, and he is now located at 318 Landers building. He has taken his 
place in the front rank of his professional brethren who confine themselves 
to the treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He has met with great 
success in this field. His experience in Washington City was invaluable to 
him, but in order to further equip himself for his chosen work he took a 
post-graduate course, in 1906, in the Chicago Eye, Ear. Nose and Throat 
College; also in 1912 took a post-graduate course in the Chicago Polyclinic. 
Dr. Klingner is a member of the Greene County Medical Society, the 
Southwest Missouri Medical Society, the Missouri State Medical Asso- 
ciation, and the American Medical Association, being a Eellow of the last 
named. He has been secretary of the Greene County Medical Society for 
the past five years, also has been president of the State Association of 
Medical Secretaries and counsellor for the Twenty-eighth District. He is 
oculist and aurist for the Burge-Deaconess Hospital, the Southwest Missouri 
Hospital, the Children's Home and the hospital for the St. Louis & San 
Francisco Railroad Company. He is also vice-president of the Southwest 
Missouri Bospital, and is secretary of the J. \V. Klingner undertaking 
establishment. In all of the above positions of trust and responsibility he 
has discharged his duties in a manner that lias reflected much credit upon 
himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Dr. Klingner was married in 1900 to Effie May Kernaghan, who was 
born in Greene county, Missouri, November -7. [874. She i> a daughter of 
Jesse and Elizabeth Kernaghan, for many years residents of this county, 
who later made their home in Joplin, Missouri. -Mr. Kernaghan, who en- 
gaged in contracting for many year-, is now practically retired from active 
life. Mis wife died in Joplin in [904 and was buried there. Mrs. Klingner 
was reared in ( ireene county and educated in the public schools here. 

To our subject and wife two children have been born, namely: Keat- 
ing Kenneth, born in Washington. D. C, in 1004. died in 1908'. and Mary 
Elizabeth, horn in Springfield, Missouri, January 10, 1913. 

fraternally Dr. Klingner is a member of the Masonic Order and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a Democrat, and in 
religious matter- is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. South. 

Personally the Doctor is a gentleman of the highest integrity and socia- 
bility and the high position he has gained in the medical profession and the 
countv is in every way deserved. 



ORF.EXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I --4 l 



DANIEL MARTIN NEE. 



One of the most promising of the younger members oi the Greene 
county bar is Daniel Martin Nee, a member of the firm of De Vorss & Nee. 
He seems to be the possessor of the necessary qualification for a success in 
the legal field and lias most carefull) prepared himself for his chosen calling, 
taking a great deal more pains in this respect than many of the older lawyers. 
By wise and judicious legislation, a barrier has been interposed against an 
easy and miscellaneous invasion of the legal profession, and those who 
propose to enter it must submit to the rigid requirements of the laws of 
the present time. The prescribed course of study must be observed, the 
ordeal of examination must be borne, and fixed grades and standards must 
be touched before the applicant can cross the statutory line that separates 
him from the bar. The result is, the profession draws its nutriment from 
a better, cleaner, stronger and more intellectual class — men fitted for the 
profession and who will sustain its high character. Our subject is of 
this class. 

Mr. Xee was born at Thayer, Oregon county. Missouri, April i, 1888, 
but most of his life lias been spent in Springfield, Greene county, whither 
the family removed when he was a child. He is a son of Coleman C. and 
.Mary 1 Foley) Xee, both natives of Ireland, and from his progenitors our 
subject seems to have inherited many characteristics of the Celtic race 
which will be of inestimable benefit to him as a lawyer. These parents 
spent their earlier years in the Emerald Isle, from which they emigrated 
to the United States when young. The Foley ancestry were mostly tillers 
of the soil. Coleman C. Xee received his education in the common schools 
of his native locality and when eighteen years of age emigrated to our 
shores. Finally penetrating into the Middle West, he took up his residence 
at Thayer, Missouri, where he engaged in business. Seeking a larger field 
for his operations, he removed to Springfield twenty years ago and 
ha- been a successful business man here ever since, well known about town 
and highly respected. Patrick Xee, the paternal grandfather, was born in 
Ireland, lived and died there, following the sea for a livelihood; in fact. 
most of the Xee progenitors were sailors by profession, and noted for their 
ability and bravery in this line. 

Daniel M. Xee grew to manhood in Springfield and here lie received 
his education, first attending the parochial schools, later was graduated 
from the public schools and high school and attended Drury College for a 
time. In 1906 he entered the law department of the University of Missouri, 
where he made a splendid record and from which he was graduated with 
the class of iqij. In July of that year he commenced practicing in Spring- 



1242 GREEXE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

field in partnership with J. T. De Yorss, and notwithstanding the fact that 
the firm is a new one, they are doing a very satisfactory volume of business, 
with very bright prospects, their auspicious start auguring well for the 
future. 

Mr. Xee has for some time been well known locally as an athlete and 
lias devoted considerable attention to athletics, of which he has been a suc- 
cessful teacher, and has coached many baseball and football teams with 
gratifying results, and at this writing he is in charge of the athletic teams 
at Drury College. He was a professional baseball player, and by his excel- 
lent work during vacation periods as a member of some good team he 
earned money to defray his expenses in college, thus being enabled to obtain 
his professional education. 

Mr. Xee is unmarried. He is a Democrat politically, and in religious 
matters is a Catholic. He is a member of the University Club and the 
Sigma Cbi. He was popular among the students while in school in Spring- 
field and at the University. 



LEONIDAS CLARK ROSS, M. D. 

It is no invasion of the province of propriety to narrate or chronicle 
the exploits, achievements, character or the lesser or larger deeds of a man 
who is yet a living personality. The truest biographic insight of an indi- 
vidual will come to him who knows him best, has most closely studied him 
in his particular spheres of thought and action, and who has the advantage 
of aids of the subject of his narrative, as the living, suggesting source and 
inspiration of it. The artist's picture of the vanished original will not be 
an accurate photograph of it. It was a maxim of the Egoists, who were 
uncertain of everything, only a few things, that "each one submit to a 
record of himself, for hi- -elf's sake hut especially for his friends." Thus 
it affords the biographer pleasure t" set forth appropriately, but succinctly, 
and. we hope, accurately, the life record of Dr. Leonidas Clark Ross, who, 
owing t" the enviable position he has gained in the medical circles of Greene 
•county, is entitled t<> specific mention within these pages. 

Dr. Ross was born in Greene county, Missouri, January r. i860, and 
is a scion of one of tin- oldest and most prominent families of the county. 
lie is a s' m m|' Rev. David and Eliza ( Robberson) Ross, the father a promi- 
nent minister in the Methodist Episcopal church. South, for many years 
in the pioneer days. His death occurred on January 6, 1869. The mother 
was a sister of the late Dr. I".. T. Robberson, of Springfield, Missouri, and 
also a representative of an "Id and well-known family. William Rn-. our 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1243 

subject's paternal grandfather, died in Morgan county, and was buried at 
Versailles, this state. William Robberson, the maternal grandfather, spent 
his lite in Tennessee, died and was buried at Farmington, that state. 

Dr. Ross' brother. Dr. F. E. Ross, was for over a half century one of 
the best known physicians of Greene county, having practiced medicine in 
Springfield from 1865 until his death in J 910. His widow still lives in 
this city. 

Dr. L. C. Ross grew to manhood in his native community and received 
his early education in the schools of Springfield. Finally deciding upon a 
career as a physician, he entered the Missouri .Medical College at St. Louis. 
where he made a good record and from which institution he graduated 
with the class of [891. In April of that year he began the practice of his 
profession in Springfield, and from that time to the present his patients 
have continued to increase in numbers until he is now a verv busy man and 
ranks with the most successful general practitioners of the county. Dr. 
Ross is a post graduate of the New York Polyclinic, attending in the year 
1895. 

He is a member of the Greene County .Medical Society, the Missouri 
State Medical Association, the Southwest Missouri Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic 
Order. Politically he is a Democrat, and in religious matters belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, South. 

Dr. Ross has remained unmarried. He is well liked by a wide acquain- 
tance, being a man of pleasing address and good habits. 



NANDY C. WILLIAMS, M. D, 

To have the human name preserved has ever been, not only the desire, 
but one of the illustions of the race and will doubtless always he. Mauso- 
leums are built and the tablets hewn — "A graven stone to plead for tears 
with alien eyes," for the purpose of binding in memory the fact of a life. 
In the very earliest of the Hindoo mythology the milk of the sea was mys- 
tically churned to make the amrita which gave immortality; and, all litera- 
ture since bears trace of similar fancies. This desire to be remembered, 
that our dust shall retain the tender regard of those whom we leave behind; 
that the spot where it shall lie will be remembered with a kind and soothing 
reverence ; that our children will visit it in the midst of their sorrows; and 
our kindred in after times will feel that a local inspiration hovers round it, 
has been one of the most potent forces in the history of man. Hence the 
value and importance of biography and a volume of the nature of the one 



1244 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

in hand, embracing as it does the leading characters in the drama of civili- 
zation as staged in Greene county, one of the well known and deserving 
actors in it of the present generation being the successful physician of Spring- 
held, whose name forms the caption of this article. 

Dr. Nandy C. Williams was born in Warren county, Iowa, February 
25, i860. He is a son of Uriah F. and Jane (Graham) Williams. The 
father was born near Indianapolis, Indiana, and there spent his earlier years, 
finally emigrating to Warren county, Iowa, where he established the family 
home. He devoted his life to general farming, and his death occurred in. 
1878. His wife preceded him to the grave in 1871. William Williams, the 
paternal grandfather of our subject, was a soldier in the Mexican war and 
was killed in battle. 

Doctor Williams grew up on the home farm and much hard work fell 
to his lot when he was a boy; however, he was ambitious and forged ahead 
despite obstacles. He received his early education in the public schools of 
his native community and also spent three years in the Simpson Seminary 
College at Indianola, Iowa, and in 1884 he entered the Iowa State Univer- 
sity at Iowa City, where he remained two years. In order to defray the 
expenses of a college course, having to depend entirely upon his own re- 
sources, he engaged in any kind of honorable work he could get to do dur- 
ing vacations, and taught school seven years. His undaunted determina- 
tion brought success. Making up his mind to enter the medical profession 
at an early age he began the study of medicine while still in school and began 
practicing under a preceptor in [888, and in 1894 received his degree from 
Barnes .Medical College, St. Louis. Missouri. In 1895 he came to Spring- 
field, Missouri, and began the practice of his profession, which he has con- 
tinued to the present time with much success, and has long since ranked with 
the best and most popular general practitioners in Greene county. 

On June 17, 1885, Doctor Williams was married to Etta A. Lyman, 
who was horn near Bloomington, Wisconsin, March 9, 1862. She is of 
Welsh ancestry. To the doctor and wife one son was horn. Leslie E., born 
at Clifton Hill, Randolph count}, Missouri, December 0, 1891 ; he was edu- 
cated in public and high schools at Springfield, this stale, later spending 
three years in the Fine Arts Academy at Chicago; he taught one year in 
the Art Institute of Chicago, in 1913, and is now engaged in commercial 
art work; he lives in Xew York City, and is unmarried; he was evidently 
born with the artistic temperament, which has been well developed and he 
gives promise of a brilliant career in bis chosen field of endeavor. 

The parents of our subject's wife are both deceased, George Lyman, 
the father, who devoted his life successfully to farming, died in 1898, but 
was living retired at the time of bis death. His wife bad preceded him to 
the grave in 1890. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 245 

Doctor Williams is a member of the Greene County Medical Society, 
the Southwest .Missouri Medical Society, the Missouri State Medical 
Association and the American Medical Association. Fraternally, he belongs 
to the Masonic order, including the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine and the Order of Eastern Star; he also belongs to the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. Politically he is a Democrat, and in 
religious matters belongs to the Presbyterian church which he faithfully 
supports. 



THEODORE A. COFFELT, M. D. 

A name that is deserving of a high position in the list of physicians in 
Greene county is that of Dr. Theodore A. Coffelt, formerly a Methodist 
minister. He is appreciated and respected in every relation of life — profes- 
sional, social and religious — a learned doctor, a sincere and reliable citizen, 
and in the better and higher conception of him, an honest man. The unos- 
tentatious candor and openness of his character were never warped by selfish 
instincts, or obscured by professional ardor. As a friend and neighbor he 
is known as a genial, generous, kind-hearted man, free from circuity and 
deceit, gentle in disposition, modest, judicious, placid, reasonable and just; 
who holds his own and his friend's honor above all the blandishments of 
passion and the seductions of ambition and wealth ; and who aims to come, 
as nearly as human nature can come, to loving his neighbor as himself. 

Doctor Coffelt was born in McDonald county, Missouri, April 10, 
1855. He is a son of Rev. Wyatt and Jane (Sligar) Coffelt, the father a 
native of Kentucky, and who devoted bis active life principally to the min- 
istry and was one of the prominent pioneer preachers of his day- He spent 
the last years of his life on a farm. His death occurred in Springfield, 
Missouri, October 17, iqoi. and he was buried in the Coffelt cemetery near 
Mason Valley, Benton county, Arkansas. The mother of our subject was 
a daughter of Adam Sligar, a German; she was born on June 18, 1816, in 
McMinn county. Tennessee. Her death occurred on January 20, 1886. She 
and her husband are buried in the same cemetery. They became parents of 
a large family, twelve children, an equal number of sons and daughters. 

Philip Coffelt, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Greenbriar county, Virginia, now a part of West Virginia. He was a son 
of Henry Coffelt, a native of Germany, from which country he emigrated 
to America in the old Colonial days. He was a member in George Wash- 
ington's company at the time of Braddock's defeat, during the French and 
Indian war. Henry Coffelt married Ellen Ryan, who was born in Ireland, 
from which country she emigrated to America when five vears of age. She 



I246 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and her older brother were captured by the Indians when she was seventeen 
years old, but effected their escape after eight weeks of captivity. Their 
freedom was gained by the wit, perseverance and ingenuity of the girl. Her 
brother was lame, suffering with what was then known as white swelling 
of the hip. When the Indians were within one day's journey of their set- 
tlement they compelled this girl and her lame brother to carry wood from 
the nearby forest into camp. The girl suspected that this meant that they 
were to be burned at the stake while the red men engaged in their accus- 
tomed revels on such occasions. So she instructed her brother how to 
leave the encampment, where to go and await her coming. He got away 
late in the afternoon and when night came on she made a break for liberty 
herself. Finding her brother at the appointed rendezvous, they concealed 
themselves under a fallen tree in a dense thicket and remained there for three 
days, never daring to move. At one time the Indians in their search for 
the runaways climbed upon the very tree under which the children were 
lying. All the sister and brother had to eat during that trying period was 
the dried tongue of a horse which Ellen had stolen from her captors shortly 
before she escaped. Finally deciding that it was safe for them to leave 
their hiding-place they traveled by night, secreting themselves during the 
day, and eventually came to the Ohio river, which was at that season low, 
and, finding a shallow place the girl carried her brother on her back across 
the river, which she waded. The hardships proved too much for the cripple 
and when sixty miles from home he died. Ellen having no way of digging 
a grave, placed the body in the crotch of a fallen tree, and with much hard 
work piled limbs of trees, rocks and leaves over the body, and that was his 
only grave. She made her way back home which she reached after much 
privation and suffering from hunger and exposure. After Ellen Ryan's 
marriage to Henry Coffelt they settled in Greenbriar county, Virginia, and 
to them ten children were born. One of their sons, Philip, was the grand- 
father of Dr. Coffelt of this sketch. He married a Miss Wvatt, of English 
ancestry, who was a cousin of Sir Francis Wyatt, first governor of Virginia 
under old Colonial conditions. 

Doctor Coffelt received his education in the common schools and the 
high school at Pea Ridge. Arkansas, after which he entered the medical de- 
partment of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, in 1883, where 
he remained one term, and in 1885 entered the Missouri Medical College 
from which he was graduated in 1886. He has been a practicing physician 
and surgeon since 1884. His earlier years were spent in Arkansas. Leav- 
ing that state in 1891 he entered the post-graduate department of the Mis- 
souri Medical College, where he remained until 1893, tnen removed to Car- 
thage, Missouri, and began practicing as a specialist on the eye, ear, nose and 
throat. Remaining there two years, he then entered the ministry of the 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1247 

Methodist Episcopal church, South, and was thus engaged from 1895 to 
1901, having joined the Southwest Missouri Conference. During that pe- 
riod of six years he served the congregations of that denomination two years 
at Pineville, in his native county; two years at Willard, Greene county; and 
two years at Marshfield, Webster county. He did an excellent work in 
building up the churches at these places and was regarded as an earnest, 
faithful and capable pastor in every sense of the word. But on account of 
failing health he gave up the ministry and resumed the practice of medi- 
cine, opening an office in Springfield where he has since remained, confin- 
ing himself to the eye, ear, nose and throat, in which field he has few equals 
and no superiors in southwest Missouri and has enjoyed a constantly grow- 
ing business all the while. He maintains an up-to-date suite of rooms in 
the Woodruff building. In order to further equip himself for this special 
line of work, the doctor took the course in the New York Post-Graduate 
School of Medicine, from which he was graduated, and he also has a certifi- 
cate of graduation from Washington University, 1888. 

Doctor Coffelt is a member of the Greene County Medical Society, the 
Southwest Missouri Medical Society, the Missouri State Medical Asso- 
ciation, the Western Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology and 
the American Medical Association. Fraternally, he is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Order, including the Royal Arch and the Council degrees. Politically, 
he is a Democrat, and he belongs to the St. Paul Methodist Episcopal church, 
South. He has always been an ardent worker in the lines of his profession. 
He has been president of the Greene County Medical Society, also president 
of the Southwest Missouri Medical Society, vice-president of the Mis- 
souri State Medical Association, and in 1908 was appointed a delegate to the 
international tuberculosis congress which convened in Washington. D. C. 
He is now president of the board of directors of the Springfield Hospital. 

Doctor Coffelt was married on October 1, 1885, to Mary M. Clayton, 
a native of Arkansas, where she grew to womanhood and was educated. 
She is a daughter of Rev. John M. and Cynthia (Dameron) Clayton. The 
father's death occurred in 1902 and the mother passed away September, 
19 1 4, in Fayetteville, Arkansas. 

Five children have been born to Doctor Coffelt and wife, named as 
follows: Everett C, born at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, July 14, 1886, was edu- 
cated in the high school in Springfield and Drury College ; he married Vita 
Hampton, and they have two children, Kenneth, born in 1912, in Kansas 
City, and Kathrvn Ruth, born on March 1, 1915. They reside on a farm in 
Webster county, Missouri. Anna Maud, second child of Doctor Coffelt, 
was born in Pea Ridge, Arkansas, September 5, 1889, was educated in the 
Springfield high school and Drury College, also attended the State Normal 
here, and is at this writing a student in the Ward-Belmont School at 



I248 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Nashville, Tennessee. Oscar T., the second son, was born in Pea Ridge, 
Arkansas. December 18, 1890, was graduated from the Springfield high 
school and is now a student of Drury College, where he will graduate with 
the class of 1915; Mabel Ruth, born in Willard, Missouri, September 19, 
1898, is attending high school in Springfield; Glenn Palmore, born in Marsh- 
field, this state, July 11, 1900, is in his last year in ward school. 

Doctor Coffelt is, practically speaking, a self-made and self-educated 
man, and is a credit to himself, his family and the public; he is a master of 
his specific profession, and justly merits the large practice which he has 
gained through skilful work, honest dealings and courteous manners. 



LAFAYETTE A. ROSS. 



One of the venerable and must widely known citizens of the northern 
part of Greene county is Lafayette A. Ross, who iias spent practically the 
entirety of his nearly four score years in this locality, which he has seen 
grow from a wild and sparsely settled prairie, dotted with log cabins, when 
land could be secured for one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre to its 
present thriving state when some of the best acres are worth one hundred 
and seventy-five dollars each and modernly appointed homes are numerous. 
And in this great transformation he has played well his part in every respect. 
His lout; life of usefulness, industry and charitable acts has won for him 
the sincere affection of almost every man, woman and child in Murray town- 
ship, and of many erf those living in townships adjacent. His early industry 
has resulted in his possession of a neat competence, and while he still enjoys 
the glow of the golden rays of the sun of life that must eventually set behind 
the horizon of the inevitable, he share- that enjoyment with no stint in the 
companionship of the members of his family and bis wide circle of friends. 
won through his residence here of more than three-quarters of a century. 

Mr. Ross was bom in Robberson township, Greene county, Missouri, 
February 21, 1835. lie is a son of David and Louisa 1 Robinson) Ross. 
David Loss, who was one of the noted pioneer preachers of southwestern 
Missouri, and one of the most extensive agriculturists and stock men of 
Greene county, was born in Kentucky, March i_\ r8i2, and he was six 
years of age when his parents, William and Elizabeth Ross, removed with 
their family to I'.oonville, Cooper county. Missouri. William Ross was a 
man of ability and an expert surveyor. While living in Cooper county he 
laid off the town of Boonville, and about that time was employed by the 
government of Mexico to assist in surveying the greater portion of what is 
now the state of Texas. After returning from the Southwest to Cooper 




MR. AND MRS. L. A. BOSS. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1^49 

county he brought his family to Greene county, having maintained his home 
in the former county six years. He took up a claim in Robberson town- 
ship, before this locality had been surveyed, and on this he erected a log 
cabin, made such other improvements as were necessary in placing raw- 
prairie land under cultivation, but he subsequently moved to Bolivar, Polk 
county, and engaged in mercantile pursuits for seven years, then located at 
Versailles, Morgan county, this state, where he spent the rest of his life, 
dying when past eighty years of age. His widow died at the home of their 
son, David Ross, when past eighty-two years of age. They were a sterling 
old pioneer couple and did much for the advancement of early civilizing 
influences in this section of the state. David Ross was twelve years of age 
when he accompanied his parents to Robberson township Greene county, 
from Boonville. Here he engaged in farming, erecting a log cabin and 
starting in true primitive fashion, and. being a hard worker, a man of rare 
foresight and good judgment he prospered with advancing years and became 
owner of over five hundred acres of fine farming land here, which he 
brought up to a high state of cultivation and improvement and carried on 
general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale, raisin- large num- 
bers of horses, mules, cattle, hogs and sheep annually, and was a most ex- 
cellent judge of live stock. He was one of the best known and most influen- 
tial of the early settlers in this locality. For a period of over thirty-five 
years he was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and 
preached in Springfield for many years and all over this country. He was 
profoundly versed in the Bible, was an earnest, forceful and eloquent 
preacher of the old school. His wife, Louisa Robinson, was born in Ten- 
nessee about 1815, and her death occurred on the home place in Greene 
county at an advanced age. He died in 1869 at the age of fifty-six years, 
when in the zenith of his powers. 

To David Ross and wife twelve children were born, namely: Lafayette 
A., subject of this sketch, is the eldest; William Monroe; Dr. Francis 
Emery, now deceased, was for over a quarter of a century one of the lead- 
ing physicians of Springfield; Mrs. Elizabeth Jane Whitlock lives in Spring- 
field; Mrs. Mary L. Skeen lives in Ash Grove, this county; David W. lives 
at Willard; Mrs. Sarah Melissa Watson lives at Morrisville, Polk county; 
Mrs. Henrietta Josephine Robinson lives in Texas ; Mrs. Cordelia Robinson 
lives in Oklahoma; Bennett J. is farming in Murray township; Mrs. Laura 
Emma Appleby lives in Topeka, Kansas : Dr. Leonadus Clark is practicing 
medicine in Springfield. 

Lafavette A. Ross grew to manhood on the home farm and w< irked 
hard when a boy, and received such educational advantages as the early 
schools afforded. He remained on the farm until he was nineteen years of 

(79) 



125° GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

age, when, on April 10, 1853, he started overland across the great western 
plains to the gold fields of California where he remained three years, return- 
ing home on July 7, 1856. His experiences on his long journey to and 
from the Pacific coast and while in the West forms a most important and 
interesting chapter in his life record. With the exception of this brief 
period he has always lived in the locality of his birth, and has resided in 
his present home since in April, 1868, or over forty-six years. He owns a 
finely improved and well-kept farm of one hundred and twenty acres, which 
was a raw, unpromising looking tract when he purchased it, but by hard 
work and close application he has made a fine farm of it and has a commo- 
dious residence and substantial group of outbuildings, his place being now 
well worth one hundred and seventy-five dollars per acre. He has always 
followed general fanning and stock raising, and he is still active, although 
the frosts of old age are upon him. but he has had an exceptionally robust 
constitution and has lived a careful life. He is a man of fine business judg- 
ment and broad-minded in practical affairs. 

Mr. Ross was married on September 21, 1856, to Malinda Evans, a 
daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Leathers) Evans, all three natives of 
North Carolina. Joseph Evans was born in 1804, and was fourth in a fam- 
ily of seven children. He grew up in his native state and when a young 
man learned the millwright's trade which he followed in connection with 
farming, plying his trade during the winter months. He removed with his 
family to Greene county. Missouri, in 1840, locating in Robberson town- 
ship, at tin' edge of what has long been known as Robberson Prairie. He 
built the first frame house in Greene county, and also had the distinction of 
building here the first saw mill and grist mill. He sawed logs for his home 
out of black walnut trees that would now be worth a small fortune. He 
became a prosperous fanner and influential citizen among the early day 
residents. His death occurred in September, 1888, at the advanced age of 
eighty-five years. Ten children were born to Joseph Evans and wife, four 
"i whom are living at this writing, namely: Alexander makes his home in 
Springfield; Malinda. wife of the subject of this -ketch; Mrs. Emma 
McDaniel, who resides in Springfield; Daniel McCord lives in Willard, tin's 
county. The paternal grandparents of these children were Daniel Evans 
and wife, who, with their son, John, emigrated from England to the United 
States in an earl) day and settled in North Carolina. 

Eight children have been born to Lafayette A. Ross and wife, namely: 
George Emery lives in Texas: William J. makes his home at Morrisville, 
Polk county; -Mrs. Emma Ault lives in Tulsa. Oklahoma; Mrs. Lula R. 
Appleby is living on the home place with her parents; David Edward lives 
in Willard; Walter Evans makes his home in Oklahoma. Two died in 
infancy. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I25I 

Mr. Ross is a Democrat hut he has never held public office or desired 
to be other than a quiet, honorable and unobtrusive citizen. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, at Willard, has been secretary 
and trustee of the church at different times. His wife is also a member of 
the same church, and both are much interested in general church affairs. 



STAHL BROTHERS. 



The firm of Stahl Brothers, horse-shoers and general blacksmiths at 
218-220-222 West Pacific street, Springfield, is one of the most widely 
known and popular of its kind in Greene county and special mention of the 
success of these young men in this, one of the oldest and at the same time 
one of the most important and indispensable of the trades, should be noted 
in a work of the nature of the one in hand. They believe in employing pro- 
gressive methods in their work and maintain a modernly equipped shop, 
where high-grade work is promptly done, and their customers come from 
over a wide territory adjacent to Springfield. 

William F. Stahl, senior member of the firm, was born on September 
26, 1878, in Sullivan, Franklin county, Missouri, lie is a son of Julius and 
Louise (Rauch) Stahl, both natives of the state of New York and of Ger- 
man descent, but they were reared in St. Louis, and they are now living in 
Springfield. The father is a contractor in concrete work and is one of the 
well-known men in his line in this locality, having lived here twenty-six 
years, removing at that time from Lebanon, Laclede count)-, Missouri. To 
Julius Stahl and wife five children were born, all still living, namely: Will- 
iam F.. Ernest A., Charles H., Julius A., and Paul W. 

William F. Stahl received a common school education and when he 
began life for himself it was in the brick business, later was with his father 
in the concrete business, finally learning the blacksmith's trade, having com- 
menced working at the age of eighteen for a blacksmith on Commercial 
street, Springfield. He then went to Watrous, Xew Mexico, and went into 
business as a blacksmith for himself, and later established a shop at Canyon 
City, Colorado, where he remained until 1906, when he returned to Spring- 
field and continued his business in partnership with L. L. Calk at the corner 
of Campbell and Pacific streets, later purchased one-half interest in the firm 
of Stryker & Morgan, buying out Mr. Morgan. Then our subject's brother, 
Charles H. Stahl, bought a one-third interest in the business, the firm name 
changing to Stryker & Stahl Bros. The latter purchased Mr. Strvker's in- 
terest in 1908 and have since conducted the business under the firm name of 
Stahl Bros., at the present location, and have built up a large and constantly 



I252 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

increasing business and enjoy a reputation for honest and excellent work as 
horse shoers and general blacksmiths. They began in a modest way, start- 
ing with a small shop, but in iqij it was necessary for them to add two new 
buildings, and they are now occupying a large, well-arranged and substantial 
two-story brick structure and are the leading blacksmiths on the north side 
of the city and equal to any in Greene and adjoining counties. Beside them- 
selves they require seven skilled assistants. 

William F. Stahl was married on August 7, 1908, to Bessie Sanders, 
who was born in Mountain Grove, Missouri, and is a daughter of William 
Sanders and wife. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Stahl has been without 
issue. 

Politically, he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
and the Eagles, having been treasurer of the latter lodge for the past six 
years, is also treasurer of the Fraternal Aid. of which he has been a member 
for a number of years. He is a member of the Germania Club and the 
( ierman Brotherhood. 

Charles II. Stahl, junior member of the firm, was born on October 11, 
1883, in Lebanon, Missouri, and received his education in the common 
schools in Springfield and when a boy began learning the blacksmith's trade 
and has since followed this vocation in Springfield. In his earlier career he 
worked for some time in the shop of L. L. Calk. He has remained unmar- 
ried. Politically, he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen 
and the Eagles, the Germania Club and the (ierman Brotherhood. Both 
these young men stand well in the circles and clubs in which they move. 



ROBERT FRANKLIN BARRETT. 

After a successful railroad career of nearly thirty years, Robert Frank- 
lin Barrett decided upon a less strenuous and quieter vocation and turned 
his attention to the theater business with the result that he is earning a very 
satisfactory livelihood as proprietor of the "Happy Hour" moving picture 
theater in Springfield, and while there are tune-, as might naturally be ex- 
pected, when he longs again for the old life of the train man, yet this mood 
does not last long, as a rule, and he is well pleased with his new vocation. 

Mr. Barrett was born in Salem. Missouri, November 13, 1855. He is 
a son of William and Margaret I McDole) Barrett, both natives of Ireland, 
from which country they emigrated to the United States when young in 
years and lure spenl tin- resl of their lives. They established their home in 
Virginia, where they spent main years and from there removed to Mis- 
souri, locating at Salem over sixty year- ago when that part of the state was 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I25J 

sparsely settled. They had been educated in the common schools of Vir- 
ginia and married in that state. There the father of our subject learned the 
business of iron ore worker which he followed principally the rest of his 
life, dying near Salem, .Missouri, when his son, Robert F., was a boy. His 
widow survived many years, dying at Bloomington, Illinois, in October, 1904. 

After the death of his father the subject of this sketch was compelled 
to get out and hustle for himself, but he was by nature courageous, having 
inherited many of the indomitable traits of his Irish ancestors, and he not 
only made his own way when a boy but also managed to obtain a fair edu- 
cation. He came to Springfield when a young man and here began his rail- 
road career in 1879 as brakeman on the Frisco, running principally on the 
western division, and he also worked as flag man on a passenger train for 
some time. He proved to be a very faithful employee wherever he was placed 
and he was promoted to freight conductor in 1885. Twelve years of his 
railroad career was spent with the Chicago & Alton Railroad Company, a 
part of which time he was passenger conductor. Leaving this road in 1898 
he returned to the Frisco system, and was given a position as freight con- 
ductor on the central division. He continued with the Frisco until 1907 
when he quit the road and engaged in the moving picture business in which 
he has been very successful and which he has continued for seven years. 
The first three years were spent at Hugo, Oklahoma, after which he came 
to Springfield and opened the "Happy Hour" Theater at 502 East Commer- 
cial street, which has been very popular and which continues to be one of 
the best patronized in the city, for Mr. Barrett knows what a good show is 
and tries to give his patrons the best and at the same time make them as com- 
fortable as possible no matter what the season or the weather is. He has a 
neat, clean and sanitary place and a full modern equipment, including an 
up-to-date electric piano. He shows the "Universal" program. He shows 
four reels daily. 

Mr. Barrett was married on December 7, 1898, in Ft. Smith, Arkansas, 
to Josephine Crow. She was born in Iowa, January 4, 1864, and she is a 
daughter of Jonathan and Helen (Dooley) Crow, both parents natives of 
Cork, Ireland, from which country they emigrated to America when young 
and here established their home, spending the rest of their lives in the New 
World. They have been deceased for some time, the father having died in 
Iowa and the mother in Arkansas. They gave their daughter, Josephine, 
good educational advantages. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Barrett one child has been born, Irene J., whose birth 
occurred on December 10, 1899, and who is now attending school. 

Politically, Mr. Barrett is a Democrat and has been active in the af- 
fairs of this party for many years. He was elected city marshal of Spring- 
field in 1886, serving one term in a manner that was highly pleasing to his 



1254 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

constituents and with credit to himself. Fraternally, he belongs to the Ma- 
sonic Order, having attained the thirty-second degree in the same, is a Knight 
Templar and a Scottish Rite, in fact has taken everything in this time-hon- 
ored order but the thirty-third degree, the highest in the order. He has long 
been prominent in Masonry in the Southwest. 



FRANK GRUBEL. 



There was a time when a large per cent of the cigars consumed in the 
United States were imported, but of recent years this is not true to such a 
great extent, partly because American growers have improved in the stock 
of tobacco produced until some grades equal any in the world and partly 
because our manufacturers have learned mure about turning out high-grade 
products. One of the best known and must successful cigar manufacturers 
in this part of the country is Frank Grubel, of Springfield, who, as his name 
indicates, is of German descent, but he has resided under the stars and 
stripes many years. 

Mr. Grubel was born on December 12, 1853, at Grafenhaynchen, Ger- 
many. He is a son of Edward and Christina (Muadrick) Grubel; both na- 
tive's of the above named place also, where they grew up and were educated. 
The father was a woodturner by trade. He and his wife spent their lives in 
their native community and died there. Their family consisted of twelve 
children, eight of whom are living, namely: Edward. Frank, Ernst, Minnie, 
Emma, Paul, Carl and Herman. 

Frank Grubel lived in his native land until fourteen years of age and 
there received his education. He emigrated to the United States in 1S68, 
locating ill St. Louis, where he learned the cigar manufacturing business, at 
which he seemed to have a natural aptitude and became quite proficient, and 
he has continued the same to the present time with ever-increasing success, 
lie came to Springfield, March 7, [873, remaining a short time, then moved 
away, but ten vears later, June 27, 1883, returned and has been in business 
here continuously ever since, in the cigar manufacturing business alone since 
1897. 1° tnat y ear ne formed a partnership with August Engelking, under 
the firm name of Engelking & Grubel. which partnership continues. They 
manufacture a fine grade of five and ten cent cigars, a few of their leading 
and well-known brands being "Frank's Club House," "Sticker," "Little 
Puritan," "Frank's Financere, Hand Made," and "Promoter." They carry 
on both a retail and wholesale business, and employ six cigar makers and 
two stemmers. Only the best material is used and most modern methods 
employed, all cigars being hand-made. The tobacco, which enters the fac- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 255 

tory in a raw state, is purchased of the most scientific growers of the South, 
.and it leaves the factor}' in the form of a line grade of cigars, boxed, sealed, 
ready for market which is found very readily and over a vast territory. The 
factor}- is located at i6n Boonville street. 

Mr. Grubel was married on October 15, 1879, in East St. Louis, to 
Elizabeth Goetz, who was born in Louisville, Kentucky, August 27, 1859. 
She received a common school education. 

To <mr subject and wife two daughters have been born, namely: Ida 
B., born on March 6, 1881, is teaching in a local school; Clara, born on 
August 10, 1882. married William Ipson, a local contractor. 

Politically, Mr. Grubel is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Woodmen, Eagles and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, also 
the German Brotherhood. 



TOM W. ARMSTRONG. 

The methods used now by modern plumbers are in many respects vastly 
•different from those in general use when Tom W. Armstrong began this 
vocation over thirty-five years ago. During that period he has followed the 
calling continuously and has kept well abreast of the times in the same and 
.today is one of the most efficient as well as one of the best known plumbers 
in Springfield, where he has spent a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Armstrong was born in Hillsboro, Illinois, February II, 1863. 
He is a son of William F. and Minerva P. (Simmons) Armstrong, the fa- 
ther born in Ireland, April 11, 1830, where he spent his boyhood and from 
which country he emigrated to the United States when a young man. He 
located in Hillsboro, Illinois where he spent the rest of his life and died on 
April iS, 1867. He was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war, 
serving in Company E, Ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, enlisting in the 
spring of 1861 at Lincoln's first call for volunteers. He proved to be a gal- 
lant and efficient soldier and was promoted to the rank of major. He served 
four years and nine months. He was severely wounded at the battle of 
Shiloh. Remaining in the army some time after the close of the war he 
had occasion to take part in some of the Indian wars of the West. He 
was in many engagements and important campaigns and the fact that he 
went to the grave carrying five bullets in his body indicates that he was not 
afraid to mix in the fiercest of the fighting. He was a carpenter and con- 
tractor by trade, which he followed until his death. He was a strong Re- 
publican, and fraternally belonged to the Masonic order and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His wife was born in 1835, in Hillsboro, Illinois, 



I256 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and they were married in Hillsboro, Illinois. Her death occurred in De- 
cember, 1900. Four children were born to these parents, namely: Samuel 
lives in Hillsboro, Illinois; Tom W. of this sketch; Elizabeth is deceased, 
and Frederick W., who lives in Springfield, Missouri, is at this writing 
plumbing inspector of the city. 

Tom W. Armstrong grew to manhood in his native city and he received 
a common school education there. On September 6, 1913, he married Met- 
tie E. Bowers, who was born in Chicago. When fifteen years old Mr. Arm- 
strong began learning the plumber's trade in his native city and served as an 
apprentice two years, then in 1881 went to Abilene, Kansas, where he 
worked at his trade nine years, moving from there to Springfield, Missouri, 
March 31, 1S90. He went in partnership with a Mr. Shearer on Xorth 
Boonville street, which partnership continued for ten years. Since that time 
he has been engaged in business for himself, his present shop and office be- 
ing located at 206 East Olive street where he has a well equipped shop and 
display rooms, carrying a large stock of modern fixtures and a general 
plumbing outfit. He has been very successful in his line and has built up 
a large business throughout the city. He handles some large contracts and 
is always busy, keeping a number of skilled assistants. 

Politically, Mr. Armstrong is a Republican. He has been a member 
of the Knights of Pythias since the day he was twenty-one years old. He 
also belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men, the Woodmen and Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 



C. L. RHODES. 



Life is pleasant to live when we know' how to make the most of it. 
Some people start on their careers as if they had weights on their souls, or 
were afraid to make the necessary effort to live up to a high standard. 
Others, by not making a proper study of the conditions of existence, or by 
not having the best of trainers — good parents — are side-tracked at the out- 
set and never seem thereafter to be able to get back again on the main track. 
C. L. Rhodes, well-known produce man of Springfield, seems to have been 
fortunate in being reared under the superb influences of a good old South- 
ern home and, having gotten a proper start on the highway of life, has 
succeeded admirably. 

Mr. Rhodes was born in the northern part of Georgia, April 19, 1853. 
lie is a son of Wesle) and Nancy (Stewart) Rhodes, both natives of Xorth 
Carolina, in which state they grew to maturity, received limited educations 
and were married, removing in an early day across South Carolina into 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. l2 57 

northern Georgia where they established the future home of the family on a 
farm which they purchased, and there they spent the rest of their lives, the 
mother dying in 1881 and the father in 1891. During the war between the 
states Wesley Rhodes enlisted in the Confederate army under Captain Stew- 
art, in Tennessee, but served only six months. His family consisted of seven 
children, namely: C. L. of this sketch is the eldest; John is engaged in 
farming in Georgia; Mrs. Sarah Freeman and husband live on a farm in 
Lawrence county, Missouri ; Nancy has remained single and lives in Ala- 
bama; William X. lives in Billings, Christian county, Missouri; James and 
Emanuel are both deceased. 

C. L. Rhodes grew to manhood on the home farm in Georgia and he 
received his early education in the public schools of his home district. He 
spent his early life in general farming and also operated a country store for 
awhile or until he removed to Christian county, Missouri, in 1886. There 
he engaged in farming four years, then moved to the town of Billings where 
he engaged in the produce and mercantile business, general trading, etc. 
Continuing there two years he returned to the farm for awhile, and in 1891 
moved to Springfield and at once opened up a produce business which he 
has conducted with every growing success to the present time, or for a 
period of twenty-three years, during which he has become one of the most 
widely known dealers in produce in southwestern Missouri. However, he 
has had other business interests the meantime. His place of business has 
remained in the same block on South Campbell street ever since coming to 
this city and he is widely known to the rural visitors from Christian, Taney 
and other counties who come to Springfield to trade. He buys and ships all 
kinds of produce in carload lots, doing mostly a jobbing business, handling 
chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, eggs, furs, hides, roots, etc. 

Mr. Rhodes was married in August, 1874, at Blairsville, Georgia, to 
Sarah Bishop, who was born in Georgia in 1858, and there she grew to 
womanhood and was educated in the common schools. She was a daugh- 
ter of Alfred and Mary (England) Bishop an old Georgian family, Mr. 
Bishop having been a successful planter in that state many years. Mr. 
Rhodes' first wife died on August 2. 1911. To this first union twelve chil- 
dren were born, namely: Mary is deceased; Bettie is deceased; William S. 
lives in Springfield, and is engaged in business with his father: Mrs. Ida 
Bowman lives in this city; James and John, twins, both live in Springfield; 
Lou and Gertrude, twins, are both deceased ; Hershel and Ernest, twins, the 
former deceased, the latter living in this city; Minnie died in early life; 
Jessie also died when young. 

On September 12, 1912, C. L. Rhodes married Frances Little, in Au- 
rora, Missouri ; she was born in the same vicinity in northern Georgia of 
which our subject was a native, but was brought to Christian count)'. Mis- 



J-'5' S 'GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

souri, when young by her parents and there grew to womanhood and at- 
tended school. She is a daughter of William and Louise Jane (Cobb) Little. 
Her mother was born in North Carolina, February 14. 1837, and her death 
occurred in Billings. Missouri, in 190S. The father of Mrs. Rhodes was 
born December 31, 1836, in North Carolina and his death occurred at Bill- 
ings, Missouri. June 26, 1892. 

.Mr. Rhodes has been very successful in a business way and owns con- 
siderable valuable property in Springfield, including a substantial modern 
residence on Phillips street. Politically, he is a Republican. Fraternally, he 
belongs to the Woodmen of the World and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He and his family are members of tbe Methodist Episcopal 
church, South, in which he is a trustee and a liberal supporter. 



CHARLES F. KAXXIXG. 

When we learn that a man has engaged in one line of business for 
over a quarter of a century at the same location, as has Charles F. Kanning, 
well-known business man of Springfield, we know that he is tbe possessor 
of a rare combination of personal qualities which never fail to make for 
success wherever they are found. It indicates that he is a man of keen 
discernment, sound judgment, conservative and persevering as well as honest 
and honorable in all the relations of life. 

Mr. Kanning, the well-known meat market man of Boonville street, 
was born March [9, [863, in Kentucky. He is of German descent and is a 
son of Henry and Mary (Kimmell) Kanning, both natives of Germany, 
from which country they emigrated to the United States when young, and 
were married in Xew York City, where they lived for awhile, then came 
West, finalh establishing then- home in Kansas. The father of our subject 
was well educated and was a merchant tailor by trade. The last fifteen 
years of his life was -pent in St. Loth-, where he followed his trade. During 
the Civil war he- served in the Union army. 

Politically he was a Democrat. His death occurred in St. Louis in 
January. [909. His widow died 011 November 27. IQ14, at her home in 
Pittsburg, Kansas. To these parents twelve children were horn, namely: 
Agnes is deceased; Alexander; Fisco is deceased; Henry; Charles F., of 
this sketch: Mary: William: Clara; Tilly; Otto; Emma, and Bertha. 

Charles F. Kanning received a common school education in Kan 
When he reached his majority he came to Springfield and went into the 
butcher business, starting with practically nothing, but by wise economy and 
good management he forged ahead and for many year- has enjoyed a grow- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 2 59 

ing and lucrative trade. He has been in his present location, 527 Boonville 
street, for a period of twenty-seven years under the firm name of Kanning's 
Meat Market, which is one of the best known in the city. He carries a large 
line of everything commonly found in the best meat markets anywhere, and 
his place is neat and attractive. Promptness and honesty have been his 
watchwords. He is still active. He has a fine home on Poplar street. 

Mr. Kanning was married in St. Louis on December 20, 1887, to Nannie 
I'.. Dunbar, who was born in Port Gibson, Mississippi, April 5. 1864. She 
is a daughter of Robert G. and Mary K. (Sevier) Dunbar, both natives of 
Louisiana, where the}' grew up, were educated and married. They each rep- 
resented excellent old Southern families. The father of Mrs. [Canning 
died at Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana, in 1866. His wife was born on 
June 5, 1S44, and her death occurred on July 17, 1887, in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. She received a good education and was talented in music and was a 
cultured, refined lady in every respect. Her father, George VV. Sevier, was 
born near the city of Nashville, and he died at Port Gibson, Mississippi, 
about thirty-five years ago. He was a grandson of Governor Sevier of 
Tennessee. His wife, Sarah Knox, was a first cousin of James EC. Polk, 
President of the United States, also a niece of Mrs. Andrew Jackson and 
she was reared by President Andrew Jackson and went with him to New 
Orleans on his first trip down the Mississippi river. John Sevier, great- 
grandfather of Mrs. Kanning, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
participating in thirty-seven battles of that conflict. By reason of his service 
in our Mar of Independence, Mrs. Kanning is a member of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution. Pier paternal grandfather, Robert Dunbar, 
spent his life in the South and died in Louisiana. Her father, Robert G. 
Dunbar, was an extensive Southern planter, owning a large plantation. Ik- 
was an Episcopalian. His family consisted of three children, namely: Nannie 
B., wife of our subject: Isaac, now deceased, was the eldest of the children; 
and Robert, who lives in St. Louis, is the youngest. 

Mrs. Kanning grew to womanhood in the South, and the careful train- 
ing and wholesome home influences of her girlhood are still manifest in her 
general address, for she is a woman of culture, social inclinations and affa- 
bility, and enjoys the friendship of all who know her. She had the ad- 
vantages of a good education. When she was a child the family left the 
South, locating in Mexico, Missouri, but lived there only about two years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kanning one child has been born, Margaret Norvell 
Kanning, whose birth occurred on June 25, 1893; sne was given excellent 
educational advantages, attending the Springfield high school and Drurv 
College : she is now a successful teacher in the public schools, and is a young 
lady of much promise. 



6 



[260 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. 



Politically Mr. [vanning is a Democrat. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America; also the Improved Order of Red Men. His 
wife belongs to the Women's Christian Temperance Union, the Maccabees 
and the Presbyterian church. 



CLYDE B. MACK. 



A representative of an excellent old Greene county family and a suc- 
cessful young merchant of Springfield is Clyde B. Mack. He is a man who 
would win his way in any locality in which fate might place him, for he has 
sound judgment, coupled with great energy and business tact, together with 
upright principles, all of which make for success wherever and whenever 
they are rightly and persistently applied. He possesses many of the sturdy 
traits of his father who was long a prominent and highly esteemed citizen 
here. 

Mr. Mack was born on December 27, 1872, in Greene county, Mis- 
souri. He is a son of Marshall H. and Lucy (Herndon) Mack. The father 
was born in Maury county, Tennessee, May 4, 183 1, and the mother was 
born in Virginia, April iS, 1837. They were brought by their parents from 
their respective localities in the South to Greene county, Missouri, in pio- 
neer days and here they grew to maturity, were educated and married. John 
A. Mack, tbe paternal grandfather, was born in Maury county, Tennessee, 
and there grew up and married a native of that locality. It was in 1853 that 
they removed with their family to Greene county, .Missouri, and here he be- 
came a prominent man, was influential in public affairs and at one time was 
elected probate judge. He was a great student of law. Here he and his 
wife spent the rest of their lives. Their son, Marshall H. Mack, father of 
our subject, was twenty-two years of age when he came to this county. He 
had grown to manhood in his native state and there attended the common 
schools. He studied medicine and became a successful general practitioner 
alter the Civil war. During that conflict he served as a member of the 
Home Guards. Politically, he was a Republican. At one time he was road 
commissioner in this county. He was a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. After a successful career as physician his death occurred 
in Springfield, March 17, 1888. . His widow survived many years, dying 
here on June 10, 191 1, at an advanced age. Her father, William Herndon, 
was a native of Virginia, where he grew up, was educated and married. He 
removed to Kentucky when the mother of our subject was fourteen years 
old, and after remaining there a short time came on to Greene county, Mis- 
souri in 1853 and established the future home of the family. 



GRI ENE C0UN1 V, M [SSOURI. [26] 

Eleven children were born to Dr. Marshall H. Mack and wife, namely: 
Lina L. is deceased; Ali O. is living; Harriett and Z. I. are deceased; the 
next child died in infancy unnamed; Austrian is deceased; Louella and Min- 
nie are living; Clyde JB. of this sketch; Claude E. is living, and Clinton A. 
i> the youngest. 

Clyde B. Mack grew to manhood in Springfield and here he received 
his education in the public schools. He first went into the grocery business 
as a clerk, later worked for the Wells-Fargo Express Company in Spring- 
field for a period of eleven years, giving a high degree of satisfaction. In 
December, 1908, he went into business for himself at 1223 Boonville street, 
his place being known as the "Cash Grocery," and he was successful from 
the first. His present location is 1150 Boonville street, where he has a large 
and attractive store and carries at all seasons an extensive stock of fancy 
and staple groceries, and, having always dealt courteously and honestly with 
his many customers has enjoyed all the while a constantly growing trade. 

Mr. Mack was married in Springfield on July 25, 1892, to Flora Port- 
ser, a daughter of L. F. and Jennie ( Guthrie 1 Portser, both natives of Penn- 
sylvania, from which state they finally came to Springfield, Missouri, and 
established their future home. The lather is now deceased, but the mother 
is still living here. 

One son has been born to our subject and wife, Clyde [van Alack, whose 
birth occurred July 8, 1893; he is attending school. 

Politically, Mr. Mack is a Republican. He belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America and is a member of Cumberland Presbvterian church. 



WILLIAM VV. W'HALEY. 

Upon the role of representative citizens of Springfield of a past gen- 
eration and prominent and highly esteemed men of affairs of Greene county 
for over a quarter of a century consistently appears the name of the late 
William \Y. Whaley, merchant, banker, insurance and general man of affairs, 
and prior to his coming here a prominent citizen of Mt. Vernon, this state, 
to which locality the Whaley family moved from the South when the Ozark 
country was little developed and here the subject of this memoir and. his 
worthy father did much toward the general development of the country in 
a material, civic and moral way, and gradually won their way into the affec- 
tions of the people through their genial, obliging and helpful natures, as 
well as their unswerving honesty, in short, they both possessed those sterling 
qualities of character which command themselves to persons of intelligence 
and the highest morality. Such a family as this is deserving of conspicuous 



1262 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

mention in any history purporting to set fortli the record of the lives of the 
most enterprising and public-spirited citizens of the locality under con- 
sideration. 

William W. Whaley was born in Dekalb county, Tennessee, not far 
from the city of Nashville, October 31, 1837, and was a son of Seth and 
Elizabeth (Bowen) Whaley, the father a native of Tennessee and the 
mother of Maryland, each scions of splendid old Southern families, long 
noted for their culture and enterprise. The parents of our subject received 
such educational advantages as the early days in the South afforded and 
there they were married on November 3. [825, and this union was blessed 
by the birth of eight children, all now deceased, namely: Mary, Nancy, 
Thomas, Robert, Margaret, Elijah. William W. (our subject), and Henry. 
Seth Whaley, father of the above named children was twice married, and 
to his second marriage three children were born. Seth Whaley devoted his 
earlier years to teaching school, later learned the trade of harness-maker, 
which he followed some time, and later engaged in farming. His death 
occurred in Eawrence county, Missouri, in the late seventies. 

William W. Whaley received a g 1 education in the public schools of 

Mt. Vernon, this state, where his parents located when he was about eight 
years of age. He remained on the farm until [851, when he entered a 
general store in Mt. Vernon as a clerk, and. having keen perceptive fac- 
ulties, he soon mastered the ins and outs of merchandising. .About this 
time he studied at the college at Fayetteville, Arkansas. In 185N Mr. Whaley 
began working for his wife's father. Benjamin Stone, and after the death 
nf the latter he continued to operate the store with the assistance of Mrs. 
Stone, and kepi the trade up to its former high standard. Later Mr. Whaley 
engaged extensively in the banking business in Alt. Vernon, and was for 
years regarded as one of the most enterprising and substantial citizens of 
that city. Seeking a larger field for the exercise of his business talents, he 
removed to Springfield in [883 and became president of the Commercial 
Ba k, which he made most successful by his able and conservative manage- 
ment. Subsequently he became a general lmsincss man. finally devoting 
much attention to the insurance business, and toward the latter part of his 
life Whaley &• Company became one of the most important insurance com- 
panies in Southwest Missouri and did a very large business. 

Mr. Whaley was married on October 3. 1867, to Mar) I.. Stone, a lady 
of many commendable characteristics, who proved to lie a most faithful 
helpmeet in every respect. She was born near Sedalia, Missouri, on June 3. 
[850, and she is a daughter of Benjamin and Nanc) (Owsle) 1 Stone, both 
these parents being natives of Tennessee, the birth of Mr. Stone having 
occurred in [818, and he died on April 3. [863, in the prime of life. The 
mother of Mrs. Whaley was bom on August 20. 1820. and her death occur- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. [263 

red in 1898, having outlived her husband thirty-six years. Air. Stone was a 
successful merchant. His family consisted of six children. 

To Mr. and Airs. Whaley two children were born, namely: Estella, 
who became the wife of Dr. J. E. Dewey, of Springfield, is deceased; and 
Lena Stone Whaley, who has remained single, lives with her mother in the 
commodious family home on North Jefferson street. 

Politically, Mr. Whaley was a Democrat, and, while he took much 
interest in public affairs, was never an aspirant for political honors. Fra- 
ternally he was a member of the Masonic Order, attaining the thirty-second 
degree, \\a^ a Knight Templar and a member of the Ancient Arabic Order 
(if Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was a member of the Baptist church, 
and was known to all as a splendid Christian gentleman. 



EUGENE J. RHODES, JR. 

For most of us life has the elements of abundant cheeriness in it. It 
represents more of encouragement than discouragement, more of satisfac- 
tion than disappointment, more of joy than sorrow, more of comfort than 
pain. Souls that are depressed and downcast are quite likely to be weighted 
down by borrowed trouble. A successful business man must be of the former 
type. Understanding this. Eugene J. Rhodes, Jr., who is engaged in the 
motorcycle business in Springfield, newer permits the little things of daily 
life that "wear and Ire. the mil" manifest themselves in his countenance or 
disposition, and I is agreeable nan-, er is a good as^et in his business. 

Air. Rhodes was born in Arkansas on March 26, 1883. He is a son of 
Eugene J. Rhodes, Si\. a. prominent business man and citizen, formerly of 
norther. 1 Arkansas, now living in Springfield, a complete sketch of whom 
is to he found on another page of this volume, hence will not be reproduced 
here. 

Our subject moved with his parents from Arkansas when young to 
Springfield and here he received his education in the high school and the 
State Normal. For three years he worked as deputy under his father, when 
the latter was surveyor, after which he engaged in the lumber business in 
Arkansas, also engaged in this business in Springfield with his father for 
some time, then for a year or more he engaged in the grocery business in 
this city, and in iqir, with his brother. Clyde A. Rhodes, he began in the 
motorcycle business, under the name of Rhodes Brothers, at 319 South Jef- 
ferson street, where the)- have remained to the present time, and have enjoyed 
a large and growing business all the while. They handle all kinds of motor- 
cycle supplies and auto accessories, maintaining a well-equipped garage and 



I-'"4 GREENE COUNTY, .MISSOURI. 

repair shop, doing all kinds of auto and motorcycle repairing promptly and 
of the highest grade of workmanship. They are also agents for several 
standard grades of motorcycles, including the Indian, Flying Merkel and 
Thor, and have built up a large trade in these. Our subject has made this 
line of business his special study for a number of years and has kept well 
up-to-date on the same. 

Eugene J. Rhodes, Jr., was married on July 14, 1901, to Mure! Hart, a 
native of Iowa and a daughter of \Y. H. and Dora Hart. Mrs. Rhodes came 
with her parents to Springfield when young and she received a good edu- 
cation. To our subject and wife five children have been born, namely: Boyd, 
born on February 15, 1903; Vivian, born on September 22, 1906; Hugh, 
born on February 14. 1909; Maxine, born on April 7, 1912; and Mildred M., 
born on January 21, 19 15. 

Politically Mr. Rhodes is a Republican, and Mrs. Rhodes is a member 
of the Christian church. 



HIRAM H. WESTMORELAND. 

The lamented subject of this sketch, now sleeping the sleep of the just 
in God's quiet acre, as the old Saxons referred to their burving-grounds, 
was in life one of the best known agriculturists in North Campbell town- 
ship, Greene county, he having been one of that worthy class of men who 
have fought their way to success through unfavorable environment; and a 
study of Mr. Westmoreland's life record reveals the intrinsic worth of a 
character which not only can bravely endure so rough a test, but gain new 
strength through the discipline. He was not favored by inherited wealth 
or the assistance of influential friends, but in spite of this, by perseverance, 
industry and wise economy, he attained a comfortable position in life and 
left behind him what should be and is prized by his descendants — a good 
name. 

Hiram H. Westmoreland was born on July \<>. [848, in Tennessee. He 
was a son of Henry Westmoreland and wife, who were born, reared and 
educated in the South and there resided until they removed with their two 
children from Tennessee to Greene county, Missouri, when the subject of 
this sketch was seven years of age. The father devoted his life to general 
farming and buying and handling live stock. He lived in Oklahoma for 
twenty years. His death occurred in [909. 

Hiram H. Westmoreland grew to manhood on his father's farm, where 
he assisted with the general work when a buy and lie received his education 
in the common schools and in Boonville College; however, bis higher edu- 
cation was interrupted by illness which compelled him to return home. 



> 



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GREENE COUNTY; MISSOURI. 1 265 

Alter his recovery he resumed work on the homestead and for some time 
engaged in buying and selling cattle. He was still a young man when he 
took rank among the well-known stockmen of his community, and prior to 
the breaking out of the Civil war he frequently drove mules overland to 
Illinois and sold them. Finally he purchased a farm of his own in Campbell 
township, Greene county, on which he raised much stock, including blooded 
horses. About thirty years ago, Hiram H. Westmoreland, with several 
other Springfield men, went to Kentucky and purchased a thoroughbred 
horse known as General Duke. This horse proved a wonderful sire and 
from him sprang some of the best horse stock known in this part of the 
state. While there he also purchased Denmark King. This horse was a 
grand breeder and noted show horse. Most of our readers residing here 
remember a coal black saddle stallion, greatly admired by every one. He 
also purchased on the same trip a highly bred trotting stallion ( Star 
Wilkes). That was the sire of some of the best road horses ever raised in 
Greene county, Missouri. Another stallion brought to this county by the 
subject was Diamond Denmark, who was high bred and had many admirers 
among our stockmen. These are names of but a few of noted horses Mr. 
Westmoreland owned and at that time his reputation as a breeder of fine 
horses was well established over all this part of the state. In later life he 
removed to Mountain Home, Arkansas, where he operated a stage line 
between that town and West Plains, Missouri, maintaining a station at 
Bakersfield where his drivers met and teams were changed. The stage line 
covered a little over fifty miles. Our subject also owned and operated a two 
hundred acre farm in Arkansas. Mrs. Westmoreland owns a fine farm, 
which now comprises three hundred and eighteen acres of productive and 
well improved land, the place being known as the "Model Dairy Farm," an 
extensive dairy business being carried on, for which the place is well 
equipped and adapted. This department is kept very sanitary and a high 
grade of cows are kept. A very ready market is found for the products in 
Springfield. A general farming business is carried on by our subject's 
widow, who is a woman of rare business ability. The old residence here 
was burned in September, 1896, but was immediately rebuilt, and a fine, 
modernly appointed and attractive home is now to be seen on the old site, 
about four miles northeast of Springfield. The dwelling is surrounded by 
a spacious and well shaded lawn and a generally attractive environment. 

Mr. Westmoreland was married on November 13, 1873, to Susie E. 
Morton. She was born in Greene county, August S, 185T, and is a daugh- 
ter of the late Hon. John and Margaret (Logan) Morton, a well known and 
highlv respected old family of this locality, Mr. Morton being now deceased, 
but his widow resides at the home of H. B. McDaniel in Springfield. 
(80) 



1266 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Five children were born to Air. and Airs. Westmoreland, named as fol- 
lows : Joseph H., born November i, 1876, resides on a part of the old home 
place in Campbell township, engaged in general farming, raising and feeding 
live stuck ; he married Eva Litton and they have four children, Austin, Belle, 
Pauline and Robert; Lucinda W., born February 21, 1879, married Lee 
Hopper, a farmer in Campbell township, and they have five children, Fay, 
Donnie, Rolland, Louise and Ralph: Susie, born November 14, 1884, mar- 
ried Edward Baker, deceased, formerly of Mountain Home, Arkansas, and 
she makes her home with her mother; Ida. born November 24, 1889, mar- 
ried Blond Gurley. a well known dairyman of Campbell township ; Hiram 
H., born September 19, 1894. is single and is living at home, assisting his 
mother operate the farm. 

Airs. Westmoreland is a woman of hospitality, kind and neighborly, 
well read and she is an active worker in the Alethodist Episcopal church. 
South, of which her late husband was also a member, in fact, the entire 
family are loyal in their support of this church. Fraternally, our subject 
was a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, also the Knights 
Templar. Politically, he was a Democrat and active in public affairs. He 
was a school director for some time, both in Arkansas and Greene count}'. He 
was a man of fine character and was honored by all who knew him. He was 
called to his eternal rest on March 1, 1903. his loss being deeply deplored by 
the entire communitv in which he was so well and favorably known. 



GODFREY C. STANCILL. 

It matters little what vocation a man may select as his life occupation 
as long as it is an honorable one. If he is an honest, upright man, courteous 
in his intercourse with his fellow-men, and possessed of the average amount 
of energy and business sagacity, he is bound to make his business a financial 
success. The late Godfrey C. Stancill possessed all the above mentioned 
requirements, and was for many years a prosperous merchant of Spring- 
field. In his earlier career he operated a plantation in the South with equal 
success. He was one of the gallant veterans of the Confederacy, and was 
always loyal to his native Dixie land. 

Mr. Stancill was born in North Carolina, one of the strongest of the 
Confederate states, having first opened his eyes on the light of day on April 
-7- l &37- He was a son of Caswell and Rebecca A. ( Anderson) Stancill, 
both parents also natives of North Carolina, the mother having been a 
daughter of Col. Rule Anderson of that state, and there these parents grew 
to maturity and married and established their home, but in 1839. when the 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. \2hj 

subject of this memoir was two years old, they removed from the old Tar 
state to Mississippi, locating on a plantation where the parents spent the re- 
mainder of their lives. Caswell Stancill entered land from the government 
there, and developed it, finally owning a valuable plantation of several thou- 
sand acres, and was a prominent citizen in his community. His family con- 
sisted of five children, three of whom survive at this writing. 

Godfrey C. Stancill grew to manhood on his father's plantation and he 
assisted with the general work on the same when a boy. He was given ex- 
cellent educational advantages for that time and was a well informed man, 
naturally keen intellectually and of sound judgment. He was still in school 
when the war between the states began and he unhesitatingly enlisted in 
1861 in Company 1. Mississippi Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Hum- 
phries, and this regiment was finally a part of General Longstreet's division, 
Confederate army and saw much hard service, participating in many im- 
portant engagements. Mr. Stancill was seriously wounded in the great bat- 
tle of the Wilderness, and was not in the service after that. He returned 
to the home plantation after the close of the war and carried on general 
farming, which he enjoyed, for a number of years, or until he removed to 
Springfield, Missouri. Here he went into the grocery business on Boon- 
ville street, later on Cherry street, and enjoyed a good business, always 
carrying a well selected stock of staple and fancy groceries and dealing 
honestly and courteously with his many customers. He spent the latter 
part of his life in retirement, having given up the store about nine years 
before his death. 

Mr. Stancill was married twice, first, to Mrs. Amanda Cox, who died 
without issue. On September 26, 1899, he married, in Springfield, Ellen V. 
I'otterfield, who was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, December 13, 1839. 
She grew to womanhood in her native community and received a good edu- 
cation in the city schools of St. Louis, and she followed teaching in that 
city for a period of fifteen years. She is a daughter of Daniel and Eliza 
(Garrett) Potterfield, both natives of Virginia in which state they spent 
their earlier years, finally removing to St. Louis county, Missouri, where 
they spent their last years, Mr. Potterfield engaging in mercantile pursuits 
during his active life. 

Politically, Mr. Stancill was a Democrat, but was never a public man, 
giving his time exclusively to his business and to his home. He was a 
worthy member of the Christian church. He always took a great deal of 
interest in the affairs of the United Confederate Veterans. 

The death of Mr. Stancill occurred at the family home on Cherry street, 
Springfield, where his widow still resides, January 6, 1912, when past sev- 
enty-five years of age. He was a man of polished Southern manners, 
neighborly, kind-hearted — in every way a true gentleman. 



1268 GREEXE COUNTY, MISSOURI". 

SIDNEY EDWIN WILHOIT. 

None of the one hundred and fourteen counties that are embraced by 
the boundary lines of the state of Missouri can boast of a more heroic band 
of pioneers than Greene county. In their intelligence, capacity for civiliza- 
tion and loyalty to the right they have no superiors. In their daring and 
courageous enterprise they have been equal to the California argonauts, a 
vast number of whom were Missouri pioneers, not a few from Greene 
count}'. Their privations, hardships and earnest labors have resulted in 
establishing one of the foremost counties in this or any other state, and one 
which still has a great possibility before it. The Wilhoits and Rountrees 
were members of this worthy class of our earliest settlers. They have been 
among our thriftiest agriculturists and worthiest citizens. A well-known 
member of the present generation of one of these old families is Sidney 
Edwin YVilhoit, manager of the Jefferson Theater of Springfield. 

Mr. Wilhoit was born in Greene county, Missouri. March 3. 1869. He 
is a son of James M. and Nancy ( Rountree ) Wilhoit. The father was 
born in Clay county, Missouri, in 1833, and the mother was born in Greene 
count}-, this state, in 1848. The father of our subject grew to manhood in 
his native county on the farm and he received exceptionally good educa- 
tional advantages for those early times, having graduated from William 
Jewell College at Liberty. Missouri. He was a school teacher by profession 
and was prominent in educational work in Clay and Greene counties for 
some time, however, his later life was devoted to farming for the most 
part. He was also one of the founders of the Springfield Wagon Works. 
He was a leader in public affairs here, and was at one time city marshal of 
Springfield, and was for two years superintendent of the county farm. He 
was widely known and highly respected by all classes. He was a man of 
ability, industry and public spirit, as well as known for his integrity and 
hospitality. He was active in Masonic affairs, having been a member of that 
order for many years. The mother of our subject grew to womanhood in 
this county ami was educated in the local schools. Her death occurred in 
1906, while the father of our subject reached an advanced age. passing his 
four-score years and more, dying in October, [914. To these parents seven 
children were born, all still living, namely: Sidney E., of this sketch; Guy, 
Andrew. Ralph R., Ray, Bessie, and Roy. 

The immediate subject of this sketch grew to manhood in bis native 
county and he received his education in the public schools. When young in 
vears he began his career as machinist in the Frisco shops in Springfield, the 
South Side plant, known as the old Gulf shops. Here he remained two 
vears. when he gave up this line of work, which was not congenial to his 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. I269 

tastes, and went to Memphis, Tennessee, where he engaged in contracting. 
Later returning to Springfield, he bought the old Hargrove Bottling Works. 
Subsequently he returned to Memphis and worked in the Frisco shops, where 
he became general foreman, in which responsible position he gave eminent 
satisfaction. Finally he began dealing in apples, and was very successful as 
a horticulturist. In 1905 he went into the theater business in Memphis and 
has been very successful in this field of endeavor ever since. Since then he 
has owned and operated thirteen shows. In September, 1913, he opened 
the Springfield Hippodrome, in which he owned a half interest, and on 
January 25, 19 14, he took full charge of the Jefferson Theater at 216 South 
Jefferson street, an up-to-date and popular vaudeville house, with two changes 
per week. In connection with a bill of several good acts of vaudeville he 
features at each performance a pleasing moving picture. He has been very 
successful with both the Jefferson and the Hippodrome. 

Our subject was married on May 1, [908, in Pine Bluff. Arkansas, to 
Priscilla (Cagle), of Pine Bluff. They have one child, Thelrna Vermel, 
who is five years old. 

Politically, Mr. Wilhoit is a Democrat. He belongs to the Springfield 
Club, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of 
Red Men. 



MIKE SHEEDY. 



No people that go to make up our cosmopolitan civilization have better 
habits of life than those wdio have come from "Erin's green isle." These 
people, as well as their descendants, are distinguished for their thrift and 
honesty, and these two qualities in the inhabitants of any country will in the 
end alone make that country great. When with these two qualities is cou- 
pled the other quality of sound sense, which all the Celtic race possesses, 
there are afforded such qualities as will enrich any land and place it at the 
top of the countries of the world in the scale of elevated humanity. One 
of this number is Alike Sheedy, of Campbell township, Greene county. 

Mr. Sheedy was born in Ireland, in August, 1885. He is a son of 
Matt and Katy (Sexton) Sheedy, both natives of Ireland also, where they 
grew up, were educated and married and there they spent their lives on a 
farm. They were members of the Catholic church. They were the parents 
of three children, namely: Alike, of this sketch; Katie, wdio lives in Ohio; 
and Mrs. Mary Lathem who makes her home in Ireland. 

Mike Sheedy grew to manhood on the home farm in his native land 
where he was taught to work diligently and intelligently. What education 
he has received has been through his own efforts. When he was fifteen 



12/0 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

years of age he emigrated to America with his sister Katie and settled in 
Cleveland, Ohio, later went to New Orleans, thence to St. Louis in 1868, 
and has lived in Missouri ever since. For some time he was in the service 
of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company. In 1873 he purchased 
the farm of eighty acres where he now lives in North Campbell township, 
Greene county. He has prospered through close application, good judgment 
and honest dealings and he is now owner of nearly eight hundred acres in 
Greene county, comprising one of the most valuable and desirable farms of 
the county, and he carries on general farming and stock raising on an ex- 
tensive scale. He raises blooded short-horn cattle, keeping about one hun- 
dred head the year round, and feeds some two to three car-loads of hogs 
yearly — also is an extensive wheat grower. In 19 14 he had two hundred 
acres in wheat and raised five thousand bushels — an average of twenty-five 
bushels per acre. He has a substantial home and large outbuildings and is re- 
garded as one of the successful self-made men of the county. 

Mr. Sheedy was married on July 5, 1873, to Mary Gorman, a native of 
Iowa, but she was reared in Missouri. She is a daughter of Simon and 
Mary (Russell) Gorman, both her parents being now deceased. She is a 
member of the Catholic church. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Sheedy nine children have been born, namely: John 
lives in Kansas City, where he is state grain inspector; Simon. Mike, James, 
Emmett, Mrs. Katie Gorman lives in this county and has five children as 
follows: Kate, Allen, Hal, Agnes and Margarite; Agnes, Maggie and Nel- 
lie. All these children but the one married daughter live at home: 

Mr. Sheedy was on the school board for twenty years and was road 
commissioner for some twenty years. Politically, he is a Democrat, and he 
and his family are members of the Catholic church. 



GEORGE F. OLENDORF. 

The (heater has long been recognized as one of the world's indispensable 
institutions, and the management of theaters, if done judiciously, is a re- 
munerative and pleasant one. Humanity needs amusement amid its exacting 
ami trying daily occupations, truly "the show's the thing," as one of the 
wisest of men remarked. The human mind must relax, must find relief at 
times, "must lose itself in other men's minds," as the great essayist. Lamb, 
wrote. This can be done in no better way than in spending an hour or so at 
a good play-house. The theater has been popular with the masses — men 
and women of all creeds and convictions, of all parties and denominations 
from remote ancient history to the present time, from the days of Grecian 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I27I 

one-act, outdoor tragedies to the latest twentieth century complex grand 
opera, and it will ever be so. George F. Olendorf, of Springfield, has long 
given his attention to the theater business, and is widely known throughout 
southwestern Missouri in this particular field. He has met with gratifying 
success because he has been industrious, has had the tact of knowing what 
the people want and because he has always been desirous of giving his 
thousands of patrons adequate returns for their money and time. He has 
made it a study and has therefore kept well abreast of the times in this line 
of endeavor. 

Mr. Olendorf was born in Middleport, New York, July 20, 1S75. He 
is a son of George H. and Caroline (Forrest) Olendorf, both parents also 
natives of the state of Xew York, where they grew to maturity, attended 
school and were married. George H. Olendorf devoted his earlier life to 
the drug business in his native locality in central New York. Back in the 
seventies he removed with his family to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he 
engaged in the furniture business fifteen or twenty years and where he 
resided until twelve years ago, when he moved to Springfield, in which city 
he and his wife still reside, living in retirement. The father has been a 
successful business man and laid by a competency for his old age. 

George F. Olendorf, the only child of his parents, was a small child 
when the family moved from the state of New York to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
and there he grew to manhood and received a common school education. In 
September, 1893, he began his career in the theater business, which he has 
continued to the present time with ever-increasing success. He began in St. 
Joseph, and was also cashier of the large Tootle estate and had charge of 
the Tootle Theater, the leading playhouse there, remaining with this estate 
for about eight years, giving eminent satisfaction in every respect. Then 
he and three other men leased a circuit of thirty-two theaters in the state 
of Missouri, which proved to be a paying venture. Mr. Olendorf came to 
Springfield in 1903 and leased the old Baldwin Theater on St. Louis street, 
one of the finest theaters south of the Missouri river in this state, with the 
exception of St. Louis, for many years, if not the finest. He managed this 
with his usual success until it was destroyed by fire in 1909. Afterward 
he was instrumental in promoting the new Landers Theater on Walnut street, 
which he leased and managed until 19 12, when he re-leased it and promoted 
the Bell-Olendorf-Ballard Amusement Company, of which he is president 
and which operates sixteen summer theaters, including the Skydome in 
Springfield. He is also manager of the Springfield Poster Advertising Com- 
pany, and maintains offices in the Landers Theater building. Each of these 
new ventures has proven successful and he is kept busy in their management. 

Mr. Olendorf was married on November 17, 1902, in Kansas City, 
Missouri, to Matilda Meyer, who was born in St. Joseph, this state. She is 



1272 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

a daughter of J. B. and Marie Meyer, both natives of Germany, from which 
country they came to the United States when young. 

To our subject and wife three children have been born, namely: Marie 
Caroline, born on May 3, 1905; George Meyer, born on November 17, 1910, 
died August 3, 191 1 ; and Forrest George, born on October 7, 1912. 

Mr. Olendorf is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and the Springfield Club; also is a thirty-second degree Mason, belong- 
ing to the Knights Templars. He is active in Masonic affairs, and his daily 
life is led along the lines laid down by this time-honored order. 



FRANK P. STUTZMAN. 

"The Song of the Forge" has ever been pleasant to the ears of Frank 
P. Stutzman, one of the most skilful and popular blacksmiths of Greene 
count} - , whose well-equipped shop in the city of Springfield draws patrons 
from remote parts of this locality, for here they know that they will receive 
prompt and careful attention. A criterion of his high-grade work is shown 
from the fact that man}- of his customers have patronized him for a score 
of years, refusing to have any other do their blacksmithing. It is as much 
an art to shoe a horse properly as it is to do anything else in a mechanical 
way, and our subject has become quite proficient in this art, being excelled. 
in fact, by none of his contemporaries, lie has lived in Springfield nearly 
a half century. 

Mr. Stutzman was burn in Goshen, Elkhart county, Indiana. April 25, 
1856. Fie is a sun of John M. and Catherine (Baughman) Stutzman, both 
natives of Ohio, where they grew up, received Mich educational advantages 
as the early-day schools afforded and there were married and established 
their home. In his earlier years John M. Stutzman was a carpenter, con- 
tractor and builder and in later life a fanner. He is living in Springfield, 
Missouri, at this writing. He has been twice married, first to Catherine 
Baughman, by which union eight children were born, six of whom a"re still 
living, namely: Elizabeth. Frank P., Mahalia. Emma, Adeline is deceased; 
Mary, Jerome; the youngest child died in infancy, unnamed. The father's 
second marriage was to Mrs. Shaw. 

Frank P. Stutzman spent his boyhood in northern Indiana. He had 
little opportunity to attend school, and most of his education has been ob- 
tained b\ studying at home of evenings after the day's work. When eleven 
years of age, in [867, he accompanied his parents to Springfield, Missouri, 
where the family established their permanent home, on a farm, just south 
of the city, and there they resided about five years, then our subject went to 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I273 

Illinois where lie remained two years, after which he returned to Spring- 
field and took up blacksmithing, first working with Sam Begle, and when 
only nineteen years of age Mr. Stutzman went into the business for him- 
self, having learned rapidly and shown much natural ability in this direction. 
He started up in the alley in the rear of the Metropolitan Hotel, on a small 
scale, and since then he has carried on general blacksmithing and horse- 
shoeing, his business increasing constantly with advancing years until he 
soon found it necessary to secure larger quarters and employ assistance. He 
has built up a large and lucrative business, and is now located in a modern 
and commodious shop on Convention avenue. He has an excellent location, 
and while he is specializing in high-grade horseshoeing, he is doing a great 
deal of general blacksmithing. Prompt and honest work has ever been his 
motto. 

Mr. Stutzman was married on May 5, 1878, in Springfield, to Louise 
Crostwait. who was born in Canada in 1859, and she removed from her 
native land to Missouri with her parents when she was a child, and here 
grew to womanhood and received a common school education, and here 
Mr. and Mrs. Crostwait spent the rest of their lives, both having been de- 
ceased a number of years. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Stutzman, namely : 
Alta, born in [881, was reared and educated in Springfield, and she is liv- 
ing at home; Virginia, horn in 1883, was also reared and educated in Spring- 
held, and is still with her parents. 

Politically, Mr. Stutzman is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen, and the Royal Arcanum. 
He is a member of the Christian church. 



ALFRED S. ABBOTT. 



The eminent position attained by Alfred S. Abbott, master mechanic 
at the Springfield Frisco shops, has been the result of long years of patient. 
painstaking, honest and conscientious effort, and he is therefore deserving 
of his success. His record might well be studied with profit by the young 
men who are striving for recognition in the mechanical world, for it indi- 
cates, among other things, how merit wins, despite obstacles, and that suc- 
cess is dependent on ability and integrity more than anything else. But 
Mr. Abbott had good parents who taught him from the start the duties 
of life — not ordinary instructions, but the higher duties which all owe t" 
each other and to society. The result has been to give broad ideas of life 
and its responsibilities and to fit him for honorable citizenship. 



1274 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Mr. Abbott was born, May 2$, 1868, in Pentwater, Michigan. He is 
a son of Jacob B. and Elizabeth E. (Snowden) Abbott. The father was 
born in Hamburg, New York, in 1842, and his death occurred in Joplin, Mis- 
souri, in 1886. The mother was born in- Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1844, 
and she died in Joplin, Missouri, in 1901. These parents grew to maturity in 
the East and were given the advantage of a public school education. Jacob 
B. Abbott studied medicine when a boy and became a successful physician 
and surgeon, which profession he followed the remainder of his active 
life. In 1873 he removed with his family from Pentwater, Michigan, to 
Kansas. In 1875 he located in Joplin, this state, but the rest of the family 
did not locate in that city until 1877. Doctor Abbott was enjoying an ex- 
cellent practice in the mining town at the time of his death. Politically, he 
was a Republican. During the Civil war he served in the Union army, having 
enlisted in Company I, Forty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in 1861, at 
Oregon. Illinois, and he saw considerable hard service in the South and 
took part in many of the great battles of the war, Wilson's Creek, Missouri, 
being among them. He was honorably discharged in 1865. His family con- 
sisted of three children, two of whom are still living, namely: Alfred S., 
of this review; Fred J., deceased; and Harry C, who lives in Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Alfred S. Abbott was nine years old when he came to Joplin, tliis state 
and there he attended the common schools. In February, 1888 he began 
his railroad career by going to work in the round-house of the Frisco 
railroad at Joplin, and there and in Springfield lie served his apprentice- 
ship of four years. In 1898 he was made division foreman at Sapulpa. 
Oklahoma, where he remained until 1902, in September of which year he 
came to Springfield as machinist in the North Side shops, and worked as 
such until in December, [902, then was made division foreman at Newburg, 
Missouri, which position he held from December 13th, of that year until 
March 1, 1907. when he was sent to Birmingham, Alabama, as general 
foreman, where he remained until July 1. 1909. when he was appointed 
master of mechanics at Ft. Smith, Arkansas, winch position lie held until 
March 1, 191 1. when he was transferred to Sapulpa, Oklahoma, with the 
same duties, which he discharged until August 15, 1911, when he was made 
mechanical superintendent at Springfield, remaining in that position until 
September 1, 1913, since which time he has been master mechanic for the 
Eastern division of the Frisco, and is at tliis writing discharging the duties of 
this responsible and important post in a manner that reflects great credit 
upon his ability, fidelity and integrity and to the eminent satisfaction of 
the company, which has ever reposed in him the utmost confidence and lias 
regarded him as one of its mosl efficient, trustworthy and reliable em- 
ployees. He is not only a close observer but is a diligent student of all 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I2 75 

that pertains to his lines of work and has kept well abreast of the times 
in the same. 

Mr. Abbott was married, June 26, 1894, in Toplin, Missouri, to Kate 
Seanor, who was born in Iowa, January 1, 1871. She is a daughter of John 
and Clara B. (Wilder) Seanor, the father a native of England and the 
mother of Sandy Creek, New York. Mrs. Abbott received a good education, 
including a college course at Boulder, Colorado. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Abbott, three children have been born, namely: Katie 
P., born July 17, 1895; John Seanor, born January 31, 1899; and Alfred S. 
Jr., born February 1, 1907. 

Mr. Abbott is a Republican. He is a member of the Episcopal church, 
and fraternally belongs to the Masonic order, including the Knights Templars 
and the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He also 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen. 



CLARENCE J. RHODES. 

The life of the average man of affairs today is spent amidst so much 
bustle and hurry and worry that he often imagines he can find but little 
time to devote to books, recreation, retrospection ; and there are many who 
hardlv ever open a book, seldom spend a day in the woods communing with 
nature, who content themselves with the dull routine of the daily drudge, 
and who never lose themselves in prose or poetry or fiction, in science, art or 
history. Perhaps one of the most busy men who lived in the past century 
was William E. Gladstone; yet he was one of the best informed and most 
deeply read men in Europe. The same may be said in America of Theodore 
Roosevelt. Such men do their work better because they come to it with 
minds refreshed and strengthened, and the}- move under the heavy load of 
the world's affairs with ease and grace and dignity because they hear things 
that other ears are deaf to and see upon all things a light to which un- 
taught eyes are blind. Clarence J. Rhodes, of Springfield, is one of our 
citizens who takes a delight in keeping up with current events and investi- 
gating the various realms of learning, having never permitted himself to 
become wholly absorbed with his daily tasks, therefore he is not only hap- 
pier but does his work better than if he ignored his tastes for culture. 

Mr. Rhodes was born at Zinc, Arkansas, February 1, 1887. He is a 
son of Eugene J. Rhodes, Sr., a well-known man of affairs, formerly of 
northern Arkansas, now of Springfield, a complete sketch of whom will 
be found on other pages of this work. 

The subject of this sketch received a practical education in the high 



I276 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

school and Springfield Normal, having come to this city with his parents 
when he was a child. After leaving school he went to St. Louis with a 
bonding company, where he remained until in February, 1907, when he 
returned to Springfield and went to work for the Kansas City, Clinton & 
Springfield Railroad Company as assistant ticket accountant or statistician, 
then became revising clerk, joint freight accountant and voucher clerk, and 
at present he is bookkeeper, with offices in the Woodruff building. He has 
given eminent satisfaction in all the above named positions, being alert, pains- 
taking, energetic and trustworthy. 

Mr. Rhodes was married on July 30, 1908, in Springfield, to Stella I. 
Sanders, who was born in Billings, Missouri. She is a daughter of J. \V. 
and Elizabeth T. (Tipper) Sanders, both natives of England, from which 
country they came to the United States in early life. The father is now 
deceased, but the mother is making her home in Springfield. Mrs. Rhodes 
was given good educational advantages. 

To our subject and wife two children have been born, namely: Warrena 
L., born July 14, 1909; and Richard J., born November jo, 1911. 

Politically, Mr. Rhodes is a Republican, and fraternally he belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias. 



JOHX KELLY. 



The vast majority of men are not their own employers. They are 
working for some one else and must continue to do so. The tendency of 
modern business is toward more economical production and this means 
larger establishments and fewer employers. Out of the ranks will come 
some captains of industry who will have large business enterprises of their 
own; but their number will be insignificant compared with the army of toil- 
ers who work for some one else. There are few men who are not compelled 
to sell their services in their youth in order to get a start in life, but lucky 
is he who does not remain a hired man too long, thereby losing confidence in 
himselt and incapacitating himself in a way to be able to go it alone. One 
of the business men of Springfield who had the tact to quit hiring out and 
start in business for himself when the proper time came is John Kelly, who 
first came to Springfield forty-four years ago, and for nearly four decades 
has been identified with the business of the city, thus literally growing up 
w itli the t< >wn. 

.Mr. Kelly was born in Ireland. June [3, [849. lie is a son of Patrick 
and Mary (Heckey) Kelly . both natives of Ireland, where they grew up, 
were educated in the common schools, and there were married and devoted 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 2JJ 

their lives to general farming. The mother was a daughter of a physician. 

John Kelly spent his early boyhood in the Emerald Isle, and there re- 
ceived a limited education by attending night school. He was sixteen years 
of age when he emigrated to America. He penetrated to the interior, first 
locating at Fulton City, Illinois, where he remained about a year, then went 
to Montana, Utah and Colorado, remaining some time in the West, then came 
to Springfield, Missouri, in 1870, arriving here in February, but soon there- 
after he went to Neosho and started in the liquor business for E. F. Kinney. 
After remaining there a year he came back to Springfield where he remained 
until 1876, when he went to Fort Worth, Texas, and spent two years there, 
then lived at Parlor Point, Texas, two years. From there he went to Colo- 
rado, where he remained six months, then returned to Springfield in the fall 
of 1880 and continued working at his profession until 1883, when he started 
in business for himself in partnership with E. F. Kinney, in the liquor busi- 
ness, on Commercial street, but two years later the partnership was dis- 
solved and he struck out for himself near the corner of Boonville and Com- 
mercial streets, where he conducted his business for fifteen years, then moved 
to Mill street where he has remained to the present time. He has prospered 
in a financial way, and has always been regarded as a law-abiding citizen. 

Mr. Kelly has remained unmarried. He has been a Democrat ever 
since he was old enough to vote, but has never aspired to office. He was 
confirmed in the Catholic church in infancy, and has always adhered to the 
same. 



JOHN W. ROSE. 



Among the enterprising, progressive and widely known merchants of 
Springfield is John W. Rose, one of Greene county "s worthy native sons, 
and a worthy scion of an old and honored family of this locality, a man who 
is deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, which 
has been in the face of obstacles that would have crushed men of less grit 
and ambition, for his early environment was decidedly unpromising, but, the 
modern Don Ouixot that he was, he did not sit by idly pining for something 
to turn up, but went forth to conquer, and, by persevering, succeeded. His 
life, though comparatively uneventful, has not been unfruitful of good results 
and kind deeds in behalf of his fellow-men. He thoroughly understands 
the business to which so many years have been devoted, and the confidence 
and respect of the hundreds of customers who pass in and out of his doors 
continuously are his in a satisfactory degree. 

Mr. Rose was born in Greene county, Missouri, on November 6, 1862. 
He is a son of John W. and Elizabeth (Laney) Rose, both natives of this 



I278 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

state. The father was a soldier in the Confederate army and was killed in 
a skirmish with Union troops in 1864. The death of the mother occurred 
in 1906. The paternal grandfather, W. R. Rose, was a native of Ten- 
nessee, and from that state he came to Greene county, Missouri, in early 
pioneer times, locating on a farm here in 1834. The maternal grandfather, 
J. H. Laney, was also a native of Tennessee, from which state he emigrated 
to Lawrence county, Missouri, in 1835, and was one of the earliest settlers 
of that county. Both the Rose and Laney families were represented in the 
Revolutionary war. The Laneys are of French and English ancestry. 
Grandfather Laney and wife are buried in Garroutte cemetery, and Grand- 
father Rose and wife are buried in Prospect cemetery. 

John W. Rose was left fatherless when two years of age, and he has 
always depended upon himself, which fact has doubtless been largely respon- 
sible for his success in life. When thirteen years of age he hired out as a 
farm hand at ten dollars a month, and continued farming until he was 
eighteen years of age. Meanwhile he had little chance to obtain an educa- 
tion, but this lack has later been made up by wide home reading and study 
and hy contact with the world until today he is regarded as one of the best 
informed men on general topics in Springfield. When a boy he learned 
telegraphy, and at the age of nineteen was in the employ of the Frisco rail- 
road and in charge of a station. He continued in that capacity for a period 
of six years, giving the company excellent service and was commended for 
his accuracy and fidelity. Not seeing much future to such employment and 
believing he had qualifications for the mercantile world, he left the road's 
employ and entered the mercantile business, and has since been engaged in 
the same in Springfield, with the exception of fifteen years spent as a traveling 
salesman, during which he gave excellent satisfaction to the firms employing 
him, and became widely known to the trade over a vast territory. He has 
operated a general book store on East Commercial street since 1906 and has 
enjoyed a large and ever-growing trade, and he carries at all seasons an 
extensive and up-to-date stock of everything found in a modern book store, 
and his obliging and courteous nature has won and retained a host of friends 
among his patrons. 

.Mr. Rose was married in 1883 to Mattie Wade, a native of Greene 
count v, where she grew to womanhood and was educated. She is a daughter 
of T. W. and Ellen ( Skelton | Wade. Mr. Wade has devoted his active 
life to farming, and he is a resident of Springfield. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rose, namely: Ethel, 
married R. R. Matthews, a mechanic, and they reside in Dallas. Texas ; Leon 
M. died on July 4. 1912: Jerry H. is associated with his father in business; 
Ina D. is at home. Ethel and Jerry H. are both graduates of the Springfield 
high school. 



GREENE rOUXTY, MISSOURI. l2 79 

Politically Mr. Rose is a Democrat. Religiously he belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and fraternally is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is deeply interested in the general welfare of 
his city and county in every way. 



ALVIN B. TRENARY. 



Although Springfield is a noted railroad town, thousands of trainmen 
and shopmen making their home here, it is impossible for each to know the 
other, but in some instances, like that of Alvin B. Trenary, an individual 
becomes well known in his own circle. This is partly because our subject 
has been a resident of this city for a period of thirty years, during which 
he has followed railroading, and partly because he is a good mixer, a jovial, 
companionable gentleman and is therefore popular among his fellow workers, 
and is a widely known passenger engineer. 

Mr. Trenary was born in Franklin, Indiana, February 20, 1862. He is 
a son of Thomas L. and Mary A. (Stairs) Trenary, the father a native of 
Indiana and the mother was born in Ohio. They grew to maturity in their 
respective localities and received good educations for that period, the father 
becoming a successful teacher, which he followed for some time. He was 
also a carpenter by trade. During the Civil war he enlisted from Johnson 
county, Indiana, in 1862, and met death in the service of his country, being 
wounded in battle, and died from the effects of the same in a St. Louis 
hospital. His widow survived to old age, and died in Greene county, Mis- 
souri. Our subject's paternal grandfather and mother had the distinction 
of being the first couple to be married in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. To 
Thomas L. Trenary four children were born. 

Alvin B. Trenary was a small child when he lost his father and he was 
thrown upon his own resources early in life, consequently his education was 
limited, but he has made up for this lack in later life by general reading 
and contact with the world. What schooling he obtained was in Urbana, 
Illinois, and when but a boy he began working in a grocery store in that town, 
and when eighteen or twenty years of age he went to Indianapolis. Indiana, 
and began his railroad career by firing extra on the Big Four road, and 
there he remained until in the autumn of 1884, when he came to Springfield, 
Missouri, where he has since resided. He went to work here for the old 
Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis Railroad as fireman of a freight train on 
the Ozark division, and eighteen months later as fireman on a passenger train 
and about the same run. Later he ran a switch engine about three years, 
then was promoted to a regular freight engineer, and ran in this capacity on 



IjSo GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI.- 

the Ozark division about six years, then was promoted to passenger engineer 
on this division, and at this writing still has the same run. This road has 
been a part of the Frisco System since 1900. Our subject is regarded as one 
of the safest and most efficient engineers out of Springfield, always sober, 
•cool, alert and careful. 

Mr. Trenary was married in Springfield on November 14, 1889, to 
Lutie Seaman, a native of Iowa, who was a small child when' her parents 
brought her to Springfield, and here she grew to womanhood and was edu- 
cated. She is a daughter of Levi and Mary (Fisher) Seaman. Mr. Seaman 
is a carpenter by trade. 

To our subject and wife two children have been born, namely: Helen 
V., born on August 13, 1890, received her education in the local high school 
and normal, and is living at home; Elsie Louise, born on April 12, 1896, is 
a junior in the Springfield high school at this writing. 

Mr. Trenary has a splendid and well furnished home on West Walnut 
street. Politically he is a Democrat. He belongs to No. 378, Brotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic Order, in 
which he has attained the master's degree. He and his family are all mem- 
bers of St. Paul's Methodist F.piscopal church. South. 



JOHN R.W'DOLPH SMITH. M. D. 

That life is tin- most useful and desirable that results in the greatest 
g( od to the greatest number and. though all do not reach the heights to which 
they aspire, yet in some measure each can win success and make life a bless- 
ing to his fellowmen; and it is not necessary for one to occupv eminent 
public positions to do so, For in the humbler walks ,,f life there remains 
much good to be accomplished and many opportunities for one to exercise 
one's talents and influence which in some way will touch the lives of those 
with whom we come in contact, making them better and brighter. In tin- 
list of Greene county's honored citizens is Dr. John Randolph Smith, now 
living in honorable retirement after a long, useful and eminently successful 
career as a physician, having for many wars ranked among the leading 
professional men of southwestern Missouri. In his career there is much 
that is commendable and his life forcibly illustrates what one can accomplish 
even in the face of obstacles, if one's plans are wisely laid and bis actions 
erned by right principles, noble aims and high ideals. 
Doctor Smith was bom on January 2~ , [836, al Monticello, Kentucky, 
a scion of an excellent old southern family, lie is a son of David and 
Charlotte 1 Havens') Smith, born in 1777 and 1800 respectively, who re- 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 



I28l 



moved to Newton county, Missouri, in 1836, and were thus pioneer settlers 
in this state. David Smith died January 24, 1845, when Doctor Smith was 
nine years of age, and his wife died in May, 1884. Our subject was an 
infant in arms at that time and he grew to manhood in Newton county, 
received a limited education in the old-time subscription schools and worked 
on a farm during his boyhood. But he was an ambitious youth and studied 
hard at home, taking an interest in medicine when only sixteen years of age, 
and about that time began studying medicine under Dr. J. W. Walker in 
Jasper county, Missouri. He made rapid progress and was equipped for 
his chosen career at an early age, being a fine example of a self-made man. 
He first began practice at Diamond Grove, this state. Seeing the need of 
a college training he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and took the course in the 
medical college there. He owes much of his success in life to his mother 
who was a well educated woman and taught him much at home. In his 
youth he taught school for a time in Xewton county, Missouri. Finally 
turning bis attention to the newspaper field he started, owned and operated 
the Weekly Record at Stella. Missouri, which he retained until in February. 
19 14, when he retired from active life. From 1871 to 1873, inclusive, he 
owned and operated a wholesale and retail drug store in Springfield, under 
the firm name of W. G. Porter & Company, at the southwest corner of the 
public square. Upon the death of Mr. Porter, Doctor Smith continued the 
drug business at 223 South street, under the firm name of J. R. Smith & 
Company. He enjoyed a large trade, maintained one of the leading drug 
stores of Springfield and was very successful as a business man. In con- 
nection with his business interests he followed his profession and had an 
extensive practice. Being of a literary turn of mind he has written and 
published a number of books on varied themes, principally of a religious 
tone. His writings show a depth of thought, broad culture, a splendid 
general knowledge and a fine literary finish. 

Doctor Smith was never named by bis parents, being known only by a 
"nickname" until he was eight years of age when he selected his own name. 
He comes from an excellent old .American family. Robert Smith, his grand- 
father, was born in England, and he served in the Revolutionary war. be- 
coming captain of a company in the Fourth North Carolina regiment. He 
was a gallant officer and took part in many engagements, including the battle 
of King's .Mountain. After the war he was a merchant and ship builder 
of note, owning several vessels which operated between North Carolina ports 
and the West Indies. Nathaniel Geist. the doctor's great-grandfather, first 
married Mary Howard, of Baltimore, Maryland, and later Dinah Yolkeer, 
of Holland. His daughter, Mary Geist. by his first wife, married Robert 
Smith, our subject's grandfather. Nathaniel Geist served with George 
(81) 



1282 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Washington in the war with England against France, and he was captured in 
1773 at Braddock's famous defeat by the Cherokee Indians, who held him 
four years. During his captivity he married an Indian maiden and they 
reared a family. One of their sons, George Geist, was a man of exceptional 
prowess and ability and the Indians called him Chief Sequoyah, and he was 
for some time chief of the Cherokee tribe. He has been held in great rever- 
ence by the succeeding generation of Cherokees in view of the fact that he 
originated the Cherokee alphabet. 

1 )avid Smith, father of our subject, was born in North Carolina. He 
lived in Tennessee, Alabama and Kentucky before coming to Missouri in 
1836. He was a great cattleman, raising large numbers in the above men- 
tioned states, and in the early days before there were any railroads in the 
South, he practiced driving immense herds of cattle to Baltimore, Maryland, 
where he marketed them. Many claim that he originated the familiar term 
"cowboy." He was left an orphan in infancy, his father and mother both 
thing at that period of his life. All his life he was a dealer in live stock and 
was one of the most widely known cattle and horse dealers in his day and 
generation in the localities where he resided. He was one of the first to 
import blooded horses, and he raised thoroughbreds for a number of years. 
He lived to a ripe old age, spending his last years on his large stock farm 
in Newton county, this state. His family consisted of the following chil- 
dren: Benjamin F. died in infancy: Sarah A. married Thomas Walker; 
Mary |.. who is now eighty-two years of age and has never married, is living 
at the old homestead. "Kent Park," Newton county, Missouri: Dr. John R.. 
of this sketch; Charlotte E. married James W. Roseberry, now deceased; 
their son Chalmer II. Roseberry. owns and conducts a large deer farm at 
"Kent Park," Newton county, ami is a member of the Society for the 
Preservation of Wild Animals of the United States Government. Thomas 
H. Benton Smith died in 1 So- while in the service of the Confederacy, hav- 
ing been with ( ieneral Rains' brigade at Ft. Smith. Arkansas, at the time 
of his death. 

Dr. fohn R. Smith owns a gun which was made to order for his father 
in 1829, by l"hn Pull, a gunsmith of Warrior Mountain, Alabama. It is a 
fine specimen of guncraft of those days, is mounted with silver and has a 
gold powder pan and bushings. The stock is of curly maple and the barrel 
of a very soft iron. It is a remarkably accurate shouting piece and it was 
designed as a "target" gun for the pioneers. The mounting has several in- 
scriptions on the silver plating. The doctor values this heirloom very highly. 

Doctor Smith was married October 3, 1861. to Frances Ruth Keet, a 
daughter of Josiah T. and Elizabeth Proctor 1 West) Keet. 

To Doctor Smith and wife the following children were born: Kenyon 
Ida died in infancy: Ernest V. is a lieutenant-colonel in the regular army of 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I283 

the United States, now stationed at Honolulu, Sandwich Islands; lie is a 
graduate of West Point Military Academy, which he entered when seventeen 
years old; he married Cora Young, of Troy, New York. Grace K. Smith 
became the wife of the late George Cooper, a sketch of whom will be found 
in another part of this work; Charlotte married Willard P. Paddock, who 
was for many years a professor in the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York; 
he is now a well known artist, and has made a fine bronze statue of Noah 
Webster, that was unveiled in Sep'tember, 1014. in Massachusetts. Mr. 
and Mrs. Paddock reside in New York City. Clara, youngest of the doctor's 
children, married Edward Steichen, a well known artist of New York City., 
where they reside. The mother of these children, to whom they owe so 
much for their general culture and success in life, is now seventy-one years 
of age. 

Doctor Smith has been living retired for some time, making his home 
with his daughter, Mrs. Grace Cooper, at her beautiful home on Cherry street, 
Springfield. He is now in his seventy-ninth year, but is still comparatively 
hale and hearty and possesses all his faculties and has a fine memory. For 
a number of years he w : as medical examiner of the pension bureau of the 
United States government. Politically, he is a Democrat. He is a mem- 
ber of the Sons of the .American Revolution and Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons, and belongs to the Christian church. He and his good wife are 
indeed a grand old couple, greatly beloved by a very wide circle of close 
friends. They have led useful and helpful lives, being hospitable and chari- 
table by nature, but never from a desire for display — rather from an innate 
love for suffering humanity and to meekly follow in the footsteps of the 
lowly Nazarene. 



CHARLES E. DANDO. 



History is made rapidly in these latter days, representing ceaseless 
toil and endeavor, the proudest achievements and the most potent progress 
in all lines, and thus it is gratifying to mark the records of those wdiose 
influence has impressed itself along the various channels through which the 
swelling tide of accomplishment makes its way. If the present volumes are 
to contain the names of the men who have "done things" in Springfield 
and Greene count} - , the name of Charles E. Dando will necessarily have to 
be included within their pages. For many years he was a widely known 
railroad man, an engineer and passenger conductor, after the usual pre- 
liminary positions, and was also a skilled machinist and worked in many 
different railroad shops. Later we find him owmer and manager of a number 
of noted horses, then he was in the moving picture business, and now is 



I284 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

living in retirement. He enjoys the distinction of having driven the engine 
that pulled the first passenger train from Kansas City to Springfield, which 
was over the old "Gulf road." 

Mr. Dando was born in Cleveland, Ohio, on September 8, 1850. He is 
a son of Joseph M. and Alary (Ball) Dando, both long since deceased; and 
he is the youngest of four children, two of whom are deceased ; Mrs. Harriet 
Prichard, the eldest, and Joseph and William were the brothers. 

Charles E. Dando received a limited education, but in later life became 
a well informed man by contact with the world and wide reading. When 
only fourteen years of age he began his railroad career, securing employ- 
ment with the old Atlantic & Great Western railroad, now owned by the 
Erie railroad. He started in the shops at Meadville, Pennsylvania, where 
he remained two years, and from there went to Galion, Ohio, where he began 
firing a switch engine in the yards: six months later he entered the railroad 
shops of the Atlantic & Great Western, learning the machinist's trade, which 
he worked at for three and one-half years, then left Galion and went to New 
Orleans, Louisiana, where he went to work in the Shakespeare & Gettys 
foundry, remaining there about a year, then went to Litchfield, Illinois, and 
worked for the Illinois & St. Louis Railroad Company as a machinist in 
their shops there, remaining a year and a half. He then went to Kansas 
City, in the spring of 1872, and worked in the machine shops of the Missouri 
River. Ft. Scott & Gulf railroad for about four months, when he began 
firing, which he continued about a year when he was promoted to engineer 
and assigned to a locomotive which ran as both freight and passenger. When 
the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis road was built between Kansas City 
and Springfield, Mr. Dando ran the engine that pulled the first passenger 
train from Kansas City to Springfield. Judge John G. Xewbill rode in the 
cab with him from Ft. Scott to Springfield. .Mr. Dando was later made a 
conductor and worked in this capacity a few years, then went back to run- 
ning a locomotive. He finally retired from railroading and purchased some 
fine race horses, including the famous "Black Dick." He took his horses all 
over the Eastern states, engaging in a large number of races, and was very 
successful. ( )f late years he has been engaged in the moving picture business 
in Springfield, but has lived in retirement during the past four years, owning 
a good home on South Main street. 

Mr. Dando was married, March 23. 1884. to Lizzell Davis, of Fort 
Scott. Kansas, a daughter of Dr. and Sarah F. 1 Hulse) Davis, whose family 
consisted of four children, namely: James. Faustien. Lizzell. and Josephine: 
the last named is deceased. Doctor Davis was horn in France. Mr-. Dando 
grew to womanhood in Ft. Scott and received her education there, making 
excellent grades in all branches. Our subject and wife had two children. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 285 

one living: James Edward was born April 19, 1886, and died October 24, 
1904; Charles Joseph was born February 19, i8y6, and is in a military- 
school at Ashville, North Carolina. 

Politically, Mr. Dando is a Democrat. He is a member of the Eastern 
Division of the Order of Railway Conductors, No. 321, and the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers. Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He was also 
made an honorary member of the Grand International Division of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Xo. 378. 



MICHAEL J. MURPHY. 

It is indeed hard to find among our cosmopolitan civilization, people of 
better habits of life, taking it all in all, than those who originally came from 
the fair Emerald Isle or their immediate descendants. They are distin- 
guished for their thrift, wit, consecutive industry, patriotism and loyalty, 
and these qualities in the inhabitants of any country will in the end alone 
make that country great. One of the well-known engineers of the Frisco is 
Michael J. Murphy, who has long resided in Springfield, a man of Celtic 
blood and of the second generation of Irish in America. He hails originally 
from the Crescent City of the far South. 

Mr. Murphj was born on January 1, 1861, in New Orleans, Louisiana. 
He is a son of Michael 1). and Dorothy Ann (O'Dwyre) Murphy, both 
born, reared and married in Ireland and there resided until 1854, when they 
emigrated to the United States, first locating' in New York state, then, in 
1859, went to New Orleans, and in 1861, when the Civil war began, they 
came north to Rolla. Missouri, when our subject was an infant. In 1847 
Michael D. Murphy took part in the Smith-O'Brien rebellion. He escaped 
and went to Australia, and after a separation of seven years rejoined his 
wife, and they came to America. He was a railroad levee contractor. His 
death occurred in September, 1872, at Rolla, this state. His widow subse- 
quently removed to Springfield, where her death occurred in 1892. To these 
parents four children were born, namely: Jeremiah, Charles E., Mary, are 
all deceased, and Michael J., of this sketch. 

Mr. Murphy, our subject, had little chance to receive an extensive edu- 
cation. However, he is a self-made man. On April 1. 1879. he went to 
work for the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company in a stone quarry 
at Rolla, later coming with an extra gang to Springfield and helped put in 
the foundation for a turntable and roundhouse at the North Side shops. In 
1880 he was given a position as fireman out of Springfield and was promoted 



1286 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

to freight engineer in 1889, and to regular passenger engineer in 1901. and 
has retained this responsible position ever since, being regarded by the com- 
pany as one of its most efficient and trustworthy engineers. His present run 
is between Springfield and Xewburg. 

For three years he traveled as special representative of the Frisco in 
fourteen different states, and did his work most acceptably. Since August 
15, 1914, Mr. Murphy has been devoting his time on the "Safety First" 
movement in accident prevention for the conservation of human life and limb 
of the employees and patrons of the Frisco system, and because of the 
increased cost of materials used and consumed by the railroads and the 
increased cost in taxes, interest and wages and the decrease of 33 1-3 per 
cent, in passenger revenue and decrease of 21 per cent, in freight revenue, 
due to the two-cent passenger fare and the maximum freight rate in Missouri, 
resulting in placing the Frisco and other Missouri railroads in a position 
where their earnings are not sufficient to meet cost of operation and main- 
tenance, interest and taxes, the roads are forced to retrench and cut down 
expenses. This could only be done by the laying off of men in shops, in the 
office and in the bridge and building departments and the purchase of less 
material, such as ties, ballast, steel rails, bridges, and building materials. 
This retrenchment on the part of the railroads placed over forty thousand 
wage-earners, skilled and unskilled, idle, leaving them unable to purchase 
the necessaries of life, which in turn affected the retail and wholesale mer- 
chants and producing classes of the state. To overcome those conditions 
and to start the wheels of progress moving, to find employment for the idle 
men. Air. .Murphy on February 3, 1915, organized the Railway Employees' 
Protective Association, and by and through this organization in the state 
of Missouri secured the signatures of bankers, farmers, merchants, manu- 
facturers, and members of organized labor to petitions aggregating in the 
whole the signatures of over 750,000 of the above citizens of Missouri and 
mailed those petitions and signatures to the members of the Forty-eighth 
General Assembly of Missouri asking for a repeal of the maximum 2-cent 
passenger fare, restoration of the 3-cent passenger rate, and that the public 
service commission of Missouri to adjust and grant a fair equitable equali- 
zation of rate- in Missouri, and for the future Mr. Murphy will be engaged 
making this movement nation-wide in its scope, so that capital will be en- 
courage to invest in railroad securities, so that the credit of the railroads 
will be restored, so that capital and labor will be in a position under wise 
and just laws, state and national, to furnish the transportation facilities so 
essential to the future development of the internal resources of Missouri 
and of the nation as a whole. 

Mr. Murphy was married on September 27. 1887, in Rolla. Missouri, 
to Mary A. Powers, a native of that city. She is a daughter of James and 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I287 

Winifred C. (Condron) Powers, both natives of Ireland. They spent their 
early days in their native land and finally emigrated to the United States. 
Mr. Powers was in the employ of the Frisco Railroad for a number of years. 
His death occurred on July 10, 1878, in Rolla. Mrs. Murphy's mother died 
in Springfield on May 19, 1900. The wife of our subject was reared and 
educated in Rolla, attending the public and Catholic schools. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Murphy two children have been born, namely: Charles 
Edward, born on August jo, 1888, in Springfield, was educated in the public 
and high schools here ; he is a machinist by trade and is living at home. 
Blanche May, born on January 11, 1890, in Springfield, attended the local 
public and high schools and later business college; she married C. N. King, 
who is with the International Harvester Company, and lives in Little Rock, 
Arkansas. Mr. and Mrs. King were married on May 10, 19 10, and one 
child has been born to them, Jack Weldon, whose birth occurred on January 
19, 191 1. 

Politically Mr. Murphy is a Democrat. He is a member of Ozark 
Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. The Murphy 
family are members of the Roman Catholic church. They own a fine and 
neatly furnished home on North Main street, Springfield. 



ANDREW DURYEA MILLS. 

Andrew Duryea Mills, chief clerk to J. R. Dritt, freight agent of the 
Frisco System at Springfield, was born in Brooklyn Borough, New York 
City, March 7, 1881. He is a son of Simeon Drake Mills, who was for 
many years engaged in business for himself in Brooklyn as a manufacturer 
of jewelry. In 1883 he removed with his family to Kansas City, Missouri, 
soon thereafter opening the S. D. Mills Jewelry Company's place of busi- 
ness, which he conducted until his death in 1890 at the age of thirty-two 
years. Politically, he was a Republican. He belonged to the Knights of 
Pythias, and was a member of the Baptist church. He was twice married, 
first, to Ella B. Duryea, a daughter of Andrew Duryea, who was a mer- 
chant in Brooklyn, New York. Her death occurred in 1883, leaving two 
children, namely : Ralph, who is agent for the Union Pacific railroad at 
Tonganoxie, Kansas, and Andrew D.. of this sketch. His second marriage 
was with .Mice Dewey, a daughter of Dr. John Dewey, of Kansas City, 
Missouri. This union was without issue. 

Andrew D. Mills was a small child when his parents brought him to 
Kansas City, and there he grew to manhood and received his education, in- 
•cluding the public schools and a business college. He began his railroad 



1288 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

career when nineteen years of age, and has worked for the following roads : 
Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis, now operated by the Frisco; the Mis- 
souri, Kansas & Texas; Kansas City Southern; Missouri Pacific & Iron 
Mountain; the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield; the Texas & Pacific; 
Union Pacific; Denver & Rio Grande; Missouri Pacific; Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Ouincy; later to the Missouri Pacific, then the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe. after which he went with the St. Louis & San Francisco road, 
with which he has since been connected. He was telegraph operator and 
station agent for the above named roads. In January, 1913, he was pro- 
moted to the position of chief clerk to the Frisco's freight agent at Spring- 
field, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Mills was married in 1902 to Nellie Wilson, a daughter of Joel 
Y. and Josephine (George) Wilson, of Osceola, Missouri. Mr. Wilson has 
for many years been a druggist at that point. There Mrs. Mills grew to 
womanhood and was educated in the common schools. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mills, namely: Wilson, 
Charles, Alice M. and Josephine G. 

Politically, Mr. Mills is a Republican in principle, but votes independ- 
ently, more for the man than for the party, as many other sensible people 
are doing today. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masons, the Royal Ar- 
canum, Royal Neighbors and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



J. W. GANN. 



From an excellent old Kentucky family comes J. W. Gann, the oblig- 
ing and popular city passenger and ticket agent for the Frisco Lines at 
Springfield, and he seems to have inherited many of the commendable traits 
of his worthy progenitors. He has devoted the major portion of his ac- 
tive career to railroad service and has given eminent satisfaction in every 
position he has held in this field of endeavor. 

Mr. Gann was born in Wayne county, Kentucky, December 11, 1871. 
He is a son of William K. and Mary (Daugherty) Gann. The father was 
born in Kentucky in 1838, and there the birth of the mother occurred in 
1848, each scions of old Southern families. They grew to maturity in the 
Blue Grass state and were educated there, the father receiving an excep- 
tionally good education for that period. After passing through the com- 
mon schools he attended the Louisville Medical College, where he made a 
fine record and from which institution he was graduated with the degree 
of doctor of medicine, also completing a course in pharmacy. He engaged 
successfully in the practice of his profession until his death in 1885. His 



greexe County, Missouri. 1289 

wife preceded him to the grave in 1883. They were the parents of five 
children, four of whom are still living, namely: Charles M. is deceased; 
1. VV. of this sketch; Hattie, Mattie and Edward Everett. 

I. W. Gann was reared at the parental homestead in Wayne county, 
Kentucky, and there he received a practical common school education, but 
he started out in life when young, being but seventeen years of age when 
he began his career as railroader, in which he has been engaged ever since. 
He began as telegraph operator lor the Queen & Crescent railroad in Tate- 
ville, Kentucky. He was sent to various places to work by this road, with 
which he remained until 1900, then went to work for the Frisco Lines as 
ticket seller in the office at Birmingham, Alabama. In 1905 he was made 
city passenger agent in that city. Remaining there until in March, 1907, he 
was transferred to Springfield, Missouri, as chief ticket clerk, and in De- 
cember, 1910, he was promoted to city passenger and ticket agent, which 
position he still holds. 

Mr. Gann was married on November 7, 1906, in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama, to Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Prewitt. She was born near Springville, 
Alabama, February 5, 1874, and there grew to womanhood and received 
her education. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Gann has been without issue. 

Politically, our subject is a Democrat. He is prominent in Masonic 
circles, having attained the thirty-second degree. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. 



e. b. McNeill. 



Like many another boy reared on the farm, E. B. McNeill, agent of 
the Missouri Pacific railroad at Springfield, turned his attention to railroad- 
ing and has continued to the present time, showing a peculiar adaptability 
for the same, so that he has won and retained the confidence of his employ- 
ers, for he is not only capable of quickly grasping the various details of his 
work, but is faithful and energetic in the performance of the same. 

Mr. McNeill was born in White county, Arkansas, May 16, 1881. He 
is a son of John T. and Amanda ( Lessenbury ) McNeill. The father was 
born in Tennessee, from which state he came to Arkansas in an early day, 
where he established the family home on the farm where he still lives in 
White county. The mother of our subject was also born in Tennessee. Her 
death occurred in White county, Arkansas, July 10. 1914. These parents 
were young when they left their native state and they were married in 
Arkansas. John T. McNeill served as a Confederate soldier during the 



I29O GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

last two years of the Civil war, was under Gen. Sterling Price and was in 
the famous raid of that great leader into Missouri. 

Tohn T. McNeill has been a successful farmer and stock raiser. His 
family consisted of eleven children, six of whom are still living, namely: 
Florence married C. M. Welbon, and they live in Colorado; E. B. of this 
sketch: William E. lives in Kensett, Arkansas: Elmer is engaged in rail- 
mad service in Arkansas: Mrs. Anna Davidson lives in Kensett, Arkansas; 
Mrs. Grace Taylor lives in White county, Arkansas. 

E. B. McNeill grew up on his father's farm in his native county and 
there assisted with the general work when a boy, and in the winter months 
he attended the common and high schools in Arkansas. He left the farm 
when nineteen years of age and began his career as railroader for the Iron 
Mountain as clerk and later as telegraph operator in his native state, work- 
ing at many points on the system. He came to Springfield in June, 191 J, 
since which time he has been filling his present position, most of his work 
being on the White river division. 

Mr. McNeill was married on June 12, 1907. at Calico Rock. Arkansas, 
to Allie M. Crew-, who was born at Walker. Missouri. She is a daughter 
of Cassie Crews and wife. She received a good common school education. 
One child has been born to our subject and wife. Dorothy May McNeill, 
whose birth occurred May 12, 1911. 

Politically, Mr. McNeill is a Democrat. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, is associate member of the Springfield Club, and his wife be- 
longs to the Methodist Episcopal church. Our subject has never affiliated 
himself with any religions body. 



R. E. ARNETT. 



R. I.. Arnett was born in Fredericktown, in southeastern Missouri, on 
February 2. [881. He is a son of R. ('. and Fanny (Layman) Arnett. The 
father was also born at Fredericktown. February 5, 1849, his parents hav- 
ing been pioneer settlers there. The mother of our subject was born in 
Piqua, Ohio. December 21, 1853. She came to Fredericktown, Missouri, 
when young and there met and married the elder Arnett. who devoted his 
life to general farming, although lie never lived on a farm. Politically, 
R. C. Arnett was a Democrat and was an influential man in public affairs 
in his native locality, having represented his county several times in the 
state legislature. His family consisted of five children, all sons, and all 
still living, namely: Smith D. lives in Pine Bluff, Arkansas; Sam R. lives 
in Minneapolis. Minnesota; R. E. of this sketch: Eugene F. is in the train 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I29I 

service and is located at Pine Bluff, Arkansas; Alexander W. is attending 
Columbia University at this writing. 

R. L. Arnett grew up at Fredericktown, where he obtained a good 
common and high school education. When only thirteen years of age he 
was enabled to begin the career he had long aspired to, that of railroading, 
and he has kept it up to the present time, his rise being gradual, and he 
evidently has greater things to yet accomplish in this field of endeavor. He 
began work for the Missouri Pacific before leaving school and continued 
at intervals with this road until he finished school, then went in the office 
as clerk in his native town. With the exception of a few months spent in 
the employ of other lines, he has remained continuously with the Missouri 
Pacific, having in the meanwhile been nearly all over the system, in various 
departments of this road. In September, 1908, he was promoted to com- 
mercial freight agent, in Ft. Scott, Kansas, and in November, 1909, he was 
sent to Springfield, where he is now occupying the same position. He is a 
young man of energy, tact, versatility and honesty of purpose and his su- 
periors place great confidence in his ability and integrity. 

Mr. Arnett was married, April .23, 1903, in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, to 
Anna Lee Green, a native of that city, where she was reared and educated, 
later attending Ouachita College at Arkadelphia, Arkansas. She is a daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Disda Green. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Arnett one child has been born, Roeanna, whose 
birth occurred July II, 1905. 

Politically, Mr. Arnett is a Democrat. He is a member of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, also the Hoo Hoo or Black Cat frater- 
nity. He is a member of the Springfield Club and the Country Club. 



NEWTON V. ALLEBACH. 

The beginning of the career of Newton V. Allebach was characterized 
by hard work and conscientious endeavor, and he owes his rise to no train oi 
fortunate incidents or fortuitous circumstances. His rise has not been of the 
•meteoric type, but has been steady and slow. The major portion of bis 
life has been devoted to railroad service, having been on the Frisco system 
for a number of years, and he is the present popular general chairman of the 
Order of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, in which he has long 
been active and influential. 

Mr. Allebach was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, August 6, 
i860. He is a son of Abraham H. and Catherine (Kramer) Allebach. The 
father was born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, September 2j, 1810. 



I292 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and the mother was also born in the old Keystone state in the year 1833. 
There they grew to maturity, received limited educations in the early-day 
schools and they were married in Clarion county and established the family 
home there, Mr. Allebach engaging in the mercantile business. He was twice 
married, our subject being a child by his second wife, and is one of six sons, 
four of whom are still living, namely : Ansen M. lives in New Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania; Rufus D. is deceased; Newton V., subject of this sketch; 
Arlington H. is deceased; Melvin C. lives in New Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
and Victor L. lives in East Brady. The death of Abraham H. Allebach 
occurred June 14, 1881, his wife, mother of our subject, surviving until in 
January, 1912, both dying in Pennsylvania, where they spent their lives. 
Politically he was a Lincoln Republican, and fraternally was a member of 
the Masonic Order, while his Wife belonged to the Eastern Star. 

Newton V. Allebach grew to manhood in his native community in 
Clarion county and he received a common school education. When he was 
seventeen years of age he went to Minnesota and worked in various parts 
of that state. For some time he engaged in lumbering at the head of Lake 
Superior. In 1881 he went to North Dakota, and in 1884 he began his 
career as railroader at Fargo, that state, on the Northern Pacific as fireman, 
and was later promoted to engineer on switch engines and freight trains. 
He remained in the North until 1889, when he had a run into Montana and 
Wyoming, then was in the employ of the Southern Pacific until in Sep- 
tember, 1895, when he came to Monett, Missouri, and went to work for the 
Frisco system as freight engineer, his run being from that city to Ft. Smith, 
.Arkansas, and in 1906 he was given a passenger train and was in that 
service about seven years. His career in the train service on all the above 
named roads has been eminently commendable and satisfactory, and is a 
record of duty ably and faithfully performed. 

Mr. Allebach has been actively engaged in the work of the Brotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers since 1895. He moved to Springfield in 1910, 
where he has since resided. Since his election to general chairman in above 
order he has devoted his time exclusively to the interests of the order. His 
position is one of importance and considerable rsponsibility. and lie is kept 
very busy looking after adjustments and the many things constantly coming 
up to be attended to, which requires a man of tact, diplomacy and forceful 
personality, as well as energy and fidelity. The splendid record Mr. Allebach 
has made in this important office with which he has been honored would in- 
dicate the wisdom of his selection and his services are entirely satisfactory to 
all concerned. He is one of the best known and most universally liked rail- 
road men in the Southwest, being a good mixer, friendly, genial, honest and 
conscientious. 

Mr. Allebach was married in Monett, Missouri, December 25, 1897. to 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 293 

Nora Blakeslee, who was born in northern Pennsylvania in 1870, where she 
spent her early girlhood, being eight years old when her parents, Lafayette 
and Delia (Cook) Blakeslee removed with her to Barry county, Missouri. 
These parents were natives of Pennsylvania, where they grew to maturity- 
received limited educations in the common schools and were married. The 
death of the father occurred in Barry county, Missouri, where Mrs. Allebach 
was reared to womanhood and educated in the common schools. The 
mother is still living. Mr. Blakeslee devoted his active life to farming and 
contracting. His family consisted of eight children. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Allebach four children have been born, namely: Franz, 
born October 3, 1898; Vernon A"., born September 13, 1901 ; Karl A., born 
November 3, 1904: Catherine, born May 22, 1907. died December 4, 1908. 

Politically Mr. Allebach is a Democrat. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Masonic Order, is a Knights Templar, and a member of the Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Religiously the family belongs 
to the Presbvterian church. 



GEORGE GREEN. 



Americans have always had great admiration for Englishmen, not- 
withstanding that these nations have twice been at war. Each has enjoyed 
a century of peace and good feeling toward the other, and we have ever 
welcomed the British to our newer land of opportunity. Greene county has 
not been fortunate enough to secure many of her immigrants, but what few 
we have we are glad to note are good citizens in every respect. One of 
these is George Green, blacksmith foreman in the shops of the Frisco sys- 
tem at Springfield. 

Mr. Green was born in Kent Waldwick, England, September 15, 1863. 
He is a son of Robert and Susanna Green, both born in England, where 
they grew- up and received fairly good educations and spent the earlier years 
of their lives, eventually emigrating to the United States, where they both 
died, the father in South Dakota and the mother in Kansas. Robert Green 
was a carpenter by trade, which he followed for a livelihood most of his 
life. In his earlier life he was in the British arm}- as a wheelwright and 
was in the memorable East India mutiny. After coming to America he 
followed railroading for a while and later was a ranchman in Texas for 
about four years. His family consisted of four children, namely: Robert 
is a locomotive engineer on the Frisco, running out of Kansas City, where 
he lives; George of this sketch; Mrs. Clara Bowen lives in Kansas City, 
Missouri, and Mrs. George Wallace, also of Kansas City. 

George Green was young when his parents brought him to America, 



1294 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

and here he received his education. He attended school in different places, 
including a year in Dallas. Texas, and some time in Rochester, New York. 
In 1880 he drove overland from Texas to Springfield, Missouri, and began 
work for the Frisco System in the North Side roundhouse. After remain- 
ing there about three years he went to Kansas City and went to work for 
the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis Railroad Company, which was leased 
by the Frisco System in 1900. and when the shops of the former road were 
opened in Springfield, now known as the South Side Frisco shops, Air. 
Green was sent here as blacksmith helper. He continued at his trade until 
in 1896, when he was elected constable of Campbell township, in which of- 
fice he served two years with satisfaction to all concerned and credit to 
himself. In 1901 he was appointed foreman of the blacksmith shop and is 
still one of the foremen in this shop. He is quite expert in his line and 
handles men well. 

Mr. Green was married in 1882. to Sarah E. Twigger, who was born 
in Connecticut, in December, 1862. She is a daughter of George and Ann 
Twigger. She was educated in the common schools. She came west when 
young in years, with her parents, locating in North Springfield, Missouri, 
and here grew to womanhood, receiving her education in the public schools 
of Springfield. She was one of eleven children, ten still living. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Green seven children have been born, namely: Frank. 
born December 25, 1883; Maude, born in [885, married George Brougher; 
Ruby, born in tSXj; Mrs. Georgia Woodfill, born in 1899; William J., born 
in 1897; Charles, born in 1900. and Clara, born in 1902. 

Politically, Mr. Green is a Democrat. Fraternally, he is a member of 
the Masonic blue lodge, the Modern Woodmen and the Loyal Order of 
Moose. The family are members of the Episcopal church. 



MATTHIAS CHRISTMAX. 

It is not the kind of work, but the kind of Spirit with which it is done 
that dignifies and exalts human service. This is a thought that should pu1 
heart into every worker, put glow and cheer into his service and fill him 
with a large degree of satisfaction in doing the work that nature seems to. 
have, in a way, appointed for him. .Matthias Christman, general machine 
foreman in the North Side Frisco shops, Springfield, is a man who gets 
satisfaction out of his daily tasks and therefore his work is not only well 
done, but life is worth living to him. 

Mr. Christman was born in Springfield, Illinois. January 29. 1863. He- 



GREENE COUNTY. MISSOURI. I — < J 5 

is a son of Michael and Caroline (Duffner) Christman, both natives of Ger- 
many, in which country they spent their childhood years, and from there 
immigrated to America when young, both locating in Springfield, Illinois, 
where they were married, and there established their permanent home, the 
father of our subject, who is now eighty-four years old, and who has de- 
voted his active life to the machinist trade, is still a resident of that city, 
but the mother passed away on May 17. [914, at the age of seventy-hve years. 
To them seven children were born, three of whom are living at this writing, 
namelv : X. B. is engaged in the hardware business in Springfield, Illinois; 
Matthias, of this sketch; John D., who was a machinist by trade, is de- 
ceased; Mary is the wife of Joseph Phillipp, who is engaged in the furniture 
and dry goods business in Springfield, Illinois. The other children died in 
early life. 

Matthias Christman spent his boyhood days in his native city and there 
he went to school until he was fourteen years old, when he left his text- 
books and went to work as an apprentice in the Wabash railroad shops in 
that town, remaining there from August, 1877, until 1882, completing his 
trade as machinist, then went as journeyman to the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe shops at Raton, New Mexico, working there from September, 1882, 
until April, 1883, in April of which year he went to Decatur, Illinois and 
worked at his trade in the shops of the Wabash Railroad. From April, 1883, 
until July, 1883, he worked for the Wabash & Decatur Railroad, and in 
August he worked as machinist in Kansas City for the Kansas City, Ft. Scott 
& Memphis Railroad Company, which transferred him in 1890 to its shops in 
Springfield, Missouri, as erecting foreman, which position he held there until 
August. 191 1, having continued in the employ of the Frisco System, which 
leased the former road in njoc. In August, 191 1, he was transferred to the 
North Side shops as assistant general machine shop foreman, and in 1912 
was promoted to general machine shop foreman, which position he now holds. 
there being about one hundred and fifty men under his direction. He is 
giving his usual general satisfactory service, being a man highly skilled in his 
trade and possessing marked executive ability. He has an interest in the 
Christman Adjustable Hub Plate Company, being a director and stockholder 
in the same. He has been the dominating factor in the success of this 
concern, indicating that he is a man of fine business acumen. He is also of 
an inventive turn of mind, and has invented piston valves and bushing for 
air pumps and holds patents on each. These devices have been highly praised 
by manufacturers. 

Mr. Christman was married in 1884 to Elizabeth Hurley, of Mt. 
Pleasant. Iowa, and to this union two children have been born, namely : 
John M., who was educated in the ward and high schools of Springfield, 



I296 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

is now a machinist in the North Side Frisco shops ; Carrie, who was also 
well educated in the Springfield schools, lives at home with her parents. 

Politically Mr. Christman is a Democrat. He belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of American, and to the Catholic church. 



WILLIAM TAYLOR HANKINS. 

Great changes "have come over the face of the land" since William 
Taylor Hankins first saw the light of day nearly sixty-seven years ago, and, 
having spent these long years in the same locality, he has been a most inter- 
ested and by no means a passive spectator to the transformations of the 
eastern part of Greene county, having sought to do his full share in the work 
of progress here. For many years he was postmaster at Strafford, but is 
now living quietly on his farm. Xo one is better or more favorably known 
in this community, for his life has been an exemplary and inoffensive one. 

Mr. Hankins was born on a farm near Strafford, Missouri, on April 2, 
1848. He is a son of Abraham and Sarah R. 1 Miller) Hankins. The 
father was born in Tennessee on March 23, 1808, and was reared there on 
a farm and attended the common schools. In youth he learned the tanner's 
trade. Remaining in his native state until 1835, he then emigrated to Greene 
county, Missouri, making the trip by wagon, drawn by an ox and a horse. 
He farmed and followed his trade here, and he owned many slaves and was 
a successful farmer. His death occurred in November, 1861. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a prominent man in 
his community. The mother of our subject was born near Winchester, Ken- 
tucky, on June 3, 1809, was reared on a farm there and attended the public 
schools. She came to Greene county. Missouri with her parents about the 
year 1835, and here met and married Mr. Hankins. She was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Her death occurred on June 30, 1878, 
on the home farm. To these parents live children were born, namely : Andrew 
Jackson, deceased; Benton T., deceased: William T., of this sketch; Letitia, 
deceased, and Mrs. Susan Potter, of Strafford, who is the youngest. 

William T, Hankins grew to manhood on the old homestead near 
Strafford and he received his education in the district schools. He worked 
on the home farm until after his father's death, and his principal life work 
has been general fanning. In [896 he was appointed postmaster at Strafford, 
the duties of which office he continued to discharge acceptably and satisfac- 
torily for a period of seventeen years, resigning in [913. He moved to his 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres, which joined Strafford, where he 
has a cozy home and is now living practically retired. 




fa 

GO 



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V. 




GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 2 97 

Mr. Hankins was married on March 7, 1S71, to Mary Jane Comstock, 
who was born on November 4, i85_ J . while her parents were emigrating from 
Tennessee to Greene county, Missouri. She is a daughter of L. B. and 
Nancy Comstock. She grew up on a farm in this state and attended the 
common schools, removing with her parents to Greene county during the 
Civil war. She was a member of the Baptist church. Her death occurred 
on April 5, 1889. 

To our subject and wife three children were born, namely: Nathaniel 
Brown lives in Greene county ; he married Sarah McCabe Fitch and they 
have two children, Hershel and Zenobia ; Mrs. Florence Foster lives in 
Strafford and has two children, Joe and Helen, and Mrs. Manta Delzell, who 
married George G. Delzell. They have two children, Gregory and Sarah 
Marie. She makes her home with her father. 

Politically Mr. Hankins is a Republican, and fraternally he is a member 
•of the Masonic Order. 



JESSE D. JAQUITH. 

The respect which should always be accorded the brave sons of the 
North who left their homes and the peaceful pursuits of civil life to give their 
services, and their lives if need be, to preserve the integrity of the American 
Union is due Jesse D. Jaquith. He proved his love and loyalty to the govern- 
ment on the long and tiresome marches in all kinds of situations, exposed 
to summer's withering heat and winter's freezing cold, on the lonely picket 
line a target for the unseen foe, on the tented field and amid the flame and 
smoke of battle, where the rattle of the musketry mingled with the terrible 
concussion of bursting shells and the diapason of the cannons' roar made up 
the sublime but awful chorus of death. 

Mr. Jaquith was born January 8, 1845, near Paris, Edgar count)-, 
Illinois. He is a son of Jesse VV. Jaquith, a native of New Hampshire, where 
he spent his earlier years. He studied pharmacy, and, having cast his lot 
with the people of the Middle West, became owner and operator of a drug 
store at Urbana, Illinois, and he was the first postmaster of that town. 
Active and influential in public affairs, he was elected a judge of the county 
court of Champaign county, Illinois. He received a good education in his 
native state, there learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed for a 
number of years, also engaged in farming in New Hampshire. It was in 
1839 that he removed to Edgar county, Illinois, among the early pioneers, 
and there he continued his trade for some time before locating in Champaign 
county and turning his attention to the drug' business. Finally leaving 
(82) 



1298 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

Urbana he came to Holden, Missouri, where he engaged in the shoe business. 
There he spent the rest of his life, dying in 1881 at the age of seventy 
years, and was buried at Holden. Politically he was a Democrat. He be- 
longed to the Masonic Order and to the Methodist Episcopal church. His 
wife, Catherine A. Wilson, was a native of Kentucky and a daughter of 
John and Maggie (Buckner) Wilson. To this union the following children 
were born: Lottie, now deceased, was the wife of John Allen, a farmer; 
Jesse D., of this sketch; John located in San Francisco and engaged in the 
machine business ; Richard, now deceased, was a shoemaker by trade ; Mate 
( Matilda) married John Cass, a commercial traveler, and they live at Holden. 
.Missouri. Willard Jaquith, grandfather of these children, was born in New 
Hampshire, from which state he emigrated to Detroit, Michigan, in an early 
day. He was a farmer in his earlier life. 

Jesse D. Jaquith grew to manhood in Illinois and received his education 
in the public schools of Urbana, leaving his text-books at the age of seventeen 
to enlist in the Federal army, in 1862, in Company G, Seventy-sixth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, at Kankakee. He saw much hard service and took part in 
numerous battles and skirmishes, including the great siege of Vicksburg and 
the many engagements incident thereto, also the battles of Jackson and Mobile, 
and although he was in many close places he was never wounded, neither had 
he occasion to answer to sick call. For meritorious conduct be was pro- 
moted from time to time until he became quartermaster sergeant, and was 
mustered out as such in July, 1865. at Chicago. He was in the armies of 
Grant and Sherman. After the war he returned to Urbana. Illinois, and 
learned the trade of tinsmith, first working for J. M. Davies. Later he came 
to Warrensburg, Missouri, and worked witli J. L. Bettis, finishing his ap- 
prenticeship there, then be worked as journeyman tinsmith at Warrensburg 
until 1870. in which year he returned to l'rbana and continued at his trade 
until 1877, then went to Kansas City and secured employment with the Union 
Pacific Railroad, working in the company's shops at Armstrong. Kansas, just 
across the river from Kansas City, Missouri. He was a journeyman tinsmith. 
He resided at Wyandotte, Kansas, and remained with that road three years. 
When the towns of Kansas City, Kansas. Wyandotte and Armourdale were 
consolidated into Kansas City, Kansas, lie was the first clerk of the board 
of education. 

Mr. Jaquith came to Springfield on February 18, 1887, and took a 
position with the Kansas City. Ft. Scott & Memphis railroad as tinsmith 
foreman in their local shops, which are now known as the South Side Frisco 
shops, having come under the control of the Frisco System in iqoo. and 
this position our subject held till 191 5, his long retention in the same being 
evidence of his faithfulness and skill and his ability to handle men so as 
to obtain the best results. However, he was foreman tinsmith at the new 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I 2 99 

shops on the North Side for three years. He has been with these roads con- 
tinuously for a period of twenty-eight years. 

Mr. Jaquith was a member of the city council of Springfield for four 
years. Before leaving Urbana, Illinois, he was a member of the board of 
education for two years and was also city clerk there for two years. As a 
public servant his record has been a most satisfactory and commendable one. 
Politically he has always been a stanch Democrat. He is a member of the 
Baptist church. Back in the seventies he was a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. 

Mr. Jaquith was married in 1865, at Warrensburg, Missouri, to Killa E. 
Dulin, who was born, reared and educated in Illinois. To this union two 
children have been born, namely: Ira, who is a machinist by trade and 
employed at the new shops in Springfield, married Carrie Burton, and they 
have two sons and two daughters ; Charles was for some time a soldier in 
the Seventeenth United States Infantry, regular army, saw service in the 
Philippines, where he was mustered out. 



FRANK P. CARROLL. 



If there is one thing which distinguishes the American tradesman or 
business man from those of any other country it is the faculty with which any 
and all occupations are readily taken up by him and made successful. In 
the older countries it was customary for the son to follow the father's 
pursuit. "Follow your father, my son, and do as your father has done," 
was a maxim which most of sons were expected to adopt. In this country 
we find few men of the present generation engaged in the same pursuits as 
were their fathers, except among the farming element. Frank P. Carroll, 
chief engineer in the Frisco's North Side shops, Springfield, has turned his 
hands to various things and proved that farming was not the only occupation 
which he could make successful. 

Mr. Carroll was born May 2, 1863, near Frankfort, Clinton county, In- 
diana. He is a son of Moses Carroll, who was born at Troy, New York. He 
grew up in his native state, attended school and learned the carpenter's trade 
there, later removing to Clinton county, Indiana, where he established his 
home. He is now deceased. He married Hannah Clark, a daughter of A. B. 
Clark, of Clinton county, Indiana, and a native of Kentucky, from which 
state the family removed to Indiana in 1840. Ten children were born to 
Moses Carroll and wife, four of whom died in infancy; the others were 
named as follows: Louisa J. is a widow and resides at Zion City, Illinois; 
Wilson B., who was a carpenter and engineer, is deceased; Mattie, also a 



I3OO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

widow, is engaged in dressmaking at Phillipsburg, Montana; Relda is the 
wife of Ellis Kiser, a draftsman by trade, and they reside in Springfield, Mis- 
souri; Mary, commonly known as Mollie, is the wife of Gus Widmeyer, a 
farmer of Greene county, this state, and Frank P. of this sketch. 

The subject of this review spent his boyhood in Clinton county, Indiana, 
and received his education in the common schools. When seventeen years 
of age he went to work as a farm hand, later worked as fireman in a flouring 
mill in Boone county, Indiana, for two years, then came to Springfield, Mis- 
souri, in 1884, and went into the dairy business with his brother-in-law, J. X. 
Kern, remaining in this line of endeavor two years. The next two years 
we find him employed at an electric light plant and in various other posi- 
tions. He also worked at the old Coon Tobacco Works, under George H. 
McCann, who was president of the concern. Our subject worked here as 
engineer from 1888 to 1900, in which year he was made chief engineer, and 
continued in this capacity with the plant until it was absorbed by the Amer- 
ican Tobacco Company, whereupon he went to the South Side or old Gulf 
shops, and was assistant engineer here for two years. He then went to Cali- 
fornia, where he remained a year as chief engineer for the Italian-Swiss 
Wine Company at Kingsburg, that state. Returning to Springfield. Missouri, 
he took a position as gas and steam fitter with the Springfield Gas Company 
and worked at this two years, then farmed a year, having previously pur- 
chased a farm near the Valley Water Mill. He then came back to Spring- 
field and worked as chief engineer at the Frisco Hospital for two months, 
then was chief engineer at the Metropolitan Hotel for some time, after which 
he worked as night engineer in the North Side Frisco shops, remaining there 
from September, T905, to May 12. 1910. when he was promoted to chief 
engineer there, which position he still holds. He has thirty hands under his 
direction and as in all his former positions i- giving entire satisfaction. 

Mr. Carroll was married in 1890 to Dura Gardner, who was horn 
on the old Phelps farm in Greene county. Missouri. She is a daughter of 
Allen V Gardner, of Springfield. She grew up in this county and was edu- 
cated in the common schools. 

To our subject and wife four children have been born, namely: Myrtle 
is single and lives at home; Leonard married Mattie Leamon, and he is em- 
ployed a- typewriter repairer at the Gardner Office Supply Company in 
Springfield; Frank is employed as typewriter repairman at the office of the 
Underwood Typewriter Company in Springfield; Paul is attending school. 

Our subject and wife celebrated their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary 
on November 5. T914. They reside on Clay street. 

Politically Mr. Carroll is a Republican. He belongs to the Christian 
church. He is a member of the National Order of Stationary Engineers 
No. Q. the Springfield division. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I3OI 

JOHN P. MALLEY. 

The general foreman of the Frisco System boiler shops, John P. Malley, 
is evidently as well qualified for his position as anyone whom the company 
could have selected, for his record shows that he has been constantly employed 
about boiler shops for a period of nearly thirty-rive years, or ever since he 
was a boy, and during this time he has had vast experience in many different 
places. He has been a close observer and has learned many new things about 
his chosen calling in each shop he has been employed, in fact, has left no stone 
unturned whereby he might improve himself. 

Air. Malley is of Irish parentage and has inherited many of the praise- 
worthy traits of that industrious people. He was born in Laporte, Indiana, 
September 25, 1862. He is a son of John and Mary (Consendine) Malley, 
both born in Ireland, where they grew to maturity, received good educations 
in the common schools, but were married in Indiana. They were yet young 
when the immigrated to the United States. They established the family home 
in Laporte, Indiana, where they spent the rest of their lives, both dying 
there, our subject being a small boy when his father died. The father fol- 
lowed railroading and for years was roadmaster for the Lake Shore rail- 
road, also the Michigan Southern railroad, being employed in that capacity 
by the latter road at the time of his death. To John and Mary Malley three 
children were born, all living at this writing, namely: John P. of this sketch; 
William is a tinner by trade and lives in Chicago; Charles is an engineer and 
also lives in Chicago. 

John P. Malley had little opportunity to receive an education, however, 
he attended the common schools in Indiana, but he is for the must part self- 
taught. He was married May 24. 1900. in Kansas City. Missouri, to Alary 
Glennon, a native of Independence, this state, and a daughter of Patrick 
Glennon and wife, both natives of Ireland, from which country they immi- 
grated to America when young. Mr. Glennon was a stone mason by trade. 
His death occurred in Kansas City, as did also that of his wife. Mrs. Malley 
grew to womanhood in Jackson county and was educated in the common 
schools. 

To our subject and wife one child has been born, Glennon Malley, whose 
birth occurred May 24, 11)04. 

In 1870 John P. Malley left Laporte, Indiana., and worked as check 
clerk in the mammoth mercantile establishment of Marshall Field's, but not 
desiring to continue this line of endeavor, he began his apprenticeship to the 
boiler maker's trade about a year later, when seventeen years of age, in the 
plant of McFarland & Company, of Chicago. He remained in the employ 
of that company for about eight years, during which time he thoroughly 



1,302 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

mastered his trade, then went to Dubuque, Iowa, and worked about a year, 
then went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he worked for the Great Northern 
Railroad in their shops there about two years, then returned to Iowa, and 
worked in Dubuque for the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Company, then 
went to firing on a locomotive and continued in this work a year and a half, 
after which he went to Texas, and was foreman at Galveston in the boiler 
shops of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railroad from 1891 until 1900, in 
which year he came to Springfield. Missouri, as general foreman of the boiler 
shops of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company, and has since 
been connected with this shop, having been general foreman of the same since 
1.9 10, and is still incumbent of that position, in which he is giving eminent 
satisfaction in every respect. 

Politically, Mr. Malley is a Republican, and he belongs to the Catholic 
church. 



JOHN R. DRITT. 

The responsible position which John R. Dritt, freight agent of the Frisco 
Lines at Springfield, fills while yet a young man, would indicate that places 
of merit and responsibility are open to those who are capable of filling them 
no matter what their age or early environment may be. However, our 
subject had careful preparation, taking sure but definite steps in his chosen 
field of endeavor from the time he was a hoy, having all the while been 
honest both with himself and his employers. This is, no doubt, the secret 
of his success. 

Mr. Dritt was born in Pierce City. Missouri, November 13. [880. He 
is a son of A. M. and Nancy Jane ( Roark) Dritt. The father was born 
at Tipton, Missouri. He was engaged in the harness and saddlery business 
at Pierce City, where his death occurred in [892, at the early age of thirty- 
four years. Politically he was a Republican, and religiously he belonged to 
the Baptist church. The mother of our subject is a daughter of \Y. I'.. Roark 
and wife. The father is engaged in the mercantile business at Aurora, Mis- 
souri, and in that city Mrs. Dritt is making her home. Three children were 
born to the parents of our subject, namely: John R., of this sketch: Russie, 
who married E. \Y. Cave lives in Chicago, where Mr. Cave is engaged 
in the automobile business. Wiley M.. the third child, who was engaged 
in mercantile pursuits at .Aurora, this state, died at the age of twenty-six 
years. Joseph Dritt, paternal grandfather of these children, was a prominent 
citizen of Tipton, Missouri, and was mayor of that town for a number of 
years. 

John R. Dritt spent most of his early years at Aurora, where the 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 1 303 

family located when he was young, and there he attended the common and 
high schools. When sixteen years of age he went to work in that town 
for the Frisco System. He was messenger boy and did station work. Later 
he came to Springfield and engaged in the hotel business, clerking for some 
time in the Central hotel, then went back to Aurora and continued station 
work for the Frisco, remaining there until 1904, at which time he went 
to Monroe, Louisiana, and worked for the National Packing Company, re- 
maining there until in December, 1905, as cashier and auditor. He then 
came to Springfield as cashier for the Frisco in its freight department. In 
May, 1907, he was promoted to assistant general agent of the general freight 
department, and in December, 191 1. he was appointed agent of the freight 
department, which position he now 7 holds, and the duties of which he is dis- 
charging with his usual fidelity and general satisfaction, and with much credit 
to himself. He has under his direction seventy-five clerks. 

Mr. Dritt was married on December 15, 1912, to Edith Smith, a daugh- 
ter of Earl N. and Lola (Doss) Smith, a well known family of Ash Grove, 
this county, where Mrs. Dritt grew to womanhood and was educated. To 
our subject and wife one child has been born, Nancy Jane Dritt, who was 
born April 27, 1914. 

Politically Mr. Dritt is a Democrat. He belongs to the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and religiously he attends the Baptist church. 



STEPHEN E. BUTLER. 



It is no reflection when we say a man is a Hoosier; on the contrary it is 
a compliment, if the word is properly understood. All natives of the great 
state of Indiana are known as Hoosiers, and everyone knows that some of 
the greatest men of the nation have been born and reared on her soil, in- 
cluding presidents, vice-presidents, great statesmen, renowned army and navy 
officers and famous literary men and women. Stephen E. Butler, foreman of 
the tin shop of the reclamation plant in the South Side Frisco shops, Spring- 
field, is a Hoosier, although not yet belonging in the class of the mighty 
just enumerated, however, being yet a young man and possessing those 
traits that win success, one must necessarily predict for him a future of use- 
fulness and more than average success. 

Mr. Butler was born April 23, 1882, in Stark county, Indiana. He is a 
son of Austin D. Butler, a native of Ohio, and a carpenter by trade. He 
left his native state when a young man and located in Stark count)-, Indiana, 
where he remained until 1888, when he went to Helena, Montana, whither 
he removed his family the following vear, and there his death occurred in 



I304 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

1897 at the early age of forty-six years. He was a soldier in the Spanish- 
American war; however, contracting malaria typhoid in the Philippines not 
long after his enlistment, he was sent back home, having spent about a 
year in service. He was a member of Company L, First Montana Volunteer 
Infantry. Upon his recovery from the malaria typhoid he resumed his trade 
of journeyman carpenter, in which he was exceptionally skilled. As a 
soldier his comrades say he was brave, faithful and intelligent. His untimely 
death was by accident, having been drowned in the Missouri river near Stubbs 
Ferry, where he was working on a dredge. Politically he was a Democrat 
He belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His widow, who was known in her maidenhood 
as Alice Miller, is now the wife of A. J. Lemkie, and they reside in Helena, 
Montana. Three children were born to her union with Mr. Butler, namely: 
Stephen E. of this sketch ; Ethel married Earl B. Richardson, who is engaged 
in the retail drug business at Helena; Hazel married Charles H. Coar, super- 
intendent of the telephone company at Minot, North Dakota. 

Stephen E. Butler was seven years of age when his parents removed 
to Helena, Montana, and there he grew to early manhood and received a 
common school education; however, he left school when only fourteen years 
of age and began learning the trade of sheet metal worker there, serving 
a four years' apprenticeship. He worked with Jacob Rummell about six 
years in that city, then went to the Pacific coast and the Northwest, where 
he spent a year working as a tinsmith, after which he came to Kansas City, 
Missouri, and worked six months, then returned West and worked in Helena 
and Virginia City three and one-half years, one year of which time he was in 
business for himself as tinsmith. \n March. [910, he came to Springfield, 
Missouri, and worked a year for the Anslinger Sheet Metal Works, then 
took a position in the- North Side Frisco shops in March, 1911, as journey- 
man tinsmith. On November 1. 1913, he was promoted to foreman tinsmith 
of the reclamation plant at the South Side shops, which position he still 
holds, and in this, as in all previous positions he is giving entire satisfaction, 
for he is nol only an exceptionally highly skilled man in his line, but is 
energetic and understands handling those under him to good advantage. 

Mr. Butler was married in July, 1907, to Dora Etta Burrell, a daughter 
of Charles and Mary (Codrey) Burrell, who reside on a farm near Conway. 

Missouri; Mrs. Butler grew to womanh 1 in Lane. Kansas, and received 

a common school education there and in California, where the family moved 
after leaving Kansas. 

To our subject and wife one child has been horn, Austin Elmer Butler, 
born July [8, [911. 

Politically Mr. Butler is a Democrat. Tie belongs to the Methodisl 
Episcopal church. South. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I3O5 



PERCY J. BATES. 



Ruskin says that we are always given strength enough and sense 
em iueh for what nature intended us to do, and that, whatever we are doing, 

o 

we cannot be properly fulfilling our earthy mission if we are not happy 
ourselves. A part of our service to the world is unquestionably cheerfulness, 
and unless we are happy in our work and in the life we lead among men we 
are withholding something that is essential to true serviceableness. Percy 
1. Bates, rip track foreman at the North Side Frisco shops, Springfield, is a 
young man who is cheerful in his daily tasks, thus making them much lighter 
to perform. 

Mr. Bates was born September 28, 1886, at Essex Junction, Chittenden 
county, Vermont. He is a son of Job Bates, who was born in Westford, 
Vermont. He grew up in his native state and attended school there and in 
his younger days followed farming, later owned and operated a general store 
at Essex Junction. He was very successful as a business man and became 
owner of three or four fine farms, which he kept well stocked and highly 
improved, but keeping them rented, merely looking after them in a general 
way. He owned a large town house in Essex Junction, where he spent about 
twenty-five years of his life. He was very fond of good horses and made 
a specialty of raising them, always owning some fine ones. Politically he was 
a Republican, and was a road master and selectman, influential and prominent. 
in his town and county. He was a member of the Congregational church. 
His death occurred on May 12, [904, at the age of seventy-five years. His 
widow, who was known in her maidenhood as Mary Ella Brackett. a daughter 
of Hiram Brackett, of Amboy, Illinois, is living at Burlington, Vermont; 
she was born in 1851. 

kleven children were born to Job Bates and wife, named as follows: 
Kizzie married Allen Martin, an attorney of Essex Junction, Vermont; Julia 
I. has remained single and lives at home; Charles M. is manager of a hotel 
at Cambridge Springs. Pennsylvania; Marion E., single, is teaching school 
in Los Angeles. California; Willis S. is physical director at Southwestern 
College, Winfield, Kansas; James S. lives at Amarillo, Texas; Jessie E., sin- 
gle, is teaching in Burlington, Vermont: Percy J., of this sketch; Mary E. 
is the wife of Dr. John Hunter, of the L'niversity of Vermont; Alice B. is a 
missionary in Labrador, teaching in the Dr. Grenville Mission there; 
Dorothy S. is single and lives at home. 

Percy L Bates grew to manhood in Vermont and there received his 
education in the common schools, two years in high school, then studied at 
Kimball Union Academy at Meriden, New Hampshire, fj-om which he was 
graduated in 1904, then in 1905 he came- We"st and entered Fairmount College 



I^o6 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

at Wichita, Kansas, from which institution he was graduated in 1909. Tak- 
ing an interest in athletics he played professional base ball in 1909 and 1910 
for the Wichita Western League, being right fielder for that team, then 
played center field for the Arkansas City (Kansas) State League. He en- 
tered railroad service at Arkansas City with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe Road, in the transportation department, and later worked in the mechan- 
ical department until May 5, 1912, when he went to Amarillo, Texas, where 
he worked as time keeper and in the car department of the same road. On 
January 26, 1914, he entered the service of the Frisco System at Chaffee as 
piece work checker. On June 1. 1914, he was transferred to Springfield, 
Missouri, as rip track foreman in the North Side shops, which position he 
is holding at this writing. He has thirty hands under his direction and 
is giving his usual satisfaction. 

Mr. Bates has remained unmarried. Politically he is a Republican, and 
he belongs to the Congregational church. He is a member of the Masonic 
Order. 



WILLIAM I'. SMITH. 



A native of Missouri, but with the blue blood of Kentuckians in his 
veins, William F. Smith, chief engineer of the Springfield Gas & Power Com- 
pany, is a young man who has attained a very creditable standing in life as 
a result of his straightforward and conscientious course. 

Mr. Smith was born in St. Joseph. Missouri, November 8, 1882. He 
is a son of Prank and Bernedina ( Vanderstay ) Smith. The father was a 
native of Kentucky, where he spent his earlier years, and from there emi- 
grated to Missouri. He devoted his active life to the plasterer's trade, and 
died in 1892, when only about thirty-six years of age. His wife was a 
daughter of Prank Vanderstay, a western Missouri citizen. Mrs. Smith is 
now making her home in Springfield, living with her son, our subject. 

To Prank Smith and wife five children were born, namely: William F. 
of this sketch; Walter is deceased: Benjamin is engaged in the grocery 
business in Kansas City; Joseph is attending school in Pennsylvania; Vincent 
is an electrical operator in the employ of the Springfield Gas & Plectiic 
Company. 

Levi Smith, the paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
a bricklayer by trade, lie spent his life in Kentucky and western Missouri, 
having married in the former state. In later life he removed to Kansas, 
where he continued to follow his trade. 

William P. Smith was educated in the common schools of St. Joseph. 
Missouri, and Atchison, Kansas. When sixteen years of age he went to 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I3O7 

work for a grocery store, delivering goods and clerking, then worked in 
the power house at Leavenworth as fireman helper, was also oiler in the en- 
gine room, then became night engineer in the Leavenworth Light, Heat & 
Power Company, remaining in the employ of the traction company there for 
eight years. He then worked a few months for the St. Joseph Light, Heat 
& Power plant at repair work, then went hack to Leavenworth and worked in 
the machine shops, later becoming day chief engineer for the traction com- 
pany of that city. In September, 1908, he came to Springfield, Missouri, and 
took a position with the Springfield Gas & Electric Company, working as 
night engineer from 1908 to 1912. when he was transferred to day engineer, 
and on August 12th of that year, he was placed in charge of the company's 
power house, located at Main street and Phelps avenue, and has since been 
chief engineer of the power house, and is discharging his duties with his usual 
success and satisfaction. He has had as many as twenty-five men under his 
direction since taking this important position, and at present he is assisted 
by ten men. He is an expert in his line and is well read on every detail. 

Mr. Smith was married in November, 1913, to Florence Pile, a daugh- 
ter of Jonah Pile and wife, of Springfield. The untimely death of Mrs. 
Smith occurred on December 23, 1914, leaving one child. Arthur Smith, who 
was born on November 9, 191 4. 

Politically Mr. Smith is a Republican. He is a member of the Catholic 
church, and he belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men and the National 
Association of Steam Engineers. 



GEORGE COOPER. 



Memoirs dealing with enterprising men. especially good men, are very 
often of inestimable benefit to others, having a tendency to point the way to 
the goal of worthy things. The examples they furnish of steadfast endeavi >r 
and patient integrity forcibly illustrate what is in the power of each individual 
to accomplish when they have courage and right principles to control their 
course of action. Some men belong to no exclusive class in life; apparently 
insurmountable obstacles have in many instances awakened their dormant 
faculties and served as a stimulus to carry them to ultimate renown. The 
instances in the face of adverse fate would seem almost to justify the con- 
clusion that self-reliance, with a half chance, can accomplish any reasonable 
object. The late George Cooper, a well-known business man and enterprising 
citizen of Springfield during the past generation, was a man who lived to 
good purpose and achieved greater success than that which falls to the lot 
•of the average individual. By a straightforward and commendable course, 



I308 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

he madc-his way from a none too favorable early environment to a respect- 
able position in the industrial world, winning the hearty admiration of the 
people of his adopted city and earning a reputation as an enterprising, pro- 
gressive man of affairs and a broad-minded, upright citizen which the public 
was not slow to recognize and appreciate, and there is much in his life 
record which could be studied with profit by the young man starting out into 
what we are prone to allude to as the battle of life. 

Mr. Cooper was a representative of a sterling old English family, whose 
genealogy traced back to ancient days ; he first saw the light of day under 
England's skies on December 5, 1863, at Leicester. He was a son of Henry 
and Mary (Richardson) Cooper, both natives of England also, where they 
grew to maturity, were educated, .married and established their home, resid- 
ing there until in 1872, when they immigrated with their children to the United 
States, landing in New York City. From there they came direct to Missouri 
and established the future home of the family in Wilson township, Greene 
county, where the father secured a farm and became one of the enterprising 
general agriculturists of his locality, and is now living in retirement on a 
small farm in that township, where he bears an excellent reputation. Upon 
taking up his residence in the Republic of the West he made a careful study 
of the political situation in this country, and cast his lot with the Democrats. 
He has served as a member of the school board in his district. He is a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church. His lather, William Cooper, was born and 
reared in England, and there spent his life. He was a man of rare business 
ability and was for man}- years regarded as one of the foremost and 
wealthiest citizens of the city of Leicester, in the upbuilding of which he 
cook much interest; one of his principal benefactions was the building of a 
handsome Episcopal church there, he being the principal contributor, and he 
was lung an active member of that denomination, lie retained the coat-of- 
arms of his ancestors, tin- older Coopers having been a prominent family in 
that part of England. 

Henry Cooper was twice married, his first wile, mother of the sub- 
ject of this biographical memoir, passing away in 1 N74. leaving two sons, 
namely: Harry, a well-known business man of Springfield, a complete sketch 
of whom will be found on another page of this work, and George of this 
review. Elizabeth Jackson became Henry Cooper's second wife, and to this 
last union one son was born, Frederick Cooper, who is now engaged in the 
plumbing business in Springfield. 

George Cooper spent his early boyhood in England, being nine years of 
age when his parents sailed with him to America in 1872. lie grew to man- 
hood on his father's farm in this county and assisted with the general work 
during the crop seasons, attending the public schools during the winter, 
continuing to farm on the homestead until he was about twenty years of age. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I3O9 

then decided on a business career and went to Springfield, where he was 
employed as clerk in Sutter & Bryan's grocery store for a short tune, then 
began learning the plumber's trade, in which he became an expert, and fol- 
lowed this until 1887, when he formed a partnership with his brother, Harry 
Cooper, establishing a plumbing business of their own at 412 South street, 
later moved to 414 that street, then to 402 the same street, the last location 
being now the site of the Bank of Commerce. They were successful from 
the start and their gradually increasing business compelled them to seek larger 
quarters from time to time. They did not only have an excellent practical 
knowledge of the plumbing business, but they each proved to be men of 
exceptional executive ability. They continued in this line of endeavor with 
■ever-increasing success until 1908. During that period of twenty-one years 
the Coopers became widely known throughout the Southwest in their line of 
endeavor, and turned out some of the finest work and some of the largest 
contracts in the state of Missouri, including the plumbing for the Missouri 
state building at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1903, at St. Louis. 
They maintained a large, up-to-date and well equipped establishment ami 
kept a large number of skilled artisans constantly employed. 

Having accumulated a comfortable competency, George Cooper lived a 
retired life from 1908 until his death. He had long desired to visit his 

native land, particularly his boyh 1 home at Leicester, so he ami his brother 

Harry sailed for England, February 9, 1910. After spending some time 
at the old home they made extensive tours about the British Isles and were 
preparing for their return trip to America when our subject was suddenly 
stricken with illness and a few days later was summoned to his eternal rest. 
on April 9, 1910. His body was brought back to Springfield for burial. 

Mr. Cooper was married in [891 to Grace Keet Smith, who was born 
in Keetsville, Barry county, Missouri. November 3, 1866, and she received 
a iwiod education in the high schools of Springfield. She is a daughter of Dr. 
John R. and F>ances R. (Keet) Smith, a prominent family of Springfield. 
a complete sketch of whom will be found on another page of this volume. 
Mrs. Cooper has long been a favorite with a wide circle of friends, and she 
and her children belong to the Episcopal church. 

Mrs. Cooper is living- quietly in her beautiful home on Cherrv street, 
with her two winsome daughters. Mary Ruth, born October 30, 1892, and 
Elizabeth Fearn, born May 31, 1804, who are receiving excellent educational 
advantages. 

Politically Mr. Cooper was a Democrat, but being a quiet, unassuming- 
business and home man, he never sought public office. Fraternallv he be- 
longed to the Royal Arcanum lodge, and was an active member of the 
Episcopal church, in which he was a vestryman for twenty-six vears. He 
was held in the hiqiiest esteem by all who knew him. 



J3IO GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

IRA CARL BOX. 

It has been by. close application and persistent, honest work that Ira 
Carl Bon, general foreman of the reclamation department of the South Side 
Frisco shops, has risen from a machinist's apprentice to his present responsi- 
ble position, and not by the influence of friends or the inscrutable working 
of fate. He is a man of personal worth and popularity and enjoys the con- 
fidence of all with whom he comes in contact. He is enterprising and pro- 
gressive by both word and example and seeks to infuse that spirit into those 
with whom he is associated. 

Mr. Bon was born May 3, 1876, at Centerville, Iowa. He is a son of 
George Bon, who was a native of New York, from which state he came 
to the Middle West when a young man and entered railroad service, and is 
at this writing coach inspector at Centerville, Iowa, for the Chicago, Bur- 
lington & Ouincy Railroad Company, having been employed by this road 
for a period of thirty-three years. He helped build the shops of this com- 
pany at Centerville and has remained there ever since. He is sixty-seven 
years old. He has charge of the superintendent's office and the depot. He 
is a member of the Christian church and is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
and belongs to the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; 
also belongs to the Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. His wife was known in her maidenhood as Eva Swearengin; 
she is fifty-five years old. Their only child is the subject of this sketch. 

I. Carl Bon's grandfather was Henry Bon, a native of Germany, from 
which country he immigrated to America when a young man. He was a 
cigarmaker by trade, and later in life became a railroad contractor, and was 
for years a builder and contractor in the state of New York and in Iowa, 
maintaining his home for some time at Centerville. 

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood at Centerville, Iowa, and 
dure attended the common schools until he was sixteen years old. when he 
began serving his apprenticeship as machinist in the shops of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Ouincy railroad at that place, remaining there from 1898 to 
1905, then worked for the Wheeling & Lake Erie railroad at Canton, Ohio, 
as storekeeper in the supply department, from 1906 to 1910. In 1910 he 
went in business for himself, as agent for several standard makes of au- 
tomobiles. He continued in this held with success until 1914, in March of 
which year he secured employment with the Frisco Lines at Springfield as 
general foreman in the reclamation department, and he is discharging the 
duties of this responsible position in a manner that reflects much credit upon 
himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. He has under his 
direction three hundred and fiftv men. 



GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. I3II 

Politically, Mr. Bon is an independent .voter. Fraternally, he belongs 
to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, and is a member of the Christian church. 

He was married in iqo8 to Alice Harvey, a daughter of William E. 
and Mary M. ( Streepy) Harvey, of Centerville, Iowa, in which city she 
grew to womanhood and was educated. She is a member of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, her grandfather having been a soldier in that 
war. 

To our subject and wife one child, Maxine Bon, has been born, whose 
birth occurred June 20, 1910. 



WILLIAM P. POWELL. 

A gentleman of warm, sympathetic impulses, liberal and generous, Will- 
iam P. Powell, assistant foreman of the reclamation department of the South 
Side Frisco shops, Springfield, is a young man whom everyone, who has ever 
known him personally, likes and speaks well of. His manners are easy in 
social intercourse, with high conceptions <>\ morality and honest, fraternal 
living. All these commendable traits, together with the fact that he has 
achieved such notable success in his field of endeavor at such an early age 
would augur for him a bright future in railroad service. 

Mr. Powell was born at Saint Mary's, Sainte Genevieve county, Missouri, 
October 10, 1884. He is a son of Elisha T. Powell and a grandson of Will- 
iam Powell, a large tobacco grower of Kentucky in the early days. The 
father of our subject was born at Henderson. Kentucky, where he grew' up, 
attended school and spent his life, engaged in raising tobacco of a high grade 
and on an extensive scale. Later in life he removed to Sainte Genevieve 
county, Missouri, and established the family home. For some time he op- 
erated a cooperage business at Jackson, this state. The latter years of his 
life were spent in retirement at De Soto, this state, where he died at the age 
of fifty-seven years, and was buried there. Politically, he was a Democrat 
and he belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. The mother of the sub- 
ject of this sketch was known in her maidenhood as Delia Van Winkle, and 
she was born at Jefferson City, Missouri, where she grew up and was edu- 
cated, and she is now making her home in Springfield and is fifty years old. 
To these parents only two children were born, a daughter dying in infancy, 
and William P., of this sketch. 

Our subject received his education in the common and high schools at 
De Soto, Missouri. After leaving school he went to Texas and became a 
clerk in the postoffice at the town of Brownwood. having taken the civil 



13 12 GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI. 

service examination for the same. Later he was for one year in the United 
States mail service in that state. He then came to Springfield, Missouri, in 
1902, and took a position as helper in the blacksmith shops of the Frisco 
railroad, in the North Side shops, under John French, who was foreman there 
for eighteen months. Our subject then went with the United Iron Works in 
this city as blacksmith helper, where he remained nine months, then took 
a position in the Schmook Machine Foundry Company here as blacksmith, 
later taking a position in the South Side Frisco shops as blacksmith helper, 
but returned to the Schmook foundry as blacksmith, then came to the South 
Side Frisco shops as blacksmith, in 191 3. and for some time he has been 
assistant foreman of the blacksmith shop in the reclamation department of 
these shops, and has given his usual high-grade service and satisfaction. 

Mr. Powell has remained single. Politically, he is a Democrat. He 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias and 
the International Brotherhood of Blacksmith Helpers. Religiously, he is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



WILLIAM WESLEY SKELLEY. 

The time has arrived when intensive and diversified farming is neces- 
sary for conditions have changed since the former generation. We must 
now look more to soil fertility, grow better and mure livestock, each farmer 
must do more work himself and hire less. The farmers and editors and 
statesmen who at one time insisted that American intelligence. Yankee thrift 
and ingenuity needed no protection have come to discover something differ- 
ent. In the language of the late Grover Cleveland, "It is a condition which 
confronts us — not a theory." One of the intelligent young farmers of 
Franklin township, Greene county, who realizes that he must emploj differ- 
ent methods in his vocation to those employed a quarter or a half century ago 
is William Wesley Skelley. and he is therefore making a success in his 
chosen work. 

Mr. Skelley was born September 17, [876, in Cumberland county. Penn- 
sylvania. Me is a son of Theodore A. and Mary Elizabeth (Smith) Skelley. 
The father was born in the same count}- and state as our subject, April 30, 
[840, and there also occurred the birth of the mother of our subject. They 
grew to maturity in their native locality, were educated in the schools of 
the early days and married there and established the family It 'me. Theo- 
dore A. Skelley devoted his active life to farming and was also a wagon 
maker by trade which he followed in his native state, working for some time 
in the railroad shops at Altoona, Pennsylvania, in fact, followed his trade for 



GREENE COL' NT V, MISSOURI. I3I3 

a period of eighteen years. He was highly skilled and always found ready 
employment. He removed with his family to Greene county, Missouri, in 
1884, when our subject was eight years old, and here he purchased a farm of 
one hundred and seventy acres in Franklin township, known as the "Cedar 
Bluff Farm." It was well improved and had a good group of buildings on 
it. Here he carried on general farming successfully, being a hard worker 
and a good manager, and was highly respected by his neighbors, being a good 
man in every sense of the word. He was a member of the Methodist church 
at New Salem in which, he was steward for several years. During the Civil 
war he enlisted in Company G. Two Hundred and Second Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, at Harrisburg, that state, August 20, 1864, and served in 
a faithful manner until the close of the war, being mustered out as corporal, 
August 3, 1865, at Harrisburg, and was honorably discharged. He was in 
the army of the Potomac, hut did mostly guard duty and was not in any of 
the great battles, but was in several skirmishes, his principal work was in 
guarding railroads in Virginia. Previous to his enlistment he had heen in 
the em