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Full text of "Past and present of Lucas and Wayne counties, Iowa, a record of settlement, organization, progress and achievement"

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 





& 



PAST AND PRESENT 



OF 



LUCAS AND WAYNE 
COUNTIES 



IOWA 






A Record of Settlement, Organization, Progress and 
1 Achievement 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME 



CHlCAGd'": :";',»- ;.. }'•.• 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING; CQ^I^'NY 




kRY 



■ 




J.Qjc^X 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HOX. FRANK Q. STUART. 

Earnest, purposeful, recognizing ever the obligations and the duties as well 
as the opportunities and advantages of citizenship, Prank Q. Stuart of Chariton 
stands with the eminent men of Iowa who have labored persistently and effect- 
ively for the welfare of state and nation. A member of the bar, he brings to 
bear upon the questions of vital interest to the country the analytical power and 
logical reasoning of the lawyer. His utterances indicate a mind trained in the 
severest school of reasoning and it is a recognized fact that policy never sways 
him in his position, which is the outcome of an earnest belief in the cause which 
he advocates. 

Iowa is proud to number Mr. Stuart among her native sons, his birth having 
occurred in Monroe county on the 24th of January, 1856. He acquired a high- 
school education and afterward studied under special instructors for several 
years. In fact, throughout his entire life he has been a student— of books, of 
men, of events — and in the school of experience he has learned many valuable 
lessons. In early life he took up the study of telegraphy ami was employed as 
an operator until 1874. lb' regarded this merely as an initial step to higher 
things, and, taking up the study of law, was admitted to the bar in the year in 
which he attained his majority. He then entered upon active practice, in which 
he has since been engaged save for intervals spent in editorial work and upon the 
public platform. Along with those qualities indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, 
rapid, logical mind plus the business sense, and a ready capacity for hard work- 
he brought to the starting point of his legal career certain rare gifts — eloquence 
of language and a strong personality. He has ever been remarkable among law- 
yers for the wide research and provident care with which he prepares his cases. 
Tn no instance has his reading ever been confined to the limitations of the ques- 
tion at issue: it has gone beyond and compassed every contingency and provided 
not alone for the expected, but for the unexpected, which happens in the courts 
quite as frequently as out of them. His logical grasp of facts and principles of 
the law applicable to them has been another potent element in.bi- success; and a 
remarkable clearness of expression, an adequate and pre, igfe .Tciion. which enables 
him to make others understand not only the salienj poinjs.qf his argument, but 
his every fine gradation of meaning, may be wr in.ijed, oive, of his most conspicu- 
ous gifts and accomplishments. , , ; 

Mr. Stuart was married in Chariton. low.i. ^e|e,n,l. i, '1. 1876, to .Miss Ida 
M. Penick, and they have two children living. Martha was married in 1906 to 
William P. Jackson, of Lake Forest and Chicago. Illinois, and they have (Wo 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

children: Virginia Stuart, born in 1908; and Barbara Jackson, bora in }'.tV2. 
Adelbert, the onlj son of our subject, was born in I8i 

Mr. Stuart v. 3 .1 resident of Colorado and served as a member 

of its legislature from 1885 until 1887, during which period he introduced and 
the enactment of nine bills into laws, among which was a law preventing 
non-resident alien ownership of land in thai state, a law prohibiting the contract- 
ing of convicl labor, and a law prohibiting the blacklisting of discharged emploj - 
II. also actively supported a proposed law for the regulation of railway rates and 
which was passed by the house, bul \\a- defeated in the senate. 

[n the year of his retirement from the < Colorado assembly Mr. Stuarl published 
a brochui led: "Natural Rights, Natural Liberty and Natural Law." 

Commenting upon this, one of the dailj papers of Denver said: "Mr. Stuart's 
in. Hi of the social problem and the land question is the clearest, mosl cone 

I dispassionate and altogether the ablest we have seen, and we commend it 
to the thinkers of the country." A Cleveland (Ohio paper wrote editorially: 
"The auth.ii- states the points of his case n ithoul ambiguity of language, and his 
argument is clear, logical and comprehensive. It is eminently worthy 

<d' the careful perusal of all students of the social problems of the day." 

In 1891 Mr. Stuart returned i" < lhariton, Iowa, and almost immediately after- 
ward was elected mayor of the town, bul soon resigned that position to become 
editor of the Des Moines Dailj Leader, which he made one of the leading news- 
papi rs of the country in the discussion of social, economic and governmental sub- 
jects. His editorials were widely read by deep thinking men. It is well known 
that Mr. Stuart has always opposed monopoly, special privilege and legalized 
injustice in all their various forms and guises. He has agitated questions con 
uected therewith in arousing public sentiment to the enormity of prevailing social, 

'.iiiiic and industrial wrongs, and all of his public efforts, whether as speaker, 
writer or political worker, have been in the direct interest of social, economic and 
political reform He has often been heard on the lecture platform and his oratorj 
has enabled him to sway his hearers, while his logic lias carried conviction. 

It is well known that Mr. Stuart's position has never been an equivocal one. 
II stands fearlessly for what he believes to be right and nothing can swerve him 
from a course which his judgment sanctions as honorable and straightforward 
in the relations of man with man and 111 the duties of citizenship. This has been 
particularly notable in his recent espousal of the principles of the progressive 
party, in which connect i.>u a contemporary writer said : " Prior to the campaign 
of 1912, Mr Stuart had for main years been affiliated with the democratic party, 
and at different times he was signallj honored bj that party. In l x,, l he was 
the democratic candidate For congress in the 'Big Eighth' district of Iowa. In 
the mpaign of l s '>7 he was in charge of the democratic press bureau of 

Iowa. In l - irv chairman of the democratic state convention, 

making t hi iwech drew from Governor John P. Altgeld 

l llinois the eiicomi ... |. mendous ring, ' and caused Leslie M. Shaw, 

then republ "vernor of Iowa and afterwards secretarj of the 

treasurj of tin 1 lass Mr. Stuart as one of the foremost political 

f) idential campaign of 1900 Mr. Stuart was 

official editor to the executive committee of the democratic national committee 

In 1902 he • ian the dei rat ic 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 7 

state committee of Iowa .luring the campaign of that year. In 1907 ( for a time 
residing in the south) he was appointed as a delegate from Louisiana to the 
national conference which was held at Des .Moines on the subjed of election of 
United States senators by direct vote of the people. In 11)10, having returned 
to Iowa, he for a second time was nominated tor congressman from the eighth 
Iowa district, making a splendid race against a large opposition majority. In 
promoting his candidacy in that campaign his home friends issued the following 
statement, signed by the treasurer, auditor, clerk of district court and county 
attorney of his home county : 'We know of no man who has fought so aggressively 
against, all forms of trusts, more earnestly for an honest reduction of the tariff, 
so constantly for conservation, or so untiringly for honesty in government, lie 
has sacrificed more time and more labor battling for the equal rights of all man 
kind than any man of our acquaintance. In him as congressman the people will 
have one who is safe and fair in all things, frank and honest in every way. able 
and courageous in every battle.' AVhile for years .Mr. Stuart supported the 
democratic party when it was hopelessly in the minority in his home state, and 
nationally — that party appearing to him to afford greater latitude than the domi- 
nant party for the free discussion of social, economic and governmental problems 
— in 1912, at a time when the democratic prospects were brighter than they had 
been in twenty years, he severed his connection with that party, resigning the 
eighth district vice presidency of the Iowa State Jefferson Club and other honor- 
ary positions, and came out promptly in support of the great declaration of 
principles promulgated by the progressive party in national convention at 
Chicago." .Mr. Stuart entered aggressively into the campaign and his ability as 
a speaker led to his cooperation being sought not only throughout Iowa, but in 
many other states, and be contributed much to the success which his party won 
in the campaign of that year. His utterances make strong appeal because of 
their clearness and simplicity of style to the average hearer: they leave an 
equally strong impress upon the mind of the logical thinker who readily sees 
the relation between cause and effect. The breadth of bis own nature and of his 
vision are manifest in all that he says, and the record of Frank Q. Stuart, law- 
yer, orator and publicist, is one which reflects credit and honor alike upon the 
state of his nativity. 



CLARENCE S. HUMESTON. 

The Humeston family is so well known in Wayne county that Clarence S. 
Humeston needs no introduction to the readers of this volume. He is at present 
in partnership with his father in the conduct of a profitable grain and coal 
business in the city which bears the family name and is numbered among the 
most able, progressive and representative men of the community. He is num- 
bered among Humeston 's native sons and was bora in the second house built in 
the town, June 22, 1877. He is a son of Alva and Annie E. (Brown) Humeston, 
of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this work, lie grew to man 
hood here and after completing his education in the public schools obtained 
employment in Hie office of the Humeston New Era, in which he worked for 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

some time. Throughout practically all his active career he has I d associated 

with his father, serving from 1893 to L897 as assistant postmaster, while Alva 
Humeston was postmaster. In L898 he \\ .is made assistant to Ins father in the 
conduct of a grain and coal business and acted in this capacity for one year, 

er which he interrupted his business career in order to pursue his studies 
in college at Dixon, Illinois. In 1901 he was made a partner in his father's 
concern and has remained a member of the firm since thai time. Ee is a capable 
business man. readil) determining the outcome of any transaction and < l»-l i trli t - 

ing in battling with complex business problems. Moreover, he lias ph 1 his 

dependence upon energy and perseverance and has as a resull gained at an 
earl) age promine and prosperity 

<>n the -1st of September, 1898, Clarence S. 1 1 u ston was united in mar- 
riage i" .Miss Ludeen Frisbie, who was born in Davis City, Iowa. Januarj 6, 
1876, a daughter of John R. and Rose Price) Prisbie, the former of whom 
has passed away. He was among the earl) settlers in Iowa and while conduct 
lie.: a store at l>a\is City was robbed by the famous -lames brothers' gang. Mrs. 
Humeston '8 mother was born in St. Louis and was a resilient cd' Nauvoo, Illinois 
at the time of the Mormon expulsion, she can vividly recall the events of thai 

ting time. At present she is residing at Kellerton, Iowa. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Prisbie became the parents of eighl children, William. Walter. Richard, Prank, 
Mrs. [da Burnker, Mrs. Humeston', Mrs Blanche Dorse) and Mrs. Winona 
Graves. Mr. and Mrs. Humeston have become the parents of a daughter, Alice 

Louise. They reside in a i lern and well furnished hone in Humeston and are 

among the most prominent people in social circles of the city. 

Clarence S. Humeston is a member of the christian church and fraternall) 
is affiliated with Fidelity Lodge, No. 228. A. F. & A. M. His political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party and he has held some important public offices, 
including those <d' city clerk of Humeston and deputy postmaster. He is a 
worthy representative of Ins name, which has long been known and honored 

in tins section, and his life, which has 1 n one of continuous and well directed 

activity, is as ,-i resull successful and happy. 



No UMAX F BAKER 



The financial and business histor) of Lucas count) would be incomplete 

lure to make mention of Norman F. Baker, hanker and merchant 

and a pro and puhl ie spi ri ted citizen, lie is at present casliier of the 

Farmers & Miners Hank of Lucas, an instituti istablished b) his father, and 

• made his influence fell in the develo] nl and conservation of banking 

interests in this pari of the state. He was i„, rM ni Chariton, Iowa, June 10, 
l^T' 1 . a son of J. C. and Martha Steff) Baker, the former a native of Brown 
county, Indiana, and the latter of Burlington, Iowa, when' her birth occurred 
December 26, 1846 The father was one of tl ■ ttlers in the town of Lucas 

and from the timi tion was ;i force in development, giving his 

and aid to the promotion of many progressive public movements and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 9 

establishing and building up many of its finest business institutions, among which 
may be mentioned the Farmers & Miners Bank, which he organized in 1886. 
He died in this city in 1901 and his widow survives him and is residing in Lucas. 
She has been a resident of Iowa since her birth and was two days old when the 
state was admitted into the Union. In this family were five children : Albert 
L.. who resides in Montana; Norman P., of this review; Laura (!.. who is 
assistant cashier of the Farmers & Miners Bank of Lucas; J. ('.. Jr., a former 
attorney of Lucas, who died in lDOIJ; and Blanche, who is residing with her 
mother. 

The common schools of Lucas afforded Norman F. Baker his educational 
opportunities, but he has carried forward his own studies since that time, being 
an apt pupil in the school of experience. Since 1886 he lias been connected 
with the affairs of the Farmers & Miners Bank, established in that year, an 
institution of which he is now cashier. A financier of shrewd and resource- 
ful ability, he has by the application of sound and progressive methods made 
the concern grow and expand so that it is now not only the oldest bank in 
the county but also one of the substantial and prosperous financial concerns 
of the state. Mr. Baker is progressive and modern in all that he does and his 
spirit of enterprise is evidenced by the fact that he will allow in the bank only 
the newest equipment, having recently installed a new burglar proof manganese 
safe, of the Victor patent, one of the first to be introduced in southern Iowa. 
In addition to his banking interests Mr. Baker owns also a profitable general mer- 
chandise store in Lucas and two good farms in .Jackson township, each of which 
is provided with an excellent set of improvements. Following his father's foot- 
steps, he has ever taken an active part in the development of Lucas, centering a 
irreat deal of his attention upon its growth along business lines and making his 
individual prosperity a factor in general expansion. 

Mr. Baker married, in October, 1896, Miss Margaret Beatty, born in Wapello 
county. Iowa. June 4. 1874. She is a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Hart) 
Beatty, the former born in Dubuque in 1848 and the latter near Sheldon, Iowa. 
December 25, 1852. When Mrs. Baker was two years of age her parents removed 
to Lucas county, where both died, the father passing away in 1880 and the 
mother in April. 1900. In their family were five children; Mrs. Ella Jones, the 
wife of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway agent at Indianola, Iowa ; 
Mrs. Baker; James, who is engaged in the mercantile business in Ottumwa ; Mrs. 
Mary Warner, whose husband is also a merchant in Albia, Iowa; and Susan, the 
wife of Arthur Knotts, interested in mining in old Mexico. The two eldest 
children in this family are natives of Wapello county, the three younger ones 
having been born in Lucas county. The family has been in Iowa since pioneer 
times. Mrs. Baker's grandparents having been among the earliest settlers in 
Dubuque county. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have two sous: Norman F., Jr., born 
December 29, 1897, now a student in the public- schools; and Gerald J., whose 
birth occurred April 19. 1900, and who is also pursuing his studies. Mrs. Baker 
is a member of the Catholic church of Chariton. 

Until 1912 Norman F. Baker was identified with the democratic party and 
was one of the most active workers in its ranks, taking a deep interest in local 
affairs and proving his public spirit by official service. He held on the democratic 



10 I.I • AS A\H WAN NE COUNTIES 

11. -kct almost all of the towD and township o£6ces ami was democratic candidate 
lor !ii;iii\.-. When ill'- progressive party was formed, however, he 

allied his interests with it and in 1912 was its candidate for the office of sti 
treasurer of Iowa. Be lias extensive fraternal connections, being a member of 
Good Shepherd Lodge, No. 111. A I-'. & A. M., of Lucas; the Royal Arch Mas 

at Chariton; and Emmanuel C mandery, No. 50, K T., of tin- same place. 

IT.' is identified also with the Modern Wood a of America and the Yeomen. 

He has held all the offices in the Masonic lodge and is at present treasurer. In 
all the Lines of activitj which claim his attention Mr. Baker has followed pro- 
gressive, constructive and modern methods and in the development of his busi- 
ness interests, which are capablj conducted, has proven himself a reliable, 
ourceful and far sighted business man. He possi sses the elements of capacity 
and character that contribute largely toward success elements of perseverance, 
self-reliance and good judgment, lie is now one of tin- leading turn <>F his 
.hi. and judging from ins presenl success, thi Euture will hold even greater 
victories and more substantial prosperity. 



JOHN W. FREELAND. 



An honest man. of high principles, of noble purposes, of kin.tU action 
and generous deeds, taking no especial credit to himself and in fad main- 
taining always a i Ies1 demes ■ and an unassuming disposition, John W. 

Freeland left the impress oi Ids individualitj for good upon the history 
of the county in which he lived for more than half a century and the cons 
ot public opinion names him as one of its must honored and valued citizens. 
For many years he was actively engaged in the practice of law and was also 
prominent in the banking circles of the county, being one of the organizers 
and president of the Wayne Count} Bank. 

Mr. Freeland was born in Owen county, Indiana. August 28, L840, and 
became a residenl of Wayne i ity, Iowa, when a youth of seventeen years. 

It was his purpose to enter upon the studj of l,iw here in the office of \\ E 

Taylor, then ,-i distinguished member of the Wayne countj bar. He con- 
tinued his reading for a few years ami was then admitted to practice by the 
Hon. J. s. Townsciid, who at that time was presiding judge. Immediately 
afterward he entered into partnership with his former preceptor under the 
firm Btyle of Taylor & Freeland, which firm continued actively in practice 
tintil after the outbreak of the Civil war. Mr. Freeland continued the prac- 

• l law with various partners until ah. mi I. mi years prior to his death. 

Ins acti\ nnection with the Wayne countj bar covering almost a half 

century. Following the dissolution of his partnership with Mr. Taylor he was 
later- essivel} in practice with J N McClanahan, E E, Clark, 

Lewis Miles, II K. Evans and II II. Carter II.- came to the starting point 
well qualified through natural abilitj and his broad stud] 
for the onerous duties of the profession ami he prepared his cases with 
thoroughness ami skill. II.- had been in practice tor but a comparatively 
I I when he was elected count] judge and remained upon the bench 




JOHN W. FREELANh 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES ]:; 

for one term. He more greatly enjoyed, however, the active work of the 
lawyer and was ever a close student of his profession. As a resull of his 
strong legal mind, sound judgment, eool deliberation and clear reasoning 
powers he reached a position at the head of the Wayne county bar. 

In January, 1862, Mr. Preeland was united in marriage to .Miss Belle 
Kelley, a daughter of B. II. Kelley, a prominent citizen of Corydon. The -real 
grief of his life came to him in the death of his wife at Corydon on the 24th 
of April, 1903. They were the parents of three children. .Mrs. .1. S. Garrett, 
Mrs. Frank B. Selby and .Mrs. P. M. West. The family have ever occupied a 
leading position in social circles— those circles in which intelligence and per- 
sonal worth are accepted as the passports to good society. Mr. Freeland 
made for himself a prominent position and yet there was nothing self-asser- 
tive about him. In fact he was unostentatious and unassuming in manner. 
hut his genuine personal worth received recognition, lie was but a boy in 
years when he arrived in Corydon, which then contained a population of less 
than one hundred. Through the ensuing half century or more he took an 
active and helpful part in all that pertained to the welfare and advancement 
of the town and county. 

In 1878 Mr. Freeland became associated witli E. E. Clark, now president 
of the Bankers Life Association, in the ownership and conduct of a bank. 
They purchased the bank of Oeohock Brothers and under the style of Free- 
land & Clark continued the business until August, 1874. .Mr. Freeland was 
then largely instrumental in organizing the Wayne County Bank, which took 
over the business of Freeland & Clark, and four years after its organization 
he became president and so continued until his death, remaining active iu 
its management and control to the last. 

He never regarded politics as something unworthy his attention. He 
always recognized the duties and obligations as well as privileges of citizen- 
ship and he never failed to give honest expression to his opinions. He was 
a stalwart advocate of democratic principles and from 1865 until 1895 was the 
recognized leader of his party in Wayne county, largely directing and shaping 
its course and influencing the choice of its candidates. He never soughl nor 
desired office for himself but strove earnestly to place in public positions 
men capable and worthy of the honor conferred upon them. Mr. Freeland 
was recognized as a man of wide general information, resulting from his 
broad reading, his earnest study and deep thinking, lie frequently made 
addresses before the Corydon Friday Club which were listened to with much 
interest. Few laymen have so comprehensive and accurate a knowledge of 
geology and he had gathered from many parts of the United States a large 
collection of geological speciments. 

Perhaps personal characteristics of Mr. Freeland may best be given in 
the words of a friend, who, following his death, which occurred April 27, 
1912, wrote of him: "He was r\f\- and always a courteous and pleasant 
gentleman. He was highly honorable and was a man of strictest integrity. 
He was an honest man, and well has it been said that 'an honest man 
is the noblest work of God.' While he was ever courteous, yet he was always 
open, plain and frank in conduct and speech. He never pretended to he 
otherwise than what he really was. lie hated and despised sham am! Iiypoc- 



It l.i CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

risj tie was an exceedingly kind, loving and affectionate husband and 
father. His home life was very happy and was the mosl pleasant, the purest 
ami the host. In his death his children and grandchildren have suffered au 
irreparable loss. Be was always reticenl in regard to religious questions and 
never said anything publicly on those matters. Whatever he may have said in 
relation to religion and a future life, if anything, was only to Ins most intimate 
friends But, whatever Ins views may have been as to these matters, all who 
knew him and his life know thai he lived an honest, upright and goodly life. 
That life shows that his heart, his intentions, his motives and purposes were 
strictly in line witli rectitude and a clean, elevated and conscientious spirit." 
Another said: "lie was not an old man. People of his temperament never 
grow old. lie enjoyed company and was a genial companion to both aged 
and young. lie was quiet, unassuming and very unselfish, yet his life was 
a material henetit to all. especially the young man. Struggling lor ;, start. 

to whom he was always a friend indeed. Words fail us to portray the good 
qualities of this friend whom we enjoyed as a near neighbor for over thirty 
year-. Our children grew up together and mingled as one family through 
all those years, making our relations as near and dear as it was possible to 
be. During all those years we knew him as a neighbor, as a man and as a 
friend who could he relied upon under any and all circumstances. During 
all that time we never knew him to eommil a seltish act or do an unmanly 
deed He was not a man of words, but of d Is. and Ins many acts id' kind- 

ness will live in memory long after his passing away. Though his outward 
demeanor was quiet, yet beneath his exterior he had a heart as true as steel 
and as firm as adamant to what he believed to he right. .Mr. Freeland was 
a friend to everyone, hut especially was he loud of children and in the sunsel 
of his life there was no greater pleasure to him than to contribute to Hie 
pleasure of his grandchildren, who especially adored him." 



DAVID II KERBY. 



David II. Kerhy. who in 1912 was .ailed upon to serve as mayor of Sej ur 

aiel who in the short time since his election has brought aboul a number of 

remedial measures of greal importance to the well-being and growth of the 

community, is one of the foremost lawyers of the city. His tireless energy, 

industry and knowledge have l'. id for him the substantia] reward which he 

finds iii his extensive practice and in recognition bj his fellow citizens as one 
ol the men of affairs in this districl 

David II. Kerhy is a native of Iowa, in which slate he was horn in Appai Be 

Qty, Maj '_' s . 1855, and is a son of Samuel and Mar.\ P. (PearCJ Kerb} 

The father was born m Randolph county, Missouri, in 1827, and was a son 

David Kerhy. of Kentucky, w ho was of English descent. At the time when 

the famiU was established in the United states four Kerbj brothers came from 

the motherland to Virginia in colonial days and fr these tour Kerhy brothers 

all the members of the American Kerhy family are descended. The grandfather 
of our subject. David Kerby, came from Kentucky to Missouri in the early 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES IT, 

history of that state, about 1824. He was a true type of a pioneer and a versatile 
man, practiced and accomplished in various professions and trades. For seven 
teen years he was active as a hunter and wagon maker and his services as such 
were in great demand in the pioneer districts in which he resided; hut lie 
was also a man of learning and combined with his pursuits the practice of 
medicine, while at times when there was no minister to spread the gospel he 
would tend to the ministration of souls as a preacher. lie was married three 
times and became the father of a large family, members of which are found 
today in many states of the Union. There were horn to him twenty-six children, 
nine daughters and seventeen sons, all of whom grew up to he useful citizens in 
the sections in which they resided, the youngest son dying shortly after he had 
reached his majority. David Kerby was a man not only accomplished and well 
read hut of extraordinary physique, his strength and good health remaining 
with him until he attained an advanced age. lie often took pleasure in recount- 
ing an incident from his youthful days illustrating his physical power, when 
he used to climb the trees to suspend from their branches the deer killed on I he 
hunt to save it from attacks of the wolves, carrying the body in his teeth. 

Ewing Kerby, an uncle of our subject, was the first white man to build a 
cabin in Appanoose county, Iowa, and his daughter was the first white child horn 
in this county. Another cousin of our subject. Elizabeth Daily Stephens, was 
the second white child horn in Appanoose county. Samuel Kerby, the father 
of our subject, followed agricultural pursuits during his life and came to Iowa 
before the Civil war. In this great conflict he served for twelve months with 
the state militia and after being discharged returned to Missouri, where he 
subsequently followed farming for the rest of his life and passed away in 
Schuyler county, that state, on the 10th of March, 1908. Although he had 
hardly enjoyed any school privileges, he educated himself by profound and 
wide reading and as he was a great student not only of books hut also of condi- 
tions as they existed and people as they were, he became a great judge of human 
nature. He was familiar with the hooks of the best thinkers the world has 
produced and took delight in studying such profound men as Demosthenes, 
Ingersoll, Talmage and many others. Naturally his judgment was often referred 
to by his fellowmen, who greatly esteemed him for his profound knowledge, and 
depended upon his decisions as final in such controversies as would arise from 
time to time. His religion was that of the Methodist church and his political 
views inclined towards the republican party, in the ranks of which he was 
active, although he never soughl office as a reward for parly fealty, lie brought 
to all public matters that high-minded interest which it is Hie privilege and 
duty of every citizen to take who is concerned in the welfare and future of this 
great nation. 

The mother of our subject, Mrs. Mary F. (Pearcy) Kerby, was a daughter 
of Henry and Millie (Collier) Pearcy, of Kentucky. The parents removed from 
the Blue Grass state to Missouri during the pioneer times of 1830 and made 
settlement in Carter county. Later they removed to Jasper county, where Mr. 
Pearcy settled upon a squatter's claim which today constitutes a pari of the 
thriving city of Carthage. .Missouri. Later he removed to the northern pari 
of Missouri, where he lived until his demise. In 1849, when the gold finds of 
California attracted the attention of the world, he made his way to thai far oil' 



16 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

country, where he remained in search of the precious metal, and again in L859 
we Bnd him in thi Pike's Peak country, where he prospected in search of a 
fortune. Mr. and .Mrs. Samuel Kerb) were the parents of eleven children, two 

of whom died in infancy. Tl thers are: Millie A., wh arried C. B. Webb, 

a resident of Colorado, and has seven children, one of whom is deceased; Martha 
lv. who is the wife of Butler Porter, resides in Missouri and lias six childr 

David II.. "i this review; Mar) S., who married R. Alexander, si deceased, 

and is the mother of eighl children, making her home in Missouri; Sarah I-'.. 

who married James Graves, b) wl she has ten children, five of whom are 

engaged in school teaching, and wl takes her home in Schuyler county, .Mis 

souri; Benjamin I... who resides in Schuyler county, Missouri, ami has attained 
prosperity as a farmer and trader there and has seven children; Emma 1'.. who 
married Ed Porter, bj whom she has two children, ami resides in Schuyler 
county, Missiiun : Samuel I... who makes his home with his mother on the "id 
homi and Laura M.. the wife of Samuel B. Shumate, by whom she has 

two children, a residenl of Schuyler county, Missouri. The mother of Edward 

Porter, brother-in-law of our subject, is still living and in g I health al the 

agt "i uinety-five years. She was tin- first woman in the state of Ohio to draw 
a salary as a school teacher. Mrs. Samuel Kerb) is still active and looks after 
her own work in the household at the age of eighty-three. Her interesl in p 
cni dav occurrences has not in the leasl abated and she has the esteem and 

friendship of man) who have had tin- In r of her acquaintance. 

David H. Kerb) was reared at home ami during hi- youthful days made him- 
self useful upon his father's farm. He received his education in the common 

scl Is of Missouri ami [owa ami after having completed his education taughl 

school, reading law at the same time. Oul of three years ho taughl thirty-three 

■ ths. attended two courses oi om month each at a normal school and read 

law, so he was able to compli irsc in that time and was admitted to 

bar in 1883. This extraordinar) accomplishment stands as irrefutable proof 
of Ins iron will and of his euerg) m attaining his ambition ami will always 
redound to his credit. In the spring of 1884 ho began the practice of law in 
Seymour, [owa, ami has since been engaged in tin- pursuit of his profession in 

that city, with the exception of two wars which he Spent in Kansas and two 

in which he practiced in Sioux City, Iowa. He is man marked b) strength 
of character and in the course of his career has won the high regard ami confidence 
of his clients and colleagues in tin profession. He has won favorable criticism 
for himself for the careful ami systematic methods which he follows in pro 
paring his 'as. vs. He has a remarkable power of concentration and application, 
ami Ins retentn - has often excited the wonder of other lawyers. He 

stand- high in the dis, mission .if legal matters i the court, where his com- 

prehensive knowledge of the lav stands him in good stead, and by the applica- 

1 1 i legal principles he demonstrates the wide scope of his professional attain 

iin-iiis. He upi.s an enviable position at the Way] ounty bar and in the 

presentation of I is s.. clear, forceful and concise that he seldom fails to 

rr) the verdict he desires. Naturally the circle of his clients has expanded 

year b) year as his attainments have increased and as his reputation has grown, 

ami toda) he is recognized as one of the fori most men of the bar in these parts 

the state. II.- is entirely free from ostentation and carries most of his cases 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 17 

to success by the simple weight of his character and the clear demonstration of 
the legal points in litigation, and he has been carried to the eminent position 
which he now occupies in the life of the community by a laudable ambition which 
has permeated his whole life's course and has carried him forward to success and 
prosperity. 

In April. 1883, David II. Kerby married .Miss Anna Loomis, a daughter of 
AVilliam and Mary (Klinkingbeard) Loomis. the former a native of New York 
who became one of the early settlers of Iowa. .Mi-, and .Mrs. Kerby bave one 
daughter. Mary E., who was horn in Seymour in 1SS4. and in 1909 married Dr. 
Edwin Burehett, a resident of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Kerby are both members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

David H. Kerby has. ever since he became a resident of Seymour, been con- 
nected with the growth and welfare of the community. He has been not only an 
interested witness of the changes that the times bave brought about, but he has 
been a helpful and cooperant factor in the general advancement of this section. 
His activities in many ways have been constructive in the development, of the 
locality and everything he has been called upon to do in the interests of the 
general public he has done well. His political views are those of the democratic 
party and he has always taken an active interest in spreading the duet lines and 
principles of this great organization, and his voice in its local councils is often 
heeded and always respectfully listened to. In 1 912 his fellow citizens honored 
him with election to the highest office in their gift — the mayor's chair — and in 
the few months since he has taken up the reins of the city government lie has 
demonstrated his energy and his term of administration promises to be one of 
greatest benefit to the healthful growth of the community. ITis fraternal rela- 
tions are confined to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in the local lodge 
of which he has held all of the chairs. David II. Kerby is a successful man in 
the truest sense of the word, a man unusually broad-minded and intelligent, tol- 
erant and with wide experience. Never mercenary or grasping and always believ- 
ing in something greater than mere material wealth, he has in the course of his 
life, which he has spent simply and unostentatiously, become a factor for good 
in his community in almost every phase of endeavor. Quick to discriminate 
between the essential and non-essential not only in matters of law. but also in 
public affairs, his varied activities redound to his own credit and to his individ- 
ual success, while they have been for the benefit of the community as well. 



GEORGE ELMORE. 



George Elmore, now living retired in Seymour, has had a Long and active 
business career characterized by many changes in occupation and location, all 
of which have materially advanced his interests. Prom 1890 to 1903 lie was in 
the coal mining business in this city and by years of earnest and well directed 
work earned the retirement he is now enjoying. lie was born in New York. 
April 22, 1846, and is a son of Daniel and Helena (Yager) Elmore, both natives 
of that state, the former of English descent and the latter of German Lineage. 
The father of our subject was a .Methodist minister and was also active at carpen- 



1- LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

tering Ee and bis wife became the parents of eighl children: Mary J. and 
M. P., both of whom have passed awaj ; Juliel M., a resident of Lodi, New York . 
Carrie, deceased; Sylvester; Celestia, who-,, home is in the state of New York; 
I-'. I. Day, who "as killed in the <'i\il war: and George, of this review. 

George Elmore acquired Ins education in New Fork, where he attended an 

academy, ami after laying aside ins I ks In- left home ami rlerkod in a groni\ 

store in Illinois for some time L spenl one year traveling for a aurserj 

concern, but finally returned to New ^'oI■k and resumed ins studies In 1866 
in- came west, locating in Wyoming, where he obtained employmenl with the 
Wyoming < loal < lompanj . acting for about four years as supei intendent of mini's. 
In 1869 he went east on a visit and remained in New York until April of the 
following year, when he wenl to Clinton, Iowa, and then- established himself 
in the retail wood, coal and ice business. At the expiration of four years he 
went to British Columbia and was successful as a fur trader until 1890. This 
period of Ins life was extremelj interesting, as during the time he traveled over 
the greater pari of northern Canada, journeying on the Fraser river almost to 
its source in search of furs. During that lime he opened a trading posl and 
this was so signally successful that he gave his entire attention to the business, 
establishing posts at various points, lie was in partnership with Ins brother, 
M. P. Elmore, and together they seemed a gratifying patronage, becoming mi,- 
cessful ami well known as reliable fur traders. In 1890 .Mr. Elmore returned 
to Iowa, settling in Seymour, where, with his In-other. M. p. Elmore, ami R. II 

Armstrong, he purchased the Sunshin tal mine, which he operated until 1903, 

wh. n thej dispose,! of the enterprise and .Mr. Elmore retired. 

In ls?l Mr. Elmore married Miss Luella Maple, a daughter of Henrj and 
Mai-ia Maple, of Illinois, the former oi whom passed away when Mrs. Elmore 
was still a child. Mr. Klmore gives Ins political allegiance to the republican 
partj ami is public-spirited and progressive in his citizenship. In 1896 his fel- 
low eiti/ens called upon him to accept the office of mayor and he did such able, 
progressive, straightforward and businesslike work that in 1908 he was again 
chosen to the office. He is a man of marked intelligence and greal force o 
acter, whose natural ability makes him an ideal leader of public thought and 
opinion. 



OSBORN BRADLEE COBB 

Osborn Bradlee Cobb, cashier id' the Allerton Stat,- Bank, for manj 
gave In; exclusive attention to agricultural pursuits, with which lie is -till 
, agaged, being the owner of a highly cultivated and well improved farm of two 
hundred ami thirty acres, located in the vicinity of Allerton. A native of New 
Hampshire, his birth occurred at Hart's Location, Carroll county, that state, on 
May 11. 1859, his parents being Samuel I-'. and Harriet (Bradlee) Cobb. The 
father was a native of Maine and the mother of Massachusetts, but the} « 
married m the last named state, whence thej subsequently removed to New 
Hampshire, settling at Hart's Location, There Samuel I-'. Cobb engaged in 

tling until 1869, when osed of his interests and removed to Iowa with 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



19 



his family. He came direct to Wayne county and bought eighty acres of prairie 
land, in the cultivation of which he me1 with such success that he was later able 
to increase his holdings by the purchase of adjoining tracts, until his farm con- 
tained two hundred acres. The further improvement and cultivation of his 
place engaged his attention until his death, which occurred in March, 1901 at 
the age of sixty-seven years. The mother, who is in her eighty-second year, mm 
makes her home in Allerton. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. Cobb cum- 
bered six. three sons and three daughters, of whom our subject is the eldest. 

Osborn Bradlee Cobb, who was a lad of ten years when he came to Iowa with 
his father's family, was reared at home and educated in the public schools. He 
remained at home and assisted in the cultivation of the farm until he had 
attained his majority. The day alter he was twenty-one he left the parental 
roof and went to working for wages. The next winter he attended school and 
in the spring he began farming for himself as a renter. By the practice of 
diligence and thrift during the succeeding two years, teaching school in the 
winter and farming in the summer, he managed to save enough to enable him to 
purchase eighty acres of land, which formed the nucleus of his present valuable 
farm. He worked tirelessly, early and late, and as the years passed added to 
the value of his place by the introduction of various improvements, and as his 
circumstances permitted increased his acreage. I lis land, which has a natural 
drainage, is all under cultivation and through careful tilling and intelligent 
rotation of crops has been brought into a high state of productivity. His prin- 
cipal crops are hay and such cereals as can be used in the feeding of stock, as 
in connection with his diversified farming he is raising horses, cattle and hogs 
and does some feeding for the market. His horses, of which he has twenty 
head, are Percherons. while his hogs are thoroughbred Chester Whites. His 
cattle are high-grade Durhams, a bull and several of the cows in his herd being 
registered. The entire place is fenced with barbed and woven wire and it is 
equipped with everything needed by the agriculturist, including many modern 
conveniences and labor-saving appliances not found on the average farm. All of 
the buildings now in use on the place have been erected during the ownership of 
Mr. Cobb. His residence, an attractive two-story and basement structure, contains 
nine rooms with ample closets and pantries. Practical in design and convenient in 
arrangement, it is well adapted to meet all the needs of the family. It was erected 
in 1901 and is thoroughly modem in every respect, being provided with a light- 
ing system and furnace beat. At a convenient distance from the house are located 
the barns, one of which is thirty-six by forty-six feet and the other forty by forty 
eight feet, and the various sheds and outbuildings necessary for the protection of 
the stock and grain. The water supply for all purposes is provided by bored wells 
and a spring in the pasture. Everything about the place manifests competent 
supervision from the appearance of the fields to the condition of the stock and the 
well repaired buildings. Although his duties as cashier occupy the greater part 

of his time, Mr. Cobb directs and plans the work of the farm, in tl peratioh of 

which he is assisted by his sons. 

On the 2d of September. 1886, Mr. Cobb was married to Miss .Myrta Kil 
bourn, a daughter of John and Amy (Loomis) Kilbourn, natives of Connecticut. 
They came west in early life, settling in Portage county. Ohio. There the grand- 
father took up some land as did also her lather. The parents passed the 



20 l.l I AS AND WAYNE < OUNTIES 

remainder of their lives on the old homestead, which is oow in the possession 
of Charles Kilbourn, their son. .Mrs. Cobb was born on the 30th of March, 1861, 
and is the second in order of birth in a family of three, six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. 0. B. Cobb, as Follows: Itasca, who died al the age 

eighl months; Arlo I!., who was born on the 5th oi January, 1889, and was 
graduated from the Allerton high school with the class of 1909, following which 
he took a course in the Capital City < !ommercial College a1 Des Moines; < >lra A . 
who was born on the 4th of November, 1891, and was graduated from the Aller 
ton high school with the class of I'M I; Rola R . whose birth occurred on Novem- 
ber 25, 1893, a high school student; Lora Al.. who was born on the 6th of July, 

1897, also attending high scl I: and Laro I-'., whose natal daj was the 13th of 

Si ptember, 190] . in grammar school. 

In matters of citizenship Mr. Cobb is public-spirited, taking an active inter- 

i-st in all movements affecting the general welfare or progress of the i munity. 

II. is one of the active members of the Wayne County Farmers' Institute, 
and was presidenl of this organization for two years, while for several years 
be was presidenl of the Allerton Chautauqua Association. His political support 
he gives to the republican partj and cast Ids tirst vote for President Garfield. 
He has served with efficiency in various local offices, having been trustee or 

clerk of Warren township for sixteen years, while for four he was ; m- 

ber of the school board. Mr. Cobb is a man of good judgmenl and keen 
discernment in matters of business and has mel with more than average success 
in the development of Ins interests. lie held- stock in various local enterprises 
and is numbered among the representative citizens of the town. Progressive in 
his ideas, trustworthy in his business methods and honorable and upright in Ins 
private life, Mr. Cobb is accorded the confidence and esteem of a large circle 
of acquaintances and is considered bj those who know him a worthy representa- 
tive of one of the c ttj 's honored pi >er families 



CI.INTi»N D SMITH 



One of the most successful men of Washington township and even of 
Lucas county, is Clinton D. Smith, who with few interruptions has made 
his home in the aforementioned township since 1864. Alone various lines 
prosperity has come to- Mr. Smith, for he is no1 onlj one of the forem'osl farmers 

and BtOCk raisers of his district, marketing more hogs than any other farmer in 

Washington township, but he also owns conjointly with his brother, E. A. 
Smith, three hundred acres of choice hmd in Benton township and property 
in Russell, where he is also a director and vice presidenl of the Russell Stati 
Bank Moreover, Mr. Smith is gifted with an inventive mind, being the 

first man to receive a patent on a road drag, and he now owns a factory in 

II for the manufacture of these implements. Prosperity, even wealth, 

to Mr Smith entirely through his own efforts, for he started in a 

humble way and what he li.-is achieved well entitles him to thai distinction 

Of which an American is most proud, the righl to be called a self mad. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 23 

While Mr. Smith has made large personal gains, he has been a constructive 
factor in the development of agriculture and industries in Lucas county, and 
his attainments are largely to be considered public assets. Ever interested 
in the general welfare and material as well as moral and intellectual advance- 
ment, he has given readily of his time and means to promote worthy public 
enterprises or private enterprises which contribute to the resources of the 
section. 

Clinton D. Smith was born in Muskingum county. Ohio, August 5, 1857, 
a son of Jacob and Emmeline (Vogel) Smith, the father born in Muskingum 
county in March. 1827, and the mother a native of Germany. In 1862 the 
parents with their family, including Clinton, who was then but five years of 
age, came overland to Wapello county, Iowa, and made settlement in Blakes- 
burg, where they resided until 1864, when a removal to Washington township 
was made. The father died at Russell on the 26th of April, 1890,. The 
mother, who had more claim to be called an American than a German, for 
she was brought to this country when only a few months old, also passe I 
away in Russell. Mr. and .Mrs. Smith became the parents of six children: 
Augusta, born November 2, 1853, who married Thomas C. Thorne, a prosper- 
ous agriculturist, who operates a fine farm on section 16, Union township, and 
of whom more extended mention is made on another page of this work. Mrs. 
Adelia Thornhrue, who was born March 12, IS.")."), and who makes her home 
in Des Moines, Iowa; Clinton D., our subject; E. A., born April 22, 1859, also 
a resident of Russell and owning valuable land in partnership with our sub- 
ject in Benton township; Mrs. Violet Coen, whose birth occurred on Feb- 
ruary 15, 1861, and who makes her home in Afton, Iowa; and Mrs. Adessa 
Plotts, born January 25, 1866, who resides in Des Moines. 

Clinton D. Smith was brought, by his parents to Wapello county, Iowa, in 
1862, and in 186-1 removed with the family to Washington township, of which 
he has ever since been a continuous resident, barring some extended trips and 
vacations which he took at various times to Oklahoma, California, Texas and 
other places. An ox team was used when the family made the overland 
journey to Iowa and .Mr. Smith still has the yoke and chain in his possession. 
In the acquirement of his education he attended the pioneer schools of Wash- 
ington township and it is worthy of mention that his first teacher was John 
A. Logan. Acquiring such knowledge as the crude educational facilities of 
the time permitted, he laid aside his text-books at the usual age and early in 
life began to earn bis own support. In his early days in Washington town- 
ship he drove six yoke of oxen, breaking the prairie and preparing land for 
cultivation. Conditions were most primitive at the time and wild animals 
were yet to be found here. Rattlesnakes were plentiful and troublesome. 
His first wages after attaining manhood were fifteen dollars a month, but as 
he was frugal and saving he succeeded in laying away a portion of his earn 
ings, judiciously investing his money. Mr. Smith was one of those who at 
one time sought the opportunities Oklahoma offered to the new settler and 
was among the first to take up residence at Oklahoma City, turning the prim- 
itive press from which was issued the first edition id' the Oklahomanian. lie 
was the fifth white man in the Arapahoe and Cheyenne reservations in Okla 
homa at the time they were opened. The other four members of the parly 



24 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

were General -lames B. Weaver, Captain Couch, the postmaster of Oklahoma 
City, and the United stairs land commissioner. There were presenl a1 the 
time twelve Indian chiefs. As the years have passed Mr. Smith has become 
one of the must successful farmers, one of the largesl stock-raisers, and one 
of the wealthiesl business men of the county. Beginning by earning his 
wages in a humble way, he has amassed a fortune and his prospi ritj is to 
be ascribed entirely to his energj and perserverance Mr. Smith owns in 
partnership with his brother, E. A. Smith, three hundred acres oi cho 
land in Benton township with one set of improvements, which include sub- 
stantial and mod. rn buildings and the most up-to-date farm machinery. .Mr. 
Smith also owns over two hundred and fifty-five acres in Washington town- 
ship, upon which he lives, and considerable propertj in Russell. Moreover, 
he is connected with financial interests of the city, being a director and 
vice presidenl of the Russell State Hank, m the management of which he is 
helpful bj virtue of these positions. Mr. Smith has also been successful alo 
another line, having received a patenl on a road drag, which he now extensively 
manufactures in his own plant at Russell. This drag lias horn used in many 
parts of Iowa and Missouri and has proven successful from the start. How- 
ever, Mr. Smith gives most of Ins attention to his stock-raising interests. On 
his farm of two hundred and fifty-five acres, located on section I. Washington 

township, which is • of the most valuable properties in the entire count] 

and modi inly improved, can he found many barns and slirds for the greal 
Dumber of head of live stork that he cares for each year, lie has full-blooded 

Duroc-Jersey swine and handles a ^ 1 grade of other classes of stock, iir 

enjoys the reputation of raising more hogs in Washington township than 
any other man engaged along thai line. 

In Wayne county, Iowa, on May 7. 1896, .Mr. Smith was married to Miss 

Betty M. Wilson, who was horn at Warsaw, that county. Jul} 3, 1868. She 

grew to womanhood in that locality and there attended rum a school. 

Being particularly gifted, she studied music at Allerton, this stair, and 
afterward at Kansas city. She also acquired a serviceable hnsiness education, 
taking a course in stenography ami typewriting at Des .Moines. Iowa Her 
parents, (ireenherry and Mary Jane (Rankin Wilson, were among the early 
pioneers of Wayne county and natives of Indiana and Ohio respectively. 
The father died in Wayne county, passing awaj in earlj manhood at the 
age of thirtj eighl .wars, bul the mother now resides in Des Moines Mr. and 

Mrs. Wilson I aim- the parents of the following children, all of whom Were 

I. ..rn m Wayne county: Mrs. Cora 0. Palladay, horn May 11. 1867, who died 
in Oklahoma in 1906; Mrs. Clinton D. Smith; and Elmer P., hnm December 
in. 1871, win. died at Allerton, June 23, 1894 Mrs. Wilson married again, her 
second union being with John W. Rankin, their home now being ill I >• - 
Moines. Of this union was horn, in 1880, one son. Charles Glenn Rankin, a 

resident of Spe r, Iowa. Mr and Mrs. Smith have four children: Vogel 

Wilson, horn January 24, 1898; Lorita Colette, born March 31, 1900; Dorothy 
Margaret, January 1. 1902; and Theodore J., horn September 1. 190-1 Miss 
Lorita Smith was horn in El Paso, Texas, where the parents then sojourned, hilt 
the other children ar. natives of Washington township. All have been r Bred in 
Knssrii and an a' p" - ul attending the public schools ol the citj 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Mr. Smith took a prominenl part in the campaign of L836 using his influ 
ence for the election of Samuel J. Tilden for president. Be is a democral 
in his political beliefs and adheres to the principles of the party. Pubiic 
spirited and progressive, his attention has been given to public offiee and he 
has been a member of the school board and school treasurer of Washington 
township for twenty-four .wars. II,. is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Russell and takes an active and helpful interest in its work. At 
various times he has traveled extensively over the western and southern sections 
of the United States, visiting Oklahoma. California. Texas and >ther divisions 
of this great country. He lias thereby greatly enhanced his outlook upon life 
and has gathered valuable information and experience which have helped him 
to attain that position which he now occupies as one of the wealthiest men of 
the county. His interest in agricultural matters is also evident from the fact 
that he is a life member of the Farmers' National Congress. Mr. Smith is also 
one of the men known as commissioners from whose ranks the executive com- 
mittee of the Farmers' National Congress is chosen. Mr. Smith is the member of 
that committee from Iowa. The foregoing is but a brief account of what Mr. 
Smith has achieved in Lucas county, but those who can read between the lines 
readily perceive the chief characteristics which have led him to success. These 
are honest and fair methods, frugality, self-control, energy, perseverance and 
incessant watchfulness for opportunities, of which he has taken advantage as 
they have presented themselves. There is no one in Lucas county who begrudges 
Mr. Smith his attainments and who does not recognize that they have been fairly 
won and are well merited. They are what every American citizen tries to 
achieve, and that he has reached the goal is proof of his extraordinary qualifica- 
tions. It must not, however, be presumed that Mr. Smith has viewed his plans 
only from the point of his own progress, for he has always considered others and 
is much guided by the effect of his actions upon the general welfare. He has 
contributed much toward the satisfactory conditions that now prevail in Lucas 
county and Washington township, and his name will find a place in the annals 
of the history of this county among those men who have labored for feasible and 
lasting achievements. His citizenship is highly commendable and should serve 
as an example to the present and coming generations. 



• I. II. CLARK. 



•1. II. Clark, who has lived in this section of the slate for almost six decades. 
is one of the prosperous and popular citizens of Corydon, where for a aumber 
of years he was engaged in the mercantile business. During the past few years. 
however, he has been employed as a traveling salesman for Chicago, Pennsylvania 
and Iowa wholesale houses and in this conned ion has also won a gratifying 
measure of success. 

.Mi-. Clark was born near fort Wayne, in Adams county, Indiana, on the 28th 
of April, 1850, his parents being John and Elizabeth (Little) Clark. The father 
was born in Scott county. Indiana, on the 22d of February, 1817, while the 
mother's birth occurred in Muskingum county. Ohio, in August, 1820. In 1852 
they made the overland journey to tin- west and on the 24th of October, 1854, 



26 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

took ■ i ] > their abode among the pioneer settlers of Wayne county, Iowa, entering 
land in Union township. Only two bouses stood between Corydon and Chariton 
at thai time, and all kinds of wild game abounded. The family did all their 
trading at Keokuk and Eddyville. In 1858 John Clark abandoned general 
agricultural pursuits and embarked in the mercantile business at Freedom. A 
scrupulously honesl man himself, he took it for granted thai all people were to be 
relied upon and thus parted with his goods with bul little security. In a shorl 
time, therefore, he found himself withoul either funds or goods and his children 
were obliged to seek work in the community. Ee endured all the hardships and 
privations of pioneer life and bore his full share in the work of carls develop- 
ment and upbuilding here. His demise occurred in Page county, Iowa, in 1881, 
while his wife passed awaj al Van Wert, towa, in September, L895. Their chil- 
dren were as follows: .Mrs. .1. M. Edwards, who was born in 1837 and resides 
in Clarinda, towa; David, born in 1840, who passed away in 1900; .Mrs. William 
Barnett, whose birth occurred in 1843 and who is deceased; Z. T., born in l v 17 
who is ;i resident of Portland. Oregon; J. II.. of this review ; John I... who was 
Iioiii in 1853 and makes his home m Nebraska; .Mis. [sabelle Carver, born in 
1855, who is ,-i resident of Clarinda. Iowa: .Mrs. Rosa Rash, whose birth occurred 
in 1858, ;ni ( | who is a resident of Derby, Iowa: A. 1!.. horn in 1860, who is a 
resident of Ottumwa, Iowa; and .Mrs. Lusetta Searl. deceased. The four younger 
children were horn in Lucas countj and the older ones were natives of Indiana. 

.1. II. Clark was a little lad of two years when the family home was estab- 
lished in Wayne county, ami his youth was spent amid pioneer conditions ami 
surroundings, lie was six years old before hi' saw a piece of bacon and eighl 
years of age before he saw an apple. It was also at the age of six that he saw 
Ins first newspaper. The South Tier Democrat, the firsl year's subscription of 

which was paid for by his father with a lew timber squirrels. r»"--niL' a 

retentive memorj ami a keen sense of humor, he has often given amusement 

bj Ins recital of sonic of the experiences of his early life, lie was one of a large 
family of children, who hinl such a wide range over which to roam that on 
Sundaj morning his mother was obliged to send out a doe m order to find them 
and bring them in for a hath. Clothing was extremely scarce, not owing to 
Style, bul necessity, and Mr. Clark has said that among tin- children there was 
often not sufficient cloth to make a respectable tea jacket for a mosquito. Ik 

also avers that they ate so milch inilsh and eornhread that all the children had 
husky voices and that their ears grew abnormally large. Because of his father's 

unfortunate business venture the children, as above stated, were obliged to assist 

in the support of 1h<' family. A good farm hand at thai tunc received thirteen 
dollars per month, hut this was paid in orders on stores at Chariton ami ( 
doll and not in cash. There was a surplus of cereals and pries were 

eXlremeh low. 

Leaving the farm. Mr. Clark went to Chariton and there drove a stage for 
I. D. I.'iiiineiis & Companj and also for the Greal Western Stage Companj He 
traveled in all direct ions out of ' hariton, Indianola. Afton. Corydon ami Garden 

Grove and earned mail to Last chance, thus bee ing well acquainted with all 

tl Id settlers of I. . Wayne counties. Subsequent^ he was For t n 

bei oi years engaged in the mercantile business al Corydon, bul during the past 
years has been a traveling salesman for Chicago, Pennsylvania and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES _>7 

Iowa wholesale houses, in which connection his excellent qualifications and his 
energy have won him success. He has covered every part of the United States 
west of Chicago, and, being a close observer, has gained a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the country. lie possesses a rich fund of original wit and humor and 
is considered one of the best story tellers in Iowa, being in grea'1 demand at all 
the old settlers' meetings and the social and fraternal organizations of which he 
is a member. He is one of the men who discovered the musical talent in Blind 
Boone, the famous negro pianist, and encouraged him to go before the public. 

On the 30th of June. 1870, at Corydon. Iowa. Air. Clark was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Angeline MeVay, who was born near Sandspring, Iowa, in Novem- 
ber, 1850, her parents being John and Betty (Hardesty) McVay. natives of 
Ohio. They became early settlers of Jones county, Iowa, and in 1865 look up 
their abode in Delaware county, this state. Both passed away at Corydon, 
Iowa. Their children were as follows: Mrs. Nancy Todd, whose demise occurred 
in Ohio; H. II.. a resident of Drakesville, Iowa; Mrs. Jane Tilly, of Kokomo, 
Indiana; Mrs. Angeline Clark: Mrs. Edward Lane, of Mercer county, Missouri; 
L. P., who has passed away; and Mrs. M. E. Freeland, whose demise occurred 
at Mount Ayr. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have four children, namely: Merritt YY.. 
who was born on the 12th of August, 1872. and is a photographer of Corydon. 
Iowa; Mrs. Hollie Semple, born in 1874, who is a resident of Pasadena. Califor- 
nia ; Fred L., whose birth occurred in 1876 and who is a merchant tailor of Cory- 
don ; and Mrs. Bertha Morris, born in 1880, who makes her home at Kahoka, 
Missouri. All are natives of Corydon and all attended the public schools of 
that town, two of the children being graduated therefrom. All possess musical 
talent. While Mr. Clark has given his children every educational advantage, 
he was obliged to learn to write while seated on the floor, and the only book he 
used in the schoolroom was a speller. The family home, which he owns, is a 
commodious and well appointed residence in Corydon. 

In politics Mr. Clark is a democrat, while fraternally he is identified with 
the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Corydon. 
He and his family are members of the Christian church at Corydon. During 
practically all of his life he has been closely identified with the region where 
he now lives. He is one of its best known residents and no man stands higher 
in the estimation of the people of the community. He has attained success 
through the application of perseverance and a good judgment that have seldom 
failed to accomplish the object which he sought, and today lie enjoys the results 
of his well directed endeavors. 



GEORGE McCULLOCH, M. D. 

No history of Wayne county would be complete without a record of the 
career of Dr. George McCulloch, who, throughout the years of an uprighl and 
honorable life, has left a deep impress upon the professional and business history 
of Humeston. where for forty years he has made his home. Throughout a longer 
period he has been active in this section of the .state, and as the years have 



28 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

passed bas proved his worth as a public-spirited citizen who oever sacrifices the 
genera] good to individual interests. At present he is nol only honored in his 
profession, but as president of the Borne State Bank is one of the dominating 
figures in the business life of the city, his honesty, enterprise and resolute work 
having gained him wealth and prosperity. Dr. McCulloch was born in Eol 

county, Ohio, October 24, 1 s K and is a boh of Joseph and \',- y (Miller) 

McCulloch, natives of Pennsylvania The father died in Ohio when the subject 
of this review was only seven years of age, and the mother passed away in the 
same state at the age of seventy-nine. In their family were thirteen children: 
One who died in infancy; Eugh and James, both of whom have passed aw 
Miller R., who was a captain in the Second Kentucky Cavalry and was ki I !•< 1 
at the battle of Murfreesboro in the Civil war: David and .Mrs. Nancy Jane 
Painter, who have also passed away; Albertus P.. a veteran of the Civil war, 
who served during that conflicl as a member of an Ohio regimenl ; .Mrs. Martha 

Ann Sherlock, residing in Indiana. Joseph, who died in infancy; <l "ge, of 

this re\iew : Alfred D., postmaster a1 Eumeston, whose sketch appears elsewhere 
in this work; Joseph ('.. whose home is in Cleveland, Ohio; and Mrs. Elizabeth 
XL-He. lit' Millersburg, < Ihio. 

Dr. George McCulloch acquired Ins early education in Eolmes enmity. Ohio. 
and in l s 7l moved to Brooklyn, in Poweshiek county, Iowa, where he began the 
.study nt' medicine. Ee remained in thai section until the fall of the same year 
and then entered Rush Medieal College of Chicago. After the destruction of 
this institution by fire in 1871, he, together with practically the entire student 
body, attended the medical departmenl of the Michigan State University at Ann 
Arbor, bul completed his professional studies in Rush Medieal College, gradual 
i 1 1 •_' from that institution with the class of 1873. Ee located firsl for practice 
in Malcolm, Poweshiek county, and remained there for a short time, coming 
in Eumeston in I s "::. and has since made this city his home. At that time there 
were mi plastered houses in the community, although there was one railroad, 

ami conditions of life wei xtremely primitive. Dr. McCulloch has therefore 

seen the development of this section of Iowa and has to a greal extent been iden- 
tified with it- He firsl came to the section in order to look after eighl hundred 
acres of choice land in Richman township entered by his father, and. being 

attracted by the future possibilities which he recognized, I stablished his resi 

dence here. Be is especially fitted for the duties of a physician, for in his char 
acter ready sympathy and quickness of perception combine with a broad and 

comprehensive knowledge of the principles of medical gcie Consequently he 

fas secured a gratifying and representative patronage and is classed among the 
efficient and successful physicians in Hum. stun. 

Dr. McCulloch has also attained unusual success in the business world and 
few if any business men of Eumeston arc better known throughout this section 

than he Be stands as a central figure in banking circles here, being president 

of the Home Stat.- Bank, and his name is known and honored among tin- leading 
financiers. The Home state Bank of Eumeston was founded as a private insti 
tution in 1880 bj Mi' Bnsbrouk ami Dr. McCulloch, who conducted it in its 
original form until 1898, when it was incorporated. At present it has a capital 

uf Bixtj thousand dollars and is one of the snund. sate ami conservative financial 
titutiona of southern Iowa. As its president Dr. McCulloch 's fine business 



IJC AS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 29 

and executive ability have been called forth and the success of the bank is largely 
due to his efforts. He has given his best energies to the advancement of the 
enterprise and is widely known as one of the leading financiers in this part of 
the state. He has other important business interests and extensive propertj hold- 
ings, owning at the present time twelve hundred and twenty-four acres of choice 
land in Wayne county, upon which there are seven sets of good improvements. 
Upon these farms Dr. MeCulloch carries on the breeding and raising of high- 
grade stock, having a herd of two hundred head of registered Angus cattle. I 'pon 
one of his tracts on section 21, Richman township, the state of Iowa experiment 
station has been established. By judicious investments and the wise use of 
every opportunity Dr. MeCulloch has secured a comfortable competence which 
to a great extent has been used in a public-spirited way, since he aids and sup- 
ports all movements which have for their objeel the development and advance- 
ment of his community. 

In Holmes county. Ohio, in 18S0, Dr. MeCulloch married Miss Druscilla A. 
Maxwell, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert .Maxwell, natives of that section. 
In this family were nine children: Robert, deceased; John T.. who for three 
terms was circuit judge of Holmes county and who is still a resident of his native 
section: Mrs. Emily MeCulloch, deceased; .Mrs. Mary Ann Lower, of Indiana: 
Mrs. Mary Ann Lewis; .Mrs. Martha Vorhees and .Mrs. Lauretta Kingman, both 
deceased, the latter passing away in Des Moines: Mrs. Elvira .Mitchell, of Millers- 
burg. Ohio; and Mrs. MeCulloch. the wife of the subject of this review. Dr. 
and Mrs. .MeCulloch became the parents of two children, the elder of whom 
died in infancy. The younger son, .Milan Ellsworth, was born in Ilumeston on 
the 6th of January, 188."., and was graduated from the Ilumeston high school. 
Later he attended the State Agricultural College, studying scientific farming, 
and was for one year in Drake University and for a similar period of time in 
the State University of Iowa. For one year he acted as instructor in agriculture 
at Ames, but resigned this position in order to go to Chicago, where he completed 
a law course in the Chicago University. During the period of his residence in Iowa 
he was one of the leading figures in agricultural circles and recognized as an 
authority upon everything connected with practical, scientific farming. Me 
visited every county in the state and afterward reported agricultural statistics 
for the national government m .January. 11)11. and was also overseer of the civil 
service department of the department of agriculture, Washington, D. C. lb' 
retired from this position in March. 1912, when he located in Ilumeston to look 
after his father's farms. 

Dr MeCulloch has extensive fraternal relations. He is a member of Chnp- 
paqua Lodge. I. 0. O. F., and of Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, U & A. M., of Ilumeston. 
lb- belongs to the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Cedar Rapids, hut was initiated 
in that body at Des Moines. Li official circles, too, he is a dominating and com 
manding figure. He gives a loyal support to the men and measures ol the 
republican party, and was for twelve years a member of the Ilumeston town 
council He was in the Iowa house of representatives as a member ol the nine 
teenth. thirtieth and thirty-first general assemblies, proving himseli at all times 
high in his ideals of public service and incorruptible in Ins integrity. In 1908 
be was elected state senator and in this connection lie served tour years. His 
vote may be relied upon in support of all progressive measures and he regards 



30 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 



public office uol as an avenue to personal advancement, bul as a trusl reposed 
in him bj Ins fellow citizens. Over the record of Ins official career there Calls 
no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, Eor in this relation as in all others 

Ins work is that of a loyal, conscientious ami high-minded man. 



JUDGE VV. II. TEDFORD. 

Judge \Y. II. Tedford was limn in Blounl county, Tennessee, Noveinh 
1844, a smi, of John ami Elizabeth Ilamill Tedford, who were of Scotch 
descent All of his great-grandfathers fought on the side of the patriots in the 
Revolutionary war. It was during thai war thai John Tedford, mi.' of Ins 
great-grandfathers, was united in marriage to Marj Paxton. Marj Paxton 
hcloiiL.mil tn that celebrated familj of Virginia Paxtons from which sprung 
General Samuel Houston of Texas ami other historic characters in the ministry 
ami the profession of law. James Tedford, the grandfather no the paternal 
side was a cousin of General Houston, their mothers being Paxtons. This 
grandfather of Judge Tedford served in the War of 1812, under General Jack- 
son, with the rank of captain. After the close of the Revolutionary war Judge 
Tedford 'sgreal grandfather with all his brothers moved t" Easl Tennessee, which 
place tor seventy years was the home of Judge Tedford's ancestors. The family 
came to Louisa county, Iowa, in 1851, ami located mi a farm, where the educa- 
tion 'if ilie young man was secured, the same being such as was afforded by the 
common schools of thai early day. At the age of sixteen Judgi Tedford enlisted 
in Company !•'. Eleventh Iowa Infantry, ami served his eountrj four years, 
taking part in the great battles of Shiloh. Corinth, Vicksburg ami Atlanta. He 
was in everj battle and skirmish in which his regimenl was engaged, ami was with 
Sherman mi Ins greal march to the sea. 

Winn the <'i\il war ended Judge Tedford at once returned to his home in 
Iowa, ami a short time thereafter entered the Iowa State University, graduating 
from the law department thereiif a i the end ol two years, with the degr f I.I. I'. 

This was in 1869, and in Sept em her of the same year he sett led at Corydon, Iowa. 

and commenced the practice of law. Within a few years he built up an extensive 
practice, ami had a Leading part in all the important litigation in the county. 

The firm nf Tedford & Miles, of which Judge Tedford was a member, in tl ase 

of the State of Iowa vs. Kabrich, 39th Iowa, page 277, first took the position in 
the [owa supreme court, that the character "i ma' charged with an offense is 

in. I III isslle. unless he i II I r< il I II ei s si \iilill.e I'elallVe lllel'elo ill his defense. 

This point was sustained hy the supr.-i nut. making this the leading • - 

mi tins point, the same being cited and referred t.. by all the leading authorities 

and text writers jrirainal law. 

In. Judge has always been a republican ami was elected one of the presi 
.1. ntial electors for towa in l vv p ||,. waa elected one of the judges of the third 
judicial districl of l'>wa in 1890, and with Ins ass., .iaie. Judge Towner, was 
ananimouslj renominated in 1894, The democratic partj in the districl ratified 

the I, ination, ami their nanus were placed mi both tickets, so thai their el tction 

was unanimous. Thej were both again reelected in 1898. .\s an interpreter 




JUDGE \V. II. TEDFORD 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



33 



of the law Judge Tedford has had few equals and no superior on the bench in 
the state. In his long career on the bench, his record was remarkable, his deci- 
sions being affirmed in a very Large majority of the very few cases appealed from 
his court. In no equity ease appealed from him was he ever reversed, so that 
the bar of his district finally quit appeals from his court, where the points 
involved were of equitable proceedings. 

Judge Tedford has done much active work for his party, having spoken in 
many parts of the state, lie has been called upon to address the people pear 
after year in different parts of the state on occasions of importance. II. is 
a member of the celebrated Crocker Brigade Association, ami delivered the 

biennial address at the large reunion of tl rganization at Ottumwa, [owa, 

September 26, 1894. of which address it was said by the Ottumwa Courier: " It 
was a scholarly and masterful effort. It is unhesitatingly pronounced the finesl 
address ever heard at a (.'rocker Brigade reunion." 

The Judge after retiring from the bench because of ill health, some years after 
again returned to the practice of law, taking part in many leading cases in his 
part of the state, in which he exhibited all the power and ability of his former 
days. In 1911 he retired from practice and is now enjoying himself in the privacy 
of his beautiful home. He takes an active interest in affairs generally and 
devotes much of his time to the reading and study of the best literary works. 

He was married to Miss Emma Thomas of Corydon, June 22, 1875, to which 
union was born one child, a daughter named Eva, born July 9, 1877. The 
wife and daughter belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, and take an 
active interest in assisting in the management of its local affairs. The daughter 
was married to C. B. Miles, a prominent young merchant of Corydon. May 4, 
1899, to which union have been born two children, named Tedford and Mildred. 



A. B. CLINTON. 



Among the most valued and representative citizens of Russell is numbered 
A. B. Clinton, well known in educational circles as president of the school 
board and president of the library board of the high school, and for the past 
few years prominently connected with the postoffice department of the city. He 
was bom in Iroquois county. Illinois, duly 28, 1867, and is a son of .1. II. and 
Martha (Stevens) Clinton, natives of Ohio. The parents came to Lucas county 
in 1877 and settled in Russell, where the father died in 1899. His wife survives 
him and makes her home in Russell. Four children were born to their union. 
as follows: Mrs. Mary C. Bender, who resides in Chicago, Illinois: II. I)., post 
master at Russell; A. B., of this review; and E. B., who resides in Marshalltown, 

Iowa. 

A. B. Clinton came with his parents to Lucas county in 1S77 and acquired 
his education in the public schools of this locality. After laying aside his books 
he became an express messenger, continuing at this work lor five years, at the 
end of which time he went west, settling in Wyoming and continuing there for 
about a vear. In 1902 he returned to Russell and entered the postoffice deparl 



;i LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

in. lit. with which be lias since been connected, bis record reflecting credil upon 
Ins energj . ability and public spirit. 

Mr. Clinton married, on the 26th of April, 1899, Miss Laura Beals, who was 
horn in Lucas county, April 15, 1877, and who grew to woman] d bere; acquir- 
ing ber education in the public schools. Her parents, A. S. and Marj i Douglas) 
Beals, were born in New York and uow reside in Benton township, whither they 
came among the early settlers in 1867. Six children were hum to their union, 
four of whom still survive : A. I>.. who resides in Des Moines; .Mrs. Clinton, wife 
cit' the subjecl of this review; .Mrs. .Mary Price, of Russell; and Archie E., ;i 
residenl of Benton township. Mr. and .Mrs. Clinton bave become the parents 
of three children: A. I'... Jr., Dwighl I >. and Roberl II.. all of whom are attend- 
ing the Russell public scl Is 

Mr. Clinton is a republican in his political beliefs and is especially interested 
in the cause of education, serving at the presenl time in a progressive and effi 

cienl manner as president of the scl 1 hoard. He is in addition presidenl of 

the library hoard of the high school and his executive ability has placed the 
affairs of that body in a flourishing condition. He and his wife belong to the 
Homesteaders of Russell, of which Mr. Clinton is president, and .Mrs. Clinton 
holds membership in the Baptist church. Thej are people of exemplary char- 
acter, interested in the welfare Of Russell and anxious tO do their part ill pro 
moting its growth, and they merit and command the confidence and bigh regard 

of an extensive circle of friends. 



WILLIAM E. LEEHART 

William B. Leeharl is one of the substantia] and representative business men 
of Lucas, where he is engaged in the drug business, and he is also well known 
as a representative of one of the pioneer families here II.' was horn in Jackson 
township. Februarj 8, 1869, a son of Frederick and Cynthia (Canterbury) Lee 
I , . , t - 1 . the former horn in Mecklenburg, Germany, in 1842, and the latter in Des 
Moines county. Iowa. The parents came to Lucas county in pioneer times .Hid 

here the father turned his attention to farming, winning prosperity and su cess 

in this upation. He owns five hundred acres of land in Jackson towi 

completelj equipped and well improved, and is numbered among the most sub- 
stantia] and representative agriculturists of the community. He and his wife 

had two sons: Karl If., who was horn m Jackson township. June 26, 1867, and 
who is now residing on a farm: and William E., of this review 

William E I-- hart lmvw t alihood in this secti if the state and acquired 

his education in the common scl Is of Jackson township. He was reared to 

tl -cupation of farming and followed this pursuit after beginning his inde- 
pendent career until \^.h. when he removed to Lucas and established himself 
in the drug business with his brother Karl, who is still associated with him. The 

latter, however, does not live in the city, hut makes his horn. ..n a farm in Otter 
Creek township, where he is engaged in -lock breeding on an extensive scale. 

having a choice herd of the best grade of Hereford cattle William B. I hart 

pves Ins attention to the develo nt of tie- drug concern and has made it a 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



35 



prosperous and profitable enterprise, his upright business thods, straightfor- 
ward dealings and the fine quality of his goods being recognized in a Large and 
increasing patronage. 

On September 1, 1909, Mr. I hart married Miss Minnie A. Eughes, who was 

born in Kansas. April 27, 1882. She is a daughter of W. J. and Elizabeth I Skid- 
more) Hughes, the former of whom was horn in Morgan county, Indiana. Sep 
tember 3, 1852, while the latter was born in Brown county. Indiana. Augusl 16 
1850. They are now residing on a farm in Jackson township, where they have 
made their home for a number of years. In their family were eight children : 
Cozzie, who died in infancy: Bert, who was born September 4. 1875, and is new 
residing in Colorado: Claude, whose home is in Texas; Eugene S., deceased: 
Minnie A., the wife of the subject of this review; .Mrs. May Esther .lames, who 
was bom January 5, 1884, and who is now residing in Oakley; and Hubert, who 
was born December 10, 1885, and Willa, born November 20, 1888. both of whom 
reside on the home farm in Jackson township. Mr. and Mrs. Leeharl are the 
parents of a son. Waldron Ransom, who was born in Lucas, October ID. 19] 1. 

Mr. Leehart gives his political allegiance to the republican party and In- and 
his brother belong to Good Shepherd Lodge, No. 41 t. A. K. & A. M. They own 
a residence in Lucas and their valuable drug business in the city. The family 
are well known throughout this section of the state, where they have resided 
for many years and where the name of Leehart stands for all that is uprighl in 
business, progressive in citizenship and worthy in private relations. 



-lOIIX J. A DA. MS. 



John J. Adams, former owner, publisher and editor of tin- Seymour Leader. 
has been engaged in newspaper work since 1891. lie was born in Henry county, 
Iowa. October 12. 1867, and after having completed his education was engaged 
at various schools as a teacher for about ten years. In 1891 he bought the 
Seymour Press and retained ownership of this journal for two years, when he 
sold out and purchased the Montezuma Republican, which he disposed of in 
turn to buy the Seymour Leader. This paper was established in 1891 by A. W. 
Maxwell as a weekly publication and was run for two years thereafter as a semi- 
weekly. Mr. Adams bought out -Mi'. Maxwell in 1904 and upon acquiring the 
paper re-equipped the whole plant and installed a linotype machine to enable 
him to more quickly turn out composition anil greatly facilitate his uews service. 
By the purchase of this machine he was enabled to duplicate and even triplicate 
the local news columns and make the paper one of greal interest to the com- 
munity. He also installed new presses, which, from a typographical point of 
view, turn out a good looking sheet, and boughl at that time a greal quantity 
of new type faces, which he uses effectively For his displaj advertising columns. 
The paper was originally a democratic organ, hut in 1904 Mr. Maxwell changed 
its politics to that of the republican party. It is an eight page publication, well 
arranged, and carries a creditable quantity of local display advertising, which 
is ever increasing. The news columns are of the greatest interest ami Mr. Adams 
endeavored to give a complete account of all the happenings of the community 



:;,; LI CAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

and vicinity, also giving sufficienl space to state and national politics and g. □ 
eral I|;| I'1" am & • ll ' over the world of importance. His editorials were forceful 
' " ,| alwavs st00d ''"'• the promotion and betterment .if the city and its people 
H« advocated clean pontics in local as well as in state and national matters and 

Ins editorials had a decided influence up< ublie opinion in this section. .Mr. 

A,l; "" s ' "' ""' conduct of Ins paper, also underwenl the vicissitudes so many a 
publisher experiences who freelj and openlj utters In. opinions upon anj ques- 
""" " r circumstance. In 1907 he was sued as the owner of the paper tor five 
thousand dollars in a libel suit. bu1 won out on t|„. decision. At thai time he 
iu,i accused one of the citizens in the district as a whiskey peddler, bul in this 

sun Ins assertion could not be disproved. .Mr. Adams became a power For g I 

in tins locality through the medium of hi. valuable paper and his influence in 
,llr local councils of the republican party, to which he belongs is widelj felt. 
His paper always advocated righteousness and stood tor those measures which 
will ultimate!} resull to the benefil of the city ami its people an. I he is .-, foe 
io underhand political methods, grafl and lawlessness. On the 1st of August 
1913, Mr. Adams sold the paper to I,. \. Glassburn. 



THOMAS C. THORNE 



Aspiril of enterprise and progress has actuated Thomas C. Thome in all the 
activities of his career ami has hem the most importanl elemenl in the attain- 
ment of the success which he todaj enjoys. He owns and operates three hundred 
ami twenty acres of tine land lying on section Hi. Union tow nship and is classi d 
nh the representative' and progressive agriculturists of this locality. He was 
horn in Henrj COUnty, Illinois. December 6, 1851, and is a son of William and 

Sophronia (Metcalf) Thome, the former bor i the Atlantic ocean and the 

latter in Maryland. The parents came overland in 1 v. t and were an g the 

pioneers in Linn county, Iowa, where the father followed farming for a uumber 
of years [n 1869 thej came to Lucas county, Washington township, and here 

William Thome passed awaj in 1888. His wife survived him a i ber oi years 

dying in Union township, this county, in 1901, Pour children were horn to their 

union: YV. A., who died in Cedar Rapids, [owa; Thomas ('.. of this review. 

I> C, residing in Floyd county; ami one child who died in infancy. 

Thomas C. Thorne was three years of age when his parents made then- over- 
land journey into Iowa and in L869 accompanied them to Washington township. 
Lucas county, when- he has since remained an esteemed and respected resi 
dent. A few years after his arrival here he turned his attention to farming and 
tlie years since that time have brought him success, prominence ami substantial 
fortune as a result of Ins well directed and energetic labors 1 1 is farm is today 
one of the finest in this part of the state. H rises three hundred and twenty 

acres on section 16, Union township, ami is equipped with two set. ,,i good 
improvements. Mr. Thorne never neglects anything which will add to its attrac- 
tive appearance or its value, and the entire property reflects his careful super- 
\ ision ami practical methods 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES ;;; 

On the 8th of September, 1S74. Mr. Thome was united in marriage to Miss 
Augusta Smith, who was horn in Muskingum county, Ohio. November 2, 1853. 
a daughter of Jacob and Emmeline (Vogel) Smith, the former a native of 
Muskingum county, horn in March, 1827, and the latter a native of Germany. 
The parents moved to Wapello county, Iowa, in the spring of 1862 and settled 
in Blakesburg, where they resided for a number of years. The father died at 
Russell, this state, on the -Jtith of April. 1890. The mother, who was brought 
to America when she was a few months old. also passed away in Russel. Six 
children were horn to their union: Mrs. Thome, wife of the subjecl of this 
review; Mrs. Adelia Thornbrue, who was horn March 12, 1855, and who now 
resides in Des Moines. Iowa; C. D., who was horn August 5, 1857, now a resi- 
dent of Russell, Iowa; E. A., who was horn April 22, 1859, also a resident of 
Russell; Mrs. Violet Coen, whose birth occurred February 15, 1861, and who 
makes her home in Afton, Iowa; and Mrs. Adessa Plotts. who was born Janu- 
ary 25. 1866, and who now resides in Des Moines. Mr. and Mrs. Thorn'e have a 
son, Harry Eugene, who was born at Russell, January 17, 1882, and who lives 
with his parents; and an adopted daughter, Ruth Adelia, who was horn Decern 
ber 5. 1S97, and who has just completed the eighth grade in the common schools 
Mr. Thorne gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and as a 
•public-spirited and loyal citizen takes a great interest in community affairs, 
although he is not an active politician. He is connected fraternally with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his wife have an extensive circle 
of friends and are highly esteemed and respected in Union township, where 
their excellent qualities of mind and character are known and recognized. 



JOSEPH E. FERREL. 



Joseph E. Ferrel is one of the highly successful agriculturists and stockmen 
of Warren township, where he owns a hundred and sixty acres of section 4, 
which constitutes one of the valuable farming properties of that locality. He is 
a native of Wayne county, his birth having occurred on the 17th of February, 

1865. and a son of John and Reb -a (Reese) Ferrel. The parents were born. 

reared and married in Pennsylvania, whence they removed to Iowa in 1855, local 
ingin this county. Here the lather purchased a hundred and twenty acres of raw 
land, to which he added from time to time until he became the owner of over five 
hundred acres, in the cultivation and improvement of which he diligently 
engaged until his death, which occurred in 1888 at the age of sixty-six years. 
He had long survived the mother, who was forty when she passed away in 1S7I. 
They were the parents of nine children, our subject being the sixth in order 

of birth. 

There was no evenl of especial importance in the early hie oJ Joseph E. 
Ferrel to distinguish his youth from that of the average lad who was reared 
in this section of Iowa during the pioneer period. He remained a1 borne and 
assisted in the cultivation of the farm until he was twenty-two. when he started 
out to make his own way in Life. Believing that the west afforded better oppor- 
tunities to young men of limited capital, he wont to Nebraska and bough! a tree 



18 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



claim, and a quarter section thai had been proved up, all of which he still 
owns, and applied himself to its improvemenl and cultivation Eor seven years. 
Returning to [owa in the fall of 1893, he boughl eighty acres of land in this 
county and here resumed his agricultural pursuits Hi subsequently increased 

his holdings bj the purchase on on asion of an adjoining eightj acre trad 

and on another of a forty, and there engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising with a good measure of success until 1904. In the year last named he 
disposed of his farm and removed to his presenl place, formerly the property 

of his father-in-law, J. \V. Smith. Tl utire trad has been brought into a high 

state of cultivation, while its value has been further enhanced bj substantial 
improvements, including large, commodious barns, ample sheds and outbuild 
mil's, and a comfortable residence. These improvements were all made by Mr. 
Smith, who also fenced the entire holding, while Mr. Fen-el is making it hog 
tight. Mr. Perrel is largely planting his fields to haj and -rr-.-iiu. and in con- 
nection with his general farming he is engaged in stock-raising, and i- meeting 
with a good measure of success in both lines of his business. He specializes in 
the raising of Duroc-Jersey hogs, which he feeds for the market, his herd a\ 
aging a hundred head. 

In 1887, Mr. Perrel was married to .Miss May Smith, a daughter of J. W. 
and Martha (Beard) Smith, natives of Illinois. They came t>> [owa in the 
earlj '50s, settling in this county, where the mother passed. away in 1905. The 
father, who is one of the few surviving pioneer farmers of Wayne county is now 
seventj two years of age and makes his home with our subject. Mrs. Ferrel, 
whose natal day w;is the L'4th of March, 1868, is the elder in a family of two. 
To Mr. and .Mrs. Perrel there have been born one daughter and two sons 
follows: Edith ().. who is attending Drake University at 1 >es Moines: and 
Bar! -I. and I I;., both of w horn are ;ii homi 

The parents are eonsistenl members of the Christian church of Allerton, 
in which Mr. Perrel holds the office of deacon. Politically he supports the 
democratic party, and although he has never figured in the official life of the 

community, he is nol at all remiss in matters .if citizenship bul extends his 

indorsement to all movements he feels will promote the progress or development 
of the county. Mr. Perrel is leading an active life and directing his under 
takings in a well organized ami capable manner as is evidenced bj the appearance 
and condition of his farm, which pays tribute i" his skill as an agriculturist no 

l.ss i han tu his business abilil v. 



II; WK C. I.AKIMKK 



Ai g tin hiL'hl.\ estee d citizens of Chariton is Frank C. Larimer, who 

after engaging along various lines is nov connected with the firm of Hollinger 
& Larimer, the junior partner being Ins brother, Mr. Larimer underwenl many 
hardships and handicaps during his career, bul he has conquered such as could 
bi conquered and in a Christian spirit has contented himself in carrj thi 
burdens which inexorable fate imposed upon him. Mr Larimer was born in 
Chariton township now Lincoln township . November 30, 1864, a sun of Wilson 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



39 



le \v;is 



King Larimer, a native of Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, where In 
born October 27. 1828, who died in Chariton, Iowa, in 1896, as one of its mosl 
prominent citizens. The father came to Lucas county overland at an early day 
and settled on a farm in Chariton township. Not only was he one of the pio 
neers but he was also active politically, having been Eor many years county 
surveyor and for six years clerk of the courts. It is significant that he was 
elected to the latter office on the democratic tickel in a strongly republican 
county. The mother of our subject was .Margaret Young, a native of Ohio, who 
also has passed away at Chariton. Her father, E. 1'. Young, was one of the very 
early pioneers of Lucas county, having in the early days removed his log 
cabin from the eastern pail of what is now Lincoln township to Chariton with 
an ox team. He endured all the privations incident to pioneer life when there 
were few settlements and distances between neighbors were such that communi- 
cation was difficult. Mrs. Margaret Larimer by a previous marriage had one 
daughter. Mrs. Best, whose husband is one of the prominent contractors of 
Chariton. Mr. and .Mrs. Wilson K. Larimer had five children: Belle, residing 
in the old Larimer home at Chariton; Frank ('., of this review: Mrs. Ollie 
Holmes, of Chariton; Edward P.. of Seymour, Iowa ; and Horace G., of Chariton. 

Frank C. Larimer, in the acquirement of his education, attended the common 
schools and later a private school at Chariton conducted by Mrs. Frank Stuart. 
He was reared and grew to manhood in Chariton township (now Lincoln) and 
has always been a resident thereof. In the earlier years he followed farming 
until he moved to Chariton, where for fifteen years be was engaged as a painter 
and contractor and also followed railroading for some time, lie then conducted 
a store in Russell and passed two years in Des Moines. At the present he is 
clerking in the store of Hollinger & Larimer, his brother being the junior part- 
ner. He has in his possession all the earlier records of Chariton township. 
which have come to him through his father, who made them when he held the 
position of surveyor. 

Frank C. Larimer was united in marriage, in 1892, to Miss Emma Myers, 
who was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. Her parents subsequently made 
removal to Lucas county. They were Isaac and Ann (Campbell) Myers, natives 
of Pennsylvania and now both deceased, having passed away in Chariton. The 
death of the mother occurred in June. 1913. Mr. and .Mrs. .Myers had five chil- 
dren: Mrs. Maggie Badger, whose husband is rural free delivery carrier in 
Chariton; Mrs. Larimer, the wife of our subject; Mrs. Cora Herd, of Los 
Angeles. California; Samuel, deceased; and Anna, of Chariton. The three 
elder children were born in Pennsylvania and the younger two in Lucas 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Larimer became the parents of one son. Willard Kelvin, 
born February (i. 1902, who died May (i. 1912. His untimely death was a sad 
blow to the parents, who already had suffered greal afflictions, for Mr. Larimer 
had been unfortunate in sustaining severe injuries while in the contracting and 
painting business, and in addition to this Mrs. Larimer became an invalid. 
Then, to fill their cup of sorrow, the sad death of their only son and child 
occurred when he was accidentally drowned. 

Politically, Mr. Larimer is a democrat and fraternally a member id' the 
Masonic lodge of Chariton and also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is an honorarv member of the volunteer fire department of this city. Mrs. 



I" LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Larimer is a member of the United Presbyterian church of Chariton, in the 
work of whirl, she takes an active and helpful interest. Both she and her hus 
band enjoy in a large measure the confidence and good-will of their fellow 
citizens and are highly respected and esteemed wherever known. They reside 
in a handsome home in Chariton, which Mr. Larimer owns, beside another 
dwelling thai is rented out. 



WILLIAM II EARNEST, M. D. 

Dr. William II. Earnest has not only attained prominence along professional 
lines as an able physician and surgeon, bul is also a land owner of Waj oe county, 
holding title to valuable propertj . More than that, he is entitled to high i redit 
for the services which he rendered his country at the time of the greal c< aflicl 
between the north and south. w hen he foughl in the ranks of the Union for the 
preservation of its entity. William 11. Earnest was horn in Pennsylvania, 
November 26, L848, and is a son of Isaac and .Mary (Bennett Earnest who 
were both natives of Pennsylvania and descendants of families who were old 
settlers of thai state. Mrs. .Mary Earnesl was a daughter of Joseph and .Alary 
Bennett and died when our subjeel was an infant of only one and a half years. 
Ili- father also passed away in his native state. 

Dr. Earnesl removed with his grandfather, Joseph Bennett, to Ohio when 
only five wars of age and there he was reared and received his early education 
Being studious by nature, a professional eareer appealed to him and he subse 
quently matriculated in the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery, from 
which he was graduated with distinction as M. D. in 1870, and thereafter prac 
ticed his profession for one year in Ohio. In 1871 he came to Seymour, Iowa, 
and opened an office. Bj his kindly ways, his thorough knowledge and his wide 
experience he gradually succeeded in building up an extensive and gratifying 
practice, and as his reputation spread his patients became more numerous. For 
ahout a quarter of a century he faithfullj served humanity, alleviating its suf 
fering and h\ his skill bringing hack to health those afflicted. It was not only. 
however, thai he helped by his knowledge and his skill, hut in his quiet, 
unassuming way he inspired that confidence and by his kindliness inspired thai 
cheerfulness which broughl back many from the brink of serious sickness, [n 
L895 hi withdrew from active practice and has since lived retired in Seymour 
Prosperity came to 1dm from his labors, and. seeking local investment, he placed 
his money largely m farm land and today owns valuable agricultural property 
in Wayne county, from which he receives excellent returns 

In 1869 Dr W. II. Earnesl married Miss Eliza J. Crawfis, of Ohio. who. how- 
ever, died alter only one year of marital happiness, leaving a son. Charles K . 
who is now engaged in the grocery husmess m Seymour. In 1872 Dr Earnest 
was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Rodgi rs, the event taking place at Sej 
mour. She is a daughter of Mr. ami Mrs Kelson Rodgers, the former a pros- 
perous fanner of this section, w ho had conic with his wife from Pennsylvania 

to I. .v.. i at an earl} day. To the sec | union ot Dr. Earnest was horn a 

daughter, Marcia, who married A G Widmer, who is one of tl wners of the 




DR. WILLIAM II. EARNEST 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 43 

Numa Block CoaJ Company and the Prairie Block Coal Company. Dr. and Mrs. 
Earnest arc members of the Presbyterian church, taking an active and helpful 
interest in the affairs of that organization. 

Dr. Earnest is a republican and although his professional duties have been 
manifold and exacting, be has found time to take up public position, and served 
as county coroner for some time, while he also acted as United Stales pension 
examiner. In 1864, when only fifteen years of age, his boyish spirit stirred by 
the all-pervading patriotism of those times, he enlisted with the One Hundred 
and Fiftieth Ohio Infantry as volunteer and also served with the One Hundred 
and Eighty-ninth Regiment, being mustered out with honorable discharge at 
the close of the war. Although a mere boy, he never faltered in the performance 
of any duty or task assigned him, however arduous, however hazardous, his 
valor, his zeal and his devotion to his country awakening and inspiring courage 
in men many years his senior who served with him in the ranks for the preserva- 
tion of the Onion. Dr. Earnest's fraternal associations extend to the Masonic 
order and the Grand Army of the Republic. In the former he is a blue lodge 
Mason, a Knight Templar and a Shriner, while in the latter he is affiliated with 
William Kellogg Post. Xo. 18(5. of which he has served as commander. In the 
latter connection he meets his comrades of yon- and there finds that spirit which 
keeps alive the flame of patriotism and devotion to one's country which makes 
life more noble and more sacred. There have been no spectacular phases 
in the life record of Dr. William Earnest, but his history is one of those which 
tell of the simple life led in the right direction, and which inspire and encourage 
others by what has been accomplished through energy, ambition, kindness and 
character. 



IIEXRY S. BROWN. 



The death of Henry S. Brown in Humeston in 1911 marked the passing of 
one of that sturdy band of pioneers who founded the civilization of the central 
west and laid the foundations of its future development. At the time of his 
death Mr. Brown was ninety-three years of age and had lived for upwards of 
half a century in Wayne county, so that In- was among its oldest residents, hav- 
ing been a witness of its growth and advancement through fiftj years of an 
honorable and worthy life. He saw the broad prairies converted into productive 

fields and in ail of the work of progress was an active participant, his li uiali- 

ties of mind and character gaining him the unqualified respect and esteem of 
his fellowmen. 

Henry S. Brown was born in Swedesboro, New Jersey. November 3, 1818, 

the same year which marked the birth of <,h n Victoria. His parents were 

poor and he had therefore the advantages of only a common school education 
and was obliged to lay aside his books at the hut of fourteen in order to begin 
his apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade, lie became very proficienl in this 
work and followed it successfully for a uumber of years, finally establishing a 
shop of his own at Shiloh. Before he left New Jersey, on -Inly 21, 1842, .Mr. 



44 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Brown married Miss Ruth D. Wesl and after the evenl itinued working at 

his tr.nlr until ls.1i). when, attracted by the growing prominence of the central 
west as a productive farming region, he and his young wife began their journej 
westward to casl their lo1 in a countrj which was then a frontier wilderness 
Theywenl to Buffalo by rail and From there bj way of the Greal Lakes to Chicago 
and tlit'iMv tn I'eoria, Illinois. .Mr. Brown boughl a farm of eighty acres six- 
teen miles northwesl of Eenry, in Stark county, and began its improvemenl in 
connection with liis work as a blacksmith. In the developmenl of the farm he 
was ably assisted by liis wife, who proved herself a worthy ami courageous help- 
mate for the pioneer, ami together they carried forward the work of improving 
their holdings, becoming finally the possessors of one of the Bnesl farms in thai 
pari of Illinois, In L870 they sold this propertj and moved to Richman town- 
ship. Wayne county, Iowa, where .Mr. Brown purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres, located three miles northwest of Bumeston The years broughl him pros 
perity as the resull of his well directed labor and each season more abundant 
harvests rewarded his rare and labor, ami a1 li ogth ho retired from active life, 
moving in 1880 into Bumeston, where ho established a homo and where the 
remaining years of his life wore spent. 

.Mi-. Brown was particularly happy and fortunate in his home life, his wife 
being a true and worthy helpmate during their sixty-five years of married life. 
They became the patents of nine children, lout- of whom are still living, namely: 
Mrs. John McKinnon, of Viola, Illinois: II. II.. who is agenl for the Colorado 
Springs & ('ripple Creek short Line Railroad, with headquarters in Colorado 
Springs; R. ,\., ,-i farmer residing in Farson, Wyoming; and Mrs. Aha Humes- 
ton, of Bumeston. One of the most interesting events m the career of Mr. and 
Mrs. Brown was the celebration in L892 of then- -olden wedding anniversary, 
when till of their children and grandchildren and their many friends gathered 
at then- home to congratulate them upon the event and to wish them many more 
years of happj life. The companionship between Mr. and Mrs. Brown was 
broken by death in 1907, when, on April 21s1 of thai year, the mother was called 
to her final rest. While preparing breakfasl on the L3tb of April she was 
stricken with apoplexj ami fell across Mr. Brown's lap. pining him to the chair 
in such a way thai he was unable to move. Miss Battie Bumeston, a grand- 
daughter, was awakened by Mr. Brown's cries, ami with the assistance of her 
mother placed Mrs. Brown in bed, from which she uever again arose, passing 
awaj on Sunday, April 21st, a1 four o'clock, she was .me of the true pioneer 

women of the central west and her life was filled with g lies., love and help 

ful service, she was an untiring worker in the cause of temperance, serving as 
president of the Women's christian Temperance Union tor several years and 
upon the committee of ladies organized to break up the saloon business in 
Bumeston. The sorrow at her death was widespread and sincere, for she had 
manj friends in Bumeston and throughout Wayne countj who had Keen drawn 

to her by her kindness, her helpfulne8S and her true and worthj life. She ami 
l„ ,■ husband bel or many years to the Baptisl church, bul after they 

moved into Humeston joined the christian denomination, of which they were 
active supporters for a number o Mr Brown survived his wife until 

I'll i. when he passed away al the advanced age of ninety-three, his death ending 
a life honorable, loyal and upright in its purposes and high and loftj in its 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



15 



aims and ambitions. A broad sympathy and a true kindness of heart endeared 

him to mam- friends, for whom "Grandpa" Brown always had a cl ry word 

and a helping hand, and his death was a great loss to Wayne county in the ranks 
of her successful pioneers. 



GEORGE MOSER. 



Throughout the years of an aetive, useful and honorable life, George Moser 

has worked his way upward from poverty to a position of prominence and influ- 
ence, facing defeat, overcoming obstacles, meeting reverses with high confidence 
and courage and advancing steadily to final triumph. The record of his life 
furnishes splendid examples of the compelling power of honesty and industry 
and of the value of ambition and determination in the development of a sue 
cessful career, for he started out in life emptydianded and is today one of the 
largest shippers of stock in Wayne county. Mr. Moser is one of the many 
sturdy, energetic, capable and enterprising men whom Germany has given to 
America. He was burn in Wittenberg, April 24, 1866, and is a son of B. and 
Ushler (Scbaefer) .Moser, natives of the fatherland, the former of whom died 
in Humeston in 1911 and the latter in the same city in 1899. In this family 
were six children, all born in Germany: John, who is residing in Clay town 
ship; George, of this review; Matthew, who is assisting his brother George in 
the conduct of his meat market; Mrs. Barbara Waite, of Idaho; .Michael, who 
died in 1906; and Mary, who passed away at the age of fourteen. 

George Moser spent Ins early childhood in his native country, but in 1881 
came to America with his parents, settling first in Aurora, Illinois, where he 
remained for one year and a half. In 188:; hi' came to Wayne county and has 
resided here ever since At the time of his arrival he possessed a capital of six 
dollars and fifty cents, but his assets in determination and ambition were unlim- 
ited, and with characteristic energy he set himself to work out an honorable 
career. For two years he engaged as a eommmon laborer and then for an equal 
period hired out by the month at farm labor. 

The four years after this were spent in railroad work. Mr. Moser in the mean- 
time saving every penny over his living expenses and investing his money in a 
judicious manner. In this way he acquired enough to stuck a farm and he 
therefore rented land and engaged in general agricultural pursuits. For two 
years he developed this property and was just beginning to make sonic progress 
toward success when his farm buildings and all of Ids stock were destroyed by 
lire. At this time also his wife, who had aided him in his reverses and shared 
his hardships, passed away, leaving him to face a situation that would have dis- 
couraged an ordinary man. However, with renewed energy Mr. .Moser set himself 
to repair his fortunes and at length became interested in the live stock busi- 
ness, shipping his own animals. Gradually he extended his activities to include 
the buying, selling and shipping of other stock, and at length Ids patronage 
increased and extended until today he has become one id' the largesl stock deal 
ers in Wayne county. In 1906 lie purchased a meat markel in Humeston and 
in addition to this owns and operates live hundred and ten acres of land, with 



It, I.I CAS AND WAYNE COI \TIKs 

three sets of improvements. His farming, stock raising and meal business be 
carries on practically as one enterprise, displaying in the managemenl of his 

nsive business interests thi executive force and power of control upon which 
bis success is founded. 

.Mr. Moser bas been twice married. In 1891 he wedded .Miss Bertha Ruff, 
who was horn in Clay township and who passed away in the same section in L892. 
One child, Ernest, was horn to this union. In 1893 Mr. Moser married Miss 
Emma Grouch, a nam, of Iowa. l,om March 7. I860. She is a daughter of .Mr. 
and .Mrs. James Grouch, both of whom have passed away. .Mr. and .Mrs. Mosi r 
have one son, Leo, who was horn in clay township, June I. L897. The family 
reside in a beautiful home just south of the city, in Richman township, and are 
will known throughout the entire community. 

.Mr. Moser gives hi- allegiance to the progressive party and is active and pro- 
gressive in all matters of citizenship, serving at the present time as a member 
of the town council. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. II,' is todaj on,- ,,i the prominenl and representative men in Eumes 
ton and is a valuable addition to the ranks of its citizenship. Coming penniless 
and unknown from Germany over a quarter of a centurj ago, he has fully real- 
ized the hope which brought him to our shores, regarding America as another 
name for opportunity. The record of his courageous, sturdy and undaunted 
struggle againsl ohstacles and reverses and the final triumph of his successful 
life max well serve as a spur to others equally unfortunate and as a hope and 
inspiration to t hose w ho come after. 



FLOYD E. PARE 



Floyd B. Farr is the proprietor of the Rexall Drug Store and is me of 
the most able, progressive and successful business men of Bumeston. He was 
born in .Macon. Missouri. January t. 1878, and is a son n[ William E. and Ilattic 
Sagiser Farr and a grandson of Edward Farr who lost his life during the 
Civil war. The father of our subject was horn in .Missouri. December 9, 1852. 
ami is at presenl residing in Kansas City, at the age of sixtj years. His 
was a native of Pennsylvania, horn October 17. 1854, and her death occuried 
,in the 26th of November, 1898. In their family wee three sous, all of ".horn 
were born m Macon. Missouri, namely: Floyd E., of this review; Sydney I '• . 
a resident of Kansas City, Missouri; and Homer I... also a resident of that city. 
Iii the acquiremenl of an education Floyd E. Fan- attended the public 
schools of Macon. Missouri, and Cowgill, of the same stale When fie began 
his active career he came to llumestoii and entered the emploj ol II C. Ad\ . 

who was engaged in the drug business here, and afterward he was with the 
Benge Drug Company. When Mr. Farr left his firsl position he wenl to 
Corydon as manager of the Shipley Drug Company in thai city bul eventually 

he returned to Humeston and reentered the emploj of the Bengc Drug C 

pany. Afterward lie went into bus ss for himself, conducting a drug store 

,,,- | lls own ,.,, Cambria for two years, disposing ol his enterprise in order to 
one the managemenl of the Stevens Drug Store in Kansas City, where be 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 17 

remained for six months. At the end of that time he returned to Humeston 
and purchased his present establishment, which he has sine,, conducted. The 
scope of the business has been expanded beyond the limits of Mr. Parr's original 
idea and the store now contains departments in which are handled wallpaper. 
paints. Eastman kodaks, Edison phonographs. Ilaviland ehinaware, silverware 
and jewelry, besides a complete stock of drugs and drug sundries. .Air. Parr 
is also agent for the famous Rexall remedies. Matson Bennett has been assisting 
him in the conduct of his establishment for the pasl three years and Theophile 
Kaznearchak is at the head of the jewelry department. His store is one of the 
finest of its kind in this part of Iowa, its flourishing condition being entirely 
due to the earnest and well directed efforts of the owner, who is a shrewd, 
able and resourceful business man and a powerful factor in the general commer- 
cial growth of his community. 

On November 29, 1899, Mr. Parr was united in marriage to Miss Elsie B. 
Humeston, who was born in White Breast. Lucas county, Iowa. November 29, 
1879. a daughter of Alva and Annie E. (Brown) Humeston. the former a 
native of Trumbull county, Ohio, born August 12. 1852, and the latter of Start 
county, Illinois. The Humeston family is one of the oldest and most prominent 
in this part of Iowa and Alva Humeston is one of the broad, liberal-minded 
and public-spirited citizens of the community in which he resides. Mr. ami 
Mrs. Parr have become the parents of one daughter, Helen Maxine, who was 
born in Humeston, January 14. 1906. Mrs. Parr is a member of the Christian 
church. 

Fraternally Mi'. Parr is affiliated with Fidelity Lodge, No. 228. A. F. & A. M., 
and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. He is widely 
known in his locality, where he has lived for many years, his upright and hon- 
orable character winning for him the confidence and esteem of all with whom 
he is associated. His career furnishes a splendid example of the power and 
force of determination and enterprise, for his path to success has been by no 
means dear of obstacles. His stock was twice destroyed by fire, once at Cambria 
and once at Humeston. hut -Mr. Parr did not allow himself to become dis- 
heartened, facing his reverses with confidence and courage and finally winning a. 
substantial measure of prosperity. 



.]. HERBERT PARK. 



J. Herbert Park has been a resident of Wayne county for forty years. Dur 
ing that time he has witnessed the growth and development of this section ol 
the state and has been a powerful individual force in Us agricultural and busi- 
ness development, many of the leading banks in Lucas and Wayne counties 
owing their foundation to his initiative spirit and their development to Ins 
ability and enterprise, an. I his eighl hundred ace farm standing as a conclusive 
evidence of his energy and ability. His record may well serve as a source of 
inspiration and encouragement, showing what may be accomplished bj ind] 
vidual effort when intelligently directed, for it has been by his own Labors that 



is LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

he has gained the prominenl position which he now occupies among men of 
marked ability and substantial worth in Ins community. 

•I. Eerberl Park was born in Warren county, Illinois. October 28, 1843, and 
is a son of Warren and Sophia ("Wheaton Park, aatives of Massachusetts, the 
former born in L806 and the latter in 1816. The Park family is one of the 
oldest in America and was founded here bj a representative of the line who 
located in Massachusetts in L635, settling on the spol where Earvard College now 
stands. There is still extant and in the possession of the subjecl of this review 
.1 genealogical record extending back eighl generations. It contains the names 
of J. Herberl Park's great-grandfather, Samuel Park, who was a member of 
the Massachusetts general courl during the Revolutionary war. his grandfather, 
John Park, wounded in King Philip's war, anil Ins paternal grandmother, who 
was a member of the famous Adams familj of Massachusetts, from which Presi- 
dent John Quinc} Adams came. The parents of the subjecl of this review were 
pioneers in Illinois, having settle,! in Warren county, that state, after the 
Black Hawk war. Both died in Benderson county, the father in L886 and the 
mother in 1904. Among their children were: Russell, who has passed away; 
Mrs. Mary Calista Anderson, who resides in Lincoln, Kansas. .1. Eerbert, of 
this review; Orlando Appleton, who resides in Brownsville, Oregon; Solomon 
Adams, of Henderson county, Illinois; Eugene, deceased; and Harry Ellsworth, 
also of Brownsville, Oregon. The elder members of this family were horn in 
Massachusetts and the younger in Henderson county, Illinois. 

J. Herbert Park grew to manhood in Illinois and there attended common 

si I Is, After laying aside his I ks he engaged in teaching, and at the ou1 

break of the Civil war enlisted from Henderson county in Company <i. One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Volunteer Infantry, serving as a non-commissioned 
officer and receiving his honorable discharge. He afterward returned to Hen 
derson count} and resumed his teaching, later abandoning this occupation and 
turning his attention to the stock business and to dealing in lands. In 1870 he 
settled at Burlington, Iowa, and there obtained a position in a law office, doing 
notary work- and also managing the real-estate department. Following this 
he went to the western mountain states and there engaged in the mercantile 
business in the mining camps of the Rock} mountains for about twentj years 
Before settling at Burlington he had purchased one hundred and thirty-five 
acres of choice land in Richman township. Wayne county, and after his return 
from the mining camps he settled upon tins property, whereon he has since 
resided. To it he has added extensively from time to time ami is now a large 
landowner, holding between seven and eighl hundred acres lying in Richman 
township, this county, and Union township, Lucas county. The farm has three 

sets "f g l improvements and is a valuable property in ever} particular, for 

il has In ' i, operated along modern, practical lines, and it responds to the '-are 
and labor of its owner in constantl} increasing productiveness 

In addition to Ins farming interests Mr. Park has lor man} years been ver} 
prominenl in financial circles of Humeston ami the vicinity and has assiste.l 
in the organization of seven different hanks. Today he is interested in the Home 
State Bank of Humeston and in the Cambria Savings Bank. II'' was the organ 
i/er of the I >crbv State Bank, in which lie has Bince disposed of his stnek. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 4!) 

Mr. Park voted for Abraham Lincoln at the time of his second election and 
at the second election of President Grant voted the independent republican 
ticket. He is, however, at present, a democrat and interested in public affairs, 
cooperating heartily in everything which he deems of permanent value to the 
community in which he has so long resided. He is connected fraternally with 
Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, P. & A. M., of Humeston, and belongs to the Royal 
Arch Masons in Corydon. He is a man of exemplary character, just, conscien- 
tious and peace-loving, and during the forty years he has lived in Wayne comity 
he has never been involved in a law suit, settling all disputes which have arisen 
in accordance with the principles of right and justice. A wide reader, he lias 

spent a great deal of time and thought upon his library, which is today 01 1' 

the finest to be found in this part of Iowa, being especially well supplied with 
books of a historical and scientific nature. He lives his own life; his books are 
his companions; his fields are his friends; his work and business, his recreation. 
The best current magazines are on his reading table, for Mr. Park is a well 
informed man and likes to keep abreast of the questions and issues of the day. 
As was said of his famous kinsman, President John Quincy Adams: "His 
mind is a storehouse of facts and nothing could be more desired by a person 
of mental attainment than to enter into any kind of conversation with him." 



DAVID A. PAGE. 



David A. Page, of the Allertou Implement Company, is one of the indus- 
trious business men and public-spirited citizens of Wayne county, where he is 
serving as a member of the board of supervisors. A large portion of his life 
has been passed in this immediate vicinity, where for many years he actively- 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, but in 1905 he removed to Allerton and iden- 
tified himself with the commercial interests of the town. Mr. Page was born in 
Woodford county, Illinois, on the 15th of April, 1865, and is a son of Moses 
P. and Martha E. (Banta) Page, the father a native of New Hampshire and 
the mother of Illinois. They were married in the last named state and began 
their domestic life in Woodford county, where the father engaged in farming 
until 1878. In the latter year he removed with his family to Wayne county, 
Iowa, and purchased six hundred acres of land to the cultivation and improve 
ment'of which he devoted his energies during the remainder of his active life. 
About 1891 he disposed of his interests here ami went to Washington, where lie 
is still residing at the venerable age of eighty-nine years. He has long survived 
the mother, who passed away in 1891, at the age of fifty-nine and is buried in 
the cemetery at Allerton. Of the marriage of Mr. ami Mrs. Page there were 
born eight children, our subject being the sixth in order of birth. 

The first thirteen years in the life of David A. Page were passed m Ins 
native state. He was reared in very much the same manner as all farmer lads, 
pursuing his education in the public schools, and while engaged in the mastery 
of the common branches becoming familiar will, the duties of the agriculturist 
He remained at home and assisted with the cultivation of the fields and care of 
the stock until he was eighteen, when he started out to make his own way in the 



50 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

world. Peeling he was fully qualified to begin his independent career as an 
agriculturist he rented a farm in McLean county, Illinois, which he cultivated 
with a good measure of success for eighl years. Coming to Wayne county, at 
the expiration of that time, he bought two hundred acres of land in Clinton 
township. The further improvement and cultivation of this place engaged 
his energies until 1904, when renting his farm he returned to McLean county, 
Illinois, when- for two years he engaged in farming and then removed to Aller- 
ton, in order to give his children the opportunity of better educational advant 
than wen- afforded in the country. When he came t<> town Mr. Page engaged in 
thehnplemenl business with C. P. Meredith, with whom he was associated until 
1912, when with W. T. Grimes and J. T Castes he bougb.1 the establishment now 
conducted under the firm name of the Allerton Implement Company. 

In ISiio. .Mr. Page was married to Miss Nettie Muzzy, a daughter of Alman 
and Marj (Packingham) Muzzy, natives of New York, who subsequently went 
to Illinois, coming from there to Iowa about 1903. Here the father passed 
away in 1912, at the age of eighty-two years, but the mother, who is in her 
seventj third year, is still living. Mrs. Page, who was the fifth in a family of six 
children, was born in October, 1865. Two sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Page, as follows: Robert K.. whose birth occurred on the 23d of January, 1891, a 
student first in the department of dentistry at the Iowa state University, Iowa 
City, and now at Northwestern Universitj ; and Manlej A., whose natal day was 
November 16, 1899, attending the public schools of Allerton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Page are members of the Christian church, and fraternally 
he is affiliated with Allerton Lodge, No. 321, K. P., and with the Homestead 
Lodge, while Mrs. Page is a member of the Pythian Sisters. His political 
allegiance he gives to the democratic party and he is now serving Ins second 
year on the hoard of county supervisors. In the course of his career Mr. Pagi 
has worked hard, directing his undertakings in a practical and systematic man- 
ner, and in the development of his interests is meeting with well deserved 
prosperity. 



WILLIAM W. ELLIOTT. 

For several years William W. Elliotl has lived retired in Seymour and by 
reason of his high standards of integrity and his honorable and uprighl life 
has gained the confidence and esteem of man} friends. He is a native of Indiana, 
horn in Morgan county, February I s . 1845, and is a son of Brooks and Martha 
Elliott, natives of Kentucky. In the earlj days of his career the father of our 

Subject moved into Indiana and there resided until his death, whieli occurred 

when Ins son William W. was onlj one month old. and only eight days after the 
death of his wife Following the death of his parents, the subject of this 
ie\ lew whs taken into the home of his sister. Mrs. John Bradlej . This family left 

Indiana in the fall of 1 85 I and ved into Iowa, locating in Appanoose county, 

where William W. Elliott attended school lie was a lad of sixteen at the OUt- 
,1. of the Civil war and was. in consequei unable to enlist until 1863, ill 



F 

> 



o 

3 




LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES ;,:; 

which year he joined Company II. Eighth Iowa Cavalry, under command of M. 
M. Walden. Ee served until the dose of the war and was mustered out at 
Macon, Georgia, on the 13th of August, 1865, receiving his honorable discharge, 
During the period of his enlistment he saw active service all the time and mice 
was iu the thick of a battle or a skirmish every day for thirty-three consecutive 
days. He was with Sherman on his Atlanta campaign and at Noonan, Georgia, 
was wounded in his right leg and his horse was killed under him by the same bullet. 
He suffered from this wound for ten years. < In MeCook 's raid, which took place on 
July 30, 1864, Mr. Elliott was captured by the rebels and remained in prison for 
four months, during which time he was afflicted four times with gangrene in 
his leg. His horse fell upon the leg which was not infected ami Mr. Elliott has 
always been more or less disabled as a result of his injuries. After his discharge 
he returned to Appanoose county and settled on a farm on the 1st of September, 
1865. He carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1896 ami then moved 
into Seymour, where he has since lived retired, with the exception of the years 
from 1907 to 1911, when lie resided in .Alt. Pleasanl in order to educate his 
children. 

On April 1. 1866, .Mr. Elliott married Miss Amanda S. Manning, a daughter 
of John and U. B. (Morgan) Manning, natives of Ohio, who came to Iowa in 
1850 and to Appanoose county in 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott became the parents 
of three children: Martha L., who married Charles G. Norris, id' NTuma, Appa- 
noose county: William, who died in infancy; and Edna Love, who lives at home. 
They are people of wide charity and practical benevolence and at different times 
have given a good home to five children who were left orphans. They are 
devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church and in their lives exemplify 
the doctrines in which they believe. 

Mr. Elliott has firm faith in the principles of prohibition and gives an active 
and helpful support to the prohibition party, lie keeps in touch with his 
comrades of fifty years ago through his membership in the Grand Army of the 

Republic, in which he has attained a place of distinction. lie has twice I n 

commander of William Kellogg Post, Xo. 186, and served for two terms in the 
same position in MeParland Post, Xo. 20, at Mount Pleasant, Iowa. All the 
relations of his life have been distinguished by the same steadfasl courage and 
perseverance which marked his work on the southern battlefields and his entire 
career has been a credit and honor to a man who once proved himself a valorous 
soldier. 



CHARLES W STEELE. 

Charles W. Steele, who since 1894 has been engaged in the practice of law 
with Lewis Miles, has attained to prominence not only in the legal profession 
but has also become one of the foremost financiers of the city as president of tie- 
First National Bank of Corydon. Mr. Steele was born in Owen county, Indiana, 
June 26, 1859. and is a son of Joseph H. and Mary (Burke) Steele, the former 
of whom is also a native of Indiana and a son of Hugh Steele, of Tennessee. 
The family is of English descent. The mother. .Mrs. Mary Steele, was a daughter 



54 l.i CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

of J. C. Burke, of Indiana, and also of English descent. Joseph II. Steele 
broughl his family to Wayne county, Iowa, in L864, after having served in the 
Civil war with the Seventieth Indiana [nfantrj as a private. In Wayne county 
he engaged in agricultural pursuits and became a successful fanner in the 
cultivation of his land, lie was a republican in polities and actively interested 
in the issues of his party. He died in Wayne enmity in lssi. In the family of 
Mr. and .Mis. Joseph II. Steele were live children, three sons and two daughters. 
Charles W. Steele was educated in the countrj school in the vicinity of his 
father's farm in Wayne counly. In lSUti lie graduated from Simpson- College 
and for a year after his graduation attended law school at the same institution 
of learning. Subsequently he read law under Judge W. P. Howell, of Corydon, 
and successfully passed th.- liar examination in 1882, immediately engaging in 
practice. He has since continuously followed his profession in Corydon and since 
1894 has been in partnership with Lewis Miles. In the course of years the 
firm has buill up an extensive practice and Mr. Steele's services are in heavy 
demand, lie is alert of mind and the conclusions which he draws arc logical, 
while by his clear and precise diction he makes himself easily understood lief ore 

judge and jury. Whatever ease he takes in hand he gives his most careful 
attention and consideration and it may be said 1o be proverbial that if one 
entrusts his case with Mr. Steele a favorable ending may be predicted if by 
points of law success may he assured 

In 1890 Mr. Steele was married to Emma W. Wright, a daughter of Samuel 
Jaco and Elizabeth (France) Wright, of Maryland. Mr. Steele's abilitj as 
lawyer was recognized when he was called upon to serve as lirst county attorney 
of Wayne county. His active connection with the law. however, does not hy 
any means demand all of his attention, for Mr. Steele has become widely inter- 
ested in the banking business in this city and at presenl serves in the important 
office of president of the First National Bank, which was organized in February, 
1912, to succeed the Citizens state Hank. This latter organization was founded 
in 1882 by C. W. Steele, C. Holliday, C. H. Lord, -lames Alexander, W. S. 
Sproatl and others. The tirst capitalization was authorized for sixtj thousand 
dollars, hut in 1894 the sio.-k of the hank was reduced to thirty thousand dollars, 
which in 1900 again was increased to sixty thousand dollars fully paid up. The 
surplus was added from year to year to the hank's resources until the capital 
and surplus on January 1. 1906, reached one hundred thousand dollars. The 
capita] of the first National Bank, which look the place of tic I h i.. us State 
Bank, was si \< nt\ five thousand dollars fully paid up. The i 'it i... us Slate Bank 
.■reded its own building in L890 and the l-'irst National Bank has since occupied 

lie ii- qui nd purchased the hank building. «'. W. Steele was the president 

of the ( Jitizens state Bank from its organization and now serves as the presidenl 
of tin- First National I '..ink with circumspection, guiding the policies of the hank 

conservatively. In his long career as a hanker he has not oids obtained pros- 
peritj for himself hut has been instrumental iii contributing to the growth and 
developmenl of the city bj extending credit at the righl time to help establish 

n.w industries, while hy careful investment of th.. hank's resources he has 

gained the confidence of its stockholders and depositors. The fraternal relations 

..f Mr. Steele an- with the Masonic order, in which organization he holds mem 

berahip in the blue lodge and tin- commandery. His work as lawyer and banker 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 55 

has been of great benefil to the community in which he makes his home and, 
while he lias attained financial independence for himself, he has also greatly 
contributed to the welfare and upbuilding of his city and the surrounding 
country and its people. 



(!KOK<iE W. MrKIXLEY. 

Throughout the years of an active business career and in every relation of 
life George W. MeKinley enjoyed the confidence and friendship of all with 
whom he came in contact. In the truest sense of the word he was a successful 
man, for his life measured up to the full standard of honorable manhood in all 
things and bis death was the occasion of deep sorrow and widespread regret. 
He was born in Guernsey county. Ohio. August 6, 1852, and was a son of Wil 
loughby and Elizabeth (Carter) MeKinley. also natives of Ohio, the father 
born in Belmont county. April 23, 1821, and the mother in Guernsey county. 
Both have passed away. The father died in Humeston in 1896 and the mother 
July 12, 1885. Three children were born to their union: John R., who resides 
in Rialto, California; .Mrs. Rachael Taylor, of Humeston; and George W., of 
this review. 

The last named was eleven years of age when he came with his parents to 
Kichman township and settled upon a farm, where he grew to manhood. Ee 
attended the district schools and when not engaged with his books aided his 
father in the cultivation of the fields. With characteristic energy he devoted 
himself to his duties so steadfastly and earnestly thai his efforts were rewarded 
by a comfortable fortune, enabling him to retire from active lite. His wealth 
was always wisely and judiciously used and many beneficial and charitable 
causes profited by his liberal contributions. No project or measure for the 
benefit of the county sought his aid in vain. He cooperated heartily in everj 
movement for the public good, giving generously of his time and means, his 
labors being of the practical character which made his efforts result in greal 
good. 

On the 24th of December, 1879, .Mi-. MeKinley married .Miss Clara V. Porter, 
who was born in Vinton county, Ohio, January 26, 1862. Her parents, -lames 
W. and Nancy (Alvin) Porter, were natives of Ohio, the former born in Vinton 
county and the latter in Guernsey county, and they came to Iowa among Hie 
earlier settlers, establishing their residence in Wayne county in 1865. In l he 
family were three children: Ira. who lives in Clay township; Mrs. McKinlej ; 
and Harvey, who lives upon the homestead in Clay township. To Mr. and 
Mrs. MeKinley were born two sons and a daughter. The eldest, -lames W.. 
was born on the 19tb of September, 1880. and after completing the course in 
the Humeston high school attended Humestou College and later Ames College, 
where he remained for one year. Afterward he studied pharmacy, graduating 
from the College of Pharmacy of Iowa City University. He is at present cod 
ducting a drug business at Sanborn. Iowa, and is meeting with gratifying sue 
cess. Nellie was born on the 15th of September, 1882, and after graduating 
from the Humeston high school attended Drake University for two years. She 



56 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

married X. T. .Mom-.', who was for ten years cashier of the Humeston State 
Bank. The youngest child born to Mr. and Mrs. McKinley is Leo <i.. whose 
birth occurred on December 8, 1889. He was graduated from the Eumeston 

high scl 1 and from Drake University and was afterward cashier of the Hn 

ton State Bank for six months. He resigned this position in order to accepl 
mii office in the legal departmenl of the Keokuk Power Company and through 

eessive stages of progress and adva imenl be has risen in tins h.-LI of labor 

until In- is imiu ill.- assistanl attorney of tin- corporation. Mrs. McKinlej is a 
devoul member of the Christian church, to which organization her husband 
belonged during his lit'.', and she belongs in Radianl Chapter, No. 30, < >. E. S., 

of Ih Mmi. she is well known socially in the city, where her many charming 

and attractive qualities have gained her a wide circle of friends. 

Mr. McKinlej was one oi the most active religious workers in this section 
of Wayne county. His father was one of the Founders of the Christian church 
nf Humeston and he himself was a regular ait.Nil.int of thai church, presiding 
at the Lord's table for over twenty-five years. Fraternally he belonged to 
Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A F. & A. M.. and to Radianl Chapter, No. 30, ' >. E s. 
IMs political allegiance was given to the democratic party. Mr. McKinley's 
death occurred in Humeston mi tin- 16th of December, 1909, and was fell as a 
distincl Inss throughout the section in which he had lived so many years. Upon 
the history nf Wayne county In- lefl the impress of his powerful ami vital 
personality ami in his children the record nf an honorable and uprighl life ami 
an untarnished name. 



II. T. SMITH. M D 



Dr. II. T. Smith is a prominenl and successful member of the i lical pro 

fession now engaged in general practice in Humeston. He is also taking an 
important though unostentatious cart in public affairs, advocating ami sup- 
porting all measures for tin- upbuilding ami development of hi- section of the 
countj along lines <<\' material, intellectual ami moral progress. He is a native 
of Ohio, horn in Stark county. July '_'•">. 1870, a son of Jacob and Amanda 
Teeph Smith, natives of the same section, who nov reside in Humeston. In 
their family were two sons: Kilson B., horn in stark county, Ohio, September 

21, 1863, who is residing on the home far ,n Harvard, Jackson township; 

ami Dr. II T., nf this review. The grandparents on both sides oi this family 
were natives nf Pennsylvania ami pioneers in Ohio. 

\)v. II. T. Smith acquired his earlj education in the public schools of Holmes 
county, <>hio. whither he had removed with his parents when In- was still a 

In 1890 ih. Familj settled near Harvard, in Way jounty, ami Dr. Smith 

has been a resident of tins seel i Iowa since thai time. Ih- worked upon 

In- father's farm for a year, bul in 1891 entered the Central Normal University 
at Humeston ami was graduated from the scientific departmenl in 1893, having 

laugh 1 school during si ■ nf the intervening time in order to paj for his 

tuition. He hail begun tin- studj nf licine in Humeston ami he later com- 
pleted his medical course in the Keokuk College '<\ Physicians ami Surgeons, 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 57 

graduating with the class of 1897. Afterward be formed a partnership with 
Dr. George McCulloch, of Humeston, for the practice of his profession and 
is now a member of the oldest medical firm in the city, the partners enjoying a 
large and constantly increasing patronage. Dr. Smith is a wide reader and 
deep thinker and possesses a thorough knowledge of the underlying principles 
of his profession, keeping abreast of the most advanced thought by his reading 
and his individual research and investigation. He is a member of the County, 
State and American Medical Societies and conducts the medical examinations 
for a number of old line insurance organizations and many fraternal societies 
He owns his own home in Ilumeston. which is modern and well appointed in 
every particular, and is also the proprietor of one hundred and twenty acres 
of fine land in Richman township, besides being a director in the Humeston 
State Bank. 

In December, 1899, Dr. Smith married Miss Myrna Angel, who passed away 
on July 21, 1000. On the 9th of April. 1902, Dr. Smith was again married, his 
second wife being Miss Carrie May Findley, who was burn in Allerton. Iowa. 
March 13, 1882. In this state she grew to womanhood and was graduated 1'mm 
the Allerton high school with the class of 1900, after which she taught school 
until her marriage. Her father, George Findley. a native of Ohio, was bom in 
1857, and passed away in 1887. .Mrs. Smith's mother. Hannah Rockwell, was 
born August 19, 1856, and died in Allerton July 8, L903. Both parents were 
among the early settlers of Wayne county. In their family were three children, 
all of whom were born and reared in Allerton, namely: Carrie May, the wife 
of the subject of this review; Orr S., who resides in Seymour; and dames, who 
passed away in May, 1907. To Dr. and Mrs. Smith have been born two daugh- 
ters: Clara Evelyn, whose birth occurred on the 29th of January, 1903; and 
Erma Maurine, born September 3, 1904. Both are attending the public schools. 
Mrs. Smith is a member of the Christian church of Humeston. 

Fraternally Dr. Smith is affiliated with Fidelity Lodge. No. 22s. A. F. & 
A. M. : the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, and the Homesteaders. He gives 
his allegiance to the democratic party and has taken quite a prominent pari in 
public affairs although he has never been desirous of official preferment. How- 
ever, he has been for some time a member of the school board and is acting as 
health officer. He has lived in Wayne county for over twenty years and during 
that time his enterprising spiril has made him an important factor in the 
general upbuilding. 



DR. EDWIN BURCHETT. 

Dr Edwin Burchett, who since 1903 has practiced medicine in Seymour, 

Iowa has in the course of the ten years he has I n engaged in bis profession 

in this city built up a practice which extends to all classes of people m the city 

and surrounding country. His services are given fi ly and indiscriminately 

to rich or poor, wherever his help is i ded, and by his knowledge and expert 

enee he has guided many a patient through crisis and brought him back to 
health To most of his patients Dr. Burchetl is not only a physician but is 



58 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

more than that — he is a friend and adviser and by his kindly yel decisive way 
he instills thai confidence and assurance of results which is half the cure, for 
In- well knows thai all medical knowledge and all medicines arc bul pour, inef- 
fectual mediums it' they arc not helped along by the personality of the man who 
inspires his patienl with a desire to become well, keeps alive in him hope to 
recover and brings to him the supreme confidence of an ultimate happy out- 
come. Dr. Burchetl was born m Van Buren county, this state, July 2, 1879 
and is :> son of E. J. and Louisa Robj Burchett, the father a native of Ohio 
and the mother of Indiana. The father was a son of |; |;. Burchett, whose 
patents died when he was bu1 a child. He was horn in Virginia of French 
descent, made his home in Michigan and Ohio lot- some time and at .an early 
age came to Iowa, where his son E. .I., the father of our subject, and Louisa 
Roby were subsequentlj married. The grandfather firsl located in Van Buren 
county where he passed most of his life, although he died in Davis county. 

E. ■). I'.uivli.'lt, the father of our subject, always followed agricultural pursuits 

which ultimately broughl him prosperity. In L909 he wenl to Appa se county, 

where he has since made his home. In his political views he is a democrat and 
his religious faith finds expression in membership in the Methodist church. 
Mr. and .Mrs. K. J. Burchetl had one child, our subject. 

Dr. Edwin Burchetl was reared and spenl Ins boyhood days in a well-to-do 
home and in early life attended the country schools in the vicinity of his father's 
farm. Although he was broughl up among agricultural surroundings he saw 
a higher aim in life in following one of the professions and decided on thai of 
medicine as the one to which he would like to devote liis services. He became 
a student at the < bicago College of Physicians and Surgeons and graduated 
from that institution in 1903, starting in practice in Seymour in the latter part 
of thai year, and here he has since remained. Dr. Burchetl can look hack 
with pride upon ten years of successful practice iu his line and many are his 
patients who place in him implicit faith and would trust no either with their 
most precious possession then- health. During his later years Dr. Burchetl has 
busied himself more or less along the line of surgery and there are notable 
operations to his credil which he performed in this county. Outside of Ids 
private practice he also acts as the local surgeon for the Rock Island Railroad 
Company. In addition to his professional labors he is identified with the inter 
ests of the community as one of the founders and promoters of the Peoples 
Savings Lank, of which he is vice president, tn tins connection he has proved 

himself a man of insighl into financial conditions, a man of initiative and yd 

of conservative judgment. 

Dr. Burchetl married on the 1st of June, 1909, Miss Mary Kirby, a mem 
her of a well known family of Seymour, lie is democratic in Ids politics and is 
interested in his party although his arduous duties along professional lines 
have precluded any aeti\e participation in oublic affairs. His fraternal rela 
lions are with the blue lodge of Masons and he is also a Shriner and a member 
of the Benevolenl Protectivi Order of Elks. He keeps in touch with the trend 
of the times along professional lues and with the latest of discoveries and 
hi. thods in the world of medical science through the lium of Ids membership 

in the county, city and national medical societies, and also as | inher of the 

American Association of Railway Surgeons. Mrs. Burchetl is a member of the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES :,<i 

Methodist church. Dr. Burchett is successful in the true sense of the word. 
A man unusually broad-minded and intelligent, he is of wide experience and 
never mercenary or grasping and has become a factor for good along his specific 
line in the community. Wherever his help is needed he gives the besl he 
has in him. To get a foothold along medical lines and to make advancement is 
proverbially slow, but he has demonstrated his ability as each year bis practice 
has grown in volume and by his sterling qualities of character he has won the 
high regard of all with whom he has come in contact. 



WILLIAM M. LARIMER. 

William M. Larimer, controlling important lumber interests in Russell, has 
been a resident of Lucas county since 1851 and is a representative of a well 
known pioneer family. He was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. 
April 17, 1847, and is a son of Hugh and Nancy Larimer, natives of that section. 
The parents came overland in the spring of 1851 and they settled in Iowa, in 
what was then Chariton township, Lucas county, in April, 1851. The father 
was a member of the board of supervisors when the name of the town- 
ship was changed and on section 35 he engaged in general farming 
until his death, which occurred January 27, 1884. He had long survived bis 
wife, who died in Lucas county, September 13, 1865. Eleven children were born 
to their union, as follows: Mrs. Mary Gobel-Lodge, who was born January 8. 
1841, and who resides in South Dakota; Isabel, whose birth occurred November 
28, 1843, and who died in Lucas county, February 13, 1883; Mis. Martha Morris, 
who was born November 17. 1845. and who resides at Abingdon. Illinois; William 
M., of this review: Eli, who was born March 16, 1849, and who died August 9th, 
of the same year. Alexander, born in Noble county. Indiana, and now residing 
in Webster City. Iowa: LeRoy. who was born March 25, 1853, and who resides 
on a farm in Lincoln township ; Mrs. Laura Sophia Delano, whose birth occurred 
April 24, 1855, and who died June 6, 1908; Joseph Henry, whose birth occurred 
May 3, 1857, and who died December 22, 1886; Wilson A., who was born March 
13, 1860, and who resides in Cedar township; and Mrs. Margaret Shirer, born 
September 16. 1862. now of Chariton. William M. Larimer is a grandson of 
Hugh Larimer, who was born March 9. 1780, and who died in November, 1858. 
He was twice married. On the 10th of May, L803, lie wedded .Miss -lane Shan- 
non, who was born in May. 1782, and who died January 5, 1817. To this union 
were born the following children: Martha; Mary C. born March 21, 1805; 
Samuel, October 1. 1806; Thomas. February 27, 1809: John, June 21, 1811; 
John, the second of the name, born October 3, L812; and Jane S.. born November 
23, 1814. After the death of his first wife Hugh Larimer was again married, 
wedding on the 25th of November, 1817, Miss Nancy McDowell. They became 
the parents of the following children: Hugh, the lather of the subject of this 
review, born November 28, 1818; Alexander, born February 19, 1820; James J . 
born July 19, 1822; William McDowell. April L9, 1824; EH Coulter. .May 29 
1826; Wilson K. October 27, 1828; George S.. March 2!). 1832; Cyrus. November 
10, 1833; Nancy, August 17. 1835; Joseph, Augusl 1. 1837; Eliza McDowell. 



60 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

April II. I839j Noah, April 28, 1-11; and Catharine, born January 8, L844, 
residing .-it Ness ' 'it.\ . Kansas. 

William M. Larimer was four .wars of age when he came with his parents 
to tnis county ami he grew in manhood her.', acquiring his education in the 
districl schools, (in May in. L864, he enlisted in the Union armj ami served 
our hundred days, receiving his honorable discharge September 23, 1864. Hi 
returned to Lucas county ami engaged in farming, following thai occupation 

until ahout the year 1882, when he moved into Russell, where ho 1 ame con 

nected with lumber interests. II. has remained identified with the Lumber 
business here shot thai time ami today controls an important patronage and 
is ranked with representative and progressive business men of the city. 

.Mr. Larimer has been twice married. He wedded first, on November 24, 
L868, Miss Eliza Jane Hall, who was born in Peoria county, Illinois. June 9, 

L848. she came to Lucas county at an early day and died in Russell, Iowa. 
Kehruan 21, L883. she was a daughter of Thomas and Jennie Maple Hall. 
both of whom have passed away. They were the parents of five children: Mrs. 
Larimer, first wife of the subjeel of this review; George, who resides in Peoria 
county, Illinois; and Tracy, Joseph ami Catharine, deceased. By his firsl wife 
Mr. Larimer became the father of live children: Mrs. Etta Russell, who was 
horn September 24, 1869, and who resides in St. Joseph, Missouri; Charles 1... 
who was horn AugUSl 17. 1871, and who makes his home in Russell; Emma, who 
was horn August 24, 1873, and who died March 17. 1-71: Mrs. Jessie Hatcher. 
who was born December 27, 1874, and who resides in El Paso, Texas; and Harry 
B., who was born March 22, L877, and who died January 22, 1908. On the 13th 
of January, 1885, Mr. Larimer was again married, his second union being with 
Miss Anna Marks, who was horn in Hennepin. Illinois. April in. 1852. Hei 
parents came overland to Mills county. Iowa, at an early day. Both have passed 
away. 

Mr. Larimer is connected fraternally with the Russell post of the Grand 
Army of the Republic ami he gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party. He has resided in this county since his childhood ami has become widely 
known here, his business integrity, his progressive spirit ami his genuine per 
sonal worth having gained him the respeel and esteem of all who come in contacl 
wit 1 1 him. 



LEWIS MILES 



Lewis Miles can look hack upon forty years of active experience in the pro 
cession of the law in Wayne county ami has attained a position of prominence 
among the members of the bar. Si i I s ' 1 1 he has practi I in partnership with 

\V. Steele, and the law liusiiiess transacted bj the firm is of mosi extensive 

proportions Mr. Miles was horn in Marion connl.\ Ohio, Jl 30, 1845, and is 

.,n of William and Bmilj Welch Miles The mother's familj were old 
Vermonl settlers William Miles came witli ins familj to Wayne county, Iowa. 
April 30, 1853, and took up governmenl land, for which he had mad itry in 

Is., | Al thai tune there were only lour log houses in the locality where he 




LEWIS MILES 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 63 

settled and the nearest market was Alexandria, Missouri. He was here suc- 
cessfully engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, December 26 1879 
excepting the years is:,, and 1858, during which time he was also engaged hi 
the mercantile business. The mother passed away on October 11, 1865. Both 
were members of the Freewill Baptist church. Of their family seven children 
grew to maturity, while two died in infancy, and our subject is the eldest mem- 
ber of the family. 

Lewis Miles was reared at home under pioneer conditions and received his 
first education in a log schoolhouse in Corydon, Iowa. He wenl for one year to 
school in North Scituate, Rhode Island, and in 1865 graduated from Bryanl & 
Stratton Commercial College in Chicago. Having supplemented his education by 
careful reading and study, he took up the profession of teaching and was so en- 
gaged in Corydon for ahout two and a half years, at the end of which time he read 
law under General Glasgow and prepared himself for the bar examination. On 
October 2(1 1868, lie was admitted to the bar. but in the following years from 
1869 to 1871 engaged in mercantile pursuits. In 1872 lie began the actual prac- 
tice of law in partnership with .1. X. MeClanahan and after this partnership 
was dissolved he became associated with W. II. Tedford. remaining in this con- 
nection until 1879. when Mr. Preeland became his partner, who remained with 
him in business until 189:;. Since August 1. 1894, he has practiced in partner- 
ship with C. W. Steele and this firm has ever enjoyed a wide reputation and an 
extensive clientage. Mr. Miles has conducted many important cases to successful 
issue and has handled much of the litigation arising in the city and in the sur- 
rounding country, lie is well read in the law. forceful in argument and prepares 
his cases and briefs carefully. By his long years of experience he has become 
one of the most prominent members of the bar not only in his city and county, 
but in the state of Iowa, and his ability along legal lines found recognition in 
his appointment to the important office of United States district attorney on 
November 27, 1889, in which capacity he served until January 1. 1894. In 1898 
he was reappointed to the same office and he again served in the same position 
from 1902 to 1907, being in all for thirteen years the incumbent in this position. 
In 1897 he was admitted to the bar of the supreme court of the United States. 

On February 20, 1868, Mr. Miles married Miss Mary I). Robb, a daughter 
of William and Rebecca Robb, of Wayne county, and of this union were born 
four children: William E., who is engaged in mercantile pursuits: Charles B., 
who is also engaged in commercial lines: Winifred, the wife of II. II. Carter; 
and Lois, who married D. W. Jackson. 

Mr. Miles has been an active factor in the local councils of the republican 
party. He has always taken greal interest in political affairs and as early as 
October, 186!). was elected to the state legislature from his district. In 1 ^7! > he 
was a candidate for the state senate, bu1 was defeated at this election. Being 
nominated in INS-'! on his party's ticket for the same position, lie was elected and 
served in the upper house of the Iowa legislature from 1883 until 1887. lie 
secured the passage of a number of important measures which were of greal 
benefit to his district, and his work while at the capital was generally of an 
important and effective character. In 1880 he served in the capacity of pre-., 
dential elector. Mr. Miles' life work has ben successful in the truest sense of 
the word. He is broad-minded and tolerant and readily discriminates between 

Vol. II— 4 



64 PICAS AND WAYNE ( '( UNTIES 

the essentia] and aon essential points as they come up in his work. He takes the 
same iiiteivsi in proniotiiifr puhlic affairs tlial he gives to his private practice 
and he has done much that redounds to his credil to benefit the city in which 
he makes his hemic. He lias been actuated by a laudable ambition to succeed 

from his early youth and this ambition and his undaunted energy have carried 
him to success. 



GEORGE PARKIN. 



Well known as one of the prosperous agriculturists of Union township. Lucas 
county, and prominent in the public life of Ins township. George Parkin is to be 
ranked with its foremosl citizens. He was born in Delaware county. Pennsyl- 
vania. April is. 1859, and is a son of Joseph and Ann News Parkin, both 

natives of England. The father was born in thai countrj in 1827 and with his 
wife came to America in 1856. In l s 7s the family removed to I nion township, 
I. mas county, ami there the father was successful until his , hath, which occurred 
in November, 1908. His wife has also passed away, her demise having occurred 
in Union township in August, 1902. Both were highly esteemed and respected 
in this locality For their many admirable qualities of mind and character. In 
their family were five children, of whom four died in infancy, the subject of 
this review being the only surviving member. 

George Parkin was educated largely in Pennsylvania and in 1878, when 
nineteen years of age, came with his parents to Union township. Lucas county, 
where they locale, I on April ll'th. and has resided here ever since. While in 
Pennsylvania memhers of the family had found employment in the woolen mills 
hut since coming to Iowa thej have ever been engaged in farming and stock 
raising and it is this occupation which has broughl Mr. Parkin success. Although 
his educational advantages in his native state were meager he has learned much 
by reading and studied deeplj in the university of life. Applying himself indus- 
triously to his purpose, he broughl his one hundred and sixty acres farm on 
section 21 to a high state of cultivation and now also owns forty acres on section 
19 and ten acres on section 5, all in Union township. Mis buildings arc sub- 
stantial and his resilience is comfortable, while the most modern machinerj can 
be found upon the place. He engages in general farming and also gives consul 
■ i able attention to stock-raising. 

In November, 1881, Mr. Parkin was united in marriage to Miss I. aura Sprott, 

who was horn in Van I'.uivn county, Iowa, on -lanuaiw 28, 1858. Her parents 

were Joseph and Prances (Brown sprott. natives of Pennsylvania, where they 
were horn Julj 30, 1826, and April L't. 1830, respectively. The lather was 
attending Rush Medical College of Chicago when the news of the California 

I m struck that city and he lefl his studies ami traveled overland to California 

but later returned by waj of Panama over the same route when- now the Panama 

canal is being constructed. On his sec | trip west he located in Union town 

ship, mar the old West tall homestead, and there remained successfullj engaged 
in agriculture until his death. Be passed awaj in Derby in August, 1903, and 
his wife survived him for about two years, her demise occurring In Union town- 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



65 



.Mrs 



ship on April 23. 1905. In their family were six children, as follows: M 
Elizabeth Mitchell, residing south of Chariton; Mrs. Joan Chapman, of Derby; 
Mrs. George Parkin; .Mrs. Kate Kobinson, whose home is in White Breasl town 
ship; Mrs. Alice Washburn, of Union township; and Thomas, deceased. The 
three older children were born in Van Buren county and the three younger 
in Union township. Lucas county. The Sprott family is one of the oldesl and 
most prominent in I'nion township and the name lias ever been held in high 
esteem. Mr. and Mrs. Parkin have become the parents of seven children: 
Joseph, born September 5, 1882. who resides in Union township; Mrs. Grace 
Thorne, born August 30, 1884, who also resides in Union township; .Mrs. Annie 
Barger, born October 15, 1888, who also makes her home in this township; Nellie, 
born December 4. 1891, who resides with her parents; Mabel, born October 19, 
1804; Frances, born September 30, 1897; and Gerald, whose natal day was .May 
6, 1903. These children were all born on the old home farm in Union township 
His political convictions lead Mr. Parkin to support the republican party 
and he has always taken a deep interest in public affairs, having for eleven 
years served as township trustee and for ten years as treasurer of the school 
board. Fraternally he is a member of the .Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Odd Fellows o\' Derby. A successful man along material lines and a factor 
in public life, his true achievement lies in the esteem and respect accorded him 
on account of those manly qualities of mind and character which have made 
possible his prosperity. 



F. T. McKIBBEN. 



F. T. McKibben, dealing in real estate and conducting also a general insur- 
ance agency, has built up an extensive business, to which he devotes a great deal 
of his time ami attention. His close application, his strong purpose, his eon 
servative and honorable methods constitute the basis of a success which classes 
him today with the leading and representative business men of Humeston. lie 
is a native of Iowa, born in Decatur county, his parents being John and Harriet 
(Hurd) McKibben, natives of Trumbull county. Ohio. The parents of our 
sub.jeet settled in Decatur county in 1857 and there resided for many years. The 
father is living at the present time in Humeston and is seventy-six years of age. 
His wife passed away in this city in 1895. They became the parents of six 
children: F. T., of this review; Mrs. Mary Ellen King, who lives in Humeston ; 
.Mattic. who passed away in the City of Mexico; .Mrs. Belle Kirl.y. also of Humes 
ton; Mrs. Elizabeth Richards, of the same city; ami Orman, who resides on the 
old home farm in Decatur county. 

F. T. McKibben was reared at home and grew to manhood upon his fathers 
farm, attending the public schools of Garden Grove. When lie laid aside his 
hooks he engaged in the mercantile business in Garden Grove for two years and 
later in Highpoint for ten years. He met with substantial success in this line 
and, carefully directing his interests, achieved results that were directly attribul 
able to his enterprise and ready use of opportunity. In 1893 he removed to 
Humeston and here for some time carried on his former occupation, conducting 



66 I.I CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

a general mercantile store for sixteen years. In 1909 he disposed of this enter- 
prise and engaged in handling real estate, dealing in town property, both 
improved and unimproved, and in farming lands in the vicinity. In addition 

I"' is c lucting a profitable insurance agency, representing some of the Leading 

companies in the United States. In both connections he has secured a large 
clientage and is devoting his fine business ability and executive force to the 
further development of his interests. 

In Bumeston, in 1894, Mr, McKibben married -Miss Jennie Wolverton, who 
was born at Bighpoint, Decatur county, on the 4th of April, 1SH4. She acquired 
her education in the public schools of thai locality and remained at home until 
she married. Ber parents, Perrj and Caroline (Miller) Wolverton, are both 
natives of Ohio bul reside in Bumeston. To their union were born two daugh 
ters: Mrs. Libbj Canfield, residing al Fori Madison, Iowa; ami .Mrs. McKibben 
Mr. and .Mrs. McKibben also have two daughters, both born in Bumeston: Bar 
riet, whose birth occurred on the 18th of February, 1896, and who is now 
attending the Bumeston high school; and Margaret, horn December 10, 1903, 
who is attending public school. The family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They reside in a comfortable and attractive home and an 
well known and widely popular in social circles <>t' the city. 

Mr. McKibben gives his allegiance to the republican party and is in all 
matters of citizenship progressive, energetic and public-spirited. For a number 
of years he did able work as a member of the town council and at the presenl 
time is serving as presidenl of the board of education. The salient features ol 
his life command the confidence and respeel of his fellow citizens, for he has 

met discouraging c litions with high confidence and quiel courage thus win 

ning success. 'The qualities which he displays in relation to all matters of general 
interest mark him as a publie-spirited citizen and his record is in all respects a 
credit to his resolution and his optimism. 



X DICKS, M. I). 



Dr. J. X. I>ieks. who is a native of Iowa, has ever since he graduated ; 
engaged in the practice of medicine at Cambria and is one of the oldesl and 
most successful physicians of Wayne county. He was horn in Independence 
township. Appanoose county. September \. 1850, hi-- parents moving there tic 
year previous, and is a son of Samuel M. and Margarel -lane Etter) Dicks 

The father was horn in Kentuckj in 1816 and passed awa> in Appanoose COUntj 
in 1878, while the mother, who was horn in Indiana in 1832, died in Appai Be 

county in 1896, surviving her husband for eighteen years. In young manhood 

father came to Iowa to make a prospective tour id' the country and make 

himself acquainted with the agricultural possibilities, returning to Indiana. 

where he remained for two years. In 1849, however, he once more moved west 
ward and entered land in Appanoose county, where he successfully followed 

agricultural pursuits until his death, being <>u<- of tl arly pioneers of that 

section. In their family were eighl children, as follows: Mrs. Mar} Makin, 
residing in Appanoose county on the farm adjoining that on which she was 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 67 

born; Dr. Dicks, of this review; Charles I!., who, in Mav. 1906 passed away 
at Des Moines, towa; Oscar N., living in Appanoose county on the old home 
farm where he was born and reared; Hiram M., a resident of Monroe county 

Iowa: Mrs. Sarah K. Cavett. who makes her home with the subject of this 
sketch: and Jacob Elmer and Ella ('.. twins, both residing m Appanoose county. 
The eldest of the children was born in Indiana but all the younger ones are 
natives of Appanoose county and there they wen- reared. 

Dr. Dicks was reared under the parental roof on the old homestead and 
attended the schools of the neighborhood in the acquirement of an education. 
His early advantages along that line were such as were available under pioneer 
conditions when the country was still unsettled and settlements were sparse. 
Early in life there developed in him a bent toward a professional career and 
as he ripened in years he decided upon the medical profession as thai for which 
he felt most adapted and subsequently attended the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons at Keokuk. Iowa, in pursuance of a professional education and 
graduated from that institution witli the class of 1876. Having received his 
degree, he immediately began to practice at Cambria, where he has ever since 
remained. As the years have passed his clientage has increased and his reputa- 
tion is such that the same is derived from a large surrounding territory. He is 
careful in diagnosis, but after he has come to a decision and has recognized 
the nature of a case is quick to apply the needed remedies. Capable, earnest 
and conscientious in the performance of his duties, he has during the long years 
of his practice demonstrated an ability which is far above the average, resulting 
in a practice which has made him prosperous. As his means have increased he 
has largely invested in valuable real estate and owns today two hundred and 
forty acres of fertile land, including eighty acres on section 2'K as well as one 
hundred and sixty acres on section '.Yo, all in Washington township, ami on these 
he has two complete sets of improvements. Besides his beautiful home in 
Cambria he owns there two business properties and also another residence which 
he rents out, and, moreover, owns property of the same character in Corydon. 
From his various interests Dr. Dicks receives a gratifying income which, in 
connection with what his practice nets him, puts him in an independent financial 
position and has made him one of the substantial men in the Locality. 

In 1872 Dr. Dicks married, in Appanoose county. .Miss Barthena .Miner. 
a native of West Virginia, who passed away only two years after her marriage, 
in Monroe county, Iowa, in .January, 1874. There was one daughter born of 
this union. Mrs. Effie M. Moore, on October 13, 1873, her husband being vice 
president of the Anchor Fire Insurance Company of I >es Moines, where they 
reside. On April :{. 1879, the Doctor was again married, his second union being 
with Miss Jennie Nelson, a native of Washington township, this county, born 
August 7, 1856. She attended the public schools of her native county in the 
acquirement of an education and there grew to womanhood and spent her entire 
life. Her parents were John M. and Sarah (McCutcheon) Nelson, the former 
a native of Mason county. West Virginia, born September 1. L834, and the 
latter born in Floyd county, Indiana. April L"J, 1837. The parents became 
early pioneers of Wayne county, traveling overland in (he primitive ways of 
the early days to this county in 1S.">J. spending the remainder of their lives here. 
where both passed away, tin- death of the mother occurring March 20, 1904 



68 I.ICAS AM) \V.\Y\K COrXTIES 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson were the parents of nine children : Jennie, the wife of our 
subject; Rev. W. A. Nelson, born February 23, L859, of Marble Rock, towa; 
.Mrs. Prances A. Eickman, born Augusl 30, 1861, residing in Clay township, 
this county: French I... born February II. 1865, who passed awaj April 17. 
L865; .Mrs. Hester Donahue, born March 11, 1866, a residenl of Mountain Valley, 
Kansas; Leonard, born February iM. 1st;*, ulm passed away at tin- age of six 
and a half years, October l:i. isTi; Julius, born -May 2, 1871. residing at Ben, 
diet. Kansas; Isaae. whose birth occurred January L6, L876, residing in this 
county; and Vesta, born duly 26, l s 7 s . who died shortly before her first birth- 
day, duly 6, 1879. All of the children were natives of Wayne county and were 
reared hen. Dr. and Mrs. Dicks are the parents of two children: .Mrs. Bertha 
Wright, who was horn in Cambria, October 21, 1880, and is now a resident of 
Corydon, Iowa: and charhs. born February I. 1883, who is residing on the 
farm of his father near Cambria, Iowa, and managing the property for him. 

The political affiliation of Dr. Dicks is with the democratic party and. 
although he has never found time or occasion to aspire to public office, he takes 
a laudable interest in all matters of public importance and bas been a factor in 
general advancement and development in this section. The family are members 
of the Baptisl church of Cambria, in the active work of which Dr. and .Mrs. 
Dicks take invat interest and to which they give their material and moral 
support. He has fraternal relations with the Yemen, being connected with 

Lodge at Cambria, and also was formerly a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. Thirty-seven years of active service as a physician have broughl 
him in contact with most of the people in this district and there is no one who 
is more bighlj esteemed and respected than Dr. Dicks for his professional accom- 
plishments as well as for his high qualities of character. There have been no 
spectacular phases in his life record hut his has been a career devoted to his 
profession, in the course of which he has done perhaps more to help humanity 
and to alleviate sickness than an) of his colleagues in the county. Successful in 

the truest sense of the word, he is unusually broad minded, tolerant and kind 
and. never mere, nary or grasping, he believes in something greater than mere 

material wealth ami in the course of a long professional Career, spent simply 

and unostentatiously, has been a powerful factor for good within the confines of 
his activity. 



CHARLES II OEHLMAN. 

Charles II. Oehlman is one of the extensive landowners and prospei 
farmers of Union township, his holdings comprising four hundred and fortj 
acres of valuable and productive land, lie is a representativi of one of the 

earliest pioneer families in this part of Iowa and has himself heen a resident 
of the countj since 1858. His birth occurred in Quincy, Adams county. Illii 

On the 18th of September, 1854, Ins parents being Charles and Dor. i I'.n: 
II, |,|, nan. both of whom were natives of llanoxcr. Germany, the form r horn 

,,,, tic L3th of February, 1822, and the latter on the 22nd of December in the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



69 



same year. The father emigrated to America in L847 and located first near 
Quincy, Illinois, where he married. In 1858 he and his wife came overland to 
Lucas county, Iowa, where in Union township he had in 1854 entered land, 
securing the patent from President Pierce. This has remained the familj 
homestead since that time and is now in possession of the subject of this review. 
The father, Charles Oehlman. died in Union township on tin- loth of March, 
1891, and his wife survived him until the 25th of October, 1908. The hitter had 
been twice married and by her first husband had one son, Henry Burgdorf, 
a native of Germany, who makes his home in Oklahoma. Unto Charles and 
Dora (Tennis) Oehlman were born the following children: Mrs. Louisa Dickin- 
son, who was born in Illinois and now resides in Seattle, Washington; Charles, of 
this review; Mrs. Emma West, of Conway. Iowa; Mrs. Lydia McMains; -Mrs. 
Frances Morey, who is ;i resident of Gordon, Nebraska; Mrs. Margaret Penick, 
of Derby, Iowa: and Mrs. Doris Hewitt, living in Gordon, Nebraska. 

Charles H. Oehlman was only four years of age when he came with his 
parents to Lucas county, and he has since been a resident of this part of Iowa. 
He was reared upon his father's farm and acquired his education in the district 
school, dividing his time between his studies and work in the operation of the 
homestead. This property eventually came into his possession and is now his 
home, its four hundred and forty acres comprising one of the most valuable and 
productive farms in this county. It is provided with two good sets of improve- 
ments and Mr. Oehlman. being a practical and progressive farmer has installed 
labor-saving machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. Everything about 
the place is in excellent condition and the farm annually yields abundant 
harvests. 

On the 12th of September, 1897. -Mr. Oehlman was united in marriage to 
Miss Cora Herring, who was born in Warren county. Iowa. January 13, 1867, 
a .laughter of Robert and Mary (Malcolm) Herring, the former a native of 
Beaver county. Pennsylvania, born June 20, 1837, and the latter of Lee county, 
Iowa, born November 22, 1843. The Malcolm family settled in Lee county in the 
same' year that Iowa became a state— 1846— and were numbered among the 
earliest settlers there, Robert Herring moved to Warren county with his 
father's family in 1854 and from there he enlisted in the Union army for service 
in the Civil war. He joined Company H. Thirty-fourth Iowa Volunteer Regi- 
ment, and was at the front three years, being mustered out March 13. 1866. With 
a creditable military record he returned to Warren county and remained there 
until March. 1867, when he moved to Lucas county, where his death occurred 
October 18 1900. His wife passed away in Union township. October in. 1!)11, 
In their family were seven children: Mrs. Oehlman. wife of Hie subject of this 
review Clarence, born July 8, 1869. who resides a1 Greybull, Wyoming; .Mrs. 
Anna Ekleberry. who was born October Vh 1872, and who resides at Hardin, 
Montana; William IL, who was born May 24, 1876, and who makes his home 
in Warren township; Mrs. E. M. Parkin, whose birth occurred April 14, 1880, 
and who resides in Union township; Mrs. Frances Holteen, who was born May 
17 1884 and who makes her home in Hardin, Montana; and Roy, who was 
bom August 2. issT. and who died October 24, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Oehlman 
became the parents of two children: Louise, who was born September 13, 1898, 
and who is attending high school at Derby: an,. Charles Herman, who was 



70 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

bora May 29, L900, and who died November 18, 1902. These children were both 
bora mi the old Oehlman homestead in Union township. 

Mr. Oehlman gives bis political allegiance to the democratic party and is 
active in public affairs, taking an intelligent interest in the advancemenl and 
development of the locality where he has so long made bis home. Be was for 
twentj years road supervisor and for Sve years township trustee and discharged 
the duties of these positions with abilitj and energy. Since November 1". 1875 
he bas been connected with the [ndependenl Order of odd Fellows and h< is 
well known in the affairs of the local branch of the organization. His wife 
is a member of the Rebekah lodge a1 Derby and is a1 presenl acting as district 
deputy. Both are representatives of old and well known families of Lucas 
countj and have an extensive acquaintance within its borders. 



WILLIAM THEODORE STEARNS. 

William Theodore Stearns, an honored and representative citizen of Lucas 
county, who died at his home in Russell on the 7th of February, 1911, was 
born at Ashland. Ashland county, Ohio, in December, 1833. Be grew to man- 
hood in his native county, remaining there until 1852, when be came overland to 
Iowa, settling in Cedar county, where be followed carpentering. Afterward he 

wnt hack to Ohio and made a joumej down the Ohio river to St. Louis, thei 

to Muscatine, and from there to Cedar county. .Mr. Stearns engaged in carpen- 
tering for some time, eventually moving to Missouri, where he was residing at 

the outbreak of the <'i\il war. Be enlisted in the Third Missouri Cavalry. 

serving three years ami seven months, after which he received Ids he rahle 

discharge with the rank of sergeant lie returned after the war to Missouri, 
where he followed 1 1). • c;i r| >etit c i' 's trade until he moved to Russell, remaining 
.•in honored and respected resident of Lucas county to tin- time of his death, 
which occurred on the 7th of February, 1911. 

At Mechanicsville, Iowa, on the 1st of January, 1868, Mr. Stearns was 
united in marriage to Miss Angeline Comstock, who was horn in Cedar county, 

\ nber 19, 1846, and who grew to womanhood there, attending the common 

schools. Her parents. Daniel I-', and Lavina (Robinson Comstock, wen- early 
selthrs in Cedar county. The father was horn in New York, March L't. 1824, 
ami died iii Russell, October 5, 1885. Bis wife, who was horn in Ohio. May 28 
1826, 'lied at Mechanicsville, Iowa. August 11. 1865. Eight children were horn 
to their union, as follows: l.orano. whose birth occurred August L9, 1845, and 
who died in infancy; Mrs. Stearns, wife of the subject of this review; Daniel 
Allen, who was horn January 31, 1849, ami who resides at Walla Walla. Wash- 
ington; Mrs Celesta Elizabeth Scars, who was born June 1'-'. 1852, ami who 

resides in Forest Grove, Oregon; Mrs. II; ah Morgan, who was horn October ■">. 

1854, ami who died at Forest Grove, Oregon; ami Maybelle, who was horn 
November 22 1862 and who died in infancy. Two other children horn to Mr. 
and Mrs Comstoci passed awaj in childhood, Mr and Mrs. steams had three 
children: Clarence Mannie, who was horn al Monticello, Missouri. November 6, 
[868, and who resides at Phoenix, Arizona; Mrs Katie Elizabeth Kauffman, who 




\\ I 1. 1,1AM T. STEARNS 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 73 

was born May 4. 1st,; and who resides a1 Stratford, Hamilton county, [owa- 
am George Clayton, who was born August 5, L886, and who resides a Grass 
alley Oregon. Mrs Stearns survives her husband. She is a ,„,,„„. of th 
Presbyterian church of Russell and exemplifies Us teachings in her life, holding 
the esteem and confidence of many friends. 

Mr Stearns was a member of the Russell Post of the Grand Army of the 

Republic and thus kept in touch with his comrades of fiftj years ago II lve 

his political allegiance to the republican party bu1 he neve,' sought nor desired 
public office. ! pright and honorable in all the relations of life he won the 
regard and respect of those with whom he came in contact and his death was 
deeply mourned by a large circle of friends. 



ADOLPII I). McGUIRE. 



e 



Adolph D. McGuire is the editor of the Humeston New Era and junior 
partner in the firm of Sanford & McGuire, who are the publishers of the paper 
and the proprietors of one of the finest general printing establishments in 
southern Iowa. He is a native of Wayne county, born iii Clay township, 
February 23, 1885, a son of J. F. and Cynthia (Surbaugh) McGuire, also natives 
of the same section, who are now residing in Humeston. In their family ar 
three children, all of whom were born and reared in "Wayne county. They are : 
Adolph D., of this review; Carleton Monroe, who resides on the home farm m 
Clay township; and Cleo, who resides with her parents in Humeston. 

Adolph D. McGuire acquired-his education in the public schools of Clay 
township and attended the high school at Humeston. Later he completed a 
business course in the Capital City Commercial College of Des .Moines and thus 
received a thorough and- efficient education. He has been active in business 
since the age of fourteen, when he left the farm and secured employment as 
a clerk in the store conducted by F. T. McKibben, of Humeston. After com 
pleting his education he engaged in the grocery business for himself for two 
years and in this venture met with an unusual degree of success. On the 1st 
of October, 1907, he formed a partnership with his father-in-law, Hector Sanford, 
in the printing business, operating under the firm name of Sanford & McGuire, 
and assumed the editorship of the New Era. He has made this an excellent 
uewspaper and in its editorial columns supports firmly all measures for the 
general benefit of the community, making the paper very influential as a 
director of public thought and opinion. Mr. McGuire has proved himself a 
capable and reliable business man and in the discharge of the duties which 
fall to his lot exhibits constantly the energetic, enterprising and progressive 
spirit upon which his success is founded. The firm of Sanford & McGuire 
does all kinds of printing and conducts an establishment which is modern. 
up-to-date and thoroughly equipped in every particular. 

On December 11. 1906, Mr. McGuire was united in marriage to .Miss Mar 
salete Sanford. who was born in Humeston, .March 25, L883, and who acquired 
her education in the public schools of her native city, where sin- grew to woman 
hood. Her father. Hector Sanford. a partner in the firm of Sanford & Mc 



74 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Guire, was born in Montezuma, Iowa. April l. L854, and when he had laid aside 
Ins books entered the printing business, becoming identified with this line of 
work at the age of eleven years and follow ing it constantly sin.-,, thai time. For 
one year he conducted a paper at Lacona and for a time "as employed in the 
Acres-Blackmer printing establishmenl a1 Burlington. He is a skilled and 
expert printer and journalist, having learned his trade on the old Leon Pioneer; 
which is now the Leon Reporter. At the presenl time he is senior member of 
the firm of Sanford & McGuire, general printers and publishers of the Humeston 
New Era. His wife, who was in her maidenhood .Miss Anna Gustafson, was 
born in Sweden, November 10, 1858. Both the Sanford and McGuire Families 
live in a beautiful home in Fairview, the finesl residential section of Humeston, 
and thej have manj warm friends in the city, being well known in social cir- 
cles. All are members of the Congregational church of Humeston. 

Fraternally Mr. McGuire is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
while Mr. Sanford belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge. Mr. McGuire's 
political views are in accord with the principles of the democratic parly. He 

is a member of the Volunteer Fire Departmenl of II iston and in all matters 

of citizenship is pubbx spirited and progressive, being cumbered among the 
priimineiit and able men of this community. 



F. i;li;i> FRY 



As cashier of i of the foremost financial institutions of Corydon, F. Bird 

Frj supies an important position. Many are the duties of a hank cashier and 

the position is such as to demand many high qualities and a clear judgment in 
extending credit, making investments and generallj managing the affairs of a 
financial institution. Mr. Fry has occupied the position of cashier of the First 
National Bank since its organization in February, 1912, and was cashier of the 
Citizens state Bank, of which the First National is the successor, from .March. 
[909. 

I'r.ini, Bird Frj was born in Wayne county, Iowa, on the 2d of March, 1875, 
and is a sen of Francis R. and Carrie M. (Kellogg) Fry. They were early 
[owa settlers, to which state the father's familj came in 1857 and the mother's 
in 1865. Kraut/ Bird Fry was educated in the district schools and graduated 
from ih.' Corydon high scl I with the class of 1895. For two years there- 
after he attended college at Grinnell, Iowa. When the Spanish-American war 

broke out and a eall was sent forth for volunteers he enlisted in the Fiftieth 

[owa Infantry, April 29, b'. ,v . and was mustered in on May 17th of the same 
year. II'- remained with his regiment until November 30, L898, when he was 
mustered out at Des Moines. On Januarj 1. 1899, Mr. Fry became connected 
with the banking business as assistant cashier of the Farmers & Merchants 
State Bank, of which he was made cashier on February 1. 1904, and served in 
that capacitj until January l. 1907. In April of that year he was appointed 
receiver of the Farmers & Drovers stale Bank of Seymour and discharged Ins 
arduous and important duties in thai capacity wiih great circumspection and 
ability. In March, L909, he was called to the position of cashier of the Citizens 



LI CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



(•) 



Slate Bank of Corydon and on the organization of the Firsl National Bank re- 
mained in the same capacity with this institution. It can be truly said of I 

that his services have been of the utmost importance to the bank and thai by his 
work the standing and resources of the institution have wonderfully increased. 
His judgment in matters of finance is clear and he knows how aiid where to 
extend credit, where the most profitable investment can be secured, and is gen- 
erally well versed in all matters pertaining to finance. The First National Bank 
is the outcome of the Citizens State Bank, which was founded in 1882 with an 
authorized capital of sixty thousand dollars, which in January, 1894, was 
reduced to thirty thousand dollars. On account of growing business the bank 
increased its stock again to sixty thousand dollars, fully paid up, in 1900, and 
as a surplus was added thereto from year to year the capital and surplus reached, 
in January, 1906, the formidable figure of one hundred thousand dollars. The 
First National Bank was organized in 1912, alter taking over the resources of 
the Citizens State Hank, with a fully paid in capital of seventy-five thousand 
dollars, and its officers consist of: C. W. Steele, president; Lemuel Kimple, vice 
president; F. B. Fry, cashier; and J. T. Rodgers, assistant cashier. The board 
of directors consist of C. W. Steele. Lemuel Kimple, F. B. Fry, Belle B. 
Sproatt, W. E. Miles, J. A. Hogue and W. G. Walker. 

On June 28, 1899, Mr. Fry was united in marriage to Emma C. Stromsten, 
of Corydon, who is a daughter of G. A. and Sophia Stromsten, natives of Sweden. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fry have one son, Lawrence L., born November 22, 1902. Both 
are members of the Methodist church. Mr. Fry is public-spirited and has not 
only in the course of his position as cashier indirectly benefited the community 
and contributed to its growth, but has found time to actively participate in the 
municipal government as member of the town council. He has always inter 
ested himself in the matter of education and also served as a member of the 
school board for a time. By industry and energy he has found substantial 
reward in his labors and has made a creditable business record, having made 
steady progress in his line of work by the utilization of every opportunity us 
it presented itself. He is a man of strong character and recognized as a force 
ful element in the community, his sterling traits having won him the high 
regard and confidence of all with whom he lias conic into contact. 



T. F. LEMLEY. 



Among the native sons of Lucas county who have gained well deserved sue 
cess in business is numbered T. F. Lemley, operating a large garage in Russell. 
He was born in Washington township, October s. 1876, and is a son of Jacob 

and Margaret (Bell) Lemley, Hie former a nativ ! Greene county, Pennsy] 

vania, and the latter of Virginia. They came as pioneers to Washington town 
ship, making the journey overland and arriving in Lucas county when it was an 
unbroken prairie and Keokuk was the nearest trading cuter. Both have passed 
away, the father dying in Russell in 1907, at the age of seventy four, ami the 
mother in the same city in 1880, when she was Eortj six years of age. There were 
nine children bom to this union: L. D. of Russell; Mrs. Rachel Long of Idaho; 



76 I.I CAS AND WAN \ E COUNTIES 

Elizabeth Morgan of Forest Grove, Oregon; Mrs Rue Anderson of Washington; 
Lizzie Pierce of Greeley, Colorado; Mrs. Anna Warner of Missoula, Montana; 
Peter Lemley of Rapid City, South Dakota ; Mrs. Dora I lodfelter of Wasco, On 
gon; and T. P., of this review. After the death of his 6rs1 wit'.- Jacob Lemlej d 
ried again and to the second union were bom five childn q, as follows: .Minnie, who 
married ;i Mr. Hillier, who resides in Minnesota; Mrs. Margarel Stewart of Lucas 
county, Iowa; Bertha, who resides in Lucas county and who is a teacher; Francis 
and Kirn, both of whom live in Lucas county. 

T. I-'. Lemlej grev in manhood in Washington township, acquiring his educa 
'inn in the public schools and in Chariton Academy, which he attended for two 
years. After laying aside liis books lie followed farming for ;i number of years, 
accumulating two hundred acres of choice hind in Washington township and 
two hundred acres in .Monroe county. These farms he operated until L910 and 
then moved to Russell and opened a garage, selling the Ford and Rambler auto- 
mobiles. In addition to this he does general automobile repairing and has built 
up an extensive and profitable business, lie still has valuable holdings in farm- 
ing lands in this vicinity and has secured a comfortable i tpetency. 

Mr. Lemley is an independent democral in his political beliefs and fraternally 
is connected with the local lodge of the Independent Order ol Odd Fellows. A 
young man of energy, resource and ambition, he has become very successful in his 
business affairs ami his future will undoubtedly he marked by continue,! ami 
rapid progress. 



.Mil IX E. GARDNER. 



John E. Gardner is the owner of two hundred ami forty acres of fertili 
m Washington township hut he now resides in Cambria, where he has erected 
a modern h e and devotes a considerable portion of In- attention to th< op, -ra- 
tion of a mill which he opened for grinding coarser food stuffs. He was horn in 

McLean county. Illinois, in a log cabh ar Sugar < 'reek. Decern her 21, 1846, ami 

is a son of Hiram ami Rachel Richards Gardner. The father was born in 
Perrj county, Ohio, ami passed awaj in Tazewell county, Illinois, in April. L870, 

while lie- niothc!-. a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, survived until 1905, in 

which year she passed awaj at Cambria. In their family were si\ children, four 
of whom are living: John E., our subject ; Benjamin P., a resident of Humeston ; 
M. !•'.. of Cambria; and Mrs. Marj E. Henline, of Oklahoma. Mrs. Martha 

Deckel- is deceased ; alld \. P. (lied ill illl'llUcy. All Of till' chillll'dl Were hol'll ill 

Mel,, Mi, and Tazewell counties, Illinois, where the surviving members were 
reared. The parents w,re early settlers of thai stat, The maternal grandfather, 

Benjamin Richards, was of the earliest settlers of Illinois and had the dis 

i met ion of having seen Georgi Washington on two different occasions. 

John E. Gardner was reared under the parental roof and when a boj re 
moved with Ins parents to Tazewell county, where he grew to manhood, assisting 
his lather in the work of the farm. He there became acquainted with the best 

methods of agriculture which later st 1 liira in good stead and this knowledge 

was the foundati f his later success. In 1876 he left Illinois and removed to 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 77 

Nebraska but later returned to the former state and there remained until 1892, 
when he purchased a farm one mile easl of Humeston, in Richman township. 
Wayne county. Iowa. Having sold this in ISO!) he boughl two hundred and 
forty acres in Washington township, well improved, and tie has since engaged 
largely in the cultivation and improvement of his property. He also gives con 
siderable attention to the operation of a mill, the returns from which enterprise 
bring him a gratifying income. II. ■ is a man of sound judgment, energy and 
industry and through these qualities, in connection with the use of modern tneth 

ods. he has attained prosperity and become one of the substantial n of his 

locality. 

Mr. Gardner was twice married, his tirst union being with Miss Sarah M. 
Livesay, a native of Tazewell county. Illinois, where she subsequently passed 
away. The wedding took place in 1878 and three .laughters were born thereof: 
Mrs. Paralee Davis, a resident of Cambria; Alba 0., who resides with her par 
cuts at the same place: and Eva Minerva, of Des Moines. Iowa. Miss Alba <). 
Gardner was born in Nebraska but the other two daughters are natives of I Hi 
nois. After the death of his first wife Mr. Gardner was married, in February, 
1892, to Miss Minnie M. Reenter, a native of Peoria county. Illinois, and a daugh 
ter of William and Matilda (Lobaugh) Reenter. Two children were born of this 
union: Jess, born in 1894, who is attending college at Iowa City ; and Hiram Ray, 
who was born in IS!).") and attends high school at Corydon. 

Mr. Gardner is a progressive republican in his political affiliations and as a 
member of the school board has done efficient service in the cause of education. 
He also has been called upon to serve as trustee of Washington township, an office 
which he fills at this writing. All measures that stand for improvement along 
educational lines and are undertaken to uplift the young find in him a ready 
supporter who not only gives them his moral endorsement but is ever ready 
to extend material help when nce.lc.1. Public-spirited and progressive, Mr. Card 
ner has become a force in local development and while he has attained individual 
success has been a helpful factor in general advancement as well. He has become 
recognized as a forceful element in this locality, having won by his sterling traits 
of character the high regard and confidence of all with whom he has come in 
contact. 



RIERLE W. BIXBY. 



Merle W. Bixby, who is acting as foreman of the old Colony Creamerj . is one 
of the well known business men of Humeston and in addition is entitled to a 
place among worthy citizens because he is an honored veteran of the Spanish 
American war. He was horn in Pond du Lac, Wisconsin, June 1!'. L878, and is 
a son of Edgar and Eliza (Glines) Bixby, the former a native of Wisconsin and 
the latter of Vermont. Both have passed away, the father dying in 1881 and the 
mother in 1885. In this family were three children. Roy, Eugene and M. W. 
of this review-. 

The last named grew to manhood in Wisconsin and acquired his cdiicaln.ii in 
the public schools of Omro and Oshkosh. In L898, at the age of twentj yea 



7- LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

he enlisted in Company D, Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and bis com 
panj was mobilized at Cbickamauga Park. He served five months and was with 
General Miles in Porto Rico. He returned to New York on the same l>oat which 
brought the genera] and his family— Transport No. 30, known as the Obdam. 
He was mustered ou1 at Ripon, Wisconsin, on November It. 1898, and imme 
diatelj afterward became identified with the creamery business in that city. His 
ability gained him rapid success and wide recognition in his chosen line of work 
and he later came to Humeston as test man in the old Colony Creamery. In June, 
L911, he was promoted to the position of foreman and this he still holds. Hi 
understands the business thoroughly, is conscientious and able in the dis- 
charge of his duties and, therefore, ideally fitted for his position. His labor 

has 1 n an important factor in tin- development of the concern ami in its 

establishment among tin- leading enterprises of the town. 

On the 5th of .May. 1903, .Mr. Bixby was united in marriage to .Miss Sadie 
Bunker, who was born in Pine River, Wisconsin, on the L'.Mh of .May. 1881. 
She is a daughter of Julius II. and Keziah (Turville) Bunker, natives of Wis- 
consin, where they are residing at 1 1 1 • - present time. In their famih are live 
children: .Mrs. Alma Rodgers, who lives in I'm Sippi, Wisconsin; Mrs. Bixby, 

tile Wife of the sllhjeet (if this !e\ie\\; .lollll. who lives in Washington ; .Mrs. 

Harriet Baxter, of Berlin, Wisconsin; and Lucy, who is teaching school in 
Pine River and who makes her home with her parents. 'I'd Mr. and Mrs. I',ixh_\ 
have been horn two children: Mildred, whose birth occurred at Omro, Wis 
cousin. March L3, 1904; ami Irwin, hom on the 13th of May, 1907. Both are 
attending school in Humeston. 

Mr. Bixby gives his allegiance to the republican part} and has served as 
chief of the volunteer lire department of Humeston. Ii.-jiilt in all matters of 
citizenship eminently public-spirited and progressive. He ami his family are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the Home 
steaders Association and. while he has not yel purchased a home of his own. 

has made the ■ which he rents attractive ami c fortable ami welcomes to 

n the many friends which he possesses in this city. He is a wide and discrim- 
inating reader, fond of good literature, and owns , of the hest selected 

libraries in this pari of the state. He is in all relations of his life upright, 
straightforward and honorable ami is a valuable addition to the ranks of 
Humeston 's citizens. 



JAMES B. COMSTOCK. 



Among the men who have come to he regarded as representative citizens and 
leading Imsiuess men of I, mas count) is numbered -lames I'.. Comstock, whose 
man) fine qualities ami progressive spirit entitle him to the high regard in 
which in is uniformly held. He was born in Little Rock, Arkansas. March 1. 

is"t>, a son of Francis J. ami Hannah .1 \\ I Comstock, the former of 

whom was horn at I '.eiitonsport , Iowa. November IT. 1837, ami the latter at 
Agencj City, Iowa, December '-'•"•. 1839. The family has been in Iowa since 
pioneer times, the grandfather having been the first mber of the Iowa legis 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 7:, 

lature from Wapello county, while the grandmother served as interpreter for 
the Indians when the government had an agency at Agency City. Both par- 
ents were born in the state and grew to manhood and womanhood here. The 
mother passed away at Richland, Missouri, December 14, L911, but the father 
survives and makes his home in Ochelata, Oklahoma. He is a veteran of the 
Civil war, having served as captain of Company 1), Third Iowa Cavalry, and 
having been severely wounded at Pea Ridge. An unci,., .lames II. Comstock, 
also a Union volunteer, was wounded at Vicksburg. The Comstock family have 
always been prominent and well known in Iowa and in the early days the post 
office was for many years located at the grandfather's home in Wapello county. 
On the maternal side also Mr. Comstock represents an honored pioneer family, 
his maternal grandmother having been probably the first white child bom in 
the state, her natal year being 1833. Her father was a western ranger and cap 
tain of a company and for many years held the title to a grant of three 
thousand acres of land in Texas, which he received" as part payment for his serv 
ices along the Brazos river. Mr. and Mrs. Francis .1. Comstock became the 
parents of four children: Mrs. Anna B. Moss, horn October 111, 1864, who is 
residing at Hartshorn. Oklahoma: .Mrs. Ada Belle Giffin, who was born Febru- 
ary 26, 1867, and who is now residing at Ochelata. Oklahoma, her husband 
being principal of schools at that place: James B., of this review; and John 
Dorsey, who was horn November 17. 1S7A ami is now residing at Hobart, 
Oklahoma. 

James B. Comstock went to Richland township, Wapello county, with Ids 
parents in 1884. He attended the common schools and supplemented this by 
one year in the Still Osteopathic College of Des Moines. However, he never 
finished this course but laid aside his books and came to Jackson township. 
Lucas county, where lie took up farming. For some time he engaged in the 
real-estate business in connection with his agricultural pursuits and is now 
centering his attention upon that, line of work, in which he has already attained 
success. Being a man of sound judgment and discrimination and possessed of 
a. comprehensive knowledge of land values, he has built up an extensive and 
profitable real-estate business and acquired a high standing among local busi- 
ness men as the head of one of the most nourishing offices of its kind in Lucas. 
On January 15, 1013. .Mr. Comstock purchased' in the city a restaurant busi 
ness and this enterprise is conducted by his wife, who is an able and farsighted 
business woman and an excellent executive and manager. 

On November 2, 1890, Mr. Comstock married .Miss Fannie I. Sanders, who 
was born in Union township. Lucas county, March 13, 1871. She grew lo 
womanhood in this section of the state, attending the pioneer schools, and has 
always been a resident of the county. ]\<t parents. William and Annie K. 
(Castle) Sanders, were among the earliest settlers in this locality, where her 
father conducted the first sawmill and also the first gristmill in Union town- 
ship, being for many years the only miller in this part of the state, lie was a. 
native of Hanover, Germany, horn in 1821. Be came to America in ls:;n and 
died in Jackson township. December 5, L904. lie was twice married and by 
his first union had three children: Wesley H., who resides in Greeley, Colo- 
rado; Mrs. Minerva Troutman, of Fulton, Kansas; and Ella, who died at Hie 
age of twenty-nine. By his second union he had two daughters: Fannie I.. 



80 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

now .Mrs. James B Comstock; and Mrs. Kate Nitchman, who was born Febru- 
ary l'7. 1873, and who is residing in Union township. This Family was among 
the firsl tn settle in Lucas county, having come here overland to Chariton when 
there were bul two cabins in thai community. There were qo railroads and the 
nearest trading poinl was at Bddyville, where Mr. Sanders drove his live 
stock to be shipped to the eastern markets Mrs. Comstock has aided her luis- 

band materially in the ace plishmenl of his Buccess, nol alone by her supporl 

and encouragement, bu1 by active participation in his business affairs. She 

bas made tl aterprise of which she is al the head a profitable and importanl 

one, having buill up by fair dealing and excellenl managemenl a liberal and 

representative pati age. She and her husband own in addition to the busi 

ness interests before mentioned < h Ired and forty-seven acres of good 

land on section l'::. Jackson township, provided with all of the necessary im- 
provements. 

Mr. Comstock gives his political allegiance to the democratic parly and is 
a public-spirited and progressive citizen, although he never seeks public office. 
Fraternally he is connected with Lucas Lodge, No. 1-4. I. t ». 0. ■ '.. and Lucas 
Castle, No. 133, K. I'. Be is identified also with the improved Order of fled 
Men, Wapello Tribe, No. 6. Mr. and Mrs, Comstock are well known ami 
widely popular in Lucas, for their lives have been such as commend them to 
the confidence and high regard of all with whom they are broughl in contacl 
in social or business life. 



• i (OK MOORE. 



J. Coe Moore has attained prominence along agricultural lines in Wayne 
county, especially as raiser of Bereford cattle and Norman horses, and has also 
filled the position of county treasurer efficiently and satisfactorily since 1910 
Mr. Moore was horn in Washington county, Iowa, on the 13th of March, 1862 
and is a son of John P. and Alvira i < ■" Moore, the former a Dative of Licking 
county, Ohio, and the latter of Missouri. The grandfather of our subjeel was 

Bruce Moore, who made his h< in Ohio. John P. Moore came to towa during 

pioneer times in 1842 and located in Washington county, the mother's Family 
coming from Missouri at aboul the same time, and thej were married in Iowa. 
John I'. Moore was a prosperous Farmer in his day bul also Followed the 

profess i medicine. Later in life he moved to Wayne county, where he 

passed awaj on the 31st of March. 1882. The mother is also deceased. There 
were three children in the family of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Moore. Ida Iv. Iva 
A. and -I < !oe, our subject, 

The hist named was reared ai hom. and received a common school education 

Being broughl np mi his father's Farm, I arlj became acquainted with agri 

cultural pursuits and learned the details of successfullj running a farm. In 

his young manl I he came to Way] ounty, where he boughl a farm in South 

Fork township, which he still owns. Be has engaged in general agricultural 
pursuits bul has made .1 specialty of stock-raising and lias become well known 
as a breeder of high grade Bereford cattle ami Norman horses 




J. COI. MOORE 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



83 



In 1890 Mr. Moore was married to Miss Katie Easley, of Wayne countv a 

daughter ot Daniel and Rachel , X,, Easley, bo[h natives of 2k 

Her father participated ,n the Mexican and the Civil u„„. „, was , , inil ,. r 
by occupation but was also active in the bridge building trade. Mr and Mrs 
Moore had tour children: Muriel, deceased; and J. C, Kenneth R. and Bural' 
at home. The family are members of the Methodisl church. 

Mr. Moore is a democrat in his political views and in 1910 was elected to 
the office of county treasurer of Wayne county, wind, he has filled to the satisfac 
tion of his constituents. He has also held various township offices during his 
residence m this district. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge 
the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Of recenl 
years he has removed to Corydon, where he owns a beautiful horn,'. He has 
not only been an interested witness of the changes thai have occurred here but 
has been helpful and cooperative in the general advancement. At all times 
he has been actuated by a laudable ambition, which has carried him forward 
to success. His industry and energy have found substantial reward in a most 
gratifying degree of prosperity and his life has been a busy and useful one. 



WILLIAM R. ALLISON'. 

Since 1907 William R. Allison has been proprietor of one of the largest 
retail hardware stores in Seymour and in its management has displayed an 
ability, resourcefulness and enterprising spirit which place him in the front 
ranks of leading business men of the city. lie is a native of Ohio, born in 
Columbiana county, in 1866, and is a son of William (J. and .Mary (Beal) Alli- 
son. The mother of our subject died in 1869 ami the father afterward removed 
to Illinois, where he married Miss ("row and made his home in Hamilton, 
where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1903. William li. Allison 
did not go to Illinois but after the death of his mother made his home with his 
uncle, R. 0. Allison, of Seymour, the latter being a son of W. 15. Allison, of 
West Virginia. The family is of Irish origin hut has been established in 
America since colonial times and can be traced hack in a direct line from W. 
B. Allison to his father, Charles, and thence to his grandfather, .lames Alii 
son. who served in the Revolutionary war. 

William R. Allison of this review acquired a public-school education and in 
1886 began his active career, engaging as a clerk in the hardware store con 
ducted by L. L. Smith in Seymour, lb' has never hit this line of work and in 
it has attained a success which comes of long familiarity and experience. When 
he resigned Ids position with .Mr. Smith he went to Allerton and spent one year 
in that city before he engaged with Johnston & Tharp as a clerk in their hard 
ware store. This connection hi' retained for ten years and then, in 1900, went 
to work for Roth & Richardson. Be was active in their interests I'm- sewn 
years but in 1907 invested his savings in a business of his own. buying the hard- 
ware establishment belonging to E. A. Rea. lie has since devoted hi-- energies 
to the management of this concern and has proved himself a reliable and 
capable business man lb- has a fine store, Ihirty-seven by one hundred and 



-I l.l CAS AND W \Y.\K COUNTIES 

forty feet, and a warehouse one hundred and forty by thirty-five feel and car- 
pies .-ill kinds of hardware, implements and furniture. Everything aboul the 
place is kepi in excellent condition, the lines of stock are complete and up to 
date and the service intelligent and directed by a spirit of courtesy. As a con- 
sequence Mr. Allison's business has extended rapidly and Ins patronage, which 
is constantly increasing, has reached gratifying proportions at the presenl time. 
In 1890 Mr. Allison married Miss Ida Gale, and they became the parents of 
three children, the eldest of whom died in infancy. The others are: Cleo E., 
who is in business with his father; and Colett, who lives at home. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allison are devout members of the Baptist church. Mr. Allison is a firm 
believer in the value of prohibition and gives active supporl to the prohibition 
party. Fraternally he is connected with the Yeomen. The years of his busi- 
ness activity in Seymour have given him a high standing in the communit 
where he is recognized as a man in whose character fidelity to high principles 
has combined with business enterprise in making him a valued and worthy 
citizen. 



HARVEY PORTER. 



Harvey Porter is numbered among the early settlers in Richman township, 
his residence here dating from 1865. Prom thai time to the presenl he has 
lived upon the farm which he now owns and since reaching maturity has been 
proprietor of the place, which reflects his many years of care and labor in its 

attractive and productive condition. lie was bom in Vinton comity, Ohio, 

October '_'!». 1864, ami is a son of .lanes \V. and Nancy (Albin) Porter, also 
natives of that state, the former horn in Vinton county ami the latter in Guern- 
sey county. They came to Iowa in lsti.'i and located on a farm in Richman 
township. Wayne county, whereon the subjecl of this review now resides. In 
their family were three children: Ira. who lives in Clay township. Wayne 
county; Mrs. McKinley, also of Wayne county; ami Harvey, of tins review. 
A in ore extended mention of this family is made on another page in this work 
in connection with the sketch of George W. McKinley. 

Harvey Porter grew up on ids father's farm and by assisting in its opera 
tion became at an earlj age familiar with the besl and most practical agricul- 
tural methods. This training has been invaluable to him in the conducl of ids 
interests which are now extensive, placing him in the front ranks of progres 

B ive and able agriculturists. He owns the old homestead of three hundred ami 
twenty acres, lying on sections 8 ami 9, Richman township, and tins property 
is w.ll developed and will cultivated, rewarding Ins competent management 
by increasing in productiveness year by year. Mr. Porter has made substan 
tial improvements, having erected a well furnished ami modern home, good 
barns and outbuildings. In addition to general farming he also raises stoek 
and both branches of ins interests are proving important ami profitable under 

able management. 

Mi- Porter has been twice married, lie wedded firsl on the 7th of Septeni 

be] L886, Mis- Nevada Ilm. who was horn in Clarke county. Iowa, and there 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

grew to womanhood, dying hi Richman township, this county, March 13 1901. 
To their union were born the following children: .1. \\\, whose birth occurred 
on the 16th of .June. 1887, and who is now an attorney at law in Twin Kails. 
Idaho; Mrs. Maude Taylor, who was born November 11. L888, and who is resid- 
ing in Warren township. Lucas county; Berl II.. whose birth occurred March 
4. 1891. and who now resides in Decatur county; Guy, who was horn Augusl 
4. 1893, and who now resides in Twin Palls. Idaho; and King, horn Augusl 
12, 1S95. These children all attended the common schools of this vicinity and 
the oldest, J. W., was for si\ years a student at Drake University. On the 
28th of September, 1903, Mr. Porter was again married, his second wife hem- 
Miss Clara Pryor, who was horn .May ti, 1886. She is a daughter of Wayne I', 
and Susie (Clarke) Pryor, the former of whom was born in Decatur county. 
Iowa. July 3, 1856, and the latter in Monroe county, this state, August 17. 1865. 
The mother passed away in Decatur county. March 24. 1892. The father sur- 
vives her and still makes his home in his native county, whither his parents 
came as pioneers. In the Pryor family were the following children: John, 
who has passed away; Clay, who was horn July 30. 1882, and who is residing 
on the home farm in Decatur county; Mrs. Porter, wife of the subject of tins 
review; Alma, who was horn November 16, 1888, and who is residing in Rich- 
man township; and .Mrs. Laura Reynolds, who was born October 24. 1890, and 
who now resides in Decatur county. All of these children were born in Decatur 
county with the exception of Mrs. Porter and Alma. 

Mr. Porter gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is con 
nected fraternally with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Humeston. 
He and his wife are members of the Christian church. They are representa- 
tives of two of the best known families in Wayne county and their many 
sterling qualities of character have gained them the respect and esteem of all 
who come in contact with them. 



HON. JOSEPH E. DOZE. 

Probably none of the native sons of Iowa has accomplished more vital and far- 
reaching work in the public service than the Hon. Joseph B. Doze, state repre- 
sentative on the democratic ticket. His worth and fidelity in positions of pub- 
lic trust is indicated by the results which have followed his work in various official 
capacities and by his definite accomplishment along constructive lines of progress 
and reform. He was born in Decatur county. Iowa, within twelve miles of his 
present home, November I s . 18f>4. and is a son of Francis K. and Cena (l'hipps) 
Doze, the former of whom was born in France in 1826 and the latter in Indiana 
in 1830. When Joseph E. Doze was still a child his parents moved to Missouri 
and remained in that state for five years, after which they returned to Iowa. 
Later the family went to Decatur county and there remained until 1874, when 
they moved to Page county. From there in 1877 they went to Ringgold county 
and remained residents of that section until 1890. The father died in Mahaska 
county, this state, in 1862 and the mother's death occurred in Minneapolis, Min- 



86 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

nesota, in 1909. She and her husband were the parents of three children: Joseph 
E., of this review ; .Mrs. Maj Doze, a residenl of Alberta, Canada; and .Mrs. [ wa 
V. Sargeant, whose birth ("•(■unci in Mahaska county and who is now residing in 
Minneapolis. 

The Hon. Joseph E. Doze was eighl years of age when his father died and he 

accompanied the other members of the family in their various removals. Fr 

1877 to L890 he was a residenl ol Ringgold county and while there began his pub- 
lic life- He was twice elected county auditor on the de cratic tickel and his 

virion was a significanl tribute to the force of his personality and to the prin- 
ciples for which he stood, because the aormal republican majority was aboul 
seven hundred. In 1890 he removed to Humeston and has resided here since 
thai time. For the pasl ten years he has been in the real-estate business and con- 
trols valuable holdings in this section and in other parts of the country, his fair 
dealing, comprehensive knowledge and stricl integrity constituting the salienl 

elements in Ins sn ss. During the last five years he has hern interested also 

in the automobile business and lias an excellenl repairing department 

Mr. Doze has been three times married. < >n March 18, 1878, he wedded .Miss 
Luella Conley, who passed away, Leaving a daughter, .Mrs. Laura P. ('lark. She 
was horn February 17. 1879, and was graduated from the Humeston high school 
with the class of Wv She is at presenl residing in Corydon, where her hus- 
band is a well known merchant tailor. Mr. Doze's second union was with Miss 
Lucille Keller, who was horn in Ringgold county, Lowa, and who died at .Mount 
Ayr-. To this union were born two sons. The elder, Lynn Keller Doze, was born 
April ii. L889, and in L907 was graduated from the Humeston high school. He 
began his business career as clerk in the mercantile establishmenl of I-'. T. Mc- 
Kibben, of Humeston, and later held the position of bookkeeper for the Hawk 
eye Lumber Companj al Centerville. He afterward did similar work in the 
interests of J. L. Humphrej & Companj of Humeston and resigned 'his position 
in order to become assistant cashier of the Home state Bank. Joseph Dean 
Doze, the younger son. was born in Humeston. October L5, 1891. He was gradu- 
ated from the Humeston high scl I with the class of 1909 and is now assisting 

his father in the conduct of the automobile business. After the death of his - 
ond wife Mr. Doze was again married, wedding in 1892 .Miss Elizabeth Davis, a 
native of Nan Buren county. Iowa, horn .lanuar.v L' s . 1872. She is a daughter '•( 
Jefferson and Elizabetl Baird) Davis, both of whom have passed away, the 
father dying in Ringgold countj and the ther in Mount Ayr in 1882. 

Mr. Doze's interest in public affairs is of thai vital and forceful kind which 

constitutes a potenl elemenl in the general advancement. All of those activities 

which atl'eet the municipal welfare, the intellectual and moral progress r ive 

his indorsi menl and heart} supporl and his active labor in their promotion. He 

was for two terms ■, member of the citj council and was mayor of Hi Bton for 

three years, to Ins fellow citizens prompt, businesslike and efficii 

service ami accomplishing during his administration much valuable work along 
lines of civic expansion. He was the successful candidate of his party fur oomina 

tion to the state Legislature in the June primaries ami at tl Lection on Novem 

her 5 1912, was chosen over his republican opponent. Mr. Fry, of Corydon, bj 
., decisivi ority, This affords him a wider field for the exercise of thai 

ability in governmenl which he bo signalh displayed in municipal affairs 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 87 

Mr. Doze is one of the best known men in Humeston at the presenl time and 
aside from his business and public interests has important fraternal affiliations. 
He is a member of Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, F. & A. M., of Eumeston, and belongs 
to Salem Chapter, No. 75, K. A. M. at Mount Ayr. of which organization he is a 
past master. Besides his well equipped garage he owns also a beautiful borne in 
Humeston. He has a successful career in municipal politics behind him and 
before him splendid prospects for continued advancement in state affairs. He is 
well equipped for the work, being loyal to his ideals, consistent in his principles 
and conduct and incorruptible in bis high integrity. 



PERRY 0. STERETT. 



Perry 0. Sterett, closely connected with important business interests in 
Humeston as manager of the Hawkeye Lumber Company, is a native of Iowa, 
horn in Woodland township. Decatur county, on the 16th of September, 1878. 
lie is a son of Albert P. and Anna (Pinkerton) Sterett, natives of Greene 
county. Illinois. The father has passed away, his death having occurred in 
Humeston, and the mother makes her home in Alhia. Iowa. In their family 
were the following children: William, who died at the age of one year; Joseph, 
who resides in Wheatland, Wyoming; Mrs. Nellie Elder, of Canada; .Mrs. Eva 
Gillis-Rennolds, who makes her home in Agency; .Minnie, of Chariton; Perry 
0., of this review; Mrs. Lillie Doolittle. who has passed away; and Jennie, who 
resides with her mother in Alhia. 

Perry 0. Sterett acquired his early education in the public schools of Wood 
land township and completed it in the Humeston public schools, his parents 
having removed to this city when he was still a child. In 1902 he began his 
independent career, engaging in the restaurant business in Humeston and con 
tinning in it for a year and a half. At the end of that time he went to Cory 
don and there for six months conducted a similar enterprise, abandoning it in 
order to enter the employ of the Hawkeye Lumber Company. He was sta- 
tioned at Alhia in 1905 and three years later was transferred to Lovilia, where 
he remained as manager until October, 1910, when he was transferred to 
Humeston. where he is now holding the same position. The Hawkeye Lumber 
Company is one of the most important manufacturing concerns in the city. 
It was established in 1905 and since that time has expanded rapidly, its affairs 
being managed along progressive and modern lines. The company deals in all 
kinds of building material ami numbers among its employes anil officials many 
able and resourceful business men. By virtue of his position as its manager 
Mr. Sterett occupies a prominent and representative place in husiness circles 
and has proved himself well able to till it. Under his management the busi 
ness has increased in volume and the markets for the company's products 
have broadened. Everything is conducted in a practical and systematic man 
ner and the wheels of the husiness run smoothly, showing the constant super 
vision of an able and enterprising man. 

Mr. Sterett married, in .March. ]W>. .Miss Clara Williams, who was horn 
in Clay township. Wayne county. Iowa. July 25, 1882. She is a daughter of 



88 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COl'XTIKS 

Levi and Josephine (Harbard) Williams, who now reside in Eumeston, and 
she acquired her education in the public schools of her native section. She is 
the eldest of a family of four children, the others being Judson, < lora and ( (pal, 
all of Eumeston. Mr. and -Mrs. Steretl have become the parents of two daugh- 
ters: Hazel .May. whose birth occurred in Albia cm the :M of -May. 1904; and 
Anna J., born in Lovilia, March 14. 1910. 

Mr. Steretl gives his allegiance to the republican party and, although he 
never seeks public office, he is yel active and progressive in all matters of 
citizenship, giving beartj cooperation to movements for the public ^ood. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A F. & A. M. He has 
already made an enviable reputation in business circles of Eumeston and gh s 
every indication of continued progress. Broad, liberal-minded and closely 
observant, he has carefully noted and utilized his opportunities and has today 
reached a position among the men in this section who control and direel 
general industrial development. Be intends nexl spring to erect a tine modern 
residence in Eumeston, and in the meantime he is residing in a comfortable 
and attractive dwelling which he ami his family have made ;i center ni' detight- 
t'nl hospitality. Eere an atmosphere of culture and refinement prevails, for 
Mr. Steretl is a wide and discriminating reader, Eond of good literature of all 
kinds, and has gratified this taste by securing a large and well selected library. 
In business relations he is upright, straightforward and honorable and in his 
private life genial and courteous -a line type of a good citizen ami an honor- 
able gentleman. 



FRED M. KYNER. 



line of tin- must progressive, enterprising and alert young business men 
of Eumeston is Fred M. Kyner, partner in the firm controlling the Eyde hard- 
ware business ami prominently connected with the general business and mer- 
cantile interests of the eit\. He was l»H'll ill Decatur eOlint.V. Iowa. A.UgUS< 17. 

Iss; ;1 ,|,| ; s a S ,,|| f Charles M. and Victoria (Westfall) Kyner. The father 
was horn in Warren county, Illinois, Januarj I. 1857, and came i" Wayne 
county in 1875, preceding tin' other members of the family — his parents ami 
his brothers bj one year, in Iowa he married Victoria Westfall. who was 
born in Lucas county, February 27, 1864. she was a daughter of Granville 
and Jeanette Teal Westfall. who were among the notable pioi r settlers of 

Lucas counts, having made their home in this section iii 1850 They came 

overland from Ohio to I ounty in 1849 and spent one year making prepara- 
tions for the establishment of their home upon the prairie. The} encountered 

all the hardships and inconveniei s of pioneer life ami met them with confi 

dence ami courage, gradually gaining prominence ami prosperity. In Lucas 
counts they reared a familj of fourteen children, eight of whom are still Living. 
Fred M. Kyner grew to manhood in Wayne countj and acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools, graduating from the Eumeston high Bchool in 1905. 
For some time afterward he worked upon his father's farm, hut later became a 
partner in the Byde hardware business in Eumeston, which is one of the largest 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 89 

enterprises of its kind in Wayne county. The company handles a complete 

stock of shelf and heavy hardware and all kinds of farm implements and enjoys 
a liberal patronage, based on the high quality of the goods, the reasonable prices 
and the straightforward dealing which is the policy of the house. In the expan- 
sion of this business Fred M. Kyner has borne a prominent part, bending his 
energies to the promotion of the company's interests and achieving that sueeess 
which always comes to the progressive, resourceful and farsighted business man. 
In addition to his beautiful home in Humeston he, in connection with his mother, 
owns five hundred acres of choice land in Wayne county and about six hundred 
acres of valuable Texas farming land. lie is in addition a director and stock- 
holder in the Humeston State Bank and since December, 1912, lias been assistant 
cashier of that institution, serving with fidelity and ability. 

In 1910 ilr. Kyner was united in marriage to Miss Blanche Hayes, who was 
born in Milton, Iowa, January 19. 1SS0, and who was graduated from the 
Milton high school in 1904. She is a daughter of William Wallace and Cynthia 
Anna (Robey) Hayes, the latter of whom was born in Indiana and died in .Milton. 
Iowa, May 28, 1912. The father makes Ins home in Milton. In this family were 
four children : Harry, who lives near Le Mars. Iowa ; Bert E., who lives near 
Ottumwa; Mrs. Kyner: and Mrs. Catharine Norman, of Milton. 

Mr. Kyner 's fraternal affiliations are with Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A. F. 
& A. M., of Humeston, to which organization his father also belonged. He has 
always been a stanch supporter of the republican party and, while not a poli- 
tician in the sense of office seeking, he is yet progressive and public-spirited in 
all matters of citizenship. He has always been interested in municipal affairs, 
giving his aid and cooperation to every movement for the general good. 
Throughout the period of his residence in Humeston he has enjoyed to the 
fullest degree the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens and his worth as 
a business man and citizen is widely recognized. 



CHRISTIAN F. SPROW. 

The greater part of the life of Christian F. Sprow has been passed in Warren 
township. Wayne county, where he resides on a fain, of two hundred acres 
located on section 14. He is a native of Ohio, having been born in Wyandot 
countv. that state, on the 19th of April, 1871, and is a son of Christian and Eva 
(Hetzel | Sprow. The parents were both born in Germany, but in early life they 
came to America and were married m Ohio, where they made their home until 
1874 In the year last Darned they came to Iowa, settling in Wayne county. 
Here the father purchased a hundred and sixty acres of Land, which he culti- 
vated during the remainder of his active life. As time passed 1.,. extended the 
boundaries of his farm until it comprised two hundred acres and upon his 
retirement turned the property over to his son. Christian F.. with whom he now 
makes his home. He ,s now seventy-five years of age. while the mother, win, 
passed away on February 28, 1908, was seventy at the time of her demise, she 
was laid to rest in the cemetery at Allerton. 



90 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Christian P. Sprow, who is the youngesl in a family of three, was a child 
of Imt three years when be accompanied his parents on their removal to Iowa. 
Be was educated in the common schools of tins county and upon laying aside 
liis text-books turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, continuing to reside 
on the home place in the cultivation of which he assisted his father until the 
latter's retirement, when he assumed the entire responsibility of its operation. 
The entire tract is under cultivation, and the fields which have been brought into 
a high state of productivitj annually yield abundanl harvests. 1 1 1- chief crops 
are haj and grain, as be is an extensive feeder of cattle and hogs and also buys 
horses for the market. His farm is situated in one of the most desirable portions 
of Warren township, and. being provided with a natural drainage, and owing 
to the extensive improvements made thereon by himself and father, is num- 
bered among the valuable properties of the county. 

Mr. Sprow was married in 1900 to .Miss Effie Barker, a daughter of G. \V. 
Barker, of this county, she was born on the l v ih of January, L876, and is the 
fifth in order of birth in a family of six. To Mr. and Mrs. Sprow there have 
been born three children: Aileen, Dwighl and Guy. 

The family attend the .Methodist Episcopal church, in which the parents 
hold membership. His indorsement in matters politic Mr. Sprow extends to 
the democratic party. Be is one of the progressive and enterprising citizens 
of Ins communitj and has served for one term as a member of the hoard of 
school directors. Mr. Sprow is meeting with the success in the development of 
his interests which is won by the man of diligent methods and definite purposi 
in any line of endeavor. 



OB \ GIBBS. 



< >i E the model farms of Wayne countj is thai of Ora Gibbs, who owns two 

hundred acres of highlj cultivated land in Benton township, where for ra 
than a quarter of a century be has successfully engaged in genera] agricultural 
pursuits and stock-raising. Be was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, on 

the 25th of May, 1852, and is a son of Sol a and Rebecca Gibson Gibbs. 

The lather was a native of < 'ana da. his birth there occurring on the 24th of July, 
1812, hut when a lad of six years the family crossed the border into the United 
states, locating on a farm in Clarion county, Pennsylvania. There he was 

reared and educated and trained to il areer of an agriculturist. In later 

years he purchased the old homestead in the cultivation of which he engaged 

until 1872, when hi' disposed of his interests in the Keystone state removed 

in Iowa, locating in \Va> iounty. Sere he purchased a quarter section of 

I. mil two niiles uorth of All.'i'ton. on which In- passed the remainder of his life, 

his (hail curring on June 21, 1900. lie was of English extraction, his people 

having removed from tic mother countrj to Canada more than a centurj ago. 
Mis Gibbs was horn in Butler county, Pennsylvania, on July 11. 1824, and 

was reared, educated and married in the slate of her natn itj . She aCCOmpanii d 
her husband and famil} on their removal t" Iowa and passed away on the old 
homestead on the 17th id' August, 1900. The familj of Mi-, and Mrs Gibba 



o 

> 
o 

M 

bd 
a 

02 

>■ 

o 







LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 93 

numbered eight, of whom our subject is the eldest. In order of birth the 
others are as follows: Newman, who passed away in 1896; .lane the deceased 
wife ot William Kin, pie. of Nebraska; James and Cameron, of Wayne countj • 
Lewis, who u a resident of Colorado; and Oliver and Elmer, of this county! 
They were all horn in Pennsylvania. 

Ora Gibbs passed his boyhood and youth in the state of ins nativity acquiring 
a meagre education in its district schools, which he attended at irregular inter- 
vals until old enough to assist his father in the fields. In common with all 
farmer lads of that period he was early trained to agricultural pursuits, and 
long before he had attained his maturity was doing a man's work, lie acco 
pained his family on their removal to Iowa and continued to share the responsi- 
bilities connected with the cultivation of the home place until he was twenty-two 
years of age. He then started out on his own responsibility and lor several years 
thereafter farmed as a renter. His efforts in this direction were rewarded with 
a fair measure of success and he finally succeeded in accumulating sufficient 
money to enable him to purchase his present place and here he has ever since 
continued his agricultural career. His is one of the oldest farms in the county, 
the government grant having been issued more than sixty years ago. The firsl 
house erected on the place is still standing but is now used for an outbuilding, 
and despite the fact that it has Keen in constant use for sixty years is still in 
a good state of preservation. That Mr. Gibbs has led a life of well organized 
activity is evidenced by the general appearance of his farm, from his carefully 
tilled fields to the condition of his stock and buildings. As his circumstances 
have permitted he has added to the value of his homestead by the introduction 

of various improvements. lie has erected a comfortable. dern residence and 

at a convenient distance therefrom are situated the barns and sheds, which are 
substantially constructed buildings and well adapted to their various uses. Mis 
equipment is thoroughly adequate to his needs and comprises practically every 
machine or implement known to the progressive agriculturist of the present day. 
In connection with the cultivation of his fields he raises stock, making a specialty 
of feeding cattle and hogs for the market. As he has always directed his under- 
takings in a practical and intelligent manner, concentrating his efforts upon 
the achievement of a definite end, he has prospered and is now numbered among 
the successful business men and substantial citizens of his community. 

On the 4th of February, 1875, Mr. Gibbs was married to .Miss Catherine 
Sollenbarger. whose birth occurred in this state on the Mb of July, 1851. She 
is the eldest child born to David and Mary Margaret (Allen) Sollenbarger, 
natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Virginia. When he was twenty-one 
the father came to Iowa and here In- met anil subsequently married .Miss Allen. 

who removed to this state with her parents in early girll d. Here .Mr. and .Mrs. 

Sollenbarger passed the entire period of their domestic life, his death occurring 
in 1900 and hers in February, 1912. To them were born eight children, those 
beside .Mrs. Gibbs being as follows: John W., who is a resident of Wayne 
county; Jennie, who died in childhood: Florence, who is living in Corydon; 
David T., a resident of Allerton ; .Mary Margaret, the wife of John Stromsten, 
of Corydon; George, also of Corydon ; and Ella, who died in infancy. The family 
of Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs numbers eight, as follows: George P., who was born in 
November, 1875, residing in this county: Florence .bine, who was born in July, 



'i| LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

1-77. now the wife of Alberl Bott, of this county ; J. Elmer, whose birth occurred 
in January, 1879, also residing in this county; Man olive, the deceased wife of 
Fred A. Wolf, who was born in 1880 and died in 1906; l> Pearl, who was born 
in L882, ,-it home; C. Oramil, who was bora in 1883 and died in infancy; Martha 
Margaret, whose natal year was 1884, and who is now Mis. John McQraw; and 
Ethel Maude, who was horn in 1886, the wife of Frank Lohr, of Wayne county. 
'I'll, family manifest their religious faith through their connection with the 
.Methodist Episcopal church, in which the parents have long held membership. 
.Mr. Gibbs is one of the widely known residents of Benton township, where his 
industrious habits and honorable husiness methods have won him the respeel 
and esteem of his oeighbors and fellow citizens, among whom he numliers many 
stanch friends. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON RIKER. 

George Washington Etiker, living retired in Russell after many years' closi 
connection with agricultural interests of Lucas county, was born in Cayuga 
county. New York, Deeemher !t. ls:i7. He is a son of Henry L. and Ann (' 
(Thorne) Riker, natives of Dutchess county, that state, the former horn Janu- 
ary -!*. 1814, and the latter July 26, 1*17. Their marriage occurred December 
3, 1835, and they resided in Cayuga county many years thereafter, later mov- 
ing to Dutchess county, where their deaths occurred. Eight children were born 
to their union: Mrs. Elizabeth Knapp, deceased; George W., of this review; 
William Eenry, who resides in New Fork; .Martha Ann, deceased: Ganzewoort 
Melville, of New York; Mrs. Anna L. Eckert, deceased: Frank, who has also 
passed away; and Cora, who resides in Rochester. New York. 

George Washington Riker grew to manhood in Cayuga county and acquired 
his education in the public schools there. When he was twenty-four years of age 
lie removed to Dutchess county and there followed tannine for some time, later 
engaging in the hoot and shoe business. In 1871 he moved to Lucas county, 
this state, and settled on a farm in Washington township, becoming in the 
course of year- a representative and successful agriculturist, with extensive 
interests in farming lands, lie resided upon his properly until 1882 and then 
purchased eleven acres also in Washington township hut within the incorpo- 
rated town of Russell and retired from active life. Since thai time he has 

given a great deal of attention to the ear.' of fees, finding both recreation and 

profil in fee culture. II. ■ has i addition perfected a number of inventions 

upon which he has taken out patents, among them a wire stretcher, a wire 
splicer and a culver! form, all of which have been tried and found practicable 

anil useful. 

Mr. Riker ha- been twee married. He wedded first, in New Fork, Sep 
temher 2, 1861, Miss Angeline B. Benedict, who was horn in Cayuga county, 
New Fork, September 7. 1839. She was a daughter of Smith and Eliza Ann 
i Williams' Benedict, the former a native of Connecticut, horn February l'7. 
1809, and the latter of \,w Fork, horn Januarj 1. 1810. Both have passed 
away, the father dying July I s . 1881, and the mother January 29, 1890 In 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 95 

their family were four children: William, wlm has passed away; Angeline 
and Adaline, twins, the former of whom became the first wife of the subject of 
this review and the latter of whom has passed away; and one child who died 
in infancy. Mr. Riker became the father of three children by his firsl mar- 
riage: Smith Henry, who was horn September 2, 1863, and who is residing 
in Troy. Xew York; George B., whose birth occurred .March 26, 1865, and who 
lives in Fort Morgan, Colorado: and Mrs. Addie S. Huston, who was horn 
August 26, 1867, and who makes her home in Russell. Mr. and Mrs. Biker 
also adopted into their family. Walter B.. the son of .lames and Florence Bell 
Russell, who was born at Lincoln. Nebraska, July 26, 1885, and who on Janu- 
ary 26, 1887, was given by his mother to Mr. and Mrs. Riker to keep and rear 
as their own. This trust they lovingly fulllilled. giving him the eare of a 
father and mother. He has now crown to manhood and hears the surname of 
Riker. He is brakeman on a passenger train on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad with a run from Burlington to Creston, Iowa. The first Mrs. 
Riker passed away .June 16, 1901, and two years later .Air. Riker was again 
married, his second wife being Mrs. Ellen (Taylor) Van Auken. She was 
born in Cayuga county. New York, a daughter of William and Marilla (North- 
rup) Taylor, natives of Connecticut. Both have passed away, the father dying 
in Russell and the mother in New York. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren: Ellen, the wife of the subject of this review; Mrs. Almira Osborne, who 
died in 1913; and William, who lives in New York. After the death of William 
Taylor's first wife he was again married and by his second union had three 
children: Eugene, who has passed away; .lames, who resides in New York; 
and .Mrs. Emma Rainey. of New York. By her marriage to Mr. Van Auken 
Mrs. Riker had four children, as follows: William, who was horn May 14, 
1872, and who makes his home in New York; Mrs. Gertrude Brown, who was 

born May 26, 187:?, also a resident of that city; Floyd, whose birtl surred 

April. 15, 1876, and who makes his home in San Diego, California: and Howard, 
whose birth occurred February 25, 1880, and who now resides in Los Angeles. 
Mr. Riker was at one time a member of the Independent Order of Coo. I 
Templars and belongs to the Grangers. He is a republican in bis political 
beliefs and served for some time as a member of the town council of Russell, 
being always active in public affairs and cooperating heartily in all measures 
to promote' general advancement and growth. He is well and favorably known 
in the city, where he has resided sine- 1882, and throughout Lucas county, 
where he has lived for forty-two year's, his neighbors and friends holding him 
in high regard as a representative business man and an uprighl and loyal 

citizen 



HENRY SANDERS. 



Henry Sanders, of Lucas. Iowa, has for many years been connected with 
agricultural and commercial interests of the county and I'm- the past ten years 
has done valuable service in the employ of McKlveen Brothers & Rogers, in 
Lucas. Born in Union township, this county, on March 6, 1865, he is a son ol 



96 I.I CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

John and Mary A. Hit. Sanders. The paternal grandfather, A. lam Sanders, 
was born in Pennsylvania and died in Qnion township, Lucas county, at the 
age of seventy-two years. His wife, Hannah Sanders, also a Dative of the Key- 
stone state, died in the same township, aged seventy-four years. Both settled 
in Union township in 1853 and are buried in the cemetery at Smyrna. The 
maternal grandparents were William and Nancj (Irvih) Bite, natives of West 

moreland county, Pennsylvania, both of wl i passed away in Wyandol county, 

Ohio, the former at the age of sixtj eighl years and the latter when sixty-seven 
years old. In their familj were six children, of whom tun survive. John 
Sanders, the father of our subject, was born in Somersel county, Pennsylvania, 
on June 4, 1818, and died in Nebraska, December 8, 1904, II. came to Union 
township. Lucas county, in 1856. His wit... Mary A. Sanders, was a native of 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, horn July 25, 1839, and moved westward 
with a sister, tirst settling at Harden Grove, Decatur county, Iowa, whence they 
came to Lucas county in 1>.V_'. When they made the overland trip th.re were 
hut few settlers, the country for the most part being uninhabited prairie. .Mr. 
and .Mrs. John Sanders had two children: Mrs. Hannah Y.uii. born March I'd. 
1863, who married E. H. Zon1 on March It'. I s s7.and died Maj f. l vs s Leaving 
one daughter, Mrs Cassie Yont > Sellers, horn April 23, 1 V >S who resides 
n.ar Chariton, Iowa: and Henry, the subjecl of this review. After the death 
of her lirst husband Mrs. Sanders married the Rev. S. X. Matheny, who was 
horn February 29, 1821, in Missouri, lie was taken in his infancy by his 
father to Kentucky, when, h.- lived \'i<r about eighl years, when the fan 
removed in Indiana. In 1850 they came 1.1 Iowa and in 1857 h.- was ordained 
a Methodist Episcopal minister. He became a Mason in 1872. ( »n February 9 
1-17. he was married to Elizabeth Jane Wilkins, who passed away Januarj 11, 
1898, and to this union were born thirteen children, eleven sous and two 
daughters. 

Ileinw Sanders grew to manhood in I. mas countj of which he has since 
been a continuous resident with the exception of one year. In the acquiremenl 

of his education he alien, led the common scl Is and earlj became acquainted 

with agricultural labor, engaging in farming until he was thirty-five wars old, 
when for three years he worked as carpenter in Lucas For the past ten y< 
he has been employed by the firm of McKlveen Brothers & Rogers, in Lucas, 
ami by his ability, industry and innate honesty has earned the high confidence 
of his emplov ers. 

On Februarj 3, 1889, Mr. Sanders was united in marriage to Miss Clara A. 
I . . in. who was born in Union township, this county, Januarj 7. 1863, and there 

• to womanh I. she is a member of an old pioi r family, her parents 

heme A -I and Kate (VanVosI Irvin. the former a native of Ohio, hum 
April 15 1838, and the latter of Shelby county, Indiana. Lorn September -. 

1842. Both of her parents .-.• to this county iii 1852 with their respective 

families and were married in this countj on November 8, I860, and are still 

residing in their comfortable home in Union township. Mr. and Mrs [rvin 

had nine children, ..I wl i Mrs. Henry Sanders was the eldest. The other 

surviving members are: Matthew G., horn Januarj 18 1864, a resides 
Hastings, Nebraska; Maude, whose birth occurred September 19, 1 s 7l\ ami who 
resides with her parents in Union township; Lee, born September 19, 1875, 



e 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 97 

making his home in Lucas; Mrs. Julia Eckleberry, born November 29, L877 
residing in Union township; and Etta, a residenl of thai township who was 
born January 31, 1882. The deceased are: Margaret, who passed away at tli 
age of one year; Mary, a little maiden of three years al the time of her death; 
and Elizabeth, who died when one year of age. Mr. and .Mrs. Sanders are the 
parents of six children: E. Arlie, born January 7. 1890, now residing in Lucas; 
Fred J., born September 6, 1891; Myrtle Y.. born January 16, 1893; Ethel /. 
born March 23, 1895: Don W., born in Decatur county, August 25, 1896; and 
Wilma L., born October 5, 1900. With the exception of Don W., all of the 
children were born in Lucas county. 

Politically Mr. Sanders affiliates with the republican party and in religious 
faith he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Moth also belong 
to the Yeoman lodge of Lucas. Mr. Sanders owns a comfortable residence in 
that city where he is widely and favorably known and highly esteemed for his 
many high qualities of mind and character. 



GEORGE P. McNAY, D. V. M. 

Dr. George P. McNay, formerly one of the best known veterinary surgeons 
in Ilumeston and now a successful real-estate operator in Denver, Colorado, was 
born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, September 22, 1862. He is a son of Jasper 
Porter and Mary Frances (Lazear) McNay, both natives of the Keystone state, 
the father born January 15, 1839, and the mother June 22, 1841. Their mar- 
riage occurred in Pennsylvania. January 30, 1860, and to their union were 
born the following children: Francis James, whose birth occurred November 
30, I860, and who died January 27. 1864; George 1'.. of this review; .Mrs. Mary 
Olive Bristor. born September 19, 1866, who is residing in Humeston; .Michael 
Luther, whose birth occurred January 16, 1868, and whose home is in Lucas 
county; John Thomas, who was born December 5, 1869, and who now resides 
near Derby, in Lucas county; Albert Lee. born October L'2. 1873, who is prac- 
ticing medicine in Kansas City, Missouri; and Jesse Lazear, born July 23, 
1877, who is practicing dentistry in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The mother 
of these children died in Pennsylvania, January 30, 1880, and the father later 
married again. To his second union were born the following children : Florence, 
who is married and resides in Pennsylvania; Daisy, who is also married and 
makes her home in the Keystone state; and Gertrude, who is teaching school 
near the old homestead in Pennsylvania. 

Dr. George P. McNay acquired his education in the public schools of Greene 
county, Pennsylvania, and when not engaged with his books assisted his father 
in the operation of the farm. His mother bad invested some money in a tract 

of land in Lucas county, Iowa, and when Dr. McNay grew to manhood he ci 

west in order to assume its management. For a number of years he operated 
this farm and eventually purchased property of his own which he developed 

and improved along progressive lines for some ti In 1893 be completed a 

course in comparative medicine in the Chicago Veterinary College and located 
for practice in Humeston. For fourteen years he gave his attention to his pro 



98 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

fessional work, building up ;i splendid patronage founded on real meril and 
recognized ability. <>n the 10th of July, 1907, he became interested in western 
real estate and opened an office in Denver, Colorado. 

Dr. McNaj married Miss Addii Kellenbarger, a representative of one of 
tin- pioneer families in this section of the state. She was born in Indiana, March 
8, 1859, and is a daughter of William Bishop and Sarah Blancel Jenkins 
Kellenbarger, the former of whom was born November 14. 1813, and the latter 
March 20, 1820. The mother was a native of Meade county, Kentucky. The 
parents rain,- as pioneers to Washington township, Wayne county, in 1861, and 
here the father took up an undeveloped trad of land and for many years benl 
his energies to its improvement. I "> ■ i 1 1 u r a skilled carpenter, his knowledge of 

his trade aided bim greatly in the erecti £ the accessary farm buildings and 

he soon had one of the besl improved properties in this pari of the state. He 
luiilt fences, barns and outbuildings, hauling the lumber from Burlington, Iowa, 
and doing the work of construction with his own hands. He died at Humeston, 
Iowa. Augusl 20, 1901, having survived his wife since June 25, 1893. Mr. and 
.Mrs. Kellenbarger were the parents of eleven children, namely: John Hilary, 
horn in 1840, who resides in Grinnell, Iowa; .Mrs. .Mary Jane Beals, born in 1843, 
who resides in Custer county, Nebraska; .Mrs. Rachel Harned, whose birth 
occurred in 1848 and who is now residing in Humeston; Joseph Allen, who 
was horn in 1852 and who makes Ins home in Custer county, Nebraska ; Benjamin 
William, born in 1857, who resides in Myrna, Nebraska; Mrs. McNay, the wife 
of the subjecl review; Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, triplets, who died in infancy; 
Philip, who passed away in childhood; and a daughter who died in infancy. 
The Kellenbarger family is of old American establishment and was for man} 
years well known in Pennsylvania. In thai state Mrs. McNay's grandfather, 
Joseph Kellenbarger, was horn on the 1-th of August, 1782, and during the War 
of 1812 served as a colonel in the American army, dying al Cambria, Iowa. 
Februarj 2, 1872. His wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Rachel Lavar, 
died in 1825. The maternal line can be traced back to Ethan Allen, of the 
Continental army. I'm- .Mrs. McNay's maternal great-grandmother was Nancy 
All. n Shaver, a cousin of the Revolutionarj soldier. Mrs. McNay's grand- 
parents came to Pella, Iowa, in I860, thus founding this branch of tin- 
family in tin' middle west. In the following year thej moved to Waynt county, 
Iowa, and were among the earliesl settlers in that section, for the Srsl few 
years they encountered all of the hardships and privations of pioneer Life bu1 
faced them resolutelj with high confidence ami courage and gradually gained 

prominei ami prosperity, leaving to their descendants the record of worthy 

work well done and the memorj of an untarnished name. 

Dr. and .Mrs. McNaj became the parents of tin- hildren. The eldest, 

I..,, N was born in Lucas county, Iowa. Augusl 22, L883. He attended the 
common schools in the community and attended the Humeston high school, later 

completing a course in c parative medicine in the Chicago Veterinary College 

and receiving Ins degree in L906. He located for practice at Garden Grove, 
Decatur county, Iowa, ami has Becured a gratifying ami representative patron 
age, for Ins ability ami knowledge of the underlying principles of his profession 

is well known. <>n I inher 26, 1906, he married Miss Sadie Garret, who was 

horn September If 1886 Shi is a daughter of Silas and Ale. Conrad Gar- 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 99 

ret, the former born October 21, 1S44. and the latter Augusl 17. 1848. The 
father is a tinner by trade and is following his chosen occupation in Chicago, 
Illinois. The brothers and sisters of .Mrs. Sadie McNay are as follows: Mrs. 
Clara Smith, horn September 5, 1876, is a graduate of the Burlington high 
school and is now residing in Peoria. Illinois. Edward, born February 19 
1878, is a magazine writer and financial editor of the New York Sun. 11 is home 
is in New Jersey. .Mrs. Gertrude Graham, horn December 11, 1882, was for- 
merly a stenographer in Chicago, where she now resides. Mrs. Marie Briggs 
born October 20, 1884, was also a stenographer in Chicago, in which city she 
still makes her home. Thomas, who completes the family, was born June lti. 
1890. He is a talented cartoonist and makes his home in Chicago. Dr. and 
Mrs. Leo N. McNay have three children: Lillian Maxine, horn Augusl 28, 
1907: Mildred Aliee. horn .June 7, 1909; and Garret, horn -June 9. 1911. Dr. 
McNay owns a beautiful home and well equipped office in Garden Grove ami 
is one of the most successful veterinary surgeons in the city. He is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias and the Yeomen, while his wife belongs to the Pythian 
Sisters in Garden Grove. The second child horn to Dr. and Mrs. George P. 
McNay, Mary Olive, was born in Lucas county, June 21. ls,s7. She attended 
the common schools of that section and was graduated from the Humeston high 
school with the class of 1907. She is a member of the P. B. O. of Humeston. 
The youngest child in the family, William Lyle, was horn September 5, L893, 
and died April 21, 1895. 

This family is one of the oldest and most highly respected in this section 
of Iowa, where its members are prominent in business, social and professional 
circles and are found always among the leaders in the promotion of worthy 
projects which influence the permanent welfare of the community. Mrs. McNay 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is a lady whose many 
excellent traits of heart and mind have won her the affection and esteem of all 
who know her. 



WILLIAM L. WERTS. 



William L. Werts, a representative of a well known pioneer family of Lucas 
county, owns a tine farm of one hundred and twenty acres on section 16, Cedar 
township, besides valuable residence property in Russell, where he makes his 
home. He is connected with business affairs in the city as manager of the 
cream, egg and poultry station, and has proved farsighted, capable ami reliable 
in carrying forward his interests. He was horn in Muskingum county. Ohio, 
February 4, 1860, and is a son of J. II. and Sophia (Imes) Werts. the former 

born in Muskingum county and the latter in X sville. In pioneer times the 

parents came down the Ohio river as far as Cairo, Illinois, and journeyed thence 
to Eddyville by rail. They then came overland 1<> Cedar township, this county, 
arriving in this section of the state when it was an open prairie and Russell had 
not vet been incorporated. The father was a cabinet-maker by trade and ml 
lowed this occupation during all of his active life. He is now living retired m 
Russell having survived his wife for some years. In this family were nme ctnl 



100 l.l CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

dren, eighl of whom are still living, as follows: .Mrs. Eliza Evans, who resides 
in Washington township; William I... of this review; Mrs. Ada Drake, s resi 
denl of Cedar township; A J., who makes his home in Springfield, [llinois; 
Mrs Tillie Johnson, of Cedar township: George and Asa. twins, who live upon 
'!"' home farm; and Leila, who resides with her father in Russell. 

William L. Werts was still a child when he journeyed from Muskingum 
county to Lucas county with his parents. Be acquired his education in the 
public schools of this locality and resided upon the homestead until he was 
twenty-two years of age. Ee then entered the employ of E. J. Batcher, a 
genera] merchanl in Russell, with whom he remained for twenty-one years, eighl 
months and twenty-one days, becoming during thai time one of the most trusted 
and reliable men connected with the concern. After the death of Mr. Batcher, 
Mr. Werts continued for a year and a half in the employ of Mr. Wiltsey, who 
became the owner of the store. Mr. Werts also discharged his duties as admin- 
istrator of the estate of Mr. Batcher with credil to himself ami satisfaction to 
all concerned. II.- then turned his attention to farming, operating one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of choice land on section 16, Cedar township, lie still 
owns this propertj although he has since returned to Russell, where he is now 
manager of a cream, egg and poultry station. He owns also two residence prop- 
erties in the city and his affairs an- capably managed, bringing him substantial 
and gratifying success. 

In April. 1885, Mr. Werts married Miss Cora E. Aden, who was born in 
Cedar township, this county, and who grew to womanhood here. Ber parents. 
Elijah and Marj J. (Kertz) Allen, were among the early settlers in this part 
of Iowa and both died in Russell. Mr. and Mrs. Werts have become the parents 
of lour children, three of whom are still living: Mrs. Elva Bancock, who 
resides iii Montana. lla/.-l. who is married and lives in Uussell ; and Arthur II.. 
who resides with his parents. 'The daughters attended Common School Of this 

loeality ami hoth had two seasons of summer school at I >es Moines. They after 
ward engaged in teaching until their marrii 

Mr. Werts is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ami gives 
his political allegiance to the democratic party. He has been a member of the 
town council and of the heard of education and is int. rested in public affairs, 
doing all in his power to promote general progress. Be is n spected and estei mi .1 
in husiiiess circles for his ability and integritj of character while his genuine 
personal worth has gained him the warm regard and confidence of manj friends 



DAVID I. Mrill.'i'W 



The profession of law has assumed more and more importance in relationship 

to our lite as the years have passed. As present da\ .-..millions have I Ome 

more complicated, life's activities present new angles and possibilities, with dan 

points and pitfalls to he a\oi.|.d. and laziness transactions have to he COH 

jidered from the legal viewpoint ami properlj safeguarded before being put 
int.. execution. As the struggle for supremacy waxes keener and wages B«rcer, 
the lawyer's advice, opinion ami assistance is practically indispensable and thert 




DAVID L. MIKROW 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



L03 



is hardly an individual who at one time or another does doI stand in need of 
legal help. David L. Murrow, who since his admittance to the bar in 190] has 
practiced law in Corydon and has been connected with much importanl litiga- 
tion since that time, has built up a reputation for reliability, knowledge and clear 
understanding of the situation which has lifted him from among the many into 
the ranks of the successful few. Although advancement a1 the bar is proverbially 
slow, no dreary novitiate awaited him, for he soon demonstrated his ability to 
capably hand],, intricate cases and each year has broughl him an increase in 
his practice. 

David L. Murrow was born in Poweshiek county, this state. May 9, 1871, and 
is a son of Thomas A. and Bvaline ( King. .Murrow. The grandfather^ Benjamin 
Murrow. brought the family to Iowa in 1850. He was of Scotch-Irish descenl 
and was a native of the state of Kentucky, born on the 29th of August, 1802. 
His wife's name before her marriage was Sarah Blue, who was also born in the 
Blue Grass state on the 17th of April, 18U7. Members of the family distin 
guished themselves by service in the War of 1812. Thomas A. Murrow. who din- 
ing his life followed agricultural pursuits, came to Wayne county in 1883, and 
here he passed away August 16, 1912. The mother of our subject was a daughter 
of John and Nancy King, who at an early day came from Indiana to Iowa 
and settled in this state. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Murrow were the parents of 
twelve children, eight of whom are living. 

David L. .Murrow. who was the fifth in order of birth of the children born to 
his parents, received a country school education. lie early showed a preference 
for a professional career and decided upon the law as the one for which he 
seemed best adapted and which would bring him the most rapid success. He 
entered the law department of Drake University and graduated from this insti- 
tution in 1901, coming immediately after attaining his degree to Corydon. where 
he has since been engaged in practice. Since 1906 he has been in partnership 
with R. C. Poston. Mr. Murrow occupies a creditable and enviable position at 
the Wayne county bar, for he prepares his cases with great thoroughness and 
presents them clearly and forcefully. Never failing to command the attention 
of court or jury, his pleas often obtain the verdict desired. His reasoning is 
logical and his deductions sound and he is seldom surprised by an unexpected 
attack of opposing counsel. 

On October 31, 1893, Mr. .Murrow was married to Miss Estella A. Kendall, 
of Lucas county, Iowa, and a daughter of N. W. and Isabelle Kendall. Mr. and 
Mrs. Murrow- had three children: Icyl I., who is attending Drake University; 
Thomas Kendall, a high-school student, at home: ami Wilma •!.. also at home. 
Mrs. Murrow passed away on October 15, 1909. 

Mr. Murrow. however, has not only made a creditable record in his profes 
sion. but has devoted his services largely to the growth and upbuilding of Cory 
don. He is public-spirited and takes a deep interesl in all measures undertaken 
in the interests of the city, and in 1910 was elected to the office of mayor, serv- 
ing for two years in that capacity. During his administration important im 
provements were made, prominent among which are the waterworks ami the 
sewerage system, which were installed under his direction. He gives his politi- 
cal support to the democratic party. His religions affiliations are with the 
Christian church, while his fraternal relations extend to the Masons and the 



Vol. IT— 6 



Hit LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Knights of Pythias. In the former organization he has attained high rank and 
is a member of the blue Lodge, a Knight Templar, a Royal Arch Mason and a. 
Shrincr. Mr. Murrow is a man of strong character and lias come to be recog- 
nized as a forceful elemenl in the community, his sterling traits having won 
him the high regard and confidence nol only of his clients, bul of all those with 
whom he has come in contact. Ai all times he has been actuated bj laudable 
ambition and this has carried him to success. 



ALPHEOUS SMITH. 



Among the family names which have I a honored and respected ones in 

Wayne county since pioneer times is thai of Smith, whose presenl represents 

tive, Alpheous Smith, recentlj retired from active life, is an ex] nt of all the 

rugged, sturdy and uprighl characteristics which have been family traditions 
for over half a century. The older generation has passed away, having lefl 
an enduring monument to their lives and activities in the fine farm which they 
evolved out of the wilderness and in the standards of integrity ami sincerity 
of purpose which thej left to their children. Their son. our subject, also a 
pioneer, endured in his earlier years all the trials and hardships incident to 
life in a new country. Today he is one of the honored and respected citizens of 
Wayne COUntj and has earned rest and retirement liy a long life of valuable 
and well directed labor. 

Alpheous Smith was horn in .Mason county. West Virginia, A.UgUSl 12 1849, 
and is a son of V. 1'.. an. I l.ouvisa (Hart) Smith, natives of thai state, the 

father's birth having occurred on the 30th of November, 1820, ami the mother's 
„n the L>nih of January, 1818 They left West Virginia in 1853 and came 
down the Ohio river to the Mississippi and thence to Keokuk. Iowa, where 
they secured a team and came overland to Benton township. Wayne county. 
II,. ,v the father purchased two hundred and eighl acre-, of land which has 

been iii possession of the family since that ti Like all pioneers, the elder 

Mr. Smith was a man of action and he spent many long hours of labor battling 
with the pioneer conditions which prevailed here at the time of his settle ill. 

Prairies stretched for many miles in all directions from his farm, broken only 
by a few sparse settlements. Life was hard and the work heavy, but Mr. Smith 
bent his determination and resolution to overcoming the obstacles in his path 
and before his death, which occurred December 19, 1900, had made his farm a 

valuable and productive property. His wife lias also passed away, dying in 
Benton township. June 15, l> s <f In their family were nine children: Eliza- 
beth, who was horn April 21, 1841, and died in Virginia at the a'.'e of live; 
Martha Ann. who was born April 16, 1842, and who is now deceased; l.ouis. 

whose birth occurred April I. 1844, and who died before Vicksburg, Mississippi. 
during the siege of that place; Mrs Sarah -lane Slocum, who was born January 
11. 1846, ami who died in Claj township^ Reverdy, who was born November 19, 
1^17. ami passed awaj in infancy ; Alpheous, of this review ; Edgar K.. w ho was 
born November 8, 1851, and whose death occurred in Wayne county, Julj 8, 

1870; Miranda, who was born Keluiiaiw II. 1856, ami who passed away in 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES Id.-, 

Benton township; and Nancy, whose birth occurred on the L4th of March 

1857. and who also died in Benton township. AH of the children in this family 
were natives of Wes1 Virginia with the exception of the two youngest, who were 
horn in Wayne county, and all were reared and educated in [owa. 

Alpheous Smith was four .wars of age when he came with his parents to 
Wayne county and from his early childhood was familiar with the hard condi 
tions of pioneer life. He attended the old-fashioned school of that time, which 
was supported by subscriptions from the parents of the children and conducted 

in the homes of the patrons. His hours outsid ' the schoolroom were filled 

with hard labor, for the new farm had to be cleared, the sod broken, buildings 
and fences erected and other improvements made. As a result, when Mr. Smith 
grew to manhood he was a skilled and practical agriculturist and when the 
time came for him to begin his active career he was well equipped for its duties. 
By that time the family homestead had been increased to five hundred and 
eighty acres, upon which Mr. Smith steadily carried forward the work of devel- 
opment and improvement through the years, making it one of the finest and best 
equipped properties in the county. The land lies in Benton. Clay and Wash 
ington townships and upon it there are three excellent sets of improvements. 
.Mr. Smith remained upon his farm until 1909, when he gave up active work 
and purchased a comfortable and modern home in Humeston, where he and Ins 
worthy wife are spending their declining years in rest and comfort, the just 
reward of their earnest, upright and honorable lives. They are people of 
exemplary character, of the rugged whole-souled type which has been largely 
instrumental in the upbuilding of the state and in placing it in the front ranks 
(if American commonwealths. 

On the 3d of April. 1870, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to .Miss Mar.\ 
E. Dollarhide. who was born in ('ass county. Indiana. April 20, 1850. She is 
a daughter of Allen and Martha A. (Fitzer) Dollarhide, natives of Ohio, who 
went to Indiana, then came to Wayne county in 1854 and removed to Indiana in 
1859. both passing away in that state. In their family were four children: 
.Mary E., now .Mrs. Alpheous Smith; George, who was born April 14, L851, 
and who died in Indiana at the age of eighteen; Bruce, who passed away in 
Wayne county, Iowa, at the age of four; and Aha. whose death occurred in 
Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Smith became the parents of six children, all of whom 
were born in Clay township; -lesse Y.. who was born November 17. 1872, and 
who died August '■',. 1910: Edward, who was born in August, 1874, and who 
died on the same day: Blanche, who was born April 13, 1876, and passed away 
April 11th of the following year; Mrs. Ethel Coffee, who was born June '_'. 
1878, and who is now residing in Richman township; Opal, who was born 
September 4. 1880, and who died November 24, 1881 : and Barry A., who was 
born in October, lsss. nm \ died May s. 1895. Mrs. Coffee is the sole surviving 
member of this family of six. She was married in Clay township. September 
25, 1896, to Cressy C. Coffee, a native of Indiana. To their union were born 
the following children: Lloyd I... born June 11. 1897; Alonzo A., born March 
2, 1899; Nettie Lois, bom January 15. 1905; Selma Irene, born October 11. 
19(111: and Laverna. born September 1 4. 1909. The three eldest children in this 
family were born in Clay township, while the younger ones were born in Rich- 
man township. 



Kit; LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Mr. Smith gives his allegiance to the republican party and li;is been trustee 
of Clay township. During the entire period of his residence in this section he 
has been known as a man of mos1 admirable principles, loyal to .-ill his duties 
and obligations, a liberal supporter of all worthy objects and a patriotic ind 
broad-minded citizen who since pioneer times has assisted in numberless ways 
in advancing the permanent welfare of the community, [ndeed, no record of 
Wayne countj would be complete without a review of the honorable and useful 
career of Alpheous Smith, recognized throughout the section as one of its most 

pected and estimable citizens. 



THOMAS M. PERKINS. 

For over thirty years Thomas M. Perkins has 1 a influentially connected 

with husiiirss interests of Seymour ami is qoti the proprietor of a profitable f I 

store. Be lias shown himself upright ami reliable in all of his Imsiness dealings 
ami in consequence has achieved a degree of success which places him among 
the representative men of his community. He was born in Newark, <>hin. 
August 8, 1836, ami is a sun of William and Hannah i Mitchell i Perkins, natives 
of Kentucky. The father of our subjed was a sin of William Perkins, also of 
Kentucky, and on the maternal side Mr. Perkins' grandparents were William 
and Elizabeth Mitchell, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania and 
latter in Ireland. The lather of our subject moved from Kentucky to Ohio at 
an early date and in the latter state his .hath occurred. His wife also died 
in i >hio. 

Thomas M. Perkins acquired a common school education and remained in his 
native state until 1855. In that year he came to Iowa, locating in Promise 
City. Wayne county, where he engaged in farming until l^Tn. when he opened a 
grocerj store and since that time lias given his attention entirelj to business lines 
lie conducted Ins firsl enterprise in Promise City until 1882 and then came 
I.. Seymour, where he opened a similar establishment, managing it successfully 
for a number of years. In I'm 1 . 1 he disposed <>\' his grocerj Imsiness and opened 
ih.- teed store which he still owns. He is an able, resourceful and progressive 
business man ami consequently his patronage has increased rapidly and has 

tied gratifying proportions al the presenl time 

In l s -">7 Mr. Perkins was united i arriage t" Miss Alice Ackley, >>i Ohio, 

a daughter of G and Sarah Ackley, who ci to Iowa in 1856. Her 

father was a farmer and was successful in this line of Occupation both in Ohio 

and in Iowa. By this marriage Mr. Perkins had thr hildren. Prank A.. 

i.ein Augusl 7. i s;,s was engaged in the grocery business ami died in 1881 
leaving "i hild, Wills Doris l>'"se A . the second of the family, is now the 

wife of Walter Knowlton, a resident of ll"t Springs, Smith Dakota, and they 

have one child, Myra. William I'... hum September 25, 1869, is engaged in the 
grocerj husiness in Seymour. After the .hath of Ids firsl wife Mr. Perkins 
married Miss Martha Kinney, of Seymour, who has also pas-, d away. In 1900 
he was again married, bis third union being with Mrs. Ella Roninger, of 

Appai se county. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES ,,17 

Mr. Perkins gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and fra- 
ternally is affiliated with the .Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge 
and chapter. He has faithfully attended the .Methodist church for over fifty 
years and his entire life has been characterized by devotion to manly and 
honorable principles. In all of his business dealings he is straightforward and 
reliable and enjoys to the fullest extent the confidence and good-will of all who 
know him. 



TANDY ALLEN. 



Tandy Allen, one of the best known pioneers of Lucas county and at one 
time one of the largest landowners in Cedar township, Lucas county, is living 
retired in Russell after many years of honorable and profitable connection with 
agricultural interests of his locality. He was born in Montgomery county, 
Kentucky, near Mount Sterling, June 3, 1S32, and is a son of Robert and Mary 
(Allison 1 Allen, the former of whom was born in Lowden county. Virginia, 
February 25, 17117. and the latter October li' of the same year. Their marriage 
occurred October 15, 1818, and they continued to reside in Virginia for some 
years. They afterward moved to Kentucky and thence, in 1837, came over 
land with ox teams to Putnam county. Indiana, settling on a farm in lli.il 
locality, upon which they continued to reside for a number of years. The father 
died at Bainbridge, Indiana, October 1, 1866, and the mother in the same city, 
August 30, 1862. Eleven children were born to their union, as follows: Mrs. 
Zarilda Pyffe, whose birth occurred March 13, 1820, the deceased wife of Thomas 
Fyffe; Joseph Franklin, who was born February 18, 1822, and who died Septem 
ber 17. of the same year; Elijah, who was born September 24. 1823, and who 
died in April, 1885: Mrs. Armilda Fyffe. whose birth occurred November 27 . 
1825, and who died at Bainbridge, Indiana. March. 1897; Mrs. Loduska Cassity, 
who was born April 23, 1828, and who died June 11, 1858; Mrs. Matilda McKee, 
who was born January 25, 1830, and who died June 16, 1868; Tandy, of this 
review; Mrs. Mary Vannice, who was born September 9, 1834, and who resides 
in Russell; Frances, whose birth occurred June 3, 1837, and who died March 23, 
1843; Albert, born October 10, 1839, residing at Shelbyville, Illinois; and Mrs. 
.Margaret .McKee. born October 5, 1841, a resident of Russell. 

Tandy Allen went overland with his parents to Putnam comity, Indiana, in 
1837, being at that time Ave years of age. He was reared upon the home farm 
in Indiana and acquired Ins education in the district schools of that stale. In 
September, 1854, he made the overland journey into Iowa, settling on a farm 
in Cedar township. Lucas county, in very early times. At the time of his arrival 
pioneer conditions prevailed everywhere, much of the land being still a primeval 
wilderness. Indians and wild game were plentiful and all the hardships and 
privations of frontier life were to l.<- met. These Mr. Allen I'acd with confi- 
dence and courage, developing his first purchase of one hundred and twenty 
acres and adding 1" it from time In time until he was finally the largesl land- 
,,„,„.,. i n Cedar township. He resided upon his property until L894, when 
he moved to Chariton, making his home there until 1898, when he returned to 
the farm. Two years later he built a commodious dome in Russell, having sold 



108 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

all his holdings with the exception of three hundred and seventy acres ol the 
original tract. 

On the 29th of January, 1856, in Bendricks county, Indiana. Mr. Allen was 
united in marriage to Miss Joanna Smith Vannice, a daughter of Peter and 
Sarah (Smith) Vannice, natives of Kentucky, the former born July 11. L801, 
and the latter February L2, 1806. They moved to Indiana in 1831 and both died 
in thai state, the father passing away February 9, 1888, and the mother 
February 11 of the sain,- year. In the Vannice family were eleven children, 

as follows: Mrs. Luzanno Iladley. who was lioi'li February 7. 1829, and who 

now resides on a portion of the old home farm in Eendricks county, Indiana; 
William, who was horn October II. 1830, and who died at Chariton in April, 
1894; Samuel, whose birth occurred March L0, 1 s :i:;. and who resides in Russell; 
.Mrs. Allen, wife of the subjecl of this review; Mrs. .lane Trotter, who was 
horn March 1. 1837, and who died June 22, 1898; Mrs. Sarah Ferguson, wi 
birth occurred December 23, 1839, and who makes her home in Chicago, Illinois; 
.Milton B., who was horn August 6, 1 S I_'. and who died Augusl 22, 1904; -lames 
R . who was born Maj 6, 1845, and who died November L2, 1851 . Ellen, whose 
birth occurred January 8, L848, and who died November 1. L851; Henry, who 
was horn duly 31, L850, and who died September 23, 1862; and Mrs. Ellen 
Hawkins, horn Februarj 12, L853, residing at Indianapolis, Indiana. The two 
eldest children in this family were horn in Kentucky and all the others on the 
old home farm in Hendricks county, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen have become the parents of twelve children. The eldest, 
Carrie E., was horn December L5, L856, and grew to womanhood in Lucas 
county. She attended the public schools and later the Missouri State Normal 
School al Kirksville, alter which she engaged in teaching, resigning to become 
county superintendent of schools of Lucas county. She held this position from 
January 1. 1890, to Januarj 1, 1896. She is at present engaged in teaching in 
the public schools in Chicago. Eliza Matilda was horn March 31, 1858. < hi the 
19th of January, 1876, she married Joseph C. Cassity and died Dear La Grange, 
Illinois. January 1. 1897. Sarah Adelaide was horn March IT. I860, and mar- 
ried March 7. 1882, William .1. Prather, of Cedar township. Mary Isabel was 
born October 17. 1861, and on March 11. 1 s ^~'. married Samuel F. Ooltry, of the 

vicinity of Russell. Louisiana was horn June 21, 1863, and married on March 

11. 1885, George II. Johnson, of Strasburg, Canada. Charles Edgar was horn 
Januarj 8, l s ''"> He married on the 29th of August, 1889, Miss Susie L. 

Morrow, and they reside in Nebraska. Fred Hadlej was born I >i mber 18, 

L866, and now resides in Nebraska. He married on the 10th of October, L894, 
Jessie E Elliott. Henry Smith was horn August 10, 1869 He married on 
November 1. 1893, Miss Annie !•'.. Boyd, and they live near Russell. Gertrude 
Marion was horn March 21, 1871. On tic 3d of August, 1898, she married 

William Perry Wortman and they make their home at Malvern. Iowa. Aylmcr 

.1. was horn November 24, 1873, and married on the 2d of October, 1901, Miss 
Mabel Werts. Thej reside near Russell. Tandy Clay was born October 5, l s 7C 
and married on the 26th of June, 1901, Miss Nellie B. Gasser The youngesl 
child in this family. Mr Lloyd Raymond, was horn September 27, 1878, and 

married on the 25th of September, 1'. Miss Katharine Hoffman. Thej make 

tin ir home at Colorado Springs, < lolorado. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 109 

Mr. Allen voted for Abraham Lincoln and since thai time lias been a 
stanch supporter of the republican party. lie is an adherent of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian church and is known as a man of exemplary character, 
upright and honorable in all the relations of life His name has long been an 
honored one in this locality, for he has taken an active pari in the development 
of Lucas county since pioneer times and has made many substantial contributions 
to progress. 



WILLIAM IT. HICKOK. 

William II. Ilickok, a well known and successful resident of Iluniesloii. was 
for a number of years identified with educational interests as a school teacher 
and also worked at the painter's trade during his active business eareer but is 
now living retired, having accumulated a competence that supplies him with 
all of the comforts ami some of the luxuries of life. In addition to his home 
at Humeston he owns one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land on section 
34, Union township, Lucas county. 

Mr. Hickok was born in Mercer county, Illinois, on the 1st of December. 
1845. his parents being Ambrose Nelson and Eliza Maria (Wright) Hickok, 
both of whom were natives of New York. Harry Ilickok. the paternal grand-. 
father of our subject, was born in the Empire state and passed away in Illinois. 
Representatives of the family were among the earlier settlers of both Ohio i ml 
Illinois. Ambrose X. Ilickok, the father of William II. Ilickok. whose birth 
occurred in 1816, was the eldest child of his parents and at the age of twelve 
years was left an orphan. He became an agriculturist by occupation and was 
engaged in the work of the fields both of Illinois and Iowa, taking up his abode 
in Union township. Lucas county, this state, in 1873. His demise occurred in 
Humeston, Iowa, in 1907, while his wife passed away on the old home farm in 
Lucas county in 1800. They were the parents of live children. Hannah Alvira. 
born in Mercer county, Illinois, in 1843. passed away in Lucas county. Iowa, in 
1910. William II., of this review, is the next in order of birth. Elizabeth -lane. 
a native of Rock Island county. Illinois, born in Is47. passed away in Humeston. 
Iowa, in 1911. Daniel Nelson, born in Rock Island county, Illinois, in 1850, 
passed away in Lucas county, Iowa, in 1905. He was one of the prominent 
citizens of his community, being held in high esteem by his fellowmen, and 
was well known in fraternal circles, bavin- attained the highesl rank as an Odd 
Fellow He had two sons. Harry V. and Arthur, both of whom are deceased 
Clarence Alvin. a native of -Merer county. Illinois, horn in is:,:;, resides at 
Aledo within a few miles of his birthplace, and at the present time is sheritl ol 
Mercer county. His children are four in number, namely: Burton 0., Roberl 
A., Mrs. Grace A. Brown, and C. Earl. 

William II Hickok grew to manhood in his native county ami obtained 
his early education in the graded schools, subsequently attending the high 
school at Rock Island and the Illinois Wesleyan College a. Bloomuigton. After 
the family home had been established in Iowa he returned to Illinois and U 
lowed the" profession of teaching m the Latter state for aboul live years Alto- 



11,1 LUCAS AND WAYNE I OUNTIES 

getl '" '" ^""' abou < ^teen years in the schoolroom and I ame know,, aa a 

successful educator, imparting clearlj and readily to others the knowledge that 
'"' Qad acquired. In addition to his labors as a school teacher 1.. worked -it 
the painter's trade, being busilj engaged al that occupation until recently 
incapacitated by physical disability. As the years have passed he has prospered 
m Ins undertakings and has gained and maintained an enviable reputation as 
one of the substantia] and public-spirited citizens of the community. 

In politics Mr. Bickok is a republican, while his religious faith is india 
by Ins membership in the Methodisl Episcopal church of Bumeston, with 
winch denomination he became identified when but twelve years ol age. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Masons, joining Lodge Mo. 755 al Preemption 

[llin °is> and enjoying the distincti. f being one of the mosl rapidh i a ced 

n in the history of the order, for he completed the work in three su - 
uights. For aboul five years he served as secretary of Preemption Lodgi At 
the presenl time he is a member of Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A. I-'. & A. M of 
Bumeston. His life is exemplary in .-ill respects and he has ever supported 
those interests which are calculated to uplifl and benefit humanity, while his 
own high moral worth is deserving of highest commendation. 



JOSEPH X McCOY, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph X. McCoy, who for a uumber of years has successfully practiced 
as physician and surgeon in Corydon and has luiilt up a gratifying client 

in this connection, has not only become well and favorably known in com tion 

with his profession bu1 also has served as mayor of Ins home city, greatly pro 
moting during Ins administration public interests. Dr. McCoy was born in 

Memphis, -Missouri. March 12, 1859, and is a s E Joseph J. and Mary 

(McCandless) McCoy, both aatives of Kentucky. The paternal grandfather was 
Zachariah McCoy, who as a young man crossed the Atlantic Erom Scotland to 
a home in the new world and find prosperity in its opportunities. Be first 
located in Virginia, bul later removed to the Blue Grass state. Joseph J. Met o 
the Eather of our subject, came to Missouri in L856, where he located al Mem- 
phis. During his active life he Eollowed agricultural pursuits successfully. Be 
made ins home at Memphis until Ins demise, which occurred in the early 'I 
Mrs. Marj McCoy removed to Allerton, [owa, after the death of her husband, 
where she subsequent!} passed away, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. McCoy were the 
parents oi nine children, seven sons and two daughters, all of whom grew to 
maturity. 

Joseph X. McCoy, our subject, was reared at home and received his education 
in the public schools. Saving acquired a fundamental knowledge of English 
learning, he decided upon a mi dii al career and in order to take up studies along 
this line removed to Keokuk, towa, where he attended the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, from which he graduated with the degree of M l>. in 1882. 
Shortly thereafter he came to Corydon, Iowa, where he remained in practice for 
four years, bul in 1886 hi removed to Pratt, Kansas, where he established an 
office and successfully followed Ins profession for some time. In February. 




DK JOSEPH V McGO\' 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 11;} 

1898, he returned to Corydon, where he has since built up a clientage of gratify- 
ing proportions. In the course of his practice he has become more or less iden 
lined with surgical work and serves as local surgeon for the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad, and the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad. His 
work in this connection as well as in his private practice is of a high order 
and he enjoys the full confidence of his patients. In the course of years he has 
not only gained a wide experience but he lias natural intuition for the exercise 
of his profession. He is careful in diagnosis and after he has once recognized 
the nature of a case hi' is quick in his decision and seldom fails to apply the 
right kind of remedy. 

Dr. McCoy was married in 1S77 to Miss Louisa L. Thompson, of Memphis, 
Missouri, a daughter of Mr. and .Mrs. Joseph Thompson. They haw .me son. 
Bernard E., who makes his home in Spokane, Washington, where he follows 
the same profession as his father, specializing in diseases of the eye. nose and 
ear. He is a graduate of Barnes Medical College of St. Louis, where he finished 
his course in 1905. lie is married and has one son. 

Dr. McCoy is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and has been highly 
honored by that organization, as he was grand chancellor for the Domain of Iowa 
for the year 1910. However, he practically centers his whole attention upon his 
profession. All of his time is given to his patients and he is at their service day 
or night whenever and wherever needed, going to any inconvenience to he of 
help in an emergency. He is a member of the slate and county medical societies 
and also of the Des Moines and Southwestern Iowa Medical Associations, and 
through the medium of these memberships keeps in contact with new work 
done in the profession and the latest methods and discoveries made in the world 
of medical science. There is little dissension of opinion regarding the high 
quality of his work and he has won for himself favorable criticism for the 
skillful methods which he has followed not only among the general public but 
also among his colleagues in the profession. 



ROBERT R. CR.\I<;. 



Robert R. Craig, who since January, 1907, has tilled the position of cashier 
of the Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Corydon. has by his activities in a 
large measure contributed toward the splendid growth of this institution. The 
Farmers & Merchants State Bank was organized in 1883 by William Eughes, 
Samuel Fry. F. R. Fry. Lewis Miles. A. Walden, B. Harper. J. A. Harper. M. A. 
Farren, V. B. Smith, S. II. Moore, Carl Moore. K. A. Rea, I'. H. Welch, I'. M. 
Everett, W. S. Sproatt and W. M. Pray and its officials were: William Hughes, 
president; W. S. Sproatt, vice president; and J. A. Harper, cashier. The first 
capitalization was for sixty thousand dollars, of which fifty per cent was paid in. 

Later in 1900. A. Walden became president and William Hughes vie pres .0. 

In 1901 F R Vw was made vice president an. I P. M . Smith succeeded Mr. 
Harper as cashier." Mr. Pry and Mr. Hughes then alternated as vice president 
for several years In 1906 William Hughes was elected to the presidencj and 



11 1 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

served as such for one year, and in 1! ,n 7 R. ('. Poston was elected presidenl and 
has acted. in this capacity ever since. P. B. Fry served as cashier of this bank 
from 1!M>4 to 1907, in which year our subjecl was elected t" this office and has 
sun-,- filled the position with ability and circumspection, greatly i«» the benefit 

of the institution with which be is connected. In 1 ! " '7 William Hughes i ame 

vice presidenl and has served in thai capacity ever since. In 1893 the remaining 
fifty per cenl of the treasurj stock was called upon and was paid in, bo thai 
the bank then had ;i fully paid in capital of sixty thousand dollars. The earn- 
ings bave in the course of years been added to the surplus and todaj the bank's 
resources, consisting of capital and surplus, exceed one hundred and five thou 
san. I dollars. A statemenl from August 30, lull, gives the deposits al about 
three hundred thousand dollars ami tin- undivided profits at al t seven thou- 
sand dollars. The total assets of the institution exceed four hundred thousand 
dollars. In 1913 tin- board of directors of the Farmers & Merchants State Bank 
consisted of John Krouse, R. C. Poston, William Hughes, Belle I".. Sproatt, <;. I-'. 
Miller, A. Heilmann an. I I-'. I. Tray. In 1883 the bank erected its own building 
hut tin- same was destroyed in 1897 by fire and since it has rebuill and is housed 
in a substantial two-story rrsi.lrii.-r. of which the lower floor serves for banking 
purposes, while the second storj is used tor offices 

Roberl R. <Tai<j was horn at Freedom, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in 
1865, ami is a son of William ami Angeline (Rodgers) Craig. The familj is 
of Scotch descent. The father during his life was an engineer and passed away 
in Pennsylvania in 1892. The mother moved subsequently with her familj to 
California, where she died eighteen years later, or in 1910. Robert R. Craig 
secured his early education in the county schools ami in tin- Pearsoll Academy, 
West Bridgewater, Pennsylvania, an. I while attending the academj also taught 
school during the winter months. He then started in the drug husinrss. with 
his brother, in Freedom, Pennsylvania, hut in 1886 came to Corydon and entered 
upon a position in the drug store of W. S. Sproatt. 11.- gave up this employment 
subsequently ami became connected with the clothing, hoot an. I shoe business 
ami later was engaged in the hardware ami implement business in Wellraan, 
Washington county, Iowa. Upon his return to Corydon in 1907 the cashier 
ship <>l' the Farmers & Merchants State Bank was offered him and he accepted 
the proposal ami began upon Ins duties on tin- 7th of January of that year, 
ami has since given Ins attention to the business of the hank, which has greatlj 

prospered under his efficient guida His activities have been constructive 

in id,, development of new business an. I the resources ami stability of the hank 
have through his labor largely increased. II.- also has extensive agricultural 
interests, as he is the owner of sis hundred ami twenty acres, situated in Jasper, 

Keokuk ami Way iounties, Iowa. This land he mils out an. I he r< ives 

therefrom gratifying returns. Furthermore he is the sixth largesl stockholder 
in the Farmers & Merchants State Bank an. I is numbered among the men of 
affairs of his community. 

In December, 1890, Mr. Craig married Miss Hattie Beal, of Corydon, a 
daughter of Thomas ami Marj (Farrell Beal, tin- former a native of Indiana 
, m ,l ,|„. | a tter of Ohio. Thej were earl} pioneers of Wayne countj at the time 
of their arrival here ami resided upon the land which they first entered for 
about thirty years. Mr. an. I Mrs. Craig have three daughters: Marie, at 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 11.-, 

Pomona College. Claremont, California; Amoret; and Roberta Guinevere. The 
parents are members of the .Methodist church. 

Mr. Craig is a republican in his political views hut has never soughl public 
office. His fraternal relations are confined to membership in tin- .Masonic lodge. 
Mr. Craig occupies a creditable and enviable position in the financial circles 
of Corydon and the success which he has won for himself is largely due to the 
careful and systematic methods which he has followed, lie has always led ,-i 
busy and useful life and his industry, energy and geniality are largely respon- 
sible for the success which he has attained. He is a man of strong character 
and has come to he recognized as a forceful element in the community, his 
sterling traits having won him the high regard and confidence of all with whom 
he has come in contact. 



WILLIAM SANDERS SPROATT. 

One of the highly esteemed pioneer business men of Corydon was the late 
"William Sanders Sproatt, who passed away on the 29th of March, 1909. lie 
was a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred at Carlyle, Sullivan county, 
that state, on the 22d of May, 1 s4(i, and was a son of John and Eliza (Minnich 
Sproatt. The father was born in Pennsylvania, hut in early life he removed to 
Indiana, where he acquired some land and engaged in farming. There lie met 
and married Miss Minnich, a native of Tennessee, whence she removed with her 
parents to Indiana, soon after that state was admitted to the Union. Both 
parents are now deceased, the mother's death having occurred in 1905. To 
them were born sixteen children, of whom our subjed was the only on.- to 
leave home. 

"William Sanders Sproatt passe. 1 his boyhood and youth in xevy much the 
same manner as other lads who were reared in the rural sections of Indiana 
during the pioneer days. He obtained his education in the district schools. 
and while there engaged in the mastery of the common branches assisted Ins 
father with the cultivation of the fields and the care of the stock. Long before 
he had attained his majority he was thoroughly familiar with the duties of the 
agriculturist, which vocation he followed during the early years of his man 
hood. When lie was twenty-five he left home and joining a family l.y the name 
of Ledgerwoods came to Iowa. They made the .journey in a covered wagon 
and upon their arrival in the state located in the vicinity of Leon. Mr. Sproatl 
later came to Corydon and took a position in the drug store of Dr. Chester, 
whom he bought out. He continued to conduct this enterprise with a fair 
measure of success until aboul three years prior to his death, when owing I., thi 
condition of his health he disposed of his store and lived retired. lie w 
widely known throughout this section of the state having been identified with 
the business interests of Corydon longer than any other resident ol the town 
at the time of his retirement. 

In this city on the 21st of March, 1877, Mr. Sproatt was married to Miss 
Belle B Bridge, a daughter of Mrs. P. W. Miles, ami a unlive of Marion county, 
Ohio Her father. William Bridge, was a member of an Ohio regimenl during 



as 



116 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

the Civil war and died a1 the front. His widow subsequently married William 
.Miles, the family later removing to Corydon. To Mr. and Mrs. Sproatl then 
were born two children, Bertha, who married C. L. Clark, of Corydon; and 
John !•'.. who is with the Iowa Engineering Company and travels over the 

entir untry. Mrs. Sproatl owns a very attractive modern residence, which 

sin- erected in 1910, and takes an active interesl in the social life of the co 
muiiity. 

Fraternally Mr. Sproatl was affiliated with the Masonic order, in which 
he had attained high rank, being a member of the Davenporl shrine His 
political support he gave to the democratic party, and although he look an active 
interesl in local affairs he would never accepl an office. Mr. Sproatl was 
highly respected as a private citizen I mis,- of the active cooperation he ex- 
tended to all worthy enterprises and movements designed to promote the wel 
of the community, and as a business man because of the honorable and uprighl 
manner in which he conducted his transactions. Ills death was deeplj mourned 
by his fellow townsmen among whom he numbered manj stanch friends of 
long years standing, who accorded him the resped and esteem ever extended 
to men of integrity and good principles. 



HAKIMX I.. EXLEY. 



Among the successful agriculturists of Lucas county is to be numbered 
Hardin L. Exley, who owns a valuable farm of two hundred and seventy six 

acres in Union township besides il Id family homestead in Clarke county 

which contains two hundred acres. Born in Franklin township, Clarke county, 
Iowa, on November 5, 1854, Mr. Exlej is a son of Thomas and Cynthia (La 
Foon) Exley. the former horn near Leeds, England, October 25, 1820, and 
the latter a native of Surry county. North Carolina, horn duly 14. 1826. Upon 
coming from England the father came to Iowa, where he remained for one 
year and then returned to the mother country in order to settle the affairs 
the family there. Returning to America, he landed in New Orleans, where hi 
expected to locate, hut conditions at thai time caused him to go to Burlington, 
[owa, ami he subsequently went to Eddyville and finallj in L854 to Clarke 
county. The trip to that section was mad.- overland in the primitive stylt 

the pi ters and took pli in the spring of 1854 When the father Srsl cam.' 

to Burlington, Iowa was still a territory. Be was by profession a bookkeeper 
and as such engaged in Eddyville and also conducted a ston before taking up 
his residence in Clarke county. He was one of the earliesl settlers in [owa and 
one of the pioneers of thai county. 

The mother was a direct , lese, n.la nl of the f a i S La Foon I'amiU of 

M .■_■,. nets who were driven fi Fran i and who settled in Surrj county, 

North Carolina. In L832 the Familj moved from North Carolina to Indiana. 
coming to Iowa in 1842 and locating in Jefferson county, in 1854 Mrs Cynthia 
Exley came with her husband to Clarke county, where not long after their son. 

Hardin I... was horn. At the time when they settled there the si primitive 

,. litmus still prevailed, Indians w.rc still numerous and wild game ahundant 



LUCAS AXD WAYNE COUNTIES 117 

and they endured all the hardships incidenl to such a life. There were only 

three houses between their place and Harden ({row. a distance of ten miles, 
on the main road, at that time. Subsequently the father attained success as an 
agriculturist and passed away on the home farm in Clarke county, A.ugus1 1. 
1905. His wife survived him until November 6, 1912, when she' died a1 the 
same place. In their family were eleven children: dames Harmon, who .lied 
at the age of two years; .Mrs. Rebecca Carey, who was born at Eddyville and 
who now resides in Kansas; Benjamin P., who died at the age of seventeen; 
Joseph, residing at Sargent, Nebraska; Hardin L., our subject; Sarah E., who 
died at the age of eighteen; Sauford, of Clarke county. Iowa; .Mis. Mary E. 
Leach, of Sargent. Nebraska: .Mrs. Cora R. Hines, of South Dakota; Mrs. 
Linnie H. Hines. of Woodburn, Iowa; and Charles S., of Clarke county. The 
three eldest children were born at Eddyville and the remainder in Clarke 
county. They all attended the common schools of the community, their firsl 
schoolhouse being of log construction and a subscription school such as was 
maintained in pioneer days. 

Hardin L. Exley passed his youth amid the primitive conditions of pioneer 
lite and acquired such educational knowledge as could be procured near his 
father's home. He early trained himself to agricultural pursuits, assisting his 
father with the farm work and learning in the school of experience. As the 
years passed he became an independent farmer, acquiring a total of two hun- 
dred and seventy-six acres of choice land in Union township, upon which can 
be found two sets of improvements. His land is under high cultivation and his 
annual harvests bring him tine returns. He also gives considerable attention 
to stock-raising. His buildings are kept in good repair and are modernly 
equipped and his machinery is of the latest make, installed with an idea towards 
labor saving and in order to increase the yield of his acres. Mr. Exley also owns 
the old homestead of two hundred acres in Clarke county, which is in a high 
state of cultivation. 

On July 3, 1884, Mr. Exley was united in marriage to Miss Sarah L. Moore 
a native of Lucas county, where she was born on January 15, 1864. She grew 
to womanhood in this vicinity and has always been a resident here. Her 
parents, who were numbered among the early settlers of Lucas county, were 
Riley and Mary Ann (Matthews) Moore, both natives of Indiana. The father 
passed way in Jackson township, this county, in 1868, and the mother a Co 
died in that township. She was a member of the well known Matthews family 
of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Moore became the parents of four children: Charles 
Allen; Mrs. Exley; William Edward; and Mrs. Serilda J. O'Connell, of Hite- 
man, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Exley have four children, all of whom were born 
in Lucas county: Thomas Moore, who was born May lb. 1885, and who is now 
a resident of Los Angeles. California: Charles Weaver, a farmer, who was 
born March 28, 1881). and who now makes his home in Union township: Joseph 
F., wdio was born February in. 1893, and who is now residing on the home farm 
in Clarke county; and Mary Ann. who was born January L5, 1898, and who 
is now attending school. 

Mr. Exley has always been deeply interested in public affairs and gives his 
political allegiance to the democratic party. He has been a school director of 
his district and done much toward promoting tie- cans.- of education. In three 



120 LUCAS AND WAYNE COr.NTIES 

m 1876 and thence to .Mount Pleasant, Benrj county, [owa, where they resided 
until 1890, when thej moved to Chariton, in Lucas county. In their familj 
were the following children: Charles Wesley, who died in infancy; William, 
who died at the age of fifteen; Mrs. Goodrich; Joseph, who died in infancy . 
Mrs. Ilattic Go, of Mount Pleasant, Iowa: Mrs. Minnie Lifenfelter, who died 
June L3, 1911 ; Franklin, who passed away at the age of one year; Charles, who 
died in infancy; Mrs. [da Rumble, of Saskatchewan, Canada; Fred, who makes 
his home in IVs Moines; John, who resides in Omaha, Nebraska; Joseph, of 
Chariton; and Mrs. Maude Downing, of Omaha. Mrs. Goodrich was the 
mother of two children by her union with .John Laymon, namely: Mi^ 
lila Neighbor, horn in Henry county. Iowa. April 30, L870, who is now living 
in Winterset; and Mrs. Mina Lusher, born July 21, 1 >7l'. who resides in Cory- 
don, where her husband is in the employ of I-'. M. West 

Mr. Goodrich is well known in local fraternal circles, holding membership 

in Wayne Post, No. I'm. Department of Iowa. (i. A. I;., of which he has 1 □ 

commander lie hchmtrs also to Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A. I-'. & A. M.. of 

Eumeston, and was the first applicant for membership after the re \al of 

the lodge from Smyrna. He served as its master for eight years ami is today 
in possession ol' the articles of incorporation. 

Mr. Goodrich has always given a great deal of his tine- to public life and 
is one of the most able men in official service in Bumeston. For twenty six 

years he lias I n justice of the peace in Bichman township ami has held 

office continuously with the exception of two terms. He has made an excel 
lent record, for during the period of his service hut three cases went to a jury 

and hut one appealed to a higher COUrl Mr. Goodrich has held nearly all of 

the local offices in the city and township, including those of constable and mayor 
of Bumeston, in which latter position lie has served lor two years, and is at 
present serving. He has at all times been interested in the welfare of Wayne 

county and has given active cooperation to manj vements tor the public good, 

his efforts being always effective and far-reaching. Living in this section since 
1873, he has become well known here as a man ot' tried integrity, business enter- 
prise and effective .public spirit. The spirit which distinguished him on the 
southern battlefields has dominated his life and has been an important element 
in his cont inued success 



BENJAMIN KING. 



The history of the agricultural development ot' Wayne county and of the 

business progress and advancement of Bumeston contains the record of the life 

of no in. lie worthy, upright and honorable man than Benjamin King, extensive 
landowner, former farmer, president of the Bumeston state Bank, and for 
many years one of the mosl powerful forces in the upbuilding ot' tin- section 
,,i the state. Through a childhood hampered by povertj and limited educational 
advantages, through earl} years of earnest labor against discouragement and 
hard conditions he has made his wa.v upward in prosperity, working always 

with courage and Steadfast determination until BUCCess ami happiness hav. 




BENJAMIN EING 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES ,, :l 

crowned his old age. He was bom in New York. December 29 L833 and is 
a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Hanmore) King, natives of New York, who 
lived and died in that state. 

Benjamin King of this review grew to manh I in the Empire state and 

for two years attended the common schools. This is all the school training he 
ever received but it has been supplemented by travel, by deep thinking, wide 
reading and varied experiences and today Benjamin King is considered one of 
the best informed men in this part of Iowa. Influenced bj his determination 
to conquer all obstacles and hew out for himself an honorable destiny, he Left 
New York in 1868 and pushed westward to Chariton, Iowa, the terminus i E 
the railroad at that time. He and his family settled on a farm in Richman 
township, one mile east of Ilumeston, and with characteristic energy and 
determination Mr. King began his agricultural career. Pioneer conditions 
prevailed throughout the entire section, settlements were sparse. Mr. King's 
nearest neighbor being one mile away, and discomforts were innumerable. llou 
ever, these were faced with resolute courage and were little by little overcome. 
Mr. King's first farm consisted of eighty acres but he lias bought and dispose,! 
of several tracts of land since that time and was the owner of one of the finest 
agricultural properties in Wayne county. However, he has disposed of all of 
his farming land in order to give more time to his extensive business affairs. 

Mr. King's career indicates clearly what may be accomplished when determi 
nation, ability and unfaltering industry are strong characteristics of the indi- 
vidual. Throughout the course of his active and well spent life he has by 
diligence, application and the labor of his hands amassed a comfortable fortune 
which has been honorably acquired and never unworthily used. He has moved 
into a beautiful home in Ilumeston and is to a greal extent concentrating his 
attention upon the affairs of the Ilumeston State Bank, which he opened on 
the Dth of February. 1893. and which now has a capital stock of sixty thousand 
dollars. Mr. King has been acting as its president since the organization of the 
institution and under his able management it has grown to be one of the strong, 
reliable and conservative banks of the city. 

In New York, on the 13th of April. 1859, Mr. King was united in marriage 
to Miss Julia Elizabeth Deyo, who was born in Coldwater, Michigan, April :!, 
1839. a daughter of Abram and Phoebe Deyo. natives of New York. The father 
died in Nebraska in 1 sst; ami the mother passed away in her native -tale on 
1he 31st of August. 1906. In their family were four children: Mrs. Rowena 
Hasbrouck. of New York; Mrs. King, of this sketch; Martha II.. who passed 
away in 1909; and Mrs. Adelia Hasbrouck, also deceased. Mr. and Mrs. King 
became the parents of two daughters, both of whom were horn in Poughkeepsie, 
New York: Mrs. Cora P. Fletcher, whose birth occurred on the 7th of February, 
1860, and who died at Tingley, Iowa, December 19, 1908; and Phebe Deyo, 
born September 8, 1862, who for the past fourteen years has been assistant 

cashier of the Ilumeston State Hank. Both daughters received i scellenl 

public-school education and Phebe is a graduate of the Iowa Business College 
at Des Moines. Mrs. King is a member of the Congregational church. 

Mr. King gives his allegiance to the republican party and has at all times 
been eminently progressive in his citizenship. lie has served in various 
important local offices, having been assessor of Richman township, mayor of 
vol n— 7 



124 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Ilumeston, a member of the town council and city treasurer, discharging his 
official duties in ;i straightforward, progressive and conscientious manner. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, F. & A M., of Bumeston, 
and Chappaqua Lodge, I. 0. < >. I-'., of which he is ;i charter member. Mr. King 
serves greal credil for what he has accomplished, having worked his way 
steadily upward by determined and straightforward effort. Be is today our 
of the mosl highly respected pioneer citizens of southern [owa and the progress 
of his career can be readily traced through his youth of steadfast work, his 
active, energetic and successful middle age to the evening of his life, which is 
full of years and honor. 



OSCAR F. XIDAY 



A worthy representative of the agricultural interests of Warren township is 

Oscar I-'. Xiday. who owns two hundred and forty-four acres of land located 
on sections 15 and 16, which he is devoting to general farming and stock-rais- 
ing. Be is a native of Wayne county. Ins birth having occurred in Benton 
township on the 7th of March, 1 s 74. and a son of John E. and ( latherine ( Allen 
Xiday. They were born in Ohio, hut came to Iowa with their parents in the 
early days and after marriage settled on a quarter section of land which the 
father had purchased from the government. After cultivating this holding for 
a number of years he disposed of it and invested the proceeds in some land in 
Benlon township, and there continued his agricultural career until his retire- 
ment from active life. He removed to Corydon in fvr_>. making that city his 
home until his death in 1S!I8. at the age of sixty-eighl years. He was buried 
in Rush cemetery, Benton township, where the mother, who passed away in 1886 
was also laid to rest. Nine children were born to .Mi-, and Mi's. Xida.\. id' whom 

our subjeel is the youngest. 

Oscar P. Nidaj was reared at home in very much tic same manner as all 
countrv youths. In the acquirement of his education he firsl attended the local 
schools, then became a student of a preparatorj school in Lincoln, Nebraska, and 
after Ins father removed to Corydon continued his course of study in the high 
school at that city lor a year. He taughl during the winter months and worked 

on the farm in summers from thai time until his marriage in 1899, si ■ which 

devoted his entire time and attention to agricultural pursuits. He is 
engaged in diversified farming and stock-raising, specializing in the breeding and 
raising of thoroughbred shorthorn cattle. Poland-China hogs and Shire horses 
]!,• is also an extensive feeder and buys cattle lor the market. Ilis land has a 
natural drainage and has fee,, go capably and intelligently tilled that his fields 
, yield abundant harvests, the qualitj of which is in everj waj fully equal 
to the quantity. His entire holding is fenced, a hundred and sixty acres of il 
hog-tight, .Mid it is .,11 subjeel t" tic plow. Mr. Xiday ha- not confined his 
,.,,,,,,1,0,, to the development of hi- farm softy as a business proposition, hut 
has expended much time and money in making it a more attractive plact 

reside] Practically all of the sheds and outbuildings now on the place have 

been erected during the period of ins ownership, and in 1911 he remodeled the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



125 



house and the year previous he rebuilt the barn, while at various times he has 
installed about the premises many modern conveniences 

On the 8th of February. 18!li). Mr. Nidaj was married to Miss Ida L Pray 
who was born on the 1st of December, is;:,, and is a daughter of William and 
Leutra (Bennett) Pray, whose history is more fully given in the biography of 
b. I. Pray, which appears m this work. She is the ninth in order of birth in 
a family of ten. The family of .Mr. and Mrs. Niday numbers five as follows- 
Floyd. Hubert. Vernon. Manfred and Evelyn. 

The family are" regular attendants of the Christian church of Ailerton in 
which the parents hold membership, and politically Mr. Niday has supported 
the republican party until recently and now gives his allegiance to the pro- 
gressives. He enjoys a wide and favorable acquaintance in Wayne county, 
and numbers among his closest friends many of the comrades of his boyhood! 
which fact pays tribute to his character. As a citizen Mr. Niday is progres 
sive and enterprising, in matters of business he is trustworthy and reliable, 
and as a friend he is thoroughly loyal and dependable all of which qualities 
have united in winning him the esteem of his neighbors and fellow townsmen. 



FRAN' CIS I. PRAY. 



Francis 1. Pray, well known in Corydon as a feeder of high-grade cattle, 
has extensive business interests and has been so successful in their management 
that he is accounted one of the leading and influential men in this part of the 
state. He is a native of Wayne county, born October 1. 1st;."), a son of William 
and Letitia (Bennett) Pray, natives of Terre Haute. Indiana, who came to 
Iowa in 1860 and located in Wayne county. The father boughl land just cast 
of New York and also purchased a farm near Bethlehcir., "pon .vhich he resided 
until his retirement, when he moved into Corydon. where his death occurred 
on thi' 2d of December, 1897. He was a republican in his political views and 
active and loyal in his support of the party to which he adhered. Roth bl- 
and his wife were members of the Christian church. They were the parents 
of eleven children, of whom eight are living. 

Francis I. Pray began his active career by operating a farm which he 
rented from his father and was so successful in the management of his enter- 
prise that at length he was able to purchase land of his own. He boughl a 
farm in Wrighl township but in L895 sold this trad and purchased He old 
home place. Since that time he has operated this property, although he 
makes his home in Corydon. lie has been successful in all departments of 
agriculture but from the beginning has given special attention to feeding 
cattle and is now recognized as a man of note in this line of occupation, to 
whom years of experience have brought a knowledge which makes his opinion 
an authority. Mr. Pray made his home upon his farm until March. 1909, 
when he moved into Corydon, his extensive business interests demanding his 
personal attention. He is a member of the firm of Teegarden & Pray, buyers 
and shippers of cattle, ho^s and other stock, and is on the board of directors 
of the Farmers and Merchants Stale Bank. He is one of the leading and influ- 



L26 LUCAS AND WAYX'K COlXTIKs 

entia] men in tins locahty, having founded a substantia] degre ' prosperity 

upon qualities of industry, perseverance, trustworthiness and high integrity and 
force of character. 

On the 1st of March, 1885, Mr. Pray married .Mis- Hattie C. Ewers, of 
Wayne county, a daughter of Smith and Elizabeth Ewers, aatives of Ohio, who 
came to tins part of towa in 1882. The father was a farmer and followed gen- 

era] agriculture upon a trad of land near C idence until his death. His 

wido^ still survives. Mr. and .Mrs. Pray became the parents of four children: 
William Evan, who pass,',) away at the age of two and a half years; Francis 
Marion; Lawrence Albert; and Eula .May. 

Fraternally Mr. Pray is affiliated with the tndependenl Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. Be gives his allegiance to the republican party and from 190] to 1904 
was a member of the board of supervisors, doing able, intelligent and efficienl 
work in an official capacity. Be has been a resident of Wayne county all dur- 
ing his life and has come to be regarded as a substantia] and progressive busi- 
n,ss '"''"'• who displays in all of his activities the energj and discrimination 
upon which his prosperity is founded, lie is eminently public-spirited and no 
measure for the public good seeks his aid in vain. His individual attain- 
ments are I, road in their significance and his influence wide in its scope sii 

Ins labors throughout the years have been a cooperanl factor in many mov< 
incuts which have been of value to the co tunity at large 



iii:\i;y w. gittingee 

The newspaper interests of Lucas county are ablj represented by Benry 
W. Gittinger, editor and proprietor of the Chariton Leader, one of the widely 
read and influential journals of this part of the slate. The important posi 
tarn this newspaper holds in the eyes of the public is largely due to the efforts 
"I' Mr. Gittinger, who ably directs its policy in the interest of general advance- 
ment, moral and intellectual development and material expansion. 

Born mi December 18, 1861, in Washington township. Lucas county, Iowa. 
Benrj W. Gittinger is ;i son of Peter and Sarah Gittinger. The mother before 
her marriage was Sarah West, a daughter of X. E. West, one of the pioneers 
of Lucas county. She was horn in Kentucky, hut his father was a aativi ol 

Balti re c ty, Maryland, where he crew to young manhood. At the early 

age of eighteen he entered the United states oavj and had the distinction of 
serving under Commodore Perry in the suppression of tin- slave trade along the 
African coasl in days long before the Civil war. Durnu.' the conflict with 
Mexico he was transferred to the land forces and distinguished himself by the 
faithful fulfillment of his duties and his courageous conduct. 

Benrj \\ Gittinger was reared under the parental roof and acquired his 

education in the con schools of Lucas county, near Ins father's home Be 

earlj showed an inclination for the printer's art and subsequently became 
connected with the printing office of the Russell News at Russell, Iowa. Familiar- 
izing himself with all the details of the trade and the conduct of a newspaper he 
acquired by thrift and industry the means to Bet himself up independently and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 127 

became the editor and proprietor of the Chariton Leader. His wide experience 
and innate ability are creditably reflected by .his newspaper, which has become 
one of the important organs of this part of the stat,.. fa news columns are 
ably conducted and local as well as genera] items broughl before the readers in 
a clear and precise style. As the prestige of the paper has increased its circu- 
lation has expanded and its advertising columns -.own to such an extenl thai 
the enterprise from a financial point of view is as much of a success as it is as a 
news disseminator and a guardian of public rights and public progress 

On December 10, 1885, Mr. Gittinger was united in marriage at Russell, 
Iowa, to Miss Nellie Goltry, a daughter of William and Cordelia Goltry, early 
and well known settlers of Lucas county. There have been two children horn 

to Mr. and Mrs. Gittinger: Howard, who married .Miss Gladys McColl I 

and who ably assists his father in the publicati f the Chariton Leader: and 

Grace, who is the wife of Mr. Charles W. Sugden and resides in Omaha. Nebraska. 
Before her marriage Mrs. Sugden was a school teacher by profession. 

Public-spirited and progressive. Mr. Gittinger gives his able support to all 
measures undertaken to benefit the community and improve conditions and 
affiliates with the democratic party, the measures and candidates of which he 
stanehly upholds. He has become a powerful influence for progress in his 
community and a leader for good along moral and intellectual lines as well as 
an ardent advocate of agricultural development and commercial expansion. 
Much of the prosperity prevailing in Lucas county is due to the efforts of Mr. 
Gittinger, who through the medium of his paper has promoted many beneficial 
measures and has always advised and counseled in such a way that following 
his leadership far-reaching and lasting results have been obtained. 



GEORGE W. LARIMER. 

Among the men who have been active in inaugurating and shaping the 
business development of Chariton is numbered George W. Larimer, who has 
been connected with business interests in the city since 1875 and who. steadily 
extending the field of his connections, is today one id' the substantia] and 
representative men of the community. lie conducts an important abstract 
business and is well known in financial circles through hj s connection with 
the Chariton National Bank, the Loan & Trust Lank and the State Savings 
Bank. 

Mi-. Larimer was born in Noble county, Indiana. February 19, 1853, a son 
of "William McDowell and Christiana (Barkley) Larimer, natives of Wesl 
moreland county. Pennsylvania, the former born April 19, 1824, and the hit 
ter in September. 1825. They afterward moved to Noble county. Indiana, 
where the father died in September, 1853, leaving two children: Mrs. Mary 
Elizabeth Howard, who was born in September, 1851, and who died in 1897; 
and George W., of this review. Afterward the mother and her children moved 
to Chariton township, this county, where Mrs. Larimer engaged in teaching. 
being the first teacher in the famous Highland district. Sin- afterward mar 
ried again, her second husband being Cyrus Larimer, by whom she had four 



L28 LUCAS .WD WAYNE COUNTIES 

children: Mrs. Nettie Mitchner, a resideni of Des Moines, towa; Mrs. Emma 
Gnbben, who passed away in 1912; Clara, .-,1s,, deceased; and II. II.. who was 

! "'" '" l862 '"" 1 wl w resides in Chariton. The two older children were 

born in Noble county, [ndiana, and the other two in Lucas county, this state. 

George W. Larimer accompanied his mother and sister t,, Chariton town 

ship in 1855 nn,l grew to manh I amid pioneer conditions in this locality. 

In 1864 he began his independent career, securing a position south of Chari- 
'"" ;1S ;1 sheep herder. Be later learned the tinner's trade an, I received a 

remunerati if five dollars per week. Be paid strict attention to business 

ami was gradually advanced, eventually securing a comfortable competencj 
H' - began his mercantile carer in Chariton on the Isl of January, 1875, ami 
be continue,! in this line of business until 1892, each year witnessing his 
increasing prosperity an, I prominence, h, the latter year he n-tircl from 
active life hut in 1897 became interested in the Loan & Trust Bank, the State 

Savings Hank an,! tlie National Bank, all of Chariton, ami he still , tinues 

his identification with these institutions. II,' also conducts an abstract busi- 
ness ami he has been verj successful in this line, his prosperity coming as the 
dired resull of his discriminating business judgment, his energy, enterprise 
ami progressive spirit. 

In l^T'i .Mr. Larimer married .Miss Emma Ward, who was horn at Winter- 
set, Iowa, in October, 1855. She is a daughter of C. C. and Serena Miller) 
Ward, natives of Hendricks county. Indiana. The parents afterward moved 

In Des Moines and thence to Chariton, where the father still resides and where 

die ther passed away. To their union were horn live children: .Mrs. Larimer. 

wife of the subjed of this review; Mrs. Cora Reeside, of Wichita, Kansas. 
William II.. of Council Bluffs, lowa : Mrs. Molly Puller, of Chariton; and Mrs. 
Mabel McMichael, of Denver. Colorado. Mr. ami Mrs. Larimer have four chil 
dren. Guy W. was horn September 24, 1880. After graduating from the 

Chariton high scl I he entered the Northwestern University at Evanston, llli- 

aois, and after npleting his course there he entered the medical department 

of the same university, from which he received the degree of M. I ». Be after- 
ward acted as interne in the Cook County Hospital and is now practicing his 
profession at Salida, Colorado. Mrs. Mary Pasco was born in Max. bs:l. ami 
acquired her education in the Chariton high school and in Simpson College at 
Imlianola. She now resides m Carroll, Iowa. Mrs. Edith Copeland was born 
in April. l ssx anc ] after graduating from the Chariton high school took a two 
years' course in Simpson College, she makes her home in Chariton. Robert 

E., who was I,,, in June 13, 1894, is at present a stud, ait in the Iowa Slate l'ni 

versity at [owa City. 

Mr. Larimer at tends lie Methodist Episcopal church at Chariton and is COH 

nected fraternally with the [ndependenl Order of Odd Fellows. Be is a repub 

Mean in his political beliefs and served for six years as a member Of the hoard of 

supervisors of Lucas county and has I n a mber of the city council id' Chari 

ton II, is numbered among the distinctlj successful n of the city, Through 

legitimate channels of trade he has won prosperity in business ami has secured 
a comfortable fortune which he has invested judiciously, evidencing Ins faith in 
the future oi' Lucas county bj placing Ins monej in local enterprises A resi 
dent of this section since his childhood, he has witnessed practically its entire 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 129 

growth and development and in later years has been a prominent factor in its 
progress. He has made his name recognized and respected in business circles 
and his personal characteristics have gained him the warm regard and con- 
fidence of many friends. 



CARLTON MONROE McGUIRE, Ml). 

Dr. Carlton Monroe MeGuire, living retired in Eumeston alter many years 
identification with active professional life, is a native son of Wayne county, horn 
in Lewisburg, Clay township. January 22, 1863. His parents were Josiah and 
Elizabeth (Axley) MeGuire, both natives of Monroe county. Tennessee, the 
father born in 1826 and the mother April 5, 183:3. The maternal grandfather. 
James Axley, was a famous Methodist contemporary of Peter Cartwrighl and 
was fully as forceful and able a man, although he did not seek notoriety. The 
parents of our subject moved from Tennessee to Clay township, Wayne county, in 
L856 and were among the earlier settlers in this section. They took up land, which 
the father developed and improved along progressive lines, dying upon the 
homestead December 5, 1010. He had survived his wife for some years, her 
death having occurred September 2, 1897. In their family were five children 
besides the subject of this review: John II., who was born in .Monroe county, 
Tennessee, in 1852 and who died in Clay township in 1866; .lames, also a 
native of Monroe county, who died in Clay township in 1872; Frank, who is 
a resident of Humeston; Mrs. Mary Wilmot, born June 10, 1866, who is resid- 
ing in Clay township; and Marion A., born in 1870, who died in infancy in 
Monroe county. Tennessee, where the family had gone on a visit to the old 
home. 

Dr. Carlton M. MeGuire grew up on his father's farm in Clay township, 
acquiring his primary education in the public schools of the locality. He Later 
attended Garden Grove Seminary and Central University at Pella, afterward 
entering Rush Medical College in Chicago, graduating in medicine in 1891 
He opened an office for the practice of his profession a1 Seymour. Iowa, and 
from there went in 1894 to Walsenburg, Colorado, where he built up a large 
and representative patronage and where he remained until his wile's health 
would not permit of further residence in the dry climate. Leaving Colorado, 
Dr. MeGuire returned to Iowa and took up his residence in Humeston. where 
he has since remained. He secured an extensive patronage, which he con 
ducted so wisely and ably thai in time he accumulated a comfortahle com- 
petence, which enables him to live retired. On Decemher 1. 1912, he red 

into his beautiful modern residence in the southern pari of the citj and 
expects to spend the remainder of his years in well earned rest. In addition 
to his home he owns bis father's farm in Claj township, comprising five hun- 
dred and eighty acres of choice land, with two sets of improvements, and also 
eleven hundred and forty acres of excellent coal land in Colorado, besides 
stock in the Home Stab' Bank of IIu ston. 

On the 29th of May, 1886, Dr. MeGuire was united in marriage to Miss 
Eva Miriam Calwell, who was born in Clay township, January 7. 1866, a daugh 



1 tO LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

ter of James and .Miriam (Elliott) Calwell, natives of Portage county, <>lno, 
where the father died in 1886. In the Calwell family were the following <hil- 
dren: Belle, who died at an earlj age; Clinton, who resides in Denver, Colo- 
rado; -Mi>. Lilly Vanderbeak, of Akron, [owa; .Mrs. Barbara Alexander, ol 
Leon, Iowa; Willard W., of Belle Plaine, Kansas: Mrs. McGuire, the wife 
the subjeel of this review; Mrs. Cora Guinn, who resides in Three Hills, Alberta, 
Canada: James, of Clay township; and Joseph, who died in infancy. Mrs. 
McGuin also has the M. I >. degree and has been a true helpmate to her husband. 
Dr. McGuire gives his allegiance to the republican party and his influence 
is always given to progressive public measures, although his public spiril never 
takes the form of office seeking. Fraternally he is identified with Huarfino 
Lodge, No. 27, A. I-'. & A. M.. of Walsenburg, Colorado; Walsenburg Chapter, 
No. 27, li. A. M.; Commandery, No. is. k. t.. of Trinidad, Colorado; and El 
Ge Bel Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Denver. lie holds 
membership also in the Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of tin- 
World ami the Royal Neighbors and he and his wife belong to Walsenburg 
Chapter. No. 14, < >. E. S. They are both well known in social circles of Humes- 
ton, for thej are representatives of two of the tines] pioneer families in this 
part of the state. The Doctor i- widely read and a liberally cultured man. a 
deep reader along professional and general lines. This interest ha- led t,i his 
collecting one of the choice medical libraries in the city and he possesses also 

valuable 1 ks of other kinds. The many sterling traits of his character are 

known to his fellow townsmen, a great majority id' whom Dumber him as a 
friend. 



JAMES A. STILES. 



•lames A. stiles, who is now living retired in Allerton, was tor thirty-six 
years eicmeed in farming in this county, of which he became a resident in the 
spring of 1869. lie is one of those who firsl responded to the call tor troops in 
'61, and for more than three years valiantly served his countrj on the battle- 
fields of the south The third in order of birth in a family of ti\e. Ins natal 
day was th.- 12th of December, 1838, and his birthplace Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania. His parents, William ami Henrietta (Woolsey) Stiles, were also 
natives of Pennsylvania, when- the mother passed awaj during the earlj child- 
hood of our subject. The father continued to make his home in the Keystone 
state until 1858, when he removed to Iowa with his family, locating in Washing 
ton county, and there he resided until his death, which occurred in 187 I 

l | and early youth of James A. Stiles were passed in the state 
of Ins nativity. At the breaking out oi the Civil war he enlisted in Company 
D, Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for a period of three months. At the expira- 
tion of thai time he i nlisted for three years, heme mustered oul with the 

rank of orderlj sergeanl at (amp Dennison, Ohio, in August, 1864. He was 
captured bj the enemj in a raid at Rome, Georgia, and was sent to the prison 
at Belle Island. Imt was exchanged thirtj days later and rejoined Ins regiment. 
II,. participated in all of the battles in which Ins regiment was engaged, iuclud- 




JAMES \. STILES AM) FAMILY 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 133 

big that of Perryville, sum.' River, Atlanta. Chickamauga and Lookout .Moun- 
tain. Upon receiving his discharge he joined bis father in Washington county, 
remaining there until his marriage in the spring of 1865, following which he 
located in Johnson county, this state. Alter a year's residence there he returned 
to Washington county, where he remained until the spring of 1869, when he 
came to Wayne county, purchasing eighty acres of raw land which he culti- 
vated for four years. At the expiration of that time he traded his holding for 
a hundred and twenty acres in Clay township, this county, which he sold 
four years later, investing the proceeds in two hundred and forty acres of land 
in Warren township. lie engaged in the further improvement and cultivation 
of the latter place until L905, when he sold it and. withdrawing from active life. 
came to Allerton, where he has since lived retired. 

On the 22d of February, 1st;;,. Mr. Stiles was married to .Miss Mattie M. 
Irving, a daughter of William Irving of Cadiz, Ohio. She is the eldest in a 
family of five and was horn on the 18th day of May, 1846. Of this marriage 
there were born the following children: Ada. of .Miami, Oklahoma, who mar- 
ried L. S. DeSilva and has five children; Susan S., who is in the state hospital at 
Clarinda. where she was placed after a severe case of typhoid fever, her menial 
condition resulting from the treatment; Belle M., the deceased wife of Harvey 
Ferrel, who passed away in 1907, at the age of thirty-three years, leaving two 
children; Charles A., who is married and engaged in ranching and the cattle 
business in Colorado; Alva E., who married Ilarley II. Ilillyard and is residing 
in this county; Grace, who died at the age of eighteen years as the result of a 
railroad wreck; and Alice, who died when three wars of age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stiles are active members of the Presbyterian church of which 
he has been one of the elders for several years. Fraternally he is affiliated with 
the Masonic order, being a member of the blue lodge of Allerton and the- chapter 
at Corydon. His political allegiance he gives to the republican party and lie 
has always taken an active interest in all local affairs. For many years he was 
a member of the school board, having performed the duties both of president 
and secretary, and for three years he served on the board of county supervisors. 

Mr. Stiles is one of the well known pioneers of Way ;ounty, when' be is 

held in high regard, baving discharged his business affairs in an honorable and 
upright manner, while as a public official he has manifested the same loyalty 
and fidelity of purpose which characterized him on the battlefields of the south. 



JOHN PAUL REAM. 



Lucas county has been signally favored in the class of men who have occu 
pied her public offices and prominent among these is John Paul Ream who is 
now filling the position of county treasurer to which he was elected on the 
democratic ticket in 1908. That his service received public indorsement is 
indicated by the fact that he was reelected in 1910. lie was horn in Benton 
township. Lucas county. .July !). 18"69, a son of Samuel Mitchell and Nancy 
E. (Murphy) Ream, who were natives of Hillsboro, Ohio, and were reared, 
educated and married there. Soon afterward they removed westward with 



|::i LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Iowa as their destination and settled in I. mas county where the remainder of 
their lives was spenl upon a farm. The father always . -; 1 1- i-i . ■■ 1 on m-nmil agri- 
cultural pursuits and after coming to this state be invested in land in Benton 
township, paying for his firsl purchase only a dollar and a quarter per acre. 
I " 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 • I % he became the owner of three hundred acres of rich and productive 
land and in addition to the development of the fields he conducted a profitable 
business in buying and feeding cattle. In politics he was a stancb democrat 
and believed firmly in the principles of the party platform. Be belonged to 
the Masonic fraternity and he was a generous contributor to the support of the 
Seventh Day Adventisl church of which his wife was an active and faithful 
member. He died January 23, 1907, at the age of seventj one years, while 
his widow survived him for more than two years, passing away October 7. 
1909, at the age of seventy. They were tie parents of a large family of six 
sons and six daughters: Mrs. Emma Webb, who is now deceased; W. D., the 
owner of an extensive ranch at Dingle, Idaho: Dora Cain, living in Hartford, 
Iowa: .Mis. Edith I.. Burns, who has been a teacher all her life and is now at 
Shawnee. Oklahoma, after residing in that state since it was opened as a ter- 
ritory; John Paul; .lames i'.. living at Twin Falls, Idaho: M. ('.. a farmer and 
traveling salesman; Mrs. Ida Parsons, of Joliet, Montana: Duward !'>.. living 
on the old homestead in Lucas county; Elda, of Montana; and Samuel ami 
Nancy, who died in infancy. 

John Paul Ream has always resided in Lucas county save for one year 
spenl in Idaho as a salesman and farmer, lie acquired his education in the 

public sel Is of his native county and for a few years engaged in teaching, 

imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge that he had acquired. 

lie organized the Western Union Telephone Company and has l □ identified 

with manj progressive movements which have had direcl ami important bear- 
ing upon the welfare, progress and prosperitj of this section of the state. lie 

i- a Stockholder in the Spring Lake lee Company of Chariton and is the owner 

of a farm of on.' hundred ami fifty acres in Benton township. 

Business interests, however, have been bul one phase of ins existence and 
have not prevented his active participation in measures relating to the public 
good. He has also been a champion of the system of public education ami has 
been almosl continuously connected with the schools in some official capacitj 

since attaining his majority. At one time he served as town clerk and also 

30] ,,i Benton township. In politics he is a liberal democrat, voting as 
his judgmenl delates withoul feeling thai he should blindlj follow a party 
Leadership. In L908 his fellowmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, elected 

hi onniy treasurer of Lucas county, he being either the firsl or the second 

democral ever chosen to thai position, lie ran far ahead of his ticket, a fact 
indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence and trust reposed in 
him. His excellent record during his firsl term led to his reelection in 1910. 
II,. was prominentia identified with securing the second rural five delivers 
rou te in Lucas county, circulating a petition in supporl of and working hard 

for this measure. 

On the 21s1 of January, 1889, Mr Ream was married to Miss \nna E. 

Brickson, who was horn in Lucas county and is a daughter of Augusi and 
Anna Erickson, who were natives of Sweden The living children of this 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 135 

marriage are five in number, Lester F., Eulala, Roscoe, Cecil and Sidney M.. 
while two sons, Charles and Fred, died in infancy. The parents hold mem- 
bership in the United Brethren ehurch and Mr. Ream belongs to the .Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias— associations which indicate 
much of the nature of his interests and the rules which govern his conduct. 
Those who know him esteem him highly not alone for what he has accomplished 
in the business world but because of his fidelity and trustworthiness in every 
public relation. 



• IOIIX C. PHILLIPS. 



John C. Phillips, who at one time was one of the mosl extensive landown- 
ers in Appanoose county and for many years prominently connected with agri 
cultural and business interests of the section, is living retired in Seymour. 
His residence in this pari of the state covers a period of forty years and lie is 
consequently well known, having by a life of energy, industry and straight- 
forward dealing gained the respect and confidence of all with whom hi' has 
come in contact. He is, moreover, entitled to a place in this work from the 
fact that, he is an honored veteran of the Civil war. -Mr. Phillips is a native 
of Ohio, born in 1841, and is a son of Theophilus and Mahala Ann (Moore) 
Phillips, natives of Ohio, 'flic father of our subject was a son of John Phillips 
and was of Welsh ancestry, while the mother was a daughter of John .Moore, 
a veteran of the War of 1812, who in turn was a son of a Revolutionary soldier. 
Theophilus Phillips, the father of the subject of this review, came to Iowa in 
1871 and remained in this state two years, going to Kansas in 187.". and estab 
lishing his home in that state, where his death occurred in February. L879. lb' 
had long survived his wife, who passed away in 1852. 

John C. Phillips acquired his education in the public schools of Ohio and 
farmed in that state until 1862. On August 9th of that year he enlisted in Com- 
pany P. Ninety-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Culbertson, see 
ing active service until the end of the war. lie was mustered out in Cincin 
nati. Ohio, and immediately resumed his agricultural pursuits, remaining in his 
native stat.' until the fall of 1868. In that year he went to Missouri and settled on 
a farm in Pettis county but after three years came to Wayne county, settling in 
this section in April, 1872. 11.- located first in Monroe township and established 
himself in the stock business at Centerville, gaining rapid and well deserved 
success, owing to his reliable and straightforward business methods. In 1884 
he abandoned his slock business in favor of general farming, purchasing a tract 
of hind, which he set aboul improving and developing with characteristic energy. 
From time to time he added to his holdings, becoming finally the owner of two 
thousand acres. In all of his business affairs Mr. Phillips is straightforward, 
reliable and progressive and consequently his labors met with a gratifying degree 
of success, his industry and enterprise having gained for him such a competence 
that in 190:J he was able to put aside the active duties of life and enjoy somewhat 
of its rest and pleasures. He moved into Seymour, where he still has some 
important business connections, although he is not personally active, lb' is 



1 16 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

interested as a director in the Firsl National Bank and owns eighl hundred a< - 
of land m Waj ae countj and i Isewhere besides his beautiful and attractive borne. 

On the 24th of August, 1861, Mr. Phillips married Miss l lementine Drake, 
a daughter of James II. and Caroline (Marshall) Drake, the former a native 
of Pennsj Ivania and the latter of Ohio. Three of .Mrs. Phillips' brothers in-law 
took an active pari in the Civil war. Mr. and .Mrs. Phillips became the parents 
of thirteen children: Charles E., who lives in Montana; Emma A., the wife of 

P. E. Stewart, of Moore, Montana ; James T.. who resides on the old h place; 

Eosea M. and -I. Walter, win, are engaged in farming in Appanoose ■•.unity; 
Barry E., who died in infancy; Carrie A., the wife of -l. T. Richardson, a farmer 

of Appai se countj ; V. Bowen, of Buffalo, Montana; K. Km, hill, who follows 

farming in this county; Berberl II.. John .1 and Oscar Orville, who are all 

engaged in agricultural pursuits in Appai se c itj ; and Roscoi I . of Buffalo, 

Montana. .Mr. and Mrs. Phillips are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Phillips gives his allegiance t" the republican party ami is pi 
and public-spirited in his citizenship. II,- belongs i<> Kellogg I',, si. i; \ i; 
and thus keeps in touch with his comrades of the battlefield. Being a man of 
greal business ability ami executive force, he has contributed during the \ 
of his residence in this pan of Iowa to the general welfare ami progress. During 
the years of his activity his energy was untiring ami it was through his zealous 
application to business ami his straightforward dealing thai he me1 with such 
rapid success ami is now able to live retired, maintaining the respecl an, I esteem 
of his fellow citizens and enjoying the comforts ami contentmenl of a well spenl 

ami useful life. 



IIAKUY KELLER. 



Barrj Keller, editor ami publisher of the Russell Union ami honored in 1913 
with the presidency of the Southern fowa Editorial Association, a position indie 
ative of his high standing among his professional brethren, was horn in Camp 

township. Polk county, Iowa. Pebruarj 29, 1884, a s >f Mahlon ami Susan 

Newell) Kelh-r. the former horn near Galesburg, Illinois, ami the latter in 
i oshocton, Ohio. Both came to Iowa in earlj life, settling with their respective 
families in Polk county. Mr. an, I Mrs. Mahlon Keller had six children: Mrs 
George Lewis of Des Moines; Mrs. Charles Wilson, of Leavenworth, Kan 

whose husband is a soldier in the United States regular armj . Mrs, Nancy Le n. 

of Milford, Nebraska; Harry, of this review; -I. P., who acts as foreman for 
the Sw ill plant at Des Moines ; an, I .Mrs. .1. I >. Lynch, of Marshall town, Iowa. 

It was 111 I',, Ik count} that Harry Keller was horn ami reared, entering school 

at the usual age ami passing through consecutivi grades until he reached the 

h bcI I. His youthful experiences were those which usually m\ur to the 

farm lad. for he was reared to agricultural pursuits. When hut eleven years 

of age lie started in the printing husmess. in which connection le gradually 

worked his wax upward, mastering the details of the liiisuiess in its various 

phases. In February, 1906, he purchased the Lovilia Tribune, hut the office was 
destroyed by tire in December of the same year and on the Isl of January, 1907, 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES l:; 7 

he purchased the Russell Union, which he has since continued to publish This 
paper was established in July, 1897, and now has a good circulation and a 
liberal advertising patronage. The office is well equipped and the Union is an 
attractive, readable sheet, devoted to local interests as well as to the discussion 
of subjects of national importance. In addition to the printing plant in Russell 
Mr. Keller owns a residence in the town and unimproved property, while his 
wife is the owner of a house and a half acre of land in Russell. 

It was in Runnells. Iowa, in 1906, that Mr. Keller married Miss Lillian 
McAdoo, who was horn at Pella, Marion county, Iowa. February 8, 1889, and 
was educated in the public schools and in Central College of Pella. Her father. 
S. C. McAdoo. was horn in Tennessee and died at Runnells, Augusl 1. L906. He 
was a second cousin of Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo. Her mother, Mrs. 
Isabelle (Sipma) McAdoo. was horn in Priesland, Holland, and is now residing 
in Runnells. Mr. and Mrs. Keller have a daughter, [sabel Gretchen, born at 
Russell. November 14, 1911. 

Mrs. Keller is a member of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Keller holds 
membership with several fraternal organizations, including the Knights of 
Pythias lodge at Chariton, the Odd Fellows lodge at Russell, the Masonic lodge 
at Runnells and the Order of the Eastern Star at Lovilia. His political support 
has always been given to the republican party, which finds in him a stalwart 
advocate, and in 1910 and again in 191 2 he attended the state convention as a 
delegate. He was city clerk at Runnells in 1905 and 1906 and on the 1st of 
April. 1912, he became mayor of Russell, which position he has since acceptably 
filled. He stands fearlessly as a champion of all that he believes to he for the 
welfare of the community, state or nation and he issues his paper in support of 
the principles in which he believes. 



SEAMAN W. LEWIS. 



Seaman W. Lewis, well known in hanking circles of Ilumeston as cashier 
of the Ilumeston State Rank, is a native son of Iowa, horn in Union township, 
Lucas county. January 1. 187(1. lie is a son of Benjamin and Rachel I Parker) 
Lewis, pioneers in the state and for many years highly esteemed and respected 
residents of Union township. The family was founded in the middle western 
states by the paternal grandfather of the subject of this review, who was horn 
in New Jersey in 1800 and who came from that state when he was a lad of 
seventeen, settling in Ohio, where he learned the blacksmith's trade. There he 
married and reared his family and there passed away. The father was born in 
Ohio, September L9, 1830, and spent his early life in thai state. In 185"! he 
and his wife moved to Clarke county. Iowa, and lived upon a rented farm in 

that section until the fall of I860, when they can xcrlaml to I township. 

Lucas county, and purchased a tract of raw prairie land. Pioneer conditions 

prevailed everywhere and there was but o >ther house upon the broad expanse 

of rolling prairie which stretched ou1 in all directions, and the settlements 
few and far removed. The father, however, be. his energies to the develop 



138 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

men! of a profitable farm and with the exception of the period of bis service 
in the Civil war. remained continuously upon the property until his death. In 
1861 he enlisted in Company G, Thirty-fourth Iowa Volunteer [nfantry, and 
spent three years upon the southern battlefields, securing at the end of thai 
time his bonorable discharge. Be returned to his farm in Lucas county and 
continued the work of development, carrying it Forward successfully until his 
death, which occurred upon the homestead, January 22, 1884. The mother has 
also passed away, dying in Lucas county, Februarj 22, 1894. To their union 
were horn the following children: Eden, who was horn April 14. 1854, and who 
is now residing in Berrj county, Missouri; Ella, who died at the age of three 
years; Mrs. .Mary Jones, a resident of Plainview, Texas; Belen, deceased; Eliza 
In ih. who has also passed awa\ ; John \V.. who was born September 23, L860, 
ami who is now one of the leading attorneys of Ottumwa, Iowa: Seaman W , 
of this re\ iew ; William K.. who was horn May 1 1. 1872, and w bo died in » (ctober, 
1IHI7 : and Amanda L.. the widow of W. B. Barger of Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Seaman \V. Lewis acquired his education in the public schools of Lucas 
countj and remained a continuous resident of thai section until be moved into 
Bumeston. When be laid aside his hooks he followed Farming, with which he 
has been connected during the greater portion of his life. Be owns a1 the present 
time three hundred and sixtv acres of well improved laud in Union township 
and Ins activities in the managemenl of this enterprise For many years con 
stituted one of the Factors in local development. In 1909 he moved to Colorado 
in order to give his wife the benefit of the healthful climate of that state hut two 
years later returned and on March 1. LUL'. moved into Humeston and accepted 
the position of cashier of the Bumeston State Hank, lie has alreadj come to he 
regarded as an able ami Farsighted financier of greal husiness and executive 
ability and the affairs of the hank have prospered greatly under his 
administ rati. in. 

On October 16, 1891, Mr. Lewis was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Etta 
Carlton, who was horn in Union township, Lucas county. June 20, 1871. In 
thai county she grew to womanhood, attending the public schools of the .. 
munity. Ber father. John E. Carlton, was a native of West L(,,?it. Dubuque 
county, born October 31, 1836. lie came as one of the earliest settlers to Lucas 
county and then- die, | September 15, 1895. Bis wife, who was m ber maiden 
lined Miss Rebecca Lout', was horn in ('anion. Illinois. November 18, 1841, and 
died in Union township, December 17. 1893. In their family were Four children : 
Charles B., horn -lulv 24, L s n7. who is residing in Portland, Oregon; Orlej E., 

who was horn June 24, 1869, and who is now residing in Humeston: Sarah Etta 

who bi -.UN' ile wite of the subjeel of this review ; and Robert P., who was horn 
Deci mber L6, 1879, and died July 1". 1> S 1 Mrs. Seaman W. Lewis died April 

25, 1912. She was the mother of three children: Lottie, who was horn Aoigusl 

26, 1892, ami died September 16, 1902; V\ .'iter Carlton, who was horn Angusl «i. 
L894, and who is now attending the high school in Bumeston; and Nellie, who 
was horn September 29, 1904, and who is pursuing her studies in the public 
s.-i Is of 1 [umeston. 

Mr. Lewis gives Ins political allegiance to the democratic party and has 
served ably and conscientiously as township trustee ami Bchool director of Union 

1,, unship lie is a uieml,, r of the Modern Woodmen of American in Derby and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 139 

belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in Eumeston. lie is a worthy 
representative of one of the most highly respected pioneer families in [owa and 
possesses many sterling trails of character and mind which endear him greatly 
to all with whom he is associated. 



JOHN J. STIRLING. 



John J. ytirliny exerts a widely felt influence upon public opinion in < n 
don and vicinity as the publisher and editor of the Wayne County Democrat, a 
newspaper which enjoys a large circulation in tins district, lie was born in 
Keokuk, Iowa. May 4, l.sTl', and is a son of John ami Man-id 1 Thomas 1 Stirling. 
The grandfather, John Stirling, was a native of Scotland, who in 1858 crossed 
with his family to the United States and located in New Hampshire. In 1866 lie 
decided to seek the greater opportunities of the growing west and came to Iowa. 
where he located in Bonaparte, but later moved to Farmington. where he estab- 
lished an enterprise which in later years became of great importance to the 
growth of this city — the Stirling Woolen Mill Company — which he ran for 
thirty years, or until his demise. .Mis. Harriet Stirling, the mother of our 
subject, was a daughter of George Thomas, a native of Pennsylvania, who in 
the early '40s became a pioneer of Jefferson county. Iowa, and in 1854 came to 
Wayne county, where he followed agricultural pursuits during his active life. 

John Stirling, the father of our subject, married .Miss Harriet Thomas in 
Bonaparte, Iowa, and after this event they removed to Keokuk, where thej 
made their home for some time. He was a printer by trade and on his removal 
to Bonaparte in 1880 bought the Bonaparte Journal, which he conducted sic 
cessfully as publisher and editor until 1885. Ee came to Corydon in 1886 and 
here bought the Wayne County Democrat, the policy of which paper be directed 
for nearly a quarter of a century — until May 2(1. 1910— when he sold the publica- 
tion to his son, our subject. The father was always a stanch adherent of Un- 
democratic party and during the administration of Cleveland served with 
efficiency as postmaster of Corydon. There were sewn children born to the 
parents of our subject: Alexander, who is a printer and resides in Denver, 
Colorado; John -T.. our subject: Hattie, who resides in Canon City. Colorado. 
and was 'the wile of Alberl McClanahan, deceased; George T.. who conducts a 

printing office in Spokane. Washington; .Maude, who runs a r; h in Idaho: 

David M., who is engaged in the publishing business with our subject: and 
Roy, who died in infamy. 

".John J. Stirling was reared at home and received his education in newspaper 
offices. He early in life became acquainted with newspaper work, learning the 
different details' of the business. He is well acquainted with all the differenl 
branches of running a printing plant and became an experl linotype operator 
and machinist, working in all the big printing plants of the west. In 1910 b. 

bought the Wavne County Dei -rat. Under his management the circulal 

the paper has considerably increased and its reputation is of a high order on 
account of the firm stand which Mr. Stirling lakes in regard to public questions 
and in promotion of all measures which mighl benefil the city of Corydon and 



1 10 II CAS WD WAYNE ( OUNTIES 

the surrounding territory. Its news columns are spicj and lull of interesl and 
record doI only all local happenings of interesl bu1 give a complete and intelligent 

iew of the political situation as it prevails in the state and nation and 
a readable record of the general happenings in the world. Under the direction 
of Mr. Stirling the advertising columns have increased in space and the paper 
is considered as the besl medium to appeal to the local trade. 

Mr. Stirling was married in L904 to .Miss Olive S. Gaboury, >•( Colorado. In 

his political virus Mr. Stirling is a de ral and necessarily he lias bec< 

prominenl in the local ranks of the party and lias I n h red with election to 

tin 1 chairmanship of the county central committee twice. His fraternal relations 
are with the Knights of Pythias and the Yeomen. Early in life he identified 
himself with the Typographical Union and lias remained active in its work, 
serving as vice presidenl of the Denver Typographical Union, No. 19, in 1905 
Mr. Stirling lias made a creditable record in the newspaper field in Iowa. He 
is a man marked by strength of character. He is presidenl of the fowa Demo 
eratic Editorial Association, composed of all the daily and weekly democratic 
papers of the state, and his opinions upon matters of public welfare find ready 
expression in his paper. 



WILLIAM KENT. 



William Kent, a native of England, was brought bj his parents to the 
United States when but six years of age and came to Lucas county in 1869, 
where he settled in Jackson township, devoting the remainder of his life to 
agricultural pursuits. He was horn in the mother country on June 5, 1826, 
and his death occurred in Jackson township, this county, April 24, 1906, bul 
a few months before his eightieth birthday. He came with his parents to 
America in 1832, their first location being Cleveland. Ohio, where he was 
reared and grew to manhood. Removal to Maywood, Illinois, was made in 
1865, and 1869 marks the arrival <d' the family in Lucas county, where a farm 
in Jackson township was acquired. The propertj comprised three hundred 
and twenty acres and to the cultivation of this Mr. Kent devoted his remain- 
ing days, attaining remarkable success along agricultural lines. The greater 
portion of the original home farm is still in possession of the family at this day. 
Loth of his parents were natives of England ami the father served at one 

ti in the British army and under the command oi General Pakenham par 

ticipated in the battle of New Orleans. The father's na was Daniel and 

■ mother before her marriagi was Miss Ann Cowley. Loth passed away in 
eland, Ohio. In their family were sii children, of whom four reached 
maturity: John, deceased; Mrs. Susan Steele, deceased; William; and Ann 
and Emma, deceased. 

In I860 Mr. Kent was united in marriage to Miss Anna Wherrett, also 
a native of England, born in Gloucestershire on January I, 1842. In L852, 
when ten years of age, she came with her parents to America and is still living, 

ding in a commodious home in Lucas. Her parents were William Trot 
man and Ann (Carefield) Wherrett. natives of England, the former horn 



PUB 










w II l I \M KEN I 




MRS. WILLIAM KENT 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 1 i;, 

in 1801 and the tatter in 1804. The father died in Berea, Ohio, in 1871, hav- 
ing long survived his wife, whose death occurred while yel in the mother coun- 
try, in 1844, at the age of forty years. Their family consisted of eight chil- 
dren: William, horn August 18, 1829, who died al Kankakee, Illinois. Decem- 
ber 11. 1855; .Mrs. Ann Parslow, horn July 20, 1831, who died at Strongville, 
Ohio, January 18, 1865; Eliza, horn December 12, 1833, who died April 14. 
1834; John, horn November 29, 1834, making his home in the state of Wash- 
ington: .Mrs. Ellen Cowell, horn November 19, 1836, who died February 23, 

1869; George, horn .May 11. 1838, who passed away at Chattanooga, Tei s 

sec. May 20, 1865, having served as a soldier in the Union army during the 
Civil war; Charles, also a Union soldier, born February 6, 1840, who died a1 
Fort Collins. Colorado, February 8, 1910; and .Mrs. Kent, the wife of our sub- 
ject and the youngest member of the family. All of their children were born 
in Stonehouse, England. .Mr. and Mrs. Kent had two sons: Charles Ells- 
worth, born at Salem. Columbiana county, Ohio, on September 7. 1861. and now 
a resident of Jackson township: and John Warren, horn March 9. 1867, a resi- 
dent of the same township. The grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Kenl 
are as follows: Ruth, horn January 22. 1906; .Melville, horn November :!. 
1907: Irene, horn November 9, 1909: and Zelia, born November 24. lull, the 
above all being children of Albert Kent; Cleo, horn November 28, 1911: and 
Cecil, horn February 2. 1913, both children of William Kent. 

Politically Mr. Kent was a republican and always kept well informed upon 
all government issues. Originally his trade was that of a carpenter and joiner 
and he was an accomplished ship carpenter, although after locating in Lucas 
county he followed agricultural pursuits entirely. His fraternal relations 
extended to the Independent Order of Good Templars, having been a member 
of the Cleveland (Ohio) lodge. Mrs. Kent, who survives, is a member of the 
Reorganized Church of the Latter Day Saints of Lucas, to which she gives her 

moral and material support. Mi'. Kent was greatly beloved and highly esteei I 

by all who knew him and his memory remains with many who esteemed in him 
a man of high character. Public-spirited and progressive, he interested him- 
self in all matters concerning the public welfare and although born on the 
other side of the Atlantic, gave in his life an excellent example of true Ameri 
can citizenship. His widow remains to perpetuate his record and is treated on 
all sides with respect and veneration for ber many womanly qualities, ber 
charitable character ami kindliness, which lead her to take an interest in all 
matters undertaken in the interests of mankind. 



ALBERT L. BARKER. 



Albert L. Barker is the able and expert chief engineer of tic Old Colony 
Creamery and in addition is closely connected with business interests of Humes 
ton as manager of the Princess Opera House. He was horn in Union town 
ship, August 14, 1871, a son of < >. J. and Eliza (Almon) Barker, the former 
a native of Indiana and the latter of Iowa. Loth passed away in Wayne 
county, the father dying in Humeston in 1906, at the age of sixty-nine, and 



146 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

the mother in Union township in May, 1872. They were numbered among 
the earliest settlers in Wayne county. 

Alberl L. Barker has remained continuously a residenl of this section 

since his birth. He acquired his education in the local public scl Is and 

alter laying aside his hooks [earned the carpenter's trade, which he followed 
until he was twenty-two years of age. For the past nine years he has been at 
intervals chief engineer of the Old Colonj Creamerj Company of Eumeston 
and is so engaged at the presenl time. Be is an expert in this line of work 
and lias had broad practical experience in it. In addition to this Mr. Barker 

has since 1907 1 n manager of the Princess opera House and has done able 

and businesslike work in this connection, securing always high class attrac 
tions. The building is owned by the Home Hank of Eumeston and is one of 
the tin. st of its kind in the county, thoroughly equipped in every particular, 
lighted 1>.\ electricity ami supplied with a large modern stage upon which 
may be seen all of the modern metropolitan attractions. The | pie of Eumes- 
ton greatly appreciate the exceptional opportunities winch this theater offers 
ami reward Mr. Barker's efforts by according him a liberal patronage. 

In 1894 Mr. Marker wa^ united in marriage to Miss Ollie Stone, a native of 
Iowti ami a daughter of A. II. and Asilee (Taylor) stone, both of whom arc 
residing in Arkansas at the present time. Mr. and Mrs. Barker are the | 
cuts df a daughter, Wilma S., horn in 1896, who attend.-. I the Eumeston high 
school. -Mr. Barker has no political affiliations, preferring t.> cast ins vote 
according to his personal convictions without regard to party lines. Both he 

and his wife are members of the < ongregational church. A mj I' high worth 

and sterling integrity, he is highly respected and honored in tin- community 
where his entire life has lien spent. 



ABRAM ELMORE RICEMAN. 
Abram Elmore Richman is the owner of one of the choice and well improved 

farms of section 5, Richman township, which was named in honor of his 

father, who was the second settler in this count} and who has seen the entire 
development of this part of the county and slat.- from primitive conditions 
to its presenl prosperity. 

Mr. Richman was horn on his father's farm in Richman township, Wayne 
county. Iowa. April 5, 1858, and irr.w to manhood in this locality where he has 
always followed farming and stock-raising, having become of the substantial 

men of this section in these pursuits. His parents were Marshall II. and Marv 

Jane (Guinn) Richman, the former a native of Greenbrier county, Virginia, 
now Summers county, Wesl Virginia, horn September 11, 1820, and the latter in 
the Bame county, horn February 20, 1823. Both passed away in Richman town 

ship, this county the father on April 9, L899, and the mother on January 31, 

1906. They were the second settlers in this township, which was named ill their 

honor, ami to which thej came from their native county in 1850 bj way of the 

Ohio riv.r to St. Louis and thence by the Mississippi to Keokuk and hy OX 

t.am to Chillicothe, mar the present site of Ottumwa, where they planted and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 147 

harvested a crop. After gathering it they came to Richman township and settled 
there and this has been the family home ever since. At the time of their arrival 
it was a broad stretch of prairie and the nearesl trading posts were Eddyville and 
Ottumwa. This was the time when the Mormons were driven from Nauvoo, 
Illinois, and went on their way seeking a new home in the far west. One hand 
of them would plant a crop, the next would care for ii and the third would 
harvest it. The Richman home was the only our on the prairie at that time ami 
became headquarters for the prospective settlers besides being a place for the 
feeding and caring for the stage horses, and a house where the stage drivers and 
passengers also could receive a hospitable welcome. .Mi-, and Airs. Richman 
were the parents of fourteen children, namely: Margaret, horn in Virginia, 
October 29, 1842, who died March 4, 1849; -lames II.. horn April 1. 1844, of 
whom more extended mention is made on another page of this work; Samuel M., 
born July 2d. 1845, who resides in Richman township; Oliver, who was born 
March IS. 1847. and died April 11. 1854; Ephraim, horn November 18, 1848, 
whose death occurred February 20, 1854; William, who was horn Augusl L8, 
1850, and died February 23, 1854: Enos, born August 23, 1852, the first white 
child horn in Richman township, who now resides at Huntley, Nebraska ; Charles, 
who was born December 23. 1854, and who passed away two days later; John 
M., horn January 23, 1856, who makes his home in Richman township; Ahram 
E., of this review; Mrs. Sarah E. Kyner, horn November 2. 1859, who resides 
in Kansas; Thomas A., who was born November 23. 1861, and now lives in Harlan 
county. Nebraska; .Mrs. Mary Pinley, horn September 15, 1863, whose home 
is in Kansas: and Airs. Cynthia .1. Barry, who was horn September 19, 1865, 
and resides near Ilumeston, Iowa. 

Ahram Elmore Richman, who has given all of his life to agricultural pursuits, 
owns two hundred and ninety acres of fertile land upon which he has placed a 
number of improvements which have greatly enhanced its value. lie has intro- 
duced every convenience upon the farm that money can secure and besides general 
farming gives special attention to stock-raising, specializing in Jersey bogs, while 
Mrs. Richman is greatly interested in poultry raising, having a choice flock of 
Barred Plymouth Rock chickens. By his industry and energy Mr. Richman has 
attained a degree of prosperity which places him among the most substantia] men 
of this locality and the success which has come to him has not only resulted in 
his own profit hut has been the means of contributing to the general development 
of this section. 

On February 14. 1893, Mr. Richman was united in marriage to Miss Johanna 
Sullivan, who was horn July 24. 1868. She is a native of Ireland and came with 
her parents to America in 1872, when only four years of age, the family settling 
in Pennsylvania, where the father, Dennis S. Sullivan, followed railroading for 
three years, after which he removed to Corydon, Iowa, and thence to LeRoy, 

where he subsequently passed away at the age of seventy-two years. The ther. 

Nora (Foley) Sullivan, was also a native of the land of Erin and is at present 
making her home with her children in this locality. Mi-, and Mrs. Sullivan were 
the parents of eleven children: Mrs. Ella Wade, who lives in Pennsylvania; 
John, residing in LeRoy, Iowa; Dennis, who makes his home in that place; Mary, 
deceased; .Mrs. Kate Smith, of Boise, Idaho: Mrs. Nora Soung, also of that 
city; Mrs. Richman ; Michael, residing near LeRoy ; Maurice, who died in Ireland ; 



1 18 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

James, of Los Angeles, < !alifornia ; and David, w In, passed away in Pennsylvania. 
All Knt tlic two younger members of the t'amih were born in Ireland, the others 
having been born in Waterford, Erie county, Pennsylvania. The home of .Mr. 
and Mrs. Etichman is out- of refinement and culture tor both are fond of good 
literature, and while they did nol enjoy all of the advantages of education in 
childhood they acquired wide and valuable experience in the school of life and 

as tli'.\ air both studious (if mind and fond of reading thej art' well informed 

upon all subjects of the presenl daj Broad-minded, liberal and public-spirited, 
they are among the mosl popular people of the community. Both have traveled 
extensively and have broadened their views upon life by tliis means. While Mr. 
Etichman has attained to well merited prosperity he has also been a force in gen- 
eral development ami any public enterprise worthy of supporl finds in him an 
ardent champion. 



GEORGE K COMBS. 



Despite the f,iet that In- has far outlived the Psalmist's alloted span of three 
score ami ten. George K. Combs is still engaged in business in Allerton, where he 
has long conducted a real-estate, loan and collection office. His birth occurred 
in Lawrence county, Ohio, mi the L8tfa of November, 1831, and he is a s,.n of 

Jonas and Margarel (K 1/ tombs, natives respectively of Virginia and Ohio. 

They were united in marriage in Lawrence county. Ohio, and there passed the 
entire period of their married life. To them were born nine children, our subject 
heme the second in unlet- of birth. 

The boy] 1 and youth of George K. Combs were passed in very much the 

same manner as those of other lads who were reared in the rural sections of the 
middle west during the pioneer period, lie remained at home with his parents 
until he hail attained his majority, ami then started out for himself. In common 

with the majoritj of farmer lads he had I □ trained to agricultural pursuits 

from his boyhood, ami continued to follow that vocation for many years, lie 
li rst rented one of his father's farms, which he cultivated tor a year. At the 
expiration of that time his father sold the property and he removed to Logan 
county, Ohio, where he operated his father-in law 's farm. He resided there 
until the spring of ls.">7. when he boughl eighty acres of land in DeWitl county, 
Illinois, and there continued his agricultural career until L863. In the year 
last u; id he sol ,1 his place ami returned to Ohio, devoting his energies to \anous 

■iipations until the spring of 1865, when he CI I" Iowa. setlliiiL' near 

Mechanicsville, Cedar county. Three years later, in 1868, he removed to Wayne 
county, purchasing eighty a, -res of raw land in Wan-en township. He applied 
himself to the cultivation and improvement of this propertj with marked 
capabilitj and intelligence, directing his undertakings with the foresighl and 

discernment that invariably bring g I returns As time passed he enhanced 

the value of liis place by the election of substantial buildings and the introduc- 
tion ahoiit the premises of various improvements, consistent with the spirit of 

progress he exercised in the direction of his business. In l^-n Mr. Combs 

i this pi; and bought seventj six and a half acres of land just south 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COl'XTIKS 149 

Allerton, on which he resided for six years. At the end of that time he like- 
wise disposed of that farm and came to Allerton, where he has ever since made 
his home. Here he subsequently became associated with E. L. Ilarl in estab- 
lishing the first real-estate office opened in the town, which they conducted on a 
partnership basis for six ami a half years. Upon the dissolution of the firm 
.Mr. Combs established a real-estate, loan and collection business which he is 
still conducting. 

In 1853. .Mr. Combs was married to Miss Sarah Byers, a native of Ohio, who 
passed away on the 1st of .May. 1909, at the age of seventy-nine years, and was 
buried in the Allerton cemetery. Of this marriage there were born six children. 
as follows: Anna M., the widow of H. B. Vance, who passed away in 1906, and 
the mother of two children, who is living on a farm in South Dakota; .Mary A., 
the wife of William Graham, of North Dakota, who has four children; Edgar I. , 
a resident of Cherryvale, Kansas, who is married and has four children; John B., 
who passed away in Allerton in 1895; Clara E., the deceased wife of B. P. 
Puckett of Scotland. South Dakota, who with two of her children was burned 
to death in their residence at Eureka, South Dakota, in February, 1896; and 
Luella, who married .lames Howell of Allerton and has four children. 

Mr. Combs is a United Presbyterian, as was also his wife, and served as 
treasurer of the local church for several years. His allegiance in matters politic 
he accords to the democratic party and served for three years as mayor of Aller- 
ton, while for ten he was a member of the school board, having discharged his 
duties in both connections in a capable and effieient manner. .Mi'. Combs owns 
his residence in Allerton and enjoys a wide and favorable acquaintance among 
the people of this community, where he is accorded the respect ever extended 
to those who have led useful and honorable lives. 



LUTHER II. BUSSELLE. 

Luther H. Busselle. prominently connected with financial interests of Chari- 
ton as cashier of the Lucas County National Dank and of the Lucas County 
Trust & Savings Bank, was born in Otter Creek township, this county, on 
the 8th of February, 1865. He is a son of William \V. and Tanseii Ann 
(Reece) Busselle, the former a native of Indiana, born in 1831, and the lat- 
ter of Illinois. Their marriage occurred in Clarke county. Iowa, and from 
there they came to Otter Creek township. Lucas county, and located on a 
farm. The father engaged in agricultural pursuits in that locality for many 
years but is now living retired at Marengo. He survives his wife who passed 
away in Chariton in July, 11)01. In their family were the following children: 
Mrs. Flora B. Thompson, who resides in Washington, D. C, where her hus- 
band has served as solicitor of the United Slates Treasury since he was ap- 
pointed to that position by President Taft; I'. 0., who resides in Wichita. 
Kansas, as general manager of the International Harvester Company, a posi- 
tion which he has occupied for the past twenty-eight years, beginning with 
the old McCormick Harvester Company; Luther II.. of this review; A. S.. 
engaged in the real-estate and loan business in Tacoma, Washington; Charles. 



150 LUCAS AND WAYNE COl'NTlES 

who has passed away; and Mrs. Effie B. Eenderaon, the wife of Dr. B. B. 
BendersoD of Marengo. All of these children were born in otter Creek town- 
ship and all supplemented a public-school education by a course in Simpson 
College at [ndianola. 

Luther II. I'.us.selle spent his boyhood upon his father's farm and his early 
experiences were those which generally fall to the lot of the farm lad. After 
attending Simpson College he settled in Chariton and in 1894 turned his 
attention to the hardware business, forming a partnership with X. I!. IIol- 
linger, with whom he continued for two years. At the end of that time the 
firm became L. II. Busselle & Company, and the business was afterwards 
conducted by Mr. Busselle alone. Ee seemed a large patronage and con- 
tinued active in its conducl until 1907 when he became interested in the organ 
i/ation of the Lucas County National Hank of which he was elected cashier. 
This responsible position he still holds and his work has been a helpful factor 
in making the hank the sound and conservative institution which it is today. 
Mr. Busselle also aided in the organization of the Lucas County Trust & 
Savings Bank, which opened its doors mi the 11th of August, 1913, and he 
is cashier of this institution also, lie is a director in both the hanks and 
recognized as one of the leaders in the financial life of tl immunity. 

(in the 22nd of February, 1911, Mr. Busselle married .Miss Eloise Cope 
land, who was born in Cincinnati. Ohio, a daughter of Elijah and Amanda 
(Baker) Copeland, residents of Chariton. Mr. Busselle is connected fraternally 
with Chariton Lodge, No. til. A. !•'. & A. M., and the Independent Order of 
Odd fellows. lie gives his political allegiance to the republican parly ami is 

interested in public affairs although not active as an office seeker. In addition 
to his connection with the two hanks above mentioned, he is also identified 
with various other important corporate interests el' the citj and he is an 
extensive land owner, holding in partnership with .Mr. Eikenberry, eighl hun- 
dred and fifty-seven acres of the old Mallory estate in Lincoln. This is the 
location of tic famous [lion, the former residence of the Mallorys. Mr. and 
Mrs. Busselle live in Chariton and are numbered among the most highly re- 
spected and esteemed residents of the city. 



LLOYD E. WARDER, D. D. S. 
Since 1903 Dr. Lloyd E. Warder has been practicing dentistrj in Corydon 

in along the line of his chosen profession has attained that succss which 

hums only as the ivsult of ability ami efficiency. He was horn in Webster, 
West Virginia, November 7. 1879, and is a sin of M. 0. ami .lane Maxwell) 
Warder, Datives of the same state. The father of our subject broughl his fam- 
ily to Illinois in L885 and located at Evanston, where he followed farming for 
a number of years. He is now living retired in Bamilton, Illinois 

Dr. Warder is the sixth in a familj of nil hildren. lie acquired his early 

education in th.- country Bchools of Illinois and supplemented this by a course 
in dentistrj at Keokuk, Iowa, receiving his degree in Hut:;. Be located imme 
diately for practice in Corydon, where he has since remained. Bj reading ami 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 151 

investigation he keeps in touch with the most advanced thought of the profes- 
sion and his labors have been attended with excellent results, viewed from both 
a financial and professional standpoint. He is a member of the Iowa State 
Dental Society and has a high standing among his fellow practitioners. 

On the 25th of December, 1905, Dr. Warder was united in marriage to 
Miss R. G. Lovitt, a daughter of 0. P. and Amelia K'ivciis l.ovitt. pioneers 
in Wayne county, who came to this section from Terre Haute. Illinois. Dr. 
and Mrs. Warder have a daughter, Lorine Elizabeth. Dr. Warder is affiliated 
with the Masonic order and is one of the leading figures in the local lodge and 
chapter. For many years he gave his allegiance to the republican party but is 
now an enthusiastic "Bull Moose." He is a student of the signs of the tines. 
keeping in touch with the trend of modern thought concerning matters of 
general interest as well as of professional advancement. He has made a 
gratifying record as a member of the dental fraternity and has met with grati- 
fying success in his practice. 



1IORACI-; (i. LARIMER. 

Horace G. Larimer is prominently connected with business interests of 
Chariton as a member of the firm of Hollinger & Larimer, dealers in men's cloth- 
ing and furnishings. He is a man who has risen rapidly by the force of his 
ability, enterprise and initiative, his interests touching closely the political and 
business development of his city. He was born in Chariton township, this county, 
November 27. 1875. and is a son of Wilson King and Margaret (Young) Larimer, 
of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this work. 

Horace G. Larimer grew to manhood in his native township and acquired 
his education in the public schools. He moved with his parents to Chariton 
when his father was elected county clerk and in August, 1900, turned his atten- 
tion to business in the city. He formed a partnership with .Mr. Hollinger under 
the firm name of Hollinger & Larimer, dealers in men's clothing and furnishings. 
They carry a large and well selected stock of goods and enjoy a liberal patronage, 
for their business methods are at all times straightforward and their business 
integrity beyond question. Mr. Larimer was for three years presidenl of t In- 
state Federation of Mercantile Associations of Iowa and for two years held 
the same office in the Iowa Retail Clothiers* Association. lie has made ;i close 
study of trade conditions and keeps in touch with everything pertaining to the 
line of work in which he is engaged. He has other important business connec- 
tions in Chariton and has valuable real-estate interests, owning besides a modern 
home a number of pieces of land. 

On the 19th of December, 1900, Mr. Larimer married Miss Willie Blanche 
Hollinger, who was born in Chariton. October 1. 1877, a daughter of Napoleon 
Bonaparte and Ellen Frances (Blanchard) Hollinger, the former bora in Seneca 
county, Ohio. November 21, 1834, and the latter in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
September 17, 1842. The parents went to Wrighl county, Iowa, in 1855 and 
moved from there to Chariton in 1S72. Here the father engaged in the hardware 
and implement business for a number of years, later joining his son-in-law in 



152 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

,Mt ' lin " "> Bollinger >.v. Larimer. He is cumbered among the besl known busi- 
IIISS ""'< of Chariton and has secured a comfortable fortune. He and bis wife 
became the parents of the following children: Mrs. Clara Culberson, who was 
born January 3, 1859, and who is now residing in Chariton; Mrs. Lydia 
Welch, born November 9, 1863, a residenl of Des Moines; Nellie, whose birth oc 
curred April 1. 1865; Etta, who was born January 9, 1869, and who died December 
21, 1886; and Mrs. Larimer, wife of the subjed of this review. Mr. and Mrs. 
Larimer have become the parents of three children: Mildred, horn May 29, 
1902; Hugh, whose birth occurred October 28, 1907; and Margaret, born August 

30. 1909. The familj reside in the well known Crocker house, E the finesl 

and most modern in the city, and the parents are well known in social circles. 

Although Mr. Larimer is one of the most able business men of Chariton his 
interests have not been confined to this line bu1 have extended to other fields also. 
He is active in republican politics and has always been vitally interested in the 
welfare of the party, having attended everj stair convention since he was of 
age. He was mayor of Chariton for one term and during thai time accomplished 
a great deal of constructive and progressive work, it being largely due to Ins efforts 
that the subways were constructed under the Rock Island Railroad. He has for 
the past eighl years been a member of the Grand Tribunal of the Knights 
Pythias of the state of Iowa, is connected with Chariton Lodge, No. 64, A. P. & 
A. M., tlic Independent < irder of < >dd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, 
the "Woodmen of the World, the Homesteaders and the Yeomen. He is a vestry- 
man in the Episcopal church, of which his wife is also a member. Mr. Larimer 
is a liberal, broad minded and public-spirited man. active in community affairs 
and L'i\m<_r largely of Ins time and means to the promotion of progressive public 
projects. A representative of the besl type of modern business man. he holds 

the esteem and respeel of Ins associates, standing among the a of marked 

ability and substantia] worth in the community. 



JUDGE HIEAM K. EVANS. 

Since 1904 Hiram K. Evans has filled the high oilier of judge of the dis 
tricl court of the third judicial district, comprising Wayne and sis other 
counties and by his strictlj fair and impartial decisions has proven himself to 
lie a most capable and fair officer of the law. He has occupied during his long 

public cai p aumerous other important positions and proven himself able 

in all relations ami positions which he has ever been called upon to till fcrj the 
people. 

1 1 nam K. K\ans was horn iii Wayne county, Iowa, on the 17th of March. 

1863, and is a son of Hiram and Sarah -lane (Robison Kvans. 'The father 

was born in Clearville, Pennsylvania, and the mother in Morgantown, West 
Virginia. 'The grandfather of our subject was James Evans, a bod of Evan 
Evans, whose father, Evan, came from Wales to America prim- to 1753 and 
settled at what is now Geigertown, Pennsylvania, where he died. He was one 
of the loyal soldiers of the Revolutionary war. a member of Captain John Robe 
son's company of the Pennsylvania state Militia, and also served valiantly in 




JUDGE IIII.'AM K. EVANS 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 155 

(several Indian campaigns. James Evans, the grandfather, was married to 
Rachel Blankley, whose father, George Blankley, served during the War of 
1812 as sergeant in Captain Jacob Huffman's company of the First Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment of Rifleman. 

The distinguished military record of the familj was made more Lustrous bj 
the son. Hiram Evans, the father of our subject, who enlisted in the Mexican 

war but was not mustered in. as the close of the war came before lu uhl be 

sent to the front. In lstii>. however, lie enlisted m Company I >. Twentj third 
Iowa Infantry, and was commissioner as lieutenant. For valiant services he 
was soon promoted to the rank of captain of the same company and served with 
distinction for two years, resigning at that time on accounl of disability. He 
had come to Lee county, Iowa, as early as 1845 hut later removed to Davis 
county, where he purchased governmenl land and from there came to Wayne 
county in 1856. where he took up a government claim of four hundred and 
eighty acres, on which he lived until his demise. He was a public-spirited 
man and enjoyed great esteem and respect in the locality and twice was 
slated as a candidate for the state legislature. For six years he served as a. 
member of the board of county supervisors and his work in this relation was 
of great benefit to his county and township. He was a prominent Mason, being 
a member of the blue lodge, a Knight Templar and a Shriner, and also belonged 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His death occurred on the L'lst 
of March. 1903. Mrs. Hiram Evans, the mother of our subject, was a daughter 
of James and Rachel (MeKelvey) Robison, both of Morgantown, West Virginia. 
Her father was a son of James Robison, a native of West Virginia, whose 
wife's name was Agnes McCray. James Robison, the grandfather, was a 
son of James Robison, a native of Scotland, who early in life crossed to [re- 
land, where he married and came to Virginia prior to 1800. The mother of our 
subject passed away April 7, 1905. Mi-, and Mrs. Hiram Evans were the par- 
ents of nine children, of whom six are still living and our subject is the young- 
est. 

Hiram K. Evans received a country-school education, which later was sup 
plemented by a course in the Allerton high school. He graduated from the law- 
department of the State University in 1886 and shortly thereafter was admit- 
ted to the bar. He began active practice of his profession in Seymour, Iowa, 
where he remained two ami a half years before coming to Corydon, where he 
has since been engaged in active practice with the exception of those periods 
during which lie has served in public office of one kind or another. He has 
won for himself favorable criticism for the careful and systematic methods 
which he has followed and has remarkable powers of concent ration and a won- 
derful memory which have often excited the wonder of his colleagues. He stands 
high in the discussion of legal matters ami by his application of legal princi 
pies demonstrates the wide range of his professional acquirements. 

The ability of our subject along professional lines found early recognition 
when in 1890 he was elected to the important position of county attorney, in 
which capacity he served for four years to the full satisfaction of his constitu- 
ency. Vigorous in prosecuting his cases, he yet maintained absolute impar- 
tiality to serve the ends of justice. Only one year after his term of county 
attorney bad expired he was honored with election to the lower bouse of tie- 



156 LUCAS AND W VVNK COUNTIES 

state legislature and was active <>n the floor of the house in forwarding a num- 
ber of measures beneficial to the state and particularly his district, and was 
con sted with much important constructive legislation. In 1897 he was rec- 
ognized by the chief executive of the state in an appointmenl as regenl of the 
State University and served in ihis rapacity for seven years, being actively 
connected during thai time with a oumber of measures which resulted greatly 
in the benefil of tins greal educational institution. Iii 1902 his t'dlow citizens 
of Corydon elected him to the office of mayor, which he filled with circumspec- 
tion for two years, promoting improvements which have sine- helped to make 
his city hotter and more modern in many ways. In 1904 yet higher honors 

awaited him when he was elected to the distinguished offii E judge of the 

district court, a position which In- has since held. His decisions are based 
strictlj upon the equity of the law, ye1 they are tempered by the human kind- 
ness which is part of the nature of Judge Evans. He is one of the most cap- 
able judges in Iowa and few of his decisions have ever been reversed in higher 
courts. Prom September, 1891, until December, L904, Judge Evans was a law 
partner of the Hon. J. W. Freehand, who is now deceased, and this partnership 
while it existed was productive of many excellenl results. In .-wry relation. 
be it along the line of law practice or in the various public positions which he 
has held and holds, it may be said of -Indue Evans thai everything he finds 
to do he docs well. 

On the 1st of January, 1891, Hiram K. Evans was married to Miss Har 
rietl Belvel, a daughter of Henry .M. and Margarel J. (McCune Belvel. The 

rather was a native of Ohio and the mother of Indiana and they were early 

pioneers of Iowa, coming to this state aboul 1856, where they were subse- 
quent^ married. Mr. Belvel was a newspaper editor, conducting a journal in 
various [daces in the state and attaining prominence and importance in mold- 
ing and guiding public opinion. He was a veteran of the Civil war. during 

which time he served in C panj F of the Thirty-fourth Iowa Infantry. For 

the last twentj years of Ids life he owned a paper which closehj connected him 
with his old army comrades, the Grand Army Advocate of Des Moines, Iowa, 
which he edited and published up to the time of his death. His demise occurred 
on the 29th of January, 1910, his widow surviving. Judge and .Mrs. Evans are 
the parents of two children: Portia B., who is attending Rockford ilM I <'<>l 
lege; and Genevieve V*., who is attending high school, still at home. Mrs. Evans 
has attained prominence in the advocacy of equal suffrage and in 191] served 

as president of the Iowa Equal Suffrage Association, upying the office of 

vice president in 1912. On her mother's side Mrs. Evans is a descendant of 
Revolutionary stock. Her mother, Margarel McCune, was a daughter of Mar- 
garel Brecount, a daughter of Gideon Brecount, whose ther was Lydia 

I let amp. a daughter of -lames I )e( 'amp. v. ho Si I ved as a private in the Second 
Battalion of the Second Regimenl of the New Jersej Continental Army of the 
Revolutionary war. 

There have he, ii iim spectacular phases in the life record of Judge Evans, 

Imt his history 18 one which may well inspire others, showing what ma\ he 

accomplished when energy and ambition lead tin- way. Free from ostentation 
.hi. I display, he has by the simple weighl Of his character ami ability attained 
important public positions and won the esteem and respd I "' • \' rj man. woman 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 157 

and child in the county. As county attorney he was a foe bo the evil doer anil 
law breaker; as legislator a constructive force in formulating beneficent meaa 
ures; as mayor a powerful influence in promoting civic righteousness; and as 
judge on the bench a man who at whatever cost upholds justice in fairness ami 
impartiality. There is little dissension of opinion about the powerful influence 
lie has had upon the development and growth of this locality, not only in his 
public relations but also in his private life. 



JAMES H. RICHMAN. 



James H. Ricbman, who is one of the foremost agriculturists of the town- 
ship which was named in honor of his father, who was the second oldest settler 
in these parts, is owner of three hundred and eighty-eight acres of valuable 
land all under cultivation and highly improved, located on sections 7 and 
8, Richman township. lie was born in Greenbrier county, Virginia, now Sum 
mers county, West Virginia, April 1. 1844. and in 1850 came with his parents to 
Richman township, Wayne county, becoming one of the early pioneers of this 
section in which he has followed agricultural pursuits for over sixty years. 
He is a son of Marshall H. and Mary Jane (Guinn) Richman, natives of West 
Virginia, both of whom passed away in this township. More extended mention 
of them is made in connection with the sketch of Abram Elmore Richman. 
In their family were fourteen children of whom our subject was the second in 
order of birth. 

When six years old James H. Richman came with his parents to Wayne 
county and here he spent his boyhood amid the primitive pioneer conditions of 
the day, early helping his father in the cultivation of his farm and learning 
valuable lessons in the school of actual experience. In the acquirement of an 
education he attended such schools as existed in the neighborhood but his ad 
vantages in this direction wen- naturally of a limited order. Remaining at 
home, he was married in 186° in Wayne county, Iowa, to Miss Anna Newell, 
a native of England, who was born February 12, 1844, ami crossed the ocean 
accompanied by her grandparents. Her parents followed her some time later 
to this country. The father. Thomas Newell, was a native of England and 
passed away in Illinois, and her mother, Mary (Barber) Newell, was also horn 
in the former country and died in northern Iowa. In their family were three 
children: Mrs. James II. Richman; Augusta, who died at the age of twenty- 
four years; and William D., who resides in Linn county. Iowa. All of them 
were born in England but. were reared and educated in America. Mr. and Mis. 
Richman are the parents of seven children: Mrs. Augusta Baker, who was 
born May 18, 1870, and is the wife of the postmaster of LeRoy, Iowa; .Mrs. 
Elsie Sullivan, who was born .March 7. 1872, and is residing near that city; 
Florence, who died at the age of five months: Mrs. Ella Barnett, who was born 
February 3, 1876, and lives in LeRoy ; W. A., whose birth occurred on the 29th 
of March, 1879, and who is assisting his father in the care of his large farm 
in Richman township; James E., born April 22, 1881, who resides in this town- 
ship; and Mrs. Jennie Tresler, born April 13, 1884, whose home is in Richman 



158 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

township. All of these children were born on the home farm where the par- 
ents uow reside and there were reared and educated. 

Mr. Richman owns three hundred and eighty-eighl acres of the best land 
in this section and in the course of a long career lias placed thereupon a aum 
ber of modern improvements which have greatly enhanced its value. Be fol 
lows genera] farming and employs modern and up-to-date methods and ideas 
in the pursuance of his labors, gaining highly gratifying results by his cir- 
cumspection, industry and energy. The residence which he has erected is 
comfortablj and well furnished and there Mr. and .Mrs. Richman extend a 
hospitable welcome to their many friends. The political affiliation of Mr. 
Richman is with the democratic party, the principles of which he believes 
most conducive to L r I government, and although he has aever aspired to pub- 
lic office he is serving as school director of his district, being induced to a. pi 

thai office on account of the warm interesl which he feels in the subjeel of 

education. A member of one of the oldesl pioi r families, he has attained 

remarkable success along agricultural lines and while his labors have resulted 

in individual prosperity they have 1 o a vital force in general advancement 

and in making this section one of the richest agricultural districts of the mid- 
dle west of the United states. Mr. Richman, although Hearing his seventieth 
birthday, is still active in the management of his extensive interests and con- 
tinues tn lead a busy and useful lite. His industry and energ] have found 
substantia] reward and he receives the confidence and high esteem of all who 
know him. 



GEORGE M. RUBY. 



George M, Ruby is conducting the only furniture ami undertaking concern 
in Seymour and in the conduct of his business affairs has displayed such i see] 

lent judgment and ability that he is now ranked a iu_ r the representative ami 

substantia] men of the communitj A native of Iowa, he was horn in Van 

Buren countj on December lU. 1858, and is a son of 11. 'I'. and .Melissa 

Pender) Ruby, natives of Indiana. On the maternal side .Mr. Rubj is a de 

S laid of the Harlan family, representatives of which cam.' to America from 

Scotland in 1'isT and established a family line which has been unbroken since 
that time. Among the most honored men who bore the name were Chief 
Justice Harlan and E. R. Harlan, curator of the Slate University of Iowa. 
In all there are aboul twenty-five hundred representatives of this family in 

America at lie pri sent 1 1 

'I'll.' grandfather of the subject of this reviev on the paternal side was Til- 
ford Ruby, who was horn in Keiitiick\ and went to Indiana at an earlv date. 
farming in that state until his death. The father of our subjeel was married 

in Indiana. September 23, 1855, and in the same year he settled iii Van Buren 
county, whence he moved to Wayne county in 1875. His death occurred in 
this section in 1892 hut his wife survives, making her home in Seymour. 
Adherence to the principles of the republican part} has long been a tradition 

in the |,'nl,\ family ami the father of our subjec.1 "as stanch in his support of 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 159 

the men and measures of that organization. Moreover, lie took an active and 
helpful part in the public life of Wayne county and for two terms served as 
mayor of' Seymour. He was a member of the Christian church ami a man 
of high moral character, exemplifying in all the relations of his life the doctrines 
and principles in which he believed, lie was the father of three children 
-I. P., a farmer who resides in Seymour; George Al.. of this review; and Wil 
lis. who was born in January. 1862, and who is now engaged in farming in 
Oklahoma. 

George M. Ruby acquired a common-school education and spent his child 
hood upon his father's farm. lie aided in the work of the fields until 1896 
and then abandoned farming in favor of commercial pursuits, becoming iden 
titied with the furniture and undertaking business in Seymour. Since thai 
time he has conducted a profitable enterprise, showing himself at all times 
forceful and reliable in business affairs, and these qualities have brougb.1 him 
rapid and well deserved prosperity. 

On September 23, 1888, .Air. Ruby married Miss Martha Keller, a daugh 
ter of Henry and Belle (Hedrich) Keller, natives of Virginia, who came to 
Iowa in 1861 and located in Appanoose county, where the father followed 
farming. Mr. and Airs. Ruby had three children: Glenn, who was born in 
1889 and who is now a mining engineer residing in Nebraska; Elsie, whose 
birth occurred on the 5th of August, 1891, and who died April 13, lSltii; and 
Lawrence, who was born in June. 1893, and -who was for some time a book- 
keeper in the Peoples Savings Bank at Seymour and now is associated with 
his father in business. .Mi', and Airs. Ruby are members of the Christian 
church. 

Air. Ruby is prominent in the Masonic order, holding membership in the 
lodge and chapter, and he is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and for eight years he 
served with ability and conscientiousness as a member of the school board. 
He is an active and willing worker for the upbuilding and advancement of 
Wayne county and stands high in the regard of all who know him. 



NELSON J. STAKK. 



A native of Sweden, where In- was born October 17. 1875, Nelson -I. Stark 
has become a useful American citizen and attained an enviable place in (he 
community of Lucas, Iowa, despite struggles and obstacles which he had to 
overcome. Persistency and industry broughl him to the goal, and. although 
he experienced drawbacks and was at limes thwarted in his career, he is now- 
considered a substantial man id' the city, where he owns a comfortable home 
A son of Andrew and Johanna (Wester) Stark, he came to America with his 
mother and the younger children, reaching Lucas, Iowa. May 21, 1884, and 
here the family has since resided. The father was born in Sweden on March 
25, 1850. and preceded the family to America, arriving here November 2, 
1882. He was a coal and ore miner in Sweden and has followed coal mining 
in this country. The mother was bom in Sweden on Ma\ 17. 1854, and both 



160 I.I CAS AM) WAYNE I OUNTIES 

she and her husband still make their home in I. was. in their family were 
three children, all of whom are natives of Sweden: Nelson J., our subject; 
Mrs. Christina Baker, horn .lnh 24, 1877, a resident of Chariton, Iowa; and 
Carl E., born November s. l.syn, who is married and resides in Lucas. 

The earlj educational advantages of Nelson .1. Start were bu1 meager, 
hut he made good use of such opportunities as presented themselves. After 
Leaving school he worked for a number of years in the coal mines near Lucas, 
assisting at an early age in caring for the oiler members of the family. In 
l"' |v he was employed as a clerk in a general merchandising establishment 
in Lucas and is at present so occupied in the employ of Warner & Baker of 
this city. Industrious and energetic, he stands high in the estimation of his 
employers and has made a creditable record in business. 

On December L2, L900, Mr. Stark was married to .Miss Ellen Olson, who 
was born in Lucas county, this state. .March II. 1878. She is an accomplished 
musician, having in addition to the common-school course taken musical les 

sons and is well qualified to teach the art. She has always made her home in 
Lucas. Her parents were .Wis and Anna Christina (Nelson) Olson, natives 
of Sweden, the former born in ]>:):', and the latter in 1836. The patents be- 
came pioneer settlers of Lucas county, being prominenl in their locality, and 
passed away in Lucas, lnua. the father on April l:!. 1896, and the mother on 
October 14, 1898. .Mrs. Olson was previously married to Prank Swanson, two 
children being born of this union, namely: Charles Swanson, born Septem- 
ber 2, 1868, a resident of White Breast township: and .Mrs. Anna Peterson, 
born .March 2, L872, of Lucas. Her marriage to Wis Olson occurred in 1873 
and to them were born: John, on May 30, 1874, engaged in general mer- 
chandising in Lucas; and -Mrs. Stark, the wit',- of our subject. Mr. and .Mrs. 
stark have one son and one daughter: Raymond Harold, born December 23, 
1901, attending school in Lucas; ami Helen Lorine, born June '■'<. 1910. Both 
of these children are natives of Lucas. The familj residence is well p 
vided with all attractions to contribute to the happiness of the children, and 
Mi-. Stark's greatesl pleasure is t ake life as pleasanl as possible to his fam- 
ily. Both he and his wife are of studious mind an. I deep readers, deriving 
keen enjbymenl from the best literature of the past ami present. Although 
Mr. stark is providing well for his children, the besl heritage he can give 

them is his own undaunted spirit, which brooks no obstacle nor discourage 

menl and which has led him to achievement. 

Politically Mr. stark is a republican and keeps well Lnfor I upon the 

public issues that all'eet the nation, his state, his county ami his locality. 

although he is mit an office seeker. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian 
church of Lucas, championing all movements undertaken in the interest of 
Christianity ami For the betterment of mankind. Fraternallj Mr. stark is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 133, of Lucas, and has taken 
an interested as well as prominent part in the work of this society, having 

l n on various occasions a delegate to the Grand Lodge, lb 1 is also a mem 

her df the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, being affiliated with Lodge No. 
Kid. of Lucas, and of Lodge No. 276, of Lucas, of the W [men of the World. 

In spite of financial drawbacks ami afflictions, Mr. Stark has iiiiiili his wa\ 

unaided to a creditabli position in the community, giving an example of what 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES Hil 

ambition and perseverance will do if consistently applied. He stands high 
today in the estimation of his fellowmen, who admire him for his spirit of 
pluekiness and his masterful endurance in overcoming adversity. There is 
no one more highly esteemed in Lucas county today than Mr. and Mrs. Wl 
son Stark, and it may be said of him that he now lint stands on the threshold 
of further success. 



FREDERICK M. WEST. 

The life record of Frederick M. West constitutes an important chapter 
in the history of Corydon. where he ranks with the most energetic, enter 
prising and prosperous citizens. He never falters in the accomplishment 
of anything that he undertakes, his well formulated plans being such as are 
carried forward to successful completion. He was born in Wayne county, 
Iowa. September 2. 1874, and is a son of Humphrey and ('. A. (Mohler) West. 
The father, a native of Illinois, was a son of Marcus West of Virginia, who 
on leaving the Old Dominion removed to Illinois and subsequently to Iowa, 
arriving in the latter state about 1872. Humphrey Wesl accompanied him 
and all located in Wayne county. For an extended period the lather was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in this county hut is now living retired in 
Corydon, his former labors having brought to him a most comfortable com- 
petence. He has figured prominently in public eon -tions and at all limes 

has labored earnestly and effectively to promote the welfare and upbuilding 
of this section of the state. From 1881 until 1885 he filled the office of 
county treasurer and the record which he made in thai connection was most 
commendable. Unto him and his wife were born five children, three sons and 
two daughters, namely: Stella, now the wife of \V. S. Augden, a residenl 
of Oklahoma; Lewis, who follows farming in Wayne county; Frederick M.; 
W. E.. a physician of Corydon who is specializing in the treatment of (he eye; 
and Mrs. M. J. Evans. 

Frederick M. West acquired a high-school education and has since learned 
many valuable lessons in the school of experience. lb' was reared in the usual 
manner of farm lads, dividing his time between the labors of the field, the 
duties of the schoolroom and the pleasures of the playground, lie continued 
to work with his father on the home farm until twenty-two years of age, 
when, thinking to find commercial pursuits more congenial, he established a. 
hay and grain business in Corydon. This has continuously grown in volume 
and importance and is now conducted along both wholesale and retail lines. He 
also does a mail order business and is now extensively handling hay. -rain, 
field seeds, fuel and poultry supplies. Year by year his patronage has grown 
and the business now returns to him a gratifying annual income owing to his 
capable management and well formulated plans. In 191] he creeled what is 
known as the West block, a two-story brick structure twenty feet front with 
eighty feet in depth. It is situated on the site of the old bank which was the 
scene of the memorable robbery by the James brothers in 1871. Mr. Wesl is 



162 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

also proprietor of the only lti;i in elevator in Corydon. having a capacity of 
twenty thousand bushels. 

On the lMiIi of .June-. L902, was celebrated the marriage of Frederick M. 
Wesl and .Miss Ploy Freeland, a daughter of Judge Freeland, one of Corydon's 
most distinguished and honored citizens. They have become parents of two 
children, Freeland II. and Ruth. Both Mr. and Mrs. Wes1 are members of 
the Methodisl church and are actively and helpfully interested in its work. 
His political supporl is given to the republican party and for six years he 
served as one of the councilmen of Corydon, exercising his official prerogatives 
to further many progressive public movements and interests. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Knights of Pythias. Be has purchased the old Freeland 

I if. which he has improved and is occupying and under its present control 

the old spirit of hospitality for which it was celebrated is maintained. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. West occupj a prominent social position and have an extensive 
circle of friends hen-. 



\I.VA HUMESTON. 



At ig the men who have been powerful and dominating factors in the 

upbuilding and development of Wayne countj Alva Humeston stands pre 
eminent, lie is a representative of one <>i the oldesl and most worthy pioneer 

families in this pari of the slate, his lather having founded the town of 
Eumeston, and throughout the years of an upright and successful life he 
has made Ins record a credit to a Dame which has long been an honored one 
in this vicinity. 

Mr. Humeston was horn in Trumbull county. Ohio, August 12, 1852, a son 

of Alva and Mary (Northrup) Humeston, the former a Dative of Coi cticul 

and the latter of Clinton, New Fork. The parents of our subject came to 
[owa in 1864 and settled on a farm in Kichnian township. Wayne county, pur- 
ihasing nine hundred and sixty aires at two dollars and a half per acre. 
Pioneer conditions prevailed throughout the section at the time of their 
arrival. There were no railroads Dearer than Ottumwa, no organized towns 
and no conveniences of any kind. Aha Humeston, Sr.., set himself with 
characteristic energy to improve his undeveloped land and as the years passed 
made d one of the finest agricultural properties m the section. Throughout 

his lite he gave active and heartj > peration to movements for the general 

advancement and left at Ins death the impress of Ins individuality upon the 
history of the county which he had aided in upbuilding, lie passed awaj 
in Fairfield in 1899, at the age of seventy-four. His wife died in tin- same 
city in 1897, being sixty tour years of age at the time of her demise. In 
their family were seven children: Daniel |i.. who died in Mendota, Illinois, 
in 1901; Mrs. Alice B. NeWCOmb, who passed away in 1878; .Mrs Susan B. 

Harkness, of Fairfield, Iowa; I.. II.. living at Cabool, Missouri: M. \W. who 
died in < 'alifornia. iii 1907; Alva, of this review ; and t 'lara. who die I on the 
old home farm in Richman township, in 1 S 7I 



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LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 165 

Alva Humeston was twelve years of age when he accompanied his parents 
to Wayne county and he remained upon the farm until after the death of 
his father, acquiring his education in the public schools of the section. Since 
coming to Humeston he has been one of the greatest individual factors in 
the business and political life of the community, exemplifying the standards 
and traditions of his family in his honorable and upright life, lie lias exten- 
sive property interests here, including the grain and coal yards and elevator, 
besides thirty-nine town lots and an attractive and well furnished home. 
In the conduct of his varied and important affairs he has demonstrated his 
resourceful and discriminating business ability and his success has contributed 
in a large measure to the general prosperity and progress. 

In 1874 .Mr. Humeston married Miss Annie E. Brown, who was bom in 
Stark county, Illinois, on June 13, 1856. Her parents, Henry S. and Ruth 
D. Brown, were natives of New Jersey, who came to Wayne county, iowa, in 
186S. The father died at the home of the subject of this review at the 
advanced age of ninety-three years. The mother passed away at Humeston, 
in 1908, being eighty-three years of age at the time of her death. In their 
family were nine children, four of whom are now living, namely: Henry, 
who resides in Colorado Springs. Colorado: Robert A., who lives in Wyoming; 
Mrs. Harriet McKinnon, of Viola. Illinois: ami .Mrs. Humeston. 

To .Mr. and .Airs. Humeston have been born nine children. The eldest, 
Adelbert E., is residing in Collbran, Colorado, where he is engaged in general 
merchandising. Clarence S. was born on the 22d of June, 1877, ami is at 
the present time associated with his father in the coal and grain business. 
Mrs. Elsie B. Farr was born November l'!>. 1879, and lives in Humeston. Her 
husband is the leading druggist in the city and further mention of his career 
appears elsewhere in this work. Floyd was born on the 14th of .May, 1883, 
and is at present assisting in a general store in Humeston. The two children 
next in order of birth are Florence and Nellie, twins, horn May 21, 1885. 
Nellie died in infancy and Florence is now Mrs. Wasabaugh, of St. Joseph, 
Missouri. Charles was born September 10, 1889, and is ;i member of the 
firm with his father and brother in Humeston. Hattie B. and Carl, twins, 
were born December 10. 1892. Carl passed away at the age of nine months 

and Hattie is the wife of Robert I. Starr, of Milo, Iowa. All tl hildren 

■were born in Richman township with the exception of Mrs. Elsie B. Farr, whose 
birth occurred at White Breast, three miles west of Chariton, Iowa. All were 
reared in this township and acquired a public-school education. Thej are 
a talented family along musical lines. Hattie and Charles being accomplished 
musicians. Charles makes good use of his talent in this direction, being 

leader of the well known Humeston band, of the besl musical organizations 

in southern Iowa. 

Fraternally Mr. Humeston is well known in tin- Masonic order, being ;i 
charter member of Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A. F. A. M. lie was formerly 
affiliated with the [ndependenl Order of odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias. In official circle too. he is well known and prominent. He was 
at one time mayor of Humeston, giving to the town a straightforward, busi 
nesslike and progressive administration. During President Cleveland's admin- 
istration he held the office of postmaster, for twenty four years he was a 

Vol. il— 9 



166 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

member ol the school board and lias been a member "I' the town council almost 
continuously since the incorporation of Humeston. He is broad, liberal-minded 
and public-spirited, eminently progressive in Ins citizenship and a! all tin 
readj to aid and supporl projects of a worthj character. Everything pertain- 
ing io ila' town's welfare and advancement receives bis indorsement and 
In-arty cooperation and bis work lias been of practical value to tin' com- 
munity in which he labors. A man of energy, positive character, indomitable 
activity and strict integrity, be bas been fully identified with the growth 
and progress of the state in which so much <>t bis lite lias been spenl and lie 
bas won the csti-rui of bis friends and tin- confidence of those who have bad 
business relations with him. 



HENRY s. RICE. 



Henry S. Rice, who since 1894 bas resided at Hum. -stun, [owa, after a long 
and successful career as agriculturisl in Wayne county, where he cultivated 
two hundred and fifty-seven acres in Clay township tor a cumber ..t years, 
bas also earned distinction as one of those men who stood in defense of the 
Union at the time of tin- darkest hour in this country's history. II.- was born 
m Payette county, Pennsylvania, duly Hi. 1841, ami grew to manhood in 
Greene countj of the same state. His parents, natives of Pennsylvania, were 
William and Sarah (Jackson) Rice, who died in their native state in 1862 
and 1844 respectively. In their family were thirteen children, of whom three 
di.d in infancy, the others being: Mrs. Lucinda Sharpneck-Cravennutt, de- 
ceased: .Mrs. Margarel Haver, deceased; Mrs. [sabelle Kline, deceased; Mis. 
Sarah Ann Curl, deceased; Mrs. I.ibby Haver, deceased: William, deceased; 

.lam.s. deceased; Samuel Jackson, who at tin- age of seventy-eighl years re- 
sides in Wyoming, Stark county, Illinois. Henry s.. ..f this review; and one 
half brother. Abel Young Rice, deceased. All of these children were born in 
Grei ne county, Pennsylvania, with the exception of our subject. 

Up to 1863 Henry S. Rice followed agricultural pursuits hut in that year, 
removing to Peoria county. Illinois, enlisted in Company A with tin- <>nc 
Hundred ami Fifty-firsi Illinois Volunteer [nfantrj Regiment, under Cap 

tain Andrews, and served with distinction until tic- close of tic- Civil war. 
He was mustered nut ,it < i .1 u 1 1 1 hi is. Georgia, .lanuarx 24, 1866, and. return 

bag to Peoria, remained there until 1870, m which year he removed to Appa 
ii. i.,se ,-, unity. Iowa, ami th.-re engaged in farming. In 1^7*; be came to Wayne 
county, following bis occupation until his removal to Humeston in L894. His 

asisted of tw.. hundred and fifty-seven acres of rich and fertile land in 

Clay township and to its cultivation ami improvement he gave his whole 
attention, instituting a number of improvements which have mad. the place 
One of the most valuable in this section. II.- also interested himself largely 

in sto.-k raising, specializing in lull blooded shorthorn cattle and Poland 
China h..._'s and deriving from tins branch of ins efforts a gratifying income. 
In ]s'i| he sol. I bis farming interests and removed to Humeston, where be 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 167 

purchased a comfortable home where he and his wife now spend their declin- 
ing days in rest and comfort well earned. II,- has also other citj properly. 

Mr. Rice was married on December 12, 1867, to Mrs. Elizabeth (Curl) 
Sharpneck, who was horn in Greene county, Pennsylvania. April 22, 1>II 
Her parents were Membrance and Emeline (Anderson) Curl, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, the latter being born June 7, 1820. The father passed away at 
Hopeville. Clarke county. Iowa, in 1901, but the mother is still surviving at 

the age of ninety-three years and makes her ho with Mr. and Mrs. Bice of 

this review. In the family of Mr. and .Mrs. Curl were the following children: 
John, residing at Indianola. Iowa: Membrance, who makes his home near 
Cincinnati. Appanoose county, this state; William, id' Wellman, Iowa: Alex- 
ander and Corwin. deceased; Mrs. Henry S. Rice; Mrs. Airie Anderson, of 
Union county, Iowa; Mrs. Mary Heal, a resident of Peoria county, Illinois; 
Mrs. Charlotte Hudson, residing at Cincinnati, Appanoose county, this state; 
and Mrs. Rachel Fritz, of Washington county, Iowa. The four eldest of these 
children were born in Pennsylvania hut the younger ones are Datives of Peoria 
county, Illinois. Mrs. Riee by a former union was the mother of one son. Wil- 
liam Sharpneck, born September 30, 1862, who resides in Davis county, [owa. 

Mr. anil Mrs. Rice were the parents of nine children, eighl of whom are 
living: George Henry, born August 4. 1860. who resides near Omaha. Nebraska; 
James Alexander, who was born November 15, 1872, and makes his borne in 
Oregon; Theodore, born in April. 1S74. residing at home; Thomas Newton, 
horn September 4. 1875, a resident of Little Rock. Arkansas; Mrs. Sarah Ann 
Steere. born January :!. 187!). who resides in St. Paul. Minnesota, where her 
husband is manager of a large pickle factory; Emma, born July 7. 1881, who 
is attending a training school for nurses in Valparaiso, Indiana; John, de- 
ceased; Roy, born September 7, 1886, who resides at St. Paul. Minnesota: 
and Mrs. Laura Syres, born September 15, 1888, a resident of Centerville, 
this state. George Henry Rice, the eldest child, is a native of Illinois, while 
the two next in order id' birth were born in Appanoose county. Iowa, ami the 
younger ones in Wayne county. Miss Emma Rice was one of the most sue 
cessful teachers in the state, being employed for a number of years in various 
of the leading high schools before undertaking the study of nursing. Mi-. 
Rice determined that all his children should receive the very best education 
that the community afforded, as his own advantages along that line in his 
boyhood were sadly neglected. This was one of the reasons that decided him 
to move into Humeston, and he can find pride in the fact that he has sent 
forth all of his children well equipped for the battle of life. 

Mr. Riee gives his allegiance to the democratic party and has always 
taken a deep and active interest in all matters concerning public- affairs. His 
wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Humeston and he 
belongs to the Wayne Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, where he 
delights to meet his former comrades in arms. Not only have his life labors 
constituted a valuable part of the developmenl of Wayne county along agri 
cultural lines but the country honors in him one of those who willingly offered 
their services at a critical period in the history of the country for the preserva 
tion of the Union. Although seventy-two years of age, he still interests him 
self in all matters which concern the city in which he makes his home and 



168 LUCAS AND WAYNE COINTIES 

gives Ins supporl to all those measures which he deems beneficial. His has 
been a busy and useful life which has been a serviceable factor in the growth 
and upbuilding of Way :ounty, and although there have been ao spectac- 
ular phases in his life record his history is one which may well inspire and 
encourage others, showing what may be accomplished when energy and ambi- 
tion lead the way. 



JAMES G. GIVENS 



The late James <L Givens, svho was prominently connected with agricultural 
interests of Wayne county Eor a number of years, attained prosperity and a 
life's competence by industry and energy. He was born in Ohio, December 23, 
1836, a son of George and .Martha Rae Givens, both natives of thai state. 
where the Eather followed general agricultural pursuits. 

James G. Givens was reared at borne, where he early became acquainted with 
the work of the farm under bis father's guidance, and received a country school 
education. He subsequently cultivated his own property in thai state bul in 
1876 traded his Ohio farm for one in Waj ue county, Iowa, upon which be located 
in thai year. Here be successfullj engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1889, 
when be removed to Seymour, where he thereafter lived until he passed away, 
June !). UMi'i. 

On I) mber 4, I860, Mr. Givens married Miss Rebecca Collison, a native of 

Ohio and a daughter of William and Mary (Adams) Collison, the for r of 

whom was a farmer of thai state. Mr. and Mrs. Givens bad three children. John 
has passed away. Martha Ellen married John Brooks, formerly a carpenter, 
and she is the mother of six children. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks now make their 
home on a farm near Seymour. Margaret E. married Charles Mumby, and they 
have one sun. They make their home on the old farm. Mrs Givens is a member 
nf the I 'nited Brethren church. 



JOHN WILLIAM BREWER 

John William Brewer, who is now living retired in Corydon, for more 
than a quarter of a century was actively identified with the agricultural de 
velopmenl <<( Wayne county, where he owns three hundred and sixtj acres 
of highly cultivated and well improved land. He is a member of an ..Id New 
Fork family, his father, David Brewer, having been born in Elmira, that 
state, his natal year being 1818 His education was acquired in the common 
schools of tlie Empire state and there he also qualified himself for an agri 

cultural career. In early maul I he went to Ohio, Rrsl Locating in the 

vicinity of Portsmouth, that state After three years residence there he i\r 
cided to continue his journej westward to Illinois, where he settled in 1841. 
He Bled on so land in Pulton county, near Parmington, and as his circum- 
stances permitted increased his holdings until he owned about two hundred 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES L69 

and fifty acres. He continued to make his borne in thai state until his death 
which occurred in 1893. It was in Ohio he me1 and married .Miss Rebecca 
Picket, who was born in Scioto eounty, thai state, in 1819, and passed awaj 
in Illinois in 1SSS. Our subject is the eldest of the seven children born of this 
marriage, the other members of the family being as follows: Eleanor, who 
passed away in 1910, the deceased wife of Captain A. \V. Dunn; Emma, who 
first married J. 0. Smith and after his death became the wife of E. II. Scales, 
of Corydon; one who died in infancy; Hattie, the wife of J. L. Scales, of 
Corydon; Milton, who is residing on the old homestead in Illinois; and Amer- 
ica, who is deceased. 

John William Brewer was reared in very much the same manner as the 
sons of other pioneer farmers of Illinois. At the usual age he began his edu- 
cation in the distrid schools, and being the eldest son was early called upon 
to assist with the work of the farm. When he was sixteen he entered Knox 
College, Galeshurg, Illinois, and later became a student of Oberlin College, in 
Ohio. He was a student of the latter institution during the Civil war and in 
May, 1864, enlisted as a member of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Ohio In 
fantry, remaining at the front until August. 1864. Upon receiving his dis- 
charge he returned to Illinois and then resumed his studies at Oberlin Col- 
lege, graduating with the class of 1865. Subsequently he took up the study 
of medicine at Charity Hospital Medical College, Cleveland, Ohio, but never 
completed his professional studies. He acted as house physician at the United 
States Marine Hospital at Cleveland. Ohio, for the year 1866-67. After 
coming to Iowa he engaged in teaching for a time, bu1 during the greater 
part of his active life his energies have been devoted to farming. In 1871, he 
bought two hundred acres of land in Union township, this county, and indus- 
triously applied himself to its improvement and cultivation. He met with 
success in his undertakings and later extended the boundaries of Ins home- 
stead until it comprised three hundred and sixty acres. There he followed 
general farming and stock-raising until 1896, when he retired from active 
life and removed with his family to Corydon. In 1900 he was appointed by 
Leslie M. Shaw as delegate to the Farmers' National Congress and in 1902 tin- 
same honor was conferred upon him by Governor Albert Cummins, which 
shows the wide recognition given his accurate knowledge of agricultural oeeds 
and conditions. Mr. Brewer is a practical man of enterprising methods and 
during the long period of his active career wroughl a marvelous improvement 
in his farm, on which he erected substantial buildings and inirn.lu.-cd various 
modern conveniences, thus enhancing its value as well as appearance 

In Washington. Iowa, on the 9th of November, 1871, Mr. Brewer was mar 
ried to Miss Ella M. Taylor, a daughter of Earvey and Eleanor (Squires) Tay- 
lor, who wen- natives of the state of New York, having I n reared in the vicinity 

of Elmira, whence they re \ ■•< I to Ohio, coming from the latter state to Wash 

ington county. Iowa, in 1847. The father was a farmer, but he also took an 
active interesl in public affairs and served for twenty years as justice of the 

peace in Ohio-and likewise in Iowa, being one of the well known pi !ers of 

this section. Eleven children were horn to Mr. and Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Brewer 
being the youngest of the five who are living. In order of birth the others an- 
as follows: B. II. Taylor, a resident of Minhurn. Iowa: David, who is living 



170 I.I CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

mi Nebraska; Addison, of Parkston, South Dakota; and Mrs. I. X. Carr of 
Wellman, Iowa. Mr. and .Mrs. Brewer have had five children: Martin T., 
who was born on the 1st of September, 1872, a practicing physician of Dei 
Soto, fowa; Frederick, whose aatal day was the 21s1 of January, 1874, now 
residing in Fredonia, Kansas; Bessie, the deceased wife of William A, Mor- 

-■'"'■ J r -. nl ' Corydon, who was bon the 23d of November, 1875, and died 

"" lllr - 1 ' 1 of July, 1910; Sylvia, who was born mi L883 and died in 1888; and 
Walter I,., whose birth occurred on December 11. 1885, now operating the old 
homestead as his father's partner. 

The family are members of the Christian church at Corydon, and fra- 
ternally Mr. Brewer is affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic, and 

is ■' •'"'"•'' " r Roberl Jackson Post, Corydon. Be supports the republican 

party, and while residing in Union township held various minor offices. Mr. 
Brewer enjoys a wide and favorable acquaintance in Wayne county, where 
he has many friends who through the long period of Ids residence here have 
had ample apportunity to tesl the tme worth of his character." 



LEE W. LUGAR. 



Among the most progressive and successful young farmers and stock-rais- 
ers of Lucas county is numbered Lee W. Lugar, who owns one hundred and 
twelve and two-fifths acres of choice land lying on sections 23 and 26, Union 
t < > n\ r i -, 1 1 i | > . He is a native of Iowa, born in Clarke county, .hum 18, 1885, a 
son of Enoch C. and Rosetta Poston) Lugar, the former a native of Indiana 
and the latter of Clarke county, Iowa. The father now ivsid.es in Kansas 
City, .Missouri, having survived his wife, who passed away in Clarke county 
in 1886. To their union were horn two children : Lee W., of this review; and 
I ah in ( '.. who died at the age of six months 

When Lee W. Lugar was eighteen months old Ins mother .lied and he was 
taken into the home of William E. Wyatt, where he grew to manhood He 
acquired his education in the public schools of Derby and at an early age he 
came familiar with the besl agricultural methods, turning his attention to 
farming when he began his independent career. He owns today a fine farm 
of one hundred and twelve and two-fifths acres on sections '-':; and 26, Union 
township. He has made extensive improvements upon this property, erecting 
substantial buildings and installing modern machinery. His stock-raising in 
terests are extensive and .Mr. Lugar 's attention is centered todaj in tins I. ranch 
of his Ihimiicss. he having the nucleus of on.' of the besl herds of Poland china 
Iiol's to l.e found in Lucas county, 

In October, 1905, Mr. Lugar was united in marriage to Mi^s Bertha <>. Rash, 

"ho was horn in I. mas county. Iowa. AugUSl 27, 1887. She is a daughter of 

Fountain F and Marj .Martin Rash, the former a native of Kentucky and 
the latter of Virginia. They moved to Lucas count} at an early, date and here 
Mrs Lugar grevi to woman] I. acquiring her education in the common schools. 

Her father ha- passed away, his death having occurred in Derby, and her mother 
resides in Montana To their union were horn nine children: William, who 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 171 

resides in Montana; Mrs. Susie Poundstone, of Reed Point, thai state: Mrs. Lucy 
Catron, of Bozeman, Montana: irvin, of Reed Point, Montana: Mrs. Belle Thomp 
son, of Chariton, Iowa: John, of Reed Point, Montana; Mrs. Alice Darrah, of 
Lucas county, this state; Elmer, of Reed Point, Montana; and .Mrs. Lugar, 
wife of the subject of this review. Of these children the six oldest were horn 
in Kentucky and the others in Lucas and Wayne counties, Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lugar have become the parents of a son. Vertle De Verne, whose natal 
day was August Hi. 1912. 

Mrs. Lugar is a member of the Presbyterian church. She and her husband 
belong to the Yeomen at Derby and he is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows of that city. He is independent in his political beliefs, inter- 
ested in men and measures rather than parties. Although still a Nouns': man 
he is an unusually successful one and has already made tangible and substan- 
tial contributions to the agricultural development of this section of the state. 



DANIEL C. KINGERY. 



Among the prominent and successful business men of Seymour is Daniel 
C. Kingery, who in partnership with N. P. Latimer conducts a large dry-goods 
store in the city. He is a native of Iowa, born in Adair county in 1873, and 
is a son of Andrew J. and Sarah (Eshelman) Kingery, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. The family is of Pennsylvania Dutch origin, the father of our subject 
being a son of Ephraim Kingery, of Pennsylvania. Andrew J. Kingery moved 
to Illinois at an early date and there engaged in farming and merchandising 
until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted in Company T, Fifty-second 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served for three years and three months. 
After the close of hostilities he returned to Illinois but in 1868 came to Iowa, 
locating in Tama county and later in Adair county, at Greenfield, where he 
resided until his death. His widow survives. 

Daniel C. Kingery is one of a family of eleven children, four of whom 
have passed away. He acquired his education in the public schools of Adair 
county and afterward learned the printing trade. He spent one year engaged 
in railroad work and then went to Grinnell, Iowa, where for a number of 
years he clerked in a general store. Mr. Kingery then went to Centerville 
and from Centerville came to Seymour, locating in this city in March, 1906. 
At that date he formed a partnership with N. P. Latimer, of Centerville, and 
together they opened a general store, with which they have since been con- 
nected. Their building is thirty-six by one hundred feet and is well furnished. 
being equipped with everything necessary for the successful management 
of an enterprise of this character. Every departmenl is well managed, the 
stock is always tastefully arranged and the lines kept new and complete. 
In fact the concern has many of the aspects of a modern metropolitan depart- 
ment store, much of the credit for its excelled condition being due to Mr. 
Kingery, who has proven himself an able, resourceful and enterprising busi 
ness man of great power and executive force 



17l> LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

On the 26th of September, 1906, Mr. Kingery married .Miss .less], i; 
Wtaittaker, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and they have become the parents of 
three children. Fraternally Mr. Kingery belongs to the Masonic lodge. Ee 
gives Ins political allegiance to the republican party but lias never been eager 
for office, preferring to perform his public service in other ways. Ee is inter- 
ested in the welfare of Seymour and as the years have gone by has won a 
creditable position as a valued citizen and business man. 



ALFRED -I. WOOD.M.W. 

Since 1873 Alfred -1. Woodman has Keen in the hardware, furniture ami 
undertaking Imsiness in Russell, ami during the intervening years has secured 
an enviable reputation I'm- integrity ami honor in all luisiness relations. Be 
was born in Somerset enmity. .Maine. Augusl 23, 1851, ami is a son oi John ami 

Rel a .1. Woodman, natives of Maine, where the father engaged in farming 

ami also in surveying for a number of years. lie was well known in local poli 
ties, holding a number of county offices, ami was numbered among the represent- 
ative men of Somerset county. Both parents passed away in Russell. On the 
paternal side the family is of old American establishment, representatives of 
the line having landed at Xewhray in 1635. There is still in the poss, ssion of 
Alfred J. Woodman a deed conveying property from Richard Hopkins to the 
Woodman family. The subjecl of this review is of the ninth generation of the 
American branch and is one of five children born to ins parents. The others 
were Dr. .1. W. Woodman. Mrs. Eliza -1. Fogg, Mrs. Abbie Raton ami Eben, all 
of w horn have passed away. 

Alfred J. Woodman was reared in his native county, acquiring his education 
in the public schools and in an academy in .Maine. After completing his studies 
he came in 1873 to Russell, this county, where In- established himself in the 
hardware, furniture ami undertaking business, continuing thus to the present 
time. Be carries a full li if shelf and heavj hardware. Farm implements and 

machinery, and has the besl selected stock id' furniture ill this part of the 

countj His undertaking luisiness is also well managed and the entire c em 

is large ami important. Mr. W Iman established the firsl hardware store ill 

Russell ami the years sine.' that time have broughl him constantly increasing 

success and prominence, so that he is classed today with the progressive and 

representative luisiness men of the city. 

In Russell, September R 1875, Mr. W Iman was united in marriage to .Miss 

Alice Butts, who was horn in Cuba, New York, March 30, 1852. She is a daugh- 
ter of I,. A. and Margarel Young Butts, the former of whom was born in 
New York. June 8, 1825, and the latter in Herkimer county, New York state. 
September 8th, 1828. The family came west in 1867 ami settled in Cedar 
township upon a farm which the father cultivated for many years. lie was 
a captain in the Eighty-fifth New York Volunteer tnfantrj during the Civil war. 

receiving his I rable discharge at the close of hostilities. Bis death occurred in 

Russell on December 30, 1910. His wife survives him. Mr. and Mrs. Raits be- 
,Min. thi parents of lour children: Mrs. Woodman, wile of the subjecl of this 




AU-'liKI) I. \\(Hi|)MA\ 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 17.-, 

review; Edward, who was born February 7. 1854, and who resides in New York 

city; Charlotte, horn .January 9, I860, living with her ther in Russell; and 

Harry .Martin, who was born October 1. 1870, and who is im« a well known cap- 
italist in the City of Mexico. .Mr. and .Mrs. Woodman have become the parents of 
six children: Mrs. Abbie Boyd, of Russell, born September 1. 1876; Edward, who 
was horn July 28, 1880, and who is now a resident of Denver. Colorado; Bertha, 
who was horn September 14. 1885, and resides in Russell; Arthur, whose birth 

occurred April 6, 1889, and who is teaching in the state University of Mil 

sota; Helen, who was horn September 11, 1891, and who is attending Knox Col 
lege at Galesburg, Illinois; and John Herbert, horn November 29, 1897. All of 
these children attended the common schools in Russell and Arthur is a graduate 
of the Iowa State Agricultural College at Ames. He is now a professor in the 
University of Minnesota. Edward supplemented his public school education 
by a course in Des Moines College. 

Mr. Woodman is a member of the Baptist church at Russell and was formerly 
identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and has held a number of town and township 
offices, his official record being characterized always by energetic and farsighted 
work in the public service. He is a broad-minded and liberal man. always ready 
to lend his aid or material support to any worthy public enterprise, and during 
his forty years' residence in Russell he has made many substantial contributions 
to community advancement and progress. 



EVAN S. EVANS. 



Evan S. Evans, who since 1912 has been a resident of Humeston, to which 
city he removed so his younger daughter could have the advantages of a higher 
education, still owns and superintends his farm of two hundred and forty acres 
on section 3. Clay township, ami section 34, Richman township. Having been 
a resident of Wayne county for fifty-rive years, he is one of the pioneers of this 
section, of the development of which he has been an interested witness and an 
active participant, and yet has another claim to distinction, for he is one of 
those who at the time of the Civil war donned the blue and shouldered anus in 
defense of the Union. 

Mr. Evans was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, August 31, 1846, a 
son of Jeremiah and Fannie (Roland Evans, both natives of Bedford county. 
Pennsylvania, where the father was horn August 25, 1820, and the mother in 
1824. The parents came west at an early day and settled at Bloomfield, Davis 
county. Iowa, whence they removed, March 1. 1858, to a farm in Walnut town- 
ship. Wayne county, this state, two and a half miles north of Seymour. There 

the father followed agricultural pursuits, becoming • of the substantial ami 

prosperous farmers of the vicinity. Both of the parents lived there for the rest 
of their lives, the father passing away in April, 1898, the mother having pre- 
ceded him in death, her demise occurring in August, 1382. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jeremiah Evans were the parents of seven children, of whom our subjeel is 
the eldest. The others are: Mrs. Emma Guthrie, of Oklahoma; Daniel, who 



176 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

resides uear Seymour, towa; .Mrs. Margaret Harrison, ;i resideni of Spo- 
kane, Washington; .Mrs. Mary Gump, also of thai • - i t \- ; Samson II.. residing 
in Ottumwa, [owa; and Manuel, who resides on a pari of the old Evans home- 
stead two and a half miles north of Seymour. The four eldesl children, 
including our subject, are natives of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, hut the 
three younger members of the family were born near Seymour, Iowa. At the 
time the family settled there primitive conditions still prevailed, as there were 
no railroads and the first homesteads were sparse and far apart. 

I ■ ) v .in S. Evans was reared under the parental roof, receiving his educa- 
tion in his native county and the early pioneer schools of Davis county, Iowa. 
whence he had removed with his parents in 1858, settling with them in Walnut 
township. Wayne county. He subsequently attended business college, gradu- 
ating therefrom in June, 1874. Studious of mind and fond of reading, his 
education was far above the average and fitted him well for school teach 
ing, which profession he followed for the following thirteen years in Wal- 
nut township, although be followed agricultural pursuits at the same time 
during the summer months. On April 1, 1S7S. he removed to a farm on see 
tion 3, Clay township, and this was his homestead, on which the family grew 
up. until his removal to Humeston on December 15, 1912, in order that the 
youngest daughter of the family might have the advantages of a high-school 
educal ion. 

On May 30. 18G4. Mr. Evans enlisted with the Union forces in Company 
II. Forty-sixth Iowa Infantry, doing valiant service with his company and 

participating in a number of engagements until he was finally discharged 

with honor on September 23, 1864, returning thereupon to Walnut town- 
ship to again follow his precious calliuir. In ]S7S. when lie came to Clay town 
ship, he possessed himself of two hundred and forty acres of choice land 
located in that and liichman townships and thereon he followed agricultural 
pur-suits, making improvements which have made the farm one of the most 
prosperous ami profitable in the district, lie has always followed progres 
sive methods in cultivating the soil and has also given intelligent attention 
to stock-raising, attaining highly satisfactory results along both lines of 
endeavor 

An early incident in the life history of Mr. Evans which vividly stands 
forth in his memorj occurred April 15, 1865, when with a neighbor by the 
name of Guthrie he was captured by a gang of bandits, who the day before 
had robbed a stage near Seymour and had captured .Mr. Evans ami Mr Guth 
rie to act for them as '_nij,| rs in this strange country. The highwaymen wen 
intercepted in their fiighl to Missouri, north of KirksviUe, and although the 

vigil: committee did not capture tl ulprits. thej made prisoners of Mr. 

Evans and Mr. Guthrie instead ami would have hanged both of them m short 
order if it had not been for one of the committee, who. on questioning Mr. 

Evans, became convii I that he was telling a truthful story, as he himself 

could vouch for some of the facts which Mr. Kvans gave coi rning the 

place ami the people of the community where they claimed to have been 
taken captive When they were overtaken by tin- puss, they were roughly 
dragged from their horses ami ropes were uncoiled ami the party was ready 

for the execution when the parley ensue, 1. with the result that when tin- 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 177 

above mentioned gentleman firmly announced thai tie would hold the whole 
party responsible should they proceed with their threats, the execution was 
abandoned and they were liberated; but Mr. Evans is firmly convinced thai 
he was never nearer death than at that moment. 

On March 21, 1878, Mr. Evans married .Mary A. (Jump, who was burn 
in Monongalia county, West Virginia, February 2.".. 1853, and who had come with 
her family to Wayne county, Iowa, in 1876, where they subsequently lived for 
many years. The father, Peter Gump, was a native of Pennsylvania, born Octo 
ber 31, 1825, and the mother was Catharine (Park) Gump, born March (>. 
1830, and who died in West Virginia, January 29, 1874. In their family were 
eleven children, all of whom were natives of West Virginia. They were: 
Eugenus, born April 2."). 1S48. residing in Walnut township; William Andrew, 
born .June 25, 1849, a resident of Spokane. Washington; .Mrs. Prudence Park, 
deceased, born March 11. 1851 ; Mrs. Evans, the wife of our subject; Mrs. Rachel 
Masters, born March 22. 1856, residing in Walnut township; .Airs. Sarah I.. 
Bumgardner, born October 18, 1857, of Numa; -lames !•'.. born October 5, L859, 
who resides in Mannington, West Virginia; Peter I., deceased; Mrs. Rusina Alice 
Tuttle. deceased, born August 10. 1866; Mrs. Amanda Linnville, born April 
25, 186S. of Mannington, West Virginia: and one who died in infancy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Evans were the parents of seven children, as follows : Mrs. Fannie ( '. Yelland, 
born January 7, 187!). who in the acquirement of her education attended high 
school at Hnmeston and for about two years Simpson College and is now a 
resident of Belen, New Mexico; Melvin J., born -Inly 2, 1880, who manages the 
old homestead farm in Clay township; a daughter, born March 15, 18S2, who 
died on August 12th of the same year; James P.. who was born June 15. 1884, 
and died September 17th of the following year; W. Hay. born August 8, 1886, 
residing on a part of the home farm in Clay township; Mrs. Rachel Lee Williams, 
born April 24, 1890. of Richman township; and Hattie A., who was born May 
27. 1891, and graduated in June. 1913. from the Ilumeston high school and is 
now teaching in Richman township. 

Mr. Evans affiliates with the republican party and has always taken a deep 
interest in all matters of public importance. For six years he has served as 
justice of the peace in Clay township and during his term of office has received 
high commendation on account of his capability, his fairness and impartiality. 
The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Maple Grove, Clay 
township, in the work of which organization they take an active and helpful 
interest, giving thereto moral and material support, the parents being charter 
members of the congregation. Mr. Evans keeps in contact with his comrades 
of the war through membership in Wayne I'ost of the Grand Army of the 
Republic at Hnmeston. Appreciating the necessity of a good education, he 
and his wife have given their children all the privileges the aeighborhood affords 
and two of them, in addition to m regular school education, have attended Simpson 
College at [ndianola, Iowa. Among the many relics ami papers which Mr. Evans 
prizes highly there is none to which he attaches more value than his firsl chiss 
teacher's certificate, which was issued to him in 1874. Both Mr. and Mrs. Evans 
are prominent in the social circles of the city where they now live and the 
county and are highly esteemed for their tnanj good qualities of mind and 
character. He has not only 1 n an interested witness of the onward march of 



178 l.l CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

civilization in tins county but in true pi ier spirit has cooperated ever since 

his arrival here, fifty-five years ago, in the advai menl of growth and develop- 
ment Whatever measures are undertaken to benefil the people find in him 
a champion and supporter and he was among the firsl signers to petition for 

rural free delivery in tins pari of the c ity. All of the family are well read 

and fond of good literature, making ready use of the choice library which Mr. 
Evans has accumulated in a lifetime. Besides Ins valuable farm of two hundred 
and fortj acres, which is equipped with two sets of improvements and wherefrom 
he receives a gratifying income, he also owns valuable residence property in 
Efumeston, including his own modern home 



JOHN II MATKIN. 



John II. .Mat km. who for sixteen years was closely and influentially connected 
with business interests of Seymour and previous to thai time a prominent factor 
in agricultural circles of Wayne county, is living retired, having won ease, rest 
am] comforl by straightforward and worthy work-in the past. He was born 
in I'm nam county, [ndiana, in April. 18 19, and is a son of John R. and Elizabeth 
I Woolrej .Matkin. Datives of the same section. On the paternal side Mr. Matkin 
is of Irish ancestry bu1 his maternal ancestors were of Dutch and Welsh descent. 
The father of our subjeel left Indiana at an early date and broughl his family 
1i> Illinois, where he engaged in farming successfully For three years. In 1 s "'l 
he came to Appanoose county among the early settlers and there entered govern- 
meiit land, acquiring over four hundred acres which he developed and improved 
until his retirement. He moved into Seymour eventuallj and purchased forty 
acres just adjoining the town, upon which he lived until his death, which occurred 
on the 19th of November, 1906. His town propertj has now all been sold as 
residence lots, .lohn R. Matkin was during his life one of the most prominent 
and .success I'u I men m this pari of Iowa ami naturally was broughl into important 
relations with the public life of his community. For two terms he served as 
max or of Seymour upon the republican ticket, giving to the city a straightforward, 
progressive and businesslike administration. Fraternally he was connected with 
the Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge, and his religious views wi 
in accord with the doctrines of the .Methodist church, lie was married four 
times and became the father of seven children, of whom only three are now living 

John II Matkin acquired his education in the public schools of Iowa 
and spenl his childhood upon his father's farm. When he began his active 

carer he purchased two I dred acres of the old homestead and upon tins 

tract of land engaged successfully in general agricultural pursuits until 
1885, when Ic moved into Seymour in order to engage in husimss. For sixteen 
years thereafter hi' was pi menl in business envies ,,i the community, for he 

soon proved himself resourceful and reliable and able to carry forward In SUC 
cessful completion the projects which he undertook. At firsl he opened a res 
tauranl 1ml disposed of this in order to conduct a gTOCerj store and finally 

he became the proprii tin- of one of the finest general nan handise establishments 
in the city. All of his business affairs were conducted in a straightforward 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 17!i 

and progressive way and as a result Mr. Matkin acquired a substantia] fortune 
which has enabled him to retire and spend the later years of his life in ease and 
comfort. In Seymour he built a beautiful borne in which he resides and which 
he has made a hospitable meeting-place for his many friends. During the period 
of his residence here he has erected and sold a greal Dumber of residences and 
business buildings and has also dealt extensively in city property. 

.Mr. Matkin has been married three times. His first union occurred on the 
19th of June. 1870, when he wedded .Miss Catherine Manning, who died on the 
9th of April. 1877. On March G, 1SS0. Mi-. Matkin married Miss Sarah Runnells, 
who passed away on the 22,\ of July. 1887. Mr. Matkin 's third marriage occurred 
on June 19, 1910, when he wedded Miss Melissa Walters, of Seymour. He is 
the father of three children by his first wile and two by his second union, all 
of whom are now deceased except Mrs. Augustus Erwin, who resides in Washing 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Matkin are devout members of the Methodist church. Mr. 
Matkin gives his allegiance to the republican party and takes an active interest 
in the affairs of the community, although this never takes the form of office 
seeking. lie is a man of keen business insight and progressive spirit and these 
qualities, which have dominated and influenced his Imsiness career, have been 
the chief factors in gaining for him the rest and retirement he is now enjoying. 



LEMUEL KIMPLE. 



Lemuel Kimple. of Corydon, is a man of large affairs who is not only one of 
tile large land owners of Wayne county hut is also, as a result of his activities 
along agricultural lines, interested in a number of banks in this section of tin 1 
state, and he has handled large quantities of grain, buying ami selling this 
commodity. Moreover, he has attained high rank and prominence in Masonic 
circles. He was horn in West Virginia, November 29, 1850, a son of George 
and Margaret (Lutes) Gartland Kimple. The father was born in the state 
of New Jersey, in August. 1812, and was only si\ years of age when the grand- 
father dii'd, leaving a family of nine children of whom the father was the 
seventh in order of birth. Early in life he had to depend upon himself for his 
support and as soon as he had finished his education lie apprenticed himself to 
the tailoring trade and having acquired a thorough knowledge of the details of 
the business opened a shop at Harmony. New Jersey. In 1837 In- removed to 
Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1839, when another 
change of residence was made to Marshall county, West Virginia. Arriving in 
that state he gave up his trade and located on a farm which hi' improved ami 
cultivated until his death. lie was twice married, wedding in 1833 a Miss foster, 
who passed away several years later in early womanhood. In 1845 he married 
Mrs. Margaret Gartland, who was a .Miss Lutes before her firsl marriage. Mr 
Kimple was the father of ten children, seven of whom were born of his second 
marriage, and of this number five arc now- living. 

Lemuel Kimple received his early education in the subscription schools near 
his father's home in West Virginia, walking during the winter for three months 
two miles every day to the schoolhouse. During the summer seasons he worked 



180 l-l CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

on the farm of Ins father, acquainting himself with the methods of agriculture 
In 1876 be came to Lowa and boughl a trad of land al nine dollars per acn 
which onlj six months Later he sold, practically doubling his investment, al a 
price of seventeen dollars per acre. Ever since he came to this state he has been 
largely engaged in farming, following systematic and progressive methods, and 
bas achieved success in this line by his industry and energy, investing his profits 
in land as opportunity favored, and be is now the owner of eighteen bundred 
acres of valuable agricultural property in this county. As bis income has 
increased he has made profitable investments along the banking line, bolding a 
large block of stock in the First National Bank of Corydon, in the affairs 
which institution he takes active participation as vice president, and the sound- 
ness and stability of this hank and its yearly increasing business is in no small 
measure due to the wise counsel of Mr. Kimple in his capacity as an officer of 
the same, lie is also interested to a considerable extent i n the Allerton State 
Bank and the ( llio State Sai ings Bank. While he has made farming the principal 
occupation of his life he has branched oul in a line of business which is intimately 
connected with tins activity, that of dealing in -rain, ami for eighteen yi 
has bought and sold large quantities of this commodity at Harvard, lowa. Along 
lines with which lie has occupied himself his work has always been of a bigh 
order and be has been actuated by that laudable ambition which invariably 
results in success. His activities, however, have been largely constructive in 
the development of tin' agricultural resources of this section and therefore have 
greatly contributed to growth and expansion. 

.Mr. Kimple married, on the 2d of .March. 1876, .Miss Josephine Hood, a 

native of Virginia and a daughter of Samuel and Elsie i Gallaher II I. oatives 

of that state, of Irish descent, lie was married in West Virginia and broughl 
bis wife to lowa shortly thereafter. Mr. and Mrs. Kimple became the parents 
often children, eighl of «| i are living: Emma A., at home; George Harold. 

residing at Harvard; May Belle, the wife of Walter West. Of Corydon; Lillian 
B., who married Merton Opp, a resident of Corydon; Carl W . who looks after 
his father's farming interests; Roxie, a school tea, -her; Carrie, who died in 
infancy; .lame-,, attending school; Margaret, at home; and Ocie, who died at 
ih. age of live years. Tin family are members of the Methodist church, in 
which organization they are prominent, taking an active part in its various 
branches. 

Mr. Kimple 's political affiliations are with the republican party and during 
bis long residence in Corydon he has attained prominence in its local ranks 
and his advice is often soughl along political lines. In 1895 he was pul forth 
as a candidate of hi- party for the office of county treasurer and was elected 
hy a gratifying majority, serving his constituents with abilitj tor a term of 
lour years, discharging his duties to the satisfaction of all concerned. In the 

Masonic Order he has attained a bigh rank and is prominent ill this body not 
Only in the blue lodge hut also as a Chapter Mason, and belongs 1" the council 

while he holds the office o f treasurer of the blue lodge and chapter. Viewed 
from every angle the life work id' Mr. Kimple has been thoroughly effective and 
he has not only been an interested witness of the changes that have occurred 
in this section hut has been a prominent factor in general advancement: Every 
-ore that makes tor the improvement of conditions in this section, for the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 181 

betterment and welfare of the people, finds in him a ready supporter and by 
the busy, active and useful life which he lives he contributes not only to his 
own success but is important in the furtherance of general prosperity in this 
section which he has helped to make one of the mosl prosperous farming com 
munities in the middle west. Everything he lias undertaken he lias done in 
the spirit of advancement that has carried along others whom he has helped 
by wise counsel based upon knowledge which he has derived from the experiences 
of a long and active life. Wayne county and Corydon have been made better 
and richer bv his endeavors. 



ALBERT BLACK. 



Albeit Black, who is a native of Washington township. Wayne county, being 
born June 26, 1876. is prominent in the commercial circles of Humeston in con 
nection with the Old Colony Creamery, with which corporation he holds the 
position of head bookkeeper. He has been connected with this large enterprise, 
the yearly output of which amounts to over one million dollars, since 1896, and 
through industry, energy and perseverance has reached the important position 
which he now holds with this concern. 

The parents of Mr, Black were Andrew Jackson and Elizabeth I Snyder) 
Black, the latter of whom passed away in Washington township, Wayne county, 
in August, 1878. The father was married three times and to his first union 
were born: Elmer E., a resident, of New York. Wayne county, and who has 
taught school in Lucas and Wayne counties for the past thirty-two years, born 
February 13. 1S6B : .Mis. Ada F. Webster, who was born August 13, 1865, and 
who died March 20, 1913; George II., born November 20. 1867: Charles R., 
born May 14. 1870. a resident of Taunton, Massachusetts; W. 1.. born July 20. 
1873, a rural mail carrier employed at the Humeston post office; and Albert, 
of this review. To the second marriage of the father was born one child, Harry. 
on February 5. 1881. who is a resident of Wayne county. Of the third marriage 
which the father contracted were born six children, four daughters and two 
sons: James, born June 23. 1884, of Humeston, Iowa; Alma Harriet, born June 
24,1885, a teacher in the public schools of Pacific Junction, Iowa; Frances P., 
born April 21, 1887. teaching school near Oskaloosa, Iowa; .Mrs. Nellie Willard, 
a resident of Collbran, Colorado; Mrs. Daisy Shaw, residing in Alex. Oklahoma; 
and Claude, born June 21. 1895, attending high school in Humeston. The lasl 
wife of Andrew J. Black had a daughter by a former marriage, .Mrs. Eliza 
Catharine Nye, born August 13. 1878, who resides at Centerville, Iowa. The 
father operated a farm until 1893, when the family removed to Humeston, where 
the parents now reside in a comfortable home. 

. Albert Black grew to manhood upon his father's farm and has subsequently 
been continually a resident of Humeston. Until sixteen 3 ears of age he attended 
public school and afterward took a course at the Central Normal University of 
Humeston. Subsequently he taught school for two terms and then entered 
the employ of -lames L. Humphrey, Jr.. as common laborer on July It. 1896, 
becoming identified with the enterprise of which be is now head bookkeeper. 



L82 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

Bis ability, diligence and attention to business soon received recognition and 
he was advanced from position to position until In- was placed in charge of tin- 
bookkeeping department of the large establishment at Humeston. Ee is the 
second oldest employe of the company, II. 1). Bines, general superintendent, 
having become connected therewith only a few days before him, and they have 
been coworkers ever since. The business was al first known as the Wayne County 
Creamery but upon becoming the property of James I- Bumphrey, Jr., the name 
was changed to the Old Colony Creamery and their goods, which are well known 
from ocean to ocean, are known under that brand. Mr. Black has in uo small 
measure contributed by his services to the success of the concern and his ability 
■ tin received commendation from the management. 

On June 18, 1902, Mr. Black was married to .Miss Mabel I. Eahler, a native 
of Clay township, Wayne county, where she was born June 21, 1883, and where 
she attended public school and grew to womanhood. Ber parents were William 
II. and Barbara (Strunk) Kahler, the former a native of Ohio, who died in 
Bumeston, August 12, 1906, the latter now making her home with her daughter, 
Mrs. Black, at Bumeston. In the Kahler family were the following children: 
Lola, a child of the former marriage of Mr. Kahler; one who has passed away: 
.Mrs. Myra Watson, residing at Fort Collins. Colorado: W. I... a residenl of 
Livingston, .Montana: Mrs. Albert Black; and D. G., of Butte, .Montana. The 
children were all horn and reared in Wayne county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Black have two sons, both born al Bumeston: Eugene Leslie, born Maj 21, 1903; 
and Albert Raymond, born September 13, 1905. Both are now attending public 
school in their native city. 

Mr. Black is a democral and takes an active interesl in local public affairs 
Be has been elected to the office of city clerk of Bumeston and al this writing 
serves as secretary of the board of education. .Mrs. Black is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which she takes an active and helpful 
interest. Their home is comfortable and web 1 furnished and there they extend 
a warm-hearted hospitality to their many friends Both Mr. and Mrs. Black 
are interested in the higher things of life and well read, being popular in the 
hesi social circles of the city. Bis energy and industry have found substantial 
reward in the position which he has attained in connection with the foremost 
industrial establishment of this section and the creditable record he has made 

has won him the high regard and confide] of all those with whom he has 

Come in contact. 



.milN SCIIXEBLY 



A history of I. mas eountj would indeed he incomplete without extended 
mention of John Schnebly, who hud resided here for many years previous to 

his diath. which unvd June IT. 1913, when he had passed his eightieth 

birthday. Be came to this county in WiT. settling in Jackson township, where 

he made his horn.- until his death. Not Only was he an interested witness of 

the changes that transformed the raw prairie into fertile fields hut a helpful 

and cooperanl factor in the transformation. Since he has passed away there 




.hillN SCI1X] I'.l ,~\ 




MRS. JOHN Si HXEBI/5 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 187 

is bu1 one person lefl in the township who voted a1 the firsl election held here. 
The reminiscences of Mr. Schnehly, covering the period when he Brsl landed 
here by stage coach, in Chariton, in 1857, until the time of his demise, were 
of great historical value. A deep reader and a studenl of conditions and 
human nature, his mind became a storehouse of Pacts in relation to the advance- 
ment and development of this section and he possessed the faculty of interest 

ing and vivid description, which made his stories of pioi rdom the more 

valuable. He became one of the substantial men of the Locality, owning at the 
time of his death a valuable farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Jack 
son township, located on sections 17. 18. 20 and 22. under high cultivation and 
well improved. A man of public spirit, he, moreover, played an important 
role in the public life of his community and was ever in the front ranks with 
those who promoted worthy public projects. 

John Schnebly was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, on December 16, 
1832, and when only four years of age was brought by his parents to .Medina 
county, Ohio, where they settled in 1836 and remained until 1852. Here he 
attended the common schools and also followed farming. His parents were 
Daniel and Rosana (Eversole) Schnebly. both natives of Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, where the former was born in November. lSDfi, and Hie latter 
in 1808. The father died in January, 1863, in Medina county. Ohio, his first 
wife having lone- preceded him, on December 29, 1838. They were among the 
pioneer families of that state and were highly respected and regarded in the 
community in which they made their home. Of this union were born: John, 
of this review; Henry, who was born June 25, 1834, and resides in Tennessee; 
Abraham, born July 11. 1836, who died on May 10, 1837; and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Hewitt, who was born April 24. 1838, and died in Lucas on January 18, 1ST I. 
After the death of his first wife the father was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Amelia Williams, who was born February 25, 1811, and died 
November 8, 1892. at the age of eighty-one years. Of this union were born: 
Alice. December 24. 1830. a resident of Michigan; Bower, who was born May 
17. 1841, and was killed in the battle of Winchester, in Sheridan's cam 
paign. on June 13, 1863; Eortense, born May 14. 1843. who has also passed 
away; Daniel, born in February, 184."), who died in Brownsville, Texas; Hiram, 
born January 16. 1847, a resident of York, Nebraska; Lewis Cass, born July 1, 
1848. who died March 15, 1910; and. William Riley, born June 7. 1850, who 
resides at Oxnard, Ventura county, California. Of these children the two 
eldest, including our subject, were born in Bedford county. Pennsylvania, and 
the younger in Ohio. 

Having made Medina county, Ohio, his home until 1852, John Schnebly of 
this review went to California by way of the Isthmus route and. rowing down 
the Chagres river, proceeded thence bj steamer to San Francisco, where he 
remained for four years. His California venture was attended with varying 
success and at the end of that period he returned to Ohio but only visited a 
short time, after which he set out on an overland trip to Lucas county in 
1857, settling in Jackson township, of which he was a resident until his death. 
There were no railroads at the time, and all the land was unbroken prairie when 
he landed at Chariton by stage coach. This now prosperous ami flourishing 
city was then a mere hamlet and Mr. Schnehly was truly entitled In the appel 

Vol II— 1 



L88 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

lation of pioneer, for be witnessed the transformation of ihis stretch of wild 
land into one of the greatesl agricultural countries. EL talked very interest- 
ingly of his travels, which took him all over the American continent, and 
possessed the rare faculty of portraying interestingly the many scenes and 
incidents which he saw and experienced. Giving his entire attention to reach- 
ing tlic goal of independence, he sel ou1 with unswerving industry to cultivate 
his land and as the years passed prosperitj rewarded his labors and he owned a 
highly cultivated, well improved farm of three hundred and twenty acres in 
Jackson township, on sections 17. L8, 20 and 22, equipped with all modern 
machinery and implements and improved with barns, outbuildings and a sub- 
stantial residence, lie raised a high-grade of live stock and along everj line 
success attended Ins efforts. He lived to the venerable age of eighty, dying 
June 17. 1913. His remains were buried in Jackson township cemetery. In 

Ins death the county lost one of its oldest and most honored pioneers and there 
are many who feel his loss keenly. 

( hi October 12, 1858, .Mr. Schnebly was united in marriage t" Miss Mary 
E. Dunlap, who was horn in Wayne county, Ohio, on December Is. 1838, and 
died in Jackson township, Lucas county, towa, October 7. 1868. Of this union 
three children were horn: .Mrs. Clara Cochran, born November s . 1859, who 
makes her home with our subject; -Mrs. Evaline Elizabeth Fteid, horn September 
9, 1861, who resides at Wonder. Nevada; and Cynthia, horn April 15, 1865, 
dying bul a few months later mi AugUSl 20th of the same year. On March 
1. 1870, Mr. Schnebly was again married, his second union lM-intr with Miss 
Mary A. Pim, a native of Morrow enmity. Ohio, where she was horn February 
21, 1<S4(S. In the acquirement of her education she attended the common schools 
in the neighborhood of her home, the course consisting of three months during 
the year. Her parents were Samuel W. and Mary -lane (Jumper Pim, pio- 
neers of Lucas county, w ho came here in 1 85 1. I ler lather was horn in < Ihester, 
Pennsylvania, May 11. 1822, and died in Jackson township, this county, Febru- 
ary 16, l s ^'_'. her mother also being a native of Pennsylvania, born December 
lii. 1826, and still resides in Chariton. Mr. Schnebly and Mr. Pim were the 
first lines to establish a public-school system in Jackson township and high credit 
should he given them mi that account. Mr. and Mrs. Tim were the parents of 
nine children: William Henry, a resident of Jackson township; Mrs Schnebly, 
the wile oi' our subject; Mrs. Esther -lane Carpenter, of Herman. Nebraska; 
Salnra Salina. who passed away at the age of eighl years; Preston Penrose, 
residing in Oklahoma; Mrs. Rachel Rebecca Reed, of Canada; Candace Clemen 

tine, deceased: Mrs. Mima Ellen Walker, also deceased; and Mrs. ()la Amelia 

Morgan, who resides with her mother in Chariton, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Schnebly 
became tie parents of three children, all id' whom were horn in Jackson town- 
ship. Lucas county, as follows: Mrs. Rosana -lan. Heston, horn Hi mber 21, 

ls7<i residing in Jackson township; Mrs. Berdella Spencer, horn March '_"_'. 
Is7:;. who dud Ma\ 9, 1897; and Mrs. Mary Zoffka, horn October •".. 1876, a 
resident of Sac county, Iowa. All uf these children enjoyed tin advantages of 
an ezcellcnl education and qualified to teach in the schools oi I. mas county. 

Broad and liberal-minded and thoroughly progressive, John Schnebly ever 
took a deep interest in all matters affecting the public welfare and efficiently 
served as justice of the peace. stable ami township trustee, w inle his stalwart 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 189 

championship of the cause of education found expression in his service as school 

director. Politically he was a democrat and readily understood the important 
issues that effect the government, interesting himself in public affairs qoI as an 
office seeker but as an American citizen of right-minded citizenship. Mrs. Schne 
bly. who is highly esteemed and respected wherever known and gifted with man] 
sweet womanly qualities and of rare accomplishments, is a devoul member of the 
Baptist church of Lucas, to the work of which she gives her earnest material 

and moral support. Mr. Schnebly was <■ iected with the Masons, being a 

member of Good Shepherd Lodge, No. 414 A. P. & A. M., of Lucas, and exempli- 
fied in his everyday life the beneficent principles of the order. Every force 
that has gone out to make this one of the greatesl sections of the United States 
along moral, intellectual or material lines, every effort to uphold its standards 
received the indorsement of John Schnebly, who in return I'm- his public spirit 
received the unqualified admiration and esteem of many who were glad and 
proud to call him friend. Although a man of over eighty years of age, lie was 
active until a short time before his death and brought to the work of the world 
that interest which is rare in one of so many years and often gave of his rich 
store of wisdom and experience for the benefil of others. The years proved the 
worth of his labors and his life reflected credit upon Lucas county for he was 
richly endowed with those qualities which make men esteemed and his wise use 
of time, talents and opportunities resulted in a success which befitted his labors 
and his qualities. Those who knew him keep in memory the record of his life 
and character and feel that it is an inspiration to uobler living. 



BYRON R. VAN DYKE. 

Byron R. Van Dyke, a representative of a well known pi i- family of 

Iowa, is still living in Chariton after forty-four years of close connection with 
its business interests, twenty-six of which he spent as proprietor and manager 
of the Bates House. He was horn in West Virginia, March L\ 1848, and is a 
son of William M. and Nancy (Hull) Van Dyke, the former horn in Penn- 
sylvania, .May 28, 1825, anil the latter in Knox county, that slate, July Is. L821. 
They were among the pioneers in Iowa, coming to this slate for the firsl time 
in 1855 and settling first near Centerville, whence they removed north to 
Burlington. Upon the outbreak of the Civil war they returned to West Vir- 
ginia and there remained until the close of the Rebellion. In 1868, after the 
death of the father, two of the children went to Russell in order to lake care of 
theif mother and look after her property. She passed away in Chariton. 
February 7. 1893. She and her husband became the parents of the following 
children: Byron, of this review; Mrs. Dora Sayles, of San Diego, California; 
John 1).. deceased; William, who resides in Kansas City: Charles M.. who 
has also passed away; Mrs. Ellen Davis, of Kansas City; and George A . of 
Minneapolis. 

Byron R. Van Dyke came west lor the first time with his parents in 1855 
and he returned with them to West Virginia at the outbreak of the civil war. 
After the death of his father he settled in Russell and he has since remained a 



190 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

resident of [owa. Li 1869 he came to Chariton and for three years was employed 
as a clerk for Mr. L. I-'. Maple, after which time he became a partner, bul later he 
wenl into the bank of Manning and Penick. Be remained there for aboul three 
years and then formed a partnership with Mr. Maple in the book and stationery 
business, which connection he maintained until 1881. Ai thai time he became 

bookkeeper for Eikenberry & Company and remai 1 with them until 1^ s 7. In 

thai year he and his wife purchased the Bates House and they conducted this 
for twenty-six years thereafter, keeping it always modern and up-to-date in 
every particular and securing a large and representative patronage. In 1912, 
feeling thai he had earned a period of leisure, Mr. Van Dyke purchased a 
modern home in Chariton and now lives there. Hi is in al] essential respects 

a self-made man. for from his early childhood he has been dependent u] his 

own resources, earning his first money, sixty cents, by picking up chips for a 
contractor <>n the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. This was when 
the road was built west from Burlington. 

At t'hariton. June 15, 1880, Mr. Van Dyke married .Miss Ella Gardner, who 
was horn at .Mount Vernon, Ohio, November lit. 1851, a daughter of Nelson 
B. and Eliza (Murphy) Gardner, pioneers in Iowa. The father was horn at 
Mount Vernon, I >hio, March 19, 1827, and the mother in the same city in April. 
1830. Their marriage occurred in December, 1850, and they afterward came 
to Chariton, settling in this city in very early times. Their firsl home was 
located where the Lucas Countj National Bank building now stands and was one 
of the first residences in the city. Nelson B. Gardner was a veteran of the Civil 
war. having served through that eontliet as captain of Company E, Thirty- 
fourth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He took part in various important engage 

ments and was at Vicksburg when il it\ fell. After the close of hostilities 

he returned to Lucas county, where he secured a position as clerk of the 

courts, .- ffice in which he did a great deal of farsighted and capable work 

for fourteen years thereafter. During that time he studied law and after being 
admitted to the bar practiced succi ssfully, becoming one of the leading members 
of the legal profession in this part of [owa. He died al Chariton. June l'7. 1909, 
having survived his wife since October 1. 1890 In their family were the fol- 
lowing children: Mrs. Van Dyke, wife of the subjeel of this review; Frank, 
who was horn December 29, 1854, and who died May 4. 1905; Anna B., who 
was horn September 23, 1 s ~>7. and who died July 17. 1871; Mrs. Minnie B. 
Wiltsey, born duly 21, 1865, residing in Hemingford, Nebraska; Mary Eva, 
whose birth occurred February 16, 1868, and who died Augusl I. 1869; Dell s . 
who was horn January 19, 1^7'_'. ami who is now ;i resident of Chicago; and 
Fred G., who was born October 9, 1 s 7 I. ami who also lives in Chicago. The two 
oldest children were horn m Mount Vernon 01 io, ami the others in Chariton. 
All were reared in Lucas county, where they attended the public schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Dyke have become the parents of two children. Byron 
Ralph, Jr., was horn September 9, l sv 7. and acquired an education in the public 
schools of Chariton, graduating from the high school in June, 1905. Imme- 
diately afterward he became interested in the Lucas Countj National Bank, 
of which he is now assistant cashier. < >n the 4th of October, 1911, he married 
Miss Man.- Down, who was horn in Chariton ami who grew to womanhood in this 
They are the parents of a daughter, Ruth, who was horn July 2, 1912. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES mi 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Dyke's other son. William Carl, was bora Augusl 9, 1889, 
and died April 2, 1905. 

Mr. Van Dyke is connected fraternally with Chariton L6dge, Mo. 64, A. F. 
& A. M., and was eminent commander of the local commandery Tor a Dumber 
of years. He belongs also to the [ndependenl Order of odd Fellows. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and 1ms served for years as a 
member of the city council. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. They occupy an attractive modern home in Chariton and own in 
addition the old Gardner residence. Mr. Van Dyke is one of the besl known 
and most highly respected men of Chariton, where he has made his home for 
the past forty-four years and where his sterling character and personal and 
business integrity are recognized and respected. 



JOHN B. BARTLETT. 



Iowa numbers among her native sons many able, progressive and enter 
prising business men not the least prominent among whom is John B. Hart let t. 
proprietor of a feed yard and implement Imsiness in Seymour. He was born 
in Appanoose county in 1855 and is a son of -lames and Mary Jane (Starks) 
Bartlett, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Indiana. The Barl 
lett family was founded in Iowa by the grandfather of our subject, [saac 
Bartlett, who came to the state from Tennessee in tin- early '40s ami acquired 
a large tract of government land. On the maternal side .Mr. Bartlett is a. 
descendant of Caleb Starks, who came with his family from Indiana to Iowa in 
pioneer times. The parents of our subject were married in Appanoose county 
and in that section the father followed farming until the outbreak of the Civil 
war, when he enlisted in the Federal army, afterward meeting death upon 
southern battlefields. His wife later married Nate Buress, a farmer of Appa- 
noose county, who spent a few years of his life in Kansas. 

John B. Bartlett was one of a family of five children horn to his parents. 
He acquired his education in the public schools of his native section and began 
his independent career in 1874, purchasing ,-it thai time his first forts' acres 
of land in Appanoose county. Iowa, lie was very successful in its development 
and cultivation and as his financial resources grew he added to his holdings 
until at the present time he owns four hundred ami eighty acres of land. Din- 
ing the course of bis agricultural career he bought and sold many acres of 
farming lands, his transactions along this line being always directed by good 
business judgment and a knowledge of land values. At one time he owned 
over five hundred acres but has sine- disposed of ;i portion of this property. 
In 1911 he abandoned agricultural pursuits in favor of ;i Imsiness career ami 
moved into Seymour, where he opened ;i feed and implement business, in the 
conduct of which he has already achieved a gratifying measure of success. 

In 1880 Mr. Bartlett married .Miss Ellen Teeter. ;i native of Appanoose 
county and a daughter of C. X. Teeter, of that section. Mr. ami Mrs. Bartletl 
have become the parents of four children: Frank, a farmer residing in Wayne 
countv; Allie. who married Lester Webb, also engaged in farming in Wayne 



L92 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

county; Ray, who is residing upon the old homestead; and James, whose home 
i- in Montana. .Mrs. Bartletl is a devoul adherenl of the Methodist church. 
]\Ir. Bartlett is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, and bis political 
allegiance is given to the democratic party. Be is well known in this part of 
the state, where he has spenl many years of liis life, and his straightforward 
and enterprising spirit has gained him widespread esteem and confidence and 
mam- friends. 



JAMES P. VORHIES. 



Among the residents of Lucas, Iowa, there are none more widely and favorably 
known than Mr. and .Mrs. James I'. Vorhies, who have made their home in this 
eity fin- nearly four decades. An aggressive man of modern tendencies, Mr. Vor- 
hies occupii s a substantial posit ion in the community life and moreover lias a dis- 
tinguished war record to his credit, having participated in some of t he important 
em_ r a'_'''inmits during the conflict between north ami south Be was horn Dear 
Koine. Benrj county, Iowa. May 22, 1842, and is a son oi Isaac and Melinda 
Knoits Vorhies, who were among the earliesl settlers id' Iowa, coming to 
Henry county in 1836. The father was a native of Ohio, horn May 30, 1806, 

and died iii Ilenn mty. Iowa, in 1865. 'The mother, Mrs. Melinda Vbrhies, 

a oative of Wesl Virginia, was horn on September '-".'. 1811, ami also passed 
away m 1 1 . 1 1 1 \ county, in 1871. The paternal grandparents of our subjeel 
were John ami Mary Vorhies, the former horn October 6, 1766, and the Latter 
.March 18, 1769. To them were horn the following children: Mary Ann. June 

29. 1789; Aaron, horn October 22, 1791; Deborah, born September r>. 1793; 
Ephraim, October 16, 1795; Susanna. February 16, 1798; John, January 29, 
1800; Daniel. . human 22, 1802; Mary, March 18, 1804; Isaac, the father of our 

subjeel : and William, horn I >. inher 7. 1808. All of these children were born 

in Guernsej countj . < Ihio 

Isaac Vorhies, the father of our subject, resided in Benrj county. Iowa, from 
L836 until the time of his death, successfully following agricultural pursuits. 
To him and his wife were horn fourteen children: Levi, horn Januarj 26, 1- 10 
who passed away ahoiit 1907; Hugh, horn Jul) 26, 1831, who 'lied ahoiil 1-71. 

Susanna, horn Januarj 21, 1833, who married Dial Kwinshaw and died about 

1908; Daniel, whose birth occurred on the 6th of .lime. 1834, and who is a 
resident of Mount Pleasant, Iowa: William, horn March 10, 1836; Maria -lane. 

Pom November 12, l s o7. who died when an infant: Edward Matthew Mont 
gomery, horn April 7. 1839, who died in infancy ; Lemuel Edgar, horn Januarj 

30, 1841, a resident of Lincoln, Nebraska; .lames I'.. of this review: Marshall 
\ born March 11, 1 - I ». who died in 1S77: Mary -lane, horn l-Vhruaiw 18 

1846, who married Sam Scarf and died in 1875; John Emery, born December 
26, 1848, who .he, l :is ,-i child G aeral George Washington, horn November 17. 
1850, who died aboul 1898; and Virginia Wren, horn Februarj B, 1853, who 
married a Mr. Lane, residing at Audubon, Iowa. Tie' tour eldest children of 
this family were horn in Ohio and the remainder in Henrj county, Iowa. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 193 

James P. Vorhies was reared upon his father's farm, attending the schools 
of the neighborhood and early becoming acquainted with agricultural pursuits. 
He grew to manhood in Henry county, enlisting from there for service in the 
Civil war. becoming a member of Company 1, Fourteenth Iowa Volunteer 
Infantry, of the Union army. His regiment belonged to Colonel Shaw's brigade 
and he served with his command until the close of hostilities August 8, 1865. 
He enlisted on September 3, 1861, and for most of the time was under the com- 
mand of Generals Grant and Sherman. He distinguished himself for his faith- 
fulness to duty and courageous conduct and participated in the battles around 
Forts Henry and Donelson, also participating in both sanguine conflicts at 
Corinth, in the famous battle of Hornet's Nest and that of Shiloh. He was with 
Banks on the Eed River expedition and at Memphis and near the close of the 
war was under the command of General A. J. Smith. After enlisting he was 
sent to Missouri and from there to Davenport, to Camp Butler, whence the 
new recruits were sent to the battle line. Mr. Vorhies also has the distinction 
of having been one of the guards of honor that guarded Abraham Lincoln's 
body on the way from the state house at Springfield, Illinois, to the Oak Ridge 
cemetery of that city. The orderly sergeant being away Mr. Vorhies was detailed 
to act as sergeant, At the close of the war he returned to Henry county, where 
he successfully followed mercantile pursuits until .May 20, 1874, when he 
removed to Lucas. Iowa, of which city he has since been a resident. For some 
time he also pursued the trade of carpenter in Lucas but now lives practically 
retired, enjoying a well earned rest after an active and useful life. Discharging 
his civil duties as well as his military obligations, he has always been a patriotic 
American, having a life record to his credit which entitles him to the highest 
commendation. 

At Salina, Jefferson county, Iowa. Mr. Vorhies was married on .March 211. 
1866, to Miss Clarissa B. George, a native of Ohio, who was born February 14, 
1846. Her parents came to Jefferson county. Iowa, in 1849, and were among 
the earliest settlers of that part of the state. They came overland from Butler 
county, Ohio, and it took them three weeks to reach their destination. Her 
parents were James and Jane (Kidwell) George, the former a native of Ohio. 
born July 2, 1803, and the latter of Kentucky, born September 30th of the 
same year. Both died in Jefferson county, Iowa, the father in 1861 and the 
mother in 1870. The mother's father. Mrs. Vorhies' maternal grandfather. 
Jonathan Kidwell. was the famous editor of the Star of the West of Cincinnati 
and also of the Sentinel of that city. The family is still in possession of a 
book which he wrote in 1829 and published in 1830, and he also wrote the 
Disquisition on the Pentateuch, which was printed in 1848. This grandfather 
was also widely known as a minister and preached to charges at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and Louisville, Kentucky. He was one of the famous trio of Qniver- 
salist ministers at that time, they being Kidwell, Gifford and Waldew. .Mr. and 
Mrs. James George were the parents of the following children: Mary A., born 
December 3, 1824, who died in 1898: Elizabeth, born May 12. 1826, who passed 
away in 1884; Hezekiah J., born March 7, 1831. who died in 1863; Matthew 
L„ "born March 7. 1833. who died in 1850; Rebecca J., born December 21, 
1834, who died in 18.".4: William II.. born in 1836; Jonathan K., born Sep- 



194 LI CAS Wl> WAYNE COUN HES 

tember 1. L838; Sarah K.. born July 12, 1840; Maria I... who died in 1854; Nancy 
■ in March '_'. L842; and .Mrs. Clarissa B. Vorhies, the wife of our subject. 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Vorhies became the parents of six children, of whom 
one, Norma Everitt, passed away al the age of seven months. The others are: 
James I... born in Jefferson county, towa, Januarj 5, l v 7n. ami now a residenl 
of Lucas; Mrs. Ada Poutcher, born August 17. ls-71. residing in Chariton, 
Iowa: Clarence W., born April 23, 1 N 7I. oi Madrid, towa; Ernest <i-. born 
May i' I. 1877, of the same citj ; and Carl R., born Julj 6, 1882, also of Madrid. 
The three eldest children were born in Jefferson county and the remainder in 
Lucas county. Mr. and Mis, Vorhies are the grandparents of seven grand- 
children: Lourine and [rene, twins, born March 2, 1896; Marvel J., born June 
30, 1897; Jay, born in February, L899; and Helen C, born in April. L900, are 
all the children of George and Ada Poutcher. Laurel Lester, born February 21, 
L910, is the sun of Ernest <i. Vorhies, and James Raymond, born February 
25, 1910, is the son of Carl R. Vorhies. 

Public-spirited and progressive, Mr. Vorhies has actively participated in the 
public life of his community, serving as township trustee and member of the 
city council of Lucas. He also was postmaster for one term, discharging his 
duties efficient h and to the un-at satisfaction of his patrons. He keeps in con- 
tact with his comrades in the war as a member of the Grand Army post a1 

Chariton. The family home is oi f the comfortable residences of the citj and 

there Mr. and Mrs. Vorhies extend a warm hearted hospitality to their many 
friends. Mrs. Vorhies is still in possession of valuable family relics which she 
highly prizes, among them a plate from a set given her mother a1 her wedding 
which is now over ninety years old. She also possesses a sel of silver teaspoons. 
with her mother's initials engraved upon them, which were given to the latter 
by her father at the time of her wedding. Moth Mr. and Mrs. Vorhies enjoj the 
high regard of all who know them and take a helpful pari in all move 
ments undertaken I'm- the lietternient of the community along moral and 
: i.il lines. 



ISAAC SHRIVER 



Isaac Shriver, who passed awa\ in Allerton on the 20th of September, 1901, 
was for many years identified with the agricultural interests of Wayne county, 
win-re his people located during the pioneer days, bu1 the latter period of his 
life was passed in this city, Ins energies being devoted to the development of 
n furniture business in which he had engaged more than a decade before his 
death. His birth occurred in Monroe county, Ohio, on the 6th of February, 
1844, and he was the thirteenth in order ol birth of the seventeen children 
born to Elias and Rachel (Stuart) Shriver. The parents were Datives of West 
Virginia, whence they removed to Ohio, coming from there to Iowa in 1855 
The lather subsequently acquired some land in this county and here he and 
the mother passed the remainder of their days. 

The lirst eleven veal's in the life ol Isaac Shri\cr were passe.l Iii the slate 

of his nativity. His education was completed in the public scl Is of Iowa. 




ISAAC SHRIYER 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 197 

and while engaged in the mastery of the common branches of English learning 
he assisted his father with the operation of the home farm. He remained 
under the parental roof until he was nineteen years of age, when he started 
out for himself. The succeeding seven years were passed in the state of Colo- 
rado, where he herded cattle and also worked in the mines. Returning to 
Wayne county at the expiration of that time, he erected a residence and such 
other buildings as were required on his portion of the old homestead and 
there pursued the career of an agriculturist for twenty years. Deciding that 
commercial activities would he more to his liking he next removed to Allerton 
and engaged in the furniture business until his death. 

On the 7th of December, 1865, .Mr. Sh river was married to Miss Cynthia 
Marick, who was born on the 9th of May, 1844, in Mouroe county, Ohio, her 
parents being Henry- and Elizabeth (Brown) Marick. They were natives of 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania respectively, but for many years resided in Ohio, 
coming from there to Iowa in lNjf). They located in Wayne county, where 
Mr. Marick purchased some land in the cultivation of which he engaged during 
the remainder of his active life. Here both he and the mother passed away 
and were laid to rest in the Higby cemetery. Their family numbered six, Mrs. 
Shriver being the fourth in order of birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Shriver there 
were born ten children: Hersa Belle; Isaac, better known as Bert, who died 
at the age of four years; Thomas Benton; Delia; Dora; Vivian and Lucy, who 
died in infancy ; Lura, usually called Edna ; Jessie and Frederick. 

Mr. Shriver was a member of the Christian church, with which his widow 
is also affiliated, and for several years held the office of deacon. Politically he 
supported the democratic party and served two terms on the school board of 
Allerton. while for one term he discharged the duties of councilman. Mr. 
Shriver was a man of many estimable qualities and was widely and favorably 
known in this locality, where he was regarded as a worthy representative of a 
respected pioneer family. 



HARRY D. HINES. 



Harry D. Hines occupies as manager of the Old Colony Creamery one of 
the foremost positions in the commercial life of Humeston. He is a native son of 
Iowa, being born at Chariton, October 28, 1870, his parents being J. II. and 
Caroline (Blair) Hines. The lather was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, about 
1823, and passed away at Chariton, June 4, 1879. He was one of the earliest 
settlers of Lucas county and a master bridge builder by trade, also following 
the occupation of railroad contracting. He built many of the bridges between 
Chariton and Leon on the Chariton and St. Joe division of the Chicago. Bur- 
lington & Quincy Railroad. The mother, Caroline (Blair) Hines, was a uative 
of Pennsylvania, born April 20, 1848, and now makes her home with her 
daughter at Flushing, Long Island. Mr. and Mrs. Hines were the parents of 
four children, three of whom are living and of whom the subject of this sketch 
is the oldest. The others living are: Allen A., born April !). 1872. residing 
in Minneapolis, Minnesota ; and Mrs. Edna Freeman, born July 31, 1876, residing 



198 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

at Flushing, Long [sland. Carrie, the firsl born, died in infancy. All the 
children were born al Chariton, Iowa. 

Harrj D Sines spenl his boy] I in Chariton and there attended public 

school in the acquirement of his education until nine years of age. At the death 
of the father in 1879 the familj removed to Kansas, where they remained for 
two years, after which they returned to Chariton, remaining a few months 
there and thence removing to Eumeston, where our subjecl has since resided 
Harry I). Hines continued Ins education while in Kansas and subsequent^ 

attended the Eumeston public scl Is. supplementing his education bj a 

course in the Centra] Normal University at Eumeston, from which he grad- 
uated with tl lass of 1893 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. His 

exeelleni education fitted li i tn well for the ] >i'u fessiuii of teaching and he 
followed this line of occupation for three years before he entered the employ 
of -lames L. Eumphrej as bookkeeper, continuing in thai capacity until 1906. 
His executive abilitj was soon recognized by his employer and in that year he 

was appointed to the position of superintendent of tl reamerj department, 

remaining in that c ection until the fall of 1909, when he was made genera] 

manager of the whole plant on the demise of Mr. Taber, his predecessor in the 
position. This creamerj was established in December, 1880, by Dr. George 
McCulloch, .lames Taylor, J. T. Riggle, J. R. Cassadj and J. D. Basbrouck, 
these gentlemen being the owners of the enterprise, li was firsl operated under 
the old gathered-cream system. During the early ' v iis it passed into the hands 
of J. P. Stoop and .Millard Chase and these gentlemen in turn disposed of 
it to Ealdeman & Son. This firm operated the business until January 1. 1896, 
at which time ii was purchased by -lames L. Eumphrey, Jr., of New Bedford, 
Massachusetts. In October of the same year Mr. Eumphrey ad. led to his 
interests bj purchasing the wholesale poultry, butter and egg business of Chase 
& Stoop and consolidated the two enterprises. The old creamerj was located 
at firsl in theeasl part of Eumeston and was known under the name of the Wayne 
Countj Creamery, bu1 when the same came into the possession of Mr. Eumphrej 

it was named the Old Colonj Creamery, under which qj >, its goods are known 

at present from ocean to oeean. The business has marvelously increased and 
necessitated in 1897-8 the erection of a fine new brick plant in the central part 
of Eumeston, adjaeenl to the railroad, where annually thousands of pounds 
of cream and poultrj are taken care of. Prom a small and humble beginning 
this institution has grown to one of the largest in Iowa, having an annual out- 
put of ahout a million dollars, and it is in a large measure due to the executive 
ability, to the energj and industry of Mr. Mines thai the business has increased 
to these proportions and that it is handled todaj in such an exemplary manner 

thai it is a i lei lor other institutions of the same kind. 

Mr. Mines was married March 25, 1897, to Miss Lennie Holmes, a native 
of Wayne county, Iowa, where she was horn January 15, 1879 In this county 
she grew to womanhood and has made it her home since. Ber parents were 
Gilbert and Elizabeth (Garton) Holmes, both of whom have passed away, and 
in their family were six children, of whom four are living: Mrs. Mines; Gil 
bert, who resides a1 Rifle, Colorado: Mrs Mabel Wright, living a1 Corydon; and 

I; J, who makes his home at the same place. Two sons dad in inl'an j . The 

youngesl of the children was hern in Kansas bul the others are all natives ol 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 199 

this county. Mr. and Mrs. Hines have one (laughter. Helen Bernice, who was 
born at Humeston, Iowa, January :!. 1808, and is now attending high school in 
the acquirement of an education. 

Mr. Hines is a democrat in his political views and although he has never 
aspired to public office takes a laudable interesl in the affairs of his party and 
the issues of the day and gives to all public questions that attention which 
a right-minded citizen considers his duty. His fraternal affiliations are with 
Fidelity Lodge. No. 228, A. F. & A. M. A man of strong character and busi- 
ness ability, he has become recognized as a forceful element in the commercial 
circles of the community and he enjoys the high regard and confidence of all 
those with whom he comes in contact. He has attained to a high place by 
honorable methods only and his activities, while of direct result to the large 
interests which he represents, are constructive in the development of a wide 
section surrounding Humeston. The keynote of his success may be said to be 
that he does well everything he finds to do and his career is proof of the fact 
that success is ambition's answer. 



JOHN W. GARRATT. 



The name of John W. Garratt has long been associated with progressive and 
successful agriculture in Wayne county, where he has passed his entire life, 
lie was born in Benton township in a little house still standing on the farm 
he now owns on the 20th of April. 1862. and is the only son of the late James 
Garratt. His father was born in Chestershire, England, on April 1. 1817, and 
there he was likewise reared and educated. His energies were early directed 
along agricultural lines, which pursuits he continued to follow in the old coun- 
try until 1842. when he emigrated to America. After a year's residence in the 
United States he went back to England, but in 184-1 he returned to this country 
and settled in the vicinity of Alton, Illinois. From there he went to Jackson- 
ville, that state, where he bought some land which he diligently improved and 
cultivated for several years thereafter. In 1854, Mr. Garratt entered some 
government land in Wayne county, Iowa, a portion of this tract still being m 
the possession of his son, and in April of the year following removed here with 
his wife and family. He immediately settled on his homestead and there 
resided until his death, which occurred in 1899. After removing here he entered 
land for a number of his friends in Illinois and also bought and sold real estate. 
He increased his own holdings and at one time owned three hundred acres, but 
he later disposed of a portion of his trad and at the time of his death his lanii 
comprised only two hundred and forty acres. For his wife Mr. Garratt chose 
Miss Deliah Lowe, who was born in Cass county, Illinois, then known as Morgan 
county, on the 18th of August, 1821. She was reared and married in her native 
state whence she removed to Iowa with her husband, whom she survived for, 
many years, her death occurring on the 8th of .March. 1012. Of this marriage 
there were born four children, the eldest of whom is a daughter Mary, now 
Mrs. C. V. Allen of this state, while the last born was our subject. John \V. 
The other two members of the family died in infancy. 



200 LUCAS AND WAYNE ( OUNTIES 

The entire life of John \V. Garratl has been passed amid the scenes with 
which he is now daily familiar. His early years were verj similar to those of 

other lads with wl i he was reared. At the usual age he entered the district 

schools of Benton township, where he acquired his education, and while engaged 
in the mastery of the fundamental principles of English learning he was also 
becoming familiar with the duties of the agriculturist. As the years passed he 
assumed more and more of the responsibilities aboul the farm of which he had 
the entire management for aboul fifteen years prior to the death of his father. 
.Mr. Garratl is enterprising and progressive in whatever he undertakes, directing 
his business in a well organized, systematic maimer. His fields, which he plants 
to such crops as he deems best adapted to the soil, are annually yielding abun- 
danl harvests, and in connection with his diversified farming he is raising stock 
ami is an extensive feeder. As the years have passed he lias increased Ids 
ai reage until his holdings now aggregate five hundred acres, all of which he lias 
brought to a high state of productivity. His buildings and fences have been 
substantially constructed and kepi in good condition, while al various times he 
has introduced about the premises different devices for reducing the labor and 
expediting the' work, making Ins one of the valuable properties of the commu- 
nity. By the exercise of L r I judgmenl and sagacity he has prospered in his 

undertakings and is not only an extensive property holder bul is one of the 
stockholders and a director of the Farmers National Bank id' Allerton 

On the llith of October, L899, Mr. Garratl was married 1 •• Sarah Hall, a 
daughter of dames and Martha I Kimple) Hall, natives of Pennsylvania, whence 
ihe\ removed to Iowa in 1857, being among the pioneer farming people of this 
section of 'he state. To Mr. and Mrs. Garratl there have been horn two children, 

as follows: Zell K.. whose birth occurred on the 7th of November, I! ; and 

Boise .1.. who was Imrn in January, 1904. 

His political support Mr. Garratl extends to the democratic party, and 

although he has never soughl an official position he is f the public-spirited 

men of his township, taking an active and helpful interest In everything In- feels 
will tend tn promote the welfare of the community either intellectually, morally 
or materially. 



HOLT BROTHERS 



Among the younger commercial enterprises of Lucas is the firm of Unit 
Brothers, who established themselves in the liverj business in this citj in I'M I 
'The firm consists of 1 1 < ■ 1 1 r\ and John Holt, both of whom now give most of 
their attention to their new departure, although they are still extensively inter- 
ested in agriculture and also own valuable Clydesdale br ling horses. Their 

success has been bul the outcoi f intelligent^ directed efforts and is the 

result of well applied industry and em I 

Henry Unit was born in Clarke county, Iowa, Maj I, l s 7n. and John in 

Otter <d 1< township, I. mas county, Iowa. January I, 1^7^ Their paternal 

grandparents, who came as pioneers to Iowa, were John and Ava [fCilgon 
Holt, natives of Indiana, who were horn in 1 82 I and 1827, respectively. They 



LUCAS AND WAYNE ('( H'XTI ES 20] 

both died in the same year, the grandfather on January 2, 1864, and the grand- 
mother in November of that year. Among their children was Lifus, the father 
of John and Henry Holt. He was born in Martin county, Indiana, December 
29, 1816, and by his marriage to Mary A. Holt in 1ST:! became the father of five 
children; .Mrs. Rowena Manley, Henry. John. Seymour and Mrs. Georgia A. 
Evans. A more extended mention of Mr. and Mrs. Lifus Holt is made in 
another part of this work. 

Henry and John Holt grew up under the parental roof and were educated 
to agricultural pursuits. Both brothers followed farming successfully until the 
beginning of 1913, when they formed a partnership in order to engage in the 
livery business in Lucas, where they own one of the best equipped barns in 
this part of the county. Within a short time they have achieved an enviable 
success which must be attributed to their business ability and their genial and 
pleasing way in dealing with their patrons. 

On February 6, 1902. Henry Holt was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
Lulu Pennington, a native of Otter Creek township, where she was born August 
16, 1879. There she attended the common schools and grew to womanhood. Her 
father. A. L. Pennington, was born in Monroe county. Indiana. January 10, 
1851, and when but a year old was brought by his parents to Otter Creek town- 
ship, where he is at present residing. His family were among the earliest set- 
tlers in this township. The mother of Mrs. Henry Holt was Elizabeth A. 
(Deckard) Holt, also a native of Monroe county, Indiana, where she was born 
June 14, 1854. She came to Iowa in 1872, when about eighteen years of age. 
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Pennington were the parents of three daughters: Mrs. 
Ida May Davidson, born May 2. 1S77, who now resides in Chariton, Iowa; Mrs. 
Minnie Lulu Holt, of this review: and Mrs. Ada Belle Ashby, born August 2(1, 
18S6, residing with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holt have become the 
parents of five children: Pearl, born January 12, 1903; Beulah, September 22, 
1905; Merrill, September 17. 1907; Mildred, June 13, 1909; and Wilma, whose 
birth occurred on the 12th of October. 1910. The second of these children was 
born in Jackson township but the remainder are natives of Liberty township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holt own forty acres of choice land in Liberty township 
with good improvements. 

John Holt on March 15. 1898, married Miss Lillie Messman, who was born 
in Clarke county, Iowa, January 1. 1877. both she and her husband having been 
born on New Year's day. In Clarke county she attended the common schools 
and grew to womanhood under the roof of her father and mother. Jacob and 
Harriet (Hart) Messman. The father was born on the ocean while his parents 
were crossing to America and the mother was a native of Henry county. Iowa. 
Both passed away in Clarke county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Messman were the 
parents of three daughters: Mrs. Ida Penick, a resident of Clarke county; Mrs. 
May Lynn, who makes her home in Adair county, this state; and Mrs. Lillie 
Holt, the wife of John Holt. The two older daughters were born in Henry 
county. Mr. and Mrs. John Holt have become the parents of six children: 
Olive, born August 28, 1899; Adrian M.. born March 24. 1902; Ida Mae. born 
December 31. 1904: Ethel P., born November 13, 1906; Irene C. born March 
18, 1908: and Boyd R., whose natal day was January :i. 1910. Those of the 
children who are old enough are attending the public schools of Lucas. 



202 I. [»'AS \\D WAYNE COUNTIES 

Both Benry and John Boll give their political adherence to the democratic 
party and both are members of the Woodmen of the World of Chariton. John 
Boll is .ils. i affiliated with the Brotherhood of American Yeomen of Lucas. Be 
sides their agricultural interests and their livery business they own registered 

imported Clydesdale horses, a ag them stallion Baron Bill, No. 15,185; the 

French drafl stallion. Bero, No. 17,657; and the grade Percheron stallion, Jim, 
No. 591, of the Iowa Department of Agriculture. These horses are kept at 
their barn in Lucas. Aggressive ami progressive l.nsiness men. the Holt brothers 

take a deep interest in the advancemenl of tl ity in which they make their 

home ami have always been found in the ranks of those who have at heart the 
development of the section. They are sneeessi'nl and enterprising business 
men ami. although their establishment has been in operation tor only a few 
months, have alreadj demonstrated that sum^ is certain to crown their efforts. 



.M AWT IN E. II ITT 



.Martin E. Ilitt is now a resident of Clarke county, Iowa, where I wns 

lour hundred acres of valuable land. Be was, however, Eor many years promi- 
nently eo -ted with agricultural interests of Union township. Lucas county, 

and his work w accounted among the factors in the farming development of this 
section of the state. He was horn in Madison eonnty. Indiana. June 6, 1838 
and is a son of Alexander and lm-a (Curtis) Ilitt. natives of Virginia. The 
father went overland to Indiana in 1832 ami remained there until 1854, when 
he Settled in Iowa. He died in Clarke eonnty. this slate, in 1882 when he was 

seventy-four years of age. His wife has also passed away, her death having 
turred when she was seventj eight. The parents were among the earliest 

pioneers of Iowa and their name is still honored ami respected bj all who kni n 
them. In their family were three children: Mrs. Sarah McFetridge, who died 
at I.eWoy. Iowa: Martin B., of this review: and Samuel A., who died in Wayne 
COUntj . this state. 

Martin E. Ilitt spent his childhood and early youth in Madison county, 
Indiana, and acquired his education in the public schools of that slat.. lie 

accompanied the family to [owa in 1854 and in the following year removed to 
Barrison county, Missouri. He there made his home until L862 and then 
moved to Franklin township, Clarke eonnty. Iowa. II.- subsequently became 

coi -ted with agricultural interests in I. mas county, turning his attention 

io the develop nt of his holdings and becoming recogni ed as a substantial 

and progressive tanner lie later re \.d again to Clarke county, Iowa, ami 

has sin.-,- remained a resident of that locality. 

In Union township, on the iMh of March, 1869, Mr lint was united in 

marriage to Miss Marj A, Bol s, who was born November 26, 1849. she is 

a representative of an honored pioneer family, her parents having been the 

first settlers in Union township. She was the first white child in the town- 
ship, where sin- is well known ami widely esteemed. Her lather. Hiram 

M II. .lines, was born iii Kentucky ami died at Great Bend, Kansas, at the 

age of seventj Ber mother. Sarah (Ruth) Holmes, was a Dative of Indiana 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES I'd:; 

and passed away in Barton county, Kansas, when she was seventy years of 
age. Mr. and Mrs. Hiram M. Holmes became the parents of eight children: 
Jacob, who has passed away; Mrs. Fudge, also deceased; .Mrs. Susanna Lowe, 
of Union township: two who died in infancy; Nathaniel and Mrs. Adeline 
Moore, who have passed away; and Mrs. II it t . wife of the subjied of this review. 
Mr. and Mrs. llitt became the parents of seven children: Rosanne, who died 
in infancy; J. W., who makes his home in Clarke county. Iowa; Clara 1!.. who 
passed away when she was still a child; Frank K., who is residing with his 
father on the home farm ; Alva E., who died in 1900; and Elsie and Elza, twins, 
who died in infancy. All of the above children were born in Franklin township, 
Clarke county. 

Mr. Hitt gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is a devout 
member of the Christian church. He is well known in agricultural circles of 
the section where he resides, owning four hundred acres of choice land in Franklin 
township. Clarke county. This property is provided with two good sets of 
improvements and is one of the best managed and most attractive farms in 
that locality. Mr. Hitt's name is honored ami respected also in Lucas county, 
where his many excellent qualities of character are known and recognized, and 
although he no longer makes his home in Union township he is nevertheless 
counted among the men whose work has been a force in its upbuilding. 



JOSIAH C. COPELAND. 

Josiah C. Copeland, president of the Chariton National Bank and long an 
active factor in professional circles in the city, was born at Kenton, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 19. 1855, a son of Howard and Catherine (Darlington) Copeland. The 
father was also a banker in Ohio and died in that state in 1884. His widow- 
survived him for about nine years, passing away in 1893. 

The early educational opportunities afforded Josiah C. Copeland were those 
offered by the public schools but later he had the advantage of study in Dela- 
ware University at Delaware, Ohio. After leaving school he clerked for' his 
father and subsequently studied law for a time in bis native state. In 1879 
he arrived in Chariton, where he continued his law reading and was admitted 
to the bar in 1881. He at once entered upon active practice, which he followed 
for twenty years, and made for himself a creditable position at the county bar. 
He was the first county attorney for Lucas county, filling that position lor 
four years, and throughout the period of his active practice he was ever faithful 
to the highest professional ethics and most carefully safeguarded the interests 
of his clients, his devotion thereto being proverbial. In 1904 he turned his 
attention to the banking business, entering the Chariton National Bank in the 
capacity of cashier. He filled that position for six years and in 1910 was elected 
to the presidency, which office he now holds. 

On the 26th of November. 1896. Mr. Copeland was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Anna (Gibbon) McCollough. who was born in Ohio lint was reared in 
Chariton. She is a daughter of Dr. "William IT. and Laura R. Gibbon. Her 
father, Dr. Gibbon, was a man of much prominence and served as a surgeon in 



204 I.ICAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

the United States army. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Copeland have been born a son 

and two daughters: Lawrence Gibl horn .January !t. is!is ; Anna I. aura, horn 

.liih 25, 1900; and Catherine G, born September 23, 1902. 

Mr. Copeland holds membership in the Masonic fraternity, in which he lias 
attained high rank. Ee has crossed the sands of the deserl with the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine and he also has membership in the Knights of Pythias 
a n< I the Sons of the American Revolution. In politics he is a stalwart republican, 
unfaltering in his allegiance to the parts- which he has supported since age 
conferred upon him the righl of Eranchise. The family attend the Episcopal 
church and arc well known socially in Chariton. Mr. Copeland is a genial, cour 
trims gentleman, kindly and jusl in spirit bul in business prompt and energetic. 
By individual merit he has attained the present enviable position which he 
occupies in the financial circles of Lucas county. 



PARKISON WILLIAMS. 

On the loth of -June. L912, there was called to Ins final resl one of the oldest 

and most esteet 1 pioneers of Lucas county in Parkison Williams, who had 

been broughl to Warren township by his parents when a child of hut four years, 
in 1845, and who had made that township his home and the held of his activities 
to the time of his death, which occurred when he had reached the age of seventy 
years. Parkison Williams was horn in Decatur county, Indiana, on the 3d of 
November, 1841. His parents were Samuel and Susan (Swiney) Williams. 
Datives of Virginia. The father was one of the heroes of the t'ivil war. meeting 
his death at the battle of Pea Ridge in 1864, his wife surviving until l s si when 
she passed away in Wayne county. Iowa. Thej came overland to Iowa in 1845, 
bringing with them their four-year-old sou Parkison, and settled in Warren 

township. Lucas county, so thai they must be counted ai g the very tirst 

pioneers in this section. At that time there was mi indication of the wonderful 

agricultural development thai should later ensue and settlements were yel verj 
sparse, the land being mostly raw. unbroken prairie. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Williams were the parents of the following children: Parkison; Mrs. Margaret 
Wells : .lohn. also a I 'ivil war veteran, w ho died in the hospital at Rolla, Missouri. 
while iii the Union army; Ned; Mrs. Marjorie Turtle; Mrs. Martha Pent; Mrs. 
Mary I. Wilson; and Mrs. Jennie Tuttle. The seven younger children were 
horn Dear Freedom, where all of them were reared, 

Parkison Williams, being broughl to Warren township in 1845, there received 

Ins education and earlj 1 ame acquainted with agricultural methods under 

pim litions. Graduallj he made himself independent and successfully 

followed farming and stock raisin" through all his life, his efforts being attended 
with considerable success. His death took place mar where the tirst settlement 

of the family was made, mi .June 15, 1912, and was the cause of deep mourning 
and regret not only to his family bul to the man] friends which he had made 
during a long, honorable and useful career. 

Parkison Williams was united in marriage, in I860, to Sarah J. Essex, who 
was horn in Eagle Village Indiana, Julj s i •- 1 1 she came overland to Iowa 




MR. AND .MRS. PAEKISON WILLIAMS 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 207 

with her parents in 1855, when eleven years old, and has made her home in 
Lucas county since. Her parents, Edward and Salena G. (Guge^ Essex, natives 
of Indiana, both passed away in Lucas county, the father dying in Lincoln 
township. In their family were six children, of whom Mrs. Williams and 
Mrs. T. J. Hawkins are the only ones now Living. The others were James M. 
Mary E., Anna E., and one who died in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Parkison 
Williams became the parents of eleven children: Mrs. Etta Tuttle, residing in 
Wayne county; Mrs. Elizabeth Ryan, also a resident of that county; Samuel L., 
who is mentioned under that caption; Mrs. Anna Wilson, of Centerville, Iowa; 
Mrs. William Connor, of Chariton, Iowa; Dr. C. E. Williams, of Russell, Iowa; 
Mrs. Nora Mclnnes, residing in Chariton; Mrs. Hattie Layton, of Wayne county; 
Salene, a native of Wayne county, who makes her home with her mother in 
Chariton; Elbert, of Lucas county; and Arthur, of Chariton. All of the chil- 
dren were reared and educated in Lucas county, and Mrs. Wilson. Mrs. Connor 
and Miss Salene. after completing the public-school course, took up academic 
work. The family home in Chariton is commodious and well furnished. Miss 
Salene Williams has for a number of years most successfully taught school 
in Lucas county and for the coming year has been selected to take charge of the 
sixth grade of the Columbus school of Chariton. She takes a deep interest in 
her work and is recognized as one of the most efficient teachers in the city. .Mrs. 
Wilson and Mrs. Connor also taught school for a number of years. 

His political views inclined Parkison Williams toward the republican party 
and he was actively and helpfully interested in all matters of public importance. 
For a number of years he served as justice of the peace and discharged the 
duties of that office with great impartiality and to the satisfaction of the general 
public. He was a member of and deacon in the Baptist church, both he and 
his wife having joined that denomination near Freedom, where they were 
charter members of the Sharon church. The family formerly also owned one 
hundred and twenty acres of land in Lucas county, which, however, has been 
disposed of. The death of Mr. Williams was a severe loss not only to his imme- 
diate family but to his locality, for he had always actively participated in all 
matters pertaining to the general welfare and did much toward advancement 
and progress in this section, especially along agricultural lines. His name is 
held in high repute by his friends and neighbors, who found in him a man 
of high qualities of mind and character. 



JOHN HENRY LOWE. 

John Henry Lowe, one of the highly honored and respected citizens of Lucas 
county, has made his home in Union township for the past fifty-six years and 
has witnessed the wonderful transformation that has here occurred as pioneer 
conditions have given way before the onward march of civilization. General 
agricultural pursuits have claimed his attention throughout his entire business 
career, and he is the owner of a valuable farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
on sections :!1 and 32. His birth occurred in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, on 
the 30th of December, 1835, his parents being Jonathan and Mary (Downard) 

Vol. II— 1 1 



208 LUCAS AND WAYNK COUNTIKs 

Lowe, who were likewise natives of the Keystone state, the latter born in Payette 
county. Our subject's grandfather, Isaac Lowe, was a soldier in the War of 
L812and acquitted himself with credit. Jonathan Lowe passed away in Madison 
countj . Iowa, at the advanced age of eighty-nine years, while his wife died in that 
countj when sixty-six years old. Their children were eleven in number, as fol- 
lows: John II.. "i ' tli is n -\ iew ; William, who resides on the old home farm in Madi 

son county, this state; Martha, who Uvea with her brother on tl Id homestead 

in Madison county; Mrs. Elziria Williams, whose demise occurred in 1912; Oliver 
Perry, living in Osceola, Iowa; .Mrs. Victoria Hyatt, who makes her home in El 
Paso county, Colorado; and five who died in early lit''-. All were horn in 
Pennsylvania. 

John Henry Lowe enjoyed hut limited educational advantages in his youth 
hut has continually augmented bis knowledge by reading, experience and 
observation and is a well informed man. When a youth of eighteen be mad. ins 
wa y to Iowa, journeying by boal down the Ohio and up the Mississippi river 
to Keokuk and then traveling overland to Van Buren county, which be reached 
,,,, the 9th of May. L854. Thence he removed to Madison county hut after a 
short time went south, spending the winter season in thai section of the country. 
The following sprintr. in W>7. he came to Union township, Lucas county, Iowa, 
and has here resided continuously since. Many evidences of pioneer life wi 
still to be found, wild g! ■ and wild animals abounding, while numerous wander- 
ing tribes of Indians sojourned in the district. There wen I\ six hou 

between Chariton and the abode of Mr. Lowe, who experienced all the hardships 
and privations of life in a frontier region. He firsl boughl eighty acres of 
university land and subsequently extended the boundaries of his farm h\ an 
additional purchase of forty acres, Ins holdings now embracing one hundred 
and twenty acres of choice prairie land in the most productive section of Lucas 
county. All the improvements thereon stand as monuments to his thrift, enter- 
prise and industry, and the neat appearance of the place bespeaks the care 
and progressive spirit of its owner. In former years Mr. Lowe specialized in 

the raising of full-blooded Hereford cattle and at presenl has a good grade 

of live stock. There was a time when he sold eggs at Chariton for three cents 
a do/en. while hoes broughl only a dollar and a quarter per hundredweight at 
Smyrna. Deciding to purchase a scoop shovel, Mr. Lowe and a neighbor husked 
a load of corn and took it to Chariton, selling the same to a dealer for ten c< ats 
per bushel and thus obtaining sufficienl cash to pay for the shovel, which cost 

two dollars and seventy -live cents. As the years have passed and the district 

has become more thickly settled, c litions have improved for the agriculturist 

in many ways. Mr. I, owe has won a gratifying measure of success in his oper 

ations as a farmer aid stock raiser and has long been numbered among the 
prosperous and representative citizens of this county. 

» in the 25th of October, L859, Mr. Lowe was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha R. Crown, who was horn in Payette county, Pennsylvania, on the 1th 

of April. 1840, her parents being Richard and Sarah Brown, likewise nal 

of the Keystone state. It was in the year 1840 that they came to Iowa, settling 
near Eddyville. Becoming discouraged with the poor prospects, however, they 
began the overland journey back to Pennsylvania but met a party from the cast 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUXTIKS 209 

who contemplated settling in Iowa and who persuaded them to remain here 
at least another year. They purchased a tract of land in Lee county and thereon 
spent the remainder of their lives. Mrs. Brown died in 1854, during a scourge 
of the cholera. Their family numbered the following children, namely: Josiab., 
Charles. Rufus, LeRoy. Mrs. Frances Sprott, Mrs. Martha Lowe and Orpha, 
all of whom were natives of Pennsylvania and all of whom are deceased. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Low.' were born seven children, as follows : Alpheus, who is deceased : 
Louisa, who died at the age of two years; Jonathan L., who is a resident of 
Union township; William, also of that township; Francis 0., who lives with 
his father; Dell E., likewise on the home farm; and Charles E., who is deceased. 
The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the 1st of April, 1896, passing 
away in L T nion township, where her demise was deeply and sincerely mourned. 

In politics Mr. Lowe is a democrat and his fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and ability, have called him to positions of public trust. He has ably 
served in the capacity of township trustee, was a member of the school board 
for fifteen years and has acted as road supervisor for sixteen years, ever dis- 
charging his official duties in a most prompt and capable manner. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Lodge 
No. 329 at Derby. He is now in the seventy-eighth year of his age and enjoys 
the veneration and respect which should ever he accorded one who has traveled 
thus far on life's journey and whose career has been at all times upright and 
honorable. 



JOSEPH F. WILSON. 



Among the esteemed pioneers of Wayne county, whose names are enrolled 
among those of the nation's honored sons who donned the blue and went to 
the front in defense of their country's flag, appears that of Joseph F. Wilson. 
Self-educated and self-made, the ambitious and thoughtful will find many 
examples worthy of emulation in the life of this estimable man, who as president 
of the State Bank and the owner of large landed interests is now numbered 
among the substantial business men and respected citizens of Allerton. 

The life record of Joseph F. Wilson was begun on a farm in Putnam county. 
Indiana, on the 16th of September, 1844, his parents being John and Susan 
(Bettis) Wilson. The father was a native of King George county, Virginia, 
and of English extraction, while the mother, whose birth occurred in Mason 
county, Kentucky, was of Irish and English lineage. They were married in 
the last named state and began their domestic life on a Kentucky farm, In it 
soon thereafter they migrated to Indiana, locating in Putnam county. There 
the father continued his agricultural pursuits until 1854, when with his family 
he again started westward, Wayne county. Iowa, being his destination upon 
this occasion. I T pon his arrival here he purchased a tract of prairie land and 
diligently applied himself to its cultivation. Later he sold it, and bought, another 
farm, which he operated for a time and likewise sold. The year 1884 was 
marked by the death of both parents, the father passing away at the age of 
seventy-two years, while the mother was sixty-eight at the time of her demise. 
They are buried in the Clinton township cemetery, this county. Their family 
numbered ten, our subject being the fifth in order of birth. 



210 I.I CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

The son of a pioneer farmer of limited means Joseph !•'. Wilson shared with 
his family .-ill of the hardships and privations Incidenl to frontier life. Il>- 

was ambitious and enterprising from boyh 1 and early m life began to provide 

for his own wants, having earned every dollar be ever received. Realizing the 
necessitj of having an education if he desired to advance in the world, when 

ad of ten years he gathered walnuts and carried them t" Corydon In order 

to procure the monej to buy a second reader. In co with the majority 

of farmer hoys he early began to assist aboul the work of the Gelds and care 

of tin- stock, Ins duties in this connection preventing his attending scl I save 

at irregular intervals during the winter session. Be remained at home with 
his parents until the 17th of February, 1862, when be enlisted in Company K. 
Eighteenth Missouri Volunteer I ofantry and went to the front. Be was wounded 
by ,i rifle ball at the battle of Shiloh on the 6th of April, thai year, and wad 
compelled to suffer the amputation of Ins left arm. Many long weeks were 
spent in a southern hospital and on the 1>th of August, 1862, he received 
his discharge and returned home. Be remained on his father's farm, rendering 
Mich assistance as he was able, until he was twenty-five. Appreciating the 
uecessitj of a better education he devoted much of bis time to stud} and for 
■ year attended school. 

Upon leaving the parental roof our subjecl engaged in buying and selling 
stock, thus acquiring the money to enable him to buj a farm of one hundred 
and twentj acres, which he cultivated for eleven years. Agricultural pursuits 
and stock buying engaged his undivided attention until 1882, since which time 
he has followed various activities. Be has chieflj engaged in the loan, real-estate 
and banking business, however, in all of which he has mel with a good measure 
of success, lie owns his residence and a store building in Allerton, in addition 
to eight} acres of land in Jackson township and his farm of two hundred and 
fort} acres in Boward township. Be is also a stockholder of the Allerton 
State Bank, one of the thriving financial institutions of the counts. A man of 
keen discernmenl and foresight, -Mr. Wilson's judgmenl is seldom at fault in 
matters of business, as bas been plainly manifested by the orderly progress of 
ins career. 

In the year 1870, Mr, Wilson was united in marriage to Mi^s Victoria Knii'iin. 
a daughter of Daniel and Clarissa Rusco rZniffin, natives of the stale of New 
York hut of English lineage. They removed to Iowa with their family aboul 
1858, locating in Waj ounty, which was their place of resilience for many 

rs. Subsequently they went to Ohio, and there pa^s. ,i the remainder of 
their years. .Mrs. Wilson, who is the youngesl in a family of six, was born on 
the 23d of July, 1853, and as she was onlj a child of aboul five years when she 
came to Iowa with her parents has passed the greater part of her life ill this 

mediate vicinity. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson there were born three daughters, 

the youngesl ol wl Lillian P., died in childhood. Their first horn. Alma 

'I', married Robert W Icock, bj wh she has had son. Robert Wilson. 

now a lad of ten years, and is living in Milwaukee. Audrey I... their second 
daughter, became the wife of I. hud I.. Livingston, also of Milwaukee, and the} 
have one daughter Victoria Louise, who is nine years of age. 

Although seekers after truth, Mr and Mrs. Wilson have never identified them 
selves with any religii tion hut attend the services of all denominations 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES I'll 

Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Grand Army of the Republic. In polities he is a democrat, and although 
lie takes an active interesl in all local affairs he has never been Identified with 
the official life of the community. Nevertheless he is numbered among the 
enterprising and progressive citizens of Allerton, where during the thirty years 
of his residence he has never failed to accord his support to any movement which 
in his judgment would forward the intellectual, moral or material welfare of 
its citizens. 



DAVID I). STTUOUOX. 



One of the most successful agriculturists and stockmen of Wayne county is 
David D. Sturgeon, who resides on a farm of six hundred and eighty acres the 
greater part of which is located on sections 5 and 6 of Jackson township, and 
the remainder in Corydon township. He has long been a resident of Iowa. 
having settled here when this section of the state was largely undeveloped prai- 
rie and gave little promise of its future prominence as an agricultural district. 
Mr. Sturgeon was born in Centerville, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of .May, 1836, 
and is a son of Robert and Eliza (Rogers) Sturgeon. The parents, who we're 
horn, reared and married in the Keystone state, removed to Ohio in 18:3!), ami 
there resided for seventeen years. In LSf>6, they continued their journey west- 
ward to Appanoose county. Iowa, where they passed the remainder of their 
lives, the mother passing away in 1869, at the age of sixty-five years, while the 
father was eighty at the time of his death, his natal year being 1799. They 
were the parents of twelve children, our subject being the eighth in order of 
birth. 

David D. Sturgeon was a child of only three years when he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Ohio, and a youth of twenty when the family came 
to Iowa. In the acquirement of his education he first attended the district and 
public schools of Martinshurg, Ohio, completing his course of study in the 
academy at Chesterville, that state. At the age of seventeen years he laid aside 
Ins text-books and began his apprenticeship at the silversmith's trade. When 
he was twenty-one he identified himself with the commercial interests of Cen- 
terville, Iowa, where for twenty-five years he successfully engaged in the jev, 
elry business. Owing to failing eyesight at the expiration of that time he was 
compelled to seek another occupation and disposing of his store he came to 
Wayne county and bought a farm, and has ever since been engaged in general 
agricultural pursuits and stock-raising. He has directed his undertakings in 
a well organized, capable manner and has met with more than an average meas- 
ure of success, and now holds the title to three thousand acres of land, the 
greater portion of it being located in Wayne and Appanoose counties and the 
remainder in Missouri and Kansas. The land in his home place has a natural 
drainage and has been brought to a high state of productivity. The entire 
tract is fenced with barbed wire, and the improvements mi the place are consist- 
ent with the spirit of progress and enterprise he has always manifested as a 



212 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

business men. In connection with the cultivation of his fields he raises graded 
Jersey cattle and hogs for the markel and also horses and mules. 

In religious faith Mr. Sturgeon is a Methodist, and fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has passed through all 
the chairs and encampment. Dunn- the <'i\il war he volunteered liis services 
three times, bul was always rejected because of an injury he had sustained to his 
hand. Eowever, he wenl to the fronl to take care of a brother-in-law, who had 
previously joined the army and was ill. remaining in the south until the el 
of hostilities. IDs allegiance in matters politic Mr. Sturgeon gives I > the repub- 
lican party, bul has never been identified with official affairs. Be is interested 

in the Corydon Lumber C panj of Corydon, and is numbered among the sub 

stantial citizens of Wayne county, where he is accorded by all who know him the 

esteem and respecl ever extended to enterprising a of honorable and upright 

business methods. Mr. Sturgeon has been an interested observer of the pi 
ress and development of this section of Iowa, toward the advancement of which 
he lias contributed his quota both as a business man and agriculturist. When 
he first rami- here the country was bul sparsely settled, and the woods still 
abounded with wild game, deer being plentiful, while the settlers were com- 
pelled to protect their stock from the wolves. 



W I l.l.l AM E. WYATT 



William E. Wyatl is the owner of valuable property interests in Lucas 
county, owning one hundred and sixty acres of choice land in Union township 
besides a comfortable residence in Derby, where he makes his home, lie is n 
representative of one of the pioneer families of Iowa, having come to this 
county with his parents in 1853, but his birth i urred in Edgar county, Illi- 
nois. September 19, 1847. He is a son of s. Y. and Eliza i Scotl Wyatt, natives 
of Virginia, who made the overland .journey in 1853 and settled in Clark" 
county, Iowa, where they made their home for a number of years. Thej endure,] 
all of the hardships and difficulties of pioneer existence hut eventually devel- 
oped a well improved and productive farm. The father died in Clarke county 
at the age of eighty si\ and the mother passed awaj in Lucas county. They 
were the parents of ten children, of whom the following grew to maturity 
William 1-'... of this review; Jacob, who is engaged in farming in Union town 

ship: -lames, of .Montana; and Mrs. Electa -I; Wells, who lias passed awa\ 

William E. Wyatt grew to maul I on his father's farm in Franklin town 

ship. Clarke county, and then remained until he was twentj one years of a 
II- then married bul continued to reside in the vicinity, engaging in farming 
for a number of years. In 1883 he removed to Derbj and here he turned Ins 
attention to the general merchandise business, developing in the course of 
years a large ami important enterprise and building up an extensive patron 
age as result of his tine stoek of goods, his reasonable prices ami his honorable 

ami straightforward Imsiness methods Mr. Wyatt till conti a to make his 

home in Derbj and he is numbered todaj among the valued ami respected r 
dents mI' that city. lie owns a well furnished home here and one hundred and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 213 

sixty acres of land in Union township, to which he gives active and careful 
supervision. 

On the lOtli of December, 1868, Mr. Wyatt was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah J. Levally. who was horn in Eddyville, Iowa. December 19, 1818, a 
daughter of Henry and Mary (Tunks) Levally. the former of whom died in 
Eddyville. Iowa. The mother afterward moved to Union township, Lucas 
county, and settled on the farm now owned by the subject of this review. 
Upon this property she passed away in January, 1882. She and her husband 
became the parents of four children: Mrs. Phoebe Garland, who has passed 
away: Mrs. Martha Irvin, of Weldon, Iowa; Henry Benton, who enlisted from 
Lucas county for service in the Union army and died upon the battlefield; and 
Mrs. Wyatt. wife of the subject of this review. Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt have an 
adopted son. Lee W. Lugar, whom they took into their home at the age of 
eighteen months. A more extended mention of his career appears elsewhere 
in this work. 

Mr. Wyatt belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Yeomen in Derby and he and his wife are members of the Rebekahs. They are 
devout members of the Christian church at Last Chance. Both are representa- 
tives of well known families of this county and have an extensive acquaintance 
within its borders, their fine qualities of character having commanded the con- 
fidence and high regard of their fellow citizens. 



JOHN C. and W. J. FULLER. 

John C. Fuller, a native of Magog. Canada, where he was born September 
25, 1835, now lives retired in his comfortable home in Lucas after a long and 
active career as agriculturist, having followed farming in Lucas county since 
1872. His parents, Benjamin and Susan (Chapman) Fuller, were also natives 
of that country, where they passed away. The maternal ancestors originally 
came from the United States. 

John C. Fuller was reared under the parental roof in Canada, remaining 
in that country until he was twenty-eighl years of age, when in 1863 he removed 
to Illinois where he remained for nine years, following agricultural pursuils 
until in 1872 he came to Lucas county. Iowa, where he and his wife have resided 
since. They settled in Liberty township where he attained success, his inces- 
sant labor, energy and thorough methods bringing him prosperity. A few 
years ago he retired and purchased a comfortable home in Lucas, and there he 
spends his declining years in the enjoyment of a competence. 

On August 20, 1855, .Mr. Puller was united in marriage to .Miss Amelia Nel- 
son, who was also born in Canada mi Christmas day. 1835. She made the trip to 
Illinois with her husband in 1863, a journey which consumed eighteen days 
on account of inclement weather, and subsequently remained his true and faith- 
ful helpmate, sharing success and adversity alike. Her parents. Major General 
Manley Nelson, a well known officer, and Mrs. Belinda (Smith i Nelson, are 
both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Fuller became parents of ten children of whom 
the four eldest were burn in Canada, the next three in Illinois and the remain- 



214 l-l CAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

der in Lucas county. They are as follows: Lunette C, deceased; Ernest 
Elbert, who lias also passed away; Mrs. S. S. Compston, a residenl of North 
Platte, Nebraska; Manly J., residing in Lucas; (Mat' I'... who also makes his 
home in thai citj ; Berberl 1''.. of Bedford, Iowa; Eugene l>.. who passed away 
in June, 1891; Orris -1 - or Chariton; W. J., of Lucas; and Berl • '.. of Cres- 
ton. lliis stale 

(If this family \V. .1. Puller was horn in Lucas COUnty, Iowa. .May Hi. L874, 

ami there attended public scl Is and grew to manhood. He early became con 

aected with coal mining interests of Lucas and is thus identified a: tin- presenl 
time. Ilr was married, February 9, 1897, to .Miss l.ih Max Patterson, who was 
horn in Washington county, Ohio, May 7. 1880, and of her parentage more 
extended mention is made on another page of this volume under the caption 
•I. I >. Patterson. Unto Mr. and Mrs. \V. .1. Fuller were horn three children: 
(»na. born June 5, L899; Fleta, born in October, 1902; ami Zora Belle, horn 
February 27, 1907. All of these an- attending the public school in Lucas. Pub- 
lic-spirited and progressive Mr. Puller carries on the honorable traditions of 
tin- family ami is making' for himself a substantia] place in the community. 
Wherever known ho is highly respected ami esteemed and he and his wife are 
popular a Dg the younger residents of Lucas. 



EUGENE A SMITH. 



Eugene A. Smith is one of the extensive landowners of Lucas county, carry- 
on genera] Farming upon two hundred and forty acres in Washington town- 
ship and owning besides a half interest in three hundred acres in Benton township. 

He is still active in the c lud of his Parming interests bu1 resides in Russell, 

where he owns a modern and well furnished home. He was horn in Muskin- 
gum county, Ohio, April 2l'. 1859, and is a son oi Jacob and Emmeline (Vogel) 
Smith, the former a uative of Muskingum county, born in March, l s '_'7. and 

the lattei of Germany. The parents ved to Wapello county, Lowa, making 

the journey overland in L862, and they settled in Blakesburg, where they resided 
for some time. '*n the 26th of March, 1864, thej moved to Lucas count} and 
the father died on the farm uear Russell, on the 26th of April, 1890. The 
mother, who was broughl to America when she was a few months old, also 
passed away in this city. Eight children were born to their union: Augusta, 
the wife of Thomas ( '. Thome, a farmer in Union township; Mrs. Adelia Thorn 
brim, who was horn March 12, 1855, and who now resides in Des Moines, lowa; 
C l>.. win. was horn August 5, L857, and resides Hoar Russell; Eugene A., of 
this review; Mrs. Violet Coen, whose birth occurred February 15, 1861, and 
who makes her home in Alton. Iowa: Mrs. Adessa Plotts, who was horn January 
25, 1866 and who now resides in Mrs Moines; one who died in infancy unnamed; 
ami Algernon, who died at the age of two years. 

Eugene A. Smith was three years of age when he accompanied his parents 
on their overland journey to Iowa Hi came with them to Lucas count} m 
1864 and here acquired his .duration After laying aside his hooks he turned 
his attention to farming and tins occupation he has since Followed with gratify- 




EUGENE A. SMITH 









TOR, LENOX 

MDATiONS 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 217 

ing success. He owns today two hundred and forty acres in Washington town- 
ship, with a set of good improvements, and in conjunction with his brother 
C. D. Smith has three hundred acres of choice land in Benton township, this 
latter property being supplied with excellent barns and outbuildings and labor- 
saving machinery. .Mr. Smith resides in Russell, where he owns a comfortable 
home and where he has become widely and favorably known as a progressive 
business man and public-spirited citizen. 

On the 30th of September. 1885, Mr. Smith married Miss Carrie W. Lutz, 
who was horn in Bushnell, Illinois. May 14. 1863. She is a daughter of George 
and Elizabeth (Ewald) Lutz. natives of Germany, the former born in Bavaria, 
August 16. 1829, and the latter horn March 20. 1837. The father came to 
America in 1852 and the parents were married at Bushnell, Illinois, where they 
resided until 1884. coming in that year to Lucas county. Iowa, where the father 
engaged in farming. Both have passed away. George Lutz dying at Russell in 
the home of his daughter, Mrs. Smith, March 2, 11)0-1. having survived his wife, 
who died at Russell. February 3. 1902. Six children were born to their union: 
Nicholas, whose birth occurred January 15, 1861, and who died at Chariton, 
May 3, 1912; Mrs. Smith, wife of the subject of this review; John, who was 
born June 25, 1866. and who died at Macon, Missouri, April 20. 1888; George, 
who was born December 3, 1868, and who resides in South Dakota; Louis, who 
passed away at the age of six months; and Mrs. Elizabeth Blanchard, who was 
born October 12, 1876, and who resides in Chariton. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have 
become the parents of two sons; Guy Walter, who was born July 21, 1891, who 
graduated from the Russell hi>rh school and who is at present attending the 
Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines; and Howard Eugene, whose 
birth occurred January 14. 1896. and who is attending public school iu Russell. 

Mr. Smith is a democrat in his political beliefs and served for four years 
as a member of the school board and for a similar period of time on tin- city 
council. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of 
which he takes a prominent part. His life is at all times in harmony with his 
professions and those who know him entertain for him the highest regard because 
of his admirable qualities of heart and mind. 



FRED CALVIN WYATT. 

Fred Calvin Wyatt is well known in agricultural circles of Lvicas and Clarke 
counties as superintendent of his father's extensive farming interests and in 
business circles of Derby as a successful dealer in horses. He is a native son of 
this part of Iowa, born in Franklin township, Clarke county, April 10, 1875, 
his parents being Jacob B. and Dora E. (Wolverton) Wyatt, of whom extended 
mention is found elsewhere in this work. 

Fred Calvin Wyatt grew to manhood upon bis father's farm in Union town 
ship and acquired his primary education in the district schools, supplement- 
ing this by one and a half years at Simpson College at Indianola. For two 
years after beginning his independent career he was a clerk in Sutton's store 
in Derby, after which he formed a partnership with Mi-. Pollard under the linn 



218 LUCAS AM) WAYXK Col XTIF.S 

name of Wyatl & Pollard. The partners conducted a large and profitable mer 
cantile establishment in Derby for five years, after which Mr. Wolverton became 
connected with the concern and the name was changed to Wyatl & Wolverton. 
After a very successful business career Mr. Wyatl retired from the conducl of 
Ibis mercantile concern and turned bis attention to farming, operating an excel- 
led Iracl of land in Union township for three 3 ears thereafter. At the end of thai 
time, bowever, be returned to Derby, where his time is now fully occupied 
by bis duties of superintending his father's two hundred and forty acre farm 
in Franklin township, Clarke county, and his extensive interests as a horse 
dealer, he having through his energy, industry and sound judgment buill up a 
profitable patronage along this line. 

Fred Calvin Wyatl married .Miss Etessa < Johnson, who was horn in Derby, 
Iowa, and who grew to womanhood in this city, attending the common schools 
and supplementing this bj a course in the Conservatory of Music at [ndianola. 
Extended mention is made of ber parents on another page of this work in eon 
uei tion with the sketch of W. P. Wolverton. Mr. and Mrs. Wyatl have become 
the parents of three children: Marie, Dwighl and Elizabeth, all of whom 
were horn in Derby and are now attending public school in that city. .Mr. 
Wyatl gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and was elected 
township clerk hut could not qualify as he had removed his residence from the 
township. While making his home in Clarke county he served as a member 
of tiie hoard of education and is at present connected with the Derbj hoard. 
II.' and his wife are both representatives of pioneer families of Iowa and have 
an extensive acquaintance within the borders of Lucas county, where their 

main excellent traits of character are known and recognized. 



LIPUS HOLT 



The year 1856 marked the arrival of Lifus Holt in Iowa, for it was in that 

year that he located in Clarke county, becoming an early pi >er of this section 

of the state. He was hoiai in Martin county, Indiana. December 29, 1846, and 
when ten years old emigrated overland with his parents bj ox team to seek the 
broader opportunities of the yet undeveloped west. His parents were John 
and Ava (Kilgore) Holt, natives of Indiana, who were horn in 1824 ami 1 s°.7. 
pectively. During life the father followed agricultural pursuits and. eon 

quering pioneer conditions and overcoming hardships and obstacles, suci ded 

in establishing a profitable farming enterprise, passing awaj on January 2, 

1864, alter a useful life of onlj about forty years. The mother survived only 

w months, her death occurring in Lucas county in November of the same 

year. In their family were the following children: l.ifus. of this review J 

Allie Ferguson, of Si ounty, Iowa; Kellogg, of Fremont count} : Nelson, 

deceased; II. C., residing in Warren county; Mrs. Sarah Ann Felton, of New 
Virginia; Sterling II.. of Clarke county; and Mrs. Catherine Pennington, of 
i in, p Creek township The older children were horn in Indiana and the younger 

ones Hi Iowa. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 219 

Reared amid pioneer conditions, Lifus Holt received such educational advan- 
tages as the neighborhood afforded and early acquainted himself with agricul- 
tural labors by assisting his father with the work of the farm. II" steeled his 
spirit by hard work on the unbroken prairie and in wresting from the wilder- 
ness a verdant and fertile farm. No railroads were there at the time of his 
arrival and such conditions as surrounded him were of the most primitive kind. 
Indians were still plentiful and wild game often furnished the meat for the 
table. However, this hard school of experience formed a character which makes 
Lifus Holt respected and esteemed by all who know him and which was the 
foundation of his success. Today he owns eighty acres of choice land mi sec- 
tion 31, Otter Creek township, with a well appointed residence and substantial 
outhuildings, the appearance of his farm indicating the prosperity which has 
been his. 

In 1873 Mr. Holt was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Holt, who was 
born in Indiana. November 16, 1856. and in that state she grew to woman- 
hood. Her father, Henry Holt, was horn in Pennsylvania in 1830 and died 
in Indiana at the ripe old age of seventy-eight, in 1909. Her mother, Vina 
Ritchey) Holt, was horn in the latter state in 1835 and there died on April 
9, 1913, having reached the same age as her husband. Mrs. Lifus Holt has one 
half-brother, Henry Nichols, who resides in Indiana. Her other brothers and 
sisters were: Jacob, of Indiana; Mrs. Catherine Armstrong, deceased; Chris- 
topher, also of Indiana; Emma, deceased; Rowena, who has also passed away; 
Mrs. Alma Blackamore, of Indiana ; Doswell, also a resident of that state ; 
Mrs. Margaret Hall, of Mississippi; Mrs. Luella Cables, of New York; James, 
of Indiana; and George, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lifus Holt have five chil- 
dren: Mrs. Rowena Manley, horn December 21, 1874, of Otter Creek township; 
Henry, born May 1. 1876. of Lucas; John, whose birth occured January 21, 
1878. and who is also a resident of Lucas; Seymour, horn on Christmas day, 
1884, who assists his father in the work of the farm; and Mrs. Georgia A. 
Evans, born June 19. 1888. who resides in Jackson township. All of these 
children were born and reared in Otter Creek township and are common 
school graduates. 

In his political affiliations .Mr. Holt is a democrat and stanchly supports 
his party's candidates at the polls. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Christian Union church of Clarke county. He still is active in the operation 
of his eighty acre tract of valuable land on section 31, Otter Creek township, 
devoting his labors to its cultivation and contributing by his work to the agri- 
eultural advancement of the county. 



HENRY WESTFALL. 



A native of Union township. Lucas county, Henry West fall has practically 
passed his entire life in this vicinity, having been continually identified with 
agricultural interests either as an active agriculturist or in buying and silling 

live stock. He is a member of one of the oldest families of Union township and 
it has been that pioneer spirit which has made itself felt in his career and 



220 l.l CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

broughl him success. One hundred and sixty acres, verdanl and in good beai 
ing, stand as evidence of in. success .-in. I n,,i only prove the able management 
of liis private affairs bul represenl the pari he has taken in the general agricul- 
tural developmi nl of the section. Henrj Westfal] was bom in Union township 
on March 17. L866, a son of Granville and Jeannette Teal Westfall, tin- former 
a aative of Jackson county, Wesl Virginia, born March :;. 1829, and the latter 
born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, on October 26, 1830. In the fall of L849, 
among the earliest settlers, the parents came overland to Union township and 
there remained until their death. There were no railroads when they arrived in 
,,lls section and the prairie was yel unbroken, its vasl stretches peopled with 
Indians and wild game roaming afield. There they founded a home and with 

hardy, undi ted spiril underwenl the trying experiences of pioneers. In their 

family were fourteen children: .Mrs. Martha Troutman, born October 20, 1849, 
and a residenl of Union township; ('lark, whose birth occurred on Marcl 

1851, ami who passed awaj in the same township; David, born November 5, 

1852, who makes his home in fndianola, lnwa : Franklin, whose natal day 
November i'»i. 1854, ami who died in Walla Walla. Washington, on January 17. 
1885; Alfred, born November 1:;. ls:>h. who died in infancy; John 1'.. who 
was born December l'7. L857, ami resides in Le Roy, [owa; George, whose bit 
day is Pebruarj L5, I860, a residenl of Derby, this state; Mrs Flora Kyner, 
horn November 28, 1861, of Humeston, Iowa; Mrs. Victoria Kyner, born l 
ruary 25, 1864, of Eumeston, [owa; Benry, of this review; Justin, born April 
(i. l.siiS, win. makes his home in Derby, where lie is manager of a large lumber 
yard an. I of whom more extended mention is made in another pari of this work; 
Lucinda, horn November 2, L870, who died December 26, 1885; Jo Ann. who 
was horn December -'•'!. 1871, ami died before she reached her firsl birth 
anniversary, on Augusl 29, 1872; an, I Charles, also deceased. .Mrs. Troutman 

was horn in Mom sounty, towa, hut all the younger children were natives 

of Union township, Lucas county. Granville Westfall passed away in Jack 

county, West Virginia, while on a visit on December 17. 1891, in Ins 

sixtj second year, his wife having pr ded him in death aboul six years, her 

demise occurring in I oion township on November 25, L885. They were among 
tin' highly respected people of their localitj and enjoyed the confidence ami 
id will of their friends ami neighbors. 

Ileinw Westfall was rear.. I ler the parental roof ami early guided bj 

Ins parents along the righl way to success by having instilled into him the value 
of those fundamental virtues which make a man respected by his fellows. ||, 
attended the common schools in Ins township ami there grew to manhood, becom- 
ing acquainted with thorough agricultural methods under the able guidance of 
his father. However, he did not take up immediatelj th.- active cultivation of 
land hut for eleven years was engaged in the buying ami se|| m .j of live stock 
in Derby, his endeavors being mel with gratifying results, lie now owns one 
hundred ami sixty acres of choice land, in Union township, under high culti- 
vation ami improved with substantial buildings. Following progressive methods, 

he has s seeded in making Ins farn ■ of the mosl valuable properties in his 

locality and can look with pride upon his achievement. 

On January 2, 1895, Mr. Westfall was unite. I in marriage to Mis. Rose 
Clarke, a native ..f In. liana, horn April 22, l s 7.">. Her family came subse 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 221 

quently to Lucas county, Iowa, where they Located near Chariton. Her parents 
had eleven children: [da, deceased; Oliver, a resident of Osceola, Iowa; Mrs. 
Mertie Rich, of Muskogee. Oklahoma; Mrs. Mary .Martin, residing in Chariton, 
Iowa; Frank, of St. Joseph. .Missouri; Mrs. Henry Westfall, of Union township; 
Mrs. Nettie Swisher, of Riehman township, Wayne county, Iowa; Ray, of IIol- 
brook, Nebraska: Arthur, of Omaha, that state: Fred, who makes his home in 
Los Angeles. California; and Leo, who resides with Mr. and Mrs. Westfall. The 
six older children of this family were born in Indiana, the succeeding four in 
Lucas county and the youngest in Clarke county. 

In political matters Mr. Westfall takes the interest of an active, earnest 
citizen and voter and is a democrat. He is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and also belongs to the Rebekah lodge of Derby, of which his 
wife is likewise a member. He also holds membership with the Modern Wood 
men of America in Derby. A forceful element in his community, Mr. Westfall 
has been a strong factor in the advancement of his section and has ever been 
as considerate of the public interests as of his own prosperity. He is therefore 
highly respected ami esteemed and there are many who are proud to call him 
friend. 



ALFRED D. McCULLOCH. 

Humeston numbers among its most public-spirited, active and progressive 
citizens the present postmaster, A. D. McCulloch, who since 1906 has been 
acceptably discharging the duties of his office. Since 1888 he has been a resident 
of the city and during the intervening period has been carried forward by the 
force of his ability and energy into important relations with the general busi- 
ness life of the community in which he has been an active force and a domi- 
nating factor. 

Mr. McCulloch was born in Holmes county. Ohio. January 24, 1851, a son of 
Joseph and Nancy (Miller) McCulloch. natives of Pennsylvania, the former of 
whom died in Ohio at an early date. The mother long survived her husband, 
passing away in that state at the age of seventy-nine. In their family were 
fourteen children: One who died in infancy; Hugh, deceased; James, who died 
in Oskaloosa. Iowa: .Miller R., who was a captain in the Second Kentucky Cav- 
alry ami was killed a1 the battle of Murfreesboro in the Civil war; David and 
Mrs. Nancy Jane Painter, who have also passed away; Albertus P.. a veteran of 
the Civil war, who served during that conflict as ;i member of an Ohio regiment ; 
Mrs. Martha Ann Sherlock, residing in Indiana: Joseph, who died in infancy; 
George, a prominent physician of Humeston; Alfred I)., of this review; Joseph 
C. whose home is in Cleveland, Ohio: Mrs. Ella Slagie, of Millersburg, Ohio; 
ami Isaac, who died at Hrooklyn, Iowa. 

In the acquirement of an education Alfred D. McCulloch attended the public 
schools in Holmes county and there grew tn manhood. After laying aside Ids 
books he followed farming and engaged extensively in stock shipping for a 
number of years, varying his activities at times by teaching school. In 1888 
he came with his family to Humeston. Towa, where lie has since resided. For 



222 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

some time be assisted his brother, Dr. George McCulloch, in the management of 
farming lands and in this waj acquired valuable property holdings, owning at 
the presenl time four hundred acres in this locality, three hundred and twenty 
acres in Union township, Wayne county, and eighty acres in Richman township, 
this county, all with good improvements. Afterward Mr. McCulloch of this 
review became interested in dealing in live stork ami for a oumber of years 
shipped high-grade horses, cattle, hogs and sheep to the eastern markets, whi 
his animals commanded a high price and a readj sale. In 1893 he entered the 
hardware field and remained in thai connection until 1911, making his business 
one of the mosl progressive enterprises in tin- town. In 1896 he was elected 

sheriff of Way] unty ami since that time has been innuentiallj con :ted 

with local public life, evidencing in this relation loyalty, patriotism ami con- 
scientiousness of a high order. For one term In- was justice of tin- peace and 
for soiih' time a member of the town council, resigning the latter office when he 
was appointed to his present position of postmaster. He has served creditably 
in this office since April. 1906, fulfilling his duties in a systematic, capable and 
efficient manner. .Mr. McCulloch has extensive property interests in Bumeston, 
owning a beautiful and well furnished home in a tine residence district and 

being the proprietor also of the building in which the postoffice is located. He 

is interested as a stockholder in the Alhrton State Bank, of which lie has been 
a director since its organization, lie is a man of keen business ability, resoui 
ful. capable and energetic, and his qualities of initiative and independence have 

ever 1 manifested in the excellent results he has achieved. 

In Holmes county, Ohio, .Mr. McCulloch was united in marriage to .Miss 
Rosa A. Finley, who was horn in that section, a daughter of David and Nancy 
(Elliott) Pinley, natives of Ohio. In this familv were six children : Mrs. Celia 
Gray, residing in ETellerton, Iowa; Calvin, whose home is at Cleveland, Ohio; 
Oliver, of Millersburg, Ohio; Rosa A., the wife of the subject of this review; 

Elmer, also a resident of Millersburg, Ohio; and Mrs. Iila Farver, who has 

passed away. All of these children were horn in Holmes county, Ohio. Mr. 
ami .Mrs. McCulloch have four children. Bert, horn in Holmes county, Ohio, 
was graduated from the Corydon high school and is now acting as cashier oi 

the Home Savings Bank at llumesion. Harry I . whose birth also occurred 

in Holmes COUnty, was graduated from the [owa State College at Ames and is 

now practicing as a veterinary surgeon at New Sharon. Iowa Nannie I)., a 

native of Wayne county, attended the State Teachers' College at Cedar Kalis 

and Drake University of Des Moines and tor the past tine,' years has heen 
teaching in the primary department of the Humeston public schools. Franklin, 

who completes the family, is attending high scl I in Humeston. 

.Mr. McCulloch has extensive fraternal relations, being a member of Fidelity 
Lodgi . No 288, I-'. & A, M . to which Ins two oldest sous also belong He holds 
membership in the chapter at Corydon, tin- commandery at Centerville and is 
affiliated also with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine He belongs to Chappaqua 
Lodge, I. 0. 0. I-'., of Humeston, ami Blue Grass Camp, Modern Woodmen 
oi' America Hi has gained a position of distinction in the latter organization 

and at om tune served as delegate to the head camp at Indianapolis. Indiana. 

He is also a member of the Feomen of Humeston and both he and Mrs. McCul 
loch belong to tin- Order of tic Eastern star, she having been worthj matron 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES l>l>:; 

for three terms. Mr. McCulloch gives his allegiance to the republican party 
and has been active in support of its principles and policies for many years. No 
movement for the public good seeks his aid in vain and he has never shirked 
the responsibilities of citizenship, working loyally always for the good of his 
community. Especially is he interested in school matters and his business ability 
has been a helpful factor in the cause of school expansion, for he was president 
of the board of education when the present school building was completed. He 
is the oldest business man in Ilumeston, as well as one of the leading and repre- 
sentative ones and his ability has been broadened and developed by travel 
through all parts of the United States. He is interested in history and has 
made it his aim to visit points of historic interest. Being in all things broad- 
minded and liberally cultured, he is an upright and straightforward business 
man and a kindly and courteous gentleman. 



WILLIAM II. CONNER. 

William II. Conner, a veteran of the Civil war and for twenty-five years 
actively and prominently connected with agricultural interests of Union township, 
is living retired in Derby, having won rest and leisure by earnest and straight- 
forward labor in the past. He was born in Preston county, West Virginia, 
September 8, 1839, and is a son of Job and Nancy (McNier) Conner, the former 
a native of Preston county and the latter of Pennsylvania. The parents journeyed 
overland in 1855 and settled in Union township, Lucas county, where they 
remained for a number of years. The father died in Indiana at the age of 
forty years and the mother passed away in Union township in 1861 when she 
was fifty years of age. Eight children were born to their union : Mrs. Margaret 
Clymer, deceased; Alfred, who resides in Derby; Elizabeth, who has passed 
away; William II.. of this review; Harrison, deceased; Lucy Ann, who died at 
the age of eighteen; a son who died in infancy; and John who died when six 
years of age. With the exception of the youngesl all of these children were 
born in West Virginia. 

William II. Conner spent his childhood and early youth in Indiana, and there 
acquired a common school education. At the age of sixteen he came overland with 
his parents and settled in Union township in 1855. He afterward removed to In- 
diana and from that state enlisted in Company D, Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteers, 
Thirteenth Army ( lorps, Infantry, for service in the ( livil war. He participated in 
many of the important engagements on the southern battle fields and was wounded 
at Champion Hills. On the 5th of April, 1865, he was mustered ou1 with honorable 
discharge and returned to Indiana, where he continued to reside until 1869. In 
that year he removed to Union township, Lucas county, and turned his attention 
to farming. Upon a fine property of eighty aires, which he still owns. In- 
carried on general agricultural pursuits and stock-raising, winning in the course 
of years success, prominence and substantial fortune. Tn 1893, having acquired 
a comfortable competency, he retired from active life and moved into a modern 
and well furnished home in Derby, where he and his wife are spending their 



224 LUCAS AND WAYNE (.'OIWTIES 

declining years in the resl and comforl which they have won by a long period 
nf earnesl labor. 

in Logansport, Indiana, September 1. 1869, Mr. Conner was united in mar- 
riage i" Miss Sarah .Marshall, who was born in Carroll county, Indiana. May 
20, L850. She is a daughter of John Hanks ami Margarel (Kendall) Marshall, 
who wenl as pioneers to Ohio and emigrated to Monroe county, Indiana, at an 
earlj date. Mrs. Conner lived in Carroll county, until sin- was fifteen years 
of age ami thru removed to Cass county, in the same stair, where she resided 
until her marriage, she is one of a family of eleven children, as follows: Mrs. 
Mary Brown; George, who resides in Logansport, Indiana: Mrs. Susanna Chord, 
also of Logansport; Mrs. Conner, wife of the subjeel of this review; .lames J. 
and Mrs. ( landace • Iragin, both of Logansport. All the other children in iliis fam- 
ily dad in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Conner have become the parents of four 
children, all born in Wayne countj : John, whose birth occurred June 15, 1870, 
and who now resides in Montrose, Colorado; Charles, who was born April lit. 
1s7l'. and who lives in Union township; Mrs. Margarel Sidebottom, who was 
horn May 22, 1877, and who makes her home in Lucas county; and Bruce, who 
was born Ma\ •-!•_'. 1889, and who died July 23, liX'ii. He was -rifted with an 
unusual talent for painting and music and two of Ins pictures which hang in the 
Conner home in Derby show rare promise along this line. Be was just entering 
upon a career which undoubtedly would have led to prominence and distinction 
had it not been rut short by his untimely death. 

Mis. Conner is a member of the Presbyterian church and is a lady of many 
excellenl qualities of mind and character, highly esteemed ami respected in the 
city where she makes her home. Mr. Conner is connected with the local posl 

of tie- Grand Army of the Republic and thus keeps in touch with his nrades 

of fifty years ago. His political allegiance is given to tin- republican partj and 
he was for three years supervisor of I. mas county, discharging his duties in 
ilns responsible position in a creditable and able way. He is a man of many 
sterling traits of character, able in business ami progressive in citizenship, ami 
his success is well deserved for it has been well earned ami is always worthily use, I. 



JAMES NEWTON JEFFRIES 

•lames Newton Jeffries has been a resident nf Wayne countj Bince 1866 ami 

sn that time has been accounted one of the greatest forces in promoting 

progress, having made substantia] contributions t" the development of farming 
ami stock-raising interests He is todaj a large buyer, seller an. I shipper of 
live stock ami is in addition presidenl of the Russell state Bank, holding a 
position of precedence in financial circles, lie was horn in Montgomery county. 
Kentucky, April H>. 1847 a son of John and Elizabeth J. (McCormick Jeffri 
the former horn near Nicholasville, Kentucky, and the latter in Montgomery 
county. The father died September 20, 1861, at the hands of the bushwhackers 
He was an ardent northern sympathizer and was recruiting for the Twentj 
fourth Kentucky Infantrj when he was killed His wife passed awaj n. Wayne 
county, Iowa. Six children were horn to their union. -as follows: Mrs. Marj 



a 




JAMES V. .1KKFKIKS 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 22 



27 



Frame, deceased ; Mrs. Nancy Willoughby, who died at .Mount Sterling, Ken- 
tucky, m 1912; W. T.. who passed away in Los Angeles, California; -lames N., 
of this review; .Mrs. Ruth Adcoek, of Confidence, Wayne county; and Mrs. 
Margaret Bowie, of Corydon. These children were all born and reared in 
Kentucky. 

James Newton Jeffries acquired his education in the public schools of Mont- 
gomery comity and there remained until 1.S65. In that year he moved to 
Wright township, this county, where he remained for a short time, returning to 
Kentucky and remaining one year. At the end of that time he came again to 
Wayne county and he has been a continuous resident of this locality since. 
During the intervening years he has engaged in farming, stock-raising and 
stock buying and shipping, but he now concentrates his attention upon the 
latter line of work, controlling a large and important patronage. <>n the 1st 
of April. 1908, he became connected with financial interests of Russell when 
he was elected president of the Russell State Hank, a position which he occupies 
at the present time. This is one of the strongest moneyed institutions in this 
part of Iowa, capitalized at twenty-five thousand dollars and doing a general 
banking business. P. A. Rockey is cashier and Mr. Jeffries' son Homer assist- 
ant cashier. As its president Mr. Jeffries occupies a responsible and important 
position and one which makes continual demands upon his energy, resourceful- 
ness and judgment. He has proved eminently well qualified for its duties and 
has already accomplished a great deal of farsighted and capable work. 

In Wayne county Mr. Jeffries married Miss Ethelinda Reynolds, who was 
born in Oquawka, Henderson county. Illinois, the only daughter of Thomas 
Reynolds, of that locality. Mrs. Jeffries passed away in Wayne county, October 
25. 1898, leaving the following children: Edward, who was born August 23, 
1878, and who resides in Wright township, on the old Reynolds homestead; 
Roy, horn the 23d of October, 1880. who resides near Russell ; John, of Wright 
township; Mrs. Leora Van Benthusan, who was born August 3, 1884, and 
who resides on the home farm on section 10, Wright township ; Thomas, who 
was born July 31, 1886, and who resides in Cedar township; and Homer, who 
was born August 9, 1889, and who is now assistant cashier of the Russell State 
Bank. All of these children were born in Wayne county. Edward and John 
took a commercial course in Quincy, Illinois, and Homer was graduated from 
the Russell high school in 1908. He is a member of Russell Lodge, No. 337, 
I. 0. O. F. In November, 1900, Mr. Jeffries was again married, his second 
wife being Mrs. Elzina G. McKinley, a native of Ohio who came to Iowa with 
her parents in early times. She had three children by her former marriage, 
as follows: Mrs. Bertha Johnson, born in January, 1874, residing on the home 
farm in Washington township; Ernest, born December "-'2. 1 s 7 7 . who lives in 
Kansas: and Aha. born December 2<i. 1884, who died in Quincy. Illinois. 

Mr. Jeffries is a member of the Masonic lodge of Promise City. He is a 
democrat in his political beliefs and has served as assessor of Wrighi townbip, 
being at all times interested in public affairs, and cooperating heartily in move 
ments to advance genera] progress ami growth. During the many years he has 
lived in this section of the state he has accumulated valuable property interests, 
owning eighty acres of choice land in Wright township, Wayne county, and two 
hundred thirteen and a half acres in Cedar township, Lucas county, besides a 

Vol 11—12 



228 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

well furnished home in Russell. A residenl of Wayne county sine 1866, be has 
become widelj and favorably known and his enviable standing in the com 
munity is the direel resull of his anquesti id integrity and Ids bonorable busi- 

m ss methods. 



JESSE E. SCOTT. I). I), s. 

Dr. Jesse E. Scott, who for the pasl four years has been engaged in 
practice of dentistry in Seymour, is discharging Ids duties with a sense of 
conscientious obligation and has won for himself a foremost place in profes- 
sional circles of this pari of the state. He was born in Wapello county, Iowa, 
in 1SSS and is a son ol ft I., and Eva i Winslow Scott, both natives of 'his 

state. His grandfather, Jesse Scott, was a native of Ohio and a pioneer in 

Iowa and spent a ureal many years of his life in Wapello county. On the 
maternal side Dr. Scott is a descendant of Jordan Winslow, of England. The 
father of our subjed is well known in business circles of Parson, where for 
many years be conducted a general merchandise store and where he is now 
living retired. To him and his wife were horn three children: Jesse E., of 
this review; Hampton, deceased; and Mary, who married Charles Baughn. 

Dr. Scott acquired his early education in the public schools of Ins native 
section and afterward studied bis profession at the Keokuk Dental College. 
He was graduated from this institution with the degree of D. D. S in 1908 
and afterward Located for practice in Eeosauqua, where be spent two ye; 

He came to Sej ur in 1910 and has since buill up a libera] patronage here. 

lie has gained recognition as of the able and successful dentists in the 

city and by his well directed work, his high professional attainments and 
his sterling characteristics has justified the respect and confidence in which 
he is held by his fellow citizens and the local public. He belongs to the 
Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge, and Ins political allegiance 

is given to the de iratic party. He keeps in touch with the advancement 

,d' his profession through his membership in the Psi Omega dental fraternity 
and also through indefatigable research and investigation. Although still a 
very young man he enjoys a large practice and is a progressive citizen and 

one whose position in the community is enviable, as tic expressii f public 

opinion regarding him is altogether favorable. 



JOHN T HINCHLIFF 

John T. Hinchliff, who has I n activelj and successfully identified with 

icultural interests in Wayne county lor more than a third of a century. 
Owns and operates an excellent farm of three hundred acres on sect,, , ns 15 and 

16, ftichman township, adjoining the town of Humeston. His birth occurred m 
Oswego county, New Fork, on the L9tfa of April. 1851, his parents being .lames 
and I'.etsx (Smith Hinchliff, both of whom were natives of England The 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



229 



lather was born in Lancaster on the 18th of March, 1825, while the mother's 
birth occurred in Yorkshire on the 30th of November, 1821. James "Hinchliff, 
who crossed the Atlantic to the United States when a young man of twenty- 
four years, was married in New York about 1850 and subsequently removed to 
Illinois, taking up his abode in Knox county, thai state, in 1851. He followed 
general agricultural pursuits for twenty-two years and on the expiration of thai 
period turned his attention to the hardware and lumber business. His demise 
occurred at Rio, Knox county, Illinois, on the 19th of August . 1901. I lis wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Betsy Smith, emigrated to America about 184!) 
and settled at New York Mills. She passed away in Knox county, Illinois. 
September 11. 1893. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hinchliff were born the following 
children: John T.. of this review; J. E., whose birth occurred on the 17th of 
July, 1853, and who passed away at Galesburg, Illinois, March 28, 1909; Amos, 
born September 5, 1855, who is a resident of Rio. Illinois; Winfield S.. born 
January 30, 1858, living at New Plymouth. Idaho; and Elmer Ellsworth, born 
May 6, 18(31, who died December 19, 18(32. at the age of one and a half years 
With the exception of the first named all of the above children were born in 
Illinois. 

John T. Hinchliff, who was but six months old when taken by his parents 
to Knox county. Illinois, there grew to manhood. In 187(3 he came to Wayne 
county, Iowa, purchased a farm in Riehman township and began its operation. 
Agricultural pursuits have claimed his attention continuously since and he 
now owns a farm comprising three hundred acres of valuable land on sections 
15 and 16. The property is lacking in none of the conveniences and improve- 
ments of a model farm of the twentieth century, and the well tilled fields annually 
yield golden harvests in return for the care and labor which is bestowed upon 
them. Mr. Hinchliff owns an attractive and commodious home and is widely 
recognized as one of the prosperous and esteemed citizens of his community. 

On the 17th of August. 1<S7(>, Mr. Hinchliff was united in marriage to .Miss 
Altha S. Thompson, who was born in Mercer county. Illinois, on the 17th of 
August, 1857, and there grew to womanhood. Her parents were Edgar and 
Mary I. (Chance) Thompson, the former born in Tazewell county, Illinois, on 
the 10th of March, 1825, and the latter on the 31st of August, 1828. Edgar 
Thompson died in 1897 but is still survived by his widow, who makes her 
home at Brush, Colorado. Their children were as follows: .Mrs. Mary I. Crosby, 
born November 30, 184(3, who is deceased: Sylvester, who was born on the Kith 
of December, 1850, and resides at Rio. Illinois; Mrs. Altha Hinchliff; Jeptha 
Cora, whose birth occurred on the 2d of February. 1860, and who is a resident 
of Rio. Illinois; Edward Dora, who was born on the 7th of December, 1862, and 
died in infancy. Mrs. Esther Luella Johnson, who was bom on the 23d of 
March, 18(34, and passed away in 1902; and Mrs. Lois Almira Epperson, whose 
birth occurred on the 3d of November, 1866, and who resides at Brush, Colorado. 
All of the above named were born in Mercer county, Illinois, and were reared 
in Mercer and Knox counties, of thai state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hinchliff have six children, all natives of Riehman township. 
Wayne county. Iowa. Orin C, whose birth occurred on the 21st of August, 
1877, is a graduate of the Humeston high school and now assists his father in 
the operation of the old home farm. At the time of the Spanish-American 



230 LUCAS AMi WAYNE COUNTIES 

war In' enlisted Eor service in Company II. Fiftieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. 
Dr. James Einchliff, whose natal day was December 7. 1879, was graduated 
from the Bumeston high school with the class of I s ' 1 - and from the Keokuk 
College of Physicians and Surgeons with the 'lass of L904. Be was married to 
Ethel Crawford of Bumeston, Iowa. December 13, 1906, and they have one 
daughter, Dorothy. Be is now successfully engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine a1 Minburn, Iowa. Airs Edna May Morford, who was horn on the 25th 
of May. iss:i, and obtained her education in the Bumeston hisih s.-hool and 
Drake University at Des Moines, is now a residenl of Richman township. She 
is the wife of W. C. Morford and thej are the parents of one daughter, .Mildred. 
Mary Mabel, whos.- birth occurred on the 31s1 of October, l s >o. was graduated 
from the Bumeston high school with the class of 1904 and Eor the pasl eight 
years lias taughl in the public schools of Bumeston. Frederick and Florence, 
twins, were horn on the 6th of June, 1890, and were graduated from the Bumes- 
ton high school as members of the same class in 1909. Frederick is now engaged 
in business at Quincy, I llinois. 

.Mr. Binehliff gives his political allegiance to the democracy and his fellow 
townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, have railed him to positions 
trust, lie has been a member of the board of education for sixteen years and 
has also served as township clerk, assessor, trustee and justice of the peace, dis- 
charging his duties in these various connections in an efficient and commend- 
able manner. Fraternally he is identified with the .Masons, belonging to Fidelity 
Lodge, No. 228, A. F. & A. M„ of Bumeston, of which he has been master for 
four years. Be is likewise a member of the Eastern Star at Bumeston, of 
which his wife is past worthj matron. Mrs. Binehliff also belongs to the Con 

gational church at Bumeston. They are widely known and highly esteemed 
and their upright, honorable lives have been a powerful influence for good in 
the community. 



•KM IN .1. GEORGE. 



Union township numbers among its valued and worthy residents. John -l 

ge, who came to this pari of Iowa in 1873. Since thai time his energetic 

public spirit and his loyalty in citizenship have been fell as forces in polities 
ami in the promotion of progressive public projects, and his labors in the culti 
vation of his fine farm on section _'l as elements in agricultural development. 

and he stands 1 1 ,, l.i y ; g tin- men of marked ability and substantial worth 

in this community. Be was horn in Bristol county, Massachusetts, Februarj 
in. 1848, and is a s,i M of Henry and Sarah Bartlej George, natives of 
England, the former horn in Nottingham, May I. 1818, and the latter in Stock 
port, May 24, Of the same year, this being also the anniversary of the birth of 
Queen Elizabeth. The parents came to America at an early date and settled 
for a time in Massachusetts, whence thej came wesl in W> s . locating in flock 
Island county, Illinois. After tw.. years thej moved to Mercer county, in the 
same state, settling in Union township. Lucas county, in I s 7.:. The father's death 
i lined iii I >• rh\ Be had been trained to the mechanic's trade in England 



I.I CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 231 

and knew nothing of fanning when he turned his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits in Rock Island county, Illinois, but he made up for defects in skill by 
industry, perseverance and determination and in time became one of the sub- 
stantial and prosperous men of this community. His wife has also passed away, 
her death having likewise occurred in Derby. They were the parents of four 
children, all born in Massachusetts: John .1., of this review; Albert L., who 
was born February 26, 1851. and who died in Lucas county. 1906; Frank H., 
whose birth occurred August 4. 1854. and who resides in Archie. .Missouri; and 
Rowland F., who has passed away. 

John J. George was ten years of age when he left Massachusetts and came 
with his parents to Rock Island county, Illinois, and he accompanied them in 
their later removals, coming to Union township. Lucas county, in 1873. Since 
that time he has remained an honored and respected resident of this part of 
Iowa and the section owes a great deal of its development and growth along 
agricultural lines to his energy and well directed labors. In addition to a 
comfortable and well furnished home in Derby he owns one hundred and forty- 
five acres of choice land on section 24. Union township, and gives a great deal 
of time to its management, its excellent condition at the present time reflect inu- 
tile many years of careful supervision and practical labor which have been 
spent upon it. .Mr. George is numbered among the progressive and substantial 
agriculturists of this locality and while promoting his individual prosperity 
has made substantial contributions to general agricultural development. 
It is not alone along this line however that Mi'. George has done splendid 

work for Union township, for since taking up his residence here he has 1 n 

active in politics and his name stands today for all that is progressive and 
public-spirited in matters of citizenship. For a number of years he has served 
as justice of the peace and during his term of office has tried two hundred and 
fifty-seven cases without having one appealed. He has been a memher of the 
Derby school board and was for nine years president of that body, the cause 
of education finding in him an earnest and able champion. He was appointed 
notary public by Governor Sherman and served two terms as mayor of Derby, 
giving to the city a constructive, efficient and businesslike administration. Move- 
ments looking towards the permanent interests of his township and county never 
seek his aid in vain and he is always to be found among the leaders in the pro- 
motion of progressive public projects. 

In Mercer county, Illinois, on the 5th of November, 1871, .Mi-. George was 
united in marriage to Miss Sarah Dunn, who was there born on the 8th of May. 
1851. She died in Derby on the 12th of December. 11)04. To this union were 
born seven children: Elsie E., who was born August 5, 1872. and died in 
Derby; Mrs. Celia W. Conner, who was born February 15, 1874. now residing 
in Union township; Mrs. Bertha Shelton, whose birth occurred February 26, 
1876, and who resides in Chariton, Iowa; W. Benjamin, who was born February 
19, 1879. engaged in the barber business in Derby; Charlie II., who was born 
August 29. 1884. and who has passed away; Loy H., who was born May 20, 1894, 
and Homer D., born December 8, 1895, both of whom are assisting their father 
with the operation of the homestead. 

On the 1st of January. 1906, .Mr. George was again married, his second 
union being with Sophia Johnson, who was born in Rock Island county, Illinois. 



232 li CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Maj 1". L867, a daughter of Robert and .Mary Jane Johnson, the former a 
native of Ireland and the Latter of lllim)is. Both * 1 i * •« I in Rock Island count} 
They had four children: Mrs. George, the wife of the subject of this review; 
Robert J., a residenl of Rock Lsland county, Illinois; John W.. also of Rock 

Island county; and .Mrs. Lizzie Backs, of Montezuma, Iowa. .Mrs. George lias 
been twice married and has two children by her Eormer union, she and her 
husband have become the parents of a sun. Russell J., who was born November 
22, 11)06. 

Mr. George is a member of the Methodisl Episcopal church of Derby and 
fraternally is connected with the Yeomen Lodge. For thirty-one years he belonged 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and was well known in the affairs of 
the Local branch of thai organization. Be is fond of the besl Literature and is 
a u ide reader, the Library in his home containing a large and well selected assort 
mem of hooks. A progressive, public-spirited and representative citizen, he 
has worked unselfishly for the best interests of the community and has placed 
them always before personal benefit. In the township where he has so Long 
resided he has become widelj and favorably known, his success commanding 
the respecl of his associates and his sterling qualities of character winning him 
the esteem and good-will of his many friends. 



WALTER P. WOLVERTON. 

Walter P. Wolverton, a successful and representative citizens of Derby, Ls 
actively engaged in the real-estate and insurance business and also superintends 
the operation of his farm of Eour hundred ami eight} acres in Franklin township, 
Clarke county. His birth occurred in thai township on the 14th of December, 

1876, his parents being John and Rel a -lane (Swinehart) Wolverton, both 

natives of Ohio. The father was born in Sycamore on the 14th of February, 

1829, while the mother's natal day was .1 29, L833. In 1853 they took up 

their abode among the pioneer residents of Decatur county, Iowa, settling on 
a farm three miles wesl of Garden Grove, where John Wolverton followed general 
agricultural pursuits for one season. Thej then resided on a farm uortheasl 
of Garden Grove for four years and then purchased a trad of land in Clarke 
county which is still in possession of the family. They made their home thereon 

until 1896 and ii.\1 removed to Le lo'.v. where they remained until 1904 111 

thai year thej took up their abode in Derby, where John Wolverton passed 
away December 17. 1907. His widow now makes her home with her son Walter. 
They were the parents of six children, as follows: Mrs. Margarel dam- Canfield, 

who was horn on the 10th of May. 1853, and passed awav in 1878 J Louise 

horn Januarj 7. 1855, whose demise occurred on the 9th of January of that 
year; Mrs Dora B. Wyatt, who was born on the Ith of May. 1856, and resides 
in Derby; Samuel Byron, horn June 30, 1859, who is deceased; John K.. whose 
birth occurred April 15, 1870, and whose residence is at Stoutsville, Missouri; 

and Walter I'., of this review. The ahow named wire all horn and reared in 
Iowa. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 233 

Walter P. Wolverton grew to manhood in Clarke county, attending the eommon 
schools in the acquirement of an education and also pursuing his studies in 
Simpson College for a year. He was a young man of twenty years when the 
family home was established in Le Roy, and in 1899 he came to Derby, here 
being engaged in the mercantile business for five years. Subsequently he spent 
a year on the old homestead in Clarke county and dun returned to Derby to 
embark in the real-estate and insurance business, in which he has been successfully 
engaged to the present time. In addition to his modern and commodious residence 
at Derby he owns a well improved farm of four hundred and eighty acres of 
rich and productive land in Franklin township, Clarke county, superintending 
ils operation in connection with his other business interests. 

On the Tth of June, 1898, at Derby, Iowa, Mr. Wolverton was united in 
marriage to Miss Anna 0. Johnson, who was born in that town on the 25th 
of June, 1879, grew to womanhood in Union township and acquired her education 
in the public schools here. Her parents. A. C. and Gustave (Brown) Johnson, 
are natives of Sweden, the former born on the 29th of September, 1848, and 
the latter on the 30th of September, IS 17. A. G. Johnson crossed the Atlantic 
to the United States in 1869 and from .May until November of that year resided 
in Chicago. He then took up his abode in Lucas county, Iowa, and has remained 
within its borders continuously since, having been engaged in the shoemaking 
and harness-making business at Derby to the present time. Unto him and his 
wife were born the following children : .Mrs. Ellen Marie Wyatt, who is deceased; 
Mrs. P. C. Wyatt. of Derby; Charles J., who was born in 1876 and resides in 
Derby; Mrs. Anna Wolverton; one who has passed away: and David E.. who 
makes his home in Derby. All of these children were born and reared in Lucas 
county. Mr. and .Mrs. Wolverton have three children, namely: Mona Marie, 
whose birth occurred on the 3d of September, 1899; Thurman J., born July 
28.19(12; and Pauline, whose natal day was December 1, 1904. All are natives 
of Derby and are now attending the public schools of that town. 

Mr. Wolverton is a stanch republican in politics ami has served as a member 
of the town council and in the capacity of town clerk for a number of years. 
He has been a member of the school board for four terms and is serving thereon 
at the present time. Mi-. Wolverton and his family belong to the Presbyterian 
church at Derby. Doth he and his wife have spent their entire lives in this 
section of the state and have a circle of friends which is almost coextensive with 
the circle of their acquaintances. 



0. T. SKIDMORK. 



A resident of Lucas. Jackson township. Iowa, of which he is a native, and a 
faithful and efficient governmenl employe connected with the railway mail 
service between Chicago and Council Bluffs, O. T. Skidmore is highly esteemed 
and respected for his many commendable qualities of character. Lorn September 
12. 1NN2. he comes of a well known family, more extended mention of whom 
is made in connection with the sketch of -1. T. Skidmore. He grew to manhood 
in Lucas, where he attended the common schools ami completed his course in 



234 I- 1 CAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

the Lucas high school. Early he assisted his father with the work on the farm 
and thru was for two years employed by C. A. Williams & Brothers, general 
merchants. Following his initial experience in the business world, he established 

himself with his brother in the coal business in Lucas, remaining in thai com - 

tion until he passed the examination for the railway mail service, which he 
entered on a run between Chicago and Council Bluffs on the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad, having ever since followed this occupation. 

On .Man-li 6, 1905, he was married to .Miss [sabelle Morrison, a native of 
Jackson township, this county, where she was born October 5, l^ s l. and grew 
to womanhood, attending the public schools in the acquirement of her education. 
Ber parents are Marion and Margarel Johnston Morrison and they now reside 
al Albia, Iowa. In their familj were eight children, of whom Mrs. Skidmore is 
the oldest. The others are : Arvilla, Rhoan, William. Francis, Adlai, Earl and 
Waldo. Mr. and .Mrs. Skidmore have four sons: Charles Noel, born March 
17. 1906; Dwighl Morrison, horn Augusl 19, 1907; Roger Wayne, horn June 
13, 1910; and Wallace Keith, horn Angusl 29, 1912. The two elder are attending 
public school at Lucas. 

Both Mr. and .Mrs. skidmore are highly respected and esteemed in their hi 
community, where they have mam friends. They are members of the Presby- 
terian church of Lucas and take deep interest in its wmk. Fraternally Mr. 
Skidmore belonged for some time to the Lodge of the Knights of Pythias al 
Lucas Imt of late has given up this connection on account ,,f his duties. The 
family residence is renowned for its hospitalitj and is often the meeting place 
of their friends. Both Mr. and Mrs. Skidmore are well versed in literature and. 
deeply convinced of the value of education, give their children the besl oppor- 
tunities along that line. Although Mr. Skidmore is bu1 thirty-one years of age, 

he has laid the foundation for a substantial position in tl ommunitv and the 

future promises well for him. 



WINFIELD S. EVANS. 



After many years of close and influential association with the agricultural 

inti rests of Wayne county Winfield S. Evans is living in retirement in Sej 
mour. enjoying the comforts earned during a long period of honest and zeal- 
ous labor. He is a native of Iowa, hom in Lee countj in December, L850, a 
son of Hiram and Sarah Jane (Robison Evans. The family can he traced 

hack through sii 'ssn,. generations from the father ol our subject, who is a 

son oi' James Evans to Evan Evans, a native of Wales, who came to America 
prior to the year 1753 ami settled in what is now Qeigertown, Pennsylvania. 

He served in many of the Indian and Colonial wars and upon the Outbreak of 
the American Revolution joined Ins forces with those of the new country, serv- 
ing in the Continental armv as a member of Captain John Robeson's Penn- 
sylvania Siate Militia. Ills grandson, who was the grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this review, married Rachel Blankley, whose father. George Blankley, 
served as sergeant in Captain Huffman's company, Firsl Regiment of Pennsyl- 
vania Riflemen, in the War of 1812. 




WINFIELD S. EVANS 






-riiD 






LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 237 

The father of our subject kept up the splendid military record of his fam- 
ily. He enlisted for the Mexican war but was not mustered in in time to see 
active service. However, in 1862 he joined Company D, Twenty-third Iowa Vol- 
unteer Infantry, entering the service as lieutenant and gaining rapid advance- 
ment through his period of enlistment, resigning on account of disability with 
the rank of captain. He had been a resident of Iowa since the year 1845 when 
he came to Lee county and purchased land. Later he bought government land 
in Davis county and in 1856 settled in Wayne county, where he took up a claim 
of four hundred and eighty acres of government land, upon which he resided 
until his death. He was eminently progressive and public-spirited in his citi- 
zenship and for six years was a member of the board of county supervisors. 
Twice he was a candidate for the office of state representative but was defeated 
both times. He had extensive fraternal relations, holding membership in the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was also prominent in Masonry, belong- 
ing to the lodge, chapter and commandery. His death occurred on the '21st 
of March, 1903. His wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Sarah Jane Robi- 
son, was a daughter of James and Rachel Robison. natives of Morgantown, 
West Virginia. This family is also of old American foundation but is of Scot- 
tish origin, James Robison, an early representative, having been born in Scot- 
land. However, he afterward went to Ireland, where he married and later 
crossed the Atlantic to America, settling in Virginia prior to the year 1800. 
The mother of our subject passed away on the 7th of April, 1905. 

Winfield S. Evans of this review came to Wayne county with his father mi 
the 13th of April, 1856, and grew up on his father's farm. He acquired a com- 
mon-school education in Wayne county and began his active career in 1876, 
when he moved upon one hundred and sixty acres of land in Walnut township 
which was presented to him by his father. With characteristic energy he car- 
ried forward the work of improvement, adding to his holdings from time to 
time until he was the proprietor of three hundred and sixty acres of fertile 
and productive land. Because his activities were always progressive and his 
standards of integrity high his labors were attended with a gratifying meas- 
ure of success and eventually he was able to retire. In October, 1909, he moved 
into Seymour, where he has since resided, his useful and well directed work in 
the past enabling him to enjoy all of the comforts and many of the luxuries 
of life. 

In 1S84 Mr. Evans was united in marriage to Miss Annie Lewis, a daugh- 
ter of John B. and Susan (McMillan) Lewis, the former a native of England. 
The paternal branch of this family was founded in America by Mrs. Evans' 
grandfather, who in early times purchased land in Iowa, locating first in Henry 
county and then in Wayne county, where he cultivated the soil until his death. 
Mr. and Mrs. Evans are the parents of six children: Sylvia, who married B. 
A. Whitmore, who is operating the farm belonging to the subject of Ibis review; 
David Glenn, a farmer in Wayne county, who married Miss Eupha Fisher; 
Angie, Hattie, Hiram ami Winnifred, all of whom reside at home. The fam- 
ily are devout adherents of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Evans gives his allegiance to the republican party but although active 
and progressive in all matters of citizenship, never seeks political preferment. 
In Masonry he has attained a place of distinction, holding membership in tin- 



238 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

Lodge, chapter and commandery. He stands high in business and social cir 
cles of Ins community, exemplifying in liis life the fine qualities of char- 
acter and the honorable and uprighl principles which are traditions in Ins 
family and which have won Eor him the respecl and confidence of the rum 
munitj . 



WII.UA.M II. BUCK. 



William II. Buck is one of the foremosl representatives of agricultural interests 
in Richman township, Wayne county, where In- owns an excellenl farm of two 
hundred and fortj acres under high cultivation. Since 1*77. in which year 
he settled in this section, he has successfully followed agricultural pursuits but 
before thai time largely followed liis trade, which was thai of carpenter and 
builder, and did important work along tins line in the various parts of the 
countrj where he resided. Moreover, he deserves special mention as one of 
those who defended the flag a1 the ti of the Civil war. 

.Mr. Buck was Kuril in Hagerstown, Maryland, January 21, 1843, and is a 

sun of <; •<,'!■ and Eva (Bunn Buck, both natives ol German} who passed 

;iw;\\ in Hagerstown, Maryland, the ratlin- in the year 1878 and tin- mother in 
1870. Their family included the following children : George, residing at Spring- 
field, Illinois; William EL, of this review; Elizabeth, who died in childhood; 
.John, of Springfield, Illinois; .Mrs. Sophia Fetzer, who died in that state; and 
Fred, making his home in Springfield, Illinois. All of these children were 
born in Hagerstown, .Maryland, and George, the eldest son. served in defense 
of his i -on nt ry as member of a Pennsylvania battery during the Civil war 

William II. Buck remained under the parental roof, spending his boyh I 

In his native city and attending the common schools. On August s . 1862, he 
enlisted Eor service in Company A. Seventh Maryland Volunteer Infantry, and 
served until the close of the war when he was honorably discharged. He served 
under Colonel Webster until the hitter was elected to congress and later under 
Colonel Phelps, participating in a number of engagements and distin<_ r nishin'.r 
himself by his courageous conduct. At the close of hostilities he returned to 
Maryland and there followed the trade of carpenter for one year. Being 
attracted by the opportunities the western countrj offered he removed in 1866 
to Springfield, Illinois, there following his trade, and a-number of the more 
pretentious structures of that daj were partial products of his skill. He engaged 
as carpenter and builder until his marriage, when he turned his attention to 

farming, following that occupation in Illinois for three years, at tl nd of 

which time he removed to Ulster county, New Fork, specializing in fruit farming 
there. The year 1877 marks his advent in Richman township, Wayne county, 
Iowa, where he has since resided. For the lirst few years he farmed rented 
land bu1 h.\ thrift and energy and through progressive methods he was enabled 
subsequently to buy eighty acres within the township and by perseverance and 
economy has gradually added one hundred and sixtj acres to his original 
tract until his present farm eonsists of two hundred and forty acres of fertile 
land. All of this is under high cultivation, well equipped with Buch machinery 
i ssary to the modern farmer and all high!) improved. His she, is and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 239 

outbuildings and such barns as are n Led for his stock arc of the most improved 

type and his residence is comfortable and modern. Besides mixed farming he 
is largely interested in stock-raising, specializing along high-class grades. 

On the 12th of December. 1868. Mr. I Suck was married to Miss Harriet A. 
Hasbrouck, a native of Highland. New Fork, born January 12. 1853. In 1859 
she removed with her parents to Illinois, settling in Sangamon county, where 
the father followed farming, being among the early settlers of this section. She 
belongs to an old American family which traces its ancestry directly back to 
the Mayflower pilgrims and Mrs. Buck is proud of the possession of an old 
Ulster county | New York i history wherein her ancestry is authentically recorded. 
The Hasbrouck family for many generations has been one of the prominent 
ones of that portion of New York state. Her father was Levi .1. Hasbrouck, 
who was born in Ulster county. New York. September 30, 1830, and died at 
Highland. New York, February 28. 1 903, while her mot her was Phoebe Jane 
(Deyo) Hasbrouck. also a native of Ulster county, born February 15, 1829. 
She died in Highland. New York, June 11, 1902. While they were residents 
of Illinois they followed general farming but in New York state specialized 
along horticulture. In their family were eight children: Mrs. Buck; Angelo, 
born January 16. 1859. residing in New York; Laura, born June 22, I860, who 
passed away in Illinois. February 28. 1861; Jacob J., born April 15. 1862. a 
resident of Humeston, Iowa; Jennie, born August 1. 1864, who died in infancy; 
Everetta, born April 10. 1866, who passed away August 18, 1S66; Lincoln, who 
was born February 22, 1868. and died September 27. of the same year; and 
Mrs. Carrie M. Feeter, a resident of Highland. Ulster county. New York, who 
was born May 11, 1869. The two eldest members of this family were born in 
New York state but the younger members were natives of Illinois. Unto .Mi-, 
and Mrs. Buck have been born five children: Lizzie, born in Illinois, September 
16. 1869. married Frank Williams by whom she has the following children: 
Fannie, born November 26, 1892; Fay William, January 14, 1895; Fern, Decem- 
ber IS. 1898; Lloyd Levi, born in June. 1900; Henry Angelo. April 12. 1902; 
Evelyn May. May 29, 1909; and William. May 21. 1910. .Mr. and Mrs. Williams 
reside in Richman township. Eva May I tuck, who was born in Illinois, May 
18, 1871, passed away in Richman township at the age of about ten years, her 
death occurring May :!. 1881. Mrs. Ilattie II. Taylor, who was born January 
II. Is7-'i. resides in Richman township and is the mother of three children, 
namely; Jessie Lauretta, born April 26. 1895; Theodore R.. born February 25. 
1897; and Harriet. July 8, 1904. Mrs. Jennie L. McRae, who is the next in 
order of birth, was born in Highland. New York, May 2:*, 1875, and resides in 
Humeston, Iowa. Her children are : Cecil, bom April 5. 1900; Bernita, October 
26,1901; Ilattie. May 15. 1904; and Lois. April 1. 1905. William Angelo. the 

fifth child, was born November 5. 1880, and at the time of the Spanish-A riean 

war enlisted in Company C, Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, becoming a 
member of the camp at Chickamaugua and at Chattanooga. Finally the regimenl 
was sent to Cuba for duty but had only been one night on the ocean when 
the war was abruptly terminated. Mr. Buck was mustered out in November 
of that year, when he returned to private life. He takes care of the large home 
farm of his father in Richman township. All of the children received excellent 
educations in the acquirement of which they attended public schools in the com- 



240 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

liiiinity and the Humeston College. All of the grandchildren of Mr. and .Mrs. 
William II. Buck, fourteen in uumher, were born in Riehman township, Wayne 

i IV. 

.Mr Buck is a republican, having casl bis Brsl vote for Abraham Lincoln 
while in the service of his country. Be lias always remained true to the principles 
of his party in war and peace. For three terms he has served as township trustee 
and since removing to Humeston has sen id Eor one term in the city council. 
His public service has always been distingui'sl ready understanding of 

issues a1 band and has been performed with such faithfulness thai ii d< si i 
commendation. The family an- members of the Congregational church of 
Humeston and .Mr. Buck belongs to the Masonic order, being a member of 
Fidelity Lodge, No. 228, A. K. & A. M., of Humeston, of which his son Aug 
is at the presenl time worshipful master. Both Mi', and Mrs. Buck are meml 
df liadiani Chapter, No. ■'!<>. 0. B. S., of Humeston, and the latter bas served 

several terms as worth} matron of that bodj Both aie charter members 
<>\ the Eastern star ami Mr. Buck also belongs to the Wayne County Posl 
the Grand Army of the Republic at Humeston, where he meets his comrades of 
Mire wIki took up arms in defense of the Sag. Mr. Buck owns a modern, well 

furnished home in II oton where he and his wile enjoy the fruits of their 

labors, highly respected ami esteemed throughoul Riehman township. Both are 

studious ,,l mind and fond of reading, possessing an excellent library of choice 
rks. While tie- wealth of the country is generallj estimated in dollars ami 
cents its real riches lie in its having such honorable people as Mr. and Mrs 
Buck have proven themselves to he ami in the rich heritage which they hand 
down by their example to the coming generations. Mr. Buck has not onlj been 
an interested witness of the changes that have occurred here hut has been a 
helpful factor in the general advancement and while he has attained well deserved 
prosperitj has been a constructive force in the development of this section. 



JOHN T SKIDMORE. 



ii T. Skidmore is classed among the substantial pioneer settlers of Lucas 
county, dating Ids residence here from very early times, lie was a young ho> 

.'i the time of liis arrival ami as the years have lt> bj Ins strong purpose ami 

laudable ambition have gained him a goodly measure of success, lie was i 
in Johnson county, Indiana. January 24, 1845, and is a - if William and 

America (Leech) Skidmore. the former of whom was born in Henry COUUty, 
Kentucky, in L818 and the latter in Indiana in 1 821 ' The} Came to Lucas 

COUntj in 1856, among tl arly settlers, and here the mother passed away ill 

1880. The father survived her several wars, dying in Kans In 

their family were seven children: Mrs. Sarah McColIum, deceased; Mrs 
Melinda Davis, residing in Kansas; Mrs. Harriet Ramsey, who lias also passed 
awaj : John T., the subjeel of this review; Mrs. Lucy .lane Mabry. deceased; 
William, whose home is in Reno county, Kansas; ami Mrs Elizabeth Hughes, 
nf Jackson township. All of these children were horn in Indiana and all 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 241 

were reared in Lucas county, where they attended the schools of the pioneer 
days. 

John T. Skidniore was still a child when he came with his parents to Iowa. 
The family came overland with horse teams from Indiana to Lucas county. 
bringing with them thirty head of cattle. They crossed the Mississippi river 
at Burlington and pushed on into Liberty township, where the father pur- 
chased from Mr. Gilpatrick a tract of land upon which they lived for a mini 
ber of years. Mr. Skidniore of this review grew up among pioneer conditions 
and can recall many characteristic incidents of pioneer life. He has been ever 
a close observer and probably no one is more familiar with the history and con- 
ditions of the early times in Iowa than he. He can remember the time when 
the distance between the markets was a serious handicap to trade relations and 
when the farmers were obliged to take their produce to Burlington or Eddy- 
ville. He himself recalls driving many herds of hogs to the latter city, 
whence they were shipped to the eastern markets. He can tell of the scarcity 
of money in those days, the rigors of the climate, the danger from Indians, 
and he can speak interestingly of the intermediate and later phases of devel- 
opment which transformed the state from a frontier wilderness into a prosper- 
ous and growing commonwealth. Success has rewarded his active labor through 
the years and he is now one of the substantial citizens of Lucas county, own- 
ing eighty acres of land on section 13, Jackson township, and four acres sub- 
divided into town lots in Lucas, besides a comfortable and attractive home in 
the latter city. 

In 1866 Mr. Skidniore married Miss Adaline Staekhouse. who was born 
in Janesville, Ohio, in May, 1841. She is a (laughter of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Crowe) Staekhouse, early settlers in Lucas county. The family came 
from Wayne county, Indiana, and thence to this section of Iowa after a resi- 
dence of one year at Drakesville, Davis county. The father followed the black- 
smith's trade in Chariton from 1860 until the time of his death in that city 
in 1883. He was one of the earlier and leading Masons, belonging to the 
Knights Templar, and was also an influential member of the Odd Fellows. 
His wife was a native of New Jersey, born in 1812, and she died in Chariton, 
Iowa, in 1893. In their family were four children: Susan, who died in 
infancy; William, who served in the Civil war as a captain in the Nineteenth 
Indiana Battery Corps and who passed away in 1877; Mrs. Angeline Buck, 
residing at Afton. Iowa: and Adaline. the wife of the subject of this review. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Skidniore were born nine children: Edwin, who was born 
August 2, 1867, and died at the age of five months; Lenora. who died at tin* 
age of one year; Effie Esther, who died at the age of three years; William S. 
who was born March 28, 1S72. and is now residing at Colfax, Iowa: .Mrs. Lulu 
Peterson, of Lucas county; Aide, deceased; John T.. Jr.; George, who passed 
away in Lucas at the age of eleven years: and 0. T., who is employed as a 
railway mail (Jerk on tin- Chicago. Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 

Mr. Skidniore gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and 
has proved his public spiril by active official service. He was township trus 
tee for six years and assessor of Jackson township for fourteen years, lie was 
for one term a member of the town council and for six years township assessor. 
serving also for a time as school director. He was a candidate on the demo- 



242 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

cratic tickel in two differenl campaigns for the office of sheriff. Fraternally 

he is connected with G I Shepherd Lodge, No. 414. A. K. & A. >!.. of which 

In- is worshipful master, and he is affiliated also with the Yeomen. During 

more than half a century he lias 1 n largely familiar with the history 

the county and lias an intimate and personal knowledge of the raanj events 
which have shaped its historj and >_r 1 1 i < 1 < - < 1 its policies. He is therefore num- 
bered among the pi ier settlers who well deserve a place on the records of 

the county. 



CHRISTOPHEE C. HAWKINS. 

A highlj cultivated and valuable far f one hundred and eighty-seven 

acres in Jackson township, Lucas county, stands as evidence of the life work 
of Christopher C. Hawkins, who is classed among the mosl prosperous a'_'ii 
culturists of his county. Born in Van Buren county, Iowa. March 18, 1872, 

In- ci ■ «i'h his parents to Lucas, Iowa, where tin- family lived until removal 

was made to the farm in Jackson township, which consists of two portions 
one of one hundred ami sixtj acres ami one of twenty-seven acres. The 
father, Christopher B. Hawkins, is a native of Cornwall, England where he 
was horn September 21, L832, ami still makes his home with our subject. The 
mother, Mary Ann (Plaster) Hawkins, a native >>t England, was born Octo 
ber 8, 1831, hut was reared in Wales. Shi- passed away in Lucas, August Hi. 
L906. In their familj were five children, of whom four are Living, hose beside 
our subject being: .Mrs. Grace Loach, "f Enterprise, Iowa; .Mrs. Carrie Kent, 
residing in Jackson township; and John W.. also a resident of Enterprise 

Christopher •'. Hawkins was reared under the parental roof ami enjoyed 

such educational advantages as tin- neighborhood afforded. Hi- early I ame 

acquainted with thorough methods ol soil culture and as tin- years have passed 
has made his property one of tin- mosl valuable in this section. All modern 
improvements '-an In- found upon tin- farm, including an up-to-date residence 
and first-class barns ami outbuildings. Following progressive ami scientific 
methods, .Mr. Hawkins has attained a success which siamls forth as onspicuous. 

On January 25, 1897, Christopher C. Hawkins was united in marriage to 
\lis-, Lillie Baker, who was born in Jackson township on Jul} 15, 1879. Here 
she l'i-i-w tn womanhood and received her education. Her parents, John 
ami Lavina (Spencer Baker, were both aatives of Indiana county, Pennsyl 
vania, tin- former born October 12, l>lii. ami the latter Angus! i >, 1856, the 

father c ing to Iowa in l- s ~>7. Mr. and Mis Baker air still living, occupj 

ing a comfortable residence in Lucas in their family were the following chil- 
dren - : Mrs. Catharine Roberts, born January 30, 1875, a resident of Hiteman, 
Inw.i. William, born July 10, 1 s~7. deceased; Mrs. Hawkins, the will- of the 
Bubject of this review Peter, born April 26, 1881, of Lucas, Iowa; Mrs Anna 
Woods, born Maj '_'". 1883, of Jackson township; Carl ami Charles, twins, 
horn April in. 1886, tin- former "i Jackson township and the latter qi » res 
ton. Iowa. Noah, born November 26, 1889, also of thai city; Albert, horn April 
12, 1893, who married Miss Irene Evans, a daughter of John and Elizabeth 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 243 

(Evans) Evans of Jackson township; and Christopher, horn August 15, 1896, 
of Lucas. Of these, Catharine, Peter and Anna were born in Clarke county, 
Iowa, but the others are all natives of Jackson township, where all were reared. 
Mr. and .Mrs. Hawkins have adopted a son, Lehigh Hawkins, who is attending 
school. 

In his politieal views Mr. Hawkins is a republican and gives his stanch sup- 
port to the measures and candidates of that party. Both he and ins wife are 
members of the Reorganized Church of the Latter Day Saints of Lucas and 
take an active and helpful interest in the work of the organization. Frater- 
nally lie is a member of Good Shepherd Lodge, No. -114,, A. P. & A. M. All 
measures and movements inauguarated to promote the public welfare find in 
him an ardent supporter, and while lie has been individually successful, his 
success has influenced the growth and development of the locality and has 
been a factor in the general advancement. 



■JACOB D. PATTERSON. 

Widely known along his particular line. Jacob I). Patterson, of Lucas, 
Iowa, lias for the past eighteen years been successfully engaged as commercial 
salesman and in that capacity travels extensively over the major portion of 
southern Iowa, having built up a gratifying and representative patronage. 
Bom in Woodstield. .Monroe county. Ohio, on April 7, 1852, he is a son of 
•fames and Mary (Miller) Patterson, natives of Washington county Pennsyl- 
vania, both deceased, the father having passed away in Ohio in 1892 and the 
mother also having died in that state. In their family were three children: 
Jacob D., of this review ; Wilmer A., secretary of the Loan & Trust Company 
of Marietta, Ohio; and one who died in infancy. 

Jacob D. Patterson was reared under the parental roof and when nine 
years of age removed with his parents to Coal Run, Washington county, Ohio, 
where he lived until he reached manhood. His educational advantages com- 
prised a common-school course and attendance at the college at Marietta, Ohio. 
His father was interested in coal mining and tanning and our subject remained 
in Coal Run, Ohio, until he was thirty-three years of age, when he removed 
to Lucas. He later wenl In Chariton, where he remained for four years, at 
the end of which period he again came to Lucas and has since resided in this 
city. For the past eighteen years he has been successfully engaged as nursery 
salesman but for some time previously also followed railroading. He has been 
most successful as commercial traveler and as the years have passed lias accu- 
mulated a gratifying competence. 

In December. 1N74, Mr. Patterson was married to Miss Sarah .1. Murray, 
who was born in Morgan county, Ohio, in March, 1853, and passed away in 
Chariton, in August. 1898. Her father was Charles Murray, a veteran of the 
Civil war. in which he participated as a member of the Ninety-second Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. He passed away in Louisville. Kentucky, in 18o':i. Her 
mother, Hannah (Henderson) Murray, was a native of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and died in February. 18!*!). Their family included: -lames. 



•-'44 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

a residenl of Eagle Grove, towa; William, residing on a farm aear Corydon, 
Iowa. John, who passed away in Chariton in 1886; and Mrs. Patterson. One 
daughter by a former marriage of the mother, .Mrs. Elizabeth Parley Warff, 
makes her home in New Virginia, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Patterson are the par 
.•nis of four children: Charles, born in L876, who resides in Illinois: Mrs 
Lillie Puller, whose birth occurred in May, 1880, and who resides in Lucas; 
Mrs Maud.- Lomax, horn in 1884, residing in Monroe county, Ohio: and one 
who died in Lnfancj . 

Mr. Patterson is deeply interested in historical subjects and lias taken 
greal pains in preserving the records of Lucas and of many of the old settlers 
of this region Be is in possession of a kettle mad.' in Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, in which the grandmother, .Mrs. Henderson, prepared many meals for 
the famous Indian fighter, Louis Wetzel. Although this vessel is consider- 
ably older than one hundred years h is still in a very good state of preservation. 
Mr. Patterson is an omnivorous reader and takes a special interesl in all 
matters pertaining to Lucas and Wayne counties. Politicallj he is a republican 
and gives his stalwart support to that party. Mr. and Mrs. Patterson are 
highly regarded and esteemed by all who have come in contact with them. 



JAMES A. HOOUE. 



•'ames A. Hogue is one of the represent at i\ e agriculturists of Benton town 
ship, where he owns three hundred and thirty acres of land, which he has devel- 
oped into one of the valuable properties of the county. He is a native of Waj ae 

county, his birth having iurred in Washington township on the L8th of June, 

185s. His father, -lames Burton Hogue, was horn and reared in Vigo county. 
Indiana, his natal day being Pebruarj 15, 1830. In his early manhood he 
crossed the plains to California, making the journey With an ox team soon after 

the discover} of gold. He there engaged in pros] ting for a while and then 

came hack to Indiana, returning by way of South America and New York citj 
Soon after ins return he was married to Miss Persia Jane Knight, who was a 
native of Illinois, her birth occurring October 12, L828, bul a resident of 
Indiana a i the time of her marriage. In the earlj days of their married life 
they came to towa, settling in Wayne county, where the father took up a tract 
of government land located in Washington township aboul lour miles north of 
his son .lames' present farm. He there engaged in general farming and stock 
raising during the remainder of his active life, meeting with success in his 
undertakings. He was thriftj and industrious and as the years passed extended 
the boundaries of his farm until he owned aboul four hundred acres of laud 
To Mr. and Mrs. Hogue there were horn nine children, as follows: Jasper V. 

Ardillia. who died al the age of twelve years; Ji is \ . our subject . Margaret, 

who died in infancy ; Rosa, Mina and William T.. all of wl are unmarried and 

residing in Wayne countj ; Lillian, who marred s II. Perkins, oi Wayne count} . 
and Sola .lane, who became the wife of Prank Moore, of Wayne county. The 
parents are both deceased, the lather having passed awaj April 30, 1902, and the 

mother on the twelfth Of April. 1- 




JAMES A. IIim.i E AND F WIII.Y 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTO r -, Ln-OX 
T1LD- ■ 



LUCAS AXD WAYNE COUNTIES 047 

The early years in the life of James A. Hogue were passed in very much the 
same manner as those of other pioneer lads reared in the rural sections of Iowa. 
In the acquirement of an education he attended the district schools, and while 
engaged in the mastery of the common branches of English learning assisted 
his father with the cultivation of the farm. He remained at home until his 
marriage, when he bought eighty-seven acres of land and began farming for 
himself. His efforts in this direction met with a good measure of success, and 
as opportunity offered he increased his holdings until his homestead now com- 
prises three hundred and thirty acres, which he has brought to a high state of cul- 
tivation. His fields are planted to such crops as in his judgment are best adapted 
to the soil, and in connection with his diversified farming he raises stock. As 
the years have passed Mr. Hogue has enhanced the value of his place by the 
erection of substantial buildings, while he has installed about the premises many 
modern appliances and conveniences. That he is a man of progressive ideas 
and enterprising methods is evidenced by the appearance of his well cultivated 
fields and the condition of his buildings and fences, all of which manifest the 
exercise of competent supervision and practical management. 

On the 19th of March, 1890, Mr. Hogue was married to Miss Rose McMains, 
a daughter of Leroy and .Mary (Bedwell) McMains, natives of Indiana, who 
subsequently removed to Iowa, locating first in Lucas and then in Wayne 
county. Here the father engaged in farming and the mercantile business. .Mr. 
and Mrs. McMains were the parents of fourteen children, of whom four are liv- 
ing. To Mr. and Mrs. Hogue there have been born three children : James Leroy, 
who died in infancy; William Ernest, whose natal day was the 15th of July, 
1892. a student at Iowa State College at Ames; and Chester Clare, who was 
born on the 8th of October, 189-1, ami is attending school at Condon, Iowa. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church, of which the parents are 
members. Mr. Hogue has been township trustee and school director and is a 
director and stockholder in the First National Bank. In all of these positions 
he has manifested ability and concern for the public welfare. He is one of the 
widely known and highly esteemed residents of his township, in the progress 
and development of which he takes an active interest, extending his indorse- 
ment and cooperation to every worths' enterprise or commendable movement. 



JOHN A. EVANS. 



Commercial as well as public interests have long been ably represented by 
John A. Evans, who in connection with the J. A. Evans wholesale ami retail- 
commission house occupies an important position in the mercantile life of Lucas 
county and as member of the city council of Lucas, as town recorder of -lack 
son township, as justice of the peace and as member of the boar:! of educa- 
tion, has actively and beneficially participated in the government of his bome 
locality. John A. Evans was born in Wales. .May 12, 1858, and when only 
lour years of age was broughl by his parents to America, who came to this 

vol n— 13 



248 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

country in t>(iL' and tirst settled al Joungstown, Ohio, where they remained 
until 1866, when they removed to Galesburg, Illinois, where the father was 
engaged in mining coal. Prom Galesburg they subsequently made removal 
to Bryant, Illinois, ami in 1874 they came to this state, settling in Des Moines, 
where the lather engaged in mining. There they remained until 1879, when 
John A. Evans of this review removed to Lucas, of which he has been a resi- 
dent since. 

His father, John E. Evans, was a native of Wales, in which country he 
was born in 1>:!7. ami died in Lucas in 1906, the mother, Mary -lane Bevi 
Evans, being a native of England, her birth having occurred December 2">, 
L837, and her death taking place in this county on December 25, 1905. The 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Evans was celebrated in Wales in 1857. 
To this union were born nine sons and one daughter, the three eldest natives 
of Wales and the others of America. The children were as follows: John A., 
Of this review; Richard, deceased: William, of Summerset, Iowa: < '. Daniel, 
of St. Joseph, .Missouri; Reece, who passed away in Illinois; Taliesin, residing 
neat- Lakonta, Iowa; Thomas, associated in business with our suhject iii Lucas; 
Joseph, who died in Des .Moines. Iowa; dames, deceased; and .Mis. Katharine 
Turner, (if Easl Pleasant Plain, Iowa. 

John A. Evans alien, id the common schools of (thin and Illinois ill the 
acquirement of his education ami made the several removals from place to 
place with his parents until he became a residenl of Lucas county in 1879 
Here he engaged in mining I'm- some lime hut in 1886 entered the grocery 
business in Lucas ami so continued until 1894. During the '90s, however, he 
ha.i became also associated with a mining company in Cleveland, Ohio, and 
during the same time was employed in the general merchandise firm of War- 
ner, Byers iV Company of Lucas, lie subsequently was connected with the Big 
Hill Coal Company as traveling salesman ami afterward managed the Roch- 
dale Cooperative store of Lucas, so continuing until L907, since which time 

he has been connected with the wholesale and retail commission I se of .1. 

A. Evans. The husiness of i he firm is of gratifying proportions ami .Mr. Evans 

receives a su 1 ist a ii t ia I annual income in return lor his efforts. The hous, ■ deals 
extensively in vegetables of all kinds and also Iced. Its present foremosl 

position among the business houses of the citj is largelj due to the efforts of 
.Mr. Evans, who brings to his tasks a wide experience gained in connection 
with a number of enterprises with which he was formerly affiliated ami an 
mnaii ability which seemed to have predestined him for a commercial career, 
(in Christmas daj of 1881 Mr, Evans was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
• lane Griffiths, who was horn in Wales in August, 1862. she was broughl I" 
America by her parents when quite young, the family settling at firsl in Scran 
ton. Pennsylvania, hut in 1< s 7:i coming to Lucas countj Her lather. John 
T Griffiths, ami her mother. Elizabeth Griffiths, were natives of Wales, ami 
both passed away in Lucas county, <>f their familj are still living: .Mrs. 

Maria .Miles, of Colfax, Iowa: Thomas, of Lucas; and William John, also 
nf thai city. To Mr. and Mrs. Kvans were hum six children: Mary Jane, 
deceased; Mrs. Maria Baker, of llileman. Inwa; Mrs. Adaline (Jill, of Peoria, 

Illinois; Mrs. Marj Marshall, of Hiteman. this state; Mrs. Elizabeth Mar- 
shall, nf the same place; ami one who died jn infancy. Mrs. Evans passed 



LUCAS A.\l) WAYNE COUNTIES 249 

away on February 8, 1894, and on April 23, 1896, Mr. Evans was again mar- 
ried, his second union being with Mrs. Rose Day (Phillips) Blakemore, who 
was bom at Beacon, Iowa, October 25, 1866, and was reared in that vicinity. 
Her parents, Isaac and Elizabeth (Davis) Phillips, were natives of Wales, 
coming to Lucas county at an early date in the history of this section. Both 
are deceased. Mrs. Evans, by her first marriage, to Mr. Blakemore, had two 
children: Mrs. Josephine Beitel, of Chariton, Iowa: and Mortimer Blake- 
more. residing in Lucas. 

Mi-, and Mrs. Evans are members of the Reorganized Church of the. Lat- 
ter Day Saints, the former having joined this organization on January 8, 
1892. Deeply interested in all social, religious and public affairs of Lucas, 
Mr. Evans has always actively participated in the public life of the district 
and at present serves as member of the city council, while he also has been 
town recorder and justice of the peace and gives evidence of his interest in the 
cause of education by having efficiently served for eighteen years on the local 
board. The family home is one of the handsome residences of Lucas and the 
gathering point of the many 'friends of Mr. and Mrs. Evans. A successful 
and substantial man, Mr. Evans has not only encompassed his own prosperity 
but has been a serviceable factor in the general advancement of Lueas county, 
and particularly his locality, and the service he has rendered in that respect 
16 worthy of the highest commendation. 



THOMPSON D. ASI1BY. 

For over half a century Thompson D. Ashby has been a resident of Otter 
( 'reek township. Lucas county, and for the past thirty-four years he has been 
a successful agriculturist, stock-raiser and shipper of live stock. A man of 
acute observation, he has been an interested witness of the changes that have 
occurred here, and there is hardly another person in the community who can 
so readily recall all the events that have brought about the present prosperous 
conditions. He is an interesting conversationalist, who in a ready flow of 
language can give, a complete picture of the last forty years of the county's 
history, being especially well acquainted with that part concerning western 
Lucas county. 

Born in Montgomery county. Indiana, on April 8. 1854, Thompson D. Ashby 
accompanied his parents on their overland trip to Iowa, starting on April 10, 
1861, and reaching Otter Creek township May 3d of that year. Both of his 
parents have passed away. The father, William II. Ashby. a native of Kentucky, 
was born December. 1821, dying in Otter Creek township on April 2(i, 187'); 
and the mother, .Margaretta (Boyer) Ashby, a native of Pennsylvania, born 
November 28, 1823, died in the same township on December HO, 1902, in 
her seventy-ninth year. The latter became a resident of Indiana when a small 
girl, removing to that state with her parents. Li the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
William II. Ashby were nine children: Mrs. Elizabeth L. Yenawine, born 
August 10, 1846, and died in Illinois in March, 1872; Mrs. Mary C. Long, born 
December 18, 1848, residing at Twin Falls, Idaho; A. O, born July 21, 1850, a 



250 LUCAS A\l> WAYNE C'Ol'XTIKs 

residenl of New Market, Tennessee; John B., who was born June 7. 1852 and 

died in L870; Tl ipson I'., our subject ; Newton B., born July 7. 1856, a residenl 

of Des Moines, this state and for eighl years United States i sul to [reland, 

with residence in Dublin, Ireland, being appointed by President Grover Cleve- 
land; George Lucky, born December I s . L858, residing at St. Paul. Texas; Lewis 
S., born September 7, 1861, engaged in general merchandising al Norwood, Iowa; 
and William E., born February 11, 1864, a residenl of Des Moines, where be 
is interested in the telephone business, with which be formerly was connected 
in Chariton. The seven oldesl children of the family were born in Indiana and 
the remaining two in Lucas county, Iowa. 

Thompson I). Ashby was reared under the parental roof and received such 
educational advantages as the vicinity afforded, there being but few pupils 
in the community in the early days when he wenl to school. At that time the 
post office was still a1 Tallahoma and most of the trading had to be done al 
that place and Chariton. As yet oo railroads traversed this section Be early 
became acquainted with agricultural work, and acquiring the thorough methods 
of his father laid the foundation of his latter day success. He now owns a 
valuable farm of one hundred and twentj acres on section 26, Otter Creek 
township, under high cultivation and well improved. All modern equipments 
and machinery can be found upon the home place. Ilis barns and outbuildings 
are kept in good repair and his residence is comfortable and commodious. For 
the past thirty-four years he has divided his attention between tannine, stock 
raising and the shipping of live stock, ami from these occupations has received 
gratifying returns. 

On March 18, 1880, Mr. Ashby was married to .Miss Lei L. Pfrimmer, who 
was horn in Indiana on November 10, 1856. Her lather George Pfrimmer was 
horn in France On February 19, 1825, and still makes his home with Mrs. 
Ashby, having passed his eighty-eighth birthday. Her mother. Mrs. Lydia 
Ann Pfrimmer, who was born in Indiana in 1829, died in Otter (reek township, 
this county. June 21, 1900. In their family were five children: Charles YY.. 
born in 1846, who resides in Mena, Arkansas: Samuel, deceased; Francis M., 
born in 1850, who resides in Stratton, Nebraska, where for a number of years 
he has served as postmaster; Mrs. Thompson 1>. Ashbj ; and A. ('.. a resident 
of Otter Creek township To .Mr and Mrs. Ashbj were born nine children, all 
of whom are living: Dr. Mary Edith, born March 13, 1881, who practices 
osteopath} in Texas; Mrs. [ola L, Primm, horn November s . 1882, residing in 
Otter Creek township: Thompson !>.. born September 16, 1884, a residenl of St. 
Paul, Texas. George E., hum September 15, 1886, residing in Lucas county; 
Nina M., horn April L'. 1889, a school teacher of Lucas county; Lydia M.. born 
May 30, 1891, teaching school in her home district; William II.. horn December 
29, 1893, also teaching school in his native county; Charles !•'.. born April 15, 

1896, at I ie. and Albert Olyn, horn December id. I s ''' 1 . attending school in 

the vicinity. All of the children received the best educational advantages. Edith 
and Nina attended sdi,.,, | ,,t Bloomfield and Thompson l».. Jr., ami George 
attended Simpson College at Indianola, while Lydia took a course at the Chariton 
high scl I. 

Thompson l> Ashby preserves independence in regard to political matters 
.nid votes tor whatever candidate and measure he considers of greatest benefit 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 25] 

under the circumstances. He has efficiently filled the office oi' assessor of Otter 
Creek township, and fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, being a member of Norwood Lodge, No. 490, and is also connected 
with the Modern Woodmen of America as a member of Camp No. 5040 of Nor- 
wood. A man well read and well informed, Mr. Ashby is highly esteemed in his 
community, not only for his material attainments, but for his intellectual accom- 
plishments. He possesses an extensive knowledge on a great range of subjects 
and is acquainted with the best literature of the present and the past. Of high 
qualities of character, he is a man who receives the confidence and good-will of 
all who know him and his standing is high in the community, where he has not 
only been a witness of the changes that have occurred, but a helpful and cooperant 
factor in the general advancement. 



WILLIAM R. P1M. 



A member of an old pioneer family of Jackson township, Lucas county. 
William R. Pirn is prominently connected with the agricultural development 
of this section, owning five hundred and fifteen acres of choice land on sections 
3 and 10 in Jackson township and section 34 in Otter Creek township. An 
elegant and modern home upon his land in Jackson township is evidence of 
his prosperity and stands as a result of his incessant labor, indefatigable energy 
and agricultural ability. Lorn in Franklin county. Pennsylvania, on March 
24, 1855, his parents were William and Rebecca (Robison) Pirn, the former 
born in Chester county. Pennsylvania, in 1820, and the latter in Franklin 
county, that state. Both parents have passed away, their deaths occurring in 
Jackson township, May 12, 1885. and October 12, 1899, respectively In their 
family w.-re twelve children, of whom five are living: Mary, who resides on 
the old home farm in Jackson township; Mrs. Jennie P. Robbins, of Chari- 
ton, Iowa; William R.. of this review; Frank L., born March 16. 1862, resid- 
ing on the home farm with his sister Mary: and .Mrs. Jessie M. Knotts. of 
Brashear, Missouri. In 1858, when our subject was but three years old. the 
family proceeded westward down the Ohio river, going by boat to Cairo, Illi- 
nois, and thence up the Mississippi to Alexandria. Missouri, and overland by 
wagon to Jackson township. Lucas county, where they settled on section 2. 

This farm lias ever since I n in the bands of the family and is now owned 

by F. L. Pirn, a brother of our subject, and his sister Mary and known in tin- 
district as the Prairie View Farm. 

William R. Pim received his educational advantages in Jackson township, 
where he was brought by his parents when but three years of age. He sub- 
sequently assisted his father with the work of the farm and. being well grounded 
in the details and methods of agriculture, subsequently set out on his own 
account and by thrift and industry gradually possessed himself of live hun- 
dred and fifteen acres of the most valuable land, located on sections 3 and 10 
in Jackson township and section :!4 in Otter Creek township, lie is one of 
the most successful farmers of his locality and raises live stock to some extent. 
his farm being particularly adapted tor that purpose'. His farm is espcially 



I.l CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

renowned for its feed yards, which are the besl in the county, where he pi 
paics his stork for the market, where the highesl prices are obtained. The 
land is all under high cultivation and kepi in a good state of productivity by 

the rotati f crops ami scientific methods, his equipmenl being of the most 

modern ami up-to-date kind. Barns ami outbuildings at f the newest type 

ami the family home is commodious ami comfortable. 

On February 'J:!. 1886, .Mr. Pirn married Mis- Barriel -I. Snuggs, who 
was born in Henry county, loua. September 14, 1861, ami was reared in 
Warren county, this stale. Her parents were among the early settlers of 
Lucas county, having made their firs! home near Last Chance in Union town- 
ship. Her parents, -lames ami Ann Maria (Hall) Snuggs, were Datives of 
England ami both have passed away, the death of the father occurring in 
Warren county, this state, in 1889, ami thai of the mother in Lacona, that 
county, on January _. 1909. In their family were twelve children: Henry E., 
of Warren county, this state; Mis. I'nii. the wile of our subject; Amanda, who 
died at the age of fourteen: .Mrs. Martha E. Oxenreider, of Lucas county; 
Thomas, deceased; Florence, of Newbern, Iowa: John, deceased; Mrs. Olive 
Hatfield, of Lacona, this state: Mrs. Sadie E. Miller, also of that city; -lames 
/.. of Liberty Center, this state: Lewis, who resides in this county; and Samuel, 
who makes his home in Xewhem. Our subject ami his wile have four chil- 
dren; Mrs. Martha Sharp, horn November - J_. 1887, of Oalesburg, Illinois. 
Mrs. Blanche Crow, horn June 22, 1889, of I. mas. Iowa: -lames William, horn 
January :!. 1SH4. who resides at home and assists his father with the work of 
the [arm; and Sarah, horn September 6, 1897, attending high school in Lucas. 

Although Mr. Pirn is public-spirited and takes a .h-ep interest in the 
advancement ami development of his section, he has not actively participated 
in the public life of Lucas county. However, he fully recognizes his obliga- 
tions as an A rican citizen ami gives his vote to the democratic party. He is 

:i forceful element in his home community and has not only been an interested 
witness of the chances that have occurred as primitive conditions have given 
way to the onward march of civilization, hut has been a helpful and cooper- 
ant factor in bringing aboul the prosperity enjoyed by the present generation. 



GEORGE W. SEFRIT 



Since 1901 rge W. Sefril has 1 □ engaged in the cultivation of a val- 
uable farm of two hundred and eightj acres of choice land on sections 27 and 
:;i. otter ('reck township. However, quite recently he has disposed of tins 
property to good advantage, acquiring title to eighl hundred acres in Ringgold 

itj <i,i his Lucas count) farm he gave especial attention to hog raising, 
and he is renowned throughout the state for having had one ,,f the lincst herds 
of Poland China hogs { ,u his farm. Following progressive and scientific meth- 
ods, he attained a success which pi; s him in a class by himself and his pros 

p. rity is the more creditable as it has been broughl about entirely through his 
own efforts Lorn in Warren county, Illinois, on March 6, 1868 he is a son 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COFNTIKS 253 

of Isaac M. and Annie (McDonald) Sefrit, natives of Davis county. Indiana, 
where the father was born November 6, 18-40, and the mother on October 30, 
1S41. Isaac M. Sefrit passed away at Chariton, Iowa, but his wife is surviv- 
ing and makes her home at Carson, this state. In their family were seven 
children: Mary, who died in Illinois; Mrs. Dora W. Lynn, of Clarke county, 
Iowa: George W., of this review; .Mrs. Amy G. Forney, of Carson, Iowa; Mrs. 
OUie M. Cooley. of Chariton. Iowa; Ilattie, who passed away at the age of 
two years; and Mrs. Ruby 'Pate, also of Chariton. The three eldest children 
were born in Illinois and the younger ones in Clarke county, Iowa, where they 
all were reared. In 1869, when our subject was but one year of age, the par- 
ents removed from Illinois to Clarke county, Iowa, and there the father fol- 
lowed farming and stock-raising, being successful in his efforts. 

George W. Sefrit was reared upon the home farm in Clarke county, attend- 
ing the schools of the neighborhood in the acquirement of his education. He 
early began to assist his father with the work of the farm and became well 
versed in thorough methods of agriculture. He followed this occupation in 
Clarke county until 1900, when he purchased the farm in Otter Creek town- 
ship, which he has cultivated until recently. This property comprises two hun- 
dred and eighty acres of choice land on sections 27 and 34 and thereon can be 
found all modern improvements. In 1907 he began to specialize in raising 
pure-blooded Poland China hogs and had the reputation of having one of the 
finest droves in the state. At a public sale which took place in February, 1912, 
in Chariton, Iowa, be disposed of fifty animals which brought him on an 
average of seventy-five dollars per head. His drove averaged about two hun- 
dred a year and he shipped to all parts of the United States. He made rapid 
strides in this venture, to which he devoted his whole time and attention, and 
prosperity has attended bis efforts. Four well known heads of his drove were : 
Longfellow Jr., No. 13513; Big Bone Again, No. 61351; Smooth Wonder III, 
No. 61352; and .Miller's Choice. No. 64979. All of his stock was selected of 
the Big Bone type. His former farm is especially equipped with sheds and 
buildings to facilitate breeding and he seized every opportunity to make a suc- 
cess of his specialty. 

On March 23, 1892, George W. Sefrit was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
E. Hendricks, a native of Kansas, who was born December 20, 1871, her par- 
ents being George and Sarah (Harrison) Hendricks. The father was born 
in Indiana and died in Kansas, the mother also being a native of the former 
state, passing away in 1874. Both died while Mrs. Sefrit was quite young. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hendricks were tin- parents of five children, all of whom are 
living: James, residing near Topeka, Kansas; Frank, who also makes his 
hoim near that city; Mrs. Sarah Manning, of Woodhull. Illinois; Mrs. Jennie 
Roe. residing near Garden Grove, Iowa; and Mrs. Sefrit. the youngest of the 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Kel'rit became the parents of ten children, of whom one, 
Alma, died at the age of three years. The others are: Amy, born February 
8, 1894; Harley M., born April 5, 1896; Bessie, born .lime li, 1898; Frank, 
born January 25, 1900; Louis II.. born January 10. 1902; Anna, born Novem- 
ber 8. 190:5; Audrey, born April 2, 1905; Vera L. burn February J. L907; 
and ( Ieorge W.. Jr.. horn October 23, 1908. The five eldest of the children 
were born in Clarke county, Iowa, hut the younger ones are natives of Lucas 



254 l.i CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

county. All attended the common schools of the vicinity, Amy. the eldest 
daughter, taking ;i course ;it the high school at Chariton. 

Mr. Sefrit is a republican in his political affiliations, taking a deep interesl 
in all matters affecting his locality and county, although he has never sought 
public office. Fraternally he is a member of the Masons, belonging to Good 
Shepherd Lodge, No. 414, A. P. i: A. M., of Lucas, ami also a charter member 
of Jay Lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Sefril sold his farm 
in Lucas county and purchased a larger holding of eighl hundred acres in 

Ringgold county, Iowa, r Iving thirty-three thousand dollars for the farm, 

a fact which speaks highly of his efficient management and his effective meth 
mis Actuated by a laudable ambition, he has been carried forward to suc- 
cess by his progressiveness, diligence, energy and ability and his prosperity 
is well earned and well merited, and will undoubtedly continue in an increased 
measure in bis new venture. 



ANNA KING PITTARD. 



That the office of county superintendent of schools for Wayj unty should 

be filled by a woman, an office thai is of the foremost importance to the county's 
inhabitants, speaks well for the high ability of the incumbent .Mrs. Pittard, who 

practically all her life has been engaged in teaching scl 1 in various ph s 

in this section, was elected in 1910 and in 1912 was reelected to the same office in 
acknowledgment of her services and as an indorsement of her policies. 

.Mrs. Anna King Pittard was born near Bethlehem, Iowa. December 7. 
liS(if). her parents being William and Margarel (Murphy King, natives of 
Indiana and Wesl Virginia respectively, she attended district school al Beth- 
lehem until the fall of 1886 when, at the age of seventeen years, she entered the 

Lineville school of Lineville. Iowa, from which she was graduated with I rs 

under Professor F. E. King in the spring of 1888. studious of mind, a lover of 

l ks and deeply interested in guiding the education of children along the 

right channel, she naturally embraced the occupation of teaching as a life 
work ami in 1889 entered upon her first position in thai connection, teaching 

scl I in Fairview district. Union township, she subsequently held various 

positions in tie- rural schools of Wayne. Lucas and Clay counties. Iowa, and 
also taught for several terms in Wan-en county, Illinois Peeling the need of 

a more professional training to obtain even more satisfactory results, from 

1892 until lsu) she attended the Humeston Normal School, an institution w I 

has since become defunct, ami later took s| ia] studies in Drake University 

.Mrs Pittard has in fact never ceased to be a student and in the course of 
years lias become one id' Wayne county's most successful teachers. 

It was while '_'i\uiL' instruction in the village school at tona, Illinois, that 

she niei George W. Pittard, their acquaintanceship ripening into love and 
resulting in marriage, the wedding being celebrated in Bethlehem, at the home 
of her father, on the Huh of March. 1897. The bridegroom had prepare,' a com 

Portable home near Alexis, Illinois, and there the young married couple started 

housekeeping, hut tic happj life to which thej looked forward was soon rent 




\\\A KING PITTARD 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 257 

asunder as the reaper Death entered and claimed the husband and, only four 
weeks after the marriage ceremony, at the same hour— high noon— Mrs. Pittard 
saw her beloved one laid to rest. Under such tragic circumstances she became 
a widow but there were left to her two little sons of a former marriage of her 
husband, George. Jr., and Guy Pittard. now doubly orphaned, and it was upon 
them that she bestowed the love of a father and mother. 

Subsequently .Mrs. Pittard again took up her vocation of teaching, following 
it for several terms in the rural schools, and at the end of that time secured a 
position in the Corydon grade school, with which she was connected for ten 
years. She gave to her work in that direction the best that was in her and 
many of the children who learned their lessons under her able guidance have 
preserved for her a warm sympathy through all their later years. She became 
one of the most forceful and successful teachers in the city and her abilities 
were widely recognized. On account of ill health she was forced to resign her 
position. In 1910. however, she was nominated on the democratic ticket for the 
office of county superintendent of schools and although the democratic party 
was in the minority in the county she was elected by an overwhelming majority. 
The service she has rendered in this important office has brought about a direct 
and visible improvement among the teachers of the county, and this in turn 
has had a decided influence upon the improvement of the schools and the edu- 
cational facilities and advantages thereof. In November, 1912, she was re- 
elected to that position, which stands as an incontrovertible proof that her 
administration has been efficient and generally acknowledged as such, and she 
continues in her service greatly to the benefit of all concerned. She brings to 
her work the same earnestness and enthusiasm that has characterized her during 
all her life as a teacher and in the long line of county superintendents of schools 
.Mrs. Pittard takes her place among the best and most highly respected. 



FRKD C. CONRAD. 



One of the finest country homes in Lucas county, set in a fertile tract of 
three hundred and eighty-three acres of choice land in Otter Creek township, 
bespeaks the prosperity and substantial position of Fred C. Conrad, who since 
infancy has been a resident of this township, where he has grown to manhood, 
his interests having been closely connected with the development of this region. 
A well educated man. he takes a deep interest in the issues and questions of the 
day as they affect government and general conditions, and is widely respected 
as one of the best informed men of his community. Born in Mahaska county, 
Iowa, November 21 .lStif), he was brought by his parents to Otter Creels township. 
Lucas county, in March, 1866, and here the family has since resided, the father 
following agricultural pursuits with good results. The parents of our subjeel 
are R. B. and Maria (Canterbury) Conrad, the former a native of Oswego, 
New York, and the latter born near Burlington, Iowa. The father's birth 
occurred January 9, 18:33. and that of the mother on November 30, 1839, the 
latter being one of the first white children born in this state. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. R. B. Conrad are passing their declining years on the same farm on which 



258 I -I CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

they settled in 1866, bighrj esteemed and respected by all who know them. The 
father was the first democral ever to be elected to a township office in Otter 
Creek and for twenty-sis years held the office of justice of the peace, discharging 
his duties with fairness and impartiality. In their family were four children: 
Catharine, born August 13, 1859, who died October 18, I860; J. P., born May 
10, I860, who attended Simpson College a1 [ndiauola, Iowa, and after studying 
law with an ancle Judge Conrad, of Des Moines— was admitted to the bar 
of Iowa in lss:> and is at the presenl time one of the Leading lawyers of Des 
Moines; .Mrs. Emma Gray, born December 10, 1862, a resident of Siebert, 
Colorado; and Fred C. our subject, -l P. Conrad, of Des Moines— better known 
as Pitch to bis intimate friends — is the well known author of state-wide mag- 
azine articles which appear under tile caption of "Mj Views." The two sons 

of this family were horn in .Mahaska county, Iowa, and the two daughters ill 
Des Moines county. The mother is one of the oldest living native [owans and 
the father, in age, the oldest settler of his township. 

Pred C. Conrad was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement 
of bis education attended the common schools in the vicinit} of his father's farm, 
whom he helped in the work on the homestead in his leisure hours. He is now 
engaged in the cultivation of three hundred and eighty-three acres of choice land 
on sections 23, 24 and 27, otter Creek township, which are equipped with two 
sets of good improvements. Mr. Conrad has .just completed one of the lines! 
country homes in Lucas county furnace heated, gas-lighted, with hot ami cold 
running water, and up-to-date in every respect. He takes great pride in his 
home ami recognizes the importance of creating a true home atmosphere so that 
his children, although living on a farm, may lack nothing thai a city affords. Por 
this reason he also has garnered a very complete library, and much of the time 
the Family spend their leisure iii literary pursuits. 

On March 19, 1893, Mr. Conrad was married to Miss Margaret I.. Baugh, 
who was horn in Warren county. Iowa, on February 21, 1869. Her father. 
•I. P. Baugh, a native of Hendricks county. Indiana, died in Lucas county in 
1908, ami her mother, Margaret -lane (Breen Baugh, was horn at Ladoga, 
Indiana, on April 19, 1831, and died Februarj 26, 1900. They came to Warren 
county, Iowa, about fifty years ago, making the trip overland. In their family 
were seven children: Effie A., deceased; Mrs Jen me Rubel, born May 11. 1864 
at Indianola, Iowa: Mrs. Mollie Amos, deceased; Orrin T.. deceased; Mrs. Pred 
i i onrad; Mrs Martha Ellen Good, of Milo, Iowa: and Mrs. Ada B. Rogers, 
who resides at Pullerton, California. The two eldest children were born in 
Hendricks county, Indiana, and the younger ones in Wan-en county, this state. 
Mr. and Mrs. ('onrad have lour children, all of whom were horn in Otter Creek 
township: Vivian [nez, born March 30, 1894, and attending high school in 

Chan i on : Margaret Marie, horn September '-''J. 1899, who is attending tl imn 

schools in the vicinity of her father's farm; Gretchen Willa, born June s . 1904; 

and Ralph Burdette, born l> mber 27, 1905. Mr. and Mrs, ('onrad. recog 

nizing the val f a good education. '_'i\e their children the hcst advantages that 

can be obtained, and in their home help in anj possible way to improve the oppor 

lunities through hooks and Studj Mrs, ('onrad has taught SCl I for live terms 

iii her own home ami her sister Mrs [lodgers has the remarkable record of 
having taught for fiftj terms 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 259 

Politically Mr. Conrad is a democrat and fraternally a member of Good Shep- 
herd Lodge, Xo. 414, A. F. & A. M.. of Lucas; and Camp No. 5040, M, W. A., 
of Norwood, serving at the present time as clerk of the latter. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Conrad are highly esteemed and respected for their substantia] qualities 
of character and arc a valuable addition to the community, not only from a 
material point of view, hut from the standpoint of intellectuality and morality. 



PERM AN E. GRAY. 



The death of Perman E. Gray on August 14, 1908, removed from the agri 
cultural stage of Lucas county a man who was standing in the midst of active 
life, launched upon a successful career. Although he was hut thirty-eight years 
of age at the time of his demise, he had already attained a recognized position 
among the substantial farmers of the county and was readily recognized as a 
leader in agricultural matters, for he was a man imbued witli the modern 
spirit who would promote development and advancement. Born near Milo, 
Warren county. Iowa, on March 10. 1870. he came to Lucas county with his 
parents and resided with them on the home farm until his death. His parents 
were J. S. and Elizabeth (Devore) Gray, natives of Indiana and Kentucky 
respectively, the former of whom passed away in Jackson township, this county, 
in March, 1012, the latter preceding him in death in October, 1002, her demise 
occurring in the same township. Of their seven children, four are living, as 
follows: Fountain, of Colorado; William, of Kansas; Mrs. Boston, of White 
Breast township : and Jacob, of Kansas. 

Ferman E. Gray was reared under the parental roof and received his educa- 
tion in the district schools near the farm. Early he became acquainted with 
thorough agricultural methods, assisting his father in his work, and gradually 
more and more of the operation of the farm fell to his lot. On his demise he 
left eighty acres of fertile land on section 1. Jackson township, to his family, 
his wife deriving therefrom a comfortable income. 

On March 27. 1004, .Mi'. Gray was united in marriage to .Miss Effie M. 
Snuggs, who was born in Otter Creek township, Lucas county. Iowa, on Decem- 
ber 1, 1868, having always remained a resident of Ibis section. Her parents 
are S. G. and Adaline (Jenkins) Snuggs. the former a prominent farmer of 
Lucas county, where lie lias resided since 1862. He was born near London. 
England. March 2, 1845, and coming to the United States in 1850 with his 
mother, settled first in Henry county, Illinois, there remaining until removal 
to Lucas county was made. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Gray wen- 
Joseph and Harriet (Stent) Snuggs, natives of England, born in 1808 and 1809 
respectively, who died in Lucas county, the grandfather on .January <>, 1SS0, and 
the grandmother on duly 31, 1898. .Mrs. Adaline Snuggs, the mother of Mrs. 
Gray, was born in Brown county. Indiana. October 27. 1848, coming with her 
parents to Lucas county in 1851. The latter were Alexander and Elizabeth 
Jenkins, natives of Ohio and Kentucky respectively, the former of whom died 
in White Breast township, this county, and the latter still residing in Ham 
burg, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Snuggs became the parents of ten children, of 



260 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

whom one, John, the second in order of birth, is deceased. The others are: 
Mrs. Effie Gray, the wife of our subject; James, of Chariton; Fannie, of 
Rocky Ford, Colorado; Charles, residing al borne; Mrs. Amanda Roberts, of 
White Breast township ; Jacob, of Otter Creek township; .Mrs. Estella Ruble, 
of Liberty township; and Ethel and Earl, who reside on the Snuggs family home- 
stead. Mr. Snuggs is one of the foremost men of Otter Creek township, being 
widely renowned as a successful live-stock raiser. Mr. and Mrs. Ferman Gray 
were the parents of one sun. Lester R., born January 27. 1905, who is now 
attending school. 

Mr. Gray always took a deep interesl in the affairs of his county and 
efficiently served as road supervisor and scl 1 director, being especially inter- 
ested in the good mads movement and tl ause of education. Fraternally he 

was a member of the Yeomen, belonging to the lodge at Lucas. A member of 
one of the early pioneer families id' Lucas county, il was his father who plowed 
the first furrow where Chariton now stands and there he was located before 
the first shant\ was erected. The father also burned the brick for the Brsl 
courthouse ever erected in Lucas county. The untimely death of Ferman E. 
Gray was a matter of deep regrel to his many friends and acquaintances, who 
esteemed him for his warm-hearted kindliness, his open-heartedness and his 
many other high qualities of mind and character. A good husband and lather. 
he left his family well provided for and his memory is fresh in the minds 
those tlear to him. 



ROBERT »> MII.I.K 



The activities of Robert < >. Miller have indeed been helpful in the develop 
menl of Lucas county, for he is not onlj one of the foremost agriculturists 

of his locality and one of the most renow oed breeders of [ive stock of the county. 
hut has also interested himself along oiler lines, having successfully served as 

justice of the peace, township clerk, memlier of the school hoard and Sundaj 

school superintendent of his church. A farm of seven hundred acres mi sections 

15, 21 and '_':!. Otter Creek township, stands as proof of his practical application 

of labor and by its appearance bespeaks the prosperity of its owner. 

Robert 0. Miller was horn in Mason county. Illinois, on September l' s . 1861, 
and when hut seven years of age removed with his parents to (titer ('reek town- 
ship. Lucas COUnty, where settlement was made on a farm near Norwood. His 
father was William Miller, who was horn in County Armagh, Ireland, on the 

kith of July, Is:::;. | died in Norwood. Iowa, in March. 1901. His family was 

decided in making removal to the United States by the precarious living condi- 
tions e\istiii'_' |n the Emerald isle at (hat time and thus it was that William 

Miller became a substantial ami prominent A rican citizen. His wife was 

Diantha Ames, a native of Illinois, who still resides in Norw l at the age 

of eightj years, making her h • with our subject. In their farailj were seven 

children, of ulnun three are si ill living: Robert 0., of I his ri \ lew . .1 s . born 
December 13, 1865, who also resides in Otter ('reek township, ami Mis Delia 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 261 

E. Clore, bora November 24, 1868, of Otter Creek township. The brother of 

our subject is a native of Illinois, and the sister of Norwood, this stale. 

Coming to Otter Creek township when hut seven years of age, Robert 0. 
Miller received his education in this district in Simpson College, Indianola, 
and early assisted his father with the work of the farm, laying the foundation 
for his later success. As the years have passed prosperity has come to him and 
he is now one of the largest landowners of his locality, holding title to seven 
hundred acres on sections 15, 21 and 23. All his land is made use of and much 
of it is under high cultivation, his improvements being of the most substantial 
kind. Some of the best farm buildings in the county can be found upon the 
farm and modem equipments and implements facilitate the labor and contribute 
to the productivity of the soil. Ilis barns are splendidly equipped, his granaries 
and sheds for the housing of grain and stock substantial, and he has recently 
erected one of the most commodious, up-to-date farm dwellings to be found in 
this neighborhood. An impotrant branch of Mr. .Miller's work is stock-raising. 
He is renowned throughout Lucas county as a most extensive breeder of blooded 
horses, in which he largely deals, buying and selling, specializing in Clydesdales 
and Percherons. He also raises Welsh ponies and has a fine herd of pure- 
blooded shorthorn cattle and high-grade Poland China hogs. His efforts along 
all these lines have been remarkably effective, as he follows the most progressive 
and scientific methods and gives his attention to his work with unflagging 
industry and energy. 

On January 1. 1890, Mr. Miller was married to .Miss Amy Puderbaugh, who 
was born in Warren county. Iowa. December 25, 1868. Her parents, Andrew 
and Elizabeth (Wagner) Puderbaugh, were early settlers of Warren county, 
where .Mrs. Miller was reared. The father, who was born in Elkhart county, 
Indiana, died in Warren county at the age of sixty-eight years, the mother, a 
native of Ohio, also being deceased, her death occurring in that county at the 
age of forty-four. In their family were seven children: Mrs. Minerva Vincent, 
a resident of Warren county; William, of Missouri; D. L., of Warren county; 
Charles, also of that county; Mrs. Robert 0. Miller; Mrs. Sadie Barlett, of 
Osceola, Iowa; and Alonzo, who cultivates the old homestead in Warren county. 
All of these children were born and reared in Warren county. The three children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Miller were born in Otter Creek township and are as follows: 
John Worth, born January 4, 1891, who received a common-school education, 
supplementing the same with a course in Simpson College of Indianola. and is 
now assisting his father with the work of the farm; Ralph Olin. born February 
24, 1895, attending high school at Chariton, Iowa; and Bildreth Marie, born 
October 24, 1900, attending local school. 

It is not surprising that a man of flic ability of .Mr. Miller should have 
been called to public office, his qualities well fitting him for important positions 
of that kind. For a number of years lie served as justice of the peace, rendering 
his decisions with such fairness and impartiality that high commendation has 
come to him on that account. He also held the office of township clerk and has 
given evidence of his interest in the cause of education by doing efficient service 
as member of the local school board. Both Mi-, and Mrs. Miller affiliate with 
the Methodist Episcopal church of Norwood, of which they are members and 
in the work of which they take an active and helpful interest. Mr. Miller at 



262 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

present serving as Sunday school superintendent. His fraternal c lections 

extend to the Lndependenl Order of Odd Fellows, as he holds membership with 

Norw I Lodge, No. 490, and the Modern Woodmen of America, and he is on 

the roster of Nona I Camp, No. 5040. The splendid success Mr. Miller has 

achieved none can begrudge him, for it lias been attained withoul outside help 
and is bu1 the outcome of Ids own ability, efficiency, industrj and energy. Be 
lias become a forceful element in his locality, where he enjoys the lii i _ r li regard 
and confidence of all who value a man for what he has attained and for the 
qualities of his character which have made possible that attainment. 



■ kwis s. asiiky 



Lewis S. Ashby, who for a number of years has been connected with agri 
cultural and mercantile interests in Lucas countj . is a native of < Itter < 'reek tow n- 
ship, where he was born on September 7. 1861. Bis parents had come in the 
same year from Indiana to Iowa, settling in Otter ('reek township ill .May. 1861, 
and there the father followed farming and stock raising. Natives of Kentucky 
and Pennsylvania respectively, William II. and Margaretta Boyer Ashby 
were among the early settlers of this section, the father, who was born in Decem- 
ber, 1821, passing away in otter Creek township on April 26, 1875, and the 
mother, born November 28, 1823, dying in the same township on December 30, 
1902. In their family were nine children: Mrs. Elizabeth L. Yenawine, bom 
August 10, 1846, who died in Illinois in March, 1872; Mrs. Marj C. Long, born 
December L8, 1848, a resident of Twin Palls, Idaho; A. C, born -Inly 21, 1850, 
who resides in New Market. Tennessee; John I!., horn June 7. 1852, who died in 
1<s7U; Thompson D.. who for the past thirty-four years has engaged in farming 
ami stuck raising in Otter Creek tow uship ; Newton I!.. horn .lulv 7. 1856, a 
resident of Des Moines. Iowa, and formerly United States consul to Ireland with 

reside] in Dublin, Ireland, an appointment which he held under the presi 

dencj of Grover Cleveland for eighl years; George Lucky, horn December I s . 
1858, who makes his home in St. Paul, Texas; Lewis s.. of this review; and 
William E . hern February 11, 1864, who is connected with the telephone companj 
in Des Moines and was formerly engaged in the same business in Chariton, Iowa. 
Thi seven eldesl children were horn in Indiana and tin- two youngest in Lucas 
county. 

Lewis S. Ashby was reared under tin- parental roof and in the acquirement 
of his education attended the common schools in the vicinity of his father's farm 
ami look a four J ears' course at Simps, m College of I ndianola. Iowa. < >f si i id mi is 

mind and well fitted for the profession, he then followed school teaching for 
about six years in Iowa and Nebraska and then engaged in farming, being well 
qualified for this occupation bj Ins earlj training under Ins father's guidance 
In 1!»ii] he engaged in the general merchandise business at Norwood, biua. ami 
has ever since conducted an establishment of this kind there. Following pro 
gri ssive methods, his busim ^ has increased from year to year and he now enjoys 
an extensive patronage. He carries complete lines of stock and as his prices are 
In conformity with the quality of his ._ r <">ds. dues a large trade. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 263 

Mr. Ashby gives his general allegiance to the republican party, although 
he reserves independent judgment on local issues, giving his support to such 
candidates and measures as lie deems most fitted fur the office irrespective of 
party affiliation. Public-spirited and progressive, he has himself actively par- 
ticipated in the public life of his locality and has held a number of local offices. 
His faith is that of the Methodist Episeopal church, of whch he is a member, 
taking an active and helpful interest in its affairs. Fraternally he is ;i member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Norwood Lodge, No. 490, 
and he also belongs to the Modern Woodmen lodge of th.- same place. Moreover 
he carries a membership in the Brotherhood of American Yeomen at Oes Moines, 
Iowa. The career of Mr. Ashby is proof of the fact that success is but ambition's 
answer and the substantial position which he has attained is well earned and 
well merited. He is a forceful element in his community and by his labors has mil 
only promoted his individual success hut has largely contributed to general 
advancement and development. 



JOHN H. FRIMM. 



A native of Lucas county, John II. Primm is the owner of eighty fertile 
acres in Otter Creek township and also cultivates the family farm of two hundred 
and eighty acres. He was born in the same township on February 19, 1878, 
his parents being Thomas N. and Adelia (Perrine) Primm, the father a native 
of Athens, Illinois, where he was born .March 24, 1844, and now a resident of 
Chariton, Iowa, and the mother a native of Ohio who passed away in Otter Creek 
township in June, 1895. They settled in Otter Creek township in 1870. In 
their family were five children, of whom Anna died at the age of five years. The 
others are: Mrs. Mattie Lovell, born August 1, 1865, a resident of Holden, 
Missouri; Mrs. Nina Kelley, born February 13, 1873, residing in Otter Creek 
township; William Newton, born in the same township on January 14, 1875, 
and residing in Lakeland, Nebraska; and John II., of this review. 

John II. Primm has always been a resident of Otter Creek township, where 
he was reared and grew to manhood, hi the acquirement of his education he 
attended the common schools of his locality and early became acquainted wit It 
agricultural methods under the guidance of his father. Setting Out of his own 
accord, he has acquired eighty acres of land in Otter Creek township, will 
improved and equipped with all modern machinery. Since the retirement of 
the father from active farm work in 1900, when the latter moved to Chariton, 
he has also had entire charge of the management of the home farm a valuable 
property of two hundred and eighty acres. 

On March 1. 190:;. Mr. Primm was married to .Miss lob) L. Ashby. ;i native 
of Otter ('reck township, who was born November 8, 1882. She has been a 
resident of this locality ever since her birth and has many friends hen' who 
highly esteem and respect her. Her parents arc Mr. and .Mrs. Thompson I). 
Ashby, of whom extended mention is made in another pari of tin's work. Mi'. 
and Mrs. Primm have four children, all of whom were born on flic old family 
homestead. They are: Ardys Marjorie, born January 2. 1904; Eleanor Janice, 



264 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

born March 22. L906; John Gerald, born September 24, 1907; and Annie Adelia 
Lei, born March 30, 1909. The older children are attending public Bchool in 
the vicinity. 

Broad and liberal-minded, Mr. Primm takes an active interesl in the public 
life of Ins community, serving al present as a member of the township board of 
trustees. Be is also a warm champion of the cause of education and for eight 
years has served as a member of the school board. .Mrs. Primm is ;i member 
of the Methodisl Episcopal church and her husband affiliates with the Independent 
Order of odd Fellows, his membership being with Norwood Lodge. No. 490. 

Although ye1 a young man, Mr. Primm has bee recognized as our of the 

substantial agriculturists of his locality and enjoys the higli regard and con 
fidence of all with whom he comes into contact. 



JOHN W. KENT. 



A native of Illinois. John W. Kent was broughl to Jackson township, Lucas 
county, in March, L869, when two years of age, and here he has since resided, 
attaining to prosperitj and becoming one of the Eoremosl agriculturists of his 
district, now owning three hundred and thirtj acres of fertile land on sections 
20, 2\ and 17. Jackson township, all under high cultivation and well improved. 

Born in Mayvn I. Cook county, Illinois, on .March 9, 1867, John \V. Cent, 

is a son of William and Anna (Wherrett) Kent, natives of England, the 
former of whom passed away in Jackson township while the latter still resides 
in Lucas, Iowa. In the family were two suns: Charles, horn in Salem. Ohio, 
and now a resident of Jackson township: and John \V. of this review. 

In March, 1869, .Mr. and Mrs. William Kent settled in Jackson township, 

taking up land, the father following tin occupati if farming until his 

demise. Our subject in the acquirement of his education attended the common 

scl Is of the township and in his leisure hours and vacations abb assisted his 

father in the work on the home place, becoming thoroughly acquainted with 

the best thods of agriculture. As the years passed prosperitj' came to him 

as a result of his i ssant labors, his natural ability, good judgment and per 

seven e, and he now owns a splendid farm, e prising three hundred and 

thirty acres, unusually well improved with harns and outbuildings and a com 
fortable residence. His progressiveness is further shown by the tact that he- 
has a private electric plant. Beside general farming he gives a '_'<>"d deal of 
attention to stock-raising, specializing in Hereford cattle, of which he has a 
tine herd. Enterprising and up to date, he follows the latest methods and his 
property stands today as a proof of their efficacy and a monument to his 

industry. 

On March I l^\ Mr. Ken1 was united in marriage to Miss Addie Thomas, 

and to this union was horn one daughter, Ethel, the date of whose birth was 
Pebruarj Is. 1889, and who is married and resides in Ward. Iowa. I >n Novem- 
ber 1'.'. 1891, Mr Knit was again married, his second union being with Mrs 
Dora Carson McLaughlin, who was born in Clarke county, Iowa, on May 




UK. AMI MRS. .mux \v. KENT 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 267 

9, 1866, widow of John McLaughlin, who died September 19, 1887. To Mr. 
and Mrs. McLaughlin one child was horn. William Otis, whose birth occurred 
December 22. 1886. Her parents, A. C. Chame and Sarah (Abrams) ('arson, 
natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively, were among the earliest settlers 
of Clarke county. The father still resides in Woodburn, Iowa, lint the mother 
passed away in 1904 near that place. In their family were twelve children, 
of whom nine are living: John, residing near Woodburn, Iowa; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Black, of Des Moines; Thomas, a resident of North Dakota; Mrs. John W. 
Kent; Harry, who makes his home near Woodburn, Iowa; Mrs. Martha Kauf- 
man, of Greenfield, Iowa; Byron W., residing in South Dakota; Alta. who makes 
her home near Woodburn; and Mrs. Elsie Heston, who makes her home near 
that city. All of their living children were horn and reared in Clarke county, 
Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Kent gave practical evidence of their kindness of heart 
in the care which they bestowed upon Velma Carson, an orphan child, whom 
they took when she was one year old and whom they reared and educated. 
She remained with them until her marriage. She is now the wife of Mr. Noah 
Baker, who is an employe of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 
and they make their home at Creston. Iowa. 

Politically Mr. Kent is a republican, giving his steadfast adherence to the 
measures and candidates of that organization. A public-spirited man who 
takes an interest in his locality, he has for six years, or two terms, served as a 
member of the board of supervisors of Lucas county and has done efficient 
service in that connection. His religious faith is that of the Baptist church, 
and fraternally he is a member of Good Shepherd Lodge, No. 414, A. F. & A. M., of 
Lucas, and also of the Yeomen, while formerly he was affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. A self-made and conspicuously 
successful agriculturist. -Mr. Kent enjoys the esteem and respect of his fel- 
lows, not only for having wrought out for himself a substantial position, hut 
on account of the qualities of his character which have made his success pos- 
sihle. and on account of the work he has done on behalf of promoting general 
advancement. 



A. s. EVANS. 



For many years A. S. Evans was classed with the honored and represent- 
ative citizens of Lucas county and was closely associated with its agricultural 
development, transforming two hundred and forty acres of land which belonged 
to his wife, into one of the finest farms in this section of the state. lie took an 
active and helpful interest in many measures that were factors in promoting 
public progress and he was also known as one of the exemplary representatives 
of the Masonic fraternity. In fact his life was one of useful and honorable 
activity. lie was horn in Knox county, Illinois. June 13, 1847, his parents 
being Joshua Brown and Georgians (Crawford) Evans, the former a native 

of Hartford. Connecticut, born in 1824, while the latter's birth iurred in 

Scotland. The parents were among the early pioneers of Knox county. Illi- 
nois, and there the father passed away at Knoxville in 1871. his wife surviving 



I.i . as AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

brim and residing cm the old home farm in K n<.\ county. The grandfather of 
our subjed accompanied by Thomas and Joshua Evans came to America from 
England al the beginning of the Revolutionary war and all three enlisted m the 
American army. In Joshua B. Evans' family were eleven children, all born in 

Illinois: A. s.. of this review; George W., a residenl "i Lucas, who was born 
November 14. 1848, and who for the pasl twenty years has been assessor of 
Jackson township, Lucas county; Mary, who makes her home with her mother 
in Knoxville and who for thirty years lias taughl school in Illinois; Ernest, 

of Woodburn, Iowa: Eliza, d lased; William ('.. who is mentioned elsewhere 

in this volume; Margaret, of Eartford, Connecticut; J. 1).. deceased; Anna, of 
Galesburg, Illinois: Ellen, of Knoxville, Illinois: ami a daughter who died in 
infancy. 

A. s. Evans was reared under the parental roof in Knox county and in the 
acquiremenl of his education attended the schools in the neighborhood of his 
father's farm. Early he became acquainted with the methods of agriculture 
and in 1873 came to Iowa, seeking the advantages of a naturally rich bul as ye1 
sparselj settled country. Jackson township, Lucas county, witnessed his |j 
labors until his death and there he attained prosperity, becoming the owner ol a 
valuable farm of five hundred and thirty-four acres, which he gradually brought 
to a high state of cultivation. Following up to date methods he made high-class 
improvements ami installed such equipmenl as is considered indispensable to 
modern agriculture, leaving to his family a property which yields a gratifying 
annual income. 

On November 9, 1868, while yet in Illinois. A. s. Evans was united in mar 
riage to .Miss Sarah E. Woods, who was horn in Highland county, Ohio. Febru- 
ary 7. 1849. She was taken to Knoxville. Illinois, when a small child by her 

parents and was there reared to woinanh 1. Accompanying her husband to 

his Iowa farm in 1ST:! she has since made this stale her home. Her parents 
were John and Susan (Wilkins) Woods, natives of Ohio, the former of whom 
passed awaj in Illinois and the latter in her native slate. In their family were 
tWO sons ami a daughter, as follows: Henry, who died in Clarke county, Iowa: 
.Mrs. A. S. Evans; and Jesse, a residenl of Adair county, this state. Mr. 
and .Mrs. Evans became the parents of eighl children: Mrs. Anna Ellen Mar- 
,|, ns . a native oi Henrj county, Iowa, who resides iii Clarke county, tins state; 
Airs. Margarel (arson, of Clarke county; .Mrs. Emma Spencer, oi Jackson 
township, this countj . Bert, a residenl ■<; Jackson township; Floyd, of Clarke 
county; George, of Jackson township; olive, who makes her home with her 
mother; and Earl, who ablj assists his mother in the management of the home 
Farm. All of the children were reared in this township 

I-',, i- a number of years A. S. Evans acted as trust if the township hoard. 

giving by his efficienl service evidence of his public-spirited citizenship. Al- 
ways taking a deep interest in the cause of education, he also tide,! the posi- 
tion of loeal Bchool director foi some tune. Fraternally he was a member of 
Good Shepherd Lodge, No U I. A. F. & A. M., of Lucas and exemplified in his 
life the beneficent spirit of the order. Mrs. Evans still owns the highlj culti- 
vated I farm. The years have proved the worth of the labors of Mr 

Evans who. making wise use of time and opportunities, became one oi the sub 
Btantial members of his coi unity, yet more than thai was .-, serviceable factor 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 269 

in the general advancement and development of Lucas county, especially along 
agricultural lines. His memory still remains enshrined in the hearts of many 
as that of a good and kindly man who endeavored to fulfill life's obligations to 
his best ability. All who knew him bear testimony of his high character and 
of the principles of uprightness and honor which governed his life. The circle 
of friends which he left behind him is almost coextensive with the circle of his 
acquaintance, for he possessed qualities which endeared him lo all who knew 
him. 



AUGUST T. SWAXSON. 

There are many who. taking pessimistic views of life, think that the country 
is given over to the commercial spirit and that the religious element is diminish- 
ing. The life history of such a man as August T. Swanson stands to the con- 
trary. His profession is that of telegraphy, but he finds many leisure hours to 
devote to the task of making the world better, being a. licensed minister of the 
Baptist church. He holds the position of telegraph operator at Troy and is 
one of the native sons of Lucas county, his birth having occurred in White 
Breast township. September 9, 1877. There he was reared to manhood, spending 
his youthful days on the old home farm in White Breast township belonging to 
his lather, A. J. Swanson, a native of Sweden. Coming to America, he won for 
himself a most creditable position among the successful and highly respected 
citizens of Lucas county. He married Christina Johnson, also a native of 
Sweden and a daughter of Eric Johnson, who was born in Sweden, March 2. 
1N22. and became one of the pioneer settlers of Lucas county, Iowa, making his 
home in White Breast township. 1'nto Mr. and Mrs. Swanson were born eight 
children: Albert, a resident of Sisseton. South Dakota; Gus, who makes his 
home northeast of Chariton. Iowa: August T.. of this review: Oscar F.. who 
was born -January 24. 1880, and is residing in Lucas; Mrs. P. K Bristor, a resi- 
dent of Montpelier, North Dakota; Harvey, whose home is north of Chariton; 
Ilattie, who is residing with her mother on the old home farm in White Breasl 
township; and Arthur, who was born January 12. 1893, and is cultivating the old 
homestead. The eldest child was born in Chariton, the seven younger in White 
Breast township and all were reared upon the farm there. 

The usual experiences of the farm boy came to August T. Swanson. who 
divided his time between the work of the tields and the duties id' the schoolroom. 
After leaving the common schools he entered the Iowa Lusiness College at Des 
Moines and studied telegraphy. Tie was first employed in the office of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company at Chariton and in 1901 he 
became a telegrapher for that road at Union Switch and afterward went to 
White Breast, where he remained for six months. He then located at Troy, where 
he is telegraph operator for the same road. 

About four years -ago Mr. Swanson began to study for the ministry and is at 
present doing evangelistic work in connection with his duties as telegraph 
operator. Each year he spends his vacation in that way. He is a graduate of 
the Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, in which he has completed two courses. 



270 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

and is now a licensed evangelist of the Baptisl church. He is widely known in 
Chariton and throughout the- county and all who are acquainted with him speak 
of him in terms of the highest regard. He has a most clean record for business 
integritj and uprightness and is a genial, earnest gentleman who possesses the 
courage of his convictions. In his Christian work be has been found to be an 
able, earnest speaker and one w hose zeal inspires ;m<l encourages others. 

Mr. Swanson was married in 1904 t<> .Miss Mary Alice Powell, who was born 
April 1. 1877, and was reared to womanhood in Lucas county, attending the 
public schools of Chariton, after which she began teaching, being connected at 
differenl times with the schools of Lucas and of Chariton. Her father. James Pow- 
ell, is now deceased, bu1 her mother, .Mrs. .Martha I Fletcher Powell, is residing 
in ( 'ha rite n i. In their family were five children, of whom three are living: Emma, 
who is with her mother in Chariton; Mrs. Florence Malone, of Charles City, 
Iowa : and .Mrs. Swanson. One sun and one daughter are now deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Swanson have become the parents of a son, Donald Odell, born in Chariton. 
• I, nniary 14, 1910. Like her husband, Mrs. Swanson is an active worker in the 
Baptist church. It is his intention sunn to lake up evangelistic work altogether, 

his reading and studies being directed to that end. He now has a eh e librarj 

filled with literature <>f the best kind, and his reading is constantly broadening 
n mind which has already made its own many of the important thoughts that 
ha\e been penned by writers of earlier days. Lucas county is proud to number 

him among her native sons, for his work is being attended with excellent results 
and his high moral Courage marks him as a man who will accomplish great good 

iii the world. 



Kid JAMES BENWAY 



Eli James Benway has since lss| conducted a profitable blacksmith shop 

in Norwood, Lucas inty, where he is widely and favorably known for Ins 

sound business principles, his honest dealing, his reliability and his genial 
and pleasant disposition, which leads him to readily make friends, lie was 
born in Esses county, New Fork, on Januarj 1. 1848, a son of Eli Willard 
and Charlotte Montj Benway, natives of New York, the former being horn 
in 1si_'7 and the latter in 1832. In L858 the family removed to Vermont, 
where the father followed the occupation of blacksmith. In thai stale the 

mother died in 1859 and f] i there the father enlisted for service in the 

<'i\il war in 1862 with the Eleventh Vermont Volunteer Infantry, belonging 
to the sixth Army Corps, remaining in the field for the term of his enlist 
ment. At the end of that period lie returned home but subsequently reen 
listed, doing valiant service until the close of the war. The father passed 
away in Kansas in 1892 In the familj of Mr and Mrs Eli W. Benway were 
three sons, all natives of New York, as follows; Eli J., of this review; Wal- 
lace, a resident of Huntington, Vermont; and Henrj ('. who makes his home 
in Illinois. All follow the blacksmith's trade. 

Eli -I. Benwaj was reared under the parental root and received Ins educa 
tion in New Fork and Vermont, making removal with the family to thai slate 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 271 

in 1858. There he learned the blacksmith. 's trade from his lather, remaining 
until 1868, when he came to Illinois, where he made another stay of ten 
years, coming in 1878 to Chariton, Iowa, where he conducted a shop near the 
present site of the Inland Coal Company's plant. The year 1881 marks his 
arrival in Norwood, where he has since followed his trade with conspicuous 
success. His shop is well and modernly equipped and lie engages in general 
blacksmithing and repair work and as he deals fairly and squarely with his 
patrons, has built up a valuable and extensive patronage which brings him 
gratifying returns. lie has become a substantial man of his community and is 
very popular with the public. 

In December, 1868, Mr. Benway was married to .Miss Maria Riehman, who 
was born in Peoria, Illinois, on December 7, 1850, and was reared there. Her 
parents were Bryan and Ann (Colby) Riehman, both natives of England, the 
latter being born in Lincolnshire. The father died in Otter Creek township, 
this county, the mother preceding him in death, passing away in Peoria. Illi- 
nois, in 1854. Tn their family were three children: Mrs. Benway; Lucy, who 
died at the age of two years; and William, also deceased. All were natives of 
Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Benway were born six children, of whom Addie, the 
second in order of birth, died at the age of two weeks. The others are: Walter, 
born in October, 1870, a resident of Otter Creek township; .Mrs. Lona Boston, 
born January 17, 1S74, residing in Jackson township; Harry, born May 19, 
1878, of Allerton, Iowa: Mrs. Delia Wright, born December 17, 1880, of Chari- 
ton, Iowa; and Mrs. Grace Poush, born January 22, 1882, of Otter Creek town- 
ship. The three eldest of the family were born in Illinois and the remainder 
in Iowa. 

Mr. Benway affiliates with the democratic party, keeping well informed 
upon all public issues. His wife is a member of the .Methodist Episcopal 
church of Norwood, to which she gives her moral and material support, and 
he is a member of Norwood Lodge, No. 490. I. 0. O. F. He owns a com- 
fortable residence, set in two acres of land, on which also is located his 
blacksmith shop. Both he and his wife enjoy the highest confidence and re- 
spect of the community, in which they have made many friends during a resi- 
dence extending over thirty years. 



SYDNEY P. HOWARD. 

In a twofold manner Lucas county has profited by the activities of Sydnej 
P. Howard, who not only has raised agricultural standards, being one of the 
substantial farmers of his locality, but for thirty years has been connected 
with the cause of education as teacher and member of the school board in 
Lucas and Clarke counties. A native of Newton county, .Missouri, he was born 
on July 24, 1850, his parents being Henry ('. and Cynthia Ann (Bonner) 

Howard, both of whom were born near Bowling Green, Kentucky, the for r 

on April 11, 1811, and the latter on February :{, 1812. The parents remained 
in Missouri until 1863. when removal was made to Warren county. Illinois, 
where thev resided until 1866. when they came to Lucas county. They were 



272 II CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

among il arlier families to settle here, the father following agricultural pur- 
suits until his death, which occurred onlj one year after settlemenl was made 
here, September 7. 1867. The mother survived him nearly forty years, pass- 
ing away in Lucas county on June 5, 1906. In their family were nine children, 
of vvliiini five are living. Those deceased are: .Mrs. Julia Lowder, born Sep 
tember 23, 1833; .Mrs. Melinda Jane Lowder. horn December 25, 1837; Eliza- 
beth Ellen, born .May 27, 1839, who died January 18, 1889; and Cynthia Livona, 
born Augusl 25, 1844, who died Januarj 10, 1848. The living children are: 
John .M.. horn dune 20, 1836, a resident of Waynesburg, Pennsylvania; Wil- 
liam Henry, born September ■">. 1840, residing in Creston, Washington; .Mrs. 
Paralee F. Brinegar, hum February l'4. 1848, residing in Otter ('reek town- 
ship; Sydney I'., of this review; and George Washington, horn .May 27, 1853, 
who makes his home in Berkeley, California. Of their nine children the two 
eldest were born near Bowling Green, Kentucky, the next following three in 
Illinois and the remainder in Missouri. 

Sydney P. Howard began his education in the schools near his lather's 
farm in Newton county. Missouri, and in 1863 accompanied his parents to 
Warren county. Illinois, where he continued Ins education. There remaining 
until 1866, he then came to Lucas county, where he has since resided. Be 
has been prominently and closelj connected with the cause of education in this 
districl from pioneer times and there are many who are indebted to him for 
their instruction in Lucas and Clarke counties, where he taughl school for 
thirty terms. Be now gives his attention largely to his valuable farm of four 

hundred and seventy seven ami a half acres located on sections 28, L'!> and :!:! 

of otter Creek township, although he still serves as secretarj of the local school 

hoard, a position which he has efficiently tilled for the past thirty years. His 

farm is under high cultivation, yielding bountiful harvests, and g I improve 

in. nis have I ii made upon the land. The residence is located on section '_ ,yi 

and. commodious ami comfortably furnished, represents an ideal farm home. 
Outbuildings and hams are in the hest of repair and the most modern equip- 
ment and implements were instituted to facilitate farm labor and increase the 
productivity of the soil. His energetic and industrious efforts have hen 
crowned with success and he is todaj considered as one of the substantial men 
of his locality. 

i in November 9, 1887, Mr. Howard was united in marriage to Miss Cath 
arine Lavilla Penick, who was born in Noble county, Indiana. Julj 17. 1864, 

and came with her pareiils to Lucas COUntj in l s 7v IL r parents were Samuel 

and Eliza (Fisher) Penick, tin 1 formei born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, on 

Ma\ 26, 1842, and the latter in llolims county, that stale, on Max 28, 1843 
I',,, lli are still living, making their home on a farm in <>tler (reek township, 
this county. Mr. and Mrs. Penick became the parents of six children, of whom 
Mrs. Sydnej I'. Howard is the eldest. The others were: William Sherman. 

who died in infancy; John I... deceased. Nathan W., of otter Creek town- 
ship. Mrs Florence Curtis, deceased; and Mrs. Rubj Anderson, of Warren 
county, this state. All of the children were horn in Indiana with the excep- 
tion of the youngest, who is a native of Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Howard became 
the parents of eleven children, all of whom were horn in Otter Creek town- 
ship. They were: Ina Ethel, born December 14, 1888, who died December 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 273 

15, 1893; Charles Earl, born .May 10, 1890, who died December 8, 1893; Mrs. 
Elsie Pearl Pirn, born December 4, 1891, a resident of Jackson township; Mrs. 
Beulah May Edwards, born October 3, 1893, residing in Otter Creek township; 
Katie P., born July 10. 1895; Wayne Porter, born April 8, 1S97 ; Flossie 
Carol, born January 7. 1899, who died February 9, 1899; Louie Gail, born 
April 30, 1900; Ila Lois, born January 28, 1902; Ima Nell, born March 1, 
1904; and Zella Ruth, born December 5, 1906. 

Politically Mr. Howard is a republican and has efficiently served in the 
position of township clerk, while for three decades he has done important 
work as secretary of the local school board, of which he has been a member 
since 1882. Both he and his wife are members of the United Evangelical 
church of Otter Creek, in the affairs of which they are active, giving their help- 
ful support to all movements undertaken to spread the Christian spirit and 
elevate humanity. While Mr. Howard has attained to an enviable position 
and has achieved financial independence, his life work has been of greater 
importance, for he has played a vital part in the advancement of Lucas 
county and his home locality along moral, intellectual and material lines. 



CHARLES ELLSWORTH KENT. 

Charles Ellsworth Kent is representative of the progress agriculture and 
stock-raising has made in Lucas county. Settling on section twenty-one. Jackson 
township, in 1869, when but eight years of age, he has since made his home there 
and attained substantial success in his occupation. His farm consists of three 
hundred acres, located on sections 21, 29 and 17, and is provided with two sets 
of good improvements, his well repaired outbuildings, barns, granaries and 
shed and his comfortable residence bespeaking the prosperity of their owner. 

Charles Ellsworth Kent was born in Salem. Columbiana county, Ohio, on 
September 7. 1861, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. William Kent, the former a 
native of England, who was bom June 5, 1826, ami died in Jackson township, 
this county. April 24, 19(16. after a long and successful agricultural career. An 
extended sketch of his life appears in this work under his own name. 

Charles Ellsworth Kent was married in 1882 to .Miss Carrie C. Hawkins, a 
native of Van Buren county. Iowa, where she was born January 24, 1866. At an 
early age she came with her parents to Lucas county and has ever sine resided 
here. Her father was Christopher B. Hawkins, whose life record is given in 
greater detail in connection with the sketch of C. C. Hawkins. Mr. and Mrs. Kent 
became the parents of the following children : Albert, born July 18, 1883, a resi 
dent of Jackson township; William, horn March 7. 1886, also of this township; 
Harry, born May 31, 1888, who passe, I away July 31, 1890; Oscar, horn Octo 
her 16. 1892, who resides with his parents on the old home farm; and Raymond, 
born January 1. 19(17. All of these children are natives of Jackson township 
and those surviving attended common school there. Mr. Lent gives his support 
to the republican party. Public-spirited ami well informed he has always taken 
;i deep interest iii the public life of his locality, and for ten years has efficiently 



274 I.I CAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

served as township trustee, while as a member oi the school board of Jackson 
township tie lias given evideno ol his interesl in the cause of '•'Iucati.ni. Bis 
wife is a member of the Reorganized Church of the Latter Day Saints, in the 
work of which she takes an active and helpful interest. Fraternally Mr. Kenl is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, being affiliated with Lucas Lodge, No. 133. A 
man of many interests, .Mr. Kenl has become closelj connected with the develop- 
menl ami advancemenl of this region and his life labors has.' aol onlj been 
productive of individual sun-ess but have largely contributed to the general 
prosperity. A man marked by strength of character, he has become a forceful 
element in his locality, where bis sterling traits have won him the bigb regard 
ami confidence of all those with "hum be has come in contact. 



R. ('. POSTON. 



R. < '. Poston has for over twenty years practiced law in Corydon and in 
that time has huilt up a large and gratifying practice. Moreover, be has 
attained prominence in other lines and at presenl tills an executive position in 
connection with the Farmers & .Merchants state Hank and also has faithfully 
served the people in public office. Mr. Poston was born in Wapello county. Iowa. 
February -1 . 1855, and is a son of Nimrod and Catherine (Gilliland Poston, the 
former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. The grandfather of our 
subject was Alexander Poston, of Virginia, and a gentleman of English descent, 
several of whose ancestors had foughl in the Revolutionary war. Alexander 

I 'ost -ame to Iowa during the early pioneer days, in 1847, and settled in 

Wapello county, where he homesteaded governraenl land. The Gilliland family 

came to Iowa tWO years before this, in 1845, and it was here that the parents 

of our subject were married. The Postons, in making their way to the west, 
came by steamboat by way of the <>hio and the Mississippi rivers, bul the 
mother's people came in the typical pioneer style by ox team and wagon. Nim- 
rod Poston farmed in Wapello county during all his life, attaining sue 

along agricultural lines, and here he lived until his death, lie not onlj became 

a prosperous farmer but was also pr lenl in public life, being elected as a 

member of the fifth general assembly from Wapello county. 

R. (' Poston was educated iii the public schools and in L870 came to Wayne 

County. His mother had died when he was a boj of Onlj thirteen years and 

ever since thai time he was compelled t ake his own way in the world. From 

his small earnings he saved as much money as he could and by teaching school 

and carefullj husbanding his resources he was able to attend the state Univei 
sity. from which he graduated in l s> --. After he had received his degree and 
was admitted to the bar he began to practice at Bumeston, Iowa, where he 
remained until 1891, when he came to Corydon, where he has since successfully 

followed his profession. Be tupies a creditable and enviable position at the 

Wayne county bar. for he prepares bis cases with greal thoroughness and skill 
and presents them clearlj and forcibly, so thai he never fails to command the 

attention of COUrl or jur\ and often obtains the verdict which he desire. Bis 

reasoning is logical, ins deductions sound and he is Idom surprised bj an 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 277 

unexpected attack of opposing counsel. Entirely tree from ostentation and 
display, he impresses by the simple weight of his character, his knowledge and 
his sincerity. 

In 1882 Mr. Poston was married to Miss Clare A. Williams, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Uriah Williams, of Warren county. Iowa, who had removed there 
from Virginia originally. Mr. and Mrs. Poston have one son, Eugene E., who 
is a graduate of the liberal arts and law departments of Drake University and 
is now living at home. 

Mr. Poston is a public-spirited man and takes great interest in the growth 
and development of the city and the locality in which he lives. He has been 
honored with public office, as he was called upon to serve as county attorney 
from 1895 to 1S97, fulfilling his duties in an energetic manner, which was entirely 
satisfactory to his constituents. Outside of his legal interests Mr. Poston has 
become prominent in financial circles of Corydon as president of the Farmers 
& Merchants Bank and by his wise guidance in this office he has greatly 
influenced the development of this important financial institution. His fra- 
ternal relations are with the Masonic order, in which he holds membership 
in the blue lodge, of which he has been master for several years, and the 
commandery. while he also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. He has made a 
creditable record in the profession, his course being marked by steady progress, 
gained through ready utilization of every opportunity that has presented itself, 
and his industry and energy have found substantial reward in a most gratifying 
degree of prosperity. 



JOHN W. NORMAN. 



As one of the foremost agriculturists of his section John W. Norman occupies 
an enviable position, owning four hundred and ten acres of valuable land in 
Otter Creek township, Lucas county. Moreover, he has been closely connected 
with the public life of his township and the county, having efficiently served 
in various positions, lie was born in Noble county, Ohio, on March 15, 1866, 
coming in 1878 to Benton township. Lucas county, with his parents, who are 
Nathan and Sarah (Hiekle) Norman and who are residing on their farm in 
Otter Creek township. The paternal grandfather of our subject, William 
Norman, was born in Virginia and distinguished himself in the War of 1812, 
participating in the battle of New Orleans. lie passed away in Ohio. 1 1 is 
wife was Mary (Kiggins) Norman, also a native of Virginia, dying in the 
same state as her husband. Both were early settlers of the Buckeye state. 
The maternal grandparents were Stephen and Mary Ann (Drake) Hiekle, 
natives of Virginia, who both passed away in Ohio, of which state they also 
were early settlers. The father, who was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, on 
January 26, 1841, carried out the military traditions of tin- family by enlisting 
in the Union army in the Civil war. doing valiant service until his honorable 
discharge. Tin- mother was also born in Ohio, her birth occurring in Noble 
county on February 1. 1836. She became the mother of three children: Elisha 
N born August 9, 1861, who resides with his parents; John W.. of this review; 



278 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

and Marj Jane, bom in December, L867, also making her home with her 
parents on their farm in Otter Creek township. The children were born in 
Ohio init reared in Lucas county. In 1878 the parents ram. to Benton 
township, this county, and there settled, the ratlin- giving Ins attention to 
bringing his farm to a high state of cultivation. Although his financial resources 
were limited, his earnesl efforts won the day and he is now considered one of 
the substantial men of Ids locality. 

John W. Norman removed with his parents in 1878 from Ohio to Benton 
township, Lucas county, attending the common schools in Lucas county, al 
Bethel, and also receiving instruction in Brush College. In 1 s >- the family 
removed to Jackson township but in 1886 settled in Otter Creek township. 
where he has followed farming and stock-raising since. The Norman farm of 
four hundred and ten acres is under high cultivation and provided with two 
sets of good improvements. All modern equipmenl and machinery, to facil- 
itate farm labor and increase the productivity of the soil, can be found u] 

the property and spacious modernly constructed barns, sheds, outbuildings 
and granaries give ample shelter for stock and harvests. Mr. Norman special- 
izes in black polled Angus cattle and derives a gratifying addition to his in- 
come from tins branch of his business. 

i in March 30, 1897, John W. Norman was married to .Miss Lucy C. Redling- 
shaffer, who was born in Benton township. Lucas county, May 21, 1>74. She 

received a thorough education and for many years was o f Lucas county's 

inosi successful public-school teachers. Hit parents, George W. and Prances 
i Lewis Redlingshaffer, wen- among the early pioneers "( Benton township 
The father was born in Bavaria, Germany, on February 7. ls;;-j. and died in 
Benton township on September 1. 1905. II. • came to America in 1849, during 
the times of the great revolutionary movemenl in the fatherland, and 1856 
marks his arrival in Lucas county. The mother was born in Fulton county. 
Ohio. September 18, 1840, and died in Benton township, Lucas county, on 
October 31, 1893, preceding her husband in death by aboul twelve years. In 
then- family were twelve children: George l>.. horn February 1. 1862, of Des 
Moines, [owa; Mrs. Nancy M. Wilson, born March 1. 1863, of Hillsdale, 
Wyoming; Mrs. Alice M. Pickett, horn December '-'7. 1864, of Chariton, this 
county: Mrs. Irene I-. Whiteside, born March 6, 1866, of Benton township: 
Charles M.. horn February 9, 1869, who did Februarj Hi. 1906; Mis. Buna F 
Myers, born March s, 1872, residing in White Breasl township: Mis. John w 

Norman; Mrs. Mary A. Bruning, born .January 20, 1876, of Des t, Idaho; 

William I... born December 28, 1^7s : Delia <>,. horn March 24, 1880, who died 
Januarj 28, 1894; Mrs. Lily Belle Anderson, horn Augusl 21, 1882, of Kali 

spell. Montana; and Nellie <!.. horn February o. 1887, also of that city. All 

children were horn and reared in Lucas county. Mr. and Mrs. Norman 

are ir, ■ parents of si\ children: Twila M., bori March 30, 1898, the first 

wedding anniversarj of her parents; Helen I'., horn .Inn.- I. 1899; Iva M. 
l..rn Februarj li>. l!»i»i . Hugh R., born Augusl 6, 1902; John K. born April 
r_>. 1904; and Nellie J., horn Januarj 9, 1907. All these childrei were born 

in Otter Creek township ami are attending public s.-l I. 

John W. Norman is a republican and t.-ik.s a livelj interest in all matters 
aining to the welfare of the community. Being recognized aa a man of no 



I.I I AS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 279 

mean ability, he has been called to serve in various positions of trust and 
honor and has done efficient duty as township assessor, trustee and member of 
the school board, giving- in this last connection evidence of his deep concern 
in the cause of education. From 1907 to 1913 Mr. Norman served as a mem- 
ber oi' the hoard of supervisors of Lucas county, filling the office to the entire 
satisfaction of those whom he represented. The county distinctly profited by 
his labors and he inaugurated or promoted a number of measures which have 
proven to be of lasting benefit. Mr. and Mrs. Norman are members of the 
United Evangelical church of Otter Creek and fraternally he is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Norwood Lodge, No. 490. 
Looked at from whatever point of view, his life must be considered a success. 
for he has not only attained individual prosperity hut has become a forceful 
eleim lit in his community, a factor for progress and advancement along material 
and moral lines. Honored wherever known, he stands high in the estimation 
of his fellowmen. who respect him not only for the position which he holds in 
the community hut for the qualities of bis character that have made possible 
his success. 



BOYD DICKERSON McCAULEY. 

A. valuable farm of two hundred and forty acres in Jackson township. Lucas 
county, gives evidence of the incessant labors and ability along the line of agri- 
cultural work of Boyd Dickerson McCauley, who is numbered among the most 
prosperous farmers of his locality. Horn in Lee county. Virginia, on March 
IS. 1861, he is a son of George and Mary Ann (Martini McCauley, the former 
a native of Ireland and the latter of England. The father was killed during 
the Civil war. in 1865. at Richmond, Virginia, while serving in Lee's army. 
The mother also died in Virginia at the age of seventy-two. She was a mem- 
ber of the famous Martin family of thai state, one of the present United States 
senators from Virginia being a member of the family. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley 
were the parents of five children, as follows: James, deceased; Albert, deceased; 
Wesley, deceased; Boyd Dickerson: and .Mrs. Lenora .Miles, who resides on the 
home farm in the Old Dominion. 

The larger part of his education Mr. McCauley received in his native state 
but at the age of fourteen moved westward and settled at Derby, Lucas county. 
Iowa, remaining there until 1880, when he removed to Jackson township, of 
which he has since been a resident. Taking up agricultural pursuits as his life 

work, he has by progressive and modern methods suee led in developing one 

of the valuable farms of his locality, on which he engages in general farming 
pursuits and stock-raising, gratifying results attending both lines of labor. 
His .arm is situated on sections 1!> and 32, Jackson township, ami g I im- 
provements have been placed upon it by Mr. McCauley. Such equipmenl as 
is considered indispensable to modern agriculture can he found upon the place 
and the standards which are followed by the owner may he set up as examples 
for others to follow. The family residence is substantially built, comfortable 
and conveniently equipped. 



280 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

On October ■">. L886, Mr. McCauley was united in marriage to .Miss Margaret 
.l.in. Walker, a native of Jackson township, where she was born on February 
is. I860. There sin- grew in womanhood ami has always since made her resi 

dence. Hit parents were among il arlj pioneers of Lucas county, making 

their home here in the spring of 1859. Ber father, James I.. Walker, was born 
in Scotland ami died in Jackson township in L880, a1 the age of sixty years, 
the mother also passing away in thai township on March 21, 1912. Before her 
marriage she was Marj Stevenson and was born in Ohio on August 31, 1824 
In their family were four children: Mrs. McCauley, the wife of our subject; 
James A., born May 12, 1861, residing on the old Walker family iiomestead in 
Jackson township; ami two who died in infancy. .Mi-, ami .Mrs. McCauley are 
the parents of three children: Grover Wesley, born July I. l sv> . residing at 
Lakota, Iowa; .Mary Ann. horn October 21, 1890, who makes her home with 
her parents; ami .lames Horace, horn December 7. 1892, also residing at home. 
All of the children attended com n school. 

Mr. McCaulej gives his allegiance to the democratic party, taking a public- 
spirited interest ill all mailers that affeel his community, although lie has never 
cared to participate in political lite. The religious faith of the familj i^ that 
of tie- Presbyterian church, both Mr. and Mrs. McCaulej being members of 
that organization in Lucas. Fraternally Mr. McCaulej is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. His career is proof of the fact that ambition, 
united with industry ami energy, leads to success, and he is big] Ij regarded 
and esteemed by all who know him for what he has accomplished and for those 
qualities of his character which have made possible his prosperity. 



.IOSIAII S. WILSON 



A lifelong residenl of Lucas county. Josiah S. Wilson was horn in Benton 
township. October 28, L875, and. growing to manhood here, has always made 
agriculture his chief occupation. His parents were Roberl Lee and Nancy (Smith 
Wilson, the former a native of Coshocton county, Ohio, where be was horn in 
1847, ami the latter of Meigs county, Tennessee, horn October <>. l s .">4. The 
father died in < 'larke count} . this state, in 1895, but the mother is still surviving 
and makes her home in that county. In their family were ten children: -losiah 

s.. of this review; Mrs. olive Roberts, horn Februarj 1-i. 1877, of Otter <'i k 

township. Mis Elizabeth Johnson, whose birth occurred on January 13, 1879, 
and w ho resides in Clarke county: Lucius, horn November L"'. 1881, who makes 

his home with his mother on the old I ie farm in Clarke count} : Mrs Jennie 

McGee, horn January 27, 1883, residing in Le Boy, Iowa: Harlan, whose natal 
day was January 29, l ss ">. of (larke county; Charles, horn May 30, l- s 7. also 
of Clarke county; Roy, born November 14, 1890, who resides on the home 
farm with his mother; Ida. who passed awaj m December, 1896, in childhood; 

ami Bessie, the youngest in the family, who also makes her hi • with her mother 

in (larke county. The three eldest of these children were horn in Lucas county, 
tin. succeeding four in Wayne count \ ami the younger ones in Clarke county. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 281 

Josiah S. Wilson grew to manhood under the parental root' and has always 
been a resident of this immediate vicinity. In the acquirement of his education 
he attended the common schools and as soon as old enough took up agricul- 
tural labors, early becoming acquainted with thorough methods and the details 
of farm work as well as market conditions and the profitable disposal of farm 
products. He now is engaged in the cultivation of two hundred and forty fertile 
acres of land in Otter Creek township which are highly improved. His build- 
ings bespeak the prosperity of their owner, being modernly equipped and in 
good repair, and he has installed the most modern machinery for labor-saving 
purposes in order to increase the yield of his farm. He also gives consider- 
able attention to the raising of live stock, of which he keeps a good grade. 

On August 21, 1901, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Gerda 
Lang, a native of Otter Creek township, where she was born on September 13, 
1878. and grew to womanhood, ever having made her home here. Her parents, 
James Moore and Edna J. (Marsh) Lang, were well known farming people of 
Lucas county, owning a valuable tract of two hundred and forty acres, well 
improved. The father was born in Pennsylvania on December 13, 1839, and the 
mother in Marietta, Ohio. May 12. 1848. They now reside at San Gabriel, 
California, the father having practically retired from active labors, although he 
still owns his farm in this vicinity. The mother was one of Lucas county's earliest 
settlers and for many years one of its most successful school teachers. Mr. Lang 
was employed for many years by the Chicago. Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
as bridge carpenter before settling upon his farm. He also helped to build the 
barn on the poor farm of Lucas county. The maternal grandmother of .Mrs. 
Wilson was one of the first passengers to come into Lucas by the Chicago. Bur- 
lington & Quincy trains. Mr. and Mrs. Lang became the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Ethel, born February 18, 1876, who died when but four years old, 
on March 3, 1880; Mrs. Wilson, the wife of our subject; Nora, born February 
2, 1881, who is a stenographer and resides with her parents at San Gabriel, Cali- 
fornia; J. Marsh, born January 5. 1886. residing in Jackson township; and 
Fay. whose natal day was September 22, 1891, and who teaches school in the 
Golden state. All of these children were born in Otter Creek township. Mr. 
Lang was among the early pioneers of Lucas county and always played a promi- 
nent part in shaping public affairs. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have been born 
seven children ; Elma. born at Glenwood, Iowa. .May :il . 1902 ; Theo, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1903. Philip, whose natal day is December 2, 1907; Vera, born May 
19. 1909; Lura. who was born June 4. 1911); Marvin, born June 11. 1911; 
and Marie, born June 11. 1912. All except the eldest daughter were born in 
Otter ( 'reek township. 

Josiah S. Wilson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
has given evidence of his interest in the development of his section and espe 
cially in the cause of education by efficiently serving as a member of the school 
board for nine years. Both he and his wife are members of the United 
Brethren church of Otter Creek, in the work of which they take a helpful 
interest, and he is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America of Lucas. 
He is a public-spirited and progressive man. always gladly willing to bear 
his share in promoting worthy public enterprises and giving as much consid- 
eration to the general welfare as to his individual success. His sturdy character 



282 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

istics, bis industry, energy and thrift have made possible a success which 

places him among the substantia] men of his locality and, as he is recognized 

- ich, he is a forceful and serviceable factor in general expansion and enjoys 

the confidence and g I will of all who know him and the friendship of manj who 

find represented in him those higb qualities oi character which always elicit 
admiration, 



ARLES B. ROGERS 



One ni the mosl enterprising, progressive and substantia] business men of 
Lucas is Charles B. Rogers, a partner in the firm of McKlveen Brothers & Rogers, 
who are connected with commercial and industrial interests as dealers in lum- 
ber, hardware, farm implements and grain. They have built up an extens 

trade and their enterprising methods and careful manage u1 promise further 

success in the fututre. Mr. Rogers has always lived in Lucas countj with the 
exception of seven years spent in Marion county, Iowa, liis birth having occurred 
in Lincoln township, December 31, 1870. Ee is a sun of T. S. and Frederika 
Grand-Girard) Rogers, the former of whom was born in Barrisburg, Pennsylva 
nia. December ::. 1825, ami the latter in Ohio. November 22, 1842. The father 
came to Iowa in L867 with a view to making a permanent location in the state and, 
being satisfied with Ins investments, returned for his wife and together thej 
took up their home in Chariton in 1868. The father boughl land jusl south of the 
city, in Lincoln township, and engaged in tannine f or a number of years They 
now reside in Fresno. California. In their family were four children, all of 
whom were horn in Lincoln township; Mrs. .Mary Porter, whose birth occurred 
•July 9, 1869, and who is now residing in Fresno, California: Charles B., of this 
review; Mrs. Nellie Gillespie, who was born December ii. 1872, and who makes 
her home in Fowler, California; and Mrs Emily Williams, of Oskaloosa, Iowa, 
horn September 21, 1878. All of these children were reared in Lucas county and 
acquired their education in the local schools, all graduating from the Chariton 
high school 

Charles B. Rogers grew t" muni I upon Ins father's farm in Lincoln town- 
ship and after completing his high-school course in 1> s 7 continued to reside 
upon the homestead for two years. In the fall of |ssp |, r turned his atten- 
tion to business pursuits, obtaining a position in the employ of Eikenbern .v 
Company, of Chariton. Iowa, with whom he continued at Chariton until July, 

1891, when he was made manager at Pleasantville, Iowa, for the sat ;om 

pany. While still thus engaged the name of the firm was changed i" G •' 
Stewart & Company, Mr. Rogers continuing as manager at Pleasantville until 
February 1. 1899, when he formed a partnership with McKlveen Brothers 

in the lumber, hardware, farm implement and grain lnisin.ss ai I. mas. They 

are accorded a liberal patronage in each line and their lmsim-s^ j s annually 
growing in volume ami importance. The success of the undertaking is attrihul 

a I ile in no small measure to the manager, Ml'. Rogere, «linsr careful ami systematic 

methods an. I keen business discernment constitute important elements in the 

attainment of prosperitj lie owns an attractive and well furnished home iii 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 283 

Lucas and important business interests here, besides a profitable Fruil ranch in 

California. 

On November 28, 1893, Mr. Rogers married Miss Cynthia Litchfield, whose 
birth occurred in Pleasantville, Iowa. October 26, 1871. and who passed away 
April 29, 1913. She was a daughter of A. X. and Mahala (Thompson) Litchfield, 
the former born in Ohio and the latter in Marion county. Iowa, where her birth 
occurred October 29. 1851. They came as early settlers to .Marion county. The 
father was a veteran of the Civil war. serving in that conflict as a member of the 
famous Ohio Third Cavalry under the command of General George Custer. For 
fear that the famous order issued by General Custer at the time of Lee's sur- 
render at Appomattox Courthouse has not been preserved it will lie inserted in 
this review. .Air. Rogers is in possession of the original, of which the following 
is a copy : 

"Soldiers of the Third Cavalry Division: 

"With profound gratitude toward the God of battles, by whose blessings our 
enemies have been humbled and our alius rendered triumphant, your commanding 
general avails himself of this, his first opportunity, to express to you his admira- 
tion of the heroic manner in which you have passed through the series of battles 
which today resulted in the surrender of the enemy's entire army. The record 
established by your indomitable courage is unparalleled in the annals of war. 
Your prowess has won For you even the respect and admiration of your enemies. 
During the past six months, although in most instances confronted by superior 
numbers, you have captured from the enemy in open battle one hundred and eleven 
pieces of artillery, sixty-five battle flags and upwards of ten thousand prisoners 
of war. including seven general officers. Within the past ten days and included 
within the above you have captured forty-six pieces of field artillery and thirty- 
seven battle flags. You have never lost a gun, never lost a color, and have never 
been defeated. And, notwithstanding the numerous engagements in which you 
have borne a prominent part — including those memorable battles of the Shenan- 
doah — you have captured every piece of artillery the enemy has dared to open 
upon you. The near approach of peace renders it improbable that you will 
again be called upon to undergo the fatigue of the toilsome march or the exposure 
of the battlefield; but should the assistance of keen blades wielded by your sturdy 
arms be required to hasten the coming of that glorious peace for which we have 
been so long contending, the general commanding is proudly confident that in the 
future, as well as in the past, wcry demand will meet with a hearty and willing 
response. Let us hope that our work is done and that, blessed with the comforts 
of peace, we may soon be permitted to enjoy the pleasures of home ami friends. 
For our comrades who have fallen let us cherish a grateful remembrance. To the 
wounded and those who languish in southern prisons let our heartfelt sympathies 
he tendered. And now, speaking for myself alone, when the war is ended and the 
task of the historian begins, when those deeds of daring which have rendered the 
name and fame of the Third Cavalry Division imperishable are inscribed upon 
the bright pages of history. I only ask that my name he written as thai of the 
commander of the Third Cavalry Division. 

"(Signed) G. A. Cr ster, 

"Brevet Major General.'.' 



284 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

In the Litchfield family were four children, as follows: Bertha, who was born 
October 18, 1869, and who died .May (i. 1913; .Mrs. Rogers, of this sketch; A. J., 
who was linrri July 22, 1873, and who is now a residenl of Dallas. Texas; and 
Addic. who was born September 10, 1884, and who died at Pleasantville, Iowa. 
.Mrs. Rogers was a native of Pleasantville and grew to womanhood there, attend- 
ing the public scl Is. This was later supplemented by a course in Drake 

University and by attendance at a private normal school in Des Moines. She 
and her hnsliand had three children: Helm, whose birth occurred November 
s . 1894, and who was graduated from the Lucas high school with the class of 

L911 and from the Chariton hisrh scl I with the class of 1912, and who is now 

attending college at Grinnell, Iowa: Harold A . who was born in Lucas. May 4. 
1900, and who is now attending the pulilie schools; and Rodney S., horn April 
l'7. 1905, a student in the Lucas public schools. Mrs. Rogers was a devout 

adherent of the Christian church, making her life tl mhodiment of its 

teachings. 

Fraternally Mr. Rogers is connected with <. I Shepherd Lodge, No. 414. 

A. F. & A. M.. of Lucas, the Independent ( >rder of Odd Fellows and the Knights 
of Pythias of Pleasantville, and be is affiliated also with the .Modem Woodmen 
of America and the Yeomen in Lucas. He gives his political allegiance to the 

republican party and is one of its most active supporters in tl ounty. He 

served as a member of the town council and is at presenl on the board of educa- 
tion, his loyalty and public spirit being proven by earnest work in the pulilie 
service. Broad, liberal-minded and progressive, a man of modern views, he is 
ever ready to give his aid and material support to progressive public enterprises 
and to any movement which tends to advance the community interests, lie is 
numbered among the most prominent and influential citizens of Lucas countj and 
his is an excellent example of the power and force of honorable manhood, of 
earnest effort and high principles. 



FRANCIS RINEHART FRY. 

A prominent pioneer citizen of Wayne county, Francis Rineharl Fry is 

honored and respected by all. not al because of the success he has achieved, 

hut also owing to the straightforward and progressive business policy that he 
has ever followed. Moreover, iii matters of citizenship he has been a recognized 
leader, standing at all times for those things which are progressive and help 
ful in the life of the community. 

A native of Mason county. West Virginia, Francis R. Fry was horn De 
cember 28, 1852, a son of Samuel ami Mar,\ A. (Circle Fry. who were also na- 
tives of .Mason county. The former was a son of John and Elizabeth I Aumil- 
ler) Fry, natives of Shenandoah county, Virginia, and was the youngest of 
Beven children He acquired a coi on-school education and was reared to 

farm work. < >n the 18th id' April. |s|s, he wedded Man A. Circle, of Mason 

county, West Virginia. In the year 1857 they removed westward to Wayne 
county, Iowa, locating firsl in Union township and in 1861 removing to Wash- 
ington township. The wile and mother passed awaj August 26, 1862, and in 




I'l.'AM'IS R. PRY 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 287 

1863, Samuel Fry wedded Mary Aim Ball, of Fauquier county, Virginia. He 
was a self-made man whose success was attributable entirely to his own efforts. 
For three years he filled the office of county supervisor and was interested in 
everything pertaining to public progress and improvement. It was through 
his efforts that Fry's chapel was built, his donation covering more than one- 
half of the expense. He labored for the material, intellectual, social and moral 
benefit of his community and his life work was of value of the district. Unto 
him and his wife were born two children, the daughter, Mrs. Mary Virginia 
Burnham, now living in Ames, Iowa. 

Francis R. Fry was but four years of age when brought by his parents to 
Iowa. He acquired his early education in the country schools and when nine- 
teen years of age was graduated from "Western College, now the Leander Clark 
College of Toledo. Iowa. For three years he engaged in teaching school and 
then refused an offer to become assistant cashier of the Cedar Rapids Savings 
Bank because of his health. Thinking that outdoor life would prove more 
beneficial, he began fanning, in 1881, on one hundred and twenty acres of land 
and by reason of his capable management, unfaltering enterprise and pro- 
gressive methods he was gradually able to increase his holdings until he now 
owns five hundred and twenty acres, a part of which is rented to his sons, 
while the remainder is cultivated on shares. He is considered the leading and 
most progressive farmer in his part of the state. His methods have always 
been of the most practical character and yet have embodied the most progres- 
sive ideas. Since he began farming his fields have always yielded a better 
percentage than others and it was often pointed out that his crops were large 
and fine while the fields on the opposite side of the road were producing much 
less. He understands the scientific as well as the practical side of farming and 
many young men are looking to him as an example of what may be accom- 
plished in this direction. It is a notable fact that the first eighty acres of land 
which his father, Samuel Fry. owned and farmed in 1857 is producing as 
good crops, if not better, than were gathered from the same tract fifty-six years 
ago. He has always followed crop rotation and has studied the needs of Hie 
soil, and the sound judgment which has guided his work has made his labors 
most effective and has justly given him rank among the foremost agricultur- 
ists of this part of the slate. In 1895, in order to give his children better edu- 
cational opportunities than could be secured in the country schools, Mr. Fry 
removed with his family to Corydon and all of his seven children are now 
graduates of the high school. 

Other business interests aside from farming have claimed the attention and 
profited by the efforts and enterprise of Mr. Fry. He and his father were 
the organizers of the Farmers & Merchants Bank and continued as officers and 
stockholders until the Citizens Savings Bank was reorganized through Mr. Fry's 
efforts and the name changed to the First National Bank, of which Francis R, 
Fry is now a director, while his son, F. B. Fry, is cashier. He is also president 
of the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company of Wayne county, filling that posi- 
tion since 1903. 

While Mr. Fry's business interests and duties have claimed his attention he 
has yet found time to cooperate in various movements relative to the public wel- 
fare. The cause of education has found in him a stalwart champion and while 
vol. n— is 



LUCAS A\D WAYNE COUNTIES 

living upon the farm he served for twenty years as a member of the school board 
and has acted in the same capacity for nine years in connection with the Cory- 
don school board. Be has likewise been township clerk and justice of the peace 
and lie was a member id' the thirty-fourth general assembly, elected for the years 
1911 and 1912. He acted on the advisory board of the city council when the 
electric lighl plant was installed, ami no movemenl for the general good seeks his 
aid and support in vain. His political allegiance has always been given to the 
republican part} and his position upon any vital question is never an equivocal 
one. His religious faith is that of the .Methodist Episcopal church. 

On the sii, of March, 1 S 7'_\ .Mr. Pry was united in marriage to Miss Carrie 
M. Kellogg, a daughter of Alvero V. and Fannie Jayne) Kellogg. It was in 
1891 that Mr. Fry was called upon in mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 
23d of Deceinher of that year. They were the parents "I' seven children : Kraut/. 

Bird, who was horn March 2, 1875, and is mentioned elsewhere in this work; 
Jeva M.. who was 1m, in Februarj 23, 1 S 7S ami died November I s . 1911; Ai-ba 
F., who was horn -Inly 17. 1880, and is now the wife of Jesse T. White, oi Cory- 
doii; Elo, who was horn June -•'!. L882, ami is the wile of I-;. A. Kiiiiuiel. a de- 
tective of Oakland, California; Samuel A., a fanner, who was born May 5, L884, 
and married Mary Jennie Kcj'js. of Seymour, December 28, 1908; Bupha IV. 
who mis horn on the 2d of May. L887, and on the 28th of December, 1908, her 

father's birthday, became the wife of Bay Evans, a farmer of Wayne countj ; 
ami Alba G., born December 11. 1891, who is cultivating the land which was first 
owned by his grandfather, Samuel Pry, this being in possession of the family 
for thne generations, lie married Nellie B. Davis Augusl 6, 1912. In the fain 
ily are ten grandchildren. Mr. Pry was married a second time March 9, 18 i 

when Miss Alice Miller beet • his wife. She is a daughter of Henry Carter and 

Prances (Upham) Miller, who arrived in Wayne county in L864 

Such in brief is the history of Fram-is K. Pry, who for fifty-six years has 
lived in Iowa. His career has been one of continuous progress ami he occupies 

today a most prominent position in tin. ml and agricultural circles, while as a 

citizen his efforts in behalf of the general welfare have been Par-reaching and 
beneficial. 



.KM IX s. STEARNS 



Saving passed the seventy-third milestone on life's journey, John S. 
Stearns is still active iii the world's work, carrying on agricultural pursuits. 
He cultivates the soil and raise-, live stock on a farm of eighty-nine acres on 
section I. Union township. Lucas county, which be purchased in 1900, having 
follow,-. I farming in various states of the Union before thai year. He first 
came to Iowa in 1852 hut in 1869 removed to Nebraska, in which state he 

made his home until 1882, when he again located in Lucas county where lie 

has resided sin,-,- A native "i Galena, Delaware county. Ohio, born on March 
1840, he is .-i s t Manny and Angeline (Comstock) Stearns, the former 

ol wlmm passed away in Tipton. Cedar county. Iowa, in 1873, and the latter 
in Galena, Ohio, in 1851. In their family were three sons ami three daugfa 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 289 

ters of whom two arc yet living. They are: Margaret, a residenl of Ore- 
gon: and John S., of this review. Those who have passed away are: .Mrs. 
Elizabeth Comstock; William; Henry, who died in 1852 at Pioneer (irove. 
Cedar county. Iowa: and one who passed away in childhood. All of these 
children were born in Ohio. 

John S. Stearns received his education partly in his native state and 
partly in Iowa, where removal was made in 1852 when he was twelve years 
of age. The family settled in Pioneer (irove. Cedar county, this slate, and 
there continued to reside until 18(12, when .Mr. Stearns enlisted for service 
in the Civil war with Company B, of the First Iowa Cavalry, serving under 
Colonel Gower in the Western Army. Faithfulness to duty and courageous 
conduct distinguished his military career. He was mustered out in 1864 
with honorable discharge, returning thereupon to Cedar county, where he fol- 
lowed farming until 1868, when he removed to Wayne county, this state, 
there continuing agricultural pursuits for one year. The next year found 
him in Lincoln. Nebraska, where he remained for three years, at the end of 
which period he proceeded to York county, that state, where lie homesteaded 
and then went to Harlan county, whence he removed to Red Willow county, 
subsequently returning to Harlan county. The year 1882 marked his return 
to Iowa, when he located on a farm near Russell, Lucas county, where he fol- 
lowed his vocation. In 1900 he purchased eighty-nine acres on section 4, 
Union township, and there he has since continuously and successfully culti- 
vated the soil and has given his attention also to the raising of live stock. 
His property is in a high state of cultivation and provided with good improve- 
ments, his barns and outbuildings being kept in good repair and the general 
appearance of his place indicating his prosperity. 

In Lincoln, Nebraska, on March 31, 1872. Mr. Stearns was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Crockford, a native of Ohio, born August 8, 1852. Her parents were 
Joseph and Mary (Friday) Crockford. both of whom have passed away, the 
former in Kansas and the latter in McOook, Nebraska. In their family were 
eight children: Henry, a resident of Hastings, Michigan; William, deceased; 
Mrs. Ellen Barrett, residing in Lebanon, Oregon; John, who died in Mon- 
tana; Benton, who passed away in Wisconsin; Mrs. John S. Stearns; Jacob, who 
resides in Higler, Nebraska; and Joseph, living in Michigan. The six oldest chil- 
dren were born in Ohio while the others' births occurred in Michigan. Of 
the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Stearns five are living: Mrs. Carrie 
Allen, born December 20. 1S72. residing in Jackson township; Joseph, born 
in York county. Nebraska, living in Russell. Iowa; Harry, born in Russell, 
who makes his home at Canmore, Canada; John ('., born in Russell, who still 
resides there; and Ethel, attending high school in Lucas. Those deceased 
are: Mary, who died while quite young a1 Alma, Nebraska; Charles, who also 
passed away in that city; and Otis, born at Alma, Nebraska, who died at 
Derby, Iowa. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Stearns is a republican and keeps will 
informed upon public issues. He keeps alive the spirit of '61 by his member- 
ship in McKnight Post, G. A. R., of Derby, Iowa. Having always led a useful 
and busy life in which indolence and idleness have been unknown he has 
not only achieved individual success hut has contributed to the development 



290 I -I CAS WD WAYNE Co TXT IKS 

and adv.- inent thai have broughl aboul the prosperous condition of the 

sect i< hi. [nterested in all movements incorporated to benefit his county and 
his locality, he has always been glad to do his share and by his life record 
has given an example of public-spirited and Inn- American citizenship in 
times of war as well as in times of peace. 



CYRCS X. I! Kid.. 



A native of Lucas county. Cyrus X. Bell has passed Ins entire life in this 

-eel ilUl Of the state, whore lie Was llOrn ill White I'.lVMSt l(iWllslli|l nil September 

20, L860, a sun of Xelson and Rebecca (Hobson Bell. Be was the only child 
born of this union. White Breasl township now knows him as one of its most 
prosperous agriculturists, his holdings comprising two hundred an 1 four acres 
of choice land on sections 7, 5, 9, 19, 20. 29 and 30, with two sets of good 
improvements. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Thomas Bell, was a native of 
Cumberland county. North England, and in an early day of the history of 
this country settled in Ohio, being among the pioneers of thai state. His wife 
was a native of Ireland and also died in Ohio. The maternal grandfather, 
Joseph Eobson, was born in Kentucky and died in Van Buren county. Iowa. 
his wife. Margarel (Sutphin) Hobson, being a native of New York and pass- 
ing away in Lie-as, Iowa. They were among Iowa's lirst pioneers. The father 
of Cyrus X. Bell, Xelson Bell, was horn iii Madison county, Ohio. January 
24, 1832, and died in the Civil war while serving in the Union army. He 
enlisted in Company B, Sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was under the 
command of General Grant. He participated in the battle of Shiloh and 
died iii Mississippi on December 24. ISC', of an illness due to the had condi- 
tions of living which the army endured. His death occurred at the time of 
the events leading up to the siege of Vicksburg. The mother. Rebecca (Hob- 
son Bell, was a native Of (lark county, Indiana, horn May 5, L826, and now 

makes her home with her son. Cyrus X.. at the age of eightj seven years. The 
parents settled in Iowa iii 1854, in Wapello county. 

Cyrus X. Bell was horn one and a halt miles wesl of the postoffice at 

Chariton and has always been a resident of this neighborhood. He early en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and in addition learned bridge carpenter work, 
having been engaged along thai line for some time with the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy Railroad. He located with his parents on the Earm where he 
now resides m 1868. As the years have passed success has attended his labors 
and ins property now comprises two hundred and Eour acres of the most 
fertile land of his locality, where he engages in general farming, also giving 
considerable attention to the raising of live stock, of which he keeps a good 
grade. He has installed on his farm the modern equipment which is con 
sidered indispensable in np to-date agricultural methods, and his buildings 

I" speak tl arc of the om ner. 

tin April 5, L888, Mr. Bell was united in marriage to Miss Florence E 
Bobbins, who was born in Decatur county. Indiana, on September 17. i- 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 291 

When but three years of age she was brought by her parents to Lucas county, 
of which she has been a resident since. The lather during all his life fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits, coming to this section overland from Eddyville. 
which was as far as the railroad extended at that time. James II. Robbins 
was born in Decatur county, Indiana, and his wife, Delia (Rutherford) Rob- 
bins, is also a native of that county. Both are still residing in a pleasant 
home in Chariton, Iowa. In their family were six children, of whom Mrs. 
Bell is the eldest. The others were: George, deceased; James H., Jr., a 
dealer in live stock residing at Chariton, Iowa ; Ludlow, of Des Moines, this 
state; Mrs. Margaret Jamison, a resident of Osceola, this state; and Electa, 
of Burlington, Iowa. The two eldest were natives (if Decatur county, Indiana. 
but the younger ones were born in Lucas county, where all were reared. .Mr. 
and Mrs. Bell are the parents of four children: James N., born May 9. 1889, 
who completed a business course in Elliott's Business College at Burlington, 
Iowa, and is employed by the Drake Wholesale Hardware Company of (he 
latter city; Floyd F., born June 17, 1890, who also attended business college 
in Burlington and now resides in Jackson township: Edna, born February 
13, 1892, who graduated from the Chariton high school with the class of 
1913; and William McKinley, born August 27, 1894, attending Elliott's Busi- 
ness College of Burlington. 

Politically Mr. Bell is a republican. He has efficiently served as assessor 
of White Breast township for four years and has been a school director. Mrs. 
Bell and her daughter Edna are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Lucas, while fraternally Mr. Bell is a member of Good Shepherd Lodge. 
No. 414, A. F. & A. M., of Lucas, and a charter member of the Eastern Star 
of that city. A public-spirited man who takes a deep interest in community 
affairs, he stands ever ready to bear his share in time or money in the pro- 
motion of any measures originated for the benefit of the community and is 
highly esteemed and regarded by all who know him for his many high qual- 
ities of mind and character. 



JAMES L. WASHBURN. 

Varied are the interests of James L. Washburn, who is not only one of the 
successful agriculturists of Union township, Lucas county, but has also actively 
participated in public life and at present serves in the position of justice of the 
peace. Although he had but a common-school education, he has taught himself 
largely and has become recognized as one of the best informed men upon the 
history of his district. He has written one of the best township histories to be 
found on Union township, Lucas county, which gives a concise record of the 
development thereof. Himself of an old and distinguished family, lie has been 
interested in genealogical work and lias compiled various records of importance 
and interest, including that of his own family. 

James L. Washburn was born in Lee county, Iowa. November 25, ISO'0. 
There be attended the common schools and grew to manhood, supplementing his 
early education by continual reading of the besl magazines and periodicals of 



292 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

the day. He subsequently studied and graduated in bookkeeping and telegraphy 
and railroad station work and is qualified to hold am of these ofliccs. For a 
time be was also interested in l>anl<iiiL r with Manning & Penick of Chariton. 
Iowa. 

The Washburn family was 6rs1 mentioned in the bistorj of the Qnited States 
in 1790 when they were Located in Vermont, in the disputed territory lying 
between Mew York and New Hampshire. .Mi'. Washburn is in possession of a 
genealogical record extending over two centuries. His father, Stephen S. Wash- 
burn, was born in Canada in 1820 and died in Lee county, this state, in l s 7-'i. 
His father was the bead of the Washburn family in America. It was in 1844 
that Stephen S. Washburn located in Lee county, Iowa, then a territory, becom- 
ing one of its very earliest pioneers. At the time of Lincoln's first election 
he was one of three men to brave the dangers in his township in order to vote 
for Lincoln, that section being at the time a rebel hotbed. Three uncles of our 
subject were captains in tie Union armj and one fought for the sojithern cause 
as colonel. The mother of James I.. Washburn was Malissa II. (Sprotl Wash 
burn, who was born in 1826 and did in Lee county in March. 1903. She came 
to that, comity with her parents in tin- same year as her husband and was a 

daughter of the well known Col I .lames Sprotl of war fame. Mi-. Washburn 

has also compiled a e plete genealogical record of the Sprotl family which 

extends \'r September, 17(i7. to the presenl time. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen s. 

Washburn were the parents of live children: Nicholas A., residing in Washing- 
ton; Mrs. Anna s. Pfligenstoffer, of Argyle, Iowa: Mrs. Ella F. Newberry, also 
of that place; Willard S.. of California; and James I... of this review. All of 
th( se children were horn and reared iii I.e.- • , , 1 1 1 1 1 .. in the home where the parents 
begun their housekeeping and where thej both lived until their deaths. 

Upon growing to manhood .Mr. Washburn gave his attention largely to . 

cultural pursuits, hnt he also made eight trips across the Rockj Mountains and 

traveled over forty thousand miles. He now enjoys a heme of one hundred and 
sixty acres of fertile la ml on sections 18 and 20, Union township, highly improved. 
His buildings are modern and well equipped and his residence is comfortable. 
lie gives considerable attention to stock raising, keeping a high grade of animals. 
As tin- years have passed he has I one of the substantia] agriculturists of 

this section ami greal credit must he given him for what he has attained. 

Iii 1885 Mr. Washburn was united in marriage to Miss Alice Sprott, of the 
same name as his mother. She was horn in Union township, lamas enmity. Sep- 

tember 7. 1867, and here grew to woman! d and hen' has ever since lived. Her 

parents were Joseph W. and Frances \ Brown Sprott, natives of Pennsylvania, 
the former horn July 30, 1826, and the latter on April 24, 1830 The parents sub- 
sequent^ moved to Iowa. The father was a forty-niner, going to < 'alitornia with 
an ox team and returning by the isthmus of Panama, walking from the Pacific to 
the Gulf through w hat is now the Canal Zone. He came to Lucas countj in 185 
where he followed agricultural pursuits. II, ■ passed awaj in Derbj in August, 
1903, the mother following him in death on April •_'::. L905, her demise occurring 
in Union township. Mr. and Mrs. Sprott became the parents of the following 
children : Mrs. Elizabeth Mitchell, who is residing south of Chariton, this state. 
Mrs. Joan Chapman, of Derlry, [owa; Mrs George Parkin, of Derby; Mrs. Kate 
E Robinson, who resides in Whit,- Breast township: Mrs, Alice Washburn, the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 293 

wife of our subject ; and Thomas, deceased. The three eldest children were born 
in Van Buren county and the remainder in Union township, Lucas county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Washburn became the parents of five children, of whom three are liv- 
ing: Agnes E., born August 4, 1889; Olive M., whose birth occurred December 
13, 1891; and Ruby F., born December 21. IS!):;. They attended the common 
schools in the vicinity of the father's farm and the two eldest took a course at 
Drake University of Des Moines. They are school teachers, the older one having 
been connected with the Osceola public schools. She and Olive M. are now teach- 
ing in the Derby schools. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Washburn is a progressive republican and has 
ever given to that party his stanch support. He is at present justice of the 
peace of Uniou township and at one time was mayor of Bondurant, Iowa. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Brotherhood 
of American Yeomen and the Modern Woodmen of Derby. In 1913 he was 
chosen president of the Farmers' Short. Course held at Derby and il is needless 
to say that the affair under his able management proved to be a complete success. 
As much as Mr. Washburn is interested in the history of his district, he gives as 
much consideration to its future and can ever be found among those men who 
support worthy public enterprises. He has not only stimulated interest in the 
present generation as regards the pioneer history of his district, but has himself 
been an active factor in promoting agricultural development and improving moral 
and intellectual standards. He must therefore lie considered a serviceable factor 
in the general upbuilding, and the confidence, respect and good-will which he 
receives on all sides are well and highly merited. 



JUSTIN WESTFALL. 



Justin Westfall has made himself felt in the development of Lucas county 
in a twofold capacity, for he followed farming until 1900, since which year he 
has turned his attention to commercial interests, being now the manager of the 
lumber yard of G. J. Stewart & Company of Chariton at I )erbj . the business hav- 
ing largely increased under his able direction. He is a son of Granville and 
Jeannette (Teal) Westfall. both natives of Virginia, the father born in Jackson 
county on March 3, 1829. and the latter in Rockbridge county. October 26, 1830. 
Mr. and Mrs. Granville Westfall came as pioneers to Union township by the 
overland route in the fall of 1849, and here they made their home until their 
demise, the father passing away in Jackson county. West Virginia, on Decem- 
ber 17, 1891, and the mother in Union township, this county, on November 25, 
1885. Justin Westfall was the eleventh in order of birth in a family of four- 
teen children, his brothers and sisters being: Mrs. Martha Troutman. a resident 
of Union township; ('lark, deceased; David, a resident of [ndianola, this state; 
Franklin, who passed away in Walla Walla. Washington; Alfred, who died in 
infancy; John P., a resident of Le Roy, Iowa; George, of Derby, this slate; Mrs. 
Flora Kyner. of Humeston, Iowa; Mrs. Victoria Kyner, also of that city; Henry, 
a prominent farmer of Union township: Lucinda. who died at the age of fifteen, 
on December 26. 1885; Jo Ann. who died in infancy; and Charles, also deceased. 



294 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Justin Westfall, in the acquiremenl of his education attended school near his 
father's farm, upon which he grew to manhood. Being early trained to thai 
vocation, he followed farming until 1900, when he entered financial circles, becom- 
ing a member of the staff of the Merchants & Fanners Hank of Derby, with which 
institution he remained for two and a half years, gaining valuable commercial 
experience. Be then entered the employ of G. J. Stewart ..v Company, of Chari- 
ton, as manager of their lumber yard at Derby, in which position he contint 
today. Energetic and active, he has displayed remarkable business ability in the 
discharge of his duties and has extended the trade connections of his firm in a 
conspicuously successful way. Be is considered one of the forceful factors in com- 
mercial expansion in Derby, and while he himself has attained an important 
position among the merchants of the city, he has been instrumental in promoting 
the interests of his community along various lines. 

On March 9, 1892, Mr. Westfall was united in marriage to .Miss Belle Bliz- 
zard, a native of Union township. Lucas county, horn Autrust •_'. lMl.s. H,., v she 
attended the common schools and grew to womanhood, complementing her educa 
tion by a course at the state Normal School of Stanberry, Missouri, and Drake 
University id' Des .Moines. Iowa. Being well prepared for the teaching pro- 
fession, sin' then so engaged in Union township for aboul five years before her 
marriage. Her parents are F. M. and Amanda Mitchell) Blizzard, who became 
early settlers of Lucas county. They now reside near Derby, the father having 
practically retired after a successful farming career in this locality. In their 
family are four children: Mrs. Ada Grimes, of Union township; Mrs. Justin 
Westfall; Mrs. Dorothy I',, lrvin. of Florence, Arizona; and 'I'. M.. who resides 
in Union township. All were horn and reared here. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Westfall is a democrat, keeping well informed 
as to the state of governmental affairs and taking interest in all issu-s thai affecl 
his locality, his county, state or the nation. He has the distinction of having served 

as the tirst town clerk of Derby while his father served on the firsl grand jury 
of this county. Both he ami his w he are members of the Presbyterian church of 

this town, in the work of which they take an active and helpful interest. Mr. and 
.Mrs. Westfall reside in a well appointed home in Derby and he still owns his 

"id homestead, comprising one hundred and sixty acres of choice land in Union 
township, highly improved, from which he derives a gratifying income. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Modern W Imen of America, belonging to the 

Derby camp. His career is proof of the fact thai industry ami honesty are %et 
the paramount qualities that lead to success ami he is esteemed and respected 

as much for ties.' characteristics, which have made his prosperity possible, as for 

the substantial position which he has reached in tic community. 



WILLIAM T. GRIMES. 



As mayor of tie- town and the proprietor of a thriving implement business, 

William 'I'. Crimes is a worthy represent at ive of the commercial and official 

circles of Alhrton. toward the progress ami development of which lie has con 

tributed no less by his able and efficienl public service than by the capable and 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 297 

competent manner in which he has assisted to promote some of its leading busi- 
ness enterprises. A native of Indiana, he was born on the 15th of August, 1859, 
and is the third in order of birth in a family of seven. His parents, Jackson 
and Ellen (Tippin) Grimes, were likewise natives of Indiana, whence they 
removed to Iowa in 1867. coming direct to Wayne county. Here the father pur- 
chased two hundred acres of prairie land, which through his diligent and capably 
directed efforts was converted into one of the fertile and valuable farming 
properties of the county. He is still residing on his farm at the advanced age 
of eighty years, but the mother passed away in 1907. and was laid to rest in the 
Allerton cemetery. She was seventy-four at the time of her death. 

"William T. Grimes, who was a lad of about eight years when he came to 
Iowa with his parents, was reared at home and educated in the public schools. 
The son of a farmer, his energies were early directed along agricultural lines. 
and long before he had reached man's estate he was thoroughly familiar with 
the practical methods of tilling the fields and caring for the crops. When be 
was twenty-four years of age his father deeded eighty acres of land to him 
and leaving home he began farming for himself. As he was industrious and 
exercised intelligence in directing the cultivation of his fields he met with a 
good measure of success and was soon able to increase his holdings by the addi- 
tion of another eighty acres. He subsequently sold the tract presented to him 
by his father and invested the proceeds in other land, continuing to purchase 
adjoining fields as the opportunity presented until his farm comprised four 
hundred acres. Not only did he prove to be a skilled agriculturist but a capable 
business man, and early began to direct his energies along other lines. In 1892, 
he temporarily withdrew from the work of the farm and went to Clio, where 
he assisted in the organization of the Bank of Clio, of which institution he was 
cashier for four years. At the expiration of that time he returned to his farm, 
which he operated until 1903. In the year last named he came to Allerton to 
enter upon the duties of cashier of the Farmers & Feeders Bank, now the 
Farmers National Bank, which be had assisted in organizing the year previous. 
He was the first president of this concern and served as cashier for five years, 
following which he resumed the management of his farm and also bought ami 
sold stock. His entire attention was given to these two undertakings until the 
spring of 1912. when he engaged in the implement business. A wide knowledge 
of farming machinery, united with a practical and intimate understanding of 
the needs of the agriculturist well adapt .Mr. Grimes for this business, and as he 
is widely known throughout the county without doubt he will succeed in 
building up a large patronage. 

On the 28th of February, 1884, Mr. Grimes was married 1o Miss Eva A. 
Allen, a daughter of Oscar G. and Anna (Miller) Allen. The parents, who were 
natives of Indiana, came to Iowa about I860, being among the first settlers in 
Wayne county. Here they passed the remainder of their days, the mother's death 
occurring in 1892, and that of the father in July. 1912. at the age of seventy- 
eight years. Mrs. Grimes, who is the fifth in order of birth in a family of 
eleven, was born on the 13th of August, 186.".. To Mr. ami Mrs. Grimes there 
have been born two daughters and a son, William L., who died at the age of 
three years. The eldest daughter, Wilma 1)., was born on January 14, 1885. 
She married Ernest R. Blakeley, a civil engineer of Illinois, and has become 



298 LUCAS AND WAYNE COCXTIES 

tin- mother of two children. Cora I)., whose birth occurred on Christinas day. 

ISiiii, is now pursuing a s] ial course of study in the University at Madison, 

Wisconsin. She previously attended Eighland Park University at Des Moines 
for a year, while she was a studenl at the Northwestern University at Evanston, 
I llinois. for two yet 

Mr. and Mrs. Grimes are members of the Methodisl Episcopal church and 
he is a member of the board of trustees. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Masonic order, Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias, in 
which order he lias passed through all of the chairs. Mrs. Crimes is a member 
of the Royal Neighbors and the Wednesday Club. Mr. Grimes gives his political 
allegiance to the democratic party and is now serving as mayor of the town, while 
for nine years he was a member of the school hoard. He has prospered in his 
carious business enterprises and has acquired extensive and valuable property 
interests, lie owns his residence in Mlerton, lour hundred ami eighty acres 
nf land in Stafford county. Kansas, and eight} acres in ('allien county. Minne- 
sota. His farm here constitutes one of the tinest properties in Wayne county 
and brings him a good annual rental. It is fenced with barbed wire, has natural 
drainage and the entire acreage is under cultivation. The improvements are 
substantial and in good condition, while the entire place is amply supplied 
with water of a superior quality from bored wells. Mr. Crimes is widely known 
and i steemed in the county, because as a business man. public official and private 
citizen he has always manifested those qualities which entitle him to the respect 

and regard of his fellow townsmen. His success is the well merited reward of 

earliest effort, dose application and capable management, and has been achieved 

in a manner which leaves qo doubt as to his integrity or question as to the reli- 

abilil v of his business methods. 



.losiAH i:u;cktt. 



Josiah Burgetl has been an interested witness ol the growth and develop- 
ment of Lucas countj from pioneer days to the present. Fifty-six years have 
come and gone since the Burgetl family arrived in this state, and when they 
,,,, their abode in I. mas county the Indians were still numerous, while 
Wild game of all hinds was plentiful. Civat indeed have been the chances 
which have since occurred, and the Burgetl family have ever borne their pail 
in all the work which has WTOUghl the present prosperity and development 
of ilc countj . 

Josiah Burgetl was born in Johnson county, Indiana. March II. 1856. His 
father, William Burgett, was born in Ohio. April 3, 1812, and in early man- 
fa' i wedded Hannah Lech, a native of Kentucky. The Leach family was 

also one of the pi ser families of Lucas county. H was m the year L857 thai 

William Burgetl brought his family to Iowa, taking up his abode in Union 
township. He remained a portion of the first year with doe Mundell of 
that township ami the following year purchased land of Mr. Skidmore lying 

parti} in Libert} township. It was upon that tract that he look up his abode. 
It was raw prairie ami there was little evidence of development and civili 



LUCAS AXL) WAYNE COUNTIES 299 

zation to be seen in this part of the state. It was not an unusual thing for the 
Indians to call at the homes of the settlers, nor was it difficult for one of these 
pioneer men to go into the forest with his «iui and return with an abundance 
of wild game. The houses for the most part were built of logs, as were the 
schoolhouses, and the methods of instruction were equally primitive. Mr. 
Burgett carried on farming for many years and passed away in Liberty town- 
ship, November 14. 1897, having for almost a quarter of a century survived his 
wife, who died April 17. 1873. Their children were thirteen in number, as 
follows: Mrs. Sarah E. Callon, who was born August 16, 1835, and resides in 
Liberty township; Mrs. America Pread, who was born on the 15th of January, 
1887, and has passed away; Mrs. Anne Richardson, born -July 15, 1838, who is 
also deceased; Jacob, born .March 9, 1840, who was a veteran of the Civil war 
and is now deceased; Aaron, whose birth occurred on the 19th of October, 1841, 
and who passed away June 14, 1903; Preston, who was born August 2, 1843, and 
has passed awaj ; Mary -lane ami Hannah, who died in infancy; -Mrs. Ma- 
hala Lee, who is deceased; William H., born January 2, 1852, who is a resi- 
dent of Oakley; -James, January 29. 1854, who died May 16, 1897; Josiah, of this 
review; and Mrs. Sophrona Browning, who was born on the 16th of February, 
1860, and is a resident of Liberty township. Only tin- youngest member of the 
family was born in Iowa, the other children being .-ill natives of Johnson county, 
Indiana. 

The usual experiences of the lad reared upon the frontier came to Josiah 
Burgett in his boyhood and youth. He assisted in the arduous task of develop- 
ing new land and bringing the fields under cultivation, and throughout his 
entire life be has carried on general agricultural pursuits. He still owns a 
part of the old homestead and his holdings include two hundred acres of choice 
land on sections 20, 21 and 28, Liberty township. There are good buildings 

and an attractive, well furnished home where good cl r and hospitality reign 

supreme. As the years have gone by Mi-. Burgetl has won success and is now 
in possession of a comfortable competence. 

In tliis county was celebrated his marriage to .Miss Cynthia Maloi i the 

17th of April, 1886. She was born in Liberty township, January 23, 1865, 
was reared to womanhood here and has always been a resident of the county 
where her parents located at a very early day. Her father, William Malone, 
was born in Ohio. February 16. 18:5"). and died in Liberty township. June 27, 
1910. Her mother, .Mrs. Malinda Webb) Malone, was born in Indiana. Jan 
uary 3, 1840, and passed away in Liberty township. May IS. ltlll. Her father, 
Joseph Webb, was one of the earliest settlers of Lucas county, arriving in 1854 
Unto William and Malinda ( Webb I Malone were born thirteen children, nameh : 
Joseph, who was born in Ohio, on the 2d of August, 1859, and has passed 
away; John A., whose birth occurred in Ohio on the 13th of April, L861, 
and who is a resident of Oklahoma; Nola J., who was born in Ohio on the 
18th of June, 1863, and is now deceased; Mrs. Cynthia Burgett; William 
I., born April is, 1*66, who passed away in Missouri; James I'.. who was born 
on the 2d of July. 1868, and is a resident of Coin, Iowa; Charles W.. whose 
birth occurred February IS, 1S69, and who has passed away; Thomas \\\. who 
was born November 15, 1871, and is deceased; David ('., who was born on the 
22<1 of November. 1873, and makes bis home near Chariton: Maurice O, whose 



.Kin LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

birth occurred on the 4th of November, L875, and who is living near Oaklej ; 
Lewis II.. born March 1-. 1877, who has passed away; Mrs. .Mary A. Lancaster, 
who was born on the 15th of April. 1878, and resides Dear Chariton; and 

Andrew I)., who was born on tin- 4th of March. 1sm», and resides at Lacona, 
The ten last named were natives of Lucas county and here all of the children 
were reared. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Burgetl havi been born nine children, as follows: Mrs. 
Zora B. Johnson, whose natal day was December 21, 1887, and who is now a 
residi n1 of Oregon; Mrs. Grace C. Ketchum, who was born on the Jlst of July. 
1SS!I. and is a resident of Chariton: Mrs. Gray Mauk, who was born on the 2d 
of April, 1892, and makes her home west of Chariton; May, twin sister of Mrs. 
.Mauk. who is still at home; Lloyd s.. born September 29, 1894, who is yel 
under the parental root'; Ross 1).. whose birth occurred on the loth of October, 
1896; Raymond 0., whose natal day was October 28, 1901; Myrtle 0., born 
May - J:;. 1903; ami Truman J., whose birth occurred on the l:;th of March, 
1906. All the above named arc- natives of Liberty township. 

Mr. Burgetl has always given his political allegiance to the democratic 
party ami has made an excellent record as a public-spirited citizen, loya] to the 
besl interests of the community, yet In- has never sought nor desired office, 
although he has served as a member of the school board. lie and his wife are 
members of the Baptist church, whose doctrines lie strongly believes and their 
religious faith is the guiding spirit of their lives. Both are widely known in 
the .canity and have- a circle of warm friends almost coextensive with the circle 
of their acquaintam e 



ALBERT (LAV PFRIMMER. 

A two hundred and ten acre farm in Otter Creek township, Lucas county, 
highly improved and well under cultivation, represents the- life's labor of 
Albert Clay l'frimmer. who was born in Harrison county, Indiana, on July 21, 
lsi,u :m ,| a8 ;l boy of nine years eame with his parents to Otter Creek town 

ship, where ever sim-e becoming old enough lie has followed agricultural pur 

suits. lie is a son of George l'frimmer. a native- of France-, in which eountiw 

he was born cm February 19, 1825, and who now makes his home in Otter 

Creek township with Mrs. '1'. I). Ashby, an ol.hr sister of our subject. The 

father has pass,-.! his eighty-eighth birthday and s-t ill enjoys remarkably good 
health for on.- of his a;.'!-. The mother. Mrs. Lydia Ann I'friiuuie-r. was born 
in Indiana in 1826 and died in Otter Creek township on June 11. 1900, at 

the- age « • t about seventy-four years. In their family were live children: 

Charles \\\. bom in 1Mb. who resides in Mina. Arkansas. Samii-I. . Icccascii : 

Francis M.. born in L850 and a resident of stratton. Nebraska, where he served 
tor a number of years as postmaster; Lei L. who is now Mrs Thompson 1> 

Ashby; and Albert Clay, "I this re-view. 

Albert Clay l'frimmer attended scl I in Indiana and Otter Creek town 

ship, having removed with his parents to this Locality when nine years of age. 

When "Id enough he began to assisi his father in the- work of the home- farm 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 301 

and early gained valuable knowledge along agricultural lines, having followed 
that occupation ever since. He now owns two hundred and ten acres of well 
improved land in Otter Creek township, with two sets of improvements. His 
buildings are substantial and modernly equipped and, while he largely engages 
in mixed farming, he gives considerable attention to his live stock interests. 
His residence is comfortable and conveniently appointed and there the family 
often entertain their many friends. 

On January 28, 1886, Mr. Pfrimmer married Miss Martha Ellen Lipe, a 
native of Otter Creek township, where she was born on July 7, 1866. There 
she attended the common schools, supplementing her fundamental education 
with a one-year course at Simpson College of Indianola. Well equipped for 
the profession, she then taught school in Lucas county for tw T o years. She is 
a daughter of John and Mahala (Davidson) Lipe, the father a native of Ran- 
dolph county, North Carolina, where he w'as born on January 9, 1829, and the 
mother of Indiana. When but three years old the father was brought to the 
latter state and subsequently tame to Iowa, where he passed his life in agri- 
cultural labors, his death occurring in Otter Creek township on April 29, 1910. 
The mother also died in that township, preceding her husband in death by 
nearly four decades, her demise occurring in December, 1871. Both came to 
Lucas county in 1861 and therefore witnessed much of the transformation 
that took place as pioneer conditions gave way to the onward march of civili- 
zation. The father had a creditable military record, having enlisted at Clinton, 
Iowa, on the Union side, and having rendered valuable service during the 
Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. John Lipe became the parents of five children: 
William, born April 3, 1862, deceased; Phoebe Ann, born August 2, 1863, 
also deceased; Mrs. Albert Clay Pfrimmer; John Wesley, a well known farmer 
of Otter Creek township, of whom more extended mention is made in another 
part of this work; and Mrs. Sarah Frances Eaton, born in December, 1870, 
who also resides in Otter Creek township. After the death of his first wife 
the father married again and of his second union the following children were 
born : Mrs. Addie Harvey, of Otter Creek township ; Mrs. Alvie Lovina Baker, 
also of that township; and Winfred LeRoy and Wilfred, twins, both deceased. 
The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Pfrimmer was one of Sumter's band and 
members of the family in the maternal line rendered valuable service during 
the Revolution. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pfrimmer became the parents of thirteen children, all of whom 
were born in Otter Creek township and all of whom are living. The elder of 
them went from the public schools into teaching. The children are: Mrs. Ada 
Ellen Patterson, born October 17, 1887, who now resides in Omaha, Nebraska, 
and who is the mother of one child, Mary Ellen, born May 16. 1908 ; Vashti, 
born January 8, 1889, who attends the Iowa State Teachers' College at Cedar 
Palls; Samuel McRae, who was born July 13, 1890, and resides with Ins parents 
but is at present teaching school in Warren township, this county; Anna 
Blonde, born December 16, 1891, attending the University of Nebraska at 
Lincoln: Lydia Mabel, whose natal day was May 29, 1893, and who attends 
the Iowa State Teachers' College at Cedar Falls; John Lipe. born December 
23, 1894, who assists his father with the work on the farm and at the same time 
attends school; George Albert, born July 10, 1896, who also helps in the minor 



302 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

duties around the home place; Anglo Saxon, born March "-'if L898; Mary Alberta, 
born November 28, L899, who is attending high school al Chariton, Iowa: 
Martha Helen, born March 29, L901; Emily Ruth, born on Christmas day of 
L902; Charlotte -May. born March L9, L905; and Wilbur Francis, born Sep 
tember 25, 1909. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pfrimmer are devoted members of the Methodist church of 
Otter Creek township, in the work of which they are actively and belpfullj 
interested. In his political views he is a repubucan and, although he has 
never cared for public- position, keeps well informed upon all matters of public 
importance and fulfills his duties as a citizen painstakingly, as he recognizes 
his obligations as readily as he enjoys his privileges. He lias been a fa 
in promoting agricultural development in Lucas county and is ever ready to 
give his supporf to worthy public enterprises. A forceful element in his com 
munity, he enjoys the high esteem and good-will of all who know him, for 

he has given evide of characteristics which stamp him as a valuable citizen 

and a reliable, progressive member of society. 



JAMES B. MUNDELL 



Having passed the eightieth milestone on life's journey, .lames B. Mundell 

enjoys the resped and esteem due i le of Ids ag« — one who lias spent a life 

rich in labor, rich in hardships and obstacles but also rich in achievements and 
results iii planting civilization on a stretch of land which was but prairie when 
he came here. But few settlements were made in Lucas county and but one 
log house was Imili ai Chariton when Mr. Mundell. in the Fall of 1849, built 
his first shack in Jackson township. He was born in Clinton county, Indiana. 
on .March 20, I s :;:;. a sun of Joseph Mundell. who was born in Kentucky in 
April. L802, and who, having long been prominenl as an agriculturist in Lucas 
county, died in Union township <m February 8, 1885. 

In the fall of 1849 James B. Mundell. with his lather, came to Jackson 
township. Lucas county, and built a shack and then returned to his native 
county, but in the spring came back to his new settlement and has been a i 

deiii of Lucas county ever sii The family moved to Union township in 

1856, after the firsl stages of hard pioneer life had hem overcome, and Mr. 

Mundell of this review still makes his I ie in this township, when he has 

followed agricultural pursuits during his long, active and useful life. W Inn 
he came here hut few settlements were made ami the rolling prairie extended 
unbroken in all directions. In Chariton one l<>!_ r house was the only sign of 
civilization; hut with the undaunted spirit of lie pioneer Mr. Mundell set 

himself i" the task to wrest a firm fr the wilderness, and to what extent 

h>' has succeeded is evidenced by the many acres which bring him gratifying 
returns today, lie owns one hundred acres id' land in Jackson township ami 
forty acres in Union township, highly cultivated and well improved. His 
buildings are substantial ami modernly equipped, modern machinery is em 
ployed in keeping the land at its highest Btate of fertility, and his stock '_'i\es 
the appearance of the best of care. A venerable pioneer, -lames R Mundell 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 303 

is still active in looking after his interests and. rugged type of mar that he is, 
he still operates his fields and can daily be found upon his acres. 

•James R. Mundell was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Tilford, a native 
of Round Prairie, Jefferson county, Iowa, where she was horn on .Tunc 25. 
1840. Her parents were among the earlier settlers in this state. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mundell became the parents of twelve children, all of whom were born 
in Union township: Sarah Belinda, who died at the age of five years; Celesta 
Jane, who died at the age of three years; J. 1'.. born December 17, 1861, a 
resident of Lucas; R. T., born March 24, 1864, who makes his home in Jack- 
son township; Mrs. Mary I. Leach, born February 20, 1866, of Jackson town- 
ship; William .)., whose natal day was April ft, 1868, of Jackson township; 
Mrs. Ida V. Stambaugh, born March 20. 1870, who resides at Reedpoint, Mon- 
tana; James A., of Jackson township, who was born April 14, 1872; Lucy E., 
born August 23, 1874, who died July 16, 1S7."> ; ('. E., of Jackson township, 
who was born August 6, 1876; Olive L.. born July 1. 1879, who resides with 
her father in Union township; and -Mrs. Nora Etta Hamilton, born April 11. 
1881, of Jackson township. Mrs. Mundell passed away in Union township on 
March 2, 1896, and Mr. Mundell subsequently married a sister of his former 
wife. 

It is to pioneers of the type of Mr. Mundell that America is indebted for 
its enormous agricultural development, and as such recognition is due him 
in this volume. Having led a long, active and useful life, to which indolence 
and idleness have ever been foreign, he has not only achieved individual suc- 
cess and has not only witnessed the onward march of civilization but has largely 
contributed to the development of Lucas county, always glad to bear his share 
in the work of making this one of the most prosperous sections of the country. 
His life work has been a serviceable factor in the growth of the county and 
there is no one more loyal to its interests than he. Although so deeply inter 
ested in development, he has never been active in politics, caring not for 
public honors or emoluments derived from public sources. He allies himself 
with the democratic party and has ever stanchly upheld its principles. Nature 
has been kind to him, for he has never abused her laws. One usually thinks 
of old age as a period when mental as well as physical powers weaken, but 
there is an old age which grows stronger and brighter mentally and morally 
as the years go by and gives out of its rich stores of wisdom and experience 
for the benefit of others. Such has been the life of Mr. Mundell, who is no1 
only one of the most venerable but also one of the most honored citizens of 
Lucas county, respected wherever known and most of all where besi known. 



SHERMAN PULLEY. 



Among the successful and prominent native sons of Lucas county is num- 
bered Sherman Pulley, who owns and operates two hundred acres of land 
lying on sections 1 and 12, Union township. He was born in this township on 
the 6th of November, 1869, and is a son of Ilenson and Charity Pulley, the 
former a native of Ohio and the hitter of Indiana. They came as pioneers into 



304 LUCAS AMI WAYNE ('(UNTIES 

Lucas county, making the journey overland into Union township in 1 s « ; r> . and 
here the father continued to reside until his death. His wife survives him and 
makes her home on the old Pulley homestead in Union township. In their 
family were eighl children: Prank, <>!' Warren township; .Alary and .Mrs. 
Emma Rosetta Evans, both of whom are deceased; Sherman, of this review; 

.Mrs. Isadore Delmar, of Oklahoma; Charley, who died at the age of i year; 

Arthur, of Oklahoma: and Mrs. Buttora Morgan, of Arkansas. The oldest 
child in this family was horn in Indiana but all of the others are natives of 
Union township. 

Sherman Pulley grew t,, manhood in Lucas county, acquiring his educa 
tion in the districl schools and in his childhood dividing his time between his 
studies and work in clearing, improving and developing the homestead. Be- 
fore he was of age he was already a practical and able farmer, understanding 
the best agricultural methods and all the details of farm operation, a knowledge 
which forms the real basis of his rapid and continued prosperity. Ee is today 
one of the prominent agriculturists of this vicinity, owning two hundred acres 
of choice land lying on sections 1 and 12. Union township. The property is 
equipped with substantial improvements and its neat and attractive appear- 
ance indicates the owner's careful supervision and practical methods. He 
engages in general farming and is also extensively interested in stock-raising, 
breeding good grades of hogs and Aberdeen Angus cattle. 

Mr. Pulley is a member of the Baptisl church, and fraternally is identified 
with the Modem Woodmen of America. His political allegiance is given to 
the democratic party and although not an office seeker, he is at all times inter- 
ested in community affairs, cooperating heartily in all measures to advance the 

interests of his native section. 



B. PRANB rillU.II'S. 



A prominent man of bis community, B. Prank Phillips is engaged in the 

furniture and undertaking business, combining a barber shop with these two 
lines of activity. Moreover, be is widely known along oilier lilies, serving at 
present as the city clerk of l.ueas and being deeply interested in fraternal organ 
Lzations, in which connection lie has attained a rank which makes liim pronii 
lien! thrOUghoUl the state. lie was born in Beacon, Iowa. September I. 1868, 
On of Isaac and Elizabeth I I 'axis. Phillips, natives of Wales, the father born 

May 8, 1834, and passing away in Chariton, fowa, October 16, 1912. The mother 

has also passed away, her death Hiring at Beacon, Iowa. The Phillips famih 

w.re among the earlier settlers of Iowa, having lo.ated at Des Moines in 1"- >6 

They removed to l.ueas. May '_"_'. 1881. In the familj of Mr. ami Mrs. Isaac 
Phillips were lie- following children: Mrs. Isabella P.urke. who was born at 
ParmingtOn, Iowa, ami now resides at lliteinan. this state: Isaac, also a ivsi 
,1,-nt of lliteman: P.. Prank, of this review; Mrs. h'osa I >a.\ Evans and Ifhoda 

May, twins, the former a resident of l.ueas ami the latter deceased; Elizabeth, 

who died ill 1889; and John, superintendent of coal mines ai NbrWOOdville, 






t- 
r 



r 

H 

o 




LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 307 

Iowa. The mother died in 1872 and the father afterwards married Mrs. Ann 
Phillips, a widow, who died September 16, 1913. 

B. Frank Phillips attended the common schools of Beacon and Lucas in the 
acquirement of his education and in 1SS7 engaged in the furniture and under- 
taking business in Lucas, with which, in 1SSS, he combined a barber shop, lie 
is so engaged at present and in the years that have passed has built up an estab- 
lishment which is a credit to the city. He carries a complete and first class line 
of goods and his patronage extends far beyond the city limits into the country. 

In May, 1895, Mr. Phillips was united in marriage to Charlotte Phillips, a 
native of Missouri, her people removing to Lucas county while Mrs. Phillips 
was quite young. Her parents, John D. and Charlotte J. (Parker) Phillips, 
were natives of Wales and New York, respectively. The father passed away in 
Lucas, but the mother is still residing there. In their family were seven 
children. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Frank Phillips have four children: Wendell Herbert, born 
January 25, 1897, who is attending high school in Lucas; Ward Franklin, born 
December 13, 1899, and Donald Lester, born December 23, 1903, both attending 
school; and Clarice Helen, born December 19, 1908. 

A man who not only enjoys the privileges of Americau citizenship, but recog- 
nizes its obligations. Mr. Phillips has become connected with the public life of 
Lucas, which city he served for a term of three years as city clerk about eighteen 
years ago, occupying the same position at the present time. Bringing ability 
and experience to his duties, he has made a creditable record and his work in 
that connection is highly commended by his constituents. He is a republican 
in his political convictions and always votes for the measures and candidates of 
that organization. Mrs. Phillips is a member of the Reorganized Church of the 
Latter Day Saints of Lucas and takes active part in the work of the church. 
For many years Mr. Phillips has held the position of chancellor of Castle Hall. 
No. 133, Knights of Pythias, of Lucas, and is at present past chancellor, while 
he has also been a member of the Grand Lodge of Iowa for the past fifteen years. 
He takes a deep interest in Pythianism and there is probably no member of the 
order in southern Iowa who is more proficient in the work. He also is past fore- 
man of the Yeoman and for two years served as clerk of the Modern Woodmen 
of Lucas. Besides other valuable property he owns his handsome home. Broad 
and liberal-minded, he takes a deep interest in the welfare of the public and has 
ably filled every position of honor and trust to which lie lias been elected. His 
career is proof of the fact that ambition will win its way and the prominent 
position which he has attained no one can begrudge him, as it has been earned 
in a most commendable way. 



WILLIAM C. EVANS. 



Incessant energy, indefatigable industry and close attention to details are 
the elements which constitute the success of William C. Evans, one of the 
prominent agriculturists of Lucas county, where he has extensive holdings 
of valuable land on sections 1 and 10, Jackson township. Born in Knox 



;,,- LUCAS AND WAYNE ('(UNTIES 

ville, Kncix county, Dlinois, od January 23, L856, be is a s<m of Joshua Brown 

and Geor^iaim (Crawford Evans, the former a native of Bartford, Con- 
necticut, where be was born in 1824, and the latter of Scotland. His grand- 
father, in company with Thomas and Joshua Evans at the beginning of the 
Revolutionary war emigrated to tins country from England, enlisting in the 
American army. The father passed away in Enoxville, Illinois, in 1871, but 
the mother is still living on the old borne farm in Knox county, thai state In 
their family were eleven children: A. S., deceased; George Y\\. a resident of 
Lucas, who was horn November 11. 1848, and who for the past twenty years 
has been assessor of Jackson township. Lucas county; Mary, who makes her 

I ,e with her mother in Knoxville and who for thirty years has taughl school 

in Illinois; Ernest, of Woodburn, Iowa; Eliza, deceased; William ('.. of this 
review; Margaret, of Bartford, Connecticut; J. D., deceased; Anna, of Gales- 
burg, Illinois; Ellen, of Knoxville. Illinois; and a daughter who died in infancj 
William ('. Evans was reared on the home farm and acquired Ids education 

in the sel Is of the neighborhood. Very early he 1 ame acquainted with the 

details of agriculture and followed farming in the vicinity of his birthplace. 
Although Ins early education was very limited he has greatly improved his 
knowledge by continuous reading and study and is accounted one of the well 
informed men upon all such subjects as come up in the course of life. Be 
came to Iowa in 1880 and, settling in Jackson township, Lucas county, has 
followed agricultural pursuits ever since with continued success, giving par- 
ticular attention to his stock-raising interests. His success is the more remarkable 
and noteworthy for the reason thai when he came here all his worldly possessions 

consisted of a horse and ten dollars and now he farms three hundred and forty 
acres, belonging to Mrs. Evans, all well improved and equipped, and he has one 
hundred aid eighty acres, the farms being located on sections 1 and 10. Follow 
ing scientific and progressive methods, he has increased the vain.' of his property 
from year to year and his farms todaj betraj by their appearance the prosperity 
of their ow iiers. 

On January 4, l* s ">. Mr. Evans was united in marriage in Jackson town- 
ship. Lucas county, to Miss Margarel Ann Ginn, who was born in Wapello 
county, Iowa. March 11. 1866. While yel a small girl she removed with her 

parents to Clarke county, this state, where they remained for year, and in 

IsTii c ame to Lucas county. Her parents were Joseph and Eli/a Jane i Elder) 
Ginn, both natives of Ohio. The father died in Lucas county, Iowa, in dune, 
1903, at the age of seventy-five years, bul the mother survives and still resides 
in Jackson township. Early in life the father made the overland trip to 
Pikes Peak in search of the precious metal, setting out with an ox team from 
Ottumwa, Iowa, hut the desired success was not to be Ins. Mi-, and Mis. Ginn 
had six children: John, who died at the age of two years; Mrs. Evans; Wil- 
liam, of Des Moines, towa; Albert, deceased; Samuel Tilden, of White Breast 
township, this county; and Joseph Arthur, living in Jackson township. All 
of these children were horn in Wapello county with the exception of the young- 
est, who is a native of Lucas. Mr. and Mrs. Evans are the parents of three 
children, all of whom were horn in Jackson township. Jay Harold, the eldest, 
was horn November 25, 1886, attended the common schools of the neighborhood 
and the public Bchools of Lucas and then took a commercial course at Simpson 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 309 

College, at Indianola, Iowa. He also attended college for two years and after 
graduating from the liberal arts depart menl of the state university at Iowa 
City taught school for several terms but is at present connected with the Omaha 
Sanitary Supply Company, of Omaha, Nebraska. Byron, the next in order of 
birth, born July 11, 1891, passed away shortly after his first birthday, on 
August 28. 1892. William, who completes the family, was born September 28, 
1896, and attends the public schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm. 
Mr. Evans is republican in his political views and gives Ids support to the 
measures and candidates of that party. Deeply interested in the cause of 
education, he has efficiently served as school director of his district and is 
fraternally connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, being a member 
of the Lucas lodge. Mrs. Evans is a member of the -Methodist Episcopal 
church. Not only has Mr. Evans been an interested witness of the changes 
that have made this section one of the richest agricultural regions of the United 
States but he has been a helpful and cooperant factor in the transformation. 
A self-made man, he is highly regarded and esteemed wherever known and 
while he has attained commendable personal prosperity has been a serviceable 
factor in his eommunitv. 



HEXRY II. BARGER. 



Henry II. Barger. successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising 
upon two hundred acres of land in Lucas, his native county, was born in Union 
township. November 22. 1860. He is a son of James Madison and Anna K i; /a 
(Willmore) Barger, natives of Rockbridge county. Virginia, the former born 
in 1823 and the latter in 1825. Their marriage occurred in 1844, and ten 
years later they came overland to Iowa, settling in Union township in pioneer 
times. Here both passed away, the father dying August 28, 1882, and the 
mother January 20, 1904. Ten children were born to their union: John \V.. 
whose birth occurred on the 7th of March, 1845, and who died on the 5th of 
November, 1912; Mrs. Jane E. Courtney, who was born in April, 1847, and 
who is now residing in Orange, California; Josiah A., whose birth occurred 
December 12. 1849, also of Orange; California; Eli I)., who was born August 5, 
1851, and who died in 19DS; Isaiah, who resides in Warren township: George 
W., who was born on the 6th of June, 1856, and who resides in Colorado; Vir- 
ginia A., who was born May 16. 1858, and died at the age of nineteen years; 
Henry H., of this review; Jasper N., who was born .March 7. 1863, and who 
is now a resident of Plattsmouth, Nebraska: and Mrs. Elva Anderson, who was 
born February 21, 1867, now a resident of Kansas City, Missouri. The live 
eldest children were born in Virginia and the remainder are natives of Iowa. 

Henry II. Barger was reared upon bis father's farm in Union township 
and from his childhood assisted with its operation, becoming at an early age 
thoroughly familiar with the best agricultural methods. When he began his 
independent career he naturally turned his attention to the occupation to 
which he had been reared and since that time has been engaged in farming and 



310 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

stock-raising, being today numbered among the prominent and successful agri- 
culturists of his uative township. He owns two hundred acres of land lying 
on sections 1, 11 and l'_' and lias made substantial improvements upon tins 
properly, erecting good barns, granaries and outbuildings and installing the 
accessary machinery. His stock-raising interests chum a greal deal of his 
attention and. being capably conducted, are an important source of income 
in him. 

Mr. Barger has been twice married. He wedded first, in 1885, Miss .Mary 
E. SMdmore, a oative of Jackson township, who died in Union township, leav- 
ing two daughters: Mrs. Alma Terhune, who was born duly 23, l^ s »i. and 
who is now living in Woodburn, Iowa: and Mrs. Eva Melvin, who was born 
April 17. 1890, and who is now residing in Derby. In 1897 Mr. Barger was 
again married, bis second union being with Miss Alice Cottrell, born near In- 
dianola, Iowa. October 8, 1876. sin- is a daughter of Benjamin Franklin and 
Eliza i Hampton) Cottrell, both of whom have passed away, the mother dying 
m January, 1913. In the Cottrell family are lour children, Vinton, Robert, 
Khoda and Alice, the wife of the subjed of tins review. Mr. and Mrs. Barger 
have four children: Lola Pay, who was horn October 20, 1898; Zella Marie, 
born March 27, 1900; Hal Edwin, born April 24, 1901; and Gerald Henry, 
horn June 11, 1906. All are attending public school in this locality- 
Mr. Barger gives his political allegiance t<> the democratic party and lias 
served as a committeeman for a number of years, llo is interested in the cause 
of education and is doing able and effective work as a member of the school 
board. He is a man of high integrity and force of character, enjoying in large 
measure the friendship of those with whom he has been brought in contact, and 

his life of well directed activity has gained him a creditable place in local agri- 
cultural circles. 



EMANUEL HENRY. 



Emanuel Henry is living retired in Derby after twenty-nine years close 
association with farming interests of Warren township. Well directed labor, 
untiring industry and firm determination have guided and directed the activ- 
ities of his career and have brought him success and a comfortable fortune 
which enables him to spend the declining years of Ids life in rest and retire- 
ment He was horn in Pennsylvania, March 13, L833, and is a sun of Martin 

and Wilhelmina Henry, also natives of thai state, who afterward moved to 
Ohio where then- deaths occurred. Twelve children were born to their union, 

whom four still survive, as follows: Mrs. Catharine Winters of Ohio; 

Emanuel of this review: Caroline, who resides in Ohio: and Jeremiah, »\' the 
same state. Of the d sased members of this family, two, Martin and Eli, died 

while in the army during the Civil war. 

Emanuel Henry was five years of age when he moved with his parents In 

Richland county, Ohio, and he there grew to manhood, acquiring his education 
in the district schools. After laying aside his I ks he moved to Union City, 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES ;il 

where he was married and thence to Delaware eounty, Indiana. He turned his 
attention to farming there and remained until the fall of 1ST:!, when he moved 
into Iowa, settling in Warren township, Lucas eounty. Then- for a period of 
twenty-nine years thereafter he remained active in agricultural pursuits, oper- 
ating an excellent farm which he made productive and valuable by his own 
well directed and practical labors. In the course of years he accumulated a 
comfortable fortune and in 1902 retired from active life, moving to Derby 
where he has since resided. He owns here a comfortable, well furnished and 
modern home with beautiful grounds and is enjoying the fruits of his former 
period of toil and labor. 

In Darke county, Ohio, on the 11th of January, 1855, Mr. Henry was united 
in marriage to Miss Barbara Dale, who was born in Miami county, thai slate, 
December 3, 1835. She is a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Howser) Dale, 
natives of Ohio, and early settlers in Darke county. Both have passed away, 
dying in Warren township, this county, the father at the age of seventy and the 
mother at seventy-six. Six children were born to their union: Paul, deceased; 
.Mrs. Henry, wife of the subject of this review: Jacob, who resides in Ottumwa. 
Iowa; Abraham, of .Mystic, Iowa; John, who makes his home in Creston; and 
Adam, of White Breast township. All the above children were born in Ohio, 
the eldest in Miami county and the others in Darke county. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Henry became the parents of nine children: Mrs. Elizabeth Christy, who 
was born April 16, 1857. and who resides in Hoisington, Kansas; Jacob, whose 
birth occurred October b', 1850, and who makes his home in Warren township; 
Mrs. Mary Catharine Magill, who was born February 3, 1862, and who has 
passed away. Andrew, who was born January 5, 1864, and who resides in Kan- 
sas; Mrs. Martha Decker, born February 27. 1866, residing in Saskatchewan. 
Canada: Mrs. Emma Bowman, born August '.), 1868, living at Promise City, 
Iowa; John William, who was born July 23, 1870, and who has passed away; 
Emanuel, Jr., born December 20. 1872. living with his parents in Derby; and 
Frank, who was born April 19, 1877. and who died in infancy. The elder children 
were born in Indiana and Illinois and the youngest one in Iowa. All were reared 
in Warren township. Mr. and Mrs. Henry have twenty living grandchildren, 
eighteen of whom were reared in this part of the state. 

Mr. Henry is a member of the German Baptist church of Warren township 
and he is a democrat in his political beliefs, taking an intelligent interest in 
public affairs. By years of incessant labor he has secured a comfortable 
fortune which enables him to spend the last years of Ins life in retirement, 
enjoying the peace and happiness which come from the consciousness of worthy 
work well done and an upright life well lived. 



A. G. CHERRYIIOL.MKS 

A. C. Cherryholmes, prominently connected with business interests of Derby 
as a partner in the hardware firm of Cherryholmes & Nessen, is numbered 
among the pioneers in Lucas county, his residence here dating from 1854 
This has covered the period of the section's greates! growth and development 



312 LUCAS AND WAYNE ('(UNTIES 

anil although In' was .-still a child at thai time, lie afterward bore his lull share 
in the work cil' progress, liis activities promoting the agricultural development 
of his township and later the mercantile growth of the city where he uow 
makes liis home, lie was horn in Tuscarawas coimtv. Ohio, on the 27th of 
August, 1852, and is a sun of John and .Mary (Norris) Cherryholmes, natives 
of that state, the father bora in 1804 and the mother in 1819. They Left Port 

Washington, Ohio, in a covered wago the 20th of September, L854, and 

arrived in Union township, Lucas county, on November Bth of the same year. 
They settled <>n a Farm here when pioneer conditions prevailed everywhere, 
the settlements lieini: sparse and the houses between their property and Chari- 
ton few and far between. The lather continued to develop his holdings, becom- 
ing one of the prosperous and substantial farmers in this locality, dying upon 
his property in Union township in L889. His wife survived him some years, 
passing away in 1894 In their family were eighl children: W, 11.. deceased; 
Joseph, whose I te is in Kansas: lihoda and a daughter (unnamed), both of 

w horn died in infancy ; A. (i.. of this review; .Mrs. Amanda B. Gibbs, of 1 1 limes 

ton: .Mrs. Ruth Brevard, of Colorado; and -I. I>.. of Taylor county, fowa. The 

live eldest children were horn in Ohio and the three youngesl in Union town- 
ship, hut all were reared in Lucas county. 

A. <!. Cherryholmes was onh two years of aire when he came with his par 
cuts to Lucas county ami amid the pioneer conditions then prevailing he grew 
to manhood, attending the district school and when not engaged with his hooks 

.issisinie with the work of the I lestead. When be began his independent 

career he naturally turned his attention to the occupation to which he had been 
reared ami he followed farming in Union township until 1897, when he moved 
into Derby, where he bas since resided. On the it h of October, 1905, he formed 
a partnership with Mr. Nesscii and they entered into the hardware ami imple- 
ment business in Derby under the firm name of Cherryholmes & Nessen. Thej 
deal in all kinds of shelf and heavy hardware, vehicles and farm implements, 
conducting one of the largest enterprises of t his character in this section, and thej 
have been accorded a Liberal and representative patronage, for their pries are 

dl times reasonable ami their business methods honorable ami straightfor 

ward. .Mr. Cherryholmes is known as a resourceful, farsighted and progres 
sive Imsiiicss man and his success is the direct result of ability corrtbined with 
industry. 

In 1881 .Mr. Cherryholmes was united in marriage to .Miss Matilda Brevard. 
who was horn in Indiana on the 26th of June, L851, a daughter of Jonathan 
.ind Charitj (Marsh) Brevard, natives of that state. They cane' overland to 

Clarke county, Iowa, in 1864 and settled on a farm I here on winch thej con 
tinned to reside until their deaths. In their familj were the following chil- 
dren: .Mrs. Rachel A. Brower, James Martin ami Jesse M., all of whom are 
deceased: .Mrs. -lane Crawford, of Nebraska; Mrs. Cherryholmes, wife of the 
subject of this sketch : Isaac, whose home is in Colorado; Mis Amanda Polk, 
of Washington; and John P., of Clarke county. Iowa. All of these children 
were horn in Indiana with the exception of Mrs. Crawford and » harles W. 
Mr. ami .Mrs, Cherryholmes became the parents of one daughter, Araminta, 
who died in infancy. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 313 

Fraternally Mr. Cherryholmes is connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Yeomen and his wife holds membership in the Rebekahs. 
He is a democrat in his political beliefs and has served ably and creditably as 
road supervisor and assessor of Derby. A public-spirited and progressive 
citizen, he is interested in the welfare of the section to which he came in pio- 
neer times and is active in promoting its growth. Business men respect him 
for his integrity and his straightforward dealings and wherever he is known 
he holds the esteem and confidence of all who are associated with him. 



ISAAC M. TAYLOR. 



Isaac M. Taylor, a worthy native son of Lucas county and a representative 
of an honored pioneer family of Union township, owns and operates a well 
improved farm of three hundred and thirty-two acres in Union and Warren 
townships and has resided thereon from his birth to the present time. He 
was born on the 10th of December, 1860, his parents being Jacob and Mary 
(McKnight) Taylor, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of Virginia. 
Jacob Taylor came to this county in 1854, when a young man of eighteen years, 
making the overland journey with an ox team. Here he spent the remainder of 
his life, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits until he passed 
away in Union township in 1872. His wife, who had made the overland journey 
to Iowa in company with her parents in 1856, died in Union township, Lucas 
county, in 1870. They were well'known and highly esteemed here, and in their 
passing the community lost two of its honored pioneer residents. Their chil- 
dren, six in number and all natives of Union township, were as follows: Mary 
Virginia, who is deceased; Isaac M., of this review: John Everett, who resides 
in the North Yakima valley of Washington; William P., of Warren township, 
this county ; Eugene, deceased ; and a son who died in infancy. 

Isaac M. Taylor first attended the district school near his father's farm and 
subsequently continued his studies in the public schools of Derby. The place 
on which he was born has remained his home to the present time, and early in 
life he became familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist. The pursuits of farming and stock-raising have claimed his at- 
tention throughout his entire business career and he now owns three hundred 
and thirty-two acres of valuable land in Union and Warren townships, with 
two sets of excellent improvements. His live stock is of good grade and this 
branch of his business has added materially to his yearly income. He annually 
harvests bounteous crops which find a ready sale on the market and has long 
been numbered among the prosperous agriculturists and representative citizens 
of his community. 

On the 22d of February. 1882. .Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to .Miss 
Joanna McCullough, whose birth occurred in Greene county, Pennsylvania. .... 
the 14th of September, 1857, her parents being Thomas and Elizabeth (Webster) 
McCulloush. likewise natives of that county. Following the death of Thomas 
McCullough. which occurred in Greene county, Pennsylvania, his widow came 
with her family to Lucas county, Iowa, in 1875. ami here spent the remainder 



314 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

of her life. Ber children were seven in number, namely: Canada, who is de- 
ceased; William, a resident of Chanute, Kansas; John, who makes his home in 
Concordia, Kansas; Mrs. Joanna Taylor; Joseph Leroy, who passed away in 
Kansas; George L., living in l.akin. Kansas; and Charles Ellsworth, of Wayne 

county, Iowa. All were natives of Green >unty, Pennsylvania. Mr. and .Mrs. 

Taylor have become the parents of tour children, all of whom were horn on the 
same farm in I'nion township where the father tirst saw the lighl of day. The 
record is as Follows: Carl K.. whose birth occurred on the "-'4th of June, 1883, 
and who resides with his parents on the home farm; .Mrs. Mary Elizabeth New 
some, horn .March 14, 1885, who is a resident of Union township; Charles, who 
was horn September 10, L888, and resides with his parents: and [lay, who was 
born on the 19th of August, 1S!I(), and also lives in Union township. The two 
eldest sons attended the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines, Iowa, 
Carl being a graduate of that institution and Charles pursuing his studies there 
for one year. 

.Mr. Taylor is a democral in polities and has served in the capacity of town- 
ship trustee for four years, having also held the office of road supervisor. Fra- 
ternally lie is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America at Derby, while 
his wife is a member of the Baptist church at May. lie is a public-spirited and 
progressive citizen whose aid and cooperation can ever be counted upon to further 
any movement or measure instituted to promote the general welfare. Thai his 
life has ever been uprighl and honorable is indicated in the fact that the asso 

eiates of his boyhood and youth are still numbered i '_ r Ins stanch friends 

and admirers. 



CHARLES II. DAVIS. 

Charles II. Davis, controlling an important and lucrative business in Derbj 

:,^ a real estate agent, has been a resident of Lucas county sine,. 1875 and has 

been prominently connected \\ ith business affairs in this city tor about thirty-three 
years. He was born in Schuyler county, Missouri, in Lancaster, December C r >, 

1853, and is a son ,,{' William -I. and Nancy I. I Roe Davis, natives of Virginia, 

the former born October II. 1823, an, I the latter April •_'■_'. lsi'ii. The parents 
removed from Missouri to Illinois where thej remained for two years, "oinfx 

from Here to Virginia. The father was well known in military circles then-, 

being second lieutenant in the Twentieth Virginia Regiment, state Militia, com 
missioned May, L844, tie- documenl being dated at Richmond, July :;. 1844, 
and signed by James McDowell, governor of the state. Prom Virginia Mr. and 
Mrs. William Davis moved to Kentucky ami there on the 1st of September, 1861, 
i in father enlisted in the Union army, joining Company I. Third Kentucky Vol 
unteer Regiment, ami dying while in the service of his country on October l">, 
L862 Three of his brothers were also members of the I'nion army. Mr. Davis' 
wife survived him many years, dying in Derby, May is. 1906. She was a grand- 
daughter of John ami Nancy Roe, the former horn October 22, 1769, and tin- 
latter December 30, lTTn. Her parents were Edmund and Isabella Roe, the 
Former of whom was horn May 9, 1 7 ' » 7 . and died in 1882. The hitter's birth 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 315 

occurred December 29, 1796, and her death in 188:!. This family also sent a 
representative to the battlefields of the Civil war, Edward Washington Roe, uncle 
of the subject of this review, having been killed at the siege of Yicksburg. Mr. 
and Mrs. William J. Davis became the parents of seven children : a son who was 
born December 19, 1845, and who died in infancy; James A., limn April 14. 1S47. 
who died April 3, 1907 ; John W., who was born March 9. 1850, and who resides in 
Oklahoma; Edward, who was born June 6, 1852, and who died February 7, 1853; 
Charles H., of this review; Tolbert H., who was born November 25, 1856, and 
who died November 6, I860; and Mrs. Sarah Isabelle Patton, who was born 
August 24, 1859, and who died at Shenandoah, Iowa, May 27, 1887. 

Charles H. Davis was reared in Kentucky and acquired his education in the 
public schools of that state. After laying aside his books he turned his attention 
to farming and this occupation he followed for some years thereafter, first in 
Kentucky and then in Lucas county, Iowa, where he removed in 1875. lie 
engaged in agricultural pursuits here for five years and at the end of that time 
moved into Derby where, with the exception of two years, he has since continued 
an esteemed and respected resident. For sixteen years after his arrival here In 
conducted a large and profitable mercantile establishment, building up an exten- 
sive and representative patronage which was accorded him in recognition of his 
upright and honorable business methods, his progressive standards and his 
earnest desire to please his customers. When he disposed of this enterprise he 
turned Ms attention to banking and for two years thereafter acted as assistant 
cashier of the Home State Bank of Humeston. He then entered into partnership 
with Mr. Crocker of Chariton and together they established a bank in Derby. 
which under their able management became one of the strong and reliable moneyed 
institutions of this part of the state. Mr. Davis severed his connection with 
banking interests here in 1905 and about 1908 accepted the appointment of post- 
master of the city, discharging his important duties in a prompt, capable and 
thoroughly satisfactory way. Failing health obliged him to resign this office 
and he has since that time devoted his attention to the real-estate business, han- 
dling a great deal of valuable property. He has at different times owned a num- 
ber of fine farms in Lucas county and is now the proprietor of one hundred 
and sixty acres of choice land in Kansas, besides having a half interest in a forty 
acre tract in Union tow r nship and ten acres adjoining Derby. He has dealt 
extensively in Derby town property and his own home in tins city is an attractive, 
modern and comfortable residence. 

On the 7th of February. LS75. Mr. Davis was united in marriage to .Miss 
Susan M. Sowder, who was born in Claiborne county, Tennessee. January 6. 
1851. She is a daughter of Henry RI. and Rachel (Osmus) Sowder, also natives 
of that state, the father residing in Lucas county, where the mother passed away. 
In this family were twelve children: Mrs. Ann ('. Smith, of Washington, D. C. ; 
Jane, who died in infancy; Mrs. Davis, wife of the subject of this review; David 

L., residing in Union township; Mrs. Mbllie Woods, d ased : William II., who 

resides in Lucas county; Benjamin F.. deceased; Emanuel M., who makes his 
home in Derby; Malinda, who died at the age of eighteen ; Cordelia, who passed 
away at the age of sixteen; Mrs. Sarah Smith of Humeston, Iowa ; and a. son, 
who died in infancy. .Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of four children : 
William II.. who was born April 13. 1878. and who is now engaged in the real- 



316 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

estate business in Chillicothe, Missouri; Flora B., who was bom September 
28, 1879, and who died September 1 I. l v ^l . Prances M., who was born December 
r>. lssn. and wlio died February Hi. 1881; and Robert T., who was born Mav 
25, L883, and who is n><\\ residing al Verndale, Minnesota, 

ll is imt alone along business lines that Charles II Davis ha- d splendid 

work leu' Derby, for he has been a force in the political life of the city for more 
than a quarter of a century and through active official service has done much to 
promote material development. As mayor lie gave I.. Derby a straightforward, 
businesslike and constructive administration, and he was for twenty years town- 
ship clerk and a mem her of the school board. During the long period of his resi- 
dence here no progressive public project has lacked his hearty cooperation and 
intelligent support, and his name stands for progress, reform and advancement 
along all line-. 



DAVID WESTFALL. 



David YVcstfall. the oldest surviving native son of Union township, is living 
retired in his beautiful home in Indianola, and has made his surroundings reflect 
his personality and the love of nature and beauty, which has he. n developed iu 
him in the course of his active ami honorable life. His bouse is set in the midst 
nl gardens which have been the object of his personal care and attention, and 
nothing has been neglected which will add to the attractiveness of the place which 
is today one of the most pleasing features of the landscape. Mr. Westfall's pies- 
eiil period of leisure has come as the reward of earnest, straightforward and 
well directed work in the past, for he was for man} wars closely identified with 
farming, stock-raising and stock buying interests here and his present comforl 
able fortune is visible evidence of his business abilitj and sound judgment. His 
birth occurred November 5, 1852, his parents heme Granville and Jeannette 
Teal West fall, the former born in Jackson county, West Virginia, March 3, 
1829, and the latter m Rockbridge county. Virginia, October 26, 1830. In the 

fall ol L849 the parents made the overland journey into Iowa and settled in 

Union township where both remained until death. At the time of their arrival 
pioneer conditions prevailed everywhere, the unbroken prairie stretched for miles 
in every direction and wild game was plentiful in the fields and woods. There 
were no railroads and the Indians were the most numerous inhabitants. In this 
mtier settlement Mr. and Mrs. Westfall founded a home, facing bravely the 

hardships and pri vat ions of pioneer life and evolving OUl of the wilderness a profit- 
able and productive farm. Thej became well known and highl] respected in this 
community where they were recognized as people of many sterling traits of char 

acter and Upright and honorable in all their relations of life. The mother died 
in Union township November 25, 1885 and the father survived her until Decern 
her 17. 1891, passing away in Jackson coiinlv. West Virginia, while on a visit. 

Fourteen children were born to their union: Mrs. Martha Troutman, who was 
born October 20, I s !' 1 . mm residing in Union township; Clark, who was born 

March 6, 1851 and who died in this township: David, ol' this review ; Franklin, 
Whose birth occurred November 26 1854. and who died in Walla Walla. Wash 



LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 317 

ington, January 17, 1885; Alfred, who was born November 13, 1856, and who died 
in infancy ; John P., whose birth occurred December '27, 1S57, and who resides in 
LeRoy, Iowa; George, who was boi'n February 15, 1860 and who makes his home 
in Derby; Mrs. Flora Kyner, who was born November 28, 1861, and who is now 
a resident of Humeston; Mrs. Victoria Kyner, born February 25, 1864, a resi- 
dent of the same city; Henry, born March 17, 1866, who lives in Union township; 
Justin, who was born April 6, 1868, and who makes his home in Derby; Lucinda, 
whose birth occurred November 2, 1870, and who died December 26, 1885 ; Jo 
Ann, who was born December 23, 1871, ami who passed away August 29, 1872; 
and Charlie, also deceased. 

David Westfall grew to manhood in Union township, and acquired his educa- 
tion in district school. He learned the details of farm operation by assisting 
with the work of the homestead and when he began his independent career 

naturally turned his attention to the occupation to which lie had I n reared. 

He purchased land and gave a great deal of time to its improvement and cultiva- 
tion, his efforts through the years being rewarded by a substantial degree of 
success. In addition to general farming Mr. Westfall was also closely identified 
with stock-raising and stock-buying interests and became well known throughout 
the township as a farsighted, progressive and enterprising business man. His 
landed holdings are today extensive, comprising one hundred and forty-one acres 
on Union township and sixty-two acres in Warren township, both farms being 
improved with modern buildings ami equipped with everything necessary for 
their successful operation. Mr. Westfall spends part of his time at Derby super- 
vising his property interests, but has practically retired from active life and 
resides in Indianola with his son and grandchildren whom he regards as espe- 
cially entrusted to his care. Here he has built a modern and beautiful home, one 
of the finest in Iowa, and having accumulated a comfortable supply of (his 
world's goods, is spending his retired life in ease and enjoyment. He takes a 
great and justifiable pride in his home which is well furnished and completely 
equipped with all modem conveniences and many luxuries and which has besides 
been built with an eye to beauty anil attractiveness. This idea has been car- 
ried oul in its surroundings also, for the house is set in I he midsl of flower gardens 
and fine shade trees which beautify a well kept lawn. There are also vegetable 
gardens and attractive shrubbery, and Air. Westfall ^ives a great deal of time 
to the care of his grounds, for he believes in living close to nature and loves 
flowers and trees and everything connected with the out-of-doors. 

On the 8th of April, 1873, Air. Westfall was united in marriage to Aliss 
Alalissa A. McMains, who was born in Jefferson county, this slate. Augusl 22, 
1850, a daughter of James and Catharine (Sears) McMains, pioneer settlers 
in Lucas county, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work. Air. 
and Mrs. Westfall became the parents of a son. Ernesl B., who was born in 
Union township. September 16. 1876. The latter grew to manhood in this 
community and on January 2, 1898, married Lola D. Tedrick, a native of War 
ren township, born November 28, 1878. She was a daughter of .John P. and 
Emma. (Westfall) Tedrick, residents of Warren township. In this family w^vr 
four children: Airs. Ernesl Westfall; Ralph, who resides in California; Mrs. 
Bertha Dobel, also of California ; and Otis of the same state. These children were 
all born and reared in Warren township. Mrs. Ernest. Westfall passed away at 



318 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Indianola July 1. 1909, and is buried al Derby. She and bier husband became the 
parents of the following children. Wilma was born in Derby, November 15, 1898, 
and was graduated from the eighth grade of the [ndianola public school in 1913. 
She is considered one of the besl penmen of her age and expects to enter nigh 
school in the fall of this year. Winnefred was born Augusl 8, L900. Alta's birth 
occurred on the 29th of duly. 1902. Helen was bora at Redland, California, 
October 25, 1904. These children and their father make their home with Mr. 
and .Mrs. David West fall, who are verj Eond of their granddaughters and do everj 
thing in their power for their comforl and welfare. 

Mr. Westfall gives his political allegiance to the democratic part; and is 
interested in the growth and development of the township where Ins entire Life 
has been spent. Ee lias been township clerk and school director and proved 
an efficient and reliable public official, discharging his duties ably and with a 
conscientious sens,- of responsibility. Be represents one of the lirst piom 
families of this countj and has an extensive acquaintance within its borders, 
his uprighl life and honorable character having won him high regard and 
widespread est. ■em. 



CHARLES A PETTYJOHN. 

Charles A. Pettyjohn, prominently connected with business interests of Chari- 
ton as a Successful mason, is a native of Iowa, horn in .Marion county, one and 

one-third miles cast of Columbia, .March 11. 1875. He is a son of Peter and 
Amanda (Rogers) Pettyjohn, the former a native of Illinois ami the Latter 
of Tennessee. The parents settled iii Wapello county, Iowa, at a very early 
date ami four years later removed to Marion county, while subsequently thej 
came to Pleasant township, Lucas county, where the father engaged in farm- 
ing, lie is still residing in this section of Lucas county and is widely and favor 

ably known. lie and his wife became the parents of the following children: 
.Martha Jane, deceased: .lames Austin, a native of Marion county, fowa; Mrs 
Mar.\ Sanders, who resides in Pleasant i ownsh i p . Joseph, ol Monroe county ; Mra 
Sarah Antrim, of Nebraska; Mrs. Emma Adaiiison, a resident of Quincy, Uli 
nois; .Mrs. Melinda Booth, whose home is mar Attica, Iowa. Peter David, who 
resides mar Carlisle. Iowa: George, deceased; Mrs. Nancj Perry, of Kim: City, 

Missouri; and Charles A . tin- subjed Of this review. 

Charles A. Pettyjohn remained in .Marion county until he was si\ years of age 
and then accompanied ins parents to Pleasant township, where be attended the 
public schools. After a time the family moved two miles west from their origi- 
nal location ami hen- Mr. Pettyjohn of tins review continued his studies and also 
assisted Ins father with the work of the farm. After attaining liis majoritj 

he harm, I the mason's trade under P. A. Stafford and after serving a four 

years' apprenticeship came to Chariton, where he has since resided. He has fol- 
lowed Ins trade since be began his active career and has met with thai su< ss 

which c is in recognition of reliable and trustworthy work and straight 

forward and honorable business methods 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 319 

On the 24th of July, 1900. Mr. Pettyjohn was united in marriage to Miss 
.Maude M. Dawson, who was born in Chariton, May 26, 1884, a daughter of Wil- 
liam and Lorenda (Sdhofield) Dawson, the former a native of Indiana and the 
latter of Tennessee, both of whom reside in Chariton. They became the parents of 
twelve children, six of whom survive: Mrs. Louise Madis, of Lehigh, Iowa; 
Edward, of Kingsville, Missouri; Charles, a resident of Davenport, Iowa; Harry, 
of Creston. this state : Mrs. Pettyjohn, wife of the subject of this review ; and 
Boyd B.. burn March 14, 1892, now a resident of Chariton. Mr. and Mrs. Petty- 
john have become the parents of six children-. Harold Nelson, born April 30, 
1902; Roland Roy. born April 12, 1904; Lura Irene and Loren Iverne, twins, 
born December 13, 1906; Vera Dorothy, who was born in Nebraska, August 4, 
1909; and Duane Grant, born November 30, 1911. at Chariton. 

Mr. Pettyjohn gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is 
active and progressive in matters of citizenship, taking an intelligent interest in 
the welfare and growth of the community. He owns a comfortable and well fur- 
nished home in Chariton with a large acreage and he is well known and highly 
esteemed in the city. 



SAMl'EL L. WILLIAMS. 

A native of Warren township, Lucas county, Samuel L. Williams has here 
spent his entire life with the exception of ten years during which he was a 
resident of Kansas. Formerly engaged in farming, he turned his attention 
to carpentering in 1908. which occupation he has since followed with grati- 
fying success. Samuel L. Williams was born September 30, 1866, a son of 
Parkison and Sarah J. (Essex) Williams, of whom more extended mention 
is made under the heading of Parkison Williams. 

Samuel L. Williams was reared and attended school in Warren township, 
spending the major portion of his life on the old homestead and assisting in 
its operation. He spent ten years in Kansas, however, but then returned to 
his former home. In the meantime he had taken up the carpenter's trade, in 
which occupation he has since been successful. 

Mr. Williams was married in 1891 to .Miss Laura E. Clayton, who was 
born in Wayne county. Iowa, May 8, 1874. She was brought by her parents 
to Lucas county when a child ami grew to womanhood here. Her parents are 
William and Elizabeth (Wright) Clayton, who came from Wayne county to 
Lucas county and are now residents of Chariton. In their family were the 
following children : Florence, deceased; Mrs. Samuel L. Williams; Mrs. Mel 
lie Graham, who resides in Oregon; Mrs. Annie Lewis of Chariton; Alvin, de- 
ceased; Henry, who makes his home in Chariton; Mrs. Essie McCulloch, of 
the same city; and Carl, who makes his home with his parents in Chariton. 
The two eldest of these children were born in Wayne county and the remainder 
in Lucas county. Mr. and Mrs. Williams became the parents of seven chil- 
dren: Herbert R,, born March 13, 1893, still at home; Dorothy Stcva, born 
July 20, 1895, who died December 3, 1896; Mamie I., born -January 10, 1901; 
Gerald, whose date of birth was September 2:i. 1903; Orlo B., whose birth oc- 



320 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

cnrred November 26, 1905; Gladys M., born January 29, 1908; and Robert I)., 
born May 19, 1911. The three elder children were born in Wayne county and 
the younger ones in Stafford county, Kansas. Mrs. Williams is a member of 
the Methodisl Episcopal church, taking an active and helpful interest in its 

work. 

Politically Mr. Williams is a republican, giving his unqualified supporl to 

the measures and candidates of thai party. Eowever, he lias never take >re 

than a citizen's interest in politics, not caring for public office, lie is public 
spirited in the best sense of the word and is interested in all that pertains to 
the progress of his section. Be enjoys in large measure the confidence and 
good will el" Ins fellow citizens and is one of Hie valued and esteemed residents 
of Warren township. 



WILLIAM 1. EVANS. 



The name of K\aus nerds no introduction to the readers of a historj of 
Wayne county, for it has been an honored one in this part of Iowa for over 

fifty years and has been hone- by soi >f the most worthy and respected citizens 

in America since prerevolutionary lines. One of the most progressive and 
successful representatives of this family at the present time is William L. 

Evans, of the extensive landowners and practical agriculturists of Wayne 

county, his native section. Ee was born on the 28th of .March. 1859, and is a 
son of Aaron ami Matilda (Baker Evans. The father was born in Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, a son of -lames and Rachel Evans. The family line can 
be traced hack through successive generations from father to son until it reaches 
Evan Evans, a native of Wales, who founded the family in America, settling 
in what is now Geigertown, Pennsylvania, before the year 1753. Ee served in 
some of the Indian and Colonial wars and was a soldier in the Continental 
arm} during the American Revolution, serving in Captain John Robeson's 
Company of the Pennsj Ivania si at.- Militia. His grandson, James Evans, married 
Rachel Blankley, a daughter of George Blankley, who served as sergeant in 
Captain Jacob Buffman's Company of the First Regimenl of Pennsylvania Ri 
men iii the War of lsii'. His son. Hiram Evans, enlisted for the Mexican war 
hut did not see active service. Eowever, at the outbreak of the war of the 

Rebellion he enlisted in C panj l». Twenty-third Iowa Volunteer Infantry. 

and was promoted from the ranl< of lieutenant to that of captain, resigning 

after two years of able service on i ounl of disability. Previous to this time 

and afterward he farmed in Iowa, taking up government land in Davis count} 
ami then in Wayne county, where he resided until his death 

Aaron Evans, the father of the subject of this review, came to Bentonsport, 

Iowa, about the year l s ">n and in the following year settled in Wayi ounty, 

where he acquired eighty acres of government land which by judicious invest 
m. His he increased until he owned six hundred and forty acres. For many 
years he was successfully engaged in general agricultural pursuits but the last 
eighteen years of his life were spent in Seymour, where he had important Imsj 
ness connections, being identified with the management of several of the citj 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 321 

banks and holding title to valuable tracts of town property. He was a republican 
in his political beliefs and was a devout member of the Methodist church. In 
Masonry he had attained a distinguished place, holding membership in the 
lodge, chapter and commandery. He was in all the relations of his life an 
upright, straightforward and honorable gentleman and his death, which was 
widely and deeply regretted, was felt as a distinct loss to the community in 
which he had so long resided. His wife was a daughter of Moses Baker, of 
Ohio, who came to Van Buren county, Iowa, about the year 1856 and removed 
to Wayne county in 1858. He followed farming during the remainder of his 
life. The mother of our subject was a devout member of the Methodist church. 
Her death occurred on the 25th of August, 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Evans 
became the parents of twelve children: William L., of this review; George I., 
a farmer near Seymour, who is married and has six children; Mary P., who 
passed away in 1886; Sarah May, who married F. A. Eastman, a retired farmer 
of Wichita, Kansas, by whom she has twelve children; James A., a farmer 
near Seymour, who is married and has six children; Charles Russell, a painter 
and paperhangcr, who resides near Seymour; John ('.. who is engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in Wayne county and who is married and the father of three 
children; Laura, who became the wife of George Tomlinson, a resident of Sey- 
mour, by whom she has two children; Lottie M., who married II. M. Lord, of 
Seymour, by whom she has three children; and Lucy, Rachel and Janie. all of 
whom have passed away. 

William L. Evans acquired a public-school education in the Iowa schools 
and spent his childhood upon his father's farm. In September, 1880, he began 
his independent agricultural career, moving upon a tract of land which was 
presented to him by his father. To this he added property which he acquired 
by purchase and in all had eighty acres. With characteristic energy he applied 
himself to the improvement and development of this farm, at intervals adding 
to his holdings until today he owns three hundred and twenty acres, one of 
the most valuable agricultural properties in this part of the state. He does 
not reside upon his farm but has a beautiful home in Seymour, where his 
attention is given to his extensive business interests. He owns a great deal 
of city real estate and is otherwise influentially connected with important local 
enterprises. 

On the 12th of February, 1880, Mr. Evans was united in marriage to .Miss 
Mary Gump, of Wayne county, a daughter of Isaac and Diana (Parks) (lump. 
natives of Pennsylvania. Their marriage occurred in Wesl Virginia ami about 
the year 1853 they came to Iowa and the father followed farming in Wayne 
county for more than twenty-five years. Mr. and Mrs. Evans have become the 
parents of five children: Martin Luther, who is engaged in teaching school 
in Spokane. Washington; James Clyde; Mbntella, who married Miss Bertha 
Walker and with his wife and three children resides upon the home farm; Ida 
May, who married Otto Naylor, a farmer in Polk county, by whom she has 
two children; and William Hiram, a. bookkeeper in Des .Moines. Mr. and Mrs. 
Evans are members of the Methodist church. 

Since 1881 Mr. Evans has been connected with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and has been through all the chairs in that organization, lie gives 
a loyal support to the n and measures of the republican party and For over 



322 I.I CAS AND WAYNE COl'XTIKS 

seventeen years lias been prominent in township affairs, holding many township 
offices. For well over a quarter ot a century lie lias been influentially associated 
with the agricultural and business interests of his community and his high 
standards of integrity, his conscientiousness and uprightness have earned him 
the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens. Be always gives his influence 
and aid to progressive public measures and stands uniformly on the side of 
justice, truth and right in public as well as private relation- 



WHITFIELD W. CLORE. 

A factor in progress and advancement, always willing to bear his share of 
time or money toward any worthy public enterprise, Whitfield W. Clore occu- 
pies an important position in the life of Lucas county, Iowa, win-re he owns a 

highlj productive farm of four hundred and sixty acres located on sections 1". 
13, 14, 23 and 24, otter Creek township. Broad and liberal-minded, he lias 
become a power in his Locality and his labors have not only been conductive 

to his own prosperity but have raised the moral, intellectual and material stand- 
ards. 

Born in Parke county, Indiana, on December 31. 1859, he is a son of How- 
ard and Sarah (Deere) Clore. natives of Kentucky, in which state the father 
was born in L818. 'fhe father subsequently re ved to Indiana where the fam- 
ily settled in Parke county and where both he and his wife became prominent 
and widely and favorably known. Be passed away in that state in ls!'.~>. long 
surviving his wife, whose death occurred in 1872, also in thai state. In their 
familj were five children, one of whom died in infancy. The others are: Henry 
II.. who resides in Indiana; Sarah, also a resident of that state: Howard D., 
born November 11. b s ">7. who makes his home in Otter Creek township, this 
COUnty; and Whitfield W., of this review. All of these children were born in 
Indiana. 

Whitfield W. ('lore was reared under the parental roof and in the acquire- 
ment of his education attended the schools near his father's farm. He remained 
in his native slate until about twenty-seven years of age, when, in .May. 1886, 
he came to otter Creek township, Lucas county, settling on sections 24 and 
13, purchasing land on which he engaged in agricultural pursuits, giving par) 
of his time tn stock-raising. Energetic and industrious, success has attended 
ins labors and be is now well known as one of the successful stock feeders of the 

township, s] ializing in full blooded Percheron horses and Bereford cattle. Di] 

igence and earnest efforts have resulted in a competence and todaj be owns 

four hundred and sixty acres of land, all under high cultivation and equipped 

with two sets of improvements. His well repaired barns and outbuildings, 

his modern and up to date implements and his richly-hearing fields bespeak 

the prosperity of their owner. The family residence is equipped with all mod- 
ern conveniences, is commodious and comfortable and rivals in elegance any 

city home. As his means have increased Mr. Clore has made other judicious 
investments and owns four hundred acres of excellent land in Texas. There 

his eldest son now resides. 




\\ BITFIELD \V. CLORE 




MRS. WHITFIELD W. < LORE 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 327 

On March 18, 1890, Mr. Clore was united in marriage to Miss Ella P. Bond, 
who was born in .Mahaska county. Iowa, on September 27, 1868, having always 
remained a resident of this state. Her parents were George T. and .Margaret 
(Johnson) Bond, natives of Maryland, who died in Otter Creek township, the 
former on February 14, 1884, and the latter on February 16, 1908. In 
their family were seven children, of whom two are living, .Mrs. ('lore's 
older brother. Charles R. Bond, being mentioned at length on another page 
of this volume. Mr. and Mrs. Clore became the parents of two sons, both 
of whom were horn at the home farm in Otter Creek township. Wayne 
Leland, born January 3, 1891, acquired his early education in the com- 
mon schools, subsequently spending one year at the Chariton high school and 
a year and a half in the seminary of Simpson College, at Indianola. lie 
resides at present in Texas. Charles Ober, born August 14, 1892, makes his 
home with his father. 

Politically Mr. Clore is a republican, well informed upon the issues of the 
day and taking an active and helpful interest in the community's welfare. 
Mrs. Clore is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Norwood, to 
which organization and its allied societies she gives her material and moral sup- 
port. Both she and her husband are highly regarded and esteemed in Otter 
Creek township and Lucas county where they are well and favorably known, 
having won good-will and high regard by their many high qualities of mind 
and character. ' The success Mr. Clore has attained is well earned and well 
merited for it is the outcome of a life rich in effort and labor, a just return 
which none can begrudge him. 



BERT I. JAMES. 

Bert I. James holds the position of rural free delivery carrier out of Derby 
and with his wife is a partner in the conduct of the Derby Hotel. A spirit of 
enterprise and progress has actuated him through all his career and has brought 
him at an early age a degree of success which places him among the substantial 
men of the city. He was born at a point two miles north and one-half mile east 
of Columbia. Marion county, Iowa, April 10, 1886, his parents being Charles 
and Rebecca E. (Mathis I James, the former a resident of the vicinity of Corydon, 
Wayne county, Iowa. The mother passed away in Marion county on February 14, 
1893. 

On the paternal side Mr. James is a grandson of Enos James, who came as a 
pioneer with his family to Warren township, Lucas county, where they settled 
near Derby. Enos James, alter the death of his wife, returned to Illinois, where 
he passed away. Charles .lames, the father of our subject, was born in that 
state on the 8th of August, 1864. He was taken to Iowa when a small boy by 
his parents, and after the death of his mother returned with his father to Illi- 
nois. Subsequently he came back to Iowa as a young man, going to Marion 
county, where on the 2d of October, 1884, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Rebecca E. Mathis. The latter was the second in a family of three daughters, 
being born January 8, 1867. Her parents were William W. and Georgianna 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Wilkerson Mathis. Ber father was bora in Jefferson county, Kentucky, on 
Aliens! 20, L817, and her mother in the same state on Augns1 13, 1833. They 
were married on January 19, l s f>l. and soon thereafter came to Marion county, 
Iowa to establish a home. They lived on a farm our mile north and three-fourths 
of a mile west of Columbia for many years or until the death of William W. 
Mat his. whirl, occurred on the 10th of June, 1904, at the age of eighty-six years, 
nine months and twenty days. To them were born three children: .Mrs. 
Josephine Crowley, whose birth occurred Januarj I s . 1865; .Mrs. Rebecca E. 
.lami's: and Killii -I.. who was horn January 23, 1869, and who makes her 
home with her mother in Columbia, to which city she moved after the death of 
her husband. 

The only issue of the marriage Of Mr. and .Mrs. Charles .lames is I'.ert I., 
our subject. The parents lived happily for a few years in their home in Marion 
county, when on February 14, 1893, the neither was called to her final real 
lit the early age of twenty-six years, one month and six days. Ber bus 
hand. Charles James, subsequently removed to Wayne county, Iowa, making 

his I le near Corydon, where he now lives. In 1910 be was again married, his 

second union being with Miss Bessie Bigley, of Wayne county. 

Berl I. -lames was the only child horn to his parents. Be acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools of .Marion county, and there resided until 1903, 
when he moved to the vicinity of Derby and obtained employment as a sta 
fcionarj engineer. After two years he was engaged as a substitute rural free 
delivery carrier and be did such prompt, capable and efficienl work that on 
the ls1 of .May. 1909, he was appointed regular carrier oul of Derby, a posi- 
tion 'which he still retains. To its duties he adds these connected with the 
eonduet of the Derhy Hotel, which he has owned since October, 1912, and with 
the capable assistance of his wife has mad.' this one of the besl institutions of 
its kind in I. mas county, run on modern, up-to-date lines, and equipped with 
all the conveniences to be found in the better hostelries of the middle west. 

On the 19th of December, 1906, Mr. Ja s was united in marriage to Miss 

Margaret B. Rash, who was horn in Lucas county, on the 3d of February, 
isst;, a daughter of William and Belle (Clarke Rash, the former horn ill Ken 
tucky, June 20, 1857, and the latter July 1 I. 1858. The parents came to Iowa 
and s.ttled in Lucas countj iii 1863 and have since remai I honored resi 

dents of this locality. The mother has been twice married and has one son 
by h'-r former union. Bernard W. Parrel, of Des Moines. Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam K'ash became the parents of five children: Mrs. James, wife of the sub- 

ject of this review; Claude, who was horn February 1, 1889, and who died ill 

March, L890 ; Mrs. Lennie Smith, born November 20, 1891, residing in Derhy: 
Mis. Bollie Scott, who was horn May 16, 1)894, and who lives in the vicinity 
of Derby; and Erma, whose birth occurred on the 8th of January, 1896, and 
who resides with her parents. All the above children were horn and reared 
in Lucas county. Mr. and Mrs. .lames have two children: Evelyn Maxim-. 

horn Ma\ I. 1908; and Olin M.. Lorn April Hi. 19] 1. 

Mr. -lames gives his political allegiai to the republican partj and as a loyal 

and progressive citizen takes a deep interest in community affairs, L'i\ ing his 

hearty support and acti ration to every worthy public enterprise. 1 1 is 

wif. is a devoul member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is widely known 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 329 

in Derby and the vicinity, not only as a representative of ;i highly respected pio- 
neer family, but also as a woman of culture, refinement and ability as well as 
excellent traits of character. Mr. James is fond of the best literature and is a 
wide reader especially along historical lines where bis interests lie to a greal 

extent. Although still a young man he has already gained a creditable asure 

of success and he possesses in bis energy and ability a guaranty of continued 
progress. 



JACOB B. WYAT'i 



Jacob B. Wyatt, a worthy representative of one of the most prominent and 
highly respected pioneer families in Iowa, controls extensive property interests 
in this state, owning two hundred and ten acres of land in Union township, 
Lucas county, and two hundred and forty in Franklin township, Clarke county, 
besides a comfortable and well furnished residence in Derby where he makes 
his home. For a number of years he was closely and influentially associated 
with agricultural interests in this locality and did a greal deal to promote farm- 
ing development, his success and the honorable methods by which it was attained 
gaining him the respect and esteem of the entire community, lie has now 
however practically retired from active life and does only a small amount of 
teaming work, his labors in former years having brought him a substantial 
fortune which enables him to spend the evening of his life in well earned 
leisure. 

Mr. Wyatt was born in Edgar county. Illinois, on the 27th of June. L852, and 
is a sou of Sacker Y. and Eliza (Scott i Wyatt. natives of Virginia. They were 
among the earliest settlers in this pail of Iowa, making the journey overland 
in 1853 and settling in Clarke county, where they made their home for a num- 
ber of years. They found here a Frontier wilderness, with miles of unbroken 
soil stretching in all directions, sparsely settled, and inhabited mostly by Indians. 
Here they endured all the hardships ami difficulties of pioneer existence, meeting 
the conditions of their life with confidence and courage, and they eventually 
developed a well improved and productive farm. The father died in Clarke 
county at the age of eighty-six and the mother passed away in Lucas county. 
The^y had ten children, four of whom grew to maturity, as follows: \Y. E., a resi 
dent of Derby; Jacob, of this review; .lames, of Montana; and .Mrs. Electa 
Jane Wells, who lias passed away. 

Jacob Wyatt was only one year old when his parents came overland to Iowa. 
and in the public schools of Clarke county he acquired his education, dividing 
his time between his studies and work in clearing, developing and improving 
the new farm. He thus became thoroughly familiar with all the details of farm 
operation and when he began his independent career turned his attention to (In- 
occupation to which he had been reared, lie became a prosperous and success 
ful farmer, acquiring extensive holdings in Clarke and Lucas counties, and prov- 
ing able, farsighted and discriminating in the conduct of his interests, lie owns 
today two fine farms one of two hundred and ten acres in Union township, Lucas 
county, and another of two hundred and forty acres in Clarke county, both well 



330 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

improved and reflecting everywhere the many years of care and labor which the 
owner lias expended upon them. In the course of time Mr. Wyatt accumulated 
a substantia] fortune and feeling thai he had earned a period of resl and leisure, 
moved into Derby where he occupies one of the finesl and mosl modern 
homes in the town. Be engages in teaming to some extent, preferring to have 

Li work to occupy his time and he is well known and highly respected by 
all \vli<> know him. 

In Osceola, this state, mi the 1st of January, I^Tl'. Mr. Wyatl was united 
in marriage to Miss Dora B. Wolverton, who was born in Decatur county, Iowa. 
on the tth of May, 1856. She is a daughter of John and Rebecca Jane (Swine 
hart i Wolverton, the former born in Ohio, February 14. 1829, and the latti r born 
January 29, 1833. The father died in Derby, Iowa. December IT. 1907, and his 
wife survives him, making her home with her son in Derby. They were among 
the earliest settlers in Decatur county. Mr. and Mrs. Wolverton became the 
parents of six children : .Mrs. Margarel -lane < !anfield, who was hum May 10, ] 853 ; 
and who died in 1878; Louise, who was horn January 7. 1855, and who passed 
away on the 9th of January, 1855; Mrs. Dura I-'.. Wyatt. the wife of the sub 
of this review; Samuel Byron, who was horn on the 30th of January, 1859, and 
who has passed awaj ; John K.. w ho was born April 15, 1870, and resides in Slouts- 
ville, Missouri: and W. I'., of Derby. Mr. ami Mrs. Wyatt have two sons: Fred 
C, born in Clarke county, April In. 1875; and Ernesl Orville, who was horn 
Deceinher ">. ls;s ;lMl | w j 10 j s nmv , . ni |, |,,y,.,l in National Park. Montana. 

Mr. Wyatt is a devout member of the Christian church and fraternally is 
connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs, of 
which latter organization his wife is also a member. Ee and his wife are also 
members of the Yeomen at Derby. He is a stanch democrat and has held si \ 
era! offices of public trust, in all of which he has proven capable, reliable and 
efficient in the discharge of his duties. In the course of an active, useful and 

honorable life he has made many substantial contributions to the agricultural 

development of this part of [owa, and his record is a credit to a name that has 
been a respected and honored one since pioneer times. 



WILLIAM .1 BURGETT. 

William .1. Burgetl is a representative of I the | ier families of 

Lucas COUntj and was horn in LihcrU township. December 1". Isol'. his par 
cuts being Aaron and Nancy (Bowles) Burgett. The father was horn in John 
son COUnty, Indiana. October 19, 1841, and tin' mother was also a native of that 

state. They were both quite young when they came to Lucas count] ami set 
tied in Liberty township with their respective parents. To their union were 
born six children, of whom William .1. Burgetl of this review is the eldest. 

The others were: Mrs, I, aura A Fivad. now deceased; John L.. who was horn 
March I. 1869, an. I resides in Kansas City, Kansas; Henry A., who was horn 

March 8, 1871, and is living in Liberty township. Mrs. Ida E. Luther-Fogle, 
deceased; and Lydia Belle, who died in infancy. The mother passed awaj 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 33] 

in Liberty township, November 24, 1874, and the father afterward married 
again. There were two children of that marriage: Elmer C, who now resides 
on the old homestead in Liberty township; and Mrs. Leta V. Fogle, a resident 
of Colorado. All of the children of both marriages, with the exception of 
Laura, who was born in Montana, were natives el' Liberty township and were 
educated in the district schools. The father reached a ripe old age, passing 
away in Liberty township, June 14, 1903. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of life I'm- Wil- 
liam J. Burgett until he left home to enter the Ackworth Academy, which he 
attended for two terms. He afterward engaged in teaching for three terms but 
has made farming his chief occupation through life and has brought his land 
to a high state of cultivation owing to his enterprising and progressive methods. 

On the 25th of August, 1885, Mr. Burgett was married to Miss Lima Frazer, 
a teacher, who was born in Schuyler county, Illinois. February IS. 1st;:!, and 
came to Lucas county with her parents, Otlio Shipley and Ann Maria I Lyde- 
botham) Frazer. The family settled in Lincoln township, hut in 1871 a removal 
was made to Liberty township. The father was horn in Baltimore, Maryland, 
November 27. 1819, and died in Chariton, Iowa, March 1, 1890. The mother, 
whose birth occurred at Endieott Mills, Maryland. June 8, 1825, passed away 
in Chariton. May 3, 1904. There were nine children in the Frazer family, of 
whom seven are living: Thomas Shipley, who was horn in Perry county, Ohio, 
January 23. 1847, and now makes his home in Chariton; Franklin Wesley, who 
was born May 17, 1849, and died August !>. 1855; .Mrs. Amorille Virginia Ram- 
sey, who was born September •"">. 1851, and resides in California; Benton W.. 
who was born March 29, 1854, and lives in Chariton; Mrs. Esther Josephine 
Davis, who was horn August 15, 1857, and resides in Des .Moines. Iowa: Charles 
Lincoln, who was horn September 15, 1860, and passed away October 5, 1863; 
Mis. Burgett: Mrs. Lillian May Peck, who was horn February 12. 1867, and 
resides in Denver, Colorado: Mrs. Margaret Caldona McCollough, who was 
born April 3t». lsii9, and lives in Chariton. The five eldest are natives of 
Perry county, Ohio, while Lincoln and Mrs. Burgett were horn in Illinois and 
the youngest in Lucas county, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burgett became the parents of seven children. Marion Ver- 
non, born June 8, 1887, is now a veterinary surgeon connected with the United 
States bureau of animal industry at St. Louis. Edith Elinor, born Decern 
ber 10, 1.SSS. is teaching school near Russell. Iowa. Mrs. Vivian Irene Strum 
kind, horn March 31, 1890, is living in Salix, Iowa. She was a successful teacher 
in Lucas county before her marriage. Theressa Odette, horn January 29. 1892, 
is teaching school in English township. Nellie Agnes, horn December 9. 1895, 
is attending the Iowa Teachers' College at Cedar falls. Leslie Glenn, horn 
December 24. 1898, and fern Marie born December 12. 1901, are attending the 
public schools. In addition to the common-school course Theressa spent a sum- 
mer in attendance at the [owa Teachers' College, and the thn lder children 

spent a year at Simpson College and one term at Shenandoah, while Vivian, 
Theressa and Nellie were students in the academy at Oakley I'm- two years. All 
this indicates Hie deep interest felt by .Mr. ami .Mrs. Burgetl in the cause of 
education, showing their desire to have their children splendidly qualified by 
mental training for life's practical and responsible duties. 



332 LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 

In politics Mr. Burgetl is a democral and Eor three terms served as town- 
ship clerk. II.' lias also filled the office of school director. His wife is a 
member of the Methodisl Episcopal church of Oakley ami they are interested 
in all thai pertains t<> the welfare and progress "i the community. Tin' home 
farm, known as tin- Pioneer Kami, comprises our hundred and forty-five acres 
of choice land on sections -1 and 22, Liberty township, whereon are tfood 
improvements. This was a portion of the old Halverty place, one of the firsl 
farms of Liberty township to be developed, and there is still to be seen in a 
good state of preservation an old log house which was buill by Mr, Ealverty 
a1 an early day. The home contains relics of early times, including a Bible 
printed more than a hundred years ago, old Eashioned wool cards and a spin- 
nine; wheel, together with other relics of pioneer times. Moreover, their home 
contains many examples of the choicesl lit rature, Eor the entire family take 
deep interest in all things which are educational and broadening. Both Mr. 
and .Mrs. Burgetl are descendants of earl) settlers and are numbered among 
the most progressive citizens of the county, interested in its welfare and active 
in promoting its advancement. 



HENRY C. DILLMAN 

Henr) C. Dillman, actively engaged in Earraing in I. mas county, bis land 
possessions comprising two hundred ami thirt) Eour acres, was horn in Liberty 
township, October 30, L862. His Eather, Andrew Dillman. a native of Indiana. 
died in Liberty township in 1866, while the mother, who bore the maiden name 
of Eliza Frances Henderson, was horn in Indiana and is now living in Chariton. 
They came to Lucas county in 1856, settling in Libert) township, after having 
made an overland .journey according to the primitive methods of the times. They 
were Earming people of this section of the state and the old Dillman homestead 
is still in possession of the Eamily. In the family were seven children, six of 
whom are living: George W., of Warren township; s. P., a residenl of Vernal, 

I tah : -Mrs. Mary E. Howard. Ii\ ing mar < (akley, Iowa : .Martha S., of I 'haritoii . 
Henry ('.. of this review ; and Louisa Thomason, of Libert) township. The eldest 
daughter was Harriet, who died in 1864. The five eldest children were horn in 
Indiana and the two youngesl in Liberty township. Eollowing the removal of 
t he Eamily to Lucas county. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof. Henr) C. Dillman 
attended the public schools and when not bus) with Ins text-books worked in 

the fields. His Eather buill the firsl name scl Ihouse in Libert) township 

i Mrs. Molly Welch was one of Henr) C. Dillman 's firsl teachers. He taughl 

ool in Clayton county in L882 and in 1883, and in Lucas county in 1887 

and l SNS Tie greater part of his life, however, has been devoted to general 

cultural pursuits. Ill' was carefully reared in that work, early becoming 

Familiar with the besl methods of tilliii'_ r the soil and caring for the crops, so 

thai practical experience proved of greal aid to him when he began Earming Eor 

himself, lie owns two hundred and thirty four acres on sections 24, 25 and 28, 

Libert) township, lie has a set of good buildings upon his place ami all modern 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES :::::: 

improvements, while the attractive appearance of his farm indicates his careful 
supervision and systematic methods. 

In Wayne county, Iowa, in 1886, Mr. Dillman married Miss Lola Gregg, 
a daughter of Jonathan and Mary Jane (Finch) Gregg, who came to Iowa at 
an early date and here passed away. They were the parents of five children of 
whom three are living: Mrs. Emma Lunney, of Mounl Ayr; Mrs. Dillman; and 
Park Gregg, of Carlisle, Iowa. The other two died in childhood. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Dillman have three sons: Robert A., horn September lo. ISSN, who resides on 
a part of the old Dillman homestead; Louis E., born September 24, 1895, at, 
home with his parents; and Franklin G., born March 12, 1903, who is pursuing 
his education in the public schools. Mrs. Dillman is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Oakley. 

Mr. Dillman belongs to several fraternal orders, including the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Chariton ami the Modern 
Woodmen of America at Oakley. He also has membership with the Sons of 
the American Revolution. In polities he is a republican and has held a number 
of local offices. He was township clerk for a number of years and for twenty 
years was connected with the school board as director, secretary and treasurer. 
In 1903 he was elected county auditor and was reelected, filling the position for 
two terms. He made a creditable record in that connection and bis public 
service like his private life commends him to the warm regard ami good-will of all. 



ANDREW J. GWINN. 



No history of the pioneer settlement of Iowa would be complete without 
mention of Andrew J. Gwinn, who is the first settler of Wayne county, now 
living, dating his residence in that section of the state from 1850, but he now 
makes his home in Lucas. Throughout the intervening years he has seen the 
prairies transformed into fertile farms, cities established, business institutions 
founded and a frontier wilderness transformed into a prosperous and populous 
state. He has not only been a witness of this growth and development but has 
also contributed in a large measure to the work of upbuilding and is so familiar 
with pioneer conditions, having in his possession all of the data pertaining to 
the earlier settlements, that he has made some valuable contributions to the 
Lucas county historical records. 

Andrew J. Gwinn was horn near Eddyville, Wapello county. Iowa, duly G. 
1849, and is a son of Samuel K. and Cynthia Gwinn, the former of whom was 
born in Greenbrier county. West Virginia, in 1*27. ami the latter in Payette 

county, that state, in the same year. The father passed away in Way ■ouidy. 

Iowa, in 1891, and is survived by bis wife, who makes her home in Wayne 
county, where she was the first settler who is still living. Andrew •). Gwinn 
represents the third generation of his family in this section of the state, his 
father and grandfather having been early settlers. They came to what is now 

section 5, Richman township, Wayne county, in the fall of 1850. Pioi c con 

ditions prevailed everywhere at that time. Wild deer roamed in the forests, 
the howling of wolves could be heard by night and all kinds of wild game 



334 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

abounded everywhere. Raw prairies stretched for miles in all directions, broken 
uiiK L\ sparse settlements, the trading points being Eddyville, Ottumwa and 
Burlington. There were no railroads and the Indians were numerous on the 
plains and prairies and at times dangerous, although they always evidenced 
warm Friendships for the members of the Gwinn family. The overland western 
trail was near the plan- where the father and grandfather settled and thousands 
of emigranl wagons passed near their borne, westward bound, during their 
earlier years. Both became prominent and successful farmers and the father 
lived to see a great deal of the state development, being at the time of his death 
a representative and substantial citizen. In the Gwinn family were eleven 
children: Andrew J., of tins review; John II.. who died in 1853; Virginia C, 
who passed away in Richman township in 1853; Marj 1-'... who died at the age 
of eleven years; -lames M. and Sarah E., both of whom passed away in 1860 
Byron, whose death occurred in 1910; .Mis. Rachel Snook, residing in Derby, 
Iowa; .Mis. [rene I. owe. whose home is in I'nion township: Mrs. M. Davidson, of 
Richman township; and Samuel K., who died in 1859. 

Amid the pioneer conditions above described Andrew -I. Gwinn grew to 
manhood, having heen only one year o!' age when he was broughl to Iowa. He 
attended the Garden Grove public schools at a time when mosl of the school- 
houses were buill of logs. His childhood was spent upon his lather's farm ami 
after he grew to maturity he began farming fen- himself, following this occupa 
lion since that lime. In 1880 he look up his residence in Jackson township. 
Lucas county, and here he has since resided. Success and prosperity have 
rewarded his laudable ambition and well directed Labor ami he now has a 
comfortable home on section 28, wherein he is passing his declining years. Hi 
has traveled over practically all of Lucas county ami southern Iowa and is well 
Known throughout the state to which he came as a pioneer. 

<>n March 6, 1870, Mr. Gwinn married Miss .Mary E. Sayres, who was born 
in Coshocton county, Ohio. Pebruarj 28, 1850 She is a daughter of Amos and 
• Ian. i Morris Sayres, the Eormer of whom was horn in Ww York in 1>H7 and 
tin- latter in Coshocton county. Thej came i" I nion township. Lucas county. 
in 1854, and here both passed away, the mother dying in 1900 and the father 
in 1912. In their familj were the following children: Mary E., the wife of 
ilc' subject of this review; John, whose home is in I'nion township; William. 

a resident of Harrisburg, Illinois; Zim. who lives upon tl Id home farm in 

I'nion township: Ida. deceased: and Mrs. Snook, residing smith of Derby. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Gwinn were horn nine sons, of whom the second and third s,,ns. 
Luther and Omar, died in infancy. Those who survive are: Kims, whosi 
home is in Richman township; Amos K.. ( '. ( '.. Arthur. Everett, and Floyd and 

Lloyd, twins, all of w h reside in Jackson township. Of dies, children (' I 

was horn in Richman township and all of tl there in I'nion township. 

Mi-. Gwinn formerlj gave his allegiance to the republican party hut for a 
number of -i has voted independently. He has e\er taken an active 
part in public affairs, being especially interested in the bistorj of the counts-, 
and liis labors have done much in promote public progress as well as individual 
prosperity. Throughout the long years of his residence in this part of the 
stale he lias enjoyed to tic fullest extent the good-will and trust of those with 
whom he lias come in itact. Strong in his honor and mi his good name, he 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 335 

has long been a prominent and influential citizen here, his labors being of prac- 
tical benefit in the upbuilding and development of the county. His name is 
inseparably associated with its history and his example is one well worthy of 
emulation. 



JOHN FRANKLIN WHEELER. 

Among the young agriculturists of Lucas county, Iowa, who have made ,,. 
decided success, beginning in a small way, is John Franklin Wheeler, who since 
1910 has been engaged in the cultivation of one hundred acres of laud in 
Union township, to which he has since added eighty acres in Jackson township. 

Mr. Wheeler was born May 26, 1874, in Otter Creek township, this county, 
where he attended public school and grew to manhood. His parents were 
William and .Mary I,. (Ruble) Wheeler, the father a native of .Monroe county, 
Ohio, and the mother of Warren county. Indiana. The former, who was hern 
on March 27. 18:>7, came to Otter Creek township by the overland route in 
1851 and the latter, who was born on February 26, 1840, came to Liberty town- 
ship with her sister in 1848. Both parents are yet alive and make their home 
in Lucas, to which place they retired after a lone- and resultant agricultural 
career. They were among the pioneers of this section of Iowa and the mother, 
who retains a wonderful memory, can still vividly recite many incidents of 
pioneer life and give an account of many of the hardships that confronted 
the early settlers. In their family were the following children: Melissa -Fane, 
born February 16, 1861, deceased; .lames, born February 8, 1863, also deceased; 
Mrs. Etta Mauley, born November 13, 1864, of Lucas; Airs. Belle Primm, born 
November 21, 1866, of Chariton; Mrs. Alice Waugh, who resides in Woodburn, 
this state: Henry, born January 9, 1872, of Creston; and John Franklin, of 
this review. All of these children were born and reared in ( >tter < reek township. 
The oldest member of the Wheeler family to settle in Iowa was the paternal 
grandfather of our subject, Jacob Wheeler, who came here in 1857, and who mar 
ried Thankful Wheeler, born June 23, 1810. Her death occurred on the L9th 
of July, 1881. 

John F. Wheeler has followed agricultural pursuits during all of his active 
life. Beginning practically without funds he has by diligence and application 
succeeded in founding one of the best equipped slock- farms in his locality. It 
comprises one hundred and eighty acres, of which one hundred are in Union 
township and eighty in Jackson township and thereon can be found a se1 of 
good improvements. The years have brought him prosperity and the appear 
ance of his property stands as evidence of his success. Before settling in Union 
township Mr. Wheeler owned a farm in otter Creels township, which he sold 
to good advantage in 1910, when he came to the propertj upon which he now 
resides. 

In 1894 Mr. Wheeler was united in marriage to Miss Cora M. Waugh, who 
was born in Clarke county. Iowa. February 23, 1876, and there attended school 
and grew to womanhood. Her parents were Charles and Mary (Larkins) 
Waugh, natives of Illinois, who for many years resided in Woodburn, [owa, 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES L':{7 

The father of our subject kept up the splendid military record of bis fam- 
ily. He enlisted for the Mexican war hut was no1 mustered in in time to see 
active service. However, in 1862 he joined Company 1). Twenty-third Iowa Vbl- 
nnteer Infantry, entering the service as lieutenant and gaining rapid advance- 
ment through his period of enlistment, resigning on accounl of disability with 
the rank of captain. He had been a resident of [owa since the year 1845 when 
he came to Lee county and purchased land. Later he bought government land 
in Davis county and in 1856 settled in Wayne county, where he took up a claim 
of four hundred and eighty acres of government land, upon which he resided 
until his death. He was eminently progressive and public-spirited in his citi 
zenship and for six years was a member of the board of county supervisors. 
Twice he was a candidate for the office of state representative but was defeated 
both times. He had extensive fraternal relations, holding membership in the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was also prominent in .Masonry, belong 
ing to the lodge, chapter and commandery. His death occurred on the 21st 
of March, 1903. His wife, who was in her maidenhood .Miss Sarah Jane Robi- 
son, was a daughter of James and Rachel Rohison. natives of Morgantown, 
West Virginia. This family is also of old American foundation but is of Scot 
tish origin, James Robison, an early representative, having been horn in Scot- 
land. However, he afterward went to Ireland, where he married and later 
crossed the Atlantic to America, settling in Virginia prior to the year 1S00. 
The mother of our subject passed away on the 7th of April, 1905. 

Winfield S. Evans of this review came to Wayne county with his father od 
the 13th of April, 1856, and grew up on his father's farm. He acquired a com- 
mon-school education in Wayne county and began his active career in 1S7G, 
when he moved upon one hundred and sixty acres of land in Walnut township 
which was presented to him by his father. With characteristic energy he car- 
ried forward the work of improvement, adding to his holdings from time to 
time until he was the proprietor of three hundred and sixty acres of fertile 
and productive land. Because his activities were always progressive and his 
standards of integrity high his labors were attended with a gratifying meas- 
ure of success and eventually he was able to retire. In October, 1909, he moved 
into Seymour, where he has since resided, his useful and well directed work in 
the past enabling him to enjoy all of the comforts and many of the luxuries 
of life. 

In 1884 Mr. Evans was united in marriage to Miss Annie Lewis, a daugh- 
ter of John B. and Susan (McMillan) Lewis, the former a native of England. 
The paternal branch of this family was founded in America by Mrs. Evans' 
grandfather, who in early times purchased land in Iowa, locating first in Eenry 
county and then in Wayne county, where lie cultivated the soil until his death. 
Mr. and Mrs. Evans are the parents of six children: Sylvia, who married I '■ 
A. Whitmore, who is operating the farm belonging to the subjed of this review; 

David Glenn, a farmer in Wayi ounty, who married Miss Bupha Fisher; 

Angie, Hattie, Hiram and Winnifred, all of whom reside at home. The fam 
ily are devout adherents of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Evans gives his allegiance to the republican party but although active 
and progressive in all matters of citizenship, never seeks political preferment. 
In Masonry he has attained a place of distinction, holding membership in the 



338 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

county and especially Union township and today enjoys high esteem and respect, 
to which li<- is entitled nol onlj for what he has personally attained bul for 
whal he has done in furthering the genera] advancement. Be is ever ready 
to supporl any worthy public cause and is loyal to Ids countj and tow oship. 



JOHN HENRY WACHTLER. 

One of the most progressive and enterprising young nun of Hoisington, 
Kansas, is John Henry Wachtler, who is a representative of a highly respected 

l ''•'• family of Iowa and ai presenl engaged in the railroad service as a 

locomotive fireman. He was bom at Lie Mars, towa, on the 25tb of March, 
ISM;!, Mud is a son of Frederick Morritz and Emma (Bender Wachtler, the 
former bom ai .Mountain Lake, Minnesota. The paternal grandfather, Rudolph 
Wachtler, was bom in Germany in L831, bul came to this countrj when twenty 
years of age, accompanied by a brother, who resides in New York. After mar- 
riage Rudolph Wachtler settled on a homestead in Cottonw 1 county, Minnesota. 

Hiswifi passed away, leaving five children : Frederick Morritz, Rudolph, Henry, 
Paulina, and Louis,.. The maternal grandmother was twice married, the first 
union being with William Wecker, by whom she had two children: William, 
who resides on a farm in Plymouth county. Iowa; and Catherine, who is the 
wife of Frank Kerhberg, who is a farmer in the same county. Mr. Wecker 
served in the civil war and was killed in the battle of v'icksburg. His widow 
later married -loin, p. Bender, and to this union were horn five children : Emma 
Elizabeth, the mother of our subject ; Anna, who is Mrs. Baumgardncr, and who 

des in < llinton, Illinois; Charles Ernest, who is li\ ing in Nebraska ; and Henry 
and John C, both of whom are residents of Clinton, Illinois. The parents of 
oursubjed came as earlj settlers into [owa and have since resided in this state, 
their home being now at Cherokee. In their familj were nine children: John 
Henry, of this review; Florence, who resides in Chicago, Illinois; Edna, of 
Tishomingo, Oklahoma: Leona, Hazel, Raj and Ruth, who live at home; Faith, 
who has passed awa\ ; and Edward. 

John Henrj Wachtler grew to manh I in Cherokee and acquired Ins edu 

cation in the public schools of thai community. After laying aside ins I ks 

he learned painting and paper hanging and followed these trades successfully 
until 1909, when he entered the railroad service .-it Hoisington, Kansas, accept 
a position as locomotive fireman, lie is so engaged at tie presenl time, an, I 
has proved prompt, capable and reliable in the discharge of his duties, winning 

tht ofidence of Ins superiors and the good will of all who are associated with 

him. 

On tie 22d of June, 1910, .Mr. Wachtler was united In marriage to Mis. 
Alma Maj Christy, who was horn in Kansas, September •-':>. 1889, a daughter 
of Charles Marion and Elizabeth Ann Henrj Christy, the former of whom 
was horn March n. I B55, and did at Welch. Oklahoma, June 2, L908. The mother 

was horn in Delaware c ty, Indiana. April 16, 1857, ami sur\ ives ler husband, 

making her home a1 Hoisington, Kansas. On the maternal side Mrs. Wachtler 
is a granddaughter of Emanuel Henry, ■ of the earh settlers in Warren 



LUCAS AM) WAYNE COUNTIES 339 

township, Lucas county, of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Marion Christy and their family made their home 
in Kansas until 1897 and then removed to Lucas county, Iowa, where they 
remained ten years, going at the end of that time to Oklahoma, where the father's 
death occurred. He and his wife became the parents of the following children: 
a son. who died in infancy; .Mrs. Maude Brown, who was horn September •>.">, 
1884, and who is now residing: in Merced, California; Mrs. Berda Sette, born 
November 29, 1886, residing at Belpre, Kansas; Mrs. Wachtler, wife of the 
subject of this review; Opal, who was horn October 4. 1891, and who is residing 
with her mother at Hoisington, Kansas; and Beulah, born April 19, 1896, and 
Charles Orlo. born November •'!. 1901, who are also at home. Mrs. Wachtler 
acquired her preliminary education in the public schools and supplemented this 
by six months at Simpson College. Indianola. She and her husband have one 
daughter. Dorothy Elizabeth, horn at Hoisington, Kansas. November 17, 1912. 
The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and are well known 
in Hoisington. where their many excellent qualities of character have won them 
a wide circle of friends. They are people of refinement and culture, widely read 
and familiar with the best literature and both are representatives of highly 
esteemed and respected families. 

Mr. Wachtler gives his political allegiance to the progressive party and keeps 
well informed on questions and issues of the day. although he is not active as 
an office seeker. His fraternal affiliations are with the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers and Firemen, the Knights and Ladies of Security and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. lie is still a young man but has already 
attained a creditable measure of success and he possesses in his ability and 
energj a guaranty of continued progress. 



FRED MOOKK CHANDLER. 

Among the foremost stock-raisers of Lucas county is Fred Moore Chandler, 
who, in partnership with his brother Howard, owns a valuable farm of two 
hundred and ninety-three acres on sections 30 and Ml in White Breast town- 
ship, which is largely devoted to live-stock interests. Mr. Chandler comes 
of a family of stock-raisers, his father being one of the most successful breeders 
of Percheron horses, formerly of Illinois but now of Iowa. Fred M. Chandler 
of this review first took up sheep raising with considerable success, being at one 
time one of the largest importers of Shropshire's in Iowa, but now gives most 
of his attention to raising Percheron horses. He has a most successful business. 

in the conduct of which he has shown executive ability, good judg id and a 

thorough understanding of the scientific phases of breeding. 

Mr. Chandler was bora at Ohio. Bureau county. Illinois. March 2, 1882, 
and in the acquirement of his education attended the common schools at thai 
place, later taking a course at the state Agricultural College at Ames. Iowa. 

in order to acquaint himself with the most Lera and successful methods per 

taining to farming and stock breeding. Members of the familj have for a long 
time been connected with that business and have been successful therein, while 



140 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

others have attained high reputation as physicians. Bis lather. II. A. Chandler, 
is oiii- of the foremost breeders of Percheron horses, having become interested 
along thai line in Ohio, whence he later moved to Illinois and then to Iowa. 
where he now has one of the mosl extensive farms of choice land, comprising 
five hundred acres, at Kellerton. Bere can be found one of the finesl herds of 
Percheron horses in the state. The family removed to Kellerton aboul twenty 
years ago. 

II. A. ('handle]- was horn at Lamoille. Illinois, in 1 SA4. while his wife is a 
native of Pennsylvania, having been born on October 31, 1858. In her maiden- 
hood she was Mary Ellen .Moore. She was broughl by her parents to Illinois 
when hut a child. .Mr. and Mrs. Chandler became the parents of six children, 
all of whom were l»irn in Illinois except the youngest, whose place of birth is 

Kellerton. The children attended the common scl Is ami the four suns took 

courses at the state Agricultural College at Ames. The eldest in the family is 
Fred M. Chandler of this review. Lettie, the next in order of birth, is a Metho- 
dist missionary in china. Before engaging in thai work she attended the dea- 
coness school in St. Louis and did deaconess work in that city, Pittsburg and 
New York. Howard is a partner of our subjecl in the live-stock business. Claj 
ton is at present on a trip to Europe in order to seled stock for the home farm 
at Kellerton. Frank resides with his parents at that city. Zilpha. the youngest 
in the family, received an excellent musical education, having taken a cou 
in that art at Drake University. Clayton, aforementioned, attended for some 
time the Northwestern University at Evanston. 

Fred Moore ('handler, in 1893, made removal with the laniiU to Kellerton. 

lie remained at home for some time ami upon reaching maturity engaged as a 
rural free delivery carrier lor a oumher of years. In 1907 he and his brother 
Howard purchased two hundred ami ainety-three acres of fertile land in White 
Breasl township. Thej at firsl became interested in sheep, being probablj the 
heaviest importers of Shropshires in Iowa, importing in one year 1907 as 
manj as eleven hundred ami twenty seven head. Bowever, now they give their 
attention mosth to the breeding of Percheron horses ami their stallion. Jalap, 
Xo. 84,210, who is at the head of the herd, is one of the very lust in the state 
This horse was imported from Prance when a colt, and Lucas countj in fact 
Iowa can boasl of no better. The horse is sent tor breeding purposes to all 
parts of the United states At present he weighs twenty-one hundred and 
eighty pounds ami has captured Brs1 prizes wherever shown. In addition to 
Jalap they have thirteen additional stallions in the home barns. The (handlers 
ha\e a national reputation for horses and also sheep, although the sheep indus 
try is now directed from Kellerton. 

Fred M. ('handler was united in marriage at Weldon, Iowa, on November 5, 

L908, lo Miss I. la Mitchell, who was horn in Knox eoiintx. Illinois, later coming 

with her parents to Iowa. Her father, A. W. Mitchell, is the present mayor 

id I lei li; To I mi and his wife eighl children were horn. Mr. and Mrs. ( 'ha mil. i 

have one son, Fred Mitchell Chandler, born -la unary is. 1912. 

Mr. Chandler is one of the mosl public-spirited and progressive citizens ol 
Ins locality. Well educated and broad and liberal-minded, he is one of the 
boosters of the besl kind and interests himseli in everj movement or measure 
undertaken to promote the general welfare and prosperity, in polities he is 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 341 

a republican, faithfully fulfilling his citizen's duties, but beyond thai he has 
not been active in political life, his important private interests calling for most 
of his time and attention. Fraternally he is a member of the Woodmen of the 
World and the Knights of Pythias of Chariton. He is highly esteemed and 
respected by all who know him as a capable, shrewd and modern business man. 
a thoroughly scientific farmer and breeder and a man whose every transact ion 
reflects the honesty and integrity of his character. 



JOHN BRINEGAR. 



The founders of the Brinegar family in America came from Germany at an 
early day in the history of this country and one of them, Adam Brinegar, served 
with distinction in the Revolutionary war. locating afterward in North Carolina, 
whence he migrated to Kentucky, from which state he went to Indiana. He died 
at the remarkable age of one hundred and fifteen years, longevity seeming to 
be a peculiarity of the family, for the grandmother lived to the age of one 
hundred and four years. Another distinguished member of the family served 
in the Mexican war. Henry Brinegar, the father of our subject, was the eldesl 
of eight brothers and survived the other seven. lie was born in Indiana on 
December 8, 1823, and subsequently married in that state Miss Elizabeth Trog- 
don, a native of North Carolina, who was born in 1818 and died in Otter Creek 
township, this county, in 1889. The father's death occurred in the same town- 
ship on April 3d, 1012. In their family were four children: Melinda, born 
March 8, 1847, who passed away in Otter Creek township on February 23, 1908; 
John, of this review; Emma, who was born March 5. 1851, and died in Otter 
Creek township. September 10, 1904: and Isaac, born in Lucas county. October 
27, 185S, and a resident of Otter Creek township. The three eldest children 
were born in Indiana. 

John Brinegar was born in Lawrence county, Indiana. January 2:1. 1849, 
and when about six years old in 1855 came with his parents by ox team In 
Iowa, settling in Otter Creek township, Lucas county, of which he lias since 
been a resident. They were among the earliest settlers of Lucas county and 
became strong factors in its development. Settling here when the country was 
but sparsely inhabited and the families were separated by great distances, they 
endured all of the hardships of pioneer life. The father broke the virgin soil 
and gradually brought his land under cultivation. John Brinegar early accus- 
tomed himself to the primitive conditions and when a boy the howls of the 
coyote and wolf were the commonest sounds to his ears. lie enjoyed such 
opportunities of education as the neighborhood afforded and early became 
acquainted with agricultural methods, assisting his lather in the transformation 
of a raw stretch of prairie into a fertile farm. Courage and determination 
distinguished the family and perseveringly they remained and labored although 
many who followed them from Indiana returned to that stale thoroughly discour 
aged by the prospects held out by the new territory. As the years passed 
success came to John Brinegar and. being industrious and thrifty, he acquired 
land from time to time until he now owns two hundred and twenty-live acres 



342 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

in Otter Crei b township upon which are two si ts of good improvements, Modern 
equipmenl and machinery facilitate bis farm labors and be follows the mosl 
up-to-date and modern methods in bis occupation, annually deriving a <_ri;it ify- 
ing income through his efforts. Ee also nuns eighty acres of land in Harrison 
county, Missouri, well unproved and under cultivation. 

John Brinegar was married in 1870 to .Miss Paralee P. Howard, who was 
horn in Missouri on February 24, 1848. Her parents were Henry C. and 
Cynthia Ann (Bonner) Howard, both born near Bowling Green, Kentucky, 
the father on April 11. 1811, and the mother on February 3, 1812. The former 
died in Lucas county, Iowa, on September 7. 1867, and the latter in the same 
countj on June 5, 1906. They were earlj settlers in this county, coming here 
in 1866 from Illinois, where the father had farmed for three years, removing 
there from Missouri. More extended mention of Mr. Howard is made on 
another page of this volume. Mr. and .Mrs, Brinegar became the parents of 
five children, as follows: Elizabeth Ann. born January 22, 187T, who died 
February 10, 1880; Ida .May. born October 10, L872, who died in 1891; Dora 

P., born March 19, 1876, who died February 10, 1880, the sa lay on which 

occurred the death of ber sister Elizabeth; Professor George Brinegar, born 
August 31, 1880, who attended the common schools and selecl school al Chariton, 
look additional work at Simpson College, [ndianola, Iowa, for two years, com' 
pleted tlio course a1 the state Teachers' College at Cedar Kails and has for the 
pasl tour years filled the position of superintendent of the citj schools at 
l.uverno. Iowa; and John II.. who was horn in Medford, Oregon, January 4. 

1NS!). who supplemented the knowledge gained in the common scl Is bj a 

course of study in Simpson College at [ndianola and is now assisting bis father 
in the work of the farm. 

A man of strong convictions in regard to local i|iiestions. John Brinegar 
rotes the prohibition ticket and takes much interest in all questions that affecl 
social conditions. He is an important factor for good in this locality ami all 
movements undertaken for the betterment of the people receive his indorse 
ment and active cooperation. He was formerly a member of the Evangelical 
church of Otter Creek township. .\ relic of former days interesting from the 
historical point of riev is an old-fashioned log house which was erected on his 
farm by John Brinegar in L872, taking the place of the old log cabin which 

had heen erected hy his father hill which has lonu since decayed. A man of 

means ami a man of high miml and character, John Brinegar is general!} 
respected and esteemed, his name standing for achievement ami progress 



JAMES A. WALKEB 



A Bcion of old pioneer families both on the paternal and maternal side 

.lames A Walker is a aativi oi Jackson township. Lucas county, and has always 

resided here, devoting his attention to the cultivation of three hundred acres 
of valuable land located on sections 21, •-"_'. 27 ami 28, Jackson township, lie 

was horn on May 12, L861, a son of .lames L. ami Mary | Stevenson 

Walker, the father a native of Scotland and the mother of Ohio. Coming as pio 



C-l 









- 



t- 1 




LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 345 

neers to Jackson township, the parents made settlement here in the spring of 1859 
and here passed the remainder of their lives. Taking up land, the father 
broke the soil and gradually put it under cultivation, transforming wild prairie 
into fertile acres. Both parents were highly respected and esteemed by their 
friends and neighbors and enjoyed the confidence and good-will of all who 
knew them. The father died in Jackson township in 1 SSI), at an age of about 
sixty years, the mother, who was born August 31, 1824. surviving him until 
March 21, 1812, when she died upon the home farm at the advanced age of 
nearly eighty-eight years. In their family were Four children, of whom two 
are living, namely: Mrs. .Margaret Jane McCauley, a resident of Jackson town- 
ship; and dames A., of this review. The two younger children died in infancy. 

James A. Walker was reared under the parental roof and early grounded by 
his parents in the old-fashioned virtues of honesty and industry. Growing up 
amid pioneer conditions, he enjoyed the primitive educational advantages of the 
period, attending the common schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm, 
and early became acquainted with the various branches of agricultural work. 
As soon as he was old enough he began to assist his father in the work of 
redeeming the land and putting it to agricultural use. More and more the 
responsibility of managing the homestead fell to his lot and upon the father's 
death he took active charge. As the years have passed the property has grown 
in value, its productivity increasing by the reason of the thorough, systematic 
and progressive methods employed by Mr. Walker. He now owns one of the 
choicest farms of his locality, comprising three hundred acres on sections 21, 22, 
27 and 28 of Jackson township, improved with a handsome residence and sub- 
stantial barns, outbuildings and granaries, the general appearance of the prop- 
erty indicating the prosperity of its owner. Mr. Walker gives considerable at- 
tention to stock-raising, specializing in full blooded Percheron horses, Duroc 
Jersey hogs and shorthorn cattle. He enjoys an enviable reputation along this 
line and obtains for his stock the best market prices. 

On March 27, 188!), James A. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Elma 
Ellen Pirn, who was born in Jackson township, Lucas county, Iowa, February 1, 
1865, and died in her native township on duly 28, 1893. Her parents were 
Samuel W. and Mary Jane (Jumper) Pirn, the former a native of Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, horn on May 11, 1822, who died in Jackson township. 
February 16, 18S2, and the latter also a native of Pennsylvania, born December 
16, 1826, and still residing at Chariton, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Pim became the 
parents of nine children: William Henry, of Jackson township; Mrs. John 
Schnebly, of Jackson township; Mrs. Esther Jane Carpenter, who resides at 
Herman, Nebraska: Salora Salina, who died at tin- age of eight years; Preston 
Penrose, of Oklahoma; Mrs. Rachel Rebecca Peed, residing in Canada; Candace 
Clementine, deceased; Elma Ellen, who became tin- wife of our subject; and 
Mrs. Ola Amelia Morgan, who makes her home with her aged mother in Chari- 
ton, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walker had one daughter, who first saw the light of day on 
the same farm in Jackson township on which her father was horn. — Mrs. Nellie 
Blanche Mauk. the date of her birth being February 9, 1800. She acquired 
her education in the public schools of the neighborhood and grew to woman- 
hood on the home farm, where she still resides with her husband. Todd Otto 
vol. n— i s 



346 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Mauk, who assists our Bubjecl in the operation of land. .Miss Nellie Blanche 
Walker married Todd Otto Mauk on March 5, 1911, the latter having always 
been a residenl of Lucas county, being born in White Breasl township on June 
10, 1*1)0. Mr. and Mrs. Mauk have one daughter, Florence Mima, who was 
born on the same farm on December 15, 1911. She is of the third generation 
in the same family to be born on this property, and this is one of the rare 
instances in the bistory of Lucas county of three generations of one family being 
born on the same farm. 

Mr. Walker gives his allegiance to the republican party and although nol an 
office seeker, keeps well informed upon all pubic issues and is never found Lag 
ging on election day. readily recognizing the obligations of American citizen- 
ship. Moth he and his daughter are members of the Presbyterian church of 
Lucas. lie trivcs his warm support to all worthy public enterprises and can 
always be Eound in the front ranks of those who are willing to bear their share 
in any measures undertaken to promote public advancement Liberal-minded 
and of studious natuiv. Mr. Walker is well read and a representative of the pro 
gressive type of agriculturist, although his progressive spirit is finelj tempered 
by a conservative judgment. Ee and his family are among the most highly 
respected people of his Locality, receiving the high regard and confidence of all 
who know them. 



JOHN II. THOMAS. 



The name of Thomas fas been well known in Lucas countj since pio 
times and its present representative, John II. Thomas, is a native oi the county 
and today one of the mosl substantia] and prominent agriculturists of Jackson 

township, where he owns one hundred ami tweiiU one and one halt acres 
land, lie was horn in Chariton. Iowa. Maj 17. 1871, and is a son of William 

and Nancy ("Wooley) Thomas, the former a native of Connecticut and the 
latter of Knox county. Illinois. The mother came to Lucas county in 1851, 
making the journej overland with ox teams in company with her parents, and 

the family settled in Warren township upon a trad of raw prairie land upon 
which wild game abounded. They were among the early settlers in this part 
of Lucas county and contributed in a substantial measure to its agricultural 

development. The mother passed awa\ in Jackson township on the 22d oi 
January, 1908. She and her husband had two children, both horn and reared 

in Lucas counts': .Mrs. Addie .1. Eelsey, whose birth occurred on the 9th of 
August, 1868, and who is nnu residing in Watertown, Nevi Fork; and John 

I [., Of this l'e\ ieW . 

When John II. Thomas was three years of age he moved from Chariton 
with his mother and thej made their home in Otter Creek township, where he 

attended districl school, at the same time becoming familiar with the details 

Of farm operation hy practical labor Upon his mother's property. When hi' 

was seventeen years of age he began his independent career, moving to Warren 
township. wlnie he cultivated the soil for some time. Prom there he moved 
half a mile south of Lucas and engaged in farming, subsequently entering the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES :{47 

coal mines in the city, where he remained for three years. He then purchased 
a farm three miles southeast of Lucas and this lie has improved and developed 
since that time. It comprises one hundred and twenty-one and one-half: acres 
of land in Jackson township with excellent improvements, including a modern, 
attractive and well furnished home. Mr. Thomas is a scientific and practical 
agriculturist and has met with excellent success in his farming operations, lie 
and his son having secured prizes on corn, potatoes and timothy seed during 
the Short Courses held in the immediate vicinity. The son captured lirst prize 
in the Derby Short Course of 1913 on a single ear of corn and second prize on 
the best ten ears of corn and both have been honored with awards in everj 
contest in which they have entered. Mr. Thomas is also a stock-raiser on an 
extensive scale, breeding and owning full-blooded Poland China hogs and good 
grades of horses and cattle. His business interests are all carefully and capably 
conducted and his success has followed as a oatural result of his well directed 
labor and unremitting industry. 

On the 31st of May, 1898, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage to Miss Effie 
J. Hall, who was born in Stark county, Illinois, on the 7th of November. 1880, 
a daughter of Sylvester and Catharine (Harding) Hall, natives of Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, the latter born April 9, 1S4.">. They arrived in New Virginia. 
"Warren county, Iowa, in January. 1881, and here remained until their daughter 
was four years of age, when they moved to Jay, Clarke county, where they 
remained until they took up their residence near Lucas, Lucas county, Iowa, 
where the father died in 1889. His wife has also passed away, her death having 
occurred in Jackson township on the 10th of October, 1904. In their family 
were nine children: Septer, who resides near Lucas; Daniel, deceased: Charley, 
who makes his home near New Virginia; a son, who died in infancy; .lames. 
also of New Virginia; Orange, of the same city; Mrs. Thomas, wife of the 
subject of this review; Gladys, deceased; and Carrie, who makes her home 
in New Virginia. The seven eldest children in this family were born in Illinois, 
and the two younger ones in Iowa. Mr. and .Mrs. Thomas have become the 
parents of three children: Ina. born May 1, 1899; Charley ('.. born March 18. 
1901; and Eunice Cecilia, born August 29, 1903. All are attending the public 
schools in this vicinity. 

Mr. Thomas gives his political allegiance to the progressive party and has 
served several times on state and federal juries. lie takes an active and helpful 
interest in the welfare of this section, for here his entire life has been spent and 
his many sterling qualities of mind and character have gained him the respect 
and esteem of all who are associated with him. 



ALFRED COXXKi;. 



Derby numbers among its honored, valued and representative citizens, Alfred 
Conner, who for almost sixty years has been a resident of Union township and 
is ranked with the earliest and greatest of her pioneers. He has witnessed prac- 
tically the entire period of the development and expansion of this pari of the 
state and in the work of upbuilding has borne an active and honorable part 



:i- l.i CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

through the years, accomplishing nol only a greal individual prosperity, bul 

a si rss which is importanl as an elemenl in general growth. Possessed of 

unusual traits of mind and character, he has s<> guided liis activities and directed 
i. is life thai he lias won the respecl and esteem of all who have been in any 
way associated with him and is recognized as a progressive citizen, an able 
business man and a worthy and upright gentleman. Mr. Conner has been a 
residenl of Union township since the spring of 1855, but was born in Preston 
county, Wesl Virginia, November 3, 1831. He is a son of Job and Nancy 
McNier) Conner, the former a native of Preston county and the latter of 
Pennsylvania, The parents came overland from Brandonville, Wesl Virginia, 
in 1844, and settled in Cass county, Indiana, near Logansport, then moved to 
Union township, Lucas county, Iowa, in 1855, where the mother passed away 
in 1861, at the age of fifty years. The father died in Indiana a1 the age of 
forty. The following children were horn to their union: .Mrs. Margaret Clymer, 
who has passed away; Alfred, of this review; Elizabeth, deceased; William II.. 
who resides in Derby; John; Harrison, who has passed away; Lucy Ann. who 
died at the age of fifteen; and two, who died in Infancy. 

Alfred Conner spenl his ehihlho.nl and youth in Brandonville, Preston 
county, W'esi Virginia, and when he was twenty-four years of age, accom- 
panied his parents overland to Iowa, locating in Union township in 1855. He 
found here a trad of raw prairie land, on which wild game was abundant, 
sparse settlements where Indians were frequenl visitors, and indeed all of the 
hard conditions of pioneer life. There was a little trading point at Bddyville 
and a station at Chariton, lint the resl of the county was practically all 
unbroken prairie which the first settlers were endeavoring to develop into 
productive farms. Mr. Conner turned his attention to farming ami stock- 

raising ami lor over a half century thereafter continued i gage in these 

pursuits, becoming in time a prominenl ami successful agriculturist. With 
characteristic energy he carried forward the work of developing his fields, first 
breaking the raw soil and erecting buildings, and afterward improving the 
place ami equipping it with modern machinery. In the early days he also 
operated tin- firsl saw ami teed mill in Lucas county, whither came the greater 
portion of the early settlers in the surrounding districts. He became well 
acquainted with his neighbors, lor all the pioneers were drawn together by 

common necessity, and he has held their honor and respect through the years, so 
that today he is one of the most highly esteemed men in this part of Iowa. A 

few years ago he reined from active business life and moved into Derby, where 

he expects to spend the remainder of his days. He has disposed of almost all 
of his land hut ivlains ninety acres in .lack-on township. 

In Chariton. Iowa, in L857, Mr. Conner was united in marriage to Miss 
Harriet Wade, who was horn iii Pennsylvania in 1841, a daughter of Waitmau 
T. and Ruhama (Aiken) Wad.-, natives of Virginia. The parents came to the 

eastern pari of Iowa in 1854, and after remaining one winter, moved iii the 

ing of the following year to I. mas county, where for a time the father 
taught the Goshen school. In 1 s ">i; he was elected countj surveyor and after 

holding this office lor some time was made countj treasurer, a position in which 

he did earnest and capable work for a number of years. Colli parents have 
passed away, the father dying in Appa se countj ami the mother in Chariton. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 



349 



To their union were born eight children: George; Jesse, who died while in 
the Union army during the Civil war; Elijah, who passed away in Kansas: 
Waitman, who resides in Seattle Washington; .Mrs. Conner, wife of the subjeel 
of this review; .Mrs. Eliza Spray, who died in Seattle. Washington, in l!lt)S : 
Mrs. Phoebe Chapman, who makes her home in Oregon; and .Mrs. Kuhama 
Pollard, deceased. The older children were bom in Virginia and Pennsylvania, 
and the younger in Union township. Mrs. Conner has passed away, her death 
having occurred in Derby. January 12, 1911. She and her husband became 
the parents of nine children, all born in Union township, as follows: Marion 
S., who was born May 31, 1859, and who lives in Warren township; W. II.. 
who was born in 1860, residing in Moscow, Idaho; Mrs. Eliza J. Williams, 
who was born in October, 1S62, residing in Derby; Joseph Iv. who was horn 
in 1S66, and who died August 22, 1905; George W.. bom in 1868, living in 
New Mexico; Franklin L., whose birth occurred May 29, 1876, and who resides 
in White Breast township; Martha A., who died al the age of three; and two 
sons, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Conner is a devout member of the Baptisl church, which he joined a1 
Goshen church in 1857. He has been an active religious worker through the years. 
serving for a long period as deacon and for some time as clerk in his church. 
In his upright and honorable life he lias exemplified the doctrines in which 
he believes and he has never been known to give his consent or aid to any 
project which his conscience has not thoroughly sanctioned. In politics he is 
a democrat, and he takes an intelligent and active interest in public affairs, 
cooperating heartily in all progressive enterprises and never seeking to evade 
any of the duties of citizenship. He has been an active worker in the ranks 
of his party and has held all the township offices, his official career having 
been varied in service and faultless in honor. Throughout his long, useful 
and honorable life be has never been known to betray a confidence, to be 
false to a friend, to neglect any personal or public duly and he has in con- 
sequence won a high place in the regard and esteem of his fellowmen. Those 
who are fortunate enough to come within the close circle of his friendship 
find him a courteous and kindly gentleman, interested in his neighbors and 
anxious to do all in his power to promote their happiness and prosperity. 
In Derby and throughout Union township he is known familiarly as "Uncle 
Alfred." and he has made this name a synonym Por upright living, for loyal 
citizenship and for kindliness of spirit. 



DAVID A. Me. MAIN'S. 



David A. McMains, a well known and representative citizen of Union 
township. Lucas county, enjoys a reputation as one of the most successful 
salesmen of southern Iowa in connection with the auctioneering business and 
owns a valuable farm of six hundred and twenty acres in addition to his home 
at Derby. His birth occurred in Union township, this county, on the 20th of 
October, 1857, his parents being .James and Catharine (Sears) McMains. The 



;,.) LUCAS AND WAYNE C0LXT1ES 

father was born in Kentucky on the 11th of April, lsi'n. while the mother's 
birth occurred in Indiana mi the 5th of August, 1824. In 1856 they took up 
their abode ; 1 1 1 n > i > «r the pioneer settlers of Lucas county, Iowa, and here the 
mother passed away in February, 1884, while the demise of James McMains 

occurred at Indianola. Iowa, on tie- 1st of June, L901. They had two children, 
namely: Mrs. .Melissa Westfall. who was horn in Jefferson county, Iowa, on 
the 22d of August, 1850, and resides in Indianola; and David A., of this review. 
The latter grew to manhood in this county, obtaining his earh education 
in the common schools and later pursuing a course of study in a select school at 
Chariton. He subsequently spent three and a half years in study at Valparaiso, 

Indiana, then returned lo Iowa and followed the profession of teaching for 

s time. Later he completed the business course at Valparaiso. Be then 

turned his attention to treneral agricultural pursuits and in connection with 
the work of the fields embarked in business as an auctioneer, being now known 
as one of the most successful salesmen of southern Iowa. His territory is very 
extensive a1 the presenl time, covering all of Lucas, Wayne. Clarke and Decatur 
counties. He disposes of all classes of material hut makes a specialty of Btock 
sales. His undertakings as an agriculturist have also been attended with 
excellent results, and he is now the owner of a farm of six hundred and twenty 
acres of rich and productive land in Union township, which is well improved in 
everj particular and annually yields bounteous harvests. He also owns an 
attractive ami well appointed home in Derbj and is well entitled to represents 
tion among the prosperous and Leading citizens of his community. 

()n the loth of May, L884, Mr. McMains was united in marriage to Miss 
Lydia Oehlman, who was horn in Union township. 1his county, on the lllth of 
June, IS.kS. and has always resided here. After completing her studies in the 

comi schools she entered the selecl school at Garden Grove. Her parents 

were Charles and Dora (Tennis Oehlman, both of whom were Datives of 
Hanover, Germany, the former horn on the 13th of February, 1822, and the 
latter on the -"_'d of December. 1822. Charles Oehlman emigrated to the United 
Static in Is 17 and located first mar Quincy, Illinois, where he was married. 
In L858 he and his wife took up their abode among the pioneer settlers of 
I. mas county, Iowa. 1 1 is demise occurred in Union township on the I5tb of 
March, 1891, while Ins wife passed away in thai township on the 25th of 
October, L908. The latter had been twice married and by her firsl husband 
had one son. Henry I>ur«dorf. a native of Gi rmany. who now makes his home in 

Oklahoma, into Charles and Dora Tennis) Oehlman were born the following 
children: Mrs. Louisa Dickinson, who was horn in Illinois and now resides 
in Seattle. Washington; Charles, horn September 18, L854, who resides on the 
old home farm in Union township. Mrs Emma West, living at Conway, Iowa; 

Mis. I.\ dia Me Ma ins ; Mrs. francs Moicy. who is a resident of Cordon. Nebraska ; 

Mrs. Margaret Penick, of Derby, Iowa; ami Mrs. Doris Hewitt, living In Cordon. 
Nebraska. All of the above children were reared in Lucas county. Mr. ami 
Mrs. McMains have one daughter, [rma Zoe, who was horn on the 30th 
September, 1891, and acquired her earlj education in the common schools, she 
subsequentlj attended Simpson College al Indianola tor a year and then entered 
tin- Northwest, rn University at Bvanston, Illinois, from which she will graduate 
in June, 1915. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 351 

Mr. McMains gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while 
his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Derby. Fraternally he is identified with the following organizations: 
Chariton Lodge, No. 63, A. F. & A. M., of Chariton, Iowa; Derby Camp, .M. 
W. A., of Derby; and Royal Neighbors of America, No. 1154, of Derby. Of 
the last named his wife is also a member. Both are fond of literature and 
theirs is one of the finest collections of books to be found in the community. 
Mr. and Mrs. McMains are representatives of two of the honored pioneer fami- 
lies of Lucas county and enjoy an extensive and favorable acquaintance within 
its borders. 



. I AMES W. JONES. 



James \V. Jones, a splendid representative of the worthiest and best type 
of Iowa's pioneer citizen, dates his residence in this state from 1854 and has 
witnessed a great deal of the period of its greatest growth and development, 
taking an active and honorable part in the work of upbuilding. He was among 
the early settlers in Clarke county and has for years been numbered among 
representative agriculturists in this part of the state, his eighty acre farm on 
section 9, Union township, Lucas county, evidencing in its appearance the care 
and practical labor which have been bestowed upon it. The years have brought 
him success, prominence and a comfortable fortune and his active and honorable 
life, guided always by high and worthy standards, has gained him the respect 
and esteem of many friends. 

.Mr. Jones was born in Putnam county. Indiana. April 4, 1839, and is a 
son of Reuben and Edith 1 Rogers) Jones, the former a native of North Carolina 
and the latter of Kentucky. In 1854 they journeyed overland to Iowa and 
settled as pioneers in Polk county, this state, taking up I heir residence on rented 
land, within three miles of the presenl site of Des Moines. The community was 
called Fort Des Moines at that time, and was a village so small that it has been 
truthfully stated that one bushel of potatoes thrown upon the market would 
overstock it. After a short period of residence in that vicinity the .Jones 
family moved to Clarke county, where the father entered land. This he later 
disposed of, buying a farm five miles south of Osceola, Clarke county. Here 
also he encountered the hardships and privations of pioneer existence, for lie 
settled upon his property at a very early date, finding the land for miles around 
raw prairie and the Indians numerous in the vicinity. With characteristic- 
energy he began the improvement ami development of his faun and became 
well known in agricultural circles, dying upon his holdings in 187:! when he 
was eighty years of age. ITis wife passed away in 1890 ami was eighty-nine at 
the time of her death. Thirteen children were born to their union: .Mary .Jane, 
deceased; David, who died in Indiana; Asa and Mrs. Margaret Thomas, who 
have also passed away; James W., of this review; Mrs. Lettie Lucas, deceased; 
Mrs. Martha Clear of Prosser, Washington: John, who died in Washington in 
1912: Reuben, also of Washington; Jacob, who makes his home in Butte, Mon- 
tana; Peter of Kansas City. Missouri; Isaac ; and Mis. Nancy Ann Crooks, of 



352 l-l CAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

Prosser, Washington. Theeighl oldest oi the above children wen- born in Indiana 
and the others in Iowa. 

James W. Jones was fifteen years of age when be accompanied Ins parents on 
the overland journey into l<>u;i and be is therefore numbered among the pioneer 
settlers bere. He Learned farming in bis childhood by practical experience upon 
Ins father's propertj and has reaped the benefil of this early training during 
his active career which bas been entirely devoted to agricultural pursuits. He 
has not remained a continuous residenl of this state since bis firsl settlement, 
for at one time be homesteaded Land in Nebraska and remained upon it for aboul 
twenty years, making it during thai period a productive and valuable farm. 
Eventually however be returned to Union township, Lucas county, where he 
has Long been a factor in agricultural development. He owns eighty acres 
fine land on section 9, and another trad of ten acres on section I. and his prop 
erties are well improved in every particular, giving every evidence of careful 
and practical cultivation. The house in which the familj reside was on< 
the firsl erected in Union township and is known as the -lames Leach home, 
having been built by a pioneer of that name. The atmosphere of the early 
tines clings around the old dwelling and homestead, where manj interesting 
relies of the pioneers have been discovered. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are now in 
possession of a piece of cedar which was taken in. m a depth of fifty-nine fei 
below the surface of the ground, a1 a time when a new well was being bored 
near the house They possess also a flax hackle and a spinning whei I b< Longing 
to Mrs. Leach, the first mistress of the house. These things have Led Mr. Jones 
to take an interest in accumulating curios of this character and his collection 
includes a shoehammer brougb.1 from Germany over a century ago. 

In 1867 Mr. Jones was united i arriage to .Miss Elvira Pollard, who was 

born in Washington county, Indiana, on the L9th of October, 1848, a daughter 
of lle/ekiah Pollard and Matilda I ox, natives of thai Locality, the former horn 
-May I. 1822. The family came overland in 1852, and settled in Union township, 
Lucas county, on October 25th of thai year, among the earliest settlers. Both 
have passed away, the father dying Maj 11. 1908, and the mother April 9, 1910 
To their union were born thirteen children: Stephen Aaron, of Hamilton county, 
Nebraska; Mrs. Jones, wife of the subject of this review; William Zachariah, 

of Hamilton comity. Nebraska; Nathaniel, who makes his h ,,, Buffalo, 

Wyoming; John of Di av( r, Colorado; Mrs. Margaret Castle of Hamilton county, 

Nebraska; Franklin Pierce, of Wy ing; Albert, who resides in Ridgeway, 

Miss,,,,,-,; Mrs. Flora Moms. f Derby; Mrs. Theodosia Robinson, who makes 
her home in Confidence, Wayne countj ; Elisha and Mary Belle, who have passed 
away; and Mrs. Ida Maj Dennis of Union township. The four eldesl of these 
children were born in Indiana and the rest in Union township, this countj 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones have become the parents of ten children: Mrs. Dora 
McDaniels, who was born November 16, L868, and who is residing with her 
parents in Union township; Delora Ellen, whose birth occurred on the L8th 
of February, 1870, and who has passed awaj . Mrs Edith Patterson, who was 
born December 17. 1871, and who resides in this township; Albert Walter, who 

W;|S ,, " ,n *mber 24, Is?:;, and who resides in Kendrick, Ldaho; Mrs. Clara 

[da Hamilton, born December 20, L875, also of Kendrick, Idaho; Minnie, who 
was ho,-,, October 8, L878, and who was graduated from the Methodisl Hospital 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 353 

and the State Hospital at Des Moines ; Mrs. Maude Morton, who was horn 
November 17, 1880, and who resides in Union township; Edna A., who was horn 
March 1, 1882, and died October 17, 1900; Fay I... bom July 6, L886; and 
Ernest Hezekiah. horn October 9, 1891. 

Mr. Jones voted twice for Abraham Lincoln and lias throughout his life 
consistently adhered to the policy of casting his ballot for the man whom he 
considers best fitted for the position without regard to party lines. He and 
his wife are devout members of the Baptist church and are people of exemplary 
character, well known and favorably regarded throughout the township. 



JOHN F. TEDRICK. 

John F. Tedrick, a prosperous and progressive farmer of Warren township, 
owns and operates one hundred and sixty acres of tine land. He was born in 
Guernsey county, Ohio, September 10, 1856. and is a son of John and Marian 
(Hopper) Tedrick, also natives of that state, the former born in Guernsey 
county. Both died in Derby, the lather passing away in 1892, at the age of 
seventy-six, and the mother in 1901, at the age of eighty. Five children were 
born to their union: Samuel, who died while in the Union army during the 
Civil war; Madison, whose death occurred in Illinois: Anderson, whose home 
is in Nebraska ; John F., of this review ; and a daughter who died in infancy. 

John F. Tedrick was only seven years of age when he came to Lucas county, 
his parents locating here in 1S(>:>. He grew up on his father's farm and after 
attaining his majority turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in which 
he has since won prominence anil success. He owns one hundred and sixty acres 
of excellent land in Warren township and has improved and developed this 
property according to the most modern and progressive methods, making it one 
of the finest farms in this locality. He owns in addition a house and lot in 
Artesia. California, and he and his family spend many of the winter months in 
that state. 

In Derby, Iowa. August 7. 1877. Mr. Tedrick was united in marriage to .Miss 
Emma D. Westfall, who was born in Monroe county. January 22. 18(11, the 
youngest child of Lorenzo D. and Elinor (Crawford) Westfall. natives of Ohio, 
the former born December 23, L818, and the latter, November 29, 1819. The 
parents were among the early settlers in Wapello county. Iowa, making the 
journey overland in 1838. The father died in Derby, January 2. 1911, having 
long survived his wife, who passed away in Wapello county. December 21. 18(il. 
Twelve children were born to their union: John, who has passed away; Mrs. 
Sarah Rachel Blue, also deceased; Eliza Jane, deceased: .Mrs. Diana Penick, who 
was born February 10, 1843, and who now resides in Derby; Mary Elinor, who 
was born January 25, 1845, and who died on the 16th of Augusl of the same 
year: George Milton, who was born June 28, 1846, and who died in Oregon in 
1900; Allison D., who was born November 1. 1848, and who is now residing in 
California ; Wesley Addison, who was horn May 14, 1851, and who makes his 
home in Oregon ; Mrs. Margarel Stodghill, who was born April 9, L853, and who 
now resides in Portland, Oregon; Janus Crawford, who was born June li, 1855, 



354 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

and who makes his home in Wapello county; Francis Asbury, who was horn 
March 16, 1858, and who now resides in Kansas; and Mrs. Emma Tedrick, wife 
of the subject of this review. All of these children were born in Wapello county. 
Mr. and -Mrs. Tedrick became the parents of lour children, all of whom were bora 
in Lucas county. They are as follows: .Mrs. Lola 1). Westfall, who was horn 
m Warren township. November 28, 1878, and who died at Indianola, Iowa, July 
1, 1!)09; Ralph, whose birth occurred July 10. 1880, and who is now a resident 
of California; Otis, horn June 12, I s "-!. also of California; and Mrs. Bertha 
Dohle, who was born October 1. I s *-:.. a1 Cambria, Wayne county, and who 
makes her home in California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tedrick are members of the Methodisl Episcopal church and 
the runner is affiliated with the Masonic lodge of Chariton and the Modern 
Woodmen of America in Derby. Mrs. Tedrick is a charter member of Royal 
Neighbors of America at Derby, Iowa. His political allegiance is given to the 
democratic partj and he takes an intelligent interest in public affairs without 
being active as an office seeker. Be is a man nf many sterling traits of character, 
able in business, progressive in citizenship and at all times trustworthy and 
reliable. 



CHARLES REED BOND. 

A valuable farm of three hundred and sixty acres of excellent land in Otter 

• icek township, Lmas county, gives testi ) of the industry ami ability of 

Charles Weed Bond along agricultural lines. The family settled hereabout forty 
years ago, in 1 s 7l\ Charles R. Bond was born in Baltimore county, Maryland, 
March 25, 1854. His parents were George T. and Margaret (Johnson) Bond, 
aatives of Maryland, who passed awaj in Otter Creek township, this county, 
the former mi February 11. 1884, and the latter mi February 16, 1908. In 
their family wen- seven children: Charles Reed, of this review: William .1.. 

di ased; frank, also deceased; OUie, who died in infancy: Ira. who passed 

away on .lul\ 2, 1912; Mrs. Anna Arnold, deceased: and Mrs. Ella Clon 
resident of otter ('nek township. The two eldest children of this family were 
horn in Maryland, tin two next following in Pennsylvania and the remainder 
in Mahaska county, Iowa. The familj moved from Maryland to Pennsylvania 

in 1857 and remained there until 1866, w hen they | ■ . d( d westward and made 

settlement in Mahaska county, Iowa, on a farm where thej remained until 1 sT'J. 
hen thej cam,- to Otter Creek township. Lucas county, the father engaging 
in farming and stock raising II.- was successful in his efforts and as the years 
passi d tmulated a substantial competence. 

Charles I.'. Loud was reared under the parental roof and. making the several 
removals with his family, came in 1872 p. Lucas county, where I"- has ever 
sinci d with the exception of two years which he spent in Clarke countj 

II. attended school in the various places where his parents resided and assisted 

his father with the work of the farm, becoming thoroughly acquainted with 
efficienl methods of agriculture. As the years passed he turned them to -end 

; ""nt and by thrift and industry became the owner of three hundred and 

sixty acres of highly cultivated and productive land in Otter Creek township. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 355 

improved with a modern home, substantial outbuildings and barns and furnished 
with all such equipment as is considered indispensable by the up-to-date agri- 
culturist. He has become one of the substantial men of the agricultural com- 
munity of Otter Creek township, his labors uo1 only being conducive to his 
own prosperity but. being a factor in the general agricultural development of 
t his region. 

On February 17, 1877. Mr. Bond was united in marriage to Miss Celestine 
Bennett, who was born in "Washington county. Iowa. October 22, 1857. Eer 
parents, Thomas and Belinda (Conley) Bennett, were among the early settlers 
in Iowa, coming here when this state was yet under territorial rule. The former 
was a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. Thomas Bennett died in 
Oklahoma, at the age of ninety-four years, the mother also passing away in thai 
state, aged seventy-seven. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett became the parents of twelve 
children: Joseph, deceased; Jeremiah, a soldier in the Civil war who died 
while in service; Joel, deceased: Mrs. Anna Morgan, a resident of Missouri; 
William, who lives in Oklahoma: .Mrs. Louise Dawson, also of that state; .Mis. 
Betsey Chapman, of Kansas: Christopher, of Oklahoma; Mrs. Bond, the wile 
of our subject: Mrs. Bethiah Cumrine, of Kansas: Mrs. Ada Castor, of Okla- 
homa; and Sarah, who was the second in order of birth and died in infancy. 
All of these children were natives of Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Bond are 
the parents of seven children, all natives of Otter Creek township, where they 
were reared and grew to maturity. They an': .Mrs. Luvernie Harvey, horn 
December 21, 1877, of Otter Creek township; .Mrs. Beulah Nelson, born May 2. 
1880, of Chariton: Mrs. Maggie Anna Taylor, horn December 30, 1881, of 
Indianola. Iowa; Mrs. Georgia Gladys Ashby, horn .May S, 1SS^. of Jackson 
township; Charles G., born November 3, 1891, residing on the home farm and 
assisting his father in his work; Arthur, born May 22, 1894, also assisting in 
the operation of the farm; and Gertrude, born October 18, 1896, at home. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bond have seventeen grandchildren. 

Politically Mr. Bond is a democrat, giving his stanch support to the measures 
and candidates of that organization. While his extensive tanning operations 
have demanded most of his time, he recognizes the obligations of citizenship 
and has actively participated in public life as township trustee, in which capacity 
he has efficiently served for fifteen years, and also as school directed', giving 
thereby evidence of his support in behalf of better educational opportunities. 
There is no man in this locality who is higher esteemed than Mr. Bond and 
justly so, for his success is well merited, as it is self-earned, and the qualities 
which have made possible his prosp.-iity are worthy of the highesl commendation. 



MICHAEL loth;. 



Among those who have long been identified with the agricultural develop- 
ment of Wayne county must he numbered Michael l.ohr. who owns a well 
improved farm in Benton township and holds the title to five hundred and 
thirty-seven acres of fertile land in that immediate vicinity. He is a native of 
West Virginia, his birth having occurred in Barbour county, that state, on the 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

15th of -May. 1847. His lather. P. P. Lohr, was of German extraction, bul was 
born in Virginia, his natal year being 1817. Hi- parents, who were fanning 
people, removed Erom Pennsylvania to Virginia in the early years of the last 
century and there passed the remainder of their li 

P. P. Lohr earlj directed his energies along agricultural lines, and engaged 

in Earming in West Virginia until March, 1854, when with his family be ca 

to [owa He first located in Jefferson county, bul in October, of the same year, 
he came to Wayne county, settling on a farm a mile and a half east of the 
place his son Michael now owns. His Srsl trad of land comprised Eortj acres, 
but as the years passed be added to bis landed interests until at the time o 
his death be owned three hundred and twenty acres. He lived to the advanced 
age «>1 eighty-three years, his death occurring in 1900. Mr. Lohr was one of 
the progressive and public-spirited pioneers of Wayne county, and took an 
active interesl in political affairs, serving with efficiency in various minor town 
ship offices. In his early life he supported the whig party, and alter it was 
merged into the republican voted the latter ticket. For his wife he chose Miss 
Sarah Holder, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1820, bul in early life removed 
to Virginia with her parents, she accompanied her husband and family to 
[owa and was residing in Wayne county when she passed away iii October, 

L911. Her parents came west in 1851, locating in Jeffers iounty, where 

they resided until L858 when thej came i<> Wayne c itj Hen Grandfather 

Holder boughl eightj acres of land adjoining the farm of his son-in-law, 1'. 1'. 
Lohr, who later purchased the property, and resided Her,, until his death in 
1861. To Mr. and .Mrs. Lohr there were born seven children, as follows: Mary, 
the deceased wife of John Davis, residing in the vicinity of Cambria; Elizabeth, 
who married John Woolis, of Cambria; Michael, our subject; Harriet Ann. 

who beet the wife of s. Hotehkiss. of Missouri; Daniel, who is residing in 

Idaho; John, who is deceased; and Allen T.. wh akes his home in Dakota. 

Michael Lohr, who was a lad of seven years when In- accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Iowa, was educated in the district schools of this county. He 
passed his early years in the unevenl ful routine characteristic of life in the rural 
ctions, and in common with the majority of countrj youths earlj became 
familiar with the duties of the agriculturist. He remained on the home place 
until after he had attained his majority and then began his independent career 
asa tanner. On lirst starting oul iii the world Eor himself he cultivated rented 
land, hut when he was twentj seven be invested his accumulated s.i\m'_rs in 
eighty acres of land, which formed the nucleus of his present bomestead. The 
faet of his having become a landowner seemed to prove an incentive to yel greater 
orl on his part, and he applied himself to the achievement of Ins purpose 
with tin- unremitting diligence which broughl constantly increasing si ss .\s 

the years passed lie added to his possessions until he now owns live hundred and 

thirty-seven acres, eightj of which is a portion of the old Eamilj homestead east 
of his place All of th.- buildings now on his farm have been erected bj Mr 

'■"hr. and at various times he has installed ahoiit the premises diffep Ul applia- 

lor reducing the labor connected with its operation, making his one of the mod. I 
places of th,. township li, s fields are planted to such cereals as are best 

adapted to the soil and annually yield abundant harvests. In connection • 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 357 

his diversified farming he is raising and feeding stork, in which lines of his 
business he is also meeting with a good measure of success. 

In Wayne county. Iowa, in 1S78. Mr. Lohr was married to Miss Mary P. 
Seaman, a daughter of W. E. Seaman, a native of England, who came to the 
United States in early life. He first settled in New Fork stale, 1ml later removed 
to Rock Island, Illinois. Of this marriage there have been born eight children, 
as follows: Jessie, the deceased wife of Clyde Hathill; William, who married 
Ethel Gibbs, and is residing in this county; Elizabeth, who is at home; Frank, 
who married Maude Gibbs, also of this county; and Fred, Seaman, Stanlej and 
Paul. 

The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Lohr is 
a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted as a member of the Forty-sixth Iowa 
Infantry in June, 1864, and remained at the front for ninety days. He main- 
tains relations with his comrades of the field through his connection with Etoberl 
Jackson Post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Allerton. Politically he 
supports the republican party, and has held various minor offices in the town- 
ship. Mr. Lohr is highly esteemed in his community as a man of worth and 
integrity, who conducts his business affairs in an honorable and upright manner 
while in matters of citizenship he is public-spirited and can be relied upon to 
support every movement that he feels will promote the welfare of the com- 
munity or advance its development. 



THOMAS BENTON MITCHELL. M. I). 

Dr. Thomas Benton Mitchell, now living retired in Derby, was for more than 
a quarter of a century engaged in the practice of medicine in various localities, 
devoting the years of an active and honorable manhood to the service of his 
followmen. In all his professional duties he has been conscientious, utilizing 
every possible means to accomplish the important tasks entrusted to him, and 
he has well earned the leisure and rest which he now enjoys. He was born 
near Eddyvillc. in Monroe county, Towa, on the -7th of February, 1856, and is 
a son of Ahrani and Nancy (Spray) Mitchell, natives of Kentucky, the former 
born in 1812 and the latter in 1811. The father moved with his parents into 
Indiana at an early day and afterward came to Iowa as a pioneer. In 1853 
he traveled overland to Colorado but afterward returned to this stale, where 
he resumed his residence in Monroe county. He died in Bloomfield, Davis 
county, in March, 1888, having survived his wife for some years, her death 
having occurred in Lucas county in 1876. In their family were five children: 
George Russell, who was horn in January, 1834, and who died in March, 1913, 
in Washington : Mrs. Mary Nelson, who was horn in 1842 and who died in 1912; 
Mrs. Amanda Blizzard, who was horn in 1845 and who is now residing in Union 
township; James, who was horn in 1850 and who died in 1894 in Kansas: and 
Dr. Thomas Benton, of this review. 

The last named came with his parents to Lucas county in 1865, at the 
close of the Civil war. Ee was a1 that time nine years of age and his education 
was acquired in the public schools of this vicinity, where alter laying aside his 



358 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

books he taught for 6ve terms. Saving determined to study medicine, he 
entered Hush Medical College in Chicago bul completed his professional studies 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in the same city, graduating from 

the latter institution in 1SM{. He immediately began the practice of his pro 
fession al Ashton, Missouri, and there continued for seven years, or until 
lsiio. when lie returned to Chicago to take up practice there, remaining in that 
city for eighteen years thereafter. Throughoul his professional career he was 
imbued with a laudable ambition for advancement, knowing how important 
are the duties which devolve upon the physician, lie was accorded a libera] 
patronage and throughoul the years he kept in touch with the modern trend 
of professional thought by his wide reading and research and his developing 
powers and wide experience brought him broad and accurate knowledge. Ik 
retired from active practice in 1908, his health being impaired, and returned 
to Iowa, building a modern and attractive home near I >erby, where he is recuper 
ating by following the simple life. Here in their beautiful residence, surrounded 
by even comfort, he and his estimable wife are securing all the enjoyment thai 

comes to those who have gained a '_ r lly competence in an honorable way. They 

are extensive readers and their library is one of the finesl to be Pound in Lucas 
county. 

Dr. Mitchell married, in Ashton, Missouri, on the 12th of October, 1886, 
Miss Stella Blythe, a native of Boone county, thai state, born in 1869. She 
grew to womanhood there, attending the common schools and supplementing 
this by a course in Stevens College al Columbia, .Missouri, and a course in 
music m Chicago. Her father. Rev. George Blythe, was horn in .Missouri and 
died in Montana, while pursuing his ministerial duties at Boulder, that state. 
Her mother, who was in her maidenhood Alio Keene, was horn in Missouri 
and is now residing with her daughter. In the Blythe family were three chil- 
dren: Mrs. Mitchell; Mrs. Mae Penn, of Troy, Missouri, the wife of the presenl 
prosecuting attorney of Lincoln county; and Arthur, who resides iii Denver, 
I lolorado. 

fraternally Dr. Mitchell is a member of the Masonic lodge, the Independent 
Order of Odd fellows, the Ancienl Order of foresters, the Independent Order 
of foresters and two organizations of the Sons of St. George He is affiliated 

also with the Ancient Order of United Work n, belonging to Maddoch Lodge 

in Chicago, and he is a member of one of the most exclusive fraternal organiza- 
tions in existence the Ancient order of Druids. His religious views are in 
accord with the doctrines of the Baptisl church and he holds membership in 
the church of this denomination in Chicago. In polities he is independent. 
voting always according to bis personal convictions without regard to partj 
lines, and he has taken an active and prominent pari in community affairs, 

cooperating heartily in everything that pertains t<> the promotion of the com- 
munity advancement and upbuilding. The cause of education has found in 

him a loyal supporter and as president Of the hoard of education he is acconi 

plishing a great deal of beneficial and lasting work, now devoting his energies 
to securing for Derby a new and modern school building. Dr. Mitchell is well 

knOWIl among the hading physicians of this state and elsewhere and has at 

all times enjoyed the highest regard of his brethren in tin- medical fraternity 
because of his close conformity to high standards of professional ethics. More 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 359 

over, he has always displayed the qualities of honorable and uprighl manhood 
and has given largely of his rich store of wisdom and experience for the benefit 
of others. His name is honored wherever it is known and most of all where it 
is best known. 



S. G. SNUGGS. 



The title of self-made man has been well earned by S. G. Snugiis, who 
began his career emptydianded with no particular advantages and has attained 
to a position of affluence as a prosperous owner of three hundred and forty acres 
of valuable land in Otter Creek township and sixty acres in Jackson township, 
Lucas count}-. A native of England, Mr. Snuggs was born near London, March 
2, 1845, a son of Joseph and Harriet (Stent) Snuggs, natives of England. The 
father was born in 1808, and the mother in 1809. the former passing away on 
January 6, 1889, and the latter in Lucas county. Iowa, on July SI, 1898. When 
five years of age S. G. Snuggs came with his mother to the United States, landing 
here in 1850 and settling in Henry county, Illinois, where they remained until 
the spring of 1862, when removal was made to Lucas county, Iowa, of which 
he has been a resident since that time. He had two brothers, James and John, 
both of whom are deceased, and one sister who is still living. Mrs. Martha 
Preston, a resident of Tuskeege, Iowa. 

As soon as old enough Mr. Snuggs engaged in agricultural pursuits, following 
mixed methods and specializing in stock-raising, and as the years have passed 
he has gained a success worthy of notice. As his means permitted he acquired 
land, owning today three hundred and forty acres in Otter Creek township and 
sixt.v acres in Jackson township, equipped with two sets of good improvements. 
For the past twenty-three years he has raised Aberdeen Angus cattle anil is I lie 
owner of an excellent herd of this breed. He also raises Civile horses and 
driving horses and has been successful in breeding graded hogs. Attention to de- 
tail, industry and perseverance have been the salient qualities that have made his 
success possible and while Mr. Snuggs has become financially independent his 
attainments are also of a general interest, as they have largely contributed to 
the development and advancement of this section. 

In 1866 Mr. Snuggs was married to Miss Adaline Jenkins, a native of 
Brown county. Indiana, where she was born October 27. 1848. When a child 
of only three years she was brought by her parents to Lucas county in 1851, her 
father being Alexander Jenkins, a native of Ohio, who died in White Breast 
township, and her mother Elizabeth Jenkins, a native of Kentucky, who still 
resides in Hamburg. Iowa. Mr. and .Mrs. Jenkins have three children: John, 
who died at the age of two years; Nancy, who passed away when only seven 
months old; and Mrs. Snuggs, the wife of our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Snuggs 
became the parents of ten children, all of whom an' living with tin- exception 
of John, the second in order of birth. The others are: Mrs. Effie Gray, of 
Jackson township; James, of Chariton, Iowa; Fannie, living in Rocky Kord, 
Colorado; Charles, at home; .Mrs. Amanda Roberts, of While Breasl township: 
Jacob, of Otter Creek township: Mrs. Estella Ruble, living in Liberty township; 



160 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

and Ethel and Earl, both a1 home. All of these children were born and reared 
in Otter Creels township and received a good common-school education. Fannie 
in addition attended college al [ndianola and Amanda a high school in Lucas. 
In bis political affiliations Mr. Snuggs is a democral and keeps well informed 
mi .ill government issues, although he does ool care for office. All movements 
and measures undertaken to benefil his locality receive Ids warm support and 

be is readily recognized as a public-spirited man and g I citizen, who can 

always be found iii the fronl ranks of those who seek expansion and promotion 
along moral, intellectual and material lines 



THOMAS CROSTON, .M. D. 

No bistorj of the medical profession, or indeed of the growth, upbuild- 
ing and progress of Lucas county along professional, material, educational 

or political lines, would be complete without menti E the career of Dr. 

Thomas Croston. physician and surgeon and a powerful and vital force in 
public affairs. A native of England, he was born near Manchester, Decemher 
12, 1846, a son of Henry and Ellen f Williams Croston, both natives of that 
section. The father was a contractor and manager of mines, his operations 
being carried on mar Bolton, England, where he died at the aire of sixty-six. 
It was there that Dr. Croston secured that practical experience in mining 
which has been of such lie net it to him in the community where he now resides, 
bringing him in sympathy with the humbler class of Laborers and broaden- 
ing his mind, so thai lie is now aide to look upon both sides of any disputed 
question. His mother lias also passed away, her death having occurred near 
Manchester when she was seventy years of age. 

Dr. Thomas Croston was the only child born to his parents. He acquired 

his preliminary education in the public scl Is of Manchester and after having 

determined to make the practii f medicine his life work studied undei 

Professor John Skelton, M, D. a prominenl physician and surgeon in England 

and an author of some popular works on the eclectic school of medicine. 

Having received his degree. Dr. Croston lefl England and came to America. 

Settling first in Steubenville, Ohio, where he practiced medicine for two years 
Al the end of that time he returned t'> his native country hut crossed tin 

Atlantic again in 1880, locating this time in Lucas, where he has since prac 

ticed, his medical skill bringing him a large and lucrative patronage, drawi 
from Lucas and the surrounding sections. He has aever allowed his ability 
to grow less as time has passed lint has kept in touch with the advancement 
Df his profession through broad reading and research. He is quick to adopt new 

methods, one,, their worth is proven, and his read) sympathy and cheery dis 

position as w.'ll as Ids professional knowledge constitute elements for good 

in the si.de room. lie is |o\e,l h\ his patients, to all of whom he is also 8 

friend, tried ami tested through riianj years 

Aside from his professional relations Dr. Croston has long been recognize) 

as an influential factor in the public life of Lucas, giving »\' his time am 

talents unstintedly for the advancement and upbuilding of the city and county 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 365 

Although born across the water, he is a loyal American citizen, his public 
spirit being proven by definite and effective work in the public interest, lie 
stands as a central figure in educational circles of the county, being now in 
the twenty-fifth consecutive year of his service as a member of the school 
board, having been first elected in the spring of 1888. He lias been president 
of the board for a number of years and to his energy, conscientiousness and 
unselfish labor is due the present efficiency of the public-school system in 
Lucas. He has never shirked anything which he believed to be his duty ami 
even in the face of the greatest opposition has carried forward his educational 
work to successful completion and is now enjoying in the respect and esteem 
of his fellow citizens the pleasure which comes to man from duty well per- 
formed. The people of Lucas have evidenced their gratitude for his services 
by retaining him in his position and giving him their support in the promotion 
of his many projects of reform and advancement. Dr. Croston has been 
mayor of Lucas for three terms and has been for twenty-four years a member 
of the town council, his public service standing as a testimonial to his loyalty 
and faithfulness in citizenship. 

Dr. Croston married, in England in 1868, .Miss Eliza Fletcher, a native 
of that country, who died in Lucas. To their union were born three children: 
Ellen, who is caring for the home in Lucas; Ernest, who resides in Needles. 
California; and George, a graduate in medicine from Northwestern Uni- 
versity in Chicago and one of the leading physicians and surgeons in Sapulpa, 
Oklahoma. 

Dr. Croston gives his political allegiance to the republican party and aside 
from the official positions before mentioned has served also as health officer 
of the town of Lucas and as county physician. Fraternally he is identified 
with Good Shepherd Lodge, No. 414, A. P. & A. M., and belongs also to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his daughter are affiliated with 
the Order of the Eastern Star, as was his wife during her lifetime. A man of 
ability, intelligence and public spirit, with his powers broadened and devel- 
oped by travel and close observation, liberal-minded in his views and influenced 
at all times by regard and consideration for the rights and privileges of others, 
Dr. Croston stands as a representative of all that is most honorable in pro- 
fessional and private relations. He has given a great deal of his attention to 
the practice of medicine, in which he has won success during the years, but 
his professional labors have not excluded his active support and promotion 
of the other vital interests which go to make up the final sum of the human exist 
enee. 



HARRISON TAYLOR PLEENOR. 

A descendant of early Iowa pioneers, Harrison Taylor Pleenor engages in 
agricultural pursuits on forty-five acres of choice land on section 32, Jackson 
township, Lucas county. He was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, April 22, 
1S47. his parents being Hiram and Mary Ann (Portloek) Pleenor, the father 
a native of Virginia. The parents came to Des Moines county in 1832, being 

VoL H— 19 



;j66 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

among the earliest settlers of Iowa. At that time there were bul two buildings 
in Burlington. They made their start to this state Erom Indiana, driving over 
land in the old pioneer fashion. The father died in Des Moines county, Iowa, 
at the age of sixty-nine years, long surviving his wife, who also died in that 
county at the age of twenty-seven. In their family were but two children, the 
brother of our subject beiug William, who still resides on the old home farm 
in Des Moines county. Of a subsequent marriage of the father were horn eight 
children, as follows : Isaac :( Jcorgi : John, deceased; Robert; Mrs. Marx Hildig; 
Elipees, deceased; Mrs. Sadie Linder; and .Mrs. Lydia Cullenbeck. All were 
horn and reared in Iowa. 

In the acquirement of his education Harrison T. Fleenor attended common 
school, early assisting his father iii the work on the borne farm and becoming 
acquainted with thorough agricultural methods. In 1863 he enlisted from 
Burlington, Iowa, for service in the Union army, becoming a member of Com 
pany (' of the Thirtieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, which was a part of the 
Army of the Cumberland. Yet a mere boy of sixteen, Mr. Pleenor distin- 
guished himself by his courageous condud and faithfulness to his duties. 
inspiriiiL' others with his spirit of patriotism. He participated in every engage- 
ment with his regimenl except the battle of Lookout Mountain and upon recei\ big 
lus honorable discharge returned to the pursuits of private life, having followed 
farming and the carpenter's trade since the close of the war. Mr. Pleenor 
enjoys today a pension from his government in part payment of the valuable 
services which he rendered the Union in upholding the northern cause, lie 
remained in Des .Moines county until 1867 and then moved to Madison county, 
this state, there following the carpenter's trade for six months. His next removal 
was to Lucas county, remaining, however, hut three months before removing to 
Missouri, where he made his home for two years. He then returned to Jackson 
1 ownsh i p. of which he has been a resident ever since. This was in the year 1871 
He now gives his attention largely to the cultivation of forty-five acres of 
valuable land, upon which can be found good improvements. His building are 

in a slate of g I repair and he follows progressive methods in order to increase 

the productivity of the soil. A resident of Lucas county for over Four decades. 
he largel] enjoys the esteem of Ins friends and neighbors and such prosperity 

as has eouie to him no one begrudges him. 

»)n September 7. 1867, Mr Pleenor was married in Des Moines county, Iowa. 

'" Miss Jeai tte Leonard, a native of that county, who was born on March 

22, 1850. Her parents were among the early settlers of Des Moines county. 
coming then' in 1846 hx the overland route. The father, George Leonard, a 
native of Franc, died in Lucas county in 1892, and the mother, Nancy Leonard. 
;| native of Ohio, also died in this county. In their family were three sons 
and four daughters, Mrs. Pleenor being the eldest in the family. The others 
were: • l " 1 " 1 - deceased; Moses, deceased; Tabitha; Lafayette, deceased; Mary, 
deceased; and Lizzie. All were born and reared in I >. a Moines county. Mr. 

''""' • Mls Pleenor beci • the parents of five children, of whom four are living, 

•he eldest, John, having passed away. The others are: William, a resident of 
Michigan; Perry, of Bverist, Iowa; Rose, residing with her parents; and Marj 
11 ll """' All these children are natives <>\' Lucas county, where thej grew 
to maturity. 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 367 

Interested in public matters, Mr. Fleenor gives his standi adherence to the 
republican party, keeping well informed upon all issues that effed the welfare 
of his locality, county, state and nation. He lias for seven years efficiently served 
as constable of Jackson township and has given evidence of his interest in the 
cause of education by serving as a member of the school board of his district. 
his term covering a similar period. For many years lie has tilled Hie position 
of road supervisor and has been active in the good roads movements, recognizing 
the importance of transportation facilities as regards the fanner. In every 
respect Mr. Fleenor is a progressive and public-spirited citizen, having given 
evidence of his patriotic spirit in war as well as in times of peace and being 
highly regarded and esteemed for his many good qualities of mind and character 
by all who know him and most of all by those who know him longest. 



-IOI1N WKSLHY LIPE. 



A farm of eighty acres of choice land located in Otter Creek township gives 
evidence of the prosperity of John Wesley Lipe, a native of this township, born 
January 17, 1869, and a son of John and Mahala (Davidson) Lipe. the former 
a native of Randolph county. North Carolina, born January 9, 1829, and the 
latter a native of Indiana. The father, in 1832, was brought to Indiana but sub- 
sequently came to Iowa, where he died in Otter Creek township, April 29, 1910. 
The mother also died in that township, preceding her husband in death by nearly 
forty years, her demise occurring in December, 1871. Both were early settlers 
of Lucas county, coming to Otter Creek township in the fall of 1861. The 
father had a military record to his credit, having done duty in the Union army 
with Company C, Fourth Iowa Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war. .Mr. 
and Mrs. John Lipe had live children, of whom three are living. William, 
the eldest, who was born April 3, 1862, has since passed away. Phoebe Ann. 
born August 2, 1863, is also deceased. .Mrs. Martha Ellen Pfrimmer, born 
July 7, 1866. resides in Otter Creek township. Mrs. Sarah Frances Eaton 
was born in December, 1870, and is also a resident of that township. The 
other member of the family is John W., our subject, who was the fourth in 
oz-der of birth. The father subsequently married again, of this second union 
being born the following children: Mrs. Addie Harvey, a resident of otter 
Creek township; Mrs. Alvie Lovina Baker, also of that township; and Winfred 
LeRoy and Wilford, twins, both deceased. 

John W. Lipe was reared under the parental roof. Losing his mother when 
only about three years of age. In the acquirement of his education he attended 
the schools of the neighborhood and subsequently assisted his lather in the 
work of the farm. He has since become the owner of eighty acres of choice 
land on sections 13 and 14. Otter Creek township, which are under a high 
state of cultivation. His improvements are in excellent condition and his home 
is comfortable and well and modernly equipped. Beside general farming .Mr. 
Lipe specializes in stock raising, deriving a gratifying income from both lines 
of endeavor. 



t68 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

John W. Lipe was married to Sarah G. McClane and of this union were born 
two daughters, lsyl and (»pal. Politically he is a socialist and in religious 
matters a member of the Latter Day Saints church of Otter Creek. Fraternally 
l„. affiliates with Senna Lodge, No. 344, A. F. & A. M., of Liberty Center, Lows. 
A public-spirited man of progressive tendencies, Mr. Lipe by his individual 
efforts bas Largely contributed to the general agricultural advancement and 
wherever known is highly regarded and esteemed 



GEORGE WASHINGTON GARTON. 

A pioneer of Wayne county, Iowa, where In- has mail.' his home for over 

sixty years, George Washingl Larton has become one of the largest land 

owners in this section, where he holds title to eighl hundred and eighty acres 
of valuable property on sections •">. 7. 8, 9 and 1". Clay township, and he takes 
the more pride in his prosperity because he has secured the same entirely by 
his ou n efforts. 

.Mr. Carton was horn m Putnam county. Virginia, November I. 1844, and is 
asonof Allen D. and Caroline (Kimberling Carton. The father was born aear 
Red House Shoals, Wesl Virginia, September 17. 1817, and died in Washington 
township. Wayne county, towa, in November, 1892. Thomas Garton, Sr., the 
great-grandfather of our subject, "as a native of Virginia, oi Scotch-Irish descent, 
and served as a soldier of the war of the Revolution. His son, Thomas Garton, 
the grandfather of George W. Garton, also rendered distinguished military 
service, being a participant in the War of 1812, in which he was seriously 
wounded, lie carried the cartridge hall which disabled him in his Leg Eor 
ahout thirty five years and after the indict was located and extracted, it was 
kept by a sister as a memento in remembrance of her brother for a great many 

years after his death. A peculiar occurrence c lected with it is the fact that 

after a lapse of ahout fifteen years the bullet crumbled into dust. For generations 
the family were prominent farmers and Large plantation owners in Virginia, 

The father, Allen D. Carton, in 1851 left his native stale with his family and. 
coming down the Ohio river as far as St. I. on is. then proceeded up the Mississippi 
to Keokuk. There he purchased a team and made his way to Jefferson county, 
Iowa, and thence to Wayne county, where he arrived in Washington township, 
October 10, 1851, and there remained until his death. There were qo railroads 

at the time and the nearest trading point was Chariton. The means of loco 

motion were ox teams and much of the travel was bj fool and the re fori' necessarily 

slow. The father I .one one of lie substantial farmers of Wa\ oiint\ 

and served in a number of public offices, being count} ass. ssor from 1857 until 

1858, and serving as justice of the peace for leu years He was a man of 
Studious mind ami a lover of hooks, well read and highly educated. In I s . ;7 
lie united with the .Methodist church and after coming to Washington township 
became a member of tin- Baptist denomination. On October 3, L843, he married 
Miss Caroline Kimberling, who died May 31, I860, and to them were horn eight 
children, of whom George W.. our subject, is the eldest. .1. M.. the next in 
order of birth, died while young and Henry B, is also d lased. F. M. resides 



LUCAS AND WAYNE ('(H'XTIKS 369 

in Oklahoma ami T. E. makes his home in Washington township. The next in 
the family is N. H. Garton, a resident of Allerton, Iowa. .Mrs. Elizabeth (Garton) 

Holmes died in Ilumeston in 11)11. The youngesl member is Cassins A., a resi 
denl of Decatur county, [owa. In October, 1861, the lather married Mary Raines, 
a daughter of John and Ellen Raines, and they became the parents of si\ 
children: Charles W., a resident of Broken How. Nebraska; Emma May. also 
of Nebraska ; Willis L., of the same state ; and William A.. Mary A. and Maria K. 
The three eldest children were horn in Virginia hut the younger ones were horn 
in Iowa and all were reared in Wayne county. 

George W. Garton came with his parents to Wayne county in 1851, when 
a hoy of only seven years, and received his education in the schools of the neigh- 
borhood. He early assisted his father with the work of the farm and became 
acquainted with tin- besl methods of agriculture. Subsequently he taught school 

for four years in Wayi ounty and in the course of his work in that capacitj 

introduced a novelty along the line of teaching geography in this section which 
was. that by singing the lessons they might more easily he fixed in the minds of 
the pupils. This new departure he instituted in 1866. He began to teach in 
1865 when twenty-one years old ami has in his possession one of the oldest cer 
tificates to he found in the comity. Subsequently he turned all his attention 
to agriculture and as success attended his efforts he increased his holdings until 
he is now the owner of eight hundred and eighty acres of finely cultivated and 
highly valuable land in Clay township, Wayne county, on sections 5, 7. 8, '■) 
and 10. equipped with four sets of improvements. Progressive and energetic, 
he has always followed the most up-to-date methods in agriculture and has become 
one of the substantial men of the locality. 

Mr. Garton was married. January 20, 1870, to Miss .Mary S. Shipley, who 
was born in Missouri, March «>. 1849, and died in Clay township, Wayne county. 
March 16. 1910. Her father was Richard R. Shipley, a native of Kentucky, who 
died in Clio. Iowa, at the age of eighty-nine years, while her mother passed 
away when Mrs. Garton was quite young. The family were early pioneers 
of the state of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Garton arc the parents of the following 
children: William R., a resident of Clay township; one who died in infancy: 
Allen D., wlio passed away at the age of two years and ten months; Cilherl 
llollister, a resident of Clay township; Samuel, who makes his home in the 
same township; and Edward, also residing there. The four eldest children 
were horn in Richman township ami the younger ones are natives of Clay 
tow nship. 

Mr. Garton is a stanch democral and has held all of the local township offices, 
an indication of his popularity and the esteem in which he is held by his fellow 
citizens. In 1903 he was democratic nominee for slate representative for Wayne 
counts' and has attended a number of county and state conventions and always 
has been a valued man in the councils of his party. His sons have also aspired 
to public office and one ,-i! present holds the office of justice of Hie peace in 
Clay township while another is assessor in the same township. The family 
are members of the Baptisl church in Claj township, in the work of which they 
take active and helpful interest, and Mr. Garton gave liberally of his means 
towards the construction of the church building as well as donated the land 
upon which it was built. He is an exemplary member of the Masonic body, 



370 LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

being connected with Cla) Lodge, No. 191, A. 1-'. & A. M., of which for many 
years he was worshipful master. In his various relations of life he has shown 
himself to be a man of strong character and high principles and has Ix-i-ome a 
Force for good in the community in which lie makes his borne, where he is highly 
regarded liy all who know him. As a pioneer of this section he lias no! only 
been an interested witness of the changes thai have occurred bul has been largely 
instrumental in l>rin^in<: ahoni the •.n-ncral advancement which has made the wild 
prairie one of the most fertile sections of the middle west, in whatever relation 
be has done service his work has been of a high order and the prosperity which 
lias come to him is well merited and while be has attained individual sue,-. ss 
along agricultural lines he has been constructive in the development of new 
methods in this section of the country. 



W. .1. s. TAYLOR. 



W. .1. s. Taylor, a resident of Humeston, who came to the stale of Iowa sixty- 
eighi years ago and has been a pioneer of Wayne county, where be has made 
bis biome for half a century, can look hack upon a career which stands forth 
as a credit to his industry, energy and ability. Successful along agricultural 
lines, he is the owner of a productive farm of two hundred acres on sections 
"_'] and 34, Richman township, and for thirty years ran successfully a gristmill 
in this vicinitj and was also |iroininent as a sloek-raiser. Moreover, he was a 
leader in all mowiiienis which were inaugurated to promote growth and 
development and his efforts alone; those lines were recognized in his election 
to the bighesl office within the gifl of the people of Humeston that of mayor. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Indiana. December -. 1843, and is a sun of James 
and Elizabeth Fair (Steele) Taylor, the former a native of east Tennessee 
where he was born April 5, 1818, and the latter horn Angus! II. 1823. In 
the spring of 1845 the parents with their family came overland from Indiana 
and settled in Davis county. Iowa, where the lather followed agricultural pur- 
suits for fifteen years. In the spring of I860 another removal was made to 
Decatur county, this state, w Inch remained the home of the familj for three years 

before thej came, in the spring of 1863, to Etichman township. Way] ounty. 

Here the father engaged in agriculture and attained prominence, passing 
awaj in Humeston. Iowa. Julj 28, 1892, greatlj respected by all who knew 
him. while the mother survived until April 15, 1910, dying at the same place. 

The maternal grandfather of our SUbjed was Jesse Steele, who was horn Kel.ruarv 

7. 1795, and spent a greal part of his life in the state of Pennsylvania, passing 
awaj Januarj 23, 1844. The maternal grandmother, Jane Y. I Pair) Steele, was 
born October 5, 1805, and died August I, 1904 The Pair family to which this 
grandmother belonged was of French extraction, leaving that country during 
tin- days of religious persecution ami inquisition about 1685, ami there is a 
record extant which tells of the marriage of Nicholas Pair to a Miss Elizabeth 
Taylor in about 1752. This dired ancestor of our subject in the maternal line 
soon after his marriage moved to Pennsylvania ami from there to Washington 
county, Tennessee He ha, I eighl children, of whom five served in the American 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 37] 

army at the time of the battle of King's Mountain, and Mr. Taylor has in bis 

possession a genealogical record which extends from this period to the present 
day. Five brothers of Elizabeth Fair (Steele) Taylor, the mother of our 
subject, who are now deceased, fought in the Union ranks during the Rebellion 
and the youngest of them was imprisoned at Andersonville for nine months, 
at the end of which time be made an attempt — driven to desperation and pre- 
ferring immediate death to endless torture — to escape and succeeded. 

Mr. and .Mrs. dames Taylor were the parents of seven children, as follows: 
W. J. S.. of this review; Mrs. Jennie Veach, who was born August 4, 1847, 
and died in August, 1912; Mrs. Paulina Chamberlain, horn September 10, 1850, a 
resident of San Diego, California; Mrs. Asilee Stone, horn May 22, 1853, residing 
in Arkansas: Mrs. Henrietta Poundstone. born June 15, 1857, of Humeston, 
Iowa; Mrs. Clara S. Hendricks, born May 22, 1860, a resident of Concordia, 
Kansas; and Mrs. Ada T. Brecken, who was horn May 12, 1865. and now makes 
her home in Barnard. Kansas. 

W. J. S. Taylor was only two years of age when the family removed to Iowa, 
where he was reared on the home farm in Davis county, attending the schools 
of the neighborhood in the acquirement of his education. He lived there until 
1860, when he moved with his parents to Decatur county and from there came 
to Richman township, Wayne county, in the spring of 1863 and here he has 
since remained. An incident which he well remembers and which is illustrative 
of the sparse settlement of this section at that period is that the votes cast at the 
first election which took place after the family had come to this township 
amounted to twenty-three for that district. All the removals of the family were 
made by team, as there were no railroads at the time and they were fraught 
with difficulties on account of the impassibility of the roads or their entire absence. 
He was the only child of the family born in Indiana, the remainder all bring na- 
tives of this state. In the spring of 1873 he began the operation of a mill in Rich- 
man township and continued in that occupation successfully for thirty years, 
although he was engaged at the same time in operating the home farm, which com- 
prises two hundred acres of fertile land on sections 21 and 34, Richman township. 
and on which he made many improvements, erecting a number of new buildings 
and instituting such equipment as he considered necessary for operation. He 
specializes along the line of stock-raising and since 1889 lias owned one of tin- 
best herds of Duroc Jersey swine to be found in Iowa, keeping a complete record 
of this stock. As the years have passed he has attained to prosperity and has 
become one of the substantial men of the community. He is highly esteemed 
as one of the pioneers of the section and respected by all who know him. lie 
resides in Humeston. where he owns a comfortable home, well furnished, where 
he and Mrs. Taylor extend warm-hearted hospitality to their many friends. 

On September 23, 1868, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage, in Wayne 
county, Iowa, to .Miss Rachel McKinley, who was bom in Guernsey county, 
Ohio, October 6, 1847, and came with her parents to this county in September, 
1863, when about sixteen years of age. Her father, Willoughby McKinley, was 
born in Ohio. April 2::. 1820, ami died in Richman township, August 19, 1896. 
The mother, who was Miss Elizabeth Carter before her marriage, was a native 
of the same state, born in Guernsey county. February 11, 1824, and died in 
Richman township, this county, duly 12. 1885. They were the parents of three 



: !7 ^ LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

children: John B . bora February 23, 1846, a residenl of California; -Mrs. 
w J. s. Taylor; and George W., born &ugus1 6, 1852, who died in Richman 
township, December 16, 1909. These children were all bora in the state of 
Ohio. .Mrs. Taylor's paternal grandparents were William and Tamer (Brown) 

McKinley, the former bora October IT. 1777. and the latter I) mber V2. 179L 

Thej were among the earlier settlers of Ohio, to which state they had come 
from Pennsylvania. The grandfather passed away February 20, 1858, and 
the grandmother June 27, 1845. The maternal grandfather, Richard Carter, 
was born September 28, 1790, and died Februarj 23, I s *'-'. while his wife, who 
was Miss Rachel Russell before her marriage, was born November 4, 1799, and 
died in 1861. The McKinlej family is closely related to thai of the late President 
William McKinley, the two branches having become separate. i a1 the time of the 
removal from Pennsylvania to Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. .1. S. Taylor are the parents of five children, all of whom 
were horn in Richman township: Alfred, who was horn June 21, 1870, and 
re-ides in Richman township: -lames Lewis, horn October 17. 1874, a .jeweler 
and optician in Bumeston; Willoughby McKinley. born Augusl 29, l s 7s. a 
residenl of California; Elizabeth Florence, who was bora February 3, 1 s sl\ 
educated in the Bumeston high school and at Grinnell and Des Moines col- 
leges, and who taughl music in Richman and vicinity for some time and is at 
present attending.the Conservatory of Music in Chicago; and Mrs. Ruth Louvene 
Bevington, horn February I. 1884, who makes her home in Centerville, Iowa. 

Mr. Taylor is a republican in politics, although he does qoI strictly follow 
the party's dictates and ofttimes follows his own judgmenl in supporting candi 
dates. Public-spirited and interested in the growth and development of this 
section, he has been called upon to serve in public office and has made a creditable 
record as tax collector of Richman township, as a member of the town council 
of Bumeston, to which body he belonged for- fifteen years, and also as mayor of 
this city. He was the lirst to till this office and during his administration much 
constructive legislation was pass,-d pertaining to the city government, with 
which he has hen \itall> connected The family are members of the Congrega- 
tional church of Bumeston and take an active ami helpful interest in the work 
of that organization. While he has attained to prosperitj an. I lias encompassed 

individual success, his lahors have been of constructive value in the development 

of this section, where he has 1 n instrumental in improving the methods ol 

agriculture and stock-raising by his example. His service in public positions 

has been SUCh as received high commendation, and in private life Mr. and 

Mrs. Taylor are well liked and highlj esteemed for their many good qualities oi 
mind ami character. 



WMI.'KW .1 SURBAUGB. 



Andrew .1. Surbaugh is a native of Wax m county, where he was horn 

October 11. 1866, and during all his life has hen connected with agricultural 

mi. rests oi his native section in the November election of 1912 he was chosen 

l,, the important position of sheriff of Wayne county and on January "J. 1913, 



LUCAS AND WAYNE COUNTIES .;;:: 

entered upon his new position, for which his many high qualities and his ability 
well fit him. He was horn in Clay township, in which be spent most of Ins 
life in the country, but since January makes his home in Corydon. His father, 
John Surbaugh. was born al Green Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, and died 
in Clay township in 1877. The mother. Elizabeth (Guinn) Surbaugh, was a 
native of the same state and she and her husband came to Clay township. Wayne 
county, in the early days, being amoug the pioneers of this section. Both were 
well and prominently known during all their lives for their many high qualities 
of mind and character and 31 r. Surbaugh became one of the substantial men 
of the locality. The mother passed away in Clay township, May 16, 1910, sur- 
viving her husband for about thirty-three years. In their family were twelve 
children, of whom seven are now living: Mrs. Nettie Caldwell, residing in 
Lewisburg, Iowa; Mrs. Alice Guinn. a resident of Bentonville, Iowa; Mrs. Mac 
Reck, born May 10, 1S4S. residing at Allerton, Iowa; Mrs. Lucy Caldwell, who 
lives at Lewisburg, Iowa; .Mrs. Cynthia McGuire, residing in Humeston; Andrew 
J., of this review; and John, born February :). 1872, of Clay township. Lee 
died in 1877, Mrs. Hattie Caldwell passed away in 1894, Rachel, Cola ami Grace 
died in infancy. 

Andrew J. Surbaugh was reared under the parental roof and attended the 
schools in the neighborhood in the acquirement of his education. He early was 
trained to agricultural pursuits, remaining in this line of occupation contin- 
uously. He now owns a farm of one hundred and eighty acres and thereon 
he has a modern, well furnished home and all such improvements as are deemed 
essential in the cultivation of an up-to-date farming enterprise. His property is 
one of the most valuable in this section and bespeaks the energy, industry and 
progressiveness of its owner. On November 5, 1912, Mi-. Surbaugh was elected 
to the office of sheriff of "Wayne county on the democratic ticket, his victory 
being highly complimentary to him. as it was won in the face of a majority of 
four hundred which is generally given to the other side. It speaks well for his 
popularity aud the confidence which is given him by the people. lie assumed 
the duties of his office on January 2, 1913, assured of the good wishes of his 
many friends and acquaintances. 

Andrew J. Surbaugh was united in marriage to Miss Elsie Olson on January 
6, 1886. Mrs. Surbaugh is a native of Mercer county, Illinois, and grew to 
womanhood in that state. Her parents were Clot ami Christina Olson, both of 
whom passed away in Illinois. L, their family were five daughters: Mrs. Chris 
tina Morford, deceased; Mrs. Anna Williner, a resident of Galesburg, Illinois: 
Mrs. Bertie Loquist, deceased: .Mrs. Surbaugh; and Mrs. Susie Grant, of Wood 
hull, Illinois. The parents were among the early settlers in Illinois, making their 
home near North Henderson, and there all their children were born and reared. 
Mr. and Mrs. Surbaugh are the parents of four children, who were born in Clay 
township with the exception of the second son: Ray, a barber of Humeston. 
Iowa; Earl, born in Mercer county, Illinois, who assists the father in the culti- 
vation of the farm; Stella, residing with her parents; and Floyd, also al home. 
The family are devoted members of the Baptist church, in the work of which 
organization they take an active interest. 

Mr. Surbaugh is a democrat in his political views and has always taken a 
keen interest in all matters of public importance. He always keeps well informed 



374 I.I (AS AND WAYNE COUNTIES 

upon the issues al stake and his advice is often sought in local political circles. 
Public honors have come t<> him manifold and he has served as trustee of Claj 

township, as member of tin- school hoard, as assessor and as road supervisor, 
discharging his duties in connection with the various offices In- has held with a 
fidelity ; ""l ability thai have received high commendation from his constituents. 
He is successful in the truest sense of the word, a man unusually broad minded 
ainl intelligent, not only attaining individual success bul being a helpful and 
cooperanl factor in the general advancement as well. 



INDEX 



Adams, J. ■! 3;> 

Allen. Tandy KIT 

Allison, W. i: 83 

Ashby, I.. S 262 

Ashby, T. 1) 240 

Baker. X. F 8 

Barger. H. II 300 

Barker. A. L 14."> 

Bartlett, J. B 191 

Bell. C. N 29ii 

Benway, E. -1 270 

Bixby, M. W 77 

Black. Albert 181 

Bond, C. R 354 

Brewer. J. W 16S 

Brinegar, John 341 

Brown. II. S 4.'; 

Buck. W. H 238 

Burchett, Edwin .">7 

Burgett, Josiah :.".)*. 

Burgett, \V. .1 330 

Busselle, L. H no 

Chandler, F. Jl 330 

Cherryholmes, A. G :;n 

Clark. .1. H 2:, 

Clinton. A. B 33 

( lore. W. W 322 

Cobb, o. B is 

Combs, G. K 148 

I omstock, .1. B 78 

i 'onner, Alfred 347 

I onner, W. II 223 

Conrad, I'. C :.'."., 

' opeland, J. ( 203 

Craig, R. R 113 

i i oston, Thomas 360 

Davis. C. B 314 

Dicks, .1. X 60 

Dillman, II. c. 332 

Doze, I. E 85 

Earnest, W. II 40 

Elliott, W. W 50 

Elmore. George 17 

Evans, A. s 267 

Evans, E. S 175 

Evans, II. K. . .152 

Evans, J. A. 247 

Evans, W. C 307 

Evans, W. 1 320 

Evans, W. s 234 

Exley, H. I- nr, 

37! 



Fair. F. E 46 

Fcrrel, .1. F 37 

Fleenor. II. T ... 365 

Freeland, J. W 10 

Fry, F. B 74 

Fry. F. R 284 

Fuller. .1. C. and W. J 213 



Gardner. .1. E. 
Garratt, I. W. 
Carton. G. W. 
George, J. J. 
Gibbs, Ora . 



76 

100 

368 

230 

90 

Gittinger, II. W 1 86 

Givens, -I. G 168 

Goodrich, I). P us 

Gray, F. E !59 

Grimes. W. T 294 

Cwinn. A. J 333 

Hawkins. C. C 242 

Henry, Emanuel 310 

Hickok, \V. IT 100 

Hinchliff, I. T 228 

lline-.. II. I) 107 

llitt. M. K 202 

Hogue, .1. A 244 

H..H Brothei - 200 

Holt, Lifus 218 

Howard, s. I" 271 

Humeston, Alva 162 

Humeston, C. S 7 

lame-. B. 1 327 

Jeffries, J. \ 224 

rones, J. W .;:.1 

Keller, Harry 136 

Kent, C. E. 273 

Kent, -I. W 264 

Kent, William 1 10 

Kerby, I). II 14 

Kimple, Lemuel 170 

King, Benjamin 120 

Kingery, D. C 171 

Kyner. F. \I 88 

Larimer, F. C 38 

Larimer, G. W 127 

Larimer, II. ( 151 

Larimei . W. \I 50 

Leehart, W. E 34 

Lemley, T. F 75 

Lewis. S. \V 

Lipe, I. W 367 



376 



INDEX 



Ivoln. Michael 

Lowe, J. 1! 

Lugar, L. \V L70 

McCauley, B. D 

McCoy, J. N no 

McCulloch, \. U -'i 

Mc< ulloch, George 27 

McGuire, A. I) 73 

McGuire, C. M 129 

McKibben, F. T 65 

McKinley, G. W 

McMains, D. A 349 

McNay, G. P 97 

Matkin, J. II 178 

Miles, Lewis 60 

. R. n 260 

Mitchell, T. B 

\1 !, J. C 80 

Moser, < leoi ge 15 

Mundell, J. I: 

Murrow, 1). L 100 

Niday, I' 124 

Norman, J, W 277 

Oehlman, C. II 68 

D. A. 19 

■ I. II II 

Parkin George 

r.ui. i son i. I) 243 

Perkins, T. \l 101 

Pettj John, C. A 

Pfrimmer, A. C 

Phillips, B. F 304 

Phillips I. i . 135 

I'mi. \v. i: 

Pittard, Anna K 

I'mi tii. I [arvey B4 

Poston. R. C.. 274 

Pray, I •'. I ■ 125 

Primm, J. H 

Pullej . Sherman 

Roam. J. P 133 

II. S 

Richman, \. E 14C 

Rii hman, J. IT 

I.'i! r. i;. « 94 

B • 

Ruby, i. M ......... 158 

lers, Henry 95 

Si Iuii M\ fohn 182 



Scott, .1. E 228 

Sefrit, G. W. 

Shrivel baai 194 

Skidmore, J. 1 . 240 

Skidmore, O. T 

Smith, Alpheous 104 

Smith, CD 

Smith, E. A. 214 

Smith, II. T. 
Snuggs, S. G. 

Sproatt, W. s 115 

Sprow, C. I-'. 

Stark. X. J.. . . 159 

Stearns J. S 

Stearns, W. T. .70 

Steele, ('. \V. 
Sten tt. IV ii.. . 

Stiles, J. A. 130 

Stirling. J. J. 139 

Stuart, I . '.' 5 

Sturgeon, I). I). 211 

3urbaugh, A. J. 
nson, A. T. 



Tavlor, I. M 
Tavlor, \\ . ' - 
Tedford, \\ II 
Tedrick, J. F. 
Thomas, I. II. . - 
Thome, T. I 
froutman, \. M 



\ an Dyke, B. R. 
\ "i hies, J. P 



30 
346 

189 
192 



W.i. I, tin. I I!. 

Walker, J. A.. 

\\ .mil - I I' . . . 150 

Washburn, J. I.. 291 

Werts, \\ . I.. 99 

i \l. mi 

Westfall, David 

Westfall, Henry 219 

Wcstfall, Justin 

W ler, .1. I'.. . 

\\ illiame Parkison 

w illiams, S. I 119 

Wilson, i- r. 

Wilson, J. s. 

Wolverton, \V. P. 

\\ oodman, \ i 172 

Wyatt, F. c 217 

w yatt, i. B. 

Win). W. E.