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PATERSON AND ITS 
PROMINENT 

MEN 



PUBLISHED BY 



®fte *^B^3Ceu# 



1915 

DEPT. 

Paterson Free Public Library 

250 Broadway 

Paterson, N. J. 07501 






s 



Paterson and Its Prominent Men 




in Paterson Evening News in pre- 
senting this lunik of its prominent men 
does so with a full confidence and an 
increasing belief in the growth and 

future (it this community. 
I he growth and progress of anj cit) is controlled 
by the energy, ability and integrit) of its citizens 

anil in presenting to the newspapers of the COUntrj . 
in this form, a photographic record oi the men who 
help to make Paterson worth while the News feels 
that no special word of commendation is necessary. 
The men who look out from these pages tell a 
facial story of ability and determination which 
requires no comment. 

Of the City of Paterson itself there is much that 
may be said and should be said to correct the false 
and erroneous impressions that have been circulated 
broadcast in the years gone by. 

Paterson the "Lyons of America" is one of the most 
attractive cities not only in New Jersey but in the 
Last. The citj is situated seventeen miles north- 
west ot New York City, and the Passaic River, 
along which it borders for several miles, forms 
its boundary line on the east and north. The 
city is built on a plain, which is surrounded on the 
west and north by high hills, a portion of it occupy- 
ing the higher land along the upper course of the 
river where it breaks from the hills and with a 
descent ot seventy teet makes its way to the level 
of the plain. In fact, the real reason for the found- 
ing of the city here is found in the abundant water 
power afforded by the falls and the rapid current 
along this portion of the Passaic. 

Among the means adopted in this country soon 
after the close of the Revolutionarj War for the 
establishment and development ot honest and pro- 
gressive industries was the "Society for Establishing 
I seful Manufactures." This society received its 
charter from the legislature of the State of New 
Jersey in the year 1 791. In looking about the 
state for promising locations, where conditions were 
equally favorable for mills and the growth of a 
town, this site, by the "Great Falls of the Passaic," 
was decided upon by the society. ( )ne of the insti- 
gators of this movement was Alexander Hamilton, 
who was intensely interested in the foundation and 
promotion of a system of American manufactures, 
and who is often mentioned as one of the original 
founders of the City of Paterson. Be that as it 
may, the real aims and purposes of its establishment 



have been its constant realization for one hundred 
and sixteen years, while the wisdom and good 
judgment of those who selected the site has never 
been questioned. 

The first factories established in Paterson were 
for the manufacture of cotton cloth and garments. 
Woolen and paper mills soon sprang up, and 
Paterson was fairly launched on a most successful 
industrial career. Samuel Colts here began the 
manufacture of his famous revolving pistols. The 
first locomotive made in Paterson required sixteen 
months" labor and was turned out in 1 8^7. Here, 
in 1840, the beginnings of the great silk industry 
were made by John Ryle, a young Englishman. The 
lasting appreciation of this step is seen today in the 
beautiful relief bust in the reading room of the 
public library, suitably inscribed, "John Ryle, 
Father of the Silk Industry in Paterson." From 
very modest beginnings the manufacture of silk has 
grown into vast proportions. In addition to the 
silk industry. Paterson has become in the last twentv 
'.ears the center of important manufacturing con- 
cerns, and at present ranks first in the United 
States in the value of the annual product of its 
silk mills. In 1902 a most disastrous conflagration 
swept awav the very heart of the business section, 
raging with unsubdued fury for two whole days. 
In less than a month the greatest flood ever known 
to the Passaic valley came upon the city and 
hundreds of the poorer classes were once more 
driven from their homes. The. next year still 
another great flood occurred, causing heavy damage 
and loss of property. In spite of these hardships, 
however, the city is prosperous and progressive. 

The growth of Paterson has been remarkable, 
considering the fact that it has been steady and 
consistent, with no "mushroom" or boom charac- 
teristics. It shows a healthy and satisfactory 
increase and every indication is pointing to its 
continuation. In i860 Paterson had a population 
of 19.586; in 1870, 33,579; in 1880, 51,031; in 
1890, 78,347; in 1900, 105,171; today the number 
reaches 130,000, and the location of the city, ad- 
joining, as it does, the great metropolitan city of 
New York, insures a continued increase both in 
population and wealth. Paterson is growing at 
the rate of almost 3,000 a vear and we cannot 
doubt that in a few short years, with the perfected 
transportation facilities that will be offered hv the 
electrified railroads and the increased trollev facili- 
ties, its population will be doubled. 



Views of Paterson's Great Fire and the Buildings Built Since 




i'ITY HALL RESTORED 




CITY II A I.I. i IN II RE 



Especial pains is taken in the education and 
training of teachers, for the board of education has 
found bj experience that the teachers educated in 
the schools of the citj arc best equipped for all 
purposes. In the High school preparation for 
college or a business training maj be acquired, and 
students arc being sent each year to all the Leading 
eastern colleges after graduation. Three regular 
Courses are maintained, besides a large number of 
elective studies: The English and classical course, 
with about five hundred pupils, the scientific and 
mechanical arts course, with three hundred and 
twenty, and the commercial course, registering two 
hundred and fitt\ , making a total of nearly eleven 
hundred pupils. 

The Free Public Library is a source of much 
pride to the citizens ot Paterson. It is managed bj 
a board of trustees on progressive lines and is a popu- 
lar and successful institution. The total number 
ot volumes on its shelves is 31,000, and this is 
being increased b\ about 2,000 each year. After 
the disastrous fire in 1902, which destroyed the 
original building, the present edifice, the Danforth 
Memorial Library building, was erected at a cost 
of #200,000; it is a magnificent structure and a 
credit to the city. The number of persons borrow- 
ing books regularly is about 12,000 a year, while 
the circulation of the books loaned for home use is 
nearl} 1 18,000 per year. Great use is made of the 
children's library and the newspaper reading room, 
where special attendants are employed. 

The religious life of the city is healthy and 
active. There are eighty churches, chapels and 
missions divided among the different denominations. 
The most prominent are the Presbyterian, Episco- 
palian, Methodist Episcopal, Dutch Reformed and 
Roman Catholic. There are also five Jewish 
Synagogues. All these are active and support large 
memberships. The churches of Paterson are, for the 
most part, magnificent structures, lending beauty 
and grace to the general aspect of the city. There 
are also Young Men's and Young Women's 
Christian Associations, each occupying a large and 
handsome building; they have large memberships 
and are active and helpful in their work among 
the young. 

There are two large and well supported hospitals, 
the General Hospital and Saint Joseph's; also an 
isolation hospital for contagious diseases, which is 
considered a model among institutions of its kind. 
Prominent among the charitable institutions must 
be mentioned the two orphan asylums, an ( >ld 
Ladies' Home and a children's day nursery with a 
building which was the gift of Mrs. Garret A. 
Hobart. 

The railroad and transportation facilities of 
Paterson are unsurpassed. There are four rail- 
roads passing through the city, the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna & Western, Erie, New York, Susquehanna 
& Western, and the Paterson & Ramapo railroads. 
One hundred and sixty-nine trains each day serve 
to keep Paterson in pretty close touch with the rest 
of the world. Situated but thirty-five minutes' ride 



from New York, with the low commutation rate 
of $6.00 a month, the benefits ot rapid transit are 
thoroughly appreciated In the citizens. There is 
trolle) connection with Jersej City, Hoboken, \™ 
York and the surrounding country, while practically 

the whole of the citj is made accessible In its eightv 

miles of street railways. This excellent combina- 
tion ot steam and electric roads affords ample 
transportation facilities to all sections ,,t the state 
at small cost. 

The banking business is well represented here; in 
tact, the financial status of tin 1 itj is one ot signifi- 
1 me and a source ot pride. There are nine bank- 
ing institutions, three ot vvhiih are National hanks, 
with a combined capital and surplus fund of more 
than $2,000,000; two arc savings banks, the oldest, 
the Paterson Savings institution, having deposits in 
excess of $10,000,000; there are four trust compa- 
nies, all strong financial institutions commanding 
the respect and confidence of the people of Paterson. 

The list of clubs and societies of the city is a 
long one and on it may be found mention of about 
every fraternal order, representing the social as well 
as the intellectual life of the city. 

Paterson is able to boast of an unusually large 
number of handsome and substantial buildings. 
Among the most important should be mentioned 
the City Hall and the Court House, each erected 
at a cost of $500,000, the Post Office, costing 
$150,000, and the Hamilton Club House, $100,000, 
the finest of its kind in the state. On the square 
adjoining the City Hall are found five .modern and 
COStlj hank buildings and several large office build 
ings ot modern construction. 

The people of this city are well supplied with 
the news by means of twelve newspapers, of which 
number four are daily, the "Call," a morning sheet, 
the "Guardian," the "News" and the "Paterson 
Dailv Press." all evening papers. 

Paterson has three beautiful and well kept 
parks, Eastside, Westside and V reel and Avenue 
parks, presenting pleasing examples of landscape 
gardening and affording very picturesque views. 
They are located, one at either end of the town, on 
the Passaic River, and the third on Vreeland Avenue. 

A general system of sanitary sewers thoroughl) 
drains the city, consisting of over fifty miles of the 
best sewer construction. The streets are a source 
of much civic pride, being wide and well kept, 
with full-width sidewalks. There are two hundred 
miles of paved streets in the city, on the greater 
part of which macadam has been used; the busi- 
ness streets always excite much favorable comment 
from visitors, the principal ones being Main, 
Market, Ellison, Broadway. Grand and West. 
The refuse of the city is well cared for. The fire 
department is well equipped, trained and housed, 
the paid force being ably augmented by volunteer 
companies in different sections of the city. The 
police force is vigilant and ample for the protection 
of the lives and property of its citizens; if consists 
of one hundred and twenty-five men. with a 
mounted squad, detective department, pension 




MAIN STREET, LOOKING NORTH FROM MARKET STREE1 




MATN STREET, LOOKING XnRTll FROM MARKET STREET 



benefits, Bertillon system oi measurements and an 
effective system ol signal boxes. 

Such are the advantages and attractions oi Pater- 
son j it is an inviting spot for thriftj home seekers 
win) want to locate iii a growing and prosperous 
i !t\ . near New \ ork. 

There is plenty of room and a health] demand 
for the employment oi more people in Paterson 
today; it is the place for business; it is the place 
for residence, while in wealth, culture and refine 
ment, it is surpassed In none and equalled In few. 

The following facts concerning Paterson are 
interesting. 

It is the healthiest citj in New Jersey. Death 
rate 1909, 14.2,.; per thousand of population; 
includes non-residents in hospitals, public institutions 
and private houses, based on a population then of 
[25,000. 

First citj in Eastern States to adopt medical 
inspection of school children. 

First city in New Jersey to declare by ordinance 
pulmonary tuberculosis to he a communicable and 
infectious disease. 

First city in New Jersey to plan and begin the 
erection of a modern tuberculosis hospital. 

Lowest death rate from infectious and contagious 
diseases in the United States. 

Public Health Association of America declares 
Paterson Isolation Hospital to he most sanitary and 
efficient in the United States. 

Water for domestic use cannot be surpassed 
anywhere. 

Hospitals, 3; Children's Day Nursery; Eye and 
Ear Infirmary; Children's Home; Old Ladies' 
Home; Home for Aged Poor; Orphan Asylums, 2; 
Rescue Mission; Crittenton Home; Boys' Home. 

Paterson has nine model banking institutions. 
Resources, $37,687,900; deposits, $30,854,650.; 
depositors, 74,8 s6. The people are thrift) and 
have the hanking habit. Note the population. 

Assessed valuations, real. $78,252,99(1; personal, 
$16,617,770. Bonded debt, $4,142,000; less than 
four per cent, of ratables. Sinking fund, $593,- 
879.50. Increase ratables over 1908, $2,777,300. 

Mail service: One hundred and twenty mails a 
day received and dispatched; 24,500,000 pieces 
handled 1908; annual receipts, $165,060.25; post- 
office stations, 25. 

Telephone subscribers, 5,200; local calls, 1908, 
6,000,000 ; out-of-town calls, 800,000. 

Trolley lines, 13; passengers carried 1908, 
23 0311,685 — a passenger a second. 

Daily newspapers, 5; weeklies and periodicals. 20. 

Paterson, the home of skilled iron, textile and 
other labor; famous for locomotives, machinery, silk 
goods, shirts, thread, and other important manu- 
factures. 

Freight rates low ; within a few hours of the coal 
fields and on two of the greatest coal-carrying roads 
of the country. Admirable express service; 200 
passenger trains a day; railroad and trolley connec- 
tion with New York City; a high-speed electric- 
road in prospect. Male labor plentiful. 



In value of manufactured products Paterson out 
ranks 17 states; area, S 1 ■ square miles; third citv 
in New Jersey; twentj fourth in manufactures 

in the United States. Value annual products, 

-,!., i.c « 11 ,., K 11 1. 

Paterson's school system is thoroughlj organized. 
A seat tor even pupil. Two new grammar schools 
erected 1909. New $500,000 high school. Com- 
mercial and manual training schools. 

Public schools, 24; Parochial schools, 1 ;; ; private 
schools, business colleges and preparatory schools. 
Pupils and students, 27.1H10. 

Special lecture courses on educational topics In 
university lectures. Evening schools. 

State Normal School within tour miles. 
Teachers, public schools. 48 1 ; value of school 
property, $2,038,037.62. 

Free Public Library (Danforth Memorial Li- 
brarv ) and branch libraries. First Free Public 
Library in state under present library law. 

Musical organizations unsurpassed. Thousands 
annually attend great musical productions in which 
local societies are assisted bv foremost artists. 

Fifty clubs have buildings or parts of buildings 
devoted to club life. The Hamilton Club, best 
appointed men's club between New York and Chi- 
cago; Pica Club, best newspapermen's club in the 
state; B. P. ( ). Elks' new $125,000 building; Y. 
M. C. A. new $150,000 building; Y. W. C. A. 
new $100,000 building. The above-mentioned and 
the Mecca Club, Knights of Columbus, Arts and 
Crafts, North Jersey Auto Club, and Progress 
Club, all within 3<x:> feet of each other. The 
North Jersey Country Club's golf links at city line. 
The Entre Nous Lyceum, finest Catholic club in 
the state. 

Cost of living below the average in New r Jersey. 
based on cost of fifty selected articles for domestic 
use. Low cost of living applies to all trading 
interests. Shopping can be done cheaper in Pater- 
son than in any city in the metropolitan district. 

Four theatres, and New York City only forty 
minutes away. 

Canoeing in summer and skating in the winter 
on the Passaic River. 

Paterson a clean, wholesome citv, of which its 
citizens are proud. Stands midway between the 
mountains and the sea, in the state where a million 
Americans spend their annual vacations. 

An ideal American industrial community — mod- 
ern factory buildings, strong financial institutions, 
well-maintained charities, magnificent church edi- 
fices, exceptional schools, artistic and beautiful 
homes. No child labor. 

The best situated city in the commutation zone 
of New York. 

Two finest parks, in New Jersey, also Preakness 
and Garret mountains, north and west of the citv. 
great natural parks. 

Paterson has the good roads for which New 
Jersey is famous. Walking, trolleving, motoring 
no better anywhere. It is a worth while com- 
munitv . Visit it. 



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ELLISON STREET, CORNER WASHINGTON STREET 




ELLISON STREET, CORNER WASHINGTON STREET 



10 




FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 




FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 



II 




cnl.T Rni.l'IXi;. CORNER ELLISON AN I.T STREETS 




VIKW FROM SOLDIERS MONUMENT 



12 



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MAIN STREET, CORNER ELLISON STREET, EAST SIDE 



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VAN HOUTEN STREET LOOKING HAST FROM PROSPECT STREET, 
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HAMILTON CLUB 




HAMILTON CLUB 



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ELLISON STREET, LOOKING EAST FROM NORWOOD FLATS 




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ELLISON STREET, LOOKING NORTH-EAST FROM NORWOOD FLATS 



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ELLISON STREET, FROM NORWOOD PLATS 



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HAMILTON TRUST COMPANY BT7ILPING, OPPOSITE CITY HA 



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LOOKING WEST ON MARKET STREET, FROM CHURCH STREET 




KATZ BUILDING, MARKET STREET 




LOOKING WEST ON KLL.ISON STREET, FROM CITY MALI. 




PATERSON SAVINGS INSTITUTION* BUILDING 



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PUBLIC LIBRARY, MARKET, CORNER CHURCH STREET 




MARKET STREET, FROM CHURCH, NORTH SUM': 



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CITIZENS TRUST COMPANY BUILDING, 




WEST OF MARKET STREET. FROM riU'Ki'H STREET 




PARK AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH, 



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PARK .\VE\CK HAPTIST CHURCH. 



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SC. J( (SEPH'S ''in RCH, 




ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH. 



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ST. MARK'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH. ELLISON ST.. CORNER CHURCH ST, 




ST MARK'S P. K. CHURCH, BROADWAY. 



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HIGH SCHOOL, VAN HOUTEN STREET. 







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CONTINENTAL HALL. MAIN STREET CORNER VAN HOUTEN STREET. 



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PARK AVENUE. ABOVE STRAIGHT STREET, LOOKING EAST. 




PARK AVENUE. ABOVE STRAIGHT STREET, LOOKING EAST. 



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UNITED BANK BUILDING, MARKET STREET. 




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SECOND NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 






The Bier Floods 

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PASSAIC FALLS IN SI'.MMKi 




PASSAIC FALLS IN WINTER. 



29 




I'AM ABOVE FALLS AT FLOOD TIME. 




PASSAIC FALLS DURING THE FLOOD. 



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RIVER. AT STRAIGHT STREET BRIDGE. 



31 




PASSAIC RIVEK, SHOWING MAIN AND WEST STREET BRIDGES 




RIVER, FOOT MULBERRY STREET. 



32 



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RAPIDS BELOW FALLS. 




RIVER, FOOT PROSPECT STREET. 



33 




WEST STREET, ABOVE K1VEK STKEKT. 




BIJOU THK.ATRE, WEST STREET. 



34 




MAIN STREET, CORNER GODWIN STREET. 




MAIN' STREET, CORNER HANK STREET. 



35 




WEST STREET, ABOVE RIVER STREET, 




NORTH WEST STREET, FROM MATLOCK STREET. 



36 




MAIN STREET, CORNER BANK STREET. 




HAMILTON AVENUE, FROM BRIDGE STREET. 



37 




GODWIN STREET, FROM I'ATERSnx ST1IEKT. 




MAIN STREET, CORNER BANK STREET. 



38 




BRIDGE STREET. PROM HAMILTON AVENUE. 




WASHINGTON STREET AND HAMILTON AVENUE. 



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HAMILTON AVENUE, FROM BRIOGRSTREET 




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WASHINGTON STREET AND I l.\ M i l/l'i IN \VK\i E 



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LOOKING DOWN RIVER STREET, FROM STRAIGHT STREET. 




GODWIN STREET, FROM PATERSON STREET. 



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STRAIGHT STREET, CORNER LAWRENCE STREET. 



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4 2 



The Tornado of July 22, 1903, and It's Damage 




BROADWAY, FROM EAST TWENTY-FIFTH STREET. 








STATE STREET. NEAP. CLAY STREET 



43 














CLAY STREET, CORNER STATE STREET. 




v.. 10 LEWIS STREET 



44 




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A. A. \VII,< i (X'S RKSIDKNCE 




No. 680 MAIN BTRBK r 



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CHESTNUT STREET, CORNER CLAY STREET. 





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48 




GARRET AUGUSTUS HOBART 



49 



BARBOUR. WILLIAM. — The fame "f an old Scotch family, whose name has been associated 
with the manufacture of linen in Scotland and Ireland for generations, has been perpetuated 
in this country by one of the direct descendants of the house. He is William Barbour. 
who now heads the Barbour Flax-Spinning Company, of Paterson, which is as well known 
in this country as are the institutions in Europe that were established by his ancestors. 
Although the Paterson plant was established by the father and the uncle of the subject of 
this sketch, he is largely responsible for the tremendous growth of the business. 

Mr. Barbour was born in New York City. September !'. 1S4T. and is a direct descendant 
of the Barbours of Paisley. Scotland. John Barbour of Paisley moved to Lisburn, Ireland 
in 1768, and in 1784 founded what is now the largest linen thread manufacturing establish- 
ment in the world. 

The advent of the family in this country was in 1S40, when Thomas, father of the subject 
of this sketch, and a descendant of John, came to New York in 1840 to be the American 
agent for the Lisburn concern. He continued as such until 1S64. when together with his 
brother, Robert, he established a thread works in this city under the name of the Barbour 
Flax-Spinning Company. 

William Barbour was educated in a private school in Paterson and in Newark, at the High 
Street Academy. Finishing there, he spent two years in Hanover. Germany and a year in 
France studying languages, after which he returned to Paterson and entered his father's 
business. 

While he is now the president of the concern. Mr. Barbour also heads several other 
business institutions. He is president of the Hamilton Trust Company of Paterson, and 
of the Linen Thread Company of New Jersey, vice-president and director of the United 
Shoe Machinery Corporation and a director in the following: Hanover National Bank. 
New Y'ork; United States Smelting, Refining and Mining Company; American Cotton Oil 
Company; Safety Car Heating and Lighting Company: First National Bank of Paterson. 
Paterson Savings Institution and the Paterson Safe Deposit and Trust Company. He is 
also connected with several water companies in New Jersey and is a governor of the Society 
for the Establishment of Useful Manufactures of Paterson. 

Mr. Barbour has always taken an active interest in politics. In 1884 he was a delegate 
to the Republican National Convention at Chicago, that nominated .lames G. Blaine for 
President, and he has been a delegate to every Republican National convention since. He 
was a close personal friend of President McKinley and of many other celebrities. He 
participated in the nomination of Governor Griggs for that -office, and later made a member 
of the personal staff of that official with the rank of Colonel. He is a member of the Union 
League, Republican and Merchants' Clubs of New Y*ork City, and of the Hamilton Club 
of Paterson. 

On November S. 1SS3, Mr. Barbour married Julia Adelaide, daughter of John H. 
Sprague, of New Y'ork City. Their children are Thomas, Robert, William. Warren and 
Fritz Krupp. The latter was named after the famous German gun maker, who was a 
warm friend of the subject of this sketch. 



50 




WILLIAM BARBOUK 



5i 



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52 




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54 




EDWARD B. HAINES 



55 




FORDYCE, ROBERT HAYES. — Mayor of Paters on, banker and public-spirited citizen, is one of 
the many men of whom the Silk City may be justly proud. He comes from an old Pater- 
son family that has been active in the affairs of the city for scores of years, and he stands 
today one of the most respected and best liked men who are in the public eye. 

Mr. Fordyce was born in Faterson in 1855. He was educated in the public schools and 
the High School and finished in a private school in Paterson. After leaving school he 
went to work for the firm of Barrel] *S: Hayes, which was engaged in the coppersmith busi- 
ness, both members of ihe firm being his uncles. Later he was shipping clerk for the 

(Continued on Page 87 I 



56 




DRUKKER, DOW H. — Dow H. Drukker, Congressional Representative from the Seventh New 
Jersey District, was born in Holland, on February 7, 1872. When he was but six months 
old, however, his parents removed to this country where they settled in Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. There Mr. Drukker spent his boyhood and received his educational training in 
the public schools. While a pupil in the High School, at the age of fifteen years, he ob- 
tained a position as cash boy in a large dry goods store. He worked for the concern eleven 
years, and, when he resigned to move with his family to Passaic, he was in charge of the 
financial department. 

(Continued on Page 87) 



57 




ROGERS. W. H.— \V. H. Rollers, division agent of the Public Service Gas Company and the 
Public Service Electric Company, represents these concerns commercially in Passaic County. 
Colonel Rogers says, that he has been so long in Paterson and likes Paterson so well that 
he is willing to forget having lived anywhere else. Starting with the Gas Company In 1888, 
he has taken part in its development and, since 1899, in the progress of the united gas 
and electric interests. 

Though never active in politics. Colonel Rogers has always been interested in movements 
for the advancement of this city. He was Secretary of the Citizens' Committee of One Hun- 
dred of the notable Centennial in 1892, commemorating the founding of Paterson. He is a 
member of the Board of Trade, several clubs, lodges and technical societies. 



58 




HAINES, HARRY B.— Harry B. Haines, Editor of the News was- burn at Altoona, Pa., 
September is, 1882 and came with his parents to Paterson in 1885 when his late father 
started the Morning Call, Mr. Haines grew up in Paterson attending the public schools 
and graduating from the High School in L898, 

.Mi. Haines unquestionably inherited his love of newspaper work from his father, Edward 
It. Haines, who was the founder of half a dozen successful publications. At ten he was 
a newspaper carrier, like many other editor's son, and at fifteen, after graduation from 
the high school, he became ;i court reporter. 

At eighteen he became associated with the Horseless Age, the first automobile publication 
in the English language, and soon became one of the best-known writers on automobiles 
in this country, his articles appearing in The Review of Reviews, Scientific American, 
World's Work, Country Life in America and kindred publications. In 1905 he re-entered 
newspaper work with the Paterson News, after having made several record Length auto- 
mobile tours in the interests of good roads, and became business manager of thai publi- 
cation. Later, on the death of his father, he became president of the News Printing 
Company :m<l edltoi of the News 



59 




LEVINE. JULES C. — Jules C. Levine, business manager of the News Printing Company, 
publishers of the Paterson Evening News, is a native uf Hawley, Wayne County, Pa., and 
the son of Isidore H. I.evine, who served three terms as mayor of that city. He was born, 
May 7, 1882 at Hawley, Pa. and came to Paterson with his parents when twelve years old, and 
lias made this city his home ever since. Mr. Levine attended the public schools in Hawley 
and Paterson, and after finishing at the local High School, he became associated with his 
father in the clothing business here. The business was then one of the largest of its kind 
in Paterson, and the experience he obtained in it stood him in good stead when lie later 
went on the road as a traveling salesman. 

Mr. Levine resigned this latter position after three years and entered the employ of the 
Paterson Evening News, as advertising solicitor in 19(16. His rise in his present business 
has been a rapid one. In 1907 he was made advertising manager and Ave years later, in 
1H12 he was made business manager. This position he has held ever since. 

The subject in this sketch is a Thirty-second Degree Mason and Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine and a former vice-president of the Progress Club. On October 'if'. 1913 he married 
Miss Edith S Stern, of this city. 



6o 




ESTY, JAMES B. — General Superintendent of the News Printing Company, publishers of The 
Paterson Evening News, probably inherits his love of printing and publishing from his 
granduncle, George Ayles. who was manager of Harper Bros., the great publishing house, 
and his father Charles I>. Esty, who was associated with him for a number of years. 
Mr. Esty was born in New York, but the family moved to New Jersey when he was quite 
young, so he has spent most of his life in this State. He finished his schooling at the Pat- 
erson High School, and started in the newspaper and printing business with Orrin Yanderhoven, 
publisher of the Passaic Herald, who was the Dean of the New Jersey newspaper business. 

(Continued on Page 881. 



61 




DUMONT. WAYNE. W'a. no Dumont, of Paterson, is one of the city's most distinguished mem- 
bers of the bar. Ability backed up by hard work have won him a place among the few 
who are ranked as the city's leaders in the legal profession. 

Mr. Dumont was born in Phillipsburg, N. J., April 14, 1871. and he was educated in local 
schools there. Preliminary to entering college he took a course in the Lorch Preparatory 
Academy in Baston, Pa., and graduated from that institution in June. 1888. He entered 
Lafayette College that fall and was graduated with honors in .Tunc, 1S92. receiving the de- 
gree. Ph. B. In later years he received two additional degrees from Lafayette — Master of 

(Continued on Page S7) 



62 




HA , L H'..- ISAAC A ;' is il m:ln t0 whom Patersoniana can justly point with pride In addition tn 

to U Ukp B , UP n, a ,' USI , neSS tha , tiS °" e " f tlK ' IareeSl " f l * khld '» ^ »'"'<' »e his found time 
to take a most active part in various other branches of city affairs. He has attained hieh 
rank in several of the best known fraternal organizations in the city te a member of 
numerous clubs in Paterson and elsewhere, is closely identified with financial affairs was 
ii ,h1!I '", '" I'"!?,, 1 hVl V- h ;' s for years been """""Kted as commissioner with some 
h eludes IT an , d A has f0 , uiui t,n,e to take « »<*rw part in philanthrophic work which 
includes an annual Christmas dinner to the Paterson newsboys. 

(Continued on Page 88). 



63 




McCRAN. THOMAS F. — One of the representative members of the bar in Paterson, is Thomas 
P. McCran. Mr. McCran was born in Newark, December 2, 1875, and was educated in the 
public schools of that city and of Paterson. Later, he attended Seton Hill College and was 
graduated there in June, 1896, with the degree of B. S. In September, 1896, he entered the 
offices of William B. Gourley, and three years later, in November, 1899, he was admitted to 
the bar. He continued in Mr. Gourley's office until 1907, when he started practice for 
himself. 

Mr. McCran 's success as an attorney has been marked. He Is rapidly building up a 
practice that compares favorably with that of any other attorney In the city. He does a 
general law business and his ability and courtesy accounts for the ever increasing number 
of clients. 

Mr. McCran has always taken an active interest in politics. In 1907 he was appointed 
City Attorney and in 1910 he was re-appointed, and In February. 1912, he resigned. He 
also served three years in the State Assembly. In 1910 he was the minority leader of the 
House and in 1911 he was the Speaker of that body. 



64 




VAN WINKLE. EDO — Never in the history of Paterson, even so far back as when th. 

nothing hut a collection of settlers' huts, has there been a time when the name Van 
Winkle has not been numbered among the most prominent men of the community. This is 
especially so today and probably the best known of the men of that famous family is Edo Vita 
Winkle, head of the firm of J. A. Van Winkle which conducts one of the city's largest hard- 
war./ in Street. He is a leader among the younger set <>f enterprising and 
progressive business men. and is ever ready to spend his time or money to further any 
movement that tends toward the advancement of the city that the Van Winkles have made 
their borne for centuries. 

tinned on Pi - 



65 




BRANDES. JULIUS. — Paterson's greatness is entirely the handiwork of her prominent men 
Many have contributed in their own way to the upbuilding of the Silk City. Probably no 
man has done more than Julius Brandes. who, although not a "native son," has been closely 
identified with the affairs of Paterson for more than thirty years. 

Mr. Brandes was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1851. and was educated in the public 
schools of that country After some experience in the dyeing establishment of his father, 
he completed an apprenticeship with a chemical works in Bremen. Then in 1S6S Mr. 
Brandes came to this country and worked in textile centers in several parts of the I'nited 
States. 

(Continued on Page NT). 



66 




QUIGLEY, JOH N. — A man who has an enviable record by serving the citizens i>f the city 
of Paterson. well and faithful, is John Quigley, who, up to the time of the publication of this 

I k. served eight years as Building Inspector. The State legislature has recently | 

a bill to apply the tenure of office law to the office of Building Inspector, and it is probable 
that Mr. Quigley will continue his good work iu the city service for many years to come. 

-Mr. Quigley was born in Paterson, and received his early education in the local public 
schools. He served an apprenticeship as a carpenter and after working at that trade for 
some years, he went into business for himself as a contractor. He continued in this line 
of work for fourteen years, and had charge of the construction of many residences in Pater- 
son and other nearby towns. 

In 1907 the Board of Aldermen appointed Mr. Quigley to the position he now occupies. 
He has given universal satisfaction in the capacity which his experience as a carpenter and 
contractor so well qualified him to fill. 

Mr. Quigley is vice-president of the Thomas Jefferson Democratic Club and a member of 
the local lodge, B. P. O. Elks. 



67 




BIMSON. JOHN.— Patersoh is fortunate in having at the head of its poliee department one of 

the most able and experienced men in the state. He is John Bimson, f the most 

honored and respected men in the city. Mr. Bimson had on June ::. 1!H4. la-en connected 
with the department fortj two Mars and he has well and capably filled the office of Ch t 
for nine years. , . , 

Mr, Bimson was horn in Crewe, Cheshire, England, September la, 184... and he came 
to this country with his parents when he was four years old. They came direct to 1'ater- 
son and he has made this city his home since 1849. He studied in the local schools and 

(Continued on Page 89) 



68 




COYLE. THOMAS L.— Although still a young man, Thomas L. Coyle. of Paterson, occupies 
one of the most responsible positions in the city. It is probable, however, that never In 
the history of the city has the position been more creditably filled and what Mr. Coyle lacks 
in years he makes up in ability, energy and close attention to duty. 

Mr. Coyle is Chief of the Paterson Fire Department and on his shoulders rests a respon- 
sibility that few would care to be burdened with. He, however, has uiven his body and soul 
to the work, with the result that the citizens of Paterson feel that they are very fortunate 
in having so able and conscientious a man filling so important a position. 

(Continued mi Pa^e stt). 



69 




TRACEY. JOHN.— When Mayor McBride in 19111 decided that the Paterson Police Department 
should have a detective bureau, he looked over the members of the force for the man best 
fitted to put in charge. His selection was the subject of this sketch. John Tracey, who was 
then a sergeant. That the mayor was correct in his selection may lie seen from the fact 
that Mr. Tracey is still at the head of the bureau and is giving the utmost satisfaction. 

Mr. Tracey was born in Paterson, October 9, 1867, and has resided here ever since. He 
was educated in St. John's Parochial school and afterward learned the boiler making trade. 
working in the local shops. He was also at one time employed by the News Printing Com- 
pany, in the circulation department. 

He was appointed to the police force on October 7, 1895, and for good and faithful service 
he was made a sergeant on June 15, 1906. His next appointment was in June 17. 19111. 
when he was promoted to his present position. Mr. Tracey has under him in the detective 
bureau, eleven men and the department has proven a valuable adjunct to the force. 

Mr. Trace) was formerly a well known figure in amateur theatrical circles in Paterson. 
He was for seventeen years a member of St. John's Church Choir. He is a member ol 
the Entre Nous Club and used to participate in the amateur performances given by that 
body. Mr. Tracey also belongs to the Knights of Columbus. 

The subject of this sketch was married on July 9, 1896, to Miss Mary Jane Kane, of 
Paterson. They have three children. 



70 



WILLIAM T. FANNING 

FANNING, WILLIAM T.-Is one of the city's best known architects. His work has included 
the plans for some of the finest structures in Paterson, and the capable manner in which 
he has handled the jobs intrusted to him is resulting in an ever increasing business. 

Mr. Fanning is a native son, having been born in Paterson, January 3 1875 He was 
educated in the local schools and then worked in the office of local architects. In 1900 he 
started in business for himself and his progress has been notable. Included in his work 
have been Police Headquarters, Home for the Aged, the new wing for St. Joseph's Hospital, 
High School and more than twenty-five public school buildings in this section of the coun- 
try. Fire Headquarters, several churches, and many fine residence buildings 

He was elected to the first Board of Freeholders that held office after the Strong Act was 
passed. Tins was from 1906 to 1908. He is a member of several clubs, lodges or fraternal 
orgamzat.ons and takes an active interest in city affairs. Mr. Fanning is married and has 
one son. 



71 




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78 





KLENERT. ABRAM.— Among the most distinguished members of 
the legal profession, a man of scholarly attainments and wide 
experience, is Abram Klenert. Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas of Passaic County. Having been in public life for a 
number of years lie bus filled other positions of honor in 
Which he has proved his executive ability and tact. 

Born in Paterson. N, J., February lfi, 1869, A I nam Klenert 
received his early education In the public and high schools of 
the city, graduating in law some years later at the New York 
Law School. After receiving his degree, he gained much valu- 

(Continued on Page 90). 



SLATER, JOHN J. John J. Slater, who is now serving his thir- 
teenth year as Canity Clerk of Passaic County, is a well 

known figure in Paterson and Passaic, especially in political 
circles. His administration of the affairs of the office ol 
County Clerk has given universal satisfaction during bis long 
term of office. This may be seen from the fact that when he 
was re-elected the second time in 1906 he was the only man on 
the Republican ticket to be victorious So better evidence 
than this could be given of the confidence deposed in him by 
his fellow citizens. 

(C intinued on Page 91). 




WARD. JOHN M. B. — John M. B. Ward was bom in Paterson, 
December tj. 1880, and received his preliminary education in 
the local schools. Later he attended the Roger McGee Pre- 
paratory School in Paterson and the Intercollegiate School of 
New York City. This was followed by a course in Columbia 
University which Mr. Ward entered in 1898, and the New York 
University Law School from which be was graduated in 1901, 
with the degree B. L. The same year he was admitted to the 
bar and he also has been admitted to practice in the United 
States courts. 

(Continued on Page 90). 




LEWIS. RANDAL B. was born in Paterson, in 1ST::, and has 

always resided in this city. He was graduated fr the local 

High School and studied law in the Office of his brother. W. 
I. Lewis, being admitted to the bar in 1896. As a reward for 
his ability he was appointed City Attorney by the Board Of 
Finance in February, 1912. He is prominent in Masonic cir- 
cles and is a member of the North Jersey Country club. 



79 





HUDSON, WALTER R.— One of the best known of the member; 
of the Passaic County Bar Association is Walter R. Hudson, 
senior member of the law firm of Hudson & Joelsun, of Pat- 
erson. Although born in Newark, Mi. Hudson came to Parerpnn 
quite young ami has been here for the past forty years He 
received his education in the local schools ami afterward 
studied law in the New York Law School. He graduated from 
that institution in lSS^i, and finished a post graduate course in 
1S96. Then he entered the law ..flirt.- of Frank Gledhil) of this 
city and was admitted to the bar in November, 1S96. 

(Continued on Page i»l). 



LANKERING. FREDERICK. One of the most popular and best 
known men in the city, is Frederick Lankering, president of the 
Lankering Cigar Company, of Paterson, the largest wholesale 
and retail tobacco business in the city. Mr. Lankering* 
penance in the tobacco business covers a period of a number 
of years and includes activity in several cities, including Ho- 
boken and Chicago. 

He was horn in Hanover, Germany, June 5, 1st;:, and re- 
ceived bis early education in the schools of that city. He 
came to this country with bis parents at the early age of 

(Continued on Page :*!>. 





MUZZY. SAMUEL VAN SAUN.— Samuel Van Saun Muzzy was 
born in Paterson. in 1852, His mother was the daughter of the 
late Judge Van Saun, and a member of one of Paterson's oldest 
families, while bis father came from New Hampshire stock. 
He was educated in the ^rade schools and the High School in 
this city ami in the Paterson Seminary. 

In lSti7 Mr. Muzzy entered the store of S. A. Van Saun and 
six years later he fonued a partnership with Albert Van Saun, 
son of S. A. Van Saun. This lasted for eleven years and then 
the interest of Mr. Van Saun was purchased by Henry and 
Kdward H. Muzzy, brothers of the subject of this sketch. They 

(Continued on Page ;'ii. 



PELLETT, FRANK E. — Although a lawyer of note, Frank E. 
Pellett. of Paterson, has won additional recognition in another 
respect. There is probably no other man in this section of 
the county who is regarded as better qualified to pass on the 
matter of investments This is proven by tin- fact that he- 
has had the financial affairs of hundreds of properties in his 
charge and he frequently lias an aggregate of as tiff 
$500,000 intrusted to his care. The ability with which he 
handles these matters ami the general satisfaction that results 
to all concerned has won for him the confidence and gratitude 
of hundreds of persons 

■ tied on Page ■'! '- 



8o 





SMITH. DAVID G. — 01 the younger satellites whose practice is 
becoming verj extensive is the rising barrister, l>.iviii G. 
Smith. IK was born in New Y.irk City, August 19th, 1888 
ami moved with his family t'> this city at the age of one year, 

receiving his preliminary education in the local public schools, 
graduating from the Paterson High School in 1907. 

In l!"i7 he entered the law offices of Edmund (;. Slalter, 
and Ward & McGinnis, respectively, to prepare himself for 
hi* chosen prof. 

In the year 19.08 he entered the New York Law School and 

I Continued on Page 92). 



SCOTT. CHARLES C- Charles C. Scott was l.orn in I'aterson. 
November l»',. 1876, and was educated in the- local s.-i is. grad- 
uating from the High School in 1S9.1. In 1S94, he finished a 
post graduate course. Following this he took up the study of 
law in the office of .1. W. DeYoe, of Paterson, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in February. 1901. 

Mr. Scott has given much of his time to the work of organ- 
ized charity and other public spirited movements. He was a 
member of the Board of Education during 1905 and 1906. 
being its president during the latter year. He is a trustee of 

(Continued on Page 92), 





MORRIS. JOHN R., was born in Paterson. July 7, 1876, and 
was educated in the public schools, graduating from the 
High School in 1894. Two years later he entered the 
County Clerk's office, and then began a connection with the 
adminstration of county affairs that has continued ever since. 
In November, 19n::, he was made deputy county clerk, and he 
continued in that position until he was elected county regis- 
ter of deeds in November. 1911. He still fills that position 
with credit to himself and satisfaction to the taxpayers. The 
matter of registering the deeds of the property in Passaic 

(Continued on Page 92). 



EVANS, WILLIAM WADSWORTH.— One of the younger genera- 
tion of lawyers in Paterson. who is rapidly building an ex- 
tensive practice, is William Wadsworth Evans. He was born 
in this city, October 5, 1887, and received his preliminary edu- 
cation in the local schools, graduating from the High School 
in 19«3. In 1906 he entered the New York Law School and 
was graduated from that institution in 1908. The following 
year, he was admitted to the bar in New York State as at- 
torney and counsellor after studying in the office of Simpson, 
Thatcher & Bartlett, well known lawyers of 62 Cedar Street. 
New York City. (Continued on Page 92). 



8i 




DEYOE, J. W. — J, W. DeYoe who has been County Counsel for 
Passaic County since January 1, 1906, is one of Paterson's 
successful attorneys. He was born in Saddle River, Bergen 
County, in 1863, and received his early education in country 
schools. His first preparation for his legal career was when 
he entered Pennsylvania College at Gettysburg, Pa., and later 
he attended the Columbia Law School. His education was fur- 
ther augmented by a course of study in the office of Z. M. 
Ward, in Paterson. In February, 1890, Mr. DeYoe was ad- 
mitted to the bar and three years later, in 1893, he was made 

{Continued on Page 9\)), 




NEWMAN, RAYMOND J. Raymond J. Newman, city treasurer 
and secretary of the Democratic County Committee, is a well 
known figure in Paterson, especially In political life. He was 
born August IS, 1878, and he was educated in the local 
schools. He was in the employ of the Nicholson File Company 
and remained with that concern for thirteen years. He re- 
signed in 1912 to become private secretary to Mayor McBride. 
His services were so satisfactory and so faithfully rendered 
that he was further rewarded on February 6, 1913, by being 
made city treasurer by the Finance Board. For several years 

(Continued on Page 91). 




OAKLEY. GEORGE.— George Oakley was born at Orsett, Essex, 
England, March 11, 1854. Educated privately until 1863 when 
his family removed to London. He continued his education at 
the Apostolic College, Gorden Square. He was befriended by 
the dowager Lady Hewitt of Netherseal, Leicestershire, then 
resident in London, who took him to her country home, where 
she helped him in his studies, in 1876 he completed a course 
at the Bristol School of Shorthand and was awarded a 
teacher certificate by Isaac Pitman. In 1882, Mr. Oakley 
opened a shorthand school at Ipswich, Suffolk. Three years 

(Continued on Page 90 1 




JOHNSTON. GILBERT. — Gilbert Johnston, osteopathist, whose 
id ace of business is at - 1" Market Street. Paterson, was born 
in Coventry. England, January 29, 1S50. His early education 
was received in the public schools of that place and later at 
Rugby College which was twelve miles from his home. Then 
he attended the London Medical College graduating from that 
institution in IN?-; with the degree of M. D. He did not take 
up the practice <>f medicine, however, but studied mechanics, 
specializing in safety appliances for railroads. He spent three 

{Continued on Page 90). 



82 





ROE. ROBERT A. — Active in political life and one of the most 
popular druggists in the city, Robert A. Roe is a well known 
figure in Paterson, For fourteen years he has conducted a 
drug store at 674 Main Street ami in- is so much esteemed by 
his follow citizens that he was chosen as a candidate for Mayor 
on the Democratic ticket in 1913. Although defeated, he made 
an excellent run and won many additional friends because of 
the fair and honorable campaign be conducted. 

Mr. Roe was born in Taterson, July 10, 1S72. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and afterward went to work in a 

(Continued on Page !'2). 



ZIMMERER. VICTOR.— Victor Zimmerer, president of the Con 

sumer-s' Baking Company, of Paterson, is justly entitled to 
being called a self-made man. Although he came to this coun- 
try a poor boy. hard work and plenty of pluck have won suc- 
cess for him and the Institution of which he is now the head, is 
one of the largest of its kind in tins section of the country. 

Mr. Zimmerer was born in Germany, September 1">. 1873, and 
was educated in the public schools there. He came to this 
country at the age of nineteen and landed in New York City, 
May 2, 1892. There he learned the baking trade and after a 

(Continued on Page 92) 




MARTIN. JAMES. — .lames .Martin is a member of a family that 
lias been identified with the affairs of this city for man\ 
years. He was born September 5, 1856, in the house in which 
he now resides at SI Prospect Street. His mother was also 
born in the same house, which has been occupied by the 
family nearly one hundred years. 

Mr. Martin was educated in the local schools and afterward 
learned the machinist trade. He engaged in the express and 
trucking business thirty-two years ago and has continued in it 
ever since, at 2l:» Main street. In politics Mr. Martin is a 

(Continued on Page 92). 




TAYLOR. JAMES E.— James E. Taylor, one of the best known 
steel construction men in the country, is now serving the city 
of Paterson in the capacity of streei commissioner, and is one 
of the most able men in the city's employ. Although for 
thirty-three years he was engaged in the work of erecting steel 
structures in all parts of the United States, Paterson has had 
the benefit of his services since Mayor McBride appointed him 
on June 7, 1911. He was reappointed in 1913 and his time 
expires in 1516. 

(Continued on Page 91). 



83 





McCAW. JOHN H. — The well known Kemp Studio which has been 
doing a photographic business in Paterson for the past forty- 
five years, is now in charge of a man who is adding to the 
many Laurels already gained by the establishment. John H. 
McCaw, the subject of this sketch, has conducted the studio 
for the past four years and his ability and progressive methods 
are constantly increasing the business. 

Mr. McCaw was born in Ireland. December 27, 1S74, but came 
to this city with his parents when lie was ten years old. He 
attended the local schools and in 1887 went to work for John 

(Continued on Page 92 1 



SCHOEN, HARRY LEON.— Harry Leon Scnoen, one of the 
younger members of the bar in Paterson, is a native of the 
city. He was born here on June s, L891, and received his pre- 
liminary education in the local schools and High School. Then 
he entered the New Yorfc Law School and was graduated 
from the institution in 1912 with the degree LL.B. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in November of the same year. Further in- 
struction in his work was received at the hands of Judge Abram 
Klenert and Isidore V, Klenert, in whose office he studied for 
five years. 

(Continued on Page '■'-> 




FERGUSON, GARWOOD.— rassair County is fortunate in bavin- 
at the head of its engineering department one of the most 
competent men in the City of Paterson. He is Garwood Fer- 
guson, who since June, 1908. has been County Engineer. 
Mr. Ferguson was born in Hackensack. August 29, 1878, but 
moved, with bis parents, to Paterson when he was two years 
old. He was educated in the public schools and the High 
School in this city, and later entered the School of Mines 
in Columbia University, New York City. He was graduated 
from Columbia in 1898 and his first position at civil engineer- 

(Continued on Page 92). 



8 4 



ADLMAN. SIDNEY.— One of the best known of the younger set 
of Paterson attorneys and one who is soon bound to be num- 
bered among the shining legal lights of the Silk City, is Sidney 
Adlman. -Mr. Adlman was horn in Meridan, Ct., August 15, 
tss.s. Soon after, his folks moved to Paterson and lie has niadt 
Paterson his home ever since. Mr. Adlman's legal career is 
founded mi an extensive school and college education. He at- 
tended the Paterson public schools, was graduated from the 
High School and then attended Columbia University in New 
York City. In 1910 he left Columbia with the degree, Bachellor 
of Science. Then he took up a post graduate course in the 
Vale Law School, remaining there one year. At the completion 
of his wui'k at Yale. Mr. Adlman studied in the law offices of 
Judge Aliram Klenert and United States Senator William 
Hughes. He was admitted to the bar in 1912 and since has 
practised at 1211 Washington street. 

WICKHAM. EUGENE.— Eugene Wickham, receiver of taxes and a 
former city treasurer, was born in Paterson; February 11, 1872. 
His early education was in St. Joseph's Parochial School, and 
he afterward attended the private institution conducted by 
Father McManus. This was followed by a course in Seton Hall 
College in South Orange, N. J., from which place he was grad- 
uated in 1893. 

Mr. Wickham's first position of note came as the result of 
passing a Civil Service examination. It led him into ths rail- 
way mail service and he continued in the work for ten years. 
He resigned in 19U8, however, to become secretary to Mayor 
McBride who was then entering office. Two years later on 
January 1, 1910, he was made City Treasurer and in March, 
1913, he was made tax receiver. In each of these offices he 
transacted the city's affairs faithfully and judiciously. 

Mr. Wickham has long been prominent in Democratic cirlces 
In Paterson. On June 20. 1910, he married Miss Anna V. 
Ryan, of Paterson. 



McGINNIS, PETER J.— That he is destined to exceed even his 
present brilliant record is the belief of everyone who knows 
Senator Peter J. McGinn! S, of Paterson. Although still a young 
man, he has gained fame in his chosen profession, that of 
the law, and he is making an excellent representative of the 
people in the State Senate. 

Mr. McGinnis was born in Paterson, September 2, 1875, and 
his early education was received from the Christian Brothers 
in Paterson and New York City. Later he entered the New 
York Law School and was graduated in June, 1898. He 
finished a post graduate course the following year. In the 
meantime he had been studying law in the office of Z. M. 
Ward in this city from 1894 to 1898 and was therefore 
admitted to the bar when he graduated. Mr. McGinnis re- 
mained with Mr. Ward until 1900 and continued in the 
practice for himself for four years, till 1904. Then he formed 
a partnership with John M. Ward, the son of his former 
instructor. The tinn still continues and does a general law 
business. 

Mr. McGinnis comes from a long line of Democrats, one 
of his ancestors voting the ticket as far back as 1832. He 
was always a party worker until he was nominated for the 
office of Senator in 1912. The first term in the Senate he 
was made floor leader to fill out an unexpired term, and the 
second year he was re-elected to the position. Although his 
experience in that legislative body has been brief, he already 
wields great influence there. He is chairman of, or member 
of, some of the most important committees in the Senate. 
He is chairman of the Judiciary and Municipal Corporation 
and member of committees on Corporations, Elections, Tax- 
ation, and Revision of Laws. He is also chairman of the 
joint committees on State Home for Boys and Public Printing. 

Mr. McGinnis is a member of the B. P. O. Elks, Loyal 
Order of Moose and of the Army and Navy Club of New 
York City. He married Miss Gertrude Nolan, of Paterson, in 
December, 1908, and they have two children. 



85 



HOPPER, ABRAM E.. was horn in Paterson, October 26, 1869, 
and received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of this city, later graduating from the High School. Then 
he secured a position with the New York, Susquehanna & 
Western Railroad and remained with that company for nine 
years, serving in various capacities, the last being that of 
agent at Edgewater, N. J. 

Mr. Hopper is now the bead of the firm of White & Hopper 
which conducts a coal and fertilizer business at Ploch street 
and the Lackawanna Railroad, This business was established 
by Mr. White and Mr. Hopper in 1894 after Mr. Hopper 
severed his connection with the Susquehanna Kailroad. Seven 
years ago Mr. Hopper purchased Mr, White's interest and now 
is at the head of the concern. 

Mr. Hopper takes an active interest in city affairs and in 
politics. He was school commissioner for three terms under 
Mayors Braun and Hinchliffe. He is a member of Ivanhoe 
Lodge, F. & A. M.. Monitor Lodge, I. 0. O. F., 0. U. A. M. 
and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. On October 22, 1902, 
he was married to Miss Bertha Greaves, of Paterson. 



MYERS, GEORGE A. — Prominent among the business men of 
the city and at the head of one of its best known commercial 
enterprises is George A. Myers. He is the senior member and 
the founder of the firm of George A. Myers & Company, which 
conducts a large wholesale and retail hardware establishment 
at 61 and 63 Washington Street. 

Mr. Myers was born in Columbus, Ohio, July 2, 1$52, and 
his early education was received principally in the schools of 
that city. His parents moved to Wells County, Indiana, while 
he was a boy, and lie lived there until he came to Paterson 
in his i ighteenth year. This city has been his home ever 
since. In 1871, soon after coming here, he decided to learn 
the hardware business and entered the employ of the firm of 
Richardson & Mills, which conducted a store at Main and 
Broadway. He remained with that firm nine years and in 
1886 formed a partnership witli George Christie and opened a 
hardware store at 74 Main Street, under the name of George 
A. Myers & Co. In 1894 he sold his interest in the firm and 
severed his connection with Mr. Christie. The same year he 
opened a store himself at 66 Broadway. Before the fire of 
1962 he moved to 63 Washington Street. A growing business 
soon made it necessary for him to have additional room and 
he enlarged the building to include So. 61 Washington Street. 
.Vow there is also an annex in the way of a storehouse at 96 
Straight Streel 



Four years ago. or in 1910, Mr. M>ers admitted to the firm 
Valentine Whitla, his son-in-law and in 1912 he also took in 
his only son, George F., who in that year graduated from 
Cornell University. 

Mr. Myers has been a life-long Republican and although 
always a party worker he has avoided public office. He is a 
member of the Hamilton and Mecca Clubs of Paterson, and of 
the Knights of Pythias. 

In 1880 Mr. Myers married Miss Josephine A. Christie of 
this city. They have two children. George F. and Mrs. Valen- 
tine Whitla. 



REYNOLDS. JOHN H.— One of the best known members of the 
bar in Paterson, is John H. Reynolds, who finds time in addi- 
tion to his legal duties to direct the destinies of the Public 
Library in the capacity of president of the Board of Trustees. 
He has been a member of the Board since 1910 and in 1912 
he was made the president. 

Mr. Reynolds was born in Paterson, February 11, 1855, and 
received his early education in the local public schools. Later 
lie attended a private school in Paterson. conducted by ue.. 
Gorge B. Day and he followed this by a course in another 
private institution of which Daniel O. Quinby was the head. 
Then with the purpose in view of entering Michigan University, 
be took a short course in a preparatory school in Ann Arbor. 
He entered Michigan University in 1S72 and graduated in 1876 
from the department of literature and arts with the degree of 
A. B. This was followed by a two year course in the Colum- 
bia Law School in New York City, from which institution Mr. 
Reynolds graduated in 1S7S with the degree LL.B. 

1 Hiring and following his course in Columbia. Mr. Reynolds 
entered the law offices of James H. Rogers, in Paterson. In 
June, 1879, he was admitted to the 'tar and was made a master 
in chancery. In 1885 be was admitted as counsellor at law 

Mr. Reynolds first devoted his time to the city's welfare 
when Mayor Belcher made him a member of the Park Com- 
mission. He resigned this office and afterwards became a 
member of the Board of Library Trustees. He is a member of 
the Board of Managers and the counsel for the Peterson Sav- 
ings Institution. 

Among the clubs of which Mr. Reynolds is a member are the 
Hamilton, the North Jersey Country, the Areola Country and 
the Alpha Delta Phi Club of New "York City. 

On April 7. 1881, he married Miss Cora C. Stevens, of 
Buffalo, and they have four children. 



86 



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89 



HESSLER. GEORGE W.— Continued 
still continues and has a thoroughly equipped plant employing sixteen per- 
sons at 28 West Street. The plant is one of the finest of its kind in this 
section of the country, and handles much of the laundry work for Paterson 
and vicinity. 

Mr. Hessler on March 28, 1904, married Miss Marie Lillian Stollberg, of 
Newark. 

RODRGCK, E. M.— Continued. 
He was educated in the local schools and later in Paterson, where his 
parents moved when he was eight years old. After leaving school he was 
eight years with tne Susquehanna ttailroad, ihen lit- wuikeu for me National 
Express Company in this city for four years. After that he entered the em- 
ploy of John Norwood Company and remained with that concern as city 
salesman for fifteen years. 

Mr. Kodrock's present business was started in 1906. The start was a small 
one, but it was backed up by a determination to succeed. The present 
flourishing business is the best evidence of the amount of success that has 
been obtained. In addition to handling coal in large quantities Mr. Rodrock 
sells plaster, plaster board, fire brick, nre ciay ami cements. 

Mr. Rodrock is a member of the Hamilton Club and the following fraternal 
organizations : B. I'. O. Elks. Improved Order of Heptasophs and Lara \ tin- 
Lodge, F. & A. M. In 1887 he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Clark, 
of this city. They have one son. 

HARMON, JAMLS A.— Continued. 

his admission to the bar, however, he started practice for himself. He con- 
tinued for three years until 1912 when he formed a partnership with Alum 
Smith. The firm has continued since and does a general law business. Mr. 
Harmon shows a particular aptitude for court work and gives every promise 
of establishing a big reputation for himself as a trial lawyer. 

Matters political have always received considerable attention from Mr. 
Harmon. He has long been a worker in the Republican ranks. He is espe- 
cially active around election time and has done a great deal of stump speak- 
ing for his party. He has never, however, sought political preferment, al- 
though he has several times been importuned to run for office by the Repub- 
lican leaders. He is a member of the Passaic County Bar Association. 

DUNN. MICHAEL.— Continued. 

years, in which capacity he is now serving. He is identified with the 
Democratic party, is a member of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, 
Paterson, New Jersey, is a member of the Knights of Columbus, Princeton 
Club of New York, and the Hamilton Club of Paterson. He spends his 
vacation in hunting, fishing and travel. He married Amelia M. Donnelly, 
daughter of Arthur and Amelia Donnelly, September 3, 1890, at Paterson, 
New Jersey, who died June 19, 1913, and had as issue of this marriage seven 
children, of whom the following survive : James M. Dunn, Arthur C. Dunn, 
Amelia M. Dunn, Edward J. Dunn, Louisa E. Dunn and Eugene Stevenson 
Dunn. Tiie family reside at Paterson. New Jersey. 



JOHNSTON, GILBERT.— Continutd. 
years in this kind of work with the London Northwestern 
Railway. 

In 1876, Dr. Johnston came to the United States and became 
associated with the Union Switch and Signal Company of Pitts- 
burg, he being located at Philadelphia. For many years fol- 
lowing Dr. Johnston gave his time to signal work and estab- 
lished with the Pennsylvania Railroad the first interlocking 
system that was used in this country. Now he has the honor 
to be the oldest signal engineer in the United States. 

In 1898, Dr. Johnston took up the study of osteopathy and in 
1900 graduated from the Columbia College of Osteopathy in 
Chicago. The same year he started practice in Paterson and 
has been located here ever since. He takes an active Interest in 
city affairs and is a member of numerous clubs and fraternal 
organizations. He is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine and is the 
oldest living member of Washington Lodge of I. O. O. F. This 
is the oldest I. O. 0. F. lodge in the country and is located in 
New York City. 

On July 4, 1ST4, the subject of this sketch was married to 
Miss Mary Ann Bromfield in Coventry, England. They have 
five children. 

WARD. JOHN M. B.— Continued. 

After being admitted to the bar, Mr. Ward became associated 
with his father, Z. M. Ward, one of the most distinguished 
lawyers Paterson has ever produced. The firm which was 
known as Z. M. Ward & Son, continued until the death of 
Mr. Ward, senior, in 1904. The subject of this sketch then 
formed a partnership with Peter J. McGinnis and the firm has 
continued ever since under the name of Ward & McGinnis. 

Mr. Ward is a Republican and has always been a party 
worker. He is well known in club, social and fraternal circles 
in Paterson and is a member of numerous organizations, 
among them being: Falls City Chapter, F. & A. M.. B. P. 0. 
Elks, Order of America, Royal Arcanum, Loyal Order of 
Muose. Lambs and the Sons of Veterans He is also a mem- 
ber of the Hackensack Golf Club and tin- Union League Club 
of that city. On May 14. 1902, lie was married and is the 
father of one child. John Z. M, Ward. 



DEYOE. J. W.— Continued. 

a counsellor- at-law. Since bis appointment as County Counsel 
he has served faithfully and judiciously. In addition to his 
legal activities, he is viee-president and a director of the Silk 
City Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

Mr. DeYoe is a member of the Hamilton Club, the B. P. O. 
Elks and Haledon Lodge No. 169, F. & A M 

In 1895, he married Miss C. Lydecker, of Paterson, and they 
have one child. 



FITZGERALD. JOHN J.— Continued, 

schools. Aside from bis work in the Board of Trade, he is well known 
because of his work in the local post office. His connection there covered 
a period of twelve years. Five years of that time he was President of the 
State Postofflce Clerks' Association. 

Although much occupied with the many projects for city advancement 
which are being fathered by the Board of Trade, Mr. Fitzgerald finds time 
to belong to several clubs and fraternal organizations. He is a firm be- 
liever in organizations of that kind, chiefly beeaue of the tendency they 
have to draw men to^emer. He has Long been active in the En! re Nous 
Club and is a former president of the Pica Club. He is also a member of 
the P. B. O. Elks, Knights of Columbus, Drawing Room Club and the Rotary 
Club. 

Mr. Fitzgerald is married and has three children. 

SCHUMANN -HE INK. HENRY.— Continued. 

included parts in such well known productions as the "Three Twins" and 
"Nobody's Widow." 

The Heink family has a summer home situated in a delightful spot in the 
hills near Paterson, and the subject of this sketch had so many friends in 
this city that he finally became closely identified with the community. He 
entered politics here in 1911 and his progress in that line of activity has been 
rapid. The following year, 1912, he ran for assembly on the Democratic ticket 
and was defeated by only a small vote. In 1913 he was appointed Kecui'dera' 
Clerk in Paterson. and he is now studying law in the office of James F. Car- 
roll, the recorder. He is well known in the social life of the city and is a 
member of many clubs, including the Technology Club, the Sigma Chi Frater- 
nity, the Graduate Club, of New York City, the Chicago Arum and the B. r. O. 
Elks, Knights of Columbus and Mozart Singing Society of Paterson. 

DOREMUS, J. TRAPHAGEN.— Continued. 

The building soon becoming inadequate for his growing business, he bought 
property at 6ti Washington Street and erected a building which juined ihe 
Fair street property at the back, forming an L. More room being needed, he 
built a large warehouse at 45 Fair Street and recently has made a lar^e 
addition to his original store, as his business, both wholesale and retail, has 
grown to be one of the largest in the city. 

In 1914, Mayor Fordyce appointed Mr. Doremus Commissioner of Public 
Works. He is a member of the Hamilton Club and a life member of B. P. 
O. Elks No. 60. Mr. Doremus was married in 1891 to Miss Helen Willinette 
Donkersley, daughter of Mrs. Helen S. and the late William B. Donkersley, 
of this city. 



OAKLEY. GEORGE.— Continued. 

later he married Helen M. Cole, daughter of William Cole, of 
this city, who was then resident in Ipswich. After a brief 
venture with an academic school at Old Bromptou, Kent, they 
sought a new home in America, landing in New York in 1887. 
They determined to locate in Paterson, Mrs. Oakley's birth 
place. He found a position with the Paterson Ribbon Co., of 
which Mrs. Oakley's brother was a partner. In 1889 he 
opened a business school, using the old Cole homestead, 41 
Prince Street. He very quickly got twenty students together, 
among them were United States Senator William Hughes and 
other men who have since gained fame. Later lie had to remove 
to the Ekings Building. Market Street. Additional rooms were 
soon required and when the A. Hubbard Lumber Co., built at 
.Market and Paterson Streets. Mr. Oakley was the flrsl tenant. 
and remained there until the building was sold and made into 
a hotel. After the great fire. Mr. Oakley removed to the 
present location, where he coiiduets a model school of busi- 
ness. During the past ten years, Mrs. Oakley has been actively 
connected and done a large share of the work that has 
brought success to thousands. Associated with him are two 
sons, George Jr., and Justus A. 

KLENERT. ABRAM.— Continued, 
able experience and knowledge of the law under the guidance 
of the late Eugene Emley, former Prosecutor of the Pleas, and 
was admitted to the bar at the November term in 1899. After 
admission to the bar he began the practice of law in Paterson. 
He prospered from the beginning and now numbers among his 
clients many prominent men. A Democrat in politics, he has 
long been active in his party and prominent in its councils 
and has several times been its representative in offices of 
public trust. During the sessions of 1906 and 1907 he was the 
leader of the Democratic majority in the Assembly, to which 
he was elected in the former year. 

Mr. Klenert's next public office came in 1910. when he was 
made Park Commissioner. He held this position until April, 
1911. when he resigned to become Judge of the District Court 
In March. 1913, he resigned to become Judge of the County 
Court of Common Pleas, a position he still holds. 

Mr. Klenert is a member of the Progress Club, I. 0. B. A.. 
I. O. B. B., the Past Grand Chancellor of New Jersey of the 
Knights of Pythias, Falls City Lodge. F. & A. M . and Amer- 
icus Lodge, i 0. O. F. 



90 



NEWMAN, Raymond J.— Continued, 
past lie bas been n member ol the Counts Board of Elections, 
being now in iiK third term, He boa been secretary of the 
Democratic Count} Committee since 1906, In 1807 be was 
selected by the State Assembly to be assistant clerk of the 
bouse for that session. 

At the outbreak ol the Spanish American War, Mr. Newman 
enlisted In Battery K. First United States Artillery. He was 
in the service two years. He is a member <.f tin- John .1. 
Brereton Command, Spanish War Veterans and of the H. P. 
(i Elks. 

Mr. Newman married Miss Florence Howe, of Paterson, In 
June, 1901, and they have two children, 



SLATER, JOHN J<— Continued. 

Mr. Slater was born November 28, is4^. at Five Corners, 
Hudson County, which is now a part of Jersey City. He arm 
attended school at Lodl and later in Paterson, where he came 
with his parents in is:.;. <>n leaving school be worked for a 

time 111 Stores in I'ateisun. In IN til be enlisted in the "City 
Blues" and served three years in the Civil War, participating 
in several Important battles, including the Becond Battle of Bud 
Kun. Gettysburg and others. During the last nine months of 
the war, Mr. Slater was detailed as Chief Clerk *>f the draft 

rendezvous at Trenton. 

A few years after the war, Mr. Slater went to Passaic to live 
and entered the employ uf the Passaic Print Works. He served 
fifteen years with that company, rising to the position of 
superintendent and treasurer. For two years he was city- 
treasurer of Passaic and was a member of the Board of Ex- 
cise of that city when tlte membership was elective. He was 
also tin.' first elected councilman -at -large in I'assaic, 

In Aprd. 1891, .Mr. Slater was appointed County Clerk of 
I'assaic County to fill out the unexpired term of A. D. Win- 
field, who died in office. The following November, lie was 
elected to the office on the Republican ticket. In 1906, he was 
re -elected and again in l!t 11. His present term of office does 
not expire until 1916. In the 1911 election, Mr. Slater received 
the largest majority ever given to a candidate for office in 
I'assaic County. 

Some years ago Mr. Slater became connected with the Pas- 
saic Trust and Safe Deposit Company and was fur a time its 
secretary and treasurer. He is still a director uf the institution. 
He is a member of the George G. Meade Post, G. A. R., a life 
member of the B. P. 0. Elks, No. 387, for the past ten years 
and a member of the Ac<iuackanonk Club of Passaic. 

The subject of this skeicli married .Miss .lemiua Hopper in 
1871. They had two children, both uf whom are dead. 



HUDSON. WALTER R.— Continued. 

In June, 1911, Mr. Hudson formed a partnership with Harry 
Joelson and they now do a general law business at 152 Market 
Street. Their ability and courtesy accounts largely tor ai. 
ever-Increasing number of clients. 

Although closely identified with Paterson affairs, Mr. Hudson 
lives in Totowa and is the mayor of that place. He was 
elected to the office in 1911 and re-elected in 1913 on the 
Republican tieket. He is also borough attorney for Allendale, 
Bergen County. 

Mr. Hudson is active in several business enterprises, being 
president of the Reynolds-Mason Iron Company ; director of 
the Lodi National Bank and a director of the Wagaraw Silk 
Dyeing Company. He is a member of the Hamilton Club, Lin- 
coln Club, B. P. 0. Elks, Benevolent Lodge, F. & A. .u.. 
Benevolent Lodge, I. O. O. F., Paterson Lodge, Knight* 01 
Pythias and the .Junior Order of American Mechanics. 

The subject uf this sketch was married to Miss Kittle ZeliP, 
of this city, in June. 1897. They have one child. 



MUZZY. SAMUEL VAN SAUN.— Continued. 

still conduct the business at 136 Main Street, specializing in 
mill supplies and seeds. The business is both wholesale and 
retail and the firm imports largely. Mr. Muzzy maintains a 
membership in the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris. 
He is prominent in Paterson financial circles being a director 
of the Paterson National Bank and the Paterson Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company. 

Mr. Muzzy played a prominent part in military affairs in 
.New Jersey. He enlisted as a private in 188 (J and eighteen 
years later, or in 1897 was retired as brigadier general, after 
a long service as colonel of the Second Regiment, N. .1. N. G. 
He was also a member of the Paterson Light Guards. He was 
always efficient in rifle practice, holding an unbroken record of 
ten years as marksman. 

Mr. Muzzy served a term as president of the Paterson Board 
of Trade and he is a member of the Hamilton Club* He was 
married twice, the first time to Miss Lucy V. Halsted, daugh- 
ter of William M. Halsted, formerly of this city, and they had 
one son, Herbert, who reside.* in Los Angeles. Mrs. Muzzy- 
died in 1902. Mr. Muzzy was married the second time in 190*9 
to Martha Moore, of Passaic, who died in February, 1913, leav- 
ing two small daughters. 



PELLETT. FRANK E.— Continued. 

Mr. Pellet! was born In Paperkating, Sussex county, N. .1 , 
September 28, 1859, and at the age ol fifteen years, entered 
the Blair Presbyterian Acadenij .it Blalrstown. Mr was gradu 
ated in 1st; and then entered Lafayette College at hast on. 

Pa. Four years later he was graduated with highest i trs 

and was the Latin Salutatorian or bis class His brilliant 
work at the Presbyterian Academy created such a profound 
Impression, thai be was Invited to beome an Instructor In the 
institution and returned there in 1881 and taught mathematics 
and Latin, at the same time studying law. During tin- year he 
was offered a position ,,,, die faculty uf Lafayette College, to 
teach either Latin, Creek or Mat hciua ties, but declined, The 

following year he entered ti [flee of Thomas M, Moure, or 

Passaic, to study law and after a year there he took up the 
same study in the office uf William Pennington in this city. 
While Studying in these two offices, he also took the law course 
in Columbia College ami in 1SN4 was admitted to the bar. 
Four years later be was made a counsellor at law. 

Mr. Pellett devotes practically his entire time to his busi- 
ness. His main diversion is gardening. Adjoining bis home in 
Paterson, be has a garden that is said to be the finest example 
uf intensified cultivation that is to be found in this section. 

A space less than ', acre in extent he has transformed into 
a most remarkable plot. On it he raises every kind of fruit 
that grows in this climate. He has fresh vegetables from 
March to the late fall, and his dwarf fruit hedges are the 
wonder of all who behold them. He specializes in roses and 
peonies. 

On March 16, 1893, Mr. Pellett married Miss Frances Drake, 
of Syracuse. They have three daughters. 



LANKERING. FREDERICK.— Continued. 

fourteen, and went directly to Chicago, where he had brothers 
and sisters living. His hrst position was office boy with a 
leaf tobacco concern and he has since continued in the tobacco 
business. He progressed rapidly and at the age of nineteen 
was a salesman on the road, selling thousands of dollars 
worth of tobacco yearly. 

In 1890 Mr. Lankering came to Hoboken with his brother 
and the firm of Adolph Laukering & Brother was started. 
The brothers were progressive and prospered. Six years later, 
or in 1896, they opened a store in J'aierson and were burned 
out by the famous fire of February 9, 1902. Following the fire 
the business was located at 148 Market Street where it still 
continues. In 1898 the firm was incorporated under the name 
of the Lankering Cigar Company with the subject of this sketch 
as vice-president. A further change occurred in 1914 and 
Mr. Lankering is now the head of the concern. His popularity 
and progressiveness has placed the institution at the forefront 
of the tobacco business in this city. Some of the brands of 
cigars he manufactures are widely known, chief among them 
being the Lankering Special and the Jose Vila. 

For the past three years Mr. Lankering has been the treas- 
urer of the local lodge of Elks. He is also a member of the 
Hudson Lodge of Masons, No. 71, Silk City Conclave, Im- 
proved Order of Heptasophs and the Pioneer Camp No. 7012. 
Modern Woodmen of America. 

On March 1. 1897, Mr. Lankering married Miss Mathilda C. 
Hagen, of Hoboken. They have one child. 



TAYLOR, JAMES E.— Continued. 

Mr. Taylor's career as a steel construction man has been 
a notable one. He is well and favorably known in all parts 
of the country where steel buildings and structures of all 
kinds are the order, and a detailed story of his activities 
would furnish a thrilling chapter to the history of the progress 
of steel construction in this country. His specialty has been the 
erection of steel skyscrapers and bridges. Some of the best 
known bridges in this country were built under his direction 
and many a proud skyscraper in New York and other cities 
bears evidence of his skill and handiwork. Some of the best 
known structures are the Metropolitan Opera House, Mc- 
Comb's Dam and Washington bridges. New York City, several 
bridges that were washed away by the famous Johnston flood. 
bridges for the big railroad systems in all parts of the country 
and the steel work for many of the largest buildings in Pater- 
son. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Preakneas in 1855, and came to 
Paterson with his parents when he was two years old. 'He 
was educated in the public schools of this city, and while a 
youth learned the carpenter trade. Later he went to work for 
the Passaic Rolling Mill Company and during his thirty-three 
years, service with that company he passed through the suc- 
cessive stages of foreman and superintendent, and finally 
superintendent of construction and erection, serving in the 
latter position for fifteen years. 

Although past the half century mark, Mr. Taylor is a very 
active man, but much of his time outside his official duties 
is spent with his family, he being essentially a home man. 
In 1878 he married Mary Hanlon of this city and they have 
one child. He is a charter member uf the local lodge B P 
O. Elks. 



91 



SMITH, DAVID G.— Continued. 

was graduated from that Institution in June 1910, having 
attained while there the singular honor, six months before 
said graduation, of being admitted to the bar in February, 
1910, as an attorney -at-law. He was admitted as a eounsellor- 
at-law in June, 1913. 

Mr. Smith is a republican in politics and for years has been 
a party worker. With the organization of the Board of 
Education for the year 1914, Mayor Robert H. Fordyce 
appointed Mr. Smith one of the new commissioners, he being 
the youngest commissioner of education in the State of New 
Jersey, and the youngest commissioner ever known to receive 
appointment in Paterson. 

Mr. Smith is a Mason and an Odd Fellow, being affiliated 
with Paterson- Orange Lodge F. A. M. No. 43, and American 
Lodge No. 205, I. O. O. F. 

Mr. Smith on March 15th, 1914. was married to Miss 
Lena Konner of Paterson. 



SCOTT, CHARLES C— Continued. 

the Paterson Orphan Asylum Association and of the Florence 
Crittenton Home. He is also a member of the Visiting Nurse 
Committee of the Charity Organization Society. 

In Masonic circles, Mr. Scott is well known, being a Past 
Master of Haledon Lodge, No. 169, F. and A. M. He is also a 
member of the Hamilton Club. 



ROE, ROBERT A.— Cuiitinued. 

drug store. He liked the work and decided to make it his per- 
manent business. With this object in view be entered the New 
York College of Pharmacy in 1890, and graduated two years 
later. His college course was followed by several years of work 
in various Paterson drug stores. In 1900 he purchased the 
store he now conducts. 

In 1898 Mr. Koe became a member of the Second Regiment, 
New Jersey Volunteer infantry, and was a steward attached to 
the hospital corps. When the Spanis'i-Amencan War was over, 
he went back to private life but he still continues as a mem- 
ber of the hospital corps and is also a member of the John J. 
Brereton Command, Camp No. 1, Spanish War Veterans. 

Mr. Roe has long been a power in the Democratic party in 
Paterson. Me is president ot the Thomas Jefferson Democratic 
Association and iu 1912 he was elected Assemblyman. For the 
past nine years he has acted as city pharmacist. He is a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of Elks, the K. of C. No. 240, and the 
Entre Nous Club. 



21 M MERER. VICTOR.— Continued. 

three year apprenticeship he came to Paterson in 1895. In this 
city, however, Mr. Zimmerer's progressive spirit asserted itself 
and he started in business for himself, opening a grocery store 
at 103 Belmont Avenue. i 

The subject of this sketch spent fifteen years in the grocery 
business in Paterson and during that time he built up an 
enviable reputation for honesty and integrity. Six years ago he 
quit the business, however, to become the president of the 
institution of which he is now the bead. Under his careful and 
able guidance the Consumers' Baking Company has progressed 
with rapid strides. 

For three years Mr. Zimmerer was treasurer of the Merchant 
Bakers' Corporation of Paterson. He is a member of the 
Lambs Club of this city. 

On April 20, 1896, he was married to Elizabeth Schnicker- 
berger, of Paterson. 



SCHOEN. HARRY LEON.— Continued. 

From September, 1911, to January, 1913, Mr. Schoen was as- 
sistant clerk in the Paterson District Court. He takes an ac- 
tive interest in charitable work and is treasurer of the Com- 
mittee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the Charity Or- 
ganization Society. He is a member of the Progress Club, is 
a Democrat, and is on the County Committee. Although Mr. 
Schoen has been in business for himself only since January, 
1913, he has already handled several large cases and his 
ability is bringing him many clients. 



MORRIS, JOHN R.— Continued. 

County was formerly handled in the county clerk's office, and 
Mr. Morris had charge of it there. So he has been at the 
head of this phase of county work for many years. 

Mr. Mmris is popular among a aide circle of friends in this 
section. He is a member of the Hamilton Club, Ivanhoe Lodge, 
Masons, and the B. P. O. Elks N'o. 60. He is well known 
iu musical circles, being secretary of the Paterson Musical 
Festival Association; secretary of the Paterson Amateur Opera 
Association and secretary of St. Paul's Episcopal church choir. 
He is treasurer of the Visiting Nurse Committee of the 
Charity Organization, 



EVANS. WILLIAM WADSWORTH.— Continued. 

In 11*11 Mr. Evans was admitted to the bar in New Jersey, 

and the same year he was appointed assistant journal clerk 
in the New Jersey Senate. His work attracted the attention 
of Assemblyman McCran, the then Speaker of the House, 
and be was appointed the Speaker's secretary in 1912. In 
August, of the same year, Mr. Evans started in business for 
himself and his practice has been steadily increasing ever 
since. He has offices at 120 Market Street, Paterson, ami 5d 
Liberty Street, New York City. 

Mr. Evans is well known in musical circles in this section. 
He has been connected with some of the Paterson churches 
in the capacity of organist since 1906. From 1906 to 1910 
he was organist of St. Mark's Protestant Episcopal Church ; 
from 1910 to 1913 he was organist and choirmaster of the 
Wesley M. E. Church and from 1913 to the present time be 
has been engaged in the same capacity at the Second Presby- 
terian Church. He is a n associate of the American Cuild of 
Organists. Mr. Evans is also a member of Ivanhoe bodge. 
No. 88, F. & A. M-, and the William Parker Council Junior 
Order of American Mechanics. 

On April 23, 1913, the subject of this sketch, married Miss 
Isabel U. Blauvelt, of Paterson. They have one child. 



FERGUSON, GARWOOD.— Continued. 

ing was under his father who was then city engineer of Pat- 
erson. The same year, 1898, Mr. Ferguson entered the ser- 
vice of the Erie Railroad and his work with that corporation 
covered a period of ten years. He soon demonstrated his 
worth and his rise was rapid until at the time of taking his 
present position, he was division engineer and had charge of 
several hundred miles of right of way. Mr. Ferguson is a 
member of the local lodge B. P. O. Elks and of the Sons of 
Veterans. In 1900 he married Miss Leslie, of Paterson, 
anil they have three children. 



McCAW. JOHN H.— Continued. 
M. Kemp to learn the photographic business. How well he 
succeeded may be seen from the fact that he was taken to 
Hohokus to work for the firm of Kemp & Wynkoop on the 
development of prepared photographic paper. This invention 
revolutionized the business and when Mr. McCaw was sixteen, 
he had so far advanced that he was sent to Chicago to instruct 
photographers in that section how to use the new paper. Mr. 
McCaw was associated with Mr. Kemp from the time he first 
entered his employ until he took over the business of the local 
studio. 

Mr. McCaw makes a specialty of high grade work. He prides 
himself on the fact that he uses no agents, tickets or schemes 
to get business. He is member of the Joppa Lodge, F, & A 
M. and of the B. P. O. Elks. 



MARTIN. JAMES.— Continued. 

Democrat and he served two years as a member of the Board 
of Freeholders. He is now completing his fourth term as a 
member of the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Martin is a member of the B. P. O. Elks, the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. 

In June, 1876, he married Miss Ruth King of this city, who 
died December 29, 1913. He has one child. 



92 




93 




RENO WNED merchant king once said: 
"The few advertisers who grow to he really 
great are those who never lose the habit of 
close inquiry— the men who never forget that with 
each day comes some new thought, some new method. 

The same man also said: u The greatest force 
developed in modern merchandising is the eminently 
sound practice of offering an ''Extra Inducement* to 
attract and hold cash trade. 

Those who follow the wise advice of the merchant 
quoted and make close inquiry, will find that as a 
business getter the method originated nearly eighteen 
years ago by Thomas A. S perry has made the 06?M" 
Green Stamp a popular household word throughout 
the United States. 

Its remarkable hold upon the public in not only 
Paterson, but everywhere, lies in the high value and 
excellence of the Premiums which the Little Green 
Stamps guarantee — representing a larger discount 
than any merchant can afford to pay in cash. 

One call at The Sperry & Hutchinson Co. 's Paterson branch, 
205 Market Street, will convince any merchant and— we know — 
will benefit the customers he serves. 



94 



d No city can thrive without street railways, electricity and gas. 

CI, The city needs the utilities as much as the utilities need the 
city. One cannot exist without the other; their interests run 
parallel. 

d Railway lines are to the community ■what the circulatory 
system is to the human body — the arteries through which the 
life sustaining currents flow. Clog the blood vessels and the 
health of the individual is seriously affected. Retard trans- 
portation facilities and the growth of the city is effectually 
checked. 

d Electricity and gas are rapidly supplanting the coal piles in 
all industrial centres, or rather, they are concentrating the coal 
piles, and changing, and distributing the energy in more con- 
venient and more economical forms. 

d Besides being the most widely used — practically the only — 
illuminating agencies for public and private lighting in cities, 
electricity and gas have become indispensable power and fuel 
factors in the industrial and commercial life of the day. 

d Low cost electric power, in unlimited quantities, available 
twenty-four hours a day is to a city, an asset which attracts 
industrial plants and encourages their development. 

d-Low priced gas for industrial and domestic purposes is an 
advertisement of great drawing power for any community that 
holds out an invitation to all persons to locate their businesses 
and make their homes within its confines. 

d Paterson has all the advantages of railway, gas and electric 
services of a character -which will compare favorable with similar 
services rendered any place else in the country, and these advan- 
tages are helping Paterson to grow in population and wealth. 

PUBLIC SERVICE. 



95 









Mouldings 
Sash 
Doors 
Blinds 



Established 1888 

_ .... _. Office Fixtures 

Building _ _. . 

Mills a Store Fittings 

Specialty Store Fronts, Etc. 



P.S.VanKirkCo. 

Building Contractors 

Dealers in all kinds of Lumber 
and Building Materials 



Our Specialty : 

YELLOW PINE. 

5,000,000 FEET KEPT 
CONSTANTLY ON HAND 

Yards : 

Fulton Street and Erie Railroad 
Paterson, N. J. 

Phones : N. Y. & N. J. 300. Sub. 301 B. 




F. Puglia and Gramatica 

it a eity is to be judged by its business houses that it is the only 
test of its claim to a higher position among its sister cities, the firm 
of v. Puglia & Gramatica is entitled to a great deal <>f credit in estab- 
lishing fur Paterson a name in the commercial markets of the East, nl 
which any city may feel proud. This concern was established in 1908, 
are dealers in Scranton ami Pittston Coal, and are located corner Beck- 
with Avenue and Cray Street, with a branch office at No. 34 I rosa 
.Street. This yard is up-to-date in every particular, and covers :'•- city 
lots. They have their own private switch which enables them to handle 
fl cars at once, and their shipping facilities are absolutely the best. 
Sim-.- their inception their business lias increased until today they are 
well and favorably known throughout Greater Paterson. They keep 
\l wagons distributing their product throughout the city at all times. 
This enables them to give their patrons the very best of service, and 
they make a specialty of rilling orders promptly. They havi 
phones No. 859. 



9 6 



PATERSON FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 0204 00110397 9 



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