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Full text of "The patriot"

1833 01770 9731 



GENEALOGY 
977.202 
SE9S 
1917 



®i^ &tar ^mtgkii IBmtver 



Oh, say, can you see, by the datvn's early light. 

What so proudly we hail'd at the tivilight's last gleaming, 

Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, 

O'er the ramparts we ivatch'd. 

Were so gallantly streaming? 

And the rochets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air. 

Gave proof thro' the night that our flag ivas still there. 

Oh, say does that Star Spangled Banner yet %vave 

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave. 

On the shore dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep. 
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes. 
What is that tvhich the breeze, o'er the towering steep. 
As it fitfully bloivs, half conceals, half discloses? 
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, 
In full glory reflected, noiv shines on the stream : 
" 'Tis the Star -Spangled Banner: Oh, long may it wave 
O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave. 

And where is that band ivho so vauntingly swore. 

That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion, 

A home and a country shoidd leave us no more? 

Their blood has tvashed out their foul footsteps' pollution. 

No refuge could save the hireling and slave, 

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave : 

And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph doth wave 

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave. 

Oh, thus be it ever ivhen freemen shall stand 
Between their loved home and wild ivar's desolation; 
Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n rescued land 
Praise the poiv'r that hath made and preserv'd us a nation! 
Then conquer we must, ivhen our cause it is just 
And this be our motto : "In God is our trust!" 
And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave 
O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave. 




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[Page Fourteen 



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Page Fifteen] 



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houj the Legend Comer Tmej 



AGNES ANDREWS 




NE WINTER day in the year of 1812, four people sat 
in a little liiit, by which Napoleon, his star sunken 
beyond the horizon, was soon to pass on his ill-fated 
journey to Sloseow. Tliese four people were Ivan 
Ivanovitch, Marinka, his vn£e, their son, Boris, and 
Marinka's old mother, who, was reputed to be a witch. 
Ivan, gnarled and old-looking, though in the 
prime of life, stood wai-ming his hands at the flicker- 
ing, smoking fire. His wife was working at her spin- 
ning wheel, while Boris sat cross-legged at the feet of 
his grandmother. 
Finally the father broke the long silence by saying, "The Little Father 
(meaning the Czar) will use his last moujik for Russia; but, as the Corsiean 
is able to call his dead soldiers to aid him, there is no use killing them." 

"Yes," gently answered Marinka, "Yes, the Czar will have to say fare- 
well to Moscow and the Kremlin, though ten thousand troops were there to 
aid him. ' ' 

"True," said Ivan, "soon we shall all be French. Until tomorrow, then 
farewell." So saying, he lay down upon the dirty, musty straw in the corner 
of the room which served as a common bed. Marinka soon followed the ex- 
ample of her literal lord and master. 

Boris had not spoken, but as soon as he heard the groans from his father, 
and the loud indrawn breath of his mother, he turned to the silent old 
woman. 

"They snore," said he scornfully. "It is well. Tell me now, grandmother, 
about the wonderfid Napoleon who is coming across the couiitiy." 

"Boris," replied the grandmother, "when this Corsiean leads his troops 
to battle, ma.vhap, he returns victorious, but many men have been left upon 
the field, dead or dying. The next battle, he does not have as many soldiers. 
He wants them all, so he gives a quick call, and back come the soldiers, who 
have perished in previous battles. They fight for him, and after the battle is 
over, they are seen no more." 

"And can he do this forever?" 



[Page Sixteen 



"Nay. Once he shows pity for someone or something, he loses his power 
and his command." 

"Grandmother," said Boris thoughtfully, "they tell me I am fair of face, 
s>ad thou as well as I, know that I am strong of limb. Aye, and thou art so 
old and decrepit that thou need'st the support of others. Think you, grand- 
mother, that if we set the house on fire, if I killed myself, with a deep red 
scar down my breast, and if thou stood 'st wailing over me, that we could move 
him to pity." 

"Aye, and any human would, but he has the devil in him. And I love 
thee so, I could not bear to lose thee, though all Russia were at stake." 

"But, grandmother, Russia is at stake, and you and I can easily save 
her. And, thou art so old, and near the end of thy days, that it would be 
an easy matter for thee to kill thyself afterwards. Even if he should not 
pity, we would be rid of a father who beats us and a master who starves us. If 
thou will 'st not, I will. ' ' 

"0 ! Boris, child of my child, thou art more to me than life itself, my only 
joy, for if thou should 'st perish, then would the light of my life be indeed 
gone. So, if thou will'st do it, I will be with thee,*' slowlj- answered the old 
woman, with tears rolling down her withered cheeks, for, although a serf, she 
had many beautiful memories. 

Before dawn the next morning, great crowds of people pressed past the 
humble dwelling of Ivan Ivanovitch. Many called to him that the dreaded 
Corsican was coming. So Ivan and Marinka joined the throng, thinking that 
Boris and the grandmother had merely been pushed aside by the crowd, and 
would later join them in Firnsky, the fortified town for which they were 
bound. 

At about noon, only a few stragglers remained on the road, bearing with 
them, all the portable effects of their homes. 

About dusk, the figures of soldiers could be dimly discerned through the 
gathering twilight. Accordingly Boris snatched a brand from the fire and 
held it to the flimsy wooden walls of the house. 

Then, as the far-famed white horse of the Emperor came into view, he 
opened his blouse, gave a long slash at his heart, and fell fainting, yes dying 
at the feet of his grandmother. 

The famous Napoleon now rode into plain view. He looked in astonish- 
ment at the not unfamiliar spectacle of a burning house, but his eyes moist- 
ened as he beheld in front of the glazing shack, a fair boy with a deep red 
gash down his breast, and an old woman loudly lamenting. 

"I pity thee' woman," came from the lips of Napoleon, as he rode 
slowly past. The boy gave one triumphant sigh, and was dead, dying hap- 
pily, for he had saved Russia. 



Page Seventeen] 



bsptecto 



HELEN BARNES 



VAIR, HAUNTING, baffling, nymph you trifling 
spirit. 
Desired by all you deign to love a few. 
From far I hear your voice, I strain to hear it ; 
But still again you leave me seeking you. 
To some you bring of thoughts a golden store. 
Fair stifling these with lavish overflow; 
To me you bring desire and nothing more, 
Except perhaps a whisper sweet and low, 
That spurs me on to greater efl'orts. 
Then you dart away with mocking swiftness 
Mayhap to try your tricks on other men, 
I pray, be kind to them in their bereftness ! 

Ah well! your shyness breeds appreciation 

In hearts of men, you Goddess Inspiration ! 




[Page Eighteen 



phora Bettys "biory 



MARGARET McCORD 




HAVE ALWAYS spent my summer at a girl's camp in 
Maine, and I'd like to know how a girl could have 
romantic experiences when the only man we ever saw 
was Old Jerry, who rowed over to camp twice a week 
with supplies and the mail. He is cross-eyed and 
half-witted besides. 

Other years it didn't matter. But when I got 
back to school last fall, all was different. The girls 
unpacked at once, bringing out numerous pictures of 
men and telling the most interesting things that had 
happened during the summer. I began to think that 
something was lacking in my vacation. That hateful Laura Maples had at 
least six large sized pictures and the most exciting experiences of all the 
girls. I tried to steer the conversation back into old channels of swimming 
and basketball, but I wasn't successful; so for three days I kept quiet while 
the other girls talked. Then, led on by the eat, Laura, they began to question 
me. Hadn't I anything to tell them? I evaded their inquiries for a while, but 
soon they began to nod to each other and whisper. I knew I must speak or 
lose my place as leader to Laura, who had always been jealous of me. So I 
spoke. 

I was on pretty shaky ground and I knew it, so I used Dick Gordon's 
name to banish all shadow of doubt. Dick is the Yale football hero, whom we 
admired — all last year, although we had never seen him. Louise Ferguson's 
cousin, who also was at Yale, used to write to her all about him and she always 
read us the letters. 

Now I ought to have known better than aim so high — but I knew it would 
bowl them over — and bowl them over it did. They fairly gasped at me, green 
with envy. From that time, if Laura would begin to brag — I immediately 
silenced her by casually mentioning where Dick and I did this or that. 



Page Nineteen] 



All went on calmly until just after Thanksgiving, when the blow fell. 
I was curled up on the window seat reading a book, when Laura came run- 
ning into the room. I glanced up, wishing to convey to her intelligence that 
she had intruded, when her words struck a chill to my very marrow, banish- 
ing all peace and calm. 

"Oh Betty," she cried, "Mrs. Jameson has just called me up and invited 
me to a week-end house party at her country home. Jack and Dick Gordon 
are going to be there, and she told me to bring you along, by all means, as 
you and Dick were such good friends. I told her about your delightful sum- 
mer with Dick. She is waiting to speak to you." 

Speechless, I got to my feet, and started down to the telephone. What 
should I do ? If I declined, Laura would of course talk to Dick, and find out 
that he liad never even lieard of me. That would be too much of an advantage 
to give my rival, for I knew that no time would be lost in spreading the news 
abroad at school. But on the other hand — if I accepted, it would be under 
false pretenses and I should be doubly enibarassed if exposed before my hostess 
No, the only thing to do, was to go and bluff it out. 

All the time I was murmuring pleased words of acceptance — I was pray- 
ing for relief. I might just as well lie down and die, I thought. 

I will omit the following two days except to say that thej' were most 
painful. I lost at least five pounds and an additional worry was added to my 
already crushing load. My clothes were now too large. 1 told Katherine 
Turner about my clothes and she offered me her entire wardrobe. 

On Friday evening we arrived at the junction and were met by ilrs. 
Jameson. Lucidly for me, the boys had not yet returned from a trip to the 
village. My hour of exposure was at least postponed and my heart grew a 
little lighter. On the drive home Laura chattered so incessantly that my silence 
was not bothered. On our arrival at the house we were shown our rooms to 
rest before dinner when we were to meet the other guests. In desperation, 
I began to pace up and down the room. Going to the window, I saw a trellis 
upon which was a vine, now bare of leaves. I quickly climbed down to the 
ground, and hiu'ried in the direction of the wood, which I had noticed on 
our way to the house. There I sat down in a protected little hollow ; shut my 
eyes and tried to think. But my mind worked in a circle. A pebble fell into 
my lap and looking up, I saw a pleasant-faced boy, with the friendliest brown 
eyes filled with astonishment, probably, at seeing at the bottom of a gully a 
girl, sitting with her face buried in her hands. 

' ' Hello ! What 's up ? Not lost are you ? " he questioned. I felt myself 
groxving hot all over. Provoked at having blushed before a mere country boy, 
I answered with all the dignity I could muster: "No, I'm quite all right, 
thank you." 



[Page Twenty 



By this time, not at all repulsed by this dignity, he had climbed down, and 
was standing beside me. 

"Really you know," he said, "that was an awful dejected attitude I found 
you in just now. "What's the trouble? Can't I help you?" 

I opened my lips to utter an indignant refusal, when his frank smile in- 
spired my confidence and I found myself detailing my predicament to him ; 

"It's all because of my miserable pride," I ended, "Now he'll openly de- 
clare that he never saw me before, and I'll be disgraced for life." 

"Oh, come now, it's not so bad as all that," he tried to reassure me. "It 
will come out all right." 

He laughed lightlj' as if he enjoyed it as a huge joke. Astonished at the 
levity with which he had treated my confidence, I scrambled to my feet and 
started off paying no attention to his, "Oh, I say, don't hurry off like that." 

"Country clod," I muttered to myself. I was more determined than ever 
not to fail. Then an idea struck me. I'd hurry back and find Dick Gordon, 
whatever he looked like, and tell him all about it before the others came down. 
But what if he should have no more understanding than the boy in the woods ? 
Glancing at my watch, I saw that it was now too late for this plan. The others 
would be downstairs, and here I was not even dressed. 

Somehow I reached my room and quickly put on Katherine's pink taffeta 
dress. I went to the door, opened it and stepped out, then closed it softly. 
At the top of the stairs, I paused, trembling. What should I do when I got 
downstairs? Suddenly I heard Laura's laugh. How the sound grated on my 
ears! Throwing back my head, I descended the stairs with the same feeling 
the French nobility must have felt when walking to the guillotine. 

Mrs. Jameson met me at the foot of the stairs and led me to the group of 
guests, murmuring introductions: "Miss Marlowe, Miss Linden, Mr. Calvin, 
Mr. Harrison and of course, dear, you know Dick." 

At that both of my hands were seized and I heard a masculine voice utter- 
ing a most cordial "I should say she does know Dick.'' 

Dazed, I glanced up and saw standing before me, my acquaintance of the 
wood. A sudden rush of understanding came to me. "You", I burst forth. 

"At your service," he said, smiling down at me. 



Page Twenty-one] 



tKiSk 



VEVA PAUL 



c 



LOUDS SCURRY fast across the sky 
And silent dusk all unawares 
Creeps close upon the heels of day 
And for the night prepares. 



The wind slips back into the sky 
And leaves the earth in waning light- 
Then faint and few the stars appear 
Meek heralds of the night. 

Then in this hour of restfulness 
Pause, busy World, in sweet content 
And let your soul, tired from its toil, 
In calm of dusk be blent. 



oofoo 




[Page Twenty-two 




FAE PATRICK 

TO A STUDENT of history no truth seems more impressive than 
the fact that every great wave of progress, in any nation or country 
has been preceeded by one of uncertainty, of unrest, and often-times 
of war. Yet out of the chaos of war, out of the darkness of distrust 
and doubt, have come periods in which the light of a new civilization has re- 
vealed truth more fully and has shown the way to a richer and higher life. 
Out of the French Revolution, with all of its cruelty and bloodshed, was 
inaugurated a force that is leading more and more to the emancipation of all 
nations. It is true that at first it brought oppression, and immediate re- 
sults, which for a time, made it seem as if the horrors of the Revolution had 
been in vain. But as time passed on, there was gradually spread over Europe 
the soil of Revolutionary France and from that time to this, the watchword of 
the Revolution, "Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity," has been gradually per 
meating the atmosphere of continental Europe. Event after event has shown its 
potent influence, until today, the French Revolution stands justified in the 
light of its results. 

Today the nations of the world are again involved in a maelstrom of war, 
a war so widespread, so awful in its destruction that we can scarcely 
realize that it can be the expression of civilization of the twentieth century. 
Yet it may be that through this war, horrible though it is, there may come to 
us and other peoples, the regenerating forces of new ideals, and it may become 
the prelude of a liberty, wide and vital. In the seeming chaos of the world 
today there are indications that we are standing on the threshold of a new 
era. Even now the master mind is beginning to reveal through the tangled 
threads of events the suggestive beginnings of a new order, an order of in- 
creased understanding and of broader and deeper sympathy. 

In his "Tale of Two Cities" Dickens gives a wonderfully realistic descrip- 
tion of Europe prior to the terrific upheaval of the French Revolution. The 
same description might be used in characterizing the world today. "It is the 
best of times, and the worst of times, it is an age of wisdom, it is an age of 
foolishness, it is a season of light, it is a season of darkness, it is the spring of 

Page Twenty-three] 



hope, it is the winter of despair, we have everything before us, we have noth- 
ing before us," in short, we can describe this age in the superlative degree 
only. 

The question naturally arises, what will be the logical outcome of such 
conditions? In considering the answer to this important question, we should 
never forget, that in this war or in this chaotic condition of affairs, are in 
volved constitutional crises, that out of it many new problems will come up 
for solution and many others that have appeared earlier, will have gathered 
force and urgency that will demand many changes and a new order along 
many lines. The new era which is bound to grow out of this crisis in world 
history will see a complete revolution in many social, religious and economic 
conditions. I do not mean to say that all the results of this war must be good, 
far from it. The inunediate material effects cannot be other than disastrous. The 
death of millions of the strongest and best cannot possibly improve the living 
stock ; the heavy war debts which the nations have heaped up, will necessitate 
the placing of a heavy tax upon the lower class of people; the devastations 
which tliis war has wrought, means a shortage of the food supply. Many 
of the immediate effects will unquestionably be most deplorable. 

As in Cicero's time, when the conspiracy of Catiline threatened the life 
of the state, the equites and senatorial or aristocratic parties joined forces 
to protect their fatherland, so in Germany and other warring nations today, 
we see the different classes of men forgetting their religions, social and po- 
litical differences, and joining forces to save their country. This unity, en- 
forced by a tremendous common danger, will have great results. Results 
that will express a greater industrial life, a more widespread prosperity, and 
a greater vitality among all classes of people. 

Again the devastation which this war has brought will unquestionably 
strengthen the arguments and policies of peace for the future. As the weeks, 
months and years of war have passed, men and women have seen with the 
bitterness of heartbreaking experiences, homes bereft of loved ones, and nations 
drained of their best blood. It is such vital experiences as these that make us 
realize the real evil of war and the meaning and value of peace. 

When the smoke or the battle has cleared awaj' and the nobler motives 
of men assert themselves in victory, it will be found in many lands and in many 
institutions, that "the old order has changed and given place to the new." 
When the daj's of war are over there will dawn a better day. Irian's vision 
will be clearer, his sympathy broader, and his grasp upon the vital things of 
life stronger and firmer. Precious blood will not have been shed in vain if the 
world is a better place and man is nobler. There will be a newer vision and 
instead of policies that through selfishness and false patriotism, through in- 



[Page Twenty-four 



ternational jealousies and short sightedness fail to realize and utilize the pe- 
culiar advantages of each country, there will be wider and more altruistic 
policies which will bring about more healthful conditions socially, economic- 
ally and politically. 

Now, as in the eleventh century, the century of the Crusades, we are in an 
age of intense excitement, an excitement which has seized equally upon those 
who stay and those who go into the turmoil of this terrible war. It is a time 
when all men are being stirred with deep enthusiasm, and all ranks of society 
are being profoundly moved. The ferment of unrest and dissatisfaction with 
existent conditions which long before tlie war was threatening to make itself 
felt in many countries, has today broken through the hard crust of Russian 
aristocracy and cruelty and is threatening Prussian military despotism. 
Slowly but surely through the years of the past the people have been gaining 
influence and today voices heretofore silent are beginning to make themselves 
heard, and new forces that have been silently and slowly gathering strength 
are beginning to be felt in the new era that will dawn on this night of war. 

Not the few, but the many, will be the effective forces of the future, and 
a universal democracy, "By the people, for the people, and of the people," will 
be more of a reality than ever before. 




Page Twenty-five] 



The^Kiiija ^f a Nou ?)c^ 



FRANK WELLER 



I 



STARTED to make the world over, 
To cast out the evil and wrong, 
The load of the weak to make lighter, 
Every heart-cry to change into song. 

I started to lead to the kingdom. 
The weary who knew not the way. 
To tear down the false and misleading. 
To bring into dawn a new day. 

"And when thou hast entered thy closet," 
I found meant to shut every door 
Of my life, to the world and its clamor, 
To still the loud waves and pass o'er. 

Then out of the silence came wisdom. 
The stillness spoke plainer than words. 
"Cast from thy o'wn life all evil,'' 
These words of true wisdom I heard. 

I forgave the whole world of unkindness. 
No malice nor envy I held; 
And breathed out a song on the heart-cry, 
My heart from the false I compelled. 

The weak I released from his burden, 
I saw but the good and the pure ; 
And behold I had made the world over, 
The Kingdom had come to endure. 



[Page Twenty-six 



^ TM)aiigto(f5aiK ^ 



HELEN ANN DANNETTELLE 

I DINED today with Sir Kenneth who told me a strange storj% said 
Mark Burr, and noting our interested expressions, he removed his pipe 
and began: 

"Several years ago a diamond was found in the blue mud of a river in 
India, absolutely perfect and almost two inches in circumference. The native 
who found it, mad with joy, placed his treasure in the hands of his king. 
Murmuring: "Even the daughter of Daik" (daughter of the Sun) he died. 

It happened that the unlucky man was celebrating the annual feast of 
Zelma, the lion. Evening came on and in the lurid light of the many torches a 
slave girl danced on the village common before the throne of the king. On her 
forehead she wore the Daughter of Daik as a sign of His ^lajesty's favor. 
From the edge of the jungle a tiger watched the scene. She was starving and 
advanced slowly. Suddenly the attention of the people was diverted from the 
dancer. Drawn by the burning eyes of the beast, they screamed in terror. 
The slave girl, with her back toward the invader, interpreted the cry as ap- 
plause, played with the dagger and danced on. As the tiger sprang toward 
her, she tore the jewel from her brow and threw it at the foot of the throne. 
The next instant she was borne screaming into the jungle. 

Now the Indian king himself began to wear the diamond, three days after 
placing the jewel about his neck he was found treacherously killed on his 
throne. His son, the j'oung prince, left India immediately to place the case 
of the king's mysterious death before the court of England, taking with him the 
Daughter of Daik. Sir Kenneth was a passenger on the same ship and on the 
voyage became an intimate friend of the young Hindoo. One day the prince in 
reply to a question of Sir Kenneth concerning the wonderful diamond which 
he now wore, told the historj' of the stone. 

When the steamer was some distance out from Liverpool the doctor called 
Sir Kenneth to the bedside of the Hindoo. The prince was dying and nerv- 
ously pressed the beautiful jewel into Sir Kenneth's hand. 

It was wonderful to possess such a stone, yet Sir Kenneth felt a strange 
repulsion toward it. Three hours later when the Hindoo was buried at sunrise, 
Sir Kenneth leaned over the rail and tossed the gleaming thing into the waters 
of the Atlantic. 
Page Twenty-seven] 



TheReuJonL 

Th&chEanasthatuje have b^, 

(dhetewe ikdl hold the opeatocel 

Nor count the bitter oostj 

Coiient to Knoiu luheiieadislDrKsoul 

lias passed, the oiiljpost ^isirs 

The Scorer counls no niedflklhere- 

he oc^ counts the scass. 

ma. 



[Page Twenty-eight 





CLARA LOUISE BRADY 

AKJORY BLANCHARD and her room-mate, 
Elizabeth Alexander were each buried in a 
couch full of cushions in the opposite ends 
of their room. They were looking, with 
muffled laughter now and then at a 
shower of valentines that had just arrived. 
Suddenly Marjory jumped up and ran 
over to Elizabeth. "Oh 'Libby'," she ex- 
claimed, "Kent's coming up to spend the 
week-end tonight. I am so glad that he'll 
be here for the party ! ' ' and she held up an 
elaborate valentine she had just opened. On 
it had been hurriedly written in a bold 
boyish hand a message which the girls read with great difficulty. 

"I'll be up from Boston, Friday night to spend the week-end. Meet me 
at the station." 

"K." 
Elizabeth picked up the envelope and examined it. The address was 
also very difficult to read. 

MISS M. BLANCHARD, 
Wellesley College 
Wellesley, Mass. 
That night ^Marjory was at the train in time to see it arrive. She peered 
anxiously around but saw no one leave the train except a tall young man, 
whom she knew at once was not her brother. 

As she stood looking anxiously through the depot, the young man speedily 
approached her and in the dim light she saw him wave in her direction. 
Seeing no one in front of her she turned to see at whom he could be waving. 
When, suddenly, some one from behind her clasped his hands over her eyes. 
She tried to pull away but could not free herself from that tight clasp. 

"It's Kent," she said. "Let go Kent, you're hurting my eyes terribly." 



Page Twenty-nine] 



At this the hands were quickly removed. Marjory turned to see the tall 
young man, looking very confused indeed and taking off his hat. They stood 
there speechless for a minute, both looking into each other's eyes in confusion. 

"Oh! I beg your pardon," said the young man. "I thought you were 
my sister." 

The situation seemed so utterly ridiculous that Marjory blushed and 
burst into a musical laugh as she exclaimed, "And I thought you were my 
brother." 

Then they agreed that it was a mutual joke and Marjory gladly ex- 
cused him his faux pas as they settled themselves comfortably in a taxi. 

"I wonder why my brother didn't come?" she said. "He wrote that he 
would be here tonight on this train." 

"Well I can't imagine why Marian hasn't come down to meet me," he 
said. ' ' Do you know my sister Marian Blanchard ? ' ' 

"Blanehard! "Why that's my name, too. No, I don't know her. What 
year is she?" 

"I'm not surprised that you don't know her," he said. "She's only a 
Freshman. Started in the first of the year. I told her in a valentine that I'd 
be here tonight and asked her to meet me." 

Marjory looked at him in perplexity. "May I ask you what your first 
name is?" she said suddenly. 

"Kenneth." 

"It's just as I thought," she exclaimed excitedly. "I got your sister's 
valentine from you. It Avas addressed to Miss M. Blanchard and was delivered 
to me. My name is Marjoiy Blanchard. Well, if that isn't strange- I 
thought since it was signed "K," that it was from my brother Kent." 

They were so amused over the complex situation that they did not notice 
how near they were to the college until the taxi stopped. "Are you coming 
down for dinner?" she asked gayly as she stepped out and shook hands with 
Kenneth. 

He looked into her brown eyes and with a note of decision in his voice 
said, "Yes I will. I guess it's not worth while going in to see ]\Iarian before 
I come to dinner, as it is such a short time till then. With an "I hope I'll see 
you at the party," Marjory started toward the college. She looked back as 
the taxi drove out, and saw Kenneth looking at her through the back window. 
How attractive she looked standing there in her little spring hat and suit! 
She was thinking how handsome and jolly he was as she hurriedly entered the 
college, for it was almost dusk. 

That night when Kenneth met his sister just before dinner, she expressed 
her surprise that she had not heard from him. 

"Why didn't you write Ken?'' she said. "I had no idea you were 
coming." 

[Page Thirty 



"What! Didn't you hear from me? That's funny. I sent you a valen- 
tine saying that I would be up tonight to spend the week-end." he said with 
a twinkle in his eye. 

"It must have been delayed or lost in the mail," she returned. 

Marjory confided to her room-mate the strange adventure and conver- 
sation of the afternoon, making her promise not to tell anyone, as she did 
not want to be made fun of. 

That night she met Kenneth at the reception and danced with him sev- 
eral times. What a graceful pair they were ! Many eyes were turned toward 
them in admiration through the evening. 

There was an almost strange confidence between them. He told her of his 
struggles in studying law, and she told him of her ambition to graduate in 
June. The evening passed very merrily and finally after the departure of the 
many guests the weary girls trudged off to bed. 

Through the remainder of the year Marjory and Marian were almost in- 
separable and together they enjoyed Kenneth's frequent visits to Wellesley. 
Lake Waban and dear old Tapelo contributed their full share towards the 
ripening of their friendship. 

June came and Marjory graduated in full glory and beauty at twenty-one. 
She was the pride of her class and among the many bouquets she found one 
of white roses witli "Heartiest Congratulations from Kenneth" ^vritten on 
a simple little card. 

The first year out of college was sincerely and earnestly engaged in set- 
tlement work. One day after a number of hours of hard work she found on 
her return home a letter — from Kenneth and we will look right over her 
shoulder and read with her, as she reads again and again. 

"The time is up now and I am coming if you say the word. Is it a go? 
All my work has been done with the hope that you would let me come and 
share my success, whatever it might be, with you. It has been my thought 
since I learned to know and love you, as I did the first few days of our ac- 
quaintance. (Thanks to that adorable valentine). Today when I saw my name 
added as junior partner to the finest law firm in our city, I thought of you and 
felt more willing and proud to offer you that name." 

Impatiently, 

"KENNETH" 

And as Marjory switched oft' the light for bed, supremely happy, she took 
from her dressing table a little ivory box and advancing to the window where 
the moonlight would fall on it, she opened it, and there, carefully preserved, 
as it would always be, lay the precious valentine. 



Page Thirty-one] 



To ODoria Lisa 



HELEN BARNES 



o 



LADY of the mysterious smile 
Of taunting look and witching eye, 
My precious moments you beguile 
As all too swift the moments fly! 

Indeed your dangerous fascination, 
Hints of mystery and romance. 
Shatter my determination, 
I close my book and look askance. 

Alas! my stiidy hour is over 
My mind is in a misty haze 
Clouded not with studies sober 
But with the mystery of your gaze. 



[Page Thirty-two 




FRANCIS STUNKEL 



OHnWH 

I 



HE CENTERVILLE Select Circle of Civic Sages is in 
session in the back of Bill Willson's general store. 
They meet to discuss news, spit, spin long-winded 
yarns, joke and then spit again. Soap boxes and 
broken relics of chairs, grouped around the big stove, 
are seats of honor. Champions of all the issues of the 
day are present. Jake Byerly, of close acquaintance 
with swinging doors, bars and steins, who relates 
lengthy tales of encounters with lamp-posts, enor- 
mous reptiles and prehistoric animals, begins an earn- 
est discourse. 
"Feller citizens of Centerville, and other islands on the bosom of this 
United States, this Liquor Law 11 be the roonation of me and many other fair 
citizens. But ye '11 all suffer with me; ye '11 see the error of your ways and 
flee from the wrath to come. When corn is thirty cents per bushel, ye '11 
suffer too, by gosh!" 

Hank Bingley, town marshal, is the only one who draws a topic from 
this, so, carefully spitting in the general direction of the spitoon, he begins: 
"Bill, when you're sober, you're nutty, and when you're drunk you're 
crazy, so keep your trap shet. This liquor business '11 never bother you as long 
as there's spirits aroun'. I wuz in a dry state onet, and say, that state wuz 
dry! They must have had Stuce Brewart sittin' on the lid. When the sports 
went into the next state to get their bitters, they wuz so dry they had to 
be soaked over night before they'd hold any liquor. Thet's the kind of a 
lid we're going to have in old Indiany when she goes dry, by Heck!" 

"Wall, boys, my wife never lets me go out with the gang any more, 
'cepting here to the store," says Jim Blake, a reno^vned henpecked hiLsband, 
sadly. "The Liquor Law don't bother me. But this Suffrage Law just gags 
me. I tell ye I got a ^vife at home thet's bad 'nuff 'thout any votin'." 

"Cheer up, Jim!" saj-s Bill Willson. "Women won't be so anxious to 
vote if they force all the rights uv votes on 'em. Won't it be purty to see 



Page Thirty-three] 



some of them women as orter be men an' isn't, going out to pay poll tax 
an' work the roads.? He! He! He!" 

This brings a general laugh and recollection of Jim Blake's former de- 
clarations of independence, all proven null and void because of the vote of 
one mightier than himself. 

Hank Bingley manages to get choked on stolen crackers and goes out to 
get a drink. While gone, a tack with guaranteed point is placed in his chair, 
to verify the guarantee, Old Man Boomer "lows as how they wuz good signs 
for an early spring,'' but Hank, returning, disagrees. He "lows as how signs 
\\'uz deceivin'," and "they wuz shore to be a frost." He turns his chair over 
and the tack falls out. "Now who cud a been so cruel?" he asks, and con- 
tinues, "but say, the H. C. of L. would a' looked like an ant-hill beside the 
lofty heights to which somebody 'd a been hoisted ef I'd a hit thet tack.*' 

"Man don't make a miss and kick that H. C. of L. any higher than it is. 
It means empty stimimicks. I 'd fight most anything to keep mine from bein ' 
empty. ' ' 

"Speakin' uv fightin'," drawls Ned Durham, "them Germans is gettin' 
a little too dern smart fer me. I'm willin' any day, if somebody '11 only give 
me a gun an' pay my fare, to go over there an' shoot the Kaiser's ears off 
an' show 'em to him just to show 'um thet a gentleman fnun Missouri won't 
stand for no sich doin's. To thunder with pacificists! Let the sissies and 
fraidcats stay home and let MEN fight. One must say, as Farragut said, 'Dam 
the torpedoes, go ahead!' " 

Bill brealcs in, "Boys this spy question is a bad one. They're every- 
where. Why, maybe old Fritz there is one! What say, Fritz?" 

"I say dot I bin kein schpy. I bin only poor 'Merican citizen. Schtill 
you says I bin Cherman schpy. Vy der odder day I go make for mine lettuce 
bett some scharecrow mit colored cloth sparrows away to drife, und vot do I 
hear? I haf put up der Cherman flag. I no understan' Dann I see und I 
laff like I vud schplit yet. Mein scharecrow! Vy dey don't know veder der 
Cherman flag is red-vite-und-plack oder schky-plue-pink.' ' 

Just then little Bill Willson Number Six comes in with the news that 
America has declared war on Germany. Great enthusiasm arises and the sages 
break up their meeting and rush to the telegraph office for later reports. 



[Page Thirty-four 




Editor-in-Chief Veva Paul 

Faculty Editor Miss Quinn 

Business Manager OscAR Shepard 

Assistant Business Manager Lee Miller 

Faculty Business Manager Miss ANDREWS 

Kssat'wis SJiitnra 

Helen Barnes Frank Weller 
Aaatatartta (Ulaaa lEiiitora 

Genevieve Brocker Francis Stunkel 

Flossie Collins Arthur Wilde 

Kenneth McCurdy Opal Craig 

Katie Hodapp 



Art liittnra 



Faculty Art Editor- 



LouisE Hodapp 
Elsie Miller 
Ldrick Cordes 



-Miss James 

Harry Miller 
Margaret Lewis 
Albert Bretthauer 



Page Thirty-fi\ 



lEbtturtal 



HELEN BARNES 




EGINNIXG WITH civilization and the dawn of culture, 
the struggle in one form or another has been for the 
individual ; for a breaking away from the idea of ' ' the 
masses." This age is marking the triumphant cul- 
mination of the period of unrest. The individual is 
coming into his o^vvn. 

There has always been given to everyone the abil- 
ity to do some one thing better than his neighbor 
could do it and now, the opportunity for using the 
ability is being given. To the pupils of Shields High 
School this opportunity is given in the publication of "The Patriot,'' a book 
which seeks originality. While it is pre-eminently the book of the school as 
a whole, yet is gives broad individual scope to the student with literary aspira- 
tions or artistic longings. In this respect "The Patriot," is indeed a living, 
growing part of the "individualistic" movement. 

This past year, so impregnated with new and vital forces, so notable a 
one in history, this year of unprecedented war and chaos, has marked the 
beginning, growth and advent of "The Patriot" of the class of '17. The 
name, "The Patriot," seems especially suggestive this year. Christened in 
a year of national trouble, the Spanish-American war, it has come down all the 
years to be re-animated today with the present significance of this greater 
cause. 

If the joy derived from the book will serve to keep alive our loyalty to 
Shields High School and will serve the greater purpose of continually making 
manifest our wider patriotism, then, indeed, it will not have been sent forth 
in vain. 

To everyone who has been considerate of the welfare of the book, we 
are most grateful. Especially do we wish to thank the business men who have 
responded so generously. 




[Page Thirty-six 



tlonor'RoU. 
1913-^1917 



Names Credits As 

LCC.»(Dill£r 35i 32 

a)alcDlni»Riti£nlM)U5C 321 zb 

Veva»paiiL 32 27 

(Qculge'Llnke 331 26 

IrlS«COX 321 25 

Riilli«KiiimnaA 32 es 



Page Thirty-seven] 




[Page Thirty-eight 




Page Thirty-nine] 



'BftieSecto 



KATE F. ANDREWS 

IN THE days when, as children, you entered the portals of school 
In that far away time, you felt that into your lives 
With the eager young gladness that comes with the new and untried ; 
Had come a turn, a branching of paths from the road 
You had trodden before, over which your steps had been led 
And the way pointed out, as love held your interests at heart. 
So, again, there has come a break in the routine of years; 
Again, you have come to the parting of ways, to the day 
When each, relying on what he has done in the past 
On the strength secured through effort expended and victories won 
In struggles to master the Hard that now and will always 
Beset the path of the one who would climb to the higher 
And higher achievement in life and win for himself 
The highest and best that a life nobly lived can yield, 
JIust answer the call and give to the world and to God 
Not the work that another should do but the work that is his. 
The Past has recorded your effort; each year has taken 
Its toll to be kept as insurance for future years. 
As a fund from which each shall draw as his need directs. 
In those years, may you always remember the truth that you chose 
As your motto to guide you aright in questions of life ; 
If you, in the time to come, would gather from life 
The best of rewards, the best that it offers to man, 
Then to life you must give the best that there is in you. 
As yon oak with its roots deep-planted stands firm and erect, 
May you, too, be strong in the power to do, to achieve. 
May the growth, which the green of your colors expresses so well. 
Make fuller and richer each year as the days swiftly pass ; 
While the white, symbolic of truth, spreads over your paths 
A light that will brighten each way and make each one feel 
God's love and God's grace in the beauty and joy of this world. 



[Page Forty 



The* Seniors 

AmlOhe* Bc3t ♦ COillGiiiicBacKTo yoa " 
Tree* pine* fbujtf^CDocKOrange^Blossom 

G)lor5 ♦ Qre£ii» And* (flhUte. 
prc5id£Bt jolm^OomieUy 

V\C£.»pfC5\d£Ilt * " 

SexJ^cmry 



Barn£3 
oy^PorkfT 




Jessaline Alexander 

In her senior year Jessaline developed into a 
sort of feminine Beveridge or no — an Emmeline 
Pankhurst. 



Helen Barnes 

First assistant in English and History, an ora- 
tor, a poetess, and an actress. Her services have 
been invaluable in the publication of "The Pa- 
triot." She will join the Seymourites at Western 
College next year. 



Paul Becker 

Paul is conspicuous as an amateur couiedian. 
His only detriment is the result of his infantile 
inability to sleep at night. 



Page Forty-one] 







WiLLARD Becker 

"Bill" is the light-weight 
champion of the world." 



'tick-tack-to" 



Elmer Bollinger 

"Bud is a cross between Vernon Castle and 
Enrico Caruso — but he just can't get "math." 



Hal Branaman 

Brigham Young thought he had done some- 
thing when he moved his family circle to Utah, 
but Hal did more here in Indiana. He led Sey- 
mour's feminine onslaught at the Columbus 
basket-ball tourney. 



Amy Bridges 

"If there is anything I consider excellent in 
the make-up of a young woman, it is instant 
and implicit obedience. 



Genevieve Brocker 

It is a melancholy and tragical fact that Gene- 
vieve just can't line up to her desires — however, 
her cute Mary Pickford-Marguerite Clark style 
gets her by — big! 



[Page Forty-two 





Helen Brunow 

Helen is the sort of girl you like to number 
among your friends; a faithful, splendid student. 



Flossie Collins 

Flossie is eloquence rampant. She orates loud 
and long on the rights of women, a little louder 
perhaps than long. She punctuates with her 
hands and scorns all methods of breathing. 



John Connelly 

John is our modern Don Juan. He has been 
fickle, but now like our friend Dr. Faustus, de- 
cides "I like Madgeic best of all." 



Iris Cox 

Diogenes might have had Iris in mind when he 
said "Blushing is the color of virtue." An honor 
student contemplates entering "Western Col- 
lege." 



Edna Dixon 

Judging from her conversation Edna is indeed 
a victim of the Hawaiian craze. 



Page Forty-three] 




Ruth Edwards 

"I wouldn't give two bits for all these 'yoimg 
gentlemen' in America, 
one at Jaketown." 



I am interested in some- 



Clyde Fitzgibbons 

Pitz aspires to membership in the "National 
Association of Red Heads." Along with his hair 
he wears a well balanced expression of "I should 



Marguerite Fox 

Marguerite's black, black hair and her manner 
of arranging the same is at once the envy and 
despair of the rest of "us girls." 



Kenneth Greeman 

An occasional broken arm keeps Kenny sup- 
plied with his share of attention and feminine 
sympathy. 



Esther Grelle 

"True,there are times when my physical being 
is shaken ^vith suppressed laughter that releases 
itself in varied and various types of giggles." 



[Page Forty-four 



Esther Groub 

"What I need when I motor is a courageous, 
cool, composed mechanic to chase tires and patch 
radiators. ' ' How will she overcome this at Ward- 
Belmont next year? 



Carmel Hazard 

Although at first she was prone to inflict us 
with long and detailed discussions of Bro%vns- 
town and its doings, Cannel has now cut the ties 
that bind, and transferred her enthusiasm to 
Seymour. 



Louise Hodapp 

Louise is an "arty" kind of a soul and her 
cleverness with the pencil is well demonstL'ated 
throughout "The Patriot." 



Jess Hoover 

Jess will be most missed at the noon period 
from 12 :30 till 1 :00 when his raggy syncopations 
caused our feet to start surreptitiously keeping 
time. 



Mansel Hughes 

We look up to Manse. He knows everything 
and impersonates anything from a lost baby to 
a robed priest. Difficult ciuestions he can easilj- 
thrust aside but "a little thing" worries him 
continually. 



Page Forty-five] 




Ruth Kamman 

"I can't say that I go much for feminine poli- 
tics, but from now on I bet the President of the 
United States will be the best looking candidate. ' ' 
— so speaks this fair member of the honor roll. 



Margaret Lewis 

"Tennyson did well in describing 'The Charge 
of the Light Brigade,' but I wish he could see 
me come down the Assembly Room aisle!" 



Madge Linke 

Otherwise "Smudge" and an earnest devotee 
of Emerson's idea that "nothing great was ever 
achieved without enthusiasm. This may account 
for her extraordinary popularity as well as her 
honor work. Purdue is indeed fortunate in re- 
ceiving this enthusiast next year. 



Mabel McColgin 

Mabel's just a wee bit reticent, but those who 
know her realize what a splendid competent girl 
she is. 



Margaret McCord 

Margaret's "crowning" ambition is to manage 
a complete and wondrous change of coiffure 
every day, whether it be a shower of hair a la 
Piekford or curl plasters a la Theda. 



[Page Forty-six 





Kenneth McCurdy 

"ilaek" is a lover of Shakespeare and holds 
a profound reverence for "what Bill says." He 
states "Bill is an individual after my own heart." 

Elsie Miller 

Elsie is no intellectual hermit crab, but at that, 
some of the rest of "we'uns" envy her "Physics 
Lab." ability. 

Lee Miller 

"And as he spoke the wonder grew — that one 
small head eould carry all he knew." Goldsmith 
surely had our honor pupil in mind when he 
wrote these lines. 

Ethel Mitchell 

A star performer in all she undertakes. En- 
tered the try-outs for the Versailles and North 
Yenion oratorical meets. Intends to prepare her- 
self for teaching. 

Marie Nichter 

"I want what I want when I want it, and if I 
can't have it then, I won't take it at all." 




It 


p. 



Page Forty-seven] 






LiLA NiEMAN 

"The trifling fancies of girlhood I find but to 
be in the way." 



HULDA OSTERMAN 

"I just adore those big overgrown lads who 
run panting, ranting, rearing species of vehicles 
called Fords." 



Fay Parker 

Her vivacity and good looks seem to be a never 
failing mascot in the realms of High School pop- 
ularity. 



Fae Patrick 

"We hardly find any persons of good sense 
save those who agree with us." 



Veva Paul 

Caesar with all of his accomplishments had 
nothing on Veva, who has been editor-in-chief of 
the Patriot, honor student, orator, poetess and 
actress. "So there." 



[Page Forty-eight 




Malcolm Rittenhouse 

This plane of existence is too tame for "Newt." 
His mind often wanders into worlds peopled witii 
objects and accidents of his brain. There he 
plays with wiffle-bats, fan-tail tigers, etc. 



Ldwin Schleter 

Ed gets in lots of rest through the day. He 
doesn't care in particular about anything and if 
habits broke themselves, without doubt, he would 
have quit coming to school. 



Horace Seelinger 

Carlyle speaks of an inarticulate genius — he 
didn't allude to "Ike Spivins." Ike's vocal condi- 
tion ought to be appreciated. He can imitate off- 
hand anything from an alarm clock to a brass 
band, trombone leading. He doesn't sing — he 
never trifles with his voice. 



Oscar Shepard 

"Shep" holds the breakage record in Physics 
as well as being the record breaker "Patriot" 
business manager. 



Ruby Smith 

"As far as I'm concerned, men may come and 
men may go or stay away forever." 



Page Forty-i 



Vergil Snow 

Translated from Vergil: "Silently hand in 
hand through the rosy dawn of life's spring time, 
wander LOVE and I, the earthly forms of two 
angels. ' ' 



Edna Sumner 

"If one allows little curls to drape one's neck 
one can meander around more easily than if one 's 
hair is combed so tight one cannot close one's 

eyes." 



WlLLA TeCKEMEYER 

Mr. Mott calls me Miss Teckemeyer, Miss An- 
drews calls me Willa but Kenny calls me "Bill." 



Eva Thicksten 

"Blessed are the thorough and quick thinkers 
for they shall receive a big string of A's." 



Marie Wieneke 

Marie is a thoroughly deserving girl whose ab- 
sence caiised by protracted illness to be deeply 
regretted. 



[Page Fifty 




Lillian Whitson 

Since it is all safely over, it has to be admitted 
that Lillian was the prize "skipper" of the 
school. What more conclusive proof of her abil- 
ity could be found? 



Anna Zimmerman 

"I like all friends, most every kind. jBut, 1 
don't like friends that don't like mine." 




Page Fifty-one] 



Tree 



"kiiDUJ Triy ♦ Opporlunily " 
OoK Fioujcf ♦ Rjcd » Rose 

Colors ♦ R£il» Andfflbilc 



itesideni: 



vlce< 



(Dre^lilejiL 
clar 
ireasur< 



Sccfciory 
rcf 



_cjaFey«Ci'aig 
6ons ♦ JacRsoa 
eoruaccotdics 



5 



MADGE BAKER 
MABEL BENNETT 
JEROME BOYLES 
FREDERICK BRETTHAUER 
DAISY CARTER 
CARMINA COLABUONO 
EDRICK CORDES 
GEORGIA COX 
DEWEY CRAIG 
ALICE DIXON 
GLADYS FOX 
GLADYS GLASSON 
CHARLES HEIN 
MARGARET HIRTZEL 
KATIE HODAPP 
ESTHER HUMES 
DORIS JACKSON 
HAROLD JAMES 



THELMA JONES 
LUCILE KASTING 
LAWRENCE KASTING 
LUCILE KESSLER 
ALICE KRUGE 
EMMA KRUGE 
JUSTINE LEAS 
KATHERINE LOVE 
HARRY MILLER 
DOROTHY MONROE 
MILDRED NICHTER 
WILLIAM ROSS 
OTIS SHANNON 
JENNIE SHIELDS 
FRANCIS STUNKEL 
WILLIAM TOPIE 
FRANK WELLER 



[Page Fifty-two 




Page Fifty-three] 



Thf: ♦ 5 opfeomorcs 



THELMA ALBERRING 
RALPH AMICK 
ELSIE AUFFENBERG 
LAFE BANTA 
RAYMOND BATSON 
BEULAH BARNUM 
MEEDY BLISH 
LORITA BOLLINGER 
EDITH BOWMAN 
LOUISE BRADY 
ALBERT BRETTHAUER 
LEROY BRETTHAUER 
EDWARD BUEHNER 
MAURICE BYRNE 
HELEN CLARK 
LYNN CORDES 
RUTH CRAIG 
HELEN DANNETTELLE 
MARGUERITE DARLING 
DURBIN DAY 
EARL DIECK 
EDNA DOWNS 
RUBY EARNEST 
MERRILL ELLIOTT 
GLEASON EWING 
EDWIN FETTIG 
MONCLOVA FIELDS 
MYLREA FINDLEY 
LORA FLEEHEARTY 
HENRY FOSTER 
GARNET GREEMAN 
HOWARD GREEN 
MAUD GREEN 
LILLIAN GRIFFITTS 
ALLEN GOENS 
STELLA GOSSET 
MARIE GUDGEL 
JANE HAAS 



MARJORY HAGAN 
FRIEDA HALL 
MARGARET HALL 
IRENE HEIDEMAN 
GINCIE HEITMAN 
CLYDE HILL 
JAMES HIMLER 
WALTER HUBER 
HAZEL HUMES 
FERN HUNTER 
RUTH HUNTER 
LAEL HURBAUGH 
SIMEON JONES 
GLENN KEACH 
RUTH KRAMER 
WARREN LAFKIN 
GLADYS LAWELL 
EDWARD LEWIS 
LEO LEWIS 
CLETUS MACKEY 
LUELLA MASCHER 
LEOTA MAY 
HAROLD MERCER 
RUTH MILLER 
LOUIS MEYER 
ROY NEWBY 
OLGA PEASE 
HELEN PHILLIPS 
ESTHER PRALL 
EDWIN RUDDICK 
BERTHA SCHMIDT 
CHARLES SPURLING 
HAZEL STANFIELD 
HILDA STEINWEDEL 
EDITH SUMMA 
OMEGA WHEATON 
JOSEPHINE WHITE 
ARTHUR WILDE 



[Page Fifty-four 




Page Fifty-five] 



Tlie*Ire:shmen 



BESSIE ABELL 
WILLIAM ABEL 
HAZEL ACKERET 
FRED ACKERMAN 
ELSIE ADAMS 
AGNES ANDREWS 
LUCY BALLARD 
CHARLES BANTA 
MARY G. BILLINGS 
CHARLES BLUMER 
CARL BRASKETT 
GAYNELL BREITFIELD 
WILLARD BURCKDALL 
FELIX CADOU 
MAE CARR 
ANNA H. CARTER 
MONTA H. CONNELLY 
NORMA CORDES 
MARION CRABB 
OPAL CRAIG 
CHARLES CRANE 
NEWTON DAY 
PEARL DAY 
WELDON DAVIS 
IRENE DEHLER 
MARGARET DEHLER 
MARGARET De MATTEO 
GEORGE DOANE 
FRANCIS DOWNS 
WILLIAM ECKSTEIN 
BERTHA EWING 



SHIRLEY FAULKCONER 
ALICE FRICKE 
EVERETT FOSTER 
EMMA GALLAMORE 
FRANCES GREEN 
BEATRICE GRIMES 
ELLEN GRUBER 
ELLSWORTH HAGEL 
RUSSELL HARRY 
MERRILL HARSH 
LAWRENCE HIGGINS 
MELVIN HILL 
MARY L. HONAN 
MARGARET HOPEWELL 
DOROTHY HUBER 
GARRISON HUMES 
DORA JOHNSON 
CECIL JONES 
RUBY JUDD 
ROBERT KEACH 
CLARA KRUWEL 
ELLA MAY KRUWEL 
HARRY LIEBRANDT 
HELEN LEWIS 
OREN LEWIS 
ELNORA LOCKMAN 
MAURICE MACKEY 
EDV/ARD MASSMAN 
GLADYS MAY 
LEOTA McCANN 

LOIS McDonald 



[Page Fifty-six 




Page Fiftygeven] 



oil}? H^r^aljUtFtt [Continued] 



ALICE MONROE 
EDMUND MONTGOMERY 
MAY NICHOLS 
DORIS NORBECK 
GLENN NORBECK 
EARL PARKER 
ARTHUR PHILLIPS 
BERT PHILLIPS 
D. POPPENHOUSE 
GRACE PRALL 
CAROL PROBST 
OSCAR QUADDE 
JOHN H. REIDER 
KATHRYN REIDER 
ELIZABETH REMY 
MIRIAM RINNE 
CLIFFORD ROBBINS 
MALCOLM ROUTT 
EDNA RUDDICK 
SARAH RUDDICK 



KATHRYN SCHAEFER 
LAWRENCE SCHAEFER 
ANNA SCHMIDT 
HOWARD SCHULTZ 
EUGENE SMITH 
LOWELL SMITH 
DOROTHY SPANAGEL 
TRAVIS SPEAR 
LEO SPRAY 
LORENE STANFIELD 
RUTH STANFIELD 
OLIVE STANTS 
LAURA TASKE\ 
MARGARET THOMAS 
IRENE TULLIS 
BERT ULM 
EDWIN VOGEL 
EMMA WESNER 
HELEN WOLTERS 
MACIE WHITSON 




&e5himm.Boy5 
1917 



[Page Fifty-eight 




BeshDHin'Oitb 
1917 



Page Fifty-nine] 




'Turning for them who pass, the common dust 
Of servile opportunity to gold." 



[Page Sixty 




(El^t Agrtmltur? i^partm^nt 

IN THE fall of 1917 agriculture, as a vocational subject, was introduced 
in the Shields High School. The work is organized under the direct siip- 

ervision of the state and of Purdue University. Its aim is to give special 
training in agriculture and it is designed especially to meet the needs of boys 
interested in farming. 

The course is in charge of A. E. Murphy, a graduate of the agriculture de- 
partment of Purdue University, and a practical farmer as well as teacher. He 
is in charge of the work the entire year. The course includes many of the 
following subjects of study: soil study, agriculture botany, animal husbandry, 
poultry raising, live stock feeding, seed selection, fertilizers, care of fruit trees, 
gardening, nursery work, farm accounting, farm mechanics, dairying, etc. 
The students in this course give each afternoon session of the tenn to agri- 
culture and allied subjects. The forenoon sessions are given to other studies 
selected from the regular high school course. Students doing full work in 
agriculture receive two regular high school credits each semester, and one for 
summer work. 

Any person who has completed the eighth grade may enter the course. 
Young people may enter without taking any other work in high school, if so 
desired. 

The course is as practical as it can be made, and it is the hope of the de- 
partment to secure and keep in Shields School as many farm boys as possible. 

Page Sixty-one] 




[Page Sixty-two 




Page Sixty-three] 




Qlnangukr i^bd? 



THIS YEAR a comparatively new phase of work along oratorical lines 
has been developed in the high school. Heretofore work of this type 
has been confined chiefly to class debates and school contests. Upon 
the request of Washington high school, which has had quite a bit of such 
work, it was decided to enter a triangular debate with that city and Bedford. 
The decision was supported by universal enthusiasm on the part of Seymour 
and while she did not vvin in the debate, she is optimistic in regard to her 
future chances. The subject discussed was: "Resolved that Congress was 
justified in passing the Literacy Test over the President's veto." Seymour's 
negative team was sent to Washington, JMarch .30, while Bedford's negative 
met Seymour's affirmative at Seymour. 



FOR SEVERAL years Indiana has been trying 
to stimulate and strengthen oratory in the 
high schools. To arouse enthusiasm among the 
students, the schools meet each other in ora- 
torical contests. The local meets determine the 
school's representative to the county meet. From 
that the winner is sent to the contest held in his 
congressional district. The district winner is sent to 
the state meet at Bloomington. The subject is al 
ways one of civic impoi'tance pertaining to the 
present needs. The high schools of the state chose 
for their subject this year the question of "Com- 
pulsory Military Training." The Jackson County 
preliminary was held at Seymour early in April. 
Veva Paul was selected to represent the county at Versailles, April 6. Other 
counties represented were Switzerland, Bartholomew, Dearborn, Jeft'ei-son and 
Johnson. 



[Page Sixty-four 



S>. E Jl. % ». A. 



THE SOUTH Eastern Indiana High School Association draws its mem- 
bership from Franklin, North Vernon, Seymour, Madison, Aurora and 
La^\Tenceburg. For several years the Association has held contests in 
Orator3' and Beading. Each school in the Association holds its preliminarj' 
and selects representatives for both the Oratory and Reading. The same per- 
son may enter both contests. The contestant is free to choose his own subject 
matter, the only requirement being that his oration be original. This year the 
contest was held at North Vernon April 20th. The six schools in the Associa- 
tion were represented by two contestants each. 




The Shields High School was ably represented 
by Fae Patrick. The subject of his oration was 
"Prophecies of War." 




Robert Keach won second place for Seymour in 
the reading contest. His selection was "George 
Says Boys Don't Have Such a Snap After All." 



Page Sixty-five] 



-'■^_ 


HIIIHIII 


» 1 


faf. 


^^^M #• 


■3 


|'#«^bhR 






1^ 



ANOTHER OF our splendid organizations is the High School Orchestra 
now consisting of seventeen members organized in the spring of 1914 
under the efficient leadership of Miss Gasaway. It has grown steadily 
and has been genuinely appreciated. 

The orchestra has been most generous and has added greatly to the suc- 
cess of all the High. School home-talent affairs. It has given many special pro- 
grams in chapel period. The work has proven a double success in that it i^ 
a benefit to the members themselves and because it has come to mean so much 
to the life of the school as a whole. 

The members are : 



-WILLA TECKEMEYER 
CARL SUMNER 
LILLIAN GRIFFITTS 
ELLSWORTH HAGEL 
WARREN LAFKIN 
HELEN DANNETTELLE 
LOWELL SMITH 



Comets— FAE PATRICK 
RALPH AMICK 
VIRGIL SNOW 
Clarinet— CHARLES HEIN 
Trombone— HORACE SEELINGER 
Saxophone— OSCAR SHEPARD 
Piano— LUCILE KESSLER 



[Page Sixty-six 




alljf (Bin (fllub 



AND NOW we come to the school warblers, "Tlie Glee Club," which has 
gro-(\Ti to be an essential both in the practical and social life of the 
school. It was thought advisable to unite the girls and boys Glee 
Clubs this year and much effective work has since been accomplished. 

Several splendid programs showing a wide range both of classical and 
popular miisie have been given and were enthusiastically received by the 
student body. The "Glee Club" has in a way dominated the general choruses 
of the school and their effective leading has added much to the spirit. 

The final achievement of the Glee Club came in the presentation of two 
operettas in which the leading roles were taken by Glee Club members. Too, 
they helped very materially in the success of the choruses. The necessity of 
repeating the perfonnance is ample proof of their worth. 

A quartette composed of some of the best male voices are planning to 
present a ragtime program at several of the commencement festivities. The 
Senior boys will furnish the music for Baccalaureate and the entire Glee Club 
is preparing a splendid program for Commencement night. 



Page Sixty-seven] 



Alunm 6t Alurmioe 



President .... HARRY G. McDONALD 

vjce-president Mrs. Ida M. Kasper 

Secretary .... MiSS Myra LaupuS 

Treasurer .... LYNN L. BOLLINGER 



[Page SLxty-eight 



allj^ Alumnt Aaanrtation 



NOT FROM the time it was first organized until January of 1916 did the 
Alumni Association of Shields High School have an organization. 
This sounds paradoxical, but is a fact. As far back as the writer 
can remember — and alumni historians of other days say it was ever thus — 
there had, of course, always been a president, a secretary and a treasurer. 
They were elected at the annual meeting of the society by popular vote. 

Through it all there was a woeful lack of organization, of a definite pro- 
gram, of something tangible to work for. Too often the mistake was made of 
electing as president a member of the graduating class, only to have him leave 
for college the nest fall. Thus the benefit of even a temporary organization 
was lost, and the society drifted along like a ship without a rudder. 

This has all changed, however, and the Alumni Association is today an in- 
corporated society, with a permanent organization, an excellent constitution, 
and a splendid corps of officers. And what is more important than this, it 
has a definite aim in view — the upbuilding of an organization that shall have 
for its work the development of a greater co-operation between the com- 
munity and the school. 

As its first step in this program the society has accepted the custody and 
management of a scholarship loan fund that has been established to aid girl 
graduates of the school in obtaining a college education. It is hoped that 
this fund may be increased until it will be of great service to many of our 
new members. The idea of the scholarship fund for girls originated with the 
Friday Magazine Club, which organization made the original contribution to 
the fund, and was conceived shortly after the announcement of the Thomp- 
son Memorial Scholarship at Yale for young men graduates of the school. 

It is the intention of the present officers to combine the social features 
of the society's activities with the more serious work it has undertaken, be- 
lieving that both will profit thereby. There is a place — in fact there is a 
necessity, for both if the organization is to fill its proper place in our com- 
munity life 

So to this work the officers extend a call to every member, from the oldest 
graduate to the members of the class of 1917. With the loyalty and co-oper- 
ation of everyone, which they have a right to expect, they will exert every 
effort to make the influence of the association felt in eveiy worthy endeavor 
in the city. 

Reonember, this is YOT'R Alumni Society. It needs YOUR sympathy 
and active co-operation if it is to become what you would like to have it. 



Page Sixty-nine] 



The following is a communication written at our request, by Mr. John L. Patrick the 
edUor.n-cnef of the first Patriot. We take this opportunity of expressing our grati- 
tilde for Ins fehcttous message.—TaE Editor. ■> j i- y > yr 

AT THE opening of the fall term, in 1898, the idea of a paper to be 
called the High School Patriot originated in the keen and kindly mind 
of Professor Henry C. Montgomery. He presented the idea to the as- 
sembled classes and instructors, setting forth the aims, ideals and limitations 
of such a paper. I M^as appointed editor, possibly because of some local re- 
porting done by me for one of the Seymour dailies, Miss Anna Hancock 
Assistant Principal was made supervising editor. The name was probably in- 
spired by the stirring days in which we were living, as it was in April of the 
year that marked the beginning of the Spanish-American war. 

During the first year there were three printed numbers, one at Thanks 
givmg, Washington's Birthday, and Commencement. There were also writ- 
ten copies each week, read at Friday afternoon exercises, which were in voaue 
those days. The printed numbers were financed through the generositv^ of 
the local merchants in advertising. While the Patriot was largelv the work of 
the Senior class, it was representative of the entire high school, and was in 
no sense a class annual. So much for its eariy history. 

In those days, I believe the Patriot enhanced a 'feeling of patriotism to 
our school, to all constituted authority, and to our nation. While I am sur- 
prised at tliis opportunity of once more contributing a message through its 
columns, to the school, the Seniors and the Alumni, I am also greatly pleased 
and feel at no loss as to what should be the tenor of my message, though some- 
what m doubt as to the words with which to clothe mv thought " It is a 
prayer for the reviving and multiplying many fold of those old thrills of pat- 
riotism in all of us and a desire that the Patriot may in some way serve as an 
aid toward this end. We are living in a much more wonderful time todav 
than m 1898. The autocracies of the worid are becoming democracies the 
privileges and duties of the classes, viewed woridwide, seem to me to be mul- 
tiplied as the grasp of greed and privilege are curtailed. Can we not formu- 
late a campai,gn plan to take advantage of them? The simplest method that 
occurs to me is a change of wording of that terse strategic plan of Grant's 
which was "POUND, POUND, POUND," and for each of us, in so far as pos^ 
sible, increase our ability to constructively, WOEK, WORK, WORK, out the 
problems that confront us, to our satisfaction, to the service of our 'country 
and the glory of God. 

As an afterthought, only to the extent that we have the abilitv to WORK, 
WORK, WORK, out our successes will we be able to receive and enjoy them. 

J. L. P., '99. 

[Page Seventy 



®1|? iian iFrom iJ^amt 

BOOTH TARKINGTON 

Given by the Alumni Association of Shields High School, Dec. 12, '16 

at the 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 

CAST OF CARACTERS: 

Daniel Voorhecs Pike Cash McOsker 

The Grand Duke Vasili Vasilivitcli Walter Voss 

The Earl of Hawcastle Carl R. Switzer 

The Hon. Almeric St. Aiibyn Kincsley Brinklow 

Iranoff Harry H. McDonald 

Horace Granger-Simpson Linden Hodapp 

Ribiere Maurice Jennings 

Mariano Coulter Montgomery 

Michele Inez Paul 

( George Laupus 
Corabuuerc : j ^ouis Cordes 

Ethel Granger-Simpson Lillian Osterman 

Comptesse DeChampigny Mrs. John Rapp 

Lady Creech Mrs. R. O. Mayes 



Page Seventy-one] 



135 The 




[Page 



Actes Leaf 




Page Seventy-three] 




®l|f f ^ar M iramattrfi 



LEE MILLER 



AMONG THE new features of the school work that have been organ- 
ized during- the past year is the dramatic work conducted in the Junior 
and Senior English classes under the direction of Mr. Arthur J. Beri- 
ault, of Indianapolis. In order to give the classes practical experience four 
short plays were undertaken. 

These included "The County Chaimnan," "Heart's Haven," "Doe Home" 
and "Scenes from Riley," all of which were taken from Indiana authors, and 
which reflected the general spirit of the Indiana Centennial. 

In addition to this special course, the usual entertainments were also 
given. Two enjoyable productions, "The Lady from Philadelphia," and 
"Mrs. Jarley's Wax Works," were given at the annual Christmas bazaar, and 
they were a large factor in the success of the fair. 

The final climax of the season was the Senior class play. "The Fortune 
Hunter," with Kenneth MeCurdy and Helen Barnes taking the leading roles, 
won over its audience by its skillful acting, sharp humor, and the cjuick 
action of the plot. It was pronounced one of the best ever given by the school. 



[Page Sevent3'-four 



'''. 


\ 


i^.i^ 


'•4 




s 


Wk 




f 

* V ■ 


I 

4 

i 


nK^ / au'^i^^^^^^l^^ 


.1 



By WiNCHELL Smith 

Presented by Senior class, May 28, 1917, at the 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 



Page Seventy-five] 



SIlj? Jcrtutt? i^mtn 



CAST OF CHARACTERS VILLAGE CHARACTERS 

Kenneth McCubdy The fortune hunter Elmeb Bollingeb The druggist 

Fae Patrick A rising young financier Malcolm Rittenhouse The banlser 

WiLLARD Becker A promoter Horace Seelinger The Uveryman's son 

Hal Branaman I .Two Wall Street Paul Becker ^. The sheriff 



Lee Miller. 1 young men John Connelly Thet 

Clyde Fitzgibbon A millionaire's son Kenneth Greeman The tailor 

Virgil Snow Kellogg's servant Edwin Sohleter The oldlnhabitant 

Jess Hoover A newsboy Helen Barnes The druggist's daughter 

Margaret McCobd. The banker's daughter 

Madge Linke The friend of Josie 

CLARA J. DENTON W. RHYS HERBERT 

CHARACTERS 

The Gardener Robert Keaeh 

His daughter Dorothy Spanagel 

The child Virginia Hoadley 

The Brownies, the Sunbeams, the Daisies, the Pansies, the 
Roses, the Sweet Peas. 

FRANK BOOTH 

CHARACTERS 

Colonel Fig, Inspector of Schools Oscar Shepard 

Valet to Inspector Fae Patrick 

Miss Pointer, School Teacher Mary Louise Honan 

Mr. Fetcham, School Attendance Officer Oscar Shepard 

Johnny Stout Paul Becker 

Dunces and Scholars. 

Pianist — Lucile Kessler. 

Violinist — Lillian Griffitts. 

Music — High School Orchestra 



[Page Seventy-six 




Page Seventy-seven] 



Alblrnr.s 




[Page Seventy-eight 



Basket'BolL 

Track 

5'Ciiib 




Page Seventy-nine] 




[Page Eighty 



THE BASKET BALL team started practice last fall working under sev- 
veral difficulties. There were only two players left from last year on 
the entire varsity squad. The new material was composed of "^players 
who were comparatively small and inexperienced. Yet the team as a whole 
was a fighting one, and certainly, no team ever represented the school that 
knew more inside basket ball and more tricks of the game. 

Tie basket ball team got off to a good start winning six of the eight 
games scheduled before Christmas. Immediately after tlie vacation the team 
faced the hardest schedule ever undertaken by Seymour High School. Yet 
the number of games won and lost was about even. The failure of the team 
to make an excellent record was caused by lagging interest, and considerable 
difficulty was experienced in keeping the players in physical condition and 
in trim to play their best game. 

Franklin was the only team to win two games from the home team. An 
even break was made with North Vernon, Scottsburg, and Bedford. Two 
games were won from Milan and Columbus. The complete record of the 
season shows eleven games Avon and eight lost. Total points scored by S. H. S. 
592; Opponents— 446. 

§rljf bub of ^aotPH 



Seymour 21 

Seymour 35 

Seymour 15 

Seymour 25 

Seymour 53 

Seymour 59 

SejTnour 16 

Seymour 36 

Seymour 16 

Seymour 32 

Seymour 29 

Seymour 30 

Seymour 25 

Seymour 36 

Sej^mour 21 

Seymour 69 

Seymour 17 

Seymour 41 

Seymour 16 



Milan 16 

Scottsburg ... 24 

Bedford 23 

Columbus 23 

North Vernon. 14 

Madison 17 

Bloomington . . 28 

Crothersville . . 12 

Franklin 25 

Bedford 20 

Hopewell 32 

Columbus 22 

Franklin 28 

Milan 13 

North Vernon. 23 

Vallonia 14 

Scottsburg .... 63 

Moorefield .... 15 

Vevay 34 



Seymour 592 Opponents 



Page Eighty-one] 



Slly^ "^" Oriub 



WITH THE idea of creating; more interest in athletics and also to give 
the opportunity to everj'one to obtain exercise and recreation th< 
"S"Club iras formed. The formation of such athletic clubs, whiel 
places the requirements for membership upon the ability of anj'one to pass cer 
tain tests of phj-sical skill and endurance, is also an outgrowth of the convic 
tion of man.y that all around physical development is better than highly 
specialized athletics. The requirements aim to require some work to attain 
them. They are not rigid, but just out of reach of the novice. They aim to 
develop all sets of muscles of the body, for there is the dash and the long 
run ; the broad jump and the high jiunp ; the shot and throwing baseball. 

While only a few are able to participate in varsity athletics, the Club is 
open to everj^one, and all are encouraged to try what they can do. In this 
way, a boy may discover some special ability he did not suspect he possessed. 
If anyone is unable to qualify for Senior standing, he can make Junior. The 
schedule of events and requirements are : 



Requirements 



Events 

1(10 yard dash 

220 yard low hurdles 

Running high jump 

Running broad jump 

Pole vault 

1 mile run 

Seven mile walk 

Swimming 

Thro^ving base baU 

*12-lb. shot put 



Senior 

12 2-5 seconds 
33 seconds 
4 feet, 6 inches 
16 feet 

7 feet, 9 inches 
6 minutes 
1 hour, 45 minutes 
50 yards 
220 feet 
30 feet 



Junior 

13 seconds 
35 seconds 

4 feet, 2 inches 

14 feet 
7 feet 

6 minutes, 30 seconds 
2 hours, 10 minutes 
40 yards 
190 feet 
25 feet 



*This is requirement for a boy of 145 pounds or over, and is scaled down 
in the following proportion : 

145 lbs.: boy's weight :: 30 ft.: his requirement. 

For Junior standing, substitute 25 ft. in above proportion. 



[Page Eighty-two 




BASKET BALL SQUAD 

TOP ROW — Harold James, Edrick Cordes, Frederick Brettliaiier, Mansil 

Hughes, Charles Craue, Frank TVeller. 
BOTTOil ROW — Horace Seeiinger, Tirgil Snow, William Eckstein, Kenneth 
McCurdj', Oscar Shepard, Jerome Boyles, John Connelly. 



The mosrt experi- 
enced and largest 
player on the team 
"Kenny" is a fight- 
er. His playing 
shows the result of 




three years experi- 
ence. He is best in 
getting the tip off at 
center and placing 
the floor. 



Capt. McCurdy 



Page Eighty-three] 




Oscar Shepard — "Shep." 

"Shep" is a consistent player at 
Guard. "Without any previous ex- 
perience he has learned a lot of 
basket ball and has given some 
good exhibitions of breaking up 
opposing plays. 



Horace Seelinger — "Ike Spivins." 

"Ike" filled the position of floor 
guard. His biggest assets as a 
basket ball player were his energy 
name, and fighting spirit. Al- 
though small, he played his posi- 
tion well and always managed to 
score several goals. 



Jerome Boyles — "Hap." 

"Hap" played his second year 
on the varsity. He was always 
cool and level-headed. Past and a 
good basket thrower, he always 
succeeded in scoring several points 
in his position at forward. ' ' Hap ' ' 
is next year's captain. 



[Page Eighty-four 




John Connelly — "Johnnie." 

"Johnnie" was our sub-for- 
ward. His lig-htness and small - 
uess prevented him from securing 
a regular position. No player on 
the team was a harder worker. He 
was very fast and a fair goal 
shooter. 



Virgil Snow — "Virg." 

This was "Virg's" first year as 
a varsity player. He filled the po- 
sition of forward in a creditable 
manner. "Virg" was the most 
consistent and cleanest player on 
the team. 



William Eckstein — "Phoenix." 

"Phoenix" held down the hard 
position of guarding the oppon- 
ents' goal. This was his first year 
on the team and he should develop 
into a star before he finishes his 
high school career. "Ex" would 
never let an opposing player get 
rough with him. 



Pngo Eighty-five] 




[Page Eight\ 




Page Eighty-seven] 



Mansil H. — "Genevieve, you are the breath of my life." 
Genevieve — "Then hold your breath." 

Mr. Murphy — "Tipton, can you get some land for a garden? 

Tipton — "Yes, but there's a boy out there who bothers me all the time." 

Joe Andrews — ' ' The book says to spray all pests. ' ' 

WHEN— THEN 

M. R., '17 

When the lion eats grass like an ox. 
When the fishworm swallows the whale, 
AVhen the robins knit woolen sox. 
And the hare is outrun by the snail; 

When Thomas cats swim through the air. 
And elephants roost on trees; 
When insects in simimer are rare. 
And snuff never makes people sneeze; 

When fish creep over dry land, 
And mules on bicycles ride ; 
When foxes lay eggs in the sand. 
And women in dress take no pride; 

When ideas grow in a baboon's head. 
And treason no longer is crime ; 
Then will the '17 class be dead, 
And the country not worth a dime. 

Miss Remy (in English) — Merrill, what is your comment on "Cranford?" 
Merrill — I have nothing to say, only I'm amused the way the ladies do. 

Sljt JP^Batng ^l\ava of 191 B 

ACrr I SCENE I 

September 18 — The curtain rises. 

September 19 — A. Everessence Murphy is discovered. Faculty receives strong 
support. 

September 20 — A. E. Murphy and W. G. Hendershot eye each other. 

September 25 — Juniors painfully organize. Heated discussion on virtue of 
dogwood as class tree. 

September 28 — John H. Reider is requested to discontinue his last period va- 
cations. John remarks this country is free. " 'Nuff sed," Miss Andrews 
thinks. 

[Page Eighty-eight 



Lost : The key to my heart — Mary Louise H. 
Found — On my key ring. — Felix C. 

Lee Miller (in Vergil class) — "Why no, the word "got" isn't in good use. I 
don't use it. Nobody else does. 

Mr. Phillips (in General Science class) — Upon the application of heat, 
what happens to tlie metal rod? 

Agnes Andrews (waving her hand as if she knew) — It will get hot. 




THE PRIDEO^THE TEAM 



Uncle Sam doesn't want Mr. Phillips for a soldier, as they would have to 
dig the trenches so deep. 

Felix Cadou's new long trousers remind one of a Persian rug. 
Miss Remy — Alice, what reason does Ruskin give for beginning a girl's 
education earlier than a boy's? 

Alice B. — Well, she grows faster. (Long pause) Ju&t like a flower., 

©lie ^aaaing ^I|Oto of 191 H 

ACT I SCENE II 

October 10 — Junior party. Frederick Bretthauer finds No. 11 's not conducive 

to dancing. 
October 16 — Mr. Phillips fittingly christens Percy Wells "Pythagoras." 
October 30 — Strangely appareled figures flit along the Roekford road. 'Tis 
no Shakespearean masque. Merely the Seniors hastening to their Hal- 
lowe'en party. 
November 12 — Junior class pins arrive. Wherefore is that wan wstful half- 
hearted Senior expression? , 



Page Eighty-nine] 




FRESHIE'S DREAM 

POOR VEVA ! ! ! 



Veva got the small-pox, one bright and sunny day, 
And from her home the doctors kept all visitors away. 
Blame it all on Veva ! 

The teachers called a meeting soon, with mien sedate and grave. 
The generoiis souls determined us from small-pox they would save. 
Blame it all ou Veva ! 

At assembly short and happy, we were blithesome, glad, and gay, 
Then there came that hated order, "This is vaccination day." 
Blame it all on Veva ! 

Blame it all — confound the luck, that vaccination talk. 
And worst of all — infernal luck, that vaccination walk. 
Blame it all on Veva ! 



Siff JpasHtng ^I^oui of 191 B 

ACT I 
December 25 — Santa Claus enters. ! ! ! 



SCENE III 



[Page Ninety 



IKE SPIVINS 

"Hey, guy, what-u-got on that Physics test, find out, huh?" — "I got 
some register, a doll of a goose egg, but I should worry." — "Listen, if I get 
a 'D' on my pasteboard the old man will make a razor-strop register on me." 
— "Well, such is life in small burgs, but you're not in bad as much as me 
anyway." — "I got caught traveling last period and stood on the green car- 
pet three hours. The chief picked my ticker right, and then said if I did 
it again, it was good-bye. O cruel world, have a heart!" — "Say guy, goin' 
out for basket-ball, that's good dope, get beat up every other night on the 
scrubs. Why some of them ginks are carried out on blotters, and others have 
battle-scarred visages, such as blackened lamps, broken bugles, and twisted 
gozzles, on that I murmur 'never more!' " — "I'm nix on the rough stuff also. 
See what a dainty complexion I've got." — "Oh say! Have you got a date 
for tonight after the .show?" — "No, I'm stagging it for a while. All the 
"Frauleins" love me though!" — "Yes, I know that, and also you fall like a 
stewed owl for all the new girls beautifully though. — Why gink, you ain't 
got nothing on me as a ladies' man. I let them fall for me, take em out to the 
show and set 'em up, and then I say 'Good Bye ! I don't know you any more.'" 
— -"Yes, you always were good at pulling that 'Little Village Stuff.'" — "Well, 
it's about foddering time. I guess I'll beat it to the beaneiy for my hay. So 
long, guy, see you at the show." 

Miss Quinn (in Vergil) — "Now who was ]\Iinos?" 

Hulda 0. — "The guard at the entrance to Hades, wasn't he?" 

Miss Quinn — "Y'es, we'll meet him there later." 

Mr. Phillips (in chemistry) — "Hurry up and tell all you know about 
it, Kenneth, it won't take you long." 

Eift JPaaaittg ^ifoxa of 1917 

ACT II SCENE I 

January 26 — Deep devious mystery — one extra day of freedom granted us. 

Bill Eckstein acquires an extra wrinkle as to the why and wherefore. 
January 28 — ^Ah, the question solved ! They let us out of school Friday so 
they eoxdd inform us whether we were to take other subjects or to take 
the same ones over again. 
February 14 — Commemorating the anniversary of Hon. St. Valentine, and inci- 
dentally the birth of a few new 'cases.' 



Page Ninety-one] 



I^gmn at If at? 



HELEN BARNES 

I HATE eases, 

THEY GET on my nerves— 

FIKST THERE are the ones of long standing, 

BEGUN IN the sixth grade, 

AjX'D continued to the Senior year, drab uninterested cases, 

THEY TAKE each other for granted, and would as soon tliink of murder, 

AS OF spending a Sunday or Friday night 

AWAY FROM the fellow-suft'erer. 

THEY SIT for hours in the porch swing, yawn most ostentatiously, and 

EACH ONE is thinliing how soon ten o'clock will arrive 

BUT NEITHER would give up the other— for worlds. 

THEN THERE are the basket ball cases. 

WITH HUM a stalwart yoimg center or so. 

AND SHE a clinging little creature 

WHO COPIES every Friday night to see her hero perform, 

AND SHRIEKS loud and long when he makes a basket, 

OR W^HATEVER it is centers do. 

THIS CASE usually ends long about 

TOURNEY TlilE, when the team is defeated, 

AND A better man than he is appears on the scejie 

PROM SOilE nearby luimlet or town. 

WORST OF all are the one-sided affairs, 

WHEN ONE of the victims falls hard, receiving little or no response 

FROM THE other side of the case. 

THEY WRITE long and langTiishing notes, 

"MY DEAREST, try to like me just a wee bit." 

AND THEN, v.-hen the cold heart 

RELENTS, THE infatuated one finds that lie or she has ceased to care 

WHETHER IT relents or not, and are oft' on a search 

FOR OTHER cold hearts to conquer. 

I HATE "cases. 

THEY GET on my nerves. 



[Page Ninety-two 



Miss Andrews (dismissing assembly room) — "The inner rows remain, 
while the outer rows pass away." 

A Senior's idea of a "Master of Art" — A Freshman, who, when caught 
skipping, gives the excuse, "I didn't know any better." 

Miss Eemy — "Why is rain the purest form of water?" 
Opal Craig — "Because it comes from heaven." 

Edwin Schleter (balancinc; 
himself on a chair in Physics 
lab.) — "Mr. Phillips, have you 
seen my wonderful feat?" 

Mr. Phillips — "Yes, I see 
them every time you come to 
class." 

Miss Laupus (in History) 
— "What has been the military 
condition of the United States 
up to the present time, Jer- 
ome?" 

Jerome B. (who hasn't re- 
cited for three months — "Not 
prepared. Miss Laupus." 

Miss Laupus — ' ' Correct, 
Jerome. 

Lee Miller (reciting America) — -"IMy voice with rapture thrills." 
Paul Becker — "Oh, Lee, Miss Gasawaj' could use you in the operetta." 




OETAO AND OONY KNOW IT 
CLASSIFIED BY WH 



®llf J^asBtng Bifom of 191 r 



ACT II 



SCENE II 



February 15 — Juniors present "Doc Home" under the auspices of one "Pud" 

Wilde. 



Febi-uaiy 20, A. M. — A certain waggish character absorbs ]\Ir. Phillip's finely 
drawn impression of him 

February 20, P. M. — "Said character repairs to Columbus High School. 

March 10 — Basket Ball Tourney. Arthur Elizabeth Murphy can't make him- 
self behave away from home. 



Page Ninety- three] 



iEtt Paaaant 



ilr. Ackerman — "Disorganizing gray matter or a cold on the liver goes 
liard with a fellow." 

Miss James — "My artistic temperament turns to the occasional drawing 
of checks." 

Miss Quinn — "Caesar and I conld have conquered the world." 

Miss Laupus — "I like the basket ball boys as a rule, but I'd rather try 
teaching a heathen than a good player." 

Miss Gasaway — "I should worr.y 'cause agriculture and music would 'nt 
harmonize." 

Miss Martindale — "I just adore a silent man, but if he knew it, he'd run 
circles around himself to get home." 

Miss Kemy — "You young "Dear-hunters" couldn't a bit more get an 'A' 
than you could lift the latch on Eden's gate." 

Miss Davison — "Us girls will powder." 

Miss Andrews — "A good man is a dead man." 

Miss Vehslage — "To run one's 'Ford' on the sidewalk ist verboten." 

Mr. Murph.y — "Good-bye girls, I'm through." 

Mr. Hendershot — "Nobody cares for nobody, when nobody won't chatter 
like a fool." 

Miss Roegge — "To perambulate after the manner of men tends to silence 
the innocent antics of youth." 

IMr. Phillips — "Boys, these girls' hearts are about as loosely constructed 
as their brains," 

Miss Alwes — "Lavished admonition prunes the tender thought but 
lavished powder only teaches youthful wit to shoot." 



[Page Ninety-four 




VERS LIBRE 
(As submitted to the "Patriot") 

Pretty little Fido, 

Sweet little pup, 
He can stand on his hind legs, 

If you hold his front legs up. 



Friendship oft would longer last, 
-Viid quarrels be prevented, 

If little words were let go past, 
Forgiven, not resented. 

Signed — Bill Becker. 



Cros»-s«ch«nof JoKnC's Heart 



Carmel Hazzard (reciting L 'Allegro in Senior English) — 

"Hence, loathed Melancholy, 
The brood of Folly without feather-bed." 
Miss Roegge (to her physiology class) — "For instance, I could walk home 
from school, even if I did not have any brains, because I have done it so 
many times. ' ' 

Glenn — "If I stole a kiss, would it be petit larceny?" 
Lucile — "No, it would be grand." 

Mr. Phillips (in Science) — "Do you know that insects are emotional at 
times?" 

Tomnu' Humes — "You bet, I once saw a moth-ball." 



©Ifp PasHutg i»tinm of 191 r 

ACT II SCENE III 

March 17 — We all get educated on the question of Military Service and in- 
cidentally wear Shamrocks 
March 25 — The school is a seething mass of oratory. The triangular debating 
teams submit themselves for the approval of the school. Fae's Waterloo is 

st-st-st-statistics. 
March. 30 — At last the Triangular Debate. Flossie sternly chaperones John 
and Fae. Little God o' Luck was agin us. 



Page Ninety-five] 





^. 


- 


Joo 


- 


-'- 


- 


(»0 


- 


.s. 


k 1 



I 



SPEECH 



AT BEGINNING 
OF SCHOOL 



AFTER FIRST 
VICTORY 



AFTCR FIRST 
DEFEAT 



scifboL 1 

Si ilT 1 


- 


300 


- 


_ /so 


- 


- 


- 


r 



BCrORF DISTRICT 
TOURNAMENT 



FOUND ON THE ASSEMBLY ROOM FLOOR 

"Say Ruby, do yoa like Kennie McCurdy?" — "Oh, I used to, but, my 
dear, I certainly don't any more. He's really not on the market now, any- 
way, and besides, he has the most extravagantly good opinion of himself." 
— "Well, speaking of self-satisf action, Bud Bollinger wouldn't change places 
with Wilson." — "I should say so. But what I loathe about him is his idea 
that all the girls are just dead for him." — "We really have several cute 
boys in our class, Johnny, Ikie, and Shep." — "Oh yes, but at that none of 
them are blessed with good looks." — "Let me ring in on that Senior boy's 
theme. Lee Miller is the one that pains me with his lofty girls-don 't- 
bother-me air." — "Well, Ed Sehleter is absolutely ex parco. ' Veva, pass this 
to Helen, and see what she tkinks of it." — "My sympathies are with you, but 
I do think Jlanse is terribly romantic looking. Hand this over to Genevieve 
and see if she doesn't agree." — "I entirely agree, but my pet abomination is 
Fae Patrick. He acts as if he has been disappointed in love. Es Grelle is 
clamoring for this. I'll hand it over. 'Spose she'll insist Hal's the pri7,e 
specimen. Careful. Here comes Miss." — "Taking up the anvil chorus, I 
do love to hear Kenneth Greeman talk. It's just darling I think. But he's 
too slow to catch a cold." 

"Read this, Margaret, I found it on the floor. Some of the girls must 
have been putting the boys tlirough a beauty shop." Bill T. 



[Page Ninety-six 



































j^k 


-^ 


^ 


5^ 



AFTER A SUBMARINE RAID 

Miss Laupiis (in Civics) — "What is the canon law?" 
Alice Dixon — "It gives yon the right to make cannons." 

Miss Quinn — "Give an English derivative from inferus-a-um, and use it 
in a sentence." 

Alice Kruge — "Infernal — In Civics we discussed infernal taxes." 

Miss Alwes — "Elmer, have you your outline?" 
Elmer — "I have it in my head." 

Miss Alwes — "Well, I'll do the best I can to represent your head in my 
grade book." 

®ijp PaHHutg i»I|om of 191 r 

ACT III SCENE I 

April 2 — One of our most industrious students, Clyde Keller, receives the po- 
sition of Mr. Phillips' secretary. 

April 6 — E^^dence of "In the spring a young man's fancy," growing stronger. 
Sophomores revel merrily. 

April 10 — We begin the seige of mastering the national air and generally dis- 
play our patriotism. Mae Carr gives directions on how to build a ship, 
and Pearl Day masterfully explains how to train an array. 

April 16 — Operetta's "Very Good, Eddie." 



Page Ninety-seven] 



COMMERCIAL ARITH. 



\l 



. ^ m .1 



^^^^^ 



Mr. Hendershot — "Edward, what are 
j'ou doing?" 

Edward M.— "Thinking." 

Mr. Hendershot — "Hm! What with?" 

Innocent Looking Soph. — "It's all off 
now." 

Junior — "What's all off now?" 
Sophomore — "Mr. Ackerman's hair." 

Miss Qninn — "Donald, I appoint j'ou 
critic of the first sentence." 

Donald M. — "I can't critic that." 

Amy Bridges — ' ' Horace Seelinger 's hair 
I'eminds me of iron filings on a magnet." 

Miriam Einne (in Latin) — "Is 'love' a 
verb of mental action?" 

Mary Billings — "No, it's heart action." 

Katie Hodapp (reading composition in 
English) — "She jumped from the train and 
ecstatically kissed him on the platform." 
Dewey Craig — "Well what a funny place to kiss him." 

Mr. Phillips (after running a comb through Shep's hair to get an elec- 
trical charge) — "Well, what would you rub the comb with to get the same 
charge?" 

Frederick Brett hauer — "Cat's fur." 



Slf? p00i«g ^Ifom of 191 r 

ACT III SCENE II 

April 18 — Virg. Snow finally got up enough energy to lift his gimboats over 
the bar at four feet six. 

April 20 — Mr. Hendershot wears a full dress shirt to class and thereby gath- 
ers enough courage to generally demolish Russell Harry. 

April 23 — ]\Iiss Davison's and Mr. Hendershot 's clubs enjoys a superheated 
canine roast at the river. Mr. Phillips also reports a hot time at his 
house. Moreover two large window panes broken in assembly room — all 
in a riotous day ! 

April 28 — ^Biggest part of Junior class leaves school. "Father" MePike is 
tired of getting "sonny" periodically re-instated in school. 



[Page Ninety-eight 




A NLW YLAR6 RESOLUTION 



Miss Andrews (assign- 
ing English lesson) — 
"I had assigned "Ev- 
en-man" for tomor- 
row, but for the pres- 
ent I shall let "Every- 
man go." 



Mr. Phillips — "Meedy, what is space?" 
Meedy (waking up) — "I don't know 
how to say it, but I have it in my head." 

Mr. Murphy (at Senior picnic to Mrs. 
]Murphy) — "You'd better let me carry that 
lunch basket, dearest. We might get sep- 
arated in the crowd." 

Estiier Grelle's motto: — "Laugh if it 
kills you, and you'll die with a grin on your 
face." 

Mr. Murphy (after telling a group of 
boys that he was their adviser) — I'm going 
to be your daddy 
now. ' ' 

George Weller — 
"Say, pop, give me a 
nickel." 




SPRING FLVER 



SUfp J^aBBtng Bi\otn of 191 r 

ACT III SCENE III 

May 10 — Books crawl out on the floor. Hap looks as if he'd been caught 

tripping in a basket-ball game. 
May 11— Windows break in. Not to let them get ahead of her Veva "breaks 

out. ' ' Felix Cadou speaks of the virtue in a brick. 
May 13 — Mr. Arthur Murphy, Esq. takes unto himself a wife. 
Jlay 1.5 — Everybody looks sweet and pretty, but alas! Ruth Jliller broke 

the "birdie." 
May 16 — Vaccination victims return from their week vacations. Iris 

awarded the gold medal for perseverance. 
May 25 — Seniors depart with bag and baggage from dear old S. H. S. 
June 1 — The Curtain falls 



Page Ninety-nine] 



A«t09rapl)a 



Evervj tVlodcrn Home MusV 
Have A Tele^V\one 



Page One Hundred and One] 



LIGHT HEAT POWER 

Phone 499 

Interstate Public Service Co. 

South Chestnut Street 
SEYMOUR - - - INDIANA 

SEYMOUR POULTRY COMPANY 

Dealers in 
POULTRY. BUTTER, EGGS. ETC. 

opposite PENNSYLVANIA FREIGHT DEPOT 

Good Prices . Honest Weights 

Phone 495 - - - - Seymour, Indiana 

[Page One Hundred and Two 



The SP ART A 


Have Your 


You 
Get 
Better 
Service 
Here 


CLEANING and 


PRESSING 

Done by 
F. S C I A R R A 

Phone R-317 
South Chestnut Street 


TheSPARTA 


Seymour : : Indiana 


MILES' BILLIARD 




PARLOR 


Harry M. Miller 


Charles E. Miles, Prop. 


all kinds of 
INSUR.ANCE 


Seymour : : Indiana 




MAYES' CASH GROCERY 


THE FASHION 


The Home of 




Quality Groceries 
at 


The only Exclusive Ladies 
Ready-toWear Store 


Reasonable Prices 


IN SEYMOUR 


Monarch Brand a Specialty 




Phone 658 


South Chestnut Street 



Page One Hundred and Three] 



G R U B ' S BELLE B RAN D 

Canned Goods are different from other brands selling at 
the same price. They are better. : : : : : : 

Order Groub'S Belle BR-AND from your grocer 



THIS 

WORLD WIDE WAR 

WE ARE HAVING 

has caused everyone to buy cautiously. We offer our ser- 
vices as expert judges of merchandise to you free of 
charge, along with our merchandise at prices unusually 
below the market. :-: :-: :-: 

Ray R. Reach's Country Store 

E.AST Second Street Seymour, Indiana 



[Page One Hundred and Four 



FeEDeiE III]ME¥IEESHT¥ 

WHERE THE FLOWER OF OUR INDIANA YOUTHS 
IS TAUGHT SCIENTIFIC FACTS, MAKE STRONG 
STATEMENTS ABOUT THE VALUE OF INDIANA 
FLOUR. THEY RECOMMEND IT FOR EVERY DO- 
MESTIC PURPOSE. EVERY HOOSIER BREAD EATER 
SHOULD HEED THEIR ADVICE. 




COIPNIAL 



trnklmg 5s lieldvniffii —Thousands of Jackson County's be^ 
housekeepers have ta^ed €©L@MEAL FL©IOM and believed. 

We want everybody to know about COLONIAL.. The self- 
rising Honey Boy, which cuts out the mistakes, is unexcelled for 
biscuit and pastry. Our Success brand is a standard that has stood 
the test. ■ BUY A SACK AND BE CONVINCED. 

ELESE MHLOMtS ۩MFAM1' 



Page One Hundred and Five] 



F. H. H E I D E M A N 

PATHE FRERES 
PHONOGRAPHS 

FURNITURE PIANOS RUGS 

Ageuey for the 

"FREE" SEWING MACHINES 

(Fuueral Director) 

lli-116 S. Chestnut St. 

SEYMOUR : : INDIANA 



F. H. GATES & SON 

the only 
NEWS DEALER 

— Dealers in — 

CAaars, Tobaccos, Fruits and 
Confections 

NEW LOCATION 5 E. SECOND ST. 
SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



GRAESSLE-MERCER COMPANY 

Commercial and Catalogue Printers 

Corner St. Louis Avenue and Pine Street. SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



F01 



MILLER'S BOOK STORE ^ 

Wall Paper, Window Shades, School and Office Supplies. 
20 West Second Street 



Seymour Woolen Mills 



UNION HARDWARE COMPANY 

PairJs, Oils, Varnishes, Glass and Building Material 
South Chestnut Street SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



[Page One Hundred and Six 



Jackson County Loan and Trust Co. 

SEYMOUR : INDIANA 

$1.00 

WILL START A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
THAT PAYS 3 PER CENT COMPOUND INTEREST 

J. H. ANDREWS, Pres. 



PROMPT DELIVERY 

Out-of-Season Vegetables and Fruits 

Privilege of weekly payment of accounts 

Personal attention to the individual wishes and tastes of our customers 

These and every other possible service 
we furnish with our 

QUALITY GROCERIES 

Phone Main 170 

PEOPLE'S GROCERY Second and Chestnut Streets 



Page One Hundred and Seven] 



"FoIIqiv the Crowd" 

—to— 
F U RN I S H ' S 

BARBER SHOP 

First Class Service 

Across from New Federal 
Building 



Visit the new Department of 

DR.ESSES, SUITS, WAISTS 
and COATS 

ABEL^S 

DRY GOODS STORF 

Two Entrances — 

SECOND and CHESTNUT 



J. M. H A M E R 

Coal and Building Material 

Phone 107 

Corner Indianapolis and 

Cincinnati Avenues 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus 50,000.00 

C. D. BILLINGS President 

B. F. SCHNECK Vice-President 

L. L. BOLLINGER Cashier 

WE SOLICIT YOUB PATRONAGE 

We Pay 3% on Time Deposit 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



—The— 
MODERN CLOTHING CO. 

For Good Clothes 

and 
Fine Furnishings 
For Men 



J. FETTIG COMPANY 

TRUNKS 
BAGS 

Fancy Leather Goods 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: Indiana 

[Page One Hundred and Eight 



A Complete Drug 
Store 

FEDERMANN'S 



HOOVER'S 



Everything in the 
Home Furnishing 
Line :: :: 



Style, Quality, Service 



SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



Page One Hundred and Nine] 




[Page One Hundred and Ten 



WE CAN HELP YOU get started if you will give us an opportunity. 

A STRONG COUBSE OF STUDY in Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Arithmetic, Penman- 
ship, Business Law, Correspondence, Salesmanship, English, etc., is given by us which 
will prepare j'ou to fill a position acceptably. 

OUK EXFEBIENCED TEACHERS will help you master these practical salary-pro- 
ducing subjects, by giving you the right sort of assistance. 

OUR YEARS OF EXPERIENCE in preparing young m.en and women as Bookkeepers, 
Stenographers, Bill Clerks, and Private Secretaries, has enabled us to formulate methods 
that produce high grade results. 

WE SECURE EMPLOYMENT for every competent student, and at wages that will 
not disappoint. The management of 



SEYMOUR BUSINESS COLLEGE 



wants you to thoroughly investigate its work, as they know you 
with the advantages offered. 

Summer term opens June 4 for 10 weeks. 



bo pleased 



Real Estate 



Insurance 



S. H. AMICK 



Phone 738-2 



2 Masonic Temple 



Everything in Jewelry Prices are Right, too 

THE BEST engraving ALWAYS 

MESEKE JEWELRY SHOP 



16 South Chestnut Street 



Seymour 



Indiana 



Page One Hundred and Eleven] 



Compliments of 
SEBA A. BARNES 

Seymour, Indiana 



E. C. BOLLINGER 

"The Real Estate M^an" 



STAR BAKERY 



HENRY N I E M EY ER 

CARPENTER AND CONTRACTOR 
414 E. Fifth Street Seymour, Indiana 



Compliments of — 

F. J. VOSS 



[Page One Hundred and Twelve 



THE TRAVIS CARTER COMPANY 

: :' Manufacturers of : : 

High Grade Mill Work, Veneered Doors and Interior Finish. 



: : Dealers in : : 

Lumber and Shingles, Lath and Sash Doors 



Seymour 



Indiana 





If it's Novelties you want in 




Footwear, it's 


— The — 


DE H LE R 


RACKET STORE 


who's 
got 


JVants Your 
Trade 


them 
DEHLER SHOE STORE 




SOUTH CHESTNUT 




SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


Telephone 472 




DOMESTIC STEAM 
L A U N D RY 


Allen's Barber 
Shop 




Corner Second and Pine Streets 


13 SOUTH CHESTNUT ST. 


First-Class Work 





Page One Hundred and Thirteen] 



Gold Mine Department Store 

Seymour : : Indiana 

SEYMOUR'S FASHION CENTER 
showing all the latest style fads which fashion decrees 

Silks, Dress Goods, Trimmings, Gloves and Notions 
Silk Hosiery, and Underwear 

Suits, Coats, Dresses and Millinery 



REYNOLD'S 
CASH GROCERY 


This is the place 
for Good Shoes 


Good Service and 
Prompt Delivery 


— Up-to-date Styles — 
For Ladies, Gents and Children 


We sell for cash 

and save you money 


For less money than you can buy 
them any place else 




Phone 163 
23 South Chestnut Street 


COLABUONO 

5 West Second Street 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



[Page One Hundred and Fourteen 



r "QUICK MEAL 


" WICK OIL STOVE 




_, 




- 




rar 


THK ORIGINAL OIL STOVE EQUIPPED 
WITH A GLASS FOUNT 
SIMPLE AS A LAMP. 
MAKES A CLEAN AND POWERFUL 
BLUE FLAME. 

EASY TO RE-WICK OR REGULATE. 
HAS PORCELAIN BURNER DRUMS 
THAT CANNOT RUST, AND AUTOMA- 
TIC WICK STOP WHICH PREVENTS 
SMOKING. 


^: 




lfc^^=2^« 


1 


1 


^J 


' 


' 


BURNS ORDINARY COAL OIL :: | 



CORDES HARDWARE COMPANY 



Seymour, Indiana 



"Where the Crowds Go" 

TO KRAFT'S FIVE AND TEN CENT STORE 

We carry an up-to-date line of 5 and loc 
merchandise. If it's new we have it. 

GEO. KRAFT COMPANY 



5 and lOr STORE 



Seymour 



Indiana 



GRADUATION GIFTS 

In Great Variety are Offered at Our Store. Come in and Make 
Your Selection Early. 



Phone 249 

GEO. F. KAMMAN— Jeweler and Optometrist 
104 West Second Street Seymour, Indiana 

Page One Hundred and Fifteen] 





T. G. L A U P U 


_s_ 






No. I N, Chestnut 






DIAMONDS 


WATCHES 




SILVERWARE 


JEWELRY 


CLOCKS 




CUT GLASS 



Seymour 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 
Fine Leather Goods 



Indiana 



EAT AT THE 

PALACE RESTAURANT 

Something Good to Eat at all Times 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNERS 



Seymour Daily Republican 

The Home Neicspapcr of Seymour 



Read in ofer 71 per cent of the homes in this city 
Delivered at your door, \oc per week 



Phone 42 



108 W. Second Street 



[Page One Hundred and Sixteen 



"Your friends can buy anything you can "Sell your goods with photographs.' 

give them — except your photograph." 



THE WINDHORST STUDIO 

high-grade portrait and 
commercial photography 

19 East Second Street :: :: :: Seymour, Indiana 



Phone 116 

C. E. LOERTZ 

Druggist 

I E. Second Street : : Seymour, Indiana 



SEYMOUR ICE CREAM, BOTTLING WORKS 
AND CREAM COMPANY 



Frozen Cream and Ic 



Phone 143 
Circle Street . . . . Seymour, Indiana 

Page One Hundred and Seventeen] 




^"Jhe Elates in this book ^ 
^^^ 'Were engraved by 

INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING 
&ELECTROTYPING G)MPANY 

222 E.OHIO ST. INDIANAPOLIS.IND. 



[Page One Hundred and Eighteen 



THE BEE HIVE 

Complete Line of 

Haviland China 

and 

Fancy Lamps 

Table Cutlery 

Souvenir Post Cards 



Seymour National Bank 
seymour :: :: indiana 



LYNN FAULKCONEE... President 

J. M. SHIELDS Vice-President 

J. S. MILLS Cashier 



Daily Democrat 



When you go to start 

YOUR CAR 

and your battery has no pep, come 
and let us put some into it. 

W. L. CLARK 
Battery Service Station 



PREPARATION MEANS 
OPPORTUNITY 

Just as surely as you make prepar- 
ation you will make opportunity. Stud- 
ents entering practically every day. 
Catalogue and other literature free. 
Chas. C. Crlng, Gen. Mgr. 

Central Business College 

3rd Floor, University Park Building 
INDIANAPOLIS. 



M. HUBER & BROTHER 

Men's and Ladies' 
FINE SHOES 



West Second Street 



Seymour 



Indiana 



Page One Hundred and Nineteen] 



Call on us for the Highest Grade Photos at reasonable prices 

Photographs in this book were made by the 

ELLIS STUDIO 

Over the Ten Cent Store SEYMOUR, INDIANA 

KUPPENHEIMER 

and 
COLLEGIAN 
C LO T HES 

To be had in Seymour only at 

ADOLPH STEINWEDEL 

The store that can serve you best 



Use Milk for Economy 

Use SWENGEL'S for SAFETY 



[Page One Hundred and Twenty 



EXCELLENCE 



For the careful considera- 
tion of young men who 
want to wear aristocratic 
looking clothes, we have 



<Jashion ^^^ Glothes 

Uaiared at J^shk m'Pa rk Ijochestir. Ii)5l 



In every detail these carry 
the excellence necessary to 
serve and real style. Not to 
be had elsewhere. 



THOMAS CLOTHING CO. 



Page One Hundred and Twenty 



PAULEY & SON GARAGE 

Dodge Brothers' Motor Cars 

AUTO LIVERY 

Phone 603-R 205-207 Ewing Street 



BROOK MONT BESTBIRD 

"Watch the Labels 

THE HIGH COST OF LIVING 

is reduced when you get full weight and standard quality. 

Every food container, can or package we sell is full weight as standard- 
ized by Federal laws, and the quality of the goods under our labels has been 
tested under the Pure Food and Drug Acts. 

Ask for BROOKMONT and the BEST BIRD brands in canned goods and 
condiments. 

"BOW" Coffee is in full weight pound cans, steel cut, and is a delicious 
drink. 

If your grocer hasn't the standard quality and packages we distribute, 
phone our office and they will tell you the grocers who have. 

WE SELL TO MERCHANTS ONLY 

GEORGE A. CLARK 

Wholesale Grocer 

BROOKMONT BESTBIRD 

Watch the Labels 



[Page One Hundred and Twenty-two 



Modern Rooms 

Ice Cream Soda 

STAR RESTAURANT 

Open Day and Night 



Give Us a Trial 



Opp. Interurban Station 



CALL 

BELL CLEANING WORKS 

IF IT'S 

CLEANING 

YOU WANT 

Phone 391 16 St. Louis Ave. 



—BICYCLE REPAIRING— 

A SPECIALTY 

Complete Line of 

Bicycles, Tires and Sundries 

CARLSON HARDWARE. 
COMPANY 

106 W. Second Street 



C. G. HELLER Barber Shop 
19 Indianapolis Avenue 



Electric Scalp and Fact 

Massage 

A Specialty 



If it's high class meats at the 
lowest cash prices, go to 

FRANK COX'S 

MEAT M.ARKET 
19 E. Second St. Seymour, Ind. 



CHAS. F. SHUTTS 



Cigars, Tobaccos, Fruits and 
Confectionery 



8 South Chestnut Street 



'Fat" Bauermeister, Ass't. 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-three] 



Ahlbrand's Cozy Cab 




Gives you more Protection and Comfort than is in a buggy 
AHLBRAND CARRIAGE COMPANY 

Buy a buggy that is built at home and help 
build up Seymour's Industry. 

Seymour, Indiana 



USE 
RAYMOND CITY COAL 

For All Purposes 

Ebner Ice and Cold Storage Co. 



Distributers 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



[Page One Hundred and Twenty-four 



HFrXMAN 

BINDERY. IN C 
BounJ-lb-PteW 

JULY 04 

N. MANCHESTEB, INDIANA 4696