(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The patriot"

V 




% 



;UN COUNTY PUBLIC I 



mmm 

3 1833 01770 9855 



GENEALOGY 
977.202 
SE9S 
1918 




Page ThreeJ 



mswem 

Wden %ie shall fiavQ led us along 

^imvse patds lolim tf\Q fatave sfiall dave^ 

hwngk us new associations ani new 

interests tdisouv fhtviot will he a ... 

^constant cemlniev of dappy experiences 

^lyit^eep evevfvesifi wltdm it's 

pages the ckevisfiei memories of 

ouvTf^igfi Schooldays 



/IV\ffl^/l\ 



Page Fiv»] 




7l^Siadcnis0f S.HS- 

IjDfio J^avQ K.esDonct<2cl 

"To Theic Coanttys Call 

Jn TFas SupterriQ otruc^alQ 

^ov Tollman Jt^ihsriy 

IjDq. IfTo Class 0f 

9Vinctecn (fia/iteGn, 

WitFi Pvido 5?aa^^oi/aUy. 

DedicatQ Owe Annual 




Page BevenJ 








[Page Eight 



To ^UA. "S) \T^ 

^./OajJamjCV ^jSvaaa. VVjL QfSxlA. XWajc KaA.K- t^syvJL 
Tx\rir Jo-tsV/ts-a : CYVJL xKjl \rvrjui_ XXa-C^ (\AAH-!) e>crwvv\^Cu./J^ 
To iSsxj^HJi •, xLi_ (AjLlv CrvvJL tLo^ XNiLOJkA Uvj. XtCxamLo 

Tr- l/^A5JL^ ivSLxSl/wv3 (5l- ^x_ jU'Jv KmA cwui: a^v^M/- 

TVc^ \jlA. rVv<N^ A/v^ euWv^ (Xa^O. ^O-iLk q^-v^ \aA.^d^ , 

Vm\^ i^a \fsM.\j^ cAJL ^oiruAiia. (Low. 



Page Nine] 



rrrf 



I I 



Srnfist ^lien 

Seotae Tlppei 
Tlrtnur remold 
Trcd Uacon 
7^oss!Bald.win 
^rnesi Sallard 
CuUcnDarncj 
Tloy Heldon 
John Bli^/i 
^nlon Brewer 
Joe Iburton 
llQngjUy Brin ^lou> 

Carton Droion 
Tved &. Bruning 
Jrmcl ^nsh 
TsDilX\a.m i3yrnc 
Tta.ncis Qa-dem 
Tifitvy Carter 
John Qasey 

?{cnri^Cobb 
Svevett (^va'iq 
Tovrest Craiq 
Ji'orCoUinj 
^ouisCordts 
Mil Cordes 
(Blatencz (?raig 



(9uv Boys 

Sverett P{uH 
(2urtis Gross 
^aujton Dannetieli 
Jofin i)c?^attco 
UL/tlliam x)e3Kundrum 
Tred ©evcrcaui 
Jiavoid DoanoU 
Joseph Sdwards 
^ wrence (sMrid jc 
James Snos 
ZDillavd $verhavt 
«^ynn Taul^concr 
T^erbcrt ^ailamore 
7rancis i9atQS 
Burron t^arvcy 
'Wilfred Sftde 
Tcank.^Hhert 
'Rea,9ilbert 
Qfiaries liOrJgftt 
o^land J'iadlcy 
James Jiancock 
Jqftn Jiayel 
JCunme J^azzenzanl 
DaU Tieinz 
i9u\i "Haiiaxd 
Xynn Tidier 
Lawrence Tfj'U 

JHeU'in Kill 
Wiifrcd Hcndcrs(\oi 
John IDals Jiodapp 
e/iariw7f,4tcfey 



Jn %e Service 



Gyrus rioffmeyer 
Walter Horst 
GdxjMrd Kub«r 

3V(ouric« Jerm'mqs 
•^bui j 7Ca\n 
(lien TCytc 
laParrcn ^af^n 
Tbrest ^cjningcr 
Trccman .^cinin^cr 
Siewetf ^indev 
GRester ^ump^in 
£?oeOV{c Donald 
JKarion ^{cJntyre 
acorgc JVdc^ug/iUn 

(Toe J^ijc^ 
Coulter JKontgomcry 
'jrani^ i!^(ontgoincri/ 
7(ar/an J^ton^jomcri/ 
7i(?i\net A J({ontgbmcr»/ 
^uis U^emeyer 
Soe Otmshy 
^ouw (9j(erman 
(?arJ(9jfermon 
liJiU (9itcrman 
(?arl(9fte 
Dale y^atficl^ 
7rwin Pumphray 
Cyril ^.eaachs 



Cavl TleinMd 

^Quis J^dman 
Z^lfred J^ynoids 
nXauricc Ujefxl 
r^iJxrrf "Ross 
Claude Apbbina 
Jlay T^ussili 
t^corgc Scfiletzr 
&jjjing Sfiieldj 
^orwln Skori 
'Jlohett Shoct 
Arthur Smiifi 
Cftc iter optllman 
Tirthuv Spray 
J^owari Stanfidd 
^oy (Sullivan 
(Barl<5uxtxcr 
Jtaalci/ Switzer 
JHcrrill iJteclc 
Charles %x>m<Lj 
XsDilVxam %oinas 
uryan rogel 
Z£>altcr Voss 
JQnnetd Zt^Aitc 
RiJf W/iitjon 
l?al/ord Wizihoff ' 
6rlc Wilson 
jran^Wieni^ 
7(crbcrt ZDive 



'Hi 



I ji 











Page Twel 



Jn cIHgmoviam 

HENRY COBB 

JN THE center o{ \\^^ S^llclas H'.gti Scliool 
Service Flag is a gold star, commemora- 
tive o{ Henrvj Cobb, o{ tlie class o{ '07, a 
sjplcndid vjoung aviator. After comf)\ct'mg li'is 
training in tbe United States Scliool o\ Aero- 
nautics at Cornell University, lie was transferred 
to Camp Ellington Fields at Dallas, Texas. 

Tlie message tbat tlie star carries to every 
lieart is one of sorrow; sorrow tliat tbere bas 
gone from among us one wbose sjalendid young 
manbood bas meant and will mean so mucb to 
tbose of us wbo knew bim and loved bim. 
Tbere is, too, a feeling of gratitude tbat so 
noble a life bas been lived among us. He bas 
made tbe su|preme sacrifice in resjponse to our 
Country's call. 



Page Thirteen] 




[Page Fourteen 



TViomas Abbott Mott 

Supermtenaenf o{ Public Schools 



Page Fifteen J 



'Aiikio 




[Page Sixteen 



Kate Ferris Andrews 

Prmclpal o{ S\y\e\ds HigVi ScViool 



Page Seventeen] 




Sliields HigVi Scliool 



[Page Eighteen 



Inarli of lEliuratinn 



LcRoy Miller 

President 



Cliarles L. Kessler 

Sccretari) 



Benjamin F. Sclineck 

Treasurer 



Page Nineteen] 



^e Jacaity 


'Some may come and some may go. 


hat we go on fovevev!' 


11- 


L, A. ACKEH.MAN 

Mathematics 
Physiology 


(^ 


Anna Clark 
Mathematics 
Latin 


^^^^4^H 


Kmalese ALWES 
Enylish 


^ 

^ 


Eleuthera V. 

Davisos 
English 
History 




Kate F. Andrews 
Principal 
English 


f 


Adelaide Oasawav 


y 




V'l 









[Page Twenty 



Rose Hamilton 
Geography 




Katherinb a. Qv 



Mtra Lait 
History 
Civics 



^A 



).^ 



y 



Page Twenty one J 




<^tevavy 



[Page Twenty-two 




FRANK WELLER 




HE SUN has slipped below the horizon. The faint blue 
line away to the west, suggesting the contact of earth and 
sk.y, was slightly edged with crimson. Two or three 
truant stars were already twinkling in the dark blue 
canopy above. At another time the serenity of it all 
might have stirred the soul of a poet to an expression of 
immortal feeling. But to us, a regiment of French in- 
fantrymen, it brought only a deep thankfulness that 
another day of slaughter was at an end. Rifles and 
machine guns that had cracked incessantly since the first 
dim hint of dawn were now silent and the general con- 
fusion of battle, so horrible in its intensity, had given 
place to a strange calm as the shadows of approaching night fell gently upon 
the earth. The last pale streaks of twilight faded out of the western sky and 
the moon, like an impetuous enchantress, seeing the last fluttering edge of her 
rival's golden robe broke from behind a cloud and enveloped the universe in 
the radiance of her beauty. As the stars grew thicker and brighter, a gentle 
breeze came whispering across the fields, bringing in its train through moonlight 
and starlight the holy hour of evening. 

Men who but a few hours ago were trying to kill other men now banished 
from their minds all thoughts of strife. The field out in front of our trench 
was strewed with silent grey-coated figures. They were shock troops who had 
been hurled against our first line fortifications. They made a gallant sight, 
those young fellows, grimly advancing while our machine gunners cut great 
swaths in their ranks. We had lost many a brave French lad in breaking that 
charge, and now it seemed that a mutual feeling of human sympathy pervaded 
the atmosphere and established an unspoken truce between us and the Germans. 



The world viust be made safe for democracy. — The President. 



Page Twenty-three] 



Many of our men sat smoking in meditative silence, thinking of the poor fellows 
lying out there in the field so white and still. They were no longer the enemy, 
simply the beings of God's creation. Those bodies once moved with the life 
and vitality He had given them. Mortal hands had destroyed the body, but 
the soul, impervious to human destruction, took its place in eternity. As they 
sat there with these thoughts in mind there crept into their consciousness this 
proposition, "Man has destroyed that which God has made," and the deep 
silence with which it was accepted made one feel he was witnessing an atonement 
between man and the Almighty. 

Others of our regiment, younger and lighter-hearted, hummed low tunes 
or sat conversing in groups. While I watched them my own mind became filled 
with sacred contemplation that comes only to the soldier who has come safely 
out of battle. Suddenlj' from the German trenches came the clear ringing 
notes of a cornet. How the fellow could play! He fairly picked up our feel- 
ings and carried them along with him. When he stopped for a moment every 
man of us rose up and cheered him. An American in our regiment started 
singing "Silver Threads Among the Gold," and the Boche played an accom- 
paniment on his cornet. It was great. At the conclusion not one of us could 
speak, but a young soldier next to me (a mere boy) started crying very softly 
and soon all down the line of strong men — war-hardened veterans — were chok- 
ing back tears they were ashamed for their comrades to see. Probably to please 
his Yankee partner the Teuton musician played "Dixie" and " 'Way Down 
Upon the Swanee River." After that he ran over a few popular French airs 
and quit. We supposed he would play no more, and at the shift of guards 
wrapped up in our blankets. I was about half asleep when again there fell on 
my ears the silvery tones of his instrument. He was playing a waltz, and at 
the first strain I leaped up in trembling excitement. Only two men in the 
whole world new that waltz existed — mj'sclf and the dearest friend of my youth, 
Karl Schmallhausen, a Bavarian musician. On my twenty-third birthday he 
had composed and played it for me: a waltz so beautiful that we decided to 
share it with no others, but keep it as a bond of mutual affection. 

For three years I had not heard it played, and now its slov.' melody came 
drifting to me over the battle field, bringing a message fi-om Karl. I knew he 
was fighting with the enemy, for once within the borders of his native land his 
body and soul must become the tool of his Imperial Master. Often I had won- 
dered if he had gone through it all unscathed, as I had. A Zouave from the 
rest billets back of the base line came down the trench with an alto under his 
arm. I stopped him and asked if I might play it. Nervously I played through 
the first strain of the waltz and immediately Karl played the second. Thus, 

The world's peace must he planted upon the tested foundations of political 
liberty. — The President. 



[Page Twenty-four 



until taps, we played to each other. I wanted to go ovei* to him, but to venture 
into that open field, even at night, was certain death. 

All night I lay in my blankets thinking of him, and I knew that somewhere 
out there in the darkness he was thinking of me. At last we had found each 
other again, but I ferventlj- hoped wc should not meet in tomorrow's fray. The 
thought of killing him as I had others of the enemy sickened mj' soul and I 
tried to banish the thought from my mind. 

With the coming of dawn I arose and to soothe my perturljed spirit climbed 
to the top of the trench and looked out in the direction of the German position. 
Almost instantly a dark figure became visible on that black line I knew to be the 
enemy's fire trench. I raised myself higher and he saw me. Quickly he crossed 
his arms on his chest and then dropped them. "Karl!" I cried. It was the 
old danger signal he and I used at the conservatory to warn each other of an 
approaching professor when either of us were into deviltry. When he caught 
my answer he leaped back in his trench. I did not understand why he had given 
the signal, but I straightway reported to the commander and he had the entire 
regiment prepare for immediate action. Again I went to the observation post 
and looked out. A great grey-gi'een line was sweeping across the field toward 
us. In that moment I knew the meaning of the signal. The German officers 
had planned a surprise attack and Karl had given us warning. 

Our machine guns sent a screen of bullets across the field, and for a moment 
their line wavered, but a second arose from the trench and joined the first. On 
they came, and as we set to meet the shock our Yankee comrade leaped up and 
rushed squarely at the foe. Without word from the officers our whole regiment 
rose up and followed him. The audacity of it startled us, but the call to follow 
was irresistible. A big German was running in advance of his column and 
the American turned toward him. They met with a lunge and I saw a bayonet 
sink in the grey coat. The weight of our impact broke their Prussian forma- 
tion, and with that gone the Teuton warriors were lost. Back they went, and 
a part of our force deploying came up in the rear and made them prisoners. 

As we marched back I saw the American sitting silently beside the big fel- 
low he had slain. His face was drawn in a half sad, half wistful expression; 
when he turned at my approach, he shuddered and looked down where in his 
hand he held — a German cornet. 

Thus it is in war. I pinned my Croix de Guerre on Karl's grey jacket and 
the American fastened a little silk flag of his own country under it. Wc did 
not bury him with the others, but wrapped him in the Tricolor and laid him to 
rest beneath a great spreading treQ. We gave him the best we could for, 
although German born, he was a Frenchman at heart. As a single cog in the 

We have no selfish e^ids to serve. We desire no conquest, no dominion. — 
The President. 



Page Twenty-five] 



great German military wheel he did his duty as it was forced upon him. As a 
man and a lover of free humanity, he gave his own life that he might save the 
champions of Liberty and Justice. No nobler hearted man ever walked on 
French soil than Karl, and the autocratic hand that forced him to oppose the 
rights of mankind with the great strength of his body could not make him 
oppose it with the greater strength of his soul. 

When peace again comes to the land of the Fleur-de-lis I am going back 
to that little mound on the French frontier and pay to it the love and gratitude 
of a Frenchman's heart. Above it shall be raised a monument dedicated to 
him who was strong enough to fight for the things he hated and die for the 
things he loved. Then as France looks with pride upon the monuments of her 
own heroic soldier sons, she may stop for a moment before this one and say, with 
the inscription on its base: "Here lies a man." 



We ^Qd Cross 



B 



DAISY CARTER 



RIGHTER THAN the flames of shelled cities 

Glows the beacon-like red of its hue, 
Bringing to "No Man's Land" pity; 

Its call, "Save the fallen and true;" 
Whiter than fairest of flowers. 

The lily-like fields of its white. 
Bringing a great healing power 

To restore the wounded man's might. 
Sweet balm for the wounded and dying, 

Comfort and joy mark its course; 
Soothing relief for the sighing. 

All come direct fron^ this source. 
'Tis the banner of comforting peace 
Thrown wide that suffering might cease. 



The thing we are fighting is without heart or conscieyice. It is, ?« short, 
'Kultur" — Louis Howland. 



[Page Twenty-8ix 



o 



Oav Savvice T^ag 

AGNES A. ANDREWS 

XE HUNDRED stars in the service flag, 
One hundred lives for you and me, 

One hundred boys to meet the foe 
In France across the sea. 

They are fighting for us, they are dying for us, 

To save us from the Hun. 
On them is the burden of progress laid, 

The burden since earth was begun. 

Out under fire in the wet and the damp, 

Under night's dark canopy. 
The bravest boys, the woi-thiest boys, 

Are freeing you and me. 

Brave Boys, when your task is done. 
And you come from freeing the earth. 

The world will hail you with a joy anew 
For aiding her rebirth. 

One hundred stars in the service flag, 
One hundred lives for you and me, 

One hundred boys to meet the foe 
In France across the sea. 



Wc arc but one of the champions of the rights of mankind. — The President. 



Page Twenty-sevenJ 




We ^gemation 

of 
%vencQ Scott 




MARY GOODLOE BILLINGS 

TERENCE SCOTT, on the morning of April 6, 1917, was awakened by his 
room-mate who was studying elocution. He was uttering the gurgling 
vowel sounds of the beginner, and his penetrating voice pierced the sweet- 
ness of Terence's beauty sleep. With a groan he remembered the day and 
rolled out to put the finishing touches to his Senior oration. This was his last 
chance to work on it. 

Terence was the honor student of the Senior class — pale, stooped and list- 
less. How he ever endured his room-mate was a mystery to the college, for 
Bob Claypool was just the reverse; a broad-shouldered, straight, energetic fel- 
low. Terence, however, admired his room-mate in spite of the inconvenience 
of walking over Bob's dumb-bells and tennis racquets; in spite of never knowing 
what he would find in his bunk when he turned down the covers; in spite of 
being awakened at all hours, since Bob had taken up elocution, by the ah, eeh, 
ooh, of the beginner. 

Terence completed the oration amid the noise and confusion of Bob's morn- 
ing calisthenics. He breathed a sigh of relief when, with a "So long, Scotty, " 
Bob departed for his tennis court. His oration was on "The Value of the 
Manufacturing Industry," and he hoped — in fact, expected — to get the Senior 
prize. Never in all the four years of his college life had Terence been any- 
thing but a "grind." He had never taken part in any of the social functions 
and spent all his recreation hours in his everlasting study. As a result, he 
was by no means popular with the majority of the students. The only person 
who had any genuine affection for him was Bob Claypool. 

The day passed quickly in the usual way, during which Terence did not 
so much as catch a glimpse of Bob. That evening, as he was studying in his 
room, the missing Bob rushed in, slammed the door, and with his face in a glow 
of excitement, thrust the evening paper before the bored eyes of his studious 
room-mate, who read this headline: 

The test of our worth is the service ire render. — Theodore Roosevelt. 



[Page Twenty-eight 



"Congress Declares War on German Empire." 

"Well," drawled Terence, "it was inevitable." 

Caesar's ghost, man! And you sit there with your biology note-book, 
calmly remarking that war was inevitable, when the U. S. A. is staking the ideals 
of all her history on this thing! Wake up, you pasty-faced milksop! Isn't 
the United States more important than biology? Or is if? Good-nigJit!" and 
he jumped on Terence and ruffled up his hair, because, in his own intense 
patriotism, it was inconceivable that anyone else should be so utterly indifferent 
and cool. As far as Bob could see, his shaking up had no effect on Terence, but 
in reality he had set the wheels in the brains of the "grind" turning in a 
different direction; and for the first time in his life, Terence Scott began to 
think of other things than simply his books. However, there was no visible 
sign of this change as he went on quietly. He finished college with honors. He 
graduated as the valedictorian of the Senior class. He was commonly classed 
as a cold-blooded, unpatriotic slacker, although he contributed liberally to the 
Red Cross and Y. M. C. A. and attended all the war lectures. 

The one cloud which marred the satisfaction of his graduation day was 
that on the morrow Bob Claypool would leave for the Naval Training Station, 
while he would go back to Lawrence, Mississippi, to begin some life of clerkship 
or stenography, he knew not which. Bob had long ago filed his application for 
entering the navy, had been accepted and was really going — going to fight for 
his beloved U. S. A. 

Terence's mind was a confused jumble. He knew he ought to go, and he 
knew that deep down in his heart he would hate himself if he did not, but he 
loathed the thought of blood and of death, and knew that he could never kill 
a man, even for his country's sake. 

On commencement night, when he took his place, he saw on the platform a 
man in olive drab — the speaker of the evening. He was an Englishman, and 
every inch a soldier. When he began to talk the crowd immediately realized 
that he knew of what he spoke. It was a soul-stirring message from the soul of 
a sincere personality. He closed with these words: 

"All I have to say is, that if every man in America does not thrill to the 
service of his country, he's not the American the British fought in 1776. The 
allied nations are sure of America, and if she fails — she's not America!" 

Terence felt his heart swell within him, and he knew that tonight — tomor- 
row at the latest — he would apply for the privilege of joining those forces of 
liberty which were going aci'oss to fight, side by side with the brave people who, 
for almost three years, had been bearing the burden alone. With a joy that he 
could not explain he told Bob of his decision, and hardly remembered the di- 
ploma in his hand, hardly remembered anything; he cared now only for Bob's 
hearty "Good for you, Scotty! I knew you'd find yourself!" 

TJiere never yet ivas a service worth rendering fhat did not entail sacrifice. 
—Theodore Roosevelt. 



Paje Twenty-nineJ 



^Q Pco^icjal Son 



T 



F. WELLEK 



HE PRODIGAL son departed hence, 

And journeyed a long way off. 
He blowed his money to the very end, 

Then hiked for the family trough. 

The old man saw him coming afar. 
And took off his hat and cried: 
"yuick, Henry, and kUl the Jersey calf. 
Thy brother a luncheon provide. ' ' 

Now Henry had stayed at home and worked, 
To plow and to sow and to reap; 

He helped his mother and catered to dad, — 
He hardly had time to sleep. 

So here comes back this boisterous youth, 

From devious paths beyond, 
To gather in the shekels again, 

And like as not abscond. 

Alas for Henry; in deep dismay 

He had to dispatch his calf. 
To feed the gluttony of worthless kin; — 

He sure was handed the gaff. 

And worst of it all, to this very day, 

The preachers delight to spiel 
About the young chap who came back home, 

And ate up poor Henry 's veal. 

And when they mention Henry at all, 
They actually call him a grouch. 

Because he kicked on slaying his calf, 
To coddle the lazy slouch. 

Albeit the world wags on that way. 

The same as in days of yore; 
The cuss who tears off the widest strip 

Is marked with the highest score. 

The dutiful Henrys plod along. 

And see that the work is done; 
They feed the calf and sow and reap. 

But hold no place in the sun. 

We hope some day the tide wall turn. 
When all of his kind are exempt. 

And Henry will sit at the steering wheel, 
And view the rest vrith contempt. 



[Page Thirty 




WelRkofthiiehKk 




IRENE HETDEMAN 

I AST NIGHT," said the old clock, "I was rudely aroused from my peaceful 
slumber by a noise of someone banging unfeelingly at my door. I 
■^ awoke, and, lo ! whom should I see standing directly before me but Mr. 
Phillips. It was but two o'clock a. m. Could I be dreaming, or was I really 
awake; and if so, what was all the commotion about? But as I had to stay on 
the wall, and Mr. Phillips offered no explanation for his unusual behavior, I 
was still in the dark. 

As I was still puzzling over the event, my hands were painfully moved 
forward, and the next thing I knew, it was three o 'clock a. m. Then I heard 
Mr. Phillips sigh as though with relief, and heard him say, "Now." 

He slammed my door and turned away. Again I fell asleep. Suddenly 
I thought that I heard a sound like the stifled shriek of a clock. The sound 
seemed to come across the hall from Room 8. I came to the conclusion that 
Mr. Phillips was visiting that clock also. I longed to come down from my place 
on the wall and rush to the aid of my fellow-clock and demand an explanation 
for all this fooling with clocks at two o'clock in the morning. But I waited, 
and all thi-ough the dreary morning hours my hands ached dreadfully. Then, 
later in the day, I overheard the conversation of several people. 

"It's a rather mixed-up affair the first day — this new government time," 
said one. "Rather," responded the other, "but the government needs the time 
— daylight especially — so the clocks must be moved forward." 

They went on talking, but I was lost in thought. Suddenly light dawned 
on my senses, and I realized it all. I, even I, only an assembly-room clock, was 
doing the government of the United States some good. I felt myself swell with 
pride, but I grew calm when I reminded myself that I was only a clock. 

And so the old clock goes "tick." ticking on, day after day, one hour ahead, 
until the time comes when we have done our bit toward gardening and helping 
our government feed our associates and our own soldiers "Over There." 

Any fool can waste. — Kipling. 



Page Thirty-one 




N' dannettell: 




N AND out between freight ships and passenger ships a 
small steam cutter nosed its way into the San Francisco 
harbor. A girl of about eighteen was leaning eagerly 
over the rail. Her small, fair face was flushed with inter- 
est and her blue eyes danced with childish delight in the 
busy scene about her; for this was the first time that 
Leslie Marley could remember seeing her native land. 
Eleven years before, when the Botanical Reseai-ch 
Society of California sent Henry Marley to Guatemala 
to study the plant life of Central America, he took his 
wife and little daughter, Leslie, with him. From year 
to year the young botanist's stay in Central America was prolonged by the 
Association. His first book on "Tropical Forests" had been a success. He 
bought an old Spanish villa in San Jose and began work on a series of books. 
But since Leslie (whom both her parents adored) had decided that she wanted 
to attend school in the States, the Marleys were returning to California. 

Now, as Leslie watched the crew hauling the baggage upon deck, prepar- 
atory to unloading it on the dock, she turned to her mother, who was standing 
near. "Oh, mother, isn't it wonderful to think j'ou're in the United States? 
How energetic and busy everyone is! I love it!" 

Her mother smiled. "I'm glad you like it, dear. I think you will like 
the Ocean View Hotel, too. The Vancouvers are there and Ysabel will make 
it very agreeable for you, I'm sure. At least, she will if she is anything like 
her mother." 

"You like Mrs. Vancouver, mother?" asked Leslie, anxiously. 
"Very much, indeed. Clara is a splendid woman." 

"I hope Ysabel Vancouver will like me, but, mother — all along I've felt 
that she won't. How much older is she than I?" 



Viion each one of you much depeiids. — Secret.\ry of State Lansing. 



[Page Thirty-two 



"Oh. Leslie, what a foolish little daughter you are. The trip has tired 
you. Ysabel is only three years older than you. She will be twenty-two this 
fall, 1 think." 

Leslie turned away, for she could not explain why she so dreaded to meet 
Ysabel Vancouver, the daughter of her mother's girlhood friend. 

At Ocean View the windows of Leslie's room overlooked the shore. Three 
quarters of an hour before dinner time that night, Leslie stood all dressed be- 
fore one of the windows, watching the sun sink beyond the sea. She was wear- 
ing a simple white dress and her only ornament was one strand of perfect pearls. 

The sound of music and laughter came up from the verandas. Leslie won- 
dered if Ysabel was down there. Mrs. Vancouver had come in during the 
afternoon, while Leslie and her mother were unpacking. She told them that 
Ysabel was strenuously practicing for the temiis tournament, which was to be 
held the next week. 

As the iMarleys entered the dining room, Mrs. Vancouver turned to a tall 
young man who was sitting next to her. "Louis," she said, "will you please 
go get the Marleys and bring them over here?" 

Louis, however, frowned. "Nothing doing, mother. I've been chasing 
your darling daughter's stray tennis balls all afternoon. Ask "Walter to do it." 

Walter Haywood, a handsome man of almost thirty, who had been talking 
to Ysabel, upon hearing his name called, looked up from the other side of the 
table. "What is it, Mrs. Vancouver?" he asked. 

"I was asking Louis to go pilot the Marleys, there by the door, over here to 
our table; but, as usual, he wants to put it off on you." 

"I'll go," said HayAvood, following her eyes to the group which had just 
entered, and making his way easily among the tables he quickly approached 
them. "Are you Mr. Marley, sir?" he asked. "I am Walter Haywood. Mrs. 
Vancouver sent me to bring you to her table." 

"You are very kind," replied Mr. Marley. "This is my wife and my 
daughter, Leslie, Mr. Haywood. ' ' The women rose and together the four crossed 
the room. 

At dinner Leslie was seated between Louis Vancouver and his father. The 
latter was very kind to her and Louis, too, made himself especially agreeable. 
He was a senior in Berkeley University and he kept Leslie amused with a never 
failing fund of school stories. Everyone was nice to her. Ysabel, who sat diag- 
onally across the table, addressed several remarks to her, but once Walter Hay- 
wood glanced across and smiled into her eyes ; and it was of that smile that Leslie 
was thinking when she fell asleep that night. 

The next morning Leslie was leisurely eating breakfast in her room when 

The first duty of a public man is to sacrifice his personal interest and that 
of his party to the general interest of the country. — Venizelos. 



Page Thirty-threeJ 



Ysabel came in. Ysabel was not as pretty a girl as Leslie, although she made 
a stunning picture in her white sport dress, with a Panama hat tied securely 
under her chin, as she stood in the middle of Leslie's room and vigorously 
whirled her tennis racket around in the air. "Oh, you slow girl!" she ex- 
claimed. ' ' Do hurry and come down to the courts with me, please. ' ' 

"I'd love to," said Leslie, discarding the remainder of her fruit. "I'll 
be ready in just a minute. ' ' 

Ysabel sat down in a large willow chair. "How do you like us here in 
California, Leslie?" she asked. 

"You are wondei-ful people," said Leslie. 

"How do you like Walter Haywood?" Ysabel continued, gazing dreamily 
out of the open window. 

He is very nice, indeed," Leslie replied. 

"He is" — Ysabel was going to say, "my fiance," but as she looked up at the 
younger girl she was putting on her hat and her eyes were very cold and unre- 
sponsive. "He is a good friend of ours," she said, instead. "My father is 
very much interested in him." 

Once outside on their wa.v to the tennis courts, Ysabel asked again, "And 
how do you like Bud?" 

"I like him a great deal," said Leslie, frankly. 

Ysabel laughed. ' ' I should say that he returned the compliment. He told 
me this morning that he was going to teach you to play tennis." 

Leslie looked up, surprised. "He didn't say anything to me about it," she 
said. 

Never mind; he'll do it. Louis never considers the other person," said 
Louis' sister. "If he has decided to teach you tennis, it's tennis you'll learn." 

With boating and dancing and tennis and swimming the summer days 
passed quickly for Leslie. Under Louis' instruction she developed a fair game 
of tennis, but she surprised everyone in the ease with which she mastered swim- 
ming lessons and while Ysabel won the tennis championship, she carried off 
all prizes in the amateur swimming contests. 

One particular afternoon, two months after her arrival at Ocean View, 
Leslie was sitting all alone on one of the side verandas. Ysabel had gone into 
town to the costumer's. Ysabel was getting a great many new clothes lately, 
Leslie mused. And Louis had gone day before yesterday with some of his 
college chums to spend the week in the mountains. All the women in the hotel 
were playing bridge and the men were downi on the links. She wondered idly 
where Haywood was. Her book had ceased to be interesting. She leaned back 
in her chair and closed her eyes. 

Let us exact from every man the fullest performance of duty, the fullest 
loyalty to our flag and the most resolute effort to serve it. — Theodore Roosevelt. 



[Page Thirty-four 



"I knew j'ou danced too late last night." 

Leslie jumped. "Mr. Haywood! Why, I thought you were 1 don't 

know where I thought you were, but I didn't know you were about the house." 

Walter Haywood sat down on the steps. "Pretty dull around here today, 
isn 't it ? " 

"It has been," said Leslie, closing her book. 

"How long is Louis going to be gone on this trip?" asked Haywood, after 
a pause. 

"I don't know. About a week, I think." 

"Look here. You're not nearly as nice to that boy as j'ou might be." 

' ' Why should you care about him ? ' ' Leslie asked, blushing ever so slightly. 
If he would say that he didn't care! If he would sa.y that he was glad she 
wasn't too nice to Louis! She had given him a good chance to say something. 

But when he began to speak she knew that he was not going to say that 
kind of thing. His voice was too cool and impersonal, with just a touch of 
laughter in it. "Well, you see, one always likes his relatives to have the best 
of everything, girls included." 

"Relatives?" asked Leslie, incredulously. 

"Why, yes; I've begun to look out for my brother, already." 

"Your brother?" And then the full significance of what he was saying 
came upon her. "You are going to marry Ysabel?" she asked, hoping so hard 
that he would laugh and tell her it wasn't so. 

"Hasn't anyone ever told you?" he said, instead. 

"No," she said; and her voice was scarcely more than a whisper. 

Haywood looked up questioningly at her, but before the pained expression 
in her eyes he dropped his own. "Whj', I guess it's so old," he said, "that 
nobody thought to tell you. We've been engaged for two years, and when I 
was able to help Mr. Vancouver so much with that big lawsuit he's always 
talking about, he took me into the firm and Ysabel and I decided to be married 
this fall." 

Leslie was silent. Again he looked up at her. 

"I didn't know it," she said at last. "No one ever told me. I-I wish 
you all the happiness — Good-bye." She held out her hand to him, but when he 
started to take it shf snatched it away and fled over the veranda, into the build- 
ing and up to her room, where, from behind the drawn curtains, she watched his 
white clad figure walk dejectedly down to the beach ; and then she flung herself 
on her bed, weeping hysterically. 

But when Walter Haywood reached the shore he sat down on the upturned 
boat and said, "Damn." And then, more calmly, "Of course, it's hard on her, 

A steadfast concert for peace can never be maintained except by partner- 
ship of democratic nations. — The President. 



Page Thirty-five] 



but just because I'm decent to her she falls in love with me. Oh, somebody- 
ought to spank her." 

Leslie did not go down to dinner that night and later in the evening her 
father came in to see her. "What's the matter, daughter?" he asked, stooping 
to kiss the pale face she lifted to him. Tears came into her eyes, but she only 
said, "I think we'd better go back to Guatemala, dad. I don't believe I want 
to go to school." 

"But I have just arranged for you to enter Berkeley as a junior," her father 
objected. "Mr. Elmond is willing to give you credit for the work you have 
done with me." 

But Leslie said, "I want to go home," and turned her face away. 

Her father, baffled, looked up at his wife. She motioned for him to follow 
her into the next room, and there she told him all she had been able to draw 
from Leslie of her feeling for Haywood. At first Mr. Marley refused to consider 
Leslie in earnest when she insisted on returning to Central America, but daily 
she grew weaker and weaker until the doctor said, ' ' Give her what she wants. ' ' 

"I can't do that," said Mr. Marley, sadly, "but I can take her away." 

And so the day before Ysabel's wedding a south-bound steamer carried the 
Marleys away from San Francisco. The Vancouvers and Walter Haywood 
stood sadly on the dock while the ship steamed slowly out of the harbor, and 
Louis watched an ever-fading figure clad in bright blue that stood resolutely 
near the prow of the ship, but it did not turn or wave a single farewell. 

On the evening of the second day out Leslie was standing on the upper 
deck when a sudden shock ran through the ship and instantly the cry, "Revil- 
lagigedo Rock," arose. Leslie could see nothing but the crew and frightened 
passengers moving frantically about the deck below. And then through the still 
air came the crisp order, "To the boats." But Leslie did not move. Below 
her father and mother searched and researched the cabins. 

The last boat was filling when the captain, searching the ship for anyone 
left behind, came suddenly upon her. "Girl, why don't you obey orders? Go 
below. Get in that boat." Leslie started to object, but the man seized her 
wrist and fairly dragged her with him. Their boat safely pushed off just as the 
huge steamer settled slowly to the bottom. 

But Leslie had no coat. She crouched in the bow of the boat and felt the 
cold spray come through her thin dress. The men in the boat were rowing hard, 
but once the captain looked around at her and fro\vned. "Get someone's coat," 
he said; but Leslie did not mind him, and when morning came and the little 
boat, having safely rounded the rocks, was entering the Revillagigedo harbor 
he looked about for her again. She was leaning forward on her face, one hand 
trailing in the icy watei-, and he knew before he lifted her up that she was dead. 

The right is more preeioua than peace. — President Wilson. 



[Page Thirty-six 




0, Spcing; tfiou art tfie mistress of tfxa year 

oHt tfiy doav call aU. nature doth awa^e; 
^y gentle winds drive off the season seav 

Plnd tender huds their wintry hed forsake; 
%e fairy muvmuv of thy silvery hvoo^ 

Comes li^e sweet music to my eager ear 
7is 1, sezure withiin some sheltered noo^, 

(Paze on thy fair andjcagvant scenes of 

cheev; 
^nd then there comes to me a haunting joy, 

%e scenes of other days come to my eyes 
7/Tg scenes of youth, when J a hare-foot boy 

Jn joy and comfort walked beneath thy 

s^ies. 



^~ 



Page Thirty-seven] 




FRANK MILLER 




HILIP FALKLAND was a talented nmsifian. His long, 
flowing pompadour and black bow-tic gave him the ap- 
pearance of an Italian master, but he was none other 
than a young man of unusual abilitj', living in our own 
Iloosier State. In the warm seasons he spent his leisure 
moments profitably at an open window, overlooking the 
garden, playing selections from such great masters as 
(riovanni Pressenda. His violin seemed fairly to sing 
with a sweet caressing tune of love and sympathy similar 
to that of Orpheus 

With his violin to his shoulder, pouring forth the 
melodious notes, his chief meditation was of Mary. Mary— ah, how sweet a 
name it had once been to him; the name of her, whom he had o)iec loved dearly 
and who had loved him; but now all of that belonged to the past. He loved 
her no more; he loved no one; he had even adopted a motto, "Valete Puellae," 
and had vowed never again to associate with them in any way. Philip only 
liked to dream of the times which could be no more ; in fact, we wanted them to 
be no more, as love between him and Mary was forever dead. But he. as only 
lovers know how or why, delighted in musing over a name which now meant 
nothing, but had once meant much. 

Mary, on the other hand, had dismissed from her mind any thoughts 
whatever of Philip. Bertram, the "stylish kid" from the city, had stepped 
in. Philip had, for a time, hated even the name of Bertram Ewing, but when 
he discovered that Mary no longer loved him, he immediately dismissed both 
love and hate from his mind ; for one of his principles was to force no one to do 
anything unwillingly. 

Eveiy Tuesday and Friday evening Philip took a music lesson from Pro- 
fessor Gunvitch, a local instructor. The class, of which he was a member, was 
composed of about fifteen young men and women of about tbe same age as 
our hero. His talents had already won fame for him among his fellow students. 



[Page Thirty-eight 



One Tuesday evening more than half of the pupils were in their places 
fully fifteen niinutcs before the required time. Philip, wdth a group of 
acquaintances, was discussing the lesson and, while giving his opinion to his 
listeners who were grouped about his seat, he chanced to glance at their faces 
to see the impression which he had produced. He looked into the eyes of June 
Mackson, a very beautiful girl. As he looked at her she smiled. Instinctively, 
1.? smiled back. His gaze then turned elsewhere, but the others were as infinite 
space before it; he saw only the image of a beautiful, smiliiig girl. 

Suddenly, there flashed before the mind of Philip two words: "Valete 
Pucllae." At once he realized the folly he had committed. For a time there 
was a serious debate in his mind, as to whether he should stand by his vow or 
yield to Cupid's temptations. He decided to remain firm. 

The following days his mind went through numerous adventures. He pic- 
tured the testing of his love for her ; he saw himself telling her that he admired 
her intellect, but that he could not admire her beauty and grace, as he had bound 
himself by a vow not to associate with girls. He pictured her turning away Avith 
many a tear in her eyes ; then he, like a noble knight, would tenderly caress her 
and, turning, bid her farewell. 

One morning he told his most intimate and confiding chum, Ferdinand Hart, 
just how the matter stood. Ferdinand, who knew of Philip's vow, said, "Philip, 
you are a fool for adopting such a motto." 

Philip carefully weighed his reply, "Jlaybe I am." 

About that time, to break up his reverie, came the declaration of war and 
the passage of the draft law. Philip enlisted as a volunteer. Having donned the 
khaki for humanity and Old Glory, he felt it his duty to call on June, as he had 
lately done quite often, and tell her good-bye. He immediately repaired to her 
home. The happiest moment of his life had at last arrived. 

"How brave of you to join the colors, and how noble to give up your life, if 
need be, for democracy," said June, admiringly. 

"What I have is my country's, and I am willing to give her all," said 
Philip, with a tear of emotion. 

"I'm proud of you, Philip," said June. Strangely moved by her words, 
Philip did not heed a subtle voice which whispered, "Your vow! your vow!" 

Philip Falkland, with June as his wife, was the happiest soldier in the 
legions of Old Glorv. When told of his resolve, June said : ' ' You arc a con- 
querer. You have conquered a vow which would have wrecked your future 
happiness. As you have been a conqueror here, may you also be a conqueror 
"Over There." 



Hope is the mainspring of efficiency; complacency is its rust. — D.wid 
Lloyd-George. 



Page Thirty-i 



w 



^ IKoagk 

THELMA JONES 

HEN YOU come to the end of your high school years 

And you sit all alone with your thoughts, 
Do you think with pride and unshed tears 

Of the victories you have wrought? 
Do you think what leaving old S. H. S. 

Can mean to a Senior's heart, 
When he says farewell to old school days. 

And dear friends have to part? 

Well, this is the end of our high school life, 

Near the end of our childhood, too; 
For now we take to the open path 

Where the "snaps" in life are few. 
But Memory has painted the^se happy years 

In colors that ne'er will fade. 
And we find at the end of our journey here 

The love of the friends we've made. 



Ti 



G 



ive 

DORIS A. JACKSON 

OD of the worshipers of old. 
Sweeping o'er this world so bold. 

You are as a charging battle line. 
Advancing slowly, destroying as you go ; 
Following your leader, sometimes crouching low. 
And then arising with a mighty din. 
While all your foe.s to you give in, 

And with a rush you claim the victory. 
Mighty and unconquerable you are; 
Feared yet admired as the heroes of war. 
Oh, Fire and Flame, 'tis easy to see 
Why the people of old worshiped thee. 

Let us pay with our bodies for our soul's desire. — Theodore Roosevelt. 



[Page Forty 





AGNES ANDREWS 

ENRY VON RIEHMER had been born in Amciiea, of 
German parents. When the war broke out he became 
vehemently pro-German, and as Germany's supporters 
grew fewer, he became more and more for the Vaterland, 
though his mothei-less children, Henry and Charlotte, 
\\ere visibly annoyed every time he lauded Germany 
Mild her achievements. 

When the United States entered the war Charlotte's 
sweetheart, Dycke Rhodes, came to him and asked per- 
mission to marry Charlotte before he should start to 
France to drive an ambulance. "No!" Von Riehmer 
thundered; "No, a thousand times. No! Vy do you nod drive an ambulance 
for der Vaterland? Pro-Englisher dogs!" and stamped indignantly away. 
As the days passed, he grew steadily more provoked at the country of his 
birth. At Christmas time, in nineteen sixteen, a nephew, Fritz, from Germany, 
came, ostensibly to visit him. He was a quick, heavy, rather bestial chap, in 
the secret service of Berlin. His manners were very bad, his disposition worse. 
After several interviews with him, young Henry, his eyes flashing, angrily left 
the house to enlist in the Canadian army. It was a hea\'y blow to the father, 
but he bore it proudly. 

In the atmosphere of his uncle's growing favor, Fritz's already bad man- 
ners grew worse. There in his uncle's house, he would pace the floor, twisting 
his little mustaches, and in his careful, precise English would give Von Riehmer 
his views on the war. 

One evening his uncle mentioned the fact that Germany was waging a war 
of self defense. Fritz laughed. "It is absurd the way you are behind the 
times. Uncle Heinrich. We are fighting because it is Germany's destiny to 
rule the world! We mu.st have a 'place in the sun!' If we cannot gain it in 

We Jiave no politics in a narrow sense in this conflict — Ex-Governor Ralston. 



Page Forty-i 



this war, we will get it in future wars. We desire fresh territory and more 
money. That is what we are fighting for." 

Henry von Riehmer was aghast at this shattering of his ideas, but in his 
heart he felt that the Germany of his old-time dreams was still alive and justly 
fighting in the right. 

One day Fritz's bad disposition got the better of him. Upon Charlotte's 
repeated refusals to shine his boots, he grew enraged and beat her. It was a 
trembling, hurt Charlotte that told her father of this outrage, but it was an even 
more hurt Charlotte who took refuge among her beloved paints and pictures, 
■utter she had watched her father storm at Fritz and heard Fritz's complacent 
answer that he should not get so excited unless he wished to receive the same 
treatment. 

Finally, the day before diplomatic relations were broken with the Imperial 
German Government, Fritz proposed to his uncle that, as he was an American, 
he could be of invaluable assistance to Germany by obtaining a government 
position that would enable him to visit the camps and secure information which 
could, without suspicion, be reported to Postdam. 

It could be said for Henry von Riehmer that he was honest, and as he stood 
there, his mind free from any taint of double dealing, he grew suddenly red, 
and then, taking a long breath, he pointed a trembling finger at his nephew 
and shouted "Go! Never darken my door again! I may luff Germany, but 
nefer for her vould I betray my countrj^ — America! Go!" 

He inwardly renounced his love for Germany and his Germanism. But 
he did not take up Americanism. He was, in fact, a man without a country. 

One day, toward the last of April, he came home from a walk and was met 
by a radiant Charlotte, who would not reveal to him the cause of her joy. But 
he found out as soon as he entered the house, for there stood Dyckc Rhodes 
and — at fii'st he could not believe his tear-dimmed eyes — his son, Henry, stand- 
ing straight and erect in his khaki uniform. After his joy had calmed a little, 
he learned that Dycke and Henry had come to join our own army. 

Reluctantly, he permitted Henry to join the American forces and Charlotte 
to become the wife of Dycke. In May, however, when he was visiting Charlotte 
and her husband, they noticed that although he said nothing for Germany, he 
was rather apathetic in his loyalty to the United States. In anxiety his daughter 
and son-in-law questioned him; but his only reply was, "The Unided States 
has done nuding for me; vy shoudt I do anyting for der Unided States? Der 
Unided States doess nod care vether I and my family are alife or deat. Vy 
shoudt I care about der Unided States?" 

Dycke gave up in despair, but Charlotte was equal to the occasion. "Oh, 

The present German submarine warfare against commerce is a warfare against 
mankind. — The President. 



[Page Forty-two 



no, father," she cried, I'unning into the house and returning with a big poster. 
"The United States docs care about you and your family." She quickly un- 
rolled the poster and held it up. It represented a benevolent Liberty, caring 
for the stricken people of all nations, and underneath it bore this legend: 

"She cares for you! Show your affcciion for her and buy LIBERTY 
BONDS." 

"That, father," she proudly cried, "i.s the prize- winning Liberty Loan 
poster; the artist is your daughter, Charlotte von Riehmer Rhodes. If Uncle 
Sam cares enough for your daughter to think that she painted the best poster 
from all over the United States, don't you think you should care for him, at 
least a little?" 

"Veil, Charlotte, you are righd. You und Dycke, here, haff made me see dot 
I do owe someding to Ungle Sam, so I vill support him. Hurray fer der Star- 
Spangled Banner! Vere is der nearest place vhere I can buy a Liberty Bond?" 

And so, another American joined the throng. 



mttde^mvsBvini 



B 



FRANK WELLER 



EF'ORE the murderous fire I reeled and fell ; 
The line surged o'er me, forward and return. 
The heat of battle rage swept on with unconcern. 

And then the river, I had heard them tell 
About, back home on Sundays, hove in sight. 
Its rolling waters grew as black as night; 
I knew no more. 

Somehow it was not yet to be farewell. 
For in her tenderness, I woke to learn. 
She drove the river back; the fever's burn 

She soothed with tender touch ; and to compel 
The pain to cease, she sang so low and sweet 
Of home and loved ones we should one day greet 
On our own shore. 



The wrongs against ichich we notv array ourselves are no common wongs; 
they cut to the very roots of human life. — The President. 



Page Forty-three] 




Patriot ^taff 



Frank Weller 
Miss Quinn 
Miss James 
Francis Stunkel 
Glenn Keach 
Miss Andrews 



Editor-in-Chief 
Faculty Editor 
Faculty Art Editor 
Business Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Faculty Business Manager 



AaBtBlant fEbttora 

Doris Jackson George Hurt Edrick Cordes 

QIIaBH iEJiitorH 

Kathryn Hodapp Aones Andrews 
Arthur Wilde Frank Miller 

Art lEbttdra 

Alice Dixon Ruth Staniield Bertha EwnNo 

Earl Dieck Helen Lewis Frederick Bretthauer 



[Page Forty-four 



Sditovial 



FRANK WELLER 




E SENIORS of 1918, standing on the threshold of a great 
new world, realize that its horizon is tinted with the dawn 
of a greater day than all past ages have forseen. Our 
graduation is denied the fairy thralldom of rosy dreams 
filled with fancy's pictures of a "big outside." It is 
as if the world had suddenly grown older and in the 
transition swallowed up that time of life when passion 
for air castles reigns supreme. Today the universe rolls 
ill a sea of fire and the time to dream is left far in the 
past. The present calls for action, immediate and man- 
sized. Thus we have traded youth's fair birthright for 
privilege of early participation in the fortunes of mankind. 

In the hearts of men there rests conviction that this world must be made 
secure for human life and liberty ; for the pursuit of happiness and the main- 
tenance thereof. The mighty door that has for ages denied the human race 
entrance into the land of universal peace and freedom is at this hour creaking 
on its rusty hinges. The champions of free humanity are striking heavy blows 
upon its iron bars and it shall open, even against mountains of mortuary ob- 
struction. The selfish hand of autocracy that holds down the latch is loosening 
its grip under the blow of the freeman's battle-axe. His war engines have 
razed to the ground the embattlements of him who would defend the ancient 
idea that creative force by one individual may have the divine right to subju- 
gate his fellow-men. 

The Pi-ussian Cain of today asks again the question of his predecessor; 
and as Christ answered the Cain of old, so are his brothers to answer now. 
On America has fallen the duty of rendering an ultimate decision. Daily and 
hourly she calls to the noblest and highest in men to answer those words of an 
olden time, ' ' Am I my brother 's keeper. ' ' In every American home the call is 
heard and few, indeed, are there who say, "What is this call about?" Already 
the Stars and Stripes have been sent far across the sea to deliver America's 
ultimatum. The best blood in all the world has gone with the flag to keep it 
free from stain while on its journey, and today it waves in the front ranks of 
the world's heroes, seeking all who would dispute its answer to the lord of 
German lands. When the time shall have come in which no man may say to 
another, "Call me master," then Old Glory will come home, waving from the 
highest peak in the world of honor for having answered this question that for 



Page Forty-five] 



century of centuries has troubled the hearts of men. 

In that day we, who now stand in the world's great Freshman class, will 
come into the heritage of blessings unknown to the world before. In that day 
our greatest duty will have come to us, and we must rise to the full comprehen- 
sion of our responsibility. To the posterity of those who are fighting for us we 
will be under obligation to preserve and perpetuate the blessings of liberty 
which their fathers and mothers made the supreme sacrifice to secure. Our 
brothers who have fallen on the battle-field have died with the expectation 
that we will protect the democracy of the world for which their lives were given. 
It will be our duty to strike from the human heart the last vestige of error. 
We must abolish forever the things that necessitate forts and arsenals. We 
must preserve for the world the wholesome ideals of universal equity, freedom 
and peace. "Ye shall know the truth." Yes, we are knowing the truth, and it 
is making the world free. Then, by the help of God, it shall be our duty to 
keep it free. 



We take this opportunity to thank the members of the faculty, the art de- 
partment and the student body for their interest and hearty cooperation in the 
publication of our Patriot. Realizing the many demands that have been made 
upon the business world today, we wish, in an especial way, to thank our 
advertisers who have so generously aided us with their patronage. 




[Page Forty-six 



5^^^ 



Tionov ^oU 

T9i4-'t9t5 

Credits cH 's 

fvancis Stun^el j6i 361 
df-ennie Sft'ields 35 35 
^elma d-oms 35 33 
Dai\?^ (?artcr 3^i Jt 



Page Forty-seven J 



%Q Pledge of 1^18 



W 



■RANK W'ELLER 



E ABE coming, Father Wilson, 

We will soon be twenty-one, 
Then we, too, may shoulder rifles. 

In this war with savage Hun. 

Ages long the world has waited. 

And the time has come, at last, 
For her children born in freedom, 

To place serfdom in the past. 

You have called upon our brothers 

To go far across the sea 
In defense of human rights, 

And man's sacred liberty. 

Cheerfully they have responded. 

Nobly sacrificing all ; 
Happy in a freeman's privilege 

To be answering such a call. 

They may fall both dead and dying, 

Bravely fighting in the rank. 
Death's grim hand may strike them heavy, 

Taking toll from front and flank. 

But the Prussian war lord's minions, 

From thralldom's Teuton horde. 
Striking at the heart of mankind. 

Must be stopped by Yankee sword. 

If our brothers fighting yonder. 

In three years do not complete 
The pilgrimage Old Glory's making, 

But strive on with lines deplete; 

Then our Wilson, Yankee Wilson, 

You in whom all freemen trust. 
In the cause for which they're falling 

We will die, too, if we must. 

/ regret thai I have but one life to give to my country. — Nathan Hale. 



[Page Forty-eight 



%e Seniors 

"Know %y (9pportuniti/" 
%Qe: Oa^ JtowQV: l^d I^osq 
Colovsi l^ed andWfiitQ 
^VQsidQnt ^Qvoma !QoylQS 
^icQ' Pvcsident ^tRvyn J^odapp 
SQcrotavy Dovis J^ac^son 
9veasavQV T^avvy cJ^iUqv 




BUREL BEATTY 

"Beattie" 

"Blushing beaut ij brings boundless blessings." 

Glee Club, 17-18, Senior clas play, 18. 

JEROME BO^TiES 

' ' Hap ; " " Jerum ' ' 

"Of all my folk's relations, I like myself the 
best." 

Senior President, 18. Senior class play, 18. 
Basket-ball, 15-16, 16-17, 17-18. Varsity 
Captain, 18. Letter man. Senior basket-ball, 
18. 







Page FortynineJ 



LORITA BOLLINGER 

"Tee" 

"Why do the ghosts knock? They are the 
tortured souls of her heartbroken lovers." 

Basket-ball, '15- '16. Senior class play, '18. 
Orchestra, '17- '18. Glee Club, '14- '15. '15- '16, 
'16- '17, '17-'18. 



FREDERICK BRETTHAUER 

"Fritz;" "Ferd" 
"He loves himself most preciously." 
Basket-ball, '17- '18. Letter man. Senior 
team, '18. Patriot staff, '18. 



DAISY CARTER 
"Bill" 
"A shady nook, a babbling brook, a story 
book, a world forsook." 

Senior class play, '18. Honor roll. 



EDRICK CORDES 

"Ignuts" 
"Ripe for deviltry, but too green to burn." 
Patriot staff, '16-'17, '17- '18. Athletic edi- 
tor, '18. Class treasurer, '17. Senior class 
play, '18. Basket-ball, '17- '18. Letter man. 
Senior team, '18. 



[Page Fifty 







GEORGIA COX 
"Ted" 
"Round her neck she wears a yaller ribbon, 
She wears it for her lover, who is fur, fur 

away." 
Senior class play, '18. Glee Club, '16- '17, 
'17-'18. 



DEWEY CRAIG 
"Dude" 

"Sometimes we think his silence is virtue, and 
then, again, we think it is just laziness." 

Track, '15-'16. Track representative, '17. 
Junior Vice-President, '17. 



ALICE DIXON 

"Theda" 

We admit she can act, but her nom de plume 
implies nothing; it is camouflage. 

Basket-ball, '15- '16. Senior class play, '18. 
Patriot staff, '18. 



GLADYS GLASSON 

"Gad" 

"There is the river Shannon and the boy 
Shannon. Irishmen love the first, but — well, I 
bet he can lick his weight in wild cats." 

Glee Club, '18. 



Page Fifty-oneJ 



GLADYS FOX 

"Peggy" 
"She could as near speak with austerity as a 
kitten could roar." 
Senior class play, '18. 



MARGARET HIRTZEL 

' ' Margie ' ' 

"So buxom, blithe and debonair, 

0, those eyes and that dark hair!" 

Nature has given her that which many girls 

spend hours to obtain. 



KATHRYN HODAPP 

"Katie" 
"Cupid's dart dents not my heart." 
Patriot staff, '16- '17, '17- '18. Glee Club, 
'15-'16, '16-'17, '17- '18. Senior class play, '18. 
Senior Vice-President, '18. 



ESTHER HUMES 
"Redo" 
"// popularity depended 07i red hair, I'd be 
all the rage." 

Basket-ball, '15- '16. Senior class play, '18. 



[Page Fifty-two 







GEORGE HURT 

"Hi-pocket" 
"0, the young Lockinvar has come out of the 
South, 
And strange are the words that fall from his 

mouth." 
Patriot staff, '18. Humorist, '18. Senior 
class play, '18. 



DORIS JACKSON 

' ' Doric ; " " Dodo ' ' 

"In the intricate recesses of her heart there is 
always room for one more." 

Patriot staff, '18 ; Assistant Editor. Junior 
Secretary, '17. Secretary Athletic Association, 
'18. Basket-ball, '15-'16. 



THELMA JONES 
"Dick" 
The junior partner of the firm of Carter & 
Jones, the original Siamese twins, wholesale 
dealers in hilarity. 

Honor Roll. Senior class play, '18. 



LAWRENCE EASTING 
"Unk" 
Small bodies often denote great minds — but 
that does not mean anything in this case. 

Senior class play, '18. Senior basket-ball, '18. 
Glee Club, '18. 



Page fifty-three J 



LUCILE KASTING 

"Bob" 
She towers above us, both mentally and phys- 
ically. 

Senior class play, '18. 



LUCILE KESSLER 

"Eel" 

"A few more years — then double harness, and 
the store at Tampico." 

Basket-ball, '15- '16. Orchestra, '15- '16, '16- 
'17, '17-'18. Senior class play, '18. Glee Club, 
'18. 



ALICE KRUGE 

"Al' 

"He who laughs last may laugh best, but he 
who laughs first, la^t and always will get the big 
feather every time." 

Senior class play, '18. 



EMMA KRUGE 
"Em" 
The little curls in her hair, the added charm 
of her personality — it is all due to a soldier. 
Senior class play, '18. 



[Page Fifty-four 



JUSTINE LEAS 
"Juttie" 
She is so bright she attracts the insects — hence 
the Miller. 

Glee Club, '18. 



KATHERINE LOVE 
"Kate" 
"/ ivanf 'Snow' the year 'round." 
Basket-ball, '15-16. Senior class play, 



MABEL MARTIN 

' ' Sam ' ' 
She is a bird at flying into hard assignments. 
Senior class play, '18. 



HARRY MILLER 

"Hodgey" 

This object of feminine attention is extremely 
plain spoken. When agitated his delivery of 
opinion becomes very forceful and his sentiments 
as then expressed are incomparable. 

Patriot staff, '17. Class Treasurer, '18. 



Page I'ifty-fiveJ 






MILDRED NICHTER 

' ' Midge ' ' 
"A heart broker with a pawn on every finger." 
Basket-ball, '15- '16. 



WILLIAM ROSS 
"Big Bill" 
"Eat as I do and you, too, may be 'long' upon 
earth." 

The strong man of the '18 class, a veritable 
"long boy," and is possessed of a remarkable 
"affair" for a yoiith of his age. 



OTIS SHANNON 
"Gladys" 
"Would I a bird ivere, from Gladys' hand to 
feed." 

Track, '15-'16. Basket-ball, '17- "18. Senior 
team. Letter man. Orchestra, '17- '18. 



WILLARD SHEEDY 

"Skeeter Bill" 
'Great trees often grow from little saplings. 
Senior basket-ball, '18. Glee club, 18. 



[Page Fift3 



JENNIE SHIELDS 
"Dude" 
"A smile lias an arch, and an 'ARCH' has a 
smile." 

Senior class play, '18. Honor Roll. 



FRANCIS STUNKEL 

"Stunk" 

He talked until we gave him all our dough. 
He talked some more and we wished we had it 
back. He talked ten minutes more and when he 
passed the hat for the last time, we all took out 
a handful. 

Patriot staff, '14- '15, '16- '17, '17- '18. Bus- 
ijicss Manager, '18. Honor student. Senior 
basket-ball, '18. Class Secretary, '18. Senior 
class play, '18. Secretary Senior Thrift Club. 
Representative in oratory, '18. 

FRANK WELLER 

"Redoski Brickdustioski" 
The Lord would have us all share alike, but 
this specimen got the run on his stock of ear 
material. 

Patriot staff, '14- '15, '15-'16, '16- '17, '17- 
'18 ; Editor, '18. Class President, '17. Basket- 
ball, '17- '18. Senior team, '18. Letter man. 
Senior class play, '18. President Senior Thrift 
Club, '18. 



Page Fifty-seven] 



In an age o{ ^o|ps and t^ovjs, 

Wanting wisdom, void of rigViV, 
Wlio sliall nerve Vieroic boys 

To Viazard a\\ m Freedom's {igViV, — 
Break sliarjalvj o\\ \;Ue\r )ol\vj games, 

Forsake <^keir comrades gay 
And quiV proud liomes and yout^kful dames 

For famine, \o\\ and jravj? 
YeV on ^]r\e nimbler air benign 

SjDeed nimbler messages, 
TkaV waft \\r\e breat^li of grace div\ne 

To bearVs in slot^k and ease. 
So nigb is grandeur Vo our dusV, 

So near is God Vo man, 
Wken Duty wkisf)ers low, THOU I^IUST, 

TVie vjouVli ref)lies, I CAN. 



[Page Fifty-eight 



Wq Janiovs 

9ree: Scccfi T^owev: CfxvysantfiQmum 

Colors: Bkc^andm^old 
^vesident cHvttiuv ZiOildQ 

iPicQ'T^VQsidQnt (^lann TQacfi 

SQcvQtavy WaltQV Tiuhev 

%easuvev d^aud cFrccn 

Two YEARS ago last September our gallant young band, eighty-six re- 
cruits, marched into the Assembly Room. We realized what a great 
straggle we were entering, but, with grim determination, resolved to pre- 
pare ourselves for life's battle. The same day we were mustered in. There was 
not a conscript among us ; we had all volunteered. Our hearts were filled with 
eagerness and pride; we though we wei'e the whole army, but the Seniors and 
Juniors soon took this out of us. They let us know that they were the seasoned 
warriors. Even the Sophomores looked upon us with contempt and called us 
"Rookies." We were forced, to our bitter disappointment, to go behind the 
lines for one year of intensive training. 

But we stuck to our post with the tenacity of a bulldog. The following 
year we took over the third line of defense, and now we are in the second-line 
trenches, fighting on and never flinching from duty, but our ranks have been 
reduced to fifty-six. The steady barrage of D's fired from the machine guns 
of the cruel pedagogues have caused many of our men to "go west;" high ex- 
plosive and large calibre E's, intermingled with bombs and gas attacks of the 
faculty have accounted for the remainder of our casualties. Even the reserves 
that have come up in the last two years could not fill up our depleted rants. 
But we are now firmly intrenched ; our line of defense is so secure that we hardly 
have to fear serious loss, and next year we shall take under our protection the 
first line trench, and we will, in the latter part of May, go "over the top" in 
gallant charge and will force the pedagogues to surrender a diploma to every 
one who crosses "No Man's Land" alive. 



Page Fifty-nine] 



QIl|f Hlumnra 



THELMA ALBERRING 
ELSIE AUFFENBERG 
RALPH AMICK 
BEULAH BABNUM 
EDITH BOWMAN 
ALBERT BRETTHAUER 
LEROY BRETTHAUER 
EDWARD BUHNER 
MAURICE BYRNE 
HELEN CLARK 
LYNN CORDES 
RUTH CRAIG 
THELMA CREAGER 
HELEN DANNETTELLE 
MARGUERITE DARLING 
DURBIN DAY 
EARL DIECK 
EDNA DOWNS 
RUBY ERNEST 
GLEASON EWING 
MONCLOVA FIELDS 
MYLREA FINDLEY 
HENRY FOSTER 
STELLA GOSSETT 
GARNET GREEMAN 
MAUD GREEN 
LILLIAN GRIFFITTS 
MARIE GUDGEL 
MARGARET HALL 



IRENE HEIDEMAN 
JAMES HIMLEB 
WALTER HUBER 
HAZEL HUMES 
FERN HUNTER 
RUTH HUNTER 
HAROLD JAMES 
SIMEON JONES 
GLENN REACH 
RUTH KRAMER 
GLADYS LAWELL 
CLETU8 MACKEY 
LUELLA MASCHER 
LOUIS MEYER 
RUTH MILLER 
ROY NEWBY 
OLGA PEASE 
IRENE PFENNIG 
HELEN PHILLIPS 
ESTHER PRALL 
EDWIN RUDDICK 
CHARLES SPURLING 
HAZEL STANFIELD 
HILDA STEINWEDEL 
EDITH SUMMA 
OMEGA WHEATON 
JOSEPHINE WHITE 
ARTHUR WILDE 



[Page Sixty 




Page SixtyoneJ 



^e Soplxomoves 



BESSIE ABELL 
WILLIAM ABEL 
HAZEL ACKERET 
FRED ACKERMAN 
AGNES ANDREWS 
LAFE BANTA 
MARY BILLINGS 
CHARLES BLUMEB 
GAYNELL BBEITFIELD 
FELIX CADOU 
MAE CABR 
ANNA CARTER 
LOUISE CARTER 
ELLA CLEMENTS 
MONTA CONNELLY 
MARION CRABB 
OPAL CRAIG 
NEWTON DAY 
MARGARET DeMATTEO 
IRENE DEHLER 
MARGARET pEHLEB 
WILLIAM ECKSTEIN 
BERTHA EWING 
SHIRLEY FAULKCONEE 
EVERETT FOSTER 
EMMA GALLAMOEE 
FRANCES GREEN 
ELLEN GRUBER 
JANE HAAS 
RUSSELL HARRY 
MERRILL HARSH 
GOLDIE HELT 
LAWRENCE HIGGINS 
MARY LOUISE HONAN 
DOROTHY HUBER 
GARRISON HUMES 
DORA JOHNSON 
CECIL JONES 



RUBY JUDD 
ELLA MAE KBUWELL 
HARRY LIEBRANDT 
HELEN LEWIS 
OREN LEWIS 
ELNORA LOCKMUND 
MAURICE MACKEY 
EDWARD MASSMAN 
GLADYS MAY 
HAROLD MERCER 
EDMUND MONTGOMERY 
MAY NICHOLS 
DORIS NORBECK 
EAKL PARKER 
ARTHUR PHILLIPS 
DOROTHEA POPPENHOUSE 
CAROL PROBST 
KATHRYN REIDER 
MIRIAM RINNE 
MALCOLM ROUTT 
EDNA RUDDICK 
KATHRYN SCHAEFER 
ANNA SCHMIDT 
CURTIS SHAFEB 
HOWARD SHULTZ 
EUGENE SMITH 
DOROTHY SPANAGEL 
LEO SPRAY 
RUTH STANFIELD 
OLIVE STANTS 
LAURA TASKEY 
MARGARET THOMAS 
IRENE TULLIS 
LUCILE WALTERS 
EMMA WESNER 
KENNETH WHITMAN 
MACIE WHITSON 
HELEN WOLTERS 



[Page Sixty-two 





Page SixtythreeJ 



%e JvQsdmen 



HENKY ABBETT 
PEARL ACKERET 
WANETA ALBRICH 
CARL AMICK 
JOE ANDREWS 
CHESTER AULT 
JAMES BAKER 
CHARLES BANTA 
HELEN BLAIN 
TIPTON BLISH 
HOWARD BLUMEB 
WILLIAM BRACKMEYER 
CARL BRASKETT 
FORREST BROCKHOFI' 
WILLARD BURKDALL 
MARY CADEM 
EDWINA CARSON 
IRIS CHILDS 
CALVIN DOBBINS 
ENOS DOWLING 
FLORENCE DOWNING 
FRANCES DOWNS 
LESLIE FARMER 
MILDRED FETTIG 
ESTELLA FORWAY 
EVA FOSTER 
PEARL FOX 
GLADYS GOSSETT 
ROBERT GRAESSLE 
MABEL GREEN 
MARGARET GUTHRIE 
HARRY HEDGES 
CLARENCE HIRTZEL 
ORVILLE HILL 
MARGARET HOPEWELL 
DOROTHY HORNING 
TOM HUMES 
CLARENCE HYATT 



EDWARD JOHNSON 

ESTHER JONES 

ALMA KRUGE 

GLADYS LEE 

EDNA LINKE 

HELEN LINKE 

ESTA LYNCH 

RALPH MACK 

WILLIAM MAINS 

HERBERT MANUEL 

CHARLES MAPLE 

ANITA MEYER 

DONALD MILLER 

FRANK MILLER 

FRANCIS MISCH 

FRANCIS NIEHAUS 

MARY OLINGER 

MABEL PFAFFENBERGER 

ESTHER PHILLIPS 

FLOYID POPPENHOUSE 

ELSIE REIDER 

ANNA RICHART 

MARGARET RIEHL 

ALBA ROGERS 

LLOYD SCHAFER 

LOUIS SCHAEFER 

RAYMOND SCHARFENBERGER 

MARGUERITE SCHNECK 

LOIS SCOTT 

ALICE SEYMOUR 

JACK SHIEL 

THELMA STEINKAMP 

GLADYS VINCENT 

THEODORE WELLER 

BERTHA WELLER 

GE0R(;E WELLER 

FLORENCE WEITHOFF 

CLARENCE WOOLS 



[Page Sixty-four 




Page Sixty-liveJ 




to ma% the wovU safe 
for Democracy 



[Page Sixty-six 




mevican^ag 

and 



It's Message 





FRANCIS STUNKEL 

HEN IN July, 1775, the delegates from the thirteen colo- 
nies niet in Philadelphia as "A Congress of the United 
Colonies of North America," the various colonies ceased 
to be colonial and became a new nation. As such then- 
lighting units needed some emblem to signify their wil- 
lingness to defend that new-born nation. An armed 
ship without a flag was a pirate, and certainly such a 
nation was not to be represented by pirates. To meet 
this need, the first American flag was created. 

As long as nations have existed, there have been 
emblems. A nation cannot exist without having some- 
thing about which its life and pride may center. A flag represents a country's 
nationality. Form, design, color, material do not matter, for it is only the 
symbolic flag that counts. More than a colored rag, a "living history," ex- 
pressive of all which a nation cherishes, it may not be trifled with. 

No nation can boast a greater emblem than "Old Glory," an emblem signi- 
fying all that is just and true in national government. No flag has ever been 
unfurled in more enterprises for the liberty and enlightenment of man. No 
nation can boast an American flag as a trophy of war. Truly, may we say that 
we have the greatest and most beautiful emblem of all. 

Although not the same in design as the one made by Betsy Ross, the flag 
we know is the same in principle as the one Washington saluted. It is, as ever, 
the expression of liberty and equal rights. 

Throughout our history, men have deemed it one of the highest privileges 
to die for "Old Glory." Heroes of the Revolution fought and starved and 
froze for it. Its colors were sufficient to make them forget hunger, cold and pain. 
In 1812, men left home and loved ones, because respect was lacking in Europe. 
In '61, thousands of noble boys in blue gave "the last full measure of devotion" 
in order that there might be, not two flags, but one. Lincoln, the typical 
American, suffered martyrdom for it. In '98, Americans gave their lives that 



Page Sixty-seven] 



other men might enjoy the privileges for which "Old Glory" stands. Sufficient 
unto these men has been the thought that they died for the flag. Pain and bloody 
graves were forgotten. May the lads of 1917 have the same spirit! 

Now, in the midst of the greatest war that has ever shaken the universe, 
America's flag is shown, as ever, in a righteous cause, the greatest cause that can 
inspire courage — the cause of human liberty as expressed in the policy of world 
democracy. Red, white and blue are the colors of the hope of the world. 

We all have a love for the flag, yet we who have never been tried do not 
really feel that love. Imagine a lonely man on a hostile warship, a prisoner 
among foes who are sending shot and shell to rend the flag he loves. All day 
he watches the conflict and takes courage from the sight of the flag still waving. 
Now, comes night and cuts oft' his vision. No longer can the colors cheer him, 
except as he sees them in the light of bursting shells. With what anxiety he 
awaits the dawn! Dawn, coming, shows the flag still gallantly flying. Ah! 
What a feeling Francis Scott Key must have experienced! Never before had 
those stars shone so brightly in their field of blue! With what joy he beheld 
those stripes of alternate red and white as the breeze stretched them out to full 
length ! If one can feel as Key felt, then he has experienced in its very essence 
the feeling called ' ' love of the flag. ' ' He is able to get the true meaning of our 
national anthem. 

If there lives a man in these United States, calling himself a citizen, who 
has not a tear of love in his eye when he sees "Old Glory" passing ,he should 
take to heart the inspired words of Scott, Hale and the host of other writers of 
patriotic inspiration. 

Patriotism — love of the flag — my feeling toward "Old Glory." It is 
something neither I nor any other mortal can express. I may tell what it has 
inspired others to do, but I cannot tell of this mysterious influence which, greater 
than love of home, of father, brother, sister — greater, even, than mother-love, 
second only to the love of God, stirs the hearts of men. I cannot but feel that 
God will be lenient with the men who die fighting under "Old Glory." I can 
but say that I should deserve eternal damnation and woi-ldly scorn were I so 
base as not to be willing to emulate the deeds of the heroes of American history 
in protecting the Star-Spangled Banner from stain and keeping it waving "o'er 
the land of the free and the home of the brave. ' ' 



And the Star-Spdngled Banner in triumph shall ivave! — Francis Scott Key. 

[Page Sixty-eight 



T^Qd Cross Wov^Qvs 



O 



AGNES ANDREWS 

H, WOMEN of peace and mercy mild, 
Clothed in your pure unspotted white, 

Hearing: the plea of man and of child, 

Working through day and working through night. 

Angels of mercy, sweeping your wings 
Through hospital wards and battle fields, 

From death and from other, worser things. 
For thousands you have been the shields. 

Giving back homes that the Hun has defiled ; 

Caring for wounded, caring for dying. 
Caring for mother and for child. 

Caring for those for their loved ones sighing. 

Feeding the hungry, and warming the cold. 

Dressing the sears and the wounds of our boys; 

Giving to all blessings untold. 

Giving the war-weary world new joys. 

Oh, women of the good Ked Cross, 

When the great conflict is spent and done, 

You will have filled the world's greatest loss, 
And your work will have only begun. 



We are not a warlike people; peace sometimes keeps men's souls sleeping. 
-Robert C. Rogers. 



Page Sixty-nine] 



Desecvatov of ^Cations 

WALTER HUBER 

ON APRIL the second, of last year, our President delivered before Congress 
his memorable address in which he asked Con^'ess to declare that a state 
of war existed between this country and the Imperial German Govern- 
ment. ' ' The time has come, ' ' he said, ' ' to conquer or submit. There is but one 
choice; we have made it." In these few words he has summed up our reasons 
for entering this great war. Let us now look at Germany and sec what kind of 
a foe we have to deal with. 

Since the beginning of the European war, over three years ago, Germany 
has violated every law governing the conduct of belligerents. When she de- 
clared war against France, she asked Belgium to allow the German army to 
march tiirough her territory to attack France. Before an answer could be 
given to this request, the German army had already begun to pour over the 
frontier into Belgium. My friends, the answer that little Belgium then did 
give will cause her name to go down in history as the bravest of all nations and 
the savior of the world from German tyranny. Her answer was the quick 
mobilization of her little army to bar the way to Prance. She heroically con- 
tested every foot of ground gained by the overwhelming foe, and for two weeks 
she kept the German hordes from reaching France. In these two weeks France 
was able to mobilize her armies so that when, three weeks later, the Germans 
and the French ela.shed in the decisive battle of the Marne the German advance 
was checked. In these two weeks France and England were saved. In these 
two weeks the fate of the world was decided. In these two weeks the war was 
won for us. For if the Belgians had allowed the German army to march un- 
molested through her territory, France would have been subdued in six weeks, 
and no power on earth could have prevented the Germans from conquering 
England and then coming to America. Unprepared, as we then were, we could 
not have hoped to have successfully %vithstood this invasion. With France. 
England and America conquered, there would have been no obstacle in the way 
of the Germans in carrying out their plan for world conquest. 

Germany iiivaded Belgium with the perfect knowledge that she was breaking 
a treaty. She did it because she thought it was the easiest and the quickest 
way to Paris. She did it because she thought she had the power to do it. When 
the whole world stood in amazement at the violation of the neutrality of Belgium, 
which had been guaranteed by the pov.-ers of Europe, including Germany herself, 
Germany tried to defend herself by saying that if she had not gone through 
Belgium the English would have gone through and attacked her. What an 



[Page Seventy 



excuse! Germany knew that England would never have violated this treaty; 
she was simply trying to defend the unjustifiable invasion of Belgium. When 
Germany realized what a weak excuse it really was, she told the world that a 
treaty was but a scrap of paper ; in other words, a treaty is binding to Gei-many 
only when it suits her. When a treaty becomes an obstacle to German conquest 
and dreams of world dominion, then a treaty is but a scrap of paper. This is 
the doctrine of the lliddle Ages that might makes right. Surely, such a doctrine 
ought not be tolerated in this twentieth century. 

Germany's warfare has been characterized by f rightfulness, horrible atroci- 
ties, and by utter disregard of all international law. The Germans have 
wantonly destroyed priceless treasures of art; they laid in ashes the historic 
city of Louvain, because a Belgian civilian had shot a German soldier; they 
completely and deliberately destroyed the beautiful cathedral of Rheims. This 
cathedral, it seems, escaped the ravages of the Middle Ages only to be destroyed 
by the invasion of the Huns. But this destruction has not been confined to 
cities or to property alone. The Germans have shot hundreds of Belgians for 
the petty offense of a few ; they have cut the hands off of innocent and defence- 
less children in order that they would not be able to take up arms against them 
when they grew up ; they have deported Belgians and have forced them to work 
under terrible conditions in the mines of Germany. But perhaps the blackest 
of all crimes charged against the German Government is the massacre of thou- 
sands of Christian Armenians. True, it was not the Germans, but the Turks, 
who were directly responsible for this, but Germany is an ally of Turkey and 
practically rules that country. Had the German Government wished, she could 
have stopped the massacres in the very beginning; but no, not even a protest 
was sent to the Turkish Government. Instead, according to the opinion of 
many writers, did Germany not only tolerate this crime which even surpassed 
the pagan persecutions of the Christians, but she instigated it. 

These atrocities are the deeds of the nation with which we are at war. 
They are not all of them, but only a few. Germany has not only violated treaties 
and broken promises, but she has even violated the sacred laws of humanity. 
Many people feel that our country, as an exponent of humanity and justice, 
ought to have declared war against Germany when she invaded Belgium; but 
our country, acting under the advice of Washington in his farewell address, 
and abiding by the Monroe Doctrine, refused to enter the European struggle 
because of these wrongs, which did not directly involve ns. 

But the time came when these wrongs did involve us. From the beginning 
of the war Germany has filled our country with spies who have sought to ruin 
our prosperity and to weaken our unity. While Von Bernstoff, the Gennan 
Ambassador, would be pledging the friendship of Germany, he would at the 
same time be directing intrigues against the welfare of this country. Germany 



tried to embroil us in a war with Japan and Mexico. And all this was done 
secretly under the cloak of friendship. 

American ships were sunk and American lives were lost. After the sink- 
ing of the Lusitania, the atrocious crime which resulted in the loss of lives of 
hundreds of defenceless and innocent women and children, America protested 
to Germany and the latter promised that from then on she would abide by the 
rules of international law ; that she would sink only vessels carrying contraband 
of war, and would give the passengers thereon a chance to save themselves. 
But what does a promise mean to Germany? Within a short time she sank the 
Sussex, and again American lives were lost. And then came the last word in 
German f rightfulness, namely: Germany announced to the world that on and 
after Febniary 1, 1917, all vessels sailing in a certain prescribed area about the 
coasts of the countries at war with her would be sunk without warning. It 
mattered not what the cargo was, or the flag, or the destination, Germany 
forbade the world to sail upon the free seas. A challenge had been flung at 
all mankind. 

We could no longer remain at peace with Germany and uphold our honor 
and respect. Surely, the time had come to conquer or submit. We will not 
submit without a struggle, and allow our honor to be trampled into the dust. 
Then, we must conquer. There can be no compromise with a nation who regards 
a treaty as a scrap of paper ; who makes promises and breaks them the same day. 

We are in this war until the last gun is fired. Germany must be beaten so 
that never again may she be able to disturb the peace of the world. Let us re- 
member that the ^\inning of this war rests with America. France can do no 
more; England, alone, cannot crush the German menace. The blood of the 
j-outh of America must win this war for the freedom of the world. But the 
soldiers at the front cannot win this war by themselves. They must have the 
support, and the whole-hearted support of us who remain here at home. We 
must support the Government in all its undertakings to the fullest extent. 
The Government has launched the Third Liberty Loan. Its failure would be 
worse than the loss of a great battle ; it would dishearten, not alone our soldiers, 
but the soldiers of France and England, the only Inie of defence that stands 
between the German army and the conquest of America and the whole world. 
Let us invest our money in Liberty Bonds, for what would our money be worth 
if we should lose this war? It is imperative to victory that we make this loan 
a great success. 

We are now entering the second year of this war. Great disasters may be 
before us, and at times it may look as if our cause will not conquer. But with a 
firm belief that our cause is just; with the heroic deeds of Belgium before us 
as an example, and with the principles for which we are fighting standing out 
as a beacon to guide us through the storm, we will fight on and, with God's help, 
we will conquer. 



[Page Seventy-two 



EDNA DOERR, '23 

IN 1859, HENRY DUNANT, a Swiss tourist, witnessed the suffering of thirty 
thousand French, Italians and Austrians, as they lay wounded and uncared 
for on the battle field of Solferino. Haunted by the memory of this scene, 
he v,as moved to write a pamphlet entitled, "The Souvenir of Solferino.'! 
This pamphlet aroused interest all over Europe, and in 1864 fourteen nations 
sent representatives to a meeting, held at Geneva, for the purpose of discussing 
an organization to care for the sick and wounded in time of war. Up to this 
time a trained nurse had never been heard of, and organized care of wounded 
men was unknown ; it was all left to chance and any unskilled doctor that might 
be at hand. We find it difficult to realize that it took humanity two thousand 
years to discover the necessity of a war-relief organization. 

The result of the conference at Geneva was the signing of the Red Cross 
Treaty. As a compliment to Switzerland (the birthplace of the idea) the cross 
of the Swiss flag was adopted as the insignia, the color being changed from white 
to red. Today, all over the civilized world, the red cross on a white field stands 
for organized human help and sympathy. The story of the Red Cross is the 
story of earthquakes, famines, floods and fires, as well as of wars. The United 
States did not sign the treaty until 1882. 

At the outbreak of the European war the Red Cross offered to the countries 
involved in it surgeons, trained nurses, surgical equipment and hospital supplies. 
If you believe in decreasing suffering and being on the spot when help is needed, 
contribute to the Red Cross and have the assurance that you have done a 
patriotic duty, a Christian deed and been a good Samaritan by proxy because 
you could not in person. 

"Faith and Hope and Mercy meeting 
Underneatii the cross of red, 
Bear from us the Master's message. 

When from heaven He bent and said: 
'Greater love hath none than he 

Who gives his life for child of mine.' — 
Why, then, shouldst thou fail or falter? 
Help us hold the Eed Cross line I" 



'Blessed are the merciful for fhey shall ohfnin mercy. 



%vift 



GEORGIA COX 

(With due apologies to Vergil.) 

I SING of the Thrift Campaign, waged by the might of President Wilson, 
because of the cost of this cruel war and the useless waste of the people. 

Relate to me, Patriot, the causes of the Thrift Campaign! For what 
reasons did the president of this people issue thrift stamps and compel men, 
marked for their loj'alty by a cheer for Old Glory, to go so deep into their pocket- 
books and to sacrifice so many pleasures in order to show their patriotism? 

There is a country, IT. S. A., opposite France and the far-away shores of 
England, rich in resources and just in war, which is said to be the fatherland of 
democracy ; here is freedom, justice and peace ; here a man may be himself. 

But I fear that democracy will fall, for I have heard that a race sprung 
from German blood, ruling autocratically and barbarous in war, is planning 
to blot out democracy and bring all the world under its sway. 

Fearing this and mindful of the proud boasts of German rulers, U. S. A., 
with the sinking of the Lusitania and the violation of treaties, entered this bloody 
contest for the supremacy of democracy or autocracy. 

Scarcely had we begun preparations when Wilson, with an empty treasury, 
spoke thus with himself: "Shall I give up my purpose in raising billions to 
finance this war and let my allies and even my own armies suffer from lack of 
food and other supplies? Did not Germany, England and France float loans 
and levy taxes with success? Shall T, the President of a people, the richest in all 
respects, fail? What country hereafter would look to U. S. A. for protection, 
or what country would show us respect? Perhaps I am hindered by the people, 
but I shall see." 

Pondering such things in his troubled heart, he floated the first Liberty 
Loan. It swooped dowi upon the people like a hurricane. The clamor of the 
buyers and the oversubscription of the bonds followed. A second loan was 
floated, and now a third has met with equal success. 

But Wilson, looking on, in the meantime saw that so great a loan would not 
reach the laborer or the salaried man. Now he calls his editors to him and tells 
them to say to his people that thrift stamps and baby bonds will be put on sale 
all over the country; and he himself speaks thus with his people: "If nothing 
is left for the civilian in so great a crisis but conservation of food and money, 
and it pleases him to help win this war, the way is open. Bring in your non- 



[Page Seventy-four 



interest-bearing money; buy Thrift Stamps. You, who have no savings, get 
some. Heed what I shall say to you. As you go out of your alley gate there is 
a full garbage can and nearby a towering ash pile. See that these get less to 
eat and j'ou more, and we shall all arrive at the same point, the winning of 
this war, the end of autocracy. 



Ban^ at tl)? ®t|nft ^tam^j 



I 



F.S. 

M JUST a Thrift Stamp, small and cheap, 

I only cost two bits; 
But in the end I'm .sure to reap 
The cost of Sammies' hits. 

It seems a very puny way 

Of making our attacks ; 
But then, you know, the stories say, 

Straws may break camels' backs. 

So save your quarters ; save, my boys ! 

For in our Uncle's hands. 
They'll soon be war-gods' smoking toys, — 

Arms for our soldier bands. 



Economy makes Imppn Jwmcs and i^ound nations. Instill it deep — George 
Washington. 



Page Seventy-five] 



Doing dav2it 



AGNES ANDREWS 

SHIELDS HIGH SCHOOL has not been a slacker in Red Cross work! 
Not only have we been practically a one hundred per cent school in the 
matter of memberships; not only have we organized ourselves into sec- 
tions the better to do Red Cross work, but we have given financial help with 
our bazaars, and plays whose proceeds have gone to the Red Ci-oss, and the ever- 
popular Penny Recitals. 

The girls have been organized into sections under the various teachers, the 
better to aid b}' having their energies directed into special channels. Under 
efficient supervision, one section makes clothes for the refugees, raising the 
money to buy the strong but expensive materials; another knits, using not only 
the designated weekly hour, but any spare moments they can find ; still others 
make washcloths, handkerchiefs, napkins and other small conveniences which 
are urgently needed, and others go to the city Red Cross shops and fold 
bandages under official supervision. 

Not only do we do this, but when the local chapter receives an order for 
something special, to be sent in a hurry, they call upon the girls of S. H. S. for 
aid. Just a few examples : They needed two hundred comfort pillows in about 
four days. These pillows are made of odds and ends snipped into extremely 
small pieces, stuffed into a specially made slip, and sewed up. These snipped 
pieces take an extremely long time to cut, and it is steady work. After 
school hours and during study periods the girls worked incessantly. No one 
shirked; there was no time, for they had to be done. ]Many even stayed after 
six o'clock to get the work completed. Even the first graders helped snip. 
But they were finished on time. 

The local shop needed bags, made of bright, gay materials, for the personal 
belongings of convalescent soldiers. The materials, generously donated by the 
merchants of the town, were taken home by the girls, and over night the required 
hundred were made. 

These are only instances of the splendid work being done by the girls. 
Many of them assist in the Red Cross rooms, while, again, hundreds of socks, 
sweaters, scarfs and wristlets have been made by the deft fingers of the girls. 

During the weekly period set apart for this work, while the older boys have 
military training, the younger ones make trench candles; and those vnth an 
artistic bent made scrap books of jokes, pictures, etc., for the war-weary 
convalescents. 



[Page Seventy- 



While the Christmas Red Cross drive was progressing, the school was an 
agency where memberships were sold, and at every chance every one was urged 
to become a link in the great "net of mercy, sweeping through a sea of agony." 
Every teacher was an agent, and the result of this energetic work was that 
practically everyone of the hundi-eds of students in the High School and the 
grades became members. Not only did they themselves join, but through their 
influence many an outsider became the proud possessor of the little white button 
adorned with the shining Red Cross. 

Our school has raised hundreds of dollars for the general fund of the Red 
Cross by the bazaars we have given. They have been two in number, and though 
one was the annual school fair, yet half of its proceeds were donated to the good 
cause. Amusement was furnished in the foi-m of short plays and minstrel 
shows. The usual dinner was served in the evening, but in strictly Hooverized 
fashion, showing us how delicious corn cakes really could be. 

The participants in the minstrel show and the perennial "Mrs. Jarley's 
Wax Woi-ks" were drawn not alone from the school, but from those especially 
talented from our towni. Their patriotism was truly tested by the black faces 
and weird costumes of the actors, but they nobly lived up to the test. 

Mrs. Sechler's section, which makes a specialty of clothes for the refugees, 
found themselves in need of money, and so, under her supervision, dinner was 
served down town one Saturday. It was an inunense success. 

Miss Gasaway inaugurated a series of Penny Recitals, given by the local mu- 
sicians who kindly and generously donated their services. Through them Miss 
Gasaway not only hopes to gain money for the Red Cross purposes by the admis- 
sion fee of one cent, but to educate us in good music. Those who have given a 
program for us are: Mrs. R. A. Greeman, Mrs. W. P. Masters, Mrs. Ralph 
Martin, Mrs. J. H. Andrews and Mrs. W. F. Peters. 

The Boys' Chorus has given a special feature program of popular songs, 
pleasing more than educating. However, "all classics and no ragtime makes 
students poor listeners." The chorus is made up of good male voices of the 
Glee Club. The girls are planning a program equally good. 

Our talented and well-trained orchestra is much in demand throughout 
the county, and has played at several commencements in the country schools. 
For this service they charge a nominal fee of ten dollars. This money is then 
given to the fund. 

Some of the ladies in town instituted a series of Red Cross link parties, 
which may be described, briefly, in this manner: One woman entertains a 
large number of women, each bringing with her fifty cents. Each of the guests 
is required to give a party with a smaller number, each guest to bring fifty cents, 
and so on down the scale. The older High School girls have been invited 
to these parties, and have given them. The younger girls seized on the 



Page Seveuty-sevenJ 



idea and are at present using it for our own Red Cross fund, with a charge of 
ten cents instead of the rather "steep" price of fifty cents. 

Interest in basket-ball was capitalized for the benefit of the fund-. A series 
of interclass games was organized and a class tournament was held in which the 
Seniors were an easy winner. We had the novel experience of seeing our star 
varsity players play against each other instead of in concord. The games were 
enthusiastically attended and applauded, several near fights ensuing from too 
vigorous class rivahy. 

We have been free and kind in our donations, unstinted with the work for 
the good cause. We have been ! But not only must we have the glad memories, 
but we must strive harder, and still harder, not content to rest on our laurels, 
but ever aspire to add to them. 



B 



luy A ®l|rtft ^tamp 



UY a Thrift Stamp ! Buy a Thrift Stamp ! 
That's the nation's cry. 
Buy a Thrift Stamp ! Buy a Thrift Stamp ! 
Time is flying by. 

Now's the time to do your bit; 

Now's the time to work. 
Buy a Thrift Stamp every day! 

Never, never shirk! 

For, even though you're safe at home. 
The Thrift Stamps that you buy, 

Will sui-ely help our boys in France 
To keep our flag on high. 



"// you can't go across, you can come across." 

[Page Seventy -eight 



(§ur iutg 



T 



DO, to work, to sacrifice 
To back our Boys and pay the price; 
To give, and give, and give again, 
To help our boys be timer men. 
That's our duty. 

To feel the war as our war, too ; 
To cheer the old Red, White and Blue, 
And carry her on to victory 
To keep the world for liberty. 
That's our duty. 

To buy Thrift Stamps, War Saving Stamps, 
To keep our boys in training camps ; 
To make the Red Cross and Y. M. C. A. 
Grateful to us of the U. S. A. 
That's our duty. 



Either Kultur or civilization must disappear from the world — Louis Rowland. 



Page Seventy-nine J 



iltgll ^rl^nnl itaruaatnn ffi^a^up 




EACH year Shields High School participates in 
the High School Discussion League. The sub- 
ject assigned by Indiana University this year was, 
"What Should Be the Policy of the United States 
in Financing the War?" Francis Stunkel was 
chosen representative of Jackson County. How- 
ever, because of illness, his place in the district 
discussion at Batesville was ably taken by his al- 
ternate, Walter Huber. 




». i. 3. % ». A, 



When the preliminary contest for the South 
Eastern Indiana Association was held, Walter 
Huber was chosen as Seymour's representative in 
oratory. His oration, "The Desecrator of Na- 
tions," was given very forcefully and won for him 
the silver medal, representing second place in the 
district meet at North Vernon. 




At the same time the preliminary contest in ora- 
tory was held, a contest was held for participants 
in reading. Mary Louise Honan, with her selec- 
tion taken from "The Bird's Christmas Carol," 
was selected as first among the large number of 
contestants. She won honorable mention in the 
district meet. 



[Page Eighty 




®I|0 ^x^i} ^ti^aoi (!9rrl|f Btra 



First Violin 


Saxophones 


LILLIAN GRIFFITTS 


CHARLES MAPLE 


LAURA TASKEY 


KARL BRASKETT 


HELEN DANNETTELLE 

Seond Violin 
DOROTHY SMITH 


Tuba 
EUGENE SMITH 


DORIS NORBECK 


Flute 


MERRIL HARSH 
LOWELL SMITH 


JAMES HIMLER 


DruniB 
NEWTON DAY 


Piano 
LORITA BOLLINGER 


Cornet 


Clarinet 


RALPH AMICK 


ARTHUR WILDE 



Page Eighty-oneJ 



mn (Ulub 



g>opratui 



GEORGIA COX 
ESTA LYNCH 
MARY BILLINGS 
ANNA CARTER 
HELEN CLARK 
FRANCE.S DOWNS 
RUBY ERNEST 
MARY LOUISE HONAN 
LILLIAN GRIFFITTS 
EMMA GALLAMORE 
RUBY JUDD 
LUCILE KESSLER 



JUSTINE LEAS 
HELEN LEWIS 
ELNORA LOCKMUND 
CAROL PROBST 
MARGARET RIEHL 
OMEGA WHEATON 
KATHRYN REIDER 
DOROTHY SPANAGEL 
LAURA TASKEY 
GLADYS LAWELL 
PEARL FOX 



Alto 



MARION CRABB 
LOUISE CARTER 
EDNA DOWNS 
FLORENCE DOWNING 
MARIE GUDGEL 
MARGARET HALL 
DOROTHY HORNING 
KATHRYN HODAPP 
EDNA LINKE 
HELEN LINKE 
RUTH MILLER 
MIRIAM RINNE 
HAZEL STANFIELD 
MADGE TABOR 
JOSEPHINE WHITE 



^enar 



LAWRENCE KASTING 
GLENN KEACH 
LOUIS MEYER 
EARL PARKER 
CARL AMICK 
CECIL JONES 
THEODORE WEILER 
WILLARD BURKDALL 



IBaas 



LYNN CORDES 
ARTHUR WILDE 
WILLARD SHEEDY 
BUREL BEATTY 
EUGENE SMITH 
FRANCIS NIEHAUS 



[Page Eighty-two 








Page Eighty-three] 



Mm anb Mm 



PRESENTED BY 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF SHIELDS HIGH SCHOOL 
May 16, 1918 

AT THE 

Majestic Theatre 



Entire proceeds devoted to the Red Cross 



cast of characters 

Mark Embury, a scholar, scientist and philosopher 

Roger Goodlake, his friend and neighbor . 

Capt. Geo. Lovell, Embury's nephew 

Sir Harry Trimhlestonc . 

Kit Baringer. a fiddler and professor of deportment 

Peter, Embury's sei-vant . 

Joanna Goodlake, wife of Goodlake 

Mrs. Deborali, Embury's housekeeper 

Peggy, Little Britain 

Matron of tlie Foundling Hospital 

Beadle of the Foundling Hospital 

Molly, a kitchen maid 

Ten Girls, orphans of the Foundling Hospital — 

Jennie Shields, Gladys Fox, Mabel Martin, Alice Kruge, Emma Kruge, 
Lucile Kessler, Daisy Carter, Doris Jackson, Esther Humes, Kathryn 
Hodapp, Georgia Cox. 




Francis Stunkel 
Frank Weller 
George Hurt 
Lawrence Easting 
Jerome Boyles 
BuREL Beatty 
Katherine Love 
Alice Dixon 
lorita bolunger 
Thelma Jones 
Edrick Cordes 
Lucile Kessler 



[Page Eighty-four 




Page Eighty-five J 




^MM^m 



[Page Eighty-six 




HarBitg laskpt Sail 



EDRICK CORDES 



IN THE fall of 1917, shortly after the re-organization of the Athletic Associa- 
tion, with William Topic as President ; William Eckstein, Vice-President ; 
Doris Jackson, Secretary, and Professor C. H. Phillips, Treasurer, the first 
call for basket-ball candidates was made by Coach G. M. Hopkins. The call 
was answered by twenty young athletes, among whom were only two of last 
year's "S" men — Captain Bo.yles and Eckstein. 

From the material obtained two fast teams were organized. During the 
season they won about half of the games played, but sickness and other unfavor- 
able conditions interfered so much that the boys were unable to establish the 
enviable record that was at first anticipated. The greatest handicap — the ex- 
treme lightness of the players — was most felt. However, they all put up a good 
brand of basket-ball and worked hard under Coach Hopkins. While Seymour 
broke fifty-fifty on this year's activities, every man has optimistic views of the 
future. The new system of using two teams has been of great benefit in building 
up a team for next year. Although the team will lose Boyles, Shannon. Cordes, 
Weller and Bretthauer through graduation, there will be five experienced "S" 
men for next year's squad — Eckstein, Keach, Banta, Niehaus and James. 



Page Eighty-seven] 




R. Forward — Cordes R. Guard — Weller 

Center — Bretthauer 
L. Forward — Boyles L. Guard — Shannon 

THE CLIMAX of the basket-ball season — a tournament held to determine 
the championship class team — put another feather in the hat of the vic- 
torious class — the Seniors. One of the features of the contests proved to 
be the exceptionally good work of the Senior guards, only forty-three points 
being made off them, whereas their scoring machine registered a hundred and 
six points. 

The preliminary games were won by the Eighth Grade, who eliminated the 
Seventh Grade fourteen to six, and the Seniors, who defeated the Freshmen 
thirty to eighteen. The semi-finals were featured by a hard fought game be- 
tween the Sophomores and Juniors, the latter winning, thirty-one to twelve, and 
a Giants vs. Midgets affair staged by the Senior and Eighth Grade teams, which 
was won by the former, forty to six. The final game between the semi-final 
victors proved the best and speediest of the contests, though the superior team- 
work and shooting ability of the Seniors soon placed them far out in the lead, 
and they were never headed. When the final whistle ended the game the thirty- 
six to nineteen score, which remained in favor of the Seniors, gave them the 
game, a large box of chocolates and the interclass championship. 



[Page Eighty-eight 




William Eckstein — "Ex." 

Plaj-ing at center, finished second 
year on the varsity. Seymour 'a 
strongest rivals admit that Bill will 
bear watching — sometimes behind the 
referee. "Sweet William" will give 
further demonstrations of his basket- 
ball ability as Captain of next year's 
quintet. 



Harold Jame.s — "Jimsey." 

Started the season at center, but 
was switched to back guard, where he 
never failed to "start something" if 
the opponents attempted to idle away 
their time shooting goals. "Jessie" 
will be a "hold-over" for next year's 
squad. 



Jerome Boyles — "Hap;" "Jerum." 
(Other names censored.) 
Played his third year as a varsity 
forward. Being the most experienced 
man on the team, the strategic plays 
centered primarily around him. Sev- 
eral times this year he has brought 
victory out of defeat by his con.sistent 
playing and the timely use of his re- 
markably concise vocabulary. 



Page Eighty-nine] 




Francis Niehaus — "Nie. " 

Was "Hap's" running mate at for- 
ward, and he frequently proved that 
he had a mean eye for the basket. 
He, too, will be a good man for next 
year, providing he escapes the angry 
charges a wily faculty directs at the 
non-studious. 



Otis Shannon — "Gladys." 

Was the speediest man on the team. 
Our opponents who happened to have 
pedigreed forwards were forced to in- 
vent alibis for the benefit of home 
boosters if Shannon was sicked on 
them, for he is a guard who is an adept 
at taking the shine out of "stars." 



'rmri 



[Page Ninety 




Vind^ughtec7\olding2otfi 
TiisSides 



Page NinetyoneJ 



THE WORLD is old, yet likes to laugh. 
New jokes are hard to find ; 
A whole new editorial staff 
Can't tickle every mind. 
So, if you meet some ancient joke, 

Decked out in modern guise, 
Don 't frown and call the thing a fake ; 
Just laugh — don't be too wise. 



Mary Louise Honan- 
(Cadou). 



-Well, I don't like red hair, but I do like Pink 



Miss Laupus — I want this class to purchase Ancient Histories. 
Ruth Miller — Why, can't you buy new ones anywhere? 



LONG BOY 

(REVISED) 

He was just a long, lean, country chap. 
From away down South, by the U. S. map. 
He came from where they're all six feet, 
And, oh, my Lord! how that boy could eat. 
But he was wise as he was long. 
So he came to a place where he'd not go wrong. 
And when he reached old Shields High School. 
We heard his loud refrain. 

Good-bye, Maw; good-bye. Paw; 
Good-bye, mule, with yer old hee-haw. 
I may not know what I'm to learn. 
But as for that I don't give a dcrn. 
And, oh, my Sally, don't you fear, 
From all pretty girls I \\ail keep clear; 
And when Shields High School I get through, 
Then I '11 come marching back to you. 



Long Boy 




Phillips— Boy, for the fifth time in thirty minutes, I've told you that 
trench candle is a rotten job. 

TippiE Blish (disgustedly)— Sherman was right. Where is the knitting 
group ? 



Little Jane Haas, she is a sweet la 

Forsooth she's a little too shy. 
'If a boy," said she, "were to ever 
I bet, by golly, I'd die." 



[Page Ninety-two 



'Pat PURCHASES a PLIVYER STRANGER-Ah, I say, pardon me, 

Miss, but have you any military ac- 
tivities here in Seymour? 
/ / / C.^1^^ / AuCE Dixon — Yes, sir ; a troop 

train went through today. 



Mary had a little lamb, 

Felix is its name; 
His ej-es are green, his hair is red. 

But she loves him just the same. 




Do you remember Mr. Hopkins' hand-knitted muffler, the one he said was 
invaluable? Well, he laid it downi on the auctioneer's block at the Christmas 
bazaar and "Pat" Murphy sold it for thirty-four cents. 



Study, oh Freshie ; keep on the tip-top ; 

Study, oh study, and don't ever stop; 

For when you start shirking, then down you will fall, 

And drag down behind you your credits and all. 



"Oh, Happy, don't; you muss my hair!" haughtily said she. But he kept 
it up, for he thought if he mussed, he must. 



Mr. Phillips — Arthur, what is the unit of Dower? 
Pud (just waking up) — Th' watt, sir? 
Mr. Philups— That's right, boy. 



Miss Andrews (addressing the assembly) — All those in the "Mouse Trap, 
come out. 



Simple Kenneth met his Helen, 

Coming down the lane; 
Said simple Kenneth to her then, 

"Won't you be my Elaine? 
If I were great Sir Lancelot, 
And you my 'lady fair', 
I'd cut those frizzles off your head 

And comb your tousled hair. 
But I am only simple Kenneth; 

You, my Helen dear. 
So I will follow you always. 
And shed a sorry tear. 



—"He was knocked unconscious and realizing his conditon he"— (Extract 
fi'om a Senior's story.) 



Page Ninety-threeJ 



Theoloordekchangeth 



The end of the day found me in the kitclien, 
inspecting the commissary layout. My wife, 
daughter and mother-in-law were preparing our 
evening repast. 

"Methinks, Henry," my mother-in-law ven- 
tured, "that you would find more space and a 
far greater welcome in yonder room." 

"Sufficient," said I, "sufficient;" and I be- 
took myself into the sitting room. The old clock 
blazed away seven times, and I remembered that 
tonight the United States had promised to set all 
her time-pieces by Woodrow Wilson's turnip, so 
1 ran the clock up one hour and went to supper. 
In the morning I arose at six bells and went 
down stairs for breakfast. No one was stirring, 
so I went down town to buy a twist of my fav- 
orite weed. All the stores were still locked, so 
I went back home and rallied the female element around the kitchen stove. 
After partaking of a scant, thoroughly Hooverized meal, I again sought the 
heart of our fair metropolis. Within the space of about nine hours shopmen 
began showing up, and for the first time I thought to look at the clock on the 
bank corner. The infernal thing said it was si.x o'clock and, by jingo, it was 
not much more than daylight then. Back home I went the second time and 
started an inquisition in the family circle. It soon leaked out that I, my wife, 
daughter and mother-in-law had each, separately and individually, set the 
family heirloom up one hour, and instead of rising at six o'clock, I had deserted 
my good old bunk at the unholy hour of midnight, plus two sixty-minute periods 
of slumber. 




And all the girls are crazy about him. 
Tall and lanky, and lean and thin. 
Scant brown hair and a dent in his chin. 

And all the girls are crazy about him. 
Eyes of brown, deep in their hue, 
He'd be better looking if their color were blue. 

And all the girls are crazy about him. 
In carriage and action he's awfully slow. 
And his long nose shines with a greasy glow; 

And all the girls are crazy about him. 
But his speech is liquid, and, oh, "so tweet". 
The girls overlook the size of his feet, — 

And all the girls are crazv about him. 
Who? 



[Page Ninety-four 



Miss Andrews — Why were you trying to skip this period? 
Oren L. — My folks told me to come home at two-thirty. 
Miss A. — Very well ; I shall call up and get their 0. K. 
Oren L. — Never mind; I don't reckon it will be necessary for me to go 
home today. 

BUY A THRIFT STAMP 

A. D. 

When you sit in cozy-eorners, 

And your thoughts are wandering far; 

When you have in mind the movies 
And your great big Overland car, 

Change that subject on the blink, 

For now is not the time to think 

Of luxui'ies and all the like, — 

But strike a blow with all your might. — 
Buy a Thrift Stamp. 



A COMPLEX COMPOUND 

Mr. Phillips — George, what is the formula for the product formed by 

litharge ? 
George — Let's see; ah — F — e — 3 — — Gee whiz, naw — . 



An apple a day, keeps the doctor away. 
But the H. C. of L. keeps the apple avvi 



Pat M. (to Leo S.) — Leo, why should you paint the inside of a chicken coop? 
Leo S.— To keep the hens from pecking the grain out of the wood. 



Bob is fond of Margaret, 

And this does Margaret know ; 
And everywhere that Margaret goes, 

Bobby is sure to go. 
He takes her home from school each day, 

And to the show at night. 
Now when we see them on the street 

We say, "A common sight." 



Miss Quinn— Give an English derivative of Humilis-humile. 

'21— Humiliated. 

Miss Quinn — All right. Give the meaning of humiliated and use it in a 
sentence. 

'21 — It means brought down. An American humiliated a German 
aeroplane. 



Page Ninety-tive] 



TWENTY YEARS HENCE 

At present Lawrence Kasting is the most sought-after man on the island of 
Luluannawannakanna. He eloped with the young princess, the fair Kumluv- 
mehun, and the old king is furious. The Royal Rowboats have cut off all escape 
by sea, and the "Go-Devil" division of the native army, in cooperation with the 
"Gum Shoe" department, is searching the island. Kasting was a member of 
His Majesty's Jazz Band, and met the princess during a revival meeting at the 
palace. 



Jerome Boyles, who succumbed to matrimony shortly after graduating from 
I. U., has resigned his position at the head of the U. S. Commission Board on 
Army Athletics so that he can devote more time to the physical training of his 
young son, Hap II. 



Justine Leas and Mildred Nichter, two nurses of the Red Cross that accom- 
panied the Yankee army on its triumphant march into Berlin, were the guests 
of honor at a ball recently given by the president of the German Republic. It is 
rumored in the social set that the two will soon get in double harness with per- 
sonages that figured high in the one-time aristocracy. 



Francis Stunkel announced today before the Indiana Association of Botan- 
ists that, as a result of fifteen years' labor, he is now ready to present to the 
world his secret of growing a giant seedless watermelon. Recently, Mr. Stunkel 
startled both Eui'ope and America by grafting the cucumber vine to the 
pumpkin for the marveloi;s production of his "Super-Jumbo Pickle." The 
government has forbidden him to experiment in animal husbandry. 



The marriage bureau of Guekenheimstadtlichshire has reported that Doris 
Jackson recently severed matrimonial negotiations with young Prince I. Gotthe- 
kale. The blow is said to have mentally deranged the poor fellow, for he tried 
to hang himself with the royal clothesline, but the wire hurt his neck. 



E. J. Cordes, through the financial backing of his wife, has been able to 
build an express company of his own. The head office is in Seymour, and the line 
branches out through Hayden, Roekford, Kurtz, Vallonia and Brownstown. 
Evidently, Mr. Cordes wants to keep the company well in the hands of the im- 
mediate family, for he has a young Cordes in fourteen minor offices under his 
supervision. 



Mrs. Katherine Snow, formerly Miss Love, of this locality, is again starring 
on the screen. Her husband, who has become a famous playwright, recently 
joined with her in acting his latest production, "Snowbound." 



[Page Ninety-six 



Lieut. H. H. Miller, of the flying squadron, sustained a painful injury in his 
left arm today when his new Ford aeroplane, in which he was doing a "Nose- 
spin," suddenly fell to the ground. The lieutenant entered the war in time to 
join the American birdmcn in bombing Postdam, and won his rapid promotion 
as a result of his remai-kable ability to manage his monoplane, "La Justine." 



The persistent call of the wild lured the " unhoosierable " George Hurt back 
to his old life along the Rio Grande. Reports from there say he has fallen into a 
careless habit of proprietorship where cattle is concerned. In fact, his present 
sojourn in Mexico is due to the fact that he and the sheriff had some recent gun 
play on the subject. 



Word was received here today that Burel Beatty and Willard Sheedy, two 
eminent agriculturists of near Hayden, Indiana, entertained malevolent designs 
on one another's facial integrity in a fistic interview early this morning. It is 
rumored that Beatty made a strong verbal objection to the habit Sheedy had of 
eneoui'aging his swine to seek nourishment in his corn field. 



Miss Alice Dixon and Miss Lucile Kessler have just returned from another 
fishing trip at Palm Beach. Gossip has it that thej' got a great many bites, but 
the water was evidently full of nibblers, since they failed to land anv fisli. 



President Jones firmly stated in the Senate today that she and Secretary of 
State Carter would fight to the last ditch to suppress male suffrage in the United 
States. Senators Humes and Ilirtzel are strongly supporting the President, but 
it is thought that Representatives Fox, Martin and Kasting will oppose the 
measure. Since these first four ladies entered the political ring, the men of the 
country have come to learn that the hand that rocks the cradle riles the world. 



Frank Weller, who forsook his mortal companions fifteen years ago, emerged 
from his attic habitation some days since to publish his life's masterpiece, an 
elegantly bound book of poems that will possibly gain some attention from 
the infant population. 



Dewey Craig, the lionized record-breaking "miler" of I. U., who recently 
won international fame as a track man, has just signed a five-year contract with 
the state of Prussia, United States of Germany, to take over complete control of 
all school activities in Prussia at the salary of .$8,000 per year. 



Jennie Shields, who decided her business of life was to sow the seeds of 
culture along the banks of the Amazon, has never been heard from since the day 
she landed in Africa. She may have become either the "Great White Hope" 
or the "Good White Roast" of heathendom. 



Page Ninety-seven] 



Georgia Cox, probably the greatest modern authority on the Roman poet, 
Vergil, will lecture at the opera house tonight on the defense of the Latin 
language. Miss Cox advocates that Latin should be made an international 
language and would employ stringent means to secure its adoption throughout 
the universe. 



Kathryn Hodapp, Indiana's famous artist, has just returned to America, 
after several months sojourn in Borneo, where she has been hunting local color 
for her proposed master painting, "Crude Humanity." 



Lorita Bollinger, an ardent devotee of the Gavotte, has become the fantastic 
whirlwind of Paris. Miss Bollinger made her debut as a dancer when she ap- 
peared as the charming little "Peggy" in the Senior play in 1918. Merely as 
the whim of a young maiden, she has made herself known to Europe as Mile. 
Myown Prantzingfeet. 

BIJOU THEATRE 

Classy movies and popular vaudeville with Hot Collie stand in connection. 

VAUDEVILLE 

Emma and Alice Kruge in the musical presentation, 
"WEE MAKA BIGGNOISE." 

A five-reel masterpiece, featuring Wm. Ross as Im A. Gonner, in 
"STRIPES." 



TOMORROW-MATINEE AND NIGHT 

Gladys Glasson and Otis Shannon in a striking drama, 
"RICE AND OLD SHOES." 

N. B. — We are not responsible for the canines that disappear during the show. 
Frederick Bretthauer, Prop. 
Admission — Adults, 10 cents. Children and dogs exempt. 



Save your pennies and buy a stamp. 
To throw a bomb in the Kaiser's camp. 
United we stand, divided we fall ; 
To beat the Hun, we give our all. 



[Page Ninety-eight 



Teacher (conducting Bible study test) — Jerome, if you pass this test, you 
may play basket-ball; if you fail, you can't. Now, fii-st, you may quote some 
Scripture. 

Jerome — Depart from inc ye workers of inquity, I never knew j-ou. 



Mary Louise and dauntless Pink, 

Together we seldom miss, 
Until, perchance, by a trifling quarrel 

They suddenly get like this. 

But Lillian, dear, has no love for men ; 

A beau is her very last wish; 
At the thoughts of sentimental things. 

She turns up her nose \\i\d ^qis. 

Whitman's Kenneth is not over shy, 

He loves full many a miss; 
And when he thinks of sweet pretty girls. 

His jumps like 

heart up this. 

The Senior's bold little President 

Sets no store by a sweet girl's kiss; 
But the thought of a grape-juice highball, 
like this, 
soaring 
Sends his spirits 

Our varsity men are students all, 

For study they loudly insist ; 
They work every night till their brains are awhirl, 
And 
this, go 
like sailing 

around 



Miss Laupus — What was brought over to America in 1619 that lowered the 
standard of American citizenship? 
Thelma Jones — Women. 



Billy had a little girl. 

Her name was Elsie Reider. 
Everywhere that Elsie went. 

Bill was right beside her. 



Miss Clark — I wonder what made the tower of Pisa lean? 
Miss Remy— I don't know. If I did, I'd try it. 



Page NinetynineJ 



Steadily, silently, insidiously, a kind of German propaganda crept into our 
school. Its victims showed signs of nervousness ; they became lifeless ; their once 
shining, upright faces assumed a shamed and downcast expression. When one 
glanced at them, they seemed to blush, for their faces turned a rosy-sunset hue. 
But, alas, the blush remained for twenty-four hours each day. Soon among its 
victims were numbered two of the faculty — one a history teacher, who always 
pointed with pride at the positions in France that were guarded by American 
forces, the other was a patriotic math teacher, whose loyalty we thought unim- 
peachable, and who had a habit of spending all his excess change on Liberty 
Bonds and War Savings Stamps. 

One morning, as I walked to school, I, who detested the words "made in 
Germany," began to feel queer. My face felt kinder flushed like those orators 
who get up and declaim before the assembly. When I reached my destination, 
I was met by Miss Andrews, who refused to let me pass to my beloved studies. 
"Get thee gone," said she. So I set about finding the handiest method for mak- 
ing myself scarce, for I knew that I, too, had that unpatriotic disease — the 
' ' German Measles. ' ' 




[cmnisT^ 




MILITARY TRAINING 



A TWO-BIT LULLABY. 

F. W. 

Uncle Sam needs money, 

If this war is won. 
If I buy a thrift stamp 

I have shot a Hun. 
Quarter cracks at William, 

Start him on the run. 
Let us, then, buy War Stamps, 

And croak the son-of-a-gun. 



Act I 
ScENK I. Seated on a lovers' bench. 

Junior Girl — It seems as if the boys nowadays try to do too many things 
at one time. 

Junior Boy — Yes — uhuh — ah — but I've got my arms full now. 



There are pretty girls galore, I swear, 
Quoth Harry, handsome Harry; 

But Justine's fairest of all the flock, 
And none but her I '11 marry. 
0, never! 



G. G. — Say, doesn't this snow hit you hard in the face? 
G. B. — Naw. I hold my mouth open. 



[Page One Hundred 



L. 6. — Say, Honan, how do j'ou spell auburn? 

M. H. (looking intently at P. C.'s cranium)— R-E-D. 



(With due apologies to Milton.) 

Hence, loathed examinations 

Of wily teachers and rigid faculties, originated 

Where gaiety is extirpated, 

'Mongst horrid histories and mathematics galore; 

Find out some foreign school house 

Where the pedagogue spreads his jealous wings 

And in stinging reprimand his ferule swings; 

There under ebon shades and low browed edifices 

In eternal darkness ever dwell. 




noAAjJtdJLBdl 



A woodpecker sat on a frcshie's head, 
And prepared himself to drill. 

He pecked away for half a day, 
An finally broke his bill. 



Frank Miller (in recitation) — Miss , may I ask you about a date? 



Hobby and Juttie and Alice and Burel, 

Otis and Gladys and — my ! what a whirl 

Of sad cases in the Senior class ; 

Most every laddie has a fair lass. 

There's George and Lucile, and Hap and "Tec," 

And it is quite natural for Frank, you see, 

To love the fair Doris. But the question of Fate 

Is, Who's to get Francis, the orator great? 

Now all Senior lassies are very sweet girls, 

But it seems as if Francis is 'fraid of a curl. 

Fate only will tell where his heart is to be. 

My! 'twould be nice were it resting with me. 



Miss Andrews — Simeon, I would call your story a melodrama. 
Simeon — Gosh! Was it that rotten? 



Page One Hundred and One] 



INFORMATION FROM A GIG-SAW APERTURE, or WHAT WILLIE 
HEARD THROUGH THE KEYHOLE 

He sat on the lounge and thought ; she sat at his side and marvelled. The 
cold sweat broke out on his face and trickled down on his collar. "Gee!" said 
she, to herself, kinda confidential like, "it must be awful to undergo such a 
mental strain." Then our hero spoke. 

"Doris," said he, and his throat went dry and his tongue clove unto the 
roof of his mouth ; ' ' Doris, do j'ou believe in being prepared 1 ' ' 

"Frank," she said, and she snuck up closer; "Frank, preparedness is my 
long suit. I maintain that a woman should always have arms about her." 

Shoot yer little arry, Cupid; shoot yer little arry. 



Hickory, dickory, dock, 

We all set up the clock. 

Time flew so fast 

We stood aghast. 

Hickory, dickorj-, dock. 



First Senior— Hap is decidedly P^nglish, don't you think? 

Second Senior— Why? 

First Senior — He likes Tee awfully well. 



NINTEENTH CENTURY TRAGEDY 
Place: The High School Gym. 
Time: Right after basket-ball practice. 
Characters: First and Second Voices. 
Act I 
Scene I. Dark inferior of Gum. 
First Voice (sarcastically) — Why didn't he put me in that last half? 
Whatta ye think I am, a bench warmer? I've dressed all I'm a-gonna if I haffta 
set on the side lines all afternoon. If you ain't got sense enough to put 
in a good man when one comes out, you'd better let somebody else be captain. 
All I gotta say is this: I've watched you run this team long enough to find out 
you're a dawggone dummicks. 

Act II 
Scene I. Same scene; same play. 
Second Voice — Much obliged. 
First Voice — Yer welcome. 



[Page One Hundred and Two 



Some problems concerning pressure against dams were taken up in Physics 
by Mr. Phillips. In assigning lesson for the next day's recitation, he remarked: 
"Oh, yes; there's another dam problem in tomorrow's 



Nineteen-eighteen now is here, 

The Seniors gladly shout ; 
Commencement day is drawing near, 

To let us prisoners out. 

We've liked our work and all of that, 

We've tried to do our best. 
And that is just the reason now, 

That we desei-ve a rest.. 

' Naughty, ' ' they all cried in fun, 

And we enjoyed the wit. 
For now we hear their words, "Well done ; 
You are not bad a bit. ' ' 



Jack Shiel (in Civics class) — Miss Laupus, can the Indians on the reser- 
voirs vote? 

UTOPIA 

F. W. 

When all male poultry in Berlin 

Crow "Yankee Doodle Do," 
And cuckoos in the vineyards 

Strike up the same tune, too, 
When little fishes in the Rhine 

Want bait red, white and blue. 
And Junker eagles loud insist 

For feathers of like hue, — 
Then Uncle Sam can come back home, 

And know the whole world o'er. 
That men will then be brothers all, 

And peace reign evermore. 



Miss Clark — Louis, which angle shall I bisect' 
Louis Meyer — Bisect the one in the corner. 



Otis had a little girl. 

Her name was Gladys Glasson. 
Everywhere that Otis went, 

Gladys went a-bossin'. 



Miss Remy — All those who have their lessons, answer twenty ; all those who 
have not, answer accordingly. Louis? 
Louis Schaefer — Accordingly. 



Page One Hundred and Three] 



UNIVERSAL KNOWLEDGE 
A Bluff — An attempt one makes to leave the impression that he knows when he 

knows not. 
Cramming — A carnivcrous attack on a text-book before test week. 
Effort — Harry Miller trying to keep awake during a recitation. 
Examination — A game of chance. 

Teachers' Meeting — Where we are "cussed," "discussed" and "recussed." 
Credits — Milestones along the road to knowledge. 
Recitation — A dangerous experiment. 
Bells — Brazen heralds of relief and torture. 
Bore— A corollary in plane geometry. 
Canned— Ejected from class. 



SOLVING THE INITIAL KNOWLEDGE OF '18 

Just Bashful Burel. Divine Comedy. 

Jollity's Brother. Decidedly Jovial. 

Feminine Befriender. Terse Jester. 

Et Cetera. Elegant Little Kisser. 

Always Deviling. Little Knickerbockers. 

Dark Character. Lighthearted Knitter. 

Great Caesarian. ^ost My Beau 

Good Guesser. Absent Knowledge 

TIT XT * I^^er Knid. 

Man Hater Just Left. 

Knid Hearted. Katydids Love. 

Ever Hungry. Onward Seniors 

Great Eraser Hurler. Modest Maiden. 

Well Risen. Heart Masher. 

Wee Student. ]\Icrry Nuisance. 

Foolish Writer. Just So. 

Funny Specimen. Grand Finale. 



If you think these Jokes are old, 
And should be on the shelf, 

Just get a piece of paper out 
And write a few yourself. 



[Page One Hundred and Four 



Thomas Clothing Company 




Co^."ll_J.t lUtt Bvh-ffnor i ilcri 



& 

The Home of — 

Hart Schaffner & Mnr.r, 
Cloth-craft and 
Swartz & Jaffee. 

CLOTHES 
FOR YOUNGER MEN 



li 



up to 



Hawes Von Gal Hats 
Fine and Levi Caps 

Manhattan and Elgin Shirts 
Interwoven Socks 
Cutter and Crossette Neckwt:ar 
& 



Thomas Clothing Company 

^'Seymour's Good Clothes Shop** 

SEYMOUR - - INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Page One Hundred and Five] 



Our Best Advertisement Is the Ability and Success of Our Graduates 



Tliorough Courses. 

Jligh-Grade Instruc- 
tion. 

Individual Instruc- 
tion. 

Day and Evening 
Sessions. 

Enter at any time. 



mmm 



rH ri 



nil 



THE SCHOOL 

THAT STARTS 

YOU RIGHT 



We secure excellent 
positions for our 
graduates. 



PONT FOOL YOURSELF 

The school you select has an important bearing upon your success. Business 
men in this territory prefer our graduates, and give them the first call. 

^ Our graduates have earned a splendid reputation for making 
good — for being efficient, reliable, trustworthy, capable. It is 
this type of young people the business man prefers for his 
assistants. 

^ The demand for Stenographers, Bookkeepers, Typists and 
Clerical Assistants is the greatest ever. Forces must be re- 
cruited quickly. Untrained help cannot meet the needs of the 
hour. Join our classes now. 

Your first position will only be a stepping stone to success. You will find 
your diploma from our school a very great asset. Arrange to begin your 
"course of training at once. Ask for a copy of "Shorthand — the Open Door 
to Opportunity'' and our booklet giving full information regarding our 
courses, etc. 

SEYMOUR BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Aluert L. Walters, President 



'THE JOB SEEKS YOU IF YOU ARE TRAINED 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Six 



BUILT BY YOUR NEIGHBORS 

The American Mutual Life Insuraxce Company came into 
existence nearly four years ago. Straightforward Business 
methods, conservative management, constructive policy forms and 
fine consideration of the rights of policy-holders have placed 
The American Mutual in the front ranks of the younger com- 
panies of Indiana. 

We Solicit the Business of All Good Men and Women 



Oren 0. SwAiLP, President Dr. M. F. Gerrish, Medical Director 

Frank J. Voss, Vice-President Dr. A. G. Osterman, Asst. Med. Dir. 

Peter A. Nichter, Treasurer Oscar B. Able, General Counsel 

W. E. Wellkr, Secretary 



THE AMERICAN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



HOME OFFICE: 

SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Seymour Poultry Company 

dealers in 

POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC. 



Opposite Pennsylvania Freight Depot 
GOOD PRICES HONEST WEIGHTS 



Telephone Main 495 



SEYMOUR :: :: :: INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Page One Hundred and Seven] 



The S P A RT A 

You 
Get 
Better 
Service 
Here 

TheSPART A 


Have Your 

CLEANING and 
PRESSING 

Done by 

F. S C I A R R A 

Phone R-317 

South Chestnut Street 

Seymour : : Indiana 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


W. N. Fox 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

We use the 
Goodyear Shoe Repairing System 

West Second Street 


Harry M. Miller 
all kinds of 
insurance 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


MAYES' CASH GROCERY 


A. H. DROEGE 

FURNITURE DEALER 

CARPETS 
STOVES 

South Chestnut Street 
Seymour Indiana 


The Home of 

Quality Groceries 

at 
Reasonable Prices 

Monarch Brand a Specialty 
Phone 658 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



[Page One Hundred and Eight 



Groub's Belle Brand 



CANNED GOODS AKE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER 
: : BRANDS SELUXG AT THE SAME PRICE : : 



THEY ARE BETTER 



Order GROUB'S BELLE BRAND from your Grocer 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Gold Mine Dept. Store 



SEYMOUR'S FASHION CENTER 

showina;- all the latest style fads which fashion decrees 

Silks, Dress Goods, Trimmings, Gloves and Notions 

Silk Hosiery and Underwear 

Snits, Coats, Dresses and Millinery 



SEYMOUR Chestnut St. INDIA N A 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Page One Hundred and Nine J 



The first Blish Mill Estahlished at 
Barnstable, Mass., 1658 



BLISH MILLING CO. 

Seymour, Indiana 

Millers for Nine Generations 
1658-1918 

MAKERS OF COLONIAL FLOUR 



The Blish Milling Co., Seymour, Indianu 
Capacity, 1000 Bbh. of Flour Daily 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hmuliea and Ten 



F. H. HEIDEMAN 



PATHE FRERES 
PHONOGRAPHS 

FURNITURE PIANOS RUGS 

Agency for the 

"FREE" SEWING MACHINES 

(Funeral Director) 

114-116 S. Chestnut St. 

SEYMOUR : : INDIANA 



F. H. GATES & SON 
the only 

NEWS DEALER 
Dealers in 

High-Grade Candies, Cigars 
Tobaccos, Fruits 

New Location, 7 East Second Street 

Seymour, Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



MILLER'S BOOK STORE 

for 

Wall Paper, Window Shades 

School and Office Supplies 



UNION HARDWARE CO. 

PAINTS, OILS, 

VARNISHES, GLASS, 

BUILDING MATERIAL 



20 West Second Street 
Seymour - - Indiana 



South Chestnut Street 
Seymour - - Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



MAXON PHARMACY 




LIGHT HEAT POWER 

Phone 499 

INTERSTATE PUBLIC 
SERVICE CO. 



AT-l'or It-S i: RVIC E 



South Chestnut Strc(t 
Seymour Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



Page Oue Hundred and Eleven] 



THE JACKSON COUNTY LOAN 
& & AND TRUST COMPANY & & 



Our Savings Department Pays 3% 
Compound Interest 



J. H. Andrews, President J. P. Matlock, Secretary 

J. B. Thompson, Vice-President J. V. Richart, Treasurer 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Coal Cold Storage Ice 

USE 
RAYMOND CITY COAL 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 

EBNER ICE AND COLD STORAGE COMPANY 

D 1 S T K I B I' T K R S 

Seymour : : Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Twel 



CARTER PLUMBING CO. 

FIRST-CLASS PLUMBING 
South Chestnut Street 

Buy War Stamps and 

Thrift Stanij^s and 

help win the ivar. 

Phones 237 and W-782 Seymour 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus 50,000.00 


C. D. BILLINGS President 

B. F. SCHNECK Vice-President 

L. L. BOLLINGER Cashier 

WE SOLICIT YOUE PATRONAGE 

We Pay 3% on Time Deposit 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: indi.'^na 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


Visit the rieiv Department of 

DRESSES, SUITS, WAISTS 

and COATS 

(^ 

DRY GOODS STORE 

Two Entrances — 

SECOND anJ CHESTNUT 


-The- 
MODERN CLOTHING CO. 

For Good Clothes 

and 
Fine Furnishings 
For Men 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


E. C. BOLLINGER 

"THE REAL 
ESTATE MAN" 

office second floor, hancock bldg 
Seymour 


J. FETTIG COMPANY 


ARTICLES FOR THE SOLDIERS 

TRUNKS 
BAGS 

Fancy Leather Goods 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: indi.an.a 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



Page One Hundred and Thirteen] 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Every Modern Home 

Must 
Have A Telepkone 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Fourteen 



A COMPLETE DRUG STORE 



FEPEIMAMM^ 



CORNER SECOND AND CHESTNUT STREETS 
Q Q 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



HOOVER'S 



EVERYTHING IN THE HOME FURNISHING 
LINE 

STYLE QUALITY SERVICE 



Corner of Chestnut Street and Saint Louis Avenue 
SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



^age One Hundred and Fifteen: 



PREPAREDNESS " 

is the great cry in business of today as well as in war 
among nations. We consider preparedness to be one of 
the most essential qualifications of a successful Business 
Firm. We are prepared, as merchants, to serve you to your 
satisfaction, both as to Price and the Quality of Our Goods. 

IF YOU BELIEVE IN THRIFT YOU WILL TRADE HERE 

THE COUNTRY STORE 



Ray R. Keach, Prop. 



East Second Street 



Seymour, Indiana 



3UY THRIFT 



JD WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 




The World Renowned 
QUICK MEAL 

WICK OIL STOVE 

Burns Ordinary 

Coal Oil 

SIMPLE AS A LAMP 

Moles a Clean and Poiverfnl 

BLUE FLAME 

CORDES HARDWARE 
COMPANY 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Everything in Jeirelry 



Prices are Right, too 



THE BEST engraving ALWAYS 



MESEKE JEWELRY SHOP 



l(i South Chestnut Street 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Sixteen 



PROMPT DELIVERY 



Out-of-Senson VEGETABLES and FRUITS 

Privilege of Weekly Payments of Accounts 

Personal attention to the individual wishes and tastes of our customerf 



THESK AND EVERY OTHER POSSIBLE niT4T TTV PRnPFRTV^ 
SERVICE WE FURNISH WITH OVR Q^ALI r\ (.ROChRTLS 

PEOPLE'S GROCERY 



Phone Main 170 
Second and Chestnut Streets 



SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Seymour Daily Republican 



JAY C. SMITH, Publisher 

United Press Leased Wire War News. 
Woman's Pa,ge on Thursdays. 
Continued Story Every Day. 
Sunday School Lesson, Fridays. 
'Men Who Have Made Good," Wednesday 
Van Loon Comic Strip Every Da}'. 
All the Local and County News. 
Something for Every Member of the Fam 



id Saturdays. 



The Newspaper For The Home 



IFT AND 



\F{ SAVINGS STAMPS 



CALL 

BELL CLEANING WORKS 



IF IT'S 

CLEANING 

YOU WANT 
Phone 391 16 St. Louis Ave. 



If it's high class meats at the 
lowest cash prices, go to 



FRANK COX'S 
Meat Market 



19 E. Second St. Seymour, Ind. 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



JY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



Page One Hundred and Seventeen] 



" Where the Crowds Go " 

To Kraft's Five and Ten-Cent Store 

WE CARRY AN UP-TO-DATE LINE OF 5c and 10c MERCHANDISE 
IF IT'S NEW, WE HAVF IT 

GEO. KRAFT COMPANY 
5 and 10c Store 



Seymour 



Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



GRADUATION GIFTS 

IN GREAT VARIETY ARE OFFERED AT OUR STORE 

Come in and 

Make Your Selection Early 

GEO. F. KAMMAN — Jeweler and Optometrist 

Phone 249 

104 West Second Street :: :: Seymour, Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



STAR BAKERY 

Victory 
Bread 



YOVR AXXFAL SPECIALIST 



GRAESS IE -MERCER 



COMPANY 

COMMERCIAL AND CATALOG 

Printers 

Seymour, Indiana 



BRANCH offices 

Indianapolis, Ind. Louisville, Ky. 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



[Pago One Hundred and Eighteen 



THE TRAVIS CARTER COMPANY 

: : Manufacturers of : : 
High Grade Mill Work, Veneered Doors and Interior Finish. 


: : Dealers in : : 
Lumber and Shingles, Lath and Sash Doors 


Seymour : : : : : : Indiana 


BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 


OAKLEY ALLEN 
Barber 


— The - 
RACKET STORE 

If ants Your 
Trade 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


Telephone 472 

DOMESTIC STEAM 
LAUNDRY 

Corner Second and Pine Streets 

First-Class Work 

Seymour - - Indiana 


If it's Novelties you want in 
Footwear, it's 

DEH LER 

who's 

got 

them 

DEHLER SHOE STORE 

SOUTH CHESTNUT 
SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S. 



Page One Hundred and Nineteen] 



Youn^ Men 

Of 
Refined 
Taste 
Like 

Style, 

Fit and 
Quality 

when thcij buy Clothes 
These dominant features are found in 

"KUPPENHEIMER" 
"HIGH ART" and 
"FRAT" Makes 

Sold Exclusively by Us 




THE HUB 

The Young Men s Store 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Twenty 



DIAMONDS 
JEWELRY 



Seymour 



J. G. LAUPUS 

No. I N. Chestnut 

WATCHES 
CLOCKS 



SILVERWARE 
CUT GLASS 



Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 
Fine Leather Goods 



THE HALL MARK STORE 



Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



EAT AT THE 

PALACE RESTAURANT 

Something Good to Eat at all Times 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNERS 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



REYNOLD'S 



CASH GROCERY 

Good Service and 
Prompt Delivery 



WE SELL FOR CASH 

AND SAVE YOU MONEY 



Phone 163 
23 SOUTH CHESTNUT STREET 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



THE BEE HIVE 



Complete Line of 



Haviland China 

and 
Fancy Lamps 

Table Cutlery 



SOUVENIR POST CARDS 



Seymour 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-one] 



CALL ON US FOR THE HIGHEST- GRADE PHOTOS 



Reasonable Prices 

Photographs in this hook were made by the 
ELLIS STUDIO 

Opposite hiterurban Station SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



USE MILK FOR ECONOMY 

USE 
SWENGEL'S for SAFETY 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



"KUPPENHEIMER ' 
and "COLLEGIAN' 



CLOTHES 



To be had in Seymour only at 
ADOLPH STEINWEDEL 

The store that can serve you best 
SEYMOUR - - - INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Twenty-two 



Telephone Main 143 Bottlers of Coca Cola 


SEYMOUR ICE CREAM COMPANY 


FROZEN CREAM AND ICES 


CIRCLE STREET SEYMOUR, INDIANA 


BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 


Phone 116 


C. E. LOERTZ 


DRUGGIST 


1 East Second Street Seymour. Indiana 


BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 


FINE CLOTHING AND SHOES 






Compliments of 


RICHART 


F. J. VOSS 


East Second Street 




Opposite Interurhan Station 




SEYMOUR, INDIANA 




BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 


BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-three] 



BROOKMONT BEST BIRD 

WATCH THE LABELS 

THE HIGH COST OF LIVING 

is reduced when you get full weight, and standard quality. 

Every food container, can or package we sell is full weight as stan- 
dardized by Federal laws, and the quality of the goods under our labels 
has been tested under the Pure Food and Drug Acts. 

Ask for Brookmont and the Best Bird 
brands in canned goods and condiments. 

"Bow" Coffee is in full weight pound 
cans, steel cut, and is a delicious drink. 

If your grocer hasn't the standard quality and packages we distribute, 
phone our office and they will tell you the grocers who have. 

We Sell to Merchants Only 

GEORGE A. CLARK, Wholesale Grocer 



BROOKMONT 



WATCH THE LABELS 



BEST BIRD 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



SEYMOUR NATIONAL 
BANK 



W. W. Whitson President 

Lynn Faulkconer. . .Vice-President 
J. S. Mills Cashier 



Seymour, Indiana 



M. HUBER & BROTHER 

Men's and Ladies' 

FINE SHOES 

West Second Street 
SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



The Daily Democrat 



thrift and war SAVINGS STAMPS 



[Page One Hundred and Twenty-four 



^ 



GOLDEN JUBILEE 



On January Ist, 1919, we will have been manufactur- 
ing high-grade buggies for FIFTY YEARS 
The quality of our product today is better than ever 



AHLBRAND CARRIAGE COMPANY 

SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



—BICYCLE REPAIRING— 

A SPECIALTY 

Complete Line of 
Bicycles, Tires and Sundries 

CARLSON HARDWARE. 
COMPANY 

io6 W. Second Street 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. 8 



GET IN "THE" GAM 



Buy Thrift 
Stamps 

KESSLER HARDWARE CO. 



East Second Street 

Seymour : : Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND W. S. S 



THE NEW EDISON DIAMOND DISC PHONOGRAPH 

PACKARD, BOND PIANOS 



E. H. HANCOCK 



Opposite Interurhan Station 



Seymour, Indiana 



BUY THRIFT AND WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-five J 




>--"f^ _^7/ie9Mesinthisbook "- 
?=^ "Were engraved by 

C INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING 
i:^^£r- &ELECTR0TYPINGQ)MPANY 

222 E.OHIOST. INDIANAPOLIS.IND. 



t-Oue^Humlreil aii<l Twciili 






V 



1 \\>'^^. 



;i-i,v^t~ /f 



\ 







vj -^^ 






^ 







kf 



^. 









Vv> 



.1' 



xs^ 






n 



'■^^^.e4^t^ ^^. 



^^^^^-^^-t^f. 



*-^ 



>f^- ^': 










.y^"^^.'^ -xAf "'' 



'>-> 



/; 



Hfckman 

[ N D E R Y. IN 



JULY 04 

I. MANCHESTER INDIANA 46962