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Full text of "The patriot"

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LEN COUNTV PUBLIC I 



3 1833 01771 0622 



GENEALOGY 
977.202 
SE9S 
1919 



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Tliomas AbboH MoH 

Superintcnacnt o\ Public Schools 



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Kate Ferns Andrews 

Prmcip.l o{ SVileias High School 



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LeRoy M'lilc 

President 



Don A. Bollinger 

Secretary 



Claude W. Carter 

Treasurer 









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Doris M. Gels 


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F. K. MILUiB, '21 






IjL the pupils of the small country school stared at 
^^^^^ the new boy as he entered. He was about fourteen but 

fl^^rSBIJU much overgrown, being perhaps six feet in height. He 
iF^U^jB^^^ ''"<P''ed the rude school-room at an awkward gait, with 
IL^BHV^S^ ^''^ arms full of books and a confused expression upon 
his face- His ragged trousers, reaching between his 
knees and ankles, were held up by a pair of old sufl- 
pcnders and, being much too large for his lean body, 
gave him a very awkward appearance. His loose shirt, 
checkered alternately green and white, was in itself 
enough to attract the attention of all. His fair hair was tangled and long 
but his face was clean. His shoes were almost soleless and his stockings full of 
holes. Taking everything in consideration he might truly be called a boy, that 
t.vpe of a Hoosier country boy that Edward Eggleston loved so much. 

"We have a new boy today, scholars," said Mr. Long, the school-master; "his 
name is Joe MuUins and he is in the seventh grade, he tells me. You all want 
to get acquainted when school is out and make Joe feel welcome." 

Poor Joe had a terrible time in reaching his seat. He collided with a desk 
and every book he had went to the floor. A group of girls, observing his awkward- 
ness, let out a giggle, and a big boy on the front seat let out a "haw ! haw ! haw !" 
At length, however, guided by Mr. Long, Joe reached an empty seat in the 
rear of the room He sat down and placed his books in the desk and awaited 
further orders from the master. 

A class in grammar was about to recite. Mr. Long told Joe that he might 
enter it. Joe picked up his grammar and took a seat with the class. 

"Our lesson today," announced the teacher for Joe's benefit, "is on page 
forty-three; it concerns the parts of speech. Each of you will have a short 
sentence; and you are to tell me which part of speech each word is." 

The sentences went around the class, each pupil reciting one of them. As 
a whole the recitations were fairly commendable. When it came Joe's time, he 
stood up and read boldly in a clear, distinct voice, "The bucket was old and with 
moss was covered." 

"What pait <if speech is the word 'the'?" asked Mr. Long. 
"All ad.i*^(live, " replied Joe. 
" 'Bucket'?" 



"A noun." 
And so he replied to everj' question until he came to the word "with," which 
he called a conjunction, because of embarrassment upon realizing his position in 
a strange class. 

" 'With' a conjunction?" 

"0 no, an adverb. ' ' 

"An adverb? Sit down. Next." 

A murmur went through the class as Joe sat do^vn. He looked about him 
and was met b.y sneers from all. A litt,le girl bobbed up from her seat and in 
her squeaky voice gave the sentence correctly. Joe realized his mistake. He 
had kno^^^l the correct answer but had failed to give it and now he could only 
do better the next time for this time had passed. 

When the shadows were lengthening eastward, the rural school was dis- 
missed, and the children, swinging their books, tramped leisurely homeward- A 
group of boys crowded about Joe and tried to make things as miserable for him 
as they could. ' ' You can 't tell us nothin ' ' ' said one, while another commented 
on his clothes and asked if they came from Paris. 

"We're goin' to have a game of baseball Saturday," announced a lad noted 
for his red hair and freckled face, "but you won't get to play. Doncha wish 
yer was?" 

"Who 're you to play?" asked Joe. 

"Carltown," spoke up another boy. "It's between us and Carltown. But 
we can't let you play. The other side might git skirred, thinkin' we was a army 
an ' you the flagpole with a green-and- white flag. ' ' 

Everyone laughed. But Joe, seeming not to mind it, went on. "Who's our 
pitcher ? ' ' 

" 'Our,' listen to that will j'ou, 'our,' " said a boy with a shaved head and 
apparently an empty one. 

"Me," proudly replied the freckled lad. "I, 'Reddy' Gawsons, am the pitcher 
of Centersville and 'Baldy' there is my catcher. Some pitcher I am too, can 
sling 'em right and left, spit-ball, curve, inshoot, er anything yer want. That's 
me." 

"Who's Carltown 's pitcher?" 

"A feller they call Ben Perry. He's a star mentally and physically both, 
they say, but I'm gonna try to beat him if I can. We can't let you p'lay as we 
know of, but of course in case we run kinda short we might let you earrj' water 
to the players or be third assistant to the umpire. ' ' 

L'nmindful of the hilarity at his expense, Joe continued, "How do the two 
teams stand this season? How many games have they lost and won?" 

"Carltown has won about eight games this season and lost none; we have 
won about seven and lost one- But say, what's that to you? You can't play. 



Guess we'll have to leave you. So long, llagpy-pole. " 

"So long, boys," said Joe, and his manner was unchanged. He went his way, 
with his head down thinking deejjly about the game. Joe had now proven his 
worth, if never before, for it takes a wonderful person indeed to remain com- 
posed during the taunts and jeers of his companions. 

Saturday came at last, welcomed by all. A field just outside of Centersville 
was crowded with spectators from both villages, gay colors were flying every- 
where and hundreds of voices could be heard cheering. Old men, veterans of the 
Rebellion, leaned on their canes and peered through their spectacles, smiling on 
the young warriors. Here and there through the crowd, as the waves of cheering 
died down, a word could be distinguished, "Goodbye, Centersville," "Take out 
("ailtown," "Skunked to be," "The game is ours," and other phrases signifying 
the keenest interest and utmost loyalty on the part of the rooters. 

At length the game began. Carltown, being the visitor, was up to bat first. 
The red-haired boy took his p?ace in the box, while "'Baldy" stood behind the 
batter, ready to catch anything the Carltown lad should miss. Each team did 
its best, for every lad had a lassie whose eyes were fixed upon him. 

' ' Reddy ' ' put the ball over the plate. 

"Strike one!" called the umpire. 

"Not such a worse pitcher, if he keep up at that rate," said Joe who was 
standing in the crowd, much interested in the game. 

The boy from Carltown woke up and knocked the ball away over in center 
field. He took third ba.se before Centersville 's fielder could get the ball back 
into the diamond. 

Ben Perry, the opposing pitcher was next up. "Reddy" shook ever so much 
as he realized the reputation of the person at bat 

"Ball one!" sang out the umpire, "Ball two . . . Ball three!" 

"Reddy" knew there was no time to waste so he put one over the plate. Ben 
was not caught napping nor was his strike a wild one. He hit the ball squarely 
and knocked it almost twice as far as the first batter, thus bringing his catcher in 
and fccoring himself. Three outs quickly followed; then Centersville was up 
to bat. 

"Baldy" struck out the first thing. "Reddy" was next up and he made 
second, but was caught off his guai'd and put out. Next was the short-stop ; he 
showed great speed — true to his long legs — and brought in a score. Jones, the 
second-baseman, made third and was brought in t)y Popplewell who "bunted" 
and made first, while Carltown "fumbled" with the ball. The next batter made 
an cut and the score stood two to two, at the end of the first inning. 

The next five innings quickly followed, Carltown having the upper hand with 
the score six to three in her favor. Joe stepped out to "Reddy" and asked him 
to allow him to pitch for them. 



"You pitch!" said "Keddy" scornfully. "Why we wouldn't think of such 
a thing. Git outa the diamond." 

"Take 'flaggy-pole' out" shouted Popplewell. 

"Hogs out of the diamond!" shouted "Baldy." 

Joe stood his ground and pleaded calmly, "I only want you to give me a 
chance- You want to win the game and I want you to win it, but you know 
you can't, if you keep up at this rate. I only want a chance. Let me pitch the 
seventh inning. If any man makes first, you may throw me out. That is fair. 
Only try me. ' ' 

There was a heated discussion among the players as to whether or not Joe 
should be put as pitcher in "Reddy's" place. At length they decided to give 
the new boy, a trial though it was much against "Reddy's" will. 

"I'm not doing this against you," said Joe to "Reddy" as he walked out to 
the box, "but I am doing it for Centersville. " 

Joe proved that he could pitch. Three opposing players were successively 
fanned out, none of them even fouling the ball. Only once did Joe fail to put 
the ball over the plate. The umpire scratched his head, as Carltown came into 
the field, and the great crowd of spectators from both villages asked each other 
the qu^^stion, ' ' What manner of boy is this and where did he come from ? ' ' 

Centersville went up to bat but no one scored. Then Carltown went up and 
Joe gave the three batters a fan-out similar to that of their fellow-players. 

The home team was up again and this time for two scores. The eighth inning 
ended with the score six to five in favor of Carltown. 

There seemed to be a great deal of commotion among the crowd of onlookers. 
Fans from Carlto^\Ti were going wild, hats were flying in the air and every other 
sound was drowned by their shouts of victory ; while a few thoughtful ones eyed 
the new boy and realized that victory was j'et to be obtained with such a person 
as he on the opposing side- No joyous shouts, were heara from the Centersville 
fans though most of them smiled confidently when they looked at Joe. 

The ninth and last inning followed- Joe took his place and Ben Perry was 
at bat. The shouts of the crowd had ceased ; every one gazed in breathless sus- 
pense, for at last the two great players were facing each other. Joe purposely 
threw a ball but Ben, expecting it to be a strike, struck at it. His strike was a 
wild one and missed the ball a good foot. Joe again threw a ball and again Ben 
struck at it, witii the same result. Then the Carltown lad saw the trick and de- 
cided not to strike at the next one. Joe put the next one, however, over the 
plate. 

"Strike three!" called the umpire. "Batter out!" 

Joe's expression remained unchanged, though, could we have looked into his 
heart, we might have seen him smiling. Centersville cheered to the top of her 
voice but Carltown was quiet. The new pitcher was acting beyond her realiza- 



tions. It was eaay for Joe to fan the next two batters and then his team was 
up to bat. The last few moments had arrived. Victory or defeat was at hand. 
Which would it bet 

The first two Centersville batters made outs, for Ben Perry was not asleep. 
The outlook for the home team seemed doubtful indeed. "Baldy" was next up. 
He hit the ball a good blow and finally made his way to second. Joe was next 
up and as he stepped to the plate he gave Ben a look of defiance. Ben returned 
it without a quiver. The ball whizzed over the plate! Joe struck and missed. 
Again the ball came over the plate and again Joe missed it. 

"What's the matter?" called a Centersville patriot. 

"He's not as good as he seemed to be," shouted some one in the Carltown 
crowd. "The game's ours." 

Joe clinched his teeth and gripped the bat. Only one more strike remained; 
the time was now or never. The ball came. "Bang!" Joe knocked the ball fully 
out of sight. It was a whole minute before the ball was returned to the diamond 
and then the score was seven to six in Centersville 's favor. Joe Mullins, the 
new boy had beaten Carltown. 

The Centersville rooters cheered as they had never been known to cheer before 
when Ben Perry walked forward to the new boy and shook hands with him. 

Joe smiled a smile of victory and, looking Ben Perry full in the eye, said, "We 
have equaled each other in plaj-ing, but Fate has placed the victory in my hands. ' ' 



njtim 



o 



ANNA SCHMIDT, '20 

VEK THE darkened landscape 

The calm bright stars shine do\vn; 
Over the forest and mountain 

Re-echoes the nightingale's round; 
Out in the night's still darkness 

The wild things roam on their way; 
And the wood-in-mphs gather wild-flowers 

While the night-hawk seeks his prey. 
Oh! the joy of the great wild nature 

Has cast its spell over me, 
As I walk in God 's great garden ; 

And the cool wind from over the lea. 
As it comes from the land of the sunset. 

Is bringing His message to me. 



fl-LULLflB/ 



MYLREA FINDLEY, '19 



THE GOLDEN dreamboat 's ready, 
"With her silken sails all spread; 
And the breeze is gently blowing 

To the fairy port of bed; 

And the fairy captain's waiting 

While the busy sand man flies 

With the silver dust of slumber 

Closing every baby's eyes. 

Oh, the night is rich with moonlight. 

And the sea is calm with peace, 
And the angels fly to guard you, 

Their watch shall never cease; 
And the fairies there await you, 

They have splendid dreams to spin ; 
You shall hear them gaily singing 

As the dreamboats draw you in. 

Like the ripple of the water 

Does the dreamboat 's whistle blow, 
Only baby ears can catch it 

When it comes the time to go. 
Only little ones may journey 

On so wonderful a ship 
And go drifting off to slumber 

With no care to mar the trip. 

Oh, the little eyes are heavy, 

But the Jittle soul is light; 
It shall never know a sorrow 

Or a terror through the night. 
And at last when dawn is breaking 

And the dreamboat 's trip is o'er, 
You shall wake to find your mother 

Smiling over you once more. 



T 



Lrts-flsc^^a(!rR 



DOKISE NORBECK, '20 

HE SUPPER is over, the hearth is swept, 

And in the wood fire's glow, 
The children cluster to hear a tale 

Of that time so long ago. 
When grandmother's hair was golden brown, 

And the warm blood came and went 
O'er the face that was scarcelj- sweeter then 

Than now, in its rich content. 

The face is wrinkled and careworn now 

And the golden hair is gray. 
But the light that shone in the young girl's c 

Has never gone away. 
And her needles catch the fire's bright g'leam, 

As in and out they go. 
With the clicking music that grandma loves, 

As she shapes the stocking toe. 

And the waiting children love it too. 

For they know the stocking song 
Brings many a tale to grandma's mind 

Which they shall hear ere long; 
But it brings no tale of olden times 

To grandma's heart tonight, 
Only a sermon quaint and short. 

That is sung by needles bright. 

"Life is a stocking," grandma says, 

"And your's is just begun. 
But I am knitting the toe of mine 

And my work is almost done; 
With merry hearts we begin to knit, 

And the ribbing is almost play. 
Some are gay colors, and some are white. 

And some are ashen gray. 



But some there are of many a hue, 

With many a stitch set wrong, 
And many a row to be sadly ripped 

Ere the whole is fair and strong. 
There are long plain spaces without a break. 

That in youth are hard to bear ; 
And many a weary tear is dropped, 

As we fashion the heel with care. 

But the happiest, saddest time is that 

Which we court, and yet would shun, 
When our Heavenly Father breaks the thread 

And says our work is done." 
The children come to say good-night 

With tears in their bright blue eyes, 
WTiile in grandma's lap, with a broken thread. 

The finished stocking lies. 



fl-ruwce. 



O 



EUTH L. MILLER, '19 

NLY A flower in the deep, dark woods. 

Half hidden by last year's leaves, 
A bit of freshness and beauty divine, 

A breath of fragrance among the trees. 

Dear litle flower with a heart so pure. 

Beautiful emblem of love! 
TeU me the secret God gave you to know. 

Did you fall from heaven above? 

How many hearts have you cheered and made glad ? 

How many souls have you healed? 
Seems to me you've a mission to fill, 

In your God-given beauty revealed. 




atiJPisc'n'Ut'tmm 

AGNES ANDREWS, '20 

>R OVER four hundred years in a certain section of 
I'icardy the name of Monduc had been synonymous with 
strong men and thrifty women. It was, as well, another 
name for honesty, and loyalty. And, as far back as the 
I)eople of this region could remember, every member of 
the Monduc family had been a wonderful shot. For 
ages, unerringly, first their arrows, then their bullets had 
reached the bull's-eye in every contest held in Picardy. 
But of late years, the family had gradually died out, 
until there remained now but one male Monduc of age. 
Pierre Monduc was an unusually happy Frenchman. Yes, happy even in 
that eventful spring of 1918. Was not his prosperous little farm far behind the 
battle-lines, even practically free from Gothas? Was he not discharged from the 
army, minus one leg, to be sure, but plus a Mcdaillc Militaire, and a Croix de 
Guerre with pa3m? Was not Zenobie, his wife, amiable and kind; not like that 
vixen, Mme. Dirong, across the road? Were not Angele-Marie, his sixteen-year- 
old daughter, and Jacques his ten-j'car-old son in the best of health? And finally 
was not the Generale American paying preposterous, unheard of prices for sup- 
plies? Why should he not be happy? 

To be sure, one small cloud obscured the horizon of his happiness. Jacques 
his only son, last of the honest Monducs, was not as truthful as he should be, and 
was too easily swayed by considerations of material things. Still, Pierre com- 
fortably reflected, he would grow out of that, he was .still young. 

So thinking, he strolled along, until his reverie was interrupted by the voice 
of liis son. "Mon pere, mon papa! les Boches are coming! Mme. Dirong said 
so! Just over the hills!" and he stood panting in the hot May sunshine, pointing 
his finger in the direction from which the invaders were supposed to come. 

I'ierre w;is silent a moment listening, but could hear nothing more ominous 
than the familiar faint roar of far-away guns. Then, for he had been a soldier, 
and had heard more than one fantastic rumor, he shrugged his shoulders. "Eh 
bien ! if they come, they come. But a big man like you should fight against them- 
Go get the guns, and let us go to our lesson, he remarked ironically. 

The l)()y, flu.shing a bit under his father's irony, ran to the house for the guns. 
Meonwhile Pierre limped across the field of grain, into the green meadow, the 
site of their gunning exhibitions, and daily lessons. Suddenly he halted, and 



turned in the direction of the thick hedge. Again he heard a low involuntary 
groan. Quickly investigating, he found ij-ing there a white faced young officer, 
his blue coat covered with blood, striving with all his might to hide the only too 
evident paiu of his wound. Seeing the sturdy peasant, the soldier confident of 
aid, spoke in low broken sentences.- "Ah, mon ami — for the love of the good 
God — have pity — on one wounded, upon whose shoulders much of importance 
rests. Diable — Hide me, the damned Boche is after me — Marbleu, this wound- 
Some place to hide and— water, water, s'il vous plait" he ended in a sort of gasp. 

Pierre's peasant mind, never quick to grasp a situation, at last formulated 
an answer, but before he could speak, he was interrupted by the patter of feet, 
and Jacques was crj-ing "VoUa! They were hidden — " but he perceived for 
the first time the wounded man. " Qui-est-il ? " "He is a soldier of Prance, 
wounded. Help me to carry him to the bam. " 

So the two, one a erippjle, and the other but a mere child, sweating and pant- 
ing under the officer's weight, staggered to the cool, dim bam. There, pillowed 
in the soft hay, they gave the man water and looked dubiously at his wound. 
Finally Pierre said, ' ' I have a daughter. She knows a little about nursing. She 
can keep a secret. Jacques, call your sister." 

In a little while. Angel e-Marie's deft fingers had dressed the gaping wound 
in his shoulder and she retired to the house, under pledge of eternal secrecy. 
Then, to the quiet man, and the wide-eyed boy, the stranger explained. 

"I am Henri Laton, aide-de-camp of General X. The Boche advanced, and 
i\'e were cut off from supplies. Then the Boche retreated. We found some plane 
of his and added them to some very valuable maps of our own. Then the Boche 
advanced again. Not finding his plans where he left them, he grew angry. So 
we were "strafed." Mon Dieu, but we were "strafed." So M. le Generale sends a 
man back to headquarters with those important plans of ours, and of M. le Kaiser. 
The Boche sees the man. The Boche wounds the man and then pursues him. 
The man is lost, and takes refuge in a convenient hedge. Helas, I am the man," 
and he sank back into the hay. 

"You are pursued?" asked Pierre anxiously. 

' ' Qui, " in a matter of fact tone. 

"Then the bam is not safe for you. It is too open. You must be hid." 

"Ehbien. Is there a loft?" 

" Certainement. " 

And in a moment, the warrior, supported by the ex-warrior, and the warrior- 
to-be, was led into the airy loft, and covered with hay. It was, of course, ar- 
ranged to give him air, but it was also a perfect device for concealment. 

"Au revoir, mon vieux ami," said Pierre. 

"Au revoir," answered a stifled voice from beneath its blanket of hay. 



As soon as they had left the barn, Pierre turned to his son. "Not a word of 
this It is a secret for France, comprends-tu ? ' ' 

' ' Oui. Je suis un Monduc. ' ' 

The shooting lesson that day was not a great success. Jacques was excited, 
and Pierre was worried. To get the message to headquarters safely and soon, 
was obviously his duty. But how was he to do it ? 

That evening he discussed the matter with Henri, over a supper prepared by 
Angele-Marie. For, though Zenobic was a worthy madame, her tongue was loose 
at both ends, and she knew not the meaning of the secret. But when the subject 
wah mentioned, Henri protested in horror. "Mais non! I have a verbal message 
which I must keep secret" he declared. And no amount of persuasion could 
move him in his determination. 

So for a day, life, on the surface at least, went on as usual in the little stone 
cottage. Morning of the second day came, and Pierre, after carrying breakfast 
to the officer, who was gradually growing stronger, set out with his rifle for the 
field, where he and Jacques were to practice again. 

A long time he waited in the sunny meadow. The shadows shortened as the 
morning slowly passed, and he still patiently waited. At last weary of inaction, 
he turned and stalked, as quickly as his lame leg would let him, back to the 
small group of buildings. Zenobie and Angele-Marie were absent that day, and 
perhaps Jacques was fixing himself a lunch. He was greedy enough to do so, 
reflected his father with a sigh. 

Just then he mounted the slight knoll at the side of the barn. For a moment 
he stood stock-still, in amazement. Then horror-stricken, he started to advance, 
but thinking better of it, retreated behind a scrubby little tree, from which he 
could see and hear without being seen- For there, in front of the barn, was his 
son, his Jacques, the last Monduc, talking to, or arguing with, a group of men 
on horseback, whom he recognized only too readily as Prussian Lancers. 

"But I tell you, I repeat, there is no man here" cried the boy, almost in 
desperation, "I am alone." 

"No. Where is he? Ach mein Gott! I know he is here. Tell us now, vite, " 
threatened one in badly pronounced French. 

"No, monsieur, there is no one here" reiterated the white faced boy. 

One of the men angrily raised his whip. The boy, in mortal terror, shrank 
against the side of the barn. Inside the barn, a pale soldier listened to the 
colloquy which would give him life or death. On the hillside a man proud in the 
pride of race, listened to the proof that his son was indeed a Monduc. 

Suddenly the man who had raised his whip dropped it, reached into his pocket, 
and dangled a gold watch before Jacques' eyes. Another man, taking his cue 
from the first, removed a heavy signet ring from his finger, and almost dropped 
it into the boy's hand. 



Jacques, watching the articles glitter in the dazzling sunlight, smiled nervously 
and leaning against the barn, clutched and unclutched his greedy hands. In his 
soul, love of country and love of beauty conflicted. And the trinkets won. 

He stretched out his hot hands — ' ' Give them here, give them here ! Yes, yes, 
he is upstairs, in the loft, hidden under the hay ! ' ' 

Dropping their ornaments in his hands, the men leaped off their horses, and 
darted into the barn. Upstairs a man was tearing to bits such maps and plans 
as he could, while muttering to himself half forgotten prayers. Jacques sud- 
denly realizing the enormity of what he had done, dropped the seductive baubles 
in the dust and crouched, weeping on the comfortless ground. On the hillside, a 
man and a father, but with the honor of a family to preserve, picked up the 
rifle with which they were to have practised, and gauging his distance carefully, 
calmly, nervelessly, shot his son dead- 

" Le fils est mort ; Vive la f amille ! ' ' 



ut-mw 



A 



MARGARET HALL, '19 



LITTLE flower bloomed at my feet, 
Its face upturned, my face to meet; 
I smiled at it, it smiled at me. 
And seemed to say, 

"I bloom for thee." 

Two dark ej'es expressive of mirth, 
Merry and gay, of smiles, no dearth; 
A wee tiny mouth for the pansy meek, 
That seemed to say, 

' ' To thee I '11 speak. ' ' 

"What would you say to me, pansy dear? 
Would you tell me how you came to be here. 
Or how you spend the sunshinj' hours? 
And it seemed to say, 

"With the other flowers." 

What keeps you happy on a very hot day. 
You live not under the fountain's spray? 
What keeps you happy, your heart full of love ? 
And it said, 

"I trust in my Father above." 



jw-pm?m 



MARGARET THOMAS, '20 




|N JUNE of nineteen hundred and ten, Jeneal Welville 
and Phillip Cartheron were married. Although both 
were Americans they had met in Paris where Philip had 
lived for many years, devoting his time to the study of 
art. 

At present they were living in Beverloo where the 
quaint homes and queer people had been the inspiration 
for many canvases. 

Those were peaceful palmy days, those days of nine- 
teen ten. The thought of war and its horrors had never 
occurred to the people of Beverloo. For how was mortal man to foresee it ? How 
was he to dream of it? 

August of the next year came, bringing joy to the Cartherons and to all of 
Beverloo for a tiny baby girl was born among them who was to be the delight 
of the village. Little America Cartheron was 'loved by all. Her dark curls and 
fascinating baby way were the talk of the village. And even her name sent a 
thrill to every one 's heart. And so it was amid these surroundings that America 
spent the first years of her life. 

It was an evening of August of nineteen fourteen that Jeneal and her two- 
year-old baby girl sat on the side porch of their little cottage and awaited the 
coming of her husband. Why didn 't he come ? He had never been so late before. 
Had anything happened? A presentiment of evil seemed to hang over the young 
mother. America after a game of romp had been amusing herself with an 0I4 
doll and her mother, to pass the time away, had picked up some sewing. The 
material fell from her hands as she heard a step on the walk. Was this her 
husband's step? It was like and yet so unlike it. She sprang to the door, 
opening it just as he reached the porch. He looked grave and sad as he drew 
his wife into the little sitting room where America was playing. 

"It's come," he said, "Germany is raiding Belgium, killing women and 
children at her will We are ordered to mobilize immediately. ' ' 

The mother screamed and little America (although not realizing the meaning 
of it all) nervously covered her face with her tiny apron. A year before, her 
face had been burned and ever since, when excited she sought to protect it in 
this way. 

"And to think," continued Philip, "I have a half-brother in Germany. 



What if he should be forced into the service and be the one to hurt you or our 
child?" 

Little time remained for much had to be done before daybreak. What 
happened in the next few hours need not be told here. At six the next morning 
Philip Carthcron left his little family to fight for Belgium as did thousands of 
other men. 

What Jeneal endured that day and the days following is only what hun- 
dreds of other wives and mothers of France and Belgium have endured, and 
like all the rest she was unselfish thinking not of herself but of her helpless 
baby girl. How was she to save her child? It would be useless to flee with 
(her. What was she to do? Every day the Germans were getting nearer to 
Beverloo and every day they were getting more barbarous. She couldn't stand 
for her little America to fall into their hands. 

Finally the thought occurred to her to teach her child to say, "I love thee," 
in German. Teach her to say it to every stranger. She was old enough to 
understand. And what German or any man would not be moved by such words 
spoken by so lovely a child? Jeneal believed there were none so inhuman. 
Immediately she began teaching America the three German words. 

Two weeks passed. The long gray line entered Beverloo about nine o'clock. 
Little America had been dressed for bed, Jeneal had heard her prayer and 
left her for the night just as the warning came Hurrying back to her child 
she repeated the three words, gathered her in her arms for the last time and left 
her. Snatching a wrap she left the house thinking it would be the better plan 
for the little one's safety. 

A young army officer of the German troops drew up before the cottage, 
dismounted and entered, motioning his men to remain where they were. As 
he entered the cozy sitting room he felt like a tired child, who had reached 
home after a long journey. He was tired of murdering people, sick of crimes. 
It was in this frame of mind that he passed into the nursery where little 
America lay in her white bed. As his eyes fell on the dark curls of the child 
his heart gave a leap. She made him think of his own little girl who had died 
only two months before. As he went up to the bed tiny America opening her 
blue eyes, looked up into his face saying, "leh liebe dich." With a cry of 
longing he gathered her up, blankets and all, and carried her out to his men. 

Little America was treated kindly, even tenderly by the big officer. About 
a week later he took her home to his wife who welcomed her even more tenderly 
than had her husband- She reminded them so much of their own little one. 



Four years had passed. Gei-many had met an irresistible force in America's 
entry into the war and had discreetly surrendered. Little America or Elga as 
she was now called was nearly seven years of age and the idol of both her 



foster parents. The scenes of her childhood had been completely forgotten. 
She was as happy as a child could be. Near her home a Red Cross hospital 
had been established under the direction of the Allies. 

One evening a Red Cross nurse was strolling through the village streets 
when her attention was attracted by little dark-haired Elga. How different 
she was from all the little fair-haired girls! Especially did her rarely beauti- 
ful eyes appeal to the woman- Only her little America ever had such eyes. 
Could this be she? Was it possible? Hurrying after the child, Jeneal (for 
she was the nurse) asked her name. "Elga," she replied and the mother 
turned sorrowfully away. 

Almost a week later Jeneal passed Elga's home. The little girl and her 
brother were plaj-ing in the yard. He was vainly trying to walk on a broom 
handle laid across two high posts. Just as Jeneal came opposite the house 
the litle fellow fell with a loud scream. Instinctively Elga covered her face 
with her apron. How many times had Jeneal seen her own little America do 
this ! This must be she ! 

Entering the yard she was finally permitted to see the mother of the two 
children. For a while the mother hesitated to tell but after a time Jeneal knew 
aU. This was her own little America found and cared for by these kind people. 
There was great rejoicing in the little home that night, for kind Providence 
had permitted America to become part of the family of her father's half- 
brother. 




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SRICLI75-RRI^ 



LESTER ABBETT 
GILBERT ABEL 
HORACE ACKERMAN 
LLOYD ACKERMAN 
ERNEST ALLEN 
JOE ALLEN 
CHARLES APPEL 
GEORGE APPEL 
WALTER ABBTJCKLE 
ARTHUR ARNOLD 
EVERETT AULT 
FRED BACON 
ROSS BALDWIN 
ERNEST BALLARD 
CULLEN BARNES 
GERALD BARNES 
ARTHUR BARTLETT 
BURYL BEATTT 
PAUL BECKER 
WILLARD BECKER 
ROY BELDON 
JOHN BLISH 
LYMAN BLISH 
ELMER BOLLINGER 
EARL BOWMAN 
JEROME BOYLES 
FRED'K BRETTHAUER 
LINTON BREWER 
KINGSLEY BRINKLOW 
REGINALD BRINKLOW 
CARLOS BROWN 
CLARENCE BROWN 
FRIJD BRUNING 
WILLARD BURKLEY 
JOE BURTON 



IRMEL BUSH 
WILLIAM BYRNE 
FRANCIS CADEM 
LOUIS CADEM 
HARRY CARTER 
JOHN CASEY 
CYRIL CHARLES 
VIRGIL CLARK 
HENRY COBB 
IVOR COLLINS 
GEORGE COMBS 
JOHN CONNELLY 
EDRICK CORDES 
LOUIS CORDES 
PHIL CORDES 
CLARENCE CRAIG 
EVERETT CRAIG 
FORREST CRAIG 
RAYMOND CRAIG 
CURTIS CROSS 
FRED DANNETTELLE 
LAWTON DANNETTELLE 
MERLE DANNETTELLE 
FRANK DARLING 
EDWARD DECKER 
JOHN DE MATTEO 
WILLIAM DEMUNBRUM 
FRED DEVEREAUX 
HAROLD DONNELL 
JOHN ECKLER 
JOSEPH EDWARDS 
LAWRENCE ELDBIDGE 
JAMES ENOS 
WILLARD EVERHART 
GLEASON EWING 



LYNN FAULKCONER 
CYLDE FITZGIBBONS 
HERBERT GALLAMORE 
BURRON GARVEY 
JOHN GARVEY 
FRANCIS GATES 
WILFRED GEILE 
FRANK GILBERT 
REA GILBERT 
CLAUDE GLASSON 
HAROLD GLASSON 
OMER GREEMAN 
WILLIS GREEN 
LELAND HADLEY 
JOHN HAGEL 
JAMES HANCOCK 
EARL HARRINGTON 
GUY HARRIS 
RUSSELL HARRY 
KENNETH HAUENSCHILD 
GUY HAZZARD 
KENNIE HAZZENZAHL 
DALE HEINZ 
LYNN HELLER 
WILFRED HENDERSHOT 
BERTRAM HINTZEN 
LAWRENCE HILL 
MELVIN HILL 
DEWITT HODAPP 
JOHN DALE HODAPP 
LYNN HODAPP 
MAURICE HODAPP 
PAUL HOFFMAN 
JESSE HOOVER 
LAWRENCE HORNING 



ocsci^yRE: 



WALTER HOEST 
ELTON HOWE 
EDWAED HTJBEE 
MAN8IL HUGHES 
WILLIAM HUMES 
MAUEICE JENNINGS 
FENELON JOHNSON 
LOUIS KAIN 
PAUL KANAUFF 
GLENN KYTE 
WAREEN LAFKIN 
FOREEST LEININGEE 
FEEEMAN LEININGER 
I?DWARD LEWIS 
DEWEY LINDER 
JASON LUCAS 
CHESTER LUMPKIN 
WILL MASTERS 
KENNETH McCUEDT 

JOE McDonald 

MAEION McINTYEE 

GEORGE Mclaughlin 

LORIS McPIKE 
WILLIAM MYEES 
CHESTEE MILLER 
HARRY MILLER 
JOHN MILLEE 
WILLAED MILLEE 
JOE MISCH 

COULTEE MONTGOMERY 
FRANK MONTGOMERY 
HARLAN MONTGOMERY 
KENNETH MONTGOMERY 
EVERETT MURRY 
LEO NICHTER 
ROY NEWBY 



SAM NEWBY 
CARL NIEHAUS 
EOY NIEHAUS 
LOUIS NIEMEYEE 
JOE ORMSBY 
CARL OSTERMAN 
LOUIS OSTERMAN 
WILL OSTERMAN 
CARL OTTE 
DALE PATRICK 
FAE PATRICK 
AUBREY PETTUS 
ORWINE PETTUS 
LAWRENCE POLLEET 
C. H. PHILLIPS 
lEWIN PUMPHEEY 
LOUIS REDMAN 
DUNCAN REED 
HAERY REED 
ALFRED REYNOLDS 
MAUEICE EIEHL 
CHESTEE EILEY 
CLAUDE ROBBINS 
CLYDE ROBBINS 
ROY EOEGGE 
ALBERT ROSS 
ELMER ROSS 
CHARLES ROTTMAN 
RALPH EUDDICK 
ELMEE RUDDICK 
JAMES RUDDICK 
RAY EUSSELL 
CHEIS SCHLETEE 
GEORGE SCHLETEE 
HORACE SEELIN6ER 



OTIS SHANNON 
OSCAR SHEPARD 
EWING SHIELDS 
NORBOURNE SHORT 
ROBERT SHORT 
ARTHUR SMITH 
VIRGIL SNOW 
CHESTER SPILLMAN 
ARTHUR SPRAY 
CHARLES STANFIELD 
HOWARD STANFIELD 
MERRIL STEELE 
GRAHAM ST. JOHN 
FRANCIS STUNKEL 
ROY SULLIVAN 
CARL SWITZEE 
STANLEY SWITZER 
JOE SWOPE 
EARL TATLOCK 
CHARLES THOMAS 
WILLIAM THOMAS 
CHARLES TRUMBO 
BRYAN VOGEL 
WALTER VOSS 
MAURICE WATERBUEY 
VALFORD WIETHOFF 
FRANK WELLEE 
GEORGE WHITE 
KENNETH WHITE 
REX WHITSON 
FRANK WIENEKE 
ALBEET WILLIAMS 
EAEL WILSON 
CHAELES WEIGHT 
HEEBERT WIEE 




CRC-B?VS-'T-SWE1DS 

iwtzrt-sumM: 





ALICE SEYMOUR, '21 

UST TWO months after peace had been declared the joy 
of the nation was turned into mourning when the bells 
of the old Trinity Church of Oyster Bay tolled forth its 
mournful message to the wor;ld that another chieftain 
had passed on to that place of eternal joy, and that 
his days of chivalry were ended. 

It is hard to put into words the grief which every 
one felt in the loss of her great American patriot, Col. 
Theodore Roosevelt, undoubtedly one of the greatest 
leaders that the history of our country will ever record. 
All America in spirit participated silently and proudly. Whatever public 
tributes may hereafter be paid. Col. Roosevelt died and was buried like the plain 
American citizen he was so proud of being. That was the kejTiote of his life, 
"Simplicity." The man who is universally mourned today achieved the highest 
distinction which our great country can confer on any man; and he lived a 
useful life. He was not deficient in education but with all that you will hear 
of his great career and his services to his country and fellow citizens, you will 
not hear that the high plane which he attained was due to his education alone. 
For he was a statesman gifted with an influence which was such that he was 
able to unite the discordant forces of government and mould the diverse purposes 
of men toward progressive and profitable action. A magistrate whose poise of 
judginent was tested and vindicated in a succession of national emergencies — 
patriotic and faithful soldier, honest and upright citizen, tender and devoted 
husband and father, helper and leader of men— and greatest of all an exemplar 
to bis people of the virtues that buUd and conserve the nation's welfare. 

His great bravery was recognized on Cuban soil more than twenty years 
ago when he organized his gallant band of Rough Riders. His diplomacy was 
showQ in his peace negotiations with Panama and with Russia and Japan. He 
was a great writer, naturalist and a traveler. 

And we as a nation, regardless of creeds and of politics, must bow down our 
heads in submission to the vdll of Almighty God and pay out of full hearts our 
homage of love and reverence to this great and most honorable man whose death 
has smitten the nation with bitter grief. 

What he has left unfinished will be taken up by other hands, and when the 
complete crowning triumph comes it will rest upon the foundation he had laid. 



Cut down in life, just as a mighty oak withers and dies after the ligthning 
stroke, was this great man. Our nation mourns the loss but not alone. Love's 
tribute comes from many a distant throne. It was "God's will;" as he had lived 
he died, statesman and soldier, fearing not to bear fate's heavy cross; while 
swift from sea 1o sea rolled the deep accents of a nation's prayer. 

A;id as wc assemble to pay the last respects of tribute to our dear and 
beloved statesman, how vivid to my mind come those beautiful words of Walt 
Whitman who voiced the anguish of the North when Lincoln was struck do\vn in 
their early hours of triumph. 

"0, Captain! My Captain! rise up and hear the bells, 

Rise up for you the flag is flung, 

For you the bugle trills. 

For you the bouquets and ribboned wreaths. 

For you the shores a-crowding. 

For you they call, the swaying mass their eager faces turning. 

The ship is anchored safe and sound 

Its voyage closed and done. 
From fearful trip the victor ship 

Comes in with object won. 
Hear Captain! Dear Captain! 

This arm beneath your head; 
It is some dream that on the deck 

You 've fallen cold and dead. 




OIo tl|p l^nnor of IB 




EDRIC CORDES was the only mem- 
ber of the class of '18 who saw 
actual service at the front in the world 
war. 

Leaving school a few days before com- 
mencement, he enlisted in the Marine 
Corps, May 23, and was assigned to 
Paris Island, S. C, for a brief but vigor- 
ous training. Thence he was sent to 
Quantico, W. Va. 

On August 12 he sailed on the Hen- 
derson, arriving at Brest fifteen days 
later. September 12th, as member of 
the Forty-fifth Company, 5th Regiment 
of Marines, he went over the top for the 
first time. He participated in the fight 
in the San Mihiel sector and later on 
the Champagne front. Here he was 
wounded and in consequence was re- 
turned to a hospital where he lay for 
nine weeks. He was then sent to a con- 
valescent camp for members of the 
Marine Corps at Mahre where he re- 
mained until his return to the States 
March 11. 

"We wish him a speedy permanent re- 
covery from his wounds. All honor to 
Edric ! 



AGNES ANDREWS, '20 

POR THREE days in the Argonne lost, 
Stai-ved in that bloody wood. 
No one can know what that brave stand cost, 
But the "Lost Battalion" stood. 

Water or food without either they fought. 

"Are we forgotten," they cried. 
And their efforts seemed to count for naught, 

As the brave men, wounded, died. 

Three nights in sunset-glory came 

In morning-paleness, waned. 
Glorious be those brave men's name, 

Their honor never stained! 

The third cruel sun dipped in the west. 
One more they could not endure; 

To offer surrender came the Boche on his quest, 
So smiling, haughty, and sure. 

They were tempted almost beyond their power. 
Their leader looked on his dead; 

But, God be thanked, in that anxious hour, 
"Go to Hell!" Major Whittlesey said. 




Adelaide Gasawavj 
Instructor of Music in Seijmour Schools 

Singing {or Convalescent Soldiers in France 



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Helen Ann Dannettei^le Editor-in-Chief 

Miss Quinn Faculty Editor 

Miss James Faculty Art Editor 

Walter Huber Business Manager 

Miss Andrews Faculty Business Manager 

ABHtBtattt lEIiitxira 

Ruth Miller Harold James Cletus Mackey 

ffllaaa lElOtara 

Hazel Stanfield Agnes Andrews Prank Miller Ophella Weiler 

Art lEbttora 

Ruth Stanfield Leroy Bretthauer Earl Dieck 

Bertha Ewing Jane Haas 

Aaatatant Huatttraa Munvigics 

Robert Keach Felix Cadou Glenn Keach 



tVfCWi. 



HELEN ANN DANNETTELLE, '19 




|NCE TO every generation in a nation's history comes 
the supreme moment, the moment when the whole 
country feels a joy so great, that in its overwhelming 
intensity, reason gives way to feeling. 

For us that moment came on the memorable morn- 
ing of last November when, amid the quiet of our 
school life, was heard the sound of whistles and the 
ringing of bells, the noisy expression of such riotous 
happiness, that we could not fail to know its wonder- 
ful message. 
On the morning of November 11, 1918, the ai-mistice was signed and the 
greatest, the most dreadful war in all history ceased. The year of 1919 will 
go down to future ages as the year memorable not for destruction but for the 
laying of the foundations of a perpetual peace through the union of the great 
peoples of the world in a League of Nations so broad in its sympathy, so up- 
lifting in its moral and spiritual influence as to make War an outcast among 
nations. The Idealist's great dream may at last come true for the world has 
indeed been reborn in the spirit of "peace on earth." 

Nevei" before have men been actuated by motives so righteous as those of 
today. The soldiers of this last war fought not from a desire for conquest nor 
from a hope of material gain, but they gave up their homes, even their lives 
for the sake of an ideal. 

Only when we look back over the long ages since the beginning of time^, during 
which war has roamed almost at wiU over the earth, can we fully realize what 
a monumental step we are taking in this resolution to make the words "to wage 
war" an archaic expression. 

It is true we can not understand why it has been our good fortune to live 
in this epoch-making age and year, yet to us that inestimable privilege has been 
given. To us has been given not the responsibility but the privilege of "carry- 
ing on" for future peace. "We are ready, we are eager for the trust — the 
optimism of youth perhaps, but possibly it is something deeper. 

■\\e wish to thank the faculty and student body who have so whole-heartedly 
co-operated and helped us to print this book. We also wish to express our 
appreciation of the generosity of the business men. 



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THELMA ALBERRING 

"Give me CrothersvUle or give me Loertzes, 
please, Central. WMch-ever is the handier." 

RALPH AMICK 
"The horn, the horn, the lusty horn 
Is not a thing to laugh to scorn." 


1^ 






ELSIE AUFFENBERG 

Elsie advises us to take things always by the 
'smooth handle." 



BEULAH BARNUM 

"Then let thy love be younger than thyself or 
thy affections can not hold the bent." 



EDITH BOWMAN 

"Those curious locks so aptly twined 
\Whose every hair a soul doth bind!" 
— the kind Edith has. 



I 



LEROY BRETTHAUER 
Ju^t notice the lettering in this book. Leroy 
did it. 




ALBERT BRETTHAUER 

// Marie would only say, "Out, oui, to every- 
thing I ask her, oh bliss! 



EDWARD BUHNER 
'Oh, Edward! Oh, Edward! Tendir and 



trewe!' 



MAURICE BYRNE 

"Slick" lived up to his name alright. If you 
■were reprimanded for something you never heard 
of before — depend on it — he turned the trick. 



HELEN CLARK 

"The beautiful are never lonely for some 
one always loves them." 



RUTH CRAIG 
Our Senior hoys are nifty, some of them are 
really nice, but I've got my eye on a Sophomore. 



HELEN DANNETTELLE 

'I've traveled much both east and west, 
Take it from me, I like millionaires best.' 



DURBIN DAY 

For goodness sake don't let him know what 
any of the girls think of him. He doesn't like 
compliments- 



EARL DIECK 
Another artist and he says, "Here lately I'm 
not so particular about politics. I know one 
nice person who's a Democrat." 




EDNA DOWNS 

"What's this dull town to mef Clancy's not 
here." 



RUBY ERNEST 

"Rube" says, "Pep without purpose is 
piffle." If you kjiow more about a Ford than 
she does you're going some. 



BERTHA EWING 

She likes to draw and to write long letters, 
but we can't find nut who the lucky fellow is. 




GLEASON EWING 

To hoot, to saddle, fo horse, and away. 
To fight for Uncle Sam in the fray; 
He did his duty, and then without fuss, 
Came back to graduate with us. 





MYLREA FINDLEY 

She sings and makes poetry and cooks! 
Yum, yum, oh boy! 



STELLA GOSSET 

those waves of brown cheveux 

It takes our Stella to arrange a coiffure. 



GARNET GREEMAN 

"He wears the rose of youth upon him, does 
our Garnet, for early to bed and early to dream 
makes a man's complexion like peaches and 
cream. 



MAUD GREEN 
However would we have managed without 
Maud to keep us informed on local "affairs?" 



f 




LILLIAN GRIFFITTS 
"TJie grass stoops not she treads on it so 
ligM," but hearts — she crushes them. 



MARIE GUDGEL 

"Beauty hath strange powers" which is to 

blame for her ever increasing train of admirers. 



MARGARET HALL 
Speak to her of Jacob's ladder and she'll ask 
you the number of steps. 



IRENE HEIDEMAN 
Here is a cheerful child. She even hopes 
out-grow those freckles. Good-luck, Irene! 



JAMES HIMLER 
"A man may try his hand at all trades," 
says Jimmy. "If I don't like astronomy I can 
siill be an eminent chemist or play the flute in 
the New York Symphony." 



WALTER HUBER 

"Buzz" quotes, "That man that hath a ton- 
gue, I say, is no man, if with his tongue he 
cannot win a woman." 



HAZEL HUMES 
At first we thought it inconsistent 

With her slow and measured tread. 
That she should scream and yell like that, 
When Seymour got ahead- 



FERN HUNTER 
'Oh, horrors! Here comes a hoy! 



RUTH HUNTER 

Her main object in taking chemistry is to learn 
to chloroform those horrid cats. 



HAROLD JAMES 
"Jessie" is "a man in all the world's new 

fashion planted, 

That hath a mint of phrases in his brain," 
Such as, "I don't believe I understand your 

question." 



GLENN KEACH 

"A lion among ladies is a most dangerous 
thing," but "Deacon" really can't help himself. 



RUTH KRAMER 

"// / can't catch one any other way I'll bedeck 
a chair with tangle-foot." 



c 


GLADYS LAWELL 


^ 


I'd do anything rather than vote for a Repub- 
lican. 


^ 


CLETUS MACKEY 


# 


This fellow has sense enough to play the fool 
and to do that requires a certain kind of wit. 


1 


LUELLA MASCHER 




"Wait till I get my complexion on." 
But believe us, it sure looks fine. 


■1 


HAROLD MERCER 


1^ 


The teachers won't miss him from their classes, 
but ivhat will become of basket-ball and the 
"matinee class?" 











RUTH MILLER 
"I Jiate onions, men and tomatoes" — a poet, 
an actress, a cyclist and general entertainer. 



IRENE PFENNING 
"0, for a forty-parson power!" 
Irene is missionarily inclined, but what can 
he her interest in ? 



ESTHER PRALL 
It's our opinion that she is rather partial to 
little fellows. 



EDWIN RUDDICK 

"Girls really don't bother me. I'd rather 
plow than talk to one of them." 



HAZEL STANFIELD 
"That boy who would rather plow — he has 
strange taste, hasn't he, Eddyf" 



HILDA STEINWEDEL 

"To be in love and act wisely is not in the 
power of the gods," so we excuse her. 



EDITH SUMMA 
No one ever said anything about a young 
girl's fancy turning, but it does, sometimes. 



OMEGA WHEATON 
"Gatch" has a sweet attractive kind 
grace. N'est-ce-pas, Walter? 




ARTHUR WILDE 
"/ am Sir Oracle (otherwise "Pud") and 
when I ope my lips, let no dog hark." 



JOSEPHINE WHITE 

"Jo" is an amiable creature. Blues sTie never 
lias and we'd recommend Tier giggle for any 
melanclioly disposition- 




CRcju/injs 






pia::5ii7C/ic 



Btssit muL 



WILLIAM ABEL 
BESSIE ABELL 
HAZEL ACKEEET 
FEED ACKEEMAN 
AGNES AJ^DEEWB 
MAEY BILLINGS 
HELEN BLAIN 
CHABLES BLUMEE 
KAEL BEASKETT 
FOEEEST BBOCKHOFF 
FELIX CADOU 
MAE CAEE 

ANNA HOLLAND CAETEE 
LOUISE CAETEE 
ELLA CLEMENTS 
MAEIAN CEABB 
OPAL CEAIG 
NEWTON DAY 
lEENE DEHLEE 
WILLIAM ECKSTEIN 
EDWIN FETTIG 
MONCLOVA FIELDS 
EVERETT FOSTEE 
FEANCES GEEEN 
HABEY GOTTBERG 
JANE HAAS 
MERRIL HARSH 
MARY LOUISE HONAN 
MAEGAEET HOPEWELL 
DOROTHY HUBEE 



GAEEISON HUMES 
DOEA JOHNSON 
CECIL JONES 
EUBY JUDD 
EOBEET REACH 
HELEN LEWIS 
OEEN LEWIS 
ELNORA LOCKMUND 
MAURICE MACKEY 
GLADYS MAY 
EDMUND MONTGOMERY 
DORIS NORBECK 
EARL PARKEE 
AETHUE PHILLIPS 
KATHBYN EEIDEE 
MIEIAM EINNE 
MALCOLM ROUTT 
EDNA EUDDICK 
KATHBYN SCHAEFEB 
ANNA SCHMIDT 
EUGENE SMITH 
DOEOTHY SPANAGEL 
LEO SPRAY 
EUTH STANFIELD 
CLARENCE STEINWEDEL 
MARGARET THOMAS 
IRENE TULLIS 
EMMA WESNER 
KENNETH WHITMAN 



crC'S^7TO:s 



HENEY ABBETT 
PEARL ACKERET 
WANETA ALBRICH 
CARL AMICK 
JOE ANDREWS 
CHESTER AULT 
JAMES BAKER 
TIPTON BLISH 
WILLIAM BRACKEMBYEE 
EDWINA CARSON 
IRIS CHILDS 
CALVIN DOBBINS 
RUTH DOUGHERTY 
IRANCES DOWNS 
SHIRLEY FAULKCONEB 
MILDRED FETTIG 
EVA FOSTER 
EMMA GALLAMORE 
ROBERT GRAESSLE 
MABEL GREEN 
MARGARET GUTHRIE 
ELLSWORTH HAGEL 
ALLAN HANAUEB 
EUSSEL HAEEY 
HARRY HEDGES 
CLARENCE HIRTZEL 
ORVILLE HILL 
DOROTHY HOENING 
FLOEENCE HUFNAGEL 
TOM HUMES 



ESTHER JONES 
ALMA KEUGE 
GLA?)Y8 LEE 
BURYL LIND 
HELEN LINKE 
WILLIAM MAINS 
CHARLES MAPLE 
EDWARD MASSMAN 
DONALD MILLER 
FRANK MILLER 
FRANCIS MISCH 
FRANCIS NIEHAU8 
MABEL PFAFFENBEBGEB 
ESTHER PHILLIPS 
ELSIE EEIDER 
ANNA RICHART 
ALBA ROGERS 
LOUIS SCHAEFEE 
LLOID SHAFER 
ALICE SEYMOUR 
MACK SHIEL 
OLIVE STANTS 
GLENN SUTTON 
MADGE TABOR 
LUCILE WALTERS 
THEODORE WEILER 
FLORENCE WIETHOFF 
BERTHA WELLER 
GEORGE WELLER 



(m-mstmtn 



LAWRENCE ABEL 
VEBNA ACTON 
CONSTANCE ACTON 
BRUNOW AHLBRAND 
THEODORE BARTLETT 
GLENN BEATTY 
FLORENCE BECKER 
EDITH BENKMAN 
HELEN BLEVIN 
HOWARD BLUMEB 
MARTHA BORCHEBDING 
GLADYS BREITFIELD 
PAULA BREITFIELD 
MARY BROWN 
OWEN CARTER 
HARRIET CLABK 
EMMALINE COLLINS 
JOHN DEAL 
GRACE DUNN 
MIIiLARD EuDALY 
OSCAR FENTON 
IBANCIS FETTIG 
CHESTER FILL 
ALICE FOSTER 
FRANCIS GEILE 
EDWARD GHOLSON 
FRANCES GILL 
LEONA GILLMAN 
HARVEY GREEN 
ALBERT HACKMAN 
VIVIAN HAMILTON 
MAURICE HAPEE 
LOAT HARREL 
LAWRENCE HATFIELD 
STELLA HELLEWELL 
CLARENCE HERTZEL 
JOHN HUNTER 
WILLIAM IRVING 
LOUISE JOHNSON 
RAY JULIAN 
PAUL KAMMAN 
EDWIN KA8TING 
WILBUR KASTING 



ABTHUB KAUFMAN 

MATILDA KES8LER 

KATHRYN KIRSCH 

HENRY KNOTT 

ZACH KRIENHAGEN 

BOY KBUWELL 

MABIE KYSAB 

FORREST KYSAB 

ELOI8E LEE 

CHARLES LINKE 

CARL MALICK 

ROBERT MANN 

EVA McCAMMON 

DONALD MILLER 

HAROLD MISAMORE 

IRENE MONROE 

MAURICE MONTGOMERY 

ALICE MORRISON 

ROSA NICHOLSON 

FRANCIS NIEHAUS 

WILBUR OAKS 

PAUL OTTING 

MARTIN PARDIECK 

LEONARD PFAFFENBEBGEB 

KATHBINE BEED 

FEBN BHOAD8 

MARGARET BIEHL 

CHARLES BOSS 

HERSCHEL RUDDICK 

RAYMOND SHARFENBEBGEE 

ESTHEB SIEFKEB 

LILLIAN SHAFEB 

OSCAR SHORT 

DOROTHY SMITH 

GEBTEUDE STEINWEDEL 

NELLIE STEWABT 

DALE SWENGEL 

LOUISE TASKEY 

OPHELIA WEILEB 

LOUISE WEBNING 

HAMEB WESNEB 

GEORGE WILSON 

LUCILE WINKENHOFFEB 



mn (Club 



MARY GOQDLOE BILLrNGS 
HELEN BLAIN 
MAfiY BBOWN 
FELIX CADOU 
ANNA HOLLAND CAETEB 
LOUISE CARTER 
MARION CRABB 
ELLA CLEMENTS 
RUTH CRAIG 
CALVIN DOBBINS 
FRANCES DOWNS 
EDNA DOWNS 
RUBY MAE ERNEST 
EMMA GALLAMORE 
FRANCES GREEN 
LILLIAN GRIFFITT8 
MARIE GUDGEL 
MARGARET GUTHRIE 
MARGARET HALL 
IRENE HEIDEMAN 
MARY LOUISE HONAN 
MARGARET HOPEWELL 
DOROTHY HORNING 
WALTER HUBEE 
FERN HUNTER 
RUTH HUNTER 
CECIL JONES 
RUBY JTJDD 
MATILDA KESSLEB 
HELEN LEWIS 
ELNORA LOCKMUND 



GLADYS LA WELL 
MAURICE MACKEY 
WILLIAM MAINS 
CHARLES MAPLE 
RUTH MILLER 
DORIS NORBECK 
MAY NICHOLS 
MABEL PFAFFENBEBGEB 
IRENE PFENNING 
ESTHER PHILLIPS 
KATHRYN REIDER 
MIRIAM RINNE 
LILLIAN SHAFER 
DOROTHY SMITH 
EUGENE SMITH 
DOROTHY SPANAGEL 
HAZEL STANFIELD 
RUTH STANFIELD 
CLARENCE STEINWEDEL 
HILDA STEINWEDEL 
EDITH SUMMA 
MADGE TABOR 
OPHELIA WEILER 
THEODORE WEILER 
BERTHA WELLEB 
EMMA MAUD WESNEB 
LOUISE WERNING 
OMEGA WHEATON 
JOSEPHINE WHITE 
FLORENCE WIETHOFF 

















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First Violin 
HELEN DANNETTELLE 
LILLIAN GRIFFITT8 
AILEEN HOPE 

Second Violin 
EMMALINE COLLINS 
FRANCIS FETTIG 
DORIS NORBECK 
ELGIN RUCKER 
DOROTHY SMITH 

Drum 
NEWTON DAY 

Cornet 
WILLIAM MAINS 
CLARENCE STEINWEDEL 



Saxophones 
JOE ANDREWS 
TOM BOLLINGER 
KARL BRASKETT 
CHARLES MAPLE 

Baritone 
EUGENE SMITH 

Flute 
JAMES HIMLEB 

Trombone 
FRED ACKEBMAN 
RAY JULIAN 

Piano 
HELEN CLARK 




PRESENTED BY 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF SHIELDS HIGH SCHOOL 
June 5, 1919 

AT THE 

Majestic Theater 

CAST OF characters 

Tom Harrington, foot-ball captain Glenn Keach 

Reginald Black, his chum Walter Hubek 

Byron Harrington, father of Tom Edward Buhner 

James Roberts, a Freshman Cletus Mackey 

William Everett James, a new professor from 

Stanford, the rival college Arthur "Wilde 

Dan Bavenant, from the hills Harold James 

Professor Magee, director of the "gym" . . . Gleason Ewing 
Dauiev. a collector James Himler 

{Garnet Greeman 
DuRBiN Day 
Earl Deeck 
Mrs. Wigginton Wiggens, the landlady .... Lillian Griffitts 

Marian Bavenant Helen Clark 

ffitf/i r7iornfo?i, Mrs. Wiggens' niece Marie Gudgel 

Bulcie Harrington, Tom's sister Ruth Miller 

CMa, Japanese servant Omega Wheaton 

Vi'idoiv Maguire, known as "The Widow" . . . Hazel Stanfield 



5fl/i/i-/ic/iS"i;i 




5/i/F-^l5^VI^ 





larHitg laskft lall 



THE ORGANIZATION of the Athletic Association marked the beginning 
of the athletic activities in the Seymour High School. The following 
officers were elected: 

Glenn Keach President 

Walter Huber Vice President 

James Himler Secretary 

Edward Buhner Treasurer 

L. A. AcKERMAN Faculty Treasurer 

Coach Carson had four experienced "S" men, hold-overs from last year's 
team : Keach, Niehaus, Eckstein, and James- The prospect for a fast and 
winning team was very promising but the season was delayed by the "Flu'' 
epidemic which interfered with the scheduled games. In spite of this handicap 
the team won fourteen out of eighteen games. Although we lose Mercer, Keach, 
and James through graduation there will remain four experienced men with 
which to build a strong team for next year, Bob Keach, Brackemeyer, Le\vi8 
and Niehaus. 




Paul E. Carson 
Athletic Coach 



Harold James — "Jesse." 

Was an all-round man and could 
be counted on making good at any 
position. 





Glenn Keach— ' ' Deacon. ' ' 

Has the ole eje for the basket. In 



everj' game he came out with 
score running high. 



the 



Oren Lewis — ' ' Judge- ' ' 

Was a sticker at guard but always 
got rough. Next j'ear he will know 
better. 



Harold Mercer — "Brub." 

The staunch back-guard. It took 
a good man to get by him as he was 
as firm as Gibraltar. 



KOBEKT KeACH- 



'Bob. 



Young but nevertheless showed up 
well in the tournament. A good asset 
for next year. 



William Brackemeyer — "Bill. 
Was a big husky and h 



how to guard. 
' dam. ' ' 



knew 
His pet expression — 



William Eckstein — "Ex." 

Showed his skill agaiu at center and 
was right there when it came to 
watching his man. 




HarBttg ^rli^buk 



Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


15. 


Dec. 


6. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


20. 


Jan. 


3. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


17. 


Jan. 


24. 


Jan. 


31. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


27. 


Feb. 


28. 


Feb. 


28. 


March 


1. 


March 


7. 


March 


8. 


March 


8. 



Seymour 38 

Seymour 34 

Seymour 31 

Seymour 35 

Sej'mour 47 

Seymour 44 

Seymour 28 

Seymour 21 

Seymour 26 

SejTnour 54 

Seymour 38 

Seymour 24 

Seymour 27 

Seymour 62 

Seymour 26 

Seymour 23 

Seymour 24 

Seymour 15 

Seymour 26 

Seymour 32 

Seymour 10 



North Vernon 17 

Bro^vn8town 14 

Washington 35 

Mitchell 19 

Crothersville 8 

Brownstown 13 

New Albany 40 

Columbus 45 

Mitchell 25 

CrothersAdlle 17 

North Vernon 18 

Columbus 44 

New Albany 26 

Madison 10 

Madison 19 

St. Xavier 22 

St. Xavier 23 

Newport, Ky 16 

Aurora 13 

Hope 7 

Columbus 19 



Who for? What for? 
Who we gonna yell for? 

Seymour ! 

That's the way to yell it! 

This' the way to spell it— 

S-E-Y-M-0-UR 

Seymour ! 




R. Fonvard — Glenn Keach R. Guard — Mackey 

Center — James 
L. Forward — Buhner L. Guard — Mercer 

A SERIES of inter-class games was arranged to determine the standard 
of basket ball in the different classes. This custom has been f oUowed 
for several years in order to assist the coach in selecting players for 
the Varsity team- The Seniors easily won over the other classes in the series. 
They were fortunate in having three men from last year's Varaity, Mercer, 
James and Keach. The total number of points made by the Seniors was 139 to 
their opponents' 43. 

Seniors vs. Juniors 22 12 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen 26 7 

Seniors vs. Sophomores 38 18 

Juniors vs. Freshmen 2 

Seniors vs. Freshmen 53 6 






0P 




mzmxy-iu: ms^ 




"fl SENIOR TRjcK- THE Juniors 5ay 



THE SPIDER AND THE FLY 

M. G. B., '20 

"Come go to the Majestic," 

Said the spider to the fly 
"Oh I'm afraid, I really am," 

The other did reply. 

"Well, you're a coward sure and true," 
Said the spider to the fly. 

' ' Oh no I 'm not ; come on let 's go, ' ' 
The other did reply. 

Sure the spider was a naughty boy. 

Accustomed to much skipping, 
"While the other was a better boy, 

"Who saw his grades were slipping. 

Such is the way of all mankind. 

Of rich, poor — you and I, 
The wily spider whispers, "come," 
"Oh yes!" returns the fly. 



Mr- Dishinger (in Commercial Arithmetic)- 
Opal C. — "Very few." 



• How many make a million ? ' 



• •! I 



"n JUNIOR TRICh-ThE SENIORS 5/^Y 



Miss Hancock — Robert, what is a man who believes in peace called? It 
comes from the verb "pacify." 
Robert — A pacifier. 



Oben L. — Say, Carson, how can you restore the natural tint to ivory? 
Prof. Carson — Get a shampoo. 



They say the soldier has a time, 
A digging in the trenches; 

But we also have to suffer 

Getting fired at in our benches. 



Joe Andrews (in Geometry) — "What kind of an angle is at the corner of 
a person's mouth? 

Miss Sutherland — "A cute angle I suppose. 



Pete Juuan — Have you a hope-box, Peggj'? 
Peggy Hopewell — No, but I have a hope-well. 



Miss Quinn — According to the recent war the Germans have no souls at all. 
A. B. P. — No wonder they wear wooden shoes. 



"Red hairs show up awfully bad" remarked M. L. H. as she industriously 
brushed her dress. 




YHinerva-taLKes ai suiiex 
lining- for SlatK anj oU goli . 



LET ME 

D. E. N., '20 

"If I were a teacher," said the clock 

As it hung upon the wall, 
"I'd get the marble throwers 

From the largest to the small. 

There would be no passing notes 

Across the room and back, 
None to Carl and none to Mary, 

None from Olive to Jack. 

I 'd show them a waste basket, 
And tell them what its for; 

So they wouldn't tear up paper, 
And throw upon the floor. 

Then when Columbus teachers came, 
They could look around and say: 

"Seymour beats our High School, 
If we do sweep twice a day." 

I'd teach the Seniors better 
Than to lead the Juniors on. 

To stack the books and hoist their colors. 
By moonlight and begone. 

This High School needs reforming. 
So Miss Andrews should get me; 

For you see I'm always on the job, 
An example of industry. 



Miss Remy (to English 
my favorite poet ? 

Lucille M. — Because he writes love sonnets. 



Can anyone tell me why Robert Herrick is 



Gladys L. (in the Senior room) — I smell matches in here. 



Ruth Hunter — Jimmy, what produces an incandescent light? 
Jimmy H. — That's easy. Push the button and the light appears. 



Miss Davison — Eddie is that you whistling. 

Ed. Massman (sitting near the radiator) — No, it's this radiator. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR OUR TEACHERS 

Miss Kessler — Let the little boys promenade some more in Domestic Science 
togs — they don't mind. 

Miss Alwes — The advice given to the twelfth pedagogue treated applies 
equally well here. 

Miss James — Do draw some cheeks on Uncle Sam, he's worn stripes long 
enough. 

JIr. Ackerman — Be sure that every one sits just so before you dismiss the 
class. 

Miss Remy — Don't inflict Thought Books on next year's class. 

iliss Beldon — A quart of cream three times a day. 

Miss Hancock — Please stand still when you conduct a class. 

Miss Andrews — Stay in the oflSee between periods. 

Mr. Carson — Can people in three's and two's. It's more sociable. 

Miss Sutherland — Raise your voice at the end of sentences. 

Miss Davison — Stop loving the little boys in the Assembly room. It's alright 
in private but in public — never ! 

Mr. Dlshinger — Smile once in a while, it won't hurt you. 

Miss Quinn — Give A to all who helped on the Patriot. 

Miss Howe — When you make cookies pass them around. 

Miss Geile — Chaperon some more parties, still in blissful ignorance of the 
fact that dancing is not allowed. 

Mr. Henderson — Don't bring your Ford to school, you can't teach it agricul- 
ture. 



THE SONG OF THE AGRICULTURE CLASS 
Sing a song of six-pence, a pocket full of seeds, 
We're going to plow a little patch that once grew only weeds; 
Instead of little tufts of grass and dandelion buds. 

We'll have some early cabbage and several rows of spuds. 



Question — Why don't Jack Shiel and Earl Parker speak to each other any 
more? 

Answer — One girl with red hair answering to the name of Olive. 



Miss Davison (in Commercial Geography) — Where is rock salt found? 
Dorothy S. — Ground up and in sacks. 



Miss Howe (in Domestic Science Class) — At a sanitarium in Michigan they 
feed nuts." 



Lines of Cicero all remind us 
If we had the author here; 

We should move, but leave behind us 
Loving footprints on his ear. 



look 



Helen D. to Ruth M. — You may be cunning but it takes me to make people 



Dorothy H. — Which way Helen? 



Ti-uc as the love of a woman, 

Fair as the lilies at dawn ; 
Happy and gay as a little brook, 

Slender and young as a fawn, 
BcautifujI hair of dark chestnut, 

Big eyes that sparkle like dew, 
Tell me, has Heaven no mercy? 

My pup has died of the "flu." 



B. w., '21 



•mMestlcJlKeatre 





aJMa^^^juLMiMaau^M ^ 



trvti 




Rawo^ Miss Remy — Kathrjm, 

O^* name a spirit in one of 
Shakcspcre 's plays. ' ' 
Kate R. — "Punk." 



Irene 



When the bats in your 

belfry do flirt, 
When your coniprenez-vous 

rope is cut; 
When there 's nobody home 

in the top of your dome 
Then your head's not a 

head, it's a nut. — Ex. 



Mr. Carson (in Botany) — Mistletoe is a parasitic plant having no use. 
Elsie Reider — "Why, it does too have a use! Just ask Hickey! 



Emma W. (in Botany) — Mr. Carson, how can I tell the hardness of this 
elm tree?" 

Mb. Carson — "Use your head." 



PINK'S PRESENT SCHEDULE AS IT REALLY IS. 
1. Slumber. 4. Smoking Club. 

2. Mansil's. 5. ReM. 

3. Greeks. 6- Matinee Class. 



Art Student (seeing Miss James write 51 after one of her drawings) — Are 
we all to put our ages after ours, too? 



AN ODE TO A PENCIL 
I know not where thou art, I only know 
That thou wert on my desk, peaceful and contented 

A moment back and as I turned my head 
To see a girl, some heartless wretch 
Went "south" with thee; 
I know not who he was nor shall I investigate ; 
Perchance, it may have been 
The guy I stole thee from. 



JUST AFTER DISMISSAL. 

"Goodness, how hot it is! Say, Lil, go get your car and we'll go out rid- 
ing-" — "No, don't, Kenneth is outside waiting for me-" — "Oh bother! Helen. 
I wouldn't worry my head over boys" — "Preachers' sons always turn out bad 
anyway, but I think red hair is perfectly beautiful." — "Now, Honan, you 
know K is nicer than Pink." — "You're wrong, Helen, pink hair and blue eyes 
are nicest. Oh, I wish I was staging at Gatch's tonight! Ed hasn't taken 
me cut in his car for three whole days." — "Botheration! I hope Buzz wins in 
the oratorical contest. I believe we ought to practice the class play. Let's go to 
Lil's tonight." — "Of course, come on up, my dad and mother are in Louisville. 
We'll have a grand time." — "Oh! I wish Pink and I could come in on that!" 
"And poor Kenneth, where will I leave him? Well, I won't come, so there!" — 
"Oh yes! Helen, you don't care- Glenn will be there." — "Oh yes, but I can't 
ignore K. altogether because 'keep what you got till you get something better,' 
and Lucile will soon be coming back." — "Oh pshaw, I'm glad I'm settled. I 
guess Ed is a sure catch. He can't very well get away" — "Nor Buzz, either." — 
' ' Oh Kids, I mu^t go — ^^\-hat will Kenneth think ? " 

' ' Well, good-bye, ' ' — ' ' good-bye. ' ' 

R. M., '19. 




Mr. Carson leaves his class 
room frequently. Whither ? The 
kitchen or the French depart- 
ment? 



Miss Remy (speaking of 
Keats '" Ode to a Grecian LTm ' ' ) 
— Why does he use the word 
"cold" to describe the figures? 

E%-erett F. — Because they are 
on a frieze. 







"THAT'S ME ALL OVER MABEL" 

I do not care for A's and B's, 
1 do not dread the C's and D's, 
1 do not wish to be the best, 
And get one hundred on my test. 

I do not try to be a pet, 
With all the teachers you can bet; 
The teachers I do not condemn, 
I'm pretty happy as I am. 

I do not care what grade I get, 

At my report I never fret, 

Nor do I cry when "canned" from class, 

For I just smile and let it pass. 

Now if you wish to take life thus, 
Please never look for an A plus; 
And to all questions just you say, 
Why worry? T'will happen anyway. 
E. p.. '20 



SHIELDS MATINEE CLASS. 
Principal — Mrs. Egglcston. 
Teacher — Fuzzy- 

President of Class — Graessle Lewis. 
Time of Recitation — 2:30 to 4:00 p. m. 
Course of Study — The Lightning Raider, etc. 
Members — All expert skippers. 
Recreation Period— Federman 's and Mansil's. 
Register Now! 



Miss Davison (with ruler in hand) to Felix Cadou rummaging through a 
senior 's desk. ' ' I now dub thee ' Sir Mettlesome Matty. ' ' ' 



Arthur K. — In "Alice in Wonderland" I have to wear wings. 
Bob M. — Keep them. It's your only chance of ever having any. 



Allan Hanauer — Are you a Freshman? 
James Black — No Scotch-Irish. 



Mae Carr to Miriam R. (in Botany Lab.)— Miriam, has your bean busted ; 




2:00 Off to the MzitA^ee Oauss 



Miss Kessler (as Agnes A. and Opal C. enter the room) — Now we have the 
barbaric invasions. 



There was a boy in our school who fancied he could bluff 
Through mazes of Geometry and all that sort of stuff, 
He'd miss the mark by scarce an inch and make the teachers sore. 
There was a boy who fancied this — there isn 't any more. 



Miss Geile (in the assembly) — "Glee Club, Dry Your Eyes.' 



A STUDENT PROGRAMME 

The only original "Fat Girls' Chorus" in the country— Ruth Kramer and 
Ruby Ernest. 



An eye opening acrobatic feature will be given by Harold James and Newton 
Day. It is entitled "Nut and Duff." 



Two real comedians— Helen Clark and Kenneth Whitman. 



Professor Huber will lecture on "How High is Up.' 



Garnet Greeman will explain how he gained twenty pounds in one day by 
using Mellen's Baby Food. 



Glenn Keach will offer for sale his famous Aphrodite cold cream which he 
guarantees will make you as beautiful as he is. 



A giggling duet by Hilda Steinwedel and Elsie Auffenberg. 



How I became what I am not what I wanted to be, "Arthur Wilde. 



Wasted hours of play remind us, 
That test time will always come; 

H in class you joke with blindness, 
Your report will not be dumb. 




6K)el<)3 School of CorT«s;>»T>dar>c< 



AND NOW IPS 
THE CALL TO BUSINESS 

We won't speak Grerman. 

We won't buy Grennan-made goods. 

We don't need to speak German, 
and we can get on quite well without 
German-made goods — though we onee 
thought we couldn't. 



The dash and daring with which we went into the war will be carried 
into business. 

And the call is out now for men and women unafraid in business — 
for leaders in our fight for the commercial supremacy of the world. 

It takes a trained soldier to make a good fight — either in war or 
business- 

Are You Trained? Can You Go Over the Top To Success? 

THE JOB SEEKS YOU IF YOU ARE TRAINED 

SEYMOUR BUSINESS COLLEGE 

ALBERT L. WALTERS, President 

SEYMOUR ... - INDIANA 

SUMMER TERM BEGINS JUNE 16th 




IT FITS 

THE BODY AS WELL AS THE PURSE 

Hart, ScHAiTNFZR & Marx _ _ _ Cloth Craft 

CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS 
HA WES HATS 
AVONDALE SHIRTS 

MUNSING UNDERWEAR 



ARROW COLLARS 



FAULTLESS CAPS 
ELGIN SHIRTS 
BOSTONIAN SHOES 

QUAKER MAID SOCKS 



THOMAS CLOTHING COMPANY 

High Class Apparel for Men and Boys 
SEYMOUR - - INDIANA 



Frank J. Voss, President " " \V. E. Weller, Secretanj 

The American 
Mutual Life Insurance Company 

JS INCORPORATED UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF INDIANA 
AND HAS COMPLIED WITH EVERY REQUIREMENT OF THE LAW. 

WE INVITE THE BUSINESS OF ALL GOOD MEN AND WOMEN. 

OUR POLICY FORMS ARE THE LAST WORD IN POLICY BUILD- 
ING. OUR POLICY-HOLDERS ARE AMONG THE BEST CITIZENS OF 
THIS BROAD LAND. 

ASK THE AGENT ALL ABOUT US OR WRITE THE HOME OFFICE. 
"TOU DON'T HAVE TO DIE TO WIN." 



SEYMOUR 



Seymour Poultry Company 

DEALERS IN 

POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, ETC. 

Opposite Pennsylvania FreigM Depot 
GOOD PRICES HONEST WEIGHTS 

Telephone Main 495 
SE^"3I0UR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



The SPARTA 

YOU 
GET 
BETTER 
SERVICE 

HERE 

The SPARTA 


Have You.i 

CLEANING and 
PRESSING 

Done by 

F. SCIARRA 

Phone R-317 

South Chestnut Street 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


W. N. Fox 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

We use the 
Goodyear Shoe Repairing System 

West Second Street 

Seymour - - - Indiana 


HARRY M. MILLER 

All Kinds of 
INSURANCE 

Seymour _ _ _ Indlana 




CARPETS 



STOVES 



A. H. DROEGE 

FVRNITVn E DEALER 

South Chestnut Street 



SE'iTMOUR 



Groub's Belle Brand Canned Goods 



The Different Food Products Packed 
Under GROUP'S PELLE PRAND 
are Absolutely the Pest You Can 
Puy. The Enormous Increased Sales 
for the Past Twenty-five Years Proves 
that Quality Will TeU. 



When Ordering Canned Goods Specify 
GROUB'S BELLE 

You Are Sure to Find What You Want in the Late^ Styles 

Gold Mine Department Store 

Seymour's Fashion Center 

IT'S A PLEASURE TO BE OF SERVICE TO YOU 
North Che^ut Street. SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



jKcSolonists used 

BLISH FLQUR^ 

^^SJIAL FLOUR 




Bl..k M.II,.( Co.r^y »nVU.<'i • p'°><" 



1658-1919 



We Stake Our 

Reputation 

on it 



BLISH MILLING COMPANY 

"America 's Fi rst Mill ' ' 
SEYMOUR INDIANA 



F. H. HEIDEMAN 

PATHE FRERES 
PHONOGRAPHS 

FURNITURE PIANOS RUGS 

Agency for the 

"FREE" SEWING MACHINES 

(Funeral Director) 

114-116 S. Chestnut St. 

SEYIMOUR <• INDIANA 



GATES 

HIGH-GRADE CANDIES, 

CIGARS, TOBACCOS, 

FRUITS 



MILLER'S BOOK STORE 

for 

Wall Paper, Window Shades 

School and Office Supplies 



UNION HARDWARE CO. 

PAINTS, OILS, 

VARNISHES, GLASS, 

BUILDING MATERIAL 



20 West Second Street 
Seymour - - Indiana 



South Chestnut Street 
Seymour - - Indiana 



WALTER ORTSTADT 

STAPLE AND FANCY 
GROCERIES 

Corner Broivn and Walnut Streets 

Phone 115 

Seymour _ - _ Indiana 



LIGHT HEAT POWER 

Phone 499 

INTERSTATE PUBLIC 
SERVICE CO. 

South Chestnut Street 

SeYMOUT^ - - - iNDLiNA 



THE JACKSON COUNTY LOAN 
& & AND TRUST COMPANY & & 



Our Savings Department Pays 3% 
Compound Interest 



J. H. Andkknvs, President J. P. Matlock, Secretary 

J. B. Thompson, Vice-President J. V. Richart, Treasurer 



Coal Cold Storage Ice 

USE 
RAYMOND CITY COAL 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 

EBNER ICE AND COLD STORAGE COMPANY 

DISTRIBUTERS 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



CARTER PLUMBING CO. 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 


First Class Pliunbing 

ELECTRIC WIRING AND 

FIXTURES 

All Work and Material Guaranteed 


Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus 50,000.00 

c. D. Bn.T.iNGS President 

B. F. SCHNECK Vice-President 

JOHN A. KEEGLER Cashier 


115 S- Chestnut St. 


We Solicit Your Patronage 


Phone 237 


We Pay 3% on Time Deposit 


SEYlilOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


SEY^IOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


Visit the neiv Department of 

DRESSES, SUITS, WAISTS 

and COATS 


—The— 
MODERN CLOTHING CO. 


ol^ 


FOR GOOD CLOTHES 


DRY GOODS STORE 


AND 

FINE FURNISHINGS 

FOR MEN 


Two Entrances — 

Second and Chestnut 


SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


OFFICE SECOND FLOOR, HANCOCK BLDG. 


J. FETilG COMPANY 




LEATHER GOODS STORE 


E. C. BOLLINGER 


Automobile Supplies, 


"THE REAL 
ESTATE MAN" 


Vulcanizing 
Racine Horse Shoe 




Tires and Tubes 


SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



Every Modern Home 

Must 
Have A Xelepnone 



SEYMOUR TELEPHONE CO. 



I.. C. CiRIFKITTS, President 



A COMPLETE DRUG STORE 



FEIDEIMAMM' 



CORNER SECOND AND CHESTNUT STREETS 



HOOVER'S 



EVERYTHING IN THE HOME FURNISHING 
LINE 



STYLE QUALITY SERVICE 

Corner of Chestnut Street and Saint Louis Avenue 
SEYMOUR :: :: INDIANA 



STEINWEDEL MUSIC HOUSE 

PIAiNOS AND PLAYER PIANOS 

TALKING MACHINES AND PHONOGRAPHS 

Emerson records, 75 cents each 

Popular akd McKinley Sheet Music 

110 W. Second Street 



SE^TVIOUR 



INDIANA 



"QUICK MEAL" WICK OIL STOVE 




THK ORIGINAL OIL STOVE EQUIPPED 
WITH A GLASS FOUNT 
SIMPLE AS A LAMP. 
MAKES A CLEAN AND POWERFUL 
BLUE FLAME. 

EASY TO RE-WIOK OR REGULATE. 
HAS PORCELAIN BURNER DRUMS 
THAT CANNOT RUST, AND AUTOMA- 
TIC WICK STOP WHICH PREVENTS 
SMOKING. 



CORDES HARDWARE COMPANY 



Seymour, Indiana 



Everything in Jewelry 



Prices are Right, too 



THE BEST ENGRAVING ALWAYS 



MESEKE JEWELRY SHOP 



16 South Chestnut Street 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



PROMPT DELIVERY 

Oid-of -Season VEGETABLES and FRUITS 

Privilege of Weekly Payments of Accoxints 

Personal attention to the individual icisTies aiid tastes of our customers 



THESE AKD EVERY OTHER POSSIBLE 
SERVICE WE FURNISH WITH OUR 



QUALITY GROCERIES 



PEOPLE'S GROCERY 
Exclusive Agents for OLD MASTER CofiFee 

Phone Main 170 
Second ant) Chestnut Streets SEYilOUR, INDIANA 



Seymour Daily Republican 

JAY C. SMITH, Publisher 

United Press Leased Wire War News. 

Woman's Page on Thursdays. 

Continued Story Every Day. 

Sunday School Lesson, Fridays. 

Farmers Page on Mondays. 

Van Loon Comic Strip Every Day. 

All the Local and County News. 

Something for Every Member of the Family. 

The Home Newspaper of Seymour 



call 
BELL CLEANING WORKS 

if IT'S 

cleaning 
you want 



Phone 391 



16 St. Louis Ave. 



If it's high class meats at the 
lowest cash prices, go to 

FRANK COX'S 
Meat Market 

Corner Second and Ewing Streets 
Seymour, Ind. 



M. HUBER & BRO. 

We always carry a complete line of Footwear in stock and are ready 
to serve you 

If you are looking for neat, serviceable Footwear, 

See Us 



Walk-Over and ^>elby Shoes 



We talk quality, not price 



SEYMOUR 




We are especiaUy desirous 

that you see our assortment of 

GRUEN WATCHES 



The Ladies watch in a rectangular shape set 
with diamonds. Grucn Precision, 18-jewel move- 
ment. The Gents watch a Louis XIV style, very 
thin model. Always glad to show you our stock. 

GEORGE F. KAMMAN 

Jeweler and Optometrist 




GRUEN 



Phone 249 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



THE TRAVIS CARTER COMPANY 

SIanufacturers of 
HIGH GRADE MILL WORK, VENEERED DOORS and INTERIOR FINISH 

Dealer in 
LOIBER and SHINGLES, LATH and SASH DOORS 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 





— The — 


OAKLEY ALLEN 


RACKET STORE 


Barber 


Wants Your 




Trade 


Telephone 472 


If it's Novelties vou want in 


DOMESTIC STEAM 


Footwear, it's 

DEHLER 


LAUNDRY 


who's 


Corner Second and Pine Streets 


got 
them 




DEHLER SHOE STORE 


First- Class Work 


SOUTH CHESTNUT 




C2>f The Kuppenheimer 



Youn^ Men 

OF REFINED TASTE LIKE 

Style, Fit and Quality 

WHEN THEY BUY CLOTHES 



These dominant features are found in 

"KUPPENHEIMER" 
HIGH ART' and 
"FRAT" Makes 



Sold Exclusively by Us 



THE HUB 

The Young Men's Store 

SEYMOUR - - INDIANA 



DIAMONDS 
JEWELRY 



SEYMOUR 



J. G. LAUPUS 



No. 1 N. Chestnut 



WATCHES 
CLOCKS 



Waterman's Ideal Foxmtain Pens 
Fine Leather Goods 



THE HALL MARK STORE 



SILVERWARE 
CUT GLASS 



EAT AT THE 

PALACE RESTAURANT 

Something Good to Eat at all Times 
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNERS 



W. H. REYNOLDS 



CASH STORES 



21 Sotith Chestnut and 
Third and Eiving Streets 



Groceries at Bottom Prices 



Give us a call and be convinced 



THE BEE HIVE 

Complete Line of 

Haviland China 

and 

Fancy Lamps 

Table Cutlery 



SOUVENIR POST CARDS 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



CALL OV IS FOR THE H I G H E S T - G R AD E PHOTOS 

AT 

Reasonable Prices 

PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS BOOFv WERE MADE BY THE 

ELLIS STUDIO 

Oppositf Infcntibaji Station Seymour, Indiana 



USE MILK FOR ECONOMY 
USE 

SWENGEL'S for SAFETY 



PAY LESS AND DRESS BETTER 

"Collegian" Clothes 

To BE HAD IN Seymour only at 
ADOLPH STEINWEDEL 



THE STORE THAT CAN SERVE YOU BEST 
SEYMOUR : : : : : : INDIANA 



Telephone Main 143 



Bottlers of Coca Cola 



SEYMOUR ICE CREAM COMPANY 



FROZEN CREAM AND ICES 



CIRCLE STREET 



SEYilOUR, INDIANA. 



Phoxe 116 



C. E. LOERTZ 



DRUGGIST 



1 East Second Street 



SeYMOLTR, iNDLiNA 



FIXE CLOTHING AND SHOES 




RICHART 


CoilPLIMENTS OF 




F. J. VOSS 


East Second Street 




Opposite Interurban Station 




SEYMOUR. INDIANA 





THE COUNTRY STORE 



No. 16 East Second Street 



The Bon Marche No. 2 
Third and Chestnut St. 



The Bon Marche Nos. 3 and 4 
Fourth and Blish St. 



STAPLE and FANCY 

GROCERIES 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES 



STAPLE and FANCY 
GROCERIES 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES 



Ray. R. Keach 



SEYMOUR NATIONAL 




BANK 


STAR BAKERY 


W. W. Whitson President 




Lynn Faulkconer. . .Vice-President 


BREAD, CAKES AND 


J. S. Miu.s Cashier 


PIES OF ALL KINDS 


Seymour, Indiana 





READ 

The Daily Democrat 



N. Chestnut St. 



SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



Ahlbrand Closed Buggy 



Just fits in with that auto of 
yours. 

Auto for good weather, closed 
buggy for bad weather. 

"What you get for your money 
is more important than the price 
you pay." 




Ahlbrand Carriage Company 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



—BICYCLE REPAIRING— 


GET IN "THE" GAME 


A SPECIALTY 




Complete Line of 
Bicycles, Tires and Sundries 


BUY 

War Saving Stamps 


CARLSON HARDWARE 


KESSLER HARDWARE CO. 


COMPANY 




106 W. Second Street 


East Second Street 


SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



Prices Right 



SEYMOUR 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 
CHARLES HYATT 

Garage 

GENERAL REPAIR WORK 

: : : : : : : : INDIANA 



UNION BILLIARD ROOMS 

HAT CLEANING— WHILE YOU WAIT 

UMBRELLAS REPAIRED AND RECOVERED 

SHOE SHINING AND DYEING A SPECIALTY 



CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND TOBACCO 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



HAUENSCHILD BROS. 

GROCERIES 

SMOKED MEATS, FRUITS 

and VEGETABLES 

Phone Main 2G5 

Corner High atid East 

Seymour - - _ Indiana 



THE NEW YORK STORE 



We undersell 

LADIES AND MISSES 

READY-TO-WEAR 



THE NEW YORK STORE 



Compliments of 

Buhner Fertilizing Company 



FARMERS HOMINY MILLS 

Millers of 

WHITE CORN PRODUCTS 

Highest market price paid for hay and grain. 

We carry complete line of feeds. 



TRY OUR ENTERPRISE FLOUR 



SEITVIOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



THE FARMERS HOME STORE 

HejVdquarters for 

EVERYTHING GOOD TO EAT 

THE KING OF LOW PRICES 



S. A. Shutters & Co. 

114 E. Second St. 
Phone 354 



E. H. HANCOCK MUSIC CO. 

PACKARD PLAYER PIANOS 

THE NEW EDISON 

COLUMBIA GRAFANOLOS 
RECORDS OF ALL KINDS 

Opposite Interurban Station 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



CENTRAL GARAGE AND AUTO CO. 

Dealers in 
BUICK, HUDSON, PORT AND STUDEBAKER CARS 

Rear of Post Office 
SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
SEYMOUR GREENHOUSE 

Phone 58 



SEYMOUR WOOLEN MILLS 

Established 1866 
ALL WOOLEN BLANKETS 



S. D. HILL 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

131/2 S. Chestnut St. 

We follow the Champion 

Shoe Repairing System 

Come and give us a trial. 

Seymour _ _ _ Indiana 



Granite Marble 

VON FANGE GRANITE CO. 

MONUMENTS 

Your satisfaction is our success 

110 S. Chestnut Street 

Seymour _ _ _ Indiana 



First in 

KODAK FINISHING 



PLATTER & CO. 



HOWARD FURNISH 

BARBER 

Across from Post Office 



Seymour 



Indlana 



Always the Same. 

Rising production costs, scarcity 
of packing materials and transporta- 
tion difficulties have never made the 
slightest difference in the superior 
qualities of Mrs. RORER'S COFFEE 

On Sale at 

NICHTER'S GROCERY 

High and Vine Streets 
SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



C. H. HELLER 

New Lynn 

BARBER SHOP 



L. L. DOWNING 


ICE CREAM — ANY QUANTITY 




KELLY'S LUNCH ROOM 


POPCORN, PEANUTS, 


HOT LUNCH, SOFT DRINKS 


CANDIES, SOFT DRINKS 




TOBACCOS, CIGARS 


Opposite Interurban Station 


Seymour _ _ _ Indiana 


SEYMOim - - _ Indiana 




PAULEY & SON, GARAGE 




RErRESENTATIVES 


ORA SWEET 


DODGE BROTHERS' CARS 


UNION BARBER SHOP 


and 
OLDSMOBILES 


12 E. Second Street. 






Phone R-603 205-207 N. Ewing St. 




Seymour _ _ _ Indiana 




CHAS. E. GILLESPIE. M. D. 


Compliments of 




BRUNOW BROS. 


EYE, EAR, NOSE AND 


CIGAR MANUFACTURERS 


THROAT 


Seymour _ _ _ Indiana 


SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



REGUL.VR ilEALS AND ShORT ORDERS COMMUTATION TICKETS $4.00 FOR $3 .50 



J. G. VOGELSANG, Prop. 

THE CITY RESTAURANT 



FAMOUS FOR ITS HOME COOKING 



SEYilOUR 



INDIANA 



MEET ME AT 

MANSIL'S 


GROVER MARQUETT 
Transfer 


CONFECTIONERY 

12 .V. Chestnut Street 


WILL TAKE PARTIES 
TO 
PICNICS AND OUTINGS 


FOR YOUR FOOT-WEARING 
APPAREL GO TO 

P. COLABUONO 


CHARLES VOGEL 

Dkat.kr In 
FEED, GRAIN AND FLOUR 

Corner Carter and Tipton Streeti 

Telephone 193 
Setmoub _ _ _ Indiana 


p.oot and Shoe Repairing "While You 

Wait. New Shoes and all 

Repairing Guaranteed. 

5 West Second St. Phone Call 173 

Setmovr _ _ _ Indiana 



SEYMOUR'S GREATEST VNDERSELLIXG STORE 

BEN SNYDER 

LADIES' AND GENTS' 

FURNISHING GOODS 

MILLINERY 

LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS 



Come here before going elsewhere — wt: will save yoc from 25c to 50c 
on the dollar 



SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



Phone 165 

WHEN YOU NEED A PLUMBER OR ELECTRICIAN 



W. C. BEVINS 



Plumbing and Electric Shop 



35 Years in Business 



TOMATOES GEO^A^CI-ARK 

BROOKMONT 

BRAND 

Canned Fruits, Vegetables, Etc. 

BEST BIRD 

BRAND 

Condiments Etc. 
Are Our Private Brands 

FULL WEIGHT HIGHEST QUALITY 

Guaranteed to Comply with all Pure Food Laws 

George A. Clark 

Wholesale Grocer 

WE SELL TO MERCHANTS ONLY 



HARRY FINDLEY 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
City Builoinq 


FRESH FISH AT ALL TIMES 

PHILLIPS FISH STAND 

QiALiTY Always Best 

OYSTERS IN SEASON 

17 Indianapolis Avenue 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


TIRES and TUBES at a saving of 
15% to 35% 

We Specialize on MASON and 
STERLING TIRES 

Guaranteed 5,000 and 6,000 Miles. 

Cut Price Tike Store 

GEO. WOLF, Mgr. 

SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 


YOUR ANNUAL SPECIALIST 

GRAESSLE-MERCER 


COMPANY 

commercial and catalog 

Printers 

Seymour, Indiana 

BRANCH offices 

Indianapolis, Ind. Louisville, Ky. 


Compliments of 

GOYERT-VOGEL 
POULTRY CO. 


ERNEST BROS. 
Coffee Roasters 

FANCY ANP STAPLE GROCERIES 

Phone 437 
SEYMOUR :-: :-: INDIANA 



J. H. POLLIJiT H. "W. AUBKE 

SEYMOUR HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE, STOVES AND 

FURNACES 

FIELD SEED 

WIRE FENCING, SLATE AND 

TIN ROOFING 

REPAIR WORK, ETC. 

Phone 718 118 S. Chestnut St. 



COMPUMENTS OF 

SEYMOUR 
MANUFACTURING 



COMPANY 



Prompt Service Excellent Food 

EAGLE RESTAURANT AND LUNCH ROOM 

THE DINING PLACE OF SEYMOUR 

Phone 739 12 West Second Street 

Arman & Zorbas, Proprietors 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



WATCH FOR THE OPENING DATE 

OF THE 

NEW MODERN THEATRE 

WHICH WILL HAVE PERFECT VENTILATION, 

PERFECT FLICKERLESS PROJECTION, 

FEATURE MUSIC 

AXD 

HIGH CLASS PHOTO-PLAYS, 

PARAMOUNT AND ARTCRAFT, 

GOLDWYN, PATHE, UNITED PICTURES, 

CHAPLIN COMEDIES 

AND MAN"r OTHERS 



The Joy Spot of Seymour 

23 S. CHESTXrT STREET. 

Next to Maxon's Pharmacy. 
C. E. McCoNAUGHY, Manager 



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