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Full text of "The patriot"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01770 9558 



GENEALOGY 
977.202 
SE9S 
1922 



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iH'ELD3 HIGH XHOa 





rOREWORD 

OLD ^Oe DR^W B^CK 

rnecuRu^^N OF vmz 

C(^Lt/nmoRv ^D lei: 
U5 ucye ONce piore 

IN UHE P^0E5 OP 

OUR Pf^LRIOi: 

UHE E/PERENCE5 

OP HIGH 5CH00L bff/3 




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3HieLD5 ^0V\ 5CMQ0L 

LETi: UPON OUR UVE5 

^ Ij^5C^NG l(nPRe55*.0N 

FOR GOOD 

^ND UM05E (^5500^ UtON^ 

H^t/E N5P?ReD \^ U5 (^ 

aNCeRE LOV^UCV 

OF NNe'CEON Zi^noZW'ZOOO 

Dewc^^ce UHD OUR (^nnu^l 



Tliomas Abbort MoH 

Sufer'mtendent o{ Public Scliools 



KaVe Ferris Andrews 

Principal o{ Sliields High School 



BOf^RD or UnC^ZKJh 




Clark B. Davis 
President 



Edward Massman 
Secretary 



^icld:) high xhool 

KATE F. ANDREWS. 

AY the eighteenth will stand in the calendar of Shields 
High School as one of her "red letter" days, for on 
that date a decision was made that will affect her 
future growth and usefulness. 

Within the last few ye^r-^, aitJiough there has uceu 
very little increase in the entire school enumeration, 
the number of students in both Junior and Senior High 
' Schools has increased about 75 per cent in the one 
and over 100 per cent in the other; and today we have in both departments 
an enrollment of about five hundred and fifty. 

Under these conditions of growth, it inevitably happened that our build- 
ing, erected when we numbered little over one hundred and fifty in the Senior 
High School, became too small for the increasing numbers, and it was felt 
by all of those closely associated with the school and knowning well all condi- 
tions that there must be built an addition that would enable us to have more 
adequate housing facilities. 




The Board of Education, alive to the needs of the Schools of Seymour, 
decided to put up two buildings. One to take the place of the present Laurel 
School; the other an addition to the Shields, which should furnish not only 
delightful rooms for the six lower grades now housed with the high schools in 
the Shields building, but an auditorium and gymnasium now greatly needed. 

After the Board had made its decision to eiilarge the Shields school and 
had gone through all necessary preliminaries, as to contracts and so forth, 
the bond issue was ■appi'oved by the council and all seemed to be moving 
smoothly when a bomb was thrown in the form of a protest. As this neces- 
sitated a hearing before the State Tax Board, there was a slight delay in pro- 
ceedings. However, a speedy hearing was given, the bonds were sold at an 
unusually high premium subject to the approval of the Tax Board and on 
May the eighteenth the bond issue was legalized. 

Now all is ready and before many days have passed, the first shovelful 
of dirt will have been dug and our much needed addition will have been com- 
menced. Our dream is that by next year instead of holding classes in the hall, 
office, and gymnasium, all of the teachers may have well-lighted, adequately 
equipped recitation rooms. 

This new building will join by a connecting corridor the present High 
School at the southwest corner; with a frontage of 178 feet it will extend 
west 71 feet. On the first floor will be a standard gymnasium, 70 by 40 feet, 
at the west end of which is a stage and on the other three sides seats above 
which is a balcony. This room can be used not only for work in physical 
culture, but for basketball and all in-door athletics. In the front part of this floor 
will be office rooms ; and by the stage will be dressing rooms and lavatories. 

Built of brick like that of the present structure and of the same style 
the two buildings will have a unity of effect and appeal strongly from the 
standpoint of architectural beauty. It is estimated that the cost for the com- 
pleted building will be $71,553. 

We understand that a building does not make a school ; the fine teacher, 
the eager student, and a splendid spirit of co-operation are the first essentials. 
These we do have and the high place that Shields High School holds in the 
educational world is testimony to this. But a larger building adapted to our 
increased numbers; needed equipment for more effective instruction; additional 
room that will enable us to put into our school courses of study and even of 
play that could not be introduced before, because of lack of space ; all of these 
factors will add to the effectiveness of the High School of Seymour as an 
influence in upbuilding the citizenship of Seymour. None realize this more 
than the teachers and students and all appreciate the active interest and wise 
effort of the superintendent and Board, and the enlightened and altruistic 
attitude on the part of the council and citizens that have made possible these 
greater educational opportunities for the children of Seymour. 





a. 



1 

A 



HE mcuixv i 




L. A. ACKERMAN 

Arithmetic 
Physiology 



£ate Axdrews 
Principal 
English 




Aqnes Cube Eleutheba Davison 

Mathematics English 



T. J. Dui3 
History 



Doris Oeils 
History 







H. C. Henderson 
Agriculture 






MiNA McHenry 


J. R. Mitchell 


Mildred Mvers 


Veva Paul 


English 


Manual Training 
Arithmetic 


Latin 


Art 




C. H. Phillips 


Esther Small 


LENORE SWAILS 


Gladys Tilly 


(Science 


Botany 


English 


Mathematics 




Geography 


Physiology 





UtE^R 





CsMEN WI!)(^E5 WERE H0RX3 

MARY VIRGINIA BROWN. 

AD it not been for little Denny Gorgan, Zandra Ma- 
liorney, who lived next door to him, might have con- 
sidered her lot a hard one. Zandra was, as she her- 
self explained, "A perfect orphan, with not even so 
much as a grandmother, ' ' while Denny had a drunken 
father, a step-mother, a step-brother, and "oceans and 
oceans of other steps in his family. ' ' 

She was sorry for him and would often tell him stories to take his mind 
away from conditions around him. She would tell him how little boj-s who had 
been good all the year would write a letter to Santa Claus, telling him what 
they wanted most, and how he would usually bring it. 

As that was last Fourth of July, Zandra (she was called that because her 
mistress thought that Alexandria was not a fitting name for a kitchen maid) 
thought that surely by Christmas poor little lame Denny would forget all about 
it ; but he did not. He had asked for a horse and when Zandra asked him if two 
handkerchiefs would not do, he drew his sleeve across his upturned nose and 
replied, "I don't nade 'em and I want a harse. " 

Poor Zandra ! What could she do ! She had only fifty cents to her name, 
and that she had seen Mr. Gorgan drop from his dirty handkerchief, when he 
had told Father Cassidy how sick he had been. He had been so sick, he said, 
that he had been "seein' things." 

"First it was fleas, then it was bumble bees, and last it was cats," ad- 
mitted Mr. Gorgan. 

"You see, 'things' get larger and larger and more dangerous," said Father 
Cassidy, "If you don't stop drinking pretty soon, your days are numbered." 

Then the two men had walked on, leaving the fifty cent piece in the grass. 
Right then and there Zandra decided that Denny should have a Christmas gift 
purchased with his o\yi\ father's money. But how could a "harse," a rocking 
"harse" big enough for Denn^-, be purchased for fifty cents! 

She might go to a second-hand store and perchance find something there 
that would answer the purpose of a hoi^se, or she might purchase one on the 
installment plan, but when would she, a mere kitchen maid ever pay the 
remainder ! 

Then one morning, as she was hanging up clothes, she happened to think 
that hobby horses were things not easily broken, but more easily outgrown. 
Around in the neighborhood there might be a hobby horse that had been out- 



grown by its master, who would be only too glad to give it as a Christmas gift 
to a little lame boy. 

Oh ! Happy thought ! She had found a plan. She decided to use that fifty 
cents to pay for an advertisement in the paper for a hobby horse. She remem- 
bered that Mr. O'Donnel had once said, "It pays to advertise." 

That night after much deliberation, Zandra put her advertisement together. 
After it was finished, it looked something like this: 

' ' Poor little lame boy would like a second-hand hobby horse. 
If you have any to give, please leave it at 1420 Small Street 
in the alley, back of the house." 

She hoped Mr. and Mrs. 'Donnel would not read the ad in the paper and 
that they would have company Christmas Eve, "so the coast would be clear." 

Her wish came true, for company carried the O'Donnels to the movies 
and Zandra was left to herself. 

Presently she heard the whirr of a ear, and looking out of the pantry 
window, she saw the glaring headlights of the car piercing the darkness. The 
auto stopped, a man got out and set a hobby horse under the specified maple tree. 
Zandra leaped with joy, and ran down the alley to see the horse safely placed in 
the Gorgan's back yard. 

As she tripped gayly back to her home, she saw beneath the maple tree 
another horse. She listened as she heard the merry voices of carol singers, 
coming down the alley. 

"Don't they sound happy," she said to herself, "and won't Denny be the 
very picture of happiness when he sees two 'harses' instead of one. 

"Here's the horsey you wanted," one of them cried, coming nearer. 

"Thank you," said Zandra, "but you must have wanted it awful bad 
yourself." Her heart moved with kindness at their liberality. 

"Not like we wanted the little lame boy to have it," he answered moving on. 

Altogether there were eight donations. Some were certainly objects for 
the tender ministrations of the "Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals," but would have appealed to the heart of any boy. 

In spite of the fact that it was a holiday and the O'Donnels had a late 
breakfast, Zandra was delighted to find that the Gorgans, too, had arisen late. 
To be able to behold the joy on Denny's face when he first beheld the chargers 
was itself Christmas present enough for Zandra. 

When she saw Mrs. Gorgan, she was just turning unbelievingly from the 
window. 

"Holy Mither of Moses!" she ejaculated. 

"Harses," gasped Denny. "I wished for one and I prayed for one, and 
now I got more." 



"You prayed too hard," replied Mrs. Gorgan. 

Mr. Gorgan, who had spent the evening before in town, came slowly into 
the room. He gave one look at the window, fell back, and made a dash for 
the door. 

"Where on earth are you going, now?" asked his wife. 

"To Father Cassidy, to make a pledge," he answered. "Things keep 
a' gitten' bigger and bigger and now I'm seein' unicorns." 



rne ic^u^n^ 



G 



MATHILDE KESSLER, '22. 

IVE me the welcomin' han'. 

Ah — Melieans, welcome me — do! 

I come far away to this Ian' 

To begin life afresh, life anew. 

Don' laugh at ma funny ole face! 

I know these clothes — they all queah, 
But — gie me the welcomin' hand. 

Instead of that laugh, and a jeer! 

Ah come heah to work an' to live. 

In this Ian' of ma long-ago dreams. 

So — gie me the welcomin' hand, 
A regula' smile full o' beams. 

Ah, Melieans surely are happy. 

Now — make me a happy one, too ; 

Oh — gie me the welcomin' hand, 
Oh, Melieans! welcome me — do! 



mrunN 



FRANCIS EUDALY, '23. 



T 



HE sun to rest sinks in the west, 

The end of a day is near ; 
A lonely thrush sings in a bush 

Whose leaves are brown and sear. 



The sky o'erhead is gold and red, 

A wedge of geese goes o'er; 
The autum leaves fall off the trees 

And cover the forest floor. 

There is a nook beside the brook, 

A bit of beauty rare, 
That thrills the heart and makes one start, 

When one comes on it there. 

The slender trees, the autumn leaves, 

The ferns beside the stream. 
The marvelous sky stained with God's dye 

Appear as in a dream. 

The days go on; the beauty's gone 

From the trees and the woods and the hill. 
Soft falls the snow and the cold winds blow ; 

The voice of the thrush is still. 



But God is not gone ; his work is not done, 
On the trees or the hill or the wood. 

He only doth rest, He knoweth best 

That the world will go on as it should. 




EMALYN COLUNS, '22. 

IICHARD Barnstone rose as usual on this October morning, 
had breakfast with his wife and little son, Dick, and left 
for the office with his customary cheerfulness. 

In the morning mail, he received an invitation to lunch 
from Mr. David Grenvil, who stated that he wanted to 
see Mr. Barnstone on business. Richard was pei'plexed 
and at the same time a little flattered to think that the 
senior partner of the great company of Grenvil-Parker would ask him to lunch. 
The more he thought of it, the more perplexed his mind became and when he 
left the office at noon on hisi way to lunch with the noted Mr. Grenvil, he was 
in a state of great anxiety. 

Now, Richard was merely an under-secretary in the head office of the firm 
which was a bitter rival of the Grenvil-Parker establishment. 

Nevertheless, when a meeting of importance was called, Barnstone was 
generally included among those present, and his opinion in serious matters was 
by no means disi'egarded. He was recognized as a man of sane judgment and 
high ambitions, mingled with the courage and confidence of youth. It was in 
vain that Richard wondered what Grenvil could want with him and what the 
"important business" was that he wished to discuss. 

On arriving at the club, he was met by Mr. David Grenvil, a small nervous 
man, who, after few preliminaries stated his business. He began by tactfully 
ridiculing Richard's present salary, which Richard had to admit was only 
moderate, even though it had been large enough to support himself, his wife 
and son, Dickie, and to a afford a small bank account which he hoped some 
day would be large enough to give Dickie a fine education. His highest ambition 
and goal was to educate his son and to give him every advantage that was in 
his power. 

As these thoughts were going through his mind, Mr. Grenvil continued. 

"It's preposterous," thumping the floor with his cane, "to think that a 
fine young man of your experience and knowledge should stay in that office, 
receiving a meager sum of one hundred and fifty dollars a month! A man of 
your ambition and high ideals ought to be getting five hundred a month and 
I am here to offer it to you ! ' ' 

Richard listened, attentive yet doubtful, expectant but hesitating. Five 
hundred dollars per month would increase that little bank account much beyond 
Richard's expectations. 



In brief, Grenvil's proposition was this: Barnstone was to remain in the 
employ of the American Company for several weeks — at least long enough to 
find out what the firm was going to bid at the next stockholder's meeting. 
Richard shook his head, for he knew that to give Grenvil this bit of knowledge 
would mean a great financial loss to his present employers. It would be play- 
ing false to the company with which he had been so long connected to quietly 
resign from the American Company and transfer to the Grenvil-Parker Estab- 
lishment as Junior partner with five hundred dollars a month and promised 
advancement. 

Richard begged leave to consider the matter until the next morning when 
he would let him know his decision. Grenvil agreed and impressed upon him 
the facts that no one would ever know about this little business, that he would 
be perfectly safe, and that he had a perfect right to change positions if another 
offered better opportunities. 

Barnstone returned to the office with a heavy heart and a cloudy mind. He 
could not work. He had to think this thing out — get it off his mind. He left 
the office and started home, although it was only mid-afternoon. As he walked 
his mind became clearer and he was able to think. Why shouldn't he accept 
Grenvil's offer? He was under no obligations to his company and there was 
no reason why he should stay with them if someone else offered a better salary. 

But his inner-self answered, "Would you enjoy the results of this better 
offer if it is obtained by deceit and underhanded schemes?" Richard knew that 
it was not an honorable plan and that his transference would not be a loyal 
thing. To disclose the knowledge that Grenvil was desirous of having was any- 
thing but the deed of a gentleman. 

But the money! That salary which would increase the bank account that 
some day was to put Dickie through college. Richard's heart beat rapidly as 
he thought of the increased advantages of a boy who has money behind him. 
No one would know of it. Hadn't Grenvil said that he would keep it quiet? 
And then — what was there really to be ashamed of? He would merely transfer 
from one company to the other, an act which was being done everj' day. 

Arguing and arguing, he finally determined to accept the offer. 

It was late afternoon when he turned his steps toward home. The little 
place looked like a fairy's castle. The tiny white cottage enshrined in trees; 
the rows of white and yellow chrysanthemums ; it was truly a scene that would 
grace fairyland. 

Richard entered the house very quietly for it seemed as if there was a 
charm on the little home. He seemed afraid of breaking the quiet and peace 
that reigned. 

He opened the door and before him was as pretty a picture of home, com- 
fort and happiness as any man could wish. His wife, Beatrice, was sitting 
before the fire, telling little Dick, who sat at her feet, a fairy story The flame 



in the fireplace sent a soft glow over the room, the only light. Richard, weary 
with the day's problems, sank in a nearby chair and listened. Beatrice, un- 
aware of his entrance, was saying: 

"Vallalila and Granmer were brother and sister and lived with their old 
grandmother in a beautiful valley, where there were lots of flowers and trees, 
and where the sun shed its warm rays upon their little home and where the 
raindrops played upon the cottage roof. Vallalila was a golden-haired girl as 
bright and cheerful as the beams that come from the sun. But Granmer was 
dark-haired and had black eyes. Sometimes he was dark and ugly like the 
sky in a storm and the flashes from his eyes were as bright and keen as those 
of the lightning. Most of the time, however, he was like his sister and they 
spent many happy hours together in the woods. 

One beautiful day in October, when many, many leaves had fallen on the 
ground, Vallalila and Granmer were playing. Suddenly, the little girl gave a 
cry and when Granmar ran to her, he found her bending over a large beautiful, 
white flower. At it's side grew a large yellow one. Granmer, attracted by the 
bright gleams of the yellow, seized it and cried, "Oh! Oh! Oh! Aren't they 
beautiful? Mine is the prettiest! You can have the pale white ones, but I 
like yellow!" 

But Vallalila was very pleased with hers and broke it from the stem and 
ran to her grandmother. When Granmer plucked his from the stem, he felt it 
grow hard in his hands and turn to solid gold. But he was overjoyed! He ran 
to his grandmother and she told them that the flowers were called chrysan- 
themums, and had probably been planted there by the "Fairy of Fate." 

"The golden chrysanthemum will bring you boundless wealth," she told 
Granmer. 

"But dear Vallalila," she said as tears fell from her eyes, "Fate has de- 
creed that you will have to suffer for the joys of another." 

' ' Oh, no ! " cried Granmer, ' ' She will never suffer, for I won 't let her ! 
I'm going to take care of her forever and ever." 

Poor Granmer ! He little knew that he was to be the cause of all her sorrow. 

For several years the two children were happy and played together in their 
valley. But one day, Granmer grew tired of his life there, so taking his golden 
chrysanthemum, he kissed his sister good-bye and left for the larger world 
beyond. Vallalila was very sad for she loved Granmer dearly. 

One day in October Granmer had left his mansion and was walking down 
the long walk to the waiting carriage. It was a beautiful day and the storm 
on his face appeared to have somewhat abated. He was inspecting the lawn as 
he walked and an attractive bunch of flowers growing near the well caught his 



eye. He went over to examine them and recognized them as chrysanthemums, 
as beautiful as those that he and Vallalila had found so many years ago. Memo- 
ries of his little sister and of the beautiful valley flooded his mind and he was 
very sad. 

"Oh, Vallalila," he cried. "How could I have ever forgotten you so longi 
Will you forgive me? I need you so — oh — so much!" 

He broke the flower from its stem and much to his dismay he saw it wither 
and fade in his hand. He realized the significance of the act at once and when 
he remembered the little girl in the valley and his neglect and disregard of 
her, he was overcome with sorrow. 

Graiuner's grief was so deep that he sent messengers to all parts of the 
kingdom to hunt for his sister but they could not find her. When all of the 
messengers returned and reported their failure, Granmer decided to set out 
himself in search of Vallalila. 

He searched for many many days and finally, weary and footsore, he 
reached his native home. He hardly recognized it. The place where every- 
thing once had been so happy and peaceful now was gloomy and dreary. 

He was so sad and weary that he sank down on a nearby log and wept. 
He had found the cottage, old and desolate, but he could not find his sister. 
He looked again at the scene before him and he saw this time growing beside 
the cottage door, a single chrysanthemum on a tall slender stem, graced with 
beautiful leaves. 

He went to it and when he touched it he saw the beautiful flower change 
its form and take on the appearance of his much sought sister, Vallalila. 

"Oh, Granmer, Im so glad you've come back to me," she cried, "You 
don 't know how sad I have been. I couldn 't stand it any longer so the ' ' Fairy 
of Fate" changed me into my white chrysanthemum. I've waited so long and 
I thought you never would come back." 

Granmer felt very sad when he thought of the suffering and sorrow he had 
cuased her but now that he had her back, he was happy. They returned to 
Granmer 's home and lived happily ever after, never forgetting the white and 
golden chrysanthemums. ' ' 

When Beatrice finished her story, Richard rose from his chair and joined 
the two before the fire. 

' ' Beatrice, ' ' he said, ' ' The time has come when I am to choose between the 
white and golden chrysanthemums. I almost chose the golden, but due to your 
beautiful little story, my honor is saved and tomorrow — I will refuse the golden 
and — accept the white chrysanthemum." 



JU5C ^ poen 

EMALYN COLLINS, '22. 



1 OME write poems for recreation 

kSome write them as their vocation. 
There are others who write by inspiration 
When filled with hate or perhaps adoration. 
There have been poets who sang for fashion, 
Who have had a song for every occasion; 
But when we were required to write an oration 
That was to be in verse and without limitation, 
You certainly could have heard the palpitation 
Of my heart — without exaggeration ! 
She said, "There must be no imitation, 
There ought not be any repetition; 
You may write about any law or nation. 
But it must express some high elation!" 
And so, if this poem causes any sensation 
And there should be heard such cries as "Cessation' 
And you feel you are very near suffocation 
But still would desire some illumination. 
As to why I've attempted such an oration 
Just know it's because of an adjuration 
And the wish to escape that flagellation. 




Cs)H7-rOR 




RAYMOND FEASTER, '24. 

I IT up, thai"!, John Evans Lee!" shouted the buxom old negro 
woman as she dexterously flopped the pancakes she was frying. 
The covers of the bed on the other side of the room 
shook slightly. 

"Git out, j-ou all, if you'se gwine t' th' centinnial." 
A black curly head of hair followed by a shining black 
face emerged into the beam of sunshine that fell through the open door. 

"Hurry up, now! yo' breakfus' am jes' about ready," she continued, still 
busy flopping the pancakes. 

"Cain't ah try to ride that goat jes' once?" eagerly came from John 
Evans Lee. 

"Ain't ah done said no!" emphatically. 

"Why for?" 

"I can't have no broke bones fer t' fool with roun' this jint, " she answered 
firmly, with a flourish of her broad right hand that boded much ill if he should 
dare disobey. 

This was the day that the little town of Denleyville down in Tennessee 
was going to celebrate it's himdredth birthday with a great ceremony. Among 
other features of the occasion was to be one that had attracted wide-spread 
interest among the younger members of the village. 

An enterprising merchant of the town was offering a ten dollar bill to 
the youth who could ride Widow Johnson's goat, whose services had been 
ofifered with the remark, "Maybe that'll take him down a notch!" 

And here let it be said that certain people (who had been so conceited as 
to think they could make up with him) had found that he had great "hitting 
strength" and a quick and furious temper. The Widow herself had had an 
encounter with him, to her own discomfort. 

One morning as she was taking some corn through his lot to her chickens, 
the goat, who was accustomed to receiving a share, became angry when his 
mistress refused to give him a portion and promptly tui'ned into a battering 
ram. The result was that he got all the corn and the Widow spent the next 
four days in bed with fresh applications of hot cloths applied every five minutes 
and a strong denunciation of the goat pronounced between each groan. 

Goaded on by the thought of winning the ten dollar bill and the popularity 
it would bring with it, John Evans had built manj' air castles that came 



tumbling about him, when his mother had flatly refused to give her permission 
for any such exploit. 

Although his spirits were lowered greatly by his mother's obstinate refusal, 
he was determined to make up for his disappointment with taffy, ice cream and 
various amusements. 

Ten o'clock found him in the huge, sweating circle of humanity, with all 
the taffy he could chew stuffed into his mouth. 

The goat amid many cheers was led in, and, when loosed, stood rolling his 
eyes from side to side, as if he were coolly sizing up his opponents. 

There was a great hush, as the crowd waited to see who should be the first 
to try his luck and a shout of applause arose as a short stocky negro boy ran 
at the goat. There was a cloud of dust and when the air was clear the boy was 
seen picking himself up and limping off as he shook his head dubiously. 

During the next half hour more than a score of boys were stretched in 
the dust by the force of the goat's powerful head-on rushes and then walked 
off (if they were able) with the jeers of the crowd ringing in their ears. With 
the defeat of each of his companions, John Evans grew more restless and 
temptation grew stronger ; but the thought of his mother 's broad palm quieted 
all his vain longings. 

The goat's temper had been rising too. It was quite perplexing to the goat 
who was seldom out of his quiet lot, to be surrounded by this yelling throng. 
Suddenly he made a rush at the circle. The ci'owd scattered and he headed 
for John Evans. 

John Evans jumped, but too late, and the goat hit him squarely. He was 
tossed high enough, however, for the goat to run between his legs. He landed 
squarely upon the enraged animal's back and automatically clamped his legs 
around its body. 

There was a shout of surprise as the goat started on a bee-line for home 
with the scared and aching John Evans on his back. 

A few minutes later the crowd found the boy perched on a post in front of 
the widow's house with the goat keeping close guard. 

John Evans spent the rest of the day lying face down in bed but the next 
morning he was up limping around outside and telling about his ride to his 
less fortunate friends and adversaries. 

"Come set down an' eat yo' breakfus' honey," called the proud mother 
from the fi'ont door of the little cabin. 

"Ah cain't set down!" exclaimed the boy in disgust. 

"Why John Evans Lee, I'd eat a standin' up for a whole month for that 
ten dollar bill!" 

"Well, I'se not mindin' havin' t' eat standin' up. What's a botherin' me 
is the why-fer ah cain't set down." 



v/t cmmiL^ miL 



T 



MARIAN SIMON, '23. 

UM, turn, turn, turn, and many turn tvuns, 
From a million of thousands of African tongues ! 
Wouldn't it make you turn pale with fear 
If you heard it coming ever nearer and near? 

Now they gather together around a great fire, 
And the smoke flies higher and higher and higher. 
Hark! They're chanting some terrible hymn, 
Until the fire burns out or is dim. 

Soon the lovely black maidens appear 
And dance at the feet of the king over there. 
The children play merrily in a ring, 
Under the sway of a cannibal king. 

Suddenly a noise breaks on the air. 
We'd like to see what it is, but don't dare. 
With joy the cannibals raise a hideous din, 
As a wonderful feast is now brought in. 

Later the feast is all cleared away, 
The cannibals welcome the coming of day. 
A procession now files over the land. 
Led noisily on by a cannibal band! 



H picruRc c^ND (A poen 



DOROTHY STEINKAMP, '25. 



O 



NCE there was a little girl, 

Who tried to write a rhyme, 

She tried to write it more than once 
And missed it every time. 

She finally grew discouraged 
And gave up in despair 

And turned around and lo, behold ! 
A picture hanging there! 

The picture was a cabin 

In Sunny Tennessee; 
It was a lovely picture 

Now you just wait and see. 

The sun was slowly sinking 
Before the cabin door; 

And a little pickaninny 

Lay sleeping on the floor. 

The picture is her poem, 

The sun-beams slanting light 
Into the dusky cabin 

And filling it with light. 

And so it told her what to say 
And now you see she's said it 

And now I hope her teacher dear 
Will give her a full credit. 



USORL!) 




MATHILDE KESSLER, '22. 

OME right in, Marthy, an' lay off your wraps. Sure am glad 
to hev' the girls here today! Guess they'll all brave the 
cold weather for an old-times meetin'. Why j^ou've got a 
new hat — real pretty. Here, right here, in the hall." 

Sally Blake bustled about to make her guest comfortable. 
' ' Come in to the fire. Yes, — it does feel good an ' warm. 
Henry made the fire for me jus' before he went back to the shop." 

Martha Sanders, her guest, came puffing in and sat down with a flourish 
on one of the large easy chairs, relaxing comfortably. She was indeed stout, 
a rather domestic looking creature with smooth capable hands. Her hair was 
combed straight back and she wore a pair of thick glasses. 

' ' We — 11, ' ' she began, pulling open a large roomy bag so typical of herself 

and disclosing a sock, half-finished. "Well, Sal, how's how's — Patrick Henry?" 

Sally Blake threaded her needle thoughtfully and then answered "Well, 

the dear thing's better, I think. He's not been a bit friskj' lately, you know, 

at all. But I think he looks a little better ! ' ' 

Patrick Henry was the Blakes' eat, and all the neighborhood had been 
duly worried about its recent illness. One exception to this general solicitude 
was a rather cross gentleman next door who was heard to declare that "he 
hated that thing over at Blake's and really felt sorry that so eminent a man 
had to be burdened with such a namesake." However he was considered a 
bit queer anyway. 

Then Mis' Sanders smiled as with relief. "So glad to hear it," she said, 
"Henry is so devoted to him, isn't he?" 

"Yes, he — oh, I hear steps. Must be the others coming," and with this 
she hastened to the door and found her supposition true. Two minutes later 
the newcomers entered the room; namely. Miss Jane Tripp and Mis' Jen 
Jennisou, the town constable 's wife, with Mis ' Blake hovering in the background. 

They exchanged greetings and drew up their chairs before the fire. 

"Git out your work, whatever you brought," said Sally Blake. "I^I'm 
making a centerpiece, course it's nothing what j'ou'd call elaborate but," — here 
she held it up none the less proudly, "but I guess it'll do maybe." 

The other three exclaimed and made the necessary compliments. 

"My — cert'n'ly is pretty," and lovely, Mis' Blake . 



Suddenly Mis' Blake got up hastily and closed the door, saying something 
about a "draft." Then she resumed her seat and Mis' Jen Jennison spoke. 
She was a nervous, slender little body. Her eyes were small and snapping, 
and her hair was arranged in an elaborate pompadour, with curls shaking 
energetically in the back. 

"Cert'n'ly is aw-ful," she said looking primly down over her nose-glasses 
and drawing her mouth into a wrinkly ball, "why I never heard-tell a' such 
doin's on!" 

"Who'd you say — Mary Ann Hutchison," said Sally dropping her work 
for the moment and looking up inquiringly. 

"Yes — Mary Ann Hutchison has bobbed her hair. Just the other day 
I was over to Mis' Hutchison's telling her about the Mish'nary meeting you 
know," — they all nodded," an' hei'e comes Mai'y Ann a flouncin' in an' that 
hair o' hers bobbing up and down. E — magine it. And — her mother smilin' 
all the time. Oh, my ! When I think — such beautiful hair — to have it slashed 
off" — here Mrs. Constable shook ner head, "An' the neat way they used to fix 
their hair, oh deai' — " 

Then Martha Sanders broke in, in a low whisper, "An' you say it was 
cut-clean even with 'er ears? Goodness! Goodness." 

Several shakings of the head went the rounds, then Jane Tripp the only 
old maid of the crowd, spoke for the first time, ' ' Well now I guess here 's about 
where I disagree with you. Mis' Jennison. That Hutchison girl's hair, 's'long 
as I could remember, was about as stringy as it could possibly be, and I think 
cutting it was a good thing." Here a gasp was emitted from the listening 
audience, but Miss Jane went bravely on, "0 course, I don't say as how I 
believe in all the new fangled notions girls get in their heads nowaday. But 
when I think the way they used to put thein hair — with a big blouse over their 
forehead — it's a wonder they could even think!" 

When she finished her three friends from childhood looked at this Modern 
Day Agitator with a distinct air of surprise, but it was but a momentary sur- 
prise, for June had always been independent, mischievous, too, along with it — 
the time she fooled the prim schoolmarm, and — but that, however is another 
story. 

Then Mis' Sanders said with a sniff, "Well if they do bob their hair it 
will be 'equinomecal' anyway for they won't have to buy hair pins." 

Depend on Martha Sanders to look after the financial side of it. 

"Nor puffs either," put in Sally with a low chuckle, "fer I see you can 
buy them in New York." 

Then Mis' Jennison said in a loud voice, "Well, I think it's ridiculous, 
an' Jane, I'm surprised, absolutely! Might know though ever since we were 
girls — " here she broke off — then, "Why my niece said just the other day — " 



And here the others involuntarily gave a sigh or two and let Mis' 
Jennison tell her inevitable tale about her dear niece. By this time Mis' Blake 
and the rest thought they knew everything there possibly was to know about! 
that dear relative, but somehow there was something new to add to the long 
list at every meeting. 

Just in the middle of her story there was a crash! a bang! and Sally 
jumped up frightened and hurried to the kitchen. She returned three minutes 
later with the announcement that the cat had only upset two chairs and 
a milk bottle. 

"That cat's not sick," murmured Miss Jane hiding a smile. 

There was a minute or two of silence after this shock. When they were 
all settled again, Martha began: 

"Say, wasn't that fine salad at the supper the other night? I tho't Bi'other 
Johnson was goin' to eat all there was. Mis' 'Tee made it, didn't she? An' 
those cheesed-pametto sandwiches! Certainly, tasted good." 

"Well to tell the truth, I wasn't much struck with those new-fangled 
sandwiches nor the salad either," said Miss Jane, hesitatingly, "I didn't care 
for it at all. Old fashioned eatin' 's good 'nuff fer me." 

As they continued in this strain they did not notice that Mis' Blake sud- 
denly grew red and coughed two or three times. Finally, she excused herself 
and left the room. Her friends, thinking it about refi'eshment time, did not 
notice anything wrong. But out in the kitchen a heart-rendering sight met 
Sally's eyes. There on the table were four plates heaped with salad and two 
delicious looking "new-fangled" pimento-cheesed sandwiches on each plate. 
A pot of hot chocolate stood ready to heat. What would she do? Here Martha 
was the only one. 

An idea came. Ten minutes later instead of the sandwiches were two large 
freshly-fried doughnuts. She also had put some good preserves next to the 
doughnuts "to make up for the salad." Then she took her tray into the guests. 

"Oh — oh aren't these doughnuts de-licious," exclaimed Mis' Jennison, 
they're about as good as Elizabeth makes." (Elizabeth was her niece.) 

"They're lovely, Sally," said Jane with appreciation, "and made just 
for this little party!" 

The picture of a hungry Henry coming home that evening to an empty 
doughnut jar, rose in his wife's mind. 

"Ah — yes, I guess they'll do," she answered, "have some more, Marthy 
dear. ' ' 

Then suddenly another crash sounded in the kitchen, and this time all 
the ladies, remembering that they had neglected to aid Mis' Blake in the other 
accident hurried after their hostess. There Patrick Henry was perched on the 



table politely partaking of the salad that was in a crock and climbing over the 
neatly-cut sandwiches. A broken plate lay on the floor. 

' ' Pati'ick, Patrick ! I 'm ashaaned — oh — get out ! ' ' And the poor cat was 
pushed out the back door. If any suspicion had come into their minds, the 
guests, to the relief of their nervous hostess, said nothing, but filed back into 
the sitting-room. 

When they reached the room something very funny met their eyes. On the 
floor lay a perfectly good set of false curls. They all looked bewildered except 
Mis' Jennison. She looked at the curls on the floor, in astonishment, then felt 
the back of her head with a dazed air. Then she realized in the suddeness of 
her jump when she had heard the noise in the kitchen, that her curls had fallen 
in the strife. She grabbed them hastily and looked up with a crimson face. 
The silence that followed was impressive and spoke more than words. The few 
with the sense of humor controlled their faces pretty well in the predicament. 

"We had such a lovely time, Sally," said Marthy, later as the guests rose 
to go, "and those refreshments were just fine!" 

Miss Jane echoed this heartily. 

"And remember you come to my house soon," murmured Mis' Jennison, 
who had quite recovered from the disgrace, "you know my niece always says — " 

"Come Mis' Jennison, goodbye Mis' Blake. We had a love-ly time." 

"Well, I'm always glad for us girls to get together this way. Goodbye. 
Don't hurt yourself on those steps, Marthy." And the guests hurried home- 
ward from their eventful afternoon. 




T 



JEANETTE CLARK, '25. 

HE pale blue sky looks down on the dreary earth, 
The dew drops spai'kle on the ground 
And everything awakens as from a swound. 

The morning 's rainbows sparkle everywhere ; 

A tinge of spring is in the air 

And flowei's unfold their colors fresh and rare. 

The sweet note of the meadow lark is heard. 

The twitter of the robin near 

And all awakening life says, "Spring is here!" 



vAt m^ 



o 



RUTH BLUMER, '25. 



VER the hilltop rises the sun. 
The stars disappear, the day has begun. 
The day bathes her face in the shing dew. 
Then goes her way, her tasks to pursue. 

The birds in the tree tops she wakes from their sleep, 
The flowers and bees from their slumber so deep. 
She wakens and calls to his duty each one, 
As up in the sky slowly creeps the warm sun. 

The children she calls to their school or their play. 
The grown people rise at the summons of day. 
Then all to their work or their studies or play 
Go to return at the close of the day. 




EDNA SIMON 
Class of 1923 

IN MEMORIAM 

March 15, 1922 



There is no death! The leaves may fall, 
The flowers may fade and pass away — 

They only wait through wintry hours, 
The coming of the May. 




Stella YLaiAjOW^iaj. .Editor-in-CMef Brunow Ahlbrand. .Bttstness Manager 
Kathryn Kessler. . .Faculty Editor Arthur Kaufman. . . .Asst. Bus. Mgr. 
Kate Andrews Facidty Business Manager 

Aaaortatf SbttorH 

Emalyn Collins Literary Mary Brown Calendar 

Kathryn Kirsch Literary Hamer Wesner Personals 

Oscar Fenton Athletics 

(!IIa00 ^MavB 

Grace Dunn Senior Raymond Feaster Sophomore 

George Wilson Junior Roscoe Smith Freshman 

Alice Cobb Junior High School 



Art lEbaora 



Lloyd Schafer 
Dorothy Mahorney 
Veva Paul 



Lois Hall 
Francis Eudaly 
.Facidty Art Editor 



EOrOR'^L 




STELLA HALLOWELL, '22. 

NE, two, three, four! 

Sometimes I wish there were more." 

Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior, just four short years, 
yet how much they hold! They contain not only the joys 
and sorrows of "high school days" but they inspire many 
of the ideals that are to shape the future of those who have 
lived within their influence. 
The student never fully realizes the effect of these four years upon his life 
in the past nor feels how great may be their influence in the unknown future, 
until he stands on that summit of youthful knowledge, his senior year, and 
looks back over the past, and then forward into the mysterious days that are 
yet to come. Then it seems that all the faith, affection and stimulating ambi- 
tions, which may have lain dormant, suddenly rush forth and almost overwhelm 
him with joy. Not until then does it dawn upon him how much his school life 
has meant. 

The school is made sacred in the memories of those who go out from its 
walls into the various walks of life; for in their hearts it will always mean the 
dreams and aspirations so dear to youth. 

Prom the mountain peak of the Senior year, the students, look down upon 
the winding, toilsome way of their ascent, and, for the first time, perhaps, per- 
ceive with feelings of exultation, the "Sloughs of Depend" and the "Valleys 
of Humiliation" through which they have passed. On and on the winding way 
climbs ever upward, sometimes passing through the pleasant meadows of 
English, and crossing the refreshing streams of History, but often rambling 
through the stony valleys of Algebra and Geometry. But there was always the 
guardian spirit of Wisdom to encourage, and her colleague. Ambition, to spur 
on the laggards. 

But how pleasant is the summit, how cool and calm is the spirit, how excit- 
ing the anticipations of that "One Night"! What gratification and pride fill 
the heart ! What love and companionship exist for those that have gone through 
the struggle together. How ready and eager one feels to enter the morning of 
life's combats and how confident that he will emerge victorious! A dream of 
youth perhaps, but one that spreads a halo about the school that has made the 
dreams possible, and the dreamer feel that he can make them come true! 







.^-\ 



Honor roll 

401 CReorcS 33^s 

BRUNOW f=1(CBR^D 

331 CREDirS ^3(^5 




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C0L0R5 RED m) COHICE 

PRESIDQNi; LLO/DXHfTER 

vicE-PRC3C)mi; oscmrENCON 

^mfZm/ ELOIX LEE 
tRR15URER JUm HflLOWELL 




Lloyd Schafer 



Oscar Fenton 




Constance Adams Brunow Ahlbrand Charles Banta 



Robert Barbour Florence Becker Edith Beukman 







Helen Blevins Gladys Breitfield Paula Breitfield 



Mary Brown Owen Carter Emalyn Collins 





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1^ -^ 



f: 




John Deal Grace Dunn Francis Fettig 



Chester Fill Alice Foster Francis Geile 






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Frances Gill Lawrence Hatfield Stella Hallowell 



John Hunter 



Ray Julian Paul Kamman 




P3k 



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Arthur Kaufman Mathilde Kessler Kathryn Kirsch 



Forrest Kysar Marie Kysar Gladys Lee 



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iyta 



Eloise Lee 



Carl Malick Robert Mann 



Donald Miller Fern Rhodes Margaret Riehl 







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Agnes Riordan Hershall Ruddick Ruth Robertson 



Dorothy Smith Hamer Wesner Louise Werning 




SENIOR CLASS POEM 

EMALYN COLLINS, '22. 



T 



WAS the war-cry of the nations 

As they fought for liberty; 
For the freedom of those peoples 

Crushed by harsh autocracy. 
When the world was dark and dreary, 

Came the ringing clarion ; 
Like a silver sword in darkness 

Came the cry of "Carry On." 

And they carried on and conquered, 

Though the very earth breathed hell ; 
Yet they carried on and conquered 

Through the heavy shot and shell. 
As they carried on and conquered, 

So have we for four years long 
Sung the war-song of all knowledge 

To the cry of "Carry-On." 

As we carried on and conquered 

In life's first great battles here, 
Let us ever press on further 

When the struggles reappear 
When we go away to college. 

Or stray elsewliei'e far from home. 
Let this motto always guide us, 

Carry On! 0, Carry On! 



am!)5aNG 



w 



GRACE DUNN, '22. 

HEN oft we sit at eventide, 

When shadows 'round us creep, 

And every star a friend recalls 

From some deep hidden sleep. 

Some wreaths of honor now my wear, 

Some boast of mighty things; 

They are the chums who helped to form 

The best of friendship's rings. 

When the shades of evening fall, 

And the darkness spreads o'er all, 

When we're feeling rather sad and lonely, too. 

When visions old arise. 

Tears of laughter dim our eyes. 

As we think of all the pranks we used to do. 

Memory keeps them safe we find. 

Memory brings them all to mind, 

As we hum this chorus through. 

We're Red and White, We fight and fight, 

Never daunted, never taunted; 

We're the grand old class of twenty- two. 




CHe m55W0RD 



CONSTANCE ADAMS, '22. 



"I 



am a senior, 

He proudly said; 
And with the word 

He raised his head. 



For who was there 
On this great earth 

Of high estate 
And noble birth. 

Could quite compare 
His honor and fame 

With the smug complacence 
Of such a name! 

None could gainsay 
His haughty demands 

T'was needful only 
To lift a hand. 

And firmly say 

With calm demeanor, 
' ' Out of my way, please, 

I am a senior!" 




mt J(JN]0R5 

GOD MELP5 r(/10X 
{jm HELP CHmXLVES 

tREE-PINE I10WER-WHCER03E 

CaOR>GREEIN m) iMLt 

PRE3DENI: f^lRCHUR BECISER 

cyicE-proDmi j^rtsmtom 
rRE^S)URER mm mnE5 



LEWIS ADAMS 
EUNICE ALEXANDER 
HUGH ANDREWS 
OPAL BALDWIN 
WILBUR BALDWIN 
PEARL BANTA 
NORMA BARKMAN 
ARTHUR BECKER 
THELMA BELL 
INEZ BEUKMAN 
EDNA BIDDLE 
JAMES BLACK 
FLORENCE BLAIN 
FRANCES BLEVINS 
RAYMOND BLUMER 
KEITH BRACKMYRE 
KARL BUHNER 
MARTIN BUHNER 
LILLIAN BUHNER 
ELVA CARTER 
CLARENCE COMBS 
HELEN CRABB 
ETHEL DUNN 
FRANCIS EUDALY 
OSBORNE FISCHBACH 
MILDRED GLASSON 
KENNETH GOSSETT 



LOIS HALL 
HARDIN HANCOCK 
MAURICE HAPER 
HUBERT HEDGES 
EVA HI EN 
ESTHER HEIWIG 
MINNIE MAE HELT 
ERNEST HERRING 
JAMES HONAN 
GLADYS HOPPLE 
GLADYS HUDSON 
RUTH HUMES 
JARVIS HYATT 
WALTER HYATT 
CATHERINE JAMES 
ELIZABETH JAMES 
LOUISE JOHNSON 
MARY JOHNSON 
MARY JUDD 
WILBUR KASTING 
CHARLES KEACH 
DOROTHY KELLEY 
LYDIA KRUGE 
MARIE LAHNE 
CHARLES LINKE 
VERA LOCKMUND 
DOROTHY MAHORNEY 



EARL McCANN 
HERSCHEL McCLINTICK 
ROBERT McCORD 
HAROLD MISAMORE 
RUBY MONTGOMERY 
VENEDA MOORE 
NELLIE PEASE 
FRANCIS RICHART 
CHARLES ROSS 
HOWARD ROSS 
LAWRENCE RUDDICK 
LESLIE RUSSELL 
RAY SCHARFENBERGER 
HELEN SHANNON 
BERYL SHIELDS 
MARIAN SIMON 
ELMA STARK 
ERMA STARK 
DOROTHY STORY 
FRANKLIN SWAIN 
LOUISE TASKEY 
EARL THOMPSON 
GLEN UTTERBACK 
CORNELIUS WALKER 
MARY LOUISE WHITE 
GEORGE WILSON 
EDITH ZIMMERMAN 



H^E nORD IHfiN "CHOU 5M0We5C 

5Hf1ISE5PmRE 



KATHRYN ACKERET 
HAROLD AHLBRAND 
HARRY BALDWIN 
LOIS BARTLETT 
THEODORE BARTLETT 
BESSIE MAE BEACH 
ESTHER BIDDLE 
EARL BOOTH 
GRACE BRACKMYRE 
JEANETTE CARSON 
CONRAD CHRISTIE 
BERYL DANNETTELLE 
NELLA DAVIS 
WILMA DEATS 
FREEMAN DICKASON 
MANUEL DOUGHERTY 
MARION DOUGHERTY 
LETHA DOWNEY 
ROWETA DUNCAN 
LOUIS ECKSTEIN 
LEWIS ELSNER 
RAYMOND FEASTER 
MARY FETTIG 
CARL FILL 

CLIFFTON FISCHBACH 
LAURA MARIE FOIST 
JOHN HENHY FORWAY 
BERNICE FOSTER 
CLARENCE GREIN 
FLORENCE GRIMES 
MALCOLM HELT 
HENRY HIRTZEL 



RAYMOND HOEVENER 
JOSEPH JOHNSON 
OPAL KASTING 
ROBERT KASTING 
HARRY KRUWELL 
RALPH LEMP 
FORREST MALICK 
ALFRED MILLER 
ROBERT MISCH 
DAVE MITCHELL 
HENRIETTA MONTGOMERY 
DONALD MOORE 
HAROLD MURPHY 
FRANCIS NICHOLSON 
CLARENCE OTIS 
EVERETT OTTE 
CLARENCE POWERS 
CARL ROGERS 
WILLIAM SCHLUESEMEIER 
IRENE SPEAR 
ELSIE SPURGEON 
WILLIAM STEWART 
MABEL SWEANY 
SUSIE SWENGEL 
LEONARD TAULMAN 
CLARICE TAYLOR 
LENORE THICKSTEN 
HARRY THOMPSON 
DARRELL WELFER 
FARE WOLTERS 
EUGENE WRIGHT 



z:he7 nose ^ssune who 

0(1/ 



LUELLA ACKERET 
LAWRENCE ACKERMAN 
EVA ADAMS 
ANNA ALBRICH 
MABEL AUFFENBERG 
HELEN BAUERLE 
MELVIN BELL 
ELSIE BERGSICKER 
ROY BEUKMAN 
LEE BLEVINS 
ALFRED BLEVINS 
RUTH BOTTORFF 
HILDA BRETHAUER 
GERALD BROWNING 
RUTH BRUNOW 
IDA BURBRINK 
WALTER BURBRINK 
RUTH CHRISTIE 
HARVEY COCHRAN 
LORAINE COX 
RUTH CROUCHER 
ROBERT DAY 
ETTA DETTMER 
ORA FOSTER 
NORRIS GARVEY 
ALLEN HALL 
JESSIE MAE HALL 
JOHN HAUENCHILD 
LELAND HOLTMAN 
CARL HUSTEDT 
DOROTHY JACOBS 
EVELYN KYSAR 
FREEDA LEE 
WILMA LAWRENCE 
HAROLD MASCHER 
KENNETH McDONALD 
WILLIAM MILLER 
DONALD MISAMORE 
MADGE MOREN 
MYRTLE MYERS 
WILLIAM NIEMAN 



WILLIS NOELKER 
HOWARD PARKER 
SYLVESTER PEASE 
BERNICE RITTEJSTHOUSE 
WILLIAM RODERT 
DONALD ROSS 
CARL RUCKER 
ROSCOE SMITH 
VIRGINIA SMITH 
MAURICE SPRAY 
JULIA STEINWEDEL 
MARGARET SUMNER 
MURIEL SWEANY 
RALPH SWEET 
VIRGIL TALKINGTON 
AUDREY TRUEBLOOD 
KENNETH VINCENT 
DOROTHY WALTERS 
SAM WHITSON 
RALPH WIENEKE 
OSCAR WILDE 
HARROLD WINKLER 
MARY WORLEY 

WILLIAM ABRAHAM 
ALICE BECKER 
ERNEST BLEVINS 
EDWIN BLISH 
RUTH BLUMER 
TOM BOLLINGER 
EDWARD BROOKS 
MAURICE BROWNING 
GEORGE BRYAN 
HOWARD BUCKLEY 
GERTRUDE BURKART 
DONALD BUSH 
RUTH CHAMBERS 
JEANETTE CLARK 
IRENE CLIFFTON 
LANDIS COOPER 
VELMA COOPER 



WILLIS COX 
MARION DICKASON 
PAUL DOUGLASS 
MARGARET DUNN 
HARRY FOX 
WALLACE GARVEY 
MARTHA GRAESSLE 
WALTER GRAVES 
DAVID GREEN 
AVIS HOENSTREITER 
THELMA HUDSON 
JOHN JOHNSON 
MARGARET KASTING 
ELSIE KIEL 
HELEN KIEL 
LAURA LANGE 
FRANCIS LEWIS 
GEORGE LOCKMUND 
VIRGIL LUNTE 
WALTER MASCHINO 
GLADYS McCORD 
LAURA MENGLER 
GORDON MILLER 
LYNN MILLER 
CLAUDE MITCHELL 
VEARL ORTELL 
ROBERT PARKER 
ESTA PRATHER 
VENICE RADER 
MADELINE RAEBURN 
HELEN SCHAEFER 
RUTH SIEFKER 
ROBERT SPRENGER 
RILEY SPRENGER 
SYLVIA STANTS 
DOROTHY STEINKAMP 
PAUL STEINKAMP 
VONDA STEWART 
MURIEL TRUEBLOOD 
RUBY UTTERBACK 
FRED WALKER 



JUNIOR HIGH XHOOL 



ELIZA ABBETT 
LOIS ACKERMAN 
FRANK ANDERSON 
THOMAS AUFFENBERG 
RALPH BRUNOW 
LLOYD BULGER 
BBRNADINE BUSKIRK 
HOWARD CARTER 
MAYNARD CHILDS 
DOROTHY CLARK 
ALICE COBB 
EARL COX 
PHILIP COX 
WERNER COX 
BLANCH DAILY 
BERYL DOUGHTY 
LOLA ELLIOTT 
AGNES COINS 
KERVAL GOODWIN 
ALTON GORBET 



JOYCE ACKERMAN 
LESTER ANDERSON 
JESSIE BELL 
ROGER BILLINGS 
WESLEY BORCHERDING 
FRANCES BROOKS 
GEORGE BURRELL 
GERTRUDE CALLAHAN 
ALMA BELLE CHARLES 
BYRON CHENOWETH 
DORIS CHILDS 



•THELMA ADAMS 
LORA ALBRICH 
HERBERT ANDERSON 
LAWRENCE ARBUCKLE 
JASON ASHBY 
PAULINE ASHLEY 
LOTTIE MAE AULT 
MARY BARNUM 
PHYLLISS BARNETT 
MARY BARKMAN 
ADELINE BOWMAN 
BENNETT BOWMAN 
OPAL CALLAHAN 
NORENA CARPENTER 
BERYL COX 
MILDRED DAILY 
GERTRUDE DEPUTY 
INEZ DOWNEY 
GLENN DUNCAN 
ALLEN EUDALY 
GRACE GRAHAM 
ARTHUR GREEN 
ORVILLE GREEN 
VIOLA GRIMES 
GORDON HALLOWELL 



LUCILE ABELL 
LUCILE ADAMS 
PAUL ADAMS 
GLADYS ALEXANDER 
MARIL ALEXANDER 
CLARENCE ARBUCKLE 
DORIS AUFDERHEIDE 
WILLIAM BALSLEY 
LUCILE BENDER 
MARY BIGGS 
STUART BLISH 
GARRIS BOHALL 
BERNA BOWMAN 
PAUL BRACKMYRE 
WILMA BROCKHOFF 
CATHERINE BROOKS 
MAURINE CARTER 
ROBERT CHAMBERS 
GEORGE COLLINS 
MARIE CORYEA 
PAUL CRABB 
PAULINE CROUCHER 



8- A CLASS 

ADDIE GREEN 
GEORGE GREEN 
RUSSELL HAMER 
CATHERINE HEHMAN 
ALVIN JOHNSON 
ALBERT JUDD 
JENNIE MAE LAHNE 
JOHN LAHNE 
NAOMI LARABEB 
DORIS LEE 
EDNA LIEBRAND 
DENNIS MAHORNEY 
HELEN McCURDY 
RUTH MESEKE 
EARL MIZE 
MABEL MIZE 
ALBRT MYERS 
MILDRED MYERS 
DALLAS NOELL 

8-B CLASS 

EDWARD DOUGLASS 
RUTH DUNN 
LAWRENCE FA HAY 
MADELINE FINDLEY 
LOUISE FREELAND 
LOIS GILBERT 
DELBERT GOSSETT 
NEAL HENNESSY 
EARL HOOPER 
AGNES JAYNES 
MARIAN MITTON 

7- A CLASS 

RAYMOND HAMILTON 
CARL HAPER 
JAMES HARLOW 
MARY HATFIF.LD 
ARTHUR HEIWIG 
LAWRENCE HENDERSON 
LEO HENLEY 
LEON HIMLER 
MADA HODAPP 
DOROTHY HOLLENBECK 
MARJORIE HOUSE 
LA VERNE HUBER 
MARY HUTNTER 
ELIZABETH JENKINS 
MIALLO JENNISON 
VIRGINIA JOHNSON 
PHYLLISS KEITH 
LURENE KRUWELL 
WRIGHT KYSAR 
JOHN LEE 
MARY LEWIS 
LAWRENCE McADAMS 
HOWARD MYERS 
KENNETH OTTO 

7-B CLASS 

DOROTHY DAVIS 
MARY DOUGHERTY 
HARRY DOWNING 
DELORIS ELSNER 
ESTHER ENGLAND 
ERNEST FLEETWOOD 
RALPH FOSTER 
BERNTCE GOENS 
EDITH GOENS 
HOWARD HALL 
MIRIAM HAMILTON 
DOROTHY HAUENSCHILD 
VIDA HAWK 
GRACE HORNING 
MILDRED HUNTERMAN 
FLORA HUSTEDT 
GROVER HUTCHTNGS 
DONALD KASTING 
ROBERT KNOST 
MILDRED LARABEE 
HARVEY LEWIS 
DELLA MAE MANNING 



VERA OEHLBERG 
CLARICE OTTO 
LENNIE PFAFFENBERGER 
WILBUR PHILLIPS 
FRANCIS PICKERRELL 
ALBERT REATER 
RUTH ANNA RITZ 
PAUL RUDDICK 
EARL RUSSELL 
RUTH SEWELL 
WILLARD STARK 
OLIVER STEINBERGER 
VIRGIL STEINKER 
REBA SWEANY 
VIRGIL SWEANY 
DALLAS THOMAS 
RUTH WHITE 
MINNIE WILLIAMSON 
ATHOS WOOLLS 



ROBERT PFAFFENBERGER 
ROY PFAFFENBERGER 
CARL PHILLIPS 
JOHN PRALL 
GORDON RAEBURN 
JOYCE STEINKAMP 
LOUIS TOBORG 
DELORIS VANHOY 
ROY WILLIAMS 
BENJAMIN YOUNT 
LOIS ZIMMERMAN 



CHARLES PHTLLIPS 
THELMA PICKERRELL 
CLARENCE POLLARD 
FERN PREWITT 
EDWARD REVEAL 
LORENE RHODES 
LELAND ROSS 
MILDRED SCHAFER 
LOUIS SCHRADER 
CHARLES SEWELL 
JOHN SHORTRIDGE 
THELMA SIERP 
HARRIETT SMITH 
HELEN STABB 
MACK STEINKAMP 
DONALD STEINKAMP 
CHARLES TASKEY 
DOROTHY TASKEY 
MARTBZ TASKEY 
ALBERT TOBORG 
JOHN WARD 
WILLIAM WHEELER 
JOE WHITE 
OREN WILLIAMSON 



BURGOYNE JIILLS 
LLOYD MOREN 
DOROTHY MYERS 
MABLE NOLTE 
CLARA MAE PATTERSON 
EDNA PETERS 
MARIE PFAFFENBERGER 
NARCISSUS REDMAN 
LUCILE REED 
WILLIS REASNER 
RAZEL RICH 
GOLDIE ROBBINS 
ORVILLE RODERT 
FRIEDA SCHLEIBAUM 
GLEN SEWARD 
CHRISTINE SMITH 
OPAL SPRAY 
HOWARD SPRINGER 
JUANITA SWENGBL 
KATHRYN WHEELER 
ANITA WOLTER 
MARTHA WOODWARD 




>^/.— .\>^/— \fc^/— \^<3/-^ 



l^'iGH .SCHOOL 




f=1CDV!DE5 




GIRLS) GLDE aUB 



STELLA HALLOWELL, Accomanist 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 
CONSTANCE ADAMS 
PEARL BANTA 
THELMA BELL 
EDITH BEUKMAN 
FLORENCE BLAIN 
FRANCIS BLEVINS 
HELEN BLEVINS 
RUTH BOTORFF 
GLADYS BREITFIELD 
PAULA BREITFIELD 
MARY BROWN 
GERTRUDE BURKART 
RUTH CHRISTIE 
HELEN CRABB 
BERYL DANNETTELLE 
ROWETA DUNCAN 



ETHEL DUNN 
MARY FETTIG 
LAURA MARIE FOIST 
FRANCES GILL 
FLORENCE GRIMES 
ESTHER HEIWIG 
GLADYS HOPPLE 
GLADYS HUDSON 
RUTH HUMES 
ELIZABETH JAMES 
MARY JOHNSON 
LOUISE JOHNSON 
OPAL KASTING 
DOROTHY KELLEY 
MATHILDE KESSLER 
KATHRYN KIRSCH 
GLADYS LEE 



ELOISE LEE 
VERA LOCKMUND 
DOROTHY MAHORNEY 
GLADYS McCORD 
AVIS McPIKE 

HENRIETTA MONTGOMERY 
VENEDA MOORE 
MADGE MOREN 
MARGARET RHIEL 
FERN RHODES 
RUTH ROBERTSON 
DOROTHY SMITH 
ELMA STARK 
ERMA STARK 
LOUISE TASKEY 
DOROTHY WALTERS 




DOV-3 GLEE aUB 



HOWARD ROSS, Accompanist 



HUGH ANDREWS 
ROBERT BARBOUR 
JAMES BLACK 
ALFRED BLEVINS 
TOM BOLLINGER 
OSCAR FENTON 
FRANCIS GEILE 
HARDEN HANCOCK 



JAMES HONAN 
RAY JULIAN 
CHARLES REACH 
ROBERT MANN 
HAROLD MISAMORE 
DONALD MOORE 
HOWARD ROSS 
OSCAR WILDE 




ORCHC^cm 



First Violin 

ETHEL DUNN 
MARIAN SIMON 
DOROTHY SMITH 
ELMA STARK 
ERMA STARK 
ROY WILLIAMS 

Second Violin 
PEARL BANTA 
JEANETTE CLARK 
MARGARET DUNN 
DONALD MOORE 
CLARENCE OTIS 

Flute 
ROBERT CHENOWETH 
BERNICE FOSTER 



Saxophone 
TOM BOLLINGER 
FRANCIS GEILE 
KERVAL GOODWIN 
KATHRYN KIRSCH 
ROBERT SPRENGER 

Cello 
ROBERT BARBOUR 

Trombone 
ROGER BILLINGS 
RAY JULIAN 

Drums 
GRAHAM ANDREWS 

Piano 
GRACE DUNN 




Wo m^Mmim or mK nm/ 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

"Aunt Mary" Watkins, a very wealthy spinster, Jack's 

aunt and Lucinda's "She" Emalyn Collins 

John Watkins, Jr., Jack Lloyd Schafer 

Burnett 1 f Owen Carter 

Mitchell [ Jack's Chums \ Ray Julian 

Clover J [ Arthur Kaufman 

Mr. Stebbins, Aiint Mary's lawyer Forrest Kysar 

Joshua, Aiint Mary's hired man Hamer Wesner 

James, the Burnett butler Oscar Fenton 

Betty Burnett, Burnett's sister — afterwards Aunt 

Mary's maid "Cranise" Stella Hallo\vell 

The Girl from Kalamazoo Frances Gill 

Lucinda, Aunt Mary's property body and soul .... Mary Brown. 

Daisy MuUins, a villager ... Kathryn Kirsch 

Eva, the Burnett maid Florence Becker 



(A v^M^ or W€m 

Nessa Teig, tlie woman of the house. . . . . . Louise Werning 

Maur.ya, her neighbor Alice Foster 

Oonah, Nessa's grand-daughter Grace Dunn 

Aengus Arann, a young peasant Donald Miller 

Aileel, a ivandering poet Robert Barbour 

Father Brian, tlie priest Carl Malick 

A Faery Child Margaret Riehl 



Finula, 

Kathleen, 

Sheila, 

Sheamus, 

Martin, 

Tumaus, 



neighbors . 



'Fern Rhodes 
Helen Blevins 
Florence Becker 
Robert Mann 
Francis Geile 
Charles Banta 



Other neighbors — Chester Fill, Edith Beukman, Paul Kamman, Agnes Riordan, 
Gladys Lee, John Hunter, Constance Adams. 



Mr. Roberts John Deal 

Mrs. Roberts Eloise Lee 

Willis Campbell Brunow Ahlbrand 

Mrs. Graham Dorothy Smith 

Mr. Bemis Hershall Ruddick 

Dr. Lawton La%\tience Hatfield 

Young Mr. Bemis Francis Fettig 

Young Mrs. Bemis Marie Kysar 

Bella, the maid Ruth Robertson 



SPRfSGCfHE 



ACT I 

Elvira Eastman, a Social Butterfly, grand-daughter of Elvira Judd. .Elsie Reynolds 

Desiree Stella Hallowell 

Joyce Margaret Riehl 

Sue Louise Werning 

Mrs. Elkins, of another generation Kate Jackson 

James Brewster, the founder of the famous "Brewster Pills" Stanley Switzee 

Thankful Standish, his sister Frances Svititzer 

Priscilla Brewster, his daughter Mrs. Don Bollinger 

Primrose Standish, Thankful's daughter Mary Gillespie 

Tom Higgins of Boston Phil Cordes 

"Wizard" Jack Wainwright, the famous inventor E. B. Chenoweth 

Bobby Brewster, a lion with the ladies Kincsley BRiNKLOVif 

Elvira Judd, a young widow Elsie Reynolds 

Abigail Tompkins, a susceptible maiden Mrs. Eunice Bollinger 

ACT II 

Little Priscilla, daughter of Priscilla Brewster Deloris Elsner 

Vera Riggs Ruth Dunn 

Daisy, who stutters Louise Freeland 

Master Jack Edwin Blish 

Mrs. Priscilla Higgins, formerly Priscilla Brewster Mrs. Don Bollinger 

"Wizard" Jack Wainwright, famous inventor E. B. Chenoweth 

Mrs. Jack Wainwright, formerly Primrose Standish Mary Gillespie 

Mrs. Elvira Riggs, formerly Elvira Judd Elsie Reynolds 

Abigail Tompkins, older but still susceptible Mrs Eunice Bollinger 

Bobby Brewster, the same Bobby Kingsley Brinklow 

Zenobia, his wife Edna Doane 

ACT III 

Priscilla Dean, Grand-daughter of Priscilla Brewster Mrs. Don Bollinger 

Dr. Jack Wainwright, grandson of "Wizard" Jack E. B. Chenoweth 

Phil, engaged to Sue John Himler 

George, engaged to Desiree Honan Willm an 

Parson, Bobby's Man Leland Bridges 

Society Group, Servants Group, Ladies of the Jury, Futurist Group, Mardi Gras, Show 
Girls, Playmates, Bridesmaids Group, Maids of Honor, Best Men, 1868 Group, Memory 
Dances, 1888 Group, Springtime Chorus. 




CHE D5ai53QN LEAGUE 

ITHIN the last ten years there has been a growing realization 
on the part of educators in both high schools and colleges that 
the ability to discuss intelligently and effectively problems of 
.importance is worth cultivating. In even the ordinarj' con- 
duct of life, much is gained through the power of presenting 
not only in correct but persuasive English, the many subjects 
that continually enlist one's attention. So in order to make the young people 
in the high schools more alive to important issues, to develop in them the habit 
of investigation, to cultivate the willingness to consider issues from many view- 
points, to stimulate to thought and to enable the students of the schools to ex- 
press their opinions in an effective way, some very interesting means have been 
adopted, a number of which make use of that spirit of contest which is so strong 
in the young and which, rightly giiided and stimulated by worthy motives, is 
a power for good and for greater effectiveness. 

Desiring to do what it could to encourage greater facility in discussion, the 
Extension division of Indiana University organized a few years ago the "State 
High School Discussion League" under the auspices of which there have been 
held many interesting discussions on subjects of vital interest. The plan adopted 
provides for the study of the given subject class contests in which represen- 
tatives are chosen for a final local contest, a county discussion, where a repre- 
sentative is elected for the district meet, and finally a state contest at Blooming- 
ton where a committee decides on the winner for the high schools of Indiana. 

A growing interest has been aroused and this year an unusually large num- 
ber of schools were represented in all of the contests. 

The subject for the spring of 1922 was "A Comprehensive Program for 
Immigration" and in the Shields High School this question was attacked by 
many students, and after spirited discussion a contest was held in which Alice 
Foster of the class of 1922 was chosen to represent us in the county and later 
in the district contest held in Seymour, April 14. 

We are now awaiting the announcement of the subject for next year. 

Another interesting oratorical contest was held at the high school on the 
evening of April 22, as the final feature of the day on which was held the 
"County Track and Field Meet." Eloise Lee brought credit to us by the de- 
lightful way in which she read. 

Friendly rivalry, an unbiased recognition of the best, a sympathy with the 
triumph of others, a sportsmanship that will make us abide by the decision of 
judges even when adverse to us, inculcate a spirit that is most worth while, and 
so we are looking forward to other contests of a similar kind for nest year. 



m^\fz mix 




Mr. Mitchell 



The Athletic Association was reorgan- 
ized early in the fall of 1921 with Lloyd 
Schafer President ; Grace Dunn, Secretary ; 
H. C. Henderson, Faculty Treasurer; Ray 
Julian, Student Treasurer; Oscar Fenton, 
Student Manager and J. R. Mitchell, Fac- 
ulty Manager. The Board of Control that 
was chosen was composed of Miss Andrews, 
Chairman; Lloyd Schafer, H. C. Hender- 
son, and J. R. Mitchell. 

Interclass games in basketball were held 
earl}' in the season and the championship 
was awarded the Seniors by their victories 
over the Sophomores and Juniors. 

The call for varsity candidates made early, was answered by fifty-two 
boys. Prospects were bright for a successful year as only three members 
were lost by graduation last year. With 
Deal, Captain Fenton and Banta as a 
nucleus and with Barbour, Misamore and 
Miller, reserves from last year, the team 
got off to a good start. Sickness and in- 
eligibility on the part of some of the regu- 
lars caused a slump in mid-season. The sea- 
son closed with 17 games won and 10 lost. 

Five men are lost this year, but with 
Hyatt, Honan, Keach, Adams, Misamore, 
Eckstein and McCord left from this year's 
squad with a lot of good material to be 
developed, Seymour should be represented 
by a strong team next year. Lloyd Schafer 





Seymour 35 

Seymour 31 

Seymour 40 

Seymour 49 

Seymour 13 

Seymour 64 

Seymour 18 

Seymour 35 

Seymour 46 

Seymour 29 

Seymour 44 

Seymour 41 

Seymour 46 

Seymour 22 

Seymour 42 

Seymour 19 

Sej-mour 23 

Seymour 35 

Seymour 34 

Seymour 18 

Seymour 30 

Seymour 20 

Seymour 39 



XHECULe 

Clearspring 15 

Washington 2 

Washington 9 

West Baden 15 

North Vernon 16 

Brownstown 2 

Clearspring 32 

Crothersville 20 

Brownstown 19 

Orleans 32 

Vallonia 24 

Cortland 27 

Alumni 21 

Shelbyville 23 

North Vernon 7 

Columbus 37 

Scottsburg 19 

Edinburg 39 

Salem 18 

Vallonia 11 

Orleans 41 

Scottsburg 25 

Edinburg 23 



m:)E-mLL 



The season opened with a boom this year. Coach Welch's call for candidates 
was answered by the largest number in history and a strong club was organized. 
Only one member of last year's squad was lost by graduation, but a few were 
lost by withdrawal from school. However with Wilson, star southpaw hurler 
of last season, and Capt. Baldwin, the peppery backstop, the outlook seems 
bright. Deal and Kaufman are the only members lost by graduation this year. 

The club line-up is as follows: 

Kaufman L. F. 

Baldwin, Capt C. 

McClintock 3 B. 

Hyatt 2 B. 

Misamore S. S. 

Deal IB. 

Adams R. F. 

Nicholson C. F. 

Wilson P. 

Eckstein P. 

Utilities: Russell, Johnson, Cochran, Becker, Keach, Malick and Welfer. 

SCHEDULE 

S — 

April 21— Medora there 19 — 7 

April 22 — Brownstown here 7 — 2 

April 28 — Columbus there 

May 5 — Franklin here 

May 6 — Mitchell there 

May 12 — Columbus here 

May 19 — Mitchell here 





Oscar Fenton 

Captain Jim was our fighting 
floor guard through whose efforts 
our team was kept fighting. He 
was the main factor in our offen- 
sive and defensive. He scored 230. 



Charles Banta 

This is Shy's last year. His 
willingness to work hard for the 
team and his good floor work 
made him a big factor in the 
team's progress. 





Donald Miller 

Miller was small but speedy, yet 
he would not allow his opponent 
to get rough with him. He made 
118 points. 



James Honan 

Cut was sub floor guard but 
when ever he played he fought 
hard. He will be back again next 
year. 





Harold Misamore 

Missy — although his name does 
not suggest it, had a mean eye for 
the basket. He will be back next 
year. Total points scored 118. 



Charles Keach 

Keachie was sub-center and on 
the varsity for the first time. His 
experience will make him a valua- 
able asset for the team next year. 





Robert Barbour 

Bob was our stone wall. Any 
man that got by him without fall- 
ing over his stray foot was a real 
player. 



John Deal 

Johnnie was handicapped on ac- 
count of sickness but in the games 
he scored heavily, making in all, 
120 points. 




rCNND 



Tennis was introduced into the program of 
Athletics this year for the first time. Much 
interest was manifested by the student body. 
While no inter-school meets were held, we hope 
to meet other schools next year. The inter- 
class contests proved interesting. Donald Miller 
and Robert McCord won the championship in 
doubles. The Sixth Street court was used. 
It is expected that tennis will be one of the 
popular forms of Athletics next fall. 



rmch 



Track and Field work was introduced for the first time in several years. 
Inexperience and lack of practice and interest held back the team. The 
team was weak in field events, but sprinters and runners were plentiful. Next 
year with Ahlbrand, Buhner, Wilson and a wealth of other material, Seymour 
will resume her place in this branch of sport. 

Team. 100 yards Ruddiek, Schaf er. Deal, Ahlbrand. 

220 yards Deal, Misamore, Ahlbrand. 

440 yards Buhner, Andrews. 

880 yards Wilson, Buhner, H. Ahlbrand. 

Broad Jump Swain, Carter, Buhner. 

Running Broad Jump .... Swain, Misamore. 

High Jump Misamore, Deal, McCord. 

Shot Put Adams. 

Relay Deal, Ruddiek, Schaf er, H. Ahlbrand, Buhner. 

Pole Vault Carter. 



U)H7 1 ^n XUDVING mC 

VEVA M. PAUL. 

THERE is much being said these days concerning the importance of voca- 
tional courses in the high school, the value of creating early in each 
student the desire for contact with the profession he wishes to follow. 

Drawing, correctly taught, in the public schools, offers the highest oppor- 
tunity for self-expression and is one of the greatest factors in the building up 
of the commercial and industrial success of our country. 

How different is our conception of the drawing course today, compared with 
that of a few years ago ! The student has gradually changed his idea of the art 
course from the hopeless task of painting so-called "pictures" to the instruction 
that influences his choice of dress, the kind of home he will build, its interior 
decoration, its gardening, the best and surest advertising plan for his business. 
Drawing, directed in such lines as these, creates a stimulating interest among 
the students and answers their many queries as to the reason for this subject 
being offered and the value of the same. 

Those studying art might be classified in four groups. First ; those who 
are truly interested and expect to adopt some sort of art v.'ork for their career ; 
these are the most serious and valuable students. Second; those who have en- 
joyed it in the grades and wish to continue it further in high school in order to 
apply the knowledge gained in every day life and to develop a high appreciation 
of the beautiful. Some of these develop ability and decide to choose it for their 
career. Third; those who think it an easy way to obtain credits because they 
think no brain is required for the work, and Fourth; the dabblers in china 
painting, magazine covers and the like. This division is most difficult to handle 
because they feel that they are already expert in their line and refuse to believe 
that it is necessary to know the fundamental principles of art before there can 
be success in specialization. The true mission of an art course is to instruct, not 
to amuse. Unless the department is considered as important as any other in a 
school, it should be dropped from the curriculum entirely. 

This year unusual interest has been shown in poster making, this particular 
phase being offered several times in the form of contests. Prizes were awarded 
by the Seymour Library for the best posters advertising State Library Week. 
The South Bend Library has awarded prizes and received the entire collection of 
posters for two successive years. Many local plays, minstrels, sales and exhibits 
received help in advertising and decorating from our drawing department. 

A pleasant spirit of helpfulness and co-operation exists among the students 
of the drawing department, a deeper interest than ever before is being mani- 
fested in the art course and it is with pleasure and eagerness that future classes 
look forward to a better located and completely equipped department. 




Some Achievements in the 
Department of Vocational Agriculture 

Everett Otte, winner of the trip to the International Livestock Exposition 
at Chicago as the guest of the Packers, for the best work in Corn and Live- 
stock Club Work. 

William Sehluesemeier, winner of the Jackson County Boys' Corn Club 
contest, and awarded a trip to the Purdue Club Round-up by the First National 
Bank of Seymour 

Wilbur Kasting, winner of the Boys' Livestock Judging Contest held by 
the Jackson County Fair Association, and awarded a trip to the Purdue Club 
Round-up. 

H. C. Henderson, our successful teacher of agriculture and companion 
of many instructive and delightful trips. 



THE HERO (Nit) 



Aeneas came from Ancient Troy, 

A warrior bold was he, 
An altho' I never saw him, 

There's a feud twixt him and me. 



"Oh Aeneas ! How you wrong us. 
Why did you roam the sea? 

Can't you see it means an ocean more. 
Of homework left for me?" 



'21 — Mr. Ackerman, can you punish anyone for something he has not done? 

L. A. — No, why? 

'27 — Well, I haven't done my arithmetic. 




Ernalyn C. — "Margaret, did you ever take ether?" 
Margaret R. — "Naw, I took General Science." 



Francis G. (making map) — Should we make these 
parallel lines straight? 



Mr. Due (at close of period) — Will you please pick 
up the floor." 



L. A. — "Benj. Yount, what is an egg?" 
B. Y. — "An egg is a chicken not yet." 



K. K. — Do you know what they call little black cats in Ireland? 

M. K.— No. 

K. K.— Kittens, foolish! 



EXTRACT FROM FRESHIES' COMPOSITION IN FRENCH— OPERETTA. 
T'opperetta wasait tray bone, Te sceneree was tray arteesteec at les costumes wereat 
worsaire. Je forgettait mon part et instead ad de skippant, je stumpa mon toe. Ah me! 
Et that thingay est hurting moi yetaire ! Je wasait se seareday grand je feenee mon 
danse que mon lovday couge bad tous disappere !" 



'22 — Did vou get that problem? 

'22+— Yep. 

'22— What d'you get? 

'22+ — The answer. 



TEACHERS' EXAMINATION 
The cause of Miss Geile's frequent visits to Bloomington? 
The date of Miss Howe's wedding? 
When will Miss Paul's hair grow out? 

Why Miss Small blushes every time she looks at Mr. Phillips? 
When will Miss Davison cease flirting with the little boys? 
Where did Mr. Mitchell learn to pull hair? 
What is Miss Myer's secret of keeping so young? 
What does Miss McHeniy do to reduce? 
Why do all the girls fall for Mr. Due? 

When will Miss Barbour reveal her secret of keeping order? 
When will Miss Cobb become a great orator? 
What make? Mr. Phillips paitial to girls? 
Please answer 10 out of 12. 



LAMENT IN GEE MAJOR 



Don't tell me school is all a snap, 
To think it makes me blue , 

For thirty credits have I got. 
Instead of thirty-two. 



Don't tell me life is Rosy Pink, 
Or any other joyous hue; 

For next year will I graduate. 
Instead of in Twenty-two. 



Mr. Due — Charles, where was the Peace Treaty signed? 
Shy — At the bottom, of course. 




'24 — "Oh, yes, I'm a big gun around here." 
'25— "I see, so that's the reason they're thinking of 
cannon' you." 



Hershall — Are you deaf to my pleadings? 

Marie — I am. 

H. — But what if I were to offer you a diamond ring? 

M. — I'm not stone deaf. 



Honan — "Say, Guff, did you ever hear of a rabbit 

bark?" 

McCord — "Rabbits don't bark, you sap." 

Honan — "That's funny, this book says that rabbits 

eat cabbage and bark." 



Miss Geile — "James, describe Queen Elizabeth." 
James B. — "Queen Elizabeth was tall and thin, but a 
stout Protestant." 



'24 — I don't see why you call Bill stupid, he says something clever quite often. 
'22 — Exactly, he don't seem to realize it should be said only once. 

Miss Small — Maurice, has the furnace gone out? 
Jake — I didn't see it pass through here. 



WANTED 
A Spelling Book 
Beauty 
A hair net 

A husband (apply commencement night) 
To grow slim 
One more credit 
Some sense 
Almost anything 

To walk off educated Commencement Night 
A hair dresser 

Pocket Edition four English Book 
A grammarian 
A nice young man 
A date with C. K. 
To be a modern Tetrazzini 
Lloyd Schafer 
A few more freckles 
Someone to laugh with me, not at me 
Not to make so much noise 
A date with the peppiest girl in the H. S. 
To be a second Vernon Castle 



Charles R. 
Shy 

Margaret R. 
Helen B. 
Francis G. 
Jim 

Emalyn C. 
Eloise L. 
Arthur 
Kathryn K. 
Donald M. 
Grace D. 
Alice F. 
Tud K. 
Louis W. 
Mary B. 
Hamer W. 
Pete 

Florence B. 
Brunow A, 
Bob Mann. 



Mr. Phillips (in Physics) — We will first discuss platinum and then turn to iron. 

'24 — I'm doing everything I can to get ahead. 
'22 — Goodness knows you need one. 



HISTORY TEST ADVOCATED BY MARGARET RIEHL 
When was war of 1812 fought? 
From what province in France was Joan of Arc? 
Who was the author of McCauley's "History of England?" 
What two nations fought in the Spanish - American War? 
In what season of the year did Washington spend his winter at Valley Forge? 
Answer any four. 




'25 — "How many subjects is Coonie carrying?" 
'2A — "He's carrying one and dragging two." 



Pit — "Our Algebra teacher don't speak good Eng- 
lish?" 

Charlie L. — "How's thai ?" 

Pit — "V/hy, he says 'Pie are square' when it should be 
'pie is round.' " 



'22 — Nothing shallow about that man. 
'23 — No. Even his voice is deep. 



'23 — Who sits behind you the third period in the assembly? 
'23 — Don't know, Mr. Phillips is there. 



Miss Davison — Louis, how often do Senators retire? 
L. Adams — Once a day. 



MY FIRST HUNT 
The first bird I shot was a squirrel. The first time I shot him I missed him. The 
second time I hit him in the same place. Then I got sore and threw a rock at him and 
killed him. Then he fell in the river and drowned. That was the first bird I ever shot. 



Paul K. (in Senior English)— I don't get any sense out of these "love days." 

A green little Freshie, 

In a green little way, 
Sassed Mr. Phillips 

In class one day. 
Now the green little grass 

Tenderly wave, 
Over the Green little Freshie's 

Green little grave. 



'23 — What'd you get on your Science test? 

'22 — Son, if you read test papers like you do thermometers, mine would look like a 
weather report in January. 

Waiter — What part of the chicken do you wish? 
'22 — Some of the meat please. 



Miss Small — We will now name some of the lower animals beginning with Louis 
Eckstein. 



Mr. Due (in civics) — What is a criminal suit? 
E. S. — I believe they're always striped. 



Bob Mann (at class party) — "Pete, you've got your coat 
in my cocoa. 

Pete J. — "Oh, that's all right, I wore my old coat." 



Her face was happy 
His'n was stem 
Her hand was in his'n 
His was in her'n. 



Miss B. — "Tomorrow we'll take the "Floating scene 
from Ivory, "The Washing act from Lux," and "The 
scrubbing Intermezzo from Old Dutch Cleanser." 




^ ^ 



EVEN AS YOU AND I 



A Freshie there was and he went to school, 

(Even as you and I) 
He started wrong and he found a lass. 
Ever>- afternoon they cut a class. 
Then finals came and they didn't pass. 

(Even as you and I) 

A Sophie there was and he smoked cigarettes. 

(Even as you and I) 
He tried to study, but to be frank, 
He soon found that his mind was a blank, 
And lower and lower, his grades all sank. 

(Even as you and I) 



A Junior there was who played basketball. 

(Even as j'ou and I) 
As a back guard he was much intent, 
But never much on his studies bent 
And so to the tourney he was not sent. 

(Even as you and I) 

A Senior there was and he studied hard, 

(Even as you and I) 
He studied early, he studied long. 
He knew to skip for a show was wrong, 
Soon he'll sing his commencement song, 

(Even as you and I) 

Lloyd Schafer, '22. 



Miss McHenry— We will now have oral reading. 

H. D. H.— What kind is there but oral? 

Miss McHenry — Didn't you ever hear of silent reading? 

H. D. H. — No, I don't believe I've ever heard silent reading. 



Phillips (In Trig)— Did everj'one get that problem? 
Owen— Yes, sir. 

AY, THERE'S THE RUB! 
It isn't the can that annoys the dog. 

It's the fact that its tied to its tail. 
It isn't your subjects that make life hard, 

Its the number of them that you fail. 



Mr. Mitchell (in manual training test) — "Can any of 
you boys name some laying out tools?" 
Geo. Burrell — "Yeh, a billy-club." 



In days of old. 

Knights were bold 

And many adventures sought. 

In days of now 

We wonder how. 

To skip and not get caught. 



Miss Paul — "Gorden, rulers have two uses. Shall I give 
an example of the other one?" 




Miss Geile — Grace, if you'll take that gum out of your mouth, I'll enjoy it. 



Honan — What will you give me for this tie? 
McCord — Anything to keep you from wearing it. 



I am a social butterfly 
Bob Mann is my name 

I rustle all the girls about, 
I'm wise to every game. 

My voice is simply wonderful, 
I sing most everything. 

And oft in select circles 
You can hear my praises ring. 



THE BUTTERFLY 

My face I give the best of care. 

Massage it every mom, 
My hair I perfume every hour 

With fragrant Eau de Jome. 

The world approves my graceful style 
On street or dancing floor. 

You must know I'm a wonder 
'Cause I couldn't be any more. 




THE HI^H-BROW 

WHO flLWnVS 

USES Bl^ WORDS 




THE SELF-BPPO'NTED 




THE WOULD- BE 
WIT WHO UPU<JHS 
L0N<3- AND (-0U0 
P»T HIS OWW 
JOKES 




THE ^UY WHO 
US WITH fl SOUO* 




THE BRSHFUU 
^UY WHO NEVER 
SPEAKS UNLESS 
SPOKEN TO 



c 



TOLD YOU 
SO .'.' 



1 




TH6I 
QINK vA/HO SPRAINS 

HIS WRI$T TRYING 
TO PBT HIMSELP 

ON THE BF?CK 




THE SOD- POCEO 
<JUY WHO NEVER 
U nu^HS 




"HE "WePTT HER 
PROPHET"''" 



rir 




Mr. Due (irate) — As a student your in- 
telligence hardly surpasses a child's, get out! 

Gladys L. (also irate) — I'll get out all 
right, but you needn't be so smart, I've 
been canned out of lots better classes than 
this! 



Ruth — Why did kings tap knights on the 
head when they were knighted? 

Emalyne — Perhaps the stars made the 
knights more realistic. 



Bob B. — I've heard all sorts of vacation 
stories but never one yet about a tent turn- 
ing to stone. 

Kaufman — Well, it's the truth, the wind 
made it rock. 



Leslie — Do your new shoes hurt? 
Lawrence — No, but my feet do. 



Inquisitive Passer-by — Are you a student? 
Owen Carter — Naw, I'm a senior. 



A FEARFUL TRUTH 
He is to sing at the Majestic. Do you think his voice will fill that big theatre? 
No; empty it. 



Lloyd S. — Eloise, I'm crazy to have a date with you. 
Eloise — Well, if j-ou think so, you needn't. 



There was a girl named Stella, 
A boy named Jim was her fella, 

T'was love at first sight. 
So by day and by night, 

Jim was always with Stella. 



Motto of Jake Haper 
It's better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt. 



If practice makes perfect, some day Sam Nicholson will revolutionize the mathematical 
world ; he finds algebra easy after taking the second half of the first year six straight 
semesters. 



Roses are red, 

Violets are blue, 
So is a student 

When report card's due. 



Basketball Coach — Here you, don't do that — use your head. 
Toots — Oh, is that allowed? 



J. D. — Give me two bits' worth of rat poison. 

Clerk — Shall I wrap it up or do you want to eat it here? 



Miss Andrews — What three words are used most by the Seniors? 
K. K.— I don't know. 
Miss A. — Correct. 



She — Mother told me I mustn't kiss you any more. 
He — No more, but just as much. 



MIXED VOICES 
You may skip recitation My idea of good luck 

On some teachers alriglit, I can easily tell, 

But if you neglect Mr. Phillips, Get called on in class, 

You'll regret it 'fore night. Then saved by the bell. 



I'm up every night, 
Out under the moon 

So I make up my sleep 
In the assembly room. 



It may not be luck, 

But its odd — I confess. 

To flunk in recitation. 

Then make "A" on the test. 



'24 — If she gets smart with me I'll give her a piece of my mind. 
'25 — You'd be foolish to divide up a little thing like that. 



McHenry — What is the subject of this sentence, "The lazy boy never has his lesson?" 
Hedges — Me. 



Swain — It's too bad Ptolemy didn't rule in Greece. 

Becker— Why? 

Swain — Because, that's what I put on my paper. 



Bob B. — Coffee, how do you spell Constantinople? 

Coffee — I can't. 

B. B. — Can't you spell it? 

Coffee— Yes, I— T. 



Miss Davison (during current events) — After this, Wilma, learn to pronounce all 
Geographical names before you come to class. 
Wilma D. — But Miss Davison, these are names of places. 



A HIGH SCHOOL BOY'S ADVENTURE 
A high school boy came in one day Then when he thought he'd like a drink. 

Without a bite of lunch, He made a sudden stop, 

He thought he'd surely starve until And smacked his pencil on the desk 

He had a happy hunch. And drank some of the pop. 



For when the teacher called the roll, 
He snatched a piece to eat, 

And made a sandwich out of it, 
With a piece of our track meet. 



The noise he made broke up the meal, 

For the teacher now alert 
Came down and yanked him from his seat, 

And gave him his dessert. 

Neal Hennessy, 8-A. 



Teacher — What ! Did you come to class without 
your pencil? What would you think of a soldier 
without a gun? 

Charles K. — I'd think he was an officer. 



Mule in the back yard, lazy and slick. 
Boy with a pin on the end of a stick, 
Creeps up behind him quiet as a mouse. 
Crepe on the door of the little boy's house. 



E. C. — May I change my seat? 
Mr. Due — You can move, but you better leave the 
seat there. 



Mr. Mitchell is a basketball fan, 
Mr. Due is a baseball fan. 

We deduce, therefrom, that Mr. Phillips is an 
electric fan. 





THE IDEA »3 TO KNOCK 
5OMCB00Y DOWN 



A FRESHMAN'S DESCRIPTION OF HIS FIRST BASKETBALL GAME 

Well, pretty soon a bunch of fellers came runnin' out in swimmin' suits. They went 

down at one end of the room where there was a hoop hangin' from the wall and began to 

go round and round each in turn trj'in' to throw a big rubber ball in the hoop. Once in a 

while one of the boys was lucky and would axidently get the ball in the hoop, then all the 

people lookin' on would yell his name a lot and some 
stuff after it j'ou couldn't understand, and the guy 
what did the deed would prance around with his 
chest out, looking as though he owned the Masonic 
Temple. 

While all this was going on, another crew of fellers 
had been doin' the same thing at the other end of 
the room. 

After these guys had run until they were worn 
out, some fella came runnin' out from the grand- 
stand blowin' a mail-carrier's whistle, he was dressed 
in a band-man's pause, and was in his shirt sleeves. 
There's only suppoed to be five fellas on each 
team but this guy with the whistle counted them to 
be sure, then he blew his whistle and the fight begun. 
The object of the game, is to throw somebody 
down, take the ball away from him and throw it 
through the hoop. 

Sometimes the whistler don't like the way you do 
it so he takes the ball away from you and gives the 
other fellers a chance to get it by throwing it up 
and letting you scramble for it all over again. 
If you throw the ball into the hoop before the whistler 
catches you, you get 2 points but this don't do much good for 
if he sees one side's gettin' too far ahead, he whistles and gives 
the ball to the under side who get a free chance to throw it 
through the hoop. 

Once in a while a gladiator gets knocked out for the count, 
this don't stop the game long, the whistle just gets another 
guy to take his place, announces the date of the funeral and 
goes on plaj'in.' 

The side having the biggest fellers always wins because they 
can stay in the battle longer without losin' so many teeth and 
also they've got the reach on the little guys. 

No side can win a game by the eliminate process because no 
difference how many guys gets mortally wounded, there is al- 
ways more to jump in and take their places. 

Generally after a game, all the fellers are so weak that 

they have to be carried off the field on a piece of bristle board. 

There's a difference between a close game and a good game. 

Scores of good games are like 90-2 or 88-21 providin' the 

home team has the heavy end of this score. 

Close games are games where each man knocks an equal 
number of opponents out, and the score is like the score of 
an extra inning baseball game called on account of darkness. 

After close games the two teams generally have to order AFTER fl CL05[ SflMf THEY 
new swimmin' suits and solicit new members to take the places HftVE TO BUY fIfW 5WIMM/(V' 
of the ones who have lost an eye or leg in the last battle. 5UIT5 




(From a junior essay on Milton) "Milton was a great poet, who wrote "Paradise Lost,' 
Then his wife died and he wrote "Paradise Regained." 



Gladys L. — Why, don't you think I'd make a pretty good personal. 

F. L. K. (focusing his eyes) — Now you resemble a cartoon more closely. 



Miss Barbour — I'm so glad to see all the boys sitting on their side today. 




j~i o'jra^! '^L eouu uiu^ 



btEVv'Ml^L' r-| 



WILD ANIMALS I HAVE KNOWN 
(With all respect for Latin spelling). 

1. Freshmenihus — Belonging to the family of soonwill (?), verv- peculiar animal, 
tall and rather gauky. Have two legs and knee trousers. Takes at least four years to 
tame them; found often in schools. 

2. Sophomonims — Member of the knowitalls family, have a large head, food consists 
of peanuts and pink lemonade, generally found in schools or running in classes. 

3. Junioridiphtis — Come from family of alecklites; sometimes have a president and 
often go to parties, usually green and white in color; sometimes play at the basketball and 
are deadly enemies of family of seniorians. 

4. Seniorians — Belong to lookmeoverkid group, very large and highly intellectual. 
Always red and white in color, and masters of the art of skipping, and plaj-ing basketball, 
very hard to catch napping, seldom found in schools. 

5. Alumni — Members of Culeiltes family. Male species sometimes sprout cootie 
catchers, flappers have bobbed hair. 



Helen — I don't see as much of you as I used to. 
Francis G. — No, I'm losing weight. 



Donald — Can you lend me $5.00 for a month, Jim. 

Jim — Sure, if you'll tell me what a month wants with five dollars. 



Miss Andrews — George, what was Osric doing all this time? 
Geo. Wilson — He kept putting his hat off and taking it on again. 



Miss Small (in Botany) — Marian, why is there more rainfall in U. S. than in Germany? 
Marian D. — U. S. is a bigger country. 



'23 — Howdja spell "sence." 

'22 — Dollars and cents, or horse sense? 

'23 — Well, like in "I ain't seen him sence." 



Miss Andrews — Oscar, have you read "To a Field-mouse? 
Oscar — Why no. How do you get them to listen? 



Mr. Due (leading singing) — Let's sing page 5. The first and third verses and stand on 
the last verse. 



Donald — And your lips are just like rose petals. 
Grace — Really, Donald, I must say goodbye now. 
Donald — Well, let's say it with flowers. 



Soph — vou want to keep your eyes open around here. 

Fresh— What for? 

Soph — Because people will think you're a fool if you go around with them shut. 



Leslie Russell — Do you have to tell when Bunyan died? 

Faculty — Yes, Leslie. 

Leslie Russell — I thought you said only to write his life history. 



Mr. Welsh — ^Howard, I want you to recite a long sentence for once, try now. 
Howard S. — Life imprisonment. 



'23 (Pointing to statuary in Assembly Room) — Is that Riley? 
'22 — No, that's only his bust. 



Miss Barbour (reading aluod) — Oratory was born in Rome. 
Opal B. — O, was he a man? 



Mr. Phillips (after charging an electroscope)— Albert, what state is the electroscope 



now m .'' 

Albert — Indiana. 



A Dip Into the Future 

"Well, look who's here! Owen Carter!" 

"Bob Barbour — 'pon my word, of all people ! Who'd a' thot we'd a' met here ! Sit 
down, man ! Haven't seen you since — say do you realize, Barbour, since the year we gradu- 
ated ! You haven't changed a bit." 

"Nor you either, except for those red whiskers ! What are you doing these days, 

Carter? I guess I can sit down a while — have a concert on at eight at the town hall. 

Celloist, you know, in "Metropolitan Stringed Quartette." Account for yourself. Carter." 

"We — 11, I'm Justice of the Peace, Sheriff here in Clearspring, a real good doctor 

and oh yes, married! You know Frances?" 

"Not Frances Gill?" 

"Yes, but you mean Frances Carter. We're happy as larks ! Say Barbour, whatever 
has become of some of the old class of '22? We might as well have a little class meeting 
right here and now." 

"Well, I'll tell all I know, and you might put in once in a while !" 
"All right, spiel! Who'll we begin with?" 

"Might as well take up Brunow Ahlbrand, because I bumped into him the other day 
in Detroit. Private assistant to Henry Ford. I always knew Brunow had a head on him." 
"Henry Ford ! Well that's fine !" 

"Oh, I see 'em scattered here and there from time to time. You remember Francis 
Fettig? Traveling man for Campbell's Soups, and he sure gets the money. There's 
Francis Geile — saw his name in a New York paper the other day. He's joined the Brown 
Brothers' Sextette and is blowing his way to fame. Our own little quartette travels around 
a good deal, and that's why I happen to meet all of them." 

"It sure sounds good. Bob, to hear what some of the Red and White's are doing. 
I happened to go to Seymour the other day and found Shy Banta and Robert Mann 
running a department store together. They bought out Gladstein's." 

"Well say. Carter, didn't you know that Lawrence Hatfield lives just up here at 
Columbus? He opened a law office recently. He's in with John Hunter. The shingle 
reads "Hunter and Hatfield." If you've been reading some of the city newspapers you've 
probably noticed Alice Foster's name a lot. She rivals 
Susan B. Anthony and is a deep, dyed-in-the-wool speaker 
for women's rights. I guess she's responsible for Stella 
Hallowell's and Marie Kysar's being in the cabinet. It 
wouldn't be at all surprising to see one of them the first 
woman president some of these days. Then maybe all of 
us '22'ers would get government positions. 

"Why Barbour, you're full of news ! Go on, tell me 
some more." 

"Well, let's see ! Speaking of notoriety, I heard 
Louise Werning sing in a big concert in Chicago last 
month. Fern Rhodes is her accompanist. They told me 
they had joined a party of musicians that Grace Dunn is 
going to conduct on a round-the-world tour. And say 
Carter, Chester Fill is the head of a boys boarding 
rifiST WOriRn preside HT school in the East. Doesn't that beat you." They tell me 
he has written a treatise on "Boys and Their Discipline." 
"Gee, I can't get over that ! Well here's one that may surprise you. My wife came 
back from a visit in Indianapolis the other day, and she said she heard Dorothy Smith give 
a lecture to the Chamber of Commerce. She's a prominent club-women and is making 
speeches all over the state." 

"Dot Smith! Well, I'll be hanged! What's her name now?" 

"Don't know ! I've forgotten. I remember it was hard to pronounce and sort-a' aristo- 
cratic-sounding. I suppose you've lost track of 'Coffee' but I've but I've kept pretty close 
tab on him. You know he went to Yale — well, he's teaching there now. He's the greatest 
living 'Master of Dead Languages' and has written volumes on 'How to Read and Enjoy 
Virgil.' " 





BfRnuofl or^ioti cumvflrOR 



"Really, Carter? Well what about 'Hamburg' Wesner and Kysar?" 
"They're both in vaudeville. You remember they got their start in this line in the '22 
history class ! They acting now in the St. Louis Winter Gardens." 

"Well if that's so, maybe I'll run on to them sometime. 
Did you know that Jim Fenton — (prepare for the shock), 
has gone to Bermuda to take up onion growing? He left 
not long ago ! Yes, you and I both thought of Pete Julian 
at the same time. He's married isn't he?" 
"Yep, you remember Mary Brown!" 
"Really? Where are they now?" 
"Why they're running a farm-journal called Prairie 
Farmer or somethin' or other in the northern part of 
Illinois, I believe." 

"Don't say so! Anybody else before the public?" 
"Sure ! Agnes Riordan is in the movies and is an 
inhabitant of Hollywood, and Emalyn Collins has been 
rivaling Sarah Bernhardt. You remember her as Aunt 
Mary? John Deal and Constance Adams have good roles 
in this year's Follies ! So we are sure well represented 
over the footlights !" 
"Any more dope?" 
"Yes, let me think ! Kathryn Kirsch and Mathilde Kessler are trying to preserve peace 
on New York Streets, for have you heard ! They are police-women ! 

"Police women ! Gee, Bob, how do you get all this news ! They tell me Carl Malick is 
teaching science in some high school." 

"Speaking of police-women reminds me to inform you that Florence Becker is the 
present mayoress of Peoria, Illinois." 

"Well it doesn't seem possible we're all so famous I Take me, for instance." 
"Now, old boy, don't try to work on my sympathies. By the way, where's Eloise?" 
"Why, Eloise and Margaret Riehl have a beauty parlor in Cortland. Their main adver- 
tisement is 'look what it did for me.' Edith Beukman has an e'lite hat shop in Cincinnati 
that is quite select, my wife tells me." 
"Where's Paula?" 
"Teaching dancing in Hawaii." 
"And Gladys Lee? Isn't she teaching?" 
"Yes — at Peter's Switch — English history. They 
say she's perfectly devoted to her subject. Gladys Breit- 
field did study dramatic art but now she's practicing 
domestic art. She's married and lives at Hayden." 

"Ruth Robertson is near here too, at Hangman's 
Crossing. She raises Angora cats for market." 

"Cats! Cats, history, vaudeville! Some versatility! 
Have I told you I met Helen Blevins Carter in a town 
in Illinois, where we were giving a concert ? She lives 
on a big farm and is an authority on truck-gardening 
for miles around. We had a talk and she told me some 
news about Donald Miller and Lloyd Schafer, 'Dado,' 
you remember." 
"Quick, tell it!" 

"Donald is fast becoming a celebrated evangelist. 
Yes, evangelist, I said ! LIo3'd is his song leader. They 
stopped in Helen's town some time ago for revival ser- 
vices. She said she heard Hershall Ruddick give a 
political speech from the rear of a train. He's cam- 
paigning for senator there in Illinois. Paul Kamman 
is running against him." 

"Well its getting late. I'll have to run along to the concert. 
Its been great to see you !" 

"Yes, you bet. I'll be there! I have tickets for the front seat. Do your best for '22! 
What's that old motto of ours, 'Come on'— 'go on', no! 'Carry on.' That's the stufiF! 
S'long, Bob." 




flUTHORlTT on TI?UCK ^flRDEdlflQ 

Come over if you can! 



Class Will 



We, the class of nineteen twenty-two, of Shields High School, Seymour, Indiana, being 
of sound mind and disposing memory, hereby do make, declare and publish this, our last 
will and testament, and revoke all other wills heretofore made by us. 

Together we leave the school building, equipment, and grounds in charge of our suc- 
cesors and contemporaries, the Juniors. 

Robert Barbour leaves to Charles Ross his boyhood masterpiece, a volume of "Simplified 
Spelling" containing his special key to pronunciation. 

Mary Brown gives to Ethel Dunn the right to use her famous laugh which has recently 
been analyzed by Mr. Phillips and found to be unclassifiable. 

Francis Geile and John Hunter, renowned electricians depend upon Franklin Swain and 
Leslie Russell to carry on their work of mending all short circuits and fractured fuse plugs. 

Grace Dunn, Emalyn Collins, Dorothy Smith, and Kathryn Kirsch bequeath their posi- 
tions in the orchestra to the Junior Boys' penny recital Jazz Band. 

James Fenton abandons his parking space in front of the school with only the simple 
request that his successor be the owner of a Ford. Charles Linke appears to be the 
legitimate heir. 

The Senior Girls hand down all umbrellas found in their wrap hangers, to the Junior 
Girls. They belonged to them at one time or other any way. 

Arthur Kaufman and Donald Miller resign their position as official eraser testers in 
favor of George Wilson. The only requirement is that he must break in all new erasers 
by the hurling method. 

Alice Foster appoints Toots Hyatt as the High School Orator for the year* ending 
May, 1923. Margaret Riehl wills her Commercial Arithmetic note book to Lydia Kruge. 

Ray Julian and Robert Mann leave the recipe and all necessary apparatus for distilling 
Raisin Jack to the elder sons of the Houses of Honan and McCord. 

Lawrence Hatfield, Carl Malick and Francis Fettig, champion consumers of milk and 
graham crackers bestow that honor upon Maurice Haper and Hubert Hedges. 

Louise Werning leaves the title of Ass't. Musical Directress to be taken by Elma and Erma. 

Paula Breitfield and Frances Gill, drawing room flunkies, depend upon Dorothy Ma- 
homey and Ted Bartlett to keep Miss Paul supplied with paint, peanuts and pencils for the 
next school year. 

Chester Fill asks Glen Utterback to continue his work of interrupting classes at every 
half period. 

Stella Hallowell donates a keg of rouge to be sold at auction to the Junor Girls for the 
benefit of next year's Annual. 

Owen Carter and Florence Becker gave to Gladys Hudson their carefully worked out 
"Student's Guide to Skipping." This book contains useful illustrations and maps of all the 
principle and obscure skipping routes in existence. 

Constance Adams and Edith Beukman, will their bashfulness to Hershall McClintock 
and Vera Lockmund. 

Lloyd Schafer, writer and character actor, relents in his policy of superiority enough 
to appoint Arthur Becker as the future "High School Critic of Anything and Everything." 

Eloise Lee and Helen Blevins leave the position of test evaders to the Junior Boys 
with Charles Keach as acting chairman of the committee on "Ways and Means." 

Hershall Ruddick and Marie Kysar bequeath the northwest comer of room 7 to Hardin 
Hancock and Katherine James. 

Mathilde Kessler's position as leader of the "Bobbed Hair Fiends" will be left to 
"Cotton" Baldwin. 

Fern Rhodes and Gladys Breitfield leave to Florence Blain and Pearl Banta the 
responsibility of interferring 'with Mr. Phillip's radio outfit by giggle waves. 

Paul Kamman thrusts upon Lewis Adams the position of official "Knife Lender." 

Ruth Robertson and Agnes Riordan, after having considered several bids, now leave the 
task of littering up newly swept floors with torn up notes, to Harold Misamore and Clifton 
Fischbach. John Deal gives to Bob McCord the honor of official desk decorator. 

Brunow Ahlbrand and Charles Banta leave their well established taxi system to James 
Honan and Charles Ross. 

Witness our hand and seal this eleventh day of May, nineteen twenty-two. 

(Signed) The Red and Whites, '22. 



CHRONOLOGY 



September 12. Back again to the old school, 

No more fun at the swimin' pool. 

September 19. Getting acquainted with Minerva, 

The Freshmen from their classes "swerva." 

September 26. Classes closed and Donald Miller 

Will have to be an English "Tiller." 

September 30. Seniors have been invited out, 

Linke's woods to roam and scout. 

October 12. It rained, we came back under cover. 

Ever afterwards to stay with "Muvver." 

October 12. Columbus sailed the ocean blue, 

To find America for me and you. 

October 29. Now wages the class tournament, 

Seniors sing Juniors' lament. 

October 31. Hallowe'en on the 31st this year. 

November 11. This was a patriotic date 

Cause for some to stay out late. 

November 18. Seniors organized at a class meeting 

And in the voting there was no cheating. 

November 23. Senior party comes off tonight. 

All are hoping 'twill be moonlight. 

November 25. A lot of kids going to North Vernon 

Rather do that than to be "a leamin." 

November 28. Back again to these sacred halls, 

No more time for teas or balls. 

December 1. We'er always fond of bazaars. 

To think of missing study hours. 

December 9. Bazaars always cause a lot of work, 

Causing some from classes to shirk. 

December 12. Bazaar is over and a big success. 

Beyond our dreams or even guess. 

December 23. Christmas is coming, accept our cheer 

And good wishes for 'Math' next year. 

January 2. We've been making New Year resolutions. 

Oh how we'll get our Geometry solutions. 

January 8. Where, oh where, was our class President! 

Somebody please tell us where he went. 

January 16. Just one more week in this semester, 

The faculty are all using a "tester." 

February 6. After two long toilsome weeks 

The voice of "Springtime" speaks. 

February 8. When Seniors pictures were received, 

How some people were deceived ! 

February 13. Im taking my pen to write a line, 

For tomorrow we write a valentine. 

February 14. O thou clinging columbine 

Wilt thou be my Valentine? 

I know this sounds like tommy-rot. 

But do come be my hottentot. 



February 16. James Oscar begs a picture from Stella, 

It must be awful to have a regular fellow. 

February 17. Listen my children and you shall hear 

Of Miss Cobbs going away this year. 
To our eyes it brought many a tear, 
To us Miss Cobb was a friend sincere. 
And when we heard she must depart, 
It rent the strings of each little heart. 

February 23. I guess love has its own romatic way. 

Miss Hanna had on a ring to-day. 

March 2. Miss Andrews said, "Stories you rnust write, 

But not on a fishing trip or a new kite." 

March 21, Meeting today to sell chocolate bars 

And how they eat 'em, "O, my stars!" 

March 22. Patriot dedicated to the school. 

Where we ne'er disobeyed the rule. 

March 24. Jim tells us onions are hard to beat, 

Shakespeare kept them for Hamlet to eat. 

March 29. Senior Program, Eloise gave a reading, 

It was a great help tward our succeeding. 

March 31. Tomorrow is Saturday and April Fool, 

Too bad that we can't be in school. 

April 4. Miss Tilly dressed in a frock so frilly. 

Did get up, announce, she thought it silly 
For boys and girls the halls to walk 
And sit around to chat or talk. 
She said her Math, classes would disperse 
And for our grades there'd be a hearse 
If it wasn't stopped; now this bit of advice 
Should closely be heeded for 'tis very nice. 

April 6. Now Seniors lay off a few days 

For Mr. Beriault and class plays. 

April 7. Tonight Alice joins in the debate. 

Let us hope she can go to the state. 

April 21. Tomorrow is the big tract meet, 

Sej'mour will show 'em how to beat. 

April 24. Freetown won. Perfect scream ! 

But Seymour has a baseball team. 

April 28. "In the spring a young man's fancy 

Lightly turns to thoughts of love." 
It seems that this has happened 
To our little "Mitchell dove." 

May 12. Brown County ! ! ! 

May 20, Reception. 

May 21. Baccalaureate. 

May 22. "The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary," 

May 23, "Twig of Thorn — Garroters." 

May 24. Class Day. 

May 25. Commencement. 



AN APPRECIATION 

To \\\e firms <:UaV liave generously sujDport- 
ed tVie "Pa^fnoV" by VUe'ir adverVisements, 
^Ue Senior class takes Irliis opjDorl:uniVij o\ 
exbress\nd Vlieir abpreciahon and o\ |3roni- 
ising VVielr active interest in tlie growtli o\ 
Scumour. 




The B-T Furniture Co. 



"The House of "Better Home*' 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



LET US RETOP YOUR CAR 
Best Material Used 
Work done by experienced mechanics 

Tops built same day, while yon wait. 



WE REPAINT AUTOS TOO 
Paint that Looks Good and Wears 

Our equipment is first class 

May we serve you? 

AHLBRAND CARRIAGE COMPANY 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

IN THIS BOOK WERE MADE 

BY 

PLATTER & CO. 



majestic 

SEYMOUR \ CbCatrC / Indiana 

Showing the best in Spoken and Silent Drama — Intro- 
ducing the world's best stars. 

Just finish the day 

In the right sort of way 

In the evening when you are at leisure, 

Come and be seen 

Looking up at the screen 

At the best, in our "Palace of Pleasure." 

We feature our music by the Majestic Orchestra, Chas. 
Sewell, leader. 



WE HAVE 

Diamonds, AVatches and Jewelry of e\'ery kind. 

Plus Fair Prices and a Service that Aims to Protect Your Interest 
as We "Would Our Own. 

GEORGE F. KAMMAN 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 



Phone 249 



Seymour, Indiana 



BAKE-RITE 
BAKERY 

THE HOME OF FRESH BREAD 
Phone 456 



BILL BOOKS 

AND 

PASS CASES 

FOR 

THE GRADUATE 
J. FETTIG CO. 





Telephone 472 


THE 
RACKET STORE 


DOMESTIC STEAM 
SOFT WATER LAUNDRY 




WANTS YOUR 




TRADE 


Cor. Second and Pine Streets 




First Class Work 



PRICE'S PLACE 

PURE SODAS, ICE CREAM, 

CANDIES AND FINE CIGARS 

FOREIGN, TROPICAL and 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

North Chestnut Street 

SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



Phone R-603 205-207 E\ving St. 

PAULEY & SON 

DODGE BROS. 

MOTOR CARS 

SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



CENTRAL GARAGE AND AUTO CO. 

Dealers in 

BUICK AND DORT CARS 

Day and Night Service 

Rear of Post Office 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

SEYMOUR GREENHOUSES 

Phone 58 



W. H. Booth, Pres. Dr. H. Lett, Secy. H. Thompson, Treas. 

FARMER'S CO-OPERATIVE ELEVATOR CO. 

FEEDS, FLOUR, GRAIN and SEEDS 
COMPLETE LINE OF FARM SUPPLIES 

FARMERS HEADQUARTERS 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



۩L@MEAL FLOei 



iK^Sotonists used 

BUSH FLOUP^ 




lAL FLOUR 



On a flour sack 
means the same 
as "Sterling" on 
silverware. It is 
an absolute guar- 
antee of the qual- 
ity of the product 



i-ffiC\:,,^m Bl»t Ov.r lOO^ittfrir" >l" 

i^ trot (ruJF.tkcr o( >L< ,a^^m oi til 

6li.k M,llu>e Comply =,ti^\.=i > tios«« 

nil! IS tlie vjcmity of tbc prcMSI bu<uiu» 



Blish Milling Company 

SEYMOUR . . INDIANA 



Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

SEYMOUR NATIONAL BANK 

CLEAN BANKING 
UNDER GOVERNMENT CONTROL 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



BICYCLE REPAIRING 
A SPECIALTY 



Complete Line of 



SUNDRIES 



TIRES AND 

BICYCLES, 

CARLON HARDWARE 
COMPANY 



Compliments of 

F. J. VOSS & SON 



PERRY WHITE 



Barber 



Seymour 



Indiana 



Have Your 

CLEANING and 
PRESSING 

Done by 

F. SCIARRA 

Phone R-317 

South Chestnut St. 

Seymour - - - Indiana 



THIRTY-TWO YEARS OF 

SATISFACTORY SERVICE IS A 

RECORD TO BE PROUD OF 




sl^wi^*'"'"™'"""'' 



ONE STANDARD— 

ALWAYS THE BEST 

FOR THE PRICE PAID 



PRINCESS THEATRE 

23 South Chestnut Street. 

Now showing the Highest Quality of Entertainment 
that Can Be Produced on the Screen, and Feel it is a 
Great Pleasure to Give Seymour Picture Lovers THE 
BEST as Paramount and First National Pictures are 
considered — Best Produced. 



Coal. Cold Storage Ice 

USE 
RAYMOND CITY COAL 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 

EBNER ICE AND COLD STORAGE COMPANY 

distributors 
Seymour : : : : : : : : Indiana 



GAS AND OIL 

FILLING STATION 

Opposite Post Office 

TRI- STATE OIL CO. 



F. H. HEIDEMAN 

PARAMOUNT PHONOGRAPHS 

FURNITURE PIANOS RUGS 
LINOLEUM 



114-116 S. Chestnut St. 
SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



BRUNOW CIGAR STORE 

Local Agents for 
REACH SPORTING GOODS 

See us for your 

BASEBALLS, BATS, GLOVES, 
FISHING TACKLES, ETC. 



J. H. POLLERT H. W. AUBKE 

SEYMOUR HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE, STOVES AND 

FURNACES 
FIELD SEED 
WIRE FENCING, SLATE AND 

TIN ROOFING 
REPAIR WORK, ETC. 



Phone 718 



118 S. Chestnut St. 



THE 
RACKET STORE 

WANTS YOUR 
TRADE 



LIGHT HEAT POWER 

Phone 499 

INTERSTATE PUBLIC 
SERVICE CO. 



South Chestnut Street 
Seymour - - - Indiana 



m^' 



— From an educational 
and scientific standpoint, 

"ECONOMY'^ 

is one of the most 

necessary and prominent 

topics of the day. 



The "GOLD MINE" 



FIXTURES BULBS 

ELECTRIC LABOR-SAVING APPLIANCES 

SYDNEY WASHERS TORRINGTON VACUUM 

Bacon Electric Shop 

Dealers of 
WILLEY'S LIGHTS 

7 N. Chestnut Street Seymour, Indiana 

PROMPT DELIVERY 

Out-of-Season VEGETABLES and FRUITS 
Privilege of Weekly Payments of Accounts 

Personal attention to the individual wishes and tastes of our customers 
These and every other possible QUALITY GROCERIES 

service VfE FURNISH WITH OUR 



PEOPLE'S GROCERY 

Exclusive Agents for OLD MASTER Coffee 

Phone Main 170 

Second and Chestnut Streets SEYMOUR, INDIANA 

THE QUALITY STORE 

SEYMOUR DAILY TRIBUNE 

Jay C. Smith, Publisher 

United Press Leased Wire News. 

Woman's Fancy Work Illustrated. 

Continued Story Every Day. 

Sunday School Lessons, Fridays. 

Farm Information. 

Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Chicago Market Reports. 

New York Stock Exchange Reports. 

"Bringing Up Father" Comic Strip Every Day. 

All the Local and County News. 

Something for Every Member of the Family. 

THE HOME NEWSPAPER OF SEYMOUR 



THE TRAVIS CARTER COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 
HIGH GRADE MILL WORK, VENEERED DOORS and INTERIOR FINISH 

Dealers in 

LUMBER, SHINGLES, LATH, SASH and DOORS 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



LOUIS G. HEINS 

The Butcher 

FRESH AND CURED MEATS, 

SAUSAGES OF ALL KINDS 
POULTRY, OYSTERS 
FISH AND GAME 

IN SEASON. 



CARPETS STOVES 

A. H. DROEGE 

FURNITURE DEALER 

South Chestnut Street 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



WM. N. FOX 
Electric Shoe Shop 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

No. 9 West Second Street 

Quality Service 



GO TO 

SPANAGEL'S 

FIRST CLASS BARBER SHOP 
First Class Service 



/Ibthiers sEy/nyuR. 

Hot Weather Clothes 




You ^et the best style, you 
^et the finest quality, you 
get expert tailoring, your 
clothes keep shape, you 
pay a low price. 



We will show you fine Dixie Weaves; Beau- 
tiful Silk Suits, Mohair Suits and other cool 
fabrics; in sizes for every figure. 



USE MILK FOR ECONOMY 

USE 

Swengle Dairy & Company's Pastuerized for Safety 



WE CLAIM 

That we are Specialists in High School Athletic Equipments 
Give us a trial for your Individual or High School Needs. 

SMITH - HASSLER - STRUM CO. 

219-221 Massachusetts Avenue Indianapolis, Indiana 

SCHOOL OF SPECIALIZATION 

Wlien you are ready, enter here, and your whole time, thought 
and energy ^^'ill be concentrated upon preparing for certain, definite, 

SPECIFIC service IN BUSINESS. 

Our school will be in session all summer. We never close. So, 
just as soon as you are ready, you can start here. You can make every 
dav count. 

For "BUDGET OF INFORMATION" and full particulars, see, 
wTite or telephone Fred W. Case, Principal. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Pennsylvania and Vermont— First Door North Y. W. C. A. INDIANAPOLIS 



1882 1922 

THE TEACHERS COLLEGE OF INDIANAPOLIS 

A Standard Normal School 

Offers the following courses : 

Kindergarten and Primary 

Home Economics 

Public School Music 

Public School Art 

Rural and Graded School 

Special classes for teachers of experience 

Special classes for review of the common branches. 

Send for catalog giving dates of registration. 
Eliza A. Baker, President, 
23rd and Alabama Streets, Indianapolis, Indiana 



FINE CLOTHING AND SHOES 

RICHART'S 

East Second Street 
Opposite Interurban Station 



SEYMOtTB 



Indiana 



JAMES DEMAS 

WISHES YOU 

GOOD LUCK 

THE SPARTA 




BATTERIES 

ALL MAKES OF BATTERIES 

RECHARGED and REPAIRED 
Work Guaranteed 

GEORGE & McDONGAL 

Battery Service 

Phone 550 

113 East Second St. 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



WILLIAMS GARAGE 

STUDEBAKER 
MOTOR CARS 

Phone 112 

EwiNG & Third, 

Seymour - - - Indiana 



COLLEGIANT CLOTHES 

They Keep You Looking Your Best 
Styles for Men of 17 to 70 

AStei|Iwedel&5oH 

Seymour's Greatest Store for Men and Boys. 



DRESSES, 



SUITS, 



WAISTS, 




COATS 



DRY GOODS STORE 
Two Entrances— Second and Chestnut SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



The call to greater service is 
heing sounded. This is a day 
of specialization. 



Train for business by enrolling in the 
SEYMOUR BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

"The School that makes a 

Specialty 
of each individual student." 

SEYMOUR BUSINESS COLLEGE 



Seymour 



Indiana 




A COMPLETE DRUG STORE 
FEPERMANN'S 

Service and Quality 
West Second Street 



Joe's Pop Corn is crispy, 

evenly seasoned and fine. 
And it's a sack for a nickle 
Or a big sack for a dime. 

JOE'S POP CORN SHOP 

110 W. Second Street 



CIGARS TOBACCOS 

F. H. GATES & SON 

MORSE'S AND LOWNEY'S 
BOX CANDY 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



HODAPP & WIETHOFF 

Offer 

A LINE OF 

SPRING AND SUMMER HATS 

AND TRIMMINGS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus 75,000.00 

C. D. Billings President 

0. H. Montgomery Vice-President 

John A, Keegler Cashier 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 
WE PAY 3% ON TIME DEPOSIT 



UNION HARDWARE CO. 




PAINTS, OILS, 


W. H. REYNOLDS 


VARNISHES, GLASS, 


CASH STORES 


BUILDING MATERIAL 


21 So. Chestnut — 3rd and Ewing 




Groceries at Bottom Prices 


South Chestnut Street 


Give Us a Call and Be Convinced. 


Seymour - - - Indiana 





NEWKIRK'S BARBER SHOP 

For Those Who Care 
BATHS— Tub and Shower 



THE JACKSON COUNTY LOAN 
& & AND TRUST COMPANY & & 



OUR SAVINGS DEPARTMENT PAYS 
3 PER CENT COMPOUND INTEREST 



J. H. Shea, President 

J. B. Thompson, Vice-President 



J. P. Matlock, Secretary 
J. V. RicHART, Treasurer 



J. P. HoNAN, Trust Officer 



GROUB'S BELLE BRAND COFFEE 

THE BEST COFFEE ON THE MARKET 
REGARDLESS OF PRICE 

When Ordering Canned Goods Specify 

Groub's Belle 



L. L. DOWNING CONFECTIONERY 

SOFT DRINKS ICE CREAM 

CIGARS TOBACCOS PIPES 

SEYMOUR : : : : : : : : : : INDIANA 



KESSLER HARDWARE CO. 

WE CARRY EVERYTHING 
FOR THE 

FISHERMAN 



M. HUBER & BRO. 

WALKOVER 

AND 

ARCH PRESERVER 
SHOES 

Second Street 

Seymour - - - Indiana 



Drugs and chemicals for use in compounding prescriptions should 
be of highest purity and strength. 

The care with which we select our drugs and chemicals has won 
for our store the reputation of being 



THE QUALITY DRUG STORE 



We Take Caee 



LOERTZ DRUG STORE 



Phone 116. 



No. 1 East Second Street 



CANDY 



Trade at 
MIX'S 



SODAS 



TOBACCO 



FRUITS IN SEASON 



MAGAZINES 



SOMETHING GOOD TO EAT AT ALL TIMES 



PALACE RESTAURANT 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 



SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNERS 



Oh Jimmy — your book 
is just splendid!" 




Will your Classmates say 
your Annual is splendid? 



Getting out an Annual is a big job— but one you'll 
enjoy too. If your book is a good one you'll win 
sudden popularity and the compliments of every 
one. You can afford to put your best efforts into 
the work you have been chosen to do. 

But you don't need to do it all alone. Here's help 
for you. The Service Department of the Indian- 
apolis Engraving & Electrotyping Company will 
help you get out a better book and solve your hard- 
est problems. Ask for more information. 



Write for Ihh fret 
inoi — If »■>// ielfi 







INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING & 
ELECTROTYPING COMPANY 

Annual Engravings Commencement Invitations 

222 EAST OHIO STREET. INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 



0^ 




Heckman 

BINDERY. INC. 

BouQd-Tb-Please' 

JULY 04 

N. MANCHESTEa INDUUW46S62