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Full text of "The patriot"

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GENEALOGY 
977.202 
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1923 




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ID Oft SCYOOUR HIGH SCHOOL 

we cne class of nineteen 

caencY-amee Deweace cms 

ocjr annaflL 



Tbomas Abbott Mott 
Superintendent of Public Schools 




4 



7 



Kate Ferris Andrews 
Principal of Shields High School 



BoaRP of epcieaciOD 




Albert H. Ahlbrand 
President 



Edward Massman 
Secretary 



R. J. Barbour 
Treasurer 




Hipper? 

CflLencs 




Gladys Hudson, '23. 

CYRUS Holmes, Taney Town's big postmaster, leaned through the post- 
master's window, talking to a small girl, Dodo, aged five, who was much 
enthused about talking to Uncle Cy. 

"Come, Dora. Come here at once," a woman's voice called sharply. 

Almost before Cyrus Holmes realized it, the little visitor was whisked away 
out of his sight by her mother, who never wanted Dodo to talk to Uncle Cy. 
And Cyrus wondered. 

At the supper table Cyrus wondered again. Mother was unusually quiet. 
Even Bee, their youngest daughter, and the only one at home now, was silent, 
although usually such a chatterbox. Soon the feeling that he was being watched 
became unbearable. 

"What's the matter that Bee isn't going to the dance with Dan?" He 
asked slowly, turning to his wife. "If it's the clothes, we'll manage that." 

"It's not the clothes, but I think there's some trouble between Dan and 
Bee," she stammered, and set hurriedly to picking up the dishes. 

' Cyrus arose and ambled off to the barn, followed by Dickie, the ancient 
spaniel. Amid the clutter of miniature houses, in his work room under the 
rafters he began to think. 

Once he had longed to be a great architect, so when the children came he 
built doll houses for them. Gradually his children grew up and the little girls 
of Taney Town all brought Uncle Cy bits of flowered silk and wall paper, lace 
from candy boxes and the like, and adored him as he formed the tiny trifles 
into lace curtains, and dimunitive upholstered chairs. 

He especially adored all things Elizabethan, and occupied himself in copy- 
ing in detail an Elizabethan banquet hall with it's great oak table, it's tapestries 

and armor. . 

Cyrus pressed Dickies head tightly between the palms of his hands, rose 
and groped for the lantern near by. For a long time bending there in the 
flickering light of the lantern, he worked in utter content at a morsel of difficult 
carving. 



Dan's voice carried to him from the gateway where he heard, "Why, your 
father-". The words trailed off into nothingness. "If you won't understand 
then— I won't go to the dance with you," he heard from Bee. 

What ever the fault it was not Dan's, he thought, as he slipped into the 
kitchen dour. Why had his name been mentioned in the talk at the gate? 

The following day Miss Polly Primsall, who saw Cyrus dressing a little 
colonial lady to rule over a colonial house (and which he had smuggled down 
to the postoflice to work on during slack hours) declared, "It's wors'n Sam 
Dean who knits. There's some sense in his knitting." 

( V, who overheard the expression, knew she was comparing him to a man 
who had a mind like a woman's. This contempt touched him in a raw spot. 

The first real blow fell on the following morning, however, when Tom 
Dillon, President of the Union Bank and the big political man of Taney Town, 
quietly informed Cy that he was serving his last term as postmaster. Yet Cy 
had been so faithful to his work, and moreover without a single complaint 
from Dillon. 

Cyrus finished the morning routine and found himself alone in his own 
barn loft. There was something back of it — Tom Dillon who had been a friend 
from school days; and if Tom switched there was a reason. He had felt for 
a wick as if something was working against him; as though the whole town 
had a secret from which he alone was shut out. 

Sitting there by the open window Cyrus heard voices and a sound like 
falling pebbles. Mother and Bee were shelling peas on the back porch. 

" It's been growing on him," sighed Mother, "But you are a foolish girl, 
Bee. Dan's folks would get over it." 

" 1 tell yon I can't do it. Dan is hard to manage, Mother. If I could only 
get away." 

"We've got to be careful, though. Dad mustn't suspect it. If we could 
only get the play houses away from him, and get his mind on something else." 

So that was it—. The meaning of the misunderstanding between Bee and 
Dan. tin reason Dodo was no longer safe with him, and the reason he could no 
longer be postmaster. They thought he, Cyrus Holmes was insane. 

Hi- would show them. He would burn the doll houses, and stay home 
nights, reading the newspaper as other men did. The people were fools, every 
one "f them, 

Ha.k at the postoffice he sat brooding over the little colonial house when 
suddenly the door slammed and standing before him was a vision. A child 
golden hau and shell-pink daintiness suggested a fairy princess done in 
jrster-eoiora The child stood laughing up at Cyrus. She reminded him of 
Dodo, Lot instead of being round like a gum drop, she was fragile like a rose 
Petal, and he realised that her frock was unknown in the little town of Taney. 
S\Kia. oh. Sylvia." called a woman's voice which Cyrus knew to be 
Itrange. "Naughty girl," scolded the mother, "She runs away." 



She took the child in her arms and inquired of Cyrus, "Is there a hotel 
here?" 

"Taney Town has one hotel," stammered Cyrus, "but who wants such a 
fairy child as that to be taken to that dingy place? We have a spare room, so 
come home with me." 

' ' Hugh, dear, ' ' she said, wheeling to face the dark-skinned young man who 
entered. "The postmaster says he's a spare room." 

"It's mighty fine of you. My name's Laidlow — my wife and child." 

' ' And I 'm Cyrus Holmes. ' ' 

Supper went well. Mr. and Mrs. Laidlow hailed from New York and were 
jolly young people. Mrs. Laidlow and Mother talked of jams while Sylvia 
played with Dickie. Cyrus, finding himself superfluous slipped away to the 
loft when the meal was over. 

Dickie padded after him, Sylvia trailing. On the threshold she caught her 
breath. "Oh," she cried, dropping to the floor bfeore the little colonial house. 
"Sylvia's house." 

"Does Sylvia like it now?" 

"But now, Uncle Cy's forgotten. We're going to make a bon-fire out of 
this great big beautiful house. Sylvia can watch it burn." 

"No." cried the child, stamping her foot. "No, Sylvia's house." And 
suddenly bursting into tears she ran sobbing from the barn. 

Cyrus was still standing helpless when she returned dragging her mother 
with her. "Why, it's colonial. Even the spinning wheel," exclaimed Mrs. 
Laidlow. Her glance leapt from one house to another. 

"Claire's crazy over colonial stuff," her husband remarked coming in. 
"You've struck her hobby. She haunts unique places." 

"But you've struck something else," he said, eyes narrowing. I sold a doll 
house to a wealthy customer last Christmas for a hundred and fifty dollars. 
I'm in the business, and if I had a couple of these for window features — " 

"Down here in a little town like this, when he's so marvelous. Why, Hugh, 
it isn't right. Anyone who can design things like this ought to do something 
big, Mr. Holmes." 

"I was going to, once." Cyrus' eyes were vague like an old man's "but 
I been building doll houses so long, I doubt if I could ever do anything else." 

"Bosh," cut in the younger man. "The value of the things is in the 
uniqueness. ' ' 

Later mother found an envelope in the house containing fifty dollars from 
Mrs. Laidlow for the doll house. 

"Seems like robbery," said Cy, "but I guess Mr. Laidlow knows. Here 
Bee, take this money and go to the dance tonight, will you?". 

His daughter stared at the money in bewilderment; then took the note 
from her mother's hand and read it twice. 



( , n a September morning two months later, Cyrus sat in the postoffice and re- 
read the amazing article on "Uncle Cy-The Man Who Builds Doll Houses 
Tme, it was only a little "People Who Are Doing Curious Things article 
■queered into a half a page; but the magazine was very prominent. 

Even Tom Dillon was urging Cy to start his bank account with the Union 
Hank, for, he pointed out to Cy, that so much money left around the house 
might be stolen. 

• ■ Wt-11. I might consider giving Bee the position she wanted," laughed 

Dillun. 

■So, she and Dan are going to be married, I think," replied Cy. 

"I see," twinkled Dillon, "and I can't say I'm surprised." 

Tom left ( !y in a splendid stupor which he came out of to find Dodo's small 
fae tilted toward him. His heart fell— she covered her face with a tiny hand 
as if in fear. But wait— she was peeping at him through spreading fingers, 
laughing. Cyrus was only conscious of the smiling neighbors as he swung her 
Dp to the window ledge. 

"Could Uncle Cy use pretty stones that Dodo finds, could he?" she asked, 
patting his cheek. 

"Pretty stones?" His hand clasped over her sticky fists. "Why Uncle 
Cy could use pretty stones any number of ways." 



A 



a sap rfiLe 



Alice Cobb 

small round hole, a little mouse, 

The mouse creeps from, his tiny house. 

A square steel trap with grim aspect, 
Has many a mouse's family wrecked. 

Within the trap the mousie sees 
A golden, luscious piece of cheese. 

The mousie doubts, yet tempted feels, 
And toward that piece of cheese he steals. 

A frightened squeak, a sinister snap, 
And mousie 's caught in the cruel trap. 

So h t me then the moral map, 

Where there it cheese, beware the trap! 



eyenmG 

Francis Eu Daly, '23. 

THE sun is sinking in the west, 
The day is done. 
The birds fly homeward to their nests, 
The whole wide world is seeking rest, 
Low sinks the sun. 

The last light zephyr has gasped out, 

Night's mantle falls, 
The blundering beetle drones about, 
The cock gives out a final shout, 

The night wind calls. 

The bull-frog in the marsh below 

Begins his song, 
The robin in the dark hedge-row 
Sings sleepily. The fireflies glow, 

Shadows are long. 

The first faint star turns up it's light 

And twinkles clear, 
The faithful watchman of the night. 
Above all, God, who guides aright 

Till day appear. 

CH6 BLUe-BIRD 



I 



Edna Peters 

know of one who has no care 

His joy is free for all, 
He travels miles without a fare 

Singing his song for all. 

With freedom from the world he sings 

His little song so true, 
Indeed, 'tis happiness that brings 

The little bird of blue. 



PTS 



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CHC COflf) 6)H0 CUB&6D. 





Franklin Swain, '23. 



DISK was settling over the city when two gentlmen seated themselves near 
the open grate fire in a private room of the most exclusive men's club 
in New York. One, whom we shall call The Man, was rather tall and 
well bllilt with dark hair, faintly tinged with gray. The man's features were 
not of unusual type except that there was a long white scar under his chin 
running all the way across, but scarcely noticeable unless his head was thrown 
backward. The other was The Cynic, who was slightly shorter and who looked 
to be forty years old, about the same age of his companion. Both wore evening 
elothee and both looked to be successful. 

The Cynic leaned forward and stirred the dying embers of the fire, which 
immediately blazed forth, sending a shower of sparks which shot upward for a 
fraction of a moment, then died again. 

"How like a dormant being who receives an inspirational stirring up and 
blazes forth with all the fire and energy of youth, only to die out from lack of 
repeated encouragement," observed the Man. 

"True indeed, my friend," was the Cynic's rejoining answer. 

The fire was the only means of illumination in the room and it cast strange 
grotetqne yd beautiful flickering shadows on the walls and ceiling. Neither 
■poke for several minutes, but were engrossed in the fantastic figures made by 
the tongues of flame as now and then they leaped up, only to vanish again. 

"I must thank you kindly for the gracious hospitality tendered me by your 
dab, while I am in your city," said the Man. 

"Pleaee do not mention it. 'Birds of a feather, '—you know. We are both 
led in steel. But let us make the best of the passing time. Pardon my 

forgetfulnea, but you arc leaving ?" 

\t eight o'dock. We haven't long," said the Man. 

They both lapsed into a reverie, gazing into the fire. Finally, the Cynic 

Moil the silence. 

I his || a world of misdemeanor, penitence and forgiveness, is it not?" 
no a«kfd. 



" Ah ! Perhaps you are thinking of the Governor's pardon to James Ruskin, 
the forger." 

''Exactly. I do not approve of giving pardons as Christmas gifts to world- 
renowned law-breakers," said the Cynic. 

"Perhaps it is for the best. He might 'go straight' as they say." 
"Bah! He might discover a fifth dimension, but — ah, quite improbable, 
you know." 

"Pardon my frankness, my gracious host, but you are a bit, ah — cynical, 
are you not? Will you try one?" the man asked, extending a case of cigars. 

"Thank you. No, I believe a man cannot be changed morally after his 
twentieth year. I base my statements upon statistics. In their parlance, 'Once 
a crook, always a crook'." 

"Then perhaps you would care to listen to an interesting little story, at 
least it seems so to me," said the Man. 

' ' Certainly, if you please. ' ' 

"The Man lighted his cigar, expelled the smoke, and began: 

"It was fifteen years ago. I was acquainted with a young man, very well 
acquainted, in fact, with this man who had nothing in the world to worry about. 
His father had died, leaving him a small fortune in some mining stock in Chile. 
He 'lived high' until one day there came a sharp decline and the bottom dropped 
out of his stock. He was left penniless and without vocational training of 
any kind. He sought work but in vain. His reputation had been that of a 
spendthrift, an idler, and so he tried the more questionable means. Newspapers 
of his town, for the next few months carried accounts of small burglaries and 
thefts, person or persons implicated unknown. There came a larger attempt. 
This boy next tried to rob the offices of a large steel foundry in a town of about 
sixty thousand. Would that God might have put this incident in his path 
sooner. He gained entrance to the building and knelt in front of the safe. 
After repeated attempts at the dial failed to open the heavy door, he became 
less cautious. One can imagine his surprise and dismay, when, upon seeing the 
lights turned on, he wheeled about and found the night-watchman staring 
mildly at him. 

" 'I imagine that is nerve racking work,' said the watchman. The boy 
was speechless with fright." 

Here the Man leaned forward and nicked the ashes in the glowing embers 
of the fire. Had he chanced to glance at the Cynic he would have seen him 
lean forward with an expression of incredulity on his face. 

' ' The boy seemed to realize his position and sat down limply in a chair. 

" 'My God! why am I doing this?' he cried." 

" 'Yes, why are you doing this?' the watchman said quietly. He crossed 
to the chair and placed his hand on the boy's back." 



" 'This is an embarrassing position,' he continued, 'but you are young; you 
have the world before you, and forty years possibly in which to atone and 
counteract. My boy, it docs not pay.' " 

"There followed a silence, as still as death, in which the office clock could 
be beard as though it were measuring off the centuries of eternity. Then the 
watchman fumbled in his pocket, brought forth a crumpled bill and extended 
it to the boy. He looked up in surprise." 

• Take it, son,' said the watchman, 'and go East or West for a fresh 
start.'" 

<< ' Why— I— y-you— I couldn't take it.' " 

" 'Consider it as a trade, then. I'll give you ten dollars for your lantern.' 

The boy arose unsteadily and extended his hand. The watchman grasped it 

and removed his hat." Here the Man glanced at his watch, then continued, 

"Together they passed out the door into the dark street." The Man arose and 

.1 to his hat and coat. 

"It is getting late. My train leaves shortly but I will finish hurriedly. The 
last thing the watchman said was, 'Try it all over again, my boy. Life is 
beautiful if it is seen from the right side, and remember, a good name is the 
most valuable asset a man may have.' The boy promised the watchman he 
would try to succeed and he has. There, my friend, are you convinced?" 

"I am. And I see you have become a success." The Cynic rose while the 
Man whirled around, facing him, and continued, "I was the night watchman 
that night" 

opp accipenrs 



I 



Keith Brackemyre, '23. 

SAW a cow slip through the fence 

A horse fly in the store; 
I saw a board walk up the street, 

A stone step by the door. 

I saw a mill race up the road, 
Morning break the gloom; 

I saw a night fall on the lawn, 
A clock run in the room. 

I saw a peanut stand up high, 

A sardine box in town; 
I saw a bed spring at the gate, 

An ink stand on the ground. 



eueninG nc ch£rod abbcy 



T 



Osborne Fisciibach, '23. 

HE setting sun with wistful glow 

Shines o'er the the ivy-covered wall — 
It's last faint gleams in glory fall 
Through a small chink into a cell 

Of Brother Ambrose deep immersed 

In prayers, 
The which he oft rehearsed. 

And as the holy man turned o'er 
The beads with many an ave 
And trembling pater noster grave, 
The last dim tokens of the day 

Shone on his old and seamed face 

And piercing eyes — 
He seemed as in a hallowed place. 

And now the cloister bell peals forth, 
Ah! Tintinabulum so clear, 
So free, so bright, and yet so drear. 
Whence thy power o'er mind and heart 
To sorely try — exhilirate 

By strains 
Thy limpid tones reverberate. 

Faster and faster falls nocturnal gloom; 
The strident frog begins to sing, 
The cricket green virbates its wing, 
And other sounds of like import 

Re-echo through the sultry night, 

And such a night! 
By angels, spirits, genii bedight. 

"Clink, clank'"' the weighty gates are heaving to — 
The porter's light weaves in and out 
As to his cot he takes his route. 
Hush! All is still! All'd quiet! 

Within the hall the brothers all 
Are sleeping. 



fOflKJDG GOOP WICH PflP 

Edith Zimmerman, '23. 

HIS name was Son. There wouldn't be any better and bigger name for a 
four-year-old. His mother was a little woman with a disposition of 
captivating exactness. Yes, her son was just like her. 
was well liked by his grandparents, and uncle and aunts, and could 
have bad as many homes as he desired. First of all there was the home of his 
mother and father. Then that of his grandmother Perkins' home and his grand- 
Diother Bolliater'8 home. But the first and second were the ones he liked best. 
Mother, auntie and all the grandparents thought Son as nearly perfect as a 
child could be. Only his father was not satisfied with the perfection, and at 
times would grumble thus: 

•• I tell you Betsy, he's too good to be true. You take a thing from him — 
does he howl I No. It isn't natural. Now I ask you, what kind of a man is 
he going to make, it* he fails to develop some spunk?" 

"Wait," was always Betsy's answer. "You forget because he is so big 
thai ho is only a four-year-old." 

"Yes, but a four-year-old who wears a six-year-old suit isn't a baby," 
retorted father. 

Son wasn't like the other boys of the neighborhood. For whenever other 
boys plucked a flower Son would do his best at repairing their damage by 
replanting it. 

Son's father was a college man even if at times he alluded to his son as 
a "mush head." 

When Son's Aunt Margaret wrote letters sending him kisses of crosses, he 
would counl them carefully and slip them into his pocket and keep them until 
a time came f<> redeem them. 

" ^ -mi can'1 beal him at a love game," his father exploded contemptuously 
MM Sunday morning after he had come upon Son searching the hamper of 
soiled clothes for the discarded suit of the day before. 

"Mj Aunt Marg's tisscs," Son explained as he fished the kisses out and 
I"" them in the pockel of the white linen suit he had on. 

"Mush head," commented his father. His Auntie Marg was coming that 
md Su„ W as going out to watch for her. So he went forth— wide blue 
eontented eyes beneath a crop of curly yellow hair. 

•"• reached the street he came upon six-year-old Ted Jones, the bully 

red s mother had just been disciplining him by making him 

• little sister's shoes, and help his little brother into his clothes. By 

revenge, Ped was kicking the tree in front of Son's house with all his 



might and main, there being in sight no living thing with which he could 
pick a fight. 

"Hello, Ted," Son said in his genial manner. Ted gave the tree an even 
more vicious kick. Ted looked at Son's satiny legs as if he were wishing that 
they stood where the tree did. 

"You waitin' to see Auntie Marg come?" beamed Son. 

"Shut up," came from the other. 

"My Auntie is coming." He smiled unconcernedly and was turning away 
when fate took a hand. 

Inside Son's pocket his hand was closed over those kisses. He brought 
them forth and displayed them proudly. 

"See my Auntie Marg's tisses, Ted? See, one, two, three, four, five." 

Ted spat contemptuously on the ground. "Who cares for your Aunt 
Marg?" he growled. Then with a quick ugliness he snatched the paper from 
Son's hand and tore it into bits and scattered it to the winds. After which he 
looked at Son with the expression "Well, what are you going to do about it?" 

At first Son's lip quivered, then something inside him began to boil. Next 
his hands were clenched and he shot forward like a shot. 

It was a whirlwind fight while it lasted. The two figures seemed as one. 
Now they were down, rolling, striking. 

From a window two people were watching. They had seen the start. As 
they watched Betsy rung her hands and wept, Avhile her husband held her 
with a merciless grip from interference. 

"Let him finish, let him finish." 

"He'll be killed," sobbed Betsy. "Oh, let me go." 

"Ted's going home," said father. 

Son brushed a hand across his eyes. There was a scratch across his cheek 
and a growing bump on his forehead, and his white linen suit was dirty. But 
Son w r asn't thinking of himself. With careful diligence he was gathering up 
the scraps of the precious paper. Then he made for the house and came in. 

"He tore up my Auntie Marg's tisses. That's why I fought him." 

Son's father coughed as he realized that Son knew that he had done some- 
thing wrong. It was up to him to give the child a lecture. But how could he 
when he was filled with the keenest satisfaction? Then noticing that Son and 
mother were rushing into each other's arms, he quietly loft the room. 

Outside the door he said to himself, "He's my son, all right, but who would 
have thought that of him." Then he laughed and taking his hat slipped 
outdoors. 



if? cm aiomirn 



T 



Alice Cobb 

HE afternoon light is fast fading 

As the sun 

Anxious to reach his destination beyond 

The horizon 

Hastens with increased speed 

Westward. 

The western sky is ablaze with glory, 

And the waning light of the sun gradually 

Blends with the marvelous rainbow 

Of the sunset and is at last lost 

In the glorified heavens, 

And it is dusk. 

A soft brooding peace falls over the world, 

And silence, like a winged messenger from the sky 

Steals over the earth. 

It envelopes the most remote corners, 

And all is still 

Save for the gentle cooing of the turtle-dove, 

The subdued sounds of crickets, 

And a few last sleepy chirps of birds hardly awake. 

A gray cloud gently enfolds 

The silent world, 

For a few moments it remains 

Then comes the night like a peaceful 

Angel of Rest 

And the moon like a guardian angel. 

The little stars twinkle cheerfully 

And rival the village lights 

In brightness. 

Then the lights disappear 

But the stars remain 

And the moon sheds her benign brilliance 

( hrer all. 

And the world sleeps. 



WHflc po coe speaK ? 



W 



HAT do we speak as the days roll by, 
To sing and smile or to pout and cry? 
Do we do our share in a great big way 
Do we work or wait, do we hope and pray? 
For the days speed by on rapid wing 
What do we speak, what do we sing? 

What shall we dream as the days roll on, 
The dreams that count and are fresh and high • 
The dreams that shall live in a lovely creed 
The dreams that shall end in a noble deed? 
For dreams live on till they mount the sky. 
What shall we dream as the days go by? 

What will we speak as the days go by? 

The words of truth, or the words that lie? 

The words that sting and that carry tears, 

Or the word that comforts, the word that cheers' 

For words are things that cannot die. 

What shall we speak as the days go by I 






****£! 53 fVJkVV* 2 **^ 




cue cjipjsc of cHMscrofls 

George Wilson, '23. 

IN a small, tumbled down house on a narrow, dirty street in Petrograd lived 
an old cobbler. He was so old that even grandmothers called him uncle. 
He was at peace with the world now, for he had come to regard his fellow 
men as little children, who make little, playful mistakes, but who are usually 
good at heart. 

He was bent over his last pair of shoes that night, for it was Christmas Eve, 
and he had some work to do before he went to his little bed to sleep. 

Upon finishing his work, he arose and crossed over to the fireside. There 
he sat and read the only text-book he had, the Bible. 

He read of the birth of Christ, and of all the humility which accompanied 
Him into the world. 

As he read on, he became more reconciled to his own condition in life. He 
began to realize that humbleness is a real blessing and not a curse; that meek- 
Q( -^ is not to be scoffed at, nor lowliness to be spurned. 

When he stopped reading, he sat in his chair a long time dreaming. 

Jt was Christmas day, a typical Christmas — everything was covered with 
snow and it was bitter cold. As he climbed out of bed, he heard the chimes of 
the cathedral ringing. They seemed to say, "Christ has come! Christ has come!" 

As he heard them he thought, "How wonderful it would be if Christ would 
come, if He would come to my house." 

•Inst then a knock came at his door. He immediately left off preparing 
his breakfast and opened the door. There before him stood a dirty, hungry boy. 

".Mister, may I come in and get warm, I'm so cold?" 

Th<' heartstrings of the old cobbler were touched, and he ushered the boy 
into the room with, "Of course you can. Of course you can." 

II. took him in, warmed and fed him, and then set him down to talk. 

" You, sec, Sir," the boy said, "I haven't any home, or father or mother. I 
ini tin only one left of our family. The rest were all killed by the Anarchists." 

Presently the boy made preparations fo leaving. The old man, perceiving 
this, said, "Won't yon stay with me over the Christmas day, my son, and we 
will be happy and worship together?" 

On,, look out through the flying snow decided the boy. 

"I 11 stay, but I can never thank you for all that you have done for me." 

A little before noon another knock came at the door. When the door was 
opened a poor, ragged mother carrying an infant was standing on the threshold. 
Have yon anything 1 can eat?" she asked, "I have not eaten for so long 
thai I cannot remember the last meal." 



As the old cobbler sat and watched the woman and boy eat, he could not 
help but feel compassion toward them. 

He thought of his own boy, now buried in the graveyard close by the greal 
cathedral. He thought of his mother, his father, and his dear, loving wife 
they were all side by side now, and he would soon join them. 

When he saw how much he could do for a few of these wandering peasants 
his heart was sore because he could not do more. He could not understand hov 
any good God could look down unmoved and see His children suffer and die, 
innocently. 

When the meal was over the mother rose to go. 

"No, no, Dear Lady, I want you to stay and enjoy the warmth and Christ- 
mas spirit with the boy and me." 

All afternoon they talked and read. The woman, he found, was well edu- 
cated, despite her poor and impoverished condition. The story she told was 
pitiful in the extreme. She had been the wife of a rich merchant, and the 
mother of a healthy, happy family. When the war came, her husband sold the 
business and left her the money. He went to war and was killed. Then, when 
the Radicals came into power, they seized all her possessions, gave her to an 
officer in the Bolshevik army, took her daughters to the auction block, and 
killed her soils, who had resisted them. She had escaped her martial husband, 
and had been wandering in the streets of the city for days with her little babe 
in her arms. 

As she finished her story, the old cobbler got up from his chair and went 
over to the fire to replenish it. He remembered that he had fixed the fire before 
she had commenced her story, but he had to do something to hid his emotions. 
He could hardly believe that he had been living in peaee and comparative pros- 
perity, while all around him was suffering and the commission of horrible crimes. 
Now 7 as he looked upon this poor, outcast mother and this poof, destitute 
orphan, he thought again of all the unnecessary misery which men and women, 
seemingly, have to suffer. 

"I am an old man, a very old man, yet I can make enough to keep us all. 
if you will stay here with me. ' ' 

The mother looked at him dumbfounded. She could not believe her ears. 
She could not believe that so much good could exist in the world, and where it 
could be expected least — in the heart of a great city, which was the headquarters 
of the most brutual organization that man could devise. 

"Well — " she stopped, for her heart was too full for speech. "I have 
looked long for a place to stay." 

"Oh, that's all right, we can get along nicely," he said, "I have long 
needed a housekeeper, and I really need a boy to run errands for me." 

That night, after he had found room for all of them, he pulled his chair up 
before the fire. As he was sitting drowsily thinking of the day's adventure, a 
man stepped before him. 



He Looked at him wonderingly. The door was closed and barred. How 
could anyone have gotten in without being heard? Then the man spoke. His 
countenance was all aflame. 

" I know all you have done today. I heard you wish that Christ would come 
into y..iir home. Three times today He has come: first, when you took in the 
hungering, shivering boy; second, when you fed and warmed the mother and 
her child; third when you asked them to remain with you and live. Good, as 
well w evil has its reward. You have won yours. I have come from my Father 
t<< bring you a message of love, for He has also seen the good works that you 
have done, and He bids me tell you that God is always with His children, and 
in an hour of trial you should not doubt, for He has placed such good people 
in the world as you, to do His good work for Him." 

As the Vision vanished the old cobbler awoke. He rose and went to the 
window — the dawn of Christmas Day was breaking. 

My, my, I must have slept the whole night through." 



I 



A^itoU? 

Norma Barkman, '23. 

*M thinking of something more precious than gold, 

More precious than honor or fame, 
Tifl worth more than the wealth of the world, all told, 

Tli is something. Can you guess it's name? 

Without it you're sad and growly, 

Hut with it you're glad and jolly; 
And though 'tis more precious than gold 

11 can neither be bought or sold. 

It tights up the homliest face 

Willi a joy that is hard to believe 
It lends you both beauty and grace, 

And helps you forget to grieve. 

Haven't you guessed it yet 

This riddle? 'Tis plain as it can be. 
Come now, won't you confess? 

It's happiness. Can't you see? 



D 



coy poem 



O your best, your very best, 
And do it every day; 

Little girls and little boys, 
That is the wisest way. 



What ever work comes to your hand. 
At home or at your school ; 

Do your best with right good will, 
It is a golden rule. 

For he who always does his best, 

Will ever better grow ; 
But he who shirks or slights his task, 

Lets all the better go. 

What if your lessons should be hard? 

You need not yield to sorrow ; 
For he who bravely works to-day, 

More brightly greets each 'morrow. 





'■■(p'» 



I 



coy Kiccen 



Lois Ashley, 7A. 

HAVE a lovely maltese cat, 

Katsumi is her name. 
Oft has she killed the wicked rat; 

Known far and wide her fame. 

She runs and jumps and purrs and plays, 
She eats and sleeps and doses; 

She has such very cunning ways, 
She's just as sweet as roses. 

When I go out to take a walk 

That cat is sure to follow ; 
It does no good at all to talk, 

She comes o'er hill and hollow. 

When I grow old and weak and gray, 

May I have friends as true; 
Who in joy or sorrow shall stay 

Katsumi, staunch as you. 



fl CHOUCHt 

Cliffton Fischbach, '23. 



"A 



WAKE!" The Father calls in youth, 

In. early youth to man, 
"Make use of bright 'ning day, for yet 

Life's but a narrow span." 

"Arise!" The summons strong we hear, 

Reluctant we arise, 
Responding to the oft heard call, 

"Go where your labor lies." 

"Rest Thou!" The Father's voice is kind, 

When dusk falls all around, 
"In sleep forget thy toils and cares, 

In slumber, sweet, profound." 

"Come Home!" The thread of life is snapped, 

The Eve of life has come, 
Freed from all the cares of life, 

Our Father takes us home. 




pacfiioc scaFF 

Editor-in-4 Ihief Francis EuDaly 

Assistant Editor Lois Hall 

Business Manager Ruth Humes 

.Wi„:,„. Busi,,,,, .Managers |2SlEoE 

Athletic Editor Franklin Swain 

( lass Editors — Literary Editors — 

Florence Blain Mildred Glasson 

Eugene Wright Beryl Shields 

Ruth Blumer Norma Barkman 

Alice Cobb Thelma Bell 

Louise Freeland Hubert Hedges 

Dorothy Hauenschtld Osborne Fischbach 

{Dorothy Mahorney 
Irene Spear 
Harden Hancock 

Faculty Advisor Kate Andrews 

Faculty Art Editor Eva Sinclair 

Faculty Literary Editor Mina McHenry 



CPICOFMflL 



Francis EuDaly, '23. 

Fifty years ago, in the east part of the city, stood a small, two-story frame 
structure. It was the first school building in Seymour. Only the oldest residents 
can remember the time when as happy children, they went to school here. 
Established when Seymour was quite young, it naturally had a small enrollment. 

Later when Seymour began to increase in population the old building was 
vacated and a larger one built on the site of the present building. It was of 
red brick, and was set in the midst of grounds, occupying the whole of a city 
block. Immediately in front of the building was a large space paved with brick, 
from which led the walk to the street. The grounds were surrounded by an old 
fashioned board fence, within the confines of which, filling all of the space not 
occupied by the building, were immense trees. Here, in the delightful shade of 
these beautiful beeches the children played. 

Later, as the school outgrew that building, an addition was made on the 
south side. This building most of our present residents remember. 

In 1910 it was condemned as unsafe and razed for the erection of a com- 
pletely equipped modern brick building. The greater portion of the trees sur- 
rounding the building was cut down, and the rear part of the lot converted into 
a playground. The front part of the lot was made into an attractive lawn, one 
of the most beautiful in Indiana. 

Until February of 1923, the High School and grades were in the same 
building; but the enrollment in the High School has increased so steadily thai 
changes were inevitable. Accordingly, plans were drawn up for a modern addi- 
tion, in which there would be a large auditorium suitable for public meetings, 
for basketball, and other gymnastics, as well as class rooms for the accommoda- 
tion of the grades. This building was completed in 1923. Now the High School 
occupys the whole of the older building, while the grades arc housed in the new 
wing. 

From a study of the evolution of our present school building a very good 
idea can be gained of the marvelous growth that the schools of the city of Sey- 
mour have enjoyed. To-day, the High School is a complete and thoroughly 
organized institution, which has a reputation for turning out well-educated, pro- 
gressive students, the greater majority of whom have made a success in busi- 
ness, social and civic life, and have revealed the value to Seymour of her fine 
School System. 





credits 

BerqlSh " 

LqdLioL Kr 

Norma fl 
Rub M MoniqomerMJ3 

Francis cuD< 
ElvaCarter 
InezBcukm 
RuthHumes 
MariahSimoh 



BA5EP OW WORK OF TOUR YEARS. REQUIREC1ENTS-ALU 
GRADES HADE IN 5EYC0OUR HIQI1 5Cf100L.N0 miUJRE.NOT 
OORE THAN TWO CVA'QRADE REQUIRED EOR 22 CREDITS. 



cHe seniors 

oop wars cHOje <anot!apcHecweu>es 

CRee-Pine FLoweR-amce Rose 
colors- OReep am> wnice 

PReSlD6Dr-01LBOR BflLDtoM 

wce-PResiDeDc-FranKup sum 
secRecara'-GeoRQe wilsod 
CReasaReR-CflcneRioe jaoes 




Lewis Adams 

Of all the varities of apples, I think 
the Baldwin is best. 



Harold Ahlbrand 

Best in the long run. 







Eunice Alexander 

"Brevity, here is thy counterpart." 



Hugh Andrews 

"I'd pick a Hudson every time. 



Opal Baldwin 

Straight is the line of duty, 
Curved is the line of beauty, 
Follow the straight line, then shall see 
The curved line will ever follow thee. 



Wilbur Baldwin 

He was the mildest-mannered man 
that ever scuttled ship or cut a throat. 



Pearl Banta 

A nobler yearning never broke her rest, 
Than but to dance and sing, be gaily 
drest. 








« 








- Jk ^K 






Norma Barkman 

"If wisdom's ways you wisely seek, 

This rule observe with care, 
Take Norma for your trusted guide 

And you'll never know despair." 



Arthur Becker 

How much wood would a woodpecker 

peck 
If he sat on the head of our dear friend 
Beck? 



T helm a Bell 

"You've got to see Mama every night 

or you can't see Mama at all." 



Inez Beukman 

I care for nobody, 
No, not I. 



Edna Biddle 

The only exception to any rule 
Is the one who follows it. 





.) \mes Black 

Woman-hater who quotes Shakespeare. 



Florence Blain 
Glen, Star, 
Ride far. 
Moonlight, 
Good-night.' 



Raymond Blumer 

"I'll go home this way because no girls 
live on this street." 



KlETH BRACKEMYRE 

Kieth believes that "A revolving frag- 
ment of the Paleozoic age collects no 
Crypto-gamus vegetation." 



Carl Buhner 

"Chad" is a silent member of the 
"Bone-dust Twins Corporation." 



Martin Buhner 

"Slim" and his car are always popular. 



Lillian Buhner 
Tall of stature 

Light of hair, 
Eyes of blue, 

Complexion fair. 



Elva Carter 

"Hear council, and receive instruction, 
That thou mays't be wise in the end." 



Margaret Dehler 

She's beautiful, and therefore to be 

wooed, 
She is a woman, therefore to be icon. 



Ethel Dunn 

"A mouthful of sarcasm, and very 
sentimental." 




Francis EuDaly 

"Better to wear out than to rust out. 



( 'UIFTON FlSCHBACH 

When the radio bug bit Tippie, 
It really made him go quite dippy. 



Osborne Fischbach 

"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit. 



Mvrie Fox 

"Even if the boys are a nuisance, we 
couldn't get along without them." 



Mildred Glasson 

"A word to the wise is sufficient." 






,#***- "% 




lES 



J 



Kenneth Gossett 

"Lend even/ man thy ear but few thy 
voice." 



Lois Hall 

A living proof Unit you can't tarrn 
ivild women. 



Eva Hein 

"// you wish to preservi your sard 
wrap it up in frankn* 



Harden Hancock 

Wanted— A .shin girl by a rave man. 
Apply in person. 



Maurice Haper 

"Jake's" opinion carries weight. 



n 



ff 






Hubert Hedges 

"0 what a pal was Mary. 



Esther Heiwig 

" 'Tis as well to be out of the world as 
out of fashion." 



Minnie Mae Helt 

"Great things through greatest hazards 
are attained, and then they shine." 



Ernest Herring 

A wily fish. You can't string him. 



James Honan 

Mr. Kutt Honan, Esq. A. B., S. 0. 8., 
B. V. D., P. D. Q., R. S. V. P. 










B 



Hollis Hooker 

A small voice but a mighty num. 



Gladys Hopple 

''Peg" drives the noon taxi. Eh, Glazt .' 



Gladys Hudson 

"Man is a creature of a wilful head, 
And hardly driven is, but easily led." 



Ruth Humes 

"One man amony a thousand have I 
found." 



Jarvis Hyatt 

"Toots" has his way with, everything 
but the ladies. 




Walter Hyatt 

The "Shiek" of Seymour. 




Catherine James 

"There's scarce a case comes in but you 
shall find a woman at the bottom." 



Elizabeth James 

The course of true love never did run 
smooth. 



Mary Johnson 

"Find me a reasonable lover against his 
weight in gold." 



M \i:v J (TDD 

Mary always likes green things, especi- 
'///// Hedges. 






Charles Reach 

''Days may come and days may go, but 
I rave on forever." 



Dorothy Kelley 

A kind and gentle heart she has, 

To comfort friends and foes, 
She tells the whole wide world her joys, 
But not a soul her woes. 



Lydia Kruge 

Like Quebec she is stationed on a bluff. 



Charles Linke 

How ya gonna keep 'im down on th' 
farm after he's seen Purdut .' 



Vera Lockmund* 

"I myself must mix with action 
Lest I wither by despair." 






<W<^Mw 6 -;?zi 



Ql 






V 




Dorothy Mahorney 

"What's the good of living if we can't 
enjoy our selves ?" 



Earl McCann 

His name may be "Squirrely," but he 
doesn't like nuts. 



Herschel McClintick 

Bill says "It's easy enough to attract 
the girls if you know how to work 
Commercial Arithmetic." 



Robert McCord 

"If work interferes with pleasure, give 
up work." 



Harold Mis \ more 

We will miss "Missy" most ivJien our 
opponents get some points ahead. 



Maurice Montgomery 

Maurice left us just in time to lose 
his dip. 



Ruby Montgomery 

"Knowledge is easy to him who hath 
understanding." 



Veneda Moore 

"Be wiser than other people if you 
can; but do not tell them so." 



Nellie Pease 

"Everything unknown is taken to be 
magnificent." 



Francis Richart 

Enthusiastic member of the Bachelors' 

Club. 




Charles Ross 

He has to get out and get under. 






Howard Ross 

Like a Dago, "Lick-Skillet" will play 
if there is a monkey to dance. 




Leslie Russell 

Long, lean, lanky Russell, 
Don't work and won't hustle. 



Beryl Shields 

She speaks not because she has to say 
something, but because she has some- 
thing to say. 



Marian Simon 

A very quiet girl, but just get her 
started 



Elma Stark 

"For John's sake, give me a man who 
has brains enough to make a fool of 
himself." 



Erma Stark 

Pep — bushels of it — and the right kind. 



Dorothy Story 

Talk what you will of taste, my friend, 

you'll find, 
Two of a face as soon as of a mind. 



Franklin Swain 

"I want a Hall in my house." 



Louise Taskey 

"Look before you ere you leap; 
For as you soic you're like to reap. 





Earl Thompson 

"For lie's a jolly good fellow — 
which nobody can deny." 



Glenn Utterback 

"Twinkle, twinkle, little Star, 
What a wonder car you are! 
This time you are Cupid's car, 
When Flo and Glenn out riding are." 



Mary White 

"My thoughts by night are often filled 

With visions false as fair, 
For in the past alone, I build 
My castles in the air." 



George Wilson 

George was a man till Cupid got after 
him. 



Edith Zimmerman 

"0 teach me how to look; and with 
what art, 
I can sway the motion of some fellow's 
heart." 



cue jcmors 

IP GOD (jieCROSC 

me-caup CRee FLoaeR-ROse 

COLORS - (SOLP ADD tottlte 

PResipenc-Loais ecHsceio 

DlCe-PReSlD€DC-PODaLP OOORe 

secRecaRY-PLORefxe GRines 
CReasaReR-naRY pectus 



KATHRYN ACKERET 

HARRY BALDWIN 

LOIS BARTLETT 

BESSIE MAE BEACH 

HERMAN BEEM 

ESTHER BIDDLE 

EARL BOOTH 

GRACE BRACKEMYRE 

JEANETTE CARSON 

CONRAD CHRISTIE 

ALICE CLARK 

BERYL DANNETTELLE 

WILMA DEATS 
FREEMAN DICKASON 
MANUEL DOUGHERTY 
MARION DOUGHERTY 
I ETHA DOWNEY 
LOUIS ECKSTEIN 
LEWIS ELSNER 
MARY FIT TIG 
CARL FILL 
BERNICE FOSTER 
FLORENCE GRIMES 
RAYMOND HOFVFNFR 



JOSEPH JOHNSON 
OPAL KASTING 
ROBERT KASTING 
HARRY KRUWELL 
RALPH LEMP 
FORREST MALICK 
AVIS McPIKE 
ALFRED MILLER 
ROBERT MISCH 
DVe MITCHELL 
DOROTHY MONTGOMERY 
HENRIETTA MONTGOMERY 
DONALD MOORE 
CLARENCE OTIS 
EVERETT OTTE 
CLARENCE POWERS 
WILLIAM SCHLUESEMEIER 
IRENE SPEAR 
ELSIE SPURGEON 
SUSIE SWENGEL 
LEONARD TAULMAN 
LENORA THICKSTEN 
DARRELL WELFER 
EUGENE WRIGHT 



CH6 S0PH0C90FO 



WILLIAM ABRAHAM 
EVA ADAMS 
ANNA ALBRICH 
ALICE BECKER 
MELVIN BELL 
ELSIE BERGSICKER 
ROY BEUKMAN 
ALFRED BLEVINS 
ERNEST BLEVINS 
LEE BLEVINS 
RUTH BLUMER 
RUTH BOTTORFF 
HILDA BRETTHAUER 
EDWARD BROOKS 
GERALD BROWNING 
RUTH BRUNOW 
GEORGE BRYAN 
WALTER BURBRINK 
GERTRUDE BURKART 
GILBERT CASE 
RUTH CHAMBERS 
RUTH CHRISTIE 
JEANETTE CLARK 
LANDIS COOPER 
VELMA COOPER 
LORAINE COX 
WILLIS COX 
ROBERT DAY 
ETTA DETTMER 
MARION DICKASON 
PAUL DOUGLASS 
ROWETA DUNCAN 
MARGARET DUNN 
JOHN HENRY FORWAY 
ORA FOSTER 
HARRY FOX 
NORRIS GARVEY 
WALLACE GARVEY 
MARTHA GRAESSLE 
I I A RENTE GREIN 
ALLEN HALL 
JOHN HAUENCHILD 
HENRY HIRTZEL 
LELAND HOLTMAN 
I 1 1 EL MA HUDSON 
CARL HUSTEDT 



DOROTHY JACOBS 
MARGARET KASTING 
EVELYN KYSAR 
LAURA LANGE 
WILMA LAWRENCE 
FREEDA LEE 
GEORGE LOCKMUND 
HAROLD MASCHER 
WALTER MASHINO 
GLADYS McCORD 
KENNETH McDONALD 
GORDON MILLER 
WILLIAM MILLER 
DONALD MISAMORE 
MADGE MOREN 
MYRTLE MYERS 
FRANCIS NICHALSON 
WILLIAM NIEMAN 
WILLIS NOELKER 
HOWARD PARKER 
ROBERT PARKER 
SYLVESTER PEASE 
VENICE RADER 
BERENICE RITTENHOUSE 
WILLIAM RODERT 
DONALD ROSS 
RUTH SIEFKER 
RUTH SIMMONS 
VIRGINIA SMITH 
MAURICE SPRAY 
RILEY SPRENGER 
ROBERT SPRENGER 
SYLVIA STANTS 
DOROTHY STEINKAMP 
PAUL STEINKAMP 
VONDA STEWART 
MARGARET SUMNER 
MURIEL SWEANY 
RALPH SWEET 
HARRY THOMPSON' 
CARL VORNHOLT 
DOROTHY WALTERS 
HAROLD WINKLER 
SAM WHITSON 
MARY WORLEY 



ch£ FftesHrcen 



ELIZA ABBETT 
fOYi I A< KERMAN 
EMMA ALWES 
THOMAS AUFFENBURG 
II RT BAKER 
VALEDIA BALDWIN 
PEARL BEDEL 
JESSIE BELL 
ROGER BILLINGS 
WILLIAM BOBB 
HELEN BREITF1ELD 
ToM BOLLINGER 
WESLEY BORCHERDING 
1 « >XALD BRUNOW 
RALPH BRUNOW 
HOWARD BUCKLEY 
LLOYD BULGER 
GEORGE BURRELL 
DONALD BUSH 
BERNADINE BUSKIRK 
MARGARET BUSKIRK 
M-.RTRUDE CALLAHAN 
ALMA BELLE CHARLES 
BYROX CHENOWETH 
DORIS CHILDS 
DOROTHY CLARK 
[RENE CLIFFTON 
ALICE COBB 
JESSE COMBS 
EARL COX 
PHILLIP COX 
\\ ERNER COX 
EDWARD DOUGLASS 
I '.I RL DOUGHTY 
KM Til DUNN 
LOLA ELLIOT 
ELIZABETH FEASTER 
\i ADELINE FINDLEY 
fOHN FOX 
I OUISE FREELAND 
I I US GU BERT 
ROSS GLASSON 
I.OTTA MAY GOBLE 



AGNES GOENS 
KERVAL GOODWIN 
ALTON GORBETT 
ADDIE GREEN 
GEORGE GREEN 
HELEN GREENE 
DELBERT GOSSETT 
WILLIAM HALL 
RUSSELL HAMER 
MARIE HANNER 
ELMA HAZZARD 
CATHERINE HEHMAN 
AGNES HEITKAMP 
NEAL HENNESSY 
ARTHUR HERKAMP 
LUCILE HIRTZEL 
MARGUERITE HOFFMIRE 
EARL HOPPER 
LYNN HUBER 
MARGARET JACOBS 
ALVIN JOHNSON 
ALBERT JUDD 
SARA KEACH 
ALICE KIRSCH 
FRED KLAYKAMP 
JENNIE MAE LAHNE 
JOHN LAHNE 
DORIS LEE 
FRANCIS LEWIS 
RAYMOND LONG 
DENNIS MAHORNEY 
GILBERT MASCHINO 
MATTIE MASCHINO 
CLYDE MAY 
HELEN McCURDY 
VIRGIL McINTYRE 
LYNN MILLER 
MARION MITTON 
EARL MIZE 
JOSEPH MOORE 
JOSEPHINE MORITZ 
ALBERT MYERS 



MILDRED MYERS 
WILFRED NICHTER 
GLENNA NIEMAN 
DALLAS NOELL 
VERA OEHLBERG 
CLARICE OTTO 
EDNA OTTING 
MILDRED PEACOCK 
WILLIAM PECK 
CARL PHILLIPS 
WILBUR PHILL T PS 
FRANCES PICKERRELL 
JOHN PRALL 
GORDON RAEBURN 
LEONA RAILING 
BERNICE RYAN 
ALBERT REATER 
WALTER REBBER 
EDWARD RIEHL 
EARL RUSSELL 
LYMAN SAGE 
HELEN SCHAFER 
CHARLES SCHNECK 
RUTH SEWELL 
HERSCHEL SPURGEON 
OLIVER STEINBERGER 
VIRGIL STEINKER 
MARTIN STOCKAMP 
REBA SWEANY 
DALLAS THOMAS 
LOUIS TOBORG 
MURIEL TRUEBLOOD 
DELORIS VANHOY 
ARTHUR VOGEL 
SYBIL WEASNER 
ROY WILLIAMS 
ATHOS WOOLLS 
MARTIN WULFF 
EARL YOUNG 
KENNETH YOUNG 
BENJAMIN YOUNT 
LOIS ZIMMERMAN 



JYJDIOK HIGH SCHOOL 



HARRY ACKERET 
MARIE ACKERET 
LORA ALBRICH 
PAULINE ASHLEY 
LOTTIE AULT 
MARY BARK MAN 
PHYLLIS BARNETT 
ELIZABETH BARNUM 
WILMA BARNUM 
WILBUR BIGGS 
RALPH BOHNENKAMP 
ADELINE BOWMAN 
BENNETT BOWMAN 
OPAL CALLAHAN 
ARTHUR CARPENTER 
NORENA CARPENTER 
VIRGINIA CASE 
ELSIE CROUCHER 
GERTRUDE DEPUTY 
INEZ DOWNEY 
ALLEN EUDALY 
HARRY GERDOM 
PAUL GERKENSMEYER 



LUCILLE ABELL 
MERRILL ALEXANDER 
CLARENCE ARBUCKLE 
DORIS AUFDERHEIDE 
WILLIAM BALSLEY 
LUCILLE BENDER 
MARY BIGGS 
STUART BLISH 
VERNIE BOWMAN 
PAUL BRACKEMYRE 
WILMA BROCKHOFF 
ROBERT BUHNER 
MAURINE CARTER 
BOBBY CHAMBERS 
GEORGE COLLINS 
PAULINE CROUCHER 
MILDRED DAILY 
MARY DOUGHERTY 
HARRY DOWNING 
GLENN DUNCAN 



SYLVESTER ANDERSON 
LOIS ASHLEY 
WILLIAM BARNES 
ALVIN BEIKMAN 
ADA BROOKS 
THEDORIS CLARK 
HERBERT COCHRAN 
DOROTHY COX 
HOMER DUE 
MARGUERITE EMHUFF 
WILLIAM EMHUFF 
CLAUDIA EMLY 
WILLIAM FENTON 
HELEN FRANZ 
EDWARD GREENE 
SARAH HATTON 



ERLINE ALLEN 
ROBERT ALLEN 
GRAHAM ANDREWS 
WILLIAM BAISE 
ALBERT BELDING 
BEATRICE BISHOP 
MILDRED BRETTHAUER 
DOROTHY BROWN 
FLORENCE BRYAN 
EDITH BUCKLEY 
ALBERT CAMPBELL 
EDGAR DAY 



8- A CLASS 

GORDON HALLOWELL 
CARL HAPER 
JAMES HARLOW 
MARY HATFIELD 
ARTHUR HEIWIG 
LAWRENCE HENDERSON 
LEON HIMLER 
MADA HODAPP 
DOROTHY HOLLENBECK 
MARJORIE HOUSE 
MARY HUNTER 
VIRGINIA JOHNSON 
ADEN JONES 
EARL KAMMAN 
LURENE KRUWELL 
WRIGHT KYSAR 
MARY LEWIS 
HOWARD MEYER 
JUAN1TA PARR 
CHARLES PHILLIPS 
THELMA PICKERRELL 
CLARENCE POLLARD 

8-B CLASS 

DOLORES ELSNER 
ESTHER ENGLAND 
RALPH FOSTER 
BERNICE GOENS 
EDITH GOENS 
ARTHUR GREEN 
HOWARD HALL 
MIRIAM HAMILTON 
DOROTHY HAUENCHILD 
VIDA HAWK 
GRACE HORNING 
MILDRED HUNTERMAN 
FLORA HUSTEDT 
GROVER HUTCIIINGS 
DONALD KASTING 
ROBERT KNOST 
MILDRED LARABEE 
HARVEY LEWIS 
LLOYD MOREN 
KENNETH OTTO 

7- A CLASS 

LOIS HERCAMP 
DOROTHY HOOKER 
DALE HOOPER 
ROBERT JACKSON 
RALPH JAMES 
FERDINAND JAYNES 
PAUL LACEY 
LILLIE LESLIE 
WAYNE JEFFERS 
RAYMOND MANNING 
GLENN McCLAIN 
EMMA McCORD 
JOHN McCORMICK 
FULTON MEYER 
MINNIE MILLS 
MARGARET MYRON 

7-B CLASS 

BRYAN DO ['GLASS 
MARVIN FENTON 
LUCILE IIATTABAI'HH 
VIRGINIA HOADLEY 
LORA HUNT 
KATHRYN JAMES 
ALICE KIETH 
DOROTHY KYSAR 
KATHLEEN McDONALD 
BESS McCANNON 
MARJOKIK MILLER 
DONALD OTTO 



FERN PREWITT 
EDWARD KK\ i: \L 
EDNA RE'S Nl ILDS 
L< IRENE Kll. >] 
LELAND ROSS 
MILDRED SCHAFEK 
LOUIS SCHRA] >EP. 
CHARLES SEWELL 
THELMA SIERP 
HARRIETT SMITH 
HELEN STABB 
DONALD STEINKAMP 
MACK STEINKAMP 
I'HAItLKS TASKLY 
DOROTHY TASKKV 
MARTEZ TASKKV 
ALBERT T( IBORG 
JOHN WAR H 
GEORGDV WEDEL 
JOE WHITE 
OREN WILLIAMSON 
KERMIT STORK 



DOROTHY MYERS 
CLARA PATTER 
KDXA I'KTKKS 
NARCISSI'S Rl'.l 'MAX 
LUCILE REED 
WILLIS RESINER 
HAZEL RICH 
ORVILLE RODERT 
BERN1E RUCKER 
FREIDA SCHLEIBAUM 
MARQARITE SCHRINK 
GLEN SKWAKI • 
CHRISTINE SMITH 
OPAL SIRA1 
HOWARD SPRENG] 
Jl'ANITA SYVKNOKL 
ELSIE WEBER 
KATHRYX WHEELER 
ANITA WOLTER 
MARTHA WOOD \RD 



EMERALD NEWKBRK 
HELEN « >WENS 
BERNICE PRATHER 
BERTHA ROBBINS 
CHARLES RUSSELL 
FAVE STARK 
MILDREI > STARK 
HAROLD S'l BPLER 
FARRELL SULLIVAN 
BERNICE s\\ KAXY 
L U'RA S\\ 
HAROLD T VSKEY 
HENRY WEBB 
VERNE WRIOHT 
ROBERT ZICKLER 



DOROTHY PHILLIPS 
MARGARET PI" KERRELL 

RAY Hi: Ml. 
CLARENCE REDMAN 
FRANCES R1 ED 
AAROX SALEE 

LILA sen ' 
ADDIE SI II "I Tl 
VI RO IX I A ST '■ 
GENEL1 E Si 'I 
IX A WHITC( >MB 




(gtrb' (glpf (Elub 



OPAL BALDWIN 
PEARL BANTA 
FLORENCE BLAIN 
RUTH BOTTOREF 
GERTRUDE BURKART 
RUTH CHRISTIE 
JEANETTE CLARK 
VELMA COOPER 
BERYL DANNETTELLE 
MARGARET DEHLER 
ROWETA DUNCAN 
ETHEL DUNN 
MARGARET DUNN 
MARY FETTIG 
FLORENCE GRIMES 
LOIS HALL 
ESTHER HEIWIG 
GLADYS HUDSON 



RUTH HUMES 
GLADYS HOPPLE 
DOROTHY JACOBS 
ELIZABETH JAMES 
KATHRYN JAMES 
MARY JOHNSON 
MARY JUDD 
OPAL K A STING 
GLADYS McCORD 
AVIS McPIKE 
DOROTHY MAHORNEY 
VENEDA MOORE 
MYRTLE MYERS 
VENICE RADER, Piano 
ELMA STARK 
ERMA STARK 
SUSIE SW'ENGLE 
LOUISE TASKEY 




Sop' (Site Otlub 



HAROLD AHLBRAND 
HUGH ANDREWS 
WILBUR BALDWIN 
ARTHUR BECKER 
ALFRED BLEVINS 
LEE BLEVINS 
CONRAD CHRISTIE 
BERL DOUGHTY 
LOUIS ECKSTEIN 
KERVAL GOODWIN 
HARDEN HANCOCK 



JAMES HONAN 
JARVIS HYATT 
WALTER HYATT 
ROBERT McCORD 
DONALD MISAMORE 
HAROLD MISAMORE 
DONALD MOORE 
ALBERT MYERS 
HOWARD ROSS 
EARL THOMPSON 
GLADYS HUDSON, Piano 




HIGH SCHOOL OReH£5CR3 



Flute 


Saxophone 


BERNICE FOSTER 


HARRY THOMPSON 


Violins 


ROBERT SPRENGER 


ELMA STARK 


Cornet 


ERMA STARK 


LELAND HOLTMAN 


ROY WILLIAMS 




ETHEL DUNN 


Trombone 


MARIAN SIMON 


ROGER BILLINGS 


MARGARET DUNN 




JEANETTE CLARK 


Piano 


LOUISE FREELAND 


HOWARD ROSS 




Lena (Jnderduck, Flynnville's police force Kingsley Brinklow 

Teckley Bramble, best checker player in town Cletis Mackey 

Arabella Wilkins, the village post-mistress Louise Carter 

Jimmy Stanton, rich in love, but poor in fact Lynn Cordes 

Flossie Neverset, who vamps and dances Ruth Christie 

Kathleen, Michael's niece and ward Elsie Reynolds 

Michael Flynn, Flynnville's wealthiest citizen Arthur Wilde 

Sans Swindler, proprietor of the General Store George McLaughlin 

Ned RollingBton, with a college education Leland Bridges 

Biggins, the butler Sim Turmail 

La«sies, Villagers, Tennis Girls, Every Toad, Shy Maids, By Hecks, Guest 
Girls, Dance My Lady, Dance-O-Mania. 




B CflLOR-CWDe com 

Mr. Huber George Wilson 

Mr. Rowland Harold Ahlbrand 

Peter James Hon an 

Dr. Sonntag Cliffton Fischbach 

Tanva Huber Ruth Humes 

John Paul Bart Franklin Sw u n 

Pomeroy Glenn Utterback 

Mrs. Stanlaw Lydi a Kk i 

Mr. Stanlaw Robert McCord 

Corinne Stanlaw Gladys Hudson 

Dorothv Elva Carter 

Bobby Westlake Hugh Andri w s 

Mr. Fleming Martin Bun m r 

Mr. Crane Charles Li n a 

Mr. Carroll Kenneth Gossett 

Mrs. Fitzmorris Ethel I" 

Mr. Fitzmorris Hollis Hooker 

Mrs. Kitty Dupuy Opal Baldwin 

Bessie Dupuy Thelma Bell 

Mr. Jellicott Harold Mis ucokz 

Abraham Nathan Osborne FlSCHBACH 

Miss Shavne Dorothy M tHOUil v 

Mr. Grayson \™ uv J 1 SSI ' ' 

Mr. Whitcomb J AMFS B, ^ CK 

Mr. Cain HoWARn * ™ 

Mr. Russell Arthur I eckrr 

Mr. Flynn X^™ ?* «™ 

Wheating Wni,lR BaLDWIM 

Waiters— Ernest Herring, Harden Hancock, Kieth Brackemyre. 

Couples at Reception— Charles Linke, Earl Thompson, Earl McCann, Carl Buhner, ^anc,< 

Richart, Charles Ross, Nellie Pease, Veneda Moore, Erma Stark, KIma Mark. 

Lillian Buhner, Vera Lockmund, Mary Louise White. 




trie CHflBCD SCHOOL 

A COMEDY 

Austin Bevans Lewis Adams 

David Mackenzie Charles Keach 

George Boyd Raymond Blumer 

Jim Simpkins Jarvis Hyatt 

Tim Simpkins Hubert Hedges 

Homer Johns Maurice Haper 

Elise Benedotti Pearl Banta 

Miss Hays Dorothy Story 

Miss Curtis Esther Heiwig 

Sally Boyd Gladys Hopple 

Mum 1 Doughty Ruby Montgomery 

Ethel Spelvin Norma Barkman 

Mix Mercier Florence Blain 

Lillian Stafford Catherine James 

Madge Kknt Eunice Alexander 

« haHotte Grey Marian Simon 

THE YOUNG LADIES OF THE SCHOOL 

1 ),,lsi( -' Lois Hall 

1 ,!n: ' Eva Hein 

c '' a Elizabeth James 

,r(t Inez Beukman 

M;,rv Edna Biddle 

' " " rU(ic Mary Johnson 

Ruth Mary Judd 



tglj ^rljnnl Alumni 



Forty-nine years ago the first class graduated from the Shields High School. 
Since the foundation of the school there have been probably thirty-five hundred 
pupils who have shared in its work and received a preparation, more or less 
extended, for the duties of life. When we consider the work of the Bchool and 
the good it has done, we must take into consideration all who have been enrolled, 
and not only those who have finished the entire course of study offered by the 
school. 

The Alumni of the school now numbers nine hundred and fifty-six. most 
of whom have filled and are filling honorable places in life. A glance over the 
roll of graduates and into the lives of the men and women whose names we find 
there, will convince any one that a "High School education does »>if unfit //oi/.s- 
and girls for the practical duties of life." The work of any school or institution 
of learning is best evidenced by the lives of the men and women that il sends 
forth into the world. 



GRADUATES OF THE SHILEDS HIGH SCHOOL 



1874 
Herbert Bowers 
Amelia Platter 
Emma Rapp Bowers 

1875 
*John B. Blish 

David McCrady 
*Rose Gerrish 

Anna Mills 

Carrie E. Mills Cone 

1876 
*Emma Blish Thompson 

Nannie Cobb Pellens 

Eva Cooley Fenton 

Ella Craig Rapp 
*Betty Ewing Mills 

Jennie Kling Dunbar 

Mary McCrory 
*Jennie Rapp Enos 

Anna Schmitt Thompson 
*Emma Shaw 

Harvey St. Clair 

Hattie Swope 

1877 
Annie Doane Vogel 
Gorge D. Carter 
James E. Moore 
Dr. F. W. Brown 
*Dr. M. F. Gerrish 



Alice Marshall 

Jennie Swope Montgomery 

Emma Vogel Clow 

1878 
No Class Graduated 

1879 
Emma Brown Shields 
Mary Durland Orman 
Sadie Frey 
Carrie Heaton 
John J. Cobb 
*Rena Marshall 
Belle Schmitt Gates 

1880 
Winifred Elliot Ackley 
*Lizzie Fairbanks Coakley 
Ida Harding Montgomery 
John J. Smith 
Mollie Patrick Bache 
Max Rosenburg 

1881 
Charlton A. Swope 
*Lutie Blish Humbert 
Effie DeVore McClure 
Lulu Donaldson Harsh 
Mattie Edward Crim 
Flora Miller 
John A. Ross 
Etta Thumser Laupus 



1882 
Marvin D. Deputy 
*Edward V. Johnston 
Fannie Vogel Hancock 

1883 
Walter Johnston 
*Lizzie Lewis Trimble 
Cyrus McCrady 
Fannie Shields Barnes 
Frankie Williams McCrady 
John A. Wood 

1884 

Emma Hibner Russell 

Geneva Huffman Bare 

Kate Jackson 
*01iver Frank McDonald 
♦Nannie Price 

Kittie Sprigman Faulkconer 

Georgie Thompson 

Laura Thumser Horst 

Kate Vosbrink 

1885 

Inez Elliott 
*Carl Horst 
*Kate Hensley 

Nivoda Johnson Baldridpe 
*H. C. Johnson 
♦Ella Rankin 

Tillie Schneck Sevcrinphaus 

Mamie Wilson Brooks 



1886 
Jennie Bain Flemings 
Kittie Benjamin 
Louisa Brown 
Clara Cliilds England 
Emma Groub Masters 
Nannie Hancock Buchannan 
Harley H. Hoskins 
Ora Jennings White 
Edwin Severinghaus 

1887 
Travis Trumbo 
I'riscilla Bergdoll Nicman 
Walter Wood 
John Brown 
Anna Hancock 
Kate Andrews 

1888 

Maggie Hancock 

Mary Huffman Graessle 
♦Fannie Lyon 
♦Sarah E. Marsh 
♦Inez L. Newby 

1889 
Frank Baker 
Kate Greer Wells 
*Bruce Shields 

1890 
Cordelia Andrews Winn 
Amanda Baird 
Minnie Phelan Riehm 
Carrie Banta Seacove 
Ida Champion Baxter 
Laura Gibson Hill 
Effie Gowdy 
Minnie Frcy Dobbins 
•Daisy Johnson Johson 
Amelia Reich 
Kate Tromback 

1891 
♦Orlena Huffman Cloud 
♦I'.Ka Kietfa 

Mary Mc.-hI P.rand 
Manilla Mead St. John 
Naotna Montgomery 
Minnie Sarver 
Louisa Schneck Raineir 
A. R. Vogel 
Emma White 



1892 
♦Jessie Bollinger Hancock 

Etta Brooks Bridges 

Jessie Burton 

Mary Clark 

Irma Fitch 

Lenore Gasaway Swails 
♦Anna Greer McCaffy 

Eva Hancock 

Lettie Marsh Orr 

Kittie Marshall 

Adelaide Miller 

Minnie Ross Zimmerman 

Ida Sarver Kackley 
♦Benjamin Schneck 

John Sheron 

A. D. Shields 
♦Kate Trumbo 

1893 
George Bush 
Ida Campbell Bonnell 
Everett Frazer 
Nannie Love Frazer 
Radie Marsh Nelson 
Anna McElvain Reinhart 
Maggie Mitchel 
Agnes Neighbor 
Robert Neighbor 
Vina Ross 
Harry Thompson 

1894 

Minnie Adams 

Will P. Billings 

Corwin Boake 

Fred C. Bush 

Alice Cobb Carlson 

Irma Crabb Lewis 
*S. V. Jackson 
♦Rose Klein 

Ida Oesting Thompson 

J. Benjamin Robertson 

Bertha Salsich Baird 

Ira G. Saltmarsh 

F. V. Schmitt 

Margaret Schobert White 

1895 
Myrtle Baker Page 
Lucy Boake Short 
Pearl Clark 
Ed Humes 



Rose Hirtzell 
Alice Harding 
Fred Leininger 
Jennie Lemon Barritt 
Algnettie Lester Carter 
♦Lulu Mason McPheeters 
Margaret J. Phelan 
Amie Robertson 
Elizabeth Reinhart O'Mara 
Willard Stout 
Bertha Short Reinhart 

1896 

Edna Brown 

Emelia Beikman 

Bert Bottorff 

Eleuthera Davison Coryea 
♦Clara Everhart 
♦Alice Moses Flomerfelt 

Edith Flenniken Gaylord 

Freda Heins Hauenschild 

Maud Jeffries 
♦Laura Klipple 

Georgia Montgomery Kirsch 

Harry McGinnis 

Albert Meseke 

Mary Meek 

Nina Patrick 

Clara Nieman Becker 

Edna Scanlon Bollinger 

Johnanna Newby 

Rossi Robertson 

1897 

Daisy Alwes 

Virgil Able 

J. H. Andrews 

H. W. Burkley 

Clara Beyer Rapp 

Lulu Casey Holderman 
♦Mayme Dennison Saltmarsh 
♦Emma Niemeyer 

Enola Miller Montgomery 

Harry H. McDonald 
♦Emma Hustedt Bell 
♦Bertha McCann 

Caroline Reich 

Katherine Short 

Bessie Thompson 

Nettie Wilhelm 

Bertie Wolf McHaffie 

Alpha Hoadley Williams 



1898 

Albert Charles 
Arthur DeGolyer 
Harry Dannettell 
Carrie Dennison 
Hattie Emery Fink 
Lydia Frey Elrod 
Lena Harlow 
Nora Flenniken 
Kittie Jackson Vernier 
Mae Love 

Millicent Miles Groub 
Helen Smith Graessle 
Edward Lauster 

1899 

Harry Arnold 
Josephine Abel 
Nora Abel 
Bertha Bollinger 
Jason Crane 
Clarence Davis 
Hettie Elliott Spreen 
Arthur French 
Clarence Hinsdale 
Wayne Hancock 
Effie Hibner Carter 
Fred Jeffries 
Lulu Knost 
Edward Loertz 
Sudie Mills Matlock 
John Patrick 
Garfield Rapp 
Effie Weaver DeGoyler 

1900 

Laura Edith Andrews 
Nellie Balsley 
Rose Barkman Hamilton 
Myrtle Bennett 
Will Borcherding 
John Buhner 
Grace Conner Harris 
Minnie Cordes Wilhelm 
Ed Eisner 
Lyda Flenniken 
Blanche Huffman 
Macie Johnson Hill 
Merle Little 
♦H. Roy Luckey 



Bessie Montgomery 
Emma Meseke Mattox 
Thomas O'Mara 
Wm. Peter, Jr. 
Raliegh Robertson 
Ed H. Vehslage 

1901 
*Mae Boggs 
Katie Mae Cordes Luckey 
Ben H. Cox 
Thomas Casey 
Helena Hustedt Bender 
Everett Heller 
Ed. Hopewell 
Viola Harsh Critcher 
Albert Massman 
Erma Montgomery Williams 
Herbert Robertson 
Amy B. Roegge 
Dorothy Sandau Martin 
Margaret Sheron Crane 
Frank B. Shields 
Lelia Vest Mayes 
Emma William Brunow 
Vallie Woesner 
Bertha Truelock Campbell 
Clarence Weaver 

1902 

Anna G. Abel 
Harry G. Ackerman 
James G. Anderson 
Goldie G. Atkisson 
Geo. A. Baldwin 
Daisy E. Barkman Blair 
Albert E. Berdon 
Kelsa F. Bottorff 
Jessie L. Buchanan 
Andrew L. Carson 
Margaret Finnegan Baker 
Clara Grelle Krueger 
Harry B. Guernsey 
Agnes A. Hoffman 
Flossie B. Johnson 
Albert H. Kasting 
E. G. Kyte 
Clara Massman 
Kathryne Price 
Alma L. Reich 
Clara L. Trueter 
Harry E. Vogel 



1903 

John H. Conner 

Frank A. Dahlenburg 
♦Charlton V. Durland 

John Louis Finnegan 

Frances Hibner Milhouse 

Rosa Himler Meyer 

Otto Carl Horst 

Mayme McDonald Eisner 

Everett F. Meyer 

Lillian Prewitt 
♦Edna F. Price 

Maybelle Richardson Fox 

John C. Rinne 

Irwin A. Schncck 

Carl R. Switzer 

Nellie Switzer 

J. F. W. Westmier 

1904 
Howard W. Balsley 
Don A. Bollinger 
Ida M. Critcher Casper 
Viola E. Doane 
Allen C. Foster 
Georgia Lauster Hopewell 
Bertha Meseke 
Madge Montgomery Steel 
Faye Johnson Reisncr 
Mina Weaver Meyer 
Bertha E. Woesner 

1905 

Chas. Appel 
♦Nellie Baughman 
♦Elsie Cordes 

Walter Horst 

Bertha Hoffman Hunter 

Maurice Jennincs 

Effie Lane McCuIlcy 

Edna Massman 

Wm. G. Masters 

Frieda Meyer 

Harlan Montgomery 

Julius Peter 

Nellie Phelan 

John Roeger 

Claude Swengle 

1906 
Anna Able 
Helen Andrew Kali in 
♦Lynn Bollinger 



Everet Craig 
Ora Emery 
Glen Frey 

Irma Hodapp Boicourt 
Bessie Humes 
Christine Lebline Rapp 
*Alice Lucky 
Kathryn McLaughlin 
Joseph Ormsby 
Clara Rapp 
Harold Ritter 
Mary Schmitt 
Ida Siefker 
Lenore Stanfield 
Stanley Switzer 

1907 

Minnie Bartlett 

Bernice Bauer 

Fred Binning 

Stenson Clark 
♦Henry Cobb 

Addie Gasaway 

Edward Huber 

Gladys Kyte 
♦Clara McDonald 

Frank Montgomery 

Clara Niemeyer 

Anna Rucker 

Robertson Short 
■ Edna Swope Hughes 

Wilhelmina Veshlage 
1908 

Nettie Able Harlow 

George Appel 

Ora Armstrong 

Glen Basey 

John Casey 

A. lies Cobb 
er Craig 

Fern I 'ens ford 

Grace Doane 

Chas. Hess 

Jessie Himler 

Delight Hopewell Gatt 

Stella Laupus Huffman 

Hazel Love Sargi nl 

nfentoria M. Donald Kendall 

Maud McGinnis 

Mabel Niemeyi 

Chas. Phelan 

l ninia Rosa M< i k< 



Minnie Shepard 
May Spurling Dobbins 
Alma Switzer 
George Veshlage 

1909 
Ross Baldwin 
Louisa Brown Swengel 
James Enos 
Rosa Hunt McLean 
Lynn Heller 
Howard Bartlett 
Goldie Kendall 
Goldie Lutes 
Matilda Lebline 
Helen Massman 
Chas. Rottman 
Louis Schneck 
Karl Seulke 

Mabel Hodapp Hufnagel 
Clem Roegge 
Holmes Thompson 
Evelyn Wood 

1910 
Flossie Allen 
Florence Appel 
Ad?. Cordes McCool 
Forest Craig 
Lemuel Day 
Homer Davis 
Edna Dobbins Sanders 
Francis Gates 
Enola Harris 
Erma Heuser 
Linden Hodapp 
Lillian Kelly Kern 
Alma Laupus Appel 
Myra Laupus Gates 
Elsie Lawell Rodert 
Cash McOsker 
Christine Meyer 
Merrill Montgomery 
*Francis Murdock 
T. Louis Niemeyer 
Fern Ritter 
Elsie Rucker Sheets 
Frank Schwab 
Joseph Swope 
Frances Teckemeyer 
Harold Vehslage 
Blain Vogel 
Frank Wheeler 



Bernice White Hodapp 
Rex Whitson 

1911 

Carrie Aufderheide 

Fred Bacon 

Mary Baker Brooks 

Madge Brown 

Willard Burkley 

Hattie Carr Hill 

Catharine Clark 

Louis Cordes 

Gladys Coryell Coleman 

Helen Downs Minkiewitz 

Chas. Foster 

Margart Frey Thoma 

Harold Graessle 

Kennedy Hassenzahl 

Minnie Heintz Marquette 

Frank Hopewell 

Martha Kitts Myrtle 

Clara Langhorst T-upman 

Marguerite Miller Hodapp 

Carl Osterman 

Nora Pomeroy Darling 

Margaret Remy 

Lois Reynolds Stiles 

Minnie Schleter 

Gertrude Sweany Pillinger 

Julius Teckemeyer 

Walter Voss 

Leota Wieneke 

1912 
Ruth Baldwin 
Ernest Ballard 
Lulu Bishop 
Bessie Bollinger 
Beula H. Bozell 
Linton Brewer 
Francis Bunton 
Juliette Cox Betz 
Clarence Craig 
John Eckler 
Carl Fox 
Raymond Foster 
Leland Hadley 
Hazel Heinz Myers 
Elizabeth Hoffman Hetzler 
Clarence Kasting 
George Laupus 
Martha Loertz 



Ruth Lebline Enos 
Joseph McDonald 
Marion Mclntyre 
Irving Pumphrey 
Duncan Reed 
Lora Reynolds Stewart 
Ethel Rottman 
*Alice Ruddick 
Edna Schwab Garvey 
Roy Schafer 
Alice Stanfield Cooley 
Leona Thompson Hess 
Luella Toms Graessle 
Hattie Roeger 

1913 

Esther Arnold 

Mary Lee Galbraith Armstrong 
Mary Teckemeyer Bacon 
Cullen Barnes 
*Hazel Bretthauer Fleetwood 
Freda Deppert Feaster 
Josephine Fettig 
Wilfred Geile 
Maurice Hodapp 
Ruth Kaufman 
Will Humes 

Catherine Hancock Laupus 
Frank Lemp 
Mary Mack 
Harriett Montgomery 
George Schleter 
Earl Schobert 
Lena Shafer 
Ethel Stewart 
Charles Thomas 
Bertha Torbrocke 
Henry Walenburg 
Ewing Shields 
Roy Manion 
Chester Miller 

1914 
Horace H. Ackerman 
Eleanor Ahlbrand 
Ernest Amick 
Jennie Bridges Zanders 
Zetta Brown Woody 
Esther Bush 
William Byrne 
Margaret Byrne 
Hazel Clark 



Wilma Colemeyer 
Phillip Cordes 
Raymond Craig 
Fred Culp 
Josephine Cuddahee 
Esther Doane 
Ova Donnell 
Arthur Enos 
Faye Everhart Amick 
Alice Fox 
Mary Foster 
Thomas Galbraith 
Herbert Gallemore 
Omer Greeman 
John Hagel 

Minerva Hazzard Gruber 
Ray Himebaugh 

Gladys Johnson 

Pearl Kaufman 

Kathryn Kessler 

Cecil Kelso 

Inez Kreinhagen Dennison 

Mary Lewis 

Everett Murray 

Gertrude Meyer 

Grace Miller Hemmer 

Joseph Misch 

Chloe Nevans 

Lillian Osterman Brunow 

Ira Pomeroy 

Amelia Schleter 

Alice Saunders 

Grahame St. John 

Charles Trumbo 

Bertha Werning 

Myrtle Young Ackerman 

1915 
Mabel Marie Abcll 
Walter Abel 
Grace Ackeret 
Lois Baker 
William Beyer 
Orville Bottorff 
Reginald Brinklow 
Kingsley Brinklow 
Mary Byrne Rottman 
Lura Carnes 
Thomas V. Carter 
Herbert Craig 
Merle Dannetell 
Florence Darling Bartlett 



Harold Donnell 

Mary Magdi leen Fettig 

Margaret Fo t< i 

Doris Geile 

Estella Gilbert 

Imogene Glasson 

Harry Glasson 

Winifred < .in in- 

Viola Green 

Earle Harrington 

Mabel Clare Hairod 

Frances Hess 

Edna Hodapp 

Elton Howe 

Edris Hughes 

Minnie Madden 

Bernice Amelia Miller 

Roy Niehaus 

Marie Orr 

Louis Osterman 

Russell Phillips 

Nona Ruckcr 

C. George Schleter 

Lawrence Shannon 

Edna Smith 

Mildred Tucker 

Frank Wineke 

Laura William Sclmeck 

Caroline Wohrer 

Margaret McDonald Burton 

1916 
Lloyd Franklin Ackerman 
Rachel Barbour 
Gladys Becker 
Lyman Blisb 
Joe Burton 
Lois Casey P.eatty 
William DeMunbrun 
Glennis Dixon 
Rebecca Dixon 
Grace Foster 
Mabel Foster 
Maud Foster 
Claude Glasson 
Elsie Harris 
Paul Hoffman 
Hilda Howe 
Mary Irene Hunsucker 
Fenelon Johnson 
Meril Jones 
Frieda Kasting 



Annette Kessler Test 
Nellie Lind 
♦William Mackey 
Marion Mains 
Maud McClintock 
Harold Meyer 
Charles Milburn 
Leota Nevins Brinklow 
Samuel Newby 
Inez Paul 
Chester Riley 
Claude Robbins 
Cecil Shields 
Emma Simons 
Carl Sumner 
Charles Stanfield 
Pearl Teckemeyer 
Edith Trumbo 
Dorothy Ulm Plump 
Carrie Ethel Walker 
Jean Weber 
Harry M. Williams 
Chester Wilson 

1917 
Jessaline Alexander 
Helen Barnes Stout 
Paul Becker 
Willard Becker 
Hal Branaman 
Elmer Bollinger 
Amy Bridges Goodlander 
Helen Brunow Bruening 
Genevieve Brocher 
John Connelly 
Flossie Collins 
Iris Cox Weddel 
Edna Dixon 
Ruth Edwards 
Marguerite Fox 
Clyde Fitzgibbon 
Esther Grelle 
Esther Groub Enos 
Kenneth Greeman 
Mansil Hughes 
Jetl Hoover 
Carmel Hazzard 
Louise Hodapp 
Putli Kamman 
Madge Linke 
Margaret Lewis 
Lee Miller 



Ethel Mitchel 
Margaret McCord 
Mabel McColgin 
Kenneth McCurdy 
Elsie Miller 
Marie Nichter Wells 
Lila Nieman 
Hulda Osterman Topie 
Fae Patrick 
Veva Paul Cooper 
Fay Parker 
Malcolm Rittenhouse 
Horace Seelinger 
Carl Sumner 
Edwin Schleter 
Oscar Shepard 
Virgil Snow 
Ruby Smith Kaufman 
Edna Sumner Glasson 
Willa Teckemeyer 
Eva Thicksten 
Marie Wieneke 
Lillian Whitson 
Anna Zimmerman 

1918 
Burel Beatty 
Lorita Bollinger 
Jerome Boyles 
Frederick Bretthauer 
Daisy Carter Weddel 
Edric Cordes 
Georgia Cox 
Due Craig 
Alice Dixon 
Gladys Fox 

Gladys Glasson Shannon 
Marguerite Hirtzel 
Kathryn Hodapp 
Esther Humes 
George Hurt 
Doris Jackson 
Thelma Jones 
Lawrence Kasting 
Lucille Kasting 
Elizabeth Lucile Kessler 
Alice Knige 
Emma Kruge 
Justine Leas 
Katherinc Love Howse 
Mabel Martin 
Harry Miller 



Mildred Nichter 
William Ross 
Otis Shannon 
Joseph Sheedy 
Jennie Shields 
Francis Stunkel 
Frank Weller 

1919 
Thelma Alberring 
Ralph Amick 
Elsie Aufenberg 
Beulah Barnum 
Edith Bowman 
Albert Bretthauer 
Leroy Bretthauer 
Edward Buhner 
Maurice Byrne 
Helen Clark 
Ruth Craig 
Helen Dannettelle 
Durbin Day 
Earl Dieck 
Edna Downs Kruwell 
Rugy Ernest 
Gleason Ewing 
Mylrea Findley Schaeffer 
Stella Gossett 
Garnet Greeman 
Maud Green 
Lillian Griffiitts 
Marie Gudgel 
Margaret Hall 
Irene Heideman 
James Himler 
Walter Huber 
Hazel Humes 
Fern Hunter 
Ruth Hunter 
Harold James 
Glenn Kcach 
Ruth Kramer 
Gladys Lawell 
Cletus Mackey 
Luella Mascher 
Ruth Miller 
Irene Pfenning 
Esther Prall 
Edwin Ruddick 
Hazel Stanfield 
Hilda Steinwedel 
Edith Summa 



Omega Wheaton 
Josephine White Icenogle 
Arthur Wilde 

1920 

Bessie Abell 
William Abel 
Hazel Ackeret 
Fred Ackerman 
Agnes Andrews 
Mary Goodloe Billings 
Helen Blain 
Charles Blumer 
Karl Braskett 
Mae Carr 

Anna Holland Carter 
Louise Carter 
Ella Clements 
Marion Crabb 
Opal Craig 
Newton Day 
Irene Dehler 
Montclova Fields Hill 
Everett Foster 
Frances Green 
Harry Gottberg 
Jane Hass 
Merrill Harsh 
Mary Louise Honan 
Margaret Hopewell 
Dorothy Huber Lunte 
Garrison Humes 
Dora Johnson 
Cecil Jones 
Ruby Judd 
Ella Mae Kruwell 
Helen Lewis 
Oren Lewis 
Elnora Lockmund 
Maurice Mackey 
Edward Massman 
Gladys May 
Harold Mercer 
Edmund Montgomery 
Doris Norbeck 
Arthur Phillips 
Kathryn Reider 
Miriam Rinne 
Malcolm Routt 
Edna Ruddick 
Kathryn Schaefer 
♦Howard E. Shultz 



Eugene Smith 
Anna Schmidt 
Leo Spray 
Dorothy Spanagel 
Clarence Steinwedel 
Ruth Stanfield 
Margaret Thomas 
Emma Maude Wesner 
Kenneth Whitman 
Helen Wolter 
Felix Cadou 

1921 
Henry Abbett 
Pearl Ackeret 
Waneta Albrich Reveal 
Joe Andrews, Jr. 
Tipton Blish 
Howard Blumer 
Wm. Brackemyre 
Edwina Carson 
Forrest Brockhoff 
Calvin Dobbins 
Frances Downs Newson 
Florence Downing 
Marguerite Edgar 
Shirley Foulkconer 
Mildred Fettig 
Mable Green 
Margaret Guthrie 
Ellsworth Hagel 
Harry Hedges 
Thomas Humes 
Esther Jones 
Ruby Joslin 
Robert Keach 
Alma Kruge 
Helen Linke 
Agnes Lucas 
Ralph Mack 
Wm. Mains 
Charles Maple 
Frank Miller 
Francis Misch 
Earl Parker 
Esther Phillips 
Elsie Reider 
Alba Rogers 
Lewis Schaefer 
Alice Seymour 
Mack Shiel 
Olive Stants 



Glen Sutton 
Lucile Walters 
Bertha Weller 
George Weller 
Florence Wicthoff 

1922 
Constance Adam- 
Brunow Ahlbrand 
Charles Banta 
Robert Barbour 
Florence Becker 
Edith Beukman 
Helen Blevins 
Gladys BreitfuKl 
Paula Breitfield 
Mary Brown 
Owen Carter 
Emalyn Collins 
John Deal 
Grace Dunn 
Oscar Fenton 
Francis Fettig 
Chester Fill 
Alice Foster 
Francis Geile 
Frances Gill 
Stella Hallowell 
Lawrence Hatfield 
John Hunter 
Ray Julian 
Paul Kamman 
Arthur Kaufman 
Matilda Kessler 
Kathryn Kirsh 
Forrest Kysar 
Marie Kysar 
Eloise Lee 
Gladys Lee 
Carl Maliik 
Robert Mann 
Donald Miller 
Fern Rhodi - 
Margaret Riehl 
Agnes Rionlan 
Ruth Robertson 
Hershall Ruddick 
Lloyd Schafer 
Dorothy Smith 
Louise Wcrning 
Hamer Wesner 
* Deceased. 



cue DKeassion lemae. 

That "Time does make ancient good uncouth" is true of the old-time 
elocution; but so great is the delight of audiences in oral expression, that the 
temporary disfavor in which it was held is rapidly being done away with, and 
there has come a revived interest in oral expression. 

Contests in debating, discussion, oratory, and interpretative reading mark 
the programs of many high schools and colleges; and courses in public speak- 
ing, as a distinctive branch of the English work, are being established in increas- 
ing numbers. The human voice, as the expression of personality as well as 
thought, is still and will always be a vital force in the affairs of men and women. 

In our own school there has been during the last few years an increasing 
amount of time spent on oral expression. 

Again this year we took part in the discussion of the question selected by 
the "State High School Discussion League"; and Osborne Fischbach as our 
county winner represented us in a most creditable way at the District Contest 
at North Vernon. 

The choice of Osborne as our district representative was preceded by a 
thorough study of and many local discussions of the question selected ; namely, 
"A solution for industrial disputes in public and quasi-public industries." 

The results of this study have been undoubtedly beneficial and a prepara- 
tion for better work next year. 

In the realm of the inter-school debate, we are about to make our initial 
venture; and as this book goes to press, we are looking forward to our joint 
debate with Bedford. The subject selected grew out of the "High School Dis- 
cussion" and the debaters will argue the question, "Resolved, That all Disputes 
in Public and Quasi-public Industries shall be settled by Compulsory Arbitra- 
tion." 

The affirmative speakers: Franklin Swain, captain, Florence Blain and 
Dorothy Story will debate at home against the negative Bedford team; our 
aegative debaters; Osborn Fischbach, captain, Norma Barkman and George 
Wilson will go to Bedford. 

Arrangements are being made for a much fuller debating schedule for 
next year. 

Another outgrowth of this revived interest in oral expression is a movement 
that promises much of value and enjoyment for the people of Seymour. Under 
the auspices of the Seymour Community Service there has been organized the 
'Seymour ( lommunity Players," a group of people interested in the recreational 
activities of our city, who, realizing the unlimited sources of delight in the 
drama are hoping to interest increasing numbers in its enjoyment. 

For 'The drama embraces and applies all the beauties and decorations of 
Poetry. The sister arts attend and adorn it. Painting, architecture, and music 
aw he- aaudmaids. The costliest lights of a people's intellect burn at her shrine. 
All ages welcome her." 



UJuatr Hkmorjj ffinntrat 



The entire music department took an inierei! in the Music Memory Contest as was 
proven by tiie results. After weeks of listening and other preparation the citj contest took 
place. Prizes were given by many people and business houses, the prizes beii 

records, or music lessons. 

In the city contest there were twelve perfect papers in the grades and eleven in the High 
School. There were many excellent papers, but onlj the perfect ones received prizes. Then 

were county, district and state contests. 

Miss Alice Becker, a Sophomore, was the only one from Shields who wenl to the 
state contest. There she made a perfect paper, and only after a prolonged overtime examina- 
tion was she eliminated. 



Qlprtamnt ffiatinum 



For several years it has been the custom of many districts in the state, to make an animal 
Latin contest one of the activities of the school year. The movement has been sponsored and 
encouraged by the State Latin Teachers' Association. It is felt that these contests have 
much to promote a fine spirit of scholarship, and to stimulate as loyal a sch< "1 spirit in the 
matter of scholarly attainments as has always been manifested in athletics. 

When the news came to us that the Fourth District was to undertake a contest of this 
sort for the first time, great interest and enthusiasm was manifested amonu the Latin students 
of our school. The local Certamen Latinum held on March the 18th, to determine the 
representatives for the county contest, proved lively and interesting. About thirty-five 
students entered the strenuous preliminaries. The following received the highest local 
honors, and represented S. H. S. at Brownstown on March the 26th. 

First Year Latin — Mildred Peacock, Beryl Dannettelle. 

Caesar — Alice Cobb, Gordon Miller. 

Cicero — Raymond Feaster, Mary Fettig. 

Virgil — Beryl Shields, Lydia Kruge. 

Results of the county contest showed that honor medals were awarded to five of our 
contestants. 

Virgil— First award, Beryl Shields ; second award, Lydia Kruge. 

Cicero — First award, Raymond Feaster; second award, Mary Fettig. 

Caesar — First award, Gordon Miller. 

These five winners were sent to Columbus on April the 2ht for the District Meet. Beryl 
Shields brought S. H. S. honor by winning first place in Virgil, Lydia Kruge, second. Ray- 
mond Feaster won second in Cicero and Gordon Miller second in Caesar, both the latter 
losing to first place by a difference of but one per cent. 

"Seymour Schola 
Semper Summa ! 
Honorissima ! 
Seymour Schola est dura ! 
O hurrah, O hurrah, O hurrah !" 

Throughout the contests a fine spirit of good sportmanship has been shown bj both 
winners and losers. We hope that the Centamen may become an annual event in our school, 
and that plans which are being made for a state-wide meet, can be carried out next year. 



Agriculture Winners 









Iatin Contestants 






g>nme Arljteuem*nte in tlj? Sfjrartmrot of 
llnratumai Agrirultur? 

Carl Fill, Everett Otte and William Schluesemeier won signal honors for 
themselves and their school when, as a team, in the state corn judging contest 
they were aAvarded first place and a large cup (trophy). 

They also won another cup as champions in the livestock judging contest 
on the work with sheep. 

In individual competition Carl Fill won a gold medal for the best corn judge 
in the state, and a ribbon for third place in the livestock judging work on Bheep. 
Everett Otte won a ribbon for second honors in the livestock judging work on 
dairy cattle. 

William Schluesemeier won the trip to the International Livestock Show at 
Chicago as a result of his successful poultry club work; and also a trip to the 
Club "Round Up" at Purdue by the First National Bank of Seymour for his 
corn club work. Everett Otte won second, a trip by the same bank and Clyde 
May stood third. Wilfred Nichter won sweepstakes honors in the annual egg 
show held by the agricultural classes. Carl Fill won second honors. 

These honors conferred upon the students of the agriculture classes are most 
gratifying and are a testimony to the high grade of work done by these students 
under the direction of their instructor, Mr. H. C. Henderson. 



ermine 





OFVRWZfOOO 

Athletic activities were resumed in the fall with the organization of the 
Athletic Association. The following officers were elected : 

President Franklin Swain 

Vice-President Jarvis Hyatt 

Secretary Elizabeth James 

Treasurer Arthur Becker 

The Athletic Council as chosen was: Miss Kate Andrews, chairman; 
Franklin Swain, Jarvis Hyatt, Elizabeth James, Arthur Becker, H. C. Hender- 
son, and J. R. Mitchell. 

The students responded nobly to the call for members. To insure the 
publicity of the athletic activities of the school a publicity committee was 
elected. Gladys Hopple, Thelma Bell, and Miss Eva Sinclair were elected to 
this committee, and were responsible for much lively advertising. 

Coach Mitchell's call for basketball candidates was answered by fifty-two 
enthusiastic boys. With Keach, Hyatt, Honan, Adams, Misamore, and McCord 
left from last year and Hooker, who moved here from Scottsburg, a fast team 
was whipped into shape with the assistance of an excellent second team to 
practice against, The Lutheran Club Gymnasium was used prior to the com- 
pletion of the new High School Gymnasium. 

Seymour was fortunate in being selected as one of the district basketball 
centers. The District Basketball Tournament was held in the new gymnasium, 
March 2 and 3, and proved to be a great success. In order to use the new 
gymnasium work was rushed to completion and was finished the morning of 
the tourney. 



lDcetvoass Basrar kill 

The inter-class basket bail tourney was postponed this year until the last 
of the season when the new gymnasium would be available. As usual, the 
Seniors romped off with the inter-class championship title, snowing the Fresh- 
men under in a hard-fought contest. 

Freshmen 17 — Juniors 14 

Seniors 64 — Sophomores 4 

Juniors 31 — Sophomores 11 

Seniors 38 — Freshmen 5 

In an unofficial tourney between the second teams of each class, the Junior 
seconds took the title. 

The Senior team was practically the same as the Varsity with Misamore, 
forward; McCord, forward; Keach, center; Hyatt center; and Honan, Adams 
and Hooker, guards. 

The best game was between the Juniors and the Freshmen, the latter 
winning by a narrow margin. 

The Seniors succeeded in scoring 102, as against their opponent's 9. 



1DC6R-CLHSS NlSt BALL 

An inter-class baseball tourney was held at the beginning of the season in 
order to give Coach Henderson a line on the available material for a winning 
team. The inter-class games were run off the first of April at the Seymour 
Athletic Park. 

Juniors 3 — Freshmen 2 

Seniors 7 — Sophomores 5 

Seniors 5 — Juniors 3 

The Seniors captured the inter-class title by defeating the Juniors in the 
final game. The line-up follows: 

McClintock, 3b Adams, If Baldwin, c 

Hyatt, 2b Andrews, cf Wilson, p 

Russell, lb McCord, rf Becker, ss 



UF1RS1CY SCHeDCJLe 

Oct. 20 — Seymour 27 — Brownstown 8 there 

Oct. 27 — Seymour 46 — Freetown 6 there 

Nov. 3 — Seymour 47 — Alumni 15 here 

Nov. 10 — Seymour 18 — Franklin 42 there 

Nov. 17 — Seymour 39 — Triangles 10 here 

Nov. 24 — Seymour 31 — Scottsburg 20 there 

Dec. 8— Seymour 22 — Edinburg 30 there 

Dec. 15 — Seymour 22 — Southport 30 there 

Jan. 6 — Seymour 34 — Orleans 28 there 

Jan. 12 — Seymour 29 — Scottsburg 14 there 

Jan. 19 — Seymour 35 — Mitchell 24 there 

Jan. 26 — Seymour 19 — Lyons 31 there 

Jan. 27 — Seymour 32 — Linton 18 there 

Feb. 10 — Seymour 31 — Brownstown 13 there 

Feb. 10 — Seymour 34 — Crothersville 11 Brownstown 

Feb. 10 — Seymour 47 — Cortland 30 Brownstown 

Feb. 16 — Seymour 17 — Columbus 34 there 

Feb. 17— Seymour 17 — Southport 20 here 

Mar. 2— Seymour 21 — Crothersville 9 here 

Mar. 3— Seymour 25 — North Vernon 11 here 

Mar. 3— Seymour 26 — Cortland 14 here 

Mar. 3— Seymour 43 — Butlervillc 14 here 

Mar. 10— Seymour 12 — Franklin 15 Bloomingtou 




LEWIS ADAMS 




ROBERT McCORD 




HAROLD MISAMORE 




LOUIS ECKSTEIN 




JARVIS HYATT 




CHARLES REACH 




JAMES HONAN 




HOLLIS HOOKER 




EARL YOUNG 




Base &an 



With the coming of spring, baseball resumed it's major position in outdoor 
athletics. With Baldwin, McClintick, Nichalson, J. Hyatt, Eckstein, Becker, 
A (I ;uns, and Johnson as hold-overs from last year, indications pointed to a very 
successful season. A wealth of material was found in Eckstein, Beem and 
Young to fill the mound position, left vacant by the ineligibility of Wilson, star 
south-paw of the last two years. Baldwin was elected to serve his third succes- 
sive year as captain. 

The season was opened with a victory over the Brownstown Bear Cats in a 
game played at Brownstown. The score was 6 to 0. 

The Athletic Association purchased new uniforms for the team at the begin- 
ning of the season. 

Baldwin, c Becker, ss 

McClintock, 3b Nicholson, If 

Hyatt, 2b Malick, cf 

Russell, lb Glasson, rf 



Young, p and lb 
Eckstein, p 
Beem, p. 
Johnson, c 



M<< lintick, Hyatt, Russell, Baldwin and Becker will be lost by graduation. 




C6DDIS 



Tennis was made a part of the fall athletic program for the second time. 
A series of inter-class matches were arranged between the Freshmen, Sopho- 
mores, Juniors and Seniors. 

The Lutheran club court was used throughout the tourney. Walter Hyatt 
and Charles Keach won for the Seniors the championship in doubles by riprht 
of their victory over the Junior representatives. 

There were no matches arranged with other schools this year, but it is hoped 
by the student body that tennis will be featured among fall athletics, and a 
series of matches with other schools may be arranged to further that. end. 




URflCK 



Coach Mitchell 's call for track candidates was promptly answered by many 
boys. Early spring training was afforded by practice in the new gymnasium, 
until the weather was favorable for outdoor work. The team worked and elimi- 
nations were made early so that the best of attention and instruction could be 
given by Coach Mitchell. 

H. Ahlbrand was the only hold-over from last year's team who participated 
in track work this spring, but around him was built a team that gave assurance 
that Seymour had resumed her former place in track work although this was 
but the second year with the track and field listed among the spring activities. 

April 19 a dual track meet was held at the Athletic Park between Crothers- 
ville and Seymour, the latter winning by the score of 67 to 39. 

Seymour showed great strength in track events, taking first place in all 
the runs, and did well in the field events. 

Other dual track meets have been arranged with Columbus, Salem, and 
Crothersville, also a Sectional Meet at Columbus, May 12. 

Track shoes and suits were purchased by the Athletic Association and dis- 
tributed to the members of the team. 



Mr. Ackerman— "Why are women like salad?" 
Bill— "Because they need a good deal of dressing." 



Elizabeth — "Oh, my lips are so sore this morning." 
Katherine— "I think it is from the sun." 
James — "Whose son?" 

Mr. Mitchell— "I'm not much of a speaker, boys, but I have several little things in my 
head that I am trying to get rid of." 

j h. — "Ever try a fine-toothed comb?" 



Mr. Phillips— "What is a vacuum?" 

Paul L— "Things you push around to clean rugs with." 



Miss McHenry — "Faces this way." 

Clarence Otis — "I can't make mine that way.' 



Francis — "Say, my feet are getting tired." 

Owen — "Oh, that's all right, think of the ride your stomach's getting." 



Eyes are to sparkle, 

Cheeks are to blush, 
Arms to encircle you 

Oh, my ! hush, 
Kiss is a noun 

Both common and proper, 
When you kiss her 

Make it a whopper. 



Miss Myers— "John, have you seen or read "Crabb's Tales?" 
John — "No, I didn't know red crabs had tails." 



Ruth — "Say, Dorothy, those are good looking shoes you have on. How much?" 

Dorothy M — "Eight and a half." 

Ruth — "Oh, I mean the price, not the size." 



Mr. Phillips— "Lewis, what is the greatest instance of magnetic power you can think of?" 
Lewis E— "When my girl draws me seven miles on Sunday night to see her." 



Walter H— "My head feels awful hot." 
Toots— "I thought'l smelled wood burning." 



Harden H.— "Don't you think a talkative girl is better than any other kind?' 
Mac— "What other kind is there?" 



■a ^ r ^'"'P 5 — " The ,aw of gravity keeps us from falling off the earth when it is up- 
»ide down. * 

'29— "What did folks do before that law was passed?" 



FLIVVERS 

Yea, verily, I say unto thee, the Ford belongs to that class of vehicles which doth Dot 
fly; nor doth it creep, but like the unceasing thunder, dotli rumble on and on forever 
thou ask where with I am supplied with the necessary knowledge and right to broa 
same? Yea, brother, I say unto thee I own one. 

It's steering wheel toucheth my heart or doth prod gently in the vicinity thereof. The 
accessory dealer doth touch my pocketbook with his line of chatter and flim-flam accessories. 

Cold weather doth give a remarkable degree of stubborness to the worthy self-starter 
(in name only) and when its battery doth run down from any of several causes, its starting 
crank doth provide a gentle and delightful exercise until it doth kick back mightily, which 
causeth its owner to register deep chagrin and murmur, "Darn it!" with all the gentle 
timidity of a man shouting "Fire !" 

When finally the sleeping engine doth begin its day again, a safe-cracking job i 
be heard in a radius of three blocks. 

At night it travelleth by the light of the moon only, for its head-light doth flicker and 
vanish as doth the mouse on seeing the kitty or as doth the pocketbook on the approach of 
friend wife. 

Ft doth rattle and knock, like unto a harvester; it doth moan and howl like unto a 
gafilta fish, which doth continually grow worse until it wheezeth its last cough. 

Trouble, like a Seven Headed Chinese Devil, never sleepeth, but doth forever percolate 
around His Lordship, the Ford owner. 

Yea, verily, I say unto you, tires are an evil influence to mankind, for they do assume 
the appearance of a good tire in the garage, but do cast off this deceptive raiment with a 
bang when thou art miles from home. 

However, brethern, as the prophets hath said, even a snake hath good points, even 
tho it be to eat other snakes. So I Liken unto this, the Ford, for when it is tuck in sand 
or mud, the owner need but get out and lift the back end over on high ground and pro- 
ceed forth. 

The Ford hath all the speed of a slumbering turtle. Allow me, my brethern, to quote 
from my friend Bill Shakespeare : 

"The Ford, it is a wonder, 

You give it gas, and say, 
You pass by all the other cars 
(That go the other way.)" 

Henry Ford hath said, "Buy a Ford and spend the difference." Brethren, I ask you, 
spend it on what? Repairs? 

Still, my brethren, the car doth seem to be vastly popular. People ordereth far in 
advance and accepeth their delivery with all the languid indifference of a starving tiger 
that pouncth upon it's first meal in a fortnight. 

So, therefore, brethern, harken ye unto my words, all that is gold need not necessarfl) 
glitter, and though a man may wear out many Fords, like a tenacious cat, he always cometh 
back and buyeth another. 



KEEP OFF THE GRASS 

The ground was soft So now take heed 
The grass was wet And do not set 

We got a chill On ground that's soft 
As there we set. Or grass that's wet. 



Miss Small (assigning lesson)— "We will begin with lightning and go to thunder." 



'24 (inspecting the basketball schedule)— "Where is that place, Alumni?" 



Mr. Glaze— "There's not a boy in this class who will say that Commercial Arithmetic 
is hard." 

'23 — "It's just because we're afraid to." 



FOR BOYS ONLY. 

pE3q J3U, UO pUEJS OJ pEq 3qS J J 

Moqauios }i je jaS p.aqs ;Eqj avoujj a^\ 
'peaj XpE3J[E s ( aqs tuaod siqj }Eqx 
smuq3nop oj sjEjiop jaq oj Suijiim. 3J,3A\ 
Moqs e jo apEqs e u3A|3 ji 
Moqauios u jnoqE j[E jno puy n.aqs jaq 3m puy 
'moujj 01 }du iqSno aqs qDiqM. }Eqi UEqj jaijag 
jno puy 0} 3>iq pmoM.' jjiS e Suiqiou s.aaaqj. 



Mr. Due — "When were automobiles first thought of?" 

R. B. — "In Bible times. The Bible says that Elijah crossed the river by Ford and went 
up on higfi." 

"How beautiful the moon is" said Mr. Ackerman, taking off his hat. 

Miss H. — "Manuel, you may come in every day after school and stay for a week." 

Mr. Due (meeting his son) — "Good morning, Homer, how is your father this morning." 

Mrs. Swails — "Fred, what does the word 'procrastinate' mean?" 

Fred — "To put off." 

Mrs. Swails — "Use it in a sentence." 

Fred — "Procrastinate me at the next corner." 



"THE PATRIOT" STAFF 

Typewriter rattling Ruth eating candy 
Telephone ringing, EuDaly gone wild, 

Lois Hall prattling Becker plays banjo 

Theodore singing. And sings "Angel Child. 

Yelling of "Hurry," Franklin gets scissors 
Splashing of glue, Cuts pictures in half 

Mahorney gone dippy Such is the life 

Over picture she drew. Of the Patriot staff. 



Miss Mains — "Charles, have you done your outside reading yet?" 
diaries — "No, it has been too cold outside." 



Miss Andrews— "Where is Miss Sinclair?" 

Louise T. — "Down stairs dyeing with the rest of the girls." 



SONGS OF THE SENIORS 

Gladys Hudson — "I Want to Powder My No 

James Black — "I ain't Nobody's Darling." 

Coonie Christie — "I'm like a Ship Without a Sail." 

Beryl Shields — "Jimmie, I Love hut You." 

Hubert Hedges — "Oh, What a Pal was Mary." 

Gladys Hopple — "I didn't raise my Ford to be a Jitney." 

Cotton Baldwin — "They Go Wild, Simply Wild Over Mi- 

Charlie Keach — "Why Am I So Misunderstood." 



Mr. Due — "In what part of the United States is most of the coal found ?' 
Earl — "In the ground." 



WHAT WE ARE UP AGAINST 

Miss Andrews wants strict attention, Miss McHenry wants undivided attention and 
Miss Barbour wants masculine attention. Now which shall we give? 



I offer no apology 

For dropping off to sleep, 
When someone says Geometry ; 

I know I'm in too deep. 



Miss Hanna (in French class) — "What does this mean Hubert?" 
Hubert — "Can't tell you, but I'll give you five guesses." 



Miss Andrews (in Senior meeting) — "If you don't want the motion vote it down." 
Chas. Keach — "I vote it down." 



ODE TO AN ERASER 

[ know not from whence thou came, 

t only know that thou art here, 

For it was I who intercepted 

Thy tragic arc 

With my ear 

And filled my ear with 

Chalk dust. 

So be it unto the end of time 

The innocent bystander gets shot, 

The onlooker must pay. 

But if that is so 

Why did I get hit? 

As I said before, I know not who 

Wafted thee hither. 

Some base Knave, 

Perhaps it was the goof 

I threw thee at 

In the first place. 



Extract from a Freshman story— "And many saw the invisible horde approacl. 



Teacher (to boy with his feet in the aisle and chewing gum)— "Here boy, take that 
gum out of your mouth and put your feet in." 



A FRESHMAN'S IDEA OF A JOKE 
A fly was sitting on Mr. Ackerman's head. He slid off. His neck was broken. 



Miss Barbour— "Sit up in your seat, James. Do you need some exercise?' 
James (drowsily)— "Naw, I need some sleep." 



Miss McHenry— "Give the principal parts of the verb begin." 
Alfred B— "Begin, began, begone, git out." 



A PICTURE 



One day as I was sleeping 

A picture came to me, 
It was the funniest picture 

That ever you did see. 
Miss Hanna came in dancing, 

And playing a cornet, 
Mr. Due came in smoking 

A great long pipe of jet, 
Then came Miss Myers a-whistling 

A tune, "I'm Loved No More," 
While Miss Andrews washed the windows, 

And Glaze, he swept the floor; 
Mr. Phillips taught us cooking 

Miss McHenry how to draw ; 
Mr. Mitchell he played hookey, 

But in each we found a flaw. 



Dick Hyatt (after solo) — I believe my voice is cracked." 

J. Honan — "Your voice is cracked all right, but your head will be worse than that if 
you don't retire into utter seclusion." 



FEEDING THE ANIMALS 

The Seniors live on choicest fruits, 
The Sophs on pork and beans, 

The Junior class on lengthy words, 
But the Freshmen class on greens. 

It's Seniors delight to bark and bite, 
And the Junior bunch to sing ; 

But all the Freshies can find to do 
Is stare at every thing. 



Miss Barbour — "Frank, what sensation do you suffer when the "Minuet in G" is being 
played ?" 

Frank Swain — "I feel like I'm in the 'teenth Baboon's heaven." 



Miss Myers (in Latin class) — "What does the word equinox mean?" 
Gertrude C — "A night horse." 



L. A. A. — "Gordon, if I gave you five dollars and you already had three what would 
have ?" 



you have 

Gordon — "Hysterics." 




A 

TWO °* * KIND 




wrnrt adams? 

HtRE^S EVE- 



Th* Bridge c$ Size 



Jfti 

THREE MU5tCTtER5 




mmmm 

NOTniN'ATALL 

:> 




Dance c Mama 




J 



H»<j K and Pvu? 



Crauj 45 theM loc K 



\ 



TEN-CENTO 




SIMPLE 5IN0N 



Out Ov A 



AS THE DAYS GO BY 

Specimus Wells was an expert on soil, 

Who spent flocks of money prospecting for oil. 

While farmer Joe Bush was a terrible hick, 

Who sat on a fence-rail and whittled a stick. 

But Wells proved to be an unfortunate bloke, 

No oil did he find. That's the reason he's broke. 

But by chance a great gusher was found on Joe's place, 

The rest you can tell by the smile on his face. 



Mr. Henderson (in botany) — "How do bacteria reproduce?" 
Earl McCann — "By the thousands." 



Teacher — "How did you measure this water?" 
Carl Fill — "With a granulated cylinder." 



Harry Baldwin (in botany)— "Little swellings on the roots of clover called noodles." 



Miss Vehslage — "Why did these men go to Cuba, William?" 

Wm. Nieman — "Oh, they went to make a revolution, but the natives wouldn't revolute." 



Bill — "Who takes charge when the President dies?" 
Will — "The undertaker." 



THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH 



Under the shade of building tall 
The modern mechanic stands, 

The sweat he wipes with a kerchief all 
Of yellow silk and tan; 

The muscles of his arms so small 
Are white as ivory bands. 

His hair is light and neatly cut, 

His face is very fair; 
His brow was never touched by soot, 

His i>ri' I- i>- very rare. 
He raises autos from the rut 

And charges with a care. 

Week in week out, from nine to six 
You can hire him if you pay. 

You will not hear him strike the licks 
With a sledge — the smithy's lay. 

If he must work nine hours he kicks 
For eight hours is his day. 



And boys returning home from school 
Step in at the open door, 

They like to watch him with a tool 
And hear the autos roar. 

He starts the engines like a fool 

And makes them snort and snore. 

He goes on Sunday to the church 
And sits among the girls, 

He only sees the preacher's shirt 
And pulls his daughter's curls. 

He often gets so drunk he'll lurch 

And break his sweetheart's pearls. 

Thus onward through this life he goes 
He does whoe'er he can. 

This tale a moral has he knows 
It makes him a proud man, 

For it is this : "Your auto woes 
Take to the garage man." 



Miss Andrews — "Use your heads, boys, don't throw balls near the building." 



A course of elective music was offered. 

8A Boy — "Miss Barbour, may I take electric music?" 



Mr. Glaze— "I don't want anyone to leave his seat without coming to the desk and 
getting permission." 



A PARABLE OF SAFED THE SAGE. 

C. M. Fischbai a, *2S 
Lo, and it came to pass in the days of high gas an( j electric bills, that Keturah, my 
wife, approached unto me, and spake thus, saying, "Sirrah, Christmas draweth nigh, and I 
must, in accordance with custom, hie me to the town to purchase presents." And she strove 
therewith to make a touch. 

I spake, raising a feehle voice in protest, but she put her arms about me and cooed soft 
words into my ears; whereupon my heart and likewise my head grew soft, and I gave unto 
her silver shekels, many and bright, which I, of a truth, had determined to 3d aside for a 
new suit, my present one being already thread-bare and worn. 

So she went. For many hours she tarried, while I, perforce, must get my own meall 
At eve she returneth again and showeth me many purchases, both wise and foolish. And 
she took out of a gorgeous box a hat, which of a truth, would have made a devout man of 
the synagogue look twice. Then spake she and said, "I shall give this unto your aunt" 

And I, being very much amazed, for my aunt is a most staid and sober woman re- 
proached her saying, "Never think that my aunt would ever wear such a head-gear. For 
her years are the number sixty, and a hat for her should be of sober black." 

And she, being amused, answered me saying, "Lo, if she can wear it not, then per- 
chance she may give it to me, for it suits me well." Which of a truth it did, but wherefore 
is there any use to try to reason with a woman anyway. 

And next she drew forth a necktie both loud and of many colors, and entirely ununited 
to a guardian of the flock. The seven colors of the rainbow and many more besides . 
contained therein, and it spake with a loud voice. And she draped it about my neck and 
stood off a little ways to get the effect. And she clapped her hands in glee, saying. "Lo, my 
Lord, you look as young as when you first paid court to me," and she kissed me. And I, 
being flattered exceedingly put aside my misgivings as regarding the wearing of the tie ami 
returned the courtesy. And I said to myself, "A wife is a pleasant if at times grasping 
necessity whom it is impossible to repress with sternness since she in all cases holds an 
insurmountable and unconquerable power over her man." And I, composing my dignity 
thereupon became once more a zealous guardian of the flock. 



If there were a boy in High School 

Of fair Toots Hyatt's size, 
Who had Charleg Reach's line of talk, 

And Johnny Hauenschild's eyes, 
If he dressed like Landis Cooper, 

And had Frank Swain's nerve to try, 
Should he borrow Hal Ahlbrand's auto 

Do you think that he'd get by? 



Bess McGannon — "I have a cold in my head." 

The Teachers — "No wonder, a cold alwavs settles in the weakest spot " 



Miss Barbour — "I wish those cars would quit passing here with their mufflers open. They 
make so much noise." 



Miss Vehslage — "Maurice, have you brought that picture of a steamboat on White 
River yet?" 

Maurice Haper — "No, mam, I haven't taken it yet." 



Mr. Due — "Lloyd, who is Mr. Green?" 

Lloyd Bulger— "Why, I think he's the man who makes sausages in Cinn." 



Miss McHenry (telling the pupils to pick up the paper on the floor)— "Sam, be sure 
and pick up your part of the floor." 



M. J. (looking out the window)— "I wonder why the trees are so late leaving: 



Miss Small — "Albert, locate Europe and Asia." 

Albert Judd— "Well, Europe is west of Asia and Asia is east of Europe." 



Mr. Mitchell— "Kerval, tell these boys another laying out tool. 
Kerval Goodwin — "A billy-club." 



Miss Geile — "Did any one help you with this map, Sam?" 
Sam — "No, my brother did it by himself." 



Lois Hall — "Do you know Lincoln's Gettysburg address"? 
Swain — "No, did he live there?" 



Miss Small — "Earl can you tell us what hemp is used for?" 
Earl T — "For cigars and things." 



JUST LIKE THE REST OF US 

Little Tommy had a lesson 
Which he couldn't get, 

And as far as I can see, 
He hasn't got it yet. 



Teacher — "Why are you late, Johnny?" 
Johnny — "I started late." 
Teacher — "Why didn't you start early?" 
Johnny — "It was too late to start early.' 



Miss Myers (explaining the Latin Slides) — "These are the horses of the infantry." 



Glen U. — "What made that bump on your head?" 
Ray B. — "That's where a thought struck me." 





ADVERTISERS 




>ka>D are 

MEMORIES 



NOT TODAY, but twenty years from today, will 
you realize the value of this — your school an- 
nual. As a book of memories of your school days it 
will take its place as your most precious possession in 
the years to come. You who are about to undertake 
the task of putting out next year's book should keep 
this thought in mind and employ only the engraver 
who will give you the most help in making ) our book 
a worth while book of memories and give you workman- 
ship that you will be proud of even in years to come. 

Write today to the Service Department of the Indianapolis 

Engraving Company and learn about their plans to help 

you make your book a memory look worth while. 

INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING 
6ELECTROTYPING COMPANY 

222 iDUsi OlfllO cSc» 
rncCioincvpoks Ind. 



COLONIAL FLOUR 



"^KcSobmsts used 

BUSH FLOUFL 




IAL FLOUR 



i by tke ooloouu^ir^^ 

— t-**5B at Bafortable. Ma**., and wai operated 

^^t^rCkrakwn Blub. Over lM^trT.jo tk« 

^ tfreat (frandfatker of tke pre^ftSfJi»^neri of tk« 

Blub Milling Company c*ta£mhed a pioneer 

Bill lo the vicinity of tke pre»«nt kuaiaea- „ t _ 



On a flour sack 
moans the Bame 
as "Sterling" on 
silverware. It is 
an absolute guar- 
antee of the qual- 
ity of the product 



Blish Milling Company 

SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



CARPETS 



STOVES 



A. H. DROEGE 

FURNITURE DEALER 

South Chestnut Street 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



SEYMOUR HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE 

FURNACES 

STOVES 

Phone 718 218 S. Chestnut St. 

Seymour, Indiana 



F. H. HEIDEMAN 




PHONOGRAPHS, PIANOS, 




FURNITURE, RUGS AND 


O'CONNER BROS. 


LINOLEUM 


Dealers in 
MONUMENTS 




212-214 S. Chestnut St. 




SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 






JONES* 


THE 


PHARMACY 


RACKET STORE 


For 


WANTS YOUR 


SPORTING GOODS 


TRADE 


FISHING TACKLES, 




ETC. 



SEYMOUR DAILY TRIBUNE 

A NEWSPAPER FOR 
THE WHOLE FAMILY 



206 W. Second Street 



Seymour, Indiana 



E. BRUNOW 

FISHING TACKLES 

BASEBALL SUPPLIES 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



A COMPLETE I)IM'(i STORE 

FEDERMANN'S 
Service and Quality 

West Second Stn i / 
SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



DON'T SAY BREAD, SAY "STAR" 

OR 

"BANQUET" BREAD 
STAR BAKERY 



Phone 466 



Third and Ewing Sts. 






PEOPLE POINT WITH PRIDE TO OUR 

WATHES, DIAMONDS & JEWELRY 

Ornaments of Taste Await You Here 

GEO. F. KAMMAN 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

202 W. Second St. Seymour, Indiana 



A. R. ENOS 

Dealer in 

All Kinds of 

GRAIN, HAY, FLOUR, 

FEED and COAL 

Office and Coal Yard 

N. Chestnut St. Seymour, Ind. 



M. BRECHER 



Ready-to- 

Wear 
Furnishings 

SEYMOUR 



_ . , Dry Goods 

Brecher s and 



Notions 



INDIANA 



WHEREVER YOU GO 

YOUR PERSONAL APPEARANCE 

WILL MAKE A LASTING IMPRESSION 



SUCCESSFUL MEN DRESS WELL 




KUPPENHEIMER GOOD CLOTHES 

ARE AN INVESTMENT IN GOOD APPEARANCE 

They Will Express Your Character and Personality 



NEWSOM HOTEL 
Barber Shop 

C. G. HELLER, Prop. 



SEYMOUR NATL BANK 
Savings Department 

IS POPULAR FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Get the Interest on What 

You Save in 

June and December 

Inquire About It. 



A COURSE FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL NEED 



s 



SEYMOUR BUSINESS COLLEGE 



EYMOUR 



Indiana 



F. H. GATES & SON 
The Pipe House 

IF IT'S A PIPE, WE HAVE IT 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



WM. N. FOX 

Electric Shoe Shop 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

No. 109 West Second Street 

Quality Service 



Have Your 




CLEANING and 


Phone 165 


PRESSING 




Done by 

F. SCIARRA 

Phone R-317 


WHEN 
YOU NEED A 
PLUMBER 


South Chestnut St. 


W. C. BEVINS 


Seymour .... Indiana 





CANDY 



TOBACCO 



Trade at 
MIX'S 

FRUITS IN SEASON 



SODAS 



MAC A/INKS 



Coal Cold Storage 

USE 
"RAY -ISLE COAL" 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 

EBNER ICE AND COLD STORAGE COMPANY 

Distributors 

HOME OF "RAYMOND CITY COAL" 



l< r. 



Seymour 



lxiHANA 



Watches 



Diamonds 



Jewelry 



THE J. P. HAGEL JEWELRY COMPANY 

101 North Chestnut Street 
Phone 53 



Seymour 



Indiana 



PRINCESS THEATRE 

23 South Chestnut Street 

Now Showing the 

HIGHEST QUALITY OF 
ENTERTAINMENT 

That can be Produced on the Screen, 
and feel it is a great pleasure to give 
Seymour picture lovers the best as 
Paramount and First National pic- 
tures are considered — best produced. 



GO TO 

SPANAGEL'S 

FIRST CLASS BARBER SHOP 

First Class Service 
Seymour - Indiana 



WHEN BUYING CANNED GOODS 

IF YOU SPECIFY 
GROUBS BELLE BRAND 

YOUR ARE GETTING THE VERY BEST THE MARKET AFFORDS 
AT A REASONABLE PRICE 



TIPS TAXI SERVICE 

DAY and NIGHT 
Phone Calls 



Office 447 
SEYMOUR 



Residence 67 
INDIANA 



BELPON'S 

Cash Groceries 

3 — Stores — 3 
4th and Blish St. 4th and Pine St. 

5th and Ewing St. 

Fancy and Staple Groceries and 

Notions 

Trade at Your Nearest 

BELDON GROCERY 

And Save Money 



PRICE'S PLACE 

PURE SODAS, ICE CREAM, 

CANDIES and FINE CIGARS 

FOREIGN, TROPICAL and 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

North Chestnut St. 

SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 



NEWSON HOTEL, 

BEST PLACE TO EAT 

BEST PLACE TO SLEEP 



BLUMER & BARRINGER 

Dealers in 

ALL KINDS OF 
FRESH MEATS 

— Phone 125 — 



Telephone 472 

DOMESTIC STEAM 
SOFT WATER LAUNDRY 

Cor. Second and Pink. Stki i 

First Class Work 

SEYMOUR : : : IM'I \\ A 




BROOKMONT 

BRAND 

CANNED FRUITS, VEGETABLES, ETC. 
BEST BIRD 

BRAND 

CONDIMENTS, ETC. 

ARE OUR PRIVATE BRANDS 

Full Weight Highest Quality 

Guaranteed 

To Comply with all Pure Food Laws 

GEORGE A. CLARK 

Wholesale Grocer 

WE SELL TO MERCHANTS ONLY 



TRUNKS, BAGS, SUITCASES, 

AND 

LEATHER GOODS 

BUY LEATHER GOODS 
AT A LEATHER STORE 

J. FETTIG CO. 



Seymour 



Indiana 



IK ONOMT PRESENTS HERSELF 
EVERY DAY OF THE STEAB 

AT 
THE BEE HIVE 

Klein & Wolters, Props. 



Seymour 



Indiana 



PROMPT DELIVERY 

Out-of -Season VEGETABLES and FRUITS 

Privilege of Weekly Payments of Accounts 

Personal Attention to the individual tastes of our customers 

These and every other possible ~ 
service we furnish with our 



QUALITY GOODS 



PEOPLE'S GROCERY 

Exclusive Agents for OLD MASTER Coffee 

Phone Main 170 
Second and Chestnut Streets SEYMOUR, INDIANA 

THE QUALITY STORE 



Tel. Main 143 Jobbers of Coca Cola 
BY DEMANDING 

SEYMOUR ICE CREAM 

YOU PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

Circle Street 
Seymour - Indiana 



LOUIS G. HEINS 
The Butcher 

FRESH and CURED MEATS 

SAUSAGES OF ALL KINDS 

POULTRY, OYSTERS 

FISH and GAME 

IN SEASON. 



Seymour 



Indiana 



USE MILK FOR ECONOMY 

USE 

Swengel Dairy & Company's Pastuerized for Safety 



The 
J. J. PETER PACKING CO. 

FINE MEATS 
WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



JAMES DEMAS 

WISHES YOU 

GOOD LUCK 

THE SPARTA 



EXIDE 
BATTERIES 

ALL MAKES OP BATTERIES 

Recharged and Repaired 

WORK GUARANTEED 

GEORGE & McDOUGAL 

BATTERY SERVICE 

Phone 550 
213 East Second St. 



JOE'S POP CORN IS CRISPY 
EVENLY SEASONED and FINE 

And it's a Sack for a Nickle 
or a 
Big Sack for a Dime 

JOE'S POP CORN SHOP 

110 W. Second St. 



THE GOLD MINE DEPARTMENT STORE 

A STORE WITH A REPUTATION 
OF FORTY YEARS SERVICE 



FINE CLOTHING AND SHOES 

RICHART 

East Second Street 

Opposite Interurban Station 

Seymour - - - Indiana 



If It's New 

Electric Chandeliers and Fitments 

For Your Home this Spring 

We are headquarters for the 

Newest and Bi 
Agents for the Riddli Fitments 
BACON ELECTRIC SHOP 

STILL GROWING 



SEYMOUR WOOLEN MILLS 



FIFTY-SIX YEARS IN SEYMOUR 



GET STYLE IN YOUR SUMMER CLOTHES 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 

DIXIE WEAVES HAVE IT 

Men's Hot Weather Suits — 

Made of Cool Porous Wools and Worsteds. They Keep 
their Shape ; always look smart, and stand the hardest wear. 

No Laundry Bill Either. 

You'll Find All the Best Colorings and Styles Here. 

THE PRICES ARE MODERATE 



YOUR STRAW HAT 

Get a Stylish One, 

Get a Lot of Value, Too. 

This is the Place to Get Yours. 



SUMMER SHIRTS 

There is a Great 

Selection Here of all the 

Good Fabrics, all the New Styles. 

CARTER - COLLINS CO. 

Seymour ..... Indiana 



HARDESTY HOTEL 

60— MODERN ROOMS— 60 

FREE SHOWER BATHS 

DINING ROOM IN 
CONNECTION 



PROGRESSIVE MUSIC CO. 

Dealers in 

PIANOS, PLAYERS and 

VICTROLAS 
VICTOR RECORDS 

207-209 North Chestnut Street 

Opposite Postoffiee 

Phone 121 



Compliments of 



IDEAL SHOE STORE 



ABEL'S 

DRY GOOODS and 

READY-TO-WEAR STORE 



Compliments of 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

C. D. Billings Pretideni 

John A. Keegler Cashier 



FOR 



FENTON'S 

FANCY GROCERIES 

AND 

MEATS 
— Phone 553 — 



MILLER'S BOOK STORE 

For 

WALLPAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES 
SCHOOL AND 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

SPALDING ATHLETIC GOODS 



120 West Second Street 
Seymour - - - Indiana 



INTERSTATE PUBLIC SERVICE CO. 



A. B. C. WASHER 



SEYMOUR 



EUREKA VACUUM CLEANER 
Phone Main 499 
: : : : : : : INDIANA 



M. HUBER & BRO. 

WALKOVER 

AND 

ARCH PRESERVER 
SHOES 

Seymour's Leading Shoe Store 



Compliments of 

BUHNER FERTILIZER CO. 



SEYMOUR 



INDIANA 



PIANOS and PLAYERS 

VOCALION PHONOGRAPHS and 
RECORDS 

Most Complete and Up-To-Date 

Music Store in 

Southern Indiana 

ZENITH RADIO OUTFITS and 
RADIO PARTS 

VAN DE WALLE MUSIC CO. 



BICYCLE REPAIRING 

A SPECIALTY 



( Jomplete Line of 



SLNDHIKS 



TIRES AND 
BICYCLES, 

CARLSON HARDWARE CO. 



THE JACKSON COUNTY LOAN 
& & AND TRUST COMPANY & & 



OUR SAVINGS DEPARTMENT PAYS 
3 PER CENT COMPOUND INTEREST 



Harry M. Miller, President J. V. Richart, 8& 'y-Treas. 

J. B. Thompson, Vice-President T. S. Blisii, 2nd Vice-Pres. 

Albert H. Ahlbrand, Chairman Board of Din dors 



STYLES FOR EVERY MAN FROM 17 TO 70 YEARS 
Collegian Clothes 

"They Keep You Looking Your Best" 
A. STE1NWEDEL & SON 

Seymour's Greatest Store for Men and Boys 



Compliments of 

F. J. VOSS 



WE WISH TO THANK 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF '23 

FOR THEIR PAST PATRONAGE 

PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS BOOK 

WERE MADE BY 

M. R. PURLEE, Photographer 



EAT AT 
SEYMOUR CAFE 



CLEAN AND COOL 



OPEN ALL NIGHT 
H. Chambers, Prop. 



Compliments of 



BAKE -RITE BAKERY 

Phone 456 



BUY A FORD and 

SPEND THE DIFFERENCE 

E. C. FRANZ CO. 

Authorized Lincoln, Ford and 

Fordson Dealers 

SEYMOUR : : : : INDIANA 




If you want 

a real Grand — 

buy a PACKARD. 



Hear the Grand 
recently purchased 
from us for the high 
school auditorium. 

IT'S A Packard 

THE GREATEST CRAM) VALUE 
OF THEM ALL 

E. H. HANCOCK MUSIC CO. 

Opposite Intcrurban Station 
SEYMOUR : : : INDIANA 



Atrtngraptja 



Autographs 



Hfckman 

BINDERY. INC 
Bound-Tb-Please* 

JULY 04 

N. MANCHESTER INDIANA 46962