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Full text of "Pearl Harbor attack : hearings before the Joint Committee on the investigation of the Pearl Harbor attack, Congress of the United States, Seventy-ninth Congress, first session, pursuant to S. Con. Res. 27, 79th Congress, a concurrent resolution authorizing an investigation of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and events and circumstances relating thereto .."

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PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE INVESTIGATION 
OF THE PEARL HAEBOE ATTACK 

CONGEESS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 
PURSUANT TO 

S. Con. Res. 27 

(As extended by S. Con. Res. 54, 79th Congress) 

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AN 

INVESTIGATION OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL 

HARBOR ON DECEMBER 7, 1941, AND 

EVENTS AND CIRCUMSTANCES 

RELATING THERETO 



PART 19 

JOINT COMMITTEE EXHIBITS NOS. 157 THROUGH 172 



Printed for the use of the 
Joint Committee on the Inyestigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack 




PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

^^.-.JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE INVESTIGATION 
OF THE PEARL HAKBOE ATTACK 
CONaKESS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 
PURSUANT TO 

S. Con. Res. 27 

(As extended by S. Con. Res. 54, 79th Congress) 

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AN 

INVESTIGATION OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL 

HARBOR ON DECEMBER 7, 1941, AND 

EVENTS AND CIRCUMSTANCES 

RELATING THERETO 



PART 19 
JOINT COMMITTEE EXHIBITS NOS. 157 THROUGH 172 



Printed for the use of the 
Joint Committee on the Investigation of the I'earl Harbor Attaclc 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
79710 WASHINGTON : 1946 



JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE INVESTIGATION OF THE PEABL 

HARBOR ATTACK 

ALBEN W. BARKLET, Senator from Kentucky. Chairman 
JERE COOPER, Representative from Tennessee, Vice Chairman 
WALTER P. GEORGE, Senator from Georgia JOHN W. MURPHY, Representative from 
SCOTT W. LUCAS, Senator from Illinois Pennsylvania 

OWEN BREWSTER, Senator from Maine BERTRAND W. GEARHART, Representa- 

HOMER FERGUSON, Senator from Mlehi- tive from California 

gan FRANK B. KEEFE, Representative from 

J. BAYARD CLARK, Representative from Wisconsin 

North Carolina -^T) 'H Ly/ 



COUNSEL 



/)5- 



(Through January 14, 1946) 

William D. Mitchell, Qentral Counsel . q yj / 

Gebhard a. Gesell, Chief Assistant Counsel ' / / «? 

JCLE M. Hannaford, Assistant Counsel , fit 

John E. Masten, Assistant Counsel ^-/i*/" / 



(After January 14, 1946) ' r. 

Seth W. Richardson, General Counsel L»'^^K<^ 

Samuel H. Kaufman, Associate General Counsel ' y 
John E. Masten, Assistant Counsel 
Edward P. Morgan, Assistant Counsel 
Logan J. Lane, Assistant Counsel 
II 



HEARINGS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



Part 


Pages 


Transcript 


No. 




pages 


1 


1- 399 


1- 1058 


2 


401- 982 


1059- 2586 


3 


983-1683 


2587- 4194 


4 


1585-2063 


4195- 5460 


5 


2065-2492 


5461- 6646 


6 


2493-2920 


6647- 7888 


7 


2921-3378 


7889- 9107 


8 


3379-3927 


9108-10517 


9 


3929-4599 


10518-12277 


10 


4601-5151 


12278-13708 


11 


5153-5560 


13709-14765 



Hearings 

Nov. 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, and 21, 1945. 
Nov. 23, 24, 26 to 30, Dec. 3 and 4, 1945. 
Dec. 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, and 13, 1945. 
Dec. 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, 1945. 
Dec. 31, 1945, and Jan. 2, 3, 4, and 5, 1946. 
Jan. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 21, 1946. 
Jan. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, and 29, 1946. 
Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6, 1946. 
Feb. 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, and 14, 1946. 
Feb. 15, 16, 18, 19, and 20, 1946. 
Apr. 9 and 11, and May 23 and 31, 1946. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



Part 
Xo. 



12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 through 25 

26 

27 through 31 

32 through 33 

34 

35 

36 through 38 

39 



Exhibits Nos. 

1 through 6. 

7 and 8. 

9 through 43. 

44 through 87. 

88 through 1 10. 

Ill through 128, 

129 through 156. 

157 through 172. 

173 through 179. 

180 through 183, and Exhibits-Illustrations. 

Roberts Commission Proceedings. 

Hart Inquiry Proceedings. 

Army Pearl Harbor Board Proceedings. 

Navy Court of Inquiry Proceedings. 

Clarke Investigation Proceedings. 

Clausen Investigation Proceedings. 

Hewitt Inquiry Proceedings. 

Reports of Roberts Commission, Army Pearl Harbor Board, 
Navy Court of Inquiry and Hewitt Inquiry, with endorse- 
ments. 



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§ii 



05 

«3 



r. 

3 

2 



§05- 

CO e 

05 g 
05 05 
^3 

So 

3 

«^§ 

05 ^ 

05 X3 

3*3 

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o3- 

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0.2 

8| 

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^3 = 

^ 05 g 

0) .-^ -3 

S ix:.2 

3 3 -S 

73.-; 03 

3 3 cc 

13 *-i *^ 

S 5 05 

5 w > 

3 == C 
COO 
0) U 05 



05 
> 
05 
X 

O 
O 



05 

X 

05 
li 



x: 

45 

I- 

3 
X3 

o 

tl 

05 



05 






05 



IM ^ 

■ 3 
> o3 

O 3 

S o 

T3 ^ 
m 

oT^ 

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05 •< 



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05 



03 

u 



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05 

> 

05 
cc 

o 

o 

c 
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't 

05 
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3 
XI 

O 

05 



05 

3 



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03 Z.i 

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b z 

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t: ^ 
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CO ^22 

05 OS 

o i^ 
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O 05 5 

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05 .1.3 

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3 



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05 
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3 
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w 



03 

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03 

a 

05 

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o 

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05 T3 

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05 
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bC 



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a 

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43 • -- 
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a 

a 

03 

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o 



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3 

05 

3 

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3 

3 
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43 

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43 

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a 

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a 

05 

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03 



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> 



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a 

o3 



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43 

CC 

05 

43 

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05 

oca 

X 3 

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OV3 

43 83 

o3 w 



05 
3^ 

bc a; 

2 « 

>! 43 



OS 



In 

05 

4J 

X 

3 
X3 

u 
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C 
03 

C 
O 

S 



05 



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x: 
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05 
X 

C 



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03 

a 

08 



" .- 3 
03 

05 



3 
05 

H 




c« 

OS 
(N 



o 
o 



o 
o 
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o 

CO 



CO 

o 

CO 



1—1 
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CO 



eo 



CO I 

00 00 

-^ I 



CO 



»o 
I 



CO 



I 






lO 






Pri P 



CD 



(N 



CO 



I 



o 



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1— < 
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lO 



CO 



N 



CM 
CM 



CO 
CM 



CM 



lO 
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CM 



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00 
CM 



OS 

CM 



P 
CO 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



IX 



X. I 

eS C 

|£ 

O a; 

.2 oj 
** c 

* 08 X 

o «.2 
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00 tc ^ 

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o3 V 3^ 

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o <A 






o aj^ 

1-1 cr-^ 

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00c -s 

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» 

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> fc- o 

c: <D ii 

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02 



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S «^ »: 

S g of 

2 S;S 
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III 

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^Q 2 

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83 oj t: o 

a; 3; u<M 
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83 -I-: 

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ci 

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5 ^^ 

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aj 

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r^ aj 
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aj ''- 

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e -.2 
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® 


CO 


rfi 


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05 





eo 


iC 





Oi 


C^ 


CO 


I— ( 


C<1 


ec 


00 


00 


05 


OS 


05 








^H 


1—1 


1-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1-H 


C«5 


CO 

1-H 


M 


1-H 


1— ( 


1—1 


1—1 


»o 


10 





lO 


iC 


iC 


lO 


»o 


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10 

00 1 
OS 1 


Oi 1 




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1—1 


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r-* 


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1—1 


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CO 



eo 



1 
1 


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CO 


■^ 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


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eo 



00 

CO 



OS 
CO 



o 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



a 
o 






c 



OS 



V 

Q 
o 

a 

3 
a: 

c 
o 

s 

B 

a> 

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bi) 

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<! = ■ 

rtS ® 

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S% 

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aO 

bC 

05.1 

I- 

o- 

O 



u 

> 

c 
o 
u 

03 



C 

u 

u 

C 

o 

*§ 

DO 



''I 

C 
O 



c 
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22 

03.2 

> -Ji 

03 b. 



(N J=! 
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.2 cc 

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« o 

IB CO 



S o 

<^ 

j2 « 

3 O 

.2 CO 

OS 
> 

5 «^ 

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cc eg 

g 0! 

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c8 
bC 



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bC CO 

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S.-5 

302 

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x:2 oo^Q 



o ajg-S.os 



«- „ c la a5 s 

^ 3 ^ - 5 ® 

^ * 03 M CO *^ 

»- O O Ml^iS 






1^1 



3 03 _ 
3 (h 

02 Ea:^^^ 
w 05 _2 n-i • _ 

%-^^^^ 2 

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■ 0343 




bc 

3 

II 

a o 
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0-* 

o2 



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>543 >-*£ 

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3 T3 05 ., bC*o 05 
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3 :3 "^ 03 hCTi IT 
X -< ^ .rr c 03 



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O^ cc~ 

Su 3 
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ioi 



6 

pa 



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3 

_o 
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03 
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3 
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t: 

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cc 

43 
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03 
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83 
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n 

43 

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3 

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03 



u 
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a 

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(N 












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00 



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OSiO 


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cc I 
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00 



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cc'T 



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INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



XI 



1 

o 
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d 

a 

cS 



n 

C 

Q 



03 

P3 

<u 

'S 

I 

c 

08 

C 
S3 

O 

C 
O 



TJ 
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■♦3 
C 

t 

o 



c 
o 



08O 
08^ 



— < CO 

05 



OS 

2^ 

t- o 

_ 01 

oS-^ 

<U oS 

C t^ 

H 

c o 
l-o 

08 

£"« 



M 

w 

O 
o 






o 



u 

O 
Xi 
02 

"oS 

V 

F 
i) 

O 

T) 
C 
«5 



^ 08 



^ -5 



cl 

^ & 

C 08 

s => 

o o 
oo 

■-3 sic 

« G 
o « 



^' 



s X 

O 00 

G^ 
a; 4^ 

G < 

^^ 
X) sS 

2 *^ 

0. G 

o o 

w « 

o o 

G V 

•22 

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o 

o 



O) 
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> 

0) 



0! 

> 
w 

o 

CQ 

G 

a; 

Q 



G 

'c 

V 

c 
o 



So 2 



03 



05 



G 
O 






^ o 
OS as 



a> 






bC 

G 



3) 



G 
3 
O 

O 

1 

<v 

G 

O 

c 

o . 

OC5 



G 

.SS 
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08 



OP 

'5 

2 < 



J3 



o 

'^ . 
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E 5C 

3 

C^ EC 

G^ 

.£« 

G ? 

r^ ^ 
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•ft « 

5 a; 
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05 



C 

_o 

O 

^- 



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O 
bC«^ 
G ~ 

5 O 
G* 
w 



GT) 
• ^ OP 

^^ 

^" 
G O! 

G ^ 

G* 

a> o 

^^ 

2- 

'^ I 

->. 

s& 
^& 

5.S 

ti U 
W 05 

05" 

CC 



OS c 



cc 

^ c 



05 






>i 


T! 


U2 


S 


G 


3 


05 


"C 


s 


a 


t 


t^ 


08 


o 


Q. 


s 

05 


05 


Q 



05 



05 



^ ' o 



05 

3 

c 






cK OS 



G»-3 



05 e "O 

3^ 0= -S 

OS 05 -fJ 
^ 3 o8 

05 G 
« G^ 

gat 

O 05 



.S'^Os 
GTjt- 



05 ^ 
^ OQ 

g"S 

— !5C 
05 08 

05 .t: 

O X 

z «— * 



O 05 



03 
05 

3 
C 



03 

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a 

I §°G 

•s-c o 
2 5; " 

OS -4^ 

^ o C 
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».-S G 

to 

O OQ 

G _,Ph 

Qj ^ ^ -»i 

^ 03O5 X 
M W'-l 05 



G 

05 

B 

-1-3 

G 



OS 
S3 



05 
OS 

C 

05 
05 

Q 



^^ 

G 

05 
W 
G 
O 
V 

G 

05 

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05 
M 

Ph 

05 
O 

-(■3 

05 
O 

s 

05 



05 

•FN 

Si 

"3 

OC 

Ii 

05 
G 
05 

O 



X 

05 

o 

T3 
C 
3 
O 

9' 

bC 

C 

•FN 

C 

05 
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c 
o 
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■♦a 

G 
05 

!S 

'S 

05 

f« 

Ph 

05 



3 
T3 
G 
08 

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a 

05 



o3 

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05 

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05 

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oo 

05 

T3 
G 
03 

a 



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V 

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05 

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05 

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4^ 



03 

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sS 

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05 
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05 

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>> 

Xi 

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bC 
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sS 



OS 



u 

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93 

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05 
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3 
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X 

03 

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03 

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C 

o 

S3 

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05 

Si 

Xi 
U 

SS 



OS 



> 

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bC 
_G 
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05 
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T3 
b. 
S3 
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c 

•fM 

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05 



o 

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3 
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g 

05 

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05 
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05 

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3 
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3 

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G 

2 

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05 

» 
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G 
03 

03 

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P3 

o 

03 



s 



s ^ 

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05. 
PJ'-3 



^ 



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m 


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t^ 


00 


o 


1— C 


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CO 


O 


I-H 


■* 


GO 


OS 


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w 


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CO 


CO 


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CO 


'S 


•>*< 


•xj* 


■?! 






1-H 


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50 

1-H 


I-H 


CO 

1-H 


1-H 


CO 

1-H 


CO 

1-H 


CO 

1-H 


CO 

1-H 


CO 


lO 


»n 


lO 


lO 


>o 


»o 


lO 


W5 


lO 


lO 


ifl 






ect 








si 




t-7 




(n7 






■* 1 


»« 1 
co^ 


1—4 


r^ 


1-^ 


1-H 


1— 1 


1-H 


1-H 


1-H 


I-H 


r1 


1-H 


1-H 


^H 



»c 



cq 


eo 


■* 


ti 


CO 


t- 


oo 


OS 


o 


T>H 


^ 


lO 


lO 


lO 


ta 


>o 


to 


»o 


>o 


CO 


CO 


CO 



XII 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



a 
o 
♦J 

a 
■C 






3 

0) 

T3 



0) 
S3 

a 

Q 

c 
.2 
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3 
0) 

2 

PL, 

bC 
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01 

a 
O 

bC 

S 



S3 



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a 



0) 

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c a; 
<e S £ 
o c a. 

<D t s3 
Q-3^ 



ID 
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2 B^ 

<<-i "H •-; 

j3 S3 

_r " 

05 a; DO 

»^ J § 
— 2 

bc.S OJ 

^ a; C 
^ *i o 

_ «5n 
5 ^ « 

T3 -^ C 
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m C3 S 

S2S 



c 
o 

Si 

%> 
. 03 

ai.S 



u 
a; 

P 

-c 

k. 

c; 

Si 

S 

> 

o 

iS 

o 

o 
O 

bC 



3 
O 



05 


(h 


^H 


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INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



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XIV 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



a 

c 
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s 

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INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



XV 



- 0) 



f3 



3 

O 05 
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XVI 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 






X! *5 "S C 

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INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



XVII 



.22 fe 



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05 



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79716 O— 46— pt. 19- 



XVIII 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



a 
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INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



XIX 






h4 



c 

S3 
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H 



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73 

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XX 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 




3S, 



I 98 ^ 



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08 



c 

c 
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"5 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



XXI 



-►SCO 

= S 

gcs 

>> 00 

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h — 

CS 

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CC 


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CC 


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XXII 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



a 
_o 
'^ 
o. 
c 

Q 






"CO 

o " 
.5 1'' 

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Q 5 






CO 

c 

03 

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3 
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c 
o 
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O) CO 

CO ** 

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SR >< 

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INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



xxni 



11 



C 

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XXIV 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS 





^ 
I 


1 

5 
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o 

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O, 


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08 




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Exhibits 
page 
No. 


OS 


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earings, i 
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duced 




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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3441 

EXHIBIT NO. 157 

(This Exhibit consists of reports, findings, and conclusions of the 
Roberts Commission, Army Pearl Harbor Board, Navy Court of 
Inquiry, and Hewitt Inquiry, with endorsements (See table of contents 
attached to this Exhibit.) and will be found printed separately in the 
Joint Committee Record. See Index of Exhibits.) 



EXHIBIT NO. 158 

(This Exhibit is a compilation of documents relating to United States-British 
conversations concerning the Japanese situation, and consists of the following 
items : 

1. Memorandum of conversation dated February 7, 1941 concerning the 
Far Eastern situation and attached aide-memoire. 

2. Letter dated February 11, 1941 from Ambassador Halifax to Secretary 
Hull with two telegrams, A and B. each dated February 11, 1941 attached. 

3. Paraphrase of message dated February 15, 1941 for the President from 
Prime Minister Churchill. 

4. Memorandum for the President dated February 22, 1941. 

5. Paraphrase of telegram from the British Ambassador, Tokyo to the 
Foreign Office, April 13, IWl. 

6. Memorandum for the President from Admiral Stark dated April 29, 1941 
with attachments dated April 25, and 28, respectively. 

7. Memorandum for the President from Secretary Knox enclosing a reply 
to certain U. S. proposals dated May 8, 1941 from Rear Admiral Danckwerts. 

8. Memorandum of conversation dated October 17,' 1941 concerning U. S.- 
Japanese relations between Secretary of State Hull and Ambassador Halifax. 
with attachment dated October 16, 1941. 

9. Telegram dated November 5, 1941 (5 sections) from Ambassador Winant 
to the Secretary of State being a message for the President from Prime 
Minister Churchill. 

10. Memorandum of conversation between Ambassador Halifax and Mr. 
Welle-s dated November 12, 1941 concerning U. S. -Japanese negotiations with 
attachment dated November 11, 1941. 

11. Paraphrase of memorandum handed to Mr. Hornbeck by Mr. Dening 
of the British Embassy November 14, 1941. 

12. Letter dated November 29, 1941 from the British Embassy, Washington 
to Secretary Hull. 

13. Letter dated December 1, 1941 from Ambassador Halifax to Secretary 
Hull with enclosures dated November 30, 1941. 

14. Letter dated December 8, 1941 from Ambassador Halifax to the Presi- 
dent enclosing paraphrase of a report from London on the military situation 
delivered to the President from the British Embassy on December 8, 1941.) 



3442 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




>uL^> ' »^^ ' M P ::/- i ^g"j i; ;gr 



DEPARTMC^^^ or srA-nt 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3443 




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•ai tlM MtaMf idiA Mt fM vwfei 


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MM tetof tett* awfMMM %• Um tUm to »wfti kM«t 


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Ml MA to I Mil toH»» 


ntoMi ttet th« y»«pif< M«tM « 


M totoc MMftdLljr 


9iMM« ••••»••«• ■#»>■> «• sff Ml tiautf ••••«• «»» 


tCVMMl «IM* «iMI BWMt t «te ttait«« MStM flMt 




M«M| Mi itoi to«» 


•M«fM««M&«ftaU«*^JIi 


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bmiMi Akwt «w. 




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af Ma«» ■■§«•«»• 9am»yim» tm 


Mto>« to to» taHMM- 


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Hv vMMMr WS* WWHI^^* 


fttiaaiiito 




- '^•^-. • .^ ' 


„i.:..„w.isi.^'i>'' '-'^'v".^ 



3444 CONGRESSIONAL INV'ESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 
Very Confidential. 

AIDE MEMOIBE 

Evidence is accumulating that tlie Japanese may already have decider! to push 
on Southward even if this means war. Press reports indicate that Japan is 
using her position as mediator between Thailand and Indo China to gain, be- 
sides a preferential economic -position, a Naval Base at Camranh Bay, Air Bases 
in Southern Indo-China and control of the Indo China customs. There is also 
reason to suppose that some military agreement with Thailand, directed against 
our territories and the Netherlands East Indies is under consideration. 

The following are a few "straws in the wind" : 

(a) His Majesty's Ambassador in Tokyo reports a general feeling amongst 
the Japanese that a crisis in the Far East will come within the next few weeks. 

(b) Cancellation of sailings of Japanese ships to the United States and the 
commandeering of ships by the Japanese Government have been reported. These 
reports have not so far been confirmed by the British Naval authorities in 
Singapore. 

(c) Japan is continuing to supply munitions to Thailand. For instance, a 
Japanese steamer arrived at Bangkok on January 29th with the following war 
material for the Thai Government : 8,000 bombs, 20 tanks and 10,000 cases con- 
taining unspecified arms and ammunition. 

(d) A telephone conversation was intercepted between two Japanese at Soura- 
baya and Ljiwang to the effect that the Japanese attack would take place on 
February 10th. The Netherlands authorities attach no undue importance to 
the conversation but think that it cannot be disregarded. 

(e) A Japanese Naval OflBcer recently stated to students of the Malay lan- 
guage that time was very short indeed. 

(f) The time-table of the "Asaka Maru" which is taking a Naval Mission to 
Berlin and may be bringing back nmchinery and certain metals, seems to indi- 
cate that action is not contemplated until the middle of March. 

(g) A French source in Indo China reports concentrations in Formosa and 
Hainan. 

While none of these indications may be conclusive in themselves, their accumu- 
lative effect is to suggest that a further movement is impending. Most of this 
information has already been given to the United States Naval Attache in London. 

British Embassy, 

Washington. D. C, February 1th 1941. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3445 



/ 
/ 



/P 



'^■* SLf 



■'?^.. 



3446 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



BRITISH EMBASSY. 
WASHINGTON D C 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3447 



Substance of Telebrnm A Kecc ived ^t tne 
Brltieh Hmbtissy from the ?V)relgr Office on ;->."bru(jr.v lltru 



The consequences of the J; panes'- inovvn.cr.ta 
in Irdo-Ghinti ana Thuilund have been revi^ wee; onc-i 
more by tne Chitfs of otaff, v,i*o iiMve rurnisrit-u tin 
estimate of th^ imrnedlBt*. dtr^^jer to be nr ticii^tited. 
This estimate Is as follows :- 

The o'api^nese ere now en!.:at,ed in a movement 
desifined both to Increase thPlr hold on Indo-Uhlnn 
and to obtain strategic fecilitieu in Thf.iland. ^ 

Accordint, to the inform?ition in the poswestUon n^ the c- 

British authorities it Ic unliKely that tne Japtnt se Z 

will bt- content, v.ith this; it ie probr.ble t:wt they 
are conteinpleting more drastic action, tn » xact natire 
of wnlfh is as yet unc» rtain. The general efftct of --• 

the present Japanese; movement is to weaken Uv "\ 

strategic position of the British K-midre in the Kar 
KQSt by .enablinc; the Japanese to secure vantage polni.- 
near Singapore. If th'^- . ap.nneae movrmont -a-cv v ■• 
exten'ied, no', only .vonl^! t:.l.; terdfTc;, oe incre. •• c 
but the Japanese irii-:ht obtain importL;nt economic 
resources which would ^re%tly strer;^ th'.r their '.•■apoc:ty 
to carry on a war. 

It JL ''V-lt certain '.hr-)t the Tapor^est t:r-- _ 
aotinv vita v. -i ci-'UrafcCmcRt oT J'- rran.-' one: tl^it tt.i. y 
are planning more vi-rnrou8 aggressive me-asure.. .:r. 
direct abreement with the '.>ermBn liovernment. Por 
these measures to help Oermony, they must directly 

affect/ 



3448 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



affect Britiah Intfireeta unci ure th' refore 
pi'obably desl^^td to forof: ireut Brituin Into 
war with JopDr. 3uch e wur woula exx'oae to attacK 
British communlcotiona with Auatralio unci ] ew 
Zealand, and Brltiuh tradf In tht Ffir Kast end In 
the Indli n Ocean, nr.o mifcht even ;Jeopnrdli'.e the 
communicati jna between the United Kingdom and tht; 
Middle East. The efforts whjclt the British 
authorities would be bound to mnke to prevent 
exct-saive damage to theat- vittl mter'-ata wjuld 
weaken tiieir wfiol'- war e fort agp.anyt >t rmany. 
Indeed, 1*' ' h- threat t :ingupore becanic imrainert, 
the Dritiah authoritiea ml^/ht be forced teiaporarlly 
to trarsafer the Brititih fleet from the [■iedlterrarear 
in ord< r to free navnl f()rce8 "or act! )n in ti. 
IndiL.n ucean. 

It ,vill be ;jii]'rt.oi .1 tr u v'liat .•; pro('')'anu 
set-back, tnis laat step v.o .Id conatitutt. Thus 
war. with Japan would inevitably lengthen the war' v.itJi 
xiermany and would, indeed, maKe ultimate :jrltish 
aucceas iffipi"oba:jl' witn . articipt-tion 

oi" t;iu r i ti d otrtea. 

h«I.C' , Willi'.- t.;.. >; : i- ct lir.r .■'i- V t /._ '- ■•' 

intereatii jn the :-'ar .'.aat corioti tuteu b.v •. '''ft • r 
Japanese movement it; clear, the inoirect dargt r t ■ 
the United Jtatea iu i-ver mor'e aurioua. ircut , it 
seert.a evi<;ert taat ,lup».reae bg-reaai-m afjUinat 
•Brltliih int'. reat^; in the :-'i.r .Caat r'.ireaei ta a 
seriou;i t.-irc-' * ' "i'- oa!>;t:» ■' t; "ri^- -' Jtatea .)n 

:> ;e J ant/ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3449 



-3- 



acco'ont of its effect on t;.e British war effort 
as 6 Arijle. It is essential, th-;ref;re, ir. the 
interests not only of the British itapire but of 
the United States, to take steps v/hich v/ill 
prevent the Japant-se from toKing the plunge. 



79716 O — 46 — pt. 19 3 



.^ 



3450 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Subetence of reletrau B receivea at the /hit 

BritlBh Embasey from the foreign Office on February 11th. 

In your further talka with the United States 
Government you will no dcuct call attention to the views 
of the Chiefs of Staff. i''he important point to emphasize 
iB that the Initiative lieo *ith Japan. ^f Japan ie 
bent on .var in combination with Gtfr;nany, mere attempts 
on our part to avoid the i..,ue are unlikely to be 
successful. The only thing likely to avert war ie 

to make it clear to Ja,)an that further aggression will 
meet .vith the opposition both of the United States and 
of ourselves, 

A joint declaration to the Japanese by the United 
States an., •..w British Empire that any -attack on -he 
Netherlands ;;a8t Indies or on the British possessions in 
the Par iiast .vould involve Japan in war imi.iediately and 
irreparably with both the United States and the British 
.mpire is obviously the course most likely to achieve this 
end. It is realised, hov/ever, that such a proposal 

may present certain aifficultiee from the point of view 
of the United btatcs, 

3o far as His ulujesty's Government are concerned 
the Poi-!jit.,n oecret'^i-y haa .nude it cleiir to the Japanese 
Ambassador that if British territories are attacked they 
will be defended with :he utmost vij,our. Speaking to 

the Japanese Ai.ibassaaor on February 7th, ,i\v. Suen said 
thdt while Hie iviajesty's Government had no aggressive 
intentions they did not intend to s;.crlfice the 3ri tish 
po . eKsions in the «'ar aast at th*^ dictation of any iOwer, 
Noi- ■•-. - ^is „.Oe-ty'^ (Vovornnent pr-epare'-i to o^ree .that 
Japan alcne wu'a entitled to control the destinies of the 
peoples of trie '-Yr Hast. ■ re!.t Britain intended to 

aischarte/ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3451 



-2- 

discharge her cbli.'ti.r.s tc these people in that part 
of the -.vorlci for ■•vno.T. she .vas -•espcr.si'ble and if 
British territories vere attackadj the British people 
would undoubtedly ciefend the..i with the utmOL=t vigour. 

It would oe luOi: t useful if the Prt^sident, 
.vhen seeing the ne-.v Japanese A.abassador on his errivsl, 
could Si:eak tc him in some.vriat similar tt-ni-s and .make 
plain beyond the possibility of misunderstanding the 
interest oi" the Lniteu, otiites in Par Eastern' affairs. 
If a ioint decl>^rr.ticn en the lines indicated above is 
i:nppacticable then it is clearly of the greatest imjor- 
tance that :he United States Governraent should indepen- 
dently go as far as chey can to :nake i-.lain their attitude 
to the jaranese Government, 

■■/ith this object in viev/ you should seek an 
interview with the rr--sider.t -.ind in placing before him 
on the moat coiaprehensive lines cur infonx.tion regarding 
the present situation in the ?ar East, inform him of 
the line already taVen by the i^'ji'i-tm Secretary ..-ith the 
Japanese Anbassaacr in London. 

You should f\i rthersiore point cut that in the 
view of the British authorities the situation would be 
greatly i...proved if in addition to any statement or 
warning that the' United States G-vernment may see fit to 
.•nake.tc Ja.an, the American naval forces in the ^ar East 
r-ere tc be increased, either by se'.uing reinforcercen.ta to 
Manila or despatching a detachuient tc Singapore, At this 
stage of events the :.;Obt effective check upon further 
Japanese adventures would a_pear to be sane definite :r>cve 
on the oart cf the American Fleet, 



3452 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

MESSAGE DATED FEBRUARY 15, 1941 FOR THE 
PRESIDENT FROM MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL 
(PARAPHRASE) 



There are indications, from many drifting straws, 
that the (Japanese mean to make war on us, or to do 
something which would compel ue to make war on them, 
during the next few weeks or months. Personally I am 
not sure that this Is not a war of nerves which Is 
Intended as a cover for Japaneee advances In Indochina 
and in Slam. Nevertheless I consider that I should let 
you know that should the weight of the Japanese Navy 
be thrown against us, situations beyond the capacity 
of our own naval strength would confront us, 

Japan would not be likely, In my opinion, to dis- 
patch such a large military expedition as would be 
necessary to besiege Singapore. Doubtless they would 
occupy oil fields and strategic centers in the Nether- 
lands East Indies and vicinity which they desire and 
In this manner acquire a much better position for a 
subsequent full scale onslaught against Singapore. 
Also they would make raids on the ports and coasts of 
New Zealand and Australia, thus arousing much anxiety 
In those countries who have already sent to the Middle 
East all of their best-trained men. However, I fear 
most of all an attack by raiders, which might include 
battle cruisers, against our communications and trade 
routes In the Indian and Pacific Oceans. By Inviting 
disaster elsewhere we could dispatch some powerful war- 
ships Into these great expanses of ocean. But escorts 
would be few and far between and It would be necessary 
for all shipping to go Into convoy. This would consti- 
tute an extremely serious additional limitation and 
disarrangement of our entire war economy. Moreover, 
It would end altogether all the military reinforcements 
which we had Intended to develop In the Middle East from 
Indian and Australasian resources. 

Should there be a threat of a major attack of New 
Zealand and Australia we would be compelled, of ooizrse, 
to remove our navy from the eastern Mediterranean. Such 
an action would result In disastrous military possi- 
bilities In that area, a certainty that sane accommoda- 
tion would have to be made by Turkey, and the reopening 
of German oil supplies and German trade from the Black 
Sea. Thus, Mr. President, you will see what an awful 
weakening of our war effort would come about; merely sho\ild 
Japan send her battle cruisers and her 12 cruisers 
carrying 6-lnch guns into the eastern oceans, and still 
Bore should there be any serious Invasion threat against 
New Zealand end Australia. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3453 

-2- 

There are some who consider that m Japan's present 
mood she would have no hesitation to entertain an attempt 
to make war against both your country and m ine. Although r, a 
It Is my personal belief that the a*|d«j?8^ aT* definitely otiULay 
against such an event, one cannot tell. Whatever you are 
able to do to Instill In Japan anxiety as to a double war 
may succeed In averting this danger. Nevertheless should 
we alone be attacked. It would be difficult to overstate 
the grave character of the consequences. 



3454 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




I . "tiiiH- 



THE WHITE HOUSE 

WASHINGTON 



Poughkeepeie , N. Y. 
February 22, 1941 



MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRESIDENT 



Mr. Renshaw In Secretary Hull's 
office phoned the following paraphrase of 
a message for the President from the Former 
Naval Person I 

"Have received better news concerning 
Japan. It seems Jap Foreign Minister Is 
shortly going to Moscow, Berlin and Rome 
for the purpose of covering the failure of 
action against us. The fear of the U. 3. 
appears to have postponed attack which 
seemed Imminent. While completely under- 
standing your situation pending enactment 
of Bill on which our hopes depend, the 
more these fears can be aroused the better. - 

"Appreciation given in my last message 
to you of naval consequences subsequent to 
Jap attack against us remains the same in 
all circumstances.* 

The message is dated February 20, 1941, 



EXHIBITS OT JOINT COMMITTEE 3455 

Telegram From the British Ambassador at Tokyo to the Foreign Office. 

April 13. 1941 (Pabaphrase) 

We have been furnished the information below by a secret source of reliability 
who is in touch with the Prime Minister of Japan and who has been accurate on 
two previous occasions, namely, (1) advance notice (3 weeks) of the military 
alliance in the Three-Power Treaty of September 1940, and (2) the occupation 
of the Island of Hainan 14 days before the event. 

We learn from this source that there is now at Hainan and Formosa an 
expeditionary force, with transports at hand, of from 12 to 15 divisions. On 
the pretense of manoeuvers and at a time in mid-March when the disembarka- 
tion of foreigners at Nagasaki was forbidden, a total of 8 or 10 divisions were 
sent to Formosa. The exjieditionary force is composed of these troops plus sev- 
eral divisions, 3 or more, which were already in Hainan. 

There is a plan for the synchronization of a direct attack on Singapore with 
German action in blocking the Suez Canal in order that the passage of British 
naval forces may be prevented. It is said that an attack on the Suez Canal 
of devastating force i.'j about to be launched. It is the idea of the Japanese 
that if an attack on Singapore is made soon, America will not be prepared to 
intervene, since opinion is not united at home and the United States is pre- 
occupied with such matters as aid to Britain, the battle of the Atlantic and the 
submarine menace. However, here is a Japanese fleet at Formosa besides light 
naval forces which are based in the Mandates. The original plan of taking 
Indochina bases was abandoned since that would have warned America which 
might have taken action. The current plan for a direct surprise attack on Malaya 
in force does not entail the use of such bases. Last night, although American 
newspaper correspondents had a story along these lines, they were unable to 
send it. 
File No. : 740.0011 P. W./191. 



3456 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



1 SKQRBT 







Nayt Dkpaktmbht 

OmCE Of THK CHDDDr OT NAVAL OPESATtONS 
WASHINGTON 

29 April X9U 



MEMORANDUM FOR THK PRgSIDIOTT 



I am sendlag by special officer messenger eopy 
of the questions you asked us to send to the British 
when we were last in the Whit* House, and also as 
enclosing copy of their reply. 

Please note the "secret status"* 





EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3457 



Op-12-VBD 

Ai6-i/Eri3 

(Serial 5) 



SBCRET 



SECRET 



April 25, 1941. 



My dear Admiral Danolcwerts: 

1. The Chief of Naval Operations h&s iBstrueted me to ooovey to 
you his view that the provisions of paragraph 6 of the laain report 
of ABC-1 ought to apply to major changes in the disposition of the 
forces of the United States %dA the XJnited Kingd<»s, even in advance 
of the tixte that the United States taay entar the nar. He proposes, 
therefore, to keep the British Chief of the NavAl Staff inforaed as 
to all contemplated shifts of United States naval forces, and to 
invite the advice of that officer concerning suoh aovejsents. 



i 



2. I have already inforaed you orally that one aircraft carrier 
and five destroyers are now en route frca the faoiflo to the Atlantic, 
and that the primary reason for this moveaent is hecause the U.S.S. 
BAICrSR (Atlantic 71eet) is soon to undergo an extensive navy yard 
overhaul . 



« 



3. However, the Chief of Kaval Operations has in contemplatlort 
other changes of a more Important nature. He therefore requests that 
you obtain the opinion of the Chief of the Naval Staff as to the fol-> 
lowing: 

(a) Vith due regard to the existing political aitoatios 
in the ?ar Sast, and to the present strength of thf 
United States Atlantic Fleet, would It be advisable, 
at this time, for the United States to transfer from 
the Pacific to the Atlantic three battleshipH, four 
light cruisers, and two destroyer squadronst (Note; 
that this force is nearly equal to the force to hi 
transferred »ft»r the United States enter" *^" * 

(b) If Axis pressure forces the British iiediterraneaxi 
Fleet to leave the Mediterranean Sea, would this 
Fleet remain in the Indian Ocean or Far Eacstern 
waters? Would it be desirable at the time this 
British fleet retires to the eastward, for the Uaitii 
States simultaneously to shift *tro«p AnvA'i fm-fAs 
fron the Pacific to the Atlantic? 

SincerolY; 



Bear Admiral T.H.Danokwerte 
British JImb&ssy, 
3100 Massaohusetts Avenue 
idashiagton, D.C. 

Copy to: 

*w Bians p> vision 
,;<{lear Admiral 



Sear <!k<isiirc 



3458 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



II 



COPT 



■ 03T aBCRBT 



|l 

BRITISH EMBASSr, 

Washington, D* C* 
88th April, 1941 



Vf tear Adalral Tnmert 

I h«v« t««daj r«oeiT«d a tel«graphie roply 
th« British Chl«f« of Staff to tho eontmta of jovir lettor 
4mt9A April SSth, 1941 {0p-12.VED A16-l/m3( Sorial 5.).) 

8* 7h9 Chief a of Staff exprass thalr gratituda for tha 
proposala aada in paragraph 1. of your letter, and aak that 
tha Ohiaf of Karal Operationa atay be informed of th<iir full 
agreenemt with tbeae propoaala* 

S» Aa regards the provision of reoiproeal inf«nBatloii» 
the Chiefs of Staff feel sure that the Chief of Haval Opera- 
tioaots viU appreoiate the dlffleulty of proriding a day te 
day report ef all changes, but propose that a regular peribdioal 
suaaary of British najor dispositions should be ociBBianieated by 
than. fkMy suggeat that it might be rei^ered weekly, and would 
be glad to know St this sumsestion would be satisfactory to the 
Chief ot SsTal Operatimm. 

4« Tbe ehiefs of Staff consider that the sMBtwa propoawt 
ta paxHigrii^ S(a) ef your letter would be advantaga«tta. It 
would audte more forees availabla for Westem Seai«phere Defenee 
Plan S«« 8f and in the event ef the Qhited States eiisariag the 
war would reduce the time tak«ei for United States* 9aval forces 
to relieve the British force at present basad on Oibraltar. The 
Chiefs of Staff feel aatlafied that the consequential reduoticHai 
la the strength of the Uhited States* Psoifle Fleet would not 
unduly encourage J'apan* 

S* As regards the queetion posed in para^^aph 9(b) of your 
letter, while the Chiefs of Staff do not anticipate that uar 
such oontingenoy is lilMly at preseatf they stats tiaat should 
the oircuBBtance arise, and the Svws Canal still be open, th» 
Hoditerranaaa Fleet would probablr be sent into the XBdim 
Ocaaa in Vi» first place* la that event they agree that a 
ftuHther tj/ftnaference of ¥aval foroaa from tho Chi tod States* 
Faclfie Fleet to the Atlsnticwould be desirable. 



• 1^. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3459 





British Embassy, 
Washington, D.cJ 



-2- 



6. If the Medlterranesoi Fleet was not able to p^sa direct 
into the Indian Ocean owing to the blocking of the Suez Canal, 
the Fleet would be brou^t into the Atlantic through the Western 
Mediterranean; an operation which the GhSefs of Staff consider 
feasible. In this event, and assuming that no other capital 
ship force had been sent to the Far East or Indian Ocean, a 
further reduction in the strength of the Pacific Fleet would be 
undesirable. 

7. As regards the reference to the movwaent of the Medit- 
erranean Fleet being limited to the Indian Ocean as a first 
stage, I believe it to be the views of the Chiefs of "^taff that 
if Jai«n was a belligerent it would not be advisable to send to 
the Far East itself, to be based on Singapore, a naval force 
weaker than that pvt forward in ABC-1, Annex III, Page 15, 
Until, therefore, that strength w§s available it would be their 
intention to retain the Mediteryanean Fleet (three battleships, 
etc) in the Indian Ocean based jxrobftbly in Trinoooalee. 

8. Nevertheless, I interpret their re.]^y to aean that in their | 
view a U.S. naval strength aiiailar to that of the Mediterranean 
Fleet could be transferred into the Atlantic, in addition to 
those \inits proposed in mragraph 3(a) of your letter, if the 
Mediterranean Fleet moved into the Indian Ocean and Jappn still 
remained a non-belligerent. It will be realised that siKJh a 
further tremsfer to the Atlantic from the Pacific Fleet would 
facilitate an earlier despatch to the Far Saat of additional 
British naval forces which, in oonjuhotion with the Medit^rranee 
Fleet, •would provide the necessary strength for satisfactory 
operation frcan Singapore in the event of Japan entering the vmr. 

9. If the Chief of Uaval Operations wishes to pursue this ™ 
matter further, perhaps we might have a discussion on the subject, 
after which I could question the Chiefs of Staff in more detail. 

Tours sincerely 



V.H.Dan&kwerts 




Rear Admiral R. K. Turner, 
U. S. Navy Department, 
Washington, D.C, 



^ 

i^^-^^^^. 



-'mffm^''^Si 




3460 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 






a^ 
















f' 



^^rft-»^ 





M 





JS Ji^-- - V~ 



rril 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3461 





SECRET 



REPLY TO CERTAIN UNITED STATES PROPOSALS 
^ AIDE MEMOIRE. 



Inform U.S. authorities that the iesuee raised 
by this proposal have been considered by the Defence 
Committee of the Cabinet and that as such a move vitally 
affects Australia and New Zealand we have obtained their 
opinions. 

2. Our opinion which is concurred in in general by 
both Australia and New Zealand is that any marked advance 
by the U.S. Navy In or Into the Atlantic would be on the 
whole more likely to deter Japan from going to war than 
the maintenance of the present very large U.S. Plieet at 
Hawaii, and further that it might exercise a profound 
Influence on the present pritioal situation in Spain, 
Turkey and Vichy France. You should therefore strongly 
encourage American action in this sense. 

3. The problem for the U.S. authorities is so nicely 
to Judge the degree of the transfer that while still 
retaining the deterrent effect of a strong U.S. Fleet 

in the pacific, there will also be the deterrent effect 
of an Increased U.S. Jl.eet in the Atlantic. 

4. It is not only the strength but also the composition 
of the fleet in the Pacific which will act as a deterrent, 
and In our view the necessary effect will not remain unless 
the KLeet in the Pacific consisted of not less than 6 
capital ships and 2 aircraft carriers. Inclusion of the 
latter is considered of the greatest importance. 



6th Hay. 1941. * ILU^. 



3462 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE ,— — 

Memorandum of Conversation 

UATF: ._._. 17, 1941 

SUBJECT; uKxTuii STACKS- JAPAttiiSli UbLATIOi'lS 



PARTICIPANTS: bhCHKTAi.:^ O" STATr- HULf, MO Tffi HiTiSH AMBASSkuOii, 
LOiu> HALi.;a 



COPIES TO: t ,^ 



T| 



'rue uritisu iUaoassador called and ntnded me tiie at- , 

D 

taohed copy oi a nemorandum oi' converaatlon between tue Am- _^ 

ba.ssRdor oi' Japan and iilmaeli' yesterday. r.j 

Tiie n-bassedor said that he understood tne diri'icnlties jj 
.J oountry and Jflr>an l.i : indintr ways and means oi' keen- 

in- up tue Bpne-in.:. not-too-strt ined reliitlons between 

o. ;■ tvio coantries wjille the present '^ov-irxuT.ont oi' Japan on- 
defcvorp Lo l>!ij)''ove ::ubll'_- f'jntl'ient nnrt opinion in support 
" I-.: oir.:...- ;!.'^;ii_ . . ^r viai on tiiis lovornmant^ s tonds urja 

•'nvi3ar:e u :)."4' •■ ■'- ' ^ o-.ent. In ttu: entire Phc Iflc 

.•ir • ; , lao A'ubassauji- .i: ir.oijlvt co:amuaii;ft te wltn nia 

jovernraent in or<lei' to S'.;':; J I it nad any svi • -estloiis alon' il 

I'n , t<h .ch woul. iciv ;i-nNient oi' Japan to move '^ 

in '. • direction on tiie i iuia«,iidntal insn-S iiivolvoa. J- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3463 



l/ 



The Jhi^hp ^e .mbaBbHdor »Bk«d rather .ayv^tpriously 
tuls miirnin.' t'lr nn Int^nrle* », 1 th rse, and ctu.ie to a^e ;ae 
this ...iternoon. 

ile be-'sn by recaiiln'; « eonv->r.>»;t l-)n tJiHt »« h' u h»itf 
«her he butl first j-r-rlved In '.shington .a '.o t:\<- t;f 8li%Dlllt> 
of sjJtelntBinlng pffnce in th" "Hoiflc. in ■■ ' ■■, >.8 I kne*, 

he h- c for aomp tlsae b'v-n tt>lkln>.' *ith :^r. Hu.l, ^-ns; froiii th- . e 

/ 
t!i)CS thPC" prir.clr!'-^ ; oints of dlfflcalty h»d «,i-r«:ed. 



-vl 



'idor dl «veiop t-is 1? :>t<;ii t;eyomi saylrvt t'->.*, the q 

' »(' t,htee ■;','v«ri*!.3»»''tt sslshf ■ • " '^' ^~^ 

• ■, rittltud© thar- they h;..d iithf^pto fe: ' ." /j 

■>■> 



CO 



3464 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



^ i: t *uald Ir.v.jivi t)' 7!""' :e. 

y 

ev'- 1 : ■ '- . " . ■ r- : ' 

triHt t'l'.' ..,.;;■-• r. r' t 

"he oatlu.' : • . 

PC, orted in th« ,'ir.,fU tylfs. 
i..i;,-ortHnce, snd ulght be t1 i s r«gHPd«i. . 

• 1th the J-^lteu tatas, n.-: t'.c /r.x.. .1 ri'-THnci 
^rlce that should te ?«1>^ for it. 

U- .evertln- to th»; 'r\- -rt't- >,ci , ;;ibR3!;Bdor 

aaid that thoigh *e uight diBngr"." , th" ' . n- rniscnt 

of the tlirr hud r^.i'urCed f.dhTen • i -y 

th8t *H poseible for Ja;f«r t; ^.ir-'-e ..vU '^f • •;- tc; th" 

■ erideroe of ^hat ha called ti 1 - ^ '- » .'St 

I.St'*"!* 

Freezing- nnd ei^bargo .-^hs res ■ t I. e-, *- 

effect very Bcriously th« ordinfiry o«.,erftS'» • i-; _ . -i-- 

• ho «er^ nccasto'aed to lo* Eta' (jnrc:;- . bit -.il^l .-r-»>hte 
difficulty for JBjaPfS'i b..'ire83. -.. -k.^ ,. t :'t 
tome .>8y out 'nuet be found. 

5. I 8hiii tiiht noboii, .<«: ted t,o oti ,/i-' • • . jr.. '-itu r 

.'irre or in the ;rltl8ii Co. j:ion..efiith, pr vide,. .'Mi.Mneee policy 
«aB no longer auch le to conetitate h threat. «io)'e.-.vi'r. If 
hr woiclc' hllo- :•*' to Bbj 80, v'n..unee»! eoor . 1 '"; -. •; 
..ere of hf^r o. •■ ..nrc;'. , ctsinl., ' .t 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3465 



3. 



of thf- difficuitlee 1-rgely c.rer.tni by on« wnr bj' ,,i.in. Ing 
into Hnother. 

y-oth '.hp ,r'lted "tntee « ■«' ;retet '(ritnlr. ^nvtfti to 
ee" pet«ce pr^sstrv'-'.; ir; thf ■hcilic, nn... Vnf-re ah.-s no r«HBon 
*hy peice sho.j;r not b«* rnf>int«ir. -c! If tht: .;a,^anea'^ nvernoK^nt 
ttbanConerS 1» «, oens^'^lat ;oHcy, and ..er-f «illln^ to 
reco,n,lse , rlnc.,aep .. ic': both the i-nltec : t«tf.' opd Orest 
'.rlt'-lri «imi-.: t,: ?>■ e rk.irte ine J. 

11^ " ■ t the uspHi'."" vT-' f"" t -iiMice tha 

ijtfiKe ol s.<'Cir ' ( r-'-!!^ horst:. T c-'iTi. .•«11 ur,('»''rt>tij-iu 
tr.i.t wittTi^ peo, ie iri Jtij-;^r= :-ii|rht b«^ .i' ;•!■•. b. t.ti» Biccf^tnl 
B'.purer.t ■ r;,(>r victorl<.'e, tut let tiw,. r« .♦r,..b^r tiiut r;onf of 
t*!»ef victories had j<^t 'br>d.;ht nenaBny within night of the 
orl^ victory thst -ouic •Ir. the .<Br. 

It :;il:'ht ir.-if.i^a we^i be f.-rg.ed th»-t tfwy hftd li.rgflxy 
<ii.vrhVf» t«i I' ■• t , V i! ;■';•,.■,.■ . ;; .• '. 1 ■ . ■ . t ;' , i ■ \ , -' 

• •■ ' .... 1 i,.o f ..:>aifi <?nu b^ -c . .in^ lritol'-r-,bie. 

"hi- .1 < .ndor a I t !s ' ,; ir; Jh .Mr; i'.(.;r'-«u *ita 

vil: vi-?», t'l,; th-t a^» hl.asii-lf ..i.'-j of '^i tnlo' t-ii.t .r,»> v'..;t'>ry 
"^•"■e -frf? not ?.n.- a.-» e t'lln,; »p h »vv.r- 
t ■ ' * ; i. , hf nO'-Pd ' rf* ..ht- t/i'T 

• '. •- ■■ . h. ■ • .-ir. -.^ y , .ft .= -.v- ■ : 

. t ' r •.,;., , ■ , . . • ■ ■ • i v 

.1- ' ihlc.'i h- !i'iu i-*-;- ■ r.. >; ■ *,^l^ oi- ', ■ 

. . -If! t:v- : ht. tt .,,.., ■ ■^ ■ tre. ,«j.,, i; t.'lcaJ* - j . •* 
■)ver' :.'»:■ ". t . ? ■ ^ .• , i . • . , . 

> Kr-' . • . . ,- « •, • Ti'itl ;rf-' o' ' ■• 



It. 



79716 O — 46 — pt. 19 4 



3466 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



t-e-. t.' t 



' 'e 



(: ' / t 
■ / . 

•/ r ',: ..r 



t-:,e -prerv K-rt. 

■(, /I '■■ can be 
)l' '»A ■ "e .« C i ■'■'■ 



iCth .'ctob.T, X?^: 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3467 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



From 



3468 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



'm 



-T r,i3tr.ncL 
5j;ir, 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3469 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



From 



china 



3470 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3471 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 






Sr err tar- 



,,,. ^1 -; .. ,,, ^„;. 



3472 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 







-2~ 5257, Novcaber 5, 5 v. a., (SECTICV TK'CE) from 

London, 

of tbE Pacific banc*- uncr. lt« IndEES It Is not too 

r.uch to sav t*-.p.t tbc outcome of the wv-olc wir .•r.ay 

:-ang upon '. t. If China h?cl the air force she r.CE<is 

T - uld be maklns!: nc pnncal to ••-■:, becn-.iPE T shoulcl 

'"'• : c^.>-.'^" 'Icrst of try nblllty to (Jcfrat tVr Irvpdcrr, 

'• • ' ..,,-■•■ r J ^p-v -."11 "*; rlr f-;rcc t^ 

', ■ --■-■♦ ..--..t 1-v.j- JapnncsE VN-^uld brlnr tc.^tnr 

:• ' "r , T'r 'V "f.v be f'.irc t'-nt *'^cy will vj'^r 

f 'nt- ■■-■•'■■•■•.:' 

■ •.■:;• In -^'iIf b •■*1e J-.i'T. 'k "Ir fir-'E cr be 



•'. f^ *•'" r*nM r-r f> w^. 1 1 be t'-^* 
• • -111 jT—iln 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3473 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



FROM 










3474 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3475 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



FROM 



3476 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



) . 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3477 



SUBJECT: 



EJEPARTMENT OF STATE 



Memorandum- of Convenation 



United Statea-Japanese n«eotlations 




fe 



DATE: 

i;ov«nt>er 12, 1941 



PARTICIPANTS: 



COPIES TO: 



-71' 



•"f 



British Ambassador, Viscoiint Halifax; 
Under Secretary, Kr. Welles 



S, ?a/d, HXi, PA/h, PS 




Txie British Jbnbassador called this juorninc at his 
request. 

i'Ue Ambassador read to me a nienioi-finduin ( t hft text of 
which Is Bttaciied herev/lthj reporting or. a recent con- 
versation betv;een the ■■Jrltlsb Ar.ibassador In "'oir;,-o arKJ 
tlif? Jananese Minister for Forel^yn Affairs. : told thn 
Ar.jbassauor that, as tiie aeoretary oX' Jtete :;fid fre^iuent- 
ly pointed cut tc t]vi Japanese ";-.verr.:-ir.n t, thio !ir,I tlah 
'.,v;rrii.'Tit would be Inrorriec; ' r:. • : aula for any 

pi'ojactcd ncrotiatlona betwi-ion .'-^ ij! ci- ' i\>» L'nlted 
i 

' StBteo If tho present conver.^^fit ! ..;r: nov. : 
t 

; :>'ive nny definite pr^^ralse ■-..-.' <::. -. r otlntionr. i.:ould 
f 

be 'itulertaken. 1 oo;mmnlcat/ed to the /•anbassati- r , '.- 



r 

c 

G 
I 

( i 

0- 



3478 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I'tjuorjt o:" .,tatc, 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3479 



/ 



At a recent intervit . kyo liio 

Ji-i-eneat; i:iniiit<jr Tor "orel ,n Affaire told His 

Uriltcci otutf.'s noo TV).. • : ceedinj., . i-i;;t 

.-iji'll, ord tiiat hi; •.•..:'':il i_:;:c<; in aiich mi.* 

tnad« him pesijinuatic fi"i>.)ut the outcome o'' so dilatory 

a process. Ir the Irivy ;.jun!,:il i!;;i.atlercf '.vjiH n -v — 

toKir.. the iducc of th.,> hopes ori.;inally pli.^. - 

L. 
. .acuoo ivjr.ii, ar; ^erefnre hl;;hly -f 

desiraol' t/; uisc-^vc:!' ,, ■,,., , ., , ;'-)ru feelin-- T" 

becasne too exacerbated. Kutt<:rs were 'bs'lr!- diac .. -J 

C 
widca '.veru of t;vs utrnoat cuncer'n t intercut;-: • 

end Mr. To Jo said he wus therefore soi-z.-whti t sui-i-rlsej "^• 

that Hla hlajesty's CJovernrnent were ta/.in.j no purt in O" 

the discussions, v/hili^ n'i could ur.durstanci that in 
the early ata:;e3 we might prefer to li;av'e i.^ottera in 
the hands of the United ototfio Ooverniiicnt, a i^oint had 
now been reached where a brcQiidown mi,^-)it havi reper- 
cussions ur-on !iriti..ii interests. Vht; !.;inister aaid lie 
had a strontj imx)re88ion tiiat, for reasons beat icnown z:. 
themselves, the United atut'js Jovernnient were 
deliberately drQg«;in.,; out the negotiations. If this 
were so it woulc of course be Impossible for the 
Japanetse Ooverru'.ient to continue them; 

Speaking for liimself, 3ir Robert Cralgie 
told the Japanese PoreioX ii:iniater that he felt aure 
that there had been no desirw in any quarter 
deliberately to drag out tho ne{;otiationM. 3ut as he 
understood the position, the United States 'Jovernraent 
had boers unable to elicit sufficiently definite 
aesuranoea and undertakings in regard to Japan's 

fu ture/ 



3480 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



future intentlofta, ui miyht leud to u iiitc!:. 

?h(r objective under discusaion wua un ambitious 
one - niii.iely, the settloraent of the ai. tuation as a 
v/hole - and It wan obviouo tru. t u task or . this 
:-. -nitudc v/oi)l ■ ' as we)?.l as latience on 

both SI . /iij r-igarda the attitude of !!ia !,:ajesty's 
jovcrn; ■.:;« negotiations, 3ir ;:obcrt 

CraiiHe -uvcsted that it was one of ii;lpful 
expectiincy , 'hot whil.; the yoreifin Secretary was 

deairon ■> ' tlomer. t re.-iched witlch v/ould 

be j-,isi. 1..! nil ' , ,,'. , .concerned, he was e'^ually 

: t«rvene in -any mariner likely to 

.: . ■ the di: ^ :;j betvve'.-n the United 3tatea and 

Japan. 

Ui'Or. r».-c<.l;'t o'. .i-ove ropr'i't of his 

'. ' ' ■ , ^ . y 

. .■ . . _ . i . ;,^ as ■ 

■ llov/0. 

j\l • 1. • ^-enty ';; Joverrment are not 

fully ... ,.,'.;. .1 :■ ■- .' conversations 

wiUch h;.ve bu>.n ta/iln,, il^oe, they are aware tiiat the 

United \jtiit,c.z lovr.in-ricrt have been aeeKin. a baoio oV 

\ 
(Ji..c ;,. , ': vorriic.-nt to-.vi-,rds a 

: •,tl' r. r t i! ■....' Moh 

'iov rn.' 'ttler.ient to be in their 

o'.vn ■ i: ■ 'Veil u t',!U" , _ un are it 

lu tn-. ir" ci-.yr-.r ' ^noulrl bit aehic^ee. 

It cun: ' • . , ■ ,i:X sll Ih', iV'in,j 

iihoul'i , jnu no advantace ia. 

fL,.i • inu unl:;sa aoi.uj basia 

To r/ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3481 



-3- 



fop cliecusston car be agreed upon in advance which 
establishes principles upon wiiich agreement will be 
aouiiht. The British Ooverni.vent have been content 
to leave tJ^iis part of the proceedings in the hands 
of the United States Oov.jrnnent who are well aware 
of the British position, ilorf'over th- liiited otutes 
Joverrunent iiavc assured the Britiah .Jovs.rr.raent (and 
it iii believed that they have so informed tne Jaiunese 
Qoverntnent) that should actual negotiations Lecon^j 
possible the British jovemment will at once be 
consulted. At that roint the British 'ii vv; rnr.en t will 
be very ready tj collDuorute ■-'.'i th the United States 
ana Japar.ese ;>j>verr.iacntG in see<tin:_; u solution of 
tneir loint problef:.s. 

Sir ii. Gr;ii,:ic: waa f .rther authorised, at 
hj s own discretion, tT urtjc. upon the Jcpanese ksverw-ient 

the advanteg*; of a eujireir.e effort t,. .■ee:..ei, t 

with the United States, as a.,8in-'. '.:-■- desiderate risks 
to Japan of allDv.in;; a si tu.-, ti .in to devflop in „,,c;i 
it cii.^'ht no Ion ;ei- be possible to control the issue of 
peace or war. 



.,. :uioo ; 



lij-t'ol'.* '. .... _i. , 

i;ovenib5,r 11th, 19L1. 



79716 O — 46— pt. 19- 



3482 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 
MKMORANutM Handei) TO Mr. Hoknhfxk By Mr. Dkning of thk British Embassy 

N0V?:MBKB 14, 1941 d'AB-APHRAKK) 

It may be of interest to the Department of State to have the following indica- 
tions as to the jxjssibility of an attack on Thailand by the Japanese. According 
to a report by the Biitis'h Ambassador to .lapan, there are several factors which 
indicates that early in 1042 is the most likely time for action against Thailand 
uidess other factors result in precipitation of the crisis earlier. 

It is stated by the British representative at Bangkok that there is no rain 
In Thailand from approximately mid-November until May and thus the dry 
weather lasts from December through April. Hf also reports that in the flat 
country, that is, Central Thailand and ( ambodia, dining the dry seas<m the 
earth in the rice fields is baked hard. He was infiirmed that at that time it is 
not ditiicnlt to improvise airdromes for temporary use, and suggests that if an 
attack on Thailand is contemplated by the Japanese, the beginning of 1942 may 
well be the bes^t time ff)r it. 

Information has been leceived from the Commander-in-Chief, Far East, that 
there are at present about .SO.OOO Japanese troops in Cochin-China and Cambodia 
and that (me and perhaps two tank regiments are included among these. Large 
quantities of anti-aircraft guns, motor transport and other tran.sportation ma- 
terial have been imported, including small vessels which could be utsed for 
transport as far as the new boundary, situated in the northern end of Tonla 
Saidle Lake. It is known that there are a number of air fields in the North 
which have either asphalt or concrete runways and which can be used at any 
time of the year. There are in the South metal runways at Tourane, Penon, Penh 
and Angkor, as well as an asphalt runway at Tan Son Nhut. Work is proceeding 
rapidly on the construction of runways at other fields in the South, at which 
heavy bombers will be used. 
P^ile No. : 740.0011 P. W./1465. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3483 




''.'i-y^ >£*-«-* /V /f «^/ ^t^ ,i<^ 



/ z^c<^ 



SR 



ITI8H EM8ASw/|5 ^ * 
WASH I NCTQiT ff^ -^ 

/ ~ 



2i'tfi Koveifiber-, ivui. 



>e 



\ 



A^^- 



^t>-tL^t>''t>^ ''7* 



-! if^jf 



Le.r i.r. :iull. 

Then I got bwck to tfi»' '•'linbagsy thia morning 
I found a telegram fx-oin 'Aden asking VKh^ther 1 ♦. would be 
po.-sible to let him s«c th*? text of the docufnent given 
to tfie JapHnese. 

I have already toli him of Itfa gerserril 
character r.3 ym ripccribed it to '.»", but I hnve no 
doubt, if yoa hnvp no objection, he omild he- ji'n\.-^Vi\ 

for t*U» or:^: ; . _ ly of sopi-,- • h»< tf^xt. 



C 



c 



Ynups ve.'v sincerely, 




x-^ 






rhe Honourable Oordell Hull, 

.'if»ci'«*tnry of tate to ' 



Htsa. 



3484 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 









aH.TlSH EVBASSY. 
WASHINGTON C 



-J - 

.1- 

o 



o-.i vrc 



o 

O 



CO 



sTpH^' 



Ax 



o 
> 

D3 



O 









o 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3485 



It i8 conceivable that United States 
Ooverrunent may ralae with you the question of 
ths compatibility of the opcratioo referred to 
with our treaty of non-aggreaaion with Theiland. 

It raoy be uBefil for yoa to icnow th;r8fore that 
wtj nave giver careful consideration to this 
point. 

^'. Ir July laiit wo irtTirt.sd the Thai . 

Jov^rnmort tht.t «e aaju^d regard the grant of 
bases to Jajan 63 sn infraction of tnkt treaty. 
.jl"-ilr.rly (altho-^,in we have as yet made no 
cock-iunicotlon to trie Thai Jovcrninentj we ahouio 
not f e- 1 Ae could tllo^v the trer.ty to bo a bar 
t ; ou" 'Ttf'rlns rhtll'ind if a .Tapor.ese invasion 
occarrrtd or w^ ; cleftrly inpendlnK. But it would 
Dte ;rc»itly , •v.f-. ruble if 1^ those eventualities 
wo Guuld act ir. eo-Oi^crati )r %ith Un: Thai 
;o/'.:r;iiier't. If 'Jst;rcf>re it were decided to 
ir «rt'-.K ' )..r-''atior, we shoald naturally do 
Oir j;-ist tJ decirt- Thsis' consent. It woulc oe 
impor-t' r , .'ijA'evc r not. to roveel to thi; »'hai 
}o'."^r'?'Tt ;,'rv:i'! tursly '.h'. existence of our 
; i' r; jv^r '^ ;,a,,- ijiinejer of It, u/tagu to the 



'o.n.;a. 



3486 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



_ 


1 

II II 


^^^^^^^^^^Hl -^ 


BRITISH EMBASSY 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 


Hr 


Deceaber dth, ISkU 


l' Secret. 






Dear Mr, President, 




I eaolose herein copies of 



the latest report reeelTed fron Londoa 
on the niXltary sitoatlon. 

BelieTS OS, 

Bear Mr. president, 

Tery sineerelir jroors* 




vOnfiC.>ii!L^^afc.#-^ 



The Honoorahle 

Franklin 0. RoossTelt, 

president of the United States of ABSrica* 
Washington, Z>. 0« 




■ff 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3487 

Faraphease of a Report From London on the Militaky Situation Delivered to 
THE President From the British Embassy on 8th December 

The inforinution provided is based <m reports received up to 7 a. m., 7th De- 
c-ember, 1941. 

(I) NAVAL REPORTS : 

Air reconnaissance reported at 3 : 15 a. m. 6th December, 2 Japanese convoys 
of 25 and 10 ships (respectively), escorted by cruisers and destroyers, by Point 
Cambo (Cochin China) on a course of 270 degrees West. Contact has been lost 
and there is no further news at present. The armed boarding vessel inentioned 
in yesterday's summary was sunk by torpedo aircraft. She had on board 300 
British wounded and 100 prisoners of war. 201 persons were rescued. A small 
British merchant vessel was sunk off Cromer last night, it is thought by a mine. 

(II) MILITARY REPORTS : 

LIBYA. 6th December. We maintained pressure with our mobile columns on 
the whole front Bardia-El Adem and also on the enemy lines of communication 
behind. Latest reports indicate that the enemy has concentrated his forces South 
of El Adem and is moving South-East towards El Gobi which is held by our 
troops. 

RUSSIA. German pressure on Moscow continues. 

(III) AIR OPERATIONS : 

6th December. Spitfires damaged seriously storage systems and buildings at 
two alcoholic distilleries in the Cherbourg Peninsula. Our aircraft also attacked 
similar targets in the Dunkirk area. Off the Norwegian coast a Hudson claimed 
hits on a 7,50<J ton merchant vessel and Beauforts probable hits on a 4,000 ton 
merchant vessel and a 5,000 ton tanker. 

LIBYA. Nothing further to my previous report. 

CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN. 5-6th December. 20 Wellingtons attacked 
Nap'.es for five hours. Over 25 1/^ tons of bombs were dropped, two 4,000 pounders 
starting a large fire in the tori)edo factory, while other bombs fell on the arsenal, 
air frame works, and the railway. We lost one aircraft. 

(IV)G. A. F. 6th December. 

A German bomber was destroyed by our fighters S<»uth of Plymouth. 
» MALTA. 5-6th December. Some 20 bombers approached the island during a 
period of nine hours. Only 8 crossed the coast and caused some damage. 

(V) AIRCRAFT CASUALTIES : 

In operations over and from the British Isles — German 1. 

( VI ) 6th December. 

The transfer from the Baltic States to Finland of broad gauge locomotives and 
rolling stock, including tank wagons, will help to relieve the transport situation 
and assist German economic exploitation. This confirms reports that the whole 
railway system in the Baltic States is in the process of being converted to 
standard guage and also the opinion that Germany intends to convert the gauge 
of all railways in occupied Russia. 

(VII) 

Both empty and full oil trains from and to Italy have regular military escorts 
on the R')umanian-Huiigarian section of the route which indicates the degree of 
unrest in Hungary and Roumania. 

FURTHER REPORT 7th DECEIMBER, 1941 

Report received at 17 : 40 G. M. T. today from the Commander-in-Chief in China 
that the Japanese were attempting lo land from 5 .ships at Kota Bharu on the 
East coast of Malaya, immediately South of the Siam Malaya frontier. 



3488 CONGRESSIOXAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 159 

This Exhibit is a compilation of material relating to United States— Chinese 
conveisaiions concerning the Japanese situation, and consists of the following 
items: 

1. Memorandum for the President by Lauchlin Currie dated Jlay 10, 1941 
concerning the Chinese aircraft program attaching two documents, one pre- 
pared by the Chinese Mission and the other written by Dr. Hornbeck. 

2. Telegram from Generalissimo Chiang-KaiShek cated July 8, 1941. 

3. Telegram from Minister of Conmiunications dated July S. 1941 with 
attached telegram from Berlin dated July 4, 1941. 

4. Cable to Lauchlin Currie from Owen Lattimore, Chungking, dated July 
22, 1941. 

5. Memorjindum for the President from Sumner Welles dated August 7, 
1941 with two enclosures, being 

(1) A note for the S'^cretary of State dated August 2, 1941 from the 
Chinese Ambassador with enclosure and 

(2) Communications to the American Embassy, Chungking, dated 
August 7. 194L 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3489 




THE WHITE HOUSE 
WASHINGTON 




May iO» X94X* 



iiaiDHAiiixM WR me raSSIDlliT 



!•: CliJHie8# Airemft Profpaa 




Im Qommction wit! yo^or consideration 
of tJna taatatlTe aircraft program for China 
vltiolL I salsdttad yesterda^Tt jo\x may find 
thm attacliad doois&ants of 6c»i6 interest. 
fli0 Q»a without a title was prepared )]Qr tlM t 
Chinese Misaion here and -^e other was 
written hy ^» Hombeck. 



Lauchlin Ctirrie 




<«HM 



3490 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Singaiwre is the key to the western Pacific and the Indian Ocean. Its posi- 
tion determines the control of eastern Asia regardless of the fate of the Philip- 
pines. All steps taken so far by Japan indicate their intention to prepare for a 
move against Singapore. 

One may as.sume that although Singap<ire is well forti.'ied, small British land. 
.><ea. and air forces there are likely to lind it difficidt to sustain for long the full 
^ impact of the Japanese fleet, air, and land forces unless outside assistance be 
given. 

The recent Soviet-Japanese pact has enabled Japan to release at least ten crack 
divisions and some five hundred first line planes now in Manchuria for operation 
in other theaters of war. 

Singapore could be saved by active intervention of the entire United States 
fleet with its attendant dangers and complications. 

Tliei'e is, however, a powerful means to clieck Japanese attack on Singap<^)re 
and the South Seas or to assist in the effective defence of the beleaguered key 
fortress, witliout the intervention of tlie United States fleet, and that is tlie crea- 
tion of a small but etticient air force in Ciiina. 

This foice would constitute a threat to the flank of a Japanese advance south- 
ward. Every Japanese move, concentrations on Formosa or Hainan, convoys of 
transports into China, Siani, or further west, tran.sport of troops across Indo- 
China, and above all, Japanese air concentrations in Tonkin and Cochin China 
would be watched sytstematically, but more important, exposed to constant attack 
and diversion. 

The configuration of southeastern Asia exposes Japan to such action on the 
part of an efficient hostile air force. Such a force located between the Burma 
frontier and the province of Kweichow, mostly on liigh plateaus, lias only to 
cover some 350 miles to reach the Japanese air concentrations at Hanoi, where 
hundreds of planes are crowding tlie few airports which the topography of the 
counti-y permits to utilize. Further, it would interfere with Japanese military 
transports and troop concentration on Formosa, Hainan, Paraoels Island, which 
are all witliin easy range. The force could as easily attack concentrations of 
Japanese planes, troops, and shipping in southern Indo-China and Siam. 

The Japanese are sprawled all over China and the existence of tliis air force 
wou'd enable the main body of the Chinese regular armies to undertake counter- 
offensive operations with good assurance of success, which they cannot do at 
present until so provided with the requisite air arm. The Japanese armies in 
central China depend exclusively for their supplies on the long and winding 
Yangtze, wliich provides an ideal target for an air force operating on interior 
lines. With the initial strength of the new air force tlie Chinese troops could 
launch counter-attacks, the main purpose of which would be not only to hold exist- 
ing Japanese forces in China but to compel the continuous dispatch of strong 
reinforcements. 

Finally, the main industrial areas within Japan, tlie triangle Kobe, Kyoto. 
Osaka, as well as Yokohama and Tokyo, could be attacked by bombers operating 
from existing air fields in <'h'na. 

[2] All the above objectives can be achieved efficiently and successfully 
by a force of 500 planes composed of 350 pursuit and 150 bombers. The existing 
lines of communication from ports of entry from the west i)ermit to supply and 
maintain in the field such a force, and would be doubly assured if urgently sup- 
plemented by some 35 transport planes of the DC-3 type. The American-operated 
China National Airways Corporation estimate that this would give an additional 
capacity of 4,000 tons monthly from the rail head in Burma and- over the most 
difficult section of the Burma highway. 

The full strength of 5<X) p'anes could be reached by three stages. 

The first stage when the 100 P-40's now on the water reach China and the 
pilots and ground crews now volunteering for service are already in the field. 
In July the force of pursuits could begin protecting the ways of access to China 
and particularly the Burma highway. 

Second stage. A force ready to operate in September and composed of 200 
pursuits and 100 bombers could be constitutnd it immediate decision were taken 
and inten.se preparjit'ons wf»re n>ade to sunp^'" an additional 100 pursuits and 
100 bond)ers to be shipped during the month of May. 

Third stage. By the first of November a full force of 500 craft would be ready 
to operate by shipment in June and July of 150 pursuits and 50 bombers. In 
addition, replacements at the rate of 15 percent would have to be provided. 

The gradual development of the operations would by then permit the full 
force to attack all the objectives at the end of the rainy season. From the first 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3491 

of November there is six months of clear weather over Burma and Yunnan^ 
permitting extensive operations. Thus preparatory work would be accomplished 
under the cover of bad weather and the force would be ready to operate at the 
best season, provided immediate decision and requisite practical steps are taken, 
which would imply certain diversions of planes, equipment, and personnel, and 
concentrated preparation (including the question of shipping). 

Permission has already been obtained to recruit pilots and ground crews for 
the P-40's already on the way. If permission is given to recruit an additional 
150 pilots and 300 technical men for ground crews, the personnel of the force 
could be in the field by the end of July. There are 1,200 Chinese pilots and a 
large number of ground crews available in China ; one-third experienced, one- 
third with fighting experience, and the remainder requiring more training, and 
the existence of this renders it possible to limit the number of the foreign mem- 
bers of the force. 

With this personnel and aircraft in operation this autumn, not only the deter- 
mined Japanese move toward the south could be prevented or rendered difficult, 
but should this move materialize, vitally effective asisistanee would be afforded to 
the defenders of Singapore and the Dutch East Indies by constant attacks in the 
rear of the enemy forces. 

To sum up: 

Effective air operations in China should follow a carefully planned program 
which includes the procurement, shipment, assembly, and operation of specified 
types of airplanes in order to attain prescribed tactical and strategical objectives. 

13] The general outline of such a program follows. 

First Phase 
Airplanes Required: 

1. 100 bombardment, modified Lockheed Hudson type. 

2. 100 pursuit, P-40 type. 

3. 100 pursuit, P-43 type. 

Note : Of the above listed airplanes, 100 P-40's have been procured 
and are en route to China. 

Volunteer Personyiel: 

1. 100 pilots. 

2. 160 technical and clerical. 

Note : These men are now being employed. 

Tactical Objectives: 

1. Defence of air bases, Burma highway, supplies in transit and in storage 
in Yunnan province and industrial establishments in vicinity of Kunming, 
Yunnan, by : 

a. I ocal operation of pursuit airplanes. 

b. Counter-offensive operations of bombardment airplanes. 

Strategical Objective: 

To force the Japanese to divert a portion of the air force now available 
for expeditionary use to the defence of his bases in Indo-China and counter- 
offensive operations in Yunnan province. 

Time Schedule: 

1. The 100 pursuit airplanes, P-40 type, may begin initial operations earlv 
in July, 1941. 

2. The 100 bombardment airplanes, Lockheed Hudson type, and 100 pur- 
suit airplanes, P-13 type, may begin operations early in September if the 
airplanes of both classes are made available without delay. 

Second Phase 
Airplanes Required: 

1. Maintenance of initial strength of: 

a. 100 pursuit. P-40 type ; 

b. 100 pursuit, P-43 t.vpe; 

c. 100 bombardment, Lockheed Hudson type, by regular monthly re- 
placement of losses. 

2. Provision of additional airplanes of following classes, types, and num- 
bers : 

a. 100 pursuit, P-43 or P-47. 

b. 50 pursuit, P-39. 

c. 50 bombardment, Lockheed Hudson, B-26 or B-23. 



3492 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

\4] Volunteer Personnel: 

1. Increase volunteer per.sonnel as follows: 

a. Pilots, 150 additional. 

b. Technical, clerical, 250 additional. 

Tactical Objectives: 

1. Defence of all establishments in Yunnan province. 

2. Attack Japanese air bases in Indo-Chlna and on Hainan Island. 

3. Attack Japanese supply dumps in Indo-China and Hainan Island. 

4. Attack Japanese supply vessels, transports, tankers, and small naval 
vessels in harbors of Indo-China and Hainan Island and at s^a between those 
places. 

5. Occasional raids on Japanese industrial establishments in Japan. 

6. Attack Japanese supply vessels on Yangtze River. 

7. Support of offensive operations of Chinese armies. 

strategical Objectives: 

1. Force diversion of considerable portion of available Japanese air force 
to defence of Japanese establishments on "South China coast and in Japan 
and to counter-offensive operations in interior of China. 

2. Enable Chinese armies to a.ssume operations which will make necessary 
heavy reinforcement of Japanese troops in China. 

3. Destruction of Japanese supplies and supply ships in order to handicap 
operations of an expeditionary force to the south of Indo-China. 

4. Destruction of Japanese factories in order to cripple production of mu- 
nitions and essential articles for maintenance of economic structure in Japan. 

Time Schedule: 

1. The increase of the air force from 300 to 500 airplanes (350 pursuit and 

150 bombardment) should be completed by October 31. 1941. 

When the railway between the Burma lioad and Siang Yun is completed, and 

this could be effected by June, 1942, suflBcient carrying capacity would be amply 

provided for the maintenance in the field of 1.000 combat planes, or indeed any 

strength it is desired to build up to. 



Table of approximate distances in statute miles 





Kun- 
ming 


Kweilin 


Hainan (Kiunechow) .. . 


610 
1,190 

800 

335 
1,025 

805 
1,340 
1,655 
1,400 
2,360 

950 


380 


Formosa (Taihoku) -. 


720 


Paracels Island - - 


590 


Hanoi . .. 


430 


Sai?on - -- 


1,055 


Bangkok . . 


1,045 


Siam-Malaya border line . - 


1,520 


SineaDore 


1,750 


Manila . 


1.030 


Soerabaja 


2,300 


Calcutta - - --- 










Chu- 
chow 


Heng- 
chow 


Kan- 
chow 


Kian 


Manila 


Naeasaki 


730 
1,060 
1,085 
1,365 


1.150 
1,485 
1,510 
1,780 


1,060 
1,410 
1,435 
1,690 


1,020 
1,360 
1,385 
1,645 


1.460 


Kobe 




Osaka . 


1,780 


Tokyo 


2,010 







December 4, 1940 
Revised April 23, 1941. 

The importance of Singapore to the defense of the British Isles and the British 
Empire and to the interests of the United States 

1. The importance of Singapore to the immediate defense of the British Isles 
lies in the fact that any major naval power based in Singapore could command 
the Indian Ocean and the maritime routes of access to the raw materials and man- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3493 

power of India, Malaya, and most of the Dutch East Indies. While the British 
Isles could perhaps carry on without access to these materials and to this man 
power, the effect of such a loss upon the economic and financial resources 
of the British Isles — would be considerable. Such a loss by seriously weakening 
our own economy (rubber, tin, jute, quinine, vegetable oils, tungsten, antimony, 
mica are among the supplies that might be lost to us) would adversely affect the 
extent of our economic aid to the British Isles. 

2. More important, the British Isles cannot carry on in a defensive position 
for an indefinitely prolonged period. However strong defensively, they must in 
time succumb unless a sustained offensive can successfully be launched against 
Germany. It is from this point of view [2] that Singapore assumes its 
greatest importance in the defense — as directed to ultimate survival — of the 
British Isles; i. e., the long-term defense of the Jsies. 

From point of view of ultimate offensive action against Germany, the Eastern 
Mediterranean and the Near East are areas of major and of obvious importance 
affording as they do (1) the key to an invasion of Europe through the disaffected 
occupied countries of the Balkans or through a weakened and perhaps collapsing 
Italy and (2) a possible means of once more bringing into action against the 
Axis the French forces in Syria and in North Africa. The significance of Sing- 
apore to the defense of the British position in the Near East lies in its domina- 
tion of the only remaining effective lines of communication for the supply of ma- 
terials and troops to that area. If these Japanese gained possesision of Singapore 
it would seem that they could not only control Malaya and the Netherlands 
East Indies but most or all of the Indian Ocean as well. (See attached sum- 
mary of distances from Singapore to various points.) 

Troop reinforcements for the British forces in the Near East come from 
Australia, New Zealand, India, Burma, South Africa and/or the British Isles. 
Supplies for these forces come from some or all of the foregoing areas and/or 
[3] from among the following: Malaya, the Netherlands East Indies, and the 
Western Hemisphere. As British naval power cannot ensure uninterrupted 
passage of the Mediterranean by British transports or by British merchant ves- 
sels (even though the increasingly doubtful assumption be made that the Axis 
powers will at no time during the war be able to close the Straits of Gibraltar), 
the only sure (for the present) route of access to the Near East from the areas 
named above is via the Indian Ocean to the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea. 

3. It must also be remembered that one of Britain's major weapons against 
Germany is the blockade. The role of Suez and of the Eastern Mediterranean 
in the enforcement of the blockade is readily apparent. Singapore's role is hardly 
of less significance. The regions of the Indian Ocean and of the Pacific eastward 
and southward and northward from Singapore are vast reservoirs of supplies. 
While Great Britain controls the routes to those reservoirs, Germany can be kept 
in larger measure from drawing on them. Should Great Britain lose that con 
trol, not only would the British Isles be deprived of those supplies but those sup- 
plies would in substantial measure be made available to Germany — via the 
Persian Gulf and the Caspian and via Vladivostok. In the event of loss by the 
British both of [4] Singapore and of their position in the Near East, the 
Axis Powers would have direct and full access to each other and these supplies 
could, therefore, be made directly available to Germany with the result that all 
effectiveness of the strategy of the blockade would be lost. 

In brief, were Singapore to be taken by Japan, Great Britain's tasks, both 
of (1) defending the British Isles and of (2) winning the war, would be rendered 
vastly more difficult and her chances of survival be greatly diminished. 

4. Singapore is, furthermore, important from point of view of more obviously 
direct interests of the United States. Were Singapore to fall, the blockade of 
China (except for the inade(fuate and unreliable northwest route from Russia) 
could be made complete and the defeat of China by Japan would be facilitated. 
The control over the natural resources of the South Seas area which Japan 
would acquire if it took Singapore has already been indicated. Our own posi- 
tion in the Philippines — a far more valuable possession both economically and 
strategically than is usually recognized — would, of course, be strategically 
prejudiced. 

It is in its effect upon China's resistance, however, that the fall of Singapore 
to Japan wou'd most [5] conclusively affect (adversely) the direct in- 
terests of the United States (other than and in addition to our interest in sur- 
vival of the British Empire). Were China to succumb we would be Less able 
than now to protect our interests in the Far East. Our historic Far Eastern 
policy and our whole position in the Far East would be seriously compromised. 



3494 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Not the least of the disastrous results of China's defeat would be a serious drop, 
as a result of such a blow to our prestige, in popular morale in this country 
and in the morale of the peoples of South America. The only remaining counter- 
weights to the power and influence in the Far East of Japan would be those 
of Russia. With the collapse of China, Japan would be master in East Asia and 
in the South Seas, and Japan would be able to draw freely upon China's natural 
resources and manpower. The security of Australia and New Zealand — to both 
of which we are bound by increasingly strong ties — would be endangered. In 
addition, Japan's access to the great economic resources of India would be 
definitely facilitated and Japanese political influence in India would increase. 
The increase in Japan's strength vis-^-vis the Uniied States which would re- 
sult from these various developments would be notable, and Japan's ability to 
challenge our [6] economic (and before long our political) position in 
Central and South America would be vastly increased. At the same time, our 
general commeirial and strategic position wou'd be considerably weakened — by 
our loss of the Chinese, Indian and South Seas markets for our exports (and 
by our loss of much of the Japanese market for our goods, as Japan would be- 
come more and more self-sufficient) as well as by inevitable restrictions upon 
our access to the rubber, tin, quinine, jute, tungsten, tung oil and other vital 
materials of the Asian and Oceanic regions. 

5. It has been suggested that Japan would be only too glad to sell to the 
British and to us the products of the region, and that in fact, therefore, our 
(and the British) economic situation would not be adversely affected. The fate 
of British and American trade in Manchuria and in North China is persuasive 
evidence that our (and British) export trade would certainly suffer. Whether 
Japan's ability to dictate the terms upon which we could acquire rubber, tin, 
and other products would also prove harmful to us in tvmes of peace need not con- 
cern us. The present and the immediate futures are times of war, and in the 
war that is raging not only is Japan an open if nonbelligerent partner of Ger- 
many and Italy but the United States is openly aiding Great Britain and China. 
[7] Japan must — while and so long as she is an ally of Germany — aid Ger- 
many in the latter's attempt to destroy the British Empire, and toward that 
end Japan must give support to Gerr^a^^'s nffompts to b.-^ms^^ring thp Brif-sh in 
their (jperations — both general and particular — of resistance. Consequently, 
Tvere Japan to acquire control of Singapore (i. e. control of the key ways to 
thf \ast natural resourcei": of Aa'^r^ anri *hp Son*^h Sen'^^ it couM not with an.v 
warrant be expected that she would freely sell to the British or to us — we being 
Britain's greatest armorer and supplier — what we severally and jointly need 
(with our expanding requirements) of the strategic materials of the Orient. 

6. There is little if any warrant for the view, rather lightly advanced in vari- 
ous quarters (and made without consideration of the above-enumerated reasons 
why successful Japanese aggression southward would make Germany's defeat 
far less likely), that, if and when Germany shall have been defeated, it would 
be an easy matter for Great Britain and/or the United States to put Japan out 
of any advanced positions which Japana may or might have taken while British 
and American attention and efforts were concentrated upon problems in the At- 
lantic and in Europe. Were the Japanese during the present war to occupy Singa- 
pore without having had to pay a huge [S] price, the Japinese Empire 
would be at the end of the war a very dfferent entity from that which it is today, 
an entity much more powerful in a military sense than it is now. Is there any 
warrant for an assumption that at that point the British would be so powerful 
that they would and could move with success against such a Japan as would 
then exist? It may well be doubted, also, whether the people of the United States 
would at that point be willing to embark upon far-flung overseas operations for 
the mere purpose of driving the Japanese out of points in which they had estab- 
lished themselves on the western side of the Pacific. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3495 

Distances from Singapore to Various Points, in Statute Miles by Great Cibclk 

Measurements 

West coast of Ceylon — 1,700 miles. 

(Note : If Singapore could not be defended, certainly Ceylon could not be— 
from Colombo to the mouth of the Gulf of Aden it is 2,000 miles and from 
Colombo to the northwestern tip of Sumatra it is 1,100 miles. Furthermore, 
Italian East Africa would be available for minor bases, thus permitting the 
distances from Colombo to the coast of Italian East Africa — 2,000 miles at 
the mouth of the Gulf of Aden ; 2,700 miles at the frontier between Kenya and 
Italian East Africa — to be halved. B ;ses at Singapore, Sumatra, Colombo 
and Italian East Africa would give Japan control of the Indian Ocean with 
consequent ability to blockade India and to cut all communications to the 
Gulf of Aden.) 

Mouth of Gulf of Aden— 3,700 miles. 
Northwestern point of Australia — 1,800 miles. 

(From Java, which is controlled by Singapore, the distance is 1,200 miles.) 
West coast of Borneo — 400 miles. 

Southern tip of French Indochina — 450 miles (thus controlling Gulf of Siam) 
Jolu in Sulu archipelago of Philippines — 1,250 miles. 



3496 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




CL^lJlo 



'h M^mi'tm smMwrnM. mud Kiratria% 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3497 



■i^M ii^ t> j^m 



Th« OavvniBsent has s«trur«<l dttfiBit* i&fosmMoR tbat 
ths r«o«iit ;rap«Mse la^rial Coofwrene* wnS^ i^ im^tsttm to 
atm sotttiivard against 8i»g«por« sad th* srsrtxofo Baat Indiss 
first b»f<»r« <M»piii« with th« Slber-laa prow.**. 

Ib aooordstuMi with thl» InformtioR all 4*p«rt9HOta 
of tb* a&mnumkt have reovlvsd IxtJStraeticMis frtm tbe Q^ieml- 
issivo to talc« li»»dl&t« Bttftsiires to mmt 1M» «otioB. 



L ^^t^^-g^Ut^^^ 



79716 O — 46 — i)t. 19- 



3498 CONGRESSiOXAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






Sm^lri»9 *» rew* t»l«grm» ifo. If (bor&ac m%muS»*» viMt to 
%rii» 'aOMm^ mimtiiteaaiiig mta riNMSIawd S8 to tlM» z-wipictlifw apbmxma 

' r)0 ef &et|.«e» aoanwEgr tad l%e3y i»9ix9A jn—diat* ~ 

"jia^ td vldfl^ Sattfo^tai. «oaM laot •«(«• o«iag to 

Z fiov Imxn Hmt »ixmm Vm otitlrMik ^ tii* BoMcMIvnMm ooafUot 
<xaqplet« nsrwHMmt taui bswi r«lelM»d n^idUdt mXXa for Mtrljr MtloB «c<dM«t 

in Zc^b-CMaa aai TUmitaod pr»iitr«t«i7^ to «i SidhnKao* •cnttaMurd acftiwHi 

Oiv IMa»is Immhi dselars tJiai d» sbo^Lld 1» %gr no mnoui dl»- 
ecKSrAfKd ^ te«9lomeats ^md Im^W) tliat fxm mi^ atSll b* «lil» to riM±%.^ 

OKing to th» mmaemiMt dt dl^loHfttl« Zi«iljiti<Mui Z mi nmtiai i^T 
t«L»graii Idaroogb StA\amri»a&. I «i proo t d lBt tlwr* ^f««lf Bad hofw to 
MlBtalo <»eiMi«et wltb oar jRrlMda fttm tbaaro. 



(^ CA/^^-yU^C^Xj^^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3499 



iin. 



3500 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



THC MtUKCTAOV OT »TATV 
W Am » M»nm. p. c. 





DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

WASHINGTON 



Aueuat 7. 19i»l. 




ICaiORANDUM FOR THE HOSIDBrr 

There Is anolosed a copy of a telegram addressed 
to you by General Chiang Kai-shek under date of 
July 31, 1941 » together wlt4> a oopy of a note frost the 
Chinese Ambassador, dated August 2, forwarding a OOpy 
of the telegram in (Question. As General Chian«*» mes- 
sage, in which he conveys to you his gratitude for your 
having aooeded to his rec^uest to plaoe Chinese stsets 
in this oouotry under freezing control, refers to other 
requests which he has nnde in the interest of strengthen- 
ing Cbiita, it seemed adTisable that reply sheuM !>• made 
to his telegram without awaiting your return. I aooordia«>** 
ly sent today & reply to Qeperal Chiang by telegraph throutfi 
our Xmhassy at Chunglcing and enolose a oopy of w^ telegram 
herewith. I trust that ay repl^f^ets with your approval. 

Bnolosures: 

X. From Chinese Ambasaado. 

Axigust 2, with enol 
2. To Aaerlean Imbasey, 

Chuaelcing, August ?. 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3501 

Ohinkse Embassy. 
Washington, Amjust 2. Wlfl. 

Honorable Stjmnkb Wpxlks, 
Acting Secretary of State 

My Drvr Mr. Secektabys I have just received a telegraphic message from Gen- 
eralissimo Chiang Kai-shek which he desires to be conveyed to the President. I 
shall be grateful if you will be so good as to transmit it to its high destination. 

I am, my dear Mr. Secretary, 
Very sincerely yours, 

Hu Shih. 

Enclosure: Telegram as above. 



Translation 

Telegram to the President of the United States From Generalissimo Chiang 

Kai-shek, Chungking, July 31, 1941. 

My Dear Mr. President : I am most grateful to you for having acceded to 
my request to place all Chinese assets under f'-eezing control. This is additional 
evidence of your desire to assist China in every possible way, and is appreciated 
by the Chinese people in that spirit. 

I am sure that the action of your Government in freezing all Japanese assets 
will prove an important body blow to the aggressor. 

The Chinese Government is sincerely grateful to you and your Government for 
having brought about concerted action, on both these measures, by practically all 
the friendly powers who are fighting aggression. 

I am confident that my other requests which I have made to you in the interest 
of strengthening China's fighting power and meeting the emergency situation of 
the Far East, will receive .vour kind attention at the appropriate time. 

Chiang Kai-shfk. 



NAVAI. RADIO 

.\UGUST 7, 1941. 
AmEmbassy, 

Chungking. 

Please inform General Chiang Kai-shek that the Chinese Ambassador promptly 
delivered to me for communication to the President General Chiang's gracious 
expression of appreciation of this Government's action in freezing (Chinese assets 
in this country pursuant to General Chiang's request, State further that the 
communication will be promptly conveyed to the President, who is absent from 
Washington at this moment ; and that, speaking for the President, I reaflSrm 
that it is the desire and purpose of the people and Government of the United 
States to aid China in concrete ways in the struggle which the Chinese Govern- 
ment and the Chinese nation are most courageously making to preserve and 
maintain China's place and perform China's function as one of the great in- 
dependent nations of the world. 



3502 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATIOJ^^ PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 160 






THE WHITE HOUSE 
WASHINGTON 



B«eaab«r 15 , 1941. 



imiOEiNDUM 



Rosarks of tlM Fresident on 
%ht oco&fiion of tbe mo ting of hit 
Cabinot at 8:30 and oontimiing at 
9:00 with logislatlTo leadort, on 
Pooottbor 7t 1941 • 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3503 

( indicates inaudibility) 

The conversations were interrupted for six weeks to two montlis. They 

were then resumed, with the same objective in mind. Despite the Japanese move 
into Indo-China, they continued until about two weeks ago, when we received 
indications from various sources — Europe and Asia — that the German govern- 
ment was pressing Japan for action under the tripartite pact. In other words, an 
effort to divert the American mind, and the British mind, from the European 
field, and divert American supplies from the European theatre to the defense of 
the' East Asia theatre. About two weeks ago we b.^gaii to realize that the prob- 
ability of Japan being in earnest was so slim that it was time to make a final 
and definite effort to pin them down on the one subject that they had never ever 
been pinned down on, and that was that they were to agree to cease their acts of 
aggression, and that they would try to bring the China war to a close. 

The result was that the Secretary of State sent a message on that point, to find 
out whether Japan would be willing to discuss or consider that point of non- 
aggression. That was the 26th of November. From that time on we were getting 
more and more definite information that Japan was headed for war, and that 
the reply to the Secretary of State would be in the negative. 

About a week ago, in adding up some of the information in addition to 

that, moving 100,000 men in Southern Indo-China, the importance of that lies in 
the fact that geographically Indo-China was at a hub, from which any attack can 
be made in a number of directions. It is only a very short distance from there 
to the Philippines in the east. It is a relatively short distance from [2] 

there down to the Dutch East Indies, which is the most industrial part — southwest 
there is Singapore — fortified. To the west there is the Malay peninsula, parts 
of Thailand, and parts of the Malay Straits, and slightly to the northwest is 
the whole of Thailand — Siam, an independent kingdom, practically surrounded 
<m two sides by England and France. Only a short distance from there, of course, 
lies Burma, and the entry — the bottleneck to the Burma Road, a short distance 
from Siam. We are getting a very large proportion of our supplies — rubber, tin, 
etc. — from that whole area of southwestern Pacific, and we are getting out over 
the Burma Road — two-way road — we are getting a large amount of very important 
material, such as tungsten and some oil — for the manufacture of paint. 

In addition to that, of course, is the fact that if the Japanese did move to the 
south, to the Dutch East Indies, from Indo-China, the Philippines would be 
virtually surrounded. They would have the Japanese on both sides — Indo- 
China — the Mandated Islands to the west, this side of the Philippines, and the 
Dutch Indies, and the Japanese possessions in the South. They would be com- 
pletely encircled by a military power. 

And so the thing went along until we believed that under the pressure from 

Berlin the Japanese were about to do something And so yesterday 

I sent a final message to the Emperor The Japanese, we learned, were 

to b^ing the Secretary of State todav a reply to his note of November 26. Actually, 
in iwint of fact (?), they telephoned to the State Department, after Hawaii had 
been attacked, for an appointment. They came to the State Department — 
\S] they were given an appointment within three-quarters of an hour, and 
they actually arrived at the State Department one hour after the terrific bomb- 
ing attack on the Island of Oahu. 

Which of coui'se was an act which is almost without parallel in relationships 
between nations, equaled only by the Japanese episode of 1904, when two squad- 
rons — cruisers — lying in the Harbor of Korea (?) and without any warning — I 
think on a Sunday morning, by the wa.v — Japanese cruisers sank all of them. 
There are other parallels, of course, such as the descent on Denmark and Norway 
in this war, without any warning whatsoever. In fact right in the face of their 
treaties of non-aggression. 

. . . Sending that message to Congress, which i.s— after you have read and 
studied it — one of the most . . . falsehoods that I have had . . . 

And finally while we wei-e on the alert — at eight o'clock — half-past seven— 
about a quarter past — half-past one, a gi-eat fleet of Japanese bombers bombed 
our ships in Pearl Harbor, and bombed all of our airfields. Shortly thereafter 
this was followed — about eleven o'clock, three hours later — by a third attack, 
which was not as violent, but most of the damage had already been done. The 
casualties, I am sorry to say, were extremely heavy. I cannot say anything 
definitely in I'egard to the numlier of ships that have been sunk. It looks as if 
out of eight battleships, three have been sunk, and possibly a fourtli. Two de- 
stroyers were blown up while they were in drydock. Two of the battleships are 



3504 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

l)adly damaged. Several other smaller vessels have been sunk or destroyed. 
The drydock itself has been <lama{red. Other portions [.'/] of the fleet 
are at sea, moving towards what is believed to be two plane carriers, with 
adequate naval escort. 

In addition to that, this afternoon, in Guam — Guam was being bombed by two 
squadrons of Japanese planes, and we know — and it is entirely possible that at 
this moment Guam — which was not defended except by a few Marines, without 
much in the way of guns — in all probability has fallen to the Japanese. 

Wake Island was also attacked, and we have no further word at the pre.sent 
time. 

We believe that Manila was attacked, but that has not proved true, and it is 
possible that other ports of the Philippines — some ports in Mindanao — have been 
attacked. Those are merely reports. 

. . . Three or four, probably, of the landing fields were very heavily bombed, 
and a very large number of aircraft were destroyed in the hangars, or on the 
fields. 

I have no word on the Navy casualties, which will undoubtedly be very heavy, 
and the best information is that there have been more than one hundred Army 
casualties and more than 300 men killed and injured. 

I do not know what is happening at the present time, whether a night attack 
is on or not. It isn't quite dark yet in Hawaii. I suppose it's four o'clock in 
the afternoon, and it will pi'obably be dark in a couple of hours. 

There might be . . . nothing definite on it ... if the Japanese force turns 
out to be a good deal lai-ger than we expected. 

The fact remains that we have lost the majority of the battle [5] ships 
there. Of course, in the long run, probai)ly most of them can be salvaged, or 
repaired, to take their place in the line of battle again. That, however, is a long 
process, and will last very many months, depending on the damage. 

I think probably — Oh yes — one more thing — Out in Shanghai the one small 
gunboat we have there has been taken over by the Japanese, and a British gun- 
boat has been blown up. We still have two hundred Marines there . . . and 
we are not certain yet whether they have been gotten out or not. Probablv not. 

The Japanese at the same time . . . which were set for one o'clock Wash- 
ington time — the Japanese made an attack on the Malay peninsula. That 
is definite. And the British fleet now in Singapore is now conducting war opera- 
tions against the Japanese ships in the Gulf of Siam, and on the eastern side of 
the Malay peninsula, at the north end — top north end of the Malay Straits, just 
short of the — we will have to look up the map — just short of the Siamese — 
Thailand part of that peninsula, short of what they call the (?) Isthmus. 

The Dutch government has declared that a state of war exists between the 
Netherlands Indies and the Japanese. 

The British cabinet is in session. I have heard nothing from them on that — 
just the fact. And at nine o'clock tomorrow morning, their time, a special 
session of the Parliament is being called. 

The Japanese have attacked the Malay Straits. 

Now I think (hat is all there is in the way of information, but it has been 
suggested that the Army and Navy losses, and the [6] rather definite 
statements that I have made about these shipe, could not be spoken of outside, 
because we must remember that detailed military information, such as the 
damage to ships, or even the lo«s of personnel — that information is of value to 
an enemv. I think that is a matter of di.seretion, which all of you will accept. 

Q. Didn't we do anything to eet — nothing about casualties on their side? 

The Prfsident. It's a little difficult. We think we got some of their submarines, 
but we don't know. 

Q. Well, planes— aircraft? 

The Ppesident. We did get, we think, a number of their Japanese planes. 
We know some Japanese planes were s^^ot down, but there again — I have seen so 
much of this in the other war. One fellow says he has got fifteen of their planes, 
and you pick up the telephone and somebody else says five. So I don't know 
what tho report on that is. except that somewhere Japanese planes have been 
knocked down on the Island. I should say that by far the greater loss has been 
stistained by us, although we have accounted for some of the Japanese. 

Q. There is a story coming over the radio that we got one of their airplane 
carriers. 

The Presidknt. I don't know. Don't believe it. It was reported about eight 
o'clock. I didn't believe it. A Japanese carrier has been discovered off the 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3505 

Panama Canal and sunk by our forces. I wish it were true. But about the 
same time, the conunanding officer [7] in the Canal Zone said they were 
on the alert, but very quiet. 

So that is literally everything I have got here. I think I have even covered 
the rumors as well. 

Of course, it is a terrible disappointment to be President in time of war, 
and the circumstances . . . came most unexpectedly. Well, we were attacked. 
There is no question about that. 

I thought that tomorrow, if it was agreeable to Senator Norris (?) he would 
be good enough to ask me to deliver a short message. I can't tell you what is in 
it at this time, because of ... I will probably have ... It has been re- 
ported but not verified that Japan has d,one one of two things. She has sent out 
word that her army and navy are in a state of hostilities with the Unied States; 
and the other reports state that they have declared war on the United States. 

I frankly— I haven't any specific information whether both of those are true 
or not. Of course, the fact is that the — it might be called the principal defense 
of the whole west coast of this country and the whole west coast of the Americas 
has been very seriously damaged today. That is why I thought I would ask you — 
after all, there are two sides — I would ask you if it was all right if you would 
let me come before you tomorrow — I think the regular Senate session tomorrow. 

Q. Yes. 

The President. The House 

Q. Twelve o'clock. 

Q. May I make one suggestion, Mr. President, and that is that you come as 
early after twelve as possible, at your convenience. Are [8] you going 
to suggest what the resolution will be before we leave? 

The President. I don't know yet. 

Q. A resolution inviting you to come? 

The President. A resolution asking me to come. 

Q. You don't want to continue any further than that tonight? 

The President. No. I think what's happened in the last nine hours. I don't 
know what's going to happen by twelve o'clock tomorrow. 

Q. My suggestion was made for this reason — after the prayer and the reading 
of the Journal, we stopped the long speeches, but it is the habit now to ask 
unanimous consent (?) I would like to introduce this resolution as soon as the 
Journal is read. Then you could come in at an early enough hour. 
. The President. Half-past twelve? 

Q. Yes, I think 

The President. In the Senate? 

Q. Five minutes to get there. We have to get that resolution — — 

The President. The concurrent resolution ? 

Q Yes. 

The President. Well, if that's all right with you, I will I will come any time — 
roughly half-past twelve is all right with me. Is that all right? 

Q. Yes, yes. Sam and I discussed that. 

The President. Well, it is an awfully serious situation. There is a rumor 
that two of the planes — Japanese planes have a rising sun painted on them — but 
two of the planes were seen with swastikas on them. Now whether that is true 
or not, I don't know. It was a rumor, and therefore news until something a 
little more definite [9] comes in. But that is a rumor. 

Q. I can't help wondering what can we do to do anything 

The President. The only specific thing to do . . . our ships — we don't know 
what ships — are out trying to get the Japs at this moment. . . . They can't send 
for fear of disclosing their position. 

Q. There are two airplane carriers of the Japanese navy over there. 

The President. Probably — in other words, if you take the timing out, those 
planes — carriers and their attending cruisers, and probably battleships — I don't 
know — at sundown last night, at about dark, were roughly twelve hours of 
darkness- — standing in the dark, away from where they launched their 
planes. Now, let us assume that they launched those planes at a distance of a 
hundred miles at daylight. That means that they had twelve hours to get to 
that point in the dark, and running at perhaps 25 knots, that would be three 
hundred miles further away. In other words, at dark, last night, they might 
veiy well have been four hundred to five hundred miles away from the Island, 
and therefore out of what might be called a good patrol distance. Patrol out of 
a given point — 300 miles under normal conditions, but 500 miles is a long way 



3506 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

for reconnaissance patrol. The planes run all through the nipht. At dawn they 
were one hundred miles away from their Island — they launched their planes — 
they steamed this way and that way, or reversed their course. The planes 
dropped their bomhs and went hack. 

Q. Well, they were supposed to be on the alert, and if they had been on the 
alert. ... I am amazed at the attack by Japan, but I am still more astounded 
at what happened to our Navy. They were all asleep. Where were our patrols? 
They knew these negotiations were [10] going on. 

The President. . . . Here is a dispatch from General MacArthur in 
the Philippines. All possible action being taken here to speed defense. Pursuit 
planes are now reporting that by a counter-attack about fifteen enemy planes north 
of the Far (?) in Central (?) ... which means that those Japs are over the 
Island of Onhu (?). Report has been received that bombing attack . . . far 
end of the Island of Mindanao ... In all probability . . . attack may come 
from the Japanese Mandated Islands, which lie to the west of the Philip- 
pines The only damage caused, said the report, is a hangar of a civilian airport. 
A report has just been received of a bombing attack on Camp John Hayes at 
Baguio. 

That message was sent twenty minutes ago, and it is just about dawn in the 
Philippines at this moment — tomorrow of Monday. 

Two hundred Marines are in Northern China (?). They have been asked 
by the Japanese array to disarm, to turn in all arms and ammunition, to 
assemble . . . The reply accepts the demands as of two o'clock today. That 
takes care of that. You have got the rest of it. 

Q. That means two hundred of our Marines are now prisoners of the Japanese? 

The President. Yes. 

Well, any of you good people got any questions? 

Q. I didn't hear you say anything about sinkings between Hawaii and Oahu. 

The President. Those are two reports. One was an armed transport supposed 
to be carrying a load of lumber. Is that right Harry? 

[11] Mr. Habry (Hopkins)? Yes, sir. 

The President. And the other one is — that was 1,500 miles off San Francisco — 
the other report which might release the same — that an American merchant ship 
had been sunk 700 miles. But they are just flabby ( ??) 

Q. If that report is true, it is pretty close to California, is that right. Harry? 

Q. Mr. President, you said you don't know what you are going to say tomorrow. 
Are you g'ung to detail to Congress all the facts you have at that time, assuming 
they don't get any better you might ... so far as the Japanese 

The President. Active hostilities, yes. 

Q. Yes, that is what I mean. 

The President. Well, let me get a little more time on it. 

Q. Yes. 

The President. In other words, at my Press Conference, they start off with 
the question "If". It's a little bit of "if" — what I will say tomorrow at half-past 
twelve. 

Q. Have you any report of a mass meeting in Tokyo to be held at 7. 30, in 
which Togo and Tojo and some otiier officials were to make speeches? 

The Presid'^-nt. I heard tliat the Prime Minister is going to make a statement, 
or a declaration, or speech, in Parliament at two o'clock tomorrow afternoon. 

Q. The radio inferred about eleven o'clock. 

Q. That would be about 7.30 our time. That's another rumor. It isn't con- 
firmed. 

[12] Q. . . . make a formal declaration of war? They are so tangled 
up in the Axis that a declaration of war by Germany on us . . . 

The President. We have reason to believe that the Germans have told the 
Japanese that if Japan declares war they will too. In other words, a declaration 
of war by Japan automatically brings . . . 

Q. You haven't made any declaration yet? 

The President. It is awfully difficult to know. 

Q. Well. Mr. President, this nation has got a job ahead of it, and what we have 
got to do is roll up our sleeves and win this war. 

The President. Doc (?) I am glad you said that because there are a lot of 
people all over the country who have been saying for the past few weeks — saying, 
well let's go in and clean U]) — blank — blank — blank. But of course that popular 
feeling — you can't do it — just wade in and clean tliem up. 

Back in 1922-1923, I wrote an article for the Asiatic Magazine, and I pointed 
out at that time that from what I had seen of the Navy Department, war between 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3507 

the United States and Japan would be won by us; but that it would be won 
primarily by the starvation and exhaustion of Japan — starvation or exhaustion. 
And always remember that they have no naval bases — they have nothing. And 
the old axiom used to be that a fleet loses five percent of its efficiency for every 
thousand miles it gets away from base. Tiiat is a rule of thumb. We saw our 
fleet at Hawaii, three thousand miles away to Japan itself ... If anything 
happens to the ship, there is one thing in particular. If you are in home waters 
you can get it back to drydock or Navy Yard, but if you are in enemy waters 
[13] • you have an awfully tough time getting back home. And therefore a 
fleet attack over in Japanese waters is almost an impossibility. And they are 
going to go through. We will have to, to prolong our national existence, but it 
makes this treacherous attack impossible in the future. We may have some very 
heavy losses. And the Japanese know perfectly well that the answer to her 
attack is proper strangulation of Japan — strangulation altogether. 

Q. How big is the Russian Army now? 

The President . . The greater part of it is there. From our best informa- 
tion there will be no offensive on land from now on until the end of April. 

Q. Not much danger in Siberia . . .? 

Q. Try to play this down, Mr. President, but I presume that we think of this 
problem — we probably have varied interpretations to place on the situation, so 
that we will probably have a declaration against Japan. Whether it goes any 
further will depend on conditions from now to then. 

The President. I think we ought not to say anything about it — what action 
will be asked fOr, or what action will be taken by the Congress tonight. 

Q. About all you can tell them is about the Message? 

The President. But lots of things may happen. 

Q. I was trying to get it from our points of view. 

The President. The fact is that a shooting war is going on today in the Pacific. 
We are in it. 

Q. By twelve o'clock tomorrow you will know whether Japan's formality has 
taken a declaration of war on us, or a state of war [I4] exists. 

Q. ... Japan had stated that a state of war existed between us, or that 
war existed. That does not necessary mean a declaration of war. That comes 
from some authority that has power to declare war. 

The President. Bill, this is the only thing that we have — from Shanghai. 
Who is Stanton? Is he our Consul there? 

Q. Consul of China. 

The Pres dent. Ciptain Smith of the U. S. S.? reeeivetl a telephone call at 
4.15 this morning. Japanese naval oflBcersi stated over the telephone that a state 
of war exists between my country and yours. I am taking control over the 
U. S. S.? . That's the nearest oflScial thing I have got, and that's a telephone 
message. I tliink we had better not say anything about it. Remember that o-^t 
there it is nearly just about dawn. They are doing things, and saying things 
during the daytime out there, while we are all in bed. 

Q. We are in bed too much. 

Q. Well, if that's-^well, that's all we can say. 

The President. What? 

Q. That is all we can say. 

The President. Yes. 

December 7, 1941 



3508 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 161 



-i^.,^:^:ii 



I 



I 



TTTP"' • I i|H||l|j 



THC SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 

>A'ASMIN3TON 

Vov«ttb«r 29, 1941 



y DivlBlon of 

r FAR m\ii} m\ 




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II- 



Xy d*«r Mr. rrcaldaati 

I aa «aelo«lag bermrith a rwy ron^ draft of 
what I hare sant orer to the State Separtaent as a aaaaa 
of helping la the draftlog of a aaeeage. I hope it aajr 
tie helpftH. 

I hare had the aealitance of both idalral Stark 
aad JUbilral Tttrner la the mugaatlon of the allttary eltuatloa. 

fee neve thla momlac Indicate! that the Jap» are 
going to dellheratel7 etall for two or three dajre, eo unleee 
thle picture ehaagee, I aa extreaeljr hopeftd that jrou will 
get a two or three dajr reeplte down there aad will eoae hack 
feeling Tory fit. 

To«r* elneerelj, 




She President 
In Route to 

Vara Springe, Georgia 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3509 

To The Congress of the United States: 

The relations between the United States and the Japanese Empire have now 
reached a stage where I consider it incumbent upon me to acquaint the Congress 
with the exact facts of the situation and their extremely serious implications. 

For the past six months, conversations have been carried on between the Secre- 
tary of State and the President of the United States and the Foreign Minister 
and Premier of Japan, for the purpose of arriving, if possible, at some under- 
standing agreeable to both governments. Throughout this entire period, the gov- 
ernment of the United States has been steadfast in its support of basic principles 
which should govern international relations. The principles for which we have 
stood in these discussions may be summarized as follows : 

(Insert here Secretary Hull's summary of our basic principles which he 
gave to Nomura.) . 

We have employed every effort of which we were capable to reach, an agreement. 
With the utmost of forbearance and patience, we have sought to bring Japan 
into accord with us on these principles. These efforts have failed. Japan has 
refused to change her posture, and relations between the two nations are threat- 
ened with rupture. 

In our negotiations, we have kept in close contact with the governments of 
Great Britain, Australia, the Netherlands Indies, and China. We have found 
these nations in complete agreement with the position we have assumed. In 
every proposal submitted to Japan, the rights and vital interests of these four 
nations have been faithfully represented. In the firm position which' we have 
taken with respect to the Japanese attitude and conduct, we have had the moral 
support of these nations. We also have assurance of their material and military 
support if that becomes necessary. 

[2] Simply stated, what we are confronted with in the Far East is a repeti- 
tion of the tactics pursued by Hitler in Europe during Ihe past two years. The 
methods which Hitler has used in Europe so successfully and which are being 
faithfully imitated by Japan, consist of a gradual expansion of power and control 
over neighboring peoples by a slow, progressive infiltration through which one 
nation after another is subdued and enslaved either by actual force or by threats 
of force. 

If the Nazi power is to be defeated, the United Kingdom must not be over- 
whelmed. British military power mans the gate which holds back from the 
Americas the flood of German military strength. The supports of British power 
extend to all parts of the ^orld. Weakening one support weakens the strength of 
the entire structure. A particularly important, possibly an essential part of that 
structure is Singapore, which, with the Philippines and the Netherlands Indies, 
furnishes great quantities of the raw materials required for the success of the 
American and British defense effort. The Southwest Pacific, important as it 
is to our economy, may be even more important as a military position, because 
it links together vital units of the British Commonwealth. Were Japan estab- 
lished in Singapore or the Netherlands Indies, the security of the British Isles 
themselves would be endangered, and thus the security of the United States 
threatened. Should this region fall, we would find that the brave troops of Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, and India would necessarily be required at home to defend 
their own territories, and thus no longer could take part in checking the Nazi 
thrust to the east and to the south. The British position in the Near East would 
be undermined. Vichy France probably would fall c-ompletely under Nazi domi- 
nation. Under Nazi control would then fall all [S] the territories and 
bases of that part of Africa which we see poised like a bludgeon over our friends 
in South America. 

Japan has faithfully followed the familiar pattern of German aggression. Each 
proclaims a burning wish for peace, and each seeks that peace by making war on 
its neighbors, one by one. The united strength of these neighbors might once 
have checked this aggression, but each has faced his doom alone. Step by step, 
country by country, the sinister military power of Germany and Japan has 
swarmed forward until now, each abetting the other, both stand as remorseless 
threats to all remaining, free peoples. 

During the past 10 years, Japanese military power has moved westward into 
Manchuria ; and then has moved southward through China into Indo-China and 
the islands of the sea. Today Japan has strong military, naval, and air bases 
which enclose three parts of the circle around the Philippine Islands, and directly 
front the British and Dutch in the southern rampart. Were the Malay States 



3510 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

and the Netherlands Indies tjo pass under Japanese military domination, two of 
our strong friends in the Far East would disappear. Standing alone, we then 
would see, surrounded and in a desperate plight, our territory in the Philippine 
Islands, and our friends, the Philippine people. We could not accept so intolerable 
a state of affairs. 

The situation holds unmistakable threats to our vital interests. The .successful 
defense ot the United States, in a military sense, is dependent upon supplies 
of vital materials which we import in large quantities from this region of the 
world. To permit Japanese domination and control of the major sources of world 
supplies of tin and rubber is a menace to our safety which cannx)t be tolerated. 
Unless the present course of events in the Far East is halted, and considera- 
tions of Justice, humanity and the principle of equality between [^] na- 
tions, are restored, we will witness in that region of the world, precisely what 
has already transpired throughout the continental limits of Europe where Hitler 
seeks diOminion by ruthless force. 

The progress and results of our patient negotiations with the Japanese Gov- 
ernment demonstrate that Japan will not accept conditions which are fair, and 
which we believe are fundamental if peace and prosperity in the Pacific Area 
are to endure. It is clear that the Japanese Government has determined on im- 
mediate further military adventures. They have enlarged the sphere of the so- 
called "New Order" until now it even includes India, Australia, and New Zealand. 
Months ago Japan proclaimed total national mobilization. Their every available 
resource is devoted to military purposes. The Premier and other leaders, again 
and again, have appealed for Japanese unity in order (and I quote) "To tide 
over the gravest crisis that Japan has faced in all her glori^ous 1000 years of 
history" (end quote). Their leaders assure the Japanese people there is no hope 
of peace, and that large-scale war is directly ahead. 

Information has reached us of dependable character that Japan contemplates 
further measures of aggression. She has assembled both land, sea and air forces 
for new conquests. She can go no further without seriously threatening the 
vital interests of Great Britain, the Netherlands Indies, Australia and ourselves. 
Unless Japan renounces such purposes and withdraws this threat of further con- 
quest by force, the four nations involved must resort to force to prevent this 
aggression, since arguments appear to have failed. 

In a final effort to prevent an extension of hostilities in the Far East, I have 
addressed an appeal to the Emperor of Japan to join me in my efforts. In the 
meantime, while I await the result of this latest [5] effort toward peaceful 
solution, I felt it incumbent upon me to apprise the Congress, and through you, 
the people of the United States of the serious situation with which we are con- 
fronted. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3511 



•I 









DRAPf RECEIVED BY THE SECHETARY OP STATS PROM 
^EBE SECRETARY OF WAR OP MATERIAL FOR POSSIBLE IN- 
CLtJSIOK IN THE PROPOSED MESSAGE TO THE CONGRESS ON 
THE SUBJECT OP RELATIONS WITH JAPAN. 



« 
fC 

is 
O 



t^ 



-z-' 'ftfi 



m 



3512 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

**.. WAR DEPARTMENT^P | 

/. OFFflCE OF THE SECRETARY 

•y MEMORANDUM 







Division of 
FAR ti^ltRH WJMRS^ 

OepartmeM of State 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3513 



A 



ii 




0BNTLB!J3M OF THE C0MORS33 ; 

I have oome before you "to report to you on the 3>^ 
serious danger which Is threatening this oountry and its 
interests in the Far Sast. 
(here introduce such further opening matter as desired) 

, Our interest in the safety of the 
Philippines, the Netherlands and 
Malaysia^ 

For over forty years our government has been 
r A conducting the unprecedented experiment of training an 

Asiatic people in the methods of freedom and self-government 
as practiced by our own republic. While our immediate aim 
has been the development of this dependent Filipino people, 
thrown Into our guardianship by the accident of war, into 
a self-governing and independent commonwealth, nevertheless 
we have other far-reaching interests in the success of that 
farslghted experiment. It is of the utaoat value to the 
material welfare of the United States that there should exist 
In that portion of the world a friendly nation bound to us 
by the ties of association and gratitude which ovir long part- 
nership in government has created. It has wrought hcane to 
the nations and peoples of the Orient the name, the credit 
and the possibility of extensive commerce with the United 
States. It has helped to establish and stabilize close 



7»7H; O— 4fi — pt. 1!>- 



3514 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

'#'1 '■ •! 

relations on our part vdth that portion of the Paolfio, 
Including particularly !,'alayela and the Hew Netherlands, 
wliich secure for us supplies of indispensable materials 
for our requirements both in time of peace and in war. 
Thus for every reason, both spiritual and material, it is 
of vital importance that the purpose which we undertooK 
four decades ago should be carried out to its intended logical 
fruition and that the people of the Philippines should aohiev* 
their ultimate position in the fatally of nations, bound to 
us by such ties of origin. ' 

Our relations to Gbiaa 

The Ataorican policy which was thus put into effect 
in regard to the Philippines was in essence of the same far- 
sighted character as that which during the same period we 
applied to our relations with China. We were the founders 
of the policy of the Open Door, - the policy which was sub- 
3Qq,i-iently legalized in the so~oalled Mn« Power Treaty, and 
which endeavored to preserve for that great nation its 
territorial and administrative integrity and to permit it 
to develop without molestfition its sovereignty and independtinoe 
jiocordlng to the modern and enlightened standards believed to 
obtain amoEg the peoples of this earth. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3515 



-3. 



The Axis attaok upon this Aaarloata poliey 
in the gar BaiT 



imriiig the pest decade, howiver, these ezaightaoed 
policies of the Amerloeu gOTeraaeat, examplifiad by our 
attitude towards China aM the Phlllppiaes, hare b«»a 
eadangersd Y/y a soheoe of vcrld oonquest set on foot by 
the so-oalled Axis powers - Germalny, Italy, and Japan;. 
These nations hare without pzxnrooatioa <»■ oxsuse attaek»d 
an<i coaq.uered and reduced to eoonoalo and poXitioal slavery 
aost of the free goTemmentiOf Xurppe. la the Far Bast 
their Axis has hesn represented toy the go'natmmnt of Japan 
which In 1940 Joined with Oermaay and Italy in a coTenant 
avowedly aim^d at the interests in the Orient of the 
government of the ttedted States. Japan has for over five 
years baen attempting to oarry out auoh a 80h«as of oonquest 
and spoliation in the far X&st. In flat defiance of Its 
own covenants In the Nine Power Tr«<aty it has invaded and 
sought to overthrow the government of China. Step toy step 
the fleets and forces of Japan, passing through the China 
Sea in the iniaBdlate praximity of the Philippine islands, 
have also invaded and taken possession of Indo China.. Today 
its forces are proposing to go further southard and are 
openly tbraetening an extension of this conquest into the 
terrilbory of tKiailand. This step would dirsotly fflanaoe 



3516 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



'^^ 



-4. 



tbe port ftzul stredta of Slogepora tlurongb whloli getaway 
runs the ocmmrom of th* world, Inoluding our oicoi, betuMB 
tlM Pacific and tba Indlaa Ooean. 

Oa the «astara side of the Phil^^^Anea, Japan baa 
also been extending its thraatening aotiyitlaa thxsugh the 
Caroline and Marshall Islanda nhare, in Tiol&tioa of tha 
oandate under whiob it raoalTed'the ouatpdy of those i»Xauaft»t 
it has been secretly establishing naval and air baaaa and 
fortlfioatlons directly on the line bativaaa the United States 
and the Philippine Islands. 

By those steps Japaii has placed itself in a 
position which encircles the western, aorthani and eastern 
approaches to our territory and intereata in the Philippines. 
Should it go further, it will couple tely encircle and 
dangerously menace thtt irital interests of the United States. 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3517 




3518 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Second: This Japanese campaign of oonquest and 
exploitation Is now approaching and encircling the Philippine 
Islands, It threatens the commerce of those lelends and 
endangers their physical safety. 

If it is successful, it will destroy the farsighted 
experiment which America has been conducting in those Islands 
and terminate their hope of index>endence and their peaceful 
democratic government. 

It will destroy the mutually profitable oonuaero* 
which exists between those Islands and the United States ani 
upon which thehigh standard of living of the FJLllpiaos now 
depends. 

It will ruin the lifelong efforts and investments 
of thousands of Aaierican citizens who have l^ransferred their 
homes and business activities to the Philippines on the * 
faith that American principles of freedom Bad Anerioan msthods 
of government would continue in those Islands. 

It will forever teinainate th^^estlge and ifafluenoe 
of the United States which the Anwrlcan ezparinent in tb« 
Philippine Islands has been ©stabltsfalng throughout the Orleat,| 

Third ; It will threaten to cut off and destroy 

our oommeroe with the Netherlands Bast ladies and the MguLejraa 

Settlements. 

If the Japanese are permitted to carry ovctu 

their threat to attack and conquer these friendly ooontrifc*,' : 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3519 



•l 



-6. 



oxa* imports from these countries will be interrupted anS 
destroyed. 

These iaports, priaeipally rubber, are vital to 
our welfare both iqftim of peeee and war. 

Proa those ooimtries we reoeire our chief supplies 
of rubber. (Here add other itens) 

In tiBw of war, wll^ the spirit of exploitation 
and destruction of ooanaffiree which exists in the tiorld today, 
Sttoh aa interruption of our trade with the ITetherlasds Bast 
Indies and the Mslayan States would be oatastirophie. 



3520 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBIT NO. 161A 



1^^ 



DEPARTMENT OF^STATE 



X 



I 



Adviser on political Relations 




c ^ ; t ^c^ 




i.-4^ ^^ 



n 9 



uy 



^iu^ 



^ 



*. ""TLi. 




"^"t. 



^^si 



^^ 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3521 



I 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



Adviser on Political Relations 



k^A^jL "^^ti^ 



-^ «rH 




J"^ '^^rdrwrv 



^^i^ 
i^*^ 



''^'^ 




^1.^ 



''*=>if-<Jl4-„> 




3522 CbNGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



^ . ^*r'. ..,..¥*' 




[The first cocument inclosed •■■*!= 
f ore ■ ■ ■ ■■ • ■' * " '^ '' '"""■ 



of 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3523 



•^ 'C*<Vv 



%,„^.<^,,xf»w 



'^^,0^- 



(iumt latoNMNw* ii9»A ftncWMNr «i9«filtoi MiilNnr' «• l»»ifM| 




M ff«0ilM6 If mof mm wmtSHUM* teUPMi m» %ismiil^%9 Aim 
• 9A f«§0m9w Sm 9mA iatmgmOum mmmsmvi^i^ w i mmMiaa^ 

fIVflJMJMMi 4M9«iriUMHtil* X» Id «{r «»l> «IMM^ V«JNM» t* tlM» 

aiEtaffiftji w^«hi «r taw mitift eiiiMMe ttt»i^ i^mm^ mm^-mfm^^ 
fgm mt%ims mM pm^* «it ib» «Nyi«i(t %a» mam, tiM 



3524 COXGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



■■1.~*r.;''w. :.-»i-*rrtv3('C^Kwr^~^>::.'.TJ,1iW3ti'^J»EW*L^^ 




9tttfttt«a« « «& im^ ^"i^ ^>^^ pvrUm 9t ^Im PMtfl«, 
imAmUm fM«i««lAvSr leasgrw^ ant «m am MMavImbAa, 

ffem 1^ «vwr 9—mm, hem «»irt«aal aai mt«ilttl, i« la 



SIM Aniri«ftift »«l>i«r «U«i «<Mt tJwi y«» tet* •fr*«« 

itt f«0He« «• liM» i1iiUp9tJM>» wa S» •»««•• ©r «» •«• f»r- 

•MAia MMMBft tM p(»09l«ll Of %H1« Mytili. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3525 



rwimirm^ 



■jSEBmSiASSjBfcMJWffiMwaKt 




IHeriBt tte jMCft attain, bewvtr, t^«M taiii^sSittnMl 
9oU«i«» of tliM imt»lva» wa rm mmu t, mmplXt±«A tfy «ear 

a«d«ft«KNkl W • MluHW of wrlA eottqa««% sot oa foot ^ 
ttM oo-oaUoA Axlo pewrs • a«nMAr» IteXy, aed JeyoA. 
IboM aotiOM iMXTo «itlMittt pjP0f94NAtoa OCT «aM«M ett«eiB»d 
•aft ooafoHToA oaS roftuooA to oocsmtdLo aai. poIiUosl al«v««r 
aoot of tito froo cev«ra»tateof B«x¥9*« Xa tiHo ]fKr Saot 
tb»ir Azift Hm 1»ooa roj^sroooatoe ^ %k» i^'vsxiBiflet ^ Stap^Si 
«iii«b la 19^ JoSjmhI wiili Oamsaagfr «aS Italy la a eoTWi«s% 
ftvewea^ ai^»a& a% tte iBi«ro«l>« la tJ^ CH^lo&t of s^Im 
mtmmmnt of „1SIH» 1Kdt(o€ Statoa. jr«s>««i !»» fnr onror tiTt 
jroars 1»o«a attaais»tiB« to a«r»y oat aae»% a soImmmi of ooa^aat 
aad syoXiatioa la tbe r«r Xaet. Xa ^at Aeflasoo ^ lt» 
OWK i^nraaaata ia tho Hiaa i^imr f^atr i% has IsvodoA aat 

to ovsrtlurow tha fovasi^aat of Qhioa. Stop bsr «t*p 
tlw floota aad foroas of /apaa, $a«alag tJixro^ tha OMua 
Boa la th» iaa»6i«t« proLiaity of tisa Philippiaa laUada, 
Itavo alas lavaftaft aal takaa yaunmdaai of ZaAo caiiaa« 9o€iigr 
ita foroaa aara pro^oBiAs to t» fttr^a? setitbaayd aad «xt» 
ojpealy tlvaataaiat aa extaaaSoa of tbia eoa^peat lato tHa 
t«rritor7 of ftoilaad. ¥tiia ata^ tntilA ftlraatly aaaa«« 



3526 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



"■■■!& 



-4. 



tte p«rt mA Stndts cdT Sioeapor* tlur«ai)i vbleh saWwqr 
ruaa th« «OHMr«« of tb« «orl4, laoluding our owi, botwooa 
tiM PMiflo Md tho Indian Oo«an. 

Oft tlw aaatara aid* of tbo FtxillppiAoa, Japan baa 
alao baaa axt«idlac ita «br«ai«iin« aatlrltlai thSDugb tha 
Oaroliaa and Mnrshall lalanda iii«ra» in ▼iolation of tha- 
■aadata «Mar i^ali 1% raaalTod tte auatody of tboaa ialazda, 
it ham baaa aaaratlr aatabll^ilog aaTaX and air baaaa and 
fortlflaatlona diraetljr on tba Una batwaaa tba tJaitad Stataa 
and tha Pblllppiaa lalaoda. 

Bf tbaaa atapa Japan baa plaoad Itaalf in a 
poaitioa wblab afiairaXaa tba •aatara,.aortbaa^ and aaatam 
i^proaabaa to our tarritery and iatareata la tba Pbilipplnaa. 
Sbo«ld it 0D l!\»rtbar, it will eooplataiy aaeirala and 
dMtcftroaslr Moaea tba vital lataraata of tba onltad Stataa ii 








EXHIBITS OF JOIXT COMMITTEE 



3527 



*? f *>fffjf ff*^yfc • poltyy of oonatt»»t i^ 
K»mo iSf th«t falXqr* oftWt «tliiK>» 



•4-«A 



(H«r« dasarib* tb* JMcotlatioas 9arrlmA 
om b7 S««r«tar7 Hull and thtir f«llur«) 



SmBmmmBBm 



to 9ax Tltftl i&Wrvata 






(Xa 



oaly) 



jQlgllti JTftpftscM poli^ ot coB^wat «ad •xpleit»tloii 
vHieii !• 88W tMiias o«rri«4 out im Qkimt IMM aljroodjr uttorljr 
&m»trew*^ ia tlio pcMrtloso of Obia* oetttplod liy f«iMi tto 
poftoofol aad irofltoliOLo oooMiroiad rolatloaa wtinix tho 
%ltoA Statos ted inrovlonsix «Bi<iqF»d. 

It IMS doraatotod aad Iiaa a^^^t to «oa«a«r %lm 
aatioB abiob for mmf aaafcurlaa W ita dovetloa to tka arts 
of pasMi and aoaaaroa has boaa tfea atoat staMIislag IftflaaBa* 
fla tha mstam aids of tte Paoifla Oaoaa. 

tba ^apaaaaa polioy tHoraateaa to tr«aaf«ra a 
paaaafttX eostiMst into oaa davottag Itaolf to tlM praatioa 
of wmr aad da«liuit«d hf ttm atllltary aad laadaralilp of 7apaa. 




3528 COXGKESSIOXAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



-5. 






SggUAi This J^cpoBMC aaapiilca of ecmq^Ast •oA 
«9KipIoi««tioa !• aam a^vTimttUm aad «netr4liag tb* »xillppia« 
Xalwi4«* Zt tl»««t«a« tte ww— r»» of tteM X*l«4* aM 
sagors th«dLr ipiiysioaX safotj* 

It it it sttBocwBful, it idU 4*stro7 ^« forsistitod 
luqpoviMBt «fei^ ^nwriM 1ml« Imnui «aDd»«tiiic ia tliOM laloads 
MiA ti««ia«t« tbtir te>p* of lAAop«Bd«so« and timlf pMooftil 
dffKoez'etio gomnrimsat. 

It will &m»tvtiy %b» mitvmXlf profitablo eo«M«r«« 
w&ielt Mciotn %M>t«««B ttiMo ZoIftM* a&A tlM trait«4 Stat«s ubA 
ayt^ nftlela tJMhi«& «tsadftrd of IIvIah ot tb« filipiaos now 

It «iU rttiA tJtM lif«lc»c offorta ttnd iBVostsonts 

«f ti»»tuMttia« of m»Tiwm eitiseiia «]to hm* ttwasttvA timlv 
hmam «ad lmsia*0« ««tiiriti«» to tl» ?hiXippia«s <m. Xh* 
t&ittk that AawneftB priaoipl.«« of tx'ooaoa tad Aaarle&a MthoAa 
of gQfT«rnMat wrald oootintM ia tlaosa lalaada. 

It will foxHtTW tontiaata tI>^«atigo aad iHfltUHieo 
of tba Cf&itod etataii abicdi tho AMileaa ascpcriaaat ia tho 
Philippia* lalaada has baaa aatablid&lxac througbout Xbm Oriaat, 



m: 



g y£<f t zt win tbaraataa to out off aad daatsray 

oar aoBMBirea vit^ %hm RatlMKrXanda Saat Ssdiaa aad tJia li^ayaa 

tJattlaaaata. 

If tht jTapaaaaa ara paraittad to oanr out 

tteiy tbraat to attaak aad ooaquar thaaa fria&dXr oauatriaa. 



■j g.^'i / fe.j ti.j',. , A J iitf ^^P^^^ -' 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3529 




•«• 



I. 



Mr matmf tetli i«iim «r 9—m «MI ««r» 

Anm %teM •matoifa m m««Iv« mar «M«f mvvUm 
•f n^lMUP. (B«r« «M etiwv 1%«mi} 

Zft tlM of wtt wlUt tte ayirit <tf •x9l«U«tloa 

mamh m l»«»f««iitio« of our tr*A« with tit* lotlHNPlaada Uutt 
XaftiM ftod tb* llidajM StoWa mhIA tea •«t«al»eiAd«. 



7JJ716 O— 46— pt. 19 8 



3530 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



•¥ppll«« by Colon*! tlio«, I \j^j\/^jy^^i^ 



If «jk« Itatl D<t««r 1« U b« <I«f*iiti«(l, tit* Oalt«« 
KJ^a^os MWt not b« <i«wirtwl«««. drltitb KlllUry pov«r 

MRS U(« ff»t* wJli«h iMla* lMI«k fPOK tht MMrlMt «h« 

n*»A •t 0»nM)n ■lllKiirjr sirvngUi. tb* •ttf^peirU «f SrlVi*li 
pvm*t axttMS «o «11 i>«rt« of tiM worlA. ^Mkralng oa« 
support w««li«iui tb* ■trcogtm of th* MSitir* «t3«0ttir«. a 
p«rti««)il»rlf l«pert«»t, pc*«lbly tn ••csntUl part of that 
■«nt«t»r« i« Siaftapora, wbloli, wltb tba J'btlipriaa* a»A tfca 
MailiarlaM* Xadlaa, fur«itliaa graat (*«aHtitl«« ar th« rav 
aatarUla raqairaA Ur ttea avaaat* ©f tiia i^mriaan wA 
^iritiab «af«n«a affart. tba Swattovaat P«ain«, l»T>arti?«t 
»• it it te oar aaoaoay, aay )»*«aft'ii»r* i«portaat a« « 
allltarjr poaltloa. t>a«a««« It Itnk* tofathar »l«al unit* 
of tfea ftritUb CMMMMwiaallA. «a«i Japan *«t«t>li«fcaa in 
$iiie»por* or tba ^a^arlaMa Xadia*, tha caaarity of tha 
aritiab Zalaa tlumaalvaa wouia ba eadaafarad, as^ tlsa« tba 
aaa«n.ty •<' *te tfaiti^ $tataa «bf»aa %*««<. Sboatfi tbi* ragloft 
fall, «#a wMlA fln« tbat tba brava trtwp* »f A»atralla» Kav 
£«Nftla»A, and XnAie v*ul« naaaasarity ba ra«:ttl4fatl at boat !• 
aafand tba&r aim tarrltortaa, mA tlMa »» laagar aaalA taka 
part >« MMolttnff tha Rati «br«tt fa tba aaat »«« to tba aoatli 
Ifha trltiab patltiaa in tba Maar Xaat «i«ul4 ba ttaftaraisad. 
Vibby Prabaa pr«bably naulA rail aoaplataly aiidifGr Rati 
<I«wiAatlott. OMar Vati aontral aaald tbwt fall all tba 
tarrttarlaa abA baaa* of tbat part of Afriaa «blab w* %^ 
paaaft llba a blb«tbab avar oar f riaadia ia Hoath Asart - 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3531 





v««e«, Mi4 t««te §••*• VMi% fNMo* ^ mkiflg wur oo l%« 
aaigiilMirR, on* lijr om. Tte «»tt«4 •tMaslto cf ttMi* 

••«ti iM» fMHKH Ma d<NMi Alfttt*. St>«9 tqr •%•»* tt««ii%i7 llf 

e»«e»ry, tiM §iai»««r ailiicrir powsf of Qmtmmf. ita<f Jr«|wii 
!!•• •'nmr—S. torwwHk mntlX now, •••H »lNi»ti«f tb* o«li«r« b««ii 
«tit»d( «• vwiMPtvlMt tta'Mtt t* ell rwiiitilag fr«« i>«9f>t««. 
D«riaf Kb* ptt*% %m y**r«, l«fMitt«»* wiliter; ptnrtr 

bet aoirvA «r««t««M !»«« ll«»«iiiiriA{ «idI £fe«tt iuui bov«4 
•o«tliw«r^. thyeufh Oiiiaft lato Iii4o»a»iit» mm. llw i«i«iiA« of 
tUM ••». T»^*V <lapiii b«« ttrvns •ititkiri', &*▼«!, aM «lr 
1»*t«« vbi9li •s«ld«9 «br«c 9«rfic of mm otr«l« «ar««s^ ^« 

4Miiii«%X«i, *w9 9t Mir Ati^Mm trl»m» in Hbn fur £••% #»<>14 
«i««fi^«r. stuMl&j^ ftlon*, »• tJMift «e«il4 §•«, •urvotittioA 
«ai in • ft«tp»rcu pl.igbt» •«i> %mnMLto»s ia ttM ?itilli^iB« 
I«1»imS«. oM o«r frlM^t, %iw i»bili|^|,n« p«#plc, v« «0uia 



3532 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

I I 




THU altakUoa taoU* a»fll«l*k«bl« tbr»«t* to <»«r vital 
iiit«r««tf. Tiw •»9e«a«r«l ««f«Bt« ©f «»• Visit«<i st«v««, m 
» aUltalr/ •••••, !• a«p«ii«»al npon ftippll** of vlUl 
MttrUl* 'tOklmk wt tvfwrt in l*rf« nuantiti** fro« tlift« 
rvfleft of th» v«rldi. To pcmit •'ttiMiicas <8o«ltw«lon nod 
••atffvl of Um M)J«r «•«!*«•• of «•>!« mipplloi of lin •nd 
mt»«wr U • MiM«« t» e«r taf^ty «^l«to Mnrot b« tol«rst«4. 

OalMs Utm prvsMt voura* ^f •««nt« ta Um r*r ^tt 
i« b«lt««, ttM •onal4cr«U(»A« of |iMUt«, httMalfif saA «h« 
ftriaaiftla of •<<a«lity l»«iv««« natien* *r« r««ior*d, «• wilt 
vHhms In tlw»| rttfioa of th* «K»rl<l, pr««i««ljr iriMt h«« 
•1ir«»4f tr«iiai>lr*<l tbrowgbout %b* aontiaentsl llvltA of 
E«if>»p*> «ti*r(» Hitivr ■••&• a«altti<;ii bjr ruUil«R« f <r««. 

flw 0«wgr««« an^ ira««lt» of owr rstl«nl n8«o%l*il9n« 
with til* impmam** 99v«r«M«al <i«i9n«tnit* Utat J»)r>sa viii 
•ot aaea^t ooaAitl&na MTitah ar* fair, anA vbiah va ^aliava 
ara foa^aaaatal If p«a«a an4 pvyipmriXjf In tha ^»eifi« 
araa ara to anSttr*. It la ol««r that tha Jfr«e«o» Oevamaant 
h«a AotaralaoA oa to^oaiat* furthar ail. tar/ advantat^t. 
. ttoof bava *alar(*4 Uio iptera of ttta ao-oallad *^-9u ordar' 
KRtil aov It aVOR ioalotfaa XaAla, Auatralla, aa^ Umit 'aalvnd. 
fiontlM aco JafMta vroalaiaaA total national aobllinatlon. 
taalr avary availakla raaouroo ia laretad to allltary ourpoaaa. 
fha Praolar amS othar laad*r«, air«la i>n4 fgaio, tutva apoanlad 
for JapaAasa unltjr in er<t«r (and I Qvot*} *t<ct tide ever tft* 
Rravaat arlau that rfapaa haa faaoA la all har glorleaa 1000 

jr«ara 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3533 





94ml9 w» i« 4llrf«%ljr «i»*t. 

SSm ka* «it«ai%l«4i ivMi i«ttC » cm «M »ir fsMNNt fttr mw 
(Nm^iwtU. tH^ Mia f® m fwpfbMr i^llM»tatt carlcMs*!/ «&r««t<«li«i''' 
t)« vital lii««i>tt»«« 9f Ol^Ml S»l«fttii« tat* {i«il|«f>2«ii4ii l«4&««« 

«aHt «(|«MUr«rwi tbU ttarMt of tmtVhm^ «0aM|«u»at l»f f«f>M» tikt 



3534 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 162 



DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 

OrriCE OF THE SECRETARY 
WASHINGTON 



i033-a(JFB) 
E#168 



11 April 1946. 



To: I'.r. Seth V. P.icharc.son. 

In responce to your reouest of 9 April 1946, there is forwarded 
a T)hot06tatic cony of the loe of the V.'ntch Officer of the Office of 
Chief of i:aval Operations from 1145, 6 December 1941 to 20^0, 7 
December 1941. 



rCHlv FORD BAECmiR, 
Commander, US13R. 



Encl.(l). 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3535 



3536 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




'^JML. 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COAIMITTEE 3537 




3538 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

V4 olj\X^c-€A, , ^iXQj^ ^jukAj^A./-aA 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3539 









V^, yiitJUiA. 






t t ' /I 




i«ws»i»traieww w ii M .li ipli lii iii« Biwwacg^^ 



3540 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

fii^ y<^^'f^ Al^*^ ^;^7/y' 








EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3541 








" ,..^^U44^U/'UHfi^ 








^^ 



.^-iX^^4Af4y<^^'<6^t> 



t ii^fffiT 



r r- 



-^^^^ 



^ 



.A. 











K^ 



"1^ 



/^ * > 



/ s 



p 









.J 



t 



* -4- 



i 



n 



/- 



V 



< 



^ v/ 



3542 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3543 

EXHIBIT NO. 162A 

Messagf:s Noted in the Log of the Watch Officer of the Office of Naval 
Operations From 1900 6 December to 2000 7 December 11)41 

Table of Contents 

(a) Spenavo London to Opnav dispatch 061535, December 1941. 

(b) ComTaskGroup 4.(i to ConiTaskFor 4 dispatch 061730, December 1941. 

(c) Opnav to Alusiia Havana dispatdi 07014a, December 1941. 

(d) ComOne to OpNav dispatch 062330, Decenil)er 1941. 

(e) CinCAF to Opnav dispatch 070327, December 1941. 

(f ) CinCAF to Opnav dispatch 070715, December 1941. 

(g) CinCPac to CinCLant, CinCAF. Opnav. di.spatch 071830. December 1941. 



3544 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3557 

EXHIBIT NO. 163 




UNITED STATES SHIP W^^ Vedneadaf 26 Noreaber 

IONS OEscfliPTioN -j^-:- T^ REMARKS 



Oe-04 steaatng under boiler Noa. 3. 4, 7. &. S, on fleet course 000 T and pgr, 
TfJJw patgc. standard speed 15 Isnots, 148 rpm, steaming at 12 knots, 113 rjsn. 
Cruising turbines In operation. Steerliie control In Conning Tower. In company 
irtth Cruiser Division NIKE (less TJS3 BOISE} "jruising in special division fonBatlon 
» T, OSS HOITOlOLtJ, auide, bearing 340° T, distant JoOO yde, formation axio, JI^CP T 
OTC, COycaiBifffOS in ISS HCWOLUI-O. Average steaa 549. Arerage rpm 118.2. 

W.'C. WKIXS, 

Sa8i»», D-V(O), U3MB. 

04-08 steanlng as b fore on course 000*' ? and pgo, 349*" pstgo. standard speed 
Ijlaota, 148 rpo. steaming at 2/3 standard speed, 12 knots, 118 rpm. Cruising 
C«rbii»a in operation. At 0415, sighted Cape TSMA. Light on the Island of Lanai 
bearing 025°, distant 8 miles. At 0600, shifted ship's control to Bridge, llgiited 
fiMS under boilers numbers 2 and 6. At 0600, changed speed to st&ndard speed, 
15 Smots, 14S rpm. Commenced steering various courses to fonn column aetern the 
tJSS ST LOOTS. At 0620, changed speed to 2/3 standard speed 12 knots, 118 rpm. 
At 0626, changed speed to 1/3 standard speed 6 knots, 58 rpm. At 06U, changed 
siMwjd to 2/3 standard speed 8 knots 78 rpm. At 0645, set course 215° T and pge, 
201'" pstgc and assumed position in formation 1000 yards astern the T!3S ST LOUIS. 
At 0718, out in boilers number 2 and 6 on fl^ln and auxiliary steam linct>. At 
0726, changed owjrse to ise** T and pgo, 174® patgo. At 0734. changed oourte to 
028° T and pgo, 014*^ pstgo. Arerage steam. 545'. Average rpm 116.7. 

S. L. COCffiJAIJE, 
SnslsQ, O.S. Havy, 

2 Steaming as before on course 028*^ f and pgo, 014° pstgo. Standard speed 
_ibt8, 148 jcpm. Stoamiai? at standard speed. Mala turbines in operation. At 
0800, flustered crew on stations, no absentees. At 0801, oommanced steering various 
aftKTses at various speeds conducting 6" 47 cal. control drill for DPB (T). At 
0820, held Flight Siuarters. At 0901, catapulted plane #1108, pilot: Ins. P. aoiI>- 
SK5IC, 1-7(N}, tJSfTR, passenger, HTOKO^Y, K.7., 8K3o, USH. At 0902, catapulted 
plaae #1109, pilot: Lt-(jgT. C.R. r)08H?LIlWER, IBM, passenger, Ens. C.B. tIA.*^Y, 
A-T(K), OSSR, At 0903, secured from Flight quarters. At 0925, ceased DBP tralaisi 
run*. At 0930, Oenerai Quarters, Condition "AFFISK" set, for DSP (T) firing runs. 
At 0937, shifted blip's control to Conaing Tower. At 0945,<soittmenoed steaming 
various courses at various speeds eonduotiag DSP (T) firing runs. At 1110, oea- 
menoed firing DSP (T). At 1114, ceased firing. At 1115, changed speed to ataa- 
dard epeed I5 knots, I48 rpm. Changed couree right to 000° T and pgc, 349° petgo. 
^soared from Oeneral quarters and Material Condition "AFPIHM". At 1117, shifted 
lAdB's control to Bridge. At 1118, changed course to right to OIOP T and pgc, 
057^ pstge. At 1X20. held Flight Quarters to. recover two aircraft, «DOG« method. 
At 1120, changed course right to 150° T and pgo, 140° pstgo. At 1123, changed 
course left to. 105° T and pgo, 095° patgc. Changed speed to 10 knote, 93 rpm. 
At X134, Blane #1109, hoisted aboard. At 1137, plane #1108, hoisted aboard. 
l«t fires die out under boilers |2 and #6. At 1145, secured main and auxiliary 
steam stops on boilers #2 and i?6. At 1150, changed course left to 325" T and pgc, 
315® pstgo. Changed epeed tc 20 knots, 198 rjan. At 1157, secured frooi Fliijht 
(juarters. Avei^ge steam 547. Average rpm 203.6. 

D. L. G. vtm. 

Ensign, tl.S. Havy. 

Steaming as before on course 325° T and pgc, 314* pstgc. standard speed 

^ ^ts, 148 rpo. Steaming at full speed 20 knots, 198 rpm. Wain turbines in 

operation. At 1201, changed course left to 285° T and pgo, 374° pstgo. At 1220. 
twld Flight quarters to recover two aircraft, -DOa" method. Commenced raaneuvorlng 
QfS various courses at various speeds to recover riiforeft. At 1<;27. piano : ->i'| 
tolated aboard. At 1231, plane #1039 hois' 









osptaln, U.S. Navy,. v^. t. ?aTf|feW>15R. 

Comaandi'" 



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3558 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




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3559 




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ADDITIONAL SHEET 



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Date 2.7 Noyember 



18. 



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12-l6 CCNT commenced recovering bombing target. At 1533. recovered bombing tar- 
get. At 1535, secured from divlalonal tactics- ' At 1545, sounded Flight Quarters, 
prepared to recover one (1) plane Independently "CAST" method. Average steam 547' 
ATorage rpm 11,1,. b. 

R. S. WASHBUKI.^Jr., 
Ensign, D-V{G), USNR. 

16-18 steaming as before on various oouraea to recover aircraft. Standard 
speed 15 knots, 148 rpm. Steaming at various speeds. Main turbines In operation. 
At l601, plane #1108, hoisted aboard. At 1606, changed speed to 20 knots 198 rpm. 
Set course 303° T and pgc, 293° pstgo. At 1738, catapulted plane |1108, Ensign 
H.F. SAUNDERS, A-V{N), UStJR, pilot. C'KEAX, V/.H. , '86820, USN, passenger. At 1739, 
catapulted plane #1109, U-(jg), DOERJXINGEH, USN, pilot: HAMILTON, Tf.T., HMlo, 
tJSN, Passenger. At 1753, changed speed to 10 knots, 98 rpm. Average steam 550. 
Average rpm 155- 3- 



km 



y. L. BAIlSY.Vr., 
Snsign, D-y((J), TJSNR. 



i 16-20 Steaming ae before on course 303 T and pgo, 293 petgo. Standard speed, 
I 15 knots, 148 rpm, steaming at 10 knots, 98 rpm. Main turbines In operation. 
; At 1800, changed course to 120° T and pgc, 109° pstgo. At 1818, ooasaenoed 
Steaming on varioiw courses at various speeds conducting NBP "Surprise" exercise. 
At 1818, General Quarters. At 1948, completed firing NBP "Surprise"' and set 
course 180° T and pgo, 169 pstgo, at standard speed, 15 knots, 148 rpm. Secured 
from General Qjiarters and Condition "A?ISM". Average steam 545. Average rpm l6$.i^. 

t.Z. BAIHD, 

Lieut. {Jg5, U.S. Navy. 

20-24 Steaming as before on course 180 T and pgo, 169° pstgo. Standard speed 
x; knots, 148 rpm, steaming at standard speed. Main turbines In operation. At 
2001, changed course right to 340 T and pgo, 331? pstgo. Changed speed to 8 
knots, 78 rpm. At 2013, plane | 1109, secured on board. At 2020, plane #1108, 
secured on board. Changed course left to 180° T and pgc, 169° pstge. Changed spwid 
to 15 knots 148 rpm. At 2057, changed speed to 10 knots, 98 rpa. At 2129, ohangw 
speed to 15 knots, I48 rpm. Commenced steering various courses in aocordanoe irtth 
slgzag Plan #13 on base course 180° T and pgc, 169° pstgo. At 2201, ceased islg- 
zagglng. Changed course left to 110°T and pgo, 098° pstgo. Changed speed to IXT 
knots, 198 rial. At 2224, changed course right to 115° T and pgo, 104° pstgo. At 
2305. sighted HONOLULU, ST LOUIS, PHOBNIX bearing 076° T, distaa* 20000 yds. At 
2330, commenced steering various courses at various speeds to tela position la 
column 800 yds astern USS ST LOUIS. At 2345 took station in column astern US3 
ST LOUIS on course 130 T and pgo, 169° pstgo at fleet speed 12 kaots, 118 rpm. 
Average steam 550- Average rpm 152.2. } - ;/ 

-/' If' , [_y C''-»-*-~^"i^-'«p-T,!«^-, . 

p. V. TBDHPSOK, 
Ensign, U.S. Navy. 





aptaln, tf.8. mvy, 
do« i>aadlaa. 




If. L. TK 
Lieut. S 



(TU« |i*«» to b» sent va BorsBtt at livtygiSaaAvasxasSiij «t«ti iA« «3Me««i 



3560 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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UNITED STATES SHIP. 



JWJSSA 






!9'.l 



zone DEScnitTioN HM-i22 



REMARKS 



00-04 steaming under boilers r?3, i. 7. an* 8, on course 000 T and pgo, 349" 
patgA. Standard speed 15 loiots, US rpm. Steaming at 2/3 standard, 12 knots, H8 
rpm. Cruising turbines in operation. Operating Independently in the Hawaiian 
operating Area. At 0015, held Fire quarters for fire in the forward engine room. 
At 0022, fire was reported as false alarm. Secured from Fire (Quarters. At 0030, 
changed course to 090^ T and pgo, 079<= pstgo. At 0139, sighted MOKAPTtU Lightj, 
bearing OI30 T, distant approximately 30 miles. At 0200, changed course to 180" T 
and pgo, 169° pstgo. At 0245. changed course to 270° T and pgc, 258° pstgc. Ave 
sage ateaa 5/3-7. ATerage rpm 98.1. 

W. 0. BOLES, 

Lieut, iiz), D-V(G), imR. 

04-08 Steaming as before on oourse 270° T and pgc, 258° pstgo, standard speed 
irfeots, 148 rpm, steaMng at 2/3 standard speed 10 knots, 98 rpa. Cruising 
turbines in operation. At O4OO, changed course right to 000© T and pgo, 348 
Bstgo. At 0430, changed oourse right to 090° T and pgc, 078^ pstgo. At 0515, 
ilghtod MAKAPUU ll^t bearing 010° T, distant about 28 miles. At 0550, changed 
ootors* right to 180° t and pgo, 168° pstgc. At O636, changed speed to standard 
stwaA 15 knots, I48 rpa. At 0645, launched plane 11178, pilot: Sns. R.W. TLSCK, 
A-V{N), Vam, passenger, SLATOII, 2. J., Hl.!3o, 'DSN and plane /ClOS?, pilot: Sis. 
H.I. SAtJOTEHS. A-7(K), tJSHH, passenger, OnrSAL, W.H.. Sea2o, TBN. At 0650,;^ 
l^Aohed plani fll09. pilot: X,t-(jgT. <5.R. DOERPtlNCatR, VW, P««?en«sr: HAMILTON, 
W.T.. Jan.0, OBN; and plane #1108, pilot: Bns. P. OOLDBBCJ:, A-V(K), OTlv-R, passenger 
Bns. O.B. HAHEY, A-V{N), VSim. At 0651, Changed speed to 2/3 standard speed 10 
toots, 98 rpm and changed oourse left to 170° t and pgc, 159° pstgo. ATerage 
•team 541. 5- Average rpa 101.7. 

3nBlgn,**D-T|o), vsm. 

-32 ateaoing as before on course 170° T and pgc, 159** Pstgo, standard speed 15 
14s rpm. Steaming at 2/3 standard speed 10 knots, 98 rpm. Cruising tw- 
*in»s In operation. At 0800, austered crew on station*; Bo absentees. At 0900, 
ohaaged course to 090© T and pgo, 079° pstgo. At 0900, the Summary Court Martial 
jrfSloh it-Comdr. , J. A. l«)H3CW, CSN, Is senior mamber met to try the oase of 
TBIPUSTT. J.S., S«a2o, OSN and PBaOtlEIXA, A. J., IJo, VS«. At WU, stopped to 
r«<?OTer sImtss from SDNOLULO planes and to resotep four {4) airoraft, ^BA«S" 
method. At 0950, the aummary Court Martial of whloh tt-Oomdr., J. A. IKJ8R0W is 
emior jBeaber, adjourned. At 1016, recovered plane #1109. At 1019, recovered 
tltm #1108. At 1021, recovered plane #1178. At 1024, recovered plane ;1!l089. 
M 10%, oogasnoed steaming on rarlous courses at various speed to fora column oa 
WB WWOtDltJ. At 1159, aseuaed position In column astsm of the USS HOKCLTTLtJ, 
Alstaooe 800 yards. Average stsaa 550. Average rpm 9«.3. 

^yi< ^^. < ?1^ < ( »« «■ ■ . « , ■ 

R. t, COCHRAMB, 
imalgn, U.S. Havy. 

12-16 Steaming as before on oourse 000° T and •pgo, 349° pstgo. Standard spesd 
i f Aao ta. \l& rpa. St^aaing at 10 knots, 98 rpaj. Main turbines In operation. 
At 1200, sounded night «a«rt«r«. At 1227, ohatoged oourse to l»'t to 27^ '^."f-, 
MM 2580 pstgo. At 123K>, catapulted plane #1108, pilots Sas. P. OOLDBWJK, A-7(H), 
^XSm Passengar: PAKKBR, D.R., caJlo, TOH. At 11!31, secured from Flight ^rters. 
At 1^31, oofflienced steaming at yarlou* speeds on various courses feoearry out 
*i.j.i«i«i tactios Atl235. strsafflsd bombing t args t for Bx. A. A. 1. At, 1245,^ , 
^I oiSlllon m in AA Biuirles. At 1500. 'SMWsfl. MM., Seats, x^ceived fractuMJ 
to the distal phalanx middle finger, right hAnd, wblle testing primers on the Isft 
MM of Mount T&ree (3). Tfte man caught his fingers behind a powder ease whloh 
^^ Iftjury. At 1506. secured from Condition III la AA Batt«rlM. At 15O?, 



"xi 



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ft^ 




1 





79716 O— 46— pt. 19- 



-10 



3562 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




16-20 Moorsd as before. At 1745, Yard Oiler ffZl, made fast to port quarter. 
At 1815, conuBoiioo'l fueling ahip, draft forward 24' 4", draft aft 7^' 5". At 
18/,5, oompletml fuellni? ship havlns; received 529/,. 46 bbls. of fuel oil. Draft 
forward ?./,< 5", draft aft 24' S". At 1851, Yard Oiler #21, oast off. 



Moored aa before. 



W. VY. J0!I2S, 
Ensign, U.fe. Navy. 

Ensign, A-V(N), USMR. 



■1. h. !SM>i,ilU!, 

Captnla, U.S. Kavy, 

fcriaiandlng. 




(o u«r«aa of MuTtgAtttgiB montMy tvHii tof itbo«t«} 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3563 







lONB O68CHIPTI0N ElUS ISi 



REMARKS 



00-04 stMffllng under boilers 3, U, 7, and 3 on oour»« 180*' T and pgo, 169° 
pstge. standard spe^d 15 knots, H8 rpm, steaming at fleet speed, 12 tcnots, 118 
rpm. Main turbines In operation. In ocwspany with CRUDIV NIKS (less VSS BOISl), 
as part of Task ?oroe 1.5- In oolumn 800 yards astern of tbe tJ33 ST LOTIS. COliCHO- 
BATFOR in US3 HC»JOLULU (O.T.C). At 0116, was joined by DESDIV 2. At 0130, Oban«e|l 
ooarse to 270° T and pgo, 258*' pstgc. Changed speed to standard speed, 15 knots, 
148 rpm. At 0330, ohanged course to 315° T and pgc, 304 pstge. Arerage stesoi 
545. Average rpm 144.9. 

D. L. 0. KTHOj 
Bnelcp, 0.8. Bavy. 

04-oa steaming as before on course 315*^ T and pgc, 305° pstgo. Standard speed 15 
Knots, 148 rpm. Steaming at standard speed 15 knots, 148 rpm. Main turbines lo 
operation. At 0600, changed speed to full speed, 18 knots, 178 rpa. At 0604, 
ohanged course to 000° T and pgo, 348® pstgo. At 0605, ooamehoed zigzagging on 
base course 000° T and pgo, 348° pstgo. At 0649, ceased zigzagging and ohanged 
speed to 20 knots, 198 rpm. At 0655, changed course to 010° T and pgo, 359^ PStgo 
At 0655, ooMttenced zigzagging on base course 010° T and pgc, 359° pstgo. ATerage 
•teaa 545. Average rpm 175 -l- 



. A^'a. SMITH, 
*^<«t. U.a. Havy. 



64{ 



At 



Steaming as before, zigzagging on base oouwse 010° T and pgo, 359° pstgo. 
ard speed 15 toots, 148 rpa. Steaming at full speed 20 knots, 198 rpa. 
tSaln turbines in operation. At 0800, mustered ore* on stations; ao absentees. 
0831, changed speed to standard speed, 15 knots, 148 rpm. At 0843» ceased zig- 
zagging and resumed base dourse 010° T and pgo, 359° petgo. At 0851, ooomenoed 
•teaming on various courses in execution of signals for division taotios from 
CCICHDBATFOH. At 0854, ohanged speed to 18 knots, 178 rpa. At 0930, ohanged 
speed to standard speed. 15 knots, 148 rpa and oommfflioed zigzagging according to 
plan on base course 350° T and pgo, 342° pstgo. At 0937, oeased zigzagging and 
oomanoed steaoiog on various courses in execution of signals as before. At 1043», 
left formation and proceeded independently on various courses at vartoas speeds lo 
approach the harbor entrance. At 1139, with Pearl Harbor entrance channel buoy #2 
abeam to starboard entered Pearl Harbor, T.fi. , and ooamenced steaming on various 
courses at various speeds conforming to the channel. Captain and Havigator on th« 
Bridge, COD at the Conn. Average steam 550. Average r^ 166. 5- 

W: C. WEUfl, 

Ensign, D-V{G), reUH. 

12-16 Steaming as before on various oourses at various speeds, entering Paarl 
iarbor, T.H. Standard speed, 15 knots, 148 rpm. Steaming at 5 knots, 48 rpa. 
Main turbines in operation. At 1203, passed buoy #16 abeam to starboard. At 
X251, moored In Berth Cast 5, with port anchor obaln out to buoy C-5, 1 5/8* wire 
stem line out buoy C-5-S. At 1307, secured main eaglnoa, unnecessary boilers. 
At 1309, secured steering gear. Boiler #3 steaming for auxiliary purposes. At 
1353, ooflKttenced fueling ship; draft forward, 23' 6" draft aft: 24' mean: 23' 9. 
At 1353, commenced receiving aviation gas. At 1420, ccapleted taking on aviation 
gas. Amount received, 1850 gals. At 1530, fuel barge oaet off port quarter aftar 
delivering on boar« 152,502 gals fuel oil. At 1500, Lt-(ig), M.T. Ttm, leftoa 
three days leave. At 1545, pursuant to orders of Ooamanding Officer, the following 
named men left the ship, temporary duty and course of instruction in the SAD^, 
having been completed: HAJiTriTON, W.R., Jr., 262 31 70, C5K3c, tJSH, SmdTm. S.T.. 

OEW, LIKK, C.K., 376 34 70, Sea2o, tSN, SOTTASON, S.B., 3l6 67 69, Saa2c, DSN. 

,' . j,-^->t:..' * / ISneign/ 

R. H. •smxisH, 

captain, tJ.S. Havy, 
CoamaAding. 




I4.eut. 



tr.S.ff./fialtfftir. 



(Otlifitai (iraifaoa) oapjp of tid* pi«a to b« Mnt to BiattMa at timtt0ka<m mfmtiiir} 



3564 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






y^ ei s u s- ^ 



«ftN.A-M 



M !^ 



A - 


i 


P 


> 


• 


< : 









i!l- 



; 









i 



I- 



r 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3565 




1 • 



foif. 



■.A^C 



UNI-reO STATES SHIP . 



HMUW* 



gatttraay 29 Morwaber 



J9«. 



K>NE oeacBirrioN 



_£lJW_iDi 



REMARKS 



Ofr -04 Hoorad in b«rth C-5, Pearl Harbor, T.H., witfe port a&ohor obaln to buoy 

O--? ana 1 5/8" wits *t«ra line to buoy C-5-Si' Boiler #3 steaadng for Rtsadliary 

P«urpos«ii. Sbipa present: Various units of tr.S- Pacific Fleet with GoaiBatyor 
S0»& m T38S OALIf<H!SIA. 

■LfZ, BAIHD, 

Xlewt. (jg), TJ.3. Navy. 

04-03 'Moorefl aes before. 



r/c. WEUs. 

S&siga, Dr-fjO), USSR. 

< ^ ~; | ^ ll^ored as before. At 0915> 'OBS CSSW and tSS ITME stood la. At 0824, 
mmTtsI tbe f oilo^lii g ato ree for ge&ei^ sesa, iospected as to quaatity by Eos. 
a.B. l^SM^Ci, 1>-T{CJ), OSKR, and as to quality by TiSSAXX, S.A., PitUZo, XBN, frois' 
^Im Coi* Storage Oo. 4000 lb« of lee. At 1045, reeeit^ed tbe follo«»lcg stores 
for tiie general boss, iiispeoted asto quality btr WHiDKlHASJ, B.tT. , PbUlo, TBR, 
aaft as to quantity by Sua. P.O. AKOBRSOH, D-7(G), 03KR, from Harder* Co. Ltd. 
400 Iba. of frait alxtupe. At 1130, tbe COManding Officer held aaet at this 
date aod awarded the folloviag puaishmenta: BGHKS.^.J., 71o, tlSSI; Offense: 
(1) Violatioa of seotloa 60S0 R.L-H. 1935 taallolous Ictjury) ja} Resisting 
arrest C3) Obsoeae langxiage. (4) Striking Shore Patrol. (5| Sinmlc. Ponishmei^: 
S«a<Mffiaaded for General Court Martial. CGZJiJsaa, A. a., SeaSo, V^; Offsase: iHh 
for R period of 23 hours, 30 ainutcs from OICW, 21 Koreid^er 1941 to OO30, 22 
Soveaber i94J. Punlshaent; Suaia&ry Court Ifortlal. At 1145, reoelTOd the foi- 
lowiag stores for general mess, lBspee ted..a s to quaatity by Sns. S.E. BJ5ISAH0, 
D»?(0}, XSmn, and as to qoallty by WOMS^JX, B- W. , PhMlo, ISN, froa Chon 
&lMke Co. Lt., X200 lbs of oelery. At 1200, BOHEE, J.J., Kto, TJSH, oonflned this 
date by ordesB^i of the G<«aBaading Officer to await trial of General court Kartiai. 

p. 0. ANDERSCH, 
3&uil^, 0-7(0), DSRR. 

12-16 Hoored as before. At I4IO, pursuant to the orders of toe Ccaamaading 
OrsToer, FI3HBL1, H.C., 381 36 84, S6a2c, IBN, returned aboard in charge of 
mtmJS, 3-.D., 332 27 75, 3ea2c, XJSK, and ^nilOm, A. (J., 393 47 32, Sea2o, T)BH 
haring oospleted two (2) weeks temporary duty at the ?leet Kaohine Q«n School, 
Har*- n-ang«, Pearl Harbor, ,^jj!> 




TT. 3. Wavy. 



lazBB.-'-^*^^-^- ^^ ^^® 



2?S f>^ Hoored aa bei^j-. 



s^-%r 



*^''*it. (3sf, TJ.sr, Na^y. 



5. 1*. KELL?/ 
2ad liout. U3MC. 



Ap- 



::B!llill<KJ : 



;. Ba-yy, 



t7".t«"t«-; •.•^^(^iO^'il; -iCJ>iv f>t r;i',« ^' 




3566 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




LOG OF THE UNITED STATES SHIP 

^E'^atlJ.farbor, T,''- to 




■rv 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3567 



Ijf'JJTEO &TAT13 8HJP _^-l^' 



< yoiisos^jfltPTiis^Kt^-lSs 



Pie: MA 



OL-OB ;"c:ii:s'a -liy b^t:>;*. 



CJ.UftrT,8r. Afc v"VJ'.', Oil;; 



j Appto\. 

captain, U.S. Xary, 






tOrisJnaS <rfS>l>OR; cts-y i>f thl» p«ae to bu ctu* io !iu".>e=c :C !•«.« It;*tl-' 



3568 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




^ 



*ii9ml>m M«Mb».-'. 






ti 



;iil 



■■■ 


1 




r 


» 




! 













^1 

















xewoia 


f-: 











L' 



Cure • 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3569 



3570 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





UJST OF OFFICERS 

to. Md oat bo»4 ef tte U. a. &-^l^!^ 

a S. K^ dorlnc tfei period Mm«d ]>7tUa U« BoiJk; with 4M««( 
far itoty, <Ja*lcfc«««rfi imatm, w destit. fewa ~L5?2.^±5, , id W to ..li_DS2$?^fi?- 



»Ott KUTf. 



Ih 



C*.B53K{eiX. 



' SaaiJBseriii 




?l.5sr., «-v(- 






1 1 



J. J. 



;,isut. (, 



. ;sfc:M.v...fi,: 

■f»nt, . i'^ 



jec. 39 











«^ ..'ul- 









^iRjs?^ - nn .T ■. 



■gatok^Jily>...- 



Iiag,.,.. •Jat,ftkJ5t,aiy,.„ 

I 

!gr^J.^afco2x,&.aiv^.... 



toh fc,Jr,> Sly. 




•!«4S»' 



'.j'aioh. 



JKn^jfotor. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3571 



tfST ^P" ?iFnnrR« 



rA«gs^i^ tt> s^Aoa >«lW!i C* ^^ t\ S S .. .-.M: 



_, U, S. H., 4\\rrfiZ *fce ?«rf^'i <?*>'• 



fi;«ai»ti5f lar iin^. toaciffotst, fTSBrfw, «»• <i«wti>t, from - -' 




3572 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3573 



TaW**©^" 



raft. 



LOG OF THE UNITED STATES SHIP- 
At Pearl Harbor, T.H. 



ilELEi^A 



lONE PE8CR{PTI0N Pl^tS I Q' i... 



.J8^.ii.-_£UCiUSH. 



(ItlenitflMllnfi NuinUr) 

l^onday 1 December |g -U 






ilH 



II 



3 
1 

5 

:i 

;! 

10 I 

11 

12 



if Latitudf — 



l( 



UUtude 



aj Lkiitude 



Comat 



I Ctiti- 



CVKOCOUrAM IN V*»: 



Error- 



CompM* Ko ,. „.. 

8.H 

Error . 

V*rii»Uoa 

D»v<»tl<.u.. . 






15 (. 
10 i 

18 I 

19 i^ 

■>r> I 



23 , 

24 : 



t 



!! 
£ 



330 U 
330 4 
330 i6 
330 "7 



730 






BABOUSTKB 






!13 



30.001 
30.001 

29,98 
29.98: 

30. or 

U0.02, 
30.04' 

130.05; 

i-^.05. 

.02 



TlfMI'KUATORF. 



3 r-B 



6/, '60 I 
63 i60 
63 60 I 
5^ '60 ' 
62 '60 
63 ;6o 

62 :61 I 

63 .61 ! 

P^ -^^ ' 
63 o3 

68 63 

69 !68 ; 



3 

t 



3C 
SC 
D 

D 
BC 
OH 
OR 

BO 
C _ 

no" 



r!?cu 

157CTT 



330 4 
330 ]/, 

SICTT I 330 7 
STU I 330 i ? 



330 • 

33f 






i;une 



3TCTr 

NB 

STCU 3^0 

crcu 3'>o 



DRIULa ANO 



Onhanrf 6230lT 



Morning 



■I 



tl Receive*) . - ' ' 

l>.»fl(or-d 2.4A..4" ._' 8 
DrWtf... 2A'.7" Jl.fi 



I '> 



'!( 2 J_j?ian«>f f or IS^ 

'. f„rM. U.ino Drill. 



' I'l-UrCHATUMUi, 

3/.^ 
Mmioium , ',y 

j.ected smokele&s 
'^■" aoEples. 
1 ons noraal . 



•"jAA Dire etc ■ 
pc.acl:ln:: Driii. 



;045 

I 030 
103C 
1 030 
•030 
030 
030 



10 
10 
10 

idl 



30^ 
30, 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 



0,5: 
03. 
02 
r: 

r,4 
'-4 

07 
09 

0^ 



67 
70' 
70 

?0 



6^: 



63 
67' 

67 

^"' 

,',/■ 

ri. 

</, 

6j 



CI- i CT.'B 



040 



030 









30 


h 


30 


" 


30 




30 




'ir 


■5 


30 


6 


30 


■' 


'',0 


7 


•; ( 



A SLilMAIilSieK 



Hijii N''>: fS<>rl»l) 



r 



<f>ri«-lnt:.T /rlbl'r 



3574 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



i-.'^'.-i;;* .-¥Sl»i-5 w-arc; 



•i^lKIU 



2C-24 «oored as liator-.-. 



ADDITJONAL SHEET 



n^t,- 



1 r«OeQ: 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3575 




i iM;-rcn STATES SHip" VSLSNA f^jOuAay 

zuNE 06«ORipTioN ??-*f*.J^y2 REMARKS 



00-04 Itoored la berth C-5, Jearl Harbor, T.H. , with the port anchor chain to 
buoy C- 5, and 1 5/8" wire stem line to buoy C-5-S. Boiler #3 ateaiaing for 
auxiliary purposes. Ships present: Various units of the U.S. Paclflo Fleot, Yara 
oM District Crart. S.O.F.A. (C0M3ATF0H) in HSS C/UJFOHJTIA. 

H. F. SAUliDEHS, 
Ensign, A-V{H), IBNa. 

Ofc:S5 ^^oored m. before. At 0515, blew tube.«< on fj boiler. 

1 , I), y iru.',i.- , 

Suslgn, P-V{G), USIIR. 

pS-lt .3 before. At 0800, held quartei-a for auster. Absentees: SZTtJ^AJISKl , 

f7T^'' .-, .^-OL since 0100, 1' Deoenber 1941. At OSIO, hcSstwI #1 Motor T^oat 

abc repairs. At 0S30, A Camp Andrews aecreatlou Party of 16 men, JOiISS, 

a.' TG", tn charge, left the ship. At 0836, hoisted out plane /'1178, 

"AI3Y, A-¥{K), U3I-<R; Passeneer: .'iA.V.ILTOn, V.T., Ria<s, D5K. At 
at rlane #1108, pilot: Ene. P. GOIiJBECK, A-7(.N'), USKS, passenger: 
, K-Oe, t©S. At 1015, li(;hted fires under boilers #1, 2, 4. At 
•■lane «1108 aboard. At 1135, hoisted aboard plane #1178. At II30, 
i cut 1., v^^ - '-'i . 2 suid 4 on the main etea/a line. 

' ' diB^^- — - 

H. A. BCVteAI?, 
; Ensign, D-7(0}, lefia. 

-'•'■■ ;,,-.,.».-^ «3 before. At 1220, completed fflaklng preparations for getting under 
,1 1225, pilot 0. H. OTTERSEN came on board. At 1235, got underway for 
,r4, Pearl Harbor, T.H. , In obedience to CamCruBatTor despatch #302000 of 
i'sber 1941. Pilot at the Conn, Captain and Ha%'igator on the Bridge. 
~ on various courses and at v&rioua speeds conforadng to the channel. At 
'ored pert side to berth f?3 Navy Yard, Pearl Harbor, T.H., with the follow- 
as: 1 5/6 " w1j^« *>«>* and atom linen, 8" manila, forward and after bow and 
jquartei' apri-niJ; llnee and S" aianila bow and quarter hreaet lines. Ships present: 
!y5r3o\i» -inlts of the U.S. Pacifies fleet. CociBatFor la the U33 CALI50a?n:A (SOPA), 
■ , sec'ored Special Sea I>etail. At 1320, lot fires die out under boilera 
At 133c, disconnected boilers #1,2,3,4 froM the asain ateara line. Jioiler 
;„-^. iiSMiing for auxiliary purposes- At 1339, pilot k ,\\, otts.TSE.! left the ahip. 
|At 1425, ooisaeaced receiving fresh wat^-r froai the DonJt. At 1425, pursuant to the 
iorders of the Cofflsaandioc Officer, US3 STIMKKHS, LOTO, S.P., fiealc, US»J, 346 ?3 77, 
iT-cfortfifi abc-ard for duty. Pursuant uo tue orders of th^ Gosncariding Officer, 

; '"'.ne Stetion, Pearl Harbor, T.K.-, Slv!l-tH, 376 35 44, SeaZc, US?;, reported 

for duty» Records and acoouata of above aea receivs'l on board. 

C. Wai', 
j iietJt.(.ig), p-yio), us:m. 

! 

Moored as before. At 1630, oo«aaenced reoeiTing telephone service from the 
it 1722, hoi9te'7 out plane |'117S, pilot; tns. R.". FISCK, A-V(H), CBJrr;, 
'i,-.--ss;cig«T; SLA""' " "3o, IBH, At 17?5, hfelsted out plane #1103, pilot; Ens. 

•;«,?. SAUi<TK-te, ', paissenser: Eos. 0.3. HAXiETf, A-VO}), (BUH. At I845, 

.teursiiaat to ths- civiers^ oi t>!f CosiK,andinc Officer, aef : ComCruBatFor aerial 3175 of 
,p.3 SoyesBbftr 1941. t«X>&AHD, ?., 27i 2"? 60, 0S3e, USH, was transferred to the 

,f ""'ag Barracks, Pearl Harbr:- " '• ^- - -■-■" •— -■ »-- to Palmyra Ialan.1 

';^g« and transfer pape- 



wtxit SB ajarjXHt «f WswilfBi-sNMj BivM»tbJl 



3576 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






LOG OF THE UNITED STATES SHIP. 



HKZKNA 



01.50 



ZONe tJCSCBIPTlON- 




Tuesday 2 D«osfflb«i> ,> U 

— tl55) i^iS 92Sk) — ' '" 






■I »»«ft:-' 






BO 




STCtJ |035 1 4 30 



■3P If. 
5CT8 



ii 



-./..i 



"t- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3577 




7, i9U, 



Made raonthly iasjpectioft 
At 1055, cosipleted hoisting 



\ A,?. 346 ?6 ?■? (2530,. DSN 

.„..,, R.o. 265 99 95 Sealo, tHK 

At i030, Secured froffj Condition III lu AA Batteries. 

tOEtn C-? .?,-r.D>:elaffs por/iSer aamples. Test satisfaofcory. ._ , ._ 

■s, tho Summary 3ou3?t MarUai, of whicfc Ueut/CoiBdr, , R.cT^ 
.ne»il>9r, aet to try the case of COSAKOS, A.G., Sea2o» 5SSf, | 
t: Jjartial of which Lieut. Oomdr. , R.D. SiafH, is aentor I 
further orders of the Ooi^asaing Officsr. At II40, j 

&lane3, i 

■ " K. A, imrnm, 

Ensign, 0,8, Havy. 



sember adjotn-nef? f 
oofflplote'i N 



■■■f At 1300, received the foliowlag stores for use ia the 
to qiwjatity by Ch. I^jc Clk, "r.M. WEIjOH, tJSJl, and ae to 
':. , HiMSe, ^3N, Ifi jars sreah. oiivee f-poa Amerlcais 
ve« orew at- quarters. At 1415, pursuant tJ> orSors 
followicg sen vy^re traasfarreS to the Naval Hos- 
H. , i'oi' trsatasect: BTmiKJya, 8. Jr., 261 89 59, tTSa, iJBSK, 
TRtT}. S5KH, D.H. , 3C0 13 93. Sea2c, tJSK, Mag; Daafaeas 
received the foUowiag stores fortJie geaeral aess, 
■ ■?«(? Cikr, T.M. ^JELOn, t®B, aKd as to quality by •> 
tai Hir.B Co., 90 tins of pio)cles. At 1515, 
.'ixillary suroosffls. 

00, ift firos c!.ic< out utsiJer boiler #3, 
■i*y 2t*am llm. 



ti before. 



7y716 O— 46— pt. 1»- 



-11 



3578 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



UNITED STAft • •'" 
ZONE DEScniiTioN Sl^. iM REMARKS 




OO-Ci Moorea port aide to 'berth #3, Kairy Yard, P«)arl Harbor, 
7 o ' ilw ins lilies: 1 5/8" wire bow and stern llaea, P" Manila rorward and after 
bow and quarter sprlnj^ lines, 8" bow and quarter breaet llnee. RaceiTine rre«h 
water and telephone service from the dock. Boiler ,f3 steaalng for avutlllsiry pur- 
posea. Ships preaeet: Various units of the TJ.S. Pacific Fleet. S.O.P.A. (C'Cf,;~ 
BA'fFCa) in the XTSS CAi:" " ' 



t.'c, McCOfffiaCK, 

Ensl^, D-V(O), USSR. j 

^, . .-.? i-/-.„t.ed ae before. At 0630, oofsfflenoed provioionins ship. At 0730, tt-jjg)' 
17?' USK returned from three (3) days' leave. At 0735» the 'OSS CtaaKDJQS | 

got ■.•- V ^' 



<l^Ki^J 



: , v.. •^■li-.s&t '• 

08-12 iioored as before. At 0600, held quarters for iau«ter. Absentee,. 
'StfT'T., ?3o, TJSK, AOl since 0100, 1 Deoember 19A.1. At 08^5, completsG pro- ; 

vislonlng ahips. At 0902, oomnleted hoisting out two planes. At 091$, ect Con- ! 
■'.'.on III watch 11 tn ^A Batteries for exercise AA 3. At lOOO, pursusot to the i 
ore of th* Coau:!S,nding Officer,, Beferenoe: CoaBasteFor despatch 160118 of Ro?«e.- 
yer 1941 the following aar.ed men *■!"-' ^ •"•' -^f erred to sailing .V3 for traosportatloi 
and further transfer to coitimander ) '.ng One for duty, with records and ! 

.„^.~„ ,.».. .-vi-irKW, •!,■ ■. ■-.;•-. 1-. ,-.r ,., TJS?J; lOSG, J.D,, 295 5* 66, AMKJO, 

, vm. At 1000, pursuant to the orders of i 
-, 295 03 27, 3?lc, OSK; was transf erred witi : 
.s to aai Xar trarisportatlon sr.d furthst tracBfer to 

'■a, r?.,-: , Jiavy Yard., Breaertoa, Washington, for daf 

1010, pursuant t« the orders of the C!ttiaoftiifiin& 
uraed jaen ware transferred tria Sailing 48 to fh*} 
-^fei- iisoeivins Station, IJavy Tard Boston, Uase, for 
fie<:ord3 iiul acooutit.a deli»ei*ed - SSLTVIilU'JJ, 3.,, 2C' 

.Oi., A.o,, 234 ?•" " ..3CSENT6, 3., 221 90 i3, 

:<.V?., 3«2 i» 3-; ; «•, 337 35 t3, Saalc, 

50 09, "' •- . ■-.' •-.»9 38, no. t®>!, lar^T- 

, WIIXI. FSo, t)SK, At 1010. pursii 

<« vv i.i.1-- vCffimendi!i(.. •,.■.• "'f? folloirtflg Mined isen »•• 

red Via Sailing 48 for far coords jpd A^p>unts d«l. 

j M^ SRRVICg ^iO 

i *^ J.T. TTTTTTT 

Ay. T).-.:. 261 6a 15 ■:':: : ■- 





.010 


coiated #) 




iOer 


Tiga BOIS?. 


Vi'«tlt Cf 




<?I 


<t':- <■■ 







EtOR 






li'ii: ^(.i^y 


T£r 


F16- 


"i'l? 


; vuBF 


J-tr 






:>1 ^ of not. 








■ tr 


PU-:/i2; 




'ov. 


8, 


1941 






■=16-3(1) 






i.? 


19i 



01^ m-' i3 

trs?i (15) Co. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3579 



■.4»T;sa^j'.tjaia6^f! 'iK^s^^aHJKia 



LOG OF THE UNITED STATES SHIP 




ZOMK oe»Oflll»TlO»* J^slfi -kV- 



TtT 



TITI 



Mm 

UMltnrf* 



; 3JU4!.'U5," 


,^ia 


rt«.''-'-i:.V 


iJ ;.^- 






1! 









B 1 M 

*^< — ~ 






» 



iq:^ a*> 



3580 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






.// '/.A. 



UNITED STATES SHIP . 



HKUiNA 






3 B«e«abar 



19 



U 



XONC DfisoRimoN JEiLSft. JiSi 



Kfc.!vi A^-c^^.!^ 



00-04 MooMiS port 9i.de to bertii No. 3, Na^y Yard, Paarl Hertor, T-M. , with the 
following lines: 1 5/6" wire bow and atem linos, 8" manila forward and after 
bow and quarter sprias linea, 8" naaila bow and quarter t- . -fit liaea. Boiler 
|6 steaming for auxiliary purposes. Receiving fresh water and telephone eervloee 
frxxn the iJavv YSrd, Ships presents Various units of the 0.3. Pacific Tleet. 
aOPA, COffiBat?or in the USS CATITOHOTA. At 0020, the OSS HEKDBP.SOK got undenmy 
and stood out. 



W, W. J0JJE3, 
Bnslgn, t'-o. Now, 



0^-08 Hoored <>,r 'o.-ifo-re. 



,.x 



p. 0". ASJDRRSON, 

KxiBign, 0-7(0), tjsrm. 



08-12 Hoored a*, bsfore. At OSOQ, held quarters for muster and physical drill i 
llseatees: SZTttvaSKl, ?., r3c, tJSK, absent over leave since 0100, 1 December 
19^.1. At 0812, e-sorolSBd orew at Btoergency Orills. At 0828, aecurod from 
KEej^ency Drills, At 0905, hoiated. out tt« (2) plaasa for iaatrunent flight. 
Plane #1109: JPilot lfe-{jg), CR. BOSBFOHaSH, xmi, paesenger: faa. H.F. aAUHDEBS, 
A-t(K), tJSNR. Plane #1178; Pilot Ens. P. OOLDBBCK, A-V(Nl, TJSHH, passengers 
Kas. C.B. HAKSY, A-VfN), OSHR. At 1040, received the following stores for use i^ 
t^tt Beneral mess, Inspected as to quality by ^nxtlNOKfeJ!, C.B. , FhM2o, VS&, as to 
<;uaatity by Sne. C.".". BRQ'SN, D-V{G>, DSNR, frda Proviaioalng Co. Ltd., 900 bays 
•'.le oreaa. At HOC j^ursuant to the ordern cf the Ooiaaandins Officer, KSIl?HARBt, 

.;'.. ^50 '^a 2fi, a?dc, trsfj, left tte ship to report to the Senior Patroi Offieop, 
colttln, 1?.H. , for ''iJK'^ with Penaaneat patrol. Tc restime regular duties upon 
.uplstion of thir .it 1100, pursuant to the orders of the CoaHsandlng 

rfioer. SAIX. H.' .0 91, WTlc, IT3U, left the ship for penaaaent duty wjtb 

Be&ah GuaasS, to return uv regular uutles upoa oojapJetlon of this duty. At 1100, 
pursuant to the or-lers of the CoMoanding Officer, the following named aen left 
the Bhi-^ for temporary duty with Shore Patrol in Honolulu, T.H, : SHSEBTK, B.D., 
#258 21" 35, aao, LBIJ; m?C, r.V?. , ^360 02 06, ?C2c, DSJJ; SIJAICCAVICH, S-R., 
■*-^5e $0 42, CBBJo, CPr. At 1115, the Casp .indrews Recreation Party of (16) «en 
'OJISS, a.B., #272 C6 17, SFlo, USN, retumeA on board. 
*At 1103, hoisted /^ 'lO? aboard. At 1105, hoisted plane #1178 aboard. 

it^VSRO'WN, 

Ensign, D-Vfa), OSNR. 



';^-l6 Moored as before. At 1300, muistered orew at Quarters. Absentees: SZYiSAN- 
■■-SffrS"., F3e, Art j.'.'ss OICO, 3 •D.s.jesb^sr 1<>41. At 1505, tJ3S OOIAU got underway 
i.v.-. shift te«rtl. '^'^ I^J^*^ "5^** ^0 ^"'^ etarboajil side. 

"vi 1525, TJ3S Vr- '■ ia and. Bonre?,. 



5ifoored as before. At 1822 
U^od. la to hArtoor. 



mzli 



ov-«.^ aa b.ofc-rr. 



.5. Havy. 



way. At 1916, OSS aULBERT 



A. It. ame. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3581 




1 n 



OO.O'gt"" 
JpTgfr' .74(681 






-| Tfe-i 



?5 ! %f'^ 

























■ 



































I 






















i 




-\ 




i 







3582 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




& Td£xovn 






I- trasat liuas. 
..'uo*iiiag Xoi auaclllArjr purposes. S*ooivt- 
: -cho Yard, Ships prwsobfc; Tarlo«e auitp 
',.^ IJSS CSilLIFORKlJ^, At 0140, «i« fv 
«iitvora?y duty with tfc« Shor« Pairol 
" M.V,-,, 360 02 06, K' 



•'o'l Llaut . tJSWC . 



04-0 8 aoorefl as be 



2 Uoov 






'^.iC^K4^^y^j> 



.-*K TTI'TC^ 






aiujtersa crew at ^uiiriuji-s. ^oenfceea: ^dt&L. 
) 5«io«ffl{)*x- lOfl. At. lOJC, pafcll«h«d tlj« 

"38, trl«a t>jr 30 

;*aS»er i9Al to 1700. »_ 

t-ue -•>"j,> -AT 55 at 063^1, 1 Hov«w3r'^ 



S fr«Bh water from 



■X bow. At 

1st off star- 
■ ^■•'•&« 



•-i 



^4^^^'^* *^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3583 



K' :«;S?33E3 



(Uar, nW 

Page. Ui^ 




v^-^p^^sc-: 




LOG OF THE UNITED STATES SHIP 
.^|;r^ y^^ Ya. fearl riarboT» JlJi. 



CL50 



ZONE DESCRIPTION' 



.1. H. Et-TOLISH 






5£*.iJLt?. f. AVwjr. 0«»»Mwv«»i. 



•J 

Pi 



fl i 



oro — 

M« 



ktJ 



UABOMRTKK 



TaMPIt»JlTT!B» 







JU«. 
1 

2 
3 

4 
£ 
6 
7 

g I 

10 

11 

12 I 



i\ lomiidn- 



^1 Longitude .^-. 



jrijAitude..^ 



3( l^JltuJc 



CttirtKat 



'Set 



Etto - 

-Ooatopasa No. _ ,. .,_ 

e.H 

V.m. 



r.n. I 

18 i 
U\ 
15 I 
l« : 
1' J 
is; 

19 I 



20 



30.06 
0.05" 
3,0,04^ 



l3 



0S,.Q.1C. 



30,03 1 

^ »OAl 
3Q^08.,L 

30.0.'. 

30.. . 



2i.i62 



i i28Ci.j: 



7.3-2C., ... 

73. 171 1 
-,73.7X1 - 
74 73-: -. 



■i,-vi'mi _-Ji25jS_ 



.■.fa..^iP-3-44X 

i/atnied .8120- 

■ tperxM 25Q3i 

.riBLPoaji-, L>:avxno Poa-r 






i^-s- 






— j 



; ectfiQEtaolcoless 

,^u._..,tter sataplea. 
iDjjn<a|,<fcijoj<lR norma 1. 



■)i29.97j 



'8170 



781 



060 I S 

OftO" V5 



.,-55— t-^:^^- Y-p— 






•^5(5 " i ■ 5 



3c: 



"25 






ISJ 



■M 







Run Ko. (S«riAl) 




TiOM to euba«f|['--„.. 
OiBatwt liepth — 









(OTigliuU (rtbbca) yopy of t1iS« page to be sect tn Bttreii« 'if Nftv*? ati' 



3584 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



r 






??^??'S?yy^°yn*>y^'-''''*' y i y^ /! T r ' y ;,t ^ ^^ 



'c 9.¥ 



ADDITIONAL SHEET 



■'Tira-rA 



, 5 Oeoeabtir 



:or for Slioi-e Pdijrv'.' 



I in ttr 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3585 



i.f'S iST' 



. Pilot. 



i uiie* i 



3586 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




gJ*««-^ar 



oeson»pTio« J 



I v., 



! 1^^'- 



'>!?!??! Pl'SS^i- 



m P i^'l^^ 



!??«?! I Hn 








trj 



--, a- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3587 




3588 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



• ».i- ■»■« ■a.ina ^••'<»54:KW<J-*SV'*S#«L!ft.;/ i,' .il^aAV- • i'«.-"<ii"'' 



p«i* ^jLjLi- — 



LOG OF THE UHITEO STATES SHIP- 



?r liliiillil 



*»-M I 



<mM4 I I 



1 i 



..'M-?— i-Hj.,.- 




I >r~T n__| _»2. 



■i 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3589 



UNITED STATES SHIP 



^'".'- \ 






20NC OC^fllPT 



iON^A^sJoi 



re:mark5 



00- QA Moored port side to Bert: -- • - ,,; ijaj-bor, T.U. , with 
the following lines: 3« .asunlla line, 8" manila for- 
ward and after bow an<3 quarter s.jruic J.incr. , o" inoxiil:' b'w and quarter breast 
lines. IBS OGLALA moored port to starboai-d side. Boiler #3 steaniin/.; for aux- 
iliary purposes. Rsceivins fresh water ajid toleohonn services from the dock. 
Ships prasenl;: Various units of the U.S. Paeiflo'S'leet. SOPA in the IBS CAiI?Ci?- 
JTIA (CojaBatFor). At 0130, the follcwisg named ■"-••• ~-- ;•-,.., .»,- -^^ n„- =;.<,, v.,..,i^„ 
completed temporary tour of duty aa Chore Patr 
v., #261 GO 22 S'lft, ■OSVr, A'DSRSC';', J, p., 1243 -. .: : - --, -.:., . : ...... 

1375 62 20 mac, t3st:: jacosy, s.?., f/243 63 9i 01120, usi.'. 

'v(<J), TTSJH. 

O/f-OS JS>ored as before. At about C757, airpiic.e;; recognized ao Japanese asade a 
surprlae dive bomblns attack on Ford Islarid. Sotinded Ocnerai O^uarters. At about j 
0757i, a aeries of three heavy explosions felt .icarfcy. At about 0758, sh5 
by vicleat explosion on starboard aide. This explosion caused by torpedo 
torpedo plane cofliing over oha.inel south of Ford Island. Hit oacur.:- ' rr,xi:iaj.<ik^ 
between frames 71 to 79. 



/'; 



v->d^<t^ 



s.'-io bellevad to 
"^■t'lCi' s^pc^***^ to 



and aomouTt-' I 



0&^ UOOT9& &!} before. At about CSC ■ 
ySpinose planes, follov;ed iaaediately . 
planes strafed boats and ships in harbor. On'- 
hats baea hit falling toward Uavy T.ard Ir fl-i-- 
cc-asi8t of a strafing attaok in coc" 
this aral other -vess-is in the harb'.. 
port. At OSIO, ?orvmrd boiler opsratiii^ s^av;.. 
I !=it»6« power out frcm ship. Firs reported In c 

■ oged off beoause of ao ¥;at'?r pressure, i* va.i i ;.,'.■•' r ;i;:v>».-: ; 
aa aotual firs b*t smoke frcn teroiadc ffxnloaioa. At 0310, 

..-.i-3. •.•■i:l, confined in the b -' -^ -.---■- - --^.^ by cv"' --•' - -• 

I At about 0820, first, attao' laying 

; = > ,..1 <.^...,. .,„^.,y4; ^jje firt,-. «.^o,.,r,. ,^v .HJO, sian-,.. ^...^ ..>,•..-. «^- .,*...^-. .-....-.'.■..^ 
. At OS40, signal hoi-sted to ships present to sortie la accord 

At 0340, report received tijataft^r bc-llo" ^--,«>-it.' - • i-r-sf.^,,-, 
"oout OS4O, Janaaese submarine reported to I. 
...,: CXJLALA taV.f.a it: lov; Ir.r tii-s vts 'iii^lc;* 
■aie ettaok coMng iv. 
•:;.; ■ . ., CiOo, OS!!, and al.^ 
repotted on »*<ird.. At O^OO, report received J' 
I,D«h. Ay »J900, Jspaneou planes st^.scVp.d, ^.p:>r'. 
ore? JIa'sry Va rd , ta'< i n.- su v -. n t a .-^ 
A*ta<ik confli.sited nf a .3c::.iflg ,-1' 

■ i'ed alo,'--. - erersii 

:.lrorafT. action, 

.:j TK-r ;i. . On: '■ ■ ■-..-■- v-.v.-u 

ii8«x. to f.3xl 1:" 1 Point. 






acout 0900, 

■ tSS 3T J.CV1S , 
vriiif: suak i- 
Southaast ;..■ 

ard buildijigs. 

T bombi.isj att.aok. 

't hits, ?i 

^rcd to aaUs- 



3590 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



«*»- 



/ , 



I 



LOG OF THE UNITED STATES SHIP 



ZONE DS8CBIPT1C 



. r. a, Ak*if 



t 
2 
3 
< 

6 
6 
7 
8 
• 

10 
II 
12 



?r 



ij LatttmJo 









lllg 



4 i » 



+ - 



Oyre— ^- 



kti 



£(AKOU£TKa 



? I 9 1 to 11 I 11 



TBUF^ttiiTUKt! 



II 



r 



-M: 



Ui^- 



R U U 



.J j.. 



7 r ^-^ 



^i^- 



I Diiih 



GiM/C0Mf*i» IX t;»i; 



SSRnv— 



8. _.i 

BrwB ^ _ 



Ui>vistl<>a_ 






ML- 



120 










>» 






- 












■ 






> 




















^ ■ 1 


i 


















! * 






I 








1 
1 




i '<()»?» ;^j( 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3591 







\. boMbin;?, attack alised ;'. ^TEViSik. At 0930, lit 

..I. j.-'jut 09'V0, second attao'r Ki .-j-,. «>, ^.34-5, informed CoraOruBat- 
le to get undewvay by 1015, apeta restricted to 15 laiote. At 0955, 



vraa reported floo&i' 
coat rolled. At 10 

vFor of a;j;ua<-ft tc r 

■;tance ' 
At 102: 

■i3. order 

'•on of t: 

r-- director a^ic aftjc 

'ilfi-.e<1 to .-nanual cc; 



liO'-iltw 


,;as ejcoUoa. ?uel cii jfir 


lolar;;;. 


; to l?e prsparad to r son Ire 


■ ' ■ ' 


.,.'i^v->j.'-.i -ji eT^jcucieu- 4OO roun" -■■'■■" 




iads or 5C oal, /Ul batteries 


,1'W-^:^ .'- ■■' 


•a were PSAI^ ■-" ■ - ■- t — • 


r<sarl H; 


u-bor, T.H. . 



ioon as steam was obtained, pur^ps were ptjt 
ied off boilers #5, 7, 8. At 1000, -in- ; 
ciler and en^ic«roorii3. At 1015, tTSS O'SU^- 
';. At 1025, P.?. boats oommeacea Boving ! 
ut 26i feet aioidsiiips, ship on efen keel.! 
to remain et berth until further ordere.f 
•^ts 6t IcorI control but tio a-.tGrial da- i 

rio ooji- t 
All I 

i- rsiicliiin.'; Ford j 
...y4iA alongside. 
ianu., i.l/?5 cai. and ' j 
At IC35, the folloir!.ng '. 



goal > 



..n genei 

■'■1 >•,-,/,»,■ 



bof 
I re>- 
i plan O.J 

trO'M''? 



1200-1; 



3592 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



i.,i,'/Xcf _ 

por! ^lley flooded. At 1318. enemy reported landing: off IIAilAKUlI. Own 
plQiiea ririag on them. At 1322, eneay ndval attac!: reported approaching nine (y; 
milns southeast of B/VJftBi.R'S POIWr. At 1335, eleotrical pov?er cut In galley, but 
sandwiches bei!\~, served to crev- " — --jlley. At 1350, reports recaived tliat six 
(6) enemy ships approaohing LI". ::cu*e, to aid lonolnc party at Tv'AJJAKt'i.I . 

At 1400, reoelvca report ar r ...i.d destroyer approacMrj;' '- ■■ •."„ At lU5i 

trani-.forrod planes and all • to Ford Island. At 1600, ■ orev/ on 

etat<' ■- T^" followinfj ca_. rrvjorteO:^ TOAD Sent to j.;...„_., ;^'M, PH., T.H. 



NAT- 



•V20 

:-a2fc 
SeaZo 



DSM 
us?! 

us:; 



OAiprriR, A.J. 



TTSi: 



.^t^3U.v 



.7. 



The folluwine laen were V-iZVXS.X> and transferred to U.S. Waval HoopStal, P.H., T.H. : 

"nalo '■' " Soalo 

ic 3ca'.?c 

J , ;■;. i.falo -'"" 

Goai.o Iv,'"j:;, ■": ^ 

yic 

-'■ £'0 

Scale 



"00, L.K. 



"C3c 

?lo 



■ Ic 



I BEARDSX.F-T, L.I- 



K.!3c 



"'Isi^ii'i-, P-", 



.■ o-2/.ao 

. — -..t^' I ■■ 11*111 llf.— ».— 

I FordlT'^ otUer caor- 

j One pi V at down to •. 

I thot tl;ese vmc^ friendly plm:' 



it.: '. u-'f-J .. y ^i;,; ; 

Infoiinatlen 



6^> 



<Tr.te i,»4f6 to !» m- 



-...K»a MiOO.1.11 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3593 

EXHIBIT NO. 164 

WAR DEPARTMENT 
WASHINGTON 



1 April 19U6 



MEMORAl^IDUM FOR MR. RICHARDSON 

At the hearing on January 25, I9U6, Congressman Murphy 
asked to see the reports of the attack on Cohu which were sent 
to Washington by General Short and his subordinates. (Tr. 83^2, 
83U6). The originals of tljose reports were shown to Congressman 
Murphy the smne day, and coriies are enclosed herewith. 



CARL R. ITELSON 
Captain, AUS 



;CTORY 
BUY 

UNITSO 
STATS* 

3VAR 

NDS 




79716 O— 46 — i)t. 19 12 



3594 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



From^ £! 




ihc W«( tJepartnumt Mewos 
Munitir.B« BMt.. V'ljstivr.i > 



CoptW /«»<■»*«* «« «-■"<"■ ■ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3595 



lllU/7 



tmcE-vr 



WOlOZrJ 




Received at the War Department Meiuiage Ctnicr 
Room 3441 Munitioiw Bidg., Washington. D. C. 



DJ;^.yB3i 7, 1941 



'tWtikl 



ASBKl.'TIES R£P'08TED TS!" Ti^:^"" «.: SF.TC!; tS;CEK3ER HINETSEN 

.•/:■;.; 'rtO;- ■,at;.„,':: rts; INTO ATTA, .. _ _. :. 



Sa'3T 




A.; BKB/bos-17ii. 

:Vfer Department. A.G.O., Decestber 7, 1941. - Toi'^A.C. of S., G-1- 
! (Sxact Copy) 

■Exact Action CbDy To: A. C. of 3.,' 

Exact Infonaation Cf-.vl^v'^.C. of S., Q-^, Cony Ifo, 2., 

V V V^-G' of S., Cr~3, Copy No. 3, 

- I "" •XC. of 3., O-ij, Cony No. /,., 



^->A ^ f^'- 



tary <it the aeneral Sta.ff , Copy Ko 
Arisy Air Forces, j Copy Jto. 6., 
Copv So. ^7 




Actiof> Copy 




3596 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



P7 WTJ 
1204? 



From.. 



RJLQIOGKIK 



\ 



o-;-c 



Received at the W»r Department Meeugte Center 
Room 3441 Mumtione Bldg.. W»»hio«ton, D. C. 

IXCEUEER 7, 1941 



536P 



HMBUI 



To-uiismmSiMmk. 



M. 



f)Cf> ....7 iTTT 



11 Ho. 1066, 7th 

. M TSO EWOff AIR ATtiCK RESUMED ELEVEN Al: rj-JCM LESS 

i IHTiaCE raWJ FORJffiR ATTACKS PERIOC IttNIU KEPORTS NO OVHiT 

I 

;i ACTS HAVE XET OCSDH^D THKtB SJCMED FIEUKR. 






SHOKT 



ijExaot Action Copy TojA.Olg'^ Cop7 Kc . 

jiExact laforsiation Oopy^osV^l, Copy Ko. 2. 

1*^,-3, Copy Ko. 3., 
"^ D, Copy No. i., 

k-ret-— ■-'■-dVal St.*^^7 C°Pi' I^o* 5. 




Action Copy 



^ SKB/bjs-1712. 

i! y 

%r Depwrtfflwot, A.U.O., Dscetnber 7, .1941. - '^3:^-2. 
>l (Ewiot, Copy) 



kUI I Mir».^«T«.>«MK|e > 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3597 




' p5..TJ 5P 



From- 



SKr« 



Coptts ftttmikM tu noted: 



I 



I 



Received at the War D«p«itin«nt Me»»age Center 
Room 3441 Monitiooa Btclg.. Weshiogton. D. C. 



To. 



CUxl.. 



NO.-1077. '' 

i ATTACKS "k^U-;C1 




1;02A ^;(/ 



•APP. 



■=HT DAS 









jILVLD S5.i/UjL, 




i^y.JKLLi:j«X . ALL Ti<OuPS ON LAT-Ln. POSITIuNS iMPH TVvO 
: . AT K}SITIONS. TOTAL LOS:, 
■ EIGHTY FTr 
rilCK>J« FIELD, STATUS 0? :: _ » :' AS 1-0IL0V;3: PLUiii? 
..TL.-^.Li. 3 EI^HTEH;; MlrlE; B Si:;V glTEEN ^^^^jr 

PURSUIT, FOTiTI .'TAL Sim SEVH>!. PlA.IiKi 

H 2L I^FAIiSX) LOCHLLf: S ■ 



ii TV.O; A T;.E<TY 



f Artxon Copy ij 



ASSIS'iAf,': : 



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t^^-'tio -*»«***» Hii.1* t9t* t 




3598 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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R«cciv«si «( tiic Wtir D(iP«rtm«nt V>e«age Cento ' J 
Room ?44l Munition* Bltl« Wa.hlofton. D. C. j 

,4 


Frortt 






To 


— •■■^ OEJiCMC '■■'•-■-, IGtfcML- , 


i 


moua, rrfousAND; thhke 




3PI-x;ihl attbjjtion to 


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orS; BATTALION TANKS PR^l- 




• ■■r-:'r-\. r.'^T ■ -t f- 


Aetton C 




- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3599 



Received at the War Department Message Center 
Room ;J44! Munitions Bldg., WasKington. D. C, 



M. 



From 





/ 

SJui,' 


:liL 


lUU i07'7-aiH. 




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3600 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 







tUi. 



P 46 WTO 
«33P/9 

PRIOR IT/ 


HAWAt ! 


* ^ RAJIOGRAM ^ 










R«c*:vm1 at tite War Dcpartmeat Mesaegt Center 
Room 3441 Munitiont BU«.. Wuhiogtotx. D. C. 

DEC. 10, 1941 




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;3CACT ACTIOti COP' 



a-2, C»py No. ij^ 



-'■ Staf.f , GHQ. 



-'■ staf.f, 



C. .. o. 3. 

.V. 01 -,. , G-1, Copy Ho, Uir 
of, Arra;.' Air Forces, Copy No. >. 





i.p '-y^* 



/^ 



• ^r;^ C?P7 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3601 




.JOClOfiiJAM- 



Rtxcivei ot tke War 0«)»irtmcnt Meangc Cenlcr 
Room ?44l Munitionj B!<ig., Washington, D. C. 



DSCESiPER 10 X941 



PfilORTTY 



?7 SRAFTRR TH 



0-4 -C 



BJa"^ 



r,, TKB AD^ro'TASI' SBT^T?/' 



..Af. 



:,J5 D«CEKBSR TSSTH 

'!S OK O'V 



■iTlM&TB OF THS S.. 

fSAN ATTACK 



, 3ED AfiaiHD F:. r PEBKUaRT FCSBS WSSE 

T«CM*?S TO PERMIT SISFSESAT, f;F FLAKES AT HICKfeM FIBLS 
. ;.SD ROT B AT TlJa! OF ATTACK STOP 

AHB NW RTjr.HINS COSSTRCCtlOK OF THBSS DISHERSAt 
FACILJ-':, .CKAM flElX; AUO AT aiCI Aiaft)R¥ AfiD it 

OTHEH FISLDS. 




ST'Wsyjf* C. of S., O-l^ Oopf i*, 2i 
/ C of a., ^IPO, Copy .Vn 3 
--^ •■.'■{■ Co-,: 



^1 j- 



.^* 



3602 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3603 




i|^- 




25th Division, of tV; 



.iivanee C^ of tlie Ticy^ftJisa'i. '"^a ooprstij^g Id the 
-^^M<itmpl, t!^ ttic .fj.ivmi.cis ^1> cT the 



■--ring 
:j-'-cb. Is 



/ - 
sticg 



'stitict atte;: 

tbe secern soou-, 
rsteiy fifteen ai : 



■'.e storn' 



■•y s»tarj3?0tn 

vere au5ceaEf(iliy ■ suffloier.t atrr^a^tii to bring ot 

auction. Ic the Aroy, tae -jrfiiflds, the pXaa«e oa tiie aio'uri!} 
tloss at thft fields «ere the first oWf-ctiv*, There wisre a f*' 
, -«,>-." -r.->3peii at Fort Sliafter and Fort AmAtrocg, thaae b#'l»g i?:tf- 
in J 1 '■.':> that these tiso iiosts wsir*- also ical-oiSea p-s asllit«rv ob<cc- 



t jvpi;. 





b. The larpjttst aurbpr of plaaae oomseatra i aft on ?eari Ee: 
each battleship, ortiiwr, and srouu of ^oatroy*.-"; w.s » trca t;-- 
ty ft (JefinJto group of plants. TKroughotrt th' 
pntlic ^tta>^k had iaeu aost carefully pl^r-P*^ 
part his jlane w^a t? plsy. Th»r^ w^e "»- 
boribiXig. ?rc» raps rstovered fr<« crss*.' 
■ '■■te. teosLclng Pearl Harbor kiiew t&e ioeatijjt or . 
.' f", r.i'O'/ .-ha- trtis Vie n/ip war ss^ -^ert» 

*>e«Ii sir out-s it 

--tiijihi -!*n?-r 



ry yiRl4 anc 




3604 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I 



10 



9. Balloiw yield •ttffer#d th« Issst. 
hor* atA one •(juadron of P-/,Ob 3.c«t al" 






10, By noon ca Siuwlsy the si scaeewfeat norael.- avweTCr, 

vlllen poyulatlon w»b jart i hsppecod BaJ ro».<jB .vere b«- 

-.--<f Jo-'i^iel vllV tTV.rfSo i'OiJW. J-. . ri. Tlia HoKoXalu Rspid Trannlt 

Coopfcoyt hsp 0^ iJuseaiB ajuS hae by far tho largoet fran- 

.>i.i»f. in r 1;Kt» dlrtction of t:-. Si.r> «rii his CIvlllCS 

id start"! 



■•- the. 



«ing d«y 






Htsnujd to tb'Blr otjarter* 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3605 



w 



IhtA DBS ree: 







|on ana »sny esroa^sotjfl rep«s*« recelv 
Sbie -sine wfeethex" libflse imports 



had at: 



The Awry Jiae 






hii';>i it v:p.. 

: cai of exert' 



« vma d^tfeiar: ember ^ 

'yaXit&ry Oovenaaea^ »a3?«» iali:tii.ts<}, with th« 
5«v«i-sor Biad the D«t»rt»ant yi.«lgs Mifoeatt; ■''. 
W!tti-?i>. The ooo?>»rs4ioK c£ th«- olYill«n r«s«3i< 

ties V. t-hs fwture t'eseij-u? to be 



'T3fK*sae:' 



asiJ Caster. IgisaSa Jet- tn* purpose C? 
fey Jftaaarj- ■'=-'- :■--■. ---i fieMg ~- 
ilss?ioa fit!-; Jaaa«a 1; 



libmty for 



3606 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




<• fi'^nrr 



for the sake of safety. The I-udingtoa on Deoembop 8th was en rout* frcr. 
Christmas to canton cariylng I500 tons ot equipment for Canton, isolxriing 
a large still to giaarantce a water supply. On orders fr\jBi Wnah-tngton the 
Vary, for -purposes of safety, dlvfrted the Lidln^on from 11 Samoa. 

C^Aiiton is Trery close to points where the Japanese are ouoi i the 

Itevy feels that it will be impossible to raroteot it at this tiB,s. 

Also, the v.-ater slttjatlon in b short time wouldjfceriouB if the 
300 ciTllians now there remain. The deoleion vjks made yesterday to send the 
KBleakal^ frow here to Canton to take all civilian* to Chrletr»9P to bn em- 
ployed upon the works there. The dredge and tugs were sterte'' ly from 
Cer.ton to Christaias as the -jositlon '•.■us too exposed to IpnvR ' -? t>:erR. 
Two 75ira'. gvins, 6 Browning autoiaatic riflce, and 6 watr^ 
ell vitb antiairorflft iscunta, are ^eing sent on the H-.. 

the garrison at Canton, consisting of 45 En^neers, Jedical and Signal ^e- 
ta"!:<nents. A detachment of ten Field Artilleiv is beiii,' e«tit to OT^crate 
the 



7.t!. $.ime. If approved by the Chief of Sf.ff, th i 
on the Island. There is avallRll<t f'o3 for a ^itilM 
art s jjood nany thousands of 



O -;■ ^*^t 1 i^T! 



aiiythl'. 



facilities It is believed that t' 

itscaf ir.dpfinitely. All en ^i>'- 

are beittr left at Canton are^ 

f*v& 1 "' - "^ ' '• " ith the InoresEi 

Kuo jng jBuoh faster • 

ouvh --■ '-■■■ /ijl islands, art v;u,. ,.4-. ..r- . ;,,j,' j-.uuii 

to use this; route vlthout either Canton or bamoa, 

the civilians from Canton to v^snioa -.-ms consli?---' 

there at Samoa. The machinery on the Lidlagtc 



■omain e ' 

- -.. , , .ocline, oi^, 

I r)roce&) with a limited 



The advlsf.'. moving 

'- -t the N^vy -^u -.lor, r.?,nt ■ 

Samoa oan be use<S to 



very great advantage at Nandi antJ the War I^enarxment is being re''nestf 

authorisse the Ludington to unload this at Suva when the first oonroy 

ceeda to the Philippine Islaais. To* norX at -is, Saudi, a:: 

will be pushed to th€> wax mum aa the necessi+ iis additlcnsi 

to the Orient it :e, particularly El:;: 

and Wake are bei to be In the handa ci 
J-? jfinese. 



16. Today nine E-i7s have arrived safe! • •.(-, mainland, aaklns? a total 
of Z'j. now avpil'^blf if the t>epartKent -^Ith t;. ..iHtl of" rt-pairirg t'*o !?«ore. 

FP are 1-' ' ")3 left, vdth 52 ?-40s/"H<^e ?-40s and he 

will b£ t scn-^r cf security is oossiblf. This 5r ■.;•- 

fly true Ir. view of the aeve; h have !~ 

17. The ground troope in tr.? Department have su 
io hl.kh nrid s stPte of training th-r^<J-'JV 'rt is ^erhar,: 
for aforoomeuts, 

ril' lefonse uaitt , .^., 

regitrente in both divialona. Antlalrci^ft artillery 
in J';nuQry »t>'' i,'<T'r>>i "hnyid be *!■'"*■ '-i ■"^..1 ■ a Kott- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3607 




■ri- 



baUylici. -■. :.^: ::,.... .., , iditional ....,..:., ,; i ;, . 

, : .s available in orier to provide any r«£erve wJiich Is -vcrtty of tve nsacc. 
Our tfic.tlcnl -iroblern hert? is one of st-poa^ ftfiid ■fortiflcatlonB -ire oar- < '-^ 
oociip'iTjion, held lithtly ■•.ith lar.?* rtiS'^rvPS sreTsarcd to wore by r:otor 
Inatent's notice. Counter-attacKs are eutcs""*''"- 'th ti^-- n't-x* ; «• 
to oe recplved wucfc ^ri»at6r use v;lll. be naie irfieldc 



■■:.tlone h-.ive rerul -.clai.'rir. 

. -f^ieMs to th« cy no'A- >i«ivc 

ta - uiinient. Tivis has rfe£-^tsui ir. celtiLiii sble tt^ 

t-in ,'ii«h >er6 bs41y v-reoked. T&ese rscoiailssicne' . 

i-he t'j^al S'lOwn in the ".bore naragrenJi. There wifi ar'ic- 
existing- run'eys ft the varic-as alrf elds. The airfi-'lfir 
. ulf-: xtsafilon of runv/ays'to a rcinimiir. of 5/JOO feet to p"C-. :■ .lir 

'iflf bo»r:h=-"s, i.'- bsim; ouahfed to the limit at all fieliis - ud 

or exa-Tple, 1,^00 Teet has been a^ded to ths ^ 'cfee 

'1>^ sine© Sunday, and part of the B-17 squ-i-lr -tr- 

A on bellows yield. By the niddl. k t,he 

:-"?ielA ■ 
- I'-'t'* ■■}'" ■ 



:ed.ly,.t^ 









3608 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

m 



10 



21, Affluairit cwerioi lis of the acticr 

■••'■^•■oruiol «ind the Controa ..■. : j t •• at Thcr.'i ~ "' ' 
fche flight of enBffiy plur.es -is cXott' 



■ ' ►; C. S!fOPT '' 

.'^nernl, C is. Arnr/, 

■ Un -. 



i; 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3609 






p 



' ynepy aircraft brllpfed used in i«lr r.sid 7 T^c-ct-r.ber 19A1- 

1. Fi^-hter 97 ITakajina. 

a. Nonretractible Isading sear. 

b. Low wing, tlunt nose. 
£. iiingle seat. 

jl. Three machine '.uns, tv.o la -A-ings, 500 rounds per gun. 
e. Sc-a level speed 2iO r.ili?'- — ' r, tnaxiwu:!'.. 

2. Fii,;hter Mitsubishi. 

_a. T^TO i-OBuii cannon firfis tnm wings; two jnacVilne guns fire throu^gb 

propellor. 
_b. 5-50 pouai bomb load. 
£. Speed 375 grilles ;>er hoiH", riinimus. 
d. Maxiwur. ?^r.",,-(^ '?) 

* 3. Boraber Ka;..ikii,i i jifi Observ-tion stnd Light Fomber Type 97 - -^^ I'^o 

Diesel motor - (One shot dovm -rith Olesel motor near '*'ahiav,a. ^ 

&. dihedral (slight positive). 

_b. Lov; v;lag monoplane. 

£. Three machine guns - bor.b load 661.3 T>ound.s - 300 kgji. 

d. Speed 21?. 4 wiles oer hour, inaxlmus;. 

it,. Dive coraber 97 (referred to sometl'seG 36 'Deck Type Reconnaissance^. 
a^. Lov- wing ir.onoolane. 
b. Eetractlblc landing gear. 
n_. Single strut. 

£. Three In crew (°ilot, 2* Pilot and radioman). 
_e. Speed sea level 200 miles ner hour, maximun. 

5. Tosrpedo Plane. 

a^. No description in T.i:. Aopfiared larger than other onen/ «irf:ri-.ft; 
low Ting, carried one torpedo directly under fusel&ge. 

• 6. Type 0-1 Fighter (Mitsubishi ■ ; 
a_. Ship board fighter. 

b. All netal lov 'vlng, Internally braced. 

c. Fully retiractible landing gear. 
£. Flush rivt-tting. 

£. T o 20n-im cannons; each wing; tv.o 7-7 ff.achin© guns in f'jiselage. :.c 

armor . 
f. FlOHtine gear and arresting gear. (This ship at HAD). 

7- Aiohi Cloc5c Type 

je. Ship board bomber. 

b. T^'-'o seater. 

c. Internally bracetj. 

■d. V.'in^^s from cvol O'sn. 

e_. All vnnifil ezcftf' Ip v.hich is weed. 

£. Seml-retractiblt -_r-.,-. 

£. Kinsei er.ane; , r.odel /.4, twin r ir cooled. 

Page 1, "tncl. :''l. 



797 IB O— 46— pt. 19 13 



3610 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



<| 




1 



SECBXS 



h. Taigtat tmpty 2388. 

T. Useful load 1272. 

3- Loaded 3660 (over all). 

k. Balleiva bomb at S50 pounds. 

_1. No azmor apparently. 

m. Two fixed guns fuselage. 

5« Flexible gun rear cockpit caliber 7.7. 

" (In possession Sary) . 

*lndioates type of ship acoordlng to IM., July 1941, one of each 
ires Ishot do«m and is in possession of Army or Nsry. 



, Tsol No. 1 



jmrnOt. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3611 



Ret'ort of Casualties . 



1. The following data reference battle casualties from midnight 
5 December 1941 to midnight 9 Cecamber 1941 is hereby submitted. 



(e) Number of patients in hosj-ital 
prior to r.idnieht 6 Cecsmber 1941. 
(b) Aduilssicns: 

1. Battle casualties (serl'usly 
and slightly wounded) . 

2. Other than battle casualties 

3. Niunber dead u^<on arrival at 
Eos; Ital 

4. Number died after admission. 
Dispositions: 

1. Battle casualties to duty. 

2. All others. 
Total number of beds vacant.. 
Total JcnoTsn dead. 
Total seriously wounded. 
Total slightly wounded 
Total Battle Casualties - - 



(o) 



H) 
(e) 
Cf) 
(g) 
(h) 



T. G. H. 


SCiiO 


HiokaiTi 


TotaJ, 


456 


531 


29 


1016 


?:8 


118 


26 


472 


10 


44 


2 


56 


J.- ■*.'• 


27 





159 


(ic) 


(11) 


(0) 


(21) 





44 


1? 


56 


la? 


288 


rs 


498 


614 


548 


5F 


1200 


142 


38 





SS4X 


75 


38 


1 


114 


Z5Z 


80 


25 


S58 
- 696 



X This includes 44 . ead bodies taken direct to the morgue. 



\ 



,^^ 



^^ 



j^^-^'- 




3612 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



V) 







, M MiMMMrl«3r far «liaai«t#arl»s •«ftli« of tUs Mlnr«» m» 

ewf«, tiCMl OMfsv* Alr«*«ft Vtndac* »mmiLi vlw 
•flMMT tatat *i^ MHVKMMriiac to Urn imr—— m« •ajpn^i 
A« «M r«|M«t tf «lMi eoBtrvl OmMTf aat VmnQ tUism OfTlMr 
•«r«Mi« t« ofwrnt* it* tetaMtwM WyMkK th* teily p«rl*< cf ta* 
taif ftr* wftil «M hnur lurtar <«nM Tiw flnt ««lM»dBl* rM|alr*a «f«m» 
iOmn •{ All ataM.ou erw 4 JkJU %» S F»M« tUXm solMtel* «m aoilft** i« 
IdM k«ar« •; « iUX. %• 4 fJIU A %— fwwry Miut*»l» ma aMct ««rl««d «ld.«h 
fMiirai Ul •««4ft«ii« %t •»«««• fiNB 4 A^M. «e U A.1I. «■« t« fa«y« 

laci «t«tlw« S*m I r«l. to 4 FOU te to««rte]r, r aawa ur 4, l»4l. I •»- 
«M««i «k« «aii«r«l OmMT «e r«fMW« WBtMrllv to 1mv« all •tatloM 9p«r- 
at» Am 4 AJC *• T AOU (MOar «• 9>m»mr» Ihmmhmt T. IMii tttU «« acrM« 
t* ligr «>M eeatral MtlMT* 

St Staff S«r««n* ftlMaUr <^^ «a<«iw«i. SCin^ Mtias nr OfflMr, rW 
MTte tin* IM mm avttJjm ttek wwM 1M •a — %r — < •• anapUlMa la th* ia- 
rgnnriii rmtA^U 19 thm tm Imtmrnmna^m Caactor fsraa 4 A.M. ta 7 A.ii. 
«wlftf t Pa«W>ir r» IMU Zkta U vwlfl«4 ^ Lt» KanaLt U lyiar. Air 
OtWfa* «|M -mm tiM «n34r ^n««r iUi ttw XttfmnMttiafB Caatar flraa 4 iuK. t« 

S* A« aiq^raisclaRtvly T«SO Aalt. « n^^nft «m rwaivad Araa « Qataatar 
ttvHflB «t «;p«M> laiftt • Urc« anaaiar «f plaiiaa «aa appraai^das tehv oat • 
MMT** lav^ S «a)pnM« ftfurtt «C a <f atsittaa of mfpnaOmkUlf 15S allaa. Sbia 
lafarMtitan wut laaaAiotoI^r 1nr«WMd«««d hy tiM a«t ta»b aa « < eparater, IY». 
JtMue^ mtSmaU ta iU» tyiuar« tiiw t«llM4 t« <^|M>a idMMt tba fUi^t. Tlia 
atatiwart of Kfa. Ammi^ JMkmM, SCHO* tiM aidltMlMMml a^wrmtor la 



4* flM l«7 UoiMtt Ofn«w** iwtitlMi vdtttlB tka Xafaraatlaa Cantar 
mm aot wmm»* ^«um X rmalMt tiM Utmmiim Caatar at ateat 81SO AJL 
SIda ]M«&tl«i WM MMMai alMrtljr t l wu aofta a* fegr faateiaal Sartaaat Maria S. 
Sta«ff«a>, seflOl* «IM ramiaaC oa tlM yioaitiaa wtil appraslaatoly 4«M 
F.C vkaat tha |lo«itiatt ma takm orar liy Ba«aJl Offla 



tto Jif M wt aayatk aat. ^ 

caofiB c» Mun* J»v 

Sad Idant., Sieaal Carpa* 
Slfaol aea9aa3r> Alraraft Varaiac* %aaU« 

M« oaara ta baf aro »a VlH ^ fj^i Mw o f /A^^j^u^J ufl* »*l 
at Fart AMftaav f • K* . . ^^ / 

Sa« Ua«t«» Micaal Oerfa, 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE • 3613 



10 



Pert ShafUr. T. K«} 

I M 

Vnrritoi7 of BumU) 

fwrmaaaMlly mppmr*A b«for« ns, th« tmdcraigiMd authority for mStda^ 
Istoriae oatha of thia oatura, cm* JoBupk P. Mtitra&U. 18006141, Pvt 1«1, 
Slfaal C«RiMkay, Alromft Warning, Baomll. «ho aft«r baiae Avly amora mtf 
MTillag to iMT dapoaaa awl aajrathi 



I MM oa duty aa t«liq>hoa« operator at tho A)@ Infonwticm Cwitor ea 
Bor&ias* DfKMab«r 7, 1941« 1 roeeived a talaptena sail trtm Opaaa 
at Tito A.M. atatlBC that a largo maibar of plaaea vwa boadiag tovarda 
Oataa Aran Iwth 3 poiata oaat. X gavo th* iaforaatiaa to Lt. Sormit A. 
tyiar. Air Oorpa, 78th Pttraolt Sfoadroa, IHaaslar Tiold, T. H* and tibm 
ll«tonant talkad with privato LoiOcard at tba Oi>aBa Station. Lt. Tylar 
•aid that it waan't anything of laportanoo. At that tin* tho planoa war* 
1st nilos out. I aakod if a* ahoulda't adriao Corporal Boatty and hava 
tto plott«ra ooB* teak. Xha <^p«aa Ihxit atraaaod tha faot that it «aa a 
ynry larg* ausbor of plaaaa and thay ao —a d axoitad. Lt. Tyler said that 
it «a« not noooaaary to oall tha plottara or got in touoh with anyxmo. 



r«rth«r tha dopooast aaya^ not. 



^^. e ^u^^^. ;^2v<.«*^ 



ifoaoph P. IWHxBald, 
Sig. C«», Airar«fi Waraing, Uowati, 



Suteorlbod and •«e:i» t« boforo no thla 
at Part SiMift«8>. f. K. 



^^^ day of -^^i^Bji^^JUD. 19*1 




^Jt^4^^^, 



ted Zdout.* Slcoal C«rpa» 
Ofma ry e«»rt. 



3614 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



N?cCTS«e Center 



'a^TCP. 



'r-n i ^7. 



1 



r.'.J;.^ 



J 



EXHIBITS OF JOIXT COMMITTEE 



3615 




3616 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Rcc«ivca kt tb« Wm L><p«ttir^t ivUtm^ta Center 
Room 344! Muaition* BWj., VCjuhh^ton, D. C 






■"Sif 



; 0.. 



m 




. Re Aft C'JUa^ j 






aOUBLRG PRESENT 



-0.'JV!;i-r. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3617 



3618 CbNGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Received at tKc Ww t)ep«rtine»t Me««j« Center 

Room >♦<! »' -:•■ f. 8tdg.. Wwh- ■■ '~> ^ 



To- 



C^pitt Jutr.ijhfi ui -f'Ji'f'^. 



l! --. 



1 ~ ,: 



A--,tir 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3619 



M.JL i:iiUm^i^ 



3620 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



4^SECRET AJ? 



"m 



HEADQUARTERS HAW^inn '.-r.. r,n, Mi.n , 
OFriCK OP THC OCPARTHKNT COMMANOCR 

roRT •MArreit t. h. 



.vi:k 



1& ra^r y*ter to t 

AS 370.2/36 



21 Dacewbor 1941. 



:.ubjec+. ;; of attcok caa O&iia, 7 D«o«aiiber 19/J. 



i«8 your radio t. 



? 17 t>f; 



th*! roj>c 



46 A O O 







EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3621 



ihHWljr »•*«*«: 



••• 



I 



tvnAOQUAwrvfm Hawaiian departmsnt 
romt sHArTKR, t. h. 



30 I>«>osB2b«r 1941 



SUBJECTi aaport of Snsay ittaok* Sunday, 7 D«os»fc«r 19-il. 
iO» A* C. of S., -r DopBrtiaant, Hte»hington, D»C, 



1. Tha follo'wtoy fact* have bsaa glasaeS from aomorouB 
••oports of «y«-witaosB«8 and suppl«a9iit or correct report* saat you 
by radio. 

Z, The eneny sffort will bo oovored undor thrao gen«r»l heeui- 
iajs: Hiok«K Field ars&j Wheeler Field Area; BsIIo-ab field aree.* 

a. mCSiuM laSU) Am » At TiSS A.V.., Sea^ber 7, 1941, the 
first. T.v-!l3ati5n of an e.ttWfc was 3 enemy single engiae, low »dae 
-'.jno">l-:ji32, carr^-.ln,- tcrv eaoes, whioh wore observed eotjthoast of 
lUckaa •■■iald :iar.s«i* U"''. flytog at an altitude of abaui. 50- feat, 
Hji^ tov«rd pearl Harbor, "hey vjers i& ti«2 aoholoas, 5 pl»aes in the 
first and 4 ia the seooud. This flight aid not attask Eickass '''ioia. 
At e.liQost the soffie tise, however, 3 dive boabers attacked tha a-awaiian 
Air tJopot buildings ^"^ssn neld hansor line fron the Seuth, «ad 

3 additional plesie. >i. the seme objactivee from the Horthwest. 

Several rainu,os later 3 additional dive bombers bratabsd Kiolcsan Field 
hon^or line frojr. the Southeast. Iianediately thereafter 7 additional 
ivs bombers attac: rickajB field hanger line from the Ba«t. 

All plaaes d- upproximataly 45 to 50 degrees from alti- 

tudes of 3000 to 5000 feet, iorobo v.ore reloased at about 1000 feet 
v.ith tha planes jullliir sut cf 'A-i'ss, froa 800 feet to approximately 

J 00 feet. 

• n.^'p--..T ^ , cff^ ar>d after borab release. 

Z sinutfc; . -oi and subsesjueat 

..,i-.,..- .,...■. ...^ ,,w- - ,ter pla;. — 

The second .i vurrod at about .1 .ea bet-wewi 

" aad 9 planes appi , ... - Irom the south tu: . ,_.__.,_., llo, 1 Agua 

stem, teoTinical builiicss iianediatoly behind hangar lines and 
consolidated barracks, rhsse pianos when first observed were flying 
level ar.d released bosOse from level flight at altitude of about 160 
feet. LMrlng and irc3?{U?,tsly after this bombing attaok our planes 
OH parking apron -A-ere attacked vdth sun fire. About <«ie minute 
later (8:23) a fortiation o£ probubly 5 or 6 planes bojabed the base- 
ball dieriond from a high altitude, evidently believing gasoline 
storage systea to be in that aroa. The aeocxid attack lasted between 
10 aril 15 minutes. 



t^ 



1 - 



3622 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



iijsii!* 







1941, 'KpproxifiiatiJIy 'M plaitSfi' ».y':- 



t^*Af^-^ f Ttpty^ 



^^^^^^^^K* 


' ^^^^^H 


^^^^K. So 


&C0 por. I^^H 


^^^K Afbsr 


I^^^H 


^^^^^K In «ir«c- 


!■ 


^^^^^^^K '^jf 


'^^H 


^^^^^E 


^H^^i 


^^^^^K b«xi£Kr LlAifi ftoo buxloi^ 


1-i in iaaisMitito Ti.aixUA.y aH 


^^^^W plaaaa l,r fli-3t ;t*:-ctir; 


.,;jj>6ari»S ftias.il w external -.. »^rf^B 


^^^^^K 


CM. '<^lXe n>?<.- t>3sltiv«ly 'iilHiH 


^^^^K> 


■•;y,',? <^f ?0 .ta. fL-« ttn-t tMe ^^^^^H 


^^^^^K. iittftoi: Xnalv ■>><•& 1& - 


'^^^^^^^B 


^^^^^^p itttaolr lAStr^t '.^<..t.*;lv 


^^H 


H S&Qi 


BStl - ^H 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3623 



SMs»ra 




Subjooti Report of Bnemy Attacks Sunday, 7 Doo«Ebor 1941 - Cont'd 
To» A. C. of S., G-2, V/ar D»pt., WMhlngtoa. 



Another attack struok '.'Shealsr s'ield a faw minutos after 9»00 A.a., 
s'-.T.a day. This attack coasiotod of 7 enemy planes wMoh approached 
from the south, flying roughly in line at an altitude of .about 600 
feet. They fired maohina guns at planes being taxied onto the air- 
drome but It Is belie-yed that ao plane fired more than 25 to 50 
rounds. All seven planes v,«ro eingia engine, low idng, moaopl&aas, 
tw-seaters. They withdrew to the north. The irfiolQ second attack 
less than 5 minutes. This oouid very reasonably have been a group 
of planes expending the roaainder of their affiaunition, 

o, BELLO'flS Fl'ji^W AHSA t The attack on Bellows Field waa 
initiaTed by a single Japanese fiEhter piano at approxiwfttaly 8t30 
A.U., Deoamber 7th. He oane directly from the sea (S&st) and 
employed naohine-gua fire on the tent area apparently ejgiendlng 
all his eBismmition in this one attack. 

At about 9 1 00 A.M., nine fighters attacked fj-»m the north in 
3 groups of 3 planes each in "V^ formation. This attack lasted 
about 15 ainutes and consisted of gun fire only, it vat initiated 
with a diving attack of all 9 plsmtm, after whioh the i formations 
of 3 each peeled oi'f and attacked fi'os; various directions. 

Aiter the single plane, tent-area attack, a S-17 which had 
fc-Tivod fron the mainland ejsd which had been unable to lajid at 
Hiokaa neld attempted to land at B»no7« Wsld but roll^ off 
the run-way. This plana was repeatedly machine- gypaed by th» 9 
olane attack. 

The attack at 3ello»8 ?i»ld appeared well plarjied, rehearaed end 
well executed. One plana was reportad stot down by Infantry traop* 
defending the area b'jit ao part of it -was reoovwre^t froa th« sea for 
iisntifioation purposes. 

S. Q faNiiaAL OgSiJiT/ATSOKS & RKa^K SSt Strafiag plmos a&m 
dov«i to a very" low altitude in prolotioalty «ll o«»«». Bema 50 to SO 
f ©«!(t from the' ground. Straf era uaed 50 caliber, ?.7 sal. Rn<i 2"^ cau 
■;1-,R torpedo planes t^loh were employed only agaiast pearl Harbor ssae 

in CO alcJit flying very 1^- ■ '■■i not (jh".--"-- ■■•"■■ ''■ ■- ■■• ■ "< '--f-^- 

pedos Tuere dropped. 

algid flijjHt diiolpJi.".-.. *.•..'.• ieEionatr..>-v. 
accurate b<MBbia|r. was avidoseud. S«oll wn. att*v 
carformed without nu!8i?r»u3 and <Safc'!.ilad rehott! 
aeeaad to have bscn r«i««ar«9d ana ««.« exoijp'tit 

Maiacru w th battle force Intel liger>.oe ii- 
:>ut the genar&l tjnotiot of tho onesay actaok 
r -joon 6 fcruote<5 . 

A f«w bnifba war 
ftility th; 
■•:^T*- !l»pf.' 





3624 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



'Subjeoti Raport of Satmy Attsok* .Suadmy, 7 Uoo«o»bi»r 1941 - Cont'o 
Toj A. C. of S., (r-2, iv*r Pept., ttMhlngtoa. 



4. aCSSOyoSlOB t it is iapo»»iblo at t.his tijae to •tate hoif 
PAay pianos or how maxTy attrriera a«r» anployed, but it la jrtill 
bolievad that »t l«Mt throa o*rrlor8 •w»r« Involr^d. I,Uc0«fi«o, 
it is iapoeslblo t^ dofiait«ly <s«tabliBh wh«th«r or not «jiy plausM 
returned to a carrior, re-ioaUed and participated ia s'j'?3««ijuent 
attaolcB. It is the opinion of this oifio« that no plartea did »o. 
It is nore probable that pl«ii«e ■w»v» Xaunohad from diffarant oarrlsra 
at different tia^o or that diffaraat groupe of planes were launohed 
at eta^gerod intfl-aa'a. It Kaa r.cfc he.m; eatablished from what dirootloa 
or dist(uio«s th« Tfsre nj lanfte wars laanohed, although 

the Ka-vj' believe. ,_ -i.. least w. . .-. .X»r operated fraa 150 ailes 

north of Oehu. It is astabliohsd that no land basad' planes wora 
«aploysd ir. the atte-'''. '-■^-' "*^'i9 waay reportjs coswa ii; relatlTe 
to onecty platuM «it;- .e bo tor no positive idwitification 

of such plfjioB has b&«^^ 3t.v»^iiohed, It is halJ--- -' •■■ -■ 3ti- 
Eotor planes reported were our own B-17'«, a fli arrlTOd 

frow the Kainlec ' " ^r '^ - ^'-".aotan 

^-*- ^. « ^ jC^' 

£»y\ — 




A. C. ot'^., G-2. 



;CRET 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3625 



HK/»DauAFSTRir«» HAWAIIAN DSPAHTMSEW 

errm. •»' tm oMOSwit ttsw w »?i« ran miirtitt tvmjjsmtK 

t^«T 8HArrt£R, r. h. 

■^ '41 At 0766, 7 S»«««b©r 1941, th» J«.piui«s« X)^arisa itiHTy «oat. it* alJiJl isa*« 

OTor P^arl Harbor, Hlakfta Fl»ld, Keasoh* Hav«a Air Station, &9II0W Fiwld, 
«v««l«r PteXd, 3ohofl3l<i Bftrmoka, Forfc Sssaishewshft, »th«r AraQr Mid l}«T»y 
Inatfcllatioas and th-s City ot Konsoluiu m wall, ia the opaniag blow ia tis,# 
pri»8«at >■«• batwsea the l^aitaii States •ud tho J&^Kxoafi SSpira. 

Lt, Col. K«i«!rU J. Fi«14«r» Asatetwit Chief af Staff, G-Z, an-iT«d 
in the 0-2 0.^i&» ia tte» headqvMurtiar* buiXdlag tit Pert Shafter at ©SOS 
and v(aa followed at short intsrvale by oth«r Kowber* of fch« ««ati«a td» 
osae froB all p&rta of the city. Tha 8<»<3tioa was in oparatioa by OSSO 
although it httjsdlad a voIuie* of a9ssag9« prior to that tl«», 

By08S0 zh« followlag subaeotieaa of th« d«j>ari»«tit 02 wars in fall 
op«ratioa» Combat latftlllgaaoa, Publio R«latiaa«, Adainistratii^at Arsy 
Canta*3t Office {oownter-subvarsiTO asuJ coaa«or>aspiona^*) « 

Contaot with tha iat«lllgeno« sections of the various posts in th* 
Separt5B»nt -wrb ostablished by tslophoas beginalag at 0815» 

iBBadiato uaa of tho radio stati<m* in Hwiolula, KOC «a4 £:SiB, «&» 
aad« by tha section. 

The "first asseage put on the ».ir by the aestioa mui that *Oah« h<ur besa 
subjected to a sporadic air raid* 3o not driva oa the atraete or higSswaj-a, 
Keep off the streets." 

Xha radios then •warned people to gat vehiolee &£"f atrsets, -so r«a«ia 
oalSR, to keap off the telephones, t« keep their ra-Sios oa, -aad that ther« 
Twuld be aQRounceoeats ixi. Japeaese end Filipino axx-i that they should not 
be alarsAed if they heard a foreign language on the air. 

All .military and naval personnel iwere warned to retum to their jwsts 
imnediately. 

Clrilian and all other ssaergensy workers vfyo had been - organised for 
disaster relief vwre ordered to their prsdesignated pests. 

About 0330 it was lamounoed to the press that the planes had h»tsa 
definitely identified as Japanese. 

The Hi&r Dapartaeat was adrised by this eeetioa of prellainary details 
ot tho attack about 0850. 

The Contact Otfioo which had been operating ©a a 24 hour basis was 
instructed to tske particular preeautlons to watoh sabotage and iscCemal 
disorders. All agents of the Contact Offioe were functioning at this tSae. 

Liaison between the section and the offioe of the Director of Sivllisn 
Defense t»as established about this tlaie. 

Shortly thereafter joveraor Poindexter declared tha Territory in a 
state of eaorgency thereby placing the Territory's "jKDay" la* into effect 
at 1000. 

As various intelligence sections of the different posts On the depart- 
ment ware oontaoted, they wore instructed to report all enoiay plaaes doiei, 
all enemy prisoners captured, all en«^y aotivity ia their respective 
sectors although those orders already were included in the Standing 
Operating Procedure for the Departngat* 







79716 O— 46— l)t. 19 14 



3626 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



"#.« asessoi (HSKSwumciUt, ■smm - «<Jttt' 



ZtSovtK mte b«^. 



.iioa* Tf^'; 



j^ettuoa, )»o1f& Amy Md aoimnm 
of ^«> isaj. 

1680 «Sw& It vtts AimcHaice^ tisj:- « '^^.i.;.-, v.««w.v.i-r-: 

.•hip 06 th* looftl j?r*«» imd E«aio •i»o «(^ l»?^cva as^cwt 

a-ss^B «8£« t4ln^ 1*7 the 3«et'ic% to «];;r«^a«d hH •sengr *smeAa es-j 

The t»io HcBoimu ««Jlc «t»tioafl, SSJ mi 30X9, w«3f« c«* jrff 'WB* «4* 
aliertjt? ftftsr IIXO to prevent ^«^ plesaa I^km «oaii»g is «» ^» %iM«u 
St^tioa SX90 flat! SCSE la MIo, BoKedl mi tiim*, Hvaed, imv9 cmt etS «%« 
«lr shortly *««rwae4«. tli<w««ft»T «il rwiio »tat;l<!a« *«n1i <ks *J» «ir oaiy 
fsor short iat»ma» ^ l)T»»488*t 93m«*^s«»«at« &i»si«>y#« fcy this •♦fftlon 

Abottt 1400 th« ectdtat lBt«Uig»s«« aoitweeiioK ttafssi ao.visg ifito th« 
forward #ob8loa s<'"i't'l<^ ^b ^^ Allaaaa« {h<et«r. 9!ui reur i)^l<» )Nnull»A 
eoBbat l!it*lUg*ac3i fros th« Eead(juert«2-« Solldiae, ?ort Slusftvr, tb«a 
y«l«y<»ei iBformatloa to th« Joiwird I!kjii«l«B «» they cea^lsiod tlwilr aoT»< 
naat lal^ tlx« atatbtt i>oeitlos. 

Kartlftl 'l«ii «C4 «>mcua3«$ hy {l«ii»ral 31iort at ISMS *t^«T a aoitf«r«!UM 
iMtvMB, GoTiraor foia&»x%9r, QeaemOl Sbor^, and tlM flkS, Colonel 7t«ld«r. 

0»B«i»i Sli^rt aaisoimo«d tha blexilcoul; at t&ia tU^t, end bi^aakaat 
wttaiinsa w»r« bsoaaoaist froa radto »tatl»a« «t lat«issltt«at lBt*rv»Js i»" 
tw»«& this hoar aad ausAoom, 

A «t«t«a«it ««« l9»u«d at 1«00 <soae«salag aextial i«* aaS tfe<» blstdcont 
to «I1 prose aaA r«uf!ic &3«a«i«s «it tbis tiaa. 

0<3tt|>lete blackout of tb« aati;« Tarrltory vact Into effect at «mdo«a, 
1600 aftsr wamiasa bjr pivss sad 7«dio tbroaglsroat the IslaxMSte, 

Th3fo'aghout the night tb« eatly* »«8tlc>a fuaotion»a froia th« forward 
echelon, th« p»ar aohelon aad th« Heaolalu Ooatact Office. 

OurlBg tb« ••coa3 elr raid th« r«ar aohsloa was aubjeoted to falling 
shell fpegaseata and maohina gua ftra from Aisarloaa goaa shootio^ at th« 
JTapiMxtsa plaaaa 

Many aasaagaa war* haadlad durlEHg *ha nl«ht ralatlre to pareclmte 
troops, aaeny Itrndioga, ead aabota^w, all ware foaad to ba falsa. 

Throu^iout Saoeobar 7 eM 6, kaowa «Ba«7 areata asd aaapect Japaaaaa, 
Oamaa aad Italian aliaas war« appraheisdad and datatnad. The Tajpanasa 
Conaul was held IneooBunleado in his Coasolata. The 0«2 taatlcs ooordlaatad 
arrangaB«3t9 for iatazXDMat and azaaisatloa of those a^prehaaded. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3627 



>•* 



• 



.• 



0-3 SBCriOW OBROHCLOglCAL REPORT - Cont*d. 
r,€n«Tal Hemarka - Cont'd. 



Efforts w«r8 started shortly after the attaoJc on Decsrabor 7 to recoa- 
struct thrt enemy tactics ot t^-3 attack. This Involved Interrogeticg dosaaa 
of eye nltnossss, most of whom told widely dif faring stories, end the trans- 
lation and daoodlng of many maps and papara. These efforts ars at.lli in 
prOijrass and a full report will bs made es a separate oonaunloaticsa. 



Attached h'srato Is a HorJc Sheet of Journal in Combat Intalligeiiae 

Section. 



1 Tnel: (In dup) 

WorJr Shtset - Journal 
7 Deoeraber 1941 - 
{7 sheets) 




^S*Lt£j^ ^k..)^ 



Llautaaaat Ooli 
A. G. of S 




2 - 



SECRETi 




3628 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Sf>- 



'O VSBBtOlf 



: vac} ^>y 



:!iSL HlftSBOS }ajM«4. ClTlli&a paUa« eaiiaot basdlvjj 

T^efejjtft. tr-cop* Xeiadijsg n*ar S&aBEas KSZKS - ajti 

S6h9fia3il BBrr*«i:s» T-wscsta* as llaicas 



1032 5lpo«)Mi Tii5»r*iiisi5 ia filrMtloa 0t TStOfbaf firca 

. ;«d at iaSRSSS POUff. %ww«ifi««. 
* t&easifi»« R» i««HS"l3»g bits* fiotferalXe wltls re* 



J Ksr« orS«r»4 to get off tb« «ir, 
raft W9r« B»Jsg 4Is« bwuw t« «<3b>z 

""'■ sjytiroT«Ml til* «ct- .. 



3SSS9 f roa manage* of SW^SX ?5UK$a2;iCSi "Ho ?ay«ctot« 



(•.;■ ■ - ' ■ 



42/,'. 



OlTlilf-,'- 






1245 ProYoa* sfeuriwal a«a*j?a3 «» ficlOBal i^ioldsr. (S^SStkL 
orvT.'J; :: toM B( Oenaral to,«4ifl»« ~ the Jy**!***!* lai» 
I .>3}«)!»itioa fti>4 i3lx«ct«d thctt «e i»i%iftt« our 

z^^,.. ;.s5SB aiix4 Qtrt«ntioB PXea. 

' 4«sl re- 



Bo 4ih«.Q$» la ^ 

J*0*ti> ■'11 






for Zitb Siiflston. Piufiuebot« 

.vvx sjr© not «0ft£'inse3. 



- -- -'-^ *iot «oaJtrs!*4. 



7 SaCSfeitt A-^iX 







EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3629 



•,^<5 







i?ac;*;t 



KO, lOiiS 



"f 0T?«Ls3f« s*> 



BS 1320 Sfe»«ttoa r® e?<ife-rif 

»s>l^l9r to jwiBP bl»« At- 

;-iJ 1330 i<sadiB« party p«|aart«d b»t»st!-<?r^- SisSiwSc 
aABAXCU, beiog finsd ©« ^;- 

IH5 1235 ^0* SusBJsa «hxn% %o Itod ia fj-ojxfc st iStJVjrjAISl , 

Bgiaras utwa- 1KSK tosasft. 

Mt UiO iVwaclatt* tro©p» a»ar SASEKa ^XSBEa oa 3'J. £5'-^-- ■*«"'■ 
Sot •wsrlftsa. 

■VW 1510 r«l»t3r!» belEs ww«a frm W &aA3*1S8 *.2 to «B«t^B, 

W 1525 ^it« a s^&er ot j«r«t«3BaUa«« l«iaa«d la BSlfOA fm - 

So tiJBe OMPT. OfaUIOBaBASS:, 1«. ItMSB, Ka. KJSSI, 5TC. »0B 

it. mt, mmm> i^^n ?r smnsa «isoat ui5 for iiXioa^?? 

ajTitt** «t Forward S«h»l<at abotxt 1550. 
OT Ho Mas ???. OXKEJ, 6418 C, A. , a»fi»i**l7 idtatitlod plsus* as 

csBH&H BES^iox 113, tdtb Jiu>issss wasiRa. 

Zr 1532 cot. DIKv^aAH report* »U ll/^t» «t PRARL SAEBCSH Kdll Vrts 
■^l*ci:«« out, imless ae«»8««u«7 tor ar««at n»Tal wirSr. 



i535 nv» pajpaohut* troops IsMsdwd o 
l>lu« deslm with reA D&ritSc 

TT ,1631 aiastout toni«iit. BfflOia. 



15 BSXOHXS «9crtQS 



ISffi 1325 O^T. m»Ear» msi. IsmmaSSf bus nmAmi up n&setmv la 
XmaS} SiSm »a& was tai« to iwpon ta ?3?OT<M!t Sasafettll. 

SHE 1330 OOL. BOHE&M r«ll«v«>l du« ^o iK«atal eo2\dlti<3(i. 

COO Bo tlBw All Balooaa etosMsd, no li^wor to be sola. 

KEE 1845 Bleokout «»iM>aao«4 to HIBmiSf OmmOSSS, 

9A I84O BUa>c»i' light oa HED HIX. 

t 19IA laadlng of pBraohato troops provofi false, 

7 1917 Slinltlng ll^t. 



I. A H 1^ 



- 2 - 



O'ECrf^ "4 



? KK!aiiS:;';v 



3630 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



mmaam 




fort SjwrtKT, «. H, 

(those wcwk9&e«te iaoljais tb» pprioA *!*la<s «a4«& 
op«r«tloa» w»r» a»i«t«ln«4 <it 9iK% Ssitft*?,, •« twii 

<Mli»lcm after the tormfA •ebeO.oa SwS m% vq? *s 
«.4T«ao«4 0, P. J 

iffisaffg, BO, TOflt iBia 

9 1925 BliB]09r.H«fe« IS'Bss* SswSi. 



iJila^j Sii St HI"'" 

Will l>a acfej.fleft 2 iivtit* i.i'-»v'xv-'.*i 
R»0)i»4 eJatAIP iy»J3Si5S, 0-2, Kser ? 



JkAJ^. 



•^i;;^* 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3631 



mw 



3 Sarfs,«» ?e 



ss 



» 



2 3X Sffi U 5:^wu22. KSOiS. 

Jcjus- ^Rp&i3cs.« ir«ssj:c-rts off SSM^^ 

Ha3<*naf fttJCaas** of PesrX Harbor r^jxsrt t SS icaatioa 

^4i7y revoyfca i20i-4«Htifi«S afjip* flytcg off laaUsAlJKI •. 
apjjTOacihiag ^ore. S^o ccaflraatloa. 

• EftSSOHS y©p<a't« havlvsg «apV.flw-; !?i<x usesat , ass^-"'- •" ' 

JSaoay Burfeoe ex-sft xss>>ojrt«d 20 fisgrs'sa, ?X n'-r.-isst'- ~ 
a o«ii>t«i', Ssafiins torp«a.« olsiswift to att«8'<. t^t 



H A V A L 



SEO«ET 



7 DBCMSBE 1941 



3632 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 








■■mAs)^}iJSfEs:s^nKiuaus csFAPiMEtrr, 

Fort Stofter, T, H. 
A.C. of 8., 0-2 - FORJMRD BCHKUal 
7 OKSiCSS 1941 



:^y$4 X»>H? plMws dlT« bonMDg ftsd aiM^hliw gumJing HtOmi 
aa<! WJSn;KIi yjaXOB end H2&KI. HAilBOJa. WBEgata nSIfl la 
f leases. Tfo Mjtort or •sesy 9urf«ee tdiin* 

AH plattJB ocenli« in off ^0208. yijrlng low. Tlait is til. 

-■^ ?18W-: ooatag ia nort!i«»at of CBOBB, Vbst l« sU. 

t)8 Order B f cwnd on ?R-n 'Pilot irt» wftffhsd at 
slittd St Co 'ic« ead wnt 

t5.W.i?V SA-'TJ'^V. -j-^r^-.r-f.^rt ^-f- a'<'iy/_ 

tift*i «fc acaofinD aasRAiJKs. 

-;• att«i!5as4 Odin) 






>5» 'fter 






IlUfSI «tet(t 1200. 

f saSSJiSfr 'cy «t»ll «nMt fire. 

■' UBSmr Hf «mll uma 
Ubu :&<^> Si^nea VXNa, 



U30 «3»jrpi>4 t>oi) 



4«: cci.. »sas< 



'h 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3633 




SH 
SOT 



ss 

AM 

BBS 

1 

ceo 



LtX, 

n ■ 
35 

15 

16 

21 

19 
20 
26 fti 

A I 



-Vi^l'.-. :"^^. SWfAIiJiS- ESfoJSaK'. 



te»b»*, iBBdiftg o3ff B«B«as 2«ea?r. skwx •t*»9js» '?o S8ii»» 

off BASOOS FOBTT.* 

l>*fC OK KBOfS Tvports ©wr ta«k fwo« «&.!(<; cruiah«r«, a«-»ral 
de«tn»9«r* Smmi&b& we»fc off BAHESSe K*lSr) , flr«a oa ty 
eottsr aircraft. Sep«rt «iw»riae«. 

14},; PiEr«^iute fomvd OB ira£? S£bW a«ar ^spcMiw plajM «)sji«k 
8r*»h»<I «ad t>«sara«d, j>ild4 >cill«a. &»ylo«ai Sr»y piiat« 
araahsd is «&» «et»ity. Hlot «&& «nll»lj«a aam isotb killed. 

U£0 7«o fiMd Bvlsitors > «ie SM(reh«S • aiiafe dona la SSiffil. H£aSQS 

1^0 Airplane apprcudilng f r«a aorth toiwrda KiiBDro JOIBT, 
abottt 15 Mllas off. »ot idanfclfiafi. 

1515 liarss wMaw planes flying aoath froa SCaonUS Biaa2Cl®. 
Signed BIHB, Bo ooafiPKSttioa. 

1515 SbsII oarriar bRssd pljaae, 2 ^atsr {feoth »«b daad), <®6 
.^ Cal. M. 0,, earburetor atada la Japan, ie dowa a* 
»T XAli aisd under gi»r4. Owurd ralierad t>y GOIOflBa 
TZSUSR'S orderii. 

1640 Ho actmtlae off KAHDKU «p to 5 wllec ovt to »•«. Qae 

plsca over tSSUXOe TOSUi at 15^000 f«et. Xdantitr oskBenr. 

1649 A iarga cutter (proarj^bly J^P^SSSZ) ia raportad at 55 J® 23 
•fey BAiaaTt CSEOTJP. Sa&Xl boat so1b« baok aad ftwth fwai 
boat to shore. Xdaatit^ ttautaaoicEk. 

1735 BASaSBS lOIOT to KASOKU 5 adlaa owt, 500 feat, no aotirity, 
JJAHItro to 2AHUKW, 



1 






1745 One sttrfaea eraft {Carrlar?) reported at lat aoOegreea, 32 
ffllauteBf long. I58 dagraae, 16 ada«t«8. Bourse 271. 
Sending torpedo airemft to attaolc. 

18C0 S*rong radio interference reported tiy J«K£L HARBOB. 

1928 towsy dhip \jeiiJ« will OK^CB HIUI. 

210* HICIAM ?ISU» asd EBARL HAHBOB being boKbed. Six or Bewn 
plaaee wlthonit lights; on plane waa afaot deira. 

20A5 OnldeHtiflad plane flying toward HBASL HA8BC® (law). 

2059 Tfaldentiflad flight otndng in. 

2101 HICKAM being bojabed. 

2102 HICXAM & VtKSL SABBOB being bo«bed. 
2110 SICKAK attaeked. Sot oonfir»ed. 

2112 PEARL HARBOR attaokod. Hot eonfin»d. 



30 2U3 AboT] 
3 



'6"^p^'eit 



ng to land. 






3634 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




HEAKiDABISSSnKuaXAlI vKPAseoma 
Fort Shatter, *. H. 
A,C. of 8., 0-2 - fORMRD KHJLOS 
7 EBOXMEBR 194I 



43 



91 



Bri<Jga near gun position of 8^ FA mtJwa KLtb 
phoaphoroas Hriil«h ws ot>Xlt«rat»d irltb aud by gun ermr. 

643s Tk Sa reports BCABL HA3B0R r«eel-rln« naval boabardaast . 

Saran plaaas rapnrtad trying to laad at ALA UOASA and 
ar« balng flsad on. 

Ho attaek on Aastraliaa araa; one Battalion of Aastraliaa 
Xiq^erial 7ore«a earouta to Kalj^ag. 

cox£)HEi msmam (Uaison HA^ mKBtM . to vt. mm vss, . 

Uaieon FOKUBO ISSmom). - ICUHAr balag attacked by 
ships 12 aiiea aoatb and west of raaf at 09X0. 

At KtlX&T, vua actual btwMag, but gtms west into action •* 
lBdieatle« plaltae looloaa. Bela^ shelled. 24 direet Ut>. ^ 

t^dantltlsd ^blji in ar«i. 



jIS 



secre;t 



7 HdUBSS, X9^ 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3635 



I 



HKADQUARTCRS HAWAIIAN DEPARTMKNT 

OFFICt or THI ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, 04 

FORT SHAFTEB, T. M. 

FonHurd Boh«loai« 
20 D«e«Hb«r 1941 

tfi^Jvoti Op«rfttions Eamdian d^piurtaaat, 7 D4N»«ab9r 1941. 
Te t ConMndiac Qrmxvnl, Eamiiim S«p«rtauRit. 

1* larvwith nfort eorwriag eoaduot of oporatlons of troop« 
«r ^ia ooMHUHl dorlsc; th« &ttask oa PmutI Harbor on 7 DMsabor 1941* 

a« Treofs of tha'B«mil»& Dopartnost tad outlyiag isl«nds 
WHO^ oa ftlort rUtas usder Jlort So* 1 b«t«»«a ISOO aad 1615 on Horr«iib«r 
£7, ld4i« OD Boerot InfenMtioaa frcm tk« Hur DoparbMOt* Votlfioatioa 
of «n«Bjr air attaok <» Poarl Mrhor and Hielcui Flold ms roooivod at 
aW«rt (^lO. Ibiji^ lokolcat CoBBU^ors and Diatrlet C<«waad«r« ««r« 
fistifiod of tli« «sm9- air oporatiotu and erdorod to faootlan laMdiatoly 
m&w M«rt Io» S» S«P B9> 6 Iov«ab«r 1941* Bosixmine at abottt 0900, 
7 I>*s«Bb^ X941* iitit&al d«f o&so pealtimu «sro oooupiod* Iko oporaticoia 
8Mitie& ffiovod to tk» f^mwrd CoaMUBd Po«t at 1@00* 

b. tmnWi ilSL FCBggy Eiekm Fi«ld« l&oolor Piold sad 
BollOMS Fiold ww^ aWid:od bjr Japaaoso airoraffc about 07SS« 7 Deoasbor 
X941« Tfeo flrat «tNiok iiaa by diTO boKbern on th« baogarsi alroraft, 
barra«ks« SaMiiiazi lie S^^et and Saj;ia««rlBg Sbop «• 7b« sooond attaolc 
at about @SSO» prooodad bjr koavy gronad straffins a(aiast alroraft aad 
antiairoraft dofanaos. Tbo ond of attaek nas at about 0950. fbo 
nmaiiaa Mr Foreo fttrtoaiatieally turaod oror IStb BoaiNMrdaoat Wiag to 
iairal o<»)trol poi' i»ix^ iraisr - Savy ij^o«a«at« it 0800 all Air 
IWEtag Sorrloo forS'Cnmol woro ordorod to Jlr Waraiag Sarrieo laf oraa- 
tiott 6«Dt«r. Sarrieoablo parsuit alroraft waro ratriorod aad took 
off It about C^60« Fofir AfZQ*» aad two B«17*« «ar« inaediatoly aalTagod, 
assanad aad took off at aboat 1140 aadar Wnj ocmtrol* Qrdora voro 
lasQOd at 01^0 to pot all a^milablo alroraft in ooHBlssion. 

o. mmus oQAsr mmmi cmum t aii troop* nw 

ftt«rt«d at WM tmi'iiook vf poaitloeas aador Floy drdar lo* 1, Eaimii«ft 
Oocat Artillorjr CoMMOid* •xampt m followst Battory "A." 41st Coaot 
ArtlUory aad Battory *B,* 4lit Coaat ArtiUory in position at Port 
fffiMMuarita, Battory Bsi^daa, t«o S-iB<di soa ooast gu&8> Fert EaaM^taMdMi, 
MUmod by lNa^iiart«H'« Battary* l&tb Coast ArtiUory. Znt«reeptor 
Ci— and •»wvmiA <^p«rt,tioaal ocaaHuod of S8d Coast ArtiUory Brigado (AA). 
%«ratio&ii darinc tbo porlod of tho raid as follows t fiMsqr plaaos 
«tta«kiag ov<b> Fort KMsshsmtha at OS0O». 1000> a^ 1120 takoa laador 
f tro by autoaatio mi^oas of Jburbw 8«f oasos of Poarl Bkrbor aad 5Sd 
Coaat ArtiUory Bricado oalts at Fort KaaMkaaMA*. At loast ooe piano 
nas b«>o«4^t doaa* Caoaaltioot Eillod* tliroo) aeandod, flfto«x* lo 
iskt«risl dSEtacod* 

*» >4^^i:WA3l!HtY gITI8ia i« lasaiy air attaek oa»o at 
iavroadUMtoly TkXO, i ^oa^or ii41. lla^ilno gua squads, autoiatio 

" 1 «• 



i/mJ' 'T^ 




3636 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I 



tir* ef AttAoklDg ?!«&••• Initial 024D41 field poaltlon* oooupl*d 
nii— inlin. «t OeSO* 7 Deo«aber 1941. All units ww la position and 
rM^ to qpwat* tador Alort Ho. 8 vltb Initial lasuo of •aranltloa 
ftt 1700, asoopt 240nft Hoirlt««r battarlat. 24GaM battarlai raady to 
fir* at 128^ 8 Daosabar 1941. Othar aotlon duriiic the period oonelsted 
of tnoreaalns msaber and strength of ataadlng guards and patrols, already 
<^peratlBf en antl-eabotage ulssions at tke beginning of the period, and 
iBTestigatlng false reports of .ensngr landing aotlon In this Division* s 
8e«fecr« Jtll units ordered to lat«aslfy fortification projects. Rraot 
line unite were In position at 1100* 

•. 26th IHPAarRY gIVI8I«t It the tiae of the raid, thle 
IH.Tleloa ms f^metloning ooder Alert Xo« 1, in the petroling of the 
niMMiHl end Tire Control Cable »fstea and ^e guarding of rltal Instal- 
latlene in Its assigned sector. At 0850 the Dlrlsion CoBMLxtder dlreoted 
the dr«(«iag of all alert eMnmltlan« At 0900 Alert Vo. 8 vas plaoed la 
effeet* At 0960 the DlTlsion departed for defense positions. Troops 
already la the field tamediately laoreased the strength of anti-sabotage 
guards on. the ao«t vltaal installations and plaoed additional posts on 
seoendary Installationc* 2eth Infantry OlTlsion Journal records Iheeler 
?ield bcaibed at 0800j at 0825 troops with SBall arss and antlairoraft 
aee ^ lTt H ' guns f^ed ca enoy airoraft} at 0830 the 26^ Dlrlsion Artillery 
nae ordered to drair their intiial issue of Field Artillery aanmition} 
at 0845 a seotxoi air raid of about fmrty ennqr planes is reported} at 
0900 orders rooelTe* to ooatq»y nar positiene ■aintalxiing two hundred 
yards botween tr«M]ca« 

1015 - Zmn laf aatry io'oops clear Sohof leld Barracks for John 

Sodgers Air fort* 
1040 • Wfcter tank of 2Sth Medloal Battalion s<«t to Hiokan Field 

Hospital. Mo water aTailable at Hickaa Field. 
1108 - RsMaiader of 298th I^sifaBtry cleared Sohofield Barracks for 
Bellom Field area (one battalion on duty that area sinee 
27 VoTsatber 1941). 
1118 • t&kits of S&th Infantry in war positl(ms. Baa Sector. 
1180 •> 29th Infantry Bands take over guard duty at Bchofield Barracks. 
1810 - Firing Batterie* of 25ai DiTision Artillery earoute to war 

petitions with one-half unit of fire. 
1846 " ft^siaeer sv^lies, coasleting of 80,000 sand bags, barbed 
wire and plokets, etc., nade aTailable to eaoh Infantry 
Rd^iisent and Artillery Battalion by DiTision Cosmander. 
1800 - 2&th DiTision Artillery Cossuuid Post closed at Sohofield 

Barracks sad opened at Forward CcssMad Post. All troops 
la war positions with at least one uait of fire all types 
of aoKunltion, except Zi/Oim Howitiers. iaanmition supply 
built up during the night to two units of fire, the 25th 
DiTision cleared the Post of Sohofield Barrackj a half hour 
ahead of oaloulated schedule. 



WILLIAM 
Lieutenant Col 




2 Znolst Aast. Chief of Staff, G-3 f\ 

il - Heport Eawalian Interceptor Coanander ^S £■■ ^^ f% fsww^ 
2 - Report Base Operations, Hickaa Field, T. H. ^^^ t V/M t I 

. '-...v .r^ iv; ■§ ^ «• 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3637 



l«» 



HEADQUARTERS HAWAIIAN INTERCEPTCR CfflMAND 

18 Deeefflber 19/11. 
Subject: Report of Enemy Activity over Oahu, 7 December 1941, 
To : Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force. 



At approximately 0802, a large formation of enemy airplanea were 
heard approaching Wheeler Field from the Rorth at approxlraately 5000 feet. 
They pealed off and attacked the hangar line with Dive Bwabero, relWMing 
in all about thirty five bonbe - of tlMse, approxiaately four were 60Q:lNtf 
about three were 250 Iba; about eight were 100 Ibs} the reraainder were amalier 
and sone appeared to be oil or other type of incendiary bonbs. The airplanes 
appeared to release their bombs froK an altitude of fron 500 to 1000 feet. 
There were two types of bombers in the attack - one with non-retractable 
wheels appeared to bm of the A-17 type, and the othare were a little faster 
and had retractable*wheels, Sach type had a crew of two. 

Bombs struck and burned Hangar No. 1 whmra the Base Bngineerii^; was 
sittiated and Hangar No. 3. They also burned a building used -as a store house 
by the Post Exchange and a mobilization- type warehou»a filled with cement. 
One bomb struck the 6th Pursuit Squadron barracks on the Souttawast corner en- 
tering a window on the second floor where it eiqplodad causing considerable dam- 
age to pers«inel and rendering the building unserrioaable. One bcmb which 
landed in the open made a crater approximately 15 feet in diameter and six feet 
deep. 

After tfa* airplanes bad expanded their bomba, they came to a vary low 
altitude and machine-gunned the air^^uies parked in traat of the hangars. They 
also fired bullets throdgh the windows of buildings, attempting to set tbem a- 
fire with incendiary ammunition. From belts of amntmition in one of tbe cap- 
tured planes, it was noted that the aaroinition was loaded two AnBoc-plarcing, 
one tracer; two Armor-piercing, one tracer; two arsor-pierolng, one locendiary. 
The bullets punctured the gasoline tanks of the airplanes and aet th«t aflra 
with tracer oad inoeadlary amiaanitlon. This method ot attack «as very success- 
ful ttsd destroT** fifty four airplaiMs bgr fire and twenty nine airplanes by 
other means. After the first raid, tha persomwX (M^t^aa post fwre M^loyad la 
polling away unbomed airplanes from those that «er« burning and removing as 
many as possible tma the ixsraiag hssigara, fbrny were 'vXao MQtliisred in filing 
the nnmeroue fires caused by the raid and in rescuing the womdad. 

Before the r>J^, all aJjcpLanea were tied down oa the ramp la fr«st of 
the hangars or were i»41i« tb«> hangars. Sone of ibem were load«d «lt& (»amd« 
tioB. After they b»& bewi rescued flrom the ftre and r<^l«d amy ftc« t&« h£&« 
ger liae, the crevs began amdng them. 



3638 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



w 

AolPlty-0, 



'^i:rTi3tr'^!tmimmmmaKs^r^<rs>'»ietA:i^M 



P-2, Utr, Bneny AoWHty-Oafaa, 7 Dec U, fr CCTIC tJ^GHAF, 18 T)«e U 

At approxinataly 0910, a second attack vaa nede by aevsQ airplanes, 
but little daiaage was done. These airplanes appeared to be expending on 
Wheeler Field what ajnrounltlon was left after the raid on HiekaiB Field and 
Pearl Harbor. 

The following members of the i6th Pursuit Squadron took off from 
Wheeler Field about 0850 and were ordered by the Ck>ntroller at the lafonaation 
Center to i>roco6d to the vicinity of Diamond Head at 8000 feet: 

1st Lieut. L. U. SAUNiaStS 

2d Lieut. J. M. THAC KER 

2d Lieut. G. - STESflLING 

2d Lieut. P. - BASUUSSSR 
They proceeded to the vicinity of Bellows field and there attacked a formation 
of nine Japanese two-seater airplanes with retractable landing gears. Lieut. 
Saunders and Lieut. Raanussen each shot dorm a Japanese aii^lane and Lieut. 
Sterling was shot down by the eneeay. Lieut. Saunders reports that the Japanese 
two-seater airplanes could out-ollab the P-36 airplanes used by the il6th Pursuit 
Sguadron. By about 0920, 1st Lieut, K. A. Moore and 2d Lieut. 0. Norris of the 
i.bth Pursuit Squadron got into the air. Lt. Hoore fired at a Japanese airplane 
wlthoot result. 

The 47th P^irsuit Squadron was located at Haleiwa and, between 0815 
end 1000, made two flights. In the first flight were 2d Eleut. Kenneth Taylor, 
2d Lieut. George Welch, 1st Lieut. JOhn 'Webster, 2d Lieut. John Dainea, each 
flying P-40'8 and Ist Lieut. Robert Sogers in a P-36. In the second flight 
were let Lieut. Robert Rogers, 2d Lieut. George Welch, 2d Lieut. Kenneth Taylor 
and 2d Lieut, Harrj' Brown In T-AO'a and 2d Lieut. John Daines in a P-36. Lieut. 
7elch shot down two Japanese planes in the first flight and two during the sec- 
ond flight. Lieut. Taylor shot down two Japanese planes during the first flight, 
Lieut. Brown shot down one Japanese plane during +he second flight. Lieut Daines 
was shot down at approxlinately 0915 over Schofield Barracks, probably by our own 
anti-aircraft troops. 

The* 44th Pursuit Squadron was on Detached Service at Bellows Field 
for Gunnery Training. Dpon being notified of the attack at Wheeler Field, the 
crews began arming the airplanes. In- aa effdrt to take off imder heavy fire 
from the enemy, Lieut. Tniteman was shot down imffiediately after take-off, Lieut. 
Hans C. Christensen was killed while getting Ir.to a P-40 to teke-off. Lieut. 
Samuel T. Bishop took off end was whot down into the ocean. jU.though wounded in 
the leg, this pilot swan ashore. 

The follottlng casualties were incurred at Wheeler Field, excepting offi- 
cers who were killed in flight: 

38 Enlisted Men Killed, 

59 Btolisted Men TTounded . 
These casualties wei'e suffered mostly hy the men sleeping in the tents and those 
sleeping in the 6th Pursuit Squadron barracks that was hit by a boab. 

The Infonaation Center for the Interceptte Conanand which had been set 
up irt a temporary installation near Fort Shafter was operated «u) follows on 7 
December 1941$ 

(a) 0403 - 0700 

(1) All six detector stations operating per orders C/6, HBD. ^ \ 

(2) lot Lieut. KERMIT A. TBI&, AC, was la^jj^OgJifej^ ^^ ____ 

- 2 - 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3639 

P-3, Ltr, Enemy Acftvity-Oahu, 7 Dec 41, fr CG«IC tS CGH&F, 18 Dec iX - 

(3) A piot'tiEg detail consisting of cne KCO and 10 enlisted 

men was on duty. 

(4) The Control Center at Wheeler Field was manned by Sgt Starry, 

(b) 0700 

(1) All detector stations closer} down except ona, the Cpana Sta- 

tion at Kahuku Point, which reaained in operation in orde:* 
to continue training a new man opersting the oscilll scope. 
This Station picked up plot at 0702 indicating airplanes 
■ at 136 miles bearing 0" to 3° and kept ti-ackirg the target. 

(2) Lieut. Tyler continued as Watch Officer as his schedule sti- 

pulated that he remain en duty imtil 0800. 

(c) 0720 

(1) The Opana Station called to infom the Information Center 

switchboard operator that they were plotting a large group . 
of airplanes. In vier: of contempiatf^d arrival of B-17'8 
from the mainland and probability of Naval aircrnft opera- 
ting, the Watch Officer did not consider it neceBsarj-- to 
talte any action. 

id) 0800 

(1) Attack underway and all AlfS personnel were called to duty. 

(e) 



il) Lieut. Grover C. White, Signal Corps, Conaminications Officer, 
and Master Sergeant Harold Taylor, Infonwtion Center Chief, 
arrived. 



(f) 2S22- 



(1) Major Lorry ». TiMal, Mr CJorps, arrived and took avfer the i 

duties of Controller. 

(«) 2SS2- 

(1) lot Lieut.. Bdwin K, Granberry, CAC, arrived and manned AA 
position. 

(1) let Lieut. A. A. X<»ikel, SC & Captain N. L. Tittle, SC, arriT«d« 

(i) m^ 1 

(1) 2d Lieut. Y. A. Herrii, CAC, arrived at AA position. 

(J) amL. 

(1) Major E. P. BeriKl'iiet, Air CSaypa, arrived, ^v*' 

SECRET \_^ 



3640 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



P-i, Ltr, BiiMijr Actimy - Oahu, 7 D«C U, tr CGHIC fl^GHiF, 18 Dec 41 - 



^%C 



IXSSL 



(k) 1030 

(1) Lt Coodr r.E.G. Taylor, arrived, 

(1) J^n PW.. 

Since 0800 the Station lx.a renained in continuous operation. 

The following is a recapitulation of the airplarwB at Wieeler Field as of 
9 December 19A1: 

Stock In Repairable Repair Upon Receipt Destroyed 
Record Coacission Locally of Llgjor A^aembl? Firt- O^her Ceugeg 



P-40B 


88 


P-40C 


13 


P-36A 


39 


P-26A 


3 


P-26B 


6 


b-47B 


1 


A-12& 


A 


B-12A 


3 


B-IS 


1 


Qk-B 


1 


QA-9 


3 


A7-6 


4 



25 
2 

24 
2 
3 

1 
1 
2 

1 


• 

1 




9 
4 
2 


1 




1 



1 



1 



5 


36 


13 





4 


3 


2 


5 


6 


P 


4 


2 





2 




















3 


c 


r, 























n 


2 








1 


2 



O ■ r 

H. C. EAVIDSCN, 

Brigadier General, Air Corps, 

CoDjnandlng. 



- 4 - 



SEcinFT 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3641 



^■^' 






I 



13 IJnae* 



10 t OowMuadittC ®»3M«P*3l, BapMKLUa Air IW»#, ^wrssr^ s«3s.4.s?ii, i« 




X Mtl**! tlw tlM te b* 074&. Z «»«1« ««1slakt« itm tMmek 9m<wrr«& 
vitkU Urn. (10) alMt^at. 

*. th« Ivmaiu Air l)»p«t r^s***" hwie"* **» *i'»» !*«*•« arrt» 

pr*s««4 )Ma» %• • Tvry lav «ltlt«i9. 



«. The «irpl*a*i p»rtMNl «a tha tMcti ««•» strsufAd aft«ir tli» (tt«» 
boBcbias eT th* kaaeers. tMNnr*! pUsM ««7» f«t ft£lir«« X BC*«d • bri|^ 
red fltoM on the gr*«»4 tader aa airplaoM pu1t»A tt«xt to Bu^pur 6« Z an 
«Mbl» tD vtat* ii)M»th»r tklo Yas «a iBMMttSlarjr beitb »ir aa airplsae S^tiw* 
The plame vera the >ea« tjrpe ia eea* oasas* X awald sajr tinat tin dlYa 
boiftwr* ««re«l«e aaai for atraflas* 

d. The haagare ead pXaaea wtf alee ttrafad bjr plaaa* fljlac 
parpandioular to ii» hangar liaa. TM« aetioB faXlaaad Uka vkratUic 
attaek in o^, ahiah aaa parallel te Hf Una* 

a. All atrafing attaoka eaiw rery eloaa to «ia ff^mA Mid eaaacd 
only idvMi alapBt on t<9 of the obJeetlTea. 

P: f . Thare aaa a ahort lall (aboat tMrty (80) siaittaa} WtVMR 

tha flrat and aoooad atta<dca. Daring i^M aaeoM attack, 19^ attwtian waa 
oette«at««tad on a hi^ altltuda attack hy a foraiftien of abavt taalta <12) 
plaaaa ahioh flaw ia froa the aoul* la a Ta»y ti|^ fenwtiaak. n>aai ^M 
approach, i^cli wu directly al<M% l*e haasara oa the aait A4m, I aaiild aay 
that thia attaok aaa iateaded for the haagar lia^. al^ough it hit lOia area 
Jttat weat of ^a haagar liao (barraoka, parado groaad, ata.,). I baU««« 
thia srovf of beaSba aaa over aad te the left of tJM iafceadad tatrgata. 



g. The aeaoQd attaok aaa aeoe^^aaled by atrafing. althoa^ It 
aaaaed leaa aoTore than dnrisg the flLrat attaok. 




V 



-1- /y 



7971« O — 46 — ^pt. 19 15 



3642 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



POO t* 00, BUT. 12^-41. 
K»pert on Botfelag Atf ak. OinrtiU 



h. IWM<i>t»ly after thm kl^ alUtad* attMk, I •bsarrwl a 
hmtLTj dlV* bartdng attaak on Ik* Paarl Harbor aroa. Ihla aaa praaaad 
boa* againat am lofcaaaa amtl-airoraft fir*, altbovgh I taw urn plaaaa 
•hot doan* The howt^r* ia tbia afctaok did aot ooa» a« law aa tboae 
'■hioh oesdootod tba attaak ia b abara. 

^. I oba anrad only aiagla aagiaa planoa* 



J[. I aav no aaaay pliOMa aotually fkll, althoagh I obtarrad taa 
(2) ahieh vara aai^kiiig and appaarod to ba la troabla. 

k* Tha attaoka war a flnlahad about 091S • 0990* 



. QCRTXm A. BL1K8, 
Major, Air Cerpa, 
Poat Oparatlans Offlaar* 



-2- __ -^.^i *y 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3643 

EXHIBIT NO. 165 
WAR DEPARTMENT 



WASHINGTON 

UD757 
The Pentagon 



10 April I9I16 



MEMORAIIDUM FOR MR. RICHARDSON: 



In response to Con^-essman liurnhy's inquiry at page U532 of the 
Committee transcript, there Is enclosed a copy of a partial translation 
of a document rel.-^ting to a ?/} February IQUl conference between Germsn 
Foreign Minister Ribbentrop and JpTj^nese Anba,esador Oshima. The rj.'^r-tial 
translation was obtained from the Office of the United States Chief of 
Counsel for the Prosecution of Axis Criminality. 



CARL H, ifflLSON 
Cent., AUS 



Incl 



CTORY 
BUY 

VNITSD 
•TATSa 

.WAR 

iNDS 




3644 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Partial Translation of Document 1834-PS 
Foreign Office 
Ram No. 56/R 

Berlin, 2 March 191)1. 
Strictly Secret 

Personal 

In the inclosure is forwarded, for strictly confidential and purely personal 
information, an extract of a report on my confyence witli the new Japanese 
Ambassador Oshima In Fiischl on 23 February 1941. These statements are of 
fundamental significance for orientation on the general political situation facing 
Germany in early Spring 1941. 

Signed : Ribbentkop. 
To: The German Embassy in 

Ankara 

Madrid 

Moscow 

Rome (Qtiir.) 

Rome (Vat;) 
The German Legation in 

Athens 

Belgrade 

Bern 

Budapest 

Bukarest 

Helsinki 

Lisbon 

Pressburg (Bratislava) 

Sofia 

Stockholm 
one each 

65215 

EJnclosure 

To RAM No. 56/R 

Strictly Secret 

Extract from the report of the conference of the Reich Foreign Minister 
WITH Ambassador Oshima in Fuschl on 13 Fhbruary 1941 

After particularly cordial mutual greetings, the RAM (Reich Foreign Minister) 
declared that Ambassador Oshima had been proved right in the policy ■2 had 
pursued regarding Germany in the face of the many doubters in Japan. By 
Germany's victory in the west these policies had been [2] fully vindicated. 
He (the RAM,) regretted that the alliance between Germany and Japan, for 
which he had been working with the Ambassador for many years already, had 
come int(» being only after various detours, but public opinion in Japan had not 
been ripe for it earlier. The main thing was, however, that they are together 
now. 

Expanding upon the general political situation the Reich Foreign Minister 
declared: The Fuehrer had always looked for an understanding with England 
and he (RAM) had himself been sent to England as an ambassador in his time 
to undertake a last attempt in this direction. A certain possibility had existed 
In the person of King Edward, even though it had been doubtful from the beginning 
whether the king would prevail. He (the RAM) had been more than skeptical 
already at his arrival in London, and had considered the chances for an under- 
standing as 100 to 1. Thus the war-inciter clique in England had then won the 
upper hand. When he (the RAM) left England, war was ntiaroidable. Then 
when it came to war the Fuehrer decided on a treaty ivith Russia — a necessity 
for avoiding a two-front war. Perhaps this moment was difficult for Japan. The 
treaty was, however, in the interest of Japan, for the Japanese empire was 
interested in as rapid a German victory as possible, which was assured by. the 
treaty with Russia. Furthermore he (the RAM) had made it clear to Stalin 
as well as to the public that the treaty between the Reich and Russia in no way 
affected the German-Japanese relationship. Now the German-Japanese alliance 
has been concluded. Ambassador Oshima is the man who gets credit for it from 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3645 

the Japanese side. After conclusion of tlie alliance the question of its further 

development now stands in the foreground. How is the situation in this respect? 

* * ■If ■*■ * * m 

As for the war against England, we had poor weather for our bombers during 
the Fall and Winter to be sure, but in spite of this, heavy damage has been done 
which has had a strongly retarding effect on English war production, etc. The 
bombings would continue in increasing measure so that we hope to destroy very 
much more than America was able to replace. We now had air supremacy over 
the whole continent. The time when we should win air supremacy over England 
would depend on further developments. 

At sea the commitment of U-boat weapon had thus far been comparativefly 
slight ; after the end of March the commitment of the U-boat weapon would mul- 
tiply in a short time. Then with the combination Air Force-U-Boat weapon we 
would deal terrible blows to England. The loss of tonnage already was making 
considerable ditficulties for the English food supply. Meat and fats were already 
scarce. It was now a matter of reducing imports by sinkings to a definite level 
below the absolute minimum for English existence. Thereby England's situation 
would take catastrophic shape overnight. The landing in England is prepared; 
its execution, however, depends on various factors, above all on weather 
conditions. 

[3] Concerning America, the Reich Foreign Minister went on, it must be 
noted that Roosevelt is the most bitter enemy of Germany and Japan. As far 
as he was concerned he would like to enter the war. However we have an 
interest in keeping America out of the war. Should America enter the war in 
spite of this it could not wage the war militarily lat all. The vast spaces of the 
oceans lying between us and America made this impossible. In East Asia, 
America would hardly dare to send its fleet beyond Hawaii, as it would then 
be threatened with destruction by the Japanese fleet. In the Atlantic Oce^n 
there is a lack of commitment possibilities with the exception of England. 
Landing in Europe is impossible, and Africa also is too far removed. Supply 
points for the fleet and land troops are lacking. This points to the creation of 
American air b'ases in England for practical purposes. But in an air war we 
are located in a strategically advantageous position with respect to England. 
We could bomb England concentrically from the broad basis of the European 
coast while England had to spread out in fanlike fashion in its attacks on 
Euroi)e and must thereby split up its forces. In an air duel — ^Europe vs. 
England — Germany would always be superior. We believed, however, that it 
should be possible to keep America out of the war by skillfully coordinated 
politics of the allied powers. 

The Fuehrer would beat Engl'and wherever he would encounter her. Besides 
our strength is not only equal, but superior to a combined English-American air 
force at any time. The number of pilots at our disposal was unlimited. The 
same was true for our airplane production capacity. As far as quality is 
concerned ours w^s always superior to the English (to say nothing about the 
American) and we were on the way even to enlarge this lead. By order of the 
Fuehrer the antiaircraft defense too would be greatly reinforced. Since the 
army had been supplied far beyond its requirements, and enormous reserves had 
been piled up (the ammunitions plants have been slowed down because of the 
immense stock of material), production would now be concentrated on submarines, 
airplanes and antiaircraft guns. 

Every eventuality had been provided for; the war has been won today mili- 
tarily, economically and politically. We had the desire to end the war quickly 
and to force Engl'and to sue for peace soon. The Fuehrer was vigorous and 
healthy, fully convinced of victory and determined to bring the war to a quick 
and victorious end. To this end the co-operation with Japan was of importance. 
However, Japan, in its own interest, should come in as soon as iwssible. This 
would destroy England's key position in the Far East. Japan, on the other hand, 
would thus secure its position in the Far East, a position which it could acquire 
only tl^rough war. There were three reasons for quick action : 

1. Intervention by Japan would mean a decisive blow against the center of 
the British Empire (threat to India, cruiser-w!arfare, etc.) The effect upon 
the morale of the British people would be very serious and this would contribute 
toward a quick ending of the war. 

[jj] 2. A surprising intervention by Japan was bound to keep America out 
of the war. America, which at pi-esent is not armed as yet and would hesitate 
greatly to expose her Navy to any risks West of Hawaii, could do this even less 



3646 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

so in such a casf. If Japan wtmld otherwise respet-t the American interests, 
there would not even he the possihility for Roosevelt to use the argument of 
lost prestitre to make war plausible to the Americans. It was very iinlikely that 
America would declaiv war if it then would have to stand by helplessly while 
Japan rakes the i'hilippines without America being able to do anything about it. 

.S. In view (»f the coming new world order it seems to be in the interest of 
Japan also, to secure for herself already during the war the position she wants 
to hold in the Far East at the time of a peace treaty. Ambassador Oshima 
agreed with me entirely and said that he would do everything to carry through 
this policy. 

The Keich Foreign Minister mentioned further that, if America should declare 
war because of Japan's entry into the war, this would mean that America had 
had the intention to enter the war sooner or later anyway. Even though it would 
be preferable to avoid this, the entry into the war would, as explained above, be 
by IK) means decisive and would not endanger the final victory of the countries 
of the Three-I'ower Pact. The Foreign Ministei- further expressed his belief 
that a temporary lift of the British morale caused by America's entry into the 
war would be cancelled by Japan's entry into the war. If, however, contrary to 
all e;:pectations. the Aniericans should be careless enough to send their Navy in 
spite of all. beyond Hawaii and to the Far East, this would represent the biggest 
chance for th«> countries of the Thiee-Power Pact to bring the war rapidly to an 
end. He, the Foreign Minister, is convinced that the Japan'^se fleet would then do 
a complete .lob. Ambassador Oshima replied to this. that, unfortunately he does 
not think the Americans w(mld do it, but he is convinced of a victory of his fleet 
in Japanese waters. 

The Minister for Foreign Affairs further explained that closest cooperation was 
required for the common waging of the war, particularly as far as intelligence 
service and press were concerned. The cooperation with the Italians is already 
exemplary; the same is true for the cooperation with Ru.mania, Hungary and 
Slovakia. The press, radio, etc. of the.se countries were already so .synchronized 
with each other that they form one single weapon. The same kind of doSe 
contact must be established with Japan. The Ambassador welcomed this and 
intends to set up a program with our men determining how our Japanese propa- 
ganda can be most effectively intensified in all fields. 

Ambassador Oshima explained that when the Three-Power Pact was concluded, 
vai'ious opinions were still present in Japan. It was then that the Emperor 
intervened with an edict. It must be stated, however, that, impressed by the 
German victory in the West, the Japanese people are now entirely for the Three- 
Power Pact. 

[.5] Ambassador Oshima remarked further that in Japan, under the influence 
of the events, the hard feelings against America had risen considerably. The 
Rei'h Foreign Minister referred to the recent statement of Nomura, the Japanese 
Ambassador in the U. S. A., concerning Japan's attitude in case of America's 
entry into the war, and mentioned that he considered it appropriate to talk plain 
lane-uage with the U. S A. Ambassador Oshima remarked hereto that the Japanese 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs had given instructions to that effect. The Minister 
for Foreign Affairs pointed out that particularly in view of the desire to keep 
America out of the war, plain language must be used. Only if the U. S. realized 
that the.v were confronting firm determination, would they hold back. The people 
in the U. S. did not like National Socialism. However, they were not willing to 
eacri''ce their sons and therefore were against an entry into the war. The 
American peoi)le felt instinctively that they were drawn into the war for no 
reason, by Roosevelt and the Jewish wire-pullers. Therefore, our politics with 
the U. S. should be plain and firm, but, of ccmrse, not aggressive. In the U. S. 
they must realize that Germany, Italy and Japan had no hard feelings for the 
Am'^rican i)eoj)le. but that .should the U. S. A. have any aggre.ssive desires, they 
would confront an iron fi-ont of determined people, a front, at that, which includes 
practic-'dly the whole world. One would therefore have to work in close coopera- 
tion against the attempts of misrepresentation by the British propaganda. As far 
as speeches and addresses of a principal nature are concerned it would be neces- 
sary to keep up a continuous exchange of ideas. In this connection the Minister 
for Foreign Affairs i-eferred to a recent remark by Matsuoka concerning Japanese 
willingness to act as mediator for peace negotiations. This remark had been 
extensively exploited b.v the enemy propaganda. 

The Reich Foreign Minister continued by saying that it was Japan's friendship 
which Jiad enabled Germany to arm after the Anti-Comintern Pact was concluded. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3647 

On the other hand, Japan had beoii able to penetrate deeply into the English 
sphere of Interest in China. Germany's victory on the continent has brought 
now, after the conclusion of the Three Power Pact, great advantages for Japan. 
France, as a power, was eliminated in the Far East (Indochina). England too 
was considerably weakened, Japan had been able to close in steadily on Singapore. 
Thus, Germany had already contributed enormously to the shaping of the future 
fate of the two nations. Due to our geographical situation we should have to 
carry the main burden of the tinal battle in the future, too. If an unwanted 
conflict with Russia should arise we should have to carry the main burden also 
in this case. If Gernlany should ever weaken, Japan would tind itself con- 
fronted by a world-coalition within a short time. We were all in the same boat. 
The fate of both nations was being determined now for centuries to come. The 
same was true for Italy. The interests of the three countries would never inter- 
sect. A defeat of Gerinany would also mean the end of the Japanese imperialistic 
idea. 

[G] Ambassador Oshima definitely agreed with these statements and em- 
phasized the fact that Japan was determined to keep its imperial position. The 
Reich Foreign Minister then discussed the great problems which would arise 
after the war for the parties of the Three Power Pact from the shaping of a new 
order in Europe and East Asia. The problems arising then would require a bold 
solution. Thereby no overcentralization should take place, but a solution should 
be formed on a basis of parity, particularly in the economic realm. In regard 
to this the Reich Foreign Minister advanced the principle that a free exchange 
of trade should take place between the two spheres of interest on a liberal 
basis. The European-African hemisphere under the leadership of Germany and 
Italy, and the East-Asia sphere of interest under the leadership of Japan. As he 
conceived it, for example, Japan would conduct trade and make trade agree- 
ments directly with the independent states in the European hemisphere, as here- 
tofore, while Germany and Italy would trade directly and make trade agree- 
ments witl) the independent countries within the Japanese orbit of power, such as 
China, Thailand, Indochina, etc. Furthermore, as between the two economic 
spheres, each should fundamentally grant the other preferences with regard to 
third parties. The Ambassador expressed agreement with this thought. 

The Reich Foreign Minister then touched uiwn the question, explicitly pointed 
out as theoretical, that the contracting powers might be required, on the basis 
of new affronts by the U. S. A,, to break off diplomatic relations. Germany and 
Italy wore fundamentally determined on this; after signing of the Three-Power 
Pact we should proceed if the occasion arises, but also jointly in this matter. 
Such a lesson should open the eyes of the people in the U. S. A. to the situation 
and under certain conditions bring about a swing toward isolation in public 
opinion. Naturally a situation had to be chosen in which America found herself 
entirely in the wrong. The common step of the signatory powers should be 
exploited correspondingly in propaganda. The question, however, was in no way 
acute at the time. 



3648 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBIT NO. 166 



wnx iNMOATC Wi nn— 



I 



rFiNrali 
Cai>«a{D*yMtar 

iNlgUMtar 

CMf(v iNiMnwwb 

FiRrali 
DqrMtw 

lll(W l«ner 

Clurg. 
S 



Telegram Sent 



I 








Deomber S, 1941. 



AMERICAN EMBASSY 
U»iDQN 

x' FOR THE AMBASSADOR 

With reference to your 






5876< p: 



pleaee read the folloiring 
J)* cable to Eden personally but leave no text of' the neeeage: 
v'WfUff,^ One. As proof of AaerloBn policy of aid to 
Russia, this OoTcmiBent recently sent representatbrea to th«. 
Soviet Onion In order to diecues the furnieblng of supplies 
to the Soviet Union to assist it in its struggle •gainst 
the Nazi invasion. These representatives eat'ei-ed Into an 
agreement with the Soviet Oovemaent as' to suppllesjan 
agreement which waa coordinated with a similar effort by 
the British Government. 

Two. It is our conviction that the test of our good 
faith with regard to the Soviet Union le the measure to 
which we fulfill the commitments our representatives made 



o 

8 



i 



4 



o 

03 



EnclpltenJ ty _. 
Str^ iy optralor 



A«, 



»_ 



0? 



1 — 14M 1. ». •evceaam miitim •rp^ac 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3649 



li^MMMMIitt^JMiMi^ 



TS lit tMMMMTRS 



I I 

ifMntt Telegram Sent NaNaaMnaamM.« 

btlMt DayMI* Mumtw 

f «8 Mto ' 

Ctwf*to 

t -8-- 

la Moeoov. Ve are exerting everr effort to oarrj cmt 
tbeee obllgattoas and vill oontlaue to do so antiX the 
final ▼! story. 

flaree. In so far aa our poet var pollelea are eoaoemed. 
It 18 oar belief that these bare beea delineated in the 
Atlantic Charter irtU.eh today repreeente the attltixde aet 
only of the United States but also of Oreat Brltala and of 
the Soviet Oaloa. 

Poor. In view of this faot la onr considered opinion 
It would be unfortunate were any of the three goTemiients, 
now on eommon ground In the Atlantic Charter to express any 
vllllngness to enter Into coBualtaents regarding speclfle 
teras of the post war settleaent. Sieousslons between the 
several govemaents looking toward fullest possible agreeaent 
on basic polleles and toward later asnrangeaent s at the 
proper t'lae and with full public knowledge will of course 
be expected to oontlnue. Upon the conclusion of hostilities 
those nations oontrlbutlng to the defeat of the Hitler 
forces will Join in an effort to restore peace and order. 



£nc^*trWiy „. 




a. I. •tmtm » m m r mamiim wnm 



3650 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR AITACK 



CellKt 



»€»*»! NO Omct ■ I TO M THAmWIT ll D 

WILL INDICATE WHCTHCR _ 

_ _ COWriDINTIAL OOOC 

f"""t« Telegram Sent 



Bppartm^ nt of 9fate 



NONCOMFiaCMTIAL OOOC 
PAICTAIII 



0«y letti^r 
Nl)|>it Utter 

diarge Oepartmwit: 

FutI nlF 
Day letttr 

Nlidit letter Waihlntton. 

Char|^ to 

$ -3- 



The partlclpctlon at that time of the Soviet Government 

will be no lees' than that of Great Britain and our oirn. 

In order not to Jeopardize the alnre we shall all share 

In common looking to an enduring peace It Is evident 

that no commitments as to Individual oountrles should be 

entered Into at this time. It would be unfortunate If we 

should approach the peace conference thue hampered. Above 

all there must be no secret accords. 

Five. Our basic policy of aid to England is no less 

strong thjin thst of aid to Rusala and we are confident that 

f I 

there le no doubt in the British mind as to our good faith 

In carrying out our policy. It was In this spirit the 

Atlpntlc Charter was conceived, to which the Soviet Qovena- 

aent has now given its adherence. Given the llmltatlone 

of this Government, It woiild be difficult if not lorooeelble 

for us to Implement this oosuaon understanding by agreements 

of n more detailed nature at this time, rurthermore, the 

consitutlonal llmltetlop to which this Government la bound 

must be keot in mind. 



Entipi-nHy ■ 



Sad hy ii^iiii^w J#, /f_ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3651 



racPAHiNa orricE 
wiu. mnCATC whcther 



(Fotl r>t« 
CellKt {Dty letter 
INIght l«tt«r 

Charge D«p«rtment: 

Full rate 
Dijr letter 
Nl^ letter 

Charge to 

% 



Telegram Sent 



TO •■ tXANWirmo 

COWIOCNTIAL OOOC 

HONOOMriDeMTiAL cooe 

MltTAHl 






-4- 



¥e have very frankly Indicated our position In order 
that in Tlev of the short tine before Mr. Eden's dep&rtare 
he may have no mlstinderetandlng as to the general lines of 
our position. 

As to numbered paragraph seven of your telegram ire 
abstain from comment because of uncertainty as to its • 
meaning. In the event that further dlsoueslons on this 
are contemplated we would like to have fuller infor)&atiaB» 






Ka:RA:RIC 



fm^Jmti l|) 




Stnl is tfitnim . 



.«,. 



.» .. 



•■•.•vnmmm* tmrnnm * 



3652 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION I'EAHL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBIT NO. 167 



, .IMIMI .11 >J|i il> !|ii IJIIIIIIi lil|l|llil.lllllll|lll.lip(|ipMIIIIII|lill 



»» 



OliiVL 



3racTi.Y -ouFiyznTiuL 



Hovember "6, 1941 



Tho roproentfltlVBS of tli« OoverriTient of th« United 
:tate« an; of the Sovarnment of Japan have been carrying 
on durln;' the pnet several monthe Infortnni n l exnlora- 
toiry oonveraatlona for the curoone of arrlv*. t 
settlement If poealble of r'uwBtlons rel tin- tc tr." 
entire Paolflo area biaed U'->on the nrlnclnlfs of oeaoe, 
law and or-Jar nnd fair aeallnr amonr nations. fheee 
prlnolplea include t'.e ^rlnclnle of inviolability of 
tarritorial integrity an.3 aoveroli'inty of eaoh and all 
nations; the principle of non-interfaranoe In V.f^ in- 
ternal affaire of other oountriee; the ^rlnolnlft of 
equality, Inoludinr' equality of oommerolal opioi-tutilty 
ana treatment; an l the rrlnoi.^lo of irelianoe u^'on in- 
ternational cooperation an; oonoillation for the nre- 
▼,«ntlon and paoifio settlement of oontrovereltH an 
for Imorovenjent of intarnatlonal oondltlon:i by peaceful 
methods and prooeaees. 

It is believed tnat in our lloouesionn ;io;:8 protrreas 
has been rnAds In referanoo to the K^n^ral principles 

whiUh 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3653 




-2- 

whloh conntltute the baeiia of a peaceful eettlenient cor- 
erlng the entllre Faolflo area. ecently the JapanPee 
Ambaeeador haa stated that the Jspanese UoTcrnment le 
deelroua of continuing the oonr«*rBatlone direct' d tow«>rd 
a oomprehenclYe and peaceful settlement In the Faoiflo 
area; that It would be helpful toward creating an ataoa- 
phere favorable to the aucoeaaful outooae of the conver- 
aatlone If a teaporary modui TlTendl could be agreed uoon 
to be m effect while the oonvereatlons looking to a 
peaceful aettlement In the Pacific were continuing. 
On November 20 the Japanese Aabaaaador oommimloated to 
the Secretary of State propoeale In regard to temporary 
meaeurea to be tnken reepeotlvely by the Government of 
Japan and by the Government of the United Statea, wt ioh 
meastirea are underatoed to have been daalgned t» aoooapliah 
the porpoaes above indicated. 

The Government f the United Statea moat earneatly 
dealrca to contribute to the promotion and maintenanoe 
of peace and atabllity in the Paoifio area, and t« afford 
every opportunity for the sontlnuanoe of dlaouaalons JhB 
with the Japaneee Oovernment directed toward working out a 
bro«d-*gav^e program of peaoe throughout the Paoifio are*. 
The propoaala whleh were preaented by the Japanea* 

Ambaaaado* 




3654 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3655 



aontrlns -iroYl«lonc ttonllnjr with th» pr««tl««l «o 11- 

i-.i our oonT«r»«tlon« orf?tlt.ut<» t'9 onlf toun'^^ bueli 
r->r vr»rthvr»-.vi» lnt<»rn»tl pnul relations. ** hoym that 

t<tT '."!-»-! ~ur txo nov«»rr:-'^--t« may b« «3r^«4it«''» 




3656 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



p raiqTLY coNrin^NTiAL . 



Cooy of document hended by the 
Secret iry of State to the 
JsDPneae /^irbpsspsir on 
November ?6. 1341. 



RoTMiber 86, 1941. 




Saotlon I 

Th« OoT«rTUB«nt of the Unitad Stataa and the (k>T«m> 
mcnt of Japan both bvlng solloitoua for Che psao* of tha 
Paolflo affira Chat thslr national polloi»a z^a air««t«d 
,vH towaru lasting and axtanalva psao* throughout tha Paolflo 
area, that thay hava no tarrltorlal daalpcna In that area, 
that thay have no Intention of thraatanln^ other ooun- 
trlea or of using ailltary foroa aggraaalvaly a^alnnt any 
" neighboring nation, and that, a«oordlnKly, In thalr na- 
tional pollolaa thay will aotlvely aupport and give 
praotloal apolloatlon to tha following fundamental 
prlnolplaa upon whloh their relatione with eaoh othar 
and with all other t/ovemmentB are baaad: 

(1) The principle of Inviolability of territorial 
Integrity and Boveralfi;nty of eaoh and all nations. 

(2) The prlnolnla of non-lnterferenoe In tha Internal 
affairs of other eountriee. 

(3) 







EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3657 



(3) Th« prlnolpl* of •quality, inoluAlng tquallty of 
ooaasroial oppertualtjr and traataant. 

(4) Tha prlnolpla ^f rallanoa upon Intamatlonal eo> 
oparatlon and oonolllatlon for tha prarentlon and 
paolflo aattlaaant of oontroTaralaa and for !»• 
proTaaant of Intamatlonal oonditiona hj paaeafal 
aathoda and p):^>aaaaaa. 

Tha Oovamaant of Japan and tha Oorarmiant ^t tha 

Unltad Stataa hara agZHtvd that toward allalnatlng ehronle 

pelltloAl inataMllty, pravantlng raourrant aoonoBle «olo 

lapaa. and orovidlng • baala for paaoa, thay will aotlraly 

aupport and praotleallj apply tha following prlnelplaa la 

thalr aooaoale ralatlona with aaoh othar and with othar 

natloaa and paopl«a: 

(I) The prlnelpla of aoB-dlafiorlalnatloa In Intama- 
tlonal oomarelal ralaitloaa. 

(e) Tha prlnolpla of Intamatlonal aeoaealo ooopcra- 
tloa and alwlltlon of axtraaa natlonallaa a« ax> 
praaaad la ax«aaalva trada raatrlotlona. 

(3) Tha prlnelpla of aon-dlaerlalnatory aeaaaa by 
all natlona to raw aatarlal aappllaa. 

(♦) Tha prlnelpla of full protaatlon of tha Intar- 
aata of eoaamlng eountrlaa and pepulatlona •• 
rafarda tha oparatlon of Intamatlonal eoaaodlty 
acraaaaata. 

(9) Tha prlaelpla of aatahllabaaat of aneh laatlta- 
tlena and arr«ac«aanta of Intaraatloaal fiaaaea 
•a aay lend aid to tha aaaantlal antarprlaaa 
ant tlM eeatlitnotta davalepatant of all oeitntrlaa 
ma& aay paralt payaaata throoi^ prooaaaaa of 
trada eenaonant with tha welfare of all.eevstrlee. 



, ■■::.«!«^i:;SJi;.}:?;*a5;i«ii-?* 



79716 O— 46 — pt. 19- 



-16 



3658 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




S*etioR IZ 




aitBi to \n Tuita bx thf ffaTtnuifttt of tbt ymna 

atatti and by th* OoT^rMtnt of Japan 



Th« doTaraaant of tha Dnltad Btataa and tha (>ot> 
araaant of Japan propoaa to taka atapa aa followa: 

1. Tka OoTarnnant of tha Unltad Stataa and tha Oot- 
amaant of Japan will andaaTor to ooneluda a aultllataral 
non->agfraaalon paot aaong tha Britlah Caplra, China, 
Japan, tha Natharlanda, tha Soviat Union, Thailand and 
tha Dnltad Stataa. 

Z. Both QbranuMRta will andaaror to oonoluda aaong 
tha Aaarloan, Britlah, Chlnaaa, Japanaaa, tha Natharland 
and Thai OovainiBanta an afraaaant wharaundar aaeh of tha 
OoTamaaata would pladga Itaalf to raapaet tha tarrltorlal 
Intagrlty of fraaeh Zndoehlna and. In tha arant that thara 
ahoald daralop a thraat to tha tarrltorlal Intagrlty of 
Indoohlna, to antar Into laaadlata oonaultatlon with m 
▼law to taklnc aaoh aaaauraa aa wmj ha daaaad naoaaaarj 
and adrlaabla to aaat tha thraat In qaaatloa. Sueh mgr*<h' 
aant would proTlda al ao that aaeh of tha OoTamaaata party 
to tha ayraaaant would not aaak or aaeapt prafarantlal 
traataaat In Ita trada or aeoaoala ralatlona with Indoohlaa 

and 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3659 



-4- 

snfi would u«« Itp innuene* to obtntn for titeh of th« 
algnptorlta equality of tr«>atment in trad* and eommero* 
with franoh Indochina. 

3. Tha TeiTiment of Jnnan will withdraw all mili- 
tary, nflval, air and polloa forcas fram China and froa 
Indochina. 

4. The OoTemiaeBt of tha United States and the Qor- 
ernment of Jpptn will not aupoort — ■llltarlly, politi- 
cally, eoonoBlcally — any go▼^^^^nm•nt or regiaa in China 
other than tha National OoT«rn»iant of tha Haoubllo of 
China with oaoltal tes'-orarlly *>t Chungking. 

ft. Both Ckfrernieenta will glra up all extraterrltorlul 
rigbta In China, Including rights and Interests In and 
with ragprd to Intt^rn^tional settlements and concessions, 
and rights under the Boxer Protocol of 1901. 

Both QoTsrnaents will eni^earor to obtain the agres- 
ment of the British pnd othur govemTentB to give up 
extraterritorial rights in Chins, including rights in 
International ssttlementq and la oonossslons and under 
the Boxer Protocol of 19nl. 

6. Tne OoTernmfnt of ths United 3t«tes and the 

OoTernmeat 





3660 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



0«Trrnffi«nt of •'»o«n will •nt«r late ni^KotlAtlon* for 
th« oonolualon betvoen tho tJnlC«d Statoa «i>(i 'i^pma of • 
trad* agrtsaMtt, bnc^d upon r«aiprctflal noot>f 4vor«»d- 
ntitlon trvetsont and reilnotlort of tr^de bp/riwm by 
both oountriaa, Including mn undortakin^^ by th« Unlt«d 
States to bind raw cllk on tha fr«« list. 

7. Tha Oovamnant of tHp n-it'n '• t ' " «• 
OoTemaont of Jap»n vlll, ra«paot!v«'7y, riis807» tha 
fraaelng reatrlotljnf on J!>i>«nei?e fan<^« In tba United 
Stt's nu or, Affiarloan funda In Jrp-'n. 

8. Both uoTarn<B*nta will spr*^ .. ^~- i-- f-j, t^j^ 
stabllliatlon of tha dollar-yan rata, lix- the -<llooa~ 
tlon ot fuQds 9d»quata for file c«rt>oae, half to ho 
auppllad by Jnpnn and h-ilf by tha United St^-ta*. 

9. ootb i>o»arnfflanta will sgree- thnt no .'ftraewant 

V Ich either hptt concluded irlth anj t*"lrd i>ot«»r or power* 

ahall Ve l't8T*^rat*d by It In auo' vqy na to eonfllot 

with V . '•' t' 1 = <?Kr9»»'»">-t, tha we- 

t '.bllshaent • .,„,,.... »;>^, ,, „. _.,,. -„ t r r the 

10. Both ^oTamaanta will us* thalr Influano* to 
oauaa othor gorarwaenta to adhere to and to give praotloal 
application to tha baaio polltloal and acoios-lo prlnwlplaa 
■•t forth In tMa agraasant. 



I 

'I 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3661 

OsAL Statement by State Depabtment Spokesman to the Pbbss, November 

26, 1941 

The Japanese representatives were handed for their consideration a document 
that is the culmination of conferences back and forth during recent weeks. It is 
unnecessary to repeat what has been said so often in the past that it rests on 
certain basic principles with which the correspondents should be entirely familiar 
in the light of many repetitions. 

Depabtment of State, 
For the Press. December 7, 1941. 

No. 585. 

The text of the document handed by the Secretary of State to the Japanese 
Ambassador on November 26, 1941, which consists of two parts, one an oral 
statement and one an outline of a proposed basis for agreement between the 
United States and Japan, reads as follows : 

"ORAL 

"Strictly confidential. 

"November 26, 1941. 

"The representatives of the Government of the United States and of the Gov- 
ernment of Japan have been carrying on during the past several months informal 
and exploratory conversations for the purpose of arriving at a settlement if pos- 
sible of questions relating to the entire Pacific area based upon the principles of 
peace, law and order and fair dealing among nations. These principles include 
the principle of inviolability of territorial integrity and soverignty of each and 
all nations ; the principle of noninterference in the internal affairs of other coun- 
tries ; the principle of equality, including equality of commercial opportunity and 
treatment ; and the principle of reliance upon international cooperation and con- 
ciliation for the prevention and pacific settlement of controversies and for 
improvement of international conditions by peaceful methods and processes. 

"It is believed that in our discussions some progress has been made in reference 
to the general principles which constitute the basis of a peaceful settlement 
covering the entire Pacific area. Recently the Japanese Ambassador has stated 
that the Japanese Government is desirous of continuing the conversations directed 
toward a comprehensive and peaceful settlement in the Pacific area ; that it would 
be helpful toward creating an atmosphere favorable to the successful outcome of 
the conversations if a temporary modus vivendi could be agreed upon to be in 
effect while the conversations looking to a peaceful settlement in the Pacific were 
continuing. On November 20 the Japanese Ambassador communicated to the 
Secretary of State proposals in regard to temporary measures to be taken respec- 
tively by the Government of Japan and by the Government of the United States, 
which measures are understood to have been designed to accomplish the purposes 
above indicated. 

"The Government of the United States most earnestly desires to contribute 
to the promotion and maintenance of peace and stability in the Pacific area, and 
to afford every opportunity for the continuance of discussions with the Japanese 
Government directed toward working out a broad-gauge program of peace 
throughout the Pacific area. The proposals which were presented by the Japanese 
Ambassador on November 20 contain some features which, in the opinion of this 
Government, conflict with the fundamental principles which form a part of the 
general settlement under consideration and to which each Government has 
declared that it is committed. The Government of the United States believes 
that the adoption of such proposals would not be likely to contribute to the ulti- 
mate objectives of ensuring peace under law, order and justice in the Pacific area, 
and it suggests that further effort be made to resolve our divergences of views 
in regard to the practical application of the fundamental principles already 
mentioned. 

With this object in view the Government of the United States offers for the 
consideration of the Japanese Government a plan of a broad but simple settlement 
covering the entire Pacific area as one practical exemplification of a program 
which this Government envisages as something to be worked out during our 
further conversations. 

The plan therein suggested represents an effort to bridge the gap between 
our draft of June 21, 1941 and the Japanese draft of September 25 by making a 
new approach to the essential problems underlying a comprehensive Pacific 
settlement. This plan contains provisions dealing with the practical application 



3662 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

of the fundamental principles which we have agreed in our ocnversations con- 
stitute the only sound basis for worthwhile international relations. We hope 
that in this way progress toward reaching a meeting of minds between our two 
Governments may be expedited." 



"Strictly confidential, 

tentative and without commitment. 

"November 26, 1941. 

"Outline of Proposed Basis foe Agreement Between 
THE Uniteid States and Japan 

"Section I. Draft mutual declarations of policy 

"The Government of the United States and the Government of Japan both being 
solicitious for the peace of the Pacific aflSrm that their national policies are 
diVected toward lasting and extensive peace throughout the Pacific area, that 
they have no territorial designs in that area, that they have no intention of 
threatening other countries or of using military force aggressively against any 
ne'ighboring nation, and that, accordingly, in their national policies they will 
actively support and give practical application to the following fundamental 
principles upon which their relations with each other and with all other govern- 
ments are based : 

"(1) The principle of inviolability of territorial integrity and sovereignty of 
each and all nations. 

"(2) The principle of non-interference in the internal affairs of other countries. 

"(3) The principle of equality, including equality of commercial opportunity 
and treatment. 

"(4) The principle of reliance upon international cooperation and concilia- 
tion for the prevention and pacific settlement of controversies and for inprove- 
ment of international conditions by peaceful methods and processes. 

"The Government of Japan and the Government of the United States have 
agreed that toward eliminating chronic political instability, preventing recur- 
rent economic collapse, and providing a basis for peace, they will actively 
support and practically apply the following principles in their economic relations 
with each other and with other nations and peoples : 

"(1) The principle of non-discrimination in international commercial rela- 
tions. 

"(2) The principle of international economic cooperation and abolition of 
extreme nationalism as expressed in excessive trade restrictions. 

"(3) The principle of non-discriminatory access by all nations to raw material 
supplies. 

"(4) The principle of full protection of the interests of consuming countries 
and populations as regards the operation of international commodity agreements. 

"(5) The principle of establishment of such institutions and arrangements of 
International finance as may lend aid to the essential enterprises and the con- 
tinuous development of all countries and may permit payments through processes 
of trade consonant with the welfare pf all countries. 

"section II. STEPS TO BE TAKEN BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES AND BT 

THE GOVERNMENT OF JAPAN 

"The Government of the United States and the Government of Japan propose 
to take steps as follows : 

"1. The Government of the United States and the Government of Japan will 
endeavor to conclude a multilateral non-aggression pact among the British 
Empire, China, Japan, the Netherlands, the Soviet Union, Thailand and the 
United States. 

"2. Roth Governments will endeavor to conclude among the American, British, 
Chinese, Japanese, the Netherland and Thai Governments an agreement where- 
under each of the Governments would pledge itself to respect the territorial integ- 
rity of French Indochina and, in the event that there should develop a threat to 
the territorial integrity of Indochina, toenter into immediate consultation with a 
view to taking such measures as may be deemed necessary and advisable to meet 
the threat in question. Such agreement would provide also that each of the 
Governments party to the agreement would not seek or accept preferential treat- 
ment in its trade or economic relations with Indochina and would use its influence 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3663 

to obtain for each of the signatories equality of treatment in trade and commerce 
with French Indochina. 

"3. The Government of Japan will withdraw all military, naval, air and police 
forces from China and from Indochina. 

"4. The government of the United States and the Government of Japan will not 
support — militarily, politically, economically — any government or regime in China 
other than the National Government of the Republic of China with capital tempo- 
rarily at Chungking. 

"5. Both Governments will give up all extraterritorial rights in China, includ- 
ing rights and interests in and with regard to international settlements and 
concessions, and rights under the Boxer Protocol of 1901. 

"Both Governments will endeavor to obtain the agreement of the British and 
other governments to give up extraterritorial rights in China, including rights in 
international settlements and in concessions and under the Boxer Protocol of 1901. 

"6. The Government of the United States and the Government of Japan will 
enter into negotiat' as for the conclusion between the United States and Japan of 
a trade agreement, based upon reciprocal most-favored-nation treatment and 
reduction of trade barriers by both countries, including an undertaking by the 
United States to bind raw silk on the free list. 

"7. The Government of the United States and the Government of Japan will, 
respectively, remove the freezing restrictions on Japanese funds in the United 
States and on American funds in Japan. 

"8. Both Governments will agree upon a plan for the stabilization of the dollar- 
yen rate, with the allocation of funds adequate for this purpose, half to be supplied 
by Japan and half by the United States. 

"9. Both Governments will agree that no agreement which either has concluded 
with any third power or jwwers shall be interpreted by it in such a way as to 
conflict with the fundamental purpose of this agreement, the establishment and 
preservation of peace throughout the Pacific area. 

"10. Both Governments will use their influence to cause other governments to 
adhere to and to give practical application to the basic political and economic 
principles set forth in this agreement. 



3664 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




"t* 



nP: 



V. 



\ 



'^3f?S£3H| 



D«o«m1>«r 2, 1941 1 
MB'.ORAia>OM 



Oirlalon of 




At thB Pr»»lden t'5 prass oonferenc a this aftamoon, 
the Fresldent aunoxuiced that ha had reoalved a lattar from 
tha Bfiierganey Railway Board concaitiing the settlement of 
the Hallway demands. He read a part of the lattar and 
said that tha rest of it wotild be given to correspondents ^ 

by Mr. Early. 7" 

!nia President coiasented that he trusted that that Is the ^ 



end of their trouble and that tomorrow he would be given 

the fonoal report and a transcript of the proceedings. 

Tb.9 President was asked if the Japanese marohed into 

Thailand what would the Dnitad States Government doT The 

President evaded tha question. Another correspondent asked 

if the President oould give any indication of the nature of 

tha information requested from the Japanese Representatives 

this morning. Xha President said let us put it this way, 

and this answers again many questions at the same time. 

Since last April we have bean disouasing with the Japanese 

some method to arrive at an objective that is pesvumeat peace 

in the whole area in the Pacific and at times It seemed that 

progress was being made. During tha whole period up to tha 

end of June we assuaed ttiat as both nations ware negotiating 

toward that objective - there would be no act contrary 

to the desired wid of paace. We ware therefore somewhat 

aurprlsed whan the Japanasa Govarranent sent troop* to 

a specific over-all total Into ZndOrChina after vary brief 

negotiations with tba Viohy Ckivammant at tha ooneluslon 
I. 

of #iloh tha Viehy Govenmaat let it be understood clearly 
titiat they had agreed to this msBd>ar of troops principally 

becavM* 



01 
I 

CD 



a 

at 



-xjMmmiacam 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3665 



p: 



-2- 



beoa»ise they were powarleao to do anything else. 

Sometlffl* later convoraations wars reaumed with th« 
United States and again we made it perfectly clear that 
the objective we were seeking meant the taking of no 
additional territory by anyone in the Pacific area. We 
received word the other day that there were large 
additional bodies of Jaoa.;ese forcaa of various kiixis, 
including troops, planes, war vessels, etc., in Indo-Chlna 
and that other forces were on the way. Before these forces 
had arrived the nxamber of forces already there had greatly 
exceeded the original amoxmt agi^ed to by the French and the 
number on the way were much greater, and the question asked 
this morning very politely, at my request, was as to what 
the purpose and intention of tha Japanese Government was as 
to the future, eliminating the necessity of policing 
Indo-caiina which is a very peaceful spot and we hope to 
receive a reply in the near future. 

In reply to a question as to whether any time for & 
i»eply liad been set, the President said that there had 
naturally been no time limit set. 




W^ffiW 



3666 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 168 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1. Letter dated November 18, l&il, from Secretary of the Treasury Henry 

Morgenthau to Secretary of State Cordell Hull, transmitting a memoran- 
dum dated November 17, 1941, which had also laeen sent to the President, 
entitled "An Approach to the Problem of Eliminating Tension with Japan 
and Insuring Defeat of Germany." 

2. Memorandum dated November 18, 1941, of conversation between Secretary 

of State Hull and the British Minister concerning "Conversations Between 
Secretary Hull and the Japanese Ambassadors." 

3. Memorandum dated November 19. 1941, of conversation between Secretary 

Hull and the Netherlands Minister. 

4. Memorandum dated November 19, 1941, of conversation between Secretary 

Hull and the Australian Minister. 

5. Memorandum dated November 26, 1941, of conversation between Stanley K. 

Hornbeck and the Canadian Minister Counselor. 

6. Memorandum dated November 29, 1941, of conversation between Secretary 

Hull and the Australian Minister. 

7. Memorandum dated November 30, 1941, of conversation between Secretary 

Hull and the Australian Minister concerning "Conversation Between 
Australian Minister and Ambassador Kurusu." 

8. Dispatch #280 dated December 1, 1941, from the State Department to the 

American Embassy, Chungking, concerning the Chinese opposition to the 
proposed modus vivendi and the U. S. negotiations with Japan. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3667 



^^ftJiSfe5">:|:i 




THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY 
WASMINOTON 

Kovenber 18, 19^1 



JlL. 

t)e(i«dm«frf »f St»t» 




Dear Ck>rdoll: 

I am enclosing copy of a 
letter and memoranduffl which I 
am sending to the President. 
Sincerely, 




/l 



The Honorahle, 

The Secretary of State. 



Enclosures 



4/^ 



A 




♦ 

!^ 

I 

4NM» 

c 




C 
o 

I 

>- 



3668 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

AH Afnokm TO tax nMHUoi or cuHXiufxae rtmum 

nta JATAII AM UHB1BUM StFBAT Of ttCMUlI 

X% U Smiling lMr«MiiiiX|p ■ntut ttet 'all Mit* 

<lpI«M%l« pyp<rt<wte it m iapwf t mi UuitrMMit •€ 

Mtivity Mf wl» b«%tl«ft« «iplMa«i« MUntf m* mIm «Im 
flgMiaf •# tiMiM iMttl** mmm—9mrfi mXllttiatf vl«t<viM 

•Ml gftlll MM mi%«M«l mUk MplfNMMlt Ml4 MA W«MU«I tiM 

•MMqr* AiplMMtiA «l«««rlM M» 4Mi}ii*ir» •lailor (pULiui* Vitlk* 
•«% MiiM* 4ii>lMNiti« TiAlwri** dtnuMjr ••itl« ntt bat* •%*• 
t«lfi*A ki«r *|>*«%«mi1m' mmmmhi** Had timj n«t •«ff*r«« Mi^tr 
dlplMMitio dmt^mf MKttt»»r >^1mi« nwr fraao* w«iiX4 bA la 
tiMijr r»rA««nti jMP«Aie«Mat«« 

An *all out* vrfMrt Invftlvva is diplMMttjr •• la «iU<- 
t*rjr atratagj th» r«ll««t «•• of atwrf ••ononULo bii<1 p«liti4Mrl 

Ml *all avt* tef9n09 or in aotwal varfar* MiMt aalic Intal* 
Xi««ftt »•« of our f«<Mn>af^aal !>9altlon, our rloh raaoiir««a, 
our Yaat labM* p9wr, taahnioal aouiirMwnt ana daaovratia 
traditiana, a« auat dlr>l«aaoy utXllta thoaa a'^Tantair»a to 
tha fall if It is to harm unj oh»n«« or •ueoata. 

'-• vf riab •• ira ahould ua« %or«> of our vaalth la 
tba intaramta of ocnea mn^ viator^* »« mr*f f^>warfttl •m va 
»iTioal<Jt ba wlXlln^ . an* our ?^o»r»»r baforot our baeka »t» t# 
tb* wall, '•a n««i<l no nation* • Xan4ii -~ w« aikOuliS aaka full 
uaa of th»t fiiot* ^* 1i#««t» out notional t>l«%«« -• now ia 
th,n til** that raoord of intaj^rity «houl<l »tand v in good 



SSHwiww- 







EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3669 

-a- 

rot«'ot#«l hy Iv - ■ .5»" »rplOit 

thdt rot'»ctl l\ 'l*l«no«» 1 t*nt l - . \ . 

■■• .'<:■ !^cj — i-t us 'f/,' •'.■ Y(.nt.*.. ■ ;'• '. ■• 

if otti ' ■ w.- • p tlflE»» wSv^n ill-'lo««ov ooul ^ ?'«'.5ur« 
itK "o *. t^llll«*nt victories far tn* Itpd 'tr:!^--?, .ow 
i- t.i"l ti»et th« longer vf» wait * «• ' --iPr>o# %l"-l •*« 

li«vi» to us* dl-lOBmof >r . : . .. •:' . . . ■' -^st- 

t«rn* of rslf tloribir J<»ll; '■ v...'F'if»; c h- 

portunltlt* lost ■ 'c: v«;'. ■ • ' -^vl 

ij-r«VOOiitlj to « C3urii'» of fctl-^- io •' tn«» -cv > ,- 

oi«« eiioia«, to »oeept x>tt9Tm »>ns^ (fc«K'» ;->' 'itl '•.!». 

*f tuft . r«rl -.lint .sir* t -rr>r^o»« iOTtthl:..-' Ilk' * •,«• 
s '»9n«l««! afTf'fnent -^a- tr.» • t, th<» whol world 

woul<l fc« •l«olrifl»d by th* auco9*<8ful tr^nsforairtlon of « 
liirvnivninK «r.J t*lll,-.-.; »nt --■yw^rful '»n«»?ay Into f. pesc-ifuX 
fcfiu ',>rosp«rou« nei/htor. "ft*^ -.-rwettj^ -n ' *': <» !««» '•ri-'ii'- 
^f tnm rr«sid«nt both «t ho»*» ;rocA»t 
tjr bo brilliant i»n*5 !»aat«ntou» 8 ■U^-lossptlc vlftory -.« ». 
victory th»t p»<>ulr»« no v«n<7ulch«i<S, « victory th t 
lawful-. t«ly voulrt Trln>'- p«»o«, n^ ^«ln*8« »n *> TotrTlty 
i-, hun»!r«»d* of million* of «tt»rn r«ir.-l^», pn*! «' ?>ur« th« 
8ttb«9cu«nt <1«f«flt nf -trftAnyl 

Th« prope*i»l I" workr-tl* rn^ o * •r<»ctRoul'>rly 

•iM««««riii, If J^-^sn ro'jl'^ fc* i- hj ■#d t.~ «eo#-t t!--' ■ -r-^nfr^- 
B«ntf and th» ^ef.t »n5v«at».-»» It t?ffi^r^ tn *)>,r»»n, s'tmi th9 
fiiot tr-.nt th« likely *ll«rn*tlT» Is wi-r "*i.«ht Inii^ue* ^»vitti 



3670 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Tho V'ro<,>oi>«l Is «;i^N»n t>*l««f only in bar* outXin* and 
In -nl; #nour:ft (l«t«ll t« lr««l"iit«» tn* •••imtL.Al r>olnt«. 
"txist \(s f»o»t n*«<1l«d At t'ds .^oatant Is not e oajr«fulVj 
worked v^ut '>rotnrw>, but rather -« Oaoicion tn •»T>l»y an 
Bll<»ottt llnlMiAtio «r-.>rea«h In tu« ourrant <il80utii«ia 
with the «;«,^i»n#«a. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3671 




■^S^^BT'"-' 




rtfjBjTlfftni frtrngflliifM CwMtriliff 

fliULUH01alil..Mij|lMi 

1, "ss b«tv«en t^«» i'nit»* ^tates «tn4 Jii|>fifi v««1d ©ett 
tl'>n>'an&9 of Uvea, billlMlt of aell»»r«} i#fmlii l«av« 

voald fo»t«>r iool.iX ^!l«ra?tl«a, «»d v<ml<! ii«tS lumow 

l>«ae« .-ftifln-;; war «hitir»n*f llv*»r, nor '^.■*rm?m«nt'lf 

t»(? eoantrl»«. 

?• Th« tfnit«kl ^t«t*« ^]*«f«rti a J««t and p««««fu^ ••%%!•» 
nt«ntit.o war as a ««Aiia ef MttXing iatarnatloMil 
aiffioultl«s, and it wilXlay^ t© r« wftra than half way 
t;o settla oeaeaably She Itaitas th^t ttand in »h« wajr 
of -ftoro friendly iataramtraa batvaaa %h« tva ©evMitrlaa. 

.?. ■-••- •r.t«-.» -r-.t--! ■r-"^'-"<f'»'s t!T*t Jp-^an, b»«a««a cf 

•1 ^ •■ ■ « ,. . 1 :^- ' .,, ,,v » ; « |» ti*'** TrV, ''••?? of fO*ir 



'if ni^ad >tat«« r««o^Tala«« thtt oar iaislgratlOB 
law» h$iV9 In fnot uajustly dlaorljslni; t«»ci a^ainAt tlM 

6, rh« ''nltad 't*t-'; h<»iiPTo» that In tr* loa rt»n tha 

lnZf>v9t« of botJ iR«fl«» r,#onlFi n ch« vm«rloaA 

•o "» e - ' '•■ rt h*) p«rT"f1 by •at'^bllrhln fulr and 
r ••• e^ful cori.:ltl"na uftviwr ^'hloh - 'lor nslo^hbor* 

C'-n TOfoer, 



3672 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



■onno«v 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3673 



■41.1* ay n 



%c 



■mv 



.79716 O— 46— pt. 19 17 



f,.- . -.^.n. ■". f ■ 



.„^M^..-%.r3i?'.A'.,:i~«iaamc 



3674 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



:«cmnB9 of th« ford<;oliVi f*cL«, U-« rnlted ^t&t«» 
^;-o>)0««i' to •nter Into ftn A^«*Mi«nt wltii Japar. • * "ic» 
imd«r whloh th« Utiit«d 0t«&«a and Japan will a«;r^ to do 
o«rtaln thins* » aa follovit 

On h«r port, tlx» Unit«d ::»t«t#8 ^ovenuaant propoaoa to 
dc th« f ollowlritj;! 

1, To withdraw tiiw bulk of titm Urnriom Mnval foro«« 
froa tha ?a«lflo» 

2. To aliin a ^O^ywar non-»,igra»»lon paet with Japan. 

5. To promote « final ••ttlanant of th« Manahurian 
:ju9»tlon, 

h* To actively ad-vooata thw placlajj of Indo-Chlna 
und«r tr-« Oovemmant of « Jc nt British, Pponei;, Japanoso, 
C.lnese and American CoB»:l*8ion, which w.aI inaur* ..o«t- 
favc red-nation treatinent or t oae fir© couatrioa imtil th* 
•■•iropaan •ar la ended, «sral «f Ic;-. will ,;;oTern ti\» country 
prlnarilj '-: t.he L-iereats , ,. .e inclo-Chirjoa© paopla, 

'■■ .-i«« u- all axtra-t«rrltorial ri^,ht» In China, 
and t: o&taln ,u^m>i.'B a,.,ramueint to jlva up h«sr axtra- 
territorial rli^htla 1^ China, and t^ive lion^^ Kon^ back to 
China, 

6, To pre* ant to Conjraaa and puan for enactmant a 
bill to repeal tha latml.^ration Aot of 1>17 whle.\ pro.hlblta 
l.TCul jraticam Into the United J^tatea oi Japaneae, and place 

Japuneae and tha C)ilr.e«e tiiB aaae baala aa ot-her 

oiotlate a trade a^reewent with Japan, giving 
her (a) -.cat-f avcred-nat-on treatmont and (b) a ich conoesaloriB 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3675 



on lm->ort« *• con X.a .r.utuail'i siiUisf act r' i; ^-.v- . -' , ' - - 
oludln.^ an u.jC6«:.. . raw t 

20 yot.-«. 

', , ^o 0JLt»ntl IX <- .l.l.cu . C-yosLT crfU t t.l . 
Cfer.t Ir.toresfct to L« drtti»n u^jon tit tlie rate not to ©ACfee>I 
7200 rjlllioii a I'^nup txca t wit a,.^>rcvji-. cl 'J\e roeiuant 
of tha rnlt«<l £t&t*«. 

'y. To set up a .^OO .-iillon i»t*.l^:^;-il . 
atipplied b^' Japan anJ -.alf by the ' nited . tat^c, I o 
usad for th« •tabllisatlon .if t:*e doilt.*'-^ en r.i'cc. 

10* To ranova th« rostriotions on Ja^aiios* fun^s a 
tha Unicad Stat«a« 

li. re u»« Itt Uiflxience to the full to »tta.t.pt to 
eliminate eourcee of ..otentlal friction ustwien Japan and 
her nai^ihbora, and to assure Japaji access lo tl^e r*» ..Uiterlala 
of ti.e world on the aase baala a* ..c» e:-..'c.!id b; '.n-tod 
3t«taa and araat Bri tain* 

8« On Ita j>art, the Japaneie Oovemnent ..ro- cst-s tc do 
the followlnjx 

1* Withdraw all alllter?, nuval, air cllee fcroea 
frcn China iuounuir lea aa cl ly^l) fro*. indo-C.ina md 
trtm Thailand. 

^, wxtbdra* ail aup.)ort — allitury, ^olltical» cr 
aeonoatlo — fron any ^^ovemriont In China oth«r tiian that 
of tlM national govarnoaatu 

>• Replaea with jvx ourrenoy at a rate agreed upon 
tmoTiQ, tlie Treaaurlea of China, Japan, inland and l-nited 
Statea all military acrlp, yen ai-^a :vu.->;jet iot«e c ' rcUatlno 
In China. 



3676 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



. I • 



U* ilv up nil •xtr«-> territorial ri^^ita In China. 

5, Vottatid to China a billion y^n loan at Z per o«nt 
tc aid In r«oc>!>atructln>^ China (ut x*«t« of IOC million 
yan a yaar) • 

6, *lt5idraw all Ja;.ana»« trccy/a from Manchuria 
exea:^t for a few dlvlMlona naceasar, ua r ^cIIca force, 
provided ■ .-".,3,R. wltHdrawe all h«r troops froro tiie Far 
'•;aeterr. front o..cept x or au oviuivalent rcrvalndar. 

7, SeLl to txie Vnlted itat^s uj Lc thrae-f o'lrtha 

of .or current output <^f war .literlal — 'ncl-jlln^ .-.aval, 
ttlv, ordnance arid co 5:©;'cJLi i a''. l;.>a on a coat-pluc .;0 per 
cent '.aala aa tV.e <;nit«iu . tatds uay aeleot. 

,. i;.x;jel all ;er!-.ta.u ttc -iical ---.mn, .llltar;* oificlala 
and ;.)roi;o jandlata, 

9. Aooord tne "nlted States a-ii Cvl'.a .cai-f avcred- 
natlon treatnent In the whole Japanese Lmpivo, 

10. }<o jot late a iO-yaar non-a.^jresalo:. pact with 
rn'ted states, '.■•.n**, -^rl'lah '.,lr-€, ..\H,c'. in.lles (and 
: l.illpplnes; . 

C. Inaamnch as ti;f T'niteU tatec caniiot ;jerK' t ti.'' ;r«3ent 
M'^.certa'n statua between the 'r't'-c' ::tatea ani ^$.ut^i t con- 
:,:.n-je In view of world devolci-nieriti, and feols ocs.ve 

action is called for now» the 'nltcd ntataa aLoul-J extend 
the above offer cf a -enercsa and poacefnl t-^lutlrr. .' the 
difflc iltlr-e betneer t'.<r, trtc coun-rles fcr or.l; & ilrllt;^ 
tl:2e. If t-ie Japanore ■". ^vern-.aent doea not Indicate Ita 
Aooe tanco In nrlnclpl- ft least of t-.-i ,,.'offered terrska 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3677 



• 10 • 

b«for* th« •xplration of Vtxmt %tM», It Mm —an <mlj 
th4Lt th« pr«««nt Japanasa Qor^rxmmnt prafsra othar aadi 
laaa paaaaful waya of aelvla^^ thoaa dlffiexiltiea, and 
la awaiting tha prapitloua Bonent to attaapt to cmrvj 
out furtlxar a plan of oonq[aaat« 



3678 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



- 11 - 

11- 

Arivfnt«>fi;e« to Jtr^n and United 
9t«t »(i of Sttob an"Ai: r><— nT" 

th* ftii'rantegei aooruiog to each goT*mn«nt sr< 
listed below t 
. To tht Onlt»d 8t«t»t 

1. In th« erent thi»t J«»ri»n el«cte<^ to rtjtot th« 
offtr of p««o*ful solution undtr terwe herein Inflicatefl, 
the tynited States would here a clearer Idea of whrt tc ^x- 
peot and eonld therefore know better ho« to ah6|.e her own 
pollejr. 

2. Our naval power will be greatly inereaeed at 

oaoe hjr the freeing of our Paciflo fleet for duty eleewhere. 

3. T^e would he able to eend wore of our equipment 

to Saglaad and Ruitl* without inoreaeing our vulnerahilitf 
t« mm attaok froa the &««t. 

k, ff« will hare stopped the war in Ohiaa and have 
regained for her hor freedoa. 

3. We will have paved tho ««y for • aubetantial in- 
oreeo* in pott««ar trsda. 

€, Ve would greatly strengthen the Allied poaitioa 
wla-a-wli (KinMugr. 

7. «• will haw* lawed ourealTOi froa a war with Japan. 

f. fha aoaey it would ooet ue would be a very saall 
part of eiut wa weald aawe hy not haTiag to fight Japaa« 
or hy not haTiag to \k» prapara« for a two-oeeaa war. 

9, A pretperoaa Japan and Ohiaa oan greatly help to 
roetora our noraal trade, ead thao aahe easier oar owa 
traaaitioa ta a peaaa tiae eaoaoay. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3679 

- X2 - 

10. Iitaur« for oum«XT«a an inor«as*d wpplj of 
tin, antlaoajr and vood oil and rubbar from tba Far Cast. 

11. Handicap Oaraany In Ita orasant ■llltary oaai- 
oalgn and ct tha aaflM tlaia giro graat isoral anoouragaaaat 
to tba British and Kuaalf>n oaorla. 

1?. rinwllj, military »;nd nhv^l axparte ^ho noir 
f««r a "two front" niwol thr«e.t will be move eatnuslaatlo 
obout •ll out help to SnRlpnd ond Huaala. Tbara will ba 
•"uch lft.= p osutta to ot poua tha *dpjinl««itr»tlon' » foraign 
r>oMcy. 
B, To J ft pan 

1. Inataad of bain^ oonfronted »lth prosi^act of a. 
Tore aerlouB war i.nC certain defi^fet In tha and, ahe oan 
fifva pefeoe • t onca. 

2. Shp ct-n croooed *»t onca to shift from a wt?r aco- 
nofliy to pe&oa aoonoay and et the oarae tlfe exparlenoe 
•roaperlty rrther thf^n » aarlous aa:r3aalon. 

3. uhs o&n withdraw from tha China Incident without 
loaa of *f<,ce'*, 

U. She oan letrangthen her currency f^nd reduce her 
•ubllo debt. 

Her foreign trade will greatly Inoreoae. 

6. 3ha oan ferote her enarglaa and oi^oital to re* 
oonfltznjctlnfj Ja^fn, building uu ^anohurl«, and developing 
ne* trtUe oaHlbllltloa at f tl-ae •«hen other coun'.rlea ara 
engaged i'l -^n" or prepsrotlon for wnr. 

{, Jhe *111 rt one atroJte have nolrad aoae of her 
thorniest croblo^a In h9r Internationfll relatione. 

g. :ihe will earold tha BOolal « laruptlon that la bound 
to *;r«.e circe In Jnor^n after f>n ex >&ndad end prolonged war 
effort. 



3680 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

. 13 - 

tk« •■• d«aff«r iakMrMt la tte pr*p«M4 «•••• •«!••• 

!■ %lut if •eo«pt«d b7 Jap*ii It «o«k<l pr«TiA« h«r «i«h • 
%r«athlac •»*•• ^rlaf which th* ••vlA ffrsatly atrwHrthtM 
h*r Bllit^nr and •o«M*i« potential, th* sight thM W • 
graatar thi*aat to «a a faar or %«• haa«« thaa aha la bo«. 
Acainat that poaaih&llty mrm tha fallawiac faatarai 
1. Owinc to tha aearaitj af many raw watarlala aha will 
not ba ftbla to axpafi4 har nrtTf «tt4 air foraa during 
tha naxt year naarljr aa mioh i>a wa oan » partioul- 
arl7 in Tlaw of tha proTiaion in tha egraaaant that 
wa eaa huj flO pareast of har awrraiit outpwt of arao- 
■ant a. 
S. Tha naxt two yaara ara amoial for uo. Xf wo oan 

obtain tho t%\.9»»% of tho Itaiaaian. Britlah and Aaari* 
ean foroaa now baing tiad up la tha far laat by Japan** 
thraatoning, wa will hawo dono aero to •traagthon 
Unitod lingdoa and Rutaia wia-a-wia Oarsany than wa 
oould with a wbola year*t ovtput of plaaaa aad taaka 
and ahipi. 
3. Tha Japanaaa poopla would ba ao mliawad by tho 
aattloiBont of tha Ohiaa *inoidant*, and tha and of 
the throat of war with oMiJor powora, and would bo ao 
happy at tha oasaatloa of aeonoaie atrangiilation and 
tho aaarganoa af rafil proaparity, that it it hardly 
likaly that any military olloua oould «tlr ut> tigni- 
fionnt trouble fcr yaara to ooraa. 

Altogathar, tha llkallhood of jAp^n'a atrangthan- 
iag har rotition and ?»a-antarlng tha world eeaaa aa 
a balligaront aggro taor in tha naatt f«» yaara ••••% 
^%Tf alia — prowidod Oomany i« daf tatad. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3681 



- 11^ - 

It would, of courae. "" e n«?ceespry to obtain 
Congree«lon«l »■ TOT^i sefore n«xln£ d«flnlt« of'trf, 
^ut through rrelluilni-ry ocnfld«ntl»l contTpnocB with 
l*«d«r« <?f botn p^rtlBi «nd with ^cpror.rlot* ooi«»ltt««i, 
th« ground ould b« nulokly pr9?«red •« that n«gotl«tiont 
could go forward. 

i^ oompl«fc»d docuNwnt could In .-. *-«•* or two b« of- 
fered to th« Js^Mie'i's ^ovemwent. Vhe worln, Including 
Xhm J&panea* p»opl» . would snow the aiotlvsB bnd th« oon- 
ttats of our offer. If th« Jiiptne«« uoT»rn««nt would not 
acovrt, it would hftT* »t least th« greet K.dvitnta(*a of 
(i) clarifying jur own policy and rallying aucpor* bahlnd 
tha Br-sldant, (?) cr«»ate eeriout diTlaion in Jar»R. 

If tba J«i^»a'»»a Oovemaant ware to indieata ita tan- 
tatlTa aoQtotanoa In nrlnol'-la, tha rr«dldant oould at' 
onoa call a oonfaranoa ia v^ahinfton to be attandad by 
Chinane, Brltiah, Rufaian, and ocaaibly lAitoh iutist Indian 
And hillrtTJina rapraaentstires. InaasiuoJa s>: all tba im- 
^>ortant conoaMSiona are to be s^da by United States aa4 
Japan, the pcrtioipation of other goremaanta in tha eon> 
ferenee need not eftspllcate negotiation** 

The above propoacd progriss of mutual ooneesciona 
MA be euoeeeeful only if oertAin Tital eoneeeelona »r% 
not left out. If adopted vith those oonoessiona oeaee in 
the >^aeifio would be gained, whereas if adooted without 
the« *arrea8e«ent' would be the result, ths threat of 
war would not be sTerted* and an axoeptional opoortuaitj 
to eettle the if cue on terns farorable to defeat of 
Oemany would be lost* 



3682 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

- 15- 

VlfilMia ecnoctflomt t« %• o^talaai fr»a /«p«B tfMvlA 
b« vlthdraval of tro«p* frea t^ Mlala»4 9t Atla aai •*!• 
to ua of tho balk of b«r ««rr«at prodvetlen of ftraaaoat*. 
If «t do not •ohltTt thlt« «t thall not obtaia aay •lf«l- 
floaat r«litf to •lllo4 «tlit»ry forvot In tho OAtt vlillt 
«• would bo aakinc ^^ ooofiUlo for Jovaa to otroactlsoa 
iMiroolf for DOaillBlt lator afcroooloa vhoa tho oitaotloa 
la aora orooitloaa for aff«rat«lvo «ato oa har part. Thm 
vlalava otjaotlraa awat bo to froa tba Aaarleaa, Vritlali 
•nd Raaalaa forcaa from tht Paolflo. 



HDW:dla 
11/1 7 Al. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3683 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE 




Memorandum of Conversation 



DATE: NOViMBKF. 18, 1941 



SUBJECT: COUVEKSATION BET.VKhN SKCRi,TA>.Y HULL AMD TI-iB 

JAPANiiSii Al-itiASSADOKS, ADtii U-.AL ztlCHiSABUKO KOMHRA 
AND Mi- . SABUhO KUWiSU 

PARTICIPANTS,- SKCRKTAi.Y Ob' STATti HULL AliD THE BKIXiSh MBJiS'iius, 
SXh K. 1. CAJ,'.PKKLL / 



COPIES TO: 




The British Minister caH«d at my request. I said 
that I nad engaged in a lengthy conference with the two 
ranking Japanese represents tives. Including Mr. Kuruau, 
who is hero for the purpose of carrying on converstitions 
with this Government. I added that the conversetlon re- 
lated to the question of a proposed peaceful settlemenlf'' 
for the Pacific area. I stated that nothing; was agreed<g 
upon at this meeting and that the discussioii included 
the subject of two opposing policies - of conqueat by 
force on the one hand and a policy of peace, law and 
order on the other. I wont on to say that the three 
inain points on which we "nave encountered serious diffi- 
culties in former converst-tlons wltii Ambassador Notmira, 

namely. 



3684 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




namely, ttis bringing of Japanese troopa out of CbiziA, 
the Tripartite Pact and certain pbaaes of conmercial 
policy, wore dlacuaeed at length; but that the Japaneae 
made no conoeaelona on the troop matter or on the matter 
of the Tripartite Pact. I told the Miniater that 'the 
Japaneae finally inquired **iether a brief temporary 
partial arrangement could not be worked out that would 
enable them to improve public sentiment in Japan along 
tJae lines of peace rather than of military action. Thia 
would also Include the idea of Japan's coming out. of 
China, They said while the United States and maybe Great 
Britain and the Netherlands East Indies, if they should 
be so disposed on consultation, would to a partial ex- 
tent relax embargoes on exports to Japan, Japan on its 
part would correspondingly take steps in the direction of 
a peaceful policy and in organizing and educating its 
public opinion in support of auch a policy during the 
next few months. The Japanese suggested further that 
the whole question of a general peaceful settlement for 
the Pacific area would be gradually developed and public 
opin'on in Japan woulo enable them to meet us more satis- 
factorily themselves, and presumably satisfactorily to us, 

on 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3685 



on the more diiilcult questions such as removinf; their 
tr<'Ops from China and tho Tripartite Pact. They did not, 
nowever, make any definite conanitmenta as to just now 
fg)- they could comply v.'itii our position with respc.t, to 
these two points. 

I si.ld to the liritlaii Minister- that I had made It 
clear to the Japanese that, if their Oovarnment cared to 
present aometninc on this point, X woula i-.lve it considera- 
tion in the event it appeared to he feasible of considera- 
tion, out tiiftt i covil.^ lacke no, promise, and that if it 
should bo deoiiked letsible, i woulc confer with ti.e 
;_rti.sii, trie buLcn, the Chinese and the Australians 
about any pnase of tiie matter in which they woulc be 
intei-esled to -.vuich tney would v'.ive consideration. I 
«.lso seld t.o the Japanese that, of course, unless Japan 
decides on a peaceful policy rather tnan a policy of 
force and conquest, we coulo not get far in any kind of 
discussion but thHt i coulc understand why tliey might 
need a little time to educate public opinion, as stated. 



C.H. 



c. CH:^iA 



3686 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I UcJ^ 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



Memorandum of Convenation 



DATE: NOVEMBEK 19, 1941 



SUBJECT: CONV]r:HSATIOW BETH .--iiETAllf HULL 

km THE TWO JAPAZUSK AMBASSADORS 



PARTICIPANTS: SECRKTAHY OF STA"": 



>iD THE MUaSTJiK OF 
LOUDON 



COPIES TO: 




The Minlstor ol tac< "letherlands -all-ijd f-<t ray re-juest 
ft-ui i. ro,jaa':*}d Lv^ air. niie subai,- rj'.ateri to 

tiw Brlti".!-! yinl=it«r on yostoraa,v iii re^orii ta -ny coa- 

i** two Jtt!)aue8« Arnliass*»'i'.r.:j . :■ was 
very apprecla* tMf. Infomation, and <*;? 

o: tile dlaposi*. 1- iq ooopyrate 

wlioleheartedl, tjtofore with his Government, 



(D 

■ — 

ro 

0) 
(0 




I.H. 



11 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3687 



I I 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE 
Memorandum of Conversation 



L-'<'/ 



\^ 



DATE: JJOVeW' 



1941 



SUBJECT; 



CO:r7SR3AT10K or secretary hull •,•■ BRITISH KISISTER 

.-li»ARDI':" •• ''"SD STATES-JAPANESE .-..-.i-.-^- . fiiS. 



PARTICIPANTS.- SECRSTARY OF STATE HULL AJSD MINISTER OF AU^RALIA, 
THE "-GKT HONORABLE RICHArD &. CASEY. / 



COPIES TO: 



•>J 




The Minister of Australia called at ay request 
and I gave him the substance of my statement to the 
British Minister yeeterday afternoon. 



C.R. 




S;CK;DFB 




'■y« K.ti^^iW^*^'^-'"-- -' • ^ - 



3688 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

DEPARTMENT OF STAl C 
Memorandum of Conversation 

DA ' f. 
SUBJECT: 



PARnClPANTS: ,p^ , „ ,, y I r. 1 - f 



■ r . a I 



COPIES TO: 



•is- 

c 



^-^-'^ - oope'' aodue yXvetw 



to Uie matter 

included sar.rv 



-aniicier. UcvirnEen 



PA/H:SKH:FLB 



EXHIBITS or JOINT COMMITTEE 3689 



Department of state .— » 

Memorandum of Conversation 

DAU- I,'OVEliBER 29, 1941 

auHjECT AUSTRALIAN' OFFER TO ACT AS MEDIATOR BST'./EKH THE UHITED 
STATES A:iD JAPAI>i 

HA:*riciPANrs- 3ECKKTAF,*.' HULL A. L ..._ .. ;3rRAl,IAN L.I.jISTEB, ;..yH? 



COPIES TO: 



71 

Tiie Austrsllfin :-,lnlDter cnllec. at; nls reruost anu :.pue "^ 

eosie referencij n t^.e -- ; -Ibl ■ Ity that ,- ' :ht cauee Kurusu 
to call on hi ., at v,'::ic;. ti:.)e t.e w;>u1j L.ji<t:ii36 the pros and 
cons of the -iroserit relations ^■■' ~t'.- - between all of the 
f?ovorn.:.cr;ts interfsted In the r-tL. i and wind up by suj'- 
f;estln:- that Austr.^llfi woulr' be "' tc ant as ir.ecllator or 
pj.-.r.* '• cf^ ttie sort. I re-^" •"' ■' latter no aerioua 

nt... ■ ■■ ■•^' ■f * r- ; : ' ' - "'^ ^ ^ -^ - ■-- vns 

I Ir.terr Veu ..',. v; ;.a..<.' I 1.^ ^- ,,c.>v ^-^fore the 

.'.Inleter ooulc -.nke a deta-j-c- .,» .,^. .ont of the natter on ^ 

t ^o asnu:. 'tlon that he wouia i^ewe.o^'- a set "f facts nlonf: 
xt-.fi t.iat -iC bi- Pi' ','■ ■ ".tl-nate. . 



79716 O— 46 — pt. 19- 1H 



3690 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3691 






raoent week* by the BrltlaJa Ambaaaador, th^s Australian 
Minister, and tvloe by the Netherlands Minister, 



C,H. 



!A;A?. 



3692 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Oittg^ Hi 



,'iMt^:AM^X . 



Tli8 l;»p6*"i!ioe-Bt notCB frva you? o«l»gj«aiB ub4<^ 
«ne« that tJha CMa«S8 Foreign Winistiar ir.tovHtf"* > 
on Moveaber 28 the China •« Aaiba,««a&er «1; W©ah^.;e<'«>* "Mis- 
informed th« l>eip««t»»Bt; thftt %h.» attltufis of CMHa t;ow«rt 
th« temporary «rpftr»g«ment with Japan uad#r tdBtstit'e -■ 
Biatratlon At that tlew wna iWfS ncgatlT^ '"^••""■^-•■ 
vill he.v« obesrvea froa th* 0«p*rta»nt»8 tfiPgrtiB uncor 
ref«r«nc« reportilng l ^^fy il^a th« GMn««* As«tM»8«ftaDr*ft 
oonyeraatlon with tii« 3eer9t«ry on llove«l>tr 28 that 
China's attitude w«« m&da knowi to thlt OoTamaant ar«i x.c 
various clrol«a In Washington through vai'lou* ohannals 
end through telagrans to aavar&l Indlvlduala. 

Th« Saoretery of State, whanavar ha has diseuesad 
with tha Ohinasa Jjubasaador tha aiat^tr of tha ourrant 
oonT»r«atlonB with tha JaiMsasa, has Mi&a it plain that 

tjKMfihtnd tit — — - .-— — 



5M if <i|tMtratM' . 



»_ 









o 



i— MM «. » •««»*«<«« Miaiisa WMl 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3693 



^i^U 



vj-i*. ^ ^ G '- .. >.. ■ 



■"' -■-■'■ ■'-• "best of o«r -■•'•-ty; and 

. ■u!>,:.v. :, oonoeirn t&lun ov.-j.v ■ "'■-■ 

d»sopro«a frnnXly aid -with 
j«s p6i'otkoXtite'ik«iX «ff»ets on th« Clilntoe puWic 
. ChlnRse will to continue re«l3tftnee vhloh »lght 
■3t«il should %ht>T« be atdopted «a arrang»««nt euoh 
ilS^iM. T ATI^r'^^ *• ^*^ und«r considftrstlon at that 
!;-..>. It vlll b« recalled that the (Jenorallsalao in hi« 
.ii»»aag9e to the Pr-eaJ,aent suad the Prime Mlnl8t«r 
at England also «poli« frankly enA forcefully of the psy- 
chological ®ff«ct« of a «ueces«ful Japaneae Invasion of 
Yttnnaa ?roTlnoe. Ag you were Informed In the Department's 
telcgran under reference the Secretsry of State In speak- 
ing to the Chinese Aabaasador on Noveasber 26 pointed out 
that one of the prlae point 8 of the draft temporary 
mo&nM. ylyen^ ,! vhlch this Goyemaieat wae then tentatively 
considering ,va8 to protect Yunnan Province and the Burma 

Ettetphnttig , , 

SiKtifaptftaer i#,. . t$„. ___„„. 



3694 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




t' 



WatJtlnthn. 



WILL INOtCATt WHCTMDI TELEGRAM SENT 

(Full rttt 

CollKt JDtjIttter 
(Nlfht lettv 

Ctarg* Oepartmwit: 

FuU rM« 
Oay Mltr 

»(lgMl«tt«r — " 

Cfcarg* to 

* Road from the Imninunt d«a^»r deacribod by th« G^on«r«l- 
Issimo &nd in Addition to lemmm th« Jmpaaeat meD*c9, 
for at least tlire* months, to the i^ole South Pacific 
area and the Fhlllpplaes. 

In his oenversatlon with you the Chinese Foreign 
Ulnlatep described serldxis and dif JTleult internal and 
external probXeios of China. 55ils Qovertaaent is not ■un- 
aware of thoae probletas and we bellcTire that the (%ln»se 
tki7en»aent ia also aware of many seritms and difficult 
problems facing ua and other simllajply ai»-">s«" powers 
such as Gi^at Brltliln and the Bethar lands. ^.j*^-^, 

We have on many appropriate odoaalon<j"and we msy 
now again aa«\a*e, China th»it in these trying and dlff.i- 
cult days its interests hs?e teen and are being given 
moat careful oonslderatlon in our fctudy of oxar own 
piH>blea5S and "dk^ the .probiwas of other nationa and 
peoples. 

It may bo noted umt t:*are iiave ocoxirred reoentJ.y 
eeveral examples of ^Sfcg^. badly oonfuaod aeohanlos for th 
conduct of dlplomntir. i>»l6tlc'm> bfltwc 
pe«i«t1iig aggression. TJiose r loatsd 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3695 





WILl. INIMOATI WtnrTMCII 



Btpattmstd of &tuU 

iVtaktngkn. 



ro M TKAMSMimcO 

soHrioCMTiAi. cooe 
No««ooNf (DcimM. cxioe 

PtAIH 



-4- 



Telegram Sent 

CeOeet {Otr IttW 

Outft Ott*rtiawti 

Fii)l n^e 
OtflattKr 

KlgktlcttK 

* that It la Bioat difflctilt to oa*ry on »uch ralatlons in 

a syatomatle Knd ao-ansi manner. 2h«re have for sxample b«en 
«x«mpl8a of Intrusion Into delicate and serious situations 
on the past of individuals who are not cosipletely or adequately 
informed of the facts. Before taking action of any sort 
it would seem to be advisable to understand ccaapletely 
each other's vieva. Bach of the nations resisting the 
courses of aggression now rangpant in the world should 
endeavor to realize thAt the other nations are in the 





Itrflt 



!^f all oonslderatione ^vm t ivAm^ the best possible 



! ■^.^/J. 



coui^ss, ind it therefore would seem to be desirable for each 
suck lation to continue a resolute course in the present 
critical world situation. 

Tou are authorised, if a favorable opportunity 
pj-Bsents itself, to laake use of the foi-egoing *«ib«««»W 
or portions thereof, providing you believe that it 
might be helpfxa in ^MtaHMito^the points raised by the 
Porelg?! Minister as reported in your telegraa under reference. 




}8£&:IIB» 



'^.-^y'r/. 



-. 19. 



FA/'H 



H--^:t 



J""-^ 



'-hi 



« -ifcMaiWWiiT »■*««»« ••»M» 



3696 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 169 

SELEX?nON OF 

State Depaetment Documents Relating to Thailand. 

TABLE OF-OSNTENTS 

1. State Department Information Bulletin No. 132 dated Aug. 6, 1941, concerning 

statement made by Secretary Hull that date at a press conference on the 
subject of Thailand. 

2. Dispatch dated Aug. 7, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, Bang- 

kok, concerning the Secretary's press conference of Aug. 6, 1941. 

3. Memorandum of Conversation dated Aug. 7, 1941, between the Thai Minister 

and M. M. Hamilton concerning "American press reports in regard to this 
Government's attitude toward developments relating to Thailand." 

4. Dispatch dated Aug. 8, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, 

Bangkok, concerning item No. 3 above. 

5. Dispatch dated Aug. 8, 1941, from U. S. Minister, Bangkok, to State Depart- 

ment concerning reaction in Thailand oflBcial quarters to statements of 
Secretary Hull on Aug. 6, 1941. 

6. Memorandum of Conversation dated Aug. 12, 1941, between the Thai Minister 

and M. M. Hamilton concerning "Thai Government's desire to obtain an 
expression of the attitude of the American Government toward Thailand." 

7. Memorandum of Conversation dated Aug. 14, 1941, between the Thai Minister 

and Mr. Peck concerning "Request of Thailand for permission to purchase 
arms in the United States." 

8. Dispatch dated Aug. 15, 1941, from U. S. Minister Foote, Batavia, to State 

Department concerning British reports of position of U. S. and Britain in 
relation to Netherlands East Indies and Thailand. 

9. Memorandum of Conversation dated Aug. 18, 1941, between Secretary Hull 

and the Thai Minister concerning "Attitude of tl. S. Government toward 
Thailand in event of Japanese attack". 

10. Dispatch dated Nov. 3, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, Bang- 

kok, concerning aid to Thailand. 

11. Memorandum of Conversation dated Nov. 4, 1941, between British Minister 

Sir Ronald Campbell and Under Secretary Sumner Welles concerning 
"Situation in Thailand." 

12. Dispatch dated Nov. 6, 1941, from U. S. Minister, Bangkok, to State Depart- 

ment, concerning aid for Thailand. 

13. Memorandum by S. K. Hornbeck concerning Aide Memoire handed the 

British Minister Sir Ronald Campbell on Nov. 6, 1941, and the attached 
Aide Memoire concerning material aid for Thailand. 

14. Dispatch dated Nov. 11, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, 

Bangkok, requesting itiquiry on Thailand's petroleum requirements. 

15. Dispatch dated Nov. 18, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, Bang- 

kok, concerning military aid to Thailand. 

16. Dispatch dated Nov. 22, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, 

Bangkok, concerning policy of this Government toward assistance to Thai- 
land in the event she should be Invaded. 

17. Memorandum of Conversation dated No. 22, 1941, between First Sec'y. 

British Embassy and Mr. Smyth concerning "Reported request of Jap- 
anese for use of Thai airdromes for 'survey flights' ". 

18. Memorandum of Conversation dated Nov. 25, 1941, between the British 

Ambassador and Under Secretary Sumner Welles concerning "Aid Needed 
by Thailand." 

19. State Department Radio Bulletin No. 280 dated No. 26, 1941, concerning 

press conference of Secretary Hull that date and information furnished 
press concerning th'^ delivery of the so-called "Ten point note" to the 
Japanese Ambassadors. 

20. Dispatch dated Nov. 27, 1941, from State Department to U. S. Legation, 

Bangkok, concerning the withdrawal of nationals from Pacific areas. 

21. Memorandum dated No. 27, 1941, ot conver.sation between the Thai Minister 

and Mr. Smyth and Mr. Adams, concernirtg the Minister's inquiry about 
press reports of the note handed the Japanese Ambassadors on Nov. 26, 
1941 by Secretary Hull. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3697 

22. State Department Radio Bulletin No. 282 dated Nov. 28, 1941, which relates 

briefly the President's Press Conference of that date at which he men-, 
tioned the U. S.-Japanese negotiations. 

23. Memorandum of Conversation dated November 28, 1941, between the Thai 

Minister and Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Smyth concerning "Aid to Thailand." 

24. Dispatch dated Nov. 28, 1941, from U. S. Minister, Bangkok to State Depart- 

ment concerning radio speech by Thai Prime Minister on Nov. 27, 1941. 

25. Memorandum of Conversation dated Nov. 29, 1941, between the Thai Minister 

and Mr. Smyth concerning "Thailand's treaties with Great Britain and 
Japan." 
28. Memorandum of Conversation dated Dec. 1, 1941 between the Thai Minister, 
the Thai Military Attache and Mr. Adams and Mr. Smyth concerning "Aid 
to Thailand." 

27. Dispatch dated Dec. 2, 1941 from State Department to U. S. Legation, Bang- 

kok, concerning talks with Japanese. 

28. Dispatch dated Dec. 2, 1941 from State Department to U. S. Legation, Bangkok 

and attached dispatch of same date to American Consul, Singapore, concern- 
ing contemplated aid to Thailand in concurrence with British in form of 
aviation petroleum products. 

29. Dispatch dated Dec. 3, 1941 from U. S. Minister, Bangkok to State Depart- 

ment reporting conference he had with Thai Foreign Minister concerning 
recent Japanese attitude toward Thailand and assistance offered by British 
and U. S. 

30. Dispatch dated Dec. 4, 1941 from U. S. Minister, Bangkok, to State Depart- 

ment concerning his conversation that morning with Thai Foreign Minis- 
ter who said the Thai Government hoped the American and British Gov- 
ernments would issue public statements that Japanese invasion of Thailand 
would incur armed resistance of those two countries in addition to Thal- 
Jand's. 

31. Dispatch dated Dec. 5, 1941 from U. S. Minister, Bangkok, to State Depart- 

ment relating conversation between Thai Foreign Minister and Japanese 
Ambassador concerning Japanese forces in Indochina. 

32. Dispatch dated Dec. 6, 1941 from Ambassador Gauss, Chungking, to State 

Department reporting rumor regarding proposed occupation of Thailand by 
British. 

33. Dispatch dated Dec. 6, 1941 from State Department to U. S. Legation, Bangkok 

concerning credit extension to Thailand. 

34. Memorandum of Conversation dated Dec. 7, 1941 between First Secretary, 

British Embassy and Mr. George Atcheson concerning "Reported desire 
of the Thai Government that British forces not move into Thailand." 

35. Dispatch dated Dec. 7, 1941 from U. S. Minister, Bangkok, to State Depart- 

ment reporting Japanese attack on Thailand. 

36. Dispatch dated Dec. 8, 1941 from U. S. Minister, Bangkok, to State De- 

partment reporting the agreement of Thai Government to allow Japanese 
passage through Thailand for their troops in order to attack Burma and 
Malaya, and related matters. 



3698 CONGRESSIONAL IxNTVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



1 I 

(NOT FOR THE PRESS) 
(FOR DEPARTMENTAL USE ONLY) 

Department of State 
Division of Current Information No, 132 

COUNTRY JAPAN DATE Aug. 6, 1941 



Subject: Inoreaslng indications that Japan la making 

demands on Thailand; statement In House of Commons 

by Mr. Eden that anything that threatens 

Thailand was of Immediate Interest to Qreat Britain 



At the press conference today Secretary Hull said: 

THAILAND 

A correspondent remarked that there are Increasing 
Indications that Japam Is making demands on Thailand, He 
said that Vir, Eden stated today in the House of Commons 
that anything that threatens the security and Integrity 
of Thailand was of Immediate Interest to Groat Britain, 
and he inquired if the Secretary would care to say any- 
thing on the situation in regard to our own policy. The 
Secretary replied that he believed we have many times 
diecueeed the question of conquest by force on the part 
of certain countries and that this has included the 
Pacific area. He said that we have made very clear our 
concern and our interest in respect to steps c£U?rylng 
out that sort of policy. He stated that Mr. Welles Just 
a few days ago had occasion to give the press a statement 
on that general question as it relates to the Pacific area 
and that he might refer to the fact that prior to giving 
out that statement Mr, Welles read to the press his own 
(the Secretary's) statement of the issues that were pre- 
sented when he himself appeared before the House Foreign 
Affairs Committee in support of the Lease Lend Bill last 
January and that he need not repeat those things here. 
Asked if the Secretary could say whether this Q-overnnent 
had had occasion to express any views to the Gtovernment 
of Thailand concerning the present crisis there, Mr. Hull 
replied that he could not go into detail s now because it 
is not at a stage whei:e he could be very definite on ac- 
count of the many angles to the matter. A correspondent 

remarked that certain steps followed the occupation by 

?h^r. 1.^?'^°"'!:^"^ """"^ ^^ ^^^«^ if " "as fair to ass^o 
that certain other stops would follow the occupatior or 

?en?ied^?h«ri'?''?^°? f Thailand by Japan. The Secretary 
replied that it is fair to liave increasing concern about 
any novement which would include the step to which the 
cou^rC^rth^f f^'f • / correspondent asked if the press 
nv^; «,, V ^^?*^^^ls Oovernment has increasing concern 

h^wn! tf f °"^ ^^''''^' J^' ""1^ ^«Pli«<i ^hat this is what 
he was trying to say and that anything that Ifr. Welles 
said regarding the Pacific area and Indochina would have 
i r^rZlr!^ application to Thailand in the present situation, 
^nt ThnT r.^ inquired if there have been some indications 
^n^ni-^ ^^"""w ^° ^^^" Offered what a-iounted to a protoo- 
inni^ ho,Tr«^^^r t^ """^^ ""^ Indochina so that the Japanese 
woul.. have a protectorate einllar to that of the British 
Commonwealth of Nations over Canada. Mr. Hull replied that 
we had not been advised on that subject. Hs saidT of 

t?,^lt'^' ^A *^® P^® = ^ ^®"' *^^^® -'^'^ l=3en a nultlDllclty of 
rumors and reports coming out of that area lately and that 
there are many angles to different and important piiases of 
the situation, all of which we are observing as closely as 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3699 



^R£PARIRO OFFICE 
«AI.I. INCICikTC WHtTHKII 



CollMt 



Full rtt« 
Oay latter 
Nl^t lett«r 

Clltrge Depirtment: 

Full rile 
Dty letter 
Night letter 

Cliwge to 



Telegram Sent 



IBepariamttt of 0iait 

Watkintbjn, 

Aui.-ust 7, 1941 



/ 



A-X2' 



/ 



/ 



^ ( / / 

' T'-.are in ^-epeated for "o-r Inf or-^iptlon^.n extract'^ 

7 / / / // / ^ 

f>j> f'- /radlo'Sul''.etln'or :/5, 1341 In re-rrd to 

"^ / / / / / / 

r.7/ore8-~ 'cont?renc5e of/t:irt date'^ra fgllowsf 




? f.M 



8-~ 'confgrenoe 



/ / / ^ 

-^ations t;-;.- t'^J,; -.'r.'^'.''2 •'■."Iclarf J^e-n-nc^s ''on 



-4 

O 

o 
o 



'rererrf»o -' .' -:.i<?n'n c-^eeol. l.':''!:iie 



' -ri; 



!• tv-R^, 



i- f'-.e 'Secre- 



■■'•>.- -'-'^-'-''anythln,.- w; ti.o situation/in 

■ . -■.<- -y. -.viicy. The Secretar/oflia that'^e '''^ 

. . v^ ...r'thr.t -.-^c :.rrj/~nny times €lacussea/the "uestlorr 

ronruesjrby f orce /fep She tJtrt of oertaln'countrisB/ 

:;- .hr-x At inoluSea 4h0 Paclf i</ai-ea. He sal-i<*t;h''t we ' 

-.:<1 rtiade Very clegT ''jui/ ooncern'anar cur'lnterest in' 

'icyto ste-.s'oDiTj-in- ovt'thr-t/sort'of ^o^i^lc:'.' He 

it; -id 'jut'that'Kr./weil-s' jufit/e faV daye '^ - '^ ' 

/ / / / #^ 




0) 



fiKf/Jhinf Ij 



M^. 



- »__. . 



i— M« ff.«.«M»»aM»»»wim«»r»^ 




3700 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



. TMttn.iffitt^:^ 



pffVAniNei orrioc 

will INOICATr WHETMUt 



- (Full r>l« 
Collwt {Day lettw 

(Night lettef 
Cbirj^e Deptrlmenli 

Full rito 
Ovf letttr 
Niglit l«tt«r 

Ckwge to 



Telegram Scnt 








-2- 



tenerr 



area. 



?.l'^uostiori^ £• It 'related 4o the ?aclflo*ai 

- . . /T' vA- :-:-t,';er this (Jovernrent ^ 

^ J / ^ j< 

h"S ii'-. occ-slon fo exnress'^pny vlevs ^o the irovernnent 

c" ' . --'^concernlri' ^ke ■oresent^rlsls'^ulr t, 
it/>'SB not • 



Into details 



there, ^ 
'now'oecaupe 



ite.' 



A rr 



7 

t-rhether it 



■„ion 4?y 



. .,- ;e coulc. l-'^''v"ry'''aef In 
"ut/^hat^ert;-.<in ^te'cs ^I'ollowed/'^ 

r /fndochlna an-' '-" J^ i--- 

i-i-ume thr'.t'cert. ^.. .v -s '^ 



would 'foil cw^the ocou'?atloiTor^tteTnpted''c 
Thalland/sy Jaian. The S^cretary^epllea ti, 
falr^o have increasing concern 'bcut p ^— - 

vould/lnolu'" -■^■- -'--/-- --'-^^^-/the co;-. 
ferred/ 

Asksd if^thij ^orresoondentQ 



-•r.t re- 



tMa 



sd if/thi3 Correspondents could Infer tnat th 
■^ovsrnraent hos/Lncrerslnsr Concern ^bout evente/over» 
:.; re, the Seeretaryi^aid thaf^hat was'-h 
:.'!;' to eay. " %hat nnythin^Ah* 

/ / y 7 

" " " '%■€ SiTBR end Indochina" 



/" 



liijg-^Che i"aolfl-d 



y 






&>i< ^ «)Mntlor 



iw— " 



!>-.!!*<»*fl'»k -;v . r 



nid "and the 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3701 



DBPAKTMENT OF STATE 




STfflSSJ^ 



Memvainkm of Ccawm^km 

DITISZOH Of TAB. UBmSSm kfTKlM 



DATE; August 7, 
1941. 



PARTICIPANTS; 



COPIES TO: 



Joerioan press xnpottm in xeg&rd to tbla 
QoTemmeat'fl attitude tcnrard derelopiBenta 
reXatiiig to Thailand 



The Tb&i Miniatax 

and 
Mr. Haaiilton 








pj^ 



The Thai Uinieter called this afternoon at hia re- 
queat. He aaid that'' he had noted reports in the prese 
last evening and again this aorning in re^rd to mat- 
ters relating to his country; and that, in as much his 
Qoremment was .very busy, at times it did not take occa- 
sion to Inform him of ourrent developments. The Minister 
then said that he wished us to knew that, if there should 
be any items of informatl<m which we would wish to bring 
to his attention, he was constantly available and would 
be plad to cwne to the Dooartment at any time for that M 
purpose. I inquired whether the Minister had anything 
particular in mind. ,He replied in rather general term» 
and said that he was not in position to make an express 

inquiry 



8 



3702 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



■ ..-^ K*'-/"iS?-- 



■'JtT^.l/.V:-'i'i;' ~ 



■•■•^. "^:..'j:**p!««,- ' A*p»'»w:^j»-»i.- 'si.a.ijii-vftB-* 'i;* 




-a- 

Inquixy In as much as be bad reoeived no Instructions 
from bis GtoTemment. After some general remarks Z men- 
tioned that we would of oouree be glad to Inform bia at 
any time upon request of exactly wbat tbe Secretary may 
have said at a prass oooferenoe. The Minister then in- 
dicated eageToesB to be informed of what tbe Secretary 
had said yesterday which bad formed the basis of many 
stories in the American press. 

I told the Minister that I had anticipated that be 
ml^t wish to inquire in regard to the basis for the 
etoriee In the press and that I ted at hand, tbe record 
of what the Secretary had said at hie press conferences 
yesterday and today. Z then gar© tbe Minister orally 
tbe eubatanoe of an extract from the Radio Bulletin of 
August S, as follows J 

*A correspoiaient stent ioned that there were 
inoreaalng Indiostions that Japan was making de- 
mands c» fhailaiid and be referred to Mr. Men's 
speech in the House of Ooaanons to the effect that 
anything that threatened the security and integrity 
of Thailand »8« of immediate laterest to Britain, 
and he wondered whether tbe Secretary would oare to 
•ay anything on the situation in regard to our own 
policy. Tbe 8«»retary seld that he thought tl»t we 
bad many times dlaouseed the Question of conquest 
by force on the oart of certain countries, and that 
it included tb« l>aclfie area. H« said that we had 
made very clear our coaoem and our interest in re- 
spect to steos carrying out that sort of policy . 
He pointed out that Mr. Wellss just a few days ago 
had occasion to give tbe ooxrespondents a statement 
on that general question as It related to tbe 
Paotflo area. 



. I 



i 



"Asked 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3703 



-»- 



"Aatod If h« oould aay whether this Oovern- 
«eat had had oooasion to ez^xeee any views to th« 
• Odreroment of Thailand ooacemlng the preaent 
orlslB out there, Mr/ Hull said he oould not go 
into details now beoauee It was not at a stage 
where he oould be tery definite. A oorreapondent 
pointed out that certain steps folloirad the occu- 
pation by Japan of Indoobina and he Inquired whether 
it was fair to assume that certain other steps would 
follow the oooupation or attempted oooupatlon of 
Thailand by Japan. The Secretary replied that it 
was fair to have inor easing ooncem about a moTement 
that would Include the step to whioh the correspondent 
referred, 

"Asked if the correspondents oould infer that 
this QoTernaent has increasing concern about events 
over there, the Seoretaxy said that that was what 
he was trying to say. He added that anything that 
Mr. Welles had said regarding the Paoiflo area and 
Indochina would have a special application to. Thai- 
land and the present situation.* 

I then informed the Minister that at the Secretary* s 
press conference today the Secretary had been asked whether 
he had anything to say in regard to newspaper reports that 

the iaario&n and the British (Sovemments had adready 

prooleed jnwiiland aid if it shwld resist Japanese ag- 
gression; that the Secretary had replied that he did not 
have anything eepeoially in mind on that subject; and that, 
when the Secretary had been pressed to confirm whether or 
not we had made such a coaiauaiioatlon to the Thai Oovern- 
ment, the Secretary had replied that he did not know of 
any such communication. 

I added that the Thai Hinister of course was fully 
aware of the general attitude and policy of this Oovem- 
aent in regard to countries which were resisting attack 

by 




3704 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Ijy foTOa* of a^rgrMvioni. I n«nttoMa that tb«x« ww a 
oouatrir nearliy to llMlltUjMi, xuuMXy, OtvlJU, which w«s a 
good lllxietrftttoa of tii« attl«ud« and pollojr pureuwd toy 
this eotintry in this x«»p«ot. 

The Kiniatei seestd r«Tf appreolatl've of ay baring 
given hln an aooount of vbat the Beoretaxy had said at 
hie press ooaferenoee yeetezday attd today in ttgnA to 
fhailaad. 



TS'.vmfBSti 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3705 




, 1<) 1;. 



3706 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3707 




3708 CONGRESSIOXAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



msmi&&' 



DEPMrTMENT OF STATU 



.,^ 



^^ 



^<ifi> 



^ 



DATV: 






PARTICIPANTS: 



■r. IsBiitm 



Qy 



COPIE 



■Ml* hmA Miem^i Ms t» mwrnA tm BvptrtMM «i«^ « 

tta to 06atflii« 1M» M ~ titat tiw AmI ««i«raMB% «Mir«« 
«• rwMla « faliway t«r«i ultia «n •wtttr&M towt ttet 
tto fhal ««raraMmt wwOd, if TlMdlMA atettU ^ «tU«teC 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3709 



3710 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





^^^^l" vnv «*^^ i^Mik. s iirtJini %iw iiiirtMM> tiwt •% th«t '^^ 


^^^B n«ai t ik«ft 4MI4 UMt » mm^t mmtm i* tfc«liiM«< tMwif , '^ 


^^^B; <9Mwft» fVMtdWft • «•»« UlMtTBttMl MT «h» wy !» 1llli«ll 


^^^B ^a»ff m» «9«u*4 «a.« wMMrt9r*» viOAm «* ■^■>int <a« 


^^^K 1» «OTaMt«« INH»l*«iKf iMMMM&WI. 


^^^V SMr li«tito9' <N^ «bttt m lft«tV|0««M tiM SMlnMUM 




^^^K^^ jfwaiif •« «»K^». «(» aMU «iM(i iau» 1tei».ginnitww< iMtM« 


^^^B' «» mmmi^^'mtmmt m «m «««»« «gteft ttMUUot ifemai %» 




^^^K «•* «•&«»« t«ft««» «M^ ««l«ki llill«W««l. CMltflMM* t» 


^^B; ^I&ImM. 


^^H 1 ««i4i «enito ^i»i> x mum %i0m ^eim mmue «» nm^ 


^^^B. K(i#ii^ df«tiHw« «^ ^^ mm»*mm tni i»iiii laiM mamt^ ^ 



««wtiiirsm^«» «»«>«»«»» ^% mti mi^^4»m* 




n^'^^'SX^m^^^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3711 



■ ■^'■-.im£?^,:'!» 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



J^':^- 



Memorandlom of CbnverscrfKM 

mVIBlO]i OF FAR EASTERN AFFAIRS 



OATS: August 



SUBJECT: Request ot Thailand for |>erml88lon to-|jurcha.se arse in 
thfi United Stfttee 

r- 



PARTic|feANTS;_ Mcujg ^Jewong'se Seni Pramoj, fhal Minister 



COPIES liO: 



IV-J; 




Th« Thai Minister called to see Mr, Hamil' 
the latter ■»&» engaged, h«» sefeed to se« fe, PeoJt- 

The MintBter recalls*, for thft infara^ 
tiiat h® had s»ll«a on Augast m Jfe. H^--. 

that he hsd Just reflslved « ti»iegr»v: >o«3rarR5ifr 

which pointed out that the fbal Sovemsent bad fAjwRsli- 
aanot»nc«sd Ita Intsntlon of resisting with f^y><-- 
«ggreB«lon that laisSit ba sttwwptsd .•«^5.r 
the basis of this &«claratlm. 
vhat the attitude of tim Aae-ricsB *trv»- 
toward Thailsuid If such ernst?. s>r 
%skA pl&oej tsertlfiular 
r»nd«r"any aesigtence to th« 



■1 






) 



,^ 



•I 



3712 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACxL 



-2- 



The MiniBter eald that Mr. Hamilton had outlined to 
him the Amerloan Government's attitude and policy toward 
rendering assl stance to countries which were re slating 
aggression, and Kr. Hamilton had Instanced the aid that 
the United States ie giving to China. The Minister^ said 
further that Mr. Hamilton had Indicated, before an 
authoritative reply could be given to the Thai Govern- 
ment's Inquiry, he would wish to lay the matter before 
higher authorities of the Government. 

The Minister said that today he had received another 
telegram from his Government which, In the gravity of Its 
tone, indicated that a critical state had been reached 
in respect of the thi'eat of invasion. His Government 
urged him to spare no effort to obtain an expression of 
the views of the Amerlo/»n Government in this situation. 

Reverting to his oonvereetion two days^ago with 
Mr. Hamilton, the lilnlster said that from the circumstance 
that Mr. Hamilton referred to American asei stance to China, 
he inferred that Mr. Hamilton had in mind asBlstance of 
the Lend-Lease variety. Assuming this to be the case, the 
Minister wished to say that the Thai Government was not 
asking for armament on credit, but was prepared to make 
purchases on a oommeroial baelo. The early acquisition of 

the arms 








EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3713 




the arme It sought was of the utmost importance to the Thai 
Government, which, at present. Is poorly auopllefl with 
equipment. Consequently, the Thai Oovernaient would be very 
grateful to leara how soon, if the American Government W 
could make arms available for purchase, ahipmentB could be 
arranged and eould begin. 

The Minister said that, speaking as man to man, the 
Thais were traditionally suspicious of Japan; he personally 
felt that in the recent contact with Japan his country had 
"played with fire", but he trusted that 1^. Peck understood 
the background of the matter. 

The Minister observed, as his own nersonal reaction to 
recent news, that the- large number of troops dispatched by 
Japan into Indochina was an ominous sign. The Japanese must 
have been aware that they would meet with no resistance in 
Indochina, which was under the control of Vichy and hence 
of Germany, and these forces must be Intended for use else- 
wh(?re. Mr. Peck remarked thst the newspapers sus-^jested 
they might toe Intended for use a.mlnst Malaya. The Minister 
reolled that the Japanese, in his opinion, would never dare 
to make an attack on Malaya without previously occupying 
Thailand, because to do so would be to leave their flank 
open to attack from Burma. He deduced that these forces 
were Intended for the occupation of Thailand end that the 
danger to Thailand was accordingly imminent end serious. 

The fact 



3714 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




-4- 

The faot of the matter now le that Thailand la deter- 
mined to maintain Its Independence, If It 06ui poselbly find 
the means of doing so. In this emergenoy the Thai Govern- 
ment Is anxiously waiting to learn the nature of the reply 
that the American Oovernment will give to the Inquiry 
transmitted on August IE. 

Mr. Peck eald that he would report to Mr. Hamilton at 
onoe the observations made by the Thai Minister. 



# 



?E:Peck;MHP 



\>amtmsMim»^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3715 



3716 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



-«.- 



Bcitftvi 



uosan0«.to tho aovftrnoi? vcnor&l- 

Oa a quootlon in- relation tc cnio atr.i;onont idcn 
oonf Irnod that in tho event of aa attack toy Japon 
tho British EDplrc will back us up con ' ' ' . . Tho 

Doclrx(ifctv:;n of thu British Oovornncnt cr.n do considorcd 
satioJ'actory politically but it is aiscpp frraa 

a atratogicttl point of viotr. On the olgh-th insinnt 
a conforoncc v.lll bo hold with Edon tc discuss tho 
poaaibilltj of drnwlnj up r^-nothcr f ' ' >*iich 

tho proposed staff diacugslDni. ccnc autajaati sally into 
action, atncc it hc.$ bocoac cl. ' c Onitod 

States and England will net rc:5ist •Jr.pcr.csc cooupation 
of "niailwid -with foroo of anas. It is also brcii^t 
to your attontlcn that any suarantcc or cortainty of 
United Stntos participation by force of arws is ab- 
solutely oxcludcd." 

T!tiroo« Whllo tho gonorr.l public hts no icnowlcdgc 
of tho abovo quoted tologrcri it has boon circulated 
rctlior frcGly cj.;-. ■ h officials "tAxcTo it hr.s 

aroused vcrying dogrooa of r^looti, pesslislari, rjid 
bittor fooling against tho tfnitod State, 



'.*? 
W 



FOOT! 



NPL 



■Hi 



m 



n 



'M^"::' 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3717 



DEPARTMENT CH^ STATE ,; ^— j „. .. • » 




Mtfmonmdi/m of Conversatkui 

DATE:AMNMt.|% VHL, 



SUBJECT: MTIIVM W ff«^ 9i0fWHtBKt fVUMti t imAif St WfWHt 99 

mam. 



s* 



PAm-iciPANTS: MMMMMOt MUU AX9 fW MSKUSM Of fUSUMl, 



COPIES TO: 






>^ 



v^ 4^' 



• ^i^". n W^ ^m>' ^i^^r»-^»ii 



^^-r?-.. 



.''if 



«• Ida fiWMOMMSl Mt «MM««EiM Willi MMkHP WA 

iMpa «M «r tm ttlwwr ii— ifftti— j thaS tBi* «vMg»s «r 



IMICMC BM«lMlt. ^1* M« ar «M ^^iKlMI «i»t ilMlP ftMl 



•l»|«««ivt !• to 0» Htttti ifaA attMk siaipiMMM* s« imIA 



3718 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





mmm^wtm M 




WMMMM M 


^^^^B IMMk fftf^' JiVMMMt "^ttl pMMiy iftRH MM 


mtmmmi m 


^^^^^HEf .'HjMlUk (tUilHHiMKll SMMIiWii ftft MM^V 1M ^MdMM 


rmmwmmmmA 9 


^^^B^ itiiwiliiiil« 




^^^B Ifcii wiirimy immiii nmt jirmmiL 


> m m» mm» 




Wta»«M«MM 


^^H «gi& mm «iy «r «tai JM» i«tMWM twMi 


^•yttlkiV' 


^^^^^^^^^^^ "^iR^MMr ^W^p^W ^BPWJ 8i^^W ^•w ^^WBBBWn^ • IPW IPBMp ilHWP flRV 




■Htimii MlMlSy 


^^^^^^K MMPBB #nW9r MMnNKP^f Mil tHMril m lA IN 


»«ii M rtiiiiiit 


^^H £« if«iii iiLM ttiBiur •» iM« M u vMAiftr iMftt. m 


^^^H| tUm fl1l>1|gf llttl lAC MMft SaNMIMMA SA Mttliim «l •• «Ml 


^^H| ^ mm'mm wtani «it imtoii «t wu m 


iii'iinmirt twiiit 


^^H %» !«(•»«•» Mil mmmg i« MM St AmUa k» iftian iM 




s M»««»iii» 




timum 


^^^^^K MMMfaMy ^ItHflMff iMtWMMI wir iM fMMI 


MMtMKAMU 




tf AwM <rt &Kf 






k«Ni»«v m» 


^^^B. ;' fi»i<i»t mm UML M «to OKuiMt immmk mm. u •«»» 




^^^^^Hk MMfMlflNI ^ SiPNMrtWi IV^ AHPtS$ ttM MAJHN 


>«f «gr«M 


^^^B: 9axmmmmmmimt^mAm»9a»mm«* 


«lwimi»« 




iiUi«wr 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3719 



OUna acaiMt W» acpwMlM «r aip«ft»««tAlttg Imp la m^ 
m^ M " t t t A «t*« «« wnM »Ut» nMiimft la Um mmut m^t^ 
wofi llM« z luem aixMir mm liMUi «wni mi^Hmmt. 

▼«t«l«a «r fM««« a^ptdally «7 wwitviM Hke t«M^r 



I 



«• tarn xu n trmtXmg imp ff ^ iaaa i ' ttaft gaaiy mtsAMr mm m^ 
ttM 0iftta tmtffitf^MR* mn ^ i^M «9 mc^iMti «» «fA«&i&# 
lA t iMmy d «r m» maXmm jmgmit aai. laf^m Hmk «f «lMi 
a««ta aaA mmmt •« »wUna« Z »Mi&«gr mm «wi S 

tt» yaiyaaa af aMteagiai .l»fisni»^ aliMt* laft*- mmsm' 
IdLM.'^ta yawaa fca l laait ffnatlmw tmt. m^ mtmr m pr 
sm Htm wmmSM. «ms inwr imm Wm lm pmskmm m 




3720 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




MILL IM04CA1C WHt' 
(Full Ut« 

Coiln-t .Oai Irttfi 
iSi(tM Irii^r 

Full n(F 
' Bay l.'tt'f 
Niirhl If'lrt 



■ • 



i4 



Tel€GRAm Sent 
Srpart«u»nt of S>tatr 



I'j D( rflANIMilIlD 
;, <ONf lOtMTtAL COOe y^ 
ttcjHf .;Nt <Dt**TIAL OOOC 
rAXTAIII 



Waahinglon, 



:k (that: 

■ (L- , Cc';obs! 



■?, 10 n.". 
irtloularly lnter.s8ted in the 



"rl ti;;: 






<£) 



RL& 



^ 



':e-,>a:-t-.c"~.t; was on 



"ormla^• Vne drlu\t',r 



Sir,V>a38y. .n re-ly lo ar; Inciulry , thst It fnvored t:\e 

ln.^aoore, but t**i ret>ly^h8B 
/s A 



'ei«- led 






i • consideration of 

litttia of Will III liMMWL. till 

A 



•\3 
C 

'v. 

> 
o 



/ 






Kl3 

: LJH 
Stnt iy optraUn hi 



m 






OE 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3721 



C«3fAN-fft 



MifMrtankan io/ CmviemahR 



OATS; llQ-^mt^bap 4, 1941 



aoWBCT: Situation In •Rjailand. 



PARTicfPAMtSi Sir Ron&M Gsu^bwll, iJriiElah Ministsr; 
Mr. Well«9, Under Ssorofcary. 



CtM>tESTO: s, A-B, PA/H, PE, SU 





••« i— M 



sir Honald Cej^ball oall»d to »«« ms tiiio momtng at 
hla request. 

He inquired wbsths>r this Government could as yet 
give the British Qoverninant e reply to th» coasai^mlcatlon 
he had left with b» a few daya ago regarding th® 8ltt.a- 
tion In Thailand. 

I told the Minister that I had assumed that a reply- 
had al3Mady been made to him by ttr. Hornbook In aa aiuoh 
as I had approved a draft reply some days ago and that It 
was my understanding that the Secretary of State had llke- 
wiae approved this draft. I then called Dr. Hornbeck on 
the telephone who told »e that tlM delivery of tha reply 






fC 



s 



r 



79716 O— 46 — pt. 19- 



-20 



3722 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



sij>&*"-*<i i»t 



JtEtp&nssA hf mk7 of ihdoeMxut on 



Hivnali that e«rt»lB. qutctlon* 

t. ™. ,. ^,. .-.- •--^„ .uiaA as well &« K»ilartd 

bad arl««n Juat as jDr. Horribeok waa About to glva the 
ifplj of tbla Qo^spnment to tfas Barltleh Emb*««y, «nd that 
for tJW tism beiftg, tliar«for«, our reply would have to be 
pontpo&ad. 

Sir Ron#ld said he f-olly -underatood tUe olrounstancaa. 



^^ 




UjSWjIJ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3723 



^ TELEGRAM RECEI)^^,, 

This tclcgl-ttn wuat-liC 

clOBEly parfphTGgcd be- 
fore being oc«nmunioc.ted 
to anyone, (C>, FROM Rec 'd 6:10 p.m. 



Doted November 6, 1941 Cs^ [^i 



Secretory cf Stntc 
Washington > 



.^^ 



Y-'^ 



504, Kovenbcr 6, 5 Ptr. , ( -ji.'.. -i-^i> v i»- . 
D* • • ■ '3 137, ^.Vb*fr p, 10 r .' . 
Cnie. Dcth the British !..i.>.lstEr cm. i, -r, 
■jnK- E;;tirtg th' t 24 flglr-ter plr.nca bK trnnsf errE^Jv 



" E i r' r 





3724 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3725 



I I 

TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



■ 1" t.-o' •, 



3726 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I 




Bfljigkok 



MA 

0l08Ely'f«4#R|MSMLRECEI5fiBfi> November 6, 1941 

fore being oom-nu nlORtEa 

to anyone. (C) Rcc'd 9:66 p.m. 




Seorctary of State, 
Washington. 



FROM 



UROENT. 

504, November 3, 5 p.m. (SECTION THREE). 

Schemce haj been of oonalderRble advantage to 
the United States and Great Britain becauee if Japan 
had acquired a dominant position in this country it 
would have had a favorable position from which to 
negotiate for seaports and airfields and to obstruct 
American and British aoccpR to the tin and rubber 
resources here. If Thailand had in any Important 
-•ri-ticular during recent :'Jonth8 sided with Japan as 
tiRE sel'f styled champion of Asia against American ejid 
British I.mperlall era the benefit to Japan's pro.j'ra:^ 
v;oald have been imT.ense, As things stand Great Brit~ 
ain has been left undisturbed in control of three 
fourths of the tin output and our Joint rubber r;-.::-- 
chasEs begun 3D{. <««> tr "l8 are proceeding at the rate 
of over 3,000 tons j.-vor.thly. Our extensive missionary 
'! '^Erprlsee are continuing without the xolestation 
they have cncpuntErEd in Japanese controlled areas. 
■ itnry Implications 

PECK 



[*.*SSW«5i»S,»..- .,■■ -^\-:^:\;^-. , , r\fi.;Jt.;-.'^'l¥V*/*r'/: 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3727 



r&XG$tAM -RECEIVED 



FROM 







m ifEot 











-ndf r 


no r,ji,ro ' f Ic 

r.rld- 






"•C'^Ents 








■; 'iCh5Ewed. 






Thrc-f. 








r-t; of 






pcr^lv r- Brit, la 














; Pri ME 














'xr.tXr.rt j n tns: 








Vl7 






" : t ^ ■ 


* 


lurries 




-• r 






*TM 














-^. _^ a: . ( '•/ . ' • 




(T 


». 1 , 


^ f « V .. V , s • 


/■ 



3728 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

It 

TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



GS !<;ingkok: 

Thla telegram must be _ ^ 

closely paraphrased be-f ""'^ Dated Novcr.ber 

fore being conimun coted 

to anyone, (C ) Re« d 10:04 > .n. 



Secretory of State, 
Washington , 

504, November 6, 5 p.ri. {SCCilOX ?1VE) 
56 piccEs of artHlrrty over a period cf ;bcut nine 
months anrt a pironlse to ooo.',:iiv Soiitrirrn 'Miailand with 
ar'"'"'i f.vT'i vji-rn '. ': , r Inv'.inx, :.■.-..., . ' 'r. :'rr v.^rth, 

Dlsi . .-, , ,. --ir-Eras ons thin ^^ _. . ...;,, .^ 

rrturn to ;,-,.. ...i : -^ ■•.,■•:- ■>! ndvaiitager- we Mrt re- 
cc'vitiK and for the r5ak ,.»^',nd ly incisD'injr tSirough 

1 1 wou _,...;:.;'■•'""' 

countr> ,■■ ., ^. ..■,.,:.. ' ■"'-'• nlli. ■.. ■ 

to cnvlsT,-'; p?.rt ' .„ ,. : ■,■_,,[.,■, ~. ex- 

pedient, Mircovtr. 11. iiiitiKj i.' '-ll iah ov.'ncd 

tin iriJn ca sncl "'' ''-.c rubber pl'^ntai lor:? are In ♦■'■.■:- 
aonth and If ukj weri^ snved nnd the bulk of the or'ini ry 
^ ' '■ '""■'' * '' ■ -. ■ '^■'.f; i'ro.""i'nnd:^ would allEt-e this 

;n ' ' ;t',>oj mi our i 3 In the Orient, 

Four, Indochina ena miiinu will be dry and 

PECK 



HTM 



SPTT—m^-- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 

'"\ "~ ■■ ^' «''"■ 

TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



3729 



■ -i-./ ■■i»-r-.*,ii-:. 



r..i a tEl£i.: - 



■■llltKrv 



jj.'.uarv to 
• ' -arasSTiu': 



cv- 



ild gun- 



g there --111 



i,ianEB for v':' 
til fo 



3730 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3731 





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3732 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





rxe&s*a put this on 
the ^gands for fhs next 
seating of th® Mmi330B 
Coital tt«e. 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3733 




DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



DIVISION OF FAR EASTERN AFFAIRS 



November 7, 
1941. 



Mr. 



Welles: 



It seems to me that the 

question of planes for Thai- 
land has reached a point 
where the only way to get 
forward with the matter is 
to have It considered by 
high officers of the War 
and Navy Departments along 
with officers of this Depart- 
ment. I therefore suggest 
that you may care to discuss 
this with General Marshall 
and %cith Admiral Star^, 



1 



892.24 



FE!MMH:HES 




3734 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3735 




3736 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3737 



<*«s. 



DEPARTMENT OF STAT«* \/' 

\ 

^■iO'^&mmr 6, 1941 3 





hersynder 
was haiia^t hj m^ to Sir 
HonaM Campbell this JBorning. 



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7971 fi O — 46 — pt. lit 21 



3738 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



fr'Vf' 



TrT.f.rNT or 

Department joeSTArtiv, 



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THE RjNDEFAii^iiiiAa' 





FE - Mr./^milton: 

I oonciiT entirely in tii© 
views set forth in the suggested 
memorandum to the Bi^itish Embassy. 
I suggest that this he given to 
the Secretary to read and if he 
concurs, that Dr. Hornbeck ask 
Sir %)nald Campbell to come in, 
and hand him the reply as drafted. 





•-"^H-iT^ 




'J:SV/jIJ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3739 




3740 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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3742 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

NOVEMBEB 11, 1941. 

Ip. m. 
Amlegation 

Bangkok (Thailand). ' 

145 
Ck)nfldential 

Department's 137, November 3, 10 p. ra. and 141, November 6, 1941, 6 p. m. to 
you. 

In connection with consideration which the Department is giving to the 
question of making available to Thailand certain supplies, the Department re- 
quests that you endeavor discreetly to obtain information in regard to specifica- 
tions and quantities of aviation gasoline and aviation lubricating oil that might 
reasonably be made available to the Thai air force under present circumstances. 
In sending to the Department your report and any recommendation which you 
may feel in a position to make, you should bear in mind the circumstance that, 
because of great and Increasing demands upon this country's production of high 
octane gasoline, careful disposition of available supplies is imperative. 

(SKH) HtJix. 



EXHIBITS or JOINT COMMITTEE 



3743 



WILL IHOICATK W««TH«t 



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3744 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

NOVEMBEB 22, 1941. 
8 p. m. 
Amlegation 
Bangkok 
153. 

Your 520, November 15, 2 p. m. and previous messages in regard to assistance 
for Thailand. 

One. The Department has on several occasions informed the Thai Minister 
in regard to the policy of the United States of extending assistance to countries 
resisting aggression and has stated to him that in the event that Thailand should 
be invaded and should endeavor in good faith to defend itself, the United States 
Government would place Thailand in the same category as China. 

The question of supplying planes to Thailand has been under active con. 
sideration by this Government and by the British Government. An officer of 
the British Embassy informed the Department November 18 that in view of the 
serious demands on British resources, the British Government was unable to 
supply any planes at the present time and that it was doubted whether bombing 
or fighting planes would be supplied from other sources, although inquiries were 
being made. The United States Government has also explored every possibility 
of supplying planes to Thailand, but it has been found impossible to spare any 
planes for Thailand at this moment in view of the tremendous demands of our 
own defense program as well as the urgent needs for planes by countries now 
actively resisting aggression. 

The question of supplying aviation gasoline and aviation lubricating oil to 
Thailand (your telegram no. 518, November 14, 7 p. m.) has also been under 
active consideration by the United States and British Governments. In a recent 
instruction to the British Minister at Bangkok, the British Foreign Office stated 
that the British Government was prepared at once to furnish limited amounts 
of aviation gasoline sufficient for the current requirements of the Thai air force. 
The appropriate authorities of the United States Government are now endeavor- 
ing to arrange for the supply of aviation lubricating oil to Thailand, and the 
Department expects to telegraph you further in this regard to the near future. 

Two. It may be stated for your information that the British Government has 
recently authorized the British Minister at Bangkok to offer to Thailand twelve 
field guns and twenty-four howitzers ; if this offer is accepted, twelve howitzers 
would be released at once from Malaya. The British Minister has also been 
authorized to assure the Thai Prime Minister that in respect to general defense, 
the British Government is ready to furnish QUOTE unobtrusive advice UN- 
QUOTE ; for this purpose the British Minister has been authorized in his dis- 
cretion to obtain the agreement of the Thai Government to the appointment of 
three additional assistant British military attaches to Thailand. 

Htnx. 
(DA) 
FE:RLS:MBW FE PA/H DE EA/T A-A. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3745 




DATE: NoTcmfcer 22, 1941. 



SUBJECT: Reported request of Japanese for uee of Thai, alrdjcooiee 
for •survey flighte*. , 

PARTICIPANTS: Mt. W. Q. Haytsr, Flret Secretai^y of the British Siabassy, 
Mr. Siayth. 



COPIES TO: 




x^ 



^JtjKrtjMirt «f 




Mr. Hayter of the BrltiBh Eiabaaey informed Mr. Smyth 
dui'lng a call on November 22, 1941 that aooordlng to a 
recent telegraa from the British Minister at Bungkofci 
japsneee members of the Thai- Indochina Boiuifiary CoBal«fiiOK 
are asking for the use of some Thai alrdroses for "giirv^y 
flights'! and also for aviation gasoline from Thailand, 
presumably to be used in these flights > Mr. Hayter 
added that thie Information had been givon to th« British 
at Bangkok by the Thai Minister of Foreign Affairs, 



-4 



FS;S!5rth:?IHS 



3746 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3747 



MX' 



as t 

be«i iisfor«6id by b 

^ . . iiil'iJiitsiy 

luable i all&nd. 

ttift Asabnseedor then - ii^a Qorer 

•ent that the eUuation sslgiit b« «selior-&>=6d c-y a credit 
of 110,000,000 to TbsUand hj fm tJnltsd States. I l-pIA 
that this iBf^ttsr wo-ilA rie giv^r, i-iu.'.-.?!!. ideration. 



V 



3748 congressionj^l investigation pearl harbor attack 

, Department of State, 
Division of Cuebbnt Information, 

November 26, 1941. 
Radio Bulletin No. 280 

Note : This digest has been compiled from press and other sources and Is in no way an 
expression of official opinion. 

WHITE HOUSE 

Yugoslavia. — At his press conference this morning Secretary Early informed 
correspondents that information had reached this Government from several of 
its Intelligence Services to the effect that the Germans have decided to make a 
final assault on Belgrade. He said that the reason behind the German plans is 
that the Nazi Army believes Belgrade to be the base of operations for the Chetniks. 
He continued that according to declarations of high German oflBcials the bombard- 
ment to which Belgrade has been subjected will be nothing to compare to what 
is now in store for the city, and that the Germans have decided to raze Belgrade, 
which will be surrounded by troops and exposed to bombardment by artillery and 
from the air. He added that the sources of this Government's information are 
convinced that the Germans have decided to carry this attack on in the same way 
as they have done previously with the city of Chabatz. 

STATE department 

Press Conference. — A correspondent said that according to reports two Amer- 
ican military observers have been captured in liibya by the Axis forces and 
inquired whether we had the right under international law to demand their return 
or whether they were to be regarded as legitimate prisoners of war. The Secre- 
tary said that he would first have to look at the law to be certain of his answer. 
In reply to an inquiry as to the position that would be taken with regard to the 
further report that some newspaper correspondents have been captured, the Secre- 
tary said that then he would certainly have to look at the law. 

Questioned whether we had received any request to intervene in or prevent 
the reported plans of the Germans to bombard Belgrade, Mr. Hull indicated that 
he had no knowledge of any request so far as concerned the bombardment itself 
but that if he should learn anything he would be glad to tell the correspondents. 

Asked about the conversations with the Japanese envoys today, the Secretary 
pointed out that he did not think he would serve either the correspondents or 
the Government any good purpose by undertaking to go into those matters at this 
time. In reply to a question whether he was going to meet the envoys agaib 
today or tonight, he said that the matter was now receiving attention. A cor- 
respondent pointed out that an allegedly authoritative Tokyo despatch took a 
gloomy view of the discussions because of the continued conference with the 
so-called ABCD powers, on the ground that these discussions were regarded as 
a threat against Japan. Mr. Hull replied that, as he had stated, he thought that 
it would not be of any advantage to go into these matters at the present. 

Asked for comment on the reported news item from Buenos Aires to the effect 
that Argentina was reluctant to accept a three-year embargo on Argentine sales 
of strategic materials to the Axis powers in return for our agreeing to purchase 
Argentine commodities, the Secretary said that all he could say offhand was that 
we had been having some conversations on those sulsjects but that he thought 
that, perhaps with one or two exceptions, the discussions had referred to a one-year 
period. 

Requested to elaborate on intimations received by the press from Mexico City 
this morning that we may soon begin a series of general staff talks with the 
Mexican Army, the Secretary said that we would naturally have to look to the 
Army and Navy for accurate knowledge on this subject. 

DEFENSE 

Lend'Lease. — Lend-Lease Administrator Edward R. Stettinius on Monday an- 
nounced that total lend-lease expenditures at the end of October were approxi- 
mately 919 million dollars and that increases since then have brought the figure 
to more than a billion dollars. The announcement added that the steady increase 
in lend-lease aid is shown by the following monthly amounts in millions of dollars : 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3749 



















Total to 


ar. 


Apr 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Oct 31, 1941 


18 


40 


60 


85 


134 


150 


207 


225 


919 



Actual contracts have been let for more than 75 percent of the first seven 
billion dollar Lend-Lease Bill and 100 percent of the funds therein have been 
allocated. The new six billion dollar appropriation is being allocated rapidly. 
Since the beginning of the war, our exports to the British, including Lend-Lease 
aid. have amounted to approximately five and a quarter billion dollars, most 
of which was financed by the British with their own dollars. In October, 
exports to the British were the largest of any month since the war began. 

Local Defense Councils. — Director La Guardia of the OCD has announced that 
a total of 0,935 local defense councils have been organized throughout the 
United States to employ 7n3,407 volunteers as air raid wardens, auxiliary police, 
auxiliary firemen, bomb squads, rescue squads, etc., plus 196,101 persons holding 
Red Cross certificates issued since June 1. 

He said that he was gratified at the increase in number of local defense councils 
but that their organization must move at an even greater rate if we are to be 
prepared to meet any emergency. 

Defense Effort Comparison. — The OPM Bureau of Research and Statistics has 
issued a comparisoji of present industrial defense efforts with that of the U. S. 
during 1917 and 1918 which shows in part: (1) disbursements for industrial 
activity month by month are at a higher level today than in World War I; (2) 
due to' lower price levels, the U. S. is probably getting more value for every 
dollar spent than in 1917 and 1918; (3) the productive capacity of each workman 
has greatly increased because of increased industrial efficiency through technical 
advances and billions of dollars of additional investment. 

Maritime Commission. — In a summary of contracts and progress in their whole 
shipbuilding program, the Maritime Commission reported that, as of November 
first, there were 809 vessels for which contracts had been let. Deliveries to date 
have amounted to 118, keels for 261 have been laid and 146 vessels have been 
launched. 

Light Draft Vessels. — President Roosevelt signed legislation on Monday au- 
thorizing the expenditure of $300,000,000 for construction or conversion of 400 
ships to be used as light-draft vessels by the Navy for inshore and Naval 'base 
defense work. 

Ferry Command. — As the Army Air Corps Ferrying Command passes the three 
million mile mark in safe delivery flights, they report that their pilots pick 
up planes at "reception points" i. e., factories, fly them to "installation points" 
where flight equipment for over-water flight is installed, and deliver them to such 
"transfer points" as Montreal and Miami where the planes are checked over 
before the transoceanic flyers of the R. A. F. Ferry Command take over. The 
ACFC has been so organized that it will also -be able to handle the President's 
50,000 plane-a-year program and its operations can be changed as the theater 
of war changes. It is providing valuable training for pilots and crews in flying 
military aircraft under carefully prepared flight plans. 

Ordnance. — Ordnance Department awards on Monday totalled $94,477,819. 
Largest item was the contract awarded to General Motors for armor-piercing 
projectiles, which amounted to $35,705,287. A total of $11,708,300 was awarded 
to three firms for the manufacture of anti-aircraft guns. 

The Denver Small Arms Manufacturing Ordnance Works, where production 
started in September will be expanded with new buildings and machinery for 
the manufacture of a greater quantity of small arms, the War Department 
announced yesterday. 

Quartermaster Corps. — The Quartermaster Corps of the War Department has 
concentrated its purchasing this month on clothing for the Army. A total of 
$76,3§4,471 has been spent for this equipment. Besides large orders for shoes, 
wool trousers, raincoats and miscellaneous items, the Quartermaster Corps has 
ordered 16,816.585 yards of cloth, mostly all-wool serge, to be made into clothing. 

Military Attaches. — The War Department has announced the assignment of the 
following three officers as Assistant Military Attaches to the Legation at Cairo: 
Captain Paul M. Wickens, Captain William S. Moore, and Captain Guy E. Parker. 

Aluminum Plants. — Federal Loan Administrator Jesse Jones has announced 
that upon recommendation of the OPM an aluminum plant costing $33,000,000, 
including power facilities, and having an annual capacity of 128,000,000 pounds 
of aluminum will be constructed at Lake Catherine, Arkansas, and will be oper- 
ated by the Aluminum Company of America under a five-year lease. 



3750 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Concurrently he announced that an aluminum fabricating plant, costing ap- 
proximately $22,000,000 and having an annual capacity of approximately 60,000,- 
000 pounds of fabricated aluminum, will be constructed on a 115 acre tract of 
land at Fairview, Oregon, and will be operated by the Aluminum Company of 
America. 

Defense Housing Priorities. — Acting FWA Administrator Edy has announced 
priorities for building materials which will expedite the defense public works 
program now in the construction stage are being obtained for contractors from 
0PM. He said projects in the $150,000,000 community facilities program will re- 
ceive priority ratings generally ranging from A-2 to A-8. 

USHA Administrator Straus reported the USHA is building defense homes at 
an average cost of $2,789. The Lanham Act sets a $3,500 limit on construction 
cost of such homes. 

President Roosevelt asked Congress for $15,000,000 in supplemental funds for 
defense housing. The funds would be used to build 3,000 trailers, 4,400 dormitory 
units and 3,550 portable houses. 

Labor Supply. — The Social Security Board reports that estimates of labor needs 
in selected defense industries show that approximately 475,000 workers were 
scheduled to be hired in 9,900 establishments in 26 defense industries during the 
six-months period September 1941-February 1942. 

Aircraft and shipbuilding industries are expected to take on nearly 250,000 
workers, expanding current employment 32 and 38 percent respectively. Employ- 
ers in 6.400 iron and steel and nonelectrical machinery establishments estimated 
they would need more than 87,000 additional workers in the next six months. 
The estimates forecast a layoff of 59,00 workers in the automobile and automobile 
equipment industry with 20,800 new hires. The tire and inner tube industry 
also anticipated a net reduction in employment. The number of workers engaged 
in manufacture of industrial rubber goods will also decline somewhat by the 
end of next February, the Board said. 

The Board also reported labor shortages are expected to develop prior to Janu- 
ary 1, 1942, in 179 of 306 selected defense occupations. Shortages were already 
occurring in 146 of these categories in mid-September. Suflacient employment 
service registrants are available to meet all reported demands in the remaining 
127 occupations, the Board said. 

Navy Enlistments. — At a Navy Department press conference this morning Ad- 
miral Nimitz, Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, said that the Navy now needs 
13,000 volunteers a month to keep pace with expansion under the two ocean 
Navy shipbuilding program, and that by next July 15,000 or more volunteers a 
month would probably be required. 

Aircraft Merger. — The press today reported a prospective merger of Vultee 
Aii'craft, Inc., of Downey, California, which has plants in Downey, Nashville, 
and Wayne, Michigan, with the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation, whose prin- 
cipal plant is in San Diego, California. It was pointed out that such a merger, 
if carried out, will unite two concerns which have defense orders totaling about 
$1,000,000,000 and are turning out every type of plane — from small commercial 
vehicles to large 4-motor, 28-ton bombers. 

The press quotes Major Reuben H. Fleet, president of Consolidated, and Mr. 
Richard W. Millar, president of Vultee, in a joint statement issued yesterday 
in part as follows : "Of our own volition we have for some time been mutually 
exploring the business aspects of a possible future association. The facilities, 
products, proximity of location and experience of Consolidated and-Vultee so com- 
plement each other as to make possible the more expeditious completion of their 
defense assignments." 

MISCE3XANE0U8 

Crude Oil Prduction. — According to the press crude oil production in the United 
States for the week ending November 22 shot upward to 4,300.000 barrels, estab- 
lishing a new all time high record by a wide margin. The crude oil output 
has been increasing steadily since the beginning of this year on an average of 
about 3,500,000 barrels daily according to statistics of the U. S. Bureau of Mines. 
The Office of the Federal Oil Coordinator for National Defense has estimated 
that the demand might readi 4,500,000 barrels daily by next year. 

Life Insurance. — According to the press the Prudential Life Insurance Company 
of America today announced that its reserve basis would be cut from three and 
one-fourth to two and one-half percent and that premiums on new ordinary life 
Insurance policies would be increased about eight percent on January 1. This 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3751 

action follows the lead of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company which last 
week announced a reduction of its reserve basis from three to two and three- 
fourths percent. Both companies attribute this move to lower yields on high- 
grade bonds. 

Cost of Living. — Labor Secretary Perkins has reported that the cost of goods 
purchase by wage earners and lower-salaried workers in large cities increased 
1.2 percent from mid-September to mid-October. "Advances in rents and in 
prices of food — clothing, automobiles, and certain house furnishings, resulted 
in an increase of al)out 1.0 percent," she said, "and excise taxes levied by the 
Revenue Act of 1941 caused the further increase of about 0.2 percent." Miss 
Perkins said the cost of goods index for October 15, 1941 was 109.4 compared with 
100 as the 1935-39 average. 

Construction Prospects. — The 0PM Bureau of Research and Statistics has 
issued a survey which predicts the volume of all construction next year will be 
higher than any year between 1930 and 1940 despite an expected 65 percent 
reduction in non-defense building. Total defense building, the survey stated, is 
expected to reach $9,000,000,000 in January 1942 ; $12,000,000,000 by July 1942 ; 
and $15,000,000,000 during 1943. 

Home Building. — The Federal Home Loan Bank Board has announced material 
and labor costs for a standard six-room house as of September 1941, increased 
13.2 percent above costs for the same period for 1940. Building supply costs 
dui'ing the 12-month period rose 12.3 percent as compared with a 15i2 percent 
labor cost increase. 

Washington Rental Rates. — Acting Commissioner Hinrichs, U. S. Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, has reported that rents wei-e raised for approximately one- 
seventh of homes occupied by white tenants in Washington suburban areas during 
the 22-months period from October, 1939 to August, 194^1 Most of the increases 
in the suburban counties of Alexandria, Arlington, Montgomery and Prince 
Georges occurred after October, 1940 and were attributed to the increasing number 
of Government employees brought to Washington by the expanding national 
defense program. 

Radio. — Lloyd A. Free, Director of the FCC Foreign Broadcasting Monitoring 
Service, has announced the establishment in London of a listening post to report 
on European radio propaganda. The London office, Mr. Free said, will utilize the 
monitoring facilities of the BBC and wil have a four or five-man force. The 
purpose of the office wil be to (1) listen to and record propaganda broadcasts 
made by Governments of the European continent to their own people, and (2) 
sift from these broadcasts any information which might be of value to the United 
States. 

According to the press the office would be essentially a part of the Intelligence 
Service of the Government which at present has in operation monitoring stations 
in Washington, Puerto Rico and Oregon, supplying information to about 19 
Government agencies. 

Coal Strike. — Dr. John Steelman, appointed by the President to represent the 
public on the three-man board to arbitrate the captive coal mine dispute, today 
convened the board at the Hotel Commodore in New York City. 

Stock Market. — "Volume of trading on Tuesday: 840,000 shares. Dow-Jones 
closing stock averages: Industrials — 116.96; Railroads — 28.10; Utilities — 15.80. 

Stocks turned down today in moderate trading. Curb stocks were mixed and 
Chicago stocks irregularly lower. In Chicago wheat closed off one-half to seven- 
eighths cents and corn was off one-fourth to five-eighths cents. 

Japanese Discussions. — Following a conference this evening between the Secre- 
tary and Ambassadors and Nomura and Kurusu correspondents were informed 
by a State Department official that the Japanese representatives were handed 
for their consideration a document that was the culmination of conferences back 
and forth during recent weeks and that it was unnecessary to repeat what had 
been said so often in the past that it rests on certain basic principles with which 
the correspondents should be entirely familiar in the light of many repetitions. 



3752 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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Sour 523', Hovttfflber 22, 9 a.s. 

One. Ib» Dapartmant unflor daw of Nov««b«i' 8£ 
telegrapii.1.caily jjiBtructed cur offloars in She ereas 
•tiontd as follow*; 

QUOf£ fix* l>«i>ci:'ttment dealres thftt Vm« teeri&s^ 
diploaatlo and consulRr off Jeers oonc«med call to 
t'ao attention cf AiB«rlcaji oitiaens In tae Jap&nsBtt 
Sinplre, Ja|>an68S~ocoapt«<l are&e of Galea, Kor^g i-oaiS, 
Maoao, and fr^nofa Indooftlna tm sdvlcs previously 
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«ls« that tii# eiUpping problea In tb© Jaoifio l« 
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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



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3754 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



Memorandum of Convenai 



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.» 



DATE: November 27, 1941. 



SUBJECT: 



PARTICIPANTS: V.OT. Bs 

la-. Smyth 



COPIES TO: 



II' 



Jewongse Seni PrfimoJ, tne Thfll Minister, ./- "^..njaMM 
yth T:d Mr. Adams (C^ ^^ T^O^^J^ 

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to 

^ 

I 

'. • e ;:i=l Kinlsttr cplled uoon his ov-n lnltl°tlvf. . ^ 

-4 

t ' i J ". t poine time a^o i-lr. Haiuilton jned told .sj 

r n ii(- r.-'u 'ny ■ ut .- t;.on to aek In re si^d to 

:n^il.-'nd he should not iieeltate to call 
^Yri /•*««i»*J«t»»-i«wBB***W|^ :v..o. ; fk u.!-; tlons hlch he hed In mind. 

1.1 v?ntat;e of -■'!•. Hflmllion's klnd- 

; :~ t if Tiornlr.^ . 

th s^na r,jld tiif Tnai Klnister t.ru-t 

■ 3 !n oonferetiof "mi v ^ thfit he himself 

.-1 ;-ll:-ilEtrr. 
* ■ t:ip follo>-lng s; ort 

', ■ - in The M(^v York Times wae 




accurate: ,\ 

1 



-. A 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3755 



accurate: 

"The State Department said: ' 
' The Japanese representatives were handed for their 
consideration a document that is the culmination of con- 
ferences back and forth during recent weeks. It Is, unnecessary 
to repeat what has been said so often in the past that it 
rests on certain basic principles with which the correspon- 
dents should be entirely familiar in the light of many 
repetitions. ' " 

Mr. Adams replied that he understood that the statement 
was substantially accurate. The Thai Minister asked whether 
the last sentence might be interpreted to mean that the 
United States insisted that the Japanese evacuate both 
French Indochina and China. 

Mr. Adams replied that he had no information or 
authority which would enable him to be specific In his 
reply to the Thai Minister's oueetlon. Mr. Adams said, 
however, that the President and the Secretary of State had 
on Miny occasions outlined the attitude of this G-overr.ment 
tov.'^srd scouislt'one of territory by force. Mr. Adams said 
that there hed been no change in this tiovt^rnment 's attitude 
in that respect. 

The Thai Minister thanked Mr. Smyth and Mr. Adams 
for the Information wh.l ch they had given him. Ke added 
that neturRlly his Govcrruient war vitally intf^rested In the 
subject matter of the statement and he v?lFhtd to keep his 

Cfovern'n'nt 



3756 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3757 

DEa?ARTMENT OF StATE, 

Division of Cubrent Information, 
Radio Bulletin No. 282 November 2S, 19Jfl. 

Note : This digest lias been compiled from press and other sources and is in no way an 
expression of official opinion. 

White House 

Merchant Ship Arming. — The Wliite House today made the following announce- 
ment : 

"American merchant vessels sailing on routes between the United States ports 
and ports of Spain, Portugal and their adjacent island possessions will not be 
armed. 

"American merchant vessels sailing in the inter-American trade between ports 
of the United States and ports in Central and South America will not be armed. 

"American merchant vessels sailing on routes in the Pacific Ocean will not be 
armed under existing circumstances. 

"Public announcement will be made of any change of policy affecting any of 
these routes." 

Press Conference. — The President informed correspondents that he planned to 
depart from Washington at 3 : 00 p. m. today for Warm Springs, Georgia, on a 
vacation that had twice been postponed, and that while he did not know when he 
would return, he hoped that it need not be before December 2, adding that he 
might have to return because of existing conditions in the Pacific. Asked how 
long he expected these conditions to exist, the Pre.sident referred the correspond- 
ent to Tokyo and not Washington. A correspondent inquired whether the Presi- 
dent could comment on further developments concerning the Japanese situation 
and the President indicated that while not able to do so, no reply had been 
received to Secretary Hull's note (see Radio Bulletin No. 279 of November 26), 
but that talks had not broken down. He added that the American policy con- 
tinued to be one of infinite patience. 

A correspondent asked what the Administration's policy was with regard to 
legal and lobbying activities on the part of former public officials, particularly 
in the matter of construction projects in connection with the defense program. 
The President said that he had discussed this with the Attorney General and 
that they were in favor of legislation which would prevent such avtivities on the 
part of persons having previously held responsible Government positions. He 
pointed out that in the past certain Government departments had prohibited such 
activities within a two-year period of holding public office. 

A correspondent mentioned a report that the people of Puerto Rico were appre- 
hensive over the outcome of an economic survey to take place regarding countries 
in the Carribbean area because the so-called "plan" would prejudicially afCect 
their country. The President replied that there was nothing in that story as 
presented by the correspondent. He said that a study was under consideration 
in which Puerto Rico would take part as well as other places in that area. He 
added that he did not see how the Puerto Ricans could worry about a study that 
has not yet begun and in which they would participate. Asked whether there 
was any possibility of joint Anglo-American consideration of certain problems 
involved, the President said that that might be possible. 

The President was asked if he had any information concerning the attitude 
of the independent steel companies with regard to the three-man arbitration 
board appointed by the President in the captive mine dispute and he replied that 
he knew nothing other than what had appeared in the press on the subject. 

State Department 

Finland. In response to inquiries as to developments in the Finnish situation, 
the Secretary of State today stated that the Finish note had been given careful, 
consideration but that it had thrown no light upon the question uppermost in 
the mind of this Government, that is, how far and to what extent the Finnish 
military policy is one of combined operations of the Germans and Finns vitally 
to injure Great Britain and her associates and to threaten the northern supply 
lines over which Russia is now receiving supplies and assistance from Great 
Britain and the United States to aid Russia in resisting the Hitler forces of in- 
vason and conquest, and to what extent that Finnish policy is a menace to all 
America's aims for self-defense. The recent journey of the Finnish Foreign 
Minister to Berlin to join with Hitler's puppet governments over Europe in sie»- 



3758 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

ing the "anti-Comintern Pact" used by Hitler solely as an instrument to wage a 
war of conquest and domination against free peoples, is highly significant 
and cannot be camouflaged or explained away by propagada attacks on nations 
engaged in defending themselves. 

The Secretary went on to say that the Department was giving careful attention 
.0 all the reports and information which might furnish a definite answer to this 
question. The concern of this Government, which has been emphasized by the 
studies made by the War Department and the statement of the Secretary of War 
on November 25, as to Finnish policy in this regard, has been made abundantly 
i;iear to the Finnish Government, the Secretary said. 

The Secretary concluded by saying that every act of the Finnish Government 
since the delivery of its note has confirmed our apprehensions that it is fully 
cooperating with the Hitler forces. 

CONGRESS 

Anti-strike Legislation. — As movements continued within the House Rules, 
Labor and Naval Affairs Committees for various types of legislation designed to 
curb strikes in defense industries, the Senate Judiciary Committee today approved 
the bill sponsored by Senator Connally, the principal feature of which would 
permit seizure and operation of strike-bound defense plants (see Radio Bulletin 
No. 277 of November 22 ) . 

Concurrently the House Labor Committee today voted favorably on the Rams- 
peck bill which is described by the press as foremost among the various House 
proposals which have received the backing of Administration leaders and is 
regarded as a compromise of various proposals. According to the press, the bill at 
present embodies the substance of various proposals made including a strengthen- 
ing by statute of the powers of the National Defense Mediation Board; a "cooling 
off" period before strikes could become operative; compulsory arbitration under 
Presidential discretion ; and, as a last resort. Government seizure and operation of 
strike-bound plants. The press says that proponents of the bill regard it as a 
"reasonable measure" and thus likely to receive Presidential support, notwith- 
standing the anticipated opposition of the AFL as well as the CIO. President 
Green of the former yesterday was reported to have stated that no need existed for 
any such legislation in so far as concerns the AFL as it has allegedly supported no 
strikes of serious magnitude in defense industries. The CIO is said to oppose all 
anti-strike measures generally as of a "repressive" nature. 

According to the press, representatives of management for the most part are in 
support of legislation of the type under consideration, with the exception of 
compulsory arbitration, which was yesterday denounced by the National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers. 

DEFEINSE 

Explosives. — The War Department today aimounced that production of Tri- 
Nitro-Toluene (TNT), the Army's most important high explosive, has increased 
111 percent in the first three weeks of November at the two Government-owned 
plants now in operation. TNT is used alone or mixed with ammonium nitrate as 
a bursting charge for high explosive shells and bombs. 

Army Construction. — Brig. Gen. Somervell, former Chief of Army Construction 
Division, now Assistant Chief of Staff, .speaking at the annual meeting of the 
NA'ashington Society of Civil Engineers, said "a blitzkrieg of building" during the 
first 15 months of the $3,r)0O,O0O,OO0 emergency building program has put the 
program "on schedule and we intend to keep it there". To date, he said, "prompt 
and superior" shelters and training quarters have been provided for 1.500,000 
troops and "two-score" munitions plants have been erected "from-the ground up," 
many of them months ahead of schedule. The construction effort, "the greatest 
ever undertaken in this Nation," is not "puncture-proof or perfect". Mistakes 
have been made "but they have been frankly admittted and promptly rectified," 
Gen. Somervell said. 

Stinison. — War Secretary Stimson said at his press conference yesterday that 
optimistic press reports on performance of American equipment used by the 
British in Egypt and Libya had been borne out by meagre despatches from our 
military ob.servers. but that "The whole campaign is still in a state of flux, and 
it will be some time before we have the whole story. So far as it has gone, our 
equipment has been satisfactory, and the press has not overemphasized our 
tanks." He said that the Army "has shown really wonderful progress, and I 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3759 

think along the right lines," in the current maneuvers in Carolina, and that the 
Army's goal is to develop hard-hitting combat units, whether armored or infantry, 
adding that this meant an "application all along the line of that principle which 
the Germans showed only in their panzer divisions." He pointed out that for 
the past year the Army has been concentrating on developing new self-propelled 
guns and other anti-tank weapons as the answer to the armored division and 
that progress is being made. 

Tawfcs.— Following the reported wide interest shown in the performance of 
U. S. -built tanks in Libya, the War Department has announced that plans for 
the construction of new facilities or the expansion of existing facilities for the 
production of rivetless armor casting for tanks have resulted in commitments 
through the Defense Plant Corp. of sums totalling $53,500,000. Major General 
Wesson, Chief of Ordnance, yesterday said that production plans have for some 
time contemplated the complete elimination of the riveted type of construction 
on all combat vehicles. Cast steel hulls are now being made in considerable 
quantities for the medium tank and a minimum of 30 pei'cent of future production 
will have the cast steel hull. The balance will be of welded construction. He 
went on to say that no reports from Libya criticizing the M-3 tanks, which are 
riveted, had been received and no orders have been issued cancelling the produc- 
tion of these tanks. However, the development of the cast armor plate and the 
use of welding puts the American tank far in advance of any known tanks. Such 
tanks are already in production and when the new facilities are completed, the 
entire output will be rivetless. 

Flight Strips. — The Army Air Force has announced that it will cooperate with 
the Bureau of Public Roads in expediting the projected $10,000,000 chain of 
"flight strips" along public highways for landing fields in connection with the 
defense program. The Department said the strips are urgently needed in the 
Northeast, the Appalachian mountains, and Northwestern regions of the United 
States. 

Glider School. — The War Department has announced that a new glider train- 
ing school for officers of the Army Air Forces will open at 29-Palms, Calif., about 
January 1. The school will have an initial class of 12 students, the Department 
said, but will ultimately train 24 pilots every four weeks until a total of 126 
students have been trained. The 29-Psllms school is the third Army gliding 
school, the others being located at Lockport, 111., and Elmira, N. Y. 

^Merchant Ship Arming. — Secretary Knox stated in a press conference on Wed- 
nesday that the Bureau of Navigation has been training gun crews since April 15, 
1941, but that the program was not designed originally for providing armed guards 
on merchant vessels. Beginning October 15, he said, special schools were. estab- 
lished and training was designed specifically for duty on armed merchantmen. 
He continued : "The results of the training program are highly satisfactory and 
trained crews are now available in any size to fit the armament of merchant 
ships as fast as they are armed." For administrative purposes, he said, two 
armed guard centers have been established, one each on the East and West coasts, 
which will serve as pools to receive the output of the training schools and will 
continue to train men, assign them to vessels and handle replacements. 

Defense Plant Corporation. — The largest Defense Plant Corporation agreement 
made to date has just been signed with the Columbia Steel Corporation, to con- 
struct facilities for the production of pig iron, steel, and steel plates, near Provo, 
Utah. The cost is estimated at $91,000,000 and brings to $250,000,000 the amounts 
obtained by U. S. Steel for its affiliates in the 10,000,000-ton steel expansion pro- 
gram. Altogether, Defense Plant Corporation has invested $391,039,000 in the 
expansion of the steel industry. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Treasury Bonds. — Treasury Secretary Morgenthau yesterday announced that 
the Treasury expects to borrow $1,000,000,000 or more in another "major financial 
operation" next week, and "barring unforeseen developments in the international 
situation," the Treasury would issue new bonds, but that no refunding would be 
included in next week's operation. 

The Treasury also announced it will issue refunding bonds in January to retire 
more than $700,000,000 of Government obligations maturing early in 1942. In 
addition, the Treasury said, $339,000,000 in Farm Mortgage Corporation bonds will 
be refunded if the Corporation's Board approves. 

Taxation. — Assistant Secretary of the Treasury Sullivan yesterday told a press 
conference that the Treasury does not plan to ask for any further increased taxes 



3760 COXGRESSIOXAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

on incomes earned during 1941 and that it does not intend to suggest to Congress 
any increases in the capital gain and loss tax that would apply to financial transac- 
tions made in 1941. The Treasury, however, is continuing work on new levies that 
would apply to 1942 earnings, he said. 

Chairman Eccles of the Federal Reserve Board, speaking in New York City, 
said, "By the middle of next year defense expenditures will probably be running 
at an annual rate of somewhat more than 15 billion dollars above the middle of the 
current year. The conclusion is inescapable . . . that additional taxation must be 
imposed and further restraints applied . . ." He said he hoped "further taxa- 
tion . . . will first tap the corporate excess profits and the middle and upper 
individual income brackets and close numerous conspicuous loopholes in the 
corporation, individual income, inheritance and gift tax structures . . ." 

Public Works. — Acting FWA Administrator Edy has announced that pro- 
spectuses from which will be built the national shelf of post-defense public works 
and service projects are being received in the Public Work Reserve Washington 
office. The prospectuses list and describe public works and services proposed by 
Stat^, municipal and other Governmental subdivisions for inclusion in the Reserve 
on which preliminary studies indicate that between 25 and 30 billion dollars may 
be expended over a six-year period. ^ 

Football Standinffs. — In what the press referred to as an up-set, the University 
of Texas football team yesterday defeated Texas A. and M. by a score of 23-0. 
Both teams were included in a sports writers' poll held on November 25 listing the 
country's ten leading teams in the following order : Minnesota, Texas A. and M., 
Duke, Notre Dame, Duquesne, Michigan, Missouri, Fordham, Northwestern, Texas. 
The same poll listed the second ten teams : Navy, Vanderbilt, Penn, Mississippi, 
Ohio State, Clemson, Oregon State, Alabama, Harvard, Georgia. 

A>'my-Navij Game. — The Army-Navy game to be played tomorrow at Philadel- 
phia at 1 : 15 p. m., E. S. T. will be broadcast by short-wave for foreign reception 
over the following stations to Europe and Latin America : \VNBI, New York, 15,150 
kilocycles or 19.8 meters ; WRCA, New York, 17,780 kilocycles or 16.8 meters ; 
WBOS, Boston, 11,870 kilocycles or 25.26 meters; WGEA, Schenectady, 15,330 
kilocycles or 19.56 meters. To Orient : KGEI, San Francisco, 9,670 kilocycles or 
31.02 meters. 

i^tock Market. — Volume of trading on Thursday : 810.000 shares. Dow-Jones 
closing stock averages : Industrials — 115.64 ; Railroads — 27.33 ; Utilities — 15.69. 

Stocks today reached new lows since June 1940 in moderate trading. Curb 
stocks were irregularly lower and Chicago stocks lower. In Chicago wheat closed 
approximately unchanged and corn was up one-fourth to one-half a cent. 



Memorandum of Conversion 

Depabtment of State, 
Date : November 28, 19Jtl. 

Subject: Aid to Thailand. 

Participants : Mom Rajawongse Seni Pramoj, Thai Minister, 

Mr. Hamilton, 

Mr. Smyth. 
Copies to: 

The Thai Minister called on his own initiative on Mr. Hamilton on November 
28. He referred to recent newspaper reports in regard to increased Japanese 
troop movements to Indochina and stated that he was apprehensive that a Jap- 
anese attack on Thailand was inuninent. He expressed the opinion that of the 
several possible areas in which the Japanese might attack, Thailand appeared to 
be the most logical ; he commented that a Japanese attack on Siberia would 
bring Soviet air attacks on Japan, an attack from Indochina against the Burma 
Road would have to go through very difficult terrain, while an attack on Malaya 
or the Netherlands East Indies would be met by strong opposing forces. He 
said that the situation of Thailand was very different from that of China where 
the great extent of the country had permitted the Chinese to withdraw far into 
the interior in the face of Japanese attack. Thailand, however, was a very 
.small country and retreat into the interior was not possible. 

He continued in substance as follows: A Japanese attack on Thailand would 
probably be carried out by a drive of land forces through Cambodia, and by a 
simultaneous Japanese naval attack in the Gulf of Siam which would meet with 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3761 

only feeble resistance from the few small gunboats constituting the Thai navy. 
The Cambodian area is chiefly jungle, but one good paved road cuts through it ; 
Japanese mechanized forces could proceed along that road. Conscription for 
military service exists in Thailand, but while the army includes some 200,000 
men. only about 40,000 are properly trained and equipped. A part of the Thai 
army, including most of the small mechanized force, is now stationed in the 
area ceded to Thailand by Indochina in May, 1941. During the dry season, 
mechanized forces can operate without difliculty through the plains of Thailand 
where Bangkok is located ; Bangkok is the nerve center of Thailand and its 
occupation by an invader would practically put a stop to resistance. Thailand 
has only one first-class airport (at Bangkok) where heavy bombers can operate; 
there are two or three other small air fields in Thailand but these can accommo- 
date only small planes, such as fighters. The capture of the Bangkok area 
would cut off the transportation route for relief supplies coming by railroad 
over the narrow peninsula from Malaya and there would remain only a few 
rough roads over the mountains into Burma which could not be used except 
in the dry season. 

The Minister stated that in the event of a Japanese attack, Thailand would 
resist with all its forces. He expressed the hope that the United States could 
now supply a number of airplanes to Thailand, as this would have a very impor- 
tant effect on Thai morale and would "raise their spirits" immensely. Referring 
to statements made to him by the Department that, in case of attack on Thailand 
by an aggressor, the United States would place Thailand in the same category 
as China and would offer assistance, he suggested that immediate consideration 
be given to the problem of making such supplies available in Thailand, and sug- 
gested in particular that the question of transportation of supplies to the Thai 
military forces be carefully studied and plans made so that supplies could go 
forward without delay in the event that hostilities occur. Mr. Hamilton informed 
the Minister that this matter would promptly be brought to the attention of 
the appropriate authorities of this Government. 

In discussing the general situation, the Minister remarked that Thailand has 
a non-aggression pact with Great Britain in which Great Britain promises to 
respect the territorial integrity of Thailand, but that this is not the case in 
Thailand's treaty with Japan ; Japan merely promises to promote coi'dial rela- 
tions, exchange information, and cooperate in economic matters. This fact, he 
commented, increased his apprehension in regard to a Japanese attack on 
Thailand. 
FE: Smyth: NHS 



3762 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3763 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



^ 



SUBJt 



PARTICIPANTS: 



COPIES TO: 



Memorandum of Conversation 

DIVISION OF FAR EASTERN AFFAIRS 



EHuUand'a treaties with 
Sr'eat Britain and Japan. 



DATE: Noveattor 2Q, 
1941. 



Th« Thai Ml 
and 
Mr. 8«yth 




A' 



The Thai Mlnlater telephoned Mr. Smyth on Novea-. 
ber 29, 1941, and, referring to his oonvereation with 
«r. Hamilton on November 2a, eald that he wuld like to 
make clear a point **iereln Thailand' e treaty with Great 
Britain differe from l»r treaty with Japan. 

Re stated that Article 1 of the Anglo-Thai Pact of 

Kon-aggreeelon of June 12, 1940, read* aa follows: 

*Eaeh high oontraeting party undertakes not 
to reeort In any case either to war or to aay act 
of violence or of a^freseioa against the otlier, 
either alone or in oono««»* with one or «ore thaa 
one third power and to reepect the territorial 
integrity of the other hig^ eontraotlng party .s^g 

m 
He then said that Article I of the "Treaty toet^ai: 

Thailand and Japan oonoertiing the Oontlnuanoe of -^ 

! Prieilttly 



-4 

••"•■■J 



n 



3764 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK! 



f. 




Friendly Relations auid Mutual Respect of Each Other's 

Territorial Integrity* of June IZ, 1940, reads as 

follows: 

■The high contracting parties shall mutually 
rospeot each other's territorial Integrity and 
hereby reaffirm the constant peace and pex^jetual 
friendship existing between them." 

The Minister pointed out that a non-aggression 

clause Is found In the British treaty but not In the 

Japanese treaty. 



F5:Ba7thtRES 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3765 

Memorandum of Conversation 

Department of State, 
Date : December 1, 1941. 

Subject : Aid to Thailand. 

Participants: Mom Rajawongse Seni Pranioj, Thai Minister, 

Lieutenant Colonel Mon Luang Kharb Kunjara, Thai Military and 

Air Attache, 
Mr. Adams, 
Mr. Smyth. 
Copies to : 

The Thai Minister called on his own initiative, accompanied by his Military 
Attache, Colonel Kunjara, on Mr. Adams and Mr. Smyth December 1, 1941. The 
Minister said that he had brought Colonel Kunjai-a along in order to explain the 
general military situation. 

Coloiiel Kunjara said that according to his latest information the Japanese 
have approximately 150,000 troops in Indochina, about equally divided betv^'een 
northern and southern Indochina. He expressed the conviction that the real 
objective of any Japanese attack from Indochina would be the Burma Road, 
and he felt that it would be far easier for the Japanese to reach the Burma 
Road by going through Thailand than by attacking from northern Indochina 
through the difficult mountain country of Yunnan. He^ said that the Japanese 
could attack from southern Indochina into Thailand, using mechanized equip- 
ment, and then proceed north along the railroad from Bangkok ; just south of 
Chiengmai a paved motor road branches off from the railroad and the Japanese 
could go north along this road to the Thai-Burma border and/or the Thai Indo- 
china border. He believed that the Japanese would then probably cut through 
a corner of Burma toward the Burma Road. He pointed out that the pass 
through the mountains of northern Thailand would be far less difficult to cross 
from a military viewpoint than would be the passes which would have to be 
crossed by an army attacking from northern Indochina. For this reason he 
was extremely apprehensive that the Japanese intended shortly to launch an at- 
tack against Thailand from southern Indochina. 

Colonel Kunjara gave the following information in regard to the Thai mili- 
tary and naval forces; the total strength of the Thai army is about 200,000 
but only 40,000 are well-equipped and trained. The Thai air force possesses 
about 200 combat planes, of which 108 are pursuit planes (slower than current 
Japanese pursuits), 30 bombing planes and the balance observation and general 
service planes. There are about three pilots for every plane. The Thai artillery 
includes 15 regiments of field artillery (12 guns to a regiment) and one regiment 
of medium artillery. The mechanized equipment includes 80 tanks (all eight 
tons or under), several hundred trucks, and one platoon of armored cars. The 
Thai navy is composed of the following vessels: two heavy gunboats (2400 tons), 
two light gunboats (1200 tons), two sloops, nine first-class torpedo boats, five sub- 
marines, five smaller torpedo boats, twelve mosquito boats, and 36 naval planes. 
The naval personnel amounts to about 6,000 men. 

Colonel Kunjara expressed the belief that a Japanese attack against Thailand 
would be carried out by a land attack through Cambodia and by a simultaneous 
naval attack; he believed that one Japanese naval force would attack along 
the coast in the region of Bangkok, while a second force would attempt to land 
men along the Kra peninsula in order to cut railroad communications with 
Malaya. 

Colonel Kunjara said that the military equipment now most urgently needed 
by Thailand was heavy artillery, bombing planes and pursuit planes. The 
Minister expressed the hope that means could be found to make this equip- 
ment available immediately in order that Thailand might be better able to re- 
sist aggression by Japan. 

Mr. Adams informed the Minister that the information given by Colonel 
Kunjara and the request of the Minister would promptly be brought to the 
attention of the appropriate authorities of this Government. 



3766 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



1 


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December 2, 1941 



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Reference your 536, November 27, 1 p.m. , paragraph 
three. 

Ab you know the Department has been carrying on for 
aomp months with the Japanese AjBbaeaador here informal 
y and explorntory conversations In an effort to determine 

whether there may be found a sound basia for the under- 
taking of negotiations looking to a comprehensive and 
fjBt*n«*N»-lj settlement ^"IBipBmBPButl covering the enti> = 
^ Pacific area. Thoea conversations are still continuing. 

In Radio Bulletin no. 'S80, Kovetnber 26, IMft, It 
was reported that the Secretary gave the Japanese 
representatives for their consideration a document 
based upon certain fundamental principles which are 
well-known aa the principles upon which the Afflerlcan 
teople and Ooverretent believe relations between nations 
should be based. In Radio Bulletin no. 282, Kovember 28, 
\ It is re crted that the President at his press cohferenoe 
on that date Informed the correspondents that the talks 
with the Japanese had not broken down and that the 
g^,j^J|jyj^can policy remained one of great patience. 

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Bearing In mind your requeatf for Information 
re.-ording the talks with the Japanese whloh might hare 
possible effect upon the situation In Thailand, the 
Department would expect to inform you promptly of any 
information In this regard which might be of especial 
Interest to you. 




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3768 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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iNlgtrtUtttr 

Oiugt Dtpvtoxad 
Full mU 
D*7 letter 
Nl(ht l<lt«r 

Ckufe to 
S 

AMLECATION, 









Drown 

Deoember^ 1941 



TO K TDAMMirT^ 

CONriOCKTIAl. OOM 

NgMOOKTIOntTIAI. cooc 



i "(n<s ->^'f -• -' • 



BANOiCOK. 



'The follovlng telegraoi sftn? to the Ajaeric&n Consulate 
at SlngftTJore If? repeated for your Inforscstlon; 

(Telegraph Section: nsert text of &ttache<l 

telsgrflm to Singapore,.) 

You are isuthorlted In your 4l8C2'»tlon to Inforia th« 
approprldte Thai authorities of the foregoing. 



\luil 



/% 








C 

(A 



"J? "' 






)K%:*-i.'J;,'tj-,.i S-.-- 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3769 




79716 () — 46 — pt. 19- 



3770 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK" 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3771 



3772 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



This tti 

for oOBjraunla«*«4. 

to h- , (0) 




B«n£kok 



Rtc'd. 4 p. m. 



From 



SEcretarx of St«tc, 



Wr 



547, Decc , . m. (STCTIOIJ THO) 

The thai* are well aware that these two nations 
arc opposing Japaoese aggrcaalon e'^en at the risk of 
■^T and naturally Infer Oiat their own efforts will 

TJrlt*. sh and iteicricsT! giipport. Sec the 
Lc^vibv,., rsrasa &^A, r 26, 11 p. m. 

para^rai:*! no. s, quoting S«o popular radio ccRimentatora 
as aayin^ tMt Thailsret will have friends to eoac to 
her asalatanofi-. 

Thrcf. if Mjmn invades this oeunfcry and no aid 
Bs* .'ri-scrSbri?. is nt'ov Idcri t^-i«rc is bound t-s 'bR -noinilar 
j»'.,:i <jtions and ir 

citlrrn-. "This ss! rtsmcntcfl b^ the Jap&neac an^ 

-■■•"- -.5rnC3.fl': nn^i:'" :• t th.£-*T tiic Brltiali 

:.il'blv:'"lnfcr; 



,i/aalo«, 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3773 



■ill i H liill HJU l I liH I WMp^ lilllllil 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



'Vhl.3 tcliigrar. must be 
closely paraplirasEd R»©M 
fcrc being corHVJuri.l-- 
to ciiycnc. (G) 



r 3, 1S41 
2:55 p.m. 



Secretary of Statr, 
V/ashln<jton. 

547, DcoCRbrr 3, 5 p.n» {S'^CTIOK THRtE) 

This will enablE the govcrreaent to plan, for 
thE futtir-e intcllisc'ntly elthtr for rcslstancE 
to tii£ last cxterJ-ty in '-.hE hope of ultitiatE 
victory throx^h supporting British and Ancrican 

•r IT a truce while ewnitlng a later 
settleT-ent, Prelliiinary advice will also do ;:iuch 
to vert •^ rev\ilsion of reEllnw If Aricricm rmd 
British aid Is nDt speedily i .Ing, The Tbci 

tovE confidence in Britciu and the TJhited States 
in spite of refuacl to supply theis with nilltary 
Efjiiipr.iEnt r.nd I feel chat it would fc fsir to in- 
fore: thFM -if our- intentions wd th reference to their 
sit'Oiitic-n as soon as those intentions can be cor.~ 
aunicattd. 

My British colleague is tclErgrcphlng 
the .rr.it ftneral line, 

(EIID OF MESS-ISE). 




3774 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3775 



3776 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



.^■^ 




.TELEGRAM RECEIVED 

KA. JBaRgkok 

Thia telegram must be 

closely paraphrased be- Dated Dcoaabcr 5, 1941 

fore being conuainloatcd FROM 

to anyone. (C) /*->~*..^ Hcc'd. 1:30 p.m. 

Secretary of S 

Washingt 

551 , December 
During a call or. the Minister for Foreign Af- 
faire this aornlng in reference to gasoline eup- 
' '-s he informed roe thmt the Jappjscse Ambassador 
.;ur,t sailed and ififortned faim that ths: Japanese 
toi-ccs in Indochina definitely would not be used 
to invade Thai and that they were coneratrated fcr 
use against the ^rtm Road. Consequently Thailand 
need feel no anxiety. The Minister for Foreign Af- 
fairs infoi?mcd me that Ma Govcrnsscnt, In spite 
" "apancsc aeoaraitccs, 4b nevertheless greatly 

becausf ocived additional evidence 




^' 



tort : 



-4 ' 

o ■ 

6 



> 

o 






nt. He 




0^ 
CD ■ 


*;c call 




I i 


tlsh 


i* 


3 1 


of 




Tec 




n 


Foreign 





EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3777 



-^rbl, Dcctrofccr 5, 3 p.m. from Sr.ngkok. 

ToTtXi-r: MinistEr inqulrEd anxl :i£thEr I had 

reported to ths; A'scrlcan G-ov-rmniEnt the hopE of tM " 
Thai Gove blic etfttEmcnts would hz 

issuL Britain nnd the United States prom- 

1-. Ailr.nd if invaded by Jnp-an 

(sCE : 550, December 4, 3 p.m.). 

P£CK 



.V'^' 



3778 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




477, DeoEinbEr 6, noon. 

The ChlEf of thE Infornntlon Departraent of the 
Foreign Office InforKied a member of my staff yesterday 
that the British "wtmted to move into Thailand but 
hesitated to do so In the absencE of a clear Indi- 
cation of the American attitude. He sold that this 
report came from a very reliable source In th? United 
Str.tea., I -Attr^ch n,- slgnlflcancE to the repop^ cxotpt 
aa IndlccstlvE ereatlng and somewhat prevalent 
tendency to pliy \ip the situation* 






G...USS 



> 

UJ 



./.-i««*«xiv- =s?M;»>EsaK : 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3779 



ifuli fStt 

Colfec! jOsy Istt-r 
INigtif l«tt«r 

full Ml- 
Oay Ifitc 
Nifhl Iftltr 



Telegram Sent 




£^ 



-■ /, 



Washin^an, 
Deceaber 6, 1941 



TO ««! IH/kNSWmtO 

fWneottriccNTiAt ccoe^' 

(>*«T»1R 



^ 

/f^ 



AMERICAN UKJATIOS. 

,, BANGKOK , (TfrniUkNC). 

Your ^pp, DuofflBber 4,^ p.®. 

You B«y assure Thai Authorltlee that extension of 
a credit to Thailand for current needs ie fully agreed 
to in principle, and that 'Department expects no delay 
in working out det«il8 with the aooroprlate lending 
sg«'noy of this Sovernment. 



A. 



3 



I \ 






01 



W 

CO 





FDtFLtKS 



luKiS^*i V - 

'>#«( III/ ;;»f'<e!ai' 



3780 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




a u ajBCT : 



PAimClPAMTR 



■■:#!i» TQi 



D£>»A«Tfc'iENT Of STATC 



A^*9»«nw<^*w fl/ CawrtwMsrWrtp 



o»» h«'i BOT« into fhailsniA 



Mr. W. ». Hiyftsr 
Mr. Atoii«ii©n 



•Sii^f 




\i n»nw^ t r . W Ji>i »L lli l li'l ^ i r 




Of;:. 



During a e«ll er» Ki-. Atatueaon this aorair-- 
in zHieponse to an iaqulry wheth«r there *fas aarsy ««««, 
stated, after 8c»» iyssltatloB, that tha Brltiah JCinl«t»r 
In Thailand had sartt a »»8«age to. tiia foralga Offiee 

whloh began "For dod's aaka* and whlsh waa andorsad by 
tha Thai foreign Mlolatar raqueetlnii that British armed 
forcea jjg^ ssovfi- into Thslland. 



O 

-r, 

Q 

> 

6 



i-^- ^* 




re;i6 



oh»eon:HES 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3781 





TELEGRAM RECEIVED 




From • ^^^"^ 

BANGKOK 



P 



d^ 



V 




S'Ecrctary of StatE, 
Washington, 

TRIPLE PRIORITY. 

55Sj, BccEmbEr 7, 8 a,fn. 

The correspondEnts Imvc beEn officially InformEd 
that th£ JapanESE attacked Thailand at various places 
on the laiid and ar.a. fponticrs at 2 a,is«, DECEBitoer 8, 
and that Thai forces reslstEd, The GovErnmcnt ordered 
cEasE firing 7;30 a.ra,, and nEgotlationa arE taking 
r'T-'x-.r, Bangkok la q,ulEt, AmErican citizEns will con- 
- "-itE in thE Legation In oasE of disorders. 



PECK 



HM 



pa 






o 

♦ 

o 
o 



13 

> 

o 

o 



> 

"^ 

O 
CO 



CO 

> 
m 



3782 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



r-x' 




TFJ.F.GRAM RECEIVED 




■ 




i 




^ ■^ ^ -.-^ i-j '. 


"^ 






•\.. ct; 






O 

• 

o 

o 






K 


i 


• 
« 

Li 




anc! ^nv 






■0 

Cv 
- 1 1 






• (U I \ 


i 


« 


' 




P'-GK 


'^■1 


"•■ .'. *■■■ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3783 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



ircTC' 



F R O M 



hrs^rc'. 



not l! 



-Tt F , 



;r rc't>liE:d 



that since 



fC- 



3784 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



557, Deotiabcr 8, 5 p.m. (SECTION r.X)) from Ban^ok. 

by the Foreign Mmietcr and the latter was told 
that Japan was fighting for Its life with Great 
Brltc.m and the United States and Intended to 
make wide spread attr.oks on their territory at 
1 o'clock In the morning of December 8, 



PECK 



JRL 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3785 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



^^ From ^"S^t'^'f 

Tb3-3 tElc,5P(in miat be »-rom 

oloaely oflrRnlireacrt be- Dnted DEOErr.bci* B, 1941 

f'->rc bcln^ ccremnJorted 

to cnyone. (0) ^ec'd 2;39 n,Fi. 



1ccrc*;ary '>f Stote, 

"/nahin-'ton. 



THiri£ PRJOHItT 

557, DccEnbcr 8, 5 o.;.. ( SECTION TI'^?:":) 
pert '■•f th.eat nttacka w-uW be *nr.dE through 
TTir.ilontJ r.nd Japan dcnp.nded thnt pooacgc <^f 
troops be allowed. Jr.pnn offered this country 
certain cbi^lcca {nnt) t^- join Jr.pan In the vrar 
cjtlnat the United Stfttea nnd are-^t Britain 
in return for nMch Jnocn itould not onl^- 
gunrantee the aotrcreisnty, independence and 
ho(T->r ^f the country but vj-^uld restore nil 
trrrltirlea lost prosectors to foreign ry^-ticrtj; 
(tv-) '^;'^l^nnd c-nild Join the tliree Dowcr prct 
rp<\ ocr'ilt pv.3n".Qt of troop3 in which nortlfleri 
nrooog^l there r^ould be no nror.iae "f rcstor- 
rtlon ->f territory. Tlic Th'ila refuact to ^oin 
-.>r ')o:-t ' nrl the flnol r.~rcencnt )-.'\-i been deacrlbe-i 
"D-c 7hr i reore3cntp,tlvC3 acAA thr\t In the rbjcncc 
t!ic ' inlater w^^' la Co-t-mivler-ln-Chlef n- 

{repcf'-.t no) reply cui • n* '^rdera 

coxiirt be 




79716 O— 46 — pt. 19- 



-24 



3786 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3787 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



vv. 

This tclcgrr;-- ^ - *- 
closely port 
fore being couini.i;; 
to anyone . (C) 



BSngkok 

j-^^£d fcccnhcr 0, IQ-ll 
Rec'd G:35 T.n. 



"--y of State, 



TMVLZ PRIORITY 

557, Decer.bfrr a, 5 p.u. (SECTION FO'OR) 
Thnl troopa; they naked thtrcforc thct the 
forclbit ftttEnpt to enter -TJir.llr.nd at ont 
-o'clock ^houlrt b€ t.t least defErrert. The 
Jn»-r.nc3e rEollEd thi- 1 no change would be .n«<a£ 
in the planned attack. 

Fighting occurred during the ni^ht ana 
thl3 nornlng at olngora, Pattani and Prachuab 
on the southern coast und ct Vctana nnd Aranyn 
on the Eastern frontier. The Thftlrj lo:)t 
possibly n bnttcllon n.f troops at Pcttanl. 

The Foreign lUniater wns ^^ctnly novel; 
he re CO lie rt the efforts r^-iue by hi a {») to 
(«) arms (?) an<3 he exnrtaosd gratitude for 
the fricndllnesa shown by the United Stotea. 
Fc aald tiin t the hpr-.rta of the Tlinl were with 
the United Stfttea und. Greet Brittsln end I 





f'5 

{ *)■ anparenfc oraisalon 



3788 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



TELEGRAM RECEIVED 



Ilf Bon^kok 

Thla tclcgran nust be From 

oloacly pornphrnacri be- Dated Dccenbtr 8, 1941 

f'>rc bcln^ oonnunlcntcd 

ne. (C) ncc'd 4:52 o.-i. 



lEcrrt-tr;- ■-■f 3totc, 
'Vashinxton. 

557, DeocnbEr 0, 5 p.n. OtCTIOJI PIV-:) 
c-'Uld nt-t but frdrilt the alnccrlt:* -^f this 
country's effort t^^ reaist Jctmn rnct the ovcr- 
whtlning force t" which It fliwlly yielded. 

It l3 the Intention "f the British .'tlnlstcr 
r.nd rty^Elf t-i continue ■•'\xr duties n^rrw lly ra 
fcr 0.3 v»E oen. It la olfaoab IrDoa^lblc for our 
nntionals under exlstins circumstance fco lervc 
nnd they have bren offereil quartcra In the 
Lc3"tion if they wlah then. 

Tlie Le.j'tlon telegra-ohc' Ar>crlcnn eltlzena 
In northern Thai Ic I. iin^ then to conalder 

Ic-vlnj ity aeeno ns oenccfiil 

aa tuiuftl. 

{ tro « V H ) 



t;'3 



pec: 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3789 

EXHIBIT NO. 170 

(Nora. — Documents contained in this Exhibit were obtained from files regard- 
ing Maj. Gen. Walter C. Short in the War Dept. and are supplemental to 
those documents appearing in Joint Committee Exhibit No. 140) 

Table of Contents 

section a. documents ke relief of gen. short from command and his subsequent 

retirement (page 3794) 

Dec. 18, 1941 Message to War Dept. reflecting the relief of Gen. Short 

by Gen. Emmons as commander of Hawaiian Dept. 

Jan. 12, 1942 Message reporting departure of Gen. Short and others 

from Hawaii for mainland. 

Jan. 12, 1942 Message reporting arrival of Gen. Short and others at 

San Francisco. 

Jan. 13, 1942 Telegraphic orders to Gen. Short to proceed to Oklahoma 

City, Oklahoma for temporary duty. 
Handwritten memo by H. L. S, (Sec'y Stimson) re Gen. 

Short case. 
Handwritten note (Gen. Marshall) on wording of the 
acceptance of Gen. Short's retirement. 

Feb. 17, 1942 Memo by Gen. Hilldring for TAG re action in detail 

required re Gen. Short's retirement. 

Feb. 17, 1942 Memo for file by Col. Ostrander re actions taken with 

reference to handling Gen. Short's retirement. 

Feb. 17, 1942 Acceptance of Gen. Short's retirement by ar Dept. 

Feb. 17, 1942 Letter to Gen. Short accepting his retirement effective 

2-28-42. 

Feb. 18, 1942 Receipt from Gen. Short of retirement papers. 

Feb. 19, 1942 Notes from Col. Ostrander and others re handling of 

press release on Gen. Short's retirement. 

Feb. 14, 1942 Copy of letter from Sec'y Stimson to Sec'y Knox suggest- 

ing wording of saving clause in acceptance of retire- 
ment of Gen. Short and Adm. Klmmel. 

Feb. 25, 1942 Blind memo stating President intends to ask for a courts- 

martial of Gen. Short and Admiral Kimmel on ques- 
tion of dereliction of duty. 
Article of War 97. 

Feb. 26, 1942 Memo for Chiefs of Staff from JAG division re proposed 

courts-martial of Gen. Short. 

Feb. 26, 1942 Final draft of press release on Gen. Short's retirement, as 

approved by President. 

Feb. 27, 1942 Memo from Gen. Marshall for Sec'y of War relating that 

approved news release was read to Gen. Short over the 
phone before release. 

Feb. 28, 1942 Press release on Gen. Short's retirement. 

Feb. 28, 1942 Wire service bulletin on announcement of retirement of 

Gen. Short and Admiral Kimmel. 

Feb. 28, 1942 Navy Dept. Communique #47 announcing retirement of 

Admiral Kimmel. 

Mar. 9, 1941 Letter from Gen. Short to TAG asking retirement be 

changed to read "for physical disability in line of duty.'' 

Mar. 17, 1942 Letter from TAG to Gen. Short stating his request of 

Mar. 9, 1941 for change in retirement was not possible. 

SECTION B. DOCUMENTS RELATING TO WAIVER OF STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS (PAGE 3818) 

Sept. 10, 1943 Handwritten memo of H. L. S. (Sec'y Stimson) suggest- 

ing War Dept. get waiver from Gen. Short. 

Sept. 10, 1943 Memo from JAG to Sec'y of War re obtaining waiver as 

had been done by Navy Dept. with Adm. Kimmel. 
Memo from Lt. Col. Wm. J. Hughes, Jr. to JAG re validity 
of agreement in advance to waiver statute of limitations. 



3790 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Sept. 7, 1943 Letter from Adm. Kimmel to Sec y of Navy and waiver 

of statute of limitations. 
Draft of letter from Sec'y of War to Gen. Short asking 
for waiver and proposed waiver. 

Sept. 25, 1943 Memo from Gen. Green to JAG transmitting attached 

waiver dates Sept. 20, 1943 from Gen. Short. 

Sept. 22, 1943 Telegram from Gen. Green to JAG re completion of his 

mission. 

Sept. 28, 1943 Memo from Gen. Green for JAG re trip to see Gen. Short 

and obtain waiver. 

Sept. 27, 1MB Memo from JAG to Sec'y of War suggesting a public an- 

nouncement of the waiver. 

SECTION C. DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE ROBERTS COMMISSION RECORDS (PAGE 3830) 

Mar. 2, 1942 Memo from Gen. Hilldring to JAG transmitting Roberts 

Commission entire file to JAG for use niconnection with 
preparation of charges against Gen. Short. 

Mar. 4, 1942 Memo from Lt. Col. J. L. Harbough, Jr. to Col. P. Granville 

Munson for use in preparing charges against Gen. Short, 
transmitting the entire Roberts Commission file. 
Memo from Col. R. N. Young to JAG asking that entire 
Roberts Commission file be forwarded to the Executive 
Officer,' Operations Division, War Dept. General Staff. 

Nov. 23, 1942 ' Memo from Col. J. M. Weir to Executive Officer, OPD, 

WD6S, transmitting the entire record of the Roberts 
Commission. 

June 26, 1944 Memo from Gen. Green to Gen. Weir stating Gen. Short 

had requested he be furnished complete copy of Roberts 
Commission proceedings. 

June 23, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to TAG asking he be furnished 

complete copy of proceedings of Roberts Commission. 

June 30, 1944 Memo from Gen. White to Chief of Staff suggesting that 

Gen. Short's request for a copy of Roberts Commission 
proceedings be put to the Pre.sident for decision. 

July 4, 19^ Memo from Sec'y of War for President asking for decision 

on furnishing Gen. Short copy of Roberts Commission 
proceedings bearing OK of the President. 

July 25, 1944 Informal action record ordering that Gen. Short be furn- 

ished a photostatic copy of Roberts Commission pro- 
ceedings. 

July 29, 1944 Memo from Col. West to TAG asking that an extra photo- 

static copy of Roberts Commission proceedings be pre- 
pared for use by the Army Pearl Harbor Board. 

Aug. 9, 1944 Receipt from Gen, Short to TAG for photostatic copy of 

Roberts Commission, transcrip, less Exhibits. 

SECTION D. DOCUMENTS RELATING TO COUNSEL FOR OEN. SHORT (PAGE 3847) 

Feb. 27, 1944 Message from Col. Greer to JAG re appointment as counsel 

for Gen. Short. 

Mar. 1, 1944 Letter from Col. Greer to JAG re defense of Gen, Short. 

Mar. 10, 1944 Letter from JAG to Col. Greer re taking of testimony in 

Gen. Short's case. 

Mar, 4, 1944 Transcription of conversation between Gen. Weir and Col. 

Springer re counsel for Gen. Short. 

Feb, 29, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to TAG asking that Col. A, J, 

Greer be detailed to act as his counsel in any courts- 
martial. 

Mar. 22, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to JAG requesting that he be al- 

lowed to enter agreement with War Dept. safeguarding 
his rights if he participated in a program of recording 
t-estimony of certain witnesses. 

July 24, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to TAG requesting that Gen. T. H. 

Green be detailed as his military counsel. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3791 

July 31, 1944 JAG memo to TAG approving assignment of Gen. Green 

as counsel to Short. 
Aug 15 1944 TAG memo appointing of Gen. Green as counsel for Gen. 

Short. 

SECTION E. DOCtJMENTS KELATING TO ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD AND PRESERVATION OF 
TESTIMONY PRIOR TO IT'S ORGANIZATION (PAGE 3858) 

Feb. 25, 1944 Report of Navy Sec'y Press Conference when it was an- 

nounced that Admiral T. C. Hart had been assigned to 
collect testimony from Navy oflScers concerning the Pearl 
Harbor attack, and that courts-martial would be post- 
poned until after "war situation had subsided." 

Mar. 2, 1944 Extracts from Sec'y of War's Press Conference where it 

was stated that War Dept. was cooperating with the 
Navy Dept. in assembling evidence in the cases of Gen. 
Short and Adm. Kimmel. 

July 18, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to TAG requesting detail of two 

oflScers as observers for him at all hearings of the Army 
Pearl Harbor Board. 

July 21, 1944 Memo from Gen. White to Gen. Grunert transmitting 

request of Gen. Short for officer observers at APHB 
hearings. 

July 26, 1944 Memo from Gen. Grunert to Asa't Chief of Staff, G-1, War 

Dept. recommending that Gen. Short's request for officer 
observers at APHB hearings be denied. 

Aug. 3, 1944 Letter from TAG to Gen. Short denying his request for ap- 

pointment of two officer observers at APHB hearings. 

Aug. 2, 1944 Message from TAG to Gen. Short advising him APHB con- 

templates calling him as witness and asks him for sug- 
gested list witnesses which he thinks have knowledge 
of facts bearing upon the investigation. 

Aug. 4, 1944 Message from Gen. Short to TAG saying list of prospective 

witnesses will be furnished after consultation with his 
counsel. 

Aug. 14, 1944 Action sheet memo, 1st endorsement by Gen. Grunert 

referring to request of Gen. Short that he be furnished 
a copy of APHB testimony befere board, etc. Recom- 
mends he be furnished copy of his testimony before 
Board, that he be denied request for copy of all other 
testimony taken before the Board and that he be allowed 
to have access to Board's Exhibits at convenience of 
Board, the Exhibits to remain with the Board. 
2nd endorsement to above by JAG recommended allowing 
copy of testimony of APHB be furnished Gen. Short, 
less Exhibits. 

Aug. 20, 1944 Memo for record, Ass't Chief of Staff, G-1, approves re- 

quest of Gen. Short for copy of APHB proceedings as 
set forth in 2nd endorsement above. 

Aug. 11, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to TAG requesting he be furnished 

a copy of transcript of testimony before APHB and 
access to its Exhibits, and TAG'S approval as attached. 

Aug. 31, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to t!A.G requesting he be furnished 

j^opies of synopses of testimony before APHB. 
Sept. 20, 1944 Memo by Gen. Grunert recommending disapproval of Gen. 

Short's request for synopses of testimony taken before 
APHB. 
Sept. 28, 1944 Memo from Col. R. E. Kunkel to TAG recommending dis- 

approval of Gen. Short's request for synopses of testi- 
mony taken before APHB. 
Oct. 1, 1944 Memo of approval by Ass't Chief of Staff, (J-1, of the 

recommendation of TAG above denying Gen. Short's 

request for synopses of testimony taken before APHB, 

and attached TAG letter to Gen. Short so advising him. 

Oct. 3, 1944 Memo from Gen. McNarney to Gen. Grunert transmitting 

letter from Gen. Short to Sec'y of War and reply thereto 
by the Sec'y re testimony before APHB. 



3792 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Sept. 29, 1944 Letter from Gen. Short to Sec'y of War referring to fact 

that APHB has apparently not been furnished full de- 
tails re intercepted Jap messages, and asks that all such 
information be made available to the Board. 

Oct. 2, 1944 Reply to Gen. Short's letter of Sept. 29, 1944 by Sec'y of 

War assuring him the APHB was exploring all sources 
of evidence bearing on the Pearl Harbor attack. 

Aug. 24, 1944 Memo by Col. West for Staff and members of APHB 

re handling of Board's transcript of testimony. 

Sept. 2, 1944 Letter from Col. Wm. J. Hughes, Jr. to Col. Chas. W. 

West, Recorder, APHB re copy of Major Clausen's 
memo of July 10, 1944 to Mr. Amberg, which he did not 
think should be furnished to Gen. Bragdon, as counsel 
for Col. Wyraan. 

Sept. 2, 1944 Memo from Col. Hughes to Maj. B. R. Powell re order 

creating APHB and referring matter of Col. Theodore 
Wyman, Jr., to Board, with attached copy of order of 
Sec'y of War dated July 8, 1944 creating the APHB, 
and memo of acting Sec'y of War dated July 12, 1944 
referring Wyman matter to Board. 

Sept. 4, 1944 List of personnel of APHB making trip to Hawaii in 

connection with its investigation. 

Sept. 13, 1944 Letter from Col. West to Col. Hughes re APHB transcripts. 

Sept. 21, 1944 Memo from JAG to Gen. Weir stating that on recom- 

mendation of Gen. McNarney, the APHB be advised 
that Col. Hughes of the JAG office be allowed to familiar- 
ize himself with APHB proceedings to facilitate review 
of APHB Report by the JAG when report submitted to 
him for opinion. 

Oct. 23, 1944 War Dept. Press Release reporting APHB report had been 

received by the Sec'y of War, who had referred it to 
the JAG for consideration. 

Oct. 26, 1944 Excerpt of Press Conference of Sec'y of War in which 

the Sec'y stated the situation had not changed re APHB 
and refused any comment on the report. 

Nov. 30, 1944 Semi final draft of statement for Sec'y of War on APHB 

report indicating partial approval and disapproval of 
• criticism by Board, and that further investigation wouM 
be conducted under his direction. Handwritten JAG 
note concludes "errors of judgment only". . . . "Reason : 
forestall demand for Ct. M." 

Aug. 12, 1944 Message from TAG to CG, 9th Service Command request- 

ing he facilitate work of APHB which would hold 
hearings at San Francisco. 

Aug. 29, 1944 Message from Gen. Somervell to Gen. Richardson re trip 

of Gen. Bragdon to Honolulu as counsel for Col. Wyman, 
and preparation of records for his examination. 

Dec. 6, 1944 Memo from JAG to Sec'y of War re effect of inactivation 

or discharge of APHB military personnel upon amena- 
bility to prosecution for unauthorized disclosure of 
classified information. 

Memo from Harvey H. Bundy to Col. Hughes re com- 
bination of safe containing documents to be examined 
by Lt. Col. Henry C. Clausen. * 

p. CONGltESSIONAL COKBESPONDENCE WITH WAE DEPT. AND UOCXTMENTS RELATING TO 
LEGISLATION EXTENDING STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS (P.\GE 3903) 

Feb. 14, 1942 Letter from Sen. Hayden transmitting copy of letter of 

constituent and War Dept. reply of Feb. 19, 1942. 

Sept. 11, 1943 Letter from Sen. Brooks and War Dept. replies of Sept. 

16, 1943 and Oct. 8, 1943, and JAG memo of Oct. 4, 1943 
saying delay in answering letter, and proposed draft of 
letter to Sen. Brooks. 

Nov. 22, 1943 Letter from Sen. E. C. Johnson to JAG re Gen. Short's 

case and reply dated Nov. 25, 1943 stating waiver of 
statute of limitations had been obtained. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3793 



May 18, 1944 
May 25, 1944 
June 3. 1944 

June 1, 1944 
Dec. 9. 1943 
Dec. 13. 1943 

June 9, 1944 
June 6, 1945 

June 8, 1945 

June 15, 1944 

June 15, 1944 
June 15, 1944 

June 15, 1944 

June 17, 1944 
June 24, 1944 

June 30, 1944 
Dec. 30, 1943 



Reply of Sec'y of War to letter from Congressman Mans- 
field dated May 10, 19^4 stating he does not consider 
a trial of Gen. Short must be held during war time and 
waiver obtained would permit trial later. 

Memo from JAG for Legislative and L'aison Division and 
draft of letter to Congressman Celler in reply to his 
letter of May 18, 1944 re H. J. Res. 283 to extend statute 
of limitations. 

Letter from Sen. Ferguson to JAG re question of "mani- 
fest impediment" stated in Article of War 39, and reply 
dated June 1, 1944 enclosing memo re "meaning of 
'Manifest Impediment' in Article of War 39" prepared 
by Col. Hughes. 

Letter from JAG of Army to JAG of Navy transmitting 
copy of his letter to Sen. Ferguson of same date and 
copy of memo re "Manifest Impediment." 

Letter from Attorney General to Director of Budget 
Bureau re H. J. Res. 199 stating he had no objection 
to it. 

Letter from Attorney General to Director of Budget 
Bureau re H. J. Res. 199 stating that he does not think 
the resolution will accomplish the purpose its sponsors 
have in mind, but he has no objection to it. 

Letter from Attorney General to Director of Budget 
Bureau re S. J. Res. 133 stating he has no objection 
to it. 

Letter from Sec'y of War to Director of Budget Bureau 
re S. J. Res. 66 stating the Department regarded the 
legislation would be ineffective to extend the statute of 
limitations. 

Transcript of conversation between JAG and Ass't Solici- 
tor General Hugh Cox re meaning of legislation direct- 
ing Sec'y of War and Sec'y of Navy to commence in- 
vestigations of the attack on Pearl Harbor. 

Transcript of Conversation between JAG and Gen. Mc- 
Narney re legislation directing Sec'y of War to investi- 
gate attack on Pearl Harbor and for similar action by 
Navy. 

Memo from J.A.G. of Navy to Sec'y of Navy re legislation 
directing investigation of Pearl Harbor attack. 

Memo from JAG of Navy to Sec'y of Navy re legislation 
relating to Pearl Harbor Prosecutions. 

Draft of statement for Sec'y of Navy re Joint Resolution 
regarding Pearl Harbor catastrophe. 

Memo from C. H. Bull, Navy, to Gen. Weir re Kimmel- 
Short courts-martial suggesting it be decided by the 
President. 

Memo from JAG of Navy to Sec'y of Navy re S. J. Res. 
133 recommending a Navy Court of Inquiry. 

Memo from JAG to Sec'y of War re Public Law 339. 78th 
Cong, directing investigation of Pearl Harbor attack 
by Secretaries of War and Navy, recommending a boai'd 
of officers be appointed to conduct the investigation 
for the Sec'y of War. 

Memo from Adm. Gatch to Gen. Cramer re copies of 
Roberts Commission testimony. 

Memo from JAG of Navy to Sec'y of Navy re H. J. Res. 
1P9 saying it could be ignored. 

Memo from Lt. Col. Hughes for Gen. Cramer re legal 
aspects of extending statute of limitations for courts- 
martial proceedings. 



3794 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Section A 



9. crannM*.!! 



»*.iL„, «n,« »»t>«», 



JIUCClDtO W Room S441. Munition* BolMtov. 



^ 



WMhiBftoa, D. C. 'A^^^ 









'■hj..'^-^^ OS---- ■ 






i- ; 57 




"• j/ a- ♦ vf > «-._,^ajl.. J 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3795 



■..MQCRm 



PRIOR I TV 



fUnrvcd «t tht Wu DeptJtBKBt M«M*«e CcBter 
Roem 3441 Muaiboo* BUg.. WMhii^ow. D. C 

JAfl , U; > fiY 1 2 



From FT 5.naFT£R 



Cfimjwnukii-i 



li 



To — ftliiJiiTa. 




NO. 1649--JANUAftY 12 

EY : 
/FREWIC- 

TRUMAN IS procl: 

telTH ROaERTS C0'» ! 
PLcTION Th 
YOOR 0«^nCE 

Short 

47 A G O • 



9:iOP 



>-!«'A ACCOfcSPANii 
"RUVtAN Iftf CO'AJA AND 

.iPPEft ELEVEfjTH 
i5«MFNT STOP CAPT 



rs -• * 



• rEMPORARY Dt/TYp fj* 

iEMICOLDN l#ON OOw- P '^ 

-.IXJTEC REPORT ^ ^ 
I 
v.Tn»4 OF GENFRfL -^ 

« 





ly^ 



J 






3796 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



S. C AfiaMa.'U 



l^eibeli at 



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til 



l^tgnarCorpsi, Winitth States Urmp 

War Dapartmvnt MaMa«« C«ttt«r, 
Room 3441, Munition* Buil(&«, . ' ' 
Wa«hinfton, D. C. ^ ^-^ "' ' 



^ 



#=* 



3fe 



229 WVY.GL 27 PTY WD 



Hft «DC AND 4TH 4RJY PRES SANFRA^I 121 P JAN .12 



AG 



WMDC 
MAJOR GEMERALS WALTER C SHOR T DASH 1621 AND F REDERICK L ..APTJ M DA 
2507 REPORTED THiS HQ FOR DUTY JAN TWELFTH COMPLIANCE ,vAR DEPT ORDERS^ 

DEMTT CG .VDC ATvD FOURTH AR^Y .^j \ 
'*' 853P 



^ 



^A^ iK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3797 



f 



telegraIvi 

i. BU8iNESS---SOV«RMMENT RATES 



WAR O^PARTMEN 



m a5.» (i^3j-<a>o© 



IS, na. 



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6 mmn i&-MAi m »sm mmm i^sim fowi 



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G JM .mams m fm jMinsf mmam 



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;, asOCK » 2402. 



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3798 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




WAR DEPARTMENT 

OFPtCC OF THK SECRETARY 

MEMORANDUM 

-ft:. I. u h LC) j^ 



I ^l A A^A 






/^f/ /A^A. 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3799 



•JTi -iiV, ,<: "^ii;S> 








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3800 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



-1/. 



yaii' 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

WAR 0«FA«TMCNT aKNCnAL BTAT^ 
MmVOMMlL DIVIIIUN «. I 

WASHINOTON 

:',,l.ri 



:.ho ivti r." i.iiit (if 
,rt, \hLtt..<;l otfitflO 



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AUJ'.tiiit jonei'ai afiect 



£, Uidt tin; IbUUii' aiiO thy ur i::/ of 'JI>!' 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3801 




-X:^> :;ri| i| Vk? - n .- T 



c.i ■ .ii, :;:o ,1-. .nri, ., 610-t^tl. j' 



_;. 'hot tho courier, Uii.lu 
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to aVjv;, 



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',:. ih.. oei:r'.:t,.)/-.- if '.^cu-, tlio i'il" of 





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3802 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




\ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3803 

WAR DEPARTMENT 
WASHINGTON 



The application of Major (Jeneral Walter C. 
Short, United States Army, for retirement is 
approved by the President, and by his direction 
Uajor General Short is retired fron active service 
to take effect February 2P, 191*2, under the pro- 
visions of Section 12/*3, Revised Statutes, after 
more than thirty-nine years • service. 



^Z 



February / /, 1942. 

APPRO VKD 
By order of the Secretary of War: 




E. 5. ADAUS, 
Uajor General, 
Ttie Adjutant General. 



3804 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

.MNFiDFNTIAl 






kXahoM ai%f, CkiataMM. 




iMKivMMiting ratirowMi w»(l«r ttw i»r«rt»l«a» 9f X* tl« UMJl 
iU U. S. C. 94:)t i-<. I. 19P^, »«e. J3bf /cu *r* MhrUMdi 
%tMt TV^ir ^p|»l,lMi%&«n for rctlrwMiit l« Mnnyttt, «nrM>ti«« 
fmhramry 24, l<y4W, vlttwo^ •oadonatlon ef aajr off«n»« «r 
prajaitfi** to any rvtar* <t— Ipttwory Mitl«B» 

tf Mm » < wiy »M f y af ftri 



ik. S. ADAI43^ 



APt: 



R 

F. ^ 



■ri..i<i Liv »i t S i>i» 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3805 




IN mmv 
Mtrvft TO 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

THE ADJUTANT GEf^RAt-S OFFICE 
WACHINCiTON 





Ul V 




4 > 



O*- 



i2i:ii_i£SIES:L: 



3806 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



S-f/OKT 



February 19, ;9i»P. 



Notes - (From Col. Ostrander) 



1. At 9:45 A.i;. - Feb. t9. If nothlnf>; hoard from '>nfral 
;-5hort - call Colonel Walsh (G-1 office) and report fact. .Valsh /2606. 

2, Vait for Secretary oi .Var's relefM-n on order, (Hep;, mail - 
n'turn receipt demind^d) 




Notes by Col. Hemenway 



Herewith - 1. Het. order (original ami two carbons) 

2, I^t of trans.Tiittal with one form. 

3, Memo to AG from G-1, Fob 17th with one carbon. 
k, I'mmo - Sequence of events (by Col. Ostrander) 

5. T/lcned receipt from '''.en. Jhort for letter advislni^ 

re rftlrement. 

6. Copy of letter to iJen. jhort , 

7. Copy of rf>t ; r<»rTf»nt order as orirlnally drafted showing 
administrativB correction reference P/A.for shlnment 



of H.I!. >foods. 



>* 



^aMel ^i^i-^tcM* 



9; 45 A.K. - February 19th 

— Calle 1 ;<-il. Jalsh fjr instructions. 

— Heport'.'U no word fron Vrif-ral. :,hort,, 

— I'ialsh stat.f'd that last nirht '^neral Hill In ad, stating 

.•;ec. jlmoson haa t=ii;<Bd to iTesident (a.^.'iumcd 3ec. Knox 
was 1n on this) and t.!,;it 'iny coriwinnical ion to press would 
h< resident. 

iors to issue v;ntii rflfar.o obi.-iVned from :ec, 

'ia.r or 'J-l . 



7/^, 



/ 



\^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3807 

Februaby 14, 1942. 

Dear Frank : Here is my own revised suggestion as to the saving clause to be 
inserted in the acceptance of the retirement': 

"without condonation of any offense or prejudice to any action on behalf of the 
Government." 

Any reasons we want to give for our action can be said to the press. I am in. 
favor of leaving the acceptance itself in this language if the Attorney General 
says that it is sufficient to keep open the power to court martial. I will talk 
with you about it on Monday if you desire. 
Faithfully yours, 

/S/ Henry L». Stimson, 

Secretary of War. 
Hon. Frank Knox, 

The Secretary of the Na/vy. 

HLS : ECN 



February 25, 1942. 
The President Intends to ask for a court-martial on the issue of whether as 
stated in the report of the Roberts' Commission, there was a dereliction of duty 
on the part of Admiral Kimmel and General Short ; the court to be held as soon 
as the public interest permits. It is the privilege of the officers themselves to ask 
for such a court-martial. 



3808 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




ARTICLE OF WAB 97i Wb«n «nd by irtuw orctorMlt 

A court of inquiry to •xmin* Into th« nature of 
any tran«*etion of or aocu«atlon or laputation ai^alnst any 
officer or «oldi«r may ba ord«r«d by the President «49r by any 
coramandlng officer; but a court of inquiry shaai not be 
ordered by any oonnandlng officer except upon the requeet of 
the officer or aoldler whoae conduct la to be Inquired into. 



# ' 



Sharfea and a pecifi cations awom to. 

Anybody subject to military law may awear to them. No officer 
haa a rl^fht to Inatitute a court martial againat hlmaelf . 



4^ 



^ 



/ 

CO 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3809 



Kabruary 2t>, 1»4E. 



._fli;.«-., )^ If for th» Chi»f of Staff. 



). a«)«r».j Short «M ; • »., ?"of i-«tlr«- 

:n»nt ««• •ooopt^d •ff»<!tt»« f'«bra*ry XK, l!**i, "*).\.ftout aondt- 
of any orf«n»» or pr»J»J<*l«« to •ny futur* di»olplinw> »8t,lo, 
1 us4*r«t«n4 tJ»««» *t **»• tt<»o U»l« ««i!.i«« »w»« A^Hthic^* t« «•»««•*! 
atwi't h» «•■ or«lly «otift»d by »J»» o<5«rl«r 4«lt»»rl»ii Wm i»vt*r 
that If h» Md •my «»te>crtl»«» to swka thaji »)j«ui<i «»• aiaA* nlfeiiin 
tmmi^~f«^r hmtr*. oth»rwi»« «»• «rA»r for tiiii rvtlrvuant •rould 
ItraSi Stedar th»t« oondiilon* th« right* af tt»<» iJoT»r«aMrot t« t>rlnf 
hl« to trl«i b»fore oourt-Kurtlal «r« jir»»»rv»^ (n<i trl*l a»y b» 
h*d «t finv tliJ»» witdin th« ,;«riO<! of tt>» ;>t«fcut» cf Llaltlitl«nn» 
i*i«n It amy b« In th» pubilo int«r««t ta du »o. 

S. It wrrMli utmat lirMnJ»l»«bl» •t thS» tiw* •« • «>»tt«r of 
poliay to !••«• « »t«t«Bwnt Uait tii«»« on'le»r« will b» trl»« by 
oourt«-(mrtl*i »t «Ay »p»»i:l«4 futur* Ms»e- !»oi,h'.>v. wouli! 'a f:«la»a 
by »a9J< ooanitntmt, Th» «j(lR-3.nsl«« of tn« ••r»^. 
It «U1 b« laij«»«4iltji» »t tmmt tl*» t© '.ry W)«»« 

tinw, •s.ii* oJrio«r« «ho would ■•• r«q.ilr®4 «« W te !> « «« • «i 
probiibl ■• i^s »9«itt«r»<! ali OT«r th» »orW, « ■ nt, »» « i,.h^••.o»l 

lap««»iblUt,y t* ••••rahi. tK*™ for suoft » tt . . .ftKemar*,' 
ttMM ottiamra »1 ?l »o»t Hk"ly «>• «>f.»e»^ ie •««•<- lJ»t>of«'«»>»- ^utl** 
from wStlnJi th«y OMmot t>» r»ll«»»<3 withwit ••rlcra« <1»ji»p« ts t.h» 
wmr •ffort. Tha <J»f«v»« «<*>jl<l <J»rt»iniy •tl.«R;>i to y**a pTt of ti>* 
bllmm to th« »*r ••;><irt»»rA . .'iuoh fl»l*}^:o« 4r «r,-KB«>?.. if pubU^j!;/ 
•dlr»<t, would t«nd to rfl»ar«'iSt -aRwal «Bd os»»» • Uas 

of ^ifld«tie« ty Uie ;.««?)« in «'•)••♦ «'" **<• '«'• '|^^«»i^« 

ThS» »o»irt e«rt«'. nl/ ^'» »« ii t^'* -i . « » . 
or « ^'5 1 ft»nl«io«. 

r«f»rMio« to th« •«r-g»»*-'<' *^ '• ^^ priori l»f„ 

of th» orfi«»r« th««««iv«« to ft»lr far » 

f»r •• a«.«r«l Short i» a»nn«fr»<i > n»r» » 

ht« to r*(}u««t « »imirt-^i»r ^ 

.>f Isr. fl«ii»a<l • apurt of * 

siOh • r«qu««t lB*«.»"a»- «" '■ -*■• 

,■ .-••ti.£*t<»4 th* ««tt.«r »-i.' I. ■• «« 

»o>aa • ■iUtijry oourt of Inqt-il- ..afnor*. ..',•.. J .«r».«» »r» 



3810 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



•yMSn«««t«M. vr «tM»t km km* 1 m* *» %t0 t im § «k* MtlMMrs mNi 

•)MUV*« iMw •« ywt Va«K pr»f»rr*4, «Ml it la 

fVHT th* rr*«l««»t 1» ■wiiiii la U^mmtt af mm* |w«r*nwB« 

tiM afrtaM-a aa a a a w > « 4 »%Xl b« fcrla4, a« fetla talac •• *•*!' C^« 

a« ^g9«r«aBl.t7 «a Ui* 4MtaMM t« allac* Wm* Mm f>rMl4a«* ta 

tsika «*«aMfMr m* t« aJMsri^ tiMt v»m mmrit mm»mm4 %y til«* MM 
a«ataMM» •/ wkiait l« mhjtmt tm kla apfHtaval, la Nat »n If artjUl 



na. 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3811 




fMvwursr U, 1%2* 



Tto SMTttaxx of lur tMMtneod today tlM •ao^ptmum, 
•ffeotlT* Prt>nMU7 28, 194S, of Mb* appUeation far MiirMMBt 
of 0«Mral WaUor C. Short, i*«itheut oondonatlon of mj ottmm* 
or prajttdloo to aigr futura UmatpHaMry aotion." 

Tha 8aeretax7 of lur annouiieod mt tha Mia tlaa 
that, baaad upoo tha flndlxwa of tha rapcnrt of tha BOharta* 
Coandaalon, ha had dijraetad tha prapara^Un of ohargaa fbr tha 
trial tj eoort-oartial of 0«Baral fttort, idl^v^ doMliotlen «^ 
dutj. Tha 8aoretar7 of lar aada it olaar, hovanrar, that tte 
trial upon thaaa diargao would not ba hold a&tll mttOx tlaa •• 
tha public Ijiberaat and aafaty weald paxnlt* 



WAR OCPARTMWfT 

OrPICK or THK SKCItaTAItV 

MKMORANOUM 




c/0 ai 



ti 



m 



/ '-^ 



s?«aupc¥-*-»-r¥»j" .v-^-jp^ -?;:^. 



3812 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




RTMEf 



M/iuJy^J^ /-/ 



iEPAfttKfENT '/y^^^ 

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF STAFF ' /J 

WASHINOTON 

( : 



»;v;ot<ANDUK ron lift, si-x^mtaky ok .';aj;! 



Kebruary 27, 19li2. 



'W^' 



General Htiidrlnt' rt^aa the ai^nroved news reiejise to 
Uenerax ^tiort over the telephone yestertiay wvening at about 
seven o'clock. A copy of the news rei«aae was glso sent hy 
elr mall, special delivery, to cioneral Sfiort et :-ort Saa 
Houston, Texas, where he is visitini; at pz^sent. 




S^- 



1? AM 



^;V 



/ - ^> 



SECRET 



\ 



Vol 



PM 'I I) 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3813 



1> 



3814 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




(Cci^ 




':. "^R^^cv. 



sen) af jre neai 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3815 



••NFTDK^^ 



Na-.-y Oepartment i^tar.uniquc if i/7 , 28 Kobniar;' 19^2. 

"Die Cc'TPtar:/ of the '•.'"'.•y wir.ourioeJ tod-iy the acoejit.'uicc effuctiv; L^arch 1, 
^'■■r ^^' " '• n;;:"-'' •■ ••'->.>■ :•• f ,, ener t of Ttcnr /.dniral H. S. Kirael, U.':. 
, ii.,, n. ;. ,• of any of!'«..-o or prejudice to any future 

i', nclplinary iicticn." ^'.\f ''ccretary ol' liie Kavy tui.'iounced at the sane 
'.ime t^-at '-.""J''. 'J' ' •-< '" '' '.>r the report of tht:» f'.oberts CoranltBlon 

h« had ; ■ ' •'■•'1 the jircpar ■ ^i for the tr'al by covi.-t 

nArtial of ;tear ...inlrcl KiiniTiel uliwiKidC dereliction of duty. The 

Secretary of :.'nvy made it clear, however, that thp trial upon these 
Phnri'cs would not '>e held imtil ::u'h tis.*- .*is tiits publ'.c '.ntcr'iflt mid 
safety 'v^'jI I ••emJ.t. 






OONFirF>^ 



>'7 



3816 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



;^jyKr 



Kort i>«n HouBton, T«Xk«, 
torch 9, 1941. 

Sublet: PhjrBlc«l Condition. 

To : Th« Adjutant G«n«r*l, 

Unlt«d St«t«* Anay, 
Washington, D. C. ' 

1. On February 21, IhkZ, tha un^Jorelgnad reiwrtad to the station Hospi- 
tal, fort -iaffl Houaton, T«xa», and requested • thorough physical exa^nination 
prior to cont«aipiat«d retlrament. Thie examination wae contpletwd on Fsbruary 
28, 19«*2, and th« r«port of the same is a matter of r«cord at the hospital 
naasd above. 

2. Aa a result of tha eocajalnation, including, nscesaary Laboratory pro- 
cedure, 1 waa advised by the eocamining phyaiciana that on account of a he*rt 
and lung condition I should limit and restrict my physical activities. At the 
ssjM time 1 was advised Informally that njy physical condition existing at the 
tltoe of the examination and necessarily for sorrs tim* prior thereto was such 
as would have warranted and required ay retirement froia active service on 
account of physical disability. 

i 

3- In view of tho fortsgoing it is recuested that a copy of the report of 
the physical examination pertaining to lay case and referred to above be obtained 
from thft Comraanding Officer of the Station Ho«f.i<«l, Fort Oam Houston, Texas, 
and that appropriate action, based upon tht> 1 physical findings, be taken 

by your office. 

4. Although thfc effective date of ajj' r«tirefflent was f ebrwary 28, 1942, it 
is reouested that, if possible, action be taken to change my status to retire- 
■ent on account of physical disability incurred In line of duty and incident to 

the military service, 

5. I am aware of the probable legal difficulties in the way of such a 

course of action. In the event the action requested can not be now legally 
accomplibhed, then it is recuoeted that V.it rejort of the physical «xaniination 
be filed with my retirement papers. If the report of the physical exajni nation 
sufficiently establishen physical disability in line of duty and Incident to the 
military service which, but for the accomplished fact of retirwnent at tuy own 
reriuest, would have warranted or required my retirement for physical disability, 
then 1 reouest that a finding to that effect be entered upon the same and in- 
cluded with the record of my retirement. 

6. I disclaim any intention to embarrass or annoy the VJar Department in 
time of war with ray personal affairs. However, having now discovered for the 
first time Biy physical condition, 1 very naturally desire that it be made of 
record with ^ rffclrement file and tfiat any corrective action deemwi aonroprlats 
b* taken ^1.r»' C9nn*cWon with the same. 



M 









k .. ,_ WALTiiH C. SHCHT, 



(M 1» ^* ' lia.lor General, U. S. Amy. (''Xc^ 

V 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3817 



'4rr 



ili 201-'}h*rt, •alter C. 



rutxh n, xf^ 






. ..rt -.-. 



ort, ' 



yiigtt^i, txtXMM. 



r»d. 



tiousvon, t«xAS, fui. twstiiMitiafe iM:i-l<»»i b« i*k«»n to ci-..!aif« your 
»t»lu« to r«itir««*tot o« •ccowft .'i ;t!y»io*i. <si«&i)tlitjr. 

2. kftmr r<ttlr« «nt an-J«r ' ;« provl«tein« of -ectlon 1243, 
R«Tl»od .';tBtut«i», t>#ea»»« mftmot^va, th,:re 1» no i«t*l •athority 
t« cKwig* Bmm ts^ r«tlrMi«ot lor phy»lc<.i ies lllly, "owoire' , 

the report, o- /Oir ./nvslcal ctj ^i-,af lo' nl n '' .- iK-»,a.'.->B- -•'■■i 
ril«t« wit!i vewr r»cor<t- 



Th« A^ju 



,*!ii . » .■.T^iiBii'^kr''^ 





v-^^ 



79716 0—4(5— pt. 19- 



-2fi 



3818 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Section B 



WAR DnPAirrMENT 

^..^ ^ OFFICK OF THK SKCRKTARV 

/• O ^^"^ ' MEMORANDUM 





EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3819 



WAft OCTARTMENT 

ARMT SCNVICt FONCC* 

flvnci or Twt Moot advocatc otMuiM. 

W*»MIWaTOW 



0\JL^J»^ 



8PJ0J 

10 SU' rj43 

LBUO<-iANlArM FOR TUK SKCHSTAKY OF 1UR. 

SubJ«oti Court-martial of Major 0«n«ral VTaltor C. Stiort, 

1. Th* atatuta of llmitatlo&s will bar trial of Ganaral onort and 
Admiral Kljra al 7 Ueeambar naxt. 

2. To m««t thl* «ltuatlaa tha Havy Datwrtaant ha* obtalaad froa 
Adnlral Klsr:el a waivar of th« abatuta of Iljnitaiioaa. Copy of lattar 

of Saoratary Knox to Aciiairal Kimaal «ad photoatatt of hla reply and wlrmr 
ara attaotvad harato* 

a. In obtalalae tha walvar froai Admiral Klnsoal tha Navy Dapartaaat 
uaad a* an intarmadlary iiaar Admiral Harria, iiatlrad. with whan Adadrml 
Klmaal practloaa oi»il enginaaring in Haw York City. It ia baliayad 
daalratjla tiiat if a walrar 1» praaantad to Ganaral Snort, ha should llk«> 
wiaa ba approachad by a paraonal friaad. 

4. nua offioa haa haard, though it oaonot varlfy, that tha Kavy 
Dapartmant'a action in gattlng tna waivar waa approTad in advanoa by th« 
Prasidant. Tha poaaibility that Ganaral Short will not axaouta a waivar 
ia fully appraoiatad but an affort in that diraetion by a truatad intar* 
aMiiary, who oan if naoaaaary diaplay Adairal Kljanal** wal-var, aaama on 
tha whola worthtrtiila. Tha undaairabla altaraatirae would ba to raquast 
laglalation axtanding tha statuta of limitatioaa in Oanaral Short* a eaaa 
or to ordar an iaaaauiata invaatigatioa uadar Artlola of War 70 and '-'.far 
tha oaaa for trial bafora a court ooaipoaad of offioars aanior to Oanaral 
Sinort. Arraigrmant bafora auoh a court would atop tha running of tha 
atatuta but tha court could hardly prooaad with tha trial aua to tha 
iapraotioability of obtaining witnaaaaa who ara aoattarad all ovar tha 
world and could only adjourn inJaf initaly. A< othar poaaibility would b« 
to drop tha mattar antirely, daolaion aa to wTiloh, in viaw of hia fonnar 
inatruotiona, would doubtlaaa ba a aattar for tha Praaidant. 

6, In tha avmt a wai-rar froai Oanaral iihort la daalrad, thara an 
Inoloaad harawith lattar to hin to ba aignad by you, for dalivary by hand 
and form of wai var. * 



T 




lifyroa C. Cramar, 
Major Oanaral, 
8 Inola. nta Judga Advooata Owaaral, 

Incl. 1 - Copy Itr. of Sao. of Navy. 

Inol. 2 - Photo, copy Itr. 1'/9/4S 

w/l Inal. 
Inol. 3 - Ltr. to Oan, S lort w/l Inel. 



3820 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

ARMV SCAVI'.f FOHCU 
'irrirt or THt JUOOI AOVOCATl ocnihal 

WAAMINOTON 



MI'llrKAnnUM >T)h OEKEHAL CHAWiK. 

)*i Validity of agrBoMnt In advanM to waiva atatuU of liaitatloM. 

Ex*inln*tir.ri of the meagre applicable authortUo indicate* that 
•n ajtreement made !n advance to waive a orlMnal atatuta of Uadtationa 
!• nf very dubioua validity. While the law n that if the bar of tha 
..Utute 18 mt aaeerted It 1« waived, the baalo of tha statute of 
llnu tatl„r^ ie the oownd public fxjllcy that pro.eoutlng officer, auit 
be diligent to prcseoute while the witneosea are available and tha 
detail, of the crtme are fresh in U.elr adnde . It is a quaaUon whathar 
an accufled can agree to waive thle public policy. But aaavaalng ha can 
•o a^ree hia agreement ie at moat a oontract. If ha braachae it ha 

, '^TJr^ ^"^^^^ °^ ■ """*='' "^ ^-ntract. Hie aubatantaUve right to 
plead the Statute would not, in my opinion, be daatroyed by an advanoa 
agreonent not U> plead it. He ml;;ht eay the agi^anant waa without 
ooneideration or Uiat t)»re waa no warrant of law for hia agraatMnt 
in adv.,«j. to waive the atatute of limltaUona. Aa to undlacloaad 
offenaee, charges aa to wfiich had not then baan InraaUgatad and 
served on Mm within t^ie meaning of ArUcle of War 70 nor rafarrad 
for trial and aa to which a court lad not even been appolnUd at tha 
time of tha waiver, a aubetantial ahowlng might be made of hia 
inability to waive a aubatantive n.'.ht under theae oondltlona. 

No caaeaof agreements to waive a criminal statute of limitatlona 
can be found in the books, itself a strong indication that no ona 
!**.*T*'' ■^^'»Pt*<l it. There is a statement In 16 Corpus Juria 
baaiaiiiM, page 228, repeated in 22 Corpus Juris Sacundiaa, paga 235, 

"An indictment, found after tha expiration of tha 
time for beginning the prosecution, is barrad by tha 
sUtuta of limiUUons, and it is not saved by tha fact 
that the proaecutlon waa withheld on account of an 
agreement with accused." 

ohow«^t*!IL''^^'^' '"'''•^•'■' Co«. V. Werner, 5 Pa. Superior, 2ii9-25l, 
ahows that the agreement was not an agreenant to walYTth. atatute 
but an agreement to support tha prosecutrix and her children. 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3821 

In civil cases a sp«clllc agreement not to assert the statute 
of limitations is usually upheld. However, in such cases the debtor 
has reaped aii artvantage from his nronise and the basis of the decision 
Is the eaultable c^^^^d °^ estoppfl. In I30 A.L.R. 21 there is a 
ainorlty yiew illustrated by i>hapley v. Abbott, li2 N.T. Ui3, containixi^ 
the treticl ant . statement! 

"No case has occurred to me in which a party can. In 
advance, ioake a valid promise that a statute founded in 
public i-ollcy shall be inoperative". 

Thm case relied upon by the Navy, Mullan v. U.S., 212 U.S. 516, 
la hardly conclusive. There a Naval officer hm convicted by a court 
of inquiry as a result of wfiich ha was liable to discharge fron the 
service. In this situation he applied to the ^cretary of the Navy 
for a court-martial to try him on charges based on the findings of 
t>» court of inquiry. The Secretary of the Navy agreed to the trial 
by court-martial provided that the accused would agree that the 
evidence before the court of inquiry, which a statute prohibited 
bein« Bubedtted to the oo urt-nartial, could in fact be submitted to 
the court-raartlal. The Supreme Court on the baeiB of Schick v. U.S., 
195 U.S. 65, permitting waiver of trial by jury, held that the 
accused could waive his right to have the witnesses appear personally 
at the trial and that as the Secretary was under no legal obligation 
to call a court-tnartial and did so for the benefit of the accused, 
\)B could convoite the court under such conditions exacted in advance 
as he saw fit. The case finally turned on the fact that the accueed 
liad been deprived of no substantial right as he was allowed to call 
additional witnesses if he wa:tted to. 

My conclusion therefore, from a quick search, la that a waiver 
in advance is, as an abstract question, of doubtful legality. 

As a concrete question, if the accused executes a waiver he 
could only repudiate it at the trial by pleading the statute of 
limitations. The court mjuld probably overrule the plea on the basil 
of the waiver wtilch tiie prosecution would thereupon submit in evidence. 

Under Capone v. Aderhold, 2 Fed. Supp. 280, affirmed in 65 
Ked. 2d 130, error in passing upon the validity of a plea of the 
statute of limitations is error committed in the exercise of Jurl,«- 
dlctlon wiiich can not be reached on habeas corpus. The only thing 
the accused could do, therefore, would be to sue in the court of claima 
for his pay which court, under Dynes v. Hoover, 20 Howard 65, Swaim v, 
U.S., 165 U.S. 563, undoubtedly irould refuse to open the record and 
retry the case on this point. 

Uy recommendation therefore is that an attempt should be made 
to secure a waiver from the accused and that the waiver should follow 
tlie form, in general, of that obtained by the Navy. 

/ 



William J. liu^l^los, Jrlt 
Lieutenant Colonel, J.A.O.D. 



3822 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

280 BRONXviLtE Road. Bronxville, N. Y., September 7, 19^3. 
From : Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, U. S. N., Ret., 280 Bronxville 

Road, Bronxville, N. Y. 
To: The Honorable Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy, Navy De- 

partment, Washington, D. C. 
Reference (a) Letter from Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, to Rear Admiral 
Husband E. Kimmel, U. S. N., Ret., proposing a waiver of the 
Statxite T)f Limitations. 
Enclosure (A) Agreement not to plead the Statute of Limitations in bar of trial 
by General Court Martial. 
Sib: Receipt is acknowledged of your undated letter. Reference (a), delivered 
to me by hand August 27th, 1943, concerning a General Court Martial in my case, 
in which letter you state that the two-year statute of limitations controlling Naval 
Courts Martial will have run on my case on December 7th, 1943, and you propose 
that I should now agree not to plead the statute of limitations in bar of trial 
and you enclose a proposed form of waiver. 

You state in Reference (a) that you think that the public interest and safety 
would now permit proceeding vdth my trial, but that you further beUeve that so 
long as the war continues it will be manifestly impracticable to have a number 
of important witnesses appear before the court on account of their war duties. 
For this reason, among others, you feel that it would be in the best interests 
of all concerned if I should now agree not to plead the statute of limitations in 
bar of trial and you give me your assurance that the trial will be held at the 
earliest practicable date. 

It is my personal desire to be brought to trial by Gteneral Court Martial in 
open court at the earliest practicable date. Delay in the matter is opposed to 
my personal interests, since the passage of time and the circumstances and 
casualties of war and of the period following may make it difficult, perhaps im- 
possib e, to assemble and produce the evidence and the witnesses required. I have 
at all times been anxious to subordinate my own interests to the national welfare, 
which appears to require that my trial be delayed. I am therefore forwarding 
to you herewith a waiver, Enclosure A, executed by me which I hope will be 
satisfactory to you. 
Respectfully, 

Husband E. Kikmel. 
End. (1) 

KN0L08URE (A) TO LETTER DATESJ SEPTEMBER 7TH, 1943, FROM BEAR AOlCIUAL HtTSBAXD 
E. KIMMEL, V. 8. N., RET., TO THE 8ECBETABY OF THE NAVY 

I, Husband E. Kimmel, Rear Admiral, United States Navy, Retired, hereby 
agree on my honor as an offl?er and a gentleman that I will not plead, nor 
permit any attorney or other person on my behalf to plead, the statute of limita- 
tions in bar of my trial by General Court Martial in open court for any alleged 
offenses with which I may be charged relating to the period on or before Dr^mber 
7th, 1941, should my trial be held during the present war or within six (6) 
months thereafter. 

I take this action voluntarily, believing it to be in the public interest. 

Husband E. Kimmel. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3823 



mt 






IQr tear QmmmiI Sh»rti 



Xa MMMMtian vitb ]K>ttr t»*»«t.>>I» trial bf ensMuml wsrli* 
of Kur J9 mH, «m1m« MtiUn 1« t4yHn t« |#«viHit t%, tat ]rmi»> 
%te ttAtute of XimlteUaa* «»td.4 )m «rt^pp*i bf- aittfar A 
whioto, pxvbaMjTt vonU •d^ettm th« omm tntll latel** 



8« long M th» wur aaatlnaM it will b« impm&ViMak&» 1m 
«. ntadMr or impttrUmt wltuMswi •^|mmu' bafor* llw Mnvt oa a«« 
of thair «ar dKiU««. I& «iiia «iiwaUo« t% haa a a a ar w M l to aa iMH 
tha praoUeal tMn« to do la W p4Mi%mm aor yaantrnt^ trial uaMl 
lator and t)M% yva tmy <lMii« far tMa piurpaaa ta maaota a aasMmr / 
af tha ««atuta of UMtatioaa. Xa tlia 9-9^0% tiMt |ro« aaa f&t ta / 
do tttu, I gSLrm fnu agr panooaX aaattraaaa ttet aagr trial ^atawrinawl 
viKm will b« iMd at tfaa aarliaat praetiaalOa data. 

If yoM ateidd acraa with iht forafolnf /owr proapt rattan of 
tte looloaad font of waivMTf duljr aaaauiad by ]««« la laquaatatf* 

a in a ax tljr rotunit 



I laal. Sa«ra«ai*r of liar. 

Valvar. 



)^ 



J>t«no('.r»ip!»lo notvs mna poui^h dr»:t in thl« orb« hairo ooon deatroyod. 



DlBintorootod erfioo r VT"<^ 

Custodial / .T "" ' ' ' '"' 






3824 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



WAIvn 



teptrabMr , 19U3. 



I, aiLTKR C. 3inft, Major 0«n«rkl, Dnlt«d 9t*t«* Ai«gr, 
ftetlrsd, harvby mgrmm on ^y honor •• an offio«r and a gantXavMI 
that I vlll not plaad, nor pandt anjr attomajr or otbar p«r«an on 
mj bahalf to plaad, the atatuta of lialtatlona in bar of agr trlftl 
by Oanaral i^uurt Uartial In op«n court for an/ all«c«d off«n*«a 
vlth ahioh I aajr ba ohargad ralating to thm pariod oo or iMfor* 
^ca^bar 7Ui. 191*1, ahould ■/ trial ba bald during tba prsMiit 
war M- within aiz (6) aontba tharaaftar. 

i tak* this action voluntarily, baliavlng it to ba in 
tha public Intai^at. 



Waltar C. Short, 
Major Uanaral, 0. 3. krmr, aaiixwl. 



^^^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3825 

25 September 1943, 
Memorandum for: The Judge Advocate General. 

There is attached hereto a waiver dated September 20, 1943, signed by Major 
General Walter C. Short, U. S. Army, Retired, in which he agrees to waiver the 
statute of limitations in bar of his trial during the present war and within six 
(6) months thereafter. 
The above waiver was obtained pursuant to your verbal instructions. 

T. H. Green, 
Brigadier General, U. S. Army, 
AHHiatant Judge Advocate General. 
Incl. 
Waiver & pertinent papers. 



WAIVER 

September 20, 1943. 

I, Walter C. Short, Major General, United States Army, Retired, hereby agree 
on my honor as an officer and a gentleman that I will not plead, nor permit any 
attorney or other pers(m on my behalf to plead, the statute of limitations in bar 
of my trial by General Court Martial in open court for any alleged offenses with 
which I may be charged relating to the i^eriod on or before December 7th, 1941, 
should my trial be held during the present war or within six (6) months 
thereafter. 

I take this action voluntarily, believing it to be in the public interest. 

Walter C. Short, 
Major General, U. S. Army, Retired. 



3826 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





TUB ««»*>« wm, »»fwe<!U-m vmammm *«■« ttn ?«•*<!» oommm^ «* •mnvm: 




E}XHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3827 



i&;?»aAV'a;u 



•Valtor . rt, ,.' . .j ■ 

;iet>t«nbe<r timi that n;<»hi s- 



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haJ b«*on aocompl i sh«il. I t>.'' 
to you lui 1 plaa« t)i« »lt;n«'l 



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Uw rftiaalon 

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3828 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




$1 SEP UMa 



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V. ft. Arm* 



1. IMmt 4k%* •# T •af4«i*«r lftlft« Mi 
tiM •«»«■«• •# ttMiteUMM la tar •/ trUl kf 

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S» la Ti«r •£ 4M piMi* la%aRMit to Ite 

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Iftaft tft la MHlMiMMa ta ftka 
p«riili« ia ftaw ft ft* p w «» < aft fM» ftlaa «i% ftiw 
»H;«1 .f ftaar AdMml — ft <a < 1. MaMA aai Mijw 
Itelftav a. Mwrft. AaMV«iacl/* 1ft 



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••Hi •ttimn haw valaatarlly a«r<M4 ft* 
ftka aftaftafta af llalftaftiaaa la bar af MMir ftrlaU 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3829 








MYBON c. mmm 






1 £mI.~ 0<^ of tMdVKT. 




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3830 CONORESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



a-1/- 



Section C 



J 



9 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

WA« DEPAKTMINT OKNKnAI. STAirr 

nM*ONNtt. DIVIIION •'I 

WASHINOTON 



m 



nn^nr-t- 



Maroh 2, \042. 




iiubloct, i 



T)iM s«or«jt rlo<' 
Abbott on I.'arch 

W ' 



» L) 



It.Vi)!!' 



'-••••'ion' r, p<5rt" ■ 
n a t Toar ' 




i " 1 1 V'-i'mI t.o you Viy (;olotiol 

vIOIUiti < ill .1 ' ! '■ »i-;M ' ; tjio aboV« 

!•<• !'.'>H V t)i; ; ' -:.. i'A connaotlon 

T'ln' ■ propnr.od trial 

..! ri . "! be connidartn! -i 



:rr 



f GFRWftD N. BmtW 

Kajor. 1. mtry 
Af i.itant Kx'Outif» 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3831 





PECRET 

WAR DEPARTMENT 


1 




1 


OmOE or THK JUOCC ADVOCATE OCNCMi. 

WAJmiMaTON 


• ; - . ' , i \ f , , ► ■ , 




1 




t ■■ 1-:. •••. t 


I-.-.; 


1 






'? 


1 


1 SECRET 




1.^ 



3832 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



• 3ECRET ' 



VmJow.j . :..i'lu, ♦ojj(..f,h-r with nhnrU ac- 
' ' ' ■ "' Jiftr »»■ • 1 






; il'ind nt' 



..i'-/iri < : 



11 




/ 



7'> 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3833 



Secret 



i/»v 



17 



t,. , 



I-' 



2g 



.1 



2;' 



Lett'-f, .'2 '>c. •/,]., I^;oi.ir-; ;,. :; • ■ ■.:toTi, i'. ,! 
A.C. , ',o.TU'x*ivd.ir.i; '['.ellowi, 1-'j.h\'1, '*' a.ior 1. 1: av , 
G-.<, li.Hwn. Air "orce, rtij.ijrtiri.; a ■' lor. t-ik^r. at 
aai^i ' nt) orders ;-,lv»;ri ii_; *iC ;•»>:!;)'"- • ■■ ■ . 

inaii'i" ;• :i"curl.1.y Giri'^e '.■::. 7 '.'.1 

.>,-mor;.- '■'''» .'.''!. A. ^ . , 

!ii'-!..oi '. .. . <, .-J ..■.. iia«n. ,ii r /'>'■';?', ., , 
23 Dt'C. '/,!, "oni-ilnln- iu*'ormut,i ',.n ;.,t t,-! i.-d- 
liKsnts i.mde, urlfra i:i5iu-<i, ari'i vci-bil i •* l m, 
'i3 nc»^ Dpc. 7, fo'* ("o'f'r j.roteoL'.^r n ,' I'l/,'', 

^u/c'ia-i'' ■ ; ,; ,h'-'-'.i.:' llrrl.i, '. ■ .. ;.. 1. .vi,. ,\'. r .■■ 

/.■.•;in;j I P f'lrnat li)i. '''in; irr:iti:y ■ • ■ ' 

.;i :•!,'■ t i on;i 'u; i or 1. iiO'-'T '.y «':' 

rii ru.-'/ at.*.'u'i' (>'' l-f^'i. 7 
l/^n.'jx' .'J Uf'C. '.',1, J-:.. ''^'loLii, ■ r-i,'. ; ,. ,,A, 

;:o,7:'aridir\; I'-ll. :! J.cl.ar'i'-ifjrit i'lUr, ;dr ■ >'.\ 

Havrn. Air i-'orc!, otiCfrn ■ t .; .irrun.'<Ti>r;! ■: -^ 

3truction:i u" ' cni^ra ''o»' ^'-cirity siT.-" '. 
'Vnorarid'ir! .;.'? D^c. 'nl, '-L. "linkfT. I'ri ;. 

w'-v-jnandin;; iiuwaiian ui ■• .'oroe, . ■ ' 

iiiatr'jrti o!"'; '"'^r 'i'^curi *■;/ .un: f . 

Air Force, :'. vn by h'.-:, •■iiioc '.r. .-•■./ 1' 
;■••„*. '■■r '^.l !;<"■. '',1. ■■- ■- -avidu^'i, '.r..;. •''■! 
■ ,■■ .1'^ :\ ../ . i'-' ■''■vr<^ei-i':n- :-s-.:in.i, ' 

.'. ifix i i'l. ,'.]:• . ■ ■"' i . . . ■ . . , ,...> 

inst,i-ui;U u^, ;) i.t ■■ 

>'■.-. iv'.l 

haw. Ai*' /oru«, to :;. ;. :.^.ri<-. :.»;'.; 

I'Xl, C(,'t/'" rnin : .!oj>i«. ,,r':v -'•■''»'..■ ■ "" 
].«'.tcr (;':r;i''_ :. : er't-ho.l'', ;'. ','■'.. . 
■ :.a/<ti. ,-.i'' . Ji"~' I !•■ J ;. i. . * ■•.■■' 

,:•■■;( , A'.'. ■•• • .av;, :r'! . : •■,, '■' ' '■■ 

■♦.tt-r l-i*" : ■'•: . ',' ' '.) , \.'-^'.f , ' ■ 

to I' ^- ,■•■;.■■■* ■• ■■■'''' "'ivv 




I '.-ofj 



All^ri, 



■ ■ I ' 
. '..1, toi^crt 






.'.urriy 



,■■■". 1 ■-'■/>■'•' 
'•; t ,t,. i "J -...t-i'-vro I'/c 


yie ■' -' ■ , ■••; 


1 • : ■ 1 1 


SECRET 

-3- 




7^ 



7971fi O — 4fi — pt. 19 27 



3834 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3835 



WAR DEPARTMENT 
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF STAFF 

WASHINGTON 

( 



lOafORAnKJII POR THE JUDGE ADVOCATE GEXERALt 

Sobjeoti Btport of Roberta CoaBlasion* 

It is desired that yon forward to tha BxaeatiT* Of- 
ficer , Operations Dirision, WDGS, for file, the rvpoort of the 
Roberts Co— iision, together with all supporting papers and 
reoords in connection therewith, now in your possession. 

Bj direction of the Chief of Staff t 



R. lyTOTOO,^ 
Colon*!, O.S.C, 
Secretary, OeneriLl Staff* 



19 



3836 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



ISECHET 

WAR DEPARTMENT 

•utvica Of luffit 

arrKi 0* TM ntixj >ovocati ccmiiui. 




Nov««b«r 



SPJUE 



MEMORANOim to KxeouUvw Officer, Op<'r«Uorvfl Dlviaicn, ir- 
DepirtiiMnt General Staff. 

Subjecti Hoport of Rob< rts Oonimisaion. 

1. t^uraiant to undated alrecUw of tSia Chler of Staff tlKtrc in 
transmitted h«r«v.itii, for fUe in your ..iTice, th« ronawlng enumt-rBted 
pmpero aJid documenta conatituUna the kaport of the Holxsrts Corainiasioii 
luS supporUng pai.ers and reeorde in cofM,*oUon with 8».ld ComaiasAon 
Report s 

^ listshowln^' doouitinta fjmlshe i tiie S/rtar } Incorporated in 
Uat showing docuiaonta f..rni3!.f.i the S/N»vy) Mnutes 
Minutes of Conmiaaion to ascertain and report facts 

mUtin,: to ihe -ittaok rmde b:; Jap. ^rmod forces upon 
Territory of Hawaii, 12-7-41. 
X packare containijii; shorttiiiiid iK>i«a of torti-a-.i.. ^ 

Got»-ni33ion ajipointed by the Preaidont, U-V-.-hj., -o 
inv«3ti-atr ,i!.L.n.;k by Japanese of Doc. 7, l>.il, on 

2 pa.LX^/^ont-.-.-... io vol««.«3 transcript of testimony (Vol. 1-8. in 1 

before Co«mx33ion investl, attack on P*«J«^«- , 

to-.Ui, 12-7-41. a«3 1 ..- • ■ ^ :,«,t.-,orv. (Vol.9-16 in Ol*.r, 

1 package eontalni.^; secret, coidid«nta«i «nd unclassified 
documents as numbtred 1 to 36, inclusive as fo.lowss 




No. 
1 



1-A 

2 

3 

4 



"inmorandum of 12/23A1, Capt.G.A. Kcngla, A...., to "^«^^"^'- 
Officer. iUiwaliar. Interceptor Conmand, rom;erning l>*«i»« 
a^a3 a^d bunkera ut *l-el«r, Haleiwa, and ^^\^"'^, '^j]''' 
together Kitl' '-'-"- .- --"^yH^t; ti»« -:r.orar.i'.'.r (ti»« latUr 
being rolled ,e charts , ..atallations", 

Secret -'OP:. ;...>, -.-■ ;corai'any ..ataiiaLions , 

Island of Oahu. Aircraft ' 

Seo'-et top "Hawaiian Uufenat Project ^ i-Axrcraiv 

DisinaiUons" ^ , ,, ^< 

j.-ap Hhcmtne "^litary r^«.rvation3 on .. ^ > --^a (1 cojy. 

S-tcial ViliU.rv :iap kJ- of Kawaiian Islands (1 .'op^ , 
XIa exrlanalory adder,.* .howi.ui ,jro.md delenar. at 

;Srt"^f'atck;« Field nho-^n. diB.osition of aircraft at 
tiro'- of attack ( 1 copy) 



:^'C 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3837 






:rfti 



ot^iteinent ><y :.laJor GentTai i.'al • 
I'.rnli'ioiis lea-tin,; up '■£> 'he . 
"jl-ier niefflo. ma;:; ■ ■ . 

■•;(■. :rab.,T ,:T. 1 /..: . . 



ort of even la and 

.it. t^t < ■ ^- , IP "f r.i r »* f 7 , 



' s from OOOl 



■r iJ4l 



y Kcijorta of K.I.. IJug^an, 5ij . 

Caj.t. Iiif . , tirvund iJefeii:;', „- 
victiviU«3 at Bellows Field ; 
Ijiil. (2 oopiea, carbon not i .. ,, 

30 L»;tter, ^'3 IJec- lV4l, Leomu-t: D. vj 
Cotansandirt iiellowa Kielri to C.i.. 
records of oijerationa tiy all um 
to U730, 7 Dec. 'Al, .md neld Oru 
Alert F'rocedure (3 coinoa - all le 

11 Letter, 22 Dec. 'U, Jay P. Tho--", 

^Oj.]i) , Oj)«-ratloiia Officer, U 
CO. Bellows ilel-'. •-'- • -• 
instructions reo 
»U to G7^" ■' •> 

12 Sdeoio. 22 i > "-.C/ol 

BcllcTfs I 
position 

B'-",it)W3 Field acconqianyi; 

13 otaLtp.iwnt 'ialcd 22 Uec. '^1, l, ■ 

Gi'ound Defi'nae Orficer, Be-lo. 

• lefe.'.:ie activities at aai 

thcrf after (2 coi-ies) 
L4 :knni}, 22 Uei.:. '41, l/f-omfd 

GoBBianuirn; Bellowa r'leXd, 

Air Force, rcj. ortiii:; action r -u.^ir, 

ijlven by Use reaponsiblc coas.iander: 

■jec. 7 '41 
15 ;.'C'mor)»nd'i)r., Iceland C. ):urd, 



...^ ,..^:... .„-uen3e 
1 to Eiecei'ibrT 7, 

, Lt.Col. A.C., 

v^-t. , reporting 

Iroia 0<JOl, IJ Nov. '/'.I 
t ris or Instructions for 
S3 Inol. indicated). 
'* . Soth Oban. S^. 
ept, , throu.:;h 
.,■ rations of and 
, fn)m 0001 1> IJov. 



;c(>rnint; !_;rvund 

r; u,,.-.. 7 '41 and . 

■ t.Col. A. . , 
, Cj-3, Hawn. 
it. i.ai:; j'ield on ordera 
, for 3«:carity aince 

jmnandin;; Hick an 



d iar. Al 



lb .L<:": 



socarity of iTl-ieeler Fiflo 
17 U-tter 23 Deo. 'U, vT.U. Hudoi, 
IBtli Uomb..rdaent tiinc, Air Co; 
npriccrnlng arran,;ement3 or Ij- 
security jlnce nee. 7 (1*38 X 



or- 



1 ui'jcra :or 

:«o, 7 

lenl. U3A, Comrian'UnB 
. ;. ilAwn, Air Force, 

ij and orders for 

. cated) 



PRET 



^ 



3838 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



SECR'^T 



18 



IV 



20 



21 



22 



24 



25 



26 



27 
2B 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 



3iV 



lAHBorandua 22 Oac. '^, CL. Tinker, Brig. 0«nl. U.S.A., 
Coiamarfilrif; l!aw*ll»n Air Forc«, diacloding ord«r» or 
In tn.ctlon* for security and employment of Hswalikn 
Air Korc«9, Kiv«n by him sinoo his arrival. 

LetVrr 23 Uec. '41, H.C. Darldaoh, Brig. Oenl. A.C., 
CoBBnantAng iUwalian IntercBptor Coamand, to C.C>. 
Hawaiian Air Force, outlininj; arrangecwnta and n«n» Inatrue- 
tiona or orders for security after raid ot 7 Dec. 1941 

Copy of letter F.L. Martin, Kajor Oeneral, U.S.A. COMaandlng 
Jlawn. Air Korce, to C.j. Kami. Dept. dated 20 S«pt. 1941, 
concerning Joint Ara(y-Navy Air Force Exercise 

Copy of letter Cheney L. Bertholf, Lt.Col. AGD Adjt. General 
iiawn. Air Farce, to C.C. 18th Bo«fc«irx]tiaBnt Ulng - aubject. 
Attack of Navy Croiaing Dioi'Oaition (less Inol. indicated). 

Copy of letter dated Feb. 7 '41, Henry L. Stiaaon, Secty. of 
tor, to the Secretary of the Savy - aubjeot. Air Dafenee of 
Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 

iteaorandua dated 26 Dec. '4l> Robert K. Dunlop, Col. AOD, 
Adjutant Oenl. Kawfi. Dept., to Major Srooke E. Allen, Air 
Corps, containing tabulation ahoiring percentage of strength 
of all major echelons, poat and district cotaaanders present 
at 8 a.nu 7 Dec. W4l, exoept Kaul Diat. 

Letter 12/25/^, fiSaxwell Murray, Uajor Oenl. USA, to Major 
Gen-'ral Frank l4«2oy, supplewenting Oeneral Hurray's 
testimor.y before the investigating coaraiaslon. 

Menio. 26 Dec. '41, A../. Meehan, Uajor A.C., A.C. of S. , 0-3, 
Hq. Hawn. Air Force, to Roberts Coiaaiaaion, ahowrlng nuiiibera 
and types of aircraft for Hawaii, specified in Defenae Flan; 
airplanes on hand 7 Deo. '41} airplanes rea^y for inriediate 
uoej planes on hand after raid sum! usable after raid; and 
airj.' lanes that took to ^he air Dec. 7 

Uemoranduffl 25 t*c. '41 Robert H. Dunlop, Colonel, A.G.D., Adji. 
Goneral, to "distribution 'B' and 'F' leas 5 and 6" - 
Subject, Priority of Gorwtruction Projects 

Tranalatlon of Mori conversation 

StancS.ng Opc-raUne Frooedure 25th Inf. !»▼. dated 12/2/41 

atansiing Opt^rating Procedure 24th Inf. Div. dated 27 Hot. '41 

Standing Opuratint; Procedure 24th Inf. Div. dated 1 Dae. '41 

Standing Opera tin,; Procedure Hawn, C.A. dated 26 ttov. 1941 

Standing (derating Procedure l{awn. Dept. dated 5 Nov. 1941 

Certain inolosures (2 in nuai'Hsr) from .eneral Short's report, 
copy of i^;ich is in rfar Department in fca»hin«,ton (33-^ 
33-1). 

Copy of letter 11/17/41 F. L. Uartln, Major Genirral USA, 
Coamandlng Air Officer to C. . Hawn. Dept* forwarding 
special reports ooacming provisions for security of 
installations at hickam and Wheeler Fields and 
ilawalian Air Depot. 




SECRE I 



- 3 - 



(,0 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3839 



35 "A Plan for Uw sjnpiojment of Lon,;-Riir ■ ' ' 'vrdinent 

Avi«U,cn in thp Deferise of OaJiu", ^ in, Major 

Cien«?ral USA Commandinj; iiawaiian Ai- ■ *" '.itny 

Air Fc»'C*«, 'Jiron ;h CO Hawtiian &-; 

30 Stateaunt by ijerseral iero* before " ' .aamxara'jit 

12-18-<1. 

■ 2, Koceipt of the forp oin/ docuaents is reqaeated b;/ inUoroa- 
ment hereon. 



For The Jud^je Advocato Onnr-rals 






John li. '.feir, 
Colonel, J.A.ij. J., 
Executivw. 



OPO 311. i Oog D (U-53-4i) 



1st Ind. 



OPERaTIO»S division, '.(AH DEPARTLENT CJEKERAL STAFF, V.aaiangton, 0. C, 
Noveinber 26, IVW. TO: Offic« of th« ^ijdg« Advocate i}«ner«l, '><Ar Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C. 

The iindersigned has received the docmaents and papers listed in the 
basic letter for file in this Division. 



THOS. 1. HANDT, 
Uajor General, 
Aseistaitt Chief of Staff. 




C. •!. LiliiT, 
Lt. Colonel, j.S.C, 
Custodian, H«ii.y. stored Uocuments, OPD. 



- ^ - 



C/ 



3840 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




ftflft&ji^ ifM^i^iiMr WrMim r gin -TS JW^ 



Arniy Sffmci FMca 

OMtOK or THK JUCNM MMKMBAt* 







I»<ltfd iMrvvltli for tlM 
offi«« HIm !• a Mfy «f m 

%0^^ti9 fwvB MtaJttP fl i wi ll n i l 
"IklUae 0* aMHrft» ivtis^» to 
tim Mlv^BMKt fliitoirfcX» datoA 

^F ^BHIW^ WHj^ tt ** I^^P^V J^ wi*0 ^WW«w^^wO ^BWI^W^WIF* ^^i^i 
WMVi^VIHV ^^ w* ^^^B ^lO^iWIlF ^^Ww ^^^fr 9i^^^ ^w ^^^fc ^iwmBw^^ww^^F'^p 










Cf 



^*t- ^' 



V*^st *^7 



^z' 







EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3841 




liUM f y ^emm. 



Ml 



tk* MlvlMll 













air !•' ww i nl i it . ijifrt mtmS.lm mtm 



tiAp tla* « 



i«J«r 



0* 



3842 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

WAM DCFARTMKf<T OMNCKAL S r«r)' 

immc**»^WL o>vt««OM a. I 

WABMINOrON 



NIXMP 201 Short, W»lt«r C. 



50 Jon* X944. 



mMORAjfntw )roH tub chubt o» tmatt 



Sobjflctt Raquaat for copy of th« Roberta 
Cc«B!t»«lon )Proc«»4i«i*5t. 



1. Ib » I«tt«r to th« MJutnat ftanana CCa^ A), 
K^or Osnaral Waltar 0. Short, Retired, rvqaaat* that h« b* 
furnlohail « oopjr of the full prQC««dluc« of th« SoTi^rtg Coml»- 
•loo. 

2. Th« War I>«n*rtsi«nt !• infcrsad th«t th» 
S«oret«kry of th» Kiivj {Mr. Ilaoi) Mr^wa oonth* itgo fur»l«h»d 
Admiral Klwwl a photoatatic copy of th« report of th« Ho^«rt» 
CoHsi««loB. TJie H»r? Q*p*rt»»nt i* tuiAliX* to stat* whsthor 
3«cr»t»ry Knox ofataloed l&foMoftl approyal from the Pr«si'di»Rt 
b«for» thlt aiotioo ««• talc«n. 

3. Th« J'udc* AdvooKt* a«fi»r&X 9xpra«a«> th« 
oplalon th&t a«n«r*l Short 1* MitltXad to and aho-altl be fumlthad 
& copy of tb« report of th« Roberta CoBoniaatoa; that the ConBi'a- 
elon \m» sppottitad by aod reported to the Prealdent of the United 
Statec; and that a copy ah^uld not be furnlahed Oaoeral Short 
without prior approval by tha Prealdont. 

IX. »^xn rftfiga»ffi4t.!»> 

1. That the attached aeworaadua for the I>reeldent 
be al|;ned and dlapatched. 

2. That whea the rasBoraaduss h«« beeo dispatched 
thle file be returned to 0-1 for further acttoa. 




lool*. ^ 

9ab A 

BMkf t ef M««a «> ^he 
F» » a *t a B « -#er wti^ 
Datuire of the S/V. 




L^'^^ 






>. VHITB, 
General , 
Aaotatant Chief of Staff. 



NO'lU ^i^^"^ '" 



^ 



■'■■■■'( ■ ' v.< 



^"^ 



■^| )j t* li > W » * » «itM i < liWpi WiMII>* Wi lWI I ^ « >HW*.MJ»y wti »rjj iW»lltl^ 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 
I I 



3843 



lot fKB mMtmmi 









MMiAiliaF iii.%li ywr flf^pMWNkl* Imm 
Ids rwpMMt. 



'5>; 



«f Ikur. 



3844 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



m^r 



HI' 



.i|^R 



tnjfx-! 



T« 



ffH 



■H9 



9r».ti <■' 

_ 9f r«- f 
. I>»*c., 



**<« 



C» 



Of* 



« 8 «> 



r'?-)!.*"'.' 






.4^ 

'.,^/ 



'^OttO-OfFp: ^lEf OF SI 









^y^^- 



6 ,<| 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3845 




WAR DEPARTMENT 
WASHINCSTON 



'\^\h'- 




bl!'-.;'-" 



■ . ',<-J •'»■ ^■'■ 

iis8i"n, the sa--; to 






kj:j^cx.^t. // f)'^,t 




x1 




3846 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 





/■", 



-A»*^^^,,rf»,4«" 



^ J'^^' 



of th& Soobarts Coawu ■ 






^it, i'flKeral 'Photostated copy 



-irswi. 



li* 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3847 



Section D 



Pi-i'-'.f- ro TO LT COL ERANA ,^, 



7 105 />v ,>ii 



C" 



/^y 








VA2 

«MU V WARG MR 9 

FROM ALLEN J 6SEEB COLONEL RETIREB VWS. BUFFALO m 27 MFT 

TO JUOCE ADVOCATE CENERAL OS ARMY ttAI SEFT aASH0C 

CR NC BT 

CENERAL WALTER SHORT TELEPHOBIP IJSIlirUt JOOR 8E?lfSE»TATIVE WILL SEE 

HIM TUESDAY AN!> ASKED ME Al RIS COUNCIL Tc'^SEE YOU MONDAY A« LEAVING 

HERE TONIGHT AND ARRIVINft'' WASHINGTON KONjyfY HS^NING S«ALL GO 

IMMEDIATELY TO YOUR OFriCE PLMSE SESaSPlK'oiNTMEWT 

a: 02032 



py^i 





3848 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



\ i WS 



'^ ■' . .„.. ^m. 



. n L«p«rt- 



• t.'.ut j'.e 
..a.i realize^' 
.. le officer, 
■"'K? t accept th« 
hJs honor 
.. ;...„^.,r. toci.- 
'>en done arn.; ' t 
: ' ^ head for 
further - 
ai'tment of 
^ t 'at t>'>se 
■■ • ■■ " ..f 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3849 






not Tf'fkl' T'r.r 

r«sp 

rten 

■neroua 8 



f c'1sft«t.er :*' 
'ipsrtmonts &.-. 
ait L©yon<^ t 
the nocoss!ty r 
rh« very fact t' 
n-r r'ifide !t •;■;'■ 
.l.tch t^ 



't was TiOt alona 
*hal the M&r, the 

htrnself Kust share 
->!can people for 
nrp!cness are also 
such f. 






or t,. 
".Var ', 






'fcl t&kes placM *. t w!'l 
In svic'i 'asues us the lacArtJ.; 
f0rce_ pi;llt5cal naC not f«ctu 
that cannot be othar ihs^n unf 



i comrnda of Spunlsh 
respect auc. personal 



^OSS' bli5 to > - ; ,,^ .. • 

.era which will 



upon your time tut couple 
few words. 



recep- 
uriv.ulj pi-«surr.' nj_, 
le ciscusaed In a 




79716 ()— 46— i)t. 19 28 



3850 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

1M4 



U«-«lt ■•la tteMt, 



0«1«m1 



« r«««ra of %mmnl ««ir froi his m&mt^rmk— -AVk 

M^. t— riT Wtlr took &4mtac* o^ Wla« la BalUa 

Ijjpjjt Mvvnd Jwlf* •4v*aA«« oTAmm Lb that TislBitjri 



is a gMMTttl f roisst%t«i# a — r>l Ihart af y rs %• 
^ . . ^Tl^ «• «h« rr sf W 4 taklK •' ••■•t""^|l !■ <*• ■••• 

■MTt m4» <M r«f«M« %• Mm cfrMt «ba% a««hiac ^ aWrtaA 
tefw* «IM first •* AyAl b«M«s« ids vlfo ms «• wis rt s « 
Mwr ofSTBUsB sM IM «sslrs« «• «id« uatLl sIm ha« fMsrrsrsA 
frsB tks% bsfsrs n^Miiiv wm 4sms« TtaA%« of ssurss* is s y s' 
•bis to «hs 



Z wk« «IM s^gostisas ■s4« la your lottor. Of 
sourso m^ •wak s«ci«o%lflas will hsw %o «m1% furthsr 
«i«B of Hko M«%«r. 

foty siaooroly ]roiu>s« 



%roa a. OrMor, 
■•Jer Ooaor*!, 
fko J«t4ffO 4«vo«««o Ooaoroi, 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3851 



^^Vi 




.« ^rasv »j»:*.T-»«>»-i-;te!«M;c»,-!SMa!'2«SSW«s-i2StM«il<««*«S 



iISNTIAt. 



W*lrt 



•ad Oolrtrsel »prlng«r, 4 M^roh 1044 



Sow with r«f«r«ao« to th« o*»« up th»r« - rmumborl Toll (l«B«r«2 
Cr«»«r th*t h« wvata Toa M MtiT* ■•rrlo* md •• th« JA oouaMl, 



aprlngT t W«Lit ju«* * nlBttts - h» w*nt« Ten «• » Wh«tt 

Tfair t Aetlv* amrri.0* - on »otlv« duty. In oth»r words ho has a rrfcirod 

■~~~* offioor. K« also would wmat » JA wid •omooao ow aotlTO duty. Ho 

would Ilk* to haTO To«. 

Bpriagori Tom, rl^ht hore. 




Woiri 



S prtngor t 



WjjlTl 

Spring ar t 
Ifolri 





Y««h. As woll •• Coloaol Cir»*r, r«tir«d. Oroer la about 67, $B, 
if I rooall It. H« wants offioors on the oourt who would b« saaior 
to hia as of th« tla« In quastion. In othor wcorda h« doasn't want 
any tamporary Iteutonaat gensrals or soaaone liVa that who ara way 
Junior to him now - junior to hln on tha Regular list, on any oourt.^ 
Ha' 11 hara oivlliaoB counsel at tha ti»e In quastion. Ha has not 
yat aBiployed oouasal but he Intends to. He's all for this investi- 
gation of o«u-s« as I told General Craaar yesterday, but he doesn't 
want to start on anything before tha first of April. His wife is 
to be operated on in the hospital in Dallaa sometiaa tha forepart 
of this month and it will be a couple of weeks probably before he'lX 
want to begin on that. Of course he wants the testiauHsy preserved 
but as I told General Cramer these depositions, or T^aterer we»ra 
going to call tham, should be used only if the witness is not alive 
or available at the time. One of ids prinoipal witoeases and 
probably a prinoipal witness on both sides, is now dead, so we're 
lost that man's tostiraony - got itt 

Yes, I got th&t all rifht. John, Oenaral Craiaer said when I talked 
to you to ask you if Morse and Daincsr wore still to go up to the 
oonfsrenoeT 

riflXl I had planned to have Daincw up there to the oooferenoe to edit 

the - 

"Vo 1, that's what I figured so I told him to count on it. 

It's not dreadfully important about Morse - I tiiourht Morse would 
have an opportunity to see the people up there and cheoip on their 
library so he wcwldn't have to make those trips all over the west. 

Well he's made moat of his trips hasn't he7 

He's siade a oouple but he hasn't gone very far west. You slight 
oheok with him on that. I'sc checking here with people as I go 
along. Jones will bo there. 

Is Jones getting his own carders? 

.<»it a isinute - he's getting, his own orders and they've been 



^ 



3852 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




* ' approved h«r« go ho' 11 b« thore. Kow what«» th« dope on th* 

OonferoDO* - eTorytJilnr. rolnp alonr, ••11 rlKht? 



V 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3853 

3141 Southwestern Botjlen'ard, 
Dallas 5, Texas, Feb. 29, 19^. 

Subject : Detail of Colonel Allen J. Greer, U. S. Army, Retired as Counsel. 
To : The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. I request that Colonel Allen J. Greer, U. S. Army, Retired be detailed to 
act as my counsel in any court-martial that may take place as a result of the 
attack of tlie Japanese on Pearl Harbor, T. H. 

2. I request that Colonel Greer be placed on active duty at once to represent 
me and to assist in the preparation of depositions to be taken in the case, accom- 
panying the officer detailed by the War Department to prepare and take the 
deposition. As a preliminary to this work I request that Colonel Greer be 
directed to report to me and go over with me the preparatioxi of the interrogatories 
of the witnesses for the defense. 

. Walter C. Shobt, 
Major General, U. 8. Army, Retted. 



3141 Southwestern Boulevard, 
Dallas, 5, Texas, March 22, J944- 
Subject : Testimony of witnesses with knowledge of the attack on Pearl Harbor. 
To : The Judge Advocate General, U. S. Army. 

Recently I was interviewed by Brigadier General John M. Weir, J. A. G. D., 
at my home in Dallas, Texas. Among other things General Weir informed me 
that the Secretary of the Navy had appointed Admiral Hart to take testimony 
of witnesses who had knowledge of the attack on Pearl Harbor and record their 
testimony in order that it might be preserved against the possibility of the trial 
of Admiral H. E. Kimmel in the future. He stated that the Secretary of War con- 
templated taking similar action in my case and that the War Department desired 
an expression of my views on the matter. In reply I stated that I desired to 
cooperate with the War Department to the fullest extent consistent with the 
protection of my rights, and that while I concurred, in principle, with the pro- 
posal to perpetuate the testimony I believed myself entitled to such stipulations 
as might be necessary to safeguard my rights. 

Since my interview with General Weir I have given further consideration to 
the matter. I am sure that there is no intention on the part of the War Depart- 
ment to place me in the position of being compelled to release any rights I may 
have in the premises. 

In this connection I believe that before the commencement of any proceedings 
to which I am to be a party it would be only fair and just that I be apprised of 
the basis of the proceedings, their scope, the use to wJiich the records may be 
put and such other details as will permit me to save my rights. I believe it would 
be a relatively simple matter to make an agreement as to those details and that 
such an agreement would insure that the proceedings will be disposed of in an 
orderly and efficient manner. It seems to me that some such agreement is so 
essential to the safeguarding of my rights that I would be compelled in self- 
defense to insist on it as a condition pi-ecedent to my participation in the proposed 
proceedings. If, therefore, the War Department decides to proceed with the 
perpetuation of the testimony in my case as contemplated, I would appreciate 
being informed before the commencement of the proceedings as to the views 
of the War Department on this point. 

In a letter which I handed to General Weir I asked that in the event proceed- 
ings were begun Colonel Allen J. Greer, Retired, be made available to me as 
counsel. I reiterate that request. I stated informally to General Weir that I 
would like to have Brigadier General T. H. Green, J. A. G. D., as my counsel 
under the same circumstances providing he was willing to serve in that capacity. 
This latter request is now reduced to writing. 

Walter C. Short, 
Major General, U. 8. Army, Retired. 



3854 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3855 




3856 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3857 



• y 



ASrO-M .TOl Short, ir*lt»r C. l«t Ind. Aff!C/»b/i>44« 

(M Jul 44) 

WD, too, ¥ft«hln«ton- 28, t. C, 9 Aa^«t 1944. 

TOi Kajor (>«n«r«l Wnlt«r 0. Short, V. S. Armjr, Hatlr«d, 3141 Southwastarn 
Boulavnrd, Dalla* 6, Texaa. 

ApproTad proTld^d it will not unduly Intorfxra with Brigndlar aeaaral 
Organ's i^rosant dutlen. ThiB ft{»pro»«l ta ^iVen with tha ajtpraaa xjadaratwvdlng 
thM; tha detftjl wilt ba in ndditlos to hi« other ilxjtlns. 

Bjr order of tha 8«cratftry of Ifarj 



J. A. tn.10. 

Major *an«r»l, 
Tha Adjutunt G»aar«l. 



00*^y^_ / ' " '^' ^t^%> ' %f 



.^ ^. ' ■ ^. . i. - 



3858 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Section E 






Secretaiy Knox «mouao9d that tlie Unit*' St/»tet tutk 7ore» wMch struck Salpon 
M\fl ilnlan l«land« hiu' d««tro;'»4 X38 eneny nlnne* in th« nlr >«»A on th« ^ounrt vlth 
tho loea of but 8lx of our -ilnnet. In qdi^itton two ahlty* v«r« sunk ntiA nine othara 

d«in/;e<l, 

llthou^ the United Stnte* forca w«8 A»tect»d by th» enuoy "hile aonronchin^; 
the isl.-mda on Ftbruary 21 and nttaokod by enemy land-based 'jlanes for nearly two 
days.aot one of our ships was sunk or eren dacin/?e4, Snaray install f\tlons «er« bomb- 
ed and strafed by "Innes froa our Onrrlers, On ?ebruf«ry aStllberatore of the 7th 
Aray Air Forces took ^aurt In the bombing of Husale.an^ on the sa«e ('ny other' ■planes 
pfirtlcipited vith Ka^y planes In bonbln^ four en«iy-held atolle in the Marshalls. 

In con lentln^ unon foe recort from the Pacific Fleet Headquarters', Secretary 
Knox said that the ajBasing t/dn/; was the hea^y dar!a,-:e our iDllote had Inflicted on 
enaay aircraft '4 th such «nBll loss to t lien selves, Purther, he said, deeolte the 
two-da;' attadk by enBny tornedo nlanes an'', bonbars on our forcesiannarentl;' not a 
Bln,^le B'.i-o had been hit. 

In response to a question, h« said t'l^t renorts ^e hnfi. received Indicated t'lat 
t:M Janancse have lanroved their -nlanes, but the quaj.lty of their lilots Is 
deteriorating, 

*he Secretary aimounoed that Admiral f, 0. Hart had been aesi.'sic'd to collect ^ 
testimony from Havy officers concerning th» iJimnnese nttack on Pearl Hnrbor for use 
at thf court martial of Adniral Elrmol am' fleneral Short. Ho said that t-ile was 
bein.~ -"o.ie because wan;'' of the offlcars wero acitterod throu^'iout the world and 
n:\n: -rngef^ in h.-^zardotts <'utln8. Ho saii' th't It was "an atterrrit to be abso- 

lute!.. -„^.:ro '"ith Adfilrnl Kiamol * mS. that tho t.jstlnony shoult* bo talten by a 
hlga ranJcing offloor in ••'horn both tho accused ai«i tho ITnw DcDartnent hnd cdnfl- 
donco, Kq cxnlninnd tlitTc was no ohmge in tho decision to Tjoot'nocf!_th<- court 
nrtrtl-^l until -iftar the; ""fir situation hnd subsided <\nf th<^ trlnl Ofvn bo hnld 

•■^'.-ir.'* I 

"h ' whethor t'lis notion ".-48 being t?\''<.n in conjunction •--it'-, siciil-tr 

iction V <r I>(rof\rtn-^nt,;ii? r<^ill'd t;vit it '-tna not nw* tVt hr fliA not Sfno" 

Arriy '•'oul'' tike li'rr. ttoDS or not. 

VlCi. Admlrnl Bon Korocl, Chi'.-f, Buronu of Tarda nK* Bocks, nttcnr on- 

f or- noo »...? roiortrd briefly on tho "ork of t'T is'-r^b.^.-^a ir. tho Pacific Ich 

hn hid tourid recently '-1th Uni'or Siorntnry Forroe' said t; ■;t 

100,000 m n In fv i^-i'-ic construction bittnllona y ••"^rf <• ., nt 

"ork in ronalrl^. to o»^t'irt>d Inst"!'' i.ti'M-.a -» ••■oil f<s bull b-^sfs. 

On', o" t '•- miot---. a '.r;e J-vjg haTB ffln''>% .'if S'^.ld, i"^B to nndfr~c«tl... . ;■ anoed 
'•»lth '■■-.Ich Am..ric"r.8 con.ld rostorft b-nsro -ujd rf^/».ir &nr.rr,r. !'ot onJ./ -(mx the Sr'v 
bocs fr.r Buntrior to tho J.Tnanesfl in aJrlll but also In the eunnly of cenatructloB 
oouliM'.nt. K.- enid tlv ttoabffs Snoci-'l, or tho stisTodorft df^tnc?-; "nte, ^•'cm doing 

rU» OUtst ',0b. 



I 



fiS 



ALT/j"s 

Fr<.ae Br^'noh 

8ur"u of Public Enlatlons 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3859 




lrkr*o% froi TmuMrlpt «f ft— C«ar«r«no* of 3»crmt»X7 of Wtr 






PSISSt 

Is ti» Iter tepturlMoat plutBisi; to record tho toMuBooy of offleora 
«lio Mty bo Ut<« unavkilAblo «tia bavo kno«l«48« of ovonts for um la 
tbo eoM of iKjor 0«Mirml Wtdtor C. SHbort, os «b»o«»o*<1 bjr tiio I017? 

ttM l»r Soportatet !• »oarklit( Ic full eooportttloa wlU) tho lotjr 
D»p«rtWMnt 1b acuMibllna; suob tovtJjKttiy . 

TSB83t 

lo It ta^wM**^ tbo Joiat Cfal«fJ,jrf-etiff «p» »' 
tho f cMtM^MTof « OoportaMSt jjMKlSlWl Dof ( 
^aj^'^MTpnt into offoet^boM^ tbo oloto $ 




I am told 
thot sabj 

PBZSSs 




t 1 ls«t» no iitwiitfrrto m»km o%,A«fC««— '""^ 



0000 jrour roply to Um prorloiMi quootloa mmh tiuit you aro takisf 
toatiaoajr? 

SBCRKTARZt 

!••, I uBdorntoad ao. Wo «ro taklas etopc to proaorr* tiuit 
•vld«nte«> whlolk wmuis tltat «• auBt b« taking toatlAonjr. 

oamuL soRUESt 

Too, «« aro working with tbo Vary Dopartaont. 

Could you aay alto la taJcio^ tlunt taatlaottTt 
SaCKRABXi 

1 tttink tbat la a aattar irttleh la oaually not dlseuasod ia 
publle a laayor poitepa. 



^■> 



3860 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




WaS3« 

I thlni( tha raason th« queutlon ••■ a8)c«4 la b«c«u0« th« Mary 
D«p«rt««nt umouno*d that Adalral Hart mo\xld »m tb« offlear In 
eharc* of as8«Hbllng tb* t»»tiaooy In ttoa Mavy. *• vondarad If you 
had daalcnatad a apaeifle officer for that. 

SECRETARY I 

I oan't anawar that. I didn't know that Adiiiral Bart bad b««n 
appolntad. My li\fora«tlcn waa Juet us I put It, that wa ara acting 
■1th tha Nary to praearva that taatlvony. 



>^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3861 





V,-,., -^uth-'^es'-fT-n 3oul«r»ard, 

9ubj«ott Detail of offloarw «» ^bs^rrBff bo«r4 of offl<?<»r« t »▼•»*< «r,».t;'. 

km- th'i Tf,prn«8o AttftcK -.f D90#al3ar ■•7,iv?4i. 

¥» I Tli« Adjuts-rit 'jenwal.tJ. S. Affly. 

i. ■ At th» r«(jtt8st of t1i« W«r D«j)«rta«Bt,OB S«.ite-.ber ?a,l<?43,I pl.'r!«« - 
rnmt not *- plvd th» stfittit* of lim^.t^tior-.n m bBP of wy tr-lel 'h'/ n^if.^iy^l ■'■ -ttel* 

Ijs op« ny nllt(»d(p;>id off- '• '« 

or wtthttt aix wont' ■.-:»• rstfijid 

of Conpriitu . " ., Kfi- f oonsid. 

offioe- a purpop* of InvaetiKott^ie f^n<S reporting the f t c ■ '«^ 

S, 1 «i'n I'.nui t.TK? !!l--'-v tiji-.!^ V.ix'.r ■!''■' ir t'i '*■ 9 f ' • ■ ffti'-X or ■" 

Inquiry et "or «ny Asflolen'.- ■ sd or 

•H9(.-.«d as>. . ,, ._ .. . ,..:..^ rJly Mltwod fr -J. It Is 

By fssBiaytioii tVvnt tb» pwjooMd bopird la belr.r onven'tJ for tU; puri>oe« of det'smiiaiag 
Bn:' fiiid bU B\l«f-<5<J iiapropar pctn or onslsfl--^" ■■^" "•• ■'■•^^ ■'•n or before D«««raber 7, 1941, 
la order to expedite txiy future trial, t her. 't I b<» p.-rmltt«d t-) hB're 

elt with t^!o Boord et the oxamliwtlon »f «Xl «,..«,=.,..« v.-. offlcerc of sny 8«l9otioa, 
to r'jpreaont me pt «ueh hecrlne?! i' w*!!- «if! to crotsB-sjiRmiive "11 vfitnosaea opp«' rlnf/, fee# 
fore the Borrd, I dentr* to point out th«t lo '.he ovsrit of irsy beirif; required to 
»e*t ?iay future resultaist oh.'.-f.es thl? privilege ^«ill «»:r<i''tly fbrid>:e the tline aeo- 
'esatiry Bd'jouf'teiy to prepare t(iy def snso. I da»lr« to point out «leo tVint siich r«pr»- , 
«ont'«tlon win »Mi«t m brlUfliv to Itfjht more oleerly triy ponltlon nvA the sltwtion 
prior tT "nd on Owjember '!', 1941, end ■■ " *e pioturo to the Bof.rd 

end the Secretrr;/ of War. It Is u -ntftd In fnlrnoRjs to 

tile underslijned ■ » veil fis to the Ui.ited Stf ts-.sr Jn t'vi ^nd It should rnsult In the 
nfvKnr, of time for flX "c^nearned. 

^. If the ebove-mentlone-1 viou i-antad T nhi-ll b*i ,-l"d to submit the oetmes 

of the of floors vfr.ora I doslre •' • •.«>. 



TRlter C. Sho>" , 
.>jor Oon^rnl,';, . . ired. 



n"? 



3862 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



(I 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

WAR uePARTMCNT GENERAL STAFF 

I'niinnii Dfvt«KiM o-i 
WASHINGTX3M 



:i'.ri,\i' tux jilort, lialtfr C. 



21 July ivhSi 



^loiic I^w ^^;', 7dth Con(ire33. 



1!3A Ketx;. ^, ■-..^- -..- 

At^Jutant Gtnerfc.1, lii, 13 

ooura for reruirk ana rtcuniai'na.ivioji in C( 
the ClTico of Vhi. <hidce Auvocate ui;neral. 



:ort. 



•.A.K^ii with 






{;;aiVr General, 
/vSsiataJu. Chief of Staff 



End. 
Memo to TACi (lb '^ui .4.U; 
ir Cifin Short. 



|l 



i 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3863 



1st liBiao Izid. 

201-SHC«t, Walter C. 

Headquarters Aray Pearl Harbor BorJPd, Munitions Building, W&shlagtrm, D,C., 
26 JvOy 1944. 

To J The Assistant Chief of StpJTf, G~l, War Department. 

1. Following consultstion with the Offi-- ■' 'Vhe Judge- te 
General the Board has conaliietwd the "rarious trwolv* cncludsd 
that the recme^t of Jfejor Gene- ■ ter C. !■: i-od, 
that he be permitted to h:ive ;■■ th« Boh: of all 
.witnesses two officers of hia selection, to represant hiis at, «uch heaxi^g 
188 well as to cr OB .--ex?, mine all witnesses apr^jarlag before the Board, should 

be denied. 

2. Although it is recognized that certain ad-rantages might be gained 
were the request granted, it is beHevcd that such a course of action would 
also entail' numerous undesirable' consequences, a com iderat ion of which 
,«uggests the advisability of not permitting the refsuested procedure. 

3. In this connection it is pertinent to note that the Board is terely 
« fact find tog agency of the Wfex Department, and not initially charged with 
an investigation of any specific alleged acta of comiaiasion or omission on 
the part of Major General Short or |iny other lndividu.il In the military 
service. However, should aubstantial evidence of such acts b« adduced, the 
Board contemtjlates affording an early opportunity to the indivldiai.l or 
individuals concerned to appear before it, with or without counsel, and to 
teotify, cpll •"ttnesses, and offer anything that iaay be desired in his or 
their behalf. The Board also cc.ni (•nu-.intff^ 'i«rmlttli5g such .oerson or persons 
again to appear after all othe been adduced, to offer ar^ything 
further that as-y be desired in lu^- i wue « behalf. 

Jt. It appears proper to point out tJ i:he event forsaal ch-.rges 

phould result from the Board's invest i^at, y accused j^er-son snust also 

un-ier Article of '"ar 70, be afforded fm"t;;er opportunity fully to present 
his oase prior to ■iny Rnbf;pr>n«nt trial on f-uch charge?. 

It is recoracasiivir-. ■-,.. t M-'jor General Short 'h^ r,dvieed acccru iiigiy . 

For the Boards 





ht. General, U.S. krvf^, 




Inol. President. 

dpy of Uem> fa 
Gen. Short '. ''d 




■l1 



3864 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



AOro-Jll-r an »mr\, ii«ut«r C. 



im/m!t/aiM 



3 Aa4m% 19U. 






to 



BigliUt 8«rriM CoodmhUU 



8. luraqrj S«tlr«4, 



1. X»nr lAiw at I* JtOjr 19k4« 8ia>jMii «0«rt»U oi efiri«Mni at vb- 

mad • »a i wm ef m4um wamXA »ijm antAU, simmnhm M u dtw iaraM.* MMWitiMBaM* 
ft tiMwHwwitlm »f vMlali ■««•««• iiw MtwlMMUtr «f net jMraitttlat tha r«» 

a* At %*!• «ianM%iMi i« &a jHWiSiMBi W a«t* th«t th* itPMurtt !■ Mfl«34r 

•n liiVM%t#Kl4«i «ur (My tffitUttt tiXtti Mit* of •wMd»«lMi or owJiOrton oa %)m 

l^wi of Miy' i«&iti4Mil. la Um a&MXatfr Mrviao* Hovovwr, ohattU wdxifitMUiUftl 
«iM4aM« •? »«ili aAo Ni aMttmit, %im Bo«rd » «l i ipa .ii»o> mlt»r4&mn m mrlf 

wUh or «ltfa»«l «Mii««I, «^ to itMSyt oftU »ite««io««« an4 «ff«r Mgruaac 

XhA mtf bo Aostnrf i» M» or ttolr tMitftUr. tho iiooHi •!«» oon t ■ upAat oo 
jMnilMtjac aaoh y ar aon or ]H)^wmi« ft«ftla %• ap^Mwr oi^tor aXl othor ««14hmo hu| 
booe (UMMotlf ie offw snjrtMas fuHiior %h^ amy t>« 4o«lro4 in hto or Umi4v 
bohaU. 



)• H fcypoypo ivopor to jwtrat o«t iiwt la th* «v«nt fomtol ^uu^oc 
■hoall4 iHMnit tvtm th« Ba«Ni'o inv*«t>ic»tlc»n, any «ocaa««l ftaraoe aaat alao 
wtuiar Artialo •i itiir ?0, t>o a^or^oA fwttoar opjortimU? fully to proaani hSM 
aaaa iwior «« oajr aabavqttwrk iMPlal on aasli abarfoa. Ceaaa<^Mntljr, jnttr ra» 
qaaat ih«i |mi te fmradttatf to iaaitfucta tao offlaora of /oar aalaotlon to 



riVKraaant y^ at hmkri»g» hmtor* ttta Boar<di <9f Cf floara 
of Pttblla x^w 339, TOth Ooiisraaa« ia 

ary of %J>i 








un4ar ttta 



^ 



I*-! 



u 



^^ 



OanaraX, 
utaat'^iaaaiiai.* 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3865 



(8 1 a Aug 44) 

WAR DEPARTMBNT-OrnCUtt. BUSINESS 



OUTOOINO CULSSimnD MESSAGE 

OffiM of origin }^..^mP9.0itimuLliaLmtlt I imm9».J&nB0M.. D.t« a Jtacuat.l9k4. 

.Afl?M!l.J»lJS»Brl*. JWJU* jC,...to.A^^ Takphoa. Tgaa 

Cl»irific»tion ^J^^^ff^^^ :>V8<»denc« JftttUJUt 

Toe oomMoim cmmAL siohw ssmci oc»ttHi) 

ARMT PSARI, mtmi BOAKD C0!JTiaeiJl»5 CAU-BO frXI A.-, A '.ITM,^. ^ asHIMOTQII 

DC co!««iiGi«a THURami Aixsisr tasffH 3top tot wMyis omrgs too to rawiiaH 

IT BT AIR MAIL AT ONC» !!tX>M P UR S8Vaf FsJUH TlllSS MmjITIOtS BUILOOiG A 
SUOC»ST«D USX CSf WITNS33S3 JTMJCH III mm (S»lStIO» H.va KX0.ri.gDG8 0KIACT8 

SAB£iD UPON THS xrivssrzaATXuR sffop XDifft Rs^fcsT FOR ccsT H(»)aa-s amoMsim 

RS CWT APJ'WWrSD STOP AMTICIP Tffll PHDToaTAflC CJOPT- SAUI WILL iiS COIb'LirJU) 

AND ATAi^o UTOB sooR ARRXTAL TiA^iiKiK« «?» mm nmmxs moABmin 

COURSXL iJXZMO COieZD]CRX> BSiOaST lUI AUKJiQflJPGie aSSXHT or THIS lUaZOORAW 
3PIP0 OASfl M Al«) IWUflM TIGS OTFICa MM U$f (^ WISSiSa 33 MAT i« atPlCTKD 
tmOODT] 

(JLZO THS AOJVTAKt <mWUX. 



ai^l^ladUm»m»Mm Cwitw. «uth«utifat«d by , 

Opmxmtiana Siiw, WOM, 

Amr P««rl liftriim- -a»«ni, M 474? MitnltiaR*.. 

V. ».. A. a. o. *n#nt sro. «m 



»e 



79716 ()— 46— pt. 19 29 



3866 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I I 

WAR DEPARTMENT 

Ci.,^SSIFIED MESSAGE CENTtl^ 
INCOMING CLASSIFIED MESSAGE 




n 



\,y^ 



1 



,/ 



uDOt- IW _ 

n prm "___ 
!) Mil va 

IJIS1 

<»TOBAaB_ 
HUNT 











r»c oa 




y 


' 


MO 




/ 




rw8 









! .\-^.»B 








OMMUIOi 








o«a 


•' 






1 900 ■ 










■/ 











COPY NO. 








( 




J- 




MAKING or AN EXACT COPY OF THIS MESSAGE IS FCWBIODEN 



18 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3867 







I 


1 






^♦Ot^SWK 


^^^^^^Hi'iMWti!^W» : 


j^ ' 


TOj The M^JMtaJst -J^twrs" 

As "to 'asasr*! Short's rvfti^st*, 
*. 'Sh»X his f^i^wat to !>e 





■t«ic#a to data by ttt» Bo^rd lOHii t 
danger *f r 

f»0«8lbl9 ju; 

^eon rao»iv»d, uiftsd and oomiu»i<»* "thereon r»*oh»»i. fi.-jw«»dr, 
o'o^ection •• .-!»vxng "ansral Snnrt ar hi* «dYae8r» U«n«r».l ■■»■•» 
hsEilqwart^rs -'ruas («i!l stufiy the rsaara of t«s1»5«>ossy t<54> 
rd rat .< • • ««^Hjij 1, ^n n-isf' tn ft •ji'«ar'iF.' -f 5«-»«r- 



M»' 



v4- 



if'^iTifiiiimiiiiiiiiiii ill iii i%i 



3868 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






*n)««i9fs mji j9%ja 2«<|amu tuooi f\tw *nja^tf»t») t{)(M */|*A}iri.r 



tint •» <aw<r 
• -«i« ■•« "MM "O ■» » "a •• 

:.iiu r>u> f»)*T> Kwuiui'u i/sm 'nnivM |«t>|n| -JO) lamg -g 
OMmoq) MVP V^ ••& t 



woawwiievf 




^f/^ 



.nit. If 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3869 



I 




Si, AW* #u.a.«.. 



K» 9. $» 



I 




%Mii Itap^iiMi »mm*f ni^MX m%m%*9 m 



no«*t1»l« ai 



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^t.^, 



RUghes.'fJ.Jr. .-ra/vaf 



*11 «• tea aj. 



■/•• been 







3870 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



J - CONFIDENTIAL | 

NAR DEPARTMENT 6ENERAL STAFF 

DISPOSITION FORM 

PUSOnXL OITISIOH, 0-1 

n 1.: MMAP 20 1 flhart, WUf r C. Mt.: X Aii«Mt 1%A. 

tURJCCT: CwMFkl Otttomr. 

TO 






roR 



_ $A — u»« *sw »si»» — c* -- 

(J.J a-» 9-« — on _ e« — 

«Ma jA« — «o — 'a — I"*"-© — cs_ 

J *rThrou<>» ofrie* Chl»f <rf auf f) 

^ g/K I) I rtct » f.c«(itfi< or CO(icurr«ivc« Ncctitiry action 

Ortft o* r«l>tr »»«ark and recomoenda t Ion tnforaiat Ion 

Olrtct raaly information for raplr PriBary Intoraat 

tyyrovad »n< ratyrntoa-t ^Ho 

. |)lt«p»roy*it 



I. Th»t tl»» r»qB««t of Stojor Owwr*! Widtsr C. Short !• •pproTOd, r^i^ 
cenettiTod la tgr tht TJ*0, in tho ••oond lador»M Mn t. i-,r 

II. rtuki. aU oono«n»«l bo •«tn«Kl Moordlatlof* \r 

ror tlM jU«lat«it Chiof of SUff , 0-lt ^C 



y ^^/i 



'^ 0. 



r 



^ 



/laeXo. 

lafonMl action shoot 
fr. AGO to 0-1, 18 A«g W», -^ 

uwirigAmmt FOR RB(»8Bt In ^h* *tt»ehod lottor, Gonoral Short ro^Mooto to bo S 
iSTnTlhoS Aa roSwr o f hi. toott»oay boforo tho Po*rl Harbor Boardt . oo«r\k 
of th» to«tlj»ny taJtwi to data by tho Board j and that boroaftor ho bo fi»i>- ^ 
nl^od with a oopy of tho roinaijidor of tlB» toatiaoigr froa day to day aa 1« lUR 

Proaidoat of tha Board roooMwirta UuS. lk«*f G SS&rt'a poquoai'w b* fttmiahod 
ulth a copy of tho to»ti«o«jr tak«» to dato by th*4 Board and that hwroaftor bo 
bo fumtabod with a oopy of tho rw»iador of tha taaUjKnyr f ro« day to dajr M 
It i« takong'ba <i»niod. TJAfi ooaeura ia Oanoral Short 'a ro<9ioat. 



AUG 22 I'^H'! 



,0-1 



•«->Mi«-aa 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3871 




MnUKTt iaqwvt far Qmpf mt VMctlMMqr (ktinM tttmm «h» Bm«4 «r ftfftiiw. 



TOt The AdjwUat 0«9Mrr«l of tk» Anigr* 

1. Cki •ppMuriim thla aamSjif b«r«r» tte aM«UI Board ctf Offloagr« 
h«J41af • iMNOrtac la «amMHiUeii altt tlM i»f««tlfRUaii «f tlui faot* 
Mrraiaidiju tiw AtUek oti ?*«rl BartMr on Dttcnn^r 7, 2'741, X rvqiwvtatf 
W IM twndwlma aith a aaio^ «f agr U«%ir«Bgr bafarc tlw Ba«NI «« aecH tm 
yra«U«abl« »b^ UkmiAm ir«qM«twi tltet X ba provMad attk » cafiy af nil 
t^ ttw taa tl w ary lalHwn lajr tlia Jlaar^ tiafarw tit* Saard fraaaaiJUiip «i<« a«»» 
aJMtod* Z ■■&• llMaa mHimata for tte porpaa* af *— ^r**n Mrf ravia«ljtM| 
ttw MMa aa tkat if aagr nppOaMHrlavr ar ajqOjoMitaiT atataawita «ara 
JarttaMa X mX(fiA imm tlM fiarthm awiWiilty af inaaaiillnii «lMa te 
tlMit «lw aai4 Witmi ■!#% haw tka ttiil a^vaatef* ««r i^ SallMirta imm 
af «ha faata aa IdMjf aadatad at ttat Uim, Tfaa OudMaa tT «ha 8aar4 
atetMl Uat ^r »*«|WN»ta aam af aaiali a natani «Mt tlMgr atMnXd Iw da« 
l|r tlM *ar DapartMiift smI mmialwid tiiat X Mint diiwai ar^pllaaticn a«i 



a, A ai w lln c l jr p X N<|iaa«t tkat aa aaea •• pmatlaaUa I ba riiiaiiiMii 
wMk a aanr of "7 taai tla w y kaf«r* iita Oma*. X ra^paat alaa ttei !■• 
■iitntaXjr X ba fwmtdkt* « aa!? «f Uw taaUiMRQr takan %a data 1^ iba 
Baard Mii Um* iwnaftar X ba fwniabad «itii a aa;tr «r «te — ifmiiir «r 

ttw taattoawy fraK dagr ta a«gr «• it itt Ujcan. X alaa rmtmaUt aaaaaa to 
•U af tlM ««ldl*«« twm tlaa «a «1m. fte »ma* uyptmu t« Immv ««m 
g apa rta r a far tiM parin i «r taiw i mtt Um tnMUNRPtbiii« af tiw UatliMw 
tmi X lfalla«« 44>i9r«via tt iqr rM«aaata aauXd iwaaaat m aindalatmitiva 
4af«l««ltjr. 



J. Ill aviar ta aspaMto Mttara, I r»paat that tbaaa oafdaa ba gk'mm 



«• WHmMMT O a nara X T. I* OVaaK, 2096 HaHitiima Kidimiig, i^ »iU fav««MI 
•aas «a aa a fc aww ir X hapiMi ta ba. 



/•/ latar C. _„ _ 
Itakjar OtnamX, n. 8. 






3872 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



HH 



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tt. a. 



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M Ml 

«ftV %• #r *> 1* ia 
«r t^HN 



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Um 



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Copjr for, TJAO, r« and Ind. SPJOJ 19W8535 WJH, Jr. 77535 

17 Aug UU, •Utin« that no h*r« «an b« turn in fun»l«hln« 
**»J G«i Short a oopy of the ttatijKtn/ alrwkdy takan, and 
day to d«7 atanographlc transcript. 



ow';, 



.•i 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3873 

I 

'C 






~ te«M« I9H. la «M;«ii 
«« to iNwcitirtim • Mir v^' 



»# am. iMv«7wi««r o. lu imw m). «■«•< i^ 






•f ttw ■I'liiipiiin «r tMftlaaar fltnaty ixnqwtwi far iwm It ^» li— nt «Ml 
ttwt X to fto«l»to« vitfa MplM «r tJta iSttwra ijwiupgtii •• audi «ton Itogr 



f. A* «feMW «i:u to • ita»t» ■BMH W it «r taitjjwny fMr at te 
«ai Mt tiaa is af tto ••■•••• X » »§ »<% Idtot atftltB •» ilda 



4« Xa m eim to anvailto afttton X trngt rn ti t Vm% «to aap i— af 

to toUtoawi to ar mwniaiiX, Irifaiiav ttaaaval f . I. 

8096 iMKiiaiMi laiKtag, iriia «1U fasrann! ttoa to aa. 






-^ix 



'I 



'\ 



3874 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



AOPO-M aca Short, 1telt«r C. 
(31 Au«44) 



WO, ACD, Wuhinctoa 25, 0. C, 1 S«piMb«r 1944. 




IMMETMATK ACTION 




Xtt Ind. 



A(Z/«b/2U6 
(St 21 S«p 4A) 



TOi PTMidmi, Ar^r PmtI Harbor Board, BXd« 36, PrMldlo ot aui 
FruMiaoo, 8ms Fraaolaoo, Call/. 



For raaark. 

By order ot tha Saoratary of Wart 



y 



J. A. ULID, 

Ua^r Oanaral, 

Tha Adjutant OaiMraX* 

A'JPO-!>* 201 Shor't, Walter C. 2ncl Ind. 00 4ih 

Army Pearl Harbor Board, 20 September 1^44. 

To: Tlio Adjutant General, U.S. Arny, Washlui'tun, D.C. 

/ 

1. Tha analyaes reX'erret^ to are not na vft the offlclsl 
record of the Bonr''! and will not, \.e until verified and accepted In 
whole or In part. At present ihn-j nrely go work 3)»oeta being cora- 
plled by- officers loaned to aaalst tho Bonrd. 

^ ie;, Fni'thor, there la but one conpl'^to copy of the nnalysle 
sheets referred to and the Hoard will neod tlila copy for otudy until 
It completes Its report, wiioreupon th«t cojiy nay or iwy not becotae 
a permanent part of tho record. Kor can that copy, of whlcVi there 
are between four and five hundrnl ahoots, bo spared by tho Hoard to 
have coplea thereof made. 

3. lience disapproval of General Short's request now, or In 
the future, is recommended. 



I''or tho Iloard: 



• ^«?, 



\9^ / 



«;.^-*' 




cyiu^^ 



Lt. Oon. , U. S. A. 
Free 1 dent. 




'7 ,- 



&:v' 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3875 



(»» kk) 






25 3«P 44 
5yno9M« of 7a«tliiDnjr tokm toafor* th« 

i^fMBT i'<MU>l liRriwr ^ar4. AtS'om 303. iit»r%, mxt^r C. 

(31 Mtf 44) 

(wo ini1nr»Ar.in^ m htniiot •« 7«t ]r««i>h«<l thi» 9fflo«« 

1 1^«I. 
cy. Itr. :a. Aii< 44* «/2 Inci»« 






VHt Hm A4)«««at o«MW»l. AttmHmi otnmr*» •ftt&«)i« •mhi leflO, 

liM&tl«l« BOlUttllf. 

MM It affpiftyt tmm wmmmA iwd«nmm»t tmm «te ftmA fM^r !(«m« %# 
9« AAJ««Mii OMMfDl, to«*i S» M{»tMiWv 1944, «tw« th« h^miiiwm of 
tMtijwa;' r««{«wtt«A l^r swmimI ShM>Hi Im the Wde MwnaMoRtlca (ki>« mttt 

la •Ml' w*r ff»R«tt*«tt« iiw offistni cie%i«« «f «hi» hokini mid ««, l« «i^ 
•f<M«, tlM ii9iunt •lc%«a t« MM m* at tlMi pim»ma% tls* apAf* «Ji»«« 

]W^)«ni, ill la f »it — i it iM that §«n«nil $)i«rt %• A#yl««4 tl>«« tfe* 



1 SmA. «M«f, Mlltenr jrtt««i4M*BtTl«i*». 



^'^ 



rii-iit w'..',s "T--355rif '"■ 



3876 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




• "'ONFIDENTIAL 

MM 0EPART>4EKT GEKERAL STAFF 

DISPOSITION FORM 

PMSOmriL Division, 0-1 



il«: VMiJf 301 Short. Wnlt«r C. 
tVIJCCT: (>«n«ral Offlear. 



I 



l»*t*: 1 Oeto'bar 1944. 



Tt 



reR 



e/i »A 

i 148., a -I 




USir *5M »$«* 

a-» fl-» — "» 

fq If. 1 ALb 


_ c« 

.C9_- 


9M6 .... J 46 


J^ f/« direct. 




C<»«««nt or Concgrr«iic« 
Ktaark intj r*co««>*nd*t ion 

|nf oralt 1 on for rtply 

tdd r»tur« to 6-1 


Kvctsxry teflon 
|nf oriii«t Ion 
PrIaary Intartft 


Br»ft o1 r«ply 

Urtct r«»l» 

4(>rov«d 
Ol**»#rov*d 



,^ 






Ihat t)i» atti.chod corr8«pon4»nco b« retumtd 'ay Ia4or»en«nt In J «. 

ncoordAnce with the reoonaeadatlon of Th« Jud^ Advocnto i>»ner?il, as oont»ln«4 s.^ 

In the attH.ch«d Tr«ii»nlttKl Sheet SPJW 1944/8636, 28 Bepteater 1944. jZf^^^ 

tor the Aeel«t«at Chief of Staff. 0-11 



ll-O' 



JzL^^^ 



^ 



Inole. 

TratiB , 



She. 



/. 



a B WAtKKB-JB^ 

l.t Col , O S 
AiilatMkt £3i«cuUve 



r'S Sep. 44 



froa TAO to iV-l w/incl». 

KEJ-p^AKDUK y Oh ^OOaSi In b^slo coniamnlcotlon Ka.for aonerel Walter C. Short 
reottowte thft in addition to full trwjecrlpt of teetlraoiiy therp he fumlehed 
hla a copy of the eynopeee of teBttoony nlre^ySy pr<it>«red for ««e 'by the Bonrd, 
and thr.t he he fumi»b»d with a copy of the future eynopees a« »nd when t>i»y 
are prer>nxod. I<ieut»»a«t l>en<»r«l Seorge Gtrunert, Prenldent of the Board. \ 
recotnnenda dlsapT-roval In 2ad indoreement. The JAO recoasienfte thnt (Jenerra 
Short he advlaed that the reou«eted aynopeea can not ^lnde^ the oiro^uaetjuiceii 
be furnished. 



uui z la^* 



NOTEO-i 



'""m 



lltF OF STAFF 



/ 



V, 



i ■ 






r' 



riAL 



i1 



**-»mi*-*» 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITl'EE 3877 



IK* % 




ihrnm 







mz» Bp.bdJ!Z-lX »• 78978 



DXSXRIBUTXOIIi 

0-1 «OQS, Bit 28925 A 




^ s^ 44, Am^ aa Short* w*u«r c,, Q^P^>^? 










' ^ 






■\ 



/«^^ ^^, _^, „^_ ,^, '•t 



3878 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



\ ,^j 



kJ 



NTIAJ^ I 



ocs 
n<ac 

vhc 



CjCSA ica snort, «.0. 
(2 Oct uij 



Octobdr 3, 194^ 



M«SK)RANDIIM PUH OW^RAL OROSfJiT: 



--4.\.»&UJ i. ", 



copy af a ietter tlst-Jd oeptea- 
b«r 2v, IVi/., aiflnad by ilajor Gtangral WaXtur C. Sho rt. 
^-^^r^^, «,ong with a roply to r,..ri«rai ij'Fi^' •hlch hia 
! by the ixjcratary of Aar. 



,..■1 



.< > /. 



"!nc. 



'.8 Uiat ttiosn b« 
".. /Our i^oard. 



JOij»:?H T. UcOiAHNwy 



Lieutsiuuit, Wii.,.!-.. i t! 
D»pt> 



oaff 




COPY Ym 



rr G! 



--UENTIAt. 









« U' 





EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3879 



3141 Southmatcm BoulaTkrd, 
Oallju 5r Taxaa, 

S«ptmb«r 29, 19U. 



Honorcbl* Henry L. 'Itljuion, 
S«or«tar7 of W«r, 

Wasblogton, D.C. 

Dmt Mr. S»oi>t*ryi 

Tha tefltlaonjr vhioh wu takan befor« th« ao-oallad RobtirtB 
Coaalnloo and that ourrvntljr b«lng takan in tb« bearing now pending 
b«fox*e th« kntj Pearl Harbor Board waa reoentl;' laade aTailable to ae. 
Upon exaBlaing tbeae reoord« to vbloh noae of the exhibits have been 
attaehed» I fail to find a dlaoloeore of eertaln vital inforaatlon 
whlob high HaahLagton officials appear to have had prior tc Deoember 
7, 19^1, of the iaaioeooe of an attaok by the JapMineae. Suoh taforoation 
wee not aade a'*ailable to ae in the exercise of xgr oooDaand in the 
Hanaiian lalande. Am I underetarai that the Ar«y Pearl Harbor Board 
is now about to couple te ita hearings and ainoe thla iaportant 
factual data ia not inoraded in the teatiaony of the Board thus far 
fumiabed to aa, I faal ooapelled to oall thla aatter to ytmr attention. 

Troa atateaenta in the reoorda of these two heairinga, it is 
to be noted that a knowledge of pertinent facts whioh are not later 
dlaoloaed la the reoord la inferred. Thla important factual inforaa- 
tion ia eaaentlal to a full apprmiaal of the aituatlcm. I apeolfioally 
refer to the following inatanoeat On pagea 318 and 319 of the teatlaooy 
takaa before the Hoberta CcMnnlaalon the qxieationa aaked by Juatloe 
Roberta Indicate that aa chainaan of the ooamiasion he waa in poa- 
8«aal<m of facta of t^e utaoat iaportanoe to this oase whioh pointed 
to a definite warning of an attaok against Pearl Harbor which ap- 
parently waa known to offiolala in Washington from certain interoepted 
Japaseae code aeaaagea. So far aa I haTe been able to learn theae 
facta are not a part of the reoord of theae hearings. 

Again in the teatiaony of Adairal lCl«ael before the krmy 
Paarl Harbor Board (¥olr3BKl^,P*g« 1811) it ia clearly indicated 
that oartain vital inforaaticm waa in the hands of the War and Havy 
Dapartaenta ra^rding the iasdnaace of an attaok, which inforaation 
aata certainly uot tranaaltted to ae. The information upon whioh he 
baaad thla atataaent ia likawiae not a pairt of the reoord of the 
baarifiga. Without a doubt he would not hare aade auoh a atateaant 
if he did not have evidence to aupport it. 

It ia alao reapeotfully pointed out that General Marahall 
had •«■• inpcrtant Infomation on whloM ]» .9eii^ >i the tlaa he J^ 




o-im^^,.^wr/^,,..,,,,F_,VH,,i '" 



I* 



3880 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

I I 







cown-'f -i^ ■ 



Mtit m Vtf MOmA UUgnm (ntwfi to «t ?•!. Tt, p««» 309, «f 
FMkTl BurtMr 3a«rd tcvtlaoo^) «H««r imf cf D>o »Eb > r 7, I9U, uhldl 
ittfortiaMit«Ij did m4 rM«h m wtil mipwi kev« «ftM> %hm attMk. 
TlM lAferMtim tqMs irtii«h Ckratna MunriMll Hurt Imt* r»li«l la 
MMdiag this ■•■••«« lltevlM do«« not aiqmtr la lAw Mwirt birfer* 
th« B<Mrd ttan* f«r fomlclMd m. 

TlM fMt« Up<« Htlah tlMlM MtiOM «ad t> t l Wt # «•>« 

k»Md sl««rX7 fo to tlM vary mmom «f tho parvMBt laqtilxy. 
Z b«li«v«, tbMofoM, TOO will rMdily agrM tluit • f^Ol ad 
ooaploto dl«elo*ur« of all tb« lafermtioa vlileb wui la th« h«ad« 
of ffAahioitoa ofrioUl* prior to OMMitbor 7, 19U. wltb nfMd to 
th* iMlnono* of aa attaok, abould ba obtaiaad and oada a Mttar of 
raoard la tha prooaadlaga of tba auraot inTaatlfatlM aa thaj ava 
af tlM iitMoat iaportanoa la apfwalalac tiila avtlxw •I'taatlau. 

Aa tba parfaetlag of tba raoord la tbla lavaatlfatioo la 
of oouraa of graat laportaaoa to aa paraotMtlljr, Z orfa tbat ao 
atapa ba laft vmturaad to aaka a aai^tlata iavaatigatioo of tba aaaa, 
ao tbat all of tha avldaaoa oonaaralag tbla aattar la In tba raaacd 
of tba h*ari04(a of tba Board. It la tharafora vargmtlj raqiaaatad 
tbat tha Board dalay tba oonplatlon of ita prooaadlaga tmtU tnob 
tlaw aa this oao ba aeaoiqpllahad. |n tbla eonoaotlon I raqnaat alao 
tbat ^f eouaaal ba givaa aooaaa to all War I^apartamst raoogpda abiah 
would ba partlnant to tbla aattar. 

1^trtbar■era , If a tberoacb iBTaatlfatloa af tba War D^artawt 
raoorda ^ tba Board and bf agr oaoaaal do aot dlaoloaa tba faata 
and arldaaoa upon irtilob tba atataaaata aad aetlona abova rafarrad 
to wara aada, I raquaat tbat aa approprlata aall ba aada opoa aaf 
othar aooroa wbidli all^t bava aaeb partiJUMit lafcanatloo^ partlaalarlar 
tba Kmry ^partaant, and tbat tfaajr ba raqulrad to fomiab aad aaka 
all aaoh arldaaoa avallabla to tba Board aad to ^f ooanaal. 

Tba War D^wrtaMnt baa dmalad aer raqoaat to bava a 
rapraaantatlva at tba Board proeaa dl afa aad to oroaa^azaalaa wltaaaaaa 
and tharafora unlaaa mr raqoaat barala la graatad tbara la aa 
aTallabla to aa by abiob I aajr ba aaa\irad tbat all tba partlaant 
arldaaoa will ba aada avmllabla to tba Board Aad to aa. 



Slaoaraljr, > 



Waltar C. Short, 
Major Oaaaral, O.S. kemj, ^tlrad. 



tT •^*^°''*^ 



">-^"-^:S^^O.u....u.AL ,0^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3881 



Urnim 9mmr»X «ai«r 6. Short* VU iwtdrwi* 

'0«iur 0«fMnr«l ahsrti 

hm4m of tl^ Amgr rwurl NMtMMfp B«*rC 

ttd* 3<»*rd 1MM a|»p<.>int«<i hj isQr »nlnr t4» m^martitliti m^ r«p*rt 
te •• th« fMsta «il*Ur/: t« t*« »Xtuttk mmI* ^tpon <*• Territory of Itowftli 
cm 7 BM<nfe«r 1%I« «Bd to baIm tMsh raeMRMMili^itmii «« it "foy dMM 
ppojMir, tou wiy th«r»foi^ r»a* MNWirw! ««t th« S<»rd i w ej^lorinc 
all acKutMM of wid«no« b«ari^^ open tJh« 9(ibj««t,. 

; am UinMlirstfT Q«n«r«l Gmmmt to ^relt ^'vnay iitjIitATr CetMiMil 
tA «xaHln« lt« «Mhiblt« la %h« prmmmam of « tM«t>«r of tht !k>&rd. %0 
aof>i** of ih«M otilblt*, NsMmiwr, wi^ h« M»iK« 

1 tis iCao dlPWJtln/; tli*t «^{>W!rj»ri««Mi isamin,^* r«3.«i.tii*.« t« 
adlltiiry wwurlty h« i5l*«n to ;«j«ir c»ii»««»l ftef Ws« ir!l'o»TiBti:,n «nd guid- 
an** of an asnoognwd* 

Sln««r«l / ■■"■!r», 

Sm»ntAry-ot «»r. 



illE Alv ■■ GENJblEAL 



l" 



» 



79716 O — 46— pt. 19 30 



3882 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



^ 




■MUwotNM *«M ruKL nuaa w(nm 




IWM 



ftmi 



/ 



fall— 1 tmnit^M 



I, Bm tt» tn af Mr Trwtrty» %• «•*• «r 
*0«»7 fdr •iiiiiif 111 arMMTt* ratf artglwa vT mII MftlMta will Iw 

fU* liiMrt^iiiit V^wHM 1-t*, ta«l ««»«•. 

I. Mdll« BlHMHlk nr«M MMria«s««i, «Mi mnpfkmm wt mm 4mi.Xtt 

%«MMMrtf«« l*«.. » ■■■ «•»*•« ^■r t— i r a Or ig i n mm' 

—■■lit, «*il IW jXlllitel.l «ft«l «iM AmTC «« MOO — 

•r* ■■MTrtii. lUw •Hmht %mw {*) MiiiM «1U )m akUMl %• «Im» 
••kr* llnitiwr»ww is HMHtftafWR. %• )m mwliirii mmk «fcUlM4 Iqr 



•WMT «• •mhhwI SImm^ (ttr«««^ hi* •(MMwl , aMnw l ar««m> 








mm/^ 






s^;r,;M:j",'?fg',; 



bsai-:: 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3883 

I 

CONnOLNTIAL 



JUtUmAnwm JtRMT PEAKL HARBOR »OAKP 
Raott /.fix, itmi%i<m9 ^^iUiag 



Btti^illn? 36, Pr««idlo «f &«o ^r«noi«oo 

>«li ' rsnel •<- ;i , nllfomi* 

I ert«lo«« h«r^w1th c ^py of »«i«or«n<J'U(« i H«v«' t.<xl'>y «#<nt to 
Ifajor H. R, Po«««ll, G.s.c., «too !• setlnK cm b' hulf of Brlgadlor 
Cl«n«r«JL J. S. Br«cdaB« eomssl for Coloe^i^l %iiMa. 

I «rot» thi» j.«t*.'«r .ft'rr eo'};ii<J»«rmbli» tho»j«i|ht jmd foasutt. w 
tloK »itlk 0«e*r&l traa#T, ^iH tfer>r« »ouid b« s »lifitin''t. '*fsH'>rr<»(»»- 
mmk% IbtoItM lit glvin* '-»««*»r-.l fr<sft<J<« " copv of Jujor Cl««ii«#t»»» 
•MMnr«D<t«M of 10 Jii.v 19^^ to )iT, Aabwrg. ThU ike«ors»<1u« la 
r»f*Tr»d to, 'a you 'Ha note, In n"" «"Oornrv^ ■;" r*" tn« ^ctlfc 
8*<;r«t.nr tt v^r to th« Jw<f* AcToct* J«n»r«i ^«t#<l l" /«ly \^i.L» 
Ib spit* of tlii» fact. It iw.» f*lt th'it ^mfirml »T*r''»» *•" ccimsel, 
il%» » rt<s,ht tC' th« or'rr r. fvrrlng thp "yaf-n c».-* to th« '?o<ir<1. In 
.t-n* ^TF-nt Q^rfrsl 'j-s.'-.on '-sAlovs up th«* presfr.t. r':ca»««t by ■"^'■.•o»»t— 
1b^ Itojor -liu*^n'» B.««or*n<au«, I rhftll, uel»iB; inftruct' -J tc th« 
eotttnrr by tb« boarc, d««llBe to rIt* It to hi* oc t4i4« grmxa<^ th^t 
it oor.t^ i©« -oc}ri->rti«l infor«»tlon to which b» Ir not '^ntlti^d. 



^li.LI'-» J. irJ^HV , JR. 

' OlOTVftl, J ,.' .;.!■. 



lael-C^ of iftOMo to 

llBj PomU widi iael* 



v'^^ 



3884 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



HIADCO I'T V IfUfl P'-APL HkPWih BO; I'D 



/ -•jjt' ab r 19^X 



S«bJ»-eti ^r-'.wr Crf tln« P«i»rl Hfirber H«Mir^. MtA 

R*f«rri,'Mj *ti>itt«-r of ;."Oi " ' 'h- <>rtor«t 
tyw.n, Jr., to i^orr*! 

i. l*urfcu«r!t to s'owr aral r«CiU«»t for tr' nsalsrsioo to ;<rlgi»<1l«r 
G»«n«r'il J. . Br«f(i!on, »hu you <!t«»t« h«:' b«»«R appo nt»«<*. roun.-«fl for 
th« «boT«-nijBiKi offlc«r, th^Tw 1;- at»,«eh«<:i heri-to co >y of cotsfld«n- 
tlal or<ier bj- tto* •^•cr«' t?-.r>- of ' «r d«t#d 6 Jniy 194.-'. cre»vtt)-.|r th« 
Pfmrl H«rbor s^otrrf, copy of iurpli-B^nt 1 ord»r of Ui«- -••erf t' ry of 
»i»r df\t«»d .' July 19iAi ''nd copy of c«mflrt«ntl»l «Mi«orikn'iu» of th* 
, atlng »>cv t .ry of tr d t»»d 1. Jul- 19ii rf-ferrlnK th*- »»tt«r of 
th» tnT»rtlg-itlor. of CoJ.ori»»l Th''0<ior« symau, Jr. und any other* 
»ho Bl^ht he Involved In Ha»»iSttn oef«n»^ proj»ct«» to th« P#r>rl 
Harbor Boarrf. 



Colonel, J.A.C.i.. 
Offirer In Ch< rg« 



In«l 

Inel Ij foof or 

rttd H Jul iA 
Inci > I :.yail or' nf ;'/* 

die' ' July AA 
Inol 3i Couf -.«.»o of AetSng S/* 

.1W i> Jul U 



,.r 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3885 








x"^ 



3886 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



I CONFiDfcNTlAL 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3887 



..■u-b,f«atJ *Q!e^m$ 

■*>-».» 4.,' V .Sii ho las M). „•.-■:«», S-.-y'«S. 

th» }»fewiM »bt«fc T»la%»fl i« Ww Huetl SfejFUwr in«»»*»r «f ♦«« r9^t% »f 



¥ 



%»i, s»i». 8w*rr ^' **«»*u, cmtH?, USA, 
Col. Ch«uri«« *. w«ift. oir>'»«, Jm:>. 






b 



X SUM]., 



i2 JuJj^V 






of Wft^- 




MJ«%*»* &8toi(«'f 



AC of S, 5^.1, Col. Oaoawta. Jt 
a 8|»ti«tlo» «r, 08, thi 8I»st>. 
Off »r »•« «•«, «« 1506, »smitlo»» *J,«4 «/<* 

Col. BttTt**, *» 10&&. '»!»alti->'.» 3'. w. %.,r. 

Ui!««Ji ©rne«f'» aoi tii*. 
AO 0/ 8, OPD. WW*. a» 3»«e . 
m. Amy Air »arc»», Sm ttiim? 




CONFfDENi 



3888 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

I CONFIDENTIAL I 



'.J? W, l-M*. 



»StnXT9 Co* 



bw«sf »Stb tk« "Wilvltlet s? t&« l*««yl Rtsptso? Wsispi S« itM tstt-*"!**^ 






COMFtDENTIAL 

j4v 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3889 

UUMlFiUlbNiiAi. 



HEAOgyilRTKR:; ARK PIAFIL H*BBOR BOARD 
RoMi i7U, Munltloon Balldlng 

A .•ptHirtr«r 19U 



itaie»iA8 oji ''05 c-'im-L j. a. &Em, o.:.«-., or , no.->B ^ce3o, p«nu««B 

Harbor «»o»r.' to M«v«i!. 

)ro« iM» fttrnlah*^ 1th •■ c«M»i»l«t»' lint of «>li th« t>«riK»nfl Includluf 
im4 •«««r»TNur\7liic th« *mgr P*«ri H»rt>or Be*r-j o« lt» trip to ^>*««il, 

tikm n'-ame ct •ach 'p«r ton r »! trr --it follovai 

Lt. :..;.. ..»orc» wriiB«»Tt, 0153^4, OiU 
ItoJ. i;«B. H(»r,ry D. !to r.fll, 0.1^769, USA 

fckj. 0«a. ?«l1* : '- fr»«)t, 0.>71, OtiA 

Col. Ch rl»^B , 0X7774, JfAOrf 

Coi. Hurry *. lo^UBta, OJ'05'i.X), AC 

Lt. Colo«"l -itmrlm* E. Il«i««m, Jr., 0,>571fe4, AC 

*.j. nohr-Tt 0. Hurt, 010«)01>4, *0C' 

lot Lt. W'jiKS L. Shjmhy, Jr., 05«3iXi, AC 

rut. ;.t«|A«« K. Motit^oiE ry, 5.)R46«'71 

•r, U.«yd i«. N«rlcir.« 

Ih-, f*rl M. Pan ell 

■r, tt. >» ^J»CoTi»or 

Ifr. L«<m a. &ol<ila« 
Hr, V»-ylot C. »re<»* 



tsILLJAM «. HyGMFii, JH. 
CoV«!«l J.A.G.ri. 
(^fle«r In CWmt* 






3890 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



WAIt DKi'AHIMKM 
HEADQUAKTEHS AKMY FKAHl. HAKUOK BOAHI) 

~- \ ,13 3«pt.emb«r "i^U* 

Colonol ■.Villiaci J. Hiirhos, JAnD 
Room Uyiii, K'linltions f^-i iHin'-. 
Waahjnrton, D. C. 

Dear Colonel Hurhas: 

ThroQ copies of all volume :i ftf t; . „. .....crlpt covts: ;; .j- .-.:m 

Francisco hearlnna to Include nunibar 23, which was the last t«3t1r.<xiy 
taken ther*e, were <1uly transrtttei to you by rorlst«r;«'i innll pri^r tc chit 
departure <'ro«a that place. This wa;; in accor'iance with p,v monorandum 
dated 2it Adjust 19iih, « copy of rrtdch waa fum-'shed yon an'! Wa^or ^'urk- 
hart. 

iHir 3ChodUj.fc» '~f op r ' ' ' .tM IJ':"I • ' ,n(.-«Jti;j i Vtj riw ana 

it has been scr.owhat di • •• Boarrf keep the rec<-!Hi 

"road". }{0W0vor, thev <1o n^-'t v»«nt the r«ar ecUcl^-n there to run oxxt of 
copy. Therefore, It has boon deciie'i not to wait urttll the record Is 
read and corrections are made on all copies (as per plan aet forth In 
prevlouB meworandvar) but tf> send vo-.j two cr.p1 en ^^f eaOi vol'une as soon 
as available an'i before correcti -ns ar" mado. These two will he those 
marked Secretary of War and Recorder. If y.u arfi still tran3»rl?.t.inp the 
lattar to i~.irv-r-.-.i r,r:. on on hehnir of nenoral ';hort, it »h<nil>1 Im exiVlaJned 
to hiir th.': t minor c^- ns way later have to be made. Ho fur 

as Rurkha; - ' - -'-''■■ " '■' •"'■- ''•' -"=-''- *'- r rr«f~t.i ,,n - »- 

be made h; 
any flar^ni* error wn'iCh j«i.. s!. 

Tn accordance with the foref"1nr r'imarks there t •« boinj' trar,:!!Tii tt-id 
to you via aarli'wt available tranap'^r^ ''^ .-. t.«. ,:•.:.,;,.:; <u,c). f v ^smes 
2U - 27 inclusive, and euhsequeni — *^'' 
copij Toted. 

:n.tntinr th.»t ovar/thinr !.■! '■ 




64 



//// 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3891 




SNM 



I 



n SniiMrtbMi 1»M 




■MbiuvooM rou ■> i&Asi?« •nr.HiO. joai m. v<m. 



••%^Mt I fmmrl H«i%*r b*«hi rnMcwAiac*. 



1. I «t«««««»4 th* TmupI dki^r ■»!««<> «l%li 6«iwnkl m^H ii WM iy 
«M« M»mtiic MkS H* %•!« M tlHkt >«iMii tlMi •••ft ImmI Mi« 11* r«p*r« 1% 
immXA vnT prvlM^lily 1m> r«f»rr«A %• ■• ia th* wnial <M«r«« f»r i^laioa. 
t» M»« vvwit I |Mb»t*« cmt that tiw tta* •Xmhii% wm «Mh tlMt •lUMtr I 

•r ' in HT offlM ««ii*i« %• >««i> to fMdM^riM Ma«*lf «dtli tiMi 

tMitlMBir !■ •f««r tlm* M «a*M <l«X«r i^w^K ■■MB' •« thl« Mi. •r al 
MiVMrMr •««i4i>^ iw «<««lMi« this pMwter* t« W UWimml. mt U •«▼!•• Vim 
KmutI Mavb»v »««r« t»«esrA4 ncly* 

y, I weuUk UV* 7«><i. t)iMrMf*r*, t* litfoni %Im S«Hira af tH» «%««« 
%• iMvr* U«l«tt«'l »i««^« fwRiUikri** MaMilf with %h9 t««tlMar •• «• 
fe« (t%i« t« «*■!•% iM «Im)» tb* tta* MUM*. 






,V,i,fy,m.t 



,<-> 



3892 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



SSSSSa^: :^<SSSBS^?^i 




^uA^i^d 'Air^oat* a»a«rai for «ca«i&ffipali»js« SliB Seeftteury wtil i»i«o penteiMdly 

SIM irei>or« hue bem «a««iiiri«^ ^ i:b» jUfttQ' lt««rd jMrtX?*. «• SSCaOSf (uol 
partly Bc fop SlCBsBr, Mft this olm§itla«AUto will 1>« nrtrl^t^vA for •«eari^ 

>|^ ■Sqi>r0prie.t« sllitary aa^ri $i«g. 



. ^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3893 




WAS iaBP.4R2KSST 

Bttr«»tt of Pu^te Relmtleft* 

FBXSS smscH 

T9l. - SSS 6706 
Brt. 3426 end 4860 



OctoXier 86, 1944 



infatuatm ion trs phsssi 

The fell owing It the text of k queetion and the renly made Tsy the 
Secretary ef H«r «t hie preee conference on Octoher 36. 1944i 

Oeji jrou dteeloee whatever yov. oaa abaut the nature of the Aray'e Pearl 

Harbor reijertt Doee It fecoaniend ooort-aartial action agRinet S«aej»l Short 

or any ether Army offlooret Doee It «lter> in any v«y the Army's expreeead 

T>laa te hold a trial after the war Is over of General Shortt Is there any 

ohanee any part of the ret>ort or a eufflasary thereof will reach the puhlic 

prior to election day, er prior to the end of the var, ci- everT Vhen will 

It he aade aTailahle to Cen«re>it 

SMCBMUCfx 

Hare you ever read the etatute under whiob my dutiee are oeabinedT 

pimss: 

1 read that and couldn't find it called for a report te Congreee on 
that thins . 

SSdtSTAKY's 

Then, why do you ask the queetion? I an going tc follow thie statute; 

•The Secretary ef Var and the Secretary cf the l?avy are severally 
directed to -nroeeed forthwith with an Investigation into the facts surround- 
ing the catastroT<he desorlhed in Section I aT>cve and to conaaonce such Tiro- 
ceedlngs agalnet such •nersono as the facts may ^Justify." 

fh«t le the duty of the law tmSer which 1 ate acting. 1 do not care to 
comment on any future action en the Jearl Snr"bor rewsrt of the hoard which 
was aTOOintad tc atslet me, except to »ay that 1 shall give this retsort the 
eonsiderRtlcn necessary In order to carry out the eerioue fluty ^ which I wmi 
charged hy this act ef Congress. The riresont etatus of the report is as 
iiven in the press release last Monday immediately after the report wae baade 



'* '^' ffil 



' ''^'■iT**""'^ '^ ■■ '*'>T:!''-'^^.''t.'.'r^^-'^'''^ ■ ■«r'^»-- T. -''*".,■■*:*■.'- V-^'^V .'J'-. \'- '.-.^i ■•".-- ■''■■;v'^;>..,/:.'-»if?X-"*Ai*:5;'<I.-'-i.-;V-^^'^^^^ ■ r." ■'■■■'' .'Xi.- 



|5 



3894 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




Smvicts or Supply 

^"^ orrics or th« juoof aovocatb mummAL 







i> 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3895 




. ix/Wu. 

%» Mil «JM vlalMi dr Oiii^mi M Mpwuiti i» Mis i-avtXnUo*, X law* 
M lavMHAflkttMU X* •■«•» %• MM1I4M M «• «Mi m4» 
1«r ovter tffttMl /tUr If XM4« • BcMMl of «lawi 

r«UUiW «• «lw AttMk M«« Ir f !» ■ ■ ■■■ MMi f«r«M tipw «!» Twrt i% ««y 

•C 11.-111. f Ml T »■■— iwr l«a Hi «• awk* 



»U<MM M 1% 



ltd* tarn fmMl tu^mr »ma* trn* m tml m^U a« mUmIv* •■• 
tor— tlgittWH. Xt «M ImmM ti — rii i ta »hwU, ••■ fnmiam, 

1% kM —■ awi • ItWtei Mf lA trtlMMMM ui fMwlwrt 

MMLMto* X hM« M<Mi itMi MfMHi awt iwiwil— H 0«m fwrta at liw - 

4n^, •« ^r iiMMMMi. MM *1M «Mii4Mi tte f^pwrt aatf tt« »— «K Mi 
ta* fl«m M fttU/ 1*» kHMfl« af liU viMt. 

iMvlJv ft inlrtif MtM M to •!»«, if Mr* M«lM to «• to toitttotoi 
Mto •«»• ftftor MA4^tot ftU tot M Mftiw ttu M, I M «XMr toft* 
i»» — mU M jMftttoft Mi fHiFM a ft 1U tot to 
^ ft rtilMiH «f V yrnMt ninl«itiM« to fto M to^r aavr to 

9, ^mmmmmm^ Mto toft pMU totoMft** IV 






:.ii, '-i-i - t. -J ' 



_,..! , 



^^ -' %)>\ iS? '- , 



j^' 



3896 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




ttm tmm fmaA. lurhar ■hw4* aMtkNgk i% 
•mMM la Vm iUU iw4 to «lw fcr S^prtaMt ■!■» M4 ■•« 

•«rM Vl«il MHM hM aV« tkU ST til* »M«i*l WMltWlM*. 

U i n i M M i , I as «# tlw (wiiidLMt ttet ld« «rMMrfl •( |ii«»iirt mm •# 

MSh • M«MM M It* itmwt. hla r«U«f Dnm * Ci — m wl vtetat*. Thla mc 

«M« W JmMMT U* Ifa. ■«< i* i^Mir i« • MTlMM M««Xt fMT MT 
•#flMV H&Ml * 1H« MMTi ttf ■—>;■■» MrriM, *U ■■Mil 111 1 1 M M 

I MU«M O ii OTWi X mmr% «• W. S» ar |«MkPM«« m tite avidMM m« 
MMMM, 1% la twrriataait mUmu 

fWtiMNnMRr*, X M Mtl«fl«4 «)»« |)t«f<«r vfe^vo mv* tolcM to 
Mrr— ♦ MMh 1 ■■<»<*■■* ■■ of •Ittkar p mrnrnmi . or ar«MltMU«ai *• mm 
•to*» is raiM aitliMr la tha lur SapartaMst «r la tte f tali a% Wm Um 
•r tka IHaurl lar^ar <14aft*t*r. 1^ aaawiaai^a la ttet Mater <fcU «)M . 
at r a w a ti i a aaa Urn a »t 4 « aaa aM iraawriad tfoaa a»t aanraat tlw laaUtoUaa 
«r Mr fwt lair pTMMdlawa awilaat mt afflcar la ilw Anr* 

la anaariaaai «l«k «>m> oplaloa of «te liatfca MtawMtta aa—wl, 
I tmm da aKa d toa% ar w<n> liWM«t0k«l«« almiU to fwHUwr aaallMai 
«a«U all to* faato to* aMa a« aiaar »m {tMslkla ta^ uaUi toa toaV- 
taaar af wnry altoaaa la jiaaaMtalaa af aatoylal faata aaa to atoalaai, 
•mi I tmm «l««a tto m»—»tarr dlraatloaa to aiiiaj^iah tola rvanlt. 
9mm «t %to toa tl aa y aar to aaait telaira* atora aitoaaaaa ajra 



/ 
-(.'> 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3897 



-J- 



V 



\ 



rtmUr* X *■ abMJLvWljr «a.wu- tJMt It MmU )m htji^kl/ 
INrajtiftLalid to tlw a w a o— « f>U. }ar»MMnt«loft of %)im wur aad Um iwjrwtgr 
•r AmmtImb Htm to wU* yulOi* »t %tM ipviNNMit ti«« Mm r^*rt irf 
Um 4nv r«M-l tferbor »muM wr tto rMttM (W »ia«b It la toa«4. 
/ r«irtl»«iwNr«, to i»ttU«fc imnAsf p>xhAMm «f «Im Itoant'B t*vwX m 
r*m»*4 aauXd iM«*a«i!j^;i/ «lato>r« iha r»«to aad ito aea«i«ialoiw, 
wDlatk «i»«K! Ukwwia* to tk^kijmt toa ]wliUa totora^. 



/' 



iC 



79716 O— 46— pt. 19 31 



3898 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3899 




i,iimim»au,3>mi&''" . 



I W'AR DEPARTMENT | 
CLASSIFIED MESSAGE CENTER 

OUTGOING CLASSIFIED MESSAGE 




S»Cr;H^ 



Haw {29 Aug ^;- 

iiilt of Gen , B 



-••' ,'t Shafter, f. H. 
Ttumher vm 8869^ 

To Rioharason fros SOBsei»v»ll aiijn«6 mrahaii. 
Ordera are being re^xjested 



i Spain.'': 



/V 




• t you fiav© the diapsrtaieiit 
,.^«i^ltxing to the oonatruotic- 
3t«-tlon«, the y«' wwerv® gaaoii. 

•rcrif p«J«ta.lBlng to bott?. alan tl- , ;>^ 

•'0 th« nohl OQtmc-llt '- 'i«f oonU'actR 

for work cr fflBtSfiaio • ove pwjjecta, 

r«vl8ved &i»(l a chroaoioj^Joftx -^naiyaitt sKide ther^^it' 
«•- thAt It v:'*!! tT. " rrf ' "■ '.■f '> •'•'7^' t^'t» officers nbov!*. 
',3 p&rt.i ■ 

Ai«o that local priori fcJ'^a ssk^ -^- *• 
■M3t®<l socowilag to th«lr occ- 
^,ii?(<?9«t»<! that £h© aiialywlfi . 

i., o;raft varalxtg stations; (B) '^ 



•jct Tor t.{i>:; 



GM-0UT-9S69R 



44) 



Nffl 



A* 



COfY NO. 

THt MAKINO or AN KXACT COPY Of THI« MCSSAOt l» rC«B)DDEN 



18 



1*^ 



3900 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




;,l*^-.-«l!:; !V AN CXA 



In -I 

COPY NO. \S ' 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3901 



....^ 



.? 5' 



1 



mm^. 






AM 






m 




TSSrisiSm'l 




X^^ISZ^l^'M 



l»« 



^Wt% 



t. 




M% (CM. t« 

1, ap* •< It Mr. 



MM*. W$ f«tt«C, |i}* 1R» 



***tiffi^S**2iiL'"**^" 



i«f Hi* 




•I 







0. 
6. 

Ml 



,^^ 




..^nnpniKMr 



N 



^ 



3902 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



^imm'^1 






t&dkutuJiihiiH KUi CUJjUNEL \,jXLxm J. HUUii:;^, JH., J.A.U.D. , Hooa 271i» 
Uunitioiis Muiifiing, (ixt«ii9ion 77>3t> 



Th« o«crot«ry of hmt air«ct« that th« coabinatlon of th» outer 
•*!• in .vuun iJ>-St>U, b* «;iv«n to Colonvl £aM«r(l P. UocliUng, sSxttcutlr* 
Uffic* «1 ..33iBt*nt Jtiief of ot«If , G-4» upon tn« I'oxiowing understanding t 



h« inner safe will reakaln trttere it la, without «ec«BS 



.h« co«biB*tion to the outer eafe will be dlscloeed 

to no oture ttian twu ut'txamr*. 

Tfje ao«jr to tlie outer sife wlli not be allowed 
to regain opon urdeas an officer is in attendance. 

i(«« occupants of tne room, entrance to wfaich is 
obtained tiu-ou^-.n the outer saie, will vacate the 
room for sucii perloa of ti«« as iaeutanaiit Colonel 
!i«iu-y C. Clausen, JAia), aay require to enable hi« 
to complete the present work assigned to hia bj 
the SocraS-ary of 'War. 

^«^^ii«i M«c(.lxii<4 wi-ii aclmowledge the above oy 
u,pj..ropr*ii»t« iiuloraeaent hareon. 




I i f ^' < i «--•£ •*- 



? 



KAHVKY K. BUNDY 

Special Assistant t^. the Secretary ef AU^ 





/ 



v'-'bii^!?^^;!!' 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3903 



Section F 



CM>f«) aUIML «iL. «■■ 









l&tniUh JSAaU* JS>9twU 



Kftbriiiir:? 



\\ 






l^; 



1^ 



X 



i^ 



.H. 



'J.. 



■^*- 



'v4 







s, 



t 




3904 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



u 



UU NOT DETACH TH 



' « 
4 
UT 

a 

m 



ft 
c 

g 

w 
t 



PVVVK OF THE AOMINLSTUATIV/E ASSISTANT 



Date 



W Adj. luMierui. 



Adj. 

Under Sw:. of War. 

A sat, Si*c. of War. 

A88t. K«!t 

Asst. Chi' 

rhief of Stair. 
« hicf of En^rH. 



Dir. Personnel. 
Chief, Air Corps. 
Chief of Fiuancw. 
t^. M. (»«m!rRl. 
Judife Advocate Gen. 
Public Relations. 
Chief Signal C^rps. 
I»n>c. & ' ' • I>iv. 



For 

N«>cc8J»ary a« 

, f'trect reply. 

i^ N**ce8»ary « 

t.UTl} of S>»: 



for »igna- 
fur signa- 



N0cei»«ary actuin and preparation of •< ^ 
ture of AdnJ"'"»rativ« Afi.sistant. 

K«?nmrk8anar.%. ,.metul»t!on. 

.VTj»morandum for ?^f'^. nf War or Adminiatrativ© A»»t. 
Investlgatioi. 
Notation and ftlinK 

Not«d by Bee. of War oV Admin! utrative A8«t. and 
n^turned for ftling:. 

Previous pap«ii«. 

Mark "PerHonal aitcmtion of Adminsstiauve^lfet." 
' <>r»-Rct!on 




By diret tiod 



Hecr«t; 






XV. % 



.a 



f< 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3905 




3906 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



•it'V,'\,'\r.ni 



WD 2C1 Short, mlUr C. 





Hanor«lxU Carl Higrdsn, 

Itolt«l SUtM 8«Mt«. 




DMkr S«mitar HK/teni 

Thia «11X aeknovladi^ r«e«lpt of jrow latter ^ f9bnmrr U» 
1943, r«|a«atl&« iof araatlan a« to tha praaant ratira«aat atatiia 
of ciaoarsl Short and Aiteiral flwal, and an«loai»jC ooiqr of a 
Icttar froa ona af /oar ea wat l t aa w U, Mra. r. H. OalU af Taoaon, 
ArUoaa, in vhloh aha protaata tha ratlraaant of thaaa t«o offlaara. 

Ttia oflfMtltlaM aurroMndiag tha aaaa af Majar Oaoaral Wtltm 
C. Shca^, Cnlt«d Stataa krmy, ara of vary aonfldaotlal aatwrai 
and, IB viaw of tha rapart ot Juatioa Kabarta eoEtaanOnc thia 
mttar, 1 faal confidant that you ain appraciata tha aaeaaaitgr 
for aweh prooadura. A* aooo aa a daoiaion haa baas raaehad kgr 
tha Dapartaani, full imbllaltr of tha aatlon to ba takan will 
ba aada. 

Slnea tha aaaa «f Adairal KImmI coMaa uadar tha ^turladl*- 
tied of U>» lavy m^wrtaant, it la mtgsmXii that /ou addraaa tha 
gaeratari' of ttta Mavy ootmmmit^ that afflaar. 



simmntXr r^um. 



Saaratary af wur.'iMc' 





EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3907 






'"■ '^Cnii<?s5 .f»l«l«ss -Scttoic 



•i*«**TlO»«i 



%j«^«!A-*.!^jJ^^ 



•■wsumAi 



\ 



Q0 



3908 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Mofima/Sk^ 



MmOMrS 






mo. 






MdrwnMid t«} !« for a p ^gm ftfUAm nvOy* 






it !• 
VMi nuanwrtty tor • •U4(M MUff hueemm m 



Ji» A« atucOp 



, -/ 



,>\ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3909 




i««uM!eHIK^ 




ocTs-tan 



UUi 8-1943 




QbilMd MkIm ln«t«. 

9mr f«B»tar Brvetet 

Id ^4r«ttr ir«yljr te ymr li*t«r tf U HjtwaiT XftM 
ta^rlnt A««Mr ■«»* e«attt«« tf lltdltAUaiw will hmt th* 
*«il*l of u»Jor CtaMnl ff«lt«r S. Short (B«%ii»^} for •lto(«< 
•IttMiBiM «ewBitt*A ea or ateuJb ? 2>»Q«d)*r XMt* }"o« ftr« 
UflM<t «M»t th» iwjTMr ii«rt«4 «f th» atKlittw of lUlU- 
tUm mte4i«d im Artisl* wt War S9 vtli Mptni 7 9M«A>«r, 
ISM* te« tlMt In ^* wMuttaM (}«R*na ttwrt liai mamAti 
• vftivwr of tte •te^tc of tlflAtttiioo*. Swirttl «>»or«*c 
Mtloe i» aJMouUsc & w«i r«r it alnilKr to %tuki of ftMr 
AimlnX SutbMid S. XIibwX «hs cacMutvd a «iiliiw •»▼< 
«h« WKfA Ota tut* of Uxd.t*«loBa. rubllc •ttB««HM«N«at 
titla oCrMt «»• Ma4a« ia th« prM« ea 8 O«tob»r 1949. 

In munmr to yvur ••ooa4 iaqvAry a* ta «h«th«r 
Sbort «M pUoad aa th« r«tir*d liat follaviae ti» 
<M t*mA BM^r. ywit mt* «dvU«d th&t Ocaanl Aiiort, «p<m 
kU Mm appXlsfttiea* «»• r«ftira4 fro* Mtir* awnrlQ* SS 
fa^rttwy XMI, "altlieut eoatemtioa of any affatta* or 
prajnila* to any ftitara dlaaiplio&ry aotiaa*> 



glne*raXf yvvra, 
(Qpl.) HENRY L SnWSON 
•••ratary of War. 




;» iJtk-kt '* W<** 



{original [>^''» cheo fwm\ 

' o! • ■ ' ' ' " '^ STAFTj 



Copy for The ...djutftnt Oen«ml 



i™&«3CJ&. 



»«w^T!««Wia((««iS*«»*5!lSj^',SSf 



3910 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



i*ar .vap*rti«nt JuWlwr l'J>43> 

Toi TtM Adjutant Jonoml '^TiHU P-mmxml Dlvj.ai(m, O-l, ^ar 
l)ep»rtni«»i» •■■••v.r-aj staff;. 

i. inclo««tl IS draft ai r*>il^ for u« aigimtup* oi" U.« 
S«cr«tAr^' of *«r, to l«tt«r of S«nutor C. .«j*yl«nd lirooka. 

iJ. The rwtum of thi» flJa wm» dml»^m<i b«c*ua« of the «jitl- 
clpatad public «nnounc««v»«nt of U« (iit,ixiii»c of a «aiY»r of Ui« 
■ tatuttf .ji lialtatlon* b^ a«iieraJ. Short. Tht» annuuncomcnt 
ipy«ar«d in *J\» i.«Hflpap«ra of 3 OcU>b«r lv'4.1. 



KQfron C, Craaer, 

Major Ciftneral, 

fiin Judj;* Advociitf General. 

2 Xncla. 

Incl. 1 - KM Tranam. uh«»t 
'•j-20-43 11/% incla. 
Incl, 2 - LTft. itr. Son.UnoaH.ai. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3911 



UaltiMt :itikum j<Hi«t«. 

'Cmiur .mimtar Brooks t 

Jn (uritmr rmpXji to >i»ur i«t.t«i' of 11 J«pt«i»ter IMJ 
iai^iriai mm%timr Ui« «t.«tuw al IiMit«Uaiw wiU bmr thm 
tri«l of Stejor ucmnaX >««lWr u. ahori (>4»Ur*d) for alidad 
afr«nMM coM&iwa an or aoout 7 Utam^r Isfd,!, /ou art 
•dvlMd Ut»t Uio two-^our ptrloa of %im «tA%uU of Ili&it»- 
viOMi iMbtMiXmJ, in »rU«il* of «*!• 3^ mUl •*ttkf 7 Di»«mti«r 
ly43, tut Uuit ia Um mmet%Xm» wiamnU. .MMsrb kM •aMcuUKl 
« Maivor oi tiio utaVuio uf llitit«i.tion«. uN«iMi>r»l ^M^rt** 
•oUon 1a axocuUrt*; m waivor li «l(«iX«jr %ti Umt of Hmut 
MJmijraX ihutbmtd K* < ^j Ljw>1 wImi ajwoutad • miivwr oavvtrin^i 
Vw «Mk«kl atatuto of linliaUorui* Ktbtio aanottmMRNHit t* 
UiiM •(i»a% waa ahmJo in U» prwaa «m 3 ..otobar },-«4?« 

m ansMsr %• /aur aaaoiMt iwiairy a« %» aHathar ommrmX 
SJao'^t «M >aao«d on tlM rwilrvd liat foilaaing tha att*ok 
«■ iaarl fiartoor, you am adviaad Umt Ckanaral ihort, upon 
MLa 0MI ajiplioation, mm* rvtiniu froia aetiva a«r/io« ZU 
¥• nukfj l^tUt '*mtt)Ov% oonctonatlfln of aajr offwruM or 
>>r»judlaa to m^ fjlum dlaolj^^narT aalian". 

ainomrmTty jroura. 



.'^^aarwtAXsr of war. 



«*«-•■ t, -jitw^ 5r-> -^ ij^ jv i'"a jfiaT«?a:-s»>».ssC':-iS'<->4;.x. -• . •. i->., . «sK«»«ijK«5w- 




3912 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

! I 

!**^ 'i^CiKHcb ^Ictit* .Sb^rtctit 



wmmt-- - r,. .^. 


- ^ H L . CM»fl»M**« 


rxMirr o t.«MA» wt*#* 


W*N«tt< «. AUVlWt. W 


ttrm»*L. *Q*«M»OM. fOi« 


• t<v«* <V»tCMI««, "» M 


(.!«'*• • »•**.». A»* 


CMAM (MMMWT. • «*•>, 


•M«>M'*«M r-^.ww'r. r^<r 








t. • imf*0»r* •m. 


4.t<«rwa/< nnvt*** 0*a«. 


1 WJUiMI.M. w*aM 


»tD(H*« * WH. •!>»«. W" 


rf.** M ftL^NA*. W Vfc. 








.fMtrW C. O •*«#«»«•». *»T« 





coMMirrm on i 



November 22, 194S 



Uajor ijeneral U. C. Cr«iaer 
n* Judge Alvoc«t« Oenarnl 
united States Army 
Waaiiington, D. C, 

Dear Qeneral Cramer t 

I am in receipt of a letter IVcaa Fi-ed W. Slinpaon of 
Colorado Sprtnga, Colorado, as followBt 

"The wrtter bega to again riae to a point 
of order and aak nhy Kiaunol and Short oannot 
be courtoartlaled before the statute of 
lljRltattona bare «ich a trial, irtxioh ahould 
be as we ujiderntand it before Deoembor 7, 
1945, n» permisaion given both of these 
laen to retire Instead of being tried at one* 
aeeas to me to be lotting them off very easy, 
to aay the least." 

It will be appreciated if you will favor me with a reply 
in duplicate wlilch I may transmit to Mr, Simpson. 

Uany thanka for your cooperation and oourtasy. 

Sincerely, 
ECJtES 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3913 




^/(/f ^ 




^ 



25 li<» 'w »i b ar 1%3 



/ 



8fJ^ 



BaBor»bl« Sthrla C. .MbfiMa, 

Unitvd Stat«a 8«n«t«. 

Dmut Sanaitor JohfUKmi 

Bio«i|»t la kekaawlAdlgad o( irwir l«tt«r of 33 
|o'««iid>«r X943 la whldi jroa «aal^ fna * l»tt«r r*^ 
ottivad tor you ?r«» fr«4 W./miil^^n, Colorado ;^?rliiv>» 
Colonwto, ?^l*t4T« to asV "if^iitutt of Uari *•*!<»• 
bkrrlng posalbla fatur* oou7t»HMrti«I of OMwrsX 
Short and Admiral UmwI.. 

In « pr«M •nnounosBwnt, 3 Oototer 1943, **• 
S«cr«t«K7 of War •t«fc*4 U\at CMnezil^lJteet ha'i «nMet«<i 
an liwtrMRvnt waiving a« a dkfWM* th« ct«tut« of 
llMltaUarw abmOii to b« trl«4 \^ aoiirtHnarU*! »ato*» 
qamt tc 7 Dao«n*bcr 1443. 4 alailar anmranowMNSt wltt 
refsrcnc* to Adnira^JivMl mus aad* t{r tJa* Sooxwiwy 
of tto Havy. 

Tory KLfitoeroly yotaro. 



g 



»?yr«r! C. 



1^ 



Krron C. Ci 

Major Q«Q«ral, 
Aulc* iUlvooato aansral. 




«. ff «. 







79716 0—46 — pt. 19- 



-32 



3914 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

I « 



-s^ 



Ito7 IB, I9Wi 



IbUM of ft i pr— n totlT—, 



DMT Mr. tensflaltfi 



I >»»• yoar l«tUr of May 10, 19U», nK^aMUnt to ta* «<tna«d 
M to th« flu- ORptrtMnt poUogr «lth rafaraop* to tho trial of 
U«ut«nA(>t 3*i»r«l laltor C, Short for allogod offonMO gpomint out of 
Xtm Jmpmmm «tt«ok oa HmuI Hiutor. lou point cut thut Urn aUtut* 
of ll«it*tio»», M «K%ma(kt4 by CongiSMMi, »lli taiplro Jam ?, ISW*. 

th» mur OopartMBit (too* not t«k« tt» »!•» Ih»t a«nMf«l Short 
auat bo Lriod bofor* Juno 7 wwt. 3e»Bi tij«i ajjo loooral tJvort aocMutotf 
a waiTar of tha atatuta of HadtaUona ahloh ofmr^t— to antond It u.jtll 
t** and of ti» war ami elx wxitha tharaaftar and tbua jwrnlta Ma trial 
imtpootiva of tha data aat by tha act of Concrasa rafarrwJ to by you 
(Aot of Daootribar 20, 19i»3, PvtolU La* 206, 78th Coograaa). I undarataad 
a 8ljd.Ur waiTar waa exacutad by Asteinil tUawl. Ifcdar thaaa drcuw- 
atanoaa, I <k> aot faal that tha trial of thia oaaa in tiaa of war i« 
naoaaaaiy. Sveb a trial would of wKiwaalty ba vary Imngikqr, w>uld jjlva 
publioitor to hi#il7 oonfidwjUal aattam am! iwuld roquira Uw attaodanoa 
of amaj Ijiportant Arwy at>d !la^ offLeara *teo at prasaot ara an«acad tn 
aotlva oparaUona a«airwt tha amny all ovar tha world. Kor thaaa 
raaaona, I faal that It would not only ba acainat tha publlo InUraat bot 
it would alao ba highly datriwmtal to tha auooaaaful oonduet of tha oar 
to brine thia caaa to trial during tim pariod of acUva oparaUona. 

Slnooraly youra, 

(i>fd.) HKitar L. znm « 

t*cratary ef *"*• 



COPT 



3* 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3915 




^«' 



•NV 



fm immj^tm km uas&os mfmnn, anrjsi cwssr m wum, 



I. Till— m>il iMiwprtMl ia d»«fl «»f • !•%««■ pMMMd f«r «lw 

to* f\mm\ Blwwrli «m» m« NR^djtikff prmmmMm. mt «^m* oiTflMni 
«ttols • vum wmMm* 



1. 4»toa«lMi to lml%wf to tlMl paMUMM^ ^41^ 
im o»n«r«» I»«l«r to tot QaiMf Mnwtoty <tf 

pMWMNll,^ (MP <{IMMKlHMFIlAl4yL let lAfHMMNMDf t tott |WM 

« tMrtur «KtoUn« prnMrn^ to MnmllJWto^ «ito Hit Wmmm «f 

to* iwdpil if tte UniMr to«Mtoqr*« ni#3^ to to to mmmA tto wffl i rt M 

of tto mm Dnnar% Mi 'i» « 



Mftjer Cto»Ml« 
V* * ' 

t TlW^Wa .? ' ^ 

IML. 2. o toiitii« sUyk a«^u 

^ ^ togr liii« 1^ ;p»«% 



3916 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






»nl«»iMi t» — t iai tlM Urn Uidt f«r fMi ii l ty frm 

MMl— lAW «r i«nMM &M«iV»A la %iM fttlHMll «i 

M|r Af ft l«i«%«r «ft«^ Jiir !•• ^M4« f)r«ft %!>• 



rimm m «ld« 



I fiMi* A>*'>V4l^ 






'^ 



Hur,h*»a, W.. , -cTfl-ftftb 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3917 



■f!^7jrS-':-e- ?^."*JSK"-^■ 







'TiZnileb ^(aie« J&en<t(« 






«eJor "eneiAl Uyron C. Craaior, 
TVi« Judffe Ail»ocatn Uoneral, 
Headquartera Anny Service forceo, 
WMhint'tori, D. C. 

My flo«r Oeneral traii.or: 

1 MB 111 r'fceipt cii' your 1'' 
meaning; of "iruuiii>st i:i.f)ediinent,'' 
atnluttj of iiroitatiiins of tim 
trial '^/Ists. 






'•BCrlt.itix & 



I r." 



11 nfi;. think 



to u ear. ' 

j ruducf) 

the -i.il. ■- 

ttiii i '■ ' • .. 

hoi'; ' "^.it 

we .. . ."■•* , 

at;.ti!*«: is oBBv: 

seen !'it t,o t*Jie a waiver frfxn ar.yot, 
h/ivo asauced on ti.eir p&rt, at l»T,-\«t 
theory f!,&t tr:«r« c«iia be only one 
F.-.".ri Ki»U>r. I thiii>> tills is A nri-,1, 
ttat I hoi>« an Invest' ^'hHoi 
i rou^Ht to trls,! at t^.- ««• i 
i-lty. Sursly irieio cor 
ifts corwr.l • t,nd nt i'««rl 
rt . 



* *ie 
...•if.i^ened at 
!■ this 
) HTB ^lity 
^tent with 
:«■ t<: ^ome 
■ -re with our 



^a « iiiatler of is* I 

r:riat. iiiv- ♦ ■■ ■-•* •■ "• ■ 
\ 9 true. 



ft.iStir.i'i-3 that 
'-■r t':?>ri thf? finuy. 
>avor to in- 



HF,' 



\ 



3918 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




- 1 m r^a 



1 iMtUM iMTMitt mw •* mmmmaam ptyw ii tomt 

MM MMlfMH tl%l»llll—l %• tVUl. «■&«%«. 



I f«^, Ml ■UPlilll is tl» MMMVMliM^ WltA > 

f«aiiir i»i4 «iM« m» MA9%«Mt •* • •%•%• •f ^< — »^»^ .^ ^ , 

i» %iM Cf «W tlwU «i«iW» %• t^^MfltU* «M «• «lw rt iiB M «f Mll» 

ttvy «1«MM*« «iuM»A ia tt« tMHP •fftyl «r w«iiM !• teiflUwIaa to 

tto M«««v iw to V toUflf «wl «M HtwiHM !• •Xam^ tolM_« 
•f ^ Tuiml %MVt ainiMiMl Mrt to iImmA th» ctMwto iM* • 
NMWM to %tU«** IM «IU wBmm to* I« Umi 

i% u 4tfn«ai ^t ■» to %Ai««* «»• • «M»towHui 

iA«li • twmA tt «!*• «lMiii«toip ««a* amtoU his ylM 
•f tiM atototo t lIMtotiMMi, li»«MPt«r, m I «mmW« to fw 
f««toff*r» "Mil Mt&m Ir «wMml aiMl wnU m»|m% Mm to totot 
iw «Mito«% ■rtmrtat m •ftt«w mA • i»11 — ««to«r A»hA«» cf 




1 ImI. 
8ir •# 



ita,/. *»., •>«f*/tirf 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3919 





II samm» wmBm, 






•imMmim wt U«I«*h«m 




Mr fOTi*« taH«c «MiBk Ir >««MR t mm wmifm% 

!• a&Utwr |M%IM« thai W iiWtMiil ttt iiiipitiiH 



%*v&Mrf«t. Ill imn imiiMiiiHL»ii*fii aiJi* ittift*. 

if. 




•MM M %• wMliMW «h» claMito 
•f XUAtoUoA* hM fvn M Mt, «iM i >»w » i> M(«% »ImhI it. M tls»t 

tartoc Mr pMtivOj* iwrt at «« yMPtoi. At «t «h» M«iil»g sf " 

IfMt UpMlMKl*, tk* fMMliaj y«f«rMM to afcwM toi tii* 

tMMunki to »A fl^- 't iii ^ tii M Im^Ji IdMI tt MMBt Mi 'IwnllMliir 

^"^^^^^^^ WR vB^M flMHMlHHMwMMHBHHMMBMHiHMHMHiHBft ^^v m^PMnn v^mn^P 9* W ^^^^mm* v ^^^k ^^w^^°^r^v^^^a^naw^ 

•i»tlM to kia« to akMUM uNLili :fMift>if<>ii|: »to «»t«l to»M»ll»to. to 
iMJOi* a«**— * •-* iff p^a «lMi mme% MSA «mi«< 

■•MMtfMt iB^tHtort* M «Mt to «ii* Milk Mttoto, 

&•« M« MMI M»«lr «Mt Af >H>MW » «r 



to Ito •fTMtor tr •ffM«l Ir to* itiltolT 

tot It MM* •MWtktoc aleto to m%mnm w t sf 

•r ft lArrtMl toAMLlltr to totoK tos iMNr utoa^pt to totoS,.* 

to tto MM «r fiinriyi,f m %i frl*pfi .***- mm.hb. tM AttotMr 

toM "aMifMt to»» itoMf * *a m» M<»r to M itM>lM« t tf tto 
•ffMM ^ tto MMMd. Wt tto* tt MMt MMttoac%iMB to atoMMf- 
mmx •t 99mr •» m fto^Ml iMlkiUtr *• ^<*« **» n^W ^mrttt to 
tftol*. 

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3920 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



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3922 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3923 

AH :cjs 
December 9, 1943. 
Honorable Harold D. Smith. 

Director, Bureau of the Budget 

Washington, D. C. 
My dear Mr. Smith : In compliance with your request of December 8, I have 
examined the resolution (H. J. Res. 199) which is before you in enrolled form, 
to extend the time limit for immunity. 

The Joint Resolution would extend the statute of limitations affecting the 
possible prosecution of any person connected with the Pearl Harbor catastrophe 
or involved in any other possible or apparent dereliction of duty, for the period 
of six months. 

The debates in the Senate and House of Representatives on this resolution 
indicate that it was the view of the sponsors of the legislation in Congress that 
as a matter of precaution in order to avoid any question as to the binding effect 
of any waivers of the statute of limitations that have been obtained so far, and 
in order to extend the right of the Government to prosecute any persons who 
have not waived the statute of limitations' it was desirable that that statute of 
limitations in respect to such cases be extended by congressional action. 
I found no objection to the approval of the Joint Resolution. 
Sincerely yours, 

[S] F. BiDDLE, 

Attorney General. 
Delivered by Asst. Sol. Gen's Office 12-10-43. 



AH :NAT :mer 
December 13, 1943. 
Honorable Harold D Smith, 

Director, Bureau of the Budget, 

Washington, D. C. 

My dear Mr. Smith : In compliance with your request of December 8, I have 
examined the resolution (H. J. Res. 199), which is before you in enrolled form, 
to extend the time limit for immunity. 

The Joint Resolution would extend the statute of limitations affecting the 
possible prosecution of any person connected with the Pearl Harbor catastrophe, 
or involved in any other possible or apparent dereliction of duty, for a period 
of six months. 

The debates in the Senate and House of Representatives on this resolution 
indicate that it was the view of the sponsors of the legislation in Congress that 
as a matter of precaution in order to avoid any question as to the binding effect 
of any waivers of the statute of limitations that have been obtained so far, and in 
order to extend the right of the Government to prosecute any persons who have 
not waived the statute of limitations, it was desirable that the statute of 
limitations in respect to such cases be extended by congressional action. 

I am inclined to the view that the resolution is not likely to have the effect its 
sponsors apparently have in mind. If present waivers of the statute of limita- 
tions are binding, the legislation would be superfluous. If the waivers are not 
effective, the statute of limitations expired on the day on which the bill was 
finally passed by the Congress and the resolution cannot now revive the right 
of the Government in institute prosecutions. 

In view of the fact, however, that the resolution is at best innocuous, I find 
no objection to its approval. 
Sincerely yours. 



Attorney Oeneral. 



HBC :gm 
June 9, 1944. 
Honorable Harold D. Smith, 

Director, Bureau of the Budget, 

Washington, D. C. 
My dear Mb. Smith : In compliance with your request of June 8, 1944, I have 
examined Senate Joint Resolution 133, to extend the statute of limitations in 
certain cases. 



3924 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

The Joint Resolution extends any statute of liiuitations that operates to pre- 
vent the court martial and prosecution of any person involved in any matter in 
connection with the Pearl Harbor catastrophe, or involved in any other possible 
or apparent dereliction of duty, crime or oftense against the United States, for 
a further period of six months. As you know, Public Law 208, Seventy Eighth 
Congress (Act of December 20, 1942; 57 Stat. 605). extended these statutes for 
a period of six months from December 7, 1943. 

Se<-tion 2 of the bill directs the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the 
Navy to proceed forthwith with an investigation into the facts surrounding the 
catastrophe, and to commence such proceedings against such persons as the facts 
may justify. 

I call your attention to my letter dated December 13, 1^3, commenting on House 
Joint Resolution 199, Seventy Eighth Congress, which became the Act of De- 
cember 20, 1943. 

I find no objection to the approval of the present resolution. 

Sincerely yours, 

> » > 

Attorney Oeneral. 

Delivered by messenger 6-9-44. 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3925 

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3926 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3927 

Telephone Coveesation Between General Cramer and Hugh Cox, Assistant 

Solicitor General, 8 June 1944 

Cox: * * * to proceed forthwith with an investigation — is cast in such 
a form that it does give the services some leeway as to the nature of the investiga- 
tion, etc., and that although the words in the concluding clause doesn't have the 
language about discretion in it, it probably doesn't require any — the institution of 
proceedings any particular time, and for that reason the Attorney General told 
Judge Rosenm"an that considering the possibility of criticism that the President 
might be subjected to if he did veto it, it was his personal view that the President 
ought to think pretty carefully before he did decide to veto it. Now we are not 
going to put all that in a report. I think we'll just send to the Budget probably 
a noncommital report stating that we don't have any objection or we don't take 
any position one way or another on the thing. But I thought you ought to be in- 
formed as to what the Attorney General had said to Judge Rosenman. 

Cramer: Yes, I'm certainly very glad to know that. Well now, he doesn't 
think that the bill in its present form — if the President approves it, will that put 
us up against the proposition that we have to go ahead ? 

Cox: Oh I think you would be under a duty probably to have some kind of 
an investigation. 

Cramer: We're going to have an investigation anyway, there's no question 
about that. 

Cox: I don't think that otherwise, and I agree with the Attorney General 
about that, it imposes any immediate duty on you at all. If you ever finish the 
investigation and got full possession of all the facts, then the question would 
arise as to when you had to commence proceedings and I think you could con- 
strue that section so that the word "forthwith" doesn't apply to commence such 
proceedings, so you wouM have some latitude there anyway. 

Cramer: Well that's just the question — I don't know-- 

Cox: The legislative history I think creates some doubt about it because they 
did take out the words "in their discretion". 

Cramer: Yes, well the investigation as far as that's concerned, we'll start that 
any time, just as soon as we find out what's going to happen to this bill and where 
we are at. We didn't take it because at first there was going to be a two-party 
investigation and then General Short's wife was sick (I guess you heard me 
tell that), so that's the reason we haven't taken any. 

Cox: Well that seemed — we look at section 2, that's the only immediate obliga- 
tion that's imposed on you. Now I think that's improper, that is I don't think 
Congress has got the right to tell you to go ahead forthwith with an investigation 
but they've done it and it's a question I suppose for the President of weighing 
an impropriety against the criticism that might come from vetoing the thing. 

Cramer: You see they say after investigating the facts surrounding the catas- 
trophe described in section 1 above and to commence such proceedings against 
such persons as the facts may justify. But doesn't that imply that they mean to 
do it within the six months period since they've extended the statute? 

Cox: I wouldn't construe it that way I think, General. I think — suppose your 
investigation for one reason or another isn't finished within the six months — the 
section shows you're not supposed to start proceedings until you've got all the 
facts. You may not be able to get the facts in six months; these people are 
scattered all over the world I suppose. 

Cramer: Yes, they are everywhere; there's a question whether we can get 
them in that length of time. But I do feel this to a certain extent, if the Presi- 
dent approves the bill, he does or at least implies that he is concurring 
with Congress in that directive, that binds the S°cr"*^ary of War and Secretary of 
Navy to go ahead, don't you think there's the possibility of that? 

Cox: Well" again I think it's — I draw a distinction between the investigation 
and the proceedings. I think he certainly binds himself and them to go ahead 
with the investigation, which you are going to do anyway. Now on the proceed- 
ings I think there — I don't think he binds himself to starting proceedings within 
the six months period. I think it depends on what happens in your investiga- 
tion — how the thing goes and what the situation is when the investigation is 
completed. I think it's pretty clear from the record of the history of the debates 
that I'm looking at that you can make a strong argument that Congress didn't 
intend you to start proceedings at any time if it was the judgment of the services 
that those proceedings would interfere with the war. 

Cramer: Well that's probably true when you go through tiie records of the 
debates — I had those in front of me yesterday. 



3928 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Cox: The Senate Debate and the House Debate both have got a lot of state- 
ments of that kind. It's not free from doubt but I think it's tenable, strong 
position. 

Cramer: Well many people — the last I haven't talked to since I talked 
to you, but they were very keen about a veto on it. I doutft myself whether the 
President would veto it. 

Cox: Well I got the impression from what the Attorney General said — heard — 
Judge Rosenman say — that the Judge would be very reluctant to have him 
veto it. 

Cramer: Yes. So maybe we can get him to put in .something in the message 
explaining the situation that by that he is not binding himself— — 

Cox: To start any proceedings if the proceedings are going to interfere with 
the war. I think it's quite possible that the people at the White House might 
approve that. 

Cramer: Well all right. That's a good suggestion, I'll see what I can do about 
it. And thank you very much. Goodbye. 



Telephone Conversation Between Giner.vl McNarney and General Cbamfr. 

15 June 1944 

Cramer: Good morning, General. I wanted to talk with you a bit about tlii.s 
Sbort-Kimmel business. I suppose you saw where the President signed the bill 
yesterday and made a statement to — in a general way about he understood that 
it was not to interfere with the war effort, which approves our going ahead with 
some sort of an investigation. Now I'm just wondering what the best procedure 
is. I've been talking with Admiral Gatch about it and we're both of about 
the idea that it ought to go up at least to the level of the two Secretaries to agree 
to do something in concurrence with each other and probably it would be a 
wise idea to put it up to the President and have sort of a joint commission of 
som.e kind — what do you think of that? 

McNarney: Well I think that whatever we do should be joint — certainly if we 
are going to have an investigation it should be a joint investigation ^with both 
the Army and Navy on — now if the President would like to add some civilian 
I would have no objection to that. 

Cramer: Well of course 

McNarney: We've already had one commission but I'm sure you and Gatch 
ought to get together and submit a recommendation to the two Secretaries as to 
what you think the — what type of a thing it should be. 

Cramer: I see. Now so far as having a joint investigation is concerned that 
would have to be directed by the President I suppose anyway even if it were only 
Army and Navy. 

McNumey: Oh no, it wouldn't have to be directed by the President because 
we have a direc-tive to go ahead and do it haven't we"/ 

Cramer: We have a directive to go ahead and do it, yes. 

McNarney: The Secretary of War and the Secretary of Navy could agree 
to that if its restricted to Army and Navy people. 

Cramer: But of course the — it says severally^I don't know what they mean 
by that act severally but the Act of (Congress says that the Secretary of War 
and Navy shall severally be directed to proceed, whicli means separately I 
presume. 

McNarney: Well I think we'd still have to do it separately. 

Cramer: The only question about it would be this — if we agreed on a joint 
commission some way as to what authority it w<mld have to subpoena witnesses 
and all that sort of thing. I mean if we just voluntarily agreed to appoint a 
joint committee. 

McNaniey: Well you'll have to give them enough authority to call witnesses 
before them and swear them I supp<)se. 

Cramer: WelTmy offhand thought on that is that they'd have to have a special 
act of Congress authorizing like y(m people did on the Roberts Commission. 

McNarney: They would, huh? I'm not enough of a lawyer to know all those 
things but I think the best thing to do is for you and Gatch to get together and 
make us a recommendation as to what we ought to do. 

Cramer: All right, fine. 

McNarney: I'm not enough of a lawyer to be able to determine it but I do 
think thai whatever we do should be joint. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3929 

Cranwr: Yes, well I think that's true. And they are sort of holding off — I told 
them we'd hold off so they wouldn't give any more public statements over there 
unless we made them together. 

McNarnep: Yes. Well I'll tell you I'll call Horn and tell him that I think 
that it should be joint and that I've asketl you to get in touch with Gatch to 
submit some sort of a recommendation. 

Cramer: All right, that will be fine. Goodbye. 

McNarneji: Goodbye. 



JAG :rl(l 

Department of the Navy, 
Office of the Judse Advocate General, 

Washington 25, D. C, 15 June 19U- 
Memorandum for the Secretary of the Navy. 

At 10: 45 this mornirg I had a talk with General Cramer and General Weir in 
General Cramer's office on the Joint Resolution extending the Statute of Limita- 
tions as approved by the President on June 13. I pointed out that this Joint 
Resolution directs the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretax-y of War severally 
hold an investigation into the Pearl Harbor catastrophy and expressed the opinion 
that this requires us to proceed separately. General Weir opined that if the 
Secretaries acted severally upon a renort it would satisfy the law in this respect. 
Both General Cramer and General Weir thought strongly that it would be pref- 
erable for the President to appoint a Joint Commission to handle the whole matter 
at once. I also agree that this would be preferable procedure providing that it 
complies to the Statute. 

I told General Cramer that I contemplated recommending to the Secretary of 
the Navy that he immediately convene a Court of Inquiry which wou'd'be given 
the Roberts Commission Report and Admiral Hart's Report and would be au- 
thorized to summons any witnesses in the Naval service on shore duty within 
the United States ; that in my opinion summonsing vi<^nesses outside of the 
United States would interfere with the prosecution of the war and would be 
counter to the President's expressed understanding in the statement he made of 
his reason of approving the Joint Resolution. General Cramer and General Weir 
thought it would be preferable to leave such a matter up to the discretion of the 
Board and tell them not to summons any witness which would interfere with our 
war effort. 

If a Commission is appointed by the President we all agreed that there should 
be a General and an Admiral on it to deal with the strategic considerations. We 
thought that Mr. Hackworth of the State Department, or at least someone high 
up in the State Department shouM be on the Conn ission to cover the diplo- 
n)atic phases and that there should be two other members so that the Commis- 
sion would be predominatelv civilian. It occurs to me that perhaps a retired 
Ju'lae and a Senator would be advisable. 

We agreed that we should present our views to the Secretary of War and 
Secretary of the Navy and that they probably would wish to take this up with 
the President. 

T. L. Gatch, 
Judge Advocate General of the Navy. 



79716 O — 46 — pt. 19 38 



3930 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3931 



Depamtment or thk Navy 

orKIOR OK THE JUDOK ADVtK ATK (lENKHAL 

WABHINfiTON, D. €. 

STATEltElir OiT tHt SICKBTAhX OF THii IIAVX KlLATWa fO IMl 
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CAlA&fiiOfUB. ', 

In &cc«ra«iic« with th« Mindat* of Con«r«s« •xpr«»»«ti ia 
th« r«c«atXy approvvd Joint h*«oiatioB r«l»tlnii to tb* e«t«cti*9fiM 
at fmmrl Harbor, I shalX «t one* ord«r « fornal Coort of Xfi<«irf 
to inT«»tlg«t« all fact* relating to UiiB ai»ast«r« 

Coograsa ulraetad aa follo«»t 

*Tli« Sacra tit rx of War and ttio 
£>acretary of th« Rayy *ra aavaralXjr 
ciiractaa to procaea fort4»Kj,tij 1th 
an InvaatltatloQ into Ui« facts aur* 
rounding tba cataatro|iha aaacrlbad in 
•actiun 1, abovaf na^ to cotaaanca pro* 
caau|.n£a againat auch paraona aa tha 
fa6ta aay Juatlfy,* 

Wtion Congrass pacaad Uils leglalatioQ, it iomv that 

AoatlraJL Hart had bmmx ati^agao for soma tlaa in mxtmlaixm amay 
wlttMasaa «lth a via« toward parpatuatlng thalr tactlaonjr. Hatrar 
tnalaaa, Con«(ras» uiractau tJtiat I procaau with an Inrastlfatlon 
of ttia xacta. 

XnaasRtch aa Congraaa is not aatlsfiau with the procaaora 
takan by AOalraX Hart anu wlshas furthar InTaatlgatloa by mm, 
it la my a«ty to ordar * for«*i Court of Inquiry. 

*h«n thia Court of Inquiry haa complatac Ita wor* and • ** 
raport«^ Ita fiivainga to ma, anu ghouls the facta bo Juatify, 
thoaa conaiaara^ uarallct in thair uuty at Paarl Harbor or 
connactaa i»ith that cataatropha, will be procaadau agalnat 

aa uiractau by Congratts. 



iU,u^i' '■"■■■ 't^^ 



.*^f — 






3932 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



■TAMOAMQ ruMM MD 



Office M^ctnorandum united states govfjinment 



JUN I '.- iy44 



DATB! 

TO : General John Weir USA 

moM : Cornelius H.buil 

ufiice JALi,Ut;N 
•UBJB..T: A.immeL-Short court mui-tial. 

1. xn my humble juugment - th« soon«r this 
matter getj. over on the uoorstep ol" No. IbOO 
Pennsylvania Avenue the better. After all, iAr. 
i\ is the only wan v.tio can deciae whether these 
two olTicerti shou ,u be court uiartiaiieu - or ^ 
tney shouia. Neither your w-ecretary nor mine can 
ueciae tnis matter. 

i^ aumirai Gatch recommenus a court lor 
Kimuiei to the Secretary oT the Navy he will have 
to lay this matter bel'ore the FreBiuent lor a 
uecision. *'e botn kmov. that thf? Presiuent woula, 

in ail probability, Jubt put the matter in his 
llies ("unaer consiuoration") eert.iinly until 
alter tht^ Kiections. 

ijhoulu the President ueciae that more 
inveiitiejation be neeued, he coulu set up a composlti 
Boar^or Court oi enquiry as he saw fdit 

Vvhen jir.Koj rei tal has int true tea us how 
to proceeu anu what to uo I'll sound oil. 

*''egara»^ 

Snnrial Afv'-ir.^nnt 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3933 



#40tCAt1 



17 m 1944 



WKJHMWM i9^ Hi ffWimyy ff ,111 Mff 




witk faarflHir i-«f«MM« 1m tte ••%!«« f Ml lulmi IT 
tb* MaT]^ D«NMrl««B« fursttuit te 8««tloa t •f •• 1. •••• 

th* M*r«tari«t of Wmr Md Sftvr luw •wurioNiUf iif««%«* 
W> pro«««4 forthwith «itb «o iaiTMil^tloa lAt« tiMi 

B«rbor of 7 D«oM,b*r I$4i} . I smmt* Ufonuilljr »«iiat«A •Vl 
••V(UrKl r^Msbttre of CoagTMS, inslisuliai two sabImv* «€ Hm 
Coaf«r«i!0« OoMkitt««, «ltk r«)sp««t to tluiir lat*rpp«ti 
iloo of tb« 41r ctiv* of 8* ;. Xo«« 133. 

All of iHo Ooa«os««»«a off ro««k*« «oro M»»tatli«Ur 

io oiTOMtoai oa th« polato 4iio«a»o«4. Z fool t&M ^otf 

oplolooo prt^sent • fair eoaooeouo of tint aojeritbr «f tlto 
•oaOoro of Ooosrooo. TM rooetlcao of tbO «o«l*f« wltti 
whoa thto mttmr «•• 41oeiuiao« »ar ^ aoMMriMMl at fel* 
loaoi 

(1) Aio R«ooiatioe ooetoffiflotoo ooimroto Ia* 
v««tig»iloa« by tte Anqr «sd Vtmrf, oc ludiootai if 

tlM uoo ef tha oord "Mvorttllr". Vlto ■«ge09tl«« 
of • ioiAt AJwy «aa Voir Inv •tig*ti(i£ e o— io ott, 
KJih oiviliun nei^oro, oooyo6o4 toy orior of ita» 
PreaidLct, «a<l uot ai et with opprorsl. It «o« fol% 
that suob o C0':jila8iafi Mulil bO O AupliOOtiOtt Of tJtm 
(iOb«rta Coatsiool o, «ji(S thorofosHi lorgolj «M««4 of« 
fort. Aj^ptiraj-itly thor* iMta )»ooa wlAo-oprooi Alff* 
oatiofaotioo wltb tho roport et tt» Beborta <la— jiWl— « 
o fsallof that It dlA ooi toll tbo full otoXT* 
AOotbor Preol4»iitl«l iaqulrf »oul)l bo QOaOtlHOd M 
acotbor aitosft to otaiX or 4ol«)r thm onoouMCMOitt of 
•borgaa osolnot aay offiooro ot jfouit. fb«r« ••Mioi 
to bu o foolliMi Oiumg bb£ aoMbojro ootBVOOOoA b£to% it 
««o tbo liitont of Ooa«roa« tbot maj lnvootifotlOB 
b« <lir«otiy uodvr tfa« ooatrol of th« Am»4 Soarriooo. 
rattftor tbaa oonveaod aad ooatroilaO by tbo freoidaai. 

(2) Tbo porpoaa of dl rioting tbo ioT«otlg»tloa 

«oa friooriiy to proTlda tbo raapcotivo oorvlitM 
• lib tba ooooaoary laforaatloa for tbo dVOviAC 9t 
obargaa and apaelf ioavioao osoioot aay offonAora* 



mithxmffmiir3«&ii^\ 



3934 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



l^" 



tAOiiuiaPit] 



fhm Alr««ilv« for ui lnv«*tic*tloa •f«r%*«i%k* 
IMS MtlTa%«4 IurMi7 by tb* •pinions oxfrosMt 
to ih« oesaiMLAt OoacrossiQosi Oo« >i%tooa thot 
tbm Any sad Msvy dlA sot hsvs suffioiont iafor* 
Mstioe upoa mhXcb. tu b«ss stoargoo sad •osstfi* 
•stloAO. It «o* not ths latstttloo of ta« Oaafi«M 
ic spsoify unj partleulsr typa or form of iavssti* 
eat loo. Tbs Ansr and Ksvy should bsks wbstovor 
typo of infsstlgstioa tbsy «•«« sMst off iossioMl 
for obtBl:.ioe tUs sbcTS iiestloasa infoxftstlon. 

, Th s* «)xprssoious of oeinioe soof im ajr origiaa^ M* 

llof tiiat the aost spproprlsto •etiOA «>oulA bo s lOTOl Goort 
of Zaaairy. to ioqairo isto tb« fsoto sjnd auUio- rowwmoa4a%i— 
•a to disoi^llQsry sotloo of offiosra fooAl to bavo tiooa at 
fault. 



Bsafsstfully 



T. L. OATCI 
la«t« AA^oaata Oaaaral of tba Iotj 



a. a Ma. n 0. tturt 

MaJ. Oaa. Myroa C. Cramar^-^ 



/I 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3935 



OOHFEDBHTIAL 






Wfn4 vliiif ^ ^ 



MMci wTwrw roR yn nenniJET or «a* mrai bi»»»i okuf ^r tihkff . 






*VMi tMr«ter|r »f iftr miA Hm ••wnrtwry •# IAm Iny 

iwHtifftt&«M ta1« til* fmm^ vimtmmMag Hi* «M«Mr%r«fiMi 
iM«rt)»«4 iB CMiteLMi I clMHr** mmI %• •«■■■■•« mmIi pp*» 

r**»lii:%i«». ttmtm 1« •«K*tlKkig «« %• ««i4 for «M« vt«afiiML««, li^ 



«i««lMHM7 wiOTliit ttf «li« m»Hk *Mv«na2|r* Wine "Mwr»%*lf-| ««• «« 

llMit i» 1tlM4r ]jMi ii««i«iiftri*« «MPIit« it M *ii«%ijM«^« MpdPkt^, 

••py ^f «bl,di r«M«MMai»ttwt it Atlw^iMNl ' 



a. z« i* «r iNtUvf iiMKt r«Mi^« •fi»i«« «iii m« w Mi4«n«« 

Wil*> MgrlMlifl l«M tiMM » iHHMhA* i W f im ilKVMr%i||«M,«l i»lM» Hm 

lanrwl'TtMt ia «b* fwirl liur^w iiMMi««». g«««v«r« Hi* SKvy** iHUMf«ta%« 

Md |H»*«^^27 ^iM ffUfUM^, tf «lM Al*«, fTMlW^M ft jl4»1l i«V4»««t#imWI 

•Md.4 iMMriljr MtiM Ml i»v»»«i9h«l<m !«%• tiMi Mr%('vl%l.«« «# wnf ymrimimiutt 
la MiHM««i«H «&«li «lk« y«M>i Wtahm* AitMilMr* mt mnO^ i« iaM|ilr« i««« 

itt > wr or»» «li»« liM MMi% «iM% Ml Ajnqr iNMur^ wm^ «« *« Hm fr«iMw% itet ia 
«• Mk* ft %1 iM r> < >#> iarr*«1i4iftmMi i««* «»• Mt&vttiM •« «h« 1iH> tl«p i ImwD 
ik cMMMtiM vil^ tiki* «iiM%«r, fliMl ^^m fMHM, fy»4 mis* riBiwiiiinii.ltijiiui- 



••*•«• «lw ttHlMA, It !• r imm i w i i a i that * »mw4 %t ^f%mem \* 
•9fiM.'^mA, tM IM MnywMM •# tkrM jwawwl wTfiMHrt M«i«t*« W « riio»r«i 
«iM tfMMli f > rt i »» y W M •tt%mm wf Ik* ,Mtt A*w«4M,t« twnwaJLU OmmtV 

•Mt, MMI ft t«i^toi«»l MNriMT i«M» AmOJ !m» Ml mtttvm tmSMMUt 1^«l «Im 
adLIltwrr VP^^Xm* IsKfl'nA, ftmX^m ilMMi^ ««iiiiii4»trsMT*l^ W mte 



OONFlDlilNTML 




3936 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 






i* Xa IAm VTWit %lM » b t ^ < r«MiMMaitem«M arm mmmmunti la* » 






iMl. l~ar»f« af Alraattw. 

IB«I. t«ll«na t» Vkm S*ar««a«7 



^^ 



X - 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3937 



ancuL ovaeu ) 

) 

i«. ) 



1. rmrmm% U Urn proTl«i«M •f hAUm Urn S», fMk Omi«vwm. 
api>ro«»4 13 ivm» 1944, • >»ftHl of <>fflo«r« Ic karvlfp apipciatoi %• 
aaosrtalB sad n^ert tlw fnats r«l*ti«c U tlM attaMlt Mi* tgr Ji 
•nMd for««« i^p«B tlM T«rnt«i7 of Km«11 «k 7 TVaBirtw IMHL, 



e. 
A. 



t 
■I 
t 
■moHUht. wi%)M«t «•«•{ 

TMtedaal aATlMr, wltkMit ▼««•. 



2. 9Mk bIIUmt -^ •tvlltM y«rMM*l My k* MWltfMi U «Mi«t 



3. riM loari vlU •«wr«M at tt* Mil af tte m«I«v 

Vlll lwl4 ••••14M ftt ffl^l «1M W ttHM uMt at VMll flAM Ar pi— tt 

it Mjr dMM *Avl*«ikl«. Am BwKrt i« M p t w wi %• jarcMrtW lt« mb 
■»4 it MtlwriMd to •■plejr • olvlliMi r«v«rl«r vr r«p«r««ra. 

4. Nilittfr Mi eivlllafB p«rMnMl wlU rMiar tte iMri aU 
»*««r]r iBforaatlaa aai mmIrI 



Bjr ari«r 9t tb* SMHTstary «f «■»! 



f . 6. MMMtU. 

omcun ^^^ ' 



Hu(Kh*« , W. J . Jr . -»M:b-nB 



3938 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



9t,S,A.M 



'io 



MUrykWHCT OF TMi 



WNAVY 



H 



CtnntM Of TMC JUOOB AOVOCATB OCNKIiAt 



MBMOMAMDUM 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3939 




V.JI. A. « 



CMU^ARTMCNT OF THE NAVY 
orrtcx or tmk juooc aovocatv. oKNKnAU 



MKMOPIANOUM 




3940 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Department of the Navy, 
Office of the Judge Advocate General, 
Washington 25, D. C, 30 Decetnber 1943. 

Memorandum for the Secretary of the Navy. 

H. J. Res. 199 has been approved by the President. This Resolution purports 
to extend the statute of limitations for trials by court martial for six months. 
Statements were made at the time of the passage of the Resolution that it would 
make mandatory the trial of Admiral Kimmel within the additional six months 
period. I foresee that such contentions will again be advanced. 

It has been my view that the agreement Admiral Kimmel made not to plead 
the statute of limitations in bar of trial was not strictlv necessary, but that his so 
agreeing made assurance doubly sure. Our statute of limitations reads: 

"Article 61. No person shall be tried by court martial ♦ * ♦ for any 
offense * * * which appears to have been committed more than two years 
before * * * unless by reason of having absented himself, or of some other 
manifest impediment he shall not have been amenable to justice within that 
period." 

It is my view that where the circumstances are such that the convening of a 
court martial and the summoning of the necessary witnesses would interfere 
with out prosecution of the war, as determined by the President or the Secretary 
of the Navy, there is clearly such a "manifest impediment" as is contemplated 
by the statute. There is an argument to the contrary, includ'ng two very ancient 
Attorney General's opinions where the circumstances were different, but I submit 
that the words of the statute mean exactly what they say. 

In any event we are amply justified in ignoring H. J. Res. 199. The attached 
copy of a letter from the Attorney General to the Director of the Budget sets out 
the reasons. 

I submit this memorandum that you may be prepared for developments. 
Respectfully, 

T. L. Gatch, 
Judge Advocate General of the Navy. 



Memorandum for General Cramer. 

1. A statute of limitations can not be extended after it has run (Falter v. U. S., 
23 Fed. 2nd 420, 425; Moore v. State, 43 N J. Law 203), the reason being that 
the prosecution being dead, the accused has a vested right to repose. Thus in 
civil cases it can not be extended once it has run. 

2. The above distinction is recognized in the Federal statute of limitations, 
18 U. S. C. 582, which prescribed a new statute of limitations and provided in 
.so many words that it should not apply to offenses already barred but would 
apply to cases wherein "the existing statute of limitations had not yet fully run". 

3. General Short's offenses were all barred under Article of War 39 on De- 
cember 7, 1943. and the act of December 20, 1&43, was powerless to revive the 
(lead prosecution. 

4 It is unthinkable that General Short would break his word not to assert the 
statute of limitations. If he did so, he would alienate any vestige of chance of 
acquittal by public opinion. But a.ssuniing he did assert the bar of the statute. 
it is b'^lieved the agreement would stand up on the following grounds : 

a. There was ample consideration on both sides. 

b. The statute of limitations does not deprive the court of jurisdiction; it is 
a mere defense which must be asserted {Johnson v. V. S., 13 Fed. Cases 867, 
No. 7418). If pleaded, the court must sustain the plea before the prosecution 
is barred. It is unbelievable that where an accused has lulled the Government 
into security until the statute has run he would be allowed to reap the benefit 
of his own fraud. 

c. The agreement might constitute a "manifest impediment" to trial within 
the meaning of Article of War 39. 14 Op. Atty. Gen. 265 discusses a manifest 
physical impediment but there is no rea^n why the impediment need be a physi- 
cal one. Fraud on the part of the accused might very reasonably constitute a 
manifest impediment. 

d. The accused's fraud would make him a fugitive from justice which tradi- 
tionally stops the running of the .statute. See 18 U. S. C. 583. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3941 

o. The real danger of the present legislation is that someone might construe 
it to be different from an ordinary statute of limitations and to deprive the courts 
of jurisdiction to try the offenders at any other time than the period as extended. 
This is a very real danger. 

Wm. J. Hughes, Jr., 
Lieutenant Colonel, J. A. O. D., 
Assistant Chief, Military Justice Division. 



3942 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBIT NO. 171 

Table of Contents 

1. Letter from Rear Admiral Kimmel to Secretary of the Navy Forrestal dated 

8 September 1945. 

2. Letter from Secretary of the Navy Forrestal to Rear Admiral Kimmel dated 

28 August 1945. 

3. Dispatch #180328 December 1941 from CincPac for Action to PacFlt. 

4. Letter from R'?ar Admiral Kimmel to Secretary of the Navy Knox dated 

26 January 1942 with endorsement dated 27 January 1942. 

5. Press and radio release from the Navy Department flated 14 April 19^. 

6. Memorandum from T. L. Gatch, Judge Advocate General of the Navy, to 

Admiral King dated 13 April 1944. 

7. Letter from Secretary of the Navy Knox to Rear Admiral Kimmel dated 

10 September 1943. 

8. Letter from Rear Admiral Kimmel to Secretary of the Navy Knox dated 

7 September 1943 vpith enclosure. 

9. Letter from Secretary of the Navy Knox to Rear Admiral Kimmel v?ith 

enclosure. 

10. Memorandum from T?*^ar Admiral Jacobs to Secretary of the Navy Knox 

dated 17 August 1943. 

11. Memorandum from L. E. Bratton, Acting Judge Advocate Genei'al of the 

Navy, to Rear Admiral Jacobs dated 4 August 1943. 

12. Navy Department Communique No. 47 dated 28 February 1942. 

13. Memorandum of Secretary of War, H. L. Stimson. 

14. Memorandum of 26 February 1942. 

15. Navy Communication #191909 February 1942 from Coml2 for Action to 

SecNav. 

16. First Endorsement from BuNav to Rear Admiral Kimmel dated 17 February 

1942. 

17. Letter from Secretary of the Navy Knox to Rear Admiral Kimmel dated 16 

February 1942. 

18. Letter from Secretary of the Navy Knox to Rear Admiral Kimmel. 

19. Memorandum from Edwin Dickinson, Special Assistant to the Attorney 

General, to Captain Gatch, Assistant Judge Advocate General, Navy Depart- 
ment, dated 14 February 1942. 

20. Memorandum from the Attorney General Francis Biddle to the Secretary 

of War, dated February 14, 1942. 

21. Alternative suggestions of language referred to in the Attorney General's 

memorandum to the Secretary of War, dated 14 February 1942. 

22. Covering title sheet addressed to Assistant Solicitor General, Department of 

Justice. 

23. Memorandum from Captain Gatch, Ass't. JAG, Navy Department, to Ass't 

Solicitor General, Department of Justice, dated 14 February 1942, with 
letter from Secretary of the Navy Knox to Rear Admiral Kimmel attached. 

24. Letter from Secretary of War Stimson to Secretary of the Navy Knox 

dated 14 February 1942. 

25. Memorandum from Secretary of the Navy Knox to Admiral Jacobs dated 

7 February 1942 with attached memorandum for the Secretary on Stimson's 
memo by Admiral H. R. Stark, dated 31 January 1942. 

26. Notes by H. L. Stimson after meeting at the White House January 28, 1942. 

27. Letter from Rear Admiral Kimmel to Secretary of the Navy Knox dated 

28 January 1942 with endorsement of the same date. 

28. Letter from Rear Admiral Kimmel to Secretary of the Navy Knox dated 26 

January 1942 with endorsement dated 27 January 1942. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3943 

280 Brnnxville Road, BronxviUe 8, N. Y., 8 September 1945. 

From : Rear Admiral H. E. Kimmel, U. S. Navy (Retired) 
To : The Secretary of the Navy. 

Subject : General Court Martial in my case. 

1. In view of the agitation for a Congressional Investigation before Congress 
reconvened and the action of the Senate in ordering a joint Congressional 
Investigation of Pearl Harbor, I wish to defer my reply to your letter of 28 
August 1945 until that investigation is completed. 

(S) H. E. KiMMEX. 



3944 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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4, JAii^. '>»^VS A, WWW 






EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3945 





iiattt etMQ^A* i8iEsa cmm i8 ip: 1941 m^n 

fItfVt ^«0M 14| S€«IAy| ftUNAff eiNtATi CIHaANT ROUTtNf 



AMIRAL HUSBAIO C KtllCL RAUUB lOM HIS FLAG ?HtS DATE AND VICE 



AWMfUL tlU^IMI S fYE USIt ASSUMES TCMPOflARy COUMANB OF THE ttS 
IC n.€ET IH ADSITfON TO ms fUUWT OUTlEf 




sisTKiaeri^ 

•tfiMy«....««6tfi ttAMc ANY mn,^ restrictco 

W» 10/tn 36t aft 15, Flu 




/^ 



79716 O — 46 — pt. 19 34 



3946 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



r 



fcI»?'EL, Husband S. 
Rear /icbtlral, USI 
(2207-, -Rn) 



January 2C, IJ^a 



l^o.i)i Rear A.dialral Uushand E. Kiiin«l, t.<.3>N> 

Tot fho Secretary ol h;- NaTy 

Subjectt =\«que«t for f<«tire"»nt i;i!der the Provisions 

of Section 1445 ^eTisod r;-.,atutoa. 

1. After forty one years ana eifht months senrlce 
In the 'filled States .iary, I ►icrob^ request that I be placed 
upon the retired list In accordance nith the provisions -of 
Section 1443 Rerlsed 5^atut s. 

2. I hold myself i/i readlaoss to perTorsR an> juty 
to which I may be assl-ned« 



Hl.SBAND B. KIv^iX 



Ist Kndorsf^Drtt 



January 27, 1942 

Pro.1t Cor.;jaad,int, r.-relfth Naval le-riot o^a.i Wava\ Oj) rating 

Base, San i'ra.'iciacc, wOlTornia 
Tot The recrr^jxry oC thte Nf.ty 

Subjects lioquost for f<e-iro::.ont unut:.- t,ric i'rovisijiui of 
:ec'.ior) 1442 evised ::tatuti)s 



1. "orwardad. 



.'. ... ;i^ N3LAi)E 



vtrfsn^mm^^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3947 

IMMEDIATE RElt.Mfi * 

PRESS AND RADIO APRIL 14, 1944 

PEARL HARBGR WrrliESSES UNAVAILABLE DI3E TO WAR ASSXCaJMENTS 

^cretary of the Navy Frank Knox has received a memorand\im from 
Admiral Ernest J. King, U.S.N., Commander in CMef of the United States 
Fleet, in which Admiral King officially Informed &e Secretary that certain . 
officers of the Navy now serving on battle fronts in various parts of the 
world, could not be -withdrawn from their military duties in order to 
participate as members or witnesses in court martial proceedings In 
connection with the Japanese attack on Pearl HarMr on December 7, 1941. 

In his consideration of the case of Rear Admiral Husband Klmmel, ' 

'U4^N. (Retired), and of the procuring df members and witnesses for a 
court martial, the Secretary had requested Admiral King to advise him as to 
Vae availability of certain officers should a court martial be convened. 

Admiral King, answering the Secretary, said: "About half the officers 
listed are on duty at sea in command of forces engaged with the enemy and 
In accordance with planned operaticais. Others at sea are performing 
duties on the staffs of those commanders." 

At his press conference oii Ajxrll 11, 1944, Secretary Knox was 
questioned In connection with Congress' extension of the time for trial of 
mose involved in the Pearl Harbor catastrophe to June 7, 1944, and'^e 
Secretary said he would obtain the opinion of his legal advisers. 

"I have discussed this matter with Rear Admiral G&teh, the Judge 
Advocate General of the Navy" said Secretary Knox, "and I have been 
advised by him that, inasmuch as Admiral Kimmel irns long since signed 
an agreement not to interpose the statute of limitations as a bar to his trial, 
there is now no necessity to construe any acts of Congress on this subject/ 

The Secretary further explained that Admiral Thomas C Hart, U.S.Nt, 
(Retired), is now in Hawaii pursuing his investigation into matters relating 
Ao the attack upcao Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941. 



1 would cejrtainly feel derelict in my duty if I took from the Fleet and 
' :ers whom 
Secretary. 



the fi^iting fronts .the officers whom Admiral King has placed in those 
positions," conduced the 



•foil e 



&0^ \ ' *** 



\ 



3948 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 







Dbpabtmbnt op the Navy 

office of the judob advocate obneiial 

washington, d. c. 

13 April 1944 

MHPWWM 198 imiwt rag 




/ 



than has %•«& a gnrnt d*«l of acitMloa In tha pr«aa raoaatl/ 

BC tba Faarl Baitor aattar. with aapaoial rafaraaea to tha dalagr 
i> tha trial of AdBlral KImuI, 

Partlaolar attantloa ia dlraotad ta tha atataaaata of Saerataxjr 
Xaoz at hla praai ooafaraaca on April 11, la «faloh tha Saoratary ia 
aajj^peaaA ta hava aaid that ha woald rafar tha mat tar ta tha Attonugr 
Oaaaral for a la^al opinion aa ha (tha Saoratair) "vaa confotaad*. 

It ia otttalttad that inaaaooh aa Adalral XlnMl haa tlpiad a 
TiKlld valvar of hia rl|^t to plaad tha atatuta of llnltatlona la har of 
trial, thara la aow no aaad to 'iatarprat* any Aeta of Oeacraaa vqpea thia 
aohjaot . aqpaeially tha ona a]rtaadla« tha tlaa within whloh trial aaat 
taka placa. 

Iran thon^ tha Hav^'a oaaa wara coqplata ia avary raapast. aa 
aetlon caa now ba takan for raaaoaa 70a taatm alraadjr fivaa, naaaljr tha 
aoa-aTailability of offloara on dntr at aaa. 

I hava draftad a aa«f*«tad praaa ralaaaa which, I haliava will do 
MMh toward aattllac thla aattar - for tha daratioa of tha war at laaat. 













EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3949 




^ 



4 



"^ 



1. 



10 S«>tfau)«'. 





Bamr / 



B»rt' 






iaijgafti' 



■1 <m m 






Cf«9»««i 



- •'hla Six ^6) »«Ksiwts- 
*I t^u"<sj tMtf '^:*-' 

' »>»,»WltiSil«. .-.^^.i. /ISMS" 
for At^ etllss^fV ,''ff#S««? 






■iai 




t Y ^ ^ t. » t I h 




3950 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 
i I 



2a> BRONXVluLE ROAD 
BRONXVlLLt, '?>i£»i XOHK 



September 7tb, 1943, 



From: 



Toi 



Reference 
(a) 



Enoloaure 
' A 



Re«r Achoiral Husband E. Kiwnel, U.S.N., Ret., 
280 Bronxville Road, 
Bro«urTill8, New Toric. 

The HoncarabXs Frank Knox, 
S^fcretary of th* Navy, 
Navy Departcent, 
f»aafeJLngtcm, D. C, 

Latter froB Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, to Henp Admiral 
Husbartd E. KlJtnmel, U.S.N., Ret., proposln,^ a Valver of t:« 
Statute of Limitations. 



Agreentent not to ploitd the Statute of Liraltatlons in bar of 
trial by General Co\irt Martial. 



Receipt is acknowledged of your undated letter. Reference (a), 
d«liver:»d to me by hand Aufust 27th, 19A3, concerning a Generil Covrt 
MartlMl in my case. In which letter you atate thst the two year statute pf 
'itipitatlons controlling Naval Courts Uartinl will have run on wy caae c«rt 
December 7th, I9A3, and you propose that I should now ajjree not to plead 
^the statute of limitations in bar of trial and you enclose a proposed fora 
l»f waiver. 



lou state in Referenco (a) that 
Interest and safety would now permit procee 
iTurther believe that ao long as the war con 
'ippractlcablt* to have a muDber of iaportant 
Otnift on account of their war duties. For 
feel that it would be in the best interests 
l^ow agree not to plead tlie statute of linit 
give me your assurance that the trial will 
able date. 



you think that the public 
din,' with my trial, but that yo^i 
tlnues it ».ill be manifestly 

Vitnessea appear before the 
this reason, amon^^ othsTS, ycru 

of all concorr.ud if I should 
atioas in bar of trial auid you 
be h^Xd at the earliest practic- 



al^ 



1*1 

- X^ 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3951 

3 









September 7th, 19A3. 



From: Rear Aciairal Kiisbiutd E. Kinsel, U.S.N. , Ret. 
Tot The Secretary of f.w Navy 



-2- 



It is «y personal desire to be brought to trial by General 
Coiart Mart ill in open coujrt at the earliest pr«cticable date; Delay in 
the matter- Is opposed to ay personal interests, since the pessage of tiae 
and the cirouostances and casualties of war and of the period following 
may m&ke it difficult, perhaps ispossible, to assemble and produce the 
evidence and the witnesses reqviired. I have at all times been anxious to 
subordinate, jBsy otm interests to the nati<x)al welfare, which appears to 
rtf^uirs tnat ajr trial be delayed. I an therefore forwnrdin^ to you here- 
with a waiver, Bnolosure A, executed by ae which I hope will be satis- 
factory to you. 



Respectfully, 



# 



«. 



*< 



iAn-AAA.^ '^ ' ' , 



vt^' 



j^ ,AA>^ 



End. (1) 






3952 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




A - to Utter dated SAstenbei .._, _.,,, :>om. 

R«ar AdrainU. Hv ?. Kiirircl, O.S*!l., Mrt., 

♦.:> the SeoretsTj^ o; ine Navy. 



I. HUSBAND E. KDC^L, Rear A^ral, Onit«<i Stat«8 S»vy, 
R^tlrsa, hereto-/ agrea on my hi<ai<»r as an oCf«^r «asd a gentlMian tiwit t■^■ 
will nol ple:id, nor jwrait R»y attoiTiey or otlier person on my b^^&If to 
plead^ the atntute of limitations in bar of my triid by General Court 
fertajsl. iK open court for any alles«<3i offenses with which I ttmy be 
chargeji relating to the period on or before Dember 7th, 194i» i^ould ay 
trialib§ hell during- the present uar or within six (6) Buxiths thereafter. 

P I tnke tills action voluntarily, believing it to be in the 

public interest. 



/!-*<- 



^4>t-*</*-i-*>f 



t *-*'A 







EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3953 



iismixam^:^ 




SatoJ««tt 



*{ 



RMur ifdbdral aasbanS B. ri—i\. 



QGII In jrbor 



■boXMOMt Fon of «f«>winnt« 



m 




tot. 



1. Tb» report of th» a^-oalXad Roberts Cmmi ■»!<» allsssd 
owrtaia darellotiona of duty en your part. Xeur 
tiraaant was appro-rwi, and It ims statad tharaia ___^.^ 
"win ba no bar to yoiir raquaatlng a ganaxtd eou^fPHHBHIHPP to tha 



MaYjr Oapartaant's ordarlnii you for trial should 




8o ^tarmlBed." 




t trial upon ttaaaa ehargaa 
intaraat and aafaty 



On Fabruary 28, 19yU I atatad to tha praas 
would not ba bald until aueh tiaa aa 
vould permit. 

2. Tha two year statute of llaitatlons eoatrolllng naval 
courts martial will have r\m in your case on Oaeaabar 7, 19^, subjaot 
to tba exception therein relating to eases is which there exist* a 
"manifest impediment" to the trial of the accused. Therefore, if orders 
for your trial are not issued prior to tha date stated, you could plead 
the statute of limitations in bar of trial, and its application to your 
case would have to be determined in the manner provided by law.^ 

3. I think that the pcU^o interest and safety would now 
permit proceeding with your trial, but I further beliere that so lone 
aa the war continues it will bsvampractieahle to have a number of 
important witnesses appear before the court on account of their imr 
duties. For this reason among others I feel that it would be to tha 
beat interests of all concerned if you shcnild now agree not to plead 
the statute of limitations in bar of trial upon ay assurance that the 
trial will be had at the earliest peracticable date 
awptr et ion t>f the two^yess {jwlud. 

4. If you agree with the foregoing yoxir prompt return of 
enclosure is requested. 








3954 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



D 






i 




hMMqr agXM on mgr honor u a& amo«r and a twntlwwn tlmt Z «U1 not \ 
Vilf*d tb* statoU of UUdtaUomi la Ixur of a^ trial fey gwwna eoort } 

MTUal for aagr an«t«l off «»»•• I My Imira otMnittwI on or btf ora 1 

i 
Dioaaibar 7, 19iU» ahouXd mj trial tw hald darlag tte praaant aar or ^ 

vitlda aix Bontha tbrnraaf tar, and that I alXl aot panait ai^ attorm^ 

or otlwr iMcraon on agr balialf to aaka auoh plaa. 

I nka %}dB agraaMnt foluoatarily, in raeoifBiUon of tha 

fact iUbat during tha praaant aar and for tlHMilMaad pariod tharaaftar 

it will b« iaqpiraeti(Mibla to obtain tha attendanca hafora a ganaral 

court aortial of aitaaaaaa «ho would ba ij^xurtant tor w^ dafanaa, 

aa wall aa witnaaaaa raquirad by tha proaaoution. 



^-'--tJcA- 






Hri. '^P' 



\y<AjL^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3955 



In rrptj.' atlrfp^w not (hr Binnt-r of thi» 
I<U»T, but liunwu vi N'ftval IVn»»^r.nrl, 
ti:t\y Depart Hit Dt. \Vjshm::tyn. D. C. 

Refer to Nc. 



CCKFIDQJTIAL. 



Navy Department 
BUREAU OF NAVAL PERSONNEL 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



^ 



y^ 






17 Aiacust 1943. 



Moaarandom for 



Tha Secretary of Mam Navy. 



The attached noBorandum brings up the question of the trial 
of Rear Admiral Kianel, based on the findings of the Roberts Board. 

In order to be snre that he be brou^t to trial, if such is 
desired, it is necessary that Specifications and charges be preferred 
prior to 7 Decenber, 1943* 

If sudi charges are preferred, I am of the opinion that 
AAniral Klatel will demand ijaoedlate trial. 

I do not think it is in the national interest to pendtlhis case 
to coae to trial at present* 

I have discussed this case with Adndral King, and he agrees with 
ne that the final decision in the case mast be made by the President. 



RANDALL JACOBS. ^^^ 




3956 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



IMf iUOO^ AOVOCATt Ol NUtAL OT tMl N*W 
AMb NKf IR lo NO. 



JAG:n.) :rid 



Dkpartmknt Of THi; Navy 

OKKICE OK THK JDDUE ADVOCIATE GENKRAl. 

wasihn<;ton, ». c. 




A August 19^3 



:. .o.-.orajidu:i; I'or hear Adairal Randall Jacobs 

Major GenerBl Viyroii C, Craner, Judge Advocnte Geiierax of the 
.'.i"v> CK.e into riy office tliis aftarnoon and stated that ho had re- 
ported to Genorti ' araliall that If ajiy action is froin^; to be taken 
rslntivc to the trial by general court martial of General Short a 
.■".eterr.ination s'rould be arrived at because tii.* Statute of Li^lit•^tions 
sxjirss on Decenber 7, 194.3. General Marshall stated thnt the matter 
vould have to be taken up with Secretary Stir.son and then asked Gen- 
eral Cra. er to malce inquiry as to what action the Navy Department was 
taicins "/itti respect to Admiral Kitmnel for the reason that it ?;ould be 
advisable that the V.'ar Departjient and the Kavy Department be in ac- 
cord with tiie action that is to be taken. 

General Craner was informed tliat Captain Gatch had been se- 
lected as the relief of Admiral 7ioodson as Judge Advocate General and 
in view of the ixportance of the matter I would immediately take the 
matter up vdth htm. Likewise I advised Gener.il Craner th.Ht in view 
of the fact tha^ the subject was one affecting personnel presumably 
Captain Gatch nould v/ant to take the matter up with Admiral Jacobs, 
the Chief of fiaval Personnel. Furthermore, I expressed the view to 
Genereil Cramer that the ultimate decision as to the action to be taken 
in the case of General Short and Admiral Kicoiel would be for the deci- 
sion of the President of the United States, that tJie respective Secre- 
taries would vevy likely be the ones to present the matter for the de- 
cision of the President and xiiat the respective Secretaries might ex- 
press their views as to the policy governinj, the action to be taken 
but that the President would render tiie decision to the Secretaries who 
in turn would then ttike such action as was determined upon. 

. It so hapt,ened that upon the arrival of Captain Gatch you came 
in to my office and the above subject matter was discussed. You re- 
quested that a memorandum be prepared with respect thereto and that 
you in tiam would take the matter up with Admira,L Ernest J . King, Com- 
■nander In Chief, United States fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3957 



JAGtAJ:rld 



This metnorandvLTi consequently is being forriarded for your Infonaation 
and such instructions in the pi-emipes ac are deterEined upon. 




L. E. Bratton 
Acting Judge Advocate General of the Navy 



•^ .\ 



3958 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

NAVY DEPARTMENT 
IMMEDIATE RELEASE FEBRUARY 28, 19U2 

NAVY DEPARTlffiNT COMMUNIQIJE NO. hi 

The Navy Department issued the following connrainique: 
The Secretary of the Navy announced today the acceptance, 
effective Iferch 1, 19ii2, of the application for retirement of Rear 
Admiral H. E. Kimmel, U.S. Navy, "without condonation of any offense 
or prejudice to any future disciplinary action." 

The Secretary of the Navy announced at the same time that, '. 
based upon the findings of the report of the Roberts Connnission, he 
had directed the preparation of charges for the trial by court-martial 
of Rear Admiral Kimmel, alleging dereliction of duty. Ttie Secretary 
of the Navy made it clear, however, that the trial upon these charges 
would not be held until such time as the public interest and safety 
would permit* 



♦ •«■♦*♦ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3959 




3960 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3961 



incnoN r 

I NAVAL COMMUNICATION SERVI 

, M4B m* NAVY DEPARTMENT 

Z KATV 101909 MKW « STAR P 8K 1|^ 



U *^ MBcnM» AT nOOM «• 



•••.a 



'awRJMMnM 'i»~uJK 




V 



ewwi BCTiiitwinr kaw kimci. scLivif^ Eunii zem ftfrmts BATf 

i«9S*»19FES1l61 



0'. 




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C3P i 



m 



3962 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



First Endor«M— nt . 



rwbruary 17, 19i;2 



1 



Fromt 



TbB Chlaf of Uie iikontuM of Narication. 
Rear ActBiral RuabAnd S. KijibmiI , U. v>. Ite'vy, 
Twairth iaral Dlatrict. 



S-. 



^ 



TlAi 
Subject » 



Tha CooEsandant. 

Tranafar to the llatirad Liat aftar tortjr (^) 
yaara* sanrlee. 



1, Plor**rcl«cl, 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3963 



^ 



N 



.^Vf~ir»-y 1 A^ 1 J^"- 



Tromi T»i« ..•crAturjr of tte« roTr 

a'ib>cti ""rwnfer ti t'.# - tVr*d . i|t «rt«r forty (4C) 

y»«ir«' ••rrle*. 

•fey«: c»"J ''] ~ .- rft-niMt for r«tlrMi«ttt, d*(*A 

^;r ^ry •'P, 194.'', 



1. ypi»i* r^cn^nt to be tr«r»f*rrea to t; r, retlr»& 

lltt "ftsr t^e eoiv>latl'>n or forty l<^) "•ir*' ••rrlc* In 
Rceordtni^ li- •. .!. rrTl»lftyit of ;. .:. C»<1«, Ht>e .14, 
Saetloa TH ir, V I'lrnctlcn of the i'^nxldant, w^^^roved, Tou 
vlll be tr».riri"«rrcd t? tK« r.tlreri M't fif pJTi'jtr'* of th« 
r.ltf* >tAta* ' »r, .- s :.f x- -»•■ '' , 1 ;,', ^ 

'. .11' • ^-'".•iVrti of <^-'iT- T^c<iftt t-iT- r»tlr«a«nt ta 

wLti»»ut condonntloR of any affenas or ; rejurtlce t: futura 

diP'-'.nH'iftT 'ctlon. 



/"i/ /> /*< /i ^ -A 



^- 



3964 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



!■ r< il 5 '- C r r H e iN A V <' 



■.y) 



^^^.im « .»m ». < »V >> ^ » "" ** M » > »■■ m i ll I i rt i wtf iiiil ' l tf ' tMH h^ 



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EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3965 






DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



-■vo . V .-^ 



ret Irer.-i'-r.!-, rfi--':- '' ^^ '• ' ' "- -'-i' 
X ;.= th — e • ::■=!• ^ ■ •••■ ■' 

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1 ;-■- C,:-t: i: - 



of t}if- '•' vy ' ) '■•■■>'.:■ A 1 »-.'.! >ij ' 

• You" *'ile ir retu ;.•=•". :.'>r 



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3966 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



Feb- 



In y 'ir :'.e~orfvndura o to'.ay concertii .*; 1. ri^f in i.'>;.- 

r.fctlon with thr- HC «'*,--•■*«'' f ♦h'- r#>:ip?t- vhich h/>vp 

been wade by A- ..r^^ctir,:. 

I h--ve reac t" ■ • -i.^ • - rie 
'.e >r«adusi. 

It -.e-. 
fis to KTir--est iori a. (n; wor«:s "sauseoueat, c;)urt ir.<!rli.^,l pro- 

ce«»r.in^s") m;'.v Vp •'•/:■ :• f-^ecl to *, ' »» ■.>^'— "s la S'JU'.-estion £ 
"withri- . : "^"n felt that *Jm 

th;-- «f lni*,»l.,- • -■ r. 

1"-^ - ... 



or T.'jt, tnf. 



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ion i, -"r^i^lf 



act 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3967 



yv. 



3968 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



N. 1 \. 



DrPARTMrNT OF THF NAVY 
0» » i< » <<t rut I urjf AlJVOCATh <>(NtHAI 



M» MOHANDU'V" 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3969 



N . .1 . \ . s 



DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 

OFFICE OF THE JUDGt ADVOCATt OENERAl 



MEMORANDUM 



Mr 4 



c r* * 



.. licit or .-'^LrT'ii 



X ; r . r; r> '• 5", t ( . • *'.*•' • r " i ■"' i. r, • u • ■ I ,■ i ' ; '^ " 
:' !>■ y-^ ■■■: ;, . '. U r f-:ers in i.e j^';*- 
of ''cr.cr'vl o.'. r'.. 

U:e * resident wnnt^ ♦•■r jir.i-!. :' 
".he .-. ■ '.'^^j'-^ey "/er.er-il v/.v^v-.^r t • r t. 

r >■ ♦ • q v-.o.; wi 1 1 



* '.f* OC^T':'"*' I"','' r 



> . I - 1 -i • 



:r-jT,v vrr-^'-* 'if^ i::t^>ro„v^ rf *}ie 



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3970 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 




1. lour request to be transferred to the retired list 
after the conpletion of forty (40) years' service in accordance 
ndth the provisions of U. J. Code, Vitle 3^, i^ection 3^1 is, 

by direction of the ^'resident, approved. You Trf.ll be trarisferred , 
to tiie retired list of officers of the United Jtates I.'avj as of 
Larch 1, 1942, 

^ C . ,• , i» • *• 

2. This &9i£icwet i» « ipp p «wrin g your request for --^tire- 
Bien.tQrLll be no bar to your requesting a general court aertial, 
or to the Navy Departitent 's ordering you for trial should it be 
so deteiuined^ 



Acknowledgment of receipt is requested. 






i^- 



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V- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3971 






«r» «aaii 1»: tiv« &>r «Ji«^#e■ 
■&W*e ■*©»** «J%«gM^^ «!«:#** i*WB»J*«e.- 









3972 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



.->•;-■.• .-'?.'?*••' 



O •" ■ - £ :-( A V V 



32C?. 



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X r->ji.. .. . : 1- t f Tie v i .~ -. if ce.n/ 



ATA'AC.'u-i^i « 



■■-•■. V" .2- .-'If' ti'' -«>;:!r r'r.ci-ir In c-':fidence 
<■ t ? err;- !t r,-x in ♦.h'' pftc.ence lr.dicr»ted. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3973 



;>■ ;•,'•:•■ -.1 



\ - : I I '. • . I I • 



.1;. :;; :• i '. : . v ■;- '. ov' ■ •■ • 1.: ...- -.0 ■, • : ;• -.;'■-.■•.:: - 
Qai*- i^) ^:- '. : "• t ;;)ti"- oT ; i ;-! r .[ . i. 
ju:-;i>ir.i :• i :. i,, f^:- r^r. ■• ■ ;, 1 lo 'k o n^ ir. ii-;' 
•.vit;. "-1." :'-^>.ic.i.i :- 

, V < ' A ' . .. - L ■ ..... ... 

i; ^ . • , , I ,:. » 1 . " . ^1. '. •• . , . , ._,.. ^..1. 
. ir;ti:iCt ■;C!i ; J.;, • ■: i ' . ■ !■ i -. i *. - r i:-\ i '■ 
r'l'.i..' . . -^: r*^:- ^ -c t i V'i • .. ■• .:v :>ovti- 

-»;i,r.-..; ■-:.:*, L 1 v _■ • i;.C ■ o, ^ "i p ;■' ; ♦.■ 

1' O ." r -■ " . : ■ - . i ■ ' ' ~ ' ' . : ■" ■ ■■ ■ i " '■ '. ■. " ■ i ■ ' : ■ * 

tr'. il .,■ '>'> i -t : :• i 1.^, ., ■ .. ^ if„.r^ ^y i^,»».-j0« ^.- -Hr» 

jt>j»«-iNt-'»^nt or •. ■ :• i *. 1/ : '. •' 1 ; ; "/ i . . 1 i :(;■:,- 
c:. ■:.' ! . -i-V .: ,■ . : .•■ •, :• ■; til'-:- o . i ■ i- '• !. ;:: 

^•T / ! :■ 1^ ; Or o.' . . - .-.'.ec; ■Miift iiMi't i'l 1 . ^:. 

••.:.- <y:-j° -1 CO 1 -t. ::.-. ••ill i . ;■;• c • i •; . 1 i-.;.0.-..i- 

riiiity it "- .. '. • ■ <.: K.',- i '. .."1 ■', . .1 .'). ^ ':".r- 

t li .1 y . 1. 1- . o. ■; .; . i • 1 ,-, ..--c •It...'. :j- ill . i.. • '•; 

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7^/e^ 



3974 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



av., tT.jii.'. ac-^ h iKt - on 



:.'! t'er. ■j.r,:\'j ir.ct ■ .it. io 
■ . :'■■■■ tr,:s : .-;■ -.[rs.t-r r' ire-' 
■jj.'i' re '.c' i^r .' ' ■' . 

!■■'-' -*. li '.■.•■•--: V.ner unno : ce t.. t t ;',f ^.: 

hril ;;«_■• :, -.■• -.'t .^ - : ,♦ ^ -■-, t.t- _ ' 

, t.if 1' -x] '.:\ '''.:.■' c'-. ' s r':' ' '' ■ .■ r- . ;' 



t T.: rtlal 




it the d-' sclos-ir- <. f 
■-. it v.o .^1 i : e 



r . In Vri*-- next r-lace - t - '. ; ■ ',<■ 1-" n r ' 'lent. thA- I t X' ; .t 
trat Mrob^ly -ill other -•%•?►;•;■, -. t. .. r^ ;,•—.' ' ■ .:;t '.:-.• n' a: • •-. 
Pe;irl Haroor re.icr-t W'.^i^i i'e i- .vn ■. x-r •. t •.,. : rer-.ur.^ ; r liii' , . - ;. 
I t~ld him hov; I ha'i treated -i si iiir ■;i>:s*„)on last week ty an ofi-" nv- 
record stat«nent, ta/'.i.-V" care to disclor'? mth-' n^;; exce^^t such •n'lt • ers ••.s 
woildn't do ham if they snould lea>; . :■:• u.;r' -.1 ,.'•.:. ■;.■: :-^,. •;'.•': --.r 
off his v>n bat sui'i-estt-ci the sw f ritti.' : ' :' -u;;- r ac!-. that : y,'.s, rai fly 
disclosure cf the unity <. f cory-.'x.d at r^a; a. .. , :■ Iht- Caribttar., ^rc srre 
other places up the coast. 






yV)«>«^ 






^*S^ 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 3975 



3976 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



DISIBICI SIAf HEAOQUABIEICi 

TWI'lFTll \AVAL DISTRICT 

tliaOL, Huabaad I. komal officf buhuinc civk cfniER 
Rear Admirid, 031 SAN FRANCISCO ■ CALIFORNIA 
(2206-00-111} 






Juuarjr 28, 1942 



ProBi R««r Adairal Hiuband E< flwl, U.S.H. 

Toi Th* S«er«tAry of th« laiy 

Subject > 1^ Request for Retlraaent 

Referenoei (A) ^jr Itr. to the Secretary of the lATy of 26 
January 1942 requaatlng retlreaent under the 
proriaiona of Article 1443 Rerlaad Statutea 

1. Reference (A) waa aubmitted after I had been 
officially informed by the Navy Departnent that General Short had 
requeated retirement« 

2. I waa officially Inforawd today by the lavy Depart- 
ment that ny notification of General Short's requeat waa not Intended 
to Influence aiy deciaion to auboit a almllar request* 

S> I deaira my request for retirement to atand, aubject 
only to determination by the Department aa to what oourae of action 
will beat ••ty* the interests of the country and the good of the 
serrloea 



li^iu^J £. jCiMi^^j^-iM. 



/ 



HDSBAID E. EIiaC]|L 



1st endorsement 

January 28, 1942 

From: CoHmandant, Twelfth Haral District and Naval -Operating 

Bas«, San Francisco, California 
To: The Secretary of the Navy 

Subjects Uy Request for Retirement 
1* Porwardad. 



^ 



ill I C.tfe^* 
GR£E»SLADI 



•/3- 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3977 



T\\ IIFTII \A\\L DISTRICT 



KIiajEL, Husband B. 

Rear Admiral, USK «> A \ K(.\N ( l>f ( • (AIIKkMA 

(2207-OC-Kn) 



January 26, 1942 



f^om: Roar Admiral Husband E. Kiinnel, U.S.H. 

Tor Th« Secr«tar>' of the Itavy 

Subjeotj Request for J?etir»«ent under the ProYlsions 
of Section 1443 Revised Statutes. 

1. After forty-one years and eight months servloe 
in the United States Havy, I hereby request that I be placed 
upon the retired list in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 1443 Revised Statutes. 



2. I hold myself in readiness to perform any duty 
to which I may be assigned. 



HUSBAND E. KIM'EX ) 






^ 



-t^<J2^ 



1st Endorsemeat 



January 27, 1942 

From: Comnandant, Twelfth Haval District and Naval Operating 

Base, San Praaciseo, California 
Tot The Secretary of the Navy 

;'iN '9 ■4?*lMl*°*'' Request for Retirement under the Provision* of 
Section 1443 Revised Statutes 



1 . Forwarded. 



f .■ W. GREEKSLABE 



-/•/- 



79716 O — 46 — pt. 19- 



-36 



3978 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



EXHIBlt NO. 172 




WASHINGTON 



Hoon 4D757 
!Ehe Pentagon 



20 Mardi 1946 



vmsBAsum k)e mr. hichabdsoh: 



In rasponee to yotir oral reqaeat, you vill find Indosad! 

(1) a talile, basod on Information soppliad "by tiM Amy 

Mr 7orce8. containing tba following data on Amerlcazv-produced "basAum 
for the pariod 1 Vabraary - 30 HoTember 1941: (a) trief desoripiima, 

(b) range %ri.th and %flthout boob load, (c) total deliveries, 

(d) dellrerlea to foreign ooTmtriea (showing whether pursuant to | 
cash contract or lend-lease), (•) irmy shipments to Bawaii, and I 
(f) Army shipments to the Philippines. It will be noted that (c) and 
(d) represent deliveries in this country while (e) ai^ (f ) repreewxt 
arrirals at destination. Vavy shipments to the Hawaiian and 
Philippine areas are not shown. i 

(2) a table, based on information supplied by the Army | 
Ordnance Department and the Army Service Torees, containing the 
followiz^ data on Army anti-aircraft weapons for the period 1 Tebruary 
7 December ISttt (a), produotiou, (b) transfers to foreign countries, 

(c) shipments to Hawaii, and (d) shipoents to the Pbilippines. Hsvy 
production, transfers and shipments, if any, az« not shown* 



RASMOir DDKCOKBB 
Lt. Colonel, OSC 

Xaole. - 2 





EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3979 





Description 


Range 
with 
max. 
bomb 
load' 


Range 
with- 
out 
bombs ' 


1 February-30 November 1941 


Type 


Total 
de- 
liver- 
ies 


Deliveries to for- 
eign countries 


Ship- 
ments 
to Ha- 
waii 2 


Ship- 
ments 




Cash 


Lend- 
lease 

8 


Total 


to 
Philip- 
pines ' 


B-17 ----- . 


AAF Heavy Bomber, 4- 

eng. 
AAF Heavy Bomber, 4- 

eng. 
AAF Medium Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
AAF Medium Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
Navy Patrol Bomber, 2- 

cng. 
Navy Patrol Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
Navy Patrol Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
AAF Light Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
AAF Light Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
AAF Light Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
AAF Light Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
.\AF Light Bomber, 2- 

eng. 
Lights Bomber, 2-eng 


1,800 

750 

1,000 

1,250 


2,750 
2,100 
1.700 
1,600 


101 
109 
122 
147 

3 
323 

4 

805 

91 

836 

78 

4 

10 

1 

2 

289 

107 

24 

22 

50 


20 
93 


20 

93 

8 


3 12 


3 35 


B-24 




B-25 






B-26 






PB2Y 












PBY 










<165 






PBM 












A-20 

A-22 (167) 

A-28 


700 
1,237 

660 
1,100 

800 


1,000 
1,425 
1,120 
2,000 
1,100 


455 
91 

735 

78 

4 
10 

1 


5 108 
«59 

2 


563 
91 

794 

78 

4 
10 

1 

2 


13 








A-29 -. 

A-30 






212 






A-27 


AAF Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 
AAF Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 
Navy Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 
Navy Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 
Navy Light Bomber. 1- 

eng. 
Navy Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 
Navy Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 
Navy Light Bomber, 1- 

eng. 


550 


900 






V-12 






8A 










SBD (A-24)-... 
8B2U 









'52 


SO 
24 




50 
24 






V3PB 










SBN 










SBC 
































Total 






3,128 


1,561 


177 


1,903 



















' Maximum for latest 1941 model under ideal conditions. 
' Navy shipments not shown. 

3 In September 1941, 9 of the 21 B-17s then in Hawaii were flown to the Philippines. 
* Army records do not indicate whether transferred under cash contract or lend-lease. 
« Orieinally French contracts, transferred to Britain then repossessed by U. S. at date of Pearl Harbor 
Aircraft transferred after Pearl Harbor. 
« Defense Aid Contract. 
' Enroute at outbreak of war; diverted to Australia. 





1 February- 


-7 December 1941 










Antiaircraft weapon 




Produc- 
tion 


Transfers 
to foreign 
countries ' 


Ship- 
ments to 
Hawaii ^ 


Ship- 
ments to 
Philip- 
pines 2 


3 inch, mobile 


3 182 

282 

136 

4,808 


98 


7 


44 


37 mm - mobile _._- . . 


22 


90 mm., mobile .- - - -- 


4 
1,805 






50 cal., water-coled 






34 













' All pursuant to lend-lease except 80 3-inch guns for the Netherlands Ea.st Indies. 

3 Equipment already held by organizations transferred to Hawaii or the Philippines between 1 February- 
7 December 1941 not included. 

3 Includes 80 3-inch mobile guns for the Netherlands East Indies believed to have been produced during 
thisi>eriod. 



3980 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Dftartment or the Navy, 

Office of the Secretary, 
Washington, 12 April J9Ji6. 
1083A(JFB) 
R#160 

Memorandum 

To : Mr. Seth W. Richardson 

In response to your request dated 21 March 1946, for a table containing the 
data outlined by you in respect of American produced bombers for the period 
1 February to 30 November 1941, there has been prepared and is forwarded 
herewith a set of tables entitled : 

LONG RANGE PATROL BOMBER AND SCOUT BOMBER ACCEPTANCES SHOWING DELIVEBIE8 
TO THE NAVY AND TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES 1 FEBBUARY-30 NOVEMBER 1941 

The term "acceptances" as used in the tables includes all deliveries of military 
aircraft of the types described that were produced by the specified manufacturer 
in question. It will be noted that the foreign deliveries were not lend-lease 
transfers, and*that of the total acceptances of 835 long range and scout bombers, 
there were delivered to the Navy 582, and to the foreign countries 253 ; and of 
those to the Navy, 218 were sent to the Hawaiian area and to carriers operating 
in the Pacific as explained in the footnotes to the attached tables. 

John Ford Baecher, 

Commander, USNR. 
Ends. (Tables) 
1 Negative 
10 Positives 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3981 



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Elisors a 



3982 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

lOeZk DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 

B#164 orriCE of the secretary 

WASHINGTON 



6 May 1946 

MBMORAKDUM 

Tot Mr, S«th V. Elcbardson 

In response to your oral request, and also that of 
Sen&tor Ferguson (Heeord of Proceedings, Pa^e 12,997) referred to 
in Item #19 of yo\ir memorandua of 29 March 1946, there has "been 
prepared and is forwarded you herewith, since Nayy activity in 
sending shore based anti-aircraft guns to the Pacific Ocean areas 
vas 8x;compl i shed through the Marine Corps, tables shoving the 
troop and weapon status, with increases and decreases as the ease 
may be, of the U. S. Marine Corps defense battalions and post 
and static a personnel at Oahu, Palmyra, Johnston, Midway, Wake» 
Samoa, Guam, Carite, Olongapo aud Shanghai, on 1 February 1941 
and 7 December 1941, together with a concluding summary. 



^John Tord Baecher 
Commander, T7SIIR 



I 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



3983 



U. S. Marine Corps troops and weapons status 

OAHU 

(Defense Battalions) 





Personnel 


5" 
51 cal. 


3" AA 
Army 
Type 


3" AA 


S/L 


AA, .50 
cal. M Jt 


AA, 30 




Officers 


Men 


cal. MG 


2/1/41 


27 
90 


645 
1.800 


6 
10 


12 
12 




6 
6 


30 

58 


30 


12/7/41 


40 








77 


1.155 


4 








28 


10 













OAHU 
(Post & Station) 



2/1/41.. 
12/7/41- 



Increase. 



2/1/41.. 
12/7/41. 



Increase. 



2/l/41_. 
12/7/41- 



Increase. 



18 
41 



23 



716 

855 



139 



8 
29 



21 



79 
769 



690 



12 



12 



Personnel 


Navy 
6"/50 


Officers 


Men 


2 
23 


20 

j.^go 


3 

4 


21 


570 


1 



3"/50 AA 



3"/23 



S/L 







PALMYRA 






2/1/41 


















12/7/41 - - - 


7 


147 


4 




4 




8 


10 








Decrease 


7 


147 


4 




4 




8 


10 








JOHNSTON 


2/1/41 


















12/7/41 


7 


153 


2 




4 




6 


10 






Increase 


-7 


153 


2 




4 




6 


10 








MIDWAY 



30 



30 



AA, 50 
cal. MO 



18 



18 



30 



30 



WAKE 


2/1/41 


















12/7/41 


'27 


'427 


6 




12 


6 


18 


30 


Increase 


27 


427 


6 




12 


6 


18 


30 








SAMOA 



AA, 30 
cal. MO 



30 



30 



' Includes: Aviation, 11 officers and 49 men. Army, 1 officer and 5 men. 
' Includes 199 Samoan Reserves. 



3984 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

GUAM 







Personnel 


Navy 


O/'/R/l 




3"/23 


S/L 


AA-fiO 
cal. MG 


AA, 30 




Officers 


Men 


6"/60 




cal. MO 


2/1/41 


8 
8 


148 
145 














12/7/41 






























Dw^roase 




3 


-' 






























• CAVITE 


2/1/41 . 


15 
23 


343 
705 





--33' 






Vi" 




12/7/41 


::.: 










Tnf»n>ft<w> 


8 


362 




























OLONOAPO 


2/1/41 




4 
4 


71 
72 














12/7/41 






























Increase 




1 






























SHANGHAI 




Personnel 


Mortars 


37 mm. 
Guns 


Lewis MG 


S/L 


AA, 60 
cal. MO 


AA, 30 




Officers 


Men 


cal. MG 


2/1/41. 


52 
<48 


884 
'778 


7 

7 


11 
11 


3 
3 




12 
12 


133 


Dec. '41« 


133 






OecreasG 


4 


106 





























' SuDplied by Navy Yard Oavite and manned on I May 1941 by Marines. 
* Sailed from Shanghai 28 Nov. for Olongapo. Arrived Olongapo 2 Dec. 1941. 

Summary 

U. S. MARINE CORPS. TROOPS AND WEAPONS STATUS PACIFIC AND FAR EAST 





Personnel 






g 


s 
f 


CO 




►J 


< 


"3 


oO 

< 
< 




7 
7 


CO 

11 
11 


cn 

< 


• 


eg 
08 




2/1/41 


134 
307 


2.906 
6,441 


3 
4 


6 

28 


4 
9 


12 
12 


1 

1 


"32" 


6 
12 


42 
151 


163 
283 


3 


12/7/41 


3 







BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 038 6