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Full text of "Pearl Harbor attack : hearings before the Joint Committee on the investigation of the Pearl Harbor attack, Congress of the United States, Seventy-ninth Congress, first session, pursuant to S. Con. Res. 27, 79th Congress, a concurrent resolution authorizing an investigation of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and events and circumstances relating thereto .."

PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



HEARINGS 

BBFORB THB 

JOINT COMMIHEE ON THE INVESTIGATION 
OF THE PEABL HAEBOE ATTACK 

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES 
SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

FIBST SESSION 
PURSUANT TO 

S. Con. Res. 27 

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AN 

INVESTIGATION OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL 

HARBOR ON DECEMBER 7, 1941, AND 

EVENTS AND CIRCmiSTANCES 

RELATING THERETO 



PART 30 ] 

PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD i 



Printed for the nse of the 
Joint Committee on the Inrestlgatlon of the Pearl HartH)r Attack 




\ 



PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

-5— JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE INVESTIGATION 
OF THE PEAKL HAEBOE ATTACK 

CONGKESS OF THE UNITED STATES 

SEVENTY-NINTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 
PURSUANT TO 

S. Con Res. 27 

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AN 

INVESTIGATION OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL 

HARBOR ON DECEMBER 7, 1941, AND 

EVENTS AND CIRCUMSTANCES 

RELATING THERETO 



PART 30 

PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



Pi'inted for the use of the 
Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack 




UNITED STATES j 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE J 



79716 ' WASHINGTON : 1946 



~D Ul 



'^it-Pl' 36 





■p^. 30 



'Xl 4 ■ ) 



"Dw , r ^ '^ 



o 



JOINT COMIVnTTEEi ON THE INVESTIGATION OF THE PEARL 
HARBOR ATTACK 

ALBBN W. BARKLEY, Senator from Kentucky, Chairman 
JERE COOPER, Representative from Tennessee, Vice Chairman 



WALTER F. GEORGE, Senator from Georgia 
SCOTT W. LUCAS, Senator from Illinois 
OWEN BREWSTER, Senator from Maine 
HOMER FERGUSON, Senator from Michi- 
gan 
J. BAYARD CLARK, Representative from 
North Carolina 



JOHN W. MURPHY, Representative from 

Pennsylvania 
BERTRAND W. GEARHART, Representa- 

time from California 
FRANK B. KEEFE, Representative from 

Wisconsin 



COUNSEL 



(Through January 14, 1946) 
William D. Mitchell, Oeneral Counsel 
Gerhard A. Gesell, Chief Assistant Counsel 
Jule M. Hannaford, Assistant Counsel 
John E. Masten, Assistant Counsel 

(After January 14, 1946) 

Seth W. Richardson, Oeneral Counsel 

Samuel H. Kaufman, Associate Oeneral Counsel 

John E. Masten, Assistant Counsel 

Edward P. Morgan, Assistant Counsel 

Logan J. Lane, Assistant Counsel 



in 



HEAMNGS OF JOINT COMMITTEE 



Part 


Pages 


Transcript 




No. 




pages 




1 


1- 399 


1- 


1058 


2 


401- 982 


1059- 


2586 


3 


983-1583 


2587- 


4194 


4 


1585-2063 


4195- 


5460 


5 


2065-2492 


5461- 


6646 


6 


2493-2920 


6647- 


7888 


7 


2921-3378 


7889- 


9107 


8 


3379-3927 


9108- 


10517 


9 


3929-4599 


1051S- 


12277 


10 


4601-5151 


12278- 


13708 


11 


5153-5560 


13709-14765 



Hearings 

Nov. 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, and 21, 1945. 
Nov. 23, 24, 26 to 30, Dec. 3 and 4, 1945. 
Dec. 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, and 13, 1945. 
Dec. 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, 1945. 
Dec. 31, 1945, and Jan. 2. 3, 4. and 5, 1946. 
Jan. 15, 16. 17, 18, 19, and 21, 1946. 
Jan. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, and 29, 1946. 
Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1, 2, 4, 5. and 6. 1946. 
Feb. 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, and 14. 1946. 
Feb. 15, 16, 18, 19, and 20, 1946. 
Apr. 9 and 11, and Mav 23 and 31, 1946. 



EXHIBITS OF JOINT COIVIMITTEE 



Part 
No. 



12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 through 25 

26 

27 through 31 

32 through 33 

34 

35 

36 through 38 

39 



Exhibits Nos. 

1 through 6. 

7 and 8. 

9 through 43. 

44 through 87. 

88 through 110. 

in through 128. 

129 through 156. 

157 through 172. 

173 through 179. 

180 through 183, and Exhibits-Illustrations. 

Roberts Commission Proceedings. 

Hart Inquiry Proceedings. 

Army Pearl Harbor Board Proceedings. 

Navy Court of Inquiry Proceedings. 

Clarke Investigation Proceedings. 

Clausen Investigation Proceedings. 

Hewitt Inquiry Proceedings. 

Reports of Roberts Commission, Arm}' Pearl Harbor Board, 
Navy Court of Inquiry and Hewitt Inquiry, with endorse- 
ments. 



INDEX TO EXHIBITS VII 



INDEX OF EXHIBITS OF ARI^IY PEARL HARBOR 

BOARD 



Page 

Exhibit No. 1 2458 

Exliibit No. 2 2623 

Exhibit No. 3 2G23 

Exhibit No. 3A 2624 

Exhibit No. 3B 2624 

Exliiiiit No. 4 2624 

Exhibit No. 4A 2634 

Exliibit No. 4B 2644 

Exliibit No. 4C 2648 

Exhibit No. 4D 2651 

Exhibit No. 4E 2660 

Exhibit No. 4F 2663 

Exhibit No. 4G 2666 

Exhibit No. 4H 2685 

Exhibit No. 41 2702 

Exhibit No. 4J 2705 

Exhibit No. 4L 2711 

Exhibit No. 4M 2715 

Exhibit No. 4N 2717 

Exhibit No. 5 2721 

Exhibit No. 6 2723 

Exhibit No. 7 2789 

Exhibit No. 8 2876 

Exhil)it No. 8A 2899 

Exliiiiit No. 8B 2917 

Exhibit No. 9 2949 

Exhibit No. 10 2951 

Exhibit No. 11 2952 

Exhibit No. IIA 2965 

Exhibit No. 12 2973 

Exhibit No. 13 2973 

Exhibit No. 14 2974 

Exhibit No. 15 2974 

Exhibit No. 16 2974 

Exhibit No. 17 2974 

Exhibit No. 18 2974 

Exjiibit No. 19 2974 

Exhibit No. 19A 2975 

Exhibit No. 20 2977 

Exhibit No. 21 2979 

Exhibit No. 22 2981 

Exhibit No. 23 : j. 2981 

Exhibit No. 24 2981 

Exhibit No. 25 2981 

Exliibit No. 26 2981 

Exhibit No. 27 2982 

Exhibit No. 28 2989 

Exhibit No. 29 2992 

Exhibit No. 30 3003 

Exhibit No. 31 3004 

Exhibit No. 32 3005 

Exhibit No. 33 3005 

Exhibit No. 34 3006 

Exhibit No. 34A 3007 



VIII INDEX TO EXHIBITS 

Page 

Exhibit No. 34B 3007 ■; 

Exhibit No. 35 3007 

Exhibit No. 36 3008 • 

Exhibit No. 3GA 30U9 i 

Exhibit No. 37 3009 I 

Exhibit No. 38 3010 ] 

Exhibit No. 38A 3010 , 

Exhibit No. 39 3011 

Exhibit No. 40 3012 ' 

Exhibit No. 40A 3013 ■ 

Exhibit No. 41 3013 " 

Exhibit No. 42 3014 i 

Exhibit No. 42A 3014 ] 

Exhibit No. 43 3016 

Exhibit No. 43A 3017 .! 

Exhibit No. 44 3017 j 

Exhibit No. 45 - 3018 j 

Exhibit No. 46 3019 1 

Exhibit No. 46A 3036 ; 

Exhibit No. 460 3039 1 

Exhibit No. 4GC 3054 ] 

Exhibit No. 46D 3058 '] 

Exhibit No. 47 3061 ' 

Exhibit No. 48 3063 '. 

Exhibit No. 49 - 3063 , 

Exhibit No. 50 3064 

Exhibit No. 50A 3064 i 

Exhibit No. 51 3063 j 

Exhibit No. 52 3067 J 

Exhibit No. 53 3082 ' 

Exhibit No. 54 3084 ! 

Exhibit No. 55 3087 i 

Exhibit Xo. 56 - 3097 

Exhibit No. 57 3131 j 

Exhibit No. 58 3139 | 

Exhibit No. 59 3159 ■] 

Exhibit No. 00 3160 :| 

Exhibit No. 61 3162 ■ 

Exhibit No. 62 , 3163 

Exhibit No. 63 3163 

Exbibit No. 64 3172 j 

Exhibit No. 65 3173 i 

Exhibit No. 66 3174 i 

Exhibit No. 67 3174 >i 

Exhibit No. 68 3175 '- 

Exhibit No. 69 3175 I 

Exhibit No. 70 3176 ; 

Exhibit A to Army Pearl Harbor Board top secret transcript 3201 

Exhibit B to Army Pearl Harbor Board top secret transcript 3235 j 

Appendix No. 1 appears in Part 39 | 

Appendix No. 2 3259 

Appendix No 3 3272 f 

Appendix No. 4 . 3327 j 

Appendix No. 5 3338 i 

Appendix No. 6 3341 

Index to Exhibits-Illustrations 3357 



HEARING 
PEARL HARBOR EXHIBIT NO. 145, VOL. 4 



EXHIBITS OF 

ARMY PEARL HARBOR 

BOARD 



2458 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

EXHIBITS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 1 
[secret] 

[a] STATEMENT BY MAJOR GENERAL WALTER C. SHORT OF EVENTS 
AND CONDITIONS LEADING UP TO THE JAPANESE ATTACK, 
DECEMBER 7, 1941 

[a] Table nf (lonterttn 

Statement Major General Walter C. Short. Pp. 1-50 incl. Exhibits A-1 R (irrl.) 



Page 



Exhibit 



Paraphrased Radio, 16 Oct. 41 from Chief Naval Operations 

W. D. Radio 472, 27 Xov. 41, from General Marshall 

Hawaiian Department Alerted 27 Nov. 41 

Alerts (Extracts from Standing Operating Procedure) 

Reasons for Calling Alert No. 1 

Extract from "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan" 

Annex #7 from "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan" 

28 Nov. 41 Radio Reply to W. D. Radio 472 (Gen. Marshall 27 Nov. 41) 

W. D. Radio 482, 28 Nov. 41, "Sabotage" 

Extract from MID-SC30-45 "Subversive Activities" 

29 Nov. 41 Radio to W. D. (Steps Taken to Prevent Sabotage) 

Events Transpiring from 27 Nov. 41 to 6 Dec. 41 



13. 



a. Order for Detector Operation 

b. Conferences With Navy 

c. Certificate "No Navy Request for Long Range Reconnaissance" 

d. Certificate "Statement Made by Naval Staff Officer" 

e. Arrival B-24 (Photo Mission) from U. S 

/. W. D. Radio 465, 26 Nov. 41 (Re B-24 Photo Mission). .__ 

g. 5 Dec. 41 Radio to Chief Air Corps (Re B-24 Photo Mission)... 
ft. Unarmed B-17 Flight from U. S. Arrive Oahu During 7 Dec. 

Attack. 

i. RCA Radio (Commercial) from General Marshall "Japanese 
Ultimatum". 

j. W. D. Radio 549, 9 Dec. 41, Requesting Time RCA Radio Re- 
ceived. 

k. Radio Reply to W. D. Radio 549, 9 Dec. 41 "Time Received"... 

/. Japanese Submarine Sunk Pearl Harbor 7:15 A. M. 7 Dec. 

TO. Aircraft Warning Service Operation 7 Dec. 41 

Action at Time of Attack, 7 Dec. 41 

a. Alert of All Units . 

b. Anti-.\ircraft Artillery 

[6] c. Hawaiin Air Force 



d. 24th Division 

e. 25th Division 

f. Medical Teams and Civilian Relief Committees 

14. Martial Law Declared 8 Dec. 41 

15. Efforts to Improve Defenses of Hawaiin Islands 

a. Letter to Gen. Marshall Outlining Deficiencies Found 

6. Request for Funds for Dispersion .Aircraft 

c. Request for Underground Maintenance Hawn. Air Depot 

d. Request for Fortification and Camouflage Funds 

e. Request for Funds for Camouflaging Air Fields 

/. Request for Funds for Roads, Trails 

g. Request for Additional .\ir Ports 

ft. Request for Kaneoho Bay Defenses 

i. Request for Funds for Improvement Landing Strips Wheeler 

Field. 

j. Request for Priorities on Aircraft Warning Stations 

k. Request for Honolulu Office Production Manager 

I. Request for $1,000,000 Fund for Stocking Reserve Supplies 

m. Letter from Chief Air Corps "Ferrying Operation Airfields" 

7i. Request for Increase in Engineer Strength 

0. Request for Increase in Coast Artillery Strength. 

p. Request for Increase in Infantry and Artillery Strength 

g. Request for Increase in Air Corps Strength 

r. Request for Reorganization Hawn. Division and an Increase in 
Initial War Garrison. 

s. Request Activation of A. A. Artillery Brigade 

t. Request Information 37 MM Guns. 

u. Standing Operating Procedure — 



1 

1 

2 

2-10 incl.. 
10-13 incl. 
11-12 incl. 

12 

11... 

13-14 incl. 

14 

14-15 incl. 
15-24 incl. 

15-16 incl. 
16-17 incl. 

17 

17 

18.: 

18 

18-19 incl. 
19 



20-21 incl. 
20... 



20-21 

21 

21-24 incl. 
24-26 incl. 



25 

25-26 incl 

26 

26-27 incl 

27-42 incl.. 

28 par. 1 

28-29 par. 2 

29 par. 3 

29 par. 4... 

30 par. 5 

30 par. 6 

30-32 incl. par. 7. 
32-33 incl. par. 8. 
33 par. 9 



33 par. 10 

34 par. 11 

34-36 incl. par. 12. 

35 par. 13 

36 par. 14 

36-37 incl. par. 15. 
36-37 incl. par. 15. 
38-40 incl. par. 16.. 
40-41 incl. par. 17.. 



41 par. 18. 

42 par. 19. 
42 par. 20. 



"A" 
"B" 



"D" 

"E" 

"F" 

"O" 

"H" 

"I" 

"J-S" 

Incl. 

"J" 

"K-L" 

"K" 

"L" 

"M" 
"N" 
"O" 

..p., 



"R" 

"S" 

"S-U' 

Incl. 



"T-U' 
Incl. 



'V" 
'W" 
'X" 
<Y" 

•Z" 

'1-A" 
'1-B" 
'1-C" 
'1-D" 

'1-E" 

'1-F" 

'1-G" 

'1-H" 

'l-I" 

•1-J" 

'1-J" 

'1-K" 

'1-L" 

■l-M" 
'I-N" 
'C" 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2459 



[a] 



Table of Contents- — Continued 



Page 



Exhibit 



16. Efforts to Better Prepare Civilian Community for Defense 

a. Army Day Speech, 6 April 41 to Honolulu Chamber of Com- 
merce. 
6. Production and Storage of Food. 

c. Organization of Doctors and Xurscs_ 

d. Organization of Auxiliary Police and Fire Force 

(f] e. Evacuation Camps and Air Raid Shelters 

f. M-Day Bill 

17. Letters from Civilian Reference Efforts to Improvement of Civilian 

Defense. 

a. Unsolicited Letter to President. United States 

6. Unsolicited Letter from Major Disaster Council, Honolulu 

c Unsolicited Letter from Gov. Poindextcr 

18. Conclusions __ 



43-45 incl 


"1-C, P- 


43. 


Q" Incl. 
"1-0" 


43-44 incl. ... .. 


"I-P" 


44 . 




44 . .. 




45 


"1-Q" 


45 


45-47 incl.. .. 


"1-R" 


45-46 incl 


"1-R" 


47 

47a 


"1-R" 
"1-R" 


48-50 incl 





[1] STATEMENT BY MAJOR GENERAL WALTER C. SHORT OF 
EVENTS AND CONDITIONS LEADING UP TO THE JAPANESE 
ATTACK, DECEMBER 7, 1941 

The following radiogram from the Chief of Staff was received October 16, 1941 — 
Exhibit "A": 

Note for commanding general Hawaiian department: 

The following is a paraphrase of a dispatch from the Chief of Naval 
Operations which I have been directed to pass to you quote: 

Japanese cabinet resignation creates a grave situation x if a new 
cabinet is formed it probably will be anti-American and strongly na- 
tionalistic X if the Konoye cabinet remains it will operate under a new 
mandate which will not include rapprochement with the United States 
X either way hostilities between Japan and Russia are strongly possible 
X since Britain and the US are held responsible by Japan for her present 
situation there is also a possibility that Japan may attack these two 
powers X view of these possibilities you will take due precautions including 
sxich preparatory deployments as wiH not disclose strategic intention nor 
constitute provocative actions against Japan x. 
The following radiogram from the Chief of Staff was received 2:22 P. M., 
November 27th— Exhibit "B": 

"Hawn Dept, Ft. Shafter, TH: 

472 27th negotiations with Japan appear to be terminated to all practical 
purposes with only the barest possibilities that the Japanese Government 
might come back and offer to continue stop Japanese future action un- 
predictable but hostile action possible at any moment stop If hostilities 
cannot comma repeat cannot comma be avoided the United States 
desires that Japan commit the first overt act stop This policy should not 
comma repeat not comma be construed as restricting you to a course 
of action that might jeopardize your defense stop Prior to ho.stile Japanese 
action you are directed to undertake such reconnaissance and other measures 
as you deem nece.ssary but these measures should be carried out so as not 
comma repeat not comma to alarm civil population or disclose intent 
stop Report measures taken stop Should ho.stilities occur you will carry 
out the tasks assigned the Rainbow Five so far as they pertain to Japan 
stop Limit dissemination of this highly secret information to minimum 
essential officers. 

Marshall, 

116P/27. 

[2] Upon receipt of the above radiogram, I gave consideration to the type 
of an alert which I should order, and, after talking the matter over with the 
Chief of Staff, Alert #1 was ordered by telephone and put into effect at once. « 

Standing Operation Procedure, Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 5 Novem- 
ber 1941.— Exhibit "C": 

"section II ALERTS 

13. All defense measures are classified under one of the three (3) Alerts as 
indicated below. Operations under any Alert will be initiated by a Department 
order, except in case of a surprise hostile attack. See paragraph / (8) below. 



2460 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

14. ALERT NO. 1. a. This alert is a defense against acts of sabotage and up- 
risings within the islands, with no threat from without. 

h. At DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, all General and Special Staff 
Sections will continue with their usual duties at their present stations, pending 
further orders. 

c. DEPARTMENT TROOPS will carry on their normal training, pending 
instructions from this Headquarters. 

d. Each INFANTRY DIVISION will: 

(1) Suppress all civil disorders, including sabotage, in its assigned sector. 

(2) Maintain one (I) infantry battalion with motor transportation sufficient 
to transport it, prepared to move on one (1) hour's notice. 

(3) Protect the SCHOFIELD BARRACKS reservation and all vital instal- 
lations (except those on garrisoned Army and Navy Reservations), in its assigned 
sector, not protected by the Territorial Home Guard. The following are among 
the important ones: 

Police District No. 1, see paragraph 14 h (2) below. 

Command and Fire Control Cable System. 

Railway and Highway Bridges. 

Water supply for SCHOFIELD BARRACKS. 

Radio Station at PUU MANAWAHUA. 

WAIAU Generating Plant. 

Telephone Exchanges at WAIPAHU, WAHIAWA, WAIALUA (in HALE- 
IWA), LAIE and KANEOHE. 
Electric sub-stations at WAHIAWA, WAIALUA, KAHUKU, KAILUA,!WAI- 
PIO AND EWA, and electric power hues from ^\ ATPIO, WAHIAWA, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS, inchisive, and to FORT BARRETTE, exclusive, from 
KOOLAU switch station BELLOWS FIELD. 

[3] Cold Storage Plant in WAHIAWA. 

Pumping Stations at ISIOANALUA and KAPAHULU. 

(4) the 25th Infantry Division will assist the Navv in guarding the pumping 
stations at AIEA and HALAWA. 

e. The HAWAIIAN COAST ARTILLERY COMMAND will: 

(1) Protect all seacoast and antiaircraft armament, searchlights, observation 
and fire control installations, and other elements of the seacoast and antiaircraft 
defense. 

(2) Protect all vital installations on posts and reservations of the command. 

(3) Protect the Radio Beacon on Sand Island. 

(4) Provide a guard for the rear echelon of Department Headquarters and 
Tripler General Hospital. 

/. The HAWAIIAN AIR FORCE will: 

(1) Protect all vital installations on posts of OAHU garrisoned by air forces. 

(2) Assist in defense of air fields on outljing islands by cooperation of local base 
detachments with District Commanders. 

g. The DISTRICT COMMANDERS, assisted by the Air Corps detachments 
within the districts, will: 

Defend the air fields and vital installations thereat against acts of sabotage, 
and maintain order in the civil community. 

h. The DEPARTMENT PROVOST MARSHAL, in addition to his normal 
duties, assisted by the Division Provost IVlarshals, will: 

(1) Regulate traffic on OAHU. 

(2) Assist the 25th Infantry Division in posting guards on vital installations. 

(3) Establish liaison with the local police force. 

i. The STATION COMPLEMENTS OF HICKAM, WHEELER and BEL- 
LOWS FIELDS, under command of the Hawaiian Air Force, will assist in the 
protection of all vital installations on their resi^ective posts. 

j. TERRITORIAL HOME GUARD. Upon the formation of the Territorial 
Home Guard, recently authorized by the TERRI'IORIAL Legislature, it is 
anticipated that this organization will relieve the Infantry Divisions and the 
District Commanders of responsibility for the protection of all vital installations, 
except the Command and Fire Control Cable System and those installations on 
•Army and Navy Reservations. 

[4] 15. ALERT NO. 2. a. This alert is applicable to a more serious con- 
dition than Alert No. 1. Security against attacks from hostile sub-surface, sur- 
face, and aircraft, in addition to defense against acts of sabotage and uprisings, 
is provided. 

h. At DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, only the G-2 and G-3 Sections 
will be required to operate on a 24-hour basis. All other sections of the General 
and Special Staffs will continue with their normal schedule. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2461 

c. DEPARTMENT TROOPS will carry on their normal training, pending 
instructions from this Headquarter'^. 

d. Each INFANTRY DIVISION will: 

(!) Suppress all civil disorders, including sabotage, in its assigned sector. 

(2) Maintain available all units at fifty percent (50%) of their present strength, 
except those required under (3), (4) and (5) below. 

(3) Maintain one fl) infantry battalion with motor transportation sufficient 
to transport it, prepared to move on one (1) hour's notice. 

(4) Protect the SCHOFIELD BARRACKS Reservation and all vital installa- 
tions (except those on garrisoned Army and Navy Reservations) in its assigned 
sector, not protected by the Territorial Home Guard. The following are among 
the important ones: ♦ 

Police District No. 1. 

Command and Fire Control Cable System. 

Railwav and Highwav Bridges. 

Water supplv for SCHOFIELD BARRACKS. 

Radio Station at PUU MANAWAHUA. 

WAIAU Generating Plant. 

Telephone exchanu^s at WAIPAHU, WAHIAWA, WAIALUA (in HALE- 

IWA). LAIE and KANEOHE. 

Electric sub-stations at WAHIAWA, WAIALUA, KAHUKU, KAILUA, 

WAIPIO and EWA, and electric power lines from WAIPIO, WAHIAWA, 

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, inclusive, and to FORT BARRETTE, exclusive, 

from KOOLAU switch station BELLOWS FIELD. 

Cold Storage Plant in WAHIAWA. 

Pumping Stations at MOANALUA and KAPAHULU. 

(5) The 25th Infantrv Division will assist the Navv in guarding the Pumping 
Stations at AIEA and HALAWA. 

[5] (6) Place 240 mm howitzers in position, establish the necessary guards 
and, when directed, place ammunition at positions. 

(7) Release Field Artillery units manning seacoast armament (155 mm guns) 
to Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command. 

(8) See Territorial Home Guard, paragraph 15 I below. 

e. The HAWAIIAN COAST ARTILLERY COMMAND, and attached Field 
Artillery, will: 

(1) Occupy initial seacoast and antiaircraft defense positions, except that rail- 
way batteries will remain at FORT KAMEHAMEHA or where emplaced. 

(2) Release the 53d AA Brigade to the Interceptor Command for operational 
control. 

(3) Protect all seacoast and antiaircraft armament, searchlights, observation 
and fire control installations, and other elements of the seacoast and antiaircraft 
defense. 

(4) Protect all vital installations on posts and reservations of the command, 
except FORT SHAFTER. For FORT SHAFTER, see paragraph 15 k (1) below. 

(5) Support Naval forces within range of seacoast armament. 

(6) Prevent approach of and landing from hostile vessels. 

(7) Coordinate all seacoast intelligence agencies. 

(8) Coordinate seacoast defense with the Inshore Patrol. 

(9) Protect the Radio Beacon on Sand Island. 

(10) Provide Army personnel required to operate the Harbor Control Post. 
/. The Haw'aiian Air Force will: 

(1) Maintain aircraft and crews in condition of readiness as directed by this 
headquarters. 

(2) Release without delay all pursuit aircraft to the Interceptor Command. 

(3) Prepare aircraft for dispatch to fields on outlying islands and upon arrival 
thereat, disperse on fields. 

(4) Disperse bombers with crews. 

(5) Disperse pursuit planes with crews to bunkers. 

(6) Protect all vital installations on posts on OAHU garrisoned by air forces. 

(7) Assist in defense of air fields on outlying islands by cooperation of local base 
detachments with District Commanders. See paragraph 15 g below. 

(8) In case of surprise hostile attack: 

[6] (a) Release to Navy for operational control all bombers in condition 
of readiness "A". The bomber commander will report to the Commander of 
Patrol Wing X TWO. 

(b) Receive all available shore based Naval and Marine Corps fighter planes in 
appropriate condition of readiness and release them to the Interceptor Command 
for operational control. 



2462 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

g. The DISTRICT COMMANDERS, assisted by the air corps detachments 
within the districts, will: 

Defend the air fields and vital installations thereat against acts of sabotage, 
hostile attacks, and maintain order in the civil communitv. 

h. The DEPARTMENT PROVOST MARSHAL, assisted by the Division 
Provost Marshals, in addition to his normal duties, will: 

(1) Regulate traffic on OAHU. 

(2) Assist the 25th Infantry Division in posting guards on vital installations. 

(3) Establish liaison with the local police force. 

(4) Be prepared to assist civilian authorities in all Air Raid Precautions includ- 
ing blackout, radio silence and evacuation of civilians from dangerous areas. 

(5) Be prepared to establish facilities for gathering and caring for refugees. 

(6) Protect FORT SHATTER. See paragraph 15 k (1). 
i. The DEPARTMENT SIGNAL OFFICER will: 

(1) Insure occupation of all battle stations by the Aircraft Warning Service 
and then release it to the Interceptor Command. 

(2) Insure that joint Army-Navy communications are in readiness for im- 
mediate emplovment. 

j. The INTERCEPTOR COMMAND will: 

Coordinate and control the operations of pursuit aircraft, antiaircraft artillery 
(including available Naval and Marine Corps A A Artillery), the Aircraft Warning 
Service, and attached units, and will provide for the coordination of antiaircraft 
measures of units not under military control, to include: 

(1) Arrival and departure of all friendly aircraft. 

(2) The coordination of the antiaircraft fire of Naval ships in PEARL and/ 
or HONOLULU HARBORS. 

(3) Transmission of appropriate warnings to all interested agencies. 
k. STATION COMPLEMENTS: 

(1) The FORT SHAFTER Complement, mider the supervision of the Depart- 
ment Provost Marshal, will protect all vital installations on FORT SHAFTER 
and, in addition thereto, will provide a guard for the rear echelon of Department 
Headquarters and Tripler General Hospital. 

(2) The HICKAM, WHEELER and BELLOWS FIELDS Complements, 
under command of the Hawaiian Air Force, will assist in the defense of their 
respective posts against sabotage, air and ground attacks. 

I. TERRITORIAL HOME GUARD. Upon the formation of the Territorial 
Home Guard, recently authorized by the Territorial Legislature, it is anticipated 
that this organization will relieve the Infantry Divisions and the District Com- 
manders of responsibility for the protection of all vital installations, except the 
Command and Fire Control Cable System and those installations on Army and 
Navy Reservations. See paragraph 15 d (4) and g above. 

16. ALERT NO. 3. a. This alert requires the occupation of all field positions 
by all units, prepared for maximum defense of OAHU and the Army installations 
on outlving islands. 

h. At DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS: 

(1) All sections of the forward echelon will occupy their stations at forward 
command post, prepared to operate on a 24-hour basis. 

(2) All sections of the rear echelon will continue their usual duties at their 
present stations. Blackout instructions will be complied with. 

c. DEPARTMENT TROOPS will remain in condition of mobile readiness at 
their permanent stations, pending instruct-ons from this headquarters 

d. Each INFANTRY DIVISION will: 

(1) Defend its assigned sector on OAHLT. 

(2) Protect all vital installations (except those on garrisoned Army and Navy 
Reservations) in its assigned sector, not protected by the Territorial Home Guard. 

(3) Release all available Bands to the Commanding Officer, SCHOFIELD 
BARRACKS. 

(4) The 25th Infantry Division will assist the Navy in guardmg the pumpmg 
stations at AIEA and HALAWA. 

(5) Place 240 mm howitzers in position. 

(6) Release Field Artillery units manning seacoast armament (155 mm guns) 
to Hawaiian Coast ArtilleryCommand. See paragraph 16 e below. 

(7) See Territorial Home Guard, paragraph 16 m below. 

e. The HAWAIIAN COAST ARTILLERY COMMAND, and attacked 
Detachment Field \8] Artillery, will: 

(1) Occupy initial seacoast and antiaircraft positions. 

(2) Sup))ort Naval forces within range of seacoast armament. 

(3) Prevent approach of and landing from hostile vessels. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2463 

(4) Support the Infantry Divisions. 

(5) Coordinate all seacoast intelligence agencies. 

(6) Coordinate seacoast defense with the Inshore Patrol. 

(7) Provide the Army personnel required to operate the Harbor Control Post. 

(8) Release the 53d AA Brigade to the Interceptor Command for operational 
control. 

(9) Protect all vital installations on post and reservations of the command, 
except FORT SH AFTER. For FORT SHAFTER, see paragraph 16 l^{2) 
below. 

(10) Protect all seacoast and antiaircraf irmament, searchlights, observation 
and fire control installations, and other elements of the seacoast and antiaircraft 
defense 

/. The HAWAIIAN AIR FORCE will: 

(1) Destroy enemy aircraft. 

(2) Carry out bombing missions as directed. 

(3) Cooperate with Naval air forces. 

(4) On OAHU, defend all posts garrisoned by air forces against sabotage, air 
and ground attacks. 

(5) Assist in defense of air fields on outlying islands by cooperation of local 
base detachments with District Commanders. See paragraph 16 h below. 

(6) Arm all planes, except that normally bombs will not be loaded on ships 
dispatched to outlying islands. 

(7) Prepare aircraft for dispatch to fields on outlying islands and upon arrival 
thereat, disperse on fields. 

(8) Disperse bombers with crews. 

(9) Disperse pursuit planes with crews to bunkers. 

(10) Perform observation, command and photographic missions. 

(11) Release without delay all pursuit aircraft to the Interceptor Command, 
g. G-5 will be prepared to establish the following: 

(1) Food administration. 

[9] (2) A Labor Procurement Service. 

h. The DISTRICT COMALiNDERte OF HAWAII, MAUI (includes MOLO- 
KAI) and KAUAI Districts, assisted by the air corps detachments present 
within the districts, will: 

Defend the air fields against actsjof sabotage, hostile attacks, and maintain 
order in the civil communitv. 

i. The DEPARTMENT PROVOST MARSHAL, assisted by the Division 
Provost Marshals, in addition to his normal duties, will: 

(1) Regulate traffic on OAHU. 

(2) Assist the 25th Infantry Division in posting guards on vital installations. 

(3) Establish liaison with the local police force. 

(4) Be prepared to assist civilian authorities in all Air Raid Precautions includ- 
ing blackout, radio silence and evacuation of civilians from dangerous areas. 

(5) Be prepared to establish facilities for gathering and caring for refugees. 

(6) Protect FORT SHAFTER. See paragraph 16 Z (2) below. 

j. The INTERCEPTOR COMMAND will coordinate and control the opera- 
tions of pursuit aircraft, antiaircraft artillery (including available Naval and 
Marine Corps A A ArtillerjO, the aircraft warning service, and attached units, and 
will provide for the coordination of antiaircraft measures of units not under 
military control to include: 

(1) Arrival and departure of all friendly aircraft. 

(2) The coordination of the antiaircraft fire of Naval shii:)s in PEARL and/or 
HONOLULU HARBORS. 

(3) Transmission of appropriate warnings to all interested agencies. 
k. The DEPARTMENT SIGNAL OFFICER will: 

(1) Insure occupation of all battle stations by the Aircraft Warning Service 
and then release it to the Interceptor Command. 

(2) Insure the joint Army-Navy communications are in readiness for immediate 
employment. 

(3) Be prepared to assume control over essential civilian communications. 
I. STATION COMPLEMENTS: 

(1) The SCHOFIELD BARRACKS Complement will protect all vital installa- 
tions on the SCHOFIELD Reservation. 

(2) The FORT SHAFTER Complement, under the supervision of the Depart- 
ment Provost Marshal, will protect all vital installations on FORT SHAFTER 
and, in addition thereto, will provide a guard for the rear echelon of Department 
Headquarters and [10] Tripler General Hospital. 



2464 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(3) The HICKAM, WHEELER and BELLOWS FIELD Complements, 
under command of the Hawaiian Air Force, will assist in the defense of their 
respective posts against sabotage, air and ground attacks. 

m. TERRITORIAL HOME GUARD.— Upon the formation of the Terri- 
torial Home Guard, recently authorized by the Territorial Legislature, it is 
anticipated that this organization will relieve the Infantry Divisions and the 
District Commanders of responsibility for the protection of all vital installations, 
except the Command and Fire Control Cable System and those installations on 
Army and Navy Reservations. See paragraph 16 d (2) and h above." 

Alert #1 is a defense against acts of sabotage and uprising within the islands 
with no threat from without. In addition to the duties prescribed in Alert #1, 
the Aircraft Warning Service was directed to operate all mobile aircraft warning 
stations from two hours before dawn to one hour after dawn. 

My reasons for ordering Alert #1 rather than Alert #2, which is applicable to a 
condition more serious than Alert #1, security against attacks from hostile sub- 
surface, surface and aircraft, in addition to defense against acts of sabotage and 
uprising, were as follows: 

1. There was a strong probability of sabotage by the Japanese population in 
Hawaii. 

2. I had no information to indicate the probability of an attack. 

3. Alert #2 or Alert #3, which provides for the maximum defense of OAHU and 
of army installations on outlying islands, interfere very seriously with training. 

These three reasons will be discussed in detail: 

1. Defense against sabotage can be carried out better where there is not too 
much dispersion of the command. Where the defense is against sabotage only, 
the planes are grouped on the landing mats and the apron, while in a defense 
against air attack the pursuit planes would be dispersed in their bunkers and the 
bombardment planes would be sent to landing fields on outlying islands or placed 
in the air if time were available. If time were not available, thej' would remain 
in their bunkers. From this can be seen that the action for the two different 
types of defense is quite different. Since sabotage was considered far more prob- 
able [11] than air attack, the planes were dispersed to all of the landing 
fields on the island of OAHU, but were not placed in bunkers. This was especially 
desirable as man-proof fencing and flood-lights had not as yet been provided for 
the fields. $240,000.00 for this purpose was requested on Mav 15, 1941, and the 
authorization of $102,000.00 was made on July 11th and $91,975.00 on August 
12, 1941. Orders for the material had to be placed in the mainland as it was not 
available in the Hawaiian Islands. Owing to the difficulties of obtaining priori- 
ties, laoth for material and for shipping, the District Engineer has not yet received 
the material. The Constructing Quartermaster was allotted funds for fencing of 
other than air fields, and a small amount of the material had been received and 
installed prior to December 7th. 

2. The Hawaiian Department is provided with no means of collecting informa- 
tion as to the location of Japanese or other ships throughout the world and is not 
responsible for distant reconnaissance. The "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense 
Plan, Hawaiian Coastal Frontier, Hawaiian Department and Fourteenth Naval 
District" — Section I, par. 3, 18 and 21, definitely place the responsibility for such 
reconnaissance upon the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District. The 
following quotation makes this evident: 

EXTRACT from "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan"— Exhibit "D": 
"3. METHOD OF COORDINATION. The Commanding General of the 
Hawaiian Department and the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District 
have determined that in this joint plan the method of coordination will be by 
mutual cooperation and that this method will apply to all activities wherein the 
Army and the Navy operate in coordination, until and if the method of unity of 
command is invoked, as prescribed in Joint Action of the Army and Navy, 1935, 
Chapter 2, paragraph 9 b. 

I|! ***** * 

18. NAVY. The Commandant, FOURTEENTH NAVAL DISTRICT, shall 
provide for: 

******* 
1. Distant reconnaissance. 
******* 
21. This agreement to take effect at once and to remain effective until notice 
in writing by either party of its renouncement, in part or in whole, or until dis- 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2465 

approved in part or in whole bv either the War or the Navv Department. This 
HCF-41 (JCD-42) supercedes HCF-39 (JCD-13) except that the annexes, Nos. 
1 to VII of latter remain effective and constitute annexes 1 to VII inclusive, of 
this plan." 

[12] Annex #7 to the "Joint Cdastal Frontier Defense Plan" provides as 

follows— Exhibit "E": 

"When the Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department and the Naval 
Base Officer, (the Commandant of the 14th Naval District), agree that the threat 
of a hostile raid or attack is sufficiently imminent to warrant such action, each 
commander will take such preliminary steps as are necessary to make available 
v/ithout delay to the other commander such proportion of the air forces at his 
disposal as the circumstances warrant in order that joint operations may be con- 
ducted in accordance with the following plans: 

1. Joint air attacks upon hostile surface vessels will be executed under the 
tactical command of the Navy. The Department Commander will determine 
the Army bombardment strength to participate in each mission. With due con- 
sideration to the tactical situation existing, the number of bombardment airplanes 
released to Navy control will be the maximum practicable. This force will remain 
available to the Navy, for repeated attacks, if required, until completion of the 
mission, when it will revert to Army control. 

2. Defensive Air operations over and in the immediate vicinity of Oahu will be 
executed under the tactical command of the Army. The Naval Base Defense 
Officer will determine the Navy fighter strength to participate in these missions. 
With due consideration to the tactical situation existing, the number of fighter 
aircraft released to Army control will be the maximum practicable. This force 
will remain available to the Army for repeated patrols or combat or for mainte- 
nance of the required alert status until, due to a change in the tactical situation, 
it is withdrawn by the Naval Base Defense Officer and reverts to Navy control. 

3. When Naval forces are insufficient for long distance patrol and search opera- 
tions, and army aircraft are made available, these aircraft will be under the tactical 
control of the naval commander directing the search operations. 

4. In the special instance in which army pursuit protection is requested for the 
protection of friendly surface ships, the force assigned for this situation will pass 
to the tactical control of the Navy until completion of the mission". 



These documents make it clearly evident that the Hawaiian Department had 
no responsibility for distant reconnaissance, and that when army bombardment 
planes are actually placed under the command of the Navy whenever they 
operate upon distant reconnaissance missions, they receive their mission and all 
instructions from the [13] Naval Commander, and report to him upon 
the completion of their mission. This method of procedure has been followed 
strictly since March 21, 1941, including the period since December 7th. 

3. If upon consideration of the available facts the calling of Alert No. 1 would 
be sufficient to handle the situation Alert No. 2 or No. 3 should not be called 
because to do so would seriously interfere with the training of the command. 
When the troops are in battle positions it is practically impossible to carry on 
any orderly training. With the number of new man in the command it is highly 
important to conduct their training regularly. This was particularly true of 
the Hawaiian Air Force on November 27th due to the fact that they had been 
given the mission of training combat crews and ferrying B-17 planes from the 
mainland to the Philippine Islands. September 8th the Hawaiian Air Force sent 
nine (9) trained combat teams to the Philippine Islands. Previous to November 
27th eighteen (18) trained combat teams had been sent to the mainland, and 
seventeen (17) more combat teams were ready to go to the mainland for ferrying 
purposes. In addition, twelve (12) combat crews had to be trained for planes 
that were expected at an early date in this Department. With only |six (6) 
B-17 planes available for training combat teams, it was imperative that the 
Commanding General of the Hawaiian Air Force make the maximum use of these 
planes for training, and any order that would take them out of training for any 
considerable period would prevent him from carrying out the ferrying mission 
that had been assigned to him. 



2466 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

I replied as follows to the radiogram from the Chief of Staff of November 27th — 
Exhibit "F": 

"Chief of Staff, 
War Department, 

Washington, D. C: 
Reurad four seven two twenty seventh report department alerted to prevent 
sabotage period liaison with navy 

Short". 

Tpon receipt of mv radiogram of November 28th, I received the following 
replv from The Adjutant General— Exhibit "G": 
"Hawn Dept., Ft. Shafter, TH: 

482 28th critical situation demands that all precautions be taken immediately 
against subversive activities within field of investigative responsibility of [14] 

W&v Department Paren See paragraph three MID SC thirty dash forty five 
End paren Stop Also desired that you initiate forthwith all additional meas- 
ures necessary to provide for protection of your establishments comma prop- 
erty comma and equipment against sabotage comma protection of your 
personnel against subversive propaganda and protection of all activities against 
espionage Stop This does not repeat not mean that any illegal measures are 
authorized Stop Protective measures should he confined to those essential to 
security comma avoiding unnecessary publicity and alarm Stop To insure 
speed of transmission identical telegrams are being sent to all air stations but 
this does not repeat not affect your responsibility under existing instructions. 

Adams". 



This par. of MID SC 30-45 referred to in the above mentioned radiogram is 
attached as Exhibit "H", and this paragraph refers wholly to subversive 
activities. 

Careful consideration of the radiograms of October 16th, November 27th and 
Novem.ber 28th discloses that the War Department emphasizes that action taken 
would not alarm the civil ])opulation, would not disclose strategic intention, 
constitute provocative actions against Japan, and would avoid unnecessary pub- 
licity. Alert #2 or #3 would have disclosed tactical positions and given more 
publicity to preparations and might have alarmed the civil population. 

If the ^^'ar Department at that time had considered it necessary to alert the 
Hawaiian Department against air and ground attack, it undoubtedly would have 
so directed instead of sending a long radiogram outlining the various steps that 
should be taken in connection with sabotage and subversive activities. 

In my radiogram of November 29th I replied to the radiogram of the War 
Department of November 28th, and explained in detail the steps I was taking to 
prevent sabotage and subversive activities, and of the authority that I had ob- 
tained from the Governor of Hawaii and of the Mayor of the City and County of 
Honolulu to legaUze all the steps which I had taken — Exhibit "I": 

"The Adjutant Genarl, 
War Department, 

Washington, D. C: 
Re your secret radio four eight two twenty eighth Comma Full precautions 
are being taken against subversive activities within the field of investigative re- 
sponsibility of War Department Paren Paragraph three MID SC thirty dash 
forty five End paren And military establishments including personnel and 
equipment Stop As regards protection [15] of vital installations out- 
side of military reservations such as power plants Comma Telephone ex- 
changes and highway bridges Comma This headquarters by confidential letter 
dated June nineteen nineteen forty one requested the Governor of the Territory 
to use the broad powers vested in him by section sixty seven of the organic act 
which provides Comma In effect Comma That the Governor may call upon 
the commanders of military and naval forces of the United States in the Territory 
of Hawaii to prevent or suppress lawless violence Comma Invasion Comma 
Insurrection etc Stop Pursuant to the authority stated the Governor on Jvme 
twentieth confidentially made a formal written demand of this headquarters to 
furnish and continue to furnish such adequate protection as may be necessary to 
prevent sabotage Comma And lawless violence in connection therewith 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2467 

Comma Being committed against vital installations and structures in the Terri- 
tory Stop Pursuant to the foregoing request appropriate military protection 
is now being afforded vital civilian installations Stop In this connection Comma 
At the instigation of this headquarters the city and county of Honolulu on June 
thirtieth nineteen forty one enacted an ordnance which permits the commanding 
general Hawaiian Department Comma to close Comma Or restrict the use 
of and travel upon Comma Any highway within the city and county of Hono- 
lulu Comma whenever the commanding general deems such action necessary in 
the interest of national defense Stop The authority thus given has not yet 
been exercised Stop Relations with FBI and all other Federal and Territorial 
officials are and have been cordial and mutual cooperation has been given on all 
pertinent matters. 

Short" 

events transpiring from november 27th to decemiier 6th 

From November 27th to December 6th the troops remained on the Alert for 
sabotage, and carried on routine training v.'ith the men not required to be on 
duty during this Alert. The Aircraft Warning Service operated daily from two 
hours before daylight until one hour after daylight. It also carried out this 
usual practice, closing the information center at 7:00 .V. M., December 7th. 
Routine training was also carried out b_\ this Detachment from 7:00 to 11:00 A. M. 
except on Sunday. Memorandum of the Siunal Officer, Hawaiian Departnient. 
states as follows — Exhibit "J": 

Subject: Detector Operation. 
To: Department Signal Officer. 

1. On November 27, 1941, after conference with .Assistant Chief of Staff G-3, 
and receiving instructions to operate all mobile detectors from two hours before 
dawn until one hour after dawn, I, as Acting Dep rtment Signal Officer, gave 
immediate instructions [16] to Captain TElIEY, Commanding Officer 
of the Aircraft Warning Company, to initiate the above detector operation so 
long Alert No. 1 was in force. 

2. The detectors in question operated daily thereafter during the prescribed 
period except when having occasional operational trouble. In addition, the six 
detector stations operated daily except Sundays from 7:00 A. M. to 11:00 A. M. 
for routine training. Daily except Saturday and Sunday, to hours 12:00 noon 
until 4:00 P. M. were devoted to training and maintenance work. 

(Signed) W. H. Murphv, 
W. H. Murphy, 

Lt. Col., Sig. C. 



During the period November 27th to December 6th I had conferences with the 
Commander-in-Chief of the United States Fleet and the Commandant of the 
Fourteenth Naval District as follows: 

November 27th: Conference on the reinforcement of the marine garrisons at 
Midway and Wake Islands by squadrons of army pursuit planes. I was accom- 
panied on this conference by Major General Frederick L. Martin, Commanding 
General of the Hawaiian Air Force, and Lt. Colonel James A. Mollison, Chief of 
Staff of the Hawaiian Air Force. 

December 1st: Conference relative to the relief of the marine garrisons on the 
islands of Midway and Wake, and the taking over of the defense of Canton Island 
by the army. 

December 2nd: Conference with the Commander-in-Chief of the United States 
Fleet with reference to a letter that he was sending to the Chief of Naval Operations 
relative to the relief of the marines at Midway and Wake by the army. 

December 3rd: Conference with reference to a radiogram I was sending to the 
War Department relative to the relief of the marines at Midway and Wake by 
the army. 

December 4th: Major Fleming, of my staff, conferred with (^ol. Pfeiffer, Fleet 
Marine Officer on the Staff of the Commander-in-Chief of the United States Fleet 
relative to the use of marine 5" guns at Canton Island. 

At these conferences the Commander-in-Chief of the United States Fleet and 
the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District had ample opportunitj' to 
acquaint me with information of the location of Japanese carriers, which would 
render possible an attack on the island of OAHU. If they believed carriers so 



2468 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

located, they unquestionably [17] would have discussed the possible danger 
to any troops attempting to effect a relief at Midway and Wake. There is at least 
a strong inference that they had no such knowledge of the location of the Japanese 
carriers which w^ould have rendered an attack possible. The fact that the Com- 
mandant of the Fourteenth Naval District did not request the employment 
under naval command of army bombardment planes for distant reconnaissance, as 
provided for by the "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan" indicates that they 
were satisfied with their information with reference to Japanese carriers, and 
there was nothing new in the situation to cause me to change from an Alert for 
sabotage to an Alert for defense against an air attack. The following certificate 
shows that no request was made by the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval 
District to the Hawaiian Air Force for long range aerial reconnaissance — Exhibit 
"K": 

HiCKAM Field, T. H., 30 December 1941. 

I, JAMES A. MOLLISON, certify that during the period of 27 November 1941 
to 7 December 1941 the Navy made no requests to the Hawaiian Air Force for in 
shore or long range aerial reconnaissances. 

(Signed) Jas. A. Mollison, 
Jas. A. Mollison, 

Lt. Col, A. C, 

H. A. F. C/S. 

To what extent such reconnaissance was made by the Navy planes is not 
known. 

At the conference on November 27th, a staff officer of the Commander-in-Chief 
of the United States Fleet made a statement about the improbability of a Japanese 
air attack in the presence of the Commander-in-Chief. This statement is covered 
by certificate of Lt. Col. James A. Mollison, as follows — Exhibit "L": 

"I certify that on November 27, 1941, I accompanied General Short and 
General Martin to Admiral Kimmel's office for conference relative to sending 
Army pursuits planes to Midway and Wake. As this would unciuestionably 
weaken the defenses of Oahu, Admiral Kimmel asked a question of Captain 
McMorris, his War Plans Officer, which was substantially as follows: 

Admiral Kimmel: McMorris, what is your idea of the chances of a surprise 
raid on Oahu? 

Captain McMorris: I should say none Admiral . 

(Signed) James A. Mollison, 

Lt. Col, A. C. 



[18] December 5th one B-24 plane arrived at Hickam Field from the 
mainland. This plane had insufficient armament for combat, only one .30 caliber 
and two .50 caliber guns in the tail, and was without ammunition for the guns 
that were installed. In spite of the fact that this plane arrived without being 
in condition to fire, the following radiogram was received from the War Depart- 
ment—Exhibit "M": 

"Commanding General, Hawaiian Department, 
Ft. Shafter, TH.: 

Four six five twenty sixth. 

Reference two B dash twenty four airplanes for special photo mission Stop 
It is desired that the pilots be instructed to photographic Truk Island in the 
Caroline group Jaluit in the Marshall group Stop Visual reconnaissance should 
be made simultaneously Stop Information desired as to the number and loca- 
tion of naval vessels including submarines comma airfields comma aircraft comma 
guns comma barracks and camps Stop Pilots should be warned islands strongly 
fortified and manned Stop Photograi^hy and reconnaissance must be accom- 
plished at high altitude and there must be no circling or remaining in the vicinity 
Stop Avoid orange aircraft by utilizing maximum altitude and speed Stop 
Instruct crews if attacked by j^Ianes to use all means in their power for self 
preservation Stop The two pilots and copilots should be instructed to confer 
with Admiral Kimmel upon arrival at Honolulu to obtain his advice Stop If 
distance from Wake and Jaluit to Moresljy is too great comma suggest one B*dash 
twenty four proceed from Wake to Jaluit and back to Wake comma then Philip- 
pines by usual route jjhotograi^hing Ponape while enroute Morcsl -v Stop Advise 
pilots best time of day for photographic Truk and Jaluit Stop Upon arrival 
in Philippines two copies each of any photographs taken will be sent to General 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2469 

MacArthur comma Admiral Hart comma Admiral Kimmel comma the Chief 
of Naval Operations comma and the War Department Stop Insure that both 
B dash twenty four airplanes are fully equipped with gun ammunition upon departure 
from Honolulu. 

Adams. 

The combination of the arrival of the plane in this condition and of the instruc- 
tions for it to be placed in instant readiness for firing during the remainder of 
the journey plainly indicates that the War Department considered Honolulu not 
the subject of a probably attack, and that flying from the mainland to Honolulu 
the hazard of carrying the extra weight of ammunition was greater than the 
possibility of being attacked by the Japanese. 

After the receipt of radiogram 46526, quoted above, the following radiogram 
was sent— Exhibit "N": 

Chief of the Army Air Forces, 

Washington, D. C: 
Reference secret photographic mission of two B twenty fours Stop One of B 
twenty fours [19] Lieutenant Faulkner which landed Hickam this date 
short following equipment considered essential to safety and success of mission 
colon fifty caliber machine guns comma mounts comma adapters and accessories 
for upper hemisphere semicolon fifty caliber tunnel gun comma adapter and 
accessories semicolon fifty caliber guns comma adapters comma mounts and 
accessories for starboard and port sides semicolon second thirty caliber nose gun 
comma adapter and accessories Stop Guns can be removed from our equip- 
ment and ammunition is available Stop Strongly recommend that second B 
twe ity four bring necessary equipment from mainland for installation on both 
planes prior their departure from Hickam field Stop Plane being held here 
until satisfactorily armed Stop Subject plane has no armor plate installation 
Stop Except for removal of passenger seats plane equipped as for ferry service 
North Atlantic Signed Martin HAF I4I. .1 

Short 

In spite of radiogram quoted above, airplanes continued to be dispatched from 
the mainland without ammunition and with guns not in condition to fire. Twelve 
B-17 airplanes, under orders from the War Department, left the mainland in two 
squadrons at 9:30 P. M., Dec. 6th, Pacific time (12:30 A. M., Dec. 7th, Eastern 
time) and 10:30 P. M., Dec. 6th, Pacific time (l:3u A. M., Dec. 7th, Eastern time). 
None of these guns were equipped witu ammunition for the defensive armament. 
Machine guns were still cosmolined and had not been bore-sighted. Ferry crews 
were skeletonized, consisting of pilot, co-pilot, navigator, engineer and radio 
operator. Sucn crews were incapable of manning gun positions, even if the guns 
had been properly prepared for combat and supplied with ammunition. (Exhibit 
"O"). The inference is plain that up to 1:30 A. M., December 7th, the War 
Department felt that the hazard of carrying the extra weight in ammunition was 
greater than the danger of an attack by the Japanese. These planes actually 
arrived at Hickam Field in the midst of the first attack. Four of the twelve 
planes were destroyed by the Japanese without being able to fight. Had the War 
Department considered an attack by the Japanese probable, these planes would 
not have been permitted to leave the mainland without ammunition, and without 
guns in condition to be fired. Up to that moment the War Department had given 
me no indication of a crisis in the American-Japanese relations. 

Later in the morning of December 7th apparently alarming news was received 
and the Chief of Staff sent the following message to me by commercial radio — 
Exhibit "P": 

[20] "Hawn Dept., 
Ft. Shafter, T. H.: 
529 7th Japanese are presenting at one PM eastern standard time today what 
amounts to an ultimatum also they are under orders to destroy their code machine 
immediately Stop Just what significance the hour set may have we do not 
know but be on alert accordingly Stop Inform naval authorities of this 
communication 

Marshall". 

The message was filed at 12:18 P. M., December 7th, Eastern time (6:48 A. M., 
December 7th, Honolulu time). It was received by the R. C. A. in Honolulu at 
7:33 A. M., December 7th, and delivered to the Signal Office, Fort Shafter, at 
11:45 A. M. (Delivery probably delayed by the Japanese Jattack). The deci- 



2470 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

phered message was delivered to the Adjutant General, Hawaiian Department, at 
2:58 P. M., December 7th. Thus this important message was received seven 
hours after the attack. If the message had befen telephoned by secret telephone 
direct to me as an urgent message in the clear without loss of time for encoding 
there would have been time to warm up the planes and put them in the air, thus, 
in all probability, avoiding a large loss of planes in the initial attack at 8:00 A. M. 
The fact that the War Department sent this message by radio in code instead of 
telephoning it in the clear and putting it through in the minimum amount of 
time indicates that the War Department, even as late as 6:48 A. M.. December 
7th, Honolulu time, did not consider an attack on Honolulu as very probable. 

When the Chief of Staff, War Department, was informed by the Chief of Staff, 
Hawaiian Department, by secret commercial telephone of the first attack, he 
inquired if the message with regard to the Japanese ultimatum had been received 
prior to the attack. He was informed that it had not been received up to the 
time of that conversation. 

On December 9th the following radiogram was received from the War Depart- 
ment- — ^Exhibit "Q": 
"Hawn Dept., Ft. Shafter, T. H.: 

Five four nine ninth please advise immediately exact time of receipt of our 
number five two nine repeat five two nine December seven at Honolulu exact 
time deciphered message transmitted by Signal Corps to staff and by what 
staff officer received. 

Cotton, Acting^'. 

The following replj' was made by this Headquarters — Exhibit "R": 

[21] "Re your five four nine radio five two nine delivered Honolulu via 
RCA seven thirty three morning seventh Stop Received signal office Fort 
Shaffer eleven forty five morning seventh paren this time approximate but within 
five minutes paren Stop Deciphered message received by adjutant general HQ 
Hawn Dept two fifty eight afternoon seventh 

Short. 

Two instances occurred early on the morning of December 7th, which, if inter- 
preted differently at the time, might have had a very great result upon the action 
that followed. 

About 7:15 A. M. a two-man submarine entered Pearl Harbor and was destroyed 
by ships on duty. Had the Naval authorities foreseen this as a possible forerunner 
of an air attack and notified the army, time would have been available for the dis- 
persion of the planes. However, the naval authorities did not connect this sub- 
marine attack with a possible general attack. The armj- was not notified until 
after the attack at 8:00. 

After the Air Craft Warning Service Information Center was closed at 7:00 
A. M., December 7th, the OP AN A station remained in operation for further prac- 
tice. At 7:20 A. M. a very significant event occurred, as shown by the following 
affidavits — 

Exhibit "8": 

"Fort Shafter, T. H. 

Territory of Hawaii, ss: 

Personally appeared before me, the undersigned, authority for administering 
oaths of this nature, one Grover C. White, Jr. 0-396182, 2nd Lieut., Signal Corps, 
Signal Company, Aircraft Warning, Hawaii, who after being duly sworn according 
to law deposes and sayeth: 

1. At the request of the Control Officer and Naval Liaison Officer the AWS 
agreed to operate its detectors beyond the daily period of two hours before until 
one hour after dawn. The first schedule required operation of all stations from 
4 A. M. to 6 P. M. This schedule was modified to the hours of 4 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
A temporary schedule was next devised which required all stations to operate from 
4 A. M. to 11 A. M. and to have "staggered" operation, i. e., 3 stations from 11 
A. M. to 1 P. M., the remaining 3 stations from 1 P. M. to 4 P. M. On Saturday, 
December 6, 1941, I contacted the Control Officer to request authority to have all 
stations operate from 4 A. M. to 7 A. M. only on Sundaj', December 7, 1941; this 
was agreed to bv the Control Officer. 

2. Staff Sergeant Stanley J. Wichas, SCAWH, acting RDF Officer, reports 
that he saw nothing that could be construed as suspicious in the information 
received by [22] the AWS Information Center from 4 A. M. to Sunday, 
December 7, 1941. This is verified by Lt. Kermit A. Tyler, Air Corps, who was the 
only oflficer in the Information Center from 4 A. M, to 7 A, M, 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2471 

3. At approximately 7:20 A. M. a report was received from a Detector station 
at Opena that g, large number of planes was approaching Oahu on a course North 
3 degrees East at a distance of approximately 192 miles. This information was 
immediately transmitted by the switchboard operator, Pfc. Joseph McDonald 
to Lt. Tyler, who talked to Opana about the flight. The statement of Pfc. Joseph 
McDonald, SCAWH, the switchboard operator is attached. 

4. The Navy Liaison Officer's position within the Information Center was not 
manned when I reached the Information Center at about 8:30 A. M. This position 
was manned shortly thereafter by Technical Sergeant Merle E. StouflFer, SCAWH, 
who remained on the position until approximately 4:30 P. M. when the position 
was taken over by Naval Officers. 

Further the deponent sayeth not. 

(Signed) Grover C. White, Jr. 

2nd Lieut., Signal Corps, Signal 
Company, Aircraft Warning, Hawaii. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of Dec. AD 1941, at Fort, 
Shafter, T. H. 

(Signed) Adam E. Huggins, 

2nd Lt., Signal Corps, 

Sum mar y Court. 
"Fort Shafter, T. H., 

ss: 
Territory of Haioaii , 
Personally appeared before me. the imdersigned authority for administering 
oaths of this nature, one Joseph P. McDonald, 13006145, Pvt. Icl, Signal Company, 
Aircraft Warning, Hawaii, who after being duly sworn according to law deposes 
and sayeth: 

I was on duty as telephone operator at the AWS Information Center on Sunday 
morning, December 7, 1941. I received a telephone call from Opana at 7:20 
A. M. stating that a large number of planes were heading towards Oahu from 
North 3 points east. I gave the information to Lt. Kermit A. Tyler, Air Corps, 
78th Pursuit Squadron, Wheeler Field, T. H., and the Lieutenant talked with 
private Lockhard at the Opana station. Lt. Tyler said that it wasn't anything 
of importance. At that time the planes were 132 miles out. I asked if we 
shouldn't advise Corporal Beatty and have the plotters come back. The Opana 
Unit stressed the fact that it was a very large number of planes and they seemed 
excited. Lt. Tyler [23] said that it was not necessary to call the plotters 
or get in touch with anyone. Further the deponent sayeth not. 

(Signed) Joseph P. McDonald, 

Joseph P. McDonald, 
Sig. Co., Aircraft Warning, Hawaii. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of December A. D. 1941 at 
Fort Shafter, T. H. 

(Signed) Adam R. Huggins, 
Adam R. Huggins, 
2nd Lieut., Signal Corps, 

Summary Court. 

statement of lieut. kermit a. tyler 

20 December 1941, 
On W^ednesday, 3 December 1941, I was first detailed to learn the operation 
of the plotting board in the Interception Control Center. I reported for duty 
at 1210, just as the crew on duty was leaving. I spoke with Lt. White, Signal 
Corps, a few minutes and he showed me the operating positions for Navy, Bom- 
bardment, Antiaircraft, Controller's position and Aircraft Warning Service. I 
remained on duty until 1600. Only a telephone operator was on duty with me. 

On Sunday, 7 December 1941, I was on duty from 0400 to 0800 as Pursuit 
Officer at the Interceptor Control Center. From 0400 until approximately 0610 
there were no plots indicated on the interception board. From that time until 
0700 a number of plots appeared on the control board at various points sur- 
rounding the Island of Oahu. I particularly remember at least one plot South 
of Kauai and I believe there was one South of Molokai. There were two plots 
at some distance north of Oahu and which I remember seeing on the historical 
record. At the time, I questioned the plotter of the historical record who stated 
that he makes a record of all plots as they come in. There were a number of 
plots over and around the Island of Oahu. Having seen the plotters work once 
79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 3 



2472 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

before with about the same general layout, this did not seem irregular to me. At 
0700 all of the men except the telephone operator folded up their, equipment and 
left. At about 0700 the operator at the OPANA RDF Station called me and 
said that the instrument indicated a large number of planes at 132 miles to the 
North. Thinking it must be a returning naval patrol, a flight of Hickam bombing 
planes, or possibly a flight of B-17 planes from the coast, I dismissed it as nothing 
unusual. (It is common knowledge that when Honolulu radio stations are 
testing by playing Hawaiian music throughout the night that coincidentally 
B-17s are apt to come in using the station [24] for radio direction finding. 
The radio station was testing on the morning of 7 December, 0230-0400) . At about 
0750 I heard some airplanes outside and looking toward Pearl Harbor saw what I 
thought to be the navy practicing dive bombing rims. At a little after 0800, 
Sergeant Eugene Starry, A. C, Wheeler Field, called me to tell me that Wheeler 
Field had been attacked. I immediately had the telephone operator call all men 
back to duty. Most of the men had returned to duty by 0820 when Major L. N. 
Tindal arrived and took charge of the Control Center. I remained on duty 
assisting Major K. P. Bergquist and Major L. N. Tindal as Pursuit Control 
Officer until about 1615, 8 December 1941, with the exception of rest periods 
from 2000 to 2400, 7 December, and 0600 to 1000, 8 December. 

(Signed) Kermit A. Tyler, 
Kermit a. Tyler, 
1st Lieut., Air Corps. 

Had Lieut. Tyler alerted the Hawaiian Air Force instead of deciding that the 
planes were friendly, there would have been time to disperse the planes but not 
to get them in the air as they were not warmed up. Dispersion, in all prob- 
ability, would have decreased the loss in planes, but would not have prevented 
the attack on Pearl Harbor. 

ACTION AT TIME OF ATTACK 

At 7:55 A. M., December 7th, the enemy planes attacked Hickam Field, Pearl 
Harbor and Wheeler Field. At 9 : 00 a second attack was made, and a third about 
11:00 A. M., each lasting approximately fifteen minutes. At 8:03 A. M. the 
Chief of Staff reported the attack, and by 8:10 order had been given to all units 
(major echelons) by telephone to put Alert #3 in effect. 

Aviiaircraft Artillery: All antiaircraft batteries had skeleton crews guarding 
them. All units had in their possession ammunition for rifles, pistols, automatic 
rifles and machine guns. 3" ammunition had been placed in positions accessible 
to all batteries except four batteries of the 64th C. A. C. (AA). The first of 
these batteries began drawing ammunition at the Aliamanu Crater at 8:15 A. M. 
At 10:15 all these batteries had drawn the initial unit of fire. 

The automatic weapon batteries at Fort Kamehameha, Pearl Harbor and Camp 
Malakole took the enemy planes under firing during the eight o'clock raid. The 
first 3" gun fire was opened at 8:30, and all batteries of the south group were in 
action by 10:00 A. M. East group opened fire between 11:00 A. Si. and 12:00 
noon. (For detailed firing of batteries, see Exhibit "S"). 

[25] Hawaiian Air Force: During the first attack men started pulling planes 
out of the fire, and at 8:50 the serviceable pursuit planes took off. At 11:40 A. M. 
the serviceable bombers took off on a mission under naval control. 

Before the attack December 7th status of planes in Hawaiian Department was 
as follows: 

Pursuit planes in commission 80 

Pursuit planes out of commission 69 

Reconnaissance planes in commission 6 

Reconnaissance planes out of commission 7 

Bombers in commission 39 

Bombers out of commission 33 

Damaged in Raid: 

Pursuit planes 88 

Reconnaissance planes 6 

Bombers 34 

Status as of December 20th, 1941: in commission Reparable locally 

Pursuit planes 61 22 

Reconnaissance 6 2 

Bombersi 50 13 

• Includes 29 bombers from mainland. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARJMT PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2473 

Exhibit "T" 

A comprehensive study of the losses inflicted on the enemy by the army places 
the number of enemy planes brought down by aviation and antiaircraft fire at 
twenty-nine (29) 

Exhibit "U" 

24th Division: Troops of the 24th Division at Schofield were attacked at 8:10 
A. M. Men with automatic rifles returned the enemy's fire. At 8:30 A. INI. the 
Division started moving to its battle positions, and all units were in position by 
5:00 P. M. and had one unit of ammunition on the position. The second unit of 
fire was issued during the night. 

25th Division: The 25th Division opened antiaircraft fire at 8:30 A. M. It also 
started to move to battle positions at 8:30 A. M., and completed movement to 
position by 4:00 P. INI. and had issued one unit of fire. The second unit of fire 
was issued during the night. 

All movement and action of troops was carried out as prescribed in 
[26] standing operating procedure (See Exhibit "B") without confusion. 
The value of planning and training with everyone made familiar with the plans 
was brought out very clearly. 

At 9:00 A. M. the first civilian surgical teams began reporting at Tripler Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

At 12:00 noon the Civilian Relief Committee began the evacuation of Hickam 
Field, Wheeler Field and Schofield, and continued throughout the afternoon and 
part of the evening. Most of the women and children were moved to school 
buildings, although a few from these posts and all of the women and children 
from Shatter, Tripler, Ordnance Depot and Signal Depot were sheltered in the 
incompleted underground Interceptor Command Post. 

During December 7th the foreign agents previously listed by F. B. I. and G-2 
were arrested and confined at the Immigration and Quarantine Stations as follows; 

Japanese 370 

Germans 98 

Italians 14 

Total L 482 

The 804th Engineers began clearing the runways at Hickam Field and Wheeler 
Field as soon as the first attack was over. The fire fighters, while still fighting 
fire, assisted in moving the debris. During the evening of the 7th the District 
Engineer began repairing broken water pipes and other utilities at Hickam 
Field. 

Governor Poindexter put the M-Day Bill in effect onTDecember 7th, and on 
December 8th declared martial law and requested the Department Commander 
to assume the responsibility as Military Governor. 

December 8th the District Engineer took over all building materials, supplies 
and equipment, called all construction companies into service and started the 
construction of bunkers and the extension of runways at the air fields. On the 
9th he started construction of evacuation camps for army dependents and ci- 
vilians. December 8th the Department Engineer distributed material to the troops 
and got field fortifications under way. December 9th he started construction 
of slit trenches on posts and in the vicinity of school buildings and parks in the 
city, and started plans for construction of shelters throughout the city. 

Niartial law was placed in effect on December 8th, and the following action 
was taken: 

1. Courts were closed. 

2. All civilian officials were asked to remain in their positions and carry on the 
work of their offices. 

[27] 3. An Advisory Committee headed by Governor Poindexter was 
appointed. 

4. A Military Commission and Provost Court were appointed. 

5. The sale of intoxicating liquors, beer and wine was prohibited. 

[28] EFFORTS TO IMPROVE DEFENSES OF HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

My effoits to improve the defenses of the Hawaiian Islands has a bearing upon 
all work under me since assuming command of the Hawaiian Department, Febru- 
ary 7, 1941. The following are some of the most important items taken up and 
the action taken b}' the War Department. Each item is supported by exhibits. 



2474 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

L The need for additional facilities and troops in this Department became 
evident vejy soon after arrival. On February 19th a letter was transmitted to 
the Cheif of Staff of the Army outlining some of the deficiencies discovered and 
recommending action which should be taken to correct them. Among these 
points were: 

(1) Cooperation with the Navy, 

(2) Dispersion and protection of aircraft and repair, maintenance and 
servicing of aircraft, 

(3) Improvement of anti-aircraft defense, 

(4) Improvement of the harbor defense artillery, 

(5) Improvement of the situation regarding searchlights, 

(6) Roads and trails, 

(7) Necessary bombproof construction, 

(8) Increase in the number of engineer troops. 
A copy of this letter is attached as Exhibit "V". 

2. On February 19, 1941, a secret letter was submitted to the War Depart- 
ment, subject: "Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft", file Engr. 452. This 
letter explains the urgent necessity of providing protective bunkers for bombard- 
ment and pursuit aviation in this Department and recommended that funds in 
the amount of $1,565,600.00 be allotted for this purpose. This cost included 
the costs of the necessary taxiwaj's and hard standings to permit the dispersion 
of planes at Hickam Field. A large part of the ground surrounding the landing 
mat at Hickam Field is made up of a soft fill and it is not possible to disperse 
planes onto this ground without the provision of taxiways and hard standings. 
This correspondence was indorsed back to this Department bv the 6th Ind., 
AG 600.12 (2-19-41) MC-G, September 12, 1941, which stated that the plans 
for revetments had been approved and that funds in the amount of $1,358,000.00 
[29] would be available about January 1, 1942. At the time of the 
attack on December 7th, no money had been received for this project and it was 
impossible to adequately disperse the planes at Hickam Field. Construction 
of these bunkers was initiated immediately after the attack under the Emergency 
Authority granted. — Exhibit "W". 

3. It was apparent that the facilities of the Hawaiian Air Depot which had 
been constructed in a very concentrated area at Hickam Field would be ex- 
tremely vulnerable to an attack. As a result, a letter was submitted to the War 
Department on September 10, 1941, file Engr. 600.96, subject: "Underground 
Repair Facihties Hawaiian Air Depot", which strongly recommended the ap- 
proval of bombproof facilities for the repair of aircraft in this Department, and 
requested funds in the amount of $3,480,650.00. This correspondence was 
indorsed back by 1st Ind., file AG 600.12 (9-10-41) MC-G, Adjutant General's 
Office, October 27, 1941, stating that due to the cost of providing bombproof 
facilities that it was the War Department's policy not to provide them, and 
suggesting that splinterproof installations be provided. During the attack of 
December 7th. the Air Depot was one of the main targets and suffered tremendous 
damage. Construction of an underground bombproof facility was started under 
the Emergency Authority subsequent to the attack. Steps have also been taken 
to decentralize the Hawaiian Air Depot to several smaller shops around the 
island.— Exhibit "X". 

4. Fortifications and Camouflage Funds. — A letter was submitted to the War 
Department on July 28th, file AG 121.2, subject: "Reallocation of Special Field 
Exercise Funds", reqviesting that these funds be made available for purchase of 
fortification and camouflage equipment. This letter was answered by confiden- 
tial radiogram No. 31, August 12, 1941, stating these special field exercise funds 
could not be made available for this purpose. This radiogram was followed by 
letter dated August 13, 1941, file AG 353 (7-28-41) MC-D, subject: "Realloca- 
tion of Special Field Exercise Funds for Field Fortification and Camouflage 
Projects", in which it was stated that the interest of the Hawaiian Department 
in providing field fortifications was appreciated by the War Department, but 
that funds could not l)e aflotted for this purpose. This letter was returned by 
1st Ind. this headquarters, file AG 353 (7-28-41) MC-D. September 14, 1941, 
again recommending an immediate allotment of $125,000.00 for field fortification 
and camouflage purposes. In 2nd Ind. to [30] the sanje correspondence 
September 26, 1941, the Adjutant General stated that the allotment could not 
be made. Also on this same sul)ject, this headquarters submitted to the War 
Department a clipper letter on October 28, 1941, file Engr. 400.312, subject: 
"Funds for Field Fortification and Camouflage Material", which recapitulated 
the previous correspondence on this subject, and requested an allotment of 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2475 

$1,445,542.00 be made available immediately for the purpose of fortification and 
camouflage materials. No funds had been received for this purpose at the tiiTie 
of the attack.— E.xhibit "Y". 

5. Camouflage: The necessity of camouflaging treatment of all airfields in this 
Department was brought to the War Department's attention in letter File Engr. 
000.91, July 15, 1941, subject: "Request for Funds for Camouflage of Wheeler 
Field". This letter stated, "There is definite need for camouflage treatment on 
all airfields in the Hawaiian Department. Up to this time no camouflage treat- 
ment had been undertalcen at any airfield in this Department." This proposal 
was finally approved in 3rd Ind., file AG 007.5 (7-12-41) MC-G from the Adjutant 
General's Office to the Chief of Engineers which directed that funds in the amount 
of $56,210.00 be included in the next budget estimate for Wheeler Field. At the 
time of the attack on December 7th, no fimds had been received for this purpose. 
The question of camouflage was also submitted to the War Department by letter 
this headquarters February 27, 1941, file p]ngr. 000.91, subjects "Camouflage of 
Defense Installations". This project was approved by 4th Ind., AG 007.5 
(2-27-41) MC-E, Adjutant General's Ofl^ce June 27, 1941. At the time of the 
attack, no funds for this purpose had been received, and although considerable 
work had been done by troop labor to camouflage these installations, its efl"ective- 
ness was limited by our inability to buy the necessary materials. — Exhibit "Z". 

6. The revised Roads and Trails Project was submitted by letter this head- 
quarters, file Engr. 611, February 19, 1941, which recommended that funds in 
the amount of $1,370,000.00 be allotted for construction of the military roads, 
railroads and trails in this Department. At the time of the attack, only $350,- 
000.00 had been allotted for this purpose. — Exhibit "lA". 

7. The need for additional airports was brought to the War Department's 
attention in letters file Engr. 600.12, according to the following [SI] Sched- 
ule: 

(1) Bellows Field April 5,1941 

(2) Barking Sands May 2,1941 

(3) Hilo Airport May 2,1941 

(4) Homestead Field Mav 2,1941 

(5) Morse Field May 2,1941 

(6) Haleiwa Mav 22, 1941 

(7) Burns Field May 22, 1941 

(8) Lanai Mav 22, 1941 

(9) Parker Ranch June 2,1941 

(10) Kipapa May 14, 1941 

At the time of the attack no funds had been allotted specifically for construction 
at these airfields. The W ar Department disapproved the proposed site at Kipapa 
and directed construction at Kahuku. This relocation required protracted 
negotiations with the Fourteenth Naval District which had a bombing range on 
the Kahuku site. These negotiations were completed only a short time before 
the attack, but as no funds had been received, no construction had been started. 
In this connection, several expedients had to be adopted due to the non-availability 
of funds. Construction work at Molokai, Burns, Morse and Barking Sands was 
actually done by troop labor using materials provided by the WPA. The need 
of an additional airdrome on Oahu was recognized as acute. The only possibility 
for immediate development was in improving the field at Bellows, and the only 
funds which had been made available for construction work at Bellows Field 
applied to housing only. The project letter on Bellows Field included a request 
for funds for improvement of runways, installation of gasoline storage and other 
facilities to make this a first class operating base. As stated, no funds had been 
allotted for these improvements. Since the need for these vital facilities was 
acute, this Department authorized the District Engineer to proceed with their 
construction, utilizing any funds which might be available to his ofl^ce. At the 
time of the attack, provision had been made for gasoline storage at Bellows and a 
5000' runway was about half done, and the District Engineer was able to com- 
plete this ruuway by Thursday night following the attack. Bellows Field is now 
a useable base, but all construction which [S3] has been done to make 
this an operating base has been done without any funds being allotted by the War 
Department. The improvement of other airdromes on Oahu at either the Kipapa 
or Kahuku area or at Haleiwa had not been underlaken at the time of the attack 
because no funds had ever been allotted for this purpose. — Exhii)it "IB". 

8. Kaneohe Bay Defenses: It was recognized that the preceding arrangement 
under which the Army disclaimed any responsibility for the defense of the new 



2476 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Naval Air Station at Kaneohe Bay was a mistake. A letter was prepared and 
transmitted to the War Department on the 18th of February 1941, subject: 
"Defense of Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, T. H." file 381. This letter 
informed the War Department that this Department had assumed responsibility 
for the defense of this area. This subject was again covered in letter this head- 
quarters, file Engr. 600.96, dated April 14, 1941, subject: "Protection of Seacoast 
Defense Batteries" to the Adjutant General, and recommendation was made that 
a 12-inch gun battery similar to Battery Closson be obtained and shipped to this 
Department for installation in the Kaneohe Bay area. The War Department 
recognized the need of this protection for Kaneohe Bay, but was unable to supply 
a 12-inch gun battery for this. The project for the permanent defenses at Kaneohe 
Bay was submitted by letter of this headquarters 31 July 1941, file AG 381/20 
Kaneohe Bay project, subject: "Coast Artillery Armament for Naval Air Station 
Kaneohe Bay", which recommended both additional personnel and additional 
armament required. This was answered by 3rd Ind. Adjutant General's Office, 
file AG 381 (7-31-41) MC-D, October 30, 1941, which approved the temporary 
utilization of armament now on hand in this Department. This indorsement 
also stated that the reinforcements of peace or war garrison of the Hawaiian 
Department for the beach and land defense of this area was not contemplated. 
The project for the utilization of temporary armament was submitted on the 18th 
of September 1941, file Engr 662/4 x 662/7 which recommended the provision of 
funds for the construction of Panama mounts for three 155-mm batteries and a 
railroad gun emnlacement, and requested that funds in the amount of $215,265.00 
be alloted for the construction of these positions. This matter was also followed 
up in radiogram No. 320 this headquarters, September 18, 1941, which recom- 
mended that funds in the amount of $215,265.00 be made available for the con- 
struction at Kaneohe Bay and also that $117,256.00 be made available for the 
completion of the project for [33] construction of railroad gun positions. 
At the time of the attack no funds had been allotted for this construction. Ex- 
hibit "IC". 

9. The necessity of improvement of the landing strips at Wheeler Field was 
brought to the War Department's attention by letter this headquarters, file 
Engr. 686/d, 21 June, 1941. In 2nd Ind. on this correspondence, from the Office 
of the Chief of the Air Corps, August 25, 1941, question was raised as to the ade- 
quacy of tne second proposed north-south runway, and the statement was made 
that no funds were available at that time for the construction and improvements 
recommended. In 2nd Ind. Chief of the Air Corps, Washington, D. C, September 
2, 1941, to tliis Department, statement was made that $25,000.00 had been 
requested for the leveling of the main runway at Wheeler Field. At the time of 
the attack, however, no funds had been received for the improvement of this 
landing strip. Some improvements had been made utilizing troop labor of the 
804th Engineers; however, due to the lack of funds these improvements were 
limited and did not adequately solve ttie problem. — Exhibit "ID". 

10. The Aircraft Warning Service is probably the most important single 
project for the defense of Oahu. At the time of the attack, however, none of the 
three fixed stations in the original project had been completed due to the impos- 
sibility of securing materials under the priorities system. The Kaala station, 
for example, depended for its construction on construction of the cableway 
approach. In radiogram 3009 on June 10th, this headquarters reported to the 
War Department that this cableway material could not be delivered unless a 
higher priority rating was received, and in War Department radio 9U4, June 
26th, the Adjutant General reported that this priority rating had been advanced 
to an A-l-c rating. With this rating it was not possible to secure the material 
to install this installation and the others expeditiously. Revised estimates for 
engineer construction of the superseding project of six fixed stations and six mobile 
stations and preliminary estimates for the cost of the signal communications 
involved in this revised project, were submitted by letter this headquarters 29 
September, 1941, file Sig 676.3. Pending the allotment of these additional 
funds, this Department authorized the District Engineer to proceed with con- 
struction of AWS stations with any funds available to his office. At the time 
of the attack, however, due to this priority difficulty, none of the three original 
fixed stations were in operation. — Exhibit "IE". 

[34] 11. The entire construction program in this Department has been 
delayed due to the situation regarding priorities. It was extremely difficult to 
secure materials for the construction program, not only those which were ordered 
specifically for a defense project, but particularly those materials which are 
ordinarily purchased as an "over the counter" transaction. From a study of 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2477 

the priorities situation, and also of the shipping situation, it became evident in 
June that the local dealers who ordinarily maintain stocks and materials necessary 
for defense projects would not be able to secure delivery from the mainland until 
after a purchase order from a Government agency had been placed. This meant 
that after the priority was placed, if the item was not available in local stock 
that there would be a delay of from six weeks to two months even under the most 
favorable conditions before mainland delivery could be effected. To remedy 
this situation a letter was sent to the War Department by clipper airmail, file 
Engr. 523.07, subject: "Priorities and Preference Ratings," July 3, 1941. This 
letter presented the problem in detail and recommended to the War Department 
that action be taken to correct this situation. The letter was followed up by 
radio on the 14th of August, and was answered by 1st and 2nd Inds. from the 
Priorities Committee dated August 18, 1941, and the Adjutant General dated 
August 26, 1941. The problem was again presented to the War Department by 
letter dated October 23, 1941, file Engr. 523.07, which recommended that the 
Office of Production Management be opened in Honolulu. In 2nd Ind. on this 
correspondence, the Priorities Committee advised that the Office of Production 
Management had been requested to establish a field office in Hawaii. This 
field office had not been established at the time of the attack and due to this diffi- 
culty in securing materials, many of our projects were not completed at the 
time of the attack.— Exhibit "IF". 

12. Another effort was made to solve this supply problem by securing funds for 
the advance procurement of certain essential materials. It was originally re- 
quested in clipper airmail letter this headquarters July 28, 1941, file Engr. 600.12, 
which recommended that a revolving fund of $1,000,000.00 be set up to permit 
the advance procurement of essential materials before the specific allotments had 
been made for individual projects. This letter had not [35] been answered 
on the 13th of September when a follow-up radiogram was sent to the War Depart- 
ment, and on the same day the matter was brought to the personal attention of the 
Deputy Chief of Staff in the War Department, who very quickly secured a solution 
of the problem by the allotment of $500,000.00 for the advance purchase of essen- 
tial materials. Before these materials could be secured, however, the $500,000.00 
was diverted by the War Department for the construction of housing at Kaneohe 
Bay, with the result that on the day of the attack, no reserve supplies of materials 
other than lumber had been accumulated.- — Exhibit "IG". 

13. The following letter shows appreciation by the Deputy Chief of Staff for 
Air of the difficulties in the carrying out of the project for the creation of air 
fields to permit ferrying of planes to the Philippine Islands, and of the rapidity 
with which the arrangements were completed. — Exhibit "IH". 

November 27, 1941 
Lieutenant General Walter C. Short, U. S. A., 
Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Dejpartment Commander, 

Fort Shajter, T. H. 
Dear Short: The copy of your report on the additional air routes has been 
received. The quantity of details requiring coordination, and the distances in- 
volved in the projects make the short time consumed in getting rolling almost 
unbelievably short. 

I extend you my personal thanks for the effort you have expended on this job 
and the results you are getting. 

The way things are working out now, it looks as if we will be using trans-Pacific 
airways almost continuously from now on. Our plans are O. K. for 4-engine 
bombers, but what are the prospects for medium bombers? Do you think we 
should even study that phase of trans-Pacific operations? 
Best regards. 
Sincerely, 

/s/ H. H. Arnold, 
Major General, U. S. A., 
Depnty Chief of Staff for Air. 

[36] 14. Increase in Engineer Troops: 

February 10, 1941.— TAG sent 3d Ind., file AG 320.2 (11-1-40) M-C saying 
that 3d Engineer Regiment was to be increased. Regular Army personnel not 
available to further increase Engineer Regiment. Selectees prohibited from being 
sent and it was not possible to aid in creating Engineer Battalion here as requested. 
On 19 Feb. 1941, letter to TAG file Engr. 322.03 requested that War Department 



2478 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

send an Eng. Regiment (Aviation) and an Eng. Regiment (General Service) here. 
1st Ind., May 15th, A. G. 320.2 (2-19-41) MC-C-M; TAG, stated that 34th Eng. 
Regiment (C) would be activated and that the personnel would probpblj'^ arrive 
in June. This Regiment was to take the place of the Regiment (General Service) 
requested. On June 18th, letter AG 320.2 (6-5-41) MR-MC, the War Depart- 
ment issued orders expanding 804 Eng. Company to the 804th Eng. Battalion. 
The troops for the 804th Eng. Battalion arrived in this Department 21 July 1941. 
Previous instructions concerning the activation of the 34th Eng. Battalion had 
been rescinded with the result that the unit was not activated until 17 October 

1941. It had not been completely trained and lacked many items of equipment 
at the time of the attack. See Exhibit "1 I". 

15. Increase in Coast Artillery Troops: 

February 18, 1941. — Letter written to TAG urgently requesting two (2) Regi- 
ments CA Mobile; 1 Battalion CA (AA) gun. Mobile (less searchlight battery); 
one Regiment CA (TD) 155 mm. gun; AA filler replacements (90 ofl^cers and 2064 
enlisted men); Harbor Defense Artillery reinforcements (150 officers and 2700 
enlisted men). TAG replied by first indorsement May 10, 1941, file AG 320.2 
(2-18-41) (55) that the Hawaiian Department CA Garrison would be augmented 
with a total of 276 officers and 5734 enlisted men between June 1941 and March 

1942, as follows: (See Exhibit "IJ"). 

June 1941 

(1) AA fillers, 60 officers, 1337 enlisted men. 

(2) 98 CA 62 officers, 1329 enlisted men 

(3) Second Battalion, 97 CA less Battery H (Gun) Battery E (SL) (17 
officers, 359 enlisted men). 

[37] November 1941: 

(1) 97 CA less 2 Battalion, 3 Battalion — (48 officers, 885 enlisted men), 

(2) Battery H, 97 CA (4 oflScers, 134 enlisted men). 

(3) Medical Personnel, 98 CA (7 officers, 49 enlisted men). 
March 1941: 

(1) AA fillers (24 officers, 661 enlisted men). 

(2) 3 Battalion, 97 CA (37 mm. gun) less Battery M, 3 Battalion, 98 CA 
(37 mm. gun) less Battery M (54 officers, 980 enlisted men). 

February 25ih, i.947.— Letter written to TAG, file AG 320.2/57 (Exhibit IJ) re- 
questing increase in enlisted men in 251st C. A. Regiment NG from 1181 to 
1450. Disapproved by TAG March 8, 1941 (Exhibit IJ) 1st indorsement, 
file 320.2/57. 

February 25ih, /S>47.— Letter written to TAG, file 320.2/58 (Exhibit IJ) re- 
questing following reinforcements of Hawaiian Department: 

(1) That CAC requested February 18th (Exhibit IJ) be given priority. 

(2) That 11th F. A. be organized under T/0 dated November 1, 1940. 

(3) One Tank Battalion. 

(4) Two (2) M. P. Companies for guarding air fields. 

(5) Reinforcements of Inf. Regiments so as to be organized under T/0 
November 1. 1940. 

(6) That 11th F. A. Brig, (less 11 F. A.) be reinforced and organized under 
T/0 November 1, 1940. 

TAG replied by first indorsement, file 320.2 (2-25-41) (58) (Exhibit IJ) that 
CAC and Engineering increases would be considered separately; that reinforce- 
ments for F. A. and Inf. Regiments were not considered urgent; that Tank 
Battalion and 2 M. P. Companies for Hawaiian Department were disapproved; 
and that any reorganization of units was to be accomplished by reducing size 
of existing units and by carrying others as inactive. On May 28th, orders for 
the shipment of CAC increases were rescinded, file 320.2/70. On Julv 15, letter 
from TAG, file 320.2/82m (Exhibit 1.1) activated the following units: 

[38] 97th CA Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2 Battalions, 

and Batteries F and G. 

98th CA Regimental Headquarters Battery (less band). Headquarters 

and Headquarters Batterv 1st and 2nd Battalions, and Batteries A, B, C, 

D, F, G and H. 

16. Increase in Air Corps Strength: 

April 9th, 1941.— Letter from TAG, file 320.2 (3-5-41) (61) (Exhibit IK) 
directing that Air Defense Connnanti be set up. First indorsement, May 3, 
1941 (Exhibit IK) to TAG called attention to the fact that the plan was presented 
to War Department in letter of April 25th, 1941, Paragraph 7 "Reorganization 
of Forces in Hawaiian Department" (Exhibit IK). 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2479 

April 24th, 754/.— Letter written to TAG from COHAF (thru channels) file 
320.2/94 (Exhibit IK) svibject "Air Base Group" requesting: 

(1) Bellows Field as permanent Air Corps Station 

(2) Permanent Station 15 Pursuit Group 

(3) A redistribution of Air Base Groups 

(4) That two Air Base Groups be authorized. 

Bv second indorsement TAG to COHD dated June 26th, 1941, file 320.2 
(4-24-41) (94) (Exhibit IK): 

(1) War Department stated that Troop Unit Basis FY 1942 provided 
for two additional material squadrons for HAF. This is believed to provide 
sufficient air base units to care for Bellows Field. 

(2) Organization of Air Base Unit for 15th Pursuit Group held in obeyance 
pending decision on new station. By third indorsement CGHD to TAG, 
file 320.2/94 (Exhibit IK) request was made for two additional material 
squadrons to be stationed at Bellows Field. On Avgust 7th, 1941, radio 
file 320.2/100 (Exhibit IK) was sent to Chief of Air Corps requesting Head- 
quarters Detachment in absence of Air Base Group. On August 15th Radio 
No. 380 (Exhibit IK) was sent to TAG requesting information of status of 
Air Base Groups for Bellows Field. Administrative situation there verv 
difficult. In answer. Chief of Air Corps sent radio no. 172, file 320.2/108c 
(Exhibit IK) stating [39] not favorably considered because it would 
exceed the 59,000 allotted and also that TAG had been requested to activate 
Headquarters Detachment. On September 27th, 1941, bv letter (exhibit IK) 
from TAG, file 320.2/108d, subject "Activation of Air Corps Unit" a Head- 
quarters Detachment was authorized at Bellows Field but personnel had to 
be furnished bv the Department. 

On August 30, 1941, Radio No. 779, file 320.2/108 (Exhibit IK) was received 
asking: 

(1) Whatjarejtotal AC^personnelJrequirements. 

(2) Total requirements for personnel for arms and services with AC. 

(3) Number AB groups needed and their locations. 

On September 9, 1941, Radio No. 272 to TAG, file 320.2/108a (Exhibit IK) 
answering Radio No. 779 requesting the following: 

(1) Two AB Groups (one for Bellows, one for Kahuku) 

(2) Air Corps enlisted men now in Department sufficient to organize 
these groups. 

(3) One Squadron (HB) (Exhibit IK) consisting of 27 officers, 220 en- 
listed men to replace 14th Bombardment Squadron transferred to Phillippine 
Islands. 

(4) Personnel for Bellows. Medical Department (1 officer, 7 enlisted 
men) Dental Corps (1 officer) Quartermaster (1 officer, 30 men) Ordnance 
Dept. (1 A. B. Co. of 4 officers and 60 enlisted men). 

(5) Personnel for Kahuku Point. Medical Department (3 officers, 12 
enlisted men) Dental Corps (1 officer) Quartermaster (1 officer, 30 enlisted 
men) Signal Corps (10 enlisted men specialists) 

(6) Following personnel needed: Air Corps (3871 enlisted men) Medical 
Corps (6 officers, 36 enlisted men); Dental Corps (1); Quartermaster (4 
officers, 70 enlisted men). 3 AB Squadrons one each at Barking Sands, 
Kauai; Morse Field; Hilo, Hawaii. 

(7) Near Future. Two (2) additional AB Squadrons — (1) Lanai (under 
construction) (2) Parker Ranch (project to be submitted). 

On November 8th Radio no. 786 was sent to TAG, file 320.2/126 (exhibit IK) 
requesting immediate assignment. 

(1) Three airdepot Groups to HAF 

(2) Procurement of civilian employees impossible and discharge of en- 
listed men for employment does not help. 

[40] (3) 30% tactical planes grounded due to shortage in depot 
maintenance. Becoming acute. 

(4) Must have personnel and material at once. No personnel 

available here for activation of units. 

On November 15th Radio no. 402, file 320.2/126a, (exhibit IK) from TAG 

stating that three Air Depot Groups were imder advisement but that groups 

not available now. If and when available, will it come within strength of war 

garrison? 

On November 19th Radio no. 889, file 320.2/126b (exhibit IK) to TAG— 
Increase of three Air Depot Groups will not come within authorized war garrison 
79716— 46— Ex. 145 156 



2480 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

but should be furnished as soon as possible due to shortage in personnel. War 
garrison must be increased to accommodate Air Base Groups. 

On November 18th the War Department activated Seventh Airways Squadron 
from existing personnel in Department, file 320.2/127 (exhibit IK). On Novem- 
ber 18th Radio'no. 873, file 320.2/128 (exhibit no. IK) was sent to TAG requesting 
Station Complements at Hickam, Wheeler, Morse Field and Barking Sands. 
Urgently requested. On November 25th 1941 Radio no. 455, file 320.2/128a 
(exhibit IK) from TAG stated that until war garrison limitation was lifted, no 
additional personnel could be sent to the Hawaiian Department. 

17. Reorganization Hawaiian Division & Increase in War Garrison April 25th, 
1941. Letter written to TAG, file 220.3/37, (exhibit IL) requesting that two 
triangular divisions be organized from the Hawaiian Division (Square) and the 
organization of station complements be made at Schofield Barracks and Fort 
Shaffer; also Air Defense Command is to be created. Bv first indorsement 
dated July 29, 1941, file 320.3 (4-25-41) (37) (exhibit IL). ^TAG returned this 
letter without action. 

May 29th, 1941. TAG sent radio no. 837, file 320.3/37a (exhibit IL) stating 
that the initial war garrison would be reduced to 58,000. Reductions would 
come from troops other than Air Corps, Anti aircraft, and Aircraft Warning 
Service. 

Ul] June 5th, 1941.— Letter was written to TAG. file 320.3/37b (Exhibit 
IL) subject "War Garrison for Initial War Operations" stating 

(1) That Table I, (Exhibit IL) shows forces recommending totaling 59.425. 

(2) Statement that proper defense of Kaneohe Bay, Airfields, beaches and 
provisions for mobile reserve cannot be successful with only 59,000 troops. 

(3) Statement of minimum increase for Kaneohe Bav as follows: 1 Regi- 
ment Inf; 1 Regiment Field Artillery, 155 How (T. D.); 1 Battalion C. A. 155 
guns plus one additional battery; 1 Regiment C. A. (AA) ; 1 Battery C. A. 
12" Barbette guns. 

(4) Urgently requested that strength be increased from 58,000 to approxi- 
mately 71,500 as follows: 2 Inf. Regiments; 1 Regiment Field Artillery, 155 
How i Regiment CA (AA) SM; 1 Battalion CA 155 guns; 1 Battery CA 12" 

Barbette guns . . . total 11,279. 

(5) Again recommended that station complements for Schofield Barracks 
and Fort Shaffer be organized. This would give an increase of 731 officers 
and men for Schofield Barracks and 131 officers and men for Fort Shaffer. 

(6) Plans are to be submitted in the near future for garrisons each of 
outlying islands with a force consisting of approximately 1 regiment of 
Infantry and a composite battalion of Field Artillery, all of which wiU not be 
within war garrison strength. 

On July 22, 1941, 1st indorsement to exhibit IL file 320.3/37b (Exhibit IL) 
TAG said 

(1) War Garrison of 59,425 recommended by CGHD is reduced to 57,429 
and augmented by following units: 1 Regiment CA (A A) SM (less 1 gun 
battalion, band, basics), 1 Battalion CA 155 M guns with 1 additional 
Battery, 1 Battery CA. 

(2) Recommendation of war garrison for 71,500 officers and men is dis- 
approved. 

(3) Troops in excess of 59,690 authorized will be sent to Hawaii only in 
case the situation develops a need and if svich troops are available. 

18. May 2nd, 1941.— Letter written to TAG, file 320.3/38 (Exhibit IM) subject 
"Organization of Anti Aircraft Artillery Brigade" requesting authority to activate 
the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery 53 CA Brig, and the Intelligence 
Battery, 53rd CA Brig, about June 1, 1941. 

June 12, 1941.— Yirst indorsement from TAG to CGHD, file 320.2 (5/2/41) 
(38) (exhibit IM) gives authority to activate. 

[42] 19. November 6, ^94^— Radio No. 759 to Chief Ordnance, file 320.2/121 
(exhibit IN) stated that 6-37 mm. batteries now in Hawaiian Department. Plans 
made for six more by March, 1942, but only twenty (20) guns on hand. When 
and in what quantities will the one hundred (100) 37 mm. guns listed under 1941 
funds be sent? Reply not vet received. 

20. STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE. Before February 7, 1941, 
Field Orders No. 1 (Landing Operations) No. IW (Sabotage) and 1 NS (Naval 
Security) had been prepared. It was found during Maneuvers, May 1941, that 
these field orders were too cumbersome. On July 14th, 1941, a tentative Standing 
Operating Procedure, Hawaiian Department was issued to eaish officer in the 
Department with instructions that any suggested changes were to be reported to 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2481 

Department Headquarters by August 15, 1941. During the preparation of the 
final form of the Standing Operating Procedure, the tentative S. O. P. was in 
effect. The final form was issued on November 5, 1941. Each unit knew its 
mission in the event Alert No. 1, 2 or 3 was put into effect. Due to this planning 
(the S. O. P.) each unit was able to act quickly and promptly when the air raid 
took place on December 7, 1941. 

EFFORTS TO BETTER PREP.^RE THE CIVILIAN COMMUNITY FOR DEFENSE 

[43] Soon after taking command of the Hawaiian Department I made a 
survey with reference to possible defense measures to enable the civilian popula- 
tion to meet any emergency which might arise. I had been asked to speak to the 
Chamber of Commerce on Army Day, April 6th, and decided that this day was 
the best opportunity to obtain publicity, as practically all the important business 
men of Oahu were present on this occassion. I proposed the following items of 
prime importance: 

1. Production and storage of food. 

2. Organization of doctors and nurses for care of injured and wounded. 

3. Organization of an auxiliary to the police force to guard utilities and prevent 
sabotage. 

4. Preparation of plans and provision for evacuation of women and children 
and preparation of shelters for workers in the vicinit}' of central industries. 

(For complete remarks on this occasion, see Exhibit "10". 

Production and storage of food: As a result of mj- talk and support by the papers 
and certain men of importance in the community, the storage of food in the pantry 
of the home was put into effect at once, and the purchases from the retailers 
increased about 20% during the first month. 

For some years a study had been made of food production required and possible 
in the islands. A committee completed this work, and made definite assignment 
of acreage and crops to all plantations on the Islands. Plantation managers 
and the five big companies which act as factors for the various plantations all 
agreed to this plan. Necessary implements for changing from cane and pine- 
apples to truck gardening were listed for each plantation. Orders for seed for 
planting the first crop were placed with firms in the mainland, orders to be filled 
upon telegraphic advice. — Exhibit "IP". 

On December 10th, after completion of the inventory of food on hand, a meet- 
ing was held with the Presidents of the five big companies and of the Governor's 
Food Committee. The District Engineer was directed to purchase the seed and 
equipment at once, as it was believed the matter could be handled in less time in 
this [44] manner instead of having each plantation make purchases. 

The committee on storage of food determined the articles and tonnage of the 
essential elements of diet necessary to provide for the civil ])opulation for six 
months. The cost of these items was estimated to be $2,500,000 for human con- 
sumption and 8900,000 for feed for dairy cattle and poultry. This matter wa.s 
taken up with the War Department. 

Governor Poindexter and Delegate Sam King gave the storage of food their 
full support. However, the item was eliminated by the Bureau of the Budget 
and no action was gotten through Congress. The purchase of this emergency 
food reserve by the Department of Agriculture and the allocation of shipping 
therefor was authorized December 17th. Recent press dispatches indicate that 
the President has made an allotment for food production. 

Organization of Doctors and Nurses for care of injured and wounded: The Medical 
Society of Honolulu got squarely behind my effort to prepare the doctors and 
nurses for an emergency. Twenty (20) civilian-aid station groups were organ- 
ized and have had considerable practice in setting up their stations. They actu- 
allj' fiuictioned efficiently on December 7th. Sixteen (16) surgical teams were 
organized. They started reporting at 9:00 A. M. December 7th, and by 9:30 
all were employed. They are representative of the leading surgeons, anesthetists, 
etc., in the city. The regular operating staff at Tripler General Hospital was 
operating at 8:45 A. M. 

After several conferences the Red Cross agreed to purchase and store in Hono- 
lulu $200,000.00 worth of medicines and surgical supplies and equipment. Much 
of the equipment and supplies had been received prior to December 7th. 

Buildings suitable for hospitals were surveyed, and many of these have actually 
been equipped and operated since December 7th. 

Organization of auxiliary -police force: The organization of an auxiliary police 
force was effected and placed under the command of Major Douglas King by the 



2482 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Mayor of Honolulu. This force was given some training in taking over leading 
utilities and the use of firearms. It proved to be a very efficient force immedi- 
ately after the raid. 

Auxiliary fire fighters and fire wardens have been organized. Requests for 
fire-fighting equipment have been made to the Office of Civilian Defense, and 
also sent direct by the Governor to the same organization. 
U5] 

Evacuation and shelters: Detailed plans were drawn for evacuation camps, for 
trenches in parks, schools, etc., and for splinter-proof shelters in the vicinity of 
public utilities. A request for $2,800,000 for construction of these camps and 
shelters was made through the War Department and also direct by Governor 
Poindexter. The funds were not provided until after the attack December 7th. 
Since that date the President has made funds available to the Governor of the 
Territory of Hawaii for this purpose. — Exhibit "IQ" 

M-DAY BILL 

At the request of the Senate of tha Territory of Hawaii I appeared before that 
body and explained the value and the necessity for the passage of the M-Day bill. 
The passage was effected in the next few days and the measure was signed by the 
Governor. The bill enabled the Governor to organize emergency committees and 
carry out many things of great benefit in the medical work, evacuation and police 
work immertiateh following the attack on December 7th. 

LETltRS FROM CIVILIANS WITH RtFKRENCE TO MY EFFORTS TO IMPROVE CIVILIAN 

DEFENSE 

The following copies' of letters_have been received: Exhibit "IR" 

Honolulu, T. H., December 22, 1941. 
The President, The White House, Washington, D. C. 

Sir: We, the undersigned, representing substantial business and social organi- 
zations in Hawaii, and having had for many years in many ways a vital interest 
in the armed forces stationed in Hawaii, do hereby wish to express our sincere 
appreciation of the services rendered to this Territory and to our Nation by 
Lieutenant General Walter C. Short. 

We ht<ve found him at all times to be most cooperative and furthermore he has 
exercised a vigorous leadership in causing this community to prepare for an emer- 
gency such as exists at present. Almost a year ago he laid out a plan for this 
purpose and has taken all steps practicable toward carrying ou< such plan. 

General Short's thorough foresight and bis forceful presentation of his ideas to 
our "Territorial Legislature, to our local officials, and to our community in gen- 
eral have been very largely responsible for (a) the enactment of a sound "M-Day" 
Bill; (b) for the provision'of a Territorial Guard; (c) tor the de- [46] cision 
to increase stored food and to produce food; and (d) for the prevention of sabotage. 
He has shown a correct and sympathetic attitude toward the problems of the civil 
community in assuring cooperation of civilians. 

He has maintained a high morale in his Command and has conducted "alerts" 
from time to time. He has proceeded with preparing the troops and with plans, 
now looking for financing from federal funds, for adequate and safe storage of 
sufficient supplies and equipment of all sorts for their use in a probable emergency. 

We are encouraged by the fact that a committee has been appointed to go into 
various phases of the entire case, believing that the excellent men you have 
selected will render a just report, fair to all concerned. 

Meanwhile, we wish to express to yourself and to all concerned our high esteem 
and our full confidence in the character and ability of General Walter C. Short 
as a citizen and as an officer, whatever his assignment may be. 

This letter is prepared without the knowledge or consent of General Short or 
any other officials, merely in our hope that no unwarranted discredit may accrue 
to the record of such a conscientious and able officer, through adverse publicity 
or otherwise. This concern is in no way lessened by our vital interest in the 
adequate defense of Hawaii and our Nation. 

With very best respects and wishes, we are 
Yours very truly, 

Lester Petrie, City of Honolulu, Mayor; C. R. Hemenway, President, 
Hawaiian Trust Co., Ltd.: A. L. Dean, Vice-President, Alex- 
ander & Baldwin, Ltd.; Walter F. Dillingham, President, Oahu 
Railway & Land Co.; F. D. Lowrey, President, Lewers & Cook, 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2483 

Ltd.; H. H. Warner, Asst. Food Administrator, 0. C. D.; J. B. 
Poindexter, Governor of Hawaii; S. B. Kemp, Chief Justice, 
Supreme Court; T. G. S. Walker, Director, Civilian Defense for 
Oahu; John E. Russell, President, Theo H. Davies & Co., Ltd.; 
George S. Waterhouse, Ex. Vice-President, Bishop National of 
Hawaii and Honolulu; Cyril F. Damon, Ex. Vice-President, 
Bishop Trust Co., Ltd.; Briant H. Wells, Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent, Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association; H. A. Walker, Presi- 
dent, American Factors, Ltd.; S. M. Lowrey, Treasurer, American 
Factors, Ltd.; P. E. Spalding. President C. Brewer & Co., Ltd.; 
Frank E. Midkiff, Trustee, Bernice P. Bishop Estate; Edouard 
R. L. Doty, Terr. Director of Civilian Defense; James Winne, 
Mgr. Mdse. Dept., Alexander & Baldwin, Ltd. (now acting as 
Food Administrator and Supply Officer). 
C. C. to General Walter C. Short. 



[4?\ Major Disaster Council 

city and county of honolulu 

Office of the Director, Island of Oahu 

Honolulu, Hawaii, December 20, 1941- 
Lt. General Walter C. Short, 

Fort Shaffer. 

Dear General Short: Please allow me to express my sincere regret that our 
contact through Civilian Defense Plans has terminated. 

It was greatly due to your help and backing that our Civilian Organizations 
were so far advanced that they were able to function so splendidly during the 
attack. 

You will always be able to recollect that your determination to have our Civilian 
Groups Prepared saved many lives of our Sailors and Soldiers through the organ- 
ized effort of our Civilian Defense Medical committee and the many trucks that 
we had ready to he turned into ambulances at a minute's notice. 

Please be assured that you will carry the sincere thanks and Aloha of your manj- 
friends here who realize the distress you saved by urging and helping us to be 
prepared. 

Yours verv sincerelv, 

(s) T. G. S. Walker, 
T. G. S. Walker, 
Director, Civilian Defense, Island of Oahu. 



seal of the territory of hawah 

Territory' of Hawaii 

Executive Chambers 

HONOLULU 



23 December 1941. 



Lieutenant General Walter C. Short, 

Fort Shnfter, T. H. 

My Dear General Short: Having noted in the puljlic press that an investiga- 
tion is being made as to the military prej^aredness of the Army and Navy in 
Hawaii on December 7, 1941, I believe it appropriate that I make to you a state- 
ment as to the state of preparedness of the civil communities of these Islands for 
war when thev were so insidiouslv and treacherouslv attacked on December 7, 
1941. 

The citizens of the Hawaiian Islands have always appreciated that these Islands 
were important to National Defense from a military standpoint, b t it has been 
only since your arrival in these Islands on February 5, 1941 that it has been 
brought home to the civil population the importance of the part it would play 
in the event of a war in the Pacific. On December 7th, the citizens of these Islands 
met the hour of their test in such a manner as to make me proud to be the Chief 
Executive of these Islands. Your foresight in urging the population to prepare to 
meet the possible vicissitudes of war and the joint efforts of the Army and civil 
population in planning and preparing for this emergency was magnificently re- 
warded. 
♦ 



2484 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

It may be of interest to point out in detail some of the plans and preparations 
which bore fruit on December 7, 1941. 

(1) The enactment of the Hawaiian Defense Act by a special session of Legislaion 
called for that purpose. This legislation permits a mobilization of the entire civil 
economy of the Islands in the interest of National Defense or in the event of 
disaster. By virtue of this act, civilian [A^M defense was planned and 
many of its phases were brought to such a point of preparation that they were 
able to go into action immediately and to function effectively on December 7, 1941. 

(2j The -production and conservation of food: Householders were persistently 
urged to stock their shelves in canned food. It is estimated that this resulted in 
increasing the available food supply of the Hawaiian Islands by more than twenty 
percent. Federal appropriation was requested for procurement and storage for 
food reserve. This appropriation has, since December 7, 1941, been authorized. 
By agreement with plantation owners, plans were made for the procurement and 
storage of seed and the planting of certain large areas with quick growing food 
crops. Agreements were also made for the growing, in normal times, of these 
crops not usually grown in marketable quantities. In furtherance of this plan, 
the War Department was induced to permit the purchase of Island grown pota- 
toes for the use of the Army although the price was above that of mainland 
potatoes. In anticipation of the receipt of reserve supplies of food asked for in 
the emergency, the Army supported a certificate of necessity for building an 
adequate warehouse to meet these needs. This warehouse is now available for 
the storage of food supply when it arrives. 

(3) The medical facilities for the care of the injured and wounded during any 
disaster was one of the first things accomplished by the civilians of these Islands 
for an emergency. This resulted in mobilizing the entire medical professoin of 
the Islands with all its medical facilities. Approximately three' thousand persons 
were given training and instruction in First-Aid as required by the Red Cross. 
The persons thus trained assisted in carrying out the arduous tasks of evacuation. 
Twenty First-Aid units were organized, each unit consisting of personnel of about 
one hundred and twenty. An ambulance corps of one hundred and forty im- 
provised ambulances were organized. The performance of their tasks by these 
groups was one of the higlilights of the civil defense efforts on December 7, 1941. 

(4) Plans for the evacuation of wom,en and children and the [4'^c] prepara- 
tion of shelters for workers in essential industries had reached a high state of 
perfection on December 7, 1941, and the evacuation of women and children from 
areas attacked was accomplished in a most admirable manner. 

(5) An auxiliary police force to guard utilities and to prevent sabotage was 
organized at an early date in our preparation and it was al:)le to function instantly 
when called upon to do so on the morning of December 7th. Their work of this 
force was exceptional and excellent. 

(6) Legislation authorizing a home guard was enacted at the special session of 
the Territorial Legislature. It was well planned and so organized that 1400 of 
such home guardsmen could and were placed on duty thereby relieving members 
of the Army for other military duty. 

(7) There were many other matterf^ too numerous to detail here which were 
planned and accomplished at your instigation. Imporcant among these was the 
bringing home to the public the urgent necessity for cooperation and public 
service in times of emergency. 

All of the foregoing required tremendous effort on the part of the local authori- 
ties, the citizenry and military authorities. All such efforts have been rewarded 
since December 7, 1941, in that Territorial and City Governments and all phases 
of the public welfare have overcome all obstacles and have operated smoothly as 
a direct result of prior planning and training. 

It is my belief that the public has confidence in the military and civil authori- 
ties. The fact that the Japanese Government has seen fit to inflict a treacherous 
attack has noi/ in any way diminished the faith of this community in your demon- 
strated abilities. I wish to state that the magnificent way in which the Territory 
of Hawaii met its problem in its crucial hour was in a large measure due to your 
foresight. I am deeply grateful for your efforts on behalf of the Territory. 

You are at liberty to use this letter in any way which you see fit. THIS IS 
A TRUE COPY. 

Very sincerely yours, 

(S) J. B. POINDEXTER, 

Governor of Hawaii. 
L. W. Truman, 
CaptaiUf Infantry. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2485 

[48] I have presented many of my actions, both with reference to the military 
defense of the islands and the preparations of the civil community for defense, to 
show that I have taken both a very active and an intelligent part in this work from 
the time of my arrival in the Hawaiian Department. 

I should be very glad if this Committee would see fit to call before it a number 
of officers of my command, preferably from officers of high enough rank to know 
what I have^accomplished, and from staff officers who are familiar with the work 
that has been carried out during the past ten months. I would also like very 
much to have the Governor and some of the leading business men called before 
the Commission to tell what the civil community thinks of the work that I have 
done over the past ten months. 

CONCLUSIONS 

1. The radiogram from the War Department thu CINCUS fleet UCS of October 
16th emphasized that measures taken by me during the grave situation of the 
Japanese negotiations should not disclose strategic intention nor constitute 
provocative actions against Japan. 

The radiogram of November 27th reiterated that action should be carried out 
so as "not repeat not to disclose intent", not alarm civil population, and avoid 
unnecessary publicity. 

When the War Department was notified that the Hawaiian Department was 
alerted against sabotage it not only did not indicate that the command should be 
alerted against a hostile surface, sub-surface, ground or air attack, but replied 
emphasizing the necessity for protection against sabotage and subversive meas- 
ures. This, taken in connection with the two previous radiograms mentioned, 
indicated to me a tacit consent to the alert against sabotage ordered by the 
Hawaiian Department. 

2. The Hawaiian Department is not provided with an agency for locating enemy 
ships in various parts of the world. Such information as it may acquire on this 
subject must be obtained from the Fourteenth Naval District or from the War 
Department. 

The "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan, Hawaiian Coastal Frontier" places 
upon the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District the responsibility for 
distant reconnaissance. Annex #7 to the "Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan" 
provides that when naval forces are insufficient for long distance patrol and search 
operations and army aircraft are made available, these will be under the tactical 
control of the naval command during search operations. That means that the 
army planes receive their missions and all instructions from the naval commander 
and carry out the search as he deems necessary in order to carry out his respon- 
sibility for distant reconnaissance. 

[49] During the period November 27th to December 6th, the Navy made 
no request for army planes to participate in distance reconnaissance. To me 
this meant that they had definite information of the location of enemy carriers 
re that the number unaccounted for was such that naval planes could make the 
necessary reconnaissance without the assistance from the army. During this 
poriod I was in frequent conferences with the Commander in Chief of the United 
States Fleet and the commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District, and at no 
time was anything said to indicate that they feared the possibility of an attack 
by the Japanese by air. In fact, the sentiment was expressed by a naval staff 
officer that there was no probability of such an attack. With a large part of the 
United States Navy in Hawaiian waters and with their sources of information, I 
was convinced that the Navy would be able either to intercept any carrier 
attempting to approach Oahu or at least to obtain such information from task 
forces or by reconnaissance as to make them aware of the presence of carriers 
in the Hawaiian waters and of the possibility of an air attack. 

3. Action of the War Department on December 5th and as late as 1:30 A. M., 
Eastern standard time, December 7th, in dispatching planes from the mainland 
to Honolulu without ammunition indicated that the War Department did not 
believe in the probability of an early Japanese attack upon Honolulu. 

I felt that I had a right to expect the War Department to furnish me by the 
most rapid means possible information should a real crisis arise in Japanese 
relations. I did not expect that when the crisis arose the desire for secrecy would 
be considered more important than the element of time. Had the message in 
regard to the Japanese ultimatum and the burning of their code machines 
been given me by telephone as an urgent message in the clearwithout loss of time 
for encoding and decoding, etc., I, in all probability, would have had approximately 
two hours in which to make detailed preparations to meet an immediate attack. 



2486 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

4. I feel that my work in the Hawaiian Department should be judged by my 
activities throughout the complete period from the assumption of command on 
February 7, until my relief upon December 16th. I believe that any careful 
examination of my work during that period will prove that I have worked very 
seriously at the job and have accomplished measures of very considerable im- 
portance. I do not see how I could better have carried out what appeared to be 
the desires of the War Department unless I was supposed to know more than the 
War Department about the danger of Japanese attack and more than the Navy 
Department about the location of the Japanese carriers. To have taken more 
steps in preparation against a Japanese attack than I did would have alarmed the 
civil population and caused publicity contrary [50] to War Department 
instructions. I do not believe that I should be found guilty even of an error in 
judgment because I did not have the vision to foresee that the War Department would 
not notify me of a crisis in the least possible time and that the Navy with its 
large fleet in Hawaiian waters would not be able to carry out its mission of inter- 
cepting Japanese carriers, or at least detecting their presence in Hawaiian waters 
and informing me of the fact. 
[57a] [Exhibit A] 

[57] Copy 

[SECRET] 

U. S. Naval Communication Service 

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF U. S. PACIFIC FLEET 

[Paraphrase] 
NOTE FOR COMMANDING GENERAL HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT: 

THE FOLLOWING IS A PARAPHRASE OF A DISPATCH FROM THE 
CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS WHICH I HAVE BEEN DIRECTED TO 
PASS TO YOU QUOTE: 

Japanese cabinet resignation creates a grave situation x if a new cabinet is 
formed it probably will be anti-American and strongly nationalistic x if the 
Konoye cabinet remains it will operate under a new mandate which will not 
include rapprochement with the United States x either way hostilities between 
Japan and Russia are strongly possible x since Britain and the US are held respon- 
sible by Japan for her present desperate situation there is also a possibility Japan 
may attack these two powers x view of these possibilities you will take due pre- 
cautions including such preparatory deployments as will not disclose strategic 
intention nor constitute provocative actions against Japan x 

CBO CRJ DATE 16 OCT 41 SERIAL NO. 10-340 

ORIGINATOR ACTION 

OPNAV CINCLANT INFORMATION 

CINCPAC 
CINCAF 
A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern 
Edward von Geldern, 
2nd Lt., F. A. 

[Exhibit B] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 

fort shafter, t. h, 
PI WAR PRTY 

Washn DC 611 PM Nov 27 1941 
P C 

Hawn Dept Ft Shafter T. H. 
472 27th negotiations with Japan appear to be terminated to all practical 
purposes with only the barest possibilities that the Japanese Government might 
come back and offer to continue stop Japanese future action unpredictible but 
hostile action possible at any moment stop if hostilities cannot comma repeat 
cannot comma be avoided the United States desires that Japan commit the first 
overt act stop this policy should not comma repeat not comma be construed as 
restricting you to a course of action that might jeopardize your defense stop prior 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2487 

to hostile Japanese action you are directed to undertake such reconnaissance and 
other measures as you deem necessary but these measures should be carried out 
so as not comma repeat not comma to alarm civil population or disclose intent 
stop report measures taken stop should hostilities occur you will carry out the 
tasks assigned in rainbow five so far as they pertain to Japan stop limit dissemi- 
nation of this highly secret information to minimum essential officers 
True Copy Marshall 

O. M. Cutler 

O M Cutler 116P/27 

Lt Col Infantry 

Note: This form to be used oiily for Radiograms and Cablegrams. One copy only to be submitted. 
The making of an e.xact copy of Secret or Confidential Radiograms is forbidden. Only such extracts as are 
absolutely necessary will be made and marked secret or confidential as the ease may be. This copy will 
be safeguarded with the greatest care and when no longer required will be returned to the Records Division, 
Adjutant General's Office, without delay. (AR 380-5) 

Form H. D. No. 1173 (Revised)— 1664 Honolulu 10-10-40 5M. 

[Exhibit C] 

[restricted] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 5 November 1941. 
Subject: Standing Operating Procedure 
To: Distribution "B", "L", and "G" less 1, 2, 3 and 5 

1. Attention is directed to attached Standing Operating Procedure, Hawaiian 
Department, which supersedes Tentative Standing Operating Procedure, Hawaii- 
an Department, 14 July 1941. 

2. Issuing headquarters will collect and destroy all copies of Tentative Standing 
Operating Procedure in the possession of units and officers. 

3. Department General and Special Staff Sections and Commanders of major 
echelons, districts, department troops and station complements directly under 
this headquarters will submit, for approval of this headquarters, Standing Operat- 
ing Procedures, Movement and Loading Tables. Chiefs of Special Staff Sections, 
HHD, will include in their SOP HD all installations under their supervision. 

By command of Lieutenant General SHORT: 

Robert H. Dunlop 
Robert H. Dunlop, 

Colonel, A. G. D., 

Adjutant General. 
1 Inclosure: SOP HD 

[restricted] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fori Shafter, T. H., 5 November 1941. 
Subject: Standing Operating Procedure 
To: Distribution "B", "L" and "G" less 1, 2, 3 and 5 

1. Attention is directed to attached Standing Operating Procedure, Hawaiian 
Department, which supersedes Tentative Standing Operating Procedure, Hawaiian 
Department, 14 July 1941. 

2. Issuing headquarters will collect and destroy all copies of Tentative Standing 
Operating Procedure in the possession of units and officers. 

3. Department General and Special Staff Sections and Commanders of major 
echelons, districts, dei)artment troops and station complements directly under 
this headquarters will submit, for approval of this headquarters, Standing Oper- 
ating Procedures, Movement and Loading Tables. Chiefs of Special Staff 
Sections, HHD, will include in their SOP HD all installations under their super- 
vision. 

By command of Lieutenant General SHORT: 

Robert H. Dunlop, 
RoBEPT H. Dunlop, 

Colonel, A. G. D., 

Adjutant General. 
1 Inclosure: SOP HD 

RESTRICTED 
79716— 46— E.\. 145, vol. 4 3 



2488 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[a] [RESTRICTED] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T H, 5 November 1941. 

Standing Operating Procedure 
Hawaiian Department 

Section I— General 
Par Subject Page 

1 Purpose 

2 Unit Procedures 

3 Short Title 

4 Department Headquarters 

5 Tactical Principles 

6 Security 

7 Liaison 

8 Orders 2 

9 Movement 2 

10 Antiaircraft Defense 3 

11 Installations and Alarm System 3 

12 Guides 3 

Section II— Alerts 

13 Alerts 3 

14 Alert No. 1 3 

15 Alert No. 2 5 

16 Alert No. 3 8 

Section III— Condition of Readiness for Aircraft 

17 Condition of Readiness 10 

Section IV— Intelligence 

18 Intelligence Standing Operating Procedure 11 

19 Essential Elements of Enemy Information 11 

20 Measures to Obtain Informatign 11 

21 Measures for Handling 15 

22 Reports and Distribution 15 

23 Department G-2 15 

24 G-2 Forms 16 

Section V— Administration 

25 Supply ■ 16 

26 Evacuation 18 

27 Traffic 19 

28 Motor Transportation 19 

[1] section I — GENERAL 

1. PURPOSE. — The purpose of a "Standing Operating Procedure" is stated 
in paragraph 159, FM 100-5, Field Service Regulations, Operations, and paragraph 
56. FM 101-5, Staff Officers' Field Manual. 

2. UNIT PROCEDURES.— Conforming to the Department Procedure, sub- 
ordinate units and staff sections will develop appropriate Standing Operating 
Procedures. 

3. SHORT TITLE.— "SOP HD" will signify this Standing Operating Pro- 
cedure. 

4. DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS.— Department Headquarters may 
operate either as a whole or in two groups. When divided, the headquarters will 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2489 

consist of a forward and a rear echelon, the composition of which ordinarily will 
be as follows: 

a. FORWARD ECHELON.— 

Commanding General and Aides 

General Staff (less G-1 and G-5) 

Secretary to General Staff 

Engineer Officer 

Signal Officer 

Chemical Officer 

Ordnance Officer 

Surgeon 

Headquarters Commandant 

Provost Marshal. 
6. REAR ECHELON.— 

G-1 

G-5 

Special Staff (less those in forward echelon). 

5. TACTICAL PRINCIPLES.— See FM 31-10, Coast Defense. The chief 
tactical principles applicable to the problem of the defense of OAHU and the air 
fields on the outlying islands are as follows: 

a. Complete organization of the ground 

b. Position to be held lightly 

c. Large reserves, held mobile, with motor transportation sufficient to transport 
them 

d. Automatic counter-attack. 

6. SECURITY. — Every unit is responsible for its security at all times from 
hostile ground or air forces. See paragraphs 233 to 273, inclusive, FM 100-5. 

7. LIAISON. — a. OFFICERS. — During all operations and alerts, a liaison 
officer with motor transportation will be sent from each of the following units to 
Department Headquarters and will remain thereat except when on a mission to 
their own headquarters: 

24th Infantry Division 

25th Infantry Division 
[2] Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command 

Hawaiian Air Force 

86th Observation Squadron 

Each Department Reserve Unit. 
b. UNITS. — Both lateral and vertical liaison are mandatory. The responsi- 
bility therefor is from right to left and from front to rear. Combat teams operat- 
ing in areas where coast artillery group stations are in operation will establish 
liaison with those stations. 

8. ORDERS. — a. The Department Commander will issue orders covering the 
action of the Infantry Divisions, the Hawaiian Air Force, the Hawaiian Coast 
Artillery Command, Department Reserve units and all attached troops. 

b. Orders issued by the Department (except as in c below) will be brief written 
field orders with an operation map. Circumstances may require the issuance of 
an oral order, but this will be confirmed later in writing. 

c. Fragmentary orders, oral or written, may be issued when appropriate. 
Copies of the Department Commander's decision or directives, together with a 
roughly sketched operation map, will be sent by staff officers to lower units as 
soon as issued in order that plans may be initiated prior to receipt of the field 
order from the Department. 

d. To expedite issue and to conserve time, unit commanders and staff officers 
will dictate their decisions, directives, plans and orders. All commanders and 
staff officers will perfect themselves in the dictation of orders. Competent 
stenographer-clerks and draftsmen will be trained within each headquarters. 

9. MOVEMENT. — a. In general, all troops will be moved by motor. The 
maximum space in trucks will be utilized for the troops (standing if necessary) 
since all movements are necessarily for short distances. 



2490 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

b. Trucks will not close up and every effort will be made to avoid halting in the 
open. Maximum use will be taken of overhead cover, and vehicles either in 
bivouac or assembly areas will always be dispersed when in the open, and will be 
dispersed to the maximum extent practicable when in concealed positions. 

c. In tactical movements, vehicles will be maintained at maximum speed 
authorized by law, consistent with safety. (This may be satisfactorily accom- 
plished by restricting the leading vehicle to 10 miles per hour less than the maxi- 
mum authorized; the others, not exceeding the maximum authorized speed). 

d. All tactical movements in daylight will be by infiltration, FM 25-10, the 
distance between vehicles being not less than 300 yards. Administrative marches 
will be made with not less than safe driving distance between vehicles, or 
any distance greater than safe driving distance which will facilitate the movement 
(paragraph 31, FM 25-10). When necessary, officers' control points and route 
markers (paragraph 94, FM 25-10) will be utilized. 

e. All movements under Alert No. 1 will be administrative. 

/. Motor vehicles operating at night, at the discretion of local commanders, 
will be (1) in convoy with standard blackout or blue lights with a shielded tail 
light on all vehicles, or (2) in the case of convoys traveling closed up, with standard 
blackout or blue lights on leading vehicle and a shielded tail light on the rear 
vehicle, and no lights on the others, or (3) no lights when operating on one way 
secondary roads, and cross-country, on military reservations and leased lands. 
On two-way roads the distance between vehicles and/or serials will be sufficient 
to permit the unimpeded flow of traffic. 

[3] g. Trucks attached to a unit for a specific mission will revert to control 
of the parent unit when the specific mission has been accomplished. 

10. ANTIAIRCRAFT DEFENSE.— a. Antiaircraft defense is a responsibilitv 
of every unit. See paragraphs 261-273, FM 100-5. 

h. All Infantry units not occupying front line positions will have their automatic 
weapons habitually in readiness for antiaircraft defense, and all other units will 
be prepared likewise to engage hostile aircraft. 

c. On marches, all small arms suitable for use against aircraft will be in readiness 
for action. When enemy air action is imminent trucks normally will halt, troops 
will detruck, disperse and fire on enemy planes. 

d. All unit commanders will be held responsible for the following: 

(1) Maintenance of air guards to give timely warning of the approach of hostile 
aviation. 

(2) Adoption of necessary measures to prevent hostile observation and aerial 
photography through advantageous use of terrain, utilization of cover, and use 
of camouflage. 

(3) Reduction of vulnerability to air attack and ol)servation by dispersion of 
personnel and materiel when in bivouac or in position and by increased speed 
during movement. 

11. INSTALLATIONS AND ALARM SYSTEM.— All important installa- 
tions not protected by the Territorial Home Guard will be guarded by troops. 
An adequate alarm system will be established in connection therewith. 

12. GUIDES. — a. In case of a relief, guides from the relieved organization will 
meet the incoming unit and remain with it until ordered back to their organization 
by the commander of the incoming unit. 

b. Whenever units are ordered to another sector for support or attachment, 
the sector commander will provide the necessary guides to assist the supporting 
or attached units. 

SECTION II ALERTS 

13. All defense measures are classified under one of the three (3) Alerts as 
indicated below. Operations under any Alert will be initiated by a Department 
order, -except in case of a surprise hostile attack. See paragraph 15/ (8) below. 

14. ALERT NO. 1. — a. This alert is a defense against acts of sabotage and 
uprisings within the islands, with no threat from without. 

b. At DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, all General and Special Staff 
Sections will continue with their usual duties at their present stations, pending 
further orders. 

c. DEPARTMENT TROOPS will carry on their normal training, pending 
instructions from this Headquarters. 

d. Each INFANTRY DIVISION will: 

(1) Suppress all civil disorders, including sabotage, in its assigned sector. 
U] (2) Maintain one (1) infantry battalion with motor transportation 

sufficient to transport it, prepared to move on one (1) hour's notice. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2491 

(3) Protect the SCHOFIELD BARRACKS Reservation and all vital installa- 
tions (except those on garrisoned Army and Nav\^ Reservations) in its assigned 
sector, not protected by the Territorial Home Guard. The following are 
among the important ones: 

Police District No. 1, see paragraph 14 /i (2) below 

Command and Fire Control Cable Sj'stem, see inclosure No. 1 

Railway and Highway Bridges, see inclosure No. 2 

Water supply for SCHOFIELD BARRACKS 

Radio Station at PUU MANAWAHUA 

WAL\U Generating Plant 

Telephone Exchanges at WAIPAHU, WAHIAWA, WAIALUA (in HALEIWA), 
LAIE and KANEOHE 

Electric sub-stations at WAHIAWA, WAIALUA, KAHUKU, KAILUA, 
WAIPIO and EWA, and electric power lines from WAIPIO-WAHIAWA- 
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, inclusive, and to FORT BARRETTE, exclusive, 
from KOOLAU switch station — BELLOWS FIELD, .see inclosure No. 3 

Cold Storage Plant in WAHIAWA 

Pumping Stations at MO AN ALU A and KAPAHULU. 

(4) The 2oth Infantrv Division will assist the Navy in guarding the pumping 
stations at AIEA and HALAWA. 

(5) See Territorial Home Guard, paragraph 14 j below. 

e. The HAWAIIAN COAST ARTILLERY COMMAND will: 

(1) Protect all seacoast and antiaircraft armament, searchlights, observation 
and fire control installations, and other elements of the seacoast and antiaircraft 
defense. 

(2) Protect all vital installations on posts and reservations of the command. 

(3) Protect the Radio Beacon on Sand Island. 

(4) Provide a guard for the rear echelon of Department Headquarters and 
Tripler General Hospital. 

/. The HAWAIIAN AIR FORCE will: 

(1) Protect all vital installations on posts on OAHU garrisoned by air forces. 

(2) Assist in defense of air fields on outlying islands by cooperation of local 
base detachments with District Commanders. See paragraph 14 g below. 

g. The DISTRICT COMMANDERS, assisted by the air corps detachments 
within the districts, will: 

Defend the air fields and vital installations thereat against acts of sabotage, 
and maintain order in the civil community. 

h. The DEPARTMENT PROVOST AIARSHAL, in addition to his normal 
duties, assisted by the Division Provost Marshals, will: 

(1) Regulate tfafl^ic on OAHU. 

(2) Assist the 25th Infantry Division in posting guards on vital installation. 
[5] (3) Establish liaLson with the local police force. 

i. The STATION COMPLEMENTS of HICKAM, WHEELER and BEL- 
LOWS FIELDS, under command of the Hawaiian Air Force, will assist in the 
protection of all vital installations on their respective posts. 

j. TERRITORIAL H0:ME GUARD.— Upon the formation of the Territorial 
Home Guard, recently authorized by the Territorial Legislature, it is anticipated 
that this organization will relieve the Infantry Divisions and the District Com- 
manders of responsibility for the protection of all vital installations, except the 
Command and Fire Control Cable System and those installations on Army and 
Navy Reservations. See paragraph 14 d (3) and g above. Instructions will be 
issued. 

15. ALERT NO. 2. — a. This alert is applicable to a condition more serious 
than ,\lert No. 1. Security against attacks from hostile sub-surface, surface, 
and air-craft, in addition to defense against acts of sabotage and uprisings, is 
provided. 

h. At DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, only the G-2 and G-3 Sections 
will be required to operate on a 24-hour basis. All other sections of the General 
and Special Staffs will continue with their normal schedule. 

c. DEPARTMENT TROOPS will carry on their normal training, pending 
instructions from this Headquarters. 

d. Each INFANTRY DIVISION will: 

(1) Suppress all civil disorders, including sabotage, in its assigned sector. 

(2) Maintain available all units at fifty percent (50%) of their present strength, 
except those required under (3), (4) and (5) below. 

(3) Maintain one (1) infantry battalion with motor transportation sufficient to 
tran.sport it, prepared to move on one (1) hour's notice. 



2492 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(4) Protect the SCHOFIELD BARRACKS Reservation and all vital installa- 
tions (except those ori garrisoned Army and Navy Reservations) in its assigned 
sector, not protected by the Territorial Home Guard. The following are among 
the important ones: 

Police District No. 1, see paragraph 15 h (2) below 

Command and Fire Control Cable System, see inclosure No. 1 

Railway and Highway Bridges, see inclosure No. 2 

Water supply for SCHOFIELD BARRACKS 

Radio Station at PUU MANAWAHUA 

WAIAU Generating Plant 

Telephone exchanges at WAIPAHU, WAHIAWA, WAIALUA (in HALEIWA,) 
LAIE and KANEOHE 

Electric sub-stations at WAHIAWA, WAIALUA, KAHUKU, KAILUA, 
WAIPIO and EWA, and electric power lines from WAIPIO-WAHIAWA— 
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, inclusive, and to FORT BARRETTE, exclusive, 
from KOOLAU switch station— BELLOWS FIELD, see inclosure No. 3 

Cold Storage Plant in WAHIAWA 

Pumping Stations at MOANALUA and KAPAHULU. 

(5) The 25th Infantrv Division will assist the Navy in guarding the pumping 
stations at AIEA and HALAWA. 

[6] (6) Place 240mm. howitzers in position, establish the necessary guards 
and, when directed, place ammunition at positions. 

(7) Release Field Artillery units manning seacoast armament (155mrQ guns) 
to Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command. See paragraph 15 e below. 

(8) See Territorial Home Guard, paragraph 15 I below. 

e. The HAWAIIAN COAST ARTILLERY COMMAND, and attached Field 
ArtiUery, will: 

(1) Occupy initial seacoast and antiaircraft defense positions, except that rail- 
way batteries will remain at FORT KAMEHAMEHA or where emplaced. 

(2) Release the 53d AA Brigade to the Interceptor Command for operational 
control. 

(3) Protect all seacoast and antiaircraft armament, searchlights, observation 
and fire control installations, and other elements of the seacoast and antiaircraft 
defense. 

(4) Protect all vital installations on posts and reservations of the command, 
except FORT SHAFTER. For FORT SHAFTER, see paragraph 15 k (1) 
below. 

(5) Support Naval forces within range of seacoast armament. 

(6) Prevent approach of and landing from hostile vessels. 

(7) Coordinate aU seacoast intelligence agencies. 

(8) Coordinate seacoast defense with the Inshore Patrol. 

(9) Protect the Radio Beacon on Sand Island. 

(10) Provide Army personnel required to operate the Harbor Control Post. 
/. The HAWAIIAN AIR FORCE wiU: 

(1) Maintain aircraft and crews in condition of readiness as directed by this 
headquarters. See paragraph 17. 

(2) Release without delay all pursuit aircraft to the Interceptor Command. 

(3) Prepare aircraft for dispatch to fields on outlying islands and upon arrival 
thereat, disperse on fields. 

(4) Disperse bombers with crews. 

(5) Disperse pursuit planes with crews to bunkers. 

(6) Protect aU vital installations on posts on OAHU garrisoned by air forces. 

(7) Assist in defense of air fields on outlying islands by cooperation of local 
base detachments with District Commanders. See paragraph 15 g below. 

(8) In case of surprise hostile attack: 

(a) Release to Navy for operational control all bombers in condition of readi- 
ness "A". The bomber commander wiU report to the Commander of Patrol 
Wing TWO. 

[7] (b) Receive all available shore based Naval and Marine Corps fighter 
planes in appropriate condition of readiness and release them to the Interceptor 
Command for operational control. 

g. The DISTRICT COMMANDERS, assisted by the air corps detachments 
within the districts, will: 

Defend the air fields and vital installations thereat against acts of sabotage, 
hostile attacks, and maintain order in the civil community. 

h. The DEPARTMENT PROVOST MARSHAL, assisted by the Division 
Provost Marshals, in addition to his normal duties, will: 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2493 

(1) Regulate traffic on OAHU, 

(2) Assist the 25th Infantry Division in posting guards on vital installations. 

(3) Establish liaison with the local police force. 

(4) Be prepared to assist civilian authorities in all Air Raid Precautions includ- 
ing blackout, radio silence and evacuation of civilians from dangerous areas. 

(5) Be prepared to establish facilities for gathering and caring for refugees. 

(6) Protect FORT SH AFTER. See paragraph 15 k (1). 
i. The DEPARTMENT SIGNAL OFFICER will: 

(1) Insure occupation of all battle stations by the Aircraft Warning Service 
and then release it to the Interceptor Command. 

(2) Insure that joint Army-Navy communications are in readiness for imme- 
diate emplovment. 

j. The INTERCEPTOR COMMAND will: 

Coordinate and control the operations of pursuit aircraft, antiaircraft artillery 
(including available Naval and ^larine Corps AA Artillery), the Aircraft Warning 
Service, and attached units, and will provide for the coordination of antiaircraft 
measures of units not under military control, to include: 

(1) Arrival and departure of all friendly aircraft. 

(2) The coordination of the antiaircraft fire of Naval ships in PEARL and/or 
HONOLULU HARBORS. 

(3) Transmission of appropriate warnings to all interested agencies. 
k. STATION COMPLEMENTS: 

(1) The FORT SHAFTER Complement, under the supervision of the Depart- 
ment Provost Marshal, will protect all vital installations on FORT SHAFTER 
and, in addition thereto, will provide a guard for the rear echelon of Department 
Headquarters and Tripler General Hospital. 

(2) The HICKAM, WHEELER and BELLOWS FIELDS Complements, 
under command of the Hawaiian Air Force, will assist in the defense of their 
respective posts against sabotage, air and ground attacks. 

[8] 1. TERRITORIAL HOME GUARD.— Upon the formation of the 
Territorial Home Guard, recently authorized by the Territorial Legislature, it is 
anticipated that this organization will relieve the Infantry Divisions and the 
District Commanders of responsibility for the protection of all vital installations, 
except the Command and Fire Control Cable System and those installations on 
Army and Navy Reservations. See paragraph 15 d (4) and g above. Instruc- 
tions will be issued. 

16. ALERT NO. 3.- — a. This alert requires the occupation of all field positions 
by all units, prepared for maximum defense of OAHU and the Army installations 
on outlving islands. 

h. At DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS: 

(1) All sections of the forward echelon (see paragraph 4 a) will occupy their 
stations at forward command post, prepared to operate on a 24-hour basis. 

(2) All sections of the rear echelon (see paragraph 4 h) will continue their usual 
duties at their present stations. Blackout instructions will be complied with. 

c. DEPARTMENT TROOPS will remain in condition of mobile readiness at 
their permanent stations, pending instructions from this headquarters. 

d. Each INFANTRY DIVISION will: 

(1) Defend its assigned sector on OAHU. 

(2) Protect all vital installations (except those on garrisoned Army and Navy 
Reservations) in its assigned sector, not protected by the Territorial Home 
Guard. 

(3) Release all available Bands to the Commanding Officer, SCHOFIELD 
BARRACKS. 

(4) The 25th Infantry Division will assist the Navy in guarding the pumping 
stations at AIEA and HA LAW A. 

(5) Place 240mm howitzers in position. 

(6) Release Field Artillery units manning seacoast armament (155mm guns) 
to Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command. See paragraph 16 e l^elow. 

(7) See Territorial Home Guard, paragraph 16 m below. 

e. The HAWAIIAN COAST ARTILLERY COMMAND, and attached De- 
tachment Field Artillery, will: 

(1) Occupy initial seacoast and antiaircraft positions. 

(2) Support Naval forces within range of seacoast armament. 

(3) Prevent approach of and landing from hostile vessels. 

(4) Support the Infantry Divisions. 

(5) Coordinate all seacoast intelligence agencies. 

(6) Coordinate seacoast defense with the Inshore Patrol. 



2494 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(7) Provide the Army personnel required to operate the Harbor Control Post. 
[9] (8) Release the 53d AA Brigade to the Interceptor Command for 
operational control. 

(9) Protect all vital installations on posts and reservations of the command, 
except FORT SHAFTER. For FORT SHAFTER, see paragraph 16 1 (2) below. 

(10) Protect all seacoast and antiaircraft armament, searchlights, observa- 
tion and fire control installations, and other elements of the seacoast and anti- 
aircraft defense. 

/. The HAWAIIAN AIR FORCE will: 

(1) Destory enemy aircraft. 

(2) Carry out bombing missions as directed. 

(3) Cooperate with Naval air forces. 

(4) On OAHU, defend all posts garrisoned by air forces against sabotage, air 
and ground attacks. 

(5) Assist in defense of air fields on outlying islands by cooperation of local base 
detachments with District Commanders. See paragraph 16 /? below. 

(6) Arm all planes, except that normally bombs will not be loaded on ships dis- 
patched to outlaying islands. See paragraph 25 e (8). 

(7) Prepare aircraft for dispatch to fields on outlying islands and upon arrival 
thereat, disperse on fields. 

(8) Disperse bombers with crews. 

(9) Disperse pursuit planes with crews to bunkers. 

(10) Perform observation, command and photographic missions. 

(11) Release without delay all pursuit aircraft to the Interceptor Command. 
(J. G-5 will be prepared to establish the following: 

(1) A Food Administration. 

(2) A Labor Procurement Service. 

h. The DISTRICT COMMANDERS of HAWAII, MAUI (includes MOLO- 
KAI) and K.AUAI Districts, assisted by the air corps detachments present within 
the districts, will: 

Defend the air fields against acts of sabotage, hostile attacks, and maintain 
order in the civil community. 

7. The DEPARTMENT PROVOST MARSHAL, assisted by the Division 
Provost Marshals, in addition to his normal duties, will: 

(1) Regulate traflic on OAHU. 

(2) Assist the 25th Infantry Division in posting guards on vital installations. 

(3) Establish liasion with the local police force. 

(4) Be prepared to assist civilian authorities in all Air Raid Precautions includ- 
ing blackout, radio silence and evacuation of civilians from dangerous areas. 

(5) Be prepared to establish facilities for gathering and caring for refugees. 
[10] (6) Protect FORT SHAFTER. See paragraph 16 i (2) below. 

j. The INTERCEPTOR COMMAND will coordinate and control the opera- 
tions of pursuit aircraft, antiaircraft artillery (including available Naval and 
Marine Corps A A Artillery), the aircraft warning service, and attached units, 
and will provide for the coordination of antiaircraft measures of units not under 
militarv control to include: 

(1) Arrival and departure of all friendly aircraft. 

(2) The coordination of the antiaircraft fire of Naval ships in PEARL and/or 
HONOLULU HARBORS. 

(3) Transmission of appropriate warnings to all interested agencies. 
k. The DEPARTMENT SIGNAL OFFICER will: 

(1) Insure occupation of all battle stations by the Aircraft Warning Service 
and then release it to the Interceptor Command. 

(2) Insure that joint Army-Navy communications are in readiness for im- 
mediate employment. 

(3) Be prepared to assume control over essential civilian communications. 
I. STATION COMPLEMENTS.— 

(1) The SCHOFIELD BARRACKS Complement will protect all vital in- 
stallations on the Schofield Reservation. 

(2) The FORT SHAFTER Complement, imder the supervision of the Depart- 
ment Provost Marshal, will protect all vital installations on FORT SHAFTER 
and, in addition thereto, will provide a guard for the rear echelon of Department 
Headquarters and Tripler General Hospital. 

(3) The HICKAM, WHEELER and BELLOWS FIELDS Complements, 
under command of the Hawaiian Air Force, will assist in the defense of their 
respective posts against sabotage, air and ground attacks. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2495 

7n. TERRITORIAL HOME GUARD.— l^on the formation of the Territorial 
Home Guard, recently authorized by the Territorial Legislature, it is anticipated 
that this organization will relieve the Infantrj- Divisions and the District Com- 
manders of responsibility for the protection of all vital installations, except the 
Command and Fire Control Cable System and those installations on Army and 
Navy Reservations. See paragraph 16 d (2) and h above. Instructions will be 
issued. 

SECTION III CONDITION OF READINESS FOR AIRCRAFT 

17. Condition of readiness for aircraft will be prescribed by a combination of 
a letter and a number as indicated in paragraphs a and b below. The letter 
indicating the part of a unit in a condition of material readiness for its assigned 
task and the number indicating the degree of operational readiness prescribed 
for that part. 

a. MATERIAL READINESS.— 

A — All assigned operating aircraft available and ready for a task. 

[11] B — One-half of all aircraft of each functional tj'pe available and ready 
for a task. 

C— Approximately one-quarter of all aircraft of each functional type available 
and ready for a task. 

D — Approximately one-eighth of all aircraft of each functional type available 
and ready for a task. 

E — All aircraft conducting routine operations, none ready for the purposes 
of this plan. 

b. DEGREE OF OPERATIONAL READINESS.— 

All times listed in this table are the maximums allowed for the first plane of 
a unit to be in the air armed and prepared to carry out the assigned task. 

1 — For pursuit and VF types: Four minutes. Types other than fighters: 
Fifteen minutes. 

2 — ^All types: 30 minutes. 

3 — All types: One hour. 

4 — All types: Two hours. 

5 — All types: Four hours. 

SECTION IV INTELLIGENCE 

18. The Intelligence Standing Operating Procedure indicated below will be 
followed generallv where applicable. 

19. ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF ENEMY INFORMATION.— 

a. Will the enemv attempt to destrov or neutralize NAVAL BASES at PEARL 
HARBOR, at KANEOHE BAY, and air fields on OAHU with the object of 
denying their use to the IGNITED STATES without occupation? If so, will 
his air attacks be accompanied by Naval bombardment and blockading operations? 

b. Will the enemv attempt to capture OAHU bv expeditionarv forces with the 
object of utilizing the NAVAL BASES at PEARL HARBOR,' at KANEOHE 
BAY, and air fields thereon? If so, when, where, and with what strength will 
he make his main attack? 

c. Will the enemy attempt to capture any other of the principal islands of the 
Haw'aiian Group with the object of utilizing the air fields and establish bases 
thereon? 

d. Will the enemy military operations be accompanied by acts of sabotage 
and terrorism on the part of resident sympathizers? 

e. Will the enemy utilize local foreign population, local aliens or nationals of 
foreign origin for sabotage operations, raids to assist landing operations, or 
other acts of assistance? 

20. MEASURES TO OBTAIN INFORMATION.— 
a. NAVY.— 

(1) Transmit, through the Joint Intelligence Loop, information received from 
the Offshore and Inshore Patrols, from an}- escort or attack forces formed, and 
from any other Naval Ships relative to: 

(a) Location, composition, course, and speed of enemy units encountered, with 
particular reference to location of aircraft carriers and transports. 

[12] (b) Indications of landings on any island of the main Hawaiian Group, 
with particular attention to the number and type of landing boats, and the 
composition of supporting Naval units. 

(c) Indications of attempts to block HONOLULU and/or PEARL HARBORS. 

(d) Indications of any hostile aerial activity in strength. 



2496 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(e) Report damage inflicted on hostile vessels, troops and installations. Dam- 
age to aircraft carriers, transports, capital ships, and other important damage 
immediately. 

(f) Report damage by hostile Naval and air bombardment, incurred or ob- 
served. Important damage, including damage to landing fields, and use of 
chemicals, immediately. 

(g) See paragraph 20 c below. 
b. ARMY.— 

(1) Hawaiian Air Force. — 

(a) Observe all waters within an area bounded as follows: 

Bv arcs of twentv (20) miles radii with centers at OPANA POINT, MAUI; 
KVtiKT HEAD LIGHT, MAUI; LAUPAHOEHOE LIGHT, HAWAII; 
CAPE KUMUKAHI LIGHT, HAWAII; KALAE LIGHT, HAWAII; SOUTH- 
WEST HEADLAND, KAHOOLAWE: LEAHI POINT, NIIHAU; LEHUA 
ISLAND, NIIHAU; KAIILU POINT, KAUAI; and arc of thirty (30) miles 
radius with its center at KAHUKU POINT, OAHL^, and the tangents connecting 
thase arcs in the order named. 

Report location, composition, course and speed of enemy units encountered. 
Maintain continuous contact with major subdivisions of enemy units. Particular 
attention to location of aircraft carriers and transports. First contact, material 
changes of direction, and definite location of aircraft carriers to he reported 
immediately by Joint Intelligence Loop; thereafter on the hour by department 
Intelligence Loop. 

(b) Report indications of landing on any island, giving location, number, type 
and formation of landing boats and composition of supporting Naval group. 
Report, when observed, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(c) Report damage inflicted on hostile vessels, troops, and installations. 
Damage to aircraft carriers, transports, capital ships, and other important 
damage immediately, by Joint Intelligence Loop. 

(d) Report damage liy hostile naval and air bombardment, incurred or ob- 
served by their operations. Important damage, including damage to landing 
fields, and use of chemicals, immediately, by Joint Intelligence Loop; other 
damage at 1815 by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(e) Report any hostile aerial activity in strength, including number, type, 
direction and area of attack or observation, by Joint Intelligence Loop. 

(2) 86th Okservadtm Squadron. — 

(a) Same as for "HAWAIIAN AIR FORCE"— see 20 b (1) above. 
[IS] (b) Be prepared to.provide, on|^call, observation for the control of long- 
range artillery fire. 

(3) Interceptor Command. — 

(a) Report immediately any and all information of hostile air force or surface 
vgssgI. 

(b) Report, upon completion of action by or with enemy air force, composition 
of enemy forces, direction of approach, time of action, area attacked, and damage 
to enemy airplanes. 

(4) Each Infantry Division.— 

(a) Report location, number, type and formation of transports and landing 
boats and composition of supporting naval grouji. Report when observed there- 
after hourly, on the hour, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(b) Report enemy front lines and boundaries between units. Report immedi- 
ately any significant change. Otherwise report every two hours, on the even hour, 
by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(c) Report location of oum front lines. Report every two hours, on the even 
hour, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(d) Report all identifications. Infantry identifications are most important. 
Report, when observed, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(e) Report indications of landing of artillery, including caliber of same, and 
tanks. Report, when observed, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(f) Report damage by hostile naval and air bombardment. Important damage 
immediately; other damage at 1830, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(g) Report time, place, kinds and method of employment of chemicals. Report, 
when observed, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(h) Report weather and surf conditions on all favorable landmg beaches. 
Report at 0300, 0700, 1200 and 1700 and 2200, by Department Intelligence Loop. 

(i) The 25th Division will assign G-2 personnel to assist the Provost Marshal 
in the examination and questioning of enemy documents and personnel in South 
Sector. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2497 

(5) Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command. — 

(a) Report immediately, by Department Intelligence Loop, initial contact with 
enemy units, giving location, composition and course of formation. 

(b) Report immediately, by Department Intelligence Loop, when an action is 
begun by hostile vessels or by the seacoast artillery, giving location of naval 
vessels, locality being attacked, and units engaged. 

(,c) Report damage inflicted on hostile vessels, troops, and installations. 
Damage to aircraft carriers, transports, capital ships, and other important damage 
immediately by Joint Intelligence Loop. 

(d) Report upon completion of any action, by Department Intelligence Loop, 
important, damage from hostile naval and air [14] bombardment, and 
report the use of chemicals immediately. Other damage at 1900 by Department 
Intelligence Loop. 

(e) Report, when observed, by Department Intelligence Loop, location, num- 
ber, type, and formation of landing boats and composition of supporting naval 
force. 

(f) Report, when observed, by Joint Intelligence Loop, indications of attempts 
to block HONOLULU HARBOR, PEARL HARBOR, or KANEOHE BAY. 

(g) Report as soon as practicable important damage to ground installations, 
including damage to use of chemical agents. 

(h) Report visibility at 0400, 0700, 1200, 1700 and 2200, by Department 
Intelligence Loop. 

(i) Any of the above reports may be transmitted by telephone when necessary 
to avoid delay. 

(6) District Comynanders of HAWAII, MAUI and KAUAI Districts. — Report 
when observed, by radio to Hawaiian Air Force, thence by Department Intelli- 
gence Loop: 

(a) Nature of hostile activity, including number, type, direction and area of 
attack or observation. 

(b) Damage by hostile naval and air bombardment. 

(c) Location, number, type and formation of landing boats and composition 
of supporting naval group. 

(d) Enemy front lines and boundaries between units. 

(e) All identifications. Infantry identifications are most important. 

(f) Time, place, kinds and method of employment of chemicals. 

(7) Department Signal Office. — 

Radio intercept and goniometric service. Report when obtained. 

c. ALL ELEMENTS OF HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT.— 

(1) Report presence of parachute troops and assemblies of enemy nationals or 
sympathizers and overt acts of sabotage or terrorism, giving location, time, num- 
bers involved, and probable intentions or damage accomplished. 

(2) Report of location of floating or stranded mines, in order that this infor- 
mation may be relayed to the Navy. No other action, i. e., attempts at destruc- 
tion, than to report location immediately, should be taken, 

d. MISCELLANEOUS.— 

(1) Transmission of G-2 Information. — 

In the absence of specific instructions as to transmission, or in the event of 
failure or overload of specified channels, G-2 information will be transmitted by 
direct line, where available, or by the most expeditious routing over the circuits 
set forth in current Signal Operations Instructions. [15] If wire and radio 
signal communication are out, important intelligence information will be sent 
back by any means at hand: Wire circuits of near-by units, motor messenger, 
commandeered vehicle, any means necessary commensurate with the value of 
the information. 

21. MEASURES FOR HANDLING.— 

a. PRISONERS: Examination stations will be located at all Prisoner of War 
collection points. 

b. DOCUMENTS AND CAPTURED MATERIAL.— 

(1) Documents will be sent to Gr-2's of Department or Divisions, with the 
minimum of delay, by regularly scheduled messenger service. 

(2) Reports of captured material will be sent to the same stations by the 
same means. 

(3) Documents and material identifying organizations or indicating the use of 
chemicals are of major importance. They will be given special priority in ship- 
ment to examination stations and will be reported to Department G-2 by the 
most expeditious means. 



2498 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(4) Liaison officers from the office of G-2, H. H. D., will be assigned to all 
Examination Stations, and will assist the Provost Marshal in examining enemy 
personnel, materiel and documents, and in determining destination of reports. 

c. MAPS. — Maps will be supplied initially by the Department Engineer. 

22. REPORTS AND DISTRIBUTION.— 

Distribution of reports from Department Headquarters: Summaries of In- 
telligence at 0800, 1300, 1800 and 2300. 

23. THE DEPARTMENT G-2 will: 

a. Keep the Commanding General and all interested staff officers informed 
regarding the enemy situation and of his deductions concerning it. 

h. Insure that counterintelligence measures are adequately provided for and 
adhered to. 

c. Establish a counter-espionage service that will not only guard against the 
subversive activities of the external enemy, but will also enable the Department 
G— 2 to keep the Department Commander constantly advised as to the attitude, 
trend of thought, and probable course of action of the civil population, particu- 
larly that of alien extraction. This service will maintain close liaison with the 
Department Provost Marshal, with a view to: 

(1) Furnishing the Department Provost Marshal with all information gained 
through the counter-espionage service of value in the prevention of civil disorders, 
sabotage and incipient uprisings. 

(2) Receiving and evaluating information relative to the internal situation 
collected by the Department Provost Marshal through his agencies set up for 
the actual control of the civil population. 

d. Collect, evaluate, and disseminate information relative to assemblies of 
enemv nationals or sympathizers, and overt acts of sabotage and terrorism. 

[16] e. Prepare propaganda and publicity for the encouragement of the 
lovaltv and support of the civil population, particularly that of alien extraction. 

24. 'G-2 FORMS.— 

a. Estimate of the Enemy Situation, see Inclosure No. 4. 

h. Periodic Reports, see page 1, Inclosure No. 5. For combat Air Force see 
page 2, Inclosure No. 5. 

SECTION V ADMINISTRATION 

25. SUPPLY (See paragraphs 75-80, FM 100-10).— 

a. SUPPLY AREAS.— 

(1) Schofield Supplv area includes the area of OAHU north and west of a gen- 
eral line extending LAE O KAOIO— PUU KAAUMAKUA— KIPAPA STREAM 
— KAMEHAMEHA HIGHWAY at (97.9— 91.0)— KAMEHAMEHA HIGH- 
WAY—PEARL CITY JUNCTION— PEARL HARBOR ENTRANCE. 

(2) The Honolulu Supply area includes the remainder of OAHU and outlying 
islands. 

b. CLASS I SUPPLIES (rations) ; including QMC class II and IV: 
Schofield Supplv Area- Quartermaster, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS. 
Honolulu Supply Area — Hawaiian Quartermaster Depot, HONOLULU. 

(1) Supplies, for a small imit of an organization, when moved nearby into a 
different supply area from the parent organization, may be continued thru the 
parent organization or may be obtained separately from the D. P. for the new 
supply area as warranted by the situation. 

(2) Distribution will be based on consolidated daily strength reports submitted 
by organizations to the Depot or Quartermaster supplying the area in which the 
organization is stationed (copy to Dept. QM) by 0800 daily. 

(3; Schedules of distribution will be arranged by issuing quartermasters by 
direct agreement with unit commanders supplied. Distribution schedules will be 
set up and copies furnished Dept. QM and G-4, H. H. D. 

(4) A standard menu ration is established for Alert No. 3. 

c. CLASS III SUPPLIES.— 

(1) All units leaving their normal posts under any alert will take with them the 
authorized allowance of gasoline containers filled. Replenishment will be made 
in the following manner: 

(a) Commanding Officer, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS will establish DPs at 
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS for all units operating in the SCHOFIELD BAR- 
RACKS area. 

(b) Commanding officers of each post in the Honolulu Supplv Area, except 
MALAKOLE, BELLOWS FIELD and KANEOHE, will establish DPs at tbr^r 
posts for the supply of all units operating in this area. MALAKOLE, BELI^OWS 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2499 

FIELD and KANEOHE will establish a DP at thoir respective posts for the 
supply [17] of their own units operating in the immediate vicinity of 
their own post. 

(c) In the event units are moved, placing them in another upply area, gasoline 
will be supplied from the DP nearest the unit, regardless of supply area. 

(d) Normally, the supply of gasoline from DPs w-ill be by 5 and 10 gallon 
drums, rather than filling individual tnicks. 

(e) Units will furnish personnel for refilling of their containers at the DP. 
Post Commanders will provide suitable equipment for refilling containers. 

(f) 11th Tank Company will draw aviation gasoline from the nearest Air 
Corps Station. 

(g) Replenishment of stocks at posts will be accomplished in the normal manner 
Following the period of the maneuvers, necessar\- monetary adjustments will be 
made through Department Headquarters. 

(h) Class III supplies on outlying islands will I e the responsibility of the 
District Commanders. 

d. CLASS II & IV SUPPLIES (except Quartermaster Corps).— 

(1) Medical Supply: 

Schofield Supplv Area — Schofield Branch, Hawaiian Medical Depot, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS. 

Honolulu Supply Area— Hawaiian Medical Depot, FORT SHAFTER. 

(2) Signal Supply (except Signal Corps aircraft radio): 

Schofield and Honolulu Supplv areas — Hawaiian Signal Depot, FORT SHAF- 
TER. 

(3) Signal Supply — aircraft radio only: 

Schofield and Honolulu Supply areas — Hawaiian Air Depot, HICKAM FIELD. 

(4) Chemical Supplies — all supply areas — Hawaiian Chemical Depot, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS. 

(5) Engineer Supplies — all supply areas — Hawaiian Engineer Depot, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS, T. H. Distributing points for class IV supplies will include 
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, FORT RUGER, FORT KAMEHAMEHA, FORT 
BARRETTE and North Shore in vicinity of (86.9-04.2). Credits at DP's to 
major echelon commanders will be announced separately to commanders con- 
cerned. 

(6) Water Supply: Will be secured locally and will be inspected by a medical 
oflficer before use except from post and CITY of HONOLULU water systems. 

(7) Air Corps Supply: All supply areas — Hawaiian Air Depot, HICKAM 
FIELD and WHEELER FIELD Branch, when so designated, for types of serv- 
ices announced by Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force. 

(8) Ordnance Supply (other than ammunition Class V). — 

Schofield Supplv area — Schofield Branch, Hawaiian Ordnance Depot, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS. 

Honolulu Supplv area — (General Storage and Shop) Hawaiian Ordnance 
Depot, HONOLULU. 

[18] e. CLASS V SUPPLIES: 

(1) Schofield Supply Area — all types — Schofield Branch, Hawaiian Ordnance 
Depot, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS (See (3) below^. 

(2) Honolulu Supply Area — aU types — Ammunition Storage Area, Hawaiian 
Ordnance Depot. (See (3) below.) 

(3) Aircraft pyrotechnics and bombs, 8-inch railway and 240mm ammunition 
and chemical ammunition (other than grenades) — Ammunition Storage Area, 
Hawaiian Ordnance Depot — all supply areas. 

(4) Credits of an "initial issue" and of one "unit of fire" are automatically 
placed at the disposal and under the control of all major echelon commanders 
whenever an Alert is ordered. Quantities of various types of ammunition in- 
cluded in the "initial issue" and in a "unit of fire" are shown in Inclosures Nos. 
6 and 7 herewith. Load of Aircraft Ammunition per airplane is indicated in 
Inclosure No. 8. 

(5) At the time Alert No. 2 or No. 3 is ordered, all units will draw such of 
their "initial issue" as has not already been drawn, except that for Alert No. 2 
the Infantry Divisions will draw initially only 1/5 of the "initial issue" and the 
balance thereof will be drawn after occupation of positions with their organic 
and/or sector weapons. Whenever issues cannot be made simultaneously, they 
will be made according to the following order of priority and according to a 
schedule to be nmtually arranged between the Unit Supply OflScer and the 
Supply Point concerned. 



2500 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Aircraft bombs and ammunition for aircraft weapons. 

Antiaircraft 3", 37mm and Machine Gun ammunition. 

Ground machine gun ammunition — all types. 

Other small arms ammunition. 

All artillery ammunition, less antiaircraft. 

(6) At the time Alert No. 1 is ordered, only small arms ammunition included 
in the "initial issue" will be drawn. 

(7) Aircraft bombs will not be issued in "initial issue" but will be held avail- 
able in bomb storage areas. 

(8) Two "units of fire" of bombs and machine gun ammunition will be main- 
tained on outlying islands for each airplane operating therefrom. 

/. Dumps and Ammunition Distributing Points will be established as directed 
by this headquarters. 
26. EVACUATION.— 

a. PERSONNEL: 

(1) North Sector Division by 24 Medical Bn. to Station Hospital, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS. 

(2) South Sector Division by 25 Medical Bn. to Tripler General Hospital ex- 
cept for troops in the area west of the line: PEARL HARBOR CHANNEL — 
EWA JUNCTION. The latter will be evacuated to Station Hospital, SCHO- 
FIELD BARRACKS. 

(3) Hawaiian Air Force. — 

(a) HICKAM FIELD, by the Surgeon, HICKAM FIELD to Station Hos- 
pital, HICKAM FIELD or Tripler General Hospital. [19] Additional 
ambulances, with drivers and orderlies, will be attached as needed. 

(b) WHEELER FIELD and HALEIWA Landing Field, by Surgeon 
WHEELER FIELD to Station Hospital Schofield. Additional ambulances, 
with drivers and orderlies will be attached as needed. 

(c) BELLOWS FIELD, by Surgeon, BELLOWS FIELD to Tripler General 
Hospital. Additional ambulances, with drivers and orderlies, as needed. 

(d) Air fields on outlying islands, by vehicle to local hospital or by air to 
Tripler General Hospital or Station Hospital, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS. 
Collection by respective medical detachment. Details of evacuation to be ar- 
ranged by the responsible commanders for each field. 

(e) HCAC, by the Surgeon, HCAC (collection by respective medical detach- 
ments, reinforced if necessary). One ambulance company to be attached to the 
command prior to combat. Evacuation from the area north and west of the line: 
PEARL HARBOR Channel— EWA Junction— LAE O KAOIO Point to Station 
Hospital, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS. Evacuation from the area south and 
east of this line to Tripler General Hospital. 

(f) KAUAI District, MAUI District and HAWAII District to local hospitals 
as directed by District Commanders under provisions of letter, this headquar- 
ters to each District Commander, dated 31 July 1941, subject: "Medical Service." 

(g) Elements not included elsewhere: North Sector by 24th Medical Bn., on 
call; South Sector by 25th Medical Bn., on call. 

b. ANIMALS: 

(1) North Sector to Veterinary Station Hospital, SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, 
by provisional Veterinarv Detachment attached to Hawaiian Pack Train. 

(2) South Sector to Veterinary General Hospital, FORT SH AFTER, by 
provisional Veterinary Detachment, attached to units having animals. 

c. SALVAGE: To supply points designated in paragraph 25 above for services 
indicated. 

d. PRISONERS OF WAR.— 

(1) Collecting Points— SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, FORT SHAFTER, 
FORT RUGER, KANEOHE BAY. To be established and operated by De- 
partment Provost Marshal, assisted by Provost Marshals, Infantry Divisions. 

(2) Prisoner of War Inclosures— Establishment and operation by Department 
Provost Marshal, as directed by this headquarters. 

27. TRAFFIC— 

The Department Provost Marshal, assisted by the Division Provost Marshals, 
will regulate traffic on OAHU. 

28. MOTOR TRANSPORTATION.— 

a. Motor pools will be established by the Infantry Divisions and the Hawaiian 
Coast Artillery Command. These pools will [ko] consist of all available 
tactical vehicles and administrative vehicles, the latter obtained by reducing to 
a minimum administrative requirements. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2501 



b. The assignment of motor vehicles for one specific purpose will be the excep- 
tion. AH motors will be used to the maximum for all purposes. 

c. Current movement and loading tables will be maintained by the Infantry 
Divisions and the Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command as follows: 

(1) Number of vehicles, tactical and administrative in the pool, showing the 
number of men and amount of impedimenta that can be moved initially into 
position. See paragraph 9 above. 

(2) Number of vehicles, tactical and administrative, subsequent to move into 
position which are available for movement of reserves, and the number of men 
which can be moved. 

By command of Lieutenant General SHORT: 



Lt. 
Official: 

Wm. E. Donegan, 
Wm. E. Donegan, 

Lt. Col, G. S. C, Asst. Chief of Staff. G-3. 
Inclosures: 

No. 1 — Map, Communications Installations. 

No. 2 — Map, Bridges and Police Districts. 

No. 3 — Map, Electric Installations. 

No. 4 — Estimate of Enemy Situation. 

No. 5 — Periodic Intelligence Report Forms. 

No. 6 — Allowances of Ammunition. 

No. 7— Unit of Fire. 

No. 8 — Load of Aircraft Ammunition. 



Walter C. Phillips, 
Walter C. Phillips, 
Col, G. S. C, Chief of Staff. 



Inclosure No. 1 

(Inclosure Xo. 1 is a map of Oaliii sliowino; Communications In- 
stallations as of July 7, 1941. This map is reproduced as Item No. 1 
in EXHIBITS-ILLUSTRATIONS, Army Pearl Harbor Board.) 

(Inclosure No. 2, in part, is a map of Oalm showing Police Districts, 
Railroad Bridges and Highway Bridges, This map is reproduced as 
Item No. 2 in EXHIBITS-ILLUSTRATIONS, Army Pearl Harbor 
Board.) 



Inclosure'No. 2 
railroad bridges 



Num- 
ber 



Location 



Type 



Bents 



Girders 




0.9 mi. W of Honolulu.-. 
1.0 mi. W. of Honolulu. 
1.9 mi. W of Honolulu. - 

2.4 mi. W of Honolulu.. 
2.6 mi. W of Honolulu.. 
2.6 mi. W of Honolulu.- 

0.7 mi. E of Aiea. 

0.2 mi. W of Aiea 

0.3 mi. E of Kalauao 

0.2 mi. E of Kalauao 

0.4 mi. W of Kalauao... 

Waiau Station 

0.2 mi. W of Waiau 

0.3 mi. W of Waiau 

0.4 mi. W of Waiau 

0.3 mi. W of Pearl City. 
0.8 mi. W of Pearl City. 

Waipahu. 

1.3 mi. W of Gilbert-... 
2.2 mi. S of Nanakuli... 
0.6 mi. S of Nanakuli 

1.0 mi. N of Nanakuli. . 

2.5 mi. S of Waianae 

1.1 mi. S o (Waianae 



Concrete pile-.. 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile .. 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 

Timber pile 

Timber pile 

Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Concrete pile... 
Timber Trestle 
Timber Trestle 
Timber Trestle 
Timber Trestle 
Timber Trestle 
Timber Trestle 
Timber Trestle 



Timber. 
Concrete 
Timber. 
Timber- 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber - 
Timber- 
Timber- 
Timber. 
Timber- 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber, 
Timber- 
Timber - 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber. 
Timber. 



100' 
32* 

160' 

leC 
32' 
12' 

208' 
48' 
96' 
28' 

112' 
27' 
32' 
32' 
32' 

160' 
16' 
63' 
64' 
64' 
96' 
64' 
64' 



2502 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 
RAILROAD BRIDGES— Continued 



Num- 


Location 


Type 


Height 


Span 


ber 


Bents 


Girders 


47 




Timber pile 

Timber pile 

Timber Trestle 

Timber Trestle 

Timber Trestle 

Concrete pile - 


Timber 

Timber 


7.0' 

7.0' 

10.6' 

10.5' 

8.5' 

8.0' 

9.2' 

7.0' 

8.0' 

14.0' 

20.0' 

1.5. 0' 

13.0' 

20.0' 

14.0' 

10.5' 

23.5' 

22.0' 

11.0' 

22.0' 

20.0' 

30.0' 

75.0' 

115.0' 

107. 0' 

55.0' 

13.0' 


96' 


50 


3.3 mi. N of Waianae 


64' 


51 


3.4 mi. N of Waianae 


Timber 

Timber 

Timber 


80' 


57 


0.2 mi. S of Makua 


62' 


58 




114' 


74 




Timber 


80' 


75 








112' 


77 


0.6 mi. W of Waialua .. 


Concrete pile 


Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 


448' 


78 
81 


Haleiwa 

2.1 mi. N of Haleiwa .- . .. 


Timber Trestle 

Timber Trestle 

Concrete pile .. 


224' 
96' 


84 




272' 


87 


7 mi. N of Waimea 


Timber Trestle 

Timber Trestle 

Timber Trestle 

Timber Trestle. _ 

Timber Trestle 

Concrete arch _ . 

Wood Trestle 

Wood Trestle 

Wood Trestle 

Wood Trestle 

Wood Trestle 

Wood Trestle 


Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 

Timber 


60' 


88 
89 


1.0 mi. N of Waimea 

2.2 mi. N of Waimea 


90' 
96' 


90 
92 


2.9 mi. N of Waimea 


75' 
128' 


101 
102 


0.6 mi. N of Waipahu__ 

2.0 mi. N of Waipahu -.- .. 


98' 
144' 


103 


4.1 mi. N of Waipahu .. 


64' 


104 


3.4 mi. S of Wahiawa 


224' 


105 


3.3 mi. S of Wahiawa 


160' 


106 


2.7 mi. S of Wahiawa 


320' 


107 


6 mi. S of Wahiawa 


272* 


108 


0.4 mi. N of Wahiawa 


Wood Trestle 

Wood Trestle 


Timber 

Timber 


608' 


109 




448' 


110 


2 3 mi. N of Wahiawa . 


Wood Trestle 


Timber 


272' 


111 


0.2 mi. N of Brodie Junction 


Wood Trestle . 


Timber .. .. 


112' 











HIGHWAY BRIDGES— PRIORITY 



Number 



52 

49 

17 

16 

9 

74 

15 

45 

13 

127 

5 

6 



160 
161 
57 
109 



Location 



Kam Highway over Waiawa Stream 

Kam Highway over Kipapa Stream 

Kam Highway over S. Fork Wahiawa Reservoir 

Kam Highway over N. Fork Wahiawa Reservoir... 

Kam Highway over Anahulu R. Haleiwa _ 

Kam Highway over Waimea R., Waimea 

Kam Highway over Poamoho Oulch 

Old Kam Highway over Kauknnahua Gulch, Schofleld Barracks 

Kam Highway over Opaeula (Twin Bridges) at Waialua 

Kam Highway at Kuapa Pond (Koko Head) 

Between Waialua Mill and Thompson Corner 

Between Waialua Mill and Haleiwa 

Between Waialua Mill and Haleiwa 

Dillingham Blvd. at Keehi Lagoon 

Kam Highway at Kahana Bay.. 

East Range Road over S. Fork Wahiawa Reservoir 

Waipahu cut-ofT over O. R. & L. RR at Waipahu 

New Kam Highway over Halawa Stream S. of Aiea ._ 

Kam Highway at Heeia fish pond 



Coordinates 



01. 95-84. 12 
98. 4 -87. 8 
96. 46-95. 68 

96. 37-96. 75 
87. 98-07. 98 
92. 82-13. 52 
95. 27-98. 92 
93. 72-96. 96 
87. 78-06. 33 
32. 45-70. 22 
86. 06-04. 57 
86. 12-05. 76 
86. 52-06. 20 
11. 76-76. 55 
14. 34-03, 25 

97. 79-95. 34 

98. 56-82. 46 
06. 82-80. 30 
21. 04-89. 11 



Inclosure No. 3 



(Inclosure No. 3 is n map of Oahii showing Electric Installations 
and Generating: Plants. This map is reproduced as Item No. 3 in 
EXHIBITS-ILLUSTKATIONS, Army Pearl Harbor Board.) 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2503 

Inclosure No. 4 

Title 
Place 
Date and hour 

ESTIMATE OF THE ENEMY SITUATION 

1. SUMMABY OF THE ENEMY SITUATION. 

a. Enemy Naval Operations. — Movements (by fleet or groups), 

b. Enemy land operations. 

(1) Enemy activities in forward areas and new identifications. 

(2) Movements, concentrations and establishments in rear areas. 

(3) Sabotage. 

(4) Terrain, weather, visibility and surf as they affect the enemy. 

2. CONCLUSIONS. 

a. Enemy capabilities. — An enumeration of lines of action open to the 
enemy which may affect accomplishment of the mission of the command. 
(b) (1) A statement of the relative probability of adoption of the fore- 
going lines of action when such statement can be justified. 
(2) Reasons justifying am' statement made in (1) above. 



Inclosure No. 5 



Chief of section. 

From: (Date and hour) 

To: (Date and hour) 

Issuing unit 

Place 

Date and hour of issue 

PERIODIC REPORTS 

No. 

Maps. (Those needed for an understanding of the report.) 

1. ENEMY SITUATION AT END OF PERIOD. 

a. Enemy front line (or nearest elements). — Location and nature. 

b. Defensive organization. — Trenches, emplacements, observation posts, com- 
mand posts, obstacles, etc. 

r. Units in contact. — Composition of units, with identificationis if known; 
location of their flanks, estimated combat efficiency (strength, training, physical 
condition, morale, and other pertinent factors). 

d. Artillery. — ^Location and calibers. 

e. Reserves and other forces capable of intervention. — Locaton, strength, 
composition, dispositions, estimated combat efficiency, and where and when 
they probably can be employed. 

/. Supplv and evacuation establishments. — Location and nature. 

2. ENENIY OPERATIONS DURING PERIOD. 

a. General summary — action of enemy forces as a whole. 

b. Operations of component elements. 

(1) Enemy Naval Operations. — Movements (by fleet or groups). 

(2) Enemy Land Operations. 

(a) Landings. (By areas. Each entry to show, for that area, the front lines 
and identifications). 

(6) Operations of Land Components. 

1. Antiaircraft artillery. 

^. Antitank units. 

3. Armored forces. 

4. Artillery. 

5. Aviation, combat. 

6. Aviation, observation. 

7. Parachute Troops. 

8. Cavalry. 

9. Chemical warfare. 

10. Engineers. 

11. Infantry. 

12. Tanks. 

13. Administrative elements. 

f. Sabotage. 

fi. Miscellaneous. — Such enemy activities, movements or changes since last re- 
port as are not convenientlv included in b above. 

3. MISCELLANEOUS." 

79716 — 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 4 



2504 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

a. Estimated enemy casualties, including prisoners. 

b. Morale. 

c. Supply and equipment. 

d. Terrain not under our control. 

e. Enemy's probable knowledge of our situation — observation, reconnaissance, 
prisoners and documents lost by us, inhabitants, etc. 

/. Weather, visibility and surf, by areas. 

g. Any enemy intelligence not specifically covered by headings of this report. 

4. ENEMY CAPABILITIES. — A discussion of each of the lines of action open 
to the enemy which may affect the accomplishment of our mission, in the order 
of their possible imminence. For each capability, the effect of time, space, terrain, 
present known dispositions, and other factors in the situation should be evaluated. 
The earliest estimated time at which the enemy can put each into effect should be 
stated. When applicable, the possible result of the adoption by the enemy of 
any capability should be included. 

AC of S, G-2. 

INTELLIGENCE PROCEDTTRE IN AVIATION UNITS 

Form G 

A form for 

Periodic Intelligence Report 

for 

Air Combat Units 

(Adapted to telegraph printer transmission) 

Periodic Intelligence Report 

From: (Date and hour) 

To: (Date and hour) 

Issuing unit 

Place of issue 

Date and hour of issue 

1. ENEMY ACTIVITIES AIR.— (Appropriate resume.) 

2. ENEMY ACTIVITIES GROUND.— (Appropriate resume.) 

3. ENEMY ACTIVITIES NAVAL.— (Appropriate resume.) 

4. OBJECTIVE FOLDERS DATA.— (Additions or changes giving serial 
number of folder in ef ch case.) 

5. IDENTIFICATIONS.— (Additions or changes in enemy units.) 

6. ENEMY KNOWLEDGE OF OUR SITUATION.— (Brief estimate.) 

7. ENEMY CAPABILITIES.— (list in priority of their probable adoption or, 
if no priority, so state.) 

8. MISCELLANEOUS.— (Any items not covered by above.) 

Note. — Information contained in previous intelligence reports will not be 
repeated; only changes or additions thereto. If no change has occurred under a 
given heading, the number of the paragraph only will be transmitted. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2505 



Inclosure No. 6. 

ALLOWANCES OF ORDNANCE AMMUNITION PER WEAPON (OTHER THAN 
AIRCRAFT) FOR INITIAL ISSUE HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT 



Weapon 


Arm or service 


N 


0. of rds 


. per weapon 


AP 


BaU 


Tracer 


Total 


Rifle, cal. .30, M1903. .. 


CA 


25 


140 
40 
32 

112 

28 
40 
25 

105 
80 

162 

28 
64 
40 
48 
105 
460 
560 

""'"992" 

240 

30 

525 

1.500 

3,500 

""i.'soo" 

4,725 

2,100 

28 

21 

340 

250 

440 

240 


20 


185 




Eng 


40 




FA 




8 
32 

8 


40 




Inf 

(Rifle Plat.) Inf. (except Rifle 
Plat.) 


16 

4 


160 
40 




QM 


40 




Sig. 






25 




Others 


30 
48 
24 

4 


15 
24 
46 

S 
16 


150 


Rifle, US, cal. .30, Ml 


Eng . 


152 




Inf 


232 




(Rifle Plat.) Inf. (except Rifle 
Pbt.) 


40 




Ord 


80 




Sig. ... 




40 




MP- 






48 




Others 


30 


15 

120 

60 

240 

120 

60 

20 

75 

2.50 

1,000 

1.200 

1,800 

900 

250 

1,350 

300 


I.tO 


Rifle, automatic, oal. .30 


CWS 


.■^so 




CA. 


60 
960 
60 


680 




FA 


120U 




Inf .- 


1,172 




Ord 


300 




QM 

Others . . 


30 

150 

250 

500 

4,800 

7,200 

3,600 

250 

675 

600 


80 
750 


Machine gun, cal. .30, HB 


Eng.. 


2,000 


(M1919A4) 


Inf 

Tanks or Armd. Cars 


5.000 
6.000 


Machine gun, cal. .30, WC 


CA-. 


9,000 


(M1917A1) 


(AW Bn.) CA (except AW Bn.). 

Eng 

Inf 


4,500 
2.000 
6,750 




Others 


3,000 


Pistol, cal. .45 


CWS, CA, Eng., Inf 


28 




FA, Ord., QM, Sig., MP, others. 
Sig. (motorcycles) 






21 


Submachine gun, cal. .45 




340 




Sig. (other than motorcycles) 

MP. .... .... 






250 




110 

60 
1,440 


550 




Others.. 




300 


Machine gun, cal. .50, WC (AA) 


CA 


5,760 


7,200 




(AW Bn.) 






CA (except AW Bn.) 


2,880 

2.880 

600 

960 

1,568 




720 
720 
150 
240 
392 


3,600 




Others. 


3,600 


Machine gun, cal. .50, HB 


FA ... .. . 


750 




Inf 


1,200 




Tanks or Armd. Cars... 


1,900 


Shotgun 


All . 


25 


Grenades, hand, frag, (per Rifle 


Inf 








150 


Co.). 
Signals, ground (asstd.) 


Inf 








25 




Sig. (Avn. or Wg. Co.).. 












Sig. (Opn. or Tri. Div. .. 








30 


Lights, Very signal (assorted) 


Co.). 
All 








24 


37mm gun, M1916 








240 


240 


37mm gun. Antitank (M3) 


FA 


200 
180 
180 




200 




Inf 




20 

1,620 

120 

132 

18 


200 


37mm gun. Antiaircraft 


CA 


1,800 


60mm Mortar -.- 


Inf 


120 


8lmm, or3"Trench Mortar 


Inf 




Light. 
Heavy 


150 










75mm gun, Truck-D. 


All 




#459 


75mm gun. Antitank 


FA 








#144 


105mm How 


FA 








#205 


155mm How 


FA 








#117 



Notes : Reduced quantities will be issued when ammunition is not available in Haw. Dept. 

Whenever any type of ammunition is not available in Haw. Dept. in sufficient quantities, 
substitution of other types suitable for the weapon will be made. 

# Proportions of types (Shrapnel, reduced charge HE, and normal charge HE) will be 
shown on requisitions kept on file at the designated supply points. 



2506 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



ALLOWANCES OP ORDNANCE AMMUNITION PER WEAPON (OTHER THAN 
AIRCRAFT) FOR INITIAL ISSUE HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT— Continued 



Weapon 


Arm or service 


No. of rds. per weapon 


AP 


Ball 


Tracer 


Total 


3" AA mobile 


CA 


15 
12 




285 
238 
300 
100 
60 


300 


90mm AA mobile 


CA 




250 


3" AA fixed 


CA 




300 


155mm gun, M1918M1 


All 






100 


240mm How. M1918 . 


FA 






60 


8" Ry. Gun .__ 


CA 


85 




85 


FIXED SEACOAST ARTILLERY 

3"gun, M1903 






505 


505 


6" gun. 




1,000 
350 
335 
275 
300 
280 
250 




1 000 


8" gun _. _ 






200 


550 


12" gun (Barbette Carriage) 




335 


12" gun (Disappearing Carriage) 








275 


12" Mortar _.- 


1 






300 


14" gun 


1 






280 


16" gun. 








250 













Inclosure No. 7 

UNIT OF FIRE (OTHER THAN AIRCRAFT)— HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT 



Weapon 


No. rds. for one (1) unit of fire 


AP 


Ball 


Tracer 


HE 


Total 


Rifle, cal. .30, Ml or M1903 


30 
150 
150 

600 

600 


105 
525 
525 

2,100 
20 
160 


15 




150 


Rifle, automatic, cal. .30.- 


75 ... 




750 


Machine gun, cal. .30, HB (M1919A4) (other than 


75 




750 


combat vehicle). 
Machine gun, cal. .30, HB (M1919A2 or A4) (com- 


150 




750 


bat vehicle). 
Machine gun, cal. .30 (M1917-17A1) 


300 




3,000 


Pistol, cal. .45 - . . 






20 


Submachine gun, cal. .45 




40 . . 




200 


Machine gun, cal. .50, HB 


720 
1,920 

960 


180 




900 


Machine gun, cal. .50, AA, WC (except in Gun 


480 




2,400 


Batteries). 
Machine gun, cal. .50, AA, WC (in Gun Batteries). 


240 




1,200 


Grenades, hand, frag, (per Rifle Co.) 






150 


Projector, signal ground (assorted) 










25 


Pistol, Very, Mklll 










24 


37mm gun, M1916 








120 
36 
540 
400 
234 
66 


120 


37mm gun, antitank, M3 


84 
60 






120 


37mm gun, antiaircraft 






600 


60mm Mortar 






400 


81mm Mortar 






Light 


300 








Heavy 




3" Trench Mortar 








300 


75mm Field Gun 






Super 


36 
150 
114 

39 
225 
150 
285 
238 
300 

38 

60 


300 








Normal 

Reduced 












75mm gun, antitank ... 


111 




150 


105mm How . 






225 


155mm How. M1918 








150 


3" AA gun, mobile _.. . _ 


15 
12 






300 


90mm AA gun, mobile.. 






250 


3" A A gun, fixed .... 






300 


155mm gun, M1918 MI 


112 






150 


240mm How. M 1918 ... 






60 


8" Ry Gun 


85 






85 


i" Chemical Mortar . . 








200 


4.2" Chemical Mortar 










200 















Notes: Reduced quantities will be issued when amnmnition is not available in Haw. Dept. 
Whenever any type of amnmnition is not available in Haw. Dept. in sulHcient quantities, substitution 
of other types suitable for the weapon will be made. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2507 



Inclosure No. 8 

LOAD OF AIRCRAFT AMMUNITION PER AIRPLANE 



Type airplane 




Bombers 






Pursuit 




OBS. 
(C&D) 


Item ... 


Hv. 
(B17D) 


Med. 
(B-18) 


Lt. 

(A20A) 


("-40) 


(P36A) 


(P-26) 


1-engine 




(0-47) 


Ctg. AP Cal 30 
















Ctg. ball Cal 30.. 


480 
120 
600 
60 
900 
240 
1,200 


1,280 

320 

1,600 


1,920 

480 

2.400 


1.600 

400 

2,000 

20 

300 

80 

400 


400 
100 
500 

10 
150 

40 
200 


800 

200 

1.000 


640 


Cte. tr Cal 30.. 


160 


Total Cal 30# 


800 


Ctg AP Cal 50 




CtfJ. ball Cal 50 










Cte. tr Cal 50 










Total Cal 50# 










BOMBS 

Bomb frag. 30# and 




40 
12 
4 
2 
1 


10 


- 


Bomb Demo. 100# or 


20 

14 
8 
6 
4 

I 4 
3 
6 
20 
10 


32 
14 
6 
4 
2 

14 
3 
6 

20 
7 








Bomb Demo 300# or 










Bomb Demo. 500-600# or 










Bomb Demo. 1,000-1, 100# or 










Bomb Demo. 2,000)1< . . 










PYROTECHNICS 

Bomb Photoflash 










14 


Flare M262 


1 
6 
20 








1 


Flare M9 








5 


Sig. AC Asstd - 








20 


Sig. Drift 























1 For Reconnaissance squadrons only. 

2 Flare M8A1 used as temporary substitute on the basis of 2-M8 or M8A1 flares per M26 flare. 

[corrected copy] 

« 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 10 December 1941 
Subject: Coordination of Traffic Control. (Paragraph 9h (TENTATIVE) 

added to SOP HD.) 
To: Distribution: Special, and Chief of Police, Honolulu, T. H. 

1. The attention of all commanders is directed to provisions of Paragraphs 27 
and 9/, SOP HD, 5 November 1941, repeated below: 

"27. Traffic: The Department Provost Marshal, assisted by the Divi.sion 
Provost Marshals, will regulate traffic on OAHU. 

"9. /. Motor vehicles operating at night, at the discretion of local commanders, 
will be (1) in convoy with .standard blackout or blue lights with a .shielded tail 
light on all vehicles, or (2) in the case of convoys traveling closed up, with standard 
blackout or blue lights on leading vehicle and a shielded tail light on the rear 
vehicle, and no lights on the others. Standard blackout light or approved modifica- 
tions are authorized for use at all times and all places during hours of darkness on 
vehicles carrying military personnel on a military mission. C)n two-way roads the 
distance between vehicles and/or serials will be sufficient to permit the unimpeded 
flow of traffic." 

2. The following additional instructions are published for the strict compliance 
of all troops in this Department: 

Paragraph 9h (TENTATIVE), SOP HD. 

(1) The civil police (special and regular) and the Military Police will have 
COMPLETE and EXCLUSIVE control of traffic on the island of OAHU with 
the following exceirtions: 

a. Guards on entrances to vital installations operating under special instructions. 

b. In case of a.ccidents or other emergencies. 

(2) Route markers are authorized for tactical or convoy movements. 

(3) Except in case of military necessity and except as otherwise hereinafter 
provided, the present civil regulations relating to traffic shall remain in force. 

(4) Only such military and civilian personnel as are actually needed on defense 
work, public utilities, and conducting emergency work or on a military mission 

■jvill be authorized to operate motor vehicles on the highways between 1800 and 






2508 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

0600 (6:00 P. M. and 6:00 A. M.), tactical movements excepted. In this connec- 
tion, contractors' trucks working on 24 hour basis on approved defense projects 
will not be delayed. All cars authorized to operate between the above hours 
(6:00 P. M. to 6:00 A. M.) shall have standard blackout, or blue lights using Moss 
Blackout Blue Paint (quick-drying) or its equivalent. 

(5) All modified lights must conform to a standard pattern and be visible for a 
distance of not to exceed 100 feet. 

(6) The Military Police assisted by the civil police, will approve and check 
modified blackout lights and will not permit modified lights to be used that do not 
conform to the standard of blackout lighting equipment, as pertains to visibility 
from the air. Special instructions and detailed specifications will be issued later 
by the Provost Marshal. 

" (7) Persons operating vehicles at night without approved blackout lights will 
be arrested promptly. 

(8) Parking is prohibited on the following streets in Honolulu: 

School Street Nuuanu Avenue 

Lusitania Street Alapai Street between Lusitania and 

Beretania Street Beretania 

King Street Iwilei Road between King and railroad 

Waialae Street tracks 

Dillingham Boulevard Queen Street on mauka side between 

Middle Street Iwilei Road and Fort Street 

(9) During air raids all vehicles are prohibited from operating, except the follow- 
ing: 

0. Military vehicles on a military mission. 

b. Civilian police cars. 

c. Certain civilian vehicles specifically authorized by the Provost Marshal. 
All other operators will halt their vehicles off the main roads or streets where 
they will remain vmtil authorized to be moved by the police (civil or military) 
or until ALL CLEAR is given. 

(10) Immediate action will be taken by all commanders to insure that their 
personnel are informed of the above contents. 

(11) The cooperation of all personnel, civil and military, is directed. 
By command o^ Lieutenant General SHORT: 

Walter C. Phillips, 
Colonel, General Staff Corps, 

Chief of Staff. 
Official: 

William E. Donegan, 

Lieutenant Colonel, G. S. C, 
Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3. 
Distribution: Special, plus 100 to Chief of Police, Honolulu, T. H., plus 500 
for file w/SOP. 

[corrected copy) 

(Please destroy all previous copies) 

HEADQUARTERS HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT, 

Forward Echelon, 
0500 17 December 1941. 
Subject: Coordination of Traffic Control (Corrections to Par 9 / and 9 h (tenta- 
tive) SOP-HD) 
To: Distribution, Special, plus one to each holder of SOP-HD and Chierof Police, 
Honolulu, T. H. 

1. Reference letter, HHD, Corrected copy, subject "Coordination of traffic 
control", dated 10 December 1941, SOP-HD is further corrected as follows: 

a. "9. /. Motor vehicles operating at night at the discretion of local commanders, 
will be: 

"(1) in convoy with Standard Blackout lights or approved modifications with 
tail light sliielded or painted all blue, on all vehicles, or, 

"(2) in the case of convoys traveling closed up, with standard blackout lights 
or approved modifications on the leading vehicle and a tail light shielded or painted 
all blue on the rear vehicle, and no lights on the others. 

"(3) Standard blackout lights or approved modifications are authorized for use 
at all times and all places during hours of darkness on vehicles carrying military 
personnel on a military mission. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2509 

"(4) On two-way roads the distance between vehicles and/or serials will be 
suflBcient to permit the unimpeded flow of traflBc. 

"(5) All motor vehicles not having standard blackout lighting equipment shall 
have modified lights conforming to the following specifications: 

"Headlights to be painted all black with the exception of a two and one-half 
inch circle, slightly below the center of the headlight lens. This circle will be 
painted with Moss Blackout Blue paint (quick-drying) or equivalent. Tail lights 
will be shielded or painted all blue. Sufficient coats of the Blackout Blue paint 
will be used to insure that the "modified lights" conform to the standard of 
blackout lighting equipment, as pertains to visibility from the air." 

b. Par 9 h (tentative), sup-par 4, changed to read as follows: 

"(4) only such military and civilian personnel as are actually needed on defense 
work, public utilities, and conducting emergency work or on a military mission 
will be authorized to operate motor vehicles on the highways between 1800 and 
0600 (6:00 PM and 6:00 AM), tactical movements except. In this connection, 
contractors' trucks working on 24 hour basis on approved defense projects will not 
be delayed. All cars authorized to operate between the above hours (6:00 PM 
to 6:00 AM) shall have standard blackout lights or "approved modifications" 
using Moss Blackout Blue paint (quick-drying) or its equivalent and with tail 
light shielded or painted all blue." 

c. Par 9 h (tentative) sub-paragraph (5) deleted. 

d. Par 9 h (tentative) sub-paragraph (6) delete the last sentence which reads as 
follows: "Special instruction and detailed specifications will be issued later by the 
Provost Marshal." 

2. The above corrections will be made on all copies of the corrected SOP-HD 
(see corrected copy of letter, same subject, HHD, dated 10 Dec 1941). 
By command of Lieutenant General EMMONS: 

J. Lawton Collins, 
Colonel, General Staff Corps, 

Chief of Staff. 
Official: 

Wm. Donegan 
William E. Donegan, 

Lieutenant Colonel, G. S. C, 
Asst. Chief of Staff, G-S. 



Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 10 December 1941. 
Subject: Air Raid Alarm Instructions. (Paragraph lib, c, d, e and/ (TENTA- 
TIVE) added to SOP HD.) 
To: Distribution Special, Plus 90 to Navy and 100 to Chief of Police, Honolulu, 
T. H. 

1. Paragraph 11, SOP HD, is repeated below and changed by inserting para- 
graph a and adding paragraphs b, c, d, e and /. 

"11. Installations and Alarm System. — a. All important installations not 
protected by the Territorial Home Guard will be guarded by troops. An adequate 
alarm system will be established in connection therewith." 

b. (1) A general Air Raid Alarm will be started by sounding a long blast on the 
siren in the Aloha Tower. Orders for such Air Raid Alarm will be given only by 
the Air Corps Warning Service Information Center by direct communication 
with the Navy Detail at the Aloha Tower. 

(2) This alarm will immediately be taken up by units, small groups, patrols 
and individuals who will immediately sound the alarm by a continuous blast on 
their alarm equipment until it is picked up and relayed by adjacent groups. 
Usually one (1) minute duration sliould be sufficient. 

(3) Alarm equipment is listed below and will be used for no other purpose ex- 
cept in connection with Air Raid Alarm and recall therefrom or All Clear Signals. 

(a) Siren on Aloha Tower. 

(b) Stewart type Klaxon Horn. 

(c) Ambulance sirens. 

(d) Fire truck sirens. 

(e) Police sirens. 

(/) All other sirens not covered above. 



2510 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

c. The "Recall from Air Raid Alarm" or "All Clear Signal" will he relayed by 
the alarm equipment indicated above, starting with the siren on the Aloha Tower, 
on instructions from the Air Corps Warning Service Information Center. The 
signal will be "broken short blasts" repeated until relayed by adjacent units. 

d. In addition to the above signals, Air Raid Alarms and "All Clear" instruc- 
tions will be announced over teletype networks, relayed over tactical communi- 
cation nets, and announced over KGNB and KGU. 

e. The above Air Raid Alarm signals will not be given except as indicated above 
unless units are actually attacked by enemy aircraft. 

/. The above Air Raid Alarms and All Clear Signals will be relayed to the Dis- 
trict Commanders of the outlying islands by the Department Signal Officer. 
By command of Lieutenant General SHORT: 

Waltee C. Phillips, 
Colonel, General Staff Corps, 

Chief of Staff. 
Official: 

Wm. Donegan, 
William E. Donegan, 

Lieutenant Colonel, G. S. C, 
Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3. 

Distribution: Special, plus 90 to Navy and|100 to Chief of Police, Honolulu, 
T. H., 500 for file w/SOP. 

[Exhibit D] 

[secret] 
headquarters headquarters 

hawaiian department fourteenth naval district 

Fort Shafter, T. H. Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, T. H. 

11 April 1941 ;il April 1941 

Joint Coastal Frontier Defense Plan, Hawaiian Coastal Frontier, 

Hawaiian Department and Fourteenth Naval District 

section I — directives 

[Extract\ 

******* 

3. Method of coordinariov . The Commanding General of the Hawaiian Depart- 
ment and the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District have determined 
that in this joint plan the method of coordination will be by mutual cooperation 
and that this method will apply to all activities wherein the Army and the Navy 
operate in coordination, until and if the method of unity of command is invoked, 
as prescribed in Joint Action of the Army and the Navy, 1935, Chapter 2, para- 
graph 9b. 

******* 

18. Navy. The Commandant, FOURTEENTH NAVAL DISTRICT, shall 
provide for: 

i. Distant reconnaissance. 

21. This agreement to take effect at once and to remain effective until notice 
in writing by either party of its renouncement, in part or in whole, or until dis- 
approved in part or in whole bv either the War or the Naw Department. This 
HCF-41 (JCD-42) supercedes ■HCE-39 (JCD-13) except that the Annexes Nos. 
I to VII of latter remain effective and constitute Annexes I to VII, inclusive, of 
this plan. 

(Signed) Walter C. Short (Signed) C. C. Bloch 

Walter C. Short • C. C. Bloch 

Lieut. General, U. S. Army, Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy, 

Commanding, Commandant, 

Hawaiian Department. Fourteenth Naval District. 

True Extract Copy: 
O. M. Cutler 
O. M. Cutler 
Lt. Col., Infantry 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2511 

[Exhibit E] 

confidential 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department; 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 20 March 1941. 

JOINT AIR OPERATIONS:— To be included as a part of Annex No. VII, 

HCF-39, (14-ND-JCD 13) RCT, Joint Security Measures for the protection 

of the PACIFIC FLEET and PEARL HARBOR BASE, (now in preparation). 

When the Commanding General of the Hawaiian Department and the Naval 

Base Defense Officer, (the Commandant of the 14th Naval District), agree that 

the threat of a hostile raid or attack is sufficiently imminent to warrant such 

action each commander will take such preliminary steps as are necessary to make 

available without delay to the other commander such proportion of the air forces 

at his disposal as the circumstances warrant in order that joint operations may be 

conducted in accordance with the following plans: 

1. Joint air attacks upon hostile surface vessels will be executed under the 
tactical command of the Navy. The Department Commander will determine the 
Army bombardment strength to participate in each mission. With due con- 
sideration to the tactical situation existing, the number of bombardment air- 
planes released to Navy control will be the maximum practicable. This force 
will remain available to the Navy, for repeated attacks, if required, until com- 
pletion of the mission, when it will revert to Arniy control. 

2. Defensive air operations over and in the immediate vicinity of Oahu will be 
executed under the tactical command of the Anm'. The Naval Base Defense 
Officer will determine the Navy fighter strength to participate in these missions. 
With due consideration to the tactical situation existing, the number of fighter 
aircraft released to Army control will be the maximum practicable. This force 
will remain available to the Army for repeated patrols or combat or for main- 
tenance of the required alert status until, due to a change in the tactical situation, 
it is withdrawn by the Naval Base Defense Officer and reverts to Navy control. 

3. When naval forces are insufficient for long distance patrol and search opera- 
tions, and Army aircraft are made available, these aircraft will be under the 
tactical control of the naval commander directing the search operations. 

4. In the special instance in which Army pursuit protection is requested for 
the protection of friendly surface ships, the force assigned for this mission will 
pass to the tactical control of the Navy until completion of the mission. 

Approved: 21 March, 1941 

(sgd) C. C. Bloch (sgd) Walter C. Short 

C. C. Bloch Walter C. Short 

Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commandant Commanding 

Fourteenth Naval District Hawaiian Department 

True Copy: O. M. Cutler 

O. M. Cutler 

Ll. Col., Infantry 

[Exhibit F] 
HEADQUARTERS HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT 

fort shafter, t. h. 
Chief of Staff 

War Department, Washington DC 
Reurad four seven two twenty seventh report department alerted to prevent 
sabotage period liaison with navy 

Short 
Enc sec by 

Lt Jos Engelbertz SC 
5:40 P 27 Nov 41 

True copy 

O. M. Cutler 
O M Cutler, 

Lt Col Infantry 



2512 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK. 

[Exhibit G] 
HEADQUARTERS HAWAIIAN DEPARTMENT 

FORT SHAFTER, T. H. 



Signature and Title 
114 War Kr 189 WD PRTY 
C C 

Washn, D. C, 842 Nov 28, 1941. 
Hawn Dept, Ft. Shafter, T. H. 
482 28th critical situation demands that all precaution be taken immediately 
against subversive activities within field of investigative responsibility of War 
Department paren see paragraph three mid sc thirty dash forty five end paren 
stop Also desired that you initiate forthwith all additional measures necessary 
to provide for protection of your establishments comma property comma and 
equipment against sabotage comma protection of your personnel against subver- 
sive propaganda and protection of all activities against espionage stop This 
does not repeat not mean that anj' illegal measures are authorized stop Protective 
measures should be confined to those essential to security comma avoiding un- 
necessary publicity and alarm stop To insure speed of transmission identical 
telegrams are being sent to all air stations but this does not repeat not affect 
your responsibility under existing instructions 

Adams 
True copv 

O. M. Cutler 

O. M. CULTER 

Li col Infantry 

[Exhibit H] 

CONFIDENTIAL 

[Extrad— MID-SR 30-45] 



3. DELINEATION OF RESPONSIBILITY, a. (1) By direction of the 
President, investigation of all espionage, counterespionage, and sabotage matters 
are controlled and handled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the Depart- 
ment of Justice, the Military Intelligence Division of the War Department, and 
the Office of the Naval Intelligence of the Navy Department. In accordance 
with this directive, the War Department assumes responsibility for the investiga- 
tion of officers, enlisted men, and civilians employed on military reservations or 
under military control. Similar personnel of the naval establishment is covered 
by Naval Intelligence. The investigation of other civilians suspected of sub- 
versive activities, except in certain overseas possessions, is the responsibility of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice, hereinafter referred 
to as the F. B. I. 

(2) Cooperation with the agencies of Naval Intelligence and the F. B. I. will be 
effected by appropriate echelons of our CS system, to the end that full protection 
may be obtained without duplication of effort. 

h. Corps Area and Department Commanders are'charged with the supervision 
of countersubversive operations, in accordance commands, including those of 
exempted stations and tactical units temporarily present, except the activities 
coordinated by the Military Intelligence Division, War Department General 
Staff. 

True Extract Copy 
O. M. Cutler 
O. M. Cutler, 

Lt. Col., Infantry 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2513 

[Exhibit I] 
Headquarters Hawaiian Department 
fort shafter, t. h. 
Memorandum For Department Adjutant General: 



(date) 

Request that the following Secret official radiogram be sent. This message 
does NOT cover subject matter previously sent in a message, either in the clear or 
having a different security classification. 
This message is Priority 

/sgd/Thomas H. Green, 
Thomas H. Green, 

Lt. Col. J. A. G. D., 
Department Judge Advocate. 

The Adjutant General, 

War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Re your secret radio four eight two twenty eighth comma full precautions are 
being taken against subversive activities within the field of investigative respon- 
sibility of war department paren paragraph three mid SC thirty dash forty five 
end paren and military establishments including personnel and equipment stop 
as regards protection of vital installations outside of military reservations such as 
power plants comma telej^hone exchanges and highwa.v bridges comma this 
headquarters l)y confidential letter dated June nineteen nineteen forty one 
requested the Governor of the territory to use the broad powers vested in him by 
section sixty seven of the organic act which provides comma in effect comma that 
the Governor may call upon the commanders of military and naval forces of the 
United States in the territory of Hawaii to prevent or suppress lawless violence 
comma invasion comma insurrection etc stop pursuant to the authority stated 
the Governor on June twentieth confidentially made a formal written demand on 
this headquarters to furnish and continued to furnish such adequate protection 
as may be necessary to prevent sabotage comma and lawless violence in connec- 
tion therewith comma being committed against vital installations and structures 
in the territory stop pursuant to the foregoing request appropriate military protec- 
tion is now being afforded vital civilian installations stop in this connection 
comma at the instigation of this Headquarters the Cit.v and County of Honolulu 
on June Thirtieth Nineteen Forty One enacted an ordnance which permits The 
Commanding General Hawaiian Department comma to close comma or restrict 
the use of and travel iipon comma any highway within the city and County of 
Honolulu comma whenever the Commanding General deems such action necessary 
in the interest of National Defense stop the authority thus given has not yet been 
exercised stop relations with FBI and all other Federal and Territorial officials 
are and have been cordial and mutual cooperation has been given on all pertinent 
matters 

Short 
Enc Sec bv 

LT JOS ENGELBERTZ SC 

Lt Jos Engelbertz SC 

2:45 P 29 Nov 41 

True copv 

O. M. Cutler 
O. M. Cutler, 

Lt Col Infantry 



2514 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[Exhibit J] 

SECRET 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 

OFFICE OF the signal OFFICER 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 20 December. 1941. 
In reply refer to: 
Sig. 

Subject: Detector Operation. 
To: Department Signal Officer. 

1. On November 27, 1941, after conference with Assistant Chief of Staff G-3, 
and receiving instructions to operate all mobile detectors from two hour 
before dawn until one hour after dawn, I, as Acting Department Signal Officer, 
gave immediate instructions to Captain TETLEY, Commanding Officer of the 
Aircraft Warning Company, to initiate the above detector operation so long as 
Alert No. 1 was in force. 

2. The detectors in question operated daily thereafter during the prescribed 
period except when having occasional operational trouble. In addition, the six 
detector stations operated daily except Sundays from 7:00 A. M. until 11:00 A. M. 
for routine training. Daily except Saturday and Sunday, the hours 12:00 noon 
until 4:00 P. M. were devoted to training and maintenance work. 

W. H. Murphy, 



True Copy: 

O. M. Cutler 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Col., Infantry. 



Li. Col, Sig C. 



[Exhibit K] 



affidavit 



HicKAM Field, T. H., 

20 December 1941. 



I, JAMES A MOLLISON, certify that during the period 27 November 1941 
to 7 December 1941 the Navy made no requests to the Hawaiian Air Force for 
in shore or long range aerial reconnaissances. 

Jas. a. Mollison, 

Lt. Col., A. C, 
H. A. F. CIS. 
True Copy: 

O. U. Cutler 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Coi., Infantry. 

[Exhibit L] 

CERTIFICATE 

I certify that on November 27, 1941, I accompanied General Short and General 
Martin to Admiral Kimmel's office for conference relative to sending Army pur- 
suit planes to Midway and Wake. As this would unquestionably weaken the 
defenses of Oahu, Admiral Kimmel asked a question of Captain McMorris, his 
War Plans Officer, which was substantially as follows: 

Admiral Kimmel: McMoriis what is your idea of the chances of a surprise raid 
on Oahu. 

Captain McMorris: I should say none Admiral. 

James A. Mollison, 

Lieut. Colonel, A. C. 
True Copy: 

O. M. Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Col., Infantry. 



■ PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2515 

[Exhibit M] 
Headquarters Hawaiian Department 

fort shafter, t. h. 

November 26, 1941, 
RCA 831 US GOVT 

Washington, DC Nov 26 1941 L149P 
Commanding General, 

Hawaiian Department, Ft. Shafter, TH. 
Four six five tweiity sixth 

Reference two B Dash Twenty four airplanes for special photo mission Stop 
It is desired that the pilots be instructed to photographic Truk Island in the 
Caroline Group Jaluit in the Marshall Group Stop Visual reconnaissance 
should be made simultaneously Stop Information desired as to the number 
and location of naval vessels including submarines Comma airfields Comma 
aircraft Comma guns Comma barracks and camps Stop Pilots should 
be warned islands strongly fortified and manned Stop Photography and 
reconnaissance must be accomplished at high altitude and there must be no 
circling or remaining in the vicinity Stop Avoid orange aircraft by utilizing 
maximum altitude and speed Stop Instruct crews if attacked by planes to 
use all means in their power for self preservation Stop The two pilots and 
copilots should be instructed to confer with Admiral Kimhiel upon arrival at 
Honolulu to obtain his advice Stop If distance from Wake and Jaluit to 
Moresby is too great Comma suggest one B dash twenty four proceed from 
Wake to Jaluit and back to Wake Then Philippines by usual route photograph- 
ing Ponape while enroute Moresby Stop Advise pilots best time of day for 
photographic Truk and Jaluit Stop Upon arrival in Philippines two copies 
each of any photographs taken will be sent to General MacArthur Cofnma 
Admiral Hart Comma Admiral Kimmel Comma the chief of naval 
operations Comma and the War Department Stop Insure that both 
B dash twenty four airplanes are fully equipped with gun ammunition upon 
departure from Honolulu. 

Adams 

Decoded by: Lt. G E Haven SC, 147A November 27, 1941. 

True copy: 

O. M. Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Col., Infantry. 

Answer should be marked "ANSWER to Code Message No. 465— 26th 

[Exhibit N] 

(Copy) 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 

FORT shafter, T. H. 

Memorandum for Department Adjutant General: 

Request that the following Secret official radiogram be sent. This message 
does NOT cover subject matter previously sent in a message, either in the clear 
or having a different security classification. 
This message is Priority. 

/s/ Cheney L. Bertholf, 
Lt. Col., A. G. D. 

Adjutant. 
Approved for Transmission: 
/s/ O. M. McDole, 

Major A. G. D., 
Asst. Adjutant General. 

Chief of the Army Air Forces, 

Washington, D. C. 
Reference secret photographic mission of two B twenty fours stop One of 
B twenty fours Lieutenant Faulkner which landed Hickam Field this date short 
following equipment considered essential to safety and success of mission colon 
fift}- caliber machine guns comma mounts comma adapters and accessories for 
upper hemisphere semicolon fifty caliber tunnel gun comma adapter and acces- 



2516 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

series semicolon for starboard and port sides semicolon second thirty caliber 
nose gun comma adapter and accessories stop Guns can be removed from our 
equipment and ammuntion is available stop Strongly recommend that second 
B twenty four bring necessary equipment from mainland for installation on both 
planes prior their departure from Hickam Field stop Plane being held here 
until satisfactorily armed subject plane has no armor plate installation stop 
Except for removal of passenger seats plane equipped as for ferry service North 
Atlantic signed Martin HAF 141 C 

Short. 
Enc sec by Lt. G. E. Haven, S. C. 225P 5 Dec/41 
A True Cop.v 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2d Lt. F. A. 

[Exhibit O] 

20 December 1941. 
certificate 

On the morning of 7 December, 1941, the 18th Wing had 6 B-17s in commission, 
with 6 B-17s out of commission for maintenance. Of the 8 B-17s destroyed dur- 
ing the attack, 4 were from those stationed at Hickam Field, 2 from those in 
commission and 2 Trom those out of commission. The other 4 were lost while 
attempting to land upon arrival from the Mainland. These B-17s arrived at 
Hickam Field between 8:00 A. M. and 8:20 A. M., 7 December, 1941. These 
planes took off from Hamilton Field, California in two squadrons, one at 9:30 
P. M. December 6, Pacific time (12:30 A. M. December 7, Eastern time) and the 
other at 10:30 P. M. December 6, Pacific time (1:30 A. M. Eastern time). 

Of the 8 B-17s which arrived safely from the mainland, none had sufficient gaso- 
line to permit dispatching them on missions, nor were they equipped with ammu- 
nition for these defensive armament. Machine guns were still cosmolined and 
had not been bore sighted. Ferry crews were skeletonized, consisting of pilot, co- 
pilot, navigator, engineer and radio operator. Such crews were incapable of 
manning all gun positions even if the guns had been properly prepared for combat 
and supplied with ammunition. 

The B-24 which arrived at Hickam Field on 5th December,'1941, previous to 
the attack, had insufficient armament for combat, only 1 .30 cal. and twin .50 
cal. guns in the tail, and was without ammunition for the guns that were installed. 

James A. Mollison, 

Lieut. Colonel, A. C. 

True Copv 

O. M". Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Col. Infantry. 

[Exhibit P] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 

fort shafter, t. h. 

1549 Ws Washington D C 74/73 RCA USG ETAT 7 121 8P 
CG 

Hawn Dept Ft Shafter TH 
529 7th Japanese are presenting at one pm eastern standard time today what 
amounts to an ultimatum also they are under orders to destroy their code machine 
immediately stop just what significance the hour set may have we do not know 
but be on alert accordingly stop inform naval authorities of this communication 

Marshall. 
Decoded bv: Lt. J. H. Babcock 251P Dec. 7, 1941 
Code Message No. 529 7th 
True Copy 

O. M. Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Col. Infantry. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2517 

[Exhibit Q] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 

fort shafter, t. h. 

P 3 war L 54 WD 1 extra urgent 

Washington DC 219P Dec 9 1941. 
C O 

Haivn Dept Ft Shafter TH 
Five four nine ninth Please advise immediately exact time of receipt of our 
number five two nine repeat five two nine December seven at Honolulu exact time 
deciphered message transmitted by Signal Corps to staff and by what staff office 
received 

Colton 

Acting. 
Decoded by: Lt L G Forbes SO 910AM Dec 9 1941 
True Copy 

O. M^. Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt Col Infantry. 

[Exhibit R] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 
fort shafter, t. h. 
Chief Signal Officer, 
Washington, D. C. 
Re your five four nine radio five two nine delivered Honolulu via RCA seven 
thirty three morning seventh stop Received signal office Fort Shafter eleven 
fort}' five morning seventh paren this time approximate but within five minutes 
paren stop Deciphered message received by Adjutant General HQ HAW dept 
two fifty eight afternoon seventh 

Short 
A true copy : 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 
note: This form to be used only for Radiograms and Cablegiams. One copy 
only to be submitted. The making of an exact copy of Secret or Confidential 
Radiograms is forbidden. Only such extracts as are absolutely necessary will be 
made and marked secret or confidential as the case may be. This copy will be 
safeguarded with the greatest caie and when no longer required will be returned 
to the Recoids Division, Adjutant General's Office, without delay. (AR 380-5), 

Form H. D. No. 1173 (Revised)— 2892 Honolulu 10-31-41 lOM. [72B] 

[Exhibit S] 

Copy SECRET 

Fort Shafter, T. H. 

Territory of Hawaii, ss : 
Personally appeared before me, the undersigned, authority for administering 
oaths of this nature, one Grover C. White, Jr. 0-396182, 2nd Lieut., Signal Corps, 
Signal Company, Aircraft Warning, Hawaii who after being duly sworn according 
to law deposes and sayeth: 

1. At the request of the Control Officer and Xaval Liaison Officer the AWS 
agreed to operate its detectors beyond the daily period of two hours before until 
one hour after dawn. The first schedule required operation of all stations from 
4 A. M. to 6 P. M. This schedule was modified to the hours of 4 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
A temporary schedule was next devised which required all stations to operate 
from 4 A. i\I. to 11 A. M. and to have "staggered" operation, i. e., 3 stations from 
11 A. M. to 1 P. M., the remaining 3 stations from 1 P. M. to 4 P. M. On Satur- 
day, December 6, 1941, I contacted the Control Officer to request authority to 
have all stations operate from 4 a. m. to 7 a. m. only on Sunday, December 7, 1941; 
this was agreed to by the Control Officer. 

2. Staff Sergeant Stanley J. Wichas, SCAWH, acting RDF Officer, reports 
that he saw nothing that could be construed as suspicious in the information 
received by the AWS Information Center from 4 A. M. to 7 A. M. Sunday, Decern- 



2518 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

ber 7, 1941. This is verified by Lt. Kermit A. Tyler, Air Corps, who was the only 
officer in the Information Center from 4 A. M. to 7 A. M. 

3. At approximately 7:20 A. M. a report was received from a Detector station 
at Opana that a large number of planes was approaching Oahu on a course North 
3 degrees East at a distance of approximately 132 miles. This information was 
immediately transmitted by the switchboard operator, Pfc. Joseph McDonald to 
Lt. Tyler, who talked to Opana about the flight. The statement of Pfc. Joseph 
McDonald, SCAWH, the switchboard operator is attached. 

4. The Navy Liaison Officer's position within the Information Center was not 
manned when I reached the Information Center at about 8:20 A. M. This posi- 
tion was manned shortly thereafter by Technical Sergeant Merle E. Stouffer, 
SCAWH, who remained on the position until approximately 4:30 P. M. when the 
position was taken over by Naval Officers. 

Further the deponent sayeth not. 

/s/ Gkover C. White, Jr., 

2nd Lieut., Signal Corps, 
Signal Company, Aircraft Warning, Hawaii. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of Dec. A. D. 1941 at Fort 
Shafter, T. H. 

/s/ Adam R. Htjggins, 

2nd Lieut., Signal Corps, 

Summary Court. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

Fort Shafter, T. H. 

Territory of Hawaii, ss: 
Personally appeared before me, the undersigned authority for administering 
oaths of this nature, one Joseph P. McDonald, 13006145, Pvt Icl, Signal Com- 
pany, Aircraft Warning, Hawaii, who after being duly sworn according to law 
deposes and sayeth: 

I was on duty as telephone operator at the AWS Information Center on Sunday 
morning, December 7, 1941. I received a telephone call from Opana at 7:20 
A. M. stating that a large numVjer of planes were heading towards Oahu from 
North 3 points east. I gave the information to.Lt. Kermit A. Tyler, Air Corps, 
78th Pursuit Squadron, Wheeler Field, T. H. and the Lieutenant talked with 
private Lockard at the Opana Station. Lt Tyler said that it wasn't anything 
of importance. At that time the planes were 132 miles out. I asked if we 
shouldn't advise Corporal Beatty and have the plotters come back. The Opana 
Unit stressed the fact that it was a very large number of planes and they seemed 
excited. Lt. Tyler said that it was not necessary to call the plotters or get in 
touch with anyone. 

Further the deponent sayeth not. 

Joseph P. McDonald, 
Sig. Co., Aircraft Warning, Hawaii. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of December A. D. 1941 at 
Fort Shafter, T. H. 

Adam R. Huggins, 
2nd Lieut., Signal Corps. 

Summary Court. 
True copy: 

O. M. Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 
Lt. Col., Infantry, 

Statement of Lieut. Kermit A. Tyler 

20 December 1941. 
On Wednesday, 3 December 1941, I was first detailed to learn the operation of 
the plotting board in the Interception Control Center. I reported for duty at 
1210, just as the crew on duty was leaving. I spoke with Lt. White, Signal 
Corps, a few minutes and he showed me the operating positions for Navy, Bom- 
bardment, Antiaircraft, Controller's position and Aircraft Warning Service. I 
remained on duty until 1600. Only a telephone operator was on duty with me. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2519 

On Sunday, 7 December 1941, I was on duty from 0400 to 0800 as Pursuit 
Officer at the Interception Control Center. From 0400 until approximately 0610 
there were no plots indicated on the interception board. From that time until 
0700 a number of plots appeared on the control board at various points surround- 
ing the Island of Oahu. I particularly remember at least one plot South of 
Kauai and I believe there was on South of Molokai. There were two plots at 
some distance North of Oahu and which I remember seeing on the historical 
record. At the time, I questioned the plotter of the historical record who stated 
that he makes a record of all plots as they come in. There were a number of 
plots over and around the Island of Oahu. Having seen the plotters work once 
before with about the same general layout, this did not seem irregular to me. 
At 0700 all of the men except the telephone operator folded up their equipment 
and left. At about 0720 the operator at the Opana RDF Station called me and 
said that the instrument indicated a large number of planes at 132 miles to the 
North. Thinking it must be a returning naval patrol, a flight of Hickam Field 
Bombing planes, or possibly a flight of B-17 planes from the coast, I dismissed it 
as nothing unusual. (It is common knowledge that when Honolulu radio stations 
are testing by playing Hawaiian Music throughout the night that coincidentally 
B-17s are apl to come in using the station for radio-direction finding. The radio 
station was testing on the morning of 7 December, 0230-0400). At about 0750 
I heard some airplanes outside and looking toward Pearl Harbor saw what I 
thought to be a navy practicing dive bombing runs. At a little after 0800, 
Sergeant Eugene Starry, A. C. Wheeler Field, called me to tell me that Wheeler 
Field had been attacked. I immediately had the telephone operator call all men 
back to duty. Most of the men had returned to duty by 0820 when Major L. N. 
Tindal arrived and took charge of the Control Center. I remained on duty 
assisting Major K. P. Bergquist and Major L. N. Tindal as Pursuit Control 
Officer until about 1615, 8 December 1941, with the exception of rest periods 
from 2000 to 2400, 7 December, and 0600 to 1000, 8 December. 

(s) Kermit A. Tyler, 
Kermit A. Tyler, 
1st Lieut., Air Corps. 

True copy. 

O. M. Cutler, 
O. M. Cutler, 

Lt. Col. Infantry. 

He.\dqu.vrters 53rd Coast Artillery Brig.\i)E (AA), 

Office of the Brigade Commander, 

Fort Shaffer, T. IL, 20 December 19.U. 
Subject: Report on action bv 53d C. A. Brigade (AA^ from 0755 to 2100, 7 Decem- 
ber 1941. 
To: General Short. 

1. At the beginning of the attack on Oahu 7 December 1941, the 53d Coast 
Artillerv Brigade (A A) was operating imder tlie conditions of Alert No. 1, S. O. 
P., N. C. A. C, 26 November 1941. The 97th C. A. and the AA Detachments of 
the East Group had anti-sabotage guards at their fixed 3-inch gun Batteries. .\11 
anti-aircraft equipment w as being guarded. 

2. a. Fort Weaver. Headquarters 2nd Battalion 97th C. A. (AA), 

Alerted 0810 
Ready to fire 0813 
Engaged enemv at 0814 
Amm. fired: 4()7— .30 Cal. ball. 
117— .30 Cal. A. P. 
53— .30 Cal. Tracr. 
12— PLstol. 
South Group Ciommand Post detail at stations at 0810. NO repeat NO inter- 
ruption in communications in South Croup during this period. There was rifle 
and automatic rifle fire on low flying enemy planes by officers and men. 

Battery G 97th, were in camp at Fort Weaver. Its battle position is at fixed 
battery at Fort Weaver. 
Alerted at 0810 
Ready to fire 0830 
Engaged enemy 0S30 

79716— 46— E.\. 145, vol. 4—5 



2520 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Fired 30 rds— 3" A. A. Shrapnel. Approximately 200 rds of .30 Cal. ball 
Amm. One .50 Cal. Machine Gun was in action at apijroximately 8:40 
A. M. During this firing Private YORK gunner was wounded while 
engaging the enemy, he stayed at his post although ordered to take cover. 
Lieutenant KING states that the battery fire broke up and definitely 
turned back one formation of 15 enemy planes. Casualties — One (1) 
Officer dead — Killed while proceeding through Hickam Field to his battle 
position. Four (4) enlisted men wounded. 

(Basic: Ltr., Hq. 53d C. A. Brigade (AA), dated 20 December 1941. Subject: "Report on action by 53d 
C. A. Brigade (AA) from 0755 to 2400. 7 Dec 1941".) 

Battery F 97th, was camped at Fort Weaver. Its battle position at Fixed 
Battery Closson, Fort Kamehameha, T. H. 

Alerted 0755, and moved to Battery position across Pearl Harbor Entrance. 
Ready to fire 0855 
Engaged Enemy 0900 to 0920 

Amm. fired: 27—3" A. A., H. E., M. K. fuse M3. 
Approximately 400 rds .30 Cal. ball. * 
Approximately 150 rds .30 Cal. A. P. 
Battery G 64th, wa,s in barracks at Fort Shatter, battle position at Ahua Point. 
Alerted approximately 0815, and moved to battery position at Fort 

Kamehameha. 
Ready to fire 1030 

Engaged Enemy with .30 Cal. M. G. at 1030 
Amm. Fired: Approximately 50 rds of .30 Cal. ball. 
Battery H 64th, was in barracks at Fort Shafter. Its battle position is at Fort 
Weaver. 

Alerted 0830 
Ready to fire 1145 
Engaged Enemy 2100 
Amm. fired: 40 rds — .50 Cal. ball. 
40 rds— .50 Cal. A. P. 
30 rds— .50 Cal. Tracer 
Marine detachment: The Fleet Machine Gun School at Fort Weaver. Opera- 
tions were in cooperation with South Group although not tactically assigned. 
Alerted 0800 
Ready to fire 0810 
Engaged Enemy 0810 

Amm. fired: Approximately 8000 rds of .50 Cal. A. P. ball and tracer. 
Approximately 450 rds of 20 mm A. A. 
This Detachment shot down 4 enemy planes and saved a 4 engined bomber by 
causing enemy plane firing on it's tail to pull out and cease it's attack. Much 
shrapnel and some small arms bullets fell about Fleet M. G. School. There was 
excellent cooperation from Fort Weaver personnel in the liaison, phone, etc. 
h. 98th Coast Artillery, Schofield Barracks. 

Alerted at 0800 
The communications section at the Command Post, Wahiawa, shot down one 
enemy plane flying at less than 100 feet, with their automatic rifles at 0855. 

1st Battalion 98th C. A. (AA), was in position and ready for action at the 
following time: 

B— 98: 0955 
D— 98: 1000 
C— 98: 1030 
Battery M 64th, stationed at Fort Shafter, was alerted at 0815, moved to Wheeler 
Field, and was ready for action at 1155. 

Snd Battalion 98th C. A. (AA). This Battalion has two batteries at Kaneohe 
and one at Waipahu School. They were in position and ready for action at the 
following times: 

F— 98: 1315 

G— 98: 1315 

H— 98: 1330 

c. Camp Malakole 251st C. A. (AA). All units were alerted at 0805 when fired 

upon by a single enemy plane. All units returned the fire with small arms and 

the plane was shot down. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2521 

1st Battalion 251st C. A. (^4^), was in position and ready for action as follows: 
B— 251: at West Loch, 1145 
C— 251: Ewa Beach, 1145 
D— 251: South of Ewa, 1145 
2nd Battalion 251st C. A. {AA), was in position as follows: 
E — 251: Navy Yard 
F — 251: Navy Recreation Area 
G — 251: Tank Farm 
H— 251: Navy Yard 
At 1120 and again at 1122, E, 251st fired on enemy planes, shooting down one 
plane. 100 rds of .50 Cal. were fired on the first plane and 200 rds of .50 Cal. 
were fired on the second plane. 

d. Fort Kamehameha. Battery A, 97th C. A. (AA) fired 1500 rds of .30 Cal. 
at one enemy plane offshore at 0835. 

e. Sand Island. The AA Detachment of Battery F, 55th C. A., present at Sand 
Island when the attack started was ready for action at 0815. This battery fired 
89 rds of 3" AA and shot down two (2) enemy planes at 0815. 

/. Fort Shafter. 

(1) Three (3; enemy dive bombers were fired on by the Headquarters Battery 
and the Intelligence Battery of this Brigade and by Battery E, 64th Q. A. (AA). 
Ammunition Expended — 3,000 .30 Cal. 

(2) Enemv planes were fired on at 0900 and 1000 bv Battery A, 64th C. A. 
(AA). Ammunition Expended— 1000 .30 Cal. 

(3) All 3" gun batteries and Automatic Weapons batteries of the 64th C. A. 
(AA) were alerted at 0815 and were in position as follows: 

B— 64: at Aiea, 1000 

C— 64: at Aliamanu, 1030 

D — 64: South of Aliamanu, 1100 

F— 64: at Pearl Citv, 1105 

G— 64: See Par. 2 a, above. 

H — 64: See Par. 2 a, above. 

I — 64: at Aliamanu 

K— 64: at Hickam Field 

L — 64: at Hickam Field. 

M— 64: See Par. 2 b, above. 
All of these units except M, 64th fired during the second attack from 1000 to 
1145. Ammunition expended as follows: 

3", 23 rds. 

.50 Cal., 2361 rds. 

.30 Cal., 2821 rds. 
g. Fort Barrette. Battery H, 97 C. A. (AA), was stationed at Fort Weaver. 
The battery was alerted at 0755, moved out of Fort Weaver at 0830, and arrived 
at Fort Barrette at 0910. Enemy planes were engaged by small arms fire at Fort 
Weaver, while enroute, and at Fort Barrette. The detachment on guard at Fort 
Barrette shot down one enemy plane at 0910 by small arms fire. 

3. Three (3) Marine A>.\ Batteries were attached to the Brigade at 2245. 

4. Ammunition. Status at 0730, 7 December 1941. All units of the Brigade 
had in their possession, the initial issue of small arms ammunition. This included 
ammunition for rifles, pistols, automatic rifles and machine guns. In addition, 
the 3-inch ammunition was so positioned that it was readily accessible to all units 
of the Brigade except four (4) batteries for which ammunition was at Aliamanu 
Crater. These batteries completed drawing their initial allowance, 1200 rounds 
per battery, by 1015. 

C. K. Wing 
C. K. Wing, 
Colonel, 53d C. A. Brigade (AA), Commanding. 



2522 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



[Exhibit T] 

Status of aircraft of 7 December 1941 before attack 

HICKAM FIELD 



Name 


Total 


Out 


In 


A-20 A 


13 

]2 

32 

2 

1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
1 


7 
fi 
12 
2 
1 




] 

2 

1 
1 


6 


B-17D .. - . 





B-IS 


20 


B-12 A - 





0-47 B 





BT 2BR - 


2 


BT-2 CR 


1 


C-33 


2 


A-12 


2 


P-26 A 





P-26 B 





B-24 











72 


33 


39 



BELLOWS FIELD 



0-47 B . 


10 
3 




1 


4 


0-49 


2 







WHEELER FIELD 



P40C . .. 


131 

87/ 


100 

44 

8—14 

2 


1 32 
24 
1—4 
3 

2 
1 







u 




P40B 


64 


P36A .... 


20 


P26A 


7—10 


P 26B ... 


3 


B 18 , 


1 


B 12 


1 


AT6 


3 


0\ 9- . . 


3 


47B 


1 


A 12A - 


2 


OA 8 


1 


BT 2 










Type 


Damaged 
in raid 


Percent of 
damage 


HICKAM field: 

A-20 .. 


2 
10 
21 

1 

67 
21 

4 
2 


18 


B-17 


40 


B-18 . 


65 


B-24 


100 


WHEELER field: 

P-40 


65 


P-36 . 


55 


bellows field: 

Q-47 .... 


40 


Q-49 


66 







A true?copy 

Edward von Geldern 
Edward von Geldern 
2nd Lt. F. A. 



James A. Mollison 
Lt. Col. A. a 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2523 



Aircraft sfaius as of 1800, '20 Deceftibcr in/,1 





B-17 


B-18 


A-20 


P 40 


P-36 


0-47 


In Commission 

1st Echelon. _ 


31 
6 


9 
5 


10 


40 
2 
3 

8 


21 
3 


5 
2 


2nd Echelon 




3rci Echelou 


2 






6 












Total 


1 39 


14 


10 


53 


30 


7 



12 B-17 on hand Hickam 0600-7 Dec. 
' 29 B-17S arrived from the Mainland from 
A true copy 

Edward von Geldern 
Ed\\ard vun Gli.pern 

2nd Lt. F. 



Dec. to 20 Dec. inclusive. 

J.-iMES A. MoLLISON, 

Lt. Col. A. C. 



[Exhibit U] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 
Forward Echelon, 21 December 1941. 
Memorandum to Lieut Col. Kendall J. Fielder. 

The following report of planes shot down, crashing or otherwise destroyed in 
the attack on Oahu, 7 December 1941, is submitted for your information. All of 
these losses have as yet not been verified, and it is very likely that some of the 
reports from different sources will be in reference to the same plane. Verifications 
are being received daily: 



Time 



Source 



Details 



Remarks 



Total 



6 officers from emergency 
landing field at Haleiwa. 

CO Mil District of Kauai. 

Civilian report 



Accounted for 10 planes. 



0940 
C922-1130 



0805 
1020 



Group of officers on fish- 
ing trip. 

Capt. Ebby, "B" Btry 
55th C. A. C. 

Btry "F", 55 CAC 



251st C. A. C 

Btry "H"97th CAC. 



I plane crashed off North shore, 
I wrecked on Niihau. 

1 plane crashed in Gulch, rear 
Aiea Hgts. 

3 planes crashing in Honolulu 
Harbor. 

2 planes destroyed by machine- 
gun flre. 

2 planes 



Some of these may 
appear in other re- 
ports. 

Verified 



Verified - 
Verified. 
Verified. 



0855 
0830 



1100 



98th C. A. C 

Hq. Btry 15th CAC. 



35th Infantry.... 
27th Infantry.... 

298th Inf 

24th Division 

Haw. Air Force. 



Navy. 



I plane, 200 yds. off Malikoli.... 

1 plane crashed flaming 2 mi. 
SW Ft. Barrette. 

I plane shot down near Wahiawa 

I plane crashed in Ord shops at 
Ft. Kam. 

Observed 1 plane crash in sea 
SW Barbers Pt. 

Observed 1 plane crash in cane 
field nr Aiea. 

1 plane shot down over Bellows 
Fid. fell in sea. 

1 plane down at Brody Camp 
#4:1 nr Kaawa. 

1 plane at Ft Weaver 1 at Wheel- 
er Field, 1 at Hickam Field, 
1 at Pearl Harbor, 1 at Ft Bar- 
rette, 1 at Ewa. Witnessed 1 
shot down back of Naval Hos- 
pital. 

1 plane by AA at Beckoning Pt, 
1 on deck of a ship. 



0922 report not veri- 
fied, 1130 rpt verfd. 
Verified 



Verified. 
Verified. 



Verified... 
Not verf _ . 

Verified 

Verified 

2 doubtful. 



Verified. 



Total. 



2 
38 



The Navy reports are not available. 

T. H. Davies, 
Ll. Col., Inf, Asst. A. C. of S., G-2. 
REMARKS: While some of the planes enumerated are undoubtedly duplica- 
tions it is believed that a minimum of at least 29 enemy planes were shot down. 

Kendall J. Fielder, 
Lt. Col., G. S. C, A. C. ofS., G-2. 



2524 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[Exhibit V] 

[SECRET] 

A true copy 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern 
2nd Lt. F. A. 

\1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 19 February 1941 
In reply refer to 
Engr. 660 

General George C. Marshall, 

Chief of Staff of the Army, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Dear General Marshall: I was very glad indeed to have your letter of Feb- 
ruary 7th as it gave us some very definite information on aircraft we did not have. 

Since assuming command I have had two conferences with Admiral Kimmel 
and two with Admiral Bloch. I have found them both most approachable and 
cooperative in every way. I have told them that from my point of view there 
will be no hair splitting, but that the one thing that would affect any decision 
where there is an apparent conflict between the Army and the Navy in the use 
of facilities would be the question of what could produce the greatest combined 
effort of the two forces. They have assured me that they will take exactly the 
same view. From my brief intercourse with them I feel that our relations should 
be extremely cordial. 

As a result of my short study of conditions here I believe that the following 
are of great importance and I am taking steps to carry out the necessary changes: 

(1) Cooperation with the Navy. 

(2) Dispersion and protection of aircraft and of the repair, maintenance 

and servicing of aircraft. 

(3) Improvement of the Antiaircraft defense. 

(4) Improvement of the Harbor Defense Artillery. 

(5) Improvement of the situation with reference to searchlights. 

(6) Provision for more rapid movement of supplies and reserves by improve- 

ment in roads and trails. 

(7) Bombproofing of vital installations such as Command Posts and com- 

munication centers. 

(8) Increase in the number of Engineer troops. 

Cooperation with the Navy. A series of joint committees consisting of Army 
and Navy officers has been appointed with a view to the stud}' of cooperation of 
the Army and Navy especially with reference to employment of air and Aircraft. 
These committees have been directed to report on March 1st. Copy of the 
letter creating these committees is attached hereto as well as copy of 
[S] instructions to the echelon commanders concerning cooperation with 
the Navy. 

Dispersion and protection of aircraft and of the repair, maintenance and servicing 
of aircraft. Provision has been made for a number of emergency fields upon the 
various islands but no provision has been made for dispersion of the planes in the 
vicinity of fields and other protection by either camouflage or by bunkers. The 
emergency fields on other islands will be valueless for pursuit aviation except 
possibly on the Island of Molokai. The pursuit aviation is capable of only 
approximately one hour's flying with the throttle wide open. This means that 
the dispersion of pursuit aviation must take place upon the Island of Oahu if it 
is to be able to meet an attack from any direction. The dispersion and bunkers 
for the greater part of the pursuit aviation can be made in the immediate vicinity 
of Wheeler Field by the use of ravines and bunkers. The maintenance and repair 
facilities can be placed in ravines under ground without an exhorbitant cost in 
time or money. Tanks are now available for the distribution of gas and we are 
asking for money to install tanks. 

The bombers can make use of the landing fields on other islands but it will be 
necessary to make provisions for their dispersion in the vicinity of those fields 
and also on the Island of Oahu. Their dispersion is more difficult than that of the 
pursuit. The repair and maintenance facilities require so much space that it 
will be necessary, at least temporarily, to place them above ground protected by 
hills. At present the only repair facilities for the bombers are in buildings on 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2525 

Hickam Field which would undoubtedly be attacked by any surprise raid. Up to 
the time that we naake runways for dispersion of planes on all the fields surprise 
enemy raids would be extremely serious. 

Improvement of the Antiaircraft Defense. The major shortages in Antiaircraft 
artillery armament are sixteen 3-inch or 90 m.m. antiaircraft guns (six enroute) 
135 37-mm antiaircraft guns, 236 .50 caliber machine guns and 30 sound locators. 
The locators are expected in June. The shortage of personnel, however, is much 
more serious than the shortage in materiel. Practically all the coast artillery 
units have dual roles. If they man antiaircraft artillery the Harbor Defense 
Artillery will not be manned, and vice versa. To man the entire antiaircraft 
artillery defense project avoiding dual assignments to all but four Harbor Defense 
batteries requires an increase in the existing antiaircraft personnel as follows: 
Two regiments of Coast Artillery Antiaircraft (IMobile) T-0 4-11. 
One Battalion Gun Coast ArtiUerv Antiaircraft (Mobile (less searchlight 
battery)) T. O. 4-15. 

[3] Approximately 90 officers and 2,000 enlisted replacements to activate 
three gun batteries and three 37-mm batteries of the 64th Coast Artillery Anti- 
aircraft, now inactive. With the increasing critical international situation at 
this time it is urgently recommended that all reinforcements of Antiaircraft 
Artillery personnel, both unit and individual reinforcements mentioned above, 
together with the shortage in antiaircraft artillery materiel, be furnished to this 
department with the least practicable delay. 

These reinforcements to the antiaircraft artillery garrison, as well as those 
for the Harbor Defense Artillery listed below, are required to complete the ap- 
proved defense project. No provision of the defense of the Kaneohe Xaval Air 
Station has been made in the defense project. This problem has been made the 
subject of a separate letter, copy attached as Inclosure Xo. 4. 

Improvement of the Harbor Defense Artillery. There are no major shortages 
of equipment for Harbor Defense Artillery. However, about 150 officers and 
2,700 enlisted men as individual reinforcements and one regiment. Coast Artil- 
lery (T. D.) T. O. 4-31 W are required to fully man the Harbor Defense Artillery, 
not including the three obsolescent seacoast mortar batteries. It is urgently 
requested that these replacements and reinforcements be furnished at the earliest 
practicable moment. 

As an accessory to the Harbor Defense Artillery, the north shore Railroad 
connection is extremely important to give access to railway gun positions on the 
north shore. 

Improvement of the situation with reference to searchlights. The only serious 
shortage is in beach defense searchlights. A 24-inch carbon-arc light is under 
development; but the receipt of these lights here may be unduly delayed. This 
shortage can be overcome immediately by supplying power units for 42 Mack 
36-inch projectors which are now on hand. The trucks and power units for 
these lights are unserviceable but the projectors are in fair to good shape. 

There is a shortage throughout of spare parts for 60-inch searchlights, which 
were requisitioned some months ago. These would be required for any pro- 
longed action. Information from the Chief of Engineers indicates that they will 
probably be furnished in the near future. 

Provision for more rapid movements of supplies and reserves by improvement in 
roads and trails. With the increase in the number of motors available in the 
department it is most necessar\' that roads be provided to make the maximum 
possible use of the motors in the movement of reserves and supplies. The Engi- 
neers have made a very careful study of the roads and trails which are necessary 
for the defense of the island. 

[4] There are numerous bottlenecks in the islands where it is not practicable 
to construct alternate roads. If these roads are damaged by shelling or bombing 
it is most important that they be repaired in the minimum of time. To provide 
for this stores of repair material should be placed in close proximity to the vital 
points. It is believed that the Territorial government will cooperate with the 
Army in this matter, thus reducing expenses to be charged to National Defense. 

Bombproofing of vital installations such as Command Posts and communication 
centers. Command Posts, communication centers and items of critical supply 
should be bombproofed. This protection of Command Posts particularly should 
be done immediately in order that these installations can be trained to function 
in these locations before hostilities start. 

Increase in the number of Engineer Troops. The protection of aircraft and the 
construction of air fields will keep one regiment of engineers employed constantly. 



2526 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

The work on roads and trails would be such as to employ one General Service 
Regiment constantly. The combat Engineer regiment of the Hawaiian Division 
should be left available for bombproofing of Headquarters and communication 
centers and other tactical work. 

Previous recommendations for a regiment of Aviation Engineers, less 1 battal- 
ion, and an increase in enlisted strength of Third Engineers were based on 
assumption that some civilian labor would be available. The situation on 
civilian labor 'has become acute, and while it has been necessary to import skilled 
labor, the recent increase in defense work is going to necessitate importing un- 
skilled labor as well. The only alternative would be to curtail activities of the 
plantations and much of our defense work should not be postponed until that 
is done. 

Communications covering all the above recommendations are being or have 
been submitted to The Adjutant General. The following are the titles and 
dates of letters covering these subjects: 

Cooperation with the Navy. 

Joint letter, HHD 14th Naval District, 14 February 1941, subject: "Army 
and Navy Aircraft in Hawaiian Area," copv attached, Inclosure No. 1 
AG 354.2/JAX-(pencil) 

Letter, HHD to major echelon commanders, 17 February 1941, subject: 
"Maximum Readiness of Aircraft in Hawaiian Area," file 354.2/JAX, 
copy attached, Inclosure No. 2. 

[5] Dispersion and protection of aircraft. Letter Engr. 452, 19 February 

1941, subject: "Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft," Copv inclosed, Inclosure 
No. 3. 

Improvement of Antiaircraft defense and of Harbor Defense Artillery. Letter, 
HHD to TAG, 19 February 1941, subject: "Reinforcements for Coast Artillery 
Garrison, Hawaiian Department," file 320.2/55 copv attached, Inclosure No. 4. 

Letter, HHD to TAG, 18 February 1941, subject: "Defense of Naval Aii 
Station, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, T. H." file 381, copy attached, Inclosure No. 5. 

North Shore Railroad Connection. Letter, HHD Engr. 662.7, 19 February 1941, 
copy attached, Inclosure No. 6. 

Improvement of situation with reference to searchlights, a. Beach defense Lights: 
Letter, Engr. 470.3/6 x 470.3/10, 29 January 1940 with 11 Indorsements, 11th 
Indorsement AG 470.3 (1-29-40) M-D, 26 August 1940. 12th Indorsement, 
HHD dated 18 February 1941, to TAG being transmitted, copy inclosed, In- 
closure No. 7. 

b. Searchlight Parts. Letter, Engr. 470.3/8, 2 November 1940, to the Chief of 
Engineers, subject: "Prioritv Items, Engineer Status Report, Revision 1940." 
1st Indorsement, O., C. of E., (381.4) (Hawaii) 101, 28 January 1941, states: 
"Reference Par 1 c, the requisition for spare parts for searchlights was concurred 
n by this office. The requisition now is undergoing review by G-4 and action 
is expected shortly. You will be promptly informed of the action taken." Copy 
of 1st Indorsement inclosed, Inclosure No. 8. 

Provision for more rapid movement of supplies and^reserves by\i7nprovement in 
Roads and Trails. 

Letter, Engr. 611, 19 February 1941, subject: "Military Roads and Trails 
Program, Hawaiian Department." Copy inclosed, Inclosure No. 9. 

Bombproofing of vital installations. Letters, Engr. 800.96, following subjects 
and dates. (Copies attached) 

1. Bombproof Command Posts, Hawaiian Air Force, 4 February 1941. 

Inclosure No. 10. 

2. Bombproof Protection, Command Posts, Hawaiian Division, 4 February 

1941, Inclosure No. 11. 

3. Bombproof Construction for Magazines at Fort Barrette and Fort 

Weaver, 4 February 1941, Inclosure No. 12. 

4. Splinterproof Protection for Antiaircraft and Mobile Seacoast Batteries, 

4 February 1941, Inclosure No. 13. 
[6] 5. Bombproof Command Post, Antiaircraft Groupment, 4 February 
1941, Inclosure No. 14. 

6. Bombproof Gasoline Storage, Hawaiian Department, 5 February 
1941, Inclosure No. 15. 

7. Bombproof Protection for Signal Installations, Hawaiian Depart- 
ment, 6 Februar\' 1941, Inclosure No" 16. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2527 

8. Storage of Defense Reserves, Aviation Gasoline, Hawaiian Air 
Force, 6 February 1941, Inclosure No. 17. 

9. Department Command Post, Aliamanii Crater, last correspondence 
660.9 (S), copy attached, Inclosure No. 18. 

Increase in number of Engineer Troops. — Letter Engr. 322.03, 19 February 1941, 
subject "Additional Engineer Troops", copy inclosed, Inclosure No. 19. 
Enclosures herewith are made for your ready reference and information. 
Sincerely yours, 

Walter C. Shokt, 
Lieutenant General, Conunanding. 
19 Incls. 

[Exhibit W] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 19 February 1941. 
In reply refer to: 
Engineer 452. 
SECRET 

Subject: Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft. 
To: The Adjutant General, War Department, Washington, D. C. 

1. With the present set-up of existing facilities in this Department the pursuit 
ships are forced to operate to a large extent from Wheeler Field and similarly the 
bombardment ships are forced to operate from Hickam Field. In times of actual 
operation some of the bombardment ships will be operating from bases on the 
outlying islands, but to a large extent the pursuit ships will continue to operate 
from Oahu due to the limited time and radius of operation without refueling. 

2. The concentration of these airplanes at Wheeler Field and at Hickam Field 
presents a very serious problem in their protection against hostile aviation. 
Wheeler Field is too small for the operation of the number of pursuit ships to be 
furnished to this Department and it will be necessary to develop another base 
for at least one group of pursuit aviation. A site in the vicinity of Barbers Point 
has been tentatively selected and is now being discussed with the Navy Depart- 
ment in connection with that Departments activities on its new air base in the 
Ewa Plain Area. The new Army air base will be the subject of a subsequent 
letter. 

3. While this new base will provide some opportunity for dispersion of the pur- 
suit ships this dispersion cannot be counted upon to give adequate protection and 
it will be necessary to provide protection by means of bunkers in the vicinity of 
existing fields for both pursuit and bombardment aviation. I have asked the 
District Engineer of Honolulu to study this problem and to submit cost estimates 
on the most economical satisfactory means of providing this protection. The 
District Engineer has recommended that the protection be provided by a rolled 
fill embankment of dirt and has estimated the cost at $1,200.00 each for pursuit 
planes, $8,000.00 each for two engine bombardment planes and $15,000.00 each 
for four engine bombardment planes. In arriving at these figures he has given 
consideration not only to present unit costs, but has included funds to cover 
increasing cost of both labor and non-labor items in this Department; the figures 
shown include both direct and indirect costs. This bunkering protection will 
cost about the same regardless of its location; the unit price includes cost of taxi 
strips and accessories. 

4. This protection should be provided for 142 single engine pursuit ships and 
121 double engine pursuit ships and for 25 two engine bombers and 70 four 
engine bombers. Using the unit costs quoted above the total for pursuit planes 
is $315,600.00 and the total for bombing planes is $1,250,000.00. The total for 
the two types is $1,565,600.00. It is recommended that funds in this amount 
be allotted to this Department as soon as possible to initiate the installation of 
this protection. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 
A true copy: 

Edward Von Gelderv, 

2nd Lieut. F. A. 



2528 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[secret] 

Subject: Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft. 

AG 600.12 (2-19-41) M 1st Ind ACW/mme 

War Department, A. G. O., March S, 1941. To the Chief of the Air Corps 
and Chief of Engineers, IN TL RN. 

For remark and recommendation. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

Adjutant General. 
Subject: Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft. 

2nd Ind (12) 

War Department, 
Office, Chief of Air Corps, 
Washington, D. C, March 5, 19^1. 
To Chief of Engineers. 

This office concurs in the recommendations as contained in basic communication. 
It is recommended that action be taken to provide funds for this project in the 
next supplemental bill. 

For the Chief of the Air Corps: 

Walter J. Reed, 
Lt. Colonel, Air Corps, 
Executive, Building, & Grounds Div. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut. F. A. 

600.1 (Haw. Dept. Airfields)— 38 

Subject: Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft. 

3rd Ind. 3-N 

Office, C. of E., April 1, 1942. 
To the Adjutant General. 

1. Attention is invited to paragraph 3 of basis letter which gives unit prices 
for rolled fill bunkers for pursuit planes, two-engine and four-engine bombard- 
ment planes. It is noted that the unit prices given include funds to cover in- 
creasing cost of both labor and non-labor items and direct and indirect costs. 
It is also noted that the unit prices include the cost of taxi strips and accessories. 

2. For the reason that the basic letter gave no basis on which this office could 
check the estimate of cost, a radiogram was sent to the Commanding General, 
Hawaiian Department, March 25, 1941, requesting detailed information sufficient 
for checking. A copy of this radiogram is inclosed. A reply was received 
thereto by radiogram from the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department, 
dated March 29, 1941, copy of which is inclosed. 

3. It is recommended that approval in principle of the proposed protective 
arrangements be granted and that an initial allotment of $1,000,000 be made at 
this time, authorizing the preparation of complete plans and initiation of con- 
struction with a view to providing necessary balances when costs are more 
fully determined. 

For the Chief of Engineers: 

William F. Tompkins, 
Lietd Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Executive Assistant. 
2 Incls: 

Copy of Radiogram dated 3/25/41; 
Copy of Radiogram dated 3/29/41. 

A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern 

2nd lieut F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2529 

Via Air Mail 

Subject: Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft. 

AG 600.12 (2-19-41) MC-E 4th Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., May 31, 1941. 
To Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Authority is granted for the construction of revetments in the Hawaiian 
Department for 70 four-engine bombardment, 13 light bombardment and 170 
pursuit planes. This is the total number of airplanes which at present are visual- 
ized as an obtainable objective in Hawaii within a reasonable time. 

2. In locating these revetments, "battle stations" of airplanes should be visual- 
ized in view of present and projected airdromes in the Hawaiian Islands. Revet- 
ments should be dispersed over the widest practicable area around and adjacent 
to airdromes. 

3. In the designs of revetments for use in the present war in the British Isles, 
provision is made for a splinter-proof shelter for airplanes crews and maintenance 
personnel who may be caught in the revetments during an air attack. In the 
British design, this splinter-proof, shelter is placed in the rear wall or back of the 
revetment. In the construction of the revetments proposed for the Hawaiian 
Department, it is believed that this feature should be incorporated. 

4. It is desired that you submit revised estimates covering the construction of 
the revetments approved in paragraph 1 above incorporating splinter-proof shelters 
for plane crews. 

5. Funds, in the amount of $1,358,000 for the completion of this project as 
finally approved after receipt of your revised estimates, are being included in 
estimates for funds now being prepared. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

Major General, The Adjutant General. 
Incls. w/d 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut., F. A, 

Engr. 452 5th Ind 

Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, Fort Shafter, T. H., 31 July 1941. 
The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Provisions in plans have been made for splinter-proof shelters for airplane 
screws and maintenance personnel. 

2. Revised estimates based on obtainable objectives are as follows: 

a. Personnel shelters 5' x 9' @ $635.00 each for 85 pursuit planes, 
bunkers having already been built on Wheeler Field by troop 
labor $53, 975. 00 

h. 85 Pursuit Bunkers @ $1,200.00 and 85 personnel shelters, 
5' X 9' @ $635.00 to be constructed at locations other than 
Wheeler $155,975.00 

c. 13 Lt. Bombardment bunkers @ $8,000 and 8 personnel shelters 

5' X 13' @ $800.00 $114,400.00 

d. 70 four-engine bombardment bunkers @ $15,000 and 70 per- 

sonnel shelters 5' x 17' @ $925.00 1, 050, 000. 00 

Total $1,374, 350. 00 

3. The bunkers for pursuit planes will be built at the new pursuit field and at 
Bellows Field. These for A-20-A planes will be at Bellows Field and for the 
4-engine bombardment planes will be started at Hickam Field. It is not planned 
at this time to construct any bunker for these 4-engine planes on the outlying 
airports, but it is possible that when these airports are completed, the installation 
of some bunkers at these airports with the majority at Hickam may be desirable. 
This question has been discussed with the District Engineer, Honolulu, who states 
that the costs at these field will be about the same as his estimate for Hickam. 

4. Since the figure of $1,374,350.00 is so close to the figure of $1,358,000.00 
mentioned in 4th Indorsement, it is recommended that the latter figure included 



2530 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

in the estimates be adopted and that funds in this amount be allotted to the Dis- 
trict Engineer, Honolulu, for this purpose. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut F. A. 

Subject: Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft, Hawaiian Department 

AG 600.12 (2-19-41) MC-G 6th Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., September 22, 1941. 

To Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Plans for revetments proposed in the preceding correspondence are approved. 

2. Funds in the amount of $1,358,000 for the completion of revetments in the 
Hawaiian Department have been included in Project C-21, preliminary estimates 
1943. It is expected that they will become available about January 1, 1942. 

3. Final design of the revetments is being prepared by the Fortification Divi- 
sion, Corps of Engineers, and will be coordinated with the Chief of the Army 
Air Forces upon completion. 

4. When available, funds will be allotted to the District Engineer, Honolulu, 
for the construction of the required revetments. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 



A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 

2nd Lieut., F. A. 



Major General, The Adjutant General. 



[E.xhibit X] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., Sept. 10. 1941. 
In replv refer to: 
Engr. 600.96 SECRET 

Subject: Underground Repair Facilities. Hawaiian Air Depot. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. The provision of bombproof facilities for the repair of aircraft by the Ha- 
waiian Air Depot is vital to the continued functioning of the Hawaiian Air Force 
during an attack on Oahu. 

2. At present all shop and repair facilities of the Hawaiian Air Depot are 
crowded into a small area at Hickham Field. This area is located close to the 
entrance channel of Pearl Harbor which is a perfect landmark even during black- 
outs. Concealment or confusion as to the purpose of this installation by camou- 
flage is impracticable by any means known to this headquarters. In any attack 
or raid on this island, it is not only probable, but almost unavoidable that the 
Depot would be put out of action. 

3. Considerable study has been made of the problem of insuring continued main- 
tenance facilities for the Air Force and the only logical solution is to provide bomb- 
proof shelter for part of the existing maintenance facilities. Provision of bomb- 
proofed protection for all of these facilities is manifestly impracticable due to the 
tremendous cost. It is believed that bombproofed space for one complete B-17 
type airplane and for two B-17's without wing and tail assemblies, togehter with 
required space for all subassembly overhaul an repair represents the minimum space 
required. The District Engineer, Honolulu, has prepared a preliminary design of 
this structure and estimates its cost at $3,480,650.00. Copies of the design draw- 
ings and his estimate are inclosed as Inclosures 1 and 2. Proposed location of this 
repair depot is shown on print, inclosure No. 3. This location has been selected 
because it is at a considerable distance from any other probable target, because the 
terrain is adapted to camouflage and because the soil will offer no construction diffi- 
cult ies. Location adjacent to the present facilities of the Hawaiian Air Depot at 
Hickam Field is impracticable; rock and ground water are reached only a few feet 
under ground and this location is close to other primary targets of an air attack. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2531 

4. It is recommended that one underground repair depot of the type shown on 
inclosed plans be approved for construction at \Yheeler Field and that funds in 
the amount of $3,480,650.00 be allotted to the District Engineer, Honolulu, for 
this construction. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 

3 Incls: #1 Design Dwgs. (3 sheets) 

2 Estimate 

3 Location Drawing 
A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern 
Edward vox Geldern, 

2nd Lieut., F. A. 

Subject: Underground Repair Facilities, Hawaiian Air Depot. 

AG 600.12 (9-10-41) XG-G 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., October 27, 1941. 
To Comma,nding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The cost of providing bombproof underground repair faciUties compared 
with the advantages to be gained is so great, that it is a policy that such facilities 
will not be provided. 

2. Although the advantages of greater security which could be achieved by the 
provision of bombproof underground repair facilities must be recognized, the 
additional cost involved makes it necessary for air base installations exposed to 
possible bombardment attacks to assume this risk. 

3. One hangar bemg built for our Atlantic base is to provide sidewalls of bomb- 
splmter proof construction. If you desire installations of this type, due consid- 
deration will be given your request, considering funds are available, and the needs 
of other bases similarly exposed to danger of air attack. 

Bv order of the Secretarv of War: 

E. S. Adams, 
Major General, The Adjutant General. 
3 Incls n/c 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut., F. A. 

[Exhibit Y] 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., October 28, 19^1. 
In reply refer to: 

Engr. 400.312 

Via "Clipper" Air Mail 

Subject: Funds for Field Fortification and Camouflage Materials. 

To: The Adjutant Gleneral, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to the following project letters from this headquarters: 

a. Letter to The Adjutant General, Engr. 600.94, 4 February 1941, subject: 
"Sphnterproof Protection for Antiaircraft and Mobile Seacoast Batteries," recom- 
mending that $306,000 be allotted to initiate protective shelters for personnel and 
propellants at antiaircraft and mobile seacoast batteries. In 4th Indorsement, 
AG 662.1 (2-4-41) M-WPD, 31 March 1941, this headquarters was advised that 
the recommendation was not favorably considered, and that "protective instal- 
lations of this type should be improvised bv ordinarv field fortifiction methods." 

b. Letter to The Adjutant General, Engr. 000.91^ 7 July 1941, subject: "Re- 
quest for funds for Camouflage of Wheeler Field," recommending that an allot- 
ment of $56,210.00 be made for the purpose of camouflaging bunkers, landing 
field, hangers and warming apron at Wheeler Field. 

c. Letter to The Adjutant General, Engr. 000.91, 27 February 1941, subject: 
"Camouflage of Defense Installations," recommending that $29,000 be allotted 
for camouflage of batteries at Fort DeRussy, Fort Kamehameha, Fort Ruger, and 



2532 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Fort Barrette. 4th Indorsement, AG 007.5 (2-27-41) MC-E, 27 June 1941, 
approved the project and stated that funds for this purpose would be included in 
the next estimates and would be made available at the earliest practicable date. 
Radio from the Chief of Engineer 10 October 1941 advises.that $29,000 for 
camouflage of coast artillery batteries had been disapproved by the Budget Ad- 
visory Committee. 

[2] d. Letter of The Adjutant General, Engr. 452, 19 February 1941, 
subject: "Dispersion and Protection of Aircraft," recommending that an initial 
allotment of $1,565,600 be made for the construction of bunkers for the dispersion 
and protection of aircraft. 4th Indorsement AG 600.12 (2-19-41) MC-E, 
31 May 1941, granted authority for the construction of revetments for 70 four- 
engine bombardment, 13 light bombardment and 170 pursuit planes, and stated 
that funds in the amount of $1,358,000 for the completion of the project after 
receipt of revised estimates would be included in estimates for funds being pre- 
pared. 5th Indorsement Engr. 452, 31 July 1941, submitted a revised figure of 
$1,374,350, and recommended that it be adopted instead of the $1,358,000. 6th 
Indorsement, AG 600.12 (2-19-41) MC-G, 22 September 1941, approved plans 
for revetments, and advised funds in amount of $1,358,000 for completion of 
revetments in department were included in Project C-21, preliminary estimates 
1943, funds expected to become available about January 1, 1942. 

e. Letter from the Adjutant General, AG 353 (7-28-41) MC-D, 13 August 
1941, subject: "Reallocation of Special Field Exercise Funds for Field Fortifica- 
tion and Camouflage Projects," and 1st Indorsement thereon, AG 121/1, 14 
September 1941, recommending the immediate allotment of $125,000 for neces- 
sary materials and tools for the construction of field fortifications. This indorse- 
ment was followed up by radio 25 September 1941, recommending immediate 
favorable action on allotment of $125,000 for execution of field fortifications and 
camouflage projects. War Department radio, 29 September 1941, advised re- 
quest was not favorably considered, confirmed by 1st Indorsement War Depart- 
ment 14 September 1941. 

/. Letter to the Chief of Engineers, Engr. 121.2, 17 May 1941, subject: 
"Annual Estimates, Fiscal Years 1942 and 1943," and supporting data under 
Project 5, which requested $50,000 each for fiscal year 1942 and 1943 for local 
purchase of supplies for units of the Hawaiian Garrison other than Engineer 
troops, these supplies to be used in the construction of fortified works other than 
command posts for major echelons and camouflage measures, letter, Office, 
Chief of Engineers, to Department Engineer, 1 July 1941, subject: "Allotment 
of Engineer Service, Army Funds, Fiscal Year 1942," advised that only $5,000 
was being allotted. It further stated "It is believed the amount of $50,000 re- 
quested for this purpose is greatly excessive. Field fortifications or camouflage 
to this extent goes beyond the training stage and reaches the status of a construc- 
tion project. It is suggested that such requirements for the defenses of Hawaii 
be obtained from construction funds, which should be estimated and appropriated 
for this purpose." 

[3\ 2. The field fortification and camouflage works that will be required to 
insure the adequate defense of this island are of such magnitude that their ac- 
complishment after the outbreak of hostilities is entirely out of the question. 
All installations located on Government owned or leased land should be con- 
structed at the present time eliminating those tasks from the work that cannot 
be done until after complete mobilization when it will be possible to enter on 
and organize private land. 

3. The program for immediate construction contemplates semi-permanent 
emplacements for all coast artillery weapons in the present defense project. 
These weapons are sited in their most advantageous positions covering all ap- 
proaches to the island and fixed Naval installations and their movement is not 
contemplated under any change of situation. Protection for infantry units is 
based on lightly held beach positions with a strong and highly mobile reserve in 
accordance with latest tactical principles. Dispersed and camouflaged Bunker 
protection must be provided for aircraft and airfield installations must be pro- 
tected by machine gun emplacements and fencing. 

4. The peculiar topographic and geologic conditions and the nature of the 
vegetation of the Hawaiian Islands require a greater expenditure of materials 
for field fortification than would normally be anticipated. In their maneuvers 
and field training, troops have constructed many field fortification works. Sal- 
vage and local materials have been used to the utmost and many methods have 
been improvised to take into consideration the coral and lava rock, sand, and 
peculiar volcanic soil of the islands. This effort has been largely wasted because 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2533 

of the rapid deterioration of the local materials used. Sand bags and local tim- 
bers have a maximum life of about six months in this locality. 

5. The War Department has repeatedly directed this Headquarters to con- 
struct certain works by Field Fortification methods but neither materials nor 
funds have been supplied. This letter presents a new computation of all material 
requirements for field fortification works and camouflage which should be con- 
structed at once. This tabulation does not include those materials which must 
be used to complete the field fortiiication works after the outbreak of hostilities. 
These requirements may be divided into three groups as follows: 

a. The Air Corps requirements. The airfields in the Hawaiian Islands are 
limited in number and there are very few places aside from regular airfields where 
enemy planes might land. Consequently, it is expected that determined efforts 
would be made to capture existing airfields. To prevent this, protected machine 
gun positions must be placed to guard the sensitive points on each airfield, and 
[4] mobile forces provided for counter-attacks on enemy air-borne or sea- 
borne troops who are attempting a landing or who have landed. Airplanes on 
the ground must also be hidden and dispersed, to prevent their loss in surprise 
air attacks, hence camouflage is needed to conceal them. For this purpose, the 
local vegetation must be augmented by additional planting. In case an airfield 
on the outlying islands must be abandoned, its runways and other essential 
features should be destroyed, hence demolition chambers should be installed in 
advance. These matters cannot be deferred because of the time required for 
vegetation to grow and the time required to install protection and demolition 
works. 

b. Coast Artillery requirements. The Coast Artillery includes permanent fixed 
defenses, mobile guns in positions prepared in time of peace, and antiaircraft 
guns protecting fixed Naval or military installations. The Coast Artillery can- 
not maneuver; the mobile elements, including antiaircraft, are held in fixed 
positions to defend fixed installations or to cover intervals in the permanent 
defenses, and the best positions have been prepared. Since these positions are 
known to the general public, the enemy also knows them. The operating per- 
sonnel must have shelters to protect them and their ammunition during air attack, 
and the positions must be camouflaged to prevent accurate aim by enemy bombers. 
Coast Artillery troops must be constantly on the alert during active operations, 
and can then spare no men for fortification work after hostilities have begun. 

c. Infantry requirements. The Infantry divisions will occupy beach positions, 
very lightly held, and will have highly mobile motorized reserves. The beach 
positions have additional weapons, beyond table of organization allowances. 
Emplacements, trench shelters, observation and command posts for the beach 
positions must be ready when the enemy appears offshore, and field works should 
be used to develop the maximum efficiency of automatic and heavy weapons and 
release as many men as possible to the reserve. There will be neither time nor 
men available to construct beach positions after the enemy arrives; fields of fire 
must be cleared, barbed wire, road blocks, anti-tank mines, and other obstacles 
must be installed at that time because these defenses will be placed on private 
property or will unduly interfere with civilian enterprise if set up in advance. 

6. Inclosed are tabulations showing the material requirements of the Air Force, 
the Coast Artillery Command and the two Infantry divisions. 

[5] 7. It is recommended that an allotment of $1,455,542 be made immedi- 
ately available for the purchase of fortification and camouflage materials so that 
the work can be initiated and carried along concurrently with normal training 
activities. 

8. The only alternative for having these positions prepared in advance is to 
have a large increase in the garrison authorized for the defense of the islands. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 

1 Incl: in six sheets (in dupl.) 

A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldkrn, 

Snd. Lt., F. A. 



2534 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 
fort sh after, t. h. 

Memorandum for Department Adjutant General: 
10 WAR TG 61 WD 

WASHN, D. C., 2r)2P Aug. 12,lHi. 
CG 

Haw Dept, Ft. Shnftcr, T. II. 
SI mh 

AGA1C reurlet July twenty eighth AG one two one point two subject realloca- 
tion of special fiold exercise funds for field fortification and camouflage projects 
stop special field exercise funds are not available for purpose requested further 
information follows by mail 

Adams 

101 7A 
A True Copy 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldernt, 
2nd Lt., I. A. 

[Exhibit Z] 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shaffer, T. H., July 15, 1941. 
In reply refer to: 
Engr. 000.91 

Subject: Request for Funds for Camouflage of Wheeler Field. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. There is definite need for camouflage treatment of Air Fields in the Hawaiian 
Department. Up to this time no camouflage treatment has been undertaken at 
any air field in this department. 

2. Attached is a plan for camouflage of Wheeler Field prepared by the 804th 
Engineer Company Aviation (Separate). The plan includes photographs of the 
type of camouflage to be applied to the bunkers, together with itemized estimates 
of costs and recommendations. 

3. In reporting on this proposed plan, Major J. F. Ohmer, Jr., Corps of Engi- 
neers, Camouflage Officer, has commented as follows: 

The place for camouflage of Wheeler Field as prepared by the 804th Engineer 
Company Aviation (separate) is a good treatment for the field and the bunkers. 
The plan generally calls for 'blending' the buildings of Wlieeler Field into the 
Schofield Barracks building area and endeavoring to restore the air field proper 
to the original condition as shown by the present earth scars, such as the old 
Kamehameha Road, the gully through the field and the pineapple fields, roads 
and irrigation ditches." 

"The plan is practicable and can be readily accomplished by the 804th Engineer 
Company Aviation." 

"The Conanandhifi; General, Wheeler Field, has approved the plan and urged 
that the work be expedited." 

"While the air photographs of the two planes in the camouflaged bunkers show 
the wing tips and the liarsh straight shadows of the deciding line between the 
upper and lower nets, this can be blended by additional garnishing and small 
nets tying the lower nets under the upper terrace. This work is now being 
completed." 

"It is recommended that the camouflage plans for Wheeler Field be approved." 

[S] 4. It is recommended that an allotment of funds be made to this office 
in the amount of $56,210.00 for the purpose of camouflaging bunkers, landing 
field, hangars, and warning apron at Wheeler Field, the work to be done by the 
804th Engineer Company Aviation (Separate). An itemized estimate is incor- 
porated as a part of the plan substantiating the amount requested. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding^ 

1 Inch Plan 

A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt, F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2535 

[3] Subject: Request for Funds for Camouflage of Wheeler Field. 

AG 007.5 (7-12-41) MC 1st Ind. RPM/gt-1712. 

War Department,, A. G. C, July 29, 1941. 
To Chief of Engineers and Chief of the Army Air Force, IN TURN. 

For remark and recommendation. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

/s/ Carl Robinson. 

Adjutant General. 
1 Inch n/c. 
A True Copy 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

3nd Lt., F. A. 
[4\ Subject: Request for Funds for Camouflage of Wheeler Field. 
600.1 (Wheeler Fid) 71 2nd Ind. 6-C 

War Department, 
Office, Chief of Engineers, 
Washington, D. C, September 16, 1941. 
To: The Chief, Army Air Forces, Washington, D. C. 

1 . The proposed plan for the camouflage of Wheeler Field, Hawaii has received 
careful consideration by The Engineer Board. As camouflage is essentially a 
local problem long range criticism may be entirely in error. Consequently, the 
following comments are offered only to supplement and should not invalidate 
decisions made on the spot by officers with initimate knowledge of local conditions. 

2. Specific comments on Part I: 

a. Bunkers. — The bunkers do not appear in the best arrangement to give maxi- 
mum protection and to afford natural concealment. Their regular curving align- 
ment throws a great burden on the artificial camouflage measures. The outer 
berm of the bunkers should be more irregular at the toe of the slope and should not 
be permitted to appear as a series of parallel lines as seen in photograph (V- 
112.101). Portions of the light colored pattern which .show on the photograph 
could be continued over the revetment by sand or the native soil and over the net 
by weaving in appropriately colored garnishing. Extensive planting in native 
patterns will assist in this blending, and it is suggested that vines could be planted 
in the bunker tops and trained to grow into the nets to aid in defeating disclosure 
by means of infra-red photography. If additional dispersal pens are constructed, 
they should be spaced further apart, be more irregularh- arranged, and the outer 
surface of the earth walls should be more irregular, especially at the toe of the 
slope. 

b. Landing Field. — The division of the field boldly into three sections by natural 
boundaries as described is excellent, and, if carried out as indicated, should be 
very successful. The following detail criticisms may aid in the execution, but are 
not arbitrary. The field roads might be made a little more conspicuous by 
sprinkling a light colored earth, gravel or lava on the stripped surface as noted by 
contrast in the field roads in lower left corner of photograph (V-109~916-N-18). 
The same technique may be useful in the reproduction of the old Kamohameha 
road. If the fertilizer method does not produce dark enough contrasts it may be 
necessary to use black emulsified asphalts or a mixture of iron sulphate and tannin. 
The dark areas of the reproduced gully should not be used for taxiing and warming 
up any more than absolutely necessary, as this will destro^v the desired effect. 

[5] c. Hangar Line. 

(1) The effort to make the buildings of Wheeler Field appear as a more homo- 
geneous portion of Schofield Barracks might be more effective if more roads, 
dummy or real, were built between the two areas. 

(2) The athletic track is a dangerous subterfuge, because of its characteristic 
outline and east-west orientation, and is not generally recommended as it becomes 
a reference point when detected. 

(3) The painting of buildings on the aprons appears satisfactory; maintenance 
will be required and should not be neglected. 

(4) The hangar painting presents a fine appearance. More disruption might be 
achieved by a larger and bolder plan of painting. The roads which terminate at 
hangars might be carried over the building successfully and the buildings painted 

79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 6 



2536 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

on the roof tops might be connected with painted walks and service roads to help 
create the illusion of a reduced scale of construction. The general trace of the 
shadows of buildings should be studied and wherever possible, there should be 
painted, or preferably planted, trees and shrubs to break up their characteristic 
outline. Planting, which may appear relatively ineffective in vertical views, may 
help materially against the bombers' approach. 

(5) Inasmuch as the concrete hangar line apron is of brighter material and more 
reflective than other roadways in the area, it should be generally toned down 
with a thin solution of tar or asphalt in kerosene, in addition to the other treatment 
suggested. 

3. Specific comments on Part II. 

n. It is suggested an asphalt emulsion for roofs would be cheaper and more 
suitable. In general, the type of paint should be selected with regard to the mate- 
rial to be coated, instead of the classification by roofs, walls, etc. Under "Con- 
crete" it is assumed that aprons are included. The American Betumuls Company, 
which maintains a branch in Hawaii, should be able to furnish asphalt emulsion 
paints and adhesives more advantageously than Rejuvo. The matter of granules 
to cover surfaces should be investigated carefully to see whether local materials of 
indigenous colors or of a nature which will absorb bituminous colors, such as lava, 
are not more easily procurable. 

[6] 4. It is recommended that: 

a. That the plan of camouflage be approved. 

h. That the camouflage office, Hawaiian Department, or the Commanding 
Officer of the 804th Engineer Battalion (Avn.) (Sep.) be granted permission to 
communicate directly with the Engineer Board on matters of materials and 
technical details to expedite the work. 

c. That the Engineer Board be furnished a report to be made upon completion 
of the work, including photographs of intermidiate the final stages. It is sug- 
gested that oblique photographs be furnished as well as vertical. The oblique 
photographs should be taken at 10,000 feet and three to four miles from Wheeler 
Field from four directions. 

d. That the amount of $56,210.00 be alloted to the Department Commander, 
Hawaiian Department, for the purpose of camouflaging bunkers, landing field, 
hangars and warming aprons at Wheeler Field, the work to be done by the 804th 
Engineer Company. 

For the Acting Chief of Engineers: 

[s] Homer Saint-Gaudens, 

Lt. Co., Corps of Engineer, 
Acting Chief, Operations and Training Section. 
1 Incl 
Sub. 1. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[7] Subject: Request for Funds for Camouflage of Wheeler Field. 

AG 007.5 (7-12-41) MC-G. 3rd Ind. WR-1712. 

War Department, A. G. O., October 28, 1941. 

To Chief of Engineers. 

1. The camouflage treatment of Wheeler Field as outlined in basic corres- 
pondence is authorized when funds become available for this construction. 

2. It is desired that you take the necessary action to include the sum of $56,210 
in the next available budget estimate for camouflage treatment of Wheeler Field. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

D. R. Van Sickler, 

Adjutant General. 
1 Incl. n/c/ 
Copy to: 

Chief of Air Corps w/cy of basic com., 1st Ind., 2nd Ind. 
Commanding General, Hawaiian Department ref. his basic Itr. 7-12-41, 
together w/cy of 1st Ind., and 2nd Ind. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2537 



Engr. 000.91 



[secret] 



27 Feb 1941. 



Subject: Camouflage of Defense Installations. 

To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1, Investigations conducted by this headquarters have demonstrated that 
effective measures can and should be taken to reduce the visibility of exposed 
defense installations to hostile aerial observation. Admittedly these installa- 
tions cannot be concealed to such an extent that they will be invisible on aerial 
photographs; at the same time, however, any camouflage which will render visual 
observation more difficult and will decrease the effectiveness of enemy bombard- 
ment IS of the utmost importance. 

2. Time has not permitted the submission of a comprehensive program for the 
camouflage of all defense instpllations in this department which require some 
degree of concealment; this matter is undergoing continuous study. Fixed sea- 
coast batteries have received first attention and plans of procedure and cost esti- 
mates have been prepared. The following table shows the various installations 
on which camouflage work should be undertaken immediately with the tentative 
costs: 



Installation 


Armament 


Inclcsure No. 


Cost 


Ft. DERUSSY: 

Battery Randolph. _.. 


2-H" (Disappearing) 


Incl. No. 1 

Incl. No. 1 

Incl. No. 2 

Incl. No. 3 

Incl. No. 3... 

Incl. No. 4 

Incl. No. 5 _ 


} $6,000.00 


Battery Dudley 


2-6" (Disappearing) _ 

2-12" (Barbette)..- 

2-12" (Disappearing).. 


Ft. KAMEHAMEHA: 

Battery Closson ... 


6, 000. 00 


Battery Selfridge 


5, 000. 00 
1,500.00 


Battery Jackson 


2-6" (Disappearing) 

2-8" (Barbette) 


Ft. RUGER: 

Battery Adams.. _. 


2, 000. 00 
8, 500. 00 


Ft. BARRETTE: 

Battery Hatch 


2-16" (Barbette) 








Total cost 


$29, 000. 00 











The measures contemplated include construction of various types of overhead 
cover, dummy positions, extension of roads, painting and the transplantation of 
trees and shrubbery. 

3. Experience in the present World War has shown the very considerable 
success of the Germans in concealing by camouflage, their long range guns on the 
channel coasts. The several millions of dollars invested in the installations 
enumerated in paragraph 2 above and their general value in the defense of this 
island justify expenditure which will render them less vulnerable to enemy 
attack. It is therefore recommended that the sum of $29,000.00 be allotted this 
department as soon as practicable to permit initiation of this camouflage work. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, Commanding. 

Incls. 1-5: Aerial Photos 

A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Li., F. A. 

Subject: Camouflage of Defense Installations. 
AG 007.5 (2-27-41) M 1st Ind. 



To : The Chief of Engineers. 

For remark and recommendation. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 



ACW/lfl 

War Department, A. G. O., 

March IS, 1941. 



Adjutant General. 
5 Incls. n/c 
C. of E. 618.33 (Oahu) 3 2nd Ind. 6-E 

Office, C. of E., May 28, 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General, THROUGH THE CHIEF OF COAST ARTILLERY. 
1. This paper was held in this office to permit direct inspection of the installa- 
tions by a representative of this office who visited Hawaii on this and other 



2538 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

fortification matters. Reference is made to Hawaii on this and other fortification 
matters. Reference is made to memorandum of March 22, 1941, to The Adju- 
tant General, in this connection. 

2. The importance of protective concealment for existing seacoast batteries is 
recognized b}' this office and a directive bulletin is now being prepared for issue 
to the field showing methods of such concealment for different type batteries. 

3. The estimate submitted is considered an absolute minimum that will be 
required even omitting from consideration at this time Batteries Hatch and 
Closson which are to be casemated and more funds will probably be required at 
a later date. It is recommended that the project be approved and funds be 
made available at the earliest practicable date. 

For the Chief of Engineers : 

George Mayo, 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Chief, Fortification Section. 
5 Incls. — n/c 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

Subject: Camouflage of Defense Installations. 

618.3/45-B 3rd Ind. 5 

War Department, Office, Chief of Coast Artillery, 

June 12, 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General. 

1. The need for camouflaging the seacoast Batteries listed in paragraph 2 of the 
basic letter is evident from inspection of the inclosures, Nos. 1 to 5, inclnsive. 
The program as outlined in paragraph 2 of the basic letter, is concurred in, subject 
to the proviso that the protective concealment of Batteries Hatch and Closson 
will be coordinated, both in time and character, with the casemating of these 
batteries. 

2. No Seacoast Defense funds are available, at this time, for application to 
camouflage projects and none are included in current estimates. 

3. It is recommended that the camouflage project, described in paragraph 2 of 
the basic letter, be approved for inclusion in the Hawaiian Department Defense 
Project. 

For the Chief of Coast ArtiUery: 

Joe D. Moss, 
Major, C. A. C, 

Acting Executive. 
5 Incls — No change. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

Subject: Camouflage of Defense Installations, Hawaiian Department. 
AG 007.5 (2-27-41) MC-E 4th Ind. BSA 

War Department, A. G. O., 

June 27,1941. 
To: The Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The program for the camouflaging of Batteries Randolph, Dudley, Closson, 
Selfridge, Jackson, Adams and Hatch, as proposed in paragraph 2 of the basic 
letter, is approved for inclusion in the Hawaiian Defense Project. 

2. Funds to the amount of $29,000 for this purpose will be included in tlie next 
estimates to be submitted and will be made available at the earliest practicable 
date. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
5 Incls. w/d. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2539 

5th Ind. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Ft. Shafter, T. H., 

July 24, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Separate Coast Artillery Brigade, Ft. 
DeRussey, T. H. 

1. To note and return to this headquarters. > 

2. The Department Engineer will be directed to include this project in the next 
revision of the Hawaiian Defense Project and to prepare plans for the execution 
of this work when funds are received. 

By command of Lieutenant General Short: 

O. M. McDoLE, 
Major, A. G. G. 
Assistant Adjutant General. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

(Basic: Ltr., HHD, Engr. 000.91, 27 February 1941, subject: "Camouflage of 
Defense Installations.") 

000.91 6th Ind. 

HQ. H. S. C. A. BRIGADE, Pt. DeRussy, T. H., July 29, 1941— To CG Haw. 
Dept. 
Noted. 

Fulton Q. C. Gardner, 
Major General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[Exhibit lA] 

[1] [secret] 

Headquarters HawaiiaiN Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 19 February, 1941. 
Engr. 611 

Subject: Military Roads and Trails Program, Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, Engr. 611, this headquarters, 8 November 1940, 
covering the recommendations for the revision of the military Roads and Trails 
Program. .\s indicated in paragraphs 5 and 8 of that letter, the revised program 
was not complete and additional roads and trails were under consideration. 

2. A detailed study made by this headquarters indicates that the following 
additional improvements are necessary: 

a. Wiliwilinui road and trail improvement, estimated cost $33,550.00. Con- 
struction covering improvement of the existing 15,000 lineal feet of road at Wili- 
wilinui Ridge, eHminating sharp curves and providing adequate turnouts. It 
also covers construction of a 6-foot pack trail extending from the end of the exist- 
ing road to the main crest of Koolaupoko Ridge area. 

b. Improvement of Pupukea-Kahuku trail estimated at $12,720.00. This 
project consists of the general widening of the existing trail from 3 to 6 feet along 
its 13,000-foot alignment. This improvement will i)rovide desirable comnuuuca- 
tion between the northeasterly section of the Island and northern end of Wahiawa- 
Pupukea trail. 

r. Coincidental with the improvement of the Koolau Ridge trail, feeder trails 
to the ridge .should be developed and improved. As a part of its reforestation 
program, the CCC has constructed several trails from forest reserve boundaries 
to the main ridge of the Koolaua along the lateral ridges. These trails, shown in 
the following list, should be partially relocated and improved as 6-foot pack trails: 

(1) Poamono trail, 22,800 feet, estimated cost $35, 100. 00 

(2) Kawailoa trail, 24,000 feet 22, 750. 00 

(3) Schofield-Waikane, 33,000 feet 45,750.00 

(4) Waiawa trail, 30,000 feet 28, 650. 00 



2540 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

d. A road to Fuu Palailai. This project (copy illegible) of a 10' 

class "B" supply road extending from the main government road to Fuu Falai- 
lai. This road is desired to improve access to a group of fire control stations 
manned by a detail of from 50 to 100 men. The approximate length of this road 
is 8,700 feet and estimated cost $10,000.00. 

e. lunia-Palehua road. This project will connect an existing plantation road 
with the Palehua spur via the Mauna Kapu and the Honouliuli trails. The need 
for an alternate route to the Manauahua Defense Area is extremely important, 
particularly in view of the exposed condition of the Falehua road to hostile 
observation. This project calls for the construction of 24,000 lineal feet of a 
10-foot class "B" road at an estimated cost of $136,500.00. 

/. Radial Ridge roads, Manauahua area. This project calls for the construction 
of three roads along the ridges, south and west of Fuu Nanauahua as shown on 
the attached map. These roads serve vital defense areas which must be made 
accessible to truck transportation. The total length of these ten-foot roads is 
approximately 20,000 feet and the estimated cost of construction is $84,900.00. 

3. These additional roads and trails have been combined with the 19 items 
listed in paragraph 7 of letter, this headquarters, file Engr. 611, 8 November 
1940, and are shown in the table below in order of their relative priority. The 
location of each item is shown on the map, scale 1/125,000, Inclosure No. 1 
hereto. 

1. Fort Weaver 155-mm position Road, 10' Class B $8,900 

2. Fort Roger Roads, 10' Class B 4,000 

3. Barbers Point East 3L Pos. Trail, 3L Trail 1,000 

4. Main Marker 3L Position Trail, 3L Trail 6,000 

5. Mailiilii 3L Position Trail, 3L Trail 1,400 

6. Eaena Point 3L Position Trail, 3L Trail 1,000 

7. Wailoa Point 3L Position Trail, 3L Trail 1,000 

8. Completion of Barbors Point Road Net, Class A 133,000 

9. North Shore RR Connection, R. R 250,000 

10. Improvement Wakiaua Pupukea Road, 10' Class A & B ... 216,000 

11. Waimoa-Pupukea Road, 10' Class B 35,000 

12. Alternate RR Schoficld-Wahiuau Bypass, R. R 70,000 

13. Conncction-Leilohua Spur to Oahu Sugar Co. tracks (rail only) R. R 48,600 

14. Ordnance Magazine Area, Schofield 25' Class A 33,000 

15. Feeder" Roads Wahiaua Pupukea Road, Improvement 111,800 

16. Eahuku 155-mm Position Road, 10' Class B 9,500 

17. Rahuku CP Trail, CP Trail 2, 100 

18. Kepuhi CP Trail, CP Trail 8,000 

19. Koolau Ridge Trail, 6' Pack Trail 20,000 

20. Wiliwilimoa Road, Improvement 17,900 

21. Wiliwilimi Trail, 6' Pack Trail 15,650 

22. Poamoho Trail, 6' Pack Trail 35,100 

23. Pupukoa-Mahuhu Trail, 6' Pack Trail 12,720 

24. Hawaiian Trail, 6' Pack Trail 22, 750 

25. Schofield-Wahiwan Trail, 6' Pack Trail 45,750 

26. Waiwan Trail, 6' Pack Trail v 28,650 

27. Pau Palailai CP Road, 10' Class B 10,000 

28. Eunia-Palahua Road, 10' Class B 135,500 

29. Ridge Roads, Mamamam Area, 10' Class B 34,900 

1, 370, 020 

4. It is recommended that the roads and trails program shown in the table 
above be approved in lieu of the present program approved in 4th Indorsement 
(AG 611 Hawaii) (3-31-38) (Misc.) (X) dated 23 Mav 1939, on War Department 
letter (AG 611 Hawaii (3-28-38)) (Misc. WPD) dated 31 March 1938, subject: 
"Military Priority Highways in the Haw^aiian Department". It is further rec- 
ommended that the sum of $1,370,020.00 be allotted to this department as soon 
as possible to permit early completion of this program. 

Walter C. Short, 

Lieutenant General, 

Commanding. 
1 Incl: Map 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2541 

Subject: Military Roads and Trails Program, Hawaiian Department. 
AG 611 Hawaii (2-19-41) M 1st Ind. AGW/ric 

War Department, A. G. O., 

February 27, 1941. 
To: Chief of Engineers and Chief of Coast Artillery, IN TURN. 

For remark and recommendation, reference being made to files C. of E. 611 
(Haw) 10 and OCGA 611/45 A 7. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

Adjutant General. 
1 Inch a/c 

C. of E., March 12, 1941.— 
To: The Chief of Coast Artillery. 

1. Items 1 to 19, inclusive, in this program were approved for inclusion in the 
Hawaiian Defense Project in 3rd Indorsement dated February 18, 1941, AG 611 
Hawaiian Department (1 1-8-40) M-WPD; OCGA 611/45 A 7; C. of E. 611 
(Hawaii) 10. It was further directed that the Commanding General confer with 
Mr. Moskowitz, the representative of the Commissioner of Public Roads in 
Hawaii, with a view to securing the maximum aid permissible from the Public 
Roads Administration for the accomplishment of the construction authorized 
Federal Highway Act of 1940. It was also directed that a revised estimate be 
submitted covering Items 9, 12 and 13. The above action was not available to 
the Commanding General at the time of preparation of basic paper. 

2. Items 20 to 29, inclusive, are new items of work. The estimated cost ap- 
pears reasonable, and their inclusion in the program is recommended. 

3. Attention is invited to letter from the Commanding General Hawaiian 
Department dated Februarv 19, 1941, subject: "Construction of North Shore 
Railroad Connection" file Engr. 611; AG 112.05 (2-19-41) M; C. of E. 61] 
(Hawaii) 11 in which it was recommended that funds in the amount of $230,000 
be allotted as soon as possible to initiate construction. The item referred to is 
included in this paper as item 9. 

For the Chief of Engineers: 

[S] George Mayo, 
George Mayo, 
Lt. Col. Corps of Engineers, 

Chief, Fortification Section. 
1 Inclosure n/c. 

611/45A-10 3rd Ind. 5. 

War Department, 
Office, Chief of Coast Artillery, 

March 15, 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General. 

1. The remarks and recommendations of the Chief of Engineers appearing in 
the 2nd Indorsement are concurred in. 

2. In addition to the funds referred to in paragraph 1, 2nd Indorsement, 
$300,000 is included in current Seacoast Defense estimates for application on 
items Nos. 9, 12 and 13 (railroad construction projects). 

For the Chief of Coast Artillery: 

[S] E. T. Blood, 
Colonel, C. A. C, Executive. 
1 Incl. n/c 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt. F. A. 

Subject: Military Roads and Trails Program, Hawaiian Department. 

AG 611 Hawaii (2-19-41) M-WPD 4th Ind. ESA 

War Department, A.G.C, 

April 1, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Attention is invited to the preceding 2d and 3d Indorsements. 

2. The program for road, trail and railroad construction contained in para- 
graph 3, basic communication, is approved for inclusion in the Hawaiian Defense 
Project in place of the road, trail and railroad program approved by 3d Indorse- 



2542 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



ment, February 18, 1941, to the letter, subject: "Military Road and Trail 
Program, Hawaiian Department", AG 611 Haw. Dept. (11-8-40) H-WPD. 

3. It is desired that you submit a breakdown of the items contained in the 
road and trail program approved herein to show the expenditures contemplated 
for augmentation and for maintenance. In this connection, attention is invited 
to your 1st Indorsement, January 16, 1941, to the letter, subject: "Maintenance 
and repairs of Fortifications, Estimate of Funds for FY 1943" (Engr. 121.2, 
Forts), in which you request funds for the maintenance of roads. The break- 
down requested is necessary to insure that no duplication will be encountered in 
the defense of estimates to be submitted for the completion of this program. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 



Inch w/d 

A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt. F. 



Major General, The Adjutant General. 



A. 



Proposed program, tactical items 



Priority 




Type 


Esti- 
mated 


Old 


Rec. 


Present 


Rec. 


cost by 
troop 
constr. 


25 


la... 
6.... 

c 

d.... 

e 

/.... 
2a... 

6.... 

c 

d.... 

e 

3a... 
6.... 

c 

d.... 

e 

4a... 
4.... 

5a... 

6.... 

c 

d.... 

e 

6a... 
6.... 

f 

d.... 
7a... 
6.-.. 


Schofield-Walkana . . 


Pack Trail 

Motor Trail 

Pack Trail 

Foot Trail 

Dirt Road 

Foot Trail... 


Motor Trail . 


$170,000 


28 


Kunia-Palehua 


10' WB Macadam 

Improve 

Improve 


75,000 


23 


Pupukea-Black Junction . 


12,720 


32 


Poanoho Trail 

Wiliwilinui Road.. .. 


10,000 


20 


10' Class B 


17,900 


21 


Wiliwilinui Trail 


Pack Trail 


10, 000 


1 


Fort Weaver-155mm Gun Posi- 
tions. 
Fort Rugor Roads 


10' Class B. . .. 


8,900 


2 


None 


10' Class B 


4,000 


3 


Barbers Point East SL Route 

Maili Marker SL Route 


None. 


SL Trail 


1,000 


4 


None... .. 


SL Trail 


6,000 


5 


Mailiilii SL Route ... 


None 


OL Trail 


6,600 


8 

10 

6 


Barbers Point Road Net Paving... 

Wahiawa-Pupukea Paving 

Koera Point SL Route. ... 


Coral Roads 

Motor Trail 

None 


Paved Motor Roads.. 

10' Class A &B 

SL Trail. 


75, 000 

200, 000 

1,000 


7 


Wailea Point SL Route 


None 


SL Trail . 


1,000 


17 


Fahuiiu CP Route ... 


None ... .. 


OP Trail 


2,100 


11 


Wainea Pupukea .. 


Foot Trail 

Raised Ford 


10' Class B 


45,000 




Alternate Crossing S. Faloraun 

Gulch. 
Ordnance Magazine Area, Scho- 

field Barracks. 
Mananahua Ridge Route... 


Bridge.. 


6,000 


14 


22' Class A 


33, 000 


20 .. 


Motor Trail 

Foot Trail 

Foot Trail 

Foot Trail 

Dirt Road 

Dirt Road 

Dirt Road 

Foot Trail 

Dirt Road 

Foot Trail. 


Water Bound Macad- 
am. 
Improve 


74,900 


19 


Koolau Ridge Trail 




24 








26 


Waiawa Route.. . ... 


Improve 

Improve .. 




15a 


Haleiwa-Opacula Approach Road . 
Fawalloe-Anahulu " 
Ashley Station 
Kopuhi OP Route 

Kahuku-155mm Gun Positions 

Fua Palailai OP Route.. 




156 


Improve.. 


i 111,800 


15c...- 

18 


Improve 




16 


10' Class A.. 


9,300 


27 


10' Class B 


10, 000 




Total. .. .- .- 








$901, 020 













A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 
Srid Lt. 



[7] 



F. A. 



5th Ind. 



Engr. 511 

Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 26 May 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to the following correspondence: 

a. AG 611, Haw. Dept. (11-8-40) M-WPD; Military Road and Trail Program, 
Hawaiin Department. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2543 

b. AG 660 (4-19-41) M; Expenditure Program, Seacoast Defense Fund, 
Fiscal Year 1942. 

c. Eng. 121.2 (Forts); Maintenance and Repair of Fortifications, Estimate of 
Funds for Fiscal Year 1943, (cited in Paragraph 3, 3rd Indorsement above). 

2. a. Road, trail and railroad program submitted in reference a was approved 
by War Department 3rd Indorsement, February 18, 1941, subject to the following: 

(1) That Mr. Moskowitz be contacted to secure a maximum of the unobligated 
portion of $446,000.00, previously allotted the PRA for Hawaii, for the con- 
struction of the road and trail items in the approved i)rogram. 

(2) That revised estimates be submitted for the railroad items in the approved 
program. 

b. 4th Indorsement, this headquarters, April 4, 1941, submitted the following: 

(1) Recommendation that $446,000.00 available to the PRA be not diverted 
from the purpose for which originally allotted, namely, construction of the 
Wahiama cut-off and the Kolokolo-Waiamoa Road. 

(2) Revised estimates for the railroad items and reduced estimates for the road 
and trails portions of the program by the $70,400.00 made available on December 
7, 1940. 

(3) Cross-referenced the'^originally approved program, items 1-19 inclusive, 
with the additional items,* 20-29 inclusive, approved herein and submitted re- 
vised estimates in the amount of $951,020.00 for the road and trail items and 
$298,000.00 for the railroad items. The total cost, $1,249,620.00 supersedes 
estimate of $1,370,020.00 reported in basic letter herewith. 

[8] 3. Reference b informed this headquarters that regular estimates for 
Seacoast Defense funds, FY 1942 include $300,000.00 for the construction of the 
railroad items and $50,000.00 for road and trail items. Release of these funds 
will cover the construction of the railroads $298,600.00) and will reduce the 
required funds for the completion of the roads and trails to $901,020.00. 

4. a. Reference c submitted estimates in the amount of $286,000.00 for the 
upkeep of military roads and trails during FY 1943. These estimates were based 
upon the maintenance of these roads and trails already constructed in this depart- 
ment, since at the time of submission, the augmentation program did not have 
War Department approval. The great increase in FY 1943 estimates over those 
of previous years has been due primarily first, to the necessity of procuring new 
plant and equipment as replacements for outworn units and second, to the neces- 
sity supplanting WPA emploj'ees with hired labor as a result of the increasing 
non-availability of the former. 

b. The breakdown of the $286,000.00 estimate showed the proportional amounts 
of the total which would be expended on existing roads and trails. In view of the 
approval by 4th Indorsement of the revised road, railroad, and trail program, 
which contains funds for the improvement of certain existing roads, the original 
breakdown of FY 1 943 maintenance estimates is no longer applicable. Specifically, 
maintenance funds for the Wahiana-Purukea Road and Barbers Point Road net 
can be reduced considerably; at the same time, however, the construction of new 
roads and trails during FY 1943 and ensuing years. Attached as inclosure No. 1 
is a revised tabulation of maintenance funds required during FY 1943 for all 
existing roads and trails and those to be constructed under the approved program. 
This breakdown shows specifically the purposes for which these funds will be 
expended. Revised estimates decrease the funds originally requested by 
$34,000.00. 

c. 1st Indorsement, January 16, 1941, which forwarded the estimates cited in 
paragraph 5a, recommended immediate release of $100,000.00 of the $286,000.00. 
This $100,000.00 is neces.sary for the purchase of materials and additional plant 
and the hiring of labor for the maintenance of long neglected existing roads and 
trails, funds for the improvement of which have not been included in the approved 
augmentation program. 

[9] 5. As explained in the foregoing paragraphs, there is no duplication in 
the funds still recjuircd for the construction of the approved augmentation pro- 
gram, $1,249,620.00 or $901,020.00 if the $350,000.00 in FY 1942 estimates is 
made available and the funds, totaling $252,000.00, required for maintenance: 
the $1,249,620.00 construction estimate includes no funds for maintenance and 
the $252,000.00 maintenance estimate includes no funds for new construction. 

6. It is recommended: 

a. That in accordance with the revised estimates cited in paragraphs 3b (3) 
and 4, above, funds in the amount of $901,020.00 for the completion of the 
approved road, trail and railroad i)rogram be included in FY 1942 estimates 
to supplement the $350,000 expected to be released. 



2544 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(b) That the revised estimates in the amount of $252,000.00 be substituted 
for the $236,000.00 now inckided in FY 1943 estimates for the maintenance and 
repair of military roads and trails and that $100,000.00 of this amount be released 
to this department during FY 1942. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
1 Inch Revised estimate. 
A true copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 
Snd Lt., F. A. 

JO] Subject: Military Roads and Trails Program, Hawaiian Department. 
AG 611 Hawaii (2-19-41) MC 6th Ind. 21-H/agb-1712 

War Department, A. G. O., June 9, 1941- 
To: Chief of Coast Artillery and Chief of Engineers, In Turn: 
For remark and recommendation. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

1 Inch n/o . 

Adjutant General. 
611/45-A-lO 7th Ind. 3. 

War Department, 
Office, Chief of Coast Artillery, 

June 12, 1941. 
To: Chief of Engineers. 

1. The records of this office indicate that the necessary action has been taken 
with a view to accomplishing the recommendations appearing in paragraph 6 a 
of 5th Indorsement, assuming that that portion of the recommendation reading 
"FY 1942" was intended to read "Fy 1943". 

2. With respect to the recommendation appearing in paragraph 6 6 of 5th 
indorsement, preliminary estimates for FY 1943 do not now include a specific 
item for maintenance and repair of military roads and trails. The total sum 
now appearing in the preliminary estimates FY 1943 under Project 11 — Alter- 
ation, maintenance and repair of fortifications — ^is $225,000. Fy 1942 estimates 
for Project 11 total $173,710. The portion of these funds to be applied to mainte- 
nance of roads and to strictly fortification works appears to be discretionary with 
the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. However, the basis for esti- 
mating these funds for FY 1941 included specifically $59,000 as applicable to 
road inaintenance. 

For the Chief of Coast Artillery: 

Leonard L. Davis, 

Lt. Col, C. A. C, 

Assistart. 
1 Inclosure 
(Dup. w/d) . 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[11] C. of E. 611 (Hawaii). 

Subject: Military Rosds and Trails Program, Hawaiian Department. 

8th Ind. 6-E 

Office, C. of E., 

July 1, 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General. 

1. Reference paragraph 6 a of 5th Indorsement and paragraph 1 of preceding- 
Indorsement, it is recommended that authority be granted to include the $901,020 
requiied for the completion of the aporoved road, trail and railroad program in 
the supolemental estimates for Fiscal Year 1943 at the fiist opportunity. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2545 

2. The remarks of the Chief of Coast Artillery in paragraph 2 of 7th Indorse- 
ment are concurred in. 

For the Chief of Engineers: 

George Mayo, 
Li. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Chief, Fortification Section. 
1 Inclosure n/c. 
CG of OCCA 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[12] Subject: Military Roads and Trails Program, Hawaiian Department. 
AG 611 (2-10-41) MC-K 9th Ind. EGA 

War Department, A. G. O., July 18, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Funds in the amount of $300,000 for railroads and $50,000 for roads and 
trpils are now available from FY 1942 appropriations for construction contained 
in the approved Road, Trail, and Railroad Program. These funds will soon be 
released to the District Engineer. Additional funds in the amount of $900,000 
have been included in tentative estimates, FY 1943 for the completion of the 
approved Road and Trail Program. This latter amount will be requested at an 
earlier time in the event that further supplemental FY 1942 estimates are prepared. 

2. General maintenance funds to the amount of $173,710 are now available 
from FY 1942 appropriations and a substantial amount thereof has been released 
to the District Engineer, Honolulu. The portion of these funds to be applied 
to the maintenance of roads is discretionary with you. Additional general 
maintenance funds to the amount of $223,000 have been included in preliminary 
estimates, FY' 1943. 

3. An additional amount of $140,000 will be included at the first opportunity 
in estimates to be submitted to provide further funds for maintenance of roads 
and trails in your department. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 



Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
Incl. w/d 

A true copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt.. F. A. 



[Exhibit IB] 

Via ''Clipper" 

Air Mail 

Engr. 600.12 



[EXTRACT] 



Commander, 
Fort Shafter, T. H., 6 April '41 



Subject: Construction at Bellows Field, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to 1st Indoresment, The Adjutant General's office, file 
AC 370.5 (2-15-41) M-D, dated 5 March 1941 which authorized the permanent 
assignment of the 86th Observation Squadron and the 58th Bombardment 
Squadron at Bellows Field. 

5. The improvement of the runwavs consist in lengthening the present runway 
from about 2800' to 3400' and widening from 150' to 300'. The new runway is 
5000' long and 300' wide. Cross-connection the existing and the new runway is a 
paved taxi strip and parking strip 300' wide and 2200' long with a servicing mat 
300' X 600' adjacent to the taxi strip. All runways, servicing mats and taxi strips 
will be asphaltic concrete. Other installations required are an airdrome control 
tower and an aqua-gasoling system of 600,000 gallon capacity. The necessary 
tanks for this gasoline system are on hand. A complete system of airport lighting 
and sewer, water, and power utilities w^l be necessary. Miscellaneous installa- 



2546 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

tions inckide man-proof fences around vital installations, improvement of the 
drainage of the camp area, pistol and 1000" machine gun ranges, and roads and 
sidewalks. 

7. The improvements recommended are all necessary. Funds for improving 
the runways in particular should be expedited. The District Engineer has in- 
formed me that it is possible at this time to secure on the mainland the necessary 
plant and equipment for this paving but that unless contracted for in the very 
near future, it will not be much longer available. 

******* 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
3 Incls: 

No. 1 Tabulation of Housing Needs 

2 Layout Map* 

3 Tabulation of Cost Estimates 

* (Filed in Drafting Room; Bellows Field #1) 

No R/S was prepared. Verbal approval of C/S and signature secured by Major 
Fleming, 5 April 1941. 

Copy to Hawaiian Air Corps 4/8/41 
Copy to District Engineer 4/17/41 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern 
Edward von Geldern 

Snd Lt., F. A. 

Subject: Additional funds for Completion of Authorized Mobilization Housing 
Project, flawaiian Department 

2nd Ind. (12-P3) 

War Department, 
Office, Chief of the Air Corps, 

Washington, D. C, June 26, 1941 
To: The Quartermaster General. 

1. Reference is made to Paragraph I.e. of basic communication which indicates 
that funds in the amount of $990,769 will be included in future estimates for the 
projects at Wheeler, Hickam, and Bellows Fields, as requested in Paragraph 
2.a,b, and c of basic communication. 



For the Chief of the Air Corps 



Frank M. Kennedy 

Colonel, Air Corps 
Chief, Buildings and Grounds Division 



Copied from Project Letter B-1 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern 

Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F.A. 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 2 May 1941. 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Construction at Barking Sands Field, Kauai, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, The Adjutant General's Office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-M, 14 March 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objective." 
At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are overcrowded 
with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are urgently 
needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons of 
training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need more 
fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. The 
Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this existing 
need. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2547 

2. It is recommended that Barking Sands Field on Kauai be developed into an 
outlying field with a rotating garrison as follows: 1 air base detachment of 6 
officers and 107 men, and 1 National Guard company to provide local security 
of 4 officers and 116 men, total 10 officers and 223 men. In addition to this 
permanent garrison, two heavy bombardment squadrons of 37 officers and 206 
men each from Hickam Field will be sent to Barking Sands for training. While 
these bombardment squadrons will change, two will be temj)orarily stationed at 
all times at this field. The total garrison at Barking Sands including temporary 
and permanent troops will be 84 officers and 635 men. 

3. Some buildings have been and are being erected at this field by the WPA. 
Additional buildings will be necessary and the WPA Administrator lias informed 
me that neither his material funds nor his available labor will be sufficient to 
complete the required program. There is inclosed as Inclosure No. 1 a tabula- 
tion showing the buildings, built and building by the WPA and the additional 
buildings required which include administration buildings, shops, warehouses, 
recreation buildings, mess halls, officers' quarters and other structures. Complete 
utility sj'stem should be provided for this camp. All buildings to be mobilization 
type. 

4. Other construction recommended consists in improvement of flying condi- 
tions by the grading of two runways 5000' by 500' and the paving of a 200' 
strip on each runway for a length of 5000', the construction of a servicing mat 
and the installation of a complete airport lighting system. Storage for 450,000 
gallons of gasoline will soon be installed by the District Engineer with funds 
now available to him; in this storage nine of the eighty [2] 50,000-gallon 
tanks now on hand will be utilized. These tanks are now designed for the aqua 
system; at this time, however, the tanks are being installed for storage only and 
if at a later date the necessity develops, this storage system can be readily con- 
verted into the aqua system. Also included in the cost estimates are miscellaneous 
items such as an airdrome control tower, pistol and 1000" ranges and man-proof 
fencing around vital installations. Roads within the camp area have also been 
included in the cost estimates; an improvement to the access road to this military 
reservation from the nearest point on the Kauai belt road has been the subject 
of discussion with the local public roads administration under the provision of 
Section 18 of the Federal Highway Act of 1940. Surveys of this road are now 
being made by the Territorial Highway Department; these surveys have not 
been completed. The local Public Roads Administration officials, based on a 
reconnaissance, estimate that this access road will cost about $150,000. As it 
is doubtful whether either territorial or Federal Highway funds will be available 
for construction on this amount has also been included in the estimates. Tele- 
phone costs have been estimated at 2' 2% of building costs as directed in Chief 
Signal officer's radio of 11 March 1941. In determining the building costs a 
constructive evaluation of the work already done by the WPA based upon costs 
of the new buildings recommended in this letter was used to arrive at the total 
costs. 

5. There are inclosed as Inclosures Nos. 2 and 3, a layout drawing of this 
field and a tabulation of cost estimates of the buildings and other improvements 
required. These cost estimates were prepared by the District Engineer, Honolulu, 
and include not only direct but also the indirect costs of the job. The total 
required to complete the installation is $1,772,220. 

6. It is recommended that the improvement of Barking Sands be authorized 
and that funds in amount of $1,772,220.00 be released to the District Engineer, 
Honolulu, to initiate this construction. 

Walter C. Short, 



3 Incls: #1 — Bldg tabulation 
#2 — Layout drawing 
#3 — Cost Estimate 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 
2nd Lt., F. 



Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 



2548 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 2 May 1941. 
In reply refer to: 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Construction at Hilo Airport. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, The Adjutant General's office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-M, 14 March 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objec- 
tive." At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are over- 
crowded with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are 
urgently needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons 
of training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need 
more fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. 
The Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this exist- 
ing need. 

2. It is recommended that Hilo airport be developed into an outlying field 
with a rotating garrison as follows: 1 air base detachment of 4 officers and 50 men, 
and 2 National Guard companies to provide local security of 4 officers and 116 
men each, total 12 officers and 382 men. In addition to this permanent garrison, 
one heavy bombardment squadron of 37 officers and 206 men from Hickam 
Field will be sent to this field for training. While this squadron will change, at 
least one will be temporarily stationed at this field a large part of the time. The 
total garrison at Hilo therefore will be 49 officers and 588 men. 

3. Some buildings are now being erected at this field by the WPA. Additional 
buildings are needed and the WPA Administrator has informed me that neither 
his material funds nor his available labor will be sufficient to complete the required 
program. The buildings now being built and the additional ones required are 
tabulated in the cost estimates. A complete utility system is recommended. 
Buildings will be mobilization type. 

4. The runways at the Hilo airport will be improved through a CAA contract 
luider supervision of the District Engineer, Honolulu. Additional improvements 
needed are the installation of storage for 450,000 gallons of gasoline; for this 9 of 
the 80 50,000-gallon tanks now on hand will be utilized. These tanks were 
designed for the aqua system, but simple storage only is recommended at this 
time. If the need later develops, this storage can readily be converted to the 
aqua system as all fittings will be available on the tanks. 

[2] 5. There are inclosed as Inclosure No. 1 a tabulation of cost estimates 
and as Inclosure No. 2 a layout map of the field. In addition to the items already 
mentioned, these estimates include miscellaneous items such as roads, airdrome 
control tower, pistol and 1000 inch ranges and telephone installations. These 
telephone costs have been estimated at 2}^ per cent of the building costs as directed 
in Chief Signal Officer's radio of 11 March 1941. In determining the total build- 
ing costs a constructive evaluation of the work now being done by the WPA was 
combined with the estimated costs of construction recommended in this letter. 
The estimates in the tabulation were prepared by the District Engineer, Honolulu, 
and include indirect as well as direct costs of the job. 

6. It is recommended that this construction on the present military reservation 
at the Hilo airport be authorized and that funds in the amount of $670,140 be 
allotted to the District Engineer, Honolulu, to complete the installation. 
2 Incls: #1 Cost Estimates 
#2 Layout map 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Kdw rd von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A, 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2549 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office op the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 2 May 1941 
In reply refer to: 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 

Subject: Construction at Homestead Field, Molokai, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, The Adjutant General's Office, file AG 560 
(3-7-41) M-G-M, 14 March 1941, Subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objec- 
tive." At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are 
overcrowded with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports 
are urgently needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for 
reasons of training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime 
need more fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. 
The Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this 
existing need. 

2. It is recommended that Homestead Field, Molokai, T. H., be developed 
into an outlying field with a rotating garrison as follows: 1 air base detachment 
of 4 officers and 50 men. and 1 National Guard Company to provide local security 
of 4 officers and 116 men, total 8 officers and 166 men. In addition to this perma- 
nent garrison, one pursuit squadron of 33 officers and 157 men from Wheeler 
Field will be sent to this field for training. While this squadron will change, at 
least one will be temporarily stationed at this field a large part of the time. The 
total garrison at Homestead Field therefore will be 41 officers and 323 men. 

3. Some buildings have been and are being built at this field by the WPA. 
Additional buildings are needed and the WPA Administrator has informed me 
that neither his material funds nor his available labor will be sufficient to com- 
plete the required program. The buildings now being built and the additional 
ones required are tabulated in the cost estimates. A complete utility system is 
recommended. Buildings will be mobilization type. 

4. The runways at the Homestead Field will be improved through, a CAA 
contract under supervision of the District Engineer, Honolulu. Additional im- 
provements needed are the installation of storage for 350,000 gallons of gasoline; 
for this 7 of the 30 50,000-gallon tanks now on hand will be utilized. These 
tanks were designed for the aqua system, but simple storage only is recommended 
at this time. If the need later develops, this storage can readily be converted to 
the aqua system as aU fittings will be available on the tanks. 

A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

27id Lt. F. A. 

[2] 5. There is inclosed a tabulation of cost estimates. In addition to the 
items already mentioned, these estimates include miscellaneous items such as 
roads, airdrome control tower, pistol and 1000 inch ranges and telephone installa- 
tions. These telephone costs have been estimated at 2}^ per cent of the building 
costs as directed in Chief Signal Officer's radio of 11 March 1941. In determining 
t\\e total building costs a constructive evaluation of the work now being done by 
the WPA was combined with the estimated costs of construction recommended 
in this letter. The estimates in the tabulation were prepared l)y the District 
Engineer, Honolulu, and include indirect as well as direct costs of the job. 

6. It is recommended that this construction on the present military reservation 
at Homestead Field be authorized and that funds in the amount of $407,600.00 be 
allotted to the District Engineer, Honolulu, to complete the installation. 
1 Incl: Cost Estimates. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt. F. A. 



2550 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., May 2, 1941. 
Engr. 600.12 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 

Subject: Construction at Morse Field, Hawaii 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, The Adjutant General's office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-M, 14 March 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objective." 
At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are overcrowded 
with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are urgently 
needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons of 
training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need more 
fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating condition. The 
Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this existing 
need. 

2. It is recommended that Morse Field on Hawaii be developed into an outlying 
field with a rotating garrison as follows: 1 air base detachment of 6 officers and 
107 men, and 1 National Guard company to provide local security of 4 officers 
and 116 men, total 10 officers and 223 men. In addition to this permanent 
garrison, two heavy bombardment squadrons of 37 officers and 206 men each from 
Hickam Field will be sent to Morse Field for training. While these bombardment 
squadrons will change, two will be temporarily stationed a large part of the time 
at this field. The total garrison at Morse Field including temporary and per- 
manent troops will be 84 officers and 635 men. 

3. Some buildings have been built at this station by troop labor. Other 
buildings have been and are being built by the WPA. Additional buildings and 
improvements are necessary; I believe that the requirements of training preclude 
any extensive use of troop labor and the WPA Administrator has informed me 
that neither his material money nor his available labor will be sufficient to com- 
plete the required program. These additional buildings will all be of mobilization 
type construction for use as operations buildings, shops, administrative and supply 
buildings, barracks, mess halls, magazines, etc. A complete system of utilities 
s ould be provided. 

4. Other construction recommended consists in improvement of flying facilities 
by the paving of a main runway 3400 feet long and 300 feet wide, and its extension 
by grading, leveling and light paving to a length of 4150 feet and width of 400 feet. 
Because of prevailing wind conditions, only one paved runway is considered 
necessary by the Commanding General, [2] Hawaiian Air Force. Neces- 
sary taxi mats, service mats and warming up aprons will be graded and paved. 
A complete airport lighting system will be installed. Gasoline storage for 450,000 
gallons utilizing nine of the eighty 50,000-gallon tanks now on hand will be in- 
stalled; because of the shortage of water at this field, this will be plain storage 
and not the aqua system. There is inclosed as Inclosure Xo. 1, a layout map of 
this field. It will be noted that considerable areas in the vicinity of the runway 
are shown for light paving. This is necessary; the soil at this field is very fine 
and with the prevailing high velocity wind there is a serious dust problem as this 
dust affects the engines of the planes. The shortage of water makes stabilization 
by sodding or vegetation impracticable, and the most practical way that this 
problem can be solved is to stabilize by light paving. 

5. There is inclosed as Inclosure Xo. 2 a tabulation of cost estimates of the 
buildings and other imiDrovements required. In addition to the items already 
mentioned, miscellaneous items such as roads, pistol and 1,000 inch ranges, an 
Airdrome Control tower, and telephone installations have been included. These 
telephone costs have been estimated at 2}2 percent of building costs as directed 
in Chief Signal Officer's radio of 11 March 1941. In determining the building 
costs a constructive evaluation of the work already done by troop labor and the 
WPA based upon costs of the new buildings recommended in this letter was 
used to arrive at the total costs. The estimates in the tabulation were prepared 
by the District Engineer, Honolulu, and include the indirect as well as the direct 
costs of the job. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2551 

6. It is recommended that the improvement of Morse Field be authorized and 
that funds in the amount of $1,687,530 be allotted to the District Engineer, 
Honolulu, to complete the installation. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Coni/tiamling. 
2. Incls: #1 — ^Layout Map 

#2 — Cost Elstimates 
A true copy 

Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Li. F. A. 

[confidential] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department ('ommander. 

Ft. Shaffer, T. H. 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Improvement of Airfield at Haleiwa, Oahu, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter. The Adjutant General's office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-jVI, 14 March 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objective." 
At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are overcrowded 
with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are urgently 
needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons of 
training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need more 
fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. The 
Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this existing 
need. 

2. At present the Hawaiian Air Force has under lease an unimproved landing 
field located at Haleiwa, on the north shore of Oahu, about ten miles airline dis- 
tance from Wheeler Field. There are no paved runways, and no installations 
other than boundary marking lights. No permanent detachment is quartered 
there. The field is used for practice landings, etc. by the pursuit aviation at 
Wheeler Field. 

3. It is proposed that this field be improved by the grading and paving of one 
runway 4000' by 300' and by the installation of other facilities for flying operations. 
These will include an operations building and airdrome control tower and storage 
for 100,000 gallons of gasoline using two of the eighty 50,000 gallon tanks now on 
hand. This storage will utilize the aqua system. A small galvanized warehouse 
for oil storage will be provided. 

4. The only garrison at this field will consist of a small permanent detachment 
to refuel and handle planes on the ground and to operate radio and control installa- 
tions. For this detachment a combined barracks and mess hall will be provided. 

5. It is recommended that the improvement of Haleiwa Airport be authorized 
as outlined above and that funds in the amount of $450,000 be allotted to the 
District Engineer, Honolulu for this construction. 

1 Incl: Cost Estimate 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2d Lt. F. A. 

Subject: Improvement of Airfield at Haleiwa, Oahu, T. H. 

AG 580 (5-22-41) MC RPM/agb-1712 

1st Ind. 

War Department, A. G. O., May 27, 1941. 

To: Chief of the Air Corps and Chief of Engineers, IN TURN: 

For remark and recommendation. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 



Adjutant General, 
1 Incl. n/c 

79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 7 



2552 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

2nd Ind. (9) 

Wak Department, 
Office, Chief of the Air Corps, 

Washington, D. C, May 31, 1941. 
To: Chief of Engineers. 
Approval recommended. 
For the Chief of the Air Corps: 

[S] Edward P. Curtis, 
Edward P. Curtis, 
Major, Air Corps, Executive, Plans Division. 
1 Inch n/c 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

300. 1 (Haleiwa Airfield, T. H.) 1 

Subject: Improvement of Airfield at Haleiwa, Oahu, T. H. (Let. from Hawaiian 
Dept. H", to AGO, 5/22/41) 

3rd Ind. 3-N 

Office, C. of E., June 10, 1941. 
To the Adjutant General. 

1. Approval recommended. 

2. It is assumed that the District Engineer at Honolulu collaborated with the 
Hawaiian Department Commander in preparation of the estimate inclosed with 
•;he basic communication. Further delay in verification of this estimate is not 
considered advisable inasmuch as the funds required can be rectified if necessary 
in the future. 

3. Funds for this construction at Haleiwa, Oahu, T. H. are available in this 
office under the Miscellaneous Construction Reserve provided this construction 
's of a high priority, the urgency for which is not known in this office. 

4. If authorized it is requested that the amount of $450,000 be approved for 
iUotment from funds reserved under the Miscellaneous Construction Reserve for 
construction of the buildings, gasoline storage and runways as specified in the 
nclosed estimate. 

For the Chief of Engineers: 

John R. Hardin, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

Chief, Construction Section, 
Inclosure: Sub 1 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 

I2nd Lt., F. A. 

Subject: Improvement of Airfield at Haleiwa, Oahu, T. H. 

A.G 580 (5-22-41) MC-D 4th Ind. RPM/agb-1712 

War Department, A. G. O., June 25, 1941' 
To: Chief of Air Corps. 

1. You are authorized to proceed with plans for construction of an airfield at 
Haleiwa, on the island of Oahu, as indicated in basic communication. 

2. You are authorized to include in the next available estimates, funds for the 
iccomplishment of this project, in the amount of $450,000, as recommended in 
oasic communication. 

3. The allotment of Miscellaneous Construction Reserve Funds for this 
oroject, as recommended in paragraph 3, 3rd Indorsement, is not favorably con- 
sidered as these funds are required for other purposes. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

D. R. Van Sickler, 
1 Incl. — n/c Adjutant General. 

Copies to: 

Chief of Engrs. Ref. his 3rd Ind., 600.1 (Haleiwa Airfield, T. H.) 1. 
6-10-41, to TAG. 

Commanding General, Haw. Dept. Ref. his basic Itr., Engr. 600.12, 
5-22-41, to TAG, w/cys. of 1, 2, & 3 Inds. 
A true copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2553 

[/] [confidential] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 
In replv refer to: 22 May 19/,1. 

Via "Clipper" Air Mail 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Construction at Burns Field, Kauai, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, The Adjutant General's office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-M, 14 INIarch 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objective." 
At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are overcrowded 
with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are urgently 
needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons of 
training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need more 
fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. The 
Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this existing 
need. 

2. It is recommended that Burns Field be developed into an outlying field with 
a rotating garrison as follows: 1 air base detachment of 4 officers and 50 men, 1 
National Guard company to provide local security of 4 officers and 116 men, 
total 8 officers and 166 enlisted men. In addition to this garrison, one heav3'' 
reconnaissance squadron of 43 officers and 233 men will be sent to this field for 
training. Either this squadron or a heavy bombardment squadron will be sta- 
tioned at this field a large part of the time. The total garrison at^the^field will 
therefore consist of 51 officers and 399 men. 

3. Some buildings have been erected at this field by soldier labor. Other 
buildings are necessary and soldier labor is not available for their construction. 
These buildings have been tabulated in the cost estimates, Inclosure No. 1. All 
buildings will be of mobilization type construction. The installation of a com- 
plete system of utilities is recommended. 

4. The runways at Burns Field are authorized for improvement by a CAA 
project. Additional improvements needed are the installation of storage for 
200,000 gallons of gasoline; for this four of the eighty 50,000-gallon tanks now on 
hand will be utilized. These tanks were designed for the aqua system, but simple 
storage only is recommended at this time. If the need later develops, this storage 
can be readily converted to the aqua system as all fittings will be available on the 
tanks. 

[2] 5. There is inclosed as Inclosure No. 1 a tabulation of cost estimates. 
In addition to the items already mentioned, these estimates include miscellaneous 
items such as roads, airdrome control tower, pistol and 1000-inch range and 
telephone installations. These telephone costs have been estimated at 2^2% of 
the building costs as directed by the Chief Signal Officer's radio of 11 March 
1941. The estimates include direct as well as indirect costs of the job. 

6. It is recommended that this construction be authorized on the present 
mihtary reservation at Burns Field and that funds in the amount of $636,163.00 
be allotted to the District Engineer, Honolulu, to complete the installation. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 
1 Incl: Cost Estimates 
A true copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt. F. A. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H. 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Proposed Airfield on the Island of Lanai. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, the Adjutant General's office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-M, 14 March 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objective." 



2554 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are overcrowded 
with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are urgently 
needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons of 
training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need more 
fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. The 
Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this existing 
need. 

2. Included in the plan for dispersion of facilities is a proposed airport on the 
Island of Lania. A location has been selected and preliminary negotiations for 
leasing have been made. The land is owned by the Hawaiian Pineapple Company 
which is willing to lease it to the government on a twenty-five (25) year lease in 
return for one dollar a year rental and the use of the flying field. The location 
of the field, barracks area, and a proposed bombing range are shown on map, 
scale 1/62,500 inclosed as Inclosure No. 1. Project letter for the bombing range 
has already been submitted by letter to The Adjutant General, subject: "Con- 
struction of Night Bombing Range, Island of Lanai" file Engr. 686 dated 16 May 
1941. 

3. It is proposed to improve this field by the grading and paving of two 5,000' 
runways 300' wide and by the installation of facilities for flying operations. These 
will include the necessary operations buildings and shops, airdrome control tower 
and storage for 200,000 gallons of gasoline using four of the eighty 50,000 gallon 
tanks now on hand. Although these tanks were designed for the aqua system, 
only simple storage is proposed, although all the necessary fittings for later con- 
version to the aqua system will be installed. 

4. The rotating garrison at this field will consist of an air base detachment of 
4 officers and 50 men and a National Guard company for local security of 4 officers 
and 116 men, total 8 officers and 166 men. In addition to this garrison, a pur- 
suit squadron of 33 officers and 157 men will be temporarily stationed at this 
field for training. While this squadron will change at least one will be tempo- 
rarily stationed at this field a large part of the time. The total garrison, there- 
fore, will be 41 officers and 323 men. 

5. There is attached as Inclosure No. 2 a tabulation showing in detail the 
buildings and other construction proposed with estimated costs. These costs 
include not onlv direct but also indirect costs of the job. The total cost shown 
on this tabulation is $1,990,000.00. 

6. The following is recommended: 

a. That this headquarters be authorized to proceed with negotiations for the 
lease of this site. 

b. That construction and improvements outlined in Inclosure No. 2 be 
authorized. 

c. That funds in the amount of $1,990,000.00 be alloted to the District Engineer, 
Honolulu, to complete this installation. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
2 Incls: #1 Map; #2 Cost Estimates. 
A True Copy. 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut. F. A. 

Subject: Proposed Airfield on the Island of Lanai. 

AG 580 (5-22-41) MC 1st Ind. RPM/agb-1712 

War Department, A. G. O., May 27, 1941- 
To: Chief of the Air Corps and Chief of Engineers, IN TURN: 
For remark and recommendation. 
Bv order of the Secretarv of War: 



2 Incls. n/c Adjutant General. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2555 

2nd Ind. 

"War Department, 
Office, Chief of the Air Corps, 

Washington, D. C. June 2, 1941. 
To: Chief of Engineers. 

Approval recommended. Attention is invited to the Memorandum for the 
Chief of Staff, (WPD 2550-22), 6-10-41, Subject: Estimates for the Construc- 
tion of Airports for Ha\\aiian Air Force. 
For the Chief of the Air Corps: 

Edward P. Curtis, 
Major, Air Corps, Executive, Plans Division. 
2 Incls. n/c 
A true copy. 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut. F. A. 

600.1 (Hawaiian Dept. Airfields) 83 

Subject: Proposed Airfield on the Island of Lanai. 

3d Ind. 3-N 

Office, C. of E., June 16. 1941. 
To the Adjutant General. 

1. Approval recommended. 

2. The estimate of cost as given in the basic communication was prepared by 
the District Engineer at Honolulu, T. H. 

3. If authorized, it is requested that the amount of $1,990,000 be approved for 
allotment to the District Engineer at Honolulu for the construction of buildings 
utilities, runways, and other installations on the Island of Lanai, as recommended 
in the basic communication and inclosure thereto, from funds reserved under the 
Fifth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation Act (Pilot Training Schools 
Reserve), approved April 5, 1941. 

For the C-hief of Engineers: 

John R. Hardin, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

Chief, Constructioji Section, 
Inclosures: Subs 1-2 
A 1 rue Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut. F. A. 

Subject- Constiuction of Airfield at Lanai, T. H. 
AG 580 (5-22-41) MC-G 

4th Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., August 8, 1941- 
To: The Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. You are authorized to proceed with negotiations for the lease of the site 
referred to in basic communication. 

2. The construction as recommended by you is authorized except that "Theatre 
Operations Type of Construction" be substituted for the "mobilization type" 
requested. 

3. It is desired that funds required be included in the next budget estimates. 
Bv order of the Secretarv of War: 



Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
2 Incls. n/c 
A true copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut F. A. 



2556 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[1] [confidential] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Departmen- Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 2 May 1941. 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Construction at Proposed Airport, Parker Ranch Area,' Hawaii, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, The Adjutant General's office, file AG 580 
(3-7-41) M-C-M, 14 March 1941, subject: "Army's Second Aviation Objective." 
At the present time the existing units of the Hawaiian Air Force are overcrowded 
with the facilities available on Oahu. Additional first-class airports are urgently 
needed for present units and those immediately contemplated for reasons of 
training and operations in time of peace; in addition to this peacetime need more 
fields are required for purposes of dispersion under operating conditions. The 
Second Aviation Objective outlined in the letter cited will increase this existing 
need. 

2. There has been for some time a realization that an additional field was 
necessary on the Island of Hawaii, and extensive studies have been made on its 
location. The best location found was about four miles from the town of Waimea 
on land owned by the Territory of Hawaii, and at present under lease to private 
cattle interests. The site consists of about 1,360 acres, and it is believed that 
the land can be transferred to the Federal government under Section 91 of the 
Organic Act. Preliminary negotiations to this end have been opened with the 
Territory. The location of the field is shown on map, scale 1/62,500, inclosed 
as Inclosure No. 1. 

3. It is proposed that this field he improved by the grading and paving of 
three 5000-foot runways and by the installation of facilities for flying operations. 
These will include the necessary operations buildings, and shops, airdrome control 
tower, and storage for 300,000 gallons of gasoline, using 6 of the eighty 50,000- 
gallon tanks now on hand. Although these tanks were designed for the aqua 
system, only simple storage is proposed, as the shortage of water will preclude 
use of the aqua system. There is inclosed as Inclosure No. 2 a print of Depart- 
ment Engineer Map No. 11-1-25D41 which shows the boundary of the land 
and the location of the three 5000-foot runways. 

4. The rotating garrison at this field will consist of an air base detachment of 
4 officers and 50 men and a National Guard company for local security of 4 officers 
and 116 men, total 8 officers and 166 men. In addition to this permanent gar- 
rison, a heavy bombardment squadron of 37 officers and [S] 206 men will 
be temporarily stationed at this field for training. While these squadrons will 
change at least one will be temporarily stationed at this field a large part of the 
time. The total garrison therefore will be 45 officers and 372 men. 

5. There is attached as Inclosure No. 3 a tabulation showing in detail the 
buildings and other construction proposed with estimated costs. These costs 
include not only direct but also indirect costs of the job. The total cost shown on 
this tabulation is $1,992,600.00. 

6. The following is recommended: 

a. That this headquarters be authorized to proceed with negotiations for the 
acquisition of this site. 

b. That construction and imj^rovements outlined in Inclosure No. 3 be author- 
ized. 

c. That funds in amount of $1,992,600.00 be allotted to the District [Engineer, 
Honolulu, to complete this installation. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
3 Incls: 

#1 Map 

#2 Print, Map No. 11-1-25D41 
#3 Estimated Costs 
A True Copy 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lieut. F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2557 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., Apnl I4, 1941. 
In reply refer to: 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 
Engr. 600.12 

Subject: Additional Airdrome, Hawaiian Department 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. The recent and anticipated increases in the Pursuit Wing of the Hawaiiar 
Air Force have emphasized the need of an airdrome to supplement the existing 
facilities at Wheeler Field. The latter field is now badly overcrowded with the 
planes stationed there. 

2. A very thorough study has been made of the location of this additional aii 
field by the Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force, Department Engineer and 
the District Engineer. At least five separate locations were given serious con 
sideration; one of these in the Barbers Point area was discarded first because ol 
its proximity to the beach and second, because of objections by the Xavy to in- 
terference with the new carrier aviation base in the Ewa plane area. Anothei 
location at Kahuku was discarded because of its proximity to the beach. A tMrd 
on the flat ground about three miles north of Wahiawa was discarded by the Ha- 
waiian Air Force because of bad flying conditions from turbulent air conditions. 
A fourth location in the general area to the east of the crossing over Kipapa Gulch 
by the Kamehameha Highway was discarded for similar flying reasons. The area 
finally selected between the Kipapa and Waikakalua Gulches and west of the 
Kamehameha Highway is believed to be the best possible location of this airdrome 
on the island of Oahu. There is inclosed a map on the scale of 1/20,000 showing 
the location of this field. 

3. The garrison to be stationed at this field will consist of the 15th Pursuit 
Group of 84 officers and 729 enlisted men, an air base group (single) 28 officers 
and 490 men, and miscellaneous detachments of 5 officers and 75 men. Total 
strength 117 officers and 1,294 men. Complete construction with mobilization 
type facilities must be provided for the housing of this garrison. The present 
construction authorized for Hickam, Wheeler and Bellows Fields is insufficient 
for the needs of those three stations and it will be impossible to transfer any of 
the existing authorization to this new field. 

4. It is estimated that at least 75% or 88 of the officers will be married and of 
this number 10% or 9 will be senior officers. Since there are no locations in this 
vicinity where these officers can be placed upon commutation and live in private 
quarters and also because of the tremendous housing shortage on Oahti, it is 
believed that Government quarters should be provided for these married officers. 
Recognizing that this [2] field must be constructed under emergency 
appropriations, it is proposed that these quarters not be as elaborate as usually 
constructed on Army Posts. With the unit costs estimated, houses similar in 
construction to the average in Honolulu can be provided. In addition it is also 
estimated that there will bel35 married noncommissioned officers in this garrison. 
Adequate quarters will also be provided for these married enlisted men and it is 
recommended that the War Department secure from the Federal Building Ad- 
ministration authorization for the construction of 135 low cost housing units at 
this field. 

5. The improvement for flying operations consists of the installation of three 
runways each 5,000 feet long with a graded width of 400 feet and a paved width 
of 200 feet; the paving of taxy strip 200' x 5,000' and a servicing apron 300' x GOO'. 
A complete installation of airport lighting is proposed. Bunkers for the protection 
of airplanes against hostile bombardment will be installed as part of the airport 
and the cost of these bunkers and necessarj- approaches are included in the cost 
estimates. It is also proposed to install storage for 900,000 gallons of gasoline 
with the aqua system. In this storage 18 of the 80 50,000 gallon tanks now on 
hand will be utilized. 

B. The housing proposed will be mobilization type construction. It will 
include barracks, mess halls, and recreation facilities for the men, buildings for 
flying operations such as an airdrome control tower. Air Corps technical schools, 
supply rooms, and housing for maintenance facilities. In addition mobilization 
type construction is proposed for the necessary post overhead, buildings such as 
a fire station, a guard house and an infirmary and warehouses for commissaries, 
etc. A complete sj-stem of utilities is covered in the estimates. In eiesigning the 
ater supply and sewage disposal sj'stems provision has been made for the 



2558 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

eventual expansion of the garrison to 4,000 men. This increase in capacity is 
proposed to take care of the possibility of assigning an anti aircraft regiment as 
part of this garrison. Shown on the map accompanying this letter are two areas 
shaded in blue. The area near the runway will be used for the construction of the 
service buildings incidental to flying operations. The 40 acre tract shown to the 
north of the runways will be utilized for construction of housing facilities for both 
officers, married noncoms, and enlisted men. The land where the runways and 
the adjacent blue area are located is now cultivated cane land. The area of the 
40 acre tract is cultivated pineapple land; the cane land involved is about 250 
acres minimum. If these sites are secured by lease it is estimated that the cane 
land will cost $30.00 per acre per year and the pineapple land $25.00 per acre per 
year, or a total annual rental of $8,500. If this land is purchased the cane land 
will cost about $1,000 and the pineapple land about $500.00 per acre; a total cost 
of about $270,000. 

7. There is inclosed a tabulation showing the buildings which should be con- 
structed with cost figures and cost estimates on runways and other flying facilities 
and on utility systems. These estimates show a total estimated cost of $4,668,950 
not including cost of land. As stated shows if the land is leased there will be a 
vearlv rental of $8,500. If the land is purchased the total cost is estimated at 
$4,938,950. 

[3] 8. It is recommended that the proposed -location of this new field be 
approved and that funds in the amount of $4,668,950 be allotted for construction 
if the War Department decides that securing the land on a lease basis is satis- 
factory. It is further recommended that if the War Department decides that 
this land should be purchased, additional funds in the amount of $270,000 be 
made available. 

(s) Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commandina. 
2 Incls: 
#1 Map 
#2 Tabulation 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nH Lt.,F. A. 

[confidential] 

Paraphrase of Radio From TAG: 

Fifteenth Pursuit airbase at Kipapa is disapproved Stop Base is to be located 
at Kahuku Stop Personal letter twenty one July (?) from General Marshall 
to General Short covers this sut:)ject. 

Ulio. 
True copv. 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[Exhibit IC] 

[1] [secret] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., April U, 1941. 
In reply refer to: Engr. 600.96 
Subject: Protection of Seacoast Defense Batteries. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to your secret radiogram No. 708, 4 April 1941, which 
was on|the subject of protection for the seacoast defense batteries in this depart- 
ment and which suggested a conference with Mr. J. C. Letts of the Office of the 
Chief of Engineers during his recent visit in this department. 

2. This radiogram stated that a letter covering this construction was being 
forwarded by mail. This letter has not as yet been received in this department. 
In order to save time, however, we're submitting recommendations without 
waiting for the arrival^of this letter as its subject matter was explained in general 
by Mr. Letts. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2559 

3. There are three batteries involved in this protection; these are the two 
16-inch gun batteries, Battery Hatch at Fort Barrette and Battery WiUiston at 
Fort Weaver and a 12-inch barbette gun battery, Battery Closson at Fort Kame- 
hameha. A study of this problem has been made jointly by the Commanding 
General, Hawaiian Separate Coast Artillery Brigade, the District Engineer and 
Mr. Letts. They recommend the casemating of Battery Hatch and Battery 
Closson and provision of a tunnel type shield for Battery WiUiston. There is 
inclosed a chart showing the fields of fire of these batteries after the protection is 
installed. From this chart it will be seen that Battery Hatch has a field of fire 
from azimuth 295 to azimuth 80; and Battery WiUiston, a 360° field of fire. The 
red shading on this chart indicates the area in which the fire of four 16-inch guns 
can be placed. The yellow shading shows the additional area which can be 
covered by the fire of two 16-inch guns at Fort Weaver. The existing range circle 
of Battery Hatch is shown by the red line and Battery WiUiston by the black line. 
The chart indicates that there is an area about 5,000 yards in range west of Oahu 
which is now covered by the fire of Battery Hatch and which is not covered by the 
fire of Battery WiUiston. On the east side of the island the area now covered by 
fire from Battery Hatch, which is sacrified by the casemating is well in the field 
covered by Battery WiUiston. The only loss in coverage is in the 5,000 yards to 
the west of the island and in the fact that the general area is now covered by the 
fire of only two 16-inch guns while under present arrangement this area is in part 
covered by the fire of four 16-inch guns. 

[2] 4. I do not believe that this loss in coverage is at all important when 
compared to the necessity of providing protection for Battery Hatch in par- 
ticular, and therefore concur in the recommendations of the Commanding General, 
Hawaiian Separate Coast Artillery Brigade. 

5. Your radio also referred to our letter, subject: "Bombproof Construction 
for Magazines at Fort Barrette and Fort Weaver," dated 4 February 1941. 
The recommendations contained in this letter are reiterated. Since the recom- 
mendation is made that Battery WiUiston should have tunnel type shield pro- 
tection which does not provide any protection for ammunition, a bombproof 
magazine for at least one-half of the propelling charges should be provided at 
that battery. Also due to the exposed position of Battery Hatch and the im- 
i:)0ssibility of camouflaging the existing magazines, it is believed that a bombproof 
magazine for one-half of the propelling charges should be provided at that battery 
in addition to the bombproof storage for 50 complete rounds in each casemate. 

6. Reference is now made to letter, this headquarters, subject: "Defense of 
Naval Air Station, Kaneche Bay, Oahu, T. H." dated 18 February 1941, file 381, 
in which the War Department was advised that this department was assuming 
responsibility for the defense of the Kaneche Bay Area. It is believed that the 
growing military and naval importance of Kaneche Bay aera makes it essential 
that a major calibre seacoast battery be installed for its protection. The need 
for this battery is urgent and its installation should not wait upon the manufac- 
ture of the armament. It is understood that there are some 12 -inch long range 
gun batteries similar to Battery Closson on the mainland where the need for 
them no longer exists and it is recommended that the armament of one of these 
l)atteries be shipped to this department and funds provided for its emplacement 
in the Kaneche Bay area. 

7. The following is therefore recommended: 

a. That protection be provided for Battery Hatch by the construction of 
casemates and overhead cover, at Battery Closson by the construction of over- 
liead cover, and at Battery Williston by the installation of tunnel type shields. 

b. That a bombproof magazine for one-half of the propelling charges be author- 
ized for Battery Williston and a similar magazine be authorized for Battery 
Hatch in addition to the storage of 50 rounds in each of the casemates. 

c. That the armament of a 12-inch gun battery similar to Battery [3] 
Closson to be obtained from a location on the mainland wliere it is no longer 
needed and shipped to this department and installed to cover the Kanoehe Bay 
area. 

(s) Walter C. Short 
Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Com tnanding. 
1 Incl: Chart (Orig of Incl Nol, is on file at H S C A B) 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd LL, F. A. 



2560 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., SI July 1941. 

[1] 

in reply refer to: 

AG 381/20 

Kaneohe Bay Project. 

Secret 

Subject: Coast Artillery Armament for Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay. 

To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. References: — 

A Secret letter HHD to TAG, 14 April 1941, subject: "Protection of Seacoast 
Defense Batteries" file AG 662.1 (4-14-41) MC-E, HD Engr 600.96, with 4 
indorsements. 

B Secret letter TAG to HHD, 8 April 1941, Subject: "Defense of Naval Air 
Station, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, T. H." file AG 381 (3-13-41) M-WPD, with 1st 
Indorsement HHD to TAG dated 16 June 1941. 

2. The attached study was prepared by the Commanding General, Hawaiian 
Separate Coast Artillery Brigade in accordance with the directive contained in 
the 4th indorsement to reference A. In considering this study, reference should 
be made to a similar study which was submitted as on enclosure to 1st indorse- 
ment, reference B. 

3. The recommendations contained in paragraph 6 of the attached study of the 
seacoast and antiaircraft defenses required for the protection of the Kaneohe 
Bay Naval Base (Incl. #1) are approved with the following exceptions: 

a. It is believed a large proportion of the 15 AA searchlights recommended in 
paragraph 6a. should be equipped with SCR 268 sets instead of the M2 sound 
locators. The severe limitations imposed by the terrain and normal atmos- 
pheric conditions present in this area make mandatory the early detection of 
hostile aerial targets. 

b. In order that personnel may be available to establish a headquarters for the 
Harbor Defenses of Kaneohe Bay, it is believed that instead of augmenting the 
seacoast personnel, as recommended in paragraph 6d. (2) by one battalion 
(TD) and three separate batteries (HD), that the increase should consist of one 
Coast Artillery regiment (HD), type B, (T/0 4-71, Nov 1/40), less band and one 
battalion. This organization will provide the necessary command and staff and 
attached medical personnel to permit the proper tactical organization of the de- 
fenses. The 155mm battalion can take the place of the second battalion of the 
Harbor Defense Regiment. 

[2] 4. It is recommended: 

a. That the eventual project for defense of the Kaneohe Bay Naval Air Station 
and Bellows Field, based on the installation of fixed armament, be as follows: 

(1) Armament: 

(a) Seacoast: 

2 155 mm Gun Batteries (latest type). 

2 6" Fixed Gun Batteries (2 guns each). 

1 16" liOng Range Casemated Gun Battery of 2 guns on 
Barbette Carriages. 

(b) Antiaircraft: 

3 90 mm AA Gun Batteries. 

3 37 mm A A Gun Batteries to consist of 10 guns each. 
48 Caliber .50 A A Machine Guns. 

15 A A searchlights together with a minimum of 6 SCR 268 
sets and 9 M2 sound locators. 

(2) Personnel: 

(a) Seacoast Artillery: 

1 Battalion Coast Artillery (TD), 155 mm guns, (T/0 4-35, 

Nov 1/40). 
1 Regiment Coast Artillerv (HD), tvpe B, less band and one 

battalion, (T/0 4-71 , Nov l/40;' . 

(b) Antiaircraft Artillery: 

1 Regiment Coast Artillerv (AA), semi-mobile, less one gun 
battalion, (T/0 4-111,' Nov 1/40). 
h. That initially based on armament now available in the Hawaiian Depart- 
ment, the defense be constituted as shown below. The seacoast armament and 
personnel to be used in this defense must bo moved from previously assigned 
po.-^itions in other parts of the island, thereby weakening the defense in other areas. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2561 

(1) Considering only personnel now present and available: 

] 155 mm Gun Battery. 

1 155 mm Gun Battery with additional assignment of five antiaircraft 
searchlights. 

1 8" Railway Gun Battery. 

2 3" Antiaircraft Gun Batteries. 

1 Seacoast Searchlight Battery. 

(2) Assuming that personnel under paragraph 4 a (2) fa) above will be made 
available at an early elate and using armament now available in ^^"ar Reserve, 
the defense can be organized as shown below. Under this plan no movement of 
armament from present assigned positions is required: 

2 155 mm Gun Batteries 

1 155 mm Gun Battery with additional assignment of five antiaircraft 
searchlights. 

1 8" Railway Gun Battery. 

2 3" Antiaircraft Gun Batteries. 
1 Seacoast Searchlight Battery. 

[S] e. That the increase in personnel and in major items of armament 
recommended in paragraphs H a and h, reference B, insofar as they relate to the 
Coast Artillery be amended to conform to paragraph 4 a. above. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, Tj. S. Army, 

Commanding. 

1-Incl: Revised Study on Seacoast and Antiaircraft Artillery Defense of the 
Kaneohe Xaval Air Station (Secret) in trip. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

■2nd Lt., F. A. 

[secret] 

Subject: Coast Artillery Armament for Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Ha- 
waiian Department. 
AG 381 (7-31-41) MC-E 3rd Ind. 

War Department, A. G. O., OcrobT 30, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Reference is made to: 

a. Letter, this office, April 8, 1941, AG 381 (3-13-41) X-WPD, subject: 
Defense of Xaval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, T. H. 

b. Radio X'o. 320, your headquarters, September 13, 1941. 

c. Letter, your headquarters, September 18, 1941, Engr. 662/4 x 662/7, subject: 
Provision of three (3) Panama Mount 155-mm Battery Positions and one (1) 
8-inch Railwav Gun Battery Position for the defense of Kaneohe Bav, Oahu, 
T. H. 

2. The following temporary measures for the defense of the Kaneohe Bay 
area are approved: 

a. Movement of one battery of 8" railway guns now in storage at Fort Kame- 
hameha to Mokapu Peninsula and temporary' installation at site designated by 
you in reference c subject to local coordination of site with the X'avy. 

b. Installation of two batteries 155-mm guns on Panama mounts at sites to 
be selected by you. 

3. Immediate personnel and armament requirements will be set: 

a. By the transfer to the Hawaiian Department of the following units at their 
allotted strengths: 

(1) One battalion, 57th Coast Artillery, TD, with battalion section, 
supply platoon T/0 4-32), and battalion section, medical detachment (T/0 
4-31), attached, less guns and fire control equipment. 

(2) 95th Coast Artillery (AA), Semimobile (less one gun battalion), with 
armament and equipment on hand. Authority is granted for the reorganiza- 
tion of the 37-mm gun battalion of this regiment into three [2] 37 
mm gun batteries (8 guns each) and one (1) Caliber .50 MO battery (A A) 
(12 guns). 

b. By the local activation of one 8" railway battery (R/O 4-47) from personnel 
available in the Hawaiian Department. 



2562 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

4. Guns and fire control equipment for the battalion of 155 mm guns and the 
8" railway battery will be furnished from defense reserves on hand in the Hawaiian 
Department. Shortages will be filled in accordance with approved War Depart- 
ment priorities. 

5. Personnel and equipment mentioned in Paragraph 3 o. above will be dis- 
patched to the Hawaiian Department by first available shipping. It is estimated 
that troops will begin to arrive in your department about December 1, 1941. 
The shipment of the major items of organizational equipment and armament for 
reinforcing units is dependent upon the availability of bottoms of which no accurate 
forecast can be made at this time. 

6. Theater of operations type housing is authorized for the personnel listed in 
paragraph 3 above. It is desired that estimates covering housing for this increased 
garrison be made the subject of separate correspondence. 

7. Ultimate approval of one 8" seacoast battery (fixed) in lieu of the 16" 
battery recommended by you, and of two 6" seacoast batteries (fixed) to replace 
the two batteries of 155 mm guns authorized for temporary defense is probable. 
The 8" seacoast guns wiil not be available before July, 1942, and the 6" seacoast 
guns not before December, 1942. 

8. In view of the expected approval of fixed armament for the Kaneohe Bay 
Area the plan submitted by reference c for the installation of the 8" railway 
battery on Mokapu Peninsula and for the construction of 155 mm gun positions 
is considered too elaborate. Plans should be revised to provide for temporary 
installation of the 8" railway battery, and for construction of Panama mounts 
for two 155 mm gun batteries. Provision should be made for splinterproofing 
magazines and plotting room only and should be confined to that which can be 
constructed by field fortification methods and materials. 

9. A revised project, to include detailed estimates of cost, is desired for the 
defense of Kaneohe Bay based on two batteries of two 6" BC guns, and one 
battery of two 8" BC guns, all shielded type. 

[3] 10. No change in the eventual project for the antiaircraft defense of 

Kaneohe Bay over that prescribed for the temporary defense Paragraph 3 a (2) 
above, is contemplated. 

11. Reinforcement of either the peace or war garrisons of the Hawaiian De- 
partment by additional troops for the beach and land defense of Kaneohe Bay is 
not contemplated at this time. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

[s] E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
2 Incls: 

#1 Memor from Ch. of Eng. to C'h. of Coast Artillerv, C. of E. 662B 

(Oahu), August 26, 1941. 
#2 1st Ind. frm Ch. of Coast Artillerv, to A. C. of S, WPD 663/45-F-l, 
July 23, 1941. (added) 
Original Inch #1 w/d) 
A true copy. 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[SECRET] 

Paraphrase 

Radio 320— 13th 

September 13, 1941 
The Adjutant General, 

Washington, D. C. 
Additional fimds needed to complete railway gun position project also funds 
needed to erect positions in Kanoehe Bay area as para four B paren two paren 
letter this headquarters thirty one July nineteen forty one subject coast artillery 
armament for naval air station Kaneohe Bay paragraph due added costs of 
materials and labor in this area railway gun positions in approved project could 
not be built with funds allotted last fiscal year Stop Estimates prepared by 
district engineer Honolulu aver that one hundred seventeen thousand two hundred 
fifty six dollars required to add to funds received last fiscal year for railway gun 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2563 

positions Stot> Building of positions for one four gun eight inch railway battery 
and three four gun one fifty five batteries in Kaneohe Bay area estimated to cost 
two hundred fifteen thousand two hundred sixty five dollars Stop Above 
amounts include direct and indirect costs and are for sites recommended as first 
priorit.v by commanding general Hawaiian Coast Artillery Command in which I 
agree for immediate construction paragraph project will follow Stop District 
engine Honolulu is submitting cost estimates to chief of engineers by radio 
Stop Pending the receipt of this letter strongly recommend that money in 
amount of three hundred thirty two thousand five hundred twenty one dollars 
be contained in pending appropriation bill. 

Short. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 

Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[SECRET] 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 18 Septemher 1941. 
In replv refer to: 
Engr. 662/4 x 662/7 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 

Subject: Provision of three (3) Panama Mount 155-mm Battery Positions and 
one (1) 8-inch Railway Gun Battery Position for the Defense of 
Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, T. H. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1 RiGf GrGncGS* 

a. Secret letter TAG to HHD, 8 April 1941, Subject: "Defense of Naval Air 
Station, Kaneohe Bav, Oahu, T. H." file AG 381 (3-13-41) M-WPD, with 1st 
Indorsement HHD to TAG dated 18 June 1941. 

6 Secret letter HHD to TAG, 5 June 1941, Subject: "War Garrison for Initial 
War Operation", file AG 320.3/37b, with 1st Indorsement TAG to HHD, dated 
22 July 1941. 

c. Secret letter HHD to TAG 31 July 1941, Subject: "Coast Artillery Arma- 
ment for Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay", file AG 381/20. 

2. Reference a. directs that the Army assumes the responsibility for the defense 
of the Kaneohe Bay area. A study by this headc)uarters of the armament require- 
ments for the defense of Kaneohe Bay and submitted by my 1st Indorsement to 
reference a. requested the inclusion of the following items of Seacoast Defense 
Armament in the Hawaiian Defense Project for this purpose: 

3 Batteries of 155-mm guns. 

1 Battery of two 12-inch barbette guns with related equipment 

3. A restudj' of the project for the defense of the Kaneohe Bay area submitted 
by reference h. recommended that the following armament be provided: 

Two 155-mm gun batteries 

Two 6-inch fixed gun batteries of two guns each 

One 16-inch long range casemated gun battery of two guns on barbette 
carriages, 
f^] 4. A realization of the fact that it will be at least two years before these 
items of fixed armament, namely, the two 6-inch batteries and the one 16-inch 
battery, can be installed, makes it necessary that some provision be made im- 
mediately for the employment of mobile artillery to defend this area. The 1st 
Indorsement from The Adjutant General's Office to reference h. authorized the 
following additional units for the defense of Kaneohe Bay: 

One battalion of Coast Artillery, 155-mm guns with one additional gun 

battery. 
One Harbor Defense Battery. 
Pending the installation of the fixed batteries, it is recommended that the 
Seacoast Defenses of the Kaneohe area consist of the following items of mobile 
art illery : 

Three 155-nim gun batteries. 
One 8-inch railway gun battery. 
The proposed locations and fields of fire of these batteries are shown on map, 
Inclosure No. 1. 



2564 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

5. Since there is no railroad running from Honolulu to Kaneohe Bay, it will be 
necessary to move this railway battery to Kaneohe Bay by truck trailer, and it is 
proposed to install this battery on fixed mounts similar to those of Battery Granger 
Adams on Black Point. 

6. Each of the 155-mm battery positions should include the following: 

(1; 4 Panama mounts. 

(2) 4 splinterproof ammunition shelters for 25 rounds at each gun position. 

(3) 4 gun bunkers. 

(4) 4 splinterproof personnel shelters. 

(5) 2 splinterproof propellent shelters for 150 charges each. 

(6) 2 splinterproof projectile shelters for 150 projectiles each. 

(7) 1 splinterproof plotting room. 

(8) The roads and ramps necessary for the occupation of the position. 

(9) Camouflage treatment of all the above listed mstallations. 
Considering the urgent need for combat training and the large amount of labor 

required to complete field works now being constructed by the troops of this com- 
mand, it is believed advisable to construct these positions by contract. 

[3] 7. The cost of installation of the three batteries of 155-mm guns includ- 
ing the acquisition of land has been estimated at $93,630.00. The cost of the 
transportation and installation of the 8-inch railway battery in an emplacement 
similar to that of Battery Granger Adams has been estimated at $121,635. These 
estimated costs include both direct costs and indirect costs. Inclosure No. 2 is 
a tabular breakdown of these cost figures. 

8. It is recommended that the installation of these three batteries of 155-mm 
guns with the necessary field fortifications and the construction of one 8-inch gun 
battery position be approved, and that funds in the amount of $215,265.00 be 
allotted to the U. S. District Engineer, Honolulu, for construction. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding, 

2 Incls: 

(1) Map 

(2) Breakdown 
A True copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[Exhibit ID] 

[SECRET] 

27 August 1941. 

Deslege Brown 

1st Lieutenant, Corps of Engrs, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 
To: The Adjutant General, 

Washington, D. C. 
Beurad anno fifteen July district engineer estimates cost of forty five hundred 
foot runway at three hundred thirty thousand dollars due to railroad relocation 
and heavy fill Stop Thirty five hundred ,foot runway is longest that can be 
provided without railway relocation Stop Reduction from thirty seven hun- 
dred feet due to bunker construction and new housing Stop Strongly recommend 
construction of thirty five hundred foot runway as auxiliary landing strip comma 
forty five hundred feet economically unfeasible Stop Main runway can be 
used by planes requiring longer run Stop Auxiliary also needed for use while 
main runway is being leveled recommend immediate allotment of twenty 
five thousand dollars for levelling of main runway and thirty thousand seven 
hundred for thirty five hun dred foot auxiliary runway. 

Short. 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

Snd Lieutenant, F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2565 

Subject: Improvement of Landing Facilities at Wheeler Field, T. H. 

2nd Ind. (12-ElO) 

War Department, 
Office, Chief of the Air Corps, 
Washington, D. C, August 25, 1941. 

To The Adjutant General THRU Chief of Engineers. 

1. Attached hereto is a copj'^ of the radiogram transmitted to the Commanding 
General, Hawaiian Department, Fort Shaft er, T. H. on July 15, 1941. 

2. In explanation thereof, 3'ou are advised that this office concurs with the 
opinion that the uneven areas in the runways, referred to in the basic communica- 
tion, should be eliminated in the interests of safe operation. 

3. This office considers runways of 4,500 feet in length to be an absolute mini- 
mum for military airports at sea level, with an additional 500 feet of length for 
each 1,000 feet of elevation or fraction thereof. This minimum likewise meets 
the requirements for the future installation of an instrument landing facility, 
if there is provided that the same time forty to one clear angles of approach at 
both ends of the runway in question. 

4. If such clearances are not available at the north end of the present N-8 
runway, or of the proposed new N-8 runway, because of quarters built at that 
end of the field, then the runway lengths should be extended on the southerly 
ends sufficientlj' to insure that a 4,500 foot length of runway will exist south 
of a point where a forty to one clearance angle may be realized. 

5. There is no objection to the runway crossing the railroad spur, if necessary, 
providing the runway pavement is kept flush with the top of the rails and there 
is; no break in the runway grade, and providing, of course, rail traffic is controlled. 
If a difference in grade exists, the rail grade should be brought to that of the 
runway, or the spur relocated. 

6. It is requested that the District Engineer be advised of these considerations, 
and that his new estimates be made accordingly. 

7. No funds are available at this time for the construction and improvements 
recommended in the basic communications. The recommendation, however, 
will be placed in our "Suspense File" for further consideration upon receipt of 
a revised estimate, and when funds therefore become available. 

For the Chief of the Air Corps: 

Walter J. Reed, 
Colonel, Air Corps, 
Asst. Chief, Bldgs. & Grounds Div. 
Incl. Cy, Radio 8/21/41 

cc: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

For information only 
This is not an authorization 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt. F. A. 

Signal Corps, United States Army 

War Department Message Center 

Room 3441, Munitions Building, 

Washington, D. C. 
56 WTJ 125 WD 

Ft Shafter TH 1057 A Aug 27 
THE AG 

Washington DC. 

Reurad agmo fifteen July district engineer estimates cost of forty five 
hundred foot runway as three hundred thirty thousand dollars due to railroad 
relocation and heavy fill stop thirty five hundred foot runway is lorfgest that can 
be provided without railway relocation stop reduction from thirty seven hundred 
feet due to bunker construction and new housing stop strongly recommend con- 
struction of thirty five hundred feet runway as auxiliary landing strip comma 
forty five hundred feet economically unfeasible stop main runway can be used 
by planes requiring longer run stop auxiliary also needed for use while main runway 
is being levelled . . Recommend immediate allotment of twenty five thousand 
dollars for levelling of main runway and thirty thousand seven hundred for thirty 
five hundred foot auxiliary runway. 

Short. 



2566 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

305 AM 
A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

Immediate Action 

War Department, 
The Adjutant General's Office, 

Washington. 
1st Ind. 
AG 580.82- Wheeler 
Field (8-27-41) NO JJF Ir 

War Department, AGO, August 28, 1941— To the Chief of the Air Corps. 
In connection with letter your office dated July 11, 1941, file 611. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

[S] John B. Cooley, 

Adjutant General. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldernj 

2nd Lt., F. A. 
Subject: Improvement of Landing facilities at Wheeler Field, T. H. 

2nd Ind. 

(12-ElO) 
War Department, 
Office, Chief of the Air Corps, 
Washington, D. C, September 2, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department, Fort Shaffer, T. H. 

1. With refeience to your radiogram dated August 27, 1941, attention is invited 
to 2nd Indorsement of basic letter dated June 21st, subject as noted above, a 
copy of which is attached hereto. 

2. A request has been made this date that $25,000.00 be included in the funds 
estimated to be required for use in future airfield development. This sum is to be 
used for the leveling of the main runway at Wheeler Field. 

3. No request will be made for the inclusion of funds for the construction of the 
auxiliary runway, pending receipt of the revised estimate as requested in the 
2nd Indorsement referred to above. 

By order of the Chief of the Air Corps. 

Frank M. Kennedy, 

Colonel, Air Corps, 
Chief, Building & Grounds Division. 
Inch Cy 2nd Ind. 8/25/41 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[Exhibit IE] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 10 June 1941. 

MEMORANDUM FOR DEPARTMENT ADJUTANT GENERAL: 

Request that the following Secret official radiogram be sent. This message 
does NOT cover subject matter previously sent in a message, either in the clear 
or having a different security classification. 
This message is routine. 

Robert J. Fleming, Jr., 

Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2567 

To THE Adjutant General, 

Washington, D. C. 

Division engineer San Francisco has informed me that the priority covering 
contract W dash four one four ENGR seven eight four with Interstate Equip- 
ment Corporation Elizabeth New Jersey is now a dash one dash G stop This 
contract is the one for furnishing all materias for cableway to Kaala aircraft 
Warning station Stop Motor and all electrical equipment sub contracted to 
General Electric Stop Division engineer states that with this priority there is 
strong probability that delivery this electrical material to contractor will be 
delayed about fifteen weeks Stop This Kaala station is the most important in 
aircraft warning system and early completion of this cableway is essential Stop 
I consider this aircraft warning service as the most important single project in 
this Department Stop Strongly recommended that the War Department give 
all possible assistance to Chief of Engineers to have priority on this contract 
changed to a dash one dash B 

[S] Short. 

ENC-SEC by Capt. C. J. Harrison SC— 715P June 10 1941 



Headquarters Hawaiian Department 
fort 8hafter, t. h. 

Washn DC. 74OP June 26 1941. 



75 War EM 61 WD 

C G ♦ 

Hawn Dept Ft Shafter T. H. 
904 26th 

Agmc reurad three zero zero nine priority contract W dash four one four 
Engr seven eight four kaala AWS Station advanced to A dash one dash C Chief of 
Engineers will instruct Division Engineer on procedure should results under this 
priority be unsatisfactory 

Adams. 
616P 
True. Copy 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2d Lt., F. A. 

[secret] 

[1] 

29 September 1941, 
SIG 676.3 

Subject: Aircraft Warning Service Installation Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, file AG 660.2 A. A. (7-5-41) MC-E, 8 July 
1941, subject: "Aircraft Warning Service Philippine and Hawaiian Departments." 
A report of a Board of Officers convened at this headquarters to restudy the 
AWs project is being transmitted to the War Department by Clipper mail under 
separate cover. This board has considered the employment of the six fixed and 
six mobile stations allocated to this Department by the War Department. The 
increased number of stations now available has necessitated some adjustments in 
both type and location of the stations in the previously approved project of three 
fixed and five mobile units, as well as new locations. The results of this restudy 
are covered fully in the report being submitted, and are summarized in the follow- 
ing paragraphs. 

Locations a. Kauai. There have been no changes in the fixed station now 
approved at Kokee. In the former project the mobile station on Kauai was 
planned for operation on the Waimea Kokee road. This mobile station is now 
recommended for operation on the coast north of Kilauea Village at latitude 
22°13'50", longitude 159°23'54". There is no change in the base camp at Kauai 
which is now under construction at Kokee for the personnel of both the fixed 
and mobile stations. 

b. Maui. No change has been made in the previously approved fixed .station 
which is now under construction at Red Hill on Haleakala. Formerly approved 
project contained a mobile station to operate along the road up Haleakala. The 
project now being submitted makes no change in this mobile unit. 

79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 8 



2568 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

c. Hawaii. The former project contained a mobile station for the Island of 
Hawaii, which was to be operated from the upper terminus of the Mauna Loa 
truck trail, with a base camp for personnel at the Kilauea Military Camp. This 
station has been eliminated in the restudy and has been replaced by a fixed 
station in the vicinity of Pahoa at latitude 19°26'50" and longitude 154°57'5", 
and by a mobile station to operate from an initial position near Kahuku Ranch at 
latitude 19°30'30", longitude 155°41'40". A base camp similar to that on 
Kauai will be constructed near the fixed station for the personnel of both that 
station and the mobile unit. 

d. Oahu (1) There is no change in the previously approved fixed station for 
Mt. Kaala. 

(2) The formerly approved mobile station at Manawahua is to be replaced by 
a fixed station. 

(3) Opana. Under the former project', there were not sufficient [2] sta- 
tions to emplace one on the north shore of Oahu. With the increase in the num- 
ber of stations allowed, this is now possible and it is recommended that a fixed 
station be installed at the Opana Triangulation station at coordinates (98.655- 
19.182). 

(4) The increase in the number of stations has also made advisable the con- 
sideration of other locations for mobile units on Oahu. This reconsideration 
indicated that a location at Makapuu Point had many advantages over the former 
approved Pali location, and it is accordingly recommended that the Makapuu 
Point Station be considered as an initial operating position in lieu of the former 
Pali location. 

(5) The increase in the number of stations allowed has ^so made possible the 
provision of units in reserve against the possibility of failure of one of the primary 
stations. Since Oahu is the central point in the islands for which protection 
must be secured, it has been decided to concentrate the reserve units on this 
island. For this purpose two mobile units are recommended as a mobile reserve 
and for general operations on Oahu and on other islands if necessary. These 
stations will be utilized as needed to either replace the other Oahu stations or 
reinforce the coverage in certain sectors. Locations on Oahu which have been 
considered for their employment are the Pali location discussed above, on the high 
ground along Tantalus Road, at Fort Shafter, and at various points along the 
coast. 

(6) Information center. There has been no change in the previous location for 
the Information Center which is now imder construction at Fort Shafter. In 
compliance with other directives, this installation has been combined with various 
command posts into an air defense command post. 

(7) No base camps are Ijeing provided for the stations on Oahu as the personnel 
will be housed in construction already approved for the Signal Area, Fort Shafter. 
The same construction, however, will be built at the Manawahua and Opana 
fixed stations as is now approved for Kaala. 

2. Reference is made to 2d Ind, Hq Haw Dept, OSigO, 31 May 1941, to the 
letter Sig. 676.3 (AWS) dated 17 October 40 in which Signal funds totalling 
$75,281.84 were requested for the installation of radio and wire facilities for the 
original three fixed and five mobile stations. Due to the abandonment of the 
mobile station at the Nuuanu Pali on Oahu and the Moana Loa Station on Hawaii, 
this sum can be reduced by $2,296.00 to $72,985.84. The allocation of additional 
stations has necessitated increased demands for Signal communications. These 
additional communication facilities are summarized as follows: 

a. Radio facilities for the control from the Information Center of pursuit task 
forces. This includes a station at the control airdrome with four satellite stations 
at the principal pursuit fields on Oahu. 

Total cost $55,000 

b. Emergency power for pursuit radio control transmitters. This power is 
to allow the operation of pursuit control during commercial power failure. 

Total cost $12, 000 

c. Commercial power extensions to include provision of adequate commercial 
power for the base camps and the principal alert stations at locations where this 
is economically feasible. 

Total cost $39, 000 

[3] d. AWS radio communication facilities to include additional transmitters 
and receivers at the new fixed stations, receivers at the Information Center and 
allied antenna and control equipment as established by standard practice. 

Total cost-. _-- - $18, 000 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2569 



e. AWS wire and cable facilities to include additional cable extensions for the 
added stations on Oahu, together with additional telephone and teletype equip- 
ment. This item also includes a cable installation from the Hawaii base camp^to 
the detector unit at Pahoa. 

Total cost... $10,900 

f . Commercial wire facilities to include leased lines from all base camps to the 
nearest commercial exchange, leased lines from the principal alert stations to the 
nearest exchanges, together with the yearly rental charge. 

Total cost _ _-_ $10, 463. 67 

Total Sig funds 145, 400. 00 

3. Estimates for the internal wire facilities of the Information Center and the 
alhed Air Defense wire facilities are being held in abeyance pending more reliable 
information upon which to estimate the necessary funds. It is believed, however, 
that estimates for the Information Center should be included in the next available 
appropriation biU. Information Center layouts and schematic diagrams of the 
Information Center Wire Net have been forwarded to the Chief Signal Officer for 
review. This data is being transmitted as an inclosure to the aforementioned 
board proceedings. 

4. Funds in the amount of $890,804 have been made available to the Dist. 
Engr., Honolulu, to complete the previously approved project of three fixed and 
five mobile stations. Some of these funds were for stations which are being 
superseded by other stations in the revised program. The tabulation below shows 
cost estimates on the new stations, less the amounts available from the superseded 
stations, and the total of engineer funds supplementing those now on hand re- 
quired to complete the revised projects. 



Item 
No. 



Description 



Oahu 
Mana- 
wahua 



Opana 



Makapuu 



Kauai 
KUauea 



Hawaii 
Pahoa 



Eahuku 



[4] 



Cost of Site 

Clearing 

Grading 

Right of Way-Access Road 

Road Constr 

Bldg. Constr 

Fuel Storage.. 

Water Supply 

Sewage Disposal 

Man Proof Fence 



$2,000 

SCO 

2,700 

500 

58,470 

26,260 

1,900 

2,970 

900 

2,000 



$2,000 

200 

800 

500 

28,000 

29,250 

1,900 

4,400 

1,000 

2,000 



$2,000 



$500 



5,700 
11, %5 



500 

500 

24,800 

12,300 



200 
1,000 



2,000 
500 



$7,500 

300 

700 

1,800 

9,000 

74,720 
2,700 
9,000 
2,970 
3,000 



$500 



200 

200 

3,000 

12. 070 



1.000 
500 



98,000 



70,050 



19, 365 



42,600 



111,690 



17,470 



Subtotals by Islands 

Funds now available from superseded sites. 
Supplemental funds required 



Oahu 



$187, 415 
76, 735 
110,680 



Kauai 



$42,600 
12,600 
30,000 



Hawaii 



$129,160 
36, 217 
98,043 



Total _._. $233,623 



Mobilization of Personnel and Plant at 3% _. $7,010 

Total direct costs 240,633 

Contingencies, Contractors Fee, Social Security, Workmen's Compensation and Insurance at 15%. 36, 100 

Engineering, Surveys, Inspection and Auditing at 18% 19,250 

General Office Overhead at 8%... 19,250 



Grand Total Engineer funds 315,233 

5. Secret radiogram Xo 321, this hq, 13 September 41, submitted for advance 
consideration the above cost estimates with the exception of those which had 
been previously submitted as stated in par 2 above. Since no information has 
been received concerning the previous recommendation, those estimates are being 
added to the figures submitted by the radiogram cited. 

6. I strongly recommend that funds in the amount of $315,233 for engineer 
construction, and $218,400 for signal communications and one year's rent of 



2570 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

leased wire facilities, total $533,633, to be included in pending appropriation 
bills, and made available as soon as possible for the completion of the revised 
project. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 
True Copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt. F. A. 

[Exhibit IF] 

[1] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Engineer, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., July 3, 1941. 
Via Clipper Airmail 
Engr. 523.07 

Subject : Priorities and Preference Ratings. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. On 4 June 1941 I wrote a letter, file Engr. 523.07, subject: "Priority in 
Shipping Space for the Hawaiian Electric Company", in which the question of 
securing shipping space priorities for this company was discussed. A coj^y of 
this letter is inclosed for ready reference. At that time the main j^roblem was 
the securing of shipping space; since then it has developed that difficulties are 
also arising concerning the procurement of materials. I have directed that an 
investigation be made of this priority question, and the results of this investi- 
gation indicate that some clarification and coordination is highly desirable. 

2. At the present time priorities and preference ratings for Army activities 
are assigned by the various procurement agencies and contracting officers. There 
is now no coordination in the Department between these various agencies, each 
of which is dealing direct on priorities questions with its Chief in the War De- 
partment. This is satisfactory as long as only one procurement agency or con- 
tracting officer is involved. There are cases, however, in which more than one 
agency is involved, and the number of these will undoubtedl}' increase in the 
future; I believe it is advisable to have a coordinating agency in the Department 
to not only coordinate these cases locally, but also to bring to the attention of 
the War Department the advisability of similar coordination between the Chiefs 
of the respective agencies. Also there are many procurement problems on which 
the establishment of j:)riorities and preference ratings is necessary which no agency 
is now handling. The 14th Naval District has already established a central 
priority office in the local bureau of supplies and accounts where priorities infor- 
mation is kept available, and where preference ratings on all Navy orders are 
issued. 

3. The following outlines in greater detail some of the problems on which diffi- 
culty has already been encountered: 

a. We have some projects in which more than one supply or construction 
branch is interested. While there is no complaint with the present system by 
which each agency handles priority matters with its Chief in the War Department 
there is a probability that desirable action by one agency may be overlooked with 
the result that the second agency might be held up in its work even thou it 
had taken all action necessary. 

[2] b. Hawaii presents, a special problem in procurement as do the other 
overseas departments, due to the shipping situation. The present jiriorities in- 
structions are concerned with procurement; in this Department, however, prior- 
ities on shipping space are important. There are large quantities of essential 
materials transported on commercial shij^ping. These shi]:)ments involve not 
only government shipments but also shipments by private concerns of materials 
which are to be incorporated in defense installations. 

c. Practically all construction materials must be imported into the island. The 
various constructing agencies are, of course, anticipating their needs and are 
having materials procured on the mainland and shij^ped to the department. It 
is impossible to anticipate every item needed, and in tlie past the various supply 
houses in the department, such as the Honolulu Iron Works, the Hawaiian 
Electric Company, and others, have maintained local stocks from which small 
items could be procured as they were needed. These local stocks are now be- 
coming a matter of concern. For example, the mainland agents of the Hawaiian 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2571 

Electric Conipaii}'- have advised the company that it can not expect to obtain 
replacements for its ordinary warehouse and operations stocks unless a preference 
rating is placed on this procurement. Practically all of our defense contracts 
demand electric power and luiless the company's local stocks are maintained it 
will be impossible to install power connections without waiting for the arrival of 
necessary materials for each connection from the mainland. A specific example 
of this occurred recently where a sub-contractor on the Hickam Field low-cost 
housing had to import by Chpper air express at an expense of $1,000.00, some 
plumbing items which under normal conditions could have been obtained from 
local stocks. 

d. As stated above shipping priorities are also important. To our knowledge 
there is now no coordinated shipping priorities, although the Matson Navigation 
Company, which handles the bulk of the shipments, is granting unofficial priority 
to items on which a procurement priority has been obtained. As far as govern- 
ment bought and shipped materials are concerned there has been no great diffi- 
culty although considerable detail work has been involved in radioing about 
specific shipments. There are large quantities of materials, however, which are 
being ordered by private firms either for direct supply to government agencies 
or for incorporation in defense works directly or indirectly, and these private 
concerns are encountering great difficulties in securing shipping space for this 
material. 

4. To meet this increasing problem I propose to set up an office in this depart- 
ment to be responsible for coordinating all priorities matters, and I have selected 
the Department Engineer's office as the section in which this control can laest 
be established. Additional officers, not necessarily engineers, will be placed on 
duty in that office to furnish needed assistance. [3] The following is a 
preliminary outline of the duties of this section: 

a. To establish an information bureau where request for information on 
priorities can be promptly filled. 

h. To keep me informed of the priorities and preference ratings assigned by 
regular supply branches to their own procurement in order to insure that these 
are coordinated. In this work with the regular supply branches and construction 
agencies it is not intended that the coordinating office will assume any control 
over these agencies; it is intended, however, that the coordinating office keep 
informed of what action these agencies are taking in priority matters. 

r. We assign preference ratings covering procurements which are essential to 
defense work and which are not now covered by existing instructions. 

.5. In the directive of the Priorities Committee of the Army and Navy Munitions 
Board, 27 November 1940, it is noted that all Panama Canal defense projects 
are placed in priority classification A-l-b. There is no similar blanket coverage 
for devents projects in this department; and the rating which can be assigned 
to any project in this department depends upon its classification as a general 
project under the other entries in this directive. The aircraft Warning Service 
project is the most important single project in the department, and imder the 
general classification in this directive the highest priority which could be assigned 
to it would be A 1-f. It is believed that the conditions facing this department 
are similar to those in Panama and that a similar blanket priority classification 
for our defense projects should be authorized, and that this rating should be high. 
If this is done it would not be necessary to assign this high a rating to all projects 
and this department could reserve the high rating for the exceptional projects 
which were considered absolutely essential. 

6. As stated above, the maintenance of adequate local stocks by local supply 
firms is essential. Existing instructions on the issuance of preference ratings 
are predicated on the fact that the firm to whom the rating is issued is a govern- 
ment contractor. The local supply firms who must obtain preference ratings 
to maintain stocks are not actually government contractors at the time they 
place their mainland orders. These firms become contractors, however, when a 
government agency orders materials from their stocks. The question involved 
liere is one of time; and obviously we should not wait until the specific need for 
a stock item arises to issue a preference rating then delay the job while the item 
is being procured and shipped. It is believed that some authority should exist 
for us to give preference ratings for the procurement of any items which we, 
through experience and knowledfge of future projects, select as essential. 

[4] 7. The following is therefore recommended: 

a. The establishment of a blanket priority for Hawaiian defense projects as has 
been done for Panama Canal defense projects, and authorization to this head- 
quarters to apply this high rating to cases of exceptional importance. 



2572 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

b. Waiving of the requirement that preference ratings can be issued only to 
governnaent contractors and authorization to this Headquarters to issue these 
ratings for the procurement of those items which we anticipate will be essential 
to the defense program. 

c. Consideration of the establishment of a liaison with shipping agencies on the 
West Coast to insure that defense materials ordered by private firms receive 
proper priorities in shipping space. 

It is further recommended that prompt consideration be given to subparagraphs 
a and b above and this headquarters advised by radio of the War Department's 
attitude. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Arm7j, Commanding. 
1 inch C/Ltr. Engr 523.07 4 Jun 1941 
Record copy Engineers 
A true copy. 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

^nd Lt., F. A. 

114.14-18-C-32 RGC/amw 
(8-18-41 

1st Indorsement 

Priorities Committee, 
Armt & Navy Munitions Board, 

War Department Building, 
Washington, D. C, August 18, 1941- 
To Commanding General, Headqviarters Hawaiian Department, Office of the 
Department Engineer, Fort Shafter, T. H. (THRU: The Adjutant General, 
Washington, D. C.) 

1. The following information is submitted in answer to the recommendations 
on page 4 of letter from Lieutenant General Walter C. Short: 

2. The establishment of a blanket priority specifically to Hawaiian Defense 
Projects is not considered necessary inasmuch as the Directive, Priorities Com- 
mittee, Army and Navy Munitions Board, established the preference rating 
A-l-c for "Construction, equipment, defense and development of outlying bases, 
not included in the Continental United States". This Directive is the cumulative 
result of an exhaustive study of the military importance of the various items 
required by the military and naval forces of the United States, and has received 
the approval of the Secretary of War and Secretary of the Navy. 

3. Attention is invited to a copy of communication of July 31, 1941, from the 
Army and Navy Munitions Board to "Supply Arms and Services of the Army 
and iBureaus and Offices of the Navy", which explains the procedure covering the 
issuance of project rating orders to Army and Navy construction projects outside 
of the Continental United States. It will be noted that the project rating orders 
issued in accordance with these instructions will not be confined to items on the 
Critical List, but will include all items necessary to complete the construction of 
a particular project. These ratings may be extended in the usual way, and it is 
believed should cover the recommendation as made in paragraph 7 b. 

4. Attention is invited to the "Defense Supply Rating Plan" recently inaugu- 
rated by the Office of Production Management. This is a plan developed whereby 
the manufacturers who supply so-called "Off the shelf" items to defense industries 
are permitted to get material with which to manufacture additional stock so as 
to make a supply available to defense customers. This plan may be of value to 
some of the concerns in the Hawaiian District and is mentioned for your 
consideration. 

5. The establishment of a liaison with shipping agencies of the West Coast has 
been referred to the Division of Emergency Shipping, Maritime Commission. 
That Commission has a record of the situation as it exists and as it has been for 
some time. They are further checking into the situation, but definite decision 
to establish a liaison agency has not been made. 

For the Priorities Committee; 

RoBT. G. Cook, 
Major, Ordnance, USA. 
1 Incl, no change. 
A True Copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd LL, F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2573 

[immediate action] 

Wab Department 

The Adjutant General's Office 

washington 

Via Air Mail * 

AG 523 Priority 

(7-7-41) MB 2nd Ind. JAU 

War Department, A. G. O., August 26, 1941. 

To: The Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

Attention is invited to preceding Indorsement. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 



Brigadier General, 
Acting The Adjutant General. 
1 Incl. n/c. 
A True Copy. 

Edward von Geldem, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

14 August 1941. 
The Adjutant General, 

Washington, D. C. 

Relet this headquarters third July file engr five two three point zero seven 
subject priorities and preference ratings stop. This question of priorities becom- 
ing more pressing and many local supply houses are now advised by mainland 
agents that no shipment can be made until priority is secured stop. Request 
radio advice as to action on recommendations paragraph seven of letter cited. 

Short. 
A True Copy: 

Edward von Greldem, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafier, T. H., Oct. 23, 1941. 
In reply refer to: 

Engr. 523.07 
Subject: Office of Production Management Field Service. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter dated 13 August 1941 from the Army and Navy 
Munitions Board, a copy of which is inclosed. Reference is also made to letter 
from this headquarters, file Engr. 523.07, subject "Priorities and Preference 
Ratings," and 1st Indorsement from Priorities Committee, Army and Navy 
Munitions Board, 18 August 1941, file 114.14-18-C-32-RGC-amw (8-18-41). 

2. The conditions as to securing priorities for materials needed in the Hawaiian 
Islands are growing worse steadily, and a large part of the difficulties encountered 
can he traced to lack of information and to failure of field offices, whose region in- 
cludes this Territory, to make themselves known to local Federal officials and 
business men. The long distances involved in travel, the difference in time, and 
the high cost of telephonic communication, all make contact with any regional 
office difficult. 

3. Governor Poindexter has already submitted a request to Washington for the 
establishment of a local office of the Priorities Division, 0PM, and at his request 
I concurred in his suggested action. A copy of my letter of September 13, 1941 
to the Governor is inclosed for your information. 

4. It is therefore requested that the War Department propose the establish- 
ment in Honolulu of a field office of the Office of Production Management, to 



2574 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

include the Priorities Division, initially, ^^ ith provision for adding representatives 
of other divisions later, if required. 

(s) Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
2 Incls: (1) Cy of Itr Army & Navy Munitions Board, 8/13/41; (2) Cy of Itr 
to Gov. Poindexter, 13 Sept 41. • 

A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

AG 334.8 Production Management Board 

(10-23-41) MB Istlnd IG/mm-1713 

War Department, A. G. O., 

October 31, 1941. 
To: The Under Secretary of War. 
2 Incls. No change. 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

2d Indorsement 
18-C-32 RGC/amw 
(11-13-41) 

Priorities Committee 

army & navy munitions board 

War Department Building, 
Washington, D. C, November 13, 1941. 
To Commanding General, Headquarters Hawaiian Department, Office of the 
Department Commander, Fort Shatter, T. H. (THRU: The Adjutant General, 
War Dept., Washington, D. C.) 

1. Recommendation has been made to the Office of Production Management 
and a field office of the Office of Production Management be established in Hawaii 
at an early date. They have requested to advise this Committee as to the 
action contemplated or already accomplished in this direction. Such information 
will be forwarded when received. 
For the Priorities Committee: 

(/s/) RoBT. G. Cook, 
Major, Ordnance, USA. 
2 Incls. No change. 

3rd Ind. 
AG 334.8 Production Management Board (10-23-41) MB 

IG:wc-1713 
War Department, A. G. O., 

November 17, 1941. 
To: The Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 
Attention is invited to preceding Indorsement. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

(/s/) E. L. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General, 
2 Incls, n/c. 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2575 

[Exhibit IG] 



Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shatter, T. H., July 28, 1941. 
VIA "CLIPPER" AIR MAIL 
Engr. 600.12 (Gen.) 

Subject: Revolving Fund for Purchase of Materials. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. The delay in securing necessary materials for our construction program has 
become a matter of serious concern. Experience indicates that from three to 
four months are necessary to procure construction materials from the United 
States after funds for projects are allotted, and increasing transportation difficulties 
may lengthen this time. 

2. The following is the situation of the two constructing agencies: 

a. The District Engineer has no revolving fund for advance procurement of 
materials. Among the first Engineer projects approved, however, were two large 
projects; one the additional ammunition storage facilities, and the other the Air 
Corps mobilization housing. As soon as these allotments were received, the 
District Engineer immediately ordered all or a large part of the necessary materials 
to complete the entire project. With his construction crews now well organized, 
the rate of using these materials has greatly accelerated and the stock is being 
depleted because the rate of use is greater than the rate of arrival from the 
mainland. 

b. The Constructing Quartermaster is in somewhat the same situation. While 
the Quartermaster General has authorized the establishment of a stock pile of 
lumber, no funds have been advanced for the procurement of other materials. 
These other materials are not available for local purchase in any appreciable 
quantities, and as a result, there will undoubtedly be delays. 

3. I understand that the Division Engineer, San Francisco, has recommended 
to the Chief of Engineers that a revolving working fund of $1,000,000.00 be 
allotted to the District Engineer, Honolulu, to permit that officer to procure 
materials in advance. This fund would be a revolving fund. All expenditures 
from it for materials would be reimbursed from other projects funds as these 
projects were approved and utilize the materials. 

4. I think that this materials situation ma.v become critical. As stated in 
previous communications, a large part of our construction forces have been 
imported from the mainland on contracts which require either their continued 
employment or return to the mainland at Government expense. It is obvious 
that if there is any lack of materials not only will the jobs be delayed, but also the 
cost to the Government will be increased. I therefore strongly recommend that 
the suggestion of the Division Engineer, San Francisco, be adopted, that the 
District Engineer, Honolulu, be allotted a revolving fund of $1,000,000.00, and 
that similar arrangements be made for the Constructing Quartermaster to permit 
him to stock materials in addition to lumber. 

(s) Walter C. Short, 
Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
Subject: Revolving Fund for Purchase of Materials. 

AG 600.12 Hawaiian Dept. 1st Ind. ET/rm 

(7-28-41) MO 

War Department, AGO, 

August 1, 1941. 
To: Chief of Engineers AND The Quartermaster General, IN TURN. 
For remark and recommendation. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 



Adjutant General. 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



2576 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

4 00.31 (Honolulu) 335. 

Subject: Revolving Fund for Purchase of Materials. 

2nd Ind. 3-N 

Office, C. of E., 

August 7, 1941. 

To The Adjutant General (Through The Quartermaster General.) 

It is recommended that a revolving fund of $1,000,000.00 be authorized for the 
purposes indicated in the basic letter. If the necessary funds are not available 
to the War Department from any other source, it is believed that this amount 
could be advanced from the Fifth Supplemental, 1941, Deferred Storage Program, 
(Air Corps), Items a & b, Parking Storage Areas, Reserve Airplanes. As a final 
resort, the sum of $1,000,000.00 now reserved for construction at the Mobile Air 
Depot, (Brookley Field) could be advanced for this purpose. In either case, 
reimbursement should be effected upon the appropriation of funds for construc- 
tion in Hawaii under the 1943 Construction Program. 
For the Chief of Engineers: 

(s) John R. Hardin, 

John R. Hardin, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

Chief, Construction Section. 
A true copy. 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

20 August 1941. 
Fred W. Herman, 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Dept. Engineer. 
The Adjutant General, 
Washington, D. C. 
Reference clipper letter this headquarters July twenty eighth file Engr six 
hundred point one two parenthesis gen period parenthesis subject revolving fund 
for purchase of materials Stop Information h^s been received from district 
engineer Honolulu that allotment of one million one hundred thousand dollars 
has been received which can be utilized for advanced purchases of materials as 
recommended in letter cited Stop Constructing quartermaster has not repeat 
not received similar allotment as revolving fund to permit advance purchases of 
materials nor any information thereof Stop Strongly recommend revolving 
fund allotment similar to that established for district engineer be made to con- 
structing quartermaster to permit advanced ordering of materials for defense 
contracts 

Shorit 
A true copy. 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edwam) Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt, F. A. 

QM 411.1 C-P 
(Hawaiian Dept.) 

3rd Ind. 

War Department, 
Office of The Quartermaster Generai-, 

Washington, D. C, August 21, 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. The Quartermaster Corps has established a stock-pile reserve of hunber in 
Hawaii in the amount of $600,000.00. It is therefore recommended that a 
revolving fund in an amount not to exceed $500,000.00 be authorized. If the 
necessary funds are not available to the War Department from any other source, 
funds in allotted status to the Quartermaster Corps can be made available. 
For the Quartermaster General: 

(s) L. R. Groves, 
L. R. Groves, 
Colonel, Q. M. C, 
A true copy. Assistant 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

Snd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2577 

Subject: Revolving Fund for Purchase of Materials — Hawaiian Department 

AG 600.12 Haw. Dept. 

(7-28-41) MO-D 4th Ind. ESA 

War Department, AGO. September 27, 1941. 

To the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department, Fort Shafter, T. H. 

The establishment of revolving funds as requested in basic communication is not 
favorabh^ considered. The Quartermaster General will, however, augment the 
lumber stock pile now maintained in the Hawaiian Department sufficiently to 
meet requirements for War Department approved projects for both Engineer and 
Quartermaster construction. A similar stock pile of other classes of construction 
materials will also be established by The Quartermaster General without delay. 
The materials used from these stock piles will be replaced from applicable funds 
of projects for which used as soon as such funds become available to local con- 
structing agencies. 

Bv order of the Secretarv of War: 



Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
A true copy. 

Edward Von Geldern, 
f]DWARD Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., Seytemher 13, 1941. 
In reply refer to: Engr. 600.12 (Gen.) 
Major General R. C. Moore 

Deputy Chief of Staff, War Department, 

Washington, D. C. 

Dear Dick: 

The situation surrounding the obtaining of materials for defense contracts is 
becoming more and more critical. On many items a delay of between three and 
four months occurs between the time an allotment of funds for a project is received 
and the materials necessary are obtained from the mainland. We have recently 
received word on some electrical equipment which indicates that delivery cannot 
be made for six months. 

In a conference with Colonel Hannum, Division Engineer is San Francisco, 
when he was here sometime ago, he mentioned that he had recommended to The 
Chief of Engineers that a revolving fund of $1,000,000.00 be set up to permit the 
District Engineer to make advance purchases of materials and plant. I followed 
up Hannum's recommendation to the Chief of Engineers with a strong letter to 
the War Department urging that this revolving fund be set up for the District 
Engineer and that similar arrangements be made for the Constructing Quarter- 
master. The District Engineer informed me today that he had received an allot- 
ment of $1,100,000.00 from the Chief of Engineers which could be utihzed for the 
advance purchase of materials. The Constructing Quartermaster, however, has 
not yet received similar information, and while he is authorized to stock lumber 
locally, he has no revolving fund for which to make advance purchases of materials 
other than lumber. 

1 am following up my previous recommendation by radio to The Adjutant 
General today. I think that the matter is sufficiently important to bring it to 
your attention, and I will appreciate it if you would have someone look into this 
matter. A copy of my letter of July 28th and of the radio follow up of September 
1 3 are inclosed for ready reference. 

Very sincerely. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenayit General, U. S. Army, Commanding. 

2 Incls: Cy. Itr. Engr. 600.12 (Gen.) 28 Jul 41, Cy. rad. 20 Aug 41. 
A true cop}': 

Edward Von Geldern, 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



2578 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

War Department, 
Office of the Chief of Staff, 

Washington, September 29, 19J,1. 
Lieutenant General Walter C. Short, 

Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, Honolulu, T. H. 
Dear Walter: 

I have 3^our letter of the thirteenth relative to the establishment of revolving 
funds in connection with construction in Hawaii. 

Owing to legal restrictions we cannot approve your request for revolving funds. 
However, it appears that the woiding of the appropriation from which tlie Quarter- 
master General maintains the lumber pile you mention is such that those funds 
may be used to make advance purchases of other materials required for con- 
struction. 

The Quartermaster General will take immediate measures to establish a stock 
pile of construction materials other than lumber, sufficient to meet requirements 
for both Engineer and Quartermaster construction. The conditions under which 
these stock piles will be reimbursed will be covered in the reply of the War 
Department to your official request of July 28, 1941. 

The Chief of Engineers advises that the allotment of $1,100,000 made to your 
District Engineer, to which you refer, is from funds now available for approved 
projects. This allotment should not be construed as making these funds available 
to you as a revolving fund, nor for advance purchase of materials, except for the 
projects to which the funds apply. 

I believe that when these stock piles have become established the situation you 
outline will be greatly relieved. 
Sincerely yours. 

[S] R. C. Moore, 
R. C. MOORF, 
Major General, Deputy Chief of Staff. 
A true copy. 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[SECRET] 

[Exhibit 1 H] 

War Department, 
Office of the Chief of Staff, 

Washington, November 27, 1941. 
Air Mail via Clipper 
Lieutenant General Walter C. Short, U. S. A., 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, Fort Shafter, T. H, Office of the Depart- 
ment Commander. 
Dear Short: The copy of your report on the additional air routes has been 
received. The quantity of details requiring coordination, and the distances 
involved in the projects make the short time consumed in getting rolling almost 
unbelievably short. 

I extend you my personal thanks for the effort you have expended on this job 
and the results you are getting. 

The way things are working out now, it looks as if we will be using trans-Pacific 
airways almost continuously from now on. Our plans are O. K. for 4-engine 
bombers, but what are the prospects for medium bombers? Do you think we 
should even study that phase of trans- Pacific operations? 
Best regards. 
Sincerely. 

[S] H. H. Arnold, 
Major General, U. S. A., 
Deputy Chief of Staff for Air. 
A true copy: 

Edward Von Geldern 
Edward Von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2579 

[Exhibit II] 

Subject: Increase in the Strength of the Third Engineers. 

AG 320.2 (11-1-40) M-C 3rd Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. 0.,Februar3' 10, 1941. 

To Commanding General, Hawaiian Departmeiit 

1. Action is being taken to increase the allotment of Regular Army enlisted 
men for the Coips of Engineers, Hawaiian Department by 107. This allotment 
uill permit the organization of the 3rd Engineers in accordance with Table of 
Organization 5-11, November 1, 1940. Regular Army personnel are not available 
to increase further the strength of this regiment. 

2. Since War Department policy forbids sending trainees to the Overseas 
Departments it will not be practicable to aid you in creating an Engineer Eat- 
talion (Separate) as recommended in your radio of January 23, 1941. 

3. As previously advised, plans provide for the activation of a separate Engineer 
Company (Avn) for your Department. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

[sgd] E. S. Adams. 
A True Copy : 

L. W. Tritman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[secret] 

Headqt:arters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commandek, 

Fort Shaffer, T. H.. February 19, Vm. 
In replv refer to: 
Engr. 322.03 

Subject: Additional Engineer Troops. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to letter, this headquarters, Engr. 322.03, 23 August 1940, 
which recommended the assignment to the Department of an Engineer regiment 
(Aviation) less one battalion, and to letter, Kugr. 210 x220.03, 1 November 1940, 
which recommended an increase in the strength of the Third Engineers, and to 
letter, Engr. 322.03, 5 February 1941, recommending a redesignation in the Third 
Engineers from a combat regiment. Division, to a combat regiment. Corps. 

2. These previous recommendations for an increase in the Engineer component 
in the Department were based upon the assumption that some civilian labor 
would be available. It has been necessary with the various agencies involved 
in defense construction to imjiort skilled labor from the mainland. A recent 
increase in the defense contracts of the Xavy will now necessitate the importation 
of unskilled labor as well. This development now makes it impossible to assume 
that any appreciable local labor will be available and requires that previous 
estimates of the minimum force of Engineers necessary be revised upwards. 

3. I consider it essential that a regiment of Engineers (Aviation^ be furnished 
this Department as an integral part of the Hawaiian Air Force and that a regi- 
ment of Engineers, General Service, be furnished this department as Department 
Engineer troops. There is sufficient work immediately on hand in connection 
with Air Corps activities on the outlying islands and on Oahu to keep a regiment 
of Engineers continuously occupied. There is also sufficient work in connection 
with military roads and trails in department units to keep a regiment of General 
Service Engineers continuously occupied. There is also sufficient work in con- 
nection with the Hawaiian Division such as bombproofing of Division command 
posts and communication centers, road blocks and other tactical employment 
to keep the Third Phigineers continuously occupied. 

4. It is therefore recommended that one regiment of Engineers (Aviation) (T.O. 
.5-411'i and one regiment of Engineers, General Service, (T. O. .5-21) be authorized 
for this Department and that these units complete with personnel and equipment 
be furnished as soon as ])ossible.. 

Walter C. Short, 

Liciilenant (General, 

Commanding. 
Record copy: Engineers. 
-A. True C'opy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41. 



2580 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Subject; Additional Engineer Troops. Hawaiian Department. 

AG 32Q.2 (2-19-41) MC-C-M 1st Ind. ESA 

"War Department, A. G. O., 

May 15, 1941. 
To the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. a. The 34th Engineers (Combat), will be activated in your department'" with 
an allotted strength of 1127 enlisted men under T/0 5-171, November 1, 1940, 
less band and basic privates, on June 1, 1941 (AG 320.2 (4-8-41) M-C, radio 
April 9, 1941). 

b. The regiment will be organized with cadres to be furnished by units now in 
your department, as directed by you, and with selectees to be dispatched from 
the Continental United States. 

c. Every effort will be made to send individuals who have completed their basic 
training; however, in order to make maximum use of the available shipping, some 
curtailment in their basic training may be required. If this is done, you will be 
informed so that they can complete their training in HaWaii. Under the present 
tentative schedule, it is proposed to dispatch the full quota except thirty-six 
attached medical, in June. The Medical Department personnel will be dis- 
patched in November. 

d. The actual date of activation of the regiment will conform to the arrival of 
personnel in your department. 

2. While your recent request for additional medical enlisted men was dis- 
approved because of non-availability of personnel, the 34th Engineers (and the 
97th and 98th Coast Artillery Regiments whose activation is covered in separate 
correspondence) is allotted a full quota of attached medical personnel, less basics. 
You are authorized to make a redistribution of this attached medical personnel, 
reporting such readjustment to this office. 

3. It is desired that you submit a report on the following: 

a. The actual date of activation of the 34th Engineers. 

b. Changes in the distribution of three-year men in engineer units in connec- 
tion with the organization of the 34th Engineers. 

4. Attention is invited to letter, this office, April 21, 1941, AG 381.4 (1-27-41) 
M-D-M, subject: Reports of change in status reports — Defense Reserves, 
Overseas Departments, 

5. Your request for aviation engineers is being considered separately. 

6. The allotment of commissioned personnel and the grades and ratings of 
enlisted personnel will be made separately. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 



3 Inclosures — 



[S] E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 



Tncl. 1.— Copy of Itr., 5-15-41, to C. G., Third Corps Area. 

Inch 2. — Copy of Itr., 5-15-41, to C. G., New York Port of Embarkation. 

Inch 3. — Copy of Itr., 5-15-41, to The Quartermaster General. 

A True Copv: 

H. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[confidential] 

War Department, 
The Adjutant General's Office, 

Washington, June 18, 1941- 
AG 320.2 
(6-5-41) MR-M-C 

Subject: Constitution and Activation of Certain Engineer Units (804th Engineer 
Battalion, Aviation (Separate), and Personnel for Engineer Head- 
quarters, Hawaiian Department Air Force). 

To: The Commanding Generals, Fourth Army, Hawaiian Department, Ninth 
Corps Area, and San Francisco Port of Embarkation. 



PEOCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2581 

Extract 

1. The 804th Engineer Company, Aviation (Separate), now in Hawaii, will be 
disbanded at the earliest practicable date and concurrently therewith the 804th 
Engineer Battalion, Aviation (Separate), will be constituted and activated with, 
an authorized strength of 21 officers and 625 enlisted men, including 10 attached 
medical. The personnel, unit funds, and equipment of the 804th Engineer 
Battalion, Aviation (Separate). 

******* 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

[S] E. S. ADAMS, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
A True Copy: 

H. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

War Department, 

The Adjutant General's Office, 

Washington, May 28, 1941. 
AG 320.2 (5-28-41) MC-C-M 
Subject: Additional Engineer Troops and Reinforcements for Coast Artillery 

Garrison, Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Commanding General, Third Corps Area. 

The Sailings of USATs Manhattan, Washington, and Wood for Hawaii have 
been indefinitely postponed. So much of letters, this office, Mav 15, 1941, AG 
320.2 (2-19-41) MC-C-M, subject: Additional Engineer Troops, Hawaiian 
Department, and May 10, 1941, AG 320.2 (2-18-41) MC-C-M, subject: Rein- 
forcements for Coast Artillery Garrison Hawaiian Department, as pertains to 
movement of trainees to Ports of Embarkation and overseas movement is rescinded. 
Instructions covering final disposition of trainees earmarked by the two letters 
mentioned above will follow this communication. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

Adjutant General. 
Copies furnished: 

The Commanding Generals, First Army, GHQ Air Force, Hawaiian Depart- 
ment, San Francisco and New York Forts of Embarkation; 
The Chief of Staff, GHQ 
The Chief of Chaplains 
The Chief of Coast Artillery 
The Chief of the Air Corps 
The Chief of Chemical Warfare Service 
The Chief of Engineers 
The Chief of Ordnance 
The Chief Signal Officer 
The Quartermaster General; and 
The Chief of Finance. 

A true copy: 

H. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 

12-22-41 

War Department, 
The Adjutant General's Office, 

Washington, June 23, 1941. 
AG 320.2 (6-16-41) MC-C-M 

Subject: Additional Engineer Troops, Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Commanding Generals, Hawaiian Department, Third Corps Area and 
the New York Port of Embarkation; 
The Quartermaster General. 
Letter this office, May 15, 1941, AG 320.2 (2-19-41) MC-C-M, subject: 
Additional Engineer Troops, Hawaiian Department, to the Commanding General, 
Third Corps Area, the Commanding General, New York Port of Embarkation, 
and The Quartermaster General, respectively; and 1st Indorsement this office. 



2582 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

May 15, 1941, AG 320.2 (2-19-41) MC-C-M, same subject, to the Commanding 
General, Hawaiian Department, are rescinded. Letters, this office Mav 23, 1941, 
AG 320.2 (5-23-41) MC-M, May 24, 1941, AG 320.2 (5-24-41) MC, and Mav 27, 
1941, AG 320.2 (5-26-41) MC, subject: Additional Engineer Troops, Hawaiian 
Department, to the Commanding General, Third Corps Area are also rescinded. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

[sgd] E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General 
Copies Furnished: 

Chief of Staff, GHQ 

The Commanding Generals, First Army, and S. F. P. of E 
The Chief of Chaplains 
The Chief of Coast Artillery 
The Chief of the Air Corps 
The Chief of Chemical Warfare Service 
The Chief of Engineers 
The Chief of Ordnance 
The Chief Signal Officer 
The Chief of Finance 
The Surgeon General 
A True Copv: 

H. W. Truman, 
H. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

Su])ject: Additional Selective Service Trainees for the Hawaiian Department. 
AG 320.2 (4-21-41) MC-C 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., 

May 31, 19/fl. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Radio No. 721, this office, April 9, 1941, requested your views on the prac- 
ticability of securing additional selectees locally, and it was not intended that an 
appeal be made to the Governor of the Territory of Hawaii to secure 1,127 addi- 
tional selectees in excess of the existirg quota. 

2. In connection with your remarks on labor shortage in Hawaii, a resolution 
recently passed by the Board of Supervisors of the City and County of Honoluhi, 
copies of which were sent to the Secretary of War and other governmental heads, 
protested the organization of a port company in Hawaii on the grounds that the- 
supply of labor was ample and that needs of Natioral Defer se projects could be 
met without importation of additional personi^el from the United States. This 
matter is brought to your attention for information only. No further action 
appears necessary or desirable at this time. 

3. Personnel for the 34th Engineers will be provided from the Continental 
United States in two increments. Details have been comnumicated to you in 
separate correspondence. 

By order ot the Secretary of War: 

[sgd] E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 21 April 1941. 
In replv refer to: 
AG 38i 

Subject: Additional Selective Service Trainees for the Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. War Department radio No. 721, of 9 April 1941, proposes activation in this 
Department of the 34th Engineer Regiment (C) in June with a strength of 1127, 
including 36 attached medical personnel. It further proposes that the 3d Engi- 
neers (C) will furnish the cadre; the balance to be local selectees. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2583 

2. As the existing Territorial quota of 1400 Selectees has already been exceeded 
by approximately 500, and those now inducted assigned to organizations, an appeal 
was made to the Governor of the Territory of Hawaii to secure the additional 
personnel required to activate this new unit. The Governor's repl.v, attached, 
states that he is without authority to call additional quotas of trainees, and even 
if such authority existed, he is opposed to providing additional manpower at the 
expense of National Defense projects and local industry which have already 
absorbed all available labor. 

3. The labor shortage in Hawaii is acute. Skilled labor for work on National 
Defense projects is now being imported and it is quite likely that the importation 
of unskilled labor will become necessary to maintain defense work schedules. 

4. In view of these circumstances it is urged that the War Department provide 
personnel from the Mainland U. S. for the activation of new or expansion of exist- 
ing units in the Hawaiian Department. 

[sgd] Walter C. Short, 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
2 Incls. 

1. Letter to Governor, T. H. 

2. Letter from Governor, T. H. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



U] 



[Exhibit IJ] 
[Secret] 



18 February 1941. 
AG 320.2/55 

Subject: Reinforcements for Coast Artillery Garrison, Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is invited to: 

A. Letter the Secretary of the Navy to the Secretary of War, dated 24 January 
1941, with reference to the defense of the Pearl Harbor Naval Base against "a 
surprise attack, copy forwarded to this headquarters as inclosure to letter TAG 
to HHD, 7 Februarv 1941, subject: "Air Defense of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii," 
file AG 381 (1-24-41) M. 

B. Letter HHD to TAG, 5 September 1940, subject: "Additional Antiaircraft 
Troops for the Hawaiian Department", file 320.2/49. 

C. Letter TAG to HHD, 27 September 1940, subject: War Reinforcements, 
Hawaiian Department", file 320.2 (9/27/40) M-WPD, with 1st and 2nd Indorse- 
ments thereon. 

2. The increasingly critical international situation, together with the vital need, 
as expressed in Reference A, for adequate provision for the best defense which 
can be provided for the security of the Pearl Harbor Naval Base and the Fleet 
against surprise attacks makes it essential that the antiaircraft artillery garrison 
of Oahu be placed upon a war footing without delay. While not specifically 
mentioned in Reference A, there is a similar requirement for a sound defense of 
the Pleet and its base against raids by surface ships. This would have special 
importance if the fleet should be withdrawn from Pearl Harbor. An adequate 
defense, ready for prompt action, can not be provided with the present garrison 
because of the necessity for dual assignments of Coast Artillery batteries to anti- 
aircraft and harbor defense missions. The reinforcements required for the anti- 
aircraft artillery and harbor defense garrisons to provide the degree of defense 
considered essential are discussed below. 

3. Antiaircraft Artillery. 

a. The approved defense project provides for twenty-five (25) gun batteries, 
five (5) searchlight batteries, and sixteen (16) automatic weapons batteries 
manning a total of seventy-two (72) mobile and twenty-six (26) fixed AA guns, 
seventy-five (75) searchlights, one hundred and twenty (120) 37 mm A A guns, 
and two hundred (200) cal. .50 A A machine guns. (NOTP]: Three hundred and 
[3] forty five (345) cal. .50 AA machine guns are jirovided in the defense 
project, of which two hundred (200) are manned by antiaircraft artillery and 
the remainder by other troops.) With the present garrison, including the 
assignment of all but two (2) harbor defense artillery batteries to antiaircraft 
assignments, only nineteen (19) gun batteries, three' (3) searchlight batteries, 
79716 — 46^Ex. 145, vol. 4 9 



2584 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

no 37 mm batteries and six (6) machine gun batteries can be manned because of 
the shortage of both personnel and equipment. The major shortages in anti- 
aircraft artillery armament are sixteen (16) three inch A A guns and associated 
equipment (of which six (6) guns are understood to be enroute to this Depart- 
ment), all one hundred and thirty-five (135) 37 mm AA guns, two hundred and 
thirty-six (236) cal. .50 machine guns, and thirty (30) sound locators. 

b. To man the entire antiaircraft artillery defense project, avoiding dual 
assignments to all but four harbor defense batteries, requires an increase in the 
existing garrison of the following antiaircraft artillery personnel: 

2 Regiments Coast Artillery AA (Mobile) T/0 4-11. 

1 Battalion Gun Coast Artillery AA (Mobile) (less searchlight battery) 
T/0 4-15. 
Approximately ninety (90) officers and two thousand (2000) enlisted men as 
individual filler replacements to activate three (3) gun batteries and three (3) 
37 mm batteries of the 64th CA (AA), now in active, and to bring to war strength 
the active elements of this regiment. 

c. In paragraph 10 a of 2nd Indorsement of Reference C, the War Depratment 
provided for only one half of the reinforcements of the peacetime garrison of 
antiaircraft artillery which, at that time, were considered essential to provide a 
reasonably effective antiaircraft defense prior to the date unit reinforcements 
from the mainland could effect the situation. With the increasingly critical 
international situation at this time, it is urgently recommended that all war 
reinforcements of antiaircraft artillery personnel, both unit and filler reinforce- 
ments described above, together with the existing shortages in antiaircraft 
artillery material be sent from the mainland with the lease practicable delay. 

4. Harbor Defense Artillery. 

The status of the defense' which can be established with existing personnel of 
the peace garrison of harbor defense artillery is described in detail in par 6/, of 
the basic document, Hawaiian Defense Project, Revision of 1940. Briefly, only 
one 16-inch battery and the seacoast searchlights of the Ulupau Group can be 
manned by batteries with harbor defense as their only mission. By employing 
the undesirable expedient of dual assignments to harbor defense and antiaircraft 
missions, and of harbor defense and Field Artillery missions, both 16-inch gun 
batteries, the one 14-inch battery, one of the two 12-inch gun batteries, none of the 
three mortar batteries, three of the five 8-inch batteries (fixed and railway), six 
of the twelve 155mm batteries (two manned by Field Artillery personnel) and 
none of the two 6-inch and two 3-inch [3] batteries can be manned upon 
initial deployment. As shown in Table I, par. 7 to HDP-40, an increase of 
approximately 165 oflficers and 3400 enlisted men as individual filler reinforcements 
and One Regiment Coast Artillery (TD, T/0 ^31 W) is required to fully man 
the harbor defense artillery. By not manning the three fixed seacoast mortar 
batteries, which are not essential to a defense against raids, the total number of 
individual filler reinforcements may be reduced to approximately 150 officers 
and 2700 enlisted men. This increase in the garrison will be sufficient to provide 
only one relief as manning details for harbor defense guns, but will be adequate so 
that key observation stations, air guards and similar details can be maintained 
continuously. 

5. Summarizing, it is urgently recommended that: 

(a) The Coast Artillery garrison of this Department be brought to substantial!}' 
war strenght by the dispatch from the mainland of the following reinforcements: 

(1) Two Regiments CA (AA) Mobile, T/0 4-11. 

(2) One Battalion CA (AA) gun, Mobile (less searchlight battery), T/0 

4-15. 

(3) One Regiment CA (TD), 155mm gun, T/0 4-31 W. 

(4) Individual antiaircraft artillery filler reinforcements to include 91 

officers and 2064 enlisted men. 

(5) Individual harbor defense artillery reinforcements to include approxi- 

mately 150 officers and 2700 enlisted men. 
b. Existing major shortages in the armament of the approved antiaircraft 
artillery projects, as set forth in par. 3 above, be filled as soon as practicable. 

Walter C Short, 

Lieutenant General, 

Commanding. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41. 



PROCEEDINGS OF AR]MY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2585 

[1] 

fSECRET] 

Subject: Reinforcements for Coast Artillery Garrison, Hawaiian Department. 
AG 320.2 (2-18-41) MC-C-M 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., May 10, 1941. 

To the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The Coast Artillery garrison, Hawaiian Department, will be augmented by 
approximately 276 officers and 5,734 enlisted men between June, 1941, and March, 
1942, in three increments paralleling the estimated delivery of material, as follows: 

a. June, 1941: 

(1) AA filler replacements, 60 officers and 1,337 enlisted men. 

(2) 62 officers and 1,329 enlisted men required to activate the following 
units in the Department: 

98th Coast Artillery (AA) (Semi-mobile) , less band, 3d Battalion (37-mm 
Gun), Battery E (Searchlight), basic privates and attached medical, under 
T/0 4-111, November 1, 1940, and component tables. 

(3) 17 officers and 359 enlisted men to activate the 2d Battalion, 97th 
Coast Artillery (AA) (Semi-mobile), less Batter}^ H (Gun), Battery E 
(Searchlight) and basic privates, under T.'O 4-115, November 1, 1940'and 
component tables. 

6. November, 1941: 

(1) 48 officers and 885 enlisted men to activate the 97th Coast Artillery 
(AA) (Semi-mobile), less band, 2d Battalion (Gun), 3d Battalion (37-mm 
gun), and basic privates, under T/0 4-111, November 1, 1940, and compo- 
nent tables. 

(2) 4 officers and 134 enlisted men to activate Battery H (Gun), 97th 
Coast Artillery, less basic privates, under T/0 4-17, November 1, 1940. 

(3) Attached Medical personnel, 98th Coast Artillery, 7 officers and 49 
enlisted men. 

[2] c. March, 1942: 

(1) AA filler replacements, 24 officers and 661 enlisted men. 

(2) 54 officers and 980 enlisted men to activate the 3d Battalion (37-mm 
Gun), 97th Coast Artillery and 3d Battalion (37-mm gun), 98th Coast Ar- 
tillery, each less Battery M (Gun) and basic privates, under T/0 4-125, 
November 1, 1940 and component tables. 

2. Cadres for the new units will be furnished from existing units in the Hawaiian 
Department; their source, strength and composition will be determined by you. 

3. Every efi"ort will be made to send individuals who have completed their basic 
training; however, in order to make maximum use of available shipping, some cur- 
tailment in their basic training may be required. If this is done, 3'ou will be in- 
formed so the individuals can complete their basic training in Hawaii. 

4. The actual activation of the various units will conform to the arrival of per- 
sonnel in the Department. 

5. While jour recent request for additional medical enlisted men was dis- 
approved because of non-availability of personnel, the 97th and 98th Coast Ar- 
tillery Regiments (and the 34th Engineers whose activation is covered in separate 
correspondence) are allottedfuU quotas of attached medical personnel, less basics. 
You are authorized to make a redistribution of this personnel, reporting such re- 
adjustment to this office. 

6. It is desired that you submit a report on the following: 

a. The actual dates on which various units are activated. 

b. Changes in the distribution of three-year men in Coast Artillery units in 
connection with activation of new units. 

c. List of all Coast Artillery units and installations in the Department includ- 
ing allotted strengths and tables off organization under which organized; this re- 
port to be submitted upon completion of the activation of all new units and dis- 
tribution of the last increment of AA filler replacements. 

[3] 7. Attention is invited to letter, this office, April 21, 1941, AG 381.4 
(1-27-41) M-D-M, subject: Reports of Change in Status Reports — Defense 
Reserves, Overseas Departments. 

8. The allotments of commissioned personnel and the grades and ratings for 
enlisted personnel will be made separately. 

9. Recommendation for augmentation of harbor defense artillery is not favor- 
ably considered at this time because the additional personnel is not available. 



2586 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

The antiaircraft reinforcenients will strengthen the seacoast defenses by the 
relief of all but four harbor defense batteries from dual antiaircraft missions. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

(sgd) E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
3 inclosures — Added. 

Incl. 1— Copy of Ltr., 5/10/41. 

AG 320.2 (2/18/41) MC-C-N. to C. G., Third Corps Area. 
Incl. 2— Copy of ltr., 5/10/41, AG 320.2 (2/18/41) MC-C-M, to C. G.s, 

N. Y. & San Fran. Ports of Emb. 
Incl. 3— Copy of ltr., 5/10/41, AG 320.2 (2/18/41) MC-C-M, to The 
Quartermaster General. 
Copies furnished: 

The Commanding Generals, Third Corps Area and New York & San 

Francisco Ports of Embarkation: 
The Chief of Staff , GHQ; 
The Chief of Chaplains; 
The Chief of Coast Artillery; 
The Chief of the Air Corps; 
The Chief of Chemical Warfare Service; 
The Chief of Engineers; 
The Chief of Ordnance; 
The Chief Signal Officer; 
The Quartermaster General; 
>The Surgeon General; and 
The Chief of Finance. 

A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[secret] 

[1] 

AG 320.2/57 25 Fkbruary 1941. 

Subject: Increase of enlisted strength, 251st Coast Artillery (AA), National 

Guard (California). 
To: The Adjutant General. 

1. On January 9, 1941, the then Department Commander, lieutenant General 
Herron, radioed for authority to incrsase the enlisted strength of the 251st Coast 
Artillery (AA), National Guard, from present allotted strength to a peac.' strength 
of 14-50 by assignment of selectees from Ninth Corps Area. On January 17, 1941 , 
the War Department replied by radiogram to the effect that tha recommendation 
made in Janurary 9, 1941 radiogram was not favorably considered and that the 
policy of the War Department is that selective service personnel in overseas gar- 
risons will be limited to those procured within the overseas department itself and 
that no additional selective service personnel will in time of peace be sent from the 
continental United States to overseas departments. 

2. I am again submitting this request as I am of the firm opinion that the 
situation here is different than in the United States, and that this is a special case 
which deserves further consideration. The facts are: 

The 251st National Guard is the only National Guard organization on duty 
outside of the continental limits of the United States; 

This regiment is composed of white officers and enlisted men ; 

The selective service trainees now in being in this Department are composed of 
469 Japanese out of the quota 700. The ne.xt draft quota of 700 which is to be 
inducted in March will undoubtedly be composed of approximately the same 
ratio of Japanese; namely, about 67%; 

The selective service trainees are of varied mixture, such as Japanese, Hawaiian, 
Part Hawaiian, Filipinos, Chinese, Korvmn, and other mixtures; 

Any assignment of the selective service trainees to the 251st Coast Artillery 
(AA) would result in a mixture of races, largely Japanese, being assigned to a white 
organization, which is contrarv to War Department policv, as stated in War 
Department Letter AG 291.21 (10/9/40) M-A-M, October 16, 1940, Subject: 
"War Department Policy m regard to Negroes", paragraph g; 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2587 

Tlie Colonel, Commanding the 251st Coast Artillery (AA), states tliat because 
of the feeling in California against orientals, any assignment of selective service 
trainees from this Department to his command v.oiild cause diss'^nsion, and 
lessen the effjciency of his command fully ")() (x-rcont. 

[2] All replacements now coming from the mainland are required for the 
Regular Army troops here. 

AH the selective service trainees in this Department will he needed to fill the 
Hawaii National Guard imits which are composed of races of the same type as in 
the selective service draft. 

3. In view of the above, the only justifiable solution of this problem is to assign 
selective service trainees from the mainland, and preferably from the 9th Corps 
Area, to the 251st Coast Artillery (AA), National Guard. It is my opinion that 
it will be contrary to the best interests of all concerned to assign selective service 
trainees in this Department to the 251st Coast Artillery (A A) to increase its 
strength. 

4. Sir ce this is a special situation incident to this Department. I do not be- 
lieve the present War Department policy, as stated in WD Radiogram, January 
17, 1941; i. e., of not sending any additional selective service personnel from the 
continental United States to overseas departments, should apply to this Depart- 
ment. 

5. I therefore again request that the 251st Coast Artillery (AA), National 
Guard, be increased from present allotted strength to a peace strength of 1450 by 
assignment of selective service trainees from the 9th Crops Area. 

(sgd) Walter C. Short, 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenani General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
A true cop}': 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[secret] 

Subject: Increase of Enlisted Strength, 251st Coast Artillery (AA), National 

Guard (California). 
AG 320.2 (2-25-41) M-C 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., 

March 8, 1941. 
To the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Your recommendation that the 251st Coast Artillery (AA) be increased from 
its present allotted strength of 1181 to a strength of 1450 by assignment of se- 
lectees from the Ninth Corps Area is not favorably considered. 

2. As stated in radiogram from this office, .January 17, 1941, all selective service 
personnel to be procured in the current fiscal year have already been allotted to 
units and activities. Additional personnel could be allotted to the 251st Coast 
Artillery (A A) only at the expense of other units or activities. 

3. If trainees were sent to the 251st Coast Artillery (AA) at the present time, 
it is not considered that they could be of great value to the regiment or to the 
defense of the Hawaiian Islands due to the short period of time they would be 
available after completing their basic training. Selectees inducted now would 
probably reach the Hawaiian Department some time in April 1941. Their basic 
training would require approximately three months making them fully available 
about July 1941. As the 251st Coast Artillery (AA) is scheduled to be returned 
to the United States for return to an inactive status of September 16, 1941, it 
appears that any selective service personnel sent at this late date would be avail- 
able to the regiment for a maximum of two months. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

(sgd) E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
A true copy. 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. ' nf. 
12-22-4 



2588 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[secret] 

[1] 

AG 320.2/58 25 February 1941. 

Subject: Reinforcements for Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is invited to: 

A. Letter, TAG to HHD. 4 February 1941, subject: "Tables of Organization, 
Overseas Departments", file AG 320.2 (1-17-41)P(C) : 

B. Letter, TAG to HHD, 27 December 1940, Subject. "Equipment for Field 
Artillery Lnits", file AG 320.2 (12/20/40) P. 

C. Letter, HHD to TAG, 18 February 1941, subject: "Reinforcements for 
Coast Artillery Garrison Hawaiian Department", file AG 320.2/55. 

D. Letter, HHD to TAG, 19 February 1941. subject: "Additional Engineer 
Troops", file Engr. 322.03. 

2. The requests for troop reinforcements as stated in Reference C and D, hold 
priority over the requests given herein. The following reinforcements are re- 
quested for this Department at the earliest possible date and in the priority in 
which they are listed. 

a. Jn accordance with Reference A, authority is requested to organize the 11th 
Field Artillery under WD T/0 6-41, dated November 1, 1940. The 11th Field 
Artillery (less 3d Battalion) is now organized under Standard War Department, 
Tables of Organization with units organized and maintained at war strength, as 
follows : 

(1) 11th Field Artillery (less 3d Bn), T/0 6-41 January 3. 1939. 

(2) Hq & Hq Btry, 11th Field Artillery. T/0 6-42, January 3, 1939. 

(3) 1st and 2d Bn, 11th Field Artillery, T/0 6-45, December 7, 1938. 

(4) Hq & Hq Btry, 1st ana 2d Bn, 11th Field Artillery, T/0 6-46. January 
7, 1938. 

(5) Four (4) batteries, 11th Field Artillery, T/0 6-47, December 7, 1938. 

b. That one Infantry Battalion, Light Tanks, be authorized for and the neces- 
sary personnel and material to organize same, be furnished this Department. 
The number of possible localities for hostile beach landings make the availability 
of a mobile reserve having the characteristic of light tanks of [2] great tactical 
importance for counterattacks. The 11th Tank Company (Light Tanks) or- 
ganized under Standard WD, T/0 7-8, dated March 17, 1938, is the only tank 
unit in this Department and could be the nucleus for the Infantry Battalion of 
Light Tanks, requested herein. 

c. That the organization of two (2) Military Police Companies, under WD, 
T/0 7-55, dated November 1, 1940, (Military Police Battalion) be authorized 
and that the necessary personnel be furnished from the Mainland for organization 
of the two (2) companies in this Department. The technical duties required of 
Air Corps enlisted personnel are retarded due to the required training for and 
actual performance of interior guard duty at both Hickam and Wheeler Fields. 
It is believed that an organized Military Police Company stationed at each of these 
fields would release Air Corps personnel for necessary air activities and also render 
more efficient interior guard and military police duty. The Military Police per- 
sonnel could be efficiently trained in anti-sabotage work and also in close-in 
defense without disrupting scheduled training. It is the intention to use the 
Military Police personnel to perform similar work at outlying air fields under the 
control of the Commanding OflBcers of Hickam and Wheeler Fields and also to 
accompany Air Corps Units to those outlying fields when either Wing is operating 
under its Dispersion Plan. 

d. That the necessary reinforcements be furnished so that the Infantry Regi-* 
ments of the Hawaiian Division, be organized under WD, T/0 No. 7, dated No- 
vember 1, 1940: Infantry Division (Square). These regiments are now organized 
under Standard WD, T/0 7-11, dated December 6, 1938, as modified to fall within 
the" Allotment of Grades and Ratings for Enlisted Men, and authorized Recruit- 
ing Strength" as published in mimeograph letter, TAG, August 7, 1940, file AG 
221 (8-7-40) E. Approval of this request would permit compliance with Refer- 
ence A, above, and also make available the necessary personnel and material au- 
thorized by current standard, War Department Tables of Organization. 

e. That the 11th Field Artillery Brigade (less 11th Field Artillery) be organized 
under WD, T/Os dated November 1, 1940 and that the necessary reinforcements 
be furnished this Department. That War Department, Tables of Basic Allow- 
ances for Field Artillery, No. 6-1, dated November 1, 1940, be made applicable 
to the 11th Field Artillery Brigade (less 11th Field Artillery). 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2589 

3. A Study is now being made of all Special Tables of Organization at present in 
use by units in this Department, with a view of submitting recommendations for 
changes that will permit organization and functioning under current Standard 
WD, Tables of Organization. 

[sgd] Walter C. Short, 

Waltek C. Short, 

Lieutenant General, 

Commanding. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41. 

[secret] 

SUBJECT: Reinforcements for Hawaiian Department. 

1st Ind. 
O 320.2 (2-25-41) I-C WVC 

War Department, A. G. O., 

A-pril 11, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The augmentation of Coast Artillery and Engineer components of the 
Hawaiian Department is being considered separately, and you will be advised 
in the near future of the action taken thereon. 

2. The augmentation of the Field Artillery and Infantry components of the 
Hawaiian Division, and the addition of a Tank Battalion and two Military Police 
Companies to the peace garrison are not considered urgent, nor is it practicable 
to provide the personnel at this time. It is believed the necessary guard duties 
can and should be performed by troops in the Department without organizing 
Military Police Companies for this purpose. 

3. The reorganization of Infantry and Field Artillery elements of the Hawaiian 
Division under latest War Department tables of organization is approved. This 
can be accomplished without additional personnel. The majority of the units 
in other foreign garrisons and in the Continental United States are below table 
of organization strengths vet conform to standard tables. As stated in letter, 
February 4, 1941, AG 320'.2 (1-17-41) P (C), subject: "Tables of Organization, 
Overseas Departments", this can be accomplished by reducing the size of com- 
ponent elements of a unit or by carrying certain elements inactive. 

By order of the Secretarv of War: 

(sgd) W. V. Carter. 
W. V. Carter, 
Brigadier General, 
. Acting The Adjutant General. 
A true copv: 

L. W." Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[Exhibit IK] 

[secret] 
AG 320.2 (3-5-41) M-WPD ACW/lfl 

April 9, 1941. 
Subject: Aircraft Warning Service and Air Defense. 

To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Reference is made to letter, this office, December 15, 1939, AG 676.3 (12- 
15-39) M-WPD, subject: "Aircraft Warning Service, Hawaiian Department", 
to subsequent communications on the same subject; to letter G-2/183-316, 
February 12, 1941, subject: "Final Report of Commanding General, Air Defense 
Command"; and to letter, this office, March 17, 1941, AG 320.2 (2-28-41) M- 
WPD-M, subject: "Defense Plans, Continental United States". 

2. It is suggested that you consider the advisability of organizing your depart- 
ment for air defense, along lines similar to those described in letter, this office, 
March 17, 1941, AG 320.2 (2-28-41) M-WPD-M, i. e., charging your senior 
air officer with functions corresponding to those of the Commanding General, 



2590 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

GHQ Air Force in the United States. These functions would include the peace- 
time organization and training of both fixed and mobile Aircraft Warning Services 
and of Interceptor pursuit aviation. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

D. R. Van Sickler, 

Adjutant General. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-23-41. 

[secret] 
AG 320.2/61 1st Ind. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 3 May, 1941. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

Considerable study has been given to the organization of a Hawaiian Air 
Defense Command and the proposed plan was presented in paragraph 7, secret 
letter, this headquarters to TAG, dated 25 April 1941, subject: "Reorganization 
of the Forces of the Hawaiian Department." 
For the Commanding General: 

Carl Grosse, 
Major, A. G. D., 
Assistant Adjutant General. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 
L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

(SECRET) 

(IG-24) 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 24 April 1941. 
In reply refer to: 320.2 
Subject: Air Base Group. 

To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C, (thru: Commanding General, 
Hawaiian Department, Fort Shafter, T. H.). 

1. The Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force, recently requested the 
War Department to designate Bellows Field, T. H., a permanent Air Corps 
station under the jurisdiction of Headquarters Hawaiian Department. 

2. A further request is being prepared by the Commanding General, Hawaiian 
Department, to have the War Department authorized the creation of a separate 
Air Corps station for the 15th Pursuit Group on Oahu, T. H. 

3. Subject to the approval of the above mentioned recommendations, a redis- 
tribution of Air Base Group units will be necessary and the following is recom- 
mended : 

a. The 18th Air base Group (R) (tentative T/0 1-411) Wheeler Field, T. H., 
be redesignated an "Air Ba.se Group, Air Base" (Single). 

h. An "Air Base Group, Air Base" (Single) (tentative T/0 1-411) be authorized 
for Bellows Field, T. H. 

c. An "Air Base Group, Air Base" (Single) (tentative T/0 1-411) be authorized 
for the new station of the 15th Pursuit Group. 

F. L. Martin, 
MajorMajor General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2591 

[CONFIDENTIAL] 

SUBJECT: Air Base Group 

AG 320.2 (4-24-41) MC-C 2nd Ind. RPM/ihw-1217 

War Department. A. G. O., 

June 26, 191^1. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The Troop Unit Basis FY 1942, provides for two additional materiel squad- 
rons for the Hawaiian Department Air Force. It is believed that this provides 
sufficient air base units to care for Bellows Field. 

2. Action on your recommendation for the organization of an additional air 
base group for station with the 15th Pursuit Group is held in abeyance pending 
decision on the new station. 

3. It is desired that you submit without delay your recommendations for station 
and construction for the two additional materiel squadrons. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

D. B. Van Sickle, 

Adjutant General. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 
L. W. Truman, 

Capl. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[SECRET] 

AG 320.2/94 3rd Ind. OMM/ajk 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 22 July 191,1. 

To: The Adjutant General, WarDepartment, Washington, D. C 

Reference paragraph 3, 2nd Indorsement, it is recommended that the two 
additional material squadrons be stationed at Bellows Field. Construction to 
care for these squadrons has been included in letter this Headquarters to the 
War Department dated 5 April 1941, Engineer file 600.12, subject: "Construction 
at Bellows Field, T. H." 

For the Commanding General: 

O. M. McDoLE, 

Major, A. G. D., 
Assistant Adjutant General, 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

7 August 1941. 
Chennet L. Bertholf, 
Lt. Co., A. G. D., 
Adjutant General 
Chief of the Air Corps, 

Washington, D. C. 
Request authority be obtained for the activation of Bellows Field of a head- 
quarters detachment to provide officer and enlisted staff for the post commander 
Stop Absence of an air-base group in the Bellows Field set-up necessitates the 
above Stop Minimum personnel for Hq Bellows Field now being furnished on 
DS from Hickam and Wheeler Fields Stop First two grade personnel available 
locally Stop Request for allotment of grades and ratings for the above follows 
by airmail Stop Request radio reply signed Martin. 

Short. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 
Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



2592 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK ; 

Confidential 

380-22 ; 

Chief of Army Air Forces, I 

Washington, D. C. 
Request information as to status of air base group for Bellows Field Stop i 
Seven hundred troops now station thereat and the administrative situation is 
becoming difiicult Stop Refer thirty nine August fifteen Signed Martin 

Short. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

Confidential 

From 

6 War WD 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 27, 1941. \ 

C G, Hawaiian DepL, Ft. Shafter, T. H. I 

172— 27th j 

The activation of the air base group for Bellows Field reurad three eighty was j 
not favorably considered by Secretary War because this would exceed the garrison I 
strength now allotted Hawaii Stop The Adjutant General has been requested I 
to activate a headquarters detachment in accordance with your letter August j 
fifteen same subject A one dash seven. j 

Arnold. i 

316P/27. 
Decoded by Lt Jos Engelbertz SC 10:00A, 29 Sept. 41. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, | 



Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

SECRET 

War Department, 
The Adjutant General's Office, 

Washington, September 27, 1941. 
AG 320.2 (8-15-41) 
MR-M-AAF 

Subject: Activation of Air Corps Units. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The Headquarters Detachment, Bellows Field, T. H., is constituted and 
will be activated by you at the earliest practicable date. 

2. Grades and ratings for this detachment will be as indicated on the attached 
inclosure. 

3. Personnel for this detachment will be furnished from personnel now avail- 
able in the Hawaiian Department with no increase in strength of the Hawaiian 
Air Force. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

(S) Otto Thuson, 

Adjutant General. 
1 Inch Copies furnished: 

Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force 

Chief of Staff, GHQ. 

Chief of the Army Air Forces 

Chief of the Air Corps 

Divisions of the War Department General Staff. 

A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

SECRET 

56 WAR RC WD 

Washington, D. C, 554P, AGU SO, 1941. 
C G Hawn Dept. Ft. Shafter, T. H. 

Seven Nine Thirtieth Air base group at Bellows Field and URAD August 
Seven reference hdqrs Bellows Field reulst April Twenty-four Stop Desired 
that following information be furnished by most expeditious means to this oflBce 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2593 

Stop One what are total Air Corps personnel requirements for Hawaiian Dept 
query two what are total personnel requirements for arms and services with 
Air Corps query three number of air base groups and location that will be required 
for Hawaiian Dept. 

Ulio. 

352P 
Decoded by: Capt. C. J. Harrison, SC. 1030A, Aug. 31, 1941. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41. 

9 September 1941. 
[S] Chemey L. Bertholf 
Lt. Col. AGD 
Adjutant General, 
272-9 

The Adjutant General, 
Washington, D. C. 

Following Air Force requirements submitted re your seven nine thirtieth 
Stop Following units and personnel required at present two air base groups 
Daren single paren comma one for Bellows Field and one for Kahuru Point semicolon 
Air Corps enlisted personnel now in department sufficient to organize these units 
Stop One heavy bombardment squadron consisting of twenty seven officers and 
two hundred twenty enlisted men required to Teplace Fourteenth Bombardment 
Squadron transferred to Philippine Department Stop Other services required 
as follows Bellows Field colon Medical Corps one officer seven enlisted Dental 
Corps one officer semicolon Quartermaster Corps one officer thirty enlisted 
comma Ordnance Department one air base company of four officers and sixty 
men Stop For Kahuru Point colon Medical Corps three officers twelve en- 
listed one Dental Corps comma Quartermaster Corps one officer thirty enlisted 
comma Signal Corps ten enlisted specialists Stop In order that the Hawaiian 
Air Force may be brought to the strength necessary to enable that force to provide 
the air defense of Oahu it is necessary that the following additional personnel 
be provided as soon as possible colon Air Corps three thousand eight hundred 
seventy one enlisted comma Medical Corps six officers thirty six enlisted one, 
Dental Corps comma Quartermaster four officers seventy enlisted Stop Also 
three air base squadrons one each at Barking Sands Kauai comma MORSE Field 
and Hilo Hawaii Stop In the near future two additional air base squadrons 
will be required one at Lanay paren under construction paren one at Parker Ranch 
paren Project to be submitted paren Stop This need covered in full detail in 
confidential letter commanding General Hawaiian Air Force to Chief Army 
Air Forces dated twenty August forty one forwarded from this headquarters 
twenty-fifth August Stop The above increased personnel both Air Corps, 
arms and services was not repeat not included in my letter ag three twenty zero 
point three slant thirty seven 2 dated June fifth forty one 

Short. 

EMC secret by Lt. G. Lennox S. C, 1146A Sept. 9, 1941. 

A true copy : 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

SECRET 

126 WAR EM WD 

Washinaton, D. C. 731 P Oct 17, 1941. 
C. G., HAWN DEPT Ft. Shafter T. H. 

17th Fourteenth Bombardment Squadron H is relieved from assignment to 
Eleventh Bombardment Group H and from permanent station at Hickam Field 
and assigned to Commanding General U S Army Forces in the Far East Manila 
P I for permanent station to be designated by him 

Adams, 

UOIP. 
Decoded by Capt. C. J. Harrison, 113SP Oct 17 1941. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



2594 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

8 November 1941. 
Cheney L. Bertholf, 
Lt. Col., A. G. D., Adjutant General. 
786-6th 

Chief of Army Air Forces, 
Washington, D. C. 
Request immediate consideration be given to the assignment of three repeat 
three air depot groups to the Hawaiian Air Force Stop Procurement of sufficient 
civilian employees for the Hawaiian Air Depot is impossible Stop Discharge 
of enlisted men at the convenience of the Government for the purpose of accepting 
employment in the Hawaiian Air Depot fails to remedy the shortage in personnel 
Stop At present our depot maintenance is far behind schedule Comma result- 
ing in the grounding of thirty percent of our tactical planes Stop Lack of 
both personnel and material is becoming increasingly acute Stop From a stand- 
point of second and third echelon maintenance we are poorly prepared for any 
augmentation in airplane strength Stop We must have maintenance personnel 
and material at once Stop No no personnel is available here for the activation 
of these groups signed Martin 

Short. 
ENC secret by LTCR Tiemah SC 310PM Nov. 8, 1941. 
A True Copy : 

F. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

secret 
59 WAR MC WD 

Washington, D. C, 748P Nov. IS, 1941. 
C G Hawn Dept. Ft. Shafter, T. H. 

Four zero two fifteenth. Refeicnce your radiogram number seven eight six of 
Nov eighth for additional air depot groups period This matter is now under ad- 
visement period Answer will be made in the immediate future period At the 
present time the air depot groups are not available for transfer to your depart- 
ment period When depot groups can be made available to your dept will this 
increase in Air Force personnel come within the authorized war garrison strength 
now approved for the Hawaiian Dept period From Arnold. 

Adams, 
120A/15/16. 
Decoded by: Capt C. J Harrison SC 435P Nov. 16, 1941. 

A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

18 November 1941. 
Wm E Donegan, 
Lt. Col. G. S. C. 
A. C. of S., G-3 
889— 19th 

The Adjutant General, 
Washington, D. C. 
Reference your four zero two fifteenth of November fifteenth increase of Air 
Depot groups will not repeat not come within authorized war garrison strength 
now approved for Hawaiian Department Stop Request that personnel for 
Air Depot groups be furnished as soon as possible Stop Air groups urgently 
needed due to difficulty in procuring civilian employees Stop Hawaiian Air 
Force will be severely handicapped in proposed augmentation in airplane strength 
Stop Demands for" depot maintenance will be unlimited Stop Authorized 
war garrison strength must be increased to accommodate air depot groups End 

Short. 
Enc see by Lt J H Babcock, 137P Nov, 19, 1941, 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2595 



SECRET 

War Department, 
The Adjutant General's Office, 
Washington, November 18, 1941. 
AG 320.2 (11-1-41) 
MR-M-AAF 

Subject: Activation and Redesignation of Air Corps Units. 
To: Commanding Generals, 

Caribbean Defense Command, Panama Canal, 
Hawaiian and Philippine Departments, 
Newfoundland Base Command and 
U. S. Forces in Far East 
Chief of Army Air Forces. 
1. The following units are constituted and will be activated at the earliest 
practicable date by the Department commanders concerned: 



Unit 


Source of Personnel 


Station of 
Activation 


Permanent Station 


5th Air Corps Squadron, 


Existing Units in 


PhU. Dept...- 


Sq. Hq. Nichols Field, P. I., Airways 


Communications, (Re- 


Phil. Dept. 




detachments as directed by Dept. 


gional Control). 






Commander. 


5th Airways Squadron, 


Existing Units in 


Phil. Dept 


Sq. Hq. Nichols Field, P. I., Airways 




Phil. Dept. 




detachments as directed by Dept. 
Commander. 


6th Airways Squadron 


Existing Units in 


P. C. Dept..-. 


Sq. Hq. Albrook Field, Panama, Air- 




Caribbean De- 




ways detachments as directed by 




fense C om- 




Dept. Commander. 




mand. 






7th Airways Squadron 


Existing Units in 


Haw. Dept.... 


Sq. Hq. Hickam Field, Haw., Air- 




Haw. Dept. 




ways detachments as directed by 
Dept. Commander. 



2. The initial strength of the 5th and 7th Airways Squadrons will be 19 officeris 
and 110 men. Grades and ratings will be issued in a separate communication. 

3. The 5th and 7th Airways Squadrons will furnish the servicing detachments 
for Airways stations in the Pacific Area. Weather and Communications person- 
nel for the Airwaj^s stations will be furnished by the Chief of the Army Air Forces 
upon receipt of a requisition from the appropriate Department commander. 

4. These units will be activated from personnel now available to the respective 
Department commanders. 

5. Further replacements for the 5th Airways Squadron and 5th Air Corps 
Squadron, Communications, will be furnished by the Chief of the Army Air Forces 
upon receipt of a requisition from the Commanding General, U. S. Forces in Far 
East. 

6. Attached is a Manning table for an Airways station. 

7. The following units are redesignated as indicated: 



OLD DESIGNATION 

Air Corps Detachment, Weather, Philip- 
pine Islands. 

Air Corps Squadron, Communications, 
Caribbean. 

Air Corps Detachment, Weather, Pan- 
ama. 

Air Corps Detachment, Communica- 
tions, Hawaii. 

Air Corps Detachment, Weather, Ha- 
waii. 

Air Corps Detachment, Communica- 
tions, Newfoundland Base Command. 

Air Corps Detachment, Weather, New- 
foundland Base Command. » 



new DESIGNATION 

5th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Re- 
gional control). 

6th Air Corps Squadron, Communica- 
tions (Regional Control). 

6th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Re- 
gional control). 

7th Air Corps Squadron, Communica- 
tions (Regional Control). 

7th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Re- 
gional control). 

8th Air Corps Squadron, Communica- 
tions (regional control). 

8th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Re- 
gional Control). 



2596 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

8. Assignment of units: 
Caribbean Air Forces: 

6th Air Corps Squadron, Communications (Regional control) with squadron 
headquarters at Albrook Field. 

All Communications detachments in the Caribbean Area including Puerto 
Rico and the Communications detachments at all Airways stations in the 
Caribbean Area. 

6th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Regional control) with squadron head- 
quarters at Albrook Field. 

All Weather detachments in the Caribbean Area including Puerto Rico and 
the Weather detachments at all Airways stations in the Caribbean Area 
Far East Air Force: 

5th Air Corps Squadron, Communications (Regional control) with squadron 
headquarters at Nichols Field. 

All Communications detachments in the Far East Area. 5th Air Corps 
squadron, Weather (Regional Control) with squadron headquarters at 
Nichols Field. 

All Weather detachments in the Far East Area. 
Hawaiian Department Air Force: 

7th Air Corps Squadron, Communications (Regional control) with squadron 
headquarters in the Hawaiian Department Area. 

7th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Regional control) with squadron head- 
quarters in the Hawaiian Department Area. 
Newfoundland Base Command: 

8th Air Corps Squadron, Communications (Regional control) with squadron 
headquarters at Newfoundland Airport. 

All communications detachments at the British Bases in the Northeast, and 
Bermuda. 

8th Air Corps Squadron, Weather (Regional control) with squadron head- 
quarters at Newfoundland Airport. 

All Weather detachments at the British Bases in the Northeast, and Ber- 
muda. 

9. Weather Sections and Communications Sections now assigned as a part of 
Airways detachments are removed from assignment thereto and reassigned as a 
Weather or Communications detachment to the appropriate Weather or Com- 
munications squadron of that area. The detachments will remain at their Air- 
ways stations. 

10. Weather and Communications personnel for the Airways stations will be 
furnished by the Chief of the Army Air Forces on receipt of a requisition from the 
Department commander concerned. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

[S] Otto Johnson, 

Adjutant General. 
Copies furnished: Chief of Staff GHQ, Commanding General, Air Force Com- 
bat Command, Chief of Air Corps, Divisions of the War Department, General 
Staff. 1 Inch 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 
L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41. 

[confidential] 
873-18 
Chief of Army Air Forces, 

Washington, D. C. 
Request that authority be obtained to activate station complements of a 
strength in grades and ratings equal to those at present organized on the mainland 
at the following Air Corps Fields within this department colon Hickam Field 
Wheeler Field Morse Field Barking Sands Stop No provision has been made 
for personnel for Base and Post functions with the result that the wings at Hickam 
Field and Wheeler Field are forced to prQvide administrative personnel for the 
posts in addition personnel from the Eighteenth Wing Hickam Field and from 
the Air Base Group Hickam Field are required to man Barking Sands and Morse 
Field comma both major outlying fields. Personnel for post administration 
must be obtained somewhere and it is now being obtained at the expense of our 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2597 

tactical organizations Stop If the tactical organizations should be moved 
into the field post administration would collapse Stop It is urgently recom- 
mended that the authority requested above be obtained immediately signed 
Martin 

A True Copy: 

L. W. Trttman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



144 WAR WE 



[CONFIDENTIAL] 

Washington, D. C, 219A, Nov. S6 1941. 



Commanding General, 

Hawaiian Dept., Ft. Shafter, T. H. 
455-25th 

Until such time as present initial war garrison limitations imposed upon Hawai- 
ian Department have been lifted additional personnel can not repeat not be sent 
to that department Stop With view to securing an increase in the air strength 
for that station action has been initiated and you will be advised when final action 
is taken Stop Referring to your eight seven three 

Adams, 
730A/25/26/1PM. 
Decoded by Lt. Jos Engelbertz SC, 3:15 P, 26 Nov 41. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. TkuMAN, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[Exhibit IL] 

[SECRET] 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 25 April 19^1. 
In reph' refer to: 
AG 230.3/37 

Subject: Reorganization of the Forces of the Hawaiian Department. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1 . Reference is invited to : 

A. Secret letter, HHD to TAG, 25 February 1941, subject: "Reinforcements 
for Hawaiian Department", file AG 320.2/58. 

B. Secret radio, TAG to HHD, 19 April 1941, 744-18th and reply thereto, 
HHD to TAG, 22 April 1941. AG 325/18-18a. 

C. Secret letter, HHD to TAG, number 264.5-18, dated 18 April 1941, in 
connection with Medical Department Enlisted Reinforcements. On file in 
Department Surgeon Office. 

2. It is recommended that authority be given this headquarters to organize the 
present Hawaiian (Square) Division into two (2) separate and independent Tri- 
angular Divisions. Under War Department, tables of Organization, No. 70, 
dated November 1, 1940, current shortages exist in both personnel and material 
but it is believed that a desirable reorganization can be accomplished without 
increases in present strength other than the expansion of certain units as requested 
in my References A, C, and D, and requested reinforcements to organize a Recon- 
naissance Troop in each of the proposed Triangular Divisions. In paragraph d, 
Reference A, I requested the necessary reinforcements to organize the Infantry 
Regiments of the Hawaiian (Square) Division under current War Department, 
Tables of Organizations, No. 7, dates November 1940, and assuming favorable 
action on the recommendation, the reinforcements requested herein for the 
expansion of existing units are in accordance with Reference A. A summary of 
the proposed reorganization with tables showing personnel shortages hereto as 
Inclosure No. 1. 

3. Primary reasons for this request are as follows: 

a. For tactical purposes the Defense of Oahu is conducted in two sectors, they 
are, the North Sector and the South Sector. Two (2) Triangular Divisions are 
considered more flexible to accomplish defensive operations in the two separate 
sectors. 



2598 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

6. The proposed reorganizations presents no serious problems as to organiza- 
tion, command, staff and tactical unity. 

c. The Hawaiian (Square) Division, as now organized and employed, consti- 
tutes a separate channel of command. Due to present organization it is less 
flexible than the proposed two (2) Triangulr Divisions and also retards the prompt 
execution of missions requiring the employment of one or more units of the Divi- 
sion in coordination with units of the other echolons under the control of the 
Department Commander. 

d. As now constituted the land defense is assigned to the Division Commander 
as the Beach and Land Defense Officer, with the result that it permits the De- 
partment Commander to play no part in the defensive action, if and when, the 
air and coast defenses are knocked out. 

4. National Guard and Selectee Units. 

a. It is proposed to assign one of the two National Guard Infantry regiments 
now in Federal Service to each of the Triangular Divisions. 

b. If the two National Guard Infantry regiments now in Federal Service are 
demobilized upon completion of one year's training and the Department's full 
yearly quota of three thousand (3,000) selectees are authorized, then it is planned 
to form two Infantry regiments from the selectees and assign one selectee Infantry 
regiment to each of the Triangular Divisions. See Reference B. 

c. Should the two (2) National Guard regiments now in Federal Service and 
two (2) tentatively Dlanned selectee regiments be in Federal Service at the same 
time then, it is planned to assign one selectee Infantry regiment to each of the 
Triangular Divisions and one or both of the National Guard regiments to defense 
missions on the Outlying Islands, or retain one National Guard regiment as a 
Department reserve unit on Oahu. 

d. By employing one National Guard regiment with each of the Traingular 
Divisions it will forstal Ian expected request for a Brigade organization of the 
two Hawaiian National Guard Regiments. 

5. Station Compliments 

a. Schofield Barracks. 

(1) It is recommended that a Brigadier General be assigned to Schofield 
Barracks for duty as an administrative Post Commander and that he be provided 
with a staff and commissioned assistants, warrant officer, nurses, enlisted men and 
civilian employees as shown in Inclosure No. 2, attached hereto, which lists the 
net minimurn requirements desired in addition to permanent personnel now on 
duty at Schofield Barracks and not assigned to units of the present Hawaiian 
(Square) Division. 

b. Fort Shafter. 

(1) It is recommended that a Lieutenant Colonel be assigned to Fort Shafter 
as the Administrative Post Commander and that he be provided w^ith the officer 
and enlisted Station Complement personnel as shown in Inclosure No. 3, attached 
hereto. The necessity for a station complement for the post of Fort Shafter is 
predicted upon operational missions of its garrison, the 64th Coast Artillery 
(Antiaircraft) regiment. When thus employed the regiment is absent from its 
station and because of post and administrative requirements is deprived of its 
maximum fighting streneth. It is believed this serious handicap couM be elimi- 
nated by employment of a Station Complement at Fort Shafter. 

c. Station Complements are not requested for stations imder control of the 
Hawaiian Air Force and the Hawaiian Separate Coast Artillery Brigade for the 
following reasons: 

(1) Hawaiian Air Forre: The duties of units of the 18th Bombardment Wing 
(Hickam FieM) and the 14th Pursuit Wing (Wheeler Field) necessitate maximum 
operation, maintenance and control from Air Fields under the control of the 
Wing Commanders and from which the Post Administrative Staff and enlisted 
assistants will not be moved. With full consideration of the anticipated comple- 
ment of three hundred (300) airplanes, no need for Station Complements exists. 

(2) Hawaiian Separate Coast Artillery Brigade: Practically all of the field 
operational functions will be performed in the vicinity of the permanent station 
and no necessity for Station complements is considered except for Fort Shafter, 
as noted above. 

6. After preparation of this letter, your 1st. Indorsement to our reference A 
was received. This request is being forwarded with a view of having it available 
for reference in the War Department, under the following conditions: 

a. That this communication with its request for reinforcements as listed in 
Inclosure #1, be given reconsideration at the earliest date it is practicable to 
provide the reinforcements requested. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2599 

b. That authority be granted me to reorganize the present Hawaiian (Square) 
Division into two (2) Triangular Divisions by using the present available per- 
sonnel and material. This can be accomplished in accordance with the last of 
your paragraph 3, 1st Indorsement, dated April 11, 1941, to my Reference A. 

7. Organization of Air Defense Command. 

a. In order that maximum coordination in all activities pertaining to the Air 
Defense of Oahu may be accomphshed, I propose to create an Air Defense Com- 
mand to be commended by the Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force, who 
will continue control of the 18th Bombardment Wing. I propose to constitute 
the Air Defense Command as follows: 

(1) Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force. 

(a) Headquarters and Staff, Hawaiian Air Force. 

(6) 18th Bombardment Wing. 

(c) Air Defense Command. 

1. Aircraft Warning Service. 

2. 14th Pursuit Wing. 

3. Antiaircraft Artillery Brigade. 

b . In the organization of an Air Defense Command no interference with normal 
antiaircraft training is contemplated. Only while actually performing operational 
missions is it planned to place the antiaircraft Artillary vuider the control of the 
Air Defense Commander. Furthermore, no increase in the numbers of the Staff 
of the Hawaiian Air Force is believed necessary in order to create an air defense 
Command for this Department. It is planned to have the Commanding General, 
Hawaiian Air Force, and his staff also perform the duties of the Commander and 
the Staff of the Air Defense Command. In order to avoid divided responsibilities 
due to the dual missions now required of some beach defense batteries, no action 
will be taken to form an Air Defense Command until the first increment of the 
antiaircraft artillary reinforcements, described in secret radiograms War Depart- 
ment, 25 and 26 April, 1941, have been received. 

c. An Air Defense Command for the Hawaiian Department is believed peculiarly 
adaptable to this theater and will best meet the needs for defense against attacks 
from the air. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
3 Incl. 

#1 — Summary of Proposed Reorganization 
#2 — Station Complement, Schofield Barracks. 
#3 — Station Complement, Fort Shaffer. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[SECRET] 

Subject: Reorganization of the Forces of the Hawaiian Department. 

AG 320.2 (4-25-41 MC-C 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., 

July 29, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. Reference is made to 1st Indorsement, this office, July 22, 1941, AG 320.2 
<6-5-41) INIC-E, subject: War Garrison for Initial War Operations, Hawaiian 
Department. 

2. In view of the action taken on the correspondence referred to above, basic 
communication is being returned without action. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

Major General. 
The Adjutant General. 
3 incls. n/c 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 10 



2600 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[secret] 
17 WVY MX 109 

Wahn D. C. 6 10 A May 29 41. 
CG 

Hawn Dept. Ft. Shafter T. H. 

Eight three seven twenty ninth Secretary of War has decided that in connec- 
tion with other vital needs total war repeat war garrison of your department for 
initial war operations must be reduced to approximately fifty eight thousand 
officers and men stop It is not believed advisable to reduce Air Corps combat 
comma antiaircraft and AWS units now set up stop Therefore a reduction 
must be made with respect to other troops stop Recommendations desired as 
expeditiously as possible as to manner of effecting required reduction 

Adams. 
657A 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. hif. 
12-22-41 

AG 320.37/37B 

5 June 1941. 
Subject: War Garrison for Initial War Operations. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is invited to: 

A. Secret Radio, TAG to HHD, 29 Mav 1941, 837-29th. 

B. Secret letter HHD to TAG, 25 April, 1941, subject: "Reorganization of 
the Forces of the Hawaiian Department", file AG 320.37/37. 

2. In compliance with instructions contained in Reference A, the composition 
of the war garrison for initial war operations has been studied. Table I herewith, 
shows the forces recommended, totaling 59,425 officers, warrant officers, nurses, 
and enlisted men, but not including the civilian employees now shown in Table I, 
par. 7, HDP-40. 

3. The proposed war garrison consists of the following major units: 

a. Two Triangular Divisions, less reconnaissance troops, with the Infantry 
and Signal Corps personnel at reduced strength. 

b. Corps troops consisting of £ light tank battalion, the existing 11th Ordnance 
Company, Division Pack Train, and Co. A, 1st Separate Chemical Battalion, 
and the recently authorized 34th Engineers, Combat, and the 804th Engineer 
Battalion (Avn.). 

c. The Hawaiian Air Force with service elements at present strenths. 

d. Harbor Defense Coast Artillery as now provided in the approved defense 
project reduced by the personnel required to man three fixed seacoast mortar 
batteries and three 155-mm GPF batteries. 

e. Antiaircraft Artillery with no reduction from the approved defense project, 
/. Service, elements, with reductions in the mobilization strengths as shown 

in par. 7 HI)P-40, and with many units entirely eliminated. 

4. (0) The necessity for the defense of existing military air fields on the outlying 
islands of the Hawaiian group, together with the recently assumed responsibility 
for the defense of the Naval Air Station at Kaneohe, Oahu, directed bv secret 
letter WD to HHd, 8 April 1941, Subject: "Defense of Naval Air Station, Kaneohe 
Bay, Oahu, T. H.", file AG 381 (3-13-41) M-NPD, and provision of a suitable 
mobile reserve for the beach and land defense of Oahu are three vital missions 
which can not be performed with any degree of success with an initial war garrison 
of approximately 59,000 troops. 

b. The 299th Infantry recently has been transferred from Oahu to the islands 
of Hawaii, Kauai, Molokai, and Maui for the defense of air fields, thus leaving the 
proposed North Sector division short one Infantry Regiment. 

c. Plans for the defense of the Naval Air Station at Kaneohe, now in preparation 
in this headquarters, indicate the minimum increase in the war garrison for this 
mission will include the following: 

1 Regiment Infantry. 

1 Regiment Field Artillerj", 155mm How., truck drawn. 

1 Battalion C. A., 155mm guns plus one additional battery. 

1 Regiment C. A., (AA), (semi-mobile) (less one gun battalion). 

1 Battery C. A., 12-inch barbette guns. 

d. Assuming that two Infantry regiments will be furnished, one to replace the 
299th Inf9.ntry and one for the defense of Kaneohe Bay, it is believed that the 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2601 

mobile reserve for the beach and land defense should be comprised of the light 
tank battalion now included in Table I herewith, and Infantry units detached 
from one or both of the triangular divisions recommended in Table I herewith. 
e. It is therefore urgently recommended that the strength of the war garrison 
for this department be increased from approximately 58,000 to approximately 
70,600 men so as to provide the following unit reinforcements from the mainland, 
not now shown in Table I herewith: 

2 Infantry Regiments, T/0 7-11 Nov. 1, 1940 6, 898 

1 Regiment F. A. 155mm How T/0 6-41 Nov. 1, 1940 1, 733 

1 Regiment C. A. (AA) Semi-mobile (less 1 gun bn) T/0 ^111 

Nov. 1, 1940 1,797 

1 Bn C. A. 155mm guns, w/1 additional gun btry, T/0 4-35 Nov. 

1, 1940 694 

1 Btry C. A. 12-inch barbette guns, T/0 4-67 Nov. 1, 1940 157 



Total 11,279 

5. Reference is invited to par. 5 and inclosures 1 and 2 of reference B i i \v'ii3 i 
it was recommended that station complements be provided for Schofield Barracks 
and Fort Shafter. Table I herewith includes provisions for the Quartermaster 
Corps, Finance Dept., Medical Corps, Signal Corps, and Ordnance personnel 
required for these station complements. It is highly desirable that the war 
garrison be increzsed sufficiently to provide the complete station complements 
for these two stations, an increase of 731 oflScers and men for Schofield Barracks 
and 131 officers and men for Fort Shafter. 

6. Summarizing, in Table I herewith the w'ar garrison for this Department has 
been reduced to a strength of 59,425. To provide a mobile reserve for the beach 
and land defense of Oahu, and to defend the Naval Air Station at Kaneohe and 
military air fields on outlying islands, an increase to approximately 70,600 officers 
and men is essential. A further increase of about 860 officers and men is highly 
desirable to furnish station complements for Schofield Barracks and Fort Shafter. 
I therefore recommend that the war strength of this command for initial war 
operations be fixed at approximately 71,500 officers and men. 

7. Recent operations in Europe, particularly the failure of the British to hold 
the island of Crete, indicate the vital importance to the defense of Oahu of the 
nearby air fields on the other islands of the Hawaiian group. Hostile use of any 
of these air fields, considering modern methods of air warfare, would be extremely 
hazardous to the defense of Oahu. While not yet included in the war garrison 
recommended for this Department, it is probable that in the near future, plans 
will be submitted for the garrisoning of each of the outlying islands by a force 
consisting of approximately one regiment of Infantrj- and a composite battalion 
of Field Artillery. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
1-Incl.— Table I. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

Subject: War Garrison for Initial War Operations, Hawaiian Department. 

AG 320.2 (8-5-41) MC-E 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., July 22, 1941. 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. The war garrison recommended in paragraph 2 of the basic communication, 
totalling 59,425 officers, warrant officers, nurses and enlisted men, reduced to 
57,249 as shown in inclosure 2, and augmented by the following units for the de- 
fense of Kaneohe Bay: 

1 Regt C A ( AA) , semi-mobile (less one gun 

Bn, band and basics) T/04-111 11-1-40 1,590 

1 Bn CA 155 MM Guns with 1 addit. gun 

btry T/04-35 11-1-40 694 

1 Btry CA T/0 4-67 11-1-40 157 



Total 2,441 

is approved. Paragraph 7, HDP-40 wiU be amended accordingly. 



2602 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



2. The recommendation contained in paragraph 6 of the basic communication 
to establish a war garrison of 71,500 officers and men for initial war operations in 
your department is not favorable considered. Troops in excess of the 59,690 
authorized in paragraph 1, above, will be sent to Hawaii only in case the situation 
develops a need therefor and provided such additional troops can be made available 
in connection with other requirements. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

(Signed) 



2 Incls; 

#1— N/c. 

#2 — Initial War Garrison, Haw. Dept. (Added) 

A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 



Initial war garrison — Hawaiian Department 



Organization 


T/0 


Date 


Mobilization strength 


OS 


WO 


ANC 


E.M. 


Total 


a. Department Headquarters: 

Gen & Spec Staff Sections 






144 
7 
3 
5 
2 


30 




152 
41 
59 

170 
70 


326 


Hq Sp Troops. ._ _ 






48 


Hq Company.. _ . ... 










62 


.MP Co Haw Dept 


7-7 


11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 






175 


QM Co (Car) 


10-87P 






72 










Total Dept HQ 


161 


30 




492 


683 




70 


11- 1-40 

10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 




h. North Sector Division (Triangu- 












lar). 
Div Hq 


70-1 


26 

7 

4 
206 

} 65 

121 
18 
38 
16 


2 




74 
123 


102 


Hq & MP Co 


70-2 


130 


Reconn Troop. 




Omitted 






Div Sig Co 


Sd 








114 
4,660 

1,577 

2,563 
616 
482 
296 


116 


19th & 21st Inf 


7-11 


10- 1-40 
10-12-40 
5-11-41 
10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 


2 




4,868 


299th Inf WD Ltr AG 221E 






and WD radio. 
Div Arty . .. 


6-80 




1 




2,685 


Engr Bn 


5-75 


634 


Med Bn 


8-65 






520 


QM Bn 


10-15 






312 










Total Div 


501 
43 
11 


5 




10, 505 
380 


11,011 


Attached Med . ... 






423 


Attached Chap 










11 
















Aggregate 


555 


5 




10, 885 


11,445 




70 

70-1 


11- 1-40 

10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 




c. South Sector Division (Triangu- 












lar). 
Div Hq. 


26 
7 

4 
206 

} 50 

121 
18 
38 
16 


2 




74 
123 


102 


Hq & MP Co 


70-2 


130 


Recon Troop.. ... 


Omitted 






Div Sig Co.. . . 


Sp 








114 
4,660 

1,308 

2, 563 
616 
482 
296 


118 


27th & 35th Inf 


7-11 


10- 1-40 
10-12-40 
5-11-41 
10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 
10- 1-40 
10- 1-10 


2 




4,868 


298th Inf WD Ltr AG 221E & 




Radio. 
Div .\rty. . 


6-80 

5-78 

8-65 




1 




2,685 


Engr Bn ... 


634 


Med Bn 






520 


QM Bn 


10-15 






312 










Total Div 


486 
43 
11 


5 




10,236 
380 


10, 727 


Attached Med... 






423 


Attached Chap 










H 
















.\ggregate 


540 


5 




10, 616 


11, 161 











PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2603 

Initial war garrison — Hawaiian Department — Continued 





T/0 


Date 


Mobilization strength 


Organization 


Off 


WO 


ANC 


E. M. 


Total 


d. Headquarters Hawaiian Air Force: 
Hq & Hq Sq HAF 


1-10-1 


8- 1-39 


70 






336 


406 








Hq & Hq Sq 18th Bomb Wing. 
Hq & Hq Sq otii Bomb Grp 

(Hv). 
23d Bomb Sq (Hv) 


1-10-1 

1-112 

1-115 

1-115 

1-115_. _ 

1-215 

1-112 

1-115 _.- 

1-115 

1-115 

1-215 

1-355 

1^11 


6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 

6- 1 41 
6- 1^1 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 

6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
8- 1-39 
6- 7-40 


13 

21 

37 
37 
37 
43 
21 

37 
37 
37 
43 
40 
40 
18 






122 
232 

217 
217 
217 
229 
232 

217 
217 
217 
229 
182 
682 


135 






253 






254 


31st Bomb Sq (Hv) 






254 


72d Bomb Sq (Hv) 






254 








272 


Hq & Hq Sq 11th Bomb Gp 

(Hv). 
14th Bomb Sq (Hv) 






253 






254 








254 


42d Bomb Sq (Hv) 






254 








272 


19th Transport Sq 






222 


17th \ir Base 






722 








18 
















Total 


531 






3,546 


4,077 














Attached Med 


17 
1 

3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 
3 
5 
5 






95 


112 


\ttached Chap 











1 


Service Units: 

53d Sie Maint Co 


11-227.. 

11-247 

11-217 


12- 1-iO 
12- 1-40 
12- 1-40 






44 

71 

71 

7 

2 

21 

10 

38 

125 

123 

4 

70 
102 
60 


47 


324th Si? Co (Air Wg) 

328th Sig Co (^.vn) 






74 






74 


Sig Sections (HAF) 






9 


Sig Sections 18th Wing 










4 


12th Sig Plat (Air Base).... 
Ord Sect Hq H\F 


11-237 


3-19-40 






22 






13 


740th Ord Co Avn (\B) 


9-167 

9-157 

9-157 


12-16-40 
12-16-40 
12-1&-40 






41 


481st Ord Co Amm (Bomb). 
482nd Ord Co Avn (Bomb) 






128 






128 


QM Sec Hq HAF & 18th 
Wing. 

13th QM Co (Truck) __ 

259th QM Co (AB) 

39th QM Co (LM) 






4 


10-57 

10-357 

10-27 


11- 1-40 
4-18-40 
11- 1^0 


3 
3 

2 






73 






157 






62 










Total attached _-. 


56 






841 


897 




1-10-1 

1-12 


6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1^1 
6- 1-41 
6- 1^1 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
6- 1-41 
1- 1-41 
8- 1-39 
6- 7-40 








e. 14th Pursuit Wing & Attached 
Units: 
Hq & Hq Sq 14th Pur Wing... 
Hq & Hq Sq 18th Pur Grp (1) 


13 
23 
35 
35 
35 
35 
13 
33 
33 
33 
21 
25 
30 






122 
209 
201 
201 
201 
201 
122 
279 
279 
279 
137 
196 
499 


135 






232 


6th Pur Sq (1) ._ 


1-15 






236 


19th Pur Sq (1) 


1-15 






236 


78th Pur Sq (1) -. .- 


1-15 






236 


44th Pur Sq (1) 


1-15 






236 


Hq & Hq Sq 15th Pur Grp (F) 


1-12 






135 


45th Pur Sq (F) 


1-12 






312 


46th Pur Sq (F) 


1-15 






312 


47th Pur Sq (F) 


1-15 






312 


86th Obs Sq 


0-255 

1-135 

(Tentative 
1-441) 






158 


58th Bomb Sq 






221 


18th Air Base Grp 






529 










Total 


364 






2,926 


3,290 














Attached Med 


17 
1 

2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
4 






84 


101 












1 


Service Units: 

Sig Sed 14th Wing 










2 
71 
21 
102 
70 
38 
50 
50 


4 


307th Sig Co (Air Wing) 


11-217 

11-237 

10-357 

10-57 

9-167 

9-157 .. 

9-157 


12- 1-40 
3-19-40 
4-18^0 
10- 1^0 
12-16-40 
12-16-40 
12-16-40 






74 


45th Sig Plat (AB) 






22 


2.58th QM Bn (AB) 






118 


14th QM Co (Truck) 






73 


741st Ord Co (AB) (Avn) 






41 


674th Ord Co AVN (Pur) 






54 


696th Ord Co AVN (Pur) 






54 










Total Attached 


40 






498 


538 














Total Hawaiian Air Force 


895 






6,472 


7,367 


(Air Units). 












Total Hawaiian Air Force 


991 






7,811 


8,802 


& Attached Units. 













2604 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 
Initial war garrison — Hawaiian Department — Continued 



Organization 


T/0 


Date 


Mobilization strength 




Ofl 


WO 


ANC 


E.M. 


Total 


f. Harbor Defense Troops: 

Hq & Hq Btry HSCAB 

15th CA (HD) (Less 1 gun 


4-10-1 

4-41 


11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 

11- 1-40 

11- 1-40 

11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 


10 
46 

42 

49 

67 
37 






75 
1,122 

969 

1,108 

1,678 
800 


85 


1 
1 




1,169 


btry). 
16th CA (HD) (Less 2 gun 


4-71 


1,012 


btry). 
41st CA (RY) (Less 1 gua bn) 

(LessBd). 

55thCAfTD) (Lessbd) 

Nth C A (TD) (Less Hq & CTn 

2d & 3d Bns & Btrys D, E, 

&F, SLBtry & Band). 


4-41 


1,157 


4-31 






1,745 


4-31 


. 




837 










Total Harbor Defense 


251 


2 




5,752 


6,005 










Attached Med: 

16th CA .-- 


6 
6 

6 
7 
4 
5 






37 
37 
35 
46 
26 


43 


15th CA 










43 


41st CA 










41 


55th CA . 










53 


Nth CA.... 










30 


Attached Chaplains 










5 
















Total Attached 


34 






181 


215 


Total Harbor Defense & 






285 


2 




5,933 


6,220 


Attached Troops. 


4-10-1 

4-08 

4-11 & 4-13. _ 

4-11 

4-lU 

4-111 


11- 1^0 
1- 1-39 

11- 1-40 
W Date— 
12-12-38 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 

11- 1-40 




g. Anti-aircraft Artillery: 

Hq & Hq Btry AA Brig 

Intelhgence Brty AA Brig 

Spec. 
64th CA (AA) (Rein) 

251st CA (AA) -. ... 


10 
4 

97 

69 

87 

87 






75 
134 

2,451 

1,S07 
1,979 

1,979 


85 






138 






2,549 


1 




1,877 


97th CA A A (less Band SL 
and one (1) 37inm Btry and 
basics in part pIuslAAMG 
Btry). 

98th CA AA (Less Band SL 
and one (1) 37niin Btry and 
basics in part plus 1 AA 
MG Btry). 


2,066 







2,066 


Total AA Coast Artillery.. 


354 


2 




8,425 


8,781 


Attached Medical' 
64th CA (.\A) 


4-11 


11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 


6 

7 
7 
6 






41 
41 
48 
49 


47 


251st CA (A A) 


*-ll 

4-111 

4-111 

4-11 






47 


Xth CA (A.4.) 






56 


Yth CA (AA'> 






56 


Attached Chaplains 






6 












Total Attached 


32 






180 


212 














Total AA & Attached 


386 


2 




8,605 


8,993 


h. Department Troops: 
11th Tank Co 


17-57 

17-55 

9-7 

Sp 


11-15-40 
11-15-40 
11- 1-40 


5 
26 
6 
3 
2 






106 
406 
140 
82 
168 


111 


Xth Tank Bn (Less 1 Co) 

11th Ordnance Co 






432 






146 


Haw Div Pack Train 






85 


Co A 1st Sep ChemBn 


3-17 


11- 1-40 






170 








Total 


42 






902 


944 


i. Chemical Warfare Service 






3 






32 


35 


Chemical Depot & filling Plant 


Sp 










. Engineer Corps: 

34th Engrs (Less Band & 
Basics). 

Attached Med & Chap 

804th Engr Bn Avn 


5-171 

5-171 

5-435 


11- 1-40 

11- 1-40 
4-22-40 


39 

7 
21 

5 






1,090 

35 

625 

51 


1.129 
43 






646 






56 














Total Engrs 


65 






1,766 


1,831 














Total Engrs plus attached 
Med & Chap 


72 








1,802 


1,874 












^-J — ' 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2605 

Initial war garrison — Hawaiian Department — Continued 



Organization 


T/O 


Date 


Mobilization strength 


Ofl 


WO 


ANC 


E. M. 


Total 


k. Ordnance Department: 


Spec- 

9-17 


'li-"i^o" 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 


12 
2 
6 
6 
6 

6 






92 
5O 
14O 
14O 
180 


104 


61st Ord Co CAmm) 






52 


62nd Ord Co (MM) 


9-7 






146 


63rd Ord Co (MM) 


9-7 






146 


74th Ord Co Depot 


9-18 






186 


Ordnance Personnel Attached 
to Units 








6 


















38 






602 


640 














;. Finance Department: 

Finance Officer USA Hon 


3 

8 






10 

38 


13 


Mis Fin Est 










46 














Total Finance Department- - 


11 






48 


59 














m. Quartermaster Department: 
QM Depot 


24 
15 
15 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
5 
4 
1 


2 
2 

1 




212 
227 
300 
224 
185 
185 
110 
110 
158 
196 
121 


236 


QM Det Scho Blis 






244 


QM Dot (Ex Scho) 






316 


Co B 90th QM Bn (HY M) 


10-17 

10-27 

10-27_.. 

10-57 

10-57 

10-147 


11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 
10- 1-40 

10- 1-40 

11- 1-40 


227 


32nd Sep QM Co (LM) 






189 


33rd Sep QM Co (LM) 






189 


loth QM Co Truck 






113 


16th QM Co truck 






113 


72nd QM Co (Bakery) 






163 


Co A 395th QM Bn (Port) 






200 


School, Bakers & Cooks 










22 














Total QM . --- -- .-- 


81 


5 




1,928 


2,014 










Attached Med QM Depot 


1 






15 


16 














Total QMC and Attached 


82 


5 




1,943 


2 030 




11-107 






71. Signal Corps: 

Signal Co (Depot) (Less Dets) 


2 
3 
1 

20 
12 






60 
230 

30 
542 

357 


62 


9th Sig Serv Co 


Spec 








233 


2nd Sig Co. (Det)--. 


Spec - 








31 


Xth Sig Bn 


11-15 

11-157 


11- 1-40 
11- 1-40 






562 


Aircraft Warning Co 






369 










Total Signal Corps 


38 
3 






1,219 
11 


1,257 


Attached Medical 










14 














Total Sig Corps & Attached 
Units 


41 

73 

73 

2 

4 






1,230 

500 

500 

8 

31 

6 

1,000 

90 

90 


1,271 


0. Hospitalization Forces: 

Tripler Gen Hosj) 

Scho Bks Gen Hosp 


(SP) 8-507- . 
(SP) 8-507- _ 


7-25-40 
7-2.5-40 




120 
120 


693 
693 


Vet Gen Hosp.. . . 


10 


Haw Med Depot 










35 


School Farriers & Horseshoers.. 










6 


2 Gen Hosps 


8-507 

8-118 

8-118 


7-25-10 
2- 1-40 
2- 1-40 


146 
3 
3 




240 


1,386 


8th Amb Co 


93 


9th Amb Co 






93 










Total Med Corps 


304 




480 


2,225 


3,009 










p. Districts Hawaiian Department: 
OAHU District Hq (Dept Ser 


25 

12 
12 
5 


1 




2 

19 
5 
2 


28 


Comd). 
HAWAII District Hq 






31 


MAUI District Hq... 










17 


KAUAI District Hq 










7 














Total (Less Dets 299th Inf) . . 


54 


1 




28 


83 










Recapitulation: 

Department Headquarters. . 


161 
1137 
991 
285 
386 
247 
304 
54 


30 
10 




492 
22,403 
7,811 
5,933 
8,605 
5,657 
2, 225 
28 


683 


Beach & Land Defense 






23,550 


Hawaiian Air Force 






8,802 


Harbor Defenses.- 






2 
2 

5 


""""480" 


6,220 


Anti-Aircraft Artillery .. 






8,993 


Service Organizations 






5,911 


Hospitalization Forces 






3,009 


Service Command.. 






83 










Total 


3565 


50 


480 


53, 114 


57,241 











A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 



2606 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(Exhibit IM] 

2 May 1941 
AG 320.3/38 

Subject: Organization of Antiaircraft Artillery Brigade. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington D. C. 
1 R,6fGrGnc6si 

A. War Dept. Secret Radio No. 739, 24 April 1941. 

B. War Dept. Secret Radio No. 760, 26 April 1941. 

C. Letter CO, RPJCAB to CG, Reun. Dept, dated 16 April 1941, subject: 
"Constitution and Activation of Antiaircraft Intelligence Battery," forwarded 
to the War Department by 1st. Indorsement dated 21 April 1941, file RECAB 
320.3, IHD 320.3/36. 

D Letter FED to TMG, subject " Reorganization of the Forces of the Hawaiian 
Department", dated 25 April 1941, file 320.3/37. 

E Letter VD to FED dated 2 April 1941, subject: "Coast Artillery units for 

Hawaiian Department", file AG 3GC.2 3G26-41 M (Ret) M-C. D 320.2 

straight Misc. 

2. Upon the arrival of the first increment (Ref. A) of the war reinforcements of 
the Antiaircraft Artillery Garrison of this Department in June 1941, the organi- 
zation of the Antiaircraft Artillery Brigade will be required. This brigade will 
be composed of all Antiaircraft Artillery Units in the Department except the one 
or two batteries of harbor defense artillery regiments which still have dual assign- 
ments to harbor defense and Antiaircraft Artillery missions. The organization 
of this brigade is mandatory not only because of the strength of the units involved 
but also because of the organization of the Air Defense Command (Reference D) 
this brigade will be required to function independently of the Hawaiian Separate 
Coast Artillery Brigade for tactical operations and in training therefore. 

3. It is proposed that the Antiaircraft Artillery Brigade, Hawaiian Department, 
will be organized as follows: 

53rd C. A. Brigade (AA) (RRF.N.). 

Hq. and Hq. Btrv, 53rd CA Brigade (RefH.). 

Intel. Btrv, 53d CA Brigade (T/0 4-08 (a) HAD) (Ref. C & R). 

64th C. A. (AA) 

251st. C. A. (AA) 

"Teh" CA (AA) semi-mobile (less 3d Ea) (Ref. A) 

"Eth" Rs, AA gun, semi mobile (less searchlight battery and one gun Bat- 
tery) (Ref. A) ; to be expanded into the "8th" Regt. upon arrival of the 
remainder of the reinforcements (Ref. B) 

4. Accordingly it is recommended that: 

a. Authority be granted to activate the Hq. and Hq. Btrv, 53d CA Brigade 
(T/0 4-10-1, 'l. Nov. 40) and the Intel. Btry. 53d. CA Brigade (T/0 4-06 (c) 
New), on or about 1 June 1941. 

b. A brigadier General be assigned to this Department to command the 53d 
CA Brigade. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
A True Copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[secret] 

Subject: Organization of Antiaircraft Artillery Brigade. 

AC 340.2 (5-2-41) 

MR-O 

1st. Ind. 

War Department, A. O., June 12, 1941, 
To: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

1. You are authorized to activate the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery 
and Intelligence Battery, 53rd. Coast Artillery Brigade, within the recently 
authorized organization of Coast Artillery garrison, Hawaiian Department, by 
1998 filler replacements. No additional personnel can be made available at this 
time. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2607 

2. It is desired that the date of activation of these units and report showing 
the reallotment to units of grades and ratings of your present allotment, Coast 
Artillery Corps, to include these units be furnished this office. 

3. Separate action will be taken on the allotment of additional grades and 
ratings and on the recommendation to assign a brigadier general to the Depart- 
ment. 

4. Table of Organization 4-06 (S) (HAD) is approved as submitted, and is 
being reproduced and distributed. 

By order of Secretar}' of War: 



Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 
A true copy: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[Exhibit IN] 

DOO 320.2/141 

W A GARRON COL ORD DEPT 

759— 6th 

Chief of Ordnance, 

Washington, D C 
Attention invited to fact that there are six each activiated thirty seven MM AA 
btrys at present in Haw Dept comma that present plans contemplate six addi- 
tional of this type battery by March nineteen forty two comma and that only 
twenty guns are on hand Period Radio information therefore requested as to 
which and in what quantities we may expect the one hundred each thirty seven 
MM AA guns listed as under procvirement from by nineteen forty one funds in 
00 secret file six six zero point two slant eleven capron. 

Short. 
ENC TIEMAN 
Nov. 6, 1941 
A True Copv: 

L. W. Truman, 

Capt. Inf. 
12-22-41 

[Exhibit 1 O] 

Talk Given by General Short to Chamber of Commerce on Army Day 

ft 
Gentlemen: 

I am especially pleased to be able to come before this representative gathering 
of Honolulu business men on the occasion of the celebration of Army Day. 
Today our military establishment is being brought closer to the view of the 
general public throughout the entire United States by exhibits and various 
demonstrations, in order that the people may become better acquainted with some 
of our equipment, methods and procedures, and now I am afforded the oppor- 
tunity of discussing some of our plans which will demand close and active coopera- 
tion on the part of the civil community and by various departments of your civil 
government. 

You are all aware of the tremendous effort being expended by industry, labor 
and all departments of the government toward the accomplishment of a gigantic 
program of national defense. While there are many evidences of this activity 
here in Hawaii, through defense projects being carried on both by the Army and 
by the Navy, the tempo of action has not reached as deeply into the private life 
of the average citizen as has been the case in many cities on the Mainland. 
Conditions are changing overnight and procedures and practices of today may be 
changed by the plans and activities of tomorrow. None of these matters are 
being handled, or even considered, in the light of actual warlike moves nor with 
any feeling of hysteria, but simply as carefully considered ])lans which are to be 
effected for the future security of each and every individual, including the young- 
est child and the oldest adult, of our nation. 



2608 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

I have been asked many times what the community can do to assist National 
Defense. The following items are of prime importance: 

(a) Production and storage of food. 

(b) Organization of doctors and nurses for care of injured and wounded. 

(c) Organization of an auxiliary to the police force to guard utilities and prevent 
sabotage. 

(d) Preparation of plans and making of provisions for evacuation of women and 
children and preparation of shelters for workers in vicinity of essential industries. 

These islands are in no way self sustaining in the matter of food. This is due 
not to lack of fertility of your soil but to your specialized agriculture. 

All of j'ou are vitally interested in the food supply of these islands. In any 
emergency, which might include the possibility of a disruption of communications 
with the Mainland, a most important safety measure would be to begin at once 
the planting of basic food crops which are known by actual practice to be the most 
easily grown in this soil and climate. Such produce might include sweet potatoes, 
string beans, lima beans, Chinese cabbage, peanuts and some other local varieties 
of vegetables. The plantations have done important development work and are 
prepared to produce these articles in quantity should the necessit\^ arise. An 
immediate increase in the stocks of such items as rice, flour, canned milk, fats and 
oils would be a great safety factor and with rising prices is sound economy. Short- 
age of storage for the food shipped in is now a problem. This condition can be 
materially alleviated if housewives will well stock their cupboards with non-perish- 
able items. This action would operate to clear needed space on retail and whole- 
sale merchant's shelves for further storage of additional foods. This plan is good 
present day economy because of steadily rising food prices. There is at present 
a plan on foot for the construction of large warehouse storage by government 
subsidy and I believe that this plan should have the support of us all as a defense 
measure. In the pursuit of this project speed is all important. 

Along this same thought I read with much interest in the local press of March 
19, 1941, an item which referred to the possible repeal of the personal property 
tax which so greatly affects the merchant or importer who desires to cooperate 
in holding large stocks of food available in his warehouse or store. I would like 
to voice my approval to such an Act, or other similar legislation which would 
freeze the tax for any corporation or individual at an amount not to exceed that 
paid in the past year. This would make it possible for more adequate and plenti- 
ful stores of food stuff to be maintained without imposing a hardship on any 
ndividual or organization. 

It is further important that the local fishing fleet be kept in operation, as it 
supplies a very large proportior. of our daily subsistence. Increased cold storage 
for meats should be provided. Existing dairy herds on Oahu should be conserved 
and feed stored. 

• In the general defense measures for these islands there is no civilian effort of 
higher importance than preparedness now for an adequate food supply for all 
the people in time of emergency. 

The preparation of your emergency medical service in the case of an extreme 
emergency such as an air attack or actual assault upon the city is of vital import- 
ance. The functions of the military forces under such conditions or control, 
would be to take measures to insure that civilian agencies, expanded as required, 
continued to function and not to displace them by a military operating agency. 
It is therefore definitely necessary that prompt action be taken to organize j^our 
medical service into the maximum possible number of teams with mobile equip- 
ment capable of being rapidly moved from place to place and set up in existing 
buildings. Staffs of doctors, nurses, technicians, and others required for the 
stations should be selected and trained and be ready at any time for immediate 
duty. 

Adequate initial medical supplies for these stations should be obtained, classi- 
fied, packed, and stored in a manner making them readily available. Necessary 
vehicles must be on hand by loan or otherwise. Suitable trucks, of the delivery 
type, for rapid conversion to use as ambulances should be listed and obtainable at 
once. Necessary personnel for the immediate expansion of hospitals properly 
located to the extent at least of the porches, dayrooms, etc., should be listed by 
each. All of these preparations should be accompanied by the preparation of 
shelters, from air attack, of the best types available. Suitable buildings should 
be selected to replace hospitals in the zones of probable bombardment. Prepara- 
tions of this nature should be made in cooperation with the Red Cross. 

The organization of a force of ex-service men to supplement the police force in 
guarding utilities and preventing sabotage I understand is under way. This move 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2609 

will release troops for defense purposes. Consideration should be given to the 
employment of the R. O. T. C. of the University of Hawaii for the same purpose. 

Here in Hawaii we all live in a citadel or gigantically fortified Island. Many 
residents have their homes well within the limits of actual military fortifications, 
docks, arsenals or many other types of legitimate military targets. Should we 
ever be faced with a military operation by any enemy against this island (which 
we fervently hope may never come true), the residents in these areas must be 
cared for and protected. Plans for such care and protection quite properly come 
under the jurisdiction of your civil governmental agencies, and I believe these 
should now receive careful, detailed and mature consideration. I repeat that 
these matters are not to be viewed with alarm or hysteria, but simply as defense 
projects and exactly in the same classification as any of the present housing 
activities which you see around you every day. If you, as civilian organizations, 
are making plans for adequate warehouse and pier space for the handling of 
defense materials should you not give some degree of the same effort toward the 
security and protection of your families from any possible contingency? I believe 
that you already have a Defense Committee, under the leadership of the Governor 
of the Territory and the Mayor of Honolulu which has given, or is about to give, 
some consideration to these matters, and I advance, for the consideration of this 
committee, some of my ideas on this subject. 

There has been considerable information in the New York newspapers as to the 
plans which are being formulated and discussed by the Mayor of that city for 
the protection of its inhabitants from any possible air raids. Elaborate measures 
have been suggested for shelters, fire protection, and other phases of which you 
are well aware. It is my suggestion that some such plans be initiated for the city 
of Honolulu. My belief is that any such proposals should be considered not only 
from a possible wartime condition but also with a view of fitting into the plans 
for the expansion, betterment and improvement in the civil facilities. In other 
words, why should we not make plans which will not only form the nucleus for 
protective measures and which will, at the same time, furnish additional recrea- 
tion centers for our civil and military population. My plans envision a recrea- 
tional center for each precinct, or perhaps smaller section of the city, which would 
be located somewhere in the highlands away from military targets. There might 
properly be selected by the Forestry Service, the City Planning Commission or 
other appropriate body. These camps would be located where a source of fresh 
water is available, some degree of natural shelter and with a view of accessibility. 
Here would be installed, in the following order of importance, water, sanitary 
facilities, outdoor grUls and other cooking installations, and mess halls. The 
Forestry Service, National Parks Administration, and the CCC have already had 
considerable experience in the construction and lajang out of such installations 
as many such recreational camps already exist on the Mainland. You j^ourselves 
have seen some of the results of these activities in your National Park on Hawaii. 

Thousands of you people spend your hours of leisure and recreation at the 
beaches. Why would it not be feasible as well as healthful to divert a portion 
of such time to comfortable and attractive camps in the hills? Forming the 
habit of such excursions to adequate and well planned camps would accomplish 
a dual purpose in establishing not only additional recreation features but at 
once establishing the basis for evacuation camps should they ever be required 
in the future. 

In case of actual hostilities, which involved this community, all able-bodied 
males would be utilized by industry or by the military services in one manner 
or another. Normal business routine would be continued to the greatest extent 
possible. Any evacuation camps would thus be dedicated to the use of women, 
children, and male citizens who would not be qualified for other duties. The 
Army has definite plans to go ahead immediately on the construction of similar 
camps for the use of the families of Army personnel should such an occasion 
ever demand that drastic action. In the meantime the camps will be utilized as 
recreation centers by all of our personnel. 

I take this opportunity of laying before you the foregoing plan as deserving 
your consideration. I believe the evacuation of the women and children from 
the area of probable bombardment the most essential and difficult problem con- 
frontmg the community. Without advance planning the greatest confusion and 
loss of life might result. 

I again repeat that the foregoing suggested plans are to be considered as im- 
portant defense measures with the same priority as given other defense plans. 
They are not to be thought of as indications of any immediate pending threat, 
but rather as carefully considered measures to safeguard our homes and families 



2610 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

in case of any future dangers. The bill now before the Legislature creating a 
major Disaster Relief Department, if enacted, will put you in a position to com- 
plete these plans and preparations. The Army is ready to do all within its 
power to help you and you must feel free to call upon us for advice at any time. 

My thoughts have been expressed to you quite frankly, as I believe we must 
understand each other on all questions and work out our common plans together. 
Army Day was inaugurated with such an ideal as its basis and I am pleased to 
have had this opportunity of bringing before you some ideas and suggestions 
which may have material work to you now and in the uncertain days of the 
future. 

I thank you. 

[1] [Exhibit IP] 

Chronological Narrative of Actions Taken by Lieutenant General 
Walter C. Short in Connection With Preparedness of the Civil Popu- 
lation TO Meet a Food Emergency in Hawaii. 

Item No. 1 Letter from General Short to Governor Poindexter, re storage facili- 
21 Mar 41 ties for Food Supply. General Short states that after a conference 

with a civilian committee on food supply and facilities for storage, 
he is in hearty accord with action taken to date. He feels strongly 
that the problem is of vital interest to both the civil population 
and the military. The civil authorities should take the initiative 
for their own supplies, and their actions will receive his utmost 
support. (See Inclosure No. 1). 
Item No. 2 Letter from General Short to War Dept. asking authority to issue 

4 Apr 41 invitations for purchase of Irish potatoes grown in Hawaii, 

stating serious problem of food supply under emergency condi- 
tions, and stating his objective is to stimulate continuous Irish 
potato production in Hawaii. (See Inclosure No. 2). 
Item No. 3 Radio from Gen. Short to War Dept. referring to his letter of 4 
12 May 41 April 41, and asking priority radio advice as soon as decision has 

been reached. (See Inclosure No. 3). 
Item No. 4 1st Indorsement to Gen. Short's letter of 4 April 41, from War 
2 May 41 Dept., granting authority to contract for Hawaiian-grown pota- 

toes, providing price does not exceed 2}^^ per pound. (See In- 
closure No. 4). 

Item No. 6. Memo to Board of Directors, Honolulu Chamber of Commerce from 
the Executive Secretary, John A. Hamilton: 

5 May 41 1. Prior to April 7, 1941, there was very little buying of food 

supplies for emergency use. However, on April 7, Lt. General 
Walter C. Short, Commanding Officer of the Hawaiian Department, 
United States Army, suggested the desirability of purchasing addi- 
tional food supplies for use during a possible emergency. 

2. Beginning with April 7, the consumer began to purchase addi- 
tional food supplies in quantities ranging from an extra can of milk 
to as much as $800.00 per family as reported by one retailer. Retail 
merchants report that 20 to 30 per cent of their customers have pur- 
chased additional food supplies in the last 30 days. This means 
that the retailers' stocks on hand would be depleted rapidly. 

3. It would be expected that the retailer, when food stocks are 
moved rapidly from the shelves as a result of heavy consumer pur- 
chases, would reorder quickly from the wholesaler or the manu- 
facturer. This has been done. In fact it would appear that 
retailers have increased their purchases by 20 to 25 per cent above 
normal. 

4. Wholesalers generally support the report of the retailers with 
regard to the increase of consumer buying as reflected in the increase 
in the buying done by the retailer from the wholesalers. 

5. Of the three wholesale firms visited, two reported large stocks 
of foodstuffs on hand as a result of additional warehousing space 
secured to care for the additional demand and the prospective needs 
in the event of an emergency. Also these firms report a satisfac- 
tory replenishment of stocks although additional time is required 
to get merchandise from the manufacturers to the docks in Honolulu. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2611 



[S] 

Item No. 7 

16 June 41 

Item No. 8 

13 Aug 41 



Item No. 9 
16 Sept 41 



Item No. 10 
23 Oct 41 



Item No. 11 
3 Dec 41 



Item No. 12 
3 Dec 41 



Item No. 13 
14 Dec 41 



[•5] 

Item No. 11 

17 Dec 41 



Note. The direct result of Gen. Short'.s public address of 7 
April 1941 was to increase the supplv of food in storage in Hawaii 
from 20 to 35%. 

In a published statement prior to a general meeting of agriculturists 
thru-out the islands at the University of Hawaii, Gen. Short 
said, "All efforts to increa.>e local food production are steps to- 
ward increased security for Hawaii". 
At an address to the University Assembly on Aug. 13th Gen. Short 
stated: 

"Among defense projects which I have publicly emphasized has 
been that of the home production of food to sustain the civilian 
population during an emergency. I regard this project of local 
food production as of primary importance to the defense of Hawaii." 
"So far as food supply is concerned, the military organization 
here is self-sufhcient as to its reserves of essential items. It will look 
after itself in time of war, and it is now projecting food production 
on military reservations to supply its needs — so far as is practicable. 
"I have also supported shipping priorities for all foods — cattle, 
dairy and poultry feeds, as well as food for human consumption. 
This support includes farm machinery which is important for large- 
scale crop production." — (From the Honolulu Advertiser, 14 Aug 
41) 

Copy of radiogram from Delegate King to Gov. Poindexter stating 
the War, Navy and State Departments and the Budget Bureau 
were lukewarm in their interest in procuring food reserve stocks 
for Hawaii. (See Inclosure No. 5 attached). 

For reply to Delegate King, stating Gen. Short's continued sup- 
port, see Inclosure No. 6. 

The Food Production Plan for Hawaii was formally presented in 
complete form to the Directors of the Hawaiian Sugar Planter's 
Association and accepted by them as the basic operating plan for 
local production of food crops, cattle and dair^- products. This 
plan covers production not only of Oahu hut of all the out-islands 
as well, setting up acreage and crops allocations to plantations, 
both sugar and pineapple, which were accepted by them as 
defense requirements. Small farmers were included in the plan 
as well. Seed requirements were set up; as well as insecticide, 
fertilizer and machinery requirements for producing crops suffi- 
cient to sustain the entire population for six months. 

This plan was based on the Army plan and was supported and urged 
thru-out by Gen. Short. It is now in operation in its initial 
phases as planned. Gen. Short arranged for the procurement 
of all seed, insecticides, fertilizer and machinery for harvesting 
this crop, as well as arrangements for procuring the necessary 
priority allocations of shipping space required. (See Inch No. 7.) 

Letter from Gen. Short to War Dept., stating that the project of 
the Emergency Food Reserve for Hawaii which failed of approval 
by the Bureau of the Budget should be brought up for recon- 
sideration, and asking the support of the War Dept. when it comes 
up. (See Inclosure No. 8.) 

Letter from Gen. Short to Gov. Poindexter, stating that he has 
always regarded a reserve food supply as of primary importance 
in defense plans, giving supporting data, and asking the Governor 
to obtain an inventory of food on hand in the Territory, in order 
to support his request for an emergency reserve food supply. 
(See Inclosure No. 9.) 

Radiogram from General Short to War Dept. stating in detail the 
immediate requirements of food, seed, livestock feed, farm ma- 
chinery, insecticides and fertilizers, including shipping space 
required, for current civilian needs. (See Inclosure >s'o. 10.) 

WD Radio #685, 17 Dec. 41 "Shipment of Food for Civilian Popu- 
lation". 



2612 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

In reply to Haw'n Dept. radio #1182, the War Dept. states food 
will be procured and delivered to civil authorities in Hawaii, 
first shipment to leave within one week, second shipment follow- 
ing week; every effort to be made to provide critical items indi- 
cated by the radios of Gen. Short and of the Governor. 
(See Inclosure No, 11.) 

As a direct result of Gen. Short's letter to the War Department 
of December 3, 1941, the attached radiogram (Inclosure No. 11) 
from the War Department, dated December 17, 1941, was re- 
ceived, indicating the immediate shipment of the Food Reserve 
Supply to Hawaii. 

While Gen. Short was not asked for letters of support for certificates 
of necessity for the construction of storage for the Emergency 
Food Supply because this was not needed, he has consistently 
supported such construction, both by the Hawaiian Pineapple 
Co. for the dry storage, and by the Oahu Ice and Cold Storage 
Co. for the refrigerated storage. 

When the Emergency Food Reserve was turned down by the 
Bureau of the Budget Gen. Short stated publicly that storage 
completed, or under construction for the Emergency Food Supply 
would be specifically reserved for the purpose for which the 
certificate of necessity was granted by the War Dept. 

At present the warehouse space of the Hawaiian Pineapple Co. is 
ready, and that of the Oahu Ice and Cold Storage Co. will be 
ready in the very near future. 

The Civilian Food Administration, as planned by Gen. Short, is 
now in full operation under Governor Poindexter's Council of 
Civilian Defense, which in turn is affiliated with the National 
Office of Civilian Defense. 

Civilian authorities of the Food Administration freelj^ acknowledge 
the impetus of Gen. Short's consistent urging of plans to imple- 
ment the Food Administration for an emergency, so that it has 
been able to get into operation without delay on the basis of 
plans set up by the Army. 

Enclosure No. 1. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., March 21, 1941. 
Honorable Joseph B. Poindexter, 

Governor, Territory of Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 
My Dear Governor Poindexter: Mr. H. H. Warner and Mr. Richard Kim- 
ball, acting as your committee on emergency food storage, conferred with me 
March 19th relative to storage facilities and food supply, and the adequacy in 
general of the supply of food stuffs during any emergency in which incoming 
shipments might be curtailed. The conference included the action taken to date 
to obtain storage facilities, including their meeting with local importers and 
bankers, the action taken by Delegate King, and your radiogram of March 18th 
to Delegate King. I assure you that I am in hearty accord with the action taken 
to date and am in full concurrence therewith. 

I strongly feel that the problem of assuring the civil population an adequate 
supply of food stuff during any emergency in which incoming shipments might 
be curtailed or cut off is of vital interest both to the civilian community and the 
military. I believe that the civilian community should take the initiative as this 
problem is primarily and initially the concern of the civil authorities. However, 
the military cannot be divorced of its concern in this problem as it is relatively 
of equal vital interest to the military. Anj' action which you may take to insure 
such an adequate supply of food for the civil population will be concurred in by 
me and have my utmost support. 
With kindest personal regards, 
Sincerely, 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2613 

Enclosure No. 2 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 4 Ayril 1941. 

Subject: Authority to Issue Invitations for Purchase of Irish Potatoes Grown in 

Hawaii. 
To: The Adjutant General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 

1. In view of the present military situation it is of high importance to increase 
the local production of food within these islands so that they may become self- 
supporting. 

Hawaii at present imports 85% of its food supplies from the mainland. In 
the event of an interruption of communications the sustenance of the civil popu- 
lation would become a serious problem. Under certain conditions the solution 
of this problem becomes a mission of this Department. 

In view of these conditions it is believed that the subsidizing of local food 
production by governmental agencies is entirely justified as an emergency defense 
measure provided that the increase in cost to the government is not unreasonable. 

In this connection attention is invited to Radiograms (381) this Headquarters, 
to the Quartermaster General, 22 and 23 August 1940, and to his reply thereto 
of 26 August 1940, authorizing this Department to contract for Irish potatoes 
under conditions as set forth in 1st Indorsement, W.D. -OQMG, July 5, 1938; 
and to related correspondence over the past four j^ears. 

2. Under the authority above quoted 1,929,000 pounds of Hawaiian-grown 
Irish potatoes have been contracted for delivery during February, Marcli and 
April of this year at an average cost of $.025 per pound. Mainland-grown 
potatoes were delivered to the Navy during this period at an average of $.018 
per pound. Therefore, the project of Irish-potato growing in Hawaii for the 
purpose of increasing local food production as an emergency defense measure 
was carried out in this case at an increased cost to the Army of $.007 per pound, 
or approximately $13,500 for the total project in terms of money. It is believed 
that this differential would hold good as an average throughout any year until 
growers have established a year-around crop when the spread would become less. 
Actually, the wastage on Island-grown potatoes is nil for shrinkage, loss of weight 
or spoilage such as occurs with mainland potatoes in their shipment to Hawaii. 
This fact materially reduces the differential cost to the government as above 
indicated. The increase in cost is considered justified as a safety defense measure 
to assure the future expansion of the local crop. This can be accomplished 
[3] only by this assurance to the grower of the return of his cost of pro- 
duction. Sugar planters — who provide the bulk of the production, are entirely 
willing to go along on this project and break even. 

3. The efforts of this Department during the past year have directly resulted in 
the increase in production of 1,242,086 lbs of locally grown Irish potatoes over 
1940. 

4. It is believed that for a part of the first year Island production will not be 
able to meet the requirements of the Army for Irish potatoes, but the project is 
still considered well worth the added cost to the government during the period 
that the requirements can be met. Local producers feel that they can quickly 
build up the industry to a point where Hawaii can meet the demand throughout 
the entire year. 

5. It is now proposed to stimulate continuous Irish potato production in 
Hawaii. For this purpose authority is requested to contract for Hawaii-grown 
Irish potatoes for the fiscal year 1942, for monthly or quarterly periods, or for 
periods of six-months, or for one year as seem most likely to accomplish the 
purpose at the time of the offering. 

(Sgd) Walter C, Short, 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
Enclosure No. 3. 

R. S. Bamberger, 
Colonel, A.G.D., Adjutant General, 
The Adjutant General, 

Washington D. C. 
Remylet four April subject authority to issue invitations for purchase of Irish 
potatoes grown in Hawaii Stop As soon as decision has been reached relative 
to request contained in paragraph five thereof request priority radio advice 

Short 



2614 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Enclosure No. 4 
AG 432 Hawaiian 
Dept. (4-4-41) M-D 1st Ind. ESA 

War Department, A. G. O., May 2, 1941. 
To: The Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

Aiitliority is granted to contract for Hawaiian-grown Irish potatoes for the 
fiscal year of 1942 on the basis proposed in Paragraph 5, basic letter, provided 
the contract price shall not exceed 2}^^ per pound. 
Bv order of the Secretary of War; 

(Sgd) E. S. Adams, 

Major General, 
The Adjutant General. 

Enclosure No. 5 
Poindexter 
Warner 

September 16, 1941. 
Further reference my wire September 15th regarding food storage at recent 
meeting attended by Maverick Ashby and representatives War Navy Interior 
State and Budget Bureau spokesman for service departments indicated rather 
luke warm interest in program for producing surplus food stocks for Hawaii 
Period. Would appreciate your asking commanding general and commandant if 
their letters dated last March endorsing this project still represent their views 
and wire me this information. 

Delegate King. 

Enclosure No. 6 

September 17, 1941. 
Honorable Samuel Wilder King, 
Delegate to Congress, 

604 House Office Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

In o{~inion of local well informed persons recent international developments only 
increase the likelihood of demand exceeding the supply of cargo space available 
for carrying civilian food requirements from mainland to the Territory which 
formed the basis for the original surplus food program Period Commanding 
general endorses his previously expressed view for the needs of this project as 
stated in his letter to Governor Poindexter March twenty first Period Admiral 
Bloch presently on off island vacation and unavailable Period Opinion of gover- 
nors food commission made plain in radiogram to you of August twenty second 
Period Regardless of current situation in Pacific personally feel that as we 
approach .shooting operations with accelerated local defense construction projects 
the shipping facilities for civilian supplies to the islands are more likely to be 
restricted t'^an when plan [was originally drawn Period Your suggestion that 
Maverick appraise local problem himself as soon as possible is receiving 
hearty support of interested parties and strongly urge you to persuade him 
make such a trip to obtain first hand information on this matter 

Warner (Poindexter). 
H. H. Warner, 

Director Agricultural Extension Service 
University of Hawaii and 

U. S. Department of Agriculture Cooperating 

Enclosure No. 8 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., 3 December 1941. 
In reply refer to: 
AO430" 

Subject: Emergency Reserve Food Supply for the Civilian Population of Hawaii. 
To: The Adjutant General, War Department, Washington, D.C. 

1. The jjresent military situation in this area has engendered a strong feeling 
among the civil authorities that tlie })roject of the Emergency Food Reserve for 
Hawaii which has lately failed of approval by the Bureau of the Budget, should 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2615 

be brought up again at this time for reconsideration based on new data to be 
presented. 

2. Tt is my feeling that this project should be progressed as a sure way to meet 
any food shortage with which the Territory may be confronted in emergency', 
and for this reason I have written a letter to the Governor of Hawaii in support 
of this project. A copy of this communication is enclosed. 

3. In view of the necessity of a reserve food supply as indicated above, and in 
the enclosure herewith, 1 request the support of the War Department for this 
project when it comes up for recon:>ideration by the Bureau of the Budget. 

Walter C. Shokt, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Armi/, 

Command trig. 
1 Incl — 

Let. Gov. of Hawaii re 
food storage dated 
12-3-11. 

Enclosure No. 9 

December 3, 1941. 
AG-430 
Honorable Joseph B. Poindexter, 

Governor of Hawaii, Honolulu, T. H. 
My Dear Governor: The present military situation in the Pacific indicates 
the necessity of advancing certain plans for the care and protection of the civil 
population of Hawaii in the event of an interruption of normal shipping between 
the Islands and the mainland. 

I have always regarded the accumulation of a reserve food supply for Hawaii 
as of primary importance in our defense plans, and I have publicly announced 
this view on appropriate occasions. 

I feel strongly that the project for the reserve food storage which has lately 
been refused approval by the Bureau of the Budget, might well be again ad- 
vanced at this time. 

In support of this view I should like to quote from the annual report of the 
Diversified Crops Committee of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association trans- 
mitting the final Food Production Plan for Hawaii to the Trustees of that or- 
ganization: 

"We think that our year of work on these plans ha,s given us a sufficiently 
clear understanding of the various phases of the problems of emergency food 
supply to enable us to express an opinion. And that opinion is, that no stone 
should be left unturned in the effort to have adequate supplies of essential basic 
foods stored here against an emergency." 

Additionally I should like to quote in part from a radiogram from Delegate 
King of October 24, 1941, addressed to yourself and to Mr. H. H. Warner of 
your Emergency Food Commission, on the subject of the refusal of the Bureau 
of the Budget to approve the Food Storage Plan. This communication was 
submitted at the time as information to the members of the commission, including 
the Army representative present. 

"Perhaps appeal by Governor addressed to President through Interior Depart- 
ment supported by inventory of specified food commodities and length of time 
such supplies could meet local needs would help bring about further consideration 
this program. 

"Direct appeal from local administration based on factual data would bring 
quicker action." 

It is apparent from the above that the surety of a food supply during the initial 
phases of a war situation and prior to any supplementary local food production, 
can be safely predicated only upon the presence of a reserve of food stored here, 
and that the chance of getting the approval of the Bureau of the Budget for this 
project rests largely upon the ability of local authority to submit factual data as 
to amounts of food currently in Hawaii. 

This requirement cannot be met with any degree of accuracy except by data 
obtained through a physical inventory of food on hand. 

It is my feeling that as a matter of safeguarding the public welfare against the 
coming emergency, the project of a defense reserve of food for Hawaii should be 
again advanced at this time, and that it should be supported in this case by a 
factual statement of the amount of food currently on hand in the Islands. 

For this purpose it is believed that the local importers and others concerned 
would voluntarily take an inventory to supply the required data in response to a 

79710— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 11 



2616 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

request from you. It would seem that an appropriate date for this inventory 
might well be the end of this calendar year to tie in with other legal inventory 
requirements of the territory, or even sooner in view of the time element involved 
in assembling the figures. 

May I take this opportunity to assure you of my continued wish to be of any 
assistance in the present emergency. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
Copy of this let. furnished War Department 

Enclosure No. 10 

[Radiogram] 

14 December 1941. 
The Adjutant General, 
War Department, 

Washington, D. C. 
Oahu food inventory of December ninth shows thirty seven days of essential 
foods on hand for two hundred fifty five thousand civilian population Stop This 
reserve must be constantly maintained by immediate shipments to supply current 
consumption Stop Thirteen days rice comma eighteen days potatoes and onions 
are most serious deficiencies Stop One hundred thirteen thousand head of cattle 
equal to one hundred fifty two daj-s reserve supply for all civilians in Territory 
comma and twelve thousand head swine equal to ten daj-s reserve supply for all 
civilians in Territory are on hand Stop Important that this reserve be main- 
tained by no more than normal slaughter Stop Food store inventories on outlying 
islands being taken Stop Sugar and pineapples on hand ample for Territory Stop 
Shipment of twenty thousand net tons of food for civilians in Territory per month 
for current needs requiring one million two hundred and fifty thousand cubic feet 
of shipping space per month Stop It is expected that commercial firms will place 
orders on mainland for necessary subsistence for current needs of civilian popula- 
tion providing there is an allocation of shipping made available Stop It is essen- 
tial that allocation for this shipping space be made immediately Stop In addition 
shipments of seven thousand two hundred net tons of food for Army personnel 
per month requiring four hundred fifteen thousand cubic feet of shipping space 
per month comma first shipment immediately comma are urgently needed Stop 
Shipment of emergency food reserve for storage to value of two million five hundred 
thousand dollars for human food and nine hundred thousand dollars value of 
animal and poultry feed comma total three million four hundred thousand dollars 
equal to forty eight thousand net tons requiring two million seven hundred fifty 
thousand cubic feet of shipping space is urgently needed Stop Letter will follow 
showing items for purchase for this emergency food reserve for storage Stop 
Requisition has been already' communicated by Governor Poindexter to Swope 
Department of Interior and Delegate King Stop Orders have been placed for 
seed comma insecticides comma fertilizer comma and agricultural implements 
through Division Engineer South Pacific Division San Francisco Stop Forty 
thousand weight tons and fifty five thousand ship tons of shipping required for 
these items Stop This must be shipped immediately Stop Request War De- 
partment obtain shipping spaces or Government shipping for all shipments covered 
in this communication both for immediate shipment and future monthly ship- 
ments. 

Short. 

Enclosure No. II. 
[Radiogram] 

Washn D. C. 403 A Dec 17 1941 
C G 

Hawn Dept, Ft. Shafter, T. H. 
685 16th Department of Agriculture will procure and deliver to civil authorities 
in Hawaii food for civilian population comma URAD one one eight two period 
First shipment planned to leave within one week followed by second shipment 
following week period Every effort will be made to provide critical items indi- 
cated in URAD and that of Governor. 

Adams. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2617 

346A 

[Exhibit 1 Q] 

[1] Headquarters Hawaiian Department, 

Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shafter, T. H., July 11, 194U 
In reply refer to: 
Via "Clipper" Air Mail 
Engr. 383 

Subject: Protection of the Civilian Population against Air and Other Attack. 
To: The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 

1. Reference is made to radiogram from Delegate Sam King to me, a copy of 
which is inclosed for ready reference. This radiogram raised questions concerning 
funds to be allotted to Hawaii under the Lanham Act for the protection of the 
civilian population against air and other forms of attack. These questions are 
answered in this letter which is submitted to the War Department in accordance 
with request in the radiogram. A copy of this letter and all inclosures is being 
forwarded direct to Dr. C. E. Fronk, in care of Division of Territories and Island 
Possessions, Department of the Interior. Dr. Fronk is now in Washington as 
the Governor's representative in this matter. 

2. Evacuation camps will be built in units designed to care for 240 people. This 
size is determined by the capacity of the standard mess hall (Fig. 74, FM 5-35) 
which will serve 120 people at one sitting. The ideal unit would be built in a 
quadrangle 100 yards wide by 120 yards long. This arrangement will facilitate 
guarding against prowlers, contribute to privacy, and shorten average distances 
between shelters and latrines, mess hall, baths, and wash rooms. See typical 
layout plan inclosed herewith (Inch No. 1). 

a. This typical layout will be modified as necessary to adapt it to ground forms, 
streets, etc.; but the general principle of using shelters to form a partially inclosed 
communal area will be observed. 

h. The design has been made extremely simple to permit erection by unskilled 
labor, and the use of any type of building material. Materials available in local 
stocks will be used to the utmost to conserve shipping space. Windows and doors 
are omitted. Occupants wi'l devise curtains to secure such privacy as they wish. 
It is proposed to construct all units except bath houses and water served latrines 
without floors initially. If lumber is available, wooden floors will eventually be 
laid on wooden sleepers. If lumber is not available, floors will be finished with 
volcanic cinders, crushed rock, or sand stabilized with portland cement if available. 
If floors cannot be provided, occupants will have to provide themselves with 
something to stand on. 

[2] c. Canec, a locally available product, will be used to the fullest extent 
practicable. Studding, rafters, flooring, and probably sleepers supporting flooring 
will have to be imported if not in stock. Roofs will be made from galvanized 
iron, if obtainable. 

d. All structures have been designed to utilize standard sheets of canec, ply- 
board, and standard lengths of lumber. 

e. The mess hall is an adaptation of the standard mess hall shown in Fig. 74, 
FM 5-35. Construction is greatly simplified by omitting doors and windows 
which permits spacing all studs uniformly 24" on centers (See Inch No. 6). 

/. All other buildings are simple shed construction. See inclosed sketches of 
shelters, latrines, bath houses, and wash houses. (Incls. 2 to 5). 

(1) 960 lineal feet of living room shelters will be provided for each camp. They 
will be built in lengths which are multiples of 8'. Standard double bunks (Fig. 
71, FM-5-35) will be placed 8' apart. (Inch No. 2). Partitions will be of canec 
so nailed that they may be easily removed. Occupants will remove and shift 
canec partitions to give any length room desired. 

(2) The same type construction will be used for latrines, bath houses, and wash 
rooms as in living quarters. Details of interior arrangements are indicated on 
inclosed sketches. Latrines will be equipped with water closets when a sewer 
system is available and the necessary plumbing supplies can be secured. Other- 
wise pit latrines will be used. Running water wall be available at all camps. 
Plumbing will be installed in mess halls, bath houses, and wash houses in the 
order named as far as available materials will permit. 

g. Protection against bombardment will be provided by slit trenches as indi- 
cated in the typical layout sheet (Inch No. 1) when camps are on flat ground. 
Camps in gulches will be provided with conveniently located alcoves dug into 
deep slopes. 



2618 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

h. Dispensary buildings and administration buildings will not normally be 
built. In the general instance sufficient space in permanent residences or other 
buildings will be available for those purposes. 

i. Protection of funds and valuables may be made a function of a central 
administration service. No provision will be made for that in construction plans. 

[3] 1. Evacuees will be encouraged to bring small articles cf furniture such 

as mirrors, chairs, hammocks, mattresses, curtains, etc. They will also be en- 
couraged to bring simple hand tools. It is presumed that subsequent to evacua- 
tion a systematic collection will be made of abandoned articles required for camp 
comfort. 

3. a. Camp locations have been selected with a view to the following. For 
locations see Incl. 7. 

(1) Utilizing existing roads, utilities installations, and community service units 
such as stores, post offices, churches, etc. 

(2) Avoiding ground at present under cultivation. 

(3) Placing a large percentage of evacuees near areas suitable for growing 
vegetables. 

(4) Securing dispersion. 

b. The equivalent of 42 units (240 persons each) with a capacity for 10,080 
people will be constructed as extensions of existing permanent plantation villages. 
In addition io this extension many villages will be increased by one mess hall, 
latrine, bath house, and wash house to permit increasing the number of occupants 
in the permanent buildings which will be utilized solely as dormitories. Planta- 
tion villages in the higher altitudes are usually built on the edges of gulches. 
The camp extensions will, in the general instance, be sited in these gulches and 
will vary greatly in size and layout, depending on terrain conditions. These 
camps will be spread throughout the central valley in areas least subject to 
probable enemy activity. Distances from Honolulu will vary from 8 to 26 miles. 
The estimated average distance is about 20 miles. Locations are shown on Incl. 
7. These camps will have running water, but will not have sewer connections. 
The following advantages are characteristic of these units: 

(1) Provide a high degree of dispersion. 

(2) Sited in excellent locations for protection. 

(3) Well located for utilization of occupants in food production. 

(4) Adaptable to race segregation which will be desirable to present communal 
discord. 

(5) Can readily be amalgamated with existing village administrations which 
will facilitate government. 

(6) Utilize existing installations. 

[4] c. 42 units (240 persons each) with a capacity for 10,080 people will be 
located at (Wahiawa, north of the Schofield Barracks East Range boundary and 
south of the North Fork of Wahiawa Reservoir. The distance from Honolulu is 
about 21 miles by Kamehameha Highway. This location offers the following 
advantages : 

(1) Will be an extension of an existing city in areas fairly well supplied with 
roads. 

(2) Can readily be supplied with sewer facilities if materials are available. 

(3) Will be included in anti-aircraft defense of Schofield Barracks and Wheeler 
Field. 

(4) Is in an area of rich soil adaptable to utilization of evacuees in food pro- 
duction. 

d. 21 units (240 persons each) with capacity for 5,040 people will be located in 
four valleys leading into the Koolau Range from the evacuated areas. For 
location see Incl. 7. They will be between 2 and 3 miles of the evacuated area. 

e. 21 units (240 persons each) with a capacity for 5,040 people will be located 
in gulches west of Aiea. For location see Incl. 7. They will be an average of 
about 13 miles from Honolulu. 

4. The projected air-raid shelters are intended to protect 6,000 persons other 
than military personnel whose continued presence in the danger area is essential 
to the defense of Oahu. The number is based upon reports submitted by essential 
governmental agencies, public utilities, and commercial firms. 

h. The proposed locations of shelters is shown on the inclosed map of Honolulu 
(Incl. No. 8). These locations have been determined from reports of probable 
distribution of personnel submitted by the organization affected. 

c. It is proposed to construct the shelters of reinforced concrete and to limit 
the normal capacity of each shelter to from 10 to 15 persons which can shelter 
from 16 to 25 people for short periods. However, other materials will be sub- 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2619 

stituted for reinforced concrete if cement and steel are not available in sufficient 
quantities. ^^ hen practicable existing structures will be utilized by increasing 
protective characteristics. Tunneling will be practicable in some locations. 
Inclosures 9 to 12 show details of the various types to be used, depending on 
conditions. 

[5] d. The cost of reinforced concrete shelters has been estimated at $100.00 
per person to be sheltered. That is each shelter will cost from $1,000 to $1,500. 
No estimate of unit cost can be made for shelters built of substitute materials. 
Should shortage of materials limit the number of concrete shelters built, the avail- 
able funds will be applied to building as many shelters of substitute materials as 
possible. 

e. It is presumed that the shelters provided for personnel essential to defense 
will be supplemented by private individual shelters and by shelters erected by 
commercial interests not essential to defense. The costs of these shelters should 
be borne by the individual. 

Walter C. Short, 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commandiyig. 
13 Incls: 

Incl. #1 Layout plan 
#2-5 Sketches 
#6 Fig. 74 
#7 Map 

#8 Map of Hono. 
#9-12 Drawings 
#13 Radio, 4 July 41 
A True Copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd Lt., F. A. 

[secret] 
5 ND DJ 243 Govt REP 

ZPN 1 Radio, Washington, D. C., July 4 0128 1941. 

Govt Rep Lt General Walter C. Short, 

Fort Shafter, TH Oahu 

Following from Doctor C. E. Fronk quote Reurletter June twenty reference 
number three eight one War Department considering whether problem lies purely 
within military jurisdiction or should be responsibility of civilian agency period 
In latter case Office of Civilian Defense may be made responsible for program of 
Federal Works Agency with funds from Lanham Act period In conference with 
General Lorenzo D. Gasser Army representative on LaGuardias committee I 
was requested obtain as soon as possible full details proposed evacuation period 
Am advised allocation of funds according to estimate submitted by Colonel 
Lyman in memorandum dated June nineteenth reference number three 
eight three would not be made on basis data so far available here period 
More explicit information regarding number and exact location of camps comma 
number of persons at each camp comma together with areas to be evacuated and 
distances from city to proposed camp sites will be required substantiated with 
maps period Recommend provision for shelters be included in which case charac- 
ter and material of shelters should be incorporated in your estimates period 
Referring to splinter shelters exact location aiid number also necessary together 
with any other data that may be pertinent period Would greatly appreciate your 
forwarding this material by fastest mail through ^\'ar Dei)artment with cojnpy 
direct to me addressed care Division of Territories and Island Possessions De- 
partment of Interior period Outlook encouraging letter follows unquote Delegate 
Sam King. 

Too, 

1028 
610A/4 
A true copy: 

Edward von Geldern, 
Edward von Geldern, 

2nd U., F. A. 



2620 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[ExhibitllR] 

December 22, 1941. 
My dear General Short: I have the honor to present an entirely unsolicited 
expression of interest from many leading men of Honolulu. 

There are a hundred more who I am sure would have felt honored to sign this, 
if time had been available. I wished to place a copy of this letter in your hands 
without further delay. 

Yours very truly, 

Frank E. Midkiff. 
A true copy: 

Robert J. Fleming, Jr., 
Robert J. Fleming, Jr., 

Major, G. S. C, 

Asst. to G-Jf- 

Honolulu T. H., December 22, 1941. 
The President, 

The White Hovse, Washington, D. C. 

Sir: We, the undersigned, representing substantial business and social organi- 
zations in Hawaii, and having had for many years in many ways a vital interest 
in the armed forces stationed in Hawaii, do hereby wish to express our sincere 
appreciation of the services rendered to this Territory and to our Nation by 
Lieutenant General Walter C. Short. 

We have found him at all times to be most cooperative and furthermore he has 
exercised a vigorous leadership in causing this community to prepare for an 
emergency such as exists at present. Almost a year ago he laid out a plan for 
this purpose and has taken all steps practicable toward carrying out such plan. 

General Short's thorough foresight and his forceful presentation of his ideas 
to our Territorial Legislature, to our local officials, and to our communit}' in 
general have been very largely responsible for (a) the enactment of a sound 
"M-Day" Bill; (b) for the provision of a Territorial Guard; (c) for the decision 
to increase stored food and to produce food; and (d) for the prevention of sabo- 
tage. He has shown a correct and a sympathetic attitude toward the problems 
of the civil community in assuring cooperation of civilians. 

He has maintained a high morale in his Command and has conducted "alerts" 
from time to time. He has proceeded with preparing the troops and with plans, 
now looking for financing from federal funds, for adequate and safe storage of 
sufficient supplies and equipment of all sorts for their use in a probable emergency. 

We are encouraged by the fact that a committee has been appointed to go into 
various phases of the entire case, believing that the excellent men you have 
selected will render a just report, fair to all concerned. 

Meanwhile, we wish to express to yourself and to all concerned our high esteem 
and our full confidence in the character and ability of General Walter C. Short 
as a citizen and as an officer, whatever his assignment may be. This letter is 
prepared without the knowledge or consent of General Short or any other officials, 
merely in our hope that no unwarranted discredit may accrue to the record of 
such a conscientious and able officer, through adverse publicit}' or other wise. 
This concern is in no waj^ lessened by our vital interest in the adequate defense 
of Hawaii and our Nation. 

With very best respects and wishes, we are 
Yours very truly, 

Lester Petrie, City of Honolulu, Mayor; C. R. Hemenway, President, 
Hawaiian Trust Co., Ltd.; A. L. Dean, Vice-President, Alexander 
& Baldwin, Ltd.; Walter F. Dillingham, President, Oahu Railway 
& Land Co.; F. D. Lowrey, President, Lowers & Cook, Ltd.; 
H. H. Warner, Asst. Food Administrator, O. C. D.; J. B. Poin- 
dexter. Governor of Hawaii; S. B. Kemp, Chief Justice, Supreme 
Court; T. G. S. Walker, Director, Civilian Defense for Oahu; 
John E. Russell, President, Theo H. Davies & Co., Ltd.; George 
S. Waterhouse, Ex. Vice-President, Bishop National of Hawaii 
and Honolulu; Cyril F. Damon, Ex. Vice-President, Bishop 
Trust Co., Ltd.; Briant H. W^ells, Executive Vice President, 
Hawaiian Sugar Planters Assn.; H. A. Walker, President, Amer- 
ican Factors, Ltd.; S. M. Lowrey, Treasurer, American Factors, 
Ltd.; P. E. Spalding, President C. Brewer & Co., Ltd.; Frank 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2621 

E. MidkiflF, Trustee, Bernice P. Bishop Estate; Edouard R. L. 
Doty, Terr. Director of Civilian Defense; James Winne, Mgr. 
Mdse Dept., Alexander & Baldwin, Ltd.; (now acting as Food 
Administrator and Supply Officer). 

c. c. to General Walter C. Short. 
A true copy: 

Robert J. Fleming, Jr., 
Robert J. Fleming, Jr., 

Major, G. S. C. 

Asst. to G-4. 

Major Disaster Council 
City and County of Honolulu, 
Office of the Director, Island of Oahu, 

Honolulu, Hawaii, December 20, 1941- 
Lt. General Walter C. Short, 

Fort Shafter 
Dear General Short, 

Please allow me express my sincere regret that our contact through Civilian 
Defense Plans has terminated. 

It was greatly due to your help and backing that our Civilian Organizations 
were so far advanced that they were able to function so splendidly during the 
attack. 

You will always be able to recollect that your determination to have our Civilian 
Groups Prepared saved many lives of our Sailors and soldiers through the organized 
effort of our Civilian Defense Medical Committee and the many trucks that we 
had ready to be turned into ambulances at a minutes notice. 

Please be assured that you will carrj- the sincere thanks and Aloha of your 
many friends here who realizes the distress you saved by urging and helping us to 
be Prepared. 

Yours very sincerely, 

(s) T. G. S. Walker 

T. G. S. Walker, Director, 

Civilian Defense, 

Island of Oahu. 
True Copy 

O. M. Cutler 
O. M. Cutler 
Lt. Col. Infantry 

[1] [SEAL OF THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII] 

TERRITORY OF HAWAII, 

Executive Chambers, 
Honolulu, 23 December 1941. 
Lieutenant General Walter C. Short, 

Fort Shafter, T. H. 

My Dear General Short: Having noted in the public press that an investi- 
gation is being made as to the military preparedness of the Army and Navy in 
Hawaii on December 7, 1941, I beUeve it appropriate that I make to you a state- 
ment as to the state of preparedness of the civil communities of these Islands for 
war when they were so insidiously and treacherouslv attacked on December 7, 
1941. 

The citizens of the Hawaiian Islands have always appreciated that these 
Islands were important to National Defense from a military standpoint, but it 
has been only since your arrival in these Islands on February 5, 1941 that it has 
been brought home to the civil population the importance of the part it would 
play in the event of a war in the Pacific. On December 7th, the citizens of these 
Islands met the hour of their test in such a manner as to make me proud to be the 
Chief Executive of these Islands. Your foresight in urging the population to 
prepare to meet the possible vicissitudes of war and the joint efforts of the Army 
and civil population in planning and preparing for this emergency was mag- 
nificently rewarded. 

It may be of interest to point out in detail some of the plans and preparations 
which bore fruit on December 7, 1941: 

(1) The enactment of the Hawaiian Defense Act by a special session of Legislation 
called for that purpose. This legislation permits a mobilization of the entire 



2622 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

civil economy of the Islands in the interest of National Defense or in the event of 
disaster. By virtue of this act, civilian defense was planned and many of its 
phases were brought to such a point of preparation that they were able to go into 
action immediately and to function effectively on December 7, 1941. 

(2) The production and conservation of food: Householders were persistently 
urged to stock their shelves in canned food. It is estimated that this resulted 
in increasing the available food supply of the Hawaiian Islands by more than 
twenty percent. Federal appropriation was requested for procurement and 
storage for food reserve. This appropriation has, since [2] December 7. 
1941, been authorized. By agreement with plantation owners, plans were made 
for the procurement and storage of seed and the planting of certain large areas 
with quick growing food crops. Agreements were also made for the growing, 
in normal times, of those crops not usually grown in marketable quantities. In 
furtherance of this plan, the War Department was induced to permit the purchase 
of Island grown potatoes for the use of the Army although the price was above 
that of mainland potatoes. In anticipation of the receipt of reserve supplies of 
food asked for in the emergency, the Army supported a certificate of necessity 
for building an adequate warehouse to meet these needs. This warehouse is 
now available for the storage of food supply when it arrives. 

(3) The medical facilities for the care of the injured and wounded during any 
disaster was one of the first things accomplished by the civilians of these Islands 
for an emergency. This resulted in mobilizing the entire medical profession of 
the Islands with all its medical facilities. Approximately three thousand persons 
were given training and instruction in First-Aid as required by the Red Cross. 
The persons thus trained assisted in carrying out the arduous tasks of evacuation. 
Twenty First-Aid units were oiganized, each unit consisting of peisonnel of 
about one hundred and twenty. An ambulance corps of one hundred and forty 
improvised ambulances were organized. The performance of their tasks by 
these groups was one of the highlights of the civil defense efforts on December 7, 
1941. 

(4) Plans for the evacuation of women and children and the -preparation of shelters 
for workers in essential industries had reached a high state of perfection on 
December 7, 1941, and the evacuation of women and children from areas attacked 
was accomplished in a most admirable manner. 

(5) An auxiliary police force to guard utilities and to prevent sabotage was 
organized at an early date in our preparation and it was able to function instantly 
when called upon to do so on the morning of December 7th. Their work of 
this force was exceptional and excellent. 

(6) Legislation authorizing a home guard was enacted at the special session of 
the Territorial Legislature. It was well planned and so organized that 1400 of 
such home guardsmen could and were placed on duty thereby relieving members 
of the Army for other military duty. 

(7) There were many other matters too numerous to detail here which were 
planned and accomplished at your instigation. Important among these was the 
bringing home to the public the urgent necessity for cooperation and public 
service in times of emergency. 

All of the foregoing required tremendous effort on the part of the local authori- 
ties, the citizenry and military authorities. All such efforts have been rewarded 
since December 7, 1941, in that Territorial and City Governments and all phases 
of the public welfare have overcome all obstacles and have operated smoothly as 
a direct result of prior planning and training. 

It is my belief that the public has confidence in the military and civil authorities. 
The fact that the Japanese Government has seen fit to inflict a treacherous attack 
has not in any way diminished the faith of this community in your demonstrated 
abilities. I wish to state that the magnificent way in which the Territory of 
Hawaii met its problem in its crucial hour was in a large measure due to your 
foresight. I am deeply grateful for your efforts on behalf of the Territory. 

You are at liberty to use this letter in any way which you see fit. 
Very sincerely yours, 

(S) J. W. POINDEXTER, 

Governor of Hawaii. 
This is a True Copy. 
L. W. Truman 
L. W. Truman, 

Captain, Infantry. 

Headquarters Hawaiian Department 
office of a. o. of s., g-4 

FORT SHAFTER, T. H. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2623 

Aemt Peabl Habboe Board Exhibit No. 2 

4A-e 
Wab Department, 
Office of the Chiet of Engineers, 

Washington, August 28, 1941. 
Lemuel B. Schofield. Special Assistant, 

Bureau of Immigration and NaturaJiation, 
Office of the Attorney General, 

Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Me. Schofield: 

The Hawaiian Constructors, a joint venture consisting of the W. E. Callahan 
Construction Company, Los Angeles, California ; Rohl-Connolly Company, San 
Francisco and Los Angeles, California ; Gunther and Shirley Company, Los 
Angeles, California, and Ralph E. Woolley, contractor of Honolulu, T. H., are 
working on very important defense construction at Honolulu, T. H. pursuant to 
Engineer Corps Contract No. W— 414-eng-602. 

Mr. H. W. Rohl, 8519 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, one of 
the principal stockholders of the Rohl-Connolly Company, applied to the U. S. 
District Court at Los Angeles, California on January 15, 1941 for his final citizen- 
ship papers which have not, as yet, been issued. Mr. Rohl is possessed of out- 
standing ability, excellent judgment and resourcefulness for the management of 
difficult construction work. Some of the outstanding work performed by Mr. 
Rohl was the construction of the Los Angeles-Long Beach Detached Breakwater, 
the construction of the Headgate Dam at Parker, Arizona for the Indian Service 
and miscellaneous dams, tunnels and other heavy construction in the State of 
California. To date, ^Ir. Rohl's valuable services have not been available for 
Government defense projects because of his alien status. 

The services of Mr. Rohl are of vital importance to the expeditious completion 
of the aforementioned defense construction projec tbecause of his peculiar quali- 
fications and scai'city of qualified supervisory personnel. It is the understanding 
of this oflice that Mr. Rohl's loyalty to the United States is beyond question. 
It is therefore requested that the granting of Mr. Rohl's final citizen.ship papers 
be expedited. 

Tour consideration and cooperation will be very much appreciated. 
Very respectfully, 

John J. Kingman, 

Brigadier General, 
Acting Chief of Engineers. 



Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 3 

(Stamped :) 

SECRET 

Auth. : C. G., Haw. Dept. 
Initials O M M. A. G. 
Date 31 Dec 1941 

In reply refer to : 

Sig. 676.3 AWS 

Headquaeteks Hawaiian Department. 

Office of the Si anal Officer. 
Fort Shatter, T. H., 31 Deoember, 19^1. 
Subject : Aircraft Warning Service. 
To : Chief Signal Officer. Washington, D. C. 

1. Inasmuch as five out of six radio sets SCR 270 were operating from 4 : 00 to 
7 : 00 A. M. on 7 December, 1941, and one station, namely the Opana station, 
remained in operation thereafter until 7 : 39 A. M., it is believed that the following 
two inclosures may be of some interest : 

2. Inclosure No. 1 is a composite based on the written records of ranges and 
azimuths kept at the following stations: KOKO HEAD. KAAAWA. OPANA, 
KAWAILOA, and FORT SHAFTER. Attention is invited to the close agreement 
of data secured on aircraft north of OAHU between 6: 48 and 6: 54 A. M. 



2624 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

3. Inclosure No. 2 is the graphical record made on the OPANA station plotting 
board. This record includes the period covered in Inclosure No. 1 and subsequent 
hours of 7 December, 1941. Attention is invited to the plot beginning at 7 : 02 
A. M. near the top of the chart and ending at 7 : 39 A. M. as it developed that this 
was the hostile flight which attacked PEARL HARBOR at 8 : 10 A. M. 

C. A. Powell 

C. A. POWEIX, 

Lt Col, Signal Corps, 

Signal Oflicer. 
2 Inclosures : Charts 
(Stamped:) 

RECEIVED 
Jan 29 1126 AM '42 
Office of the Chief Signal Offioeb 



Abmy Peael Haebob Boaed Exhibit No. 3A 

(Exhibit 3-A is a map of the Hawaiian Islands bearing notations 
from Radar Detector Station Records. This map is reproduced as 
Item No. 4 in EXHIBITS-ILLUSTRATIONS, Army Pearl Harbor 
Board.) 

Abmy Pearl Haebob Board Exhibit No. 3B 

(Exhibit 3-B is a map showing record of Opana Radar Detector 
Station 7 December 1941. This map is reproduced as Item No. 5 in 
EXHIBITS-ILLUSTRATIONS, Army Pearl Harbor Board.) 



Abmy Pearl Habbob Board Exhibit No. 4 

SUMMARY I 

Was De:paetment ' 

UNITED states ENGINEEB OFFICE 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 ; 

Mt. Kaala (Oahu, T. H.). I 

Job Order #2.1 March 5, 1941. I 

Construct 9,000 feet of access road from Kole Kole Pass Road to proposed site ; 

of Cableway at Mt. Kaala. I 

Est. Cost $78,825.00. \ 

Commencement date: March 6, 1941. , 

Est. date for completion : May 6, 1941. i 

Supervision by J. J. Kestly, Area Engr., 3rd Field Area. i 

Job Order #2.0 Feb. 6, 1941. J 

Construct Cableway Mt. Kaala. \ 

Est. Cost $71,451.00. j 

Commencement date: Feb. 6, 1941. | 

Est. date for completion : June 1, 1941. j 

Supervision John J. Kestly, Area Engr., 3rd Field Area. 

Addendum #1 Feb. 19, 1942 Cable Warehouse. j 

Addendum #2 Feb. 26, 1942 Splinter Proof Tunnel. 1 

Job Order #2.2 Oct. 17, 1941. 
Construct A. W. S. Camp and install utilities — Mess Hall, Barracks, Power House, 

Radio Communication Bldg., etc. Also erect 100 ft. Radio Tower and install 

equipment. 
Est. Cost $31,120.93. 
Commencement date : Dec. 1, 1941, 
Est. date for completion : Mar. 1, 1942. 
Supervision Area Engr. J. J. Kestly 3rd Field Area. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2625 



Was Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., March 5, 19Jtl. 
JOB ORDER No. 2.1 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Access Road from Kole Kole Pass Road to base of pro- 

posed Cableway at Mt. Kaala. 

2. LOCATION: Island of Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: C. of E. 665 (Oahu) 505. July 31, 1940. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct approximately 9,000 feet of access road 

from Kole Kole Pass Road to the proposed site of the Cableway at IMt. 
Kaala, together with all necessary culverts and drainage facilities. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General — Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : See Para. 1-03 Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: 21010605 Signal Service of the Army 

194041. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $57,225.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : IMarch 6, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: May 6, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : 14,200 man hours. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS: See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : J. J. Kestly, Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, District Engineer. 
Approved : March 20, 1941. 
For and in the absence of the Division Engineer : 

J. R. D. Matheson, 
• Colonel, Corps of Engineers, Executive Assistant. 

ESTUVIATE OF COST 
To Accompany Job Order No. 2.1 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost : Access Road From Kole Kole Pass Road to Base of Proposed 

Cableway at Mt. Kaala, Island of Oahu, T. H. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done is on the Island of Oahu, T. H., and includes the furnishing 
of all necessary labor and equipment, and the performing of all work necessary 
to construct a 10' roadway approximately 9,000 feet long, together with all nec- 
essary culverts and drainage facilities. Unit prices are stated in the following 
schedules : 

1. Materials to le furnished: 



Designation 



Dj-namite 

Blasting Cnps, Electric (Lump Sum'). 

Cement 

Fine Aggregate 

Coarsf Aggregate 

1" Reinf. Steel.. 

Vi" Rciaf. Steel 

56" Reinf. Steel 

1" X 6" Shiplap — Lumber 

2" X 4" Studding— Lumber 

4" V 4" Whaling — Lumber. 

2" Black Steel Pipe and Fittings 

Wire #14 

48" R. C. Pipe 

Tar Paper 

Kails 

IS" Reinf. Concrete Pipe 



Total Cost of Material. 



Quantity 



15, 000 



460 

170 

2fi0 

7,210 

8,420 

27, 560 

9.500 

3,000 

3,500 

9,000 

100 

60S 

1 

300 

240 



Unit 



lbs. 



bbl 

cu. yd 

cu. yd 

lbs 

lbs 

lbs 

bf 

bf 

bf 

lin. ft 

lbs 

lin. ft 

roll 

lbs 

lin. ft 



Unit 
Price 



.125 



3.04 
■ 2. 70 

3.00 

0.045 

0. 045 

0.045 
55. OOM 
55. OOM 
53. OOM 

0.30 

0. 10 

6.30 

3.00 

0.08 

3.15 



Amount 



.$1, 87.'). 00 
400. 00 
1,398. to 
459. 00 
7S0. 00 
324. 45 
378. 90 

1, 240. 20 
522. 50 
165. 00 
185. 50 

2, 700. 00 

10.00 

3, S30. 40 

3.00 

24.00 

756. 00 



15, 052. 35 



2626 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

2. Day Labor: 

( a ) Clearing and Gru bUng : 

60 man hours @ $1- 50 $90. 00 

1,400 man hours 0. 50 700. 00 

(b) Hauling and Handling: 

16 man hours @ $1.50 24.00 

320 man hours 1. 00 320. 00 

320 man hours 0. 50 160. 00 

(c) Excavation and Fill (Road) : 

800 man hours @ $1.50 1,200.00 

480 man hours 1-00 480.0;) 

2,400 man hours 0. 75 1, 800. 00 

1,200 man hours 0.50 600.00 

( d ) Excavation and Backfill ( Drainage Structures ) ; 

24 man hours @ $1. 50 36. 00 

400 man hours 0.50 200.00 

(e) Drillina and Blasting: 

300 man hours @ $1.50 450.00 

1,200 man hours 0.75 900.00 

800 man hours 0. 50 400. 00 

(f) SJwping and Rolling: 

16 man hours @ $1.50 24.00 

280 man hours 1.00 280.00 

240 man hours 0. 50 120. 00 

(g) Forming, Stripping and Curing: 

40 man hours___l @ $1. r.O 60.00 

320 man hours 1.00 320. OU 

320 man hours 0. 50 160. 00 

(h) Mixing and Placing Concrete: 

40 man hours (fi) $1. 50 60. 00 

80 man hours 1.00 80.00 

320 man hours ' 0.50 160. 0(» 

(i) Trenching, Layinq and Backfilling Concrete Pipe: 

64 man hours @ $1.50 06.00 

100 man hours 1. 00 100. 00 

100 man hours 0.75 75.00 

420 man hours 0.50 210.00 

(j) Rock Masonry — Channel Work: 

64 man hours @ $1.50 96.00 

120 man hours 1.00 120.00 

300 man hours 0. 50 150. 00 

(k) Maintenance Crew, Watchmen, etc.: 

240 man hours @ $1.50 360.00 

480 man hours 1.00 480.00 

480 man hours 0. 65 292. 00 

480 man hours 0.50 240.00 

Total Cost of Da.v Labor 10, 843. 00 

3. Plant Operation. 

(a) Rental of Equipnient: 

ICaterpiUar w/dozer (iOda. (a $22.50 $1,3.50.00 

1 Grader 15 da. 6.00 90.00 

1 Shovel— 21/^ vd 2 mo. 3,115.00 6,230.00 

3 Trucks— 9 yd 2 mo. .581.00 3,504.00 

1 Truck— 11/. ton 2 mo. 180.00 360.00 

1 Pick-up Truck 2 mo. 69.00 138.00 

1 Concrete Mixer— % yd 20 da. 2.50 50. (X) 

1 C(mipressor 2 mo. 695. 00 1. 390. 00 

3Jackhammers 2 mo. 45.00 270.00 

1 Roller Imo. 360.00 360.00 

1 Motor truck Crane 1/2 mo. 942.00 471.00 

1 Sedan 2 mo. 76.00 152.00 

1 Bar bending Machine 6 da. 2. 50 15. 00 

IBar Shear 6 da. 3.50 21.00 

Small Tools (lump sum) 500.00 

Total Plant to be Leased 14, 901. 00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2627 

(b) Fuel, Oil, and Supplies $900.00 

(c) Temporary buildings, shelters 200.00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 16, 001. 00 

Part 4. 

Total Plant Operation Cost of Job: 

Cost of Material 15,052.35 

Cost of Day Labor 10, 843. 00 

Cost of Plant Operation 10, OOL 00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 41,896.35 

5. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Plant Operation Cost 41,896.35 

Contingencies — 15% 6, 284. 45 

Total Direct Cost 48,180.80 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Mobilization & Demobilization $1,500.00 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering — 10% 4, 818. 08 

Total Indirect Cost 6,318.08 

Total Field Cost 54, 498. 88 

General Office Overhead— 5% 2, 726. 12 

Estimated Grand Total Cost by Hired Labor and Gov- 
ernment Plant 57,225.00 

Theodore Wyman, Jr. 
lA. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



UNSKILLED LABOR 



SEMI-SKILLED LABOR 



CLASS l—$0.50 per Jiour. 

Sliovelers 
Concrete Placers 
Slopers — Roadway 
Material Handlers 
Brush Cutters 
Water Boy 

CLASS 2— $0.65 per Jiour. 

Carpenter's Helper 
Crane Operator's Helper 
Air Compressor Men 



CLASS 3- 



.75 per hour. 



Truck Drivers 
Drillers 
Steel Tiers 

SKILLED LABOR 

CLASS 4— $1.00 per hour. 

Carpenters 
Tractor Operators 
Crane Operators 
Cement Finlshei'S 

CLASS 5~$l.-50 per hour. 
General For(Mii;iii 



ADDENDUM NO. 1 



June 24, 1941. 



To Accompany Job Order No. 2.1 
Contract No. W-414-eng 602 

Work To Be Done: Pave Mt. Kaala Access Road, with 4" Water Bound 

Macadam Base Course and 2yz" Asphaltic Concrete Top Course. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Mt. Kaala Access 
Road, on the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific item: 



2628 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to pave 
Mt. Kaala Access Road with a 4" water bound Macadam base Course and 2i^" 
asphaltic concrete top Course, in accordance with the Specifications to be issued 
and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

Addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 2.1 is additional work and does not alter 
Job Order No. 2.1. 

The total Cost of the Work shall not exceed $21,600.00. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

I. Total Cost of Work. 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $21, 600. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 2, 160. 00 

Total Direct Cost $23, 760. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engneering $1, 728. 00 

Total Indirect Cost $1,728.00 

Total Field Cost $25,488.00 

General Office Overhead 1,728.00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government $27, 216. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for 
distribution to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

War Depabtment, 
United States ExGiNEEii Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., Februarij 6, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 2.0. 
Contract No. W-414r-eng-602. 
To : Hawaiian Constructors Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Sea Coast Defense, Cableway Mt. Kaala. 

2. LOCATION : On the island of Oahu, T. H., east slope of Mt. Kaala. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: C. of E. 065 (Oahu) 500. July 31, 1940. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete a cableway, as specified and 

in conformity to the approved plans and drawings. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As enumerated, (see Para. 1-03 of 

attached specifications). 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: S. S. S. A. 1940-1941, Aircraft Warn- 

ing Service, Hawaiian Department SC1450 P99 A0605-01. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $71,451.91 (see detailed estimate attached). 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE: (See para. l-05a of attached specifications.) 
10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: (See para. l-05b of attached 

specifications). 

II. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: 11,020 man hours (See detailed estimate 

sheet). 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS: See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : John J. Kestly, Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

Theodore Wyaian, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Aijproved : ■ 

Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2629 

(d) DriUing avd Blasting for Excavation : 

120 man hours @ $1.50 $180.00 

240 man hours @ 0.75 180.00 

240 man hours ^ 0.65 156.00 

(e) Erection Structural Steel and Striuffing Cable: 

400 man hours @ 1.50 600.00 

1200 man hours @ 1. 00 1,200.00 

1200 man hours @ 0. 65 780.00 

(f) mstalUng Electrical Equipment: 

100 man hours @ 1.50 150.00 

200 man hours @ 1. qO 200.00 

200 man hours @ 0.65 135.00 

(g) Operators for Rented Equipment: 

360 man hours (^ 1.25 450.00 

1800 man hours @ 1. 00 1,800.00 

/u^ 600 man hours @ 0. 75 450.00 

(n) Misel. Form and Scaffolding, etc.: 

480 man hours @ 1.00 480.00 

960 man hours @ 0. 65 624.00 

(1) Clearing and Grubbing for Cableway: 

80 man hours @ 1.50 120.00 

400 man hours @ 0.50 200.00 



Q p, . . , ^?*''^ ^^^''''* ^°^^ 9, 805. 00 

6. Plant to he leased: 

(2) Truck 60 da. @ $5. 00 600. 00 

(1) Tractor with Wade 60 da. @ 2.50 150 00 

(1) % yd. Concrete Mixer 50 da. @ 2. 50 125 00 

(2) Compressors #210 50 da. @ 10.00 1,000.00 

(2) Jacl< hammers 50 da. @ 1.50 150 00 

(1) 2-Drum Hoist 60 da. @ 3. 50 210 00 

(1) Water Wagon 60 da. (5) 2.50 150 00 

(1) Welding Machine 45 da. @ 18.00 810 00 

l^^x ?.TP 50 da. @ 1.50 75.00 

(1) Vibrator 50 da. @ 1.00 50.00 

Small Tools, Gas, Oil & Supplies (Lump Sum) ^'_ 500 00 

(1) Pick-up Truck 60 da. @ 3.50 210 00 



Total Plant Cost 4 030 00 

4. Field Cost: " ' "'^"- ^' 

Materials _ 33 geo. 50 

Plant Rental 4^ 030. 00 

Labor 9^ S05 qq 

Total Field Cost 47 nqn rn 

5. Total Cost to Work: ^^uyD.ou 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total plant operating cost 47 095 50 

Contingencies — 20% 9] 419] iq 



(b) Indirect Cost: 

Mobilization and demobilization $.500.00 

Engineering and inspection — 12% 6, 78l! 75 



Total Indirect Cost 7,281.75 

Total Field Cost 63 796 35 

General Office Overhead— 12% 7' 65.5^ 56 

Grand Total Cost by hired labor and Government plant__ 71, 451. 91 

Theodore Wtman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



2630 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Febkuaky 19, 1942. 

ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 2.0 

Contract W-414-Eug-602 

Disteict: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 2.0 (Cable Warehouse at Mount 
Kaala) authorizes the constrviction of necessary housing to protect the hoist 
equipment serving the Mount Kaala Cable Warehouse. All work is to be done 
in accordance with plans and instructions furnished the Ai-ea Engineer. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



J04 3-20 
March 16, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 (Revised) 
To Accompany Job Order No. 2.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 (Revised), to accompany Job Order No. 2.0 (Cableway at 
Mount Kaala) authorizes the construction of necessary housing to protect the 
hoist equipment serving the Mount Kaala Cableway. All work is to be done 
in accordance with plans and instructions furnished the Area Engineer. 
For the District Engineer : 

/s/ H. B. NtmsE, 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Executive Assistant. 



FEBRUARY 26, 1942. 

ADDENDUM NO. 2. 

To Accompany Job Order No. 2.0 

Contract W^14-Eng-602. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2, to accompany Job Order No. 2.0, (Cableway at Mt. Kaala) 
provides for the construction of a splinter-proof protection for Bombardment 
Tunnel, Mt. Kaala, in accordance with plans and specifications furnished the 
Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

/S/ THEODORE WYMAN, Jr., 

Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

March 13, 1942. 

ADDENDUM NO. 2 (Rev.) 

To Accompany Job Order No. 2.0 

Contract W^14-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 (Revised) to accompany Job Order No. 2.0 (Cableway at Mt. 
Kaala), authorizes the construction of a protection tunnel for personnel at 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2631 

Mt. Kaala, in accordance with plans and specifications furnished the Area 
Engineer, Third Field Area. 
For the District Engineer : 

/S/ H. B. NUESB, 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Executive Assistant, 



Wae Depaement, 
United States Engineee Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., October 17, I94I. 
JOB ORDER NO. 2.2. 
Contract W-414-eng-602. 
To: Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Construct A. W. S. Camp and Install Utilities 

2. LOCATION : Mt. Kaala, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : ND 676.3— A. W. S. Mt. Kaala 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and complete with necessary utilities, 

1 Mess Hall, 1 Barracks Building, 1 Power House, 1 Caretaker's Quarters, 
1 Radio Communications Building, 1 Power House Building for Radio, 1 
Foundation for Transmitter Building and Tower, 1 Water tank. Also erect 
100-ft. Radio Tower, clear and grade Camp Site, and install equipment. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian Department 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As enumerated in Specifications to Ac- 

company Job Order No. 2.2 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : SC 1450. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $31,120.93. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : December 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : March 1, 1942. 

IL ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: 

13. MATERIALS: " " " ** 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer— Third Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., » 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Waeren T. Hannttm, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 2.2 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

WoEK TO Be Done : Construct A. W. S. Camp and Install Utilities 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Mt. Kaala, on the i 

Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- | 
struct and complete the following structures : 

(a) 1 Mess Hall (33'-0"x52'-0") ! 

(b) 1 Barracks Building. Thirty-Man ( 22'-0"x83'-0" ) 

(c) 1 Power House (16'-0"xl6'-0") 1 

(d) 1 Caretaker's Quarters (40'-0"x42'-0") I 

(e) 1 Radio Communications Building I 

(f ) 1 Powerhouse for Radio 1 

(g) 1 Foundation for Transmitter Building and Tower ' 
(h) 1 Erect 100-ft. Steel Tower (Tower furnished by Signal Corps) 
(i) 1 20,000 gallon concrete water tank. 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to clear 
and grade site for structures and facilities, and install necessary equipment. 

79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 12 



2632 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

3. Furnish all labor and equipment and do all work necessary to Install, com- 
plete, all necessary utilities for the Camp. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $31,120.98. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Cost to Contractok 
1. Construction A. W. S. Cam'p — Mt. Kaala 

A. 1 Mess Hall (33'-0" x 52'-0") : 

(a) Materials $2,275.46 

(b) Labor 2,423.61 

(c) Plant Rental 100.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Office Overhead 191.96 

(e) Mobilization & Demobilization 479.91 

Total $5, 470. 94 

B. 1 Barracks BuihUng, Thirty-Man (22'-0" x 83'-0") : 

(a) Material $2,667.43 

(b) Labor 2,438.29 

(c) Plant Rental 100.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Ofe. Overhead 208. 23 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 520. 57 

Total 5, 934. 52 

C. 1 Poiver House (16'-0" x 16'-0") : 

(a) Material $526.09 

(b) Labor 819. 10 

(c) Plant Rental 50.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 55.81 

(e) MobiL & Demobil 139.52 

Total 1, 590. 52 

D. 1 Caretaker's Quarters (40'-0" x 42'-0") : 

(a) Materials $2,386.93 

(b) Labor 2,513.96 

(c) Plant Rental 100.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 200. 04 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 500.00 

Total 5, 700. 93 

E. 1 Radio Communications : 

(a) Labor $1,874.40 

(b) Materials 2,359.92 

(c) Plant Rental 100.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 173. 37 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 433.43 

Total 4, 941. 12 

F. 1 Power House for Radio (18'-0" x 24'-0") : 

(a) Material $798.96 

(b) Labor 1, 033. 58 

(c) Plant Rental 50.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 75. 30 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 188.25 

Total 2, 146. 09 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2633 

G. Foundations for Transmitter Building & Toiver: 

(a) Material $810.73 

(b) Labor 390. 68 

(c) Plant Rental 35.00 

(d) Contractors Field & OfE. Overhead 49. 46 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 123. 64 

Total $1, 409.51 

H. Erect 100-ft. Radio Toioer: 

(a) Labor $725.00 

(b) Plant Rental 50.00 

(c) Contractors Field & OfE. Overhead 31.00 

(d) Mobil. & Demobil 77.50 

Total 883. 50 

L One 20,000 Gallon Cona-ete Water Tank: 

(a) Materials $600.00 

(b) Labor 1,100.00 

(c) Plant Rental 200.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 76.00 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 190.00 

Total 2, 166. OO 

J. Clearing of Site d Grading: 

(a) Material $20. 00 

(b) Labor 300.00 

(c) Plant Rental .50.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 14. 80 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 37.00 

Total $421. SO 

K. Install Equipment: 

(a) Material $50.00 

(b) Labor 300.00 

(c) Plant Rental 50.00 

(d) Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 16.00 

(e) Mobil. & Demobil 40. 00 

Total 456. 00 

Total cost to the contractor 31, 120.93 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work : 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $31, 120. 93 

Contingencies — 10% 3, 112, 09 

Total Direct Cost 34,233.02 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $2, 849. 67 

Total Indirect Cost 2, 489. 67 

Total Field Cost 36, 722. 69 

General OflSce Overhead 2, 489. 67 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 39, 212. 36 



2634 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

This estimate is prepared for use in tlie District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Aemt Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4a 

Summary 
War Department 

united states engineer office 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract W414-eng-602 

Kokee (Kauai, T. H.) 

Job Order #23.0 April 28, 1941 (revised) Sept. 3, 1941. 

Construct a 12 foot road approximately 11,500 feet long (AWS Service Rd., 
Kokee). 

Est. Cost : $79,030.00. 

Est. Cost (Rev.) : $69,3(33.00. . 

Commencement date : May 1, 1941. 

Est. date for completion : Jul 15, 1941. 

Revised date for completion : Sept. 25, 1941. 

Supervision by Area Engr. 4th Field Area. 

Job Order #2S.l June IS, 1941 (revised) Dec. 17, 1941. 

Construct — complete structures at Base Camp and Station X with utilities and 
fence National Palikona Forest Reserve. 

Est. Cos: $82,800.00. 

Est. Cost (rev.) : $87,124.15. 

Commencement date : June 23, 1941. 

Est. date for completion : Sept. 23, 1941. 

Revised date for completion : Dec. 1, 1941. 

Supervision by Area Engr. 4th Field Area. 

Addendum #1 June 2, 1941 $300.00 shed. 

Addendum #2 Oct. 10, 1941 Construct Radio Shelter and Garage $14,081.57. 

Addendum #3 Feb. 5, 1942 Construct Bombproof Shelter for Radio Communi- 
cations. 

War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., September 3, 19J,1. 

JOB ORDER NO. 23.0 (Revised) 

Contract No. W^14-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed vpith the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Aircraft Warning Service Road, Kauai, T. H. 

2. LOCATION : Na Palikona Forest Reserve, Kauai, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2014. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct a twelve foot road approximately 11,500 

feet long complete with penetration macadam paving and all necessary 
di-ainage facilities. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : As enumerated in Specifications, "Access 

Road to Kokee, Job Order No. 23.0". 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : S. S. A. 1940-41 SC1450 P23-A0605-01. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $55,050.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : May 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : September 25, 1941. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2635 



11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : Detailed Estimate Attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer, Fourth Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Dhsrict Engineer. 
Approved : 

Wakben T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 

ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 23.0 (Revised) 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done : Construct a 12 foot road approximately 11,500 feet long, 
complete with penetration macadam paving and all necessary drainage 
facilities. 

District : Honolulu District. Honolulu. T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located on the Na Palikoma 

Forest Reserve, on the Island of Kauai, T. H., and is limited to the following 

specific items : 

1. Ftu-nish all necessary labor and equipment, and i)erform all work necessary 
to construct a twelve foot road approximately 11,.500 feet long, complete with 
penetration macadam paving and all necessary drainage facilities. 

All of the work to be done shall be in accordance with the Specifications, 
"Access Road to Kokee, Job Order No. 23.0", and the details on the drawings 
enumerated in the Specifications. 

The cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $55,0.50.00. 

2. Job Order No. 23.0 is revised on the basis of a detailed cost estimate. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Kokee Access Road 



1. Material. 



Item 



Quantity 



Unit 



Unit 
Cost 



Total 
Amount 



1. Cement (201 eu. yds.) 

2. Fine Aggregate 

3. Coarse Aggregate 

4. J^" Reinforcing Steel 

5. W<i " " 

6. M"0 " " 

7. #14 Oa. Black Wire... 

8. 1" X 6" T. & O. Sheeting 

9. 2' x4" #1 Comm. Lbr 

10. 4"x4"#l " " 

11. Nails 6s— 8s— 10s and 20d 

12. 2 X 4— 12'— 16' #1 Comm 

13. 1>2' X 2" X 18" Stakes (Wood) . 

14. Form Oil 

15. 24" Diam. R. C. Pipe 

16. 18" " " " 

17. Emulsified Asphalt 

18. #2 Crushed Rock 

19. m Crushed Rock 

20. #4 Standard Crushed Rock... 

21. 50# Rubble Rock 

22. Dynamite— 60% 

23. Electric Detonating Caps 

24. #10 Gal V. Iron Wire 

25. Boat Freight & Stevedoring.. 

26. Miscellaneous Supplies 



305 

100 

180 

4,800 

10, 700 

12, 600 

200 

4,200 

4,200 

2,100 

6 

1.5,400 

4,650 

25 

264 

372 

27, 2.50 

971 

324 

220 

15 

4,000 

1,000 

200 

200 

Lump sum 



bbl 

eu. yds- 

lbs_.-._" 



KegS--. 
MBM. 

Ea 

Gal_-.. 
lin. ft. . 



Gal.... 
cu. yds. 



lbs. 



lbs... 
Tons. 



$2.93 

5.50 

5.50 

0. 0293 

0. 0293 

0. 0293 

0.08 
66.00 
66.00 
66.00 

6.60 
66.00 

0.08 

0.21 

2.70 

2.02 

0. 125 

5.50 

5. ,50 

5.50 

5.50 

0.105 

0.10 

0.09 

7.01 



$893. 65 

550. 00 

990. 00 

140. 64 

313.51 

369. 18 

16.00 

277. 20 

277. 20 

138. 60 

39.60 

1,016.40 

372. 00 

5.25 

712.80 

751.44 

3, 406. 25 

5, 340. ,50 

1,782.00 

1,210.00 

82.50 

420. 00 

100. 00 

18.00 

1. 402. 00 

225. 28 



Total Cost of Material. 



20, 850. 00 



2636 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



2. Labor: 

(a) Clearing and Grubbing: 

60 man boxirs @ $1. 50 

80 man hours -— @ 1- 25 

160 man hours @ 1.00 

1,700 man hours @ . 50 

(b) Handling and Hauling: 

40 man hours @ $1. 50 

60 man hours @ 1. 25 

120 man hours (nj 1.00 

1,560 man hours @ . 50 

(c) Roadway Excavation. 

360 man hours @ !?1. 50 

440 man hours 1. 25 

720 man hours 1.00 

240 man hours . 75 

960 man hours . 50 

(d) Drilling and Blasting. 

120 man hours @ $1. 50 

240 man hours 1. 25 

1,000 man hours . 50 

(e) Structure Excavation: 

40 man hours @ $1. 50 

60 man hours 1. 25 

lOO man hours 1. 00 

1,600 man hours _— . 50 

(f) Rolling d Compacting Backfill: 

60 man hours @ $1. 50 

SO man hours 1. 25 

320 man hours 1.00 

660 man hours . 50 

(g) Placing Drain Pipe: 

24 man hours @ 1. 50 

32 man hours 1. 25 

400 man hours . 50 

(h) Assembling d Placing Concrete Forms: 

40 man hours @ $1. ."0 

300 man hours 1. 30 

380 man hours . 50 

(i) Placing Reinforcing Steel: 

20 man hours @ $1. 50 

40 man hours 1. 25 

360 man hours 1. 00 

(j) Mixing, Placing d Curing Concrete: 

40 man hours @ $1. 50 

80 man hours 1.25 

120 man hours 1. OO 

3,600 man hours . 50 

(k) Placing Rock Masonry RipRap: 

10 man hours @ $1. 50 

10 man hours 1. 25 

60 man hours 1.00 

41 man hours . 50 



$90. 00 
100. 00 
160. 00 
850. 00 



60. 00 
60.00 

120. OO 
780. 00 



540. 00 
5.^0. 00 
720. 00 
180. 00 
480. 00 



180. 00 
3G0. 00 
500. 00 



60. OO 

75. 00 

100. 00 

800.00 



90.00 
100. 00 
320'. 00 
330. 00 



36.00 

40. CO 

200. 00 



60.00 
390. 00 
190. 00 



30.00 

50.00 

360. 00 



60.00 

100. 00 

120. 00 

1, 800. 00 



15.00 
12.50 
60.00 
20.50 



$1, 200. 00 



1, 020. 00 



2, 470. 00 



980. 00 



1, 035. 00 



840.00 



276. 00 



640. OO 



440.00 



2, 080. 00 



108.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2637 



(1) Grading & Rolling Sub Grade: 

25 man hours @ $1.50 $36,00 

24 man hours 1. 25 30. 00 

160 man hours 1. 00 160. 00 

160 man hours . 50 80. 00 

$306. 00 

(m) Setting Header Boards: 

SO man hours @ $1. 50 100. OO 

160 man hours 1. 25 100. 00 

320 man hours 1. 00 320. 00 

320 man hours . 50 160. 00 

780. 00 

(n) Placing and Rolling Emulsified As- 
phalt Pavement: 

69 man hours @ $1.50 90.00 

80 man hours-J 1. 25 100. 00 

320 man hours 1. 00 320. 00 

640 man hours . 50 320. 00 

• 830. OO 

(o) Maintenance and Repairs: 

100 man hours @ $1. 50 150. 00 

120 man hours 1.25 150.00 

320 man hours 1.00 320.00 

320 man hours . 75 240. 00 

320 man hours . 50 160. 00 

1, 020. 00 

Total Cost of Labor 14, 02.5. 00 

3. Plant Operation: 



(a) Rental of Equipment: 

1% Cu. Yd. Power Shovel 

3 5 Cu. Yd. Dump Truck 

1 Caterpillar Dozer 

1 Road Patrol Grader 

1 12-Ton Roller 

1 8-Ton Tandem RoUer 

1 Power Broom 

1 Water Wagon 

1 34 Ton Pick-Up 

1 10-Ton Flat Rack Truck.. 

1 Service Truck 

1 Sedan 

1 Asphalt Spreader Tank & Truck 

1 405 C. F. Air Compressor 

3 Jackhammcrs-^- 

Hand Brooms, Shovels, Small Tools, Etc. 
1 14 Cu. Yd. Concrete Mixer 

(b) Gas, Diesel Oil, Grease, Lub. Oil, Etc 



Total Cost of Plant Operation. 



Time required 



1 Mo^ 

2 " - 
iH" - 

m" - 
2 " - 
2 " - 

1 " . 

2 " . 
2 " . 
2 " - 
2 " . 
2 " . 
1 " . 

'A " - 



Lump Sum, 
1 Mo 

Lump Sum. 



Rental 



$1,174.00 
407. 00 
869. 00 
513.00 
513.00 
412. 00 
130. 00 
412.00 
132. 00 
407. 00 
407. 00 
132. 00 
869. 00 
132. 00 
100. 00 



132. 00 



Total 
amount 



$1,174.00 

2, 442. 00 

1, 303. 50 

769. 50 

1, 026. 00 

824. 00 

130. 00 

824. 00 

264. 00 

814.00 

814. 00 

204. 00 

869. 00 

66.00 

50.00 

234. 00 

132. 00 

1, 750. 00 



13, 750. 00 



4. Total Phnit Operation Cost of Job: 

Total Cost of Material $20, 850. 00 

Total Cost of Labor 14, 025. 00 

Total Cost of Plant 13, 750. 00 

Contractors Field & Off. Overhead 1, 675. 00 

Mobilization & Demobilization 4, 750. 00 

Total Plant Operation Cost of Job to Contractor 55, 050. 00 

[s] Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodoee Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 
District Engineer. 



2638 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $55, 050. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 5, 505. 00 

Total Direct Cost 60,555.00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $4, 404. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 4,404.00 

Total Field Cost 64, 959. 00 

General Office Overhead 4,404.00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government : 69, 363. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

[s] Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 
District Engineer. 



War DEa»ARTMENT, 

United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., April 28, 19)1. 

JOB ORDER No. 28.0. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 
To: Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby dii'ected to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Aircraft Warning Service Road, Kauai, T. H. 

2. LOCATION : Na Palikona Forest Re.serve, Kauai, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2014 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct a twelve foot road approximately 11,000 

feet long complete with 2" asphaltic concrete paving and all necessary 
drainage facilities. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : To be furnished later. 

7. APPROPRvIATION CHARGEABLE : S. S. A. 1940-41 SC1450 P23-A0605-01. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $79,030.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : May 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FO RCOMPLETION : July 15, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : To be furnished later on a detailed estimate. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : To be furnished later on a detailed estimate. 

13. MATERIALS : To be furnished later on a detailed estimate. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : Area Engineer, Fourth Field Area. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 
Distribution : 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2639 

June 2, 1&41. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1. 

To Accompany Job Order No. 23.0 

Contract No. W^14-eng-602 

WoRj To Be Done: Construct and Complete a Wood frame Tool Shed and 

Store Room. 
DISTRICT : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, and provided for herein, is located at Kokee Road on the 
Island of Kauai, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific Item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to Construct 
and Complete a Wood frame Tool Shed and Store Room Building. The work to 
be done shall be as directed by the Area Engineer, Fourth Field Area. 
The total Cost of the Work to be done shall not exceed $300.00. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer 



Rc('(ipiti(hifion of Estiniated Cost 

1. Total Cost of the Work To Be Done: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $300. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 30. 00 

Total Direct Cost 330. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $24. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 24. 00 

Total Field Cost of Job 354. 00 

General Office Overhead 24. 00 

Grand Total Cost to the Government 378. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



War Db3>abtment, 
United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., December 17, 1941, 
JOB ORDP]R NO. 2:^.1 (Revised) 
Contract No. W^14-eng-602 
To: Hawaiian Constructors. Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to pi-oceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : A. W. S. Base Camp and Field Station. 

2. LOCATION: Kokee Road. Na Palikona Forest Reserve, Kauai, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : ND 67G.3 Kokee. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete structures at Rase Camp and 

Station "X", together with the installation of necessary utilities and 
manproof wire fence. 
."). WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Drawings enumerated in the Specifi- 

cations to Accompanv Job Order No. 23.1. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGKABLK : SC 1450 ($77,333.10) Eng. ($9,701.05) 



2640 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $87,124.15. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 23, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : December 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS. See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer— Fourth Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers. 

District Engineers 

Septembke 27, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 23.1 (Rev.) 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done: Construct and Complete One Utility Truck Shelter And One 

Garage Building. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done as provided for herein, is located at A. W. S. Camp, on 
the Island of Kauai, T. H.. and is limited to the following specific items: 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete one (1) Utility Truck Shelter. All of the work to be done 
in accordance with the details shown on Drawings, "Fixed Station Kauai and 
Maui, Utilitv Truck Shelter", Sheets No. 1 and No. 2, File Numbers, F-24/58, 
F-24/59. 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete one Garage Building No. 1. 

Total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $14,081.57. 
Addendum No. 1 to Job Order Order No. 23.1 is additional work and does not 
alter Job Order No. 23.1. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Cost to Contractor 
One TJtilitif Truck Shelter: 

Labor $1. 829. 86 

Material 1, 875. 83 

Plant Rental 75.00 

Mobil. & Demobilization 378.02 

Contractors Field & Office Overhead 132. 31 

Total $4, 290. 52 

One Oarage Building No. 1: 

Labor $3, 777. 78 

Materials 4, fi98. 69 

Plant Rental 150.00 

Mobil. & Demobilization 862. 65 

Contractors Field & Office Overhead 301. 93 

Total ». 791. 05 

Total Cost to Contractor 14. 081. 57 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman. Jr.. 
Lt. Col., Corps of EnqhiPcrs. 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2641 

Rccapiiidation of entiinutcd cost 

1. Tutul Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $14,081.57 

Contingencies— 10% 1, 408. Ki 

Total Direct Cost 15,489.73 

(b» Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $1, 12G. 53 

Total Indirect Cost 1,126.53 

Total Field Cost 16,616.20 

General Office Overhead 1,126.53 



Estimated Total Cost to the Government 17, 742. 79 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

(s) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Oct. 10, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 23.1 (Rev.) 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

WoKK To Be Done: Construct One (1) Utility Truck Shelter, and One (1) Radio 

Shelter Building. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at A. W. S. Camp, on 
the Island of Kauai. T. H., and is limited to the following specific items: 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete one (1) Utility Truck Shelter. All of the work to be done 
shall be in accordance with the details shown on the Drawing, "Fixed Station 
Kauai and Maui, Utility Truck Shelter", Sheets No. 1 and No. 2, File Numbers, 
F-24/r.8, and F-24/59. 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete one (1) Radio Shelter Building. 

Total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $14,081.57. 
Addendum No. 2 to Job Order No. 23.1 supplants Addendum No. 1. 
Charge $4290.52 to SO 1450. Charge $9791.05 to Eng. 993. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theouore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Cost to Contractor 

1. One Utility Truck Shelter: 

Lab(U- $1,829.36 

Material 1,875.83 

Plant Rental 75. 00 

Mobil. & Demobilization 378.02 

Contractors Field & Office Overhead 132. 31 

Total $4, 290. 52 



2642 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

2. One Radio Shelter Building: 

Labor $3. 777. 78 

Material 4,6C8. 69 

Plant Rental ir.O. 00 

Mobil. & Demobilization 862. 65 

Contractors Field & Office Overhead 301. 93 

Total $9, 791. Or, 

Total cost to contractor 14, 081. 57 

( Sgd. ) Theodore Wyman, Jr. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr. 

Lt. Col., Corps of E)ifjiiwers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

1. Total Cost of work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $14, 081. .57 

Contingencies— 10% 1, 408. 16 

Total Direct Co.st $15, 489. 73 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $1, 126. 53 

Total Indirect Cost 1, 126. .53 

Total Field Cost 16,616.26 

General Office Overhead 1. 126. 53 

Estimated total cost to the government 17, 742. 79 

'I'his estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers. 

District Engineer. 



February 5, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 3 

To Accompany Job Order No. 23.1 (Revised) 

Contract W-^14-eng-602. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 3 to Job Order No. 23.1 (Revised), (A. W. S. Camp — Utilities & 
Fence), authorizes the construction of a bombproof shelter for Radio Commu- 
nications with necessary appurtenances, in c<)nnection with A. W. S. Station, 
Kokee, Kauai Base Camp, Kauai, T. H. 

All work is to be done in accordance with plans and instructions furnished 
the Area Engineer. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2643 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu. T. H., June 18, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 23.1. 
Coiitract W-414-eng-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : A. W. S. Camps, Utilities, and Fence, Kokee Road. 

2. LOCATION : Kokee Road, Na Palikona Forest Reserve, Kauai, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2014. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and Complete Structures at Base Camp and 

at Station X, together with the installation of Necessary Utilities and 
Manproof wire fence. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: Drawings, "Base Camp, Kokee Road," 

File No. F-4/85, and F^/87 to F--i/90 inclusive. And additional drawings 
to be furnished. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : S. S. A. 1940-41 SC14.50-P23-AO 605-01. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $82,800.00. 

!>. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 23, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : September 23, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LAB( )R AT SITE : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

13. MATERIALS : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer, Fourth Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

(Signed) Warren T. Hanuum. 
Warren T. Hanntjm, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer- 



Approved : June 27, 1941. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 23.1 

Contract No. W^14r-eng-602 

Work To Be Done: Construct and Complete Structures at Base Camp and Sta- 
tion X, together with the installation of necessary Utilities and manproof wire 
fence. 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu. T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Base Camp, and 

Station X, Kokee Road, on the Na Palikona Forest Reserve, Island of Kauai, 

T. H., and is limited to furnishing all labor and equipment and performing all 

work necessary for the following Specitic items : 

1. Construct and Complete the following Structures at Base Camp. 

(a) 2 Barracks Buildings. 

(b) 1 Mess Hall. 

(c) 1 Officers Quarters. 

(d) 1 Radio Communications Building. 

(e) 1 Generator Station Building. 

(f) 1 Headquarters Supply Building. 

2. Construct and Complete the following Structures at Station X. 

(a) Tower foiuulation for Station X. 

(b) 1 Building. 

(c) 1 Power house for 3 units. 

(d) Erect IW ft. Steel Tower. (Tower furnished by Signal Corps). 

3. Install Complete, all necessary utilities and equipment, together with in- 

stallation of manproof wire mesh fence around vital installations at Base 
Camp and Station X. 



2644 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

All of the work to be done shall be in accordance with "Specifications To Ac- 
company Job Order No. 23.1", and the details shown on the drawings enumer- 
ated in the Specifications. 

The total Cost of the Work to be done shall not exceed $82,800.00. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 
1. Total cost of work: 

Total Cost to Contractor $82, 800. 00 

Contingencies —10% 8, 280. OC 

Total Direct Cost 91,080.00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering (8% of Total 

Cost to Contractor) $6,624.00 

Total Indirect Cost 6,624.00 

Total Field Cost 98,704.00 

General Office Overhead— ^% 6,624.00 



Estimated Total Cost to the Government 105, 328. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4B 

Summary 
War Department 

united states engineer office 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract W414-eng-602 

Haleakala (Maui, T. H). 

Job Order #41.0 June 14, 1941 (Revised) December 11. 1941. 

Construct. A. W. S. road on Haleakala together with A. W. S. camp and fixed 

station. 
Est. Cost: $105,086.00+ Add #1, 2, 3. 
Est. Cost (Rev.) : ,$121,160.90. 
Commencement date : June 25. 1941. 
Est. date for completion : Sept. 25, 1941. 
Revised date for completion : Nov. 30. 1941. 
Supervision by Area Engr. 6th Field Area. 
Addendum #1 Oct. 10, 1941 Est. cost $14,081.57. 

Construct Radio Shelter bldg. and garage. 
Addendum #2 Feb. 5, 1942 No est. cost given. 

Construct bombproof shelter for Radio Communication with necessary ap- 
purtenances. 
Addendum #3 Aug. 29. 1942 No est. cost given : 

Construct underground telephone line from .\. W. S. at Haleakala and base 
station. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2645 

AVab Depabtment, 
UNITED States Engineeb Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., Decemher 11, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 41.0 ( Revised— Orig. June 14th. ' 

Contract W-414-eng-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. , 

You ai-e hereby directed to proceed with the following work : ] 

1. PROJECT TITLE : A. W. S. Road, Camp, and Fixed Station. I 

2. LOCATION: Haleakala. Maui, T. H. I 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCES : ND 676.3 Haleakala. ( 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete A. W. S. road on Haleakala, ' 

together with construction of base camp and fixed station. I 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. j 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : As enumerated in the Specifications to ! 

accompany Job Order No. 41.0. I 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: SC 1450 ($111,369.85) Eng. 993 ' 

($9,791.05). 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $121,160.90. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 25, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: November 30, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer— Sixth Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman. Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engiiieers, 

District Engineer. 



Oct. 10, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 41.0 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

WoBK To Be Done : Construct One (1) Utility Truck Shelter and One (1) Radio 

Shelter Building. 
District : Honolulu District, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at A. W. S. Camp, on 
the Island of Maui, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items: \ 

1. Fui-nish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete one (1) Utility Truck Shelter. All of the work to be done ' 
shall be in accordance with the details shown on the drawing, "Fixed Station 

Kauai and Maui. Utility Truck Shelter", Sheets No. 1 and No. 2, File Numbers, 
F-24/5S, and F-24/.59. 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct one (1) Radio Shelter Building. (Radio Shelter Building replaces 
Garage Building No. 1 shown (in General Plan, F-4/86). 

Addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 41.0 is additional work. j 

Total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $14,081.57. | 

Charge $4290.52 to SC 1450. Charge $9791.05 to Eng. 993. j 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr. 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



February 5, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 41.0 (Revised) 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 to Accompanying Job Order No. 41.0 (Revised) (A. W. S. Road 
and Camp, Haleakala, Maui, T. H.) authorizes the construction of a bombproof 



2646 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

shelter for Radio Communication witli necessary appurtenances, in connection 
with A. W. S. Station at Haleakala, Maui, T. H. 

/s/ Tlieodore Wyman, Jr. 
Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Colonel, (JorpH of Engineers, 

District Hnglneer. 



AxKiusT 29, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 3 

To Accompany Job Order No. 41.0 (Revised) 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of the Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 3 to accompany Job Order No. 41.0 (Revised) (A. W. S. Road, 
Camp and Fixed Station, Haleakala, Maui) authorizes the construction of Under- 
ground Telephone Line between Base Camp and the A. W. S. Station at Haleakala. 
Work has been completed. 
For the Department Engineer : 

(s) Joseph Matson, Jr., 

Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



Wak Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., June 1/,, IQ.'il. 
JOB ORDER NO. 41.0. 
Ccmtract W-414-eng-602. 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : A. W. S. Road and (Jamp. 

2. LOCATION: Haleakala, Maui, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2014. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and Complete A. W. S. road on Haleakala, 

together with A. W. S. Camp. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 
6 DRAWINGS AND REFERE.XCES : To i»e furnished later. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARCJEABLE : SSA 1940-41 SC1450 P23-A060r)-01. 

S. ESTIMATED COST : $105,08(100. 

9. ( "OMMENCEMENT DATE : June 25, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: September 25, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

13. MATERIALS: Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer, Sixth Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 41.0 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

WOKK To Be Done : Construct and Complete A. W. S. Road on Haleakala, together 

with A. W. S. Camp. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Haleakala, on the 
Island of Maui, T. H., and is limited to the following ,specilic item : 

1. Furnish all necessary lal)or and equipment and perform all work necessary to 
Construct and Complete an A. W. S. Road together with an A. W. S. Camp, in 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2647 

accordance with the "Specifications to Accompany Joh Order No. 41.0", and the 
details shown on the drawings, enumerated in the Specifications. 
The Total Cost of the Work Shall not exceed $105,086,00. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $105, 0S6. 00 

Contingendes— 10% 10, 508. 60 

Total Direct Cost 115, 594. 60 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering (8% of Con- 
tractor's Cost) $8,406.88 

Total Indirect Cost 8,406.88 

Total Field Cost 124, 001. 48 

General Office Overhead . 8, 406. 88 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 132, 408. 36 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Oct. 10, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 41.0 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done: Construct One (1) Utility Truck Shelter and One (1) Radio 

Shelter Building. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at A. W. S. Camp, on 
the Island of Maui, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete one (1) Utility Truck Shelter. All of the work to be done 
shall be in accordance with the details shown on the drawing, "Fixed Station 
Kauai and Maui, Utility Truck Shelter", Sheets No. 1 and No. 2, File Numbers, 
F-24/58, and F-24/59. 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct one (1) Radio Shelter Building. (Radio Shelter Building replaces Garage 
Building No. 1 shown on General Plan, F-4/86). 

Addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 41.0 is additional work. 
Total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $14,081.57. 
Charge $4290..52 to SC 14.50. Charge $9791.05 to Eng 993. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



79716—46 — Ex. 145, vol. 4—13 



2648 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Cost to Contractor 

1. Otie Utility Truck Shelter: 

Labor $1, 829. 36 

Material 1, 875. 83 

Plant Rental 75.00 

Mobil. & Demobilization 378.02 

Contractors Field & Office Overhead 132. 31 

Total $4, 290. 52 

2. One Radio Shelter Building: 

Labor $3, 777. 78 

Material 4, 698. 69 

Plant Rental 150.00 

Mobil. & Demobilization 862. 65 

Contractors Field & Office Overhead 301. 93 

Total 9, 791. 05 

Total Cost to Contractor 14,081.57 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr. 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of estimated cost 
1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $14, 081. 57 

Contingencies — 10% 1,408.16 



Total Direct Cost 15,489.73 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $1,126.53 

Total Indirect Cost 1,126.53 

Total Field Cost 16,616.26 

General Office Overhead 1, 126. 53 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 17, 742. 79 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Army PiLiRL Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4C 



Summary 



War Department 

UNITED states ENGINEER OFFICE 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract No. W414-eng-602 

Mauna Loa (Hawaii, T. H.) 

Job Order #46.0 June 30, 1941 

Construct new AWS Road, Buildings, Water System, etc., including improvement 

of present road. 
Est. Cost $39,300.00 
Commencement date : July 1, 1941 
Est. date for completion : Sept. 1, 1941 

Work suspended 7-14-41. 

Job order cancelled 5-10-42. 
Supervision by Area Engr., 7th Field Area. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2649 

War Depabtment, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Uonolulu, T. H., June 30, 1941. 

JOB ORDER NO. 46.0. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work: 

1. PROJECT TITLE : A.W.kS. Road, Buildings, Water System, Fencing. 

2. LOCATION: Mauna Loa, Hawaii, T. H 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2014. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and Complete A.W.S. Road, portable build- 

ings, building foundations, garages. Fence, Water System, Clearing Site 
for buildings and foundations, together with improvement of present align- 
ment of existing access road. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General — Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Drawing A.W.S. Mauna Loa, Hawaii, 

T. H. File No. F-24/1 to F-24/16 inclusive and other plans to be issued 
later. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : SC 1450. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $39,300.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : July 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : September 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LATOR AT SITE: Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : " " " " 

13. MATERIALS: " " " " 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer, Seventh Field Area. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 



Approved ; 



Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Warren T.Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 46.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done : Construct and Complete : A. W. S. Road, Portable Buildings, 
Foundations, Garages, Fence, Water System, Clearing Site for buildings 
and foundations, together with improvement of present alignment of existing 
Access Road. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Mauna Loa, on the 
Island of Hawaii, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific items : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to Com- 
plete the following items : 

(a) Construct A. W. S. Road, complete with necessary drainage facilities, 
pave road with 4" rock base Course and 2" asphaltic Concrete top Course. 

(b) Construct Concrete foundations for buildings. 

(c) Construct and Complete 3 portable buildings. 

(1 — Barracks Building, 1 — Mess Hall, 1 — No. 2 Latrine.) 

(d) Install Water Supply System. 

(e) Grade Site for foundations. 

(f) Install protective fencing. 

(g) Construction at Base Camp, Kilauea Military Camp, one garage for mobile 
unity, and one garage for Utility cars. 

(h) Grade and Clear Site for buildings, 
(i) Install protective fencing. 



2650 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

All work to be done shall be in accordance with the, "Specifications to Accom- 
pany Job Order No. 46.0", and the details shown on the drawings enumerated 
in the Specifications. 

The total Cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $39,300.00. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodoke Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work. 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $39, 300. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 3, 930. 00 

Total Direct Cost 43, 230. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $3, 144. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 3, 144. 00 

Total Field Cost 46, 374. 00 

General Office Overhead 3, 144. 00 



Estimated Total Cost to the Government 49, 518. 00 



This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, 'jr.. 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers. 

District Engineer. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer, Office, 

HonoAdn, T. H., July I4, 19^1. 
Refer to File No. Cont. 602 

Memorandum 

Subject : Job Order No. 46.0 

Contract W-414-eng-602 
All Construction on "A. W. S. Road. Buildings, Water System, and Fencing", 
authorized by Job Order No. 46.0, shall be suspended pending further orders from 
the District Engineer. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

May 10, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 46.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 46.0 (A. W. S. Road, Buildings, 
Water System, Fencing, Mauna Loa, Hawaii), cancels Job Order No. 46.0. 

Cancellation requested By: Department Engineer by memorandum from the 
Assistant Department Engineer, dated May 7, 1942. 
For the Department Engineer: 

/s/ John C. Meadows, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2651 

Abmy Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4D 

Summary CBR 
War Depabtment 

united states engineeb office 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract No. W414-eng.-60L' 

Beixows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

Job Order #20.1 May 12, 1941 Revised Sept 15, IMl. 

Construct — Fabricate and install twelve (12) each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage 

tanks and appurtenant work. Note Revised Job Order 20.1 reduced No. of 

tanks to six (6). 
Est Cost : $144,684.00. 

Revised: $54,968.00. 
Commencement Date: May 12, 1941. 
Est date for completion : Aug 1, 1941. 

Revised: Jan 1, 1942. 
Supervision by The Area Engineer, 5th Field Area. 

Job Order #20.120. 
Commencement Date: Sept 15, 1941. 
Est Date for completion : Jan 1, 1942. 
Six (6) 50,000 gal gasoline tanks. 

Job Order #20.130. 

Commencement Date : Sept 15, 1941. 

Est Date for Completion : Jan 1, 1912. 

Construct Tunnel for Twelve (12) 50,000 gasoline tank*:. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., May 12, W^l. 
JOB ORDER N. 20.1. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Fabrication and Complete installation (Aqua System) 

of Twelve (12) each 50,000 Gallon Gasoline Storage Tanks. 

2. LOCATION : Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2021.3. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Fabricate and install twelve (12) each 50,000 gallon 

gasoline storage tanks, (Aqua System) and all appurtenant work at Bel- 
lows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS ANT) REFERENCES : As shown in specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: 21X0540.035 (C of B U & A) No. Year 

Eng. 715 P99. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $144,684.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : May 12. 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : August 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY: Area Engineer, Fifth Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Wabben T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 
Distribution : 



2652 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

War Dei'artment, 
United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., September 15, 191,1. 

JOB ORDER NO. 20.1 (Revised) 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

To: Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Install Complete (Pump System) 6 Each 50,000 Gallon 

Gasoline Storage Tanks. 

2. LOCATION: Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2021.3. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Install, Complete, (Pump System) 6 Each 50,000 

Gallon Gasoline Storage Tanks. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General — Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As enumerated in the Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng. 715. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: (Present construction limited to $54,968.00) 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : July 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : January 1, 1942. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer— Fifth Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Wareen T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 
To Accompany Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised) 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work to Be Done: Install, Complete, (Pump System) 6 Each 50,000 Gallon Gaso- 
line Storage Tanks. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Bellows Field, on 

the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items: 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to install, 

complete (Pump System), 6 each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage tanks. All of 

the work to be done shall be in accordance with the Specifications to Accompany 

Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised) and the drawings enumerated in rhe Specifications. 
The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $54,968.00. 
Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised) supplants Job Order No. 20.1, dated May 12, 

1941, and the Addendums, Numbers, 1, 2, and 3, to Job Order No. 20.1. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $54,968.00 

Contingencies— 10% 5, 496. 80 

Total Direct Cost 60,464.80 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2653 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $4,397.44 

Total Indirect Cost $4,397.44 

Total Field Cost 64,862.24 

General Office Overhead 4, 397. 44 

Estimated total cost to the Government 69, 259. 68 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for Distribution 
to the Contractor. . 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



January 1, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised) 

Contract No. W^14-Eng-602 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised), suspends work 
on the installations of six gasoline storage tanks at Bellows Field, T. H. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman. Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



January 4, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised) 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 to accompany Job Order No. 20.1 (Revised), voids Addendum 
No. 1. Work ivill continue. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Colonel, U. S. Army, 

District Engineer. 

April 6, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 3 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.1 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu. T. H. 

Addendum No. 3 to accompany Job Order No. 20.1, (50,000 Gallon Gas Storage 
Tanks, Bellows), requires expedition in placing and filling gasoline tanks. 

Work requested by: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department, in memo, 
from Acting Deputy Chief of Staff, dated March 23, 1942. 
For the Department Engineer : 

/s/ H. B. Nurse, 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



2654 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

WAR DEPARTMENT, 

United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., September 15, 19^1. 
JOB ORDER NO. 20.120 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to Proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Install Complete, (Pump System) 6 Each 50,000 Gallon 

Gasoline Storage Tanks. 

2. LOCATION : Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2021.3. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Install complete (Pump System), G each 50,000 

gallon gasoline storage tanks. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENES : As enumerated in the Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: Eng. 991. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: (Present construction limited to $50,000.00). 
0. COMMENCEMENT DATE: September 15, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: January 1, 1942. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer— Ffth Field Area. 

/s/ Theadore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Approved 



Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.120 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

WOEK To Be Done: Install, Complete (Pump System), 6 Each 50,000 Gallon 

Gasoline Storage Tanks. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Bellows Field on the 
Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to install, 
complete (Pump System), 6 each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage tanks. All of 
the work to be done in accordance with the Specifications to Accompany Job 
Order No. 20.120 and the drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

Job Order No. 20.120 is additional work and does not alter Job Order No. 
20.1 (Revised). 
The cost of present construction shall not exceed .$50,000.00. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Thex)Dore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $50, 000. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 5, 000. 00 

Total Direct Cost 55,000.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2655 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $4, 000. 00 

Total Indirect Cost $4,000.00 

Total Field Cost 59,000.00 

General Office Overhead 4, 000. 00 

Estimated Total Cost to tbe Government 63, 000. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



January 1, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.120 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 20.120 suspends work on the installation of 
six gasoline storage tanks at Bellows Field, T. H. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



January 4, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.120 

Contract W-^14-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 to accompany Job Order No. 20.120, voids Addendum No. 1. 
Work will continue. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., Sept. 15, I'J^I. 
JOB ORDER NO. 20.13U 
Contract W-414-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Excavate Tunnel for 12 Each 50,000 Gallon Gasoline 

Storage Tanks. 

2. LOCATION : Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2021.3. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Excavate approximately 10,000 cubic yards to com- 

plete tunnel for 12 each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage tanks, together with 
placing of necessary concrete tunnel lining and sidewalk, and disposal of 
excavated material. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H., Gasoline 

Storage and Dispensing System, File No. F-20/66 and other plans to be 
furnished. 



2656 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: Eng. 991. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $84,000X0. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE: Septeml)er 15, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : January 1, 1942. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer— Fifth Field Area. 



/s/ 



Approved : 



Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Wakren T. Hannum, 

Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.130 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

WoEK To Be Done : Excavate tunnel for 12 each, 50,000 Gallon Gasoline Storage 

Tanks. 
DiSTRiar: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Bellows Field, on the 
Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furni-sh all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to excavate 
approximately 10,000 cubic yards to complete tunnel for 12 each, 50,000 gallon 
gasoline storage tanks, together with jilacing of necessary concrete tunnel lining 
and sidewalk, and disposal of excavated material. 

All of the work to be done in accordance with the, "Specifications to Accompany 
Job Order No. 20.130", and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the 
Specifications. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $84,000.00. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



1. Material: 



Item 



Designation 



Quantity 



Unit 



Unit price 



Dynani ite 

Elect. Caps — Assorted.. 

Cement 

Coarse Aggregate 

Fine Aggregate 

1" X 6" Shiplap 

2 X 4s & 6s 4 X 4 #1 Com . 

Reinforcing Steel 

Nails _ _.. 

#14 Wire— Black (Tie).. 
Miscellaneous Supplies. 



35. 000 

10. 500 

1,050 

630 

465 

4,500 

8,000 

50, 000 

4 

600 



lbs.. 



bbl 

eu. yds. 

MBM_" 



lbs 

kegs 

lbs 

lump sum 



Total Cost of Material. 



$0. 125 

0.17 

2.93 

3.25 

3.00 
55. 00 
47.50 

0. 0293 

6.60 

0.06 



$4, 375. 00 

1. 785. 00 
3, 076. 50 

2, 047. 50 
1, 395. 00 

247. 50 
380. 00 
1,465.00 
26.40 
36.00 
216. 10 



15, 050. 00 



Lal)or: 

(a) Handling and Hauling: 

36 man hours @ $1. 50 $54. 00 

104 man hours 1.25 130.00 

436 man hours .50 218.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2657 



(h) Drilling and Blasting: 

800 man hours @ $1.50 $1,200.00 

6,400 man hom's 1. 25 S, 000. 00 

4,800 man hours 1. 00 4, 800. 00 

3,200 man hours .75 2,400.00 

1,600 man hours . 50 800. 00 

(c) Mucking: 

800 man hours @ $1.50 1,200.00 

1,6C0 man hours 1.25 2,000.00 

19,200 man hours .50 9,600.00 

(d) Muck Disposal: 

200 man hours @ $1.50 300.00 

4C0 man hours 1.25 500.00 

1,600 man hours 1.00 1,600.00 

1,600 man hours . 50 800. 00 

(e) Assembling, Ercclitig d Stripping Forms: 

40 man hours m $1.50 60.00 

320 man hours 1.25 400.00 

320 man hours .625 200.00 

(f) Placing Reinforcing Steel: 

40 man hours @ $1. 50 60. 00 

480 man hours 1. 25 600. 00 

480 man hours 1. 00 480. 00 

240 man hours . 75 180. 00 

(g) Miring <& Placing Concrete: 

80 man hours @ $1.50 120.00 

600 man hours 1. 25 750. 00 

200 man hours 1.00 200.00 

200 man hours . 75 150. 00 

4.800 man hours .50 2,400.00 

(h) Maintenance — Watchmen, Etc: 

160 man hours @ $1. 50 240. 00 

320 man hours 1.25 400.00 

640 man hour.s 1.00 640.00 

320 man hours . 75 240. 00 

1,600 man hours .50 800.00 

Total Cost of Labor 41. 522. 00 

3. Plant Operation. 



Daily Cost 



Days Re- 
quired 



Amount 



(a) Rental of Equipment: 

2 Air Compressors 

1 Receiver _._ __. 

6 Hammers— Col'mns- Arms-Hose 

1 2-HP Elect. Motor and Fan.... 

1 Tool Grinder 

Air Pipe — Assorted Sizes 

1 Mucking Machine 

2 Dump Cars and Truck 

1 5-Cu. Yd. Dump Truck 

1 10-Ton Flat Rack Truck 

1 Batching Plant.. 

1 Horiz. Belt Conveyor 

1 Inl'd Belt Conveyor 

1 Qunite Machine 

Concrete Buggies 

1 y^-Cxx. Yd. Pick-Up 

1 Sedan 

Miscellaneous Small Tools 

(b) Gas, Oil, Grease, Miscellaneous Supplies. 

Total Cost of Plant Operation 



$50. 00 

1 30 

'(.00 

3.00 

1.00 

3.00 

5.50 
10.00 
18.00 
18.00 
26.00 
18.00 
26.00 

6.00 

2.00 

6.00 

6.00 

lump sum 



110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 
110 

no 

110 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
110 
110 



$5, 500. 00 

110.00 

770.00 

330. 00 

110. 00 

330. 00 

605.00 

1, 100. 00 

1, 980. 00 

1, 980. 00 

546.00 

378.00 

546.00 

126.00 

42.00 

660.00 

660. 00 

250.00 

1, 750. 00 



17, 773. 00 



2658 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Cost to the Contractor 



1. Total Cost of Material $15,050.00 

2. Total Cost of Labor 41, 522. 00 

3. Total cost of Plant 17,773.00 

4. Contractors Overhead 2, 445. 00 

5. Mobilization and Demobilization 7,210.00 

Total Cost to the Contractor 84, 000. 00 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 
1. Total Cost of Work. 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $84,000.00 

Contingencies— 10% 8,400.00 

Total Direct Cost 92,400.00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $6,720.00 

. Total Indirect Cost o, 720. 00 

Total Field Cost 99, 120. 00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 105, 840. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theo Wyman, Jr., 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., October 13, 19^1. 
JOB ORDER NO. 20.140. 
Contract W-414-eng-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Construct and Complete Access Road to Gasoline Storage 

and Dispensing System. 

2. LOCATION : Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : ND 611. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct approximately 8O0O linear feet of 18' road 

complete with necessary bridge and drainage structures, and do all necessary 
appurtenant work. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: Drawings, Bellows Field, Oahu, T. H., 

Gasoline Storage Access Road, File Nos. F-2/69 to F-2/76 inclusive. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng. 991. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $26,000.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : October 12, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : November 15, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: " " " " " «' 

13. MATERIALS: " " " " " 

14. Supervisioned by : The Area Engineers— Fifth Field Area. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman. Jr., 

Thex)dorb Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2659 

ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.140 

Contract W^14-eng-602. 

WOEK TO BE Done : Construct and Complete Access Road to Gasoline Storage and 

Dispensing Systems. 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Bellows Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct approximately SOOO linear feet of IS' road complete with necessary bridge, 
and drainage structures, and do all necessary appurtenant work. 

All of the work to be done shall be in accordance with the specifications to 
accompanying Job Order No. 20.140 and the details shown on the drawings enu- 
merated in the specifications. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $26,000.00. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodoee Wyman, Je., 
Lt. Col, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $26, 000. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 2, 600. 00 

Total Direct Cost 28,600.00 

(&) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $2, 080. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 2, 080. 00 

Total Field Cost 30, 6S0. 00 

General Office Overhead 2,080.00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 32, 760. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District Only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodoee Wyman, Je., 
Lt. Col.. Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Was Department 

Unitbu) States Engineer Office 

Honolulu, T. H., December 25, 19Jfl. 

JOB ORDER NO. 20.150 
Contract W-414r-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Construct Tunnel; Bellows Field. 

2. LOCATION : Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : None. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct tunnel and install sis gasoline tanks 

therein, in accordance with plans and instructions to be furnished the 
Area Engineer. 



2660 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : To be fiirnisiied. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng. 1067. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : Estimate to be furnished later. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE: December 26, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATE DATE FOR COMPLETION : April 1, 1942. 

11. ESTIMATE LABOR AT SITE : Estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : Estimate to be furnished later. 

13. MATERIALS : Estimate to be furnished later. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer, Fifth Field Area. 

(Sgd.) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

April 7, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 20.150 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 20.150 (Construct Tunnel and 
install six gasoline tanks. Bellows Field) directs that the gasoline storage tanks 
be dispersed and placed according to revised plan from the Commanding General, 
Hawaiian Department. 

Office File Reference : Serial No. 3084. 

Change requested by: The Commanding General, Hawaiian Department by 
letter from the Assistant Department Engineer dated March 31, 1942. 
For the Department Engineer : 

/s/ J. C. Meadows, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4E 

War Department 

united states engineer office 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract NO. 414-eng.-602. 

Barking Sands. Kauai, T. H. 
Job Order #21.1 April 26, 1941 

Construct — Fabricate and install nine (9) each 50,000 gallon storage tanks 

(Two tanks will be fabricated by the Government) 
Est Cost $114,350.16. 
Commencement Date: April 21, 1941. 
Est Date for Completion : June 21, 1941. 
Supervision by H. E. Helmboldt, Area Engr, 4th Field Area. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., April 26, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 21.1 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to pi-oceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Fabrication, transportation and complete installation of 

9 each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage tanks. 

2. LOCATION : Barking Sands, Kauai, T. H. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2661 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 759.2A1. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Fabricate and install 9 each 50,000 gallon gasoline 

storage tanks complete, and all appurtenant work, at Barking Sands, Island 
of Kauai, T. H. Two of the tanks will be fabricated by the Government and 
furnished to the Hawaiian Constructors at Honolulu, T. H. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As shown in paragraph 1-04 of the 

specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: 21X0540.035 (C of B U & A) No Year 

Eng. 715 P99-A-0540.035-N. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $84,081.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : April 21. 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : June 21, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: H. E. Helmboldt, Area Engineer, Fourth Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr.. 
Theodore Wyman, Jr.. 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 



Approved : 



District Engineer. 

Wareen T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engiyieers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 21.1 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost : To fabricate, transport and install 9 each 50,000 gallon gaso- 
line storage tanks, complete, at Barking Sands, Kauai, T. H. 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Barking Sands on 

the Island of Kauai, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items: 

(1) Furnish all labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary to trans- 
port to and install complete at Barking Sands, Kauai, T. H., two (2) each pre- 
fabricated 50.000 gallon gasoline storage tanks and all appurtenant work in 
accordance with Specifications. "Gasoline Storage and Dispensing System, Bark- 
ing Sands, Kauai, T. H.," and the details as shown on drawings enumerated in 
paragraph 1-04 of the Specifications. 

(2) Furnish all labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary to trans- 
port labor, equipment and material to site and fabricate and install complete 
seven (7) each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage tanks and all appurtenant work in 
accordance with Specifications, "Gasoline Storage and Dispensing System, 
Kauai, T. H.," and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in paragraph 
1-04 of the Specifications. 

Estimated unit costs are as follows: 

Cost to Contpuctor 



Two (2) Tanks — Fabricated in Honolulu, transported to, and installed at Bark- 
ing Sands, Island of Kauai, T. H. 

1. 2 — Tanks: 

Labor $5, 000. 00 

Materials 200. 00 

Total Fabrication Cost 5,200.00 



2662 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

2. MoMUsation and Demobilization: 

Transportation Charges $2, 500. 00 

Plant Rental during Mobilization and Demobilization. 1, 935. 00 
Labor Charges during Mobilization and Demobili- 
zation 800. 00 



Total Mobilization and Demobilization $5, 235. 00 

3. Excavation 4,200 Ou. Yd. @ $0.35 2, 940. 00 

4. Backfill 3,900 Cu. Yd. @ $0.12 936. 00 

5. Concrete 48 Cu. Yd. @ $18.00 1, 728. 00 

6. Placing Tanks 400. 00 

7. Gasoline Pumping System installed 2, 100. 00 

8. Dewatering Operations 1, 000. 00 

9. Contractor's Field and Office Overhead 1,000.00 



Total Cost to Contractor 20, 539. 00 

B 

Seven (7) Tank.s — Fabricated and Installed at Barking Sands, Islands of 

Kauai, T. H. 

1. 7 — Tanks — Fabrication: 

Labor $21, 000. 00 

Materials 2, 100. 00 

Plant Rental 3, 282. 00 



Total Fabrication Cost 26, 382. 00 

2. Mobilization and Demobilization : 

Ti'ansportation Charges during Mobilization and 

Demobilization $1, 800. OO 

Labor Charges during Mobilization and Demobili- 
zation 150. 00 

Plant Rental during Mobilization and Demobili- 
zation 646. 00 



Total Mobilization and Demobilization 2, 596. 00 

3. Excavation 10,200.00 

4. Backfill 3, 276. 00 

5. Concrete 6, 048. 00 

6. Placing Tanks 2,100.00 

7. Gasoline, Pumping System installed 7, 350. 00 

8. Dewatering Operations 3, 500. 00 

9. Contractor's Field and Office Overhead 2, 000. 00 



Total Cost to Contractor 63, 542. 00 

Grand Total Cost to Contractor for Nine (9) Tanks 84, 081. 00 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of Estimate of Cost 

Total Cost of Work: 
( ti) DivGct dost * 

Grand Total Cost to Contractor $84, 081. 00 

Contingencies— 20% 16, 816. 20 

Total Direct Cost 100. 897. 20 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection and Engineering — 8% (Contractor's 
Cost) $6,726.48 



Total Indirect Cost 6,726.48 



Total Field Cost of Job 107, 623. 68 

General Office Overhead— 8% (Contractor's Cost) 6,726.48 



Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 114, 350. 16 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2663 

This estimate is prepared for use in tlie District only, and is not for distribution 
to tlie Contractor. 

(Signed) Tlieodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

June 4, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 21.1 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

WoEK To Be Done : Construct and Complete a wood frame tool shed and Store 

Room. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Barking Sands on 
the Island of Kauai, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific Item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to construct 
and complete one wood frame tool shed and Store Room Building. The work to be 
done shall be as directed by the Area Engineer, Fourth Field Area. 
The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $300.00. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer, 

Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

1. Cost of Work to he Done: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $300. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 30. 00 

Total Direct Cost 330. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, engineering $24. (X) 

Total Indirect Cost . 24. 00 

Total Field Cost of Job 354.00 

General Office Overhead 24. 00 

Grand Total Cost to the Government 378. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

^ ■ M 

Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4F 

Summary — CBR 
War Department 

UNITED states ENGINEER OFFICE 

Honolulu, T. H. 
Morse Field (Hawaii, T. H.). 
Job Order #25.0 May 7, 1941. 
Construct. P'abricate and install nine (9) each 50,000 gallon gasoline Storage 

tanks and appurtenant work. 
Est. Cost $116,390.16. 
Commencement Date : May 8, 1941. 
Est. Date for Completion : August 1, 1941. 
Supervision by The Area Engineer, Seventh Field Area. 
Addendum #1 dated March 24, 1942 suspends indefinitely all work on Job Order 

#25.0. 

79716 — 4G — Ex. 145. vol. 4 14 



2664 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., May 7, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 25.0. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 

To: Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Transportation, Fabrication and Complete Installation 

of Nine (9) each 50,000 Gallon Gasoline Storage Tanks. 

2. LOCATION: Morse Field, Hawaii, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2021.2. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Fabricate and install nine (9) each 50,000 Gallon 

Gasoline Storage Tanks Complete, and all appurtenant work at Morse 
Field, Island of Hawaii, T. H. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General, H.nwaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As shown in paragraph 1-04- of the 

Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: 21X0540.035 (C of BU & A) No Year 

Eng. 715 P 99 A-O540.035-N. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $85,581.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE: May 8, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: August 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer, Seventh Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engiiieers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved: May 15, 1941. 

(Signed) Warren T. Hannum, 

Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 25.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost: To Transport, Fabricate and Install Nine (9) Each 50,000 

Gallon Gasoline Storage Tanks, Complete, at Morse Field, Hawaii, T. H. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Morse Field on 
the Island of Hawaii, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item: 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to 
transport labor, equipment and material to site, and fabricate and install com- 
plete nine (9) each 50,000 Gallon Ga.soline Storage tanks and all appurtenant 
work in accordance with Specifications. "Gasoline Storage and Dispensing 
System, Morse Field, Hawaii, T. H.", and the details shown on the drawings 
enumerated in the Specifications. 

Cost to the Contractor 

1. Nine (9) Tanks — Fabrication: Unit Cost Total 

Labor $ 3,000.00 $ 27,000.00 

Materials 300.00 2.700.00 

Plant Rental 470.00 4,230.00 

Labor $3,000.00 $27,000.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2665 

2. Mobilization and Demobilization: 

Transportation charges during Mobilization Unit Cost Total 

& Demobilization $260. 00 $2, 340. 00 

Labor charges during Mobilization and De- 
mobilization 22. 00 198. 00 

Plant Rental during Mobilization and De- 

motbilization 93. CO 837. 00 

Total Mobilization and Demobilization Cost 375. 00 3, 375. 00 

3. Excavation, 4,200 cu. yds. per unit @ $0.60 2, 520. 00 22, 680. 00 

4. Backfill, 3,900 cu. yds. per unit (a $0.20 780. 00 7, 020. 00 

5. Concrete, 4S cu. yds. per unit @ $18.00 864. 00 7, 776. 00 

6. Placing Tanks 300.00 2,700.00 

7. Gasoline Dispensing System Installed 600.00 5,400.00 

8. Contractor's Field & Office Overhead 300.00 2.700.00 

Total Cost to Contractor 9,509.00 85, oSL 00 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore, Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Co., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $ 85, 581. 00 

Contingencies— 20% 17, 116. 20 

Total Direct Cost 102,697.20 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engr. (8% of Contractor's 

Cost) $6,846.48 

Total Indirect Cost 6,846.48 



Total Field Cost 109,543.68 

General Office Overhead (8% of Contractor's Cost) 6, 846. 48 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 116,390.16 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for 
distribution to the Contractor, 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



MARCH 24, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 25.0 Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office, Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 25.0, (Transportation, Fabrication 
and Complete Installation of nine (9) each 50,000 gallon gasoline storage tanks) 
suspends indefinitely all work on Job Order No. 25.0. 

Suspension requested by the Commanding General, Hawaiian Department 
through the Department Engineer. 
For the Department Engineer: 

/s/ H. B. Nurse, 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers 

Executive Assistant. 



2666 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Army Peael Habbob Boaed ExHiBrr No. 4G 

Summary 
Wab Department 

united states engineer office 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract W414-eng-602 

Wheeler Field (Oaliu, T. H.). 
Job Order #5.0 Feb. 24, 1941. 

Construct three reinforced concrete bombproof amniuuitiou storage structures, 
of 30,0C0 cubic feet capacity each, with appurtenant -work and access roads. 
Est. Cost $1,847,000.00. 
Commencement date : Feb. 24, 1941. 
Est. date for completion : Sept. 1, 1941. 
Supervision by John J. Kestly, Area Eugr., 3rd Field Area. 
Work Authorized by Job Order No. 5.0, Addenda #3 to #7 inclusive: 

(a) Construction of six (6) each 30,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof 
magazines, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(b) Construction of three (3) each 10,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof 
magazines, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(c) Construction of six (6) each 5,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof 
magazines, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(d) Construction of all necessary connecting and access roads, complete 
with paving, culverts, headwalls, and riprapped ditches. 

(e) Construction and installation of electrical distribution system for 
magazines. 

(f ) The installation of all necessary construction plant, equipment, build- 
ings, and facilities to carry out the construction program. 

Work is to be performed under Contract No. W-414-eng-602 (1-A. Ammunition 

Storage Magazines.) 
Est. Cosf— $1,083,473 Addenda 5 to 7 incl. 
No date for completion given. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 
• Honolulu, T. H., Febf'uary 24, 19.il. 
WORK ORDER NO. 5.0. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 
To: Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Bomb Proof Ammunition Storage, Wheeler Field, T. H. 

2. LOCATION : Wheeler Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 400.1 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete reinforced concrete bomb- 

proof ammunition storage structures together with their appurtenant work 
and all necessary connecting and access roads, as specified in Schedule "A" 
attached hereto. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As enumerated (See para. 1-03 attached 

specifications.) 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: Seaeoast Defenses, Eng 306 P 99 

A1204-N. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $1,847,000.00 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : February 24, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : September 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: 375,590 man hours. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: John J. Kestly, Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Enoineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 



Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2667 



SECRET DOCUMENT 

To Accompany Work Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-4l4-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost: Bomb Proof Ammunition Storage, Wheeler Field, T. H. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done is at Wheeler Field, on the Island of Oahu, T. H. The 
work includes the furnishing of all necessary labor, equipment, materials and 
supplies, and the performing of all work necessary to construct reinforced con- 
crete bombproof magazine structures complete with all necessary utilities and 
fixtures, together with necessary connecting and access roads, complete with 
214" concrete bituminous pavement, culverts, headwalls, and riprapped ditches, 
for ingress and egress to magazine structures. 

1. Materials to "be FurnisJied: 



Designation 



Reinforcing Steel 

Structural Steel 

Steel Water Stops 

Copper Water Stops 

4" TiJe Drain 

Cement 

Fine Aggregate... 

Coarse Aggregate... . 

30" Reinforced Concrete Culvert Pipe 

24" Reinforced Concrete Culvert Pipe 

18" Reinforced Concrete Culvert Pipe 

12" Reinforced Concrete Culvert Pipe 

Rip-rap stone 

Lumber 

Nails, Bolts, Wires 

Electrical wires, conduits and fixtures flump sum) 
Paint 



Dynamite. 

Hardware... 

Asphalt Concrete... 

Rock Surfacing 

3" Galv. Iron Pipe. 
2" Galv. Iron Pipe. 
1" Galv. Iron Pipe. 



Total Cost of Materials. 



Quantity 



6, 000, 000 

100, 000 

37, 000 

1,700 

6,500 

60, 690 

20,880 

30, 900 

100 

200 

200 

450 

2,050 

350 

10, 000 



140 
10, 000 
2,000 
3,750 
4,400 
8,000 
10, 000 
2,000 



Unit 



lbs.... 
lbs.... 
lbs.... 
lbs.... 
lin. ft-, 
bbl...- 
cu. yd. 
cu. yd. 
lin. ft., 
lin. ft. . 
lin. ft., 
lin. ft.. 

ton 

M 

lbs 



gals... 
lbs.... 
Ibs...- 
tons... 
cu. yd- 

ft 

ft 

ft 



Unit 



$0,045 
0.20 
0.10 
0.15 
0.20 
3.04 
2.70 
3.00 
4.10 
2.90 
2.20 
1.15 
3.00 

45.00 
0.08 



2.75 

0.125 

0.75 

6.00 

2.70 

0.54 

0.26 

0.12 



To complete 
330,000 cu. ft. 



Amount 
$270, 000. on 
20. 000. 00 

3, 700. 00 
255. 00 

1, 300. 00 

184, 497. 60 

56, 376. 00 

92, 700. 00 

410.00 

580.00 

440.00 

517. 50 

6, 150. 00 

17, 750. 00 

800. 00 

11,000.00 

.385. 00 

1, 250. 00 
1, 500. 00 

22, 500. 00 
11,880.00 

4, 320. 00 

2, 600. 00 
240. 00 



710, 951. 10 



2. Day Labor: to complete 

(a) Clearing and Oruhhing : 330,000 cti. ft. Amount 

800 man hours @ $1.50 $1,200.00 

1,600 man hours @ 1. 00 1, 600. 00 

4,000 man hours @ 0.50 2,000.00 

(b) Sauling and Handling Materials: 

1,200 man hours @ 1. 50 1, 800. 00 

12,000 man hour.s @ 0.75 9,000.00 

12,000 man houns @ 0.50 6,000.00 

(c) Excavation and Backfill Structures: 

7,200 man hours @ 1. .50 10, 800. 00 

7,200 man hours @ 1.00 7,200.00 

7,200 man hours @ 0. 65 4, 680. 00 

43,200 man hours @ 0. 50 21, 600. 00 

(d) Road Excavation and Backfill: 

400 man hours @ 1.50 600.00 

1,600 man hours @ 1.00 1,600.00 

4,000 man hours @ 0.75 3,000.00 

4,000 man hours @ 0.50 2,000.00 

(e) Culverts: 

120 man hours @ 1.50 180.00 

.580 man hours @ 1.00 580.00 

1,000 man hours @ 0. 65 650. 00 

1,000 man hours @ 0. 50 500. 00 



2668 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

To complete 

(f) Placing Bituminous Concrete Roads: 330,ooo cu. ft. Amount 

1,200 man hours @ $1.50 $1,800.00 

1,800 amn liours @ 0.75 1,350.00 

8,200 man hours @ 0.50 4,100.00 

(g) Placing Reinforcing Steel Structures and 

Burster Course: 

900 man hours @ 1. 50 1, 350. 00 

20,000 man hours ® 0.75 15,000.00 

20,000 man hours @ 0.50 10,000.00 

(h) Mixing, placing, curing concrete in Structures 
and Burster Course: 

3,600 man hours @ 1.50 5,400.00 

30,000 man hours (ct) 1. 00 30, 000. 00 

120,000 man hours @ 0.50 60,000.00 

(i) Riprap and Drainage: 

480 man hours @ 1.50 720.00 

2,000 man hours @ 0.75 1,500.00 

3,.500 man hours @ 0. 50 1, 750. 00 

(j) Placing Tile Drain: 

100 man hours @ 1. 50 150. 00 

100 man hours @ 1.00 100.00 

400 man hours @ 0.50 200.00 

(k) Electrical Installation: 

720 man hours @ 1.50 1,080.00 

720 man hours @ 1.00 720.00 

720 man hours @ 0.65 468.00 

(1) Concrete Forms — Framing, Erecting, Stripping: 

1,800 man hours @ 1.50 2,700.00 

8,000 man hours @ 1.00 8,000.00 

10,000 man hours @ 0.65 6,500.00 

(m) Placing Structural Steel: 

1.50 man hours @ 1.50 22.5.00 

300 man hours @ 1. 25 375. 00 

300 man hours @ 0.75 225.00 

(a) Painting: 

100 man hours @ $1.50 150.00 

100 man hours @ 1.00 100.00 

100 man hours @ 0.65 65.00 

(b) Maintenance, Crew, Warehouseman, etc.: 

1,400 man hours @ $1.50 2,100.00 

10,000 man hours @ 1.00 10,000.00 

10,000 man hours @ 0. 65 6, 500. GO 

10,000 man hours @ 0.50 5,000.00 

Total Cost of Day Labor 252, 618. 00 

3. Plant Rental: 

(a) Plant to he Leased: 

2 21/2 yd. Shovels 7 mo. @ $3,115.00. $43,610.00 

3 Caterpillar dozers 7 mo. @ 869.00 18,249.00 

1 Grader 7 mo. @ 558. 00 3, 906. 00 

1 Roller, with tractor 7 mo. @ 8C6. 00 5,642.00 

2 Compressors 7 mo. @ 69-5.00 9,730.00 

6 5 yd. Dump Trucks 7 mo. @ 407.00 17,094.00 

6 9 vd. Dump Trucks 7 mo. @ 584.00 24,528.00 

1 Batching Plant 7 mo. (a' 653. 00 4, 571. 00 

2 % yd. Shovels 7 mo. @ 1,174.00 16,436.00 

3 Tractor w/trailer 7 mo. @ 281. 00 5, 901. 00 

1 Sterling Truck and Trailer 7 mo. @ 1,521.00 10,647.00 

1 Welding Machine 7 mo. (a) 93.00 651.00 

4 % ton Pick-up Trucks 7 mo. @ 69.00 1,932.00 

4 Sedans, Ford 7 mo. @ 76.00 2,128.00 

4 Coupes, Ford 7 mo. @ 70.00 1,960.00 

1 Rubber-tired 1 sk. mixer 7 mo. @ 113. 00 791. 00 

1 Concrete Placing Outfit, 7 cu. ft__ 7 mo. @ 168. 00 1, 176. 00 

1 AD4 Auto Crane 7 mo. @ 942. 00 6, 594. 00 

1 2 Drum Hoist 7 mo. @ 281.00 1,967.00 

2 16" Radial Saws 7 mo. @ 81.00 1,134.00 

1 Jointer 7 mo. @ 33. 00 231. 00 

1 Threading Machine 7 mo. @ 48. 00 336. 00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2669 



3. Plant Rental — Continued. 

(a) Plant to be Leased — Continued. 

To complete 330,000 cti. ft. Amount 

1 Bar Shear 7 mo. @ $109. 00 $763. 00 

1 Bar Bender 7 mo. (gi 72.00 504.00 

1 250' X 30" Inclined Conveyor 7 mo. (a 690.00 4, 830. CO 

1 200' X 30" Horizontal Conveyor__ 7 mo. @ 430.00 3,010.00 

1 2 yd. Concrete Bucket 7 mo. fe 33. 00 231, 00 

1 1 vd. Concrete Bucket 7 mo. @ 24.00 168.00 

2 Wagon Drill Rigs 7 mo. Ca 50. OJ 700.00 

2 1 cu. yd. Multifoote Pavers 7 mo. @ 837.00 11,718.00 

Total Plant to be Leased 201,138.00 

( b) Fuel, Oil, Small Tools & Supplies 15, 000. 00 

(c) Temporary Buildings— Storage 5,000.00 

Total Cost Leased Plant and Supplies 221. 138. 00 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost to Jobs 

Cost of Materials $710, 9.-)l. 10 

Cost of Day Labor 2.'^2, 618. 00 

Plant Rental 221, 138. 00 

Total Plant Operation Cost $1, 184. 707. 10 

5. Total Cost of Work. 

(a) Direct Cost. 

Total plant operation cost $1, 184, 707. 10 

Contingencies — 15% 1""' '0''- Of" 

Total Direct Cost $1,362,413.16 

(b) Indirect Cost. 

Mobilization and Demobilization .$135, 000. 00 

Surveys, inspection, supervision — 10% 136, 241. 31 

Total Indirect Cost 271,241.31 

Total Field Cost to Job 1, 633, 6.14. 47 

General Office Overhead— 8% 146, 475. 62 

Buildings, camp, survey, covered bv previous Work 

Orders 66, 869. 91 

Estimated Grand Total Cost by hired labor and 
government plant 1, 847. 000. 00 



Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Coi-ps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



UNSKILLED LABOR 

Class 1 — $0.50 per hour: 
Shovelers 
Concrete placers 
Slopers — roadway 
Material handlers 
"Water boy 

Class 2 — $0.65 per hour: 
Carpenter's helper 
Rigger's helpers 
Powderman's helpers 
Pipefitter's helper 
Tractor operator's helpers 
Crane operator's helpers 
Electrician's helpers 



SEMI-SKILLED LABOR 

Class 3 — $0.75 per hour: 
Truck Drivers 
Steel Tiers 
Jackhammer man 

SKILLED LABOR 

Class 4 — $1.00 per hour: 

Carpenters 

Ti-actor operators 

Crane ojK^rators 

Cement finishers 

Electricians 

Pipefitters 

Class 5 — $1.50 })er hour: 

General Foreman. 



2670 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

SCHEDULE "A" 

Work Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

1. The site of the work is at Wheeler Field on the Island of Oahu, T. H. 

2. The work authorized to be done under Work Order No. 5.0 includes fur- 
nishing, by the contractor, of all labor and performing all work for the Qon- 
struction of ammunition storage magazines and appurtenant work in conformity 
with plans and specifications and within the limits of available fimds. 

3. The materials essential to the construction provided for herein, will be 
furnished by the Government, at a convenient location on the Island of Oahu, 
from which location the materials will be transported, by the contractor to 
the site of the work. 

4. The work to be done at this time under Work Order No. 5.0 is as follows : 

(a) Clearing and grubbing the site of the work. 

(b) Transport material to the site of the work. 

(c) Perform all excavation for structures. 

(d) Perform all excation for service roads. 

(e) Install all culverts. 

(f) Construct and complete three (3) bomb proof ammunition storage maga- 
zines (of 30,000 cubic feet capacity each). 



May 22, 1941. 
ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

ADDENDUM NO. 1 

Estimate of Cost: Three (3) Each 30,000 Cubic Feet Capacity Bomb Proof 

Ammunition Storage Structures At Wheeler Field, T. H. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wheeler Field, 
on the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items : 

(1) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work neces- 
sary to construct three (3) 30,000 cubic feet reinforced concrete bomb-proof 
magazine structures, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(2) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work neces- 
sary to construct graded dirt connecting and access roads, complete with cul- 
verts, headwalls, and riprapped ditches. 

All of the work done shall be in accordance with Specifications, "Bombproof 
Ammunition Storage and Appurtenant Work to Accompany Job Order No. 5.0," 
and the details shown on drawings listed in paragraph 1-03 of the Specifications. 
This addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 5.0 supplements paragraph 4 (f ) of Sched- 
ule A to Work Order 5.0 and is not authority for additional construction. The 
estimated cost of the work to be done is as follows : 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2671 



Cost to the Contractor 



1. Materials to be Furnished: 



Designation 



Quantity 



Unit 



Unit 
price 



Reinforcing Steel..: 

Cement 

Fine Aggregate. . 

Coarse Aggregate. 

Structural Steel 

Steel Water Stop— Jie" x 8" 

Copper Water Stop— 16"— 24 oz . 

Wrought Iron Pipe — 2" Diam 

Wire— #14 Ga 

Paint 

Vitrified Pipe — i" Diam 

Graded Aggregate — H" to 1^" 

Lumber 

Form Oil 

Curing Compound 

Nails 

Oalv. Wire #8 Ga 

Reinforced Concrete Pipe — 12" Diam. 
Reinforced Concrete Pipe — 18" " . 
Reinforced Concrete Pipe — 24" " . 
Reinforced Concrete Pipe — 30" " . 

Rock— 12" Thick for Drop Inlets 

Electric Installation Lighting 

Hardware 

Galv. Iron Pipe — i" 

Galv. Iron Pipe— 2!,^" 

Misc. Materials and supplies 



1, 335, 900 

13, 262 

6.078 

6,301 

31, 478 

5,724 

282 

14 

4,540 

8 

1,327 

81 

224, 220 

275 

1,520 

7,850 

1,323 

160 

120 

80 

40 

35 



Total Cost of Materials. 



8,600 
5,000 



Lb 

Bbl 

Cu. Yd- 

Lb....."' 
Lin. Ft. 



Lb 

Gal 

Lin. Ft- 
Cu. Yd. 

M 

Gal 



Lb. 



Lin. Ft- 



Cu. Yd 

Lump Sum. 



Lin. Ft. 



$0. 045 
3.05 
2.70 
3.00 
0.20 
0.51 
0.40 
0.26 
0.08 
2.75 
0.225 
3.00 

45.00 
0.21 
0.52 
0.08 
0.08 
0.855 
2.02 
2.70 
3.98 
3.00 



0. 7164 
0. 3620 



$60, 115. 50 

40, 449. 10 

16, 410. 60 

18, 903. 00 

6, 295. 60 

1, 389. 21 

112.80 

.3.64 

363. 20 

22.00 

298. 57 

243. 00 

10, 089. 90 

57.75 

790. 40 

628. 00 

105. 84 

136. 80 

242. 40 

216. CO 

159. iO 

105.(0 

970.(0 

120.(0 

6,161.04 

1, 810. CO 

500. CO 

166, 698. 58 



2. Day Labor: 

(a) Handling and Hauling. 

320 man hours @ $1. 50 $480. 00 

3,200 man hours @ 0.75 2,400.00 

6,400 man hours @ 0.50 3,200.00 

(b) Clearing and Onibbing (S^ Acres). 

56 man hours @ $1. 50 84. 00 

80 man hours @ 1. 00 80. 00 

80 man hours @ 0. 65 52. 00 

960 man hours @ 0. 50 480. 00 

(c) Excavation and Backfill Road. 

900 man hours @ $1. 50 1, 350. 00 

2,160 man hours @ 1.00 2,160.00 

2, 000 man hours @ 0. 75 1. 500. 00 

2,000 man hours @ 0.65 1,300.00 

5. 760 man hours @ 0.50 2,880.00 

(d) Culverts. 

80 man hours @ $1. 50 120. 00 

80 man hours @ 1. 00 80. 00 

160 man hours @ 0. 65 104. 00 

800 man hours @ 0. 50 400. 00 

(e) Riprap and Drop Inlets. 

40 man hours @ $1. 50 60. 00 

480 man hours @ 0. 50 240. 00 

( f ) Excavation and Backfill Structures. 

1, 600 man hours @ $1. 50 2, 400. 00 

3,200 man hours @ 1.00 3,200.00 

2, 400 man hours @ 0. 75 1, 800. 00 

2, 200 man hours @ 0. 65 1, 430. 00 

5,280 man hours @ O. 50 2, 640. 00 

(g) Concrete Forming and Stripping. 

960 man hours 0) $1. 50 1, 440. 00 

3, 600 man hours @ 1. 00 3, 600. 00 

2,800 man hours @ 0.65 1,728.00 

2, 000 man hours @ 0. 50 1, 000. 00 



2672 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(h) Placing Reinforcing Steel-Structure. 

960 man hours @ $1.50 $1,440.00 

4,800 man hours @ 1.00 4,800.00 

4, 800 man hours @ 0. 50 2, 400. 00 

(?) Mixing, Placing, Curing Concrete. 

2, 000 man hours @ $1. 50 3, 000. 00 

3, 600 man hours @ 1.00 3,600.00 

3,900 man hours (^ 0.75 2,925.00 

12, 200 man hours @ 0. 65 7, 930. 00 

20,000 man hours @ 0.50 10,000.00 

(j) Structural Steel Placing. 

96 man hours @ $1.50 144.00 

192 man hours @ 1. 00 192. 00 

192 man hours @ 0. 75 144. 00 

192 man hours @ 0. 50 96. 00 

(k) Laying Drainage Tile. 

16 man hours @ $1.50 24.00 

120 man hours @ 0. 65 78. 00 

320 man hours @ 0.50 160.00 

(l) Electrical Installation. 

320 man hours @ $1. 50 480. 00 

400 man hours @ 1.00 400.00 

420 man hours @ 0.75 240. 00 

(m) Cleaning and Painting. 

8 man hours @ $1.50 12.00 

48 man hours @ 1.00 48.00 

72 man hours @ 0.50 36.00 

(n) Maintenance — Watchmen, etc. 

2,880 man hours @ $L 50 4,320.00 

2,160 man hours (^ 0.75 1,620.00 

1,440 man hours @ 0. 50 720. 00 

Total Cost of Labor 81, 017. 00 

3. Plant Operation: 

(a) Recital of Equipment. 

2 21/2 Cu. Yd. Shovel 2 mo. <a} $3, 150. 00 $12, 600. 00 

1 % Cu. Yd. Shovel 3 mo. @ 1, 174. 00 3, 522. 00 

1 Caterpillar dozer 3 mo. @ 869.00 2,607.00 

1 Road Grader 1 mo. @ 558.00 558.00 

1 Roller with Tractor 1 mo. @ 806. 00 806. 00 

1 Air Compressor 2 mo. @ 695. 00 1, 390. 00 

2 9 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 3 mo. @ 584. 00 3, 504. 00 

1 Conveyor— inclined 2 mo. @ 690. 00 1, 280. 00 

2 5 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 3 mo. m 407. 00 2, 442. 00 

2 % Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 3 mo. @ 69. 00 414. 00 

2 Sedans 3 mo, @ 76. 00 456. 00 

1 Coupe 3 mo. (S) 70. 00 210. 00 

1 Batching Plant 2 mo. @ 653. 00 1, 306. 00 

1 Pug Mill 2 mo. @ 200. 00 400. 00 

1 Concrete Placing Outfit 2 mo. @ 168. 00 336. 00 

1 AD-4 Auto Crane 3 mo. (d) 942. 00 2, 826. 00 

1 16" Radial Saw 3 mo. @ 81.00 243.00 

1 .Tointer 3 mo. (a) 33. 00 99. OO 

1 Bar Shear 3 mo. @ 109.00 327.00 

1 Bar Bender 3 mo. @ 72. 00 216. 00 

1 2 Cu. Yd. Concrete Bucket 2 mo. (n) 33. 00 66. 00 

1 1 Cu. Yd. Concrete Bucket 2 mo. (5) 24. 00 48. 00 

1 Conveyor— Horizontal 2 mo. @ 430.00 860.00 

Misc. Tools and Equipment 500. 00 

(b) Fuel, Oil, Gas and Supplies Lump Sum 5, 500. 00 

Total Plant Rental Cost 42,516.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2673 

4. Total Plant Operation Coat of Job: 

Cost of Materials $166, 698. 58 

Cost of Day Labor SI, 017. 00 

Cost of Plant Rental 42, 516. GO 

Mobilization and Demobilization 135, 000. 00 

Total Cost to Contractor $425,231.58 



Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col. Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of estimate of cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost of Work to Contractor : $425, 231. 58 

Contingencies— 10% 42, 523. 16 

Total Direct Cost 467,754.74 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Insp., Engr.— 8% $34, 018. 53 

Total Indirect Cost 34,018.53 

» 

Total Field Cost 501, 773. 27 

General Office Overhead— 8% 34, 018. 73 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to the Government 535, 792. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the contractor. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



May 26, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done: Construct and Complete (5) each 30,000 Cubic Feet Capacity 
Bombproof Ammunition Storage Structures at Wheeler Field, T. H. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wheeler Field, on the 

Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items : 

(1) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary 
to construct five (5) each 30,000 cubic feet reinforced concrete bombproof maga- 
zine structures, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(2) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary 
to construct graded dirt connecting and access roads, complete with culverts, 
headwalls, and rip-rapped ditches. 

All of the work done shall be in accordance with Specifications, "Bombproof 
Ammunition Storage and Appurtenant Work to Accompany Job Order No. 5.0," 
and the details shown on the drawings listed in paragraph 1-03 of the Speci- 
fications. 

Addendum No. 2 to Job Order No. 5.0, supplants and makes void Addendum 
No. 1 to Job Order No. 5.0. 

Total cost of the work to be one shall not exceed $585,993.89. 



2674 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Cost to the Contractor 
1. Materials Required for Magazines: 



Item 
No. 



Item 



Quantity 



Unit 



Unit 
price 



Amount 



Cement 

Fine Aggregate 

Coarse Aggregate. _ . . 

Yi" to IW' Graded Aggregate 

Keinforcing Steel 

Structural Steel 

Steel Water Stop 

Copper Water Stop 

2" Diam. Black W. 1. Pipe 

#14 Ga. Black Wire 

#S Ga. Galv. Wire • 

4" Diam. V. C. Pipe 

l"x 6"T & G Flooring 

2" X 4"-4" X 4"-4" X 6" #1 Com. Lumber. 

Form Oil 

Curing Compound . 

Nails— 20d, 16d, lOd, 8d, 6d 

Paint 

Conduit, Wiring and Fixtmes 

4" Diam. W. 1. Pipe and Couplings 

2" Diam. W. 1. Pipe and Couplings 

M iscellaneous Hardware 

Miscellaneous Supplies 



21. 225 

9,342 

9,060 

140 

2, 226, 500 

52, 465 

9,540 

470 

24 

7, 500 

2,210 

2, 2' 2 

112,620 

140, 400 

460 

2,500 

100 

13 

Lump sum 

7,740 

4, .500 

Lumpsum 



Bbl 

Cu. Yd- 



Lb 

LinVrt. 



Lb. 



Lin. Ft... 
M. B. M. 



Gals. 



Keg.. 
Gals. 



Total Cost ol Materials for Magazines. 



$2.92 

2.70 

3.00 

3.00 

0.0293 

0. 1004 

0.51 

0.40 

0.26 

0.08 

0.08 

C.225 
61.50 
47.10 

0.21 

0.52 

6.60 

2.75 



0. 7164 
0. 4125 



$62, 189. 25 

25, 223. 40 

27, 180. 00 

420.00 

65. 236. 45 

5, 267. 49 

4, 865. 40 
188.00 

6.24 

600. 00 

176. 80 

497. 70 

6, 926. 13 

6, 612. 84 

96.60 

1.300.00 

660. 00 

35.75 

1, 940. 00 

5, 544. 94 
1, 856. 25 

210. 00 
850.00 



217, 883. 24 



1-A. Materials Required for Access & Connecting Roads: 



Cement 

Fine Aggregate 

Coarse Aggregate 

Reinforcing Steel.. 

1" X 6" Shiplap.. . 

2" X 4" #1 Com. Lumber... 

R. C. Pipe 12" Diam 

R. C. Pipe 18" Diam 

R. C. Pipe 24" Diam 

R. C. Pipe 30" Diam 

Masonry Stone (50#) 

Galv. W. 1. Pipe— 4" Diam. 
Galv. W. 1. Pipe— 2" Diam. 

Nails, Wire, etc 

Miscellaneous Supplies 



Total Cost of Materials for Access & Con- 
necting Roads. . 



75 

50 

48 

3,500 

2.400 

3,000 

160 

120 

80 

40 

35 

860 

500 



Bbl 


$2.93 


Cu. Yd 


2.70 


" " 


3.00 


Lb 


0.0293 


B. M 


61.50 


B. M 


47.10 


Lm. Ft 


0.855 


" " 


2.02 


" " 


2.70 


" " 


3.98 


Cu. Yd 


3.00 . 


Lm. Ft 


0. 7164 


" " 


0. 4125 


Lump sum.. 





$219. 75 
135.00 
144.00 
102. 55 
147. 60 
141. 30 
136. 80 
242. 40 
216. 00 
159.20 
105.00 
616. 10 
206. 25 
16.50 
150.00 



2, 738. 45 



2. Day Labor {Magazines) : 

(a) Handling and Hauling (6,200 Tons) : 

1,000 man hours @ 

l.OOO man hours (g) 

1,000 man hours @ 

10,670 man hours @ 

(b) Clearing and GrubUng (7^ Acres) : 

32 man hours @ 

96 man hours @ 

960 man hours @ 

(e) Laying Temporary Water Line (7,740' of 4", 
4,500' of 2") : 

50 man hours @ 

120 man hours @ 

1,020 man hours @ 

(d) Structure Excavation (82,000 Cu. Yds.) : 

1,500 man hours_^ @ 

3,000 man hours @ 

3,000 man hours @ 

9,000 man hours @ 



$1.50 

1. OO 

.65 

.50 

$L50 
.75 
.50 



$1.50 
.75 
.50 

$1.50 

1.00 

.65 

.50 



$1, 500. 00 

1, 000. 00 

650. 00 

5, 335. 00 

48.00 

72.00 

480.00 



75.00 

90.00 

510. 00 

2, 250. 00 

3, 000. 00 
1, 950. 00 

4, 50O. 00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2675 

(e) Structure Backfill— Compacted (63,350 Cu. Yds.) : 

1,170 man hours @ $1.50 $1,7^5.00 

2,340 man hours @ 1.00 2,340.00 

2,340 man hours @ .65 1,521.00 

6,932 man hours @ .50 3,466.00 

(f) Forming and' Stripping (Assembling — 263 M., Erecting — 

36Sy5 M., Stripping— 368% M.) : 

1,340 man hours @ $1. 50 2, 010. 00 

6,000 man hours (Sj 1.00 6,000.00 

6,000 man hours fa, . 65 3, 900. 00 

15,200 man hours @ . 50 7, 600. 00 

(g) Reinforcing steel— Bind'g d Plac'g (2,226,500 Lbs.) : 

2.080 man hours @ $L 50 3,120.00 

20,800 man hours @ 1.00 20,800.00 

20,800 man hours @ .65 13,520.00 

14,620 man hours @ . 50 7, 310. 00 

(h) Placing and Curing Concrete (14,710 Cu. Yds) : 

4.000 man hours @ $1. 50 6, 000. 00 

8,000 man hours @ 1. 00 8, 000. 00 

12,000 man hours @ . 75 9, OOO. 00 

16.000 man hours @ . 65 10, 400. 00 

16,000 man liours @ . 50 8, 000. 00 

(i) Laying Drainage Tile (2,212 Lin. Ft.) : 

28 man hours @ $1. 50 42. 00 

200 man hours (a . 65 130. 00 

536 man hours (a . 50 268. 00 

(j) Strnctnrnl Steel Placing (52,4&5 Lbs.) : 

leOman hours •——__-__ @ $1. .50 240.00 

640 man hours (a 1. 00 640. 00 

640 man hours rr? .75 480. 00 

960 man hours @ . 50 480. 00 

(k) Conduits, Wiring and Fixtures (Placing) : 

160 man liours (S; $1. 50 240. 00 

480 man hours & 1.00 480.00 

480 man hours (a' . 75 360. 00 

960 man hours @ . 50 480. 00 

(1) Maintenance (watchmen, etc.) : 

2,660 man hours (cH $1. 50 3, 900. OO 

2.660 man hours (a) 1.00 2,660.00 

2,000 man hours @ .50 1,000.00 

Total Cost of Day Labor for Magazines 147, 692. 00 

2-A. Day Labor for Access and Connecting Roads: 

(a) Clearing and Grubbing (9 Acres) : 

40 man hours @ $1. 50 $60. 00 

120 man hours (Si .75 90.00 

1,540 man hours @ .50 770.00 

(b) Handling and Hauling (30 Tons) : 

8 man hours @ $1.50 12.00 

16 man hours @ 1. 00 16. 00 

8 man hours (if .65 5.20 

96 man hours (if . .50 48. 00 

(c) Laying Temporary Water Line (1,360 Lin. Ft.) : 

8 man hours @ $1. 50 12. 00 

16 man hours (at .75 12.00 

104 man hours @ .50 .52.00 

(d) Excavation (44,260 Cu. Yds.) : 

800 man hours (^ $1. 50 1, 200. 00 

1,600 man hours @ 1.00 1.600.00 

1,600 man hours (S) .75 1,200.00 

1,600 man hours @ . 65 1, 040. 00 

4.800 man hours @ . 50 2, 400. 00 

(e) Fill — Compacted (24,500 Cu. Yds.) : 

800 man hours (cf $1.50 1,200.00 

800 man hours (S 1. 00 800. 00 

800 man hours (S .65 .520.00 

3,200 man hours @ .50 1,600.00 



2676 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(f) Culvert Pipe— Placing (400 Lin. Ft.) : 

80 man hours @ $1.50 $120.00 

SO man hours @ 1.00 80.00 

160 man hours @ .65 lOt. 00 

800 man hours @ .50 400.00 

(g) Headwalls — Forming and Stripping (5,400 B. M.) : 

72 man hours @ $1.50 108.00 

144 man hours @ 1.00 144.00 

144 man hours @ .50 72.00 

(h) Reinforcing Steel — Binding <& Placing (3,500 Lbs.) : 

24 man hours @ $1.50 36.00 

48 man hours @ 1.00 48.00 

20 man hours @ .65 13.00 

32 man hours @ .50 16.00 

(i) Placing and Curing Concrete (50 Cu. Yds.) : 

16 man hours @ $1.50 24.00 

32 man hours @ 1.00 32.00 

48 man hours @ .75 36.00 

80 man hours @ .50 40.00 

(j) Drop Inlets — Placing Masonry (35 Cu. Yds.) : 

32 man hours @ $1.50 48.00 

60 man hours @ 1.00 60.00 

128 man hours @ . 50 64.00 

(k) Riprap Ditches and Culvert Aprons (100 Sq. Yds.) : 

16 man hours m $1.50 24.00 

48 man hours @ .50 24.00 

(1) Grading and Sliaping Roadway (12,000 Sq. Yds.) : 

160 man hours * ® $1.50 240.00 

480 man hours (5) 1.00 480. OD 

320 man hours @ . 65 208. 00 

540 man hours @ .50 270.00 

(m) Maintenance (Watchmen, etc.) 

400 man hours m $1.50 600.00 

400 man hours @ 1.00 400.00 

400 man hours m -75 300.00 

400 man hours @ .50 200.00 

Total Cost of Day Labor (Access Roads) 16,828.20 

3. Plant Operation (Magazines) . 



(a) Rental of Equipment. 

2 2V9 Cu. Yd. Power Shovels. 
1 H Cu. Yd. Power Shovel. __ 

\ Caterpillar Dozer 

1 Roller with Tractor 

1 Air Compressor- 

2 9 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks... 
2 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks... 
2 H Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks.. 

2 Sedans 

1 Coupe 

1 Batching Plant 

1 Pug Mill 

1 Concrete Placing Outfit 

1 A. D. Auto Crane 

1 le" Radial Saw 

1 Jointer 

1 Bar Shears 

1 Bar Bender 

1 2 Cu. Yd. Concrete Buoket. 
1 1 Cu. Yd. Concrete Bucket. 

1 Inclined Conveyor 

1 Horizontal Conveyor 

Miscellaneous Small Tools.. 

(b) Fuel, Oil, Gas & Supplies 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Magazines). 



Months 
required 



25 

2W 

2^ 

2 

2 

2yn 

2H 

2yn 
2yi 

2U 
2H 
21-ft' 

2K2 

2J'2 

2.^ 

2.1/2 

2.4 
24 
2>^ 
2.4 
2M 



Monthly 
rental 



$3,150.00 

1, 174. 00 

S69. 00 

806. 00 

fi95. 00 

584. 00 

407. 00 

60.00 

76.00 

70.00 

653. 00 

200.00 

168. 00 

942. 00 

81.00 

33.00 

109. 00 

72.00 

33. 00 

24.00 

690.00 

430. 00 

Lump Sum 

Lump Sum 



Amount 



$15. 7.50. 00 

2, 935. 00 

2, 172. 50 

1,612.00 

1,390.00 

2, 020. 00 

2. 035. 00 

345. 00 

380. 00 

175.00 

1,632.50 

500. 00 

420. 00 

2, 355. 00 

202. 50 

82.50 

272. 50 

180. 00 

82.50 

60.00 

1.725.00 

1, 075. 00 

550. 00 

7, 700. 00 



46, 552. 00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2677 



3-A. Plant Operatioji {Access Roads): 



a) Rental of Equipment. 

1 2'i Cu. Yd. Power Shovel 

1 H Cu. Yd. Power SHovel 

1 Caterpillar— Dozer 

1 Roller with Tractor 

2 9Cu. Y*d. Dump Trucks 

2 5 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 

2 H Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 

2 Sedans 

1 Coupe 

1 14 Cu. Yd. Concrete Mixer... 

1 A. D.-4 Auto Crane 

1 16 In Radial Saw 

1 Bar Shears 

1 Bar Bender 

Miscellaneous Small Tools 

(b) Fuel Oil. Gas. Oil and Supplies- 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Access Roads). 



Months 
required 



Monthly 
rental 



.$3. 150, 00 

1,174.00 

860. 00 

800.00 

584.00 

407.00 

69.00 

76.00 

70.00 

55.00 

942.00 

81.00 

109. 00 

72.00 

Lump Simi 

Lump Sum 



$6, 300. 00 

2, 348. 00 

1, 73,S. 00 

1,612.00 

1, 168. 00 

1, 628. 00 

1.38. 00 

304.00 

140. 00 

55.00 

471.00 

40.50 

27.25 

18.00 

212.25 

2, 100.00 



19, 300. 00 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Joh {Magazines) : 

Total Cost of Material $217, 883. 24 

Total Cost of Labor 147,692.00 

Total Cost of Plant 46, 552. GO 

Mobilization and Demobilization 123, 365. 70 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Magazines) $535, 492. 94 



4-A. Total Plant Operation Cost of Job {Access Roads) : 

Total Cost of Material $2, 738. 45 

Total Cost of Labor___^ 16, 828. 20 

Total Cost of Plant 19,300.00 

Mobilization and Demobilization 11, 634. 30 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Access Roads) 50, 500. 95 



5. Total Cost of Work (5 Magazines d Access Road) : 

Total Cost of 5 Magazines $535, 492, 94 

Total Cost of Access Road 50, 500. 95 



Total Cost to Contractor 585,993.89 

Thex)i>oee Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $585, 993. 89 

Contingencies— 10% 58, 599. 40 

Total Direct Cost 644,593.29 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Surveys, Inspection and Engr. — 8% $46, 879. 51 

Total Indirect Cost 46,879.51 

Total Field Cost 691, 472. 80 

General Office Overhead— 8% 48,879.51 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 738,352.31 



2678 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

This recapitulation is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for dis- 
tribution to the Contractor. 

Theodobb Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



ADDENDUM NO. 3 



June 5, 1941. 



To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 Contract No. W-414-eng-601 

Work To Be Done : Complete necessary excavation for all Ammunition Storage 
Structures authorized by Job Order No. 5.0, together with Construction of 
graded dirt Connecting and access roads, complete with necessary culverts, 
headwalls, and riprapped ditches. 

DiSTKicT : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wheeler Field, on the 

Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific items : 

(1) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary 
to complete necessary excavation for all Ammunition Storage Structures, author- 
ized by Job Order No. 5.0. 

(2) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment and perform all work necessary 
to complete Construction of graded dirt Connecting and access roads, Complete 
with, culverts, headwalls and riprapped ditches. 

All of the work done shall be in accordance with Specifications, "Bombproof 
Amnmnition Storage and Appurtenant Work to Accompany Job Order No. 5.0". 

Addendum No. 3 is additional Work and does not alter Addendum No. 2 to Job 
Order No. 5.0. 

The Cost of the Work to be done Shall not exceed $115,084.10. 

Theodoke Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

1. Materials To Be Furnished (Excavation for Magazines) : 



Item 
No. 



Designation 



2 In. W. I. Pipe and Fittings, 

Dynamite (Caps & Fuse) 

Miscellaneous Supplies . 



Total Cost of Material for Magazines. 



Quantity 



1,950 
500 



Unit 



Ft 

Lbs 

Lumpsum. 



Unit 
price 



$877. 50 
100. 00 
72.50 



1, 050. 00 



lA. Materials to lie Furnished (Excavation for Access Road) : 



Item 
No. 



Designation 



2 In. W. I. Pipe and Fittings. 
Cement 

Fine Aggregate 

Coarse Aggregate 

Form Lumber 

Wire.. 

Nails (20' 16' 8' & 6d') 

R. C. Pipe— 12 In. Diam 

R. C. Pipe— 18 In. Diam 

R. C. Pipe— 24 In. Diam 

R. C. Pipe— 30 In. Diam 

Masonry and Riprap Stone... 
Dynamite (Caps and Fuse).. 

Reinforcing Steel.. 

Miscellaneous Supplies 



Total Cost of Material for Roads. 



Quantity 



3,200 

90 

50 

48 

9,000 

50 

3 

290 

80 

120 

60 

150 

500 

5,000 



Unit 



Lin. ft 

Bbl 

Cu. Yds.... 



M-BM. 

Lbs 

Kegs 

Lin. ft.. 



Ton. 
Lbs. 



Lump Sum. 



Unit 
price 



$0. 4125 

3.19 

2.70 

3.00 
57.50 

0.08 

6.60 

0.855 

2.02 

2.70 

3.98 

3.00 

0.20 

0. 0293 



$1,320.00 
287. 10 
135. 00 
144, 00 
517.50 
4.00 
19. 60 
247. 95 
161. 60 
324. 00 
238. 80 
450. 00 
100. 00 
146. 50 
103. 95 



4, 200. 00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2679 

2. Day Labor (Magazines) : 

(a) Handling and Hauling: 

1 man hour @ $1.50 $1.50 

4 man hours @ 0.50 2.00 

(b) Clearing and Orubbing: 

24 man hours @ $1. 50 . 36. 00 

72 man hours @ 0. 75 54. 00 

720 man hours @ 0. 50 360. 00 

(c) Laying Temporary Water Line: 

8 man hours @ $1. 50 12. 00 

20 man hours @ 0.75 15.00 

172 man hours @ 0. 50 86. 00 

(d) Structure Excavation: 

2,160 man hours @ $1.50 3,240.00 

4,320 man hours @ 1.00 4,320.00 

4,320 man hours @ 0. 65 2, SOS. 00 

12,960 man hours @ 0. 50 6, 480. 00 

(e) Maintenance: 

3,832 man hours @ $1.50 5,748.00 

8,832 man hours 1. 00 3, 832. 00 

3,200 man hours 0. 50 1, 600. 00 

Total Cost of Day Labor on Magazines 28, 594. 50 

2A. Day Labor (Access & Connecting Roads) : 

(a) Clearing and Grubbing: 

24 man hours @ $1. 50 36. 00 

72 man hours @ 0.75 54.00 

960 man hours @ 0.50 480.00 

(b) Handling and Hauling: 

8 man hours @ $1. 50 12. 00 

12 man hours @ 1. 00 12. 00 

12 man hours @ 0. 65 7. 80 

80 man hours @ 0. 50 40. 00 

(c) Laying Te^nporary Water Line: 

12 man hours @ $1. 50 18. 00 

24 man hours @ 0.75 18.00 

148 man hours @ 0. 50 74. 00 

(d) Excavation for Access Road: 

1,100 man hours @ $1.50 1,650,00 

2,200 man hours @ 1, 00 2, 20O. 00 

2,200 man hours @ 0.75 1,650.00 

2,200 man liours @ 0. 65 1, 430. 00 

6,600 man hours @ 0. 50 3, 300. 00 

(e) Fill — Compacted: 

800 man hours @ $1.50 1,200.00 

800 man hours @ 1. 00 800. 00 

800 man hours @ 0.65 520.00 

3,200 man hours @ 0.50 1,600.00 

(f ) Culvert Pipe Placing: 

110 man hours @ $1.50 165.00 

110 man hours @ 1.00 110.00 

220 man hours @ 0. 65 143. 00 

1,100 man hours @ 0.50 550.00 

(g) Headwalls — Forming & Stripping: 

120 man hours @ $1.50 180.00 

240 man hours @ 1.00 240.00 

240 man hours @ 0. 50 120. 00 

(h) Reinforcing Steel: 

36 man hours (dl $1.50 54.00 

72 man hours @ 1.00 72.00 

32 man hours @ 0.65 20.80 

44 man hours @ 0. 50 22. 00 



79716—46 — Ex. 145, vol. 4 15 



2680 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(i) Placing and Curing Concrete: 

24 man hours @ $L 50 $36.00 

48 man hours @ 1.00 48.00 

72 man hours @ 0. 75 54. 00 

120 man hours @ 0.50 60.00 

(j) Drop Inlets & Aprons — Placing Masonry: 

72 man hours @ $L 50 108. 00 

136 man hours @ 1.00 136.00 

288 man hours @ 0.50 144.00 

(k) Grading and Shaping Roadway: 

100 man hours @ $1.50 1.50.00 

300 man hours i @ 1.00 300.00 

200 man hours @ 0.60 130.00 

340 man hours @ 0.50 170.00 

(1) Maintenance: 

500 man hours ' @ $1. 50 7.50. 00 

500 man hours @ 1. 00 500. 00 

500 man hours (^ 0. 75 375. 00 

500 man hours : @ 0.50 250.00 



Total Cost of Day Labor on Road 19, 989. 60 

Platit Operation (Magazines) : 

(a) Rental of Equipment: 

1 21/. Cu. Yd. Power Shovels 3% Mos. @ $3, 150. 00 $11, 812. 50 

1 % Cu. Yd. Power Shovels 3% Mos. (a) 1,174.00 4,402.50 

1 Caterpillar Dozer 3% Mos. ((t> 869.00 3,258.75 

2 9 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 2 Mos. @ 584.00 2,336.00 

2 5 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 2 Mos. @ 407. 00 1, 628. 00 

2 % Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 2 Mos. @ 69. 00 276. 00 

2 Sedans 3% Mos. @ 76.00 570.00 

1 Coupe 3% Mos. @ 70.00 262.50 

Miscellaneous Small Equipment. Lump sum 103. 75 

(b) Fuel Oil, Gas, Oil & Grease, Lump sum 3,7-50.00 



Total Plant Operation (Magazines) 28.400.00 

3A. Plant Operation (Access Road) : 

(a) Rental of Equipment: 

1 % Cu. Yd. Power Shovel 3% Mos. @ 1, 174. 00 3, 228. 50 

1 2V> Cu. Yd. Power Shovel 3% Mos. @ 3, 150. 00 8, 662. 50 

1 Caterpillar Dozer 2% Mos. @ 869.00 2,389.75 

1 Roller with Tractor 2% ]\Ios. @ 806. 00 2, 216. 50 

2 9 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 2% Mos. C(l 584. 00 3, 212. 00 

2 5 Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 2% Mos. (^' 407. 00 2. 238. 00 

2 % Cu. Yd. Dump Trucks 2% IMos. @ 69. 00 3, 795. 00 

2 Sedans 3 Mo.s. @ 76.00 4.56.00 

1 Coupe 3 Mos. (^ 70.00 210.00 

1 1/4 Cu. Yd. Concrete Mixer 1 Mo. @ .55. 00 55. 00 

1 A. D. Auto Crane V. Mo. @ 942. 00 471. 00 

1 16 In. Radial Saw 1/2 Mo. @ 81. 00 40. 50 

1 Bar Shears % Mo. @ 109. 00 27. 25 

1 Bar Bender 14 Mo. @ 72.00 18.00 

1 Batching Plant % Mo. (S), 6.53.00 163.25 

1 Inclined Conveyor % Mo. @ 690. 00 172. .50 

1 Horizontal Convevor % Mo. (a). 430.00 107.50 

1 Power Road Grader 2 Mos. @ 460. 00 920. 00 

Miscellaneous Small Equipment, Lump Sum 166. 25 

(b) Fuel Oil, Gas, Oil & Grease, Lump Sum 4,250.00 



Total Plant Operation (Access Road) 32.800.00 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Magazines) : 

Total Cost of Material $1,0.50.00 

Total Cost of Labor 28.. .594. 50 

Total Cost of Plant____ 28. 400. 00 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Magazines 58, (^44. 50 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2681 

4A. Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Access Roads) : 

Total Cost of Material $4, 200. 00 

Total Cost of Labor 19, 989. 60 

Total Cost of Plant 32, 800. 00 



Total Plant Operation Cost of Job (Access Roads) §56. 989. 60 

Total Cost of Work (Magazines & Access Roads) 

Total Cost of Excavation for Magazines $58, 044. 50 

Total Cost of Excavation for Access Roads 56, 989. 60 

Total Cost to Contractor 115, 034. 10 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Jub: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $115, 034. 10 

Contingencies— 10% 11, 503. 41 



Total Direct Cost 126, 537. 51 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Surveys, Inspection and Engineering, (8%) $9,202. 73 

Total Indirect Cost 9,202.73 

Total Field Cost 135, 740. 24 

General Office Overhead— 8% 9, 202. 73 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 144, 942. 97 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

Theodobe Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



ADDENDUM NO. 4 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Doxe : Pave Ammunition Storage Access and Connecting Roads 
with 4" Waterbound Macadam Base Course and 2iA" Asphaltic Concrete Top 
Course. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wheeler Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific Item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to pave 
Ammunition Storage Access and Connecting Roads with 4" Waterbound Macadam 
Base Course and 21-2" asphaltic top course. The work to be done shall be in 
accordance with the Specifications to be issued and the details shown on the 
drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

The total Cost of the Work to l)e done shall not exceed $47,000.00. 
Addendum No. 4 to Job Order No. 5.0 is additional work and does not alter 
Addendum No. 3. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



2682 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Recapitiilation of estimated cost 
1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $47, 000. 00 

Contingencies — 10% 4, 700. GO 

Total Direct Cost 51, 700. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection Engineering $3, 760. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 3,760.00 

Total Field Cost 55,460.00 

General Office Overhead 3,760.00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 59, 220. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

July 1, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 5 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-e02 

Work To Be Done : Construct and Complete 4 each 30,000 cubic feet capacity re- 
inforced Concrete bombproof Ammunition Storage Structures. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wiieeler Field, on 

the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific Items : 

1. Furnish all necessary labor and equipment and perform all work necessary 
to Construct and Complete 4 each 30,000 cubic feet reinforced concrete bombproof 
Ammunition Storage Structures, (Structures to be constructed are shown as No. 
30-1, 30-2. 30-8, 30-9, on drawing "Bombproof Magazines," General Plan No. 2, 
File No. F-5/2). All of the work done shall be in accordance with Specifications, 
"Bombproof Ammunition Storage and Appurtenant Work to Accompany Job 
Order No. 5.0", and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the Specifica- 
tions. 

2. Work shall not be initiated on Construction of Burster Course for structures 
30-1. 30-2, 30-8, 30-9, until so ordered by the District Engineer. 

Addendum No. 5 to Job Order No. 5.0 is additional work and does not alter 
Addendums 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

The Cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $330,350.00. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
(Signed) Theodore Wyman Jr. 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers. 

District Engineer 



RECAPITULATION OF ESTIMATED COST 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $330, 350. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 33, 035. 00 

Total Direct Cost $363,385.00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $26, 428. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 26, 428. 00 

Total Field Cost 389,813.00 

General Office Overhead 26, 428. 00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government,, ..^,,, 416, 241. 00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2683 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is nut for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



August 14, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. i> 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W^14-eng-602 

Work To Be Done: Construct and complete two (2) each 5,000 cubic feet 
capacity, and three (3) each 10,000 cu. ft. capacity reinfoixed concrete bomb- 
proof ammunition storage structures. 

District: Honolulu District — Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wheeler Field, on the 

Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete two (2) each 5,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof ammuni- 
tion storage structures, (Structures to be constructed as shown as No. 5-1, and 
No. 5-2, on Drawing, '"Bombproof Magazines", General Plan No. 2, File No. 
F-5/2). 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete three (3) each 10,0€0 cubic feet capacity reinforced con- 
crete bombproof ammunition storage structures, (Structures to be constructed 
are shown as No. 10-1, No. 10-2, No. 10-3, on drawing, "Bombproof Magazines", 
General Plan No. 2, File No. F-5/2) . 

All of the work done shall be in accordance with Specifications, "Bombproof 
Ammunition Storage and Appurtenant work to Accompany Job Oi-der No. 5.0", 
and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

Work shall not be initiated on the construction of Burster Course for struc- 
tures 5-1, 5-2, 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, until so ordered by the District Engineer. 

Addendum No. 6 to Job Order No. 5.0 is additional work and does not alter 
Addendums 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $230,821.00. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore W'yman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Summary Sheet 

1. Work Authorized by Job Order No. 5.0 Addenda #3 to #7 inclusive: 

(a) Construction of nine each 30,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof maga- 

zines, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(b) Construction of three (3) each 10,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof 

magazines, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures. 

(c) Construction of six (0) each 5,000 cubic feet capacity bombproof maga- 

zines, complete with all necessary utilities and fixtures, 
(d) Construction of all necessary connecting and access roads, complete 
with paving, culverts, headwalls, and riprapped ditches 

(e) Construction and installation of electrical distribution system for 

magazines. 

(f) The installation of all necessary construction plant, equipment, build- 

ings, and facilities to carry out the construction program. 

2. Work is to be performed under Contract No. W— 414-eng-602. ( 1-A. Ammuni- 

tion Storage Magazines.) 

3. Present Construction is Limited to: 

(a) Excavation for all bombproof magazines. 

(b) Construct access and connecting roads complete with paving, culverts, 

headwalls, and drainage ditches. 

(c) Construct and complete nine (9) each 30,000 cubic feet capacity maga- 

zines, except that work on burster courses for magazines No. 30-1, 
30-2, 30-8, 30-9, is suspended until further orders by the District 
Engineer. 



2684 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(d) Construct and complete two (2) each 5,000 cubic feet magazines, No. 
5-1, and 5-2, except that work on the burster courses is suspended 
until further orders by the District Enyineer. 

(e) Construct and complete three (3) each 10,000 cubic feet magazines. No. 

10-1, 10-2, 10-3, except that work on the burster courses is suspended 
iintil further orders from the District Engineer. 

(f) Construction, installation, and repair of necessary plant equipment, 

and facilities for consumation of construction program. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, . 

District Engineer. 



September 2, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 7 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract No. W-4l4-eng-602 

Work To Be Done: Construct and Complete Four (4) Each 5,000 Cubic Feet 
Capacity Reinforced Concrete Ammunition Storage Structures. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Wheeler Field, on the 

Island of Oahu, T H,. and is limited to the following specific items : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary to construct 
and complete four (4) each 5,000 cubic feet capacity reinforced concrete ammuni- 
tion storage structures, (Structures to be constructed are shown as No. 5-3, 5-4, 
5-5, and 5-6, on drawing. "Bombproof Magazines", General Plan No. 2, File No. 
F-5/2). All of the work to be done shall be in accordance with Specifications, 
"Bombproof Ammunition Storage and Appurtenant Work to Accompany Job Order 
No. 5.0", and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

2. Work shall not be initiated on the construction of Burster Course for struc- 
tures 5-3, 5-If, 5-5, and 5-6, until so ordered by the District Engineer. 

Total Cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $157,200.00. 
Addendum No. 7 is work authorized under Job Order No. 5.0 and noes not alter 
Addendums, No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $157, 200. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 15, 720. 00 

Total Direct Cost 172, 920. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $12, 576. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 12, 576. 00 

Total Field Cost 185,496.00 

General Oflice Overhead 12. 576. 00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 198, 072. 00 



This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2685 

November 13, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 8 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract W-414 eng-602. 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 8 authorizes construction of burster courses for magazines, 
numbers: 30-1, 30-2, 30-S, 30-9, 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, 5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, and 
5-6, on which work was suspended by Addendum No. 5 dated July 1, 1941; 
Addendum No. 6 dated August 14, 1941 ; and Addendum No. 7 dated September 
2, 1941. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

January 3, 1942. 

ADDENDUM No. 9 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 9 to accompany Job Order No. 5.0 provides for the plugging 
of holes in all magazines not contemplated for use of personnel. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Colonel, U. 8. Army, 

District Engineer. 

February 20, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 10 

To Accompany Job Order No. 5.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 10 to accompany Job Order No. 5.0 (Bombproof Ammunition 
Storage Magazines, Wheeler Field, provides for camouflaging of entrances and 
approaches to the bomb storage magazines, in accordance with plans and instruc- 
tions furnished the Area Engineer. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4H 

Sumniai'y — CBR 
War Department 

united states engineer office 

Honolulu, T. H. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Hickam Field. Oahu, T. H. 

Job Order #7.0 April 25, 1941 (Rev) Aug 15, 1941. 

Construct— Eight (8) Igloo type reinforced concrete Magazines (2G' 6" x 40' 4" 

inside dimensions). Increased to ten (10) by revised job order. 
Est. Cost $91,062.00. 

Revised $143,406.00 (to Gov). 
Commencement Date: May 1, 1941. 



2686 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Est. Date to Complete : September 1, 1941. 

Revised : November 1, 1941. 
Supervision by G. A. Sisson, Area Engr., 2ncl Field Area. 
Addendum #2 Suspends work on Igloo #8 of Job Order 7.0 (revised) . 
Job Order #7.1 June 16, 1941 Revised December 1, 1944. 
Construct — Access road to bomb storage magazines. 
Est. Cost $38,052.00. 

Revised $74,805.96 (to Gov). 
Commencement Date : June 14, 1941. 
Est. Date Completion : August 1, 1941. 

Revised : December 15, 1941. 
Supervision by The Area Engr., Second Field Area. 
Job Order #7.2 June 16, 1941 Rev November 26, 1941. 
Construct — Railroad to Bomb Storage Magazine at Hickam Field. 
Est. Cost $16,700.00. 

Revised $76,086.08 (to Gov). 
Commencement Date : June 14, 1941. 
Est. Date to Complete : August 1, 1941. 

Revised : December 15, 1941. 
Supervision by The Area Engr, 2nd Field Area. 
Job Order #7.3 Aug. 15, 1941. 
Construct — Four (4) Igloo Type Reinforced Concrete Magazines, 

Three (3) P. O. #46 Magazines, one (1) P. O. #42 Magazine and one (1) 

Block Powder #45 Magazine, and barricades for Magazines. 
Est. Cost $126,000.00 (to Gov). 
Commencement Date : Aug. 16, 1941. 
Estimate Date for completion : Dec. 1, 1941. 
Supervision by the Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 
Addendum #1, Dated Aug 18, 1941. Suspends work on all Igloos and Magazines 

except Igloo #11. 
Job Order 7.4. Aug 15, 1941. 
Construct — Approx 3410 lin feet Manproof wire fence and relocate 2075 lin feet 

existing fence. 
Est. Cost : $9,918.70. 
Commencement Date : 

Aug 16, 1941. 

Oct 1, 1941. 
Supervision by the Area Engr, Second Field Area. 



Wab Depaktmewit, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., April 25, lO^l. 
Contract No. W-414-Eng-602— 7.0 

Order No 

To : Hawaiian Constructors — Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : The Construction of 8 Igloo Type/Concrete Underground 

Magazines. 

2. LOCATION : Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2019 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and complete 8 reinforced concrete igloo 

type underground magazines (26'-6" x 40'-4" inside dimensions) together 
with barricades for each structure. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : As shown in paragraph 1-04 of Specifi- 

cations. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : C. B. and U. A. 21 x 0540.062 Construc- 

tion of Buildings utilities and appurtenances at Military Posts, Eng. 716 
P99 A-O540.062-N. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $91,062.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : May 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE : September 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: See detailed estimate attached. 



J 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2687 



13. MATERIALS : See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: G. A. Sisson, Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 



Distribution ; 



Approved : 



/s/ Thbodobe Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col. Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Wakeen T. Hannum, 

Col., Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



Mat 22, 1941. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done : Construct and install Electrical Distribution System For 

Bomb Storage Magazines, Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickam Field, on the 
Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment, and i)erform all work necessary to con- 
struct and make complete installation of Electrical Distribution System for Bomb 
Storage Magazines, in accordance with Specifications to Accompany Addendum 
No. 1 to Job Order No. 7.0, and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in 
the Specifications. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $2,464.70. 

Addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 7.0 provides for additional work other than 
that specified in Job Order No. 7.0 and does not in any manner change the work 
to be done thereunder. 



Cost to Conteactob 



1. Materials to be Furnished: 



Item 
No. 


Designation 


Quantity 


Unit 


Unit 
Price 


Total 
Cost 


1 


5KVA Transformer. 


1 
9 


Each.... 


$128.00 
24.00 


$128.00 


2 


Poles— Creosoted— Douglas Fir (35') .. .... 


216.00 


3 


Cross Arms— Douglas Fir 


13 


<< 


1.50 


19.50 


4 


Cross Arm Braces — Galv . 


26 
7 


" 


0.25 
5.50 


6.50 


5 


Underground Ties — 3 Way. 


38.50 


6 


Wire— 3 Conductor #6RR 600V... _ 


3,600 
4,000 


Lin. Ft- 


0.30 
0.016 


1, 080. 00 


7 


Wire— #6 Solid Primary (316#) 


64.00 


8 


Wire— 2 Conductor #8. 


200 


■< <i 


0.18 


36.00 


9 


Primary Cutouts . . .. 


2 


Each 


8.00 


16.00 


10 


Miscellaneous Hardware 




Lump 

Sum, 




70.50 




Total Cost of Materials 










$1, 675. 00 














2. Day Labor. 








(a) Handling and Hauling. 








16 man hours 




@ $1.50 


$24.00 


16 man hours 




0. 75 


12.00 


.^>2 man hours 




0. 50 


16.00 


(b) Digging Pole Holes and Backfilling. 








8 man hours 




. @ $1.50 


12.00 


48 man hours 




0. 50 


24.00 


(c) Erecting Poles, Anchors and Cross 


Arms. 






16 man hours 




@ $L50 


24.00 


32 man hours 




1.00 


32.00 


32 man hours 




0. 75 


24.00 




32 man hours 







0.50 


16.00 



2688 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(d) Overhead Construction, String Wire. 

16 mull hours @ $1. 50 $24. 00 

24 man hours 1. 00 24. 00 

24 man hours .» 0.75 18.00 

24 man hours 0. 50 12. 00 

(e) Excavation and Backfill for Line Trench. 

16 man hours @ $1. 50 24. 00 

24 man hours 1. 00 24. 00 

24 man hours 0.65 15.60 

48 man hours 0. 50 2A. 00 

(f ) Splicing and Lwging Underground Cable. 

16 man hours @ $1. 50 24. 00 

32 man hours 1.00 32.00 

32 man hours 0. 75 24. 00 

64 man hours 0. 50 32. 00 

Total Cost of Day Labor 461. 60 

3. Plant Operation. 

(a) Plant Rental. 

FJatrack Track 2 da. @ $18.50 37.00 

Truck Crane 2 da. @ 42. 80 84. 60 

Pick-up Truck 10 da. @ 3. 15 31. 50 

Ditching Machine 2 da. @ 25. 00 50. 00 

Bulldozer 1 da. @ 25. 00 25. 00 

288.10 

(b) Gas, Oil, and Miscellaneous Supplies^ 50.00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 278. 10 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost of Joh. 

Cost of Material 1, 675. 00 

Cost of Day Labor 401. 60 

Cost of Plant Operation 278. 10 

Mobilization & Demobilization 50. 00 

Total Cost of Job to Contractor 2, 464. 70 

Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Job: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $2, 464. 70 

Contingencies— 10% 246. 47 

Total Direct Cost 2, 711. 17 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Insp., and Engr.— 8% $197. 18 

Total Indirect Cost 197. 18 

Total Field Cost of Job 2, 908. 35 

General Office Overhead— 8% 197. 18 

Grand Total Cost to Governmeait 3, 105. 53 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF AR]MY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2689 

Wab Depaktment, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., August 15, 1941, 
JOB ORDER NO. 7.0 (Revised) 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu. T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PRO.IECT TITLE : Construct Ten Isloo Type Reinforced Concrete Magazines. 

2. LOCATION: Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2019. 

4. WORK TO BE L>()NE : Construct and complete ten (10) Igloo Type Rein- 

forced concrete magazines (26' x 6" x 40'-4", inside dimensions) together 
with a barricade for each structure. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General — Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As shown in paragraph 104 of Specifica- 

tions. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng 716. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $113,515.00. 

0. COMMENCEMENT DATE : May 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: November 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: H2,.570 Man Hours. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : Mixer, trucks, power shovel, pile driving equipment, 

hand tools. 

13. MATERIALS : Building materials. Fuel, Oil Supplies. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Approved 



Wakren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised) 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done : Construct and complete Ten Igloo Type Reinforced Concrete 

Magazines. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickam Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete ten (10) Igloo Type reinforced concrete magazines, (26'-6" 
X 40'-4" inside dimensions), together with a barricade for each structure. All 
of the work to be done shall be in accordance with, "Specifications to Accompany 
Job Order No. 7.0", and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the 
specifications. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $113,815.00. 
Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised) supplants Job Order No. 7.0 dated April 25, 1941. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor.. $113,815.00 

Contingencies— 10% 11,381.50 

Total Direct CJost 125, 196. 50 



2690 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $9, 105. 20 

Total Indirect Cost $9, 105. 20 

Total Field Cost 134, 301. 70 

General Office Overhead 9, 105. 20 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 143, 406. 90 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

April 18, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Rev.) 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Rev.), (Construct ten (10) 
Igloo type reinforced concrete magazines) suspends work on Igloo No. 8 of Job 
Order No. 7.0 (Rev.). 

Suspension Requested By : 1st Indorsement Department Engineer to G-4 dated 
April 3, 1942. 

For the Department Engineer : 

/s/ John C. Meadows, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



May 12, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 3 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised) 

Contract W-414r-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 3 to accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised) (Construct 10 
Igloo Type Reinforced Concrete Magazines, Hickam Field) authorizes additional 
electrical distribution work necessary to serve all igloo type magazines at Hickam 
Field. 
Office File Reference : Serial No. 4639. 

Work Requested By: Department Engineer by letter from Area Engineer, 
Second Field Area, dated May 5, 1942. 
For tlie Department Engineer : 

[S] John C. Meadows, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



December 4, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 4 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Rev.) 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of the District Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 4 to accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised) (Construct 10 
Igloo Type Reinforced Concrete Magazines— Hickam Field) cancels work author-. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2691 



ized by Addendum No. 3 to Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised), with tlae exception of 
grading work, which will lie completed. 
Office File Reference FA2-57. 

Cancellation Requested bv : Area Engineer, Second Field Area. In Inter-Office 
Memo, dated 11/12/42. 

For the District Engineer : 

IS] Joseph Matson, Jr., 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

Assistant. 



Decembee 7, 1942 



ADDENDUM NO. 4 (REVISED) 



To Accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised) 
Contract W-^14-Eng-602 

Office of the District Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 4 (Revised) to accompany Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised), (Con- 
struction of 10 Igloo Type Reinforced Ctmcrete Magazines — Hickam Field) 
cancels work authorized by Addendum No. 3 to Job Order No. 7.0 (Revised). 
Office File Reference : FA-2-57. 

Cancellation Requested by : Area Engineer, Second Field Area. In Inter-Office 
Memo, dated November 12, 1942. 
For the District Engineer : 

[S] Joseph Matson, Jr., 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

Assistant. 



Was Department, 
United States Exgineee Office, 

Honolulu, T. H. June 16, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 7.1. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Access Road— Bomb Storage Magazines 

2. LOCATION : Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2019 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and Complete the Access Road to Bomb 

Storage ilagazines. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Drawings, File No. F-23/19 to F-23/36 

inclusive. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng 716 
S. ESTIMATED COST: $30,200.00 

9. CO-AIMENCEMENT DATE : June 14, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : August 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: Detailed estimate to be Furnished Later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: " " " " 

13. MATERIALS: " " " " 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer, Second Field Area 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodobe Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Wabben T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



2692 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.1 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

WoKK To Be Done: Construct and Complete the Access Road to Bomb Storage 

Magazines. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickam Field on the 
Island of Oahn, T. H., and is limited to the following Specific item : 

1. Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary 
to construct and complete the Access Road to Bomb Storage Magazines, in accord- 
ance with, "Specifications to Accompany Job Order No. 7.1", and the details 
shown on the di'awings enumerated in the Specifications. 

The total Cost of the Work to be done shall not exceed $30,200.00. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $30,200.00 

Contingencies— 107c 3, 030. 00 

Total Dir'-ct Cost 33,220.00 

(b) Indirect Co^st: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering, (S% of Total 

Cost to Contractor) $2,416.00 

Total Indirect Cost 2,416.00 

Total Field Cost 35,636.00 

General Office Overhead (8% o fTotal Cost to Contrac- 
tor) 2,416.00 

Estimated total cost to the government 38, 052. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H.. December 1, 19-il. 

JOB ORDER NO. 7.1 (Revised) 
Contract W-414-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work: 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Access Road— Bomb Storage Magazines 

2. LOCATION : Hickman Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : ND-611 Hickman-ND-633 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete the access road to bomb 

.storage magazines. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian Department 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Drawing as enumerated in Specifications 

to accompanv Job Order 7.1 (Revised.) 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: Eng. 716 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $59,524.00 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 14, 1941 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : December 15, 1941 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2693 



11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REGUIRED : 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY: Area Engineer, Second Field Area 

/s/ Theodore Wyman Jr., 
Lt. Col. Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.1 (Revised) 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

Work To Be Done : Access Road — Bomb Storage Magazines. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hlckam Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete the access road to bomb storage magazines, in accordance 
with "Specifications to accompany Job Order No. 7.1 Revised," and the details 
shown on the drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman Jr., 
Lt. Col. Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Hicham Field bomb storage magazine access road 



1. Materials: 



1. Concrete (Readv Mix^ 

2. Reinforcing Steel (W0 & 5^"0) 

3. Rock (in Place) 

4. Asphaltic Cement (in place) 

5. 18" Reinforced Concrete Pipe 

6. Collars for R. C. Pipe 

7. Lumber— 2" x 6" (Header Boards). 

8. Stakes— 2" x 3" x 18" 

9. Plywood (Forms) 

10. Lumber (Forms) 

11. Nails (16d, 8d & 6d) 

12. Wir(^#14 Ga. Black 

13. Miscellaneous Supplies 



Total Material. 



No. of 
Units 



20 

3135 

3020 

3825 

104 

11 

27.42 

5480 

380 

.57 

4 

35 



Unit 



Cu. Yd... 

Lb 

Cu. Yd... 

Tons 

Lin. Ft... 

Ea 

M. B.M.. 

Ea 

Sq. Ft_._. 
M. B. M. 

Keg 

Lb 



Unit 
Cost 



$9.75 

0. 0292 

3.00 

7.60 

1.80 

1.71 
47.50 

0.05 

0.095 
47.50 

6.7C 

0.08 



. $195.00 

92.00 

9. OfiO. 00 

29, 070. 00 

187. 00 

19.00 

1, 302. 00 

274. 00 

36.00 

27.00 

27.00 

3.00 

100.00 



$40, 392. 00 



2. Labor: 

A. Placing Fill: 

512 Man Hours @ $1. 50 Per Hour $ 768. 00 

256 " " " 1.25 " " 320.00 

96 " " " 1.10 " " 106.00 

112 " " " 1.00 " " 112.00 

1536 " " " 0.95 " " 1,459.00 

208 " " " 0.90 " " 187.00 

256 " " " 0.65 " " 166.00 

256 " " " 0.50 " " 128.00 

Total $3, 246. 00 

B. Finishing Base Course: 

20 Man Hours @ $1. 50 Per Hour $ 30. 00 

56 " " " 1.10 " " 62.00 

40 " " " 1.00 " " 40.00 

Total 132. 00 



2694 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

C. Setting Header Boards: 

28 Man Hours @ $1. 50 Per Hour $ 42.00 

224 " " " 1.25 " " 280.00 

112 " " " 0.50 " " 56.00 



Total $378. 00 

D. Framing & Placing Reinforced Concrete: 

24 Man Hours @ $1. 50 Per Hour $ 36. 00 

24 " " " 1.30 " " 31.00 

24 " " " 0.625 " " 15.00 

106 " " " 0.50 " " 5,3.00 



Total 135. 00 

E. Excavation {Hand — 125 Cn. Yds.): 

16 Man Hours @ $1. 50 Per Hour $ 24. 00 

128 " " " 0.50 " " 64.00 



Total 88. 00 

F. Placing Concrete Pipe {10 Jf Ft.) : 

6 Man Hours @ $L 50 Per Hour $ 9.00 

8 " " " 0.95 " " 8.00 

6 " " " 0.75 " " 5.00 

60 " " " 0.50 " " 30.00 



Total 52. 00 

G. Maintenance, Watchmen. Etc.: 

128 Man Hours @ $1. 30 Per Hour $ 166. 00 

128 " " " 0.90 " " 115.00 

432 " " " 0.50 " " 216.00 



Total 497. 00 

H. Handling and Hauling: 

8 Man Hours (oi $1. 50 Per Hour $ 12. 00 

16 " " " 0.95 " " 15.00 

128 " " " 0.50 " " 64.00 



Total 91. 00 



Total Labor 4, 619. 00 

Plant Rental: 

A, 1-11/2 Cu. Yd. Shovel 19 Days @ $90. 00 1, 710. 00 

6-5 Cu. Yd. Trucks " 

1-Cat Dozer " 

1-12 Ton Roller 15 

1-Road Maintainer " 

1-Water Tank with Truck " 

1-Truck with Derrick 1 

1-5 Ton Flat Truck 2 

1-% Ton Pick Up 33 

1-Sedan " 

1-Welding Outfit 19 

Miscellaneous Small Tools 100. 00 

B. Gas— Diesel Oil— Lubricants 885. 00 



20. 36Ea. 2,314.00 

42. 60 809. 00 

20. 40 306. 00 

28. 35 425. 00 

15. 00 225. 00 

38. 00 38. 00 

13. 00 26. 00 

4. 20 139. 00 

5. 55 183. 00 
2. 25 43. 00 



Total cost to the contractor 7, 203. 00 

Total Operation Cost: 

Total Cost of Labor 4, 619. 00 

Total Cost of Materials 40, 392. 00 

Total Cost of Plant 7,203.00 

Contractors Filed & Office Overhead 2, 089. 00 

Mobilization & Demobilization 5, 221. 00 



Total cost to the contractor 59, 524. 00 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2695 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $59, 524. 00 

Insurance, Taxes, Compensation & Fixed Fee 2, 380. 96 

Total Direct Cost 61,904.96 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Inspection and Supervision $3, 095. 25 

Surveys -- 3, 095. 25 

Overhead— Field 1, 857. 15 

Auditing & General Administrative 619. 05 

Total Indirect Cost 8,666.70 

Total Field Cost 70, 571. 66 

Overhead— District & Division 4,234.30 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 74, 805. 96 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



ADDENDUM NO. 1 



November 5, 1942. 



To Accompany Job Order No. 7.1 (Rev.) 

Contract W^14-Eng-602 

Office of the District Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to above Job Order (Access Road to Magazines, Hickam 
Field), eliminates the asphalt concrete paving of access road from Job Order No. 
7.1, effective above date. 

Work requested by the Area Engineer, Second Field Area, 1st, Ind. 10/28/42. 
Approved by : Dist. Engr. — ^^Operations Officer. 
For the District Engineer : 

/s/ Joseph Matson, Jr., 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

Assistant. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. E., June 16, 1941. 
Contract No. W^14r-eng-602. 
Job Order No. 7.2. 

To: Hawaiian Constructors — Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Railroad— Bomb Storage Magazines. 

2. LOCATION : Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2019 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and Complete Railroad to Bomb Storage 

Magazines at Hickam Field. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Drawings, F-23/19 to F-23/36 Inclusive. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng. 716 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $16,700.00 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 14, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: August 1, 1941. 



79716 — 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4- 



-16 



2696 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

13. MATERIALS : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The area Engineer, Second Field Area. 

/s/ Theodoee Wyman, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers. 
Approved : 

Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 
Distribution : 



Wae Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., November 26, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 7.2 (REVISED). 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

To: Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Railroad— Bomb Storage Magazines 

2. LOCATION : Hickani Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: ND 617— Ry. Hickam 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and complete railroad to Bomb Storage 

Magazines at Hickam Field. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Access Railroad and Highway, F-29/62 

and other drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng. 716. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $60,542.61. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 14, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : December 15, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See detailed estimate attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: 

13. MATERIALS: 

14. SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer— Second Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : 

Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 
Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.2 (Revised) 

Contract W^14-eng-G02 

Work to be Done : Railroad — Bomb Storage Magazines 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickham Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and complete a railroad to the Bomb Storage Magazines, in accordance 
with the Specifications to Accompany Job Order No. 7.2 (REVISED) and the 
details shown on the drawings enumerated in the Specifications. 



1. Material: 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 
Hickam Field access railroad to bomb storage 



2697 



Xo. of 

Units 



U. cost 



Amount 



10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
23. 
27. 
23. 



60 lb. RaU-Stand. A. S. C. E. Punched. 

#9 Turnout Complete 

Angle Bars 

H" X iH" Track Bolts & Nuts 

^e" X 5H" Track Spikes 

60 Lb. Guard Rails— Std. Punching 

Verona lock washers 

Tie Plates— 66" x 8"— 60#— 4 hole 

RaU Braces 

84" x6" Bolts with Hex. Xuts 

iPipe— IK" D- S.— 3?4" long O. D.:1.66" 
6" X 8" X 6'— 0" Cross Ties— Untreated. 
Switch Ties— 6' X 8" X 6'-6" " 
" " 7'-0" 



6" 
8'-0" 
" 6" 
g'-O" 
" 6" 
10- -0" 
14'-0" 



Crushed Rock Ballast. 

18" Reinf. Concrete Pipe 

Collars for 18" Reinf. Concrete Pipe. 

Reinforcing Steel 

Lumber 

?s" Plywood 

Ready-Mix Concrete 

Miscellaneous Material 



Total cost of material. 



Tons. 
Each. 
Pairs. 
Kegs. 

Tons. 
Each. 



Cu. Yds_ 
Lin. ft... 

Each 

Lbs 

MBM... 
Sq. Ft... 
Cu. Yds. 
Lump 



157. 13 

1 

694 

11 

91 

53.58 

6470 

12118 

25 

3590 

3590 

4345 

10 

5 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

6140 

48 

5 

464 

.2 
128 
2 



$33. 33 

277.75 

1.94 

13.90 

7.78 

33.33 

.0167 

.25 

.55 

.099 

.25 
1.12 
1.24 
1.33 
1.43 
1.52 
1.62 
1.71 
1.80 
1.90 
2.66 
2.55 
1.80 
1.90 

.03 
47.50 

.125 
8.50 



$5, 237. 14 

277. 75 

1, 346. 36 

152.90 

707. 98 

1, 785. 82 

108. 57 

3, 029. £0 

13.75 

355. 41 

897. cO 

4, 866. 40 

12.40 

6.65 

5.72 

4.56 

4.86 

5.13 

5.40 

5.70 

5.32 

15, 657. 00 

86.40 

9.50 

13.92 

9.50 

16.00 

17.00 

200.00 



$34,844.14 



2. Day Labor: 

(a) Clearing Site: 

6 Man Hours @ $1.50 

6 '• " .75 

48 " " .50 . 

(b) Excavation d Embankment: 

40 Man Hours @ $1.50 

24 " " 1.25 

192 " " .50 

(c) Handling d Hauling d Distributing: 

112 Man Hours (<i' $1.50 

64 " " 1.25 

400 " " 1.00 

576 " " .50 

(d) Laying Track {78S2 Lin. ft.): 

392 Man Hours @ $1.50 

9936 " " .50 4, 

(e) Installing Guard Rail (o35S") : 

240 Man Hours @ $1.50 

300 " " 1.37i/> 

300 " " .90 

2400 " " .50 1 

180 " " .65 

(f ) Ballasting d Surfacing: 

400 Man Hours @ $1.50 

10960 " •• .50 5, 

(g) Reconstruction of Pres. Track: 

56 Man Hours &> $1.50 

1304 " " .50 

(h) Installing Turnout : 

24 Man Hours @ $1.50 

224 " " .50 

(i) Installing 18" Concrete Pipe: 

8 Man Hours (a) $1.50 

8 " " 1.25 

80 " " .50 



$9.00 

4.50 

24.00 

60.00 
30.00 
96.00 

16S. 00 

80.00 

400.00 

288.00 

588.00 
968.00 

360. 00 
412. 50 
270. 00 
200. 00 
117.00 

660. 00 
480. 00 

84.00 
652.00 

36.00 
112. 00 

12.00 
10.00 

40.00 



2698 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(j) Building Concrete Culverts (2 Cu. Yds. Concrete): 

16 Man Hours @ $1.50 !>24. 00 

10 " " 1.30 13.00 

20 " " 1.25 25.00 

8 " " .50 4.00 

(k) Maintenance, Clerks, Watchmen, Etc. (2 Months): 

20S Man Hours @ $1.50 - 312.00 

594 " " 1.00 594.00 

832 " " .75 624.00 

1024 " " .50 512.011 

Total Cost of Day Labor 18,269.00 

3. Plant Operation: 

(a) Rental of Equipment : 

Carryall & Tractor 2 days @ $40. 00 $80. 00 

Bulldozer 3 " " 28.40 85.00 

Gasoline Locomotive 2 Mos. " 45.00 90.00 

Hand Car 2 " " 16.00 32.00 

Auto Crane 8 days '• 42.80 342.40 

(2) R. R. Dump Cars 1 Mo. " 90.00 90.00 

(1) Ford Sedan 2 Mos. " 110. OH 220.00 

(1) •% -Ton Pickup 2 " " 83.00 166.00 

Misceallaneous Tools & Equipment 500.00 

1, 605. 60 

(b) Fuel, Oil, Ec 200.00 

(c) Rental on R. R. Cars 120.00 

Total Plant Operation 1,925.60 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost of Job: 

(1) Cost of Material 34,844.14 

(2) Cost of Labor 18,269.00 

(3) Cost of Plant Operation 1,925.60 

(4) Mobilization & Demobilization 5,503.87 

Total Cost to the Contractor 60. 542. 61 

/s/ Theodore Wyii.\n, Jr., 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of Estimated Cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $60, .542. 61 

Ins., Taxes, Compensation, Fixed-Fee 2, 421. 70 

Total Direct Cost 1 62,964.31 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Inspection & Supervision $3, 148. 22 

Surveys 3, 148. 22 

Overhead— Field 1, 888. 93 

Auditing & General Admn 629. 64 

Total Indirect Cost - 8,815.01 

Total Field Cost 71,779.32 

Overhead— District & Division 4.306.76 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 76, 086. 08 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2699 



ADDENDUM NO. 1 



February 12, 1942. 



To Accompany Job Order No. 7.2 (Rev.) 

Contract W-414-eng-602 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to Accompany Job Order No. 7.2 (Rev.) (Access Railroad to 
Magazines) authorizes the rehabilitation of all tracks serving the Hickam Field 
Bomb Storage Area, in accordance with instructions furnished the Area Engineer. 

/s/ Theodore Wymax, Jr., 

Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



April 20, 1942. 

ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.2 (REV) 

Contract W^14-Eng-602 

Office of Department Enginkee, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 to accompany Job Order No. 7.2 (REV) (Railroad — Bomb 
Storage Magazines) cancels Addendum No. 1 (Rehabilitation of all tracks serving 
the Hickam Field Bomb Storage Area). 
Office File Reference : Serial No. 3963. 

Cancellation Requested By : Department Engineer by letter from the Area 
Engineer dated April 14, 1942. 
For the Department Engineer : 

/s/ John C. Meadows. 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., August 15, 191(1. 
JOB ORDER No. 7.3. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Construct and Complete Four (4) Igloo Type Rein- 

forced Concrete Magazines, three (3) P. O. No. 46 Magazines, one (1) 
P. O. No. 42 Magazine, and one (1) Black Powder No. 45 Mrgazine. 

2. LOCATION : Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2019. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and complete four (4) Igloo Type rein- 

forced concrete magazines; three (3) P. O. No. 46 magazines; one (1) 
P. O. No. 42 magazine, and one (1) Black Powder No. 45 magazine, 
together with necessarv barricades. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian De- 

partment. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : To be furnished later. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng 716. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: ,'?100,000.00. 

9. CO.AIMENCEMENT DATE : August 16, 1941. 

10. ESTi:\IATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : December 1, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: Detailed estimated to be furnished 

later. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 



2700 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

13. MATERIALS : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: The Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodobe Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : August 28, 1941. 

/s/ H'arren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineers. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.3 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

W^ORK TO BE Done: Construct and complete four (4) Igloo Type reinforced con- 
crete magazines; three (3) P. O. No. 46 magazines; one (1) P. O. No. 42 maga- 
zine, and one (1) Black Powder No. 45 magazme, together with necessary 
barricades. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickam Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following specific item : 

1. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to construct 
and complete the following structures, in accordance with the Specifications, 
"To Accompany Job Order No. 7.3", and the details shown on drawings enumer- 
ated in the Specifications : 

(a) Four (4) Igloo Type Reinforced Conci'ete Magazines. 

(b) Three (3) P. O. No. 46 Magazines. 

(c) One (1) P. O. No. 42 Magazine. 

(d) One (1) Black Powder Magazine. 

(e) Necessary barricades for the Magazines. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $100,000.00. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work : 

Total Cost to the Contractor $100, 000. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 10, OOO. 00 

Total Direct Cost 110,000.00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $8, 000. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 8,000.00 

Total Field Cost 118,000.00 

General Office Overhead 8,000.00 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 126, 000. 00 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2701 



J06 4-21 

April 18, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.3 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu. T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 7.3, (Construct four (4) Igloo 
Type reinforced Concrete Magazines: three (3) P. O. No. 46 Magazines; one (1) 
P. O. No. 42 Magazine and one (1) Black Powder No. 45 Magazine together with 
necessary barricades (susi)ends work on all Igloos and Magazines authorized by 
the Job Order No. 7.3 except Igloo No. 11.) 

Suspensit)u Requested By : 1st Indorsement Department Engineer to G-4 dated 
April 3, 1942. 

For the Department Engineer. 

/s/ John C. Meadows, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



Wak Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., August 15, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 7.4. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Construct and install approximately 3410 lineal feet of 

Manproof Wire fence, and relocate approximately 2075 lineal feet of 
existing Manproof Fence. 

2. LOCATION: Hickam Field. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : ND 654. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and install approximately 3410 lineal feet 

of Manproof wire fence and relocate approximately 2075 lineal feet of 
existing Manproof fence. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : To be furnished later. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: Eng. 716. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $7,872.00. 
COMMENCEMENT DATE : August 16, 1941. 
ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : October 1, 1941. 
ESTIMATED LABOR AT S''^'^< : Detailed estimate to be furnished later. 
PLANT REQUIRED : " " " " 
MATERIALS: " " " " 
SUPERVISION BY : The Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 



/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr.. 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineen 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 7.4 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work to ee Done : Construct and install approximately 3410 lineal feet of man- 
proof wire fence, and relocate approximately 2075 lineal feet of existing 
manproof fence. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickam Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. II., and is limited to the following specific items : 

1. Fui-nish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to con- 
struct and install approximately 3410 lineal feet of manproof wire fence. 



2702 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

'1 

2. Furnish all labor and equipment and perform all work necessary to relocate 
approximately 2075 lineal feet of existing mauproof fence. 

All of the work to be done shall be in accordance with the "Specifications to 
Accompany Job Order No. 7.4", and the details shown on the drawings enu- 
merated in the Specifications. 

The total cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $7,872.00. 



/s/ 



Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Je., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to the Contractor $7, 872. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 787. 20 

Total Direct Cost 8,659.20 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engineering $629. 76 

Total Indirect Cost 629. 76 

Total Field Cost 9, 288. 96 

General Office Overhead 629.76 

Estimated Total Cost to the Government 9,918.72 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only and is not for distri- 
bution to the Contractor. 

/s/ Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Je., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Abmy Peael Haebor Boaed Exhibit No. 41 

Summary 
War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., March 15, 1941. 

Contract No. W414-eng-602 

Punchbowl, Oahu T. H. 

Job Order #14.0. 

Construct — reinforced concrete fire control station at Punchbowl. 

Est. Cost : $3,650.00. 

Commencement Date : March 10, 1941. 

Est. date for completion : April 10, 1941. 

Supervision by J. J. Kestly, Area Engr., 3rd Field Area. 



Wae Department, 
U. S. Engineer Office, 
Honolulu, T. H., Mar. 15, 191,1. 

JOB ORDER NO. 14.0. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 

Tuo : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Fire Control Station at Punchbowl. 

2. LOCATION : Honolulu, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2013.4 F. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete reinforced concrete fire 

conti'ol station at Punchbowl. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : See paragraph 1-03 Specifications. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2703 



7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : C. A. C. 131 P 99 A 1210-N. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $3,650.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : March 10, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : April 10, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : 1840 man hours. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY : J. J. Kestly, Area Engineer, 3rd Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Enrfineers 

District Engineer. 



Approved : April 3, 1941. 



Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 14.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost : Fire Control Station, Punchbowl, Oahu, T. H. 
District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done is at Punchbowl on the Island of Oahu, and includes the 
furnishing of all necessary labor and equipment and the performing of all work 
necessary to construct a reinforced concrete fire control station, complete with 
all utilities and fixtures, all of the work to be done shall conform to the provisions 
of specification, "The Construction of a Fire Control Station, Punchbowl, and 
appurtenant work to accompany Job Order No. 14.0 to Contract No. W-414-eng- 
602", and the details shown on the following drawings : 
Sheet No. Description File No. 

1 Project Location and Index to Drawings F-3/39 

2 Detailed Location of Work and Typical Sections F-3/40 

3 Instrument Bldg. — Plan, Details, and Bar Schedule F-3/41 

4 Miscellaneous Metal — Standard Details F-3/42 

The estimated cost of the work to be done is as follows : 
1. Materials to be furnished: 



Item 


Designation 


Quantity 


Unit 


Unit 
cost 


Amount 


] 


Cement (From Base Yard Delivered) 


45 

30 

15 

3,850 

1,640 

4,300 


bbls 

cu. yd 

cu. yd 

lbs 

lbs . . 


$3.04 

3.00 

2.70 

0,045 

0.10 
45. OOM 


$136 80 


2 


Coarse Aggregate d.ocal Delivered) .._ _.. . 


90 00 


3 
4 


Fine Aggregate (Local Delivered) _ 

Reinf. Steel (From Base Yard Delivered) .^. 


40.50 
173 25 


5 


Structural Steel (Local Delivered) 

Lumber (From Base Yard Delivered) 

Hardware & Electrical Fixtures (lump'sum) (Local 

at Honolulu) 
Paint (Local at Honolulu) .. 


164. 00 


6 

7 


b.f 


193. 50 
50.00 


8 


1 
100 
200 


gal _ 

lbs 

lbs 


2.75 
0.08 
0.125 


2.75 


9 


Nails (Local at Honolulu) 


8 00 


10 


Dynamite (From 1st F. A. Magazine). 


25.00 




Total Cost of Materials 










883,80 















2. Day Labor: 

(a) Clearing Site: 

8 man hours @ J?l. 50 $12.00 

24 man hours @ 0.50 12.00 

(b) Excavating for Instrument House: 

18 man hours @ 1.50 24.00 

48 man hours @ 0. 65 31. 20 

480 man hours @ 0.50 240.00 



2704 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(c) Placing Concrete and Steel Instrument House: 

16 man hours @ $1- 50 $24. 00 

32 man hours @ 1-00 32.00 

32 man hours @ 0.65 20.80 

160 man hours @ 0.50 80.00 

(d) Placing Structural Steel and SJiutters: 

24 man hours @ 1-50 36.00 

40 man hours @ 1-00 40.00 

24 man hours @ 0. 65 15. 60 

100 man hours @ 0.50 50.00 

(e) Backfiling Structure: 

16 man hours @ 1.50 24.00 

24 man hours @ 1-00 24.00 

240 man hours @ 0.50 120.00 

(f) Drilling and Blasting for Excavation: 

20 man hours '@ 1-50 30.00 

80 man hours @ 0.75 60.00 

80 man hours @ 0.50 40.00 

(g) Operators of Rented Plant: 

120 man hours ® 1.00 120.00 

224 man hours @ 0.75 168.00 

Total Cost of Day Labor 1, 203. 60 



3. Plant Operation: 

(a) Plant to be Leased: 

1 Concrete Mixer— % cu. yd 6 da. @ 2. 50 15". 00 

2 Jackhammers 6 da. @ 1. 50 18. 00 

1 Compressor #210 6 da. @ 10. OO 60.00 

1 Truck— li/L. ton 21 da. @ 5.00 105.00 

Total Plant to be leased 198. 00 



(b) Fuel, Oil, Hand Tools, Supplies (lump sum) 150.00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 348.00 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost of Jot: 

Cost of Materials $883. 80 

Cost of Day Labor 1,203.60 

Cost of Plant Operations 348. 00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 2,435.40 



5. Total Cost of Work: 
(a) Direct Cost: 

(a) Total Plant Operation Cost 2,435.40 

Contingencies — 15% 365. 31 

Total Direct Cost 2,800.71 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Mobilization and Demobilization $300. 00 

Engr. Inspection and Supervision — 10% 280. 00 

Total Indirect Cost 580.00 



Total Field Cost 3,380.71 

General Office Overhead— 8% 269. 29 



Estimated Grand Total Cost by Hired Labor and Govern- 
ment Plant 3, 650. 00 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, .Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2705 



UNSKIIiED LABOE 

Class 1 — $0.50 per hour. 
Shovelers 
Material Handlers 
\\'ater Boy 

SEMI-SKILLED LABOE 

Class 2 — $0.65 per hour. 
Carpenter Helpers 
Class 3 — $0.75 per hour. 
Truck Drivers 
Jackhammer man 
Powder man 



SKILLED LABOE 

Class 4 — $1.00 per hour. 
Carpenters 
Cement Finishers 
Class 5 — $1.50 per hour. 
General Foreman 



Aemy Pearl Haebor Boakd Exhibit No. 4J 

Summary 
CBR/dw 
Wak Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., March 18, 1941. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Diamond Head, Oahu, T. H. 

Job Order No. 15.0. 

Construct — reinforced concrete fire control station, together with necessary access 

trail. 
Est. Cost: $5,785.00. 
Commencement Date: March 22, 1941. 
Est. Date for Completion : April 22, 1941. 
Supervision by J. J. Kestley, Area Engr., 3rd Field Area. 

War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., March 18, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 15.0. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 

To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Fire Control Station at Diamond Head. 

2. LOCATION: Honolulu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2013.3. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete reinforced concrete fire con- 

trol station, together with necessary access trail. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : See paragraph 1-04 of Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : CAC 131 p99 A-1210-N. 

8. ESTIMATED COST: $5,785.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE: March 22, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: April 22, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : 2,910 man hours. 
32. PLANT REQUIRED: See detailed estimate attached. 
13. MATERIALS: See detailed estimate attached. 

H. SUPERVISION BY : J. J. KESTLEY, Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col, Corps of Engineers. 

District Engineer. 

(Signed) Warren T. Hannum, 
Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer 



Approved : April 3, 1941. 



2706 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 15.0. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost : Fire Control Station Diamond Head. 
Distbict: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done is at Diamond Head, ou the Island of Oahu, and includes 
the furnishing of all necessary labor, materials, equipment and supplies, and the 
performing of all work necessary to construct a reinforced concrete fire control 
station, complete with all utilities and fixtures, together with the construction of 
an access trial. All of the work to be done shall conform to the provisions of 
Specifications, "The Construction of a Fire Control Station at Diamond Head 
and Appurtenant Work to Accompany Job Order No. 15.0 to Contract No. W^14- 
eng-602," and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in paragraph 1-03 
of the Specifications. The estimated cost of the work to be done is as follows: 

1. Materials to be purchased: 



Item 


Designation 


Quantity 


Unit 


Unit 
prices 


Amount 


1 


Reinforcing steel .. - . . 


3,340 

45 

20 

21 

1,648 

8 

6 

6 

2 

2 

7 

3,750 


lbs 

bbls 

cu. yd 

cu. yd 

lbs 

pes 

pes 

ft.- 


$0,045 

3.04 

2.70 

3.00 

0.10 

0.12 

0.09 

0.23 

0.26 

0.10 

3.00 
55. OOM 


$150. 30 


2 
3 


Cement 

Fine Aggregate 


136.80 
54.00 


4 




63.00 


5 


Structural Steel 


164.80 


6 


%" X 8" Anchor bolts 


0.96 


7 


W X S" Galv. bolts 


0.54 


S 


2" Galv. pipe.- - . 


1.38 


C) 


2" Pipe caps _ 


pes 

ft 


0.52 


10 


Yi" Conduits. 


0.20 


11 


3" Rock 


cu. yd 

b. m 

lumpsiun. 
gal 

lbs 

gal-_ 

sq .ft 

lbs 

lbs 

lbs 


21.00 


1? 


Form lumber... 


206. 25 


13 


Electrical Fixtures, etc . _ 


75.00 


14 


Paint.. 


1 
200 
4 
288 
88 
37 
200 


2.75 

0.065 

0.52 

0.014 

0.10 

0.10 

0.125 


2.75 


15 


Nails . .-- -. . .... 


13.00 


Ifi 


Curing Compound- . 


2.00 


17 


6" X 6"— #10 Qa. Wire Mesh... 


4.03 


18 


#10 Ga. Wire 


8.80 


19 


#14 Ga. Wire 


3.70 


?0 


Dynamite.. 


25.00 




Total Cost of Material 










934. 11 















2, Day Labor: 

(a) Handling and Hauliny: 

48 man hours @ 

48 man hours @ 

16 man hours @ 

16 man hours @ 

1,024 man hours @ 

(b) Excavation for Structures: 

48 man hours @ 

96 man hours @ 

480 man hours @ 

(c) Grubbing, Excavation for Trail: 

24 man hours @ 

48 man hours @ 

144 man hours @ 

(d) Concrete Forms and Stripping: 

32 man hours @ 

80 man hours @ 

80 man hours @ 

(e) Placing Reinforcing Steel: 

14 man hours @ 

48 man hours @ 

48 man hours @ 



)1 


50 


$72. 00 


1 


00 


48.00 




75 


12.00 




65 


10.40 




50 


512. 00 


1 


50 


72.00 




75 


72.00 




50 


240. 00 


1 


50 


36.00 


1 


00 


48.00 




50 


72.00 


1 


50 


48.00 


1 


00 


80.00 




65 


52.00 


1 


50 


21.00 


1. 


00 


48.00 




75 


36.00 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2707 

(f ) Mixing, Placing, and Curing Concrete: 

32 man lionrs @ $1.50 $48.00 

32 man hours Cq> 1.00 32.00 

160 mni hours @ .50 80. Ou 

(g) Backfill for Structure: 

16 man hours @ 1. 50 24. 00 

240 man hours (it . .ju 12u. 00 

(h) Erecting Shutters and Door: 

24 man hours @ 1. 50 86. 00 

24 man hours (a 1.2."') 30. UO 

24 man hours @ .70 16.80 

(i) Cleaning and Painting. 

16 man hours @ 1. 00 16. 00 

(j) Electrical Installation. 

24 man hours @ 1. 00 24. 00 

24 man hours @ .65 15.60 



Total Day Labor Cost 1, 921. 80 

3. Plant Operation: 

(a) Rental of Equipment. 

1— 5-ton truck, dump 2 da. @ $11.00 22.00 

1— 2-ton truck 2 da. @ 5.20 10.40 

2 — Jackhammers — Barco Gasoline 10 da. (5) 2. 50 50. 00 

6— Pack Mules 16 da. @ 5.00 480.00 

2— Automobiles 30 da. @ 5. 00 300. 00 

1—%" Rubber hose 250 ft. 27. 50 

Small Tools and Equipment — Lump Sum 100. 00 

Total Plant Rental Cost 989.90 

(b) Fuel, Oil Forage, Supplies 150.00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 1,139.90 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost to Joh: 

Cost of Material 934.11 

Cost of Day Labor 1,921.80 

Cost of Plant Rental 1, 139. 90 

Total Plant Operation Cost 3. 995. 81 

5. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost. 

Total Plant Operation Cost 3, 99-5. 81 

Contingencies — 15% - 599.37 

Total Direct Cost , 4,595.18 

(b) Indirect Cost. 

Mobilization and Demobilization $300.00 

Surveys, Engr. and Insp. 10% 4.59. 52 

Total Indirect Cost 7.59. .52 

Total Field Cost of Job ,5, 354. 70 

General Officer Overhead — 8% 430. 30 

ESTIMATED GRAND TOTAL COST By 

Hired Labor and Government Plant 5, 785. 00 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr.. 
Theodore Wymax. Jr.. 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



2708 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



UNSKILLED LAKOE 

Class 1 — $0.50 per hour. 

Shovelers 

Material Handlers 

SEMI-SKILLED LABOE 

Class 2 — $0.65 per hotir. 
Carpenters' Helpers 
Truck Driver— 2 Ton 
Riggers' Helpers 
Class 3— $0.70 per hour. 
Structural Steel Helper. 
Class 4 — $0.75 per hour. 
Jackhammer man 
Truck Drivers — 5 Ton 



SKILLED LABOE 

Class 5 — $1.00 per hour. 

Carpenters 

Reinf. Rodsetters 

Electricians 

Painters 

Mule Skinner 

Cement Finishers 

Riggers 

Class 6 — $1.25 per hour. 

Structural Iron Worker 

Class 7— $1.50 per hour. 

General Foreman. 



Abmy Peakl Haeboe Board Exhibit No. 4K 

Summary 
War Depaetment, 
United States Engineeb Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., March 22, WJfl. 

Contract AV414-eng-602 

Kavpailoa Camp, Oahu, T. H. 

Job Order #13.0 

Construct and equip a reinforced concrete powerhouse and a reinforced concrete 

fire control station complete with all utilities and fixtures. 
Est Cost : $13,285.00. 
Commencement Date: March 15, 1941. 
Est date for completion : April 20, 1941. 
Supervision by J. J. Kestly, Area Engr. 3rd Field Area. 



Wab Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., March 22, 19^1. 
JOB ORDER NO. 13.0. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 
You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : Fire Control Station at Kawailoa Camp. 

2. Location : Kawailoa Camp, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2013.2F. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and equip a reinforced concrete power- 

house, and a reinforced concrete fire control station complete with all utili- 
ties and fixtures. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General — Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : See paragraph 1-03, attached Specifica- 

tions. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Seacoast Defenses, Insular Departments, 

1941, CAC 126 P99 A1210-01. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $13,285.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : March 15, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: April 20, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : 3,446 man hours. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED : See detailed estimate attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See detailed estimate attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: J. J. Kestly, Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wtman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved: Apr. 8, 1941. 

Waeben T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2709 



ESTIMATE OF COST 
To Accompany Job Order No. 13.0 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost : Fire Control Station at Kawailoa Camp, Oabii, T. H. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done is at Kawailoa Camp on the Island of Oahu, and includes 
the furnishing of all necessary labor, and equipment, and the performing of all 
work necessary to construct and complete a reinforced concrete building for a 
power plant together with all electrical and mechanical equipment and all fix- 
tui'es, and also a reinforced concrete fire control station complete with all utilities 
and fixtures. All of the work to be done shall conform to the provisions of 
Specification "Fire Control Station, Kawailoa, and appurtenant work to accom- 
pany Job Order No. 13.0", and the details shown on the following drawings : 
Sheet No. Description File No. 

1. Project Location and Index to Drawings F-3/25 

2. Detailed Location of Work and Typical Sections F-3/26 

3. Instrument Bldg.— Structural Details No. 1 F-3/27 

4. Instrument Bldg.— Structural Details No. 2 F-3/28 

5. Instiument Bldg.— Structural Details No. 3 and Bar Schedule No. 3_ F-3/29 

6. Power Plant Bldg.— Plan Details and Bar Schedule F-3/30 

7. Miscellaneous Metals— Standard Details — No. 1 F-3/31 

8. Miscellaneous Metals— Standard Details— No. 2 F-3/43 

The estimated cost of the work to be done is as follows : 
1. Materials to be furnished: 



Item 



Designation 



lieinf. Steel (Del. from Base Yard ) 

Structural Steel (Honolulu Purchase) 

Cement (From Base Yard) 

Fine Aggregate (Delivered) 

Coarse Aggregate (Delivered) 

laimber (From Base Yard) 

Nails ( l^elivered) 

Form Wire #11 (Delivered) 

Tie Wire #16 (Delivered) 

1" Black Pipe (Honolulu Purchase) 

Metal Louvers (Honolulu Purchase) 

Wire Mesh Reinforcement 6" x fi" (Hon. Pur.) 

2" Galv. Electrical Conduit (Hon. Pur.) 

24" Galv. Electrical Conduit (Hon. Pur.) 

Curing Compound for Concrete (Hon. Pur.) 

Electrical Wiring & FLxtures (Lump Sum) (at 
Honolulu). 

3 KVA Generator Unit (at Honolulu) 

Paint (Local at Honolulu) 

Hardware (lump sum) (Local at Honolulu) 



Total Cost of Materials. 



Quantity 



11, 900 

6,000 

143 

68 

C7 

19, 650 

800 

530 

100 

3 

4 

1,100 

22 

4 

50 



Unit 



lbs 

lbs 

bbls. .. 
eu. yd-- 
cu. yd.- 

b. f 

lbs 

lbs 

lbs 

ft 



sq. ft- 
lin. ft. 
lin. ft. 
gal.--. 



gal. 



Unit cost -Amount 



0.045 
0.10 
3.04 
2.70 
3.00 
45. OOM 
0.08 
0.05 
0. 062 
0.17 
7.00 
0.015 
0.20 
0.35 
0.52 



$535. 50 

600. 00 

434. 72 

183. 60 

201.00 

884, 25 

64.00 

26. .50 

6.20 

0.51 

28.00 

16.50 

.5.72 

1.40 

26.00 

175.00 

450. 00 

5.50 

150. 00 



3, 794. 40 



2. Day Labor: 

(a) Clearing and Grubbing Roadway: 

24 man hours . @ 

24 man hours 

64 man hours 

128 man hours 

(b) Clearing and Grubbing Braiding Sites: 

16 man hours @ 

8 man hours 

96 man hours 

(c) Excavation and Backfill — Buildings: 

16 man hours @ 

16 man hours 

96 man hours 

(d) Hauling and Handling Materials and Providing 
Transportation: 

8 man hours (g} 

240 man hours 

200 man hours 



$1.50 
1.00 
0.75 
0.50 

1. 50 
1.00 
0.50 

1. 50 
1. CO 
0. 50 



1.50 
0.75 
0.50 



$36.00 
24.00 
48.00 
64.00 

24.00 

8.0O 

48.00 

24.00 
16.00 
48.00 



12.00 
180. 00 
100. 00 



2710 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(e) Concrete Forms — Framing, Erecting, Stripping: 

160 man hours @ $1. 50 $240. 00 

480 man hours 1.00 480.00 

480 man hours 0. 65 312. 00 

(f) Mixing, Placing, Finishing, Concrete: 

66 man hours @ 1. 50 99. 00 

74 man hours 1. 00 74. 00 

240 man hours 0.75 180.00 

438 man hours 0. 50 219. 00 

(g) Placing Reinf. Steel in Buildings: 

32 man hours @ 1. 50 48. 00 

160 man hours 0. 75 120. 00 

(h) Installing Doors and Shutters. 

64 man hours @ 1.50 96.00 

128 man hours @ 1.00 128.00 

(i) Electrical Installation. 

32 man hours @ 1.50 48.00 

80 man hours @ 1.00 80.00 

80 man hours @ 0.65 52.00 

Total Day Labor Co.st 2, 908. 00 

3 Plant Operation: 

(a) Plant to he Leased. 

1— CuterpiUar dozer 8 da. @ $22. 50 180. 00 

1— Truck— 3 ton 30 da. @ 10. 00 300. OO 

1— Concrete Mixer— y. yd 30 da. © 3. 00 90. 00 

1—2 Drum hoist 30 da. @ 3. 50 105. 00 

1— Water Wagon 8 da. @ 2.50 20.00 

1— Skip 30 da. (?i 0.50 15.00 

1— Hopper 30 da. @ 1. 00 30. 00 

1— Compressor 30 da. @ 10. 00 300. 00 

Total Plant to be Leased 1, 040. 00 

(b) Fuel, Oil, Small Tools and Supplies 400. 00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 1, 440. 00 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost of Job: 

Cost of Materials $3,794.00 

Cost of Day Labor 2, 908. 00 

Cost of Plant Rental 1, 440. 00 

Total Plant Operation Cost 8, 142. 40 

I 

5. Total Cost of Works: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Plant Operation Cost 8, 142. 40 

Contingencies— 15% 1, 221. 36 

Total Direct Cost 9, 363. 76 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Mobilization and Demobilization $500. 00 

Survey, Inspection, Supervision, 10% 936. 38 

Right of Way 1,500.00 

Total Indirect Cost 2,936.38 

Total Field Cost to .Tob_ 12, 300. 14 

General Office Overhead 984.86 

Estimate Grand Total Cost by Hired Labor and Govern- 
ment Plant 13,265.00 

Theodoee Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2711 



UNSKILLED LABOR 

Class 1~$0.50 per hour. 

Shovelers 
Concrete placers 
Slopers — roadway 
Material handlers 
Water boy. 

Class 2 — $0.65 per hour. 

Carpenter's helper 
Rigger's helper 
Pipefitter's helper 
Tractor operator's helper 
Electrician's helper 



SKILLED LABOR 

Class 4 — $1.00 per hour. 

Carpenters 
Tractor Operators 
Cement Finisher 
Electricians 

Pipefitters 

CJass 5 — $1.50 per hour. 
General Foreman. 



SEMI-SKILLED LABOR 



Class S- 



.75 per hour. 



Truck Drivers 
Steel Tiers 



Aemy Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 4L 

Summary 
CBR/dw 
War Department, 
United States Engneee Office, 

Honohilu, T. H., April 30, 1941. 

Contract No. W414-eng-602 
Ft. Shafter, Oahu, T. H. 
Job Order #17.0. 
Construct — bombproof addition to radio transmitter station and appurtenant 

work. 
Est. Cost : $44,907.44 to Gov. 
Commencement Date : May 1. 1941. 
Est. date for completion : Aug. 1, 1941. 
Supervision by J. J. Kestly, Area Engr., 3rd Field Area. 



War Department. 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. E., April SO, 19/,1. 
JOB ORDER NO. 17.0. 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602. 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE : The Construction of Bombproof Addition to Radio Trans- 

mitter Station at Fort Shafter. 

2. LOCATION : Fort Shafter, Island of Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE : 2017. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE: Construct and complete bombproof addition to radio 

transmitter station, including connecting passageway between the existing 
structurfts and the new station. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Connuanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES: As enumerated in paragraph 1-04 of 

Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE: 21X1204 Soacoast Defense General Eng. 

305 P 13-32 A1204-N. 
ESTIMATED COST: $35,640.82. 
COMMENCEMENT DATE: Mav 1. -1941. 
ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION: August 1, 1941. 



9. 

10. 



11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : See Detailed Estimate Attached. 
79716 — 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 17 



2712 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



12. PLANT REQUIRED : See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

13. MATERIALS : See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: J. J. Kestly, Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



Approved : 



WARREN T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 17.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Estimate of Cost : Construction of Bombproof Addition to Radio Transmitter 

Station at Fort Shafter, T. H. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located on the Government 
Military Reservation at Fort Shafter, Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to 
the following specific item : 

(1) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work neces- 
sary to construct and complete a bombproof addition to radio transmitter station, 
including connecting passageway between the existing structures and the new 
station, all in accordance with Specifications, "The Construction of Bombproof 
Addition to Radio Transmitter Station at Fort Shafter, T. H., toAccompany Job 
Order No. 17.0," and the details shown on drawings Numbers F-1/8 to F-1/10, 
inclusive, listed in paragraph 1-04 of the Specifications. 

Unit costs are as follows : 



Cost to Contractor 



1. Material to be Furnished: 



Item 



Designation 



Quantity 



Unit 



Unit price 



Amount 



Dynamite— 40% 

Elec. Caps #6—6' Lead. 

Cement 

Sand 



Fine Aggregate 

Coarse Aggregate 

1" X 4" T. & Q. Flooring 

l"x6" T. & G. Sheeting 

2" X 4" and 2" x 12" No. 1 Com.— S2E 

4" X 4" and 4" x 6" No. 1 Com 

Roofing Felt (90#) 

Asphalt - 

Form Oil 

5^"0 Reinforcing Steel 

#14 Ga. Wire 

Nails— 20d, 16d, lOd, 6d, 4d 

}4x 5" Wide Mastic Joint Felt 

#10 Ga. Galv. Wire Mesh 6" x 6" 

2—3' X 7' H" Plate Doors & Frame 

W' X 12" Checkered Plate— Cover Angles, etc. 

#26 Ga. Galv. Metal Air Duct 

yi" X 8" Anchor Bolts and "U" Stirrups 

#16 Ga. H" Galv. Wire Mesh 

1— Robertson Vent. Fan and Hood 

4"0 Concrete Drain-Pipe 

Masonry Stone 

2" Galv. W. L. Pipe (18" Cplng. & Plug).— 

Electric Conduit, Wiring and Lighting... 

Paint-.-- 

2" W. L. Pipe and Fittings -.. 

Miscellaneous Equipment 



2.000 

700 

64.5 

30 

270 

260 

3,800 

11,000 

8,100 

5,100 

22, 350 

8,400 

30 

14,250 

300 

30 

345 

1,800 

1.050 

3,735 

425 

15 

4 



240 
29 
60 



Lb 

Only 

Bbl 

Cu. Yds- 



B. M_. 
B. M_. 
B. M_. 
B. M-- 
Sq. Ft- 

Lb 

Gal--.. 
Lb 



Kegs 

Lin. Ft 

Sq. Ft 

Lb 

Lb. 

Lb---. 

Only 

Sq. Ft- 

Lump Sum. 

Lin. Ft 

Cu. Yd 

Lin. Ft 

Lump Sum. 

Gal--. 

Lin. Ft 



0.125 

0.083 

3.19 

2.70 

3.00 

3.00 
55.00 
55.00 
46.63 
46.63 

0.0165 

0.0180 

0.21 

0. 0275 

0.052 

6.60 

0.175 

0.021 

0.10 

0.070 

0. 15 

0.45 

0.48 



0.225 

3.00 

0.41 



2.75 
0. 4125 



$250. 00 

58.10 

2, 057. 55 

81.00 

810.00 

780.00 

209. 00 

605. 00 

377. 70 

237. 81 

368. 78 

151.20 

6.30 

391. 88 

15.60 

198. 00 

60.38 

37.80 

105. 00 

261. 45 

63.75 

6.75 

1.92 

285. 00 

54.00 

87.00 

24.60 

475. 00 

2.75 

412.50 

300. 00 



Total cost of Materials - 



8, 775. 82 



PROCEEDIXGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2713 

Day Labor: 

(a) Access Road: 

16 Man Hours @ $1. 50 $24. 00 

16 Man Hours 1.00 16.00 

80 Man Hours 0. 50 40. 00 

(b) Temporary Water Line histaUed: 

8 Man Hours % 1.50 12.00 

48 Man Hours 0. 50 24. 00 

(c) Handling and Hauling: 

16 Man Hours @ 1.50 24.00 

16 Man Hours 1.00 16.00 

16 Man Hours 0. 75 12. 00 

160 Man Hours 0. .50 80.00 

(d) Excavation — Outside: 

4S Man Hours @ 1. .50 72.00 

192 Man Hours 1.00 192.00 

576 Man Hours 0.75 432.00 

600 Man Hours 0. 50 300. 00 

(e) Excavation — Vestibule: 

16 Man Hours • @ 1.50 24.00 

32 Man Hours 1. 00 32. 00 

96 Man Hours 0. 75 72. 00 

120 Man Hours 0. 50 60. 00 

(f) Excavation — Mai7i Tunnel: 

240 Man Hours © 1.50 3()0. 00 

640 Man Hours 1. 00 640. 00 

2,000 Man Hours 0.75 1, .500. 00 

3,200 Man Hours 0. 50 1, 600. 00 

(g) Excavation — Connecting Tunnel: 

16 Man Hours (a^ 1.50 24.00 

48 Man Hours 1.00 48.00 

144 Man Hours 0. 75 108. 00 

232 Man Hours 0. .50 116.00 

(h) Placing Grout: 

60 Man Hours @ 1. 50 90. Od 

180 Man Hours 1.00 180.00 

96 Man Hours 0. 75 72. 00 

236 Man Hours 0. 50 118. 00 

(i) Waterproofing: 

96 Man Hours @ 1.50 144.00 

320 Man Hours 1. 00 320. 00 

320 Man Hours 1__ 0.50 16a 00 

(j) Placing Drain Tile: 

8 Man Hours et: 1.50 12.00 

40 Man Hours 0. 50 20. 00 

(k) Placing Reinforcing Steel: 

48 Man Hours (U} 1. .50 72.00 

192 Man Hours 1.00 192.00 

116 Man Hours 0.50 58.00 

(1) Concrete Forming and Stripping: 

64 Man Hours J @ 1. .50 96.00 

672 Man Hours 1.00 672.00 

420 Man Hours 0.75 315.00 

720 Man Hours 0. .50 300. 00 

fm) Placing Concrete: 

360 Man Hours m 1.50 240.00 

640 Man Hours 1.00 640.00 

640 Man Hour.s 0.75 480.00 

4,800 Man Hours 0.50 2, 4(X). 00 

(n) Electric Light and Power Installed: 

32 Man Hours (a. 1. .50 48.00 

64 Man Hours 1.00 64.00 

64 Man Hours 0.75 48.00 

64 Man Hours 0.50 32.00 



2714 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

(o) Air CondUioning Plant Installed: 

24 Man Hours @ $1.50 $36. (X» 

48 Man Hours 1.00 48.00 

48 Man Hours 0. 75 36. 00 

48 Man Hours 0.50 24.00 

(p) Structural Steel Installed: . 

8 Man Hours @ 1.50 12.00 

32 Man Hours 1.25 40.00 

40 Man Hours 0.50 20.00 

(q) Placing Rubble Masonry. 

240 Man Hours @ 1.50 360.00 

240 Man Hours 0. 75 180. 00 

(r) Maintenance — Watchman, etc. 

480 Man Hours 1 @ 1.50 720.00 

480 Man Hours 1.00 480.00 

480 Man Hours 0.75 360.00 

1,440 Man Hours 0.50 720.00 



Total Cost of Day Labor 15, 697. 00 



3. Plant Operation: 

(a) Rental of Equipment. 

1— Truck— Flat Rack 30 da. @ $18.50 555.00 

2— Trucks— Dump 30 " @ 18. 50 1, 110. 00 

1— Caterpillar Dozer 30" @ 39.50 1,185.00 

1—% Ton Pick-up 90 " @ 6. 30 567. 00 

2— Air Compressor 3 Mo. @ 1390.00 4,170.00 

6— Jackhammers 30da. @ 9.00 270.001 

2— Water Liners 60 " @ 8. 00 480. 00 

1— i/o Cu. Yd. Mixer 30 " @ 2.00 60.00 

1 — Concrete Placing Equipment 30 " % 7.00 210.00 

1— Bar Bender Shears 5 " i^ 6. 00 30. (K) 

1—16" Radial Saw IMo. i/, 33.00 33.00 

1— Jointer 1 " @ 33.00 33.00 

1—% Cu. Yd. Shovel 1/2 " @ 1174. 00 587. 00 

1— Ford Sedan 3 mo. @ 76.00 228.00 

Miscellaneous Small Tools 350. 00 

(b) Fuel, Oil, Gas, and Miscellaneous Equipment 700.00 



Total Plant Operation Cost 10, 568. 00 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost of Job: ===r= 

Mobilization and Demobilization $600.00 

Total Cost of Material 8, 775. 82 

Total Cost of Labor 15,697.00 

Total Cost of Plant Operation 10,568.00 



Total Cost to Contractor 35,640.82 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr.. 

Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Recapitulation of Estimate of Cost 
1. Total Cost of Job: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $85. 640. f 2 

Contingencies— 10% ' 3 564. 08 

Total Direct Cost $89,204.90 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection and Engineering — 8% of 

Contractor's Cost $2,851.27 

Total Indirect Cost 2.851.27 



Total Field Cost 42.0.56.17 

General Office Overhead— 8% (of Contractor's Cost) 2, 851. 27 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 44, 907. 44 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2715 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribution 
to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Enyineers, 

District Engineer. 

J02 3-42 
March 19, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 17.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-002 

OflSce, Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 17.0 (Bombproof Addition to 
Radio Station, Fort Shafter) authorizes the installation of additional ventilation 
equipment in the transmitter section and power room at the transmitter station 
at Fort Shafter and modification of ventilator shaft. This work shall be done in 
accordance with plans, (File No. F-41/33 and File No. F-41/10) and specifications 
furnished the Area Engineer. 

Ofiice File Reference : Serial No. 2525. 

Work requested by : The Conunanding General, Hawaiian Department by 2nd 
Indorsement of the Department Engineer, dated March 4, 1942. 
For the Department Engineer : 

/s/ H. B. Nurse, 
Lt. Col., Cor/j.s of Enyineers. 

Executive Assistant. 



22 January 1943. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 17.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of the District Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 to accompany Job Order No. 17.0 (Bombproof Addition to 
Radio Station. Ft. Shafter) cancels Addendum No. 1 to Job Order No. 17.0, 
effective January IS, 1943. 

Cancellation Requested by : Operations Officer. 
For the District Engineer : 

/s/ Joseph Matson, Jr., 
Major, Corps of Engineers, Assistant. 



Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhihit No. 4I\I 

Summary 
CBR/dw 

War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., May IJf, 19J,1. 

Contract No. W414-eng-602 

Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

Job Order No. 29.0. 

Construct — Armanent, Fire Control, supply and repair building (bombsight) 

reinf. concrete, (Approx. 67 ft. x 90 ft. in dimensions). 
E.St. Cost: $150,000.00 (to Gov). 
Commencement Date: May 15, 1941. 
Est. Date for Completion : Sept. 15, 1941. 
Supervision by Area Engr., 2nd Field Area. 



2716 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

War Depaetment, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., May U, 1941. 
JOB ORDER NO. 29.0. 
Contract No. W^14-eng-602. 
To : Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work : 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Armament, Fire Control, Supply and Repair Building 

(Bombsight). 

2. LOCATION: Hickam Field, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 776.1A1. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct and complete an Armanent, Fire Control, 

Supply and Repair Building (bombsight), of reinforced concrete design, 
approximately 67' x 90' in dimension. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY: Commanding General, Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : To be furnished later. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Eng. 812. 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $125,000.00. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : May 15, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : September 15, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE : To be furnislied later on a detailed estimate. 

12. PLAN REQUIRED: To be furnished later on a detailed estimate. 

13. MATERIALS : To be furnished later on a detailed estimate. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 
Approved : .May 23, 1941. 

(Signed) Warren T. Hannum, 
Warren T. Hannum, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

Division Engineer 



ESTIMATE OF COST 
To Accompany Job Order No. 29.0' • 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work to be Done: Construct and Complete an Armament, Fire Control, Supply 

and Repair Building (Bombsight). 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is located at Hickam Field, on 
the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the following si)ecific item : 

(1) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work neces- 
sary to construct and complete an Armament, Fire Control, Supply and Repair 
Building (bombsight). This building shall be in general conformity with Quar- 
termaster Corps drawings for the Armament, Fire Control, Supply and Repair 
Building at San Antonio Air Depot (Duncan Field), Texas, as moditied by tlie 
specifications, "Armament, Fire Control, Supply and Repair Building, Hickam 
Field," and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in the specifications. 
The building is to be of reinforced concrete design, approximately 67' x 90' in 
dimension. 

The cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $125,000.00. 

(Signed) Tlieodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2717 

Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 
( €i\ DiTsct dost* 

Total Cost' to Contractor $125, 000. 00 

Contingencies— 10% 12, 500. 00 

Total Direct Cost $137, 500. 00 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engr $ 6,250.00 

Total Indirect Cost 6,250.00 

Total Field Cost 143,750.00 

General Office Overhead - 6,250.00 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 150, 000. 00 

This recapitulation is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for 
distribution to the contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodoee Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 

Aemy Pearl Harboe Board Exhibit No. 4N 

Summary 
CBR/dw 
9 Aug 44 

War Depaetment, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., May 21, 1941. 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Ft. Kamehameha, Oahu, T. H. 

Job No. 24.0. 

Construct — Structural steel tower instrument building and stairway to existing 

fire control station. 
Est. Cost: $10,026.41 (to Gov.). 
Commencement Date : June 1, 1941. 
Est. Date for Completion : June 21, 1941. 
Supervision by Area Engineer, 3rd Field Area. 
Addendum No. 1 dated Feb. 25, 1942. 

Transfers supervision to Area Engr, 2nd Field Area. 
Addendum No. 2 dated May 3, 1942. 

Cancels Job Order No. 24 and work will be done by Work Order. 



War Department, 
United States Engineer Office, 

Honolulu, T. H., Mmj 27, 19Jfl. 
JOB ORDER No. 24.0. 
Contract W-414-eng-602. 
To: Hawaiian Constructars, Honolulu, T. H. 

You are hereby directed to proceed with the following work: 

1. PROJECT TITLE: Fire Control Station, Fort Kamehameha. 

2. LOCATION: Fort Kamehameha, Oahu, T. H. 

3. OFFICE FILE REFERENCE: 2013.5. 

4. WORK TO BE DONE : Construct a Structural Steel Tower Instrument Build- 
ing complete with ladders and stairway together with Structural Steel Con- 
nection (Stairway) to existing Fire Control Station. 

5. WORK REQUESTED BY : Commanding General— Hawaiian Department. 

6. DRAWINGS AND REFERENCES : Paragarph 1-04 of Specifications. 

7. APPROPRIATION CHARGEABLE : Seacoast Defenses, Insular Department, 
1941-CAC-131 P99 A-1210-N. 



2718 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

8. ESTIMATED COST : $7,957.46. 

9. COMMENCEMENT DATE : June 1, 1941. 

10. ESTIMATED DATE FOR COMPLETION : June 21, 1941. 

11. ESTIMATED LABOR AT SITE: See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

12. PLANT REQUIRED: See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

13. IMATERIALS: See Detailed Estimate Attached. 

14. SUPERVISION BY: Area Engineer, Third Field Area. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman. Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



ESTIMATE OF COST 

To Accompany Job Order No. 24.0 

Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Work T'^ i?k Done: Construct Fire Control Station and Appurtenant Work at 

Fort Kamehameha. 
District : Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

The work to be done, as provided for herein, is lorated at Fort Kamehameha 
Government Reservation, on the Island of Oahu, T. H., and is limited to the 
following Specific item : 

(1) Furnish all necessary labor and equipment, and perform all work necessary 
to construct a Structural Steel Tower Instrument Building complete with ladders 
and Stairway together with Structural Connection (Stairway) to existing Fire 
Control Station. The work to be done shall be in accordance with Specifications, 
"The Construction of a Fire Control Station and Appurtenant Work at Fort 
Kamehameha to Accompany Job Order No. 24.0 to Contract W-414-eng-602", 
and the details shown on the drawings enumerated in paragraph 1-04 of Speci- 
fications. 

The cost of the work to be done shall not exceed $7,957.46. 



Cost to Contr-\ctob 



1. Matcriids to be FurnisJicd: 



Item 
No. 



Description 



Cement 

Fine Aggregate 

Coarse Aggregate 

Lumber for Forms 

Lumber for Subflooring 

Lumber for Flooring 

[Structural Steel -- 

•{Angles --- 

iPlates 

Miscellaneous Metals 

IW Standard Pipe (Galv.) 

l}4" Extra Strong Pipe (Black) 

Malleable Iron Ball Pattern Fittings 

2" Conduits 

W Conduits --- 

Type 1-200 W-Outlets 

No. 12 Electric Wire Conductor 

No. 16 Signal Wire RC 1 

Paint : 

4 Light Polished Wire Glass Windows 

Service Switch Box Electric Toggle 

VA" Conduit 

No. Copper Bare Wire 

Copper Ground Rods (%" x 8') --- 

Entrance Switches 

Anchor Bolts (?4" x 18") 

Welding Rods, Filler Metal for Structural Iron. 

Lumber for Scaffold 

Clamps for Ground Rods 

Nails 

Miscellaneous Materials & Supplies . 



Quantity 



Total Cost of Materials & Supplies. 



2.5 
5.0 
.100 

.288 
.288 

62, 620 

3,200 
395 
165 
100 

65 
120 
8 
240 
130 

29 

1 
3 

24 
8 
2 

12 

150 

1,900 

8 

50 



Unit 



Bbl 

Cu. Yd 

M.Bd. fV--^-- 
Lbs 


$2.93 
2.70 
3.00 
45.00 
47.00 
55. 00 

0.04 




0.08 


Lin. Ft 

Lump Sum... 
Lin. Ft 

Each 


.1695 
.25 

.07 
24.44 


Lin. Ft 

Gal ~.\V..V. 


.10 

.055 

2.75 


Each _- 


17.00 


Lin. FtV.".'-."^ 
Lbs 


.30 
.21 
.313 


Lin. Ft 

Each 


2.66 
0.98 




.02 


Lbs 


0.08 


M. Bd. Ft.... 
Each-. 


60.00 
0.45 


Lbs 


0.08 



Unit cost 



Amount 



$23. 44 
6.75 
15.00 
4.50 
13.54 
15.84 

2, 504. 80 

256. 00 

66.95 

41.25 

157. 57 

18.20 

8.40 

195. 52 

24.00 

7.15 

79. 75 

119.00 

0.30 

0.63 

7.51 

21.28 

1.96 

0.24 

12.00 

114.00 

3.60 

4.00 

163.15 



3, 886. 33 



PROCEEDINGS O^ ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2719 

2. Day Lal)or: 

(a) Handling and Hauling Materials: 

32 Man Hours @ $1. 50 $ 18.00 

32 :\Ian Hours 1.23 40.00 

64 Man Hours 0.7") 44.80 

128 Man Hours 0.50 64.00 

(b) Excavation: 

1 Man Hour @ 1.50 1.50 

12 Man Hours 0.50 6.00 

(c) Class "A" Concrete for Bases: 

8 Man Hours @ 1.50 12.00 

8 Man Hours 0.65 5.20 

32 Man Hours 0. 50 16. 00 

(d) Structural Steel Fabrication <£• Erection: 

150 Man Hours @ 1.50 225.00 

40 Man Hours 1.35 54.00 

700 Man Hours 1.25 875.00 

150 Man Hours 1.00 150.00 

800 Man Hours 0.70 560.00 

150 Man Hours 0. 65 97. 50 

800 Man Hours 0.50 400.00 

(e) Framing d Carpcntiy for kitrucural Steel d Flojrs: 

16 Man Hours @ 1. .50 18. 00 

16 Man Hours 1.00 16.00 

32 Man Hours .__ 0.65 20.80 

32 Man Hours 0.50 10.00 

(f) Electrical Wiring System & Signal System: 

16 Man Hours @ 1.50 24.00 

16 Man Hours 1.00 16.00 

16 Man Hours 0.65 10. 4o 

32 Man Hours 0. 50 16. 00 

(g) Cleaning d Painting Stiuctural Steel and Stairs: 

32 Man Hours @ 1.50 48.00 

40 Man Hours 1. UO 40.00 

40 Man Hours 0.65 26.00 

(h) Maintenance and Field and Office Force: 

80 Man Hours @ 1.50 120.00 

50 Man Hours 1. 00 50. 00 

150 Man Hours 0. 50 75. 00 

Total Cost of Day Labor 3, 065. 20 

3. Plant Operation: 

(a) Rental of Equipment: 

1-400 Amp. Elec. Welding Machine 8 da. @ $3. 55 $28. 40 

1-Spray Paint Outfit 5 da. 1. 00 5. 00 

1-Jaeger — 1 Sack Mixer 1 da. 4. 40 4. 40 

1-% Ton Pick Up Truck— Ford 16 da. 2.30 36.80 

1-5 Ton Flat Rack Truck— Ford 4 da. 13. 57 54. 28 

1-Power Shovel — With erecting boom 4 da. 105. GO 420. 00 

1-Sedan 8 da. 2.53 20.24 

1-Coupe 5 da. 2.33 11.65 

Miscellaneous Small Tools — (Lump Sum) 100.00 

(b) Gas, oil, and Supplies 75.00 

Total Cost of Plant Operation 755. 93 

4. Total Plant Operation Cost of Job: 

Cost of Material 3, 886. 33 

Cost of Day Labor 3, 065. 20 

Cost of Plant Operation 7.55. 93 

Mobilization and Demobilization 250. 00 

Total Cost of Job to Contractor 7,957.46 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers. 

District Engineer. 



2720 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Recapitulation of estimated cost 

1. Total Cost of Work: 

(a) Direct Cost: 

Total Cost to Contractor $7, 957. 46 

Contingencies — 10% 795. 75 

Total Direct Cost 8, 753. 21 

(b) Indirect Cost: 

Survey, Inspection, Engr. (8% of Total Cost to 

Contractor) $636.60 

Total Indirect Cost 636.60 

Total Field Cost of Job 9, 389. 81 

General Office Overhead (8% of Total Cost to 

Contractor) 636.60 

Estimated Grand Total Cost to Government 10, 026. 41 

This estimate is prepared for use in the District only, and is not for distribu- 
tion to the Contractor. 

(Signed) Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Lt. Col., Corps of En&liieers, 

District Engineer. 



» Febkuary 25, 1942. 

ADDENDUM NO. 1 

To Accompany Job Order No. 24.0 

Contract W-414-Eng 602 

District: Honolulu District, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 1 to accompany Job Order No. 24.0 (Fire Control Station, Ft. 
Kamehameha) transfejs the supervision from the Area Engineer, Third Field 
Area to the Area Engineer, Second Field Area. 

This transfer in supervision conforms to the new designated boundaries for 
the two above mentioned Areas. 

[s] Theodore Wyman, Jr., 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 

District Engineer. 



May 3, 1942. 
ADDENDUM NO. 2 

To Accompany Job Order No. 24.0 

Contract W-414-Eng-602 

Office of Department Engineer, Honolulu, T. H. 

Addendum No. 2 to accompany Job Order No. 24.0 (Fire Control Station, Ft. 
Kamehameha ) cancels Job Order No. 24.0 and work will be done by Work Order. 
Cancellation Requested By: Department Engineer by ]\Iemo. from Assistant 
Department Engineer, dated April 18, 1942. 
For the Department Engineer : 

[s] B. L. Robinson, 
Lt. Col., Corps of Engineers, 
Assistant Department Engineer. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



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2722 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 



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PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2723 

[secbet] 

Army Pearl Harbor Board Exhibit No. 6 

House of Representatives 

Committee on Military Affairs 

washington, u. c. 

lu re : Hans Wilhelm Rohl. 
State of California, 

County of Los Angeles, ss: 

Alice Anstey, who resides at 938 East Edgemore Road, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, first being duly sworn, deposes and says : 

I have been employed as a hotel maid by the Biltmore Hotel for fifteen years, 
and am now employed there in that capacity. During the last four years, I have 
been working on the ninth floor, and there are apartments on that floor as well 
as suites. 

I first saw HANS WILHELM ROHL about four years ago, when he used to 
occupy Apartment Z. He usually would have dinner at about 8 : 30 P. M. 
About four years ago last February, I know Rohl gave a big dinner party in 
Apartment Z, and I know the man whose picture you now show me was present. 
(John H. Weiner shows picture of THEODORE WYMAN, JR. to affiant with 
Wyman's name covered). I don't recall any other men at that party except Rohl 
and Wyman, who became extremely drunk. The liquor was brought up there by 
the case. During the course of the evening there were about twenty young girls 
who kept coming in and out of the Apartment all evening, and the party was still 
in progress when I left to go off duty at about 10 : 30 P. M. The girls appeared 
to be cheap, commercial party girls of the type that frequent the Main Street 
bars and night places. 

After this first party, I saw Rohl and Wyman on a great many occasions when 
they had wild drinking parties of the same general type. The same cheap 
looking type of young girls paraded in and out all evening. 

In cleaning up the various suites on the ninth floor, used for the parties, 
Suites Q, Z and W, there were twin beds, and I always found them pushed 
together. 

[SECRET] 

I would find lip-stick on the pillow cases and bedclothes, towels strewn over 
the floor and hair pins and bobby pins all over the room. At these subsequent 
parties, there would usually be four or five girls during the evening. While the 
parties were underway, I could never get into the bedrooms because they were 
always locked. Mr. Rohl always called Wyman "Ted" or "Teddy". On each 
and every occasion when these parties occurred, I have seen girls sitting on 
Rohl's lap and Wyman's lap, and all the indications that would naturally lead 
me to believe that these girls were simply being hired to cater to the sexual 
whims of the two men, because different girls were used from time to time, and 
as I was the maid on that floor, I went in to take fresh supplies of towels and 
had ample opportunity to observe what went on. 

Rohl had a party in Apartment Q on the Ninth Floor about six weeks ago. 
He had no baggage and registered alone. Kohl had a tall, blond girl with him 
and said she was his nurse. They had dinner together and he said he had just 
come from the hospital where he'd had his gall-bladder removed. On this 
occasion a lot of liquor went up to this Suite, both Rohl and the nurse were 
drinking and Rohl got drunk. 

About two months ago, in Apartment Q, on the Ninth floor, Rohl gave a party 
and there was a dark little girl who looked like a Mexican. That was after Rohl 
just left the hospital following the gall-bladder operation. On this occasion he 
also came in with the same blonde nurse, and tiie brunette, the blonde nurse and 
Rohl were all drinking and a great deal of liquor was brought in. On this 
occasion the twin beds were shoved together and the mattresses were placed 
crossways on the beds, and on the bed-clothes and pillow-slips were evidences 
of lip-stick, and there were rouge-stained cigarettes, used towels, hair pins and 
bobby-pins strewn about the bedroom. At about 10 P. M. the blonde shoved the 
brunette out of the apartment and into the hall and shut the door. This blonde. 



2724 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

whom Rohl stated was his nurse, was almost always with him on these many 
parties. 

I saw Wyman alone in the hotel about a year ago and haven't seen him since. 

Alice Anstey 
Alice Anstey. 

Subscribed and Sworn to before me this 18 day of December, 1943. 

Fbieda Segel. 



[secret] 
State of California, 
County of Los Angeles, ss: 

JuANiTA Black WELL, first being duly sworn, deposes and says : 

I went to work for Hans W. Rohl approximately sixteen years ago, on Rodeo 
Drive in Beverley Hills, then to Shaddow Place, then to the Talmadge Apts., 
then to their present residence. I was cook and cared for the house. At 8159 
Hollywood Boulevard, Theodore Wyiuan, Jr. was a guest. Mr. Rohl often spoke 
of Wyman when we were living in the Talmadge Apartments in about 1936. It 
was shortly after we had moved from the Apartments that Mr. Rohl took Dr. 
Lewis and his wife on a cruise aboard the yacht "Vega," to the Hawaiian Islands. 

Major Wyman never remained overnight — he usually discussed business with 
Mr. Rohl during these visits, and used to stay for dinner. Every other day or so 
Major Wyman would telephone Mr. Rohl, and I would answer the phone, and 
he would, of course, tell me who he was. Major Wyman frequently was driven 
to the Rohl residence by a soldier in an army car. 

Werner Plack used to telephone infrequently, would ask for Mr. Rohl, and 
would, of course, tell me Itis name when I answered the telephone. 

Many times after Wyman went to Honolulu, he and Mr. Rohl would talk for 
quite a long time on the long-distance telephone, and I have heard Rohl swear 
at him during these conversations. Rohl certainly wasn't afraid of Mr. Wyman 
at all. Dui'ing these long-distance conversations Wyman and Rohl would discuss 
business, and I heard Rohl speak of hangars, runways, and landing fields. Mr. 
Paul Grafe also used to phone Mr. Rohl from Honolulu about business, too. 

JUANITA BLACKWELL. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of December, 1&43. 

R. E. Combs, 
Counsel for State Fact Finding Committee on Un-American Activities; #ACR59. 

John H. Weiner, 
W. Bruce Pine 

Mr. T. E. Connolly was interviewed by Mr. John H. Weiner, Investigator for 
the Committee of Military Affairs, House of Representatives on December 11, 
1943 at his office, 461 Market Street, San Francisco. 

Question. Your name is T. E. Connolly? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Where do you reside? 

Answer. I reside at 2400 Fulton Street, San Francisco. 

Question. Are you acquainted with Hans Wilhelm Rohl? 

Answer. I am. 

Question. When and under what circumstances did you first meet him? 

Answer. I met H. W. Rohl sometime prior to 1925, probably at some contractor's 
gathering because I knew him as such. The exact date and exact circumstances 
I don't remember. 

Question. Are you acquainted with Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr. ? 

Answer. I am. 

Question. When and under what circumstances did you first meet him? 

Answer. The year and date I do not have. I first met him when he came 
to Los Angeles as a captain in the United States Army Engineers and was in 
charge of construction activities in that area. 

Question. Do you remember who introduced you to him? 

Answer. It was very possible that I introduced myself. If a formal intro- 
duction was arranged,"^ I don't think that was so. I would rather say that I 
went over there to get some plans or offer a bid. I certainly met him in his 
office in an official capacity. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2725 

Question. In other words, it is possible that you went over to discuss with 
him contracts, etc.? 

Answer. Certainly. I have done that many times. 

Question. It is a fact is it not that you are a stockholder in the Rohl-Connolly 
Co., a Nevada corporation doing business in California? 

Answer. Yes, sir. 

Question. Where is the principal place of business? 
Answer. Los Angeles, California. 

Question. Wasn't it formed in 1932 by Frank S. Cliff, F. E. Leader and a 
man named Peterson? Who are these gentlemen? 

Answer. I don't know. Of course, it was formed in Nevada — they may be 
the attorneys, those must be the qualifying directors — absolutely unknown to me. 

Question. Isn't the corporation's principal place of business 511 N. Carson 
Street, Carson City, Nevada? 

Answer. It might be so recorded but our principal place of operations has 
been Los Angeles. 

Question. Didn't the California Commissioner of Corporations in May of 1932 
issue a permit for the sale of 40,000 shares of the capital stock of the concern 
to H. W. Rohl, Irma Dickey and yourself? 

Answer. If so, I don't think that was acted upon. My recollection is there 
is only 20,000 shares out. 

Question. What consideration, if any, did you give the corporation for your 
shares? 

Answer. Cash. 

Question. How much, what amount, do you remember? 

Answer. I think $200,000. 

Question. How many shares were originally issued to you? 

Answer. I think 10,000 shares. 

Question. What office did you hold in December of 1940? 

Answer. The latter half of December, 1940, I was president. 

Question. Did Rohl ever state to you that he knew Wymaii prior to meeting 
you? 

Answer. No, sir. 

Question. Was it your general custom to confer with Rohl from time to time 
on important projects in which your firm was engaged? 

Answer. Yes, sir. 

Question. Are you acquainted with General Virgil Lee Peterson of Washing- 
ton, D. C? 

Answer. I met General Peterson, who was then Colonel Peterson, when he 
was in charge of the Los Angeles District when we bid our first section of the 
Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater. 

Question. Were you in Washington on December 18, 1940? 

Answer. Yes, sir. 

Question. Were you in Washington on January 17, 1941? 

Answer. I was there on the evening of that day. I was in a plane from Los 
Angeles to Washington during the day on January 17th. 

Question. Were you in Washington, January 21, 1941? 

Answer. Yes, sir. 

Question. While you were in Washington on these dates, Mr. Connolly, isn't 
it a fact that you were there discussing the contracts that you had in the Hawaiian 
Islands? 

Answer. No, sir. When I was there in December we were discussing the 
Hawaiian contracts. When I was there on January 17th to appear before the 
naval board on January 18th regarding the building of naval bases and Bermuda 
installation was mentioned, but we had gone there to try and obtain construction 
of a dry dock at San Diego. We prepared questionnaires and on January 22nd 
we appeared before the naval board and made our submission regarding the con- 
struction of the dry dock at San Diego and refused our consideration of any work 
in Bermuda or Newfoundland. 

Question. While you were in Washington, did you receive any long distance 
calls from Mr. Rohl? 

Answer. Whether I received them or not — I talked to him. If I didn't receive 
them, I made them. 

Question. During your visits to Washington to either negotiate or conclude 
government contracts for your firm for installation of fortifications in the 
Hawaiian Islands, Mr. Rohl called you in Washington? 



2726 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Answer. I had telephonic communication with Mr. Rohl when I was in Wash- 
ington concerning these contracts. Whether he called or I called, I cannot state, 
but we did have telephone conversations. 

Question. Regarding the contracts? 

Answer. Yes. The first knowledge I had of a potential contract in the Hawaiian 
Islands was on Monday, December 16, 1940, when I was called in Denver, Colorado 
by Mr. Rohl from San Francisco who stated that Colonel Wyman was here from 
the Hawaiian Islands seeking contractors to perform certain work over there 
and that he, Rohl, wished me to meet a certain plane at Cheyenne and go on 
east with Colonel Wyman and endeavor to get the contracts. I asked what type 
of contracts they were and Rohl answered that the Colonel would explain that 
to me. I was unable to get on a plane at Cheyenne so I flew to Chicago and got 
on a plane with Colonel Wyman and flew from Chicago down to Washington. We 
went to the Carlton Hotel where we could get no rooms and we were expecting 
Mr. Paul Grafe. He had not yet arrived so we occupied his room. I met John 
Martin, Mr. Rohl's attorney, who told me he was in Washington in the interests 
of acquiring citizenship or furthering citizenship applications for Mr. H. W. Rohl. 
When I thought that there was a likelihood that we would acquire the contract 
I further thought that I should have Mr. Rohl resign as an oflficer of the Rohl- 
Counolly Co. and sul)stitute myself and I so 'phoned him and it was so done, and 
he was neither oflicer nor a director of the Rohl-Connolly Co. until after he 
obtained his naturalization papers. 

Question. In other words Mr. Coiuiolly, at your insistence he resigned as an 
oflicer or a director of the company? 

Answer : That's right. 

Question. But still retained his stock? 

Answer. That is right. 

Question. Subsequent to receiving the contract for the Hawaiian Islands, did 
Mr. Rohl discuss with you the nature of the contract, etc. ? 

Answer. No. There was no detailed discussion of this contract at all. Per- 
sonally I never saw a written description of it or a blueprint on any part of it. 
Rohl and I discu.«:.sed the necessary financial arrangements, advancement of 
monies because after all we were financing this. We were building certain air- 
fields. We knew what that meant, just simply movement of materials and stabi- 
lization of a base without a blueprint at all. When- you are told to run a 7500 
runway we knew what it takes. 

Question. But it would be most usual for him to discuss with you the nature and 
type of contract that you received for the Hawaiian Islands? 

Answer. Yes. I don't doubt but what we mentioned building an airport there. 
I don't think that we ever got into some of these installations out there, I don't 
think Rohl and I ever discussed anything of that nature. We talked of those warn- 
ing stations because I was curious as to what they were. That's all that I know 
that we ever got into any detail about. 

Question. I believe that's all, Mr. Connolly. 

.1. E. Connolly. 

Witness 

John H. Weiner, 

Dec. 11-43. 

Pasadena, California, December 14, 1943. 

At the request of Mr. John H. Weiner, investigator for the Committee of 
Military Affairs, House of Representatives, Mr. E. T. Foley made the following 
statement : 

To the best of my recollection, my first meeting with Colonel Theodore Wyman, 
Jr. occurred during the construction of the Fort Peek Dam, ten years or more 
ago. Our Company was one of a group of contractors that unsuccessfully bid for 
the spillway of this dam, and Colonel Wyman at that time was one of the engineer 
oflScers on this work. I believe he was a captain at that time. This meeting 
was short and purely in the line of the business at hand. 

My next meeting with Colonel Wyman, as I recall it, occurred in about 1937 
on completion of the San Gabriel Dam. At that time, Colonel Wyman, then a 
major, was in charge of the engineering worli on the Los Angeles River, and the 
West Slope Construction Co. rented to the Government a portion of the plant that 
had been used on the San Gabriel Dam. 

I have never had any social relations with Colonel Wyman. 

Tlie circumstances surrounding the connection of Foley Brotliers, Inc. with the 
Rohl Connolly Co. in the construction of the Haines Cutoif to the Alcan Highway 
are briefly as follows: 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2727 

Foley Brothers, Inc. representatives went to Edmonton early in February at 
the request of Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr., the Division Engineer of the North- 
west Division of the U. S. Engineers Corps. 

Colonel "Wyman stated that it was necessary that the Haines Military Cutoff 
Road be completed in the fall of 1943 and that he desired that Foley Brothers, 
Inc. undertake the work jointly with Rohl Connolly Co. as that firm owned a 
considerable amount of floating equipment suitable for ocean transport of per- 
sonnel, construction machinery and material to Haines, Alaska. Prior to this 
time there had been no transactions between these firms although Foley Brothers, 
Inc. knew that Rohl Connolly Co. was a well established and successful firm. It 
was known that both Mr. Rohl and Mr. Connolly had been actively engaged in 
construction in the Pacific Coast district for many years and there was no knowl- 
edge or suspicion on the part of anyone connected with Foley Brothers, Inc. 
that Mr. Rohl was anything but an American citizen. It was known that prior to 
this time he had been engaged on Army work in the Pacific area. Tlie press 
accounts of the investigation of the California Committee on Unamerican Activi- 
ties came as a complete surprise. This Haines Cutoff work is the only work on 
which Foley Brothers. Inc. have ever been associated with Rohl Connolly Co. 
or with Mr.H. W. Rohl. 

After this unfavorable publicity in connection with Mr. H. W. Rohl occui'red, 
representatives of Foley Brothers, Inc. again went to Edmonton and told Gen- 
eral L. D. Worsham, Colonel Wyman's successor as Division Engineer, that 
Foley Brothers, Inc. entered into this association at the Army's insistence, that 
through no fault of its own, Foley Brothers, Inc. found itself in a very awkward 
position, and that Foley Brothers, Inc. would withdraw and consent to the 
cancellation of the letter of intent, if the Army so desired. General Worsham 
pointed out that the work was urgent, that this procedure would result in 
unnecessary delay and agreed to the suggestion of both firms that Mr. Rohl 
be entirely disassociated from the work. Negotiations were completed with 
General Worsham and contract entered into. 

By arrangement with Mr. T. E. Connolly, now president of Rohl Connolly 
Co. Co. the construction was entirely handled by Foley Brothers, Inc. and Mr. 
Rohl was never on the work. 

The road was completed on schedule and below the estimated cost, a result 
which is very creditable to everyone connected with the project. 

E. T. FOT.KY. 

Witness 

John H. Weinee 

Dec. 14-43 

House of Representatives, 
com>[ittee on military affairs, 
Washington, D. C, March IS, 19 U. 

INTERVIEW 

Present : Colonel Earl E. Gessler and H. Ralph Burton. 

Mr. Burton. Please state your name and position that you hold. 

Colonel Gessler. Colonel Earl E. Gessler, Corps of Engineers, at present 
Division Engineer of the Middle Atlantic Division, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Q. How long have you been with the Engineer Corps? 

A. Since 1915. 

Q. Did you at any time have occasion to participate in negotiations which led 
up to the awarding and signing of contracts for defense projects in the Ha- 
waiian Islands to the Hawaiian Constructors, Inc? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you have occasion at any time to participate in negotiations in which 
Colonel Theodore Wyman. Jr. took part? 

A. No, never in any negotiations. 

Q. Do you know anything about any contract awarded to the Hawaiian 
Consti'uctors? 

A. I know there were such contracts, I possibly have seen them when I was 
in the Chief of Engineers Office. 

Q. There was a contract for certain installations in Hawaii which was nego- 
tiated and finally signed on December 20, 1940, and some of tlie i)ersons con- 
nected with those negotiations were Ilaiis Wilhelm Rohl, Paul Grafe and T. E. 
Connolly. Do you recall any of these? 

A. I recall the names. Yes, sir. 

79716— 46— Ex. 145, vol. 4 18 



2728 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Q. Did you ever come in contact with any of them? 

A. I never met any of them, no, sir. 

Q. At what place were you staitoned in 1940? 

A. I was Chief of the Finance Section at that time, which included the Con- 
tracts and Claims Branch. 

Q. Do you recall having any dealings with Hans Wilhelm Rohl, T. E. Con- 
nolly, or Paul Grafe? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Did you ever have occasion to participate tn any negotiations leading up 
to the awarding and signing of a contract for the Canol Project in Alaska. 

A. As a general rule I did not participate in any of the negotiations. I do not 
remember having seen it before it was executed or after it was executed. I do 
know there was such a contract. 

Q. You had no personal contact with either the negotiations or the awarding 
of the contracts for the installation of defense projects in Hawaii, the Pacific 
Islands, or the Canol Project in Alaska? 

A. That is true. It may be that my assistants may have had something to do 
with it. I can give you their names and perhaps that would be helpful. 

Q. I would be very glad if you would. 

A. At that time there was connected with the contract work, David Ogden, 
Now Brigadier General, in the South Pacific, I think ; possibly Watler Pincus, 
a Major, also in the South Pacific ; also Brig. Gen. D. L. Newman, but if it were 
Newman it could not have been Ogden. I forget just what the date of relief 
was there. They are the only officers who might have had contact in the con- 
tract section. 

[i] Statement of IMr. Cyril J. Harrington, 2142 Ewing Street, Los Angeles, 
California. Normandy 16774. 

Interviewed by : Mr. John H. Weiner, Investigator, Committee on Military 
Affairs, House of Representatives. 

Question. What is your name? 

Answer. Cyril .1. Harrington. 

Question. Where do you live. Mr. Harrington? 

Answer. 2142 Ewing Street, Los Angeles, California. 

Question. Were you ever employed by the Biltmore Hotel, in Los Angeles? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. How long were you so employed ? 

Answer. From September 20, 1936 to November 5, 1940. 

Question. W^hat were your duties? 

Answer. House officer. 

Question. Do you know Hans Wilhelm Rohl? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Do you know Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr.? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. While you were employed at the Biltmore Hotel, did you have occa- 
sion to meet either of these men there? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Do you know of your own knowledge if Mr. Rohl had, from time to 
time, been a guest at the hotel? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Would Mr. Rohl retain a room or a suite? 

Answer. It would be a suite or apartment — an apartment, if available. 

Question. Did you develop quite an acquaintance with Mr. Rohl? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. For that reason, you had many opportunities to visit his suite? 

[2] Answer. Yes. 

Question. Did you ever see Colonel Wyman there? 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. What would usually be the condition of Mr. Rohl and Colonel Wyman 
on your visits? 

Answer. I would say that Rohl, most of the time, was apparently drinking. Of 
course there was always liquor there and usually Rohl and Wyman would be in 
conversation. 

Question. Have you ever seen girls in Mr. Rohl's suite or apartment? 

Answer. Numerous times — many times. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2729 

Question. Would these parties last late? 

Answer. Yes, because I didn't go on duty until 11 :30 P. M. 

Question. Do you know Mr. SvendrupV 

Answer. Yes. 

Question. Will you please state the time or times that you saw Mr. Sveudrup, 
while he was registered at the hotel, in the company of Mr. Ruhl or Colonel 
WymanV 

Answer. Mr. Svendrup was in Mr. Rohl's apartment and he called requesting 
that his suite be cleaned during his absence. Ray Moore, handyman around the 
hotel, was sent to Svendrup's room to clean it and he found a purse. Ray Moore 
called me and I found approximately .$3.00 in the purse and I knew that Mr. Sven- 
drup and the girls were visiting in Mr. Rohl's apartment. I took the purse to 
Rohl's apartment and turned it over to them and Svendrup was very much per- 
turbed, saying that I should have left the purse in his room and that I should not 
touch anything in the room. At this point, Mr. Rohl ordered Mr. Svendrup to 
leave his apartment and go back to his own room and take his girl friend. Mr. 
Rohl resented the fact that Mr. Svendrup talked to me the way he did. 

Question. Did Mr. Svendrup leave and take his girl friend? 

Answer. I don't know that he left at that moment, but he did leave shortly 
thereafter. 

[3] Question. What was the apartment or suite number of Svendrup on 
that occasion? 

Answer. I believe it was 7315 and 7316. 

Question. Had you seen these girls around the hotel previously? 

Answer. Yes, three or four times. 

Question. What would you say the occupation of these girls might be? 

Answer. My opinion is that they were good time girls. I had seen them in 
the rooms of Rohl and Svendrup at different times. 

Question. Did you ever see Colonel Wymau in Svendrup's apartment? 

Answer. To the best of my knowledge, I only saw him there once. 

Question. Do you recall about what time it was? 

Answer. About 7 A. M. 

Question. Had he been there all night? 

Answer. Apparently. 

Question. What was his condition? 

Answer. He had been drinking. Of course, I wasn't employed at the hotel 
at this time, but I had been at the hotel the night before and had met Svendrup 
who had told me to be at his apartment at 7 the next morning, stating that he 
wanted to talk to Mr. Rohl about a position I was to get in Honolulu and the 
reason I had to be there so early was because Svendrup told me he was leaving 
the city early. 

Question. I believe that is all, Mr. Harrington. Thank you. 

Cyril J. Harrington 

Mr. Cykil J. Harrington. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 22nd day of December, 1943. 

[SEAL] Frances H. Purtexl, 

Notary Public in and for the County of Los Angeles, State of California. 

My Commission Expires Oct. 6, 1947. 

SECRET 

AFFIDAVIT 
[1] 

State of California 
County of Los Angeles, ss : 

Walter Horne, being first duly sworn, depos'^s and says : 

That he is a native born American citizen, now of the age of 53 years, and 
that he has resided on the West Coast of the United States of America for the past 
fifty years. 

That during said period of time, he owned the German-built yacht, "Contender," 
formerly known as the "Arm Gaard," whicli vessel was built and owned by a 
German Prince, Lippe. 



2730 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

That said vessel during affiant's ownership was known as the Contender with 
its home port at Long Beach, California and that said Contender was moored 
along side of a vessel known as the "Pandora" and that the records will disclose 
that said Pandora was registered in the name of the said Rohl because said 
vessel was Jess than 75 feet in length, and therefore could be registered in the 
name of an Alien German. 

That wliile affiant was the owner of said vessel, Contender, he met the said 
Hans Wilhelm Rohl and had many conversations with him, including conversa- 
tions regarding the construction of said Contender, but during said conversations, 
said Rohl was very arrogant, boastful of all things German, and claimed that his 
Uncle occupied a high position as Managing Director in the Hamburg-American 
line and the North German Lloyd Steamship Co. 

That in 1928, affiant entertained several persons upon his yacht the Contender, 
among which was Felix Von Luckner, commonly known during World War No. 1, 
as the German Raider, that affiant did not invite the said Rohl to said entertain- 
ment, and that thereafter, the said Rohl no longer renewed his friendship and 
acquaintance with the affiant, and that said Rohl represented that he visited with 
the said Von Luckner, and claimed close acquaintance with all visiting Germans of 
high rank in business and in Diplomatic Service of the German Republic. 

That during the acquaintanceship between the said Rohl and affiant, a large 
sea going vessel with its home port in New York which affiant was informed was 
purchased by the said Rohl for $47,000, was believed to be registered in the name 
of Floyee Rohl, who was a native born American, and that by said registration 
any perfunctory examination of the record would disclose that said vessel, the 
Vega being in excess of 75 feet in length was owned by an American citizen in 
truth and in fact that said vessel "Vega" was purchased and controlled by the 
said Hans Wilhelm Rohl, a German alien in violation of U. S. Maritime laws. 

That affiant was informed and believes that said Hans Wilhelm Rohl is the 
same person who secured upon the recommendation of an American Army officer 
known as Major Wyman, construction contracts from the United States Engineer- 
ing Department in excess of $100,000,000. 

That affiant is informed and believes that the said vessel, Vega, was chartered 
by the Engineering Department of the United States Army through said Major 
Wyman for $75,001, and that said charter provided that said vessel, Vega, was to 
be used in the war effort, but instead the said vessel under said charter was used 
to haul a load of liquor to Honolulu at the instigation of the said Major Wyman, 
and that said $75,001 was authorized by the said Major Wyman, and was actually 
paid by the United States Government to tlie then wife of Hans Wilhelm Rohl, a 
German alien. 

[2] That affiant is informed and believes that said vessel sailing with the 
said cargo of intoxicating liquor from the harbor of San Pedro was never used 
for any purpose of National Defense or as set forth in the charter thereof. 

That affiant believes that the method of registration of said vessel Vega and 
the chartering thereof, and the wrongful use of said charter, was and is a 
fraud upon the United States Government. 

That affiant is informed and believes that the said Rohl was at Pearl Harbor, 
Honolulu, prior to December 7, 1941, and had complete detailed information of 
all of the offensive and defensive installations of the War Department, and that 
he knew on said date of the location of American Naval vessels, American planes, 
fortifications and other vital installations, and that the aforesaid knowledge of 
the said Rohl at that particular place at that particular time, was too serious to 
be a mere coincidence, which in affiant's opinion should be thoroughly investi- 
gated by officials of the Government high enough not to be biased, prejudiced, or 
influenced in any manner whatsoever. 

Affiant further states that in his opinion, the Government investigators should 
go deeper than the records disclose upon the surface, so that there may be appre- 
hended all Alien Spies working under cover against the best American interests, 
and in league with agents of Germany or Japan, and that all persons so appre- 
hended should lose their citizenship, and all of their worldly goods and ill-gotten 
gains available should be confiscated, and that they should be deported to the 
countries from which they originally came. 

And that it should not be forgotten that the fathers and mothers who mourn 
tlieir dead soldiers and sailors who lost their lives in this war, and who have 
received Awards of Merit and Distinguished Service Medals, would want to 
return these Awards to the United States Government so long as the said Major 
Wyman is allowed to retain any merits or the Distinguished Service Medal 
granted him, and that he should be subjected to an impartial Court Martial, and 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2731 



treated as found guilty, according to his just deserts and the best American 
tradition. 

Walter Horne. 
9425 Wilshire Blvd, Beverly Hills, California. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 24th day of December 1943. 

Agnes Kyle. 
Notary Public for Aforesaid County and State. 



House of Repkesentatives, 
Committee on Military Affairs 

Washington, D. C. 

In Re : Hans Wilhehn Rohl 

State of California 

County of Los Angeles, ss: 

H. J. KING, who resides at 904 South Oaldand Street, Pasadena, first being 
duly sworn, deposes and says : I was on active service in the Army Engineers 
from December, 1917 to September, 1919, with the rank of Major when I resigned 
in 1929. I studied engineering at Northwestern University, where my son is now 
a professor. 

About January 15, 1942 I had completed a project at San Luis Obispo, and 
learned that a tunnel man was needed in tlie Hawaiian Islands, and was 
eventually employed by Paul Grafe for Hawaiian Constructors, and arrived in 
Honolulu on February 16, 1942, and lived in the Pleasanton Hotel until January 
25, 1943. 

I met Hans W. Rohl a day or two after I arrived. He was drunk when we 
met, and although I saw him many times thereafter, I hever did see him when 
he was fully sober ; and he was never in the full possession of his faculties 
during the time I saw him. 

The work being done during the period/when Col. Theodore Wyman, Jr. was 
in charge, was quite muddled. This was due to a variety of causes, some being 
the fact that there was a natural state of confusion following the attack on 
Pearl Harbor, and a constantly-changing tactical situation throughout the 
Pacific theatre. Among the business people who come in contact with Col. 
Wyman there was a general impression that he was extremely arbitrary. 

After Col. Wyman left, the situation began to improve; more equipment began 
to arrive and our program was much more definite. 

I was there when Rohl's yacht the Vega arrived in February of 1942, and 
I used to see it tied to the dock from time to time. The U. S. Engineers Depart- 
ment took over the Vega upon her arrival, but so far as I know they never 
used the boat, because she just remained tied up, and was never sailed at all. 

When I arrived I laid around for about thirty days before Rohl got sufficiently 
sober to put me to work. On about March 15. 1942 I commenced work as Area 
Superintendent for Area 14, which included the Ewa area. After a little over 
two weeks had elapsed I was appointed General Superintendent for Hawaiian 
Constructors — April 3, 1943, and thenceforth until I left I had complete super- 
vision over all field work. 

Generally speaking, the work that had been accomplished under the super- 
vision of Col. Wyman prior to December 7. 1941, was pretty lousy; and when 
the people in the Hawaiian Islands who were familiar with this work — ofticers 
and civilians alike — learned that Colonel Wyman had been awarded the Dis- 
tinguished Service Medal "for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished serv- 
ice in the performance of duty of great responsibility as District Engineer, 
Honolulu (T. H.) Engineer District, from October 14, 1941, to March 15, 1942," 
it was a source of considerable amusement. 

(signed) H. J. King 
H. J. King. 

This statement taken, and signature witnessed by JOHN H. WEINER, INVES- 
TIGATOR for The Committee On Military Affairs UNITED STATES HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

(signed) John H. Weiner 
John H. Weiner.' 

SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this 18 day of December, 1943, by 
H. J. King and John H. Weiner. 

Frieda Segel. 



2732 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

sECKErr 

IN RE HANS WILHELM ROHL 

State of Caufornia. 
County of Los Angeles, ss: 

Statement of Mrs. Gertrude Marcus 

I reside at 2007 W. Third Street, Los Angeles; have been employed for the 
last seventeen years by the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles ; for the last four years 
have been desk clerk assigned to the ninth floor. 

I have known Hans Wilhelm Rohl for several years as a patron ; he most 
usually requested quarters on my floor, since one of the suites has a refrigerator. 
He most always was drunk, and it was a common practice for him to have cheap 
looking girls visiting him ; they would stop at my desk for directions, but after a 
while they got wise and came up the back elevator. 

His male companion on these parties was the man whose picture Mr. Weiner 
showed me. Mr. Rohl would sometimes call him Ted and sometimes Mr. Smith. 
I now know his name is Colonel Wyman, but I have not seen him recently. 
When W.vman and Rohl would leave together, they would be pretty plastered. 
When Mr. Rohl was here about a month ago the bellboy, Charles Hays, said: 
"You ought to see how Rohl is bleeding ; you know he was operated on for gall 
bladder". 

Mrs. Gertrude Marcus. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of December, 1943. 

This statement taken, and signature witnessed bv John H. Weiner, Investi- 
gator for The Committee on Military Affairs, UNITED STATES HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES. 

John H. Weiner, 
John H. Weine:r. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 24th day of December, 1943. 

Frieda Segel. 

[i] AFFIDAVIT 

State of California, 
County of Los Angeles, ss: 

FERMAN K. PICKERING, being first duly sworn, deposes and says: 
I was employed by Bechtel-Price-Callahan in San Francisco as Cost Clerk. 
I left Oakland, California June 6, 1942, arriving in Edmonton, Canada June 10, 
1942. I then proceeded to Waterways, Canada, arriving there Jime 12, 1942. 
During my two weeks' stay, I lived at the New Franklin Hotel at Fort McMurray, 
which is approximately one and one-half miles from Waterways. I arrived in 
Waterways with my immediate superior, Mr. E. W. Bailey and Mr. J. H. Cooper, 
Assistant Administrative Manager for Bechtel-Price-Callahan. We were met 
at the depot by Mr. Robert Hoffman, who introduced himself as the Construc- 
tion Superintendent for Bechtel-Price-Callahan. After the departure of Mr. 
Bailey and Mr. Cooper, which took place a few days after their arrival, and 
when we, according to instructions of both Cooper and Bailey, ordered some 
oflSce supplies, we learned that Bechtel-Price-Callahan apparently was unknown 
locally, but that the firm which had established credit was known as Hoffman 
and Boyce. I learned that the employees were paid in cash and had never 
heard of Bechtel-Price-Callahan but thought they were working for Hoffman and 
Boyce. The cash for the payroll was handled by Mr. E. E. Beckett, who also 
believed he was working for Hoffman and Boyce rather than Bechtel-Price- 
Callahan. His remark was "Who is Bechtel-Price-Callahan?" I never met Mr. 
Boyce and in spite of numerous Inquiries, never was able to find anyone who 
knew him. 

The two front rooms of the New Franklin Hotel, where I lived, at Fort Mc- 
Murray, were occupied by Mr. Robert Hoffman and Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr. 
of the United States Engineers, who was in charge of the Northwest Division. 
For a period of two weeks I saw Colonel [2] Wyman nearly every day 
•v^ith the exception of two occasions when he didn't leave his room. Mr. Robert 
Hoffman seemed to be a very close friend as well as business associate of Colonel 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2733 

Wyman. Mr. Hoffman told me that he had been with the Hawaiian Constructors 
and had worked with Colonel Wyman in the Hawaiian Islands. It was general 
gossip among the men that Colonel Wyman was a heavy drinker and no ap- 
parent effort was made to conceal this fact. On several occasions I saw Colonel 
Wyman when he was, in my opinion, drunk. On several other occasions I saw 
him when, in my opinion, he had been apparently drinking heavily. Upon an- 
other occasion, Mr. Robert Hoffman told me that he was very much worried as 
Colonel Wyman was out of liquor and had asked him to get some, which was 
difficult, as Edmonton, the nearest legal source for liquor, was over three hundred 
miles away. 

One night, at Waterways, at the Northern Alberta Railway depot. Colonel 
Wyman asked the Railway Agent to spot some cars that had arrived that day 
loaded with prefabricated barges. He was told that it would be a matter of 
a couple of hours before an engine was available. The Colonel, who obviously 
had been drinking, told the agent that he and the other Canadians were incom- 
petent and that "If you can't run the God damned railroad, I'll take it over and 
run it myself." 

One evening, while having dinner, seated close to Colonel Wyman's table, the 
Colonel, who apparently hadn't seen us vip to that time, asked Mr. Robert Hoff- 
man who we were. Mr. Hoffman replied that we were administrative employees 
sent from Edmonton several days prior to that time. The Colonel asked Mr. 
Hoffman if he had hired us. Mr. Hoffman replied that he hadn't and the Colonel 
said, blustering, "Send them back to Edmonton. We don't want them here." On 
another occasion, at the New Franklin Hotel, Mr Hoffman was talking to a man 
who had approached him in reference to buying a saw mill for $25,000. Mr. 
Hoffman replied that he had no authority to spend $25,000. At that iwint. 
Colonel Wyman approached and asked Mr. Hoffman, "Who the hell [3] is 
going to spent $25,000.?" Mr. Hoffman replied that no one was; that the man 
had a saw mill that he wanted to sell for that amount. Colonel Wyman asked 
Hoffman what use they had for the lumber and was told that it could be used 
in building barges. Colonel Wyman said, "Go ahead and buy the God damned 
thing." Earl Harcourt, who was a Bechtel-Price-Callahan Transportation Ad- 
visor and who had worked in the surrounding country for a number of years, 
told me that the saw mill in question wasn't worth over $5,000. as it had stood 
idle for some time. Whether or not this deal was consummated, I do not know. 

I talked to Mr. Everett Seaberry, whose title was Project Manager on the Canal 
Project. By way of introduction, I asked Mr. Seaberry if he was not Bechtel- 
Price-Callahan's Project Manager to which he relied : "I'm supposed to be, but 
don't have a damned thing to say about anything that is being done." 

After being in Waterways for two weeks, I returned to Edmonton on June 27, 
1942, where I remained until July 27, 1942. I found the town full of idle men 
who were drawing salary and subsistence, which in the case of, for instance, 
a tractor operator, amounted to about $20.00 per day, with subsistence allowance. 
From my arrival back in Edmonton until July 27, 1942, I was on a travel status, 
drawing salary and subsistence allowance with no work assigned. 

Robert Finney who wrote "Canada Moves North" was on the Bechtel-Price- 
Callahan payroll with the title of Chief Expediter at, I was told, a salary of 
$1,000 per month. It was my understanding that all administrative salaries of 
$200 or more per month had to be approved by the United States Engineers. 

Before I left Waterways, I met a Mrs. Cooper and another girl, whose name 
I cannot recall, who told me they had also worked with Colonel Wyman in the 
Hawaiian Islands prior to coming to Canada. 

Gertrude Campbell, who called herself the Colonel's personal representative, 
told me that she had been with the Engineers in Los Angeles ; from Los Angeles 
she had gone to Hawaii, where she worked directly under Colonel Wyman and 
had gone to Canada from [^1 Hawaii. I flew from Edmonton to White 
Horse in the same plane with Miss Campbell. After staying in White Horse 
for two days, we proceeded to Skagway, Alaska, by train, also accompanied by Miss 
Campbell, who was the Colonel's personal representative on the Canal Project 
#2 at Skagway, Alaska. Miss Campbell told me, in the presence of my wife 
and others, that on the morning of December 7, 1941, in the Plawaiian Islands, 
Colonel Wyman, who was then District Engineer, came to the office after the 
Japanese attack, in a drunken condition and in civilian clothes, and changed 
to his uniform in full view of the girls in the office. Colonel Wyman meantime 



2734 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

shouted directions to those in the office and passed out guns to anyone who 
seemed to be able to operate tirearms. 

Ferman K. Pickering, 
Mr. Ferman K. Picicering. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7 day of January, 1944. 

Marie A. Dodge, 
Notary Public in and for the'County of Los Angeles, State of California. 

My Commission Expires May 28, 1947. 

House of Repb.'^sentatives, 
Committee on Military Affairs, 

Washington, D. C. 
In re: Hans Wilhelm Rohl. 
State of California, 

County of Los Angeles, ss: 

Lieutenant L. M. STAUB, 11166 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, 
U. S. Navy, Reserve, first being duly sworn, deposes and says : 

I first met Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr. about 1938 ; I have seen him on H. W. 
Rohl's yacht, the Vega, four or five times, and on each and every occasion Wyman 
was so drunk that he was utterly obnoxious and incapable of transacting any 
business ; when I was first introduced to him. Colonel Wyman criticized my ap- 
pearance and was very insulting to me ; he would pour whisky on the floor and 
drop his burning cigarettes on the carpet. 

Mrs. Floy Rohl once stated to me that she didn't like Wyman, but that H. W. 
Rohl, her husband, had to tolerate him for business reasons. 

I was acquainted with Werner Plack, having mot him in about 1935 or 1936, 
and know that he spent most of his time at Gert Von Gundhardf s home in Beverly 
Hills. Plack also told me that he visited at Frank Morgan's home in Beverly 
Hills. 

L. M. Staub. 
L. M. Staub. 

This .statement taken, and signature witnessed by JOHN H. WEINER, INVES- 
TIGATOR for The Committee On Military Affairs UNITED STATES HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES. 

John H. Weiner. 
John H. Weiner. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 24th day of December, 1943. 

Frieda Sexjel. 



House ob' liEPRF.SENTATiVES, 
Committe:e on Military Affairs, 

Washington, D. C. 
In re : Hans Wilhelm Rohl. 
State of California, 

County of Los Angeles, ss: 

REA B. WICKISER, who.se residence is 1522 Rodney Drive, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, first being duly sworn, deposes and says : 

I was born in Lima, Ohio, in 1908, educated in that state, and went into tunnel 
construction work in Michigan, worked on the Boulder Dam pro.1eet, on the 
Southern California Acqueduct and Parker Dam, and went to Honolulu on the 
Alinanau Crater project under the supervision of Major Bruce Hill, then worked 
running quarries and making estimates for the U. S. Engineers on the California 
Central Valleys Project, then worked for jMr. H. J. King on the Pennsylvania 
Turnpike, then on a shaft and tunnel for the Navy in Bremerton, Washington, 
then to Parker Dam driving penstock tunnels, then to San Luis Obispo. 

In about May, 1941, I heard that Territory Airport Constructors had gotten a 
contract for building five aii'ports in the Hawaiian Islands, and contacted Phil 
Shirley, of Gunther-Shirley Company, and was hired to take charge of rock exca- 
vation in the Islands for Territory Airport Constructors, having signed the con- 
tract on July 18, 1941. 

I went to the Island of IMaui in July, 1941, and started supervising rock excava- 
tion work there. Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr., was .supervising all this work 
for the Army Engineers. I then worked on an airport on the Island of Hilo as 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2735 

superintendent for Territory Airport Constructors. No particular difficulties 
were encountered until the United States went to war, and the engineers bought 
all our equipment for the Army, and we assigned our contracts over to the Army 
Engineers, and our personnel went to work for Hawaiian Constructors. My first 
job was to mine Hilo Airport which consisted of placing boxes of explosives in a 
definite pattern below the grade of the runways — this being immediately after 
Pearl Harbor. This was under Col. Theodore Wyman, Jr. The grades on 
the runways were changed nine times by the Army Engineers, necessitating chang- 
ing positions of the demolition boxes. Since an invasion was feared, I was put 
to work with a crew of my men to stand by on a 24-hour emergency. Two Army 
demolition experts were stationed at Hilo as advisors, but in fact I had to instruct 
them. I was really in charge of the "scorched earth" program. I requested 
soldiers be assigned to my detail, and this was done. 

I was next sent to Pahoa as superintendent to take charge of very secret work. 
I was instructed by the Engineering Corps, headed then by Wyman, not to leave 
the dirt in the tunnel and not to dump it outside. My one small blueprint indi- 
cated the tunnel's course as making a 62° turn to the right off an exit. I finished 
the job 2 days ahead of schedule, and was asked drive another one at Pahoa, 
hut the Engineers failed to locate it for me ; so I had to locate and drive it, which 
I did in 15 days; the plan showed a 62° turn to the left, but after we had com- 
pleted it, the Engineers brought out another set of plans showing the 62° tuvn 
to the right instead of the left. This was all under Wyman's supervision. 

I then went to Kahuku to drive another tunnel of the same type through rock, 
necessitating mechanical equipment. Believing the work was needed in a hurry, 
I asked for equipment, but Wyman's engineers in Honolulu wouldn't give us 
any equipment, so we did the job by hand. 

My wife was then evacuated from Honolulu to the mainland, and I decided that 
things were in such a mess I would leave, and got a medical release from my 
contract by the engineers, but I stayed on under Mr. King until we left together 
on January 2."), 1943. Was general superintendent of all underground construc- 
tion from June, 1942 until our contract was fulfilled. 

From the experience I had with Wyman's Engineers, when I found he received 
the Distinguished Service Medal, I thought somebody had slipped up somewhere 
along the line, and that Washington just didn't know what had been going on. 

Referring to the testimony given by Ray Anderson, where he insinuated that 
Plea.sonton was a place of debauch, but this is not true. The female help in 
this hotel was never allowed above the first floor. 

The food about which Anderson complained was furnished by the Army Engi- 
neers, and was a livable ration. 

He mentions a vehicular tunnel as being dug by soldiers, whereas I dug it 
myself in 1935. 

(Signed) Rea B. Wickiser, 
Rea B. Wickiser. 

This statement, taken, and signature witnessed by JOHN H. WEINER, IN- 
VESTIGATOR for The Committee On Military Affairs UNITED STATES HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

(Signed) John H. Weiner, 
John H. Weineb. 

SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this 18 day of December, 1»43, Rea B. 
Wicki-ser and John H. Weiner. 

Frieda Seget.. 

Headquarters H.\waiian Department, 
Office of the Department Commander, 

Fort Shnfter, T. H., 2/, September 1942. 
In reply refer to : AG-201.22 
Re Contract No. W-414-eng-602 

Hawaiian Constructors, 

Punahou Campus, Honolulu, T. H. 

Dear Sirs: The Hawaiian Department commends your organization on its 
achievements as noted below. 

The completion of Runway A at Wheeler Field in 30 days is particularly note- 
worthy. This project was started on the morning of July 24, 1942 and the com- 
pleted and paved runway, 300' wide by G,2(j0' long, was turned over to and used by 



2736 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

the Air Force on the morning of August 25, 1942, a record for runway construction 
which it is believed has never been equaled in this area. 

Special credit is due to Herbert J. King, General Superintendent, who, by 
reason of his training, experience and unselfish devotion to the job, brought about 
the coordination of forces necessary for these achievements. 

Specifically to be commended ai"e your Tunnel Department, headed by R. B. 
Wickiser, General Tunnel Superintendent, his able assistants, and the organiza- 
tion under his jurisdiction. Within 90 days, not only was this organization per- 
fected, but notable advances were made in tunnel construction which are the more 
remarkable in view of the difficulties, obstacles and unforseeable contingencies to 
be overcome. 

The outstanding work of the grading organization headed by John Crockett, 
Excavation Superintendent, also merits recognition. The grading of Waiele 
Gulch Airfield, involving in excess of 600,0(X) yards of excavation, was completed 
in 34 days. At Wheeler Field, the grading and placing of foundation rock base 
course on Runway A was completed in 20 days. 

Special appreciation is also merited by the asphalt paving crew under Donald D. 
Cook, Asphalt Superintendent. This crew, I am informed, started asphalting the 
base course on Runway A at Wheeler Field before more than half of the course 
had been laid and so coordinated its work with other operations that the entire 
project could be completed in record time. 
Very truly yours, 

Delos C. Emmons, 
Dexos C. Emmons, 
Lieutenant General, U. 8. Army, 

Commanding. 

[i] Headquarters, 

san bernakdino air service command, 
san bernardino army air fueld, california. 

Statement of Mr. Emil Zucca, 

Residence: 1141 Ma&nolia Street, San Bernardino, California. 

Interviewed by John H. Weiner, Investigator, Committee of Military Affairs, 
House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. 

Statement taken at San Bernardino Air Service Command, San Bernardino 
Army Air Field, California, December 23, 1943. 

Q. Please state your name. 

A. Emil Zucca. 

Q. Where do you reside, Mr. Zucca? 

A. 1141 Magnolia Street, San Bernardino, California. 

Q. Where are you employed? 

A. San Bernardino Air Service Command. 

Q. What is your occupation? 

A. Senior Aircraft Mechanic. 

Q. Were you ever employed by the U. S. Engineer Department, South Pacific 
Division, Los Angeles District? 

A. Yes. 

Q. What wei'e your duties? 

A. Chauffeur. 

Q. To whom were you assigned? 

A. District Engineer. 

Q. And who was that? 

A. Major Theodore Wyman, Jr. 
[2] Q. How long were you employed in that capacity? 

A. I started in February, 1936, and I worked there until March of 1942. 

Q. How long did you actually drive for Major Wyman? 

A. About 3 years and 7 months. 

Q. Was that a government car? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Were you acquainted with the first Mrs. Wyman — Ella Wyman? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Also the second Mrs. Wyman — Ruth Wyman? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Do you know Hans Wilhelm Rohl? 

A. Yes. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2737 

Q. Had yon had occasions to drive Major AVyman in the evenings and early 
ujornings? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Did you ever have occasion to drive Major Wyman to the Biltmore Hotel? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Do you know, from your own knowledge, who he was going there to visit? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Have you ever had occasion to go up to Mr. Rohl's apartment in the Bilt- 
more Hotel? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. What would be these occasions? 

A. On different occasions, I have gone to Mr. Rohl's apartment to take Major 
Wyman ciiiarettes, and his brief case — on occasions. 

Q. Who would be in the apartment on these occasions? 

A. Mr. Rohl, Major Wyman, sometimes would be alone; and on other occasions, 
there would be Mr. Svendrup, and Paul Graffe. 

[3] Q. As a rule, would you have to wait for Major W\vman? 

A. Yes. 

Q. How late, if you remember, would you have to wait for him on some 
occasions? 

A. Oh, anywhere from 9:00 until 2 :00. 

Q. Where would you then take him? 

A. Home. 

Q. Do you remember the address? 

A. 221 Woodruff, West Los Angeles. 

Q. It was also customary, was it not, for you also to drive Major Wyman and 
his friends around to the various night clubs? 

A. I have, on occasion. Yes. 

Q. Please name some of the night clubs that you have taken Major Wyman 
and his guests. 

A. Earl Carroll's, Cafe La Maze, Little Jane Jones' club, the Trocadero, and 
the Ambassador Hotel. 

Q. Who would usually be along on these parties? 

A. Mr. Rohl, Major Wyman. Mr. Svendrup, Captain George Withers, Captain 
Clatterbos, Paul Graife. There was also one man whose name I don't remem- 
ber . . . medium build. 

Q. On these trips, Mr. Zucca, you always used the government car, did you not? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Would you then have to wait until the party was over and take them home? 

A. Most of the time. 

Q. How late would you have to wait to take the parties home? 

A. Around midnight or one o'clock. 

Q. But there have been occasions that you just took out Mr. Rohl and Major 
Wyman to the same type of places? 

A. Yes, sir. 

[^] Q- Would you be paid extra for this work? 

A. Occasionally I received a tip. 

Q. Please state the various night clubs or country clubs where you took Mr. 
and Mrs. Rohl and Major and Mrs. Wyman. 

A. The Bel-Air Country Club. DilYerent hotels. It is impossible for me to 
remember all the names. 

Q. Please state if there have also been occasions when it was necessary for 
\ ou to take Mrs. Wyman shopping. 

A. Yes. I have taken both of them shopping. 

Q. And that, also, was in the government car? 

A. Yes. 

Q. To the best of your recollection, Mr. Zucca, please state the various banks 
that you took either Major Wyman or Mrs. Wyman. 

A. The Bank of America at Seventh and Figueroa, and the Bank of America 
at Westwood Village. 

Q. On your visits to Mr. Rohl's apartment in the hotel, while Major Wyman 
and these men were there, did you see evidences of liquor?. 

A. I have, on occasions. 

Q. Have you ever driven Major Wyman down to the Los Angeles Yacht Club? 

A. Yes. 

Q. Do you know who he was to meet there? 



2738 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

A. I presume Mr. Rohl. 

Q. Have you ever been on the Vega? 

A. No. But I have seen it. 

Q. Have you ever taken Major Wyraan from the hotel to homes other than 
his own? 

A. Yes. 

[5] Q. Do you linow whose homes you took him to? 

A. I drove him to Mr. Rohl's home, and Captain Clatterbos' liome, and Captain 
Withers'. Those are the only ones that I recall. 

Q. AVould you leave him there, or would you wait for him? 

A. Sometimes I would leave him there, and sometimes I would wait. 

That is all Mr. Zucea. Thank you very much. 

Emil Zucca. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 23rd day of December, 1943. 

Edwabd C. Strum. 
My Commission Expires April 28. 1944. 

[1] House of Representatives, 

Committee on Military Affairs, 
Washington, D. C, February 3, 1944- 

interview 

Present: Herman J. Galloway, John INI. Martin, H. Ralph Burton, Joseph G. 
Colgan. 

Mr. Martin All of the Rohl-ConnoUy Company work performed prior to the 
negotiated contract for construction work in the Hawaiian Islands was performed 
pursuant to an invitation for bids and an award for them at public letting. The 
first negotiated contract that Rohl-Connolly became interested in was known as 
the Hawaiian Constructors contract about December 18, 1940. Present were 
Mr. Paul Grafe, then Vice President of the Callahan Construction Company, Mr. 
T. E. Connolly, the President of the Rohl-Connolly Company. Mr. Grafe also is 
either Vice President or Attorney in Fact for the Gunther-Shirley Company. 

Mr. Bttrton. Could you state just what interest Rohl had in any of the com- 
panies making up the Hawaiian Constructors? 

Mr. Martin. The same interest as the three had in the Caddoa Constructors, 
that being 40 percent participating interest ; 40 percent participating interest was 
held by W. E. Callahan and 20 percent by Guntlier-Shirley Corporation. The 
Rohl-Connolly [2] stock was then owned 50 percent by T. E. Connolly 
through his ownership in the T. E. Connolly Co., Inc., 25 percent was owned by 
Floy E. Rohl, Rohl's wife, and 25 percent was held by H. W. Rohl, so that Rolil 
had 10 percent interest in those contracts. That was later reduced by selling a 
participating interest to Ralph Wooley and the Hawaiian Contracting Company. 

Mr. Burton. I understand that Rohl was the directing head of the Hawaiian 
Constructors on the Hawaiian contracts. 

Mr. Martin. That is true only from on or about the 26th or 27th of September 
1941 on which date he first arrived. Prior to that date he had nothing to do 
whatsoever with the Hawaiian Islands contract or with work being performed 
there. He probably was consulted as to the necessary finances the Rohl-Connolly 
Co. would have to advance toward an operating fund. 

Mr. Burton. Isn't it true that Colonel Wyman was in Washington in December 
of 1940 when this contract was negotiated? 

Mr. Martin. I personally met and talked with Colonel Wyman in Washington, 
D. C. on December 18, 1940. 

Mr. Burton. You state there were a number of supplements dated December 
20, 1940? 

Mr. Martin. Yes, I served as Attorney for Hawaiian Constructors from the very 
inception of the contract until the completion of the work about a year ago. By 
that I mean I personally dictated from Wasliington to my Los Angeles OflSce 
the joint venture agreement. 

Mr. Bueton. I would like to ask you to repeat what you said about the Far 
Eastern Air route. 

[3] Martin. You asked me about Mr. Rohl's being in charge of the Islands. 
It is my understanding that on or about the 25th of September, 1941 Mr. Rohl 
took a clipper to the Islands and immediately took direct charge of a major portion 
of the project. I understand from him that he was there on December 7, 1941 
and that on or about December 10, 1941 he received from the Commanding General 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2739 

an order to construct for the Government the five ferry command bases from the 
United States to Australia. Within 35 days after the receipt of such order he had 
completed those 5 ferry command bases. 

BuETON. Do you know anything of the relationship of Leif J. Sverdrup of the 
firm of Sverdrup and Parcel and later the firm of Sverdrup and Parcel and J. 
Gordon Turnbull, to the Hawaiian Constructors? 

Martin. I have spent, as attorney for the Bechtel-Price-Callahan Company, 
a considerable amount of time on their problems. On one occasion I flew to 
Edmonton and spent a portion of a month there as attorney for Bechctel-Price- 
Callahan who had the contract for what is known as the Canol Project. While 
there) were only three names on the contract, there were probably 10 or 12 who 
had been contributing their efforts to that project. I do not believe a supplemental 
contract was made so as to bring all those people in as contractors to that project. 
I did come into contact with that firm in connection with the Canol project. I 
have never contacted them in connection with the Rohl-Connolly Company. It is 
my recollection that Svei'drup has .served as the consultant in my work with other 
clients. 

[4] BuBTON. Do you know whether or not Sverdrup is an associate or close 
personal friend of Hohl? 

Martin. I am sure he is not. I never met Sverdrup. I have represented Mr. 
Rohl as his attorney and I would say also as his attorney in fact for a period of 
more than 15 years and I don't know the man Sverdrup. 

BuETON. Do you know about how many supplements there were to the original 
contract which was W-414 eng 602 signed December 1940? 

Martin. Approximately 40. 

BuETON. Do you know anything of negotiations which are pending now relating 
to the termination settlement of the contract with the Hawaiian Constructors? 
Have you had anything to do with them? 

Martin. It is my uuder.standing that conferences concerning that matter have 
been had with my office, probably with my brother, Frank L. Martin, Jr. I have 
had some discussion with those interested in the Hawaiian Constructors, but I 
have no detailed information of that now. I can say to you I believe the present 
status would show that on approximately $100,000,000 worth of work completed 
by Hawaiian Constructors, there is a major portion of it on which no settlement 
has been made either as to deternunation of fees or the issuance of final estimates 
of the making of final payments the,mselves. 

Burton. Are those negotiations taking place in California or in Hawaii? 

Martin. I am personnally not handling them and I can't give you any help 
on that subject. It is my recollection that a decision was [J] reached 
by Mr. Connolly, Mr. Grave, and Mr. Shirley that that matter was to be handled 
by their partner Mr. Wooley who resides in the Islands and that Mr. Wooley has 
the assistance of Mr. Middleton who has been in continuous active charge of the 
office for Hawaiian Constructors in the Islands throughout the entire period 
of the contract. 

Btjeton. Will you continue your statement regarding Colonel Wyman? 

Martin. When I said a few moments ago I personally saw Colonel Wyman 
in Washington, D. C. about the 18th of December, 1940, I h,ad in mind a joint 
conference with Mr. Connolly, Mr. Grafe and Mr. Wyman which was prior to 
the date when the contract was signed for the work. I only spoke to Colonel 
Wyman in greeting because I had known him in Los Angeles. I don't recall 
there was any business discussion at all in that conference. I had shortly ad- 
journed to a conference with Mr. Connolly and Mr. Grafe at which time I learned 
of their wishes for a joint venture. The negotiations for that contract were 
handled by Mr. Connolly personally with Mr. Grafe, General Schley and Gen- 
eral Robbins in Washington and a Major Neuman. Mr. Rohl was not present 
in Washington and to the best of my knowledge, knew none of the terms or pro- 
visions of that contract or had anything to do with it until on or about Sep- 
tember 25, 1941. T make that statement because sometime in 1929 Mr. Rohl 
had come to my office and handed me his original declaration of citizenship and 
inquired of me whether there wasn't some means by which he could [6] now 
proceed to obtain his final papers. I told Mr. Rohl he had waited too long, that the 
7 years period had already expired. He said he was quitp anxious to expedite 
the obtaining of his papers and wondered if I didn't know of somebody who knew 
a way that the procedurp could be shortened, calling to my attention the fact 
that his wife was an American. I told him I would write to Washington. D. C. and 
try to think of something that would enable him to obtain citizenship without 
starting all over again. In the early spring of 1941 Mr. Rohl came to my office 



2740 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

and handed nie an order of Colonel Wyman, District Engineer, directing that he 
report as a consultant in the Islands In connection with the work of the Ha- 
waiian Constructors. I at that time discussed wtih Mr. Rohl tlie possibility of 
the Department issuing him a permit authorizing him to go to the Islands. 
It is my recollection that I thought probably the order by the District Enguieer 
would be sufficient for him to go, but that I felt for him to go in the capacity where 
the order itself disclosed that the contract was secret, this order showed it was 
a secret contract, would not be wise. I advised Mr. Rohl he shouldn't attempt 
to assume responsibility for a secret project at a time when he wasn't a citizen 
of the United States. Mr. Rohl asked me if I would explain to General Robbins 
why Mr. Rohl was not obeying that request of Colonel Wyman. I told him [7] 
I would and I think there was a lapse of probably several months. Other subse- 
quent requests had been made by Colonel Wyman who apparently was row- 
ing with Paul Grafe, in which Rohl was again requested to come to the Islands 
and it drifted along until about August 1041 when I had come to Washington 
and handed to General Robbins a photostatic order directing that Rohl go to 
the Islands and I believe that Colonel Lorance and a civilian attorney for the 
Chief of Engineers named Stelphen were there. It is my recollection that Gen- 
eral Kingman, who was then Acting Chief of Engineers, was brought into the 
discussion and that Kingman thereupon wrote a letter to Mr. Schofield. Was it 
Schofield? The letter was dated about August 28, 1941, and Mr. Schofield is 
head of the Department of Inimigratiton in which General Kingman stated that 
there could be no question of Mi-. Rohl's loyalty to the United States; that his 
services were badly needed in the islands, and that he understood he had a peti- 
titon pending wtih the court in Los Angeles for his naturalization and would they 
do what they could to expedite the hearing on its merits by the Federal court. 
It is my recollection that Mr. Stelphen delivered that letter by hand to Mr. Scho- 
field and that Mr. Schofield then wired his oflSce at Los Angeles asking that they 
expedite a hearing of the Rohl petition, and while in Washington I was advised 
that it had been set for September 15. At that hearing my brother appeared as 
attorney for Mr. Rolil. 

Burton. Did Mr. Rohl have any one else employed as attorney? 

Martin. Only as my associate. At that time my brother was ill and [S] 
I had Mr. Cannon aid me. He was on a number of cases with me and probably 
had an active part in this hearing on September 15, although I was not personally 
present. That is just my recollection. 

CoTxiAN. Did I understand he had taken out his first papers? 

Martin. He took out his first papers at Sacramento in about 1913 to 1915. 

Burton. Do you want to tell of I'ohl-Connolly's Company participation in 
contracts having to do with the Government or is there something you want 
to say before then ? 

Martin. I previously stated that the first contract fm- Government work 
awarded the Rohl-Connolly Company on a competitive bidding basis was for 
the Hawaiian Constructors. The second contr.ict, and I believe the only other 
Government contract ever awarded the Rohl-Connolly Company, or in which 
it participated other than on a competitive bidding basis is what is known as 
the Haines Cut-ofE contract, which is a secret contract of the War Department. 
The contract, I believe, was signed by a General Woi'sham, Division Engineer 
of the Northwestern Engineering District. I believe a letter of intent was signed 
by Colonel Wyman about February 9, 1942. The Rohl-Connolly Company had 
no active participation in the prosecution of the Haines Cut-off work. That was a 
highway which was being built to avoid a bottleneck in the Alaskan Highway, 
about 160 miles long. It started at a place called Haines. The Rohl-Connolly 
Company had a considerable amount of marine equipment that was then being 
used under a rental agreement by Navy contractors doing breakwater work 
and Army contractors doing breakwater work in Los Angeles Harbor. Foley 
Bros, and Rohl-Connolly Company were asked [91 to join in a 50-50 
proposition in the execution of this secret contract. The primary reason for 
doing this was to gain the permission of the Rohl-Connolly Company to termi- 
nate the rental agreements for this marine equipment for the Army and Navy 
work so that the marine equipment would be available for the Haines Cut-off 
job, which contract was signed and a very considerable portion of the Rohl- 
Connolly Company equipment was made available. 

Burton. You niean that the Rohl-Connolly Company retained their financial 
interest in the contract but did not have any active participation in it? 

Martin. That is correct. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2741 

CoLGAN. You spoke of ten or more subcontractors on the Canol project? — or 
was it supplemental contracts? 

Martin. What I said was the original contract with the Bechtel-Price-Callahai 
(Corporation — that is, special features of the work were performed by other com 
panies ; they were selected to perform those special tasks and it is my recollection 
that those companies were not made parties to the original contract, with th* 
full knowledge and approval of the contracting officer. Mr. Kohl had no interest 
either directly or indirectly in the Canol project. 

BxjBTON. Do you know whether Mr. llolil was over in Alaska during the period 
of construction work ? 

Maetin. I do not believe that he has ever been in Alaska at any time. Not 
to my knowledge. 

Burton. Is the Bechtel-Price-Callahan one corporation? 

Martin. The Bechtel Corporation is just one corporation, the W. W. [10] 
Callahan Corporation is another. The Bechtel-Price-Callahan is the same Cal- 
lahan Corporation that was interested in the Hawaiian Constructors. 

Burton. What was the name of the Callahan Company which was in the 
Hawaiian Constructors? 

Martin. W. E. Callahan Construction Company. 

CoLGAN. Can you give us some of Mr. Kohl's background prior to 1926? 

Maktin. I can cover that whole field but it would take a little time. Mr. Kohl 
was educated as a mechanical engineer at one of the universities in Germany. 
As a young man he went to South America. He had been in South America ia 
charge of a special force there on mining properties. What I think should really 
happen here, as I can hit just the high points, I will have my brother prepare 
a statement, or have Kohl come here so that we have accurately all information 
you want. I have heard so much broadcast against Mr. Rohl that I am beginning 
to wonder as I do not know any of the things that I have heard broadcast. I 
have heard Fulton Lewis, Jr. broadcast about the $75,000 yacht. The yacht 
belonged to Mrs. Rohl, she received $1' for the leasing of it and that is all she 
received. (He here made mention of the Senator Tenuey investigation, and 
stated that he obtained copies of the transcript and personally delivered a copy 
of it to Major General Roberts and to Attorney General Biddle on March 9, 
1943). 

Bubton. Do you know how much the Government spent in reconditioning the 
Vega? 

Martin. No. It was the best maintained and kept boat on the Pacific [11] 
coast when the Government took it. I do know this. I know that the object 
of Colonel Wyman in taking it was to use it in certain South American countries 
as a survey project, but through the lack of cooperation the original use, to 
make a survey of the shortest route from these countries to the island, was never 
realized. It was to be used as a survey boat, a secret survey. 

Burton. Certain South American coimtires would not cooperate? 

Martin. That is my information. It is secondhand, I learned during the time 
that the facts transpired. Colonel Wyman could give you better information than 
I can. There are certain islands that could have been used, which would have 
shortened our route, certain S'outh American countries made this impossible. It 
was to have been used as a survey boat. The boat was subsequently purchased 
by the Government contract. 

Burton. I think by the Navy. 

IVLvRTiN. I am using broad terms. 

Burton. Is Mr. Grafe an American citizen? 

Martin. I have no information at all. I always assumed he was. 

Galloway. I know this. He was going to Rose Polytec in Terre Haute. 
Indiana, where I lived. I was practising law there before the World War and 
he was there and was a friend of friends of mine. 

Martin. So far as knowing it, I do not know. I do know this, I know him well 
enough to know that he is a very loyal, aggressive man. whose ability is well 
recognized in the industry. He pushed through nnd built Madden Dam. and has 
done a great deal of construction [12] work, tunnels, dams. etc. for the 
Government, and that he is the manager of the Policy Cdnimittee for the Canol 
Project and has given largely of his personal time. While Lewis was broad- 
casting about him he was north of the Arctic Circle doing his work, no radio 
broadcasts could get through there and he did not know what was being said 
abotit him. Mr. Kohl and Mr. Grafe are both aggressive men and you cannot 
be aggressive without stepping on someone's toes. I do know they are loyal to 
this country and their loyalty cannot be questioned. I do know that one of the 



2742 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

natural effects of the Fulton Lewis broadcasts and activities is to hamper our 
war effort and our preparedness program. I do know that when you do anything 
of this nature that you effect the mental punch of a man by destroying his 
peace of mind and destroying his ability to accomplish construction projects, 
or anything else. I feel that men who are engaged in putting forth their efforts 
in that direction under war conditions, should have support and not be interfered 
with. I will say for Mr. Rohl, Mr. Grafe, and Mr. Connolly, they are willing to 
come here. All I have to do is pick up the telephone and they will come here 
voluntarily, without sei'vice of subpoena. 

BuKTON. It is gratifying to know that. 

Maetin. I know something of the difficulties that are being encountered on 
the Canal project. But it is my understanding that they have discovered one of 
the largest potential oil fields that have ever been discovered on the North Amer- 
ican continent ; rich in 100 octane gas, oil, etc. If that is true, it should be worth 
level oping, and [13] as to the cost of development, maybe their com- 
nercial development would be very high in dollars, but if it is to be measured 
n the human lives saved then the cost is inunaterial. 

I served as a pilot in the Army 27 years ago, my brother was a pilot, my son 
s an Army pilot, and 1 have a daughter who is married to a Naval officer. I am 
lomewhat prejudiced when I see anyone blackmailing, getting publicity for mud- 
linging, or for other reasons injuring the fellow who is doing this work. I have 
lo sympathy for him. 

I was personally informed by the Speaker of the California State Legislature 
Ihat the Jack Tenney Committee received appropriations for the calling in of 
■hose witnesses and taking of testimony on the representation that it was taking 
hat testimony at the special instance and request of Attorney General Biddle. 
1 received a copy of the transcript, and I personally delivered it to Attorney 
General Biddle. I advised him of the information I had received from the 
Speaker of the Assembly. I advised him in the presence of witnesses that 
Cenney had stated he had taken that testimony at the special instance of Mr. 
Middle. Mr. Biddle at once informed me that that statement was not true. 
Chat none of the proceedings were being done at the instance or request of the 
^.ttorney General or his department. 

I know that the petition which the department prepared for Rohl for his citi- 
cenship in the Spring of 1941 could not be acted upon, could not get any recom- 
mendations or any action of any [L'f] kind on it. I finally found out that 
li person in Los Angeles had taken the position, with relation to the Rohl- 
DonnoUy Company, who owned the scows, tugs, etc., that these had been licensed 
by the Bureau of Navigation when Hans Wilhelm Rohl owned 25% of 
the stock of the Rohl-Connolly Company, whereas the participation of an alien 
Is limited to 15%. I personally came to Washington and submitted all of the 
facts and all of the data to the Solicitor General for the Department of Com- 
merce, who personally went through all the files and all of the data and reported 
back that he could find no moral turpitude; that it was not a case for seizure 
of the vessels. The vessels had been documented by a broker who did not know 
that Mr. Rohl was not a citizen and signed by a secretary, Irma Dickey, neither 
of whom knew of the limiting of stock to 85% American and 15% alien. The 
Rohl-Connolly Company was fined $25,000. That was promptly paid by the Rohl- 
Connolly Company. The Department of Commerce in turn comnuniicated direct 
with Mr. Schofield, head of Immigration and advised Mr. Schofield that so far 
as. the Department of Commerce was concerned, they could find nothing as to why 
''Ir. Rohl's petition should not be promptly acted upon, and with that determina- 
tion by the Department of Commerce, and letter from General Kingman, Mr. 
Schofield did expedite the placing of the petition on the calendar. I was told, and 
I hesitated a moment ago to say, I learned not so long ago that the informer had 
been paid by the United States Government, a statutory portion of that $25,000 
penalty. 

Of course, I assume that you are not intei'ested in any [15] threats that 
may have been made to any of my clients as to what would happen in the event 
they did not pay off. I assume that it is your duty to determine any action you 
may take on the facts. 

BuETON. I think it is important that you include in your statement anything 
that you may know of any threats which have been made to your client. 

Martin. I do not want to bother you with something you are not concerned with. 

Burton. If there is anything within your knowledge that reflects in any way upon 
the credibility of a witness who has, or does appear before the Committee, I think 
it your duty to submit it. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2743 

Mabtin. Only recently, prior to coming to Washington, in a telephone conversa- 
tion with Mr. Hans Wilhelm Rohl. I was informed by him that such threats had 
been made. He did not jiive me the details, but I understand that they had been 
made by person or persons scheduled to appear before your Committee. I asked 
Mr. Rohl whether he had pers(mally seen such documents. He said that he 
had. I asked him how many. I think he said two. I asked him if he could 
furnish me with photostatic copies. He said he could. I told him that if Mr. 
Burton was interested in them, I would let him know. That is all the information 
I have on this subject. 

Burton. I think it proper at this point to say to you emphatically, and without 
qualification or the slightest question, that this Committee as such, or any of the 
members of the Committee, are absolutely above participating in anything in the 
nature of persecution of anyone, and if any threats directly or indirectly [16] 
are involved they should be submitted at once. 

Martin. That is the reason I just made the statement, summary of my knowl- 
edge, my information from Mr. Rohl on that subject. I do not have in my pos- 
session or have I seen such threats relating to the telephone conversation I had 
with Mr. Rohl. I have but one interest here which is paramount, that is our 
preparedness program. 

Burton. A hearing, or an investigation, so far as this Committee is concerned, 
is never conducted for the purpose of publicity or smearing any one, and I can 
say without qualification that I have never encountered any such thing. 

Martin. If you had an opportunity to talk with Mr. Rohl and Mr. Grafe, they 
could substantiate what I have said. If you could satisfy yourself from the key 
leads I am giving you here, I think you would be in a position to move with con- 
siderable dispatch. I am ready to bring these men here at any time you want 
them. 

Hans Wilhelm Rohl 

Born in Lubeck, Germany, September 29, 188G. 

His last foreign residence was Raneagna, Chile. He emigrated to the United 
States from Valpariso, Chile, on October 23, 1913, arriving in New York City on 
the S.S. "Santa Marta" and paid his head tax. 

He came to the United States to work for Nevada Consolidated Mining Company. 
Went to Nevada and worked there for about a year. 

In 1914 he went to Sacramento, California, where he was employed by George 
Pollock, contractor. 

He had a common law marriage in Sacramento in 1914. Four children were 
born of this marriage. 

On July 23, 1915, he filed Declaration of Intention in Superior ('ourt at Sacra- 
mento. He registered for the draft in 1917. He did not surrender Declaration 
of Intention or claim exemption because of citizenship. He was given some sort 
of supervisory position on a project engaged in raising food stuff for the Army 
during World War I, on which project some 600 were employed. 

Later took up residence in San Francisco and in 1925 had a common law 
divorce, by agreement providing for care of children and common law wife until 
she remarried. Wife has since remarried and lier name is now Mrs. Clark. Mrs. 
Clark's last residence of which I have knowledge was Sacramento, California. 

Married Floy Edith Hubert (nee Adams) in San Francisco on August 26, 192."). 
Floy Edith Adams was born in lola, Kansas, on October 27, 1890. She was 
formerly married but divorced in San Francisco. 

On Novembei- 27. 1924, sailed from New York on S. S. Deutsland to England. 
Spent week or less in Germany. Returned New York January 10, 1925 on S. S. 
France. Had visa from German Consul in San Francisco. 

In 1931 made several trips to Mexico in connection with highway construction 
for Mexican Government. 

In 1932 wife purchased Yacht Ramona in New York, and he sailed on boat 
through I'anama Canal arriving at San Diego. 

In V.y.M Ramona sold, and wife purchased Yacht Vega in New York. He went 
aboard at Jacksonville. Fla., went tlirough Canal, then to Honolulu, arriving 
there in January, 1938, and then to Los Angeles, arriving in February, 1938. 

Registered under Alien Reg. Act in Dec. 1940. 

February 3, 1941, filed preliminary application paiwrs for citizenship with 
Butterfield. 

March 10. 1941, took examination before Butterfield with two witnesses, T. E. 
Connolly and Dr. Karl Lewis. Filed petition for naturalization and appeared 
79716 — 46 — Ex. 145, vol. 4 19 



2744 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

before Julge Terrell, who excused the witnesses, but requested certified copies of 
his divorce proceedings, and of present wife's divorce proceedings. 

On September 15, 1941, his petition was heard by the U. !S. District Court at 
Los Angeles, and decree granting citizenship was entered. 

On September 2.5, 1941, left by Clipper for Honolulu in accordance with written 
order of Colonel Wyman, dated January 22, 1941. 

Mr. Kohrs reasons for refusing sooner compliance with Colonel Wyman's order 
of January 22, 1941, were fully explained to Major General Robins, U. S. Engineer 
Corps, about August 28, 1941, at which time General Jolm J. Kingman directed 
a letter to Lemuel R. Schoheld, head of the Department of Immigration and Nat- 
uralization in Washington. This letter in substance stated that Rohl's services 
were badly needed in the Islands and that he had declined to make his services 
available to Colonel Wymon until such time as the U. S. District Court in Los 
Angeles had heard and determined upon its merits his then pending petition for 
citizenship. 

Mr. Schofield, on receipt of General Kingman's letter, w'ired his Los Angeles 
office requesting that Mr. Rohl's petition be placed upon the September 15 calendar 
for hearing in the Federal Court of Los Angeles. The petition was heard on 
September 15, decree of citizenship entered and on September 25, Mr. Rohl left 
by Clipper for Honolulu and for the next 14 months took active charge of work of 
the Hawaiian Constructors in the Islands. 

At no time prior to the entry of his hnal decree of citizenship did Hans Wilhelm 
Rohl take any part in prosecution of the work or the performance of the Hawaiian 
Constructors' obligations, as during the period prior to Mr. Rohl's declaration of 
citizenship Mr. Paul Grafe was in the Islands in active charge of the work of 
Hawaiian Constructors. Mr. Rohl had no part in the negotiations or the 
Hawaiian Constructors contract as such contract was personally negotiated in 
Washington, D. C, by Mr. T. E. Connolly, president of Rohl-ConnoUy Company, Mr. 
Paul Grafe, vice-president of W. E. Callahan Construction Company, with General 
Schley, General Robins, and Major Newman. 

During the period of these negotiations, Colonel AVyman was then serving as 
District Engineer in the Islands and was present in Washington for the purpose of 
making known to the Department his requirements, but the actual negotiations 
were primarily with the three other officers above-mentioned. 

[Confidential] 

War Department, 
Washington, May 23, 19I,Ji. 
H. Ralph Burton, 

Getieral Counsel, House Military Affairs Committee, 

519 Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Mr. Burton : With reference to your oral request that you be furnished 
certain information with respect to the equipment which was purchased from 
Rohl-Connolly Company for use in connection with contract No. W^14-eng-602, 
there is enclosed a memorandum from the Office of the Chief of Engineers dated 
May 23, 1944 which, it is believed, contains the information desired by you. 
Yours sincerely, 

/s/ James P. Murtagh, 
James P. Murtagh, 

Major, Inf. 
{For Julius H. Amberg, Special Assistant to the Secretary of War.) 
Enc. 
khm 

War Department, 
Office of the Chief Engineers, 

Washington, 23 May 19U- 

Address reply to Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, 

Washington, D. C. 

Refer to File No SPEGS 3335 (Hawaiian Dept). 

Memorandum for Mr.^Julius H. Amberg, 

Special Assistant to the Secretary of War. 

Atten : Major James P. Murtagh, Inf. Room 3D739, The Pentagon. 

Subject : House Military Affairs Comniittee Investigation Rohl-Connolly Com- 
pany. 
1. Reference is to your memorandum for the Chief of Engineers dated 14 April 

1944, subject as stated above. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2745 



2. Information responsive to the inquiries made by the Chief Counsel of the 
House Military Affairs Committee, relative to the equipment which was pur- 
chased from Rohl-Connolly Company for use in connection with Contract No. 
W— 414-eng-602, has been secured from the Acting District Engineer at Honolulu, 
T. H., and is furnished below. 

a. A list of the equipment involved. The following items of equipment were 
purchased from Rohl-Connolly Company for use in connection with Contract 
No. AV-414-eng-602 : 



No. 
of 

units 



Description 



SO-D Northwest Shovel, Serin.l No. 5437 _.. 

80-D Northwest Shovel, Serial No. 5184 

80-D Northwest Shovel, Serial 3872 

Sullivan Class Wn. Air Compressors, Serial Nos. 19023 & 19024 

Palmer International Generator, Serial No. 508186-1 

Sterling Trucks, Model HCS, Kncine Nos. 13622, 13604, 13701, 13659, 

19789, 10398, 13605 

Rex Double Pumpcretc (Model 200) 

Lot Pumpcrete Accessories and Parts 

Hell Hoist (Model OT-73-S0) 



Total. 



Unit price 



$30, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

20, 000. 00 

4,500.00 

2, 500. 00 

9, 000. 00 

9, 000. 00 

6, 982. 14 

941. 03 



Total cost 



$30, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

20, 000. 00 

9, 000. 00 

2, 500. 00 

63. 000. 00 

9, 000. 00 

6, 982. 14 

941. 03 



166. 423. 17 



&. The date on which the equipment was, according to the terms of the 
agreement, to be delivered. No written agreement was entered into prior to 
actual acquisition of the equipment by the Government. Arrangements were 
made in November, 1941, between Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr., then District 
Engineer, Honolulu, and Mr. H. D. Rohl, of the Rohl-Connolly Company, for 
the plant in question to be made available for use under Contract No. W-414- 
eng-602. The transaction was consummated by issuance of Government pur- 
chase order to Rohl-Connolly Company 18 March 1942, after the equipment had 
been in the possession of the United States for approximately four months, i. e., 
considering both time in transit and time in use. 

c. When the equipment ivas actually delivered in Hawaii. — The equipment 
was received in the Hawaiian Islands early in Febrviary 1942. 

d. What caused the delay in transporting the equipment to Hawaii. — The 
equipment was originally scheduled for use on construction work being performed 
at Canton Island under Contract No. W-414-eng-602. The equipment was 
shipped from Los Angeles, California, on the Army Transport Ludington and 
was enroute to Canton Island at the time of the enemy attack of 7 December 
1941, whereupon the vessel was ordered back to the United States and accord- 
ingly returned to Los Angeles. The equipment was then shipped to the Hawaiian 
Islands under war restrictions, where it was retained for utilization on defense 
projects. 

e. How much was paid to Rohl-Connolly Company for the equipment and 
how much edditional expense, if any, was incurred in transporting it. — Total 
payment in the amount of $166,423.17 was made to Rohl-Connolly Company on 
19 March 1942 for the equipment listed in subparagraph a above as representing 
its value at time of original possession by the Army. The equipment was pur- 
chased f. o. b. Los Angeles, California. Inasmuch as the equipment was shipped 
from that point via Army Transport, the actual additional cost incurred by the 
Army in transporting the equipment to Hawaii is not available. 

For the Chief of Engineers : 

/s/ Douglas I. McKay, 
Douglas I. McKay, 
Special Assistant to the Chief of Engineers. 



[1] 



War Department 



Washington, May 22, 19U 
H. Ralph Burton, 

General Counsel, House Military Affairs Committee, 

519 Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Mr. Burton: This will acknowledge receipt of two unsigned memoranda, 
addressed by you to Lt. Colonel Miles H. Knowles under date of March 22, 1944. 



2746 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

in which you requested certain information in connection with the investigation 
being conducted by your Committee of the award of construction contracts in 
Hawaii. 

The Office of the Chief of Engineers has furnished the seven enclosures listed 
below which, it is believed, contain the information desired by you. In addition, 
that office has supplied the following comments with respect to the enclosures : 

1. Information pertaining to basic contract and supplements thereto numbers 
1, 2, 3. 4, and 5: 

a. Dates of the orders to proceed for all the schedules listed in summary. 
Copies of all job orders, with addenda thereto, applicable to the basic contract 
and first five supplemental agreement are enclosed, together with an index 
identifying the relationship of the various job orders to the schedules of work 
in the contract and supplemental agreements (End. #1). These job orders 
constitute the notice to the contractor to proceed with the work, and list in 
each case the proposed commencement date and estimated date for completion 
of the work. It will be noted from the last column of the index (End. #1) 
that, in many cases, the contractor was directed to proceed with the various 
items of work under any one particular schedule on different .dates. 

6. Progress charts for the same schedules. Progress charts, as such, were not 
maintained for the various schedules. In lieu thereof, data covering actual 
progress of the work were kept on a job order basis, and with respect to the job 
orders applicable to the basic contract and supplements Nos. 1 to 5 thereto, are 
reflected in the information furnished in subparagraph le below. 

[2] c. Monthly reports shmving percentage of completion of the work as 
determined from, estimates made arid approved by the Contracting Officer. Ex- 
tracts of partial payment estimates pertaining to work under the basic contract 
and first five supplemental agreements are enclosed (End. #2.) These payment 
schedules show the progressive percentages of completion of the applicable job 
orders as determined from estimates jointly made and agreed to by representa- 
tives of the contractor and the Government and approved by the Contracting 
Officer. 

d. Record of weekhj reimburseinents to contractor for payroll and material 
invoices for the year 19ffl. No reimbursements were made to the contractor for 
payroll and material invoices for the year 1941, since all reimbursable salaries 
and wages were paid to the contractor's employees directly by the Government 
and all materials utilized on the projects were either furnished by the Govern- 
ment or payment therefor made directly to vendors in accordance with the direct 
payment option reserved in the contract. 

e. By tvhoni the air raiding devices were supplied and ichen they tvere received 
by the District Engineer for the District of Hawaii. The only work performed 
by the contractor at Aircraft "Warning Service locations was the construction 
of camps, buildings, utilities, roads, tunnels, fencing, and such appurtenant work. 
The actual furnishing and installation of technical equipment was a responsi- 
bility and function of the Army Signal Corps. In connection with Job Order 
No. 2.0 (Original Contract, Schedule "B"), the cableway erected at Mt. Kaala 
was purchased from the Interstate Equipment Corporation, 18 "West Jersey 
Street, Elizabeth, New Jersey, under Government Supply Contract No. ■W-414- 
eng-784, dated 30 April 1941. 

f. By tvhom the storage tanks for gasoline toere supplied. The gasoline stor- 
age tanks covered by Supplemental Agreement No. 2, Schedule "J", were fur- 
nished the District Engineer in plate form by the Army Air Corps. The tanks 
were then either prefabricated by the contractor at a central jwint and hauled 
to the site or the plates were transported to, and welded at, the installation site. 
Revised work under Supplemental Agreement No. 4, Schedule "G", provided for 
the substitution of nine (9) 40,000-barrel all welded steel underground gasoline 
storage tanks for the four (4) 50,000-barrel tanks originally specified. These 
nine (9) tanks were furnished and installed by the Hammond Iron "Works, 
"Warren, Pennsylvania, under Govei'nment Lump-Sum Construction Contract No. 
"W-llOl-eng-5309, dated 23 October 1941. 

g. Record of any complaints made by the Government concerning delays of 
the contractor during 1941. — There is no record in this office (U. S. E. O., Hono- 
lulu, T. H.) of any formal complaints registered by the Government concerning 
delays of the contractor during 1941. 

2. Information applicable to basic contract and all supplements thereto: 

a. Chart showing the organization of the Hawaiian Constructors as required 
by Article 16 of the contract. Three separate charts, reflecting the contractor's 
organizational set-up as of 31 March 1941, 26 May 1941 and 10 October 1942, are 
enclosed (End. #3.) 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2747 

b. Copy of Hawaiian District, Order No. 1, dated 1 January 1943, terminating 
the contract and sup'plements to that date. The order mentioned has apparently 
been cited in error, since District Order No. 1 dated 1 January 1943 has no bear- 
ing on the termination of Contract No. W— il4-eng-602. It is believed that 
reference is intended to District Circular No. 4, dated 12 January 1943, copy of 
which is enclosed ( Eucl. #4. ) There is also enclosed copy of termination notice 
given the contractor on 11 January 1943 (End. #5.) Prior to issuance of the 
notice (End #5) terminating all work under the contract, as amended, the work 
provided for under Supplemental Agreement No. 43 (Parts 1 and 2) and Supple- 
mental Agreement No. 23 (Parts 1 and 2) was terminated for the convenience of 
the Government by Change Order No. 12, dated 5 May 1942, and Change Order 
No. 13 (Part 1), dated 13 May 1942, respectively. Copies of both of these change 
orders are enclosed (End. #6 and #7.) 
Yours sincerely, 

/s/ James P. Murtagh 
James P. Muktagh 

Major, Inf. 
(For Julius H. Amberg, Special Assistant to the Secretary of War.) 

7 Enclosures : 

1 — Cys Job Orders & Index 

2 — Cys Payment estimates 

3 — Three Organization charts 

4— Cy Dist. Cir. No. 4 

5 — Cy termination notice 

6— Cy Change Order No. 12 

7— Cy Change Order No. 13 (Part 1) 
khm 

[Air Mail] 

Headquarters United States Army Forces Central Pacific Area 

OFFICE OF the COMMANDING GENERAL 

APO 958 

8 Feb. '44 BRW HS. 

Officer Affixing. 
Refer to File Engr-CCA-160 10 Feb 1944. 

Subject : Information concerning contracts with Hawaiian Constructors, Sverdrup 

& Parcel and Territory Airport Constructors 
To : The Chief of Staff, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 

1. Information requested in War Department secret radiogram No. 84 dated 6 
February 1944, for the House Military Affairs Committee, concerning all con- 
tracts awarded under the jurisdiction of this Headquarters to Hawaiian Con- 
structors, Honolulu, T. H. ; Sverdrup & Parcel, St. Louis, Missouri ; and Territory 
Airport Constructors, Honolulu, T. H., is given below. 

2. Information relative to Contract No. W-JilJf-eng-602 : 

a. Total payments made to date other than reimbursements for supplies, 
materials and services: 

(1) To Hawaiian Constructors: 

$541,031.35— Fixed Fee 

$124,105.05 — Rental and recapture of new equipment 

(2) To Hawaiian Contracting Company, Ltd.: 

$317,128.58 — Purchase of used equipment 

(3) To Rohl-Connolly Company: 

$166,423.17 — Purchase of used equipment 

(4) To W. E. Callahan Construction Co. : 

$84,000.00 — Purchase of used equipment 

(5) To T. R. Connolly, Inc.: 

$57,500.00 — Purchase of used equipment 

The bulk of the supplies and materials utilized on the contract work were 
purchased by the Government from independent vendors and paid for directly 
by the Government to the several vendors. With few exceptions, [2] all 
personnel employed by the conti'actor on the work was paid directly by the 
Government. Of the sums reimbursed or paid by the Government under Contract 



2748 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

No. W— il4-eng-602, Hawaiian Constructors have been requested by the present 
Contracting Officer to refund to the Govei'nment the following : 



Date of re- 
quest for 
refund 


Item 


Amount 


9 Apr. 43 




$110.00 


22 Apr. 43 




9, 833. 32 


21 Sep. 43 
20 Oct. 43 
20 Oct. 43 
25 Jan. 44 


De-luxe subsistence items ordered in connection with operation of Yacht VEGA- 

1% per month interest prior to recapture of equipment used on the work 

License fees & taxes on equipment used on work 


146. 47 
124, 105. 05 
20, 929. 18 
29, 518. 70 


4 Feb. •i4 




10, 233. 76 




Total - - 






194, 876. 48 









None of these sums has been refunded to date, although a total of $29,604.83 
has been set off against reimbursement payments which would otherwise have 
been due the contractor under the terms of the contract. 

b. Relative degree of participation by the Joint Venturers. — The following 
data from the files of the U. S. Engineer Office, Honolulu, T. H., are believed to 
be substantially correct but have not been definitely confirmed. 



Period 



Joint venturer 



Extent'of 
interest 



12/20/40 to 5/27/41 

[S] 5/27/41 to 12/31/41. 

1/1/42 to 1/31/43 



W. E. Callahan Construction Co 

Rohl-Connollv Co _.. 

Gunther & Shirley Co 

W. E. Callahan Construction Co 

Rohl-Connolly Co 

Gunther & Shirley Co 

Ralph E. Woolley 

W. E. Callahan Construction Co. 

Rohl-Connolly Co 

Gunther & Shirley Co 

Ralph E. Woolley 

Hawaiian Contracting Co., Ltd.. 



40% 
40% 
20% 
32% 
32% 
16% 
20% 
24% 
24% 
12% 
20% 
20% 



c. Personalities involved in the work on behalf of each one of the Joint 
Venturers. 



Name of joint venturer 



Name and title of official 
involved 



Nature and extent of participation 



W. E. Callahan Construction 
Co. 



Gunther & Shirley Co 

Rohl-Connolly Company 

Ralph E. Woolley 



U] Hawaiian Contracting 
Co., Ltd. 



Paul Grafe, Vice President 



J. P. Shirley, President 

T. E. Connolly, President. 
H. W. Rohl, President 



Ralph E. Woolley, trading as 
an individual 

H. P. Benson, President 



Negotiation of contract^and supple- 
mental agreements and active super- 
vision of contract work from 20 De- 
cember 1940 to approx. 31 December 
1941 

Negotiation of contract only 

Negotiation of contract only 

Negotiation of supplemental agree- 
ments to contract and active super- 
vision of contract work from about 1 
January 1942 to about 24 June 1942 

Participated in supervision of contract 
work from 22 May 1941 to 31 January 
1943 

Participated in direction of contract 
work from 3 January 1942 to 31 Jan- 
uary 1943 



d. War Department representative engaged in settlement negotiations. Colonel 
B. R. Wimer, C. E., Deputy District Engineer and Contracting Officer, U. S. Engi- 
neer Office, Honolulu, T. H. 

3. Information relative to Contracts Nos. W-^14-eng-634, W-JflJ^-eng-808, 
DA-W-414-eng-511, •DA-W-JtH-eng-585 and DA-W-JflJt-eng-8Ji2: 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2749 



a. Were contracts terminated at same time as Contract No. W-JtlJf-eng-602'i 



No. 



b. If not, toere they completed or terminated on some other date? 



Contract No. 



W^14-eng-634 

W^14-eng-808 

DA-W-414-eng-511. 

DA-W-114-ene-585 
DA-W-414-eng-842 



Completed or 
terminated 



Completed 

Completed 

Terminated... 

Completed 

Completed 



Date of com- 
pletion or ter- 
mination 



27 February 1941. 
24 April 1942. 
24 December 

1942. 
1 April 1943. 
1 January- 1943. 



c. Amount paid under each contract and to xchom paid: 



Contract No. 



W-414-eng-634 

W^14-eng-808 

DA-W-414-eng-511 
DA-W^14-eng-,585 
D A-W-41 4-eng-842 



Amoimt paid ■ 



Fee— .$1.300.00.... 
Fee— $13,600.00 .. 
Fee— $101.188.43.. 
Fee— $20,469.00_.. 
Fee— $40,139.00... 



To whom paid 



Sverdrup & Parcel, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



' Other than reimbursements for supplies, materials and services. 

d. If any of the contracts were terminated has a settlement teen reached and 
full details of the settlement indicating what part of the icork under the contract 
teas performed: 

(1) Contract No. DA-W-414-eiig-oll is the only one of the contracts listed 
in this paragraph which was terminated prior to completion of all work there- 
under. Final settlement has been reached in connection with the termination 
of this contract. 

(2) Details of the settlement and percentages of work completed at each 
site under Contract No. DA-W-414-eng-511 are as follows : 



[5] Site 


Fee for 

design, 

plans, etc. 


% compl. 


Fee earned 


Fee for 
supervision 

of constr. 
& constr.- 

manage- 
ment serv- 
ices 


% compl. 


Fee earned 


Nandi, Fiji Islands 


$21,921 
5,270 
1,120 

15, 998 
2, 332 


98 
98 
75 

75 
100 


$21, 482. 58 

5, 164. 60 

840. 00 

11,998.50 
1 2, 332. OC 


$54,914 

13,214 

746 

10, 665 
1,555 


80 
45 
75 

75 
1 60 


$43 931 20 


Narewa, Fiji Islands 

Tontouta, New Caledonia 

Plaines de.s Gaiacs, New Cale- 
donia 


5, 946. 30 
559. 50 

7,998.75 
935 00 


Townsville, Australia 








$46, 641 


$41,817.68 


$81,094 


$59. 370. 75 
41,817.68 


Total fixed fee earned 
and paid... ... 




$101,188.43 















Approximately 60%. 



e. If termination settlement negotiations are current, state present status 
of such negotiations and whether it is possible to estimate the amount ultimately 
to be paid. Payments listed under subparagraph 3c above represent final settle- 
ment in connection with the termination or completion of all of the above listed 
contracts. 



2750 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

f. Information as to the personalities involved in performance of each contract. 



Contract No. 


Name and title of person 


nvolved 


Nature of participation 


W-4U-eng-634 

W-414-eiig-808 

6] DA-W-414-eng-511-.. 

DA-W-414-eng-585 


L. J. Sverdrup, Partner.. 

L. J. Sverdrup, Partner.. 
D. C. Wolfe, Engineer-in 
L. J. Sverdrup, Partner. 

D. C. Wolfe, Engineer-in 

L. J. Sverdrup, Partner.. 
D. C. Wolie, Engineer-in 
L. J. Sverdrup, Partner. 
D. C. Wolfe, Engineer-in 




Negotiated contract and performed 


-Chief.'"; 


contract work. 
Negotiated contract only. 
Performed contract work. 
Negotiated contract and actively su- 


-Chief... 
-Chief."."; 


pervised contract work from incep- 
tion of contract to about 25 April 1942. 

Supervised contract work from 25 April 
1942 to termination of contract. 

Negotiated contract only. 


DA-W-414-eng-842 


Actively supervised the contract work. 
Negotiated contract only. 




-Chief... 


Actively supervised the contract work. 



g. Na7ne of War Department representative in the negotiation of termination 
settlement. Colonel B. R. ^Yimel•, C. E., Deputy District Engineer and Con- 
tracting Officer, U. S. Engineer Office, Honolulu, T. H., negotiated the settlement 
in connection with Contract No. DA-W-414-eng-511, the only one of the above 
numbered contracts terminated prior to completion. 

4. Information as to what part of performance of contracts was supervised 
ht) Hans MHlhelm Rohl, Paul Grafe, and Leif J. Sverdrup, and the installations 
and locations involved. (The following information supplements that contained 
in paragraph 3.) 



Contract No. 


Supervised by 


Title and company 


Approx. period 


Nature and 

location of 

work 


W-414-eng-602 

[7] W-414-eng- 

634. 
DA-W-414-eng- 

511. 


Paul Grafe... 
H. W. Rohl... 
L.J. Sverdrup. 
L.J. Sverdrup. 


Vice President, W. E. Cal- 
lahan Construction Co. 

President, Rohl-ConnoUy 
Co. 

Partner, Sverdrup & Par- 
cel. 

Partner, Sverdrup & Par- 
cel. 


20Dec. '40to31Dec.'41.. 
IJan. '42to24June'42..- 
21 Jan. '41tol6Feb. '41-. 
6Nov. '41to2.')Apr. '42.. 


(Omission) 

(Omission; 
(Omission) 



5. Advise tvhether Haivaiian Constructors still have all of the construction 
work in the Eaicaiian Department ; if not, who does have itf Since the termina- 
tion of Contract No. W-414-eng-602 effective 31 January 1943, Hawaiian Con- 
structors have not performed any construction work in the Hawaiian Depart- 
ment (now Central Pacific Area). From 1 February 1943, all construction 
work has been and is now being performed by hired labor forces of the United 
States Engineer Office, Honolulu, T. H., with the exception of a few lump sum 
contracts which have been awarded by the United States Engineer Office to local 
contractors having available organizations and equipment for construction of 
temporary buildings and facilities in the Hawaiian Islands. 

[S] 6. Advise specifically whether there was any other reason for the 
termination of construction contracts relating to ivork in New Caledonia other 
than the reasons which led to the general termination of Contract No. W-414- 
eng-602. The arrival of the task force and their taking over the construction 
prompted the termination of all work in New Caledonia under Contracts Nos. 
W-414-eng-6U2 and DA-W-414-eng-511. 

7. Information as to all prime contracts and subcontracts awarded in areas 
of Territory of Haicaii or Southwest Pacific (including Canton Island, Christmas 
Island, the Fiji Islands, New Hebrides, Nexv Caledonia, the Solomon Islands, 
Aitutaki, Tongatabu, Norfolk and Townsville, Australia) to the Tei^itory Air- 
port Constructors, or to any other company, corporation, partnership or syndi- 
cate in which Hans Wilhelm Rohl, Paul Orafe, or T. E. Connolly loere in any 
way associated. 

a. Contractor. Hawaiian Constructors, Honolulu, T. H., a joint venture com- 
posed of W. E. Callahan Construction Company, a Nebraska corporation ; Gunther 
& Shirley Company, a Nebraska corporation ; Rohl-Connolly Company, a Nevada 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2751 

corporation; Ralph E. Woolley, operating as an inclividnal of Honolulu, T. H. ; 
and Hawaiian Contracting Company, Ltd., an Hawaiian corporation. 

(1) Contract No. W-414 eng-602. 

(2) Amount of contract. Total estimated cost of all work ordered by the 
Government prior to termination of the contract (including that not completed 
at the effective termination date) $135,891,523.00, and estimated total fixed fee 
allowance with respect thereto $1,035,892.00. These figures are approximate 
only, and are based upon the amounts set forth in the contract, as amended to 
date, plus the estimated cost of work ordered prior to termination but not yet 
incorporated into the contract by supplemental agreement and the estimated fixed 
fee allowance with respect thereto. Amounts included with respect to work 
not yet covered by contract have been proposed by the Government, but have 
not been fully or finally accepted by the contractor. 

(3) Date of aivard of contract. 20 December 1940. 

(4) Estimated completion date. Six months for original contract ; indefinite 
thereafter. 

(5) Date or termination prior to completion of work. 31 January 1943. 

[9] (6) Percentage of work completed at time of cancellation. Approxi- 
mately 65%. 

(7) By whom work was completed. Essentially all projects not completed 
prior to termination of Contract No. W-414-eng-602 have been or are now being 
prosecuted by hired labor forces of the United States Engineer OflSce, Honolulu, 
T. H. 

(8) Date of completion. The majority of the individual projects formerly 
covered by Contract No. W— 114^eng-602 have been completed at various intervals 
since the termination of that contract effective 31 January 1943. A few of the 
projects are not one hundred per cent (100%) complete by reason of temporary 
suspension of the work at intervals due to low priority, nonreceipt to date of 
certain materials required in the work, etc. 

(9) Full details of any termination settlement concluded. Negotiations are 
still in progress. No mutually satisfactory settlement is in sight. 

(10) Status of pending termination settlements, and amounts to he paid if that 
can he estimated. Contract No. W-414-eng-€02, as amended to date, does not 
cover all of the work ordered by the Government and performed by the contractor 
prior to termination, nor does it reflect all revisions within the* contract which 
were directed by the Government prior to termination. Reference is made to 
tabulation entitled "Cost Estimates — Contract No. W^14-eng-602."' forwarded 
to the Chief of Staff', U. S. Army by secret letter of this Headquarters dated 21 
January 1944. subject "House Military Affairs Committee Investigation — Hans 
Wilhelm Rohl." Exhibits "A" and "B"' of that tabulation cover all work included 
in the contract, as well as changes in these contract items which have not yet 
been covered by formal change order. The figures set forth in Exhibits "A" and 
"B" of the tabulation i-epresent the final agreed estimated construction costs of 
the work covered by the contract, adjusted to reflect all revisions in these projects 
which were directed by the Government prior to final termination. All revised 
estimates listed in Exhibits "A" and "B"' of the tabulation have been agreed to by 
the contractor and by the Government, with the exception noted by the contractor 
to deduction of $700,000 from the estimated cost of work performed under Sup- 
plemental Agreement No. 4, Schedule G. The figures listed in [70] Exhibit 
"C" of the tabulation cover direct costs only on the balance of the work ordered 
by the Government and completed by the contractor as of the effective contract 
termination date, but not yet covered by supplemental agi'eement to the contract. 
The Contracting Officer and the contractor have agreed to these direct cost esti- 
mates and to the proportion of the work actually completetl at the contract 
termination date. The Contracting Officer has pi'oposed an allowance of seven 
per cent (7% ) of direct costs to cover the estimated indirect cost to the contractor 
of performing all work li-sted in Exhibit "C." This allowance has been appealed 
by the contractor, but no final decision reached. The Contracting Officer has 
further proposed to the contractor an allowance of 25% of the maximum allow- 
able fees approved by the Under Secretary of War for work under cost-plus-a- 
fixed-fee construction contracts with respect to the work included in Exliibit "C" 
of the aforementioned tabulation and not yet covered by the contract. The 
contractor has protested this proposed basis of computing the additional fixed fee 
allowance. However, based upon the estimates of cost, percentages of comjileted 
work and fixed fee allowance on which agreement has been reached, and using 
the additional amounts which have been proposed by the Grovernment but not 



2752 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

accepted by the contractor, the total estimated cost of the work completed under 
Contract No. W-414-eng-602 at the effective contract termination date will 
approximate $88,525,609.00 and the fixed fee allowance is presently estimated 
at $800,000. 

(11) Personalities involved in work on behalf of each company. See sub- 
paragraph 2c above. 

(12) War Department representative engaged in settlement negotiations. 
See subparagraph 2d above. 

b. Contractor. Territory Airport Constructors, a joint venture composed of 
W. E. Callahan Construction Company, a Nebraska corporation ; Gunther & 
Shirley Company, a Nebraska corporation ; and Paul Grafe, an individual of 
Los Angeles, California. 

(1) Contract }^'o. CCA-4140 (W-414-eng-8.54). 

(2) Amount of contract. Approximately $3,594,203.42. 

(3) Date of ate ai-d of contract. 19 May 1941. 

(4) Estimated completion date. 10 September 1942. 

(5) Date of termination prior to completion of tcork. 20 December 1941. 

(6) Percentage of work completed at time of cancellation. ( Omission. ) 

(7) By u-hom work was completed. The Upolu airport project was totally 
abandoned. The terminated work at the Hilo, Maui and Molokai Airports was 
completed by Hawaiian Constructors under Contract No. W-414-eng.-602. 

(8) Date of completion. (Omission.) 

(9) Full details of any ternunatlon settlement concluded. Payment was made 
at the contract unit prices for all work in place as of the effective contract ter- 
mination date in the total sum of $679,813.43. 

(10) Status of pending termination settlement, and amount to he paid if that 
can be estimated. The amount of the payment stipulated under subparagraph 
7b (9) above represents final settlement. 

(11) Personalities involved in work on behalf of each company. 



Name of joint venturer 



Name and title of ofQeial involved 



Nature and extent of participation 



W. E. Callahan Construction 
Co. and Paul Grafe. 

Gunther & Shirley Company... 



Paul Grafe, Vice President of 
'W. E. Callahan Construction Co. 
and trading as an individual. 

None - 



Negotiated contract and actively 
supervised contract work. 



[12] (12) War Department representative engaged in settlement negotia- 
tions. Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr., C. E., then District Engineer, U. S. Engi- 
neer Office, Honolulu, T. H. 

8. Tlie original of the report of the Inspector General concerning Colonel 
Theodore Wyman, Jr., and Rohl-Connolly Company has been forwarded under 
separate cover via air mail. 

Robert C. Richaedson, Jr., 
Lieutenant General, U. S. Army, 

Commanding. 
Confidential 

Wae Department, 
Washington, D. C, 14 January 1944- 
Re : House Military Affairs Committee Investigation of Colonel Theodore Wyman, 

Hans Wilhelm Rohl, and Colonel Lief J. Sverdrup. 
H. Ralph Burton, 

Chief Counsel, Truman Committee, 

Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Mr. Burton : In response to your oral reciuest for a compilation of tlie 
contracts held by Colonel Lief J. Sverdrup and associates with the War Depart- 
ment, you will find annexed a compilation of the contracts giving the contract 
number, date, amount of contract and description and location of the work. These 
contracts are between the War Department and the following: 
L. J. Sverdrup 
Sverdrup & Parcel 

Sverdrup & Parcel and J. Gordon Turnbull 
You will note that several of the contracts listed herein have been awarded 
on a cost-plus-fixed-fee basis. The letters "FF" indicate the fee to the Architect- 
Engineer and the figure shown as "estimated cost of construction" indicates the 
amount to be paid the constructor under a separate contract. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2753 

Your attention is called to the fact that the conti-acts are all dated with the 
exception of one before 7 December 1941. Since that date, if any further con- 
tracts have been let to Colonel Sverdrup and his associates, they are under the 
jurisdiction of the Commandins: General of the Hawaiian Department to whom 
inquiry is being addressed by this office for further information. You will note 
that tills material is classified as confidential by the War Department, and it is 
respectfully requested that the Committee respect the War Department classi- 
flcation. 

Yours sincerely, 

/s/ Miles H. Knowles 
Miles H. KN0^^^.ES 

Lt. Colonel, JAGD 
(For Julius H. Amberg, Special Assistant to the Secretary of War.) 
Enc. 
Khm 

SECRET 

War Department, 
Obtice op the Under Secretary, 
Washington, D. C, 8 January 1944- 
Mr. H. Ralph Burton, 

Chief Counsel, House Military Affairs Committee, 
519 Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Burton : I refer below to memorandum dated 8 December 1943, from 
the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4, regarding the contract with Hawaiian Construc- 
tors, in which Rohl-Connally was a joint venturer. This memorandum was trans- 
mitted to this OflBce through another War Department branch and was mistakenly 
filed in that branch until yesterday, when it was traced and then delivered to this 
OflBce. This accounts for the delay. 

The above mentioned memorandum gives the following information : 

By radio CM-IN-4957 (8 Dee 43) the commanding General, Central Pacific 
Area has advi.sed that only one contract involving Hans Wilhelm Rohl has 
been awarded in that area. The number of this contract is W 414 Eng 602. 
It was awarded by the Honolulu District Engineer to Hawaiian Constructors, 
in which Rohl-Connally Company was a joint venturer. The contract was 
dated 20 December 1940 and was approved by the Under Secretary of War 
on 3 January 1941. It was terminated for the convenience of the Govern- 
ment, effective 31 January 1943, prior to completion of all work thereunder. 

The total estimated cost involved in this contract was ?84.436,961 and the 
contract called for a fixed fee of $1,014,690. As result of current negotiations 
in connection with the termination of this contract, these figures are subject 
to substantial revision. 

The contract referred to above covered various construction projects lo- 
cated throughout the Hawaiian Islands, including air fields, fortifications 
and other defense projects. Airport facilities were also included for Canton 
Island. Christmas Island. Plaines Des Gaiacs on New Caledonia, and Nandi 
in the Fiji Islands. All of the above are in the Pacific Ocean. 

The Central Pacific Area has entered into no contracts in which Rohl is 
involved as a subcojitractor. 

The above mentioned information was received by this Ofl5ce classified as 
"Secret" and I request that you respect this classification unless the material is 
released from the classification by the War Department. 

Sincerely yours, 

Herbert A. Friedlich, 

Lt. Colonel, JAGD. 

Assistant. 
Confidential 

Wab Department, 
Washington, D. C, -'/ January 19.'i.'i. 
H. Ralph Burton, 

Chief Counsel, House Military Affairs Coniniittee. 

Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Mr. Burton : In Colonel Knfiwles' absence, I enclose herewith copy of 1st 
indorsement from the Chief of Engineers, dated 1 January, 1944, and addressed 



2754 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

to Mr. Julius H. Amberg, setting out contract information requested by you in 
your letter of 20 December, addressed to Mr. Julius H. Amberg. 

I note that there is indicated in some of the material under the heading 
"Approved" that certain contracts were not approved. I presume that under 
War Department regulations, the contracts indicated as not approved, would not 
require any approval in addition to the signature of the officer who signed the 
particular contract in question. 

As I know, you are in a great hurry to get this material, I am sending it out to 
you without checking it. 

Yours sincerely, /s/ Herbert A. Friedlich 

Heebert a. Friedlich, 

Lt. Colonel, JAGD, 

Assistant. 

P. S. — I note that there is included in the enclosures, contract No. W-869-eng- 
7G0O with Miller Construction Company, Inc. I doubt very much if this contract 
should properly be included among those in connection with the Canol project. 

H. A. F. 
Ends. 

Confidential 

1st Ind. 
678 (Canol) (22 Dec 43) 

CE 161 SPEAC OPE/ajc 

Office, C. of E.. 1 January 1944. 

To: Mr. Julius H. Amberg, Special Assistant to the Secretary of War, Room 
3-E-739, the Pentagon. 
Pursuant to request in basic communication there is attached, in duplicate, a 
page for each contract giving a brief description of the work required by the 
contract, names of the contractors or architect-engineers, the amount of the 
contract and of each supplemental agreement and/or change order, the i*espective 
date of the contracts and/or change orders and by whom if they were signed 
and approved. 
For the Chief of Engineers : O. P. Easterwood, Jr., 

Major, Corps of Enf/ineers, 
Assistant, Contracts & Claims Branch. 
9 Inclosures: (in dup.) 
1— Report of Cont. No. W-412-eng-52. 

2— " " " " W-412-eng-58. 

3— " " " " W-412-eng-54. 

4— " " " " W-2385-eng-34. 
ii— " " " " W-23S5-eng-89. 

6— '" " " " W-2385-eng-44. 

7— " " " " W-2385-eng-6. 

8— " " " " W-869-eng-7600. 



9— Ltr 20 Dec. 43. 



War Department, 
Washington, 18 December 1943. 



Re : Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr. 

H. Ralph Burton, 

Chief Counsel, House MUitary Affairs Committee, 

519 Old House Office Building, Washingto7i, D. C. 
De.\r Mr. Burton : Annexed is memorandum from Major General Thomas M. 
Robins, Deputy Chief of Engineers, to Mr. Amberg covering the information 
requested by you on 11 December 1943 from the office of the Corps of Engineers 
in regard to the duties of Colonel Wyman in Hawaii and Canada. 

It is hoped that this material is sufficiently complete to serve your require- 
ments. 

Sincerely yours, /S/ Miles H. Knowles 

Miles H. Knowles 

Lt. Colonel. AUf^ 
(From Julius H. Amberg, Special Assistant to the Secretary of War.) 
En p. 
Khm 

Address Reply to Chief of Engineers, 
U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 

Refer To File No. SPEGD 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2755 

War Department, 
Office of The Chiei^ of Engineers, 

Washington, 16 December, 1943. 
Memorandum to : Mr. Julius H. Amberg, Office of the Secretary of War, Room 
3-E-739 Pentagon. 

1. Pursuant to telephonic request 1600, 11 December 1943, of Mr. Burton, 
counsel of the House Military Affairs Committee, the following information is 
furnished relative to the duties of Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr., in Hawaii and 
Canada. 

2. In September 1939, Colonel Wyman was relieved from duty in Los Angeles 
and assigned to duty with the 3rd Engineers, Schofield Barracks, T. H. By War 
Department orders dated 5 June 1940 he was relieved from duty with the 3rd 
Engineers and assigned as assistant to the District Engineer, Honolulu Engineer 
District, effective on or about 1 July 1940, with additional duties as assistant to 
the Works Projects Administrator for the Territory of Hawaii. Special orders 
of the Chief of Engineers appointed Colonel Wyman, District Engineer, on 15 
July 1940. 

3. As District Engineer, Colonel Wyman was charged with the administration 
of the district which covered the entire Territory of Hawaii, with the execution 
of any construction projects assigned the district and with the execution of 
fortification and other military construction under the direction of the local 
military commander as prescribed in Army Regulations and other War Depart- 
ment instructions. Colonel Wyman as District Engineer was specifically au- 
thorized to— 

(a) Issue certain permits in the name of the Secretary of War for works in 
the navigable waters of the United States. 

(b) Provide, within prescribed limits of cost, for hire or rental, construction, 
repairs, and alterations to plants and structures, and procurements. 

(c) Approve specifications, awards, contracts, and change orders within pre- 
scribed limits of cost. 

4. In October 1941, pursuant to a secret War Department directive, which 
placed the District Engineer at the disposal of the Commanding General, Ha- 
waiian Department, Colonel Wyman was placed in charge of construction of 
facilities necessary to provide an air route from Hawaii to the Philippines via 
Australia. This directive was later changed to limit the activities of the Com- 
manding General, Hawaiian Department, to that portion of the route from Hawaii 
to Australia. 

5. Colonel Wyman was relieved from duty as District Engineer, Honolulu En- 
gineer District, by War Department orders dated 10 March 1942 and assigned 
as assistant to the Division Engineer, South Pacific Division. At the same time 
all functions of the District passed to the control of the Commanding General, 
Hawaiian Department, in accordnace with War Department directives con- 
cerning construction activities outside of the continental limits of the United 
States. 

6. Prom the time of Colonel Wyman's arrival in the United States until May 
5, 1942 he was engaged in officer procurement activities in connection with the 
activation of an Engineer General Service Regiment. On May 5, 1942, Colonel 
Wyman was designated as Officer in Charge of the Canol Project and was directed 
to proceed with the necessary surveys and construction incident thereto, re- 
porting directly to the Chief of Engineers. He was vested with all the authority 
of a District Engineer which carried an automatic designation as contracting 
officer with full authority to make procurements and to execute contracts neces- 
sary for the accomplishment of his mission. District Engineers are empowered 
to award contracts not exceeding $3,000,000. 

7. As Officer in Charge of the Canol Project, Colonel Wyman was sent on tem- 
porary duty to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and such other points in Canada and 
the United States as were necessary for the accomplishment of his mission. The 
period of this temporary duty started on or about 23 May 1942. The temporary 
nature of the assignment was changed l)y War Department orders of 21 November 
1942 which relieved Colonel Wyman from Ihe temporary duty status and from 
assignment as a.ssistant to the Division Engineer, South Pacific Division, and 
assigned him as Division Engineer, Northwest Division, with station at Edmon- 
ton, Alberta, Canada. 



2756 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

8. Colonel Wyman was relieved from duty as division engineer by orders issued 
25 March 1943. Records of this otBce show Colonel Wyman now assigned overseas 
at APO 29, in care of the Postmaster, New York, N. Y. 

/s/ Thomas M. Robins, 
Thomas M. Robins, 

Major General, 
Deputy Chief of Engincera 
War Department, 
Washington, D. C, 13 December 1943. 
Re : Hans Wilhelm Rohl 
H. Ralph Burton, 

Chief Counsel, House Military Affairs Committee, 

519 Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Mr. Burton : Annexed is memorandum covering the contracts of the 
War Department with construction concerns with which Hans Wilhelm Rohl is 
associated. This material is furnished in conformity with your oral request of 
3 December 1943. 

In respect to the information on page 2 regarding construction in Hawaii, 
further information is being secured from the Service Command, and the total 
amount may be increased somewhat. The material will be forwarded to your 
office immediately upon its receipt. 
Yours sincerely, 

/s/ Miles H. Knowles 
Miles H. Knowles, 

Lt. Colonel, AU8 
(For Julius H. Amberg, Special Assistant to the Secretai'y of War). 
Enc. 

COPY 
JPT/aam 
War Department, 
Office of the Chiei' of Engine2:rs, 

Washington, 6 December 19 'i3. 



Address reply to 

Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, 

Washington, D. C. 



Refer to File No. SPEAC 

Memorandum for the Office of the Director of Materiel. (Attention: Major 

Frank W. Xiques, Room 5D-666, The Pentagon ) . 
Subject: House Military Affairs Committee Investigation — Hans Wilhelm Rohl. 
In conformity with your verbal request of 3 December 1943, the following 
information is furnished concerning the request of the House Military Affairs 
Committee for information relating to contracts with the War Department in 
which Hans Wilhelm Rohl was (or is) interested, either as contractor or sub- 
contractor, including the amounts involved and the locations where the work 
was performed (or is being performed) : 

CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO WITH ROHL-CONNOLLY COMPANY, 4351 ALHAMBRA 
AVE., LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 



Contract No. 



Date 



Amount 



Location and type of work 



W 509 eng-68. 
W509eng-85. 



W509eng-4(ER). 



W 509 eng-103_ 
W 509 eng-267. 



W 509 eng-9 
W 509 eng-9 



W 509 eng-4622. 



W509eng-979 

W509eng-1000 (ER). 



W 509 eng-61 Subcontractor. 
(Contractor is Puget Sound 
Bridge & Dredging Co.) 



10- 4-33 
7-26-34 

8-10-35 

8- 6-36 
12- 3-37 

1-24-40 
2-21^0 

3- 6-43 



$1, 520, 000. 00 
557, 790. 00 

827, 750. 00 

2, 145, 000. 00 
2, 600. 00 

23, 875. 00 
865, 678. 25 

50, 000. 00 

11,250.00 
15, 770. 00 

466, 410. 00 



Construction of breakwater Los Angeles, Long 
Beach Outer Harbors, San Pedro Bay, Calif. 

Construction on new enrockments, reconstruc- 
tion existing enrockment, Newport Bay, 
Calif. 

Construction breakwater,[Los Angeles & Long 
Beach Harbors, Calif, 
do. 

Repair of revetment, Los Angeles, (Harbor) 
California. 

Rental of floating derrick, towboat and barge. 

Improvement of Los Angeles River, Section 
VII, Downey Rd. to Atlantic Avenue, City 
of Vernon & Los Angeles Co., Calif. 

Repair of floating plant, any available ship- 
yard. 

Jetty stone, Newport Bay Harbor, Calif. 

Derrick stone, F. O. B., Railroad cars at 
Ormand (Riverside), Calif. 

39,307 Tons Class B Stone, and 87,081 Tons 
Class A Stone. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 



2757 



CONTRACT ENTERED INTO WITH CADDOA CONSTRUCTORS (JOINT VENTURE WITH 
W. E. CALLAHAN CONSTRUCTION CO., AND GUNTHER & SHIRLEY COMPANY, AND 
ROHL-CONNOLLY) 



Contract No. 


Date 


Amount 


Location and type of work 


W 911 eng-487 .. 


7-19-40 


$7, 478, 790. 41 


Construction John Martin Dam and appur- 




tenant works on Arkansas River in Bent 
County, Colorado. 


CONTRACT ENTERED INTO WITH HAWAIIAN CONSTRUCTORS (JOINT VENTURE 
WITH W. E. CALLAHAN CONSTRUCTION CO., GUNTHER & SHIRLEY COMPANY, 
ROHL-CONNOLLY COMPANY AND RALPH E. WOOLEY.) 


W 414eng-602 


12-20-40 


$1, 097, 673. 00 


Construction works of National Defense — 
Hawaiian Islands. 


CONTRACT ENTERED INTO WITH FOLEY BROTHERS, INC., & ROHL-CONNOLLY CO. 


W3416eng-51. 


2-9-43 


$11,000,000.00 


Haines Cutoff, Alaska. 







For the Chief of Engineers : 

/s/ John H. Hendren, Jr., 
John H. Hendken, Je., 

Major, J. A. G. D., 
Acting Chief, Contracts and Claims Branch. 

[ii] Prior to making this inspection trip, these oflScers studied directives, 
communications and other data from the Headquarters, Service of Supply to the 
Office of the Chief of Engineers, and from the latter to the Division Engineer, 
Northwest Service Command, and also made a two months intensive study of 
the Field Progress Reports. 

They state that immediate remedial action by higher authority is needed ; 
leadership of Commanding General and the Division Engineers are of a low 
order ; subordinate officers lack respect for their ability and capacity ; complete 
lack of organization, except on paper ; lack of respect and cooperation between 
the various offices, with a low state of morale throughovit ; lack of, or belated, 
planning for many important phases of this entire project. 

Quotations from report : 

"B Northwest Division Engineer Office 

"The undersigned, during the course of the past twenty months, has had 
occasion to study and analyze the construction activity on some 1500 projects 
and has i)ersonally visited and inspected the work on approximately 500 jobs. 
I say unhesitatingly that the Office of the Division Engineer, Northwest Service 
Command and, as a consequence, all echelons of command under it and all pri- 
vate constructors and others having contractual relations with it, represent the 
most confused, frustrated, disjointed, heterogeneous, disorganized, demoralized 
group of organizations with which we have ever come in contact." 

"Sound processes of ratiocination are conspicuous because of their absence ; 
understanding of military concepts and knowledge and information on the basis 
of which plans must be made and work executed are nebulous, fragmentary and 
disarranged ; designs, plans, and specifications are grandiose, expensive to exe- 
cute and anachronistic in their preparation ; job planning and job scheduling 
are superficial, fantastic and in many cases child-like ; execution of physical 
work-in-place is pitifully slow, wasteful, lacks balance between labor, material 
and supervision, and is performed in a sequence lacking common-sense, let alone 
that complementarity of effort which is ordinarily necessary for efficient, eco- 
nomic and speedy work execution. 

"The entire atmosphere at the Office of the Division Engineer (and several 
of the Districts) reflects mental desuetude, capricism, mysticism and insouciance. 

"It is my conviction that the construction work, if ever accomplished, will be 
prolonged for many months, in some cases as much as a year or more ; will involve 



♦Colonel Theodore Wyman, Jr. 



2758 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

the unnecessary expenditure of many millions of dollars ; and will cause the 
wasteful and misdirected employment of millions of man-hours and the uneco- 
nomic use of hundreds upon hundreds of pieces of all types of heavy equipment 
and vehicles — automotive, truck, etc. 

"A few specific illustrations of the many observations upon which the above 
opinions are predicated are given herewith. 

"On the 11th and 12th of February, 1943, conferences were held at the Office 
of the U. S. Division Engineer between Colonel AVilliam C. Henry, assistant to 
the Chief Signal Officer, U. S. Army, and Colonel Theodore Wyman, Division 
Engineer, relative to coordinating and accelerating the work on the construction 
of the communications system throughout the Northwest Service Command. In 
attendance were representatives of the Alaska Communications Service, members 
of the Division Engineer's Office, special assistants to Commanding General, 
NWSC, and members of the firm and key employees of the Architect-Engineer, 
Turnbull, Sverdrup & Parcel, and the Prime Contractor, Bechtel-Price-Callahan." 

General James A. O'Connor, Colonel James K. TuUy, General Staff, Washington, 
D. C. and Major Lee E. Scheid and Captain William T. Carpenter, Jr., of the 
Services of Supply, Washington, D. C, attended one of these meetings, at which 
the undersigned were present. 

Quotations from report : 

"To anyone who has been over the territory covered by the Northwest Service 
Command for as little as one week it is obvious that the communications system 
is to all practical purposes the sine qua non of efficient construction effort. And 
yet, when Colonel James K. Tully, [13] because of the nature of the con- 
versations, had occasion to express the fact that the General Staff had established 
the work on the communications system and on the Port of Prince Rupert as 
the Number One and Two Priorities for accomplishment in the Northwest Service 
Command, Colonel Wyman registered surprise and stated that it was the first 
time that such information had been brought to his attention, officially or 
otherwise. 

"It was apparent to everyone in the room that the work on the communications 
system had been woefully neglected, and what little had been done was not in 
accordance with Signal Coi'ps standards, design or specifications. . . . 

"The inability to get the job done retards the War effort." 

"In my opinion. Colonel Wyman does not iniderstand the use of or does not 
choose to employ the members of an organization in a generally accepted sense. 

"I can conceive of a man being a geuius, being possessed of a superlative degree 
of clairvoyance, onmiscience, omnipresence, perspicacity, and perspicuity, and 
having an indomitable will (incidentally. Colonel Wyman does not, in my opinion, 
possess any of these qualities to a reasonably desirable degree). . . . 

"The slow preparation of plans and specifications ; the lack of faulty planning 
and sclieduling of many features of work the Impractical manner and sequence in 
which work is executed and the fact that work which should be started and 
vigorously prosecuted according to common-sense and its important significance 
to other work is not started ; the confusion surrounding the procurement and sup- 
ply of materials and equipment : the complete lack of transportation means months 
after all facilities should have been in a state of immediate readiness ; the lack of 
organization on the port of the Architect-Engineer, the Contractors and the 
echelons of the Division Engineer Office, and the low state of morale and feeling of 
frustration and despair which pervades almost everyone bespeak hut one thing. 
It is vitally necessary that n leadership of vision, imagination, cooperation- 
inspiring, and which will produce results in a quick, efficient and economic manner 
be found at once, in the person of a Division Engineer. 

"Planning 

"The planning of all construction work in the Northwest Service Command 
seems to be exceptionally poor in many respects, 

[141 "1- The preparation of designs, plans and specifications is far too slow, 
assuming all other phases of activity were reasonably satisfactory, to consum- 
mate all the work at the required completion dates as established by higher 
authority. 

"2. ... As a consequence, there is over-design, as in the case of proposed rail 
heads at Dawson Creek. Whitehorse and Fairbanks, and Skagway." 

"3. The sequence in which work is planned to be done lacks a sense of under- 
standing of complementarity and integration of all the features of work. . . . 
The sense of correct relativity, proper timing, and general perspective of all the 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2759 

elements of the construction program are distorted. This in my opinion is the 
reason for the over-emphasis on the immediate construction of the elaborately 
conceived railheads for which an allotment of eighty-one million dollars was re- 
quested on Canol Projects #1 and #3, and the under-emphasis on the Ports of 
Skagway, Haines, and Prince Rui^ert, on Canol Projects #4 and #5. on the facili- 
ties along the Alcau Highway, and on the Haines-Champagne Cut-Otf. . . . 

"Scheduling 

"The scheduling of work to be accomplished as reflected in the Off-Continent 
Field Progress Reports submitted by the Northwest Division is meaningless and 
is being prepared unthinkingly and mechanically. The estimated work schedules 
shown on the bar graphs cannot possibly be met for any of the projects. Not- 
withstanding the fact that the data is officially submitted by the Division Engi- 
neer, it is understood and recognized as being impossible of accomplishment by 
officers, contractors, and employees in the field. 

"If the.se prognoses are fanciful, so must be the data and calculations on which 
they are predicated. . . . The same lack of thinking and planning generates a 
mobilization of field employees without material to woi'k on so as to accomplish 
physical work-in-place, and leads to the procurement and delivery of materials in 
the wrong order, and in the wrong place and without men to work on them. 

"7. An organization of the Division Engineer and the six District Engineer 
offices exists but only on paper. The Division Engineer delegates responsibili- 
ties to his District Engineers through the issuance of generalized orders based 
on directives. But nothing has been done as yet to simultaneously establ-ish 
authority and create the wherewithal in the District Offices on the basis of which 
the duties can be performed and the responsibilities fulfilled. 

"It is imperative that a sensible and workable channel of command and 
authority for direction, supervision, and control of the work to be established at 
once. . . . 

[J 5] "It this is not effectuated, all the District Engineer Offices are truly 
supei'fluous and should be abolished. * * * 

"8. More skillful and learned policy and procedure in the methods and proc- 
esses of awarding contracts to private firms is essential. * * * 

"9-b. Troops are over-taxed because of the assignment of too many missions. 

Troops are not as well fed as employees of the private firms with whom they 
are in close proximity. 

Quotations from report : 

"10. The field agencies of the Public Roads Administration are possessed, in 
a measure, of the many defi'*iencies expressed relative to the organization of the 
Architect-Engineers, Contractors, and the United States Engineer Offices. The 
liaison and channelizing through echelons is particularly bad, and direction and 
supervision are carried on, too prepond'rantly, at headquarters away from the 
areas of activity. Because of these conditions, the proper equipment is not at 
the disposal of Contractors at places and time when it should be, and it takes 
months to affect the sending and receipt of spare parts by requisition. 

"Because there are so many groups in being for the accomplishment of tlie 
construction work * * * jj- y^m require the highest degree of intelligence 
and leadership, of which one can conceive to unravel periodic snags, let alone 
getting the job done. This entire set-up requires immediate remedial action, so 
that the correct chain of authority is clearly defined, the greatest cooperation 
i.s established, and the direction and supervision processes are simplified 
throughout. 

'^Personnel, Labor and Morale 

"Much of the supervisory, administrative, technical and other key personnel 
employed * * * jg qqj- qualified not competent, to assist in carrying out the 
missions which have been mandated ; a la'k of specialized training on the part 
of employees is aggravated by the poor organizational fabric of which they are 
made a part ; the efficiency of labor is very low on practically all of the con- 
struction work. The uiuisual depth to which it has fallen is mainly attributable 
to the poor leadership, lack of organization, et cetera. 

"3. The morale of a majority of all civilians and officers engaged in the con- 
struction task in the Nortliwest Service Command is as low as has ever come 
to our personal attention. This is due to all that has been stated heretofore 
in this report. * * * 

[16] "Work requirements and work accomplishment." 
79716—46 — Ex. 145, vol. 4 20 



2760 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

"To date, for the time already consumed, the physical work-in-place accom- 
plishment is meagre and subnormal." 

Military Liaison and Cooperation 

It would appear that the liaison and cooperation between the different branches 
of the Services were very poor, especially between the Corps of Engineers and 
the Signal Corps, and the Corps of Engineers and Army Air Forces, and that 
the liaison between the Northwest Service Command and the Division Engineer's 
office were based upon personal acquaintance between General O'Connor and 
Colonel Wyman, to the exclusion of most of their respective staffs. 

This report gives considerable information in regard to railway facilities, and 
calls attention to their lack of equipment : that they are constructed with light 
rail, and that the majority of the roadlied is built upon "muskeg", with metal 
ballast being practically non-existent; that it does not appear that the Division 
Engineer lias made any plans to take care of this situation, although all these 
railway facilities are badly needed to carry supplies. 

There seems to be a lack of planning for housing and storage facilities, water, 
and sanitation at the various rail heads. 

Alcan Eighway 

Again, this report reveals what appears to be lack of foresight planning. 
This is readily illustrated by the fact that many of the trestles and bridges are 
of- temporary timber eonsrtuction and will be washed out by the Spring thaws, 
with no supply of material [i7] being placed adjacent thereto for their 
repair or rebuilding, which will naturally mean considerable delay caused 
thereby. 

Alcan Teleplione Line 

Here again is pointed out the value of communication facilities in connection 
with such a large construction project and the lack of proper planning to have 
this installed and available for construction purposes. 

Skagway 

The following relative to this port is interesting : 

"Everything done thus far has been 'hit or miss' ; it is thought that a com- 
prehensive plan for the use of the port and the available land area should be 
prepared * * *" 

"Canal Project 

"For the period of time during which work has been going on in connection 
with this entire project, only a moderate amount of physical work-in-place has 
been accomplished. The required completion dates cannot possibly be met. 

"The only jobs on which any substantial amount of work has been done are 
Canol No. lA, Canol No. 6, and Canol No. 2. The remainder of the work on jobs 
Canol No. 1, Canol No. 3, Canol No. 4 and Canol No. 5 is either in the category 
of 'barely started' or 'not started.' " 

Division and District Offices 

That part of the report dealing with the Division and District Engineer Offices 
is severely critical, stating, among other things, that the Division Office at 
Edmonton is a conglomeration of individuals under headless guidance and 
direction, with living and working conditions exceedingly poor and conductive 
of the lowest morale, that the various District Offices, of which there are six, 
appear to be ineffectual because of lack of proper knowledge of [18] con- 
struction facts, authority, control, and specifically defined objectives, which 
should be given them by the Division Engineer's Office. 

This report ends with the following general conclusions and recommendations : 

"General Conclusions 

"1. The breaking through of the pioneer road (Alcan Highway) was an out- 
standing and praiseworth performance. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2761 

"2. The planning, scheduling, methods of arranging for the execution of work, 
and the conduct of work performance throughout, subsequent to the breaking 
through of the pioneer road, have been as disgraceful as the work on Alcan was 
commendable. 

"3. The leadership in the Northwest Service Command and in the Northwest 
Division Engineer Office, particularly the latter, is of a very low order. This 
leadership and the complete lacli of organization which exists have not permitted 
and will not permit of the rapid, efficient, and economic consummation of the 
construction task. 

"4. The requirements for construction work as embodied in the various direc- 
tives issued and the capacity for the performance of this work with the instru- 
mentalities and agencies, as they exist, are so out of consonance that they can- 
not be reconciled. 

"5. Any curtailment or deferment of the work authorized, because of changes 
in strategic and tactical concepts, caused by changes in war conditions, will not 
solve the problems in the Northwest Service Command. It is vitally necessary 
to change the leadership and to reorganize, revitalize and catalysize the agencies 
enjoined or engaged for the work performance. We are fully convinced that the 
present construction program, regardless of its adequacy or necessity, can be 
performed more rapidly, efficiently and economically by good organization and 
under proper leadership than a deleted program can be executed by the present 
forces and agencies. 

"6. The liaison and cooperation between the many commands, divisions and 
branches of the Army have not as yet reached the stage where they might be 
termed as completely satisfactory. 

[19] "Recommendations 

"1. That the Commanding General, Northwest Service Command, be relieved, 
or alternatively, that the Commanding General be assigned a staff of officers, 
qualified and trained for this ijarticular type of supply and transportation task, 
who in turn are further implemented in the form of expert technical assistance. 

"2. That the Northwest Division Engineer be relieved. There is no alterna- 
tive procedure to this recommendation. The retainment of the Division En- 
gineer in his present capacity will and must eventuate in disgraceful perform- 
ance or failure." 

(Report of Horowitz and Helgerson, War Department, dated March 15, 1943.) 

It is of pertinent interest that conditions in Alaska, as have been described in 
the paragraphs just preceding, compare noticeably with those in the islands of 
the Pacific where defense installations were under the direction of Colonel Wy- 
man, pursuant to contracts with Hawaiian Constructors, Rohl's Company, and 
Sverdrup and Parcels, architect-engineers, selected by them. 

During this period when tliose defense projects vitally affecting the defense 
of the United States were being installed in that strategic and vulnerable Alas- 
kan area, Attn and the Aleutians were occupied by the Japanese, causing a con- 
tinuing threat. 

confidential 

Wae Department, 
Washington, 7 December 1943. 
Mr. H. Ralph Bukton, 

Chief Counsel, House Military Affairs Committee, 
519 Old House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Deab Mr. Burton : In pursuant of your telephone request, I enclose confidential 
document of date 15 March 1943, being report of Colonel L. George Horowitz to 
Colonel F. S. Sti'ong, Jr. of the Corps of Engineers and covering various matters 
in the Northwest Service Command, with particular reference to the Division 
Engineer in connection with construction operations. 

This document is given to you for the confidential use of the Committee and 
not for publication. 

It represents the views of Colonel Horowitz, but has not been approved as to its 
findings or accuracy by higher authority in the Department. 
Yours siiK'erely, 

/s/ Julius H. Amberg, 
Julius H. Ambekg, 
Special Assistant to the Secretary of War. 
End. 



2762 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

[i] CONFIDENTIAL 

March 15, 1943. 

Report Covering an Inspection of All Construction Work and Related 
Functions UNDim the Jurisdiction of the U. S. Division Engineer in the 
Northwest Service Command 

Col. L. George Horowitz Col. F. S. Strong, Jr. 

This report, on the above-named subject, has been prepared on the basis of 
the following studies and observations : 

a. A study of many if not all directives and communications from the 
Headquarters Services of Supply to the OflBce, Chief of Engineers, and from 
the latter to the Division Engineer. Northwest Service Command. Many 
other documents of a miscellaneous but important and pertinent character 
have also been carefully scrutinized. 

b. An intensive and extensive analysis over a period of two months (De- 
cember 1942 and January 1943) of all the Field Progress Reports submitted 
by the Division Engineer, Northwest Service Command, to the Office, Chief 
of Engineers. 

c. Observations made by the undersigned and Major H. C. Helgerson, Corps 
of Engineers, during the course of an inspection trip throughout the North- 
west Service Command, from February 7, 1943 to March 6, 1943. An outline 
of our itinerary is attached to this report. 

Our observations and investigations have developed personal reactions on our 
part from which have sprung the many opinions and beliefs expressed herein. 
Because it is our conviction that many matters require immediate remedial action 
by the authorities charged with the responsibility for executing the construction 
tasks and correstive action by higher authority in those matters beyond the con- 
trol of the former, we have decided to treat the subject by an elaboration under 
the headings which follow. We feel that the presentation in this form will give 
the most comprehensive portrayal in the simplest, most direct and most graphic 
manner. 

I. Leadership 

A. Northwest Service Command 

B. Northwest Division Engineer Office 
II. Planning 

IIL Scheduling 
IV. Organization 
V. Personnel, Labor and Morale 
VI. Work Requirements and Work Accomplishment 
VII. Militarv Liaison and Cooperation 
VIIL Thumbnail Sketches 
[2] IX. General Conclusions 

X. Recommendations 

I. leadership 

The leadership on the part of the Commanding General. Northwest Service 
Command, and the U. S. Division Engineer is, in our opinion, of a low order. 
This has manifested itself in many ways, such as : 

1. Lack of respect and open expression of such lack of respect by many officers, 
in the rank from Captain to Colonel, for the ability and capacity of the two above- 
mentioned officers to successfully effectuate the construction and supply tasks 
which have been mandated to them by directives from higher authority. 

2. The complete lack of organization, except on paper, after several months, 
as one understands the meaning and connotation of that word in both a military 
and construction sense. 

3. The vacillation, superficiality, and belated actions involving : thinking in 
terms of concepts : planning of tasks and procedures ; scheduling of work in sound 
sequence and in an integrated program and accomplishment sense: mobilization 
of military forces at various locations and the assignment of missions to them : 
method of awarding contracts to private construction firms ; direction and super- 
vision of the efforts of these firms in preparing designs, plans, specifications, 
procurement of material mobilization of personnel and labor forces, and in the 
execution of the work. 



PROCEEDIXGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2763 

4. Lack of proper and suflScient liaison and practical cooperation between the 
Headquarters of the Northwest Service Command and the OflBce of the Division 
Engineer; the Office of the Division Engineer and the OflBces of the District 
Engineers ; the Northwest Service Command and the Alaska Defense Command ; 
the Corps of Engineers, the Army Air Forces and the Signal Corps ; the Engineer 
for the Commanding General. Alaska Defense Command and the Northwest 
Division Engineer; and the Office of the Northwest Division Engineer and the 
Field Representatives of the Public Roads Administration. 

5. The low state of morale and spirit of frustration which obtain at Edmonton, 
Dawson Creek. Fort Nelson, Whitehorse. and Skagway and the sense of helpless- 
ness which pervades the hearts and minds of officers and employees at Fairbanks 
and Prince Rupert. 

[S] A. Northwest Service Command 

Our observations, attendance at conferences, and conversations with many offi- 
cers and civilians have given us the distinct reaction that General Order No. 44, 
War Department, Washington, D. C, September 4, 1942, will not prove workable 
becau.'^e of the personalities involved and the conditions and circumstances which 
exist. 

The Commanding General, NWSC, has established a hybrid organization which 
consists of an antiquated Corps Area set-up, infiltrated with task command offi- 
cers, recently appointed officers from civil life and civilians, all of whom are sup- 
posedly to function as specialists. In addition to a Chief of Staff, a Deputy 
Chief of Staff, the four Staff O's, there is an Alcan Highway Commanding Officer, 
a Northern and Southern Sector Commander, a Railroad Commander at Dawson 
Creek, an officer in charge of equipment and parts, an officer in charge of auto- 
motive transportation on the Alcan Highway, and, we presume, others. 

Wliether the organization is orthodox or heterodox is of little moment in the 
final analysis if there is a high type of leadership, a systematic arrangement of 
all procedure, and an efficient execution of all work. But unfortunately, the dia- 
metrically opposite conditions obtain. The Commanding General seems to vacil- 
late, apparently because of his susceptability to advice from many and the latest 
quarters ; seems to issue orders which are not properly channelized and about 
which ihere is timely lack of knowledge on the part of officers who should know 
about them; and he is inclined to command spasmodically, so to speak, not on a 
basis of perspicacity and advance planning but as crucial moments occur or a 
stalemate or impass arises. As a result, the entire atmosphere at Whitehorse 
is one of confusion, frustration, lack of interest, indifference, and low morale. 
Dynamic, respected and accomplishment-inspiring leadership are imperative. 

One of many illustrations of the lack of or belated planning on the part of the 
Northwest Service Command is the fact that as late as February 13. 1943. a 
conference was held at the office of the Division Engineer at Edmonton, one of 
the purposes of which was to arrange for the transportation of construction 
materials up the Alcan Highway. It was evident, or should have been evident, 
as early as December 1, 1942. that one of the vitally important tasks was to pro- 
vide for the movement of construction material up the highway before the April 
thaw set in, so that physical work-in-place could be performed during the months 
of April, May, and June, when the road was impassable. 

At the conference of February 13, 1943, it was apparent that no workable plans 
had been formulated until then. The lack of knowledge on the conditions or 
location of trucks was pathetic. The discussion on lack of gasoline, fuel, kero- 
sene, alcohol, Prestone, spare parts, drivers, facilities [J^^ for making and 
shelter under which to make repairs bespoke a completely chaotic state of affairs. 
It became doubly evident that the data on planning, scheduling, work perform- 
ance, etc., as contained in and submitted in Field Progress Reports was highly 
unrealistic and in most cases fantastic. One had no further to look to understand 
the reason for the jam-up of some thousand freight cars in the Edmonton railroad 
yards or the large percentage of vehicles and equipment of every description 
which were on the dead-line or otherwise inaccessible and unavailable. 

As a result of this conference. Colonel Glandon. who has superseded Col. 
Wheeler as the Commanding Officer of the Alcan Highway, was directed to corral, 
sequester, and what-not all the trucks in the Service Command for the purpose 
of allocating them for specific uses. One of these truck employments was desig- 
nated as the movement of construction material up the Alcan Highway. At the 
time I was leaving Edmonton to return to the United States on March 4. 1943, 
I was informed by Colonel Henry Woodbury, Asst. Division Engineer, that prac- 
ticallv nothing in that direction had been accomplished since the meeting of 
February 13, 1&43. 



2764 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

Coincident with the failure to make plans and preparations for the overhauling, 
repair and disposition of such trucks, so that tonnage of approximately 68,000 
tons could be moved over the highway on or before April 15, 1943, evidence 
appeared of available trucks not being expeditiously used and trucks being 
assigned to tasks which very ostensibly were of a priority of performance much 
below the many purposes to which they could and should have been assigned. 
As an example of the former, we refer to approximately 150 new White 10-ton 
Diesel Drive trucks which were at Dawson Creek and not being used (no one 
seemed to know to whom the trucks belonged and averyone volunteered that they 
were not running because of lack of winterization, lack of Prestone, etc.). As 
an example of the latter, we refer to the approximately 25 White Trucks, later 
increased to 50, which the Metcalf, Hamilton and the Kansas City Bridge co-ven- 
tures were apparently able to persuade the Commanding General to allocate to 
them for the purpose of building their railheads of fantastic preliminary con- 
ception and much more fantastic estimated cost. 

The t-easons for the other statements relative to the manifestations of the low 
order of leadership expressed in resume form under I. Leadership, supra, will 
become obvious as delineations of facts and conditions are made under headings 
which follow. 
B. Northtvest Division Engineer Office 

The undersigned, during the course of the past twenty months, has had 
occasion to study and analyze the construction activity on some 1500 projects 
and has personally visited and inspected the work on approximately 500 jobs. I 
say unhesitatingly that the OflBce of the Division Engineer, Northwest Service 
[5] Command and, as a consequence, all echelons of command under it and 
all private constructors and others having contractual relations with it, repre- 
sent the most confused, frustrated, disjointed, heterogeneous, disorganized, 
demoralized group of organizations with which we have ever come in contact. 

Sound processes of ratiocination are conspicuous because of their absence; 
understanding of military concepts and knowledge and information on the basis 
of which plans must be made and work executed are nebulous, fragmentary and 
disarranged ; designs, plans and specifications are grandiose, expensive to execute 
and anacTaronistic in their preparation ; job planning and job scheduling are 
superficial, fantastic and in many cases child-like ; execution of physical work- 
in-place is pitifully slow, wasteful, lacks balance between labor, material and 
supervision, and is performed in a sequence lacking common-sense, let alone that 
complementarity of effort which is ordinarily necessary for efficient, economic 
and speedy work execution. 

The entire atmosphere at the Office of the Division Engineer (and several of 
the Districts) reflects mental desuetude, physical paralysis, resort to processes 
of temporization, eapiricism, mysticism and insouciance. 

It is my conviction that the construction work, if ever accomplished, will be 
prolonged for many months, in some cases as mnch as a year or more; will 
involve the unnecessary expenditure of many millions of dollars; and will cause 
the wasteful and misdirected employment of millions of man-hours and the 
uneconomic use of hundreds upon hundreds of pieces of all types of heavy equii>- 
ment and vehicles — automotive, truck, etc. 

A few specific illustrations of the many observations upon which the above 
opinions are predicated are given herewith. 

On the 11th and 12th of February, 194.3, conferences were held at the Office of 
the U. S. Division Engineer between Colonel William C. Henry, assistant to the 
Chief Signal Officer, U. S. Army, and Colonel Theodore Wyman, Division Engi- 
neer, relative to coordinating and accelerating the work on the construction of 
the communications system throughout the Northwest Service Command. In 
attendance were representatives of the Alaska Communications Service, mem- 
bers of the Division Engineer's Office, special assistants to Commanding General, 
NWSC, and members of the firm and key employees of the Architect-Engineer, 
Turnbull, Sverdrup & Pai'cel, and the Prime Contractor, Bechtel-Price-Callahan. 
General James A. O'Connor, Colonel James K. Tully, General Staff, Washington. 
D. C, and Major Lee E. Scheid and Captain William T. Carpenter, Jr., of the 
Services of Supply, Washington, D. C, attended one of these meetings, at which 
the undersigned was present. 

To anyone who has been over the territory covered by the Northwest Service 
Command for as little as one week it is obvious that the communications system 
is to all practical purposes the sine qua non of efficient construction effort. And 
yet, when Colonel James K. Tully, because of the nature of the conversations, 
had occasion to express the fact that the General Staff had established the work 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2765 

on the communications system and on tlae Port of Prince Rupert as tlie Number 
One and Two Priorities for accomplishment in the Northwest Service Com- 
mand, Colonel Wyman registered surprise and stated that it was the first 
[6] time that such information had been brought to his attention, ofllcially or 
otherwise. 

It was apparent to everyone in the room that the w^ork on the communica- 
tions system had been woefully neglected, and what little that had been done 
was not in accordance with Signal Corps standards, design or specifications. 
Lengthy conversations, much of a superfluous character, ensued between CJol- 
onels Henry and Wyman. It is my opinion, the hypotheses, the processes of 
reasoning, and the constructive intentions and purposes of Colonel Henry were 
sound, logical, practical and commendable. Colonel Wyman comported himself 
as one engaged in the art of fencing. The weapons of which he made repetitious 
and irrelevant use were "the matter of unfortunate personalities and proper 
or improper jurisdiction". I could not draw any inference other than that, if 
phobias existed, they were inherent in Colonel Wyman, and it seemed to me 
that a peculiar psychosis permeated all of Colonel Wyman's reasoning and 
viewpoints. 

The conclusion is inescapable that at least three months of valuable time 
have been lost during which much of the work on the communications system 
could or should have been accomplished. The lack of progress on this feature 
of work will decelerate the efforts of all persons engaged in the construction 
task. Northwest Service Command, in an inordinately large measure. 

The discussions, higgling and haggling, which accompanied the attempts to 
obtain the signature of the Commanding General, NWSC, and the Signal Corps 
representatives to a Memorandum of Understanding, have convinced me beyond 
any shadow of doubt that any accomiDlishment in the overall construction task 
that might and should reflect kudos to the Services of Supply, the Corps of 
Engineers, aiid others engaged in this effort, will be exceedingly difficult if not 
impossible. 

At the time of my visit to Edmonton, the Office of the Division Engineer had 
approximately 180 civilian employees and 30 officers, and the Division Engineer 
was in the process of building up a home organization of approximately 450 
persons. If an organization that possessed cohesion and coordination and func- 
tioned smoothly and efficiently were to result, little fault, if any, might be found 
with the set-up, regardless of whether or not it contained a small percentage 
of supernumeraries. But when disconnected, non-used and misdirected com- 
partmentalization obtains, and it is my opinion that it does and will, deadening 
effects transcend the considerations of useless expenditure of funds, wasted 
man-hours, low morale, etc. TJw inaMlitij to get the job done retards the War 
Effort. 

In my opinion. Colonel Wyman does not understand the use of or does not 
choose to employ the members of an organization in the generally accepted 
sense. Cases have come to my attention where officers have been excoriated in 
the presence of fellow officers and others for carrying out the duties, functions 
and missions for the very purpose of which they have been secured as members 
of his organization. 

I can conceive of a man being a genius, being possessed of a superlative degree 
of clairvoyance, omniscience, omnipresence, perspicacity, and i)er.spicuity, and 
having an indomitable will (incidentally. Colonel Wyman does not, in my 
opinion, possess any of these qualities to a reasonably desirable degree). 
[7] A lack of understanding of the elementary principles of good leadership, 
a lack of tactfulness and diplomacy, a lack of the ability to inspire others and 
win their respect and cooperation would still cause failure in the accomplish- 
ment of a mandated objective. Particularly so, if the task is almost super- 
human, as is the construction job in the Northwest Service Command. 

Most of the officers in the r)ivision Office (and in the District Offices), whatever 
their individual ability, capacity, resourcefulness, etc., might be, have good 
educational backgrounds and have had more oii less military training and 
experience, particularly in the Construction Service. They understand the dif- 
ference between good organization and bad organization, the distinction between 
active and dynamic leadership as against passive leadership, whereby com- 
placency is mistaken for confidence and self-satisfaction because of sweeping 
blanket and not properly thought-out delegation of duties and responsibilities by 
faulty contractual relationships entered into with private construction com- 
panies. As a consequence, most of the officers and civilian personnel as well 
feel that they are superfluous, are almost morbid, and are impelled to express 



2766 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

the fear that they have been relegated to affiliation with a mission which is 
destined to be a failure. 

The slow preparation of plans and specifications ; the lack of faulty planning 
and scheduling of many features of work ; the impractical manner and sequence 
in which work is executed and the fact that work which should be starced and 
vigorously prosecuted according to common-sense and its important significance 
to other work is not started ; the confusion surrounding the procurement and 
supply of materials and equipment; the complete lack of transportation means 
months after all facilities should have been in a state of immediate readiness : 
the lack of organization on the part of the Architect-Engineer, the Contractors 
and the echelons of the Division Engineer Office; and the low state of morale 
and feeling of frustration and despair which pervades almost everyone bespeak 
but one thing. It is vitally necessary that a leadership of vision, imagination, 
cooperation-inspiring, and which will produce results in a quick, efficient and 
economic manner be found at once, in the person of a Division Engineer. 

II. PLANNING 

The planning of all construction work in the Northwest Service Command 
seems to be exceptionally poor in many respects. 

1. The preparation of designs, plans and specifications is far too slow, assum- 
ing all other phases of activity were reasonably satisfactory, to consummate 
all the work at the required completion dates as established by higher authority. 

2. Many concepts of a strategic and logistic nature on the basis of which 
directives are issued and construction planning must predicated are ephemeral 
in the minds of most persons having a responsibility in the direction, preparation 
and supervision of design, plans and specifications. As a consequence, there is 
over-design as in the case of the proposed railheads at Dawson Creek, White- 
horse, and Fairbanks : faulty and under-design as in the case of tlie communi- 
cations system ; or no design as in the case of many necessary facilities at 
Edmonton, Dawson Creek, along the Alcan Highway, at Whitehorse, Fairbanks, 
and Skagway. 

[8] The true sigtiificance of the element — TIME — in a eonstrvction pro- 
gram havwg a triple purpose of defense of a territory, supply of an allied nation 
and means of an offensive operation against an enemy power, is not fully grasped. 
If the purpose and urgency of the work toere correctly visualized, it would T)e 
planned and executed in segments and hy phases so that at all intervals of time 
some use could ie made of completed facilities in and to at least a limited part 
of the finallii desired capacity sense or in the priority of requirement sense as 
ordained hy higher authority. This procedure would also lend itself to the most 
rapid, efficient and economic accomplishment of the construction work. 

.3. The sequence in which work is pl'anned to be done lacks a sense of under- 
standing of complementarity and integration of all the features of work. For 
example, motions are gone through, involving proposed transportation of mate- 
rial for Canol #1, as though it had a priority of importance over the communi- 
cations system and the docks and 'appurtenant facilities at Prince Rupert and 
Skagway. Trucks are allocated for the movement of materials for the proposed 
over-designed railhead at Dawson Creek, but little attention is paid to the prep- 
aration for the repair of the several 'arteries, such as the road from Edmonton 
to Dawson Creelc, Northern Alberta Railway, Alcan Highway, and White Pass- 
Yukon Railway, which, if neglected, will cause a general stalemate for months. 
The sense of correct relativity, proper timing, 'and general perspective of all the 
elements of the construction program are distorted. This, in my opinion, is 
the reason for the over-emphasis on the immediate construction of the elaborately 
conceived railheads for which an allotment of $81,000,000 was requested, on Canol 
Projects #1 and #3, and the under-emphasis on the Ports of Skagway, Haines, 
land Prince Rupert, on Canol Projects #4 and #5, on the facilities along the 
Alcan Highway, and on the Haines-Champagne Cut-Off. It is the reason for 
the over-emphasis on warehousing and the under-emphasis on all roads, railways, 
waterways, and the instrumentalities of transportation leading to and from this 
warehousing. 

III. SCHEDULING 

The scheduling of work to be accomplished as reflected in the Off-Continent 
Field Progress Reports submitted by the Northwest Division is meaningless and 
is being prepared unthinkingly and mechanically. The estimated work sched- 
ules shown on the bar graphs cannot possibly be met for any of the projects. 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2767 

Notwithstanding the fact that this data is officially submitted by the Division 
Engineer, it is understood and recognized as being impossible of accomplishment 
by officers, contractors, and employees in the tield. 

If these prognoses are fanciful, so must be the data and calculations on which 
they are predicated. One might ai'gue that this was only the matter of the 
required submission of a piece of paper and the necessity for technical compliance 
with an order. But such is not the case. The same lack of thinking and plan- 
ning generates a mobilization of field employees without material to work on 
so as to accomplish phy.sical work-in-place, and leads to the procurement and 
delivery of materials in the wrong order, in the wrong place and without men 
to work on them. 

[9] To a much greater degree than obtains on jobs within the Continental 
limits of the United States, the distances involved, the many forms of resistance 
and obstacles encountered, the fight against nature in the raw, require scien- 
tifically prepai-ed and precise processes of flow engineering of materials and the 
vital necessity of obtaining balance and timing of and for materials and labor. 

The conditions which obtain to the present time are said to say the least. 
Employees can be seen at many places with little or nothing to do and materials 
are jammed up at Edmonton because of lack of transportation facilities. The 
order in which materials are finally moved out in many cases adds to the already 
existing difficulties. No other result can be expected without properly and 
realistically prepared schedules. 

If job control is to be had, and it will have to be established, correct planning 
and scheduling will have to be insisted upon at once. 

IV. ORGANIZATION 

The organizations of the Architect-Engineers, the Prime Contractors, the Public 
Roads Administration, and the United States Division and District Engineer 
Offices, as they are now constituted, are not of the quality, nor have they the 
direction, the cohesion and the coordination, to accomplish their missions in a 
rapid, efficient and economic manner. 

1. It is our opinion that none of the above-named construction entities have 
become thoroughly and fundamentally indoctrinated with an understanding of 
the military concepts involved and with a satisfactory translation of those 
concepts into design, plans, specifications and physical work-in-place. 

2. All of the organizations need more forceful and inspiring leadership. In 
the case of the private firms and the P. R. A., this can be accomplished with 
the acquirement of better key personnel. In the case of the Corps of Engineer 
forces, it is necessary to supplant the present leadership, to obtain a reasonable 
number of specially qualified officers, and to obtain for civilian i)ersonnel the 
best that can be found in the ranks of the Civil Service Commission employees. 

3. In quantity, the supervisory, administrative, and technical employees of the 
Architect-Engineers and Prime Contractors are much too great in number; in 
quality, they are distinctly inferior to what obtains on most jobs in the United 
States and do not measure up to the requirements of the task at hand. 

4. The Architect-Engineer and particularly the prime contractor Bechtel-Price- 
Callahan set-ups are too distended between the United States and Canada and 
have not been molded so as to possess the direction, cohesion, coordination and 
smoothness of operation vitally necessary to get the job done. 

5. There is a tendency for the Architect-Engineer, the Prime Contractor, and 
the PEA organizations to cling too tenaciously to civilization. Something must 
be done to inject in them a pioneer and overcome-hardship spirit. [10] Cor- 
relative with the above-named propensity is the failure to establish echelons for 
direction and supervision in tlie field. 

6. Too much temporization with plans and too much extemporization with work 
execution maintain. Tlie inauguration of proper planning and scheduling, pro- 
curement, supply and balancing of labor and material should cure this defect. 
The change is necessary forthwith. 

7. An organization of the Division Engineer and the six District Engineer 
offices exists but only on paper. The Division Engineer delegates responsibilities 
to his District Engineers through the is.suance of generalized orders based on 
directives. But nothing has been done as yet to simultaneously establish au- 
thority and create the wherewithal in the District Offices on the basis of which 
the duties can be performed and the responsibilities fulfilled. 

The Division Engineer does not purposefully use his own organization and 
seems to use the office of the Edmonton District Engineer for a multiplicity 



2768 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

of purposes, such as for supervision of work in the field, administration by a 
District Engineer over other District Engineers, preparation and consummation 
of contracts, so-called control functions, preparation and submission of Field 
Progress Reports, etc. Because of the manner of evolution of the Division 
Engineer Office, this practice is deleterious in many respects — it causes the Dis- 
trict Engineer offices to be useful in only a niodicum degree for the performance 
of many tasks for which they are better qualified than the Edmonton office: it 
causes the District Engineers to feel superfluous and unproductive and resentful 
against the Division Office and the Edmonton District Office; it causes the repre- 
sentatives and key personnel of the firms engaged by the Government to neglect 
and fail to recognize any authority of the District Engineers and to look to 
Edmonton with a consequent loss of time, efficiency, and coordination. 

It is imperative that a sensible and workable channel of command and author- 
ity for direction, supervision, and control of the work to be established at once. 
The organizations of the Architect-Engineer and Contractors must l3e developed 
along echelon lines paralleling those of the U. S. Division Engineer, so that each 
District Engineer can perform his duties efficiently and in the best interest of 
the Government. Concomitantly, the necessary liaison and cooperation among 
the six District Engineers must be introduced. 

If this is not effectuated, all the District Engineer Offices are truly super- 
fluous and should be abolished. The only alternative to this method of opera- 
tion, and a very poor alternative, is the direction and supervision of all work by 
the person and office of the Division Engineer through the instrumentality of 
assistant operations officers or Ai'ea Engineers in the field. With conditions 
and circumstances as they are, this will in substance be tantamount to running 
a job bigger than the Panama Canal .job from the hat of one man whose head is 
already befogged. 

8. More skillful and learned policy and procedure in the methods and processes 
of awarding contracts to private firms is essential. This should [11} be 
done and can be done so as to induce the best features of competitive effort, so 
as to provide continuous incentives to all who have contractual obligations and 
so as to generate the highest degree of teamwork and cooperation in every con- 
ceivable direction. In my opinion, the Division Engineer is impulsive, superficial, 
and wasteful in his methods of delegating work through contractual arrange- 
ments. 

9. Better judgment than now obtains must be exercised in the disposition and 
administration of troops and in the assignment to them of their various missions. 

a. The manner in which duties are assigned to troops is carried out too impul- 
sively «nd with too much substitution back and forth. 

b. The troops are overtaxed because of the assignment of too many missions. 
This has resulted because of the still existing deficiencies of the private contrac- 
tors. For example, the troops of one regiment are engaged in providing their own 
maintenance, digging telephone pole holes, driving a winter road along a proposed 
pipeline from Brooks brook to Sheldon Lake, the assembly of timber for the re- 
building of bridges along sections of the highway, and what-not. The execution 
of most of this work, incidentally, is provided for by the contracts with firms such 
as Becbtel-Price-Callahan, Miller Construction Company, and several contractors 
under the jurisdiction of the P. R. A. 

c. The troops are not only fed more poorly than are the employees of the private 
firms with whom they are in close proximity, but use is made of ti'oops in such 
a manner and at such places as leads to the flaunting in their faces of high wages 
and other beneficial aspects of conditions of work by and under private contrac- 
tors. This is morale-breaking to say the least. 

10. The field agencies of the Riblic Roads Administration are possessed. In 
a measure, of the many deficiencies expressed relative to the organization of the 
Architect-Engineers, Contractors, and the United States Engineer Offices. The 
liaison and channelizing through echelons is particularly bad. and direction and 
supervision are carried on, too preponderantly, at headquarters away from the 
areas of activity. Because of these conditions, the proper equipment is not at the 
disposal of contractors at places and times when it should be, and it takes months 
to effect the sending and receipt of spare parts by requisition. 

Because there are so many groups in being for the accomplishment of the con- 
struction woi-k : employees, foremen, straw bosses, superintendents, subcontrac- 
tors, contractors, collateral contractors, prime contractors, construction-manage- 
ment contractors, field agencies of the P. R. A., Area Engineer officers and 
employees. District Engineers and employees. Works Engineer for the P. R. A., 
U. S. Division Engineer, Commanding General, N. W. S. C, and his equipment and 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2769 

maintenance transportation specialists, it will require tlie liigliest degree of 
intelligence and leadership of which one can conceive to unravel periodic snags, 
let alone getting the job done. This entire set-up requires immediate remedial 
action, so that the correct chain of authority is clearly defined, the greatest coop- 
eration is established, and the direction and supervision processes are simplified 
throughout. 

[12] V. PEIiSONNEI., LABOR AND MORAT.E 

1. Much of the supervisory, administrative, technical and other key personnel 
employed by the Architect-Engineers, Prime Contractors, and U. S. Engineer 
Offices is not qualified nor competent to assist in carrying out the missions which 
have been mandated to these agencies. 

A lack of specialized training on the part of these employees, which is aggra- 
vated by the poor organizational fabric of which they are made a part, causes 
many mental and physical processes to degenerate to a point where they are 
meaningless, purposeless, completely mechanical, superfluous, mutually interfer- 
ing, retardative, and generally confusion-breeding. 

Tlie recognition of these facts in the field itself, together with the knowledge of 
the excessive salaries and wages paid throughout the Command, causes a wide 
propagation of rumors, innuendos and caustic depreciations. The diatribes and 
informal indictments have reached a level which is spirit- and morale-shattering 
to say the least and has resulted in a universal bewailing stated in such terms as 
"we are bushed, suffering from frustration, destined to failure." 

2. The efficiency of labor is very low on practically all of the construction work, 
when measured in terms of the productivity of labor which obtains in the United 
States. That the efficiency of the former would be less than the latter was to be 
expected because of many conditions and circumstances peculiar to work in this 
part of the world, particularly the hardships caused by distances, climate, tem- 
peratures, topography, lack of facilities, etc. However, the unusual depth to 
which it has fallen is mainly attributable to the poor leadersliip, lack of planning 
and scheduling of work, faulty and procrastinated procurement of materials, lack 
of organization, etc. It is our unmistakable observation that the labor does want 
to and will put out if all the other elements are placed in congruity. As conditions 
are, labor is not only non-productive but its turn-over is so great that it is unneces- 
sarily costly and stymies progress. 

3. The morale of a majority of all civilians and officers engaged in the construc- 
tion task in the Northwest Service Command is as low as has ever come to our 
personal attention. This is due to all that has been stated heretofore in this 
report. As bad as the morale is, the lack of good morale is not chronic and can be 
and must be completely restored, the sooner the better. 

VI. WORK REQUIREMENTS AND WORK ACCOMPLISHMENT 

The volume of construction work in the Northwest Service Command as pro- 
vided for by the directives issued from higher authority, at the required com- 
pletion dates embodied therein, and the volume of construction work which can 
be accomplished in the same respective periods of time by the persons and 
organizations charged with the performance thereof are at such great variance 
that they cannot be reconciled. Not to recognize this, the organizations, per- 
sonnel, [13] facilities, status of materials, the weather and ground con- 
ditions being what they are, might make still more difficult the general and 
complete transmutation of all agencies from organisms of disorder and dis- 
ruption to those of hai'mony, cooperation, and attainment. 

We feel that a priority of execution of all the work by projects and by phases 
of projects should be established by higher authority, expres.sed in difinitive 
form and imposed upon all the agencies engaged in the construction task. 
Simultaneously, a review should be made of all the projects for the purpose of 
determining required completion dates which are more in consonance with 
presently existing conditions and circumstances and hence more realistic. This 
may appear as a deceleration on paper but, with the institution of corrective 
measures, will, in our opinion, bring an acceleration of all physical work-in- 
place in actuality. If the field is left to its own devices and exercises its own 
judgment ba.sed upon what are now fictitious completion dates, the lack of bal- 
ance between labor and material, the faulty sequence of transportation of ma- 
terial, and the misconception of relative significance and importance of project 
completions will become more pronounced and retard the over-all effort. 



2770 CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION PEARL HARBOR ATTACK 

To date, for the time already consumed, the physical work-in-place accom- 
plishment is meager and subnormal. Very little physical work-in-place will be 
performed during the course of the next three months because of the failure to 
plan and execute the transportation of materials and related construction work 
during the months of December 1942 and January and February 1943. A very 
substantial volume of physical work-in-place can be accomplished during the 
months of July, August. September, October and possibly November, if measures 
are taken to insure proper planning for labor, material, equipment and super- 
vision and the preparations are made to supply and transport all possible ma- 
terials and equipment between now and when the thaw sets in and as soon as 
feasible after the break-up. 

VII. MILITARY LIAISON AND COOPERATION 

A number of incidents and conditions came to our attention which reveal 
that the degree of liaison and cooperation between different divisions and 
branches of the Army having jurisdiction in contiguous theaters of activity or 
over functions in the same theater can stand considerable improvement. Cited 
as examples are : the lack of complete understanding between the Army Air 
Forces and the Corps of Engineers with respect to the construction of flight 
strips and miscellaneous facilities; the Signal Corps and the Corps of Engineers 
with respect to the design and construction of the communications system ; the 
Transportation Corps and the Northwest Service Command with respect to the 
operation and control of facilities and the methods of administration at S'kag- 
way ; the Army Air Forces and the Northwest Service Command with respect 
to the transportation of gasoline and fuel from Fairbanks to Tanana, McGrath 
and Galena. 

Based on heresay, gleaned from several conversations with a number of 
officers, it is our opinion that the cooperation between Colonel Wyman, U. S. 
Division Engineer, and Colonel Tally, Engineer for the A. D. C, is not what It 
[14] should be, nor is the cooperation between the Alaska Defense Command 
and the Northwest Service Command developed to a level which a full impregna- 
tion of the unity and sameness of purpose should bring forth. 

The liaison between the Northwest Service Command and the Division Engi- 
neer Office seems to be basically a personal one between General O'Connor and 
Colonel Wyman, to the exclusion of most of their respejctive staffs. That between 
the Division Engineer and his six District Engineers is to all intents and purposes 
practically non-existent. 

The liaison and cooperation between the Corps of Engineers and the Public 
Roads Administration hangs on very tenuous connections. The difference between 
the right men and the wrong men in the respective positions of U. S. Division 
Engineer and Field Manager of the P. R. A. will spell cooperation or conflction 
and divergence of effort. 

Vni. THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 

A. Northern Alherta Railroad and Road from Edmonton to Dawson Creek 

The Northern Alberta Railroad runs a distance of approximately 525 miles in 
a northwesterly direction from Edmonton, Alberta, to Dawson Creek, B. C. The 
topography in general permits of easy access but, notwithstanding, the line skirts 
a number of rivers and wash areas which is perhaps attributable to the desire 
in the initial construction to keep costs at a minimum. The line was completed 
to Grand Prairie in 1930 and several years later was pushed on to Dawson Creek. 
So-called "muskeg" supports much of the road bed ; hence, even at this date, the 
fills are not stable. Previous to the war approximately two trains per week were 
operated over the line except in the fall when grain was hauled south from the 
farming regions near the northern terminus. 

The entire line was largely constructed from relay rail varying from 85# 
to 55# with the majority being 65#. At the present time, numerous derailments 
are caused by cracked rail. The spacing of ties is a maximum for branch line 
construction, and it is now estimated that 50% to 75% of the ties need immediate 
replacement. No tie plates were used on tangents or curves and even some of the 
trestles are without them ; hence, numerous cases of spread gauge, and tipped 
rail delay train operations. Metal ballast is for all practical purposes non-exist- 
ent. Spring thaws cause considerable heaving and shifting of the track over the 
entire line, with the result that the last portion of the line from McLennan to 
Dawson Creek will not be in operation in the spring unless sufficient man-power 



PROCEEDINGS OF ARMY PEARL HARBOR BOARD 2771 

is available to care for every part of track day by day. Trestles were generally 
designed for approximately an E40 loading and have not been maintained. E60 
loadings are now being moved over the trestle at very reduced speeds from 3 to 5 
miles an hour. Short sidings, which are used as passing tracks only with diffi- 
culty, are provided at 16 points along the main track. 

Roundhouse facilities, passable for the use which the railroad had during peace- 
times but no mbre, exist only at Edmonton and Dawson Creek. The Dawson Creek 
roundhouse was partially burned out approximately six weeks ago. There 
[J5] is no water supply at Dawson Creek, the northern terminus of the road 
and all water must be hauled from the Pouce Coupe River approximately seven 
miles away. There are, however, approximately six sources of water along the 
line at which tankage on towers has been installed. All coaling except at Edmon- 
ton is done by hand-shoveling, although at certain points passenger locomotives 
are coaled by means of gasoline-operated cranes. 

The rolling stock actually owned by this railroad is in poor condition and of 
negligible quantity. The CPR and the CNR. however, have loaned considerable 
cars and stifficient locomotives to operate the road and are in a position to pro- 
vide all rolling stock which the road, as it is, is capable of using. 

At the present time, the railroad does not have sufficient labor available to 
maintain the track even at its now questionable condition. It is recognized that it 
will be necessary to import labor or to use troops on the maintenance of the sec- 
tion from McLennan to Dawson Creek in the spring if the road is to be kept open 
at all. With a reasonable amount of maintenance and with good luck, it is 
estimated that approximately 2000 tons per day may be moved over this road 
during the summer months. It is, however, questionable, considering the present 
state of repair, that more than 200,000 tons can be moved over the railroad in 
one operating year. In order to place the road in a position to carry the esti- 
mated capacity of the average single-track line, or approximately 4000 tons per 
day. a very considerable sum of money must be spent for delayed maintenance 
and improvements to the right-of-way and operating installations. 

At this point it is well to mention the road which now exists from Edmonton 
to Dawson Creek, with the view of using motor transportation not to supplant 
but to augment the present facilities of the Northern Alberta Railroad. This 
road is of regular cottntry-type construction, such as is found in North Dakota 
and Montana in the United States. The right-of-way is generally narrow. The 
ditching is sketchy and in a poor state of maintenance. The surface is of a soil 
generally known as gumbo. The bridges are of light construction such as is found 
on any country road. During the months of middle summer and the months of 
middle winter, the road is passable, and it is possible to operate trucks at a speed 
of approximately 20 to 25 miles an hour. During the two months of freeze-up 
and the three months of thaw, the road is to all practical purposes impassable. 
It may be said that although the terrain is relatively easy, the road compares 
unfavorably with most of Alcan Highway. If trucks are to be operated on this 
road to any considerable degree, appropriate maintenance operations must be 
initiated at once. Bridges must be reinforced, ditches cleaned and road metal 
must be placed at many sections. 

B. Dawson Creek Railhead 

The Dawson Creek Railhead as it now exists consists of a series of buildings 
.scattered along the Northern Alberta Railroad just inside and just outside the 
limits of the village of Dawson Creek itself. All constrtiction is frame except for 
a number of metal huts which are used to house troops. No water facilities, no 
sanitary facilities, and no fire protection facilities exist. The [16] layout 
obviously grew like Topsy ; that is, additional buildings were added during the 
course of the construction of the highway and later as needs developed and mani- 
fested themselves. The work was accomplished through the use of two PRA 
contractors, W. E. Elliott Construction Company and Currin & Briggs. The 
activities of the construction companies were augmented by troop labor ftirnished 
by the Second Battalion of the 341st Engineers. Facilities as now existing at this 
so-called temporary railhead are as follows : troop hou