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II hro 



rough tile year, amid the hurried flutter of calendar 
pages, Washington College kept up the pace with a concen- 
trated program of studies and activities. From earliest fall 
until tire twenty-fifth of May, each day meant new ideas, 
new interests and new bits of knowledge. Surrounded by 
history and tradition its students found those high ideals 
and worthwhile interests which make college life worth ex- 
periencing. To that in the wake of scratched off dates and 
pleasant memories the history of our Alma Mater is richer and 
her students are better for having passed this way. 




THE PEG A 



VJ 




Published by the Senior Class 
Washington. College, Chesterton, Maryland 



A 

~~ir 



DEDICAT 



TO 

DR. KENNETH S. BUXTON 

WHOSE LEARNING, SYMPATHY AND UNDERSTANDING 

BLEND 

WITH A WARM AND GENIAL PERSONALITY 

TO CREATE FOR 

THE STUDENTS OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

A BRILLIANT TEACHER OF CHEMISTRY 

AND 

A TRUE MASTER 

THE 1042 PEGASUS 

IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 





Dr. KENNETH S. BUXTON 




CAIN MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM 



WILLIAM SMITH HALL 





REID HALL 



DUNNING HALL 





BUNTING LIBRARY 



FACULTY ROW 





Dr. Gilbert Wilcox Mead 

A.B., Litt.D., Allegheny College: A.M., Columbia Univer- 
sity; L.L.D., Birmingham- Southern College: Phi Beta Kappa. 



PRESIDENT 



THE DEAN 



Dr. Frederick G. Livingood 
B.S., AlbrigKt College; Ed.M., 
Ed.D.. Harvard University. 





Dr. J. S. William Jones 
Professor of Mathematics 




Dr. Esther M. Dole 

Professor of History 

and Government 




Dr Arthur L. Davis 
Professor of German 



FACULTY 




Photo by Bachmc 
Dr. William R. Howell 
Registrar and Professor of 
Economics and Sociology 




Dr. Winton Tolles 
Professor of English 
and Public Speaking 




Dr. Julian D. Corrincton 
Professor of Biology 




Dr. Fredk. G Livincood 
Dean and Professor of 




Dr. Kenneth S. Buxton 
Professor of Chemistry 




Dr. Jesse J. Coop 
Professor of Physics 



FACULTY 





- 



Assistant Professor of 
Latin and French 



Dr. Lawrence F'ord 

Assistanl Professor of 

Modern Languages 



Mr I. Thomas Kibler 
Director of Physical Fducatk 






Mr. Frank Go 
Assistanl Professor of 
Social Science 



Miss F. T. Sxodgrass 
Assistant Professor of Education 



(*£? 




Mr I-redk. W. Dumschott 

Assistanl Professor of History 

and Government 



4ii 



Dr. Herman O. Werner. Jr. 
Assistant Professor of English 




Mr. George Ekaitis 

Assistant Professor of 

Physical Education 



Miss Amanda T. Bradley 

Dean of Women 

Assistant Professor of English 




FACULTY 




Mr. James W. Johns 
Business Manager 



Mrs. J. S. William Jones 
Assistant Librarian 




ft 



Miss Louise B. Russe 
Instructor in Music 







Mr. David Libbey 

Assistant Librarian and 

Cntaloger 




M.ss Doris T. Bell 

Instructor of Physical 

Training For Girls 



Dr. Wilbur J. Robinson 

Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics and Chemistry 




Mr. Henry E. Coleman, Jr 
Librarian 



Mr. Charles M. Synder 

Assistant Professor of Educatio 

and History 




Dr. Albert P. Kline 
Assistant Professor of Biolo 




VISITORS AND GOVERNORS 

President Gilbert W. Mead, 

e.v officio 

By Gubernatorial Appointment 
Term Expires June 1943 

Edward D. E. Rollins Ellcton 

Samuel E. Shannahan Easton 

Elias W. Nuttle Denton 

F. Stanley Porter Baltimore 

Term Expires June 1945 

S. Scott Beck Chestertown 

James W. Chapman, Jr Baltimore 

Arthur C. Humphreys Snow Hill 

T. Harris Smith Queenstow n 



Term Expires June 1947 

Avery \V. Hall Salisbury 

George A. Bunting Baltimore 

J. Millard Tawes Crisfield 

Carroll L. Dail Cambridge 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND GOVERNORS 



By Alumni Election 
Term Expires June 1942 

William D. Corddry Snow Hill 

Benjamin A. Johnson Salisbury 

R. Brice Whittington Marion Station 

Ernest A. Howard Wilmington, Del. 



Term Expires June 1944 

Hiram S. Brown Rye, N. Y. 

P. Watson Webb Cambridge 

W. Lester Baldwin Baltimore 

W. G. Jack Port Deposit 

Term Expires June t946 

Fred G. Usilton Chestertown 

Dudley G. Roe Sudlersville 

Walter S. McCord Easton 

Walter L. Wheatley Federalsburg 



The purpose of this publication is to 
collaborate, in word and picture, the spirit 
and activities of a year on the Washing- 
ton College campus. With a feeling of 
pride we, the 1942 Pegasus staff, have 
installed a new theme which we hope will 
give you a more truthful and realistic 
memory of our college. We have attempt- 
ed to build an annual which would at 
once be worthy of the graduation class 
and a credit to ourselves. With a limited 
budget, we have embodied in the book 
a seasonal motif which, we feel, will 
serve to make this volume something 
more than a mere record of fact and 
photographic album. It is not for us. how- 
ever, to judge the measure of our success. 
Our task done, we can but await the 
reception which our readers accord this 
volume. 



r /^\ FALL: Freshmen, sorority life, activities, 

j fall sports. 



WINTER: Sophomores, campus casuals, 
fraternity life, activities, publications, 
winter sports. 

SPRING: Juniors, student councils, 
O.D.K., S.S.O., spring sports. 



SUMMER: Seniors at last. 



FALL 





am 




. H. B 



Top row: Hodges, Warfiald, Garner, Barnes, Klein, Hall, II 
Horsfield. Katzenberg, Llewellyn. Wilkinson. 

Middle row: Ockrymiek, Horowitz, Thornton, Everngam, F. Der 
Dinger, Horn, Merriken, Cooksey. Goodwin, Falardeau, Ha/Jolt. 

Bottom row: Hastings, Lowery, Horner, Connors, Lerner. Ion 
Nash. Brockson. 

Top row: Earthrowe. Kirbv. J. Derringer, Stromberg. L. Johnston. Car\ 
R. Berry. Cohen. Woodford, Pretlvman, R. English. Sutton. Parris, Twnpack. 

Middle row: Sheppard. Packman, Gardner, H. Gill. Ward, Ocker. Ba 
Sutherland. Lumpkin. Gilland. Edwards. Hignult. Boiling. H. English. Caine. 

Bottom row: Newton. Copeland, Crew. Schillinger. Reindollar. Lent*. Logan. Loll. Neighbor. Mack 
Olsen, Wilson. Lewis. 



hcock, Borrow.. Shmnamon, Voitn, 

iger, Broadwater, Graber. Leaverton, 
Boiko. Reed, Dorsey. Pierce, 
Grove. Bosc. Payne. I. Gill. 
, Harnischfeger, J. Johnston. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



In breathless excitement and eager anticipa- 
tion we arrived on "the hill. We were green, 
ot course, but we immediately responded to the 
attraction of the friendly college. Shortly, we 
watched the whirl of Freshman Week subside, 
sadly reconciling ourselves to the grind of 
classes. In prompt succession the rigors of rat- 
ting descended, atoned for in full measure by 
our decisive victory over the sophomores in the 
annual football game, tug-of-war, and tie-up— 
the first class ever to achieve all three victories. 

Some of our members were fast grooming 
themselves for places in our imaginary Hall of 
Fame: Bill Loll, varsity football; Jerry Voith, 
varsity basketball; Joan Johnston for ' Smilin 
Through." 



Exams nearly wrecked us. However, from the 
scrambled ruin we managed to sort out and 
elect Roger Berry, Student Council representa- 
tive: Norman Tarr, class president; Pete Shin- 
namon, vice president; Joan Conners, secretary; 
Bill Carver, treasurer; and Vivian Dinger, Reid 
Hall Council representative. 

Not so much do we dwell on the year 1945, 
for it is evident to us that we must attune our- 
selves to the emergency of the day. We feel we 
have within us the makings of an answer to 
whatever "the hill may demand of us. We 
came with high hopes and in the same vein 
we envision a bright bid of promise for the 
future. 



FROSH LIFE 



Rat traps, pigtails, pillowcases. College life had 
really begun, after a preliminary social whirl 
called "Freshman Week," with the ratting of the 
Freshman girls, and the boys quaking in their 
shoes, awaiting thir own hazing. When it started, 
what mournful faces! Finally the anticipated Pa- 
jama Parade came. What sport to crawl around 
High Street with only an egg for company! No- 
body suffered from his experiences but many a 
Frosh began his year in a more humble manner 
than was expected. 



Faculty Reception . . . Pigtails, rat traps, etc. . . . Shoe hunt 
. . . Revenge at last ... A wet day for the Sophs. 





Stouffer. Hammond. Tliornion. Do 
sev. Nash. Boiling. Johnston. Suite 
land, Harnischfeger. 



Broadwater. Reindollar, Olson, Hig- 
nult. Everngam. Connors. 



SORORITY LIFE 



s. Neighbor. Dinger. Grabe 
Riedy. Ocker. 



After rushing, pledging, and initiation, 
each year some twenty girls become mem- 
bers of one of the three national social 
women's fraternities. With rooms in Wil- 
liam Smith Hall, as headquarters, the sor- 
orities sponsor dances and parties, do 
social service work, encourage concen- 
trated study and seek to build up ideals 
and friendships that will last throughout 
a sorority girl s life. 




Lefl io right: E. Peters, P. Peters, Blackwood, Humphreys. Dukes, Steele 



PAN HELLENIC COUNCIL 

President Mary Liz Humphreys 

Secretary Ellen Peters 

Treasurer Minor Steele 

With the establishment of the three National Sororities, the 
National Panhellenic Council was formed in 193iS. The ohject of 
the council is the maintenance of a high place of sorority life and 
inter-sorority relationship, to co-operate with college authorities in 
their effort to maintain high social and scholastic standards 
throughout the whole college. The council accomplishes this 
through forums on the discussion of sorority problems. 

The council sponsors a tea at the beginning of the year to intro- 
duce the freshmen to the sorority girls and three forums are held 
to acquaint the freshmen with the sororities. 

They sponsor an inter-sorority dance, which is one of the big 
social events of the year. 

Most particularly, the council governs rushing on the campus. 
They have made regulations which cover next year s rush period 
and they formulate certain policies which are carried out by the 
three sororities. 



ALPHA 



President Mary Elizabeth Humphreys 

Vice-President Mary Blackwood 

Treasurer Frances Kreeger 

Recording Secretary Helen Marie Culver 

Corresponding Secretary Sarah Speicher 

Sorore In Facilitate 
Miss Florence T. Snodgrass 

Hostesses 

Mrs. Thomas Kibler Mrs. Frances Perry Metcalfe 

Mrs. Julian Corrington Mrs. Charles Kingsley 

Mrs. Maurice BarroII Mrs. Richard Collins 

Mrs. Winton ToIIes Mrs. Fred Dumschott 

Mrs. Frank Goodwin 

Sorores In Collegio 

1942 
Sara Blackwood Mary Elizabeth Humpreys 

Ellen Bordley Frances Kreeger 

Sarah Speicher 

1945 
Mary Blackwood Dian Hubbard 

Helen Marie Culver Frances Harris 

Lois Stevens 

1944 
Claire Cregar Mary Louise Truslow 

Ann Rouse Gretchen Smith 

Peggy Wolcott 

1945 
Peggy Bauer Vivian Dinger 

Jean Graber 

Pledges 
Grace Neighbour Miriam Ocker 

Dorothv Riedv 



BETA PI CHAPTER 

Founded at De Pauiv University, 1885 

Established at Washington College, 1957 

National President: MRS. CARL I. WINSOR 



CHI OMEGA 



'<p ,- 







tjjjfNtiWlfa 



ALPHA 



President .Minor Steele 

Vice-President Virginia Hoopes 

Treasurer Margaret Anne Dukes 

Recording Secretary Eleanor White 

Corresponding Secretary Ann Gordon 

Sorore in Facultate 
Mrs. J. S. William Jones 

Hostesses 

Mrs. Arthur Brown Mrs. Elias Nuttle 

Mrs. Jesse J. Coop Mrs. E. Clarke Fontaine 

Mrs. Howard Dana Mrs. Lawrence Ford 

Mrs. Bonwell Dukes Miss Louise Russell 

Mrs. Donald Stam 

Sorores in Collegio 

1942 
Virginia Hoopes Ann Cordon 

Minor Steele 

1943 
Betty Dockhorn Margaret Anne Dukes 

Eleanor White 

1944 
Mildred Powers Louise Hammond 

1945 
Ann Boiling Ruth Johnson 

Joan Johnston Betty Nash 

Eleanor Harnischfeger Alice Sutherland 

Marie Thornton 

Pledge 
Grace Stouffer 



SIGMA TAU CHAPTER 

Founded at Barnard College, 1897 

Established at Washington College, 1938 

National President: HELEN HALLER 



O M I C R O N PI 




Z E T A 



President Ellen Peters 

Vice-President Alice Johanns 

Treasurer Naomi Russell 

Recording Secretary Virginia Cooper 

Corresponding Secretary Betty Hill 

So/ore in Facultate 
Dr. Esther M. Dole 



Hoste: 



ses 



Mrs. Preston P. Heck Mrs. H. O. Werner 

Mrs. Arthur L. Davis Mrs. C. M. Snyder 

Mrs. Hiram S. Brown Mrs. J. B. Whitworth 

Mrs. Frank M. Dick Miss Anne B. Smith 

Mrs. W. A. McGregor Mrs. George Keester 

Mrs. George Baldwin 

Sorores in Collegio 

19-12 
Alice Johanns Lanny Russell 

1945 

Virginia L. Cooper Phyllis Peters 

Ann Fenderson Naomi Russell 

Ellen Peters Ruth Smith 

1944 
Frances Frary Betty Lohmulier 

Betty Hill Laura Rainey 

Irma Rogers 

1945 

Ruth Broadwater Charlotte Hignutt 

Joan Connors Mary Lou Lumpkin 

Mariana Everngam Harriet Olsen 

Dorothy Reindollar 

Pledge 
Ellen Edwards 



GAMMA BETA CHAPTER 

Founded at Virginia State Normal School, 1898 

Established at Washington College, 1958 

National President: MRS. HAROLD HILL HELPER 



TAU ALPHA 




lb 










Y. M. C. A. 



FIRST SEMESTER OFFICERS 

President William Nagler 

Vice-President Atlee Kepler 

Secretary Charles Nairn 

Treasurer Elroy Bover 

Sergeant-at-arms Francis Taylor 

Librarian Vernon Dovvlinc 

SECOND SEMESTER OFFICERS 

President ChARLES Nairn 

Vice-president Elroy Boyer 

Secretary John R. Smith 

Treasurer Harry Roe 

5ergeant-at-arms Branch Warfield 

Librarian Francis Shinnamon 




Sitting, front row: A. Horner. Roe, 
Pierce. Meiscr. Smith. Alteri. 

Second row: Wood. Boyer. Nairn. 
Nagler. Kepler. Mover. Dowling. 
D. Horner. 

Standing- Maguire. MacHale. 
Harris. Gorman. Nowak. Clark. Bur- 
rows. Shinnamon. Livingston. Hors- 
field. Warfield, Lyon, Andrews. 



This year as in the past the Y.M.C.A. has continued as an 
important service organization on the Washington College 
Campus. 

Among the numerous activities of the organization are the 
sponsoring of tennis and ping pong tournaments, the decoration ol 
p. Christmas tree at Yuletide. the distribution of flowers on Mother s 
Day and the conducting of Freshman Week activities. As a further 
service the "Y" also sold soft drinks and hot dogs at the football 
games. 

During the year members were sent to Washington, D. C, 
and Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania as representatives in 
youth conferences. 

At the annual "Y" assembly this year, senior awards for four 
years' service were presented to William Nagler, Basil Clark, Atlee 
Kepler, John Harris, Henry Maguire, and Robert Livingston. 



Y. W. C. A. 



President Phyllis Peters 

Vice-president Norma Murray 

Secretary Molly Blackwood 

Treasurer Mary Nardi 




The Y.W.C.A. is an organization which does a lot but says 
little. It appoints "big sisters to help the Freshmen over that ori- 
entation period called "Freshman Week. It began an employment 
agency as a service to the town people and to help the girls earn 
spending money. The National Secretary visited the campus and 
as a residt the Y.W.C.A. of Washington College was given full 
participative membership. Delegates were sent to a National Citi- 
zenship Seminar at Washington, D. C, the first time the local 
group attempted anything of that sort. In tune with war work the 
"\ " did knitting for the Red Cross and gave part of the funds to 
war relief in China. 

The features of this year s program were Vespers and joint meet- 
ings with the Y.M.C.A. The discussions were built around the 
parables of Jesus and various plans of a reorganization after the 
peace. 



Silting. First row: Burrell. Johnson 
Broadwater. Goodwin, Nardi. 

Second row: Starr. Blackwood 
Wood. P. Peters. Murray. Latham 
Lohmuller. Waesche. Frary. Rogers 

Standing: Ward. Gilland. Dinger 
Merriken. Graher. Fenderson. E 
Peters. Cooper, Petry. Hignutt 




Standing: Clark. Nairn. Horner. Lyon, Murphv. 
Silting: Smith, Starr. Petry. M. Blackwood, Ga 



Naglcr, S. Blackwood. Lohmullcr. Wood. 



MOUNT VERNON SOCIETY 



President Mort Garrison 

Vice-president William Nacler 

Treasurer Molly Blackwood 

The Mount Vernon Literary Society is trie oldest society on 
the campus, celebrating its ninety-fifth anniversary this year. Still 
an active organization, it provides casual discussion, relaxation, and 
good refreshments at its monthly meetings. 

The programs have included such ambitious feats as play 
production and original literary works in the early days of the soci- 
ety's existence to book revues and discussions of various phases of 
literature in our more hurried times. This season, topics that will 
form the basis for future literature were discussed by Mr. Snyder 
in a talk on South American relations. Dr. Werner showed the 
effect of the Greek chorus by recorded excerpts of the dramas. As 
has been the custom of the society, the members entered into a 
close contest of wits in a literary quiz. 

The purpose of the society has been to foster an active interest 
in literature among the students and the faculty to whom there is 
always extended a cordial welcome. The members, like Chaucer s 
Clerk of Oxford, are glad to learn and teach. 



President Calvert Jones. Jr. 

Honorary President Dr. Esther M. Dole 

Vice president Phil Souder 

Secretary Molly Burrell 

Treasurer George Coppace 

The aims of the Society are to collect and preserve items of historical interest 
of our state, our country, and particularly of our college, to cooperate in this effort 
with local and county historical societies, and further to give students of history an 
opportunity to pursue studies of special interest to them outside of class. 

This year the Society framed its first constitution. It was accepted by the Stu- 
dent Council. Just before Christmas, the annual Christmas Party was held in Hod- 
son Hall and it was at that time that the Society voted to drop all previous plans in 
favor of serving the College during the period of the emergency. A series of lectures 
entitled, "The Crisis,' were given at two-week intervals. Various members of the 
faculty delivered the lectures which were designed to inform the students on the 
various phases of the crisis and how it affected them. 

The first of these lectures was delivered by the Society in the form of a quiz 
program at their annual assembly program. President Jones was the quiz-master. 

At the end of the lecture series, the Society adopted a program of a minimum 
of meetings in order that they could cooperate with the College Administration in 
reducing extra-curricular activities to a minimum. 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Silling: Burrell. Gilland, Olsen. Nash. Thornton. Jones. Pritchard. Johnson. Bishop. Hotchliss. 
Standing: Broadwater. Latham. Stromberg. Rothermel, Walbert. Hignutt. Coppage. Horner. E. Peters. 
Bartolini. Brulz. Hubbard. 




FOOTBALL 



In spite of a record of 5 wins, 5 losses, and 
one tie. Coach George Ekaitis maroon eleven 
can boast a very successful season. Washing- 
ton remained a constant threat to all of its op- 
ponents, win or lose. A survey of the scores, as 
on page 55, is evidence of the fact that only 
in the P.M.C. game was the "Big Red" out- 
classed. 

Probably the most exciting and well-played 
game of the season was the 2-0 victory over 
Mt. St. Mary's After holding the Mounts time 
after time at the goal line, Washington turned 



the tide and completely outfought Mt. St. 
Mary s for three quarters. The deciding issue 
came when co-captain, Al Dudderar, crashed 
through the Mounts line and tackled a Mount 
punter behind his own goal line for a safety. 
Special notice should also be brought to the 
final Delaware game where the Washington 
eleven outplayed the highly favored Delaware 
squad and after leading 6-0 for better than 
three quarters, lost the ball game as a result of 
two interceptions and one long forward pass 
by the Blue Hens. Games like these managed 




to keep the support and interest of the school 
in constant favor. 

Outstanding individuals on the team are 
seen in co-captains. Dudderar and Kirby, Dud- 
derar gaining All-Maryland Center laurels. 
Messick, McLaughlin. Brandt, and Macielag 
performed well in the backfield. Lew Yerkes 
deserves special praise in gaining a unanimous 
All-Maryland choice and a backfield position 
on the Little Ail-American. Bill Benjamin 
and Freshman Bill Loll were big factors in the 
Maroon s success. Linemen who held their 
own in all the ball games were guard and co- 
captain, Kirby: tackles Sinclair, Riedy, and 



Steele; and guards Gibe and Dougherty. 
Capable reserves were seen in Novvak, Gray 
Juliana in the backlield; with Warther and 
Mackrell in the line. 

With only Kirby, Dudderar and Riedy grad- 
uating, possibilities for a still more successful 
season next year loom high. 





SEASONS RECORD 




Washington . 


6 


Johns Hopkins . . . 





Washington . 





Randolph Macon . 


13 


Washington . 


26 

6 






Washington . 


P.M.C 


00 


Washington . 





Ursinus 




Washington . 


Mt. St. Marvs ... 





Washington . 


f . 


Delaware 


.... 18 




Bottom Ron,: Nowal. Loll. Gibe. Macielag. Dougherty 
R. Kirby. Dudderar. Riedv. Benjamin. Second Rou. 
Sladc. Hoba... Benjamin. Brandt. Sinclair. Steele. Jack 
son. McLaughlin. Yerkes. Tfurd Row: Morgan. Svec 




VARSITY CLUB 



President Francis McNiff 

Yice-Piesiclent Albert Dudderar 

Secretary-Treasurer James Stevens 




Top Row: Jackson. Gibe, Si le, Miles, Brandt. Patterson. 

Middle Row: Yerkes, Warther. Sinclair, Macielag, Benjamin. Maguire. Carter. 
Bottom Row: Bartolini. Dudderar. McNiff. Stevens. Kirby. Riedy. 



MEMBERS 



David Bartolini 
Robert Carter 
Albert Dudderar 
James Dougherty 
Jolm Harris 



Ray field Kirby 
Henry Maguire 
Francis McNiff 
Wilbur Patterson 
Wilson Riedy 



Xelson Sold 



Pbilip Souder James Stevens 

Marlin Storm 



Walter Brandt Onmar Jackson 

William Benjamin Southey Miles 

Martin Wartber 

10-14 
Frank Gibe Frank Samele 

Frank Macielag Raymond Sinclair 

Lewis Yerkes 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

President Virginia Hoopes 

Vice president FRANCES KreegeR 

Secretary-Treasurer Naomi Russell 

Senior Members Catherine Newton. Minor Steele 

Junior Memoers. .Molly Blackwood. Helen Marie Culver 

Sopbomore Member Laura Rainev 

Fresbmar. Member Anne Bolling 



Members al Large, 

Betty Dockhorn, Mar 



va Everncam. Fra 




Bottom Row: Newton, Steele, Hoopes. 

Second Row: Blackwood. Harris. Culver, Dockhorn. Russe 

Top Row: Boiling, Rainey, Everngam. 



The Board of Managers of the Women's 
Athletic Association is elected by the entire 
association and is made up of representatives 
from each class along with three members at 
large. Holding a meeting every two weeks, the 
Board became a very active organization this 
year and accomplished much. 

The work of this group of girls is quite va- 
ried—ranging from selling candy at football 
games to selecting the honorary varsity at the 
end of each major sport season. At the end of 



the year the Board makes a sen.'or award (a 
beautiful maroon and black blanket) to those 
girls who have participated in two major sports 
for four years, have been a member of the Hon- 
orary Varsity in at least one sport; and have 
obtained their maroon YV by accumulating 
one thousands points in a year. 

Besides raising money for the association and 
recognizing superior ability displayed by teams 
and individuals, it tries to promote good sports- 
manship, fair play, and an interest in girls 
athletics on the campus. 




-£$ €%M£i 



i LA ia^^^^jiit^U.- tl^J 





Left to Right: Nash. E. Newton. Nardi. C. Newton. Hoopes, Culver, Stevens, Harris. 
Raincy, Rogers, Waesche. 

GIRLS' HOCKEY 

Hockey, long a major sport at Washington College, became 
still more popular this year with keen competition between the class 
teams. The Freshmen started the season by defeating the Sopho- 
mores 1-0. The surprise of the year was the Seniors unexpected 
victory over last year s champions, the Juniors, 4-0. The next 
game was hotly contested with the Juniors tying the Freshmen 
0-0. The following game found the Juniors and Sophomores fight- 
ing on even terms through forty long minutes with the final score 
tied 1-1. Kitty Newton was high scorer of the season. 

Receiving places on this year's varsity team were: Mary Nardi, 
Ginny Hoopes, Kitty Newton, Frances Kreeger, Helen Marie Cul- 
ver, Irma Rogers, Lois Stevens, Laura Rainey, Frances Harris, 
Sally Waesche, and Betty Nash. This team is chosen annually by 
the Board of Managers and is composed of those girls who are 
outstanding in their respective positions. 




N T E Ft 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



We are at that uncertain age now where we and we are very proud of their success. It was 

have outgrown our freshmen peculiarities, but Inn, too, to be on the other end of rushing and 

have not yet gained the prestige and privileges ratting-to see the freshmen bow and scrape at 



of true upperclassmen. 

Last year was a successful one, especially in 
the field of athletics. We tried our best to take 
ratting and rushing in our stride and to make a 
name for the class of 44. 

Now as Sophomores we present an even bet- 
ter record on the athletic field. Lew ^ erkes and 
Frank Gibe started on the Big Red eleven and 
Lew was unanimously elected to the All-Mary- 
land football team. In basketball we contrib- 
uted three big names — ^ erkes. Gibe and Samele 



the cry of Air Raid! We were not very suc- 
cessful in the Freshmen-Sophomore football 
game and the Free-for-all cannot be included 
as one of our victories. These defeats have not 
dampened our spirit, however, nor ruined our 
newly acquired dignity. Our girls have made 
up for them by making the Varsity Hockey 
Team and by holding up the scholastic end of 
college life. 

We are looking forward to a big future in 
our remaining years on the Hill— may they be 
as much fun as the two just passed! 



Bottom Row: Crouch. LokmuIIer, Roe, Latham. Pole. Sylvester, MacHale. Rainey. Morgan, Phillips. 
Eisner. G. Smith. R. Hill. Frary, Rossherg. B. Hill. Parks. 

Second Row: C. Lynch. Hess, Lyon, Evans. Applegarth, Kurze. Mver, Rogers, Waesche. Cregar. 
Lochmar. Stunhlefielcl. Truslow. Rouse. Riedv, Sunderland, Emich. Williams.' J. Smith. McLaughlin. Juliana. 
Andrews, Dowling, Rothermel. 

Top Row: Sharrer. Thomas. Gifce. Johnson. Wieneke, D. Lynch. Nowak. Yerkes. Sinclair, Macielag. 
Conant. Freeman. Corddry. Porter, Steele. Lytwyn, Ruff. Howard. Paldcr. Pletts. Healey. 





All College Night . . . Waitin. 
American Elm . . . Blue Monday . . . Bennetts after the dance 
. . . Same old line Smith? . . . Welcome back Ginny . . . Bull 
session . . . Carney studying? . . . Outstanding scientist . . . Wild 
Willy the Wheeler . . . Eating again, Phyllis . . . Convalescent? 
. . . Merrily we go to gym . . . Now Joan . . . We work tooo . . . 
Surprised Dave? . . . Campus couple . . . No practice today . . . 
Candidate Alpha ... a la fern me 46 . . . Y.M.C.A. changes 
hands. 



WE HAVE FUN, TOO! 




Johnson. Dudde 
Barlolini. 



Wood. Davis. I. Smith, Sohl. Mile 
G. Garrison. 



Maguirc. Corlev. Littlelon. Clark. 
D. Smidi. Murphy. 



FRATERNITY LIFE 



Centered around three national social 
fraternities, fraternity life at Washington 
College plays an important part in 
campus activities. Approximately seventy- 
five men find recreation, social contacts, 
and scholastic aid in the various fraternity 
houses. Having been based on sound prin- 
ciples and high ideals the Greeks should 
continue to prove themselves a necessary 
part of the college organization. 




Left to right: Clark, Lore. Murphy. Johnson. Smith. Kaylor. Bartolmi, Parris, Davis. 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

President Donald W. Smith 

Vice -president Rufus Johnson 

Secretary-Treasurer Nelson Kaylor 



The interfraternity council was organized for the purpose or 
promoting the interest of the college, and of three fraternities rep- 
resented on the campus; for insuring amiable cooperation between 
the various fraternities; and of maintaining efficient relations with 
the administration. 

The Council consists of the presidents and vice-presidents of 
each fraternity, and one junior for each house. 

The principle activities of the Council are the regulation of 
fraternity rushing, the selection of a date for silence period, the 
awarding of an interfraternity basketball trophy, and the sponsor- 
ing of the interfraternity dance. 



T H E T A 



E.r Arch Lloyd R. Davis 

Vice Ex Arc/i James Diocumakos 

Graphite Elroy G. Boyer 

Treasurer Albert Mooney 

Marshal Harry Lore 

Chaplain Ernest Laramore 

Praters in Facilitate 
Mr. Frank Goodwin Mr. Arthur Brown 

Fralers in Collegia 

1942 

Lloyd Davis Ernest Laramore 

James Diocumakos Harry Lore 

Robert Garrison Francis Mead 

Donald Horner Nelson Son! 
Edgar Wood 

1943 
Elroy Bover William Roe 

Nelson Kaylor Paul Ruark 

Southey Miles Harry Slade 

Albert Mooney Robert Thawley 

Martin Wartber 

1944 

Gilbert Conant Eugene Johnson 

Frank Evans James Metcalf 

Frank Gibe Harry Roe 

Pledges 

Roger Berry John Hitchcock 

Edward Bosc Warren Hodges 

William Carver Ted Lytwyn 

Robert Grove William Prettyman 

Turner Hastings Irving Smith 
Lee Wilkinson 



Founded at Norwich University. 1856 
Established at Washington College, 1940 

Ex Arch: EARL D. RHODES 



C H I 






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•** — 



LAMBDA 



High Alpha Basil W. Clark 

High Beta Donald W. Smith 

High Gamma Charles B. Nairn, Jr. 

High Tau Andrew R. Gorman 

High Epsilon Austin R. Murphy, Jr. 

High Pi Dr. Jesse J. Coop 

High Phi Robert K. Crane 

Fraters in Facilitate 
Dr. Jesse J. Coop Dr. William H. Howell 

Dr. Frederick G. Livingood 



Fraters in Collegia 



Laurence S. Brice 
Robert E. Carter 
Basil C. Clark 
Robert N. Corley 
Robert K. Crane 
Thomas Eliason 
Mortimer Garrison 



1942 



John A. Harris 
Atlee C. Kepler 
Oliver W. Littleton 
Henry F. Maguire 
William M. Nagler 
Donald W. Smith 
John W. Smith 



Michael Alteri 
Calvin Carney 
Andrew R. Gorman 



Austin R. Murphy, Jr. 
Charles B. Nairn, Jr. 
Francis Taylor, Sr. 



James H. Emich 
Charles E. Rothermel 
Theodore Kurze 



Rudolph Parks 
Robert A. Ruff 
Gaylord Steele 



John R. Smith, Jr. 



Terrence Burrows 
Harold English 
Russell English 
Robert Hors field 
Paul Llewellyn 



Pledge 



Jack MacHale 
Robert Pierce 
Francis Shinnamon 
Branch Warfield 
Walter E. Woodford, Jr. 



EPSILON THETA ZETA 

Founded at Boston University, 1909 

Established at Washington College, 1937 

Grand High Alpha: RUSSELL SHETTERLY 



CHI ALPHA 





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KAPPA 



/ David Bartolini 

// Philif B. Souder 

111 Rufus C. Johnson 

IY Wilbert T. Patterson 

Y .Norman E. Sharrer 

\ 7 J. Leonard Parris 

YH A. Rayfield Kirby 

Ylll Edwin R. Boyer 

/X Albert Dudderar 

Praters in Facilitate 
Dr. J. S. William Jones Mr. Frederick Dumschott 

Mr. J. Thomas Kibler 

F raters in Col/egio 

19-42 

David Bartolini A. Rayfield Kirov 

R. Albert Dudderar William W. Paca 

Rufus C. Johnson Wilbert T. Patterson 

J. Calvert Jones, Jr. Wilson Riedy 

John B. Kardash Philip B. Souder 

19-13 

Edwin R. Boyer S. Omar Jackson 

Walter Brandt Harold O. Martin 

Peter J. DePalma J. Leonard Parris 

19-44 

James N. Juliana Herbert J. Morgan 

Frank Macielag Norman E. Sharrer 

Judson Williams 

Pledges 

Carl Brutz Robert Munyan 

William Hoban Albert Nowak 

Cuy Lerner James Stevens 

Valentine Lentz Norman Tarr 

William Loll Francis Twupack 

Gerard Voith 



BETA OMEGA CHAPTER 

Founded at Wasningron ana Lee, 1865 

Established at Washington College, 1936 

Knight Commander: JOHN R. BERRYMAN, JR. 



ALPHA 



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ORCHESTRA 




Student Director Mort Garrison 

Librarian Donald McClelland 

Faculty Director Dr. F. G. Livinoood 



VIOLINS 

Norman Sharrer 
Ruth Johnson 
Lucilla Latham 
Charles Dulin 

CLARINETS 

Elmer Thomas 
James Crouch 
Clarence Valentine 

SAXOPHONES 

Jack Hitchcock 
Tea Hazlett 
Charles Rothermel 
Vernon Reed 



Lee Wilkinson 
Marie Sylvester 

TROMBONES 

Paul Ruark 
Donald McClelland 

BASSOON 

Robert Livingston 

TRUMPETS 

Herbert Morgan 
John Russell 

PIANO 

Sarah Speicher 



DRAMATICS 




Sitting: F 
Cooper. Magui 

Standing: 
Falardeau. Se< 
Lyon. 



ont Row: Gilland, Burrcll. Hill. Fran. Smith, Boiling. Second Row: Palder. Blackwood. Davis. 
re. DePalma, Petrv. Pierce. 

Front Row: Roe. Lachmar. Goodwin. Truslow, Graher, Hotchhiss. Dinger. Johnston. J. Smith. 
ond Row: Horsfield. Parks. Parris. D. Smith. Warfield. Macielag. Berry. Thomas. Johnston. 

THE WASHINGTON PLAYERS 

TIME: September-May 
PLACE: "the friendly college" 

CAST OF CHARACTERS: not especially in order of appear- 
ance : 

President Henry Maguire 

Vice-President Lloyd Davis 

Secretary Virginia Cooper 

Business Manager Peter De Palma 

Stage Manager Ed Palder 

Properties Manager Molly Blackwood 

Make-up Manager Miss Doris Bell 

Act I 
VILLIAN STEALTHILY APPROACHES, RUBBING HIS 

HANDS TOGETHER (Players drew up year's calendar of 
events; plunged determinedly into Irish dialect and ghostly appari- 
tions of Smilin Through; sent to the annual National Dramatic 
Conference at the University of Delaware representatives who saw 
Saroyan s new play Jim Dandy; represented best assembly pro- 
gram of year with The Devil and Daniel Webster); AHA, ME 

PROUD BEAUTY! 

Act II 
LITTLE NELL SHRINKING AWAY IN ABJECT TERROR 

(Players sponsored two one-act plays before annual Christmas 
party; devised a constitution to replace the one lost two years 
ago; set the wheels in motion for the inter-class plavs) : NO. NO, 

A THOUSAND TIMES NO! 

ACT III 
HERO STRIDING IN. SEIZING THE VILLIAN BY THE 

SCRUFF OF THE NECK (Players invited neighboring college 
to produce invitation plays; presented another three-act play; can- 
celled the third one because of the increased hours for the second 
semester; struggled on for better equipment) ; HALT, YOU CUR! 

VILLIAN: COISES! FOILED AGAIN! 
CURTAIN 

Encores for faithful support to Dr. Tolles, Miss Doris Bell. Henrv 
Maguire, Pete De Palma. Ed Palder. Molly and Snooks Black- 
wood. 



SOCIETY OF SCIENCES 

President James Diacumokus 

Vice President Mary Liz Humphreys 

Secretary Francis Taylor 

Treasurer Naomi Russell 

Sergeant at Arms Mary KlNTNER 

Tke Society of Sciences is an organization composed of 
Chemists, Biologists and Physicists of Washington College. Its 
purpose is to foster a better relationship between the student body 
and the sciences. 

The society presented many interesting programs during the 
year. Guest speakers included faculty members and outsiders. 

As a new accomplishment the group sponsored a very inter- 
esting and educational assembly program. Many members partici- 
pated in a dramatic sketch of the scientific view of Our Town 
which not only proved a definite scientific accomplishment but 
also a dramatic masterpiece. 

Due to the accelerated program the scheduled trips to Frank- 
lin Institute in Philadelphia and to Smithsonian Institute in 
Washington had to be cancelled. 




Front Row: Russell. Diacumalcos, Humphreys. Kinlner. Taylor. 
Second Row: Engel. Dr. Coop. Dr Buxton. Sleiser. Rossberg. J. Smith. 
Third Row: Rothermel; Petrv. Maguire. Shinnamon. Falardeau. Horner. Kirwan. 
Fourth Row: DcPalma. Cooksey, Lewis. Slromberg. Packman. Rogers. Lore. Kurze. 
Fifth Row: Steffens, Jones. Mackrell, Juliana. Everngam. Meyer, Dowling. Hodges. 
Sixth Row: English. Harnischfeger, Harris. Johnston, Mooney, Pretlyman, Roe, Evans. 
Seventh Row: Rcindollar. Littleton. Hagler. LohmuIIer, Conant, Warther, Metcalfe 
Eighth Row: Gorman. R. English, Johanns, D. Smith, Sharrer. 



Palcle 



Again this year the society organized an exhibit in Dunning 
Hall for the public. Lectures and demonstrations were given as 
usual. 

At the commencement exercises the society presented, as is its 
custom, an award to the graduating science major with the highest 
honors in any of the three fields offered at Washington College. 

Much of the Society of Sciences success is due to the guid- 
ance of their faculty advisers. Dr. K. Buxton, Dr. J. Corrington, 
Dr. J. Coop, Dr. W. Robinson, and Dr. Kline. 



PAUL E. TITSWORTH DEBATE CLUB 



President Robert Holdt 

Vice-President Pat Patterson 

Secretary-Treasurer Marry I 1> er 

Business Manager Nelson Kavi.or 

The first meeting of the Paul E. Titsworth Debate Club in Oc- 
tober found a strong infection of new blood present, particularly 
from the Freshmen class. Plans were made by Manager Kaylor 
for an extensive schedule of inter-collegiate debates with colleges 
and universities of Pa.. Va.. Md., N. Y., and N. J. For the instruc- 
tion of new members a series of practice debates was held within 
the club. Most meetings found several individuals called upon to 
do a bit of extemporaneous speaking as a practice for Oregon 
style debates. 




Silting: Meyer, Kavlor. D. Horner. Diacumakos. Bover. Patterson. 

Standing: Applegarth. Goodwin. Johnston. H. Roe. Johnston. Holdt. Dowling. Boiling. Starr. W. Ro 



The activities of the second semester were begun by the election 
of a new president, necessitated by the drafting of Mr. Souder. 
In accordance with the administration's request to curtail extra- 
curricular activities, the club voted to abandon the regular sched- 
ule of debates and concentrate on intra-club activities and speaking 
engagements in the vicinity of the college. However, a radio debate 
with Salisbury State Teachers College was not cancelled, since 
preparations for it had already been completed. 

The last three months saw members of the Debate Club speak- 
ing at schools and meetings of town and county organizations, 
affording all participants much excellent experience, which, it is 
hoped, will be put to good use next year when other collegiate 
debaters are opposed by practiced Washington College speakers. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 



President Sara D. Blackwood 

Vice-President Marjorie Starr 

Secretary Molly Blackwood 

Treasurer Mortimer Garrison 

Sergeant at -/Arms Atlee Kepler 



The Cercle Francais, organized on the Washington College 
campus in 1935, is one of the youngest and rapidly growing organ- 
izations on the "Hill." With Dr. Lawrence Ford as a guide, the 
society is going forward in the study of the French life and culture. 

The monthly meetings are conducted in French and all mem- 
bers participate, giving each a more understanding grasp of the 
French language. 

The aims of the society are the dissemination of French cul- 
ture and to make French a felt and spolcen language among its 
students. The meetings and projects are planned with this in view. 

Because of the accelerated scholastic program, the Cercle has 
been forced to curtail some of its activities; therefore, the French 
play which heretofore has been given every spring in conjunction 
with the Dramatic Club has been omitted this year. However, we 
expect it to be resumed at a future date. 

Those eligible for membership in the society are those who 
have completed four semesters work in the French language. 



Standing: Alter!. Rouse. Kepler. 
Sitting: Bishop. Cooper. E. Peters, Bun 



Sewell, Starr, S. Blackwood. G 



Wood. M. Blackwood, 




CLASSICAL SOCIETY 



Proese Mahjorie Starr 

Scriba Eleanor Winn 

Quaestor Aerarius Joan Tischer 

Socci Honoris Causa 
Dr. Gilbert W. Mead Miss Florence T. Sondgrass 

Dr. Esther M. Dole Mrs. Clara S. Solandt 

Dr. H. O. Werner Dr. Albert P. Kline 

The Classical Society, sponsored by Professor Solandt, was 
organized in 1933 for Latin students and others interested in the 
classics. Its purpose is to foster these interests on an enjoyable 
intellectual level. 

This past year the society has been fortunate in securing a 
variety of programs directed by Robert Holdt. Mortimer Garrison 
and Minor Steele. Dr. lolles spoke on "Matthew Arnold and the 
Classics. The December meeting was devoted to a Christmas 
party. Dr. Werner spoke on "The Influence of Plutarch on Shake- 
speare. Interested Iriends of members of the society were present 
as guests of honor from time to time. Refreshments in charge of 
Joan Tischer were served during the informal discussions following 
the meeting. 



Sitting: Graber. Blackwood. Steele. Tischer. Starr. Se 
Standing: Burrows. Lyon. Garrison. Horner. 



Ho 



es. Patterson. Prof. Solandt. 





Sitting: Blackwood. Russell. Jones. Johnson. Kreeger. Val- 

Standing. Front Row- E. Peters. Lentz. Goodwin. J. John- 
ston. Frarv. Riedv. J. Smith. McClellan. Bach Row: Slate. J. 
Johnston. Macielag, Boyer, Warfield. Reed. Sharrer. 



THE WASHINGTON ELM 



Editor.in-Cf.ie/ Calvert Jones, Jr. 

Associate Editors Frances Kreecer 

Mary Landon Russell 

Assistant Editors Molly Blackwood 

Leonard Parris, James Aycock 

Sports Editor John Kardash 

Women's Editor Ellen Peters 

Feature Editor Norman Sharrer 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager Rufus C. Johnson 

.Assistant Business Manager Clarence Valentine 

Circulation Manager Doc Slade 

Assistant Advertising Manager James Juliana 

Volume XLI of the Washington ELM saw 
an entirely different paper. The paper started oft 
with a record-breaking sheet of twelve pages 
and alternated its thirty issues with four and 
six-page papers. Included in the increased plan 
was an increased number of pictures, better 
writing, and frequent guest writers from the 
professional world. 

In addition, the ELM, feeling the need of a 
definite service on the Campus, promoted an 
All-College Night which was a tremendous 
success and sponsored a popularity contest 



which was also successful. In addition, the 
ELM reviewed popular novels and other books 
of interest monthly and then presented those 
books to the library and it also sponsored a Mili- 
tary Service Publicity Bureau which proved of 
much interest to the male students. 

After hostilities broke out in December, the 
ELM pledged itself to the service of the State 
and this pledge was accepted by Governor Her- 
bert R. O Connor. Through its columns, it 
kept the students informed of every development 
affecting them and, in addition, wrote letters and 
editorials in an attempt to obtain the desires 
of the student body. 

Along the lines of advertising. Business Man- 
ager Rufus Johnson almost tripled the income 
of the paper which enabled an increased pro- 
gram of production. 

At the beginning of the year, the editors of 
the ELM pledged themselves to obtain an AII- 
American rating from the Associated Collegiate 
Press and at the time the Pegasus goes to press, 
that information is not known. 





Sitting: Russell. Culver. Davis. D. Smith. Hoopes. Clark. 

Standing: DePalma, Peters. Johnston. Roe. J. W. Smith. 
Llewellyn, Woodford. J. R. Smith. Broadwater. Murphy. 
Johnson. 



THE 



PEGASUS 



The 1942 Pegasus is the 18th volume of the 
Washington College annual. It represents 
what we hope will he a new era in local year- 
book publication. The present issue tends to 
follow the modern idea of informality but still 
upholds the dignity of its purpose. 

In publishing our book it was necessary to 
call on many people for assistance. The Editor 
and Business Manager wish to express their 
appreciation to Dr. Werner. Dr. Meade. Miss 
Whitalcer, Paul Gendler. Yince Sheehan. 
Walt Mazurek, Orv Stambaugh. the associate 
editors, business managers, historians, and 
others who helped to put out this edition. 



STAFF 

EdUor-ln-chief Donald W. Smith 

.Assistant Editor Basil C. Clark 

Editorial Board-Lanny Russell. Virginia Hoopes. Alloc Kepler 

Sports Editors Ellen Peters. Charles Nairn. Jerry Voith 

Senior Wrile-l/ps Minor Steele. Robert Corley 

Photography Editor Waller Woodford 

Senior Historian lohn W. Smith 

Junior Historian Virginia Cooper 

Sophomore Historian Betty Hill 

Freshman Historian Joan Johnston 

Typists Ruth Broadwater. Paul Llewellyn 

BUSINESS 

Business Manager Lloyd R. Davis 

Assistant Business Manager William Roe 




COACH DL'MSCHOTT STEVENS 




Standing: Coack Dumschott, Pole. Barlolini. Benjamin. Tarr. Lentz, Yerfces, McNiff, Stevens, Gihe. Co 
ant. Parris (manager). 

Sealed: Samele. Lore. Juliana. Voilh. Brutz. Ruff. 



MGR. PARRIS 



BASKETBALL 



Although the Washington College team did not win the 
conference championship this year they played some excellent 
"thrillers ". Foremost among these were the two games played with 
our outstanding rival, Baltimore University. In the first game staged 
in the armory in Chestertown. the Retrievers just won over the 
boys from the "big town" by a 41-40 score. The second game 
played in Baltimore was mistakenly given to Baltimore University 
by an official error which was corrected after the game, making it 
a tie. 

Coach Dumschott rapidly found a good combination in the 
following players: McNiff, noted for his ball handling and long 
shots: Stevens, for his speed and deception; Samele. for his eye ; 
Voith, for his ability to get rebounds and long shots; Gibe, for his 
spectacular guarding; Yerlces. for his speed and eye; and Benjamin, 
for his all-around good playing. With this material to work with, 
and the wealth of reserves to draw from, Coach Dumschott formed 
a team that, even when it lost, always scored close enough to make 
it hot for the opponents. 

Every year it seems there is a new star that forces his way 
into the spotlight. This year it was Jerry Voith, a freshman, who 
because ot his excellent playing and contribution to the team, 
deserves to be mentioned here. 

To some of the players we say good-bye. McNiff graduates 
this summer and with his leaving, W. C. loses one of the best 
players in its history. Stevens is going to be called into the Xaval 
Air Corps sometime this summer along with "Bill Benjamin. 
Yerkes will probably be in the armed services before you read this 
article— Brutz is going to work for Uncle Sammy, and "Doc Lore 
is beginning Medical School this summer. With the omission of 
these boys from next year's line up, the team will suffer a great 
loss, but new men will take their places. 

Mention must also be made of the help given the team by 
its Manager, "Doc" Parris. He worked hard and did much to build 
morale within the club. 

Our hope is that we can come back next year and see the 
Washington College basketball team win still greater honors. 



BASKETBALL 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 




Left lo Right: Co 



Hoopns. Dockl.orn. Sutherland. Newton. 



At the end of the regular basketball schedule the Senior A 
team emerged unbeaten and was crowned champions for 1942. 
The Freshmen Red team, runners-up and was a hard obstacle 
for the older girls, with another year s experience should be a 
serious contender for the next season. 

Last years champion Junior Navy team were weakened con- 
siderably by an ankle injury to their aggressive forward, Naomi 
Russell. This mishap plus stirrer competition put them in third 
position. 

This year's honorary varsity basketball team as selected by 
the Board of Managers is composed by Ginny Cooper. Alice Suth- 
erland, and Franny Kreegar, forwards: Ginny Hoopes, Kitty New- 
ton, and Betty Dockhorn, guards. Because of the abundance ol 
good material the Board did not pick any one for honorable 
mention. 

For the first time in the history of the Girls Athletic Depart- 
ment each class had enough girls participating to have two teams. 
This made a total of eight teams playing, which shows how popu- 
lar basketball has become among the girls at Washington College. 



D 






JUNIOR CLASS 



No longer are we green, awkward, bashful 
Freshmen; no longer are we domineering, proud, 
commanding Sophomores: we re the sophisti- 
cated and dignified Juniors — or at least we re 
supposed to bel But we feel left out of things. 
The Freshmen go through that "delightful 
stage of being ratted: the Sophomores "turn on 
the pressure and rat the Freshmen: the Seniors 
graduate and leave their alma mater amid fond 
farewells and happy congratulations; and the 
Juniors — we feel like middlemen. But we did 
succeed in giving a grand Junior Prom— doing 
our part for national defense by giving the pro- 
ceeds to the Red Cross. 

With Murphy guiding our "crew of jolly 
Juniors we boast of many achievements. The end 



of the first semester disclosed two three points- 
seven of our "brain storms were received into 
Sigma Sigma Omicron. Brandt. Messick, Ben- 
jamin, Warmer, and Jackson continued to help 
the football team to victory — Swifty Jackson 
maintained his laurels in track. Not to slight the 
girls the Junior basketball team retained their 
high standing of previous years. 

We really haven t changed much— Joe Jump 
is still around; Dockhorn has stopped bleaching 
her hair and has cast off the title of our Straw- 
berry Blonde: Carney and Murphy are still 
gaiting around and Messick is still trying to 
pull off his wisecracks. Just a happy-go-lucky 
crew. That s us. The Jolly Juniors. 




Bottom Row: Hess. Valentine. Stevens, McCleilan. Burrell. Kavlor. Cooper. Murphv. Russell, DePalma. 
Tischer. Coppage. Hubbard, Menser. Bisbop. 

Second Row: Jackson. Martin. Bover. Roe. Harris. Smith, Blackwood. Hotcbkiss. Fenderson. Culver. 
Wood. E. Peters. Miles, Dulin, Alteri. Taylor. 

Top Row: Steffens. Brut/.. Jones. Messick, Aycock, Munvan. Criss. Benjamin. Tomlinson. Bover, Engel, 
Wartber. Tbawley. Ruark. Parris. Slade. Brandt, Mooney. 



62 



GLEE CLUB 




First Row: Hignutt Lumpkin. Logan, Speicher, Powers. Graber. Di, 



Pritchard. Lattam. Broadwater, 



Petry. 

Second Row: Miss Russell. Olsen. Lewis. Gilland. Merriken. Hotchkiss. Horn. Boiko. Ward. Johnson. 
Mr. Coleman. 

Third Row: Smith. Kepler. Pole. Parks. Walbert, Thomas. Rothermel. Slemmer. 



President Philip Souder 

Manager Atlee C. Kepler 

Secretary-Treasurer Henri Pole 

Student Leader Jane Lyon 

Another successful year of musical activity has 
been completed by the Washington College 
Glee Club. Under the direction of Mr. Julian 
Coleman continued interest was shown in the 
organization. Many students find this club the 
only outlet of their musical talent. A great deal 
of credit is due to the female contingent who 
displays so much enthusiasm in the activities of 
the Mixed Chorus. Several trips were made to 
neighboring towns on the shore and concerts 
were sponsored by the local churches and civic 
organizations. One of the most successful ap- 
pearances was at the United Service Organiza- 



tion concert at Centreville. In addition to these 
outside performances, assembly numbers and a 
complete program in March are features ol this 
group. Jane Lyon, our student leader. led the 
assembly singing during the year. 

Quite a few additions were made to the li- 
brary of the club and a very enjoyable and va- 
ried program was presented for both the Spring 
and Commencements Concerts. 1 he dee Chip 
hopes to grow and broaden its activity and with 
the acquisition of new singers next year and 
continued interest on the part of the old mem- 
bers, even better accomplishments are in store. 
This organization should play a vital part in the 
life of Washington College and its students. 



MEN'S STUDENT COUNCIL 




Left to Rigbt: Clarlt, Boyer. Cu 



, Mo 



, Kirty, Lore. Ro 



President RayFIELD KlRBV 

\'ice -President Harry Lore 

Secretary-Treasurer Albert Mooney 



Under the able leadership of Ray field Kirby the 1941-42 Stu- 
dent Council successfully accomplished the ever-growing task of 
trying to live up to the high standards of its predecessors. 

The organization has as its aims the perpetuation of healthy 
college traditions, promotion of cooperation between the students 
and the administration, regulation of student conduct and the 
fostering of personal responsibility and honor. 

Among the various problems that confronted the council this 
year were student conduct in academic work, better supervision 
of the dining hall, reorganization of rat rules, investigation of 
possible sources of student graft, and the arranging for chaperons 
at the college dances. In accomplishing these ends the council 
provided a more harmonious feeling between the student body 
and the administration and thus truly represented the purpose for 
which it stands. 



WOMEN'S STUDENT COUNCIL 




Led to Right: Cordon, FenJerson, Peters, Pill. Murray. Dinger. Frary. 

President Peggy Pill 

Vice-President Norma Murray 

Secretary-Treasurer Phyllis Peters 

The Reid Hall Council attained a higher level this year than 
any one preceding. Through the cooperation of the girls, and the 
able guidance of Dean Bradley and Peggy Pitt, the council suc- 
ceeded in giving the girls greater privileges. Never before have the 
Freshmen girls had such leniency, they were granted library privi- 
lege two nights a week, Bennett s and movies privilege once a 
week. This year, too. the Juniors and Seniors were given eleven 
o clock movie permission on Tuesdays, and all the students ob- 
tained a bowling privilege. 

The Council held their annual Freshmen Orientation Tea. and 
assisted Dean Livingood in the Freshmen Week activities in Sep- 
tember. They assisted later in the year at a tea held in conjunction 
with National Art Week. 

The annual Christmas party was held by Dean Bradley and 
Mother Wilson with the assistance of the Council. 

In February. Vivian Dinger, was installed into the Council as 
the Freshmen representative who completed the Council staff, and 
aided in its successful functioning throughout the remainder of the 
year. 



O M I C R O N 

President Harry E. Lore, Jr. 

Vice President Rufus C. Johnson 

Secretary Winton Tolles 

Treasurer Albert L. Mooney 

Fraters in Facilitate 
Dr. Gilbert W. Mead Dr. Winton Tolles 

Dr. Frederick G. Livingood Dr. Kenneth S.Buxton 

Dr. J. S. William Jones Mr. J. Thomas Kibler 

Fraters in Collegio 

1942 

David Bartolini Rufus C. Johnson 

Basil C. Clark A. Rayfield Kirby 

Lloyd R. Davis Harry E. Lore, Jr. 

William M. Nagler 

1943 

Albert L. Mooney S. Omar Jackson 

ALPHA PSI CIRCLE 

Founded at Washington and Lee, 1914 

Established at Washington College, 1957 

National President: PROF. C. STANTON BELFOUR 



DELTA KAPPA 




Standing: Bartolini. Nagler, Kirnv 
Seated: Jackson. Johnson. Lore. Mo 
Not in picture: L. Davis. B. Clark 



s . s . o 




Top Row: Jackson. Holdt. Engle. Larmorc. Mooney 

Middle Row: Parris. Garrison. Livingston, Dorf. Carter. Wood 

Bottom Row: Slarr. Johnson. Diacamakus. Newton. Johanns 



President James Diacumakos 

Vice President CATHERINE Newton 

Secretary Dr. Arthur DavIS 

Treasurer Atlee Kepler 

Sigma Sigma Omicron was organized to 
promote scholarship and foster a respect tor 
scholastic achievement among students at 
Washington College. Its motto "Service 
through scholarship for Washington exempli- 
fies the aim of the society. 



The adoption of the Dean s list allowing un- 
limited cuts to those students outstanding in 
scholarship and the petitioning for one day 
holiday before exams are examples of the ac- 
complishments of the society. 

Membership to the society is made to those 
Juniors or Seniors who have an aggregate index 
of at least 2.23 and stand in the upper 15% of 
their class. Provision is made for occasional 
admittance of Seniors who are outstanding in 
scholarship. 



LUts i %i 




First Row. Left to Rig] 
Second Row: Patterson. 

Schroeter. Kardash. 
Third Row: Hodges, m 

Twupaclc. Hoban. Alt. 



Messiclc, Row. Grc 
,anager: Ruff. Benji 



Tarr. TKawley, Lol 
Samele. Gibe, Ha 



tings, bteve 



an. Coach K.hl.r 
Maguirc. English 



Dulin. Dowiing. Deringer. Brulz. Lynch. Hall. Svec. Yoith. Earthr, 



BASEBALL 

With such men as Fetter, Bush. Bremer. 
Selby, and Rayne graduating, Coach Kibler 
found himself searching for replacements who 
could keep Washington College's long line of 
baseball successes intact. Such capable fresh- 
men performers as Russ English, Fred Schroeter. 
Bob Groves, and Bill Gray soon left Washing- 
ton's baseball enthusiasts at ease. These prom- 
ising freshmen strengthened the Washington s 
nine sufficiently to give Washington potentially 
the greatest defensive team in the state. Captain 
Jim Stevens, Jean Messich, and Frank Samele 
had already proven themselves an outfield hard 
to beat in college loops. The infield soon round- 
ed out smoothly with Ruff. Schroeter, Kardash. 
English, and Gibe gaining starting berths. 
Freshmen Hastings, Loll and Tarr were ready 
to substitute when infield slumps occurred while 
the outfield had Benjamin, Hall, and Dowiing 
in reserve. 

The pitching outlook, which was consider- 
ably darkened with the graduation of Rayne and 
Selby, was greatly improved when the chuckers 
made their appearances. The experience of Ma- 
guire and Lynch made them very dependable 
moundsmen and Coach Kibler depended on 
these two boys for the bulk of the pitching 



duties. Bob Groves and Bill Gray soon proved 
their worth and a strong pitching staff could be 
foreseen. 

Hitting during the early spring practice was 
fairly weak. Coach Kibler, however, was confi- 
dent that as the season progressed timing would 
improve and the team would be able to earn suf- 
ficient runs to win. The experience of Captain 
Stevens, Messick. Samele. Ruff, and Kardash 
makes them serious threats at the plate. 

Shortening of the school year forced the Kib- 
lermen to cut their schedule to twelve games, 
winding up on May 9th with Delaware. Poten- 
tially it is a red-hot schedule and Washington 
will have to play its best to keep up the good 
record of the past years. 

In general, the team s chances for the Mason- 
Dixon Championship are good and it is a con- 
servative prediction to say that no more than 
three games should be lost. 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
Mav 
May 
May 



13 American U.... 

14 Randolph-Macon 

15 Catholic U. ... 

18 Randolph M n 

25"! I!!"."!" Delaware ".'.'.'.. 

27 Catholic U 

29 West Chester .. 

2 Maryland 

6 West Chester . . 

9 Delaware 



Awa, 
Home 
Hon.. 
Hon,. 
Home 



Horn. 

Awa. 









Top Row: Coach Ekaitis. Horner, Warfield, Gwyn. SKinnamon, Falardeau. Kirwan. Hitchcock, Harris, 

SeconcTRow:' Roe, Warther. JoKnston. Wilkinson, Mackrell, Horsneld. Macielag. Sutton, Ruark. 

Bolton, Row: Martin, Sinclair. Metcalf. Williams, Morgan. Juliana. Jackson. Yerkes. Katzenherger. Pole. 



TRACK 



Coach George Ekaitis will have a job on his hands in whipping 
together a topnotch track team. Severe losses were suffered when 
Buckingham, McCauIey. and Jim Steele graduated; and Storm. 
Freeman and Gayle Steele were called into various national 
services. 

Newcomers Mackrell and Juliana show promise of being able 
to capably perform the sprint duties, while the distance laurels rests 
with Roe and Katzenberg. Jackson, Yerkes, and Metcalfe are the 
bright spot of the dashmen, all three being quite competent in this 
Held. Yerkes and Sinclair seem certain to shine in the field events as 
Their past performances are first-rate. Johnson and Wartner have 
shown up well on the high hurdles. 

Special praise should be given Lew Yerkes, who has proven the 
most outstanding all-round "point-getter of the squad. Omar Jack- 
son has also proven a versatile performer. 

The abbreviated five meet schedule should not offer the Shore- 
men too much trouble in experiencing a good season. 

TRACK SCHEDULE 

April 18 Catholic U Away 

April 25 Penn Relays Away 

April 28 Delaware Away 

May 2 Hopkins Home 

May 8-9 Mason-Dixon Championship . . Away 



GIRLS' SPRING SPORTS 

Arrival of spring immediately brings thoughts of the many spring 
sports offered to the girls of Washington College. It appears that the 
athletic department is trying to make this season one of the best yet. 
The purchase of new equipment should be an incentive for more 
girls to participate in one, if not all, of the various sports offered. 

For the more active girls there will be singles and doubles in 
badminton. The tournaments are now in progress with keen competi- 
tion among the girls. From all appearances Kitty Newton will win 
the singles championship without much trouble. Kitty was the bad- 
minton champion last year and continues to improve with more com- 
petition. Tennis has been made a minor sport because of the 
uncertain weather. 

Archery, a major sport on the athletic calendar, will be even 
more popular this year. A new target and new bows and arrows have 
been purchased, and the tournament is expected to begin soon. 

Besides these major sports there will be ping-pong, a minor 
sport, and bicycling and roller-skating to those girls who are inter- 
ested. With such a variety of spring sports every girl will be able to 
participate in athletics. 

These sports being continued during the summer will enable 
those girls who are returning to the campus for the summer session 
to take part in any of the above sports offered them by the Athletic 
Department. 




OUTSTANDING IN MAROON "W" GIRLS' SPORTS 



The aim of every girl who is interested in ath- 
letics is to accumulate one thousand points dur- 
ing her college career. These points are awarded 
for various things. Points are awarded for par- 
ticipation in the recognized sports, for being 
elected to any of the honorary varsity teams, and 
for any other activity approved by the instructor. 

The Athletic Board awards a white W 
sweater to all girls who accumulate one thou 
sand points in a year. This year most of the 
Freshmen will receive one of these sweaters. The 
Board of Managers is working on a new system 
for these rewards and it is expected that quite a 
few of the Sophomore girls will receive a maroon 
"W" for their continued participation after win- 
ning their sweaters last year. By this new system 
a sweater will be awarded to the Freshmen with 
a thousand points and a maroon "W to the 
Sophomores. 1 he Board is still working on an 
award for the Juniors. 



To those Seniors who have, during their four 
years accumulated the necessary number ol 
points, have been on two major class teams, and 
been selected for one of the honorary varsity 
teams receive a blanket. The Seniors who are 
to receive one of these this year are Kitty 
Newton, Ginny Hoopes, and Mary Nardi. 

A silver cup is awarded to the girl who has 
the highest number of points each year. Last year 
the winner of the cup was Mary Lu Truslow. 

Since the dropping of the June Fetes by the 
Athletic Department, when the most popular 
girl was selected for the leading role, the Board 
now selects the most outstanding girl in athlet- 
ics. This honor was won last year by Kitty New- 
ton and she will receive this distinction again 
this year. Kitty deserves this honor for she has 
participated and excelled in every sport during 
her four years in college and justly deserves the 
title of the most outstanding girl athlete in 
Washington College. 



Standing: Nardi. Newton, E. Peters, P. Peters. Culver, Dockhorn, Mis 

Bell, director. 
Kneeling: Cooper. Riedy, Truslow, Lohmuller. Rogers, Hoopes. 




VJ 






SENIOR HISTORY 



As we the class of 1943 approach the climax 
of our four years of experience at Washington 
College, we turn in retrospect to recall pleasant 
memories and associations that will always be 
cherished. Traditionally we will never forget 
how we were dubbed "rats and well we recall 
how submissive we were to the sophs. There was 
freshmen week, football games we never won, 
sorority rushing, initial impressions of home- 
coming and the bonfire, our first taste of three- 
hour mid-semesters, fraternity bids, formal 
dances, Minor and Mary Liz in "Little Wom- 
en, class elections, the swan song of the June 
Fete, commencement and the first milestone was 
planted. 

As sophomores we felt our position was an 
indispensable one, after all. the greater part of 
freshmen orientation rested in our hands. We 
now began to take an avid interest in campus 
activities. The growth of the college by the erec- 
tion of the Bunting library and the Dunning 
Science Building was noted with pride. Mem- 
bers of our class began to support and join the 
various organizations. Lloyd starred in Ten 
Nights in a Bar Room and Dave in You Can t 
Take It With You. We also participated in 
sports and Nagler held a key position on the ten- 
nis squad. With the passing of the half-way 
mark, we were looking forward to becoming 
Juniors. 

In the role of sophisticated Juniors we further 
expanded our activities and many of our class- 
mates were developing into potential leaders. 
Ten of our members were voted into the Honor 



Society, Kirby rated All-Maryland in football, 
Kitty Newton was selected best girl athlete. Lore, 
Kirby, and Crane were elected to the Student 
Council, Lloyd had part in "Our Town." Even 
with these points of interest, still a year remained 
for us to scale the ladder another rung. 

Seniors, at last, we embark on the final stage 
of our college life. Here we recall that Dave. 
Lloyd, and Franny have been our class officers 
all four years; Ray Kirby presides over the Stu- 
dent Council with Lore, Clark, and Crane as 
senior representatives; Peggy Pitt reigns in Reid 
Hall; Al Dudderar merited the deserved All- 
Maryland in football; Moose McNiff captained 
the Flying Dutchman; Bartolini headed the 
Varsity and Hoopes the G. I. A. A. 

We felt the imminence of war conditions 
when the selective service threatened to deplete 
our ranks. Then, too, there was the accelerated 
program for the second semester with night 
classes for the first time. The idea of commence- 
ment, which we had viewed with awe in the 
past, was soon to become a reality. We are not 
reviewing these events because they were spec- 
tacular, but merely to record the progress we 
made and to acknowledge the efforts of our mem- 
bers. 

As we leave these portals to take our place in 
the puzzling world, we leave behind these mem- 
ories of an enjoyable college life. With grim 
determination we go forward to substantiate the 
ideals of our predecessors and leave behind the 
traditions and rich heritage of Washington Col- 
lege to share with others. 



DAVID BARTOLINI 



WILLIAM CLYDE BENJAMIN. JR. 



SARAH DOUGLAS BLACKWOOD 



ELLEN COCHELLE BORDLEY 




DAVID BARTOLINI Prexy of Senior Class . . . first Mr. Washington . . . "#l" Kappa Alpha 
. . . three-cornered athlete . . . assistant coach football and basketball . . . discus 
swirler . . . personality plus . . . O.D.K. . . . Who s Who . . . fun loving Epicurean 
. . . dark, different, mature, intelligent, competent. 

WILLIAM CLYDE BENJAMIN, JR. Six letter man in intramurals . . . gambling gal free . . . 
fierce and furious fireman . . . preserving Historian . . . reserver. hardy, inde- 
pendent, amiable. 

SARAH DOUGLAS BLACKWOOD Alpha Chi Omega . . . president "Le Circle" . . . beauti- 
cian in dramatics . . . browbeats a broad "A . . . polished, artistic, interesting 
. . . wields a winning paint brush . . . drenchingly dry wit . . . poised, efficient, 
unassuming individualist . . . football plugger. 



ELLEN COCHELLE BORDLEY Devastatingly sophisticated in a mild way . . . blonde bomber 
. . . "Veronica . . . Hollywood protege a la Chestertown ... an Alpha Chi 
specialty . . . snow drift sparkle . . . cool, indifferent, attractive. 




LAURENCE SMITH BRICE 



ROBERT EMERSON CARTER 



BASIL CRAWFORD CLARK 



H( )BERT NORMAN CORELY 



LAURENCE SMITH BRICE Hard hitting . . . straight shooting mallard marauder . . . Lambda 
Chi Alpha . . . independent, congenial . . . whiffle top . . . easy going, sincere, a 
welcome addition to any gathering. 

ROBERT EMERSON CARTER Physics whiz and lab. assistant . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . 
Sigma Sigma Omicron . . . quiet, energetic, persevering . . . scientifically minded 
. . . football manager . . . pool room enthusiast . . . prosperous outlook. 

BASIL CRAWFORD CLARK Aggressive Lambda Chi president . . . O.D.K. . . . student 
council . . . Who s Who . . . manly manhandler . . . rovering Romeo . . . 
Epicurean incognito . . . from gob to governor . . . Weight Anchor Shipmates, 
Wind's in the Rigging! 



ROBERT NORMAN CORELY "Rugged Robert" . . . Lambda Chi . . . amusing and confusing 
. . . that terrible Trig! . . . champion hurdle buster . . . inimitable . . . terrific 
personality . . . superb sense of humor . . . the playboy poet . . . happy-go-lucky. 



R( (BERT KKIJ.OGG CRANE 



LLOYD ROBERT DAVIS 



JAMES NICHOLAS 
DIAMCUMAKOS 



MILTON IRVING DORF 




ROBERT KELLOGG CRANE Chemistry major and lab. assistant . . . Lambda Chi Alpha 
officer . . . student council . . . Honor Society . . . Middle Hall monitor . . . winner 
of billiards . . . conscientious, serious, and respected classmate who does his 
duties diligently. 

LLOYD ROBERT DAVIS President Theta Chi . . . money spender of yearbook . . . O.D.K 

Who's Who . . . wonderful personality . . . killer with the chips . . . hero of many 
plays . . . sensational sense of humor . . . masculine, interesting, good company. 

JAMES NICHOLAS DIAMCUMAKOS Prexy of Sigma Sigma Omicron . . . Theta Chi vice 
president . . . leader of Society of Sciences . . . quiet, serious student and trusted 
executive . . . cnem. major with expectations of a doctor s career . . . popular 
campus leader. 



MILTON IRVING DORF "Milt" . . . Franks right-hand man . . . Sigma Sigma Omicron . . . 
intelligent and good natured . . . grade grabber . . . persistent and insistent ... a 
future Frankfurter . . . town transit . . . statistical expert. 




RAYMOND ALBERT DUDDERAR 



THOMAS WALKER ELIASON, JR. 



MORTIMER GARRISON. JR. 



ROBERT GUY GARRISON 



RAYMOND ALBERT DUDDERAR "AI" . . . bone-crushing, hard-hitting, quick thinking, 
four year varsity football center . . . swell sense of humor . . . Don Juan of the 
Kappa Alpha s ... no more dives, AI, Keep Em Flying!! 

THOMAS WALKER ELIASON, JR. Tommy" ... a bang-up bridge player . . . Lambda Chi 
Alpha . . . hard server in tennis . . . neat dresser ... a gentleman on all occasions 
. . . unruffled, persevering, conservative . . . enjoys good music . . . Reid Hall, 
Hodson Hall, Library. 

MORTIMER GARRISON, JR. Violin virtuoso . . . competent student . . . leader of orchestra 
. . . Lambda Chi . . . S.S.O. . . . Mount Vernon Literary Society head . . . 
consistent scholar ... a future in Held of Psychology via graduate school. 



ROBERT GUY GARRISON Comes to us from Salisbury State Teachers . . . Theta Chi . 
card shark . . . sense of humor . . . equally versatile in Arts and Sciences . 
never a dull moment . . . pensive . . . bright future in physics. 



ANN MURRAY GORDON 



WILLIAM OLIVER HACKETT 



JOHN ALCAYER HARRIS 



VIRGINIA STREETT HOOPES 




ANN MURRAY GORDON "Butch" . . . Alpha Omicron Pi . . . independent and sure . . . poised 
and quiet . . . student council . . . efficient custodian of the room-campused . . . 
ingenious writer . . . cultured contralto . . . regal, different, interesting . . , 
interested in the army. 

WILLIAM OLIVER HACKETT "Little Minister" of the class ... not seen too often . . . pre- 
serving history major . . . reflective thinker . . . supporter of ethical and moral 
standards . . . planned future in a needed field. 

JOHN ALGAYER HARRIS Chemistry major with mathematics as a sideline . . . Lambda Chi 
Alpha . . . active in Y.M.C.A. functions . . . Society of Sciences member . . . 
track manager . . . meritorious in scholarship . . . quiet, willing and sincere . . . 
well liked senior. 



VIRGINIA STREETT HOOPES "Ginny" , . . vice-president Alpha Omicron Pi . . . president 
G.I.A.A. . . . quiet, unaffected charm . . . popular senior . . . sincere, companion- 
able friend . . . likeable librarian . . . industrious, capable . . . topnotch sports 
woman . . . "Watch the Fords go by "! . . . Sweetheart of Lambda Chi! 




DONALD HEARN HORNER 



MARY ELIZABETH HUMPHREYS 



ALICE AUGUSTA JOHANNS 



RUFUS CLAY JOHNSON 



DONALD HEARN HORNER Theta Chi . . . Salisbury State Teacher's transfer . . . loyal 
supporter of Debate Club . . . clean cut, handsome . . . man of a few words . . . 
answer to a maiden s prayer . . . prospective teacher. 

MARY ELIZABETH HUMPHREYS "Liz" . . . captain Alpha Chi's . . . president Pan Hel 
... a nock of reddish curls ... a perky smile, a piquant air . . . talkative . . . 
aggressive athlete . . . graceful dancer . . . smooth sailor. 

ALICE AUGUSTA JOHANNS "Jo" . . . Officer in Zeta Tau Alpha . . . Sigma Sigma Omicron 
. . . acme of organized study . . . petite . . . nifty little dresser ... a model of 
decorum . . . forceful independence . . . asset in the Dean and Registrar s offices 
. . . awaiting an Annapolis arrival. 



RUFUS CLAY JOHNSON Business manager Elm . . . Kappa Alpha . . . S.S.O. . . . O.D.K. 
. . . Who s Who . . . casual, confident public speaker . . . laudable lawyer . . . 
activity conscious . . . sardonic humor . . . his success is eminent. 



CALVERT JEROME JONES. 1R. 



IOHN KARDASH 



ATLEE CALVIN KEPLER 



MARY ANNA KINTNER 




CAL\'ERT JEROME JONES. JR. Editor of Elm . . . Kappa Alpha . . . Who's Who . . . 
President Historical Society ... a journalistic entirety . . . cagey, industrious 
knows the way and plays his cards. 

JOHN KARDASH Varsity second baseman . . . Kappa Alpha . . . dark and individualistic . . . 
solid dresser . . . basketball squad . . . swing advocate . . . good sense of humor 
. . . easy-going . . . congenial . . . popular . . . good index . . . good mixer . . . 
Swing light, John, and hit that Future with a solid sock! 

ATLEE CALVIN KEPLER Brain trust . . . respected headwaiter . . . Lambda Chi . . . terrific 
tenor . . . versatile ... a friend in need . . . well-rounded sense ol humor . . . 
persevering, dependable, accomplished English major . . . brilliant teaching future. 



MARY ANNA KINTNER Quiet, pleasing personality . . . sweetheart of Chem. lab. . . . subtle 
sense of humor . . . indifferent, poised, and cool . . . good guard in basketball . . . 
great things are expected of our potential Madame Curie. 




ALLEN RAYFIELD KIRBY 



JOHN PHILLIP KIRWAN 



FRANCES ELIZABETH KREEGER 



ERNEST MARCELLUS 
LARMORE. JR. 



ALLEN RAYFIELD KIRBY President Student Council . . . Kappa Alpha . . . O.D.K. . . . 
Who's Who . . . offensive All Maryland football guard . . . quiet, friendly, un- 
dignified . . . mauler of mathematics . . . mature, forceful, well liked. 

JOHN PHILLIP KIRWAN Boarding student who went local . . . mathematics major with interest 
in physics . . . competent library assistant . . . tall, serious . . . keen handler of cue 
stick . . . pipe smoker . . . seen riding in red Chewy. 

FRANCES ELIZABETH KREEGER "Franny" . . . treasurer of Alpha Chi . . . four-year class 
officer . . . attractive transit . . . casual Mademoiselle dresser . . . sportswoman 
. . . intelligent, interesting . . . unaffected sophistication . . . personality! 



ERNEST MARCELLUS LARMORE, JR. "Toby" . . . reverent Theta Chi Chaplain . . . 
Sigma Sigma Omicron . . . persevering scholar . . . the thinker of the class . . . 
contemplative, sincere . . . gets along well with the gals . . . future doctor of 
Tyaskin. 



JEAN MAY LELAND 



OLIVER YV1LBKRT 
LITTLETON, JR. 



R( )BERT LEE LIVINGSTON 



HENRY ELMER LORE. JR 




JEAN MAY LELAND Hard working Alpha Omicron Chi . . . woman economist . . . gay. 
light-hearted . . . talkative . . . careful . . . stylish dresser . . . wind blown bob 
. . . clever artistic decorator . . . generous. 

OLIVER VVILBERT LITTLETON. JR. "Oliie" . . . epicurean in or out of cognito . . . wor- 
shipper of the weaker sex . . . chemistry major ... at home among the test tubes 
. . . Lambda Chi Alpha ... a neat appearance . . . even tempered . . . amiable 
. . . ambitious. 

ROBERT LEE LIVINGSTON Mathematics and physics form his main interests . . . diligent 
scholar and member of S.S.O. . . . Y.M.C.A. member . . . Society of Sciences 
. . . library assistant and debater . . . serious minded and conscientious . . . bright 
future. 



HENRY ELMER LORE. JR. Student Council vice-president . . . O.D.K. president . . . officer 
of Theta Chi . . . Inter fraternity council . . . Who s Who . . . pleasing personality 
. . . sense of humor . . . basketball and baseball participant . . . melodious tenor 
. . . Reid Hall Cadet . . . promising pre-medical student. 




HENRY FRANCIS MAGUIRE 



NORMA LEE MURRAY 



WILLIAM MICHAEL NAGLER. JR. 



CATHERINE ELIZABETH 
NEWTON 



HENRY FRANCIS MAGUIRE A Jersey City speciality . . . earnest above all . . . successful 

President of Dramatic Club . . . Lambda Chi Alpha . . . pitcher on the baseball 

team . . . energetic, vivacious friend . . . politician . . . serious-minded . . . 
dynamic doctor of the future. 



NORMA LEE MURRAY "Nomie". . . Alpha Chi . . . vice-president of Women's Student Council 
. . . small, friendly . . . frank . . . career woman . . . wonderful sense of humor 
. . . Eastern Shore twang 



a live wire. 



WILLIAM MICHAEL NAGLER, JR. Tennis pro . . . Lambda Chi . . . president of Y.M.C.A. 
. . . O.D.K. . . . Reid Hall regular . . . tall, lanky with a winning smile . . . 
unassuming . . . quick humor . . . lively dancer . . . practical, frank and popular 
. . . future in physics and math. 

CATHERINE ELIZABETH NEWTON Mathematics major ... day student . . . outstanding 
girl athlete . . . consistent scholar and member of Sigma Sigma Omicron . . . 
pleasant library assistant . . . respected and popular classmate . . . bright prospect 
in the held of teaching. 



REBEKAH P. PATTERSON 



YVILBERT THOMAS 
PATTERSON. IR. 



MARIA THERESA PETRY 



MARGARET AVARS PITT 




REBEKAH P. PATTERSON "Becky" . . . sheer beauty tops a classy chassis . . . startling . . 
smooth . . . serene . . . stylish . . . incongruous laughter . . . grand sense of humor 
. . . friend indeed! . . . popular ... a stag line s dream. 

WILBERT THOMAS PATTERSON, JR. Effervescent Cheer Captain . . . Kappa Alpha . . . 
boundless energy . . . original . . . Manager of baseball . . . quick, precise, efficient 
. . . vivacious humor . . . always in a hurry. 

MARIA THERESA PETRY "Maria" . . . experimenting biology assistant . . . capable Thespian 
. . . seen driving a Chevrolet coupe . . . female ping-pong player . . . retentive 
mind . . . studious classmate . . . good soprano voice . . . hopes to be lab. technician. 



MARGARET AYARS PITT "Peggy" . . . president of Woman's Student Council ... a high- 
scoring forward in basketball . . . immutable personality . . . unusual, subtle sense 
of humor . . . very independent . . . rugged individualist . . . headed for brilliant 
career in education. 




MARGARET JANE PR1TCHARD 



WILSON LOBACH RIEDY 



MARY LANDON RUSSELL 



MIRIAM VIRGINIA SEWEU 



MARGARET JANE PR1TCHARD A quiet, sedate transfer . . . efficient librarian assistant . . . 
sincere preacher s daughter . . . English major . . . made many friends during two 
years with us . . . cooperative, gracious and tolerant. 



WILSON LOBACH RIEDY "Lil Abner" . . . funny and befuddled . . . practical prankster . . . 
tough tackle on the Varsity Squad . . . Kappa Alpha Deluxe . . . tall, dark and 
disturbing suave swisher on the dance floor . . . "Rough Start— Smooth Finish. ' 



MARY LANDON RUSSELL "Lanny" . . . cheerful day hop . . . English major . . . ardent 
worker in Z.T.A. . . . versatile journalist with interest in Elm and Pegasus . . . 
gracious, obliging, and co-operative . . . merits recognition as a promising teacher. 



MIRIAM VIRGINIA SEWELL •Miriam" . . . attractive local girl . . . French major . . . often 
seen at dances . . . quiet, helpful . . . education student with promise of a teaching 
future . . . trained for a career, but predicted to be a housewife. 



DONALD \\ II. LARD SMITH 



IRVING RUSSEL SMITH 



JOHN WEBSTER SMITH 



GEORGE NELSON SOHL. JR. 




DONALD WILLARD SMITH "Dutch" ... #2 of the Lambdas . . . President of Inter-frat 
Council . . . ambitious Editor of the Pegasus . . . Who s Who . . . loves em and 
leaves em . . . erratic, vivacious, pleasing personality . . . boundless energy . . . 
carefree, capable and collegiate. 

IRVING RUSSEL SMITH "Peanut" . . . thunderous Theta Chi . . . rough and ready guard in 
football . . . what hair/ . . . good-natured, easy-going . . . perpetual smile . . . 
strong man . . . familiar campus ligure. 

JOHN WEBSTER SMITH Lambda Chi Alpha . . . government and history assistant . . . base- 
ball player . . . mannerly, manly, congenial, distant attachment . . . good com- 
panion . . . attractive smile ... a hearty fellow . . . well met. 



GEORGE NELSON SOHL. JR. Popular personality . . . Theta Chi . . . gridiron gouger . . . 
manager of track . . . varsity club . . . continuous smile ... a rugged individualist 
in the real sense ... a great future in front and behind him . . . Army Air Corps. 




PHILIP BOYER S< H DHR 



SARAH [SABELLF. SPEICHER 



MINOR PORTER STEELE 



MARJORIE ELSIE STARR 



PHILIP BOYER SOUDER "Phil" . . . president of Debate Club . . . Kappa Alpha officer . . . 
Glee Club prexy . . . history assistant . . . small but energetic ana enthusiastic . . . 
efficient basketball manager . . . left us after the first semester to join the armed 
forces. 

SARAH ISABELLE SPEICHER Alpha Chi . . . quick pert, vivacious . . . super songstress 
. . . polished piano player . . . dark, attractive, confident . . . batty on shoes of all 
sizes and descriptions . . . interesting, ambitious, capable, independent. 

MINOR PORTER STEELE Twice president of the Alpha Omicron Pi . . . Queen of the 
campus . . . tall, tense and terrific . . . dramatic s devotee . . . depth of mind and 
character . . . Cultured Cosmopolite . . . idealistic . . . bridge enthusiast . . . well 
met . . . well spoken . . . accomplished. 



MARJORIE ELSIE STARR Feminine brain trust ... all around classicist . . . Latin whiz 
Sigma Sigma Omicron . . . quiet, sophisticated . . . energetic and capable 
prexy of Classical society . . . has bright future as a successful pedagogue. 



WILLIAM MAXWELL STERLING 



THOMAS WATTS STEVENSON 



WILLIAM OLIVER SUTTON 



CHARLES EDGAR WOOD. JR. 




WILLIAM MAXWELL STERLING "Bill" . . . math major . . . keeper of the Royal Billiards 
. . . seen about town frequently . . . trained for a teacher . . . dependable 
bard working tennis manager . . . one of Frank s statisticians . . . headed tor the 
Coast Guard. 

THOMAS WATTS STEVENSON "Tom" . . . lean and tall mountaineer . . . history major . . . 
congenial, happy-go-lucky, sincere friend . . . transfer from Frostburg . . . good 
student ... a promising teaching career. 

WILLIAM OLIVER SUTTON "Crafty" . . . boarding student from nearby farm . . . cue-ball 
artist . . . arts major . . . nonchalant . . . reserved . . . cagey at cards . . . seldom 
heard from . . . store of cranial capital . . . now with the parachute troops. 



CHARLES EDGAR WOOD. JR. "Woody" . . . Theta Chi . . . frank, honest, jovial . . . clever 
carpenter . . . student of economics . . . determined, forward . . . discus and javelin 
burler . . . changeable, likeable . . . independent. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

ALTERI, MICHAEL ALBERT Wolcott. N. Y. 

ANDREWS. THOMAS BIRDSAL, JR 103 Mill St., Cambridge, Md. 

ANTHONY. JAMES ELMER. JR Centreville. Md. 

APPLEGARTH. HAROLD GREGORY 106 Church St., Cambridge, Md. 

ARNOLD, JOSEPH RAY Kitzmiller. Md. 

AYCOCK. JAMES MELCHER 3119 Ferndale Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

BALDWIN. WILLIAM STEWART Chestertown, Md. 

BARKER, WAYNE GRISWOLD Fort Hancock, N. J. 

BARNES, JOHN ELWOOD, JR Chestertown, Md. 

BARTOLINI. DAVID 13 Thomas St., Waterbury. Conn. 

BAUER. PEGGY ANN 224 Park Ave.. Swarthmore. Pa. 

BENJAMIN. WILLIAM CLYDE, JR Chestertown, Md. 

BENJAMIN, WILLIAM HERMAN 8 Center Ave., Trainer, Pa. 

BERRY, HARRY DALTON, JR 12 E. Burke Ave.. Towson, Md. 

BERRY. ROGER STANLEY. . . .Brook's Road, Central Ave., Seat Pleasant. Md. 
BISHOP. MARY EDITH Showell, Md. 

BLACKWOOD, MARY DOUGLAS 4406 Bond Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

BLACKWOOD, SARA DOUGLAS 4406 Bond Ave.. Drexel Hill. Pa. 

BOIKO, ELLEN 163 Long Hill Road. Waterbury, Conn. 

BOLLING, ANNE CHADWICK Brookeville. Md. 

BORDLEY, ELLEN COCHELLE Chestertown, Md. 

BOSC. EDMUND Forestville. Md. 

BOYER. EDWIN RISDON, JR 631 Linnard St., Baltimore, Md. 

BOYER, ELROY GEORGE Rock Hall, Md. 

BRANDT, WALTER CLARK 4202 Oakford Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

BRAUNSTEIN, IRVING DAVID Kerhonkson. N. Y. 

BRICE. LAWRENCE SMYTH Betterton, Md. 

BROADWATER, RUTH JEAN Chesapeake City. Md. 

BROCKSON. CLIFFORD ALLEN Chestertown, Md. 

BROWN. MADISON Centreville. Md. 

BRUTZ, CARL EDMUND 26 Bennitt St., New Milford. Conn. 

BURRELL, MOLLY STEWART "Woodlawn Manor," Earleville, Md. 

BURROWS. TERRENCE McMAN, JR.. .4732 Frederick Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

CAINE. JAMES BADLEY Clinton St., Delaware City, Del. 

CARNEY, BLANCHARD DONALD. 3613 Liberty Heights Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

CARNEY. JOHN CALVIN, JR 3615 Liberty Heights Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

CARTER. ROBERT EMERSON Berlin, Md. 

CARVER, WILLIAM FRANCIS 1900 Sulgrave Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

CHERASHORE, ARNOLD DAVID 363 Center St., Nutley. N. J. 

CLARK, BASIL CRAWFORD Church Road, EHicott City, Md. 

COHEN. LEONARD ARLIN 465 South Main St., Torrington, Conn. 

CONANT, DANIEL GILBERT, JR.. .215 New Castle St., Rehoboth Beach. Del. 

CONNORS, JOAN MARIE 1070 Ogden Ave.. Bronx, N. Y. 

COOKSEY. MARY MARGARET Mt. Victoria. Md. 

COOPER, VIRGINIA LOUISE 2805 Strathmore Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

COPELAND. THOMAS JOSEPH 1329 Bolton St., Baltimore. Md. 

COPPAGE. GEORGE HERMAN. JR Pearson, Md. 

CORDDRY, ROBERT NEWELL Snow Hill, Md. 

CORLEY, ROBERT NORMAN. ...116 Laurel Hill Road. Mountain Lakes. N. J. 

CRANE. ROBERT KELLOGG Chestertown, Md. 

CREGAR, HELEN CLAIRE 455 W. Hanover St.. Trenton. N. J. 

CREW. AMANDA VIRGINIA Betterton. Md. 

CRISS. JAMES ALAN 5406 Lynchester Road. Baltimore. Md. 

CROUCH. JAMES CHARLES Chestertown. Md. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

CROUCH, WINTER EDWIN, JR Church Hill. Md. 

CULVER, HELEN MARIE Chestertown, Md. 

CURSEY, ELLWOOD WEBSTER Kennedyville. Md. 

DAVIS, LLOYD ROBERT Federalsburg, Md. 

DEPALMA. PETER JOHN 1 16 Roosevelt St., Roselle Park. N. J. 

DERINGER. FLORENCE HURTT Still Pont, Md. 

DERINGER, JOHN ALDRICKS Chestertown, Md. 

D1ACUMAKOS, JAMES NICHOLAS. . .... .duPont Highway, Smyrana, Del. 

DINGER, MARIAN VIVIAN 507 Schuyler Road, Silver Spring, Md. 

DOCKHORN, BETH' PORTER 3507 Echodale Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

DORF, MILTON IRVING Chestertown, Md. 

DORSEY, ELIZABETH Chestertown. Md. 

DOUGHERTY, JAMES EDWARD 28 William St., Waterhury, Conn. 

DOWLING VERNON FRANKLIN Rock Hall, Md. 

DUDDERAR, RAYMOND ALBERT. . . .2923 Woodland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
DUKES, MARGARET ANNE Chestertown, Md. 

DULIN, CHARLES WESLEY Worton, Md. 

DULIN, WILLIAM EDWARD Worton, Md. 

EDWARDS, ELLEN SOPHIA Greensboro, Md. 

EISNER. WILLIAM STANLEY 1 102 E. Lombard St.. Baltimore, Md. 

ELIASON, THOMAS WALKER. JR Chestertown, Md. 

ELIASON, JOHN CREE Chestertown. Md. 

ELLICOTT. WARREN SADLER. . .261 1 Bavnard Boulevard. Wilmington. Del. 

ENGEL, MARTIN JAY 755 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. 

ENGLISH, HAROLD MEDVIN 706 Sunset Ave., Hagerstown. Md. 

ENGLISH. JAMES RUSSELL 1766 E. North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

ERSHLER, WILLIAM CARLTON 104 Robert St., Waterbury, Conn. 

EVANS, FRANK BARTON 224 E. Main St., Elkton, Md. 

EVERNGAM, MARIANA Denton, Md. 

FALARDEAU, WALTER JAY, JR.. .4604 43rd St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

FAULKNER. RANDOLPH THOMPSON Kenton, Del. 

FENDERSON. MARGARET ANN Chevy Chase, Md. 

FRARY, FRANCES MARION 13 Orchard Road. Great Neck, N. Y. 

FEEMAN. HAROLD MIDDLETON 117 Manheim Ave.. Oaklvn, N. J. 

FRITZ. JACKSON WRIGHT 1808 E. 32nd St., Baltimore, Md. 

GARDNER, FRANCES HELEN Greensboro, Md. 

GARNER. JAMES LAVERGNE 3625 Florida Ave., Randallstown. Md. 

GARRISON, MORTIMER. JR 40 East Ave., Bridgeton, N. J. 

GARRISON, ROBERT GUY Crisfield, Md. 

GENTRY, MILLARD SEWELL Fairton. N. J. 

GIBE, FRANK ATKINSON, JR Shiloh Road, Bridgeton, N. J. 

GILL, HENRIETTA Chestertown, Md. 

GILL, JOHN LEE Chestertown, Md. 

GILLAND, PEGGY ELAINE 32 Cardwell Ave., Raspeburg, Md. 

GOBERMAN. CHARLES ABRAM 2711 Boulevard, Wilmington, Del. 

GOODWIN, FRANCES MARY Clinton, Md. 

GORDON, ANN MURRAY Hilton Court Apartments. Baltimore, Md. 

GORMAN, ANDREW ROBINSON Chestertown, Md. 

GRABER. JEAN AVIS 933 Glen Terrace, Chester, Pa. 

GRAY. WILLIAM FRANCIS 1603 E. 32nd St.. Baltimore, Md. 

GROVE. ROBERT GARDNER 89 Douglas Ave., Lonaconing, Md. 

GWYN, LAWRENCE TINGLE 2905 Guilford Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

HACKETT, WILLIAM OLIVER Henderson, Md. 

HALL, DANIEL ANDREW Rising Sun, Md. 

HAMMOND, LOUISE LEDLEY Upper Falls, Md. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

HARNISCHFEGER. ELEANOR LOUISE. .4507 Schley Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

HARRIS. FRANCES ANN Chestertown. Md. 

HARRIS. JOHN ALGAYER "Maplewood," Bel Air. Md. 

HASTINGS. TURNER BIRCH Berlin. Md. 

HAZLETT. THEODORE J 123 Magnolia St.. Kennett Square. Pa. 

HEALEY. PHILIP NORMAN. JR 6903 Beech Ave., Overlea. Md. 

HESS. DAVID HAMPTON Hancock, Md. 

HESS, RACHEL ELIZABETH Jarrettsville, Md. 

HIGNUTT. CHARLOTTE ROSE Denton, Md. 

HILL. BETTY BAKER 1604 E. 29th St., Baltimore. Md. 

HILL, ROBERT RAYMOND, II Kennedyville. Md. 

HITCHCOCK. FERN RUDOLPH. JR Tanevtown. Md. 

HITCHCOCK, JOHN AUSTEN Box 210. PiWille. Md. 

HOBAN. WILLIAM MILES 2713 Mt. Holly St., Baltimore. Md. 

HUBBARD. ELINORE DI AN Chestertown. Md. 

HOLDT. ROBERT PAUL VON 451 I Arabia Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

HOOPES. VIRGINIA STREETT Darlington. Md. 

HODGES. WARREN JOSEPH 1813 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md. 

HORNE. JEAN ELEANOR Chestertown, Md. 

HORNER. ARCHIE HARRY Denton. Md. 

HORNER. DONALD HEARN Quantico, Md. 

HORNUNG. DONALD OSCAR Chestertown, Md. 

HOROWITZ. ROBERT SIDNEY. . .2634 Park Heights Terrace. Baltimore, Md. 

HORSFIELD. ROBERT 68 Monclair Ave.. North Newark. N. J. 

HOTCHKISS, HILDA LOUISE 211 Bryan Place, Hagerstown, Md. 

HOWARD, ARTHUR NEPOLEON 8913 Harford Road, Parkville. P. O.. 

Baltimore, Md. 

HUMPHREYS, MARY ELIZABETH Chestertown. Md. 

JABLIN, RICHARD FRANKLYN 2917 Harview Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

JACKSON, SAMUEL OMAR, JR 1914 E. 30th St.. Baltimore. Md. 

JOHANNS, ALICE AUGUSTA Bloomsbury Ave.. Catonsville, Md. 

JOHNSON, EDWARD EUGENE 315 Meredith St.. Kennett Square. Pa. 

JOHNSON, RUTH FRANCES 63 Thorne St., Patchogue. N. Y. 

JOHNSON. RUFUS CLAY 257 S. Division St., Salisbury. Md. 

JOHNSTON, JOAN Mt. Defiance. Middleburg, Va. 

JOHNSTON, LYLE TESSON, JR Mt. Defiance. Middleburg, Va. 

JONES. JEROME CALVERT, JR Chester. Md. 

JONES. WILLIAM IRVING. JR 4205 Oakford Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

JULIANA, JAMES NICHOLAS 225 N. Church St.. Moorestown, N. J. 

KARDASH. JOHN 641 W. Hoffman St., Baltimore, Md. 

KATZENBERG. MORTON CHARLES. . . .2304 Eutaw Place. Baltimore. Md. 

KAYLOR, NELSON WILLIAM 25 Oak St., Cumberland, Md. 

KEESTER. GEORGE BENNETT 117 Water St.. Chestertown. Md. 

KEPLER. ATLEE CALVIN Middletown, Md. 

KINTNER, MARY ANNA Perryville. Md. 

KIRBY, WILLIAM SETH 205 Earl Ave., Easton. Md. 

KIRWAN. JOHN PHILLIP Bailev Ave.. Cambridge. Md. 

KLEIN. SAMUEL 225 Clermont Ave., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

KREEGER, FRANCES ELIZABETH Chestertown, Md. 

KURZE. THEODORE 161 Verbena Ave., Floral Park, N Y. 

LACHMAR. ELLEN LEE 1 1 Brookletts Ave., Easton. Md. 

LARMORE, EARNEST MARCELLUS. JR Tyaskin. Md. 

LATHAM, ELVA LUCILLA Denton, Md. 

LEAVERTON. SHIRLEY MAE Centreville, Md. 

LELAND. JEAN MAY 4410 Ethland Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

LENTZ, VALENTINE WILLIAM. JR.. . .3032 Edmondson Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 
LERNER. GUV ELWOOD Box 122, Hancock. Md. 

LEWIS. DOROTHY ARLINE 4007 Oglethorpe St.. Hvattsville. Md. 

LITTLETON. OLIVER WILBERT. JR 3111 Tvndale Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

LIVINGSTON. ROBERT LEE 210 Washington St.. Salisbury. Md. 

LLEWELYN. PAUL MEGGER 713 "C" St.. Sparrows Point. Md. 

LOGAN. ANNA RUTH Chestertown. Md. 

LOHMULLER. BETTY OZELAH 613 E. 34th St.. Baltimore. Md. 

LOLL. GUS WILLL4X 1 50 Monroe St.. Bridgeton. N. J. 

LORE. HARRY ELMER. JR Cedarville. N. J. 

LOWERY. ISABEL COOKE Chester. Md. 

LUMPKIN. MARY LU Chestertown, Md. 

LYNCH. CALVIN WILLIAMS Chestertown. Md. 

LYNCH. HERBERT DICKSON Rising Sun, Md. 

LYON. HENRY HARROP 194 E. Commerce St., Bridgeton, N. J. 

LYON. JANE CROSBY 194 E. Commerce St.. Bridgeton, N. J. 

LYTWYN, THEODORE 87 South 21st St.. Irvington, N. J. 

McCLELLAN. DONALD SHOEMAKER. .610 Hazlewood Road. Ardmore. Pa. 

MacHALE. JOHN MARTIN. JR Easton. Md. 

Mclaughlin. Joseph francis. jr 433 e. isth St.. Chester, p a . 

McNIFF. FRANCIS WALTER 46 William St., Waterburv, Conn. 

MACIELAG. FRANK 551 1 W. 3rd St.. Chester. Pa. 

MACKRELL. ALEXANDER JAMES 1 10 Penn Ave., Collingswood. N. J. 

MAGUIRE, HENRY FRANCIS 142 Randolph Ave.. Jersey City, N. J. 

MARTIN. HAROLD ODEST. JR Princess Anne. Md. 

MEAD. FRANCIS HUDSON Chestertown. Md. 

MEISER. CHARLES HERBERT. JR Stockton. Md. 

MERRIKEN. ELLENOR MARIE Federalsburg, Md. 

MESSICK. JEAN FRANCE 2901 Hillcrest Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

METCALFE, JAMES GAWITH, JR 99 Queen St., Chestertown, Md. 

MILES. SOUTHEY FRANCIS. JR 1909 Chelsea Road, Baltimore, Md. 

MOONEY, ALBERT LEE 4007 Cheslev Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

MORGAN. HERBERT JOSHAU, JR 103 South St.. Elkton, Md. 

MUNYAN. ROBERT KENNETH 5 Merion Terrace. Collingswood, N. J. 

MURPHY, AUSTIN RAY, JR Denton. Md. 

MURRAY. NORMA LEE Princess Anne, Md. 

MYER, HARRY LEO 2501 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md. 

NACRELLI. JOHN HENRY 104 W. 24th St.. Chester. Pa. 

NAGLER. WILLIAM MICHAEL. JR.. . .5041 Philadelphia Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 
NAIRN. CHARLES BELDING. JR 827 Glen Allen Drive. Baltimore. Md. 

NARDI. MARY BERNICE Hogbin Road. Millville, N. J. 

NASH. MARY ELIZABETH 4 Iona Ave.. Narberth. Pa. 

NATANSON. MURRY 2021 65th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

NEIGHBOUR. GRACE PAULINE 50 Clinton Ave.. Arlington. N. J. 

NEWTON. CATHERINE ELIZABETH Chestertown, Md. 

NEWTON. ELEANOR MARIE Chestertown, Md. 

NOWAK, ALBERT WILLIAM 1 121 E. 15th St.. Wilmington. Del. 

OCKER. MIRIAM HEATHCOTE 517 W. Joppa Road, Towson. Md. 

OCKRYMIEK, ALEXANDER IS Breckenridge Terrace, Irvington, N. J. 

OLSEN. HARRIET BESSIE 1 10 Third St., Elmer, N. J. 

PACA. WILLIAM WINCHESTER. JR Chestertown. Md. 

PACKMAN. ALLAN BERNARD. . .28 S. Montgomery Ave., Atlantic City. N. J. 

PALDER, EDWARD LAWRENCE 9 Cleveland Ave.. Takoma Park, Md. 

PARKS. RUDOLPH MARION 12 Terrace Road, Essex, Md. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

PARRIS, JAMES LEONARD 24 Liberty Parkway, Dundalk. Md. 

PARRIS. PAUL SOUTHERLAND. JR 70 Gaston St.. West Orange. N. J. 

PATTERSON. WILBERT THOMAS. JR Dogwood Road, Woodlawn. Md. 

PAYNE. WILFORD HENRY. JR 303 N. Queen St., Chestertown. Md. 

PETERS. ELLEN ELIZABETH 1526 Round Hill Road. Baltimore, Md. 

PETERS, PHYLIS JEAN 1526 Round Hill Road. Baltimore, Md. 

PETRY, MARIA THERESA Millington, Md. 

PHILLIPS. DOROTHY JEAN Millington, Md. 

PIERCE. ROBERT WARDELL.301 Rodman Rd.. Gordon Heights. Wilmington 

PITT. MARGARET AYARS Port Deposit. Md. 

PLETTS. DONALD COLE 13 Lincoln St.. Brunswick. Maine 

PORTER. THAYER PRETTYMAN 113 St. Laurence. Rehoboth, Del. 

POTE, HENRI DE VRIES 13 E. Brandywine Ave., Claymont, Del. 

POTTS. MARIAN ELIZABETH Hillsboro, Md. 

POWERS, MILDRED WOODSON Chestertown, Md. 

PRETTYMAN, WILLIAM CLARK Tilgbman. Md. 

PRITCHARD, MARGARET JANE Salisbury. Md. 

RAINEY, LAURA CAROLYN Swedesboro, N. J. 

REED, VERNON DUVALL 510 Wilton Road. Towson. Md. 

REINDOLLAR. DOROTHY ALICE 4006 Bonner Road. Baltimore. Md. 

REVELLE. WILLIAM HARRISON. JR St. Michaels. Md. 

RIEDY, DOROTHY ELIZABETH Chestertown, Md. 

RIEDY, WILSON LOBACH Chestertown. Md. 

RODNEY. CHARLES ALFRED. JR Rock Hall. Md. 

ROE, HARRY RITTENHOUSE Centreville, Md. 

ROE, WILLIAM MEDFORD DUDLEY Sudlersville, Md. 

ROGERS, IRMA LIBBIE . Walnut Park Plaza Hotel Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSSBERG WILLIAM CHARLES 506 Hazlett Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

ROTHERMEL. CHARLES EDWARD. JR North East, Md. 

ROUSE. ANN JEWELL 21 Rigdon Road. Aberdeen, Md. 

RUARK, PAUL EDWIN, JR 510 Chesapeake Ave., Crisheld, Md. 

RUFF, ROBERT ANDREW, JR Virginia Ave., Catonsville, Md. 

RUSSELL, MARY LANDON Chestertown. Md. 

RUSSELL. NAOMI WATERS Chestertown, Md. 

SALTSMAN. SAMUEL ATHERTON. JR 6 Forest Drive, Catonsville. Md. 

SAMELE. FRANKLIN 301 E. Main St., Torrington, Conn. 

SCHROETER. FRED WILLIAM 3626 Gibbons Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

SEVERSON. HELEN VIRGINIA Golt, Md. 

SEWELL. MIRIAM VIRGINIA Mt. Verncn Ave.. Chestertown, Md. 

SEYMOUR, DAVD Cmmpton, Md. 

SHARRER. NORMAN EUGENE Rocky Ridge, Md. 

SHEPPARD, MILTON RORAY, JR 22 Institute Place, Bridgeton, N. J. 

SHILLINGER. FREDERICK WILLIAM Easton. Md. 

SHINNAMON. FRANCIS ALBERT 1 15 Rosewood Ave.. Catonsville. Md. 

SINCLAIR. RAYMOND GRIFFITH, JR. .151 Lawnside Ave., CoIIingswood, N. J. 

SLADE. HARRY MONTROSE Reisterstown. Md. 

SLEMMER. WILLIAM RAIMOND. JR Frederick, Md. 

SMITH, DONALD WILLARD 1612 E. 50th St., Baltimore, Md. 

SMITH, GRETCHEN LUISE 14505 Hamlin St., Van Nuys, Calif. 

SMITH, IRVING RUSSEL 704 Gay St., Salisbury, Md. 

SMITH, JOHN RICHARD. Church Hill, Md. 

SMITH, JOHN WEBSTER Federalsburg, Md. 

SMITH, RUTH ALBERTA Goldsboro, Md. 

SOHL, GEORGE NELSON. JR 1015 Morton St.. Baltimore. Md. 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 

SOUDER. PHILIP BOYER Monrovia, Md. 

SPEICHER. SARAH ISABELLE Ckestertown. Md. 

STARR, ELSIE MARJORIE Galena, Md. 

STEELE, MAURICE GAYLORD, JR Havre de Grace. Md. 

STEELE, MINOR PORTER Havre de Grace, Md. 

STEFFENS. DIETRICH HENRY Bryantown. Md. 

STERLING. WILLIAM MAXWELL 164 Green St., Annapolis. Md. 

STEVENS, JAMES ARTHUR, JR 2821 Winchester St., Baltimore. Md. 

STEVENS. LOIS MARGARET Ckestertown, Md. 

STEVENSON. THOMAS WATTS Mountain Lake Park. Md. 

STORM. ELMER MARLIN 3138 Oakford Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

STOUFFER, GRACE MARIE 902 Davis Ave., Takoma Park, Md. 

STROMBERG. MAURICE HERMAN 1823 Baker St.. Baltimore, Md. 

STRONG, MARY JEANNE Chestertown, Md. 

STUBBLEFIELD, EMMAJO 4308 Yuma St.. N. W., Washington 

SUNDERLAND, ELLA ANNABELLE 101 1 Oak Hill Ave., Hagerstown 

SUTHERLAND, ALICE 8 Center Road. Towson, Md. 

SUTTON. JOSEPH AUGUSTINE 103 Queen St.. Chestertown, Md. 

SUTTON, WILLIAM OLIVER Kennedyville, Md. 

SVEC, JAMES FREDERICK 813 N. Glover St.. Baltimore, Md. 

SYLVESTER. DOLA MARIE Goldsboro, Md. 

TARR. NORMAN 2633 Cecil Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

TAYLOR. FRANCIS, JR 52 Progress Ave.. Woodbury, N. J. 

TEAL. LEE DE HIRST Chestertown. Md. 

THORNTON. MARIE LOUISE Worton, Md. 

THAWLEY, ROBERT HOOPER Denton, Md. 

THOMAS, ELMER COLLINS, JR Chestertown, Md. 

TISCHER. DORCAS JOAN Greenhill Road. Dover. Del. 

TOML1NSON. JOSEPH HANSON. Ill Sykesville, Md. 

TOWNER. JOSEPH BONN, JR Chestertown, Md. 

TRUSLOW, MARY LOUISE Chestertown, Md. 

TWUPACK. FRANCIS WILLIAM Charlotte Hall. Md. 

TYLER, EDGAR BYRON 203 Broad St., Salisbury, Md. 

VALENTINE, CLARENCE ELDRED. .271 Devonshire Road, Hagerstown. Md. 

VOITH, GEORGE GERARD 1621 E. 29th St.. Baltimore, Md. 

WAESCHE, SARA MAGDALENE Thurmont, Md. 

WALBERT. WALTER LEE, JR Chestertown, Md. 

WALDMAN, SIDNEY 1701 Moreland Ave.. Baltimore. Md. 

WALTERS, JOHN GILLESPIE Still Pond, Md. 

WARD. IDA LOUISE 544 East 38th St.. Baltimore, Md. 

WARFIELD. HENRY BRANCH Svkesville, Md. 

WARTHER, JOHN MARTIN, JR 631 Parkwyrth Ave.. Baltimore, Md. 

WHITE, ELEANOR EVANS Chestertown. Md. 

WIENEKE, CHARLES WILLIAM Greensboro. Md. 

WILKINSON, KENNETH LEE 600 Walnut St., Pocomoke City, Md. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN WRIGHT, JR Prince Frederick. Md. 

WILLIAMS, JUDSON THOMAS, JR 2100 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

WILSON, CHARLES FREDERICK 1 19 Buffalo Ave., Takoma Park, Md. 

WOLCOTT, MARGARET KATHRYN Centreville, Md. 

WOOD, CHARLES EDGAR, JR 2952 Manns Ave., Parkville, Md. 

WOOD, NORMA JEAN A-S04 Wilson Point Road, Middle River. Md. 

WOODFORD. WALTER EDGAR. JR Centreville. Md. 

YERKES, LEWIS ALBERT 10 West Homestead Ave.. CoIIingswood. N. J. 

EARTHROWL. FRANCIS HENRY. JR 105 Riverview Ave.. 

Longmeadow, Mass. 



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Compliments of 


FLORIST 
CHESTERTOWN. MD. 


BAKERS 

OF 


Flowers for All Occasions 
Phone 283 


BOND BREAD 



FAMED -FROM POLE TO POLE! 



Back in 1917, Dr G. A. Bunting, Washington 
College, class of 1891, perfected the formula 
for Noxzema Medicated Skin Cream. 

Today Noxzema is world famous! It is sold 
not only throughout the United States and 
Canada — but in practically every country in 
the world. It has gone by dog-sled to distant 
Hudson Bay trading posts in the shadow of 
the North Pole. It was included in the supplies 
of the U S. Antarctic Service's Expedition to 
the South Pole! 

For this soothing, greaseless, medicated cream 
has been found invaluable for quick relief 
from Sunburn, Windburn, Chapped Hands 
and Lips, Painfully-Chafed Skin, Shaving dis- 
comfort Poor Complexion, and many other 
types of externally-caused skin irritations. 




OVER 15 MILLION JARS 
USED EVERY YEAR! 



NOXZEMA CHEMICAL COMPANY, BALTIMORE, MD. 



THE TRANSCRIPT 

CHESTERTOWN. MD. 


FOLLOW THE BEST-GROOMED MEN 


Neat Printing Our Specialty 


TO 


Dance Programs — Tickets 




Placards, Etc. 


OTIS BARBER SHOP 


• 


UNDER THE VOSHEL HOUSE 


COMPLETE COVERAGE OF NEWS 





Compliments of 

The Chestertown Light and Power Company 

Westinghouse Mazda Lamps 

Phone 333 
CHESTERTOWN MARYLAND 



ALWAYS UP TO DATE WITH THE 
BEST BUILDING MATERIALS 

E. S. ADKINS AND COMPANY 

And Associated Yards 

EVERYTHING NEEDED FOR BUILDING 

CHESTERTOWN— HURLOCK— SALISBURY— CENTERV1LLE— EASTON— BERLIN 



Your Printer . . . 

is he your Partner or your Victim? 

In the long run, you cheat yourself when you play one printer against another in buying 
printing on a price basis. You are handicapping the working power of a man who cooper- 
ates with the administration and development of every department in your business. . . . 
Make your printer feel that he is a vital part of your organization, and you will be assured 
of much greater value from your printing in many ways. . . . The real test of effective print- 
ing is not what it costs but what it produces. And the only way to get good printing is to 
find a good printer and make him your partner . . . not your victim. 



The Queen Anne's Record & Observer 
Publishing Company, Inc. 



CENTERVILLE 



Phone 1 — MARYLAND 



FULTON-GRAND 
LAUNDRY 

BALTIMORE'S BETTER LAUNDERERS 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE KENT GRILLE 

HOME-COOKED FOOD 
CHESTERTOWN MARYLAND 



National Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

SCHOOL and COLLEGE SPECIALISTS 

Outfitters to Washington College 
Student and Alumni Headquarters in Baltimore 

RAWLINGS ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 



George A. Bratt, Jr., President 



310 E. Baltimore St. 



Phone Calvert 0284 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

FORNEY'S JEWELRY 
SHOP 

CHESTERTOWN 



MD. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE PEOPLE'S BANK 

of 
CHESTERTOWN, MD. 



Buy U. S. Defense Bonds and Stamps 

The Wm. Schluderberg - T. J. Kurdle Co. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Producers of 

ESKAY QUALITY MEATS 



THE PACA SHOP 

A Smart Shop tor Women 



HIGH STREET 
CHESTERTOWN 







COMPLIMENTS ! 


COMPLIMENTS 




OF 


OF 




J. KREEGER 


THE CHESTERTOWN BANK 


Optometrist 


of 




CHESTERTOWN, MD. 


MARYLAND 




COMPLIMENTS 
OF 


♦ 




THE CHESTERTOWN 
RESTAURANT 


CHESTERTOWN. MD. 




HIGH ST. 


Ai 




i 


I 

||| COFy-FEE ,^ 


TIMID BOY MEETS GIRL , 




V ' .key- «««■«<•„ ,{ 


WANTS TO MEET HER 
AGAIN 




HAS LOTS OF OOMPH 




NOW 




'CAUSE HE DRINKS 11-10. 



ERIM-BALIBAM 

• SPECIALISTS IN YEARBOOK PHOTOGRAPHY— 
PROVIDING HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
AND EFFICIENT SERVICE FOR MANY OUT- 
STANDING SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES YEARLY. 

• OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS TO THE 1942 
PEGASUS WASHINGTON COLLEGE. 

• ALL PORTRAITS APPEARING IN THIS PUBLICA- 
TION HAVE BEEN PLACED ON FILE IN OUR 
STUDIOS AND CAN BE DUPLICATED AT ANY 
TIME FOR PERSONAL USE. WRITE OR CALL US 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 

1010 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA, 





fataattt efe&ZMt, cawtyawP 



Suppose, Mr. Editor, when you settled down on your yearbook you discovered that you 
had on your staff four cracker-jack artists who had designed hundreds of leading 
books, several experienced layout men, a seasoned yearbook expert who was qualified 
to discuss your ideas and problems with you, several people who knew the ins and outs 
of engraving, printing, and offset — would you produce an outstanding yearbook? 
What could stop you? 

Cease dreaming and see CAMPUS which has all the above assets. They are specialists 
with the background of wide yearbook experience and equipped in every way to assist 
you and your staff produce an outstanding book. 

campus PUBLiSHinG company, inc. 

1316 ARCH STREET • PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

PRINTING • ENGRAVING • OFFSET • ART SERVICE 




GEORGE AVERY BUNTING LIBRA* 

WASHINGTON COLLEGE 

aUBSTERTOWN, MARYLAND