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Full text of "The Pen"






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WE HONOR 




Rev. Edgar H. Goold 



As a token of our appreciation of his affection and sincere friendship; for 
his genuine interest in the spiritual as well as the material welfare of every indi- 
vidual, and his whole-hearted cooperation in solving our many problems, we 
dedicate this Yearbook to— our understanding counselor. Rev. Edgar H. Goold. 





Edson E. Blackman, M. D. 

President, Alumni Assocation 

THE PEN 

St. Augustine's College 

Raleigh, N. C. 

I am very glad that you are going to publish a Yearbook which will 
embody the many activities and personalities of the college. It is a 
worthwhile effort and the publication will be a valuable souvenir 
and will remind us as the years go by of what our Alma Mater was 
and looked like in the year 1941. 

EDSON E. BLACKMAN 

President, Alumni Association 



EDITORIAL 



Many of the conditions and problems 
which face mankind today cause us to 
hesitate and try to avoid unpleasant reali- 
ties. This, of course, cannot be done. Reali- 
ties are realities and even four happy years 
at St. Augustine's must come to a conclu- 
sion. 

After we feel the tension and ex- 
perience the poignant emotions which ac- 
company graduation and goodbyes, we 
will wake up to find ourselves in our res- 
pective communities. We do not expect 
that our old friends and conditions will be 
just as they were four years affo because 
we do not live in a vacuum. They have 
changed and so have we. Our formal col- 
lege experiences and our religious train- 
ing have given us new perspectives. Our 



solemn duty, now, is to take these glad 
tidings home and share them indulgently 
with those who have not been so fortun- 
ate. Let us not forget that slowly but 
surely we must lift our people out of the 
mire, for their uplift is ours also. We re- 
turn humbly and reverently to our parents 
for their history is pregnant with heart- 
aches, sacrifice, nobleness of spirit, and 
a persistent vision of a more hopeful 
future. Like them, we are still pioneers. 
Our burden is threefold. We must not 
fail them, we must not fail St. Augustine, 
and in a broader sense, we must not fail 
our fellowmen. May God bless us as we 
part, comrades, and may fate deal kind- 
ly with us. 

Charles X. Atkins '41 



Advisors 






PEARL A. SNODGRASS, B. S.. M. A. 

Biblical Literature and Librarian 

Senior Class Adviser 



CECIL D. HALLIBURTON, B. A., 

M. A. 

Social Science 
Senior Glass Adviser 
Pen Staff Adviser 



GLORIA E. BAIRD, B. A, M. A. 

English 
Pen Staff Adviser 





•f \ 



ALLEN E. WEATHERPORD B. S. 

M. Ed. 

Mens' Procter-Athletic Director 
School llvgeine 






REGINALD L. LYNCH, B. A., M. A. 

French 
Acting Dean 




CECIL X. COBLE, B. S. 
Science, Mathematics 




MABEL M. LATHAM, B. S. 

English 



oiarr 



LLOYD L. WOODS, B. A., Se. M. 
Head of Chemistry Dept. 



IVAN E. TAYLOR, B. A., M. A. 
Head of English Dept. 




ARTHUR P. CHIPPY, B. A., M, A. * 

7 
- 



Science, Biology 



JULIA DELANY, B. A., M. A. 

English, Expression 



T. CURTIS MAYO, Mus. B., Mus, M. 
Director of Music 



Members 



THEODORA R. BOYD, B. A., M. A. 
Physical Education, French 






EARL H. McCLENNY, B. A., M. A. 
IZ><m? 0/ Education Dept. 



ALMIRA J. KENNEDY, B. A. 

English 



ELSIE M. COOK 
Secretary and Registrar 



ALICE HALL 
Supervisor of Laundry 




JOHN H. FRANKLIN, B. A., M. A. 
History 



GEORGE L. VICK, B. S., M. S. 
Mathematics and Physics 



PAUL McSTALLWORTH, B. A. 
M. A. 

History and Social Sciences 



ESTELLA G. GRAYSON, B. A. 
B.S. 

Assistant Librarian 



ALLENE PITTS 
Dietitian 



BERNICE B. TAYLOR, B. A. 
Assistant to Superintendent 



CHARLES N. ATKINS 
"Butch" 
New York, N. Y. 
Football, Varsity, Layreader, Dra- 
matics, Chenuatry Asst , Acies Di- 
m-tor of Brotherhood, Eta Sigma 
Mu Society', Pen Staff Editor, 
Class Vice-President, Barber prize 
speaking contest winner 1939, Hon- 
or Roll 
Chemistry B. S. 



MAX BRITTO 

"Gito" 
East Orange, N. J. 
Basketball, Football, Varsity, Ac- 
ies, Eta Sigma Mu Society 
General Science B. S. 



THOMASCINA DUNCAN 

" To mm 11 " 

Hamlet, N. C. 

Basketball, Choral Club, Choir, 

Student Council 
Chemistry B. S. 



ELBRE B. GAITER 

" The Gate" 

Coconut Grove, Florida 

Tennis Team, Varsity Basketball 

Historr B. A. 




THOMAS -J. BEMBRY, Jr. 

"Be.m" 
Edenton. N. Q 
Cant. Football team, Basketball 
Varsity, Creative Dancing, Clasr 
Preside nt, President of Studen' 
Council and Chancellors. All State 

C. I. A. A. '10 
History B. A. 



GLADYS V. DELPHY 

' ' Delfi ' ' 

Dayton, Ohio 

Student Council, Archery, Altar 

Guild, President Lea Elites 
History B. A. 



THELAIA LOUISE GARY 

Hampton, Va. 
Choir, Jr. Women 'sAux. Class Sec. 

Choral Club, Les Elites 
History, English B. A. 



DAVID ALBERT HARPER 

'■Dave" 
Thomasville, Ga. 
Choral Club, Student Council, Bro- 
therhood, Sec. Acie3, Soloist 
English B. A. 



CHARLES GARFIELD 

HOWELL 

' ' Shadow ' ' 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Track, Tennis, Choral Club, Choir 

Layreader, Brotherhood, Pen Staff 

Social Science B. A. 



LLOYD ALLEN 

"Mr. Young" 

Houston, Texas 

Choir, Choral Club, Dramatics 

Acies Brotherhood, Pen Staff Art- 

tist. 
History B. A. 



MURIEL A. CARTER 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Winner of English .Scholarship 

1938, Honor Roll 
English French B. A. 



ALEXANDER EASLEY 
" Cop" 
Richmond, Va. 
Choir, Dramatics Social Commit- 
tee, President Music Guild 
English B. A. 



THELMA R, HAMILTON 

' ' Shadow" 

Charleston, S. C. 

Dramatics 

English B. A. 



HARRY T. JOHNSON 
"Taylor" 
Avon, X. Y. 
Capt. Football Team, Basketball. 
Varsity, Lavreader, Creative Danc- 
ing, History Club, Chancellors, Eta 

Sigma Mu Society, Honor Roll 
Chemistry B. S. 




IVY BURNSIDE 

' 'Sifleburn ' ' 
East Orange, N. J. 
Honor Roll 
History B. 



P ■ ^* ^S. 




ROSIA MAE DE LAINE 

"Siiring Bosc" 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Choral Club, Junior l 'Y" member 

English B. A. 



CHARLES W. FOX 

' 'Preacher' ' 
Kearneyville, W. Va. 
Choir, Lavreader, Varsity. Bro- 
therhood, Football, Student Coun- 
cil Acies. Honorable Mentioned 

all C. I. A. A. 
English B. A. 



DORIS LANE HOLLOW AY 
" Holloira ' ' 
Durham, X. C. 
Historv B. A. 



DAVID WENDELL JONES 

: 'D'Wen" 

Sommerville, Mass. 

Athletic Council, Dramatics, Bro- 

therhood 
English B. A. 



SADIE E. NEWKIRK 

Raleigh, N. ('. 

Basketball, Badminton, Biology 

Asst., Winner of Science Prize 1040 

Honor Roll 
Chemistry B. S. 



LOUISE ALMA PERRY 

' ' Lou " 

FranJtlinton, N. C. 

French B. A. 



MIRIAM E. ROBERTS 

"NicTcy" 
Columbia, 8. ('. 
• ' ioir_ Altar Guild, Dramatics, Les 
Elites. Winner of Creative Con- 
test 1040, Honor Roll 




CARLOTTA E. MAXWELL 

• ' Cliclcy ' ' 

East Orange, N. J. 

choral Club, Tennis, Jr. Women's 

A:ix., Archery, Year Book Commit 

tee. Honor Roll 
English B. A. 



HERMAN 0. MARSHALL 

' ' Doe ' ' 

Wilson, N. C. 

Football. Varsity, Brotherhood, 

Food Committee, Acies, Eta Sigma 

Mu Society 
Chemistry B. S. 



HENRY BITFORD PERRY 

"Bufo" 

Thomasville, Ga. 

Varsity, Acies, Class Treasurer, 
Brotherhood, Eta Sigma Mu Soci- 
ety, Track 
Chemistry B. S. 



MELTON J. SADLER 

••J- rod" 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Varsity 

General Science B. S. 



GEORGE W. SHERMAN 
' ■ Crysan Theman ' ' 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Acies, Choir, Sec. Brotherhood, 

Choral Club, Track 

Iieneral Science B. S. 



MARGARET JUANITA 
SATTERWHITE 

' ' Mar go ' ' 
Dunn, N. C. 
Basketball, Dramatics, Junior Wo- 
men's Aux. Zeta Sigma Rho Soc- 
iety- 
History B. A. 




PAUL MILTON SMITH, Jr. 

" Smithy ' ' 

Raleigh, X. C. 

History B. A. 



DOROTHY L. PAIGE 

"Los" 
B. A. 

Raleigh, 2S T . C. 



FLORIA B. MOORE 
"Flo " 

Clayton, N C. 



Winsome Seniors Prep. Dept. 



WILBUR R. SAUNDERS 
"Will" 

Raleigh, N. C. 

ELIZABETH H. VINCENT 
B. A. 




JOYCE W. MYERS 



Class Song 



hail dear school, we much adore' 

God's benedictions we implore ; 

Upon thy sacred walls and grounds, 

Where e'er thy children may be found. 

Within thy loving atmosphere ; 

Which draws thy sons and daugthers near. 

We'll always sing thy praises kind. 

And thou, of us, shall e'er be proud. 

We'll always raise thy praises high, 

And while our fame soars through the sky, 

0. S-T-A-. My S-T-A, 

Thy children live to honor thee. 

Words by Louise A. Perry '41 
Music by Elizabeth Vincent '41 




DOROTHY G. JOSEPH 

Class Poem 

Four Cloistered years 

Have passed ; 

Four cloistered years 

Plave armed us to the teeth 

And now we sally forth 

Upon the Seven Winds ; 

Thoughtful, impatient, and spirited : 

A task before each one of us — 

Some duty to perform. 

We'll therefore, work 

With might and main 

To do our share — smiling. 

And if, perchance, frowns and aloofness 

Be our lone rewards. 

Then we'll still fight like champions; 

For we are Alma Mater's sons and daughters. 

We will not shame her. 

We'll bear on liijrh her standards 

xVnd defend her virtues rare 

For we. her sons and daughters 

Love old Alma Mater. Dear. 

Charles N. Atkins '41 



THE BISHOP TUTTLE SCHOOL 




Some Members of The Faculty and Students 




A national Center under the auspices of the Episcopal Church for training 
workers The school is open to college graduates and offers a two-year course m 
religious education and social work. On the basis of this training every graduate 
has found work in one of these- two fields. Thirty-six hours of class work, of 
which twenty-four are in the junior year, and one thousand hours of field work 
are required for graduation. During the senior year there is a period of three 
months' intensive field work on the staff of some parish or agency. Students are 
assisted in finding work through the summer that affords useful experience. 



CLASS PROPHECY 



Dear Thelnia, 

It's terrible that you were too busy to 
make the trip down to dear old St. Aug. 
for our class reunion. But a registrar's 
job is no easy one at this time of the year, 
especially in a school like Hampton. It's 
nice that you are able to keep a position 
at home. 

You must come up to "Washington to 
visit my finishing school. The girls are 
such lovely things; I'm so happy that I 
thought of establishing it. 

More of that later; our class reunion is 
what I'm writing to tell you about. And 
I don't intend to leave out a single per- 
son, Nearly all of us returned for the re- 
union. Charles Fox was not there, along 
with the others, but he sent his greet- 
ings from Brazil where he is doing Mis- 
sion work. The church there has made 
wonderful progress. 

My trip was interesting from the begin- 
ning. When I was leaving Washington I 
met one of the old Glamour Boys, George 
Sherman, at the station. He has been work- 
ing in Washington for the past five years 
he tells me, but I never even knew it. His 
work as civil service statistician employees 
in the South keeps him out of town much 
of the time. George and I had fun remem- 
bering oldtimes together. 

Margaret. Dr. Charles Atkins (Bui oh to 
us), and Dr. Britto -imagine-met us at 
the station. Margaret looks well and the 
three girls all favor her. Jones, or if you 
please, Professor Jones is on leave Of ab- 
sence from the Department of English at 
St. Aug-working on his Ph. D. at Fniver- 
sity of Michigan— That accounts for his 
not being along-Butch and Britto. I simp- 
ly find it impossible to call our old class- 
mates by their professional titles, however 
proud I am that many of them are so suc- 
cessful-are stationed at Xew St Agnes Hos- 
pital, now one of the bpst and most modern 
in the South, by the American Medical As- 
socation to do research work on children's 
Diseases. Both have been physicians for 
only four years ; their progress in medicine 
is surprising. And Britto is so busy these 
days that he has almost lost his gift oC 2'ab. 

Butch, who himself is writing poems for 
publication, gave me a volume of lovely 
poems that Rosia Delaine has just publish- 
ed. 



At the college : Thomas Bembry gave the 
class one of those "whole hearted wel- 
comes" that he loves so well to do. It was 
hard for him to get at this time of year- 
he's Diesel engine expert at Baldwin Mail- 
ing Shops, but as the Bern always would, 
he made it. 

The program was varied and exception- 
ally interesting. I've read much about the 
Harper, Vincent, Perry troupe but this was 
my first occasion to hear them. I don't 
know who made her do it. but Lou finally 
is really giving the public the benefit of 
that beautiful voice of hers — and Vincent's 
piano technique is perfect now. Dave's 
voice has developed to no less degree. The 
three have but recently returned from 
giving a series of concerts in Babia — they 
saw Father Fox while in South America. 
The Metropolitan has contracted with them 
to sing in one of the operas in the spring- 
Elizabeth serving as pianst of course. 

Lloyd Allen is drawing a good income as 
an advertising artist for five leading firms. 
Consumers- Economic at St. Aug. led him 
into that field of art. But don't for the mi- 
nute thinks that he does't whistle anymore 
He whistled The William Tell Overture on 
the program. 

Thehna Hamilton who is a prominent ac- 
tress on the Xew York stage did several 
monologues, swell they were. Beginning 
next week she is booked for ihree weeks at 
the Paramount to play one of the leading 
roles in Rosia Delaine's modernized adapt- 
ation of Romeo and Juliet. 

Paul Smith and Elbre Gaitor are at St. 
Aug. teaching History From all indica- 
tions they are doing efficient work. It is 
satisfying to know that our Alma Mater 
has employed so many of the alumni. 

I was so glad to find that Delphy had 
come to the reunion. She brought the chil- 
dren along — twin boys, six years old. She 
and her husband, who is a surgeon are plan- 
ning to move to Liberia in September where 
he will be head surgeon in the General 
Hospital. 

Muriel Carter Constant carried us to her 
apartment in Chavis Heights — the coziest 
place — and adorable! Speaking of apart- 
ments in Chavis Heights- Wilbur Saunders 
is manager there now, you know. 

Delphy and 1 were walking back to the 
campus — we always would walk — when we 



passed a neat little shop displaying the 
sign — Silent-Do-Good. You guessed it. It's 
the same little shop Lou and Margo opened 
nine years ago. Margo operates it now 
since Lou has begun her career, she sells 
everything from corn pads to stocking caps. 
Before we had walked very far Doris Hol- 
loway picked us up in her Buick. She stop- 
ped in Raleigh on her way to New York 
i liiversity where she has just received her 
degree in social work. She drove us over to 
Durham. Did we get the surprise of our 
lives? She stopped by Marshall-Sadler Mor- 
ticians. Imagine those two in business. Dor- 
is, in fun as usual, says that the way they 
get most of their business is through Mar- 
shall ; he talks as many people as he can to 
death. 

I don't believe you would recognize the 
campus. So many changes have been made, 
and the student body has doubled in size. 
Looking through the new science building, 
which is over the hill near the Hallibur- 
ton's cottage, we found Sadie Newkirk, 
who is associate professor, administering a 
hypodermic to her "picats" — creatures re- 
sulting from her experiment in cross-breed- 
ing cats and pigs. Thomacina Duncan, as 
you remember her by that name, was watch- 
ing with interest. She tells me that she 
grew tired of life in the Souih, divorced 
and moved to New Jersey where she is 
living in a comfortable suburban home — 
Mrs. for the second time. 

Floria Moore and Carlotta (Clickey) 
came together. Both are employed in North 
Carolina. Floria 's job is most unusual — 
she is supervisor of handicraft in the state 
under its recently instituted progressive 
system of education. Clicky still teaches in 
Rocky Mount where her husband is prin- 



cipal ; she loves her work. Ivy wasn 't there 
— Clicky tells me that she was too busy 
gathering material for her dissertation; she 
expects to have the Ph.D. degree from Rad- 
cliffe next winter. Did you ever use the 
little book that Ivy wrote — How to Play 
Auction and Contract Bridge ? 

Dorothy Paige is still petite and neat 
She is secretary of the North Carolina Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Co. Now. 

Goodness don't let me forget our old 
campus comedian; Easley sort of pleasant- 
ly disappointed us all. He turned out to be 
a priest and is now chaplain in the army at 
Fort Jackson near Columbia. He visits my 
people whenever he goes to the city. 

Harry Johnson has just retired from pro- 
fessional football and now he is caterer in 
Avon, his home town. Business, he tells me 
is very good. 

Living 1941 over again was the life ; made 
me feel like a girl again. But after all we 
never grow old. 

The finishing school of mine is quite the 
thing — quite exclusive. As long as I 'm di- 
rector I intend to keep it that way. Joe 
quite agrees that I should. He's a great 
help in advising me about the girls. 
I've romped so with them today — we have 
two holidays a Meek — that I 'm in for a good 
sleep. So I'll ha.ve to stop with telling you 
about our classmates this time. 

When Henry is home again remember me 
to him. I know you miss him since he start- 
ed piloting the U/nited States mail plane. 
And he's only in Hampton once a month.' 
We missed both of you at the reunion. 

Do write soon and expect me down for a 
week-end almost any time. 

Sincerely, 

Miriam 



CLASS HISTORY 



On a warm September day in 1937 eighty- 
green and eager students made their first 
appearance on St. Augustine's Campus. 
This versatile group was destined to be- 
come the famous class of '41. The custo- 
mary freshman initiation was administer- 
ed and was accepted with a surprising 
calm. After the novelty of being away 
from home had worn, off. we went about 
the business of class organization. 

At the first official class meeting the 
following election of officers took place : 



Harry Johnson, president; Charles Atkins, 
vice-president ; Ellen Jones, secretary ; and 
Ethel Hegamin, treasurer. Willie and 
Henry Perry were chosen as council rep- 
resentatives. Witli this as a start the class 
of 1!)41 was soon in the midst of campus 
activities. 

Eager to get the most out of college 
life, we began to branch out into the var- 
ious extra-curricular activities. Fourteen 
of our members joined the Choral Club, 
eitjkt became active in the Dramatic Club, 



mm 



three of the young men became integral 
parts of the football team, two of the 
young ladies were stars on the girls' 
basketball team, many joined the various 
campus clubs, three were chosen to the 
PEN staff and reflected the freshman 
opinion of the campus. Our freshman year 
closed with everyone apparently well satis- 
fied. Catastrophe first visited our class 
when Ria Dora Ellis, popular student 
from Great. Falls, Montana, was painfully 
injured in, the great "Olympian" train 
wreck. 

Our sophomore year was entered with 
ill-concealed anticipation. There was much 
to do, including the important job of ''dis- 
cipline" the new freshmen. There were 
fifty-eight of us, forty-six who had re- 
turned from the year previous and eight 
others who joined us for various reasons. 
Most welcome additions were Miriam 
Roberts from S. C. who has since proved 
one of our ablest members, and Melton 
Sadler, who was returning to school after 
a year's absence. Charles Atkins was 
elected class president; Ethel Hegamin 
vice-president ; Ellen Jones, secretary ; and 
Swannie Thorpe, treasurer. As a class, we 
maintained a high degree of interest in 
the varied programs of the school and 
there was increased participation. Out- 
standing for our sophomore years was 
Charles Atkins, who won the Barber 
Prize "for best delivering an address of 
his own composition." Without realising 
it we had completed one-half of our col- 
lege career. 

The beginning of our Junior Year 
found its increasingly self-confident. We 
boasted an enrollment of forty-four stu- 
dents of whom four were with us for the 
first time : Lloyd Allen familiarly known 
as "Tex", became number one artist of 
the Pen Staff; Thelma Hamilton excelled 
in. Dramatics; Olivette Hall became one 
of the popular members of the class con- 
nected with the Junior Woman's Auxili- 
ary; and Charles Fox, as well as being a 
lay-reader, became one of St. Aug. 's fam- 
ous "Ironmen" of the gridiron. 

As for class officers, the following were 
chosen: Charles Atkins, president; Thomas 
Bembry, vice-president ; Ellen Jones, 
secretary; Henry Perry, treasurer; and 
for Council representatives there were : 
Charles Atkins, Miriam, Roberts. Thomas 
Bembry, and Orvntha Wright. 



This was the year that our class really 
'came into its own". Charles Atkins head- 
ed the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, and 
the Student Council, Thomas Bembry 
was elected Captain of the Football Team, 
and Elbre Gaiter moved up in Tennis. 
Class participation in campus activities 
can best be shown by the number of our 
members represented. This was the first 
year that our class witnessed a football 
game won by our own. team. The affairs 
of the year were culminated by the An- 
nual Junior-Senior Prom, an affair that 
our class put over with spectacular success. 
The semester marks showed that eight of 
the Juniors had gained places on the honor 
roll. 

We entered our senior year with an 
inexplicable feeling of mingled joy and 
iv. We were joyful beceause we were 
sorrow. We were joyful because we were 
soon to leave friends who have become a 
part of our lives. There were thirty-one of 
us, twenty-one of us having marched the 
long , hard way together. At our first class 
meeting we vowed to make the year a 
success. To lead us clown the eventful home 
stretch we chose the following class offic- 
ers : Thomas Bembry, president ; Charles 
A,tkins, (Vice-president ; Gladys Delphy, 
secretary ; Henry Perry, treasurer. Coun- 
cil members elected were David Harper, 
Muriel Carter, Thomascina Duncan. 
Charles Fox, and Thomas Bembry. 

This was the year that the Seniors domi- 
nated the scene. Thomas Bembry was elect- 
ed president of the Student Council 
Charles Atkins again became the head of 
the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, Harry 
Johnson was chosen to captain the foot- 
ball team, Gladys Delphy became presi- 
dent of the Les Elites, Charles Atkins 
assumed responsibilities as Editor-in- 
chief of the Pen, Thomas Bembry was 
duly initiated as Lord High Chancellor of 
the Chancellors' Club, David Harper be- 
came the secretary of the Aeies Club for 
the second time. 

It may be said of our class that what- 
ever we entered, we gave the very best we 
had. Through the combined efforts of the 
Senior Class and the Student Council was 
promoted the first Homecoming in the 
history of the school. We have contributed 
to the best on the campus. A survey of 
the class achievements shows the follow- 
ing results of our four years: Two student 



L 



council presidents, three lay readers, two 
football captains, three club presidents, 
eight recognized dramatic players, one All- 
CIA" A football player, cue membeer of the 
All-CIAA Tennis Team, one member of 
the Talladega Conference, three represen- 
tatives of the Greensboro Conference, and 
three four year honor roll members. 

It can be truly said that this has been 
a successful year. The spirit and coopera- 
tion have been admirable. There has been 
fun and work. We have enjoyed hearing 
Wendell Jones' pronunciation of his favor- 
ite "Boston", Thomas Bernbry's "Vic- 
tory," Charles Atkins' "beginning". Now 
as we walk the last steps together, we look 



back upon our past achievements. V'e have 
made mistakes, but that is a part of train- 
ing. 

To the members of the faculty who 
have heleped us on our way we extend 
sincere appreciation and gratitude. We 
shall never forget Miss Guernsey who 
helped us as freshmen to get the much 
needed start — for without a start there can 
be no finish. We are going, but not far 
away. Ami as we march from these walls, 
we hope to be remembered as the Class of 
'41 — ' ' we strove our best ; 'twas for the 
Blue and White!" 

Harry Taylor Johnson, '41 



LETTER TO UNDERGRADUATES 



Dear Undergraduates, 

I do not take the sophisticated attitude 
of a Senior talking to lower classmen, but 
rather of a friend who is deeply interested 
in you and your welfare. Life has much 
to offer at St. Augustine's, and it is a 
great privilege to become enriched with 
what it affords. 

Some say you take away from college 
what you bring to it. 1 disagree. Some take 
away less, that is they lose some of their 
desirable qualities; some take away more, 
that is they add to what they already have. 
It is my liope. Undergraduates, that you 
will grasp and hold firmly to the finer 
things of life. St. Augustine's affords all 
of these elements which are so necessary 
for !i""ing an abundant life. The cultural, 
spiritual and social influences, as such, 
have potentialities to shape your lives for 
now and the future if you only permit 
yourself to take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities that lie open,. The cultural in- 
fluence reflects in the classroom as well 
as at forums and programs; the spiritual 
influence reflects in the treatment of class- 
ma + es and contacts with other people; the 
social, in all types of group activity. Re- 
member that the tools you are going to 
use the rest of your lives are sharpened in 
college. Why not sharpen I hem from all 
possible angles? 

Of course problems will arise occasional- 
ly that tend to shift our goal out of focus, 
but then there is always a way to cope 
with problems. To begin with, it is neces- 



sary to realize then that it is a problem. 
People who bury their heads in the sand 
like ostriches leave their most vulnerable 
parts exposed, when they pretend that life 
has no problems. Running away from a 
problem won't solve it, neither will day- 
dreaming. Don't try to imagine your way 
to the things you want from life. Realities 
come only from planning and effort. Rat- 
ionalization, too, has its place, but I would- 
n't recommend it as a method of problem 
solving. We can't go through life "alibi- 
ing" and making excuses for our actions. 
See how foolish it is to lay the blame for not 
having passed a course on an, unfair in- 
structor; or maintain that the way to cut 
class is 1c> oversleep. It is appropriate to 
check yourselves when the alibi habit be- 
gins to form and make an honest analysis 
of why you did what you shouldn't have 
done. To live is to encounter problems, but 
equipped with a healthy mental attitude, 
which I am sure all (if us have, we should 
be abb' 1" form and solve them intelligent- 

ly. 

We live only once so why not live at 
our best. Undergraduates, take away more 
than vim brought to college. The valuable 
materials are here and yours for 1he tak- 
ing. You may help yourselves liberally 
but use your portion, as a means of be- 
diming better able to live abundantly. 
Farewell and gocd-luck. 

Ever sincerely. 
Carlotta E. Maxwell '41 



sea 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 



We the Senior Class of Saint Augus- 
tine's College, City of Raleigh, State of 
North Carolina, being of sound mind and 
body, realizing that our college days are 
drawing to a close, do take this means of 
disposing of some of our treasures which 
we have laid up in the past four years. 
Realising the value of these said treasures 
we do charge our legatees forever to 
guard them as they would their lives. 

Before proceeding with the will, we will 
pause for a moment to pay tribute, first, 
t<> our Alma Mater ;to her we pledge our 
most sincere love, loyalty and devotion. 
To our advisers. Miss Gloria Baird, Miss 
Snodgrass. and Mr. Halliburton, our deep- 
est appreciation for their timely help in 
all i ur needs. To our clear beloved facul- 
ty our undying gratitude for their un- 
tiring efforts in instructing us during 
four years of study at this institution. 

In our four years of college we have 
accumulated many of the more valuable 
assets of life, which we dispose of as fol- 
lows : 

We. the graduating Class of 1941, be- 
queath tn the students of Saint Augus- 
tine's College all our lost text-books, used 
pads, broken fountain pens, half-inch 
pencils, incorrect chemistry notes, flunk- 
ing biology, French, math, and literature 
quizzes, and last, but not least a perma- 
nent seat in the angle for all the couples. 

Muriel Carter hereby wills her poise and 
dignity to Rebecca Blake. 

Lloyd Allen leaves his ability to carry 
the en ss, and handle the alms basin to 
Kenneth Young. 

Thelma Hamilton bestows to Mary 
Wright her ability to act on a stage. 

Wilbur Saunders bequeaths his barber 
U • 's to Graham Cathey. 

Margaret Satterwhite wills her ability to 
p'av basketball to Carmelita Perkins. 

Herman Marshall leaves his slowness to 
anyc ne who is able to walk from the Ly- 
man Building to the dining hall in two 
days. 

Ivy Burn.side bestows her grace, poise 
ami gentle voice to Viola Gardner. 

Thomas Bembry doth hereby bequeath 
bis tangled love affairs to Joseph Le 
Compte. 

Thomascina Duncan leaves all her jiv- 
m r > abilities to Carolyn Jones. 

Penrv Perry wills his green bench in 
the angle to anyone who can endure Decem- 



ber's snow, April rain and May's thunder 
showers. 

Elizabeth Vincent leaves her uncon- 
cerneed attitude, and easy-go-lucky way 
of life to Winifred Thompson, hoping that 
she won't be as tired and fatigued at the 
end of her four years as Elizabeth was. 

Charles Fox bestows his ability to lay- 
Hygiene to Florence Simpkins, hoping 
read to Aaron Herrington. 

Gladys Delphy bequeaths her love for 
that she will not fall the victim of kyphosis, 
scoliosis and lordosis. 

Charles Atkins wills his position as 
head-waiter to anyone with a cool temper 
and a surprising ability. 

Carlotta Maxwell leaves her goals 
nature, scope and outcome to anyone who 
is having trouble with Education Eleven. 

Milton Sadler bestows his bed to Victor 
Hall in hope that the instrument of rest 
and comfort will not crush from exhaus- 
tion before commencement. 

Miriam Roberts bequeaths her intelli- 
gence of History VI] I to Reginald Kent. 

Harry Johnson leaves his size and posi- 
tion on the football team to John Harris. 

Louise Perry wills her red jacket to 
Doris Goodwin. 

David Harper wills his melodious, tenor 
voice to Oliver Morse. 

Sadie Xewkirk leaves her headaches 
troubles and worries of the Biology lab. to 
anyone dumb enough to take them. 

D. Wendell Jones, George Sherman and 
Elbre Gaiter bestow their ability to settle 
an argument in a quiet, peaceful manner 
to Loyd Qnaterman. Hunter Satterwhite 
and Peter White. 

Thelma Gary wills her petite-ness to 
Dorothy Clark. 

Charles Howell leaves his interrupted 
love affair to Julius Mason in hope that 
he too will write poetry, draw beautiful 
pictures and sing melodious love songs. 

Max Britto bequeaths his seat in Politi- 
cal Science to anyone who is able to con- 
sume fifteen chapters of State government 
in one night and come to class late every 
day for four semesters. 

Doris Holloway wills her Southern ac- 
cent to Emma Saunders. 

Alex Easley leaves his ardent love of 
sweet potatoes to Xorman Proeopes hoping 
that this dish will be served in abundance 
thoughout the coming semesters. 

We herebv charge to the Junior Class 



L 



RMR9 



the task of executing our Lust Will and 
Testament. In witness thereof we have 
hereunto set our hands and seal this 
eventful day of May in the year of our 
Lord, one thousand, nine hundred and 
forty-one. 



THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1941 
Alexander Easley. Testator 
Witness: Max "Loquacious" Britto, 
Louise "Alma" Perry. 



"A SENIOR SPEAKS" 



It seems strange that we should use 
the word "commencement" to designate 
the day en which we lay down for all time 
the seiiool work we have carried for so 
many happy years. To me, "completion" 
would seem to be a more appropriate term. 
But that would not be life, for in this 
world everything that marks an end also 
marks a beginning. The end of one day is 
the commencement of another. The end 
of one task is the beginning of a new one. 

So it is with our education! What we 
have learned at school, valuable as it is, 
is only a beginning. The end of our school 
work merely means the commencement of 
those experiences which will put to test 
the principles we have learned. Therefore, 
Seniors, whether or not you have derived 
all the advantages of the courses you have 
just finished is a matter between you and 
your own conscience. During these four 
years our work has been directed and made 
easy and beneficial as trained minds could 
make it. From now on we must rely more 
and more upon our own efforts. I am sure 
that the good that we derived from our col- 
lege work depended entirely upon us ! 



The success we make of our life career 
will likewise be due to our own initiative. 

Today means different things to each of 
us. To some it is the commencement of 
higher educational work; to others it is 
the beginning of business life or home 
cares. To those who are going to further 
their education, I would say: Stick to your 
purpose! Work toward your goal with 
earnestness. And the same goes for those, 
who by choice or necessity, are going im- 
mediately into some line of endeavor. Do 
not work aimlessly! Life is too short for 
us to waste even a year of it ! Let us re- 
member that it is well t<> keep our heads 
bowed against the storm of life -but it is 
better still to keep our hearts high, for 
the longest storm the world ever had came 
to an. end one sunny morning. 

Seniors, may your hopes and dreams be 
realized in the fullest degree, and in the 
years to come may your names reflect 
credit upon St. Augustine's which has 
been our home during the past four years 
of our life. 

Muriel Carter '41 



THE SPORTS TRAIL 



As waning summer packed the green 
leaves preparatory to her leaving, the 
Sports Trail beckoned to us for a journey 
along an unknown path. Bravely we set 
out. Brown autumn and bleak winter 
passed and with them went football and 
basketball. With the renewed vigor and 
life of the trees and the sprouting green 
leaves came gasping figures, pushing 
churning feet down the cinder path, and 
joyous enthusiasts mingled on the tennis 
courts. 

But in the aftermath of the basketball 
season is due to the "greats" a fitting 
tribute. Figures themselves say little but 
our analyses may be interesting. The Saints 
rolled up 424 points to 574 for the op- 
position. Individual scoring honors go to 
the greatest all-round athlete in the Saints 



haven. Howard Pnllen. Bullen. the idol 
of his schoolmates, a true sportsman, a 
truly great athlete, and respected by his 
opponents, scored a total of 121 points 
during I lie basketball season to 100 for 
Hunter Satterwhite and 75 for Bill Mc- 
Kinney. But in avrage points per game 
Pullen barely nosed out Satterwhite 8.(>42 
to 8.333. McKinney trailed with an aver- 
ag of 5.769. 

Track and field events rush to the fore, 
now. The rampaging lower classmen swept 
the intra-mural events. The class of '43 
won and were trailed by the classes '44, 
'41, and '42 in that order. 

Shaw's Bears, confident and compla- 
cent, opened the intercollegiate season on 
our track. Points were piled up, St. Aug., 
Shaw, Shaw. St. Aug.. — but again the 



wm 




'HORSEMEN" 



Saints fell victim to the ancient rivals 
43-37. The feature of the afternoon saw- 
George Foxwell race an 11 min. 40 sec. two- 
mile and a 2 min. 9 sec. half-mile in thril- 
ling fashion. 

On the same afternoon Mr. Ghippey's 
tennisters battled the Smith Bulls on our 
courts. But the Bears and the Bulls were 
too much for one afternoon and Smith 
triumphed 3-1. This loss dropped the 
Saints' average to .500 for they had earli- 
er dropped the sister school, St. Paul. 4-0 
at St. Paul. 

Now on to "Washington for the C. I. A. 
A. Tournament. Our same three man team 
played admirably. Brocco in the singles, 
and Brocco and Gaiter in the doubles ad- 
vanced to the quarter finals but Bill Mc- 
Kinney was eliminated in the first round 
of singles by Flip Jackson. Howard, who 
went on to win the championship. 

The campus doings were big — but in- 
complete. The campus lennis champs were 
never decided because inclement weather 
intervened and the St. Paul meet rushed 
down us. 



The charming Satterwhite sisters led 
flashy teams on the basketball court and 
badminton finals were open to the public. 
Inez Green! ea defeated Delores Lewis for 
the singles title and Inez Greenlea and 
Thclma Wallace defeated Delores LeAvis 
and Frances Mayo in the doubles. 

After a brief four-month vacation, on 
the trail will ramble; but some of us are 
destined to turn our steps towards a by- 
path, never again to hit that Venture trail 
again under the Blue and AYhite. To 
Seniors Fox, Atkins, Marshall and Sadler, 
(football). Bembry, H. Johnson, and Brit- 
to, (football and basketball) Gaiter ('ten- 
nis) and Perry (manager) — a memorial 
deeply embedded and affectionately root- 
ed in the memory of those who have travel- 
ed the trail with you. And to the Misses 
Satterwhite. Xewkirk, and Duncan a 
similar trophy for your athletic feats. 

Until we resume our trip a cherry, 
cherry, cheerio from me to all the readers 
who travel with me down the SPORTS 
TRAIL. 

Robert L. Clarke '42 



nni 



nm 



Girls' Basketball Team 



Trackmen 



Twelfth Nighters 



Dramatic Club 





The Pen Staff 



The Acies Club 



The Zeta Sigma 
Rho Society 



The Chancellors 



Lay Readers 



Choir 



Altar Guild 



Brotherhood of 
St. Andrew 





Junior Women's 
Auxiliary 



Choral Club 



Cheer Leaders 



Varsity 



ZL iZi SET. ! 



Some Freshmen 



Some Sophomores 



Some Juniors 



Student Council 




Creative 
Dance 
Group 



Les Elites 



Miss 
Guernsey 











MELLOW CAT 



I 've got my jive-box in my 

hand 
And its jumping with the 

hottest band 
Dig this criteria, Jack 
T 'm a hard cat 
From away back. 
When I fall by in my drape 
Ton can see all the hep-cats gape. 




Mr 



WELL WISHERS 



Dr. H. L. Fleming 

Miss Louise E. Rich 

Miss Mae S. Tate 

Mrs. Mary Carnage 

Mr. Francis Otey Constant 

Mrs. C. D. Halliburton 

Mrs. L. L. Woods 

Mrs. John Hope Franklin 



Mrs. Bertha Richards 
Miss Marie Melver 
Mr. J. W. Holmes 
Mrs. Rosa Mai Godley 
Rev. Robert J. Johnson 
Haynes Studio 
Green Cleaners 
Maye's Pharmacy 



APPRECIATION 



We find it difficult to express adequately our gratitude to our many 
friends who have assisted us in so many ways. We should like to thank 
the members of the staff for their cooperation, especially Miss Cook for 
her zeal and interest. Miss Kennedy for her timely advices. Miss Baird 
for her alertness, Mr. Woods and Mr. Chippey for their assistance, Mr. 
Halliburton for his guidance, and last but net least, we extend our heart 
felt thanks to everyone who has done his or her part to make this pro- 
ject a success. 



THE PEN STAFE 
Charles N. Atkins, Editor-in-Chief 
Inez Greenlea, Business Manager 



*».,. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 
FOUNDED 1867 

A four year course is offered, accredited by the Southern Association 
of Colleges and the North Carolina State Department of Education, lead- 
ing to degrees of B. A. and B. S.. including Pre-Medical work and Teach- 
er Training for State High School Teachers' certificates. 

Thorough training, healthy enviroment, Christian influenes. Mod- 
erate terms. Opportunity for self help. 

For Catalog and Information Write the Registrar 
ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE RALEIGH, N. C. 



Compliments of — 

COLLEGE CASH GROCERY 

317 North Tarboro Road C. N. Coble, Prop. 



SERVICE PRINTING COMPANY 



Publications for Schools and Colleges 



608 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



DURHAM, N. C. 



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