(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Pen"

Dr. James A. Boyer 
1504 Oakwood Ave. 
Raleigh, NC 27610 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/pen1945sain 



«:. 



.^■•. 



THE PEN 

Published by the Senior Class of St. Augustine's College 
Raleigh, N. C. 



1945 



Staff 

John D. Harris, Editor 

Mary B. Scott, Assistant Editor 

Antoinette Duncan, Advertising Maiiager 

John J. Jarrett, Business Manager 



Associate Editors 

Prezell Robinson 

Ruth Edgecombe 

Irving Mayson 



StaiEP Artist 
John D. Harris 



Foreword 



This year as have the past three years, finds the class of 1945 caught in 
the strong arms of war. As a result the male representation is small in 
number. Our classmates are found in all corners of the globe fighting 
to make this world a better place to live in. It is to them we dedicate 
this book. To the boys of the class in the armed forces who are serving 
on all fronts and in all capacities, we pledge allegience. We urge them 
on to a lasting peace for all peoples. 

We who are going out have an altogether diff'erent outlook on life than 
we had when we entered through the gates of St. Augustine's. Our hopes 
are at their highest, for we are the ones who are to take our places as 
leaders in the world of tomorrow. We hope that we are ready when that 
opjDortunity presents itself. 

Long live St. Augustine's! This yearbook is the result of the whole- 
hearted support of the entire administration, faculty, student body and 
many friends who have made this book possible. Without them success 
would have been impossible. We wish to show our appreciation and 
always strive to uphold the high ideals set forth by St. Augustine's. 

The Editor. 

/ 



Dedication 




To Our Classmates in the Armed Services 




President 

Rev. Edgar H. Goold, 
M.A., S.T.B. 



ADMINISTMATIVE OFFICERS 




r?s^ 



"^ 



% i »» i<f ■ 



' -WJ^ 




Cecil D. Halliburton 
B.A., M.A. 

Dean of College 
Social Science 



Reginald L. Lynch 
B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Dean 
French 







^^^n 




Arthur P. Chippey 
B.A., M.A. 

Science, Biology 
Pen Stajf Adviser 



Earl H. McClenny 
B.S., M.S. 



Pearl A. Snodgrass 
B.S., M.A. 



Head of Education Department Biblical Literature, Librarian 
Pen Staff Adviser Senior Class Adviser 




Mabel M. Latham 
B.S, 

Matron and Dean of Women 
English 



Nina W. Anthony 
B.S. 

Assistant Dean of Women 
Education 



David C. Virgo 

B.A., M.A. 

English 




TiNSLEY L. SpRAGGINS 

B.A., M.A. 
History 



T. Curtis Mayo 

Mus.B., Mus.M. 

Head of Music Department 



Lillian O'Daniel 

B.S., M.S. 
Music Education 




Julia Delaney- 
B.A., M.A. 

English. Expression 
Dramatics 



Lloyd L. Woods 
B.A., Sc.M., Ph.D. 

Head oj Chemistry 
Department 



Hazel Virginia Clarke 

B.S. 

Instructor in Business 
Education 





o ,^ 



i_ 



Lettye H. Wheaton 
Cashier 



Wilson B. Inborden 

B.S. 
Mathematics. Physics 



Elsie M. Cook 
Secretary and Registrar 




Bernice B. Taylor 
Superintendent of Grounds 



Catherine Burgess 
Assistant Matron 



Alice Hall 
Supervisor of Laundry 



Not photographed. 



^Ella Mae Williams 
B.A. 

Assistant Librarian 




PAULINE HOLMES BAKER 

Chicago, in. 

Zeta Sigma Rho Society, President; Big 

Sisters; Altar Guild; Choral Club. 

Pleasant, cooperative, sincere 

Are qualities which make you a dear! 

Social Studies, English B.A. 



ALETHEA YVONNE DUPEE 

"Lee" 

Drakes Branch, Va. 

Valeda Club; Girls Service League; Choral 

Club, Big Sisters. 

"Rose in the Bud" they sing oj you — 
A tender lovely tune, it's true. 

B.S. 



REBECCA COLIN HARTLEY 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Girls Service League; Choral Club; Altar 
Guild; Creative Dance. 

A bit "fluttery" in word and deed 
These traits may help you to succeed. 
Biology B.S. 



ROBERTI LaVERNE GORDON 

"Werm" 

Petersburg, Va. 

Treasurer Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Altar 

Guild; Big Sisters. 

Sweet, ambitious you always are 
In word or deed, you never jar! 
Chemistry B.S. 



ELISHA SALATHIEL CLARKE, JR. 
West Palm Beach, Fla. 
President Senior Class; Acies Club; Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew; Choir; Choral Club. 
The fact that on you we may depend 
Has added to your worth, no end! 

B.A. 



EDITH CHRISTINE GRAVES 
"E" 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Secretary Zetas; Big Sisters. 

Studious, inquisitive, by all odds, 
Are traits which promise great reivards. 
Biology B.S. 

HELEN VIRGINIA CRAIG 
Orange, N. J. 
President Valeda Club; Girls Service 
League; Big Sisters; Choral Club. 
A philosophical turn of mind 
Seeking always deep ansioers to find. 
Social Studies, Health and Physical Educa- 
tion B.A. 

DORIS AURELIA HARRIS MILLER 
"Butterbean" 
Littleton, N. C. 
Les Elites; Choral Club; Choir; Chapel Ad- 
visory Council; Big Sisters. 

Music and love have gone hand in hand, 
Ever since you joined ottr band. 
Science, Music B.S. 

ANTOINETTE ERMA DUNCAN 
"Toni" 
West Palm Beach, Fla. 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Advertising man- 
ager of The Pen; Dramatics; President Girls' 
Service League. 

Your constantly sweet and sunny way, 
Has influenced our behavior inuch 
alway 
Social Studies, English B.A. 

JOHN DeAVOLIS HARRIS 
"Johnnie" 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
Acies Club; Editor of The Pen; Dramatics; 
Choir; Choral Club; Lay Reader; Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew; Creative dance. 
Because of your varied rich artistic 

touch. 
We'll miss you here, oh, very much! 
Health and Physical Education, Social 
Studies B.A. 

WE SENIORS 



BERNETTA LAVONNE HORTON 

"Skeets" 

Edenton, N. C. 

Les Elites; Choral Club; Girls' Service 

League; Big Sisters. 

A refreshing rather juvenile air in you 

is laudable: 
Your neatness, too, is very admirable. 
French, Social Studies B.A. 

JOHN JACOB JARRETT, JR. 

"J.J.J." 

Miami, Fla. 

Choir; Choral Club; Brotherhood of St. 

Andrew. 

Utter nonsense and humor droll 

Give much charm to your natural role. 

B.A. 

DOROTHY GEORGEANIA JOSEPH 
"Jo Jo" 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Assistant Secre- 
tary Senior Class; Big Sisters. 

Not in withholding but generous giving 
Does one enjoy abundant living. 
Science B.S. 

BEULAH ODESSA KELSEY 

"Dess" 

Trenton, N. J. 

Girls' Service League; Valeda Club; Big 

Sisters. 

The studious mind with the gift to 

express 
Is very fortunate in time of stress. 
French, Math., Social Studies B.A. 

RUTH YVONNE LeFLORE 
Mobile, Ala. 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Big Sisters. 
Sincerity is a trait that commands 

admiration 
Whatever the time or place or station. 
French, History B.A. 



NORMA JAMES LEVISTER 

"Butch" 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Les Elites; Choir; Choral Club; Big Sisters. 

A song on your lips in a voice of pathos 

and beauty, 
And shared so generously as if a duty! 
English, Music B.A. 

MARGARET MACK 
"Marge" 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Les Elites Society; Big Sisters. 
So quiet in spirit and demean — 
"Things are not always what they 
seem." 
Social Studies B.A. 

JOYCE TERRYSENA MASON 

"Beanie" 

Aiken. S. C. 

Les Elites Society; Big Sisters; Dramatics 

Club. 

A bit of the Madonna in you we see 
We're not quite certain what you'll be. 
French B.A. 

JOYCE WILMA MEYERS 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
President Les Elites Society; Clioir; Choral 
Club; Big Sisters; Class Secretary. 

Gifted by nature with an urge to good 

deeds — 
Follow that bright ideal wherever it 
leads. 
Social Studies B.A. 

MARGUERITE LENORA NIXON 
Edenton, N. C. 
Les Elites Society; Clioir; Big Sisters. 
GiLard zealously your gay outlook and 

love of jest 
They're points which give to living 
zest. 
History B.A. 



WE SENIOMS 




10 




WINIFRED PRICILLA PRIMO 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Zeta Sigma Rlio Society; Altar Guild; Dra- 
matics Club: Big Sisters. 

Serious, studious, very sane — 
Add the light touch in life's great game. 
Social Studies B.A. 

M. EDITH PIERCE 
Tuscaloose, Ala. 
Big Sisters: Vice President of class. 
Ill your frankness of speech let not 

words betray 
Or over your mind hold too much 
sway. 
English B.A. 

JUANITA CELESTINE PARKER 
"Pita" 
Gainesville, Fla. 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Big Sisters. 

You'll find many companions all over 

the world. 
As you're fascinated, they say, by the 
social whirl. 
Chemistry B.S. 

FLORENCE ELOISE SCOTT 

"Scottie" 
West Point, Va. 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Girls' Service 
League; Big Sisters. 

You?' vitality and enthusiasm 
Will help you over many a chasm. 
Chemistry B.S. 

MARY BRYSON SCOTT 

'■B.B.- 

West Point, Va. 

Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Girls' Service 

League; Associate Editor of The Pen; Big 

Sisters. 

Personal dignity and self esteem 
Are attributes fine, if not too extreme. 
Social Studies B.A. 

•Not Pictured. 



THELMA JEANETTE WALLACE 

'■Wallye" 

Shreveport, La. 

President Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Choral 

Club; Big Sisters; College Activity Council. 

Just the right sense of humour and 

sweetness here 
To balance the road of life, my dear. 
Chemistry, Mathematics B.S. 



GWENDOLYN ANITA YOUNGE 

"Billie" 

Cheltenham, Md. 

Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Big Sisters; Choir; 

Choral Club. 

Music and sentiment go hand in hand. 

A pleasing combination in any land. 

English. Music B.A. 



MYRTLE A. MORINE YOUNG 
Spindale, N. C. 
Valeda Club; Big Sisters. 

Are you as serious as you seem. 
Or is it an outward manner or mien? 
Biology B.S. 



BESSIE LEE ZACHERY 
La Grange, Ga. 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Girls Service 
League: Big Sisters. 

Do learn, my dear, to be on time — 
And add so much to your personality 
fine. 
Science, English, French B.S. 



*CHARLES CHAN JOHNSON 

"Beethoven" 

Emporia, Va. 

Business seems to be your chief aim — 

In it. there are many things to gain. 

Social Studies B.A. 



WE SENIORS 



11 



CLASS POEM 

Dear Alma Mater, 
For four years we have struggled 
Through difficulty, toil and strife 
To make our stay here worthwhile; 
And a beacon in our life. 

Many who started out with us 
Have parted by the way; 
But wherever they are 
Their hearts are here today. 

We glorify in our triumph; 
Our struggles were not in vain 
We've conquered in our trials; 
To reach this higher plane. 

To you, dear Alma Mater 

We bid a sad adieu. 

To our teachers, advisers; 

Our friends and schoolmates, too. 

You have made our four years pleasant ones; 
Filled them with happiness. 
Without you we couldn't have traveled 
This rugged road to success. 

Our destinations are quite unknown; 
Or what life holds in store. 
We live in hopes of great renown 
For we know not what lies before. 

We are at the door of this great world; 
For which you have paved the way. 
We tremble as we grasp the doorknob; 
Knowing that we'd rather stay. 

But, for today we forget the future, 
To render our last devotions true; 
To you, our dear Alma Mater, 
Again, again, we say Adieu. 

— John D. Harris. 



12 



CLASS SONG 

The days we hold so dear have come to an end, 
We are starting out on life's highway. 

But we will ne'er forget St. Augustine's as the friend 
Who helped us reach this goal today. 

So as we now depart we hope and we pray, 
Your love will guide us all the way. 

Refrain: 

Though we're leaving you 
Our thoughts will be with you, 
And whate'er we do; 
We will succeed. 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

We, THE SENIOR CLASS of St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, N. C, realizing 
that our college days are drawing to a close, take this time to bequeath to the 
undergraduates some of our treasures which we have accumulated during our 
years here. We request that our legatees guard and cherish them forever. 

To our Alma Mater we pledge our love, loyalty, devotion, and sincere appre- 
ciation for all that she has done for us. 

To our adviser, Miss Snodgrass, we pledge our sincere appreciation for her 
untiring effort in helping and guiding us at all times. 

To the faculty, our thanks for their helpful instructions and guidance dur- 
ing the years that we have spent here. 

We dispose of our most valuable assets as follows: 

We, the graduating class of 1945, leave to the student body our flunking marks 
in Biology, History, French, Sociology, and Business Math. Our lost pencils, empty 
ink bottles, and our most honorable seats in the grill, playing pinochle, are also 
bequeathed. 

We bequeath our chapel seats to the Junior class with the request that they 
fill them with regularity and always keep uppermost in mind the element of time. 

Thelma Wallace and Juanita Parker will their 3x4 club to Marilyn Miller and 
Mamie Shuler. 

Bernetta Horton wills her St. Aug. coat to any student who knows exactly what 
hour to reverse it. 

Doris Harris wills her piano practice room to Cynthia Thompson. 

Helen Craig wills her ability to keep a clean room to Ernestine Hopkins. 

Edythe Pierce — "I will-not be here next year." 

Rebecca Bartley wills her petite lines to Francis DeYoung. 



13 



Charles Johnson wills his position in Coble's store to anyone who successfully 
fulfils it. 

Florence Scott wills to Francis Clarke and Joseph Saunders her ability to take 
four sciences in one semester and pass them all. 

Alethea Dupee wills her Chapel attendance record to George Sadler. 

Dorothy Joseph wills her job as clerical worker for Miss Pitts to anyone 
who is willing to take it. 

Gwendolyn Younge wills her ability to stay out of trouble to Gwendolyn 
Sinithwick. 

Beulah Kelsey wills her collecting of milk funds to Helen Morton. 

Joyce Meyers wills her seat in Bible to Louise Lambert in hopes that she 
too will be a good listener and get by. 

Winifred Primo wills her voice to Claudia Parham. 

Amorine Young wills her bed and her ability to go to bed between 9:30 and 
10:00, instead of spending the night up playing pinochle, to Queen Esther Moore. 

John Harris wills his position as bell ringer to Neal Stitt, if he can stand 
setting his watch two or three times a day to keep up with the office clock and 
still end up with a watch in good shape. 

John Jarrett wills his calmness and coolness to "Pine Bluff" and his electrical 
ability to Prezell Robinson. 

Pauline Baker wills her room in Tuttle Building to Marguerita Lewis in the 
hope she will enjoy its central location as much as she has. 

Elisha Clarke wills his ability to cease socializing at 5:30 to Shirley C. Williams. 

LaVerne Gordon wills her ability to get up at 7:55 and get to Chemistry at 
8:00 to anyone who is able to do it. 

Edith Graves wills her ability to sit straight in a room for two different 
classes ( Ed. 4 and 5 ) to anyone capable of it. 

Marguerite Nixon wills "Arthur" and "Oscar" to the Delany Building girls. 

Bessie Zachary wills her job as bread girl, with all its responsibilities, to 
anyone who can keep a steady head ( which she didn't I and can be sure to go even 
on the coldest and darkest mornings. P.S. : The rolls must be HOT every morning. 

We hereby charge to the students of St. Augustine's College the task of exe- 
cuting our last Will and Testament. 

In witness thereof we have hereunto set our hands and seal this eventful day 
of May in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and forty-five. 

The Senior Class of "45. 

Witness: 
^ Bernetta Horton. 

Testator : 

Edith Graves. 



14 



CLASS HISTORY 

On the warm morning of September 23, 1941, eighty-four green and eager 
students made their first appearance on St. Augustine's campus. From all parts 
of the United States came this versatile group who were destined to become the 
famous class of '45. The customary freshman initiation was administered and 
accepted with a surprising calm. 

After the novelty of being away from home had worn off, we went about the 
business of class organization. At the first official class meeting, the following 
officers were elected: John Miller, president; Nathan Wright, vice president; 
Thelma Wallace, secretary; and Jessie Lewis, treasurer. Hilda Lewis and Arthur 
Lane were chosen as Student Council representatives. 

Eager to get the most out of college life, we began at once to branch out into 
various extra-curricular activities. Our classmates were well represented in the 
Choral Club, Dramatics Club, and the various athletic activities of the campus. 
This was true particularly of the basketball team which was largely composed of 
freshmen. 

Looking back a little we can say that the fruits of our labors were made obvi- 
ous by the number of prizes awarded to members of our class. Jack Holsey was on 
the receiving end of four of the annual prizes offered to members of the freshman 
class. One of the prizes for excellence in literary expression was awarded him 
also. Arthur Lane, in the face of stiff competition coming from the upper class- 
men, triumphed in the Barber Speaking Contest. 

One poet has aptly said, "Into each life some rain must fall." The sophomore 
class of 1942-1943, however, could think only in terms of the popular song which 
retorts, "But too much is falling in mine." Even before the opening of that school 
year, the denuding influence of the famous goldfish bowl had been felt. Classmates 
Ellis and William Brown, Samuel Logan and Henry Sims had already fallen victims, 
to be followed before or soon after the close of that session by Winfield Ashby, 
Joseph Gordon, William Gordon, Jack Holsey, James Johnson, Bradford Marshall, 
the three Miller boys (John, Quentin, and William). This irreplaceable loss, 
coupled with an unavenged feeling against the freshman class had a disorganized 
effect upon the class. Nevertheless, they rose united to meet the task of disproving the 
general opinion of sophomores, and under the leadership of Arthur Lane, success- 
fully passed another milestone on the road to success. Wayland Horton and Eleanor 
Chippey assisted Lane this year, and John Miller, Joseph Gordon and Thelma 
Wallace represented the class on the Student Council. 

Reduced in number from eighty-four at the beginning of our second year and 
even more later when the full effects of the draft were felt, reinforcements were 
in order and came in the persons of Eulalia Bailey, Ester Copeland, La Verne Gor- 
don, Edith Graves, Dorothy McKenzie, Anna Pair, Juanita Parker, and Lee Walter 
Wright. 

At the end of our sophomore year, Joseph Gordon won the annual award for 
excellence in dramatic expression. 

Returning in September of 1943, the class still further depleted, we welcomed 
the newcomers ( Lelia Burton, E. Clarke, J. Jarrett, Margaret Mack, Margaret 



15 



Nixon, and Winifred Primo); mourned the losses to the armed forces, and marshalled 
our forces for action. Wayland Horton was elected president for the year, but 
served only a short time before he was called into the services. This vacancy was 
filled by the vice president,, Joyce Meyers. Norma Levister served as secretary and 
Helen Craig as treasurer. 

The class settled down to hard work this year, most of us realizing for the 
first time our real purpose and the goal toward which we were working. Our 
scholastic duties demanded so much of our attention that we had little time for ex- 
tra-curricular activities. We took time out, however, to sponsor a Junior-Senior 
Prom which the seniors of '44 will hardly forget. 

Our strenuous endeavors did not go unrewarded. LaVerne Gordon, Otis 
Muse, Thelma Wallace, and Winifred Primo won annual awards this year. 

We launched into our senior year with only sixteen of the original eighty-four, 
the other thirteen having joined us somewhere along the way. Elisha Clarke, 
Edythe Pierce, Joyce Meyers, and Helen Craig were the class officers for the term. 
Many of the seniors served in official positions in some of the other campus organiza- 
tions. Pauline Baker, president of the Big Sisters; Helen Craig, president of the 
Valeda; Antoinette Duncan, president of the Girls' Service League; Joyce Meyers, 
president of the Les Elites; Thelma Wallace, president of the Zeta Sigma Rho 
Society. 

And now the time draws near when we must leave our beloved St. Augus- 
tine's — we are both confident and reluctant. With deepest gratitude to those who 
have helped us up this rugged trail, we lower the lid of our trunk of memories — 
memories of our trials as well as our triumphs; of our losses, as well as our gains; 
memories to be filed away in our cabinets of fond reminiscences, to be recalled at 
will. 



CLASS PROPHECY 

SCENE — The recreation room in the Tuttle building. 

The senior class is seated and the lights turned low. The swamis. Younge 
and Gordon, have their hands on the table of the Ouija Board. Slowly Ouija 
moves, indicating that he is in the room. The questions fly thick aiid fast, and 
Ouija unfolds — Year 1955. 

Mrs. Primo is with her husband, three sons and a daughter in Philadelphia, Pa. 

Billie Younge has finally corrected her attitude and is happily married to 
Shirley and is living in New York City. Several of her songs have been published 
and made famous. 

Dr. Thelma Wallace is Professor of Organic Chemistry at our beloved Alma 
Mater, working in the newly completed Science building. She is still unmarried and 
Ouija's predictions are threatening to come true. 

Helen Craig is married and head of the Y.W.C.A. in Orange, N. J. 

Beulah Kelsey has her master's in mathematics from Columbia University and 
is head of the department of math at a high school in Trenton, N. J. 



16 



The Rev. and Mrs. Elisha S. Clarke ( she was Amorine Young ) are living in 
West Palm Beach, Florida. Amorine is assisting her husband in a thriving work. 

Bessie Zachery is married and living in Chicago, Illinois. She has just pub- 
lished her second book of poetry and Negro folk lore. 

Norma Levister is now in Russia studying Russian folk songs. 

Rebecca Bartley and Alethea Dupee are the science teachers in adjoining 
towns in North Carolina. 

Ruth LeFlore and her Ted are happily married and are the proud parents of 
two boys and a girl. Ruth doesn't have any more history worries now. 

Juanita Parker is a medical technician at a sanatorium in Chicago. 

Doris Harris is head of music at St Paul's. She is married and has two 
children. 

LaVerne Gordon is a medical technician at her husband's hospital in Virginia. 

Dorothy "Jo Jo" Joseph is supervisor of nurses at Lincoln Hospital in Bronx, 
N. Y. 

Margaret Mack is a social worker in Port Arthur, Texas. 

Toni Duncan is married and head of an institution for delinquent boys in 
Kentucky. 

Mrs. Pauline Baker is supervisor of parolees in Chicago. She has her master's 
from Loyola University. 

Joyce Mason has her master's from Howard and is well-known in the 
theatrical world. She is starring in a Broadway production which was written by 
John Harris who is making a name for himself as a playwright, poet and artist. 

Florence Scott, now Mrs. Curtis, has just received her doctorate from Colum- 
bia University. Her thesis on voice improvement has been proclaimed the best in 
the field. 

Joyce Meyers is still "bugs" over social work and is working between New 
York and Washington. 

The librarian at Atlanta University is none other than Edythe Pierce. 

Mary "B-B" Scott, now married, is teaching in Batesburg, S. C. She is near 
her old roommates, Bernetta Horton and Edith Graves, who are teaching in the 
southern part of North Carolina. 

J. J. Jarrett is priest-in-charge of a parish in Texas. 

Charles Johnson's love of keeping store has followed him and he is the owner 
of three stores in Emporia, Va. 

Marguerite Nixon is teaching history in Goldsboro, N. C. 

Thelma Wallace is asking again if she'll ever marry. Ouija quickly goes to 
NO and proceeds to spell I-a-m-t-i-r-e-d. My, but it's late! The time reminds me of 
the cessation of a pinochle game. That's all, folks! Ouija has had his say. 

LaVerne Gordon, 
Amorine Young. 



17 




18 




AN OPEN LETTEH TO THE JUNIOMS 

Dear Classmates: . . , 

Today we stand together after almost three years of work under the banner 
of St. Augustine's. As we look back, our hearts throb with many emotions, think- 
ing of the roads that we have passed over together. Many are the nights that we 
have stayed up after hours cramming for history and psychology. Many are the 
days spent in class meetings, in biology lab and in English, where we learned each 
others" weaknesses and good points! Many are the days spent in Chapel where we 
have so reverently knelt and worshipped together. 

Those days have passed and others are yet to come. Some among our ranks 
have departed never to return. Some will return and take up the unfinished work. 
We have learned so much. Yet, there is room for expansion; for improvement. 
We must fight onward and upward, ever approaching that perfection that the 
Master intended us to reach. 

Finally, we must search and strive for the finer and greater things of life. 
What we have learned here will be of no use to us if we cannot apply it to our 
daily lives. Little acts of kindness, little deeds of thoughtfulness and neighborliness 
will bring us rich rewards. The foundation that we lay now will have great bear- 
ing on the way that we will be able to bear up against misfortune and forge ahead. 

Let us look back now and see if we have really made any progress during 
these three years. If we have, then we must "keep a-pluggin' away" because ''cul- 
ture is not satisfied until we all come to a perfect man." Let us keep this little verse 
with us as we struggle on: 
"Not all who seemed to fail have failed 
indeed: not all who failed have there- 
fore worked in vain; there is no failure 
for the good and brave." 

A Classmate and Pal, 

Pattie Louise Laws, 



19 



THE SOPHOMOKE CLASS 



In the fall of nineteen forty-three, sixty-six green, yet eager freshmen entered the 
tradition-filled and cultured portals of St. Augustine's College. Like all freshmen, we were 
faced with the problem of adjusting our lives to the new conditions now surrounding us. 
We found little difficulty, however, in entering into the family spirit which is so much a 
part of St. Augustine's. Under the helpful leadership of such officers as President Hugh 
Marshall, Secretary Ruth Edgecombe, and Treasurer Mayme Shuler, the class has made great 
progress. 

Academically, the sophomore class, on a whole, has represented itself in a most com- 
mendable manner. The chief major fields of our class are in the sciences: social, natural and 
business. The highest averages made during our freshman year were made by Hugh Marshall 
and Corine Wright, both chemistry majors. The honor roll during that year also included 
the names of Hiawatha Lee, LeRoy Thompson, Carolyn Evans, Bertha Brown, Martha 
Goodson, Mayme Shuler, Eunice Tucker, Marilyn Miller and Ann Johnson. 

At the end of our freshman year several annual prizes were given, many of which 
were awarded the members of our class. Hugh Marshall was awarded the Phi Beta Sigma 
Fraternity prize for the highest scholastic record among the young men of the freshman 
class. Eunice Tucker received the prize for the highest average in General Biology; 
Corine Wright, the prize for qualitative analysis. The prize for the greatest improvement 
in freshman English was earned by Erma Ligon. The Zeta Sigma Rho presented to Eunice 
Tucker its prize for the young woman in the freshman class giving evidence of outstanding 
traits of potential leadership, plus womanhood and scholarship. To Frances DeYoung 
came the third prize for excellence in literary composition. 

Besides being so proficient scholastically, we have taken profound and active interest 
in extra-curricular activities. Members of good standing in the choir are Ann Johnson, 
Corine Wriglit, and Carolyn Evans. Not to be overlooked is the small but efficient part 
played by sophomore members of the Girls' Service League and the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew." The membership lists of the various societies and clubs include the names of many 
sophomores. 

The Music Department would be at a great loss without the many Chopins and Marian 
Andersons afforded it by the sophomore class. Majoring in Public School Music we have 
Louise Mitchell, Ann Johnson, Bertha Mitchell, Roena King and Dorothy Black. As ac- 
complished pianists we have Marilyn Miller and Adelaide Hart. We hope in the future to 
see concert artists from these musically-inclined sophomores. 

Life on a college campus would be unquestionably uninteresting without its Romeos 
and Juliets, Mr. Chips, and Mrs. Skeffingtons, and St. Augustine's may be proud of the fact 
that it is abounding with dramatic talent, among which are several sophomores. Do you 
remember the Du-Bignon-Lewis Dramatic Expression contest that was held in the Spring 
of 1944'? Surely you will recall the names of Eva M. Calhoun, Frances DeYoung and Mary 
Green, who, though freshmen at the time, represented their class in the true fashion of the 
theater. We may also be proud of the fact that Eva Calhoun, who has since left us, was the 
winner of the first prize with her monologue. 

In spite of the eiTects which the war has had upon intercollegiate athletics, we have 
managed, with a little luck and perseverance, to carry on two athletic games: basketball, 
intercollegiately, and football, intramurally. On the football team were such stalwarts as 
James Smith, William Jackson and Frizell Jones. In basketball we produced William Jack- 
son and LeRoy Thompson. The sophomore girls played no small part in intramural basket- 
ball. Here the names of Beatrice 
Carter, Juanita Banks, Ellen Alston, 
and Doris McKinney do not pass un- 
noticed. 

Last but not least, we are proud 
of our many classmates who are serv- 
ing in the armed forces. They are 
Jesse Boston, Herbert Richardson, 
James Cooper, Basil Young, James 
Green, and James Smith. 

We have our faults and discrepan- 
cies, but academically, religiously, 
musically, athletically, dramatically — 
we have done ourselves well and we 
are justly proud. Realizing, however, 
that we have only crossed the bay and 
that the ocean lies before us we strive 
on toward the goal which means serv- 
ice to God and man. The class of '47 
strives on and in its strivings hopes 
some day to prove an asset to our 
Alma Mater. 




20 



^^Htiii. 




FMESHMAN CLASS 



Motto: ''SiLCcess Croums Earnest Efort." 



It is said that every rose has its thorn; every joy, its sorrow; and we 
freshmen, our title. At the beginning of the school year we, the freshmen 
of i944.'45, were dubbed "The Lowly Dogs." 

Having gone through many trials, sleepless nights, headaches, cramped 
fingers, eyestrain and so forth, we are now on our way to becommg true 
St. Augustinians. 

Although at the bottom of the educational ladder we are very much 
aware of the many opportunities that are here about us. We feel it our 
duty to avail ourselves of these opportunities and to make the most of them. 
Wholeheartedly and gratefully we thank the teachers and our advisers 
for their judgment, knowledge and most of all for the advantage of their 
experience-all of which we have heeded, and from which we have 

benefited. 

CYRIL C. BURKE, 

President. 



21 



1/5 









> 



< 



y 
H 




22 




History of Les Elites Society 
Les Elites society was organized^ 
sponsored by members of the st^^ Therefore, in September 1933, plans were 

ZlTct^plefeTior thf orgamzation of the^first social club for young women on St. Augus- 
tine's campus. ppnerallv considered to be the student founder of the Les 
.r. ^"Ih^m.'de a^l Xns^or fhe organizat on wfth the help of Mrs. Latham the Dean of 
Elites. She made a!,l P'=*"f,J?'^,";u "{|ter became Dr Boyd) was the first faculty adviser and 
women. Miss Theodora Boyd (who later ^r^^"]!;^'' ^^e club It was she who named the 

^^, "'f es%'liW•^'l'?.e"sele"\Td few) . ^Th°/'maln pur'pose'of the organization was to stimu- 
club Les Elites < ^il^ seieciea lew ,^ t- campus and to give the members 

late a greater interest i" a weU ^°""^^f i^g'-g^gj-ghip Later on the club took on other ob- 
of the club a greater opportuityf^^^ ^^ong the students, affording 

'gfeatTr'op^rtunitfforllf expreslion and the development of an integrated personality 

through group work. =„on«nrpd all tvoes of programs on the campus, such as edu- 

As the club progressed It sponsored all ^ypes oi pro„ President, Almira 

cational, spiritual. ^^^ social activUes^ The first officer^^ ^^^^^^^ members 

Kennedy; Secretary, Dorothy Washington, ^reasure^^^ Charlotte Galloway. These 

Tu'ng fadles we"f ch'^fe^ f^rom'a ta^l g^oup of ladies because they had qualities which 
^ere wanted and "^eded by the orgamzat.om ^^ ^^ Augustine's. Its 

men^e;^^\j^J^^|a Hi^i- - 

have always been compn^^^ maintain a friendly and cooperative atti- 

"" ."V ^,l/7l'?Horce?t" the fast rna^ S™ have a twotoU pi.rpoe on the 

SLS- V eynlsrShoU "Self!,™ .laniards anfl traditions and they mnst carr, on 

'° "^;l ^°j^afa '^eL^nf'wh'o''tl-erognfz"ed1lrT.T wide as a great civic and social leader, 
is now facLUty adviseYof the club. In addition, the group is always glad to receive criti- 
cisms and suggestions from other faculty members. ■,. r ^.^ f.i„h 
M?ss Joyce Meyers is now completing her second year as president of the club. 

23 



VALEDA CLUB. Charter Members: Annie K. Spencer, Helen V. Craig, 
Margaret E. Donaldson, Elizabeth C. Willis, Mattie Evans, Helen E. Gill,' 
Dora Hawkins, Otis G. Muse, Amorine M. Younge. 

Miss Mildred Fancher 

Members: Beulah Kelsey, Althea Dupee, Queen E. Moore, Mary Greene, 
Sarah McLamb. Eunice Tucker, Mayme Shuler, Sallie Jones, Marilyn 
Miller, Frances DeYoung, Doris Wilder, Phyllis Cuffee, Christine Watson, 
Emma Nixon, Dorothy Ash, Martha Blacknall. 

Miss Hazel V. Clarke 




ACIES CLUB. Front row. lejt to right: Neal Stitt, Shirley Williams 
Leroy Thompson, Francis Clarke. Hugh Marshall. Second row: John 
McDougle, George Sadler, James Faniel, William Jackson, Elisha Clarke. 
Third row: Walker LeFlore, George Stanley, Lawrence Jones, Prezell 
Robinson, Horace Lawson, Charles Farrar. 



24 



The Brotherhood of 
St. Andrew 



Girls' Service 
League 



Big Sisters Club 




25 




The Choral Club 



The Cheer Leaders 



The Dramatic Club 



26 



YE OLE GRILLE. The place of our Favorite past-time. Dancing, eating 
and playing Pinochle. 




Entrance to Campus. 



27 




'*■'' 



28 



WHAT DOES THE WAM MEAN TO YOU? 

The second world war is a clean turning point in the destiny of the American 
people. More than that, the future of the race will be highly determined by its 
ultimate outcome. It seems to be as crucial a war as any that has occurred in all 
the turbulent past of mankind. 

There are, however, few thoughtful Americans who do not feel that this is so. 
But why is it so? Not many of us find it easy to answer that question with what 
could be called total satisfaction. Well-worn words like "freedom" and "democ- 
racy," phrases like "preservation of our way of life," have sparks but they hardly 
provide the full illumination we all crave. 

The reason for this fairly common mental state seems plain upon reflection. 
This is world war number two taking place in a highly complicated and complex 
world, which itself, is far from being comprehended by the general run of human 
beings. 

Our deep-going granite resolution that the war shall be won — wholly won! — 
is not weakened by the fact that many of us are comparatively inarticulate about 
it. One is always somewhat tongue-tied about things that matter deeply. Yet 
certainly it is more satisfying to be articulate, if it is possible; to have a reasoned 
philosophy about the war, instead of what might be considered an instinctive one. 

Such a philosophy is at once acquired — it rounds itself out — as soon as one 
great simple truth about modern human society is recognized : that all the diverse 
peoples on this planet are now bound together, indivisibly, in an economic world- 
union. This is not yet a de jure, a contractual, union. But that fact does not mini- 
mize — on the contrary, it emphasizes — the indestructible character of the union. 

Prezell R. Robinson, '46. 



29 



In our class we have: 
A Mason — but no Brick 
A Mack — but no Garage 
A Joseph — but no Stalin 
A Baker — but no Miller 
A Primo — but no Camera 
A Parker — but no Taylor 
A Wallace — but no Henry 
A Scott — but no Irish 
A Pierce — but no Arrow 
A Clark — but no Lewis 
A Johnson — but no Andrew 
A Craig — but no Martin 
A Grave — but no Death 

Helen Craig, '45. 



TO ST. AUGUSTINE'S 

How shall we crown her 
dignified head? 
Crown her with lilies 
yellow and red; 
Crown her with roses creamy 
and white 
As lovely fragments sweeten 
the night, 
Crown her with flowers as 
pink as the dawn. 
In which there are voices 
like that of the faun 
And a gayer Queen 
will ne'er be seen. 
Than our dear St. Augustine's. 



JUST ONE MORE 

Four-year hair style for Bca Scott 

"F" from Mr. Spraggins 

Midnight "nasty" 

Coatless Jerelyn Keeling 

New coat for Mr. Weatherford 

C.P.L. from Beulina 

Grant within the Grill 

Lift from Coble's store 

Glamour girl like Eloise Bryant { thinks she is ) 

Hair style out of A. Morrison and L. DuPress 

Knock knees from F. Clarke 

Mrs. "Ladum," Miss ""Wheetum," and Mr. "Wedderfoot" 

Explosion out of G. M. 

Reconciliation out of Shirley and Billie 

Hat upon the head for "Toni" 

White boot from sunny Florida 

Love affair for Cat Williams 

Dance from Clarke and Thompson 

"Gifting down wit it" from Boop 

Step out of Thigpen 

Charles Philip Farrar 

Love affair and curl from E. Graves 

"Old Acquaintance" from Skete and Florence 

Combination of colors from C. Debnam 

Engagement ring from M. Wright 

Chat from L. Lambert 

Ouija Board 

Jitterbugging Johnnie "^ 

Grill-going freshman class 

Victorious basketball game 

Just one more "one more" and croak 



30 



JUNIOR SUPERLATIVES 

Cordelia Blackburn, most comical girl 

Marian Cheek, most reserved 

Lillian DuPree, most composed young lady 

Price Braithwaite, the biggest jiver 

Ernestine Hopkins, most uncertain 

Augustine Morrison, most serious-minded young lady 

Catherine Williams, most fickle-minded young lady 

Marian Evans, most serene 

George Mask, most conservative young man 

Pattie Laws, tallest girl 

Queen Moore, the best card player 

Helen Morton, most refined young lady 

Prezell Robinson, most valuable young man 

Hattic Redden, quietest young lady 

Edith Sands, most athletically-inclined belle 

George Stanley, best basketball player 

Beulina Roberts, slowest and quietest 

Sarah DuPree, most winning smile 

Rosa Hopkins, smallest girl 

Naomi Edgecombe, most sympathetic young lady 

Neal Stitt, most musically-inclined 

Hattie Watford, best imitator of faculty 

Minnie Wright, most attractive young lady 

George Sadler, most ambitious young man 

Shirley Williams, shortest young man 

Mary Wright, most stern young lady 

Charles Farrar, most appealing personality 

Rebie Wilson, best chemist 

Joseph Saunders, best biologist 

Willie Fennell, most lady-like 

Margarita Lewis, most brilliant young lady 

The Faculty Speaks — 

"You are not see-rious a-tall" 

"Your book account is overdrawn" 

"Circulez, Brother" 

"You got it" 

"One minute after eleven, girls" 

"I've got a car and I'll track you down" 

"And there again we have — " "Yes, but — " 

"Unto this day" 

"Spring is in the air, beware" 

"I question that" 

"Every man for 'heself and God for all" 

"Will you begin reading" 

"It's not office hours, but I'll cash it" 

"That reminds me of the time — " 

"You boys know it's after five-thirty" 

"You've got to act positively" 



31 



THE PEN 

St. Augustine's College 

Raleigh, N. C. 

It is gratifying to know that you are going 
to publish the Yearbook again this year. It 
is a worthwhile effort, and the publication 
will increase in value as the years go by, for 
it will contain the activities and personali- 
ties of the College as of the year 1945. Good 
luck and best wishes. 

Edson E. Blackman, President. 

Alumni Association. 
April 12, 1945 
Charlotte, N. C. 




Dr. Edson E. Blackman 



My PhilosopJhy of Eeligion 

The Mythical religion which I was taught has become a religion of reality, founded 
not on things of a supernatural world, but founded on an impregnable stone of faith. 

Without faith there can be no religion. The age of mysticism and the super- 
natural powers of God are gone. Consequently, we must face reality without imagi- 
nation, and begin to build our religion not on sinking sand, but on solid rock. 

Christ bled to death on a wooden cross. Yet he had faith in God. Although God 
did not remove the nails from His hands, He was with Him. Christ knew this and kept 
faith which was His and ours. That same faith now lights the world, but because we 
have been bathed in mysticism, and not in reality, we are blind and cannot see this 
faith. Yet this same faith should be our predominating argument against spiritual 
disintegration and ethical chaos. 

We must paint a new picture of our Creator. But we must begin on a new canvas, 
so that our picture will not conflict with our new one — for our old one has become 
marred beyond repair. Our new picture must be streaked with courage and filled with 
reality. Its base must be faith. 

How many of us have this faith of which I speak? How many of us know what 
it is? I cannot describe it — neither can I tell you how to acquire it — for faith is inani- 
mate; it cannot be reached by our hands, but must be obtained in our hearts and 
minds. For without this faith we will be lost like a ship at sea without the compass 
and the sun to guide us. We cannot depend upon others to transmit this faith to us; 
we must grasp this faith ourselves, for it is our lifeline, our only link between God 
and man. 

Without faith there can be no God — Without God, there can be no peace. So in 
order to have these things which we cherish in our hearts and which mean so much 
to the happiness of all the world, we must open our eyes to the flame of faith which is 
still shining from the cross upon which the blessed Saviour died. When that has been 
done, we may say in our hearts that "God is in heaven," and all is right with the world. 

QuENTiN K. Miller, 
U. S. Coast Guards. 



32 



1944 




Sept. 


17- 


Sept. 


20 


Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


23 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


20 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


21 


Dec. 


19 



POOE SENIOR'S ALMANAC 



We return to school. Look over the new crop of freshmen from our lofty status 
as seniors. We started life in the Tuttle Building. 

Registration for classes. Bible heads the list. 

Classes begin and Bessie Zaehery begins the semester by coming late to 
Political Science. 

Thelma Wallace arrives after finding one long-lost ticket. 

First class meeting. Elected officers were : E. Clarke, President; Edith Pierce. 
Vice President; Joyce Meyers, secretary; and Helen Craig, treasurer. 

Big Sisters organized. 

We received registration cards to entertain at the U.S.O. The Colonade opened 
the same night. 

First group of practice teachers started observing at Berry O'Kelly and Wash- 
ington High schools. 

Big Sisters entertain Little Sisters. Remember. "Be kind to your Web-footed 
friends!" 

Thanksgiving Day! Ham, peas, string beans, and mince pie! 

We start counting the days 'til Christmas vacation. 

A.M. We awaken the campus before breakfast with our melodious ( ? ) Christ- 
mas caroling. 

Dec. 19 P.M. All northbound seniors spend the night in the Seaboard Station dreaming 

of standing room on the 24-hour-late stage coach. 

Ho-hum. back at school. Everyone late to Bible. Their trains were late — they 
said. 

Founders' Day. Seniors speak at the banquet. 

Big Sisters entertain Soldiers' basketball team from Greensboro. 

Norma Levister leaves for her first position at the high school in Fairmont, N. C. 

We beat Fayetteville in basketball. Everyone overjoyed. 

Marks come out. Every "said" senior becomes a full-fledged senior. 

Seniors sponsor Coronation Ball. Bernetta Horton wins contest as most popular 
girl on the campus. 

Feb. 12 Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra at the Auditorium. Among the seniors seen 

were Antoinette Duncan, Charles Johnson. Doris Harris. Edith Graves, Bernetta 
Horton. Bessie Zaehery, Edith Pierce, and Pauline Baker. Or was it the concert 
— Pierce, Baker, and Zaehery??? 

St. Valentine's Day — Ash Wednesday. Chapel one hour long. 

Mr. Haynes sends our picture to us — Oh Agony!!! 

Seniors late to Chapel. 

George Washington's birthday — "V (veal) Day" — after hours. 

"V Day" continues. Chapel that evening. Remember the Epistle for St. Matthias' 
Day — Brother!!! 

Scott sisters present their vaudeville troupe in the suite. 

Seniors take a hike??? They see bear tracks and make tracks for home via 
hog truck — P-Yew!!! 

Easter — and did we look sharp — or did we? 

WOW! The Junior-Senior Prom!!! 

The President's reception. We became the chosen ones. 

Final exams — Whew!!! 

Our last student social. The days are passing too fast. 

Baccalaureate Sunday puts a lump in our throats. No moving. 

Class day. Proud parents, etc. — Snapping pictures. 

We become nostalgic about our favorite spots on the campus. 

The DAY is at hand! Joyce Mason has a permanent dent in her hand from 
snatching her diploma. Our college days are over. 

May 31 Happy Days . 

By: 

Edyth Pierce, 
Pauline Baker. 



1945 




Jan. 


3 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


28 


Jan. 


31 


Feb. 


5 


Feb. 


10 



Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


23 


Feb. 


24 


Feb. 


25 


April 


1 


May 


12 


May 


19 


May 


21-26 


May 


26 


May 


27 


May 


28 


May 


29 


May 


30 



33 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The Pen Staff and the Senior Class of 1945, find it difficult to find words that 
will justly express our deepest appreciation for the aid given to make this book a 
success, both materially and financially. 

We extend added appreciations to Mr. Chippey and Mr. Halliburton for their 
wholehearted guidance and patience; to Miss Clarke, who volunteered many hours 
of her time to act as typist for The Pen; and to Major Smith, of Edwards & Brough- 
ton Company, for his much needed advice. Thanks to each and every contributor. 



PATEONS 



Mrs. Louise B. Duncan 

Mr. and Mrs. Elza Burch 

Mr. Charles Phillip Farrar 

Lt. and Mrs. Alphonso L. Finch 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Harris 

Quentin Kyles Miller 

Mclver High School 

L. S. Gillard, Principal 

Littleton, N. C. 

Rev. and Mrs. Charles S. Rhoden 

Miss Marion Holmes 

Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Alleyne 

Cpl. Wayland H. Horton 

Mrs. D. K. Harrison 

Mrs. Iredelle L. Cooper 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Strickland 

Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Hunt, Jr. 

Mr. Richard DeVeaux, Jr. 

Mrs. Julia Zachery 

Mrs. Alice C. Jones 

Mrs. Annie E. Powell 

Mr. C. E. Warner 



Mr. and Mrs. George H. Mitchell 

Miss Margaret Bugg 

Dr. J. O. Plummer 

Mrs. Louise A. Epps 

Mr. George L. Stanley 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Taylor 

Sgt. Howard Pullen 

Dr. Thos F. Cathcart 

A Friend 

Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Wheeler 

Miss Gertrude Meyers 

Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Penick, D.D. 

St. Augustine's College Club of New York 

Rev. J. Jones 

Sgt. Oscar A. Jones 

Miss Almira J. Kennedy 

Mrs. Wadsworth V. Holmes, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. L. L. Woods and daughter 

Mr. Dan Sherman. 

Bishop F. M. Craig 

Dr. William R. Jones 

S, Sgt. James A. Buggs 



34 



St. Agnes School of Nursing 

. St. Agnes Hospital 



A Member of the V. S. Cadet Nurse Corps 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Compliments 



Fallon s Florist 



Phone 8347 



FOR LATEST SPRING 

and 

SUMMER STYLES 

Visit 

HUDSON-BELK CO. 



205 Favetteville Street 



Congratulations 



CompUinents of 



METAL ARTS CO., Inc. 



Jewelry and Stationery Craftsmen 



ROCHESTER 5, N. Y. 



^^Evevythlng for the 
Office'' 

• 

James K. lliiem 

108 Fayetteville Street 

* 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Compliments of 

THE IVEIGHBORIIOOD 
GROCERY STORE 

2 North Tarboro Road 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


Compliments of 

Martin's Florist 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


Colonade 
* 

Dine and Dance 

* 

427 South Blount Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Compliments of 

r me s 

Men's Shop 

* 

Raleigh, N. C. 



MAYERS PHARMACY 



Corner Davie and Blount Streets 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



A Full Line of Toilet and Household Articles Together With 
Cigars, Cigarettes, Ice Cream and Sodas 



TELEPHONE 9143 



Compliments 



E. RUDOLPH CLARKE, M.D. 



Class 1935 



Capital Cab Co. 



Service Is Wlutt We 



133 E. Hargett Street 



Raleigh, N. C. 



i> . '^ 



© 



c=^^< 



^ , \eave VO«^.foi v^*^"' .oiess^on. 

AS you \ea h„tvdteJ/chosen P^°' 



RTBi 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 



SMALLS' PARADISE 
of N. Y. 

Incorporated 



2294 SEVENTH AVENUE 
AT 135TH STREET 



NEW YORK 30, N. Y. 



COIVGRATrLATIO]\S 

cfttcl 

BEST WISHES 

from the 

12-12 
Luncheonette 



Next to Lincoln Theatre 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Arcade Hotel 

A Home Aivay from Home 



PRIVATE DINING ROOM 

for 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



125 East Hargett Street 
Dial 4213 



FUEL OIL KEROSEIVE 


AMl^RICAN 


AMOCO 


GAS 


John ]\orwooc1, Distributor 


Phoue 6653 Raleigli, 1\. C. 


CotnpUments of 


Contpliments of 


Skinner's 


LIGHTNER'S 


Florist 


FUNERAL 


Mrs. Willielmina Skinner 


HOME 




INC. 


Flowers for All Occasions 




^ 


Phone 5-6339 : 5-8171 -W 




416 Brood Street 


312 Smithfield Street 


Jacksonville 2, Florida 


Raleigli, N. C. 



Congratulations to the 


Compliments of 


Graduating Class 




of 


COMMUNITY 


St. Augustine's 


DRUG 


from 


COMPANY 


PURITAN 


• 


CHEMICAL 




COMPANY 


RALEIGH. N. C. 


Atlanta, Georgia 


DIAL 8538 


Compliments of the 


Ambassador 'I'heatre 


• 


All* Conditioned 


for Comiort untl Enjotintont 


• . 


RALEIGH, N. C. 



ST. AUGUSTINE 
COLLEGE 

Seventy-seventh Year 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Rtttetl CUiss ''A" hy the Southern 
Associtition of Colleges 



Arts and Sciences Commerce Music 

Physical Education Premedical Work 

High School Teacher Training 



Cotnplinients of 




Hayiies' Studio 


Compliments of 


* 


Miss Montelle Gittens 


Raleigh, N. C. 


~ 


Compliments of 


Mother and Daughter s Store 


Insurance Building 



FIRST-CITIZENS BANK 
& TRUST COMPANY 

We Serve Eastern Carolina 



SMITHFIELD 

NEW BERN 

DUNN 

MOREHEAD CITY 

BURGAW 

GRIFTON 

RALEIGH 

CLINTON 

BENSON 

BEAUFORT 

CLAYTON 

MARINE BARRACKS, 



ANGIER 
KINSTON 
ROSEBORO 
LOUISBURG 
FORT BRAGG 
JACKSONVILLE 
FAYETTEVILLE 
FRANKLINTON 
SPRING HOPE 
RICHLANDS 
CHERRY POINT 
NEW RIVER 



Complete Banking and 
Trust Service 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 






This Space is Occupied 

with the 
Compliments of a Friend 



Couiplinieiits of 



Capital Fimeral Home 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Compliments of 



Dr. H. L. Fleming 




^ .\ .. 



AUTOGRAPHS 



-<f- 



too 

■ O "IS 

3"ir 



/