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Full text of "The Pen"










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THE PETV 1946 

Published by the Senior Class of St. Augustine's 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 




Pattie Laws 
Editor 

Neal Stitt 
Assistant Editor 



Augustine Morrison 

Cordelia Blackburn 

Naomi Edgecombe 

Mary Wright 

Advertising Managers 



Louise Lambert. '47 

Doris McKinney. "47 

Joseph Saunders 

Shirley Williams 

Assistants 



Ellen Alston. '47 
Helen Payne, '47 

Associate Editors 



Edith Sands 
George Stanley 

Photographers 



Ellen Alston 
Neal Stitt 

Typists 

Prezell Robinson 
Business Manager 



" -tiitm 







President 

REV. EDGAR H. GOOLD 

M.A., S.T.R. 




Foreirord 



Of Thee we sing, dear Alma Mater! To you within whose walls we have spent 
these four vears so fraught with laughter and tears, we raise our song! What price- 
less gifts have you bestowed upon our heads! Wisdom, truth, humility, honor, 
service, lovalty, brotherhood, manhood, womanhood and reverence with which you 
have imbued us. seeking to prepare us not for school but for more abundant life. 

To the members of the faculty who have struggled so diligently to help us on our 
journev. we offer our sincere thanks, and it is to them that we dedicate this book 
as an outward and visible sign of an inner and spiritual appreciation for their efforts 
which we know at some times seemed to be directed toward a helpless cause. To our 
fellow students who have helped to make our book a success, we say "Que dien vous 
lienisse."' To all people connected with Dear Saint Augustine's we offer our heartfelt 
thanks, and as we go out into the cold, cold world to meet the foe, we give you our 
sincere pledge. "We shall not fail; we shall toil and toil with the tools you have 
gi\en to us: we shall hold high the torch and finallv emerge victorious over the enemv. 
for We Face a .\eir Day oj Problems and Chunf^es: But With Courage." 



-,- -■ — - — - '---ill III •iV-'TllM'^l 



ADMIl^ISTRATIVE OFFICERS 




CECIL D. HALLIBURTON 
B.A., M.A. 

Dean of College 
Social Science 




REGINALD L. LYNCU 
B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Dean 
French 




LLOYD L. WOODS 
B.A., Sc.M., Ph.D. 

Head of Chemistry 
Department 




ARTHUR P. CHIPPEY 
e.A., M.A. 

Science, Biology 
Pen Staff Adviser 




PUARL A. $I\OI>«RA$S 
B.S., M.A. 

Bihlieal IJteraitire 

lAbrttrian 

Senior Class Adviser 




Ms 




T. CURTIS MAYO 
Mus.B., Mus.M. 

Music 




JUUIA DELAIVEY 
B.A., M.A. 

English Earprcssion 
nramatics 




DAVID C. VIRGO 
B.A., M.A. 

English 




HAZEL V. CLARKE 
B.S. 

Instructor in Business 
Education 



I 



im —" *- 



i^SS^SSS 





LILLIAX O'DANIEL 
B.S., M.S. 

Music 



TmSLEY L. SPRAGGINS 
B.A., M.A. 

History 




IVIIVA W. AiXTHONY 
B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Dean of Women 
Educatioti 





EARL H. McCLENl^EY 
B.S., M.S. 

Head of Education 
Department 



MABEL M. LATHAM 
B.S. 

matron and Dean ot Women 
English 




WILSO]\ B. I^BORDEN 
B.S. 

Mathematics, Physics 



I 




GRACE LAI\E 
B.A. 

Assistant Librarian 




JAMES A. LIVAS. JR. 
M.A. 

So€'ial Studies 




REICNICE TAYLOR 
B.A. 

Superintendettt of Grounds 




CATHERIIVE BURGESS 

Assistant Matrtnt 




LETTYE H. WHEATO]\ 

Cashier 




ELSIE M. COOK 
Secretary and l?^»istrnr 





ALICE HALL 

Supervisor of Laundry 



Senior Class 




t \v 



EULALIA BAILEY 

"Eu" 

New York City 



PRICE BRAITHWAITE 

"Braitli" 

Fayetteville. N. C. 



Big Sisters Club; Honor Roll: GirFs Serv- Brotherhood of St. Andrew: Chancellors 
ice League: Senior Class Treasurer (1st Club: Omega Psi Phi Fraternity: \ arsitv 



Semester) . 

Selfish, ambitious, fastidious 

B.A. English, Social Studies 



Football; Varsity Basketball; Athletic 
Council; College Activities Council; Intra- 
mural Council. 

Radical, athletic, philosophical 
B.S. Pre- Medical 





CORDELIA BLACKBLRN 
-Jess- 
High Point. N. C. 



MARIAN CHEEK 

"Love" 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Clionic Society President 
ciety Treasurer; Honor 
Dance; Dramatic Club; Bij 
Neat, studious, selfish 
B.A. French, Social Studies 



Les Elites So- 
Roll; Creative 
g Sisters Club. 



Les Elites Society; 
mercial Club. 
Dainty, talkative. 
B..\. Commerce 



Big Sister's Club; Com- 
siighlly radical 



SEIVIORS 





LILLIAN KliTH DIU'REE 

"Lil" 

Farmville. N. C. 

Big Sister's Club: Literary Correspondent: 
Clioral Chili; Class Treasurer; Girl's Serv- 
ice League: Hcmor RolL 
Radical, intelligent, talented 
B.A. English, Social Studies 



NAOMI LOULSE EDGECOMBE 
"Bunny 

Ciioir: Clioral Club: Dramatic Club: Big 
Sister's Club; Pen Staff: Girl's Service 
League: Intramural (^mncil. 
Pleasant, ucll-groomed. unassuming 
B.A. .Social Studies. Healtli Education 





•ARAH FIELD Di FREE 

"Butch" 

Brooklvn. N. Y. 



MARION FOYE E\ ANS 
'"Foye" 

Raleigh. N. C. 



I ' 



^•■' rt'iarv Les Elites: Secretary Senior Les Elites Society; Big Sister's Club. 

I la--: Big Sister's Club: Choir: Dramatic Sueel. naive, uell-dressed 

'lull: Intiamural Council: Honor Roll. B.A. Social Studies 

' iiiliiish. stubborn, sincere 

I' A. English. Health Education 



8E!\IORS 




WILLIE MAE FENNELL 

"Fenn" 

Willard, N. C. 



SALLIE JONES 

"Sal" 

Gary, N. C. 



Big Sister's Club, President; GirFs Serv- Veleda Club: Big Sister's Glub; Honor 

ice League. Roll. 

Conservative, studious, cooperative Quiet, studious, cute 

B.S. Chemistry B.A. French. Social Studies 




ROSA BERNIGE HOPKINS 
"Bud" 

Greenville. N.' C. 

Les Elites Society; Big Sister's Glub. 
Petite, moody, easily influenced 
B.A. Social Studies 



A^?"'*^^^ 




PATTIE LOUISE LAWS 

"Lou " 

Rocky Mount. N. G. 

Editor Pf\; Les Elites, President; Girl's 
Service League: Altar Guild; Student 
Council; Honor Roll; Clionic Society; Big 
Sister's Glub. 

Intellectual, industrious, democratic 
B.A. Enghsh. French 



10 



SENIORS 





MARGARITA LEWIS 

"Rita"' 

Charleston, S. C 

Zeta Sigma Rho Soicety. President; 
Service League; Big Sister's Club; 
Guild; Honor Roll. 
Industrious, generous, ostentatious 
B.A. English, French 



Girl's 

Altar 



QUEEN MOORE 

"Es" 

North Harlowe, N. C. 

Veleda, President; Big Sister's Club; 
Service League; Honor Roll. 
Lazy, congenial, comical 
B.-'V. English, French 



Girl'i 




GEORGE MASK 

"Beau" 

Hamlet. N. C. 

Brotherhood of St. Andrew; Basketball; 
Creative Dance. 
Musical, quiet, reserved 
B.S. Chemistry 



AUGLSTINE MORRISON 

"Stine" 
Rolling Fork. Miss. 

Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Girl's Service 
League; Big Sister's Club; Dramatic Club. 
Dramatic, generous, prevaricator 
B.S. Chemistry. French 



11 



SENIORS 




WILLIE MAE RAGINS 

"Will" 
Wedgefield, S. C. 

Big Sister's Club: Girl's Service League. 
Generous, comical, creative 
B.A. Social Studies. English 



PREZELL ROBINSON 
Batesburg, S. C. 

Honor Roll: Acies Club: Brotberliood of 

St. Andrew. Treasurer; Pen Staff: Choir: 

Clionic: Choral Club; Track Team; Lay 

Reader. 

Scholarly, ambilious, conscrralive 

B..\. Social Studies. Psychology 




HATTIE DOROTHY REDDEN 
New York City 

Girl's Service League, President: Altar 
Guild: Clionic Society: Honor Roll. 
Pious, ambitious, scholarly 
B..4. .Social Science 



GEORGE JACKSON SADLER . 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity; Honor Roll; 

Student Council; Choir; Choral Club: Bas- 

kethall; Acies Club; Lay Reader; Athletic 

( ioLincii. 

Inlellectual. gentle, athletic 

B.S. Science. Mathematics 



12 



SENIORS 





EDITHE RlCllLEEN SANDS 



"Kicliie 
West Palm Beach. Fla. 



(;E0RGE STANLEY 
Richmiiiul. Va. 



Brotherhood of St. Andrei': ,\cies Cluh: 
,„ Conferer,ce in Applied Christianity; Cltontc 
Les Elites: Girrs Service Leasue: AH ^^^^.^ .. p3,kethall. 
Sports- Big Sister-s Club; Dramatic Uul). (_.^„^.^,-,,^_ rooperalwe, bombastic 
^4thU-tk: neut. miserlx b.a. French. Social Studies 

B.A. Music, English. Health Education 




JOSEPH CLEMLAL SAUNDERS 

"Jo" 

Atlantic City. N. J- 

Alnha Phi Alpha Fraternity; Basketball: 

Football Acie : Choral Club: Brotherhood 

!;; It Andre.: Pen Staff: Track; Honor 

Roll. , . , 

Athletic, caddish, congenial 
B S Science, Mathematics 



FREIDA STRICKLAND 

Raleigh, N. C 

Bic "lister's Club; Commercial Club. 
n'ell-drcssed. unaffected, sophisticated 
B.A. Commerce 



13 



SENIORS 




NEAL ARCHIE STITT 

"Stitt" 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

Choir: Choral Club: Acies: Pen Staff: 

Commercial Club. President: Brotherhood 

of St. Andrew; Student Councd; Honor 

R<di. 

Artistic, virile 

B.A. Music, Commerce 



CATHERINE HARRIET WILLIAMS 

"Cat" 
Columbia, S. C. 

Les Elites Societv: Girl's Service League; 
Assistant Organist: Choral Club. 
Fickle, juvenile, talented 
B..\. Music, Social Studies 




SHIRLEY C. WILLIAMS. Ill 
New York City 

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; Football; 
Acies; Brotherhood of St. Andrew; Dra- 
matic Qub; Pen Staff; Student Council. 
Moody, cosmopolitan, amorous 
B.S. Chemistry 



JACKSON WHEELER 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Choral Club; Choir; Brotherhood of St. 

Andrew. 

Affable, gifted, industrious 

B.A. Music, Health Education 



14 



SEIVIORS 




REBIE MAE WILSON 

"Reba" 

Greenville. N. C. 








WILLIAM PERRY, JR. 

"Buster" 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Treasurer Senior Class; Treasurer Big Acies Club: Brotherhood of St. Andrew; 

Si'iter's Club: Honor Roll; Girl's Service \ arsity Football. 

]^g2„y^ Conservative, manly, uelt-bred 

Studious, shy. philosophical B.A. History, Social Studies 

B.S. Chemistry 




MARY WRIGHT 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Clinnic Society. Vice President; Big Sister's 

<!lub; Choir; Zeta Sigma Rho Society; Pen 

Staff. 

Talkative, irrational, glamorous 

B.A. Social Studies 




I 



CHARLES FARRAR 

'"Beaumont" 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Acies; 
Episco- 



Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew; N. C. , 
pal Student Conference; Student Central 
Committee; Chapel Council; Pen Staff; 
Choir; Class President. 
Dogmatic, fine actor, garrulous 
B.A. English, Social Studies 






15 



CLASS HISTORY 

Here we are on that home stretch, htokiiig back with pride u]3on the ground already covered. Let us reminisce 
a bit. Monday. September 20. 1942. was a beautiful sunny day when !U frightened and "green" freshmen entered 
St. Augustine's Campus. The first week of initiation sent shivers over us all and started a number of us repacking 
our trunks to go back to old familiar places — home. We managed to breast these ills and quicklv entered upon 
our studies with zest and heart-ridden ambition. In our second semester, having the feeling of belonging, we or- 
ganized our class with .Joseph Saunders. President: Harold Wright. Vice President; Cordelia Blackburn. Secre- 
tary; Edith Sands. Assistant Secretary; and Queen Moore. Treasurer. Our student council representatives were 
George Sadler and Lucretia Anthonv. 

In this same year we represented nearly every extra-curricular acti\itv on the campus. The freshmen girls 
organized for the first time the Thomas Building Council under Miss M. L. Fancher. We're even prouder of 
ourselves for having been the first Freshman Class to present an assembly program. It was in this year that 
Joseph Saunders and Pattie Laws won the prizes for the highest scholastic averages in General Biology. George 
Sadler won the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity award and Joseph Saunders the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity award. 
Algie Mayo was awarded the prize for the greatest improvement in Freshman English. Hattie Redden received 
the Zeta Sigma Rho Society award. As freshmen, we were well represented academically, socially and also re- 
ligiously as we remember our large and steady Sunday s:hool class under Mr. McStallworth. 

As the months passed, the war waged on. not sparing our class at all. When we returned as Sophomores, 
there were only 38 of us. We began to miss such familiar faces as T. Johnson. E. Williams. M. White. A. L nder- 
due. 0. Crump. Muse, Miller. Piper. Anderson, Robinson — all of whom had fallen victims of the draft. To 
offset this a bit. we welcomed two new-comers — Catherine Williams from Benedict College and Hilda Lewis, a 
former member of St. Augustine's. Our class officers for the year were Harold Wrigiit. President; Xeal Stitt. 
Vice President; Pattie Laws. Secretary; and George Sadler, Treasurer. We held up our once-begun representa- 
tion in all activities. Remembering the motto, "Climb though the path be rugged," we did not allow any of our 
plans to be annihilated. We were destined to excel in all our endeavors. We led the honor roll for the year 
and participated in every activity with leading roles. 

At the end of the year Neal Stitt won the first prize for e.xcellence in literary composition and Charles 
Farrar won second prize in the Du Bignon speaking contest. 

Though we were becoming more and more aware of the evils of war. we were carrying on. We returned 
for our Junior year in College with the realization that we were living in turbulent times and that we had to work 
diligently and keep the faith of those who had departed from our ranks. We tried to elect a strong group of 
officers who would lead us in successful channels. Neal Stitt was elected president; Prezell Robinson, vice 
president; Richie Sands, secretary; Queen Moore, assistant secretary; Rebie Wilson, treasurer, and Cordelia 
Blackburn, chairman of the program committee. Among new members were: Prezell Robinson. Jackson Wheeler, 
Mary Wright, Helen Morton, and Minnie Wright. 

Many of us made the honor roll and at the beginning of the second semester our plans were taking shape 
for the Prom and other activities. During National Music Week we presented a delightful program of music 
of all ages. Later we entered the popularity contest with Minnie Wright, a new-comer, as our candidate. Our 
Junior-Senior prom was very successful and everyone had a delightful time. Neal Stitt became president of the 
Acies, Cordelia Blackburn, first president of the Clionic Society, George Stanley, Director of the Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew. Pattie Laws, Vice President of Les Elites Society, Augustine Morrison, Vice President of the 
Zeta Sigma Rho Society, Queen Moore, Secretary of Veledas and Margarita Lewis served as Secretary of Girls 
Service League. Pattie Laws was also president of the Delanv House Government. George Sadler captain of 
the Basketball Team. Charles Farrar became first colored president of the N. C. Episcopal Students" Conference. 

At the end of the year after tears and worries, we realized that we were rising seniors and that a great task 
lay before us. Hattie Redden was awarded the Delanv Scholarship based on scholarship, character and promise 



16 



iri' 



f future usefulness; Auarustine Morrison won the Latham award for constructive leadership during sophomore 
d junior years; Pattie Laws won one of the prizes offered for excellency in English Composition. So the year 
Jrew to a close and ahead of us lay the goal post — the last mile. God only knew what it would bring. 

Seniors! The word struck a deep note in our hearts. We felt that we had come over the rough and steep 
lills and we lost no time in organizing ourselves and making plans for a memorable vear. After much delibera- 
ion and meditation we elected Charles Farrar, President; ISeal Stitt. Vice President; Sarah DuPree, Secretary; 
']dith Sands. Assistant Secretary; and Rebie Wilson. Treasurer. We began to plan for our senior publication, 
''he Pen which was to be the best in the schooFs history. We also decided to be the leaders in reorganizitig 

he Student Council. Pattie Laws became editor-in-chief of The Pen, ]\eal Stitt, Associate Editor; Prezell 
vobinson, business manager and Augustine Morrison and Cordelia Blackburn, co-advertising managers. TSew 
iienibers were: Frieda Strickland and William Perry. 

George Sadler became President of the Acies. and again Captain of the basketball team; Cordelia Blackburn 
/as reelected president of the Clionic Society; Hattie Redden became president of the Girls' Service League; 
Villie Fennell president of the Big Sisters; Pattie Laws president of Les Elites Societv; Queen Moore president of 
/'eleda Club; Margarita Lewis president of Zeta Sigma Rho Society. Margarita Lewis and Hattie Redden repre- 
ented the seniors on the Altar Guild and Neal Stitt, George Sadler, Joseph Saunders, George Stanlev, Prezell 
lobinson. and Charles Farrar were our senior Lav-readers. 

As tiie time jiassed, we began to tliink in term of programs. We presented two interesting and well-received 
irograms: The first program, directed by Cordelia Blackburn, showed the rules of etiquette for all time; the 
econd program, directed by Queen Moore and Prezell Robinson, was a panel discussion of the timely topic 
Are Sororities and Fraternities desirable on any college campus?" 

The seniors made history when twenty-one of the thirty-two members made the honor roll for the first 

jemester. Our boys made history, too, when they went en masse into Greek fraternities. Shirley Williams, 

oseph Saunders and Charles Farrar became members of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity: George Sadler and 

I'rice Braithwaite became members of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity and George Stanley and Prezell Robinson 

lecame pledged to the Omegas. 

The time is passing so swiftly! Soon we must leave the old familiar place and people. Our four years 
ire filled with memories that bless and burn! May Saint Augustine's stand forever! 



17 



SENIOR CLASS WILL 

We. the Senior Class of Saint Augustine's College. Cit\ of Raleigh. State of North Carolina, being of 
sound mind and bodv. realizing that our college days are drawing to a close, take this means of dispensing ^vitll 
some of our treasures which we have accumulated in the past four years. We realize the value of said treasures 
and each of us hereby charges his legatees to guard them with their li\es. We are disposing of them in thi> 
following manner: 

To the members of our faculty who have been most patient with us for four years, we take this opportunity 
to express our sincere appreciation for all they have done 

To our Alma Mater we pledge our everlasting devotion, loyalty and deepest love. 

Charles Farrar wills his responsibilities to anyone who is fool enough to take them with sincere hopes that 
they will benefit by them. He also wills his ability "to read and not be read," to Mr. Revis and tiie "Stupid 
Four." 

Augustine Morrison throws her personality to tiie wind. ho|jing it will settle on one Miss Wilma Mauney. 

Queen Moore wills her ability to keep calm and collected to Ruby \\ ynn. and her position as president of the 
Valeda Club to Mayme Shuler. 

Naomi Edgecombe wills her dignity to Hilda Thigpen. 

Pattie Laws wills to Hattie Watford her position on the Honor Roll; to Helen Payne she passes the mantle 
of President of Les Elites Society. 

To whom it may concern: The misfortune of being campus mail carrier, being constantly asked. "Did I get 
a special?" wearing shoes down to the last nail in the heel, having your work aid cul two dollars each time you 
fail to turn on and off the office lights — two dollars fifty cents if you fail to dust the legs of a certain chair within 
the office, receiving phone calls at 2 a.m. that "there's a special in Tuttle Building to be delivered" — in other 
words — having your feet kept to llie fire l)ul liking it. for it all only serves to make you prompt and responsible. 
Do it, "chum," and youre a sender! Sincerely — Neal A. Stitt. 

George L. Stanley and Prezell R. Robinson will their ability to keep the office I The Firm I going throughout 
the year with an increase of books, typewriters, and fluorescent lamps, and to be able to wear four white shirt? 
in one week to Hugh Marshall and Stanislaus Solomon, with the hope that thev will make a smooth job of it. 
(They question it.) 

Cordela Blackburn wills her Bible notebook to anyone who can complete those sentences she began and 
could only catch "the" — the first word; her ability to do accurate, neat work, to Doris McKinnev. 

Eulalia Bailey wills her studiousness to Beatrice Carter, and her ability to mind her business to Louise Lambert. 

Margarita Lewis wills her industriousness to Roena King; her position as President of Zeta Sigma Rho to 
Claudia Mitchell. 

Sara Dupree ivills her well-shaped legs to Dorothy Ashe; her tiny figure to Tillie Spears and her ability 
to keep out of trouble to the "Big Four" of the Delany Building. 

Mary Wright wills her fur coat to Jerelyn Keeling, and her charming personality plus her "come hither ' 
eyc^s to Dorethea Lennon. 

Marian Cheek wills her ability to be utterly feminine at all times to Mary Morrison. 

Rosa Hopkins wills her urge to be "nice" to service "guys" to Adelaide Hart. 

George Mask wills his ability to interpret the master nmsical compositions to Colderide Reeves in hopes 
that some day both will reach Carnegie Hall. 



18 



'l! 



I 



L 



Shirley Williams wills his ability to make friends and get along with everyone to Rocky DeVeaux. He 
sincerely hopes that Miami will benefit, along with St. Aug. from this legacy. 

Joseph Saunders wills whatever little athletic ability and "do or die" spirit he has left to James Vinson. 
Joe hopes that this will allow Vinson to stick faithfully to losing teams throughout his college years. 

Price Braithwaite wills his extra pounds to Harold Boyd and his ability to keep cool to Cyril Burke. 

Willie Ragins wills all tiie History Classes to Annie McKiethen and her ability to hold an entertaining 
conversation to Iris Taylor. 

William Perry wills his qualities of manhood to Francis Clark, and his ability to be "sho nufT" married to 
Stanislus Solomon. 

Jackson Wheeler wills his melodious voice and his ability to answer questions when asked to Valla Oliver. 

George Sadler wills his ability to refrain from writing notes and going to sleep in Education HI to anyone 
who feels that he is able to do so and pass the course: his position as president of Acies to Hugh Marshall. 

Lillian Dupree wills her abilitv to sing to Sara Williams, and she fervently hopes that she will use it; also 
lii Sara she wills her nonchalance and ability to keep cool. 

Hattie Redden wills her abilitv to keep a clean room to Adriena Carter in hopes that she will utilize it. 
Her jobs in the library and chapel to anyone with endless patience. 

Willie M. Fennell wills to Maynie Shuler her perfect four-year class attendance record in the hope that 
she will continue to preserve it. To Ainie Coleman she wills her even temper. 

Richie Sands will to anyone who is able to do it the following: her abilitv to major in three different 
subjects, her ability to be both student and faculty member at the same time, and her ability to be well-groomed 
for four years. 

Catherine \^ illiams wills her dexterity at the piano to Adelaide Hart, with the hope that she'll make her 
dormitory mates happy, and to Horace Lawson a ring with the hope that hell have his next performance "inside" 
Taylor Hall. 

Sally Jones wills her dignity to Ernestine Hopkins and her studiousness to Etta Nickpeay. 

Mirian Evans wills her stable personality to Helen Kilpatrick. and her southern drawl to Rosita MacDonald. 

Frieda Strickland wills her ability to be friendly to the campus girls as well as the city students to Alice 
Morgan. 

Rebie Wilson wills her well-rounded personality and her willingness to help in any capacity at any time 
to Rosinda Nealv. 

We hereby charge to students of Saint Augustine's College the task of executing our Last Will and Testament. 

In witness thereof we have set hereunto our hands and seals, this sixth day of February in the vear of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and forty-six. 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1946 
Charles Farrar. 

Testator. 
Witnesses: 

Rebie Wilson 
Mary Wright 



19 



' 



314 North Pennsylvania Avenue 
Atlantic City. New Jersey 
Dear Bernetta. 

In your last letter you asked us 
about our classmates of 1946 at 
Saint Augustine's. Well, some of 
them write to us and some of them 
don't. You know Naomi Edge- 
combe Boston is here spending the 
holidays with me. Her little twins 
are so cute, and "Jackie," the little 
girl, has the prettiest eyes. She 
has a lot of newspaper clippings 
that she has been cutting out about 
the various girls and boys of 46. 
I have some, too. so we decided to 
send them to you so you can see 
for yourself what they are doing. 
Here they are: 
Wasliington. D. C— Miss Eulalia Bailey 
has been appointed Case worker with the 
Department of Public Heahh. to succeed 
Miss Joyce Meyers who left to be married. 
Miss Bailey received her B.A. degree from 
Saint Augustine's College, and the degree 
of M.A. from Columbia University. For 
the past two years she has held the posi- 
tion of Junior Case worker with the Wel- 
fare Department in Charlotte. N. C. 

New York. N. Y. — With the expansion of 
the Harlem Community Center, several 
new faces can be seen on the staff. Among 
these is the charming Mrs. Cordelia Black- 
burn Miller who is assistant director of 
the Center. Mrs. Miller is a Saint Augus- 
tine graduate and later received her 
Master's degree from Atlanlic University. 
She comes highly recommended from the 
Community Center in Bridgeport, Connecti- 
cut, where she was the only Negro Member 
of the staff. She is a member of Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Sorority. 

New York, N. Y.— Dr. Price Braithwaite 
was the speaker at the banquet given by 
the local chapter of the Omega Psi Phi 
Fraternity. Dr. Braithwaite. an outstand- 
ing Child Specialist, did pre-medical work 
at Saint Augustine's College and received 
his M.D. at Meharry Medical School. His 
wife, the charming Virginia Carter, is also 
a Saint Augustine's graduate and is very 
active in the social world. 

Durham, N. C— Mrs. Marion Cheek 
Hawkins, stenographer wilh the North 
Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
entertained at a delightful buffet supper 
for Dr. Pattie Laws Wolfman who is spend- 
ing some time at their home. Many people 
from all over North Carolina attended. 

Norfolk. "Va.— In a survey of the num- 
ber of college graduates serving on the 
staff of the Journal and Guide it was 
noted that there are three graduates of 
Saint Augustine's doing outstanding work. 
Lemuel Graves is the outstanding sports 
commentator for the paper. He is a Saint 
Augustine's graduate, as well as Mrs. 
Lillian DuPree, and Mrs. Willie Ragins 
White who are doing exceptional work as 
social commentators. 

Raleigh. N. C. — Mrs. Marion Foye Evans, 
a member of the faculty at Washington 
High School, left for New York today to 
do graduate work at Columbia University. 
Los Angeles. California. — Many forms 
of entertainment are being planned for 



CLASS PROPHECY 

Mrs. Willie Fennell. a former Carolina 
teacher who resigned her position lo join 
her husband, Mr. Wm. Wrenn. here on 
the coast. 

Method. N. C— The French Club of 
Berry O'Kelly High School sponsored by 
.Miss Sallie Jones, a graduate of St. Augus- 
tine's College, is presenting a series of 
French Plays for the Christmas season. 
The public is cordially invited. 

Washington. D. C— Dr. Mordecai John- 
son. President of Howard Universily. an- 
nounces the appointment of Dr. Pattie 
Laws Wolfham to the position of head 
of the English Departm.ent to succeed Dr. 
Ivan Taylor who has accepted a position 
at Harvard Iniversity. Dr. Wolfham re- 
ceived her B.A. from Saint .Augustine's 
College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the 
University of Chicago. She is a member 
of the .Alpha Kappa .Alpha Sorority and 
author of several .Anthologies and .Novels. 
Rouen. France. - Among the foreigners 
registered here at L'ecole des Lettres is 
Madame Margarita Lewis Durand of the 
United Slates. Madame Durand is doing 
research work for her new novel. "'Bleeding 
Heart." which promises to smash the bril- 
liant record of the last book, "Louise." 

New York. N. Y'.— Music lovers are 
eagerly awaiting the return performance 
of that brilliant Concert Pianist. George 
Cecil Mask, who is appearing at Carnegie 
Hall for the second time this year. Mr. 
Mask has returned from .South .America 
where he was widely acclaimed as the 
pianist of the year. 

Queens Village, New York.— Queens Vil- 
lagers are happy to have a new radio re- 
pair shop and a new school marm! Mr. 
Freddie Spruill will he open for business 
after Julv 4. His wife, the former Queen 
Esther \ioore. will be French teacher and 
director of dramatics. Mrs. Spruill is a 
graduate of Saint Augustine's College. 

Hollywood, California. — The Warner 
Brothers Studio lias announced the ap- 
pointment of Augustine Morrison Miller as 
Staff photographer. Wife of the 1955 
.Academv award winner. Mrs. Miller is an 
outstanding actress, but prefers to do 
photography instead of act. 

New York. N. Y.— Miss Hattie D. Red- 
den left on S.S. Blandenburg for China 
where she will serve as missionary under 
the auspices of the Episcopal Church. 

Columbia. S. C— Flash!! For the first 
time in its history and even in the history 
of the south, a Negro from South Carolina 
has been elected senator! The Honorable 
Prezell Robinson will take his seat with 
the 81st session of Congress. He has our 
wholehearted support. 

Princeton. N. J. — George Jackson Sad- 
ler, a graduate of the University of Chicago 
and Saint Augustine's College, is a special 
assistant to Albert Einstein, the great math- 
ematician, and at the same time a boogie- 
woogie pianist wilh .Art Calloway. He is 
making history in both instances! 

Raleigh, N. C— Dr. Allen E. Weather- 
ford has returned to Saint Augustine's as 
phvsical education director. He has as his 
assistant Edith Sands Smith who is a 
"46 graduate of the college. 

New York, N. Y'. — Mayor Milton Galami- 
son of New York City has announced the 
appointment of Attorney George Lafayette 
Stanley as Justice of the Court of Domestic 



Relations to succeed Judge Hubert Delany. 
Justice Stanley is a graduate of Saint 
Augustine's College and prepared for his 
legal career at Howard I niversily. 

London. England. — King George and 
Queen Elizabeth were among the nobles 
attending the concert given by the re- 
nowned Baritone. .Neal Stilt. Critics have 
called Mr. Stitt's voice ""The N'oice of the 
Centun'." He will proceed lo Denmark. 
Norway and Sweden, where he will be 
presented in several concerts, returning to 
U. S. through Russia. 

Moscow, Russia. — It was a very touching 
scene here at the Opera House to watch 
the reunion between two outstanding 
.American Artists. Neal Stitt and Jackson 
Wheeler. Stitt is here on a concert tour 
and Wheeler is doing benefit work with 
his i|uartette for the United Nations Relief. 
Tonight Stitt and the Wheeler Quartette 
will appear in joint recital at the Rostov 
Memorial .Auditorium. Both will embark 
soon for the United Stales. 

New York, N. Y.— Mrs. Katheryn Wil- 
liams Naught has completed her second 
<cimposition. ""Rien." and is headed now 
for an extended vavalion in .Nassau. 
Bahamas. 

New York. N. Y'. — The Tenth .Anniversary 
of the founding of the Williams (Jiain 
Drug Stores will be celebrated at Smalls' 
Paradise. Mr. Shirley (barter Williams, the 
founder, will speak briefly. 

Raleigh. N. C— Miss Rebie Wilson has 
been aiipointed laboratory technician at 
Saint .Agnes Hospital. Miss Wilson is a 
graduate of Saint .Augustine's and Meharry 
Medical .School. 

Raleigh. N. C. — Citizens of Raleigh will 
be pleased to know that the new ilentist 
is none other than Raleigh's own son, 
William '"Busier"' Perry who recently grad- 
uated from Meharry after finishing his 
pre-medical course at Saint Augustine's. 

Raleigh. N. C— Mrs. Mary Wright Har- 
ris LeCompte entertained at a lovely bridge 
party for Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Carter. 
Mrs. LeCompte is one of the leading social- 
ites of the community. She is a member 
of Delta Sigma Theta and the Y.W.(^..A. 
Raleigh. N. C — Mrs. Freida Strickland 
has accepted a position as cashier of Saint 
Augustines College to succeed Mrs. Lellye 
Wheaton who has resigned. 

New York. N. Y. — Theatre goers got a 
thrill at the premier of "Life Wilh .'^ister." 
the record-breaking play by the great dram- 
atist. Charles Phillip P'arrar. Mr. Farrar 
is conferring with executives at MGM who 
wish to bring the play to the screen. 

Well that's about all we know now, 
"Skeet. " You know, of course, that Joe is 
now an electrical engineer with General 
Electric. Naomi says that Boston is doing 
fine in his law business and that she likes 
being an Occijpational niysiolhertipist. 
although the children take up a lot of her 
time. My Children. Joe IV and "Vicky,'' 
are fine. Joe will start to school in 
.September. 

Write to me soon and let me know how 
little "'Bill" and '""Big Bill" are getting 
along. Hope to see you at Stitt's concert 
in .New York this summer. 

Sincerely, 
Sar.^h "'Butch" DlPree Salnders, 
Naomi "Ne'' Edgecombe Boston. 



i 



CLASS POEM 

Fair Saint Augustine's College, 
For you our prayers we raise — 
Your ideals were our guiding stars 
Throughout our collegiate days. 

We love you. Saint Augustine's, 
We fly your banner high. 
If e"er your call for aid is heard, 
On us you can rely. 

0, Gracious Saint Augustine's, 
You've made us rich in thought — 
We'll do our most to use, not in vain. 
The things that you have taught. 

Dear Saint Augustine's College, 
To your standards we'll be true — 
It's raining mem'ries, blessed school. 
Sweet memories of you. 

Joseph C. Saunders, '46. 



21 



Senior Superlatives 

EuLALiA Bailey Most conservative young lady 

Cordelia Blackburn Most popular young lady 

Marion Cheek Neatest young lady 

Sarah DuPree Mo*t well-rounded lady 

Lillian DuPree Most outspoken young lady 

Naomi Edgecombe Most pleasing personality 

Marian Evans Most lovable young lady 

Willie Fenneli Most dignified young lady 

Rosa Hopkins Sweetest young lady 

Sallie Jones Quietest young lady 

Pattie Laws Most brilliant young lady 

Margarita Lewis , Most reliable young lady 

Queen Moore Sunniest disposition 

Augustine Morrison = Prettiest young lady 

Willie Ragins Most generous young lady 

Richie Sands Most athletic young lady 

Frieda Strickland Best dressed young lady 

Catherine Williams Most childish and talented young lady 

Rebie Wilson Most studious young lady 

Mary Wright Most glamorous young lady 

Charles Farrar Most popular young man 

George Mask Most consei"vative young man. 

William Perry Most serious young man 

Prezell Robinson Most studious young man 

George Sadler Most versatile young man 

Joseph Saunders Most athletic young man 

George Stanley Most business-like young man 

Neal Stitt Best vocalist 

Jackson Wheeler Most congenial young man 

Shirley Williams Best liked young man 

Price Braithwaite Most indifferent young man 



22 



Dedicated to Yon • • • 



THROUGH the years you have kept high the buming torch 
of womanhood. You have never deviated from the high 
moral standards that we know were imbued in you from 
birth. Gentle, dignified, wise and motherly, you have 
strived so diligently to make women of us all. Never, 
never once have you shown us that you saw no good in us; 
never have you refused to listen to our childish pleas. 
You have nursed our ills, you have dried our tears and 
soothed our wounds. Your kindly advice always found 
its way to our hearts even if our heads ignored it. In so 
many simple ways have you tried to be a mother to us who 
are so far away from home. 

If we have seemed ungrateful; if we at times seemed 
incorrigible; if we have rended your heart with our care- 
lessness, thoughtlessness and often our callousness — if we 
have done any of these things. FORGIVE US. MOTHER, 
DEAR. We want you to know that we are weak and fool- 
i-li and often do things that we regret the minute .they are done. Although we seem incorrigible 
,it time- there is some good in us and we shall try to bring it forth from day to day. 

Vk f cherish the good that you have done for us. We admire your dignity, poise and those 
inlaiigihle qualities you possess which set you apart from the average woman. May we some 
il.i\ develop those qualities and stand out as you do. 

Therefore, it is with sincere regret that we must bring our closer friendship to an end. 
\\ !■ realize that you have sustained us thus far and as we look into the dim, distant future, we 
\\Hiii|('r ii we can hold ourselves up without your noble assistance. We hope we can and with 




>IKS. MABEL LATHAM 



ra\er- and Gods help, we believe we can. 



With All Our Hearts 



THE SENIOR YOUNG WOMEN OF 1946 



23 



] 



I 



ac^M 



Junior Class 




FTont row, left to right: Helen Payne, Lucille Paterson. Beatrice Carter. Ellen Alston. Carolyn Evans. Helen 

Kilpatrick. 

Second row: Shirley Morgan. Helen Gill. Louise Lambert, Edith Taylor. Doris McKinney. Sarah McClamb. 

Third row: Erma Ligon, Corine Wright, Vivian Harris. Mayme Shuler. Marion Lundy. Adalaide Hart. 

Fourth row: Richard DeVeaux, George Foxwell, Hugh Marshall, William Jackson, Virginia Brown, Pearleen Moore, 

Hiwatha Lee. 



24 



I: 



You Would be Considered a Perfect Junior Girl if 
You Had . . . 

a figure like MARIAN LUNDY 

hair like ADRIENA CARTER 

eyes like ANNA M. COLEMAN 

a nose like HELEN KILPATRICK 

a mouth like DOREATHA BAXTER 

skin like HARRIET LEE 

hands like VIVIAN HARRIS 

feet like CAROLYN EVANS 

legs like ELLEN ALSTON 

dancing ability like DORIS McKINNEY 

a fiance like LOUISE LAMBERT 

height like PEARLEEN MOORE 

a smile like SARAH McCLAMB 

a personality like HELEN GILL 

studiousness like CORINE WRIGHT 

poise like MAYME SHULER 

dramatic ability like HELEN PAYNE 

coolness like ERMA LIGON 

business ability like SARAH WILLIAMS 

athletic ability like BEATRICE CARTER 

simplicity of BERTHA MITCHELL 

as many hair-styles as CLARA DEBNAM 

taste in dress like DELORES PEEBLES 

a line of jive like VIRGINIA BROWN 

musical ability like ADELAIDE HART 

faithfulness like LUCILLE PATTERSON 

conscientiousness like DOROTHY BLACK 

a disposition like ARTHURINE COOK 

scholarly interests like EDITH TAYLOR 



You Would be Considered a Perfect Junior Boy if 
You Would . . . 

dance like LeROY THOMPSON 

be handsome like WILLIAM JACKSON 

haye a personality like BRADFORD MARSHALL 

be studious like HUGH MARSHALL 

be neat like LeROY THOMPSON 

not talk like FRANCIS CLARK 

have hair like STANISLAUS SOLOMON 

sing like WAYMOND BURTON 

be as sharp as GEORGE FOXWELL 



25 



To Class of 1948: 

Having traveled tliree-loiirlhs of the rough road to Education, we the members 
of the Junior Class feel that we are in a position to give vou advice and helpful 
hints that we have picked up along tile way. We feel, too, that vou will appreciate 
these suggestions coming from us as older brothers and sisters. 

We have found that in anv- organization, be it an organaization for business or 
one for pleasure, little can be accomplished without the cooperation of each member. 
"No chain is stronger than its weakest link." Nothing much is gained when it is done 
in a haphazard sort of wav. System is essential. Enough emphasis cannot be placed 
on this. 

As members of a student bodv that is well-known and respected in North Carolina, 
vou must remember that evervthing vou do reflects on the institution. Alwavs think 
before you act. Speaking in a frai\k manner, this refers to a lot of you members 
individually. 

There's one thing needed in the fight for learning that cannot be called anything 
but "stick-to-it-iveness." That is as plain as we can make it. Diligence, faithfulness 
and constant pursuit of a definite thing brings rich rewards. 

Then, there's that feeling of responsibility. Remember there are some people who 
care whether vou succeed or not. care whether vou hold vour head high or let it drop, 
care whether vou forget how much it means to them to have you on the top shelf. 
Those people are vour parents. To them vou exemplify the finest maidiood and 
womanhood in the world, because you're all their own. 

So keep in mind the aforementioned necessities for a really successful college career, 
namely: Cooperation, self-respect, "stick-to-it-iveness," responsibility and regard for 
others. Armed with these weapons plus the earnest desire to really "go places, " how 
can you avoid being a class in the future, of which Saint Augustine's may be justly 

proud? 

Sincere wishes, 

THE JUNIOR CLASS '47 

Helen C. Payne, President 
Harriet H. Lee, Secretary 



26 



Sophomore Class 




The ihorned-rose. the sorrow, and our previous title has passed; we are now 
on the second rung of the success ladder and nearer, the inevitahle. Ournumber, 
though lessened by '"time and tide," still has its nucleus of determination, faith, 
and ability regardless of our shortcomings and blunders. "Time marches on," 
and we strive to keep in pace — in acquisition and conformity to our past year of 
experiences. 

Now we are sophomores — fools made wiser by the knowledge, teachings, and 
experiences of our benign teachers and advisers. All that we have achieved, at- 
tained, and retained, we owe to their ceaseless efforts. Our gratitude has no depth 
nor our laud any height; 

In spite of our present world of chaos and confusion, sophomores, our future 
is assured. We have our flaws and realizing, too, our diverse mistakes and 
adverse criticisms; nevertheless with obedience to God and service to our fellow- 
mates, we shall attain the ultimate goal of true democracy — good citizenship. 

James H. Faniel. President. 



27 



Fresshman Class 




■<V- .'- -■•-. 



In September the freshman class of "45-*46 entered Saint Augustine's un- 
prepared and very shy: but with a will and determination to get adjusted and 
to succeed. 

From the beginning we worked with an unceasing effort to achieve the 
goal we had set before us. With aching heads, burning eyes and tired fingers 
we worked, never getting disappointed. 

During the time we spent on these grounds, we have found out that Saint 
Augustine's stands for truth, loyalty and respect of persons and the rights of 
others; and through these things we hope to be better citizens and good leaders 
in our various walks of life. 

It is with great joy that we, the members of the freshman class, are able to 
thank our instructors and advisers for all the benefits obtained. We hope to put 
these into practice. 



28 



Freshman Superlatives 

c. beaty 

Best Female Singer 

f. perrv' 

Best pianist 

m. mitchell 

Most vivacious 

j. Vinson 

Best memory ;" 

s. deane 

Most chic 

h. pratt 

Best male singer 

m. neely 

Sweetest smiler 

n. benjamin 

Quietest girl 

d. bethel 

Best dancer 

i. harris 

Quietest boy 

i. bames 

Most reserved 

_b. neelv 
Smallest girl 

r. ienerson 

Best basketball player 

s. davis 

Stoutest girl 

h. smith 

Best imitator 

,. a. Calloway 

Most appealing personality 

. - 1. gooding 

Slowest girl 

e. brown 

Most uncertain 

. - a. morgan 

Most comical girl 

, J 1. thorpe 

Most refined young lady 

b. Stevenson 

Shortest young man 

1. Jones 

Most fickle-minded 

h. hill 

Most consers'ative young man 

, J e. wilson 

Most sympathetic young Jady 

r. poole 

Most serene 

bv i. bames. 



29 



CLUBS 

SO€IETI£S 

AND 

OTHER 

ORGANIZATIO]\S 



30 



THE ACIES CLUB 



r 



-1 




standing, letl to right: T^illiam Perry. Joseph Saunders, Prezell Robinson, Laurence Jones, William Jackson, George 
Manle). Horace Lawson. \^alker LeFlore. 

Scnletl: Francis Clarke. Neal Stitt, George Sadler. Professor Lloyd L. Woods, Adviser; Shirley Williams. LeRoy 
Tliompson. Hugh Marshall. 

.\«/ pictured: Charles Farrar, Stanislaus Solomon. 



THE BATTLE LIIVE 



Here's to a family of brothers 
\^ hose purpose is to work and aid 
Maroon and Gold our dashing hue 
Stand as our lii\e for you. 

Chorus 
\es, well work we'll strive. 
Stand firm till the end of strife. 
Hold back the foe. fight never flee. 
Defend the BATTLE LINE ACIES. for thee. 



Were one united firm with courage 
With brotherhood as our fond aim 
With loyalty and service true 
ACIES, dear club, for you. 

We feel our hopes can be accomplished 
We know we "11 do our most to make them 
But til! the hour our judgments due 
ACIES we're all for vou. 



31 




BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW 




CHOIR 




LAY READERS 



4. 



THE BIG SISTERS' CLUB 




Slanding, leit to risht: Rtbie \^ ilson. Lillian Dupree. Sarah Dupree. Pattie Laws, Willie Fennell, 
Rosa Hopkins, Marian Cheek. 

Sealed: Willie Mae Rayins. Aucuslinc Morrison, -Alary V^ right. Qu^fi E. Moore. Naomi Edgecombe, 
Cordelia Blackburn. 

Not pictured: Eulalia Bailey, .'^ally .Junes. Frieda Strickland. Edith Sands. Catherine Williams. 
Hattie Redden. .Margarita Lewis, .Marion Evans. 



The Big Sisters' Club has pledged to be big sisters to the freshmen girls of Saint 
Augustine's College and to entourage them to utilize all of the worthwhile opportuni- 
ties offered them during their vears in college. This organization is composed of 
the young women of the Senior Class. During our years here we have become 
acquainted with the problems that confront the freshmen in becoming adjusted to 
college life. \^ e have tried to make this transitional period easier in order that our 
little sisters will ha\e pleasant memories of their first college davs and will endeavor 
two years hence to accept the responsibilitv to be Big Sisters to the freshmen girls 
in 1948-49. 



1 



33 



THE CLIOIVIC SOCIETY 




The Clionic Society is the outgrowth of the interest on the part of the students of 
Saint Augustine's College in current issues and problems. Mr. T. L. Spraggins 
realized that many of the students enjoyed debates, group and panel discussions. 
Therefore, in the fall of 1945 he gathered together representatives — students of different 
classes — and organized the Clionic Society. 

The qualifications for membership are very simple: an average of "C" in academic 
work and an interest in current topics, magazines and other periodicals. The Clul) 
has grown in membership to twenty-eight. The members are still very enthusiastic 
and the programs presented are always well received. Beside panel discussions and 
the like, the club sponsors several social affairs, including an annual fall banquet 
and an annual spring picnic. Miss Cordelia Blackburn is serving for the second 
time as president of the group. 



34 



I 




CHORAL CIX'B 






%•' 







CHEER LEADER!^ 




DRAMATICS 



35 




LES ELITES SOCIETY (1933-1946) 



Colors: Pink and blue 



(The Selected few) 

F'lowkr: Pink carnation 



Motto: Excelsior! 



Pattie 



OFFICERS 

LonisE Laws President Jessie Corde-.ia BLACKBURN-rrP<r,s«rer 

CORINE Luxu. WRicHT__F.ce President Katheeen Svevester R.v.e^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

Sara Field DuPree Secretary 

Marian Lovette Cheek-_.Js5/. Secretary 

Mrs. Val Dora Tlrner Frazer. A.B. Fisk Universitv; Graduate work, Yale. Adviser 



Helen Payne. Elle 



Members 

n Alston. Yvunne Hart. Barbara W>i,ht, Mar.an Cheek. R.^a Hopkins. E.lith 
Sands. Catherine W.lliants. Marian Evans, Vivian Harris. Yvonne Brown, Flora To.nsencl. Ha.tie 
Watford. Evangeline Farr.or, Ahna Harris, Redh.ia Kiggtns. .Marie Traeye. Berd.ne Caple. Clara 
Coward. Edith Oakes. Delia Scott. 



36 



\ 




VELEDA CLUB 1943-1946 

Miss Hazel V. Clarke 
Adviser 



OFFICFRS 



Queen Moore, President 
Helen Gill. J ice President 



Sarah McClamb, Secretary 
Mayme ShL'LER. Treasurer 



Dorothy Hollintrsworth 
Erma Burroughs 

Dorothy Jatkson 

Doris Wilder 



Helen Kilpatrick 
Martha Blacknall 
Dorothy Ashe 
Marion Lundv 



Doris Willis Clara Kelly 
Emma Nixon 

Viola Poe 

Marion Neely 

Lillie Slade 

Sally Jones 



37 



:• 




ZETA SIGMA RHO SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 



Margarita Lewis. President 
Louise Lambert, Vice President 



Flower: Dahlia 

Doreatha Baxter 
Erma Ligon 
Carolyn Evans 
Harriet Lee 
Gloria Eaves 
Augustine Morrison 
Adriena Carter 
Mary Wright 
Jerelyn Keeling 
Claudia Mitchell 
Claudia Patton 
Gladys Ligon 
Wilma Mauney 
Doris McKinney 



RosiNDA Nealy, Treasurer 
Ruby Wynn, Secretary 

Colors: Purple and Gold 



Members 




.Mrs. L. C. O'Daniel 
Sponsor 



38 



I 



I 



LITERARY EFFORT OF STUDENTS 
WHOSE BLOOD SAVED CORPORAL JOl^ES? 

It didn't matter to this young taxi driver from Harlem. It didn't matter to his widowed mother 
and sisters and brothers either. Nor did it matt?r to the hundreds of thousands of Americans all 
over the country. But it did matter a great deal to Adolph Hitler. Why? Because, simply that blood was 
one of the great reasons why he and his murderous henchmen were facing inevitable defeat. 

Thousands of us gave freely of our blood during the war. Mr. Contu. the little Italian peddler 
contributed two quarts in behalf of his only son who died at Pearl Harbor. Jacques, the French chef 
at the big hotel, gave also. So did Mr. Rause, the Dutch jeweler; Fa Lung, the Chinese laundry boy, 
and Albert, the Greek student at the Liniversity. Mr. Gallosky. the Jewish storekeeper, down at the 
corner, closed shop early one afternoon so that his blood could help to save the lives of hundreds of 
our boys at Bataan. 

All during the war. there were vicious propagandists who would have had us believe that 
Negro blood was inferior, that any nation that had even a drop of it running through its system 
was a weak, degenerate nation. But Corporal Brown proved that these stories were all lies, that there 
is only 0\E strain of blood— HUMAN BLOOD! 

Because of the discrimination that was made towards our blood by the Red Cross, many prejudiced 
people believed that if the blood of a different people were transferred to another, that person receiv- 
ing it would inherit some of the qualities and physical characteristics of this other people. Scientists 
have proved this statement to be wholly untrue. Plasma, when mixed with water, could and was used 
to sa\e the life of any man or any woman of any race or color wounded in action anywhere in the 
world. 

So. what difference did it make if the Red Cross did label our blood? When the need for this 
life-restoring liquid arose, that little tag on the jar became just another scrap of paper. Our blood 
saved the life of an American boy who may have been our own brother, father or husband. That is all 
that mattered. 

But. still you ask. whose blood did save Corporal Brown? Well, suppose we just sav that it 
was the blood of Jew and Gentile. Catholic and Protestant. Negro and White. Democrat and Republican. 
Northerner and Southerner. \^ e shall never know, and we should not even care. 



(Taken from essav submitted for Church Institute Prize. "45. 



ROSINDA NeALY. 



39 



1 



THE FUTURE OF THE ]\EGRO YOUTH 

The abrupt ending of the second world war has definitely affetted the future of the American 
Negro. During that conflict many of our boys made the supreme sacrifice without flinching. They 
were found in all theaters of the war fighting to preserve that which thev hold so dear and value so 
highly — libertv. As a result of their constant struggle and numerous achievements, they have, in the 
last two or three decades, caused many thoughtful Americans to wonder just what part thev would 
plav in the postwar world. 

Today, our boys are returning home by the thousands to an America which they hoped would 
no longer be veiled with prejudice and hatred. They are trying to elevate themselves above the 
mountains of indolence, fear, sloth, ignorance and superstition which have engulfed for more than 
a century. This means that they will soon demand their rights, and in so doing, they will in all 
eventuality open many doors for us. But how many of us will be able to enter these doors? Only 
the Negro youth can answer this question. Let us turn to them with renewed hope and uplifted heart. 
Their eagerness to defend the principles of democracy has caused our hopes to soar to unheard of 
heights. If they gird on ambition, they will surely win. With that one incentive worlds have been 
conquered. 

We must awaken them to the realization that preparation is the key to success. In preparing 
themselves, they must remember that education is their chief asset. We were stopped once before 
because of lack of education. We can't let it hinder us now! We must stand behind our vouth 
with unfaltering trust and staunch belief. Never before has the field been so ripe with opportuni- 
ties. It is up to our youth to choose some v^ocation for which each is best fitted. They must become 
extremely efficient in their chosen work. Let us remember that our tomorrow must be built on the 
foundation of perseverance and faith. 

In planning for today's task, we must remember that along with every opportunity comes to chal- 
lenge to prove our worth and convince our fellow-Americans that we should be allowed to share in 
the peace that is yet to be won. 

It will be well for us to remember and put into practice the motto of the late Dr. George W. 

Carver: 

'"Start with what you have, 
Never be satisfied." 

KL^THLEEN P.\YNE. 



40 



1 



GOOD SPORTSMAIVSHIP 

At last the day for the game we've all been waiting for has arrived. The whistle blows, the ball 
is thrown into play, and the great test of skills begins. Backward, and forward, the players dash over 
the court, dribbling, trying tricky shots, and when the timing is perfect, sinking the ball into the 
basket for a score. This coordination, cooperation, or whatever you may call it, among those five 
boys on the court determines the outcome of the game. Win or lose, this hand of fellowship among 
the players which we would like to call sportsmanship has influenced their attitude toward their 
opponents. 

So it is in the game of life. From the moment of birth we begin to gather unto ourselves some 
feeling and respect for the rules of sportsmanship — good or bad. In our daily life our attitudes in 
playing this all important game fairly, become a silken cord which binds us to others and others to us. 
We know that we cannot win all the time, but by learning to be more skillful in dribbling and 
trickv shots the time will come when we shall make a score. We must learn to take our losses with 
a smile on our faces and to shake hands with the opponent sincerely and honestly. 

Sometimes we may feel that we have done all that we can in abiding by the rules of "the game" 
and still we are cheated; but let us remember this that "the harder the defeat the sweeter the victory." 
How much more we appreciate this victory, then, because we know that to our opponents we have ex- 
tended the hand of fellowship and found in them an eagerness to accept it. 

Sarah DuPree. 



I 






I 



41 



THE TRUTH SHALL If IKE YOU FREE 

Today, nineteen centuries removed from the time of the utterance. "The Truth Shall Make You 
Free." the workl is not free. Instead of there being perfect truth, the world is filled with confusion 
and gropes in darkness. 

Sometimes, we hear the expression: "What is truth?" There are any number of definitions of 
truth, but I like to think of truth as being steadfast and sincere — dealing with one"s self and his 
fellow men and following in the way and statutes of one's creator and leailer. 

Men must know the truth and must be able to distinguish truth from falsehood. They must 
know when people are preaching false doctrines and must be able to withstand them lest they lead 
them into utter chaos. Whenever this idea of false doctrines comes to my mind. I inevitably think 
of the people of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy who were led into the vallev of darkness and 
despair by despots who filled them full of lies and deceitful doctrines. We must be able to analyze 
the teachings of such persons and not fall victims of the same. It is true that the Germans proved 
superior in many ways. They proved this without a doubt. They had tenacity, perseverance, fore- 
sight, and dexterity which enabled them to advance with staggering swiftness. But. as the saying 
goes: "Truth crushed to earth will rise again" and. thus, today we look at our warped and vengeful 
enemy, a beaten nation, looking to the people they scorned for meat and shelter. 

We can bring our minds to an even clearer event when we think of the abuses hurled at the 
Negroes, and after having been abused, falsely accused, oppressed and desolated, they have achieved 
some of the highest places ever in world society. They have made more progress in eighty years than 
any race under the sun. 

Men who know the truth are brave and unafraid. In this connection we can carry our minds 
a long way back to the oppression of the Jews in Palestine by people who called themselves religionists 
and descendants of Abraham. The Jews were beaten, devastated, and distressed until a certain Nazarene 
came to their rescue. He gave them the truth as he knew it. He spoke in the temple among enemies 
who were ready to take away his life at that same time; but he was not afraid. We ask ourselves 
this question: "Why did this Nazarene speak so boldly with complete freedom from fear of 
religionists who attempted to mob him?" There he stands speaking in the temple to those belie\ing 
in him. Listen to him! Hear for yourselves his own answer to the question: "If ye continue in 
my word, then ye are my disciples indeed and ye shall know the truth and The Truth Shall Make 
you Free." He was finally arrested by religionists, held in custody, and abu.sed and derided, falsely 
accused, and then nailed to a tree till lifeless. But he died a free man. He died because he did not 
choose to fight back with powers that were at his command. He died because the interests of truth con- 
cerning Himself and his Father would be more fully served by suffering innocently unto death than 
by continuing to live as a man. 

In conclusion, it is well to note that one must buy the truth at the cost of his time and effort 
spent in searching for freedom. 

Queen Moore. 



42 



' 



IRVmG'S MUSIIVGS 



Charity Begins at Home 



When Hitler's stridenl l)attle-cry 
Eniliillered and ernliroiled the world 
A dcizen nations" war-Hags 
Defiantly unfurled. 

Proud England smiled al Ireland. 
And lifte<l thence lier maUed hand. 
Removed her sword from India's throat 
And loosed from Egypt her garrote. 
Atoned for her harsliness to each colony. 
And sent the call throughout her span 
For every alile-hodied man 
To take up arm? for Liherty. 

And stately France sent to Morocco 

Algeria. Madagascar, and the Congo 

Saying. '"Take your sword in hand. Black Brothers, 

Get your rifie out and clean it: 

When we slew your sire and mothers. 

You know we didn't really mean it. 

All your sores fr<tm knives and lashes 

We will gladly salve. 

All those unfair tithes and taxes 

We will gladly halve. 

No more pitiful dole for you. 

No forced labor with pick and bar 

In those mines we stole from you. 

You may have equality 

And freedom while we are at war — 

Come and fight for Liberty!" 



Japan, hypocrytic and vain. 

Plotted with the German maniac. 

Said "So solly if honorable blade cause pain," 

And plunged her knife in America's back. 

America reeled from the coward blow — 

Reeled and recovered with her rage aglow. 

The brazen trumpet-calls rang forth. 

East and West, South and North. 

To muster men, supplies, machines. 

Soldiers, sailors, flyers, marines. 

To avenge the deadly hypocrisy 

And fight to protect democracy. 

And down in Georgia or Tennessee. 

A mob of Southerners around a tree 

Heard their country's call and never flinched. 

With firm foot-steps that did not lag. 

They rallied to Democracy s flag. 

Leaving hanging in that tree 

A burnt and tortured amorphy — 

A 'nigger" they had lynched. 

When Hitler's strident battle-call is stilled, no more to blast. 
And the world has seen the Rising Sun fall to a final 

setting at last. 
May all the folk of the world agree 
To follow this ancient epitome: 
Freedom. Justice. Love . . . Charity 
SHOULD BEGIN AT HOME. 



Life 



Who would think, that in a raindrop — 

Tlie geometric symmetry of a snowflake latent lies. 

The lake is a singing turquois blue — 

But when I dip up some in my palm, it feigns a clear hue. 



Out upon the plains of hesitation. 

Lie the bones of countless millions — 

Who upon reaching the threshold of success — rest, and 

resting died — 
This . . . is . . . Life. 

Irving Mayson. '4S. 



Wistful 

My arms are the proper setting for a jewel like her; 

But I'm too shy 

I fix a smile upon my face when she passes by. 

She returns an answering smile and slightly nods. 

Passing me by. 

I should overwhelm her with ardencies, but I'm too shy. 

She smiles demurely, yet intriguingly — 

It makes me sigh 

And dream of storming her heart's portals — but I'm too shy. 

Irving Mayson, '48. 



43 



Campus Activities 



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FEATURES 




Mr. and Mrs. T. Curtis Mayo, unique performers in a Joint Piano Recital sponsored 
bv the ACIES Club. Featured on the Recital was a performance of the Grieg Concerto 
—two piano arrangement. Mrs. Mayo at the first piano. The Recital, enjoyed im- 
mensely by campus students and faculty, was repeated at St. Ambrose Episcopal Church 
to assist in the Building Fund campaign carried on by that church. 



49 



OPE]\ LETTER 

To the Young Women of the Campus: 

Since Saint Augustine's is a Co-edurational college, we realize that harmony among its inhabitants is to be 
achieved only through the striving of members of both sexes to be a brother or sister to his or her mates. 

So as a brother to you all — and I do consider myself a brother — may I voice the young men's opinions of 
you? It is not that I wish to down you; rather, it is that we seek an understanding on both our parts. 

I know that from time to time you have been puzzled with the actions of the young men and have asked your- 
selves "what's wrong with the boys?" Well, we've done the same and now we wish to lake a trip around the 
campus and seek to remedy these many shortcomings. 

Let us venture to the dormitories for a while. There we see — every day— a certain group of young ladies 
entertaining a certain group of weak males, not thinking to give the other girls and boys a chance, and causing 
these weak males to be conditioned and flunked in class work. Had you ever stopped to think that you're causing 
your future husbands to spend a lifetime trying to prepare themselves to care for you? Okay, then, so lighten 
up on the dates and give the fellows a chance to study. They're weak, so you must be strong, 1 know that SOCI.\L 
HOURS are every day from 2:30 to .S:.30, but that does not mean the SAME GIRLS AND EVERY DAY? Be- 
sides, the less he sees you the prettier you become, and vice versa. Since the campus is so small that one cannot 
step out of his dormitoi? without seeing everybody, then why not limit your dates to once a week and maybe Sundays? 
That's common sense, for then you're giving the other hundreds of girls a chance to sit on a sofa with their guys. 

And, by the way, if you must wear those top coats within the Dining Hall, then please stop reaching so far for 
food. We'd rather see your pretty dresses when we're eating— show them more often, please. And the least you 
could do would be to take off those campus caps when seated at a table. And sister, by all means, please stop walking 
out of the dining hall only because the food isn't what you want. Remember that there are hundreds of others 
who don't have the money you have, and, all cooks burn food sometimes, and besides, it reveals poor intelligence 
and thoughtless actions. Sit for at least ten minutes even if you don't eat. 

Let us go to our beloved Chapel. Shall we go to giggle, move and replace our hymnals as noisily as we can, sit 
inattentively, or shall we go to meditate and secure as much spiritual uplifting as possible? Then, shall we resolve 
to make this a better place for spiritual food? Wonderful! \ step forward! 

Oh, it's library hour, so grab your book and meet that guy, he's waiting. Just the thoughts of being beneath 
a silver moon and the beautiful landscape make you long for nightly caresses. What do you think that guy thinks of 
you for meeting him in such an illegal manner? The library is a place for studying and should be used for 
such in a quiet way. And by all means encourage him to take you by the Cheshire Building on the way home! 

The monthly social comes up tomorrow night. Are you planning to attend? No? Why? The Boys only dance 
with a "few" girls? Oh sis, you're forgetting that the meaning of the word SOCI.AL is not limited to dancing alone. 
Besides, the boys are only human beings, seeking in a world of preservation, to conserve leather — dancing with those 
who offer the most entertainment for the length of a rec rd. You must admit that an intelligent conversation while 
dancing adds much to enjovment. So, to the "few" las you say) who have been fortunate enough to dance every 
dance, we say 'THANKS SIS, FOR A LITTLE COMMON SENSE AND KNOWLEDGE OF HOW TO CARRY 
ON AN INTELLIGENT CONVERSATION." 

Sister, don't be a cheer leader unless you can control your tongue, for we all know that school spirit here is 
poor. Sometimes we are emotionally drained and don't feel like yelling, although the boys are playing a swell game. 
If you must be a cheer leader remember "A slip of the lip (with the boysi really sinks a ship. ' 

And about dormitory secrets, they're to be kept within the dormitory. Boys will listen to your telling them, 
but their opinion of your reliability, in the end, is lowered. 

Sisters, we don't mean to be harsh in any way, we only wish that you be nice young women by remedying 
your shortcomings, thus causing us to become better and more alert brothers. It is then only that Saint Augustine s 
will be the college of our ideal and a campus conducive to work. 

In other words, before you act, think through the matter and say, "I'm going to give the other fellow, as well 

as myself, a chance." 

Sincerely, 

Co-editor, 



50 



A LEADI]\G LADY OF THE CAMPUS 




Mrs. L. G. O'Danicl 



I was very pleased when the staff asked me to intervew Mrs. 
O'Daiiiel for the Pe.n. I have been associated with her since 
-lie lias been with the Music Department here and I Icnow her 
a> a very charming person with whom all students can feel ut- 
!<m1\ at ease. Of course. 1 could not talk about everything 
idiinected with her life because time would not permit. There- 
fore, after chatting about this and that we got down to business. 
Naturally her music career was the highlight of the tete-a- 
li-le. She started from her childhood and worked up to the 
present and after she had finished I knew perfectly well why 
our music department ha;- been so enriched since she has been 
licre. 

A? a child. Mrs. O'Daniel began study of the piano under 
a Quaker woman who saw thai she had exceptional musical 
talent and encouraged her mother and father to keep up her 
lessons. Thus, further strengthened by a distant relative 
ulio was a gifted musician in Philadelphia, she launched out 
oil licr musical career. At fifteen years of age Mrs. O'Daniel 
ua? chosen bv voung church people to organize and direct the 
I liurrh choir. This was her incentive to do choral work. 

After graduating from high school, she entered the State Teachers College at Cheyney. Penn- 
-\hania. where she received the Bachelor of Science degree. She was greatlv encouraged there by 
the college President and the music teacher, and was verv active during this time, appearing as soloist 
for the choir, as dramatic star and in many other activities. 

After graduation, she taught music in the Washington High School in Washington, N. C. It was 
,1- the result of this work that her marriage came about. She studied at Chicago Musical College, 
and being encouraged further by her piano and voice teacher she later went to the Lniversity of 
r(Miis\ hania where she received the Master of Science Degree in Music Education. She has done 
additional studv at Pennsylvania University and State College even after this. 

<)uickl\ we came to her career here at Saint Augustine's where she has made such great progress 
uilli the raw material. She says that she prefers to leach music although she likes her literature 
I oiirses as well. The Choral Club here at Saint Augustines has been a great inspiration to her because 
-lie can see what can be done in spite of the manv handicaps we ha\e. She finds the students eager 
.irid willing to work, and for the most part, musical and intelligent. It gratifies her to no end. you 
' .in imagine, to see the rapid progress and development that freshmen students make in the musical 
' la-se- and choral club. 

>lie finds a very sound and helpful Music set-up here at Saint Augustine's. Her onlv advice for 
iiKantement would be an expanded instrumental department A\here students mav learn to plav other 
in-truinents besides the piano. She feels that any teacher of music needs to be familiar with at least 
"Hi' in-trument in everv class. 

.^o the afternoon came too quickly to a close. I thought of the progress that had been made in 
inu-K since Mrs. O'Daniel's arrival here and I silently prayed that each year would issue in some 
one who would do as much as she has for the progress of Dear Old Saint Augustine's. 



51 




Dr. L. L. Woods 



A CAMPUS SCHOLAR 

Perhaps one of the most outstanding personalities on Saint 
Augustine's campus, taking all things in consideration, is Dr. 
Lloyd L. Woods. I feel that when we get an insight into the 
factors that have contributed so much to the success of the 
enviable person, we can well understand why students of the 
campus have benefited so much by his brilliant presence. His 
life, like most men of his peer, really began in college. 

Born in Tola, Kansas, and educated in the Wichita public 
schools, Lloyd Woods embarked on his chemical career af 
Friends University in Wichita. After a brilliant college career 
he was graduated in 1930. In the fall of 193L he began his 
teaching career far from home at Saint Augustine's College, 
in Raleigh, N. C. A year later he married Miss Dora Keeton 
also of lola, who was in her senior year in college. 

The year 1934 was a year of dual happiness for the Woods. 
Their only child, Elaine, was born and at the same time. Dr. 
Woods received the Master's degree from Kansas State College. 
Continuous hard work and study in the years that followed 
led to the earning of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
the field of Chemistry. This degree was conferred in the 
summer of 194-i at Kansas State College. 

Dr. Woods is connected with several national organizations pertaining to science, namely: The 
American Chemical, the Phi Lambda Upsilon Honary Chemical Society and the Kansas Academy of 
Science, also a social fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi. During the summer of 1945, he taught Inorganic 
Chemistry at the summer session of New York University. Numerous papers on chemistry have been 
written by Dr. Woods and have been published in such national magazines as the Journal of Chemi- 
cal Education. 

During the past years Dr. Woods has proved himself to be not only a teacher well-versed 
in his subject matter, but also a favorite with the students because he's a "regular fellow." Chem- 
istry majors fondly call him "boss." In extra-curricular activities, both with the facultv and the 
student bodv. Doctor Woods has rendered his services conimendably. Before the war called the 
members of the Chancellors Club, he led them in a very admirable fashion. Now he is faculty 
adviser to the ACIES Club and the Sophomore Club. He is also co-chairman of the Activities 
Council. 

Dr. Woods has launched many men on successful professional careers for by his splendid 
method, he made them really learn the things that were worth while. The chemistry which seemed 
a burden to them while here in pre-medical school proved to be a life-saver once they entered 
medical school. Dr. Woods is justly proud of his many students, several of whom have graduated 
with honor as physicians, dentists, or technicians. 

Therefore, with pleasure and pride, the Pen Staff presents the "Scholar of the Year," Dr. Lloyd L. 

Woods, the "right guy." 

Helen P.wne. 



52 



ORCHIDS 

It's only human for people to like to receive awards. Perhaps I should say that it's only 
natural for people to like to receive awards for something which they may have done that was con- 
structive. Personally, I like to see people rewarded for everything they do. Of course, the value 
of the award should be determined bv the constructiveness of the accomplished task which warranted 
their receiving it. Therefore, I hereby bestow upon the following persons and organizations award 
of ORCHIDS: 



Mr. George Mask, Miss Cecile Beatty. Mr. Neal Sritt. and 
Miss Yvonne Brown for their splendid representation of 
St. Auyusline at the Omega Talent Hunt. 

Mr. Aul)rey Lawson for liis brilliant performance in his 
first dramatic jierformance. 

Zela Sigma Rho for tlieir delightful January' dance. 

The Clieer Leaders for their "revived spirits" after 
last year's rest period. 

The \ eleda Qub for remaining conservative and demo- 
cratic in a smoldering environment. 

The veterans who adapted themselves so admirably to 
a changed situation. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Vincent Mayo who. in her unique 
IJerformance. gave the students a recital they had long 
wailed for. 

Miss Eulalia Bailey, who has '"come out of her shell,'" 



and is well on her way to becoming a well-integrated 
personality. 

Mrs. 0"Daniel for her excellent Choral Club. 

Miss Freida Perry. Choral Club accompanist for the 
Christmas program. 

Our B.W.I.'s, Miss Ina Barnes. Mr. Hugh Marshall. 
Mr. Stanislaus Solomon. Mr. LeRoy Thompson, and 

Mr. Coleridge Reeves for their academic success. 

The Practice teachers for a job "'well done." 

Mr. Price Braithwaite for providing entertainment for 
the campus when he became the "Bearded man." 

Mr. Lynch for his general spirit of cociperativeness, 
friendliness, and helpfulness. 

Mr. Charles "Mack"" Williams for coaching such a 
determined team. 

Les Elites Society for presenting an interesting and 
helpful workshop on "The Worthy Use of Leisure Time."' 



To all of the recipients. I say '"wear your ORCHIDS proudly. It's a wonderful thing to have people like you." 



53 



m^ 



FACULTY SUPERLATIVES 

Cecil D. Halliburton »««< all-around 

Reginald Lynch »«*' «'*«*' 

Arthur P. Chippey ^ost pleasing personality 

Earl H. McClenney ^'«** «^«<^* 

Pearl Snodgrass ^«s^ Sincere 

Mabel I»I. Latham ^»«< cultured 

Nina Anthony ^'»"«< unupprouclioble 

David Virgo ^«*< reserved 

Tinsley L. Spraggins ^ost radical 

Theodore Mayo ''»«* courteous 

Lillian O'Daniel Most beautiful 

Julia Delany M«*^ obserruut 

Dr. Lloyd Woods ^«^t scholarly 

Hazel V. Clarke IVeatest 

Wilson Inborden W»«« technlcol 

Val Dora Frazier ^^i**^* serene 

James Livas M«s« uuodopted 



HO]\OR ROLL 
FIRST SEMESTER, 1945-1946 



Caroline Alexander 
Ellen Alston 
Eulalia Bailey 
Ina Barnes 
Cordelia Blackburn 
Sylvia Blount 
Arthur Calloway 
Berdine Caple 
Lillian DuPree 
Sarah Dupree 
Charles Farrar 
Willie Fennell 
Alma Harris 
Sallie Jones 
Helen Kilpatrick 
Lois Latham 
Pattie Laws 
Aubrey Lawson 
Hilda Lewis 
Margarita Lewis 
Bradford Marshall 
Hugh Marshall 
(leorge Mask 



Irving Mayson 
Queen Moore 
Rosinda \ealy 
Emma Nixon 
Janet Owens 
Kathleen Payne 
Alice Peebles 
Frieda Perry 
Hattie Redden 
Redahlia Riggins 
Prezell Robinson 
George Sadler 
Joseph Saunders 
Mayme Shuler 
Stanislaus Solomon 
George Stanley 
A>al Stitt 
LeRov Thompson 
Marie Traeye 
James Vinson 
Rosa Whitley 
Shirley Williams 
Rebie Wilson 
Corine Wright 



54 



RAGIN'S RAMBLIN'S 



By Willie M. Ragins 



Song Sensations and Book Titles That Remind Me of 

People. Places and Things 

Halfway to Heaven — St. Augustine's College 

Time Alone Will Tell — whether you passed the test 

or "missed the bus" 

I'M Making Believe — we're C.I.A.A. Champs 

Everyday of My Life — Chapel 

My FAVoniTE Song — The Warrior Song 

After Awhile — there will be no boys in the Senior 
Class 

A Wonderful Winter — just one snowfall 

When Christmas Comes — another vacation 

Baby, I Can't Sleep — when thinking of the Discipline 

Committee 

And So I Dreamed — school closed — no coal 

Just You Wait and See — next year's football team 

Helpless — at meal time 

CoUNTiN' On You — in Bible 

Happy Again — May 29th is just around the corner 

If It Could Happen — ham and eggs for breakfast 

One Meatball — dining room 

Movie Mirth (When I Saw Them I Thought of Certain 

Things) 

To Have and Have Not — all A's 

Practically Ours — class pins 

Music for Millions — Mr. and Mrs. Mayo 

Can't Help Singing — Choral Club 

Ministry of Fear — Discipline Committee 

And Now Tomorrow — homeward bound 

Guest in the House — at home games 

Hollywood Canteen — College Grill 

Tomorrow, the World — Class of '46 

I'll Be Seeing You — at the Senior Dance 

The Virginian — Stanley 

Together Again — Sarah and Joe 



Experiment Perilous — Chemistry Lab 

The Three Cabelleros — Stitt. Saunders, and Robinson 

Leave Her to Heaven — Eulalia Bailey 

Love Letters — Ragins and Blunt 

I Love a Soldier — Rose B. Hopkins 

The Dolly Sisters — Lillian and Mattie Dupree 

The Thin Man — George Sadler 

A Tree Grows In Brooklyn — Margarita Lewis 

Love Affair — Shirley Williams 

In This Our Love — Mary Wright 

The Great John L. — Pattie Laws 

The Clock — Frieda Strickland 

Janie — Marion Cheek 

Marriage Is a Private Affair — Buster Perry 

Doll Face — Naomi Edgecombe 

GoiN My Way — Charles Farrar 

Conflict — Joe and Cliff 

Confidential Agent — George Mask 

The Corn Is Green — Catherine Williams 

Old Acquaintance — Stine and Simon 

Rebecca — Queen Moore 

Conspirators — Stanley and Robinson 

This Love of Ours — Cordelia and J. T. 

Gone With the Wind — Beulina 

In Our Time — No men. no team 

A Song To Remember — Neal Stitt 

Song of Bernadette — Hattie Redden 

Something for the Boys — Richie Sands 

Madame Curie — Rebie Wilson 

Without Love — Braithwaite 

Gas Light — Marian Evans 

Spellbound — -anybody's Pledgees 

The Valley of Decision — to study or not to study 

Anchors Aweigh — at the Monthly Social 

Week-end at the Waldorf — we'll settle on Arcadt 



DRIFTWOOD 



History is a deadly subject. 

As deadly as can be; 

It killed r. D. R. 

And now it's killing me. 

"Roses I sent to match your cheeks." 
So wrote a lovelorn fellow: 
At last the florist sealed his fate. 
The roses he sent were yellow. 

What'cha doin? fishin? 
Naw, I'm drawin worms. 

Little poodle asleep on a log; 
Forest fire . . . hot dog! 

He: Please, May I? 

She : No. 

He : Just this once':* 

She: Certainly not! 

He : Oh, gosh ma, all the kids are goin' barefoot, 

A jitterbug went out to swim, 



Alas! too late he found 
The current grim — too much for him, 
'Hep! Hep! he cried and drowned. 

This here poem 'orter 
Be two lines shorter. 

Pity costs nothin' and ain't wuff nothin'! 

Here lies my wife; tears can't bring her back: 
Therefore. I weep. 

Nature never makes a mistake. If she makes a fool 
she means it. 

He who fights and runs away 
Will live to fight another day. 

There was a litle boy from York 

He learned how to eat with a fork 

He came to Saint Aug 

Where one eats like a hog 

And now he don't eat with no fork a-tall! 



II 



? 

l* 



o5 



GRILL 

The College Grill, located in the basement of the Hunter Building, is one of the finest recrea- 
tional facilities provided by the school. Dancing and games are enjoved and snacks are served dailv. 




DR. EDSON E. BLACKMAN 
Charlotte. N. C. 

President of the St. Augustine's College 
General Alumni Association 




56 




We are very much interested in tlie atom. 



57 



PATROI\S 



Mr. and Mrs. James Boyer 

Mr. John H. Brown, Jr. 

Miss Helen B. Davis 

Mr. and .Mrs. C. K. Hunt. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Hunt, Sr. 

-Mr. and Mrs. Douglas L. Hunt 

Mrs. Clinton B. Ligon 

Mrs. Elsie Hunt Perry 

.Mr. and .Mrs. W. A. Perry, ?r. 

Mrs. Ida H. Reid 

Lt. Thomas J. Bembry 

Mr. and .Mrs. Osceola Morrison 

Lt. Charles E. .Miller 

".Missie" 

Mrs. Grace M. Stephens 

.Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Scott 

Mrs. Zura Turner 

Mr. Oliver Homes 

Pfc. John F. .Morrison 

Mrs. Williams 

.Mr. Joseph LeCompte 

Miss Virginia Jefferson 

Miss Julia Magwood 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Edgecombe 

Pfc. Jesse Boston 

Mrs. Nora Brown 

Miss Florence Worficld 

Miss Edith Graves 

.Miss Eleanor Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl .\1. McClenney 

Dr. and Mrs. Lloyd L. Woods 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Inborden 

Bland High School 

Rev. Henry Sutton 

Mrs. Mildred James 

Mrs. Ethel Fennell 

.Mr. Elijah Highsmith 

Mr. J. D. Fennell 

Mrs. Florence Haves 

Mrs. E. P. Wiley ' 

Miss Edna .\iken 

Miss Eddie Joe Aiken 

Mr. H. .Melton White 

Mr. and .Mrs. Richard Ragins 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitfield Braxton 

Dr. and Mrs. Nelson L. Perry 

Mr. Asbury McCain 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Foye 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brimage 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Foye 

Mr. Charlie Perkins 

Mr. and .Mrs. Moseley 

Mr. James Younge, Jr. 

Miss Grace Sweeney 

Mr. John Leon Ward 

Miss Blanche Jenkins 

Mr. Edward Marshall 

Mr. David Virgo 

Mr. Cecil D. Halliburton 

Mr. Nathaniel Culmer 

Miss Helen M. Roberts 

Mrs. Isabelle Thatch 

Miss Alva Thatch 

Mrs. .Vlartha Wiggins 

Mrs. Mary E. Saunders 

Mr. James F. Burke 

Mr. John Gorham 

Miss Hanie Gorham 

Miss Beulah 0. Kelsey 

Mr. Waddie Saunders 

Mrs. Gladys Palin 

Mrs. Louise Paxton 

Mrs. Bertha Butler 



Mr. Ernest Guess 

-Mr. and Mrs. William Foster 

Mrs. Rosebud Conner 

Mr. Linwood Young 

Miss Bernice W. Greene 

Mr. Linwood Saunders 

Mr. Alonza .Vlidgett 

Mr. Frank Pollock 

.Mr. Eddie Cherry 

.Mr. John Carter 

Mr. William Martin 

.Mr. James George 

Mr. Allen Johnson 

Mr. Norman West 

Mr. Edward George 

-Vlr. John Bell 

Justice Hubert Delany 

Rev. John H. Johnson 

Mrs. F. J. Carnage 

Mr. John Carrington 

Miss Grace Redden 

.Miss Ethelle Ma.xwell 

.Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Dupree 

Miss Vlarian VL Dupree 

Mr. Tinsley Spraggins 

-Vliss Hazel V. Clarke 

Miss Nina W. .\uthony 

Mrs. Catherine Burgess 

Miss Norma J. Levister 

.Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Blackburn 

Mr. Graham Daniel. Sr. 

.Mr. .\lbert G. Hudson 

.Vlr. and Mrs. Jefferson Blackburn 

Mr. J. T. Miller 

Mr. J. B. Nelson 

Dr. J. B. Davis 

Cpl. William H. Jackson. Jr.. '40 

.Mr. H. M. Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Strickland 

Mr. Clarence .Mitchell 

Mr. and .Mrs. Kinston Cotton 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel Barbee 

Mr. John Henry Johnson 

Miss Grace Lane 

-Vlr. Daniel Coleman 

Mr. --Vlvin Knight 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stanley 

-Miss Audrey L. McQueen 

-Mr. Frank Chavis 

.Mr. Jesse .Saunders 

Miss Helen Gill 

Miss Myrtle Roberls, R.N. 

Mr. Samuel Tinimons 

Mr. Dossie Jones 

Mr. Herbert Grav 

Mr. William H. Gordon. Jr. 

Mrs. William H. Gordcm. Sr. 

Sgt. Bennett W. Massy, Jr. 

Mr. H. Worth. Sr. 

Mr. J. H. Sands 

Mrs. Wayman Clemens 

Dr. W. F. Clark 

Dr. E. E. Blackman 

Miss Bernetta Horton 

Miss Dorothy Clarke 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson 

Miss Ester Parker 

Mr. E. L. Gibson 

Mrs. Violet Pullen 

Mr. Wayland H. Horton. Sr. 

Miss Blonnie Slade 



Dial 6273 



Dial 6273 



BUTLER'S 
RADIO SERVICE 



FRIENDLY and EFFICIENT 
SERVICE 



7431/2 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



it I 

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Congratulations 




to the 




Graduating Class 




of 


CotnpUntents 


St. Augustine^s College 




* 


of 


COURTESY 


A FRIEI\D 


BEAUTY BAR 

312 Brust Street 




DETROIT, MICH. 




* 




Dial CA-6625 M. Morrison, Prop. 


Compliments 


of the 


TEPEE RESTAURANT 


HOME OF THE FAT INDIANS 


8530 OAKLAND AVE. DETROIT, MICH. 


G. W. TURNER, Proprietor 



* 


THE 


WILLIAM F. CLARK, M.D. 


COLONADE 


314 East Cabarrus Street 


Extends 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Congratulations 




To 


* 


St, Augustine^s 


JAMES E. THIEM 


SEE 


''^Everything for the Office'^ 


CLAUDE D. TAYLOR 


* 


for 


DESKS - CHAIRS 




FILING CABINETS 


MUSIC 


SHEET MUSIC - RECORDINGS 


For Any Occasion 


• 


• 


Dial 2-2913 




108 Fayetteville Street 


Dial 2-3950 



Compliments 


=^ 

CAPITAL CAB CO. 


of 


• 


THE CAROLINIAN 


Service Is What 


* 


We Give 




• 


Raleigh's Only 


133 East Hargett Street 


Negro Newspaper 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Com-pliments 
of 


Com.plim.ents 
of 


Compliments 


NEW COLLEGE 
INN 

* 

315 N. Tarboro Road 


MAYE'S 
PHARMACY 

Corner Davie and Blount Sts. 


of 

FINE'S 
MEN SHOP 


DIAL 9483 


* 


* 


• 
J. Young, Sr., Prop. 


Telephone 9143 


RALEIGH, N. C 



»•? 



J 



A KILOWATT HOUR? 



That's Easy! 



r 



A kilowatt hour is really not difficult 
to understand Electricity is measured in 
units of pressure (volts) and in units of 
current flow (amperesK Multiply these 
two together and you have a unit of 
power, the watt. The watt is a relatively 
small unit and it is customary to use 
1,000 watts, or kilowatt as a practical 
base of measurement of electricity. A 
KILOWATT HOUR represents the use 
of one kilowatt (1,000 watts) for one 
hour. It represents energy equivalent to 
one and one third horsepower. It is the 
unit of measurement used in your electric 
bill, and the residential customers of the 
Carolina Power & Light Company pay 
an average of two and seven-tenths 
cents for each kilowatt hour of elec- 
tricity used 




r ^ 

CAROLINA 

POWER & LIGHT 

COMPANY 



Compliments 


Compliments 


Compliments 


of 


of 


of 


DIXIE 


McNeill 
tire shop 


AMBASSADOR 


LOAN CO. 


* 


THEATRE 


* 


325 E. Cabarrus Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


* 


S. Wilmington Street 


* 


Fayetteville Street 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Phone 3-1533 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Com.plim.ents of 


BROGDEN PRODLCE CO. 


WHOLESALE 


• 


FRESH FRUITS AND PRODUCE 


• 


RALEIGH, N. C. 



< 



Compliments 



of 



MARTIN'S FLORIST 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Compliments 

FALLON'S FLORIST 



PHONE 8347 



205 Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Compliments of 



FASHIONS 



Insurance Building 



EFIRD'S 
Department Stores 

208 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



"/i Good Place to 
Those Who 

Like to 
Save Money" 



The Largest 

Sporting Goods 

Store 

in the South! 






^..^>fes«:^^S« 




i.'iAt'X\^^^tV. 



112 West Hargett 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Compliments of 



JEFFREYS' FOOD STORE 



GROCERIES : MEATS : FEEDS 
SEA FOOD : PRODUCE 



Corner Netcbern Avenue and Tarboro Road 
PHONE 6879 RALEIGH, N. C. 



MECHANICS & FARMERS BANK 

Complete Banhing Service 

COMMERCIAL - SAVII^GS • TRUST DEPARTMENTS 

RALEIGH and DURHAM, IS. C. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

ACME REALTY C OMPANY 

FIRE AND AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 
BONDS - REAL ESTATE - RENTALS 

Call Us For Information and Service 

DIAL 2-0956 RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Compliments 
of 

12-12 LUNCHEONETTE 

Next Door to 
LINCOLN THEATRE 



Compliments 
of 

CITY TAXI CO. 

W. MARTIN STREET 

DIAL 2-1489 




We appreciate your patronage during the school year just ending and look 
forward to serving you again during the coming year. 



OFFICIAL JEWELERS 

TO 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 



The Metal Arts Co., Inc. 

Rochester 5, N. Y. 

"Pioneers of a Negro Sales Force" 



North Carolina Representative 

W. 0. YARBROUGH 

P.O. Box 1571 Raleigh, N. C. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 
Founded 1867 

REV. EDGAR H. GOOLD. President 

A four-year college course is offered, accredited Class "A" by the 
• Southern Association of Colleges and the North Carolina State Depart- 
ment of Education, leading to degrees of B.A. and B.S. including 
Pre-medical work and Teacher Training for State High School 
Teacher's certificates. 

I^ew Departments Added in Commerce, Music, Physical Education 

and Health, and Religious Education. 

Thorough Training Healthy Environment Christian Influences 

Under Auspices of the Episcopal Church 

MODERATE TERMS OPPORTUNITY FOR SELF-HELP 

Registration of New Students . . . Tuesday, September 17, 1946 

For Catalog and Information write the Registrar 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE : RALEIGH, N. C. 



BEST WISHES AND MUCH SUCCESS 

to 

SENIOR CLASS OF '46 

* 

HAMLIN^S STUDIO 

118 East Hargett Street 
PHONE 3-3224 RALEIGH, N. C. 

* 

Portraits : General Photography : Copying 



AUTOGRAPHS 



I 



I 



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BUILDERS 
DI^AMS 

•\nSlONS created by llie imagination 
* precede tlie achievement of any 
reailv great accomplisliment. The 
ability to weave the tlireads of imagi- 
nation into the finislied fabric i* equally 
important. 

It has been the privilege of the 
Euvv\Ki)> & BitoLiiinoN Comi>any to co- 
„perate with the staff in creating then- 
vision into material form. 

^iLch cooperation is one of tbe 
-visions- which precede the building o 
a successful business, and is a part ol 
a,e working policy of the Kowards & 
BltOUCHTON CoMrANV. 

To those Staffs desiring complete co- 
„peralion. we offer nnexcelled service. 
You. too, may be proud of your 
annual. 

Correspondence is Invited 
EDWARDS & BROUGHTON CO. 

RAI.E1<;H. NOHTH CAROLINA 



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AUTOGRAP H S 



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AUTOGRAPHS