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Full text of "Penmanship of the XVI, XVII & XVIIIth centuries : a series of typical examples from English and foreign writing books"




3F THE XVI, XVII, & XVIIIT9 CENTURIES 



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Presented to the 

LIBRARIES of the 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

by 



PETER H. WEINRICH 



PENMANSHIP 

OF THE XVI, XVII & XVIIITH CENTURIES 



OTHER WORKS BY LEWIS F, DAY 

ALPHABETS OLD AND NEW. Third Edition 

LETTERING IN ORNAMENT 

PATTERN DESIGN 

ORNAMENT AND ITS APPLICATION 

NATURE AND ORNAMENT 

ART IN NEEDLEWORK. Third Edition 

ENAMELLING 

WINDOWS: A BOOK ABOUT STAINED 
& PAINTED GLASS. Third Edition 

BY PERCY J. SMITH 

LETTERING AND WRITING. 

A Portfolio of Examples 



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Palomares, Madrid, 1789 



PENMANSHIP 

OF THE XVI, XVII XVIIlTH CENTURIES 

A series of typical Examples from English 
and Foreign Writing Books selected by 

LEWIS F. DAY 

Author of " Alphabets Old and New " 
"Lettering in Ornament" "Windows" etc. 




LONDON 
B. T. BATSFORD, 94 HIGH HOLBORN 




- 









NOTE BY MISS DAY 

ENMANSHIP has, of recent years, assumed a position of 
so great importance as a branch of art education that 
there is no need to make any apology for bringing out a book 
on the subject. The present volume, moreover, deals with a 
branch of penmanship which has been practically ignored of 
late, and about which little has been written. The tendency 
has been to pay little attention to any kind of lettering but 
uncial, half-uncial, and Roman. But, whilst the dignity of 
these letters must be apparent to every one, there are purposes 
for which they are quite unsuitable, and it is for just these 
purposes that the lightness and comparative frivolity of more 
modern writing is peculiarly well adapted. 

While going through an important collection of Writing 
Books of the i6th, i7th, and i8th centuries, at that time in 
the possession of Mr. Batsford, it occurred to my father that 
here was a, very mine of suggestions for the inspiration of 
writers, illuminators, architects, engravers, and the numerous 
art workers who have to use lettering in one form or another. 

Mr. Batsford's collection, which has been largely drawn 
upon for this volume, contained a number of rare old writing 
books, not to be found at the British Museum or in the Library 
of the Victoria and Albert Museum. We have, however, not 
been content with simply reproducing these ; we have gone 



through hundreds of writing books Dutch, English, French, 
German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish in order that we may 
be able to give not only a representative collection of hand- 
writings, but the best possible examples. In examining this 
mass of material, we were astonished to find how much of 
it, though finely engraved, was quite unsuitable to modern 
needs. We discovered, further, that the later writing masters 
were in the habit of calmly copying from their predecessors 
(though they don't usually mention the fact) and vulgarizing 
their work in the process, so that from one cause or another a 
good many of the most easily accessible writing books are 
really worthless to the student. 

My father had, before his death, chosen most of the ex- 
amples now reproduced, the remainder have been added by 
Mr. Percy J. Smith, Mr. Batsford, and myself; and we have 
closely followed his principles of selection, and have adhered in 
the main to his plan of arrangement. Our special thanks are 
due to Mr. C. L. Ricketts of Chicago, who has most readily 
offered suggestions as to the volumes best worth referring to. 
We have also to thank the authorities of the British Museum 
and the Victoria and Albert Museum for permission to repro- 
duce certain plates. 

It is not contended that all the pages given are altogether 
admirable, or that everything, or indeed anything, in the 
volume should be copied as it stands. What we have tried to 
do is, to provide students, teachers, and craftsmen with good 
examples of penmanship which may serve to show them what 
has been done, and what can be done, with a pen, and to inspire 
them to attempt something of their own which may be dis- 
tinctive and graceful without necessarily being too far removed 
from the writing of everyday life. 

With regard to the arrangement of the plates, writing 
masters used such varying terminology that it was hopeless to 



try to group the examples after the manner of any particular 
penman, whilst to arrange them in a strictly chronological 
order would have meant simply chaos. It has therefore been 
necessary to try some rather different plan. The book begins 
with some examples of the various Chancery hands, and these 
are followed by specimens of Old English, German, Roman, 
and other more or less formal types of penmanship. The 
rather restrained running hands come next, followed, in their 
turn, by writing characterized by more or less heavy blobs of 
ink at the ends of the letters. The current hands in which 
flourishes are predominant, bring to an end the examples 
chosen simply as writing. The remaining illustrations contain 
a few specimens of how title-pages and other special work were 
set out and framed up, and some examples of scrolls and 
flourishes. 

The book does not pretend to be in any sense a history of 
penmanship that would be a very large undertaking but 
those interested in calligraphy, from a more or less antiquarian 
point of view, will find a good deal of information in the list of 
books from which the illustrations have been taken, whilst the 
wants of the more strictly practical student have been provided 
for by the descriptive list of plates. 

R. M. D. 



SHORT CRITICAL NOTES ON PENMANSHIP 
WITH REFERENCE TO THE EXAMPLES IN 
THIS WORK, BY PERCY J. SMITH 

DURING the i6th, i/th, and i8th centuries Penmanship, 
i.e. the style or manner of writing, occupied a position 
in the curriculum of studies which it is difficult for us to 
appreciate to its full extent : its practitioners and professors 
were often men of culture and influence, and held a very high 
place in the esteem of their contemporaries. Among these we 
may mention, as a representative English scribe, John Davies 
of Hereford. Educated at Oxford University, and pursuing his 
occupation as writing master in the same city, he was very well 
known during the late i6th and early iyth centuries both as 
a poet and as one of the most skilful penmen of his day. His 
epigrams and sonnets, containing references to Shakespeare, 
Fletcher, Ben Jonson and other writers of the period, show the 
calligrapher to have been on terms of friendship with many 
of his most notable contemporaries. At one time he had 
many pupils in Magdalen College, and drew others, including 
Algernon, Lord Percy, from families of the highest rank. 
One of his pupils, Richard Gething, who worked at the sign 
of the Hand and Pen in Fetter Lane, London, also attained 
considerable eminence at a little later date. 

The work of the best of the penmen deserves study, not 
only because we find reflected in it the spirit of their time, but 
because, if we put aside their exaggerated displays of technical 
skill and "ingenuity in making divers curious figures," for 
theirs is essentially a conscious art, we shall find much that 
is beautiful, fundamentally right, and of practical use in the 
work of to-day. 



It is not possible within the necessarily brief limits of these 
notes to consider separately all the examples from old writing 
books here brought together ; moreover, were they thus treated, 
the interested student would lose somewhat the valuable and 
pleasurable exercise of personal judgment and discovery. Nor 
will the relation between the styles or the development of the 
various characters be investigated, for to treat that part of the 
subject adequately would require a history of writing. This 
is an introduction to the collection as a whole ; references will 
be made to specific examples, but mainly as representative of a 
particular style or of a method of treatment, while the criticisms 
made and principles laid down will be found capable of a very 
wide application. The guiding thought and intention will be 
to open the eyes of the mind to perceive the best. 

It is deeply to be regretted that we are deprived of the 
advantage of the late Mr. Day's experience and trained judgment 
in the introduction which should rightly be his, for his know- 
ledge of, and interest in, everything appertaining to lettering is 
too well known to need emphasis here, and it must needs be 
a source of regret that we cannot know his thoughts and 
consider his criticism on these examples of the craft. Both 
before and since his death the collection has passed through 
many examinations and siftings, and every example contains 
some feature or features justifying its inclusion ; though 
occasionally pages are reproduced with details which it is 
not desirable that we should emulate or study. Especially 
is this true of the initials, as, for instance, in the work of 
Beauchesne and Baildon in Example 30, but with the excep- 
tion of this initial the page well repays study, both for the 
character displayed in the small letters and for the signs of 
playfulness in the slight scrolls and flourishes. 

At the close of the I5th century a formal literary or book- 
hand ceased to be generally practised ; it was superseded 



by the printing press; and it was during the i6th century 
that cursive writing, under the pressure of influence from the 
northern Gothic or pointed style and the southern more rounded 
and freely written Italian script, passed through one of its most 
interesting phases. This period may be considered to mark 
the birth of modern writing. The first three examples of 
this collection, and others of the style of Examples 7 and 8, 
exhibit very clearly the influence of northern 15th-century 
bookwork. The letters have much of the "weight" and soli- 
darity of type, while the freedom of penwork is evident in the 
treatment of descending strokes, and in the use of flourishes 
and scrolls. Example 4, which is also type-like in character, 
is taken from a Spanish writing book of the i8th century 
and shows a style of work noticeable for its fine roundness 
and bold simplicity of form, combined with good, clear spacing 
of letters and lines ; the value of these qualities in ensuring 
readability, and what we may define as tranquillity and a 
forceful serenity of character in the page, cannot easily be 
overestimated. 

The decorative value of a headline of letters, larger and 
heavier than the text, may be seen in such examples as n, 18, 
20, and 25 ; while No. 14, an example of work by John Ayres, 
writing-master in St. Paul's Churchyard during the last half 
of the i yth century, is worthy of study as suggesting a legiti- 
mate method of interlineal decoration forming, as it were, a 
rich background of pattern or tone which need in no way 
interfere with the legibility of the matter. The somewhat thin 
and weak treatment of some of the scrolls and the complete 
isolation of others are weaknesses we must not repeat in 
work based upon this example. The page is, however, full 
of suggestion to metal workers and engravers, of whose craft 
it is peculiarly reminiscent. The superiority of the wide 
Gothic writing over the laterally compressed form in such 



essentials of good lettering as legibility, dignity, and strength, 
may be studied in Examples 14, 15, and others. 

The Italian or Roman style, destined to supersede the 
heavier and more complicated Gothic, is illustrated in Example 
35, a very beautiful piece of late 16th-century work. The 
initial " D " is well constructed and full of vitality. The student 
should observe the strength and very beautiful subtlety of form 
in this letter, especially noting how the bow springs from the 
base of the stem and, curving well out, returns and completes 
its form with a slight drop. Observe, too, the honouring of 
the two important words and the decorative value accruing 
from the use thus made of the line of capitals ; the equality of 
weight as between the large and small letters ; the excellent 
spacing, which is a thing so little understood and so rarely 
well done in these days ; the freedom with which the lines 
are allowed to terminate where they will, without excessive 
spreading out or closing up ; and, lastly, the simplicity and 
good composition of the whole. All these features combine 
to make this a very quiet and dignified inscription, severely 
simple, yet stored with lessons and inspiration for the modern 
scribe, but even more for the discerning letter-cutter, typo- 
grapher, and architect. 

In Plate 32 we have a small, interesting example of decora- 
tive writing from a Spanish copybook of 1650. The arrange- 
ment and balance of effect are excellent : and the flourishes 
are legitimate and unforced accentuations of distinctive parts 
of the letters from which they spring. They are full of 
vitality, and while adding interest to the page form a good 
example of organic decoration. The three lines of small 
writing are invaluable in providing a base and thus steadying 
the composition. 

Spain has provided us with many examples of a style of calli- 
graphy which, though closely akin to that of Italy, has a distinct 



national character. Example 49, taken from an iSth-century 
writing book, is strongly and beautifully written with a slanted 
pen, and shows an interesting and varied treatment of the serifs 
or terminating strokes of the/'s and g's. Both in this and in 
other examples, it is well to note that the placing of the dots 
of the z's is responsible for a feeling of "spottiness." The 
practice of making the dots range with the tops of the ascending 
strokes was, and is, often followed, with a resultant loss of con- 
nection between the two component " parts, and consequent 
isolation of the smaller member. It adds to the unity of the 
letter, to the strength of the lines of writing, and to the 
restfulness of the page, if the dots are placed close to the stems 
of the letters of which they form necessary parts. It is to be 
regretted that the border in this example is not in scale with 
the writing ; it is weak in weight of line, and somewhat 
'disconnected in design ; nevertheless it contains suggestions 
as to decoration which should be of practical use to the 
discriminating student. Another method of adding a decorative 
interest, and at the same time strengthening the composition 
of a page which would otherwise be disconnected, is by tying 
the parts together with bands and lines. These may be 
judiciously interlaced as in the two examples from the book 
of Palatino, one of the earliest and best known of the Italian 
writing masters, given in Examples 66 and 67. 

The very beautiful Italian semi-formal script of the Renais- 
sance had a decisive influence on other European styles, and, 
mainly as the result of this influence, English cursive writing 
gradually lost a great part of its disjointed and angular character 
and acquired the freely written and linked-up manner exemplified 
in the writing of Peter Gery (see No. 51). Plate 38 and the 
succeeding italic alphabets and writings are replete with hints 
to modern workers witness the interesting and useful forms of 
.amperzands ; the character, strength of curvature, and subtleties 



of shape and construction in the letters ; the spacing, compact- 
ness, and uniformity of the lines ; and the treatment of capitals 
and ascending and descending strokes, with their flourishes 
and scrolls. The manner of writing the word " Socrates " in 
Example 82 is an instructive example of the pride of display 
and " ingenuity " of the French penman, Jean de Beaugrand, not 
without its fascination for the modern scribe and letter-engraver. 
Examples 71 and 72 illustrate good "placing" of title or head- 
ing, and the free but fairly reticent rendering of the scrolls in 
which the writers loved to show their control of the pen, while 
the management of the various items of the note on Plate 74, 
written by Maria Strick as a specimen for the guidance of her 
numerous pupils, shows a good feeling for balance and com- 
position. 

Two varieties of upright writing, both showing good judg- 
ment in arrangement, deserve mention. That in Plate 75 has 
a pleasing little scroll carried into the lower margin and flanked 
and supported by some long vertical lines that materially steady 
the design. The other, Plate 90, notwithstanding a rather 
heavily inked initial and flourish, exhibits a very beautiful 
economy of line in the construction of the letters and suggests 
the presence of that restrained power characteristic of most 
achievements which win an abiding place in the hierarchy of 
things done. 

The most delicate writing in the series is that shown in 
Examples 80 and 8r, selected from a book issued by Beaugrand 
early in the I7th century. The graceful and fanciful treatment 
of the initials in both examples and of the two scrolls in the 
lower margin of the latter is very pleasing and contains ideas for 
the modern calligrapher and designer, while in both plates the 
judicious placing of the flourishes and consequent accentuation 
of the corners greatly strengthens the design as a whole. 

The excessively intricate borders so often found in the old 



writing books though they are the inevitable development of 
the ornamentation of the initials rarely add to the true beauty 
of the work and certainly show but little feeling for that 
restrained power to which reference has just been made. It is 
sufficient to say here that the examples shown are the most 
restrained and the best that could be found, and, while they are 
not to be considered as in any way perfect examples of taste, 
they are typical of their time and contain suggestions which 
may be of service. 

We are on happier ground when we come to such page 
arrangements as that of Peter Gery (No. 100). The natural 
manner in which the arm of the initial L in this plate holds the 
text, and the steadying influence of the line or base formed by 
the signature, are vital elements in a very good composition. 

A cursory glance through this collection is sufficient to 
clearly reveal the great importance of the ensemble made by 
the composition. The value of a well-shaped mass be it 
light or heavy as a contribution to the success of a page 
may be judged by a reference to such examples as 53, 81, and 
86. Construction and growth of letter, line, and ornament ; 
steadiness and balance of part against part ; the due accentua- 
tion of this and the dropping of the other ; the question of 
scale, and the using of ornament, not for its own sake, but to 
support and give value to the whole ; all these considerations 
are involved in producing a strong and beautiful piece of work 
and must be remembered while studying these examples. 

In conclusion, the writer of this introduction would em- 
phasize, with all due reserve, the supreme importance, in the 
whole range of Penmanship and Lettering, of an appreciation 
of reticence combined with legitimate freedom in execution, 
associated with depth and vitality of spirit in tone and 
inspiration. 

P. J. S. 



DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



For full Titles of the Books quoted, see Alphabetical List of Authors 
at the end of this Volume 



i. PAPAL CHANCERY HAND. Spanish, from the Recopilacion 
Subtilissima of Juan de Yciar, 1548. 

2.) PAPAL CHANCERY HAND. Italian, from II Perfetto Scrittore 
3.] of G. F. Cresci, 1570. 

4. A MUCH LATER VERSION OF THE SAME KIND OF 

HAND. Spanish, from the Arte nueva de Escribir of J. C. 
Aznar de Polanco, 1719. 

5. SET CHANCERY HAND, from A booke containing divers sortes 

of hands by J. de Beauchesne and John Baildon, 1571. 

6. GOTHIC WRITING. Flemish, from the Exercitatio Alphabetica 

of Clement Perret, 1569. 
(Compare Nos. 8, 9, and 14.) 

7. GOTHIC WRITING. Netherlandish, from the Exemplaar-Boek 

of A. Perlingh, 1679. 

8. GOTHIC WRITING. Flemish, from the Exemplaria sive Formulae 

Scripturae Ornatioris XXXIV. of J. Houthusius, 1591. 
(Compare Nos. 6, 9, and 14.) 

9. GOTHIC WRITING, from the Theatrum Artis Scribendi by 

J. Hondius. This is a so-called " bastard " English type, and 
is written by M. Martin, 1594. 
(Compare Nos. 6, 8, and 14.) 

10. GOTHIC WRITING. Flemish, from the Exemplaer - Boec of 

J. van den Velde, 1607. 
B 



11. GOTHIC WRITING, from the Lust-Hof der Schrijft-Konste by 

Symon de Vries, 1619. Notice the terminations of the/'s and g's 
which are particularly ingenious and the decorative value of the 
headline. 

12. GOTHIC WRITING. German, from the Anweissung zur zier- 

lichen Schreibkunst of B. U. Hoffman, 1694. 
(Compare Nos. 1 1 and 14.) , 

13. GOTHIC WRITING. English, from A Tutor to Penmanship 

by John Ayres, 1695. 
(Compare Nos. 9 and 14.) 

14. GOTHIC WRITING. English, from the same source. 

Note how the flourishes form a kind of middle tint, and decorate 
the page without obscuring the writing. 

15. GOTHIC WRITING. English, from Multum in Parvo, or the 

Pen's Perfection by Edward Cocker, c. 1675. 

The third word on the fourth line is meant for a contraction of 
Christian but Cocker, or one of his predecessors, has evidently 
gone astray and mistaken the Greek p for a/. 

1 6. GOTHIC WRITING. English, from Writing Improved by John 

Clark, 1714. 

17. GOTHIC WRITING. German, from Kunst-richtige Vorshriften, 

Frankfort and Leipzig, 1702. 

It is interesting to compare this late German example with the 
three English versions which precede it (Nos. 14, 15, 16), and 
to note how in this case the letters are all closed up and, as it 
were, flattened, whilst in the English work they are much rounder 
and more open. 

1 8. GOTHIC WRITING by Peter Gery, 1670. 

This shows a headline in large letters satisfactorily combined 
with smaller writing on the rest of the page. 

19. A SMALL SCRIPT, rather Gothic in type, from the Exemplaria 

sive Formulae Scriptorae Ornatioris XXXIV of Houthusius, 1591. 
Note the character given to the writing by the long tails of 
the s's. 
(Compare Nos. 20 and 21.) 



20. ANOTHER EXAMPLE of the use of the long s, from Poecilo- 

graphie by J. de Beaugrand, 1598. 
Note the decorative value of the headline. 
(Compare Nos. 19 and 21.) 

21. GOTHIC WRITING, from the Spieghel Der Schrijfkonste by J. 

Van den Velde, 1605. 

Note the characteristic long s's and the curious form of the 

double s. 

(Compare No. 26.) 

22. CURRENT DUTCH WRITING, from the Tooneel der loflijcke 

Schrijfpen of Maria Strick, 1607. 

(The four lines at the top of the page compare with Nos. 59 et 

seq.} 

23. A PRETTILY SPACED RENDERING, in Gothic script, of a 

poem in three verses, from the same source. 

24. CURRENT WRITING, to go with larger Gothic letters, from 'T 

Magazin oft' Pac-huys der Loffelijcker Penn-const by D. Roe- 
lands, 1616. 

25. A MINUSCULE WRITING, showing certain affinities with 

Gothic. From the Paranimphe de 1'Escriture Ronde of F. 
Desmoulins, 1625. 
(Compare Nos. 19-23.) 

26. ANOTHER CURRENT HAND with long tails to the/'s as well 

as the s's, from 'T Magazin der Loffelijcker Penn-const by D. 
Roelands, 1616. 

27. A CURIOUS and characteristic Dutch script, from the Exemplaar- 

Boek of A. Perlingh, 1679. 

28. SECRETARY HAND, from A booke containing divers sortes of 

hands by J. de Beauchesne and John Baildon, 1571. 

29. ANOTHER HAND showing the characteristic d of 28, from 

Chirographia by R. Gething, 1619. 

30. AN EXAMPLE OF LETTRE PATTEE, from the Exercitatio 

Alphabetica of C. Perret, 1569. 



31. LETRA ANTIGUA. A kind of simple Roman letter with occa- 

sional flourishes introduced, which very much help the balance 
of the page. From the Recopilacion Subtilissima of J. de Yciar, 
1548. 

32. AN ITALIC HAND, in which some of the letters are adorned 

with flourishes. Spanish, from the Primera Parte Del Arte De 
escrivir by J. de Casanova, 1650. 

33. A VERSION OF ROMAN MINUSCULE, having some affin- 

ity with the so-called "diplomatic hand." From the Libellus 
valde doctus elegans, utilis, multa varia scribendarum litterarum 
genera complectens of R. Wyss, 1549. 

34. ROMAN SCRIPT, from the Exercitatio Alphabetica of C. Perret, 

1569. 

35. ROMAN SCRIPT, from II Perfetto Scrittore of G. F. Cresci, 1569. 

36. ROMAN SCRIPT, from the Primera Parte del Arte de Escrivir, 

by J. de Casanova, 1650. 

37. ROMAN SCRIPT, from Kunst-richtige Vorschriften. Frankfort 

and Leipzig, 1702. 

38. ITALIC WRITING, bearing some resemblance to No. 33. From 

the Anweissung einer gemeine handschrift, by J. Neudorffer the 
elder, 1538. 

39. ITALIC WRITING, from the Exercitatio Alphabetica of C. 

Perret, 1569. 

40.\CAPITALS AND SMALL LETTERS, from A booke contain- 
41.) ing divers sortes of hands by J. de Beauchesne and J. Baildon, 
1571. 

42. LETTERE PIACEVOLLE, a rather fantastic italic hand from 

the same source. 

Note the unsatisfactory initial. 

43. A VERY SIMPLE ITALIC HAND, from the Exemplaria sive 

Formulae Scripturae Ornatioris XXXIV. of J. Houthusius, 1591. 

44.JTWO SIMPLE ITALIC HANDS, in which the tops of the IPs 
45. J etc., show traces of the blob-like thickening which characterizes 

the more flowing hands illustrated in Nos. 53 to 64. From the 

same source as the preceding example. 



46. SPANISH "BASTARDO" WRITING, from the Nueva Arte de 

Escribir of P. Diaz Morante, issued by Palomares in 1789. 

47. REDONDILLO, or Spanish round hand, from the Arte de Escrevir 

of Francisco Lucas, 1580. 

Note the curious form of the d which characterizes this type of 

writing. 

48. BASTARDO Spanish Writing, from the same source. 

49. SPANISH WRITING, from the Nueva Arte de Escribir of P. 

Diaz Morante, issued by Palomares in 1789. 
Note the interesting treatment of the /'s and ^'s. 

50. ROUND HAND WRITING, from the Copy-Book of Richard 

Daniel, 1664. 

51. ROUND HAND, by Peter Gery, 1670. 

52. FRENCH AND BASTARD ALPHABETS, from L'Art 

d'Ecrire, by J.-B. Allais de Beaulieu, 1680. 

53/IEARLY EXAMPLES of the heavy endings to /'s, d's, and other 
54.J letters with limbs above the line which form so conspicuous a 

feature in the next ten examples. Italian, from the Libro di 

G.-B. Palatino, 1540. 

5S.\MORE FORMED WRITING, Italian, from II Perfetto Scrittore 
56.] of G. F. Cresci, 1570. 

57. A BELGIAN RENDERING of the same characteristic, from the 

Exercitatio Alphabetica of C. Perret, 1569. 

58. ANOTHER EXAMPLE of the same kind of writing, in which 

the Initial is less satisfactory and there is more tendency to 
introduce flourishes. From the Exemplaria sive Formulae 
Scripturae Ornatioris XXXIV. of J. Houthusius, 1591. 

59. A MORE RUNNING HAND, with the same characteristic 

blobs, from the Tooneel der loflijcke Schrijfpen of Maria Strick, 
1607. 

60. ANOTHER EXAMPLE, with typical penwork scrolls of the 

period above and below the writing. From Les Oevres de Lucas 
Materot, 1608. 



61. AN ITALIAN EXAMPLE, from II Cancelliere by L. Curione, 

1609. 

62. AN ENGLISH EXAMPLE, from The Writing Schoolemaster of 

John Davies of Hereford, 1648. 

63. ANOTHER EXAMPLE, with typical scrollwork, from Les Oevres 

de Lucas Materot, 1608. 
(Compare No. 60.) 

64. A PORTUGUESE EXAMPLE, from the Nova Escola para 

aprender a ... escrever, by M. de Andrade de Figueiredo, 1722. 
(Note the/;/,/, q, and compare them with Nos. 49, 62, and 63.) 

65. AN EXAMPLE, showing the same typical thickening, in a modi- 

fied form, combined with the flourish. From the Grundliche 
Unterricht der edlen Schreib-Kunst of G. Scheurer. 

66.HTALIAN MERCANTILE HANDS, showing an early re- 
67.) strained and happy use of the flourish. From the Libro di 

Palatino, 1540. 

Note how the lines help the composition of the page. 

68. ANOTHER ITALIAN MERCANTILE HAND, with flourishes, 
from the Opere de Frate Vespasiano Amphiareo, 1554. 

69/1 ITALIAN WRITING with flourishes. From II Perfetto Scrittore 
70. / of G. F. Cresci, 1570. 

71. \PRETTILY SPACED and arranged pieces of flourish work. 
72. / From the Spieghel der Schrijfkonste of J. van den Velde, 1605. 

73. RATHER RIOTOUS FLOURISH WORK, from the Tooneel 

der loflijcke Schrijpen of Maria Strick, 1607. 

74. SLOPING AND UPRIGHT WRITING, with flourishes from 

the same source. 

(Compare the two lines at the top with No. 75.) 

75. UPRIGHT WRITING, with flourishes, from the T Magazin oft' 

Pac-huys der Loffelijcker Penn-const by Daniel Roelands, 1616. 
(Compare the upper part of 74.) 

Note the pleasing little scroll and how the long vertical lines on 
either side of it help to steady the design. 

76. SLOPING WRITING, with flourishes, from Les Oeuvres de Lucas 

Materot, 1608. 



77- ANOTHER SLOPING WRITING, with flourishes, from II 
Cancelliere of L. Curione, 1609. 
(Compare No. 61.) 

78. RIOTOUS, but on the whole legible, flourish work. From 

'T Magazin oft' Pac-huys der Loffelijcker Penn-const by David 
Roelands, 1616. 

79. A WELL SET OUT piece of flourish writing, from Chirographia 

by R. Gething, c. 1619. 

8o.\TWO EXAMPLES, in which the flourish is kept within bounds, 
8i.J from the Poecilographie of J. de Beaugrand, 1633. 

Note the delicacy of the writing and the fanciful treatment of 

the initials. 

82. RESTRAINED FLOURISH-WORK, from the same source. 

83. SLOPING WRITING, with flourishes, from a book by Thomas 

Weston, 1 68 1. 

84. ANOTHER SLOPING HAND, with flourishes, from Kunst- 

richtige Vorschriften, 1702. 

85. A SIMPLE CURRENT HAND, with a few flourishes added. 

From M. Baurenfeind's Vollkommene Wieder-Herstellung der 
Schreib-Kunst, 1716. 

86.) PORTUGUESE WRITING, with flourishes. From the Nova 
87.) Escola para aprender a ... escrever by M. Andrade de Fig- 
ueiredo, 1722. 

88. ^CURRENT WRITINGS, from Chirographia by R. Gething, 
89.) c. 1619. 

90.1TWO WRITINGS WITH FLOURISHES, showing a deliber- 
9 i.J ately sought after effect where the ink has not run freely from the 
pen. From Richard Daniel's Copy- Book, 1664. 

92. GREEK WRITING, from the same source. 

93. GREEK WRITING, from The Universal Penman by George 

Bickham, 1743. 

94. TYPICAL BORDER WORK, from the Tooneel der loflijcke 

Schrijfpen by Maria Strick, 1607. 



95- TYPICAL BORDER WORK, from Calligraphotechnia by R. 
Gething, 1619. 

96. VERY ELABORATE BORDER WORK, from the Pen's 

Transcendency by Edward Cocker, 1660. 

97. A PAGE OF WRITING framed by one sweeping line. From 

the Tooneel der loflijcke Schrijfpen by Maria Strick, 1607. 

98.1TWO PAGES OF WRITING, one sloping, the other upright, 
99.] each framed by an encircling line, by Jean Delachambre, 1638. 

100. A PAGE OF WRITING partially framed by the tail of the 

Initial L. From Gerii Viri in Arte Scriptoria quondam cele- 
berrimi opera, 1670. 

101. A PAGE OF WRITING framed by one sweeping line. From 

the Exemplaar-Boek of A. Perlingh, 1679. 

102. SIGNATURE AND FLOURISHES, from T'Magazin oft 'Pac- 

huys of David Roelands, 1616. 

103. A FLOURISH, from the Spieghel der Schrijfkonst by J. van den 

Velde, 1605. 

104. A FLOURISH, from the Exemplaar-Boek of A. Perlingh, 1679. 

105. LETTERING WITH FLOURISHES, which form a kind of 

scrollwork, from Chirographia by Richard Gething, 1645. 

106. A BORDER OF HEARTS, from the same source. 

IO7.\FLOURISHES, one encircling the signature, from Calligrapho- 
io8.J technia by Richard Gething, 1619. 

109. AN ELABORATE FLOURISH starting from the downstroke 

of a/. From A. Perlingh's Exemplaar-Boek, 1679. 

1 10. AN ELABORATE FLOURISH starting from the tail of a k. 

From the Exemplaria sive Formulae Ornatioris XXXIV. by J. 
Houthusius, 1591. 

in. A FLOURISH, by Peter Gery, c. 1670. 

112. SIGNATURE FORMING A HEART, from Richard Daniel's 
Copybook, 1664. 



PLATES 




fe ante porfatn lafiha fancf c 
cccliepnFr 
pijcopua Tbletonu^ 
ac 2ugnc^ cattdk matbr c^ancdlar 









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(let An no fcotmni * i 5 4 ^5 :-^ 

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j#etbf t>ermoent boor (trnen >ooon bat fiir 'fcmbe 

c\ ST?) r r r 

Unneemen een^vt)antaaeti e vlaetse met retires 



ban wenitmfi i^ofc : meter 



bte met 



(onber metckefi|ce noobt jrrne (S' oftateitenax)on 

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I A1GVNA VEZ PENSAMO 

algtm bien . fcpamos que el efpiritu 



demal:feiblesqueelEfpirituCmfofe 
rooco 
gnos 



.r . f . s .* .v. u .x..- 




NacicTo el infante, que el ciclo rcfcafa Ynm que diamante. 

ni fol ni que pi at a. con fc mtiy conjtante. 
l-v^y^fu madrelotracfa.puefto en 

ocfcbrcrmedio 
cado. 



.S.T.V.X.YZ_ 




L.a.t.c.d.e.f .g.h.i.l.m.n. 
o.p.q.r.f.i.t.v. 




IOAMNESBE YCIAICEXCVDEBAT 

C .TA R AVGVi TE ANNO 

^.4* 



i.d.u* 



3 1 







E lefpacio etisla {juwruulajtclexa en 
bianco pant djelloReal 

via CasanowO 







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^ndcarnpometriett 
almaiconmiaesseo, 

cori^omismojxleo 




Siyo mismo rntwy 



r -<v c 

, Tian/ J 




47 

H 





: Ocfcmentissimojy venwnissimi 
jesu tnsename, endcncameytt 
jyiufamc scnorcn todo. mu/y 
Sufcissimofeuquanio'tu vist- 
tans mi coracon akamm ham- 
todas mis entranas. Uu crcsmi. 

aforia yakqria c[c mi coracon: 

* yT jL 

! tu eres mi uberanca ymitm 

_f. 4 ^^^f ~J 

aeno madia <ft mi trioulaao, 

-travajo. : ^-> 
ucas (o escmiia.Ano 




CJT /vt +*^r *J> 




yfrecevtores nmsolutru 



( j. 



^ 4 



carcre crimm turpitudi- 
nis 9 sed etiam suspidol 

aJt 

oportet. Quos mini dili- 

^^^ ^^^^^^^^x^ 

ait^Dommiu^. . , 

D f f O^ 

et qimi^pater in filio, 

-L< J< # , ^^ 

comfit flf/t fin/ 

t/iy/ / 1/L/1/L44A/L' / /-I/ 1 . 

*~s 

dins preceptor? funoso. 

c^ 





49 



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t^^i^alct Ujattvrd 

CL CU.V W , C , () d fr t C /V O , *S fff> 

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rwm, , 



o v t <p w , aaa/, 
bt LJ ,w <v <v Jc oc x, f , 
et 



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tw 





tier* 





f f 

Cafimok, ho 

/ >r f f 

"Vckto tyrirtilmtlo ritrowito mm> 
co 






\ 

o/ wimo uettirSaOajtrat s 






53 



mjjctrfmenw turn wnflon mi 



{[junto 
dljotto. 

]adifcintia ffcTuna (rtfttn a^Palim dc 
uc?$at/qMto if&fkitib 




tt 



4E ^ a atitwaa cfnffiina yaw fa a fa 

-' / xi "v ' 

k 






c J a fdxwlM (CafCun ucrfi a [nCtro dtiic 

afta um 






fyntw ii ioi 



54 




cm* 



nium virtutum cmator, ct conerwtor omnimi /n? 

tc (j>crwtim$u(?me?confo(atoromum mtc da* 
JL y, j-i * * - 

mmtiim qui qum etterrcm de ninilofecitti vni* 
tientm mm^imi(loccnc(^i/Bnati^m (ju J 








nom ai Crwitto noifiamo iuumwti^ww m I 
c la vent fud^cfirwmw, c(u iftwnmd oani fuiom che 
wnfumonoo, cmc f?e.ujojm fux mandi. 



u . 
e 



r 
omnemnomtnemyementtm 




55. 56 




00 
10 



1^ 





r 



>ao admikm as sacnaas, aouan 
com acjcos a alas scnao alica;or- 



mal sc compaaccan cmpcnhos 
'o tntmaimmlo com aisirahimmlos 
(a vontaac. 

inaa ~q mm nomem scja scnlior 
(o mwido, scondb /or aos sau appeti- 
tes podcsc conlar cntrcommw dos ink - 

/ / / /* / / 

Cr^ f f f -^ i 

nets porquc do dcscanco do cspirito at- 

/ / > / 

'/// ^f 

vcndc, alciiadadc da yida. 




64 



K 



<**/\ 




/ Cx 11 i - . 

cmauecento ottantu^oro in czo pec -to) ccvtufa aua 

^ fr f *; Q. ^ i. <?><? n/ ^ /? N 

DJ|(ee 6 \Ktiav\<T:entuK >Komano 
/ ; II *' c^"^ ^ Vj 

^- ' f\ * ' " 



<^|titto vfbcwammto 

9Uozi.X>t) 
C^ 



. . rt o- 

tee tam^ Vt Jaamo ([w9Uozi, / xt)o 



e^j'^E 

UXVZ9-T 





xxxVmi 



loaimcfc Oatoiifta 

\ 




v^m^fc-y >Of 
Vj 



n 



9 uctjtoco 





^^^&t)^^ 



^ii tmbazmo jpu 
c,cju ej to; eg* tuttt; aue^lLjc. atco^POy ncvfcono 







i > ei no ciottey,' 



, U i 






ft t f^mctiLTU.^^'al t et ne 'fetter ,' eceefco Qa. Ce x 

I f> I n ^TT A r> H 

none ^^c) pa^^atwfkuuc^^te^.e.ef.^.com^fvl 




itict>t on9e ft pzmano 




cc 



dutte -6e fo 






1 

Cccefto tu 



/7Jr\ /i/? /> 
I ta * Vna I ota 4- 



h junno a$- un 

, t/^e ft jtirmo in o;, mi* 
/> . . I I 





(Z b .*/ 

,* <=$? ^ g r X E- 

-^ *^^ ^f * *l * 

*^f^ 3<a L-=S 

ofej-1 i-S^.,^ 

J'Jt*4^.'l 

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j? r-4? s S E- 




a 




jddrt? ikmaJWfun jl 

/J **V /** "" *A* 

/^^5 Mccnbtfv la sawU 

La terra: ctfi ncu&mim Jcuold, no siptio OC 

> >*< Tf J f 

ptwaftio dL 0ffur,jeM& col mma 

f <**< o 

mdU> 







; cG> 0l2e&ima& za 
rf ntti 







umfit 






..^ _, ^ ^^ _ ^ ^,r,~ ^rrr.-- - 

^ <^3^n n <^3s // o 



m y/u> . Iwfttiu 

69, 70 



- jo 
ti mmo aud \9oterodamos 



m/ncum pzcEcelu^i/n aztc-, ^ 
/-\ J /?> 





f (F *-s 

tcnecnvnm ttt in catt fa 

r -> 

is fiopulj, qua MZ '2H(L colta 
' % - x v^7~*"-^ / " /^" ' /^/"^ 

utu ^rra/ncucc bonus , 





'& (feuti - 
jci'tmas. 



( liii 



c- 








75 




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to 





r i^^ 
fe ^ 1^1 



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T>*k^ ^J 



tv :.11 11 . 

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ri s 



v? 




o 

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\ 

acquit Le LOJ &<vn ^fiercalc vrwd 




ULW2L&Z6 ci&s emfwicJ auoi/r L& front 

r Js* <f r /~ 

cl&rri&ric6 (& doiLeeu/r ettre, d&s (xnu cu/nv^) t 
r&nwrg va/ruL6uc& cui/x, me6Cb^n6 



wri/r (d&re cuuveuplb & oon, cvrvtcfc 

r , X -^ ~^ 
relcne sad QHK 

*-JJs 

1 <tue tons prejt. 



I 6 J&,ce6 haas \ 

-<i >- ^-i 




a 



tuus. 



-r >fi' rr *~r 

* wmt& cu'v/ne au/r&ilu, (wcu 



jj putt petite La, sufvu&nb? 
J ^ 



V^m^and^wr p> 

x*~\ (^ 

omme c mnus 



cuu/anc 

r 

vn rand&u/r tvus 





81 



M 




CO 




CO 

co 



> I I (Ti *M c 






rvtr com cj olooj corpo. 
o aetutao, u&vnwsura cajcre,. 
ar 



, cpearcu prccosas 
comoslas at terra caasao tanta a- 



Sy. x .r? r -* i 
tiqria avuta do coracao bumano; 

aU^ia,t contmtanwnio jerdver 



ue 



- r r. . -iT f 
tiuados, t a inhnita bdie^a ao/7Uj: 

mo ' 



Qje at oiwir o som, t musica eta VOZDU: 
mana, e narmonia doj insuiimzntos t 
sc rcccpc tanta suavidaac qu& jica o 



onwm s\uptnso,e,juut osono,zcomi- 
da porutt qojto; gue mcwidaai strd 




r r 

owvicti da alma oj can- 
, comm 



lo " 



uvo, e acoiuicao a 

tr\js 



86 




Caw/ntta aoqcjidcoTn am o 
6. {// 

cjm&wm a imacrem vne uifltn 



Q 



rctra to ci^ntim ; 
<-/ n 



s n . f , ^ n 
nap, je uiculca sonwnfc naxi c - 
v. , /7 ^_J /O 

]rwru/iiLa daPvroa, tamb&ni stda, a- 






toM. U(^be/nefca/ve/l ajpcclo 
Vx /O ' 



ara je> 111 

rS 

on izara M, o 



tcu a 
a (reaced 

-o- , 

tU) ,o ant oulro 



i/inape/m. 

<y 



ncz a/vu 





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x 'a .^ ^ $^ 



^> 



> 



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I i<5 ^^ 

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5 *C S 

Jfj4l 

T- >3 Q 

^cb! 

V^ 'fc 

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^2 



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r> $r^/1^ *3 

\l ^1 1 



N 



enouaeo mi 




( 6^/rto me rrataza:Cn fu 




menaea^pa^ee: mato 
^^^ L ^ Vjl 
a aouao 3e zepo^o me 

naza Dotaez mLairria: ouiazme 






oz 



cj 



u 



A EKA : A o ros. 



OL, 

A ' > f 

A.TVOGV 0V X^GTMtJ GFOl'V\ffllS TTCWTOS OL^GU^f^U . (o 



t*M> 

LVl 

"A ' -\ o ' ' \ 

Avpi o(&\.ojufaa) sGVLotsS 'team 



ZFCLIiS. TTOVOLOl . 



TT -. / / /i \ ' 

11 ^OTI^J/XTI et /^/pn/p J4/plvp/t&i \\rto)(T(& 

Yt^SV^ Olitt f^LOlS 



I 



VI 



cfi 

v, <ftrz/lv nTp -$J < ST ? ^, Oe<?v yt^vonzuv (ji$ O 

ov \stu y<r$ aw 5 T>T 



93 




8 




101 




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109 




no 




1 1 1 




I 12 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF AUTHORS 

WITH THE NAMES OF THOSE OF THEIR BOOKS WHICH 
HAVE BEEN DRAWN UPON FOR ILLUSTRATIONS 



ALLAIS DE BEAULIEU, JEAN BAPTISTE. 

L'art d'Ecrire ov Le moyen d'exceler en cet Art sans 
Maistre. Paris, 1680. 

No. 52. 

AMPHIAREO, FRATE VESPASIANO. 

Opera di Frate Vespesiano Amphiareo da Ferrara dell'ordine 
minore conventvale nella quale si insegna scrivere Varie Sorti di 
Lettere, Et Massime Una Lettera Bastarda Da Lui, Novamente, 
Con Sua Industria Ritrovata. Vinegia, 1554. 

No. 68. 

ANDRADE DE FIGUEIREDO, MANGEL DE. 

Nova Escola para aprender A ler, escrever, e contar. Primeira 
Parte. Lisboa, 1722. 

Nos. 64, 86, 87. 

AYRES, JOHN. 

A Tutor to Penmanship ; or, the writing master : a Copy Book 
shewing all the Variety of Penmanship and Clerkship as now 
practised in England. (2 parts.) London, 1698. 

Nos. 13, 14. 

AZNAR DE POLANCO, JUAN CLAUDIO. 

Arte Nueva de Escribir por preceptos geometricos, y reglas 
mathematicas. Madrid, 1719. 

No. 4. 

BAURENFEIND, MICHAEL. 

Michael Baurenfeinds . . . Vollkommene Wieder-Herstellung der 
. . . Schreib - Kunst . . . gezeiget . . . von Christoph Weigel 
in N Urn berg. 1716. 

No. 85. 
P 



BEAUCHESNE, J. DE, and BAILDON, JOHN. 

A booke containing divers sortes of hands as well the English as 
French secretarie with the Italian, Roman, Chancelry and Court 
hands. Also the true and iust proportio of the capitall Romoe set 
forth by J. de Beauchesne P. and M. John Baildon. Imprinted at 
London by Thomas Vautroiuillier dwelling in the blackefrieres. 

London, i 571. 
Nos. 5, 28, 40, 41, 42. 



BEAUGRAND, JEAN DE. 

Poecilographie Ov diverses escritures propres pour L'Usage 

Ordinaire avec une methode fort breve et facile pour les bien 

apprendre par Jean de Beaugrand Parisien Secretaire . . . de 

la chambre de Roy etc. 

Probably published at Paris early in the i?th century. 

Nos. 20, So, 8 1, 82. 



BICKHAM, GEORGE. 

The Universal Penman ; Or the Art of Writing Made Useful To 
the Gentleman and Scholar, as well As the Man of Business . . . 
Written With the friendly Assistance of several of the most 
Eminent Masters And Engraved by Geo. Bickham. London. 

First issued in parts 1733-41, republished 1743. 
No. 93. 



CASANOVA, JOSEPH DE. 

Primera parte del arte de escrivir todas formas de letras por el 
Maestro Joseph de Casanova. Madrid, 1650. 

Nos. 32, 36. 



CHAMBRE, see DE LA CHAMBRE. 



CLARK, JOHN. 

Writing Improv'd or penmanship made easy, in its useful and 
ornamental parts. With various Examples of all the Hands 
now Practis'd in Great Britain. Engraved by George Bickham. 

London, 1714. 
No. 1 6. 






COCKER, EDWARD. 

Magnum in Parvo or the Pen's Perfection. 

(The copy in the British Museum is dated 1675, but in that 

the particular plate illustrated here does not appear.) 

No 15. 



The Pen's Transcendency : or Fair Writings Store-house Fur- 
nished with examples of all the Curious Hands practised in 
England and the Nations adjacent. London, 1660. 

No. 96. 



CRESCI, GIOVANNI FRANCESCO. 

II perfetto Scrittore Di M. Gio. Francesco Cresci Cittadino 
Milanese Doue se veggono i veri Caratteri & le natural forme 
di tutte quelle sorti di lettere che a vero scrittor si appartengono. 
Con alcun'altre da lui nuouamente ritrouate : Et i modi che 
deue tenere il mastro per ben insegnare. Venetia, 1569. 

Nos. 2, 3, 35, 55, 56, 69, 70. 



CURIONE, LUDOVICO. 

II Cancelliere di Ludovico Curione ornato di lettere corsiue et 
d'altre maniere di caratteri vsati a scriuersi in Italia. Libro 
Quarto. Roma, 1609. 

Nos. 6 1, 77. 



DANIEL, RICHARD. 

Daniel's Copy-Book : or A Compendium of the most Usual 
Hands of England, Netherlands, France, Spaine, and Italic etc. 

London, 1664. 
Nos. 50, 90, 91, 92, 112. 



DAVIES OF HEREFORD, JOHN. 

The Writing Schoolemaster, or the Anatomic of faire writing, 
Wherein is exactlie expressed each severall Character. Together 
with other Rules and Documents coincident to the Art of Faire 
and speedy writing. By John Davies of Hereford. London, 1648- 
(There is also a portrait with some title dated 1631.) 
No. 62. 



DE LA CHAMBRE, JEAN. 

Verscheyden geschriften geschreven ende int'Koper gesneden 
door Jean de la Chambre Liefhebber ende beminder der pennen 
tot Haarlem. 1638. 

Nos. 98, 99. 



DESMOULINS, FRANgOIS. 

Le Paranimphe de Lescriture Ronde financiere & italienne de 
nouuelle formes prompte enriches de diuers traictez des inuentions 
de frangois Desmoulins escriuain. Le tout faict & graue* par luy 
mesme. Lyon, 1625. 

No. 25. 



DIAZ MORANTE, see PALOMARES. 



GERY, PETER. 

Gerii Viri in Arte Scriptoria quondam celeberrimi opera. Or a 
copie Book of all the hands now in use Performed according to 
the naturall Freenes of the Pen by that excellent Mr. of writing 
Peter Gery. Engraved by Wm. Faithorne. London, 1670. 

Nos. 1 8, 51, 100, in. 



GETHING, RICHARD 

Chirographia or A Booke of Copies containing sundrie Examples 
for such as are desirous to better their hands and attaine to 
perfection in the Art of commendable Writing, with certaine 
peeces of Cursorie hands (not heretofore extant) newlie com in 
vse amongst the gentrie especiallie with secretaries and their 
Clearks, and are of excellent facilitie and dispatch for any manner 
of imploiments whatsoever. Composed and published by Richard 
Gething. 1645. 

Nos. 29, 79, 88, 89, 105, 1 06. 

Calligraphotechnia or The Art of faire writing. Sett forth and 
newly enlarged by Ri: Gethinge Mr: in the said Art dwelling in 
Fetter-lane, at the hand and Penne, and are to be soulde by 
George Humble at the white horse in Popes head alley over 
against the roiall Exchange in London. 1619. 

Nos. 95, 107, 108. 



HOFMANN, BERTHOLD ULRICH. 

Griindliche and leichte Anweissung zur Zierlichen Schreib-Kunst 
der lieben Jugend zum besten und auf vielfaltiges Zegehren an 
den Tag gegeben von Berthold Ulrich Hofmann Schreib und 
Rechenmeister in Niirnberg. Niirnberg, 1694. 

No. 12. 



HONDIUS, JODOCUS. 

Theatrvm Artis scribendi, Varia Svmmorvm Nostri Seculi, 
Artificum exemplaria complectens. Judoco Hondio celatore. 

1594. 
No. 9. 

HOUTHUSIUS, JACOBUS. 

Exemplaria sive Formulae Scripturae Ornatioris XXX IV. In 
quis, praeter diuersa Litterarum genera, varij earumdem ductus 
structurae & connexiones. Antverpia, 1591. 

Nos. 8, 19,43,44,45, 58, HO. 

LUCAS, FRANCISCO. 

Arte de Escrevir de Francisco Lucas Vezino De Sevilla etc. 
Dirigada ala S.C.R.M. Del Rey don Phelippe II. Nuestro Senor. 

Madrid, 1577. 
Nos. 47, 48. 

MATEROT, LUCAS. 

Les Oeuvres de Lucas Materot Bovrgvignon Francois, Citoyen 
d'Avignon. Ou Ion comprendra facilement la maniere de bien 
et proprement escrire toute sorte de lettre Italienne selon 1'vsage 
de ce siecle. Avignon, 1608. 

Nos. 60, 63, 76. 

MORANTE, see PALOMARES. 

NEUDOERFFER, JOHANN DER AELTERE. 

Anweijsung einer gemeiner hanndschrift. Durch Johann 
Neudoerffer, Burger vnd Rechenmeister zu Nurmberg geordnet 
und gemacht. Niirnberg, 1538. 

No. 38. 



PALATINO, GIOVANNI BATTISTA. 

Libro di M. Giovambattista Palatino Cittadino Romano Nelqual 
s'insegna a Scriuere ogni sorte lettera, Antica et Moderna di 
qualunque natione con le sue regole et misure et essempi. Et Con 
vn Breve et Vtil Discorso De Le Cifre: Riueduto nuouamente & 
corretto dal proprio Autore. Con La Giunta di Qvindici Tavole 
Bellissime, Romae. 1540- 

Nos. 53, 54, 66, 67. 

PALOMARES, FRANCISCO XAVIER DE SANTIAGO. 

Arte nueva de escribir, inventada por el insigne maestro Pedro 
Diaz Morante e illustrada con Muestras nuevas, y varios discursos 
conducentes al verdadero Magisterio de Primas Letras, por D. 
Francisco Xavier de Santiago Palomares etc. Madrid, 1776. 

Nos. 46, 49, & frontispiece. 

PERLINGH, AMBROSIUS. 

Exemplaar-Boek Jnhoudende Verscheyde nodige Geschriften . . . 
Geschreven en Gesneden, Door Ambrosius Perlingh Schryf-Mr. 
binnen. . . . Amsterdam. 1679. 

Nos. 7, 27, 101, 104, 109. 

PERRET, CLEMENT. 

Exercitatio Alphabetica nova Et vtilissima Variis Expressa 
Lingvis et characteribus: Raris ornamentis, vmbris & recessibus 
picture, Architecturaeque, speciosa, Bruxellae. 15^9- 

(Another edition was published by Plantin in 1571.) 
Nos. 6, 30, 34, 39, 57. 

POLANCO, see AZNAR DE POLANCO. 

ROELANDS, DAVID. 

t'Magazin Oft'Pac-huys der Loffelycker Penn-const . . . Ghe- 
practizeert Door David Roelands van Antwerpen, Fransoijschen 
School-Mr, binnen Vlissinghen. 1616. 

Nos. 24, 26, 75, 78, 102. 

SCHEURER, GEORG (Publisher, no other name given). 

Griindliche Unterricht der edlen Schreib-Kunst in Verlegung 
Georg Scheurers Kunst-Handlers in Niirnberg. (No date.) 

No. 65. 



STOSSEL, JOHANN CHRISTOPH (Publisher, no other name 

given). 

Kunst-richtige so wohl Deutsche als Lateinische Sachsiche Vorsch- 
riften bestehend in allerhand Current Cantzelen fractur Verfal- 
Romanischen Quadrat-Buchstaben und Zugwerk so insgemein 
in Deutschland in sonderheit aber in obervvehnten Sachsischen 
Landen am gebrauchlichsten, etc. Franckfurth und Leipzigk bey 
Johann Christoph Stosseln. 1702. 

Nos. 17, 37, 84. 

STRICK, MARIA. 

Tooneel der loflijcke Schrijfpen Ten dienste van de Const- 
beminnende Jeucht int licht gebracht Door Maria Strick Fran- 
soysche School-houdende binnen . . . Dolff G'hesneden Door 
Hans Strick. 1607. 

Nos. 22, 23, 59, 73, 74, 94, 97. 

VELDE, JAN VAN DEN. 

Exemplaer-Boec Jnhoudende alderhande Geschriften zeer bequaem 
ende dienstelijck voor de Joncheydt onde' alien Liefhebbers der 
Pennen. Harlem, 1607. 

No. 10. 

Spieghel Der Schrijfkonste in den welcken ghesien worden veelder- 
hande Gheschriften met hare Fondementen ende onderrichtinghe. 
Ut ghegeven door Jan van den Velde Fransoysch-School M. binnen 
Rotterdam. 1605. 

Nos. 21, 71, 72, 103. 

VESPASIANO, see AMPHIAREO. 

VRIES, SYMON DE. 

Lust-Hof der Schrijft-Konste. 1619. 

No. 11. 



WESTON, THOMAS. 

Illustrissimo Principi C. Ruperto Comiti Palatino Rheni . . . hoc 
in Arte Scriptoria Tentamen imperfectum Submisso cultu DDD 
Tho: Weston. 1681. 

No. 83. 



WYSS, R. 

Libellus valde doctus elegans utilis, multa varia scribendarum 
litterarum genera complectens. Zurich, 1549. 

No. 33. 

YCIAR, JUAN DE. 

Recopilacion subtilissima: intitvlada Orthographia practica . . . 
Hecho y experimentado por Jua de Yciar Vizcayno, escriptor de 
libros por la qual se enseiia a escrevir perfectamente ; ansi por 
practica como por geometria todas las suertes de letras que mas 
en Espafia . . . y fuera della se usan . . . cortado por J. de 
Vingles Frances. Caragoga, 1548. 

Nos. i, 31. 



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