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Full text of "The Pennsylvania Farm Market. [microform]"

-* 




THE PENNSYLVANIA 

STATE COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE AND 
EXPERIMENT STATION 




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Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



THE PEMSYLVMIIA lABM I.IAHKET 



CONTENTS 

Introduction General Information 

Section One Fairm Cash Income 

Section Two Princi-oal Cror)S 

Section Three Livestock and Poultry 

Section Four Farm Equipment and Machinery- 
Section Five Miscellaneous Data 

Section Six Pennsylvania Farmer 



Blue Sheets are guides to each section. 



Pennsj'-lvania Farmer goes regularly to 2 of every 3 farms in 
Pennsylvania — far more than any other puhli cation. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



E S^?.. \ 



PENN LAND 




The Circulation Field 
of Pennsylvania Farmer 



Farmers in this field have the advantage of the most concentrated popu- 
lation in the country — a field consuming more food products that it produces. 

POPULATION PER SQUARE MILE OF LAND AREA— 1930 

Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland 

and West Virginia, average 196 

Remaining 43 States 37 

With immediate home markets, most farm products are delivered without 
freight costs, and in any case, with only a very low freight cost. Motor trucks 
are used more extensively than in any other section of the country. 



201253 




THE BEST MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTING FIELD 
IN THE COUNTRY 



Incorporated towns of over 1,000 inhabitants — 1930 



W. Number Popu- 

Penna. N. J. Md. Del. Va. Towns lation 

1,000 to 2,500 Pop. 216 85 26 10 62 399 651,079 

2.500 to 5,000 " 149 53 12 4 17 235 835,866 

5,000 to 10.000 " 103 50 3 - 12 168 1,192,217 

10,000 to 25,000 " 75 40 3 - 5 123 1,893,225 

25,000 to 100,000 " 22 20 2 - 5 49 2,373,936 

Over 100,000 "5611- 13 5,157,030 






Total 570 254 47 15 101 987 12,103,353 

This town population of 12,103,353 (comprising a local market 

for Penn Land farm products) is greater than the corresponding 

town population of 24 other states. 



^ cj In the Five States in which "Pennsylvania Farmer" circulates there is : 



f 



14.0% of the Population of the United States 
10.8% of the Rural Population 
16.6% of the Urban Population 
12.1% of the Milk Sold 
10.1% of the Chickens and Eggs Sold 
10.8% of the Potato Crop \ 

13.0% of the Vegetable Acreage 
•: ■■ . kt ::■■ av.:; 15.1% of the Apple Crop -..,-:; '^ '..::..-, ■ ^r 

Within easy reach of the Pennsylvania farmer's motor truck are : 

Pennsylvania's 354 towns of more than 2,500 population, (almost 
twice as many such towns as any other state.) 

30% of all U. S. towns of more than 2,500 population (in Pennsyl- 
vania and states which border Pennsylvania). 

39% of all U. S. consumers in towns of over 2,500 population (in 
Pennsylvania and bordering states). 

It logically follows that this is one of the richest agricultural fields in the 
country, wnich no manufacturer can afford to overlook. 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



^ A state farm paper can give attention to every 
subject of national or general interest that a 
national farm paper can. 

^ It cdso gives attention to local events, conditions, 
needs, crops, markets that a national cajinot 
touch upon. 

i^ Although the state paper is narrower in so far 
as area covered is concerned — it is broader when 
content is considered. 

^ The state paper cannot (for production reasons) 
compare with the national in mechanical excel- 
lence and appearance * — it does not have to, and 
does not suffer in reader interest — its local con- 
tent always makes it the favorite of the "Home 
Folks." 

^ From its lack of mechanical excellence and ap- 
pearance, the state paper has no appeal for city 
folks — so it naturally finds its readers on the 
farms, where the people understand and accord- 
ingly vcJue it. 



'Anymore than a newspaper compares with a four-color monthly.) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Beat 



THE BEST INIARKETING AND DISTRIBUTING FIELD 
IN THE COUNTRY 

Incorporated towns of over 1,000 inhabitants — 1930 



W. Number Popu- 

Penna. N. J. Md. Del. Va. Towns lation 

1,000 to 2,500 Pop. 2i6- 85 26 10 62 399 651,079 

2.500 to 5,000 '• 149 53 12 4 17 235 835,866 

5,000 to 10.000 " 103 50 3 - 12 168 1,192,217 

10,000 to 25,000 " 75 40 3 - ? 123 1,893,225 

25,000 to 100.000 " 22 20 2 - 5 49 2,373,936 

Over 100,000 "5611- 13 5,157,030 



Total 570 254 47 15 101 987 12,103,353 

This town population of 12,103,353 (comprising a local market 
_ for Penn Land farm products) is greater than the corresponding 

town population of 24 other states. 

, J- tj In the Five States in which "Pennsylvania Farmer" circulates there is: 

14.0% of the Population of the United States 

10.8% of the Rural Population 

16.6% of the Urban Population 

12.1% of the Milk Sold 

10.1% of the Chickens and Eggs Sold 

10.8% of the Potato Crop 

13.0% of the Vegetable Acreage 

15.1% of the Apple Crop 

Within easy reach of the Pennsylvania farmer's motor truck are : 

Pennsylvania's 354 towns of more than 2,500 population, (almost 
twice as many such towns as any other state.) 

30% of all U. S. towns of more than 2,500 population (in Pennsyl- 
vania and states which border Pennsylvania). 

39% of all U. S. consumers in towns of over 2,500 population (in 
Pennsylvania and bordering states). 

It logically follows that this is one of the richest agricultural fields in the 
country, which no manufacturer can afford to overlook. 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



^ A state farm paper can give attention to every 
subject of national or general interest that a 
national farm paper can. 

^ It also gives attention to local events, conditions, 
needs, crops, markets that a national cajinot 
touch upon. 

^ Although the state paper is narrower in so far 
as area covered is concerned — it is broader when 
content is considered. 

^ The state paper cannot (for production reasons) 
compare with the national in mechanical excel- 
lence and appearance* — it does not have to, and 
does not suffer in reader interest — its local con- 
tent always makes it the favorite of the "Home 
Folks." 

^ From its lack of mechanical excellence and ap- 
pearance, the state paper has no appeal for city 
folks — so it naturally finds its readers on the 
farms, where the people understand and accord- 
ingly value it. 



♦Anymore than a newspaper compares with a four-color monthly.) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witin funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/pennsylvaniafarmOOpitt 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



RURAL POPULATION IN PENNSYLVANIA 



On''-/ one state has a rural population greater than Pennsylvania's, 



Rural 
County Population 

*Adams 31,544 

Allegheny 211,931 

*Armstrong 54,696 

Beaver 46,001 

'Bedford 34,356 

*Berks 91,146 

Blair 37,491 

♦Bradford 32,661 

Bucks 66,637 

*Butler 56,912 

Cambria 92,647 

Cameron 2,378 

Carbon 24,537 

*Centre 33,440 

*Chester 74,485 

♦Clarion 31,330 

♦Clearfield 62,771 

♦Clinton 18,704 

♦Columbia 27,050 

♦Crawford 38,227 

♦Cumberland 34,514 

Dauphin 50,013 

Delaware 75,851 

Elk 14,948 

Erie 41,846 

♦Fayette 151,136 

♦Forest 5,180 

♦Franklin 38,067 

♦Fulton 9,231 

♦Greene 36,852 

♦Huntingdon 26,571 

♦Indiana 57,858 

♦Jefferson 32,291 

♦Juniata 14,325 



Rural 
County Population 

Lackawanna 29,213 

*Lancaster 106,052 

Lawrence 37,610 

♦Lebanon 34,572 

Lehigh 45,950 

Luzerne 101,039 

Lycoming 33,143 

♦McKean 29,629 

Mercer 39,001 

*Mifflin 23,889 

'■Monroe 16,226 

Montgomeiy 89,971 

*Montour 7,332 

Northampton 47,779 

Northumberland 55,482 

♦Perry 21,744 

*Pike 7,483 

*Potter 14,743 

Schuylkill 96,243 

♦Snyder 16,039 

♦Somerset 64,099 

♦Sullivan 7,499 

♦Susquehanna 25,394 

♦Tioga 28,228 

♦Union 14,160 

Venango 27,560 

♦Warren 26,590 

♦Washington 118,193 

♦Wajme 22,930 

■'Westmoreland 149,801 

♦Wyoming 15,517 

♦York 87,089 

Total 3,097,839 



Pennsylvania's rural population is greater than the total 
population in each of 36 states. 



*44 of the state's 67 counties have more rural than urban population. 



(Rural, by U. S. Census definition, means people living on farms or in towns 
under 2,500 population.) 



115 M-io 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Ai 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



WHAT MAKES PEMSYLVAKIA A PROFITABLE FAEM .MARKET? 




191, 2S4 Farms Number oj farmt 

under county 
in Pennsylvania names 
Wis Census 



CRAwroRo 
6,420 



2,104 



MEOCf» 

4,626 



VCnanGO I roBCST 

443 




2,655 



£AVCR 

2,354 



AILECHCNY 

3,594 



ARMSTRONG 

3,351 



JeFFCRSOM 

2,738 



IMOIANA 

3,842 



|CA»1CltON\ 

199 



ClEARriCLO 

3.306 



3,239 



CUMTOH 

1,023 



CCNTRI 

2,105 



LVCOMtMO 

3,014 



BRAOrORO 

4,984 



VSUIUVAN 

718 



5USCUCHAr.NA 



3,271 



2,849 



WYOMING 

1,460 



[1,5631 

LUZEQNC * >\ 



2,769 



riTllVM 2.475' 



HONfiOC 

1,450 



CAMGRIA y BLAIR 

2,829 / <^;^*- 
1,871 



1,712 / "„ 3?,1 



jSCMUYKIU^ 

2,803 



o^o'* 



■S^" 



,11^/ 



5,368 '^^ 



f2,035/ 



1.854 I2Mq\ 

*^ 2,268 

CU»^BCRLAND 



SERKS 
6,002 



5,072 " 


f fAVtTTt ^ 


/sei<rRS(T 

y 3,844 


1 3,160 


(rulTOH 


/ \ 

^reA«uit\ 


3,032 


Y0P>V^ 


*' LANCASTt< 

^ 8,863 


^'cfKENC\^_ 


3,954 / 


f 




h.ZbbJ 


3,861 


Madams 


\ 7,857 


\, 


3,170 J 


) 




/ 


/ 




3,581 


) 


\, 



'^CHESTEB " 

4,936 



286 



1. Diversification of Cpotds and Livestock 

2. High Cash Income evenlv Distributed 

throughout the Year 

3. Local Markets 

4. Progressive Farm Families 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



YAMi OPEEATORS IN PENNSYLVANIA 



Full Owners 





jl45,992| 





Tenants 



33,927 



Part Owners 



D 



9,195 



Managers 



2,170 



Percentage of Farm Qnerators in Penna. and U. S . 

Full Part 

Owners Tenants Owners Managers 

Pennsylvania 76.3^5 17.8^ 4.8fJ l,l1 

U. S. 47.1^ 42.1-1 10.1-1 0.7l 



PENNSYLVANIA exceeds all states "but three in farms 
o-nerated by full Owners 



Source - 1935 Census Figures 



56M-14 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



AI 



^ 



c 



^l-'^iS.'.aJS 



f. 



iTiet nl 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



PEMSYLVMIA'S AGRICULTURAL HANK 



Crops 



Farm Buildings and Eqtil-oment 



Value of 'buckwheat 

Production cigar leaf tobacco 

Value of potatoes grown 

Value of farm gardens 

Production clover and timothy hay 

Value of greenhouse products 

Value of apples nroduced 

Value vegetables produced 

Value of manle ■nroducts 

Value of hay produced 

Ensilage corn production 

Cherry production 

Grape production 

Value of peaches produced 

Value of nursery products 

Value of farm forest -nroducts 

Timothy seed production 

Value of rye produced 

Value of pears produced 

Value of small fruits 

Production of winter wheat 

Value of oats produced 

Production of clover seed 

Value of all principal crops 



Livestock , Poultry and Product s 



Value of chickens on farms 

Cash income from milk 

Cash income poultry -nroducts 

Value eggs produced 

Baby chicks piarchased 

Val-ae all cattle 

Value of all livestock 



4 Number farm owned motor tr-acks 

4 Water piped into farm dwellings 

5 Farms with high line electric hook-up 

5 Value of farm b-oildingc 

6 Gas engines on farms 

7 Electric motors for farm v/ork 

8 Val-ae farm implement machinery 

10 K-umcer farm owned automobiles 

12 Farm families with radio sets 

13 Tele-ohones on farms 
15 Tractors on farms 

Miscellaneous 

1 Local farm markets 

1 Non-resident hunting licenses issued 

1 Revenue from h-unting licenses 

1 Number farmer-trap-ocrs 

1 Niimber farmcr-beckeepers 

2 R-ural population 

3 Farm expenditures for feed 

4 Farms operated by c/ners 

7 Expenditures for fertilizer 

11 Farm cash income (9 excluding 

Benefit Paj'-ments) 
Over a period of years Pennsylvania 
has ranked from r4th to 8th among all 
states in farmers' cash income. 

This does not include $44,000,000 
worth of farm products for home use, nor 
substantial revenue many farm families 
receive from underlying oil, gas, coal, 
and from off-season work in nearby mills 
and factories. 

(So-urce - latest government figures 
available as of November 1, 1936 



Pennsylvania does not rank below 15th in any of these items and compares 
favorably \vith other states, which are us-ually considered almost exclusively 
agricalt-ural states. 



^/V-/ 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



— ^ Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 

PENNSYLVANIA — AN AGRICULTURAL STATE 

(PennsylvsCHia farm statistics for 1935 as compiled by 
tne Pennsylvania and U. S. Departments of Agriculture) 

Farm cash income (not including $1,390,000 *" 

in, AAA crop adjustment loayments $ 231,400,000 

" " " from dairy products $92,037,000 

" " " " crops iDrcduced 67,588,000 

" " " " poultry products — 42,507,000 
" " " " other sources 29,268,000 

Value of farm crops produced $ 135,232,000 

" " livestock (horses, cattle, sheep, mules 

and swine) Jan. 1, 1936 -^^ 137,235,000 

" " poultry, Jan. 1, 1936 19,683,000 



Corn 

Tame Hay 

Potatoes 

Winter Wheat 

Oats 

Tohacco 

Buckwheat 

Barl ey 

Eye 



Principal Field Crops 
Acreage Production 



1,277,000 

2,429,000 

198,000 

896,000 

897,000 

20,700 

146,000 

58,000 

111,000 



Value 



58,742,000 hus. 


$ 41,119.000 


3,241,000 tons , 


32,734,000 


22,572,000 bus. 


13,543,000 


18,816,000 bus. 


15,053,000 


26,013,000 bus. 


10,925,000 


26,910,00 lbs. 


3,229,000 


2,847,000 bus. 


1,480,000 


1,595,000 bus. 


893,000 


1,665,000 bus. 


966,000 



Principal Fruits 



Apples 

Peaches 

Grapes 

Pears 

Cherries 



Jviilk 

Eggs 
*Butter 

Wool 
*Honey 



Production 

11,440,000 bus. 

1,675,000 bus. 

27,750 tons 

370,000 bus. 

7,360 tons 

Livestock Products 

Production 

541,928,000 gals. 
134,666,667 doz. 
15,800,000 lbs. • 

3,192,000 lbs. 

2,935,050 lbs. 



4" 



*1934 figures, latest available 

Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Value 

8,351,000 

1,926,000 

569,000 

296,000 

294,000 



Value 

108,402,000 

35,552,000 

3,792,000 

798,000 

432,270 

116M-2 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Section One 



FAPJvI CASH INCOIvjE 



Only two states exceeded Pennsylvania in 
farmers' cash income from milk and poioltry 
products in 1935. Althoio^];!! the 32nd state 
in size, and very important industrially, 
Penns3''lvania alwa^^s ranks among the first 
14 states in farm income. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Soiirce of 1935 Farm Cash Income in Pennsylvania 
(Diversity of production shown by 33 commodities sold) 



Commodity 

Milk $ 

Eggs 

Cattle and Calves 

Chickens 

Potatoes 

Wheat 

Greenhouse Products 

Truck Crops 

Hogs 

Apples 

Hay (all) 

Tobacco 

Nursery Products 

Corn 

Forest Products 

Peaches 

Sheep and Lambs 

Strawberries 

Wool 

Oats 

Buckwheat 

Gra-pes 

Small Fruits 

Honey 

Eye 

Ma"nle Sugar & Syrup 

Pears 

Cherries 

Cloverseed 

Plum, prunes, cherries a,nd apricots 

Barley 

Timothy Seed 

Popcorn 



Cash Income 

92,037,000 

28,996,000 

19,847,000 

13,511,000 

11 , 439 , 000 

9,027,000 

8,838,000 

8,260,000 

7,171,000 

6,848,00'0 

5,950,000 

3,421,000 

3,308,000 

3,196,0Ci0 

1,668,000 

1,552,000 

1,138,000 

896,000 

798,000 

636,000 

633,000 

482 , 000 

358,000 

314,000 

281,000 

192,000 

157,000 

150,000 

126,000 

71,000 

51 , 000 

40,000 

8,000 



Cash Income 



$ 231,400,000 



Pennsylvania is the NINTH state in 
cash income from sale of 78 crops 
and 13 livestock items. 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



1261-6 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Farm Cash Income in Pennsylvania 
(Exclusive of AAA Benefit Payments) 
1932 - 1935* 





1935* 


1934 




1933 




1932 




jirnty 


Cash Income 
$ 17,118,500 


Cash Income 
$ 15,296,600 


Gash Income 
$ 13,529,100 


Cash Income 


mcaster 


$ 12,677,600 


lester 


11,808 


200 


10,735 


000 


9,559 


300 


8 


371 


300 


>rk 


11,100 


800 


9,798 


900 


8,264 


600 


6 


955 


200 


icks 


8.577 


300 


7,609 


300 


6,755 


200 


6 


100 


500 


irks 


8,390 


800 


7,508 


300 


6,614 


700 


5 


689 


400 


)ntgoraery 


6,873 


600 


6,056 


100 


5,351 


500 


4 


884 


000 


•adford 


6,317 


900 


5,633 


000 


5,019 


600 


4 


857 


000 


•anklin 


5,830 


800 


5,422 


000 


4,490 


200 


3 


551 


700 


'awford 


5,799 


500 


5,171 


400 


4,275 


100 


4 


035 


100 


'ie 


5,592 


700 


5,092 


500 


4,627 


000 


4 


366 


100 


.legheny 


5,310 


000 


4,757 


100 


4,179 


100 


3 


839 


700 


ishington 


4,808 


300 


4,219 


400 


3,786 


800 


3 


331 


800 


isquehanna 


4,786 


800 


4,324 


600 


3,780 


300 


3 


739 


000 


Lams 


4,512 


400 


4,180 


000 


3,206 


700 


2 


893 


900 


istmoreland 


4,452 


400 


3,924 


600 


3,520 


600 


3 


303 


900 


unterland 


4,450 


700 


3,995 


400 


3,377 


500 


2 


893 


000 


>merset 


4,411. 


900 


3,971 


000 


3,707 


000 


2 


970 


000 


oga 


4,347 


800 


3,949 


400 


3,590 


900 


3 


215 


500 


lyne 


4,336 


000 


3,879 


000 


3,310 


300 


3 


304, 


200 


ircer 


3,691 


100 


3,232 


300 


2,717 


700 


2 


591 


500 


ibanon 


3,629 


800 


3,278 


500 


2,871 


300 




204 


900 


idford 


3,441, 


200 


3,072 


600 


2,810 


000 


2 


432 


900 


itler 


O f *J ( Kj 


800 


3,012 


500 


2,622 


400 


2 


499 


200 


»rthampton 


3,342 


000 


3,029 


900 


2,825 


600 


2 


466 


600 


ihigh 


3,228 


100 


3,017 


800 


2,873 


300 


2 


142 


600 


^coming 


3,183 


500 


2,863 


700 


2,477 


200 


2 


273 


600 


ihijylkUl 


3,067 


200 


2,804 


500 


2,645 


000 


2 


163 


000 


tuphin 


2,970 


200 


2,627 


800 


2,322 


900 


2 


193 


100 


Lzerne 


2, 963 


800 


2,719 


800 • 


2,563 


900 


2 


177 


400 


>ntre 


2,950 


500 


2,656 


100 


2,430 


400 


2 


057 


000 


)l-um'bia 


2,545 


500 


2,336 


700 


2,119 


700 


1 


810 


600 


id i ana 


2,500 


300 


2,242 


500 


2,065 


300 


1 


875 


,100 


irthumberland 


2,377 


000 


2,130 


800 


1,857 


500 


1 


652 


100 


iwrence 


«d } -ueZiK^ 


800 


2,067 


200 


1,845 


600 


1 


753 


,100 


-eene 


2,266 


900 


1,888 


500 


1,715 


600 


1 


541 


800 


lyette 


2,233 


000 


1,958 


900 


1,816 


000 


1 


599 


900 


imbria 


2,206 


600 


2,026 


000 


1,800 


200 


1 


503 


600 


'mstrong 


2,206 


100 


1,962 


700 


1,683 


700 


1 


544 


500 


5l aware 


2,175 


300 


1,954 


800 


1,593 


300 


1 


,432 


500 


.air 


2,154 


700 


1,959 


200 


1,771 


000 


1 


,661 


,200 


ickawanna 


2,110 


500 


1,908 


500 


1,805 


500 


1 


,507 


,800 


;rry 


1,973 


800 


1,728 


,500 


1,414 


200 


1 


, 532 


800 


irren 


1,911 


,500 


1,688 


,900 


1,604 


400 


1 


547 


500 



(Over) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



-2- 



County 

Jefferson 

Potter 

Clarion 

Huntingdon 

Wyoming 

Beaver 

Clearfield 

Union 

SiTyder 

Mifflin 

Juniata 

Venango 

Monroe 

Fulton 

Philadelphia 

McKean 

Clinton 

Montour 

Carbon 

Sullivan 

Elk 

Pike 

Forest 

Cameron 



$ 



1935* 

C ash Income 

1,911,400 

1,866,600 

1,839.000 

1,823,700 

1 , 822 , 600 

1,767,300 

1 , 702 . 900 

1,654,400 

1,579,100 

1,554,800 

1,535,500 

1 , 471 , 600 

1,286,800 

1,217,300 

1,189,200 

1,022,600 

989,700 

847,500 

773,500 

743,800 

556 , 100 

592 , 300 

171,800 

117,800 



1934 
Cash Income 

\, 1 , 747 , 600 

1,728,100 

1.618,000 

1..599,300 

1,654,600 

1,574,600 

1,547,000 

1,525,600 

1,385,200 

1,361,300 

1,360,300 

1,306,600 

1,158,300 

1,115,900 

1.079,500 

919,300 

901 , 800 

776,300 

?10,000 

666,100 

504,400 

344,900 

152,400 

105,500 



1933 
Cash Income 

$ 1,571,600 

1,588,200 

1,444,300 

1,483,200 

1 , 440 , 300 

1.419,800 

1,356.100 

1,247,100 

1,268,300 

1,248,600 

1,155,800 

1,092,100 

1,056,600 

783,200 

1.001,500 

826,000 

785,900 

609,400 

679.000 

553.100 

435,600 

279,800 

138,600 

96,700 



1932 
Cash Tncome 

$ 1.303,500 

1.273,500 

1 , 322 , 300 

1,360.100 

1,445.700 

1.352,200 

1,185,700 

1,083,500 

1,147.800 

1,120,400 

1,089,100 

1.064,200 

948,100 

708,600 

868,700 

809,600 

673,600 

524,400 

608,000 

522,000 

407,300 

296.100 

133,200 

80,200 



Total 



$ 223,500.000 $ 200,535,000 $ 176,579.000 $ 158,590,000 



*1935 Cash Income forecast based on -orice level prevailing to September 15, 193£ 



So-urce - Penna. Der)t. of Agri. 



105-1-1 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Pennsylvania Farm Cash Income Increased 20^^ in 1935 
($73,000,000 more than 1933 cash income) 



Farm cash income in Penns-'lvp-nia 
has shown a substantial increase in 
the past three vears, according to 
recent fignires released "bv the Penn- 
sylvania Department of Agriculture. 



Penna. Farm Casn Income 
(00,000 omitted) 



231,4 



i I 

li 



192,1 



176,7 

! 
■ I 



i 



1935 1934 1933 1932 



Pennsylvania farmers received $231,400,000 from the 
sale of farm loroducts in 1935. 

This is $39,234,000 greater than the 1934 cash income 
($192,166,000) and is also an increase of $72,810,000 

ahove the cash income received b^' farmers in 1932 
($158,590,000.) 



Year 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 





1935 


Cash Income 


Percent Increase 


$ 158,590,000 


45. 9-1 


176,759,000 


30.9 


192,166,000 


20.4 


231,400,000 


__ 



The above totals do not include AAA. benefit payments amount- 
ing to $828,000 in 1933; $2,034,000 in 1934 and $1,390,000 
in 1935. 

1251-4 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Comparison of Farm Cash Income in Pennsylvania 
(Exclusive of AAA Benefit Payments) 









1934 - 1935* 










1935* 


1934 


Increase 


Percent Increas 


e 


County 


Cash Income 
$ 17,118,500 


Cash Income 
$ 15,296,600 


1935 over '35 
$ 1,821,900 


1935 over '34 
11.9^ 




Lancaster 




Chester 


11,808 


200 


10,735,000 


1,073,200 


10.0 




York 


11,100 


800 


9,798,900 


1,301,900 


13.3 




Bucks 


8,577 


300 


7,609,300 


968,000 


12.7 




Berks 


8,390 


800 


7,508,300 


882,500 


11.7 




Montgomery 


6,873 


600 


6,056,100 


817,500 


13.5 




Bradford 


6,317 


900 


5,633,000 


684,900 


12.2 




Franklin 


5,830 


800 


5,422,000 


408,800 


7.5 




Crawford 


5,799, 


500 


5,171,400 


628,100 


12.1 




Erie 


5,592 


700 


5,092,500 


500,200 


9.8 




Allegheny 


5,310 


000 


4,757,100 


552,900 


11.5 




Washington 


4,808, 


300 


4,219,400 


588,900 


14.0 




Susquehanna 


4,786, 


800 


4,324,600 


462,200 


10.7 




Adams 


4,512, 


400 


4,180,000 


332 , 400 


7.9 




Westmoreland 


4,452, 


200 


3,924,600 


527,800 


13.4 




Ciunberland 


4,450, 


700 


3,995,400 


455,300 


11.4 




Somerset 


4,411 


900 


3,971,000 


440,900 


11.1 




Tioga 


4,347 


800 


3,949,400 


398,400 


10.1 




Wayne 


4,336, 


000 


3,879,000 


457,000 


11.8 




Mercer 


3,691, 


100 


3,232,300 


458,800 


14.2 




Lebanon 


3,629, 


800 


3,278,500 


351 , 300 


10.7 




Bedford 


3,441, 


200 


3,072,600 


368,600 


12,0 




Butler 


3,373, 


800 


3,012,500 


361,200 


12.0 




Northampton 


3,342 


000 


3,029,900 


312,100 


10.3 




Lehigh 


3,228, 


100 


3,017,800 


210,300 


7.0 




Lycoming 


3,183 


500 


2,853,700 


319,800 


11.2 




Sch-uylkill 


3,057 


200 


2,804,500 


262,700 


9.4 




Dauphi n 


2,970 


200 


2,627,800 


342,400 


13.0 




Luzerne 


2,963 


800 


2,719,800 


244,000 ■ 


9.0 




Centre 


2,960 


500 


2,656,100 


304,400 


11.5 




Columhia 


2 , 545 


500 


2,336,700 


208,800 


8.9 




Indiana 


2,500 


300 


2,242,500 


257,800 


11.5 




North-umberland 


2,377 


000 


2,130,800 


245,200 


11.6 




Lawrence 


2,323 


800 


2,067,200 


255,600 


12.4 




Greene 


2,266 


900 


1,888,500 


378,400 


20,0 




Fayette 


2,233 


000 


1,958,900 


274,100 


14.0 




Cambria 


2,206 


600 


2,026,000 


180,600 


6.9 




Armstrong 


2,206 


100 


1,962,700 


243,400 


12.4 




Delaware 


2,175 


500 


1,954,800 


220,500 


11.3 




Blair 


2,154 


,700 


1,959,200 


195,500 


10.0 




Lackawanna 


2,110 


,500 


1,906,500 


202,000 


10.6 




Perry 


1.973 


,800 


1,728,500 


245,300 


14.2 





(Over) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



-2- 





1335* 


1954 


I 


r.crease 


Percent Incre 


County 


Cash Income 


Cash Income 


195 


5 over ' 34 


1935 over '3 


Warren 


$ 1,911,500 


$ 1,688,900 


$ 


222,600 


15.24 


Jefferson 


1,911,400 


1,747,600 




163,800 


9.4 


Potter 


1,856,600 


1,728,100 




158,500 


8^0 


Clarion 


1,839,000 


1,618,200 




220,800 


13.6 


Huntingdon 


1,823,700 


1 , 599 , 300 




224,400 


14.0 


Wyoming 


1,822,600 


1,554,600 




168,000 


10,1 


Beaver 


1,767,300 


1,574,600 




192,700 


12.2 


Clearfield 


1 , 702 , 900 


1,547,000 




155,900 


10.1 


Union 


1,554,400 


1,525,600 




128,800 


8.4 


Snyder 


1,579,100 


1,385,200 




193,900 


14.0 


Mifflin 


1,554,800 


1,561,300 




195,500 


14.2 


Juniata 


1 , 5u5 , 500 


1,360,300 




175,200 


12.9 


Venango 


1,471,500 


1 , 306 , 600 




165,000 


12.6 


Monroe 


1,285,800 


1,158,300 




126,500 


11.1 


Fulton 


1,217,300 


1,115,900 




101,400 


9.1 


Philadel-oliia 


1,189,200 


1,079,500 




109,700 


10.2 


McKean 


1,022,600 


919,300 




105,300 


11.2 


Clinton 


989,700 


901 , 800 




87,900 


9.7 


Montour 


847,500 


776,300 




71,200 


9.2 


Carbon 


773,500 


710,000 




63,500 


9.0 


Sullivan 


743,800 


666,100 




77,700 


11.7 


Elk 


556,100 


504,400 




51,700 


10.2 , 
13.7 


Pike 


392,300 


344,900 




47,400 


Forest 


171,800 


152,400 




19,400 


12.7 


Cameron 


117,800 


105,300 




12,500 


11. 9f. 



Total 



$ 223,500,000 $ 200.535,000 $ 22,955,000 



11.5^ 



*1935 Cash Income forecast based on nricc level ^rev.-iling to Se^t. 15, 1935 
Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



105 I 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



AAA. Payments Lilade to Pennsylvania Farmers 



*May 12, 1933 to Decemter 31, 1935 



Coimty 

Adams 

Allegheny 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Bedford 

Berks 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucks 

Butler 

Cam"bria 

Cameron 

Carbon 

Centre 

Chester 

Clarion 

Cl-earfield 

Clinton 

Colurahia 

Crawford 

Cumtf^rland 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Elk 

Erie 

Fayette 

Forest 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Greene 

Huntingdon 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Juniata 

Lackawanna 



AAA 




AAA 


Payments 


County 


Payment s 


$ 73.286.04 


Lancaster 


$ 1,894,535.59 


2,293.43 


Lawrence 


1,913.51 


687.11 


Lebanon 


39,674.32 


2,410.05 


Lehigh 


19,276.49 


13,710.35 


Luzerne 


9,500.88 


70,686.58 


Lycomrng 


20,643.12 


15,574.12 


McKean 





7,544.48 


Mercer 


3,745.68 


27,941.23 


Mifflin 


4,489.05 


4,722.68 


Monroe 


616.53 


1,437.85 


Montgomery 


51,372.25 





Montour 


15,836.97 


1,383.06 


Northampton 


23,915.60 


18,407.46 


No r thumb erl and 


21,189.38 


94,161.46 


Perry 


39,011.41 


3,578.46 


Philadelphia 





286.60 


Pike 





28,561.50 


Potter 


591.27 


34,761.79 


Schuylkill 


10,544.59 


4,631.28 


Snyder 


10,454,14 


93,654.59 


Somerset 


5,733.68 


35,771.56 


Sullivan 


.3,149.23 


21,565.71 


Susquehanna 


5,967.28 


797.75 


Tioga 


10,922.21 


2,686.88 


Union 


38,928.94 


1,659.97 


Venango 


2,238.96 


231.38 


Warren 


1,602.11 


197,331.33 


Washington 


8,494.24 


16,612.15 


Wayne 





17,639.89 


Westmoreland 


2,281*63 


16,873.64 


Wyoming 





2,737.39 


York 


205,772.78 


5,864.70 






10,112.80 


Total 


$ 3,282,107.11 



♦Beginning of AAA 

So'iirce - Agricultural Adjustment Administrata«on 



16M-8 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



^1" 



fi^ Mk 



Lei oT 



M. 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Section Two 



PKINCIPAl CROPS 



Some jrears Pennsylvania is the first state 
in the Union in cash incore fron notatoes 
grown. Every important commercial crop is 
produced in Pennsylvania, exce^^t cotton, 
citrus frmts, and peanuts. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of CORl'I in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(78^ of all Pennsylvania farms grow corn) 



-onty 


Bushels 
5,327,030 $ 


3 


Value 
,835,460 


County 
Union 


Bushels 
670,360 


Value 


.ncaster 


$ 408,920 


rk 


3,765,640 


2 


,786,570 


Schuylkill 


643,290 


501 , 770 


ester 


2,941,210 


2 


,000,020 


Juniata 


612,240 


404,080 


irks 


2,757,240 


1 


,930,070 . 


Mifflin 


604,610 


368,810 


■anklin 


2,349,710 


1 


,433,320 


Blair 


583,100 


414,000 


imberland 


1,962,130 


1 


,236,140 


Susquehanna 


555,220 


452,180 


LCkS 


1,675,710 


1 


,139,480 


Tioga 


558,180 


429,800 


.ams 


1,660,640 


1 


,212,270 


Allegheny 


501 , 430 


385,100 


■awford 


1,472,250 


1 


,074,740 


Jefferson 


453,360 


303,750 


istmoreland 


1,426,780 


1 


,070,090 


Fulton 


447,280 


281,790 


ircer 


1,415.270 




962 , 380 


Beaver 


441 , 700 


331,280 


LShington 


1,351,680 




973,210 


Luzerne 


417,250 


312,940 


!"banon 


1 , 301 , 370 




910,960 


Clearfield 


416,700 


320,860 


)ntgomery 


1,266,310 




899,080 


Montour 


380,140 


230,890 


Luphi n 


1,192,510 




846,680 


Clinton 


351,120 


235,250 


rooming 


1,178,950 




719,160 


Venango 


348,080 


215,810 


•ie 


1,128,370 




857,560 


Wayne 


307,570 


252,210 


irthamoton 


1,114,340 




702,030 


Cambria ■ 


305 , 720 


232,350 


;dford 


1,098,880 




802,180 


Wyoming 


288,870 


225,320 


mtre 


1,087,340 




772,010 


Delaware 


269,350 


180,460 


•adford 


1,051,260 




851,520 


Warren 


252,380 


201,910 


itler 


1,030,520 




814,120 


Monroe 


239,650 


179,740 


)rth"uml)erland 


1,016,460 




6S0,040 


Lackawanna 


177,640 


156,320 


jlumtia 


942 , 140 




687,760 


Carbon 


140,000 


103,600 


)merset 


909,830 




645,980 


Potter 


112,290 


88,710 


;high 


902 , 940 




586,910 


Sullivan 


99,300 


76,460 


erry 


892 , 380 




552,200 


McKean 


57,220 


38,340 


rmstrong 


870,100 




569,980 


Elk 


47,110 


36,270 


ndiana 


851,030 




519,130 


Philadelphia 


43,850 


28,940 


awrence 


830,780 




540,010 


Forest 


41,900 


30,170 


■antingdon 


778,180 




521,380 


Cameron 


21 , 420 


16,070 


reene 


746,430 




559,820 


Pike 


28,630 


20,620 


nyder 


738,430 




450,440 








ayette 


735,650 




492,890 








larion 


699,550 




475,690 


Total 


60,896,000 


$ 42,627,000 




"Corn prices 


received by 


Pennsylvania 


farmers in 






1935 were 4f^ 


higher than 


U. S. average 


prices." 





ource - Penna, Department of Agriculture 



96C-1 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



-»eT 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of TAIJE HAY in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(76^ of all Pennsylvania farms grov Timothy and Clover Ha-"-) 



Mz 



Tons 



Value 



jQ-unty 



Tons 



Value 



Lancaster 


142,900 


$ 1,557,600 


Allegheny 


38 


780 


$ 511,900 


rradford 


142,850 


971 , 380 


Northampton 


3d 


710 


572,910 


Tra-wford 


133,000 


857,900 


Lehigh 


36 


970 


399,270 


lioga 


124,040 


793,860 


Beaver 


36 


110 


418,880 


Chester 


108,860 


1,023,280 


Clearfield 


35 


950 


452 ^970 


Sus quehanna 


107,680 


925,050 


Venango 


34 


670 


559,770 


York 


105,920 


1,038,020 


Schu3'lkill 


33 


600 


446 , 380 


Erie 


98,410 


569,190 


ColuT.hia 




800 


537,040 


Washington 


97,900 


930,050 


Huntingdon 


30 


520 


421,180 


Berks 


92,900 


1.-161,250 


Northumherland 


30 


390 


373,800 


Westmoreland 


88,450 


865,610 


Luzerne 


29 


570 


422,850 


Mercer 


85,210 


707,240 


McKean 


26 


230 


502,060 


Wayne 


80,910 


954,740 


Wyoming 


26 


130 


259,140 


Somerset 


78,550 


738,370 


Blair 


25 


180 


554,390 


Franklin 


78,510 


722,290 


Perry 


24 


560 


255,420 


Butler 


70,950 


674,120 


J-uniata 


22 


840 


305,770 


Lehanon 


70,110 


834,310 


Lackawanna 


22 


570 


282,120 


Bucks 


64,560 


658,510 


Snyder 


22 


100 


296,140 


Adams 


62,550 


550,440 


Union 


20 


750 


224,100 


Greene 


61,230 


642 , 920 


Mifflin 


20 


080 


206,820 


Potter 


58,010 


597,500 


F^olton 


16 


590 


179,170 


Indiana 


56,980 


541 , 310 


Monroe 


16 


320 


251,330 


C^osiherland 


56 , 700 


549,990 


Sullivan 


14 


960 


115,690 


Clarion 


50,540 


505,400 


Elk 


14 


900 


175,320 


Armstrong 


50,100 


475,950 


Monto-or 


13 


370 


137,710 


Montgomery 


48,990 


485,000 


Clinton 


13 


,090 


161,010 


Jefferson 


47,320 


511,060 


Delar-are 


13 


080 


152,190 


Lycoming 


47,260 


581 , 300 


Car Don 


9, 


240 


127,510 


Fayette 


47,220 


557,200 


Forest 


5 


700 


55,310 


Bedford 


44,850 


461 , 960 


Pike 


3 


340 


50,100 


Dauphi n 


44,340 


545,380 


Philadelphia 


2 


540 


32,260 


Centre 


42,640 


553,000 


Cameron ■ 


2 


'--50 


25,250 


Lawrence 


42.340 


372,590 








Cambria 


41,280 


559,650 








Warren 


38,860 


380,830 


Total 3, 


329, 


000 


$ 35,623,000 



26^ more hay was produced in Pennsylvania, in 
1935 than in 1934. This was the fifth most val- 
uable ha" cl-OT) in the United St-^tes. 



So-urce - Penna. Dept. of Agri, 



106C-8 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



A 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Proiduction and Value of POTATOES in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(.75> of all Pennsylvania farms grov; Irish Potatoes) 



^cunty 


Bushel s 


Value 


County 


Bushels 


Value 


Lehigh 


2 , 046 , 780 


$ 1.330,410 


Lawrence 


248 , 000 


$ 124,000 


jancaster 


1 , 631 , 840 


1,060,700 


Clarion 


237,180 


130,450 


fork 


1,169,000 


748,160 


Venango 


224,480 


123,460 


somerset 


1,154,310 


669,500 


Montgomery 


217,210 


152,050 


Jrawford 


1,002,000 


571,140 


Warren 


212,440 


118,970 


]rie 


998,800 


589,290 


Yfeyne 


205,040 


144,230 


>chuylkill 


931,700 


596,290 


Fayette 


199,470 


117,690 


Jerks 


928,200 


603,530 


Clinton 


198,360 


119,020 


lorthampton 


339,220 


579,060 


Wyomi ng 


178,080 


119,310 


lercer 


750,780 


412,930 


Blair 


171,690 


171,690 


^amhria 


633,080 


411,500 


Monroe 


170,560 


119,390 


Jutler 


623,070 


336,460 


Snyder 


158,860 


93,730 


"ol-umtia 


621,780 


404,160 


Adams 


154,780 


102,150 


'hester 


564,570 


389,550 


Beaver 


153,520 


84,440 


juzerne 


537,140 


349,140 


Union 


147,650 


88,500 


'otter 


499,100 


299,460 


Huntingdon 


139,590 


89,540 


jvcoming 


466,240 


289,070 


Juniata 


132,300 


79,380 


ndiana 


461,700 


277,020 


Perry 


120,780 


71,260 


je"banon 


453,680 


285,820 


Elk 


119,550 


71 , 740 


Jra6.ford 


413,100 


260,250 


Mifflin 


101,850 


65,180 


Jucks 


399,840 


279,890 


McKean 


93,930 


58 , 240 


)learfield 


359,870 


233,920 


Montour 


89,010 


52,520 


Jefferson 


350,450 


189,250 


Washington 


86,450 


51,870 


!entre 


324,500 


201,190 


Delaware 


72,800 


45,860 


Jarton 


323,850 


204,030 


Allegheny 


68,670 


41,200 


'ioga 


310,200 


189,220 


Fulton 


67,640 


40,580 


Lrmstrong 


307,400 


156,770 


Sullivan 


53,500 


40,640 


restmoreland 


304,110 


185,510 


Greene 


44,500 


27,500 


rorthioiTi'berland 


293,280 


173,040 


Forest 


43,050 


22,820 


;-umbei-land 


288,000 


181,440 


Cameron 


32 , 240 


19,670 


jackawanna 


282,030 


183,320 


Pike 


23,140 


15,200 


)auphin 


280,330 


182,210 


Philadelphia 


14,300 


9,150 


jusquohanna 


272,500 


179,920 








iedford 


268,290 


155,610 








Yanklin 


253,510 


152,110 


Total 


25,536,000 


$ 15,923,000 



Pennsylvania' s 


1935 


potato 


crof 


- 


with a 


slight decrease 


in acreage 


and 


22^ decrease 


in production - 


was 


19=3 higher 


in 


value than 


the 1934 crop. 













Source - Penna.. Dept, of Agri. 



105C-7 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



i 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of WINTER WHEAT in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(45^ of all Pennsylvania farms grow winter wheat) 



County 


Bushels 


Value 


County 


Bushels 


Value 


Lancaster 


2,442,550 


$1,929,610 


Fayette 


208.150 


$ 164,440 


York 


1,892,880 


1,533,230 


Lawrence 


188,600 


143,990 


Franklin 


1,385,770 


1,136,330 


Montour 


167,180 


137,090 


Berks 


1,127,280 


901,820 


Crawford 


155,390 


127,420 


Cumberland 


764,170 


613,930 


Jefferson 


150,270 


115,710 


Chester 


723,500 


549 , 860 


Allegheny 


132,090 


105,670 


Adams 


645,740 


542 , 420 


Clinton 


122,460 


99,190 


Lebanon 


567,760 


448 , 530 


Beaver 


107,140 


84,640 


Bucks 


551,310 


435,530 


Greene 


106,400 


81,930 


Westmoreland 


498,440 


388,780 


Luzerne 


91,980 


73,180 


Northampton 


463,470 


384,680 


Erie 


91,120 


75,540 


Centre 


462,500 


379,250 


Clearfield 


88,130 


72,270 


Lehigh 


454,300 


363,440 


Cambria 


76,380 


63,400 


Dauphin 


419,760 


327,410 


Monroe 


64,640 


54, 940 


Bedford 


411 , 460 


316,820 


Car bo n 


64.440 


54,130 


Columbia 


406,640 


341 , 580 


Bradford 


55,690 


48,450 


Montgomery 


389,150 


319,100 


Venango 


55,380 


44,300 


Perry 


381 , 400 


312,750 


Delaware 


46,010 


36,810 


Northumberland 


358,860 


287,090 


Warren 


17,960 


15,270 


Washington 


325,640 


244,230 


Philadelphia 


12,830 


10,900 


Indiana 


313,880 


238,550 


Tioga 


10,380 


9,140 


Huntingdon 


306,250 


241 , 940 


Forest 


9,230 


7,660 


Butler 


303,890 


249,190 


Wyoming 


6,480 


5,640 


Armstrong 


300 , 300 


234,230 


Sullivan 


5,400 


4,480 


Lycoming 


296,140 


239,870 


Susquehanna 


2,170 


1,78C 


Clarion 


293,370 


222,960 


Elk 


1,800 


1,440 


Somerset 


283,750 


218,490 


Pike 


1,700 


1,430 


Juniata 


276,180 


218,180 


Potter 


1 , 050 


870 


Schuylkill 


272,590 


218,070 


Lackawanna 


660 


510 


Fulton 


270,410 


210,920 


Wayne 


600 


490 


Mifflin 


263,200 


205,300 


McKean 


340 


280 


Snyder 


255,700 


204,560 


Cameron 


— 


— 


Union 


241 , 580 


198,090 








Mercer 


210,850 


168,680 








31air 


208,280 


164,540 


Total 


20,811,000 


$ 15,649,000 




"Wheat prices received 


by Pennsylvani 


a farmers 








were Z'fc hi 


gher than average U.S. prices.'* 







So-urce - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



96C-2 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of OATS in Penns?/lvania 

1935 
i57fo of all Pennsylvania farms grow oats) 



Co'onty 


Bushels 
L, 221, 660 $ 


Value 
438,660 


County 
Union 


Bushels 
354,020 


Value 


Berks ] 


$ 127,440 


Cravvford 1,031 


940 


392 


140 


Adams 


325 


170 


126 


820 


Somerset 


921 


840 


405 


610 


Huntingdon 


314 


540 


132 


020 


Mercer 


863 


460 


328 


110 


J-oniata 


298 


890 


131 


510 


York 


76C 


960 


304 


380 


Montgomery 


295 


730 


144 


930 


Erie 


759 


220 


303 


690 


Venango 




180 


lis 


070 


Westmoreland 


743 


350 


312 


210 


Potter 


282 


570 


129 


890 


Bradford 


630 


960 


236 


000 


Mifflin 


281 


880 


112 


750 


Lycoming 


659 


890 


257 


360 


Blair 


275 


950 


123 


280 


Butler 


649 


390 


285 


950 


Susquehanna 


269 


840 


132 


220 


Tioga 


642 


820 


250 


700 


Luzerne 


254 


000 


106 


6S0 


Centre 


605 


060 


235 


190 


T7arren 


249 


560 


102 


240 


Ciiester 


590 


100 


271 


440 


Allegheny 


247 


930 


106 


510 


Ciimberland 


585 


540 


235 


420 


Montoiir 


252 


440 


81 


350 


Clarion 


582 


890 


235 


160 


Beaver 


218 


400 


98 


280 


J7feshington 


567 


530 


258 


560 


Clinton 


189 


860 


72 


150 


Torthampton 


565 


820 


248 


960 


Greene 


189 


650 


87 


230 


Columtia 


565 


440 


220 


520 


Monroe 


172 


620 


75 


950 


B.-cks 


555 


320 


254 


530 


Wayne 


165 


300 


85 


960 


i'crth-um"berland 


535 


310 


192 


710 


Franklin 


1 rro 


250 


52 


900 


I'-uoliin 


528 


080 


237 


640 


Wyoming 


126 


520 


64 


520 


Jefferson 


513 


600 


210 


580 


Carbon 


125 


000 


51 


250 


Indiana 


480 


340 


192 


140 


Lackawanna 


108 


870 


d7 


700 


Lebanon 


464 


780 


204 


500 


McKean 


105 


420 


57 


470 


Perry 


457 


460 


201 


280 


Sullivan 


101 


720 


39 


670 


Lancaster 


456 


960 


210 


200 


Elk 


94 


960 


46 


530 


La^vrence 


455 


300 


182 


520 


Fulton 


48 


400 


20 


530 


Bedford 


451 


160 


198 


510 


Forest 


45 


280 


18 


560 


Schuylkill 


447 


950 


210 


540 


Delaware 


59 


130 


20 


350 


Armstrong 


442 


940 


190 


460 


Cameron 


19 


870 


8 


740 


Lehigh 


429 


120 


138 


310 


Pike 


15 


480 


6 


070 


Cambria 


370 


730 


174 


240 


Philadelphia 


D 


510 


2 


860 


Clearfield 


361 


230 


169 


780 








Fayette 


356 


400 


153 


250 








Snyder 


355 


580 


135 


120 


Total 26 


,555,000 


$ 11,145,000 




"Oat prices 


received by 


Pennsylvania f 


armers 








were 2lfo hig 


•her tnan U. 


S. average pri 


ces. " 









Source - Penna. Lept. of Agri. 



96C-3 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of TOBACCO in Pennsylvania 

1935 
{2.2fo of all Pennsylvania farms grow toliacco) 



Co'anty 

Lancaster 

Chester 

York 

Clinton 

Lycoming 

Lebanon 

Berks 

Tioga 

Juniata 

Dauphin 

Snyder 

Total 



Po'onds 

27,506,300 

310 , 500 

265,150 

106,400 

105,000 

98 , 000 

48 , 000 

14,900 

12,500 

11,750 

11 , 500 

28,488,000 



Value 

$ 3,300,790 

38,190 

31,580 

13,410 

13,120 

11,760 

5,950 

1,850 

1,500 

1,470 

1,380 

$ 3,421,000 



Pennsylvania ranks FIRST in cigar leaf tobacco production 



Pennsylvania's 1935 tobacco cror) 
was one-third greater, and valued 
70-;^ higher than the 1934 crop. 



106C-9 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of BUCKWHEAT in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(20^ of all Pennsylvania farms grow "buckwheat) 



County 

Bradford 

Tioga 

Crawford 

Jefferson 

Somerset 

Indiana 

Erie 

Clearfield 

Clarion 

Mercer 

Lycoming 

Venango 

Armstrong 

Bedford 

Butler 

Susquehanna 

Camhria 

Potter 

Col'omoia 

Warren 

Sullivan 

Monroe 

Northumberland 

Fayette 

Wyoming 

Luzerne 

Fulton 

Wayne 

Schuylkill 

Westmoreland 

Hiintingdon 

Perry 

Blair 

Lawrence 

Carhon 



Bushels 


Value 


County 


Bushels 


Value 


295,840 $ 


153,840 


Snyder 


15,200 


$ 8,060 


220,800 


117,020 


Elk 


14,720 


9,130 


175,990 


86 , 240 


Bucks 


13,340 


8,140 


154,570 


74,100 


ivIcKea.n 


13,300 


5,650 


154,160 


86,330 


Montour 


12,600 


6,430 


145,600 


72 , 800 


Centre 


11 , 590 


5,610 


118,730 


58,180 


Forest 


10,960 


5,810 


113,470 


55,600 


Juniata 


10.860 


5,650 


106,690 


51 , 210 


Lackawanna 


10,320 


6,400 


100,070 


48 , 030 


Northampton 


9,980 


6,490 


87,150 


44,450 


Clinton 


7,650 


3,900 


86,330 


41 , 440 


Adams 


6,040 


3,440 


80,010 


40,010 


York 


5,230 


3,290 


78,210 


39,110 


Berks 


4,500 


2,740 


70,600 


34,590 


Mifflin 


4,200 


2,180 


66,250 


39,090 


Lehigh 


4,130 


2,590 


64,250 


37,260 


Franklin 


3,900 


2,140 


61 , 560 


32,010 


DauDhi n 


3,820 


1,950 


46,070 


23,960 


Allegheny 


3,560 


1,780 


45,940 


22,510 


Montgomery 


3,370 


2,020 


37,810 


19,660 


Pike 


3,300 


2,080 


36,310 


20,700 


Beaver 


2,400 


1,270 


36,080 


19,480 


Union 


2,280 


1,190 


34,530 


18,650 


Lancaster 


1,720 


1,070 


31 , 580 


16,420 


Washington 


1,550 


810 


28,950 


17,950 


Cameron 


1,040 


540 


26,720 


14,430 


Chester 


990 


510 


24,010 


15,130 


Greene 


980 


480 


23,720 


13,520 


Cumherland 


600 


300 


23,220 


14,000 


Lebanon 


450 


270 


21,010 


11,560 


Delaware 






18,060 


9,570 


Philadelphia 






17,850 


10,710 








15,220 


7,760 








15.200 


8,660 


Total 


2,847,000 $ 1,480,000 



"Buckwheat prices received by Pennsylvania farmers 
were slightly above 1934 nrices." 



Source - Pcnna. Dept. of Agri , 



960-6 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



Production and Value of BARLEY in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(6^ of all Pennsylvania farms grow barley) 



"ounty 


Bushels 


Value 


County 


Bushel 


_s 


Lancaster 


208,810 


$ 137,810 


Schuylkill 


4,490 


York 


195,570 


101,700 


Delaware 


4,380 


Pranklin 


176,210 


86,110 


Butler 


4,380 


Chester 


151,790 


89,560 


Mercer 


4,370 


Berks 


71 , 560 


40,790 


Warren 


4,160 


Ciamberland 


69,600 


33,410 


Washington 


3,670 


Northampton 


63,900 


32,590 


Lycoming 


3,670 


Adams 


61 , 590 


31 , 410 


Carbon 


3,570 


Lebanon 


57,350 


34, 410 


Luzerne 


3,460 


Lehigh 


42 , 220 


25,750 


Indiana 


3,130 


Somerset 


37,120 


20,040 


Clinton 


3,130 


Tioga 


30,850 


15,120 


McKean 


3,120 


Daunhi n 


29,320 


15,830 


Lawrence 


2,910 


Bucks 


28,970 


17,960 


Venango 


2,800 


Columbia 


19,400 


12,030 


Fayette 


2,790 


Montgomery 


19,040 


12,570 


Armstrong 


2,300 


Bedford 


17,980 


9,170 


Juniata 


2,140 


Bradford 


16,930 


11,510 


Susquehanna 


2,040 


Blair 


16,870 


8,770 


Northumberland 


1^990 


Potter 


16,740 


10,050 


Montour 


1,930 


Erie 


15,480 


7,430 


Monroe 


1,740 


Centre 


12,630 


5,940 


Sullivan 


1,710 


Cambria 


12,170 


7,300 


Wayne 


1,570 


Clarion 


11,180 


6,040 


Allegheny 


1,390 


Jefferson 


10,760 


6,460 


Lackawanna 


870 


Perry 


8,920 


4,190 


Beaver 


810 


Cra"fford 


8,360 


4,180 


Wyoming 


660 


Westmoreland 


7,960 


3,980 


Greene 


660 


Clearfid. d 


6,800 


4,490 


Pike 


560 


Fulton 


6,450 


3,610 


Forest 


550 


H-'ontingdon 


6,400 


3,200 


Cameron 


200 


Union 


5,370 


2,370 


Philadelphia 


— 


Mifflin 


5,860 


2,760 






Snyder 


5,740 


2,700 






Slk 


4,950 


3,270 


Total 


1,537,000 




"Barley prices received 


by Pennsylvania 


farmers 






were 15^ hi 


gher than average U. S. prices." 





Value 

2,780 

2,670 

2,630 

2,670 

2,460 

2,130 

1,760 

2,110 

2,110 

2,040 

1,530 

2,030 

1,780 

1,650 

1,620 

1,400 

1,050 

1,390 

900 

870 

870 

1,010 

1,070 

790 

590 

490 

450 

380 

340 

310 

110 



$ 861,000 



Source - Penna. Dent, of Agri . 



96C-4 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



;j.'>n.Vi 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



Production and Value of EYE in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(llfj of all Pennsylvania farms grow rye) 



County Bushels 


Value 


County 


Bushels 


Value 


Franklin 173,400 


$ 97,100 


Lancaster 


16,780 


$ 10,400 


Berks 119,370 


68,040 


Montgomery 


16,380 


10,650 


Cum'berland 105,560 


57,000 


Union 


16,350 


8,500 


Indiana 


74,210 


44,530 


Monto-or 


16,000 


9,600 


Schuylkill 


67,510 


39,160 


Chester 


13.870 


. 3,180 


Bedford 


65,650 


40,050 


Fayette 


13,490 


9,040 


ColiEi'bia 


60,190 


35,110 


Lawrence 


13,430 


7,670 


York 


57,280 


32,080 


jToniata 


13,260 


7,960 


Korth-umtcrland 


45,150 


27,090 


Mifflin 


13,130 


7,480 


Lycoming 


44,420 


23,540 


Allegheny 


11,880 


7,840 


Adams 


37,800 


20,750 


Clinton 


10,990 


5,710 


Camhria 


36,980 


21 , 450 


Bradford 


10,640 


5,750 


Lehigh 


34,630 


19,390 


Washington 


8,150 


5,630 


Somerset 


33,940 


23,010 


Crawford 


5,450 


3,000 


Erie 


33,260 


17,960 


Wyomi ng 


4,090 


2,820 


Bucks 


32,130 


19,500 


Venango 


5 , 600 


1,980 


Jefferson 


31,370 


17,570 


Beaver 


2,810 


1,600 


F-olton 


30,720 


16,280 


Lackawanna 


2,090 


1,360 


Armstrong 


30,500 


17,690 


Philadelphia 


2,040 


1,530 


Westmoreland 


28 , 540 


17,470 


G-reene 


1,960 


1,350 


Snyder 


27,820 


16,970 


Delaware 


1,900 


1,120 


Northampton 


27,300 


16,110 


Tioga 


1,890 


1,060 


Perry 


26 , 600 


16,490 


Sullivan 


870 


500 


Dauphi n 


26,270 


14,450 


Pike 


640 


400 


Blair 


25,440 


16,280 


Wayne 


600 


370 


Mercer 


24,620 


14,030 


Susquehanna 


580 


380 


Luzerne 


22,440 


12,790 


Elk 


570 


oOC 


Huntingdon 


21,150 


11,420 


Warren 


490 


270 


Monroe 


20,300 


11,980 


Forest 


160 


90 


Lebanon 


20,200 


15,130 


Cameron 


150 


80 


Butler 


19,600 


10,190 


McKean 


150 


80 


Clarion 


18,720 


11,040 


Potter 


150 


80 


Carhon 


18,400 


9,940 








Clearfield 


17,090 


10,600 








Centre 


16,880 


10,130 


Total 1 


,680,000 


$ 974,000 




(Rye prices received hy Pennsylvania 


farmers 






were 25^ 


, higher than U. S. prices. ) 







Source - Penna. Dent, of Agri. 



96C-5 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



'.TS aoliiiubtyT^ 



1* 



L_ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of Apples in Pennsylvania 

1935 
♦There is an average of tl^irty-seven apple trees for every farm in Pennsylvania) 



D^onty 


Bushels 


Value 


County 


Bushels 


Value 


iams 


1,346,860 


$ 861 ,990 


Lebanon 


109,430 


$ 71,130 


ranklin 


881,830 


555,550 


Indiana 


108,230 


82,250 


jzerne 


550,920 


465,560 


Mercer 


105,040 


93,490 


3rk 


530 ,000 


365,700 


Lawrence 


100,190 


83,160 


erks 


465,040 


362,730 


Bradford 


94,610 


84,200 


sdford 


392,410 


211,900 


Clearfield 


93,290 


74,630 


omberland 


310,590 


183,250 


Tioga 


91,150 


71,100 


ancaster 


307,380 


224,390 


Carbon 


89,790 


61,060 


llegheny 


248,320 


178,790 


Crawford 


86 , 600 


77,070 


lair 


246,230 


172,360 


Perry 


84,350 


54,830 


3merset 


235,620 


143,730 


Clinton 


82,310 


76,550 


:huylkill 


219,450 


153,620 


Jefferson 


76,820 


57,600 


;lC ks 


218,370 


159,410 


Mifflin 


76,440 


56,570 


ontgomeiy 


217,300 


160,800 


Union 


70 , 840 


48,170 


Dl^ambia 


215,140 


176,410 


Juniata 


65,660 


44,000 


.-coming 


213,320 


185,590 


Venango 


66,490 


60,510 


fie 


187,320 


166,710 


Armstrong 


65,420 


50,840 


lester 


187,150 


158,490 


Warren 


51,770 


53,740 


coming 


186,580 


147,400 


Delaware 


60,480 


48,590 


ishigh 


176,660 


121,900 


Fayette 


57,440 


44,800 


entre 


169,790 


115,450 


Potter 


55,950 


46,700 


.ashington 
liiuphi n 


167,810 


125,860 


Greene 


53,700 


46,720 


154,530 


105,940 


Elk 


41,260 


39,510 


Bstmoreland 


154,470 


125,000 


Clarion 


40,520 


39,300 


asq-aehanna 


161,360 


137,160 


Sullivan 


32,200 


30,110 


ilton 


157,690 


85,150 


Monroe 


23,920 


21,530 


!b r thumb e rland 


153,960 


115,470 


Montour 


23,120 


18,500 


■'ontingdon 


150,970 


119,270 


McKean 


19,430 


18,250 


ackawanna 


129,010 


116,110 


Pike 


7,200 


7,130 


Drthampt^n 


128,900 


97,960 


Cameron 


6,800 


5,320 


:iyder 


120,870 


88,240 


Forest 


2,000 


1,760 


&yne 


120,720 


120,720 


Philadelphia 


1,580 


1,240 


3aver 


119,380 


90,730 








ainbria 


116,480 


88,520 








atler 


111,430 


90,360 


Total 


11,440,000 


$ 8,351,000 



Pennsylvania produces the third largest apple crop. 
Over 9,000,000 bushels were sold this year, bringing 
a cash income of almost $7,000,000. 



;-rce - Penna Dept. of Agri. 
• 1935 Census 



115C-11 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



9C 






biJ 






I ^ 



Ot:c,P'b. 






Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of Peaches in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(There is an average of sixteen peach trees for every farm in Pennsylvania) 



County 


Bushels 


Value 


County 


Bushels 


Value 


Franklin 


163,300 


$ 200,860 


Centre 


11,410 


t 13,240 


York 


126,850 


144,610 


Dauphin 


11,220 


12,900 


Adams 


118,000 


146,320 


Crawford 


10,860 


10,320 


B erks 


115,000 


164,710 


Delaware 


10,550 


11,820 


Washington 


91,800 


77,110 


Huntingdon 


9,490 


3,450 


'Westmoreland 81,750 


73,580 


Clearfield 


9,250 


11,100 


Allegheny 


77,840 


81 , 730 


Union 


8,690 


10,170 


Lehigh 


55,950 


86,390 


Montour 


7,730 


10,900 


Erie 


50,550 


4-6,000 


Somerset 


7,600 


8,360 


Lancaster 


45 , 900 


86,100 


Luzerne 


7,170 


10,040 


Armstrong 


42,500 


43,350 


Clarion 


5,770 


5,700 


Beaver 


39 , 650 


34,890 


Clinton 


5,550 


9,430 


Snyder 


36,000 


45,000 


Bradford 


5,440 


5,800 


3acks 


35,910 


47,040 


Jefferson 


5,430 


5,270 


Oujnberl^nd 


34,140 


38,920 


Mifflin 


4,310 


4,550 


Chester 


38,170 


35,710 


Cambria 


4,050 


4,300 


Montgomery 


27,460 


32,130 


Venango 


3,540 


3,510 


Lawrence 


27,350 


25 , 990 


Wyoming 


2,470 


4,170 


G-reene 


27,030 


27,030 


Tioga 


1,650 


2,050 


Le'oanon 


23 ,480 


30 , 290 


^ayne 


1,150 


2,070 


Hercer 


23,330 


24,030 


Monroe 


1,140 


1,390 


Butler 


22,650 


21 , 270 


Philadelphia 


1,090 


1,550 


Indiana 


21,900 


20 , 810 


Lackawanna 


640 


1,090 


Blair 


21,770 


. 26,120 


Sullivan 


520 


650 


Col"amhia 


21,250 


29 , 750 


Susquehanna 


400 


680 


Bedford 


20,510 


22,670 


ITarren 


320 


320 


Payette 


20,160 


19,760 


Elk 


190 


240 


Lycoming 


17,570 


24,S50 


Pike 


50 


40 


Ilorth-umherland 15,550 


23,180 


Forest 







Fjlton 


16,280 


17,750 


Cameron 








llorthflmpton 


15,050 


19,740 


McKean 





___ 


Carbon 


14,610 


18,260 


Potter 







Perry 


13,760 


15,410 








Juniata 


13,030 


14,070 








Schuylkill 


12,180 


18,030 


Total 1 


,575,000 


$ 1,325,000 




1935 cash 


income from 


peaches - $1,552 


,000; 






1934 - $5 


63,000. This 


is $919,000 more 


or 






145^ increase 


in cash income for Pennsylvan 


ia farmers 





Source - Penna. 
* 1935 Census 



Dept. of kgri. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



116C-12 



10 auitjV iiiis «:■ 



Ooi.CS 



rrrrit^ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of Pears in Pennsylvania 

1935 
■(Almost three of every five Pennsylvania farms grow -near trees) 



Co'onty 

Scnuylkill 

Berks 

Lancaster 

York 

Chester 

Montgomery 

Erie 

Allegheny 

Westmoreland 

Sedford 

Bucks 

Cambria 

Columbia 

Northampton 

Luzerne 

Somerset 

Lehigh 

Northumberland 

Mercer 

Crawford 

Clearfield 

Carbon 

Blair 

Armstrong 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Dauphin 

Lebanon 

Butler 

Washington 

Lackawanna 

Wayne 

Bradford 

Fayette 

Hunti ngdon 



Bushels 


Value 


County 


Busbiels 


19,900 


$ 21,290 


Lycoming 


4,100 


18,810 


14,100 


Centre 


4,070 


14,990 


9,290 


Beaver 


3,990 


13.670 


7,250 


Franklin 


3,950 


12,880 


8,240 


Delav^are 


3,950 


12,040 


11,680 


Clarion 


3,780 


11,620 


8,950 


Lawrence 


3,710 


10,110 


9,300 


Cumberland 


3,400 


9,710 


8,640 


Adams 


5,380 


9,650 


5,690 


Fulton 


3,320 


9,390 


5,950 


Susquehanna 


3,260 


9,220 


8,210 


•Tioga 


3,250 


8,980 


6,650 


Snyder 


3,080 


8,750 


8,580 


Greene 


• 2,940 


7,830 


8,300 


Mifflin 


2,850 


7,720 


6,870 


Venango 


2,580 


7,630 


5,420 


Perry 


2,350 


7,610 


6,240 


Monroe 


2,280 


7,560 


6,350 


Warren 


2,100 


7,450 


6,410 


"Wyoming 


1,870 


6,690 


4,280 


Potter 


1,350 


6,310 


6,940 


Clinton 


1,330 


6,210 


4,780 


Union 


1,220 


5,200 


4,900 


J'oniata 


1,170 


5,890 


4,360 


Montour 


1,050 


5,760 


4,440 


Elk 


880 


5,480 


4,330 


S-ollivan 


830 


5,260 


3,520 


Pike 


630 


5,230 


4,130 


McKean 


620 


5,170 


4,860 


Philadelphia 


240 


4,700 


5,080 


Forest 


240 


4,640 


4,640 


Cameron 


150 


4,580 


4,080 






4,290 


3,560 






4,170 


2,210 


Total 


370,000 



Value 

3,850 

2,560 
3,470 
2,010 
2,920 
2,800 
2,970 
1,670 
2,130 
1,630 
5,290 
2,990 
2,510 
2,320 
1,620 
1 , 990 
1,270 

1,780 

1,610 

1,540 

1,180 

840 

690 

860 

870 

570 

620 

610 

140 

190 

150 



296,000 



Higher 


cash 


income 


was received 


by Pennsylvania 


1 


farmers 


from 


less 


■nears iDroduced in 1955 as 


com- 


" i 




pared wi 


th 1954 T)roduc 


,tion. 




..j 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 
* - 1935 Census 



116C-13 



— Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of GRAPES in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(43^ of all Pennsylvania farms grow grapes) 



District 


Tons 


Val-oe 


Northwestern 


20,598 


$ 457,300 


Southwestern 


861 


22,390 


Southeastern 


807 


21,390 


Central 


685 • 


19,180 


West Central 


513 


12,310 


South Central 


• 504 


13,610 


East Central 


445 


12 , 460 


North Central 


255 


7 , 900 


Northeastern 


82 


2,460 


Total 


24,750 


$ 569,000 



Pennsylvania ranks FIFTH in grape production 



Pennsylvania farmers harvested 
30^ more grapes in 1935 as com- 
Tjared with 1934 crot>. 



106C-14 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



i; I -' V Tv s raaV aoHOSj 



-S^ Ul: 



'v^rii-rrV. 



^eS 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Section Three 



LIVESTOCK AOT POULTRY 



Over 58fi> of Pennsylvania farm cash income 
is from the sale of milk and po-'oltry products. 
This means Pennsylvania farmers have a com- 
paratively steadj'' year-around income. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Value of all LIVESTOCK on Farms in Pennsylvania 

January 1, 1936 

(Pennsylvania is one of the first ten leading livestock states) 



County 



Value County 



Value 



Lancaster 


$11,064,590 


Clarion 


$ 1,691,750 


York 


7,353,180 


Allegheny 


1,660,750 


Chester 


5,311,980 


Perry 


1 , 611 , 830 


Berks 


6,119,910 


Huntingdon 


1 , 572 , 240 


Bradford 


5,223,680 


Luzerne 


1,559,210 


Crawford 


5,023,250 


T7arren 


1,518,450 


Washington 


4,420,480 


Ti7yoraing 


1 , 471 , 930 


Susquehanna 


4,323,560 


Blair 


1,379,230 


Bucks 


4,298,480 


Potter 


1,375,230 


Franklin 


4,179,820 


Lackawajina 


1,372,110 


West morel ana 


. 3 , 900 , 430 


Jefferson 


1,315,820 


Erie 


3,823,030 


Mifflin 


1,312,690 


Tioga 


3,434,150 


Beaver 


1,280,980 


Mercer 


3,422,270 


Clearfield 


1,271,440 


Montgomery 


3,337,880 


Snyder 


1,267,400 


Adams 


3,082,410 


Union 


1,204,690 


Somerset 


3,035,750 


J-oniata 


1,193,410 


Cumberland 


3 , 031 , 530 


Cambria 


1,190,230 


^ayne 


2,972,360 


Venango 


1,145,630 


Lebanon 


2,789,550 


Delaware 


1,008,730 


Butler 


2,679,540 


Fulton 


855,680 


Greene 


2,502,090 


lIcKean 


813,560 


Bedford 


2 , 459 , 350 


Clinton 


721,880 


Ivionroe 


2 , 385 , 260 


Montour 


713,450 


Lycoming 


2,297,880 


Monroe 


715,130 


Indiana 


2,297,520 


Sullivan 


573,200 


Dauphin 


2,297,000 


Carbon 


475,060 


Centre 


2,149,650 


Elk 


420,410 


Armstrong 


2,009,380 


Forest 


189,480 


Lawrence 


1,954,140 


Pike 


187,570 


Lehigh 


1,951,550 


Philadelphia 


127,310 


Fayette 


1,921,200 


Cameron 


90,510 


Schuylkill 


1,875,600 






Northumhciand 1,808,560 






Colurahia 


1,748,580 


Total $ 


155,918,000 



Livestock on Pennsylvania farms increased 
4^ in number and over 354 in value 
in 1935 as corarDarod "/ith 1934. 



Livestock includes - Cattle, Horses, Chickens, Swine 
Mules and Sheep, 

SouiTce - Pcnna- Dcpt. of Agri, 

Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



126LV-1 



3iaEv:.v,'.n::ii 



— Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Value of Milk, Eggs, Wool and Honey Produced on Farms in Pennsylvania 



1935 



County 

Lancaster 1 

Chester 

Bradford 

York 

Bucks 

Berks 

Sus quehanna 

Montgomery 

Crav/ford 

Washington 

Westmoreland 

Wayne 

Franklin 

Erie 

Tioga 

Somerset 

Cumherland 

Mercer 

Bedford 

Butler 

Lebanon 

Allegheny 

Northampton 

Adams 

Dauphin 

Indiana 

Centre 

Lawrence 

Lycoming 

Schuylkill 

Fayette 

Armstrong 

Lehigh 

Greene 

Nor thurah erland 



Value 

9,254,200 

7,443,100 

5,987,550 

5,962,520 

5,291,760 

5,285,870 

4,555,630 

4,261,140 

4,251,440 

4,194,930 

3,821,490 

3,593,650 

3,338,850 

3,327,370 

3,302,090 

3,065,780 

2,902,140 

2,823,220 

2,397,620 

2 , 338 , 460 

2,268,370 

2,245,090 

2,150,790 

2,109,230 

2,058,950 

1,882,220 

1 , 871 , 340 

1^849,900 

1,825,370 

1 , 821 , 910 

1,770,270 

1,526,990 

1,513,290 

1,495,050 

1,491,080 



County 

Wyoming 

Huntingdon 

Luzerne 

Columbia 

Beaver 

Warren 

Lackavianna 

Blair 

Potter 

Jefferson 

Perry 

Camhria 

Clarion 

Union 

Mifflin 

Venango 

Juniata 

Clearfield 

Snyder 

Monroe 

Delaware 

McKean 

Fulton 

Montour 

Clinton 

Sullivan 

Carbon 

Elk 

Pike 

Forest 

Philadelphia 

Cameron 



Total 



Value 

$ 1,490,060 

1,469,860 

1,452,250 

1,404,610 

1,385,400 

1,354,630 

1,350,380 

1,275,540 

1,256,680 

1,205,510 

1,195,890 

1,170,370 

1,129,850 

1,122,560 

1,121,190 

1,097,150 

1,049,860 

1,037,560 

1,008,530 

839,540 

825,780 

765,050 

674,300 

600,040 

531,480 

473,030 

440,590 

377,820 

255,430 

130,030 

115,940 

79,630 



$ 145,175,000 



The value of livestock products proaucea 
on farms in 1935, is 13.5^ greater than in 1954. 



126LP-5 



Source-Penna. Dept. of Agri, 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



MILK COWS and HEIFERS on Farms in Pennsylvania 
(T'.vo Years Old and Over) 

Janioary 1, 1936 

(78^ of all Pennsylvania farms have cows and heiferG' 



Number 



Value County 



Lancaster 


41 , 890 


$ 3,476,870 


Clarion 


Chester 


38 , 900 


3,384,300 


Greene 


Bradford 


38 , 640 


2,588,880 


Beaver 


Crawford 


35,990 


2,231,380 


Jefferasn 


Sus quehanna 


35,450 


2,729,650 


Huntingdon 


Tioga 


27,990 


1,875,330 


Blair 


Erie 


27,580 


1,709,960 


Northumberland 


Washington 


26,730 


1,897,830 


Luzerne 


Wayne 


26,190 


1,597,590 


Columbia 


Berks 


25,840 


2,325,600 


Clearfield 


Westmoreland 


24,500 


1,715,000 


Venango 


York 


24,390 


1,582,910 


Cambria 


Mercer 


23,870 


1,288,980 


Schuylkill 


Bucks 


20,810 


1,685,610 


Lehigh 


Franklin 


20,670 


1,405,560 


Perry 


Somerset 


19,450 


1,107,510 


McKean 


Montgomery- 


16,710 


1,487,190 


Union 


Butler 


15,670 


908,860 


Mifflin 


Bedford 


15,520 


822,560 


Juniata 


Cumberland 


15,310 


933,910 


Snyder 


Lycoming 


14,220 


824,760 


Fulton 


Centre 


14,140 


848 , 400 


Clinton 


Indiana 


"13,650 


805,350 


Monroe 


Lawrence 


12,880 


798,560 


Sill li van 


Northampton 


12,370 


989,600 


Delaware 


Lebanon 


12,170 


1,070,960 


Monto-or 


Fayette 


12,010 


672,560 


Elk 


Warren 


11,770 


729,740 


Carbon 


Adams 


11,530 


807 , 100 


Pike 


Armstrong 


11,070 


653,130 


Forest 


Dauphin 


10,910 


709,150 


Cameron 


Potter 


10,810 


702,650 


Philadelphia 


Wy omi ng 


10,720 


825,440 




Allegheny 


10,110 


566,160 


Total 


Lackp,wajina 


9,590 


690,480 





Number 

9,520 
9,130 
8,930 
8,710 
8,560 
8,370 
3,370 
8,220 
8,150 
8,140 
8,080 
7,940 
7,570 
7,280 
6,620 
6 , 490 
6,400 
6,340 
6,110 
5,930 
4,310 
4,290 
4,210 
3,880 
3,770 
3,580 
2,770 
1,960 
1,240 
1,100 
490 
460 



V alue 

542 , 640 
468,180 
517,940^ 
435,500 
599,200 
569,160 
516,940 
534,300 
562,350 
465,980 
420,160 
373,180 
582,890 
455,920 
383,960 
434,830 
441,600 
450,140 
421,590 
426,960 
219,810 
291,720 
256,810 
252,200 
358,150 
257,760 
171,740 
147,000 
52,000 
64,900 
31,850 
39,120 



887,000 $ 50,516,000 



I 



Dairy cows on Pennsylvania farms number 2^^ 
less^than -nreceding vear, while the value 
increase $20,000,000 or 48^. 



Source - Penna. Dcpt. of Agri. 



1C6L-5 



I 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



is 



■iot^ni 



DlV 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Dairy Farms, Pennsylvania Farmer Circiilation and Farms ty States 





Dairy 


Pennsylvania Farmer 




Farms 


Circulation 


Pennsylvania 


148,321 


122 , 850 


West Virginia 


89,768 


12,274 


New Jersey 


15,622 


9,890 


Maryland 


32 , 454 


6,858 


Delaware 


7,060 


1,956 



293,225 



153,828 



Farms 
191,284 
104,747 
29,375 
44,412 
10,381 

380,199 



Dairy Farms - Farms reporting - cows two years old and over. 
Pennsylvania Farmer Circulation - DecemlDer 1935 
Farms - 1935 Census Figures 



rP' 



36LD-1 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



■t.\<s.u 



;i".' JssIT 



^'IZVibI' 



31 X^is 



■'^a'K 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



PEMSYLVMIA 
20<fc INC5EASE IN CASH INCOi.j; FROM DAIEY PRODUCTS in 1934 

Cash income realized from the sale of milk, butterfat and butter by 
Pennsylvania farmers was as follows: 

1934 $ 86,800,000 

1933 72,407,000 

Increase $ 14,393,000 or 20^o 

The three leading states in cash income from dairj"- products are: 

Wisconsin New York PSITOSYLVAI'TIA 

Uses of Milk Produced on Farms in Pennsylvania in 1934 



Wholesaled by producers 2,698,000,000 lbs. 
Petailed as milk or cream by producers 740,000,000 
Used on farms where produced 413,000,000 

Utilized for making butter on farms 549,000,000 
Skimmed or separated for sale of butterfat 187,000,000 
Fed to calves 108,000,000 

Total I/.ilk Produced 4,495,000,000 lbs. 

40;,3 more milk and cream is retailed by dairymen in Penns3''lvania 
than in any other state. 

Pennsylvania farm nrices of milk, incl'oding both wholesale and retail 
sales, wa,s estimated as follows: 

1934 $2.26 cwt. 

1933 1.92 

Increase $ .34 or IB'i 

These prices are SO-i higher than the average for the entire country. 



Source: - Penna. Do-ot. of AgricolturG, -'rekly News Bulletin, May 23, 1935. 



36LP-7 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 






3A 3£- 



t 





Daiiiy 


Coxmty 


Farms 


larren 


1,815 


Lehigh 


• 1,769 


H'ontingdon 


1,659 


Lehanon 


1,633 


Perry- 


■ 1,504 


Potter 


1,460 


Blair 


1,400 


Snyder 


1,265 


Wyoming 


1,243 


McKean 


1,195 


Lackavjanna 


1.167 


Monroe 


1,162 


Pulton 


1,146 


Juniata 


1,156 


Mifflin 


1,031 


Union 


969 


Clinton 


800 


Elk 


753 


Siillivan 


620 


Carton 


601 


MontoTor 


589 


Delaware 


512 


Forest 


374 


Pike 


370 


Cameron 


156 


Philadelphia 


93 



%Dtal 



148,321 



Percent 
Dairy 
Farms 

86.3 
51.8 
31.5 
72.2 
81.1 
83.5 
74.8 
73.9 
35.1 
79.8 
74.7 
80.1 
84.6 
78.4 
84.5 
-84. 9 
78.2 
84.4 
86,4 
55.0 
86.2 
51.5 
84.8 
83.5 
78.4 
32.9 

77.5 



Farms 

2,104 
2,861 
2 , 035 
2,268 
1,854 
1,749 
1,671 
1 , 712 
1,460 
1,497 
1,563 
1 , '150 
1 , 355 
1 , 449 

i.sro 

1,141 
1,023 
392 
718 
924 
683 
995 
441 
443 
199 
286 

191,264 



Penna. Farmer 


Percent 


CirC'ilation 


Coverare 


1,067 


5^.7l 


1,363 


47.8 


1,853 


91.1 


1,C21 


71.5 


1,532 


82.6 


703 


40.2 


1,825 


95.5 


re 9 


55.6 


1,C77 


73.8 


G23 


42.0 


574 


36.7 


414 


28.6 


955 


70.5 


933 


64.4 


900 


73.8 


916 


80.3 


500 


43.9 


565 


63.3 


506 


70.5 


556 


61.3 


485 


71.2 


455 


<5.7 


258 


53.5 


169 


58. 2 


135 


57.8 


372 


13C.1 



123,400 



Dairy Farms - Farms reporting cows and l.eifer£. oi er tr-o years old 

taken fror,; 1935 Censas. 
Penns'-lvenia Farmer Circ-ulation - Jjne 30, 1936 

Farms - 1935 Census 



86LD-2 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



C 



DairjT' Farms, Pennsylvania Farmer Circulation, Farms and Coverage "by Co'onties 



PEMSYLVANIA 



Coxinty 

Lancaster 

York 

Cravrford 

Westmoreland 

Erie 

Bradford 

Wasliington 

Mercer 

Berks 

Chester 

Butler 

Somerset 

Bucks 

Indiana 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Susquehanna 

Bedford 

Tioga 

Armstrong 

Cleaxfield 

Greene 

Adams 

Wayne 

Lycoming 

Jefferson 

Ciamberland 

Montgomery 

Camtria 

Clarion 

Allegheny 

La^vrence 

Luzerne 

Scnuylkill 

Columbia 

Northampton 

Dauphi n 

Centre 

Northainborland 

Venango 

Beaver 







Percent 


Dairy 


Dairy 


Farms 


Farms 


5,327 


71.4 


5 


528 


70.4 


5 


256 


81.7 


4 


211 


78.4 


4 


,171 


77.4 


4 


136 


83.0 


4 


095 


80.7 


3 


943 


85.2 


3 


370 


64.5 


3 


609 


73.1 


3 


416 


81*6 


3 


347 


87.1 


3 


323 


65.5 


3 


283 


85.5 


3 


090 


78.2 


3 


025 


78.3 


2 


850 


87.1 




823 


89.3 


2 


794 


86.3 


2 


727 


81.4 


2 


689 


81.3 


2 


649 


83.6 


2 


498 


69.7 


2 


496 


87.6 


2 


385 


79.1 


2 


329 


85.1 


2 


307 


76»1 


2 


293 


59.6 


2 


283 


80.7 


2 


244 


86.4 


2 


225 


61.9 


2 


124 


80.0 


2 


113 


76.3 


2 


042 


72.9 


2 


022 


81.7 


O 
O 


022 


72.9 


1 


908 


72.3 


1 


874 


89.0 


1 


370 


78.3 


1 


866 


81.8 


1 


851 


77.8 



Farms 



8 


,863 


7 


,857 


6 


,420 


5 


,368 


5 


,386 


4 


984 


5 


,072 


4 


625 


5 


002 


4 


,S36 


4 


,185 


3 


844 


5 


070 


3 


842 


3 


954 


3 


861 


3 


271 


3 


160 


3 


239 


3 


351 


3 


506 


3 


170 


3 


5S1 


2 


849 


5 


014 


2 


738 


3 


032 


3 


846 


•^1 


829 


2 


595 


3 


594 


2 


655 


2 


759 


2 


803 


2 


475 


2 


775 


2 


640 


2 


105 


2, 


537 


2 


281 


2 


35-1- 



Penna 


. Farmer 


Percent 


Circulation 


Coverage 


7,435 


83.9f5 


6 


,008 


75.5 


3 


,849 


60.0 


3 


,627 


67.6 


3 


,139 


53.3 


3 


,090 


62.0 


3 


270 


64.5 


2 


,745 


59.3 


3 


,297 


54.9 


4 


,354 


88.2 


3 


,154 


75.3 


2 


482 


64.6 


2 


,689 


53.0 


2 


733 


71.1 


1 


,930 


48.8 


2 


285 


59.2 


1 


969 


60.2 


2 


635 


83.4 


1 


551 


47.9 


2 


322 


69.3 


1 


446 


43.7 


1 


686 


53.2 


2 


671 


74.6 


1 


649 


57.9 


^ 1 


,971 


65.4 


1 


578 


57.5 


2 


609 


86.0 


2 


883 


75.0 


1 


350 


47.7 


2, 


257 


87.3 


2 


100 


58.4 


1 


768 


65.6 


1 


239 


46.6 


1, 


946 


89.4 


1, 


478 


59.7 


1 


665 


60.0 


1, 


816 


68.8 


1 


375 


65.3 


1, 


346 


56.3 


1, 


073 


47.0 


1, 


524 


64.7 



(ovt-r) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



FUST 20 STAT3S IN CASH 

In 
State 

1. liVisconsin 

2. New York 

3. PEFNSYLVA^IIA 

4. Minnesota 

5. California 

6. Illinois 

7. Iowa 

8. OHIO 

9. MICHIGAN 

10. Texas 

11. Indiana 

12. MISSOURI 

13. KANSAS 

14. Washington 

15. Vermont 

16. Nebraska 

17. NEW JEHSEY 

18. Massachusetts 

19. Oklahoma 

20. Oregon 



INCOIffi FROM MILK SOLD 
1935 

Cash Income 

$ 131,916,000 
128,473,000 

92,037,000 

78,694,000 
73,036,000 
64,498,000 
61,969,000 

61,921,000 

55,629,000 

39,889,000 
37,756,000 

32,556,000 

29,958,000 

26,119,000 
24,663,000 
23,482,000 

22,972,000 

22,684,000 
20,615,000 
19,453,000 



FENNLAMD 

Pennsylva.nia 
New Jersey- 
West Virginia 
Iviaryland 
Delaware 



$ 92,037,000 
22,972,000 

8,847,000 
15,528,000 

2,471,000 



NEW ENGLAND 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



11,899,000 
8,167,000 

24,663,000 

22,684,000 
4,044,000 

17,539,000 



$ 141,855,000 



$ 88,996,000 



U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics-Aug. 1936 

116LP-14 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 






V C^ A *t^*X A A 



■•■■ r:S •4M?'1«*^^*' T>f * ■■- r 
X.-. 1 '■^ i',; ? jj. 



t)oa;*/i«,;j^ 






:ij: $ 



;r 






■.■■c<^4-\-^i"' " 






, t,Ov , X- 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of MILK in Pennsylvania 

1935 
;Cows in Pennsylvania produced 17 quarts of milk for every nerson in the U.S.) 



bounty 

Jancaster 

sradford 

Chester 

:us quehanna 

]rav;f ord 

Vayne 

rioga 

Berks 

Tashington 

Erie 

'Jestinoreland 

3ucks 

fork 

liercer 

viontgoraery 

?ranklin 

Somerset 

Dumterland 

Butler 

Bedford 

-^entre 

Lycoiiiing 

Letanon 

NorthamDton 

Da-uphin 

Lawrence 

Wyoming 

Indiana 

Allegheny 

Potter 

Lackawanna 

Warren 

Adams 

layette 

KuntiniTdon 



Milk 
( Gallons ) 

27,564,910 

26,148,560 

25,572,200 

23,1?2,360 

19,468,860 

16,604,910 

15,821,080 

15,699,500 

15,399,900 

15,081,913 

14,461,600 

14,188,060 

13,027,830 

12,473,710 

11,768,550 

11,255,480 

10,909,450 

10,479,020 

8,500,960 

8,288,800 

8,100,350 

7,923,940 

7,855,790 

7,644,620 

7,607,960 

7,422,280 

7,253,450 

6,645,560 

6,556,710 

6,138,060 

6,101,110 

5,933,640 

5,835,510 

5,825,320 

5,550,760 



Value County 



Milk 
(Gallons) 



6 


,339, 


4 


,706, 


6 


,468, 


4 


,163, 


3 


,504. 


2 


,983, 


2 


,847, 


3 


.510, 


3 


,587. 


2 


,714, 


3 


,036, 


3 


405, 


2 


995, 


2 


245; 


2 


824, 


2 


588, 


2 


509, 


2 


305, 


1, 


785, 


1 


939, 


1 


458, 


1, 


425, 


1, 


723, 


1, 


452, 


1, 


521, 


1, 


484, 


1, 


255, 


1, 


St!5, 


1, 


508, 


1, 


104, 


1, 


098, 


1, 


056, 


1, 


225, 


1, 


359, 


1, 


215, 



690 

740 

050 

820 

390 

830 

790 

880 

980 

740 

940 

150 

400 

270 

450 

760 

170 

380 

200 

510 

060 

310 

870 

430 

590 

450 

080 

570 

040 

850 

200 

050 

460 

820 

770 



Armstrong 

Nor thumt er land 

Beaver 

Schuylkill 

Luzerne 

Union 

Blair 

Columbia 

Clarion 

Lehigh 

Greene 

Jefferson 

Venango 

Mifflin 

Clearfield 

Cam.bria 

perry 

Junia.ta 

Sr^der 

McKean 

Monroe 

Delaware 

Clinton 

Montour 

S'ul 1 i v^n 

Fult on 

Slk 

Carbon 

Pike 

Porest 

Philadelohia 

Cameron 



5,280 
5,112 
4,962 
4,877 
4,779 
4,674 

4, 564 
4,542 
4,505 
4,435 
4,416 
4,547 
4,268 
4,010 
5,955 
5,699 

5 , 641 
5,515 
5,257 
5,255 
2,680 
2 , 552 
2,255 
2,181 
2,099 
1 , 891 
1,523 
1,150 

772 
555 
317 
252 



,000 
,760 
,610 
,540 
,770 
,040 
,430 
,320 
,750 
,750 
,810 
,690 
,330 
,050 
,750 
,090 
,860 
,120 
,250 
,850 
,620 
,160 
,750 
,350 
,140 
,560 
,120 
,240 
,080 
,700 
,840 
,740 



Value 

1,108,800 
1,022,550 
1 , 091 , 770 
1,170,560 
1,003,750 
888,070 
1,026,170 
953,690 
356, 090 
942,010 
971,700 
913,010 
855,670 
802,010 
791,140 
850,790 
691,950 
667,870 
615,070 
646,770 
645,350 
655,520' 
402,070 
436 , 270 
577,850 
435,010 
274,160 
264,550 
162,140 
100,030 
76,280 



Total 



523,025,260 $ 108,402,000 



Pennsylvania farmers received $92, 000', 000 cash income 
from milk in 1955 as compared with $84,000,000 in 1954. 
This is an increase of over $8,000,000 from milk alone. 



So-Lurce - Penna. Dent, of Agri. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



116LP-1 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of FASJl BUTTER in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(Butter is churned in one of every three Pennsylvania farm homes) 



Coimty 

York 

Somerset 

Lancaster 

Indiana 

Butler 

Washington 

Westmoreland 

Erie 

Armstrong 

Jefferson 

Greene 

Fayette 

Mercer 

Bedford 

Cambria 

Clearfield 

Venango 

Lj^coming 

Bradford 

Crai-7ford 

Clarion 

Allegheny 

Schuylkill 

Adams 

Lawrence 

Nor thumhcr land 

Berks 

Warren 

Huntingdon 

Beaver 

Tioga 

Blair 

Colurahia 

Franklin 

Perry 



Pounds 

621 , 590 

572,580 

538,090 

507,080 

494,960 

480,550 

463,460 

460,390 

421,600 

420,450 

402,370 

400,630 

3b8,240 

576,270 

340,280 

318,350 

309,990 

306,770 

295,160 

288,050 

277,410 

224,080 

201 , 600 

200,360 

185,530 

134,100 

172,270 

171,970 

171 , 420 

169,210 

166,240 

150,080 

146,790 

143,010 

142,020 



Value County 



174,050 
171,770 
166,760 
141 , 980 
143,540 
144,170 
143,670 
142,720 
113,050 
126,140 
112,560 
116,180 
120,350 
101,590 
105,490 
101,870 
93,000 
85,900 
94,450 
92,180 
86,000 
76,190 
68,540 
52,090 
55,800 
51 , 550 
56,850 
53,310 
48 , 000 
57,530 
51 , 550 
45,020 
44,040 
58,610 
59,770 



Fulton 

Centre 

Clinton 

Dauphin 

Wayne 

Mifflin 

Potter 

Monroe 

Chester 

Sus quehanna 

Cumocrland 

Lehigh 

Elk 

Lucerne 

McKean 

Lf^ckawanna 

Forest 

Bucks 

'Wyoming 

Snyder 

Carbon 

Sullivan 
Montour 

Pike 

Junia.ta 

Lebanon 

Northampton 

Montgomery 

Union 

Cameron 

Delaware 

Pniladel-ohia 



Pounds 

141,170 
136,120 
152,230 
131,590 
129,360 
126,400 
126,270 
119,450 
111,120 
106,550 
105,140 
98,060 
92,170 
89,610 
89,520 
77 , 570 
75 , 500 
72 , 000 
71 , 580 
56,450 
56,430 
55,010 
48,910 
42 , 850 
42 , 750 
42,250 
59 , 380 
36,790 
28,760 
10,070 
6,230 
2,850 



Value 

36,700 
43,560 
57 , 040 
44,740 
40,100 
55,590 
40,410 
34,640 
38,890 
34,100 
30,490 
32,360 
25,810 
29,570 
27,750 
25,270 
20,390 
25,2C0 
21,410 
17,280 
17,510 
18,700 
14,670 
12,000 
12,400 
13,520 
15,000 
12,510 
7,770 
5,220 
2,240 
910 



Total 



15,625,000 $ 4,086,900 



The value of butter churned on Pennsylvania 
farms in 1955 was 164 greater than in 1954. 



Source - Penna. De^Dt. of Agri, 



126LP-2 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



1' ' 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



FiaST 20 STATES II'I C.^SH INCOI.iE F20i/I CHICKENS MB EGGS SOLD IN 1935 



St3.te 



1. . 


Iowa 


2. 


PEKA-SYLVMIA 


o. 


California 


4. 


OHIO 


5. 


Ne^v York 


6. 


Illinois 


7. 


MISSOURI 


8, 


Indiana 


9. 


Wisconsin 


10. 


Minnesota 


11. 


UJSSAo 



12. k'ICEIG-AN 

13. Texas 

14. New Jersey 

15. Ne>)raEi:a 

16. Washington 

17. Virginia 

18. TenneL',see 

19. Oklahoma 

20. Massachusetts 



Cash Income 

$ 49,697,000 

42,507,000 

41,104,000 

37,974,000 

55,807,000 
34,953.000 

32,939,000 

26,947,000 
25,629,000 
24,912,000 

24,622,000 

21,393,000 

17,575,000 
17,222,000 
17,045,000 
15,429,000 
15,242,000 
10,020,000 
9 , 762 , 000 
9,454,000 



Pennland 

Pennsylvania 
New Jersey 
Maryland 
West Virginia 
Delaware 



$ 42,507,000 

17,222,000 

9 , 331 , 000 

5,591,000 

4,410,000 



New England 

liassacausetts 

Connecticut 

Maine 

New Hamn shire 

Vermont 

Bhode Island 



$ 9,434,0CG 
7,475,000 
5,884,000 
4,853,000 
1,936,000 
1,285,000 



$ 79,061,000 



$ 30,919,000 



U. S. Bureau of Agricultural Economics - Aug. ,1936. 



86 LP-12 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Chickens on Farins in Pennsylvania By Sir,e of Flock 





j<ar;ns 


Kumter of 


Per 


cent of 


Size of Flock 


Het)orting: 


Chickens 


All 


Chickens 


Under 50 


58,742 


1,641,074 




10.61 


50 to 99 


47,423 


3,082,326 




20,0^3 


100 to 199 


32,185 


4,084,799 




26. 4l 


200 to 399 


15,477 


3,584,989 




21.9fo 


400 to 599 


3,602 


1,720,534 




11.2-1 


700 to 999 


868 


679,404 




4.4l 


1,000 to 2,499 


529 


595,832 




4.5,1 


2,500 and over 


44 


157,556 




1.0^ 


Total 


156,871 


15,446,514 




100. O7I 



Over 78 Percent of All Chickens on Farms in P'-nnsylvania are 
in Flocks of 400 or less. 

1930 U. S- Census Figures 



105L-9 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 






9155 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



FIRST 20 STATES IN VALUE OF CHICKENS ON FAHI.iS 
January 1, 1936 



1. Iowa 

2. PENITSYLVANIA 

3. Illinois 

4. OHIO 

5. MISSOURI 

6. California 

7. New York 

8. Texas 
'9. Indiana 

10. Wisconsin 

11. Minnesota 

12. KANSAS 

13. MICHIGAN 

14. Nebraska 

15. Virginia 

16. Kentucky 

17. Tennessee 

18. NEW JERSEY 

19. Oklahoma 

20. North Carolina 



PENtlLAND 

Pennsylvania 
New Jersey 

West Virginia 

Maryland 

Delaware 



$ 19,683,000 
6,619,000 
2,708,000 
4,573,000 
1,857,000 



$ 35,440,000 



So^urce: 



Burcxu of Agri, Economics 



$ 24,819,000 

19,683,000 

19,485,000 

. 17,522,000 

15,869,000 

15,780,000 
14,748,000 
13,217,000 
13,182,000 
12,958,000 
12,205,000 

10,799,000 

10,337,000 

9,348,000 
7,580,000 
6,920,000 
6,691,000 

6,619,000 

6,377,000 
6 , 038 , 000 



NEW ENGLAND 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rliode Island 

Connecticut 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 





$ 


1 


970 


,000 






1 


,517 

858 


,000 
,000 






2 


715 
386 


,000 
,000 






2 


302 


000 




$ 


9 


748 


000 


96LP- 


-13 









Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Chickens on Farms In Pennsylvania 
Jan-uary 1, 1936 

(*87.5^ of all Pennsylvania farms have chickens) 



Co-gnty N-umber 

York 1,775,460 

Lancaster 1,651,050 
Berks - 985,890 

Bucks 879,200 

Montgomery 708,760 

Bradford 685,090 

Cnester 585,980 

Adams 564,270 

Frariklin 461,620 

Westmoreland 450,180 

Crawford 444,320 

Mercer 406,340 

Wayne 373 , 020 

Washington 370,540 

Northamioton 369,690 

Butler 365,930 

Erie 360,240 

Somerset 351,940 

Cumberland 345,460 

Allegheny 342,560 

Lebanon 336,000 

Lehigh 335,510 
Northumberland 322,620 

Schuylkill 318,210 

Perry 309,260 

Daupnin 300,790 

Bedford 280,090 

Indiana 269,820 

Armstrong 262,800 

Snyder 259,390 

Bus quehar- na 2 57 , 480 

Columbia 247,850 

Lycoming 239,010 

Juniata 234,630 

Lawrence 226,470 



Value County 

$ 1,562,390- Fayette 

1,618,030 Tioga 

1,045,040 Centre 

931,950 Luzerne 

758,370 Clarion 

671,390 Jefferson 

609,420 Mifflin 

524,770 Beaver 

415,460 Cambria 

436,670 Warren 

409,230 Greene 

398,210 Union 

354,370 H'ontingdon 

344,600 Fulton 

358,600 Clearfield 

325,680 Lackawanna 

360,240 Venango 

306,190 Blair 

300,550 Wyoming 

315,160 Monroe 

346,080 Delaware 

338,870 Montour 

287,130 Carbon 

321,390 Potter 

241,220 Clinton 

270,710 Pike 

254,880 Sullivan 

245,540 Elk 

231,260 l.cKean 

204,920 Philadelphia 

250,050 Forest 

235,470 Cameron 
227,060 

187,700 T 

226,470 Total 



Number 

225,500 

224,340 

220,690 

209,070 

182,670 

173,260 

169,150 

168,710 

168,650 

166,580 

156,320 

156,490 

149,110 

149,100 

147,230 

145,970 

157,810 

137,330 

129,490 

111,390 

96,810 

90,880 

87 ,520 

84,830 

79,940 

59,160 

51,310 

50,920 

50,610 

17,870 

17,620 

14,650 



Value 



191 
217 

209 

215 

153 

143 

157 

158 

141 

159 

146 

155 

140 

125 

132 

14S 

129 

131 

129 

103 

105 

89 

84 

72 

66 

55 

44 

50 

50 

19 

15 

14 



680 
610 
850 
340 
440' 
810 
310 
590 
570 
720 
360 
360 
160 
240 
540' 
890 
540 
840 
490 
590 
520 
060 
690 
100 
350 
020 
640 
410 
100 
660 
500 
650 



20,719,000 $ 19,685,000 



Chickens on Penns-'lvania farms nuiiber 4,4o 
more than the preceding :^ear, while the 
value increased over $4,000,000 or 27^--. 



Source - Penna. Dent, of Agri, 
*1935 Census 



116L-7 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



19 



,Vi 



o< 



ci\.ia 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



FIRST 20 STATES IN VALUE OF EGGS PRODUCED 
1935 



I 



1. 


Iowa 


2. 


PEMSYLVAUIA 


3. 


California 


4. 


Kew York 


5. 


OHIO 


6. 


MISSOURI 


7. 


Illinois 


8. 


Texas 


9. 


Wisconsin 


10. 


Minnesota 


11. 


KAITSAS 


12. 


Indiana 



13. MICHIGAN 

14. Netraska 

15. Washington 

16. Virginia 

17. NEW JERSEY 

18. Oklahoma 

19. Tennessee 

20. Kentucky 



PENNLAND 



Pennsylvania 
Hew Jersey 
West Virginia 
Maryl and 
Delaware 



$ 35,552,000 

13,197,000 

6,061,000 

7,833,000 

2,858,000 



if 39,707,000 

35,552,000 

35,322,000 
32,193,000 

31,822,000 

29,825,000 

27,996,000 
25,905,000 
24,630,000 
22,309,000 

22,068,000 

21,261,000 

19,474,000 

15,402,000 
15,030,000 
14,222,000 

13,197,000 

12,244,000 
10,863,000 
10,643,000 



NEW ENGLAND 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



$ 4,815,000 
3,595,000 

1,955,000 
7,260,000 
1,000,000 
5,802,000 



$ 65,501,000 



$24,427,000 



Source; 



Bureau of Agri. Economics 



96LP-11 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



10 aUIAY ZI TZRII 



Oa,^>i-,v:i 



coo, Tt I, 51 



;C 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural StaU 



Production and Value of EGGS in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(Hens on Pennsylvania farms produced 13 eggs for each person in the United States) 



County 

York 

Lancaster 

Bucks 

Berks 

Bradford 

Kontgomery 

Adams 

Chester 

Franklin 

Cra'7ford 

Westmoi-eland 

Mercer 
.JLLlegheny 

Wayne 

Cumberland 

Northampton 

Erie 

Somerset 

Schuylkill 

Butler 

Perry 

Washington 

Lehigh 

Lebanon 

North-omberland 

Dauphi n 

Indiana 
i Susquelianna 

Armstrong 

Juniata 

Lycoming 

Columbia 
!> ?ioga 

Bedford 

Centre 



Eggs 
( Dozen ) 

12,008,010 

10,820,670 

6,279,280 

6,222,220 

4,863,560 

4,780,660 

3,702,850 

3,466,660 

2,956,320 

2,935,780 

2,753,330 

2,446,100 

2,432,830 

2,424,350 

2,335,650 

2,312,510 

2,259,870 

2,196,050 

2,163,890 

2,161,980 

2,116,460 

2,054,470 

2,020,490 

2,012,540 

1,972,040 

1,911,310 

1,824,160 

1,699,290 

1,640,310 

1,607,700 

1,598,840 

1,595,170 

1,565,000 

1,564,190 

1,561,260 



Value County 



$ 2,946,300 
2,885,810 
1,875,630 
1 , 659 , 440 
1,245,210 
1,427,980 
869,. 040 
961,530 
725,360 
720,330 
765,070 
547,990 
726,680 
698,290 
573,080 
690,750 
597,370 
538,820 
646 , 360 
530 , 470 
496,720 
591,760 
560 , 420 
536 , 740 
462,830 
530,130 
467,040 
489,450 
402 , 470 
377,310 
392,290 
442 , 440 
434,080 
383,790 
399 , 730 



bnyaer 

Fayette 

Luzerne 

Lawrence 

Mifflin 

Clarion 

Warren 

Cambria 

Jefferson 

Beaver 

Union 

Greene 

Fulton 

Huntingdon 

Venango 

Blair 

Clearfield 

Wyoming 

Lackawanna 

Monroe 

Delaware 

Montour 

Carbon 

Potter 

Clinton 

Pike 

Elk 

McKean 

Sullivan 

Forest 

Philadelphia 

Cameron 



Eggs 
( Dozen ) 

1,523,210 

1 , 496 , 320 

1,479,290 

1,365,120 

1,212,160 

1,164.510 

1,142,240 

1,123,600 

1,097,500 

1,051.970 

1 , 057 , 080 

1,012,250 

978,500 

903,570 

903,220 

901 , 470 

892,070 

870,400 

364,610 

750,160 

624,490 

604,170 

580,090 

537,670 

493,420 

375,680 

367 , 090 

357,760 

350,830 

116 , 030 

123,040 

96,350 



Value 

389,990 
415,020 
441 , 660 
349,510 
5i:.,350 
265,361 
280 , 200 
311,650 
280,990 
280,550 
232,340 
248.370 
229,650 
240,930 
231,250 
240,420 
237,910 
250,710 
249,030 
192,060 
186,540 
161,130 
173,280 
157,660 
125,530 
92,130 
101,510 
110,740 
89,820 
28,470 
59,530 
27,750 



Total 



134,566,670 $ 35,552,000 



Pennsylvpjiia 


farmers rec 


eived 


almost 


$7 


000, 


000 


more or 


30-1 


increase 


in 


cash 


income 


from e& 


,gs 


in 1955 


aii 


con-nared 


v;i 


th 1954 income figiures. 



So-urce - Penna. Der»t. of A^jri, 



116LP-4 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



\: n.j..->> 



I 

■i 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



FIRST 20 STATES IN VALUE OF CFICKEiJS BAISED 

1935 



1. Iowa 

2. Illinois 

3. OHIO 

4. PENNSYLVANIA 

5. Indiana 

6. MISSOUEI 

7. New York 

8. California 

9. Minnesota 

10. lUNSAS 

11. Wisconsin 

12. Texas 

13. MICHIGAN 



14. 


Nebraska 


15. 


Virginia 


16. 


Kentucky- 


17. 


Oklahoma 


18. 


NEW JERSEY 



19, Tennessee 

20, North Carolina 



PENNLAND 

Pennsylvania 
New Jersey 
West Virginia 
Mar;/-land. 
Delaware 



$ 19,745,000 
7,179,000 
2,914,000 
4,429,000 
2,545,000 



$ 28,407,000 
24,073,000 

19,928,000 

19,745,000 

17,039,000 

16,950,000 

14,772,000 
14,272,000 
14,218,000 

13,572,000 

12,471,000 
12,314,000 

12,125,000 

11,306,000 
9,876,000 
8,325,000 
8,146,000 

7,179,000 

7,022,000 
6,538,000 



NEW ENGLAND 

Maine 

NeV.' Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



$ 2,668,000 
2,235,000 
1,089,000 
4,056,000 
551 , 000 
3,101,000 



Source: 



$ 36,812,000 



Bureau of Agri. Economics 



$12,700,000 



96 L - 11 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



:^r'.■a r r 

. r- ' J t ----- 






n.zx 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



N-umter of Baoy Chicks Bought 

in 

Pennsylvania 



Co-gnty 

Lancaster 

York 

Bucks 

Berks 

Iviontojoraery 

Chester 

Bradford 

Schu;;^lkill 

Tfayne 

Northamr)ton 

Erie 

Westmoreland 

Allegheny 

Franklin 

Lelianon 

Lehigh 

Adams 

Ciainherland 

Da"i4>hin 

North-omherland 

Butler 

Washington 

Crawford 

Columtia 

Snyder 

Somerset 

Perry 

Luzerne 

Mercer 

Mifflin 

Centre 

Juniata 

Indiana 

Lawrence 

Tioga 



Nuraher of 
Bahy Chicks 

1,842,079 
1,729,666 
1,143,965 
355,343 
726,631 
589,833 
503^067 
453 , 545 
371 , 336 
370,952 
357,208 
344,822 
343,795 
343,682 
343,598 
328 , 212 
319,577 
316,535 
314,133 
299,979 
268,205 
254,221 
244,527 
244,043 
241 , 891 
240,188 
216,091 
203,631 
203,400 
192,712 
176,691 
174,018 
174,015 
173,922 
162,124 



Co-gnty 

Lycoming 

Fayette 

Sus quehanna 

Bedford 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Lackawanna 

Camhria 

vTarren 

Clarion 

Jefferson 

Union 

Venango 

Huntingdon 

Carbon 

Wyoming 

Clearfield 

Montour 

Delaware 

Monroe 

Blair 

Fulton 

Clinton 

G-reene 

Pike 

Sullivan 

I.icKean 

Elk 

Potter 

Philadelphia 

Forest 

Cameron 



Total 



Number of 
Bahy Chicks 

158,536 

150,093 

148,327 

141 , 656 

139,717 

137,237 

132,968 

130,409 

123,824 

105.125 

100,859 

99,738 

92,450 

92,153 

90,185 

86,377 

86,114 

83,201 

72,963 

71 , 948 

69,751 

67,801 

56,953 

56,101 

47,997 

53,763 

.33,674 

33,671 

33,116 

11,335 

8,977 

4,072 



17,768,752 



1930 Census Figures 



56L-10 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



The Het-urn From A Questionnaire Mailed to Five Hundred CUST0L':E5.S & PROSPECTS 

OF A 

LEADING EASTE5K HATCHERY** 

-SHOWS- 

57.9^1 SuBscrite regularly to PEMSYLVAITIA FARivES. 
23. V-'^ " " to First Poultry Magazine 
15,8^ " " to Second Poultry Magazine 
31. 6t Do not subscribe to any of these three publications 

34.0-a Subscribe to PEMSYLVAL'JIA FAHlvSR only. 
S.O-I " " First Poultry Magazine only. 
3.0^:^ " " Second Poultry Magazine only. 

ONLY 10.54 ADDITIONAL CUSTOIvEHS GAM BZ PJLA.CHED BY THE 
ADDITIONAL USE OF BOTH POULTRY PUBLICATIONS 

4.5^ Of the Subscribers to PENNSYLVANIA FARI^IER subscribe to both 

the first and Second Poultry i>'agazine. 
27.3-t Of the Subscribers to PENNSYLVA^riA PAEiviER subscribe to the 

First PoTxLtry Magazine. 
18.2f„ Of the Subscribers to PENNSYLVAI^IA FAR2£SR subscribe to the 

Second Poultry Magazine. 

66.6-0 Of the Subscribers to the First Poultry Liagazine subscribe 

to PENNSYLVA^IIA FARi.SR. 
66.6^ Of the subscribers to the Second Poultry Magazine subscribe 

to PENNSYLVA1«A FARIvfER. 



212 Average size of flock. 

197 Average size of flock of subscribers to PENNSYLVAITIA FARi-.lSR. 

231 Average size of flock of non- subscribers to PSNlvTSYLVA^HA FARiviSR. 

410 Average nunber of chicics bo-oght in 1934. 

495 Average nimber of chicks bought by subscribers to PENNSYLVANIA FARi/3R. 
295 Average number of chicks bought by non-subscribers to PEMSYLVAI'TIA 
FARIvER. 

**This hatchery has consistently advertised in all three of these 
publications for several years. Name of hatchery will bo given uoon 
request. 

December, 1934 



338 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



.teeirp A moil an 



oi eui'iui£ci^ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Circulation of Everybody's Poultry Magazine and Po\iltry Item 
in Pennsylvania Farmer's Territory 





Everybody' s 


Poultry 


Pennsylvani 




Poultry Mag. 


Item 


Farmer 


Pennsj''lvania 


33,533 


31 , 551 


123,400 


New Jersey 


4,099 


7,160 


9,511 


Maryland 


5,004 


3,751 


6,795 


Delaware 


1,304 


1,001 


1,876 


West Virginia 


1,434 


2,531 


11,834 


Total 


45,374 


45,994 


153,416 


Adv. Hate 


$1.10 


$1.10 


$1.00 



If the t'-'o poultry -oapers had no duplicate circulation and ALL of their 
circula.tion in Pennsylvania - 65,084 was on farms they '-"O'ald be reaching 
only 34)3 of the 191,284 farms in Pennsylvania, while Pennsylvania Farmer 
alone reaches 64. 5'"^ and has ijractically no small town circulstion. 



Everybody's Poultry wiagazine circiilation figures as of June, 1936. 
Poultry Item Circulation as of June, 1936 
Pennsylvania Farmer circulation as of June, 1936 



116FF-5 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



"10 ^ciJi-^iii-o-xiO 



'3T S'l 



10 } . I 



^tPWcX?' 



01, 



JX.X^ 



19 1 olxnV 
.lio aytoi iiii^,; 



^'r>Trr> 



7.tL''C^ 



at lo 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



PHEFEHENCE OF DAIHYIffiN MD POULTRYI/ZEN IN PErJSYLVAl'TIA 

Sesiilts of a questionnaire sent out (■Jovem'ber , 1954) ty Gardner 
Advertising Agency, St. Louis, Ivlissouri to a list of ^ros-oects 
and customers (in Pennsylvania) of Ealston Purina Co. Inc., St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Note that this was not sent to the sulDscribers of any -outlication 
but rather to the advertisers' prospects and customers so that the 
results may he taken as representin£; fairly, actual reade:r preference. 

Dairv Farmers 
Mont. Prcf. 
Magazines Mentioned 

PEM'ISYLVAlvIA FAiuviSE 

Farm Journal 

Count r;' Gontlemen 

Successful Farming 

Rural New Yorker 

Hoard's Dairyman 

Po'oltr;- Item 

American Poultr"' Journal 

Svcr^'hody's Poultr;- Magazine 

Poultry Tribune 

74^ of all Dairy Farmers IfENTIONED PEMSYLVAITIA ?A5I,ZE and it was PSSFEEZSD 

almost three times more than the next magazine. 
55^ of all Po-oltry Farmers I/Jl'-TIOIJEL PEMSYLVANIA FAPJvEH and it was PEiJFBIuTSD 

three times more than the next magazine. 

Abbreviations: 

Ivlcnt. - Mentioned 
Prof. - Preference 

371 



50 


30 


39 


4 


28 


3 


26 


2 


21 


12 


21 


12 



Poultry 


Farmers 




Total 


Ment. 


Prcf. 


Mojnt. 


Pi-ef. 


45 


21 


105 


51 


24 


4 


63 


8 


22 


5 


50 


8 


14 


3 


40 


5 


18 


5 


39 


17 


5 


1 


26 


IC 


12 


5 


12 


5 


16 


6 


16 


6 


14 


2 


14 


2 


17 


7 


17 


7 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



";l 



Od 


^"'. 


U- 


0^ 


'- 


&I 


.. ■ 


3 


--- 


b'i 


X 


c 


Si 


a 


^I 


61 


5 


31 


.■■. r 


S 


*I 


fl 


V 


^X 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



ALL CATTLE and CALVES on Farms in Pennsylvania 
Jamaary 1, 1936 
(79fo of all Pennsylvania farms have cattle) 



Coiinty 

Lancaster 

Chester 

Bradford 

Crawford 

Susquehanna 

York 

Berks 

Washington 

Erie 

Tioga 

Westmoreland 

Mercer 

Wayne 

Somerset 

Franklin 

Bucks 

Bedford 

Butler 

CumlDerland 

Montgomery 

Centre 

Indiana 

L eh anon 

Adams 

Lycoming 

Greene 

Lawrence 

Fayette 

Dauphin 

Northampton 

Armstrong 

Clarion 

Warren 

Potter 

Wyoming 



N'omher 



Value County 



Number 



Value 



94 
59 
59 
55 
51 
49 
44 
43 
41 
41 
40 
39 
37 
36 
34 
31 
23 
26 
26 
23 
23 
23 
23 
22 
21 
21 
20 
20 
20 
18 
18 
17 
17 
16 
15 



,040 
,820 
,230 
,130 
,870 
,390 
,490 
,840 
,690 
,560 
,140 
,380 
,590 
,120 
,510 
,510 
,730 
,780 
,100 
,520 
,240 
,220 
,020 
,090 
,990 
,360 
,620 
,590 
,130 
,340 
,230 
,970 
,840 
,980 
,270 



5,698 

4,007 

3,156 

2,756 

3,112 

2,597 

2,936 

2,192 

2,088 

2,166 

2,047 

1,716 

1,892 

1,549 

1,863 

2,032 

1,165 

1,189 

1 , 312 

1,625 

1,120 

1,007 

1,473 

1,188 

1,035 

869 

927 

858 

970 

1,148 

824 

734 

867 

859 

916 



,820 
,940 
,960 
,500 
,200 
,910 
,340 
,000 
,670 
,320 
,140 
,970 
,040 
,550 
,540 
,400 
,420 
,030 
,830 
,230 
,170 
,750 
,280 
, 440 
,750 
,350 
,900 
,900 
,270 
,080 
,000 
,970 
,020 
,190 
,200 



Huntingdon 

Allegheny 

Lacka'.7anna 

No r thiimh e r 1 and 

Perry 

Jefferson 

Clearfield 

Beaver 

Blair 

Camhria 

ColTJmhia 

Venango 

Sch\aylkill 

Luzerne 

Lehigh 

Mifflin 

Union 

Snyder 

Juniata 

McKean 

Fulton 

Clinton 

Monroe 

Sullivan 

Delaware 

Montour 

Elk 

Carbon 

Forest 

Pike 

Cameron 

Philadelphia 



15 

15 

14 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

11 

10 

10 

9 

9 

8 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5 

4 

2 

2 

1 



160 
090 
010 
890 
710 
690 
260 
170 
050 
870 
450 
550 
330 
260 
230 
360 
150 
010 
640 
550 
120 
940 
390 
230 
040 
540 
700 
950 
050 
750 
830 
690 



Total 



1,469,000 



$ 792, 


670 


676, 


030 


812, 


580 


676, 


440 


621 


060 


532 


540 


574 


160 


590 


020 


715, 


140 


501 


930 


694 


020 


533 


520 


733 


800 


574 


300 


615 


170 


602 


080 


571 


440' 


555 


550 


534 


060 


515 


700 


312 


620 


356 


700 


304 


160 


311 


500 


422 


800 


312 


460 


224 


650 


177 


000 


92 


,250 


69 


650 


41 


000 


44 


710 


77,115 


000 



Cattle on Pennsylvania farms number the 
same as the preceding year, while the value 
has increased $25,000,000 or 49fo. 



106L-4 



Source - Pcnna. Dept. of Agri, 

Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Xjiasio J 



Lie 



.1.-. 



:I 



a.' 
3-: 



■^nin:oo'';J 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Horses on Farms in Pennsylvania 

Janioary 1, 1936 

(65fo of all Pennsylvania farms have horses) 



County Kumher 

Lancaster 14,520 

Crawford 10,750 

Chester 10,230 

Franklin 9,630 

Berks 9,390 

Bradford 8,690 

Eri e 8 , 550 

York 8,380 

Bucks 7,970 

Washington 7,620 

Westmoreland 7,610 

Mercer 7,360 

Somerset 6,280 

Montgomery 6,190 

Butler 6,180 

Tioga 5,970 

Susquehanna 5,760 

Indiana 5,590 

C'amherland 5,580 

Lycoming 5,510 

Adams _ 5,460 

Bedford 5,260 

Northampton 4,980 

Lehigh 4,900 

Armstrong 4,860 

Greene 4,860 

Fayette 4,720 

Wayne 4,280 

Centre 4,220 

Lawrence 4,110 

Clarion 4,080 

Allegheny 3,890 

Sch-uylkill 3,860 

Col-umbia 3,850 
Northumberland 3,850 



Value County 



1,815,720 

1,591,000 

1,319,670 

1 , 328 , 940 

1,211,310 

1,242,670 

1,222,650 

1,081,020 

1,099,860 

1,051,560 

1,088,230 

1,052,480 

929 , 440 

711,850 

939,360 

943,260 

858,240 

799,370 

714,240 

843,030 

720,720 

699,580 

687,240 

725,200 

767,880 

694,980 

679,680 

654,840 

582 , 360 

649,380 

652,800 

556,270 

551,980 

531 , 300 

512,050 



Lebanon 
Dauphin 
Jefferson 
Luzerne 
Beaver 
Cambria 
Clearfield 
Tifarren 
Potter 
H"untingdon 
Venango 
Blair 
Snyder 
Perry 
Mifflin 
Union 
Lackawanna 
Delaware 
Wyoming 
Fulton 
Juniata 
Monroe 
Montour 
McKean 
Clinton 
Sullivan 
Carbon 
'Elk 

Philadelphia 
Forest 
Pike 
Cameron 



Total 



Number 

3,690 
3,610 
3,490 
3,150 
3,040 
3,040 
3,030 
2,950 
2,900 
2,850 
2,690 
2.660 
2,620 
2,600 
2,400 
2,390 
2,160 
2,150 
2,150 
2,130 
2,100 
1,800 
1,680 
1,600 
1,590 
1,150 
1,090 
840 
510 
430 
370 
200 



Value 

$ 476,010 
469,300 
523,500 
481 , 950 
434,720 
419,520 
442 , 380 
439,550 
394,400 
379,050 
398,120 
388,360 
340,600 
345,800 
331,200 
329,820 
352,080 
294,550 
354,750 
283,290 
273,000 
248,400 
218,400 
220,800 
235,320 
187,450 
155,870 
125,160 
61 , 200 
63,640 
53,650 
30,000 



294,000 $ 41,262,000 



(Horses on Pennsylvania farms number the same as the 
preceding year, but the value increased over 14^). 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri . 



105L-1 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



-'S,X 



, M 1. 



.loj^ni 



J 5 3 tame. 



jbOBlli 



3.' 



LI 



jnsxiaama. 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



Mules on Farms in Pennsylvania 
January 1, 1936 
{l2fo of all Pennsylvania farms have mules) 



County Num"ber 

York 9,780 

Lancaster 9,460 

Berks 3,520 

Adams 2,710 

Cumberland 2,660 

Lebanon 2,240 

Dauphin 2,020 

Perry 1,860 

Pranklin 1,350 

Chester 1,320 
Northumherland 1,100 

Juniata 980 

Schuylkill 950 

Huntingdon 920 

Columhia 710 

Mifflin 710 

Luzerne 700 

Snyder 690 

Bedford 630 

Lehigh 530 

Indiana 520 

Centre 450 

Westmoreland 420 

Bucks 410 

Pulton 390 

Union 380 

Clearfield 360 

Blair 350 

Washington 340 

Northampton 310 

Cambria 300 

Somerset 280 

Crawford 260 

Jefferson 250 

Bradford 240 



Value 

$ 1,564,800 

1,419,000 

510,400 

392,950 

372,400 

349,440 

303,000 

279,000 

189,000 

191,400 

154,000 

132,300 

150,100 

128,800 

110,050 

95,850 

105,000 

93,150 

94,500 

79,500 

75,400 

65,100 

67,500 

59 , 450 

56,550 

57,000 

50,400 

50,750 

49,300 

44,950 

47,100 

44,800 

37,180 

38,750 

33,840 



County 

Wyoming 

Greene 

Mercer 

Armstrong 

Allegheny 

Montgomery 

Butler 

Fayette 

Lackawanna 

Lycoming 

Clinton 

Car Don 

Susquehanna 

Clarion 

Lawrence 

li7ayne 

Erie 

Beaver 

Monroe 

Venango 

Montour 

Warren 

Delaware 

Elk ^ 

Tioga 

Potter 

Sullivan 

Pike 

Forest 

McKean 

Ca,meron 

Philadelphia 



Total 



Number 

240 

230 

220 

220 

220 

220 

200 

200 

190 

180 

170 

160 

140 

140 

140 

130 

120 

120 

120 

110 

100 

60 

60 

50 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 

10 



Value 

38,880 

31,050 

27,280 

37,180 

31,900 

28,600 

31,200 

27,000 

28,500 

23,220 

22,780 

27,200 

17,500 

21,700 

20 , 300 

19,500 

16,500 

18,600 

17,400 

12,540 

15,000 

6,780 

9,000 

6,200 

7,150 

5,040 

3,600 

■ 3,100 

1,320 

1,210 



54,000 $ 8,050,000 



M"ales on Pennsylvania farms n'oraher the same as the 
preceding year, but the value increased over 27*o. 



So'orcG - Penna. Lept. of Ai^ri. 



1C6L-2 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Of! 

c-sx 

Oil 



U3 

03 



oe 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



\ 



SWINE on Farms in Pennsylvania 

January 1, 1936 

(47^ of all Pennsylvania farms have swine) 



County 

York 

Lancaster 

Berks 

Franklin 

Crimberland 

Dauphi n 

Adanis 

Bedford 

Montgomery 

Westmoreland 

Centre 

Lycoming 

Columbia 

Bucks 

Washington 

Delaware 

Somerset 

No r th"amb e rl and 

Lehigh 

Chester 

Crawford 

Mercer 

Northampton 

Butler 

Lebanon 

Armstrong 

Perry 

Clarion 

Fayette 

Indiana 

Huntingdon 

Mifflin 

Erie 

Snyder 

Greene 



N'um'b er 

42,700 

32,650 

30,290 

25,280 

20,520 

19,960 

17,390 

14,990 

14,870 

14,140 

13,690 

13,570 

13,260 

13,080 

12,510 

12,490 

12,200 

11,790 

11,420 

11,130 

10,900 

10,430 

10,040 

9,570 

9,330 

9,210 

9,050 

8,850 

8,810 

8,550 

8,510 

8,200 

7,690 

7,650 

7,530 . 



Value County 



529,480 
465 , 900 
395,600 
313,470 
270,860 
274,650 
229,550 
191,870 
203,720 
229,070 
151,960 
161,480 
176,350 
163,430 
177,800 
167,370 
159,580 
174,490 
172,440 
146,920 
167,860 
149,150 
135,880 
146,420 
133,420 
128,020 
113,120 
115,180 
128,530 
130,110 
105,520 
110,700 
116,890 
73,440 
86,600 



Blair 

Schujrlkill 

Union 

Allegheny 

Juniata 

Lawrence 

Cambria 

Fulton 

Jefferson 

Montour 

Bradford 

Clearfield 

Luzerne 

Venango 

Clinton 

Beaver 

Susquehanna 

Tioga 

Monroe 

Wa.rren 

Wayn^ 

Carbon 

Lackawanna 

Potter 

Wyoming 

Sullivan 

Forest 

Elk 

McKean 

Pike 

Cameron 

Philadelohia 



Total 



Number 

7,030 
6,940 
6,370 
5,200 
6 , 010 
5,980 
5,480 
5,470 
5,260 
5,230 
4,890 
4,670 
4,550 
3,880 
3,820 
3,550 
5,220 
3,310 
2,810 
2,600 
2, 550 
1,710 
1,540 
1,520 
1,500 
1,430 
1,180 
1,000 
970 
380 
220 
70 



Value 

74,520 
111,040 
91,090 
83,080 
64,910 
102,860 
70,690 
57,980 
57,850 
77,400 
64,550 
67,720 
78,720 
47,340 
38,570 
52 , 700 
44,760 
44,350 
37,930 
35, 350 
42 , 250 
30,440 
29,030 
16,590 
26,400 
15,010 
15,340 
13,200 
11,540 
5,090 
2,510 
930 



604,000 $ 3,131,000 



Swine on Pennsylvania fanns increased 
50,000 head and value increased 82ffe 
this year, as compared with last year. 



So-orce - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



105L-5 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



, i. 






Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Sheep on Farms in Pennsylvania 
January 1, 1936 
((i,2fo of all Pennsylvania farms have sheep) 



Coxmty 


Number 


Value 


County 


Nurat 


)er 


Value 


Greene 


140,340 


$ 773,750 


Perry 


2,040 


$ 11,630 


Wasnington 


102,580 


605,220 


Sullivan 


2,000 


11,000 


Mercer 


13,250 


78,180 


Jefferson 


1,920 


10,370 


Crawford 


10,420 


61 , 480 


Warren 


1,890 


10,020 


Tioga 


10,270 


55,400 


Bucks 


1,780 


11,390 


Bradford 


10,240 


54,270 


Lebanon 


1,770 


11,330 


Franklin 


10,060 


69,410 


Montgomery 


1,630 


10,110 


Clamber land 


8,790 


60,650 


Cambria 


1,580 


9,320 


Butler 


8,250 


47,850 


Wayne 


1,560 


9,360 


Bedford 


8,140 


52,100 


Delaware 


1,530 


9,490 


Lancaster 


7,110 


46 , 220 


Dauphi n 


1,510 


9,060 


Indiana 


6,670 


39 , 350 


Lycoming 


1,360 


7,340 


Somerset 


6,350 


36 , 200 


Northampton 


1,270 


8,510 


Lawrence 


6,510 


37,230 


Juniata 


1,150 


6,440 


Westmoreland 


5,800 


34,220 


Wyoming 


1,150 


6,210 


Chester 


5,550 


36 , 630 


CI earf i el d 


800 


4,240 


Susquehanna 


5,330 


30,910 


Northumberland 


780 


4,450 


Potter 


5,150 


27,810 


Luzerne 


710 


3,900 


Beaver 


4,880 


25,350 


Monroe 


570 


5,650 


Venango 


4,550 


24,570 


Cameron 


460 


2, 550 


Payette 


4,520 


25,310 


Clinton 


440 


2,160 


Huntingdon 


4,380 


25,84-0 


Union 


360 


1,980 


Adams 


4,060 


25,980 


Snyder 


310 


1,740 


Armstrong 


3,970 


21,040 


Forest 


270 


1,450 


York 


3,940 


27,580 


Columbia 


250 


1,580 


Lehigh 


3,470 


20,470 


Schuylkill 


230 


1,290 


Erie 


3,400 


18,020 


Montour 


210 


1,130 


Fulton 


3,390 


20,000 


Lackawanna 


190 


1 , 030 


Allegheny 


3,390 


18,310 


Pike 


180 


1 , 060 


Centre 


3,180 


17,810 


Elk 


150 


780 


Berks 


5,080 


20,020 


Philadelphia 


130 


810 


Blair 


2,910 


18,520 


Carbon 


110 


660 


iviifflin 


2,880 


15,550 








McKean 


2,650 


14,310 








Clarion 


2,440 


13,660 


•Total 


462,000 $ 2,676,000 




Sneep on 


Pennsylva.nia 


farms is valued 


305^ 








higher than the number on farms last 


year . 







So-orce - Penna. Dopt. of Agri. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



115Ir-6 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of WOOL in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(420,000 shee'i were fleeced in Pennsylvania) 





Production 






Production 


bounty 


Po-onds 


Value 


County 


Po-unds 


Value 


jreene 


1,062,430 


$ 265, ?10 


Peri-^- 


13,020 


$ 2,550 


fashington 


777,080 


202 , 040 


Sullivan 


11,680 


3,040 


■;iercer 


84,000 


22,680 


Warren 


11 , 350 


3,060 


Crawford 


69,150 


17,980 


Bucks 


11,320 


2,380 


franklin 


67,490 


16,870 


Lebanon 


11 , C60 


2,430 


jOumterl.and 


60,880 


15,220 


Dauphi n 


10,570 


2,430 


Bradford 


59,500 


13,680 


Jefferson 


10,450 


2,510 


Tioga 


58,480 


13,450 


Montgomery 


9,670 


2,520 


Butler 


51 , 600 


13,420 


Delaware 


9,230 


1 , 750 


Lancaster 


49,730 


10,440 


Carahria 


8,960 


2,240 


Bedford 


44,630 


10,710 


'Tayne 


8,190 


1,970 


I ndi ana 


41 , 760 


10,440 


Northam-oton 


8,150 


1,S6C 


La'.'^rence 


40,360 


10,900 


Lycoming 


7,980 


1,840 


Chester 


37,270 


7,080 


Juniata 


7,050 


1,690 


Westmoreland 


35,710 


8,210 


Wyoming 


6,280 


1 , 630 


SoHTierset 


34,320 


8,580 


Northumberland 5,150 


1,240 


Beaver 


30,320 


7,880 


Clearfield 


4,480 


1,160 


Susquehanna 

Fayette 

Potter 


30 , 220 


8,160 


Luzerne 


3,960 


910 


29,570 


7,690 


Monroe 


3,340 


730 


29,550 


7,390 


Cameron - 


2,740 


680 


Venango 


28,440 


7,390 


Clinton 


2,660 


530 


Adams 


26,030 


5,990 


Union 


2,330 


580 


Huntingdon 
Armstrong 


25,760 


5,920 


Snyder 


1,950 


410 


24,940 


6,730 


Forest 


1,600 


420 


York 


24,060 


5,290 


Montoxir 


1,350 


510 


Berks 


22,500 


5,400 


Columbia 


1,320 


500 


Erie 


22,060 


5,290 


Schu:dkill 


1,240 


250 


Lehigh 


21,390 


4,490 


Lackawanna 


1,080 


270 


Mifflin 


19,750 


4,940 


Pike 


1,000 


200 


Centre 


19,080 


4,770 


Elk 


880 


250 


Fiji ton 


19,000 


4,750 


Philadelnhia 


300 


170 


Allegheny 


17,850 


4,460 


Carbon 


710 


150 


Blair 


16,980 


4,240 








yicKean 


14,830 


3,560 








Clarion 


13,700 


3,700 


Total 3, 


192,000 


$ 798,000 




In 1935 


Pennsylvania 


farmers received 




1 


highest 


'vool prices 


- one cent more 




ner pound than 


farmers received in any otl" 


.er state. 


L26LP-3 












Srsir-ce - Penna. 


Dept. of Agri, 
Pennsvl 


unnin F'nu'nr 


tt»f /7rk«lo»o I* D. 


._« 





Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



Hives of Bees on Farms in Pennsylvania 
Janxiary 1, 1936 
(There are more Beekeepers in Pennsylvania than any other state) 



Sounty 

adford 

Lancaster 

Bedford 

ITork 

Somerset 

Erie 

Westmoreland 
' Berks 

Greene 

Washington 

Armstrong 

jJefferson 

iCol-umtia 

Indiana 

3ucks 

Icrawford 

Tioga 

Fr ankl i n 

Adams 

Clearfield 

Butler 

Fayette 

Mercer 

Ciomherland 

Centre 

H"antingdon 
1 Lehigh 
I Clarion 
' Perry 
: Susqhehanna 
; Camhria 
i Dauohin 

1 Chester 

Northampton 

Luzerne 



Hives 



6 


,920 


3 


,910 


3 


720 


3 


670 


3 


400 


3 


27C 


3 


180 


3 


060 


2 


810 


2 


810 


2 


750 


2 


700 


2 


700 


2 


690 


2 


660 


2 


630 


2 


500 


2 


470 


2 


450 


2 


410 


2 


290 


2 


270 


2 


260 


2 


200 


2 


180 


2 


030 


1 


920 


1, 


910 


1 


770 


1 


760 


1 


730 


1, 


700 


1, 


700 


1, 


690 


1, 


680 



Value County 



Hives 



27,680 


Wayne 


1,620 


17,600 


Korthuraherland 


1,600 


10,420 


Potter 


1,590 


12,110 


Fulton 


1,590 


10,200 


Alleghenj'- 


1,560 


12,100 


Venango 


1,520 


11,770 


Blair 


1 , 480 


11,630 


Lycoming 


1,450 


10,680 


Montgomery 


1 , 420 


12,080 


Wyoming 


1,40C 


11 , 000 


Monroe 


1,380 


9,720 


Lawrence 


1 , 360 


8,910 


Schuylkill 


1,360 


8,070 


Beaver 


1,220 


9,840 


Snyder 


1,190 


9,990 


Mifflin 


1,140 


11,000 


Lehanon 


1,140 


8,89C 


Juniata 


1,010 


9,590 


barren 


1,000 


8,680 


Lackawanna 


950 


9,390 


Carhon 


890 


8,170 


Sullivan 


820 


9,940 


I.'lontour 


800 


6,380 


McKean 


700 


8,070 


Clinton 


580 


7,100 


Union 


580 


7,300 


Elk 


570 


6,300 


Forest 


390 


7,080 


Pike 


300 


6,690 


Delaware 


300 


6,750 


Ca-neron 


170 


5,610 


Philadelphia 


30 


6,800 






5,920 






6,890 


Total 


124,900 



Value 



Honey considered as a oy-TDroduct "b"'- Ponnsylvania beekeepers 
returned $314,000 casn income in 1935. Mo^t bees are kerit 
largely for pollenization of fruits and berries. 



Source - Penna, De-ot. of Agri, 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



6 


480 


5 


600 


6 


04C 


4 


610 


7 


020 


7 


300 


5 


330 


5 


430 


5 


820 


5 


460 


/ 


420 


5 


580 


5 


710 


4 


150 


3 


570 


4 


670 


O J 


990 


o 


030 


o 


400 


3, 


990 


4 


000 


3 


120 


2 


480 


2 


750 


2 


260 


2, 


200 


2 


220 


1 


480 


1 


200 


1 


110 




660 




100 



$ 465,510 



115L-S 



yrst- 



39viH 



io3. QIOB'. 9TS 319fiT) 



*»ifTsV 



XI 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Production and Value of HONEY in Pennsylvania 

1935 
(Honey is produced mostly on fruit farms in Pennsylvania) 



Co'jnty 

Bradford 

Lancaster 

Bedford 

York 

Berks 

Srie 

Somerset 

Washington 

Crawford 

Westmoreland 

Columoia 

Indiana 

Cumberland 

Armstrong 

Greene 

Adams 

Jefferson 

Franklin 

Clearfield 

Tioga 

Butler 

Centre 

Lehigh 

Bucks 

Potter 

Cambria 

H'untingdon 

Fayette 

Mercer 

Chester 

Northampton 

Daunhi n 

Luzerne 

Fulton 

Allegheny 



Pounds 



Value 



183,530 


$ 22,020 


Clarion 


X ^J '-U.i.U.0 

36,180 


107,400 


18,260 


Lycoming 


35,220 


93,660 


13,810 


Venp.ngo 


54,550 


76 , 430 


14,550 


ITontgomerj'- 


33,620 


72,460 


10,150 


Perry 


33,530 


71,240 


9,970 


T73;-oming 


33,150 


70,850 


9,210 


Wn.vne 


32,220 


69,200 


13,150 


Northumberland 31 , 830 


67,260 


8,740 


Susquehanna 


30,010 


66,270 


11,270 


Lawrence 


29,630 


61,380 


7,980 


Schtiylkill 


29,630 


61,150 


9,170 


Blair 


29,440 


60,430 


8,460 


Beaver 


28,890 


59,910 


8,990 


Lebanon 


28,070 


58,560 


9,370 


Honroe 


26,140 


58 , 250 


8,740 


Mifflin 


25,910 


56,260 


9,000 


Warren 


23,680 


56,150 


7,860 


Juniata 


22,960 


52 , 500 


7,350 


Snjrdcr 


22,540 


52,090 


6,770 


Lackawanna 


18,000 


52,060 


9,570 


Sullivan 


17,860 


51,620 


8,780 


Carbon 


16,860 


45,460 


6,370 


Montour 


16,670 


45,350 


8,620 


Clinton 


15,930 


45,180 


6,780 


1.1 cK can 


15,250 


44,240 


6,190 


Elk 


12,420 


44,220 


6,190 


Union 


10,440 


45,000 


7,740 


Forest 


7,390 


42 , 810 


7,280 


Pike 


5,680 


40,250 


6,440 


Delaware 


5,680 


40,020 


5,600 


Cameron 


4,550 


38,640 


5,800 


Philadelphia 


600 


58,190 


5,730 






37,550 


4,890 






36,940 


5,910 


Total 2 


,820,000 


Pennsylvania farmers 


received $314,000 cash 




income 


from the sale of honey in 1935. 





$ 



Value 

4.7C0 
4,530 
4,840 
6,390 
4,360 
4,640 
4,510 
4,460 
4,200 
5,040 
4,740 
4,710 
5,200 
5,330 
5,400 
3,890 
5,320 
2,990 
5,160 
2,880 
2,320 
2,7CO 
2,530 
2,550 
1,980 
1,620 
1,570 
1,110 
910 
970 
650 
110 



$ 425,000 



Sotirce - Pcnna. Dc^t. of Acvri. 



126LP-5 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



i 



iW 



■^ 



s. 



.aaaol — eoii/ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Section Four 



FARM EQ.UIFMENT AND MCHINEHY 



Among the first 10 states in farm cash 
income Pennsylvainia ranks 5th in numher 
and -oercentage of electrified farms. 
Over 81f5 of all Pennsylvania farms have 
automobiles and the state ranks high in 
the use of all types of labor-saving farm 
and home eq\iipment. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 

V?,lue of I>;7el lings on Farms 

Pennsvlvania Compared witn U.S.A. 

It is very interesting to note that the -oercentage of farmers' 
6.wellings in the higher value classes is much greater in Pennsyl- 
vania than in the United States as a whole. 

In Pennsylvania, 68^ of the dwellings on farms operated by ov-Ticrs 
axe in the $1,000 to $5,000 value class, while in the United States, 
there are onlj/" 47^ in that class. Even the dwellings on farms op- 
erated by tenants show 67fj in the $1,000 to $5,000 value class, .vith 
oi^y 23fb for the United States* 

Tiie value of farmers' dwellings by owners and tenants in Pennsyl- 
vania and United States is as follows: 

Dwellings on Farms O^nerated by 0^-ners 

Penna. Per cent U.S.A. Per cent 



^ 



Under $1,000 30,913 21.3fi 1,539,990 43.9^ 

$1,000 - $4,999 98,814 68.2^ 1,734,305 47.8-1 

$5,000 - $9,999 8,765 6.0-^ 132,726 3.7" 

$10,000 - $14,999 1,046 .7^ 14,305 .44 

$15,000 - $19,999 314 .2i 3,715 .1:1 

$20,000 and over 339 .31 4,088 .ij 

Not re-norted 4,829 3.3l 145,154 4.0fi 

145,025 1,524,283 

D-.-ellings on Farms Operated by Tenants 

U.S.A. Per cent 

Under $1,000 4,592 16.8fo 1,742,551 65. 4j 

$1,000 - $4,993 18,337 67.0^ 617,565 ^^'-^^^ 

$5,000 - $9,999 1,733 6.3fo ^^'??? -'P^ 

I 

o 



Pezma. 


Per cent 


4,592 


16.8fo 


18,337 


67.0^ 


1,733 


6.3fo 


143 


.51 


29 


.if^ 


24 


.11 


2,536 


q od. 



$10,000 - $14,999 143 .51 1,722 .l-> 



378 .01 
298 .01 



$15,000 - $19,999 

$20,000 - and over 

Not reported 2.556 9.2l 277^048' 10. 4-. 

27,394 654,365 

The Pennsylvania farmers have better homes and arc constantly in 
the market for products and improvements to make their homes more 
comfortable and liveable. 



234 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



ELECTRICITY ON FAEI.IS IN PENiTSYLVMIA 

Earns With High Line Hook-Up 
Farms Having Individiial Light Plants 
Un-electrif ied Farms 





Farms Served 


Farms Having 


Co\int.y 


Power Lines 


Light Plants 


Lancaster 


4,379 


1,005 


Sucks 


2,691 


338 


York 


2,534 


478 


Chester 


2,504 


519 


Montgomery 


2,279 


280 


Erie 


1,898 


277 


Berks 


1 , 604 


553 


Mercer 


1,441 


294 


Westmoreland 


1,382 


342 


Northampton 


1,316 


211 


Allegheny 


1,204 


192 


Crawford 


1,041 


235 • 


Somerset 


991 


223 


Lehigh 


979 


150 


Franklin 


929 


174 


Blair 


893 


135 


Lebanon 


848 


161 


Wayne 


753 


334 


Washington 


728 


312 


Bradford 


724 


404 


Lawrence 


712 


186 


Lackawanna 


710 


145 


Dauphi n 


703 


216 


Fayette 


697 


172 


Schujrikill 


687 


321 


Adams 


677 


215 


Clearfield 


664 


85 


Luzerne 


654 


202 


C"uinberland 


620 


183 


Beaver 


613 


170 


Susquehanna 


579 


389 


Indiana 


533 


112 


Delaware 


532 


89 


Butler 


515 


237 


Northumherland 


491 


155 


Cambria 


478 


126 


Monroe 


459 


129 


Tioga 


450 


153 


Lycoming 


442 


259 


Centre 


440 


80 


Bedford 


415 


250 


Jefferson 


379 


74 



Farms 
Un-electrified 

3,479 
2.041 

4,845 
1,913 
1,287 
3,211 
3,845 
2,891 
3,644 
1,248 
2,198 
5,144 
2,630 
1,732 
2,758 

842 
1,259 
1,762 
4,032 
3,856 
1,757 

708 
1,721 
3,085 
1,795 ■ 
2,689 
2,557 
1,913 
2,229 
1,571 
2 , 303 
3,197 

374 
3,434 
1,741 
2,225 

S62 
2,626 
2,313 
1,585 
2,495 
2,285 



Total 
Farir:S 

8,663 
5,070 
7,857 
4,936 
3,546 
5,386 
6,002 
4,626 
5,368 
2,775 
3,594 
6,420 
3,344 
2,861 
3,861 
1,871 
2,268 
2,849 
5,172 
4,984 
2,655 
1,565 
2,640 
3,954 
2,803 
3,581 
3,306 
2,769 
3,032 
2,354 
3,271 
3,842 
995 
4,186 
2,387 
2,529 
1,450 
3,259 
3,014 
2,105 
3,160 
2,758 



(Over) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 





Farm 


s Served 


Farms Having 


Farms 


Total 


Coijiitv 


Power Lines 


Light Plants 


Un-electrified 


Farms 


Warren 




375 


15 


1 , 65t:' 


2 , 104 


Colv4nbia 




313 


210 


1,952 


2,475 


Huntingdon 




206 


120 


1,619 


2 , 035 


McJCegn 




293 


27 


1,174 


1,497 


Ai.v. strong 




291 


97 


2,963 


5,351 


PF.rry 




273 


100 


■ 1 , 481' 


1 , 854 


Mi fflin 




260 


71 


839 


1,220 


UTii en 




257 


35 


849 


1,141 


FyoTiiip,g 




249 


151 


1,060 


1,450 


Clarion 




233 


80 


2,283 


2,596 


Greene 




213 


89 


2,868 


5,170 


C?ii'r;on 




206 


88 


530 


924 


Piiiiadeliohia 




197 


10 


79 


266 


Clinton 




193 


57 


773 


1,023 


Snyder 




192 


47 


1,473 


1,712 


Venango 




187 


131 


1,963 


2,281 


JtuiLata 




174 


80 


1,195 


1,449 


Pike 




172 


108 


153 


443 


Elk , ■ 




115 


23 


754 


392 


F-ulton 




115 


79 


1,161 


1,355 


Potter 




106 


• 48 


1,595 


1 , 749 


Siollivan 




84 


69 


565 


718 


Monto-jr 




76 


29 


578 


583 


Cameron 




15 


12 


172 


199 


Forest 




8 


11 


422 


441 


Total 


48 


,455 


12 , 423 


130,396 


191,284 




25. 3^i) 


oe.ofo 


68.2^ 


lOO^fc 



Farms Served By Power Lines - Pennsvlvania Joint Committee on Sural Electrif icati 

January 1, 1935. 

Farms Having Light Plants - 1930 Census 

Farms Un-electrified derived by subtracting farms having electricity from total 
fa.rras in state. 

Farms - 1930 Census 



86E-12 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



First 20 States In Number of Farms Served Electricity- 
Peri od Ending Jxme 30, 1936 



State 



Farms Served 



1. 


California 


91,329 


2. 


Hew York 


65,288 


3. 


OHIO 


58,383 


4. 


MIOHIGM 


56,466 


5. 


PEMSYIVMIA 


50,797 


6. 


Wisconsin 


41 , 635 


7. 


Washington 


40,924 


8. 


Iowa 


33,676 


y. 


Illinois 


32,269 


10. 


Indiana 


29,013 


11. 


Massachusetts 


20,923 


12. 


Oregon 


19,859 


13. 


MISSOURI 


19,168 


14. 


Utah 


18,133 


15. 


Connecticut 


18,114 


16. 


Virginia 


16,556 


17. 


Idaho 


16,005 


18, 


KEW JERSEY 


15,351 


19. 


KAIISAS 


14,685 


20. 


Maine 

PEDffllAED 


14,621 



Pennsylva.nia 
New Jersey 
Maryland 
West Virginia 
Delaware 



50,797 

15,351 

8,371 

7,036 

1,882 



Penna. Rural Electric Date 
January 1, 1936 



Electric Lines . . , 
Cost to Build . , 
Aver. Lines Built 

per year 1,116 miles 



13,914 Miles 
$ 25,512,199 



Total Customers Served . 
Percent Farm Customers 
Aver. Customers Added 
per year 



179,079 
13,030 



26.65^ of the Farms in Pennsylvania 
are served hy High Line Power 
Hook-up. 



First 20 states contain 78.3^ 
of all farms served electricity 
in United States, 



NEW ENGLAND 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Rhode Island 



20,923 
18,114 
14,621 
10,205 
8,205 
2,779 



83,437 



74,847 



Source: 



Edison Elec, and Pa. Elec. Assoc» 



96 E - 13 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



bort'n? 



AJ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Farms Having Running Water in Pennsylvania 



January 1, 1936 



County 

Lancaster 

York 

Chester 

Westmoreland 

Bucks 

Bradford 

Erie 

Somerset 

Crawford 

Mercer 

Montgomery 

Washington 

Berks 

Indiana 

Allegheny 

Susquehanna 

Butler 

Tioga 

Fayette 

Wayne 

Jefferson 

Armstrong 

Clearfield 

Clarion 

Carat ri a 

Greene 

Lav/rence 

Lycoming 

Luzerne 

Sch-oylkill 

Adams 

Bedford 

Northampton 

Potter 

Columhia 



Numher County 



3,640 


Franklin 


2,6?C 


Lehigh 


2,660 


Blair 


2,290 


Northumberland 


2,140 


Warren 


1,980 


McKean 


1,980 


Venango 


1,960 


Centre 


1,850 


Lackawanna 


1,790 


Wyoming 


1,730 


Monroe 


1,710 


Beaver 


1,650 


Dauphin 


1,590 


Huntingdon 


1,560 


Mifflin 


1,520 


Delaware 


1,500 


Cumberland 


1,460 


Lebanon 


1,450 


Perry 


1,380 


Elk 


1,270 


Clinton 


1,240 


Snyder 


1,180 


Pike 


1,130 


Carbon 


1,070 


Juniata 


1,040 


Union 


1,040 


F^alton 


1,030 


Sullivan 


980 


Montour 


920 


Philadelphia 


880 


Cameron 


870 


Forest 


810 




790 




760 


Total 



Numb er 

760 
750 
700 
690 
690 
670 
670 
660 
660 
520 
600 
590 
590 
580 
560 
510 
500 
490 
430 
360 
320 
320 
290 
260 
260 
260 
210 
200 
170 
150 
90 
80 



68,220 



More than O'flE of every THREE farms i 
Have R-onning Water in Pennsylvania! 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



96E-9 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



Farms Having Radios in Pennsylvania 



January 1 , 1936 



County 



Lancaster 


2,400 


Berks 


2,310 


Ciiester 


2,290 


Bucks 


2,260 


York 


2,180 


Westmoreland 


1,960 


T7ashington 


1,840 


Erie 


1,580 


Crawford 


1,620 


Montgomery 


1,590 


Bradford 


1,490 


Wa^rne 


1,400 


Lehigh 


1,390 


Allegheny 


1,330 


Mercer 


1,330 


Somerset 


1,320 


Northampton 


1,300 


Susquehanna 


1,290 


Butler 


1,290 


Tioga 


1,140 


Armstrong 


1,050 


Indiana 


990 


Beaver 


940 


Luzerne 


920 


Adams 


920 


G-reene 


890 


Clarion 


870 


Lebanon 


870 


Lawrence 


850 


Lycoming 


820 


Franklin 


800 


C^jmherland 


790 


Venango 


790 


Columbia 


760 


Cambria 


750 



Radios Farms Having Coign ty 



Radios Farms Havi ng 



863 27.1^ Warren 

002 38.5 Fayette 

936 46.4 Dauphin 

070 44.6 Schuylkill 

857 27.7 Northu-nberland 

368 35.5 Jefferson 

072 36.3 Centre 

386 31.2 Bedford 

420 25.2 Clearfield 

845 41.3 Monroe 

984 29.9 Perry 

S49 49.1 Potter 

861 48 . 6 Lac kawanna 

594 37.0 Wyoming 
626 28.8 Union 
844 34.3 Delaware 
775 46.9 Blair 

271 39.4 Huntingdon 

186 30.8 Juniata 

239 35.2 McKean 

351 31.3 Fulton 

842 25.8 Montour 

354 39.9 Carbon 

769 33.2 Clinton 

581 25.7 Snyder 

170 28.1 Sullivan 

595 33.5 Mifflin 
268 38.4 Pike 

655 32.0 Philadelphia 

014 27.2 Elk 

861 20.7 Forest 

032 26.1 Cameron 

281 34.6 

475 30.7 

829 26.5 Total 



720 
710 
580 
680 
610 
610 
590 
580 
570 
540 
520 
520 
500 
450 
450 
440 
4-iO 
3?0 

3-:o 

340 
320 
230 
2b0 
280 
260 
240 
240 
250 
210 
200 
90 
50 



2,104 
3,954 
2,640 
2,803 
2,387 
2,733 
2,105 
3,150 
3,306 
1,450 
1.854 
1,749 
1,553 
1,450 
1,141 
995 
1 . 371 
2 ,035 

-j ^^Q 

J, , - _w 

1,49 7 

1,355 

533 

924 

1,023 

1.712 

713 

1,220 

443 

285 

892 

441 

199 



54 . 2:i 
18. G 
25.8 
24.3 



25, 
22. 

28, 
18, 
17, 

37 

28, 

29 



44 

53 



18,2 
23,5 
22.7 
23 . 6 
41.0 
30.3 
27.4 
15.2 



19.7 
51.9 
75.4 
22.4 

2C c'-i 



59,780 191,284 31 



,070 



Almost one of every THREE farms 
in Pennsylvania have Radios 



Source - Penna. Dept. of A.gri. 



115E-7 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



«I. 






1j:)o1 



1 


cnxisa 


a 


CJ 


^ 


Ot 


P. 


a 




oei.^ 



,^ 



as 



- Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 

Farms Having Telephones in Pennsylvania 



Janu-^ry 1, 1936 



County 

Lancaster 

Che s te r 
Bradford 
T^ashington 
Erie 

Tioga 

Crawford 

Prankl in 

Kontgomerj?' 

Butler 

Susquehanna 

i.Iercer 

Westmorelajid 

York 

Somerset 

Allegheny 



Muaber County 



Berks 

A-dams 

Indiana 

Clarion 

Armstrong 

Lycoming 

Jefferson 

Cumberland 

Bedford 

Lawrence 

Columbia 

Warren 

Venango 

Centre 

Potter 

Luzerne 

Lebanon 



3,660 


Fayette 


2,460 


Beaver 


2,340 


Nor thumb erl^" 


2,010 


Northampton 


1,700 


Wyoming 


1,610 


Lackawanna 


1,550 


Schuylkill 


1,530 


JucKean 


1,420 


Clearfield 


1,420 


Union 


1,410 


C.-mibria 


1,370 


Perry 


1,370 


Dauplain 


1,370 


Blpir 


1,360 


Huntingdon 


1,290 


Lehigh 


1,270 


Monroe 


1,270 


Delaware 


1,230 


Clinton 


1,170 


Juniata 


1,140 


Mif fl in 


1,130 


Sull ivan 


1,020 


Carbon 


1,010 


Montour 


1,000 


Snyder 


960 


Pike 


900 


Pilton 


860 


Elk 


840 


Philadelphia 


820 


Forest 


770 


Cameron 


740 


Greene 


710 




690 




650 


Total 



ITumb er 

640 
620 
570 
570 
560 
560 
550 
550 
530 
520 
500 
490 
470 
450 
440 
410 
370 
360 
290 
280 
280 
250 
220 
210 
190 
170 
150 
150 
130 
90 
30 
10 



57,670 



W-most Olffi of every THREE farms 
have Telephones in Pennsylvania 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



115E-9 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



b at 1 , X 'ip. r~ jj'Xi ■; u 



i.- -— j^rL 



. -I 



fi~C 



.■- r 



nr-- 



Ui 



.--rj^s^ - '>0'Hfo2 



— Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Farms Having Heating Systems in Pennsyl 



vania 



January 1, 1936 



Coxmty 

Lancaster 

Westmoreland 

Chester 

Bucks 

Montgomery 

Somerset 

Washington 

Erie 

Fayette 

Lawrence 

Bradford 

Crawford 

York 

Susquehanna 

Wayne 

Allegheny 

Mercer 

Indiana 

Butler 

Berks 

Lehigh 

Tioga 

Cambria 

Beaver 

Luzerne 

Armstrong 

Franklin 

Northamptor) 

Clearfield 

Adams 

Schuylkill 

Jefferson 

Lycoming 

Bedford 

Wyoming 



Number County 



2,690 


— — . «_ 

Blair 


420 


1,840 


Columbia 


420 


1,810 


Northumberland 


420 


1,680 


Cumberland 


400 


1,600 


Delaware 


390 


1,510 


Dauphi n 


340 


1,150 


Monroe 


340 


1,090 


Centre 


320 


1,080 


Lackawanna 


320 


1,070 


Clarion 


290 


1,050 


H-ontingdon 


290 


1,040 


Lebanon 


280 


1,030 


Warren 


270 


990 


Philadelphia 


240 


990 


Venango 


230 


980 


Juniata 


210 


960 


Greene 


200 


950 


Carbon 


180 


880 


Mifflin 


170 


840 


Montour 


150 


830 


Union 


150 


730 


Elk 


130 


710 


Potter 


130 


670 


Perry 


100 


660 


Siollivan 


110 


600 


Pike 


120 


600 


Clinton 


90 


600 


Fulton 


90 


560 


McKean 


90 


550 


Snyder 


80 


540 


Cameron 


30 


510 


Forest 


20 


480 


\ 




460 






430 


Total 


41,180 



More than ONE of every YlYE farms 
Have Heating Systems in Pennsylvania 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Beat 



96S-8 






— ^ •^. ^ ■ f . 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Farms Having Bathrooms in Pennsylvania 

Jan-aary 1, 1936 
(Almost one of every five farms in Pennsylvania has a "bathroom) 



County 

Lancaster 

Chester 

Bucks 

Montgomery 

Erie 

Somerset 

Westmoreland- 

Allegheny 

York 

Washington 

Bradford 

Crawford 

Berks 

Wayne 

Mercer 

Butler 

Susquehanna 

Tioga 

Luzerne 

Fayette 

Sch-ojrlkill 

Greene 

Delaware 

Lycoming 

Franklin 

Lawrence 

Clarion 

Adams 

Lehigh 

Lackawanna 

Northampton 

Armstrong 

Camhria 

Clearfield 

Jefferson 



Humher County 



Number 



2 , 030 


Monroe 


310 


1,880 


Col'um'bia 


310 


1,270 


Warren 


310 


1,210 


McKean 


290 


970 


Blair 


290 


920 


Wyoming 


280 


870 


Potter 


270 


850 


Da.'urohin 


270 


840 


llor thumh erland 


270 


820 


Clarion 


230 


740 


Cumberland 


260 


700 


Bedford 


250 


690 


Lebanon 


240 


590 


Beaver 


230 


550 


Venango 


210 


• 550 


Centre 


190 


540 


Pike 


180 


540 


Huntingdon 


170 


520 


Mifflin 


170 


520 


Carbon 


140 


490 


Philadelphia 


130 


420 


Perry 


130 


420 


Clinton 


110 


390 


Elk 


100 


390 


Union 


90 


390 


Jiinifita 


90 


380 


Fulton 


80 


370 


Snyder 


80 


370 


Sullivan 


60 


350 


Montour 


50 


340 


earner on 


40 


34(5 


Forest 


30 


■320 






320 






320 


Total 


29, 100 



12't more Pennsylvania farms are equipped 
with bathrooms this year, as compared with 
the number in 1930. 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 

Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



116E-10 



■.orirf.tP: tr .-,„,.,r,.- 



isd'TU-'H 






.- r- 



fiiriq^I 



acoo'). 



.-as^ 



-".sJ 



nrrrl= 



iTOj-";t • 



1^10 i - 



19 



r.- 



^■B^ai^ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



AUTOMOBILES on Farms in Pennsylvania 
January 1, 1936 



County 

Lancaster 

York 

Chester 

Berks 

Crawford 

Bucks 

Westmoreland 

Bradford 

Erie 

Wr.shington 

Mercer 

Montgomery 

Franklin 

Somerset 

Adams 

Butler 

Cumterland 

Bedford 

I ndi ana 

Susquehanna 

Tioga 

Northampton 

Greene 

Allegheny 

Wc.yne 

Lycoming 

Armstrong 

Fayette 

Lehigh 

Lauphi n 

Lebanon 

Clarion 

Lawrence 

Schuylkill 

Northumberland 



Number County 



9,630 


Luzerne 


7,580 


Columbia 


5,160 


Jefferson 


5,020 


Centre 


4,470 


Venango 


4,400 


Clearfield 


4,070 


Beaver 


4,050 


Perry 


4,000 


Huntingdon 


3,930 


Cambria 


3,630 


Warren 


5,540 


Snyder 


3,530 


Blair 


3,270 


Juniata 


3,260 


Monroe 


3,170 


Potter 


2,840 


Union 


2,740 


Lackawanna 


2,710 


Fulton 


2,620 


Wyoming 


2,600 


McKean 


2,570 


Mifflin 


2,480 


Delaware 


2,460 


Clinton 


2,410 


Montour 


2 , 390 


Carbon 


2,390 


Elk 


2,560 


Sullivan 


2,320 


Pike 


2,300 


Forest 


2,180 


Philadelphia 


2,140 


Cameron 


2,110 




2,060 




2,040 


Total 



Niaiber 

1,970 

1,920 

1,910 

1,790 

1,730 

1,670 

1,650 

1,620 

1,580 

1,550 

1,540 

1,410 

1,330 

1,320 

1,280 

1,230 

1,130 

1,110 

1,060 

1,050 

910 

910 

790 

740 

640 

630 

550 

510 

490 

210 

210 

120 



155,140 



rOUa of every FIVE farms liave 
Automobiles in Pennsylvania 



Source - Penna. DeT)t. of Agri. 



106E-1 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



■jn: 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Co'unty 



Farm-Owned Motor Trucks in Pennsylvania 



January 1, 1936 



* Total 
Trucks 



Lancaster 

Berks 

York 

Chester 

Bucks 

Erie 

Allegheny 

Montgomery 

Luzerne 

Westmoreland 

Schuylkill 

Northampton 

Bradford 

Susquehanna 

Lehigh 

Columhia 

Crawford 

Wayne 

Franklin 

Somerset 

Tsashington 

Bedford 

Adams 

Butler 

Mercer 

NorthumlDerland 

Lycoming 

Fayette 

Lackawanna 

Blair 

Indiana 

Tioga, 

Lebanon 

Dauphin 

Camhria 

Cumherland 

Beaver 

Centre 

Wyoming 

Lawrence 

Armstrong 

Clearfield 



7,456 
8,104 
5,395 
4,971 
4,349 
5,307 
29,747 
9,036 
10,900 
6,058 
7,715 
5,359 
1,838 
1,424 
5,618 
2,252 
2,071 
1,502 
2,097 
2,123 
4,246 
1,294 
1 , 598 
2,563 
2,304 
4,893 
2,952 
4,220 
7,793 
3,806 
1,761 
1,320 
2,977 
8,388 
4,142 
2,227 
2,874 
1,553 
1,087 
2,356 
1,580 
2,019 



Farra-Ovmed 


Percent 


Trucks 


Farm-Owned 


2,460 


33. Of^ 


2,390 


29.5 


2,290 


55.8 


1,970 


59.6 


1,930 


44.4 


1,510 


28.5 


1,460 


4.9 


1,430 


15.8 


1,370 


12.6 


1,350 


22.3 


1,340 


17.4 


1,120 


20.9 


1,040 


56.6 


1,040 


73.0 


1,010 


18.0 


1,000 


44.4 


930 


47.3 


970 


64.5 


910 


43.4 


910 


42.9 


910 


21.4 


860 


56.5 


850 


60.8 


820 


32.0 


820 


35.6 


820 


16.3 


790 


26.8 


770 


18.2 


730 


9.4 


700 


18.4 


680 


38.5 


680 


51.5 


670 


22.5 


660 


7.9 


d50 


15.7 


620 


27.8 


600 


20.9 


600 


38.6 


590 


54.3 


540 


22.9 


440 


27.9 


440 


21.8 



(Over) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 





Total 


County 


Trucks 


Delaware 


5,489 


Monroe 


1,320 


Venango 


1,812 


Huntingdon 


958 


Snyder 


699 


Carbon 


1,476 


Giarion 


1,087 


Potter 


596 


Warren 


1,243 


Jefferson 


1,269 


Juniata 


492 


McKean 


2,045 


Perry 


751 


Union 


570 


Greene 


777 


Fulton 


259 


Clinton 


828 


Mifflin 


1,165 


Elk 


777 


Philadelphia 


41 , 657 


Montour 


466 


Pike 


414 


Sullivan 


337 


Forest 


181 


Cameron 


155 



Farm-O'-ned 


?er'7ent 


Trucks 


Farin-Oivned 


430 


7.3;1 


430 


32 6 


410 


2? , 6 


400 


4.1 8 


370 


5\9 


350 


23, •' 


340 


31.3 


340 


57,1 


340 


27 4 


330 


26 oO 


300 


61cC 


270 


15.2 


260 


34. 6 


260 


45,6 


250 


52.2 


240 


92=7 


220 


26,6 


220 


13»9 


200 


25,8 


180 


.4 


170 


36.5 


150 


3? . 3 


130 


3C,6 


50 


^ r , o 


30 


19: i 



Total 



258,898 



50 , 390 



19,5^0 



[Pennsylvania farmers in each of 42 counties own and operate over 
25^ of all trucks in their county, 

jOmitting Philadelphia and Allegheny counties, i. e. , city trucks in 
Philadelphia, and Pittshurgh, Pennsylvania farmers own 
26. 6^6 of all trucks in Pennsylvania. 

*Total Trucks - 1935 Registration Figures 



Soiirce:- Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and Bureau of 
Motor Vehicles. 



66E-2 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



TEACTOHS on Pamis in Pennsylvania 
January 1, 1936 



County 



Number 



Lancaster 


2,210 


Cambria 


Berks 


1,820 


Blair 


York 


1,600 


Armstrong 


Bucks 


1,590 


Beaver 


Chester 


1,530 


Clearfield 


Montgomery 


1,210 


Huntingdon 


Erie 


1,120 


Venango 


Westmoreland 1,020 


Perry 


Bradford 


1,000 


Wayne 


Northampton 


890 


Wyoming 


Lehigh 


860 


Mifflin 


Crawford 


820 


Snyder 


Somerset 


770 


Union 


Adams 


760 


Jefferson 


Washington 


740 


Lackawanna 


Franklin 


730 


Juniata 


Butler 


720 


Warren 


Allegheny 


590 


Potter 


Mercer 


680 


Clinton 


Centre 


600 


Montour 


Tioga 


580 


Greene 


Susquehanna 


570 


Delaware 


Lebanon 


570 


Carbon 


Schuylkill 


530 


Monroe 


Lawrence 


530 


Elk 


Cumberland 


530 


McKean 


Fayette 


520 


Fulton 


Indiana 


520 


Philadelphia 


Luz erne 


500 


Sullivan 


Lycoming 


480 


Forest 


Dauphin 


470 


Pike 


Columbia 


470 


Cameron 


Bedford 


450 




Korth-omberla 


nd 450 




Clarion 


440 


Total 




ONE of everj 


■ FIVE farms 




have Tractor 


s in Pennsylvania. 


Source - Pea 


na. Dent, of 


Agri. 



Number 

400 

380 

380 

360 

350 

330 

320 

320 

310 

310 

310 

310 

310 

300 

300 

280 

270 

240 

220 

200 

200 

190 

190 

180 

180 

130 

120 

110 

60 

40 

40 

10 



36,620 . 



106E-3 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



n£i 



yi&iaf 



latfiia.f'K 






;-l3:;!;j?^J 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



GAS ENGIKES on Farms in Pennsylvania 
January 1, 1936 



County 



Lancaster 


3,980 


Westmoreland 


York 


3,930 


Clearfield 


Berks 


3,210 


Snyder 


Bucks 


2,900 


Somerset 


Chester 


2,290 


Indiana 


Montgomery 


2,050 


Perry 


Bradford 


2,030 


Wyoming 


Crawford 


1,740 


Ht-mtingdon 


C-umterland 


1,730 


Potter 


Susquehanna 


1,640 


Mifflin 


Wayne 


1,610 


Beavor 


Lehigh 


1,560 


Juniata 


FrarJiclin 


1,500 


Greene 


Erie 


1,490 


Armstrong 


Tioga 


1,450 


Clarion 


Northampton 


1,380 


Carbon 


Adaiqs 


1,310 


Blair 


"^yashiiigton 


1,210 


Lackawanna 


Lycoming 


1,190 


Montour 


Lebanon 


1,150 


Clinton 


Butl er 


1,100 


Venango 


Schuylkill 


1,080 


Pike 


Mercer 


1,070 


Jefferson 


Luzerne 


1,040 


SuLlivan 


Dauphi n 


1,000 


Fayette 


Northumherland 


900 


Delaware 


Warren 


880 


McKean 


Monroe 


850 


F-olton 


Colunhia 


780 


Elk 


Centre 


710 


Philadelphia 


Allegheny 


680 


Forest 


Bedford 


670 


Cameron 


Union 


660 




Lawrence 


640 




Camhria 


620 


Total 




Almo 


3t TWO of 


every FIVE farms 




have Gas 


Engines 


in Pennsylvania 



N-umber 

600 
580 
580 
580 
530 
520 
510 
510 
500 
480 
460 
460 
460 
450 
450 
440 
420 
400 
360 
320 
300 
270 
260 
250 
240 
240 
230 
170 
140 
70 
60 
40 



63,910 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri . 



lCo-E-4 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



^ a» 2n-Jj> 



t 2Afi 



y^ZBU :iB « 



19 T:- 



BXf 



•<':^E 



BTlSX-iti 



1\ 



,J"v.. 



3'IU'C2 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



SILOS on Farms in Pennsylvania 
Jan-uary 1, 1936 



Coimty 

Bradford 

Lancaster 

Crawford 

Tioga 

Susquehanna 

Chester 

Erie 

Somerset 

■"feyne 

York 

Mercer 

Bucks 

Bedford 

Butler 

Franklin 

Washington 

Warren 

Montgomery 

Wyoming 

Lycoming 

Lawrence 

Cumherland 

Berks 

Westmoreland 

Potter 

L oh anon 

Clarion 

Lackawanna 

Centre 

Adams 

Beaver 

Blair 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Luzerne 



Numher County 



2,880 
2,250 
2,110 
1,960 
1,920 
1 ,600 
1,460 
1,310 
1,250 
1,140 
1.130 
950 
920 
870 
870 
840 
810 
800 
740 
720 
710 
570 
660 
640 
560 
540 
530 
510 
500 
490 
420 
420 
410 
410 
410 



Armstrong 

Perry 

Carahria 

Clearfield 

Da-uphin 

Venango 

Northampton 

Allegheny 

Huntingdon 

Mifflin 

North-umherland 

Sullivan 

Union 

Columhia 

Snyder 

McKean 

Juniata 

Fayette 

Clinton 

Sch-uylkill 

Elk 

Delaware 

liontour 

Lehigh 

Pike 

Fulion 

Monroe 

Greene 

Carhon 

Forest 

Cameron 

Philadelphia 



Total 



Numher 

350 
350 
340 
340 
340 
330 
330 
320 
310 
310 
290 
280 
270 
260 
240 
210 
190 
190 
150 
140 
130 
120 
110 
110 
100 
100 
90 
70 
50 
20 
20 
10 



40,890 



'yore than ONE of every FI'v^E 
farms have Silos in Pen nsylvania 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



106E-5 



- Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



EiiJms.O 



9n'^3'. 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Farms Having Cream Separators in Pennsylvania 
January 1, 1936 . 



Coimty 

York 

Somerset 

Mercer 

Bedford 

Clarion 

I ndi ana 

Jefferson 

Camtria 

Crawford 

Yi'arren 

Washington 

Butler 

Erie 

Lycoming 

Clearfield 

Westmoreland 

Venango 

Allegheny 

Lancaster 

Lawrence 

Columbia 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Northumberland 

Fayette 

Huntingdon 

Sch-aylkill 

Dauphi n 

Susquehanna 

Greene 

Luzerne 

Fulton 

Wayne 

Potter 

Centre 



Number Co'anty 



2,560 


Blair 


2,350 


Lackawanna 


2,310 


Perry 


2,010 


I'.i'cPCean 


1,960 


Bradford 


1,960 


Sit ; 


1,910 


Berks 


1,900 


Monroe 


1,890 


Snyder 


1,720 


Franlrl i n 


1,710 


Lehigh 


1,630 


Adams 


1,630 


Mifflin 


1 , 600 


Clinton 


1,420 


Tioga 


1,420 


Carbon 


1,400 


Pike 


1,330 


Forest 


1,290 


Northajnpton 


1,200 


Chester 


1,110 


Wyoming 


1,090 


Sullivan 


1,040 


Lebanon 


990 


Bucks 


960 


Cumberland 


960 


Union 


850 


J-oniata 


850 


Liontgomery 


820 


Cameron 


790 


Montour 


710 


Philadelphia 


690 


Delaware 


690 




690 




650 


Total 



Number 

600 
600 
590 
590 
560 
510 
480 
460 
450 
450 
^0 
400 
370 
340 
310 
300 
270 
270 
240 
240 
200 
200 
190 
180 
170 
160 
110 
100 
80 
70 
30 
20 



58,060 



j- One of Every Three Farms In 

[ Pennsylvania Have Cream Separators 



Source - Penna. Dept. of Agri. 



115E-11 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



t bn a , 



v,7^,'-j 



r- 



J321- 



no 



..iTvt. 1'' .^T'-. 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Section Five 



MISCELLAI-iSOUS DATA 



Pennsylvania has many more towns, i. e, , 
good local markets for farm prod-acts, 
than any other state. It is connected 
with these towns by 27,300 miles of hard 
s-urfaced highway. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural StaU 



Average Size of Pennsylvania Farms ty Co\inties 





1935 




1935 


Counties 


Acres 


Counties 


Acres 


Adams 


76.7 


Lancaster 


58.6 


Allegheny 


53.0 


Lawrence 


68.0 


Armstrong 


83.1 


Lebanon 


69.4 


Beaver 


76.4 


Lehigh 


58.6 


Bedford 


129.1 


Luzerne 


66.2 


Berks 


66.8 


Lycoming 


100.0 


Blair 


83.8 


McKean 


83.9 


Bradford 


114.7 


Mercer 


79.0 


Bucks 


55.9 


Mifflin 


106.2 


Butler 


76.6 


Monroe 


96.4 


Cambria 


67.7 


Montgomery 


48.1 


Cameron 


95.9 


Montour 


102.4 


Carbon 


67.0 


Northampton 


57.8 


Centre 


115.6 


Northunberland 


30.2 


Chester 


78.9 


Perry 


107.3 


Clarion 


89.3 


Philadclphxia 


48.6 


Clearfield 


63.8 


Pike 


108.3 


Clinton 


92.1 


Potter 


142.4 


Columbia 


81.0 


Sch-uylkill 


65.6 


Cra-ffford 


83.4 


Snyder 


78.6 


Cumberland 


80.5 


Somerset 


113.4 


DauDhi n 


71.5 


Sullivan 


111.2 


Delaware 


56.1 


Susquehanna 


127.2 


Elk 


71.3 


Tioga 


131.8 


Erie 


74.9 


Union 


84.3 


Eayette 


68.6 


Venango 


83.3 


Forest 


87.9 


Warren 


99.2 


Franklin 


88.7 


Washington 


92.7 


Fulton 


128.0 


Wayne 


110.5 


Greene 


106.3 


Westmoreland 


75.7 


Huntingdon 


138.3 


Wyoming 


101.7 


Indiana 


90.1 


York 


63.3 


Jefferson 


78.1 






Juniata 


99.9 


Total 


82.9 


Lackawanna 


71.5 







Source - 1935 Census Figures 



96 M - 15 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



B^n■ 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



FIRST 20 STATES IN TOTAL FERTILIZER CONSUMPTION 

1935 











Per Cent Change 




State 


■ Cons-umption 


1934 to 1935 


1. 


North Carolina 


1,000,071 


Tons 


14.0 % 


2. 


G-eorgia 


617,439 


ti 


12.4 


3. 


South Carolina 


613,561 


11 


7.2 


4. 


Alahama 


422 , 400 


II 


17.8 


5. 


Florida 


418,239 


11 


1.1 


6. 


Virginia 


378,536 


ti 


12.7 


7. 


Ohio 


306,509 


II 


16.2 


8. 


PENNSYLVANIA 


275,466 


II 


2.8 


9. 


New York 


234,000 


11 


3.5 


10. 


Mississippi 


214,015 


II 


32.1 


11. 


Indiana 


194,946 


II 


30.8 


12. 


California 


178,156 


II 


19.9 


13. 


Maryland 


164,843 


11 


12.5 


14. 


New Jersey- 


149,408 


II 


8.2 


15. 


Maine 


125,000 


II 


9.4 


15. 


Michigan 


105,000 


II 


16.7 


17. 


Tennessee 


96,444 


II 


4.3 


18. 


Lo-oisiana 


92 , 532 


II 


21.2 


19. 


Kentucky- 


73,502 


II 


17.6 


20. 


Massachusetts 


63,208 


11 


9.7 



PENNLAND 






NEW ENGLAND 




Pennsylvania 


275,466 


Tons 


Maine 


125,000 Tons 


Maryland 


164,843 


11 


Massachusetts 


63,208 " 


New Jersey 


149,408 


11 


Connecticut 


51,000 " 


West Virginia 


55,000 


11 


New Hampshire 


16,000 " 


Delaware 


37,800 


II 


Vermont 
Rhode Island 


15,295 " 
12,000 " 




fiRP.5T7 


Tons 


282,505 Tons 



Source - The Fertilizer Review 



96 F 3 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



S.SI 



I.SK 



.TiT",? TTT " 



JOC i 



r-? 



..- ^. gaitrsnoO • ^s^lI^ 



zcioT ,1 snii. 

» 



iinaiei 9X;Oiiit 



S 1 5fe- 



.0 li-' 






•5 r 



e^T-'i » 






. -J 



sriT - 501; 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



COMCSHCIiL FEHTILIZEH Used On Pennsylvania Farms 

1935 
(73)o of all Pennsylvania farmers use commercial fertilizer) 









*Percent 


Co'onty 


Tonnage 


Value 


Farmers Usin^ 


Lancaster 


24,710 


$ 643,700 


3255 


York 


23,090 


519,520 


89 


Berks 


13,940 


329,680 


76 


Chester 


12,980 


319,960 


84 


Bucks 


11,270 


289,080 


87 


Adams 


10,510 


230,170 


92 


Franklin 


10,570 


204,810 


89 


Cumberland 


8,560 


152,370 


85 


Columbia 


7,350 


181,910 


82 


Somerset 


7,200 


161,280 


73 


Erie 


7,190 


196,290 


76 


Schuylkill 


6,920 


186,840 


84 


Lehigh 


6,970 


175,640 


88 


Montgomery 


6,760 


176,440 


56 


Kortharar)ton 


5,910 


140,360 


76 


Crawford 


5,740 


141,200 


77 


Westmoreland 


5,730 


124,910 


71 


Lycoming 


5,430 


123,330 


85 


Lebanon 


5,120 


117,500 


85 


Butl er 


4,980 


118,520 


74 


Washington 


4,900 


122,990 


59 


No r t humb e r 1 and 


4,890 


109,290 


83 


I ndi ana 


4,610 


94,950 


69 


Allegheny 


4,550 


• 120,570 


80 


Bradford 


4,470 


86,270 


55 


Luzerne 


4,460 


109,270 


74 


Perry 


4,350 


79,350 


88 


Clearfield 


4,270 


113,370 


64 


Cambria 


4,160 


81,120 


81 


Armstrong 


4,110 


97,820 


80 


Dauphi n 


3,350 


106,840 


79 


Jefferson 


3,520 


74,620 


85 


Bedford 


3,350 


68,840 


71 


Centre 


3,290 


67,940 


74 


Mercer 


3,170 


81,150 


61 


Tioga 


3,000 


59,580 


51 


Snyder 


2,990 


65,030 


83 


Lawrence 


2,910 


73,910 


65 


Clarion 


2,850 


60,420 


83 


Fayette 


2,630 


51 , 800 


51 



(over) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 









♦Percent 


County 


Tonnage 


Value 


Farmers Using 


Juniata 


2,590 


$ 50,250 


83<g 


Beaver 


2,450 


55,620 ■ 


77 


Susquehanna 


2,390 


58,860 


52 


T7arren 


2,220 


50,170 


82 


Fulton 


2,210 


34,700 


88 


Union 


2,180 


47 , 520 


76 


Lackawanna 


2,000 


56 , 700 


73 


Wayne 


1,950 


49,630 


54 


Venango 


1,930 


45,360 


76 


Blair 


1,900 


48,260 


58 


Ivionroe 


1,810 


42,170 


82 


Carton 


1,790 


45,380 


91 


Montour 


1,760 


37 , 660 


73 


Delaware 


1,740 


55,680 


77 


Mifflin 


1.660 


33,200 


65 


H-antingdon 


1,550 


32,940 


64 


Clinton 


1,300 


28,860 


69 


Wyoming 


1,240 


35,960 


49 


Potter 


1,140 


27,770 


40 


Elk. 


1,100 


28,940 


80 


Philadelphia 


1,010 


32 , 320 


82 


Sullivan 


930 


23,250 


82 


Greene 


800 


16,160 


24 


McKean 


700 


17,010 


62 


Forest 


340 


8,130 


71 


Pike 


130 


3,900 


23 


Cameron 


110 


2 , 450 


42 


Total 


308 , 000 


$ 7,238.000 


73^ 



Pennsylvania - eighth state in fertilizer 
consumption - used over 14^ more commercial 
fertilizer in 1935 than in 1934. 



*1934 figures - latest available 

SoTorce - Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture 



106F-1 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



LIME Used on Pennsylvania Farms 

1935 

(41^ of all Pennsylvania fanners use lime) 



County 


Tonnage 


West morel and 


24,210 


Washington 


15,600 


Fayette 


14,560 


Armstrong 


13,500 


Chester 


13,590 


Butler 


12,600 


Bra.dford 


11,960 


Somerset 


11,930 


Indiana 


11,440 


York 


11,060 


Mercer 


10,630 


Lancaster 


10,600 


Clarion 


10,180 


Crawford 


9,270 


Allegheny 


3,730 


Jefferson 


8,160 


Wayne 


8,070 


Blair 


7,650 


Berks 


7,550 


Lawrence 


7,550 


Clearfield 


7,330 


Sch-uylkill 


7,080 


Cambria 


6,900 


Erie 


6,880 


Susquehanna 


5,090 


Venango 


6,030 


Beaver 


6,000 


Luzerne 


5,360 


Lycoming 


4,820 


Tioga 


4,760 


Bucks 


4,450 


Montgomery 


4,300 


Columbia 


4,050 


Warren 


3,900 


Bedford 


3,740 


Perry 


3,690 


Franklin 


3,660 


Union 


3,620 


Potter 


3,580 


Lackawanna 


5,500 



Value 



124, 


680 


112, 


320 


88, 


820 


79, 


560 


150, 


170 


77, 


490 


90, 


220 


60, 


840 


71, 


500 


31, 


290 


46, 


240 


112, 


360 


56, 


500 


51, 


450 


60, 


240 


42 


020 


58, 


580 


31, 


360 


81, 


540 


28 


300 


41 


780 


67 


970 


37 


600 


47 


470 


49 


940 


30 


150 


28 


800 


34 


840 


27 


710 


34 


750 


52 


,510 


43 


,860 


28 


550 


26 


,520 


15 


,710 


15 


,130 


22 


,330 


16 


,290 


22 


,550 


35 


,000 



♦Percent 

Farmers Usin;':; 

634 
58^ 
634 
71 1 
52^ 
574 
60i 
524 
53fo 
32^". 
534 
27^ 
50^ 
54«i 
55^ 
52^ 

455J 
275^ 
59fJ 
48^ 
64f» 
574 
44f5 
64^ 
504 
7173 

eifi, 
44^ 
44^ 

254 
264 
37^ 
59^ 
30^ 
28fg 
175? 
41^ 

4:&fo 

574 



(Over) 

Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



-2- 











♦Percent 


County 


Tonnage 


Value 


Farmers Using 


Juniata 


3,300 


$ 14,350 


30f? 


Wyoming 


3,150 


25,200 


595S 


Adams 


2,760 


22,080 


16';^ 


Elk 


2,450 


18,010 


54^3 


Dauphin 


2,350 


17,390 


17f. 


Centre 


2,300 


10,700 


14f(, 


Huntingdon 


2,250 


10,460 


205J 


McKean 


2,110 


14,560 


42fi> 


Snyder 


1,910 


8,790 


19^ 


Nor thiomb erland 


1,870 


10,000 


IZfb 


Clinton 


1,790 


9,670 


37fo 


Sullivan 


1,720 


10,320 


455S 


Fulton 


1,710 


11,630 


20^ 


Lebanon 


1,390 


10,420 


14^ 


&reene 


1,380 


7,870 


15^ 


Carton 


1,290 


14,190 


Z8<fo 


Mifflin 


1,140 


5,240 


15^ 


Cumberland 


1,110 


8,940 


6f. 


Delaware 


1,090 


11,940 


28<J 


Forest 


880 


5,720 


77^ 


Monroe 


830 


6,470 ' • 


18^ 


Forthampton 


830 


7,890 


9^0 


Montour 


760 


3,800 


19fi 


Lehigh 


500 


5,000 


6f. 


Pike 


290 


2,350 


21^ 


Cameron 


230 


1,200 • 


21^3 


Philadelphia 


130 


1,430 


13;^ 


Total 


370,000 


$ 2,460,560 


41;1 



Pennsylvania 


first in 


consumption, 


uses lOfj 


of 


all 




lime 


applied 


in U.S. 


(1935 Penna. 


consurapt 


ion 


- 




i4-:^a 


more than in 1934 


and 98;"^ grea 


ter 


than 


in 


1932. 


) 



*1934 figures - latest available 
Source - Penna. De-ot. of Agri. 



106F-2 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural Statt 



Pennsylvania farmers sell 
$55,000,000 annually 
in farm products direct to 
consumers in 1 32 farmer 
markets 



On October 7, the Borough of Hanover in York 
County opened its new municipal farmers' market 
for operation, says the Pennsylvania bureau of 
markets. The market, which comprises a new one- 
story brick and steel building, 64 feet wide and 
156 feet long, containing 96 stalls, was built by 
the borough to replace the curb market which has 
been in operation many years, the bureau special- 
ists explain. It is a modem market in every re- 
spect, being well lighted and ventilated, attractive- 
ly laid out and sanitarily equipped with ample 
parking space to the rear for the accommodation 
of tenants and buyers. This market cost the bor- 
ough only $15,000 complete, which is described as 
an unbelievably low sum considering the substan- 
tial construction of the building and the fact that 
the equipment includes two comfort stations, steam 
heating plant, white enameled stands, white butch- 
er cases, good electric lights and complete plumb- 
ing supplies. 

Because of the low costs, the borough is able to 
rent space to farmers and dealers at a very low 
price and hence a complete occupancy is assured. 
In addition to using the building for a farmers' 
market, the Hanover authorities plan to hold an- 
nual automobile, flovi-er, farm products and other 
shows to stimulate local enterprises, in the prem- 
ises. 

This latest adition to Pennsylvania farmers' 
market houses brings the total number of enclosed 
retail farm markets in this State to seventy. In 
adition to the enclosed markets, Pennsylvania has 
62 open air or curb markets still in operation, 
making a total of 132 farmers' markets in this 
State. The business transacted at these markets is 
estimated to exceed $55,000,000 annually in farm 
products alone. 



From Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture 
Weekly News Bulletin, October 19-26. 1933. 



This is an average of $319.00 per farm direct cash sales in nearby markets 
with a minimum of transportation charges (almost all conveyed by farmers' 
own trucks). Net cash — no commission or brokers' charges. The actual sales 
by those farmers who sell in these markets is no doubt much over S500.00 
on the average. This does not include major crops, grains, livestock, milk, etc. 
This is really an enlargement of the old-time "Butter and Egg money" of the 
farm wife. It is made possible by home markets for all that Pennsylvania 
farms produce. 

This does not include "Road-Side" markets on which no estimate can be made. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



i 



Pennsylvania Eanks Second in Numter of Retail Establishments. 
Also Second in Net Sales Voltur.e of Business Dioring 1933. 







Number of 






Sank State 


Stores 


Net Sales 


Rank 


(1 


) New York 


177,034 


$ 4,005,615,000 


(1) 


(2 


) PEMSYLVMIA 


115,421 


2,014,402,000 


(2) 


(3 
(4 


) Illinois 


98,793 


1,727,407,000 


(4) 


) California 


89,107 


1,816,793,000 


(3) 


(5 


) Ohio 


85,818 


1,417,109,000 


(5) 


(6 


) Texas 


67,171 


959,029,000 


(9) 


(V 


) New Jersey 


53,335 


1,011,279,000 


(8) 


(8 


) Michigan 


56,937 


1,069,872,000 


(7) 


(9 


) Massachusetts 


51,812 


1,210,895,000 


(6) 


(10 


) Missouri 


49,185 


757,051,000 


(10) 


(11 


) Wisconsin 


44,487 


618,649,000 


(11) 


(12 


) Indiana 


41,235 


569,080,000 


(13) 


(13 


) Iowa 


34,551 


479,223,000 


(14) 


(14 


) Minnesota 


33,947 


584,412,000 


(12) 


(15 


) North Carolina 


27,585 


363,207.000 


(18) 


(16' 


) Georgia 


26,699 


351,801,000 


(20) 


(17' 


Kansas 


26,653 


327,997,000 


(23) 


(18' 


Virginia 


26,419 


357,889,000 


(19) 


(19' 


Oklahoma 


26,313 


343,495,000 


(21) 


(20' 


Kentucky 


25,651 


305,491,000 


(24) 


(21 ; 


Maryland 


23,438 


378,869,000 


(17) 


(22; 


Tennessee 


22,794 


330,862,000 


(22) 


(23; 


Washington 


22,273 


416,490,000 


(16) 


(24: 


Louisiana 


22,239 


. 263,542,000 


(27) 


(25] 


Connecticut 


21,738 


426,183,000 


(15) 


(26] 


Florida 


21,649 


283,227,000 


[25) 


{27) 


Alabama 


20,079 


249,692,000 


(23) 


(2.8) 


Nebraska 


19,185 


275,463,000 


(25) 


(29) 


West Virginia 


17,124 


244,163,000 


(29) 


(30) 


Arkansas 


15,822 


179,284,000 


C36) 


(31) 


South Carolina 


15,468 


185,175,000 


;55) 


(32) 


Mississippi 


14,775 


140,869,000 


(37) 


(33) 


Oregon 


13,749 


224,288,000 


'32) 


(34) 


Colorado 


13,667 


235,749,000 ( 


30) 


(35) 


Maine 


11,383 


183,551,000 


(35) 


(36) 


South Dakota 


8,538 


105,951,000 ( 


41) 


(37) 


Rhode Island 


8,417 


185,173,000 ( 


34) 


(38) 


North Dakota 


7,967 


107,905,000 ( 


40) 


(39) 


Montana 


6,711 


111,162,000 ( 


35) 


(40) 


New Hampshire 


6,297 


110,480,000 ( 


39) 


(41) 


Dist. of Columbia 


6,139 


234,947,000 ( 


31) 


(42) 


Idaiio 


5,136 


87,322,000 ( 


45) 


(43) 


Utah 


5,090 


94,884,000 ( 


42) 


(44) 


Vermont 


4,884 


77,844,000 ( 


44) 


(45) 


Arizona 


4,745 


76,147.000 1 


45) 


(46) 


New Mexico 


4,238 


53,557,000 ( 


46) 


(47) 


Delaware 


3,421 


56,057,000 ( 


46) 


(48) 


Wyoming 


5,160 


55,788,000 ( 


47) 


(49) 


Nevada 


1,459 


28,391,000 ( 


49) 




' U. S. Total 


1,520,339 


$ 25,700,712,000 





115 - li 3 






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XsioT .2 .U 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Pennsylvania Hoads 
(48,500 miles of "farm-to-raarket" roads not included) 







Surfaced 








Total Miles 


and 




percent 


County 


Highways 


Improved 


Unimnroved 


Unira-nroved 


Westmoreland 


1,096 


799 


297 


27.1^ 


Lancaster 


1,047 


1,038 


9 


00.9 


York 


1,017 


763 


254 


25.0 


Che'oter 


1,001 


851 


150 


14.8 


Bradford 


886 


587 


299 


33.7 


Berks 


875 


737 


138 


15.8 


Washing-ton 


855 


634 


171 


20.0 


Susquehanna 


837 


456 


381 


45.5 


Bucks 


852 


712 


120 


14.4 


Crawford 


823 


570 


253 


30.7 


Somerset 


815 


545 


270 


33.1 


I ndi ana 


802 


631 


171 


21.3 


Allegheny 


787 


557 


230 


29.2 


Montgonery 


747 


740 


7 


00.1 


Lycoming 


741 


478 


263 


35.5 


Bedford 


713 


441 


272 


38.1 


Clearfield 


713 


439 


274 


38.4 


Erie 


691 


519 


172 


24.9 


Tioga 


681 


431, 


250 


36.7 


Butler 


672 


506 


166 


24.7 


Luserne 


651 


527 


124 


19. C 


Wayne 


629 


423 


206 


32.8 


Mercer 


622 


498 


124 


. 20.0 


Armstrong 


606 


404 


202 


33.3 


Huntingdon 


606 


404 


202 


33.3 


Fayette 


598 


469 


129 


21.5 


Schuylkill 


563 


501 


62 


11.0 


Centre 


530 


449 


81 


15.3 


Beaver 


529 


351 


168 


31.8 


Greene 


524 


311 


213 


40.7 


Can::bria 


522 


462 


60 


11.5 


Franklin 


515 


467 


48 


9.3 


Jefferson 


495 


373 


122 


24.6 


Cumberland 


493 


372 


121 


24.5 


Colu-nhia 


488 


353 


155 


51,8 


Northumberland 


485 


349 


136 


28.0 



(Over) 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 







S\irfaced 








Total Miles 


and 




Percent 


County 


Highways 


IraiDroved 


UnimDrovod 


Unimproved 


Adams 


483 


370 


113 


23.4^ 


Clarion 


471 


343 


128 


• 27.1 


Potter 


454 


285 


169 


37.2 


Warren 


443 


307 


136 


30.7 


Venango 


441 


327 


114 


25.9 


Monro e 


424 


343 


81 


19.1 


Dauphin 


422 


392 


30 


07.1 


Lehigh 


422 


597 


25 


05.9 


Northampton 


411 


393 


18 


04.4 


McKean 


388 


330 


58 


15.0 


Perry 


388 


264 ■ 


124 


32.0 


Delaware 


576 


373 


3 


00,1 


Lackawanna 


564 


314 


50 


13.7 


Lawrence 


352 


261 


91 


25.9 


Lehanon 


344 


336 


8 


00.2 


Blair 


343 


304 


39 


11.4 


Wyoming 


326 


217 


109 


33.4 


Snyder 


307 


192 


115 


37.5 


Pulton 


300 


188 


112 


37.5 


Juniata 


293 


186 


107 


56.5 


Pike 


286 


191 


■ 95 


35.2 


Clinton 


271 


215 


56 


20.7 


Sullivan 


265 


133 


135 


50.0 


31k 


239 


170 


69 


28.9 


Union 


237 


155 


82 


34.6 


Mifflin 


227 


181 


- 46 


20.3 


Carhon 


225 


209 


16 


07.1 


Forest 


172 


126 


46 


26.7 


Montour 


150 


88 


62 


41.3 


Cameron 


99 


82 


17 


17.2 


Philadelnhia 


1 


1 


- 


- 



Total 



35,412 



26,860 



8,552 



24. 2'^p 



58^ of all roads in Pennsylvania are dirt 
county roads and are of vital interest to 
Pennsylvania farmers. These "farm-to- 
market" roads ms::^j he taken over permanently i 
hy the state. I 



Scarce - Department of Highways - Axig. 27, 1935 



116M-4 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



FIHST 20 STATES IK NUI.SEH 0? FAFJviSP.-TBAPP35S 



State 



Nto'ber 



1. PEMSYLVAJ^IIA 



148,900 



2. 


Illinois 


3. 


Texas 


4. 


Alataina 


5. 


Iowa 


6. 


Kentucky 


7. 


Indiana 


8. 


Tennessee 


9. 


ArkansB-s 


10. 


MICHIGAN 


11. 


KAi^SAS 



132,990 
115,810 
85,200 
72.300 
71,290 
64,780 
62 , 730 
67,760 

56 , 450 

56,150 



12. l?Jisconsin 

13. New York 

14. Louisiana 



54,130 
53,890 
53,240 



15. OHIO 



52,890 



16. Minnesota 

17. Virginia 

18. OklaJioraa 

19. South Carolina 

20. North Carolina 



51,200 
50,150 
45,570 
41,150 
40,350 



Pennland 




New England 




Pennsylvania 


148,900 


Maine 


14,090 


New Jersey 


10,600 


New Hamnshire 


4,420 


West Virginia 


27,480 


Vermont 


9,480 


Maryland 


13,460 


Massachusetts 


8,500 


Delaware 


3,230 


Hhode Island 


1,080 






Connecticut 


5,700 









203,670 



43,270 



National Fur Tax Committee-May, 1935 



116M-17 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



I 



'-q. 



k. J.YJ- 



T>V -■ I .•'1 



i 



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■'?'*t ir 



3{JBT T 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Pennsylvania Farmer Monthly Pattern Sales In 1935 





Dress 


Embroidery & Quilt 


Fashion 


Total 




Patterns 


Patterns 


Books 


Sales 


Jantiary 


2,439 


1.423 


42 


3,904 


Pebr-uary 


2,396 


1,104 


15 


3,515 


March 


2,050 


552 


30 


2,632 


April 


1,669 


453 


■ 5 


2,107 


May 


1,356 


175 


8 


1,539 


June 


1,158 


212 


27 


1,397 


July 


1,093 . 


88 


22 


1,203 


August 


.946 


35 


7 


988 


September 


999 


132 


3 


1,134 


October 


1,325 


93 


10 


1,428 


November 


1,357 


266 


43 


1,666 


December 


968 


295 


34 


1,297 



17,756 



4,808 



246 



22,810 



PEMSYLVANIA FARMER sold an average of one pattern for every 
6.9 subscribers in 1935. 

This will compare favorably with the pattern sales of purely 
WOMEN'S PUBLICATIONS considering the relative 
space devoted to the subject. 



26M-7 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



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Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural StaU 



STUDENTS REGISTEHEI) IN THE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
PEMSYLVAIIIA STATE COLLEGE 



Total registration for year 1935-36 is highest in nistor-^ of College 
with one exception, the year 1914-15; which had only seven raore students 
enrolled. 

Freshmen registration is highest number ever enrolled in scnaol. 



Year 

1906-07 
1907-08 
1908-09 
1909-10 
1910-11 
1911-12 
1912-13 
1913-14 
1914-15 
1915-16 
1916-17 
1917-18 
1918-19 
1919-20 
1920-21 
1921-22 
1922-23 
1923-24 
1924-25 
1925-26 
1926-27 
1927-28 
1928-29 
1929-30 
1930-31 
1931-32 
1932-35 
1933-34 
1934-35 
*1935-36 



Four Year 
Course - Total 

45 

90 
206 
300 
400 
514 
628 
707 
767 
757 
769 
529 
388 
633 
620 
631 
636 
541 
543 
552 
565 
611 
565 
613 
616 
660 
628 
642 
754 
944 



Freshmen 

23 

51 
109 
131 
163 
195 
247 
256 
269 
202 
247 
180 
129 
152 
165 
188 
184 
152 
165 
159 
188 
214 
150 
202 
181 
203 
197 
209 
271 
325 



Agriculture student enrollment indi- 
cates the condition of agriculture, 
or tne opinion of students and tjarents 
regarding o-ODortunitics in that 
nrof ession. 



*Excludes special students, two year and winter courses 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



106li-13 



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■■•:i 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



Section Si; 



PBFpSYLVMIA F.4PJ/KH 



123,400 Penns'"'lvanian' s subscribe to 
Pennsjrlvania Fa,rmer. 914 of these sut- 
scriters live on riaral routes and in 
CQ-untry villages -under 1000. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 










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Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor since 1895. 

Born in Pickaway County, Ohio, and 
spent early life there. 

Farm owner. Aberdeen-Angus breeder 
for 40 years. 

Member, Board of Directors, American 
Aberdeen-Angus Association — 3 years. 

President, Pennsylvania Livestock Breed- 
ers' Association, several terms. Formerly 
Secretary. 

Honorary Member, American Veterinary 
Medical Association. 

Chairman, Allegheny County Farm Bu- 
reau 5 years. 

Sec 




Tri-State Wool Growers' As.so- 



Member, 
ciation. 

Attended first International Livestock 
Show in 1900 and has met with livestock 
men at each show since that time. 

Trustee and Member, Executive Commit- 
tee Penn.sylvania State College-^S years. 

Lecturer at Agricultural Meetings in 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, New York. 
West Virginia and Delaware for 35 year.«. 

President, East Liberty Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Past-President, Pittsburgh Rotary Club. 

Member, American Committee, Intema- 
Editor-in-Chief tional institute of Agriculture, Rome. 

H'ho's Who in America 



E. S. BAYARD 



C. L. WHITE 
Editor 

Native of Tioga County, 
Pa., where he operated a 
dairy farm for a time. 

Advanced Registry Tester 
in summer, during his course 
in School of Agriculture at 
Pennsylvania State College. 
Editor Pennsylvania Farm- 
er since 1921. 
Travels extensively in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, 
Delaware and Maryland, visiting farmers and at- 
tending agricultural meetings, and throughout the 
North American Continent in connection with va- 
cation tours sponsored for readers by Pennsyl- 
vania Farmer. 

In charge of Master Farmer project when first 
undertaken in the East. 




MASON C. GILPIN 
Editor 

Born on farm in Wayne 
County, Pa. 

Worked on farm until eight- 
een years old. 

Graduate, School of Agri- 
culture, Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Assistant Editor. Pennsyl- 
vania Stockman and Farmer, 
nine years. 

Manager of Protective Service 
Farmer project. 

Publicity work for School of Agriculture, Penn- 
sylvania State College. 

Editorial Staff Washington Newspaper. 
Reported for: 

United States Department of Agriculture, 
National Farm Organizations. 

Editor, County Weekly, Florida. 




and Master 



Born and raised in Lebanon County, 
Pennsylvania. 

Owns and operates own farm with hogs, 
beef cattle and potatoes the chief lines 
of interest on the farm. 

B. S. Pennsylvania State College of 
Agriculture. 

M. A. Columbia University. 

Secretary of the Pennsylvania Potato 
Growers' Association. 

Member of the Executive Committee, 
National Potato Growers' Association. 

Member, Joint Committee on Rural 
E'ectrification. 

Representative, State General Assembly. 

Lecturer on agricultural subjects at ag- 
ricultural meeting during the past 12 
years in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. 

Secretary, State Council of Agricultural Organ 
izations of Pennsylvania. 

Member, Executive Committee of the Pennsyl 
vania Livestock Breeders' Association. 




MILES 

Field 



Ex-member of the Executive Committee 
and Chairman of the Committee on Man- 
agement and Entertainment of the Penn- 
sylvania Farm Products Show Commis- 
sion. This Commission consists of the 
Governor of Pennsylvania, the Secretary 
of Agriculture. Deputy Secretary of Ag- 
riculture. Dean of the Agricultural Col- 
lege, and three men appointed by the 
Governor from a list of six names sub- 
mitted by farm organizations. 

Home County: 

Treasurer of Lebanon County Farm 
Bureau. 

Chairman, Agricultural Committee. 
Lebanon Chamber of Commerce. 

Chairman, Committee to study Unemployment 
Relief in Pennsylvania. 

Director of Lebanon County Potato Growers' 
Association. 



HORST 

Editor 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



I 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 




W. D. ZINN 

Farm Management 
Crops 



Farm owner for 50 years. Owns two farms. 

Breeder of Angus Cattle for more than 20 years, 
years. 

Taught in fifteen schools and was County Super- 
intendent of Schools 4 years. 

Member, State Board of Agriculture eight years. 

Lecturer at Farmers' Institutes for 35 years, in 
Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, New Jersey, New York, Kentucky and 
Indiana. 

President, West Virginia Federation of Farm 
Bureaus, one term. 

President, Grange Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of West Virginia, 32 years. 

President of an Orchard Company, 15 years, and 
Director in a bank for more than 20 years. 




A. A. BORLAND 
Dairying 



Born and raised on a farm. 

Head of the Department of Dairy Husbandry 
at Pennsylvania State College. He is in charge 
of the famous College dairy herd. 

Came to Pennsylvania from the University of 
Vermont where he conducted exhaustive experi- 
ments, the results of which are familiar to all 
dairy scientists. 

Member of the American Dairy Science Asso- 
ciation and other scientific bodies. 

Traveled extensively as Dairy Extension Special- 
ist of the Pennsylvania State College before 
taking his present position. 

Appointed one of the delegates from the United 
States to the World's Dairy Congress at London 
in 1928, and further broadened his knowledge of 
dairying by travel in England, Scotland, Holland, 
Germany and France. 




ALVA AGEE 
General Farming 



M. S. University of Wooster and also Princeton 
University. 

Farm Owner — Demonstrated value of lime, used 
much under drainage and grew potatoes profitably. 

Chairman, Board of Control, Ohio Experiment 
Station, for a term of years. 

Author of books on soil fertility, lime, etc. 

Lecturer on Agricultural Subjects in thirteen 
states. 

Director of Agricultural Extension, Pennsyl- 
vania State College five years; Acting Dean one 
year. 

Director of Extension in New Jersey for a term 
of years. 

Secretary, New Jersey State Department of 
Agriculture, ten years. 

President of National Association Commission- 
ers of Agriculture, two years. 

Director, New York and New Jersey Joint-Stock 
Land Bank. 

See Who's Who in America. 




ELSIE K. WATSON 
Household Editor 



Born and raised on fruit farm in Allegheny 
County, Pennsylvania, and is familiar with the 
round of agricultural problems which confront 
farm women. 

Served on editorial staff of City & Suburban 
Life, and Presbyterian Banner, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

As Tour Hostess on the Pennsylvania Farmer 
tours, has traveled thousands of miles and is per- 
sonally acquainted with many readers. 

Editor The Farm Home page and Young 
People's Forum. 

Active in community and welfare work in home 
section near Pittsburgh. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 




GILBERT S. WATTS 
Garden and Truck Crops 

Raised on a truck farm and 
studied vegetable gardening at 
Pennsylvania State College. 

Taught Vegetable Garden- 
ing at the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College, and for a 
time was connected with the 
Virginia Truck Experiment 
Station at Norfolk. 

Owns and operates a large 
farm in central Pennsylvania 

where he grows about 125 acres of vegetables and 
small fruits each year, marketing half of them 
through his wholesale and retail roadside market. 

Active member of State and National Vegetable 
Growers' Associations. 

Author of "Roadside Marketing." 

Dr. S. W. FLETCHER 
Orchard Crops 

Director of Agricultural 
Research at Pennsylvania 
State College. 

Head of the Department 
of Horticulture at Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 

Director of the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station of 
Virginia before coming to 
Pennsylvania. 

Author of numerous books and encyclopedia 
articles on horticultural subjejcts. 

Owns and operates, with a partner, orchards of 
60 acres of bearing apple trees and 30 acres of 
peaches in central Pennsylvania. 

See Who's Who in America. 





R. L. Scharring-Hausen 
Poultry 



Graduate of Rutgers Uni- 
versity. 

Connected with the New 
Jersey Agricultural Exper- 
iment Station for a time 
after his graduation. 

Owns and operates a 
farm in Mercer County, 
New Jersey, with poultry 
raising the principal interest. His flock now num- 
bers about 1,500 birds of a well-bred strain of 
White Leghorns. 

Secretary of the Mercer County Poultry Asso- 
ciation for 3 years. 

Member of the Executive Committee of the New 
Jersey State Pou'try Ass'n. for several years. 
Member of State R. O. P. Association. 
Member Flemington Cooperative Association. 
Member of Executive Committee Mercer Countv 
Board of Agriculture, New Jersey Baby Chick 
A'-F;ociation. 

Elected Member to the Hopewell TowTiship 
Board of Education. 




H. C. KNANDEL 
Poultry 

B. S. Cornell University, 1914. 

Instructor in Poultry Hus- 
bandry, Bristol County Agri- 
cultural School, 1914-16. 

In charge of Poultry Exten- 
sion Work, Pennsylvania State 
College, 1916-20. 

Head of Poultry Depart- 
ment, Pennsylvania State Col- 
Ieg3, 1920 to date. 

President, Poultry Science Association in 1923. 
Director in 1924-25. Member since 1916. 

Member, Pennsylvania State Poultry Association. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Pennsylvania State 
Baby Chick Association since its organization, 1926. 

Delegate to World's Poultry Congress in Lon- 
don in 1930. 

Associate Editor, Pennsylvania Stockman and 
Farmer, seven years. 



F. L. BENTLEY 

Livestock 

Head of the Department of 
Animal Husbandry, Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 

Born on farm in Northwest 
E> -4 \ ^ly Missouri. 

|^» ^"^mL Graduate, University of Mis- 

■HB^ A^^^: sc>uri. 1913. Specialized in Ani- 
B^BH^ #^^^B mal Husbandry and Agronomy. 
BUJIJjj^i^HB M. S. Pennsylvania State 
College, 1918. 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry at University 
of Missouri, 1914-16. 

Cams to Pennsylvania State College in 1916 as 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry, in charge of 
beef cattle. 

Conducted experiments with swine and beef 
cattle; taught livestock judging, feeding and live- 
stock production courses. 

Judged at County. State and Interstate Fairs 
in the East. 




Im- 



Adviser, 



L. W. EIGHTY 
Dairying 

Dairying for 25 years. 

Salesman Agricultural 
plements — 4 years. 

Beekeeping for profit and 
instruction — 50 years. 

Poultry keeping on the scale 
of 800 layers and 800 incu- 
bator capacity — 10 years. 

Lecture Work. Department 
of Agi'iculture — 31 years. 
Department of Agriculture — 



Farm 

years. 

Dairy Adviser for the War Board. 

Master of the local Grange — 5 years. 

Wrote for farm press 47 years. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 




Dr. J. G. LIPMAN 
Soils and Fertilizer 

Dean of the New Jersey State College of Agri- 
culture, and Director of the New Jersey Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 

Awarded $1,250 by American Society of Agron- 
omy in November, 1928, for conspicuous contri- 
butions in the field of Nitrogen research; silver 
medal French Academy Agriculture, 1919; Chan- 
dler Medal Columbia University, 1934. 

President, Associaton of Land-Grant Colleges 
and Universities. 

Past President, International Society of Soil 
Science. 

President, First International Congress of Soil 
Science. 

Fellow of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science and numerous other scien- 
tific organizations. 

Fellow of the American Public Health Associa- 
tion. 

President New Jersey Health and Sanitary 
Association. 

Editor-in-Chief, Soil Science. 

Editor, John Wiley and Sons Agricultural Series. 

Associate and Consulting Editor of scientific 
Journals in Germany, Russia, France and Holland. 

Corresponding and Honorary Member of scien- 
tific societies and academies in Sweeden, Czecho- 
slovakia and Italy. 

See Who's Who in America. 




Dr. J. F. SHIGLEY 
Veterinarian 



Graduate of Cornell University, 1915. 

Professor of Animal Husbandry at the Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 

Veterinarian in charge of about 1,000 valuable 
animals belonging to the College. 

Consultant Veterinarian for a number of the 
largest breeding establishments in the country. 




R. U. BLASINGAME 

Agricultural Engineering 



Head, Department of Agricultural Engineering, 
Pennsylvania State College. 

Chairman, Power and Machinery Division, Amer- 
ican Society of Agricultural Engineers; also first 
Vice-President. 

Chairman, Southern and North Atlantic Sec- 
tions American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 

Member, United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, Council in Research, Division of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

Leader, Threshing Division, Grain Corporation, 
Pennsylvania Division during War. 

Head, Agricultural Engineering Department. 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1915-17. 

Investigator, Giant Power Survey, Pennsylvania 
1924. 

Farm Development Engineer, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture. 




R. R KESTER 

"Neshaminy Gardens" 



Raised on a farm. Has been actively engaged 
in farming throughout his public career. 

Associate Editor of Pennsylvania Farmer for 
five years and Editor for nine years. 

Before taking up editorial work, Mr. Kester was: 

Lecturer of the Pennsylvania State Grange. 

Special Adviser of the State Department of 
Agriculture. 

Farmers' Institute Lecturer. 

"Neshaminy Gardens," his personal column, with 
its gentle humor, homely philosophy, and stories 
of his successes and failures, has made Kester 
and his farm a topic of conversation throughout 
Pennsylvania Farmer territory. 

See Who's Who in America. 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



76 Advertisers Used 500 Lines or More 
In Pennsylvania Farmer During 1355 



-a-dverti ser 

The Atlantic Refining Co. 
Pennsylvania Electric Ass'n 
General Foods Corp. 

Int. Harvester Company of America 

Firestone Tire & EuTDter Co. 

Standard Oil Co. of N. J. 

The Larrowe Milling Co, 

Philco Hadio & Television Corp. 

Pa. Thre Shermans & Farmers Mut-aal 

Casualty Insurance Co. 
Plymouth iuotor Corp. 
Ford Motor Corp. 

American AgricultTiral Chemical Co. 
International Salt Co. 
Chevrolet Motor Corp. 
Dairy Assoc. Co. Inc. 
American Oil Co. 
Pillsbur;- Flour Mills Co. 
Swift & Co. 
B. F. Babbit Inc. 
The Park & Pollard Co. 
The Maytag Co. 
Dr. Hess & Clark Inc. 
Maritime Milling Co. Inc. 
Deere i Co. 
A. H. Hoffman Inc. 
Wheeling Corrugating Co. 
Dr. Salisbury's Laboratories 
Armour Fertilizer Works 
A. B. Farquhar Co. Ltd. 
The Freedom Oil Works Co» 
The Oliver Farm Eqjaipment Co. 
Sears Roebuck & Co. 
American Telephone & Telegra-oh Co. 
National Carbon Company 
The B. F. Goodrich Co. 
Portland Cement Ass'n 
Efihyl Gasoline Corp. 
New Idea Inc. 
R. L, Rohrer & Bro. 
Edwin F. Dibble 
Mid-States Steel & TiJire Co. 



Lineage 



Product Advertised 



11,480 


Petrole'om Products 


6,650 


Institutional Power 


6,474 


Corn Flakes & Baking 




Powder 


5,642 


Trucks 8c Farm Equipment 


5,184 


Tires & Tubes 


4,528 


Petroleum Products 


4,378 


Dairy & Poultry Feeds 


4,224 


Radi s 


3,490 


Automobile Insurance 


3,360 


Passenger Cars 


3,264 


Trucks & Tractors 


3,240 


Fertilizer 


3,072 


Salt 


2,868 


Passenger- Cars & Trucks 


2,716 


Kow Kare & Bag Balm 


2,688 


Petroleum Products 


2,352 


Flour 


2,304 


Inst. Marketing Service 


2,087 


Lyo 


2,084 


Feeds 


1,960 


Washers 


1,848 


Livestock Homcdies 


1,834 


Poultry Feeds 


1,827 


Tractors & Spreaders 


1,821 


Seeds 


1,764 


Fence 


1,680 


Poultry Remedies 


1,582 


Fertilizer 


1,541 


Farm Equir)ment 


1,500 


Kerosene 


1,440 


Farm Eq^oiument 


1,352 


Mail Order Supply 


1,344 


Bell System 


1,292 


Batteries 


1,152 


Rubber Footwear 


1,102 


Cement 


1,022 


Gasoline 


1,018 


Farm Equipment 


992 


Seeds 


924 


Seeds 


920 


Fence 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



-2- 



Advertiser Lineage 

C-iilf Refining Company 

The Quaker Oats Co. 

The Dow Chemical Co, 

Pratt Food Company 

Vick Chemical Company 

Federal Land Bank of Baltimore 

Mishawaka Rubber & Wool Mfg. Co. 

F. S. Royster G-uano Company 

Bethlehem Steel Company 

York Chemical Works 

Bellinger Hfg. Cojppany 

American Steel & Wire Company 

Bagpak Inc. 

De Laval Separator Co. 

U. S. Rubber Company 

Walker Remed]?' Company 

Limestone Products Corp. 

Continental Steel Company 

Premier Pabst Sales Company 

Pittsburgh Steel Company 

The Beacon Milling Co. , Inc. 

Briggs & Stratton Corp. 

N.P - C.P. Burlington Route, Alaska S.S 

Company 
P.S.A. - LI.N. - Southern Pacific, etc. 
The Mantle Lamp Co. of America 
Burlington Route, Alaska S.S. 
Zenith Radio Corp, 
The Fate-Root Health Co, 
Marietta Concrete Corp, 
Iodine Educational Bureau 
Penick & Ford, Ltd. Inc« 
Unadilla Silo Co, 
Acetol Producits Inc. 
Pennsylvania Salt Mfg. Co, 
National Oil Products Co. 



Product Advertised 



900 


Livestock Spraj'- 


896 


Poultry & Dairy Feeds 


872 


Arsenate & Spraj^^s 


868 


Poultry Feed & Regulator 


854 


Vaporub 


840 


Land 


772 


Rubber Footwear 


764 


Fertilizer 


756 


Fence & Posts 


750 


Fertilizer 


744 


Farm Equipment 


736 


Pence 


728 


Paner Bags 


717 


Separators & Milkers 


686 


Rubber Boots 


660 


Walko Tablets 


623 


Calcite Crystals 


600 


Fence 


600 


Malt Extract 


590 


Fence 


588 


Dairy & Poultry Feeds 


585 


Gasoline Motors 


584 


Tour 


576 


Tour 


548 


Kerosene Lamps 


544 


To-or 


540 


Radio 


521 


Tractor 


518 


Silos 


511 


Iodine 


510 


Molasses 


509 


Silos 


504 


Cel-0-Glass 


504 


Salt 


500 


Cod Liver Oil 



26 P. F. - 1 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



ADVERTISING IN PENNSYLVANIA FARMER 

of 

PENNSYLVANIA THRESHERMAN'S & FARMERS' MUTUAL & CASUALTY INSURANCE COMPANY 

HARRISBURG, PA 



1921 




Issue Lineage 


Tuly 9 84 Lines 


July 23 84 




August 6 42 




August 20 42 




September 3 . . 42 




September 17 . 42 




December 10 . . 84 




December 24 . . 42 " 


Total 462 L 


ines 



1922 

January 7 42 Lines 

January 21 42 " 

February 4 ... 42 " 

February 18 . . 42 " 

March 4 42 " 

April 1 28 " 

April 15 28 " 

April 29 28 " 

June 17 28 " 

June 24 28 " 

December 16 . . 42 " 

December 30 . . 42 " 

Total 434 Lines 

1923 

July 28 28 Lines 

August 11 28 " 

August 25 28 " 

September 8 . . 28 " 
September 22 . 28 " 

October 6 28 " 

October 20 28 " 

November 3 ... 28 " 

Total 224 Lines 

1924 

April 5 28 Lines 

April 19 28 " 

May 3 28 " 

May 17 28 " 

May 31 28 " 

Jime 28 28 " 

July 12 28 " 

July 26 28 " 

Total 224 Lines 

1925 

January 10 28 Lines 

April 4 28 

April 11 28 " 

April 18 28 " 

April 25 28 " 

Total 140 Lines 



1926 

January 2 28 Lines 

January 16 ... 28 " 

January 30 28 " 

February 13 ... 28 " 

February 27 . . 28 " 

March 13 28 " 

March 27 28 " 

April 10 28 " 

AprU 24 28 " 

May 8 28 " 

May 22 28 " 

June 5 28 " 

June 19 28 " 

July 3 28 " 

July 17 28 " 

August 7 28 " 

August 21 28 " 

September 4 . . 28 " 

September 18 . 28 " 

October 2 28 " 

October 16 28 " 

October 30 28 " 

Total 616 Lines 



1927 

April 9 35 Lines 

April 23 35 " 

May 7 35 " 

May 21 35 " 

June 4 35 

June 18 35 " 

July 2 35 " 

July 16 35 " 

July 30 35 " 

August 13 35 " 

August 27 35 " 

Total 385 Lines 



1928 

January 28 42 Lines 

February 11 ... 42 " 
February 25 . . ■ 42 " 

March 10 42 " 

March 24 42 " 

April 7 42 " 

April 21 42 ''^ 

May 5 42 

June 2 42 " 

Total 378 Lines 



1929 

January 19 .... 14 Lines 

February 16 ... 14 " 

March 2 14 " 

March 16 14 " 

March 30 14 " 

April 13 28 " 

AprU 27 28 " 

May 11 28 " 

May 25 28 " 

June 8 28 " 

June 22 28 " 

July 6 28 " 

July 20 28 " 

August 3 28 " 

August 17 . . . 28 " 

Total 350 Lines 

1930 

July 19 34 Lines 

August 2 34 " 

August 16 34 " 

August 30 34 " 

Total 136 Lines 

1931 

May 16 28 Lines 

May 30 28 " 

June 13 28 " 

June 27 28 " 

Total 112 Lines 

1933 

April 15 28 Lines 

April 29 28 " 

May 13 28 " 

May 27 28 " 

June 10 28 " 

June 24 28 " 

July 8 28 " 

August 5 42 " 

August 19 42 " 

September 2 . . 42 " 

September 16 . 42 " 

September 30 . 42 " 

October 14 42 " 

October 28 42 " 

November 11 . . 42 " 

November 25 . . 42 " 

December 9 ... 42 " 

December 23 . . 42 " 

Total 658 Lines 



1934 

January 6 .... 100 Lines 

January 20 . . . 100 " 

February 3 . . 93 " 

February 17 . 93 " 

March 3 93 " 

March 17 93 " 

March 31 93 " 

April 14 93 " 

April 28 93 " 

May 12 93 " 

May 26 93 " 

June 9 168 " 

June 23 168 " 

July 7 168 " 

Agust 4 168 " 

August 18 . . . 168 " 

September 1 . 168 " 

September 15 168 " 

September 29 168 " 

October 13 . . . 134 " 

October 27 . . . 134 " 

November 10 . 140 " 

November 24 . 140 " 

Total 2,929 Lines 

1935 

January 5 65 Lines 

January 19 . . . 140 " 

February 2 . . . 65 " 

February 16 . ■ 134 " 

March 2 .... 134 " 

March 16 134 " 

March 30 134 " 

April 13 134 " 

April 27 134 " 

May 11 134 " 

May 25 134 " 

June 8 134 " 

June 22 134 " 

July 6 134 " 

July 20 . . 134 " 

August 3 134 " 

August 17 . . . 134 " 

August 31 . . . 134 " 

September 14 134 " 

September 28 134 " 

October 12 . . . 134 " 

October 26 . . . 134 " 

November 9 . . 134 " 

November 23 . 134 " 

December 7 . . 134 " 

December 21 . 134 " 

Total 3,352 Lines 



106-PF-4 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



The Crown Cork and Seal Company 

Baltimore. U.S.A. 



Pennsylvania Farmer 
7301 Penn Ave, 
Pittst-urgh, Pa 



Attn: Mr» Neff Laing 
General Manager 



Dear Mr. Laing; 



The Pennsylvania Parmer seems to nave greater 
piilling power than the average farm magazine judging from 
our experience. 

Returns indicate a better than usual reader 
interest and we "believe that any farm paper advertising 
schedule should certainly include the Pennsylvania Farmer* 



Very truly yours, 

N. D. Grasty (Signed) 
Asst. Sales Manager 
KDGrE 



i 



I 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



PENNSYLVANIA FARMER 

NET PAID CIRCULATION, JUNE 30, 1936 



IN 



PENNSYLVANIA 



County 



Circulation Farms 



Adams 2,671 3,581 

Allegheny 2,100 3,594 

Armstrong 2,322 3,351 

Beaver 1,524 2,354 

Bedford 2,635 3,160 

Berks 3,297 6,002 

Blair 1,825 1,871 

Bradford 3,090 4,984 

Bucks 2,689 5,070 

Butler 3,154 4,186 

Cambria 1,350 2,829 

Cameron 135 199 

Carbon 566 924 

Centre 1,375 2,105 

Chester 4,354 4,936 

aarlon 2,267 2,596 

Clearfield 1,446 3,306 

ainton 500 1,023 

Columbia 1,478 2,475 

Crawford 3,849 6,420 

Cumberland 2,609 3,032 

Dauphin 1,816 2,640 

Delaware 455 995 

Elk 565 892 

Erie 3,139 5,386 

Fayette 1,930 3,954 

Forest 258 441 

Franklin 2,285 3,861 

Fulton 955 1,355 

Greene 1,686 3,170 

Huntingdon 1,853 2,035 

Indiana 2,733 3,842 

Jefferson 1,578 2,738 

Juniata 933 1,449 

Lackawanna 574 1,563 

Lancaster 7,435 8,863 

Lawrence 1,768 2,655 

Lebanon 1,621 2,268 

Lehigh 1,368 2,861 

Luzerne 1,289 2,769 

Lycoming 1,971 3,014 



Per Cent 
Coverage 

74.6 
58.4 
69.3 
64.7 
83.4 
54.9 
95.5 
62.0 
53.0 
75.3 
47.7 
67.8 
61.3 
65.3 
88.2 
87.3 
43.7 
48.9 
59.7 
60.0 
86.0 
68.8 
45.7 
63.3 
58.3 
48.8 
58.5 
59.2 
70.5 
53.2 
91.1 
71.1 
57.6 
64.4 
36.7 
83.9 
66.6 
71.5 
47.8 
46.6 
65.4 



Per Cenl 

County Circulation Farms Coverage 

McKean 628 1,497 42.0 

Mercer 2,745 4,626 59.3 

Mifflin 900 1,220 73.8 

Monroe 414 1,450 28.6 

Montgomery 2,883 3,846 75.0 

Montour 486 683 71.2 

^■orthampton 1,665 2,775 60.0 

Northumberland 1,345 2,387 56.3 

Perry 1,532 1,854 82.6 

Philadelphia 372 286 130.1 

Pike 169 443 38.2 

Potter 703 1,749 40.2 

Schuylkill 1,946 2,803 69.4 

Snyder 969 1,712 56.6 

Somerset 2,482 3,844 64.5 

Sullivan 506 718 70.5 

Susquehanna 1,969 3,271 60.2 

Tioga 1,551 3,239 47.9 

Union 916 1,141 80.3 

Venango 1,073 2,281 47.0 

Warren 1,067 2,104 50.7 

Washington 3,270 5,072 64.5 

Wayne 1,649 2,849 57.9 

Westmoreland 3,627 5,368 67.6 

Wyoming 1,077 1,460 73.8 

York 6,008 7,857 76.5 

Total 123,400 191,284 64.5 

States Circulation 

Pennsylvania 123,400 

West Virginia 11,834 

New Jersey 9,511 

Maryland 6,795 

Delaware 1,876 

New York 1,400 

Virginia 573 

Miscellaneous 859 

Grand Total 15fi,248 



Pennsylvania Farmer reaches more farm families in Pennsylvania than any other farm paper. 

PENNSYLVMIA CirculaUon as of December 31, 1936 - 125.565 Subscribers 

(Coxinty Count not yet available. ) 



Farm fig<.ires from 1935 Census. 



86 P.F.-2 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



■i- Fr",-, 



;*? Algi^VJYS.. - 



Pennsylvania Is An Agricultural State 



PENNSYLVANIA FARMER 

NET PAID CIRCULATION. JUNE 30, 1 936 

IN 
WEST VIRGINIA. NEW JERSEY. MARYLAND AND DELAWARE 



WEST VIBGINIA 



County Circulation 

arbour 219 

erkeley 253 

oone 2 

|raxton 314 

rooke 135 

abell 43 

alhoun 115 

lay 77 

loddridge 146 

ayette 42 

ilmer 185 

rant 166 

reenbrier 209 

[ampshire 275 

:ancock 208 

lardy 117 

larrison 656 

ackson 717 

efferson 189 

ianawha 56 

lewis 457 

incoln 13 

ogan 7 

IcDowell 

[arion 502 

larshall 642 

[ason 147 

[ercer 12 

lineral 166 

[ingo 2 

[onongalia 370 

[onroe 153 

lorgan 33 

Nicholas 116 

ihio 217 

■endleton 366 

leasants 109 

'ocahontas 198 

'reston -723 

'utnam 80 

laleigh 5 

Randolph 283 

iitchie 463 

:oane 454 

ummers 38 

?ayIor 123 

"ucker 117 

"yler 385 

Ipshur 294 

Vayne 11 

Pebster 44 

Vetzel 702 

Virt 107 

Vood 369 

Vyoming 2 

Total 11,834 





Per Cent 


Farms 


Coverage 


2,182 


10.0 


1,341 


18.9 


1,556 


0.1 


3,194 


9.8 


394 


34.3 


2,204 


2.0 


1,945 


5.9 


1,532 


5.0 


1,526 


9.6 


1,934 


2.2 


1,800 


10.3 


900 


18.4 


2,942 


7.1 


1,721 


16.0 


363 


57.3 


1,314 


8.9 


2,845 


23.1 


2,743 


26.1 


951 


19.9 


4,690 


1.2 


1,867 


24.5 


2,751 


0.5 


1,379 


0.5 


2,060 


.0 


2,746 


18.3 


1,875 


34.2 


2,443 


6.0 


3,186 


0.4 


971 


17.1 


1,298 


0.2 


2,106 


17.6 


2,037 


7.3 


712 


4.6 


2,169 


5.3 


678 


3:;.o 


1,359 


26.9 


785 


13.9 


1,409 


14.1 


2,987 


24.2 


2,118 


3.8 


2,507 


0.2 


1,988 


14.2 


2,136 


21.7 


2,805 


16.2 


2,089 


l.S 


1,220 


10.1 


803 


14.6 


1,431 


26.9 


2,410 


12.2 


3,397 


0.3 


1,526 


2.9 


2,017 


34.8 


1,142 


9.4 


2,419 


15.3 


1,844 


0.1 



104,747 



11.3 



NEW JERSEY 

Per Cent 
County Circulation Farms Coverage 

Atlantic 368 2,125 17.3 

Bergen 33 752 4.5 

Burlington 1,337 2,122 63.0 

Camden 182 951 19.1 

Cape May 191 765 25.0 

Cumberland 1,339 3,506 38.2 

Essex 34 287 11.9 

Gloucester 616 2,511 24.5 

Hudson 11 93 11.8 

Hunterdon 615 2,509 24.5 

Mercer 726 1,163 62.4 

Middlesex 454 1,270 35.7 

Monmouth 1,285 2,762 46.5 

Morris 74 1,167 6.3 

Ocean 85 821 10.4 

Passaic 21 529 4.0 

Salem 1,304 1,655 78.8 

Somerset 152 1,270 12.0 

Sussex 312 1,339 23.3 

Union 31 334 9.3 

Warren 341 1,444 23.6 

Total 9,511 ; 

MARYLAND 

Allegany 152 

Anne Arundel 3 

Baltimore 494 

Ca'vert 1 

Caroline 199 

Carroll 1,535 

Cecil 316 

Charles 3 

Dorchester 26 

Frederick 661 

Garrett 407 

Harford 870 

Howard 31 

Kent 228 

Montgomery 84 

Prince Georges 13 

Queen Annes 65 

St. Marys 

Somerset 39 

Talbot 337 

Washington 856 

Wicomico 321 

Worcester 154 

Total 6,795 44,412 15.3 

DELAWARE 

Kent 440 2,871 15.3 

New Castle 1,098 1,839 59.7 

Sussex 338 5,671 6.0 

Total 1,876 10,381 18.1 



29,375 


32.4 


1,352 


11.2 


1,447 


0.2 


3,418 


14.5 


1,269 


0.1 


1,977 


10.1 


3,290 


46.7 


1,298 


24.3 


1,663 


0.2 


1,961 


1.."? 


3,474 


19.0 


1,999 


20.4 


2,128 


40.9 


1,226 


2.5 


1,014 


22.5 


1,900 


4.4 


2,303 


0.6 


1,220 


5.3 


1,436 


.0 


1,653 


2.4 


1,046 


32.2 


2,600 


32.9 


2,635 


12.2 


2,103 


7.3 



Farm figures from 1935 Census. 



86PF-2A 



Pennsylvania Farmer Covers It Best 



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